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Sample records for active carbon ac

  1. Parameters characterization and optimization of activated carbon (AC) cathodes for microbial fuel cell application.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Carlo; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Babanova, Sofia; Atanassov, Plamen; Ieropoulos, Ioannis; Grattieri, Matteo; Cristiani, Pierangela; Trasatti, Stefano; Li, Baikun; Schuler, Andrew J

    2014-07-01

    Activated carbon (AC) is employed as a cost-effective catalyst for cathodic oxygen reduction in microbial fuel cells (MFC). The fabrication protocols of AC-based cathodes are conducted at different applied pressures (175-3500 psi) and treatment temperatures (25-343°C). The effects of those parameters along with changes in the surface morphology and chemistry on the cathode performances are comprehensively examined. The cathodes are tested in a three-electrode setup and explored in single chamber membraneless MFCs (SCMFCs). The results show that the best performance of the AC-based cathode is achieved when a pressure of 1400 psi is applied followed by heat treatment of 150-200°C for 1h. The influence of the applied pressure and the temperature of the heat treatment on the electrodes and SCMFCs is demonstrated as the result of the variation in the transfer resistance, the surface morphology and surface chemistry of the AC-based cathodes tested.

  2. Parameters characterization and optimization of activated carbon (AC) cathodes for microbial fuel cell application.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Carlo; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Babanova, Sofia; Atanassov, Plamen; Ieropoulos, Ioannis; Grattieri, Matteo; Cristiani, Pierangela; Trasatti, Stefano; Li, Baikun; Schuler, Andrew J

    2014-07-01

    Activated carbon (AC) is employed as a cost-effective catalyst for cathodic oxygen reduction in microbial fuel cells (MFC). The fabrication protocols of AC-based cathodes are conducted at different applied pressures (175-3500 psi) and treatment temperatures (25-343°C). The effects of those parameters along with changes in the surface morphology and chemistry on the cathode performances are comprehensively examined. The cathodes are tested in a three-electrode setup and explored in single chamber membraneless MFCs (SCMFCs). The results show that the best performance of the AC-based cathode is achieved when a pressure of 1400 psi is applied followed by heat treatment of 150-200°C for 1h. The influence of the applied pressure and the temperature of the heat treatment on the electrodes and SCMFCs is demonstrated as the result of the variation in the transfer resistance, the surface morphology and surface chemistry of the AC-based cathodes tested. PMID:24787317

  3. Adsorption of anionic and cationic dyes by activated carbons, PVA hydrogels, and PVA/AC composite.

    PubMed

    Sandeman, Susan R; Gun'ko, Vladimir M; Bakalinska, Olga M; Howell, Carol A; Zheng, Yishan; Kartel, Mykola T; Phillips, Gary J; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V

    2011-06-15

    The textural and adsorption characteristics of a series of activated carbons (ACs), porous poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) gels, and PVA/AC composites were studied using scanning electron microscopy, mercury porosimetry, adsorption of nitrogen (at 77.4 K), cationic methylene blue (MB), anionic methyl orange (MO), and Congo red (CR) from the aqueous solutions. Dye-PVA-AC-water interactions were modeled using the semiempirical quantum chemical method PM6. The percentage of dye removed (C(rem)) by the ACs was close to 100% at an equilibrium concentration (C(eq)) of less than 0.1 mM but decreased with increasing dye concentration. This decrease was stronger at C(eq) of less than 1 mM, and C(rem) was less than 50% at a C(eq) of 10-20 mM. For PVA and the PVA/AC composite containing C-7, the C(rem) values were minimal (<75%). The free energy distribution functions (f(ΔG)) for dye adsorption include one to three peaks in the -ΔG range of 1-60 kJ/mol, depending on the dye concentration range used and the spatial, charge symmetry of the hydrated dye ions and the structural characteristics of the adsorbents. The f(ΔG) shape is most complex for MO with the most asymmetrical geometry and charge distribution and adsorbed at concentrations over a large C(eq) range. For symmetrical CR ions, adsorbed over a narrow C(eq) range, the f(ΔG) plot includes mainly one narrow peak. MB has a minimal molecular size at a planar geometry (especially important for effective adsorption in slit-shaped pores) which explains its greater adsorptive capacity over that of MO or CR. Dye adsorption was greatest for ACs with the largest surface area but as molecular size increases adsorption depends to a greater extent on the pore size distribution in addition to total and nanopore surface areas and pore volume.

  4. Adsorption of anionic and cationic dyes by activated carbons, PVA hydrogels, and PVA/AC composite.

    PubMed

    Sandeman, Susan R; Gun'ko, Vladimir M; Bakalinska, Olga M; Howell, Carol A; Zheng, Yishan; Kartel, Mykola T; Phillips, Gary J; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V

    2011-06-15

    The textural and adsorption characteristics of a series of activated carbons (ACs), porous poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) gels, and PVA/AC composites were studied using scanning electron microscopy, mercury porosimetry, adsorption of nitrogen (at 77.4 K), cationic methylene blue (MB), anionic methyl orange (MO), and Congo red (CR) from the aqueous solutions. Dye-PVA-AC-water interactions were modeled using the semiempirical quantum chemical method PM6. The percentage of dye removed (C(rem)) by the ACs was close to 100% at an equilibrium concentration (C(eq)) of less than 0.1 mM but decreased with increasing dye concentration. This decrease was stronger at C(eq) of less than 1 mM, and C(rem) was less than 50% at a C(eq) of 10-20 mM. For PVA and the PVA/AC composite containing C-7, the C(rem) values were minimal (<75%). The free energy distribution functions (f(ΔG)) for dye adsorption include one to three peaks in the -ΔG range of 1-60 kJ/mol, depending on the dye concentration range used and the spatial, charge symmetry of the hydrated dye ions and the structural characteristics of the adsorbents. The f(ΔG) shape is most complex for MO with the most asymmetrical geometry and charge distribution and adsorbed at concentrations over a large C(eq) range. For symmetrical CR ions, adsorbed over a narrow C(eq) range, the f(ΔG) plot includes mainly one narrow peak. MB has a minimal molecular size at a planar geometry (especially important for effective adsorption in slit-shaped pores) which explains its greater adsorptive capacity over that of MO or CR. Dye adsorption was greatest for ACs with the largest surface area but as molecular size increases adsorption depends to a greater extent on the pore size distribution in addition to total and nanopore surface areas and pore volume. PMID:21457992

  5. Preparation of a new adsorbent from activated carbon and carbon nanofiber (AC/CNF) for manufacturing organic-vacbpour respirator cartridge.

    PubMed

    Jahangiri, Mehdi; Adl, Javad; Shahtaheri, Seyyed Jamaleddin; Rashidi, Alimorad; Ghorbanali, Amir; Kakooe, Hossein; Forushani, Abbas Rahimi; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-26

    In this study a composite of activated carbon and carbon nanofiber (AC/CNF) was prepared to improve the performance of activated carbon (AC) for adsorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and its utilization for respirator cartridges. Activated carbon was impregnated with a nickel nitrate catalyst precursor and carbon nanofibers (CNF) were deposited directly on the AC surface using catalytic chemical vapor deposition. Deposited CNFs on catalyst particles in AC micropores, were activated by CO2 to recover the surface area and micropores. Surface and textural characterizations of the prepared composites were investigated using Brunauer, Emmett and Teller's (BET) technique and electron microscopy respectively. Prepared composite adsorbent was tested for benzene, toluene and xylene (BTX) adsorption and then employed in an organic respirator cartridge in granular form. Adsorption studies were conducted by passing air samples through the adsorbents in a glass column at an adjustable flow rate. Finally, any adsorbed species not retained by the adsorbents in the column were trapped in a charcoal sorbent tube and analyzed by gas chromatography. CNFs with a very thin diameter of about 10-20 nm were formed uniformly on the AC/CNF. The breakthrough time for cartridges prepared with CO2 activated AC/CNF was 117 minutes which are significantly longer than for those cartridges prepared with walnut shell- based activated carbon with the same weight of adsorbents. This study showed that a granular form CO2 activated AC/CNF composite could be a very effective alternate adsorbent for respirator cartridges due to its larger adsorption capacities and lower weight.

  6. Preparation of a new adsorbent from activated carbon and carbon nanofiber (AC/CNF) for manufacturing organic-vacbpour respirator cartridge

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this study a composite of activated carbon and carbon nanofiber (AC/CNF) was prepared to improve the performance of activated carbon (AC) for adsorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and its utilization for respirator cartridges. Activated carbon was impregnated with a nickel nitrate catalyst precursor and carbon nanofibers (CNF) were deposited directly on the AC surface using catalytic chemical vapor deposition. Deposited CNFs on catalyst particles in AC micropores, were activated by CO2 to recover the surface area and micropores. Surface and textural characterizations of the prepared composites were investigated using Brunauer, Emmett and Teller’s (BET) technique and electron microscopy respectively. Prepared composite adsorbent was tested for benzene, toluene and xylene (BTX) adsorption and then employed in an organic respirator cartridge in granular form. Adsorption studies were conducted by passing air samples through the adsorbents in a glass column at an adjustable flow rate. Finally, any adsorbed species not retained by the adsorbents in the column were trapped in a charcoal sorbent tube and analyzed by gas chromatography. CNFs with a very thin diameter of about 10-20 nm were formed uniformly on the AC/CNF. The breakthrough time for cartridges prepared with CO2 activated AC/CNF was 117 minutes which are significantly longer than for those cartridges prepared with walnut shell- based activated carbon with the same weight of adsorbents. This study showed that a granular form CO2 activated AC/CNF composite could be a very effective alternate adsorbent for respirator cartridges due to its larger adsorption capacities and lower weight. PMID:23369424

  7. Enhanced capacitive properties of commercial activated carbon by re-activation in molten carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Beihu; Xiao, Zuoan; Zhu, Hua; Xiao, Wei; Wu, Wenlong; Wang, Dihua

    2015-12-01

    Simple, affordable and green methods to improve capacitive properties of commercial activated carbon (AC) are intriguing since ACs possess a predominant role in the commercial supercapacitor market. Herein, we report a green reactivation of commercial ACs by soaking ACs in molten Na2CO3-K2CO3 (equal in mass ratios) at 850 °C combining the merits of both physical and chemical activation strategies. The mechanism of molten carbonate treatment and structure-capacitive activity correlations of the ACs are rationalized. Characterizations show that the molten carbonate treatment increases the electrical conductivity of AC without compromising its porosity and wettability of electrolytes. Electrochemical tests show the treated AC exhibited higher specific capacitance, enhanced high-rate capability and excellent cycle performance, promising its practical application in supercapacitors. The present study confirms that the molten carbonate reactivation is a green and effective method to enhance capacitive properties of ACs.

  8. Catalytic Growth of Macroscopic Carbon Nanofibers Bodies with Activated Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, N.; Muhammad, I. S.; Hamid, S. B. Abd.; Rinaldi, A.; Su, D. S.; Schlogl, R.

    2009-06-01

    Carbon-carbon composite of activated carbon and carbon nanofibers have been synthesized by growing Carbon nanofiber (CNF) on Palm shell-based Activated carbon (AC) with Ni catalyst. The composites are in an agglomerated shape due to the entanglement of the defective CNF between the AC particles forming a macroscopic body. The macroscopic size will allow the composite to be used as a stabile catalyst support and liquid adsorbent. The preparation of CNT/AC nanocarbon was initiated by pre-treating the activated carbon with nitric acid, followed by impregnation of 1 wt% loading of nickel (II) nitrate solutions in acetone. The catalyst precursor was calcined and reduced at 300 deg. C for an hour in each step. The catalytic growth of nanocarbon in C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/H{sub 2} was carried out at temperature of 550 deg. C for 2 hrs with different rotating angle in the fluidization system. SEM and N{sub 2} isotherms show the level of agglomeration which is a function of growth density and fluidization of the system. The effect of fluidization by rotating the reactor during growth with different speed give a significant impact on the agglomeration of the final CNF/AC composite and thus the amount of CNFs produced. The macrostructure body produced in this work of CNF/AC composite will have advantages in the adsorbent and catalyst support application, due to the mechanical and chemical properties of the material.

  9. Encapsulation of α-Particle–Emitting 225Ac3+ Ions Within Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Matson, Michael L.; Villa, Carlos H.; Ananta, Jeyarama S.; Law, Justin J.; Scheinberg, David A.; Wilson, Lon J.

    2016-01-01

    225Ac3+ is a generator of α-particle–emitting radionuclides with 4 net α-particle decays that can be used therapeutically. Targeting 225Ac3+ by use of ligands conjugated to traditional bifunctional chelates limits the amount of 225Ac3+ that can be delivered. Ultrashort, single-walled carbon nanotubes (US-tubes), previously demonstrated as sequestering agents of trivalent lanthanide ions and small molecules, also successfully incorporate 225Ac3+. Methods Aqueous loading of both 225Ac3+ ions and Gd3+ ions via bath sonication was used to construct 225Ac@gadonanotubes (225Ac@GNTs). The 225Ac@GNTs were subsequently challenged with heat, time, and human serum. Results US-tubes internally loaded with both 225Ac3+ ions and Gd3+ ions show 2 distinct populations of 225Ac3+ ions: one rapidly lost in human serum and one that remains bound to the US-tubes despite additional challenge with heat, time, and serum. The presence of the latter population depended on cosequestration of Gd3+ and 225Ac3+ ions. Conclusion US-tubes successfully sequester 225Ac3+ ions in the presence of Gd3+ ions and retain them after a human serum challenge, rendering 225Ac@GNTs candidates for radioimmunotherapy for delivery of 225Ac3+ ions at higher concentrations than is currently possible for traditional ligand carriers. PMID:25931476

  10. Physicochemical and porosity characteristics of thermally regenerated activated carbon polluted with biological activated carbon process.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lihua; Liu, Wenjun; Jiang, Renfu; Wang, Zhansheng

    2014-11-01

    The characteristics of thermally regenerated activated carbon (AC) polluted with biological activated carbon (BAC) process were investigated. The results showed that the true micropore and sub-micropore volume, pH value, bulk density, and hardness of regenerated AC decreased compared to the virgin AC, but the total pore volume increased. XPS analysis displayed that the ash contents of Al, Si, and Ca in the regenerated AC respectively increased by 3.83%, 2.62% and 1.8%. FTIR spectrum showed that the surface functional groups of virgin and regenerated AC did not change significantly. Pore size distributions indicated that the AC regeneration process resulted in the decrease of micropore and macropore (D>10 μm) volume and the increase of mesopore and macropore (0.1 μmAC, which are benefit for water treatment. These results will provide a theoretical basis for the reuse of biological waste (spent AC) from BAC process.

  11. The recovery of chlorofluorocarbons and chlorofluorocarbon replacements by surface modified activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, Naohito; Tanada, Seiki; Nakamura, Takeo; Abe, Ikuo

    1995-06-15

    The adsorption properties of chlorofluorocarbon CFC113 and CFC replacements (HCFC225cb and 5FP) on activated carbon treated with 6 N nitric acid or hydrogen gas were investigated on the basis of their physicochemical adsorption isotherm and Dubinin-Rudshkevich plot to elucidate the difference between untreated activated carbon (U-AC) and surface modified activated carbon (NT-AC and HT-AC) during interaction with CFCs and CFC replacements. No correlation between the physicochemical properties of the activated carbon surface and the polarity of CFCs or CFC replacements was observed. The adsorption isotherms of CFC113, HCFC225cb, and 5FP on U-AC, NT-AC, and HT-AC have different branch points, that is, selective adsorption (HT-AC) and nonselective adsorption (NT-AC). NT-AC is well suited for the recovery of a mixture of CFCs and CFC replacements, while HT-AC is good for a sample of CFC replacements. Studying the adsorption rate is useful for increasing the recovery efficiency. Therefore, the rate of adsorption of CFCs and CFC replacements onto surface modified activated carbon was investigated. The Sameshima equation fits the adsorption isotherms. The initial rate constants k for CFC113, HCFC225cb, and 5FP onto U-AC, HT-AC, and HT-AC, respectively, were the largest. HT-AC could be adapted for the recover of HCFC225cb and 5FP.

  12. Activated carbon from biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manocha, S.; Manocha, L. M.; Joshi, Parth; Patel, Bhavesh; Dangi, Gaurav; Verma, Narendra

    2013-06-01

    Activated carbon are unique and versatile adsorbents having extended surface area, micro porous structure, universal adsorption effect, high adsorption capacity and high degree of surface reactivity. Activated carbons are synthesized from variety of materials. Most commonly used on a commercial scale are cellulosic based precursors such as peat, coal, lignite wood and coconut shell. Variation occurs in precursors in terms of structure and carbon content. Coir having very low bulk density and porous structure is found to be one of the valuable raw materials for the production of highly porous activated carbon and other important factor is its high carbon content. Exploration of good low cost and non conventional adsorbent may contribute to the sustainability of the environment and offer promising benefits for the commercial purpose in future. Carbonization of biomass was carried out in a horizontal muffle furnace. Both carbonization and activation were performed in inert nitrogen atmosphere in one step to enhance the surface area and to develop interconnecting porosity. The types of biomass as well as the activation conditions determine the properties and the yield of activated carbon. Activated carbon produced from biomass is cost effective as it is easily available as a waste biomass. Activated carbon produced by combination of chemical and physical activation has higher surface area of 2442 m2/gm compared to that produced by physical activation (1365 m2/gm).

  13. Electric properties of carbon nano-onion/polyaniline composites: a combined electric modulus and ac conductivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papathanassiou, Anthony N.; Mykhailiv, Olena; Echegoyen, Luis; Sakellis, Ilias; Plonska-Brzezinska, Marta E.

    2016-07-01

    The complex electric modulus and the ac conductivity of carbon nano-onion/polyaniline composites were studied from 1 mHz to 1 MHz at isothermal conditions ranging from 15 K to room temperature. The temperature dependence of the electric modulus and the dc conductivity analyses indicate a couple of hopping mechanisms. The distinction between thermally activated processes and the determination of cross-over temperature were achieved by exploring the temperature dependence of the fractional exponent of the dispersive ac conductivity and the bifurcation of the scaled ac conductivity isotherms. The results are analyzed by combining the granular metal model (inter-grain charge tunneling of extended electron states located within mesoscopic highly conducting polyaniline grains) and a 3D Mott variable range hopping model (phonon assisted tunneling within the carbon nano-onions and clusters).

  14. Complete reaction mechanisms of mercury oxidation on halogenated activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Rungnim, Chompoonut; Promarak, Vinich; Hannongbua, Supa; Kungwan, Nawee; Namuangruk, Supawadee

    2016-06-01

    The reaction mechanisms of mercury (Hg) adsorption and oxidation on halogenated activated carbon (AC) have been completely studied for the first time using density functional theory (DFT) method. Two different halogenated AC models, namely X-AC and X-AC-X (X=Cl, Br, I), were adopted. The results revealed that HgX is found to be stable-state on the AC edge since its further desorption from the AC as HgX, or further oxidation to HgX2, are energetically unfavorable. Remarkably, the halide type does not significantly affect the Hg adsorption energy but it strongly affects the activation energy barrier of HgX formation, which obviously increases in the order HgIAC for Hg elimination significantly decreases as I-AC>Br-AC>Cl-AC. Thus, the study of the complete reaction mechanism is essential because the adsorption energy can not be used as a guideline for the rational material design in the halide impregnated AC systems. The activation energy is an important descriptor for the predictions of sorbent reactivity to the Hg oxidation process. PMID:26943019

  15. Activated carbon material

    DOEpatents

    Evans, A. Gary

    1978-01-01

    Activated carbon particles for use as iodine trapping material are impregnated with a mixture of selected iodine and potassium compounds to improve the iodine retention properties of the carbon. The I/K ratio is maintained at less than about 1 and the pH is maintained at above about 8.0. The iodine retention of activated carbon previously treated with or coimpregnated with triethylenediamine can also be improved by this technique. Suitable flame retardants can be added to raise the ignition temperature of the carbon to acceptable standards.

  16. Characterization and photocatalytic activity of Zn 2+-TiO 2/AC composite photocatalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xincheng; Jiang, Jianchun; Sun, Kang; Cui, Dandan

    2011-12-01

    Activated carbon (AC) supported Zn 2+-TiO 2 photocatalyst was prepared by sol-gel method. The prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron micrograph, nitrogen absorption, diffuse reflectance UV/VIS and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Using toluene as a pollution target, the photocatalytic activity of photocatalyst was evaluated. The results showed that prepared photocatalyst was obviously helpful for the removal of toluene in air. The photocatalytic degradation of toluene by Zn 2+-TiO 2/AC reached 100% for 40 min and remained 75% after 160 min, while degradation by TiO 2 was only 30%. It indicated that the photocatalytic activity of prepared photocatalyst was enhanced. It is due to Zn 2+-doping increased the oxidation and reduction of hole-electron pairs, which was the important factor in heterogeneous photocatalysis.

  17. AC transport in carbon-based devices: challenges and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foa Torres, L. E. F.; Cuniberti, G.

    2009-05-01

    Time-dependent fields are a valuable tool to control fundamental quantum phenomena in highly coherent low dimensional electron systems. Carbon nanotubes and graphene are a promising ground for these studies. Here we offer a brief overview of driven electronic transport in carbon-based materials with the main focus on carbon nanotubes. Recent results predicting control of the current and noise in nanotube based Fabry-Pérot devices are highlighted. To cite this article: L.E.F. Foa Torres, G. Cuniberti, C. R. Physique 10 (2009).

  18. Activation of peroxymonosulfate by graphitic carbon nitride loaded on activated carbon for organic pollutants degradation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Mingyu; Gao, Long; Li, Jun; Fang, Jia; Cai, Wenxuan; Li, Xiaoxia; Xu, Aihua

    2016-10-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride supported on activated carbon (g-C3N4/AC) was prepared through an in situ thermal approach and used as a metal free catalyst for pollutants degradation in the presence of peroxymonosulfate (PMS) without light irradiation. It was found that g-C3N4 was highly dispersed on the surface of AC with the increase of surface area and the exposition of more edges and defects. The much easier oxidation of C species in g-C3N4 to CO was also observed from XPS spectra. Acid Orange 7 (AO7) and other organic pollutants could be completely degraded by the g-C3N4/AC catalyst within 20min with PMS, while g-C3N4+PMS and AC+PMS showed no significant activity for the reaction. The performance of the catalyst was significantly influenced by the amount of g-C3N4 loaded on AC; but was nearly not affected by the initial solution pH and reaction temperature. In addition, the catalysts presented good stability. A nonradical mechanism accompanied by radical generation (HO and SO4(-)) in AO7 oxidation was proposed in the system. The CO groups play a key role in the process; while the exposure of more N-(C)3 group can further increase its electron density and basicity. This study can contribute to the development of green materials for sustainable remediation of aqueous organic pollutants. PMID:27214000

  19. Activation of peroxymonosulfate by graphitic carbon nitride loaded on activated carbon for organic pollutants degradation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Mingyu; Gao, Long; Li, Jun; Fang, Jia; Cai, Wenxuan; Li, Xiaoxia; Xu, Aihua

    2016-10-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride supported on activated carbon (g-C3N4/AC) was prepared through an in situ thermal approach and used as a metal free catalyst for pollutants degradation in the presence of peroxymonosulfate (PMS) without light irradiation. It was found that g-C3N4 was highly dispersed on the surface of AC with the increase of surface area and the exposition of more edges and defects. The much easier oxidation of C species in g-C3N4 to CO was also observed from XPS spectra. Acid Orange 7 (AO7) and other organic pollutants could be completely degraded by the g-C3N4/AC catalyst within 20min with PMS, while g-C3N4+PMS and AC+PMS showed no significant activity for the reaction. The performance of the catalyst was significantly influenced by the amount of g-C3N4 loaded on AC; but was nearly not affected by the initial solution pH and reaction temperature. In addition, the catalysts presented good stability. A nonradical mechanism accompanied by radical generation (HO and SO4(-)) in AO7 oxidation was proposed in the system. The CO groups play a key role in the process; while the exposure of more N-(C)3 group can further increase its electron density and basicity. This study can contribute to the development of green materials for sustainable remediation of aqueous organic pollutants.

  20. A Comparative Study on AC Conductivity and Dielectric Behavior of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes and Polyaniline Coated Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Filled High Density Polyethylene-Carbon Black Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Dinesh, P.; Renukappa, N. M.; Siddaramaiah; Lee, J. H.; Jeevananda, T.

    2010-10-04

    This paper presents an experimental investigation on AC conductivity and dielectric behavior of carbon black reinforced high density polyethylene (HDPE-CB) and HDPE-CB filled with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs-CB-HDPE) and Polyaniline (PAni) coated MWNTs-CB-HDPE nanocomposites. The electrical properties such as dielectric constant ({epsilon}'), dissipation factor (tan {delta}) and AC conductivity ({sigma}{sub ac}) of nanocomposites have been measured with reference to the weight fraction (0.5 and 1 wt% MWNTs), frequency (75 KHz-30 MHz), temperature (25-90 deg. C) and sea water ageing. The experimental results showed that the increased AC conductivity and dielectric constant of the nanocomposites were influenced by PAni coated MWNTs in HDPE-CB nanocomposites. The value of dielectric constant and tan {delta} decreased with increasing frequency. Further more, above 5 MHz the AC conductivity increases drastically whereas significant effect on tan {delta} was observed in less than 1 MHz.

  1. Metal-carbon nanocomposites based on activated IR pyrolized polyacrylonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimov, Mikhail N.; Zhilyaeva, Natalya A.; Vasilyev, Andrey A.; Muratov, Dmitriy G.; Zemtsov, Lev M.; Karpacheva, Galina P.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we report about new approach to preparation of metal-carbon nanocomposites based on activated carbon. Polyacrylonitrile is suggested as a precursor for Co, Pd and Ru nanoparticles carbon support which is prepared under IR pyrolysis conditions of a precursor. The first part of the paper is devoted to study activated carbon structural characteristics dependence on activation conditions. In the second part the effect of type of metal introduced in precursor on metal-carbon nanocomposite structural characteristics is shown. Prepared AC and nanocomposite samples are characterized by BET, TEM, SEM and X-ray diffraction.

  2. Variable transposition of eight maize activator (ac) elements located on the short arm of chromosome 1.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, William F

    2011-09-01

    Eight Activator (Ac) transposable elements mapped to the maize chromosome arm 1S were assessed for Ac transposition rates. For each of the Ac stocks, plants homozygous for the single Ac element and the Ds reporter r1-sc:m3 on chromosome 10 were crossed as females by a homozygous r1-sc:m3 tester color-converted W22 line. The resulting ears produced mostly coarsely spotted kernels and a low frequency of either near-colorless fine-spotted kernels or nonspotted kernels. The relative frequency of these two types of near-colorless kernels differed among the eight Ac stocks. The extent to which increased Ac dosage results in nonspotted kernels may be Ac-specific. Although all of the Ac elements are in near-isogenic inbred W22 lines, they varied to a large extent in their transposition frequency. These differences might possibly result from structural differences among the Ac elements. Because one pair of Ac elements derived from Ac33 on chromosome arm 5S differed about 13-fold in transposition frequency and a second pair of Ac elements derived from Ac12 on chromosome arm 1S differed about 3-fold in transposition frequency, this is not a likely explanation for all eight Ac elements. The data presented here support the notion that the differences in transposition frequency of the eight Ac elements may be a reflection of variability in Ac transcription or accessibility of the transposase to the Ac element, resulting from differences in the chromatin environments wherein the Ac elements are located. This is the first report of variability in transposition rates among different Ac donor lines.

  3. Carbon nanofibers grafted on activated carbon as an electrode in high-power supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Gryglewicz, Grażyna; Śliwak, Agata; Béguin, François

    2013-08-01

    A hybrid electrode material for high-power supercapacitors was fabricated by grafting carbon nanofibers (CNFs) onto the surface of powdered activated carbon (AC) through catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). A uniform thin layer of disentangled CNFs with a herringbone structure was deposited on the carbon surface through the decomposition of propane at 450 °C over an AC-supported nickel catalyst. CNF coating was controlled by the reaction time and the nickel content. The superior CNF/AC composite displays excellent electrochemical performance in a 0.5 mol L(-1) solution of K2 SO4 due to its unique structure. At a high scan rate (100 mV s(-1) ) and current loading (20 A g(-1) ), the capacitance values were three- and fourfold higher than those for classical AC/carbon black composites. Owing to this feature, a high energy of 10 Wh kg(-1) was obtained over a wide power range in neutral medium at a voltage of 0.8 V. The significant enhancement of charge propagation is attributed to the presence of herringbone CNFs, which facilitate the diffusion of ions in the electrode and play the role of electronic bridges between AC particles. An in situ coating of AC with short CNFs (below 200 nm) is a very attractive method for producing the next generation of carbon composite materials with a high power performance in supercapacitors working in neutral medium. PMID:23794416

  4. Determining activated carbon performance

    SciTech Connect

    Naylor, W.F.; Rester, D.O.

    1995-07-01

    This article discusses the key elements involved in evaluating a system`s performance. Empty bed contact time (EBCT) is a term used to describe the length of time a liquid stream being treated is in contact with a granular activated carbon bed. The EBCT is the time required for a fluid to pass through the volume equivalent of the media bed, without the media being present. In a bed of granular activated carbon, the void volume or space between particles is usually about 45 percent. Therefore, the EBCT is about twice the true or actual time of contact between the fluid being treated and the GAC particles. The EBCT plays an important role in determining the effectiveness and longevity of granular activated carbon (GAC) used to treat liquids in a fixed-bed adsorber. Factors that influence and are influenced by EBCT, and their relationship to GAC performance in a treatment scheme include: adsorption, mass transfer zone, impurity concentration, adsorption affinity, flow rate and system design considerations.

  5. A Magnesium-Activated Carbon Hybrid Capacitor

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, HD; Shterenberg, I; Gofer, Y; Doe, RE; Fischer, CC; Ceder, G; Aurbach, D

    2013-12-11

    Prototype cells of hybrid capacitor were developed, comprising activated carbon (AC) cloth and magnesium (Mg) foil as the positive and negative electrodes, respectively. The electrolyte solution included ether solvent (TBF) and a magnesium organo-halo-aluminate complex 0.25 M Mg2Cl3+-Ph2AlCl2-. In this solution Mg can be deposited/dissolved reversibly for thousands of cycles with high reversibility (100% cycling efficiency). The main barrier for integrating porous AC electrodes with this electrolyte solution was the saturation of the pores with the large ions in the AC prior to reaching the potential limit. This is due to the existence of bulky Mg and Al based ionic complexes consisting Cl, alkyl or aryl (R), and THF ligands. This problem was resolved by adding 0.5 M of lithium chloride (LiCl), thus introducing smaller ionic species to the solution. This Mg hybrid capacitor system demonstrated a stable cycle performance for many thousands of cycles with a specific capacitance of 90 Fg(-1) for the AC positive electrodes along a potential range of 2.4 V. (C) 2014 The Electrochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  6. Tetracycline adsorption onto activated carbons produced by KOH activation of tyre pyrolysis char.

    PubMed

    Acosta, R; Fierro, V; Martinez de Yuso, A; Nabarlatz, D; Celzard, A

    2016-04-01

    Tyre pyrolysis char (TPC), produced when manufacturing pyrolysis oil from waste tyre, was used as raw material to prepare activated carbons (ACs) by KOH activation. KOH to TPC weight ratios (W) between 0.5 and 6, and activation temperatures from 600 to 800 °C, were used. An increase in W resulted in a more efficient development of surface area, microporosity and mesoporosity. Thus, ACs derived from TPC (TPC-ACs) with specific surface areas up to 814 m(2) g(-1) were obtained. TPC, TPC-ACs and a commercial AC (CAC) were tested for removing Tetracycline (TC) in aqueous phase, and systematic adsorption studies, including equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamic aspects, were performed. Kinetics was well described by the pseudo-first order model for TPC, and by a pseudo second-order kinetic model for ACs. TC adsorption equilibrium data were also fitted by different isotherm models: Langmuir, Freundlich, Sips, Dubinin-Radushkevich, Dubinin-Astokov, Temkin, Redlich-Peterson, Radke-Prausnitz and Toth. The thermodynamic study confirmed that TC adsorption onto TPC-ACs is a spontaneous process. TC adsorption data obtained in the present study were compared with those reported in the literature, and differences were explained in terms of textural properties and surface functionalities. TPC-ACs had similar performances to those of commercial ACs, and might significantly improve the economic balance of the production of pyrolysis oil from waste tyres.

  7. Tetracycline adsorption onto activated carbons produced by KOH activation of tyre pyrolysis char.

    PubMed

    Acosta, R; Fierro, V; Martinez de Yuso, A; Nabarlatz, D; Celzard, A

    2016-04-01

    Tyre pyrolysis char (TPC), produced when manufacturing pyrolysis oil from waste tyre, was used as raw material to prepare activated carbons (ACs) by KOH activation. KOH to TPC weight ratios (W) between 0.5 and 6, and activation temperatures from 600 to 800 °C, were used. An increase in W resulted in a more efficient development of surface area, microporosity and mesoporosity. Thus, ACs derived from TPC (TPC-ACs) with specific surface areas up to 814 m(2) g(-1) were obtained. TPC, TPC-ACs and a commercial AC (CAC) were tested for removing Tetracycline (TC) in aqueous phase, and systematic adsorption studies, including equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamic aspects, were performed. Kinetics was well described by the pseudo-first order model for TPC, and by a pseudo second-order kinetic model for ACs. TC adsorption equilibrium data were also fitted by different isotherm models: Langmuir, Freundlich, Sips, Dubinin-Radushkevich, Dubinin-Astokov, Temkin, Redlich-Peterson, Radke-Prausnitz and Toth. The thermodynamic study confirmed that TC adsorption onto TPC-ACs is a spontaneous process. TC adsorption data obtained in the present study were compared with those reported in the literature, and differences were explained in terms of textural properties and surface functionalities. TPC-ACs had similar performances to those of commercial ACs, and might significantly improve the economic balance of the production of pyrolysis oil from waste tyres. PMID:26855221

  8. Biological responses to activated carbon amendments in sediment remediation.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Elisabeth M-L; Beckingham, Barbara A

    2013-07-16

    Sorbent amendment with activated carbon (AC) is a novel in situ management strategy for addressing human and ecological health risks posed by hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) in sediments and soils. A large body of literature shows that AC amendments can reduce bioavailability of sediment-associated HOCs by more than 60-90%. Empirically derived biodynamic models can predict bioaccumulation in benthic invertebrates within a factor of 2, allowing for future scenarios under AC amendment to be estimated. Higher AC dose and smaller AC particle size further reduce bioaccumulation of HOCs but may induce stress in some organisms. Adverse ecotoxicity response to AC exposure was observed in one-fifth of 82 tests, including changes in growth, lipid content, behavior, and survival. Negative effects on individual species and benthic communities appear to depend on the characteristics of the sedimentary environment and the AC amendment strategy (e.g., dose and particle size). More research is needed to evaluate reproductive end points, bacterial communities, and plants, and to link species- and community-level responses to amendment. In general, the ability of AC to effectively limit the mobility of HOCs in aquatic environments may outshine potential negative secondary effects, and these outcomes must be held in comparison to traditional remediation approaches.

  9. Dewatering Peat With Activated Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, N. K.

    1984-01-01

    Proposed process produces enough gas and carbon to sustain itself. In proposed process peat slurry is dewatered to approximately 40 percent moisture content by mixing slurry with activated carbon and filtering with solid/liquid separation techniques.

  10. Ozone degradation by fluoride onto plasma-treated activated carbon in CF{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Tanada, Seiki; Kawasaki, Naohito; Nakamura, Takeo; Ohue, Takashi; Torii, Yasuhiro

    1997-06-15

    The ozone degradation of fluorine was investigated using the tetrafluoromethane plasma-treated activated carbon (PT-AC). The ozone in the stratosphere has been degraded by the chloride and bromide radicals which are produced from chlorofluorocarbons and bromofluorocarbons, respectively. However, the authors believe that fluorine also was related to the ozone degradation. The fluoride was introduced onto the activated carbon surface by tetrafluoromethane plasma treatment. The breakthrough curve of ozone onto PT-AC was measured to elucidate the relationship between the ozone and the fluoride. The amount of ozone adsorbed/degraded onto the PT-AC was larger than the amount that was adsorbed/degraded onto the untreated activated carbon. The amount of fluoride ion eluted from the PT-AC before the adsorption/degradation of ozone was larger than that which eluted after the adsorption/degradation of ozone. These results indicated that the ozone was degraded by the fluoride on the PT-AC surface.

  11. AC Electric Field Activated Shape Memory Polymer Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Jin Ho; Siochi, Emilie J.; Penner, Ronald K.; Turner, Travis L.

    2011-01-01

    Shape memory materials have drawn interest for applications like intelligent medical devices, deployable space structures and morphing structures. Compared to other shape memory materials like shape memory alloys (SMAs) or shape memory ceramics (SMCs), shape memory polymers (SMPs) have high elastic deformation that is amenable to tailored of mechanical properties, have lower density, and are easily processed. However, SMPs have low recovery stress and long response times. A new shape memory thermosetting polymer nanocomposite (LaRC-SMPC) was synthesized with conductive fillers to enhance its thermo-mechanical characteristics. A new composition of shape memory thermosetting polymer nanocomposite (LaRC-SMPC) was synthesized with conductive functionalized graphene sheets (FGS) to enhance its thermo-mechanical characteristics. The elastic modulus of LaRC-SMPC is approximately 2.7 GPa at room temperature and 4.3 MPa above its glass transition temperature. Conductive FGSs-doped LaRC-SMPC exhibited higher conductivity compared to pristine LaRC SMP. Applying an electric field at between 0.1 Hz and 1 kHz induced faster heating to activate the LaRC-SMPC s shape memory effect relative to applying DC electric field or AC electric field at frequencies exceeding1 kHz.

  12. The effect of activated carbon addition on membrane bioreactor processes for wastewater treatment and reclamation - A critical review.

    PubMed

    Skouteris, George; Saroj, Devendra; Melidis, Paraschos; Hai, Faisal I; Ouki, Sabèha

    2015-06-01

    This review concentrates on the effect of activated carbon (AC) addition to membrane bioreactors (MBRs) treating wastewaters. Use of AC-assisted MBRs combines adsorption, biodegradation and membrane filtration. This can lead to advanced removal of recalcitrant pollutants and mitigation of membrane fouling. The relative contribution of adsorption and biodegradation to overall removal achieved by an AC-assisted MBR process can vary, and "biological AC" may not fully develop due to competition of target pollutants with bulk organics in wastewater. Thus periodic replenishment of spent AC is necessary. Sludge retention time (SRT) governs the frequency of spent AC withdrawal and addition of fresh AC, and is an important parameter that significantly influences the performance of AC-assisted MBRs. Of utmost importance is AC dosage because AC overdose may aggravate membrane fouling, increase sludge viscosity, impair mass transfer and reduce sludge dewaterability. PMID:25801795

  13. The effect of activated carbon addition on membrane bioreactor processes for wastewater treatment and reclamation - A critical review.

    PubMed

    Skouteris, George; Saroj, Devendra; Melidis, Paraschos; Hai, Faisal I; Ouki, Sabèha

    2015-06-01

    This review concentrates on the effect of activated carbon (AC) addition to membrane bioreactors (MBRs) treating wastewaters. Use of AC-assisted MBRs combines adsorption, biodegradation and membrane filtration. This can lead to advanced removal of recalcitrant pollutants and mitigation of membrane fouling. The relative contribution of adsorption and biodegradation to overall removal achieved by an AC-assisted MBR process can vary, and "biological AC" may not fully develop due to competition of target pollutants with bulk organics in wastewater. Thus periodic replenishment of spent AC is necessary. Sludge retention time (SRT) governs the frequency of spent AC withdrawal and addition of fresh AC, and is an important parameter that significantly influences the performance of AC-assisted MBRs. Of utmost importance is AC dosage because AC overdose may aggravate membrane fouling, increase sludge viscosity, impair mass transfer and reduce sludge dewaterability.

  14. Iron Impregnated Activated Carbon as an Efficient Adsorbent for the Removal of Methylene Blue: Regeneration and Kinetics Studies

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Irfan; Adnan, Rohana; Wan Ngah, Wan Saime; Mohamed, Norita

    2015-01-01

    In this study, iron impregnated activated carbon (FeAC) was synthesized following an oxidation and iron impregnation of activated carbon (AC). Both the AC and FeAC were characterized by pHZPC and FTIR spectroscopy. The removal of Methylene Blue (MB) by AC and FeAC was examined under various experimental conditions. The FeAC showed up to 95% (higher than AC) MB removal in the pH range of 7–10. Although the reaction kinetics was pseudo–second order, the overall rate was controlled by a number of processes such as film diffusion, pore diffusion and intraparticle diffusion. The activation energy values for the MB uptake by AC and FeAC (21.79 and 14.82 kJ/mol, respectively) revealed a physisorption process. In the regeneration study, FeAC has shown consistently ≥ 90% MB removal even up to 10 repeated cycles. The reusable characteristic of the spent FeAC improved the practical use of activated carbon and can be a breakthrough for continuous flow system applications where it can work effectively without any significant reduction in its performance. PMID:25849291

  15. Textural and electronic characteristics of mechanochemically activated composites with nanosilica and activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gun'ko, V. M.; Zaulychnyy, Ya. V.; Ilkiv, B. I.; Zarko, V. I.; Nychiporuk, Yu. M.; Pakhlov, E. M.; Ptushinskii, Yu. G.; Leboda, R.; Skubiszewska-Zięba, J.

    2011-11-01

    Nanosilicas (A-50, A-300, A-500)/activated carbon (AC, SBET = 1520 m2/g) composites were prepared using short-term (5 min) mechanochemical activation (MCA) of powder mixtures in a microbreaker. Smaller silica nanoparticles of A-500 (average diameter dav = 5.5 nm) can more easily penetrate into broad mesopores and macropores of AC microparticles than larger nanoparticles of A-50 (dav = 52.4 nm) or A-300 (dav = 8.1 nm). After MCA of silica/AC, nanopores of non-broken AC nanoparticles remained accessible for adsorbed N2 molecules. According to ultra-soft X-ray emission spectra (USXES), MCA of silica/AC caused formation of chemical bonds Si-O-C; however, Si-C and Si-Si bonds were practically not formed. A decrease in intensity of OKα band in respect to CKα band of silica/AC composites with diminishing sizes of silica nanoparticles is due to both changes in the surface structure of particles and penetration of a greater number of silica nanoparticles into broad pores of AC microparticles and restriction of penetration depth of exciting electron beam into the AC particles.

  16. Porous texture of activated carbons prepared by phosphoric acid activation of woods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Díez, M. A.; Gómez-Serrano, V.; Fernández González, C.; Cuerda-Correa, E. M.; Macías-García, A.

    2004-11-01

    Activated carbons (ACs) have been prepared using chestnut, cedar and walnut wood shavings from furniture industries located in the Comunidad Autónoma de Extremadura (SW Spain). Phosphoric acid (H3PO4) at different concentrations (i.e. 36 and 85 wt.%) has been used as activating agent. ACs have been characterized from the results obtained by N2 adsorption at 77 K. Moreover, the fractal dimension (D) has been calculated in order to determine the AC surface roughness degree. Optimal textural properties of ACs have been obtained by chemical activation with H3PO4 36 wt.%. This is corroborated by the slightly lower values of D for samples treated with H3PO4 85 wt.%.

  17. Preparation of activated carbon from wet sludge by electrochemical-NaClO activation.

    PubMed

    Miao, Chen; Ye, Caihong; Zhu, Tianxing; Lou, Ziyang; Yuan, Haiping; Zhu, Nanwen

    2014-01-01

    Activated carbon (AC) from sludge is one potential solution for sewage sludge disposal, while the drying sludge is cost and time consuming for preparation. AC preparation from the wet sludge with electrochemical-NaClO activation was studied in this work. Three pretreatment processes, i.e. chemical activation, electrolysis and electrochemical-reagent reaction, were introduced to improve the sludge-derived AC properties, and the optimum dosage of reagent was tested from the 0.1:1 to 1:1 (mass rate, reagent:dried sludge). It was shown that the electrochemical-NaClO preparation is the best method under the test conditions, in which AC has the maximum Brunauer, Emmett and Teller area of 436 m²/g at a mass ratio of 0.7. Extracellular polymeric substances in sludge can be disintegrated by electrochemical-NaClO pretreatment, with a disintegration degree of more than 45%. The percentage of carbon decreased from 34.16 to 8.81 after treated by electrochemical-NaClO activation. Fourier transform infrared spectra showed that a strong C-Cl stretching was formed in electrochemical-NaClO prepared AC. The maximum adsorption capacity of AC reaches 109 mg/g on MB adsorption experiment at pH 10 and can be repeated for three times with high removal efficiency after regeneration.

  18. Preparation of activated carbon from sorghum pith and its structural and electrochemical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Senthilkumar, S.T.; Senthilkumar, B.; Balaji, S.; Sanjeeviraja, C.; Kalai Selvan, R.

    2011-03-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Sorghum pith as the cost effective raw material for activated carbon preparation. {yields} Physicochemical method/KOH activation for preparation of activated carbon is inexpensive. {yields} Activated carbon having lower surface area surprisingly delivered a higher specific capacitance. {yields} Treated at 500 {sup o}C activated carbon exceeds maximum specific capacitances of 320.6 F/g at 10 mV/s. -- Abstract: The cost effective activated carbon (AC) has been prepared from sorghum pith by NaOH activation at various temperatures, including 300 {sup o}C (AC1), 400 {sup o}C (AC2) and 500 {sup o}C (AC3) for the electrodes in electric double layer capacitor (EDLC) applications. The amorphous nature of the samples has been observed from X-ray diffraction and Raman spectral studies. Subsequently, the surface functional groups, surface morphology, pore diameter and specific surface area have been identified through FT-IR, SEM, histogram and N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption isotherm methods. The electrochemical characterization of AC electrodes has been examined using cyclic voltammetry technique in the potential range of -0.1-1.2 V in 1.0 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} electrolyte at different scan rates (10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 100 mV/s). The maximum specific capacitances of 320.6 F/g at 10 mV/s and 222.1 F/g at 100 mV/s have been obtained for AC3 electrode when compared with AC1 and AC2 electrodes. Based on the characterization studies, it has been inferred that the activated carbon prepared from sorghum pith may be one of the innovative carbon electrode materials for EDLC applications.

  19. Distribution of Activator (Ac) Throughout the Maize Genome for Use in Regional Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kolkman, Judith M.; Conrad, Liza J.; Farmer, Phyllis R.; Hardeman, Kristine; Ahern, Kevin R.; Lewis, Paul E.; Sawers, Ruairidh J. H.; Lebejko, Sara; Chomet, Paul; Brutnell, Thomas P.

    2005-01-01

    A collection of Activator (Ac)-containing, near-isogenic W22 inbred lines has been generated for use in regional mutagenesis experiments. Each line is homozygous for a single, precisely positioned Ac element and the Ds reporter, r1-sc:m3. Through classical and molecular genetic techniques, 158 transposed Ac elements (tr-Acs) were distributed throughout the maize genome and 41 were precisely placed on the linkage map utilizing multiple recombinant inbred populations. Several PCR techniques were utilized to amplify DNA fragments flanking tr-Ac insertions up to 8 kb in length. Sequencing and database searches of flanking DNA revealed that the majority of insertions are in hypomethylated, low- or single-copy sequences, indicating an insertion site preference for genic sequences in the genome. However, a number of Ac transposition events were to highly repetitive sequences in the genome. We present evidence that suggests Ac expression is regulated by genomic context resulting in subtle variations in Ac-mediated excision patterns. These tr-Ac lines can be utilized to isolate genes with unknown function, to conduct fine-scale genetic mapping experiments, and to generate novel allelic diversity in applied breeding programs. PMID:15520264

  20. Sodium Hydroxide Activated Nanoporous Carbons Based on Lapsi Seed Stone.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Sahira; Shrestha, Lok Kumar; Kamachi, Yuichiro; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Pradhananga, Mandira Adhikari; Pokhrel, Bhadra Prasad; Ariga, Katsuhiko; Pradhananga, Raja Ram

    2015-02-01

    Nanoporous activated carbons (ACs) were prepared from Lapsi (Choerospondias axillaris) seed powder by chemical activation with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) at different NaOH impregnation ratios. The prepared ACs were characterized by Fourier transform-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, Raman scattering, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Semi-quantitative information on the surface properties was obtained by estimating iodine number. FTIR spectra showed the presence of oxygenated functional groups such as hydroxyl, carbonyl, and carboxyl in the prepared ACs. Raman scattering showed clear D and G bands in the spectra. The intensity ratio of G and D band peak intensity was ca. 1.39 at lowest NaOH and Lapsi seed powder ratio 0.25:1 showing high graphitic degree. This ratio decreased with increase in the NaOH impregnation ratio and reached minimum ca. 0.94 (comparable with commercial AC) at NaOH and Lapsi seed powder ratio 1:1 demonstrating that higher NaOH impregnation reduces the graphitic structure of the carbon. XRD patterns showed two broad peaks at diffraction angles of approximately 25 and 43 degrees indicating the amorphous structure. Surface properties of the ACs (BET surface area, pore volume, and pore size distributions) were evaluated by nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherm. Our ACs showed strong methylene blue adsorption property (maximum methylene blue is ca. 200 mg/g). Judging from the iodine number and methylene blue values, structure, and surface areas, it can be concluded that NaOH impregnation ratio is one of the key parameters to tune the surface properties of Lapsi seed stone-based activated carbons.

  1. Removal of pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) and toxicological response of Cyperus alternifolius exposed to PhACs in microcosm constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qing; Feng, Guozhong; Gao, Xu; Sun, Chengxiao; Guo, Jin-song; Zhu, Zhiwei

    2016-01-15

    This study investigated the effects of selected four pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) (carbamazepine, sulfamethoxazole, ofloxacin, and roxithromycin) on the photosynthesis and antioxidant enzymes of Cyperus alternifolius in constructed wetlands (CWs). Moreover, the removal and kinetics of PhACs in CWs were evaluated to explore the related removal mechanisms. Results showed that C. alternifolius can uptake and withstand certain PhACs. The PhAC tolerance of C. alternifolius might be attributed to their capacity to maintain relatively normal photosynthetic activity and elevated antioxidative defense. CWs offered comparable or even higher removal efficiencies for the selected PhACs compared with conventional WWTPs. The removal of the target PhACs was enhanced in the planted CWs versus the unplanted CWs mostly because of plant uptake and rhizosphere effects. In particular, carbamazepine, which is considered the most recalcitrant of the PhACs, was significantly reduced (p<0.05). The removal of target PhACs fitted into two distinct periods. The initial fast step (within the first 2 h) was essentially attributed to the adsorption onto the CW medium surface. The subsequent slow process (2-12 h) closely followed first-order kinetics probably because of the interaction between microorganisms and plants. The obtained results indicate that C. alternifolius can phytoremediate PhAC-contaminated waters in CWs. PMID:26465971

  2. Removal of pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) and toxicological response of Cyperus alternifolius exposed to PhACs in microcosm constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qing; Feng, Guozhong; Gao, Xu; Sun, Chengxiao; Guo, Jin-song; Zhu, Zhiwei

    2016-01-15

    This study investigated the effects of selected four pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) (carbamazepine, sulfamethoxazole, ofloxacin, and roxithromycin) on the photosynthesis and antioxidant enzymes of Cyperus alternifolius in constructed wetlands (CWs). Moreover, the removal and kinetics of PhACs in CWs were evaluated to explore the related removal mechanisms. Results showed that C. alternifolius can uptake and withstand certain PhACs. The PhAC tolerance of C. alternifolius might be attributed to their capacity to maintain relatively normal photosynthetic activity and elevated antioxidative defense. CWs offered comparable or even higher removal efficiencies for the selected PhACs compared with conventional WWTPs. The removal of the target PhACs was enhanced in the planted CWs versus the unplanted CWs mostly because of plant uptake and rhizosphere effects. In particular, carbamazepine, which is considered the most recalcitrant of the PhACs, was significantly reduced (p<0.05). The removal of target PhACs fitted into two distinct periods. The initial fast step (within the first 2 h) was essentially attributed to the adsorption onto the CW medium surface. The subsequent slow process (2-12 h) closely followed first-order kinetics probably because of the interaction between microorganisms and plants. The obtained results indicate that C. alternifolius can phytoremediate PhAC-contaminated waters in CWs.

  3. Rapid quantification of dimethyl methylphosphonate from activated carbon particles by static headspace gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Brendan L; Billingsley, Brit G; Logue, Brian A

    2013-06-01

    Activated carbon (AC) particles are utilized as an adsorbent for binding hazardous vapors in protective equipment. The binding affinity and utilization of these AC particles should be known to ensure effective and efficient use. Therefore, a simple and effective method was developed for the quantification of the chemical warfare agent simulant, dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), from AC particles. Static headspace gas chromatography mass-spectrometry with internal standard, DMMP-d6, was used to perform the analysis. The method produced a linear dynamic range of 2.48-620g DMMP/kg carbon and a detection limit of 1.24g DMMP/kg carbon. Furthermore, the method produced a coefficient of variation of less than 16% for all intra- and inter-assay analyses. The method provided a simple and effective procedure for quantifying DMMP from AC particles and was applied to the analysis of a DMMP-exposed AC protective respirator filter.

  4. Rapid quantification of dimethyl methylphosphonate from activated carbon particles by static headspace gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Brendan L; Billingsley, Brit G; Logue, Brian A

    2013-06-01

    Activated carbon (AC) particles are utilized as an adsorbent for binding hazardous vapors in protective equipment. The binding affinity and utilization of these AC particles should be known to ensure effective and efficient use. Therefore, a simple and effective method was developed for the quantification of the chemical warfare agent simulant, dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), from AC particles. Static headspace gas chromatography mass-spectrometry with internal standard, DMMP-d6, was used to perform the analysis. The method produced a linear dynamic range of 2.48-620g DMMP/kg carbon and a detection limit of 1.24g DMMP/kg carbon. Furthermore, the method produced a coefficient of variation of less than 16% for all intra- and inter-assay analyses. The method provided a simple and effective procedure for quantifying DMMP from AC particles and was applied to the analysis of a DMMP-exposed AC protective respirator filter. PMID:23639122

  5. Textural properties and surface chemistry of lotus stalk-derived activated carbons prepared using different phosphorus oxyacids: adsorption of trimethoprim.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai; Zhang, Jian; Bao, Nan; Cheng, Cheng; Ren, Liang; Zhang, Chenglu

    2012-10-15

    The preparation of activated carbons (AC-H(x)P(y)O(z)) by four kinds of oxyacids of phosphorus (H(3)PO(4), H(4)P(2)O(7), HPO(3) and H(3)PO(3)) activation of lotus stalk (LS) was studied, with a particular focus on the effect of these H(x)P(y)O(z) on both surface chemistry and porous texture. The XRD analysis of the samples after H(x)P(y)O(z) impregnation showed H(4)P(2)O(7) had the strongest influence on the crystallinity of LS. Thermo gravimetric studies of the pyrolysis of LS-H(x)P(y)O(z) indicated that these H(x)P(y)O(z) had a very different influence on the thermal degradation of LS. The prepared activated carbons were characterized by SEM, N(2) sorption/desorption isotherms, XRD, FTIR and Boehm's titration. Batched sorption studies were performed to compare adsorptive properties of the carbons toward trimethoprim (TMP). The surface area and pore volume of AC-H(3)PO(4) and AC-H(4)P(2)O(7) were much higher than AC-HPO(3) and AC-H(3)PO(3). Boehm's titration results indicated that AC-H(4)P(2)O(7) and AC-H(3)PO(3) possessed more acidic oxygen functionalities than AC-H(3)PO(4) and AC-HPO(3). The structure of the AC-HPO(3) was kept as its starting material after activation. Activation with H(3)PO(3) would result in the aromatization of the carbon. The sorption affinities of TMP follows an order of AC-H(4)P(2)O(7)>AC-H(3)PO(4)>AC-H(3)PO(3)>AC-HPO(3).

  6. Separating proteins with activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Stone, Matthew T; Kozlov, Mikhail

    2014-07-15

    Activated carbon is applied to separate proteins based on differences in their size and effective charge. Three guidelines are suggested for the efficient separation of proteins with activated carbon. (1) Activated carbon can be used to efficiently remove smaller proteinaceous impurities from larger proteins. (2) Smaller proteinaceous impurities are most efficiently removed at a solution pH close to the impurity's isoelectric point, where they have a minimal effective charge. (3) The most efficient recovery of a small protein from activated carbon occurs at a solution pH further away from the protein's isoelectric point, where it is strongly charged. Studies measuring the binding capacities of individual polymers and proteins were used to develop these three guidelines, and they were then applied to the separation of several different protein mixtures. The ability of activated carbon to separate proteins was demonstrated to be broadly applicable with three different types of activated carbon by both static treatment and by flowing through a packed column of activated carbon. PMID:24898563

  7. Removal of sulfa drugs by sewage treatment in aqueous solution systems: activated carbon treatment and ozone oxidation.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Fumihiko; Tominaga, Hisato; Kangawa, Moe; Inoue, Kenji; Kawasaki, Naohito

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the activated carbon (AC) treatment and ozone oxidation of the sulfa drugs--sulfamethoxazole (SMX), sulfamonomethoxine (SMM), sulfadimidine (SDD), and sulfadimethoxine (SDM)--in aqueous solution systems. Three AC samples were prepared from Shirasagi (AC1 and AC2) and coal (AC3), and the surface functional groups, solution pH, specific surface areas, pore volumes, and morphologies of the three samples were evaluated. The specific surface areas were in the following order: AC1 (1391 m²/g) > AC2 (1053 m²/g) > AC3 (807 m²/g). The pore volume and mean pore diameter of AC3 were greater than those of AC1 and AC2. The concentration of sulfa drugs adsorbed onto the AC samples reached equilibrium within 150 h. Experimental data of the adsorption rate were fitted to a pseudo-second-order model. The amount of sulfa drugs adsorbed onto the AC samples was in the order of SDM < SMM < SDD < SMX; the mechanism of adsorption of the sulfa drugs onto the AC samples depended on the hydrophobicity of the AC surface. The adsorption isotherm data were fitted to Freundlich and Langmuir models. Ozone was generated from oxygen gas using an A-27 ozone generator, and the complete degradation of the sulfa drugs by ozone treatment at 60 mL/min was achieved within 50 min. Ozone treatment caused the structure of the sulfa drugs to decompose via ozone oxidation. PMID:22450123

  8. Recent studies on activated carbons and fly ashes from Turkish resources

    SciTech Connect

    Ayhan Demirbas; Gulsin Arslan; Erol Pehlivan

    2006-05-15

    This article deals with adsorptive properties of activated carbons (ACs) and fly ashes from Turkish coal and biomass resources. ACs because of their high surface area, microporous character and the chemical nature of their surface have been considered potential adsorbents for the removal of heavy metals from industrial wastewater. Pyrolysis is an established process method for preparation of activated carbon from biomass. The bio-char is can be used as AC. The adsorption properties of ACs were strictly defined by the physicochemical nature of their surface and their texture, i.e., pore volume, pore size distribution, surface area. It is well known that the pH of the solution-adsorbant mixture is an important variable in the adsorption process. Fly ash has the highest adsorption capacity (198.2 mg/g for Cd(II)). Almond shell AC has the lowest adsorption capacity (2.7 mg/g).

  9. Effect of an AC electric field on the conductance of single-wall semiconductor-type carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Belonenko, M. B.; Glazov, S. Yu.; Mescheryakova, N. E.

    2010-09-15

    The effect of an ac electric field on the conductance of a system of single-wall semiconductor-type carbon nanotubes placed in a dc electric field is considered. The strength vectors of dc and ac electric fields are directed along the nanotube axis. The electronic system of carbon nanotubes is considered in the context of the Boltzmann kinetic equation in the relaxation-time approximation. The dependence of the current density in the system on the characteristics of applied fields is studied. The effect of absolute negative conductance is detected.

  10. Effects of pore structure and electrolyte on the capacitive characteristics of steam- and KOH-activated carbons for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Feng-Chin; Tseng, Ru-Ling; Hu, Chi-Chang; Wang, Chen-Ching

    Four kinds of activated carbons (denoted as ACs) with specific surface area of ca. 1050 m 2 g -1 were fabricated from fir wood and pistachio shell by means of steam activation or chemical activation with KOH. Pore structures of ACs were characterized by a t-plot method based on N 2 adsorption isotherms. The amount of mesopores within KOH-activated carbons ranged from 9.2 to 15.3% while 33.3-49.5% of mesopores were obtained for the steam-activated carbons. The pore structure, surface functional groups, and raw materials of ACs, as well as pH and the supporting electrolyte were also found to be significant factors determining the capacitive characteristics of ACs. The excellent capacitive characteristics in both acidic and neutral media and the weak dependence of the specific capacitance on the scan rate of cyclic voltammetry (CV) for the ACs derived from the pistachio shell with steam activation (denoted as P-H 2O-AC) revealed their promising potential in the application of supercapacitors. The ACs derived from fir wood with KOH activation (denoted as F-KOH-AC), on the other hand, showed the best capacitive performance in H 2SO 4 due to excellent reversibility and high specific capacitance (180 F g -1 measured at 10 mV s -1), which is obviously larger than 100 F g -1 (a typical value of activated carbons with specific surface areas equal to/above 1000 m 2 g -1).

  11. Adsorption of pharmaceuticals to microporous activated carbon treated with potassium hydroxide, carbon dioxide, and steam.

    PubMed

    Fu, Heyun; Yang, Liuyan; Wan, Yuqiu; Xu, Zhaoyi; Zhu, Dongqiang

    2011-01-01

    Adsorption of sulfapyridine, tetracycline, and tylosin to a commercial microporous activated carbon (AC) and its potassium hydroxide (KOH)-, CO-, and steam-treated counterparts (prepared by heating at 850°C) was studied to explore efficient adsorbents for the removal of selected pharmaceuticals from water. Phenol and nitrobenzene were included as additional adsorbates, and nonporous graphite was included as a model adsorbent. The activation treatments markedly increased the specific surface area and enlarged the pore sizes of the mesopores of AC (with the strongest effects shown on the KOH-treated AC). Adsorption of large-size tetracycline and tylosin was greatly enhanced, especially for the KOH-treated AC (more than one order of magnitude), probably due to the alleviated size-exclusion effect. However, the treatments had little effect on adsorption of low-size phenol and nitrobenzene due to the predominance of micropore-filling effect in adsorption and the nearly unaffected content of small micropores causative to such effect. These hypothesized mechanisms on pore-size dependent adsorption were further tested by comparing surface area-normalized adsorption data and adsorbent pore size distributions with and without the presence of adsorbed antibiotics. The findings indicate that efficient adsorption of bulky pharmaceuticals to AC can be achieved by enlarging the adsorbent pore size through suitable activation treatments.

  12. Hot electrons injection in carbon nanotubes under the influence of quasi-static ac-field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amekpewu, M.; Mensah, S. Y.; Musah, R.; Mensah, N. G.; Abukari, S. S.; Dompreh, K. A.

    2016-07-01

    The theory of hot electrons injection in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) where both dc electric field (Ez), and a quasi-static ac field exist simultaneously (i.e. when the frequency ω of ac field is much less than the scattering frequency v (ω ≪ v or ωτ ≪ 1, v =τ-1) where τ is relaxation time) is studied. The investigation is done theoretically by solving semi-classical Boltzmann transport equation with and without the presence of the hot electrons source to derive the current densities. Plots of the normalized current density versus dc field (Ez) applied along the axis of the CNTs in the presence and absence of hot electrons reveal ohmic conductivity initially and finally negative differential conductivity (NDC) provided ωτ ≪ 1 (i.e. quasi- static case). With strong enough axial injection of the hot electrons, there is a switch from NDC to positive differential conductivity (PDC) about Ez ≥ 75 kV / cm and Ez ≥ 140 kV / cm for a zigzag CNT and an armchair CNT respectively. Thus, the most important tough problem for NDC region which is the space charge instabilities can be suppressed due to the switch from the NDC behaviour to the PDC behaviour predicting a potential generation of terahertz radiations whose applications are relevance in current-day technology, industry, and research.

  13. Catalysis kinetics and porous analysis of rolling activated carbon-PTFE air-cathode in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, Heng; Yu, Hongbing; Wang, Xin

    2012-12-01

    The microbial fuel cell (MFC), being an environment-friendly technology for wastewater treatment, is limited by low efficiency and high cost. Power output based on capital cost had been greatly increased in our previous work by introducing a novel activated carbon (AC) air-cathode (ACAC). The catalysis behavior of this ACAC was studied here based on catalysis kinetics and pore analysis of both carbon powders and catalyst layers (CLs). Plain AC (AC1#), ultracapacitor AC (AC2#), and non-AC (XC-72) powders were used as catalysts. The electron transfer number (n) of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) with CLs increased by 5-23% compared to those n values of corresponding carbon powders before being rolled to CLs with PTFE, while the n value of Pt/C decreased by 38% when it was brushed with Nafion as the CL, indicating that rolling procedure with PTFE binder substantially increased the catalytic activity of carbon catalysts. Two-four times larger in micropore area of AC powders than non-AC powder resulted in 1.3-1.9 times increase in power density of MFCs. In addition, more uniform distribution of microporosity was found in AC1# than in AC2#, which could be the reason for the 25% increase in power density of ACAC1# (1355 ± 26 mW·m(-2)) compared to 1086 ± 8 mW·m(-2) of ACAC2#. PMID:23151092

  14. Characterization of nano-lead-doped active carbon and its application in lead-acid battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Bo; Jiang, Liangxing; Xue, Haitao; Liu, Fangyang; Jia, Ming; Li, Jie; Liu, Yexiang

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, nano-lead-doped active carbon (nano-Pb/AC) composite with low hydrogen evolution current for lead-acid battery was prepared by ultrasonic-absorption and chemical-precipitate method. The nano-Pb/AC composite was characterized by SEM, EDS and TEM. The electrochemical characterizations are performed by linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) in a three-electrode system. Since intermediate adsorption is the rate-determining step, the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is markedly inhibited as the intermediate adsorption impedance of nano-Pb/AC increased. Meanwhile, the working potential of nano-Pb/AC is widened to the whole potential region of Pb negative plate (from -1.36 V to -0.86 V vs. Hg/HgSO4) in lead-acid battery. In addition, nano-Pb can improve the interfacial compatibility between AC and Pb paste, accordingly relieve the symptoms of carbon floatation. Finally, 2.0 V single-cell flooded lead-acid batteries with 1.0 wt.% nano-Pb/AC or 1.0 wt.% AC addition in negative active materials are assembled. The cell performances test results show that the 3 h rate capacity, quick charging performance, high current discharging performance and cycling performance of nano-Pb/AC modified battery are all improved compared with regular lead-acid battery and AC modified lead-acid battery.

  15. The Formation of Carbon Nanofibers on Powdered Activated Carbon Impregnated with Nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Y. M.; Al-Mamun, A. A.; Muyibi, S. A.; Al-Khatib, M. F. R.; Jameel, A. T.; AlSaadi, M. A.

    2009-06-01

    In the present work, the production and characterization of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) composite is reported. Carbon nanofibers (CNF) were produced on powdered activated carbon PAC—impregnated with nickel—by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) of a hydrocarbon in the presence of hydrogen at ˜780° C. The flow rates of carbon source and hydrogen were fixed. The CNFs were formed directly over the impregnated AC. Variable weight percentage ratios of the catalyst salt (Ni+2) were used for the impregnation (1, 3, 5, 7 and 9%, respectively). The product displays a relatively high surface area, essentially constituted by the external surface, and the absence of the bottled pores encountered with activated carbon. FSEM, TEM and TGA were used for the characterization of the product.

  16. Influence of pore size distribution on the adsorption of phenol on PET-based activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Lorenc-Grabowska, Ewa; Diez, María A; Gryglewicz, Grazyna

    2016-05-01

    The role of pore size distribution in the adsorption of phenol in aqueous solutions on polyethylene terephthalate (PET)-based activated carbons (ACs) has been analyzed. The ACs were prepared from PET and mixtures of PET with coal-tar pitch (CTP) by means of carbonization and subsequent steam and carbon dioxide activation at 850 and 950 °C, respectively. The resultant ACs were characterized on the basis of similarities in their surface chemical features and differences in their micropore size distributions. The adsorption of phenol was carried out in static conditions at ambient temperature. The pseudo-second order kinetic model and Langmuir model were found to fit the experimental data very well. The different adsorption capacities of the ACs towards phenol were attributed to differences in their micropore size distributions. Adsorption capacity was favoured by the volume of pores with a size smaller than 1.4 nm; but restricted by pores smaller than 0.8 nm. PMID:26890386

  17. Biological activation of carbon filters.

    PubMed

    Seredyńska-Sobecka, Bozena; Tomaszewska, Maria; Janus, Magdalena; Morawski, Antoni W

    2006-01-01

    To prepare biological activated carbon (BAC), raw surface water was circulated through granular activated carbon (GAC) beds. Biological activity of carbon filters was initiated after about 6 months of filter operation and was confirmed by two methods: measurement of the amount of biomass attached to the carbon and by the fluorescein diacetate (FDA) test. The effect of carbon pre-washing on WG-12 carbon properties was also studied. For this purpose, the nitrogen adsorption isotherms at 77K and Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectra analyses were performed. Moreover, iodine number, decolorizing power and adsorption properties of carbon in relation to phenol were studied. Analysis of the results revealed that after WG-12 carbon pre-washing its BET surface increased a little, the pH value of the carbon water extract decreased from 11.0 to 9.4, decolorizing power remained at the same level, and the iodine number and phenol adsorption rate increased. In preliminary studies of the ozonation-biofiltration process, a model phenol solution with concentration of approximately 10mg/l was applied. During the ozonation process a dose of 1.64 mg O(3)/mg TOC (total organic carbon) was employed and the contact time was 5 min. Four empty bed contact times (EBCTs) in the range of 2.4-24.0 min were used in the biofiltration experiment. The effectiveness of purification was measured by the following parameters: chemical oxygen demand (COD(Mn)), TOC, phenol concentration and UV(254)-absorbance. The parameters were found to decrease with EBCT. PMID:16376966

  18. In situ sequestration of hydrophobic organic contaminants in sediments under stagnant contact with activated carbon. 1. Column studies.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yongju; Cho, Yeo-Myoung; Luthy, Richard G

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of activated carbon (AC) treatment to sequester hydrophobic organic contaminants in sediments under stagnant contact was comprehensively studied for the first time. Two years of column experiments were conducted to simulate field conditions with two study sediments contaminated with petroleum and polychlorinated biphenyls, respectively, and variations in AC-sediment contact times, initial AC mixing regimes and distribution, AC particle sizes, and pore-water flow. The benefit of AC treatment was gradually enhanced with time toward the end point of the treatment, where sorption equilibrium is established between sediment and AC. After two years of stagnant contact, the contaminant uptake in polyethylene passive samplers embedded in the columns was reduced by 95-99% for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and 93-97% for polychlorinated biphenyls with 5 and 4 wt % AC dose, respectively, when AC was initially applied by mechanical mixing. These results verify that AC treatment can effectively control the availability of hydrophobic organic contaminants under stagnant conditions within a reasonable time frame following an initial distribution of AC into the sediment. The effectiveness of AC treatment was strongly dependent on AC particle size and AC distribution, while the effect of AC initial mixing regimes and pore-water flow was not pronounced.

  19. Development of nanoporous structure in carbons by chemical activation with zinc chloride.

    PubMed

    Rajbhandari, Rinita; Shrestha, Lok Kumar; Pokharel, Bhadra Prasad; Pradhananga, Raja Ram

    2013-04-01

    Series of activated carbons (ACs) have been prepared from Lapsi (Choerospondias axillaris) seed powder (LSP) by chemical activation with zinc chloride (ZnCI2) and the effects of ZnCl2 impregnation ratio, carbonization time, and precursor sources on the structure and properties of ACs have been systematically investigated. Carbonization was carried out at 400 degrees C and the ratio of LSP and ZnCI2 was varied from LSP:ZnCl2 = 1:0.25 (AC-0.25), 1:0.50 (AC-0.50) 1:1 (AC-1), 1:2 (AC-2), and 1:4 (AC-4). The ACs were characterized by Fourier transform-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, Raman scattering, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Surface properties (effective surface areas, pore volumes, and pore size distributions) were studied by nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurements. The electrochemical and vapor sensing properties were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) method, respectively. All the ACs are amorphous materials containing oxygenated surface functional groups and having nanoporous (microporous and mesoporous) structures. We found that surface properties depend on the LSP:ZnCI2 ratio, carbonization time, and also on the precursor type. The effective surface area increased significantly with increasing LSP:ZnCI2 ratio from 1:0.25 to 1:0.5 and then remain apparently constant. However, total pore volume increased continuously with ZnCI2 ratio. Increase in the carbonization time above 4 h decreased both the surface area and pore volume. ACs prepared from bamboo and coconut shell showed better surface properties compared to AC prepared from sugarcane; surface area and pore volume of the former systems are nearly double of the later system. AC derived from LSP (AC-4) showed excellent electrochemical performance giving specific capacitance value of 328 F/g in 1 M H2SO4 solution demonstrating the potential use of this material for supercapacitor electrodes. Our

  20. Activation of Bt Protoxin Cry1Ac in Resistant and Susceptible Cotton Bollworm

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Gemei; Wang, Bingjie; Zhong, Feng; Chen, Lin; Khaing, Myint Myint; Zhang, Jie; Guo, Yuyuan; Wu, Kongming; Tabashnik, Bruce E.

