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Sample records for active catalyst species

  1. Population and hierarchy of active species in gold iron oxide catalysts for carbon monoxide oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qian; Freakley, Simon J.; Edwards, Jennifer K.; Carley, Albert F.; Borisevich, Albina Y.; Mineo, Yuki; Haruta, Masatake; Hutchings, Graham J.; Kiely, Christopher J.

    2016-09-01

    The identity of active species in supported gold catalysts for low temperature carbon monoxide oxidation remains an unsettled debate. With large amounts of experimental evidence supporting theories of either gold nanoparticles or sub-nm gold species being active, it was recently proposed that a size-dependent activity hierarchy should exist. Here we study the diverging catalytic behaviours after heat treatment of Au/FeOx materials prepared via co-precipitation and deposition precipitation methods. After ruling out any support effects, the gold particle size distributions in different catalysts are quantitatively studied using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). A counting protocol is developed to reveal the true particle size distribution from HAADF-STEM images, which reliably includes all the gold species present. Correlation of the populations of the various gold species present with catalysis results demonstrate that a size-dependent activity hierarchy must exist in the Au/FeOx catalyst.

  2. Population and hierarchy of active species in gold iron oxide catalysts for carbon monoxide oxidation

    PubMed Central

    He, Qian; Freakley, Simon J.; Edwards, Jennifer K.; Carley, Albert F.; Borisevich, Albina Y.; Mineo, Yuki; Haruta, Masatake; Hutchings, Graham J.; Kiely, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    The identity of active species in supported gold catalysts for low temperature carbon monoxide oxidation remains an unsettled debate. With large amounts of experimental evidence supporting theories of either gold nanoparticles or sub-nm gold species being active, it was recently proposed that a size-dependent activity hierarchy should exist. Here we study the diverging catalytic behaviours after heat treatment of Au/FeOx materials prepared via co-precipitation and deposition precipitation methods. After ruling out any support effects, the gold particle size distributions in different catalysts are quantitatively studied using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). A counting protocol is developed to reveal the true particle size distribution from HAADF-STEM images, which reliably includes all the gold species present. Correlation of the populations of the various gold species present with catalysis results demonstrate that a size-dependent activity hierarchy must exist in the Au/FeOx catalyst. PMID:27671143

  3. Catalyst activator

    DOEpatents

    McAdon, Mark H.; Nickias, Peter N.; Marks, Tobin J.; Schwartz, David J.

    2001-01-01

    A catalyst activator particularly adapted for use in the activation of metal complexes of metals of Group 3-10 for polymerization of ethylenically unsaturated polymerizable monomers, especially olefins, comprising two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms and a ligand structure including at least one bridging group connecting ligands on the two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms.

  4. Population and hierarchy of active species in gold iron oxide catalysts for carbon monoxide oxidation

    DOE PAGES

    He, Qian; Freakley, Simon J.; Edwards, Jennifer K.; Carley, Albert F.; Borisevich, Albina Y.; Mineo, Yuki; Haruta, Masatake; Hutchings, Graham J.; Kiely, Christopher J.

    2016-09-27

    The identity of active species in supported gold catalysts for low temperature carbon monoxide oxidation remains an unsettled debate. With large amounts of experimental evidence supporting theories of either gold nanoparticles or sub-nm gold species being active, it was recently proposed that a size-dependent activity hierarchy should exist. Here we study the diverging catalytic behaviors after heat treatment of Au/FeOx materials prepared via co-precipitation and deposition precipitation methods. After ruling out any support effects, the gold particle size distributions in different catalysts are quantitatively studied using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). A counting protocol is developed to revealmore » the true particle size distribution from HAADF-STEM images, which reliably includes all the gold species present. As a result, correlation of the populations of the various gold species present with catalysis results demonstrate that a size-dependent activity hierarchy must exist in the Au/FeOx catalyst.« less

  5. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts.

    PubMed

    Varnell, Jason A; Tse, Edmund C M; Schulz, Charles E; Fister, Tim T; Haasch, Richard T; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Gewirth, Andrew A

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites.

  6. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varnell, Jason A.; Tse, Edmund C. M.; Schulz, Charles E.; Fister, Tim T.; Haasch, Richard T.; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Gewirth, Andrew A.

    2016-08-01

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites.

  7. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Varnell, Jason A.; Tse, Edmund C. M.; Schulz, Charles E.; Fister, Tim T.; Haasch, Richard T.; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Gewirth, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites. PMID:27538720

  8. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts.

    PubMed

    Varnell, Jason A; Tse, Edmund C M; Schulz, Charles E; Fister, Tim T; Haasch, Richard T; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Gewirth, Andrew A

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites. PMID:27538720

  9. The influence of Mn species on the SO2 removal of Mn-based activated carbon catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Yi-Fan; Guo, Jia-Xiu; Chu, Ying-Hao; Sun, Ming-Chao; Yin, Hua-Qiang

    2013-10-01

    Using Mn(NO3)2 as precursor, a series of Mn-based activated carbon catalysts were prepared by ultrasound-assisted excessive impregnation method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and temperature programmed reduction (TPR). The influences of Mn species and nitric acid pretreatment on the removal role of SO2 were investigated. MnO and Mn3O4 coexist in catalysts calcined at 650 and 800 °C and exhibit best SO2 removal ability, whereas Mn2O3 formed in the catalyst calcined at 500 °C and shows poor activity. After treatment by nitric acid, the Cdbnd O of activated carbon support increases and the crystal size of MnO decreases, resulting in the enhancement of the catalytic activity. During reaction process, manganese oxides are gradually transferred into MnO2. And this change directly results in a decrease of activity. But the SO2 removal rate has been maintained in the range of 30-40%, indicating that MnO2 still has a certain SO2 removal ability.

  10. An in-depth understanding of the bimetallic effects and coked carbon species on an active bimetallic Ni(Co)/Al2O3 dry reforming catalyst.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xin; Gerdts, Rihards; Parker, Stewart F; Chi, Lina; Zhao, Yongxiang; Hill, Martyn; Guo, Junqiu; Jones, Martin O; Jiang, Zheng

    2016-06-29

    Ni/Al2O3, Co/Al2O3 and bimetallic Ni(Co)/Al2O3 catalysts were prepared using an impregnation method and employed in CO2 dry reforming of methane under coking-favored conditions. The spent catalysts were carefully characterized using typical characterization technologies and inelastic neutron scattering spectroscopy. The bimetallic catalyst exhibited a superior activity and anti-coking performance compared to Ni/Al2O3, while the most resistant to coking behavior was Co/Al2O3. The enhanced activity of the Ni(Co)/Al2O3 bimetallic catalyst is attributed to the reduced particle size of metallic species and resistance to forming stable filamentous carbon. The overall carbon deposition on the spent bimetallic catalyst is comparable to that of the spent Ni/Al2O3 catalyst, whereas the carbon deposited on the bimetallic catalyst is mainly less-stable carbonaceous species as confirmed by SEM, TPO, Raman and INS characterization. This study provides an in depth understanding of alloy effects in catalysts, the chemical nature of coked carbon on spent Ni-based catalysts and, hopefully, inspires the creative design of a new bimetallic catalyst for dry reforming reactions. PMID:27326792

  11. An in-depth understanding of the bimetallic effects and coked carbon species on an active bimetallic Ni(Co)/Al2O3 dry reforming catalyst.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xin; Gerdts, Rihards; Parker, Stewart F; Chi, Lina; Zhao, Yongxiang; Hill, Martyn; Guo, Junqiu; Jones, Martin O; Jiang, Zheng

    2016-06-29

    Ni/Al2O3, Co/Al2O3 and bimetallic Ni(Co)/Al2O3 catalysts were prepared using an impregnation method and employed in CO2 dry reforming of methane under coking-favored conditions. The spent catalysts were carefully characterized using typical characterization technologies and inelastic neutron scattering spectroscopy. The bimetallic catalyst exhibited a superior activity and anti-coking performance compared to Ni/Al2O3, while the most resistant to coking behavior was Co/Al2O3. The enhanced activity of the Ni(Co)/Al2O3 bimetallic catalyst is attributed to the reduced particle size of metallic species and resistance to forming stable filamentous carbon. The overall carbon deposition on the spent bimetallic catalyst is comparable to that of the spent Ni/Al2O3 catalyst, whereas the carbon deposited on the bimetallic catalyst is mainly less-stable carbonaceous species as confirmed by SEM, TPO, Raman and INS characterization. This study provides an in depth understanding of alloy effects in catalysts, the chemical nature of coked carbon on spent Ni-based catalysts and, hopefully, inspires the creative design of a new bimetallic catalyst for dry reforming reactions.

  12. [Active oxygen species of Co-V-O catalysts in propane oxidative dehydrogenation analyzed by FTIR and XPS spectra].

    PubMed

    Xu, Ai-Ju; Lin, Qin; Bao, Zhaorigetu; Jia, Mei-Lin; Liu, Lian-Yun

    2009-02-01

    A series of Co-V-O (meta-CoV2O6, pyro-Co2 V2 O7, and ortho-Co3 V2 O8) catalysts were prepared by microwave oxalate co-precipitation method and characterized by (XRD), TEM, BET, FTIR, XPS, H2-TPR and conductivity measurement. The catalytic characters of the catalysts for propane oxidative dehydrogenation were investigated. The FTIR spectra of catalysts were obtained in the range of 400-1 100 cm(-1) and their major bands were assigned. The peak separation fitting of O(1s) XPS spectra was carried out and the quantity of oxygen species was calculated. The results of XRD characterization showed that pure meta-CoV2O6, pyro-Co2 V2O7, and ortho-Co3 V2O8 with nice structure were obtained. The TEM images demonstrated that the catalysts showed uniform particle with the mean particle size of 20-30 nm. The diagram of the relationship between electrical conductivity and oxygen partial pressure of Co3V2O8 and Co2 V2O7 showed dsigma/dPo2 > 0, which implied that these were p-type semiconductor, and CoV2O6 reverse showed dsigma/dPo2 < 0, which implied n-type semiconductor. 48.12%, 47.82% and 35.24% of C3 H6 selectivities were obtained for p-type semiconductor Co3 V2O8, CO2 V2O7 and n-type CoV2O6 catalysts respectively at 10% C3H6 conversion, and the results showed that p-type semiconductor catalysts Co3 V2O8 and Co2 V2O7 showed higher activity than n-type catalyst CoV2O6. The results of FTIR, XPS, H2-TPR and conductivity measurement indicated that transferring between non-stoichiometric and lattice oxygen that easily happened in Co3 V2O8 and Co2 V2O7 catalysts might promote the oxidation-reduction reaction between different valence vanadium species, and promoted the oxygen vacancy formation. Furthermore, the forming of Co-O-V bridge bond that was easy to shift between Co and V increased the mobile oxygen species of O2-, O2(2-) and O- and made the redox reaction among different valence V be realized. It is concluded that high catalytic properties of p-type semiconductor Co3 V2O8 and

  13. Availability of surface boron species in improved oxygen reduction activity of Pt catalysts: A first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Libo; Zhou, Gang

    2016-04-14

    The oxidation process of boron (B) species on the Pt(111) surface and the beneficial effects of boron oxides on the oxygen reduction activity are investigated by first-principles calculations. The single-atom B anchored on the Pt surface has a great attraction for the oxygen species in the immediate environment. With the dissociation of molecular oxygen, a series of boron oxides is formed in succession, both indicating exothermic oxidation reactions. After BO2 is formed, the subsequent O atom immediately participates in the oxygen reduction reaction. The calculated O adsorption energy is appreciably decreased as compared to Pt catalysts, and more approximate to the optimal value of the volcano plot, from which is clear that O hydrogenation kinetics is improved. The modulation mechanism is mainly based on the electron-deficient nature of stable boron oxides, which normally reduces available electronic states of surface Pt atoms that bind the O by facilitating more electron transfer. This modification strategy from the exterior opens the new way, different from the alloying, to efficient electrocatalyst design for PEMFCs. PMID:27083744

  14. Availability of surface boron species in improved oxygen reduction activity of Pt catalysts: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Libo; Zhou, Gang

    2016-04-01

    The oxidation process of boron (B) species on the Pt(111) surface and the beneficial effects of boron oxides on the oxygen reduction activity are investigated by first-principles calculations. The single-atom B anchored on the Pt surface has a great attraction for the oxygen species in the immediate environment. With the dissociation of molecular oxygen, a series of boron oxides is formed in succession, both indicating exothermic oxidation reactions. After BO2 is formed, the subsequent O atom immediately participates in the oxygen reduction reaction. The calculated O adsorption energy is appreciably decreased as compared to Pt catalysts, and more approximate to the optimal value of the volcano plot, from which is clear that O hydrogenation kinetics is improved. The modulation mechanism is mainly based on the electron-deficient nature of stable boron oxides, which normally reduces available electronic states of surface Pt atoms that bind the O by facilitating more electron transfer. This modification strategy from the exterior opens the new way, different from the alloying, to efficient electrocatalyst design for PEMFCs.

  15. Organometallic model complexes elucidate the active gallium species in alkane dehydrogenation catalysts based on ligand effects in Ga K-edge XANES

    SciTech Connect

    Getsoian, Andrew “Bean”; Das, Ujjal; Camacho-Bunquin, Jeffrey; Zhang, Guanghui; Gallagher, James R.; Hu, Bo; Cheah, Singfoong; Schaidle, Joshua A.; Ruddy, Daniel A.; Hensley, Jesse E.; Krause, Theodore R.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Hock, Adam S.

    2016-01-01

    Gallium-modified zeolites are known catalysts for the dehydrogenation of alkanes, reactivity that finds industrial application in the aromatization of light alkanes by Ga-ZSM5. While the role of gallium cations in alkane activation is well known, the oxidation state and coordination environment of gallium under reaction conditions has been the subject of debate. Edge shifts in Ga K-edge XANES spectra acquired under reaction conditions have long been interpreted as evidence for reduction of Ga(III) to Ga(I). However, a change in oxidation state is not the only factor that can give rise to a change in the XANES spectrum. In order to better understand the XANES spectra of working catalysts, we have synthesized a series of molecular model compounds and grafted surface organometallic Ga species and compared their XANES spectra to those of gallium-based catalysts acquired under reducing conditions. We demonstrate that changes in the identity and number of gallium nearest neighbors can give rise to changes in XANES spectra similar to those attributed in literature to changes in oxidation state. Specifically, spectral features previously attributed to Ga(I) may be equally well interpreted as evidence for low-coordinate Ga(III) alkyl or hydride species. These findings apply both to gallium-impregnated zeolite catalysts and to silica-supported single site gallium catalysts, the latter of which is found to be active and selective for dehydrogenation of propane and hydrogenation of propylene.

  16. Structure-activity relationship of Cr/Ti-PILC catalysts using a pre-modification method for NO oxidation and their surface species study.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Lei; Yu, Yang; Cai, Wei; Geng, Xinxin; Zhong, Qin

    2015-06-14

    The performances of Cr/Ti-PILC catalysts, which were prepared by the pre-modification method, are studied for the selective catalytic oxidation of NO. The aim of this paper is to elucidate the detailed relationship between physical nanoparticle structure and chemical properties. The maximum NO conversion over the Cr-HP(3)/TP catalyst reached 71.4% at 280 °C. The catalysts were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), temperature-programmed reduction of H2 (H2-TPR), temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) techniques. The characterization results demonstrated that the enhanced catalytic activity was ascribed to several beneficial effects, which were caused by the pre-modification such as the inhibition of crystallite size, improvement of Cr species dispersion and increase of the amount of active sites. XPS and FTIR experiments indicated that two Cr(VI) species, oxidized state CrO3 and chromate species with the anionic form, were generated via pre-modification, which played different roles in the catalytic reaction. In addition, the TPR and TPD results suggest that the increased active sites (Cr(VI) species) were conducive for the preferential adsorption and activation of NO. Furthermore, DRIFTS results revealed that the intermediates, NO(+) and nitrates, interacted quickly to generate gaseous NO2.

  17. Hydrogen activation by magnesia catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Yulin Gu; Brenner, A. )

    1992-07-01

    Hydrogen activation by magnesia catalysts was investigated by studying H{sub 2}-D{sub 2} exchange. The number of active sites, surface composition, rate, and mechanism of the reaction were investigated as a function of the activation temperature. Behavior of a commercial magnesia and a catalyst synthesized from Mg(OH){sub 2} were similar, although the latter catalyst had a much larger surface area. The upper limit for the number of active sites was determined in the classical manner by using selective poisoning by CO. A novel technique involving monitoring the stoichiometric reaction between magnesia and D{sub 2}(g) enabled the very unusual determination of the lower limit for the number of active sites. Thus, the true number of active sites is bracketed within the upper and lower limits. Maximal activity occurred after activation at 700 C. The number of active sites is about 10{sup 12}/cm{sup 2}, which is 10{sup 3}-fold higher than formerly reported on the basis of EPR data. The turnover frequency at 273 K and a partial pressure of 20 Torr of an equimolar mixture of H{sub 2}-D{sub 2} is 4 s{sup {minus}1}, roughly 10{sup 3}-fold less than previously reported. The site density and activity are now consistent with expected values, rather than the anomalous values previously reported. The hydroxyl coverage of the surface was determined in a novel manner using thermogravimetric analysis over the temperature range of 300 to 1,400 K. The catalysts are of low activity when the surface is either of very high or very low hydroxyl content. A mechanism in which the active site includes an ensemble consisting of a Mg{sup 2+} center and neighboring surface OH and O{sup 2{minus}} is proposed.

  18. In Situ Observation of Active Oxygen Species in Fe-Containing Ni-Based Oxygen Evolution Catalysts: The Effect of pH on Electrochemical Activity.

    PubMed

    Trześniewski, Bartek J; Diaz-Morales, Oscar; Vermaas, David A; Longo, Alessandro; Bras, Wim; Koper, Marc T M; Smith, Wilson A

    2015-12-01

    Ni-based oxygen evolution catalysts (OECs) are cost-effective and very active materials that can be potentially used for efficient solar-to-fuel conversion process toward sustainable energy generation. We present a systematic spectroelectrochemical characterization of two Fe-containing Ni-based OECs, namely nickel borate (Ni(Fe)-B(i)) and nickel oxyhydroxide (Ni(Fe)OOH). Our Raman and X-ray absorption spectroscopy results show that both OECs are chemically similar, and that the borate anions do not play an apparent role in the catalytic process at pH 13. Furthermore, we show spectroscopic evidence for the generation of negatively charged sites in both OECs (NiOO(-)), which can be described as adsorbed "active oxygen". Our data conclusively links the OER activity of the Ni-based OECs with the generation of those sites on the surface of the OECs. The OER activity of both OECs is strongly pH dependent, which can be attributed to a deprotonation process of the Ni-based OECs, leading to the formation of the negatively charged surface sites that act as OER precursors. This work emphasizes the relevance of the electrolyte effect to obtain catalytically active phases in Ni-based OECs, in addition to the key role of the Fe impurities. This effect should be carefully considered in the development of Ni-based compounds meant to catalyze the OER at moderate pHs. Complementarily, UV-vis spectroscopy measurements show strong darkening of those catalysts in the catalytically active state. This coloration effect is directly related to the oxidation of nickel and can be an important factor limiting the efficiency of solar-driven devices utilizing Ni-based OECs.

  19. Effect of catalyst preparation on catalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Design parameters have been identified for Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts prepared by wet impregnation and incipient wetness from nickel nitrate solution in contact with a {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} support. The metal dispersion, activity for C{sub 1}, C{sub 2}, and C{sub 3} formation under synthesis conditions, and the carbon deposited during reaction have been shown to be predictable based solely on the properties of the electrolytes from which these catalysts were formed. Regardless of the method of preparation, NiAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} was found to be the only active Ni species on low weight loading Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts; both Ni and NiAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} are present on high weight loading catalysts. The high-temperature methane peak observed only from CO-TRP spectra of low weight loading catalysts is due to NiAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}; the low-temperature peak that appears as the weight loading is increased is due to Ni. Steady-state reaction kinetics for CH{sub 4} production yield activation energies which increase with increasing weight loading. The apparent activation energies for catalysts with a single methane peak in their CO-TPR spectra were found to be normally distributed. The apparent activation energies for catalysts with two methane peaks in their CO-TPR spectra were found to also be normally distributed when the method of preparation was considered in testing the statistical nature of the distribution. Titration experiments of the carbon pool subsequent to steady-state reaction of H{sub 2} and CO in conjunction with temperature-programmed surface reaction were used to asses the impact of Ni speciation on the rate-determining in step in the methanation reaction. In situ ESCA experiments and microreactor studies were used to examined the existence of metal-support interaction between dispersed Ni and the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} carrier.

  20. Investigating the performance of CoxOy/activated carbon catalysts for ethyl acetate catalytic combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hongmei; Zhao, Xiaoping; Zhou, Guilin; He, Xiaoling; Lan, Hai; Jiang, Zongxuan

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic properties of Co-supported activated carbon (AC) catalysts for ethyl acetate catalytic elimination in air were investigated. Results showed that air atmosphere promoted the generation of high-valence state cobalt oxides, and promote the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the Co3O4/AC catalyst. ROS crucially functioned in improving the catalytic activity of Co3O4/AC catalysts. Therefore, CoACA catalyst prepared in air exhibited higher catalytic activity than CoACN catalyst prepared in nitrogen, and CoACA catalyst led to high ethyl acetate conversion (>93%) and stability at a low reaction temperature (210 °C).

  1. Highly Stable and Active Catalyst for Sabatier Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Jianli; Brooks, Kriston P.

    2012-01-01

    Highly active Ru/TiO2 catalysts for Sabatier reaction have been developed. The catalysts have shown to be stable under repeated shutting down/startup conditions. When the Ru/TiO2 catalyst is coated on the engineered substrate Fe-CrAlY felt, activity enhancement is more than doubled when compared with an identically prepared engineered catalyst made from commercial Degussa catalyst. Also, bimetallic Ru-Rh/TiO2 catalysts show high activity at high throughput.

  2. Immobilisation of homogeneous olefin polymerisation catalysts. Factors influencing activity and stability.

    PubMed

    Severn, John R; Chadwick, John C

    2013-07-01

    The activity and stability of homogeneous olefin polymerisation catalysts, when immobilised on a support, are dependent on both chemical and physical effects. Chemical factors affecting catalyst activity include the ease of formation of the active species, which is strongly dependent on the transition metal. Catalyst productivity is dependent on the balance between activity and stability. Immobilisation can lead to a lower proportion of active species and therefore lower initial polymerisation activity, but nevertheless give higher polymer yields in cases where increased catalyst stability is obtained. Important physical factors are support porosity and the ability of a support to undergo progressive fragmentation during polymerisation, facilitating monomer diffusion through the growing catalyst/polymer particle. This article illustrates the importance of these factors in olefin polymerisation with both early- and late-transition metal catalysts, with particular reference to the use of silica and magnesium chloride supports as well as to effects of immobilisation on polymer structure and properties. PMID:23467461

  3. The Electrode as Organolithium Reagent: Catalyst-Free Covalent Attachment of Electrochemically Active Species to an Azide-Terminated Glassy Carbon Electrode Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Atanu K.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Liu, Fei; Bullock, R. Morris; Roberts, John A.

    2013-12-02

    Glassy carbon electrodes have been activated for modification with azide groups and subsequent coupling with ferrocenyl reagents by a catalyst-free route using lithium acetylide-ethylenediamine complex, and also by the more common Cu(I)-catalyzed alkyne-azide coupling (CuAAC) route, both affording high surface coverages. Electrodes were preconditioned at ambient temperature under nitrogen, and ferrocenyl surface coverages obtained by CuAAC were comparable to those reported with preconditioning at 1000 °C under hydrogen/nitrogen. The reaction of lithium acetylide-ethylenediamine with the azide-terminated electrode affords a 1,2,3-triazolyllithium-terminated surface that is active toward covalent C-C coupling reactions including displacement at an aliphatic halide and nucleophilic addition at an aldehyde. For example, surface ferrocenyl groups were introduced by reaction with (6-iodohexyl)ferrocene; the voltammetry shows narrow, symmetric peaks indicating uniform attachment. Coverages are competitive with those obtained by the CuAAC route. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic data, presented for each synthetic step, are consistent with the proposed reactions. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy. A portion of the research was performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  4. Effects of Si/Al Ratio on Cu/SSZ-13 NH3-SCR Catalysts: Implications for the active Cu species and the Roles of Brønsted Acidity

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Feng; Washton, Nancy M.; Wang, Yilin; Kollar, Marton; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2015-09-03

    Cu/SSZ-13 catalysts with three Si/Al ratios of 6, 12 and 35 were synthesized with Cu incorporation via solution ion exchange. The implications of varying Si/Al ratios on the nature of the multiple Cu species that can be present in the SSZ-13 zeolite are a major focus of this work, as highlighted by the results of a variety of catalyst characterization and reaction kinetics measurements. Specifically, catalysts were characterized with surface area/pore volume measurements, temperature programmed reduction by H2 (H2-TPR), NH3 temperature programmed desorption (NH3-TPD), and DRIFTS and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies. Catalytic properties were examined using NO oxidation, ammonia oxidation, and standard ammonia selective catalytic reduction (NH3-SCR) reactions on selected catalysts under differential conditions. Besides indicating possible variably active multiple Cu species for these reactions, the measurements are also used to untangle some of the complexities caused by the interplay between redox of Cu ion centers and Brønsted acidity. All three reactions appear to follow a redox reaction mechanism, yet the roles of Brønsted acidity are quite different. For NO oxidation, increasing Si/Al ratio lowers Cu redox barriers, thus enhancing reaction rates. Brønsted acidity appears to play essentially no role for this reaction. For standard NH3-SCR, residual Brønsted acidity plays a significant beneficial role at both low- and high-temperature regimes. For NH3 oxidation, no clear trend is observed suggesting both Cu ion center redox and Brønsted acidity play important and perhaps competing roles. The authors gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office for the support of this work. The research described in this paper was performed in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE’s Office of

  5. Support chemistry, surface area, and preparation effects on sulfided NiMo catalyst activity

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, T.J.; McLaughlin, L.I.; Sandoval, R.S.

    1996-06-01

    Hydrous Metal Oxides (HMOs) are chemically synthesized materials which contain a homogeneous distribution of ion exchangeable alkali cations that provide charge compensation to the metal-oxygen framework. In terms of the major types of inorganic ion exchangers defined by Clearfield, these amorphous HMO materials are similar to both hydrous oxides and layered oxide ion exchangers (e.g., alkali metal titanates). For catalyst applications, the HMO material serves as an ion exchangeable support which facilitates the uniform incorporation of catalyst precursor species. Following catalyst precursor incorporation, an activation step is required to convert the catalyst precursor to the desired active phase. Considerable process development activities at Sandia National Laboratories related to HMO materials have resulted in bulk hydrous titanium oxide (HTO)- and silica-doped hydrous titanium oxide (HTO:Si)-supported NiMo catalysts that are more active in model reactions which simulate direct coal liquefaction (e.g., pyrene hydrogenation) than commercial {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported NiMo catalysts. However, a fundamental explanation does not exist for the enhanced activity of these novel catalyst materials; possible reasons include fundamental differences in support chemistry relative to commercial oxides, high surface area, or catalyst preparation effects (ion exchange vs. incipient wetness impregnation techniques). The goals of this paper are to identify the key factors which control sulfided NiMo catalyst activity, including those characteristics of HTO- and HTO:Si-supported NiMo catalysts which uniquely set them apart from conventional oxide supports.

  6. Catalyst Activity Comparison of Alcohols over Zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Wang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol transformation to transportation fuel range hydrocarbon on HZSM-5 (SiO2 / Al2O3 = 30) catalyst was studied at 360oC and 300psig. Product distributions and catalyst life were compared using methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol or 1-butanol as a feed. The catalyst life for 1-propanol and 1-butanol was more than double compared to that for methanol and ethanol. For all the alcohols studied, the product distributions (classified to paraffin, olefin, napthene, aromatic and naphthalene compounds) varied with time on stream (TOS). At 24 hours TOS, liquid product from 1-propanol and 1-butanol transformation primarily contains higher olefin compounds. The alcohol transformation process to higher hydrocarbon involves a complex set of reaction pathways such as dehydration, oligomerization, dehydrocyclization, and hydrogenation. Compared to ethylene generated from methanol and ethanol, oligomerization of propylene and butylene has a lower activation energy and can readily take place on weaker acidic sites. On the other hand, dehydrocyclization of propylene and butylene to form the cyclic compounds requires the sits with stronger acid strength. Combination of the above mentioned reasons are the primary reasons for olefin rich product generated in the later stage of the time on stream and for the extended catalyst life time for 1 propanol and 1 butanol compared to methanol and ethanol conversion over HZSM-5.

  7. Process of activation of a palladium catalyst system

    DOEpatents

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly; Rossin, Joseph A.; Knapke, Michael J.

    2011-08-02

    Improved processes for activating a catalyst system used for the reduction of nitrogen oxides are provided. In one embodiment, the catalyst system is activated by passing an activation gas stream having an amount of each of oxygen, water vapor, nitrogen oxides, and hydrogen over the catalyst system and increasing a temperature of the catalyst system to a temperature of at least 180.degree. C. at a heating rate of from 1-20.degree./min. Use of activation processes described herein leads to a catalyst system with superior NOx reduction capabilities.

  8. Hydrodenitrification catalyst and a method for improving the activity of the catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, R. C.

    1985-03-12

    Hydroconversion catalysts containing Group VIII and/or Group VIB catalytically active metals on a support, and particularly those containing nickel and molybdenum on alumina, are improved in hydrodenitrification (HDN) activity by impregnation of additional molybdenum and/or tungsten carbonyls onto the catalyst by sublimation. Preferably from about 1 to 5% w molybdenum is added. The carbonyl impregnated catalyst is then dried, calcined and, generally sulfided before use in a hydrocarbon conversion process.