    2016-01-01

    Crystalline (Cry) proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are used extensively for insect control in sprays and transgenic plants, but their efficacy is reduced by evolution of resistance in pests. Here we evaluated reduced activation of Cry1Ac protoxin as a potential mechanism of resistance in the invasive pest Helicoverpa armigera. Based on the concentration killing 50% of larvae (LC50) for a laboratory-selected resistant strain (LF120) divided by the LC50 for its susceptible parent strain (LF), the resistance ratio was 1600 for Cry1Ac protoxin and 1200 for trypsin-activated Cry1Ac toxin. The high level of resistance to activated toxin as well as to protoxin indicates reduced activation of protoxin is not a major mechanism of resistance to Cry1Ac in LF120. For both insect strains, treatment with either the trypsin inhibitor N-a-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK) or the chymotrypsin inhibitor N-a-tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone (TPCK) did not significantly affect the LC50 of Cry1Ac protoxin. Enzyme activity was higher for LF than LF120 for trypsin-like proteases, but did not differ between strains for chymotrypsin-like proteases. The results here are consistent with previous reports indicating that reduced activation of protoxin is generally not a major mechanism of resistance to Bt proteins. PMID:27257885

  1. Activation of Bt Protoxin Cry1Ac in Resistant and Susceptible Cotton Bollworm.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jizhen; Liang, Gemei; Wang, Bingjie; Zhong, Feng; Chen, Lin; Khaing, Myint Myint; Zhang, Jie; Guo, Yuyuan; Wu, Kongming; Tabashnik, Bruce E

    2016-01-01

    Crystalline (Cry) proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are used extensively for insect control in sprays and transgenic plants, but their efficacy is reduced by evolution of resistance in pests. Here we evaluated reduced activation of Cry1Ac protoxin as a potential mechanism of resistance in the invasive pest Helicoverpa armigera. Based on the concentration killing 50% of larvae (LC50) for a laboratory-selected resistant strain (LF120) divided by the LC50 for its susceptible parent strain (LF), the resistance ratio was 1600 for Cry1Ac protoxin and 1200 for trypsin-activated Cry1Ac toxin. The high level of resistance to activated toxin as well as to protoxin indicates reduced activation of protoxin is not a major mechanism of resistance to Cry1Ac in LF120. For both insect strains, treatment with either the trypsin inhibitor N-a-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK) or the chymotrypsin inhibitor N-a-tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone (TPCK) did not significantly affect the LC50 of Cry1Ac protoxin. Enzyme activity was higher for LF than LF120 for trypsin-like proteases, but did not differ between strains for chymotrypsin-like proteases. The results here are consistent with previous reports indicating that reduced activation of protoxin is generally not a major mechanism of resistance to Bt proteins. PMID:27257885

  2. Highly porous activated carbons prepared from carbon rich Mongolian anthracite by direct NaOH activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byamba-Ochir, Narandalai; Shim, Wang Geun; Balathanigaimani, M. S.; Moon, Hee

    2016-08-01

    Highly porous activated carbons (ACs) were prepared from Mongolian raw anthracite (MRA) using sodium hydroxide as an activation agent by varying the mass ratio (powdered MRA/NaOH) as well as the mixing method of chemical agent and powdered MRA. The specific BET surface area and total pore volume of the prepared MRA-based activated carbons (MACs) are in the range of 816-2063 m2/g and of 0.55-1.61 cm3/g, respectively. The pore size distribution of MACs show that most of the pores are in the range from large micropores to small mesopores and their distribution can be controlled by the mass ratio and mixing method of the activating agent. As expected from the intrinsic property of the MRA, the highly graphitic surface morphology of prepared carbons was confirmed from Raman spectra and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies. Furthermore the FTIR and XPS results reveal that the preparation of MACs with hydrophobic in nature is highly possible by controlling the mixing conditions of activating agent and powdered MRA. Based on all the results, it is suggested that the prepared MACs could be used for many specific applications, requiring high surface area, optimal pore size distribution, proper surface hydrophobicity as well as strong physical strength.

  3. Surface modification and electrochemical properties of activated carbons for supercapacitor electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dan; Qiu, Wenmei; Xu, Jingcai; Han, Yanbing; Jin, Hongxiao; Jin, Dingfeng; Peng, Xiaoling; Hong, Bo; Li, Ji; Ge, Hongliang; Wang, Xinqing

    2015-12-01

    Modifications with different acids (HNO3, H2SO4, HCl and HF, respectively) were introduced to treat the activated carbons (ACs) surface. The microstructures and surface chemical properties were discussed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), ASAP, Raman spectra and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra. The ACs electrode-based supercapacitors were assembled with 6 mol ṡ L-1 KOH electrolyte. The electrochemical properties were studied by galvanostatic charge-discharge and cyclic voltammetry. The results indicated that although the BET surface area of modified ACs decreased, the functional groups were introduced and the ash contents were reduced on the surface of ACs, receiving larger specific capacitance to initial AC. The specific capacitance of ACs modified with HCl, H2SO4, HF and HNO3 increased by 31.4%, 23%, 21% and 11.6%, respectively.

  4. Investigating the performance of CoxOy/activated carbon catalysts for ethyl acetate catalytic combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hongmei; Zhao, Xiaoping; Zhou, Guilin; He, Xiaoling; Lan, Hai; Jiang, Zongxuan

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic properties of Co-supported activated carbon (AC) catalysts for ethyl acetate catalytic elimination in air were investigated. Results showed that air atmosphere promoted the generation of high-valence state cobalt oxides, and promote the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the Co3O4/AC catalyst. ROS crucially functioned in improving the catalytic activity of Co3O4/AC catalysts. Therefore, CoACA catalyst prepared in air exhibited higher catalytic activity than CoACN catalyst prepared in nitrogen, and CoACA catalyst led to high ethyl acetate conversion (>93%) and stability at a low reaction temperature (210 °C).

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF ACTIVATED CARBONS FROM COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    Harold H. Schobert; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Zhe Lu

    2003-09-30

    The increasing role of coal as a source of energy in the 21st century will demand environmental and cost-effective strategies for the use of coal combustion by-products (CCBPs), mainly unburned carbon in fly ash. Unburned carbon is nowadays regarded as a waste product and its fate is mainly disposal, due to the present lack of efficient routes for its utilization. However, unburned carbon is a potential precursor for the production of adsorbent carbons, since it has gone through a devolatilization process while in the combustor, and therefore, only requires to be activated. Accordingly, the principal objective of this work was to characterize and utilize the unburned carbon in fly ash for the production of activated carbons. The unburned carbon samples were collected from different combustion systems, including pulverized utility boilers, a utility cyclone, a stoker, and a fluidized bed combustor. LOI (loss-on-ignition), proximate, ultimate, and petrographic analyses were conducted, and the surface areas of the samples were characterized by N2 adsorption isotherms at 77K. The LOIs of the unburned carbon samples varied between 21.79-84.52%. The proximate analyses showed that all the samples had very low moisture contents (0.17 to 3.39 wt %), while the volatile matter contents varied between 0.45 to 24.82 wt%. The elemental analyses show that all the unburned carbon samples consist mainly of carbon with very little hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur and oxygen In addition, the potential use of unburned carbon as precursor for activated carbon (AC) was investigated. Activated carbons with specific surface area up to 1075m{sup 2}/g were produced from the unburned carbon. The porosity of the resultant activated carbons was related to the properties of the unburned carbon feedstock and the activation conditions used. It was found that not all the unburned carbon samples are equally suited for activation, and furthermore, their potential as activated carbons precursors could be

  6. Activated carbon to the rescue

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, S.

    1996-03-01

    This article describes the response to pipeline spill of ethylene dichloride (EDC) on the property of an oil company. Activated carbon cleanup proceedure was used. During delivery, changeout, transport, storage, thermal reactivation, and return delivery to the site, the carbon never came into direct contact with operating personnel or the atmosphere. More than 10,000 tones of dredge soil and 50 million gallons of surface water were processed during the emergency response.

  7. Ac conductance and capacitance of carbon black polymer composites during thermal cycling and isothermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, K.-M.; McQueen, D. H.; Vilcáková, J.

    2002-05-01

    The ac electrical properties of acetylene black composites mixed into ethylene butylacrylate copolymer (EBA) and into poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) have been measured in thermal cycling and isothermal annealing experiments. The results show that changes in electrical properties are due to rearrangement of gaps between the carbon black aggregates. This has been concluded using an exponent z that relates the critical frequency ωc denoting the crossover of the conductivity from the dc-plateau to its frequency-dependent part to the dc conductivity, σdc, according to ωc ∝σdcz. Below the melting range of EBA and the glass transition of PMMA z is about one corresponding to strong variation of the conductivity and weak dependence of the permittivity on the gaps. Above the melting range of EBA z is about 1.5, indicating strong dependence of both the conductivity and the permittivity on the gaps, as predicted by percolation theory. This was not found in the PMMA composites above the glass transition. We conclude that the polymer matrix affects the nature of the gaps between carbon black aggregates, either allowing their size to vary continuously (z about 1) or letting them open and close (z about 1.5).

  8. Metalloradical-catalyzed aliphatic carbon-carbon activation of cyclooctane.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yun Wai; Chan, Kin Shing

    2010-05-26

    The aliphatic carbon-carbon activation of c-octane was achieved via the addition of Rh(ttp)H to give Rh(ttp)(n-octyl) in good yield under mild reaction conditions. The aliphatic carbon-carbon activation was Rh(II)(ttp)-catalyzed and was very sensitive to porphyrin sterics.

  9. Proton Affinities of Cationic Carbone Adducts [AC(PPh3 )2 ](+) (A=Halogen, Hydrogen, Methyl) and Unusual Electronic Structures of the Cations and Dications [AC(H)(PPh3 )2 ](2.).

    PubMed

    Petz, Wolfgang; Kuzu, Istemi; Frenking, Gernot; Andrada, Diego M; Neumüller, Bernhard; Fritz, Maximilian; Münzer, Jörn E

    2016-06-13

    This work reports the syntheses and the first crystal structures of the cationic carbone adducts [FC(PPh3 )2 ](+) and [BrC(PPh3 )2 ](+) and the protonated dication [FC(H)(PPh3 )2 ](2+) , which are derived from the carbone C(PPh3 )2 . Quantum chemical calculations and bonding analyses were carried out for the series of cations [AC(PPh3 )2 ](+) and dications [AC(H)(PPh3 )2 ](2+) , where A=H, Me, F, Cl, Br, I. The bonding analysis suggests that the cations are best described as phosphane complexes L→(CA)(+) ←L (L=PPh3 ), which are related to the neutral borylene adducts L→(BA)←L (L=cyclic carbene; A=H, aryl) that were recently isolated. The carbone adducts [AC(PPh3 )2 ](+) possess a π electron lone pair at carbon and they can easily be protonated to the dications [AC(H)(PPh3 )2 ](2+) . The calculations of the dications indicate that the molecules are best represented as complexes L→(CHA)(2+) ←L (L=PPh3 ) where a carbene dication is stabilized by the ligands. The central carbon atom in the cations and even in the dications carries a negative partial charge, which is larger than the negative charge at fluorine. There is also the peculiar situation in which the carbon-fluorine bonds in [FC(PPh3 )2 ](+) and [FC(H)(PPh3 )2 ](2+) exhibit the expected polarity with the negative end at fluorine, but the carbon atom has a larger negative charge than fluorine. Given the similarity of carbodiphosphorane C(PPh3 )2 and carbodicarbene C(NHC)2 , we expect that analogous compounds [AC(NHC)2 ](+) and [AC(H)(NHC)2 ](2+) with similar features as [AC(PPh3 )2 ](+) and [AC(H)(PPh3 )2 ](2+) can be isolated.

  10. Proton Affinities of Cationic Carbone Adducts [AC(PPh3 )2 ](+) (A=Halogen, Hydrogen, Methyl) and Unusual Electronic Structures of the Cations and Dications [AC(H)(PPh3 )2 ](2.).

    PubMed

    Petz, Wolfgang; Kuzu, Istemi; Frenking, Gernot; Andrada, Diego M; Neumüller, Bernhard; Fritz, Maximilian; Münzer, Jörn E

    2016-06-13

    This work reports the syntheses and the first crystal structures of the cationic carbone adducts [FC(PPh3 )2 ](+) and [BrC(PPh3 )2 ](+) and the protonated dication [FC(H)(PPh3 )2 ](2+) , which are derived from the carbone C(PPh3 )2 . Quantum chemical calculations and bonding analyses were carried out for the series of cations [AC(PPh3 )2 ](+) and dications [AC(H)(PPh3 )2 ](2+) , where A=H, Me, F, Cl, Br, I. The bonding analysis suggests that the cations are best described as phosphane complexes L→(CA)(+) ←L (L=PPh3 ), which are related to the neutral borylene adducts L→(BA)←L (L=cyclic carbene; A=H, aryl) that were recently isolated. The carbone adducts [AC(PPh3 )2 ](+) possess a π electron lone pair at carbon and they can easily be protonated to the dications [AC(H)(PPh3 )2 ](2+) . The calculations of the dications indicate that the molecules are best represented as complexes L→(CHA)(2+) ←L (L=PPh3 ) where a carbene dication is stabilized by the ligands. The central carbon atom in the cations and even in the dications carries a negative partial charge, which is larger than the negative charge at fluorine. There is also the peculiar situation in which the carbon-fluorine bonds in [FC(PPh3 )2 ](+) and [FC(H)(PPh3 )2 ](2+) exhibit the expected polarity with the negative end at fluorine, but the carbon atom has a larger negative charge than fluorine. Given the similarity of carbodiphosphorane C(PPh3 )2 and carbodicarbene C(NHC)2 , we expect that analogous compounds [AC(NHC)2 ](+) and [AC(H)(NHC)2 ](2+) with similar features as [AC(PPh3 )2 ](+) and [AC(H)(PPh3 )2 ](2+) can be isolated. PMID:27166027

  11. Environmental impact associated with activated carbon preparation from olive-waste cake via life cycle assessment.

    PubMed

    Hjaila, K; Baccar, R; Sarrà, M; Gasol, C M; Blánquez, P

    2013-11-30

    The life cycle assessment (LCA) environmental tool was implemented to quantify the potential environmental impacts associated with the activated carbon (AC) production process from olive-waste cakes in Tunisia. On the basis of laboratory investigations for AC preparation, a flowchart was developed and the environmental impacts were determined. The LCA functional unit chosen was the production of 1 kg of AC from by-product olive-waste cakes. The results showed that impregnation using H3PO4 presented the highest environmental impacts for the majority of the indicators tested: acidification potential (62%), eutrophication (96%), ozone depletion potential (44%), human toxicity (64%), fresh water aquatic ecotoxicity (90%) and terrestrial ecotoxicity (92%). One of the highest impacts was found to be the global warming potential (11.096 kg CO2 eq/kg AC), which was equally weighted between the steps involving impregnation, pyrolysis, and drying the washed AC. The cumulative energy demand of the AC production process from the by-product olive-waste cakes was 167.63 MJ contributed by impregnation, pyrolysis, and drying the washed AC steps. The use of phosphoric acid and electricity in the AC production were the main factors responsible for the majority of the impacts. If certain modifications are incorporated into the AC production, such as implementing synthesis gas recovery and reusing it as an energy source and recovery of phosphoric acid after AC washing, additional savings could be realized, and environmental impacts could be minimized.

  12. [Removal of fluorescent whitening agent by hydrogen peroxide oxidation catalyzed by activated carbon].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-Long; Zhang, Zhong-Min; Zhao, Xia; Jiao, Ru-Yuan

    2014-06-01

    Degradation of fluorescent whitening agent VBL in the processes of activated carbon (AC) and activated carbon modified (ACM) adsorptions, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) oxidation, and hydrogen peroxide oxidation catalyzed by activated carbon were studied. Mechanism of the above catalytic oxidation was also investigated by adding tert-Butyl alcohol (TBA), the free radical scavenger, and detecting the released gases. The results showed that: the activated carbon modified by Fe (NO3)3 (ACM)exhibited better adsorption removal than AC. Catalytic oxidation showed efficient removal of VBL, and the catalytic removal of AC (up to 95%) was significantly higher than that of ACM (58% only). Catalytic oxidation was inhibited by TBA, which indicates that the above reaction involved *OH radicals and atom oxygen generated by hydrogen peroxide with the presence of AC. The results of H2O2 decomposition and released gases detection involved in the process showed that activated carbon enhanced the decomposition of H2O2 which released oxygen and heat. More O2 was produced and higher temperature of the reactor was achieved, which indicated that H2O2 decomposition catalyzed by ACM was significantly faster than that of AC. Combining the results of VBL removal, it could be concluded that the rate of active intermediates (*OH radicals and atom oxygen) production by ACM catalytic reaction was faster than that of AC. These intermediates consumed themselves and produced O2 instead of degrading VBL. It seemed that the improper mutual matching of the forming rate of activating intermediates and the supply rate of reactants was an important reason for the lower efficiency of ACM catalytic reaction comparing with AC.

  13. Removal of Heavy Metal Ions and Diethylenetriamine Species from Solutions by Magnetic Activated Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kaiwen

    Even though activated carbon is widely used in the removal of contaminants from effluents, it is difficult to be completely recovered by screening or classification. In this project, we prepared a magnetic form of activated carbon (M-AC) by co-precipitation of iron oxides onto activated carbon surface. M-AC can be separated from solutions by applying an external magnetic field and regenerated for reuse. The synthesized M-AC was characterized by X-ray diffraction, specific surface area measurement, and scanning electron microscope. Characterization results show that the major phase of coated iron oxides is magnetite (Fe 3O4). Batch adsorption experiments were carried out for single-component and multi-component solutions. M-AC shows a better adsorption capacity for singlecomponent of Cu (II), Ni (II), or diethylenetriamine (DETA) and for multiple-components of Cu-DETA and Ni-DETA complexes in deionized water than activated carbon. M-AC also shows the potential application in carbon-in-pulp process for gold recovery.

  14. Surface modified activated carbon with β-cyclodextrin--Part I. Synthesis and characterization.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jae H; Wilson, Lee D

    2010-11-01

    Surface functional groups produced from oxidation (carboxylic acid, lactone, quinine, phenol, and nitro groups), reduction (alcohol and amine groups), and grafting (imine and hemi-acetal) reactions were characterized (using surface analysis and chemical methods) and compared with unmodified activated carbon (AC) materials. The untreated, surface-modified, and grafted activated carbon materials were characterized by various surface sensitive methods: Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, thermogravimetry analysis, and Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time of Flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. A chemical method (Boehm titration) was used for estimating the amount of surface bound acidic and basic functional groups. Nitrogen porosimetry was used to analyze the surface area (95-1350 m²/g) and pore volume (0-0.31 cm³/g) characteristics of AC, surface modified AC, and AC materials grafted with β-cyclodextrin. PMID:20924923

  15. Tobacco Stem-Based Activated Carbons for High Performance Supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Xiaohong; Liu, Hongbo; Shi, Lei; He, Yuede

    2012-09-01

    Tobacco stem-based activated carbons (TS-ACs) were prepared by simple KOH activation and their application as electrodes in the electrical double layer capacitor (EDLC) performed successfully. The BET surface area, pore volume, and pore size distribution of the TS-ACs were evaluated based on N2 adsorption isotherms at 77 K. The surface area of the obtained activated carbons varies over a wide range (1472.8-3326.7 m2/g) and the mesoporosity was enhanced significantly as the ratio of KOH to tobacco stem (TS) increased. The electrochemical behaviors of series TS-ACs were characterized by means of galvanostatic charging/discharging, cyclic voltammetry, and impedance spectroscopy. The correlation between electrochemical properties and pore structure was investigated. A high specific capacitance value as 190 F/g at 1 mA/cm2 was obtained in 1 M LiPF6-EC/DMC/DEC electrolyte solution. Furthermore, good performance is also achieved even at high current densities. A development of new use for TS into a valuable energy storage material is explored.

  16. Impacts of Activated Carbon Amendment on Hg Methylation, Demethylation and Microbial Activity in Marsh Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmour, C. C.; Ghosh, U.; Santillan, E. F. U.; Soren, A.; Bell, J. T.; Butera, D.; McBurney, A. W.; Brown, S.; Henry, E.; Vlassopoulos, D.

    2015-12-01

    In-situ sorbent amendments are a low-impact approach for remediation of contaminants in sediments, particular in habitats like wetlands that provide important ecosystem services. Laboratory microcosm trials (Gilmour et al. 2013) and early field trials show that activated carbon (AC) can effectively increase partitioning of both inorganic Hg and methylmercury to the solid phase. Sediment-water partitioning can serve as a proxy for Hg and MeHg bioavailability in soils. One consideration in using AC in remediation is its potential impact on organisms. For mercury, a critical consideration is the potential impact on net MeHg accumulation and bioavailability. In this study, we specifically evaluated the impact of AC on rates of methylmercury production and degradation, and on overall microbial activity, in 4 different Hg-contaminated salt marsh soils. The study was done over 28 days in anaerobic, sulfate-reducing slurries. A double label of enriched mercury isotopes (Me199Hg and inorganic 201Hg) was used to separately follow de novo Me201Hg production and Me199Hg degradation. AC amendments decreased both methylation and demethylation rate constants relative to un-amended controls, but the impact on demethylation was stronger. The addition of 5% (dry weight) regenerated AC to soil slurries drove demethylation rate constants to nearly zero; i.e. MeHg sorption to AC almost totally blocked its degradation. The net impact was increased solid phase MeHg concentrations in some of the soil slurries with the highest methylation rate constants. However, the net impact of AC amendments was to increase MeHg (and inorganic Hg) partitioning to the soil phase and decrease concentrations in the aqueous phase. AC significantly decreased aqueous phase inorganic Hg and MeHg concentrations after 28 days. Overall, the efficacy of AC in reducing aqueous MeHg was highest in the soils with the highest MeHg concentrations. The AC addition did not significantly impact microbial activity, as

  17. p-Chlorophenol adsorption on activated carbons with basic surface properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenc-Grabowska, Ewa; Gryglewicz, Grażyna; Machnikowski, Jacek

    2010-05-01

    The adsorption of p-chlorophenol (PCP) from aqueous solution on activated carbons (ACs) with basic surface properties has been studied. The ACs were prepared by two methods. The first method was based on the modification of a commercial CWZ AC by high temperature treatment in an atmosphere of ammonia, nitrogen and hydrogen. The second approach comprised the carbonization followed by activation of N-enriched polymers and coal tar pitch using CO 2 and steam as activation agent. The resultant ACs were characterized in terms of porous structure, elemental composition and surface chemistry (pH PZC, acid/base titration, XPS). The adsorption of PCP was carried out from an aqueous solution in static conditions. Equilibrium adsorption isotherm was of L2 type for polymer-based ACs, whereas L3-type isotherm was observed for CWZ ACs series. The Langmuir monolayer adsorption capacity was related to the porous structure and the amount of basic sites. A good correlation was found between the adsorption capacity and the volume of micropores with a width < 1.4 nm for polymer-based ACs. Higher nitrogen content, including that in basic form, did not correspond to the enhanced adsorption of PCP from aqueous solution. The competitive effect of water molecule adsorption on the PCP uptake is discussed.

  18. Characterization and organic electric-double-layer-capacitor application of KOH activated coal-tar-pitch-based carbons: Effect of carbonization temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Poo Reum; Lee, Eunji; Kwon, Soon Hyung; Jung, Ji Chul; Kim, Myung-Soo

    2015-12-01

    The present study reports the influence of pre-carbonization on the properties of KOH-activated coal tar pitch (CTP). The change of crystallinity and pore structure of pre-carbonized CTPs as well as their activated carbons (ACs) as function of pre-carbonization temperature are investigated. The crystallinity of pre-carbonized CTPs increases with increasing the carbonization temperature up to 600 °C, but a disorder occurs during the carbonization around 700 °C and an order happens gradually with increasing the carbonization temperatures in range of 800-1000 °C. The CTPs pre-carbonized at high temperatures are more difficult to be activated with KOH than those pre-carbonized at low temperatures due to the increase of micro-crystalline size and the decrease of surface functional groups. The micro-pores and meso-pores are well developed at around 1.0 nm and 2.4 nm, respectively, as the ACs are pre-carbonized at temperatures of 500-600 °C, exhibiting high specific capacitances as electrode materials for electric double layer capacitor (EDLC). Although the specific surface area (SSA) and pore volume of ACs pre-carbonized at temperatures of 900-1000 °C are extraordinary low (non-porous) as compared to those of AC pre-carbonized at 600 °C, their specific capacitances are comparable to each other. The large specific capacitances with low SSA ACs can be attributed to the structural change resulting from the electrochemical activation during the 1st charge above 2.0 V.

  19. Immobilization of a Metal-Nitrogen-Carbon Catalyst on Activated Carbon with Enhanced Cathode Performance in Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wulin; Logan, Bruce E

    2016-08-23

    Applications of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are limited in part by low power densities mainly due to cathode performance. Successful immobilization of an Fe-N-C co-catalyst on activated carbon (Fe-N-C/AC) improved the oxygen reduction reaction to nearly a four-electron transfer, compared to a twoelectron transfer achieved using AC. With acetate as the fuel, the maximum power density was 4.7±0.2 W m(-2) , which is higher than any previous report for an air-cathode MFC. With domestic wastewater as a fuel, MFCs with the Fe-N-C/AC cathode produced up to 0.8±0.03 W m(-2) , which was twice that obtained with a Pt-catalyzed cathode. The use of this Fe-N-C/AC catalyst can therefore substantially increase power production, and enable broader applications of MFCs for renewable electricity generation using waste materials.

  20. Photoconductivity of Activated Carbon Fibers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Kuriyama, K.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    1990-08-01

    The photoconductivity is measured on a high-surface-area disordered carbon material, namely activated carbon fibers, to investigate their electronic properties. Measurements of decay time, recombination kinetics and temperature dependence of the photoconductivity generally reflect the electronic properties of a material. The material studied in this paper is a highly disordered carbon derived from a phenolic precursor, having a huge specific surface area of 1000--2000m{sup 2}/g. Our preliminary thermopower measurements suggest that this carbon material is a p-type semiconductor with an amorphous-like microstructure. The intrinsic electrical conductivity, on the order of 20S/cm at room temperature, increases with increasing temperature in the range 30--290K. In contrast with the intrinsic conductivity, the photoconductivity in vacuum decreases with increasing temperature. The recombination kinetics changes from a monomolecular process at room temperature to a biomolecular process at low temperatures. The observed decay time of the photoconductivity is {approx equal}0.3sec. The magnitude of the photoconductive signal was reduced by a factor of ten when the sample was exposed to air. The intrinsic carrier density and the activation energy for conduction are estimated to be {approx equal}10{sup 21}/cm{sup 3} and {approx equal}20meV, respectively. The majority of the induced photocarriers and of the intrinsic carriers are trapped, resulting in the long decay time of the photoconductivity and the positive temperature dependence of the conductivity.

  1. Characterization of activated carbon prepared from chicken waste and coal

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Zhang; Hong Cui; Riko Ozao; Yan Cao; Bobby I.-T. Chen; Chia-Wei Wang; Wei-Ping Pan

    2007-12-15

    Activated carbons (ACs) were prepared from chicken waste (CW) and coal (E-coal) blended at the ratios of 100:0, 80:20, 50:50, 20:80, and 0:100. The process included carbonization in flowing gaseous nitrogen (300 mL min{sup -1}) at ca. 430{sup o}C for 60 min and successive steam activation (0.1 mL min{sup -1} water injection with a flow of N{sub 2} at 100 mL min{sup -1}) at 650{sup o}C for 30 min. Chicken waste is low in sulfur content but is high in volatile matter (about 55 wt %), and ACs with higher specific surface area were more successfully obtained by mixing with coal. The specific surface area of the CW/Coal blend AC can be estimated by SSA{sub BET} = -65.8x{sup 2} + 158x + 168, where SSA{sub BET} is the specific surface area in m{sup 2} g{sup -1} as determined by the BET method using CO{sub 2} as the adsorbent, where x is the coal fraction by weight in the CW/coal blend ranging from 0.0 to 1.0 (e.g., x = 0.0 signifies the blend contains no coal and x = 1.0 signifies the blend consists of 100% coal). 26 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Measuring and Modeling Organochlorine Pesticide Response to Activated Carbon Amendment in Tidal Sediment Mesocosms.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jay M; Hsieh, Ching-Hong; Hoelen, Thomas P; Weston, Donald P; Luthy, Richard G

    2016-05-01

    Activated carbon (AC) sediment amendment for hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) is attracting increasing regulatory and industrial interest. However, mechanistic and well-vetted models are needed. Here, we conduct an 18 month field mesocosm trial at a site containing dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and chlordane. Different AC applications were applied and, for the first time, a recently published mass transfer model was field tested under varying experimental conditions. AC treatment was effective in reducing DDT and chlordane concentration in polyethylene (PE) samplers, and contaminant extractability by Arenicola brasiliensis digestive fluids. A substantial AC particle size effect was observed. For example, chlordane concentration in PE was reduced by 93% 6 months post-treatment in the powdered AC (PAC) mesocosm, compared with 71% in the granular AC (GAC) mesocosm. Extractability of sediment-associated DDT and chlordane by A. brasiliensis digestive fluids was reduced by at least a factor of 10 in all AC treatments. The model reproduced the relative effects of varying experimental conditions (particle size, dose, mixing time) on concentrations in polyethylene passive samplers well, in most cases within 25% of experimental observations. Although uncertainties such as the effect of long-term AC fouling by organic matter remain, the study findings support the use of the model to assess long-term implications of AC amendment. PMID:27040592

  3. Activated carbon prepared from coffee pulp: potential adsorbent of organic contaminants in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Maraisa; Guerreiro, Mário César; Ramos, Paulize Honorato; de Oliveira, Luiz Carlos Alves; Sapag, Karim

    2013-01-01

    The processing of coffee beans generates large amounts of solid and liquid residues. The solid residues (pulp, husk and parchment) represent a serious environmental problem and do not have an adequate disposal mechanism. In this work, activated carbons (ACs) for adsorption of organic compounds were prepared from coffee pulp by controlled temperature at different pulp/Na2HPO4 ratios (4:1, 2:1, 5:4 and 1:1). The N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms showed ACs with high quantities of mesopores and micropores and specific surface areas of 140, 150, 450 and 440 m(2)g(-1) for AC 4:1, AC 2:1, AC 5:4 and AC 1:1, respectively. The prepared material AC 5:4 showed a higher removal capacity of the organic contaminants methylene blue (MB), direct red (DR) and phenol than did a Merck AC. The maximum capacities for this AC are approximately 150, 120 and 120 mg g(-1) for MB, DR and phenol, respectively. Thus, a good adsorbent was obtained from coffee pulp, an abundant Brazilian residue.

  4. Adsorptive performance for methylene blue of magnetic Ni@activated carbon nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Panfeng; Xu, Jingcai; Zhang, Beibei; Li, Jing; Jin, Hongxiao; Jin, Dingfeng; Peng, Xiaoling; Hong, Bo; Gong, Jie; Ge, Hongliang; Wang, Xinqing

    2015-11-01

    Owing to the unique microporous structure and high specific surface area, activated carbon (AC) can act as a good candidate for functional materials. In this paper, Ni@AC magnetic nanocomposites with excellent magnetic response are synthesized by the hydrothermal method. All Ni@AC nanocomposites present ferromagnetism and Ni nanoparticles exist in the pores of AC. The saturation magnetization (Ms) increases with the increasing content of Ni, while the specific surface area and pore volume decrease. The S-50 sample possesses the parameters of the specific surface area of 1156.8 m2 ṡ g-1 and Ms of 3.5 emu/g. Furthermore, the methylene blue (MB) removal analysis indicates that 99% MB can be adsorbed in 50 min. The as-prepared Ni@AC nanocomposites present good adsorptive capacity of MB and can be separated easily from water by magnetic separation technique.

  5. Antibacterial action of silver-doped activated carbon prepared by vacuum impregnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ying; Wang, Zi-qiang; Zhao, Xin; Li, Wei; Liu, Shou-xin

    2013-02-01

    Silver-containing activated carbon (Ag/AC) exhibiting controlled release of silver and antibacterial action was prepared by vacuum impregnation using acetate silver as a precursor. The antibacterial activity toward E. coli and resistance to water erosion were investigated with the view of water purification. N2 adsorption at 77 K, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the surface morphology and crystalline properties of the Ag/AC samples. As the concentration of CH3COOAg increased, the samples change from exhibiting no antibacterial activity to inhibition of bacteria growth and then to antibacterial activity because of the higher silver content and smaller size of the silver particles. The Ag/AC composites showed a lower release rate of silver than that of a composite prepared by a traditional AgNO3 impregnation method, which suggests a strong interaction between the silver particles and carbon. Because the Ag particles block the pores of AC, the BET surface area, total pore volume and average pore diameter of the Ag/AC samples decreased as the concentration of the CH3COOAg solution increased. The higher antibacterial activity and controlled release of silver by Ag/AC containing 1.65 wt % silver means that it shows promise for purification of drinking water.

  6. The removal of endocrine disrupting compounds, pharmaceutically activated compounds and cyanobacterial toxins during drinking water preparation using activated carbon--a review.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Luis F; Charles, Philippe; Glucina, Karl; Morlay, Catherine

    2012-10-01

    This paper provides a review of recent scientific research on the removal by activated carbon (AC) in drinking water (DW) treatment of 1) two classes of currently unregulated trace level contaminants with potential chronic toxicity-pharmaceutically activate compounds (PhACs) and endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs); 2) cyanobacterial toxins (CyBTs), which are a group of highly toxic and regulated compounds (as microcystin-LR); and 3) the above mentioned compounds by the hybrid system powdered AC/membrane filtration. The influence of solute and AC properties, as well as the competitive effect from background natural organic matter on the adsorption of such trace contaminants, are also considered. In addition, a number of adsorption isotherm parameters reported for PhACs, EDCs and CyBTs are presented herein. AC adsorption has proven to be an effective removal process for such trace contaminants without generating transformation products. This process appears to be a crucial step in order to minimize PhACs, EDCs and CyBTs in finished DW, hence calling for further studies on AC adsorption removal of these compounds. Finally, a priority chart of PhACs and EDCs warranting further study for the removal by AC adsorption is proposed based on the compounds' structural characteristics and their low removal by AC compared to the other compounds.

  7. The removal of endocrine disrupting compounds, pharmaceutically activated compounds and cyanobacterial toxins during drinking water preparation using activated carbon--a review.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Luis F; Charles, Philippe; Glucina, Karl; Morlay, Catherine

    2012-10-01

    This paper provides a review of recent scientific research on the removal by activated carbon (AC) in drinking water (DW) treatment of 1) two classes of currently unregulated trace level contaminants with potential chronic toxicity-pharmaceutically activate compounds (PhACs) and endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs); 2) cyanobacterial toxins (CyBTs), which are a group of highly toxic and regulated compounds (as microcystin-LR); and 3) the above mentioned compounds by the hybrid system powdered AC/membrane filtration. The influence of solute and AC properties, as well as the competitive effect from background natural organic matter on the adsorption of such trace contaminants, are also considered. In addition, a number of adsorption isotherm parameters reported for PhACs, EDCs and CyBTs are presented herein. AC adsorption has proven to be an effective removal process for such trace contaminants without generating transformation products. This process appears to be a crucial step in order to minimize PhACs, EDCs and CyBTs in finished DW, hence calling for further studies on AC adsorption removal of these compounds. Finally, a priority chart of PhACs and EDCs warranting further study for the removal by AC adsorption is proposed based on the compounds' structural characteristics and their low removal by AC compared to the other compounds. PMID:22885596

  8. Improvement of thermostability and activity of firefly luciferase through [TMG][Ac] ionic liquid mediator.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Mehdi; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Heydari, Akbar; Khavari-Nejad, Ramazan Ali; Akbari, Jafar

    2012-10-01

    Firefly luciferase catalyzes production of light from luciferin in the presence of Mg(2+)-ATP and oxygen. This enzyme has wide range of applications in biotechnology and development of biosensors. The low thermal stability of wild-type firefly luciferase is a limiting factor in most applications. Improvements in activity and stability of few enzymes in the presence of ionic liquids were shown in many reports. In this study, kinetic and thermal stability of firefly luciferase from Photinus pyralis in the presence of three tetramethylguanidine-based ionic liquids was investigated. The enzyme has shown improved activity in the presence of [1, 1, 3, 3-tetramethylguanidine][acetate], but in the presence of [TMG][trichloroacetate] and [TMG][triflouroacetate] activity, it decreased or unchanged significantly. Among these ionic liquids, only [TMG][Ac] has increased the thermal stability of luciferase. Incubation of [TMG][Ac] with firefly luciferase brought about with decrease of K(m) for ATP.

  9. [Effect of acid-base two steps surface modification on the adsorption of Cr(VI) onto activated carbon].

    PubMed

    Liu, Shou-xin; Chen, Xiao-yun; Chen, Xi; Sun, Cheng-lin

    2005-11-01

    Effect of HNO3-NaOH two steps surface modification on the adsorption of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution onto activated carbon was evaluated. Activated carbon was oxidized in HNO3 aqueous solution at first (AC1), then treated in the mixture of NaOH and NaCl solution (AC2). Batch equilibrium and continuous adsorption experiments were conducted to determine the adsorption characteristics. Boehm titration method, element analysis were used to characterize the surface properties. N2/77 K adsorption isotherm method was used to characterize the pore structure. The results reveal that adsorption capacity and adsorption rate increase significantly, which in the following order: AC2>AC1>AC0. Surface modification caused BET surface area decreased and the total number of surface oxygen acid groups increased. First oxidation modification in HNO3 solution produced positive acid groups on the surface of activated carbon. Subsequent 2nd modification replaced H+ of carbon surface groups by Na+, the acidity of AC2 was decreased. The main cause of higher Cr(VI) adsorption capacity and rate for AC2 was the more oxygen surface acid groups, and suitable solution pH provide by surface groups.

  10. Inhibitory effect of açaí (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) pulp on IgE-mediated mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Tomoko; Ishiguro, Nahoko; Chihara, Kazuyasu; Ogi, Kazuhiro; Nakashima, Kenji; Sada, Kiyonao; Hori-Tamura, Naoko

    2011-05-25

    The palm fruit açaí is known to have potential health benefits due to its antioxidant scavenging capacities. Pretreatment of IgE-sensitized mouse primary cultured mast cells with açaí pulp resulted in the dramatic suppression of antigen-induced degranulation in a dose-dependent manner. Similarly, açaí suppressed IgE-mediated degranulation and transcription of the cytokine genes from a cultured mast cell line of rat basophilic leukemia (RBL)-2H3 cells. Açaí could selectively inhibit FcεRI signaling pathways. Furthermore, the FcεRI-mediated complementary signaling pathway was also suppressed by açaí. These results demonstrate that açaí is a potent inhibitor of IgE-mediated mast cell activation.

  11. Activated, coal-based carbon foam

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Darren Kenneth; Plucinski, Janusz Wladyslaw

    2004-12-21

    An ablation resistant, monolithic, activated, carbon foam produced by the activation of a coal-based carbon foam through the action of carbon dioxide, ozone or some similar oxidative agent that pits and/or partially oxidizes the carbon foam skeleton, thereby significantly increasing its overall surface area and concurrently increasing its filtering ability. Such activated carbon foams are suitable for application in virtually all areas where particulate or gel form activated carbon materials have been used. Such an activated carbon foam can be fabricated, i.e. sawed, machined and otherwise shaped to fit virtually any required filtering location by simple insertion and without the need for handling the "dirty" and friable particulate activated carbon foam materials of the prior art.

  12. Activated, coal-based carbon foam

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Darren Kenneth; Plucinski, Janusz Wladyslaw

    2009-06-09

    An ablation resistant, monolithic, activated, carbon foam produced by the activation of a coal-based carbon foam through the action of carbon dioxide, ozone or some similar oxidative agent that pits and/or partially oxidizes the carbon foam skeleton, thereby significantly increasing its overall surface area and concurrently increasing its filtering ability. Such activated carbon foams are suitable for application in virtually all areas where particulate or gel form activated carbon materials have been used. Such an activated carbon foam can be fabricated, i.e. sawed, machined and otherwise shaped to fit virtually any required filtering location by simple insertion and without the need for handling the "dirty" and friable particulate activated carbon foam materials of the prior art.

  13. Sorption of mercury onto waste material derived low-cost activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhakta, Jatindra N.; Rana, Sukanta; Lahiri, Susmita; Munekage, Yukihiro

    2014-11-01

    The present study was performed to develop the low-cost activated carbon (AC) from some waste materials as potential mercury (Hg) sorbent to remove high amount of Hg from aqueous phase. The ACs were prepared from banana peel, orange peel, cotton fiber and paper wastes by pyrolysis and characterized by analyzing physico-chemical properties and Hg sorption capacity. The Brunauer Emmett and Teller surface areas (cotton 138 m2/g; paper 119 m2/g), micropore surface areas (cotton 65 m2/g; paper 54 m2/g) and major constituent carbon contents (cotton 95.04 %; paper 94.4 %) were higher in ACs of cotton fiber and paper wastes than the rest two ACs. The Hg sorption capacities and removal percentages were greater in cotton and paper wastes-derived ACs compared to those of the banana and orange peels. The results revealed that elevated Hg removal ability of cotton and paper wastes-derived ACs is largely regulated by their surface area, porosity and carbon content properties. Therefore, ACs of cotton and paper wastes were identified as potential sorbent among four developed ACs to remove high amount of Hg from aqueous phase. Furthermore, easily accessible precursor material, simple preparation process, favorable physico-chemical properties and high Hg sorption capacity indicated that cotton and paper wastes-derived ACs could be used as potential and low-cost sorbents of Hg for applying in practical field to control the severe effect of Hg contamination in the aquatic environment to avoid its human and environmental health risks.

  14. Effect of surface property of activated carbon on adsorption of nitrate ion.

    PubMed

    Iida, Tatsuya; Amano, Yoshimasa; Machida, Motoi; Imazeki, Fumio

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the removal of acidic functional groups and introduction of basic groups/sites on activated carbons (ACs) by outgassing and ammonia gas treatment were respectively carried out to enhance the nitrate ion adsorption in aqueous solution. Then, the relationships between nitrate ion adsorption and solution pH as well as surface charge of AC were investigated to understand the basic mechanisms of nitrate ion adsorption by AC. The result showed that the nitrate ion adsorption depended on the equilibrium solution pH (pHe) and the adsorption amount was promoted with decreasing pHe. The ACs treated by outgassing and ammonia gas treatment showed larger amount of nitrate ion adsorption than that by untreated AC. These results indicated that, since basic groups/sites could adsorb protons in the solution, the AC surface would be charged positively, and that the nitrate ion would be electrically interacted with positively charged carbon surface. Accordingly, it was concluded that basic groups/sites on the surface of AC could promote nitrate ion adsorption.

  15. Adsorption properties of CFC and CFC replacements on activated carbon containing introduced ionic fluoride and chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Tanada, Seiki; Kawasaki, Naohito; Nakamura, Takeo; Abe, Ikuo

    1996-10-15

    Plasma technology has been available for the chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) decomposition or etching of silicone. The adsorption properties of CFC (CFC113) and CFC replacements (HCFC141b, HCFC225cb, and 5FP) on several kinds of plasma-treated activated carbons (P-ACs) prepared under different treatment gases were investigated using the adsorption isotherms, the limiting pore volume and the affinity coefficient and energy of adsorption calculated by the Dubinin-Radushkevich plot, and the quality and kinds of introduced fluoride and chloride. The dissolved fluoride and chloride atoms were introduced to the surface of activated carbon by CFC113, HCFC141b, and HCFC225cb, while the dissolved fluoride atoms were those from 5FP and tetrafluoromethane. The adsorbed amount of CFC and CFC replacements, except for 5FP, on P-ACs was larger than that on U-AC. The specific adsorption site on plasma-treated activated carbon of the CFC and CFC replacements was the fluoride atoms which were introduced by plasma treatment. It is concluded that the plasma-treated activated carbon was suitable for the recovery of CFC and CFC replacements, because the adsorbed amount of CFC and CFC replacements was larger than that on untreated activated carbon, and the adsorbed CFC and CFC replacements on activated carbon were decomposed by the plasma treatment.

  16. Influence of activated carbon upon the photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue under UV-vis irradiation.

    PubMed

    Matos, Juan; Montaña, Ricmary; Rivero, Eliram

    2015-01-01

    Photodegradation of methylene blue (MB) was studied on TiO2 in the presence of activated carbon (AC) prepared from the sawdust of a soft wood by physical activation under CO2 flow, by pyrolysis under N2 flow, and by chemical activation with ZnCl2 and H3PO4 under N2 flow. MB photodegradation was performed under UV and UV-visible irradiation to verify the scaling-up of the present TiO2-AC binary materials. It was verified that oxygenated surface groups on carbon were intrinsically photoactive, and a synergy effect between both solids has been estimated from the first-order apparent rate constants in the photodegradation of MB. This effect enhances the photoactivity of TiO2 up to a factor of about 9 under visible irradiation, and it was associated to the surface properties of AC. PMID:24788930

  17. JV Task 119 - Effects of Aging on Treated Activated Carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin Olson; Lucinda Hamre; John Pavlish; Blaise Mibeck

    2009-03-25

    For both the United States and Canada, testing has been under way for electric utilities to find viable and economical mercury control strategies to meet pending future mercury emission limits. The technology that holds the most promise for mercury control in low-chlorine lignite to meet the needs of the Clean Air Act in the United States and the Canada-Wide Standards in Canada is injection of treated activated carbon (AC) into the flue gas stream. Most of the treated carbons are reported to be halogenated, often with bromine. Under a previous multiyear project headed by the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), testing was performed on a slipstream unit using actual lignite-derived flue gas to evaluate various sorbent technologies for their effectiveness, performance, and cost. Testing under this project showed that halogenated ACs performed very well, with mercury capture rates often {ge} 90%. However, differences were noted between treated ACs with respect to reactivity and capacity, possibly as a result of storage conditions. Under certain conditions (primarily storage in ambient air), notable performance degradation had occurred in mercury capture efficiency. Therefore, a small exploratory task within this project evaluated possible differences resulting from storage conditions and subsequent effects of aging that might somehow alter their chemical or physical properties. In order to further investigate this potential degradation of treated (halogenated) ACs, the EERC, together with DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory, the North Dakota Industrial Commission (NDIC), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), SaskPower, and Otter Tail Power Company, assessed the aging effects of brominated ACs for the effect that different storage durations, temperatures, and humidity conditions have on the mercury sorption capacity of treated ACs. No aging effects on initial capture activity were observed for any carbons or conditions in the investigation

  18. Laser light triggered-activated carbon nanosystem for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Chu, Maoquan; Peng, Jinliang; Zhao, Jiajia; Liang, Shanlu; Shao, Yuxiang; Wu, Qiang

    2013-02-01

    Among carbon-based nanomaterials, activated carbon (AC) may be an ideal candidate as a carrier for tumor therapeutic agents. Here we found a new property of nanoscale activated carbon (NAC) with narrow size distribution, namely the rapid conversion of light to thermal energy both in vitro and in vivo. An aqueous suspension of 200 μL of NAC (1 mg/mL) exhibited a rapid temperature increase of more than 35 °C after irradiation for 20 min with a 655-nm laser; this was within the temperature range for effective tumor treatment. We demonstrated that lung cancer cells (H-1299) incubated with bamboo nano-AC (BNAC) were killed with high efficiency after laser irradiation. In addition, mouse tumors with sizes smaller than the laser spot that had been injected with BNAC disappeared after irradiation. For tumors larger than the laser spot area, the incorporation of the photosensitizer ZnPc obviously increased the tumor growth inhibition efficiency of BNAC. BNAC-ZnPc was found to exhibit a synergistic effect when photothermal and photodynamic therapies were administered in combination. These results indicated that NAC can be used for high efficiency cancer phototherapy.

  19. Removal of Pb(II) from water by the activated carbon modified by nitric acid under microwave heating.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shuheng; Zhang, Jiajun; Shen, Dekui; Xiao, Rui; Gu, Sai; Zhao, Ming; Liang, Junyu

    2016-02-01

    The rice husk based activated carbon (RH-AC) was treated by nitric acid under microwave heating, in order to improve its capability for the removal of heavy metal ions from water. The optimal conditions for the modification of RH-AC (M-RH-AC) were determined by means of orthogonal array experimental design, giving those as the concentration of nitric acid of 8mol/L, modification time of 15min, modification temperature of 130°C and microwave power of 800W. The characteristics of the M-RH-AC and RH-AC were examined by BET, XRD, Raman spectrum, pH titration, zeta potential, Boehm titration and FTIR analysis. The M-RH-AC has lower pore surface area, smaller crystallite, lower pHIEP and more oxygen-containing functional groups than the RH-AC. Removal capacity of Pb(II) ions by the M-RH-AC and RH-AC from water solution was estimated concerning the influence of contact time, pH value, and initial concentration. The equilibrium time of Pb(II) removal was found to be around 90min after modification process. Two kinetic models are adopted to describe the possible Pb(II) adsorption mechanism, finding that the adsorption rate of Pb(II) ions by the M-RH-AC is larger than that of RH-AC. PMID:26520818

  20. Activated carbon as an electron acceptor and redox mediator during the anaerobic biotransformation of azo dyes.

    PubMed

    van der Zee, Frank P; Bisschops, Iemke A E; Lettinga, Gatze; Field, Jim A

    2003-01-15

    Activated carbon (AC) has a long history of applications in environmental technology as an adsorbent of pollutants for the purification of drinking waters and wastewaters. Here we describe novel role of AC as redox mediator in accelerating the reductive transformation of pollutants as well as a terminal electron acceptor in the biological oxidation of an organic substrate. This study explores the use of AC as an immobilized redox mediator for the reduction of a recalcitrant azo dye (hydrolyzed Reactive Red 2) in laboratory-scale anaerobic bioreactors, using volatile fatty acids as electron donor. The incorporation of AC in the sludge bed greatly improved dye removal and formation of aniline, a dye reduction product. These results indicate that AC acts as a redox mediator. In supporting batch experiments, bacteria were shown to oxidize acetate at the expense of reducing AC. Furthermore, AC greatly accelerated the chemical reduction of an azo dye by sulfide. The results taken as a whole clearly suggest that AC accepts electrons from the microbial oxidation of organic acids and transfers the electrons to azo dyes, accelerating their reduction. A possible role of quinone surface groups in the catalysis is discussed. PMID:12564915

  1. Study on CM-chitosan/activated carbon hybrid gel films formed with EB irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Long; Luo, Fang; Zhai, Maolin; Mitomo, Hiroshi; Yoshii, Fumio

    2008-05-01

    A series of novel hybrid gel films were prepared from carboxymethylated chitosan (CM-chitosan) and activated carbon (AC) by irradiation of compression-molded CM-chitosan/AC mixture in physical gel state with electron beam (EB) at room temperature. The formation, properties and structure of CM-chitosan/AC hybrid gel films were discussed in terms of gel fraction, swelling, mechanical property, SEM image and XPS spectra. Compared with pure crosslinked CM-chitosan gel, the gel fraction and mechanical property of the hybrid sample were obviously improved after adding AC into CM-chitosan film. The morphology analyses indicated that the hybrid gel films exhibited a rough and folded surface and a relatively interior uniform structure was sustained between CM-chitosan and AC. XPS revealed that the content of protonated amino groups of CM-chitosan macromolecule was promoted by AC. In addition, the adsorptive property of the gel films against humic acid was investigated by batch adsorption method. It was found that the adsorption efficiency of CM-chitosan is significantly improved by adding AC. These preliminary evaluations suggest that the CM-chitosan/AC gel films have great potential for applications in industrial field and biomedical field.

  2. Isolation and characterization of pediocin AcH chimeric protein mutants with altered bactericidal activity.

    PubMed

    Miller, K W; Schamber, R; Osmanagaoglu, O; Ray, B

    1998-06-01

    A collection of pediocin AcH amino acid substitution mutants was generated by PCR random mutagenesis of DNA encoding the bacteriocin. Mutants were isolated by cloning mutagenized DNA into an Escherichia coli malE plasmid that directs the secretion of maltose binding protein-pediocin AcH chimeric proteins and by screening transformant colonies for bactericidal activity against Lactobacillus plantarum NCDO955 (K. W. Miller, R. Schamber, Y. Chen, and B. Ray, 1998. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 64:14-20, 1998). In all, 17 substitution mutants were isolated at 14 of the 44 amino acids of pediocin AcH. Seven mutants (N5K, C9R, C14S, C14Y, G37E, G37R, and C44W) were completely inactive against the pediocin AcH-sensitive strains L. plantarum NCDO955, Listeria innocua Lin11, Enterococcus faecalis M1, Pediococcus acidilactici LB42, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides Ly. A C24S substitution mutant constructed by other means also was inactive against these bacteria. Nine other mutants (K1N, W18R, I26T, M31T, A34D, N41K, H42L, K43N, and K43E) retained from <1% to approximately 60% of wild-type activity when assayed against L. innocua Lin11. One mutant, K11E, displayed approximately 2. 8-fold-higher activity against this indicator. About one half of the mutations mapped to amino acids that are conserved in the pediocin-like family of bacteriocins. All four cysteines were found to be required for activity, although only C9 and C14 are conserved among pediocin-like bacteriocins. Several basic amino acids as well as nonpolar amino acids located within the hydrophobic C-terminal region also were found to be important. The mutations are discussed in the context of structural models that have been proposed for the bacteriocin.

  3. Impact of activated carbon, biochar and compost on the desorption and mineralization of phenanthrene in soil.

    PubMed

    Marchal, Geoffrey; Smith, Kilian E C; Rein, Arno; Winding, Anne; Wollensen de Jonge, Lis; Trapp, Stefan; Karlson, Ulrich G

    2013-10-01

    Sorption of PAHs to carbonaceous soil amendments reduces their dissolved concentrations, limiting toxicity but also potentially biodegradation. Therefore, the maximum abiotic desorption of freshly sorbed phenanthrene (≤5 mg kg(-1)) was measured in three soils amended with activated carbon (AC), biochar or compost. Total amounts of phenanthrene desorbed were similar between the different soils, but the amendment type had a large influence. Complete desorption was observed in the unamended and compost amended soils, but this reduced for biochar (41% desorbed) and AC (8% desorbed). Cumulative amounts mineralized were 28% for the unamended control, 19% for compost, 13% for biochar and 4% for AC. Therefore, the effects of the amendments in soil in reducing desorption were also reflected in the extents of mineralization. Modeling was used to analyze key processes, indicating that for the AC and charcoal treatments bacterial activity did not limit mineralization, but rather desorption into the dissolved phase.

  4. Activated carbon amendment for in-situ remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmquist, M.; Brändli, R.; Henriksen, T.; Hartnik, T.; Cornelissen, G.

    2009-04-01

    For the first time in Europe, a novel and innovative remediation technique is used in a field pilot study. This technique is amendment of the soil with two types of activated carbon (AC). Here, one pulverized AC (PAC, 50% < 15µm and 3% >150 µm) and one granular AC (GAC, 1.7-0.43 mm) is tested. The idea of this technique is that the added AC binds organic contaminants so strongly that they cannot be taken up in living organisms or transported to other environmental compartments. Laboratory studies with 2% (wt %) AC amendment to an urban soil reduced the freely dissolved pore water concentrations of PAH by 17% to 99% (Brändli et al. 2008). Several parameters such as dissolved organic carbon (DOC), K, NO2, NO3, NH4, PO4 and PAH, are being measured in this field study. Plant growth and earthworm bioaccumulation tests were also carried out during the summer months. DOC showed a 70% reduction between untreated soil and soil with PAC about one year after the amendment. In the soil mixed with GAC, a 55% reduction could be measured. For K, a 40% lowering value was observed for the soil with GAC compared to no affect for the soil with PAC. NH4 was reduced by 50% for both GAC and PAC amended soils compared to the untreated soil, whereas NO2 and NO3 increased with 2-4 times for the soil with GAC and no effect were seen for the soil with PAC. The freely dissolved PAH concentrations were reduced by 49-78% for the soil with GAC and 82-96% for the soil with PAC. The plant experiment showed best growth rate in the soil with GAC, followed by the untreated soil and least growth was measured on the PAC treated soil. The low growth rate seen in the soil with PAC may come from the fact that DOC and some other nutrients are also being sorbed to the PAC surface together with the organic pollutants and are thereby taken away from the biological cycle. Amendment of soil with AC remediates the soil from organic contaminants when these pollutants are sorbed to the AC surface. This is an

  5. Activated carbon decreases invasive plant growth by mediating plant-microbe interactions.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Nicole E; Kulmatiski, Andrew; Beard, Karen H; Norton, Jeanette M

    2014-01-01

    There is growing appreciation for the idea that plant-soil interactions (e.g. allelopathy and plant-microbe feedbacks) may explain the success of some non-native plants. Where this is the case, native plant restoration may require management tools that change plant-soil interactions. Activated carbon (AC) is one such potential tool. Previous research has shown the potential for high concentrations of AC to restore native plant growth to areas dominated by non-natives on a small scale (1 m × 1 m plots). Here we (i) test the efficacy of different AC concentrations at a larger scale (15 m × 15 m plots), (ii) measure microbial responses to AC treatment and (iii) use a greenhouse experiment to identify the primary mechanism, allelopathy versus microbial changes, through which AC impacts native and non-native plant growth. Three years after large-scale applications, AC treatments decreased non-native plant cover and increased the ratio of native to non-native species cover, particularly at concentrations >400 g m(-2). Activated carbon similarly decreased non-native plant growth in the greenhouse. This effect, however, was only observed in live soils, suggesting that AC effects were microbially mediated and not caused by direct allelopathy. Bacterial community analysis of field soils indicated that AC increased the relative abundance of an unidentified bacterium and an Actinomycetales and decreased the relative abundance of a Flavobacterium, suggesting that these organisms may play a role in AC effects on plant growth. Results support the idea that manipulations of plant-microbe interactions may provide novel and effective ways of directing plant growth and community development (e.g. native plant restoration). PMID:25387751

  6. Activated carbon decreases invasive plant growth by mediating plant–microbe interactions

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Nicole E.; Kulmatiski, Andrew; Beard, Karen H.; Norton, Jeanette M.

    2015-01-01

    There is growing appreciation for the idea that plant–soil interactions (e.g. allelopathy and plant–microbe feedbacks) may explain the success of some non-native plants. Where this is the case, native plant restoration may require management tools that change plant–soil interactions. Activated carbon (AC) is one such potential tool. Previous research has shown the potential for high concentrations of AC to restore native plant growth to areas dominated by non-natives on a small scale (1 m × 1 m plots). Here we (i) test the efficacy of different AC concentrations at a larger scale (15 m × 15 m plots), (ii) measure microbial responses to AC treatment and (iii) use a greenhouse experiment to identify the primary mechanism, allelopathy versus microbial changes, through which AC impacts native and non-native plant growth. Three years after large-scale applications, AC treatments decreased non-native plant cover and increased the ratio of native to non-native species cover, particularly at concentrations >400 g m−2. Activated carbon similarly decreased non-native plant growth in the greenhouse. This effect, however, was only observed in live soils, suggesting that AC effects were microbially mediated and not caused by direct allelopathy. Bacterial community analysis of field soils indicated that AC increased the relative abundance of an unidentified bacterium and an Actinomycetales and decreased the relative abundance of a Flavobacterium, suggesting that these organisms may play a role in AC effects on plant growth. Results support the idea that manipulations of plant–microbe interactions may provide novel and effective ways of directing plant growth and community development (e.g. native plant restoration). PMID:25387751

  7. Adsorption studies of methylene blue and phenol onto vetiver roots activated carbon prepared by chemical activation.

    PubMed

    Altenor, Sandro; Carene, Betty; Emmanuel, Evens; Lambert, Jacques; Ehrhardt, Jean-Jacques; Gaspard, Sarra

    2009-06-15

    Vetiver roots have been utilized for the preparation of activated carbon (AC) by chemical activation with different impregnation ratios of phosphoric acid, X(P) (gH(3)PO(4)/g precursor): 0.5:1; 1:1 and 1.5:1. Textural characterization, determined by nitrogen adsorption at 77K shows that mixed microporous and mesoporous structures activated carbons (ACs) with high surface area (>1000 m(2)/g) and high pore volume (up to 1.19 cm(3)/g) can be obtained. The surface chemical properties of these ACs were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Boehm titration. Their textural and chemical characteristics were compared to those of an AC sample obtained by steam activation of vetiver roots. Classical molecules used for characterizing liquid phase adsorption, phenol and methylene blue (MB), were used. Adsorption kinetics of MB and phenol have been studied using commonly used kinetic models, i.e., the pseudo-first-order model, the pseudo-second-order model, the intraparticle diffusion model and as well the fractal, BWS (Brouers, Weron and Sotolongo) kinetic equation. The correlation coefficients (R(2)) and the normalized standard deviation Deltaq (%) were determined showing globally, that the recently derived fractal kinetic equation could best describe the adsorption kinetics for the adsorbates tested here, indicating a complex adsorption mechanism. The experimental adsorption isotherms of these molecules on the activated carbon were as well analysed using four isotherms: the classical Freundlich, Langmuir, Redlich-Peterson equations, but as well the newly published deformed Weibull Brouers-Sotolongo isotherm. The results obtained from the application of the equations show that the best fits were achieved with the Brouers-Sotolongo equation and with the Redlich-Peterson equation. Influence of surface functional groups towards MB adsorption is as well studied using various ACs prepared from vetiver roots and sugar cane bagasse. Opposite effects governing MB

  8. Comparison of the characteristics and mechanisms of Hg(II) sorption by biochars and activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoyun; Schierz, Ariette; Xu, Nan; Cao, Xinde

    2016-02-01

    Two biochars were produced from bagasse and hickory chips (referred to as BB and HCB, respectively) and evaluated for their sorption ability of Hg(II) in aqueous solution. A commercial activated carbon (AC) which is commonly used for Hg(II) removal was included for comparison. Both biochars showed higher sorption capacities than AC, following the trend of BB>HCB>AC. The sorption of Hg(II) by BB and AC was mainly attributed to the formation of (COO)2Hg(II) and (O)2Hg(II). As a result, the adsorption capacity of Hg(II) by BB decreased 17.6% and 37.6% after COOH and OH were blocked, respectively and that of Hg(II) by AC decreased 6.63% and 62.2% for COOH and OH hindered, respectively. However, blocking the function groups had little effect on the Hg removal by HCB since sorption of Hg(II) by HCB was mainly resulted from the π electrons of CC and CO induced Hg-π binding. Further X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis indicated the possibility of reduction of the Hg(II) to Hg(I) by phenol groups or π electrons during the removal of Hg(II) by both biochars. In conclusion, biochar is more effective than activated carbon in removing Hg(II) and there exists a high potential that biochar can be a substitute of activated carbon for removal of Hg(II) from wastewater. PMID:26520810

  9. Comparison of the characteristics and mechanisms of Hg(II) sorption by biochars and activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoyun; Schierz, Ariette; Xu, Nan; Cao, Xinde

    2016-02-01

    Two biochars were produced from bagasse and hickory chips (referred to as BB and HCB, respectively) and evaluated for their sorption ability of Hg(II) in aqueous solution. A commercial activated carbon (AC) which is commonly used for Hg(II) removal was included for comparison. Both biochars showed higher sorption capacities than AC, following the trend of BB>HCB>AC. The sorption of Hg(II) by BB and AC was mainly attributed to the formation of (COO)2Hg(II) and (O)2Hg(II). As a result, the adsorption capacity of Hg(II) by BB decreased 17.6% and 37.6% after COOH and OH were blocked, respectively and that of Hg(II) by AC decreased 6.63% and 62.2% for COOH and OH hindered, respectively. However, blocking the function groups had little effect on the Hg removal by HCB since sorption of Hg(II) by HCB was mainly resulted from the π electrons of CC and CO induced Hg-π binding. Further X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis indicated the possibility of reduction of the Hg(II) to Hg(I) by phenol groups or π electrons during the removal of Hg(II) by both biochars. In conclusion, biochar is more effective than activated carbon in removing Hg(II) and there exists a high potential that biochar can be a substitute of activated carbon for removal of Hg(II) from wastewater.

  10. Influence of moderate pre-oxidation treatment on the physical, chemical and phosphate adsorption properties of iron-containing activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengfang; Shi, Mo; Li, Jihua; Zheng, Zheng

    2014-03-01

    A novel adsorbent based on iron oxide dispersed over activated carbon (AC) were prepared, and used for phosphate removal from aqueous solutions. The influence of pre-oxidation treatment on the physical, chemical and phosphate adsorption properties of iron-containing AC were determined. Two series of ACs, non-oxidized and oxidized carbon modified by iron (denoted as AC-Fe and AC/O-Fe), resulted in a maximum impregnated iron of 4.03% and 7.56%, respectively. AC/O-Fe showed 34.0%-46.6% higher phosphate removal efficiency than the AC-Fe did. This was first attributed to the moderate pre-oxidation of raw AC by nitric acid, achieved by dosing Fe(II) after a pre-oxidation, to obtain higher iron loading, which is favorable for phosphate adsorption. Additionally, the in-situ formed active site on the surface of carbon, which was derived from the oxidation of Fe(II) by nitric acid dominated the remarkably high efficiency with respect to the removal of phosphate. The activation energy for adsorption was calculated to be 10.53 and 18.88 kJ/mol for AC-Fe and AC/O-Fe, respectively. The results showed that the surface mass transfer and intra-particle diffusion were simultaneously occurring during the process and contribute to the adsorption mechanism.

  11. Insights into properties of activated carbons prepared from different raw precursors by pyrophosphoric acid activation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Yue, Qinyan; Gao, Baoyu

    2016-03-01

    Low-cost activated carbons (ACs) were prepared from four kinds of solid wastes: petroleum coke, Enteromorpha prolifera, lignin from papermaking black liquid and hair, by pyrophosphoric acid (H4P2O7) activation. Thermo-gravimetric analysis of the pyrolysis of H4P2O7-precursor mixtures implied that H4P2O7 had different influences on the pyrolysis behavior of the four raw materials. N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and adsorption capacities for dyes were used to characterize the prepared activated carbons. AC derived from E. prolifera exhibited the highest surface area (1094m(2)/g) and maximum monolayer adsorption capacity for malachite green (1250mg/g). Kinetic studies showed that the experimental data were in agreement with the pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption isotherms were well described by the Langmuir isotherm model, indicating the adsorption of dye onto the ACs proceeded by monolayers. PMID:26969070

  12. Toluene vapor capture by activated carbon particles in a dual gas-solid cyclone system.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yun Hui; Ngo, Khanh Quoc; Park, Young Koo; Jo, Young Min

    2012-08-01

    Capturing of odorous compounds such as toluene vapor by a particulate-activated carbon adsorbent was investigated in a gas-solid cyclone, which is one type of mobile beds. The test cyclone was early modified with the post cyclone (PoC) and a spiral flow guide to the vortex finder. The proposed process may contribute to the reduction of gases and dust from industrial exhausts, especially when dealing with a low concentration of odorous elements and a large volume ofdust flow. In this device, the toluene capturing efficiency at a 400 ppm concentration rose up to 77.4% when using activated carbon (AC) particles with a median size of 27.03 microm. A maximum 96% of AC particles could be collected for reuse depending on the size and flow rate. The AC regenerated via thermal treatment showed an adsorption potential up to 66.7% throughout repeated tests.

  13. Sulfur infiltrated activated carbon cathodes for lithium sulfur cells: The combined effects of pore size distribution and electrolyte molarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung Tae; Zhao, Youyang; Kim, Hyea; Cho, Won Il; Yushin, Gleb

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we adopted three different commercial activated carbon samples (ACs) having different particle size, specific surface area and pore size to make sulfur-carbon (S-AC) nanocomposites for rechargeable lithium sulfur batteries. The effect of the physical parameters of ACs and the combined effect of electrolyte molarity were investigated. The performance of the cells at two different temperatures of 25 and 70 °C were compared. For room temperature operation of the cells, the capacities of S infiltrated into microporous AC having smaller pore size and stronger interactions with sulfur and sulfides were lower than those of the S infiltrated into micro- and mesoporous ACs containing larger pores. In contrast, the microporous AC demonstrated higher capacity at the elevated temperature due to the improved ion transport rate. The effect of electrolyte molarity on the performance of Li/S cells was found to depend on the AC pore size and particle size distributions. Increasing electrolyte molarity from 1 to 3 M demonstrated improved cell performance and reduced polysulfide dissolution in all the studied S-AC samples. However, further increasing electrolyte salt concentration resulted in a high polarization and reduced cell performance in S-ACs having large particle size or smaller pores.

  14. Adsorption of herbicides using activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Derbyshire, F.; Jagtoyan, M.; Lafferty, C.; Kimber, G.

    1996-10-01

    This work describes development of a series of novel activated carbon materials and their testing for possible water treatment applications by studying the adsorption of sodium pentachlorphenolate, PCP (a common herbicide/wood preservative). Although the application of activated carbons is an established technology for the treatment of public water supplies, there is a growing need for materials with higher selectivity and adsorptive capacities as well as high abrasion resistance. The materials that will be discussed include extruded wood-derived carbons with novel pore size distributions and high hardness, as well as activated carbon fiber composites. Comparisons will be made with commercial granular water treatment carbons.

  15. Impedance spectroscopic analysis of composite electrode from activated carbon/conductive materials/ruthenium oxide for supercapacitor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Taer, E.; Awitdrus,; Farma, R.; Deraman, M. Talib, I. A.; Ishak, M. M.; Omar, R.; Dolah, B. N. M.; Basri, N. H.; Othman, M. A. R.; Kanwal, S.

    2015-04-16

    Activated carbon powders (ACP) were produced from the KOH treated pre-carbonized rubber wood sawdust. Different conductive materials (graphite, carbon black and carbon nanotubes (CNTs)) were added with a binder (polivinylidene fluoride (PVDF)) into ACP to improve the supercapacitive performance of the activated carbon (AC) electrodes. Symmetric supercapacitor cells, fabricated using these AC electrodes and 1 molar H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} electrolyte, were analyzed using a standard electrochemical impedance spectroscopy technique. The addition of graphite, carbon black and CNTs was found effective in reducing the cell resistance from 165 to 68, 23 and 49 Ohm respectively, and increasing the specific capacitance of the AC electrodes from 3 to 7, 17, 32 F g{sup −1} respectively. Since the addition of CNTs can produce the highest specific capacitance, CNTs were chosen as a conductive material to produce AC composite electrodes that were added with 2.5 %, 5 % and 10 % (by weight) electro-active material namely ruthenium oxide; PVDF binder and CNTs contents were kept at 5 % by weight in each AC composite produced. The highest specific capacitance of the cells obtained in this study was 86 F g{sup −1}, i.e. for the cell with the resistance of 15 Ohm and composite electrode consists of 5 % ruthenium oxide.

  16. Impedance spectroscopic analysis of composite electrode from activated carbon/conductive materials/ruthenium oxide for supercapacitor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taer, E.; Deraman, M.; Talib, I. A.; Awitdrus, Farma, R.; Ishak, M. M.; Omar, R.; Dolah, B. N. M.; Basri, N. H.; Othman, M. A. R.; Kanwal, S.

    2015-04-01

    Activated carbon powders (ACP) were produced from the KOH treated pre-carbonized rubber wood sawdust. Different conductive materials (graphite, carbon black and carbon nanotubes (CNTs)) were added with a binder (polivinylidene fluoride (PVDF)) into ACP to improve the supercapacitive performance of the activated carbon (AC) electrodes. Symmetric supercapacitor cells, fabricated using these AC electrodes and 1 molar H2SO4 electrolyte, were analyzed using a standard electrochemical impedance spectroscopy technique. The addition of graphite, carbon black and CNTs was found effective in reducing the cell resistance from 165 to 68, 23 and 49 Ohm respectively, and increasing the specific capacitance of the AC electrodes from 3 to 7, 17, 32 F g-1 respectively. Since the addition of CNTs can produce the highest specific capacitance, CNTs were chosen as a conductive material to produce AC composite electrodes that were added with 2.5 %, 5 % and 10 % (by weight) electro-active material namely ruthenium oxide; PVDF binder and CNTs contents were kept at 5 % by weight in each AC composite produced. The highest specific capacitance of the cells obtained in this study was 86 F g-1, i.e. for the cell with the resistance of 15 Ohm and composite electrode consists of 5 % ruthenium oxide.

  17. Activated carbon derived from carbon residue from biomass gasification and its application for dye adsorption: Kinetics, isotherms and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Maneerung, Thawatchai; Liew, Johan; Dai, Yanjun; Kawi, Sibudjing; Chong, Clive; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    In this work, activated carbon (AC) as an effective and low-cost adsorbent was successfully prepared from carbon residue (or char, one of the by-products from woody biomass gasification) via physical activation. The surface area of char was significantly increased from 172.24 to 776.46m(2)/g after steam activation at 900°C. The obtained activated carbons were then employed for the adsorption of dye (Rhodamine B) and it was found that activated carbon obtained from steam activation exhibited the highest adsorption capability, which is mainly attributed to the higher surface area and the abundance of hydroxyl (-OH) and carboxyl (-COOH) groups on the activated carbon surface. Moreover, it was also found that the adsorption capability significantly increased under the basic condition, which can be attributed to the increased electrostatic interaction between the deprotonated (negatively charged) activated carbon and dye molecules. Furthermore, the equilibrium data were fitted into different adsorption isotherms and found to fit well with Langmuir model (indicating that dye molecules form monolayer coverage on activated carbon) with a maximum monolayer adsorption capability of 189.83mg/g, whereas the adsorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics.

  18. Activated carbon derived from carbon residue from biomass gasification and its application for dye adsorption: Kinetics, isotherms and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Maneerung, Thawatchai; Liew, Johan; Dai, Yanjun; Kawi, Sibudjing; Chong, Clive; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    In this work, activated carbon (AC) as an effective and low-cost adsorbent was successfully prepared from carbon residue (or char, one of the by-products from woody biomass gasification) via physical activation. The surface area of char was significantly increased from 172.24 to 776.46m(2)/g after steam activation at 900°C. The obtained activated carbons were then employed for the adsorption of dye (Rhodamine B) and it was found that activated carbon obtained from steam activation exhibited the highest adsorption capability, which is mainly attributed to the higher surface area and the abundance of hydroxyl (-OH) and carboxyl (-COOH) groups on the activated carbon surface. Moreover, it was also found that the adsorption capability significantly increased under the basic condition, which can be attributed to the increased electrostatic interaction between the deprotonated (negatively charged) activated carbon and dye molecules. Furthermore, the equilibrium data were fitted into different adsorption isotherms and found to fit well with Langmuir model (indicating that dye molecules form monolayer coverage on activated carbon) with a maximum monolayer adsorption capability of 189.83mg/g, whereas the adsorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics. PMID:26512858

  19. On the origin of enhanced electrochemical behavior of oxidized activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Rui; Li, Haibo; Ma, Yulong

    2016-08-01

    The amount of ions stored within the electrochemical double layer is dominantly determined by the surface area of porous electrode. High surface area indicates high capacitance. However, this is not the case when the pore is extremely small, ∼less than 1 nm. To observe this phenomenon, we have carried out an experiment by comparatively investigating the electrochemical performance of activated carbon (AC) and sulfuric acid treated AC (SAC). The results show that the electrochemical performance of SAC involving the specific capacitance, rate capability and cycling stability is significantly increased as compared to pristine AC. These are attributed to the improved porosity by differentiating the respective contributions of electrochemical double layer capacity and pseudo-capacity from SAC and AC, respectively.

  20. Treatment of soil eluate containing nitro aromatic compounds by adsorption on activated coke (AC).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiping; Jiang, Zhenming; Zhao, Quanlin; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Su, Hongping; Gao, Xuewen; Ye, Zhengfang

    2016-01-01

    Soil washing is a kind of physical method to remove organic matters from contaminated soil. However, its eluate after washing may result in secondary pollution to the environment. In this study, activated coke (AC) was used to remove organic pollutants from contaminated soil eluate. The effect of temperature, initial chemical oxygen demand (COD) and AC dosage on COD removal efficiency was investigated. The results showed that the organic matter can be removed in the eluate because the COD dropped a lot. When the AC dosage was 20 g·L(-1), 88.92% of COD decreased after 480 min of adsorption at 50 °C. The process of adsorption can be described by the Redlich-Peterson isotherm. The adsorption was spontaneous and endothermic. The pseudo-second-order model can be used to describe the adsorption process. After adsorption, the acute toxicity of the eluate was reduced by 76%, and the water qualities were in agreement with Chinese discharge standard GB 14470.1-2002, which means the eluate could be discharged to the environment. PMID:27003071

  1. Treatment of soil eluate containing nitro aromatic compounds by adsorption on activated coke (AC).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiping; Jiang, Zhenming; Zhao, Quanlin; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Su, Hongping; Gao, Xuewen; Ye, Zhengfang

    2016-01-01

    Soil washing is a kind of physical method to remove organic matters from contaminated soil. However, its eluate after washing may result in secondary pollution to the environment. In this study, activated coke (AC) was used to remove organic pollutants from contaminated soil eluate. The effect of temperature, initial chemical oxygen demand (COD) and AC dosage on COD removal efficiency was investigated. The results showed that the organic matter can be removed in the eluate because the COD dropped a lot. When the AC dosage was 20 g·L(-1), 88.92% of COD decreased after 480 min of adsorption at 50 °C. The process of adsorption can be described by the Redlich-Peterson isotherm. The adsorption was spontaneous and endothermic. The pseudo-second-order model can be used to describe the adsorption process. After adsorption, the acute toxicity of the eluate was reduced by 76%, and the water qualities were in agreement with Chinese discharge standard GB 14470.1-2002, which means the eluate could be discharged to the environment.

  2. Mechanism of enhanced nitrate reduction via micro-electrolysis at the powdered zero-valent iron/activated carbon interface.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jinghuan; Song, Guangyu; Liu, Jianyong; Qian, Guangren; Xu, Zhi Ping

    2014-12-01

    Nitrate reduction by zero-valent iron (Fe(0)) powder always works well only at controlled pH lower than 4 due to the formation of iron (hydr)oxides on its surface. Fe(0) powder combined with activated carbon (AC), i.e., Fe(0)/AC micro-electrolysis system, was first introduced to enhance nitrate reduction in aqueous solution. Comparative study was carried out to investigate nitrate reduction by Fe(0)/AC system and Fe(0) under near-neutral conditions, showing that the Fe(0)/AC system successfully reduced nitrate even at initial pH 6 with the reduction efficiency of up to 73%, whereas for Fe(0) only ∼10%. The effect of Fe(0) to AC mass ratio on nitrate reduction efficiency was examined. Easier nitrate reduction was achieved with more contact between Fe(0) and AC as the result of decreasing Fe(0) to AC mass ratio. Ferrous ion and oxidation-reduction potential were measured to understand the mechanism of enhanced nitrate reduction by Fe(0)/AC micro-electrolysis. The results suggest that a relative potential difference drives much more electrons from Fe(0) to AC, thus generating adsorbed atomic hydrogen which makes it possible for nitrate to be reduced at near-neural pH. Fe(0)/AC micro-electrolysis thus presents a great potential for practical application in nitrate wastewater treatment without excessive pH adjustment. PMID:25217726

  3. SORPTION OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY BY ACTIVATED CARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mechanisms and rate of elemental mercury (HgO) capture by activated carbons have been studied using a bench-scale apparatus. Three types of activated carbons, two of which are thermally activated (PC-100 and FGD) and one with elemental sulfur (S) impregnated in it (HGR), were...

  4. Tc-99 Adsorption on Selected Activated Carbons - Batch Testing Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2010-12-01

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently developing a 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system as the remedial action selected under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision for Operable Unit (OU) 200-ZP-1. This report documents the results of treatability tests Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers conducted to quantify the ability of selected activated carbon products (or carbons) to adsorb technetium-99 (Tc-99) from 200-West Area groundwater. The Tc-99 adsorption performance of seven activated carbons (J177601 Calgon Fitrasorb 400, J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, J177612 Norit GAC830, J177613 Norit GAC830, and J177617 Nucon LW1230) were evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36. Four of the best performing carbons (J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, and J177613 Norit GAC830) were selected for batch isotherm testing. The batch isotherm tests on four of the selected carbons indicated that under lower nitrate concentration conditions (382 mg/L), Kd values ranged from 6,000 to 20,000 mL/g. In comparison. Under higher nitrate (750 mg/L) conditions, there was a measureable decrease in Tc-99 adsorption with Kd values ranging from 3,000 to 7,000 mL/g. The adsorption data fit both the Langmuir and the Freundlich equations. Supplemental tests were conducted using the two carbons that demonstrated the highest adsorption capacity to resolve the issue of the best fit isotherm. These tests indicated that Langmuir isotherms provided the best fit for Tc-99 adsorption under low nitrate concentration conditions. At the design basis concentration of Tc 0.865 µg/L(14,700 pCi/L), the predicted Kd values from using Langmuir isotherm constants were 5,980 mL/g and 6,870 mL/g for for the two carbons. These Kd values did not meet the target Kd value of 9,000 mL/g. Tests

  5. Bioturbation and dissolved organic matter enhance contaminant fluxes from sediment treated with powdered and granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Kupryianchyk, D; Noori, A; Rakowska, M I; Grotenhuis, J T C; Koelmans, A A

    2013-05-21

    Sediment amendment with activated carbon (AC) is a promising technique for in situ sediment remediation. To date it is not clear whether this technique sufficiently reduces sediment-to-water fluxes of sediment-bound hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) in the presence of bioturbators. Here, we report polychlorobiphenyl (PCB) pore water concentrations, fluxes, mass transfer coefficients, and survival data of two benthic species, for four treatments: no AC addition (control), powdered AC addition, granular AC addition and addition and subsequent removal of GAC (sediment stripping). AC addition decreased mass fluxes but increased apparent mass transfer coefficients because of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) facilitated transport across the benthic boundary layer (BBL). In turn, DOC concentrations depended on bioturbator activity which was high for the PAC tolerant species Asellus aquaticus and low for AC sensitive species Lumbriculus variegatus. A dual BBL resistance model combining AC effects on gradients, DOC facilitated transport and biodiffusion was evaluated against the data and showed how the type of resistance differs with treatment and chemical hydrophobicity. Data and simulations illustrate the complex interplay between AC and contaminant toxicity to benthic organisms and how differences in species tolerance affect mass fluxes from sediment to the water column. PMID:23590290

  6. Wastewater treatment--adsorption of organic micropollutants on activated HTC-carbon derived from sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Kirschhöfer, Frank; Sahin, Olga; Becker, Gero C; Meffert, Florian; Nusser, Michael; Anderer, Gilbert; Kusche, Stepan; Klaeusli, Thomas; Kruse, Andrea; Brenner-Weiss, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Organic micropollutants (MPs), in particular xenobiotics and their transformation products, have been detected in the aquatic environment and the main sources of these MPs are wastewater treatment plants. Therefore, an additional cleaning step is necessary. The use of activated carbon (AC) is one approach to providing this additional cleaning. Industrial AC derived from different carbonaceous materials is predominantly produced in low-income countries by polluting processes. In contrast, AC derived from sewage sludge by hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a regional and sustainable alternative, based on waste material. Our experiments demonstrate that the HTC-AC from sewage sludge was able to remove most of the applied MPs. In fact more than 50% of sulfamethoxazole, diclofenac and bezafibrate were removed from artificial water samples. With the same approach carbamazepine was eliminated to nearly 70% and atrazine more than 80%. In addition a pre-treated (phosphorus-reduced) HTC-AC was able to eliminate 80% of carbamazepine and diclofenac. Atrazine, sulfamethoxazole and bezafibrate were removed to more than 90%. Experiments using real wastewater samples with high organic content (11.1 g m(-3)) succeeded in proving the adsorption capability of phosphorus-reduced HTC-AC. PMID:26877044

  7. Wastewater treatment--adsorption of organic micropollutants on activated HTC-carbon derived from sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Kirschhöfer, Frank; Sahin, Olga; Becker, Gero C; Meffert, Florian; Nusser, Michael; Anderer, Gilbert; Kusche, Stepan; Klaeusli, Thomas; Kruse, Andrea; Brenner-Weiss, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Organic micropollutants (MPs), in particular xenobiotics and their transformation products, have been detected in the aquatic environment and the main sources of these MPs are wastewater treatment plants. Therefore, an additional cleaning step is necessary. The use of activated carbon (AC) is one approach to providing this additional cleaning. Industrial AC derived from different carbonaceous materials is predominantly produced in low-income countries by polluting processes. In contrast, AC derived from sewage sludge by hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a regional and sustainable alternative, based on waste material. Our experiments demonstrate that the HTC-AC from sewage sludge was able to remove most of the applied MPs. In fact more than 50% of sulfamethoxazole, diclofenac and bezafibrate were removed from artificial water samples. With the same approach carbamazepine was eliminated to nearly 70% and atrazine more than 80%. In addition a pre-treated (phosphorus-reduced) HTC-AC was able to eliminate 80% of carbamazepine and diclofenac. Atrazine, sulfamethoxazole and bezafibrate were removed to more than 90%. Experiments using real wastewater samples with high organic content (11.1 g m(-3)) succeeded in proving the adsorption capability of phosphorus-reduced HTC-AC.

  8. Environmental impact associated with activated carbon preparation from olive-waste cake via life cycle assessment.

    PubMed

    Hjaila, K; Baccar, R; Sarrà, M; Gasol, C M; Blánquez, P

    2013-11-30

    The life cycle assessment (LCA) environmental tool was implemented to quantify the potential environmental impacts associated with the activated carbon (AC) production process from olive-waste cakes in Tunisia. On the basis of laboratory investigations for AC preparation, a flowchart was developed and the environmental impacts were determined. The LCA functional unit chosen was the production of 1 kg of AC from by-product olive-waste cakes. The results showed that impregnation using H3PO4 presented the highest environmental impacts for the majority of the indicators tested: acidification potential (62%), eutrophication (96%), ozone depletion potential (44%), human toxicity (64%), fresh water aquatic ecotoxicity (90%) and terrestrial ecotoxicity (92%). One of the highest impacts was found to be the global warming potential (11.096 kg CO2 eq/kg AC), which was equally weighted between the steps involving impregnation, pyrolysis, and drying the washed AC. The cumulative energy demand of the AC production process from the by-product olive-waste cakes was 167.63 MJ contributed by impregnation, pyrolysis, and drying the washed AC steps. The use of phosphoric acid and electricity in the AC production were the main factors responsible for the majority of the impacts. If certain modifications are incorporated into the AC production, such as implementing synthesis gas recovery and reusing it as an energy source and recovery of phosphoric acid after AC washing, additional savings could be realized, and environmental impacts could be minimized. PMID:24091159

  9. Remediation of contaminated marine sediment using thin-layer capping with activated carbon--a field experiment in Trondheim harbor, Norway.

    PubMed

    Cornelissen, Gerard; Kruså, Marie Elmquist; Breedveld, Gijs D; Eek, Espen; Oen, Amy M P; Arp, Hans Peter H; Raymond, Caroline; Samuelsson, Göran; Hedman, Jenny E; Stokland, Øystein; Gunnarsson, Jonas S

    2011-07-15

    In situ amendment of contaminated sediments using activated carbon (AC) is a recent remediation technique, where the strong sorption of contaminants to added AC reduces their release from sediments and uptake into organisms. The current study describes a marine underwater field pilot study in Trondheim harbor, Norway, in which powdered AC alone or in combination with sand or clay was tested as a thin-layer capping material for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated sediment. Several novel elements were included, such as measuring PAH fluxes, no active mixing of AC into the sediment, and the testing of new manners of placing a thin AC cap on sediment, such as AC+clay and AC+sand combinations. Innovative chemical and biological monitoring methods were deployed to test capping effectiveness. In situ sediment-to-water PAH fluxes were measured using recently developed benthic flux chambers. Compared to the reference field, AC capping reduced fluxes by a factor of 2-10. Pore water PAH concentration profiles were measured in situ using a new passive sampler technique, and yielded a reduction factor of 2-3 compared to the reference field. The benthic macrofauna composition and biodiversity were affected by the AC amendments, AC + clay having a lower impact on the benthic taxa than AC-only or AC + sand. In addition, AC + clay gave the highest AC recoveries (60% vs 30% for AC-only and AC + sand) and strongest reductions in sediment-to-water PAH fluxes and porewater concentrations. Thus, application of an AC-clay mixture is recommended as the optimal choice of the currently tested thin-layer capping methods for PAHs, and more research on optimizing its implementation is needed. PMID:21671651

  10. Magnetic properties and adsorptive performance of manganese-zinc ferrites/activated carbon nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B. B.; Xu, J. C.; Xin, P. H.; Han, Y. B.; Hong, B.; Jin, H. X.; Jin, D. F.; Peng, X. L.; Li, J.; Gong, J.; Ge, H. L.; Zhu, Z. W.; Wang, X. Q.

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the unique microstructure and high specific surface area, activated carbon (AC) could act as an excellent adsorbent for wastewater treatment and good carrier for functional materials. In this paper, manganese-zinc ferrites (Mn0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4: MZF) were anchored into AC by hydrothermal method, resulting in the excellent magnetic response for AC nanocomposites in wastewater treatment. All results demonstrated the magnetic nanoparticles presented a spinel phase structure and existed in the pores of AC. The saturation magnetization (Ms) of MZF/AC nanocomposites increased with the ferrites content, while the pore volume and specific surface area declined. The Sample-5 possessed the specific surface area of 1129 m2 g-1 (close to 1243 m2 g-1 of AC) and Ms of 3.96 emu g-1. Furthermore, the adsorptive performance for organic dyes was studied and 99% methylene blue was adsorbed in 30 min. The magnetic AC nanocomposites could be separated easily from solution by magnetic separation technique.

  11. In situ treatment with activated carbon reduces bioaccumulation in aquatic food chains.

    PubMed

    Kupryianchyk, D; Rakowska, M I; Roessink, I; Reichman, E P; Grotenhuis, J T C; Koelmans, A A

    2013-05-01

    In situ activated carbon (AC) amendment is a new direction in contaminated sediment management, yet its effectiveness and safety have never been tested on the level of entire food chains including fish. Here we tested the effects of three different AC treatments on hydrophobic organic chemical (HOC) concentrations in pore water, benthic invertebrates, zooplankton, and fish (Leuciscus idus melanotus). AC treatments were mixing with powdered AC (PAC), mixing with granular AC (GAC), and addition-removal of GAC (sediment stripping). The AC treatments resulted in a significant decrease in HOC concentrations in pore water, benthic invertebrates, zooplankton, macrophytes, and fish. In 6 months, PAC treatment caused a reduction of accumulation of polychlorobiphenyls (PCB) in fish by a factor of 20, bringing pollutant levels below toxic thresholds. All AC treatments supported growth of fish, but growth was inhibited in the PAC treatment, which was likely explained by reduced nutrient concentrations, resulting in lower zooplankton (i.e., food) densities for the fish. PAC treatment may be advised for sites where immediate ecosystem protection is required. GAC treatment may be equally effective in the longer term and may be adequate for vulnerable ecosystems where longer-term protection suffices. PMID:23544454

  12. In situ treatment with activated carbon reduces bioaccumulation in aquatic food chains.

    PubMed

    Kupryianchyk, D; Rakowska, M I; Roessink, I; Reichman, E P; Grotenhuis, J T C; Koelmans, A A

    2013-05-01

    In situ activated carbon (AC) amendment is a new direction in contaminated sediment management, yet its effectiveness and safety have never been tested on the level of entire food chains including fish. Here we tested the effects of three different AC treatments on hydrophobic organic chemical (HOC) concentrations in pore water, benthic invertebrates, zooplankton, and fish (Leuciscus idus melanotus). AC treatments were mixing with powdered AC (PAC), mixing with granular AC (GAC), and addition-removal of GAC (sediment stripping). The AC treatments resulted in a significant decrease in HOC concentrations in pore water, benthic invertebrates, zooplankton, macrophytes, and fish. In 6 months, PAC treatment caused a reduction of accumulation of polychlorobiphenyls (PCB) in fish by a factor of 20, bringing pollutant levels below toxic thresholds. All AC treatments supported growth of fish, but growth was inhibited in the PAC treatment, which was likely explained by reduced nutrient concentrations, resulting in lower zooplankton (i.e., food) densities for the fish. PAC treatment may be advised for sites where immediate ecosystem protection is required. GAC treatment may be equally effective in the longer term and may be adequate for vulnerable ecosystems where longer-term protection suffices.

  13. Magnetic properties and adsorptive performance of manganese–zinc ferrites/activated carbon nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, B.B.; Xu, J.C.; Xin, P.H.; Han, Y.B.; Hong, B.; Jin, H.X.; Jin, D.F.; Peng, X.L.; Li, J.; Gong, J.; Ge, H.L.; Zhu, Z.W.; Wang, X.Q.

    2015-01-15

    Owing to the unique microstructure and high specific surface area, activated carbon (AC) could act as an excellent adsorbent for wastewater treatment and good carrier for functional materials. In this paper, manganese–zinc ferrites (Mn{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}: MZF) were anchored into AC by hydrothermal method, resulting in the excellent magnetic response for AC nanocomposites in wastewater treatment. All results demonstrated the magnetic nanoparticles presented a spinel phase structure and existed in the pores of AC. The saturation magnetization (Ms) of MZF/AC nanocomposites increased with the ferrites content, while the pore volume and specific surface area declined. The Sample-5 possessed the specific surface area of 1129 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} (close to 1243 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} of AC) and Ms of 3.96 emu g{sup −1}. Furthermore, the adsorptive performance for organic dyes was studied and 99% methylene blue was adsorbed in 30 min. The magnetic AC nanocomposites could be separated easily from solution by magnetic separation technique. - Graphical abstract: The Sample-5 presented both good magnetic response and high BET surface area up to 1129 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} (close to AC of 1243 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}), which could be separated completely for about 60 s. MZF/AC nanocomposites (Sample-3, 4, 5) in our work could be used as the magnetic absorbents, which could be separated easily by an outer magnet after the MB adsorption. - Highlights: • Mn{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (MZF) as few as possible was implanted into activated carbon (AC) for the higher surface area. • Sample-5 possessed the high specific surface area (1129 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}) and the suitable Ms (3.96 emu g{sup −1}). • Methylene blue was adsorbed almost completely by MZF/AC nanocomposites in 30 min. • MZF/AC nanocomposites were separated easily from solution by magnetic separation technique.

  14. [Study on influence between activated carbon property and immobilized biological activated carbon purification effect].

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-zhi; Li, Wei-guang; He, Wen-jie; Han, Hong-da; Ding, Chi; Ma, Xiao-na; Qu, Yan-ming

    2006-10-01

    By means of immobilizing five kinds of activated carbon, we studied the influence between the chief activated carbon property items and immobilized bioactivated carbon (IBAC) purification effect with the correlation analysis. The result shows that the activated carbon property items which the correlation coefficient is up 0.7 include molasses, abrasion number, hardness, tannin, uniform coefficient, mean particle diameter and effective particle diameter; the activated carbon property items which the correlation coefficient is up 0.5 include pH, iodine, butane and tetrachloride. In succession, the partial correlation analysis shows that activated carbon property items mostly influencing on IBAC purification effect include molasses, hardness, abrasion number, uniform coefficient, mean particle diameter and effective particle diameter. The causation of these property items bringing influence on IBAC purification is that the activated carbon holes distribution (representative activated carbon property item is molasses) provides inhabitable location and adjust food for the dominance bacteria; the mechanical resist-crash property of activated carbon (representative activated carbon property items: abrasion number and hardness) have influence on the stability of biofilm; and the particle diameter size and distribution of activated carbon (representative activated carbon property items: uniform coefficient, mean particle diameter and effective particle diameter) can directly affect the force of water in IBAC filter bed, which brings influence on the dominance bacteria immobilizing on activated carbon.

  15. Evaluation of activated carbon respirator filter effectiveness by concentration mapping of dimethyl methylphosphonate.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Brendan L; Billingsley, Brit G; Logue, Brian A

    2014-01-01

    Activated carbon (AC) has been used extensively in personal protective equipment (PPE) to adsorb toxic substances for the purpose of protecting the user from exposure. The ability to evaluate localized carbon utilization in multiple PPE designs would help engineers develop more effective PPE. Therefore, a method to map dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), a common PPE testing agent, concentrations throughout AC filters was developed and tested on DMMP-exposed filters, some purposefully occluded to simulate defective filters. DMMP concentrations were highest at the point of entry and dispersed outward in a radial pattern from that site, decreasing with distance from the point of exposure. Occluded filters were detected by observing DMMP adsorption inconsistent with unblocked filters and showed high concentrations of DMMP localized in unblocked areas of the filter. The DMMP mapping technique detailed in this study provides a tool for testing AC utilization inside DMMP-exposed PPE. PMID:24517267

  16. [Removal of arsenite from drinking water by activated carbon supported nano zero-valent iron].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hui-Jie; Jia, Yong-Feng; Wu, Xing; Wang, He

    2009-06-15

    Nano zero-valent iron was loaded onto activated carbon by deoxidizing Fe2+ in aqueous solution and approximately 8.2% (wt) of iron was loaded it. The size of the needle-shaped iron particles in the pores of carbon was (30-500) x (1 000-3 000) nm. The adsorption capacity for arsenic was approximately 1.997 mg/g activated carbon supported nano zero-valent iron (NZVI/AC) in the 2 mg/L As(III) solution at pH 6.5 and (25 +/- 2) degrees C. The uptake of arsenic by NZVI/AC was rapid in the first 12 h (94.3%) and equilibrium was achieved at 72 h (99.86%). As(III) was partly oxidized by the absorbent in the process of absorption. The presence of phosphate and silicate ions significantly decreased arsenic removal rate while the effect of other common ions such as sulfate, carbonate and oxalate was insignificant. NZVI/AC was effectively regenerated after adsorption of arsenic when elution was applied with 0.1 mol/L NaOH solution. The results suggest that NZVI/AC is an ideal candidate for the treatment of arsenic contaminated drinking water.

  17. Comparative study on composition, structure, and adsorption behavior of activated carbons derived from different synthetic waste polymers.

    PubMed

    Lian, Fei; Xing, Baoshan; Zhu, Lingyan

    2011-08-15

    The composition, structure, and adsorption behavior of activated carbons (ACs) derived from three different types of waste polymers, i.e., tire rubber (TR), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and polyethyleneterephtalate (PET), by KOH activation were compared. The AC derived from PET exhibited the largest surface area (2831 m(2)/g) and pore volume (1.68 cm(3)/g) due to the homogenous aromatic composition of PET. The AC derived from PVC exhibited relatively lower surface area (2666 m(2)/g) but more narrowed pore size distribution (2-3 nm). The complex composition and high ash content of tire particles resulted in AC product with significantly lower surface area (398.5 m(2)/g) and heterogeneous pore width. Adsorption data of methylene blue (MB) were fitted well by Langmuir equation, indicating monolayer coverage on the ACs. The high oxygen content of PET-derived AC heavily affected its adsorption to MB and iodine. Due to the remarkable surface area and highly mesoporous structures, ACs based on both PET and PVC exhibited much higher adsorption capacities than that of TR and commercial coal-based AC (F400). This study demonstrates that the properties of ACs are highly dependent on their starting polymers and the potential of converting synthetic polymer waste into effective adsorbents for environmental remediation and cleanup.

  18. Ultrasound-assisted adsorption of 4-dodecylbenzene sulfonate from aqueous solutions by corn cob activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Milenković, D D; Bojić, A Lj; Veljković, V B

    2013-05-01

    This study was aimed at removal of 4-dodecylbenzene sulfonate (DBS) ions from aqueous solutions by ultrasound-assisted adsorption onto the carbonized corn cob (AC). The main attention was focused on modeling the equilibrium and kinetics of adsorption of DBS onto the AC. The AC was prepared from ground dried corn cob by carbonization and activation by carbon dioxide at 880°C for 2h in a rotary furnace. The adsorption isotherm data were fitted by the Langmuir model in both the absence and the presence of ultrasound (US). The maximum adsorption capacities of the adsorbent for DBS, calculated from the Langmuir isotherms, were 29.41mg/g and 27.78mg/g in the presence of US and its absence, respectively. The adsorption process in the absence and the presence of US obeyed the pseudo second-order kinetics. The intraparticular diffusion model indicated that the adsorption of DBS ions on the AC was diffusion controlled as well as that US promoted intraparticular diffusion. The ΔG° values, -24.03kJ/mol, -25.78kJ/mol and -27.78kJ/mol, were negative at all operating temperatures, verifying that the adsorption of DBS ions was spontaneous and thermodynamically favorable. The positive value of ΔS°=187J/molK indicated the increased randomness at the adsorbent-adsorbate interface during the adsorption of DBS ions by the AC. PMID:23187067

  19. Reactions of ultrathin hard amorphous carbon (a-C) films under microbeam laser processing

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Lihong; Gong Hao; Li Yuanqing; Wang Jianping

    2004-11-01

    The decomposition mechanism of hard a-C films under irradiation using a microbeam laser (514.5 nm) was studied. The films were magnetron sputtered at different pressures to achieve different degrees of sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} bonding ratio. Under laser irradiation, they showed graphitization and decomposition. The graphitization saturated at early exposure of {approx}4 min, while the decomposition progressed exponentially with the exposure time, following a first-order reaction mechanism. The decomposition of a-C films under laser irradiation can be modeled using a two-step process with the establishment of a quasi steady-state intermediate. The relative energy barrier and rate constant for film decomposition were calculated. With increasing sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} bonding ratio, the films showed increasing resistance against the irradiation-induced changes. This is shown by the decreasing rate constant and increasing energy barrier during the decomposition.

  20. Activated carbons derived from coconut shells as high energy density cathode material for Li-ion capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Akshay; Aravindan, Vanchiappan; Jayaraman, Sundaramurthy; Kumar, Palaniswamy Suresh; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Madhavi, Srinivasan; Srinivasan, M. P.

    2013-10-01

    In this manuscript, a dramatic increase in the energy density of ~ 69 Wh kg-1 and an extraordinary cycleability ~ 2000 cycles of the Li-ion hybrid electrochemical capacitors (Li-HEC) is achieved by employing tailored activated carbon (AC) of ~ 60% mesoporosity derived from coconut shells (CS). The AC is obtained by both physical and chemical hydrothermal carbonization activation process, and compared to the commercial AC powders (CAC) in terms of the supercapacitance performance in single electrode configuration vs. Li. The Li-HEC is fabricated with commercially available Li4Ti5O12 anode and the coconut shell derived AC as cathode in non-aqueous medium. The present research provides a new routine for the development of high energy density Li-HEC that employs a mesoporous carbonaceous electrode derived from bio-mass precursors.

  1. Activated carbons derived from coconut shells as high energy density cathode material for Li-ion capacitors

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Akshay; Aravindan, Vanchiappan; Jayaraman, Sundaramurthy; Kumar, Palaniswamy Suresh; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Madhavi, Srinivasan; Srinivasan, M. P.

    2013-01-01

    In this manuscript, a dramatic increase in the energy density of ~ 69 Wh kg−1 and an extraordinary cycleability ~ 2000 cycles of the Li-ion hybrid electrochemical capacitors (Li-HEC) is achieved by employing tailored activated carbon (AC) of ~ 60% mesoporosity derived from coconut shells (CS). The AC is obtained by both physical and chemical hydrothermal carbonization activation process, and compared to the commercial AC powders (CAC) in terms of the supercapacitance performance in single electrode configuration vs. Li. The Li-HEC is fabricated with commercially available Li4Ti5O12 anode and the coconut shell derived AC as cathode in non-aqueous medium. The present research provides a new routine for the development of high energy density Li-HEC that employs a mesoporous carbonaceous electrode derived from bio-mass precursors. PMID:24141527

  2. Activated carbons derived from coconut shells as high energy density cathode material for Li-ion capacitors.

    PubMed

    Jain, Akshay; Aravindan, Vanchiappan; Jayaraman, Sundaramurthy; Kumar, Palaniswamy Suresh; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Madhavi, Srinivasan; Srinivasan, M P

    2013-10-21

    In this manuscript, a dramatic increase in the energy density of ~ 69 Wh kg⁻¹ and an extraordinary cycleability ~ 2000 cycles of the Li-ion hybrid electrochemical capacitors (Li-HEC) is achieved by employing tailored activated carbon (AC) of ~ 60% mesoporosity derived from coconut shells (CS). The AC is obtained by both physical and chemical hydrothermal carbonization activation process, and compared to the commercial AC powders (CAC) in terms of the supercapacitance performance in single electrode configuration vs. Li. The Li-HEC is fabricated with commercially available Li₄Ti₅O₁₂ anode and the coconut shell derived AC as cathode in non-aqueous medium. The present research provides a new routine for the development of high energy density Li-HEC that employs a mesoporous carbonaceous electrode derived from bio-mass precursors.

  3. Enhanced Oxygen and Hydroxide Transport in a Cathode Interface by Efficient Antibacterial Property of a Silver Nanoparticle-Modified, Activated Carbon Cathode in Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Da; Qu, Youpeng; Liu, Jia; Liu, Guohong; Zhang, Jie; Feng, Yujie

    2016-08-17

    A biofilm growing on an air cathode is responsible for the decreased performance of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). For the undesired biofilm to be minimized, silver nanoparticles were synthesized on activated carbon as the cathodic catalyst (Ag/AC) in MFCs. Ag/AC enhanced maximum power density by 14.6% compared to that of a bare activated carbon cathode (AC) due to the additional silver catalysis. After operating MFCs over five months, protein content on the Ag/AC cathode was only 38.3% of that on the AC cathode, which resulted in a higher oxygen concentration diffusing through the Ag/AC cathode. In addition, a lower pH increment (0.2 units) was obtained near the Ag/AC catalyst surface after biofouling compared to 0.8 units of the AC cathode, indicating that less biofilm on the Ag/AC cathode had a minor resistance on hydroxide transported from the catalyst layer interfaces to the bulk solution. Therefore, less decrements of the Ag/AC activity and MFC performance were obtained. This result indicated that accelerated transport of oxygen and hydroxide, benefitting from the antibacterial property of the cathode, could efficiently maintain higher cathode stability during long-term operation. PMID:27441786

  4. [Preparation, characterization and adsorption performance of mesoporous activated carbon with acidic groups].

    PubMed

    Li, Kun-Quan; Li, Ye; Zheng, Zheng; Zhang, Yu-Xuan

    2013-06-01

    Mesoporous activated carbons containing acidic groups were prepared with cotton stalk based fiber as raw materials and H3PO4 as activating agent by one step carbonization method. Effects of impregnation ratio, carbonization temperature and heat preservation time on the yield, elemental composition, oxygen-containing acid functional groups and adsorptive capacity of activated carbon were studied. The adsorption capacity of the prepared activated carbon AC-01 for p-nitroaniline and Pb(II) was studied, and the adsorption mechanism was also suggested according to the equilibrium experimental results. The maximum yield of activated carbons prepared from cotton stalk fiber reached 35.5% when the maximum mesoporous volume and BET surface area were 1.39 cm3 x g(-1) and 1 731 m2 x g(-1), respectively. The activated carbon AC-01 prepared under a H3 PO4/precursor ratio of 3:2 and activated at 900 degrees C for 90 min had a total pore volume of 1.02 cm3 x g(-1), a micoporous ratio of 31%, and a mesoporous ratio of 65%. The pore diameter of the mesoporous activated carbon was mainly distributed in the range of 2-5 nm. The Langmuir maximum adsorption capacities of Pb(II) and p-nitroaniline on cotton stalk fiber activated carbon were 123 mg x g(-1) and 427 mg x g(-1), respectively, which were both higher than those for commercial activated carbon fiber ACF-CK. The equilibrium adsorption experimental data showed that mesopore and oxygen-containing acid functional groups played an important role in the adsorption. PMID:23947073

  5. Carbon Nanotube-Based Supercapacitors with Excellent ac Line Filtering and Rate Capability via Improved Interfacial Impedance.

    PubMed

    Rangom, Yverick; Tang, Xiaowu Shirley; Nazar, Linda F

    2015-07-28

    We report the fabrication of high-performance, self-standing composite sp(2)-carbon supercapacitor electrodes using single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as conductive binder. The 3-D mesoporous mesh architecture of CNT-based composite electrodes grants unimpaired ionic transport throughout relatively thick films and allows superior performance compared to graphene-based devices at an ac line frequency of 120 Hz. Metrics of 601 μF/cm(2) with a -81° phase angle and a rate capability (RC) time constant of 199 μs are obtained for thin carbon films. The free-standing carbon films were obtained from a chlorosulfonic acid dispersion and interfaced to stainless steel current collectors with various surface treatments. CNT electrodes were able to cycle at 200 V/s and beyond, still showing a characteristic parallelepipedic cyclic votammetry shape at 1 kV/s. Current densities are measured in excess of 6400 A/g, and the electrodes retain more than 98% capacity after 1 million cycles. These promising results are attributed to a reduction of series resistance in the film through the CNT conductive network and especially to the surface treatment of the stainless steel current collector. PMID:26046685

  6. Carbon Nanotube-Based Supercapacitors with Excellent ac Line Filtering and Rate Capability via Improved Interfacial Impedance.

    PubMed

    Rangom, Yverick; Tang, Xiaowu Shirley; Nazar, Linda F

    2015-07-28

    We report the fabrication of high-performance, self-standing composite sp(2)-carbon supercapacitor electrodes using single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as conductive binder. The 3-D mesoporous mesh architecture of CNT-based composite electrodes grants unimpaired ionic transport throughout relatively thick films and allows superior performance compared to graphene-based devices at an ac line frequency of 120 Hz. Metrics of 601 μF/cm(2) with a -81° phase angle and a rate capability (RC) time constant of 199 μs are obtained for thin carbon films. The free-standing carbon films were obtained from a chlorosulfonic acid dispersion and interfaced to stainless steel current collectors with various surface treatments. CNT electrodes were able to cycle at 200 V/s and beyond, still showing a characteristic parallelepipedic cyclic votammetry shape at 1 kV/s. Current densities are measured in excess of 6400 A/g, and the electrodes retain more than 98% capacity after 1 million cycles. These promising results are attributed to a reduction of series resistance in the film through the CNT conductive network and especially to the surface treatment of the stainless steel current collector.

  7. Preparation of activated carbon by chemical activation under vacuum.

    PubMed

    Juan, Yang; Ke-Qiang, Qiu

    2009-05-01

    Activated carbons especially used for gaseous adsorption were prepared from Chinesefir sawdust by zinc chloride activation under vacuum condition. The micropore structure, adsorption properties, and surface morphology of activated carbons obtained under atmosphere and vacuum were investigated. The prepared activated carbons were characterized by SEM, FTIR, and nitrogen adsorption. It was found that the structure of the starting material is kept after activation. The activated carbon prepared under vacuum exhibited higher values of the BET surface area (up to 1079 m2 g(-1)) and total pore volume (up to 0.5665 cm3 g(-1)) than those of the activated carbon obtained under atmosphere. This was attributed to the effect of vacuum condition that reduces oxygen in the system and limits the secondary reaction of the organic vapor. The prepared activated carbon has well-developed microstructure and high microporosity. According to the data obtained, Chinese fir sawdust is a suitable precursor for activated carbon preparation. The obtained activated carbon could be used as a low-cost adsorbent with favorable surface properties. Compared with the traditional chemical activation, vacuum condition demands less energy consumption, simultaneity, and biomass-oil is collected in the procedure more conveniently. FTIR analysis showed that heat treatment would result in the aromatization of the carbon structure. PMID:19534162

  8. Biocontrol activity of Paenibacillus polymyxa AC-1 against Pseudomonas syringae and its interaction with Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chi Eun; Kwon, Suk Yoon; Park, Jeong Mee

    2016-04-01

    Paenibacillus polymyxa AC-1 (AC-1) is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) that has been used as a soil inoculant for biocontrol of plant pathogenic fungi and to promote plant growth. In this study, we examine the effects of AC-1 on the bacterial phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae and internal colonization of AC-1 by counting bacterial populations that colonize plants. AC-1 inhibited the growth of both P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst) and P. syringae pv. tabaci (Pta) in a concentration-dependent manner in in vitro assays. Upon treatment of AC-1 dropping at root tip of axenically grown Arabidopsis, we found that most of the AC-1 was detected in interior of leaves of Arabidiopsis plants rather than roots after 5 days post infection, indicating systemic spreading of AC-1 occur. We examined further AC-1 colonization patterns in Arabidopsis mutants deficient in phytohormone signaling pathways. These results indicated that abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathways positively and negatively contributed, respectively, to AC-1 colonization of leaves, whereas epiphytic accumulation of AC-1 around root tissues was not affected. This study shows that AC-1 is an effective biocontrol agent to suppress P. syringae growth, possibly owing to its colonization patterns as a leaf-inhabiting endophyte. The results showed in this work will help to expand our understanding of the mode of action of AC-1 as a biological control agent and consequently, its application in agriculture.

  9. Expression characteristics of CS-ACS1, CS-ACS2 and CS-ACS3, three members of the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase gene family in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) fruit under carbon dioxide stress.

    PubMed

    Mathooko, F M; Mwaniki, M W; Nakatsuka, A; Shiomi, S; Kubo, Y; Inaba, A; Nakamura, R

    1999-02-01

    We investigated the expression pattern of three 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) synthase genes, CS-ACS1, CS-ACS2 and CS-ACS3 in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) fruit under CO2 stress. CO2 stress-induced ethylene production paralleled the accumulation of only CS-ACS1 transcripts which disappeared upon withdrawal of CO2. Cycloheximide inhibited the CO2 stress-induced ethylene production but superinduced the accumulation of CS-ACS1 transcript. At higher concentrations, cycloheximide also induced the accumulation of CS-ACS2 and CS-ACS3 transcripts. In the presence of CO2 and cycloheximide, the accumulation of CS-ACS2 transcript occurred within 1 h, disappeared after 3 h and increased greatly upon withdrawal of CO2. Inhibitors of protein kinase and types 1 and 2A protein phosphatases which inhibited and stimulated, respectively, CO2 stress-induced ethylene production had little effect on the expression of these genes. The results presented here identify CS-ACS1 as the main ACC synthase gene responsible for the increased ethylene biosynthesis in cucumber fruit under CO2 stress and suggest that this gene is a primary response gene and its expression is under negative control since it is expressed by treatment with cycloheximide. The results further suggest that the regulation of CO2 stress-induced ethylene biosynthesis by reversible protein phosphorylation does not result from enhanced ACC synthase transcription. PMID:10202812

  10. Hydrogen storage studies on palladium-doped carbon materials (AC, CB, CNMs) @ metal-organic framework-5.

    PubMed

    Viditha, V; Srilatha, K; Himabindu, V

    2016-05-01

    Metal organic frameworks (MOFs) are a rapidly growing class of porous materials and are considered as best adsorbents for their high surface area and extraordinary porosity. The MOFs are synthesized by using various chemicals like triethylamine, terepthalic acid, zinc acetate dihydrate, chloroform, and dimethylformamide (DMF). Synthesized MOFs are intercalated with palladium/activated carbon, carbon black, and carbon nanomaterials by chemical reduction method for the purpose of enhancing the hydrogen adsorption capacities. We have observed that the palladium doped activated carbon on MOF-5 showed high hydrogen storage capacity. This may be due to the affinity of the palladium toward hydrogen molecule. The samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analysis. We have observed a clear decrease in the BET surface area and pore volume. The obtained results show a better performance for the synthesized sample. To our best knowledge, no one has reported the work on palladium-doped carbon materials (activated carbon, carbon black, carbon nanomaterials) impregnated to the metal-organic framework-5. We have attempted to synthesize carbon nanomaterials using indigenously fabricated chemical vapor deposition (CVD) unit as a support. We have observed an increase in the hydrogen storage capacities.

  11. INVESTIGATION OF FLY ASH AND ACTIVATED CARBON OBTAINED FROM PULVERIZED COAL BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Edward K. Levy; Christopher Kiely

    2005-11-01

    One of the techniques for Hg capture in coal-fired boilers involves injection of activated carbon (AC) into the boiler downstream of the air preheater. Hg is adsorbed onto the AC particles and fly ash, which are then both removed in an electrostatic precipitator or baghouse. This project addresses the issues of Hg on activated carbon and on fly ash from a materials re-use point of view. It also addresses the possible connection between SCR reactors, fly ash properties and Hg capture. The project is determining the feasibility of separating AC from fly ash in a fluidized bed and of regenerating the separated AC by heating the AC to elevated temperatures in a fluidized bed. The temperatures needed to drive off the Hg from the ash in a fluidized bed are also being determined. Finally, samples of fly ash from power plants with SCR reactors for NO{sub x} control, are being analyzed to determine the effect of SCR on the ash.

  12. Investigation of Fly Ash and Activated Carbon Obtained from Pulverized Coal Boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Edward K. Levy; Christopher Kiely; Zheng Yao

    2006-08-31

    One of the techniques for Hg capture in coal-fired boilers involves injection of activated carbon (AC) into the boiler downstream of the air preheater. Hg is adsorbed onto the AC particles and fly ash, which are then both removed in an electrostatic precipitator or baghouse. This project addressed the issues of Hg on activated carbon and on fly ash from a materials re-use point of view. It also addressed the possible connection between SCR reactors, fly ash properties and Hg capture. The project has determined the feasibility of separating AC from fly ash in a fluidized bed and of regenerating the separated AC by heating the AC to elevated temperatures in a fluidized bed. The temperatures needed to drive off the Hg from the ash in a fluidized bed have also been determined. Finally, samples of fly ash from power plants with SCR reactors for NO{sub x} control have been analyzed in an effort to determine the effects of SCR on the ash.

  13. INVESTIGATION OF FLY ASH AND ACTIVATED CARBON OBTAINED FROM PULVERIZED COAL BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Edward K. Levy; Christopher Kiely

    2004-11-01

    One of the techniques for Hg capture in coal-fired boilers involves injection of activated carbon (AC) into the boiler downstream of the air preheater. Hg is adsorbed onto the AC particles and fly ash, which are then both removed in an electrostatic precipitator or baghouse. This project addresses the issues of Hg on activated carbon and on fly ash from a materials re-use point of view. It also addresses the possible connection between SCR reactors, fly ash properties and Hg capture. The project is determining the feasibility of separating AC from fly ash in a fluidized bed and of regenerating the separated AC by heating the AC to elevated temperatures in a fluidized bed. The temperatures needed to drive off the Hg from the ash in a fluidized bed are also being determined. Finally, samples of fly ash from power plants with SCR reactors for NO{sub x} control, are being analyzed to determine the effect of SCR on the ash. These analyses will also determine the properties of ash which are important for Hg capture.

  14. Reduction of COD in refinery wastewater through adsorption on date-pit activated carbon.

    PubMed

    El-Naas, Muftah H; Al-Zuhair, Sulaiman; Abu Alhaija, Manal

    2010-01-15

    Experiments were carried out to evaluate the batch adsorption of COD from petroleum refinery wastewater on a locally prepared date-pit activated carbon (DP-AC), and its adsorption effectiveness was compared to that of commercially available BDH activated carbon (BDH-AC). Adsorption equilibrium and kinetic data were determined for both adsorbents and fitted to several adsorption isotherm and kinetics models, respectively. The Langmuir monolayer isotherm fitted well the equilibrium data of COD on both adsorbents; whereas, the kinetics data were best fitted by the pseudo-second order model. Modeling of the controlling mechanisms indicated that both intrinsic kinetics and mass transfer contributed to controlling the adsorption process. Mass transfer seemed to be the dominant mechanism at low COD content, while intrinsic kinetics dominates at high concentrations. In general, the adsorption effectiveness of locally prepared DP-AC was proven to be comparable to that of BDH-AC. Therefore, DP-AC can be utilized as an effective and less expensive adsorbent for the reduction of COD in refinery wastewater.

  15. Enhancing the adsorption of ionic liquids onto activated carbon by the addition of inorganic salts

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Catarina M. S. S.; Lemus, Jesús; Freire, Mara G.; Palomar, Jose; Coutinho, João A. P.

    2014-01-01

    Most ionic liquids (ILs) are either water soluble or present a non-negligible miscibility with water that may cause some harmful effects upon their release into the environment. Among other methods, adsorption of ILs onto activated carbon (AC) has shown to be an effective technique to remove these compounds from aqueous solutions. However, this method has proved to be viable only for hydrophobic ILs rather than for the hydrophilic that, being water soluble, have a larger tendency for contamination. In this context, an alternative approach using the salting-out ability of inorganic salts is here proposed to enhance the adsorption of hydrophilic ILs onto activated carbon. The effect of the concentrations of Na2SO4 on the adsorption of five ILs onto AC was investigated. A wide range of ILs that allow the inspection of the IL cation family (imidazolium- and pyridinium-based) and the anion nature (accounting for its hydrophilicity and fluorination) through the adsorption onto AC was studied. In general, it is shown that the use of Na2SO4 enhances the adsorption of ILs onto AC. In particular, this effect is highly relevant when dealing with hydrophilic ILs that are those that are actually poorly removed by AC. In addition, the COnductor like Screening MOdel for Real Solvents (COSMO-RS) was used aiming at complementing the experimental data obtained. This work contributes with the development of novel methods to remove ILs from water streams aiming at creating “greener” processes. PMID:25516713

  16. Sorption of boron trifluoride by activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Polevoi, A.S.; Petrenko, A.E.

    1988-01-10

    The sorption of born trifluoride on AG-3, SKT, SKT-3, SKT-7, SKT-4A, SKT-6A, and SKT-2B carbons was investigated. The sorption isotherms for both vapors and gas were determined volumetrically. The coefficients of two equations described the sorption of BF/sub 3/ in the sorption of BF/sub 3/ on active carbons. Heats of sorption of BF/sub 3/ on the activated carbons are shown and the sorption isotherms and temperature dependences of the equilibrium pressure of BF/sub 3/ for activated carbons were presented. The values of the heats of sorption indicated the weak character of the reaction of BF/sub 3/ with the surface of the carbons. The equations can be used for calculating the phase equilibrium of BF/sub 3/ on carbons in a wider range of temperatures and pressures.

  17. Enhancing the adsorption of vapor-phase mercury chloride with an innovative composite sulfur-impregnated activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Ie, Iau-Ren; Chen, Wei-Chin; Yuan, Chung-Shin; Hung, Chung-Hsuang; Lin, Yuan-Chung; Tsai, Hsieh-Hung; Jen, Yi-Shiu

    2012-05-30

    Mercury chloride (HgCl(2)) is the major mercury derivate emitted from municipal solid waste incinerators, which has high risk to the environment and human health. This study investigated the adsorption of vapor-phase HgCl(2) with an innovative composite sulfurized activated carbon (AC), which was derived from the pyrolysis, activation, and sulfurization of waste tires. The composite sulfur-impregnation process impregnated activated carbon with aqueous-phase sodium sulfide (Na(2)S) and followed with vapor-phase elemental sulfur (S(0)). Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was applied to investigate the adsorptive capacity of vapor-phase HgCl(2) using the composite sulfurized AC. The operating parameters included the types of composite sulfurized AC, the adsorption temperature, and the influent HgCl(2) concentration. Experimental results indicated that the sulfur-impregnation process could increase the sulfur content of the sulfurized AC, but decreased its specific surface area. This study further revealed that the composite sulfurized AC impregnated with aqueous-phase Na(2)S and followed with vapor-phase S(0) (Na(2)S+S(0) AC) had much higher saturated adsorptive capacity of HgCl(2) than AC impregnated in the reverse sequence (S(0)+Na(2)S AC). A maximum saturated adsorptive capacity of HgCl(2) up to 5236 μg-HgCl(2)/g-C was observed for the composite Na(2)S+S(0) AC, which was approximately 2.00 and 3.17 times higher than those for the single Na(2)S and S(0) ACs, respectively.

  18. Making Activated Carbon by Wet Pressurized Pyrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, John W.; Pisharody, Suresh; Wignarajah, K.; Moran, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A wet pressurized pyrolysis (wet carbonization) process has been invented as a means of producing activated carbon from a wide variety of inedible biomass consisting principally of plant wastes. The principal intended use of this activated carbon is room-temperature adsorption of pollutant gases from cooled incinerator exhaust streams. Activated carbon is highly porous and has a large surface area. The surface area depends strongly on the raw material and the production process. Coconut shells and bituminous coal are the primary raw materials that, until now, were converted into activated carbon of commercially acceptable quality by use of traditional production processes that involve activation by use of steam or carbon dioxide. In the wet pressurized pyrolysis process, the plant material is subjected to high pressure and temperature in an aqueous medium in the absence of oxygen for a specified amount of time to break carbon-oxygen bonds in the organic material and modify the structure of the material to obtain large surface area. Plant materials that have been used in demonstrations of the process include inedible parts of wheat, rice, potato, soybean, and tomato plants. The raw plant material is ground and mixed with a specified proportion of water. The mixture is placed in a stirred autoclave, wherein it is pyrolized at a temperature between 450 and 590 F (approximately between 230 and 310 C) and a pressure between 1 and 1.4 kpsi (approximately between 7 and 10 MPa) for a time between 5 minutes and 1 hour. The solid fraction remaining after wet carbonization is dried, then activated at a temperature of 500 F (260 C) in nitrogen gas. The activated carbon thus produced is comparable to commercial activated carbon. It can be used to adsorb oxides of sulfur, oxides of nitrogen, and trace amounts of hydrocarbons, any or all of which can be present in flue gas. Alternatively, the dried solid fraction can be used, even without the activation treatment, to absorb

  19. Promoted degradation of perfluorooctanic acid by persulfate when adding activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu-Chi; Lo, Shang-Lien; Kuo, Jeff; Huang, Chin-Pao

    2013-10-15

    Treatment of persistent perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in water using persulfate (PS) oxidation typically requires an elevated temperature or UV irradiation, which is energy-consuming. Under relatively low temperatures of 25-45°C, activated carbon (AC) activated PS oxidation of PFOA was evaluated for its potential of practical applications. With presence of AC in PS oxidation, PFOA removal efficiency at 25°C reached 682% with a high defluorination efficiency of 549% after 12h and few intermediates of short-chain perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs) were found. The removal and defluorination rates with the combined AC/PS system were approximately 12 and 19 times higher than those of the PS-only system, respectively. Activated carbon not only removes PFOA through adsorption, but also activates PS to form sulfate radicals that accelerate the decomposition and mineralization of PFOA. The activation energy for PS oxidation of PFOA was reduced from 668 to 261kJ/mol by the catalytic effect of AC, which implies a lower reaction temperature and a shorter reaction time would suffice. A 2-cycle schematic reaction mechanism was used to describe PS oxidation of PFOA with the generation of various intermediates and end-products.

  20. A key parameter on the adsorption of diluted aniline solutions with activated carbons: The surface oxygen content.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Beatrice; Ferrer, Nabí; Sempere, Julià; Gonzalez-Olmos, Rafael

    2016-11-01

    A total of 11 different commercial activated carbons (AC) with well characterized textural properties and oxygen surface content were tested as adsorbents for the removal of aniline as a target water pollutant. The maximum adsorption capacity of aniline for the studied AC was from 138.9 to 257.9 mg g(-1) at 296.15 K and it was observed to be strongly related to the textural properties of the AC, mainly with the BET surface area and the micropore volume. It was not observed any influence of the oxygen surface content of the AC on the maximum adsorption capacity. However, it was found that at low aniline aqueous concentration, the presence of oxygen surface groups plays a dominant role during the adsorption. A high concentration of oxygen surface groups, mainly carboxylic and phenolic groups, decreases the aniline adsorption regardless of the surface area of the AC. PMID:27497348

  1. A key parameter on the adsorption of diluted aniline solutions with activated carbons: The surface oxygen content.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Beatrice; Ferrer, Nabí; Sempere, Julià; Gonzalez-Olmos, Rafael

    2016-11-01

    A total of 11 different commercial activated carbons (AC) with well characterized textural properties and oxygen surface content were tested as adsorbents for the removal of aniline as a target water pollutant. The maximum adsorption capacity of aniline for the studied AC was from 138.9 to 257.9 mg g(-1) at 296.15 K and it was observed to be strongly related to the textural properties of the AC, mainly with the BET surface area and the micropore volume. It was not observed any influence of the oxygen surface content of the AC on the maximum adsorption capacity. However, it was found that at low aniline aqueous concentration, the presence of oxygen surface groups plays a dominant role during the adsorption. A high concentration of oxygen surface groups, mainly carboxylic and phenolic groups, decreases the aniline adsorption regardless of the surface area of the AC.

  2. Non-Ideal Detonation Properties of Ammonium Nitrate and Activated Carbon Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Atsumi; Echigoya, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Hidefumi; Ogawa, Terushige; Katoh, Katsumi; Kubota, Shiro; Wada, Yuji; Ogata, Yuji

    To obtain a better understanding of detonation properties of ammonium nitrate (AN) and activated carbon (AC) mixtures, steel tube tests with several diameters were carried out for various compositions of powdered AN and AC mixtures and the influence of the charge diameter on the detonation velocity was investigated. The results showed that the detonation velocity increased with the increase of the charge diameter. The experimentally observed values were far below the theoretically predicted values made by the thermodynamic CHEETAH code and they showed so-called non-ideal detonation. The extrapolated detonation velocity of stoichiometric composition to the infinite diameter showed a good agreement with the theoretical value.

  3. An electrochemical double layer capacitor using an activated carbon electrode with gel electrolyte binder

    SciTech Connect

    Osaka, Tetsuya, Liu, X.; Nojima, Masashi; Momma, Toshiyuki

    1999-05-01

    An electric double layer capacitor (EDLC) was prepared with an activated carbon powder electrode with poly(vinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene) (PVdF-HFP) based gel electrolyte. Ethylene carbonate (EC) and propylene carbonate (PC) were used as plasticizer and tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate (TEABF{sub 4}) was used as the supporting electrolyte. An optimized gel electrolyte of PVdF-HFP/PC/EC/TEABF{sub 4} - 23/31/35/11 mass ratio exhibited high ionic conductivity of 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} S/cm, high electrode capacitance, and good mechanical strength. An electrode consisting of activated carbon (AC) with the gel electrolyte as the binder (AC/PVdF-HFP based gel, 7/3 mass ratio) showed a higher specific capacitance and a lower ion diffusion resistance within the electrode than a carbon electrode, prepared with PVdF-HFP binder without plasticizer. This suggests that an electrode mixed with the gel electrolyte has a lower ion diffusion resistance inside the electrode. The highest specific capacitance of 123 F/g was achieved with an electrode containing AC with a specific surface area of 2500 m{sup 2}/g. A coin-type EDLC cell with optimized components showed excellent cycleability exceeding 10{sup 4} cycles with ca. 100% coulombic efficiency achieved when charging and discharging was repeated between 1.0 and 2.5 V at 1.66 mA/cm{sup 2}.

  4. [Removal of arsenate from drinking water by activated carbon supported nano zero-valent iron].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hui-jie; Jia, Yong-feng; Yao, Shu-hu; Wu, Xing; Wang, Shu-ying

    2009-12-01

    A new adsorbent, activated carbon impregnated with nano zero-valent iron was prepared, which size of the needle-shaped iron particles in the pores of carbon was (30-500) nm x (1000-3000) nm and approximately 8.2% of iron was loaded onto it. The arsenate removal percentage was 99.5% by 1.5 g/L NZVI/AC in the 2 mg/L arsenic solution at pH 6.5 and (25 +/- 2) degrees C. The adsorption capacity was about 15.4 mg/g when equilibrium concentration was 1.0 mg/L. Kinetics revealed that uptake of arsenate ion by NZVI/AC was 91.4% in the first 12 h and equilibrium time was about 72 h. The intraparticle diffusion model was applied to study the mechanics of arsenate in the activated carbon. The presence of phosphate and silicate could significantly decrease arsenate removal while the effects of the other anions and cations on the arsenic removal were neglectable. NZVI/AC can be effectively regenerated when elution is done with 0.1 mol/L NaOH solution. Our results suggest that NZVI/AC is a suitable candidate for drinking water treatment due to its high reactivity.

  5. Thermal behaviour of arsenic trioxide adsorbed on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Cuypers, Frederic; De Dobbelaere, Christopher; Hardy, An; Van Bael, Marlies K; Helsen, Lieve

    2009-07-30

    The thermal stability and desorption of arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)) adsorbed on activated carbon (AC) was investigated as this phenomenon is expected to influence the arsenic release during low temperature pyrolysis of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) wood waste. Firstly, a thermogravimetric (TG) experiment with arsenolite, an allotropic form of As(2)O(3), was performed. The sample starts to sublime at temperatures lower than 200 degrees C with a sublimation peak temperature of 271 degrees C. Subsequently, TG experiments with samples of As(2)O(3) adsorbed on AC revealed that only very little (max. 6+/-3 wt%) As(2)O(3) was volatilized at temperatures below 280 degrees C, while still 41.6 (+/-5)wt% of the original arsenic concentration was retained at 440 degrees C and 28.5 (+/-3)wt% at 600 degrees C. The major arsenic volatilization occurred between 300 degrees C and 500 degrees C. The kinetic parameters of desorption, activation energy of desorption (E(d)) and pre-exponential factor (A), were determined by fitting an Arrhenius model to the experimental data, resulting in E(d)=69 kJ/mol, A=1.21 x 10(4)s(-1). It can be concluded that the adsorption of As(2)O(3) on AC can contribute to the thermal stabilisation of As(2)O(3). Consequently, during low temperature pyrolysis of CCA wood arsenic release may be prevented by adsorption of As(2)O(3) on the coal-type product formed during the thermal decomposition of the wood. PMID:19136209

  6. [Toluene, Benzene and Acetone Adsorption by Activated Carbon Coated with PDMS].

    PubMed

    Liu, Han-bing; Jiang, Xin; Wang, Xin; Yang, Bing; Xue, Nan-dong; Zhang, Shi-lei

    2016-04-15

    To improve the adsorption selectivity of volatile organic compounds ( VOCs) , activated carbon ( AC) was modified by polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and characterized by BET analysis and Boehm titration. Dynamic adsorption column experiments were conducted and Yoon-Neslon(Y-N) model was used to identify adsorption effect for toluene, beuzene and acetone on AC when relative humidity was 0%, 50% and 90%, respectively. The results showed that the BET area, micropore volume and surface functional groups decreased with the PDMS modification, and surface hydrophobicity of the modified AC was enhanced leading to a lower water adsorption capacity. The results of dynamic adsorption showed that the adsorption kinetics and capacity of Bare-AC decreased with the increase of relative humidity, and the adsorption capacities of PDMS coated AC were 1.86 times (toluene) and 1.92 times (benzene) higher than those of Bare-AC, while a significant improvement of adsorption capacity for acetone was not observed. These findings suggest that polarity of molecule can be an important influencing factor for adsorption on hydrophobic surface developed by PDMS. PMID:27548948

  7. Effects of activated carbon amended sediment on biological responses in Chironomus riparius multi-generation testing.

    PubMed

    Nybom, Inna; Abel, Sebastian; Mäenpää, Kimmo; Akkanen, Jarkko

    2016-11-15

    The biological effects of activated carbon (AC) amendments in sediments were studied with the midge Chironomus riparius. The effects on larvae growth were studied using three different AC particles sizes (PAC: 90% <63μm, MAC: ø 63-200μm and GAC: ø 420-1700μm). The long- term effects of MAC were studied in an emergence experiment over two generations (P, F1), together with larvae growth experiment over three generations (P, F1, F2). Retarded growth and development of the larvae were observed in the two smallest particle sizes (PAC and MAC), as well as morphological changes in the gut wall microvilli layer studied from transmission electron micrographs. In addition, at high AC treatments the larvae reaching fourth instar stage were of a smaller size compared to the controls. With PAC treatment AC amendment dosages higher than 1% of sediment dry weight induced mortality. In the emergence experiment there was an indication of a delay in F1 generation emergence. Male dry weight (dw) in P generation was significantly reduced in the 2.5% MAC treatment. The effects of AC amendments were more obvious in the C. riparius larvae compared to the effects seen in emerging adults exposed to AC-amended sediment during the larval stage. PMID:27450330

  8. [Toluene, Benzene and Acetone Adsorption by Activated Carbon Coated with PDMS].

    PubMed

    Liu, Han-bing; Jiang, Xin; Wang, Xin; Yang, Bing; Xue, Nan-dong; Zhang, Shi-lei

    2016-04-15

    To improve the adsorption selectivity of volatile organic compounds ( VOCs) , activated carbon ( AC) was modified by polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and characterized by BET analysis and Boehm titration. Dynamic adsorption column experiments were conducted and Yoon-Neslon(Y-N) model was used to identify adsorption effect for toluene, beuzene and acetone on AC when relative humidity was 0%, 50% and 90%, respectively. The results showed that the BET area, micropore volume and surface functional groups decreased with the PDMS modification, and surface hydrophobicity of the modified AC was enhanced leading to a lower water adsorption capacity. The results of dynamic adsorption showed that the adsorption kinetics and capacity of Bare-AC decreased with the increase of relative humidity, and the adsorption capacities of PDMS coated AC were 1.86 times (toluene) and 1.92 times (benzene) higher than those of Bare-AC, while a significant improvement of adsorption capacity for acetone was not observed. These findings suggest that polarity of molecule can be an important influencing factor for adsorption on hydrophobic surface developed by PDMS.

  9. The effects of pore structure on the behavior of water in lignite coal and activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Nwaka, Daniel; Tahmasebi, Arash; Tian, Lu; Yu, Jianglong

    2016-09-01

    The effects of physical structure (pore structure) on behavior of water in lignite coal and activated carbon (AC) samples were investigated by using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and low-temperature X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. AC samples with different pore structures were prepared at 800°C in steam and the results were compared with that of parent lignite coal. The DSC results confirmed the presence of two types of freezable water that freeze at -8°C (free water) and -42°C (freezable bound water). A shift in peak position of free water (FW) towards lower temperature was observed in AC samples compared to the lignite coal with decreasing water loading. The amount of free water (FW) increased with increasing gasification conversion. The amounts of free and freezable bound water (FBW) in AC samples were calculated and correlated to pore volume and average pore size. The amount of FW in AC samples is well correlated to the pore volume and average pore size of the samples, while an opposite trend was observed for FBW. The low-temperature XRD analysis confirmed the existence of non-freezable water (NFW) in coal and AC with the boundary between the freezable and non-freezable water (NFW) determined. PMID:27254256

  10. Assessment of the direct effects of biogenic and petrogenic activated carbon on benthic organisms.

    PubMed

    Lillicrap, Adam; Schaanning, Morten; Macken, Ailbhe

    2015-03-17

    Activated carbon (AC) has long been associated with the capacity to effectively remove organic substances from aquatic and sediment matrices; however, its use in remediation purposes has drawn some concern due to possible impacts on benthic communities. Within the inner Oslofjord, the use of AC has been well documented for reducing the risks associated with dioxins or dioxin-like compounds from contaminated areas. However, benthic surveys performed on areas treated with AC have revealed that the abundance of organisms inhabiting these areas can be reduced significantly in the subsequent years following treatment. The reason for the reduction in the benthic communities is currently unknown, and therefore, an integrated approach to assess the effects of 2 different forms of AC (biogenic and petrogenic) on benthic organisms has been performed. A battery of 3 different benthic organisms with different feeding and life-cycle processes has been used encompassing sediment surface feeders, sediment ingestors, and sediment reworkers. Results of the tests indicated that although AC is not acutely toxic at concentrations up to 1000 mg/L, there may be physical effects of the substance on benthic dwelling organisms at environmentally relevant concentrations of AC at remediated sites.

  11. Adsorption isotherms and kinetics of activated carbons produced from coals of different ranks.

    PubMed

    Purevsuren, B; Lin, Chin-Jung; Davaajav, Y; Ariunaa, A; Batbileg, S; Avid, B; Jargalmaa, S; Huang, Yu; Liou, Sofia Ya-Hsuan

    2015-01-01

    Activated carbons (ACs) from six coals, ranging from low-rank lignite brown coal to high-rank stone coal, were utilized as adsorbents to remove basic methylene blue (MB) from an aqueous solution. The surface properties of the obtained ACs were characterized via thermal analysis, N2 isothermal sorption, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Boehm titration. As coal rank decreased, an increase in the heterogeneity of the pore structures and abundance of oxygen-containing functional groups increased MB coverage on its surface. The equilibrium data fitted well with the Langmuir model, and adsorption capacity of MB ranged from 51.8 to 344.8 mg g⁻¹. Good correlation coefficients were obtained using the intra-particle diffusion model, indicating that the adsorption of MB onto ACs is diffusion controlled. The values of the effective diffusion coefficient ranged from 0.61 × 10⁻¹⁰ to 7.1 × 10⁻¹⁰ m² s⁻¹, indicating that ACs from lower-rank coals have higher effective diffusivities. Among all the ACs obtained from selected coals, the AC from low-rank lignite brown coal was the most effective in removing MB from an aqueous solution. PMID:25909729

  12. Treating PCDD/Fs by combined catalysis and activated carbon adsorption.

    PubMed

    Ji, Sha-sha; Ren, Yong; Buekens, Alfons; Chen, Tong; Lu, Sheng-yong; Cen, Ke-fa; Li, Xiao-Dong

    2014-05-01

    V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalysts are used to destroy dioxins present in the gas phase, yet both their removal efficiency (RE) and destruction efficiency (DE) decrease with rising initial concentration (IC). Therefore, activated carbons (AC-1: based on lignite; AC-2: based on coconut shell) were mixed with the catalyst to tackle these high IC gases. A gas phase dioxin-generating system was used to supply three different stable IC-values. When the highest IC is used (20.5 ng I-TEQ Nm(-3)) without AC, at 200°C, the RE and DE-value of PCDD/Fs reaches only 76% and 64%, respectively. At the same conditions, using a mix of catalyst and AC-2, these RE and DE-values rise to 90.1% and 82.0%, respectively. The mix catalyst/AC also shows better performance at low temperature (160 and 180°C). The AC characteristics influence upon the adsorption and degradation abilities of the mixtures.

  13. Effects of activated carbon amended sediment on biological responses in Chironomus riparius multi-generation testing.

    PubMed

    Nybom, Inna; Abel, Sebastian; Mäenpää, Kimmo; Akkanen, Jarkko

    2016-11-15

    The biological effects of activated carbon (AC) amendments in sediments were studied with the midge Chironomus riparius. The effects on larvae growth were studied using three different AC particles sizes (PAC: 90% <63μm, MAC: ø 63-200μm and GAC: ø 420-1700μm). The long- term effects of MAC were studied in an emergence experiment over two generations (P, F1), together with larvae growth experiment over three generations (P, F1, F2). Retarded growth and development of the larvae were observed in the two smallest particle sizes (PAC and MAC), as well as morphological changes in the gut wall microvilli layer studied from transmission electron micrographs. In addition, at high AC treatments the larvae reaching fourth instar stage were of a smaller size compared to the controls. With PAC treatment AC amendment dosages higher than 1% of sediment dry weight induced mortality. In the emergence experiment there was an indication of a delay in F1 generation emergence. Male dry weight (dw) in P generation was significantly reduced in the 2.5% MAC treatment. The effects of AC amendments were more obvious in the C. riparius larvae compared to the effects seen in emerging adults exposed to AC-amended sediment during the larval stage.

  14. Effects of steam activation on the pore structure and surface chemistry of activated carbon derived from bamboo waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-Juan; Xing, Zhen-Jiao; Duan, Zheng-Kang; Li, Meng; Wang, Yin

    2014-10-01

    The effects of steam activation on the pore structure evolution and surface chemistry of activated carbon (AC) obtained from bamboo waste were investigated. Nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms revealed that higher steam activation temperatures and/or times promoted the creation of new micropores and widened the existing micropores, consequently decreasing the surface area and total pore volume. Optimum conditions included an activation temperature of 850 °C, activation time of 120 min, and steam flush generated from deionized water of 0.2 cm3 min-1. Under these conditions, AC with a BET surface area of 1210 m2 g-1 and total pore volume of 0.542 cm-3 g-1was obtained. Changes in surface chemistry were determined through Boehm titration, pH measurement, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results revealed the presence of a large number of basic groups on the surface of the pyrolyzed char and AC. Steam activation did not affect the species of oxygen-containing groups but changed the contents of these species when compared with pyrolyzed char. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe the surface morphology of the products. AC obtained under optimum conditions showed a monolayer adsorption capacity of 330 mg g-1 for methylene blue (MB), which demonstrates its excellent potential for MB adsorption applications.