  9. Characterization of active sites in zeolite catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, J.; Bug, A.; Nicol, J.M.

    1997-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Atomic-level details of the interaction of adsorbed molecules with active sites in catalysts are urgently needed to facilitate development of more effective and/or environmentally benign catalysts. To this end the authors have carried out neutron scattering studies combined with theoretical calculations of the dynamics of small molecules inside the cavities of zeolite catalysts. The authors have developed the use of H{sub 2} as a probe of adsorption sites by observing the hindered rotations of the adsorbed H{sub 2} molecule, and they were able to show that an area near the four-rings is the most likely adsorption site for H{sub 2} in zeolite A while adsorption of H{sub 2} near cations located on six-ring sites decreases in strength as Ni {approximately} Co > Ca > Zn {approximately} Na. Vibrational and rotational motions of ethylene and cyclopropane adsorption complexes were used as a measure for zeolite-adsorbate interactions. Preliminary studies of the binding of water, ammonia, and methylamines were carried out in a number of related guest-host materials.

  10. Activation of catalysts for synthesizing methanol from synthesis gas

    DOEpatents

    Blum, David B.; Gelbein, Abraham P.

    1985-01-01

    A method for activating a methanol synthesis catalyst is disclosed. In this method, the catalyst is slurried in an inert liquid and is activated by a reducing gas stream. The activation step occurs in-situ. That is, it is conducted in the same reactor as is the subsequent step of synthesizing methanol from a methanol gas stream catalyzed by the activated catalyst still dispersed in a slurry.

  11. Electrolyte-dependent electrosynthesis and activity of cobalt-based water oxidation catalysts.

    PubMed

    Surendranath, Yogesh; Dinca, Mircea; Nocera, Daniel G

    2009-02-25

    Electrolysis of Co(2+) in phosphate, methylphosphonate, and borate electrolytes effects the electrodeposition of an amorphous highly active water oxidation catalyst as a thin film on an inert anode. Electrodeposition of a catalytically competent species immediately follows oxidation of Co(2+) to Co(3+) in solution. Methylphosphonate and borate electrolytes support catalyst activity comparable to that observed for phosphate. Catalytic activity for O(2) generation in aqueous solutions containing 0.5 M NaCl is retained for catalysts grown from phosphate electrolyte.

  12. Phosphine-Free EWG-Activated Ruthenium Olefin Metathesis Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grela, Karol; Szadkowska, Anna; Michrowska, Anna; Bieniek, Michal; Sashuk, Volodymyr

    Hoveyda-Grubbs catalyst has been successfully fine-tuned by us in order to increase its activity and applicability by the introduction of electron-withdrawing groups (EWGs) to diminish donor properties of the oxygen atom. As a result, the stable and easily accessible nitro-substituted Hoveyda-Grubbs catalyst has found a number of successful applications in various research and industrial laboratories. Some other EWG-activated Hoveyda-type catalysts are commercially available. The results described herewith demonstrate that the activity of ruthenium (Ru) metathesis catalysts can be enhanced by introduction of EWGs without detriment to catalysts stability. Equally noteworthy is the observation that different Ru catalysts turned out to be optimal for different applications. This shows that no single catalyst outperforms all others in all possible applications.

  13. Increasing the hydrogenation activity of commercial catalysts for selective hydrocracking

    SciTech Connect

    Khashagul`gova, N.S.; Freiman, L.L.; Zelentsov, Yu.N.

    1994-07-01

    The catalysts generally used in hydrodewaxing or selective hydrocracking of n-paraffins are zeolites with the pentasil structure: TsVK, TsVM, TsVN, and Ultrasil. For use in the production of high-quality transformer oils from paraffinic feedstocks, these catalysts have not only a high cracking activity but also an adequate hydrogenating activity. Catalysts containing a nickel-molybdenum complex (or nickel molybdate synthesized by a specific method) are higher in hydrogenating activity in comparison with catalysts in which the metals are introduced by coextrusion or impregnation. Precipitation of a nickel-molybdenum complex on a solid support (aluminosilicate or zeolite) tends to increase its hydrogenating activity, so that the content of the hydrogenating metals in the catalyst can be reduced. This report describes studies on catalysts based on TsVM and TsVN high-silica zeolites.

  14. Activation of molecular catalysts using semiconductor quantum dots

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, Thomas J.; Sykora, Milan; Klimov, Victor I.

    2011-10-04

    Photocatalytic materials based on coupling of semiconductor nanocrystalline quantum dots (NQD) and molecular catalysts. These materials have capability to drive or catalyze non-spontaneous chemical reactions in the presence of visible radiation, ultraviolet radiation, or both. The NQD functions in these materials as a light absorber and charge generator. Following light absorption, the NQD activates a molecular catalyst adsorbed on the surface of the NQD via transfer of one or more charges (either electrons or electron-holes) from the NQD to the molecular catalyst. The activated molecular catalyst can then drive a chemical reaction. A photoelectrolytic device that includes such photocatalytic materials is also described.

  15. Low Temperature Activation of Supported Metathesis Catalysts by Organosilicon Reducing Agents.

    PubMed

    Mougel, Victor; Chan, Ka-Wing; Siddiqi, Georges; Kawakita, Kento; Nagae, Haruki; Tsurugi, Hayato; Mashima, Kazushi; Safonova, Olga; Copéret, Christophe

    2016-08-24

    Alkene metathesis is a widely and increasingly used reaction in academia and industry because of its efficiency in terms of atom economy and its wide applicability. This reaction is notably responsible for the production of several million tons of propene annually. Such industrial processes rely on inexpensive silica-supported tungsten oxide catalysts, which operate at high temperatures (>350 °C), in contrast with the mild room temperature reaction conditions typically used with the corresponding molecular alkene metathesis homogeneous catalysts. This large difference in the temperature requirements is generally thought to arise from the difficulty in generating active sites (carbenes or metallacyclobutanes) in the classical metal oxide catalysts and prevents broader applicability, notably with functionalized substrates. We report here a low temperature activation process of well-defined metal oxo surface species using organosilicon reductants, which generate a large amount of active species at only 70 °C (0.6 active sites/W). This high activity at low temperature broadens the scope of these catalysts to functionalized substrates. This activation process can also be applied to classical industrial catalysts. We provide evidence for the formation of a metallacyclopentane intermediate and propose how the active species are formed.

  16. Low Temperature Activation of Supported Metathesis Catalysts by Organosilicon Reducing Agents

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Alkene metathesis is a widely and increasingly used reaction in academia and industry because of its efficiency in terms of atom economy and its wide applicability. This reaction is notably responsible for the production of several million tons of propene annually. Such industrial processes rely on inexpensive silica-supported tungsten oxide catalysts, which operate at high temperatures (>350 °C), in contrast with the mild room temperature reaction conditions typically used with the corresponding molecular alkene metathesis homogeneous catalysts. This large difference in the temperature requirements is generally thought to arise from the difficulty in generating active sites (carbenes or metallacyclobutanes) in the classical metal oxide catalysts and prevents broader applicability, notably with functionalized substrates. We report here a low temperature activation process of well-defined metal oxo surface species using organosilicon reductants, which generate a large amount of active species at only 70 °C (0.6 active sites/W). This high activity at low temperature broadens the scope of these catalysts to functionalized substrates. This activation process can also be applied to classical industrial catalysts. We provide evidence for the formation of a metallacyclopentane intermediate and propose how the active species are formed. PMID:27610418

  17. Low Temperature Activation of Supported Metathesis Catalysts by Organosilicon Reducing Agents.

    PubMed

    Mougel, Victor; Chan, Ka-Wing; Siddiqi, Georges; Kawakita, Kento; Nagae, Haruki; Tsurugi, Hayato; Mashima, Kazushi; Safonova, Olga; Copéret, Christophe

    2016-08-24

    Alkene metathesis is a widely and increasingly used reaction in academia and industry because of its efficiency in terms of atom economy and its wide applicability. This reaction is notably responsible for the production of several million tons of propene annually. Such industrial processes rely on inexpensive silica-supported tungsten oxide catalysts, which operate at high temperatures (>350 °C), in contrast with the mild room temperature reaction conditions typically used with the corresponding molecular alkene metathesis homogeneous catalysts. This large difference in the temperature requirements is generally thought to arise from the difficulty in generating active sites (carbenes or metallacyclobutanes) in the classical metal oxide catalysts and prevents broader applicability, notably with functionalized substrates. We report here a low temperature activation process of well-defined metal oxo surface species using organosilicon reductants, which generate a large amount of active species at only 70 °C (0.6 active sites/W). This high activity at low temperature broadens the scope of these catalysts to functionalized substrates. This activation process can also be applied to classical industrial catalysts. We provide evidence for the formation of a metallacyclopentane intermediate and propose how the active species are formed. PMID:27610418

  18. Low Temperature Activation of Supported Metathesis Catalysts by Organosilicon Reducing Agents

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Alkene metathesis is a widely and increasingly used reaction in academia and industry because of its efficiency in terms of atom economy and its wide applicability. This reaction is notably responsible for the production of several million tons of propene annually. Such industrial processes rely on inexpensive silica-supported tungsten oxide catalysts, which operate at high temperatures (>350 °C), in contrast with the mild room temperature reaction conditions typically used with the corresponding molecular alkene metathesis homogeneous catalysts. This large difference in the temperature requirements is generally thought to arise from the difficulty in generating active sites (carbenes or metallacyclobutanes) in the classical metal oxide catalysts and prevents broader applicability, notably with functionalized substrates. We report here a low temperature activation process of well-defined metal oxo surface species using organosilicon reductants, which generate a large amount of active species at only 70 °C (0.6 active sites/W). This high activity at low temperature broadens the scope of these catalysts to functionalized substrates. This activation process can also be applied to classical industrial catalysts. We provide evidence for the formation of a metallacyclopentane intermediate and propose how the active species are formed.

  19. Reduction of low temperature engine pollutants by understanding the exhaust species interactions in a diesel oxidation catalyst.

    PubMed

    Lefort, I; Herreros, J M; Tsolakis, A

    2014-02-18

    The interactions between exhaust gas species and their effect (promotion or inhibition) on the light-off and activity of a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) for the removal of pollutants are studied, using actual engine exhaust gases from the combustion of diesel, alternative fuels (rapeseed methyl ester and gas-to-liquid fuel) and diesel/propane dual fuel combustion. The activity of the catalyst was recorded during a heating temperature ramp where carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) light-off curves were obtained. From the catalyst activity tests, it was found that the presence of species including CO, medium-heavy HC, alkenes, alkanes, and NOx and their concentration influence the catalyst ability to reduce CO and total HC emissions before release to the atmosphere. CO could inhibit itself and other species oxidation (e.g., light and medium-heavy hydrocarbons) while suffering from competitive adsorption with NO. Hydrocarbon species were also found to inhibit their own oxidation as well as CO through adsorption competition. On the other hand, NO2 was found to promote low temperature HC oxidation through its partial reduction, forming NO. The understanding of these exhaust species interactions within the DOC could aid the design of an efficient aftertreatment system for the removal of diesel exhaust pollutants.

  20. The role of copper species on Cu/γ-Al2O3 catalysts for NH3-SCO reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Chunxia; Li, Xinyong; Qu, Zhenping; Tade, Moses; Liu, Shaomin

    2012-02-01

    UV-vis spectra, XRD, H2-TPR, TEM and ESR were used to characterize a series of Cu/γ-Al2O3 catalysts, which were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation using copper nitrate, copper acetate or copper sulfate as precursors, to study the role of Cu species on Cu/γ-Al2O3 catalysts for NH3-SCO reaction. It was found that the mixture of CuO phase and CuAl2O4 phase formed on various Cu/γ-Al2O3 catalysts, and the Cu species and dispersion had significant influence on the Cu/γ-Al2O3 activity. Highly dispersed CuO phase on the support would be related with its high activity for the NH3-SCO reaction.

  1. Method for regeneration and activity improvement of syngas conversion catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Lucki, Stanley J.; Brennan, James A.

    1980-01-01

    A method is disclosed for the treatment of single particle iron-containing syngas (synthes.s gas) conversion catalysts comprising iron, a crystalline acidic aluminosilicate zeolite having a silica to alumina ratio of at least 12, a pore size greater than about 5 Angstrom units and a constraint index of about 1-12 and a matrix. The catalyst does not contain promoters and the treatment is applicable to either the regeneration of said spent single particle iron-containing catalyst or for the initial activation of fresh catalyst. The treatment involves air oxidation, hydrogen reduction, followed by a second air oxidation and contact of the iron-containing single particle catalyst with syngas prior to its use for the catalytic conversion of said syngas. The single particle iron-containing catalysts are prepared from a water insoluble organic iron compound.

  2. Catalytic deactivation of methane steam reforming catalysts. I. Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Agnelli, M.E.; Demicheli, M.C.; Ponzi, E.N.

    1987-08-01

    An alumina-supported catalyst was studied both in its original state and after activation and sintering. Chemical composition and textural properties were determined, and crystalline compounds were identified. Active-phase and support transformations occurring during activation were determined by differential thermoanalysis (DTA), temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), and X-ray diffraction. The catalyst activated by means of various procedures was characterized by measuring crystallite size.

  3. Platinum-Promoted Ga/Al2O3 as Highly Active, Selective, and Stable Catalyst for the Dehydrogenation of Propane**

    PubMed Central

    Sattler, Jesper J H B; Gonzalez-Jimenez, Ines D; Luo, Lin; Stears, Brien A; Malek, Andrzej; Barton, David G; Kilos, Beata A; Kaminsky, Mark P; Verhoeven, Tiny W G M; Koers, Eline J; Baldus, Marc; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2014-01-01

    A novel catalyst material for the selective dehydrogenation of propane is presented. The catalyst consists of 1000 ppm Pt, 3 wt % Ga, and 0.25 wt % K supported on alumina. We observed a synergy between Ga and Pt, resulting in a highly active and stable catalyst. Additionally, we propose a bifunctional active phase, in which coordinately unsaturated Ga3+ species are the active species and where Pt functions as a promoter. PMID:24989975

  4. The structure and activity of titania supported cobalt catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ho Suiwen; Houalla, M.; Hercules, D.M. ); Cruz, J.M. )

    1992-05-01

    A series of titania supported cobalt catalysts (0.5-6%) were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation, and were characterized by ESCA, XRD, and hydrogen chemisorption. After calcination at 400 C, a surface CoTiO[sub 3]-like phase was the main species present in the 0.5 and 1% cobalt catalysts. For higher cobalt loadings, discrete Co[sub 3]O[sub 4] particles were formed in addition to surface CoTiO[sub 3]. ESCA indicates that after reduction the cobalt metal particle size (6-13 nm) increases with increasing cobalt loadings, but does not vary with reduction temperature (400-500 C). Hydrogen chemisorption was found to be activated and suppressed. The extent of hydrogen chemisorption suppression increases with increasing reduction temperature and decreasing cobalt particle size. The turnover frequency (based on cobalt dispersion derived from ESCA) for benzene and CO hydrogenation decreases with increasing reduction temperature and decreasing cobalt particle size. The decline in activity correlates with the extent of suppression of H[sub 2] chemisorption. The results were interpreted in terms of a decrease in the fraction of exposed surface cobalt due to site blocking by reduced TiO[sub 3] moieties.

  5. The role of catalyst activation on the activity and attrition of precipitated iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Datye, A.K.; Shroff, M.D.; Harrington, M.S.; Coulter, K.E.; Sault, A.G.; Jackson, N.B.

    1995-12-31

    The results of this work indicate that magnetite is not catalytically active for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) in precipitated, unsupported iron catalysts, but the formation of the carbide phase is necessary to obtain FTS activity. The transformation of magnetite to carbide, though essential to obtain FTS activity, also causes the catalyst to break down. This can lead to severe problems during operation in a commercial slurry phase reactor. The results presented here imply that activation and attrition are simultaneous and complementary processes. In another study, we show that the catalyst can also under go attrition on a micron scale which is caused by lack of strength of the forces binding the catalyst primary particles in the agglomerates. Both these processes can make wax separation and product recovery extremely difficult. In this study, we have also shown that H{sub 2} reduction of this catalyst to metallic iron is detrimental to subsequent catalyst activity and causes a loss of surface area due to sintering of the iron crystallites. Reduction to metallic Fe also causes impurities such as S to segregate to the surface causing a complete loss of FTS activity. It has been shown that even submonolayer amounts of S can cause a dramatic decrease in FTS activity, hence reduction to metallic Fe should be avoided during activation of these catalysts. We have shown, however, that a mild H{sub 2} reduction to magnetite does not lead to S segregation to the surface, and is therefore acceptable.

  6. Highly active and highly selective aromatization catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Santilli, D.S.; Long, J.J.; Lewis, R.T.

    1987-10-06

    This patent describes a reforming catalyst comprising an L zeolite containing platinum metal and at least one promoter metal selected from the group consisting of iron, cobalt, titanium, and rare earth metal. The catalyst has a platinum to promoter metal mole ratio of less than 10:1. The patent also includes a method of preparing the reforming catalyst of claim 1, comprising steps of: (a) forming an aqueous solution of alkali hydroxide, aluminum hydroxide, and ferric salt; (b) combining the solution with an aqueous solution of silica to form a thickening gel in a mother liquor; (c) heating the thickening gel to form an L zeolite; (d) cooling the gel containing the L zeolite; (e) decanting the mother liquor from the gel; (f) filtering the L zeolite from the gel; (g) washing the filtered L zeolite; (h) drying the washed L zeolite; (i) adding platinum to the dried L zeolite to form a catalyst; (j) drying the catalyst; and (k) calcining the dried catalyst.

  7. Morphology-dependent bactericidal activities of Ag/CeO2 catalysts against Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lian; He, Hong; Yu, Yunbo; Sun, Li; Liu, Sijin; Zhang, Changbin; He, Lian

    2014-06-01

    Silver-loaded CeO2 nanomaterials (Ag/CeO2) including Ag/CeO2 nanorods, nanocubes, nanoparticles were prepared with hydrothermal and impregnation methods. Catalytic inactivation of Escherichia coli with Ag/CeO2 catalysts through the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was investigated. For comparison purposes, the bactericidal activities of CeO2 nanorods, nanocubes and nanoparticles were also studied. There was a 3-4 log order improvement in the inactivation of E. coli with Ag/CeO2 catalysts compared with CeO2 catalysts. Temperature-programmed reduction of H2 showed that Ag/CeO2 catalysts had higher catalytic oxidation ability than CeO2 catalysts, which was the reason for that Ag/CeO2 catalysts exhibited stronger bactericidal activities than CeO2 catalysts. Further, the bactericidal activities of CeO2 and Ag/CeO2 depend on their shapes. Results of 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide spin-trapping measurements by electron spin resonance and addition of catalase as a scavenger indicated the formation of OH, O2(-), and H2O2, which caused the obvious bactericidal activity of catalysts. The stronger chemical bond between Ag and CeO2 nanorods led to lower Ag(+) elution concentrations. The toxicity of Ag(+) eluted from the catalysts did not play an important role during the bactericidal process. Experimental results also indicated that Ag/CeO2 induced the production of intracellular ROS and disruption of the cell wall and cell membrane. A possible production mechanism of ROS and bactericidal mechanism of catalytic oxidation were proposed.

  8. Role of surface Ni and Ce species of Ni/CeO2 catalyst in CO2 methanation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guilin; Liu, Huiran; Cui, Kaikai; Jia, Aiping; Hu, Gengshen; Jiao, Zhaojie; Liu, Yunqi; Zhang, Xianming

    2016-10-01

    CeO2, which was used as support to prepare mesoporous Ni/CeO2 catalyst, was prepared by the hard-template method. The prepared NiO/CeO2 precursor and Ni/CeO2 catalyst were studied by H2-TPR, in-situ XPS, and in-situ FT-IR. The catalytic properties of the prepared Ni/CeO2 catalyst were also investigated by CO2 catalytic hydrogenation methanation. H2-TPR and in-situ XPS results showed that metal Ni species and surface oxygen vacancies could be formed by H2 reduction. In-situ FT-IR and in-situ XPS results indicated that CO2 molecules could be reduced by active metal Ni species and surface oxygen vacancies to generate active CO species and promote CO2 methanation. The Ni/CeO2 catalyst presented the high CO2 methanation activity, and CO2 conversion and CH4 selectivity reached 91.1% and 100% at 340 °C and atmospheric pressure.

  9. Ruthenium-based olefin metathesis catalysts bearing pH-responsive ligands: External control of catalyst solubility and activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balof, Shawna Lynn

    2011-12-01

    Sixteen novel, Ru-based olefin metathesis catalysts bearing pH responsive ligands were synthesized. The pH-responsive groups employed with these catalysts included dimethylamino (NMe2) modified NHC ligands as well as N-donor dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) and 3-(o-pyridyl)propylidene ligands. These pH-responsive ligands provided the means by which the solubility and/or activity profiles of the catalysts produced could be controlled via acid addition. The main goal of this dissertation was to design catalyst systems capable of performing ring opening metathesis (ROMP) and ring closing metathesis (RCM) reactions in both organic and aqueous media. In an effort to quickly gain access to new catalyst structures, a template synthesis for functionalized NHC ligand precursors was designed, in addition to other strategies, to obtain ligand precursors with ancillary NMe2 groups. Kinetic studies for the catalysts produced from these precursors showed external control of catalyst solubility was afforded via protonation of the NMe2 groups of their NHC ligands. Additionally, this protonation afforded external control of catalyst propagation rates for several catalysts. This is the first known independent external control for the propagation rates of ROMP catalysts. The incorporation of pH-responsive N-donor ligands into catalyst structures also provided the means for the external control of metathesis activity, as the protonation of these ligands resulted in an increased initiation rate based on their fast and irreversible dissociation from the metal center. The enhanced external control makes these catalysts applicable to a wide range of applications, some of which have been explored by us and/or through collaboration. Three of the catalysts designed showed remarkable metathesis activity in aqueous media. These catalysts displayed comparable RCM activity in aqueous media to a class of water-soluble catalysts reported by Grubbs et al., considered to be the most active catalyst for

  10. Hydrogenation of biofuels with formic acid over a palladium-based ternary catalyst with two types of active sites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Zhang, Bingsen; Meng, Xiangju; Su, Dang Sheng; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2014-06-01

    A composite catalyst including palladium nanoparticles on titania (TiO2) and on nitrogen-modified porous carbon (Pd/TiO2@N-C) is synthesized from palladium salts, tetrabutyl titanate, and chitosan. N2 sorption isotherms show that the catalyst has a high BET surface area (229 m(2)  g(-1)) and large porosity. XPS and TEM characterization of the catalyst shows that palladium species with different chemical states are well dispersed across the TiO2 and nitrogen-modified porous carbon, respectively. The Pd/TiO2@N-C catalyst is very active and shows excellent stability towards hydrogenation of vanillin to 2-methoxy-4-methylphenol using formic acid as hydrogen source. This activity can be attributed to a synergistic effect between the Pd/TiO2 (a catalyst for dehydrogenation of formic acid) and Pd/N-C (a catalyst for hydrogenation of vanillin) sites.

  11. Active site densities, oxygen activation and adsorbed reactive oxygen in alcohol activation on npAu catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu-Cun; Friend, C M; Fushimi, Rebecca; Madix, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    The activation of molecular O2 as well as the reactivity of adsorbed oxygen species is of central importance in aerobic selective oxidation chemistry on Au-based catalysts. Herein, we address the issue of O2 activation on unsupported nanoporous gold (npAu) catalysts by applying a transient pressure technique, a temporal analysis of products (TAP) reactor, to measure the saturation coverage of atomic oxygen, its collisional dissociation probability, the activation barrier for O2 dissociation, and the facility with which adsorbed O species activate methanol, the initial step in the catalytic cycle of esterification. The results from these experiments indicate that molecular O2 dissociation is associated with surface silver, that the density of reactive sites is quite low, that adsorbed oxygen atoms do not spill over from the sites of activation onto the surrounding surface, and that methanol reacts quite facilely with the adsorbed oxygen atoms. In addition, the O species from O2 dissociation exhibits reactivity for the selective oxidation of methanol but not for CO. The TAP experiments also revealed that the surface of the npAu catalyst is saturated with adsorbed O under steady state reaction conditions, at least for the pulse reaction. PMID:27376884

  12. Active sites and mechanisms for direct oxidation of benzene to phenol over carbon catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wen, Guodong; Wu, Shuchang; Li, Bo; Dai, Chunli; Su, Dang Sheng

    2015-03-23

    The direct oxidation of benzene to phenol with H2 O2 as the oxidizer, which is regarded as an environmentally friendly process, can be efficiently catalyzed by carbon catalysts. However, the detailed roles of carbon catalysts, especially what is the active site, are still a topic of debate controversy. Herein, we present a fundamental consideration of possible mechanisms for this oxidation reaction by using small molecular model catalysts, Raman spectra, static secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), DFT calculations, quasi in situ ATR-IR and UV spectra. Our study indicates that the defects, being favorable for the formation of active oxygen species, are the active sites for this oxidation reaction. Furthermore, one type of active defect, namely the armchair configuration defect was successfully identified.

  13. The activation mechanism of Fe-based olefin metathesis catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poater, Albert; Pump, Eva; Vummaleti, Sai Vikrama Chaitanya; Cavallo, Luigi

    2014-08-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been used to describe the first turnover for olefin metathesis reaction of a homogenous Fe-based catalyst bearing a N-heterocyclic carbene ligand with methoxyethene as a substrate. Equal to conventional Ru-based catalysts, the activation of its Fe congener occurs through a dissociative mechanism, however with a more exothermic reaction energy profile. Predicted upper energy barriers were calculated to be on average ∼2 kcal/mol more beneficial for Fe catalyzed metathesis. Overall, this present computational study emphasises on advantages of Fe-based metathesis and gives a potential recipe for the design of an efficient Fe-based olefin metathesis catalysts.

  14. Near-ambient XPS characterization of interfacial copper species in ceria-supported copper catalysts.

    PubMed

    Monte, Manuel; Munuera, Guillermo; Costa, Dominique; Conesa, José C; Martínez-Arias, Arturo

    2015-11-28

    Catalysts based on combinations of copper and cerium oxides are interesting alternatives to noble metal ones for processes involved in the production/purification of hydrogen produced from hydrocarbons or biomass like the water-gas shift or the preferential oxidation of CO reactions. Active sites for such processes have been proposed to correspond to reduced species formed at the interface between both oxides. The present work provides direct evidence of reduced copper species located at the interface and observed during the course of near-ambient XPS experiments performed over samples of copper oxide supported on ceria nanospheres and nanocubes subjected to interaction with CO at different temperatures. The analysis of XPS results is based on DFT+U calculations employed as a complementary method for the analysis of redox properties of the catalysts and core-level shifts produced upon such redox changes. Differences observed in interfacial redox properties as a function of the ceria support morphology appear to be most useful to explain catalytic properties of this type of system for mentioned processes.

  15. Catalyst dispersion and activity under conditions of temperature- staged liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.; Schobert, H.H.; Mitchell, G.D.; Artok, L.

    1992-02-01

    The general objectives of this research are (1) to investigate the use of highly dispersed catalysts for the pretreatment of coal by mild hydrogenation, (2) to identify the active forms of catalysts under reaction conditions and (3) to clarify the mechanisms of catalysis. The ultimate objective is to ascertain if mild catalytic hydrogenation resulting in very limited or no coal solubilization is an advantageous pretreatment for the transformation of coal into transportable fuels. The experimental program will focus upon the development of effective methods of impregnating coal with catalysts, evaluating the conditions under which the catalysts are most active and establishing the relative impact of improved impregnation on conversion and product distributions obtained from coal hydrogenation.

  16. The synergic effect between Mo species and acid sites in Mo/HMCM-22 catalysts for methane aromatization.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ding; Zhu, Qingjun; Wu, Zili; Zhou, Danhong; Shu, Yuying; Xin, Qin; Xu, Yide; Bao, Xinhe

    2005-08-21

    The acid properties of Mo/HMCM-22 catalyst, which is the precursor form of the working catalyst for methane aromatization reaction, and the synergic effect between Mo species and acid sites were studied and characterized by various characterization techniques. It is concluded that Brønsted and Lewis acidities of HMCM-22 are modified due to the introduction of molybdenum. We suggest a monomer of Mo species is formed by the exchange of Mo species with the Brønsted acid sites. On the other hand, coordinate unsaturated sites (CUS) are suggested to be responsible for the formation of newly detected Lewis acid sites. Computer modelling is established and coupling with experimental results, it is then speculated that the effective activation of methane is properly accomplished on Mo species accommodated in the 12 MR supercages of MCM-22 zeolite whereas the Brønsted acid sites in the same channel system play a key role for the formation of benzene. A much more pronounced volcano-typed reactivity curve of the Mo/HMCM-22 catalysts, as compared with that of the Mo/HZSM-5, with respect to Mo loading is found and this can be well understood due to the unique channel structure of MCM-22 zeolite and synergic effect between Mo species and acid sites.

  17. NOx reduction Activity over Phosphate-supported Platinum Catalysts with Hydrogen under Oxygen-rich Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, M.; Takehara, M.; Saito, M.; Machida, K.

    2011-10-01

    The phosphate supported Pt catalysts (Pt/AlPO4, Pt/CePO4, Pt/CeP2O7, Pt/SnP2O7, Pt/TiP2O7, Pt/Zn3(PO4)2) were prepared by a conventional impregnation method to evaluate their selective catalytic reduction activity of NOx under excess oxygen condition. Among them, good NOx reduction activity was obtained on the Pt/AlPO4 catalyst. Specific adsorption species during the NOx reduction were checked by a diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectrum (DRIFTs) measurement to examine the reaction mechanism. Also NH3 temperature programmed desorption measurements were performed for all catalysts and their catalytic properties were discussed from the viewpoints of solid acidity.