  15. The transport properties of activated carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    di Vittorio, S.L. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Dresselhaus, M.S. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA . Dept. of Physics); Endo, M. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

    1990-07-01

    The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  16. The Transport Properties of Activated Carbon Fibers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    di Vittorio, S. L.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Endo, M.; Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

    1990-07-01

    The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons.

  17. ACTIVATED CARBON FROM LIGNITE FOR WATER TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin S. Olson; Daniel J. Stepan

    2000-07-01

    High concentrations of humate in surface water result in the formation of excess amounts of chlorinated byproducts during disinfection treatment. These precursors can be removed in water treatment prior to disinfection using powdered activated carbon. In the interest of developing a more cost-effective method for removal of humates in surface water, a comparison of the activities of carbons prepared from North Dakota lignites with those of commercial carbons was conducted. Previous studies indicated that a commercial carbon prepared from Texas lignite (Darco HDB) was superior to those prepared from bituminous coals for water treatment. That the high alkali content of North Dakota lignites would result in favorable adsorptive properties for the very large humate molecules was hypothesized, owing to the formation of larger pores during activation. Since no standard humate test has been previously developed, initial adsorption testing was performed using smaller dye molecules with various types of ionic character. With the cationic dye, methylene blue, a carbon prepared from a high-sodium lignite (HSKRC) adsorbed more dye than the Darco HDB. The carbon from the low-sodium lignite was much inferior. With another cationic dye, malachite green, the Darco HDB was slightly better. With anionic dyes, methyl red and azocarmine-B, the results for the HSKRC and Darco HDB were comparable. A humate test was developed using Aldrich humic acid. The HSKRC and the Darco HDB gave equally high adsorption capacities for the humate (138 mg/g), consistent with the similarities observed in earlier tests. A carbon prepared from a high-sodium lignite from a different mine showed an outstanding improvement (201 mg/g). The carbons prepared from the low-sodium lignites from both mines showed poor adsorption capacities for humate. Adsorption isotherms were performed for the set of activated carbons in the humate system. These exhibited a complex behavior interpreted as resulting from two types

  18. Effect of calcination on Co-impregnated active carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Bekyarova, E.; Mehandjiev, D. . Inst. of General and Inorganic Chemistry)

    1993-11-01

    Active carbon (AC) from apricot shells with known characteristics has been impregnated with a 9.88% Co(NO[sub 3])[sub 2] [center dot] 6H[sub 2]O solution. The samples are destroyed in air at 200, 300, 400, and 550 C. The processes accompanying the thermal treatment are studied by DTA. Two processes are established during calcination of Co-impregnated active carbon: (i) destruction of the support as a result of oxidation catalyzed by the impregnated cobalt and (ii) interaction of the active phase (Co[sub 3]O[sub 4]) with the support (AC), during which Co[sub 3]O[sub 4] is reduced to CoO and Co. The presence of Co[sub 3]O[sub 4], and CoO phases is proved by X-ray measurements, while that of metal Co is established by magnetic measurements. The porous structure changes are investigated by adsorption studies. The characterization of the samples is performed by physical adsorption of N[sub 2] (77.4 K) and CO[sub 2] (273 K). The poresize distribution curves are plotted over the range 0.4--10 nm by the methods of Pierce (for the mesopores) and Medek (for the micropores). The micropore volume is determined by two independent methods: t/F method and D-R plot. The results from adsorption studies indicate a decrease of S[sub BET], V[sub mi], and, especially, the supermicropores of the samples.

  19. Adsorption of Acid Red 57 from aqueous solutions onto polyacrylonitrile/activated carbon composite.

    PubMed

    El-Bindary, Ashraf A; Diab, Mostafa A; Hussien, Mostafa A; El-Sonbati, Adel Z; Eessa, Ahmed M

    2014-04-24

    The adsorption of Acid Red 57 (AR57) onto Polyacrylonitrile/activated carbon (PAN/AC) composite was investigated in aqueous solution in a batch system with respect to contact time, pH and temperature. Physical characteristics of (PAN/AC) composite such as fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were obtained. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models were applied to describe the equilibrium isotherms and the isotherm constants were determined. The activation energy of adsorption was also evaluated for the adsorption of AR57 onto (PAN/AC) composite. The pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models were used to describe the kinetic data. The dynamic data fitted the pseudo-second-order kinetic model well. The activation energy, change of free energy, enthalpy and entropy of adsorption were also evaluated for the adsorption of AR57 onto (PAN/AC) composite. The thermodynamics of the adsorption indicated spontaneous and exothermic nature of the process. The results indicate that (PAN/AC) composite could be employed as low-cost material for the removal of acid dyes from textile effluents. PMID:24463242

  20. Synthesis of activated carbon from oil fly ash for removal of H2S from gas stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, Zaheer; Shawabkeh, Reyad A.; Hussein, Ibnelwaleed A.; Al-Baghli, Nadhir; Eic, Mladen

    2015-02-01

    Activated carbon (AC) is made from waste oil fly ash (OFA) which is produced in large quantities from power generation plants through combustion of heavy fuel oil. OFA contains ∼80% carbon that makes it suitable for producing AC by physicochemical treatments using a mixture of HNO3, H2SO4, and H3PO4 acids to remove non-carbonaceous impurities. The acid treated OFA is then activated by CO2 at 990 °C. The physico-chemical treatments of OFA have increased the surface area from 4 to 375 m2/g. Surface morphology and pore volume of AC are characterized by combined SEM and EDX techniques. Elemental analysis shows that sulfur content is reduced from 7.1 wt% in untreated OFA to 0.51 wt% for the treated OFA. The AC is further treated with HNO3 and NH4OH solutions in order to attach the carboxylic and amine groups on the surface, respectively. FTIR characterization is used to confirm the presence of the functional groups on the surface of AC at different stages of its development. The performance of functionalized AC samples is tested for the removal of H2S from a synthetic natural gas by carrying out breakthrough experiments. The results from these tests have shown maximum adsorption capacity of 0.3001 mg/g for NH4OH functionalized activated carbon with 86.43% regeneration efficiency. The ammonium hydroxide treated AC is found to be more effective for H2S removal than acid treated AC as confirmed by breakthrough experiments. The results indicate that the presence of more acidic functionalities on the surface reduces the H2S adsorption efficiency from the gas mixture.

  1. Adsorption of herbicides using activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Derbyshire, F.; Jagtoyen, M.; Lafferty, C.; Kimber, G.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the results of research in which novel activated carbons have been examined for their efficacy in water treatment and, specifically, for the adsorption of a common herbicide and wood preservative, sodium pentachlorophenolate. To place this work in context, the introduction will discuss first some of the considerations of using activated carbons for water treatment, and then certain aspects of the authors research that has led to this particular topic.

  2. Effects of Activated Carbon on PCB Bioaccumulation and Biological Responses of Chironomus riparius in Full Life Cycle Test.

    PubMed

    Nybom, Inna; Abel, Sebastian; Waissi, Greta; Väänänen, Kristiina; Mäenpää, Kimmo; Leppänen, Matti T; Kukkonen, Jussi V K; Akkanen, Jarkko

    2016-05-17

    The nonbiting midge Chironomus riparius was used to study the remediation potential and secondary effects of activated carbon (AC, ø 63-200 μm) in PCB contaminated sediments. AC amendments efficiently reduced PCB bioavailability determined by Chironomus riparius bioaccumulation tests and passive samplers. PCBs were shown to transfer from larvae to adults. Lower PCB concentrations were observed in adult midges emerging from AC amended compared to unamended sediments. Increased reproduction, survival, larval growth and gut wall microvilli length were observed with low AC dose (0.5% sediment dw) compared to unamended sediment, indicating an improved success of larvae in the sediment with low organic carbon content. On the other hand, higher AC doses (2.5% sediment dw) caused adverse effects on emergence and larval development. In addition, morphological changes in the gut wall microvilli layer were observed. This study showed that the secondary effects of AC amendments are dependent on the dose and the sediment characteristics. Metamorphic species, such as C. riparius, may act as a vector for organic pollutants from aquatic to terrestrial ecosystems and according to this study the AC amendments may reduce this transport. PMID:27100921

  3. Magnetite decorated activated carbon composites for water purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barala, Sunil Kumar; Arora, Manju; Saini, Parveen

    2013-06-01

    Activated carbon decorated with magnetite (ACMG) nanoparticles composites have been prepared by facile method via impregnation of AC with stable dispersion of superparamagnetic MG nanoparticles followed by drying. These composites exhibit both magnetic and porosity behavior which can be easily optimized by controlling the weight ratio of two phases. The structural, magnetic, thermal and morphological properties of these as synthesized ACMG samples were characterized by powder XRD, FTIR, VSM and SEM techniques. The ACMG powder has been used for water purification having methylene blue (MB) dye as an impurity. The nanoporosity of these composites allow rapid adsorption of MB and their magnetic behavior helps in single step separation of MB adsorbed ACMG particles by the application of external magnetic field.

  4. Enhanced adsorption of benzene vapor on granular activated carbon under humid conditions due to shifts in hydrophobicity and total micropore volume.

    PubMed

    Liu, Han-Bing; Yang, Bing; Xue, Nan-Dong

    2016-11-15

    A series of hydrophobic-modified (polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) coating) activated carbons (ACs) were developed to answer a fundamental question: what are the determinants that dominate the adsorption on ACs under humid conditions? Using column experiments, an inter-comparison among bare-AC and PDMS-coated ACs was conducted regarding the association of surface characteristics and adsorption capacity. Primary outcomes occurred in two dominating markers, hydrophobicity and total micropore volume, which played a key role in water adsorption on ACs. However, their contributions to water adsorption on ACs substantially differed under different Pwater/Pair conditions. Hydrophobicity was the only contributor in Pwater/Pair=0.1-0.6, while the two markers contributed equally in Pwater/Pair=0.7-1.0. Furthermore, PDMS-coated AC had a significant increase in benzene adsorption capacities compared to bare-AC at 0-90% relative humidity, while these differences were not significant among PDMS-coated ACs. It is thus presumed that the balance between the two markers can be shifted to favor almost unchanged benzene adsorption capacities among PDMS-coated ACs over a large range of relative humidity. These findings suggest potential benefits of PDMS coating onto ACs in enhancing selective adsorption of hydrophobic volatile organic compounds under high humid conditions. To develop new porous materials with both high total micropore volume and hydrophobicity should thus be considered. PMID:27450334

  5. Enantioselective synthesis of tatanans A-C and reinvestigation of their glucokinase-activating properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Qing; Jackson, Jeffrey J.; Basak, Ashok; Bowler, Joseph M.; Miller, Brian G.; Zakarian, Armen

    2013-05-01

    The tatanans are members of a novel class of complex sesquilignan natural products recently isolated from the rhizomes of Acorus tatarinowii Schott plants. Tatanans A, B and C have previously been reported to have potent glucokinase-activating properties that exceed the in vitro activity of known synthetic antidiabetic agents. Here, using a series of sequential [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangements, we report the total synthesis of tatanan A in 13 steps and 13% overall yield. We also complete a concise enantioselective total synthesis of more complex, atropisomeric tatanans B and C via a distinct convergent strategy based on a palladium-catalysed diastereotopic aromatic group differentiation (12 steps, 4% and 8% overall yield, respectively). A plausible biosynthetic relationship between acyclic tatanan A and spirocyclic tatanans B and C is proposed and probed experimentally. With sufficient quantities of the natural products in hand, we undertake a detailed functional characterization of the biological activities of tatanans A-C. Contrary to previous reports, our assays utilizing pure recombinant human enzyme demonstrate that tatanans do not function as allosteric activators of glucokinase.

  6. Targeting Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling in Mouse Models of Cardiomyopathy Caused by Lamin A/C Gene Mutations.

    PubMed

    Muchir, Antoine; Worman, Howard J

    2016-01-01

    The most frequently occurring mutations in the gene encoding nuclear lamin A and nuclear lamin C cause striated muscle diseases virtually always involving the heart. In this review, we describe the approaches and methods used to discover that cardiomyopathy-causing lamin A/C gene mutations increase MAP kinase signaling in the heart and that this plays a role in disease pathogenesis. We review different mouse models of cardiomyopathy caused by lamin A/C gene mutations and how transcriptomic analysis of one model identified increased cardiac activity of the ERK1/2, JNK, and p38α MAP kinases. We describe methods used to measure the activity of these MAP kinases in mouse hearts and then discuss preclinical treatment protocols using pharmacological inhibitors to demonstrate their role in pathogenesis. Several of these kinase inhibitors are in clinical development and could potentially be used to treat human subjects with cardiomyopathy caused by lamin A/C gene mutations.

  7. Amination of activated carbon for enhancing phenol adsorption: Effect of nitrogen-containing functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guo; Chen, Honglin; Qin, Hangdao; Feng, Yujun

    2014-02-01

    To study the contribution of different nitrogen-containing functional groups to enhancement of phenol adsorption, the aminated activated carbons (AC) were characterized by N2 adsorption/desorption, XPS, Boehm titration, and pH drift method and tested for adsorption behaviors of phenol. Adsorption isotherm fitting revealed that the Langmuir model was preferred for the aminated ACs. The adsorption capacity per unit surface area (qm/SSABET) was linearly correlated with the amount of pyridinic and pyrrolic N, which suggested that these two functional groups played a critical role in phenol adsorption. The enhancement of adsorption capacity was attributed to the strengthened π-π dispersion between phenol and basal plane of AC by pyridinic, pyrrolic N. The adsorption kinetics was found to follow the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, and intraparticle diffusion was one of the rate-controlling steps in the adsorption process.

  8. Removal of dyes from aqueous solutions using activated carbon prepared from rice husk residue.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaxin; Zhang, Xian; Yang, Ruiguang; Li, Guiying; Hu, Changwei

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of dye wastewater by activated carbon (AC) prepared from rice husk residue wastes was studied. Batch adsorption studies were conducted to investigate the effects of contact time, initial concentration (50-450 mg/L), pH (3-11) and temperature (30-70 °C) on the removal of methylene blue (MB), neutral red, and methyl orange. Kinetic investigation revealed that the adsorption of dyes followed pseudo-second-order kinetics. The results suggested that AC was effective to remove dyes, especially MB, from aqueous solutions. Desorption studies found that chemisorption by the adsorbent might be the major mode of dye removal. Fourier transform infrared results suggested that dye molecules were likely to combine with the O-H and P=OOH groups of AC. PMID:26942535

  9. Organic solvent regeneration of granular activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, W. H.; Suidan, M. T.; Roller, M. A.; Kim, B. R.; Gould, J. P.

    1982-09-01

    The use of activated carbon for the treatment of industrial waste-streams was shown to be an effective treatment. The high costs associated with the replacement or thermal regeneration of the carbon have prohibited the economic feasibility of this process. The in situ solvent regeneration of activated carbon by means of organic solvent extraction was suggested as an economically alternative to thermal regeneration. The important aspects of the solvent regeneration process include: the physical and chemical characteristics of the adsorbent, the pore size distribution and energy of adsorption associated with the activated carbon; the degree of solubility of the adsorbate in the organic solvent; the miscibility of the organic solvent in water; and the temperature at which the generation is performed.

  10. Adsorption of methyl mercaptan on activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Bashkova, Svetlana; Bagreev, Andrey; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2002-06-15

    Activated carbons of different origins were studied as methyl mercaptan adsorbents in wet, dry, and oxidizing conditions. The materials were characterized using adsorption of nitrogen, Boehm titration, and thermal analysis. Investigation was focused on the feasibility of the removal of methyl mercaptan on activated carbons and on the role of surface chemistry and porosity in the adsorption/oxidation processes. The results showed relatively high capacities of carbons for removal of CH3SH. The amount adsorbed depends on the surface features. Methyl mercaptan, in general, is oxidized to disulfides, which, depending on the chemistry of the carbon surface, can be converted to sulfonic acid due to the presence of water and active radicals.

  11. Antimicrobial Activity of Carbon-Based Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Maleki Dizaj, Solmaz; Mennati, Afsaneh; Jafari, Samira; Khezri, Khadejeh; Adibkia, Khosro

    2015-01-01

    Due to the vast and inappropriate use of the antibiotics, microorganisms have begun to develop resistance to the commonly used antimicrobial agents. So therefore, development of the new and effective antimicrobial agents seems to be necessary. According to some recent reports, carbon-based nanomaterials such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) (especially single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)) and graphene oxide (GO) nanoparticles show potent antimicrobial properties. In present review, we have briefly summarized the antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanoparticles together with their mechanism of action. Reviewed literature show that the size of carbon nanoparticles plays an important role in the inactivation of the microorganisms. As major mechanism, direct contact of microorganisms with carbon nanostructures seriously affects their cellular membrane integrity, metabolic processes and morphology. The antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanostructures may interestingly be investigated in the near future owing to their high surface/volume ratio, large inner volume and other unique chemical and physical properties. In addition, application of functionalized carbon nanomaterials as carriers for the ordinary antibiotics possibly will decrease the associated resistance, enhance their bioavailability and provide their targeted delivery. PMID:25789215

  12. Microwave-assisted regeneration of activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Foo, K Y; Hameed, B H

    2012-09-01

    Microwave heating was used in the regeneration of methylene blue-loaded activated carbons produced from fibers (PFAC), empty fruit bunches (EFBAC) and shell (PSAC) of oil palm. The dye-loaded carbons were treated in a modified conventional microwave oven operated at 2450 MHz and irradiation time of 2, 3 and 5 min. The virgin properties of the origin and regenerated activated carbons were characterized by pore structural analysis and nitrogen adsorption isotherm. The surface chemistry was examined by zeta potential measurement and determination of surface acidity/basicity, while the adsorptive property was quantified using methylene blue (MB). Microwave irradiation preserved the pore structure, original active sites and adsorption capacity of the regenerated activated carbons. The carbon yield and the monolayer adsorption capacities for MB were maintained at 68.35-82.84% and 154.65-195.22 mg/g, even after five adsorption-regeneration cycles. The findings revealed the potential of microwave heating for regeneration of spent activated carbons.

  13. Activated coconut shell charcoal carbon using chemical-physical activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budi, Esmar; Umiatin, Nasbey, Hadi; Bintoro, Ridho Akbar; Wulandari, Futri; Erlina

    2016-02-01

    The use of activated carbon from natural material such as coconut shell charcoal as metal absorbance of the wastewater is a new trend. The activation of coconut shell charcoal carbon by using chemical-physical activation has been investigated. Coconut shell was pyrolized in kiln at temperature about 75 - 150 °C for about 6 hours in producing charcoal. The charcoal as the sample was shieved into milimeter sized granule particle and chemically activated by immersing in various concentration of HCl, H3PO4, KOH and NaOH solutions. The samples then was physically activated using horizontal furnace at 400°C for 1 hours in argon gas environment with flow rate of 200 kg/m3. The surface morphology and carbon content of activated carbon were characterized by using SEM/EDS. The result shows that the pores of activated carbon are openned wider as the chemical activator concentration is increased due to an excessive chemical attack. However, the pores tend to be closed as further increasing in chemical activator concentration due to carbon collapsing.

  14. Immobilization of a Metal-Nitrogen-Carbon Catalyst on Activated Carbon with Enhanced Cathode Performance in Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wulin; Logan, Bruce E

    2016-08-23

    Applications of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are limited in part by low power densities mainly due to cathode performance. Successful immobilization of an Fe-N-C co-catalyst on activated carbon (Fe-N-C/AC) improved the oxygen reduction reaction to nearly a four-electron transfer, compared to a twoelectron transfer achieved using AC. With acetate as the fuel, the maximum power density was 4.7±0.2 W m(-2) , which is higher than any previous report for an air-cathode MFC. With domestic wastewater as a fuel, MFCs with the Fe-N-C/AC cathode produced up to 0.8±0.03 W m(-2) , which was twice that obtained with a Pt-catalyzed cathode. The use of this Fe-N-C/AC catalyst can therefore substantially increase power production, and enable broader applications of MFCs for renewable electricity generation using waste materials. PMID:27416965

  15. Application of least squares support vector regression and linear multiple regression for modeling removal of methyl orange onto tin oxide nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon and activated carbon prepared from Pistacia atlantica wood.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, M; Rahimi, Mahmoud Reza; Ghaedi, A M; Tyagi, Inderjeet; Agarwal, Shilpi; Gupta, Vinod Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Two novel and eco friendly adsorbents namely tin oxide nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon (SnO2-NP-AC) and activated carbon prepared from wood tree Pistacia atlantica (AC-PAW) were used for the rapid removal and fast adsorption of methyl orange (MO) from the aqueous phase. The dependency of MO removal with various adsorption influential parameters was well modeled and optimized using multiple linear regressions (MLR) and least squares support vector regression (LSSVR). The optimal parameters for the LSSVR model were found based on γ value of 0.76 and σ(2) of 0.15. For testing the data set, the mean square error (MSE) values of 0.0010 and the coefficient of determination (R(2)) values of 0.976 were obtained for LSSVR model, and the MSE value of 0.0037 and the R(2) value of 0.897 were obtained for the MLR model. The adsorption equilibrium and kinetic data was found to be well fitted and in good agreement with Langmuir isotherm model and second-order equation and intra-particle diffusion models respectively. The small amount of the proposed SnO2-NP-AC and AC-PAW (0.015 g and 0.08 g) is applicable for successful rapid removal of methyl orange (>95%). The maximum adsorption capacity for SnO2-NP-AC and AC-PAW was 250 mg g(-1) and 125 mg g(-1) respectively. PMID:26414425

  16. Activated carbons from coal/pitch and polyethylene terephthalate blends for the removal of phenols from aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ewa Lorenc-Grabowska; Grazyna Gryglewicz; Jacek Machnikowski

    2009-05-15

    Blends of two bituminous coals and a coal-tar pitch (CTP) with polyethylene terephthalate (PET) were evaluated as precursors of activated carbons (ACs). The intensity of the interactions between the raw materials, coal/CTP and PET during copyrolysis was closely observed by means of thermogravimetric analysis. In addition, the homogeneity of the carbon matrix of the chars produced at 800{sup o}C in a horizontal oven was studied by polarized light optical microscopy. Activated carbons were prepared from single components and their blends (1:1 w/w) by subjecting them to carbonization up to 800{sup o}C in a horizontal oven and then activation with steam at 800{sup o}C to 50% burnoff. The porous structure of the ACs was determined by sorption of N{sub 2} at 77 K and of CO{sub 2} at 273 K. The PET-containing blends produced microporous activated carbons with a maximum BET surface area of nearly 1100 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} and a maximum micropore size distribution of 0.6-0.8 nm in the case of the AC from the CTP/PET blend. The addition of PET to a bituminous coal was compared with the preoxidation of coal P in air as a way to reduce thermoplasticity and to promote the development of the porous structure. The modification of bituminous coals by PET appeared to be more effective than conventional coal preoxidation treatment. The resultant ACs were tested by measuring their effectiveness in removing phenols from an aqueous solution. The adsorption of p-chlorophenol (PCP) by the ACs prepared from the PET-containing blends was slightly higher than for the commercial activated carbon. The ability to adsorb PCP was found to be related to the volume of the super-micropores.

  17. High-performance Supercapacitor cells with Activated Carbon/MWNT nanocomposite electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markoulidis, F.; Lei, C.; Lekakou, C.; Figgemeier, E.; Duff, D.; Khalil, S.; Martorana, B.; Cannavaro, I.

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate and improve the performance of supercapacitor cells with carbon-based nanocomposite electrodes. The electrode structure comprised activated carbon (AC), four types of multi-wall nanotubes (MWNTs) and two alternative polymer binders, Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) or Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF). Electrode fabrication involved various stages of mixing and dispersion of the AC powder and carbon nanotubes, rolling and coating of the AC/MWNT/binder paste on an aluminium substrate which also served as current collector. The organic electrolyte utilised was 1M tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate (TEABF4) fully dissolved in propylene carbonate (PC). All devices were of the electrochemical double layer capacitor (EDLC) type, incorporating four layers of tissue paper as separator material. The surface topography of the so fabricated electrodes was investigated with scanning electrode microscopy (SEM). Overall cell performance was evaluated with a multi-channel potentiostat/galvanostat/impedance analyser. Each supercapacitor cell was subjected to Cyclic Voltammetry (CV) at various scan rates from 0.01 V/s to 1 V/s, Charge-Discharge at a fixed current steps (2 mA) and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) with frequency range from 10 mHz to 1 MHz. It was established that an AC-based supercapacitor with 0.15%w/w MWNT content and 30 μm roll-coated, nanocomposite electrodes provided superior energy and power and energy densities while the cells was immersed in the electrolyte; well above those generated by the AC-based EDLC cells.

  18. Exceptionally strong sorption of infochemicals to activated carbon reduces their bioavailability to fish.

    PubMed

    Jonker, Michiel T O; van Mourik, Louise

    2014-03-01

    The addition of activated carbon (AC) to sediments is a relatively new approach to remediate contaminated sites. Activated carbon strongly sorbs hydrophobic organic contaminants, thereby reducing their bioavailability and uptake in organisms. Because of its high sorption capacity, AC might, however, also sorb other chemicals that are not contaminants but instead have ecological functions. Examples of such compounds are infochemicals or pheromones (i.e., compounds serving as chemical inter- and intraspecies information vectors). The present study investigated the sorption of 2 known infochemicals, hypoxanthine-3-N-oxide (H3NO) and pyridine-N-oxide (PNO), to 5 different powdered ACs. Sorption isotherms of these low-molecular-weight, polar fish kairomone substances appeared highly nonlinear, with logarithmic Freundlich sorption coefficients of up to 7.6. At physiologically relevant concentrations, sorption was up to 7 to 9 orders of magnitude stronger than expected on the basis of hydrophobic forces only (i.e., the compounds' log octanol-water partition coefficient, being approximately -1), indicating exceptionally strong binding to specific sites. This binding effectively reduced the bioavailability of H3NO to Sarasa goldfish, as was shown in a behavioral assay. The present study demonstrates the previously unrecognized potential of AC to sorb ecologically relevant chemicals. Whether this potential may lead to subtle, unwanted ecological effects in the field will have to be investigated in more detail during future research. PMID:24272993

  19. [Effects and mechanism of catalytic decomposition of ozone by activated carbon].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-Long; Zhang, Zhi-Ye; Zhang, Zhong-Ming; Jiao, Ru-Yuan; Wang, Rui-Jun

    2012-10-01

    Effects and mechanism of catalytic decomposition of ozone by activated carbon (AC) were studied by detection of residual components in released gas and temperature of reactor pole, and heat analysis through the ozone decomposition pole (ODP). Results showed that ozone could be thoroughly decomposed (removal rate was maintaining 100% all along the process studied) for 5 h under the condition of O3 12.89 mg x min(-1), 18 mm diameter glass tube was stuffed by activated carbon (made from coal, 2.0-2.5 mm diameter). The temperature of ODP was found rise during the treatment. The temperature became stable after quickly rise to 65-69 degrees C; and the CO2 output reduced with the stable temperature. The mechanisms of ozone decomposition were found including three parts. The first is catalytic decomposition by AC. AC enriches O3 and enhances O3 decomposition to form O2. The second is AC reaction with O3, which leads to destruction of the surface structure or group and output of CO2 and NOx are released with offgas. The third is temperature rising caused by heat production of CO2 and NOx formation according to the above two mechanisms, which enhances O3 thermal decomposition. Meanwhile, some basic design principles of ozone decomposition device were discussed.

  20. Current-induced strength degradation of activated carbon spheres in carbon supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuan; Chen, Rong; Lipka, Stephen M.; Yang, Fuqian

    2016-05-01

    Activated carbon microspheres (ACSs), which are prepared using hydrothermal synthesis and ammonia activation, are used as the active materials in the anode and cathode of electric double layer capacitors (EDLCs). The ACS-based EDLCs of symmetrical electrodes exhibit good stability and a high degree of reversibility over 2000 charge-discharge cycles for electric current up to 10 A g-1. The ACSs maintain a nongraphitized carbon structure after over 2000 charge-discharge cycles. Nanoindentation experiments are performed on the ACSs, which are electrochemically cycled in a voltage window of 0-1 V at three electric currents of 0.5, 5, and 10 A g-1. For the same indentation load, both the contact modulus and indentation hardness of the ACSs decrease with the increase of the electric current used in the electrical charging and discharging. These results suggest that there exists strength degradation introduced by the electric current. A larger electric current will cause more strength degradation than a smaller electric current.

  1. Biochar, activated carbon, and carbon nanotubes have different effects on fate of 14C-catechol and microbial community in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Jun; Ji, Rong; Yu, Yongjie; Xie, Zubin; Yan, Xiaoyuan

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of biochar, activated carbon (AC)-, and single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and MWCNTs) in various concentrations (0, 0.2, 20, and 2,000 mg/kg dry soil) on the fate of 14C-catechol and microbial community in soil. The results showed that biochar had no effect on the mineralization of 14C-catechol, whereas AC at all amendment rates and SWCNTs at 2,000 mg/kg significantly reduced mineralization. Particularly, MWCNTs at 0.2 mg/kg significantly stimulated mineralization compared with the control soil. The inhibitory effects of AC and SWCNTs on the mineralization were attributed to the inhibited soil microbial activities and the shifts in microbial communities, as suggested by the reduced microbial biomass C and the separated phylogenetic distance. In contrast, the stimulatory effects of MWCNTs on the mineralization were attributed to the selective stimulation of specific catechol-degraders by MWCNTs at 0.2 mg/kg. Only MWCNTs amendments and AC at 2,000 mg/kg significantly changed the distribution of 14C residues within the fractions of humic substances. Our findings suggest biochar, AC, SWCNTs and MWCNTs have different effects on the fate of 14C-catechol and microbial community in soil.

  2. Biochar, activated carbon, and carbon nanotubes have different effects on fate of 14C-catechol and microbial community in soil

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Jun; Ji, Rong; Yu, Yongjie; Xie, Zubin; Yan, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of biochar, activated carbon (AC)-, and single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and MWCNTs) in various concentrations (0, 0.2, 20, and 2,000 mg/kg dry soil) on the fate of 14C-catechol and microbial community in soil. The results showed that biochar had no effect on the mineralization of 14C-catechol, whereas AC at all amendment rates and SWCNTs at 2,000 mg/kg significantly reduced mineralization. Particularly, MWCNTs at 0.2 mg/kg significantly stimulated mineralization compared with the control soil. The inhibitory effects of AC and SWCNTs on the mineralization were attributed to the inhibited soil microbial activities and the shifts in microbial communities, as suggested by the reduced microbial biomass C and the separated phylogenetic distance. In contrast, the stimulatory effects of MWCNTs on the mineralization were attributed to the selective stimulation of specific catechol-degraders by MWCNTs at 0.2 mg/kg. Only MWCNTs amendments and AC at 2,000 mg/kg significantly changed the distribution of 14C residues within the fractions of humic substances. Our findings suggest biochar, AC, SWCNTs and MWCNTs have different effects on the fate of 14C-catechol and microbial community in soil. PMID:26515132

  3. Biochar, activated carbon, and carbon nanotubes have different effects on fate of (14)C-catechol and microbial community in soil.

    PubMed

    Shan, Jun; Ji, Rong; Yu, Yongjie; Xie, Zubin; Yan, Xiaoyuan

    2015-10-30

    This study investigated the effects of biochar, activated carbon (AC)-, and single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and MWCNTs) in various concentrations (0, 0.2, 20, and 2,000 mg/kg dry soil) on the fate of (14)C-catechol and microbial community in soil. The results showed that biochar had no effect on the mineralization of (14)C-catechol, whereas AC at all amendment rates and SWCNTs at 2,000 mg/kg significantly reduced mineralization. Particularly, MWCNTs at 0.2 mg/kg significantly stimulated mineralization compared with the control soil. The inhibitory effects of AC and SWCNTs on the mineralization were attributed to the inhibited soil microbial activities and the shifts in microbial communities, as suggested by the reduced microbial biomass C and the separated phylogenetic distance. In contrast, the stimulatory effects of MWCNTs on the mineralization were attributed to the selective stimulation of specific catechol-degraders by MWCNTs at 0.2 mg/kg. Only MWCNTs amendments and AC at 2,000 mg/kg significantly changed the distribution of (14)C residues within the fractions of humic substances. Our findings suggest biochar, AC, SWCNTs and MWCNTs have different effects on the fate of (14)C-catechol and microbial community in soil.

  4. Comparison of models on the prediction of binary equilibrium data of activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadpour, A.; Wang, K.; Do, D.D.

    1998-03-01

    A pure-component equilibrium adsorption isotherm of methane, ethane, propane, and CO{sub 2} at different temperatures and the binary adsorption data of methane with the other three species measured at 500 torr (66.7 kPa) and temperatures of 273 K and 303 K are presented and discussed. These measurements were carried out on three nutshell-derived KOH chemically activated carbon (AC) samples and one commercial activated carbon. The binary adsorption data of another commercial AC (Nuxit-al) from the literature are also used for comparison purposes. The single and binary experimental data were applied to six models: IAST, loading-dependent isosteric heat, micropore-size distribution (MPSD), energy distribution (ED), extended Langmuir, and extended Sips models. The models were found to describe the experimental data of the commercial ACs with a reasonably good accuracy, but only the model assuming isosteric heat as a function of loading could reasonably predict the data of KOH chemically activated carbons.

  5. A critical evaluation of magnetic activated carbon's potential for the remediation of sediment impacted by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhantao; Sani, Badruddeen; Akkanen, Jarkko; Abel, Sebastian; Nybom, Inna; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K; Werner, David

    2015-04-01

    Addition of activated carbon (AC) or biochar (BC) to sediment to reduce the chemical and biological availability of organic contaminants is a promising in-situ remediation technology. But concerns about leaving the adsorbed pollutants in place motivate research into sorbent recovery methods. This study explores the use of magnetic sorbents. A coal-based magnetic activated carbon (MAC) was identified as the strongest of four AC and BC derived magnetic sorbents for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) remediation. An 8.1% MAC amendment (w/w, equal to 5% AC content) was found to be as effective as 5% (w/w) pristine AC in reducing aqueous PAHs within three months by 98%. MAC recovery from sediment after three months was 77%, and incomplete MAC recovery had both, positive and negative effects. A slight rebound of aqueous PAH concentrations was observed following the MAC recovery, but aqueous PAH concentrations then dropped again after six months, likely due to the presence of the 23% unrecovered MAC. On the other hand, the 77% recovery of the 8.1% MAC dose was insufficient to reduce ecotoxic effects of fine grained AC or MAC amendment on the egestion rate, growth and reproduction of the AC sensitive species Lumbriculus variegatus.

  6. Arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activation in airway epithelial cells induces MUC5AC via reactive oxygen species (ROS) production.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Takahito; Uchi, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Gaku; Gondo, Hisaki; Moroi, Yoichi; Furue, Masutaka

    2011-02-01

    The dioxins and dioxin-like compounds in cigarette smoke regulate various immunological responses via the arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR). These environmental toxicants are known to cause bronchitis, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and lung cancer. Recent studies have demonstrated that AhR activation upregulates the expression of mucin 5AC, oligomeric mucus/gel-forming (MUC5AC) in the airway epithelial cell line. However, the mechanism for the production of mucin has not been clarified. In this study, we investigated the role and pathway of AhR in airway epithelial cells by using selective agonists and antagonists. After stimulation with or without benzopyrene (B[a]P), an AhR agonist, MUC5AC expression was measured by real-time RT-PCR. The mechanism of AhR-induced MUC5AC expression in airway epithelial cells was studied in terms of the production of cytokine and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Treatment with B[a]P increased ROS generation in NCI-H₂₉₂ cells. Furthermore, B[a]P-induced MUC5AC upregulation and mucin production were inhibited by AhR siRNA or the use of an antioxidative agent. These results suggest that the AhR-induced increase of mucin production is partially mediated by ROS generation. An antioxidant therapy approach may help to cure AhR-induced mucus hypersecretory diseases. PMID:20709182

  7. Phenol removal onto novel activated carbons made from lignocellulosic precursors: influence of surface properties.

    PubMed

    Nabais, J M Valente; Gomes, J A; Suhas; Carrott, P J M; Laginhas, C; Roman, S

    2009-08-15

    The adsorption of phenol from dilute aqueous solutions onto new activated carbons (AC) was studied. The novel activated carbon was produced from lignocellulosic (LC) precursors of rapeseed and kenaf. Samples oxidised with nitric acid in liquid phase were also studied. The results have shown the significant potential of rapeseed and kenaf for the activated carbon production. The activated carbons produced by carbon dioxide activation were mainly microporous with BET apparent surface area up to 1350 m(2)g(-1) and pore volume 0.5 cm(3)g(-1). The effects of concentration (0.1-2 mM) and pH (3-13) were studied. The phenol adsorption isotherms at 25 degrees C followed the Freundlich model with maximum adsorption capacities of approximately 80 and 50 mg g(-1) for the pristine and oxidised activated carbons, respectively. The influence of pH on the adsorption has two trends for pH below and above 10. It was possible to conclude that when phenol is predominantly in the molecular form the most probable mechanism is based on the pi-pi dispersion interaction between the phenol aromatic ring and the delocalised pi electrons present in the activated carbon aromatic structure. When phenolate is the major component the electrostatic repulsion that occurs at high pH values is the most important aspect of the adsorption mechanism.

  8. Kinetic analysis of acid orange 7 degradation by pulsed discharge plasma combined with activated carbon and the synergistic mechanism exploration.

    PubMed

    Guo, He; Wang, Huijuan; Wu, Qiangshun; Zhou, Guangshun; Yi, Chengwu

    2016-09-01

    The synergistic technique of pulsed discharge plasma (PDP) and activated carbon (AC) was built to investigate the kinetics of acid orange 7 (AO7) degradation under different conditions of AC addition, electrode gap, initial pH value of solution, gas variety and gas flow rate. Emission spectra of OH and O, UV-vis absorption spectra of the AO7 solution and TOC removal were measured to illustrate the synergistic mechanism of the PDP and the AC. The obtained results indicated that the kinetic constant of AO7 degradation increased from 0.00947 min(-1) to 0.01419 min(-1) when 4 g AC was added into the PDP system; AO7 degradation was higher in the case of alkaline solution when oxygen was used as the flow gas in the PDP/AC system, 2 L/min oxygen flow was more favorable for the degradation. Results of the relative emission intensities of OH and O indicated the catalytic effect of the AC on the active species formation as well as the important role of the two radicals for the AO7 degradation. There was no new peaks appeared by the UV-vis analysis of the AO7 solution after 60 min treatment. The highest TOC removal in the PDP/AC system was 30.3%, which was achieved under the condition of 4 L/min air flow rate and 3 initial pH value. PMID:27295438

  9. Silver and zinc oxide nanostructures loaded on activated carbon as new adsorbents for removal of methylene green: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, M; Karimi, H; Yousefi, F

    2014-09-01

    In this study, the removal of methylene green (MG) from aqueous solution based on two new adsorbents including silver nanoparticles and zinc oxide nanorods loaded on activated carbon (Ag-NP-AC and ZnO-NR-AC, respectively) has been carried out. The dependency of removal process to variables such as contact time, pH, amount of adsorbents, and initial MG concentration were examined and optimized. It was found that the maximum MG removal percentage was achieved at pH = 7.0 following stirring at 400 r min(-1) for 7 and 6 min for Ag-NP-AC and ZnO-NR-AC, respectively. Equilibrium data were well fitted with the Langmuir model having maximum adsorption capacity of 166.7 and 200 mg g(-1) for Ag-NP-AC and ZnO-NR-AC, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters of MG adsorption on Ag-NP-AC such as enthalpy and entropy changes, activation energy, sticking probability, and Gibbs free energy changes show the spontaneous and endothermic nature of the removal process. Among different conventional kinetic models, the pseudo second-order kinetics in addition to particle diffusion mechanism is the best and efficient model for the prediction and explanation of experimental data of MG adsorption onto both adsorbents.

  10. Kinetic analysis of acid orange 7 degradation by pulsed discharge plasma combined with activated carbon and the synergistic mechanism exploration.

    PubMed

    Guo, He; Wang, Huijuan; Wu, Qiangshun; Zhou, Guangshun; Yi, Chengwu

    2016-09-01

    The synergistic technique of pulsed discharge plasma (PDP) and activated carbon (AC) was built to investigate the kinetics of acid orange 7 (AO7) degradation under different conditions of AC addition, electrode gap, initial pH value of solution, gas variety and gas flow rate. Emission spectra of OH and O, UV-vis absorption spectra of the AO7 solution and TOC removal were measured to illustrate the synergistic mechanism of the PDP and the AC. The obtained results indicated that the kinetic constant of AO7 degradation increased from 0.00947 min(-1) to 0.01419 min(-1) when 4 g AC was added into the PDP system; AO7 degradation was higher in the case of alkaline solution when oxygen was used as the flow gas in the PDP/AC system, 2 L/min oxygen flow was more favorable for the degradation. Results of the relative emission intensities of OH and O indicated the catalytic effect of the AC on the active species formation as well as the important role of the two radicals for the AO7 degradation. There was no new peaks appeared by the UV-vis analysis of the AO7 solution after 60 min treatment. The highest TOC removal in the PDP/AC system was 30.3%, which was achieved under the condition of 4 L/min air flow rate and 3 initial pH value.

  11. Effectiveness of activated carbon and Egyptian montmorillonite in the protection against deoxynivalenol-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Wahhab, Mosaad A; El-Kady, Ahmed A; Hassan, Aziza M; Abd El-Moneim, Omaima M; Abdel-Aziem, Sekena H

    2015-09-01

    This study was conducted to prepare and characterize activated carbon (AC) and to evaluate its protective effect against deoxynivalenol (DON) toxicity in rats compared to Egyptian montmorillonite (EM). AC was prepared using a single-step chemical activation with phosphoric acid (H3PO4). The resulted AC has a high surface area and a high total pore volume. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 6 groups (n = 10) and treated for 3 weeks as follow: the control group, the groups fed AC or EM-supplemented diet (0.5% w/w), the group treated orally with DON (5 mg/kg b.w.) and the groups fed AC or EM-supplemented diet and treated with DON. Blood and liver samples were collected for different analyses. Treatment with DON increased liver function enzymes, lipid peroxidation, tumor necrosis factor α, DNA fragmentation, decreased hepatic glutathione content, up regulating mRNA Fas and TNF-α genes expression and increased micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes and normochromatic erythrocytes in bone marrow. Co-treatment of DON plus AC or EM succeeded to normalize the levels of the biochemical parameters, reduced the cytotoxicity of bone marrow and ameliorated the hepatic genotoxicity. Moreover, AC was more effective than EM and has a high affinity to adsorb DON and to reduce its cytotoxicity and genotoxicity.

  12. Structural improvement of compounds with analgesic activity: AC-MPF4, a compound with mixed anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activity via opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Rossato, Mateus Fortes; Oliveira, Sara Marchesan; Trevisan, Gabriela; Rotta, Mariane; Machado, Pablo; Martins, Marcos A P; Ferreira, Juliano

    2015-02-01

    Successful pain control is a world health problem, which indicates an ever-growing need in the discovery of new molecules with improved analgesic activity and reduced side effects. The aim of this study was to describe the synthesis and biological activity of AC-MPF4, a new acetyl- and pyrazole-containing molecule derivate from MPF4. Firstly, we evaluated the analgesic and anti-edematogenic effect of AC-MPF4 in the carrageenan test. AC-MPF4 presented similar analgesic properties to MPF4 (opioid drug) and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA-a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) (maximal effect of 85.4±10.9%, 62.0±11.0% and 95.0±10.4% of allodynia reduction, respectively). Regarding anti-edematogenic properties, AC-MPF4 presented similar results to ASA, while MPF4 presented no effect (maximal effect of 42.2±8.3% and 46.1±5.1% in paw thickness reduction, respectively). Remarkably, Naloxone fully prevented the analgesic effect of MPF4 and partially prevented the analgesic effect of AC-MPF4. However, neither ASA nor the anti-edematogenic activity was affected by Naloxone. The gastrointestinal motility and gastric mucosa integrity, which are parameters affected by opioid and NSAID drugs, respectively, were also evaluated. Neither of these parameters showed alterations induced by AC-MPF4, whereas ASA induced gastric ulceration (10 fold higher), and MPF4 decreased gastrointestinal motility (62.0±7.7%). Together, these data indicate that AC-MPF4 presents good analgesic and anti-edematogenic effects with no detectable side effects. AC-MPF4 may be considered a good prototype for the development of new analgesic/anti-inflammatory drugs.

  13. Cry1Ac toxin induces macrophage activation via ERK1/2, JNK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Torres-Martínez, Marilu; Rubio-Infante, Néstor; García-Hernández, Ana Lilia; Nava-Acosta, Raúl; Ilhuicatzi-Alvarado, Damaris; Moreno-Fierros, Leticia

    2016-09-01

    The Cry1Ac toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis is used commercially as a bio-insecticide and is expressed in transgenic plants that are used for human and animal consumption. Although it was originally considered innocuous for mammals, the Cry1Ac toxin is not inert and has the ability to induce mucosal and systemic immunogenicity. Herein, we examined whether the Cry1Ac toxin promotes macrophage activation and explored the signalling pathways that may mediate this effect. Treatment of primary and RAW264.7 macrophages with the Cry1Ac toxin resulted in upregulation of the costimulatory molecules CD80, CD86 and ICOS-L and enhanced production of nitric oxide, the chemokine MCP-1 and the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6. Remarkably, the Cry1Ac toxin induced phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) ERK1/2, JNK and p38 and promoted nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p50 and p65. p38 and ERK1/2 MAPKs were involved in this effect, as indicated by the Cry1Ac-induced upregulation of CD80 and IL-6 and TNF-α abrogation by the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580. Furthermore, treatment the MEK1/2 kinase inhibitor PD98059 blocked increases in MCP-1 secretion and augmented Cry1Ac-induced ICOS-L upregulation. These data demonstrate the capacity of the Cry1Ac toxin to induce macrophage activation via the MAPK and NF-κB pathways. PMID:27394658

  14. Influence of anatase and rutile phase in TiO2 upon the photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue under solar irradiation in presence of activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Matos, J; Montaña, R; Rivero, E; Escudero, A; Uzcategui, D

    2014-01-01

    The influence of activated carbon (AC) on the photocatalytic activity of different crystalline TiO2 phases was verified in the photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue under UV and solar irradiation. The results showed a volcano trend with a maximum photoactivity for the crystalline phase ratio of anatase:rutile equal to 80:20 both under UV or solar irradiation. By contrast, in presence of AC the photocatalytic activity of the binary materials of TiO2/AC followed an exponential trend, increasing as a function of the increase in anatase proportion in the TiO2 framework. The increase in the photoactivity of the binary material TiO2/AC relative to neat TiO2 was up to 22 and about 17 times higher under UV and visible irradiation, respectively. The present results suggest that AC interacts more efficiently with anatase phase than with rutile phase.

  15. Removal of arsenic from water by supported nano zero-valent iron on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huijie; Jia, Yongfeng; Wu, Xing; Wang, He

    2009-12-30

    Nano-sized zero-valent iron is an effective adsorbent for arsenic removal from drinking water. However, its application may be limited in public water system and small scale water treatment system due to its tiny particle size. In the present work, nanoscale zero-valent iron was supported onto activated carbon (NZVI/AC) by impregnating carbon with ferrous sulfate followed by chemical reduction with NaBH(4). Approximate 8.2 wt% of iron was loaded onto carbon and SEM analysis showed that the iron particles in the pores of carbon were needle-shaped with the size of 30-500 x 1000-2000 nm. Kinetics study revealed that adsorption of arsenite and arsenate by NZVI/AC was fast in the first 12h and the equilibrium was achieved in approximately 72 h. The adsorption capacity of the synthesized sorbent for arsenite and arsenate at pH 6.5 calculated from Langmuir adsorption isotherms in batch experiments was 18.2 and 12.0mg/g, respectively. Phosphate and silicate markedly decreased the removal of both arsenite and arsenate, while the effect of other anions and humic acid was insignificant. Common metal cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+)) enhanced arsenate adsorption but ferrous iron (Fe(2+)) was found to suppress arsenite adsorption. NZVI/AC can be effectively regenerated by elution with 0.1M NaOH.

  16. Akt-mTORC1 signaling regulates Acly to integrate metabolic input to control of macrophage activation

    PubMed Central

    Covarrubias, Anthony J; Aksoylar, Halil Ibrahim; Yu, Jiujiu; Snyder, Nathaniel W; Worth, Andrew J; Iyer, Shankar S; Wang, Jiawei; Ben-Sahra, Issam; Byles, Vanessa; Polynne-Stapornkul, Tiffany; Espinosa, Erika C; Lamming, Dudley; Manning, Brendan D; Zhang, Yijing; Blair, Ian A; Horng, Tiffany

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage activation/polarization to distinct functional states is critically supported by metabolic shifts. How polarizing signals coordinate metabolic and functional reprogramming, and the potential implications for control of macrophage activation, remains poorly understood. Here we show that IL-4 signaling co-opts the Akt-mTORC1 pathway to regulate Acly, a key enzyme in Ac-CoA synthesis, leading to increased histone acetylation and M2 gene induction. Only a subset of M2 genes is controlled in this way, including those regulating cellular proliferation and chemokine production. Moreover, metabolic signals impinge on the Akt-mTORC1 axis for such control of M2 activation. We propose that Akt-mTORC1 signaling calibrates metabolic state to energetically demanding aspects of M2 activation, which may define a new role for metabolism in supporting macrophage activation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11612.001 PMID:26894960

  17. Activity determination of (227)Ac and (223)Ra by means of liquid scintillation counting and determination of nuclear decay data.

    PubMed

    Kossert, Karsten; Bokeloh, Karen; Dersch, Rainer; Nähle, Ole

    2014-10-23

    The activity concentrations of solutions containing (227)Ac and (223)Ra in equilibrium with their progenies, respectively, were measured by means of liquid scintillation counting. The counting efficiencies were determined with the aid of a free parameter model. The corresponding calculations comprise the computation of several alpha, beta and beta/gamma branches. For short-lived progenies like (215)Po the counting efficiency depends on the counter dead time. Measurements were made in custom-built triple-to-double coincidence ratio (TDCR) systems and various dead-time adjustments were used. In addition, two commercial counters were used to apply the CIEMAT/NIST efficiency tracing technique using (3)H as a tracer. For the (227)Ac solution, the overall relative standard uncertainty of the activity concentration was found to be 0.93%. The dominant uncertainty components are assigned to the efficiency computation of the low-energy beta transitions of (227)Ac. We have identified a need for improved (227)Ac decay data to achieve a significant reduction in the overall uncertainty. In the case of (223)Ra, the activity concentrations were determined with relative standard uncertainties below 0.3%. Hence, PTB is prepared to provide calibration services for (223)Ra, which is an isotope of increasing interest in nuclear medicine. The TDCR measurements were also used to determine the half-life of (223)Ra. The decay was followed for about 58 days and a half-life T1/2=11.4362(50)d was obtained.

  18. [Preparation and characterization of activated carbon-silver composite with antibacterial behavior via vacuum impregnation method].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zi-Qiang; Liu, Shou-Xin

    2011-01-01

    Activated carbon-silver composite (Ag/AC) for antibacterial performance by controlling silver release was prepared by silver acetate vacuum impregnation method. The antibacterial activity towards E. coil and resistance of water erosion was investigated through distilled water. Surface area and porosity analyzer, Scanning electron spectroscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize the surface morphology and pore properties. The results show that Ag0 was deposited on AC symmetrically. The content of silver supported and particle size were increased by the increasing of the concentration of CH3 COOAg, while specific surface area, total pore volume and average pore size were decreased. Ag/AC prepared with silver content of 0.97% which killed 10(7) CFU/mL concentration of E. coil in 120 min exhibited the similar antibacterial activity for E. coil with that prepared by traditional impregnation method. However, the silver loss of the Ag/AC prepared with silver content of 0.97% was 37.6%, showing much higher resistance to water erosion. High antibacterial activity and control silver release can be simultaneously realized by the silver acetate vacuum impregnation method.

  19. Photocatalytic degradation of an azo-dye on TiO2/activated carbon composite material.

    PubMed

    Andriantsiferana, C; Mohamed, E F; Delmas, H

    2014-01-01

    A sequential adsorption/photocatalytic regeneration process to remove tartrazine, an azo-dye in aqueous solution, has been investigated. The aim ofthis work was to compare the effectiveness of an adsorbent/photocatalyst composite-TiO2 deposited onto activated carbon (AC) - and a simple mixture of powders of TiO2 and AC in same proportion. The composite was an innovative material as the photocatalyst, TiO2, was deposited on the porous surface ofa microporous-AC using metal-organic chemical vapour deposition in fluidized bed. The sequential process was composed of two-batch step cycles: every cycle alternated a step of adsorption and a step of photocatalytic oxidation under ultra-violet (365 nm), at 25 degreeC and atmospheric pressure. Both steps, adsorption and photocatalytic oxidation, have been investigated during four cycles. For both materials, the cumulated amounts adsorbed during four cycles corresponded to nearly twice the maximum adsorption capacities qmax proving the photocatalytic oxidation to regenerate the adsorbent. Concerning photocatalytic oxidation, the degree of mineralization was higher with the TiO2/AC composite: for each cycle, the value of the total organic carbon removal was 25% higher than that obtained with the mixture powder. These better photocatalytic performances involved better regeneration than higher adsorbed amounts for cycles 2, 3 and 4. Better performances with this promising material - TiO2 deposited onto AC - compared with TiO2 powder could be explained by the vicinity of photocatalytic and AC adsorption sites.

  20. Lignin-based activated carbons for adsorption of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate: Equilibrium and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Cotoruelo, Luis M; Marqués, María D; Rodríguez-Mirasol, José; Rodríguez, Juan J; Cordero, Tomás

    2009-04-01

    The adsorption of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS) from its aqueous solution at different temperatures has been studied using three activated carbons prepared in our laboratory. Lignin was used as raw material for the preparation of activated carbons (ACs). The results of the adsorption equilibrium were analyzed and fitted to the Langmuir model. Thermodynamic magnitudes were estimated as well, and their values indicated that the adsorption processes were spontaneous and exothermic. The kinetic study showed that the processes are of second apparent order related to the concentration of the vacant active centers on the surface of the activated carbons. The values of the effective internal diffusion coefficients have been calculated applying the equations developed by Crank and Vermeulen.

  1. Methylene blue adsorption from aqueous solution by activated carbon: effect of acidic and alkaline solution treatments.

    PubMed

    Ijagbemi, Christianah O; Chun, Ji I; Han, Da H; Cho, Hye Y; O, Se J; Kim, Dong S

    2010-01-01

    The removal of Methylene Blue (MB) from aqueous solution using activated carbon (AC) has been investigated. Adsorption experiments were conducted and the maximum adsorption capacity was determined. The effect of experimental parameters such as pH, dye concentration and temperature were studied on the adsorption process. Equilibrium data were mathematically modeled using the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models to describe the equilibrium isotherms at different dye concentrations and temperature. Parameters of best-fit model were calculated and discussed. To understand the mechanism of adsorption, kinetic models were employed to follow the adsorption processes; the pseudo-first-order best described the adsorption of MB onto AC. It was found that pH plays a major role in the adsorption process; adsorption capacity was influenced by the physical and surface chemical properties of carbon and the pH of the solution. 99.0% MB removal was achieved at equilibrium.

  2. Renewable phenols production by catalytic microwave pyrolysis of Douglas fir sawdust pellets with activated carbon catalysts.

    PubMed

    Bu, Quan; Lei, Hanwu; Wang, Lu; Wei, Yi; Zhu, Lei; Liu, Yupeng; Liang, Jing; Tang, Juming

    2013-08-01

    The effects of different activated carbon (AC) catalysts based on various carbon sources on products yield and chemical compositions of upgraded pyrolysis oils were investigated using microwave pyrolysis of Douglas fir sawdust pellets. Results showed that high amounts of phenols were obtained (74.61% and 74.77% in the upgraded bio-oils by DARCO MRX (wood based) and DARCO 830 (lignite coal based) activated carbons, respectively). The catalysts recycling test of the selected catalysts indicated that the carbon catalysts can be reused for at least 3-4 times and produced high concentrations of phenol and phenolic compounds. The chemical reaction mechanism for phenolics production during microwave pyrolysis of biomass was analyzed. PMID:23765005

  3. Renewable phenols production by catalytic microwave pyrolysis of Douglas fir sawdust pellets with activated carbon catalysts.

    PubMed

    Bu, Quan; Lei, Hanwu; Wang, Lu; Wei, Yi; Zhu, Lei; Liu, Yupeng; Liang, Jing; Tang, Juming

    2013-08-01

    The effects of different activated carbon (AC) catalysts based on various carbon sources on products yield and chemical compositions of upgraded pyrolysis oils were investigated using microwave pyrolysis of Douglas fir sawdust pellets. Results showed that high amounts of phenols were obtained (74.61% and 74.77% in the upgraded bio-oils by DARCO MRX (wood based) and DARCO 830 (lignite coal based) activated carbons, respectively). The catalysts recycling test of the selected catalysts indicated that the carbon catalysts can be reused for at least 3-4 times and produced high concentrations of phenol and phenolic compounds. The chemical reaction mechanism for phenolics production during microwave pyrolysis of biomass was analyzed.

  4. Hydrogen production using thermocatalytic decomposition of methane on Ni30/activated carbon and Ni30/carbon black.

    PubMed

    Srilatha, K; Viditha, V; Srinivasulu, D; Ramakrishna, S U B; Himabindu, V

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen is an energy carrier of the future need. It could be produced from different sources and used for power generation or as a transport fuel which mainly in association with fuel cells. The primary challenge for hydrogen production is reducing the cost of production technologies to make the resulting hydrogen cost competitive with conventional fuels. Thermocatalytic decomposition (TCD) of methane is one of the most advantageous processes, which will meet the future demand, hence an attractive route for COx free environment. The present study deals with the production of hydrogen with 30 wt% of Ni impregnated in commercially available activated carbon and carbon black catalysts (samples coded as Ni30/AC and Ni30/CB, respectively). These combined catalysts were not attempted by previous studies. Pure form of hydrogen is produced at 850 °C and volume hourly space velocity (VHSV) of 1.62 L/h g on the activity of both the catalysts. The analysis (X-ray diffraction (XRD)) of the catalysts reveals moderately crystalline peaks of Ni, which might be responsible for the increase in catalytic life along with formation of carbon fibers. The activity of carbon black is sustainable for a longer time compared to that of activated carbon which has been confirmed by life time studies (850 °C and 54 sccm of methane).

  5. Hydrogen production using thermocatalytic decomposition of methane on Ni30/activated carbon and Ni30/carbon black.

    PubMed

    Srilatha, K; Viditha, V; Srinivasulu, D; Ramakrishna, S U B; Himabindu, V

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen is an energy carrier of the future need. It could be produced from different sources and used for power generation or as a transport fuel which mainly in association with fuel cells. The primary challenge for hydrogen production is reducing the cost of production technologies to make the resulting hydrogen cost competitive with conventional fuels. Thermocatalytic decomposition (TCD) of methane is one of the most advantageous processes, which will meet the future demand, hence an attractive route for COx free environment. The present study deals with the production of hydrogen with 30 wt% of Ni impregnated in commercially available activated carbon and carbon black catalysts (samples coded as Ni30/AC and Ni30/CB, respectively). These combined catalysts were not attempted by previous studies. Pure form of hydrogen is produced at 850 °C and volume hourly space velocity (VHSV) of 1.62 L/h g on the activity of both the catalysts. The analysis (X-ray diffraction (XRD)) of the catalysts reveals moderately crystalline peaks of Ni, which might be responsible for the increase in catalytic life along with formation of carbon fibers. The activity of carbon black is sustainable for a longer time compared to that of activated carbon which has been confirmed by life time studies (850 °C and 54 sccm of methane). PMID:26233751

  6. Development of an activated carbon filter to remove NO2 and HONO in indoor air.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jun Young; Park, Chan Jung; Kim, Ki Yeong; Son, Youn-Suk; Kang, Choong-Min; Wolfson, Jack M; Jung, In-Ha; Lee, Sung-Joo; Koutrakis, Petros

    2015-05-30

    To obtain the optimum removal efficiency of NO2 and HONO by coated activated carbon (ACs), the influencing factors, including the loading rate, metal and non-metal precursors, and mixture ratios, were investigated. The NOx removal efficiency (RE) for K, with the same loading (1.0 wt.%), was generally higher than for those loaded with Cu or Mn. The RE of NO2 was also higher when KOH was used as the K precursor, compared to other K precursors (KI, KNO3, and KMnO4). In addition, the REs by the ACs loaded with K were approximately 38-55% higher than those by uncoated ACs. Overall, the REs (above 95%) of HONO and NOx with 3% KOH were the highest of the coated AC filters that were tested. Additionally, the REs of NOx and HONO using a mixing ratio of 6 (2.5% PABA (p-aminobenzoic acid)+6% H3PO4):4 (3% KOH) were the highest of all the coatings tested (both metal and non-metal). The results of this study show that AC loaded with various coatings has the potential to effectively reduce NO2 and HONO levels in indoor air.

  7. Electrochemical studies on nanometal oxide-activated carbon composite electrodes for aqueous supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Mui Yen; Khiew, Poi Sim; Isa, Dino; Chiu, Wee Siong

    2014-11-01

    In present study, the electrochemical performance of eco-friendly and cost-effective titanium oxide (TiO2)-based and zinc oxide-based nanocomposite electrodes were studied in neutral aqueous Na2SO3 electrolyte, respectively. The electrochemical properties of these composite electrodes were studied using cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge-discharge (CD) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The experimental results reveal that these two nanocomposite electrodes achieve the highest specific capacitance at fairly low oxide loading onto activated carbon (AC) electrodes, respectively. Considerable enhancement of the electrochemical properties of TiO2/AC and ZnO/AC nanocomposite electrodes is achieved via synergistic effects contributed from the nanostructured metal oxides and the high surface area mesoporous AC. Cations and anions from metal oxides and aqueous electrolyte such as Ti4+, Zn2+, Na+ and SO32- can occupy some pores within the high-surface-area AC electrodes, forming the electric double layer at the electrode-electrolyte interface. Additionally, both TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles can provide favourable surface adsorption sites for SO32- anions which subsequently facilitate the faradaic processes for pseudocapacitive effect. These two systems provide the low cost material electrodes and the low environmental impact electrolyte which offer the increased charge storage without compromising charge storage kinetics.

  8. Interfacial behavior of polar, weakly polar, and nonpolar compounds bound to activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Gun'ko, V M; Turov, V V; Zarko, V I; Goncharuk, O V; Nychiporuk, Yu M; Kozynchenko, O P; Skubiszewska-Zięba, J; Leboda, R; Charmas, B; Balakin, D Yu; Ptushinskii, Yu G

    2013-08-15

    Detailed analysis of the interfacial behavior of water and weakly polar or nonpolar organics adsorbed alone or co-adsorbed onto activated carbons (AC) at different temperatures is a complex problem important for practical applications of adsorbents. Interaction of water, 1-decanol, and n-decane with AC possessing highly developed porosity (pore volume Vp≈1.4-2.3 cm(3)/g, specific surface area S(BET)≈1500-3500 m(2)/g) was studied over a broad temperature range using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermoporometry, (1)H NMR spectroscopy, cryoporometry, and temperature-programmed desorption with mass-spectrometry control methods. Comparison of the pore size distributions (PSD) calculated using the DSC thermoporometry, NMR cryoporometry, and nitrogen adsorption isotherms allows us to determine localization of adsorbates in different pores, as well as changes in the PSD of AC due to freezing of adsorbates in pores. Theoretical calculations (using ab initio HF/6-31G(d,p), DFT B3LYP/6-31G(d,p), and PM7 methods) explain certain aspects of the interfacial behavior of water, decane, and decanol adsorbed onto AC that appear in the experimental data. Obtained results show strong temperature dependence (above and below the freezing point, Tf, of bulk liquids) of the interfacial behavior of adsorbates on the textural characteristics and hydrophilic/hydrophobic properties of AC and the adsorbate amounts that affect the distributions of adsorbates unfrozen at T

  9. Comparative performance of cement kiln dust and activated carbon in removal of cadmium from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    El-Refaey, Ahmed A

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the performance of cement kiln dust (CKD) as industrial byproduct and commercially activated carbon (AC) as adsorbent derived from agricultural waste for the removal of cadmium (Cd(2+)) from aqueous solutions. CKD and AC were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and surface areas demonstrate the differences of physicochemical properties. Batch equilibrium experiments were conducted for various intervals extended to 96 h at 20, 25 and 30°C to investigate the efficiency of the sorbents in the removal of Cd(2+). CKD expressed high affinity for removal of Cd(2+) and was not affected by temperature, while AC was significantly affected, which reflects dissimilarity in the retention mechanisms defendant in CKD and those pursued by AC. The results were explained by changes of FTIR and SEM images before and after sorption experiments. The suggestion is that electrostatic ion exchange and complex reactions are the main mechanisms for Cd(2+) removal. The kinetic data were evaluated by fractional power, Elovich, pseudo-first order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model was found to correlate with the experimental data well. These results revealed that CKD can be used as a cost-effective and efficient sorbent for Cd(2+) removal in comparison with AC.

  10. Interfacial behavior of polar, weakly polar, and nonpolar compounds bound to activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Gun'ko, V M; Turov, V V; Zarko, V I; Goncharuk, O V; Nychiporuk, Yu M; Kozynchenko, O P; Skubiszewska-Zięba, J; Leboda, R; Charmas, B; Balakin, D Yu; Ptushinskii, Yu G

    2013-08-15

    Detailed analysis of the interfacial behavior of water and weakly polar or nonpolar organics adsorbed alone or co-adsorbed onto activated carbons (AC) at different temperatures is a complex problem important for practical applications of adsorbents. Interaction of water, 1-decanol, and n-decane with AC possessing highly developed porosity (pore volume Vp≈1.4-2.3 cm(3)/g, specific surface area S(BET)≈1500-3500 m(2)/g) was studied over a broad temperature range using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermoporometry, (1)H NMR spectroscopy, cryoporometry, and temperature-programmed desorption with mass-spectrometry control methods. Comparison of the pore size distributions (PSD) calculated using the DSC thermoporometry, NMR cryoporometry, and nitrogen adsorption isotherms allows us to determine localization of adsorbates in different pores, as well as changes in the PSD of AC due to freezing of adsorbates in pores. Theoretical calculations (using ab initio HF/6-31G(d,p), DFT B3LYP/6-31G(d,p), and PM7 methods) explain certain aspects of the interfacial behavior of water, decane, and decanol adsorbed onto AC that appear in the experimental data. Obtained results show strong temperature dependence (above and below the freezing point, Tf, of bulk liquids) of the interfacial behavior of adsorbates on the textural characteristics and hydrophilic/hydrophobic properties of AC and the adsorbate amounts that affect the distributions of adsorbates unfrozen at T

  11. Comparative performance of cement kiln dust and activated carbon in removal of cadmium from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    El-Refaey, Ahmed A

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the performance of cement kiln dust (CKD) as industrial byproduct and commercially activated carbon (AC) as adsorbent derived from agricultural waste for the removal of cadmium (Cd(2+)) from aqueous solutions. CKD and AC were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and surface areas demonstrate the differences of physicochemical properties. Batch equilibrium experiments were conducted for various intervals extended to 96 h at 20, 25 and 30°C to investigate the efficiency of the sorbents in the removal of Cd(2+). CKD expressed high affinity for removal of Cd(2+) and was not affected by temperature, while AC was significantly affected, which reflects dissimilarity in the retention mechanisms defendant in CKD and those pursued by AC. The results were explained by changes of FTIR and SEM images before and after sorption experiments. The suggestion is that electrostatic ion exchange and complex reactions are the main mechanisms for Cd(2+) removal. The kinetic data were evaluated by fractional power, Elovich, pseudo-first order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model was found to correlate with the experimental data well. These results revealed that CKD can be used as a cost-effective and efficient sorbent for Cd(2+) removal in comparison with AC. PMID:27054742

  12. Biochar and activated carbon for enhanced trace organic contaminant retention in stormwater infiltration systems.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Bridget A; Im, Eugenia A; Werner, David; Higgins, Christopher P

    2015-05-19

    To assess the effectiveness of biochar and activated carbon (AC) for enhanced trace organic contaminant (TOrC) retention in stormwater infiltration systems, an approach combining forward-prediction modeling and laboratory verification experiments was employed. Batch and column tests were conducted using representative TOrCs and synthetic stormwater. Based on batch screening tests, two commercially available biochars (BN-biochar and MCG-biochar) and an AC were investigated. The AC exhibited the strongest sorption, followed by MCG-biochar and BN-biochar. Langmuir isotherms provided better fits to equilibrium data than Freundlich isotherms. Due to superior sorption kinetics, 0.2 wt % MCG-biochar in saturated sand columns retained TOrCs more effectively than 1.0 wt % BN-biochar. A forward-prediction intraparticle diffusion model based on the Langmuir isotherm adequately predicted column results when calibrated using only batch parameters, as indicated by a Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis. Case study simulations estimated that an infiltration basin amended with F300-AC or MCG-biochar could obtain sorption-retarded breakthrough times for atrazine of 54 or 5.8 years, respectively, at a 1 in./h infiltration rate. These results indicate that biochars or ACs with superior sorption capacity and kinetics can enhance TOrC retention in infiltration systems, and performance under various conditions can be predicted using results from batch tests.

  13. Preparation and electrochemical characterization of polyaniline/activated carbon composites as an electrode material for supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Oh, Misoon; Kim, Seok

    2012-01-01

    Polyaniline (PANI)/activated carbon (AC) composites were prepared by a chemical oxidation polymerization. To find an optimum ratio between PANI and AC which shows superior electrochemical properties, the preparation was carried out in changing the amount of added aniline monomers. The morphology of prepared composites was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The structural and thermal properties were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), respectively. The electrochemical properties were characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV). Composites showed a summation of capacitances that consisted of two origins. One is double-layer capacitance by ACs and the other is faradic capacitance by redox reaction of PANI. Fiber-like PANIs are coated on the surface of ACs and they contribute to the large surface for redox reaction. The vacancy among fibers provided the better diffusion and accessibility of ion. High capacitances of composites were originated from the network structure having vacancy made by PANI fibers. It was found that the composite prepared with 5 ml of aniline monomer and 0.25 g of AC showed the highest capacitance. Capacitance of 771 F/g was obtained at a scan rate of 5 mV/s.

  14. Adsorption properties of an activated carbon for 18 cytokines and HMGB1 from inflammatory model plasma.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Satoru; Kiriyama, Kentaro; Hatanaka, Yoshihiro; Kanoh, Hirofumi

    2015-02-01

    The ability of an activated carbon (AC) to adsorb 18 different cytokines with molecular weights ranging from 8 kDa to 70 kDa and high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) from inflammatory model plasma at 310 K and the mechanisms of adsorption were examined. Porosity analysis using N2 gas adsorption at 77K showed that the AC had micropores with diameters of 1-2 nm and mesopores with diameters of 5-20 nm. All 18 cytokines and HMGB1 were adsorbed on the AC; however, the shapes of the adsorption isotherms changed depending on the molecular weight. The adsorption isotherms for molecules of 8-10 kDa, 10-20 kDa, 20-30 kDa, and higher molecular weights were classified as H-2, L-3, S-3, and S-1 types, respectively. These results suggested that the adsorption mechanism for the cytokines and HMGB1 in the mesopores and on the surface of the AC differed as a function of the molecular weight. On the basis of these results, it can be concluded that AC should be efficient for cytokine adsorption.

  15. Development of an activated carbon filter to remove NO2 and HONO in indoor air.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jun Young; Park, Chan Jung; Kim, Ki Yeong; Son, Youn-Suk; Kang, Choong-Min; Wolfson, Jack M; Jung, In-Ha; Lee, Sung-Joo; Koutrakis, Petros

    2015-05-30

    To obtain the optimum removal efficiency of NO2 and HONO by coated activated carbon (ACs), the influencing factors, including the loading rate, metal and non-metal precursors, and mixture ratios, were investigated. The NOx removal efficiency (RE) for K, with the same loading (1.0 wt.%), was generally higher than for those loaded with Cu or Mn. The RE of NO2 was also higher when KOH was used as the K precursor, compared to other K precursors (KI, KNO3, and KMnO4). In addition, the REs by the ACs loaded with K were approximately 38-55% higher than those by uncoated ACs. Overall, the REs (above 95%) of HONO and NOx with 3% KOH were the highest of the coated AC filters that were tested. Additionally, the REs of NOx and HONO using a mixing ratio of 6 (2.5% PABA (p-aminobenzoic acid)+6% H3PO4):4 (3% KOH) were the highest of all the coatings tested (both metal and non-metal). The results of this study show that AC loaded with various coatings has the potential to effectively reduce NO2 and HONO levels in indoor air. PMID:25725340

  16. A novel activated carbon for supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Haijie; Liu, Enhui; Xiang, Xiaoxia; Huang, Zhengzheng; Tian, Yingying; Wu, Yuhu; Wu, Zhilian; Xie, Hui

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel activated carbon was prepared from phenol-melamine-formaldehyde resin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The carbon has large surface area with microporous, and high heteroatom content. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heteroatom-containing functional groups can improve the pseudo-capacitance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Physical and chemical properties lead to the good electrochemical properties. -- Abstract: A novel activated carbon has been prepared by simple carbonization and activation of phenol-melamine-formaldehyde resin which is synthesized by the condensation polymerization method. The morphology, thermal stability, surface area, elemental composition and surface chemical composition of samples have been investigated by scanning electron microscope, thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller measurement, elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. Electrochemical properties have been studied by cyclic voltammograms, galvanostatic charge/discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements in 6 mol L{sup -1} potassium hydroxide. The activated carbon shows good capacitive behavior and the specific capacitance is up to 210 F g{sup -1}, which indicates that it may be a promising candidate for supercapacitors.

  17. Black Ink of Activated Carbon Derived From Palm Kernel Cake (PKC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selamat, M. H.; Ahmad, A. H.

    2009-06-01

    Recycling the waste from natural plant to produce useful end products will benefit many industries and help preserve the environment. The research reported in this paper is an investigation on the use of the natural waste of palm kernel cake (PKC) to produce carbon residue as a black carbon for pigment source by using pyrolysis process. The activated carbons (AC) is produced in powder form using ball milling process. Rheological spectra in ink is one of quality control process in determining its performance properties. Findings from this study will help expand the scientific knowledge-base for black ink production and formulation base on PKC. Various inks with different weight percentage compositions of AC will be made and tested against its respective rheological properties in order to determine ideal ink printing system. The items in the formulation used comprised of organic and bio-waste materials with added additive to improve the quality of the black ink. Modified Polyurethane was used as binder. The binder's properties highlighted an ideal vehicle to be applied for good black ink opacity performance. The rheological behaviour is a general foundation for ink characterization where the wt% of AC-PKC resulted in different pseudoplastic behaviors, including the Newtonian behavior. The result found that Newtonian field was located in between 2 wt% and 10 wt% of AC-PKC composition with binder. Mass spectroscopy results shown that the carbon content in PKC is high and very suitable for black performance. In the ageing test, the pigment of PKC perform fairly according to the standard pigment of Black carbon (CB) of ferum oxide pigment. The contact angle for substrate's wettability of the ink system shown a good angle proven to be a water resistive coating on paper subtrates; an advantage of the PKC ink pigment performance.

  18. LSER model for organic compounds adsorption by single-walled carbon nanotubes: Comparison with multi-walled carbon nanotubes and activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiangquan; Sun, Weiling; Ni, Jinren

    2015-11-01

    LSER models for organic compounds adsorption by single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes and activated carbon were successfully developed. The cavity formation and dispersion interactions (vV), hydrogen bond acidity interactions (bB) and π-/n-electron interactions (eE) are the most influential adsorption mechanisms. SWCNTs is more polarizable, less polar, more hydrophobic, and has weaker hydrogen bond accepting and donating abilities than MWCNTs and AC. Compared with SWCNTs and MWCNTs, AC has much less hydrophobic and less hydrophilic adsorption sites. The regression coefficients (e, s, a, b, v) vary in different ways with increasing chemical saturation. Nonspecific interactions (represented by eE and vV) have great positive contribution to organic compounds adsorption, and follow the order of SWCNTs > MWCNTs > AC, while hydrogen bond interactions (represented by aA and bB) demonstrate negative contribution. These models will be valuable for understanding adsorption mechanisms, comparing adsorbent characteristics, and selecting the proper adsorbents for certain organic compounds.

  19. LSER model for organic compounds adsorption by single-walled carbon nanotubes: Comparison with multi-walled carbon nanotubes and activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiangquan; Sun, Weiling; Ni, Jinren

    2015-11-01

    LSER models for organic compounds adsorption by single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes and activated carbon were successfully developed. The cavity formation and dispersion interactions (vV), hydrogen bond acidity interactions (bB) and π-/n-electron interactions (eE) are the most influential adsorption mechanisms. SWCNTs is more polarizable, less polar, more hydrophobic, and has weaker hydrogen bond accepting and donating abilities than MWCNTs and AC. Compared with SWCNTs and MWCNTs, AC has much less hydrophobic and less hydrophilic adsorption sites. The regression coefficients (e, s, a, b, v) vary in different ways with increasing chemical saturation. Nonspecific interactions (represented by eE and vV) have great positive contribution to organic compounds adsorption, and follow the order of SWCNTs > MWCNTs > AC, while hydrogen bond interactions (represented by aA and bB) demonstrate negative contribution. These models will be valuable for understanding adsorption mechanisms, comparing adsorbent characteristics, and selecting the proper adsorbents for certain organic compounds. PMID:26319510

  20. Vortex activation energy in the AC magnetic response of superconducting YBa2Cu3O7 thin films with complex pinning structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivan, I.; Ionescu, A. M.; Miu, D.; Mele, P.; Miu, L.

    2016-09-01

    The vortex activation energy U AC in the AC magnetic response of superconductors exhibits a logarithmic variation with the screening current density J (regardless of the pinning structure details), and takes surprisingly high values in the vicinity of the DC irreversibility line, especially at low external DC magnetic fields, as often reported. This is essentially different from the behaviour of the vortex-creep activation energy at long relaxation time scales in DC magnetic measurements, and is not completely understood. We investigated the DC relaxation and the AC response for YBa2Cu3O7 films containing nanorods and nanoparticles, with the DC and AC fields oriented perpendicular to the film surface. It is shown that the large U AC values in the vicinity of the DC irreversibility line, where the critical-state-related AC signal occurs, are generated by a non-diffusive vortex motion during the AC cycle, with the mean vortex hopping length longer than the average distance between the pinning centres. In these conditions, the smearing of the vortex pinning potential by thermally induced vortex fluctuations is weak, and U AC mainly results from the strong influence of the pinning-enhanced viscous drag on the vortex hopping process. The logarithmic U AC(J) dependence is consistent with a high U AC.

  1. Electrospun carbon nanofibers from polyacrylonitrile blended with activated or graphitized carbonaceous materials for improving anodic bioelectrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Patil, Sunil A; Chigome, Samuel; Hägerhäll, Cecilia; Torto, Nelson; Gorton, Lo

    2013-03-01

    The electrospun carbon nanofibers obtained from polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and PAN blends with either activated carbon (PAN-AC) or graphite (PAN-GR) were tested as anodes using Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Extensive physico-chemical and electrochemical characterization confirmed their formation, their fibrous and porous nature, and their suitability as electrodes. N2 adsorption measurements revealed high specific surface area (229.8, 415.8 and 485.2m(2) g(-1)) and porosity (0.142, 0.202 and 0.239cm(3)g(-1)) for PAN, PAN-AC and PAN-GR, respectively. The chronoamperometric measurements showed a considerable decrease in start-up time and more than a 10-fold increase in the generation of current with these electrodes (115, 139 and 155μAcm(-2) for PAN, PAN-AC and PAN-GR, respectively) compared to the graphite electrode (11.5μAcm(-2)). These results indicate that the bioelectrocatalysis benefits from the blending of PAN with activated or graphitized carbonaceous materials, presumably due to the increased specific surface area, total pore volume and modification of the carbon microstructure. PMID:23399497

  2. Activated carbon fiber for heterogeneous activation of persulfate: implication for the decolorization of azo dye.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiabin; Hong, Wei; Huang, Tianyin; Zhang, Liming; Li, Wenwei; Wang, Ying

    2016-09-01

    Activated carbon fiber (ACF) was used as a green catalyst to activate persulfate (PS) for oxidative decolorization of azo dye. ACF demonstrated a higher activity than activated carbon (AC) to activate PS to decolorize Orange G (OG). The decolorization efficiency of OG increased as ACF loading, PS dosage, and temperature increased. OG decolorization followed a pseudo first-order kinetics, and the activation energy was 40.902 kJ/mol. pH had no apparent effect on OG decolorization. Radical quenching experiments with various radical scavengers (e.g., alcohols, phenol) showed that radical-induced decolorization of OG took place on the surface of ACF, and both SO4 (·-) and HO· were responsible for OG decolorization. The impact of inorganic salts was also evaluated because they are important compositions of dye wastewater. Cl(-) and SO4 (2-) exhibited a promoting effect on OG decolorization, and the accelerating rate increased with elevating dosage of ions. Addition of Cl(-) and SO4 (2-) could increase the adsorption of OG on ACF surface, thus favorable for OG decolorization caused by the surface-bound SO4 (·-) and HO·. Conversely, HCO3 (-) and humic acid (HA) slightly inhibited OG decolorization. The azo band and naphthalene ring on OG were remarkably destructed to other intermediates and finally mineralized to CO2 and H2O. PMID:27294702

  3. Activated carbon and single-walled carbon nanotube based electrochemical capacitor in 1 M LiPF{sub 6} electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Azam, M.A.; Jantan, N.H.; Dorah, N.; Seman, R.N.A.R.; Manaf, N.S.A.; Kudin, T.I.T.; Yahya, M.Z.A.

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Activated carbon and single-walled CNT based electrochemical capacitor. • Electrochemical analysis by means of CV, charge/discharge and impedance. • 1 M LiPF{sub 6} non-aqueous solution as an electrolyte. • AC/SWCNT electrode exhibits a maximum capacitance of 60.97 F g{sup −1}. - Abstract: Carbon nanotubes have been extensively studied because of their wide range of potential application such as in nanoscale electric circuits, textiles, transportation, health, and the environment. Carbon nanotubes feature extraordinary properties, such as electrical conductivities higher than those of copper, hardness and thermal conductivity higher than those of diamond, and strength surpassing that of steel, among others. This research focuses on the fabrication of an energy storage device, namely, an electrochemical capacitor, by using carbon materials, i.e., activated carbon and single-walled carbon nanotubes, of a specific weight ratio as electrode materials. The electrolyte functioning as an ion carrier is 1 M lithium hexafluorophosphate. Variations in the electrochemical performance of the device, including its capacitance, charge/discharge characteristics, and impedance, are reported in this paper. The electrode proposed in this work exhibits a maximum capacitance of 60.97 F g{sup −1} at a scan rate of 1 mV s{sup −1}.

  4. Activated carbon monoliths for methane storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chada, Nagaraju; Romanos, Jimmy; Hilton, Ramsey; Suppes, Galen; Burress, Jacob; Pfeifer, Peter

    2012-02-01

    The use of adsorbent storage media for natural gas (methane) vehicles allows for the use of non-cylindrical tanks due to the decreased pressure at which the natural gas is stored. The use of carbon powder as a storage material allows for a high mass of methane stored for mass of sample, but at the cost of the tank volume. Densified carbon monoliths, however, allow for the mass of methane for volume of tank to be optimized. In this work, different activated carbon monoliths have been produced using a polymeric binder, with various synthesis parameters. The methane storage was studied using a home-built, dosing-type instrument. A monolith with optimal parameters has been fabricated. The gravimetric excess adsorption for the optimized monolith was found to be 161 g methane for kg carbon.

  5. Solar regeneration of powdered activated carbon impregnated with visible-light responsive photocatalyst: factors affecting performances and predictive model.

    PubMed

    Yap, Pow-Seng; Lim, Teik-Thye

    2012-06-01

    This study demonstrated a green technique to regenerate spent powdered activated carbon (AC) using solar photocatalysis. The AC was impregnated with a photocatalyst photoexcitable under visible-light irradiation to yield a solar regenerable composite, namely nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide (N-TiO(2)/AC). This composite exhibited bifunctional adsorptive-photocatalytic characteristics. Contaminants of emerging environmental concern, i.e. bisphenol-A (BPA), sulfamethazine (SMZ) and clofibric acid (CFA) which exhibited varying affinities for AC were chosen as target pollutants. The adsorption of BPA and SMZ by the N-TiO(2)/AC was significantly higher than that of CFA. The performance of solar photocatalytic regeneration (SPR) of the spent N-TiO(2)/AC composite generally increased with light intensity, N-TiO(2) loading and temperature. The regeneration efficiency (RE) for CFA-loaded spent composite was the highest compared to the other pollutant-loaded spent composites, achieving 77% within 8h of solar irradiation (765 W m(-2)). The rate-limiting process was pollutant desorption from the interior AC sorption sites. A kinetic model was developed to predict the transient concentration of the sorbate remaining in the spent composite during SPR. Comparison studies using solvent extraction technique indicated a different order of RE for the three pollutants, attributable to their varying solubilities in the aqueous and organic solvents. PMID:22464146

  6. Preparation of activated carbons with mesopores by use of organometallics

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Yoshio; Yoshizawa, Noriko; Furuta, Takeshi

    1996-12-31

    Activated carbons are commercially produced by steam or CO{sub 2} activation of coal, coconut shell and so on. In general the carbons obtained give pores with a broad range of distribution. The objective of this study was to prepare activated carbons from coal by use of various organometallic compounds. The carbons were evaluated for pore size by nitrogen adsorption experiments.

  7. USING POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON: A CRITICAL REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because the performance of powdered activated carbon (PAC) for uses other than taste and odor control is poorly documented, the purpose of this article is to critically review uses that have been reported (i.e., pesticides and herbicides, synthetic organic chemicals, and trihalom...

  8. MODELING MERCURY CONTROL WITH POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents a mathematical model of total mercury removed from the flue gas at coal-fired plants equipped with powdered activated carbon (PAC) injection for Mercury control. The developed algorithms account for mercury removal by both existing equipment and an added PAC in...

  9. Isolation of sequences flanking Ac insertion sites by Ac casting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dafang; Peterson, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Localizing Ac insertions is a fundamental task in studying Ac-induced mutation and chromosomal rearrangements involving Ac elements. Researchers may sometimes be faced with the situation in which the sequence flanking one side of an Ac/Ds element is known, but the other flank is unknown. Or, a researcher may have a small sequence surrounding the Ac/Ds insertion site and needs to obtain additional flanking genomic sequences. One way to rapidly clone unknown Ac/Ds flanking sequences is via a PCR-based method termed Ac casting. This approach utilizes the somatic transposition activity of Ac during plant development, and provides an efficient means for short-range genome walking. Here we describe the principle of Ac casting, and show how it can be applied to isolate Ac macrotransposon insertion sites.

  10. Pore structure effects on Ca-based sorbent sulfation capacity at medium temperatures: activated carbon as sorbent/catalyst support.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hui-Hsin; Wey, Ming-Yen; Lin, Chiou-Liang; Chang, Yu-Chen

    2002-11-01

    The reaction between three different Ca-based sorbents and SO2 were studied in a medium temperature range (473-773 K). The largest SO2 capture was found with Ca(OH)2 at 773 K, 126.31 mg SO2 x g Ca(OH)2(-1), and the influence of SO2 concentration on the sorbent utilization was observed. Investigations of the internal porous structure of Ca-based sorbents showed that the initial reaction rate was controlled by the surface area, and once the sulfated products were produced, pore structure dominated. To increase the surface area of Ca-based sorbents available to interact with and retain SO2, one kind of CaO/ activated carbon (AC) sorbent/catalyst was prepared to study the effect of AC on the dispersion of Ca-based materials. The results indicated that the Ca-based material dispersed on high-surface-area AC had more capacities for SO2 than unsupported Ca-based sorbents. The initial reaction rates of the reaction between SO2 and Ca-based sorbents and the prepared CaO/AC sorbents/catalysts were measured. Results showed that the reaction rate apparently increased with the presence of AC. It was concluded that CaO/AC was the active material in the desulfurization reaction. AC acting as the support can play a role to supply O2 to increase the affinity to SO2. Moreover, when AC is acting as a support, the surface oxygen functional group formed on the surface of AC can serve as a new site for SO2 adsorption.

  11. Equilibrium and kinetic modeling of contaminant immobilization by activated carbon amended to sediments in the field.

    PubMed

    Rakowska, Magdalena I; Kupryianchyk, Darya; Koelmans, Albert A; Grotenhuis, Tim; Rijnaarts, Huub H M

    2014-12-15

    Addition of activated carbons (AC) to polluted sediments and soils is an attractive remediation technique aiming at reducing pore water concentrations of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs). In this study, we present (pseudo-)equilibrium as well as kinetic parameters for sorption of a series of PAHs and PCBs to powdered and granular activated carbons (AC) after three different sediment treatments: sediment mixed with powdered AC (PAC), sediment mixed with granular AC (GAC), and addition of GAC followed by 2 d mixing and subsequent removal ('sediment stripping'). Remediation efficiency was assessed by quantifying fluxes of PAHs towards SPME passive samplers inserted in the sediment top layer, which showed that the efficiency decreased in the order of PAC > GAC stripping > GAC addition. Sorption was very strong to PAC, with Log KAC (L/kg) values up to 10.5. Log KAC values for GAC ranged from 6.3-7.1 and 4.8-6.2 for PAHs and PCBs, respectively. Log KAC values for GAC in the stripped sediment were 7.4-8.6 and 5.8-7.7 for PAH and PCB. Apparent first order adsorption rate constants for GAC (kGAC) in the stripping scenario were calculated with a first-order kinetic model and ranged from 1.6 × 10(-2) (PHE) to 1.7 × 10(-5) d(-1) (InP). Sorption affinity parameters did not change within 9 months post treatment, confirming the longer term effectiveness of AC in field applications for PAC and GAC. PMID:25262554

  12. Comparison of raw and modified activated carbon and rice industry wastes for methylene blue sorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Befani, Maria; Manariotis, Ioannis D.; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K.; Quintero, César E.

    2015-04-01

    In Argentina the average paddy rice production was 1.3x106 tn/year in the last decade. Entre Ríos province (E.R.) accounts for 60% of national milling, resulting in a significant accumulation of waste in the local environment; husk and ashes are used as fuel in drying grain plants. The use of rice wastes, as low-cost sorbents for the removal of synthetic dyes and other contaminants may be a sustainable option. The aim of this work is the investigation of the removal capacity of methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solutions using: (a) rice husk from a rice mill located in E.R. of size between 0.15 to 1.18 mm (RH2), (b) ash from rice husk burned at 800°C in oven for the grain drying unit of the rice mill (RHA800), and (c) biochar obtained from pyrolysis of RH2 material at 850°C (RHA4). Commercial activated carbon (AC), which is a porous material of high sorption capacity, was also used to compare its sorption capacity with the rice husk products. Furthermore, the incorporation of iron in the AC was studied using two different AC/Fe weight-by-weight ratios (AC-Fe and AC-0.5 Fe). The solution pH effect was studied in a range from 2 to 6.9. The maximal MB removal was achieved at pH of 6.8 to 6.9 for all materials studied, and at pH of 6.4 for AC. Kinetic experiments were conducted for a period of 48 h at pH 7 and C0 = 50 mg MB/L. Equilibrium was reached after 24 h and the adsorption capacity was 156, 104, 90, 79, 26, and 9 mg/g for AC, AC-Fe, AC-0.5 Fe, RHA4, RH2 and RHA800, respectively. The pseudo-second-order model expressed better the sorption kinetics of MB for all adsorbent materials. The AC-based materials presented better performance. The experimental data were fitted with the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models. The Langmuir model fits the data better in all cases. The maximum adsorption capacity was 238, 125, 92, 91, 46 and 9 mg/g for AC, AC-Fe, AC-0.5 Fe, RHA4, RH2 and RHA800, respectively. Agricultural wastes can be considered low-cost sorbents, but

  13. Asymmetric hydration structure around calcium ion restricted in micropores fabricated in activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, Takahiro; Kusudo, Tomoko; Kuroda, Yasushige

    2016-11-23

    The adsorbed phase and hydration structure of an aqueous solution of Ca(NO3)2 restricted in micropores fabricated in activated carbons (ACs) having different average pore widths (0.63 and 1.1 nm) were investigated with the analysis of adsorption isotherms and x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra on Ca K-edge. The adsorbed density of Ca(2+) per unit micropore volume in the narrower pore was higher than in the wider pore, while the adsorbed amount per unit mass of carbon with the narrower pore was half of the amount of ACs with the larger pore. On the other hand, variations in the bands assigned to double-electron (KM I) and 1s  →  3d excitations in XAFS spectra demonstrate the formation of a distorted hydration cluster around Ca(2+) in the micropore, although the structural parameters of hydrated Ca(2+) in the micropores were almost consistent with the bulk aqueous solution, as revealed by the analysis of extended XAFS (EXAFS) spectra. In contrast to the hydration structure of monovalent ions such as Rb(+), which generally presents a dehydrated structure in smaller than 1 nm micropores in ACs, the present study clearly explains that the non-spherically-symmetric structure of hydrated Ca(2+) restricted in carbon micropores whose sizes are around 1 nm is experimentally revealed where any dehydration phenomena from the first hydration shell around Ca(2+) could not be observed. PMID:27624154

  14. Removal of organic contaminants from aqueous solution by cattle manure compost (CMC) derived activated carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Qingrong; Chen, Qinghua; Machida, Motoi; Tatsumoto, Hideki; Mochidzuki, Kazuhiro; Sakoda, Akiyoshi

    2009-04-01

    The activated carbons (ACs) prepared from cattle manure compost (CMC) with various pore structure and surface chemistry were used to remove phenol and methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solutions. The adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of two organic contaminants onto the ACs were investigated and the schematic models for the adsorptive processes were proposed. The result shows that the removal of functional groups from ACs surface leads to decreasing both rate constants for phenol and MB adsorption. It also causes the decrement of MB adsorption capacity. However, the decrease of surface functional groups was found to result in the increase of phenol adsorption capacity. In our schematic model for adsorptive processes, the presence of acidic functional groups on the surface of carbon is assumed to act as channels for diffusion of adsorbate molecules onto small pores, therefore, promotes the adsorption rate of both phenol and MB. In phenol solution, water molecules firstly adsorb on surface oxygen groups by H-bonding and subsequently form water clusters, which cause partial blockage of the micropores, deduce electrons from the π-electron system of the carbon basal planes, hence, impede or prevent phenol adsorption. On the contrary, in MB solution, the oxygen groups prefer to combine with MB + cations than water molecules, which lead to the increase of MB adsorption capacity.

  15. Temperature dependence of dc electrical conductivity of activated carbon-metal oxide nanocomposites. Some insight into conduction mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barroso-Bogeat, Adrián; Alexandre-Franco, María; Fernández-González, Carmen; Sánchez-González, José; Gómez-Serrano, Vicente

    2015-12-01

    From a commercial activated carbon (AC) and six metal oxide (Al2O3, Fe2O3, SnO2, TiO2, WO3 and ZnO) precursors, two series of AC-metal oxide nanocomposites are prepared by wet impregnation, oven-drying at 120 °C, and subsequent heat treatment at 200 or 850 °C in inert atmosphere. The temperature-dependent dc electrical conductivity of AC and the as-prepared nanocomposites is measured from room temperature up to ca. 200 °C in air atmosphere by the four-probe method. The decrease in conductivity for the hybrid materials as compared to AC is the result of a complex interplay between several factors, including not only the intrinsic conductivity, crystallite size, content and chemical nature of the supported nanoparticles, which ultimately depend on the precursor and heat treatment temperature, but also the adsorption of oxygen and water from the surrounding atmosphere. The conductivity data are discussed in terms of a thermally activated process. In this regard, both AC and the prepared nanocomposites behave as semiconductors, and the temperature-dependent conductivity data have been interpreted on the basis of the classical model proposed by Mott and Davis. Because of its high content of heteroatoms, AC may be considered as a heavily doped semiconductor, so that conduction of thermally excited carriers via acceptor or donor levels is expected to be the dominant mechanism. The activation energies for the hybrid materials suggest that the supported metal oxide nanoparticles strongly modify the electronic band structure of AC by introducing new trap levels in different positions along its band gap. Furthermore, the thermally activated conduction process satisfies the Meyer-Neldel rule, which is likely connected with the shift of the Fermi level due to the introduction of the different metal oxide nanoparticles in the AC matrix.

  16. Cadmium telluride nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon as adsorbent for removal of sunset yellow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaedi, M.; Hekmati Jah, A.; Khodadoust, S.; Sahraei, R.; Daneshfar, A.; Mihandoost, A.; Purkait, M. K.

    2012-05-01

    Adsorption is a promising technique for decolorization of effluents of textile dyeing industries but its application is limited due to requirement of high amounts of adsorbent required. The objective of this study was to assess the potential of cadmium telluride nanoparticles loaded onto activated carbon (CdTN-AC) for the removal of sunset yellow (SY) dye from aqueous solution. Adsorption studies were conducted in a batch mode varying solution pH, contact time, initial dye concentration, CdTN-AC dose, and temperature. In order to investigate the efficiency of SY adsorption on CdTN-AC, pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich, and intra-particle diffusion kinetic models were studied. It was observed that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model fits better than other kinetic models with good correlation coefficient. Equilibrium data were fitted to the Langmuir model. Thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpy, entropy, activation energy, and sticking probability were also calculated. It was found that the sorption of SY onto CdTN-AC was spontaneous and endothermic in nature. The proposed adsorbent is applicable for SY removal from waste of real effluents including pea-shooter, orange drink and jelly banana with efficiency more than 97%.

  17. Supercapacitor Electrodes from Activated Carbon Monoliths and Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolah, B. N. M.; Othman, M. A. R.; Deraman, M.; Basri, N. H.; Farma, R.; Talib, I. A.; Ishak, M. M.

    2013-04-01

    Binderless monoliths of supercapacitor electrodes were prepared by the carbonization (N2) and activation (CO2) of green monoliths (GMs). GMs were made from mixtures of self-adhesive carbon grains (SACG) of fibers from oil palm empty fruit bunches and a combination of 5 & 6% KOH and 0, 5 & 6% carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by weight. The electrodes from GMs containing CNTs were found to have lower specific BET surface area (SBET). The electrochemical behavior of the supercapacitor fabricated using the prepared electrodes were investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and galvanostatic charge-discharge (GCD). In general an addition of CNTs into the GMs reduces the equivalent series resistance (ESR) value of the cells. A cell fabricated using electrodes from GM with 5% CNT and 5% KOH was found to have the largest reduction of ESR value than that from the others GMs containing CNT. The cell has steeper Warburg's slope than that from its respective non-CNT GM, which reflect the smaller resistance for electrolyte ions to move into pores of electrodes despite these electrodes having largest reduction in specific BET surface area. The cell also has the smallest reduction of specific capacitance (Csp) and maintains the specific power range despite a reduction in the specific energy range due to the CNT addition.

  18. Effectiveness of activated carbon and biochar in reducing the availability of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans in soils.

    PubMed

    Chai, Yunzhou; Currie, Rebecca J; Davis, John W; Wilken, Michael; Martin, Greg D; Fishman, Vyacheslav N; Ghosh, Upal

    2012-01-17

    Five activated carbons (ACs) and two biochars were tested as amendments to reduce the availability of aged polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin/dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) in two soils. All sorbents (ACs and biochars) tested substantially reduced the availability of PCDD/Fs measured by polyoxymethylene (POM) passive uptake and earthworm (E. fetida) biouptake. Seven sorbents amended at a level of 0.2 × soil total organic carbon (0.2X) reduced the passive uptake (physicochemical availability) of total PCDD/Fs in POM by 40% to 92% (or toxic equivalent by 48% to 99%). Sorbents with finer particle sizes or more macropores showed higher reduction efficiencies. The powdered regenerated AC and powdered coconut AC demonstrated to be the most effective and the two biochars also performed reasonably well especially in the powdered form. The passive uptake of PCDD/F in POM increased approximately 4 to 5 fold as the contact time between POM and soil slurry increased from 24 to 120 d while the efficacy of ACs in reducing the physicochemical availability remained unchanged. The reduction efficiencies measured by POM passive uptake for the regenerated AC were comparable to those measured by earthworm biouptake (bioavailability) at both dose levels of 0.2X and 0.5X. The biota-soil accumulation factor (BSAF) values for unamended soil ranged from 0.1 for tetra-CDD/F to 0.02 for octa-CDD/F. At both dose levels, the regenerated AC reduced the BSAFs to below 0.03 with the exception of two hexa-CDD/Fs. The reduction efficiencies measured by earthworm for coconut AC and corn stover biochar were generally less than those measured by POM probably due to larger particle sizes of these sorbents that could not be ingested by the worms. PMID:22136630

  19. Degradation of paracetamol by catalytic wet air oxidation and sequential adsorption - Catalytic wet air oxidation on activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Quesada-Peñate, I; Julcour-Lebigue, C; Jáuregui-Haza, U J; Wilhelm, A M; Delmas, H

    2012-06-30

    The concern about the fate of pharmaceutical products has raised owing to the increasing contamination of rivers, lakes and groundwater. The aim of this paper is to evaluate two different processes for paracetamol removal. The catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of paracetamol on activated carbon was investigated both as a water treatment technique using an autoclave reactor and as a regenerative treatment of the carbon after adsorption in a sequential fixed bed process. Three activated carbons (ACs) from different source materials were used as catalysts: two microporous basic ACs (S23 and C1) and a meso- and micro-porous acidic one (L27). During the first CWAO experiment the adsorption capacity and catalytic performance of fresh S23 and C1 were higher than those of fresh L27 despite its higher surface area. This situation changed after AC reuse, as finally L27 gave the best results after five CWAO cycles. Respirometry tests with activated sludge revealed that in the studied conditions the use of CWAO enhanced the aerobic biodegradability of the effluent. In the ADOX process L27 also showed better oxidation performances and regeneration efficiency. This different ageing was examined through AC physico-chemical properties.

  20. Method And Apparatus For Production Of Bi-213 From The Activity Ac-225 Source

    DOEpatents

    Egorov, Oleg B.; O'Hara, Matthew J.

    2005-12-06

    A method and apparatus for isolating and purifying a .sup.213 Bi radioactive isotope from an .sup.225 Ac source using a primary column and a primary sorbent which preferentially retains .sup.225 Ac over .sup.213 Bi when exposed to a compatible solvent in combination with a secondary column having a secondary sorbent which retains .sup.213 Bi when exposed to a mixture of the compatible solvent and .sup.213 Bi. A "compatible solvent" is a solvent which will preferentially remove .sup.213 Bi radioactive isotopes from a primary sorbent without removing .sup.225 Ac radioactive isotopes, and then allow .sup.213 Bi radioactive isotopes removed from the primary sorbent to be retained on a secondary sorbent, without having to dilute or otherwise chemically or physically modify the compatible solvent in between exposure to the primary and secondary sorbents.

  1. Bioturbation delays attenuation of DDT by clean sediment cap but promotes sequestration by thin-layered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Lin, Diana; Cho, Yeo-Myoung; Werner, David; Luthy, Richard G

    2014-01-21

    The effects of bioturbation on the performance of attenuation by sediment deposition and activated carbon to reduce risks from DDT-contaminated sediment were assessed for DDT sediment-water flux, biouptake, and passive sampler (PE) uptake in microcosm experiments with a freshwater worm, Lumbriculus variegatus. A thin-layer of clean sediment (0.5 cm) did not reduce the DDT flux when bioturbation was present, while a thin (0.3 cm) AC cap was still capable of reducing the DDT flux by 94%. Bioturbation promoted AC sequestration by reducing the 28-day DDT biouptake (66%) and DDT uptake into PE (>99%) compared to controls. Bioturbation further promoted AC-sediment contact by mixing AC particles into underlying sediment layers, reducing PE uptake (55%) in sediment compared to the AC cap without bioturbation. To account for the observed effects from bioturbation, a mass transfer model together with a biodynamic model were developed to simulate DDT flux and biouptake, respectively, and models confirmed experimental results. Both experimental measurements and modeling predictions imply that thin-layer activated carbon placement on sediment is effective in reducing the risks from contaminated sediments in the presence of bioturbation, while natural attenuation process by clean sediment deposition may be delayed by bioturbation.

  2. Removal of toluene from water by photocatalytic oxidation with activated carbon supported Fe(3+)-doped TiO2 nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Rongfang; Zhou, Beihai; Ma, Li

    2014-01-01

    In this work, activated carbon (AC)-supported TiO2 containing 1.0% (mass percent) of 1.0 at.% (atomic percent) Fe(3+)-doped TiO2 nanotubes (Fe-TNTs) were successfully synthesized. The catalyst was used to effectively decompose toluene in water under O3/UV conditions, and some properties including the morphology, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction patterns, specific surface area and UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy were analyzed. A removal efficiency of 90.7% was achieved in the presence of fresh AC-supported Fe-TNTs calcined at 550 °C, with a pseudo-first-order rate constant of 0.038/min. The removal efficiency of toluene was reduced when the catalysts were repeatedly used, since the amount of adsorption sites of the supporting substrates decreased. However, even after AC-supported catalyst was used four times, the removal efficiency of toluene was still sufficient in water treatment. The enhanced photocatalytic activity of AC-supported Fe-TNTs was related to the synergistic effect of AC adsorption and Fe-TNTs photocatalytic ozonation. The water from a petrochemical company in China was used to obtain the removal efficiency of the pollutants, and the toluene and total organic carbon removal efficiencies were 69.9% and 58.3%, respectively.

  3. Effect of biochar or activated carbon amendment on the volatilisation and biodegradation of organic soil pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, David; Meynet, Paola; Bushnaf, Khaled

    2013-04-01

    Biochar or activated carbon added to contaminated soil may temporarily reduce the volatilisation of organic pollutants by enhanced sorption. The long-term effect of sorbent amendments on the fate of volatile petroleum hydrocarbon mixtures (VPHs) will depend on the responses of the soil bacterial community members, especially those which may utilize VPHs as carbon substrates. We investigated the volatilisation and biodegradation of VPHs emanating from NAPL sources and migrating through one meter long columns containing unsaturated sandy soil with and without 2% biochar or activated carbon amendment. After 420 days, VPH volatilisation from AC amended soil was less than 10 percent of the cumulative VPH volatilisation flux from unamended soil. The cumulative CO2 volatilisation flux increased more slowly in AC amended soil, but was comparable to the untreated soil after 420 days. This indicated that the pollution attenuation over a 1 meter distance was improved by the AC amendment. Biochar was a weaker VPH sorbent than AC and had a lesser effect on the cumulative VPH and CO2 fluxes. We also investgated the predominant bacterial community responses in sandy soil to biochar and/or VPH addition with a factorially designed batch study, and by analyzing preserved soil samples. Biochar addition alone had only weak effects on soil bacterial communities, while VPH addition was a strong community structure shaping factor. The bacterial community effects of biochar-enhanced VPH sorption were moderated by the limited biomass carrying capacity of the sandy soil investigated which contained only low amounts of inorganic nitrogen. Several Pseudomonas spp., including Pseudomonas putida strains, became dominant in VPH polluted soil with and without biochar. The ability of these versatile VPH degraders to effectively regulate their metabolic pathways according to substrate availabilities may additionally have moderated bacterial community structure responses to the presence of biochar

  4. Sorption of priority pollutants to biochars and activated carbons for application to soil and sediment remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckingham, B.; Gomez-Eyles, J. L.; Kwon, S.; Riedel, G.; Gilmour, C.; Ghosh, U.

    2012-04-01

    The effectiveness of different biochars in comparison to 2 commercially available activated carbons (ACs) to sorb polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and mercury (Hg) was assessed, with the aim of identifying promising materials for application to soil and sediment remediation and elucidating material properties that may enhance pollutant binding potential. Biochars studied were produced from pine dust, peanut hull, barley straw, and acai pit in addition to steam-activated biochars made from poultry litter (chicken and turkey). Aqueous concentrations of PCBs were measured using a polyoxymethylene passive sampling technique allowing a very low environmentally-relevant concentration range to be examined. Mercury pH-edge isotherms were conducted at relatively high concentrations in a wide pH range (pH 3-11). Sorption of Hg at low concentrations was also performed with ACs and two other biochars made from a marsh reed and a hard wood. Organic contaminant isotherms were analyzed by the Freundlich model, and Freundlich sorption coefficients (KFr) were normalized to a single concentration to allow comparison among materials (i.e. Kd). Values of Kd were related to the sorbent surface area, with sorption being greater for ACs than activated biochars, followed by unactivated biochars. ACs also had higher carbon content (80-90%) than biochars (22 - 77%). This sorption trend would thus be expected for adsorption of hydrophobic compounds to black carbon surfaces. In contrast, at high concentration all biochars removed more Hg from solution than ACs. Steam-activated poultry litter biochars showed the best performance, with consistent removal of >99.7% Hg over the entire pH range. The relatively high sulfur and phosphate content of these materials likely contribute to this enhanced Hg sorption. Also, owing to their lower pyrolysis temperatures relative to ACs, biochars are reported to have a greater surface group functionality which can enhance cation sorption. The importance of

  5. Evaluation of biochars and activated carbons for in situ remediation of sediments impacted with organics, mercury, and methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Eyles, Jose L; Yupanqui, Carmen; Beckingham, Barbara; Riedel, Georgia; Gilmour, Cynthia; Ghosh, Upal

    2013-12-01

    In situ amendment of activated carbon (AC) to sediments can effectively reduce the bioavailability of hydrophobic organic contaminants. While biochars have been suggested as low-cost and sustainable alternatives to ACs, there are few comparative sorption data especially for mercury (Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) at the low porewater concentrations in sediments. Here we compare the ability of a wide range of commercially available and laboratory synthesized ACs and biochars to sorb PAHs, PCBs, DDTs, inorganic Hg, and MeHg at environmentally relevant concentrations. Compared to natural organic matter, sorption capacity for most organic compounds was at least 1-2 orders of magnitude higher for unactivated biochars and 3-4 orders of magnitude higher for ACs which translated to sediment porewater PCB concentration reductions of 18-80% for unactivated biochars, and >99% for ACs with 5% by weight amendment to sediment. Steam activated carbons were more effective than biochars in Hg sorption and translated to modeled porewater Hg reduction in the range of 94-98% for sediments with low native Kd and 31-73% for sediments with high native Kd values for Hg. Unactivated biochars were as effective as the steam activated carbons for MeHg sorption. Predicted reductions of porewater MeHg were 73-92% for sediments with low native Kd and 57-86% for sediment with high native K(d). ACs with high surface areas therefore are likely to be effective in reducing porewater concentrations of organics, Hg, and MeHg in impacted sediments. Unactivated biochars had limited effectiveness for organics and Hg but can be considered when MeHg exposure is the primary concern.

  6. Ultrasonic preparation of nano-nickel/activated carbon composite using spent electroless nickel plating bath and application in degradation of 2,6-dichlorophenol.

    PubMed

    Su, Jingyu; Jin, Guanping; Li, Changyong; Zhu, Xiaohui; Dou, Yan; Li, Yong; Wang, Xin; Wang, Kunwei; Gu, Qianqian

    2014-11-01

    Ni was effectively recovered from spent electroless nickel (EN) plating baths by forming a nano-nickel coated activated carbon composite. With the aid of ultrasonication, melamine-formaldehyde-tetraoxalyl-ethylenediamine chelating resins were grafted on activated carbon (MFT/AC). PdCl2 sol was adsorbed on MFT/AC, which was then immersed in spent electroless nickel plating bath; then nano-nickel could be reduced by ascorbic acid to form a nano-nickel coating on the activated carbon composite (Ni/AC) in situ. The materials present were carefully examined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and electrochemistry techniques. The resins were well distributed on the inside and outside surfaces of activated carbon with a size of 120 ± 30 nm in MFT/AC, and a great deal of nano-nickel particles were evenly deposited with a size of 3.8 ± 1.1 nm in Ni/MFT. Moreover, Ni/AC was successfully used as a catalyst for ultrasonic degradation of 2,6-dichlorophenol.

  7. Carbon nanomaterials: Biologically active fullerene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Bogdanović, Gordana; Djordjević, Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery, fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and graphene attract significant attention of researches in various scientific fields including biomedicine. Nano-scale size and a possibility for diverse surface modifications allow carbon nanoallotropes to become an indispensable nanostructured material in nanotechnologies, including nanomedicine. Manipulation of surface chemistry has created diverse populations of water-soluble derivatives of fullerenes, which exhibit different behaviors. Both non-derivatized and derivatized fullerenes show various biological activities. Cellular processes that underline their toxicity are oxidative, genotoxic, and cytotoxic responses.The antioxidant/cytoprotective properties of fullerenes and derivatives have been considered in the prevention of organ oxidative damage and treatment. The same unique physiochemical properties of nanomaterials may also be associated with potential health hazards. Non-biodegradability and toxicity of carbon nanoparticles still remain a great concern in the area of biomedical application. In this review, we report on basic physical and chemical properties of carbon nano-clusters--fullerenes, nanotubes, and grapheme--their specificities, activities, and potential application in biological systems. Special emphasis is given to our most important results obtained in vitro and in vivo using polyhydroxylated fullerene derivative C₆₀(OH)₂₄.

  8. Carbon nanomaterials: Biologically active fullerene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Bogdanović, Gordana; Djordjević, Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery, fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and graphene attract significant attention of researches in various scientific fields including biomedicine. Nano-scale size and a possibility for diverse surface modifications allow carbon nanoallotropes to become an indispensable nanostructured material in nanotechnologies, including nanomedicine. Manipulation of surface chemistry has created diverse populations of water-soluble derivatives of fullerenes, which exhibit different behaviors. Both non-derivatized and derivatized fullerenes show various biological activities. Cellular processes that underline their toxicity are oxidative, genotoxic, and cytotoxic responses.The antioxidant/cytoprotective properties of fullerenes and derivatives have been considered in the prevention of organ oxidative damage and treatment. The same unique physiochemical properties of nanomaterials may also be associated with potential health hazards. Non-biodegradability and toxicity of carbon nanoparticles still remain a great concern in the area of biomedical application. In this review, we report on basic physical and chemical properties of carbon nano-clusters--fullerenes, nanotubes, and grapheme--their specificities, activities, and potential application in biological systems. Special emphasis is given to our most important results obtained in vitro and in vivo using polyhydroxylated fullerene derivative C₆₀(OH)₂₄. PMID:27483572

  9. The kinetics and QSAR of abiotic reduction of mononitro aromatic compounds catalyzed by activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wenwen; Liu, Xinhui; Gao, Ding; Yu, Yanjun; Fu, Wenjun; Cheng, Dengmiao; Cui, Baoshan; Bai, Junhong

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics of abiotic reduction of mono-nitro aromatic compounds (mono-NACs) catalyzed by activated carbon (AC) in an anaerobic system were examined. There were 6 types of substituent groups on nitrobenzene, including methyl, chlorine, amino, carboxyl, hydroxyl and cyanogen groups, at the ortho, meta or para positions. Our results showed that reduction followed pseudo-first order reaction kinetics, and that the rate constant (logkSA) varied widely, ranging between -4.77 and -2.82, depending upon the type and position of the substituent. A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model using 15 theoretical molecular descriptors and partial-least-squares (PLS) regression was developed for the reduction rates of mono-NACs catalyzed by AC. The cross-validated regression coefficient (Qcum(2), 0.861) and correlation coefficient (R(2), 0.898) indicated significantly high robustness of the model. The VIP (variable importance in the projection) values of energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (ELUMO) and the maximum net atomic charge on the aromatic carbon bound to the nitro group (QC(-)) were 1.15 and 1.01, respectively. These values indicated that the molecular orbital energies and the atomic net charges might play important roles in the reduction of mono-NACs catalyzed by AC in anaerobic systems.

  10. Electrical conductivity of activated carbon-metal oxide nanocomposites under compression: a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Barroso-Bogeat, A; Alexandre-Franco, M; Fernández-González, C; Macías-García, A; Gómez-Serrano, V

    2014-12-01

    From a granular commercial activated carbon (AC) and six metal oxide (Al2O3, Fe2O3, SnO2, TiO2, WO3 and ZnO) precursors, two series of AC-metal oxide nanocomposites were prepared by wet impregnation, oven-drying at 120 °C, and subsequent heat treatment at 200 or 850 °C in an inert atmosphere. Here, the electrical conductivity of the resulting products was studied under moderate compression. The influence of the applied pressure, sample volume, mechanical work, and density of the hybrid materials was thoroughly investigated. The DC electrical conductivity of the compressed samples was measured at room temperature by the four-probe method. Compaction assays suggest that the mechanical properties of the nanocomposites are largely determined by the carbon matrix. Both the decrease in volume and the increase in density were relatively small and only significant at pressures lower than 100 kPa for AC and most nanocomposites. In contrast, the bulk electrical conductivity of the hybrid materials was strongly influenced by the intrinsic conductivity, mean crystallite size, content and chemical nature of the supported phases, which ultimately depend on the metal oxide precursor and heat treatment temperature. The supported nanoparticles may be considered to act as electrical switches either hindering or favouring the effective electron transport between the AC cores of neighbouring composite particles in contact under compression. Conductivity values as a rule were lower for the nanocomposites than for the raw AC, all of them falling in the range of semiconductor materials. With the increase in heat treatment temperature, the trend is toward the improvement of conductivity due to the increase in the crystallite size and, in some cases, to the formation of metals in the elemental state and even metal carbides. The patterns of variation of the electrical conductivity with pressure and mechanical work were slightly similar, thus suggesting the predominance of the pressure

  11. Performance and kinetics of LiFePO4-carbon bi-material electrodes for hybrid devices: A comparative study between activated carbon and multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varzi, Alberto; Ramirez-Castro, Claudia; Balducci, Andrea; Passerini, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Activated Carbon (AC) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) are investigated as components of LiFePO4 (LFP)-based bi-material electrodes for hybrid devices. Firstly, the influence of their different morphological and porosimetric characteristics is correlated to the electrochemical performance. Furthermore, kinetic aspects are carefully studied (by means of galvanostatic cycling and cyclic voltammetry), in order to address the processes which determine the power performance. The results indicate that, independently from the carbon, under high current loads the electrode kinetics are limited by the transport of reactant to the LFP particles. In such conditions CNT allow, better than AC, rapid electrons and Li+ ions flow through the open network established in the electrode, thus enabling superior high rate performance, especially during pulsed operation.

  12. Chemical and structural evaluation of activated carbon prepared from jute sticks for Brilliant Green dye removal from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Asadullah, Mohammad; Asaduzzaman, Mohammad; Kabir, Mohammad Shajahan; Mostofa, Mohammad Golam; Miyazawa, Tomohisa

    2010-02-15

    Activated carbons have been prepared from jute sticks by chemical activation using ZnCl(2) and physical activation using steam for the removal of Brilliant Green dye from aqueous solution. The activated carbons and charcoal prepared from jute sticks were characterized by evaluating the surface chemistry, structural features and surface morphology. The maximum BET surface area was obtained to be 2304 m(2)/g for chemical activated carbon (ACC) while it is 730 and 80 m(2)/g for steam activated carbon (ACS) and charcoal, respectively. The FT-IR spectra exhibited that the pyrolysis and steam activation of jute sticks resulted in the release of aliphatic and O-containing functional groups by thermal effect. However, the release of functional groups is the effect of chemical reaction in the ZnCl(2) activation process. A honeycomb-type carbon structure in ACC was formed as observed on SEM images. Although charcoal and ACC were prepared at 500 degrees C the ACC exhibited much lower Raman sensitivity due to the formation of condensed aromatic ring systems. Due to high surface area and high porous structure with abundance of functional groups, the ACC adsorbed dye molecules with much higher efficiency than those of ACS and charcoal.

  13. Adsorption and desorption of SO2, NO and chlorobenzene on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuran; Guo, Yangyang; Zhu, Tingyu; Ding, Song

    2016-05-01

    Activated carbon (AC) is very effective for multi-pollutant removal; however, the complicated components in flue gas can influence each other's adsorption. A series of adsorption experiments for multicomponents, including SO2, NO, chlorobenzene and H2O, on AC were performed in a fixed-bed reactor. For single-component adsorption, the adsorption amount for chlorobenzene was larger than for SO2 and NO on the AC. In the multi-component atmosphere, the adsorption amount decreased by 27.6% for chlorobenzene and decreased by 95.6% for NO, whereas it increased by a factor of two for SO2, demonstrating that a complex atmosphere is unfavorable for chlorobenzene adsorption and inhibits NO adsorption. In contrast, it is very beneficial for SO2 adsorption. The temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) results indicated that the binding strength between the gas adsorbates and the AC follows the order of SO2>chlorobenzene > NO. The adsorption amount is independent of the binding strength. The presence of H2O enhanced the component effects, while it weakened the binding force between the gas adsorbates and the AC. AC oxygen functional groups were analyzed using TPD and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements. The results reveal the reason why the chlorobenzene adsorption is less affected by the presence of other components. Lactone groups partly transform into carbonyl and quinone groups after chlorobenzene desorption. The chlorobenzene adsorption increases the number of C=O groups, which explains the positive effect of chlorobenzene on SO2 adsorption and the strong NO adsorption.

  14. Kinetics of adsorption with granular, powdered, and fibrous activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Shmidt, J.L.; Pimenov, A.V.; Lieberman, A.I.; Cheh, H.Y.

    1997-08-01

    The properties of three different types of activated carbon, fibrous, powdered, and granular, were investigated theoretically and experimentally. The adsorption rate of the activated carbon fiber was found to be two orders of magnitude higher than that of the granular activated carbon, and one order of magnitude higher than that of the powdered activated carbon. Diffusion coefficients of methylene blue in the fibrous, powdered, and granular activated carbons were determined experimentally. A new method for estimating the meso- and macropore surface areas in these carbons was proposed.

  15. Ac-SDKP suppresses TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 expression in endothelial cells via inhibition of IκB kinase and NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liping; Yang, Xiao-Ping; Janic, Branislava; Rhaleb, Nour-Eddine; Harding, Pamela; Nakagawa, Pablo; Peterson, Edward L; Carretero, Oscar A

    2016-05-01

    N-acetyl-seryl-aspartyl-lysyl-proline (Ac-SDKP) is a naturally occurring tetrapeptide that prevents inflammation and fibrosis in hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases. We previously showed that, in angiotensin II-induced hypertension, Ac-SDKP decreased the activation of nuclear transcription factor NF-κB, whereas, in experimental autoimmune myocarditis and hypertension animal models, it also reduced the expression of endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule ICAM-1. However, the mechanisms by which Ac-SDKP downregulated ICAM-1 expression are still unclear. TNF-α is a proinflammatory cytokine that induces ICAM-1 expression in various cell types via TNF receptor 1 and activation of the classical NF-κB pathway. We hypothesized that in endothelial cells Ac-SDKP suppresses TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 expression by decreasing IKK phosphorylation that as a consequence leads to a decrease of IκB phosphorylation and NF-κB activation. To test this hypothesis, human coronary artery endothelial cells were treated with Ac-SDKP and then stimulated with TNF-α. We found that TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 expression was significantly decreased by Ac-SDKP in a dose-dependent manner. Ac-SDKP also decreased TNF-α-induced NF-κB translocation from cytosol to nucleus, as assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay, which correlated with a decrease in IκB phosphorylation. In addition, we found that Ac-SDKP decreased TNF-α-induced IKK phosphorylation and IKK-β expression. However, Ac-SDKP had no effect on TNF-α-induced phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase or ERK. Thus we conclude that Ac-SDKP inhibition of TNF-α activation of canonical, i.e., IKK-β-dependent, NF-κB pathway and subsequent decrease in ICAM-1 expression is achieved via inhibition of IKK-β.

  16. Aqueous mercury adsorption by activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Hadi, Pejman; To, Ming-Ho; Hui, Chi-Wai; Lin, Carol Sze Ki; McKay, Gordon

    2015-04-15

    Due to serious public health threats resulting from mercury pollution and its rapid distribution in our food chain through the contamination of water bodies, stringent regulations have been enacted on mercury-laden wastewater discharge. Activated carbons have been widely used in the removal of mercuric ions from aqueous effluents. The surface and textural characteristics of activated carbons are the two decisive factors in their efficiency in mercury removal from wastewater. Herein, the structural properties and binding affinity of mercuric ions from effluents have been presented. Also, specific attention has been directed to the effect of sulfur-containing functional moieties on enhancing the mercury adsorption. It has been demonstrated that surface area, pore size, pore size distribution and surface functional groups should collectively be taken into consideration in designing the optimal mercury removal process. Moreover, the mercury adsorption mechanism has been addressed using equilibrium adsorption isotherm, thermodynamic and kinetic studies. Further recommendations have been proposed with the aim of increasing the mercury removal efficiency using carbon activation processes with lower energy input, while achieving similar or even higher efficiencies.

  17. Cry1Ac Transgenic Sugarcane Does Not Affect the Diversity of Microbial Communities and Has No Significant Effect on Enzyme Activities in Rhizosphere Soil within One Crop Season

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Dinggang; Xu, Liping; Gao, Shiwu; Guo, Jinlong; Luo, Jun; You, Qian; Que, Youxiong

    2016-01-01

    Cry1Ac transgenic sugarcane provides a promising way to control stem-borer pests. Biosafety assessment of soil ecosystem for cry1Ac transgenic sugarcane is urgently needed because of the important role of soil microorganisms in nutrient transformations and element cycling, however little is known. This study aimed to explore the potential impact of cry1Ac transgenic sugarcane on rhizosphere soil enzyme activities and microbial community diversity, and also to investigate whether the gene flow occurs through horizontal gene transfer. We found no horizontal gene flow from cry1Ac sugarcane to soil. No significant difference in the population of culturable microorganisms between the non-GM and cry1Ac transgenic sugarcane was observed, and there were no significant interactions between the sugarcane lines and the growth stages. A relatively consistent trend at community-level, represented by the functional diversity index, was found between the cry1Ac sugarcane and the non-transgenic lines. Most soil samples showed no significant difference in the activities of four soil enzymes: urease, protease, sucrose, and acid phosphate monoester between the non-transgenic and cry1Ac sugarcane lines. We conclude, based on one crop season, that the cry1Ac sugarcane lines may not affect the microbial community structure and functional diversity of the rhizosphere soil and have few negative effects on soil enzymes. PMID:27014291

  18. High voltage AC/AC electrochemical capacitor operating at low temperature in salt aqueous electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Qamar; Béguin, François

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate that an activated carbon (AC)-based electrochemical capacitor implementing aqueous lithium sulfate electrolyte in 7:3 vol:vol water/methanol mixture can operate down to -40 °C with good electrochemical performance. Three-electrode cell investigations show that the faradaic contributions related with hydrogen chemisorption in the negative AC electrode are thermodynamically unfavored at -40 °C, enabling the system to work as a typical electrical double-layer (EDL) capacitor. After prolonged floating of the AC/AC capacitor at 1.6 V and -40°C, the capacitance, equivalent series resistance and efficiency remain constant, demonstrating the absence of ageing related with side redox reactions at this temperature. Interestingly, when temperature is increased back to 24 °C, the redox behavior due to hydrogen storage reappears and the system behaves as a freshly prepared one.

  19. High effective adsorption of organic dyes on magnetic cellulose beads entrapping activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaogang; Zhang, Lina

    2009-11-15

    Maghemite (gamma-Fe(2)O(3)) nanoparticles were created with a submerged circulation impinging stream reactor (SCISR) from FeCl(3) x 6H(2)O and FeCl(2).4H(2)O by using precipitation followed by oxidation. Subsequently, by blending cellulose with the Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles and activated carbon (AC) in 7 wt% NaOH/12 wt% urea aqueous solution pre-cooled to -12 degrees C, millimeter-scale magnetic cellulose beads, coded as MCB-AC, was fabricated via an optimal dropping technology. The cellulose beads containning Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles exhibited sensitive magnetic response, and their recovery could facilitate by applying a magnetic field. The adsorption and desorption of the organic dyes on MCB-AC were investigated to evaluate the removal of dyes (methyl orange and methylene blue) with different charges from aqueous solution. Their adsorption kinetics experiments were carried out and the data were well fitted by a pseudo-second-order equation. The results revealed that the MCB-AC sorbent could efficiently adsorb the organic dyes from wastewater, and the used sorbents could be recovered completely. Therefore, we developed a highly efficient sorbent, which were prepared by using simple and "green" process, for the applications on the removal of hazardous materials.

  20. Decision-making framework for the application of in-situ activated carbon amendment to sediment.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yongju; Cho, Yeo-Myoung; Gala, William R; Hoelen, Thomas P; Werner, David; Luthy, Richard G

    2016-04-01

    This study provides a decision-support framework and a design methodology for preliminary evaluation of field application of in-situ activated carbon (AC) amendment to sediment to control the (bio)availability of hydrophobic organic contaminants. The decision-making framework comprises four sequential steps: screening assessment, input parameter determination, model prediction, and evaluation for process optimization. The framework allows the application of state-of-the-art experimental and modeling techniques to assess the effectiveness of the treatment under different field conditions and is designed for application as a part of a feasibility study. Through a stepwise process it is possible to assess the effectiveness of in-situ AC amendment with a proper consideration of different site conditions and application scenarios possible in the field. The methodology incorporates the effect of various parameters on performance including: site-specific kinetic coefficients, varied AC dose and particle size, sediment and AC sorption parameters, and pore-water velocity. The modeling framework allows comparison of design alternatives for treatment optimization and estimation of long-term effectiveness over a period of 10-20 years under slow mass transfer in the field. PMID:26736169

  1. Composition and structural effects on the adsorption of ionic liquids onto activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Lemus, Jesús; Neves, Catarina M S S; Marques, Carlos F C; Freire, Mara G; Coutinho, João A P; Palomar, Jose

    2013-09-01

    The applications and variety of ionic liquids (ILs) have increased during the last few years, and their use at a large scale will require their removal/recovery from wastewater streams. Adsorption on activated carbons (ACs) has been recently proposed for this aim and this work presents a systematic analysis of the influence of the IL chemical structures (cation side chain, head group, anion type and the presence of functional groups) on their adsorption onto commercial AC from water solution. Here, the adsorption of 21 new ILs, which include imidazolium-, pyridinium-, pyrrolidinium-, piperidinium-, phosphonium- and ammonium-based cations and different hydrophobic and hydrophilic anions, has been experimentally measured. This contribution allows an expansion of the range of IL compounds studied in previous works, and permits a better understanding of the influence of the IL structures through the adsorption on AC. In addition, the COSMO-RS method was used to analyze the measured adsorption isotherms, allowing the understanding of the role of the cationic and anionic structures in the adsorption process, in terms of the different interactions between the IL compound and AC surface/water solvent. The results of this work provide new insights for the development of adsorption as an effective operation to remove/recover ILs with very different chemical nature from water solution.

  2. Experimental study on the removal of PAHs using in-duct activated carbon injection.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hong-Cang; Zhong, Zhao-Ping; Jin, Bao-Sheng; Huang, Ya-Ji; Xiao, Rui

    2005-05-01

    This paper presents the incineration tests of municipal solid waste (MSW) in a fluidized bed and the adsorption of activated carbon (AC) on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). An extraction and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) technique was used to analyze the concentrations of the 16 US EPA specified PAHs contained in raw MSW, flue gas, fly ash, and bottom ash. The aim of this work was to decide the influence of AC on the distribution of PAHs during the incineration of MSW. Experimental researches show that there were a few PAHs in MSW and bottom ash. With the increase of AC feeding rate, the concentrations of three- to six-ring PAHs in fly ash increased, and the concentration of two-ring PAH decreased. The total-PAHs in flue gas were dominated by three-, and four-ring PAHs, but a few two-, five-ring PAHs and no six-ring PAHs were found. PAHs could be removed effectively from flue gas by using in-duct AC injection and the removal efficiencies of PAHs were about 76-91%. In addition, the total toxic equivalent (TEQ) concentrations of PAH in raw MSW, bottom ash, fly ash, and flue gas were 1.24 mg TEQ kg-1, 0.25 mg TEQ kg-1, 6.89-9.67 mg TEQ kg-1, and 0.36-1.50 microg TEQ Nm-3, respectively.

  3. Long-term leaching behavior of phenol in cement/activated-carbon solidified/stabilized hazardous waste.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianguo; Nie, Xiaoqin; Zeng, Xianwei; Su, Zhaoji

    2013-01-30

    The long-term leaching behavior of phenol in solidified/stabilized (S/S) hazardous wastes cured for 28 d with different amounts of activated carbon (AC) was investigated using synthetic inorganic acid (H(2)SO(4):HNO(3) = 2:1, pH = 3.2), acetic acid buffer (HAc/NaAc, pH = 4.93), and deionized water as leachants to simulate the leaching of phenol in three exposure scenarios: acid-precipitation, co-disposal, and neutral-precipitation. Phenol immobilization was enhanced by AC adsorption and impaired by the growth of micropores with increasing amount of AC; thus the optimal added amount of AC to be to added S/S wastes was 2%. The leaching behavior of phenol in co-disposal scenario was unpredictable due to inadequate ionization of HAc in the HAc-NaAc buffer solution. The findings indicated that S/S products should be disposed of in hazardous waste landfills rather than municipal solid waste landfills. PMID:23270892

  4. Effects of oxygen functional groups on the enhancement of the hydrogen spillover of Pd-doped activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Chung, Tsui-Yun; Tsao, Cheng-Si; Tseng, Hui-Ping; Chen, Chien-Hung; Yu, Ming-Sheng

    2015-03-01

    The hydrogen storage performance of Pd-doped oxidized activated carbon (Pd/AC-ox) with various oxygen contents or functional groups was investigated. The surface chemistry of the Pd/AC-ox sample was modified by treatment with hydrogen gas. Temperature-programmed desorption was performed to characterize the oxygen functional groups in each sample. In this study, low- and high-pressure hydrogen adsorption isotherm experiments were conducted using a static volumetric measurement at room temperature (RT) and pressures of up to 8 MPa. The results showed that increasing the oxygen content and functional groups on the surface of the Pd/AC-ox significantly improved the reversible RT hydrogen storage capacity due to the spillover effect. The hydrogen spillover enhancement factors at 0.12 MPa were greater than 100% for all samples. The hydrogen uptake of Pd/AC-ox1 at RT and 8 MPa with an oxygen content of 8.94 wt.% was 0.37 wt.%, which was 48% greater than that of Pd-free AC-ox (0.25 wt.%). In addition, the hydrogen uptake of Pd/AC-ox3 with lower oxygen contents demonstrates that the hydrogen spillover enhancement gradually disappears when the pressure is increased to more than 2 MPa (i.e., a transition from spillover to physisorption). The surface diffusion, or reversible adsorption, of the spiltover H atoms, which is enhanced by oxygen functional groups, was affected by a threshold amount of oxygen groups (such as hydroxyl groups). PMID:25490569

  5. Long-term leaching behavior of phenol in cement/activated-carbon solidified/stabilized hazardous waste.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianguo; Nie, Xiaoqin; Zeng, Xianwei; Su, Zhaoji

    2013-01-30

    The long-term leaching behavior of phenol in solidified/stabilized (S/S) hazardous wastes cured for 28 d with different amounts of activated carbon (AC) was investigated using synthetic inorganic acid (H(2)SO(4):HNO(3) = 2:1, pH = 3.2), acetic acid buffer (HAc/NaAc, pH = 4.93), and deionized water as leachants to simulate the leaching of phenol in three exposure scenarios: acid-precipitation, co-disposal, and neutral-precipitation. Phenol immobilization was enhanced by AC adsorption and impaired by the growth of micropores with increasing amount of AC; thus the optimal added amount of AC to be to added S/S wastes was 2%. The leaching behavior of phenol in co-disposal scenario was unpredictable due to inadequate ionization of HAc in the HAc-NaAc buffer solution. The findings indicated that S/S products should be disposed of in hazardous waste landfills rather than municipal solid waste landfills.

  6. Less-costly activated carbon for sewage treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingham, J. D.; Kalvinskas, J. J.; Mueller, W. A.

    1977-01-01

    Lignite-aided sewage treatment is based on absorption of dissolved pollutants by activated carbon. Settling sludge is removed and dried into cakes that are pyrolyzed with lignites to yield activated carbon. Lignite is less expensive than activated carbon previously used to supplement pyrolysis yield.

  7. Hybrid capacitor with activated carbon electrode, Ni(OH) 2 electrode and polymer hydrogel electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nohara, Shinji; Asahina, Toshihide; Wada, Hajime; Furukawa, Naoji; Inoue, Hiroshi; Sugoh, Nozomu; Iwasaki, Hideharu; Iwakura, Chiaki

    A new hybrid capacitor (HC) cell was assembled using an activated carbon (AC) negative electrode, an Ni(OH) 2 positive electrode and a polymer hydrogel electrolyte prepared from crosslinked potassium poly(acrylate) (PAAK) and KOH aqueous solution. The HC cell was characterized compared with an electric double layer capacitor (EDLC) using two AC electrodes and the polymer hydrogel electrolyte. It was found that the HC cell successfully worked in the larger voltage range and exhibited ca. 2.4 times higher capacitance than the EDLC cell. High-rate dischargeability of the HC cell was also superior to that of the EDLC cell. These improved characteristics strongly suggest that the HC cell can be a promising system of capacitors with high energy and power densities.

  8. Hierarchically structured activated carbon for ultracapacitors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mok-Hwa; Kim, Kwang-Bum; Park, Sun-Min; Roh, Kwang Chul

    2016-01-01

    To resolve the pore-associated bottleneck problem observed in the electrode materials used for ultracapacitors, which inhibits the transport of the electrolyte ions, we designed hierarchically structured activated carbon (HAC) by synthesizing a mesoporous silica template/carbon composite and chemically activating it to simultaneously remove the silica template and increase the pore volume. The resulting HAC had a well-designed, unique porous structure, which allowed for large interfaces for efficient electric double-layer formation. Given the unique characteristics of the HAC, we believe that the developed synthesis strategy provides important insights into the design and fabrication of hierarchical carbon nanostructures. The HAC, which had a specific surface area of 1,957 m2 g−1, exhibited an extremely high specific capacitance of 157 F g−1 (95 F cc−1), as well as a high rate capability. This indicated that it had superior energy storage capability and was thus suitable for use in advanced ultracapacitors. PMID:26878820

  9. Norfriedelins A-C with acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity from acerola tree (Malpighia emarginata).

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie-Qing; Peng, Xing-Rong; Li, Xu-Yang; Li, Ting-Zhao; Zhang, Wei-Ming; Shi, Lei; Han, Jiang; Qiu, Ming-Hua

    2013-04-01

    Three novel norfriedelanes, A-C (1-3), were isolated from the branches and roots of Malpighia emarginata . Their structures and absolute configurations were determined by 1D and 2D NMR techniques and X-ray crystallographic analysis. Norfriedelin A (possessing an α-oxo-β-lactone group) and norfriedelin B (with a keto-lactone group) showed acetylcholinesterase inhibitory effects with the IC50 values of 10.3 and 28.7 μM, respectively.

  10. Asymmetric supercapacitor based on nanostructured graphene foam/polyvinyl alcohol/formaldehyde and activated carbon electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bello, Abdulhakeem; Barzegar, Farshad; Momodu, Damilola; Dangbegnon, Julien; Taghizadeh, Fatemeh; Fabiane, Mopeli; Manyala, Ncholu

    2015-01-01

    We present the electrochemical results of highly porous and interconnected carbon material by activation of graphene foam/polyvinyl alcohol-formaldehyde composite material designated as GF/PVA-F. Asymmetric supercapacitor devices were fabricated using the activated material (GF/PVA-F) and activated carbon (AC) as the positive and negative electrodes respectively. The device exhibited a maximum energy density of 42 mWh cm-2, a power density of 0.5 W cm-2 and 98% retention of its initial capacitance after 2000 cycles in an extended cell potential window of 1.8 V in 1 M Na2SO4 aqueous electrolyte. This work shows the great potential of this material for high performance energy storage application.

  11. Hypertonic-induced lamin A/C synthesis and distribution to nucleoplasmic speckles is mediated by TonEBP/NFAT5 transcriptional activator

    SciTech Connect

    Favale, Nicolas O.; Sterin Speziale, Norma B.; Fernandez Tome, Maria C.

    2007-12-21

    Lamin A/C is the most studied nucleoskeletal constituent. Lamin A/C expression indicates cell differentiation and is also a structural component of nuclear speckles, which are involved in gene expression regulation. Hypertonicity has been reported to induce renal epithelial cell differentiation and expression of TonEBP (NFAT5), a transcriptional activator of hypertonicity-induced gene transcription. In this paper, we investigate the effect of hypertonicity on lamin A/C expression in MDCK cells and the involvement of TonEBP. Hypertonicity increased lamin A/C expression and its distribution to nucleoplasm with speckled pattern. Microscopy showed codistribution of TonEBP and lamin A/C in nucleoplasmic speckles, and immunoprecipitation demonstrated their interaction. TonEBP silencing caused lamin A/C redistribution from nucleoplasmic speckles to the nuclear rim, followed by lamin decrease, thus showing that hypertonicity induces lamin A/C speckles through a TonEBP-dependent mechanism. We suggest that lamin A/C speckles could serve TonEBP as scaffold thus favoring its role in hypertonicity.

  12. The caspase-1 inhibitor AC-YVAD-CMK attenuates acute gastric injury in mice: involvement of silencing NLRP3 inflammasome activities

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fang; Wang, Liang; Wang, Jun-jie; Luo, Peng-fei; Wang, Xing-tong; Xia, Zhao-fan

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the protective effects of inhibiting caspase-1 activity or gastric acid secretion on acute gastric injury in mice. AC-YVAD-CMK, omeprazole, or vehicle were administered to mice before cold-restraint stress- or ethanol-induced gastric injury. Survival rates and histological evidence of gastric injury of mice pretreated with AC-YVAD-CMK or omeprazole, and exposed to cold-restraint stress, improved significantly relative to the vehicle group. The increased levels of tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-18 following cold-stress injury were decreased by AC-YVAD-CMK, but not omeprazole, pretreatment. The increased expression of CD68 in gastric tissues was inhibited significantly by AC-YVAD-CMK pretreatment. Inhibiting caspase-1 activity in the NLRP3 inflammasome decreased gastric cell apoptosis, and the expression of Bax and cleaved caspase-3. AC-YVAD-CMK pretreatment significantly inhibited cold-restraint stress-induced increases in the expression of phosphorylated IκB-alpha and P38. General anatomy and histological results showed the protective effect of AC-YVAD-CMK on ethanol-induced acute gastric injury. Overall, our results showed that the caspase-1 inhibitor AC-YVAD-CMK protected against acute gastric injury in mice by affecting the NLRP3 inflammasome and attenuating inflammatory processes and apoptosis. This was similar to the mechanism associated with NF-κB and P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathways. PMID:27053298

  13. The caspase-1 inhibitor AC-YVAD-CMK attenuates acute gastric injury in mice: involvement of silencing NLRP3 inflammasome activities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Wang, Liang; Wang, Jun-jie; Luo, Peng-fei; Wang, Xing-tong; Xia, Zhao-fan

    2016-04-07

    This study evaluated the protective effects of inhibiting caspase-1 activity or gastric acid secretion on acute gastric injury in mice. AC-YVAD-CMK, omeprazole, or vehicle were administered to mice before cold-restraint stress- or ethanol-induced gastric injury. Survival rates and histological evidence of gastric injury of mice pretreated with AC-YVAD-CMK or omeprazole, and exposed to cold-restraint stress, improved significantly relative to the vehicle group. The increased levels of tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-18 following cold-stress injury were decreased by AC-YVAD-CMK, but not omeprazole, pretreatment. The increased expression of CD68 in gastric tissues was inhibited significantly by AC-YVAD-CMK pretreatment. Inhibiting caspase-1 activity in the NLRP3 inflammasome decreased gastric cell apoptosis, and the expression of Bax and cleaved caspase-3. AC-YVAD-CMK pretreatment significantly inhibited cold-restraint stress-induced increases in the expression of phosphorylated IκB-alpha and P38. General anatomy and histological results showed the protective effect of AC-YVAD-CMK on ethanol-induced acute gastric injury. Overall, our results showed that the caspase-1 inhibitor AC-YVAD-CMK protected against acute gastric injury in mice by affecting the NLRP3 inflammasome and attenuating inflammatory processes and apoptosis. This was similar to the mechanism associated with NF-κB and P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathways.