  18. CATALYST ACTIVITY MAINTENANCE FOR THE LIQUID PHASE SYNTHESIS GAS-TO-DIMETHYL ETHER PROCESS PART II: DEVELOPMENT OF ALUMINUM PHOSPHATE AS THE DEHYDRATION CATALYST FOR THE SINGLE-STEP LIQUID PHASE SYNGAS-TO-DME PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang-Dong Peng

    2002-05-01

    At the heart of the single-step liquid phase syngas-to-DME process (LPDME{trademark}) is a catalyst system that can be active as well as stable. In the Alternative Fuels I program, a dual-catalyst system containing a Cu-based commercial methanol synthesis catalyst (BASF S3-86) and a commercial dehydration material ({gamma}-alumina) was demonstrated. It provided the productivity and selectivity expected from the LPDME process. However, the catalyst system deactivated too rapidly to warrant a viable commercial process [1]. The mechanistic investigation in the early part of the DOE's Alternative Fuels II program revealed that the accelerated catalyst deactivation under LPDME conditions is due to detrimental interaction between the methanol synthesis catalyst and methanol dehydration catalyst [2,3]. The interaction was attributed to migration of Cu- and/or Zn-containing species from the synthesis catalyst to the dehydration catalyst. Identification of a dehydration catalyst that did not lead to this detrimental interaction while retaining adequate dehydration activity was elusive. Twenty-nine different dehydration materials were tested, but none showed the desired performance [2]. The search came to a turning point when aluminum phosphate was tested. This amorphous material is prepared by precipitating a solution containing Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} with NH{sub 4}OH, followed by washing, drying and calcination. The aluminum phosphate catalyst has adequate dehydration activity and good stability. It can co-exist with the Cu-based methanol synthesis catalyst without negatively affecting the latter catalyst's stability. This report documents the details of the development of this catalyst. These include initial leads, efforts in improving activity and stability, investigation and development of the best preparation parameters and procedures, mechanistic understanding and resulting preparation guidelines, and the accomplishments of this work.

  19. Catalytically Active and Spectator Ce(3+) in Ceria-Supported Metal Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Kopelent, René; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A; Szlachetko, Jakub; Edebeli, Jacinta; Paun, Cristina; Nachtegaal, Maarten; Safonova, Olga V

    2015-07-20

    Identification of active species and the rate-determining reaction steps are crucial for optimizing the performance of oxygen-storage materials, which play an important role in catalysts lowering automotive emissions, as electrode materials for fuel cells, and as antioxidants in biomedicine. We demonstrated that active Ce(3+) species in a ceria-supported platinum catalyst during CO oxidation are short-lived and therefore cannot be observed under steady-state conditions. Using time-resolved resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy, we quantitatively correlated the initial rate of Ce(3+) formation under transient conditions to the overall rate of CO oxidation under steady-state conditions and showed that ceria reduction is a kinetically relevant step in CO oxidation, whereas a fraction of Ce(3+) was present as spectators. This approach can be applied to various catalytic processes involving oxygen-storage materials and reducible oxides to distinguish between redox and nonredox catalytic mechanisms.

  20. Integration of molecular and enzymatic catalysts on graphene for biomimetic generation of antithrombotic species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Teng; Peng, Bo; Xue, Min; Zhong, Xing; Chiu, Chin-Yi; Yang, Si; Qu, Yongquan; Ruan, Lingyan; Jiang, Shan; Dubin, Sergey; Kaner, Richard B.; Zink, Jeffrey I.; Meyerhoff, Mark E.; Duan, Xiangfeng; Huang, Yu

    2014-02-01

    The integration of multiple synergistic catalytic systems can enable the creation of biocompatible enzymatic mimics for cascading reactions under physiologically relevant conditions. Here we report the design of a graphene-haemin-glucose oxidase conjugate as a tandem catalyst, in which graphene functions as a unique support to integrate molecular catalyst haemin and enzymatic catalyst glucose oxidase for biomimetic generation of antithrombotic species. Monomeric haemin can be conjugated with graphene through π-π interactions to function as an effective catalyst for the oxidation of endogenous L-arginine by hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, glucose oxidase can be covalently linked onto graphene for local generation of hydrogen peroxide through the oxidation of blood glucose. Thus, the integrated graphene-haemin-glucose oxidase catalysts can readily enable the continuous generation of nitroxyl, an antithrombotic species, from physiologically abundant glucose and L-arginine. Finally, we demonstrate that the conjugates can be embedded within polyurethane to create a long-lasting antithrombotic coating for blood-contacting biomedical devices.

  1. Integration of molecular and enzymatic catalysts on graphene for biomimetic generation of antithrombotic species.

    PubMed

    Xue, Teng; Peng, Bo; Xue, Min; Zhong, Xing; Chiu, Chin-Yi; Yang, Si; Qu, Yongquan; Ruan, Lingyan; Jiang, Shan; Dubin, Sergey; Kaner, Richard B; Zink, Jeffrey I; Meyerhoff, Mark E; Duan, Xiangfeng; Huang, Yu

    2014-01-01

    The integration of multiple synergistic catalytic systems can enable the creation of biocompatible enzymatic mimics for cascading reactions under physiologically relevant conditions. Here we report the design of a graphene-haemin-glucose oxidase conjugate as a tandem catalyst, in which graphene functions as a unique support to integrate molecular catalyst haemin and enzymatic catalyst glucose oxidase for biomimetic generation of antithrombotic species. Monomeric haemin can be conjugated with graphene through π-π interactions to function as an effective catalyst for the oxidation of endogenous L-arginine by hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, glucose oxidase can be covalently linked onto graphene for local generation of hydrogen peroxide through the oxidation of blood glucose. Thus, the integrated graphene-haemin-glucose oxidase catalysts can readily enable the continuous generation of nitroxyl, an antithrombotic species, from physiologically abundant glucose and L-arginine. Finally, we demonstrate that the conjugates can be embedded within polyurethane to create a long-lasting antithrombotic coating for blood-contacting biomedical devices. PMID:24518643

  2. Integration of molecular and enzymatic catalysts on graphene for biomimetic generation of antithrombotic species

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Teng; Peng, Bo; Xue, Min; Zhong, Xing; Chiu, Chin-Yi; Yang, Si; Qu, Yongquan; Ruan, Lingyan; Jiang, Shan; Dubin, Sergey; Kaner, Richard B.; Zink, Jeffrey I.; Meyerhoff, Mark E.; Duan, Xiangfeng; Huang, Yu

    2014-01-01

    The integration of multiple synergistic catalytic systems can enable the creation of biocompatible enzymatic mimics for cascading reactions under physiologically relevant conditions. Here we report the design of a graphene–haemin–glucose oxidase conjugate as a tandem catalyst, in which graphene functions as a unique support to integrate molecular catalyst haemin and enzymatic catalyst glucose oxidase for biomimetic generation of antithrombotic species. Monomeric haemin can be conjugated with graphene through π–π interactions to function as an effective catalyst for the oxidation of endogenous L-arginine by hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, glucose oxidase can be covalently linked onto graphene for local generation of hydrogen peroxide through the oxidation of blood glucose. Thus, the integrated graphene–haemin–glucose oxidase catalysts can readily enable the continuous generation of nitroxyl, an antithrombotic species, from physiologically abundant glucose and L-arginine. Finally, we demonstrate that the conjugates can be embedded within polyurethane to create a long-lasting antithrombotic coating for blood-contacting biomedical devices. PMID:24518643

  3. Activity and Stability of Nanoscale Oxygen Reduction Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Shao-Horn, Yang

    2015-07-28

    Design of highly active and stable nanoscale catalysts for electro-oxidation of small organic molecules is of great importance to the development of efficient fuel cells. The amount and instability of Pt-based catalysts in the cathode limits the cost, efficiency and lifetime of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. We developed a microscopic understanding of the factors governing activity and stability in Pt and PtM alloys. Experimental efforts were focused on probing the size and shape dependence of ORR activity of Pt-based nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes. A microscopic understanding of the activity was achieved by correlating voltammetry and rotating ring disk electrodes to surface atomic and electronic structures, which were elucidated predominantly by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Scanning transmission electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (STEM-EDS) and synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS).

  4. Studies of the activity of catalysts based on heteropolyacids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turek, Wincenty; Lapkowski, Mieczyslaw; Debiec, Joanna; Krowiak, Agnieszka

    2005-10-01

    The catalytic activity of samples such as PPy(H 4SiW 12O 40), PPy(H 5PMo 10V 2O 40), PPy(H 2Fe(III)PMo 10V 2O 40), PPy(H 3Cu(II)PMo 10V 2O 40) has been examined in two different test reactions. The acid-base and oxidation-reduction properties were studied using the conversion of isopropyl alcohol to propene and acetone. Redox ability of catalysts was examined in the reaction of oxidation of allyl alcohol to glycidol. It was found that the activity of catalysts in the oxidation of allyl alcohol increases as the oxidation properties determined from the conversion of isopropyl alcohol increase. It was also observed that stronger oxidation-reduction properties of the catalyst result in a high rate of the consecutive reaction of glycidol to 3-hydroxypropanone. The phase composition of catalysts was determined by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD).

  5. The use of a vanadium species as a catalyst in photoinduced water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Santoni, Marie-Pierre; La Ganga, Giuseppina; Mollica Nardo, Viviana; Natali, Mirco; Puntoriero, Fausto; Scandola, Franco; Campagna, Sebastiano

    2014-06-11

    The first water oxidation catalyst containing only vanadium atoms as metal centers is reported. The compound is the mixed-valence [(V(IV)5V(V)1)O7(OCH3)12](-) species, 1. Photoinduced water oxidation catalyzed by 1, in the presence of Ru(bpy)3(2+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) and Na2S2O8, in acetonitrile/aqueous phosphate buffer takes place with a quantum yield of 0.20. A hole scavenging reaction between the photochemically generated Ru(bpy)3(3+) and 1 occurs with a bimolecular rate constant of 2.5 × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1). The time-resolved formation of the oxidized molecular catalyst 1(+) in bimolecular reactions is also evidenced for the first time by transient absorption spectroscopy. This result opens the way to the use of less expensive vanadium clusters as water oxidation catalysts in artificial photosynthesis schemes.

  6. Modeling Species Inhibition and Competitive Adsorption in Urea-SCR Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Lee, Jong H.

    2012-04-16

    Although the urea-SCR technology exhibits high NOx reduction efficiency over a wide range of temperatures among the lean NOx reduction technologies, further improvement in low-temperature performance is required to meet the future emission standards and to lower the system cost. In order to improve the catalyst technologies and optimize the system performance, it is critical to understand the reaction mechanisms and catalyst behaviors with respect to operating conditions. Urea-SCR catalysts exhibit poor NOx reduction performance at low temperature operating conditions (T < 150 C). We postulate that the poor performance is either due to NH3 storage inhibition by species like hydrocarbons or due to competitive adsorption between NH3 and other adsorbates such as H2O and hydrocarbons in the exhaust stream. In this paper we attempt to develop one-dimensional models to characterize inhibition and competitive adsorption in Fe-zeolite based urea-SCR catalysts based on bench reactor experiments. We further use the competitive adsorption (CA) model to develop a standard SCR model based on previously identified kinetics. Simulation results indicate that the CA model predicts catalyst outlet NO and NH3 concentrations with minimal root mean square error.

  7. Structure-activity relationship of CuO/MnO2 catalysts in CO oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Kun; Qian, Zhaoxia; Hua, Qing; Jiang, Zhiquan; Huang, Weixin

    2013-05-01

    A series of CuO/MnO2 catalysts with different CuO loadings were synthesized by the incipient wetness impregnation method. The catalysts were characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, powder X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, H2-temperature programmed reduction, CO-temperature programmed reduction and scanning electron microscope. The CuO/MnO2 catalysts with CuO loading of 1-40% exhibit almost the same catalytic performance toward CO oxidation while those with higher CuO loadings exhibit a much poorer catalytic activity. The structural characterization results demonstrate that the CuO-MnO2 interface is the active site for CO oxidation in CuO/MnO2 catalysts and CO oxidation over CuO/MnO2 probably follows the interfacial reaction mechanism in which CO chemisorbed on CuO reacts with oxygen species on MnO2 at the CuO-MnO2 interface.

  8. Design of a high activity and selectivity alcohol catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, H.C.; Mills, G.A.

    1992-07-30

    In methanol dehydration by K-doped Rh-Mo/[gamma]-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], while higher K levels reduced the dehydration propensity of the surface, at higher levels the potassium oxide layer formed after doping and calcining the surface interferes detrimentally with the Rh-Mo active metallic sites. Silica- and alumina-supported catalysts with 0.5% Rh loading were synthesized and tested for hydrogenation of CO.

  9. NREL Team Creates High-Activity, Durable Platinum Extended Surface Catalyst for Fuel Cells (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    Researchers with NREL's Fuel Cell team showed that platinum can replace copper nanowires in such a way that high-surface-area and high-specific-activity catalysts are produced, potentially allowing for lower-cost catalysts.

  10. Alumina-supported sulfided catalysts: V. Effect of P and F on the catalytic activity of hydrodesulfurization sulfided catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Startsev, A.N.; Klimov, O.V.; Kalinkin, A.V.; Mastikhin, V.M.

    1994-07-01

    Phosphorus and flourine additives incorporated into the Ni-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} sulfided catalysts on various stages of their preparation considerably lower the activation energy of the thiophene hydrogenolysis reaction. The interaction of promoting additives with the active component of the hydrodesulfurization catalyst is proved by XPS and {sup 31}P NMR. The effect of additives is discussed in terms of a synchronous mechanism involving interaction of reacting molecules in the coordination sphere of a bimetallic sulfide compound.

  11. Synthesis of cobalt-containing mesoporous catalysts using the ultrasonic-assisted "pH-adjusting" method: Importance of cobalt species in styrene oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baitao; Zhu, Yanrun; Jin, Xiaojing

    2015-01-01

    Cobalt-containing SBA-15 and MCM-41 (Co-SBA-15 and Co-MCM-41) mesoporous catalysts were prepared via ultrasonic-assisted "pH-adjusting" technique in this study. Their physiochemical structures were comprehensively characterized and correlated with catalytic activity in oxidation of styrene. The nature of cobalt species depended on the type of mesoporous silica as well as pH values. The different catalytic performance between Co-SBA-15 and Co-MCM-41 catalysts originated from cobalt species. Cobalt species were homogenously incorporated into the siliceous framework of Co-SBA-15 in single-site Co(II) state, while Co3O4 particles were loaded on Co-MCM-41 catalysts. The styrene oxidation tests showed that the single-site Co(II) state was more beneficial to the catalytic oxidation of styrene. The higher styrene conversion and benzaldehyde selectivity over Co-SBA-15 catalysts were mainly attributed to single-site Co(II) state incorporated into the framework of SBA-15. The highest conversion of styrene (34.7%) with benzaldehyde selectivity of 88.2% was obtained over Co-SBA-15 catalyst prepared at pH of 7.5, at the mole ratio of 1:1 (styrene to H2O2) at 70 °C.

  12. Cationic tungsten-oxo-alkylidene-N-heterocyclic carbene complexes: highly active olefin metathesis catalysts.

    PubMed

    Schowner, Roman; Frey, Wolfgang; Buchmeiser, Michael R

    2015-05-20

    The synthesis, structure, and olefin metathesis activity of the first neutral and cationic W-oxo-alkylidene-N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) catalysts are reported. Neutral W-oxo-alkylidene-NHC catalysts can be prepared in up to 90% isolated yield. Depending on the ligands used, they possess either an octahedral (Oh) or trigonal bipyramidal ligand sphere. They can be activated with excess AlCl3 to form cationic olefin metathesis-active W-complexes; however, these readily convert into neutral chloro-complexes. Well-defined, stable cationic species can be prepared by stoichiometric substitution of one chloro ligand in the parent, neutral W-oxo-alkylidene-NHC complexes with Ag(MeCN)2B(Ar(F))4 or NaB(Ar(F))4; B(Ar(F))4 = B(3,5-(CF3)2-C6H3)4. They are highly active olefin metathesis catalysts, allowing for turnover numbers up to 10,000 in various olefin metathesis reactions including alkenes bearing nitrile, sec-amine, and thioether groups. PMID:25938340

  13. Cationic tungsten-oxo-alkylidene-N-heterocyclic carbene complexes: highly active olefin metathesis catalysts.

    PubMed

    Schowner, Roman; Frey, Wolfgang; Buchmeiser, Michael R

    2015-05-20

    The synthesis, structure, and olefin metathesis activity of the first neutral and cationic W-oxo-alkylidene-N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) catalysts are reported. Neutral W-oxo-alkylidene-NHC catalysts can be prepared in up to 90% isolated yield. Depending on the ligands used, they possess either an octahedral (Oh) or trigonal bipyramidal ligand sphere. They can be activated with excess AlCl3 to form cationic olefin metathesis-active W-complexes; however, these readily convert into neutral chloro-complexes. Well-defined, stable cationic species can be prepared by stoichiometric substitution of one chloro ligand in the parent, neutral W-oxo-alkylidene-NHC complexes with Ag(MeCN)2B(Ar(F))4 or NaB(Ar(F))4; B(Ar(F))4 = B(3,5-(CF3)2-C6H3)4. They are highly active olefin metathesis catalysts, allowing for turnover numbers up to 10,000 in various olefin metathesis reactions including alkenes bearing nitrile, sec-amine, and thioether groups.

  14. Patched bimetallic surfaces are active catalysts for ammonia decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei; Vlachos, Dionisios G.

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia decomposition is often used as an archetypical reaction for predicting new catalytic materials and understanding the very reason of why some reactions are sensitive on material's structure. Core–shell or surface-segregated bimetallic nanoparticles expose outstanding activity for many heterogeneously catalysed reactions but the reasons remain elusive owing to the difficulties in experimentally characterizing active sites. Here by performing multiscale simulations in ammonia decomposition on various nickel loadings on platinum (111), we show that the very high activity of core–shell structures requires patches of the guest metal to create and sustain dual active sites: nickel terraces catalyse N−H bond breaking and nickel edge sites drive atomic nitrogen association. The structure sensitivity on these active catalysts depends profoundly on reaction conditions due to kinetically competing relevant elementary reaction steps. We expose a remarkable difference in active sites between transient and steady-state studies and provide insights into optimal material design. PMID:26443525

  15. Patched bimetallic surfaces are active catalysts for ammonia decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Wei; Vlachos, Dionisios G.

    2015-10-07

    In this study, ammonia decomposition is often used as an archetypical reaction for predicting new catalytic materials and understanding the very reason of why some reactions are sensitive on material’s structure. Core–shell or surface-segregated bimetallic nanoparticles expose outstanding activity for many heterogeneously catalysed reactions but the reasons remain elusive owing to the difficulties in experimentally characterizing active sites. Here by performing multiscale simulations in ammonia decomposition on various nickel loadings on platinum (111), we show that the very high activity of core–shell structures requires patches of the guest metal to create and sustain dual active sites: nickel terraces catalyse N-H bond breaking and nickel edge sites drive atomic nitrogen association. The structure sensitivity on these active catalysts depends profoundly on reaction conditions due to kinetically competing relevant elementary reaction steps. We expose a remarkable difference in active sites between transient and steady-state studies and provide insights into optimal material design.

  16. Patched bimetallic surfaces are active catalysts for ammonia decomposition.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Vlachos, Dionisios G

    2015-10-07

    Ammonia decomposition is often used as an archetypical reaction for predicting new catalytic materials and understanding the very reason of why some reactions are sensitive on material's structure. Core-shell or surface-segregated bimetallic nanoparticles expose outstanding activity for many heterogeneously catalysed reactions but the reasons remain elusive owing to the difficulties in experimentally characterizing active sites. Here by performing multiscale simulations in ammonia decomposition on various nickel loadings on platinum (111), we show that the very high activity of core-shell structures requires patches of the guest metal to create and sustain dual active sites: nickel terraces catalyse N-H bond breaking and nickel edge sites drive atomic nitrogen association. The structure sensitivity on these active catalysts depends profoundly on reaction conditions due to kinetically competing relevant elementary reaction steps. We expose a remarkable difference in active sites between transient and steady-state studies and provide insights into optimal material design.

  17. Pd/MgO: Catalyst characterization and phenol hydrogenation activity

    SciTech Connect

    Claus, P.; Berndt, H.; Mohr, C.; Radnik, J.; Shin, E.J.; Keane, M.A.

    2000-05-15

    The gas-phase hydrogenation of phenol has been studied over a 1% w/w Pd/MgO catalyst prepared by impregnation of MgO with (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}PdCl{sub 6}. The catalyst precursor was activated by precalcination in air at 473 K followed by reduction in hydrogen at 573 K. Temperature-programmed reduction/desorption has revealed the presence of ammonium carbonate and/or ammonium hydrogen carbonate on the active surface in addition to a metallic palladium component. Whereas the latter was not detectable by X-ray diffraction due to the high metal dispersion, transmission electron microscopy revealed that the mean palladium particle diameter is 1.3 {+-} 0.2 nm, which corresponds to a palladium dispersion of D{sub Pd} = 71%. Impregnation followed by calcination is shown to transform MgO to Mg(OH){sub 2} while the additional reduction step generates a surface phase that is composed of both needle-like Periclase MgO and Mg(OH){sub 2}. X-ray photoelectron spectrometric analyses of the activated catalyst has established the presence of zero-valent palladium which appears to be electron rich as a result of metal-support interaction; a degree of palladium charging is also evident as well as residual surface chlorine. The effects on fractional phenol conversion and reaction selectivity of varying such process variables as reaction time, temperature, and phenol molar feed rate are considered and the possibility of thermodynamic limitations is addressed. Hydrogenation was observed to proceed in a stepwise fashion with cyclohexanone as the partially hydrogenated product and cyclohexanol as the fully hydrogenated product. The catalyst delivered a 96% selectivity with respect to cyclohexanone production at 423 K but the cyclohexanone yield decreased at higher temperatures as conversion declined and cyclohexanol was increasingly preferred. Conversion and selectivity were both stable with prolonged catalyst use, i.e., time on stream in excess of 55 h.

  18. Sol immobilization technique: a delicate balance between activity, selectivity and stability for gold catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Alberto; Wang, Di; Veith, Gabriel M; Prati, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Sol immobilization is a widely used method to prepare gold catalysts. The presence of the protective layer can have a significant influence on catalyst properties by mediating metal-support and reactantmetal interactions. This paper details the effect of a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) protecting groups on the activity of a supported gold catalysts as well as its selectivity towards glycerol oxidation.

  19. Evaluation of photocatalytic activities of supported catalysts on NaX zeolite or activated charcoal.

    PubMed

    de Brites-Nóbrega, Fernanda F; Polo, Aldino N B; Benedetti, Angélica M; Leão, Mônica M D; Slusarski-Santana, Veronice; Fernandes-Machado, Nádia R C

    2013-12-15

    This study aimed to evaluate the photocatalytic activity of ZnO and Nb2O5 catalysts, both supported on NaX zeolite and activated charcoal (AC). The synergistic effect between oxide and support and the influence of solution pH (3, 7 and 9) on photocatalytic degradation of reactive blue 5G (C.I. 222) were analyzed. The catalysts Nb2O5/NaX, Nb2O5/AC and ZnO/NaX, ZnO/AC with 5 and 10% (wt%) were prepared by wet impregnation. The results showed that the catalysts exhibit quite different structural and textural properties. The synergic effect between ZnO and NaX support was higher than that with the activated charcoal, showing that these catalysts were more efficient. The most photoactive catalyst was 10% ZnO/NaX which showed 100% discoloration of the dye solution at pH 3, 7 and 9 after 0.5, 5 and 2h of irradiation, respectively. The hydrolytic nature of zeolite favored the formation of surface hydroxyl radicals, which increased the activity of the photocatalyst. Thus, catalysts supported on NaX zeolite are promising for use in photocatalysis.

  20. Carrier effects of active carbon for methanol carbonylation with supported transition metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, K.; Omata, K.; Yagita, H.

    1996-10-01

    Transition metals such as nickel or noble metals showed excellent catalytic activities for the vapor phase carbonylation of methanol to acetic acid. Reaction proceeded via the carbonylation of methanol to methyl acetate and its successive carbonylation to acetic acid anhydride followed by the hydrolysis. Under slightly pressurized conditions and at around 250{degrees}C methanol was completely carbonylated to acetic acid with the selectivity of 97% or higher. Also, other group 8 metals including noble metals showed excellent catalytic activity only when they were supported on active carbon, whose activity, ordered by strength of metal-halogen bonding showed a volcano-shape relationship with the peak at Rh. The role of active carbon as the active carrier was clarified by kinetics and catalyst characterization which showed that active carbon promoted the reductive elimination of intermediate for acetic acid formation by donating electron from carbon to nickel species.

  1. Direct evidence of active surface reconstruction during oxidative dehydrogenation of propane over VMgO catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Pantazidis, A.; Mirodatos, C.; Burrows, A.; Kiely, C.J.

    1998-07-25

    This paper presents a thorough investigation of an optimized VMgO catalyst (14 wt% V) for the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane, carried out in order to elucidate the nature and behavior of the active surface. The catalyst morphology and the surface composition are studied by means of HREM, XPS, UV-vis, XRD, and in-situ electrical conductivity techniques, as a function of the gaseous environments of the catalyst. The active surface is shown to be essentially a monolayer of amorphous VO{sub 4}{sup 3{minus}} units scattered over the magnesia as isolated and polymeric species. These surface vanadia units are found to stabilize an unusual polar (111) orientation of MgO up to temperatures of 800 C. A direct and outstanding evidence of a totally reversible phenomenon of order/disorder restructuration of this V overlayer is provided in conjunction with the redox state of the surface depending on the properties of the surrounding atmosphere (reductive or oxidative). These fast surface phenomena are assumed to determine the elementary steps of propane activation within the overall oxidative dehydrogenation of propane (ODHP) process.

  2. Cationic Silica-Supported N-Heterocyclic Carbene Tungsten Oxo Alkylidene Sites: Highly Active and Stable Catalysts for Olefin Metathesis.

    PubMed

    Pucino, Margherita; Mougel, Victor; Schowner, Roman; Fedorov, Alexey; Buchmeiser, Michael R; Copéret, Christophe

    2016-03-18

    Designing supported alkene metathesis catalysts with high activity and stability is still a challenge, despite significant advances in the last years. Described herein is the combination of strong σ-donating N-heterocyclic carbene ligands with weak σ-donating surface silanolates and cationic tungsten sites leading to highly active and stable alkene metathesis catalysts. These well-defined silica-supported catalysts, [(≡SiO)W(=O)(=CHCMe2 Ph)(IMes)(OTf)] and [(≡SiO)W(=O)(=CHCMe2 Ph)(IMes)(+) ][B(Ar(F) )4 (-) ] [IMes=1,3-bis(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)-imidazol-2-ylidene, B(Ar(F) )4 =B(3,5-(CF3 )2 C6 H3 )4 ] catalyze alkene metathesis, and the cationic species display unprecedented activity for a broad range of substrates, especially for terminal olefins with turnover numbers above 1.2 million for propene.

  3. Cationic Silica-Supported N-Heterocyclic Carbene Tungsten Oxo Alkylidene Sites: Highly Active and Stable Catalysts for Olefin Metathesis.

    PubMed

    Pucino, Margherita; Mougel, Victor; Schowner, Roman; Fedorov, Alexey; Buchmeiser, Michael R; Copéret, Christophe

    2016-03-18

    Designing supported alkene metathesis catalysts with high activity and stability is still a challenge, despite significant advances in the last years. Described herein is the combination of strong σ-donating N-heterocyclic carbene ligands with weak σ-donating surface silanolates and cationic tungsten sites leading to highly active and stable alkene metathesis catalysts. These well-defined silica-supported catalysts, [(≡SiO)W(=O)(=CHCMe2 Ph)(IMes)(OTf)] and [(≡SiO)W(=O)(=CHCMe2 Ph)(IMes)(+) ][B(Ar(F) )4 (-) ] [IMes=1,3-bis(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)-imidazol-2-ylidene, B(Ar(F) )4 =B(3,5-(CF3 )2 C6 H3 )4 ] catalyze alkene metathesis, and the cationic species display unprecedented activity for a broad range of substrates, especially for terminal olefins with turnover numbers above 1.2 million for propene. PMID:26928967

  4. Redox properties and VOC oxidation activity of Cu catalysts supported on Ce₁-xSmxOδ mixed oxides.

    PubMed

    Konsolakis, Michalis; Carabineiro, Sónia A C; Tavares, Pedro B; Figueiredo, José L

    2013-10-15

    A series of Cu catalysts supported on Ce1-xSmxOδ mixed oxides with different molar contents (x=0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1), was prepared by wet impregnation and evaluated for volatile organic compounds (VOC) abatement, employing ethyl acetate as model molecule. An extensive characterization study was undertaken in order to correlate the morphological, structural and surface properties of catalysts with their oxidation activity. The optimum performance was obtained with Cu/CeO2 catalyst, which offers complete conversion of ethyl acetate into CO2 at temperatures as low as 260°C. The catalytic performance of Cu/Ce1-xSmxOδ was interpreted on the basis of characterization studies, showing that incorporation of samarium in ceria has a detrimental effect on the textural characteristics and reducibility of catalysts. Moreover, high Sm/Ce atomic ratios (from 1 to 3) resulted in a more reduced copper species, compared to CeO2-rich supports, suggesting the inability of these species to take part in the redox mechanism of VOC abatement. Sm/Ce surface atomic ratios are always much higher than the nominal ratios indicating an impoverishment of catalyst surface in cerium oxide, which is detrimental for VOC activity. PMID:23995554

  5. Pollution Control Meets Sustainability: Structure-Activity Studies on New Iron Oxide-Based CO Oxidation Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Schoch, Roland; Bauer, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    A new class of catalysts for the oxidation of CO based on iron oxide as a biocompatible, earth-abundant and non-toxic metal is presented. The catalytic activities achieved with these catalysts provide promising milestones towards the substitution of noble metals in CO oxidation catalysts. The catalysts can be obtained by using iron core-shell nanoparticle precursors. The metal used for the shell material determines whether the iron core is integrated in or isolated from the support. The active iron site is effectively integrated into the γ-Al2 O3 support if an aluminum shell is present in the core-shell precursor. When the metal used for the shell is different from the support, an isolated structure is formed. Using this directed synthesis approach, different iron oxide species can be obtained and their structural differences are linked to distinct catalytic activities, as demonstrated by combined in-depth analytical studies using XRD, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), UV/Vis, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis. The key species responsible for high catalytic activity is identified as isolated tetrahedrally coordinated Fe(III) centers, whereas aggregation leads to a reduction in activity.

  6. Highly durable and active non-precious air cathode catalyst for zinc air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhu; Choi, Ja-Yeon; Wang, Haijiang; Li, Hui; Chen, Zhongwei

    The electrochemical stability of non-precious FeCo-EDA and commercial Pt/C cathode catalysts for zinc air battery have been compared using accelerated degradation test (ADT) in alkaline condition. Outstanding oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) stability of the FeCo-EDA catalyst was observed compared with the commercial Pt/C catalyst. The FeCo-EDA catalyst retained 80% of the initial mass activity for ORR whereas the commercial Pt/C catalyst retained only 32% of the initial mass activity after ADT. Additionally, the FeCo-EDA catalyst exhibited a nearly three times higher mass activity compared to that of the commercial Pt/C catalyst after ADT. Furthermore, single cell test of the FeCo-EDA and Pt/C catalysts was performed where both catalysts exhibited pseudolinear behaviour in the 12-500 mA cm -2 range. In addition, 67% higher peak power density was observed from the FeCo-EDA catalyst compared with commercial Pt/C. Based on the half cell and single cell tests the non-precious FeCo-EDA catalyst is a very promising ORR electrocatalyst for zinc air battery.

  7. Novel, high-activity hydroprocessing catalysts: Iron group phosphides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianqin

    A series of iron, cobalt and nickel transition metal phosphides was synthesized by means of temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) of the corresponding phosphates. The same materials, Fe2P, CoP and NO, were also prepared on a silica (SiO2) support. The phase purity of these catalysts was established by x-ray diffraction (XRD), and the surface properties were determined by N2 BET specific surface area (Sg) measurements and CO chemisorption. The activities of the silica-supported catalysts were tested in a three-phase trickle bed reactor for the simultaneous hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) of quinoline and hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of dibenzothiophene using a model liquid feed at realistic conditions (30 atm, 370°C). The reactivity studies showed that the nickel phosphide (Ni2P/SiO2) was the most active of the catalysts. Compared with a commercial Ni-Mo-S/gamma-Al 2O3 catalyst at the same conditions, Ni2P/silica had a substantially higher HDS activity (100% vs. 76%) and HDN activity (82% vs. 38%). Because of their good hydrotreating activity, an extensive study of the preparation of silica supported nickel phosphides, Ni2P/SiO 2, was carried out. The parameters investigated were the phosphorus content and the weight loading of the active phase. The most active composition was found to have a starting synthesis Ni/P ratio close to 1/2, and the best loading of this sample on silica was observed to be 18 wt.%. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) measurements were employed to determine the structures of the supported samples. The main phase before and after reaction was found to be Ni2P, but some sulfur was found to be retained after reaction. A comprehensive scrutiny of the HDN reaction mechanism was also made over the Ni2P/SiO2 sample (Ni/P = 1/2) by comparing the HDN activity of a series of piperidine derivatives of different structure. It was found that piperidine adsorption involved an alpha-H activation

  8. Iridium Oxide Coatings with Templated Porosity as Highly Active Oxygen Evolution Catalysts: Structure-Activity Relationships.

    PubMed

    Bernicke, Michael; Ortel, Erik; Reier, Tobias; Bergmann, Arno; Ferreira de Araujo, Jorge; Strasser, Peter; Kraehnert, Ralph

    2015-06-01

    Iridium oxide is the catalytic material with the highest stability in the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) performed under acidic conditions. However, its high cost and limited availability demand that IrO2 is utilized as efficiently as possible. We report the synthesis and OER performance of highly active mesoporous IrO2 catalysts with optimized surface area, intrinsic activity, and pore accessibility. Catalytic layers with controlled pore size were obtained by soft-templating with micelles formed from amphiphilic block copolymers poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(butadiene)-b-poly(ethylene oxide). A systematic study on the influence of the calcination temperature and film thickness on the morphology, phase composition, accessible surface area, and OER activity reveals that the catalytic performance is controlled by at least two independent factors, that is, accessible surface area and intrinsic activity per accessible site. Catalysts with lower crystallinity show higher intrinsic activity. The catalyst surface area increases linearly with film thickness. As a result of the templated mesopores, the pore surface remains fully active and accessible even for thick IrO2 films. Even the most active multilayer catalyst does not show signs of transport limitations at current densities as high as 75 mA cm(-2) . PMID:25958795

  9. Iridium Oxide Coatings with Templated Porosity as Highly Active Oxygen Evolution Catalysts: Structure-Activity Relationships.

    PubMed

    Bernicke, Michael; Ortel, Erik; Reier, Tobias; Bergmann, Arno; Ferreira de Araujo, Jorge; Strasser, Peter; Kraehnert, Ralph

    2015-06-01

    Iridium oxide is the catalytic material with the highest stability in the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) performed under acidic conditions. However, its high cost and limited availability demand that IrO2 is utilized as efficiently as possible. We report the synthesis and OER performance of highly active mesoporous IrO2 catalysts with optimized surface area, intrinsic activity, and pore accessibility. Catalytic layers with controlled pore size were obtained by soft-templating with micelles formed from amphiphilic block copolymers poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(butadiene)-b-poly(ethylene oxide). A systematic study on the influence of the calcination temperature and film thickness on the morphology, phase composition, accessible surface area, and OER activity reveals that the catalytic performance is controlled by at least two independent factors, that is, accessible surface area and intrinsic activity per accessible site. Catalysts with lower crystallinity show higher intrinsic activity. The catalyst surface area increases linearly with film thickness. As a result of the templated mesopores, the pore surface remains fully active and accessible even for thick IrO2 films. Even the most active multilayer catalyst does not show signs of transport limitations at current densities as high as 75 mA cm(-2) .

  10. Lattice-Strain Control of the Activity in Dealloyed Core-Shell Fuel Cell Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Strasser, P.; Koh, Shirlaine; Anniyev, Toyli; Greeley, Jeff; More, Karren Leslie; Yu, Chengfei; Liu, Zengcai; Kaya, Sarpa; Nordlund, Dennis; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Toney, Michael F.; Anders, Nilsson

    2010-01-01

    Electrocatalysis will play a key role in future energy conversion and storage technologies, such as water electrolysers, fuel cells and metal-air batteries. Molecular interactions between chemical reactants and the catalytic surface control the activity and efficiency, and hence need to be optimized; however, generalized experimental strategies to do so are scarce. Here we show how lattice strain can be used experimentally to tune the catalytic activity of dealloyed bimetallic nanoparticles for the oxygen-reduction reaction, a key barrier to the application of fuel cells and metal-air batteries. We demonstrate the core-shell structure of the catalyst and clarify the mechanistic origin of its activity. The platinum-rich shell exhibits compressive strain, which results in a shift of the electronic band structure of platinum and weakening chemisorption of oxygenated species. We combine synthesis, measurements and an understanding of strain from theory to generate a reactivity-strain relationship that provides guidelines for tuning electrocatalytic activity.

  11. Biphasic catalysis using amphiphilic polyphenols-chelated noble metals as highly active and selective catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Hui; Yu, Hong; Chen, Jing; Liao, Xuepin

    2013-01-01

    In the field of catalysis, it is highly desired to develop novel catalysts that combine the advantages of both homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts. Here we disclose that the use of plant pholyphenol as amphiphilic large molecule ligand/stabilizer allows for the preparation of noble metal complex and noble metal nanoparticle catalysts. These catalysts are found to be highly selective and active in aqueous-organic biphasic catalysis of cinnamaldehyde and quinoline, and can be reused at least 3 times without significant loss of activity. Moreover, the catalytic activity and reusability of the catalysts can be rationally controlled by simply adjusting the content of polyphenols in the catalysts. Our strategy may be extended to design a wide range of aqueous-organic biphasic catalysis system. PMID:23863916

  12. Patched bimetallic surfaces are active catalysts for ammonia decomposition

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Wei; Vlachos, Dionisios G.

    2015-10-07

    In this study, ammonia decomposition is often used as an archetypical reaction for predicting new catalytic materials and understanding the very reason of why some reactions are sensitive on material’s structure. Core–shell or surface-segregated bimetallic nanoparticles expose outstanding activity for many heterogeneously catalysed reactions but the reasons remain elusive owing to the difficulties in experimentally characterizing active sites. Here by performing multiscale simulations in ammonia decomposition on various nickel loadings on platinum (111), we show that the very high activity of core–shell structures requires patches of the guest metal to create and sustain dual active sites: nickel terraces catalyse N-Hmore » bond breaking and nickel edge sites drive atomic nitrogen association. The structure sensitivity on these active catalysts depends profoundly on reaction conditions due to kinetically competing relevant elementary reaction steps. We expose a remarkable difference in active sites between transient and steady-state studies and provide insights into optimal material design.« less

  13. Catalytic activity of bimetallic catalysts highly sensitive to the atomic composition and phase structure at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Shiyao; Petkov, Valeri; Prasai, Binay; Wu, Jinfang; Joseph, Pharrah; Skeete, Zakiya; Kim, Eunjoo; Mott, Derrick; Malis, Oana; Luo, Jin; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2015-11-01

    The ability to determine the atomic arrangement in nanoalloy catalysts and reveal the detailed structural features responsible for the catalytically active sites is essential for understanding the correlation between the atomic structure and catalytic properties, enabling the preparation of efficient nanoalloy catalysts by design. Herein we describe a study of CO oxidation over PdCu nanoalloy catalysts focusing on gaining insights into the correlation between the atomic structures and catalytic activity of nanoalloys. PdCu nanoalloys of different bimetallic compositions are synthesized as a model system and are activated by a controlled thermochemical treatment for assessing their catalytic activity. The results show that the catalytic synergy of Pd and Cu species evolves with both the bimetallic nanoalloy composition and temperature of the thermochemical treatment reaching a maximum at a Pd : Cu ratio close to 50 : 50. The nanoalloys are characterized structurally by ex situ and in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction, including atomic pair distribution function analysis. The structural data show that, depending on the bimetallic composition and treatment temperature, PdCu nanoalloys adopt two different structure types. One features a chemically ordered, body centered cubic (B2) type alloy consisting of two interpenetrating simple cubic lattices, each occupied with Pd or Cu species alone, and the other structure type features a chemically disordered, face-centered cubic (fcc) type of alloy wherein Pd and Cu species are intermixed at random. The catalytic activity for CO oxidation is strongly influenced by the structural features. In particular, it is revealed that the prevalence of chemical disorder in nanoalloys with a Pd : Cu ratio close to 50 : 50 makes them superior catalysts for CO oxidation in comparison with the same nanoalloys of other bimetallic compositions. However, the catalytic synergy can be diminished if the Pd50Cu50 nanoalloys undergo phase

  14. A Pt-cluster-based heterogeneous catalyst for homogeneous catalytic reactions: X-ray absorption spectroscopy and reaction kinetic studies of their activity and stability against leaching.

    PubMed

    Li, Yimin; Liu, Jack Hung-Chang; Witham, Cole A; Huang, Wenyu; Marcus, Matthew A; Fakra, Sirine C; Alayoglu, Pinar; Zhu, Zhongwei; Thompson, Christopher M; Arjun, Arpana; Lee, Kihong; Gross, Elad; Toste, F Dean; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2011-08-31

    The design and development of metal-cluster-based heterogeneous catalysts with high activity, selectivity, and stability under solution-phase reaction conditions will enable their applications as recyclable catalysts in large-scale fine chemicals production. To achieve these required catalytic properties, a heterogeneous catalyst must contain specific catalytically active species in high concentration, and the active species must be stabilized on a solid catalyst support under solution-phase reaction conditions. These requirements pose a great challenge for catalysis research to design metal-cluster-based catalysts for solution-phase catalytic processes. Here, we focus on a silica-supported, polymer-encapsulated Pt catalyst for an electrophilic hydroalkoxylation reaction in toluene, which exhibits superior selectivity and stability against leaching under mild reaction conditions. We unveil the key factors leading to the observed superior catalytic performance by combining X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and reaction kinetic studies. On the basis of the mechanistic understandings obtained in this work, we also provide useful guidelines for designing metal-cluster-based catalyst for a broader range of reactions in the solution phase. PMID:21721543

  15. Regioselective chromatic orthogonality with light-activated metathesis catalysts.

    PubMed

    Levin, Efrat; Mavila, Sudheendran; Eivgi, Or; Tzur, Eyal; Lemcoff, N Gabriel

    2015-10-12

    The ability to selectively guide consecutive chemical processes towards a preferred pathway by using light of different frequencies is an appealing concept. Herein we describe the coupling of two photochemical reactions, one the photoisomerization and consequent activation of a sulfur-chelated latent olefin-metathesis catalyst at 350 nm, and the other the photocleavage of a silyl protecting group at 254 nm. Depending on the steric stress exerted by a photoremovable neighboring chemical substituent, we demonstrate the selective formation of either five- or six-membered-ring frameworks by light-triggered ring-closing metathesis. The orthogonality of these light-induced reactions allows the initiation of these processes independently and in interchangeable order, according to the wavelength of light used to promote them.

  16. CO2 copolymers from epoxides: catalyst activity, product selectivity, and stereochemistry control.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao-Bing; Ren, Wei-Min; Wu, Guang-Peng

    2012-10-16

    systems were also very efficient in catalyzing the terpolymerization of cyclohexene oxide, propylene oxide and CO(2). The resulting terpolymer had a single glass-transition temperature and a single thermolysis peak. This Account also provides a thorough mechanistic understanding of the high activities, excellent selectivities, and unprecedented stereochemical control of these Co(III)-based catalysts in the production of CO(2) copolymers . The catalysis occurs through a cooperative monometallic mechanism, in which the Lewis acidic Co(III) ion serves as electrophile to activate then epoxide and the nucleophilic counterion or cocatalyst serves as a nucleophile to initiate polymer-chain growth. The high activity and excellent regioselectivity observed in the epoxide ring-opening reactions results from epoxide activation through the moderate electrophilicity of the Co(III) ion, the fast insertion of CO(2) into the Co-O bond, and the facile dissociation of the propagating carboxylate species from the central metal ion. The reversible intra- or intermolecular Co-O bond formation and dissociation helps to stabilize the active Co(III) species against reversion to the inactive Co(II) ion. We also describe our laboratory's recent preparation of the first crystalline CO(2)-based polymer via highly stereospecific copolymerization of CO(2) and meso-cyclohexene oxide and the selective synthesis of perfectly alternating polycarbonates from the coupling of CO(2) with epoxides bearing an electron-withdrawing group.

  17. Highly active copper-network catalyst for the direct aldol reaction.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Hidetoshi; Uozumi, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Yoichi M A

    2011-09-01

    The development of a highly active solid-phase catechol-copper network catalyst for direct aldol reaction is described. The catalyst was prepared from an alkyl-chain-linked bis(catechol) and a copper(II) complex. The direct aldol reaction between carbonyl compounds (aldehydes and ketones) and methyl isocyanoacetate was carried out using 0.1-1 mol% [Cu] catalyst to give the corresponding oxazolines at yields of up to 99% and a trans/cis ratio of >99:1. The catalyst was reused with no loss of catalytic activity. A plausible reaction pathway is also described. PMID:21751405

  18. Fischer-Tropsch activity for non-promoted cobalt-on-alumina catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Singleton, Alan H.; Oukaci, Rachid; Goodwin, James G.

    2001-01-01

    Cobalt catalysts, and processes employing these inventive catalysts, for hydrocarbon synthesis. The inventive catalyst comprises cobalt on an alumina support and is not promoted with any noble or near noble metals. In one aspect of the invention, the alumina support preferably includes a dopant in an amount effective for increasing the activity of the inventive catalyst. The dopant is preferably a titanium dopant. In another aspect of the invention, the cobalt catalyst is preferably reduced in the presence of hydrogen at a water vapor partial pressure effective to increase the activity of the cobalt catalyst for hydrocarbon synthesis. The water vapor partial pressure is preferably in the range of from 0 to about 0.1 atmospheres.

  19. Improving the activity of Mn/TiO2 catalysts through control of the pH and valence state of Mn during their preparation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyun Jin; Kim, Sung Su; Hong, Sung Chang

    2012-03-01

    In this study, the authors investigated the influence of the valence state of Mn on the efficacy of selective catalytic reduction using a Mn-based catalyst. The nitrogen oxides (NOx) conversion rate of the catalyst was found to be dependent on the type of TiO2 support employed and on the temperature, as the catalyst showed an excellent conversion of > 80% at a space velocity of 60,000 hr(-1) when the temperature was above 200 degrees C. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses confirmed that catalyst displaying the highest activity contained the Mn4+ species and that its valence state was highly dependent on the pH during the catalyst preparation.

  20. Oxygen reduction at carbon supported ruthenium-selenium catalysts: Selenium as promoter and stabilizer of catalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulenburg, Hendrik; Hilgendorff, Marcus; Dorbandt, Iris; Radnik, Jörg; Bogdanoff, Peter; Fiechter, Sebastian; Bron, Michael; Tributsch, Helmut

    Carbon supported ruthenium-based catalysts (Ru/C) for the oxygen reduction in acid electrolytes were investigated. A treatment of Ru/C catalysts with selenious acid had a beneficial effect on catalytic activity but no influence on intrinsic kinetic properties, like Tafel slope and hydrogen peroxide generation. Reasons for the increased activity of RuSe x/C catalysts are discussed. Potential step measurements suggest that at potentials around 0.8 V (NHE) a selenium or selenium-oxygen species protects the catalyst from formation of inactive RuO 2-films. This protective effect leads to an enhanced activity of RuSe x/C compared to Ru/C. No evidence was found for a catalytically active stoichiometric selenium compound. The active phase may be described as a ruthenium suboxide RuO x (x < 2) layer integrated in a RuSe y phase or RuSe yO v (y < 2, v < 2) layer at the particle surface.

  1. Highly active gold-based catalyst for the reaction of benzaldehyde with ethyl diazoacetate.

    PubMed

    Fructos, Manuel R; Díaz-Requejo, M Mar; Pérez, Pedro J

    2009-09-14

    The gold complex [IPrAu(NCMe)]BF(4) catalyzes the reaction of ethyl diazoacetate with benzaldehyde to give mixtures of ethyl 3-oxo-3-phenylpropanoate and ethyl 3-hydroxy-2-phenylacrylate in the first example of a group 11 metal-based catalyst for this transformation; the catalyst activity is improved by a factor of 2500 compared to those of previously reported iron-based catalysts.

  2. Correlation between Fischer-Tropsch catalytic activity and composition of catalysts

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the synthesis and characterization of monometallic and bimetallic cobalt and iron nanoparticles supported on alumina. The catalysts were prepared by a wet impregnation method. Samples were characterized using temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO), CO-chemisorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM-EDX) and N2-adsorption analysis. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) was carried out in a fixed-bed microreactor at 543 K and 1 atm, with H2/CO = 2 v/v and space velocity, SV = 12L/g.h. The physicochemical properties and the FTS activity of the bimetallic catalysts were analyzed and compared with those of monometallic cobalt and iron catalysts at similar operating conditions. H2-TPR analysis of cobalt catalyst indicated three temperature regions at 506°C (low), 650°C (medium) and 731°C (high). The incorporation of iron up to 30% into cobalt catalysts increased the reduction, CO chemisorption and number of cobalt active sites of the catalyst while an opposite trend was observed for the iron-riched bimetallic catalysts. The CO conversion was 6.3% and 4.6%, over the monometallic cobalt and iron catalysts, respectively. Bimetallic catalysts enhanced the CO conversion. Amongst the catalysts studied, bimetallic catalyst with the composition of 70Co30Fe showed the highest CO conversion (8.1%) while exhibiting the same product selectivity as that of monometallic Co catalyst. Monometallic iron catalyst showed the lowest selectivity for C5+ hydrocarbons (1.6%). PMID:22047220

  3. Influence of Ce/Zr ratio on CO oxidation activity of ceria-zirconia supported Cu catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Masatomo; Haneda, Masaaki; Ozawa, Masakuni

    2016-01-01

    The influence of Ce/Zr ratios in the cerium-rich region on the dispersibility and reduction property of Cu catalysts supported on ceria-zirconia composite oxides was investigated. In the catalysts, the dispersibility of copper oxide species on ceria-zirconia supports was different depending on Ce/Zr ratio. The particle size of copper oxide species on Ce0.7Zr0.3O2 was smaller than that on Ce0.5Zr0.5O2. CO oxidation activity of 1.0 wt % Cu/Ce0.7Zr0.3O2 was higher than that of 1.0 wt % Cu/Ce0.5Zr0.5O2. Temperature programmed reduction by CO (CO-TPR) measurement revealed that the reducibility of Cu/Ce0.7Zr0.3O2 was higher than that of Cu/Ce0.5Zr0.5O2. The temperature of the first peak in CO-TPR profiles for both catalysts was in good agreement with the temperature at which the conversion of CO reached 50% (T50). It is suggested that the copper oxide species — ceria-zirconia interaction influences the activation of oxygen at the interface between copper oxide species and ceria-zirconia, resulting in different catalytic performance for CO oxidation.

  4. Sunlight-driven copper-catalyst activation applied to photolatent click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Beniazza, Rédouane; Lambert, Romain; Harmand, Lydie; Molton, Florian; Duboc, Carole; Denisov, Sergey; Jonusauskas, Gedeminas; McClenaghan, Nathan D; Lastécouères, Dominique; Vincent, Jean-Marc

    2014-10-01

    The synthesis, full characterization, photoreduction properties, and catalytic activity for the copper(I)-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction of a copper(II)-DMEDA (N,N'-dimethylethylendiamine) complex is reported. Spectroscopic studies (UV/Vis, EPR) demonstrated that under daylight illumination highly effective copper(II) to copper(I) reduction occurs in this complex. These findings are in agreement with a high photoreduction quantum yield value of 0.22 in MeOH, and a value approaching unity as determined in THF. The reduction process, which can also be conducted by irradiation at 365 nm by using a standard TLC (thin layer chromatography) lamp, is ascribed to a highly efficient photoinduced electron transfer (PET) process mediated by the benzophenone photosensitizer present in the carboxylate counterion. Having deaerated the reaction mixture, the photogenerated copper(I) species proved to be highly active for the CuAAC reaction, demonstrated by reactions conducted with low catalyst loading (0.5 mol %) on a range of clickable protected and non-protected mono- and disaccharides. Once initiated, the reaction can be stopped at any time on introducing air into the reaction medium. Deoxygenation followed by irradiation restores the activity, making the copper(II)-DMEDA complex a switchable catalyst of practical value. PMID:25171758

  5. Surface characterization and dehydrocyclization activity of Pt/KL catalysts prepared by different methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcoya, Adolfo; Seoane, Xosé Lois; Grau, Javier Mario

    2003-01-01

    Three Pt/KL-zeolite catalysts containing 1 wt.% of metal were prepared by different procedures: CI-1 and CI-2 by wetness impregnation of the zeolite with aqueous solutions of Pt(NH 3) 4(OH) 2 and Pt(NH 3) 4(NO 3) 2, respectively, and CE-3 by ion exchange with a Pt(NH 3) 4(OH) 2 solution. These samples were successively calcined at 573 K and reduced at 773 K. An additional sample, CE-3-n, was obtained from CE-3 by ion-exchange with KNO 3. The catalysts were characterized by H 2-O 2 titration, TPD of NH 3, XRD, CO-FTIR and XPS and tested in the dehydrocyclization of n-heptane to toluene at 723 K, 100 kPa, WHSV=3.4 h -1 and H 2/ nC 7=7.3 mol mol -1 in a fixed bed tubular reactor. Characterization results show that Pt dispersion for the ion exchanged samples is higher than for the impregnated ones and CE-3 is the more acidic catalyst. FTIR measurements indicate that the highest population of electron reach platinum species (Pt δ- ) is found in CE-3-n, while CE-3 exhibits the highest concentration of electron deficient platinum species (Pt δ+ ). The order of dehydrocyclization activity, CE-3-n>CI-2>CI-1>CE-3, roughly correlates with that of the intensity of the FTIR bands attributed to Pt δ- . The low selectivity toward toluene of CE-3 is attributed to the protons generated during the reduction of Pt 2+ exchanged.

  6. Enhancement of alkylation catalysts for improved supercritical fluid regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Petkovic, Lucia

    2009-09-22

    A method of modifying an alkylation catalyst to reduce the formation of condensed hydrocarbon species thereon. The method comprises providing an alkylation catalyst comprising a plurality of active sites. The plurality of active sites on the alkylation catalyst may include a plurality of weakly acidic active sites, intermediate acidity active sites, and strongly acidic active sites. A base is adsorbed to a portion of the plurality of active sites, such as the strongly acidic active sites, selectively poisoning the strongly acidic active sites. A method of modifying the alkylation catalyst by providing an alkylation catalyst comprising a pore size distribution that sterically constrains formation of the condensed hydrocarbon species on the alkylation catalyst or by synthesizing the alkylation catalyst to comprise a decreased number of strongly acidic active sites is also disclosed, as is a method of improving a regeneration efficiency of the alkylation catalyst.

  7. Enhancement of alkylation catalysts for improved supercritical fluid regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Petkovic, Lucia M.

    2010-12-28

    A method of modifying an alkylation catalyst to reduce the formation of condensed hydrocarbon species thereon. The method comprises providing an alkylation catalyst comprising a plurality of active sites. The plurality of active sites on the alkylation catalyst may include a plurality of weakly acidic active sites, intermediate acidity active sites, and strongly acidic active sites. A base is adsorbed to a portion of the plurality of active sites, such as the strongly acidic active sites, selectively poisoning the strongly acidic active sites. A method of modifying the alkylation catalyst by providing an alkylation catalyst comprising a pore size distribution that sterically constrains formation of the condensed hydrocarbon species on the alkylation catalyst or by synthesizing the alkylation catalyst to comprise a decreased number of strongly acidic active sites is also disclosed, as is a method of improving a regeneration efficiency of the alkylation catalyst.

  8. Modeling Species Inhibition of NO oxidation in Urea-SCR Catalysts for Diesel Engine NOx Control

    SciTech Connect

    Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Tran, Diana N.; Lee, Jong H.; Herling, Darrell R.

    2010-09-15

    Urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts are regarded as the leading NOx aftertreatment technology to meet the 2010 NOx emission standards for on-highway vehicles running on heavy-duty diesel engines. However, issues such as low NOx conversion at low temperature conditions still exist due to various factors, including incomplete urea thermolysis, inhibition of SCR reactions by hydrocarbons and H2O. We have observed a noticeable reduction in the standard SCR reaction efficiency at low temperature with increasing water content. We observed a similar effect when hydrocarbons are present in the stream. This effect is absent under fast SCR conditions where NO ~ NO2 in the feed gas. As a first step in understanding the effects of such inhibition on SCR reaction steps, kinetic models that predict the inhibition behavior of H2O and hydrocarbons on NO oxidation are presented in the paper. A one-dimensional SCR model was developed based on conservation of species equations and was coded as a C-language S-function and implemented in Matlab/Simulink environment. NO oxidation and NO2 dissociation kinetics were defined as a function of the respective adsorbate’s storage in the SCR catalyst. The corresponding kinetic models were then validated on temperature ramp tests that showed good match with the test data.

  9. Modeling Species Inhibition of NO Oxidation in Urea-SCR Catalysts for Diesel Engine NOx Control

    SciTech Connect

    Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Tran, Diana N.; Lee, Jong H.; Herling, Darrell R.

    2011-04-20

    Urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts are regarded as the leading NOx aftertreatment technology to meet the 2010 NOx emission standards for on-highway vehicles running on heavy-duty diesel engines. However, issues such as low NOx conversion at low temperature conditions still exist due to various factors, including incomplete urea thermolysis, inhibition of SCR reactions by hydrocarbons and H2O. We have observed a noticeable reduction in the standard SCR reaction efficiency at low temperature with increasing water content. We observed a similar effect when hydrocarbons are present in the stream. This effect is absent under fast SCR conditions where NO ~ NO2 in the feed gas. As a first step in understanding the effects of such inhibition on SCR reaction steps, kinetic models that predict the inhibition behavior of H2O and hydrocarbons on NO oxidation are presented in the paper. A one-dimensional SCR model was developed based on conservation of species equations and was coded as a C-language S-function and implemented in Matlab/Simulink environment. NO oxidation and NO2 dissociation kinetics were defined as a function of the respective adsorbate’s storage in the Fe-zeolite SCR catalyst. The corresponding kinetic models were then validated on temperature ramp tests that showed good match with the test data. Such inhibition models will improve the accuracy of model based control design for integrated DPF-SCR aftertreatment systems.