  14. Preparation of high-quality activated carbon from polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) bottle waste. Its use in the removal of pollutants in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Carrasco, Raúl; Cuerda-Correa, Eduardo M; Alexandre-Franco, María F; Fernández-González, Carmen; Gómez-Serrano, Vicente

    2016-10-01

    A waste-treats-waste approach has been used for the removal of two common pollutants, namely p-nitrophenol and/or Fe(III) from aqueous solution. Polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) from bottle waste has been used as the precursor for the preparation of activated carbons (ACs) by physical activation with steam and chemical activation with potassium hydroxide under controlled heating conditions and atmospheres. The resulting ACs were characterized in terms of chemical composition, porous texture and surface chemistry, and morphology. Selected ACs were tested as adsorbents for the removal of the aforementioned pollutants in aqueous solution. For comparison purposes, a commercial AC was also used. In general, the yield of the process of preparation of ACs is lower than 10% with steam and between 24.62 and 32.07% with potassium hydroxide. ACs possess a very high carbon content and a very low ash content. The BET surface areas reach 1235 m(2) g(-1) with steam and 1002 m(2) g(-1) with potassium hydroxide at most. Also, the degrees of development of micro- and mesoporosity are markedly larger with steam. Conversely, the development of macroporosity is much larger with potassium hydroxide. The PET-derived ACs exhibit a better adsorption behavior towards p-nitrophenol than the commercial AC, both in terms of adsorption rate and adsorption capacity. On the contrary, the commercial AC acts as a better adsorbent of Fe(III) ions. As compared to separately, the simultaneous presence of both solutes in the adsorptive solution scarcely affects the adsorption process except for equilibrium for Fe(III). PMID:27423101

  15. Vibration damping with active carbon fiber structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugebauer, Reimund; Kunze, Holger; Riedel, Mathias; Roscher, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents a mechatronic strategy for active reduction of vibrations on machine tool struts or car shafts. The active structure is built from a carbon fiber composite with embedded piezofiber actuators that are composed of piezopatches based on the Macro Fiber Composite (MFC) technology, licensed by NASA and produced by Smart Material GmbH in Dresden, Germany. The structure of these actuators allows separate or selectively combined bending and torsion, meaning that both bending and torsion vibrations can be actively absorbed. Initial simulation work was done with a finite element model (ANSYS). This paper describes how state space models are generated out of a structure based on the finite element model and how controller codes are integrated into finite element models for transient analysis and the model-based control design. Finally, it showcases initial experimental findings and provides an outlook for damping multi-mode resonances with a parallel combination of resonant controllers.

  16. An Invasive Plant Promotes Its Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbioses and Competitiveness through Its Secondary Metabolites: Indirect Evidence from Activated Carbon

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yongge; Tang, Jianjun; Leng, Dong; Hu, Shuijin; Yong, Jean W. H.; Chen, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Secondary metabolites released by invasive plants can increase their competitive ability by affecting native plants, herbivores, and pathogens at the invaded land. Whether these secondary metabolites affect the invasive plant itself, directly or indirectly through microorganisms, however, has not been well documented. Here we tested whether activated carbon (AC), a well-known absorbent for secondary metabolites, affect arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbioses and competitive ability in an invasive plant. We conducted three experiments (experiments 1–3) with the invasive forb Solidago canadensis and the native Kummerowia striata. Experiment 1 determined whether AC altered soil properties, levels of the main secondary metabolites in the soil, plant growth, and AMF communities associated with S. canadensis and K. striata. Experiment 2 determined whether AC affected colonization of S. canadensis by five AMF, which were added to sterilized soil. Experiment 3 determined the competitive ability of S. canadensis in the presence and absence of AMF and AC. In experiment 1, AC greatly decreased the concentrations of the main secondary metabolites in soil, and the changes in concentrations were closely related with the changes of AMF in S. canadensis roots. In experiment 2, AC inhibited the AMF Glomus versiforme and G. geosporum but promoted G. mosseae and G. diaphanum in the soil and also in S. canadensis roots. In experiment 3, AC reduced S. canadensis competitive ability in the presence but not in the absence of AMF. Our results provided indirect evidence that the secondary metabolites (which can be absorbed by AC) of the invasive plant S. canadensis may promote S. canadensis competitiveness by enhancing its own AMF symbionts. PMID:24817325

  17. An invasive plant promotes its arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses and competitiveness through its secondary metabolites: indirect evidence from activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yongge; Tang, Jianjun; Leng, Dong; Hu, Shuijin; Yong, Jean W H; Chen, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Secondary metabolites released by invasive plants can increase their competitive ability by affecting native plants, herbivores, and pathogens at the invaded land. Whether these secondary metabolites affect the invasive plant itself, directly or indirectly through microorganisms, however, has not been well documented. Here we tested whether activated carbon (AC), a well-known absorbent for secondary metabolites, affect arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbioses and competitive ability in an invasive plant. We conducted three experiments (experiments 1-3) with the invasive forb Solidago canadensis and the native Kummerowia striata. Experiment 1 determined whether AC altered soil properties, levels of the main secondary metabolites in the soil, plant growth, and AMF communities associated with S. canadensis and K. striata. Experiment 2 determined whether AC affected colonization of S. canadensis by five AMF, which were added to sterilized soil. Experiment 3 determined the competitive ability of S. canadensis in the presence and absence of AMF and AC. In experiment 1, AC greatly decreased the concentrations of the main secondary metabolites in soil, and the changes in concentrations were closely related with the changes of AMF in S. canadensis roots. In experiment 2, AC inhibited the AMF Glomus versiforme and G. geosporum but promoted G. mosseae and G. diaphanum in the soil and also in S. canadensis roots. In experiment 3, AC reduced S. canadensis competitive ability in the presence but not in the absence of AMF. Our results provided indirect evidence that the secondary metabolites (which can be absorbed by AC) of the invasive plant S. canadensis may promote S. canadensis competitiveness by enhancing its own AMF symbionts. PMID:24817325

  18. Advances in preparation of modified activated carbon and its applications in the removal of chromium (VI) from aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Z. L.; Liang, M. N.; Li, H. H.; Zhu, Z. J.

    2016-08-01

    The wastewater in which Cr(VI) is not fully treated has drawn environment researchers’ attention increasingly, due to its environmental pollution and harms to human health. Thus a high efficiency of modified activated carbon (MAC) to remove Cr(VI) has become one of the hot topics among environmental material research. This paper introduces the modification methods from the physical structure features and chemical properties of the activated carbon (AC) surface. At the same time, it briefly analyses the chemical characteristics of Cr(VI) in aqueous solutions, and on the basis of the aforementioned introduces the modification methods of the surface chemical characteristics of AC, such as: oxidation modification, reduction modification, loaded metal modification, and microwave modification. Combining studies on removing Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions by MAC in recent years, this paper anticipates the new trends of preparing MAC and the points in absorption research, offering some suggestions for future studies.

  19. Sorption of mercury (II) and atrazine by biochar, modified biochars and biochar based activated carbon in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Tan, Guangcai; Sun, Weiling; Xu, Yaru; Wang, Hongyuan; Xu, Nan

    2016-07-01

    Corn straw biochar (BC) was used as a precursor to produce Na2S modified biochar (BS), KOH modified biochar (BK) and activated carbon (AC). Experiments were conducted to compare the sorption capacity of these sorbents for aqueous Hg (II) and atrazine existed alone or as a mixture. In comparison to BC, the sorption capacity of BS, BK and AC for single Hg (II) increased by 76.95%, 32.12% and 41.72%, while that for atrazine increased by 38.66%, 46.39% and 47 times, respectively. When Hg (II) and atrazine coexisted in an aqueous solution, competitive sorption was observed on all these sorbents. Sulfur impregnation was an efficient way to enhance the Hg (II) removal due to the formation of HgS precipitate, and oxygen-containing functional groups on the sorbents also contributed to Hg (II) sorption. Activated carbon was the best sorbent for atrazine removal because of its extremely high specific surface area.

  20. Charcoal and activated carbon at elevated pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Antal, M.J. Jr.; Dai, Xiangfeng; Norberg, N.

    1995-12-01

    High quality charcoal has been produced with very high yields of 50% to 60% from macadamia nut and kukui nut shells and of 44% to 47% from Eucalyptus and Leucaena wood in a bench scale unit at elevated pressure on a 2 to 3 hour cycle, compared to commercial practice of 25% to 30% yield on a 7 to 12 day operating cycle. Neither air pollution nor tar is produced by the process. The effects of feedstock pretreatments with metal additives on charcoal yield are evaluated in this paper. Also, the influences of steam and air partial pressure and total pressure on yields of activated carbon from high yield charcoal are presented.

  1. Adsorbed natural gas storage with activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jian; Brady, T.A.; Rood, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    Despite technical advances to reduce air pollution emissions, motor vehicles still account for 30 to 70% emissions of all urban air pollutants. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 require 100 cities in the United States to reduce the amount of their smog within 5 to 15 years. Hence, auto emissions, the major cause of smog, must be reduced 30 to 60% by 1998. Natural gas con be combusted with less pollutant emissions. Adsorbed natural gas (ANG) uses adsorbents and operates with a low storage pressure which results in lower capital costs and maintenance. This paper describes the production of an activated carbon adsorbent produced from an Illinois coal for ANG.

  2. Preparation of low cost activated carbon from Myrtus communis and pomegranate and their efficient application for removal of Congo red from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Tavallali, Hossein; Sharifi, Mahdi; Kokhdan, Syamak Nasiri; Asghari, Alireza

    2012-02-01

    In this research, the potential applicability of activated carbon prepared from Myrtus communis (AC-MC) and pomegranate (AC-PG) as useful adsorbents for the removal of Congo red (CR) from aqueous solutions in batch method was investigated. The effects of pH, contact time, agitation time and amount of adsorbents on removal percentage of Congo red on both adsorbents were examined. Increase in pH up to 6 for AC-MC and pH 7 for AC-PG increase the adsorption percentage (capacity) and reach equilibrium within 30 min of contact time. Fitting the experimental data to conventional isotherm models like Freundlich, Langmuir, Tempkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich show that the experimental data fitted very well to the Freundlich isotherm for AC-MC and Langmuir isotherm for AC-PG. Fitting the experimental data to different kinetic models such as pseudo first-order, pseudo second-order, Elovich and intraparticle diffusion mechanism showed the applicability of a pseudo second-order with involvement of intraparticle diffusion model for interpretation of experimental data for both adsorbents. The adsorption capacity of AC-PG and AC-MC for the removal of CR was found to be 19.231 and 10 mg g -1. These results clearly indicate the efficiency of adsorbents as a low cost adsorbent for treatment of wastewater containing CR.

  3. Improvement of activated carbons as oxygen reduction catalysts in neutral solutions by ammonia gas treatment and their performance in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Valerie J.; Nieto Delgado, Cesar; Logan, Bruce E.

    2013-11-01

    Commercially available activated carbon (AC) powders from different precursor materials (peat, coconut shell, coal, and hardwood) were treated with ammonia gas at 700 °C to improve their performance as oxygen reduction catalysts in neutral pH solutions used in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The ammonia treated ACs exhibited better catalytic performance in rotating ring-disk electrode tests than their untreated precursors, with the bituminous based AC most improved, with an onset potential of Eonset = 0.12 V (untreated, Eonset = 0.08 V) and n = 3.9 electrons transferred in oxygen reduction (untreated, n = 3.6), and the hardwood based AC (treated, Eonset = 0.03 V, n = 3.3; untreated, Eonset = -0.04 V, n = 3.0). Ammonia treatment decreased oxygen content by 29-58%, increased nitrogen content to 1.8 atomic %, and increased the basicity of the bituminous, peat, and hardwood ACs. The treated coal based AC cathodes had higher maximum power densities in MFCs (2450 ± 40 mW m-2) than the other AC cathodes or a Pt/C cathode (2100 ± 1 mW m-2). These results show that reduced oxygen abundance and increased nitrogen functionalities on the AC surface can increase catalytic performance for oxygen reduction in neutral media.

  4. Sorptive uptake of selenium with magnetite and its supported materials onto activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jae H; Wilson, Lee D; Sammynaiken, R

    2015-11-01

    Kinetic and equilibrium uptake studies of selenite in aqueous solution with synthetic magnetite (Mag-P), commercial magnetite (Mag-C), goethite, activated carbon (AC), and a composite material containing 19% magnetite supported on activated carbon (CM-19) were investigated. Kinetic uptake studies used a one-pot setup at pH 5.26 at variable temperature. Sampling of unbound selenite in-situ was achieved with analytical detection by atomic absorbance. The sorptive uptake at equilibrium and kinetic conditions are listed in descending order: goethite>Mag-P>Mag-C>CM-19. Kinetic uptake parameters reveal that Mag-P showed apparent negative values for the activation energy (E(a)) and the enthalpy of activation (ΔH(‡)), in agreement with a multi-step process for the kinetic uptake of selenite. By contrast, Mag-C, CM-19, and goethite showed positive values for E(a) and ΔH(‡). The uptake properties of the various sorbent materials with selenite are in accordance with the formation of inner- and out-sphere complexes. Leaching of iron from the composite material (CM-19) was attenuated due to the stabilizing effect of the magnetite within the pore sites and the surface of AC. Supported iron oxide nanomaterial composites represent a unique sorbent material with tunable uptake properties toward inorganic selenite in aqueous solution.

  5. Production of activated carbon from TCR char

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, Fabian; Heberlein, Markus; Klinner, Tobias; Hornung, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The utilization of char for adsorptive purposes is known since the 18th century. At that time the char was made of wood or bones and used for decoloration of fluids. In the 20th century the production of activated carbon in an industrial scale was started. The today's raw materials for activated carbon production are hard coal, peat, wood or coconut shells. All these materials entail costs especially the latter. Thus, the utilization of carbon rich residues (biomass) is an interesting economic opportunity because it is available for no costs or even can create income. The char is produced by thermo-catalytic reforming (TCR®). This process is a combination of an intermediate pyrolysis and subsequently a reforming step. During the pyrolysis step the material is decomposed in a vapor and a solid carbon enriched phase. In the second step the vapor and the solid phase get in an intensive contact and the quality of both materials is improved via the reforming process. Subsequently, the condensables are precipitated from the vapor phase and a permanent gas as well as oil is obtained. Both are suitable for heat and power production which is a clear advantage of the TCR® process. The obtained biochar from the TCR® process has special properties. This material has a very low hydrogen and oxygen content. Its stability is comparable to hard coal or anthracite. Therefore it consists almost only of carbon and ash. The latter depends from input material. Furthermore the surface structure and area can be influenced during the reforming step. Depending from temperature and residence time the number of micro pores and the surface area can be increased. Preliminary investigations with methylene blue solution have shown that a TCR® char made of digestate from anaerobic digestion has adsorptive properties. The decoloration of the solution was achieved. A further influencing factor of the adsorption performance is the particle size. Based on the results of the preliminary tests a

  6. In vitro antitrypanosomal activity of the cyclodepsipeptides, cardinalisamides A-C, from the insect pathogenic fungus Cordyceps cardinalis NBRC 103832.

    PubMed

    Umeyama, Akemi; Takahashi, Koichi; Grudniewska, Aleksandra; Shimizu, Mina; Hayashi, Sayaka; Kato, Masayuki; Okamoto, Yasuko; Suenaga, Midori; Ban, Sayaka; Kumada, Toshio; Ishiyama, Aki; Iwatsuki, Masato; Otoguro, Kazuhiko; Omura, Satoshi; Hashimoto, Toshihiro

    2014-02-01

    During the search for new antitrypanosomal drug leads, three new antitrypanosomal compounds, cardinalisamides A-C (1-3), were isolated from cultures of the insect pathogenic fungus Cordyceps cardinalis NBRC 103832. Their structures were elucidated using MS analyses and extensive 2D-heteronuclear NMR. The absolute configurations of 1-3 were addressed by chemical degradation and Marfey's analysis. 1-3 showed in vitro antitrypanosomal activity against Trypanosoma brucei brucei with IC50 values of 8.56, 8.65 and 8.63 μg ml(-1), respectively. PMID:24084682

  7. Intermolecular dearomative C2-arylation of N-Ac indoles activated by FeCl3.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Raj Kumar; Ratsch, Friederike; Beaud, Rodolphe; Guillot, Régis; Kouklovsky, Cyrille; Vincent, Guillaume

    2016-04-18

    We report the FeCl3-mediated direct addition of electron-rich arenes to the C2-position of electrophilic N-Ac indoles under mild conditions (room temperature, air). No functional group is required on the arene nucleophile: one of its C-H bonds is added to the C2[double bond, length as m-dash]C3 double bond of the indole nucleus in a Friedel-Crafts-type reaction. This dearomatisation process delivered a broad range of C2-arylated indolines. PMID:27005518

  8. Increased Ac excision (iae): Arabidopsis thaliana mutations affecting Ac transposition.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, P; Belzile, F; Page, T; Dean, C

    1997-05-01

    The maize transposable element Ac is highly active in the heterologous hosts tobacco and tomato, but shows very much reduced levels of activity in Arabidopsis. A mutagenesis experiment was undertaken with the aim of identifying Arabidopsis host factors responsible for the observed low levels of Ac activity. Seed from a line carrying a single copy of the Ac element inserted into the streptomycin phosphotransferase (SPT) reporter fusion, and which displayed typically low levels of Ac activity, were mutagenized using gamma rays. Nineteen mutants displaying high levels of somatic Ac activity, as judged by their highly variegated phenotypes, were isolated after screening the M2 generation on streptomycin-containing medium. The mutations fall into two complementation groups, iae1 and iae2, are unlinked to the SPT::Ac locus and segregate in a Mendelian fashion. The iae1 mutation is recessive and the iae2 mutation is semi-dominant. The iae1 and iae2 mutants show 550- and 70-fold increases, respectively, in the average number of Ac excision sectors per cotyledon. The IAE1 locus maps to chromosome 2, whereas the SPT::Ac reporter maps to chromosome 3. A molecular study of Ac activity in the iae1 mutant confirmed the very high levels of Ac excision predicted using the phenotypic assay, but revealed only low levels of Ac re-insertion. Analyses of germinal transposition in the iae1 mutant demonstrated an average germinal excision frequency of 3% and a frequency of independent Ac re-insertions following germinal excision of 22%. The iae mutants represents a possible means of improving the efficiency of Ac/Ds transposon tagging systems in Arabidopsis, and will enable the dissection of host involvement in Ac transposition and the mechanisms employed for controlling transposable element activity.

  9. Breakthrough curves for toluene adsorption on different types of activated carbon fibers: application in respiratory protection.

    PubMed

    Balanay, Jo Anne G; Floyd, Evan L; Lungu, Claudiu T

    2015-05-01

    Activated carbon fibers (ACF) are considered viable alternative adsorbent materials in respirators because of their larger surface area, lighter weight, and fabric form. The purpose of this study was to characterize the breakthrough curves of toluene for different types of commercially available ACFs to understand their potential service lives in respirators. Two forms of ACF, cloth (AC) and felt (AF), with three surface areas each were tested. ACFs were challenged with six toluene concentrations (50-500 p.p.m.) at constant air temperature (23°C), relative humidity (50%), and air flow (16 l min-1) at different bed depths. Breakthrough data were obtained using continuous monitoring by gas chromatography using a gas sampling valve. The ACF specific surface areas were measured by an automatic physisorption analyzer. Results showed unique shapes of breakthrough curves for each ACF form: AC demonstrated a gradual increase in breakthrough concentration, whereas AF showed abrupt increase in concentration from the breakpoint, which was attributed to the difference in fiber density between the forms. AF has steeper breakthrough curves compared with AC with similar specific surface area. AC exhibits higher 10% breakthrough times for a given bed depth due to higher mass per bed depth compared with AF, indicating more adsorption per bed depth with AC. ACF in respirators may be appropriate for use as protection in environments with toluene concentration at the Occupational Safety and Health Administration Permissible Exposure Limit, or during emergency escape for higher toluene concentrations. ACF has shown great potential for application in respiratory protection against toluene and in the development of thinner, lighter, and more efficient respirators. PMID:25528579

  10. Breakthrough curves for toluene adsorption on different types of activated carbon fibers: application in respiratory protection.

    PubMed

    Balanay, Jo Anne G; Floyd, Evan L; Lungu, Claudiu T

    2015-05-01

    Activated carbon fibers (ACF) are considered viable alternative adsorbent materials in respirators because of their larger surface area, lighter weight, and fabric form. The purpose of this study was to characterize the breakthrough curves of toluene for different types of commercially available ACFs to understand their potential service lives in respirators. Two forms of ACF, cloth (AC) and felt (AF), with three surface areas each were tested. ACFs were challenged with six toluene concentrations (50-500 p.p.m.) at constant air temperature (23°C), relative humidity (50%), and air flow (16 l min-1) at different bed depths. Breakthrough data were obtained using continuous monitoring by gas chromatography using a gas sampling valve. The ACF specific surface areas were measured by an automatic physisorption analyzer. Results showed unique shapes of breakthrough curves for each ACF form: AC demonstrated a gradual increase in breakthrough concentration, whereas AF showed abrupt increase in concentration from the breakpoint, which was attributed to the difference in fiber density between the forms. AF has steeper breakthrough curves compared with AC with similar specific surface area. AC exhibits higher 10% breakthrough times for a given bed depth due to higher mass per bed depth compared with AF, indicating more adsorption per bed depth with AC. ACF in respirators may be appropriate for use as protection in environments with toluene concentration at the Occupational Safety and Health Administration Permissible Exposure Limit, or during emergency escape for higher toluene concentrations. ACF has shown great potential for application in respiratory protection against toluene and in the development of thinner, lighter, and more efficient respirators.

  11. Solid-phase microextraction of phthalate esters in water sample using different activated carbon-polymer monoliths as adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Lirio, Stephen; Fu, Chung-Wei; Lin, Jhih-Yun; Hsu, Meng-Ju; Huang, Hsi-Ya

    2016-07-13

    In this study, the application of different activated carbon-polymer (AC-polymer) monoliths as adsorbents for the solid-phase microextraction (SPME) of phthalate esters (PAEs) in water sample were investigated. The activated carbon (AC) was embedded in organic polymers, poly(butyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) (poly(BMA-EDMA)) or poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) (poly(STY-DVB)), via a 5-min microwave-assisted or a 15-min water bath heating polymerization. Preliminary investigation on the performance of the native poly(BMA-EDMA) and poly(STY-DVB) demonstrated remarkable adsorption efficiencies for PAEs. However, due to the strong hydrophobic, π-π, and hydrogen bonding interactions between the analytes and polymers, low extraction recoveries were achieved. In contrast, the presence of AC in native polymers not only enhanced the adsorption efficiencies but also assisted the PAE desorption, especially for AC-poly(STY-DVB) with extraction recovery ranged of 76.2-99.3%. Under the optimized conditions, the extraction recoveries for intra-, inter-day and column-to-column were in the range of 76.5-100.8% (<3.7% RSDs), 77.2-97.6% (<5.6% RSDs) and 75.5-99.7% (<6.2% RSDs), respectively. The developed AC-poly(STY-DVB) monolithic column showed good mechanical stability, which can be reused for more than 30 extraction times without any significant loss in the extraction recoveries of PAEs. The AC-poly(STY-DVB) monolithic column was successfully applied in SPME of PAEs in water sample with extraction recovery ranged of 78.8%-104.6% (<5.5% RSDs). PMID:27237837

  12. Adsorption of N-nitrosodimethylamine precursors by powdered and granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Hanigan, David; Zhang, Jinwei; Herckes, Pierre; Krasner, Stuart W; Chen, Chao; Westerhoff, Paul

    2012-11-20

    Activated carbon (AC) has been shown to remove precursors of halogenated disinfection byproducts. Granular and powdered activated carbon (GAC, PAC) were investigated for their potential to adsorb N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) precursors from blends of river water and effluent from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). At bench scale, waters were exposed to lignite or bituminous AC, either as PAC in bottle point experiments or as GAC in rapid small-scale column tests (RSSCTs). NDMA formation potential (FP) was used as a surrogate for precursor removal. NDMA FP was reduced by 37, 59, and 91% with 3, 8, and 75 mg/L of one PAC, respectively, with a 4-h contact time. In RSSCTs and in full-scale GAC contactors, NDMA FP removal always exceeded that of the bulk dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and UV absorbance at 254 nm. For example, whereas DOC breakthrough exceeded 90% of its influent concentration after 10,000 bed volumes of operation in an RSSCT, NDMA FP was less than 40% of influent concentration after the same bed life of the GAC. At full or pilot scale, high NDMA FP reduction ranging from >60 to >90% was achieved across GAC contactors, dependent upon the GAC bed life and/or use of a preoxidant (chlorine or ozone). In all experiments, NDMA formation was not reduced to zero, which suggests that although some precursors are strongly sorbed, others are not. This is among the first studies to show that AC is capable of adsorbing NDMA precursors, but further research is needed to better understand NDMA precursor chemical properties (e.g., hydrophobicity, molecular size) and evaluate how best to incorporate this finding into full-scale designs and practice.

  13. Adsorption of N-nitrosodimethylamine precursors by powdered and granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Hanigan, David; Zhang, Jinwei; Herckes, Pierre; Krasner, Stuart W; Chen, Chao; Westerhoff, Paul

    2012-11-20

    Activated carbon (AC) has been shown to remove precursors of halogenated disinfection byproducts. Granular and powdered activated carbon (GAC, PAC) were investigated for their potential to adsorb N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) precursors from blends of river water and effluent from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). At bench scale, waters were exposed to lignite or bituminous AC, either as PAC in bottle point experiments or as GAC in rapid small-scale column tests (RSSCTs). NDMA formation potential (FP) was used as a surrogate for precursor removal. NDMA FP was reduced by 37, 59, and 91% with 3, 8, and 75 mg/L of one PAC, respectively, with a 4-h contact time. In RSSCTs and in full-scale GAC contactors, NDMA FP removal always exceeded that of the bulk dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and UV absorbance at 254 nm. For example, whereas DOC breakthrough exceeded 90% of its influent concentration after 10,000 bed volumes of operation in an RSSCT, NDMA FP was less than 40% of influent concentration after the same bed life of the GAC. At full or pilot scale, high NDMA FP reduction ranging from >60 to >90% was achieved across GAC contactors, dependent upon the GAC bed life and/or use of a preoxidant (chlorine or ozone). In all experiments, NDMA formation was not reduced to zero, which suggests that although some precursors are strongly sorbed, others are not. This is among the first studies to show that AC is capable of adsorbing NDMA precursors, but further research is needed to better understand NDMA precursor chemical properties (e.g., hydrophobicity, molecular size) and evaluate how best to incorporate this finding into full-scale designs and practice. PMID:23106335

  14. Reduction of bromate by granular activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Kirisits, M.J.; Snoeyink, V.L.; Kruithof, J.C.

    1998-07-01

    Ozonation of waters containing bromide can lead to the formation of bromate, a probable human carcinogen. Since bromate will be regulated at 10 {micro}g/L by the Stage 1 Disinfectants/Disinfection By-Products Rule, there is considerable interest in finding a suitable method of bromate reduction. Granular activated carbon (GAC) can be used to chemically reduce bromate to bromide, but interference from organic matter and anions present in natural water render this process inefficient. In an effort to improve bromate reduction by GAC, several modifications were made to the GAC filtration process. The use of a biologically active carbon (BAC) filter ahead of a fresh GAC filter with and without preozonation, to remove the biodegradable organic matter, did not substantially improve the bromate removal of the GAC filter. The use of the BAC filter for biological bromate reduction proved to be the most encouraging experiment. By lowering the dissolved oxygen in the influent to the BAC from 8.0 mg/L to 2.0 mg/L, the percent bromate removal increased from 42% to 61%.

  15. REPEATED REDUCTIVE AND OXIDATIVE TREATMENTS ON GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fenton oxidation and Fenton oxidation preceded by reduction solutions were applied to granular activated carbon (GAC) to chemically regenerate the adsorbent. No adsorbate was present on the GAC so physicochemical effects from chemically aggressive regeneration of the carbon coul...

  16. Beneficial role of ZnO photocatalyst supported with porous activated carbon for the mineralization of alizarin cyanin green dye in aqueous solution

    PubMed Central

    Muthirulan, P.; Meenakshisundararam, M.; Kannan, N.

    2012-01-01

    The present investigation depicts the development of a simple and low cost method for the removal of color from textile dyeing and printing wastewater using ZnO as photocatalyst supported with porous activated carbon (AC). Photocatalytic degradation studies were carried out for water soluble toxic alizarin cyanin green (ACG) dye in aqueous suspension along with activated carbon (AC) as co-adsorbent. Different parameters like concentration of ACG dye, irradiation time, catalyst concentration and pH have also been studied. The pseudo first order kinetic equation was found to be applicable in the present dye-catalyst systems. It was observed that photocatalytic degradation by ZnO along with AC was a more effective and faster mode of removing ACG from aqueous solutions than the ZnO alone. PMID:25685455

  17. [Biochemical effects of chronic peroral administration of carbon nanotubes and activated charcoal in drinking water in rats].

    PubMed

    Khripach, L V; Rakhmanin, Iu A; Mikhajlova, R I; Knyazeva, T D; Koganova, Z I; Zhelezniak, E V; Savostikova, O N; Alekseeva, A V; Kameneckaya, D V; Ryzhova, I N; Kruglova, E V; Revazova, T L

    2014-01-01

    Chronic 6-month experiment was carried out in rats, which received drinking water with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), diameter of 15-40 nm, length ≥ 2 mkm) or activated charcoal (AC, diameter of 10-100 mkm), blood samples of the animals were used for assessment of biochemical markers. Both coal compounds induced the appearance of signs of oxidative stress 2 weeks after the beginning of the experiment and alteration of serum markers of liver and renal damage, as well as changes of cortisol and protein serum concentrations later Thus, despite of known high (asbest-like) inhalation toxicity of carbon nanotubes in comparison with other carbon allotrops (fullerenes and black carbon), we have found similar effects of MWCNTs and carbon microparticles in orally treated rats.

  18. N-terminal activation is an essential early step in the mechanism of action of the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac insecticidal toxin.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Alejandra; Sanchez, Jorge; Kouskoura, Thaleia; Crickmore, Neil

    2002-07-01

    A variant form of the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac toxin that is not cleaved at the N terminus during proteolytic activation with trypsin was found to be incapable of forming pores in Manduca sexta brush border membrane vesicles in vitro and had reduced insecticidal activity in vivo. Binding studies indicated an altered binding pattern of the mutant toxin in that bound toxin could not be fully displaced by a high molar excess of fully trypsin-activated toxin. These results suggest that proteolytic removal of the N-terminal peptide of Cry1Ac is an important step in toxin activation.

  19. Merging allylic carbon-hydrogen and selective carbon-carbon bond activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masarwa, Ahmad; Didier, Dorian; Zabrodski, Tamar; Schinkel, Marvin; Ackermann, Lutz; Marek, Ilan

    2014-01-01

    Since the nineteenth century, many synthetic organic chemists have focused on developing new strategies to regio-, diastereo- and enantioselectively build carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bonds in a predictable and efficient manner. Ideal syntheses should use the least number of synthetic steps, with few or no functional group transformations and by-products, and maximum atom efficiency. One potentially attractive method for the synthesis of molecular skeletons that are difficult to prepare would be through the selective activation of C-H and C-C bonds, instead of the conventional construction of new C-C bonds. Here we present an approach that exploits the multifold reactivity of easily accessible substrates with a single organometallic species to furnish complex molecular scaffolds through the merging of otherwise difficult transformations: allylic C-H and selective C-C bond activations. The resulting bifunctional nucleophilic species, all of which have an all-carbon quaternary stereogenic centre, can then be selectively derivatized by the addition of two different electrophiles to obtain more complex molecular architecture from these easily available starting materials.

  20. Activated Carbon Composites for Air Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Frederick S; Contescu, Cristian I; Tsouris, Costas; Burchell, Timothy D

    2011-09-01

    Coal-derived synthesis gas is a potential major source of hydrogen for fuel cells. Oxygen-blown coal gasification is an efficient approach to achieving the goal of producing hydrogen from coal, but a cost-effective means of enriching O2 concentration in air is required. A key objective of this project is to assess the utility of a system that exploits porous carbon materials and electrical swing adsorption to produce an O2-enriched air stream for coal gasification. As a complement to O2 and N2 adsorption measurements, CO2 was used as a more sensitive probe molecule for the characterization of molecular sieving effects. To further enhance the potential of activated carbon composite materials for air separation, work was implemented on incorporating a novel twist into the system; namely the addition of a magnetic field to influence O2 adsorption, which is accompanied by a transition between the paramagnetic and diamagnetic states. The preliminary findings in this respect are discussed.

  1. Tailoring activated carbons for the development of specific adsorbents of gasoline vapors.

    PubMed

    Vivo-Vilches, J F; Bailón-García, E; Pérez-Cadenas, A F; Carrasco-Marín, F; Maldonado-Hódar, F J

    2013-12-15

    The specific adsorption of oxygenated and aliphatic gasoline components onto activated carbons (ACs) was studied under static and dynamic conditions. Ethanol and n-octane were selected as target molecules. A highly porous activated carbon (CA) was prepared by means of two processes: carbonization and chemical activation of olive stone residues. Different types of oxygenated groups, identified and quantified by TPD and XPS, were generated on the CA surface using an oxidation treatment with ammonium peroxydisulfate and then selectively removed by thermal treatments, as confirmed by TPD results. Chemical and porous transformations were carefully analyzed throughout these processes and related to their VOC removal performance. The analysis of the adsorption process under static conditions and the thermal desorption of VOCs enabled us to determine the total adsorption capacity and regeneration possibilities. Breakthrough curves obtained for the adsorption process carried out under dynamic conditions provided information about the mass transfer zone in each adsorption bed. While n-octane adsorption is mainly determined by the porosity of activated carbons, ethanol adsorption is related to their surface chemistry, and in particular is enhanced by the presence of carboxylic acid groups.

  2. Accelerated OH(-) transport in activated carbon air cathode by modification of quaternary ammonium for microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Feng, Cuijuan; Ding, Ning; Zhang, Qingrui; Li, Nan; Li, Xiaojing; Zhang, Yueyong; Zhou, Qixing

    2014-04-01

    Activated carbon (AC) is a promising catalyst for the air cathode of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) because of its high performance and low cost. To increase the performance of AC air cathodes, the acceleration of OH(-) transport is one of the most important methods, but it has not been widely investigated. Here we added quaternary ammonium to ACs by in situ anchoring of a quaternary ammonium/epoxide-reacting compound (QAE) or ex situ mixing with anion exchange resins in order to modify ACs from not only the external surface but also inside the pores. In 50 mM phosphate buffer solution (PBS), the in situ anchoring of QAE was a more effective way to increase the power. The highest power density of 2781 ± 36 mW/m(2), which is 10% higher than that of the control, was obtained using QAE-anchored AC cathodes. When the medium was switched to an unbuffered NaCl solution, the increase in maximum power density (885 ± 25 mW/m(2)) was in accordance with the anion exchange capacity (0.219 mmol/g). The highest power density of the anion exchange resin-mixed air cathode was 51% higher than that of the control, indicating that anion exchange is urgently needed in real wastewaters. Excess anchoring of QAE blocked both the mesopores and micropores, causing the power output to be inhibited.

  3. Selective sorption behavior of iodine species on an activated carbon disk and its implication for the speciation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, H.; Lee, J.; An, J.

    2013-12-01

    In recent times, iodate (IO3-) which can be generated under highly oxidized conditions such as the ozonation process in a water treatment plant has been receiving increasing attention due to its high toxicity to human and environment. In this respect, sorption behavior of iodide (I-) and IO3- on an activated carbon (AC) disk as a solid sorbent was investigated for the further development of efficient removal and analytical techniques. To this end, batch sorption tests were performed as a function of pH, sample volume, and initial concentration. Sorption of I- occurred preferentially on the surface of AC disk, regardless of pH levels (i.e., 4, 6, and 8). However, IO3- was quite sensitive to pH levels and the sorption capability of IO3- on the AC disk was much smaller than that of I-. Maximum sorption capacities of I- and IO3- in the different matrices (i.e., deionized water and seawater) were also assessed. In addition, the analytical strategy for the iodine speciation was also introduced. Iodine species were separated and pre-concentrated onto the AC disk based on their selective sorption properties according to the pH levels. Then, the AC disk pre-concentrated was directly analyzed using wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. Acknowledgement This research was supported by a grant from the Korea Basic Science Institute (project No. E33300).

  4. Bottom-Up Fabrication of Activated Carbon Fiber for All-Solid-State Supercapacitor with Excellent Electrochemical Performance.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wujun; Chen, Shaohua; Yang, Shengyuan; Chen, Wenping; Weng, Wei; Zhu, Meifang

    2016-06-15

    Activated carbon (AC) is the most extensively used electrode material for commercial electric double layer capacitors (EDLC) given its high specific surface area (SSA) and moderate cost. However, AC is primarily used in the forms of powders, which remains a big challenge in developing AC powders into continuous fibers. If AC powders can be processed into fiber, then they may be scaled up for practical applications to supercapacitors (SCs) and satisfy the rapid development of flexible electronics. Herein, we report a bottom-up method to fabricate AC fiber employing graphene oxide (GO) as both dispersant and binder. After chemical reduction, the fiber has high electrical conductivity (185 S m(-1)), high specific surface area (1476.5 m(2) g(-1)), and good mechanical flexibility. An all solid-state flexible SC was constructed using the prepared fiber as electrode, which is free of binder, conducting additive, and additional current collector. The fiber-shaped SC shows high capacitance (27.6 F cm(-3) or 43.8 F g(-1), normalized to the two-electrode volume), superior cyclability (90.4% retention after 10 000 cycles), and good bendability (96.8% retention after bending 1000 times). PMID:27239680

  5. Bottom-Up Fabrication of Activated Carbon Fiber for All-Solid-State Supercapacitor with Excellent Electrochemical Performance.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wujun; Chen, Shaohua; Yang, Shengyuan; Chen, Wenping; Weng, Wei; Zhu, Meifang

    2016-06-15

    Activated carbon (AC) is the most extensively used electrode material for commercial electric double layer capacitors (EDLC) given its high specific surface area (SSA) and moderate cost. However, AC is primarily used in the forms of powders, which remains a big challenge in developing AC powders into continuous fibers. If AC powders can be processed into fiber, then they may be scaled up for practical applications to supercapacitors (SCs) and satisfy the rapid development of flexible electronics. Herein, we report a bottom-up method to fabricate AC fiber employing graphene oxide (GO) as both dispersant and binder. After chemical reduction, the fiber has high electrical conductivity (185 S m(-1)), high specific surface area (1476.5 m(2) g(-1)), and good mechanical flexibility. An all solid-state flexible SC was constructed using the prepared fiber as electrode, which is free of binder, conducting additive, and additional current collector. The fiber-shaped SC shows high capacitance (27.6 F cm(-3) or 43.8 F g(-1), normalized to the two-electrode volume), superior cyclability (90.4% retention after 10 000 cycles), and good bendability (96.8% retention after bending 1000 times).

  6. Toward the use of surface modified activated carbon in speciation: selective preconcentration of selenite and selenate in environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Tsoi, Yeuk-Ki; Leung, Kelvin Sze-Yin

    2011-04-22

    This paper describes a novel application of tetrabutylammonium hydroxide-modified activated carbon (AC-TBAH) to the speciation of ultra-trace Se(IV) and Se(VI) using LC-ICP-DRC-MS. The anion exchange functionality was immobilized onto the AC surface enables selective preconcentration of inorganic Se anions in a wide range of working pHs. Simultaneous retention and elution of both analytes, followed by subsequent analysis with LC-ICP-DRC-MS, allows to accomplish speciation analysis in natural samples without complicated redox pre-treatment. The laboratory-made column of immobilized AC (0.4 g of sorbent packed in a 6 mL syringe barrel) has achieved analyte enrichment factors of 76 and 93, respectively, for Se(IV) and Se(VI), thus proving its superior preconcentration efficiency and selectivity over common AC. The considerable enhancement in sensitivity achieved by using the preconcentration column has improved the method's detection limits to 1.9-2.2 ng L(-1), which is a 100-fold improvement compared with direct injection. The analyte recoveries from heavily polluted river matrix were between 95.3 and 107.7% with less than 5.0% RSD. The robustness of the preconcentration and speciation method was validated by analysis of natural waters collected from rivers and reservoirs in Hong Kong. The modified AC material is hence presented as a low-cost yet robust substitute for conventional anion exchange resins for routine applications.

  7. Enhancement of Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal activity by combining Cry1Ac and bi-functional toxin HWTX-XI from spider.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yunjun; Fu, Zujiao; He, Xiaohong; Yuan, Chunhua; Ding, Xuezhi; Xia, Liqiu

    2016-03-01

    In order to assess the potency of bi-functional HWTX-XI toxin from spider Ornithoctonus huwena in improving the insecticidal activity of Bacillus thuringiensis, a fusion gene of cry1Ac and hwtx-XI was constructed and expressed in an acrystalliferous B. thuringiensis strain Cry(-)B. Western blot analysis and microscopic observation revealed that the recombinant strain could express 140-kDa Cry1Ac-HWTX-XI fusion protein and produce parasporal inclusions during sporulation. Bioassay using the larvae of Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera exigua showed that the Cry1Ac-HWTX-XI fusion was more toxic than the control Cry1Ac protoxin, as revealed by 95% lethal concentration. Our study indicated that the HWTX-XI from spider might be a candidate for enhancing the toxicity of B. thuringiensis products. PMID:25721170

  8. Characterization of Activated Carbons from Oil-Palm Shell by CO2 Activation with No Holding Carbonization Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Herawan, S. G.; Hadi, M. S.; Ayob, Md. R.; Putra, A.

    2013-01-01

    Activated carbons can be produced from different precursors, including coals of different ranks, and lignocellulosic materials, by physical or chemical activation processes. The objective of this paper is to characterize oil-palm shells, as a biomass byproduct from palm-oil mills which were converted into activated carbons by nitrogen pyrolysis followed by CO2 activation. The effects of no holding peak pyrolysis temperature on the physical characteristics of the activated carbons are studied. The BET surface area of the activated carbon is investigated using N2 adsorption at 77 K with selected temperatures of 500, 600, and 700°C. These pyrolysis conditions for preparing the activated carbons are found to yield higher BET surface area at a pyrolysis temperature of 700°C compared to selected commercial activated carbon. The activated carbons thus result in well-developed porosities and predominantly microporosities. By using this activation method, significant improvement can be obtained in the surface characteristics of the activated carbons. Thus this study shows that the preparation time can be shortened while better results of activated carbon can be produced. PMID:23737721

  9. Theoretical study of chlordecone and surface groups interaction in an activated carbon model under acidic and neutral conditions.

    PubMed

    Gamboa-Carballo, Juan José; Melchor-Rodríguez, Kenia; Hernández-Valdés, Daniel; Enriquez-Victorero, Carlos; Montero-Alejo, Ana Lilian; Gaspard, Sarra; Jáuregui-Haza, Ulises Javier

    2016-04-01

    Activated carbons (ACs) are widely used in the purification of drinking water without almost any knowledge about the adsorption mechanisms of the persistent organic pollutants. Chlordecone (CLD, Kepone) is an organochlorinated synthetic compound that has been used mainly as agricultural insecticide. CLD has been identified and listed as a persistent organic pollutant by the Stockholm Convention. The selection of the best suited AC for this type of contaminants is mainly an empirical and costly process. A theoretical study of the influence of AC surface groups (SGs) on CLD adsorption is done in order to help understanding the process. This may provide a first selection criteria for the preparation of AC with suitable surface properties. A model of AC consisting of a seven membered ring graphene sheet (coronene) with a functional group on the edge was used to evaluate the influence of the SGs over the adsorption. Multiple Minima Hypersurface methodology (MMH) coupled with PM7 semiempirical Hamiltonian was employed in order to study the interactions of the chlordecone with SGs (hydroxyl and carboxyl) at acidic and neutral pH and different hydration conditions. Selected structures were re-optimized using CAM-B3LYP to achieve a well-defined electron density to characterize the interactions by the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules approach. The deprotonated form of surface carboxyl and hydroxyl groups of AC models show the strongest interactions, suggesting a chemical adsorption. An increase in carboxylic SGs content is proposed to enhance CLD adsorption onto AC at neutral pH conditions. PMID:26945637

  10. Theoretical study of chlordecone and surface groups interaction in an activated carbon model under acidic and neutral conditions.

    PubMed

    Gamboa-Carballo, Juan José; Melchor-Rodríguez, Kenia; Hernández-Valdés, Daniel; Enriquez-Victorero, Carlos; Montero-Alejo, Ana Lilian; Gaspard, Sarra; Jáuregui-Haza, Ulises Javier

    2016-04-01

    Activated carbons (ACs) are widely used in the purification of drinking water without almost any knowledge about the adsorption mechanisms of the persistent organic pollutants. Chlordecone (CLD, Kepone) is an organochlorinated synthetic compound that has been used mainly as agricultural insecticide. CLD has been identified and listed as a persistent organic pollutant by the Stockholm Convention. The selection of the best suited AC for this type of contaminants is mainly an empirical and costly process. A theoretical study of the influence of AC surface groups (SGs) on CLD adsorption is done in order to help understanding the process. This may provide a first selection criteria for the preparation of AC with suitable surface properties. A model of AC consisting of a seven membered ring graphene sheet (coronene) with a functional group on the edge was used to evaluate the influence of the SGs over the adsorption. Multiple Minima Hypersurface methodology (MMH) coupled with PM7 semiempirical Hamiltonian was employed in order to study the interactions of the chlordecone with SGs (hydroxyl and carboxyl) at acidic and neutral pH and different hydration conditions. Selected structures were re-optimized using CAM-B3LYP to achieve a well-defined electron density to characterize the interactions by the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules approach. The deprotonated form of surface carboxyl and hydroxyl groups of AC models show the strongest interactions, suggesting a chemical adsorption. An increase in carboxylic SGs content is proposed to enhance CLD adsorption onto AC at neutral pH conditions.

  11. Adsorption of clofibric acid and ketoprofen onto powdered activated carbon: effect of natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yaohuan; Deshusses, Marc A

    2011-12-01

    The adsorption of two acidic pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs), clofibric acid and ketoprofen, onto powdered activated carbon (PAC) was investigated with a particular focus on the influence of natural organic matter (NOM) on the adsorption of the PhACs. Suwannee River humic acids (SRHAs) were used as a substitute for NOM. Batch adsorption experiments were conducted to obtain adsorption kinetics and adsorption isotherms with and without SRHAs in the system. The adsorption isotherms and adsorption kinetics showed that the adsorption ofclofibric acid was not significantly affected by the presence of SRHAs at a concentration of 5 mg (as carbon) L(-1). An adsorption capacity of 70 to 140 mg g(-1) was observed and equilibrium was reached within 48 h. In contrast, the adsorption of ketoprofen was markedly decreased (from about 120 mg g(-1) to 70-100 mg g(-1)) in the presence of SRHAs. Higher initial concentrations of clofibric acid than ketoprofen during testing may explain the different behaviours that were observed. Also, the more hydrophobic ketoprofen molecules may have less affinity for PAC when humic acids (which are hydrophilic) are present. The possible intermolecular forces that could account for the different behaviour of clofibric acid and ketoprofen adsorption onto PAC are discussed. In particular, the relevance of electrostatic forces, electron donor-acceptor interaction, hydrogen bonding and London dispersion forces are discussed PMID:22439557

  12. Comparative study of the adsorption of acetaminophen on activated carbons in simulated gastric fluid.

    PubMed

    Rey-Mafull, Carlos A; Tacoronte, Juan E; Garcia, Raquel; Tobella, Jorge; Llópiz, Julio C; Iglesias, Alberto; Hotza, Dachamir

    2014-01-01

    Samples of commercial activated carbons (AC) obtained from different sources: Norit E Supra USP, Norit B Test EUR, and ML (Baracoa, Cuba) were investigated. The adsorption of acetaminophen, Co = 2500 mg/L, occured in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) at pH 1.2 in contact with activated carbon for 4 h at 310 K in water bath with stirring. Residual acetaminophen was monitored by UV visible. The results were converted to scale adsorption isotherms using alternative models: Langmuir TI and TII, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich (DR) and Temkin. Linearized forms of the characteristic parameters were obtained in each case. The models that best fit the experimental data were Langmuir TI and Temkin with R(2) ≥0.98. The regression best fits followed the sequence: Langmuir TI = Temkin > DR > LangmuirTII > Freundlich. The microporosity determined by adsorption of CO2 at 273 K with a single term DR regression presented R(2) > 0.98. The adsorption of acetaminophen may occur in specific sites and also in the basal region. It was determined that the adsorption process of acetaminophen on AC in SGF is spontaneous (ΔG <0) and exothermic (-ΔHads.). Moreover, the area occupied by the acetaminophen molecule was calculated with a relative error from 7.8 to 50%.

  13. Comparative study of the adsorption of acetaminophen on activated carbons in simulated gastric fluid.

    PubMed

    Rey-Mafull, Carlos A; Tacoronte, Juan E; Garcia, Raquel; Tobella, Jorge; Llópiz, Julio C; Iglesias, Alberto; Hotza, Dachamir

    2014-01-01

    Samples of commercial activated carbons (AC) obtained from different sources: Norit E Supra USP, Norit B Test EUR, and ML (Baracoa, Cuba) were investigated. The adsorption of acetaminophen, Co = 2500 mg/L, occured in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) at pH 1.2 in contact with activated carbon for 4 h at 310 K in water bath with stirring. Residual acetaminophen was monitored by UV visible. The results were converted to scale adsorption isotherms using alternative models: Langmuir TI and TII, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich (DR) and Temkin. Linearized forms of the characteristic parameters were obtained in each case. The models that best fit the experimental data were Langmuir TI and Temkin with R(2) ≥0.98. The regression best fits followed the sequence: Langmuir TI = Temkin > DR > LangmuirTII > Freundlich. The microporosity determined by adsorption of CO2 at 273 K with a single term DR regression presented R(2) > 0.98. The adsorption of acetaminophen may occur in specific sites and also in the basal region. It was determined that the adsorption process of acetaminophen on AC in SGF is spontaneous (ΔG <0) and exothermic (-ΔHads.). Moreover, the area occupied by the acetaminophen molecule was calculated with a relative error from 7.8 to 50%. PMID:24570846

  14. Comparison of nickel doped Zinc Sulfide and/or palladium nanoparticle loaded on activated carbon as efficient adsorbents for kinetic and equilibrium study of removal of Congo Red dye.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, K; Ghaedi, M; Ansari, A

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the efficiency of nickel doped Zinc Sulfide nanoparticle loaded on activated carbon (Ni-ZnS-NP-AC) and palladium nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon (Pd-NP-AC) for the removal of Congo Red (CR) from aqueous solution was investigated. These materials were fully identified and characterized in term of structure, surface area and pore volume with different techniques such XRD, FE-SEM and TEM analysis. The dependency of CR removal percentage to variables such as pH, contact time, amount of adsorbents, CR concentration was examined and optimum values were set as: 0.03g Ni-ZnS-NP-AC and 0.04g of Pd-NP-AC at pH of 3 and 2 after mixing for 22 and 26min for Ni-ZnS-NP-AC and Pd-NP-AC, respectively. Subsequently, it was revealed that isotherm data efficiency can be correlated Langmuir with maximum monolayer adsorption capacities of 286 and 126.6mgg(-1) at room temperature for Ni-ZnS-NP-AC and Pd-NP-AC, respectively. Investigation of correlation between time and rate of adsorption reveal that the CR adsorption onto both adsorbents followed pseudo second order and interparticle diffusion simultaneously.

  15. Removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution by adsorption onto activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Selvi, K; Pattabhi, S; Kadirvelu, K

    2001-10-01

    Activated carbon (AC) prepared from coconut tree sawdust was used as an adsorbent for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution. Batch mode adsorption studies were carried out by varying agitation time, initial Cr(VI) concentration, carbon concentration and pH. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms were applied to model the adsorption data. Adsorption capacity was calculated from the Langmuir isotherm and was 3.46 mg/g at an initial pH of 3.0 for the particle size 125-250 microm. The adsorption of Cr(VI) was pH dependent and maximum removal was observed in the acidic pH range. Desorption studies were carried out using 0.01-1 M NaOH solutions.

  16. C isotope fractionation during heterotrophic activity driven carbonate precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Nurgul; Demirel, Cansu

    2016-04-01

    Stable carbon isotopic fractionation during carbonate precipitation induced by environmentally enriched heterotrophic halophilic microorganims was experimentally investigated under various salinity (% 4.5, %8, %15) conditions at 30 °C. Halophilic heterotrophic microorganims were enriched from a hypersaline Lake Acigöl located in SW Turkey (Balci et al.,2015) and later used for the precipitation experiments (solid and liquid medium). The carbonate precipitates had relatively high δ13C values (-4.3 to -16.9 ‰) compared to the δ13C values of the organic compounds that ranged from -27.5 to -25.4 ‰. At salinity of 4.5 % δ13C values of carbonate ranged from -4.9 ‰ to -10.9 ‰ with a 13C-enrichment factor of +20 to +16 ‰ higher than the δ13C values of the associated DOC (-27.5) . At salinity 8 % δ13C values of carbonate ranged from -16.3 ‰ to -11.7 ‰ with a 13C-enrichment factor of+11.3 to+15.9 ‰ higher than the δ13C values of the associated DOC. The respected values for 15 % salinity ranged from -12.3 ‰ to -9.7 ‰ with a 13C-enrichment factor of +15.2 to+16.8 ‰ higher than the δ13C values of the associated DOC. The carbonate precipitates produced in the solid medium are more enriched in 13C relative to liquid culture experiments. These results suggest that the carbon in the solid was derived from both the bacterial oxidation of organic compounds in the medium and from the atmospheric CO2. A solid medium used in the experiments may have suppressed convective and advective mass transport favouring diffusion-controlled system. This determination suggests that the rate and equilibration of CO2 exchange with the atmosphere is the major control on C isotope composition of carbonate minerals precipitated in the experiments. Key words: Lake Acıgöl, halophilic bacteria, carbonate biomineralization, C isotopes References Nurgul Balci, Meryem Menekşe, Nevin Gül Karagüler, M. Şeref Sönmez,Patrick Meister 2015.Reproducing authigenic carbonate

  17. C isotope fractionation during heterotrophic activity driven carbonate precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Nurgul; Demirel, Cansu

    2016-04-01

    Stable carbon isotopic fractionation during carbonate precipitation induced by environmentally enriched heterotrophic halophilic microorganims was experimentally investigated under various salinity (% 4.5, %8, %15) conditions at 30 °C. Halophilic heterotrophic microorganims were enriched from a hypersaline Lake Acigöl located in SW Turkey (Balci et al.,2015) and later used for the precipitation experiments (solid and liquid medium). The carbonate precipitates had relatively high δ13C values (‑4.3 to ‑16.9 ‰) compared to the δ13C values of the organic compounds that ranged from ‑27.5 to ‑25.4 ‰. At salinity of 4.5 % δ13C values of carbonate ranged from -4.9 ‰ to -10.9 ‰ with a 13C-enrichment factor of +20 to +16 ‰ higher than the δ13C values of the associated DOC (-27.5) . At salinity 8 % δ13C values of carbonate ranged from -16.3 ‰ to -11.7 ‰ with a 13C-enrichment factor of+11.3 to+15.9 ‰ higher than the δ13C values of the associated DOC. The respected values for 15 % salinity ranged from -12.3 ‰ to -9.7 ‰ with a 13C-enrichment factor of +15.2 to+16.8 ‰ higher than the δ13C values of the associated DOC. The carbonate precipitates produced in the solid medium are more enriched in 13C relative to liquid culture experiments. These results suggest that the carbon in the solid was derived from both the bacterial oxidation of organic compounds in the medium and from the atmospheric CO2. A solid medium used in the experiments may have suppressed convective and advective mass transport favouring diffusion-controlled system. This determination suggests that the rate and equilibration of CO2 exchange with the atmosphere is the major control on C isotope composition of carbonate minerals precipitated in the experiments. Key words: Lake Acıgöl, halophilic bacteria, carbonate biomineralization, C isotopes References Nurgul Balci, Meryem Menekşe, Nevin Gül Karagüler, M. Şeref Sönmez,Patrick Meister 2015.Reproducing authigenic

  18. Lamin A/C and emerin regulate MKL1-SRF activity by modulating actin dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chin Yee; Jaalouk, Diana E; Vartiainen, Maria K; Lammerding, Jan

    2013-05-23

    Laminopathies, caused by mutations in the LMNA gene encoding the nuclear envelope proteins lamins A and C, represent a diverse group of diseases that include Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, and Hutchison-Gilford progeria syndrome. Most LMNA mutations affect skeletal and cardiac muscle by mechanisms that remain incompletely understood. Loss of structural function and altered interaction of mutant lamins with (tissue-specific) transcription factors have been proposed to explain the tissue-specific phenotypes. Here we report in mice that lamin-A/C-deficient (Lmna(-/-)) and Lmna(N195K/N195K) mutant cells have impaired nuclear translocation and downstream signalling of the mechanosensitive transcription factor megakaryoblastic leukaemia 1 (MKL1), a myocardin family member that is pivotal in cardiac development and function. Altered nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of MKL1 was caused by altered actin dynamics in Lmna(-/-) and Lmna(N195K/N195K) mutant cells. Ectopic expression of the nuclear envelope protein emerin, which is mislocalized in Lmna mutant cells and also linked to EDMD and DCM, restored MKL1 nuclear translocation and rescued actin dynamics in mutant cells. These findings present a novel mechanism that could provide insight into the disease aetiology for the cardiac phenotype in many laminopathies, whereby lamin A/C and emerin regulate gene expression through modulation of nuclear and cytoskeletal actin polymerization.

  19. Lamin A/C and emerin regulate MKL1/SRF activity by modulating actin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chin Yee; Jaalouk, Diana E.; Vartiainen, Maria K.; Lammerding, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Laminopathies, caused by mutations in the LMNA gene encoding the nuclear envelope proteins lamins A and C, represent a diverse group of diseases that include Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy (EDMD), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, and Hutchison-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS).1 The majority of LMNA mutations affect skeletal and cardiac muscle by mechanisms that remain incompletely understood. Loss of structural function and disturbed interaction of mutant lamins with (tissue-specific) transcription factors have been proposed to explain the tissue-specific phenotypes.1 We report here that lamin A/C-deficient (Lmna−/−) and Lmna N195K mutant cells have impaired nuclear translocation and downstream signaling of the mechanosensitive transcription factor megakaryoblastic leukaemia 1 (MKL1), a myocardin family member that is pivotal in cardiac development and function.2 Disturbed nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of MKL1 was caused by altered actin dynamics in Lmna−/− and N195K mutant cells. Ectopic expression of the nuclear envelope protein emerin, which is mislocalized in Lmna mutant cells and also linked to EDMD and DCM, restored MKL1 nuclear translocation and rescued actin dynamics in mutant cells. These findings present a novel mechanism that could provide insight into the disease etiology for the cardiac phenotype in many laminopathies, whereby lamins A/C and emerin regulate gene expression through modulation of nuclear and cytoskeletal actin polymerization. PMID:23644458

  20. Record Methane Storage in Monolithic and Powdered Activated Carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soo, Yuchoong; Nordwald, E.; Hester, B.; Romanos, J.; Isaacson, B.; Stalla, D.; Moore, D.; Kraus, M.; Burress, J.; Dohnke, E.; Pfeifer, P.

    2010-03-01

    The Alliance for Collaborative Research in Alternative Fuel Technology (ALL-CRAFT) has developed activated carbons from corn cob as adsorbent materials for methane gas storage by physisorption at low pressures. KOH activated carbons were compressed into carbon monolith using chemical binders. High pressure methane isotherms up to 250 bar at room temperature on monolithic and powdered activated carbons were measured gravimetrically and volumetrically. Record methane storage capacities of 250 g CH4/kg carbon and 130 g CH4/liter carbon at 35 bar and 293 K have been achieved. BET surface area, porosity, and pore size distributions were measured from sub-critical nitrogen isotherms. Pore entrances were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A prototype adsorbed natural gas (ANG) tank, loaded with carbon monoliths, was tested in Kansas City.

  1. Preparation of activated carbons from coffee husks utilizing FeCl3 and ZnCl2 as activating agents.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Luiz C A; Pereira, Elaine; Guimaraes, Iara R; Vallone, Andrea; Pereira, Márcio; Mesquita, João P; Sapag, Karim

    2009-06-15

    Ferric chloride was used as a new activating agent, to obtain activated carbons (AC) from agro industrial waste (coffee husks). This material was compared with two samples from the same raw material: one of them activated by using the classical activating agent, zinc chloride, and the other, activated with a mixture of the two mentioned activating agents in the same mass proportion. The carbonaceous materials obtained after the activation process showed high specific surface areas (BET), with values higher than 900 m(2)g(-1). It is interesting to observe that the activation with FeCl(3) produces smaller pores compared to the activation with ZnCl(2). An important fact to emphasize in the use of FeCl(3) as activating agent is the activation temperature at 280 degrees C, which is clearly below to the temperature commonly employed for chemical or physical activation, as described in the bibliography. All the studied materials showed different behaviors in the adsorption of methylene blue dye and phenol from aqueous solutions. PMID:18996644

  2. Synthesis of fluorescent carbon nanoparticles directly from active carbon via a one-step ultrasonic treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Haitao; He, Xiaodie; Liu, Yang; Yu, Hang; Kang, Zhenhui; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2011-01-15

    Water-soluble fluorescent carbon nanoparticles were synthesized directly from active carbon by a one-step hydrogen peroxide-assisted ultrasonic treatment. The carbon nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, optical fluorescent microscopy, fluorescent spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer. The results showed that the surface of carbon nanoparticles was rich of hydroxyl groups resulting in high hydrophilicity. The carbon nanoparticles could emit bright and colorful photoluminescence covering the entire visible-to-near infrared spectral range. Furthermore, these carbon nanoparticles also had excellent up-conversion fluorescent properties.

  3. A Novel Activated-Charcoal-Doped Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Hybrid for Quasi-Solid-State Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell Outperforming Pt Electrode.

    PubMed

    Arbab, Alvira Ayoub; Sun, Kyung Chul; Sahito, Iftikhar Ali; Qadir, Muhammad Bilal; Choi, Yun Seon; Jeong, Sung Hoon

    2016-03-23

    Highly conductive mesoporous carbon structures based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and activated charcoal (AC) were synthesized by an enzymatic dispersion method. The synthesized carbon configuration consists of synchronized structures of highly conductive MWCNT and porous activated charcoal morphology. The proposed carbon structure was used as counter electrode (CE) for quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The AC-doped MWCNT hybrid showed much enhanced electrocatalytic activity (ECA) toward polymer gel electrolyte and revealed a charge transfer resistance (RCT) of 0.60 Ω, demonstrating a fast electron transport mechanism. The exceptional electrocatalytic activity and high conductivity of the AC-doped MWCNT hybrid CE are associated with its synchronized features of high surface area and electronic conductivity, which produces higher interfacial reaction with the quasi-solid electrolyte. Morphological studies confirm the forms of amorphous and conductive 3D carbon structure with high density of CNT colloid. The excessive oxygen surface groups and defect-rich structure can entrap an excessive volume of quasi-solid electrolyte and locate multiple sites for iodide/triiodide catalytic reaction. The resultant D719 DSSC composed of this novel hybrid CE fabricated with polymer gel electrolyte demonstrated an efficiency of 10.05% with a high fill factor (83%), outperforming the Pt electrode. Such facile synthesis of CE together with low cost and sustainability supports the proposed DSSCs' structure to stand out as an efficient next-generation photovoltaic device. PMID:26911208

  4. [Effects of different fertilizer application on soil active organic carbon].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Gui-Long; Ji, Yan-Yan; Li, Gang; Chang, Hong; Yang, Dian-Lin

    2013-01-01

    The variation characteristics of the content and components of soil active organic carbon under different fertilizer application were investigated in samples of calcareous fluvo-aquic soil from a field experiment growing winter wheat and summer maize in rotation in the North China Plain. The results showed that RF (recommended fertilization), CF (conventional fertilization) and NPK (mineral fertilizer alone) significantly increased the content of soil dissolved organic carbon and easily oxidized organic carbon by 24.92-38.63 mg x kg(-1) and 0.94-0.58 mg x kg(-1) respectively compared to CK (unfertilized control). The soil dissolved organic carbon content under OM (organic manure) increased greater than those under NPK and single fertilization, soil easily oxidized organic carbon content under OM and NPK increased greater than that under single chemical fertilization. OM and NPK showed no significant role in promoting the soil microbial biomass carbon, but combined application of OM and NPK significantly increased the soil microbial biomass carbon content by 36.06% and 20.69%, respectively. Soil easily oxidized organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon and microbial biomass carbon accounted for 8.41% - 14.83%, 0.47% - 0.70% and 0.89% - 1.20% of the total organic carbon (TOC), respectively. According to the results, the fertilizer application significantly increased the proportion of soil dissolved organic carbon and easily oxidized organic carbon, but there was no significant difference in the increasing extent of dissolved organic carbon. The RF and CF increased the proportion of soil easily oxidized organic carbon greater than OM or NPK, and significantly increased the proportion of microbial biomass carbon. OM or RF had no significant effect on the proportion of microbial biomass carbon. Therefore, in the field experiment, appropriate application of organic manure and chemical fertilizers played an important role for the increase of soil active organic carbon

  5. [Effects of different fertilizer application on soil active organic carbon].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Gui-Long; Ji, Yan-Yan; Li, Gang; Chang, Hong; Yang, Dian-Lin

    2013-01-01

    The variation characteristics of the content and components of soil active organic carbon under different fertilizer application were investigated in samples of calcareous fluvo-aquic soil from a field experiment growing winter wheat and summer maize in rotation in the North China Plain. The results showed that RF (recommended fertilization), CF (conventional fertilization) and NPK (mineral fertilizer alone) significantly increased the content of soil dissolved organic carbon and easily oxidized organic carbon by 24.92-38.63 mg x kg(-1) and 0.94-0.58 mg x kg(-1) respectively compared to CK (unfertilized control). The soil dissolved organic carbon content under OM (organic manure) increased greater than those under NPK and single fertilization, soil easily oxidized organic carbon content under OM and NPK increased greater than that under single chemical fertilization. OM and NPK showed no significant role in promoting the soil microbial biomass carbon, but combined application of OM and NPK significantly increased the soil microbial biomass carbon content by 36.06% and 20.69%, respectively. Soil easily oxidized organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon and microbial biomass carbon accounted for 8.41% - 14.83%, 0.47% - 0.70% and 0.89% - 1.20% of the total organic carbon (TOC), respectively. According to the results, the fertilizer application significantly increased the proportion of soil dissolved organic carbon and easily oxidized organic carbon, but there was no significant difference in the increasing extent of dissolved organic carbon. The RF and CF increased the proportion of soil easily oxidized organic carbon greater than OM or NPK, and significantly increased the proportion of microbial biomass carbon. OM or RF had no significant effect on the proportion of microbial biomass carbon. Therefore, in the field experiment, appropriate application of organic manure and chemical fertilizers played an important role for the increase of soil active organic carbon

  6. Production of activated carbon and its catalytic application for oxidation of hydrogen sulphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azargohar, Ramin

    coal-based and biomass-based catalysts to 115 and 141 minutes, respectively. The average amounts of sulphur dioxide produced during the reaction time were 0.14 and 0.03% (as % of hydrogen sulphide fed to the reactor) for modified activated carbons prepared from biochar and luscar char, respectively. The effects of porous structure, surface chemistry, and ash content on the performances of these activated carbon catalysts were investigated for the direct oxidation reaction of hydrogen sulphide. The acid-treatment followed by thermal desorption of activated carbons developed the porosity which produced more surface area for active sites and in addition, provided more space for sulphur product storage resulting in higher life time for catalyst. Boehm titration and temperature program desorption showed that the modification method increased basic character of carbon surface after thermal desorption in comparison to acid-treated sample. In addition, the effects of impregnating agents (potassium iodide and manganese nitrate) and two solvents for impregnation process were studied on the performance of the activated carbon catalysts for the direct oxidation of H2S to sulphur. Sulphur L-edge X-ray near edge structure (XANES) showed that the elemental sulphur was the dominant sulphur species in the product. The kinetic study for oxidation reaction of H2S over LusAC-O-D(650) was performed for temperature range of 160-190°C, oxygen to hydrogen sulphide molar ratio of 1-3, and H2S concentration of 6000-10000 ppm at 200 kPa. The values of activation energy were 26.6 and 29.3 kJ.gmol-1 for Eley-Rideal and Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanisms, respectively.

  7. Removal of vertigo blue dyes from Batik textile wastewater by adsorption onto activated carbon and coal bottom ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusmiyati, L., Puspita Adi; Deni, V.; Robi Indra, S.; Islamica, Dlia; Fuadi, M.

    2016-04-01

    Removal of vertigo blue dye from batik textile wastewater was studied by adsorptionprocess onto activated carbon (AC) and coal bottom ash (CBA).The influence of experimental conditions (pH solution, dye concentration, and contact time) were studied on the both adsorbents. At equilibrium conditions, the data were fitted to Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models. The maximum adsorption capacity calculated from the Langmuir model for carbon active was 6.29mg/g at pH that found to be considerably higher than that obtained for coal bottom ash 3.72mg/g pH 9. From Freundlich model, the maximum adsorption capacity is less for coal bottom ash (pH 9) than that for carbon active (pH4).

  8. Activation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors increases intracellular cAMP levels via activation of AC1 in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Qing; Yakel, Jerrel L.

    2015-01-01

    The activation of α7 nAChRs has been shown to improve hippocampal-dependent learning and memory. However, the molecular mechanism of α7 nAChRs’ action remains elusive. We previously reported that activation of α7 nAChRs induced a prolonged enhancement of glutamatergic synaptic transmission in a PKA-dependent manner. Here, we investigated any connection between the activation of the α7 nAChR and cAMP signaling in hippocampal neurons. To address this question, we employed a FRET-based biosensor to measure the intracellular cAMP levels directly via live cell imaging. We found that application of the α7 nAChR-selective agonist choline, in the presence of the α7 nAChR positive allosteric modulator PNU-120596, induced a significant change in emission ratio of F535/F470, which indicated an increase in intracellular cAMP levels. This choline-induced increase was abolished by the α7 nAChR antagonist MLA and the calcium chelator BAPTA, suggesting that the cAMP increase depends on the α7 nAChR activation and subsequent intracellular calcium rise. The selective AC1 inhibitor CB-6673567 and siRNA-mediated deletion of AC1 both blocked the choline-induced cAMP increase, suggesting that calcium-dependent AC1 is required for choline’s action. Furthermore, α7 nAChR activation stimulated the phosphorylation of synapsin, which serves as a downstream effector to regulate neurotransmitter release. Our findings provide the first direct evidence to link activation of α7 nAChRs to a cAMP rise via AC1, which defines a new signaling pathway employed by α7 nAChRs. Our study sheds light into potential molecular mechanisms of the positive cognitive actions of α7 nAChR agonists and development of therapeutic treatments for cognitive impairments. PMID:25937212

  9. [Degradation of PCDD/Fs by the Mixture of V2O5-WO3/TiO2 Catalyst and Activated Carbon].

    PubMed

    Ren, Yong; Ji, Sha-sha; Yu, Ming-feng; Li, Xiao-dong; Yan, Jian-hua

    2015-09-01

    The mixture of V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalyst and two kinds of Activated Carbons (AC) (AC-1: based on lignite; AC-2: based on coconut shell) was used to destroy gas phase PCDD/Fs with high concentration (9. 80 ng.m-3, evaluated by international toxic equivalence quantity (I-TEQ) under low thermal temperature (160°C) based on a dioxin generating system. After mixing with AC, removal efficiency (RE) and destruction efficiency (DE) of PCDD/Fs increased by 20% compared with only catalyst condition. In comparison with mixture of AC based on coconut shell, mixture of AC based on lignite had lower RE-values and higher DE-values. The adjustments of the ratio of catalyst and AC could cause the different degradation effects, and RE-values increased and DE-values decreased with increasing proportions of catalyst. When the volume fraction of oxygen was 0% in experimental atmosphere, catalyst could lose its activity and most PCDD/Fs were not oxidized but adsorbed by the mixture. RE and DE-values increased with increasing content of oxygen. The addition of ozone (concentration of 200 mg.m-3) could improve catalytic oxidation effects to a certain degree. However, ozone might react with AC, which could influence the lifetime of the mixture. Under 200°C, the mixture with proportion of AC: catalyst = 1:1 and in the present of 200 mg.m-3 ozone conditions, the highest RE and DE-value were obtained with 98. 0% and 94. 8% respectively, and the concentration of PCDD/Fs residual in off-gas was only 0. 51 ng.m-3 evaluated by I-TEQ.

  10. Overview of NATO/AC 243/Panel 3 activities concerning radiowave propagation in coastal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christophe, F.; Douchin, N.; Hurtaud, Y.; Dion, D.; Makaruschka, R.; Heemskerk, H.; Anderson, K.