  10. Synthesis of cobalt-containing mesoporous catalysts using the ultrasonic-assisted “pH-adjusting” method: Importance of cobalt species in styrene oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Baitao Zhu, Yanrun; Jin, Xiaojing

    2015-01-15

    Cobalt-containing SBA-15 and MCM-41 (Co-SBA-15 and Co-MCM-41) mesoporous catalysts were prepared via ultrasonic-assisted “pH-adjusting” technique in this study. Their physiochemical structures were comprehensively characterized and correlated with catalytic activity in oxidation of styrene. The nature of cobalt species depended on the type of mesoporous silica as well as pH values. The different catalytic performance between Co-SBA-15 and Co-MCM-41 catalysts originated from cobalt species. Cobalt species were homogenously incorporated into the siliceous framework of Co-SBA-15 in single-site Co(II) state, while Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles were loaded on Co-MCM-41 catalysts. The styrene oxidation tests showed that the single-site Co(II) state was more beneficial to the catalytic oxidation of styrene. The higher styrene conversion and benzaldehyde selectivity over Co-SBA-15 catalysts were mainly attributed to single-site Co(II) state incorporated into the framework of SBA-15. The highest conversion of styrene (34.7%) with benzaldehyde selectivity of 88.2% was obtained over Co-SBA-15 catalyst prepared at pH of 7.5, at the mole ratio of 1:1 (styrene to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) at 70 °C. - Graphical abstract: Cobalt-containing mesoporous silica catalysts were developed via ultrasonic-assisted “pH-adjusting” technique. Compared with Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} in Co-MCM-41, the single-site Co(II) state in Co-SBA-15 was more efficient for the styrene oxidation. - Highlights: • Fast and cost-effective ultrasonic technique for preparing mesoporous materials. • Incorporation of Co via ultrasonic irradiation and “pH-adjusting”. • Physicochemical comparison between Co-SBA-15 and Co-MCM-41. • Correlation of styrene oxidation activity and catalyst structural property.

  11. Use of H2S to Probe the Active Sites in FeNC Catalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) in Acidic Media

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Deepika; Mamtani, Kuldeep; Bruening, Christopher R.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Ozkan, Umit S.

    2014-10-01

    H2S has been used as a probe molecule both in an “in situ” poisoning experiment and in intermediate-temperature heat-treatment steps during and after the preparation of FeNC catalysts in an attempt to analyze its effect on their ORR activity. The heat treatments were employed either on the ball-milled precursor of FeNC or after the Ar-NH3 high temperature heat treatments. ORR activity of the H2S-treated catalysts was seen to be significantly lower than the sulfur-free catalysts, whether the sulfur exposure was during a half-cell testing, or as an intermediate-temperature exposure to H2S. The incorporation of sulfur species and interaction of Fe with sulfur were confirmed by characterization using XPS, EXAFS, TPO, and TPD. This study provides crucial evidence regarding differences in active sites in FeNC versus nitrogen-containing carbon nanostructured (CNx) catalysts.

  12. Initial activity of reduced chromia/alumina catalyst in n-butane dehydrogenation monitored by on-line FT-IR gas analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hakuli, A. |; Kytoekivi, A.; Suntola, T.

    1996-06-01

    The initial activity of chromia/alumina catalyst (13 wt% Cr) in n-butane dehydrogenation was studied in a flow reactor at 853 K. The initial activity was determined by on-line FT-IR gas analysis, which enabled sampling of the gaseous product mixture at a time resolution of seconds. The catalysts were processed in repeated cycles of oxidation, reduction, and dehydrogenation using n-butane, methane, hydrogen, or carbon monoxide as reducing agents. With n-butane, methane, and hydrogen and dehydrogenation activity was associated with Cr{sup 3+} species apparently formed in the reduction of high-valence Cr species. The catalyst reduced with carbon monoxide at 853 K showed poor initial selectivity for butenes and, relative to the other catalysts. Simultaneous data relating the initial activity, coke content, and some of the physicochemical properties of the catalyst indicated that the surfaces of all catalysts were modified to some extent by the successive reaction cycles. 33 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Aged nano-structured platinum based catalyst: effect of chemical treatment on adsorption and catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Shim, Wang Geun; Nahm, Seung Won; Park, Hyuk Ryeol; Yun, Hyung Sun; Seo, Seong Gyu; Kim, Sang Chai

    2011-02-01

    To examine the effect of chemical treatment on the adsorption and catalytic activity of nanostructured platinum based catalyst, the aged commercial Pt/AC catalyst was pretreated with sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and a cleaning agent (Hexane). Several reliable methods such as nitrogen adsorption, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) were employed to characterize the aged Pt/AC catalyst and its chemically pretreated Pt/AC catalysts. The catalytic and adsorption activities of nano-structured heterogeneous Pt/AC catalyst were investigated on the basis of toluene oxidation and adsorption isotherm data. In addition, the adsorption isotherms of toluene were used to calculate the adsorption energy distribution functions for the parent catalyst and its pre-treated nano-structured Pt/AC catalysts. It was found that sulfuric acid aqueous treatment can enhance the catalytic performance of aged Pt/AC catalyst toward catalytic oxidation of toluene. It was also shown that a comparative analysis of the energy distribution functions for nano-structured Pt/AC catalysts as well as the pore size distribution provides valuable information about their structural and energetic heterogeneity.

  14. Understanding Iron-based catalysts with efficient Oxygen reduction activity from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafiz, Hasnain; Barbiellini, B.; Jia, Q.; Tylus, U.; Strickland, K.; Bansil, A.; Mukerjee, S.

    2015-03-01

    Catalysts based on Fe/N/C clusters can support the oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR) without the use of expensive metals such as platinum. These systems can also prevent some poisonous species to block the active sites from the reactant. We have performed spin-polarized calculations on various Fe/N/C fragments using the Vienna Ab initio Simulation Package (VASP) code. Some results are compared to similar calculations obtained with the Gaussian code. We investigate the partial density of states (PDOS) of the 3d orbitals near the Fermi level and calculate the binding energies of several ligands. Correlations of the binding energies with the 3d electronic PDOS's are used to propose electronic descriptors of the ORR associated with the 3d states of Fe. We also suggest a structural model for the most active site with a ferrous ion (Fe2+) in the high spin state or the so-called Doublet 3 (D3).

  15. Effect of Mo on the active sites of VPO catalysts upon the selective oxidation of n-butane

    SciTech Connect

    Irusta, S.; Boix, A.; Pierini, B.; Caspani, C.; Petunchi, J.

    1999-10-25

    The effect of the addition of Mo to VPO formulations on the physiochemical and catalytic properties of VPO solids was studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Laser Raman spectroscopy (LRS), temperature-programmed reduction, and a flow reactor system. The addition of Mo to the oxides increases the activity and selectivity of the VPO catalysts. The promoting effect is a function of both the Mo loading and the way such cation was added to the VPO matrix. The best catalyst was obtained when 1% Mo was impregnated on the NOHPO{sub 4}-0.5H{sub 2}O phase. At 400 C 36% of molar yield to maleic anhydride was obtained in this catalyst against 12% of the unpromoted catalysts and only 3% of the solids where Mo was added during the phosphatation step. The impregnated 1% Mo catalyst achieved a molar yield of 50% after 700 h under reaction stream (equilibrated catalysts). (VO){sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} was the only phase detected by XRD and LRS in all the catalysts studied. They showed comparable BET surface areas and crystallinity after 400 h under reaction conditions. A local order distortion of the O{sub 3}-P-O-P-O{sub 3} structure was detected by LRS in the impregnated Mo VPO catalysts. After 400 h on stream, both promoted and unpromoted solids only showed V{sup IV} on the surface layer. The main effect on the addition of Mo by impregnation to VPO oxides was enhanced by the very strong Lewis acid sites and the liability of the oxygen of (VO){sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}. This suggests that the promoting effect is more electronic in nature than structural. Polymeric MO{sub 3} species were detected neither by TPR nor by LRS. All the promoted catalysts presented a surface molybdenum enrichment but whereas the coprecipitated Mo VPO solid only shows surface Mo{sup VI}, both Mo{sup VI} coexist in the impregnated catalyst.

  16. Linking morphology with activity through the lifetime of pretreated PtNi nanostructured thin film catalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Cullen, David A.; Lopez-Haro, Miguel; Bayle-Guillemaud, Pascale; Debe, Mark; Steinbach, Andrew J.; Guetaz, L.

    2015-04-10

    In this study, the nanoscale morphology of highly active Pt3Ni7 nanostructured thin film fuel cell catalysts is linked with catalyst surface area and activity following catalyst pretreatments, conditioning and potential cycling. The significant role of fuel cell conditioning on the structure and composition of these extended surface catalysts is demonstrated by high resolution imaging, elemental mapping and tomography. The dissolution of Ni during fuel cell conditioning leads to highly complex, porous structures which were visualized in 3D by electron tomography. Quantification of the rendered surfaces following catalyst pretreatment, conditioning, and cycling shows the important role pore structure plays in surfacemore » area, activity, and durability.« less

  17. Linking morphology with activity through the lifetime of pretreated PtNi nanostructured thin film catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, David A.; Lopez-Haro, Miguel; Bayle-Guillemaud, Pascale; Debe, Mark; Steinbach, Andrew J.; Guetaz, L.

    2015-04-10

    In this study, the nanoscale morphology of highly active Pt3Ni7 nanostructured thin film fuel cell catalysts is linked with catalyst surface area and activity following catalyst pretreatments, conditioning and potential cycling. The significant role of fuel cell conditioning on the structure and composition of these extended surface catalysts is demonstrated by high resolution imaging, elemental mapping and tomography. The dissolution of Ni during fuel cell conditioning leads to highly complex, porous structures which were visualized in 3D by electron tomography. Quantification of the rendered surfaces following catalyst pretreatment, conditioning, and cycling shows the important role pore structure plays in surface area, activity, and durability.

  18. Photogeneration of active formate decomposition catalysts to produce hydrogen from formate and water

    DOEpatents

    King, Jr., Allen D.; King, Robert B.; Sailers, III, Earl L.

    1983-02-08

    A process for producing hydrogen from formate and water by photogenerating an active formate decomposition catalyst from transition metal carbonyl precursor catalysts at relatively low temperatures and otherwise mild conditions is disclosed. Additionally, this process may be expanded to include the generation of formate from carbon monoxide and hydroxide such that the result is the water gas shift reaction.

  19. Design and Preparation of Supported Au Catalyst with Enhanced Catalytic Activities by Rationally Positioning Au Nanoparticles on Anatase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Wang, Hong; Rice, Andrew E; Zhang, Wei; Li, Xiaokun; Chen, Mingshu; Meng, Xiangju; Lewis, James P; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2015-06-18

    A synergistic effect between individual components is crucial for increasing the activity of metal/metal oxide catalysts. The greatest challenge is how to control the synergistic effect to obtain enhanced catalytic performance. Through density functional theory calculations of model Au/TiO2 catalysts, it is suggested that there is strong interaction between Au nanoparticles and Ti species at the edge/corner sites of anatase, which is favorable for the formation of stable oxygen vacancies. Motivated by this theoretical analysis, we have rationally prepared Au nanoparticles attached to edge/corner sites of anatase support (Au/TiO2-EC), confirmed by their HR-TEM images. As expected, this strong interaction is well characterized by Raman, UV-visible, and XPS techniques. Very interestingly, compared with conventional Au catalysts, Au/TiO2-EC exhibits superior catalytic activity in the oxidations using O2. Our approach to controlling Au nanoparticle positioning on anatase to obtain enhanced catalytic activity offers an efficient strategy for developing more novel supported metal catalysts.

  20. Design and Preparation of Supported Au Catalyst with Enhanced Catalytic Activities by Rationally Positioning Au Nanoparticles on Anatase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Wang, Hong; Rice, Andrew E; Zhang, Wei; Li, Xiaokun; Chen, Mingshu; Meng, Xiangju; Lewis, James P; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2015-06-18

    A synergistic effect between individual components is crucial for increasing the activity of metal/metal oxide catalysts. The greatest challenge is how to control the synergistic effect to obtain enhanced catalytic performance. Through density functional theory calculations of model Au/TiO2 catalysts, it is suggested that there is strong interaction between Au nanoparticles and Ti species at the edge/corner sites of anatase, which is favorable for the formation of stable oxygen vacancies. Motivated by this theoretical analysis, we have rationally prepared Au nanoparticles attached to edge/corner sites of anatase support (Au/TiO2-EC), confirmed by their HR-TEM images. As expected, this strong interaction is well characterized by Raman, UV-visible, and XPS techniques. Very interestingly, compared with conventional Au catalysts, Au/TiO2-EC exhibits superior catalytic activity in the oxidations using O2. Our approach to controlling Au nanoparticle positioning on anatase to obtain enhanced catalytic activity offers an efficient strategy for developing more novel supported metal catalysts. PMID:26266615

  1. Characterization and CO oxidation activity of Cu/Cr/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Park, P.W.; Ledford, J.S.

    1998-03-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) have been used to characterize a series of Cu/Cr/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts prepared by stepwise incipient wetness impregnation of first chromium followed by copper (designated CuCry). The copper loading was held constant at 8 wt% CuO, and chromium loadings were varied from 0 to 20 wt% Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The information obtained from surface and bulk characterization has been correlated with the CO oxidation activity of the catalysts. XPS and XRD results of analogous Cry indicated that the Cr dispersion decreased and the concentration of Cr{sup 3+} species increased with increasing Cr content. The decrease in Cu dispersion of CuCry with increasing Cr content has been attributed to the formation of large crystalline CuO and CuCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Copper addition decreased the Cr dispersion by reacting selectively with a dispersed Cr{sup 3+} species to form CuCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} species. However, the Cu addition did not affect the Cr oxidation state distribution compared to that of Cry. For low Cr loading CuCry catalysts (Cr/Al {le} 0.027), the CO oxidation activity increased with increasing Cr content due to the formation of crystalline CuO on the Cr-modified alumina. This has been attributed to the inhibition of Cu ion diffusion into alumina lattice vacancies by highly dispersed chromium species. The CuCry catalyst of Cr/Al = 0.054 showed the highest CO oxidation activity due to the formation of CuCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} which was more active than the CuO phase. For Cr-rich catalysts (Cr/Al {ge} 0.080), the decrease in CO oxidation activity has been ascribed to the encapsulation of the active site with Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} species.

  2. Correlations between mass activity and physicochemical properties of Fe/N/C catalysts for the ORR in PEM fuel cell via 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and other techniques.

    PubMed

    Kramm, Ulrike I; Lefèvre, Michel; Larouche, Nicholas; Schmeisser, Dieter; Dodelet, Jean-Pol

    2014-01-22

    The aim of this work is to clarify the origin of the enhanced PEM-FC performance of catalysts prepared by the procedures described in Science 2009, 324, 71 and Nat. Commun. 2011, 2, 416. Catalysts were characterized after a first heat treatment in argon at 1050 °C (Ar) and a second heat treatment in ammonia at 950 °C (Ar + NH3). For the NC catalysts a variation of the nitrogen precursor was also implemented. (57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, neutron activation analysis, and N2 sorption measurements were used to characterize all catalysts. The results were correlated to the mass activity of these catalysts measured at 0.8 V in H2/O2 PEM-FC. It was found that all catalysts contain the same FeN4-like species already found in INRS Standard (Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2012, 14, 11673). Among all FeN4-like species, only D1 sites, assigned to FeN4/C, and D3, assigned to N-FeN2+2 /C sites, were active for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The difference between INRS Standard and the new catalysts is simply that there are many more D1 and D3 sites available in the new catalysts. All (Ar + NH3)-type catalysts have a much larger porosity than Ar-type catalysts, while the maximum number of their active sites is only slightly larger after a second heat treatment in NH3. The large difference in activity between the Ar-type catalysts and the Ar + NH3 ones stems from the availability of the sites to perform ORR, as many sites of the Ar-type catalysts are secluded in the material, while they are available at the surface of the Ar + NH3-type catalysts.

  3. Active Gold-Ceria and Gold-Ceria/titania Catalysts for CO Oxidation. From Single-Crystal Model Catalysts to Powder Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Jose A.; Si, Rui; Evans, Jaime; Xu, Wenqian; Hanson, Jonathan C.; Tao, Jing; Zhu, Yimei

    2014-07-23

    We studied CO oxidation on model and powder catalysts of Au-CeO2 and Au-CeOx/TiO2. Phenomena observed in Au-CeO2(1 1 1) and Au-CeO2/TiO2(1 1 0) provided useful concepts for designing and preparing highly active and stable Au-CeOx/TiO2 powder catalysts for CO oxidation. Small particles of Au dispersed on CeO2(1 1 1) displayed high catalytic activity, making Au-CeO2(1 1 1) a better CO oxidation catalyst than Au-TiO2(1 1 0) or Au-MgO(1 0 0). An excellent support for gold was found after depositing nanoparticles of ceria on TiO2(1 1 0). The CeOx nanoparticles act as nucleation centers for gold, improving dispersion of the supported metal and helping in the creation of reaction sites efficient for the adsorption of CO and the dissociation of the O2 molecule. High-surface area catalysts were prepared by depositing gold on ceria nanorods and CeOx/TiO2 powders. The samples were tested for the low-temperature (10–70 °C) oxygen-rich (1%CO/4%O2/He) CO oxidation reaction after pre-oxidation (20%O2/He, 300 °C) and pre-reduction (5%H2/He, 300 °C) treatments. Moreover, synchrotron-based operando X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption (XAS) spectroscopy were used to study the Au-CeO2 and Au-CeOx/TiO2 catalysts under reaction conditions. Our operando findings indicate that the most active phase of these catalysts for low-temperature CO oxidation consist of small particles of metallic Au dispersed on CeO2 or CeOx/TiO2.

  4. Solution Structures of Highly Active Molecular Ir Water-Oxidation Catalysts from Density Functional Theory Combined with High-Energy X-ray Scattering and EXAFS Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ke R; Matula, Adam J; Kwon, Gihan; Hong, Jiyun; Sheehan, Stafford W; Thomsen, Julianne M; Brudvig, Gary W; Crabtree, Robert H; Tiede, David M; Chen, Lin X; Batista, Victor S

    2016-05-01

    The solution structures of highly active Ir water-oxidation catalysts are elucidated by combining density functional theory, high-energy X-ray scattering (HEXS), and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. We find that the catalysts are Ir dimers with mono-μ-O cores and terminal anionic ligands, generated in situ through partial oxidation of a common catalyst precursor. The proposed structures are supported by (1)H and (17)O NMR, EPR, resonance Raman and UV-vis spectra, electrophoresis, etc. Our findings are particularly valuable to understand the mechanism of water oxidation by highly reactive Ir catalysts. Importantly, our DFT-EXAFS-HEXS methodology provides a new in situ technique for characterization of active species in catalytic systems. PMID:27087202

  5. Copper catalyst activation driven by photoinduced electron transfer: a prototype photolatent click catalyst.

    PubMed

    Harmand, Lydie; Cadet, Sarah; Kauffmann, Brice; Scarpantonio, Luca; Batat, Pinar; Jonusauskas, Gediminas; McClenaghan, Nathan D; Lastécouères, Dominique; Vincent, Jean-Marc

    2012-07-16

    PET cat. While the copper(II) tren ketoprofenate precatalyst 1 (see picture) is inactive at room temperature in methanol, it is quantitatively and rapidly reduced to its cuprous state upon light irradiation to provide a highly reactive click catalyst. By simply introducing air into the reaction medium the catalysis can be switched off and then switched on again by bubbling argon followed by irradiation. PMID:22777953

  6. Texas Endangered Species Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Kathleen Marie; Campbell, Linda

    This publication is the result of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Division's (TPWD's) commitment to education and the fertile partnerships formed between TPWD biologists and educators. This activity book brings together the expertise and practical knowledge of a classroom teacher with the technical knowledge and skills of a TPWD biologist and artist.…

  7. Performance of (CoPC)n catalyst in active lithium-thionyl chloride cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Pinakin M.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted with anode limited D size cells to characterize the performance of an active lithium-thionyl chloride (Li/SOCl2) system using the polymeric cobalt phthalocyanine, (CoPC)n, catalyst in carbon cathodes. The author describes the results of this experiment with respect to initial voltage delays, operating voltages, and capacities. The effectiveness of the preconditioning methods evolved to alleviate passivation effects on storage are also discussed. The results clearly demonstrated the superior high rate capability of cells with the catalyst. The catalyst did not adversely impact the performance of cells after active storage for up to 6 months, while retaining its beneficial influences.

  8. Microwave and Beam Activation of Nanostructured Catalysts for Environmentally Friendly, Energy Efficient Heavy Crude Oil Processing

    SciTech Connect

    2009-03-01

    This factsheet describes a study whose goal is initial evaluation and development of energy efficient processes which take advantage of the benefits offered by nanostructured catalysts which can be activated by microwave, RF, or radiation beams.

  9. Crystallographic dependence of CO activation on cobalt catalysts: HCP versus FCC.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-Xun; Su, Hai-Yan; Sun, Da-Peng; Zhang, Bing-Yan; Li, Wei-Xue

    2013-11-01

    Identifying the structure sensitivity of catalysts in reactions, such as Fischer-Tropsch synthesis from CO and H2 over cobalt catalysts, is an important yet challenging issue in heterogeneous catalysis. Based on a first-principles kinetic study, we find for the first time that CO activation on hexagonal close-packed (HCP) Co not only has much higher intrinsic activity than that of face centered-cubic (FCC) Co but also prefers a different reaction route, i.e., direct dissociation with HCP Co but H-assisted dissociation on the FCC Co. The origin is identified from the formation of various denser yet favorable active sites on HCP Co not available for FCC Co, due to their distinct crystallographic structure and morphology. The great dependence of the activity on the crystallographic structure and morphology of the catalysts revealed here may open a new avenue for better, stable catalysts with maximum mass-specific reactivity.

  10. Catalyst dispersion and activity under conditions of temperature-staged liquefaction. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.; Schobert, H.H.; Mitchell, G.D.; Artok, L.

    1993-02-01

    This research program involves the investigation of the use of highly dispersed catalyst precursors for the pretreatment of coals by mild hydrogenation. During the course of this effort solvent preswelling of the coal was evaluated as a means of deeply impregnating catalysts into coal, active phases of catalysts under reaction conditions were studied and the impact of these techniques were evaluated during pretreatment and temperature-staged liquefaction. Two coals, a Texas subbituminous and a Utah high volatile A bituminous, were used to examine the effects of solvent swelling pretreatment and catalyst impregnation on conversion behavior at 275{degrees}C, representative of the first, low-temperature stage in a temperature-staged liquefaction reaction. Ferrous sulfate, iron pentacarbonyl, ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, and molybdenum hexacarbonyl were used as catalyst precursors. Without swelling pretreatment, impregnation of both coals increased conversion, mainly through increased yields of preasphaltenes.

  11. Catalyst dispersion and activity under conditions of temperature-staged liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.; Schobert, H.H.; Mitchell, G.D.; Artok, L.

    1993-02-01

    This research program involves the investigation of the use of highly dispersed catalyst precursors for the pretreatment of coals by mild hydrogenation. During the course of this effort solvent preswelling of the coal was evaluated as a means of deeply impregnating catalysts into coal, active phases of catalysts under reaction conditions were studied and the impact of these techniques were evaluated during pretreatment and temperature-staged liquefaction. Two coals, a Texas subbituminous and a Utah high volatile A bituminous, were used to examine the effects of solvent swelling pretreatment and catalyst impregnation on conversion behavior at 275[degrees]C, representative of the first, low-temperature stage in a temperature-staged liquefaction reaction. Ferrous sulfate, iron pentacarbonyl, ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, and molybdenum hexacarbonyl were used as catalyst precursors. Without swelling pretreatment, impregnation of both coals increased conversion, mainly through increased yields of preasphaltenes.

  12. A green mesostructured vanadosilicate catalyst and its unprecedented catalytic activity for the selective synthesis of 2,6-disubstituted p-benzoquinones.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, M; Park, S B; Kim, J M

    2014-01-21

    We have developed a green method for the production of 2,6-disubstituted p-benzoquinones (DSBQs) by liquid-phase oxidations of di/tri-substituted phenols using two-dimensional hexagonally thick-walled mesoporous vanadosilicate catalysts. In particular, 2,6-di-tert-butyl-p-benzoquinone was synthesized by the oxidation of 2,6-di-tert-butylphenol, using various reaction parameters, over mesoporous VSBA-15 catalysts synthesized with various vanadium contents. A promising chemical treatment method for the preparation of green mesoporous VSBA-15(5) or W-VSBA-15(5) (W: washed) catalysts was successfully used in the presence of ammonium acetate solution to remove moderately toxic non-framework V2O5 crystallite species from the active surface, and the catalytic activity of the recovered green mesoporous VSBA-15(5) catalyst was determined. To confirm the green aspects, recyclability and hot-catalytic filtration experiments were performed. The combined results show that the green mesoporous VSBA-15(5) is a highly active, recyclable, and promising heterogeneous catalyst for the selective synthesis of DSBQs (98-100%), and has unprecedented catalytic activity compared with other mesoporous vanadosilicate catalysts.

  13. CO oxidation on nanoporous gold: A combined TPD and XPS study of active catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Röhe, Sarah; Frank, Kristian; Schaefer, Andreas; Wittstock, Arne; Zielasek, Volkmar; Rosenauer, Andreas; Bäumer, Marcus

    2012-11-30

    Disks of nanoporous gold (np-Au), produced by leaching of silver from AgAu alloy and prepared as active catalysts for CO oxidation in a continuous-flow reactor, were investigated in detail by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and temperature-programmed desorption spectroscopy in ultra-high vacuum. Np-Au exhibits several oxygen species on and in the surface: Chemisorbed oxygen (Oact), probably generated at residual silver sites at the surface, is readily available after np-Au preparation and consumed by CO oxidation. It can be replenished on activated np-Au by exposure to O2. In addition, strongly bound oxygen, probably at subsurface sites, is present as a major species and not consumed by CO oxidation. Pronounced CO desorption at temperatures above 200 K observed after exposing np-Au to CO at 105 K indicates an additional, more stable type of CO binding sites on np-Au as compared to pure gold. Only CO at these binding sites is consumed by oxidation reaction with Oact. In conclusion, we propose that the presence of strongly bound subsurface oxygen stabilizes CO adsorption on np-Au, thereby being as crucial for the observed catalytic activity of np-Au as residual silver.

  14. Operando and in situ Raman studies of alumina-supported vanadium phosphate catalysts in propane ammoxidation reaction: activity, selectivity and active phase formation.

    PubMed

    Mikolajska, Ewelina; Rasmussen, Søren B; Lewandowska, Anna E; Bañares, Miguel A

    2012-02-21

    Alumina-supported VPO materials are efficient catalysts for acrylonitrile production by the propane ammoxidation reaction. In order to understand the structure-activity relationship and the nature of active sites, operando Raman-GC analyses follow the states of vanadium and phosphorous species on an alumina support during ammoxidation. These oxides were supported on γ-alumina by incipient wetness impregnation at a total V + P loading of two monolayers, which led to incipient formation of nanoscaled VPO crystallites possessing a high surface-to-volume ratio. Since catalysis occurs at the catalyst surface, which is related to the surface and outermost layers, this approach allows studying surface species phase transformations near the surface, and relates changes in activity and selectivity to variations in composition and structure. Dispersed surface V(5+) species appear selective to acetonitrile and V(4+) species would promote selectivity to acrylonitrile. This study suggests that V(3+) is probably involved in redox processes during propane ammoxidation and that the balance between these vanadium species would be determined by activation process. PMID:21993840

  15. Atomic scale simulations of the interactions of plasma species on nickel catalyst surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somers, Wesley

    The increased greenhouse gas concentrations compared to the pre-industrial values have led to an enhanced greenhouse effect and, as a consequence, global warming. One of the possibilities to mitigate the climate change is to increase the energy efficiency of industrial processes. This is particularly interesting for the methane reforming processes, since CH4 (and CO2 in the case of dry reforming) is converted into syngas, a valuable chemical mixture of H2 and CO. These processes have a large energy cost under conventional conditions, due to the high temperatures that are required. A promising alternative to the conventional procedure is the use of plasma catalysis, i.e. the combination of plasma technology and catalysis. However, this technology is very complex and there is little fundamental knowledge on the operative interaction mechanisms between plasma and catalyst. Therefore, reactive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used in this doctoral study to investigate the interactions of plasma species on different nickel catalyst surfaces. The plasma species under study are CH, radicals (x={1,2,3}) and vibrationally excited CH4. These particles impinge on a total of six different nickel surfaces, to study the influence of crystallinity on the reactivity. At a temperature of 400 K, different reaction mechanisms are observed, dependent on the nickel surface. The reactivity of impinging CH2 and CH radicals is high, however little H2 is formed at this temperature. A temperature study within the range of 400 K -1600 K showed that high H2 yields are obtained at temperatures above 1400 K. However, at these temperatures the crystallinity of the nickel surface is reduced due to the continuous C-diffusion into the surface. Therefore, the role of the surface structure seems to become limited. Afterwards, the motion of vibrationally excited CH4 is included in the MD simulations. This is done by first calculating the normal coordinates of the vibrational modes. These are

  16. Highly selective plasma-activated copper catalysts for carbon dioxide reduction to ethylene.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Hemma; Varela, Ana Sofia; Bonifacio, Cecile S; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Sinev, Ilya; Choi, Yong-Wook; Kisslinger, Kim; Stach, Eric A; Yang, Judith C; Strasser, Peter; Cuenya, Beatriz Roldan

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need to develop technologies that use renewable energy to convert waste products such as carbon dioxide into hydrocarbon fuels. Carbon dioxide can be electrochemically reduced to hydrocarbons over copper catalysts, although higher efficiency is required. We have developed oxidized copper catalysts displaying lower overpotentials for carbon dioxide electroreduction and record selectivity towards ethylene (60%) through facile and tunable plasma treatments. Herein we provide insight into the improved performance of these catalysts by combining electrochemical measurements with microscopic and spectroscopic characterization techniques. Operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy and cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy show that copper oxides are surprisingly resistant to reduction and copper(+) species remain on the surface during the reaction. Our results demonstrate that the roughness of oxide-derived copper catalysts plays only a partial role in determining the catalytic performance, while the presence of copper(+) is key for lowering the onset potential and enhancing ethylene selectivity.