    1995-02-01

    The performances of most systems operating at RF and millimeter waves can be seriously affected by propagation effects. That is the reason why NATO established the Research Study group No. 8 (RSG8) within Panel 3 (physics and electronics) of Defense Research Group (AC 243), with its Propagation Subgroup (PSG) responsible for the propagation aspects. Comparison of mm and other wavelengths was to be considered. In maritime and coastal environments, the use of such wavelengths for various military applications like anti-ship seekers, fire control radars, ship to ship communications or Electronic Support Measurements (ESM) led to the setting up of specific measurement campaigns; the last three are reported hereafter. The first two experiments used facilities close to Lorient, on the Atlantic coast, and Toulon, on the Mediterranean coast of France, with the purpose of documenting the refractive effects for medium range over the horizon paths. These experiments where are referred to as Lorient 89 and Toulon 90 campaigns, are described in this paper, and some typical results are presented. The latest cooperative work of RSG8/PSG took place recently (fall 1993) near Lorient, on a line-of-sight 10 km path over seawater. This experiment, referred to as Lorient 93 campaign, was devoted to the analysis of phase-front distortions due to multipath along with refractive effects, and to the assessment of performances for naval systems like short range tracking radars. Analysis of the data, either on a statistical base or as specific case studies, is being performed presently, but some early typical results will be given in this paper after a detailed description of the experiment.

  11. JPL Activated Carbon Treatment System (ACTS) for sewage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    An Activated Carbon Treatment System (ACTS) was developed for sewage treatment and is being applied to a one-million gallon per day sewage treatment pilot plant in Orange County California. Activities reported include pyrolysis and activation of carbon-sewage sludge, and activated carbon treatment of sewage to meet ocean discharge standards. The ACTS Sewage treatment operations include carbon-sewage treatment, primary and secondary clarifiers, gravity (multi-media) filter, filter press dewatering, flash drying of carbon-sewage filter cake, and sludge pyrolysis and activation. Tests were conducted on a laboratory scale, 10,000 gallon per day demonstration plant and pilot test equipment. Preliminary economic studies are favorable to the ACTS process relative to activated sludge treatment for a 175,000,000 gallon per day sewage treatment plant.

  12. Activated Carbon Modified with Copper for Adsorption of Propanethiol

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Piraján, Juan Carlos; Tirano, Joaquín; Salamanca, Brisa; Giraldo, Liliana

    2010-01-01

    Activated carbons were characterized texturally and chemically before and after treatment, using surface area determination in the BET model, Boehm titration, TPR, DRX and immersion calorimetry. The adsorption capacity and the kinetics of sulphur compound removal were determined by gas chromatography. It was established that the propanethiol retention capacity is dependent on the number of oxygenated groups generated on the activated carbon surface and that activated carbon modified with CuO at 0.25 M shows the highest retention of propanethiol. Additionally is proposed a mechanism of decomposition of propenothiol with carbon-copper system. PMID:20479992

  13. Sulphate-activated growth of bamboo-like carbon nanotubes over copper catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jarrn-Horng; Chen, Ching-Shiun; Zeng, Zhi-Yan; Chang, Chia-Wei; Chen, Hsiu-Wei

    2012-07-01

    A sulphate-activated mechanism is proposed to describe the growth of bamboo-like carbon nanotubes (CNTs) over copper catalysts using chemical vapour deposition with helium-diluted ethylene. Sulphate-assisted copper catalysts afford a high-yield growth of bamboo-like CNTs at a mild temperature, 800 °C however, non-sulphate-assisted copper catalysts, e.g., copper acetate and copper nitrate prepared catalysts, were inert to CNT growth and only gave amorphous carbons (a-C) surrounding copper nanoparticles under the same conditions. Nevertheless, the addition of sulphate ions in the preparation step for the two inert catalysts can activate their abilities for CNT growth with remarkable yields. Furthermore, Raman spectra analysis demonstrates a linear dependence between the concentration of sulphate ions in copper catalysts and the ratio of CNT-a-C in the as-grown carbon soot. The sulphate-activated effect on CNT growth over copper catalysts could be related to a three-way interaction of sulphate ions, copper nanoparticles and support. In situ TEM images of an as-grown CNT irradiated by electron beams without the inlet of carbon sources reveal a new pathway of carbon diffusion through the bulk of copper nanoparticles and an enlarged inner-wall thickness of the on-site CNT. This carbon diffusion model over copper catalysts can provide new insights into the CNT growth mechanism over non-magnetic metal catalysts.A sulphate-activated mechanism is proposed to describe the growth of bamboo-like carbon nanotubes (CNTs) over copper catalysts using chemical vapour deposition with helium-diluted ethylene. Sulphate-assisted copper catalysts afford a high-yield growth of bamboo-like CNTs at a mild temperature, 800 °C however, non-sulphate-assisted copper catalysts, e.g., copper acetate and copper nitrate prepared catalysts, were inert to CNT growth and only gave amorphous carbons (a-C) surrounding copper nanoparticles under the same conditions. Nevertheless, the addition of

  14. Hyperbranched Aliphatic Polyester Modified Activated Carbon Particles with Homogenized Surface Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Zhang, Liuxue

    The hyperbranched aliphatic polyester grafted activated carbon (HAPE-AC), was successfully prepared by the simple "one-pot" method. The surface functional groups of commercial activated carbon particles were homogenized to hydroxyl groups by being oxidized with nitric acid and then reduced with lithium tetrahydroaluminate (LiAlH4) at first. Secondly, the surface hydroxyl groups were used as the active sites for the solution polycondensation of the AB2 monomer, 2, 2-bis(hydroxymethyl)propionic acid (bis-MPA), with the catalysis of p-toluenesulfonic acid (p-TSA). The homogenization of the surface groups of the activated carbon particles and the graft polymerization of the hyperbranched aliphatic polyester were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) technique. The products were also characterized with Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The competitive adsorption properties of the products toward the heavy metal ions (Cu(II), Hg(II), Zn(II), and Cd(II)) also proved the translations of the surface groups.

  15. Preparation of nitrogen-enriched activated carbons from brown coal

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Pietrzak; Helena Wachowska; Piotr Nowicki

    2006-05-15

    Nitrogen-enriched activated carbons were prepared from a Polish brown coal. Nitrogen was introduced from urea at 350{sup o}C in an oxidizing atmosphere both to carbonizates obtained at 500-700{sup o}C and to activated carbons prepared from them. The activation was performed at 800{sup o}C with KOH in argon. It has been observed that the carbonization temperature determines the amount of nitrogen that is incorporated (DC5U, 8.4 wt % N{sup daf}; DC6U, 6.3 wt % N{sup daf}; and DC7U, 5.4 wt % N{sup daf}). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements have shown that nitrogen introduced both at the stage of carbonizates and at the stage of activated carbons occurs mainly as -6, -5, and imine, amine and amide groups. On the other hand, the activation of carbons enriched with nitrogen results in the formation of pyridonic nitrogen and N-Q. The introduction of nitrogen at the activated carbon stage leads to a slight decrease in surface area. It has been proven that the most effective way of preparing microporous activated carbons enriched with nitrogen to a considerable extent and having high surface area ({approximately} 3000 m{sup 2}/g) is the following: carbonization - activation - reaction with urea. 40 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  16. Acoustical Evaluation of Carbonized and Activated Cotton Nonwovens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The process of manufacturing a carbonized and activated nonwoven made by cotton fiber was investigated in this paper. The study was focused on the acoustic application and nonwoven composites with cotton nonwoven as a base layer and glass fiber nonwoven, cotton nonwoven, and carbonized and activated...

  17. Biodegradation of persistent organics can overcome adsorption-desorption hysteresis in biological activated carbon systems.

    PubMed

    Abromaitis, V; Racys, V; van der Marel, P; Meulepas, R J W

    2016-04-01

    In Biological Activated Carbon (BAC) systems, persistent organic pollutants can be removed through a combination of adsorption, desorption and biodegradation. These processes might be affected by the presence of other organics, especially by the more abundant easily-biodegradable organics, like acetate. In this research these relations are quantified for the removal of the persistent pharmaceutical metoprolol. Acetate did not affect the adsorption and desorption of metoprolol, but it did greatly enhance the metoprolol biodegradation. At least part of the BAC biomass growing on acetate was also able to metabolise metoprolol, although metoprolol was only converted after the acetate was depleted. The presence of easily-degradable organics like acetate in the feeding water is therefore beneficial for the removal of metoprolol in BAC systems. The isotherms obtained from metoprolol adsorption and desorption experiments showed that BAC systems are subject to hysteresis; for AC bioregeneration to take place the microbial biomass has to reduce the concentration at the AC-biomass interface 2.7 times compared to the concentration at which the carbon was being loaded. However, given the threshold concentration of the MET degrading microorganisms (<0.08 μg/L) versus the average influent concentration (1.3 μg/L), bioregeneration is feasible.

  18. Copper-spent activated carbon as a heterogeneous peroxydisulfate catalyst for the degradation of Acid Orange 7 in an electrochemical reactor.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Lin, Heng; Yang, Lin; Zhang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The exhausted activated carbon generated from the adsorption of heavy metal wastewater needs further treatment/disposal. In this study, a new application of copper-spent activated carbon (Cu-AC) was proposed. Cu-AC was used to activate peroxydisulfate (PDS) for the decolorization of Acid Orange 7 (AO7) and electrical current was introduced to enhance the process. The decolorization followed a pseudo-first-order kinetic pattern well (R(2) > 0.95). 92.4% of color removal at 60 min and 38.3% of total organic carbon removal at 180 min were achieved when initial pH value was 9.0, current density was 16 mA/cm(2), PDS concentration was 5 mM and Cu-AC dosage was 0.25 g/L. The radical scavengers including methanol, tert-butanol and phenol, as well as electron paramagnetic resonance test, were employed to investigate the oxidizing species responsible for AO7 decolorization. The stability of Cu-AC was confirmed by three recycle experiments.

  19. Copper-spent activated carbon as a heterogeneous peroxydisulfate catalyst for the degradation of Acid Orange 7 in an electrochemical reactor.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Lin, Heng; Yang, Lin; Zhang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The exhausted activated carbon generated from the adsorption of heavy metal wastewater needs further treatment/disposal. In this study, a new application of copper-spent activated carbon (Cu-AC) was proposed. Cu-AC was used to activate peroxydisulfate (PDS) for the decolorization of Acid Orange 7 (AO7) and electrical current was introduced to enhance the process. The decolorization followed a pseudo-first-order kinetic pattern well (R(2) > 0.95). 92.4% of color removal at 60 min and 38.3% of total organic carbon removal at 180 min were achieved when initial pH value was 9.0, current density was 16 mA/cm(2), PDS concentration was 5 mM and Cu-AC dosage was 0.25 g/L. The radical scavengers including methanol, tert-butanol and phenol, as well as electron paramagnetic resonance test, were employed to investigate the oxidizing species responsible for AO7 decolorization. The stability of Cu-AC was confirmed by three recycle experiments. PMID:27120633

  20. The application of prepared porous carbon materials: Effect of different components on the heavy metal adsorption.

    PubMed

    Song, Min; Wei, Yuexing; Yu, Lei; Tang, Xinhong

    2016-06-01

    In this study, five typical municipal solid waste (MSW) components (tyres, cardboard, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), acrylic textile, toilet paper) were used as raw materials to prepare four kinds of MSW-based carbon materials (paperboard-based carbon materials (AC1); the tyres and paperboard-based carbon materials (AC2); the tyres, paperboard and PVC-based carbon materials (AC3); the tyres, paperboard, toilet paper, PVC and acrylic textile-based carbon materials (AC4)) by the KOH activation method. The characteristic results illustrate that the prepared carbon adsorbents exhibited a large pore volume, high surface area and sufficient oxygen functional groups. Furthermore, the application of AC1, AC2, AC3, AC4 on different heavy metal (Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Pb(2+), Cr(3+)) removals was explored to investigate their adsorption properties. The effects of reaction time, pH, temperature and adsorbent dosage on the adsorption capability of heavy metals were investigated. Comparisons of heavy metal adsorption on carbon of different components were carried out. Among the four samples, AC1 exhibits the highest adsorption capacity for Cu(2+); the highest adsorption capacities of Pb(2+) and Zn(2+) are obtained for AC2; that of Cr(3+) are obtained for AC4. In addition, the carbon materials exhibit better adsorption capability of Cu(2+) and Pb(2+) than the other two kind of metal ions (Zn(2+) and Cr(3+)).

  1. The application of prepared porous carbon materials: Effect of different components on the heavy metal adsorption.

    PubMed

    Song, Min; Wei, Yuexing; Yu, Lei; Tang, Xinhong

    2016-06-01

    In this study, five typical municipal solid waste (MSW) components (tyres, cardboard, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), acrylic textile, toilet paper) were used as raw materials to prepare four kinds of MSW-based carbon materials (paperboard-based carbon materials (AC1); the tyres and paperboard-based carbon materials (AC2); the tyres, paperboard and PVC-based carbon materials (AC3); the tyres, paperboard, toilet paper, PVC and acrylic textile-based carbon materials (AC4)) by the KOH activation method. The characteristic results illustrate that the prepared carbon adsorbents exhibited a large pore volume, high surface area and sufficient oxygen functional groups. Furthermore, the application of AC1, AC2, AC3, AC4 on different heavy metal (Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Pb(2+), Cr(3+)) removals was explored to investigate their adsorption properties. The effects of reaction time, pH, temperature and adsorbent dosage on the adsorption capability of heavy metals were investigated. Comparisons of heavy metal adsorption on carbon of different components were carried out. Among the four samples, AC1 exhibits the highest adsorption capacity for Cu(2+); the highest adsorption capacities of Pb(2+) and Zn(2+) are obtained for AC2; that of Cr(3+) are obtained for AC4. In addition, the carbon materials exhibit better adsorption capability of Cu(2+) and Pb(2+) than the other two kind of metal ions (Zn(2+) and Cr(3+)). PMID:26951338

  2. Microbial Enzyme Activity and Carbon Cycling in Grassland Soil Fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, S. D.; Jastrow, J. D.

    2004-12-01

    Extracellular enzymes are necessary to degrade complex organic compounds present in soils. Using physical fractionation procedures, we tested whether old soil carbon is spatially isolated from degradative enzymes across a prairie restoration chronosequence in Illinois, USA. We found that carbon-degrading enzymes were abundant in all soil fractions, including macroaggregates, microaggregates, and the clay fraction, which contains carbon with a mean residence time of ~200 years. The activities of two cellulose-degrading enzymes and a chitin-degrading enzyme were 2-10 times greater in organic matter fractions than in bulk soil, consistent with the rapid turnover of these fractions. Polyphenol oxidase activity was 3 times greater in the clay fraction than in the bulk soil, despite very slow carbon turnover in this fraction. Changes in enzyme activity across the restoration chronosequence were small once adjusted for increases in soil carbon concentration, although polyphenol oxidase activity per unit carbon declined by 50% in native prairie versus cultivated soil. These results are consistent with a `two-pool' model of enzyme and carbon turnover in grassland soils. In light organic matter fractions, enzyme production and carbon turnover both occur rapidly. However, in mineral-dominated fractions, both enzymes and their carbon substrates are immobilized on mineral surfaces, leading to slow turnover. Soil carbon accumulation in the clay fraction and across the prairie restoration chronosequence probably reflects increasing physical isolation of enzymes and substrates on the molecular scale, rather than the micron to millimeter scale.

  3. Ozone Removal by Filters Containing Activated Carbon: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William; Spears, Mike; Sullivan, Douglas; Mendell, Mark

    2009-09-01

    This study evaluated the ozone removal performance of moderate-cost particle filters containing activated carbon when installed in a commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) system. Filters containing 300 g of activated carbon per 0.09 m2 of filter face area were installed in two 'experimental' filter banks within an office building located in Sacramento, CA. The ozone removal performance of the filters was assessed through periodic measurements of ozone concentrations in the air upstream and downstream of the filters. Ozone concentrations were also measured upstream and downstream of a 'reference' filter bank containing filters without any activated carbon. The filter banks with prefilters containing activated carbon were removing 60percent to 70percent of the ozone 67 and 81 days after filter installation. In contrast, there was negligible ozone removal by the reference filter bank without activated carbon.

  4. Fractal analysis of granular activated carbons using isotherm data

    SciTech Connect

    Khalili, N.R.; Pan, M.; Sandi, G.

    1997-08-01

    Utilization of adsorption on solid surfaces was exercised for the first time in 1785. Practical application of unactivated carbon filters, and powdered carbon were first demonstrated in the American water treatment plant, and a municipal treatment plant in New Jersey, in 1883 and 1930, respectively. The use of activated carbon became widespread in the next few decades. At present, adsorption on carbons has a wide spread application in water treatment and removal of taste, odor, removal of synthetic organic chemicals, color-forming organics, and desinfection by-products and their naturally occurring precursors. This paper presents an analysis of the surface fractal dimension and adsorption capacity of a group of carbons.

  5. Selecting activated carbon for water and wastewater treatability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W.; Chang, Q.G.; Liu, W.D.; Li, B.J.; Jiang, W.X.; Fu, L.J.; Ying, W.C.

    2007-10-15

    A series of follow-up investigations were performed to produce data for improving the four-indicator carbon selection method that we developed to identify high-potential activated carbons effective for removing specific organic water pollutants. The carbon's pore structure and surface chemistry are dependent on the raw material and the activation process. Coconut carbons have relatively more small pores than large pores; coal and apricot nutshell/walnut shell fruit carbons have the desirable pore structures for removing adsorbates of all sizes. Chemical activation, excessive activation, and/or thermal reactivation enlarge small pores, resulting in reduced phenol number and higher tannic acid number. Activated carbon's phenol, iodine, methylene blue, and tannic acid numbers are convenient indicators of its surface area and pore volume of pore diameters < 10, 10-15, 15-28, and > 28 angstrom, respectively. The phenol number of a carbon is also a good indicator of its surface acidity of oxygen-containing organic functional groups that affect the adsorptive capacity for aromatic and other small polar organics. The tannic acid number is an indicator of carbon's capacity for large, high-molecular-weight natural organic precursors of disinfection by-products in water treatment. The experimental results for removing nitrobenzene, methyl-tert-butyl ether, 4,4-bisphenol, humic acid, and the organic constituents of a biologically treated coking-plant effluent have demonstrated the effectiveness of this capacity-indicator-based method of carbon selection.

  6. A novel Ni-WC/AC catalyst with enhanced electroactivity for glucose oxidation.

    PubMed

    Qi, Suitao; Yue, Jiaqi; Hao, Chen; Li, Yingying; Yi, Chunhai; Yang, Bolun

    2015-03-01

    WC-doped Ni over an active carbon catalyst (Ni-WC/AC), prepared by incipient wetness impregnation, is proposed as an anode for the amplified electrochemical oxidation of glucose in 0.1 M KOH solution. Cyclic voltammetry and morphology characterizations were used to explore these electrocatalysts. It was found that Ni-WC/AC catalysts were nanoparticles with a diameter of 10 nm and the 20%wtNi-20%wtWC/AC catalyst showed superior electrocatalytic activity toward glucose oxidation. The extraordinary activity obtained at the 20%wtNi-20%wtWC/AC modified glass carbon electrode (GCE) is attributed to the synergistic effect between Ni and WC toward glucose electroxidation. PMID:25656011

  7. Photothermal desorption of single-walled carbon nanotubes and coconut shell-activated carbons using a continuous light source for application in air sampling.

    PubMed

    Floyd, Evan L; Sapag, Karim; Oh, Jonghwa; Lungu, Claudiu T

    2014-08-01

    Many techniques exist to measure airborne volatile organic compounds (VOCs), each with differing advantages; sorbent sampling is compact, versatile, has good sample stability, and is the preferred technique for collecting VOCs for hygienists. Development of a desorption technique that allows multiple analyses per sample (similar to chemical desorption) with enhanced sensitivity (similar to thermal desorption) would be helpful to field hygienists. In this study, activated carbon (AC) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) were preloaded with toluene vapor and partially desorbed with light using a common 12-V DC, 50-W incandescent/halogen lamp. A series of experimental chamber configurations were explored starting with a 500-ml chamber under static conditions, then with low ventilation and high ventilation, finally a 75-ml high ventilation chamber was evaluated. When preloaded with toluene and irradiated at the highest lamp setting for 4min, AC desorbed 13.9, 18.5, 23.8, and 45.9% of the loaded VOC mass, in each chamber configuration, respectively; SWNT desorbed 25.2, 24.3, 37.4, and 70.5% of the loaded VOC mass, respectively. SWNT desorption was significantly greater than AC in all test conditions (P = 0.02-<0.0001) demonstrating a substantial difference in sorbent performance. When loaded with 0.435mg toluene and desorbed at the highest lamp setting for 4min in the final chamber design, the mean desorption for AC was 45.8% (39.7, 52.0) and SWNT was 72.6% (68.8, 76.4) (mean represented in terms of 95% confidence interval). All desorption measurements were obtained using a field grade photoionization detector; this demonstrates the potential of using this technique to perform infield prescreening of VOC samples for immediate exposure feedback and in the analytical lab to introduce sample to a gas chromatograph for detailed analysis of the sample.

  8. Photothermal Desorption of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Coconut Shell-Activated Carbons Using a Continuous Light Source for Application in Air Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Floyd, Evan L.; Sapag, Karim; Oh, Jonghwa; Lungu, Claudiu T.

    2014-01-01

    Many techniques exist to measure airborne volatile organic compounds (VOCs), each with differing advantages; sorbent sampling is compact, versatile, has good sample stability, and is the preferred technique for collecting VOCs for hygienists. Development of a desorption technique that allows multiple analyses per sample (similar to chemical desorption) with enhanced sensitivity (similar to thermal desorption) would be helpful to field hygienists. In this study, activated carbon (AC) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) were preloaded with toluene vapor and partially desorbed with light using a common 12-V DC, 50-W incandescent/halogen lamp. A series of experimental chamber configurations were explored starting with a 500-ml chamber under static conditions, then with low ventilation and high ventilation, finally a 75-ml high ventilation chamber was evaluated. When preloaded with toluene and irradiated at the highest lamp setting for 4min, AC desorbed 13.9, 18.5, 23.8, and 45.9% of the loaded VOC mass, in each chamber configuration, respectively; SWNT desorbed 25.2, 24.3, 37.4, and 70.5% of the loaded VOC mass, respectively. SWNT desorption was significantly greater than AC in all test conditions (P = 0.02–<0.0001) demonstrating a substantial difference in sorbent performance. When loaded with 0.435mg toluene and desorbed at the highest lamp setting for 4min in the final chamber design, the mean desorption for AC was 45.8% (39.7, 52.0) and SWNT was 72.6% (68.8, 76.4) (mean represented in terms of 95% confidence interval). All desorption measurements were obtained using a field grade photoionization detector; this demonstrates the potential of using this technique to perform infield prescreening of VOC samples for immediate exposure feedback and in the analytical lab to introduce sample to a gas chromatograph for detailed analysis of the sample. PMID:25016598

  9. An X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of surface changes on brominated and sulfur-treated activated carbon sorbents during mercury capture: performance of pellet versus fiber sorbents.

    PubMed

    Saha, Arindom; Abram, David N; Kuhl, Kendra P; Paradis, Jennifer; Crawford, Jenni L; Sasmaz, Erdem; Chang, Ramsay; Jaramillo, Thomas F; Wilcox, Jennifer

    2013-12-01

    This work explores surface changes and the Hg capture performance of brominated activated carbon (AC) pellets, sulfur-treated AC pellets, and sulfur-treated AC fibers upon exposure to simulated Powder River Basin-fired flue gas. Hg breakthrough curves yielded specific Hg capture amounts by means of the breakthrough shapes and times for the three samples. The brominated AC pellets showed a sharp breakthrough after 170-180 h and a capacity of 585 μg of Hg/g, the sulfur-treated AC pellets exhibited a gradual breakthrough after 80-90 h and a capacity of 661 μg of Hg/g, and the sulfur-treated AC fibers showed no breakthrough even after 1400 h, exhibiting a capacity of >9700 μg of Hg/g. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to analyze sorbent surfaces before and after testing to show important changes in quantification and oxidation states of surface Br, N, and S after exposure to the simulated flue gas. For the brominated and sulfur-treated AC pellet samples, the amount of surface-bound Br and reduced sulfur groups decreased upon Hg capture testing, while the level of weaker Hg-binding surface S(VI) and N species (perhaps as NH4(+)) increased significantly. A high initial concentration of strong Hg-binding reduced sulfur groups on the surface of the sulfur-treated AC fiber is likely responsible for this sorbent's minimal accumulation of S(VI) species during exposure to the simulated flue gas and is linked to its superior Hg capture performance compared to that of the brominated and sulfur-treated AC pellet samples.

  10. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon produced from pomegranate seeds by ZnCl 2 activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uçar, Suat; Erdem, Murat; Tay, Turgay; Karagöz, Selhan

    2009-08-01

    In this study, pomegranate seeds, a by-product of fruit juice industry, were used as precursor for the preparation of activated carbon by chemical activation with ZnCl 2. The influence of process variables such as the carbonization temperature and the impregnation ratio on textural and chemical-surface properties of the activated carbons was studied. When using the 2.0 impregnation ratio at the carbonization temperature of 600 °C, the specific surface area of the resultant carbon is as high as 978.8 m 2 g -1. The results showed that the surface area and total pore volume of the activated carbons at the lowest impregnation ratio and the carbonization temperature were achieved as high as 709.4 m 2 g -1 and 0.329 cm 3 g -1. The surface area was strongly influenced by the impregnation ratio of activation reagent and the subsequent carbonization temperature.

  11. Detection and abundance of mRNA and protein encoded by transposable element activator (Ac) in maize.

    PubMed

    Fusswinkel, H; Schein, S; Courage, U; Starlinger, P; Kunze, R

    1991-02-01

    The 3.5 kb long mRNA of the maize transposable element Ac contains an open reading frame (ORFa) which encodes a polypeptide of 807 amino acids, the putative transposase of Ac. The Ac mRNA is a rare transcript: we now estimate the fraction of Ac mRNA in wx-m7::Ac seedlings to be 2-13 x 10(-5) of the polyA RNA. Assuming that maize cells contain similar amounts of polyA RNA as another monocot (0.16 pg/cell), this is equivalent to 1.5-10 transcripts in each cell. A protein with an apparent molecular weight of 112 kDa is detected, by five antisera directed against different segments of ORFa, exclusively in nuclear extracts from Ac-containing maize. This protein is most likely the full-length Ac ORFa protein. We estimate its concentration to be in the range of 3 x 10(-7) of the nuclear proteins, or about 1000 molecules per triploid endosperm cell containing one Ac element. PMID:1848648

  12. Hydrodeoxygenation of prairie cordgrass bio-oil over Ni based activated carbon synergistic catalysts combined with different metals.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shouyun; Wei, Lin; Zhao, Xianhui; Kadis, Ethan; Cao, Yuhe; Julson, James; Gu, Zhengrong

    2016-06-25

    Bio-oil can be upgraded through hydrodeoxygenation (HDO). Low-cost and effective catalysts are crucial for the HDO process. In this study, four inexpensive combinations of Ni based activated carbon synergistic catalysts including Ni/AC, Ni-Fe/AC, Ni-Mo/AC and Ni-Cu/AC were evaluated for HDO of prairie cordgrass (PCG) bio-oil. The tests were carried out in the autoclave under mild operating conditions with 500psig of H2 pressure and 350°C temperature. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The results show that all synergistic catalysts had significant improvements on the physicochemical properties (water content, pH, oxygen content, higher heating value and chemical compositions) of the upgraded PCG bio-oil. The higher heating value of the upgraded bio-oil (ranging from 29.65MJ/kg to 31.61MJ/kg) improved significantly in comparison with the raw bio-oil (11.33MJ/kg), while the oxygen content reduced to only 21.70-25.88% from 68.81% of the raw bio-oil. Compared to raw bio-oil (8.78% hydrocarbons and no alkyl-phenols), the Ni/AC catalysts produced the highest content of gasoline range hydrocarbons (C6-C12) at 32.63% in the upgraded bio-oil, while Ni-Mo/AC generated the upgraded bio-oil with the highest content of gasoline blending alkyl-phenols at 38.41%.

  13. Hydrodeoxygenation of prairie cordgrass bio-oil over Ni based activated carbon synergistic catalysts combined with different metals.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shouyun; Wei, Lin; Zhao, Xianhui; Kadis, Ethan; Cao, Yuhe; Julson, James; Gu, Zhengrong

    2016-06-25

    Bio-oil can be upgraded through hydrodeoxygenation (HDO). Low-cost and effective catalysts are crucial for the HDO process. In this study, four inexpensive combinations of Ni based activated carbon synergistic catalysts including Ni/AC, Ni-Fe/AC, Ni-Mo/AC and Ni-Cu/AC were evaluated for HDO of prairie cordgrass (PCG) bio-oil. The tests were carried out in the autoclave under mild operating conditions with 500psig of H2 pressure and 350°C temperature. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The results show that all synergistic catalysts had significant improvements on the physicochemical properties (water content, pH, oxygen content, higher heating value and chemical compositions) of the upgraded PCG bio-oil. The higher heating value of the upgraded bio-oil (ranging from 29.65MJ/kg to 31.61MJ/kg) improved significantly in comparison with the raw bio-oil (11.33MJ/kg), while the oxygen content reduced to only 21.70-25.88% from 68.81% of the raw bio-oil. Compared to raw bio-oil (8.78% hydrocarbons and no alkyl-phenols), the Ni/AC catalysts produced the highest content of gasoline range hydrocarbons (C6-C12) at 32.63% in the upgraded bio-oil, while Ni-Mo/AC generated the upgraded bio-oil with the highest content of gasoline blending alkyl-phenols at 38.41%. PMID:26902668

  14. Grain-based activated carbons for natural gas storage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tengyan; Walawender, Walter P; Fan, L T

    2010-03-01

    Natural gas has emerged as a potential alternative to gasoline due to the increase in global energy demand and environmental concerns. An investigation was undertaken to explore the technical feasibility of implementing the adsorbed natural gas (ANG) storage in the fuel tanks of motor vehicles with activated carbons from biomass, e.g., sorghum and wheat. The grain-based activated carbons were prepared by chemical activation; the experimental parameters were varied to identify the optimum conditions. The porosity of the resultant activated carbons was evaluated through nitrogen adsorption; and the storage capacity, through methane adsorption. A comparative study was also carried out with commercial activated carbons from charcoal. The highest storage factor attained was 89 for compacted grain-based activated carbons from grain sorghum with a bulk density of 0.65 g/cm(3), and the highest storage factor attained is 106 for compacted commercial activated carbons (Calgon) with a bulk density of 0.70 g/cm(3). The storage factor was found to increase approximately linearly with increasing bulk density and to be independent of the extent of compaction. This implies that the grain-based activated carbons are the ideal candidates for the ANG storage.

  15. Adsorption of selected pharmaceuticals and an endocrine disrupting compound by granular activated carbon. 2. Model prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Z.; Peldszus, S.; Huck, P.M.

    2009-03-01

    The adsorption of two representative pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) naproxen and carbamazepine and one endocrine disrupting compound (EDC) nonylphenol was studied in pilot-scale granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorbers using post-sedimentation (PS) water from a full-scale drinking water treatment plant. The GAC adsorbents were coal-based Calgon Filtrasorb 400 and coconut shell-based PICA CTIF TE. Acidic naproxen broke through fastest while nonylphenol was removed best, which was consistent with the degree to which fouling affected compound removals. Model predictions and experimental data were generally in good agreement for all three compounds, which demonstrated the effectiveness and robustness of the pore and surface diffusion model (PSDM) used in combination with the time-variable parameter approach for predicting removals at environmentally relevant concentrations (i.e., ng/L range). Sensitivity analyses suggested that accurate determination of film diffusion coefficients was critical for predicting breakthrough for naproxen and carbamazepine, in particular when high removals are targeted. Model simulations demonstrated that GAC carbon usage rates (CURs) for naproxen were substantially influenced by the empty bed contact time (EBCT) at the investigated conditions. Model-based comparisons between GAC CURs and minimum CURs for powdered activated carbon (PAC) applications suggested that PAC would be most appropriate for achieving 90% removal of naproxen, whereas GAC would be more suitable for nonylphenol. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Adsorption of selected pharmaceuticals and an endocrine disrupting compound by granular activated carbon. 2. Model prediction.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zirui; Peldszus, Sigrid; Huck, Peter M

    2009-03-01

    The adsorption of two representative pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs)-naproxen and carbamazepine and one endocrine disrupting compound (EDC)-nonylphenol was studied in pilot-scale granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorbers using post-sedimentation (PS) water from a full-scale drinking water treatment plant. Acidic naproxen broke through fastest while nonylphenol was removed best, which was consistent with the degree to which fouling affected compound removals. Model predictions and experimental data were generally in good agreement for all three compounds, which demonstrated the effectiveness and robustness of the pore and surface diffusion model (PSDM) used in combination with the time-variable parameter approach for predicting removals at environmentally relevant concentrations (i.e., ng/L range). Sensitivity analyses suggested that accurate determination of film diffusion coefficients was critical for predicting breakthrough for naproxen and carbamazepine, in particular when high removals are targeted. Model simulations demonstrated that GAC carbon usage rates (CURs) for naproxen were substantially influenced by the empty bed contact time (EBCT) at the investigated conditions. Model-based comparisons between GAC CURs and minimum CURs for powdered activated carbon (PAC) applications suggested that PAC would be most appropriate for achieving 90% removal of naproxen, whereas GAC would be more suitable for nonylphenol. PMID:19350922

  17. Impact of sulfur oxides on mercury capture by activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Presto, Albert A; Granite, Evan J

    2007-09-15

    Recent field tests of mercury removal with activated carbon injection (ACI) have revealed that mercury capture is limited in flue gases containing high concentrations of sulfur oxides (SOx). In order to gain a more complete understanding of the impact of SOx on ACl, mercury capture was tested under varying conditions of SO2 and SO3 concentrations using a packed bed reactor and simulated flue gas (SFG). The final mercury content of the activated carbons is independent of the SO2 concentration in the SFG, but the presence of SO3 inhibits mercury capture even at the lowest concentration tested (20 ppm). The mercury removal capacity decreases as the sulfur content of the used activated carbons increases from 1 to 10%. In one extreme case, an activated carbon with 10% sulfur, prepared by H2SO4 impregnation, shows almost no mercury capacity. The results suggest that mercury and sulfur oxides are in competition for the same binding sites on the carbon surface.

  18. Impact of Sulfur Oxides on Mercury Capture by Activated Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Presto, A.A.; Granite, E.J.

    2007-09-15

    Recent field tests of mercury removal with activated carbon injection (ACI) have revealed that mercury capture is limited in flue gases containing high concentrations of sulfur oxides (SOx). In order to gain a more complete understanding of the impact of SOx on ACI, mercury capture was tested under varying conditions of SO2 and SO3 concentrations using a packed bed reactor and simulated flue gas (SFG). The final mercury content of the activated carbons is independent of the SO2 concentration in the SFG, but the presence of SO3 inhibits mercury capture even at the lowest concentration tested (20 ppm). The mercury removal capacity decreases as the sulfur content of the used activated carbons increases from 1 to 10%. In one extreme case, an activated carbon with 10% sulfur, prepared by H2SO4 impregnation, shows almost no mercury capacity. The results suggest that mercury and sulfur oxides are in competition for the same binding sites on the carbon surface.

  19. CCN activation of pure and coated carbon black particles.

    PubMed

    Dusek, U; Reischl, G P; Hitzenberger, R

    2006-02-15

    The CCN (cloud condensation nucleus) activation of pure and coated carbon black particles was investigated using the University of Vienna cloud condensation nuclei counter (Giebl, H.; Berner, A.; Reischl, G.; Puxbaum, H.; Kasper-Giebl, A.; Hitzenberger, R. J. Aerosol Sci. 2002, 33, 1623-1634). The particles were produced by nebulizing an aqueous suspension of carbon black in a Collison atomizer. The activation of pure carbon black particles was found to require higher supersaturations than predicted by calculations representing the particles as insoluble, wettable spheres with mobility equivalent diameter. To test whether this effect is an artifact due to heating of the light-absorbing carbon black particles in the laser beam, experiments at different laser powers were conducted. No systematic dependence of the activation of pure carbon black particles on laser power was observed. The observations could be modeled using spherical particles and an effective contact angle of 4-6 degrees of water at their surface. The addition of a small amount of NaCl to the carbon black particles (by adding 5% by mass NaCl to the carbon black suspension) greatly enhanced their CCN efficiency. The measured CCN efficiencies were consistent with Kohler theory for particles consisting of insoluble and hygroscopic material. However, coating the carbon black particles with hexadecanol (a typical film-forming compound with one hydrophobic and one hydrophilic end) efficiently suppressed the CCN activation of the carbon black particles.

  20. Highly sensitive and selective glutamate microbiosensor based on cast polyurethane/AC-electrophoresis deposited multiwalled carbon nanotubes and then glutamate oxidase/electrosynthesized polypyrrole/Pt electrode.

    PubMed

    Ammam, Malika; Fransaer, Jan

    2010-03-15

    A highly sensitive and selective glutamate microbiosensor based on polypyrrole (PPy), multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and glutamate oxidase (GluOx) deposited on the transducer platinum electrode (Pt) is described. The sensor consists of a permselective membrane of polypyrrole for the rejection of interferences, followed by a layer of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and glutamate oxidase deposited by asymmetrical alternating current electrophoretic deposition (AC-EPD). The biosensor has a high sensitivity (3.84 nA/(microMmm(2))), low response to interferences such as ascorbic acid, uric acid and acetaminophen, a fast response time (7s), low detection limit (approximately 0.3 microM), a linear range of 140 microM and a satisfactory stability. In order to improve the linear range and the stability, a thin layer of polyurethane (PU) was applied to the Pt/PPy/MWCNT/GluOx sensor. The resulting sensor with the PU outer membrane showed an increase in the linear range up to approximately 500 microM glutamate and has a better stability at the expense of a decrease in sensitivity (2.5 nA/(microMmm(2))) and an increase in the response time (15s).

  1. Soil Inorganic Carbon in Deserts: Active Carbon Sink or Inert Reservoir?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monger, H. C.; Cole, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    Soil inorganic carbon is the third largest C pool in the active global carbon cycle, containing at least 800 petagrams of carbon. Although carbonate dissolution-precipitation reactions have been understood for over a century, the role of soil inorganic carbon in carbon sequestration, and in particular pedogenic carbonate, is a deceptively complex process because it involves interdependent connections among climate, plants, microorganisms, silicate minerals, soil moisture, pH, and Ca supply via rain, dust, or in situ weathering. An understanding of soil inorganic carbon as a sink or reservoir also requires examination of the system at local to continental scales and at seasonal to millennial time scales. In desert soils studied in North America, carbon isotope ratios and radiocarbon dates were measured in combination with electron microscopy, lab and field experiments with biological calcite formation, and field measurements of carbon dioxide emissions. These investigations reveal that soil inorganic carbon is both an active sink and a inert reservoir depending on the spatial and temporal scale and source of calcium.

  2. Role of nitrogen in pore development in activated carbon prepared by potassium carbonate activation of lignin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubouchi, Naoto; Nishio, Megumi; Mochizuki, Yuuki

    2016-05-01

    The present work focuses on the role of nitrogen in the development of pores in activated carbon produced from lignin by K2CO3 activation, employing a fixed bed reactor under a high-purity He stream at temperatures of 500-900 °C. The specific surface area and pore volume obtained by activation of lignin alone are 230 m2/g and 0.13 cm3/g at 800 °C, and 540 m2/g and 0.31 cm3/g at 900 °C, respectively. Activation of a mixture of lignin and urea provides a significant increase in the surface area and volume, respectively reaching 3300-3400 m2/g and 2.0-2.3 cm3/g after holding at 800-900 °C for 1 h. Heating a lignin/urea/K2CO3 mixture leads to a significant decrease in the yield of released N-containing gases compared to the results for urea alone and a lignin/urea mixture, and most of the nitrogen in the urea is retained in the solid phase. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses clearly show that part of the remaining nitrogen is present in heterocyclic structures (for example, pyridinic and pyrrolic nitrogen), and the rest is contained as KOCN at ≤600 °C and as KCN at ≥700 °C, such that the latter two compounds can be almost completely removed by water washing. The fate of nitrogen during heating of lignin/urea/K2CO3 and role of nitrogen in pore development in activated carbon are discussed on the basis of the results mentioned above.

  3. Acidic and alkaline pretreatments of activated carbon and their effects on the performance of air-cathodes in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Gao, Ningshengjie; Zhou, Qixing; Dong, Heng; Yu, Hongbing; Feng, Yujie

    2013-09-01

    Activated carbon (AC) is a high performing and cost effective catalyst for oxygen reduction reactions (ORRs) of air-cathodes in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Acidic (HNO3) and alkaline (KOH) pretreatments on AC at low temperature (85°C) are conducted to enhance the performance of MFCs. The alkaline pretreatment increased the power density by 16% from 804±70 to 957±31 mW m(-2), possibly due to the decrease of ohmic resistance (from 20.58 to 19.20 Ω) and the increase of ORR activities provided by the adsorbed hydroxide ion and extra micropore area/volume after alkaline pretreatment. However, acidic pretreatment decreased the power output to 537±36 mW m(-2), which can be mainly attributed to the corrosion by adsorbed proton at the interface of AC powder and stainless steel mesh and the decreased pore area.

  4. Acidic and alkaline pretreatments of activated carbon and their effects on the performance of air-cathodes in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Gao, Ningshengjie; Zhou, Qixing; Dong, Heng; Yu, Hongbing; Feng, Yujie

    2013-09-01

    Activated carbon (AC) is a high performing and cost effective catalyst for oxygen reduction reactions (ORRs) of air-cathodes in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Acidic (HNO3) and alkaline (KOH) pretreatments on AC at low temperature (85°C) are conducted to enhance the performance of MFCs. The alkaline pretreatment increased the power density by 16% from 804±70 to 957±31 mW m(-2), possibly due to the decrease of ohmic resistance (from 20.58 to 19.20 Ω) and the increase of ORR activities provided by the adsorbed hydroxide ion and extra micropore area/volume after alkaline pretreatment. However, acidic pretreatment decreased the power output to 537±36 mW m(-2), which can be mainly attributed to the corrosion by adsorbed proton at the interface of AC powder and stainless steel mesh and the decreased pore area. PMID:23890977

  5. Ocean bottom sediments as an active carbon pool.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimov, N.; Zimov, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Bottom deposits of oceans, seas and lakes are long term carbon sinks - particulate organic carbon falls to the bottom where it is covered by sediments and preserved by anoxic conditions. However, the upper horizons of these deep sediments ('active layer') interact with bottom waters through diffusion, bubbling of gasses and bioturbation and can thus also act as temporary carbon sources given favorable environment conditions. Oxygen diffusion is the main factor that limits organic decomposition in bottom deposits. Depth of diffusion depends on porosity of sediments and rates of oxygen consumption in the upper horizons. Amplified organic rain leads to higher oxygen demand and, consequently, to a thinner oxic horizon in the bottom sediments. Declined ocean productivity, in contrast, allows oxygen to diffuse deeper into the bottom sediments and remobilizes previously preserved carbon. Therefore a substantial decline in ocean productivity during glacial periods could cause ocean sediments to shift abruptly from a carbon sink to a considerable carbon source. To estimate the effects of the phenomena described above, we present a model of the dynamics and vertical distribution of organic carbon in ocean sediments that considers the input of organic rain, sediments porosity, oxygen availability, rates of sedimentation to the ocean floor and bioturbation. The model enables quantification of bulk carbon storage, carbon distribution within the 'active layer', and the flux of carbon from the upper sediment horizons to deeper deposits as sediments accumulate on the ocean floor. Applying our model, we find that during glacial periods, decreased ocean productivity led to the mobilization of old carbon previously stored within anoxic horizons. Under this scenario, carbon transfer from sediments to ocean waters would have exceeded 10 kg/m2. Our study therefore, suggests that the ocean floor is not merely a passive buffer in the global carbon cycle, but instead an active pool which

  6. Capture of methyl bromide emissions with activated carbon following the fumigation of a small building contaminated with a Bacillus anthracis spore simulant.

    PubMed

    Wood, Joseph P; Clayton, Mathew J; McArthur, Timothy; Serre, Shannon D; Mickelsen, Leroy; Touati, Abderrahmane

    2015-02-01

    A wide-area Bacillus anthracis spore contamination incident will present immense challenges related to decontamination capacity. For this reason, fumigation with methyl bromide (MeBr) has been proposed as a potential remediation option. Although a few bench-scale laboratory studies have been conducted to evaluate activated carbon for the capture of MeBr, these studies were conducted at conditions replicating commodity fumigation using relatively low MeBr concentrations, temperatures, and/or relative humidity (RH) levels. The more rigorous MeBr fumigation requirements to fully inactivate B. anthracis spores are much more of a challenge for an activated carbon system (ACS) to capture MeBr, and warrant their own investigation. Further, while the aforementioned studies have shown activated carbon to be a possible option for the capture of MeBr in gas streams, these tests were conducted at laboratory bench scale, and thus lack operational perspective and data. Thus, we present for the first time the results of a full-scale study to evaluate an ACS employed for the capture of MeBr at conditions that would be used for decontaminating a building structure contaminated with B. anthracis spores. Airflow rate, temperature, RH, and MeBr levels were measured within the ACS during its operation. Despite the relatively high humidity, temperature, and MeBr levels, the MeBr capture efficiency of the ACS was demonstrated to be more than 99%. The concentration of MeBr exhausted from the structure was reduced from 41,000 to 136 ppmv in 3.5 hr, corresponding to an overall atmospheric emission rate of less than 2 kg. The practical adsorption rate of the ACS was determined to be 4.83 kg MeBr/100 kg carbon. The information and data presented here will facilitate future use of this technology when fumigating with MeBr.

  7. Identification of some factors affecting pharmaceutical active compounds (PhACs) removal in real wastewater. Case study of fungal treatment of reverse osmosis concentrate.

    PubMed

    Badia-Fabregat, Marina; Lucas, Daniel; Gros, Meritxell; Rodríguez-Mozaz, Sara; Barceló, Damià; Caminal, Glòria; Vicent, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Many technologies are being developed for the efficient removal of micropollutants from wastewater and, among them, fungal degradation is one of the possible alternative biological treatments. In this article, some factors that might affect pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) removal in a fungal treatment of real wastewater were identified in batch bioreactor treating reverse osmosis concentrate (ROC) from urban wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). We found that degradation of PhACs by Trametes versicolor was enhanced by addition of external nutrients (global removal of 44%). Moreover, our results point out that high aeration might be involved in the increase in the concentration of some PhACs. In fact, conjugation and deconjugation processes (among others) affect the removal assessment of emerging contaminants when working with real concentrations in comparison to experiments with spiked samples. Moreover, factors that could affect the quantification of micropollutants at lab-scale experiments were studied.

  8. Identification of some factors affecting pharmaceutical active compounds (PhACs) removal in real wastewater. Case study of fungal treatment of reverse osmosis concentrate.

    PubMed

    Badia-Fabregat, Marina; Lucas, Daniel; Gros, Meritxell; Rodríguez-Mozaz, Sara; Barceló, Damià; Caminal, Glòria; Vicent, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Many technologies are being developed for the efficient removal of micropollutants from wastewater and, among them, fungal degradation is one of the possible alternative biological treatments. In this article, some factors that might affect pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) removal in a fungal treatment of real wastewater were identified in batch bioreactor treating reverse osmosis concentrate (ROC) from urban wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). We found that degradation of PhACs by Trametes versicolor was enhanced by addition of external nutrients (global removal of 44%). Moreover, our results point out that high aeration might be involved in the increase in the concentration of some PhACs. In fact, conjugation and deconjugation processes (among others) affect the removal assessment of emerging contaminants when working with real concentrations in comparison to experiments with spiked samples. Moreover, factors that could affect the quantification of micropollutants at lab-scale experiments were studied. PMID:25464308

  9. PAH-sequestration capacity of granular and powder activated carbon amendments in soil, and their effects on earthworms and plants.

    PubMed

    Jakob, Lena; Hartnik, Thomas; Henriksen, Thomas; Elmquist, Marie; Brändli, Rahel C; Hale, Sarah E; Cornelissen, Gerard

    2012-07-01

    A field lysimeter study was carried out to investigate whether the amendment of 2% powder and granular activated carbon (PAC and GAC) to a soil with moderate PAH contamination had an impact on the PAH bioaccumulation of earthworms and plants, since AC is known to be a strong sorbent for organic pollutants. Furthermore, secondary effects of AC on plants and earthworms were studied through growth and nutrient uptake, and survival and weight gain. Additionally, the effect of AC amendments on soil characteristics like pH, water holding capacity, and the water retention curve of the soil were investigated. Results show that the amendment of 2% PAC had a negative effect on plant growth while the GAC increased the growth rate of plants. PAC was toxic to earthworms, demonstrated by a significant weight loss, while the results for GAC were less clear due to ambiguous results of a field and a parallel laboratory study. Both kinds of AC significantly reduced biota to soil accumulation factors (BSAFs) of PAHs in earthworms and plants. The GAC reduced the BSAFs of earthworms by an average of 47 ± 44% and the PAC amendment reduced them by 72 ± 19%. For the investigated plants the BSAFs were reduced by 46 ± 36% and 53 ± 22% by the GAC and PAC, respectively.

  10. Liquid-phase adsorption of organic compounds by granular activated carbon and activated carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.H.; Hsu, F.M.

    1995-06-01

    Liquid-phase adsorption of organic compounds by granular activated carbon (GAC) and activated carbon fibers (ACFs) is investigated. Acetone, isopropyl alcohol (IPA), phenol, and tetrahydrofuran (THF) were employed as the model compounds for the present study. It is observed from the experimental results that adsorption of organic compounds by GAC and ACF is influenced by the BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) surface area of adsorbent and the molecular weight, polarity, and solubility of the adsorbate. The adsorption characteristics of GAC and ACFs were found to differ rather significantly. In terms of the adsorption capacity of organic compounds, the time to reach equilibrium adsorption, and the time for complete desorption, ACFs have been observed to be considerably better than GAC. For the organic compounds tested here, the GAC adsorptions were shown to be represented well by the Langmuir isotherm while the ACF adsorption could be adequately described by the Langmuir or the Freundlich isotherm. Column adsorption tests indicated that the exhausted ACFs can be effectively regenerated by static in situ thermal desorption at 150 C, but the same regeneration conditions do not do as well for the exhausted GAC.

  11. JV Task 90 - Activated Carbon Production from North Dakota Lignite

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Benson; Charlene Crocker; Rokan Zaman; Mark Musich; Edwin Olson

    2008-03-31

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has pursued a research program for producing activated carbon from North Dakota lignite that can be competitive with commercial-grade activated carbon. As part of this effort, small-scale production of activated carbon was produced from Fort Union lignite. A conceptual design of a commercial activated carbon production plant was drawn, and a market assessment was performed to determine likely revenue streams for the produced carbon. Activated carbon was produced from lignite coal in both laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactors and in a small pilot-scale rotary kiln. The EERC was successfully able to upgrade the laboratory-scale activated carbon production system to a pilot-scale rotary kiln system. The activated carbon produced from North Dakota lignite was superior to commercial grade DARCO{reg_sign} FGD and Rheinbraun's HOK activated coke product with respect to iodine number. The iodine number of North Dakota lignite-derived activated carbon was between 600 and 800 mg I{sub 2}/g, whereas the iodine number of DARCO FGD was between 500 and 600 mg I{sub 2}/g, and the iodine number of Rheinbraun's HOK activated coke product was around 275 mg I{sub 2}/g. The EERC performed both bench-scale and pilot-scale mercury capture tests using the activated carbon made under various optimization process conditions. For comparison, the mercury capture capability of commercial DARCO FGD was also tested. The lab-scale apparatus is a thin fixed-bed mercury-screening system, which has been used by the EERC for many mercury capture screen tests. The pilot-scale systems included two combustion units, both equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Activated carbons were also tested in a slipstream baghouse at a Texas power plant. The results indicated that the activated carbon produced from North Dakota lignite coal is capable of removing mercury from flue gas. The tests showed that activated carbon with the greatest iodine number

  12. Activated carbon fibers and engineered forms from renewable resources

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Frederick S.

    2010-06-01

    A method of producing activated carbon fibers (ACFs) includes the steps of providing a natural carbonaceous precursor fiber material, blending the carbonaceous precursor material with a chemical activation agent to form chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers, spinning the chemical agent-impregnated precursor material into fibers, and thermally treating the chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers. The carbonaceous precursor material is both carbonized and activated to form ACFs in a single step. The method produces ACFs exclusive of a step to isolate an intermediate carbon fiber.

  13. Activated carbon fibers and engineered forms from renewable resources

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Frederick S

    2013-02-19

    A method of producing activated carbon fibers (ACFs) includes the steps of providing a natural carbonaceous precursor fiber material, blending the carbonaceous precursor material with a chemical activation agent to form chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers, spinning the chemical agent-impregnated precursor material into fibers, and thermally treating the chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers. The carbonaceous precursor material is both carbonized and activated to form ACFs in a single step. The method produces ACFs exclusive of a step to isolate an intermediate carbon fiber.

  14. Nickel adsorption by sodium polyacrylate-grafted activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Ewecharoen, A; Thiravetyan, P; Wendel, E; Bertagnolli, H

    2009-11-15

    A novel sodium polyacrylate grafted activated carbon was produced by using gamma radiation to increase the number of functional groups on the surface. After irradiation the capacity for nickel adsorption was studied and found to have increased from 44.1 to 55.7 mg g(-1). X-ray absorption spectroscopy showed that the adsorbed nickel on activated carbon and irradiation-grafted activated carbon was coordinated with 6 oxygen atoms at 2.04-2.06 A. It is proposed that this grafting technique could be applied to other adsorbents to increase the efficiency of metal adsorption.

  15. Grafting of activated carbon cloths for selective adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gineys, M.; Benoit, R.; Cohaut, N.; Béguin, F.; Delpeux-Ouldriane, S.

    2016-05-01

    Chemical functionalization of an activated carbon cloth with 3-aminophthalic acid and 4-aminobenzoic acid groups by the in situ formation of the corresponding diazonium salt in aqueous acidic solution is reported. The nature and amount of selected functions on an activated carbon surface, in particular the grafted density, were determined by potentiometric titration, elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The nanotextural properties of the modified carbon were explored by gas adsorption. Functionalized activated carbon cloth was obtained at a discrete grafting level while preserving interesting textural properties and a large porous volume. Finally, the grafting homogeneity of the carbon surface and the nature of the chemical bonding were investigated using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) technique.

  16. Physical and electrochemical study of halide-modified activated carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barpanda, Prabeer

    The current thesis aims to improve the electrochemical capacity of activated carbon electrodes, which enjoy prominent position in commercial electrochemical capacitors. Our approach was to develop electrochemical capacity by developing faradaic pseudocapacitance in carbon through a novel mechanochemical modification using iodine and bromine. Various commercial carbons were mechanochemically modified via solid-state iodation and vapour phase iodine-incorporation. The halidation-induced changes in the structure, composition, morphology, electrical and electrochemical properties of carbon materials were studied using different characterization techniques encompassing XRD, XRF, XPS, Raman spectroscopy, BET study, TEM, SAXS and electrochemical testing followed by an intensive battery of physical and electrochemical characterization. The introduction of iodine into carbon system led to the formation of polyiodide species that were preferentially reacted within the micropore voids within the carbon leading to the development of a faradaic reaction at 3.1V. In spite of the lower surface area of modified carbon, we observed manyfold increase in its electrochemical capacity. Parallel inception of non-faradaic development and faradaic pseudocapacitive reaction led to promising gravimetric, surface area normalized and volumetric capacity in iodated carbons. With promising electrochemical improvement post halidation process, the chemical halidation method was extended to different class of carbons and halides. Carbons ranging from amorphous (activated) carbons to crystalline carbons (graphites, fluorographites) were iodine-modified to gain further insight on the local graphite-iodine chemical interaction. In addition, the effect of pore size distribution on chemical iodation process was studied by using in-house fabricated microporous carbon. A comparative study of commercial mesoporous carbons and in-house fabricated microporous carbons showed higher iodine-uptake ability and

  17. Hydrogen storage on activated carbon. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, J.A.

    1994-11-01

    The project studied factors that influence the ability of carbon to store hydrogen and developed techniques to enhance that ability in naturally occurring and factory-produced commercial carbon materials. During testing of enhanced materials, levels of hydrogen storage were achieved that compare well with conventional forms of energy storage, including lead-acid batteries, gasoline, and diesel fuel. Using the best materials, an electric car with a modern fuel cell to convert the hydrogen directly to electricity would have a range of over 1,000 miles. This assumes that the total allowable weight of the fuel cell and carbon/hydrogen storage system is no greater than the present weight of batteries in an existing electric vehicle. By comparison, gasoline cars generally are limited to about a 450-mile range, and battery-electric cars to 40 to 60 miles. The project also developed a new class of carbon materials, based on polymers and other organic compounds, in which the best hydrogen-storing factors discovered earlier were {open_quotes}molecularly engineered{close_quotes} into the new materials. It is believed that these new molecularly engineered materials are likely to exceed the performance of the naturally occurring and manufactured carbons seen earlier with respect to hydrogen storage.

  18. Production and characterization of activated carbons from cereal grains

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatraman, A.; Walawender, W.P.; Fan, L.T.

    1996-12-31

    The term, activated carbon, is a generic name for a family of carbonaceous materials with well-developed porosities and consequently, large adsorptive capacities. Activated carbons are increasingly being consumed worldwide for environmental applications such as separation of volatiles from bulk gases and purification of water and waste-water streams. The global annual production is estimated to be around 300 million kilograms, with a rate of increase of 7% each year. Activated carbons can be prepared from a variety of raw materials. Approximately, 60% of the activated carbons generated in the United States is produced from coal; 20%, from coconut shells; and the remaining 20% from wood and other sources of biomass. The pore structure and properties of activated carbons are influenced by the nature of the starting material and the initial physical and chemical conditioning as well as the process conditions involved in its manufacture. The porous structures of charcoals and activated carbons obtained by the carbonization of kernels have been characterized.

  19. Microstructure and surface properties of lignocellulosic-based activated carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-García, P.; Centeno, T. A.; Urones-Garrote, E.; Ávila-Brande, D.; Otero-Díaz, L. C.

    2013-01-01

    Low cost activated carbons have been produced via chemical activation, by using KOH at 700 °C, from the bamboo species Guadua Angustifolia and Bambusa Vulgaris Striata and the residues from shells of the fruits of Castanea Sativa and Juglans Regia as carbon precursors. The scanning electron microscopy micrographs show the conservation of the precursor shape in the case of the Guadua Angustifolia and Bambusa Vulgaris Striata activated carbons. Transmission electron microscopy analyses reveal that these materials consist of carbon platelet-like particles with variable length and thickness, formed by highly disordered graphene-like layers with sp2 content ≈ 95% and average mass density of 1.65 g/cm3 (25% below standard graphite). Textural parameters indicate a high porosity development with surface areas ranging from 850 to 1100 m2/g and average pore width centered in the supermicropores range (1.3-1.8 nm). The electrochemical performance of the activated carbons shows specific capacitance values at low current density (1 mA/cm2) as high as 161 F/g in the Juglans Regia activated carbon, as a result of its textural parameters and the presence of pseudocapacitance derived from surface oxygenated acidic groups (mainly quinones and ethers) identified in this activated carbon.

  20. Increased Long-Flight Activity Triggered in Beet Armyworm by Larval Feeding on Diet Containing Cry1Ac Protoxin

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xing Fu; Chen, Jian; Zhang, Lei; Sappington, Thomas W.; Luo, Li Zhi

    2013-01-01

    Evaluating ecological safety and conducting pest risk analysis for transgenic crops are vitally important before their commercial planting. The beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, a long-distance migratory insect pest, is not a direct target of transgenic Cry1Ac-expressing cotton in China, but nevertheless it has recently become an important pest. Migrants leaving their natal field arrive in other appropriate habitat far away in a short time, often followed by larval outbreaks. S. exigua has low susceptibility to Cry1Ac. However, our results from laboratory experiments identified (i) sublethal effects of Cry1Ac protoxin on larval development rate, larval and pupal weight, and adult lifetime fecundity, and (ii) increased long-flight behavior triggered by Cry1Ac which may contribute to larval outbreaks elsewhere. No significant differences in larval mortality, pupation rate, adult emergence rate, longevity, pre-oviposition period, or oviposition period were observed between controls and larvae fed on artificial diet incorporating a low concentration of Cry1Ac protoxin. The negative sublethal effects on some developmental and reproductive traits and lack of effect on others suggest they do not contribute to the observed severity of S. exigua outbreaks after feeding on Cry1Ac cotton. Interestingly, the percentage of long fliers increased significantly when larvae were reared on diet containing either of two low-dose treatments of Cry1Ac, suggesting a possible increased propensity to disperse long distances triggered by Cry1Ac. We hypothesize that negative effects on development and reproduction caused by Cry1Ac in the diet are offset by increased flight propensity triggered by the poor food conditions, thereby improving the chances of escaping adverse local conditions before oviposition. Increased long-flight propensity in turn may amplify the area damaged by outbreak populations. This phenomenon might be common in other migratory insect pests receiving sublethal doses

  1. Increased long-flight activity triggered in beet armyworm by larval feeding on diet containing Cry1Ac protoxin.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xing Fu; Chen, Jian; Zhang, Lei; Sappington, Thomas W; Luo, Li Zhi

    2013-01-01

    Evaluating ecological safety and conducting pest risk analysis for transgenic crops are vitally important before their commercial planting. The beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, a long-distance migratory insect pest, is not a direct target of transgenic Cry1Ac-expressing cotton in China, but nevertheless it has recently become an important pest. Migrants leaving their natal field arrive in other appropriate habitat far away in a short time, often followed by larval outbreaks. S. exigua has low susceptibility to Cry1Ac. However, our results from laboratory experiments identified (i) sublethal effects of Cry1Ac protoxin on larval development rate, larval and pupal weight, and adult lifetime fecundity, and (ii) increased long-flight behavior triggered by Cry1Ac which may contribute to larval outbreaks elsewhere. No significant differences in larval mortality, pupation rate, adult emergence rate, longevity, pre-oviposition period, or oviposition period were observed between controls and larvae fed on artificial diet incorporating a low concentration of Cry1Ac protoxin. The negative sublethal effects on some developmental and reproductive traits and lack of effect on others suggest they do not contribute to the observed severity of S. exigua outbreaks after feeding on Cry1Ac cotton. Interestingly, the percentage of long fliers increased significantly when larvae were reared on diet containing either of two low-dose treatments of Cry1Ac, suggesting a possible increased propensity to disperse long distances triggered by Cry1Ac. We hypothesize that negative effects on development and reproduction caused by Cry1Ac in the diet are offset by increased flight propensity triggered by the poor food conditions, thereby improving the chances of escaping adverse local conditions before oviposition. Increased long-flight propensity in turn may amplify the area damaged by outbreak populations. This phenomenon might be common in other migratory insect pests receiving sublethal doses

  2. Mechanism of phenol adsorption onto electro-activated carbon granules.

    PubMed

    Lounici, H; Aioueche, F; Belhocine, D; Drouiche, M; Pauss, A; Mameri, N

    2004-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to determine the mechanisms which govern the adsorption of the phenol onto electro-activated carbon granules. This new activation technique allowed an increase of the performance of the adsorbent. Two models were utilised to understand the improvement in the performance of electroactivated carbon granules. The first, a simple external resistance model based on film resistance, gave acceptable predictions, with an error of less than 15%, between the theoretical results and experimental data independent of the activation potential and phenol initial concentration. The second linear model, based on diffusion phenomena, was more representative in describing the experiment than the first model. It was observed that the electro-activation method did not change the mechanism which governs phenol adsorption onto granular carbon. Indeed, the same mathematical model based on diffusion phenomena made it possible to predict with a very low error (less than 5%) the experimental data obtained for the favourable activation potential, without activation potential and with an unfavourable activation potential. The electro-activation technique makes it possible to increase the number of active sites that improve the performance of the electro-activated granular carbon compared with conventional granular activated carbon.

  3. Removal of E. coli from water using surface-modified activated carbon filter media and its performance over an extended use.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sukdeb; Joardar, J; Song, Joon Myong

    2006-10-01

    Modification of activated carbon (AC) by aluminum hydroxychloride (AHC), and diatomaceous earth by zinc hydroxide changed the zeta potentials of these filter media from negative to positive. The modification method is amenable to room temperature, and eliminates the essential requirement of strong base treatment for making metal hydroxide coated filter media. Solid-state MAS 27Al NMR spectra suggested the presence of Al13-mer in the AHC-treated AC. AHC-modified AC samples were further treated with silver halide, and two antibacterial compounds to prevent microbial growth on filter media. In situ precipitation of silver bromide on AC resulted in formation of nanosized AgBr crystals. Bacteria removal performances of the modified media were tested in columns. For the first time, we demonstrated that only 30 g of either AHC-treated AC (60 x 200 mesh) or nano AgBr supported AC could provide >6 log E. coli removal over approximately 1000 L when the input water had a bacterial load of 10(7) CFU/mL. The filter media were robust enough to perform even when water was passed at superficial velocities 3-10 times the typical velocity (6 cm/min) of water treatment processes. Metal leaching from the modified media was found to be less than the USEPA specified Maximum Contaminant Level.

  4. Preconcentration of Sn (II) using the methylene blue on the activated carbon and its determination by spectrophotometry method.

    PubMed

    Khodadoust, Saeid; Cham Kouri, Narges

    2014-04-01

    A simple and accurate spectrophotometric method for determination of trace amounts of Sn (II) ion in soil sample was developed by using the methylene blue (MB) in the presence of activated carbon (AC) as the adsorbent Solid Phase Extraction (SPE) of Sn (II) and then determined by UV-Vis. The Beer's law is obeyed over the concentration range of 1-80ngmL(-1) of Sn (II) with the detection limits of 0.34ngmL(-1). The influence of type and volume of eluent, concentration of MB, pH, and amount of AC on sensitivity of spectrophotometric method were optimized. The method has been successfully applied for Sn (II) ion determination in soil sample.

  5. An Active Ac/Ds Transposon System for Activation Tagging in Tomato Cultivar M82 Using Clonal Propagation1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Jared D.; Pereira, Andy; Dickerman, Allan W.; Veilleux, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is a model organism for Solanaceae in both molecular and agronomic research. This project utilized Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation and the transposon-tagging construct Activator (Ac)/Dissociator (Ds)-ATag-Bar_gosGFP to produce activation-tagged and knockout mutants in the processing tomato cultivar M82. The construct carried hygromycin resistance (hyg), green fluorescent protein (GFP), and the transposase (TPase) of maize (Zea mays) Activator major transcript X054214.1 on the stable Ac element, along with a 35S enhancer tetramer and glufosinate herbicide resistance (BAR) on the mobile Ds-ATag element. An in vitro propagation strategy was used to produce a population of 25 T0 plants from a single transformed plant regenerated in tissue culture. A T1 population of 11,000 selfed and cv M82 backcrossed progeny was produced from the functional T0 line. This population was screened using glufosinate herbicide, hygromycin leaf painting, and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Insertion sites of transposed Ds-ATag elements were identified through thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR, and resulting product sequences were aligned to the recently published tomato genome. A population of 509 independent, Ds-only transposant lines spanning all 12 tomato chromosomes has been developed. Insertion site analysis demonstrated that more than 80% of these lines harbored Ds insertions conducive to activation tagging. The capacity of the Ds-ATag element to alter transcription was verified by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR in two mutant lines. The transposon-tagged lines have been immortalized in seed stocks and can be accessed through an online database, providing a unique resource for tomato breeding and analysis of gene function in the background of a commercial tomato cultivar. PMID:23569107

  6. In Situ Sediment Treatment Using Activated Carbon: A Demonstrated Sediment Cleanup Technology

    PubMed Central

    Patmont, Clayton R; Ghosh, Upal; LaRosa, Paul; Menzie, Charles A; Luthy, Richard G; Greenberg, Marc S; Cornelissen, Gerard; Eek, Espen; Collins, John; Hull, John; Hjartland, Tore; Glaza, Edward; Bleiler, John; Quadrini, James

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews general approaches for applying activated carbon (AC) amendments as an in situ sediment treatment remedy. In situ sediment treatment involves targeted placement of amendments using installation options that fall into two general approaches: 1) directly applying a thin layer of amendments (which potentially incorporates weighting or binding materials) to surface sediment, with or without initial mixing; and 2) incorporating amendments into a premixed, blended cover material of clean sand or sediment, which is also applied to the sediment surface. Over the past decade, pilot- or full-scale field sediment treatment projects using AC—globally recognized as one of the most effective sorbents for organic contaminants—were completed or were underway at more than 25 field sites in the United States, Norway, and the Netherlands. Collectively, these field projects (along with numerous laboratory experiments) have demonstrated the efficacy of AC for in situ treatment in a range of contaminated sediment conditions. Results from experimental studies and field applications indicate that in situ sequestration and immobilization treatment of hydrophobic organic compounds using either installation approach can reduce porewater concentrations and biouptake significantly, often becoming more effective over time due to progressive mass transfer. Certain conditions, such as use in unstable sediment environments, should be taken into account to maximize AC effectiveness over long time periods. In situ treatment is generally less disruptive and less expensive than traditional sediment cleanup technologies such as dredging or isolation capping. Proper site-specific balancing of the potential benefits, risks, ecological effects, and costs of in situ treatment technologies (in this case, AC) relative to other sediment cleanup technologies is important to successful full-scale field application. Extensive experimental studies and field trials have shown that when

  7. Microwave photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B using TiO2 supported on activated carbon: mechanism implication.

    PubMed

    He, Zhong; Yang, Shaogui; Ju, Yongming; Sun, Cheng

    2009-01-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) was carried out using TiO2 supported on activated carbon (TiO2-AC) under microwave irradiation. Composite catalyst TiO2-AC was prepared and characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET). In the process of microwave-enhanced photocatalysis (MPC), RhB (30 mg/L) was almost completely decoloured in 10 min, and the mineralization efficiency was 96.0% in 20 min. The reaction rate constant of RhB in MPC using TiO2-AC by pseudo first-order reaction kinetics was 4.16 times of that using Degussa P25. Additionally, according to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) identification, the major intermediates of RhB in MPC included two kinds of N-de-ethylation intermediates (N,N-diethyl-N'-ethyl-rhodamine (DER)), oxalic acid, malonic acid, succinic acid, and phthalic acid, maleic acid, 3-nitrobenzoic acid, and so on. The degradation of RhB in MPC was mainly attributed to the destruction of the conjugated structure, and then the intermediates transformed to acid molecules which were mineralized to water and carbon dioxide.

  8. Adsorption kinetic and equilibrium study for removal of mercuric chloride by CuCl2-impregnated activated carbon sorbent.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Liu, Zhouyang; Lee, Joo-Youp

    2013-05-15

    The intrinsic adsorption kinetics of mercuric chloride (HgCl2) was studied for raw, 4% and 10% CuCl2-impregnated activated carbon (CuCl2-AC) sorbents in a fixed-bed system. An HgCl2 adsorption kinetic model was developed for the AC sorbents by taking into account the adsorption kinetics, equilibrium, and internal and external mass transfer. The adsorption kinetic constants determined from the comparisons between the simulation and experimental results were 0.2, 0.3, and 0.5m(3)/(gs) for DARCO-HG, 4%(wt), and 10%(wt) CuCl2-AC sorbents, respectively, at 140 °C. CuCl2 loading was found to slightly increase the adsorption kinetic constant or at least not to decrease it. The HgCl2 equilibrium adsorption data based on the Langmuir isotherm show that high CuCl2 loading can result in high binding energy of the HgCl2 adsorption onto the carbon surface. The adsorption equilibrium constant was found to increase by ~10 times when CuCl2 loading varied from 0 to 10%(wt), which led to a decrease in the desorption kinetic constant (k2) by ~10 times and subsequently the desorption rate by ~50 times. Intraparticle pore diffusion considered in the model showed good accuracy, allowing for the determination of intrinsic HgCl2 adsorption kinetics.

  9. Selection and preparation of activated carbon for fuel gas storage

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, James A.; Noh, Joong S.; Agarwal, Rajiv K.

    1990-10-02

    Increasing the surface acidity of active carbons can lead to an increase in capacity for hydrogen adsorption. Increasing the surface basicity can facilitate methane adsorption. The treatment of carbons is most effective when the carbon source material is selected to have a low ash content i.e., below about 3%, and where the ash consists predominantly of alkali metals alkali earth, with only minimal amounts of transition metals and silicon. The carbon is washed in water or acid and then oxidized, e.g. in a stream of oxygen and an inert gas at an elevated temperature.