  17. Highly selective plasma-activated copper catalysts for carbon dioxide reduction to ethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mistry, Hemma; Varela, Ana Sofia; Bonifacio, Cecile S.; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Sinev, Ilya; Choi, Yong-Wook; Kisslinger, Kim; Stach, Eric A.; Yang, Judith C.; Strasser, Peter; Cuenya, Beatriz Roldan

    2016-06-01

    There is an urgent need to develop technologies that use renewable energy to convert waste products such as carbon dioxide into hydrocarbon fuels. Carbon dioxide can be electrochemically reduced to hydrocarbons over copper catalysts, although higher efficiency is required. We have developed oxidized copper catalysts displaying lower overpotentials for carbon dioxide electroreduction and record selectivity towards ethylene (60%) through facile and tunable plasma treatments. Herein we provide insight into the improved performance of these catalysts by combining electrochemical measurements with microscopic and spectroscopic characterization techniques. Operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy and cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy show that copper oxides are surprisingly resistant to reduction and copper+ species remain on the surface during the reaction. Our results demonstrate that the roughness of oxide-derived copper catalysts plays only a partial role in determining the catalytic performance, while the presence of copper+ is key for lowering the onset potential and enhancing ethylene selectivity.

  18. Highly selective plasma-activated copper catalysts for carbon dioxide reduction to ethylene

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Hemma; Varela, Ana Sofia; Bonifacio, Cecile S.; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Sinev, Ilya; Choi, Yong-Wook; Kisslinger, Kim; Stach, Eric A.; Yang, Judith C.; Strasser, Peter; Cuenya, Beatriz Roldan

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need to develop technologies that use renewable energy to convert waste products such as carbon dioxide into hydrocarbon fuels. Carbon dioxide can be electrochemically reduced to hydrocarbons over copper catalysts, although higher efficiency is required. We have developed oxidized copper catalysts displaying lower overpotentials for carbon dioxide electroreduction and record selectivity towards ethylene (60%) through facile and tunable plasma treatments. Herein we provide insight into the improved performance of these catalysts by combining electrochemical measurements with microscopic and spectroscopic characterization techniques. Operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy and cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy show that copper oxides are surprisingly resistant to reduction and copper+ species remain on the surface during the reaction. Our results demonstrate that the roughness of oxide-derived copper catalysts plays only a partial role in determining the catalytic performance, while the presence of copper+ is key for lowering the onset potential and enhancing ethylene selectivity. PMID:27356485

  19. Effects of impregnation pH on the surface structure and hydrodesulfurization activity of Mo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Houalla, M.; Kibby, C.L.; Petrakis, L.; Hercules, D.M.

    1983-09-01

    A series of Mo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ (molybdenum/alumina) catalysts was prepared by incipient wetness impregnation at various pH's (4.0, 5.4, 7.1, and 11.0) using a fixed amount of Mo (8% Mo). The effect of pH on the state and dispersion of Mo species in the dried, calcined, and reduced catalysts was investigated by the combined use of two surface sensitive techniques: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, ESCA) and ion scattering spectroscopy (ISS). The surface properties were correlated to thiophene hydrodesulfurization activities for the various catalysts. A tentative interpretation of the influence of pH of the Mo impregnating solution on the surface structure of Mo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts at various stages of their preparation is proposed. 8 figures, 1 table.

  20. Causes of Activation and Deactivation of Modified Nanogold Catalysts during Prolonged Storage and Redox Treatments.

    PubMed

    Kolobova, Ekaterina; Kotolevich, Yulia; Pakrieva, Ekaterina; Mamontov, Grigory; Farías, Mario H; Bogdanchikova, Nina; Cortés Corberán, Vicente; Pestryakov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    The catalytic properties of modified Au/TiO₂ catalysts for low-temperature CO oxidation are affected by deactivation and reactivation after long-term storage and by redox treatments. The effect of these phenomena on the catalysts was studied by HRTEM, BET, SEM, FTIR CO, XPS and H₂ TPR methods. The main cause for the deactivation and reactivation of catalytic properties is the variation in the electronic state of the supported gold, mainly, the proportion of singly charged ions Au⁺. The most active samples are those with the highest proportion of singly charged gold ions, while catalysts with a high content of trivalent gold ions are inactive at low-temperatures. Active states of gold, resistant to changes caused by the reaction process and storage conditions, can be stabilized by modification of the titanium oxide support with transition metals oxides. The catalyst modified with lanthanum oxide shows the highest stability and activity. PMID:27089310

  1. Causes of Activation and Deactivation of Modified Nanogold Catalysts during Prolonged Storage and Redox Treatments.

    PubMed

    Kolobova, Ekaterina; Kotolevich, Yulia; Pakrieva, Ekaterina; Mamontov, Grigory; Farías, Mario H; Bogdanchikova, Nina; Cortés Corberán, Vicente; Pestryakov, Alexey

    2016-04-13

    The catalytic properties of modified Au/TiO₂ catalysts for low-temperature CO oxidation are affected by deactivation and reactivation after long-term storage and by redox treatments. The effect of these phenomena on the catalysts was studied by HRTEM, BET, SEM, FTIR CO, XPS and H₂ TPR methods. The main cause for the deactivation and reactivation of catalytic properties is the variation in the electronic state of the supported gold, mainly, the proportion of singly charged ions Au⁺. The most active samples are those with the highest proportion of singly charged gold ions, while catalysts with a high content of trivalent gold ions are inactive at low-temperatures. Active states of gold, resistant to changes caused by the reaction process and storage conditions, can be stabilized by modification of the titanium oxide support with transition metals oxides. The catalyst modified with lanthanum oxide shows the highest stability and activity.

  2. Structure and activity of tellurium/molybdenum oxide acrylonitrile catalysts. [Ammoxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Bart, J.C.J.; Giordano, N.

    1980-08-01

    The tellurium/molybdenum mixed oxides ((TeMo)O) catalyst system was investigated as part of the development of an industrial cerium/tellurium/molybdenum mixed oxides catalyst for propylene ammoxidation Catalysts containing 25% active phase on silica were prepared, characterized by BET surface area measurement, mercury porosimetry, X-ray diffraction, and optical microscopy, and tested for the ammoxidation of propylene at 400/sup 0/-460/sup 0/C in a flow reactor. The results suggested that Te/sub 2/MoO/sub 7/ is the active phase. The mechanism probably involves activation of propylene on a tellurium site and oxygen insertion at isolated and highly distorted MoO/sub 6/ octahedral sites. The addition of cerium to the binary catalyst prevents the reductive degradation of (TeMo)O which occurs under reactor flow conditions by a phase-separation process.

  3. Sulphate-activated growth of bamboo-like carbon nanotubes over copper catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jarrn-Horng; Chen, Ching-Shiun; Zeng, Zhi-Yan; Chang, Chia-Wei; Chen, Hsiu-Wei

    2012-07-01

    A sulphate-activated mechanism is proposed to describe the growth of bamboo-like carbon nanotubes (CNTs) over copper catalysts using chemical vapour deposition with helium-diluted ethylene. Sulphate-assisted copper catalysts afford a high-yield growth of bamboo-like CNTs at a mild temperature, 800 °C however, non-sulphate-assisted copper catalysts, e.g., copper acetate and copper nitrate prepared catalysts, were inert to CNT growth and only gave amorphous carbons (a-C) surrounding copper nanoparticles under the same conditions. Nevertheless, the addition of sulphate ions in the preparation step for the two inert catalysts can activate their abilities for CNT growth with remarkable yields. Furthermore, Raman spectra analysis demonstrates a linear dependence between the concentration of sulphate ions in copper catalysts and the ratio of CNT-a-C in the as-grown carbon soot. The sulphate-activated effect on CNT growth over copper catalysts could be related to a three-way interaction of sulphate ions, copper nanoparticles and support. In situ TEM images of an as-grown CNT irradiated by electron beams without the inlet of carbon sources reveal a new pathway of carbon diffusion through the bulk of copper nanoparticles and an enlarged inner-wall thickness of the on-site CNT. This carbon diffusion model over copper catalysts can provide new insights into the CNT growth mechanism over non-magnetic metal catalysts.A sulphate-activated mechanism is proposed to describe the growth of bamboo-like carbon nanotubes (CNTs) over copper catalysts using chemical vapour deposition with helium-diluted ethylene. Sulphate-assisted copper catalysts afford a high-yield growth of bamboo-like CNTs at a mild temperature, 800 °C however, non-sulphate-assisted copper catalysts, e.g., copper acetate and copper nitrate prepared catalysts, were inert to CNT growth and only gave amorphous carbons (a-C) surrounding copper nanoparticles under the same conditions. Nevertheless, the addition of

  4. Surface Chemistry and Properties of Oxides as Catalyst Supports

    SciTech Connect

    DeBusk, Melanie Moses; Narula, Chaitanya Kumar; Contescu, Cristian I

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous catalysis relies on metal-oxides as supports for the catalysts. Catalyst supports are an indispensable component of most heterogeneous catalysts, but the role of the support is often minimized in light of the one played by the catalytically active species it supports. The active species of supported catalysts are located on the surface of the support where their contact with liquid or gas phase reactants will be greatest. Considering that support plays a major role in distribution and stability of active species, the absorption and retention of reactive species, and in some cases in catalytic reaction, the properties and chemistry that can occur at the surface of an oxide support are important for understanding their impact on the activity of a supported catalyst. This chapter examines this rich surface chemistry and properties of oxides used as catalyst supports, and explores the influence of their interaction with the active species.

  5. Alkene epoxidations catalysed by Mo(VI) supported on imidazole-containing polymers I. Synthesis, characterisation, and activity of catalysts in the epoxidation of cyclohexene

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.M.; Sherrington, D.C.

    1995-04-01

    Polystyrene resins functionalised with hydroxylpropyl aminomethyl pyridine, pyridyl imidazole, and carboxybenzimidazole, polyglycidyl methacrylate resins functionalised with aminomethyl pyridine and pyridyl imidazole, and polybenzimidazole resin have all been loaded with Mo(VI). The resulting polymer metal complexes have been activated by treatment with t-butylhydroperoxide, then used as catalysts in the liquid-phase epoxidation of cyclohexene using t-butylhydroperoxide. Polymers containing the imidazole group were particularly active, and unlike the other species did not require preactivation to induce high activity. The complexes formed with the imidazole-containing polymers appear to be monometallic species, whereas the other polymer ligands yield oxybridged bimetallic species. This accounts for the major difference in activity recorded. Possible structures for the catalysts are proposed based on information in the literature. 30 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Effect of Support on the Activity of Ag-based Catalysts for Formaldehyde Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianghao; Li, Yaobin; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Min; Wang, Lian; Zhang, Changbin; He, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Ag-based catalysts with different supports (TiO2, Al2O3 and CeO2) were prepared by impregnation method and subsequently tested for the catalytic oxidation of formaldehyde (HCHO) at low temperature. The Ag/TiO2 catalyst showed the distinctive catalytic performance, achieving the complete HCHO conversion at around 95 °C. In contrast, the Ag/Al2O3 and Ag/CeO2 catalysts displayed much lower activity and the 100% conversion was reached at 110 °C and higher than 125 °C, respectively. The Ag-based catalysts were next characterized by several methods. The characterization results revealed that supports have the dramatic influence on the Ag particle sizes and dispersion. Kinetic tests showed that the Ag based catalyst on the TiO2, Al2O3 or CeO2 supports have the similar apparent activation energy of 65 kJ mol−1, indicating that the catalytic mechanism keep immutability over these three catalysts. Therefore, Ag particle size and dispersion was confirmed to be the main factor affecting the catalytic performance for HCHO oxidation. The Ag/TiO2 catalyst has the highest Ag dispersion and the smallest Ag particle size, accordingly presenting the best catalytic performance for HCHO oxidation. PMID:26263506

  7. Decoupling HZSM-5 catalyst activity from deactivation during upgrading of pyrolysis oil vapors.

    PubMed

    Wan, Shaolong; Waters, Christopher; Stevens, Adam; Gumidyala, Abhishek; Jentoft, Rolf; Lobban, Lance; Resasco, Daniel; Mallinson, Richard; Crossley, Steven

    2015-02-01

    The independent evaluation of catalyst activity and stability during the catalytic pyrolysis of biomass is challenging because of the nature of the reaction system and rapid catalyst deactivation that force the use of excess catalyst. In this contribution we use a modified pyroprobe system in which pulses of pyrolysis vapors are converted over a series of HZSM-5 catalysts in a separate fixed-bed reactor controlled independently. Both the reactor-bed temperature and the Si/Al ratio of the zeolite are varied to evaluate catalyst activity and deactivation rates independently both on a constant surface area and constant acid site basis. Results show that there is an optimum catalyst-bed temperature for the production of aromatics, above which the production of light gases increases and that of aromatics decrease. Zeolites with lower Si/Al ratios give comparable initial rates for aromatics production, but far more rapid catalyst deactivation rates than those with higher Si/Al ratios. PMID:25504857

  8. Catalytic activity of bimetallic catalysts highly sensitive to the atomic composition and phase structure at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Shan, Shiyao; Petkov, Valeri; Prasai, Binay; Wu, Jinfang; Joseph, Pharrah; Skeete, Zakiya; Kim, Eunjoo; Mott, Derrick; Malis, Oana; Luo, Jin; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2015-12-01

    The ability to determine the atomic arrangement in nanoalloy catalysts and reveal the detailed structural features responsible for the catalytically active sites is essential for understanding the correlation between the atomic structure and catalytic properties, enabling the preparation of efficient nanoalloy catalysts by design. Herein we describe a study of CO oxidation over PdCu nanoalloy catalysts focusing on gaining insights into the correlation between the atomic structures and catalytic activity of nanoalloys. PdCu nanoalloys of different bimetallic compositions are synthesized as a model system and are activated by a controlled thermochemical treatment for assessing their catalytic activity. The results show that the catalytic synergy of Pd and Cu species evolves with both the bimetallic nanoalloy composition and temperature of the thermochemical treatment reaching a maximum at a Pd : Cu ratio close to 50 : 50. The nanoalloys are characterized structurally by ex situ and in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction, including atomic pair distribution function analysis. The structural data show that, depending on the bimetallic composition and treatment temperature, PdCu nanoalloys adopt two different structure types. One features a chemically ordered, body centered cubic (B2) type alloy consisting of two interpenetrating simple cubic lattices, each occupied with Pd or Cu species alone, and the other structure type features a chemically disordered, face-centered cubic (fcc) type of alloy wherein Pd and Cu species are intermixed at random. The catalytic activity for CO oxidation is strongly influenced by the structural features. In particular, it is revealed that the prevalence of chemical disorder in nanoalloys with a Pd : Cu ratio close to 50 : 50 makes them superior catalysts for CO oxidation in comparison with the same nanoalloys of other bimetallic compositions. However, the catalytic synergy can be diminished if the Pd50Cu50 nanoalloys undergo

  9. Surface state and catalytic activity and selectivity of nickel catalysts in hydrogenation reactions. III. Electronic and catalytic properties of nickel catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Y.; Nitta, Y.; Imanaka, T.; Teranishi, S.

    1980-08-01

    Various nickel catalysts (nickle-boride, nickel-phosphide, Raney-nickel, Urushibara-nickel, and decomposed-nickel) were investigated to examine the relationships between catalytic and electronic properties of nickel catalysts modified by component elements (boron, phosphorus, aluminum, and zinc) in the catalysts. Based on the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic results, a parameter ..delta..q was tentatively proposed to characterize the electronic properties of the catalysts. The specific activity (activity per surface area of nickel metal) for hydrogenation reaction, the adsorption equilibrium constant of acetophenone, the resistivity against poisoning, and the characteristic selectivities in hydrogenation of 1,2-butylene oxide were found to be summarized in terms of the parameter ..delta..q. It is suggested that a useful parameter to reflect the electronic properties of the nickel catalysts.

  10. Catalysts possessing augmented C-O and C-N hydrogenolysis activity. Preliminary progress report, August-September 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Massoth, F.E.; Shabtai, J.S.

    1983-10-31

    The aim of the proposed research is to synthesize and investigate new sulfided catalyst systems having higher carbon-heteroatom hydrogenolysis activity as compared to ring hydrogenation activity. A fundamental approach is planned to gain understanding of the basic catalytic properties which relate to hydrogenolysis, hydrogenation and cracking functions of the catalysts. This will involve preparation of new catalysts, characterization of their properties and model compound reactivity studies. In another part of the project, selected catalysts will be applied in studies of more complex O- and N-containing model compounds with the objective of providing fundamental data on the stereochemistry of HDO and HDN reactions. These data will be used to develop steric surface-reactant models for sulfided catalysts. These new catalysts should be of particular importance for upgrading of coal-derived liquids and solids, as well as other heavy feedstocks. The research is divided into four tasks: (1) catalyst preparation and activity testing; (2) catalyst characterization; (2) study of catalyst activity under hydroprocessing conditions; and (4) stereochemical studies. This report covers a period of only one month. Work was initiated on catalyst preparation. A brief literature search was made to ascertain what different preparation methods can be applied to supported sulfide catalysts besides the standard wetness method. Several Cr/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts containing Co or Ni were prepared by the standard impregnation method. 3 references.

  11. Method of treating intermetallic alloy hydrogenation/oxidation catalysts for improved impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration and increased activity

    DOEpatents

    Wright, Randy B.

    1992-01-01

    Alternate, successive high temperature oxidation and reduction treatments, in either order, of intermetallic alloy hydrogenation and intermetallic alloy oxidation catalysts unexpectedly improves the impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration capacity and/or activity of the catalysts. The particular alloy, and the final high temperature treatment given alloy (oxidation or reduction) will be chosen to correspond to the function of the catalyst (oxidation or hydrogenation).

  12. An alternative approach to PEPPSI catalysts: from palladium isonitriles to highly active unsymmetrically substituted PEPPSI catalysts.

    PubMed

    Zeiler, Anna; Rudolph, Matthias; Rominger, Frank; Hashmi, A Stephen K

    2015-07-27

    A series of new pyridine-enhanced precatalyst preparation, stabilization, and initiation (PEPPSI)-type complexes bearing different types of carbene ligands was prepared by the modular and convergent template synthesis strategy. Nitrogen acyclic carbenes, saturated and unsaturated five-membered NHC, saturated six-membered NHCs, and five-membered N-heterocyclic oxo-carbene (NHOC) ligands on palladium were prepared this way. These new organometallic compounds then were tested in Suzuki and Negishi cross-coupling reactions by using substrates with one or two substituents in ortho-position of the new CC bond being formed. Both aryl chlorides and bromides were tested as coupling partners. In some cases, the new ligands gave results similar to Organ's successful IPr-based and IPent-based PEPPSI derivatives, with aryl bromides 0.05 mol % catalyst load still gave satisfactory results, with aryl chlorides 0.5 mol % were needed. PMID:26096141

  13. Fischer-Tropsch Cobalt Catalyst Activation and Handling Through Wax Enclosure Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klettlinger, Jennifer L. S.; Yen, Chia H.; Nakley, Leah M.; Surgenor, Angela D.

    2016-01-01

    Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis is considered a gas to liquid process which converts syn-gas, a gaseous mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide, into liquids of various hydrocarbon chain length and product distributions. Cobalt based catalysts are used in F-T synthesis and are the focus of this paper. One key concern with handling cobalt based catalysts is that the active form of catalyst is in a reduced state, metallic cobalt, which oxidizes readily in air. In laboratory experiments, the precursor cobalt oxide catalyst is activated in a fixed bed at 350 ?C then transferred into a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) with inert gas. NASA has developed a process which involves the enclosure of active cobalt catalyst in a wax mold to prevent oxidation during storage and handling. This improved method allows for precise catalyst loading and delivery into a CSTR. Preliminary results indicate similar activity levels in the F-T reaction in comparison to the direct injection method. The work in this paper was supported by the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Subsonics Fixed Wing Project.

  14. Renewable phenols production by catalytic microwave pyrolysis of Douglas fir sawdust pellets with activated carbon catalysts.

    PubMed

    Bu, Quan; Lei, Hanwu; Wang, Lu; Wei, Yi; Zhu, Lei; Liu, Yupeng; Liang, Jing; Tang, Juming

    2013-08-01

    The effects of different activated carbon (AC) catalysts based on various carbon sources on products yield and chemical compositions of upgraded pyrolysis oils were investigated using microwave pyrolysis of Douglas fir sawdust pellets. Results showed that high amounts of phenols were obtained (74.61% and 74.77% in the upgraded bio-oils by DARCO MRX (wood based) and DARCO 830 (lignite coal based) activated carbons, respectively). The catalysts recycling test of the selected catalysts indicated that the carbon catalysts can be reused for at least 3-4 times and produced high concentrations of phenol and phenolic compounds. The chemical reaction mechanism for phenolics production during microwave pyrolysis of biomass was analyzed. PMID:23765005

  15. Catalyst dispersion and activity under conditions of temperature-staged liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.; Schobert, H.H.; Mitchell, G.D.; Artok, L.

    1992-02-01

    The general objectives of this research are (1) to investigate the use of highly dispersed catalysts for the pretreatment of coal by mild hydrogenation, (2) to identify the active forms of the catalysts under reaction conditions and (3) to clarify the mechanisms of catalysis. The ultimate objective is to ascertain if mild catalytic hydrogenation resulting in very limited or no coal solubilization is an advantageous pretreatment for the transformation of coal into transportable fuels. The experimental program will focus upon the development of effective methods of impregnating coal with catalysts, evaluating the conditions under which the catalysts are most active and establishing the relative impact of improved impregnation on conversion and product distributions obtained from coal hydrogenation.

  16. Renewable phenols production by catalytic microwave pyrolysis of Douglas fir sawdust pellets with activated carbon catalysts.

    PubMed

    Bu, Quan; Lei, Hanwu; Wang, Lu; Wei, Yi; Zhu, Lei; Liu, Yupeng; Liang, Jing; Tang, Juming

    2013-08-01

    The effects of different activated carbon (AC) catalysts based on various carbon sources on products yield and chemical compositions of upgraded pyrolysis oils were investigated using microwave pyrolysis of Douglas fir sawdust pellets. Results showed that high amounts of phenols were obtained (74.61% and 74.77% in the upgraded bio-oils by DARCO MRX (wood based) and DARCO 830 (lignite coal based) activated carbons, respectively). The catalysts recycling test of the selected catalysts indicated that the carbon catalysts can be reused for at least 3-4 times and produced high concentrations of phenol and phenolic compounds. The chemical reaction mechanism for phenolics production during microwave pyrolysis of biomass was analyzed.

  17. Quantifying the density and utilization of active sites in non-precious metal oxygen electroreduction catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Sahraie, Nastaran Ranjbar; Kramm, Ulrike I.; Steinberg, Julian; Zhang, Yuanjian; Thomas, Arne; Reier, Tobias; Paraknowitsch, Jens-Peter; Strasser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Carbon materials doped with transition metal and nitrogen are highly active, non-precious metal catalysts for the electrochemical conversion of molecular oxygen in fuel cells, metal air batteries, and electrolytic processes. However, accurate measurement of their intrinsic turn-over frequency and active-site density based on metal centres in bulk and surface has remained difficult to date, which has hampered a more rational catalyst design. Here we report a successful quantification of bulk and surface-based active-site density and associated turn-over frequency values of mono- and bimetallic Fe/N-doped carbons using a combination of chemisorption, desorption and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. Our general approach yields an experimental descriptor for the intrinsic activity and the active-site utilization, aiding in the catalyst development process and enabling a previously unachieved level of understanding of reactivity trends owing to a deconvolution of site density and intrinsic activity. PMID:26486465

  18. Role of pH in the formation of structurally stable and catalytically active supported gold catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Veith, Gabriel M; Lupini, Andrew R; Dudney, Nancy J

    2009-01-01

    We report the investigation of titania (Degussa P25) supported gold catalysts prepared by magnetron sputtering. Catalysts grown on natural fumed titania were structurally unstable, resulting in the rapid coarsening of 2.4 nm gold clusters into large {approx}20 nm gold clusters in a few days at room temperature under normal atmospheric conditions. However, treating the titania support powder to a mock deposition-precipitation process, at pH 4, followed by the subsequent deposition of gold onto this treated powder produced a remarkable enhancement in gold particle stability and a 20-fold enhancement of catalytic activity. Furthermore, it was found that treating the titania under basic conditions (pH 10) resulted in a further enhancement of structural stability and a further doubling of the reaction rate to 0.28 mol of CO/mol of Au {center_dot} s. This enhancement cannot be attributed to removing surface Cl{sup -} species from the titania, the formation of oxygen vacancies on the TiO{sub 2} surface, or an electronic effect. Instead, it appears to be associated with the formation of strongly bound hydroxyl species on the TiO{sub 2} surface. The formation of surface hydroxyls during the deposition-precipitation method is coincidental and contributes significantly to the properties of Au/TiO{sub 2} catalysts.

  19. Activation and deactivation of a robust immobilized Cp*Ir-transfer hydrogenation catalyst: a multielement in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Sherborne, Grant J; Chapman, Michael R; Blacker, A John; Bourne, Richard A; Chamberlain, Thomas W; Crossley, Benjamin D; Lucas, Stephanie J; McGowan, Patrick C; Newton, Mark A; Screen, Thomas E O; Thompson, Paul; Willans, Charlotte E; Nguyen, Bao N

    2015-04-01

    A highly robust immobilized [Cp*IrCl2]2 precatalyst on Wang resin for transfer hydrogenation, which can be recycled up to 30 times, was studied using a novel combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at Ir L3-edge, Cl K-edge, and K K-edge. These culminate in in situ XAS experiments that link structural changes of the Ir complex with its catalytic activity and its deactivation. Mercury poisoning and "hot filtration" experiments ruled out leached Ir as the active catalyst. Spectroscopic evidence indicates the exchange of one chloride ligand with an alkoxide to generate the active precatalyst. The exchange of the second chloride ligand, however, leads to a potassium alkoxide-iridate species as the deactivated form of this immobilized catalyst. These findings could be widely applicable to the many homogeneous transfer hydrogenation catalysts with Cp*IrCl substructure.

  20. Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes as a highly active metal-free catalyst for selective oxidation.

    PubMed

    Chizari, Kambiz; Deneuve, Adrien; Ersen, Ovidiu; Florea, Ileana; Liu, Yu; Edouard, David; Janowska, Izabela; Begin, Dominique; Pham-Huu, Cuong

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic reactions are generally carried out on supported metals or oxides, which act as an active phase and require impregnation and thermal treatment steps. During tests, the metal or oxide nanoparticles could be further sintered, which would induces deactivation. Direct incorporation of the active phase into the matrix of a support could be an elegant alternative to prevent catalyst deactivation. Here, we report that nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs) can be efficiently employed as a metal-free catalyst for oxidative reactions that allow the selective transformation of the harmful, gaseous H(2)S into solid sulfur. The catalyst exhibits a high stability during the test at high space velocity. The macroscopic shaping of the catalyst on the silicon carbide foam also increases its catalytic activity by improving the contact between the reactants and the catalyst. Such macroscopic shaping allows the avoidance of problems linked with transport and handling of nanoscopic materials and also reduces the pressure drop across the catalyst bed to a large extent.

  1. ALTERNATIVE ROUTES FOR CATALYST PREPARATION: USE OF ULTRASOUND AND MICROWAVE IRRADIATION FOR THE PREPARATION OF VANADIUM PHOSPHORUS OXIDE CATALYST AND THEIR ACTIVITY FOR HYDROCARBON OXIDATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vanadium phosphorus oxide (VPO) has been prepared using ultrasound and microwave irradiation methods and compared with the catalyst prepared by conventional method for both the phase composition and activity for hydrocarbon oxidation. It is found that ultrasound irradiation metho...

  2. Iridium Ziegler-Type Hydrogenation Catalysts Made from [(1,5-COD)Ir( -O2C8H15)]2 and AlEt3: Spectroscopic and Kinetic Evidence for the Irn Species Present and for Nanoparticles as the Fastest Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Alley, W.; Hamdemir, I; Wang, Q; Frenkel, A; Li, L; Yang, J; Menard, L; Nuzzo, R; Ozkar, S; Finke, R

    2010-01-01

    Ziegler-type hydrogenation catalysts, those made from a group 8-10 transition metal precatalyst and an AlR{sub 3} cocatalyst, are often used for large scale industrial polymer hydrogenation; note that Ziegler-type hydrogenation catalysts are not the same as Ziegler-Natta polymerization catalysts. A review of prior studies of Ziegler-type hydrogenation catalysts (Alley et al. J. Mol. Catal. A: Chem. 2010, 315, 1-27) reveals that a {approx}50 year old problem is identifying the metal species present before, during, and after Ziegler-type hydrogenation catalysis, and which species are the kinetically best, fastest catalysts-that is, which species are the true hydrogenation catalysts. Also of significant interest is whether what we have termed 'Ziegler nanoclusters' are present and what their relative catalytic activity is. Reported herein is the characterization of an Ir Ziegler-type hydrogenation catalyst, a valuable model (vide infra) for the Co-based industrial Ziegler-type hydrogenation catalyst, made from the crystallographically characterized [(1,5-COD)Ir({mu}-O{sub 2}C{sub 8}H{sub 15})]{sub 2} precatalyst plus AlEt{sub 3}. Characterization of this Ir model system is accomplished before and after catalysis using a battery of physical methods including Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), high resolution (HR)TEM, and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. Kinetic studies plus Hg(0) poisoning experiments are then employed to probe which species are the fastest catalysts. The main findings herein are that (i) a combination of the catalyst precursors [(1,5-COD)Ir({mu}-O{sub 2}C{sub 8}H{sub 15})]{sub 2} and AlEt{sub 3} gives catalytically active solutions containing a broad distribution of Ir{sub n} species ranging from monometallic Ir complexes to nanometer scale, noncrystalline Ir{sub n} nanoclusters (up to Ir{sub {approx}100} by Z-contrast STEM) with the estimated mean Ir species being 0.5-0.7 nm, Ir{sub {approx}4-15} clusters

  3. Structure-Activity Relationship Studies of Cyclopropenimines as Enantioselective Brønsted Base Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Bandar, Jeffrey S.; Barthelme, Alexandre P.; Mazori, Alon Y.; Lambert, Tristan H.