  10. TESTING GUIDELINES FOR TECHNETIUM-99 ABSORPTION ON ACTIVATED CARBON

    SciTech Connect

    BYRNES ME

    2010-09-08

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently evaluating the potential use of activated carbon adsorption for removing technetium-99 from groundwater as a treatment method for the Hanford Site's 200 West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system. The current pump-and-treat system design will include an ion-exchange (IX) system for selective removal of technetium-99 from selected wells prior to subsequent treatment of the water in the central treatment system. The IX resin selected for technetium-99 removal is Purolite A530E. The resin service life is estimated to be approximately 66.85 days at the design technetium-99 loading rate, and the spent resin must be replaced because it cannot be regenerated. The resulting operating costs associated with resin replacement every 66.85 days are estimated at $0.98 million/year. Activated carbon pre-treatment is being evaluated as a potential cost-saving measure to offset the high operating costs associated with frequent IX resin replacement. This document is preceded by the Literature Survey of Technetium-99 Groundwater Pre-Treatment Option Using Granular Activated Carbon (SGW-43928), which identified and evaluated prior research related to technetium-99 adsorption on activated carbon. The survey also evaluated potential operating considerations for this treatment approach for the 200 West Area. The preliminary conclusions of the literature survey are as follows: (1) Activated carbon can be used to selectively remove technetium-99 from contaminated groundwater. (2) Technetium-99 adsorption onto activated carbon is expected to vary significantly based on carbon types and operating conditions. For the treatment approach to be viable at the Hanford Site, activated carbon must be capable of achieving a designated minimum technetium-99 uptake. (3) Certain radionuclides known to be present in 200 West Area groundwater are also likely to adsorb onto activated carbon. (4) Organic solvent contaminants of concern (COCs) will

  11. AC-conductance and capacitance measurements for ethanol vapor detection using carbon nanotube-polyvinyl alcohol composite based devices.

    PubMed

    Greenshields, Márcia W C C; Meruvia, Michelle S; Hümmelgen, Ivo A; Coville, Neil J; Mhlanga, Sabelo D; Ceragioli, Helder J; Quispe, Jose C Rojas; Baranauskas, Vitor

    2011-03-01

    We report the preparation of inexpensive ethanol sensor devices using multiwalled carbon nanotube-polyvinyl alcohol composite films deposited onto interdigitated electrodes patterned on phenolite substrates. We investigate the frequency dependent response of the device conductance and capacitance showing that higher sensitivity is obtained at higher frequency if the conductance is used as sensing parameter. In the case of capacitance measurements, higher sensitivity is obtained at low frequency. Ethanol detection at a concentration of 300 ppm in air is demonstrated. More than 80% of the sensor conductance and capacitance variation response occurs in less than 20 s.

  12. Field Testing of Activated Carbon Injection Options for Mercury Control at TXU's Big Brown Station

    SciTech Connect

    John Pavlish; Jeffrey Thompson; Christopher Martin; Mark Musich; Lucinda Hamre

    2009-01-07

    The primary objective of the project was to evaluate the long-term feasibility of using activated carbon injection (ACI) options to effectively reduce mercury emissions from Texas electric generation plants in which a blend of lignite and subbituminous coal is fired. Field testing of ACI options was performed on one-quarter of Unit 2 at TXU's Big Brown Steam Electric Station. Unit 2 has a design output of 600 MW and burns a blend of 70% Texas Gulf Coast lignite and 30% subbituminous Powder River Basin coal. Big Brown employs a COHPAC configuration, i.e., high air-to-cloth baghouses following cold-side electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), for particulate control. When sorbent injection is added between the ESP and the baghouse, the combined technology is referred to as TOXECON{trademark} and is patented by the Electric Power Research Institute in the United States. Key benefits of the TOXECON configuration include better mass transfer characteristics of a fabric filter compared to an ESP for mercury capture and contamination of only a small percentage of the fly ash with AC. The field testing consisted of a baseline sampling period, a parametric screening of three sorbent injection options, and a month long test with a single mercury control technology. During the baseline sampling, native mercury removal was observed to be less than 10%. Parametric testing was conducted for three sorbent injection options: injection of standard AC alone; injection of an EERC sorbent enhancement additive, SEA4, with ACI; and injection of an EERC enhanced AC. Injection rates were determined for all of the options to achieve the minimum target of 55% mercury removal as well as for higher removals approaching 90%. Some of the higher injection rates were not sustainable because of increased differential pressure across the test baghouse module. After completion of the parametric testing, a month long test was conducted using the enhanced AC at a nominal rate of 1.5 lb/Macf. During the

  13. Complement activation and protein adsorption by carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Salvador-Morales, Carolina; Flahaut, Emmanuel; Sim, Edith; Sloan, Jeremy; Green, Malcolm L H; Sim, Robert B

    2006-02-01

    As a first step to validate the use of carbon nanotubes as novel vaccine or drug delivery devices, their interaction with a part of the human immune system, complement, has been explored. Haemolytic assays were conducted to investigate the activation of the human serum complement system via the classical and alternative pathways. Western blot and sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) techniques were used to elucidate the mechanism of activation of complement via the classical pathway, and to analyse the interaction of complement and other plasma proteins with carbon nanotubes. We report for the first time that carbon nanotubes activate human complement via both classical and alternative pathways. We conclude that complement activation by nanotubes is consistent with reported adjuvant effects, and might also in various circumstances promote damaging effects of excessive complement activation, such as inflammation and granuloma formation. C1q binds directly to carbon nanotubes. Protein binding to carbon nanotubes is highly selective, since out of the many different proteins in plasma, very few bind to the carbon nanotubes. Fibrinogen and apolipoproteins (AI, AIV and CIII) were the proteins that bound to carbon nanotubes in greatest quantity.

  14. Natural gas storage with activated carbon from a bituminous coal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sun, Jielun; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Lizzio, A.A.

    1996-01-01

    Granular activated carbons ( -20 + 100 mesh; 0.149-0.84 mm) were produced by physical activation and chemical activation with KOH from an Illinois bituminous coal (IBC-106) for natural gas storage. The products were characterized by BET surface area, micropore volume, bulk density, and methane adsorption capacities. Volumetric methane adsorption capacities (Vm/Vs) of some of the granular carbons produced by physical activation are about 70 cm3/cm3 which is comparable to that of BPL, a commercial activated carbon. Vm/Vs values above 100 cm3/cm3 are obtainable by grinding the granular products to - 325 mesh (<0.044 mm). The increase in Vm/Vs is due to the increase in bulk density of the carbons. Volumetric methane adsorption capacity increases with increasing pore surface area and micropore volume when normalizing with respect to sample bulk volume. Compared with steam-activated carbons, granular carbons produced by KOH activation have higher micropore volume and higher methane adsorption capacities (g/g). Their volumetric methane adsorption capacities are lower due to their lower bulk densities. Copyright ?? 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  15. N-type Cu2O doped activated carbon as catalyst for improving power generation of air cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Li, Kexun; Yan, Pengyu; Liu, Ziqi; Pu, Liangtao

    2015-01-01

    A novel n-type Cu2O doped activated carbon (AC) air cathode (Cu/AC) was developed as an alternative to Pt electrode for oxygen reduction in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The maximum power density of MFCs using this novel air cathode was as high as 1390±76mWm(-2), almost 59% higher than the bare AC air cathode. Specifically, the resistance including total resistance and charge transfer resistance significantly decreased comparing to the control. Tafel curve also showed the faster electro-transfer kinetics of Cu/AC with exchange current density of 1.03×10(-3)Acm(-2), which was 69% higher than the control. Ribbon-like Cu2O was deposited on the surface of AC with the mesopore surface area increasing. Cubic Cu2O crystals exclusively expose (111) planes with the interplanar crystal spacing of 2.48Å, which was the dominate active sites for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). N-type Cu2O with oxygen vacancies played crucial roles in electrochemical catalytic activity.

  16. Sustainable Regeneration of Nanoparticle Enhanced Activated Carbon in Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    The regeneration and reuse of exhausted granular activated carbon (GAC) is an appropriate method for lowering operational and environmental costs. Advanced oxidation is a promising environmental friendly technique for GAC regeneration. The main objective of this research was to ...

  17. GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON ADSORPTION AND INFRARED REACTIVATION: A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study evaluated the effectiveness and cost of removing trace organic contaminants and surrogates from drinking water by granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption. The effect of multiple reactivations of spent GAC was also evaluated. Results indicated that reactivated GAC eff...

  18. [Influence of biological activated carbon dosage on landfill leachate treatment].

    PubMed

    Cui, Yan-Rui; Guo, Yan; Wu, Qing

    2014-08-01

    Effects of biological activated carbon (BAC) dosage on COD removal in landfill leachate treatment were compared. The COD removal efficiency of reactors with 0, 100 and 300 g activated carbon dosage per litre activated sludge was 12.9%, 19.6% and 27.7%, respectively. The results indicated that BAC improved the refractory organic matter removal efficiency and there was a positive correlation between COD removal efficiency and BAC dosage. The output of carbon dioxide after 8h of aeration in reactors was 109, 193 and 306 mg corresponding to the activated carbon dosages mentioned above, which indicated the amount of biodegradation and BAC dosage also had a positive correlation. The combination of adsorption and bioregeneration of BAC resulted in the positive correlation betweem organic matter removal efficiency and BAC dosage, and bioregeneration was the root cause for the microbial decomposition of refractory organics.

  19. A multiwavelength strong lensing analysis of baryons and dark matter in the dynamically active cluster AC 114

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sereno, M.; Lubini, M.; Jetzer, Ph.

    2010-07-01

    Context. Strong lensing studies can provide detailed mass maps of the inner regions even in dynamically active galaxy clusters. Aims: We illustrate the important role of a proper modelling of the intracluster medium, i.e., the main baryonic component. We demonstrate that the addition of a new contribution accounting for the gas can increase the statistical significance of the lensing model. Methods: We propose a parametric method for strong lensing analyses that exploits multiwavelength observations. The mass model accounts for cluster-sized dark matter halos, galaxies (whose stellar mass can be obtained from optical analyses), and the intracluster medium. The gas distribution is fitted to lensing data exploiting prior knowledge from X-ray observations. This gives an unbiased insight into each matter component and allows us to study the dynamical status of a cluster. The method was applied to AC 114, an irregular X-ray cluster. Results: We find positive evidence of dynamical activity, the dark matter distribution being shifted and rotated with respect to the gas. On the other hand, the dark matter follows the galaxy density in terms of both shape and orientation, illustrating the collisionless nature of dark matter. The inner region (≲250 kpc) is underluminous in optical bands, whereas the gas fraction (~20 ± 5%) slightly exceeds typical values. Evidence of lensing and X-ray suggests that the cluster develops in the plane of the sky and is not affected by the lensing over-concentration bias. Despite the dynamical activity, the matter distribution seems to agree with predictions of N-body simulations. An universal cusped profile provides a good description of either the overall or the dark matter distribution, whereas theoretical scaling relations seem to be accurately fitted.

  20. Adsorption of dichlorodifluoromethane, chlorodifluoromethane, and chloropentafluoroethane on activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Berlier, K.; Frere, M.; Bougard, J.

    1995-09-01

    The CFCs (chlorofluorocarbons) are used as working refrigerant fluids. Recent concerns of the effects of CFCs on the ozone layer requires the development of efficient recovery methods. One technique is to adsorb the fluids onto a porous medium such as silica gel or activated carbon. Isotherms and enthalpies of adsorption curves of dichlorodifluoromethane (R12), chlorodifluoromethane (R22), and chloropentafluoroethane (R115) on three different activated carbons have been obtained at 303 K and at pressures to 602 kPa.

  1. Carbon Nanotube Materials for Substrate Enhanced Control of Catalytic Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Heben, M.; Dillon, A. C.; Engtrakul, C.; Lee, S.-H.; Kelley, R. D.; Kini, A. M.

    2007-05-01

    Carbon SWNTs are attractive materials for supporting electrocatalysts. The properties of SWNTs are highly tunable and controlled by the nanotube's circumferential periodicity and their surface chemistry. These unique characteristics suggest that architectures constructed from these types of carbon support materials would exhibit interesting and useful properties. Here, we expect that the structure of the carbon nanotube support will play a major role in stabilizing metal electrocatalysts under extreme operating conditions and suppress both catalyst and support degradation. Furthermore, the chemical modification of the carbon nanotube surfaces can be expected to alter the interface between the catalyst and support, thus, enhancing the activity and utilization of the electrocatalysts. We plan to incorporate discrete reaction sites into the carbon nanotube lattice to create intimate electrical contacts with the catalyst particles to increase the metal catalyst activity and utilization. The work involves materials synthesis, design of electrode architectures on the nanoscale, control of the electronic, ionic, and mass fluxes, and use of advanced optical spectroscopy techniques.

  2. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon from sugarcane bagasse by physical activation with CO2 gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachrun, Sutrisno; AyuRizka, Noni; Annisa, SolichaHidayat; Arif, Hidayat

    2016-01-01

    A series of experiments have been conducted to study the effects of different carbonization temperatures (400, 600, and 800oC) on characteristics of porosity in activated carbon derived from carbonized sugarcane bagassechar at activation temperature of 800oC. The results showed that the activated carbon derived from high carbonized temperature of sugarcane bagassechars had higher BET surface area, total volume, micropore volume and yield as compared to the activated carbon derived from low carbonized temperature. The BET surface area, total volume and micropore volume of activated carbon prepared from sugarcane bagassechars obtained at 800oC of carbonized temperature and activation time of 120 min were 661.46m2/g, 0.2455cm3/g and 0.1989cm3/g, respectively. The high carbonization temperature (800oC) generated a highly microporous carbonwith a Type-I nitrogen adsorption isotherm, while the low carbonization temperature (400 and 600oC) generated a mesoporous one with an intermediate between types I and IInitrogen adsorption isotherm.

  3. Bio-based phenols and fuel production from catalytic microwave pyrolysis of lignin by activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Bu, Quan; Lei, Hanwu; Wang, Lu; Wei, Yi; Zhu, Lei; Zhang, Xuesong; Liu, Yupeng; Yadavalli, Gayatri; Tang, Juming

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study is to explore catalytic microwave pyrolysis of lignin for renewable phenols and fuels using activated carbon (AC) as a catalyst. A central composite experimental design (CCD) was used to optimize the reaction condition. The effects of reaction temperature and weight hourly space velocity (WHSV, h(-1)) on product yields were investigated. GC/MS analysis showed that the main chemical compounds of bio-oils were phenols, guaiacols, hydrocarbons and esters, most of which were ranged from 71% to 87% of the bio-oils depending on different reaction conditions. Bio-oils with high concentrations of phenol (45% in the bio-oil) were obtained. The calorific value analysis revealed that the high heating values (HHV) of the lignin-derived biochars were from 20.4 to 24.5 MJ/kg in comparison with raw lignin (19 MJ/kg). The reaction mechanism of this process was analyzed. PMID:24747393

  4. Production of activated carbon from rice husk Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobochkin, V. V.; Tu, N. V.; Hieu, N. M.

    2016-09-01

    This work is dedicated to the production of activated carbon from rice husk from Delta of the Red River in Viet Nam. At the first stage, carbonization of a rice husk was carried out to obtain material containing 43.1% carbon and 25 % silica with a specific surface area of 51.5 m2/g. After separating of silica (the second stage), the specific surface area of the product increased to 204 m2/g and the silica content decreased to 1.23% by weight as well. The most important stage in the formation of the porous structure of the material is the activation. The products with the high specific surface area in the range of 800-1345 m2/g were obtained by activation of carbonized product with water vapour or carbon dioxide at temperatures of 700 °C and 850 °C, with varying the flow rate of the activating agent and activation time. The best results were achieved by activation of carbon material with water vapour at the flow rate of 0.08 dm3/min per 500 g of material and the temperature of 850 °C.

  5. Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Weaver, Charles E.; Chilcoat, Bill R.; Derbyshire, Frank; Jagtoyen, Marit

    2000-01-01

    An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

  6. Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Weaver, Charles E.; Chilcoat, Bill R.; Derbyshire, Frank; Jagtoyen, Marit

    2001-01-01

    An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

  7. Water vapor adsorption on activated carbon preadsorbed with naphtalene.

    PubMed

    Zimny, T; Finqueneisel, G; Cossarutto, L; Weber, J V

    2005-05-01

    The adsorption of water vapor on a microporous activated carbon derived from the carbonization of coconut shell has been studied. Preadsorption of naphthalene was used as a tool to determine the location and the influence of the primary adsorbing centers within the porous structure of active carbon. The adsorption was studied in the pressure range p/p0=0-0.95 in a static water vapor system, allowing the investigation of both kinetic and equilibrium experimental data. Modeling of the isotherms using the modified equation of Do and Do was applied to determine the effect of preadsorption on the mechanism of adsorption. PMID:15797395

  8. Removal of vapor-phase elemental mercury from stack emissions with sulfur-impregnated activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Sowlat, Mohammad Hossein; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Gharibi, Hamed; Yunesian, Masud; Rastkari, Noushin

    2014-01-01

    This systematic review of high-quality, relevant original research articles existing in the literature was conducted to comprehensively explore the efficiency of Hg11 capture from stack emissions by sulfur-impregnated vs. virgin ACs. Our systematic overview suggested that significantly higher amounts of Hg0 are absorbed by sulfurimpregnated ACs than by virgin ones ( 1.5-32 times higher, based on the applied operational conditions). The main reason for this is because Hg11 capture by virgin ACs follows a physisorption mechanism, whereas that by sulfur-impregnated ACs occurs from a combination of physisorption of Hg11 on carbon texture and chemical reaction between Hg0 and impregnated sulfur, with subsequent formation of HgS. Temperature increased the Hg0 adsorption capacity of virgin ACs, especially when temperatures exceeded 100 oc. For sulfur-impregnated ACs, increasing the temperature up to I 00 oc increased the Hg0 adsorption capacity by enhancing the chemisorption of Hg0 capture. A further increase in temperature enhanced the efficiency of ACs that were impregnated with Sat higher temperatures (600 °C, for instance). This mainly resulted from production of stronger bonding of sulfur to carbon at higher impregnation temperatures and also from a more even distribution of sulfur in the carbon matrix. The authors of different papers reported different results with respect to whether there is an effect of initial Hg11 concentration on AC adsorption capacity. The authors of two studies could find no such etl'ect. The predominant evidence, however, favors the view that increased Hg0 adsorption capacities exist at higher inlet Hg0 concentrations. Such behavior is attributed to faster kinetics of Hg0 capture and an enhanced higher driving force at higher initial Hg0 inlet concentrations. Results from reviewed studies also indicated that the optimum SIC ratio and sulfur content are 2/1 and I 0-20%, respectively. Surface area has a less significant impact on Hg11

  9. Removal of vapor-phase elemental mercury from stack emissions with sulfur-impregnated activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Sowlat, Mohammad Hossein; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Gharibi, Hamed; Yunesian, Masud; Rastkari, Noushin

    2014-01-01

    This systematic review of high-quality, relevant original research articles existing in the literature was conducted to comprehensively explore the efficiency of Hg11 capture from stack emissions by sulfur-impregnated vs. virgin ACs. Our systematic overview suggested that significantly higher amounts of Hg0 are absorbed by sulfurimpregnated ACs than by virgin ones ( 1.5-32 times higher, based on the applied operational conditions). The main reason for this is because Hg11 capture by virgin ACs follows a physisorption mechanism, whereas that by sulfur-impregnated ACs occurs from a combination of physisorption of Hg11 on carbon texture and chemical reaction between Hg0 and impregnated sulfur, with subsequent formation of HgS. Temperature increased the Hg0 adsorption capacity of virgin ACs, especially when temperatures exceeded 100 oc. For sulfur-impregnated ACs, increasing the temperature up to I 00 oc increased the Hg0 adsorption capacity by enhancing the chemisorption of Hg0 capture. A further increase in temperature enhanced the efficiency of ACs that were impregnated with Sat higher temperatures (600 °C, for instance). This mainly resulted from production of stronger bonding of sulfur to carbon at higher impregnation temperatures and also from a more even distribution of sulfur in the carbon matrix. The authors of different papers reported different results with respect to whether there is an effect of initial Hg11 concentration on AC adsorption capacity. The authors of two studies could find no such etl'ect. The predominant evidence, however, favors the view that increased Hg0 adsorption capacities exist at higher inlet Hg0 concentrations. Such behavior is attributed to faster kinetics of Hg0 capture and an enhanced higher driving force at higher initial Hg0 inlet concentrations. Results from reviewed studies also indicated that the optimum SIC ratio and sulfur content are 2/1 and I 0-20%, respectively. Surface area has a less significant impact on Hg11

  10. THE EFFECT OF WATER (VAPOR-PHASE) AND CARBON ON ELEMENTAL MERCURY REMOVAL IN A FLOW REACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of studying the effect of vapor-phase moisture on elemental mercury (Hgo) removal by activated carbon (AC) in a flow reactor. tests involved injecting AC into both a dry and a 4% moisture nitrogen (N2) /Hgo gas stream. A bituminous-coal-based AC (Calgon WP...

  11. Effectiveness of activated carbon disk for the analysis of iodine in water samples using wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junseok; An, Jinsung; Kim, Joo-Ae; Yoon, Hye-On

    2016-01-01

    A novel approach using wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) spectrometry combined with an activated carbon (AC) disk was developed for the determination of total iodine concentrations in water samples. Dissolved iodine species (i.e., I(-) and IO3(-)) in water samples were preconcentrated on the AC disk and directly analyzed by WDXRF spectrometry. The adsorption behavior of I(-) and IO3(-) on the AC disk was assessed at varying pH levels (4, 6, and 8). The AC disks completely retained the I(-) and IO3(-) for all the pH levels tested. The calibration curve obtained from the iodine concentrations (i.e., 0, 20, 200, and 400 μg) of AC disks and the measured X-ray intensity from the WDXRF analysis showed a good linearity (R(2)=0.9960), with a relatively low limit of detection (0.575 μg). The durability of the AC disk for repeatable measurements was also assessed to validate the sustainability of the proposed method and consequently the measured X-ray intensity for the AC disks was constant until 8d of analysis time. The accuracy of the proposed AC-WDXRF method was confirmed by measuring iodine concentration spiked in drinking water using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The proposed method is simple, rapid, efficient, and environmental friendly for iodine analysis in water samples. As a precursor of disinfection by products (DBPs), it is important to determine the total iodine concentrations in raw water.

  12. Effectiveness of activated carbon disk for the analysis of iodine in water samples using wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junseok; An, Jinsung; Kim, Joo-Ae; Yoon, Hye-On

    2016-01-01

    A novel approach using wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) spectrometry combined with an activated carbon (AC) disk was developed for the determination of total iodine concentrations in water samples. Dissolved iodine species (i.e., I(-) and IO3(-)) in water samples were preconcentrated on the AC disk and directly analyzed by WDXRF spectrometry. The adsorption behavior of I(-) and IO3(-) on the AC disk was assessed at varying pH levels (4, 6, and 8). The AC disks completely retained the I(-) and IO3(-) for all the pH levels tested. The calibration curve obtained from the iodine concentrations (i.e., 0, 20, 200, and 400 μg) of AC disks and the measured X-ray intensity from the WDXRF analysis showed a good linearity (R(2)=0.9960), with a relatively low limit of detection (0.575 μg). The durability of the AC disk for repeatable measurements was also assessed to validate the sustainability of the proposed method and consequently the measured X-ray intensity for the AC disks was constant until 8d of analysis time. The accuracy of the proposed AC-WDXRF method was confirmed by measuring iodine concentration spiked in drinking water using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The proposed method is simple, rapid, efficient, and environmental friendly for iodine analysis in water samples. As a precursor of disinfection by products (DBPs), it is important to determine the total iodine concentrations in raw water. PMID:26117241

  13. Activated carbon/Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticle composite: fabrication, methyl orange removal and regeneration by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Do, Manh Huy; Phan, Ngoc Hoa; Nguyen, Thi Dung; Pham, Thi Thu Suong; Nguyen, Van Khoa; Vu, Thi Thuy Trang; Nguyen, Thi Kim Phuong

    2011-11-01

    In the water treatment field, activated carbons (ACs) have wide applications in adsorptions. However, the applications are limited by difficulties encountered in separation and regeneration processes. Here, activated carbon/Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticle composites, which combine the adsorption features of powdered activated carbon (PAC) with the magnetic and excellent catalytic properties of Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles, were fabricated by a modified impregnation method using HNO(3) as the carbon modifying agent. The obtained composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption isotherms and vibrating sample magnetometer. Their performance for methyl orange (MO) removal by adsorption was evaluated. The regeneration of the composite and PAC-HNO(3) (powdered activated carbon modified by HNO(3)) adsorbed MO by hydrogen peroxide was investigated. The composites had a high specific surface area and porosity and a superparamagnetic property that shows they can be manipulated by an external magnetic field. Adsorption experiments showed that the MO sorption process on the composites followed pseudo-second order kinetic model and the adsorption isotherm date could be simulated with both the Freundlich and Langmuir models. The regeneration indicated that the presence of the Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles is important for a achieving high regeneration efficiency by hydrogen peroxide. PMID:21840037

  14. Comparison of toluene adsorption among granular activated carbon and different types of activated carbon fibers (ACFs).

    PubMed

    Balanay, Jo Anne G; Crawford, Shaun A; Lungu, Claudiu T

    2011-10-01

    Activated carbon fiber (ACF) has been demonstrated to be a good adsorbent for the removal of organic vapors in air. Some ACF has a comparable or larger surface area and higher adsorption capacity when compared with granular activated carbon (GAC) commonly used in respiratory protection devices. ACF is an attractive alternative adsorbent to GAC because of its ease of handling, light weight, and decreasing cost. ACF may offer the potential for short-term respiratory protection for first responders and emergency personnel. This study compares the critical bed depths and adsorption capacities for toluene among GAC and ACF of different forms and surface areas. GAC and ACF in cloth (ACFC) and felt (ACFF) forms were challenged in stainless steel chambers with a constant concentration of 500 ppm toluene via conditioned air at 25°C, 50% RH, and constant airflow (7 L/min). Breakthrough data were obtained for each adsorbent using gas chromatography with flame ionization detector. Surface areas of each adsorbent were determined using a physisorption analyzer. Results showed that the critical bed depth of GAC is 275% higher than the average of ACFC but is 55% lower than the average of ACFF. Adsorption capacity of GAC (with a nominal surface area of 1800 m(2)/g) at 50% breakthrough is 25% higher than the average of ACF with surface area of 1000 m(2)/g, while the rest of ACF with surface area of 1500 m(2)/g and higher have 40% higher adsorption capacities than GAC. ACFC with higher surface area has the smallest critical bed depth and highest adsorption capacity, which makes it a good adsorbent for thinner and lighter respirators. We concluded that ACF has great potential for application in respiratory protection considering its higher adsorption capacity and lower critical bed depth in addition to its advantages over GAC, particularly for ACF with higher surface area.

  15. Carbon-Carbon Bond Cleavage in Activation of the Prodrug Nabumetone

    PubMed Central

    Varfaj, Fatbardha; Zulkifli, Siti N. A.; Park, Hyoung-Goo; Challinor, Victoria L.; De Voss, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon-carbon bond cleavage reactions are catalyzed by, among others, lanosterol 14-demethylase (CYP51), cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11), sterol 17β-lyase (CYP17), and aromatase (CYP19). Because of the high substrate specificities of these enzymes and the complex nature of their substrates, these reactions have been difficult to characterize. A CYP1A2-catalyzed carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction is required for conversion of the prodrug nabumetone to its active form, 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6-MNA). Despite worldwide use of nabumetone as an anti-inflammatory agent, the mechanism of its carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction remains obscure. With the help of authentic synthetic standards, we report here that the reaction involves 3-hydroxylation, carbon-carbon cleavage to the aldehyde, and oxidation of the aldehyde to the acid, all catalyzed by CYP1A2 or, less effectively, by other P450 enzymes. The data indicate that the carbon-carbon bond cleavage is mediated by the ferric peroxo anion rather than the ferryl species in the P450 catalytic cycle. CYP1A2 also catalyzes O-demethylation and alcohol to ketone transformations of nabumetone and its analogs. PMID:24584631

  16. Waste polyvinylchloride derived pitch as a precursor to develop carbon fibers and activated carbon fibers.

    PubMed

    Qiao, W M; Yoon, S H; Mochida, I; Yang, J H

    2007-01-01

    Polyvinylchloride (PVC) was successfully recycled through the solvent extraction from waste pipe with an extraction yield of ca. 86%. The extracted PVC was pyrolyzed by a two-stage process (260 and 410 degrees C) to obtain free-chlorine PVC based pitch through an effective removal of chlorine from PVC during the heat-treatment. As-prepared pitch (softening point: 220 degrees C) was spun, stabilized, carbonized into carbon fibers (CFs), and further activated into activated carbon fibers (ACFs) in a flow of CO2. As-prepared CFs show comparable mechanical properties to commercial CFs, whose maximum tensile strength and modulus are 862 MPa and 62 GPa, respectively. The resultant ACFs exhibit a high surface area of 1200 m2/g, narrow pore size distribution and a low oxygen content of 3%. The study provides an effective insight to recycle PVC from waste PVC and develop a carbon precursor for high performance carbon materials such as CFs and ACFs.

  17. Adsorptive removal of patulin from apple juice using Ca-alginate-activated carbon beads.

    PubMed

    Yue, Tianli; Guo, Caixia; Yuan, Yahong; Wang, Zhouli; Luo, Ying; Wang, Ling

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the adsorption of patulin from apple juice by Ca-alginate-activated carbon (Ca-alginate-AC) beads. The capacity of patulin was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. The results showed that Ca-alginate-AC beads have significant ability to reduce patulin from contaminated apple juice. Furthermore, the adsorption process did not affect the quality of apple juice. The effects of contact time, initial patulin concentration, adsorbent dose, and temperature were assessed. The removal percentage of patulin increased with contact time, adsorbent dose, and temperature. A reduction was also noted to bind patulin at increased levels of contamination. The equilibrium data were fitted to Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin isotherm models and the isotherm constants were calculated at different temperatures. The adsorption equilibrium was best described by the Freundlich isotherm (R(2) > 0.990). The pseudo 1st-order model was found to describe the kinetic data satisfactorily. Thermodynamic parameters such as standard Gibbs free energy (ΔG◦◦), standard enthalpy (ΔH◦), and standard entropy (ΔS◦) were evaluated. The results showed that the adsorption was spontaneous and endothermic nature.

  18. [Competitive adsorption between bromine and bromate on activated carbon and impact on bromate formation].

    PubMed

    An, Dong; Song, Jia-xiu; Le, Lin-sheng; Wang, Wei-zhi

    2008-04-01

    Regularity of adsorption removal for bromine and bromate in water has been tested by three different activated carbon. It is demonstrated that in single adsorbent solution adsorption removal rates for bromine and bromate is 69% and 88%, respectively. As for double adsorbent solution, the removal rate of bromine decreased to 10% and of bromate is higher than 60%. The competitive adsorption between NOM and bormate is due to surface area and pore size distribution etc. The pore size distribution for AC-400 favors NOM adsorption process but hinders bromate adsorption. In low concentration solution(c(e) < 72 mg x L(-1)) NOM is absorbed with high rate, while in the solution with the concentration between 72 mg x L(-1) and 211 mg x L(-1), AC-150 is effective in removing NOM. Furthermore, ammonia concentration and pH level has impact on bromate removal rate in water. The optimal conditions for bromate removal are determined by ammonia concentration less than 200 microg/L and low pH in water.

  19. Silver electrodeposition on the activated carbon air cathode for performance improvement in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Liangtao; Li, Kexun; Chen, Zhihao; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Xi; Fu, Zhou

    2014-12-01

    The present work was to study silver electrodeposition on the activated carbon (AC) air cathode for performance improvement in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The treated cathodes were proved to be effective to enhance the performance of MFCs. The maximum power density of MFC with silver electrodeposition time of 50 s (Ag-50) cathode was 1080 ± 60 mW m-2, 69% higher than the bare AC air cathode. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results showed that zero-valent, monovalent and divalent silver were present to transform mutually, which illustrated that the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at the cathode took place through four-electron pathway. From electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis, the electrodeposition method made the total resistance of the electrodes largely reduced. Meanwhile the deposited silver had no toxic effects on anode culture but inhibited the biofilm growth of the cathodes. This kind of antimicrobial efficient cathode, prepared with a simple, fast and economical method, was of good benefit to the performance improvement of MFCs.

  20. Central composite design and genetic algorithm applied for the optimization of ultrasonic-assisted removal of malachite green by ZnO Nanorod-loaded activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaedi, M.; Azad, F. Nasiri; Dashtian, K.; Hajati, S.; Goudarzi, A.; Soylak, M.

    2016-10-01

    Maximum malachite green (MG) adsorption onto ZnO Nanorod-loaded activated carbon (ZnO-NR-AC) was achieved following the optimization of conditions, while the mass transfer was accelerated by ultrasonic. The central composite design (CCD) and genetic algorithm (GA) were used to estimate the effect of individual variables and their mutual interactions on the MG adsorption as response and to optimize the adsorption process. The ZnO-NR-AC surface morphology and its properties were identified via FESEM, XRD and FTIR. The adsorption equilibrium isotherm and kinetic models investigation revealed the well fit of the experimental data to Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetic model, respectively. It was shown that a small amount of ZnO-NR-AC (with adsorption capacity of 20 mg g- 1) is sufficient for the rapid removal of high amount of MG dye in short time (3.99 min).

  1. Central composite design and genetic algorithm applied for the optimization of ultrasonic-assisted removal of malachite green by ZnO Nanorod-loaded activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, M; Azad, F Nasiri; Dashtian, K; Hajati, S; Goudarzi, A; Soylak, M

    2016-10-01

    Maximum malachite green (MG) adsorption onto ZnO Nanorod-loaded activated carbon (ZnO-NR-AC) was achieved following the optimization of conditions, while the mass transfer was accelerated by ultrasonic. The central composite design (CCD) and genetic algorithm (GA) were used to estimate the effect of individual variables and their mutual interactions on the MG adsorption as response and to optimize the adsorption process. The ZnO-NR-AC surface morphology and its properties were identified via FESEM, XRD and FTIR. The adsorption equilibrium isotherm and kinetic models investigation revealed the well fit of the experimental data to Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetic model, respectively. It was shown that a small amount of ZnO-NR-AC (with adsorption capacity of 20mgg(-1)) is sufficient for the rapid removal of high amount of MG dye in short time (3.99min).

  2. Central composite design and genetic algorithm applied for the optimization of ultrasonic-assisted removal of malachite green by ZnO Nanorod-loaded activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, M; Azad, F Nasiri; Dashtian, K; Hajati, S; Goudarzi, A; Soylak, M

    2016-10-01

    Maximum malachite green (MG) adsorption onto ZnO Nanorod-loaded activated carbon (ZnO-NR-AC) was achieved following the optimization of conditions, while the mass transfer was accelerated by ultrasonic. The central composite design (CCD) and genetic algorithm (GA) were used to estimate the effect of individual variables and their mutual interactions on the MG adsorption as response and to optimize the adsorption process. The ZnO-NR-AC surface morphology and its properties were identified via FESEM, XRD and FTIR. The adsorption equilibrium isotherm and kinetic models investigation revealed the well fit of the experimental data to Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetic model, respectively. It was shown that a small amount of ZnO-NR-AC (with adsorption capacity of 20mgg(-1)) is sufficient for the rapid removal of high amount of MG dye in short time (3.99min). PMID:27318150

  3. Adsorption of methylene blue dye onto activated carbons based on agricultural by-products: equilibrium and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Ioannou, Z; Simitzis, J

    2013-01-01

    Mixtures of novolac resin and olive stone biomass (20/80 and 40/60 w/w) were cured, pyrolyzed up to 1,000 °C and activated with CO2 under a continuous flow operation (named N20B-cCa and N40B-cCa respectively). Commercial activated charcoal was similarly re-activated with CO2 and used for comparison reasons (AC-a). The characterization of these materials was performed by Fourier transform Infrared (FTIR) analysis and their specific surface area was determined according to DIN 66132. The materials were tested for their adsorption abilities at different temperatures (298, 333 K) and initial dye concentrations (0.01-0.35 g/L) using 1 L of methylene blue (MB) solution in 10 g of activated carbon. MB adsorption kinetic was also studied. The FTIR spectra of all activated carbons show absorption peaks which correspond to -OH, -CH, -C-O-C- groups and to aromatic ring. The presence of the absorption peak at about 1,400 cm(-1) for N20B-cCa, N40B-cCa indicates more acidic groups on them compared to the commercial AC-a. The specific surface area of N20B-cCa, N40B-cCa and AC-a has values equal to 352, 342 and 760 m(2)/g respectively. From the applied kinetic models, pseudo-second-order equation could best describe MB adsorption. Consequently, such adsorbents can be used as filters to adsorb dyes from wastewaters.

  4. Wet oxidative regeneration of activated carbon loaded with reactive dye.

    PubMed

    Shende, R V; Mahajani, V V

    2002-01-01

    Wet Oxidative Regeneration (WOR) of powdered activated carbon (PAC) and granular activated carbon (GAC) loaded with the reactive dyes, namely chemictive brilliant blue R and cibacron turquoise blue G, was studied. Attempts were made to regenerate the loaded carbons designated now as spent carbon. A slurry (10% w/v) of spent carbon in distilled water was oxidized by wet oxidation in the temperature range of 150-250 degrees C using oxygen partial pressures between 0.69-1.38 MPa in an 1 1 SS 316 autoclave. The percent regeneration was determined from a ratio, X(RC)/X(VC), corresponding to an equilibrium adsorption capacity of regenerated carbon/equilibrium adsorption capacity of virgin carbon from an initial adsorption period of 3 h. It was observed that the regeneration mainly occurred due to the oxidation of the adsorbates taking place on the surface of carbon. It was possible to regenerate the spent GAC and PAC to the extent of more than 98% (approximately X(RC)/X(VC) > 0.98) by wet oxidation. After four consecutive cycles of adsorption and regeneration using the same stocks of GAC, carbon weight loss observed at 200 degrees C was about 40%. SEM studies of the regenerated carbon showed widening of the pores and loss of structure between the adjacent pores as compared with the virgin carbon. PAC was found to be more suitable as compared with GAC for the adsorption and wet oxidative regeneration processes to treat the aqueous solution containing lower concentration of unhydrolyzed reactive dye. The suitability of wet oxidative regeneration is demonstrated at a bench scale to treat the synthetic reactive dye solution.

  5. Wet oxidative regeneration of activated carbon loaded with reactive dye.

    PubMed

    Shende, R V; Mahajani, V V

    2002-01-01

    Wet Oxidative Regeneration (WOR) of powdered activated carbon (PAC) and granular activated carbon (GAC) loaded with the reactive dyes, namely chemictive brilliant blue R and cibacron turquoise blue G, was studied. Attempts were made to regenerate the loaded carbons designated now as spent carbon. A slurry (10% w/v) of spent carbon in distilled water was oxidized by wet oxidation in the temperature range of 150-250 degrees C using oxygen partial pressures between 0.69-1.38 MPa in an 1 1 SS 316 autoclave. The percent regeneration was determined from a ratio, X(RC)/X(VC), corresponding to an equilibrium adsorption capacity of regenerated carbon/equilibrium adsorption capacity of virgin carbon from an initial adsorption period of 3 h. It was observed that the regeneration mainly occurred due to the oxidation of the adsorbates taking place on the surface of carbon. It was possible to regenerate the spent GAC and PAC to the extent of more than 98% (approximately X(RC)/X(VC) > 0.98) by wet oxidation. After four consecutive cycles of adsorption and regeneration using the same stocks of GAC, carbon weight loss observed at 200 degrees C was about 40%. SEM studies of the regenerated carbon showed widening of the pores and loss of structure between the adjacent pores as compared with the virgin carbon. PAC was found to be more suitable as compared with GAC for the adsorption and wet oxidative regeneration processes to treat the aqueous solution containing lower concentration of unhydrolyzed reactive dye. The suitability of wet oxidative regeneration is demonstrated at a bench scale to treat the synthetic reactive dye solution. PMID:11942707

  6. Aerobic debromination of BDE-209 by Rhodococcus sp. coupled with zerovalent iron/activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lili; Zhang, Yacong; Liu, Ruihong; Wang, Zhiping; Xu, Feng; Chen, Yilun; Lin, Kuangfei

    2016-02-01

    In this study, an aerobic strain identified as Rhodococcus sp. was isolated from the sediment of a typical electronic waste disassemble site, Taizhou, China. This strain could use BDE-209 as the sole carbon and energy source and degrade 65.1% of BDE-209 (initial concentration being 50 mg/L) within 144 h. To explore the BDE-209 degradation properties of this strain with the co-existed electronic donor, zerovalent iron/activated carbon (ZVI/AC) was introduced to build a microbial-chemical coupling system, which was found to promote the degradation of BDE-209 slightly (74.7% in 144 h). Moreover, the debromination products in both of the batch experiments were determined with GC/MS, which showed that lower brominated PBDE congeners were produced almost in order of the number of bromine ions, ranged from nona- to di-BDEs. In addition, the possible debromination pathways of BDE-209 for each system were proposed respectively, which confirmed the microbial activity of BDE-209 debromination. Since some of the lower-brominated BDE congeners are much toxic than BDE-209, these microbial activities might bring potential hazards to the environment with BDE-209 contamination. It is the first time to investigate the transformation of BDE-209 with microbial-chemical coupling system, which is universal in the nature, thus suggesting that the ecological safety of environment exposed to PBDEs should be focused in the future.

  7. Nanoscale zero-valent iron/AC as heterogeneous Fenton catalysts in three-dimensional electrode system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Zhou, Lei; Yang, Jie; Yu, Xinmin; Jiang, Yonghai; Zhou, Minghua

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, nanoscale zero-valent iron/activated carbon (NZVI/AC) was investigated as heterogeneous Fenton catalyst in three-dimensional (3D) electrode system for methyl orange (MO) degradation. Some important operating parameters such as cathodic potential, pH, and O₂ flow rate were investigated, exhibiting good decolorization. The mineralization of MO was significantly improved by 20-35% compared to two-dimensional (2D) AC system at the optimum conditions. Although the TOC removal of AC was higher than NZVI/AC due to its good adsorption capacity initially, heterogeneous Fenton catalysis played a more and more important roles in the following test. After eight runs, NZVI/AC still exhibited excellent catalytic properties with low iron leaching. Further, a relatively comprehensive mechanism of NZVI/AC as particle electrodes in 3D system was proposed.

  8. Particle size distribution and morphological changes in activated carbon-metal oxide hybrid catalysts prepared under different heating conditions.

    PubMed

    Barroso-Bogeat, A; Alexandre-Franco, M; Fernández-González, C; Gómez-Serrano, V

    2016-03-01

    In catalysis processes, activated carbon (AC) and metal oxides (MOs) are widely used either as catalysts or as catalyst supports because of their unique properties. A combination of AC and a MO in a single hybrid material entails changes not only in the composition, microstructure and texture but also in the morphology, which may largely influence the catalytic behaviour of the resulting product. This work is aimed at investigating the modifications in the morphology and particle size distribution (PSD) for AC-MO hybrid catalysts as a result of their preparation under markedly different heating conditions. From a commercial AC and six MO (Al2O3, Fe2O3, ZnO, SnO2, TiO2 and WO3) precursors, two series of such catalysts are prepared by wet impregnation, oven-drying at 120 ºC, and subsequent heat treatment at 200 ºC or 850 ºC in inert atmosphere. The resulting samples are characterized in terms of their morphology and PSD by scanning electron microscopy and ImageJ processing program. Obtained results indicate that the morphology, PSD and degree of dispersion of the supported catalysts are strongly dependent both on the MO precursor and the heat treatment temperature. With the temperature rise, trends are towards the improvement of crystallinity, the broadening of the PSD and the increase in the average particle size, thus suggesting the involvement of sintering mechanisms. Such effects are more pronounced for the Fe, Sn and W catalysts due to the reduction of the corresponding MOs by AC during the heat treatment at 850 ºC.

  9. Composite electrodes of activated carbon derived from cassava peel and carbon nanotubes for supercapacitor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taer, E.; Iwantono, Yulita, M.; Taslim, R.; Subagio, A.; Salomo, Deraman, M.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, a composite electrode was prepared from a mixture of activated carbon derived from precarbonization of cassava peel (CP) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The activated carbon was produced by pyrolysis process using ZnCl2 as an activation agent. A N2 adsorption-desorption analysis for the sample indicated that the BET surface area of the activated carbon was 1336 m2 g-1. Difference percentage of CNTs of 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20% with 5% of PVDF binder were added into CP based activated carbon in order to fabricate the composite electrodes. The morphology and structure of the composite electrodes were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The SEM image observed that the distribution of CNTs was homogeneous between carbon particles and the XRD pattern shown the amorphous structure of the sample. The electrodes were fabricated for supercapacitor cells with 316L stainless steel as current collector and 1 M sulfuric acid as electrolyte. An electrochemical characterization was performed by using an electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) method using a Solatron 1286 instrument and the addition of CNTs revealed to improve the resistant and capacitive properties of supercapacitor cell.

  10. Modification of granular activated carbon using low molecular weight polymer for enhanced removal of Cu(2+) from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Yin, C Y; Aroua, M K; Daud, W M A W

    2007-01-01

    Palm shell activated carbon was modified via surface impregnation with polyethyleneimine (PEI) to enhance removal of Cu(2+) from aqueous solution in this study. The effect of PEI modification on batch adsorption of Cu(2+) as well as the equilibrium behavior of adsorption of metal ions on activated carbon were investigated. PEI modification clearly increased the Cu(2+) adsorption capacities by 68% and 75.86% for initial solution pH of 3 and 5 respectively. The adsorption data of Cu(2+) on both virgin and PEI-modified AC for both initial solution pH of 3 and 5 fitted the Langmuir and Redlich-Peterson isotherms considerably better than the Freundlich isotherm.

  11. Preparation of titanium dioxide photocatalyst loaded onto activated carbon support using chemical vapor deposition: a review paper.

    PubMed

    Li Puma, Gianluca; Bono, Awang; Krishnaiah, Duduku; Collin, Joseph G

    2008-09-15

    Various methods to prepare and characterize TiO(2) photocatalyst loaded onto activated carbon (AC) support have been developed over the last decade. This photocatalyst has been used in a variety of investigations, i.e. from water decontamination to direct pollutant degradation in aqueous and gas phase systems using UV irradiation and lately with the assistance of ultrasonic sound waves. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method is one of the most promising and well-researched methods for deposition of catalysts onto supports. Given its advantage, from an engineering and fundamental aspect, CVD method also has commercial applications. A detailed search of published reports of these investigations was carried out and analyzed in this paper with focus on CVD techniques, activated carbon support and sonication.

  12. Adsorption uptake of synthetic organic chemicals by carbon nanotubes and activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Brooks, A J; Lim, Hyung-nam; Kilduff, James E

    2012-07-27

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown great promise as high performance materials for adsorbing priority pollutants from water and wastewater. This study compared uptake of two contaminants of interest in drinking water treatment (atrazine and trichloroethylene) by nine different types of carbonaceous adsorbents: three different types of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), three different sized multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs), two granular activated carbons (GACs) and a powdered activated carbon (PAC). On a mass basis, the activated carbons exhibited the highest uptake, followed by SWNTs and MWNTs. However, metallic impurities in SWNTs and multiple walls in MWNTs contribute to adsorbent mass but do not contribute commensurate adsorption sites. Therefore, when uptake was normalized by purity (carbon content) and surface area (instead of mass), the isotherms collapsed and much of the CNT data was comparable to the activated carbons, indicating that these two characteristics drive much of the observed differences between activated carbons and CNT materials. For the limited data set here, the Raman D:G ratio as a measure of disordered non-nanotube graphitic components was not a good predictor of adsorption from solution. Uptake of atrazine by MWNTs having a range of lengths and diameters was comparable and their Freundlich isotherms were statistically similar, and we found no impact of solution pH on the adsorption of either atrazine or trichloroethylene in the range of naturally occurring surface water (pH = 5.7-8.3). Experiments were performed using a suite of model aromatic compounds having a range of π-electron energy to investigate the role of π-π electron donor-acceptor interactions on organic compound uptake by SWNTs. For the compounds studied, hydrophobic interactions were the dominant mechanism in the uptake by both SWNTs and activated carbon. However, comparing the uptake of naphthalene and phenanthrene by activated carbon and SWNTs, size exclusion effects

  13. Adsorption uptake of synthetic organic chemicals by carbon nanotubes and activated carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, A. J.; Lim, Hyung-nam; Kilduff, James E.

    2012-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown great promise as high performance materials for adsorbing priority pollutants from water and wastewater. This study compared uptake of two contaminants of interest in drinking water treatment (atrazine and trichloroethylene) by nine different types of carbonaceous adsorbents: three different types of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), three different sized multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs), two granular activated carbons (GACs) and a powdered activated carbon (PAC). On a mass basis, the activated carbons exhibited the highest uptake, followed by SWNTs and MWNTs. However, metallic impurities in SWNTs and multiple walls in MWNTs contribute to adsorbent mass but do not contribute commensurate adsorption sites. Therefore, when uptake was normalized by purity (carbon content) and surface area (instead of mass), the isotherms collapsed and much of the CNT data was comparable to the activated carbons, indicating that these two characteristics drive much of the observed differences between activated carbons and CNT materials. For the limited data set here, the Raman D:G ratio as a measure of disordered non-nanotube graphitic components was not a good predictor of adsorption from solution. Uptake of atrazine by MWNTs having a range of lengths and diameters was comparable and their Freundlich isotherms were statistically similar, and we found no impact of solution pH on the adsorption of either atrazine or trichloroethylene in the range of naturally occurring surface water (pH = 5.7-8.3). Experiments were performed using a suite of model aromatic compounds having a range of π-electron energy to investigate the role of π-π electron donor-acceptor interactions on organic compound uptake by SWNTs. For the compounds studied, hydrophobic interactions were the dominant mechanism in the uptake by both SWNTs and activated carbon. However, comparing the uptake of naphthalene and phenanthrene by activated carbon and SWNTs, size exclusion effects

  14. Adsorption uptake of synthetic organic chemicals by carbon nanotubes and activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Brooks, A J; Lim, Hyung-nam; Kilduff, James E

    2012-07-27

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown great promise as high performance materials for adsorbing priority pollutants from water and wastewater. This study compared uptake of two contaminants of interest in drinking water treatment (atrazine and trichloroethylene) by nine different types of carbonaceous adsorbents: three different types of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), three different sized multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs), two granular activated carbons (GACs) and a powdered activated carbon (PAC). On a mass basis, the activated carbons exhibited the highest uptake, followed by SWNTs and MWNTs. However, metallic impurities in SWNTs and multiple walls in MWNTs contribute to adsorbent mass but do not contribute commensurate adsorption sites. Therefore, when uptake was normalized by purity (carbon content) and surface area (instead of mass), the isotherms collapsed and much of the CNT data was comparable to the activated carbons, indicating that these two characteristics drive much of the observed differences between activated carbons and CNT materials. For the limited data set here, the Raman D:G ratio as a measure of disordered non-nanotube graphitic components was not a good predictor of adsorption from solution. Uptake of atrazine by MWNTs having a range of lengths and diameters was comparable and their Freundlich isotherms were statistically similar, and we found no impact of solution pH on the adsorption of either atrazine or trichloroethylene in the range of naturally occurring surface water (pH = 5.7-8.3). Experiments were performed using a suite of model aromatic compounds having a range of π-electron energy to investigate the role of π-π electron donor-acceptor interactions on organic compound uptake by SWNTs. For the compounds studied, hydrophobic interactions were the dominant mechanism in the uptake by both SWNTs and activated carbon. However, comparing the uptake of naphthalene and phenanthrene by activated carbon and SWNTs, size exclusion effects

  15. User-oriented batch reactor solutions to the homogeneous surface diffusion model for different activated carbon dosages.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiong; Crittenden, John; Hristovski, Kiril; Hand, David; Westerhoff, Paul

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents a simplified approach and user-oriented solutions to the homogeneous surface diffusion model (HSDM) equations for determining the surface diffusivity using a batch reactor system. Once the surface diffusivity is known, this model could also be used to estimate the performance of activated carbon (AC) applications as a function of contact time. In addition, fixed-bed performance can be predicted using the user-oriented solutions to the HSDM for fixed beds. The step-by-step procedure for determining surface diffusion coefficients of an activated carbon adsorber, which was initially developed by Hand, Crittenden and Thacker in 1983 for a carbon dose where C(equilibrium)/C(0)=0.5, is modified to allow calculations for different carbon dosages. This modification provides solutions to the HSDM equations for different activated carbon dosages. The solutions to the HSDM framework are provided as simplified algebraic equations suitable for quick and easy estimations of D(S). The excel spread sheet is provided in the supplemental information and a detailed example is discussed. PMID:19249812

  16. Activated Carbon Composites for Air Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Baker, Frederick S; Tsouris, Costas; McFarlane, Joanna

    2008-03-01

    In continuation of the development of composite materials for air separation based on molecular sieving properties and magnetic fields effects, several molecular sieve materials were tested in a flow system, and the effects of temperature, flow conditions, and magnetic fields were investigated. New carbon materials adsorbents, with and without pre-loaded super-paramagnetic nanoparticles of Fe3O4 were synthesized; all materials were packed in chromatographic type columns which were placed between the poles of a high intensity, water-cooled, magnet (1.5 Tesla). In order to verify the existence of magnetodesorption effect, separation tests were conducted by injecting controlled volumes of air in a flow of inert gas, while the magnetic field was switched on and off. Gas composition downstream the column was analyzed by gas chromatography and by mass spectrometry. Under the conditions employed, the tests confirmed that N2 - O2 separation occurred at various degrees, depending on material's intrinsic properties, temperature and flow rate. The effect of magnetic fields, reported previously for static conditions, was not confirmed in the flow system. The best separation was obtained for zeolite 13X at sub-ambient temperatures. Future directions for the project include evaluation of a combined system, comprising carbon and zeolite molecular sieves, and testing the effect of stronger magnetic fields produced by cryogenic magnets.

  17. Effects of surface chemical properties of activated carbon modified by amino-fluorination for electric double-layer capacitor.

    PubMed

    Jung, Min-Jung; Jeong, Euigyung; Cho, Seho; Yeo, Sang Young; Lee, Young-Seak

    2012-09-01

    The surface of phenol-based activated carbon (AC) was seriatim amino-fluorinated with solution of ammonium hydroxide and hydrofluoric acid in varying ratio to fabricate electrode materials for use in an electric double-layer capacitor (EDLC). The specific capacitance of the amino-fluorinated AC-based EDLC was measured in a 1 M H(2)SO(4) electrolyte, in which it was observed that the specific capacitances increased from 215 to 389 Fg(-1) and 119 and 250 Fg(-1) with the current densities of 0.1 and 1.0 Ag(-1), respectively, in comparison with those of an untreated AC-based EDLC when the amino-fluorination was optimized via seriatim mixed solution of 7.43 mol L(-1) ammonium hydroxide and 2.06 mol L(-1) hydrofluoric acid. This enhancement of capacitance was attributed to the synergistic effects of an increased electrochemical activity due to the formation of surface N- and F-functional groups and increased, specific surface area, and mesopore volumes, all of which resulted from the amino-fluorination of the electrode material. PMID:22721788

  18. Influence of activated-carbon-supported transition metals on the decomposition of polychlorobiphenyls. Part I: Catalytic decomposition and kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yifei; Tao, Fei; Liu, Lina; Zeng, Xiaolan; Wang, Wei

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the synergism between activated carbon (AC) as a catalyst support and transition metals (TMs) is used to destroy low concentrations of PCBs. AC-supported TM catalysts were prepared according to two different methods: impregnation and ion exchange. Thermal reactions between 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB-153) and catalysts generated using AC-supported Ni or Cu ion exchange were conducted under a N2 atmosphere and resulted in a decomposition efficiency > 99.0%. Decomposition efficiency of PCB-153, the residual PCB-153 distribution, and the fingerprint characteristics of the decomposition products are investigated. Important findings include: (i) establishing a ranking of TM reactivities with respect to PCB decomposition of: Ni > Cu > Zn > Fe, (ii) PCB degradation reactions proceed via adsorption, reaction, and desorption, (iii) for ion-exchange-type catalysts, the activation energy order was IRNi-C < IRCu-C < IRZn-C < IRFe-C, which matches the order of the catalytic effects of the catalyst.

  19. AC-1001 H3 CDR peptide induces apoptosis and signs of autophagy in vitro and exhibits antimetastatic activity in a syngeneic melanoma model.

    PubMed

    Rabaça, Aline N; Arruda, Denise C; Figueiredo, Carlos R; Massaoka, Mariana H; Farias, Camyla F; Tada, Dayane B; Maia, Vera C; Silva Junior, Pedro I; Girola, Natalia; Real, Fernando; Mortara, Renato A; Polonelli, Luciano; Travassos, Luiz R

    2016-09-01

    Antibody-derived peptides modulate functions of the immune system and are a source of anti-infective and antitumor substances. Recent studies have shown that they comprise amino acid sequences of immunoglobulin complementarity-determining regions, but also fragments of constant regions. VH CDR3 of murine mAb AC-1001 displays antimetastatic activities using B16F10-Nex2 murine melanoma cells in a syngeneic model. The peptide was cytotoxic in vitro in murine and human melanoma cells inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis by the intrinsic pathway. Signs of autophagy were also suggested by the increased expression of LC3/LC3II and Beclin 1 and by ultrastructural evidence. AC-1001 H3 bound to both G- and F-actin and inhibited tumor cell migration. These results are important evidence of the antitumor activity of Ig CDR-derived peptides. PMID:27642552

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF ACTIVATED CARBONS FROM COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    Prof. Harold H. Schobert; Dr. M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Ms. Zhe Lu

    2001-09-29

    The implementation of increasingly stringent Clean Air Act Regulations by the coal utility industry has resulted in an increase in the concentration of unburned carbon in coal combustion fly ash. In 1999, around 6 million tons of unburned carbon were disposed in the US, due to the present lack of efficient routes for its utilization. However, unburned carbon is a potential precursor for the production of adsorbent carbons, since it has gone through a devolatilization process while in the combustor, and therefore, only requires to be activated. Accordingly, this report evaluates and compares several routes for the production of activated carbons from unburned carbon, including physical activation with steam or CO{sub 2}, and chemical activation using KOH pretreatment. During the present reporting period (June 30, 2000--June 29, 2001), Task 1 ''Procurement and characterization of CCBPs'' was concluded, including samples from pulverized utility boilers, a utility cyclone unit equipped with a beneficiation technology, a suspension-fired research boiler, and a class C fly ash. The characterization studies showed that the samples collected have significantly different carbon contents, as determined by the ASTM C114 procedure, with the sample from the cyclone unit containing the highest carbon content (LOI of {approx} 80%), since this unit has been retrofitted with a technology to separate the unburned carbon from the fly ash. The porosity of the samples assembled was characterized by N{sub 2} adsorption isotherms at 77K. The surface areas of the class F fly ash samples from pulverized coal combustors are between 30-40 m{sup 2}/g, while the samples from the suspension-fired research boiler had surface area around 115 m{sup 2}/g. As expected, the surface areas of the class C ash is much higher than that of the class F ashes, with values up to 390 m{sup 2}/g. In addition, during the current reporting period, also Task 2 ''Development of activated carbons'' and Task 3

  1. Porous texture evolution in Nomex-derived activated carbon fibers.

    PubMed

    Villar-Rodil, S; Denoyel, R; Rouquerol, J; Martínez-Alonso, A; Tascón, J M D

    2002-08-01

    In the present work, the textural evolution of a series of activated carbon fibers with increasing burn-off degree, prepared by the pyrolysis and steam activation of Nomex aramid fibers, is followed by measurements of physical adsorption of N(2) (77 K) and CO(2) (273 K) and immersion calorimetry into different liquids (dichloromethane, benzene, cyclohexane). The immersion calorimetry results are discussed in depth, paying special attention to the choice of the reference material. The activated carbon fibers studied possess an essentially homogeneous microporous texture, which suggests that these materials may be applied in gas separation, either directly or with additional CVD treatment. PMID:16290775

  2. A comparison of the electrochemical behavior of carbon aerogels and activated carbon fiber cloths

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, T.D.; Alviso, C.T.; Hulsey, S.S.; Nielsen, J.K.; Pekala, R.W.

    1996-05-10

    Electrochemical capacitative behavior of carbon aerogels and commercial carbon fiber cloths was studied in 5M KOH, 3M sulfuric acid, and 0.5M tetrethylammonium tetrafluoroborate/propylene carbonate electrolytes. The resorcinol-formaldehyde based carbon aerogels with a range of denisty (0.2-0.85 g/cc) have open-cell structures with ultrafine pore sizes (5-50 nm), high surface area (400-700 m{sup 2}/g), and a solid matrix composed of interconnected particles or fibers with characteristic diameters of 10 nm. The commercial fiber cloths in the density range 0.2-04g/cc have high surface areas (1000-2500 m{sup 2}/g). The volumetric capacitances of high-density aerogels are shown to be comparable to or exceeding those from activated carbon fibers. Electrochemical behavior of these materials in various electrolytes is compared and related to their physical properties.

  3. [Comparison study on adsorption of middle molecular substances with multiwalled carbon nanotubes and activated carbon].

    PubMed

    Li, Guifeng; Wan, Jianxin; Huang, Xiangqian; Zeng, Qiao; Tang, Jing

    2011-08-01

    In recent years, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCTs) are very favorable to the adsorption of middle molecular substances in the hemoperfusion because of their multiporous structure, large surface area and high reactivity, which are beneficial to the excellent absorption properties. The purpose of this study was to study the MWCTs on the adsorption capacity of the middle molecular substances. Vitamin B12 (VB12) was selected as a model of the middle molecular substances. The morphologies of MWCTs and activated carbon from commercial "carbon kidney" were observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The adsorption behavior of VB12 was compared to each other with UV-visible absorption spectra. The MWCTs formed a sophistaicate gap structure, and compared to the activated carbon, MWCTs had a larger surface area. By Langmuir equation and Freundlich equation fitting analysis, VB12 adsorption on MWCTs is fit for multi-molecular layer adsorption, and the adsorption type of activated carbon is more inclined to the model corresponding to Langmuir monolayer adsorption. The adsorption rate of MWCTs is faster than that of the activated carbon and the adsorption capacity is greater, which could be expected to become the new adsorbent in the hemoperfusion. PMID:21936376

  4. Bacteria associated with granular activated carbon particles in drinking water.

    PubMed Central

    Camper, A K; LeChevallier, M W; Broadaway, S C; McFeters, G A

    1986-01-01

    A sampling protocol was developed to examine particles released from granular activated carbon filter beds. A gauze filter/Swinnex procedure was used to collect carbon fines from 201 granular activated carbon-treated drinking water samples over 12 months. Application of a homogenization procedure (developed previously) indicated that 41.4% of the water samples had heterotrophic plate count bacteria attached to carbon particles. With the enumeration procedures described, heterotrophic plate count bacteria were recovered at an average rate of 8.6 times higher than by conventional analyses. Over 17% of the samples contained carbon particles colonized with coliform bacteria as enumerated with modified most-probable-number and membrane filter techniques. In some instances coliform recoveries were 122 to 1,194 times higher than by standard procedures. Nearly 28% of the coliforms attached to these particles in drinking water exhibited the fecal biotype. Scanning electron micrographs of carbon fines from treated drinking water showed microcolonies of bacteria on particle surfaces. These data indicate that bacteria attached to carbon fines may be an important mechanism by which microorganisms penetrate treatment barriers and enter potable water supplies. PMID:3767356

  5. FENTON-DRIVEN REGENERATION OF GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON: A TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Fenton-driven mechanism for regenerating spent granular activated carbon (GAC) involves the combined, synergistic use of two reliable and well established treatment technologies - adsorption onto activated carbon and Fenton oxidation. During carbon adsorption treatment, enviro...

  6. Biofuel intercropping effects on soil carbon and microbial activity.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Michael S; Leggett, Zakiya H; Sucre, Eric B; Bradford, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Biofuels will help meet rising demands for energy and, ideally, limit climate change associated with carbon losses from the biosphere to atmosphere. Biofuel management must therefore maximize energy production and maintain ecosystem carbon stocks. Increasingly, there is interest in intercropping biofuels with other crops, partly because biofuel production on arable land might reduce availability and increase the price of food. One intercropping approach involves growing biofuel grasses in forest plantations. Grasses differ from trees in both their organic inputs to soils and microbial associations. These differences are associated with losses of soil carbon when grasses become abundant in forests. We investigated how intercropping switchgrass (Panicum virgalum), a major candidate for cellulosic biomass production, in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) plantations affects soil carbon, nitrogen, and microbial dynamics. Our design involved four treatments: two pine management regimes where harvest residues (i.e., biomass) were left in place or removed, and two switchgrass regimes where the grass was grown with pine under the same two biomass scenarios (left or removed). Soil variables were measured in four 1-ha replicate plots in the first and second year following switchgrass planting. Under switchgrass intercropping, pools of mineralizable and particulate organic matter carbon were 42% and 33% lower, respectively. These declines translated into a 21% decrease in total soil carbon in the upper 15 cm of the soil profile, during early stand development. The switchgrass effect, however, was isolated to the interbed region where switchgrass is planted. In these regions, switchgrass-induced reductions in soil carbon pools with 29%, 43%, and 24% declines in mineralizable, particulate, and total soil carbon, respectively. Our results support the idea that grass inputs to forests can prime the activity of soil organic carbon degrading microbes, leading to net reductions in stocks

  7. Treatment of activated carbon to enhance catalytic activity for reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, B.J.; Rhee, H.K. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Lee, J.K.; Park, D. )

    1994-11-01

    Catalytic activity of activated carbon treated with various techniques was examined in a fixed bed reactor for the reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia at 150 C. Activated carbon derived from coconut shell impregnated with an aqueous solution of ammonium sulfate, further treated with sulfuric acid, dried at 120 C, and then heated in an inert gas stream at 400 C, showed the highest catalytic activity within the range of experimental conditions. The enhancement of catalytic activity of modified activated carbon could be attributed to the increase in the amount of oxygen function groups which increased the adsorption site for ammonia. Catalytic activity of activated carbons depended on the surface area and the oxygen content as well.

  8. Decolorization of Cheddar cheese whey by activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Campbell, Rachel; Drake, MaryAnne; Zhong, Qixin

    2015-05-01

    Colored Cheddar whey is a source for whey protein recovery and is decolorized conventionally by bleaching, which affects whey protein quality. Two activated carbons were studied in the present work as physical means of removing annatto (norbixin) in Cheddar cheese whey. The color and residual norbixin content of Cheddar whey were reduced by a higher level of activated carbon at a higher temperature between 25 and 55°C and a longer time. Activated carbon applied at 40g/L for 2h at 30°C was more effective than bleaching by 500mg/L of hydrogen peroxide at 68°C. The lowered temperature in activated-carbon treatments had less effect on protein structure as investigated for fluorescence spectroscopy and volatile compounds, particularly oxidation products, based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Activated carbon was also reusable, removing more than 50% norbixin even after 10 times of regeneration, which showed great potential for decolorizing cheese whey. PMID:25704972

  9. Decolorization of Cheddar cheese whey by activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Campbell, Rachel; Drake, MaryAnne; Zhong, Qixin

    2015-05-01

    Colored Cheddar whey is a source for whey protein recovery and is decolorized conventionally by bleaching, which affects whey protein quality. Two activated carbons were studied in the present work as physical means of removing annatto (norbixin) in Cheddar cheese whey. The color and residual norbixin content of Cheddar whey were reduced by a higher level of activated carbon at a higher temperature between 25 and 55°C and a longer time. Activated carbon applied at 40g/L for 2h at 30°C was more effective than bleaching by 500mg/L of hydrogen peroxide at 68°C. The lowered temperature in activated-carbon treatments had less effect on protein structure as investigated for fluorescence spectroscopy and volatile compounds, particularly oxidation products, based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Activated carbon was also reusable, removing more than 50% norbixin even after 10 times of regeneration, which showed great potential for decolorizing cheese whey.

  10. Breakthrough CO₂ adsorption in bio-based activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Shahkarami, Sepideh; Azargohar, Ramin; Dalai, Ajay K; Soltan, Jafar

    2015-08-01

    In this work, the effects of different methods of activation on CO2 adsorption performance of activated carbon were studied. Activated carbons were prepared from biochar, obtained from fast pyrolysis of white wood, using three different activation methods of steam activation, CO2 activation and Potassium hydroxide (KOH) activation. CO2 adsorption behavior of the produced activated carbons was studied in a fixed-bed reactor set-up at atmospheric pressure, temperature range of 25-65°C and inlet CO2 concentration range of 10-30 mol% in He to determine the effects of the surface area, porosity and surface chemistry on adsorption capacity of the samples. Characterization of the micropore and mesopore texture was carried out using N2 and CO2 adsorption at 77 and 273 K, respectively. Central composite design was used to evaluate the combined effects of temperature and concentration of CO2 on the adsorption behavior of the adsorbents. The KOH activated carbon with a total micropore volume of 0.62 cm(3)/g and surface area of 1400 m(2)/g had the highest CO2 adsorption capacity of 1.8 mol/kg due to its microporous structure and high surface area under the optimized experimental conditions of 30 mol% CO2 and 25°C. The performance of the adsorbents in multi-cyclic adsorption process was also assessed and the adsorption capacity of KOH and CO2 activated carbons remained remarkably stable after 50 cycles with low temperature (160°C) regeneration.

  11. Established and potential physiological roles of bicarbonate-sensing soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) in aquatic animals

    PubMed Central

    Tresguerres, Martin; Barott, Katie L.; Barron, Megan E.; Roa, Jinae N.

    2014-01-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a recently recognized source of the signaling molecule cyclic AMP (cAMP) that is genetically and biochemically distinct from the classic G-protein-regulated transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs). Mammalian sAC is distributed throughout the cytoplasm and it may be present in the nucleus and inside mitochondria. sAC activity is directly stimulated by HCO3−, and sAC has been confirmed to be a HCO3− sensor in a variety of mammalian cell types. In addition, sAC can functionally associate with carbonic anhydrases to act as a de facto sensor of pH and CO2. The two catalytic domains of sAC are related to HCO3−-regulated adenylyl cyclases from cyanobacteria, suggesting the cAMP pathway is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for sensing CO2 levels and/or acid/base conditions. Reports of sAC in aquatic animals are still limited but are rapidly accumulating. In shark gills, sAC senses blood alkalosis and triggers compensatory H+ absorption. In the intestine of bony fishes, sAC modulates NaCl and water absorption. And in sea urchin sperm, sAC may participate in the initiation of flagellar movement and in the acrosome reaction. Bioinformatics and RT-PCR results reveal that sAC orthologs are present in most animal phyla. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the physiological roles of sAC in aquatic animals and suggests additional functions in which sAC may be involved. PMID:24574382

  12. Established and potential physiological roles of bicarbonate-sensing soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) in aquatic animals.

    PubMed

    Tresguerres, Martin; Barott, Katie L; Barron, Megan E; Roa, Jinae N

    2014-03-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a recently recognized source of the signaling molecule cyclic AMP (cAMP) that is genetically and biochemically distinct from the classic G-protein-regulated transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs). Mammalian sAC is distributed throughout the cytoplasm and it may be present in the nucleus and inside mitochondria. sAC activity is directly stimulated by HCO3(-), and sAC has been confirmed to be a HCO3(-) sensor in a variety of mammalian cell types. In addition, sAC can functionally associate with carbonic anhydrases to act as a de facto sensor of pH and CO2. The two catalytic domains of sAC are related to HCO3(-)-regulated adenylyl cyclases from cyanobacteria, suggesting the cAMP pathway is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for sensing CO2 levels and/or acid/base conditions. Reports of sAC in aquatic animals are still limited but are rapidly accumulating. In shark gills, sAC senses blood alkalosis and triggers compensatory H(+) absorption. In the intestine of bony fishes, sAC modulates NaCl and water absorption. And in sea urchin sperm, sAC may participate in the initiation of flagellar movement and in the acrosome reaction. Bioinformatics and RT-PCR results reveal that sAC orthologs are present in most animal phyla. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the physiological roles of sAC in aquatic animals and suggests additional functions in which sAC may be involved. PMID:24574382

  13. Muc5ac gastric mucin glycosylation is shaped by FUT2 activity and functionally impacts Helicobacter pylori binding

    PubMed Central

    Magalhãe