    2015-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that chiral cyclopropenimines are viable Brønsted base catalysts in enantioselective Michael and Mannich reactions. Herein, we describe a series of structure-activity relationship studies that provide an enhanced understanding of the effectiveness of certain cyclopropenimines as enantioselective Brønsted base catalysts. These studies underscore the crucial importance of dicyclohexylamino substituents in mediating both reaction rate and enantioselectivity. In addition, an unusual catalyst CH···O interaction, which provides both ground state and transition state organization, is discussed. Cyclopropenimine stability studies have led to the identification of new catalysts with greatly improved stability. Finally, additional demonstrations of substrate scope and current limitations are provided herein. PMID:26504512

  4. The effect of catalyst preparation on catalytic activity: Final report, December 1, 1983-November 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, J.A.

    1986-12-01

    The performance of catalysts has been shown to be strongly dependent on their methods of preparation. The objective of our research has been to examine the effect of preparation procedures including metal concentration and pH of the impregnation solution on the catalytic properties of supported-metal catalyst systems. Design parameters have been identified for Ni/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts propared by incipient wetness and wet impregnation from nickel nitrate solution in contact with a ..gamma..-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ support. The metal dispersion, activity for C/sub 1/, C/sub 2/, and C/sub 3/ formation under synthesis conditions, and the carbon deposited during reaction have been shown to be predictable based solely on the properties of the electrolytes from which these catalysts were formed.

  5. Acidic Properties and Structure-Activity Correlations of Solid Acid Catalysts Revealed by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Anmin; Li, Shenhui; Liu, Shang-Bin; Deng, Feng

    2016-04-19

    Solid acid materials with tunable structural and acidic properties are promising heterogeneous catalysts for manipulating and/or emulating the activity and selectivity of industrially important catalytic reactions. On the other hand, the performances of acid-catalyzed reactions are mostly dictated by the acidic features, namely, type (Brønsted vs Lewis acidity), amount, strength, and local environment of acid sites. The latter is relevant to their location (intra- vs extracrystalline), and possible confinement and Brønsted-Lewis acid synergy effects that may strongly affect the host-guest interactions, reaction mechanism, and shape selectivity of the catalytic system. This account aims to highlight some important applications of state-of-the-art solid-state NMR (SSNMR) techniques for exploring the structural and acidic properties of solid acid catalysts as well as their catalytic performances and relevant reaction pathway invoked. In addition, density functional theory (DFT) calculations may be exploited in conjunction with experimental SSNMR studies to verify the structure-activity correlations of the catalytic system at a microscopic scale. We describe in this Account the developments and applications of advanced ex situ and/or in situ SSNMR techniques, such as two-dimensional (2D) double-quantum magic-angle spinning (DQ MAS) homonuclear correlation spectroscopy for structural investigation of solid acids as well as study of their acidic properties. Moreover, the energies and electronic structures of the catalysts and detailed catalytic reaction processes, including the identification of reaction species, elucidation of reaction mechanism, and verification of structure-activity correlations, made available by DFT theoretical calculations were also discussed. Relevant discussions will focus primarily on results obtained from our laboratories in the past decade, including (i) quantitative and qualitative acidity characterization utilizing assorted probe molecules

  6. TiO2 nanotubes supported NiW hydrodesulphurization catalysts: Characterization and activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palcheva, R.; Dimitrov, L.; Tyuliev, G.; Spojakina, A.; Jiratova, K.

    2013-01-01

    High surface area TiO2 nanotubes (Ti-NT) synthesized by alkali hydrothermal method were used as a support for NiW hydrodesulphurization catalyst. Nickel salt of 12-tungstophosphoric acid - Ni3/2PW12O40 was applied as oxide precursor of the active components. The catalyst was characterized by SBET, XRD, UV-vis DRS, Raman spectroscopy, XPS, TPR and HRTEM. The results obtained were compared with those for the NiW catalysts prepared over high surface area titania and alumina supports. A polytungstate phase evidenced by Raman spectroscopy was observed indicating the destruction of the initial heteropolyanion. The catalytic experiments revealed two times higher thiophene conversion on NiW catalyst supported on Ti-NT than those of catalysts supported on alumina and titania. Increased HDS activity of the NiW catalyst supported on Ti-NT could be related to a higher amount of W oxysulfide entities interacting with Ni sulfide particles as consequence of the electronic effects of the Ti-NT observed with XPS analysis.

  7. A Frontier Molecular Orbital determination of the active sites on dispersed metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, R.L.; Lahanas, K.M.

    1992-11-01

    An angular overlap calculation has been used to determine the s, p and d orbital energy levels of the different types of surface sites present on a dispersed metal catalysts. The basis for these calculations is the reported finding that a large number of catalyzed reactions take place on single atom active sites on the metal surface. Thus, these sites can be considered as surface complexes made up of the central active atom surrounded by near-neighbor metal atom ``ligands`` with localized surface orbitals perturbed only by these ``ligands``. These ``complexes`` are based on a twelve coordinate species with the ``ligands`` attached to the t{sub 2g} orbitals and the coordinate axes coincident with the direction of the e{sub g} orbitals on the central atom. These data can permit a Frontier Molecular Orbital treatment of specific site activities as long as the surface orbital availability for overlap with adsorbed substrates is considered along with its energy value and symmetry.

  8. A Frontier Molecular Orbital determination of the active sites on dispersed metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, R.L.; Lahanas, K.M.

    1992-01-01

    An angular overlap calculation has been used to determine the s, p and d orbital energy levels of the different types of surface sites present on a dispersed metal catalysts. The basis for these calculations is the reported finding that a large number of catalyzed reactions take place on single atom active sites on the metal surface. Thus, these sites can be considered as surface complexes made up of the central active atom surrounded by near-neighbor metal atom ligands'' with localized surface orbitals perturbed only by these ligands''. These complexes'' are based on a twelve coordinate species with the ligands'' attached to the t{sub 2g} orbitals and the coordinate axes coincident with the direction of the e{sub g} orbitals on the central atom. These data can permit a Frontier Molecular Orbital treatment of specific site activities as long as the surface orbital availability for overlap with adsorbed substrates is considered along with its energy value and symmetry.

  9. Stable N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC)-palladium(0) complexes as active catalysts for olefin cyclopropanation reactions with ethyl diazoacetate.

    PubMed

    Martín, Carmen; Molina, Francisco; Alvarez, Eleuterio; Belderrain, Tomás R

    2011-12-23

    The Pd(0) complexes [(NHC)PdL(n)] (NHC=N-heterocyclic carbene ligand; L=styrene for n=2 or PR(3) for n=1) efficiently catalyse olefin cyclopropanation by using ethyl diazoacetate (EDA) as the carbene source with activities that improve on previously described catalytic systems based on this metal. Mechanistic studies have shown that all of these catalyst precursors deliver the same catalytic species in solution, that is, [(IPr)Pd(sty)], a 14e(-) unsaturated intermediate that further reacts with EDA to afford [(IPr)Pd(=CHCO(2)Et)(sty)], from which the cyclopropane is formed.

  10. Computational approaches to the determination of active site structures and reaction mechanisms in heterogeneous catalysts.

    PubMed

    Catlow, C R A; French, S A; Sokol, A A; Thomas, J M

    2005-04-15

    We apply quantum chemical methods to the study of active site structures and reaction mechanisms in mesoporous silica and metal oxide catalysts. Our approach is based on the use of both molecular cluster and embedded cluster (QM/MM) techniques, where the active site and molecular complex are described using density functional theory (DFT) and the embedding matrix simulated by shell model potentials. We consider three case studies: alkene epoxidation over the microporous TS-1 catalyst; methanol synthesis on ZnO and Cu/ZnO and C-H bond activation over Li-doped MgO.

  11. Computational approaches to the determination of active site structures and reaction mechanisms in heterogeneous catalysts.

    PubMed

    Catlow, C R A; French, S A; Sokol, A A; Thomas, J M

    2005-04-15

    We apply quantum chemical methods to the study of active site structures and reaction mechanisms in mesoporous silica and metal oxide catalysts. Our approach is based on the use of both molecular cluster and embedded cluster (QM/MM) techniques, where the active site and molecular complex are described using density functional theory (DFT) and the embedding matrix simulated by shell model potentials. We consider three case studies: alkene epoxidation over the microporous TS-1 catalyst; methanol synthesis on ZnO and Cu/ZnO and C-H bond activation over Li-doped MgO. PMID:15901543

  12. C-H functionalization: thoroughly tuning ligands at a metal ion, a chemist can greatly enhance catalyst's activity and selectivity.

    PubMed

    Shul'pin, Georgiy B

    2013-09-28

    This brief essay consists of a few "exciting stories" devoted to relations within a metal-complex catalyst between a metal ion and a coordinated ligand. When, as in the case of a human couple, the rapport of the partners is cordial and a love cements these relations, a chemist finds an ideal married couple, in other words he obtains a catalyst of choice which allows him to functionalize C-H bonds very efficiently and selectively. Examples of such lucky marriages in the catalytic world of ions and ligands are discussed here. Activity of the catalyst is characterized by turnover number (TON) or turnover frequency (TOF) as well as by yield of a target product. Introducing a chelating N,N- or N,O-ligand to the catalyst molecule (this can be an iron or manganese derivative) sharply enhances its activity. However, the activity of vanadium derivatives (with additionally added to the solution pyrazinecarboxylic acid, PCA) as well as of various osmium complexes does not dramatically depend on the nature of ligands surrounding metal ions. Complexes of these metals are very efficient catalysts in oxidations with H2O2. Osmium derivatives are record-holders exhibiting extremely high TONs whereas vanadium complexes are on the second position. Finally, elegant examples of alkane functionalization on the ions of non-transition metals (aluminium, gallium etc.) are described when one ligand within the metal complex (namely, hydroperoxyl ligand HOO(-)) helps other ligand of this complex (H2O2 molecule coordinated to the metal) to disintegrate into two species, generating very reactive hydroxyl radical. Hydrogen peroxide molecule, even ligated to the metal ion, is perfectly stable without the assistance of the neighboring HOO(-) ligand. This ligand can be easily oxidized donating an electron to its partner ligand (H2O2). In an analogous case, when the central ion in the catalyst is a transition metal, this ion changing its oxidation state can donate an electron to the coordinated H2O2

  13. Precision control of radical polymerization via transition metal catalysis: from dormant species to designed catalysts for precision functional polymers.

    PubMed

    Ouchi, Makoto; Terashima, Takaya; Sawamoto, Mitsuo

    2008-09-01

    In the past decade, living radical polymerization has provided one of the most versatile methods to precisely construct designed polymer architectures with complexity and polar functionality. This process takes advantage of carbon-radical intermediates, which tolerate a variety of functional groups in monomers and reaction media. "Transition metal-catalyzed living radical polymerization", one of these living systems, has widely been employed for precision polymer synthesis. Not only can this process produce well-defined functional polymers, but it can also generate hybrids or conjugates with other (often biological) materials. Metal-catalyzed systems retain the advantages of conventional radical polymerization but distinguish themselves through a catalytic reversible halogen exchange equilibrium: the growing radical exists alongside a dormant speciesa covalent precursor capped with a terminal halogen from an initiator. The catalyst dictates the selectivity, exchange rate, and control over the polymerization. This Account provides an updated overview of our group's efforts in transition metal-catalyzed living radical polymerization with specific emphasis on the design of metal catalysts and the resulting precision polymer syntheses. With increasing use of the living processes as convenient tools for materials synthesis, researchers are currently seeking more active and versatile metal catalysts that are tolerant to functional groups. Such catalysts would enable a wider range of applications and target products, would have low metal content, could be readily removed from products, and would allow recycling. Since we first developed the "transition metal-catalyzed living radical polymerization" with RuCl 2(PPh 3) 3, FeCl 2(PPh 3) 2, and NiBr 2(PPh 3) 2, we have strived to systematically design metal catalysts to meet these new demands. For example, we have enhanced catalytic activity and control through several modifications: electron-donating or resonance

  14. Nanoscaled palladium catalysts on activated carbon support "Sibunit" for fine organic synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakova, I.; Koskin, A.; Deliy, I.; Simakov, A.

    2005-08-01

    The application of nanosized palladium catalysts has gained growing importance over the last few years. Palladiumbased catalytic methods for fine organic synthesis permits the replacement of traditional labor-consuming techniques in multi-step organic syntheses and provides an improvement from the standpoint of cost and environmental impact. The use of activated carbon "Sibunit" as a substrate for catalysts has been fostered by the substrate's high surface area, chemical inertness both in acidic and basic media, and at the same time by the absence of very strong acidic centers on its surface which could promote undesirable side reactions during the catalytic run. A conversion of alpha-pinene derivatives to commercial biologically active compounds and fragrances as well as sun screens with ultra violet filtering properties, involves a catalytic hydrogenation as a key intermediate step. The aim of the present work is to clarify the factors favoring the dispersion of Pd metal on carbon. The effect of reduction temperature and pretreatment of the carbon surface on metal size during preparation of Pd on "Sibunit" catalysts for selective verbenol conversion was studied. The electron microscopy method (TEM) was used to show the influence on Pd metal dispersion of carbon surface oxidation by the oxidant H2O2, HNO3. The catalytic activity of Pd/C catalyst samples in verbenol hydrogenation reaction was determined. Kinetic peculiarities of verbenol hydrogenation over the most active catalyst sample were obtained.

  15. Engineering catalytic activity via ion beam bombardment of catalyst supports for vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth

    DOE PAGES

    Islam, A. E.; Zakharov, D.; Stach, E. A.; Nikoleav, P.; Amama, P. B.; Sargent, G.; Saber, S.; Huffman, D.; Erford, M.; Semiatin, S. L.; et al

    2015-09-16

    Carbon nanotube growth depends on the catalytic activity of metal nanoparticles on alumina or silica supports. The control on catalytic activity is generally achieved by variations in water concentration, carbon feed, and sample placement on a few types of alumina or silica catalyst supports obtained via thin film deposition. We have recently expanded the choice of catalyst supports by engineering inactive substrates like c-cut sapphire via ion beam bombardment. The deterministic control on the structure and chemistry of catalyst supports obtained by tuning the degree of beam-induced damage have enabled better regulation of the activity of Fe catalysts only inmore » the ion beam bombarded areas and hence enabled controllable super growth of carbon nanotubes. A wide range of surface characterization techniques were used to monitor the catalytically active surface engineered via ion beam bombardment. The proposed method offers a versatile way to control carbon nanotube growth in patterned areas and also enhances the current understanding of the growth process. As a result, with the right choice of water concentration, carbon feed and sample placement, engineered catalyst supports may extend the carbon nanotube growth yield to a level that is even higher than the ones reported here, and thus offers promising applications of carbon nanotubes in electronics, heat exchanger, and energy storage.« less

  16. Engineering catalytic activity via ion beam bombardment of catalyst supports for vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, A. E.; Zakharov, D.; Stach, E. A.; Nikoleav, P.; Amama, P. B.; Sargent, G.; Saber, S.; Huffman, D.; Erford, M.; Semiatin, S. L.; Maruyama, B.

    2015-09-16

    Carbon nanotube growth depends on the catalytic activity of metal nanoparticles on alumina or silica supports. The control on catalytic activity is generally achieved by variations in water concentration, carbon feed, and sample placement on a few types of alumina or silica catalyst supports obtained via thin film deposition. We have recently expanded the choice of catalyst supports by engineering inactive substrates like c-cut sapphire via ion beam bombardment. The deterministic control on the structure and chemistry of catalyst supports obtained by tuning the degree of beam-induced damage have enabled better regulation of the activity of Fe catalysts only in the ion beam bombarded areas and hence enabled controllable super growth of carbon nanotubes. A wide range of surface characterization techniques were used to monitor the catalytically active surface engineered via ion beam bombardment. The proposed method offers a versatile way to control carbon nanotube growth in patterned areas and also enhances the current understanding of the growth process. As a result, with the right choice of water concentration, carbon feed and sample placement, engineered catalyst supports may extend the carbon nanotube growth yield to a level that is even higher than the ones reported here, and thus offers promising applications of carbon nanotubes in electronics, heat exchanger, and energy storage.

  17. Fe/S doped granular activated carbon as a highly active heterogeneous persulfate catalyst toward the degradation of Orange G and diethyl phthalate.

    PubMed

    Pu, Mengjie; Ma, Yongwen; Wan, Jinquan; Wang, Yan; Huang, Mingzhi; Chen, Yangmei

    2014-03-15

    Fe/S doped granular activated carbon (Fe/SGAC) was synthesized with ferric nitrate, Na2S2O3 and (NH4)2S2O8 via an impregnation-precipitation, reduction-oxidation combining with aqueous-phase synthesis method treatment. Surface density of functional groups, surface area changes as well as the chemical state inside Fe/SGAC catalyst were studied by Boehm titration, N2 adsorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The reactivity of the catalysts was tested by degrading Orange G (OG) and diethyl phthalate (DEP). The Fe/SGAC catalysts could significantly enhance the removal rate of OG as compared to persulfate alone and PS/GAC. And the catalytic capacity was also enhanced by S doping. But the degradation of DEP under the similar condition was inhibited by adsorption process because of the different hydrophobicities of OG and DEP molecule. Fe2O3/FeOOH (Fe(3+)) (represents ferrihydrite) together with FeO/Fe3O4 (Fe(2+)) and Fe2O3-satellite, which provide the new active site for persulfate catalyst was found to be the major components of iron element in Fe/SGAC catalyst; the existence of FeS2(S(-)) for sulfur element verified the assumption that the doped S element promoted the electron transfer between the persulfate species and iron oxide at the interface. COD removal experiment further confirmed that mostly contaminant removal was owed to the Fe/SGAC catalytic persulfate oxidation process. PMID:24461853

  18. ZrO2 -Based Alternatives to Conventional Propane Dehydrogenation Catalysts: Active Sites, Design, and Performance.

    PubMed

    Otroshchenko, Tatyana; Sokolov, Sergey; Stoyanova, Mariana; Kondratenko, Vita A; Rodemerck, Uwe; Linke, David; Kondratenko, Evgenii V

    2015-12-21

    Non-oxidative dehydrogenation of propane to propene is an established large-scale process that, however, faces challenges, particularly in catalyst development; these are the toxicity of chromium compounds, high cost of platinum, and catalyst durability. Herein, we describe the design of unconventional catalysts based on bulk materials with a certain defect structure, for example, ZrO2 promoted with other metal oxides. Comprehensive characterization supports the hypothesis that coordinatively unsaturated Zr cations are the active sites for propane dehydrogenation. Their concentration can be adjusted by varying the kind of ZrO2 promoter and/or supporting tiny amounts of hydrogenation-active metal. Accordingly designed Cu(0.05 wt %)/ZrO2 -La2 O3 showed industrially relevant activity and durability over ca. 240 h on stream in a series of 60 dehydrogenation and oxidative regeneration cycles between 550 and 625 °C. PMID:26566072

  19. Bulk binary ZrO2-based oxides as highly active alternative-type catalysts for non-oxidative isobutane dehydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Otroshchenko, Tatyana; Radnik, Jörg; Schneider, Matthias; Rodemerck, Uwe; Linke, David; Kondratenko, Evgenii V

    2016-06-21

    Bulk binary ZrO2-based oxides efficiently catalyse non-oxidative dehydrogenation of isobutane to isobutylene. Their activity strongly depends on the kind of second metal oxide. So designed CrZrOx showed superior activity to industrially relevant catalysts with supported Pt or CrOx species. It was also stable under alternating dehydrogenation and oxidative regeneration cycles over ca. 110 h under different reaction conditions between 550 and 600 °C. PMID:27277540

  20. Copper on responsive polymer microgels: a recyclable catalyst exhibiting tunable catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qingshi; Cheng, Han; Chang, Aiping; Bai, Xue; Lu, Fan; Wu, Weitai

    2014-11-25

    Copper has been immobilized on a chitosan-based responsive polymer microgel by simply stirring the microgel dispersion with copper sulfate. The ensuing catalyst is highly active for a model azide-alkyne [3+2]-cycloaddition reaction, and can be recycled at least 5 times; the catalytic activity can be tuned via swelling-deswelling transitions of the polymer gels. PMID:25283806

  1. Design of a high activity and selectivity alcohol catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, H.C.; Mills, G.A.

    1993-02-17

    Preliminary investigations of these manganese oxide materials show that the different oxides exhibit different selectivity toward methanol and other products. It seems that there is a correlation between the initial O/Mn ratio of the oxide and methanol selectivity. These conclusions are supported by the results displayed in Figures 1 and 2. The main product of the manganese oxide-catalyzed CO hydrogenation is methanol except on Mao, which shows the lowest methanol selectivity, but the highest CO[sub 2] yield. Preliminarily, the results suggest that the higher the O/Mn ratio of the precursor oxide, the higher will be the methanol selectivity, while the CO[sub 2] and methane selectivities will be lower. The higher CO[sub 2] and C[sub 2], C[sub 3] and C[sub 4] hydrocarbon selectivities over the Mao catalyst compared to the other manganese oxides tested, indicates that Mao acts more like a water-gas shift and Fischer-Tropsch catalyst.

  2. High-activity PtRuPd/C catalyst for direct dimethyl ether fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Wen, Xiaodong; Wu, Gang; Chung, Hoon T; Gao, Rui; Zelenay, Piotr

    2015-06-22

    Dimethyl ether (DME) has been considered as a promising alternative fuel for direct-feed fuel cells but lack of an efficient DME oxidation electrocatalyst has remained the challenge for the commercialization of the direct DME fuel cell. The commonly studied binary PtRu catalyst shows much lower activity in DME than methanol oxidation. In this work, guided by density functional theory (DFT) calculation, a ternary carbon-supported PtRuPd catalyst was designed and synthesized for DME electrooxidation. DFT calculations indicated that Pd in the ternary PtRuPd catalyst is capable of significantly decreasing the activation energy of the CO and CH bond scission during the oxidation process. As evidenced by both electrochemical measurements in an aqueous electrolyte and polymer-electrolyte fuel cell testing, the ternary catalyst shows much higher activity (two-fold enhancement at 0.5 V in fuel cells) than the state-of-the-art binary Pt50 Ru50 /C catalyst (HiSPEC 12100).

  3. The role of surface reactions on the active and selective catalyst design for bioethanol steam reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benito, M.; Padilla, R.; Serrano-Lotina, A.; Rodríguez, L.; Brey, J. J.; Daza, L.

    In order to study the role of surface reactions involved in bioethanol steam reforming mechanism, a very active and selective catalyst for hydrogen production was analysed. The highest activity was obtained at 700 °C, temperature at which the catalyst achieved an ethanol conversion of 100% and a selectivity to hydrogen close to 70%. It also exhibited a very high hydrogen production efficiency, higher than 4.5 mol H 2 per mol of EtOH fed. The catalyst was operated at a steam to carbon ratio (S/C) of 4.8, at 700 °C and atmospheric pressure. No by-products, such as ethylene or acetaldehyde were observed. In order to consider a further application in an ethanol processor, a long-term stability test was performed under the conditions previously reported. After 750 h, the catalyst still exhibited a high stability and selectivity to hydrogen production. Based on the intermediate products detected by temperature programmed desorption and reaction (TPD and TPR) experiments, a reaction pathway was proposed. Firstly, the adsorbed ethanol is dehydrogenated to acetaldehyde producing hydrogen. Secondly, the adsorbed acetaldehyde is transformed into acetone via acetic acid formation. Finally, acetone is reformed to produce hydrogen and carbon dioxide, which were the final reaction products. The promotion of such reaction sequence is the key to develop an active, selective and stable catalyst, which is the technical barrier for hydrogen production by ethanol reforming.

  4. Catalytic reduction of NO by CO over rhodium catalysts. 2. Effect of oxygen on the nature, population, and reactivity of surface species formed under reaction conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kondarides, D.I.; Chafik, T.; Verykios, X.E.

    2000-04-01

    The effect of oxygen on the nature, population, and reactivity of surface species formed during reduction of NO by CO over Rh/TiO{sub 2} catalysts has been examined employing FTIR and transient MS techniques. It has been found that the activity of Rh is hindered by accumulation of surface oxygen originating from NO decomposition and gas-phase oxygen in the feed. Adsorbed CO and reduced TiO{sub 2{minus}x} species in the vicinity of Rh particles act as oxygen atom scavengers and, under fuel-rich conditions, remove atomic oxygen from the surface and restore the catalytic properties. Results of the present study provide additional evidence that production of N{sub 2} is related to dissociation of adsorbed Rh-NO{sup {minus}} while production of N{sub 2}O is related to the presence of Rh(NO){sub 2}. The presence of reduced RH{sup 0} sites is necessary for the formation of both reduction products. In the absence of oxygen in the feed, surface isocyanate species are also observed under reaction conditions. Their formation requires the presence of adjacent Rh{sup 0}-CO and reduced Rh{sup 0} sites. Although these species are favored under conditions in which NO conversion to reduction products is observed, there is no evidence that they are catalytically active species.

  5. Cytotoxic activities of phytochemicals from Ferula species

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ferula species are reputed in folk medicine for the treatment of a variety of disorders. There have been sporadic reports on the chemopreventive and chemosensitizing activities of some terpenoid coumarin derivatives from the genus Ferula. The present study investigated the cytotoxic activity of 11 phytochemicals (conferone, farnesiferol A, acantrifoside E, mogoltadone, diversin, galbanic acid, herniarin, 7-isopentenyloxycoumarin, umbelliprenin, stylosin and tschimgine) from Ferula species together with a newly synthesized prenylated derivative of curcumin (gercumin II). Methods Cytotoxic activity of phytochemicals was evaluated against ovarian carcinoma (CH1), lung cancer (A549) and melanoma (SK-MEL-28) cell lines using MTT assay. Results and conclusion Overall, moderate cytotoxic activity was observed from the tested compounds with IC50 values in the micromolar range. The highest activity against CH1 and A549 lines was from conferone while stylosin and tschimgine were the most potent compounds against SK-MEL-28 line. In conclusion, the findings of the present investigation did not support a potent cytotoxic activity of the tested phytochemicals against CH1, A549 and SK-MEL-28 cell lines. With respect to previous reports, the beneficial impact of these phytochemicals in cancer therapy may be more attributable to their chemopreventive or chemosensitizing activity rather than direct cytotoxic effects. PMID:23701832

  6. Effects of coordination number of Au catalyst on oxygen species and their catalytic roles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Gen; Zhu, Kong-Jie; Zhang, Lei; Cui, Peng-Fei; Teng, Bo-Tao; Wen, Xiao-Dong

    2016-11-01

    To explore the effects of coordination number of Au nanoparticles on oxygen species and their catalytic roles is very important in gold catalysis. Based on the systematic study of oxygen adsorption on Au(997) by density functional theory calculation, the quantitative correlation for different oxygen species with coverage and Au coordination number is established in theory. The only O adatoms near step area with relatively low Au coordination numbers exist at low coverage (<1/18 ML), O adatoms adsorb at terrace areas with relatively high Au coordination numbers at medium coverage (1/18-2/9 ML); while oxygen islands form at high coverage (>2/9 ML). The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the experimental observations in TDS spectrum. On the basis of Langmuir-Hinschelwood and Eley-Rideal mechanisms for NO oxidation, the activities of the three different oxygen species also exhibit correlation with Au coordination number. The oxygen island shows the highest oxidation activity, followed by the O adatom at terrace surface; while the O adatom near step area has the lowest oxidative performance. This work will shed light into the understanding of gold catalysis.

  7. Niobium-silica catalysts for the selective epoxidation of cyclic alkenes: the generation of the active site by grafting niobocene dichloride.

    PubMed

    Tiozzo, Cristina; Bisio, Chiara; Carniato, Fabio; Gallo, Alessandro; Scott, Susannah L; Psaro, Rinaldo; Guidotti, Matteo

    2013-08-28

    Niobium-containing silica materials obtained by deposition via liquid-phase grafting or dry impregnation of niobocene(iv) dichloride are active and selective catalysts in the epoxidation of alkenes in the presence of aqueous hydrogen peroxide. The generation of the catalytically-active Nb species was followed step-by-step, and investigated using a combined DR-UV-Vis, NIR, Raman, XRD, XANES and EXAFS analyses. At the end of the grafting procedure, the nature of the surface active species can be described as an oxo-Nb(v) site, tripodally grafted onto the silica surface in close proximity to other Nb(v) centres. The liquid-phase methodology provides a better dispersion of the metal sites onto the siliceous support than the dry-impregnation approach. The niobium-silica catalysts were then tested in the epoxidation of cyclohexene and 1-methylcyclohexene, as model substrates.

  8. Metal organic framework-mediated synthesis of highly active and stable Fischer-Tropsch catalysts.

    PubMed

    Santos, Vera P; Wezendonk, Tim A; Jaén, Juan José Delgado; Dugulan, A Iulian; Nasalevich, Maxim A; Islam, Husn-Ubayda; Chojecki, Adam; Sartipi, Sina; Sun, Xiaohui; Hakeem, Abrar A; Koeken, Ard C J; Ruitenbeek, Matthijs; Davidian, Thomas; Meima, Garry R; Sankar, Gopinathan; Kapteijn, Freek; Makkee, Michiel; Gascon, Jorge

    2015-03-05

    Depletion of crude oil resources and environmental concerns have driven a worldwide research on alternative processes for the production of commodity chemicals. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is a process for flexible production of key chemicals from synthesis gas originating from non-petroleum-based sources. Although the use of iron-based catalysts would be preferred over the widely used cobalt, manufacturing methods that prevent their fast deactivation because of sintering, carbon deposition and phase changes have proven challenging. Here we present a strategy to produce highly dispersed iron carbides embedded in a matrix of porous carbon. Very high iron loadings (>40 wt %) are achieved while maintaining an optimal dispersion of the active iron carbide phase when a metal organic framework is used as catalyst precursor. The unique iron spatial confinement and the absence of large iron particles in the obtained solids minimize catalyst deactivation, resulting in high active and stable operation.

  9. Metal organic framework-mediated synthesis of highly active and stable Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Vera P.; Wezendonk, Tim A.; Jaén, Juan José Delgado; Dugulan, A. Iulian; Nasalevich, Maxim A.; Islam, Husn-Ubayda; Chojecki, Adam; Sartipi, Sina; Sun, Xiaohui; Hakeem, Abrar A.; Koeken, Ard C. J.; Ruitenbeek, Matthijs; Davidian, Thomas; Meima, Garry R.; Sankar, Gopinathan; Kapteijn, Freek; Makkee, Michiel; Gascon, Jorge

    2015-03-01

    Depletion of crude oil resources and environmental concerns have driven a worldwide research on alternative processes for the production of commodity chemicals. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is a process for flexible production of key chemicals from synthesis gas originating from non-petroleum-based sources. Although the use of iron-based catalysts would be preferred over the widely used cobalt, manufacturing methods that prevent their fast deactivation because of sintering, carbon deposition and phase changes have proven challenging. Here we present a strategy to produce highly dispersed iron carbides embedded in a matrix of porous carbon. Very high iron loadings (>40 wt %) are achieved while maintaining an optimal dispersion of the active iron carbide phase when a metal organic framework is used as catalyst precursor. The unique iron spatial confinement and the absence of large iron particles in the obtained solids minimize catalyst deactivation, resulting in high active and stable operation.

  10. Enhanced Oxygen Reduction Activity In Acid By Tin-Oxide Supported Au Nanoparticle Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Baker,W.; Pietron, J.; Teliska, M.; Bouwman, P.; Ramaker, D.; Swider-Lyons, K.

    2006-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles supported on hydrous tin-oxide (Au-SnO{sub x}) are active for the four-electron oxygen reduction reaction in an acid electrolyte. The unique electrocatalytic of the Au-SnO is confirmed by the low amount of peroxide detected with rotating ring-disk electrode voltammetry and Koutecky-Levich analysis. In comparison, 10 wt % Au supported on Vulcan carbon and SnO{sub x} catalysts both produce significant peroxide in the acid electrolyte, indicating only a two-electron reduction reaction. Characterization of the Au-SnO{sub x} catalyst reveals a high-surface area, amorphous support with 1.7 nm gold metal particles. The high catalytic activity of the Au-SnO is attributed to metal support interactions. The results demonstrate a possible path to non-Pt catalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cell cathodes.

  11. Kinetics studies of d-glucose hydrogenation over activated charcoal supported platinum catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Muthanna J.

    2012-02-01

    The kinetics of the catalytic hydrogenation of d-glucose to produce d-sorbitol was studied in a three-phase laboratory scale reactor. The hydrogenation reactions were performed on activated charcoal supported platinum catalyst in the temperature range 25-65°C and in a constant pressure of 1 atm. The kinetic data were modeled by zero, first and second-order reaction equations. In the operating regimes studied, the results show that the hydrogenation reaction was of a first order with respect to d-glucose concentration. Also the activation energy of the reaction was determined, and found to be 12.33 kJ mole-1. A set of experiment was carried out to test the deactivation of the catalyst, and the results show that the deactivation is slow with the ability of using the catalyst for several times with a small decrease in product yield.

  12. Air Oxidation of Activated Carbon to Synthesize a Biomimetic Catalyst for Hydrolysis of Cellulose.

    PubMed

    Shrotri, Abhijit; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Fukuoka, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    Oxygenated carbon catalyzes the hydrolysis of cellulose present in lignocellulosic biomass by utilizing the weakly acidic functional groups on its surface. Here we report the synthesis of a biomimetic carbon catalyst by simple and economical air-oxidation of a commercially available activated carbon. Air- oxidation at 450-500 °C introduced 2000-2400 μmol g(-1) of oxygenated functional groups on the material with minor changes in the textural properties. Selectivity towards the formation of carboxylic groups on the catalyst surface increased with the increase in oxidation temperature. The degree of oxidation on carbon catalyst was found to be proportional to its activity for hydrolysis of cellulose. The hydrolysis of eucalyptus in the presence of carbon oxidized at 475 °C afforded glucose yield of 77 % and xylose yield of 67 %.

  13. Catalysts possessing augmented C-O and C-N hydrogenolysis activity. Progress report No. 3, April-June 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Massoth, F.E.; Shabtai, J.S.

    1984-07-01

    The aim this research project is to synthesize and investigate new sulfided catalyst systems having higher carbon-heteroatom hydrogenolysis activity as compared with ring hydrogenation activity. A fundamental approach is being applied to gain understanding of the basic catalytic properties which relate to hydrogenolysis, hydrogenation and cracking functions of the catalysts. This involves preparation of new catalysts, characterization of their properties and model compound reactivity studies. In another part of the project, selected catalysts are being applied in studies of more complex O- and N- containing model compounds with the objective of providing fundamental data on the stereochemistry of HDO and HDN reactions. These data will be used to develop steric surface-reactant models for sulfided catalysts. Supported noble metal catalysts containing Rh and Pd were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation of ..gamma..-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ using nitrate solutions. Catalysts containing also Co and Cr were similarly prepared. Catalyst activities for HDO and HDN were evaluated using the model compounds dibenzofuran and indole. Characterization work by ESCA and oxygen chemisorption, of CoMo catalysts, and stereochemical studies with several catalysts were also initiated. 15 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  14. Collagen degrading activity associated with Mycobacterium species

    PubMed Central

    Masso, F; Paez, A; Varela, E; d Diaz; Zenteno, E; Montano, L

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The mechanism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis penetration into tissues is poorly understood but it is reasonable to assume that there is a contribution from proteases capable of disrupting the extracellular matrix of the pulmonary epithelium and the blood vessels. A study was undertaken to identify and characterise collagen degrading activity of M tuberculosis.
METHODS—Culture filtrate protein extract (CFPE) was obtained from reference mycobacterial strains and mycobacteria isolated from patients with tuberculosis. The collagen degrading activity of CFPE was determined according to the method of Johnson-Wint using 3H-type I collagen. The enzyme was identified by the Birkedal-Hansen and Taylor method and its molecular mass determined by SDS-PAGE and Sephacryl S-300 gel filtration chromatography using an electroelution purified enzyme.
RESULTS—CFPE from Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Rv showed collagenolytic activity that was four times higher than that of the avirulent strain H37Ra. The 75 kDa enzyme responsible was divalent cation dependent. Other mycobacterial species and those isolated from patients with tuberculosis also had collagen degrading activity.
CONCLUSIONS—Mycobacterium species possess a metalloprotease with collagen degrading activity. The highest enzymatic activity was found in the virulent reference strain H37Rv.

 PMID:10212111

  15. Stable amorphous georgeite as a precursor to a high-activity catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrat, Simon A.; Smith, Paul J.; Wells, Peter P.; Chater, Philip A.; Carter, James H.; Morgan, David J.; Fiordaliso, Elisabetta M.; Wagner, Jakob B.; Davies, Thomas E.; Lu, Li; Bartley, Jonathan K.; Taylor, Stuart H.; Spencer, Michael S.; Kiely, Christopher J.; Kelly, Gordon J.; Park, Colin W.; Rosseinsky, Matthew J.; Hutchings, Graham J.

    2016-03-01

    Copper and zinc form an important group of hydroxycarbonate minerals that include zincian malachite, aurichalcite, rosasite and the exceptionally rare and unstable—and hence little known and largely ignored—georgeite. The first three of these minerals are widely used as catalyst precursors for the industrially important methanol-synthesis and low-temperature water-gas shift (LTS) reactions, with the choice of precursor phase strongly influencing the activity of the final catalyst. The preferred phase is usually zincian malachite. This is prepared by a co-precipitation method that involves the transient formation of georgeite; with few exceptions it uses sodium carbonate as the carbonate source, but this also introduces sodium ions—a potential catalyst poison. Here we show that supercritical antisolvent (SAS) precipitation using carbon dioxide (refs 13, 14), a process that exploits the high diffusion rates and solvation power of supercritical carbon dioxide to rapidly expand and supersaturate solutions, can be used to prepare copper/zinc hydroxycarbonate precursors with low sodium content. These include stable georgeite, which we find to be a precursor to highly active methanol-synthesis and superior LTS catalysts. Our findings highlight the value of advanced synthesis methods in accessing unusual mineral phases, and show that there is room for exploring improvements to established industrial catalysts.

  16. Stable amorphous georgeite as a precursor to a high-activity catalyst.

    PubMed

    Kondrat, Simon A; Smith, Paul J; Wells, Peter P; Chater, Philip A; Carter, James H; Morgan, David J; Fiordaliso, Elisabetta M; Wagner, Jakob B; Davies, Thomas E; Lu, Li; Bartley, Jonathan K; Taylor, Stuart H; Spencer, Michael S; Kiely, Christopher J; Kelly, Gordon J; Park, Colin W; Rosseinsky, Matthew J; Hutchings, Graham J

    2016-03-01

    Copper and zinc form an important group of hydroxycarbonate minerals that include zincian malachite, aurichalcite, rosasite and the exceptionally rare and unstable--and hence little known and largely ignored--georgeite. The first three of these minerals are widely used as catalyst precursors for the industrially important methanol-synthesis and low-temperature water-gas shift (LTS) reactions, with the choice of precursor phase strongly influencing the activity of the final catalyst. The preferred phase is usually zincian malachite. This is prepared by a co-precipitation method that involves the transient formation of georgeite; with few exceptions it uses sodium carbonate as the carbonate source, but this also introduces sodium ions--a potential catalyst poison. Here we show that supercritical antisolvent (SAS) precipitation using carbon dioxide (refs 13, 14), a process that exploits the high diffusion rates and solvation power of supercritical carbon dioxide to rapidly expand and supersaturate solutions, can be used to prepare copper/zinc hydroxycarbonate precursors with low sodium content. These include stable georgeite, which we find to be a precursor to highly active methanol-synthesis and superior LTS catalysts. Our findings highlight the value of advanced synthesis methods in accessing unusual mineral phases, and show that there is room for exploring improvements to established industrial catalysts. PMID:26878237

  17. Results of catalyst testing using iron-based catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Linehan, J.C.; Darab, J.G.; Matson, D.W.

    1993-03-01

    As coal liquefaction catalysts, iron-based products are generally inferior to the more expensive molybdenum, cobalt, or nickel-based materials. However, the lower costs of production and recovery (or in the case of some iron catalysts, non-recovery) give the iron-based materials a potential economic advantage over the more efficient precious and semi-precious metal catalysts for this application. Recent research has shown that a number of different iron-containing materials can be successfully utilized as coal liquefaction catalysts or as catalyst. Pyrrhotite (Fe[sub 1-x]S) or a similar iron-sulfide phase is commonly believed to be the active catalyst in coal liquefaction and model compound pyrolysis reactions, although no specific phase has been yet been isolated as the actual catalyst species. The active iron-containing catalyst is usually generated in situ from an iron-oxide precursor and an elemental sulfur source under reducing conditions in the reactor vessel. Most research has concentrated on the use of common iron-oxide phases such as hematite or goethite (and their derivatives) as the iron-bearing precursor, or on non-specific iron materials produced by the reaction of various iron salts and compounds in the coal or liquefaction reactor. To our knowledge there has been no systematic effort to determine the optimum iron-containing precursor phase for producing active coal liquefaction catalysts, despite the fact that there are over ten iron-(hydroxy)oxide phases which can be easily synthesized in the laboratory. We have undertaken a systematic study to identify the most active iron-oxide catalyst precursor phases, the co-catalysts, and the coal pretreatments which will provide optimum yields in coal liquefaction processes.

  18. Results of catalyst testing using iron-based catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Linehan, J.C.; Darab, J.G.; Matson, D.W.

    1993-03-01

    As coal liquefaction catalysts, iron-based products are generally inferior to the more expensive molybdenum, cobalt, or nickel-based materials. However, the lower costs of production and recovery (or in the case of some iron catalysts, non-recovery) give the iron-based materials a potential economic advantage over the more efficient precious and semi-precious metal catalysts for this application. Recent research has shown that a number of different iron-containing materials can be successfully utilized as coal liquefaction catalysts or as catalyst. Pyrrhotite (Fe{sub 1-x}S) or a similar iron-sulfide phase is commonly believed to be the active catalyst in coal liquefaction and model compound pyrolysis reactions, although no specific phase has been yet been isolated as the actual catalyst species. The active iron-containing catalyst is usually generated in situ from an iron-oxide precursor and an elemental sulfur source under reducing conditions in the reactor vessel. Most research has concentrated on the use of common iron-oxide phases such as hematite or goethite (and their derivatives) as the iron-bearing precursor, or on non-specific iron materials produced by the reaction of various iron salts and compounds in the coal or liquefaction reactor. To our knowledge there has been no systematic effort to determine the optimum iron-containing precursor phase for producing active coal liquefaction catalysts, despite the fact that there are over ten iron-(hydroxy)oxide phases which can be easily synthesized in the laboratory. We have undertaken a systematic study to identify the most active iron-oxide catalyst precursor phases, the co-catalysts, and the coal pretreatments which will provide optimum yields in coal liquefaction processes.

  19. Nanocrystalline Ferrihydrite-Based Catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis: Part II. Effects of Activation Gases on the Catalytic Performance.

    PubMed

    Rhim, Geun Bae; Hong, Seok Yong; Park, Ji Chan; Jung, Heon; Rhee, Young Woo; Chun, Dong Hyun

    2016-02-01

    Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) was carried out over nanocrystalline ferrihydrite-based (Fe9O2(OH)23) catalysts activated by different reducing agents: syngas (H2+CO), CO, and H2. The syngas activation successfully changed the ferrihydrite-based catalysts into an active and stable catalytic structure with chi-carbide (Fe2.5 C) and epsilon'-carbide (Fe2.2 C). The crystal structure of the catalysts obtained by syngas activation was similar to the structure obtained by CO activation; this similarity was probably due to the peculiar reduction behavior of the ferrihydrite-based catalysts, which exhibit much greater reducibility in CO atmosphere than in H2 atmosphere. The performance of the catalysts activated by syngas was much higher than the performance of the catalysts activated by H2 and was comparable to the performance of the catalysts activated by CO. This strongly demonstrates that the ferrihydrite-based catalysts are advantageous for industrial FTS processes because syngas can be commonly used for both activation pre-treatment and subsequent reaction.

  20. Nanocrystalline Ferrihydrite-Based Catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis: Part II. Effects of Activation Gases on the Catalytic Performance.

    PubMed

    Rhim, Geun Bae; Hong, Seok Yong; Park, Ji Chan; Jung, Heon; Rhee, Young Woo; Chun, Dong Hyun

    2016-02-01

    Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) was carried out over nanocrystalline ferrihydrite-based (Fe9O2(OH)23) catalysts activated by different reducing agents: syngas (H2+CO), CO, and H2. The syngas activation successfully changed the ferrihydrite-based catalysts into an active and stable catalytic structure with chi-carbide (Fe2.5 C) and epsilon'-carbide (Fe2.2 C). The crystal structure of the catalysts obtained by syngas activation was similar to the structure obtained by CO activation; this similarity was probably due to the peculiar reduction behavior of the ferrihydrite-based catalysts, which exhibit much greater reducibility in CO atmosphere than in H2 atmosphere. The performance of the catalysts activated by syngas was much higher than the performance of the catalysts activated by H2 and was comparable to the performance of the catalysts activated by CO. This strongly demonstrates that the ferrihydrite-based catalysts are advantageous for industrial FTS processes because syngas can be commonly used for both activation pre-treatment and subsequent reaction. PMID:27433672

  1. Antimicrobial activities of selected Cyathus species.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya-Jun; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2004-02-01

    Twelve selected Cyathus species were tested for their abilities to produce antimicrobial metabolites. Most of them were found to produce secondary exo-metabolites that could induce morphological abnormalities of rice pathogenic fungi Pyricularia oryzae. Some extracts from the cultivated liquid obviously inhibited human pathogenic fungi Aspergillus fumigatus, Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Activities against six human pathogenic bacteria were also obtained from some of these extracts. PMID:15119855

  2. Comparison of preparation methods for ceria catalyst and the effect of surface and bulk sulfates on its activity toward NH3-SCR.

    PubMed

    Chang, Huazhen; Ma, Lei; Yang, Shijian; Li, Junhua; Chen, Liang; Wang, Wei; Hao, Jiming

    2013-11-15

    A series of CeO2 catalysts prepared with sulfate (S) and nitrate (N) precursors by hydrothermal (H) and precipitation (P) methods were investigated in selective catalytic reduction of NOx by NH3 (NH3-SCR). The catalytic activity of CeO2 was significantly affected by the preparation methods and the precursor type. CeO2-SH, which was prepared by hydrothermal method with cerium (IV) sulfate as a precursor, showed excellent SCR activity and high N2 selectivity in the temperature range of 230-450 °C. Based on the results obtained by temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR), transmission infrared spectra (IR) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), the excellent performance of CeO2-SH was correlated with the surface sulfate species formed in the hydrothermal reaction. These results indicated that sulfate species bind with Ce(4+) on the CeO2-SH catalyst, and the specific sulfate species, such as Ce(SO4)2 or CeOSO4, were formed. The adsorption of NH3 was promoted by these sulfate species, and the probability of immediate oxidation of NH3 to N2O on Ce(4+) was reduced. Accordingly, the selective oxidation of NH3 was enhanced, which contributed to the high N2 selectivity in the SCR reaction. However, the location of sulfate on the CeO2-SP catalyst was different. Plenty of sulfate species were likely deposited on CeO2-SP surface, covering the active sites for NO oxidation, which resulted in poor SCR activity in the test temperature range. Moreover, the resistance to alkali metals, such as Na and K, was improved over the CeO2-SH catalyst.

  3. Commercial runs show TiO/sub 2/ Claus catalyst retains activity

    SciTech Connect

    Nougayrede, J.; Philippe, A.; Quesmerel, E.; Vermeersch, R.

    1987-08-10

    Commercial data are given for the CRS 31 Claus catalyst, jointly developed by Rhone Poulenc and Societe Nationale Elf Aquitane (Production) (SNEA). The data confirm laboratory results that show the catalyst's ability to deliver more complete hydrolysis in the first reactor of Claus sulfur recovery plants, and its ability to maintain activity in the second and third reactors. The most important losses in sulfur yields in Claus plants generally come from COS and CS/sub 2/ formed in the thermal steps of the process in the first reactor, and from the low Claus activity of alumina-based catalysts in the second and third reactors. In the first reactor, loaded with alumina-based catalyst, hydrolysis is only partial. Low Claus activity in second and third reactors is caused by the inevitable sulfation of the alumina. Catalytic-activity decrease of aluminas is caused particularly by the presence of oxygen, even in trace amounts, in the Claus gases. Therefore, in the first reactor, the CS/sub 2/ hydrolysis rate is lowered in the subsequent reactors, the H/sub 2/ + SO/sub 2/ conversion significantly drops. The chemical composition of CRS 31, TiO/sub 2/ only, in the same operating conditions, causes a significant improvement in activity because of its increased resistance to sulfation. The economics of the process are given.

  4. HDS activity and characterization of zeolite-supported nickel sulfide catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Welters, W.J.J.; Vorbeck, G.; Haan, J.W. de; Beer, V.H.J. de; Santen, R.A. van; Zandbergen, H.W.

    1994-11-01

    Catalysts of nickel sulfide supported on zeolite Y have been prepared (by impregnation or ion exchange) and characterized by means of thiophene hydrodesulfurization (HDS), sulfur analysis, temperature-programmed sulfiding, {sup 129}Xe-NMR, HREM and dynamic oxygen chemisorption. The catalysts show large differences in catalytic behavior dependent on the preparation method (impregnation vs ion exchange) and the pretreatment conditions (method of sulfidation). Especially the ion-exchanged catalysts show a high initial activity, but due to the presence of acid sites deactivation is very strong. The initial activity of these catalysts can be improved significantly by drying prior to sulfidation. In all cases sulfidation results in quantitative formation of nickel sulfide, with Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} being the main product. Occasionally, also some NiS appears to be present. The major part of the nickel sulfide phase is invariably located on the outside of the zeolite particles. The fraction of nickel sulfide in the zeolite pores depends on the preparation method and the pretreatment conditions. The differences in catalytic activity are ascribed not only to variations in overall nickel sulfide dispersion but also to the acidity of the support, and the presence of very active small nickel sulfide clusters in the pores of the zeolite can have a strong influence on the thiophene HDS activity. 40 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Highly Active Carbon Supported Pd-Ag Nanofacets Catalysts for Hydrogen Production from HCOOH.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenhui; He, Ting; Liu, Xuehua; He, Weina; Cong, Hengjiang; Shen, Yangbin; Yan, Liuming; Zhang, Xuetong; Zhang, Jinping; Zhou, Xiaochun

    2016-08-17

    Hydrogen is regarded as a future sustainable and clean energy carrier. Formic acid is a safe and sustainable hydrogen storage medium with many advantages, including high hydrogen content, nontoxicity, and low cost. In this work, a series of highly active catalysts for hydrogen production from formic acid are successfully synthesized by controllably depositing Pd onto Ag nanoplates with different Ag nanofacets, such as Ag{111}, Ag{100}, and the nanofacet on hexagonal close packing Ag crystal (Ag{hcp}). Then, the Pd-Ag nanoplate catalysts are supported on Vulcan XC-72 carbon black to prevent the aggregation of the catalysts. The research reveals that the high activity is attributed to the formation of Pd-Ag alloy nanofacets, such as Pd-Ag{111}, Pd-Ag{100}, and Pd-Ag{hcp}. The activity order of these Pd-decorated Ag nanofacets is Pd-Ag{hcp} > Pd-Ag{111} > Pd-Ag{100}. Particularly, the activity of Pd-Ag{hcp} is up to an extremely high value, i.e., TOF{hcp} = 19 000 ± 1630 h(-1) at 90 °C (lower limit value), which is more than 800 times higher than our previous quasi-spherical Pd-Ag alloy nanocatalyst. The initial activity of Pd-Ag{hcp} even reaches (3.13 ± 0.19) × 10(6) h(-1) at 90 °C. This research not only presents highly active catalysts for hydrogen generation but also shows that the facet on the hcp Ag crystal can act as a potentially highly active catalyst. PMID:27454194

  6. Highly Active Carbon Supported Pd-Ag Nanofacets Catalysts for Hydrogen Production from HCOOH.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenhui; He, Ting; Liu, Xuehua; He, Weina; Cong, Hengjiang; Shen, Yangbin; Yan, Liuming; Zhang, Xuetong; Zhang, Jinping; Zhou, Xiaochun

    2016-08-17

    Hydrogen is regarded as a future sustainable and clean energy carrier. Formic acid is a safe and sustainable hydrogen storage medium with many advantages, including high hydrogen content, nontoxicity, and low cost. In this work, a series of highly active catalysts for hydrogen production from formic acid are successfully synthesized by controllably depositing Pd onto Ag nanoplates with different Ag nanofacets, such as Ag{111}, Ag{100}, and the nanofacet on hexagonal close packing Ag crystal (Ag{hcp}). Then, the Pd-Ag nanoplate catalysts are supported on Vulcan XC-72 carbon black to prevent the aggregation of the catalysts. The research reveals that the high activity is attributed to the formation of Pd-Ag alloy nanofacets, such as Pd-Ag{111}, Pd-Ag{100}, and Pd-Ag{hcp}. The activity order of these Pd-decorated Ag nanofacets is Pd-Ag{hcp} > Pd-Ag{111} > Pd-Ag{100}. Particularly, the activity of Pd-Ag{hcp} is up to an extremely high value, i.e., TOF{hcp} = 19 000 ± 1630 h(-1) at 90 °C (lower limit value), which is more than 800 times higher than our previous quasi-spherical Pd-Ag alloy nanocatalyst. The initial activity of Pd-Ag{hcp} even reaches (3.13 ± 0.19) × 10(6) h(-1) at 90 °C. This research not only presents highly active catalysts for hydrogen generation but also shows that the facet on the hcp Ag crystal can act as a potentially highly active catalyst.

  7. Evidences of the presence of different types of active sites for the oxygen reduction reaction with Fe/N/C based catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Alonso, Francisco J.; Domínguez, Carlota; Al-Thabaiti, Shaeel A.; Al-Youbi, Abdulrahman O.; Abdel Salam, Mohamed; Alshehri, Abdulmohsen A.; Retuerto, María; Peña, Miguel A.; Rojas, Sergio

    2016-09-01

    Fe/N/C catalysts are very active for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR); however, the nature of the active site(s) is not fully understood. In this work, we study the performance of different types of N/C and Fe/N/C catalysts for the ORR, and the effect of the addition of NaCN. Phthalocyanine and graphene have been studied as model metal-free catalysts for the ORR. Fe-phthalocyanine (FePhcy), Fe-phthalocyanine dispersed in graphene (FePhcy/G) and Fe/N/G, have been used as model Fe-containing catalysts. FePhcy and FePhcy/G only contain Fe atoms coordinated to 4 nitrogen atoms. On the other hand, different species such as Fe-Nx and Fe3C coexist in Fe/N/G. In addition, Csbnd C ensembles are present in the graphene present in FePhcy/G and Fe/N/G. The ORR activity is characteristic of each catalyst, being the highest for the catalysts containing FeN4 ensembles. The addition of CN- results in the selective poisoning of the Fe-containing sites but it does not suppress the ORR activity of the Graphene containing samples. In-situ infrared spectroscopy studies during the ORR reveal that CN- poisoning of the Fe sites is reversible, desorbing at potentials less positive than ca. 600 mV. As a consequence, the ORR activity of the Fe-containing sites is recovered gradually.

  8. Coatings of active and heat-resistant cobalt-aluminium xerogel catalysts.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Miriam; Schubert, Lennart; Thomé, Andreas; Kiewidt, Lars; Rosebrock, Christopher; Thöming, Jorg; Roessner, Frank; Bäumer, Marcus

    2016-09-01

    The application of catalytically coated metallic foams in catalytic processes has a high potential for exothermic catalytic reactions such as CO2 methanation or Fischer-Tropsch synthesis due to good heat conductivity, improved turbulent flow properties and high catalyst efficiencies. But the preparation of homogenous catalyst coats without pore blocking is challenging with conventional wash coating techniques. Here, we report on a stable and additive free colloidal CoAlOOH suspension (sol) for the preparation of catalytically active Co/Al2O3 xerogel catalysts and coatings. Powders with 18wt% Co3O4 prepared from this additive free synthesis route show a catalytic activity in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and CO2 methanation which is similar to a catalyst prepared by incipient wetness impregnation (IWI) after activating the material under flowing hydrogen at 430°C. Yet, the xerogel catalyst exhibits a much higher thermal stability as compared to the IWI catalyst, as demonstrated in catalytic tests after different heat agings between 430°C and 580°C. It was also found that the addition of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to the sol influences the catalytic properties of the formed xerogels negatively. Only non-reducible cobalt spinels were formed from a CoAlOOH sol with 20wt% PEG. Metallic foams with pores sizes between 450 and 1200μm were coated with the additive free CoAlOOH sol, which resulted in homogenous xerogel layers. First catalytic tests of the coated metal foams (1200μm) showed good performance in CO2 methanation. PMID:27240245

  9. SOx Tolerant Pt/TiO2 Catalysts for CO Oxidation and the Effect of TiO2 Supports on Catalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Taira, Kenji; Nakao, Kenji; Suzuki, Kimihito; Einaga, Hisahiro

    2016-09-01

    We developed a new technique for mitigating catalyst deactivation caused by SO2 in exhaust gases. A series of 0.1 wt %-Pt/TiO2 catalysts with different surface, crystal, and pore structures were prepared and tested for CO oxidation activity in the presence of SO2 and H2O. The order of the CO oxidation activity under the influence of SO2 was much different from that in the absence of SO2. Catalysts with a high ratio of larger pores exhibited higher catalytic activity under the influence of SO2 and H2O in the temperature range of 250-300 °C, whereas other parameters, such as BET surface area and crystal structure of the TiO2 support, had minor effects on the CO oxidation activity. The oxidation state of Pt differed significantly depending on the kind of TiO2 support. Some catalysts were less active without H2 reduction pretreatment due to the presence of oxidized Pt species. PMID:27501217

  10. Ligand-free Heck reaction: Pd(OAc)2 as an active catalyst revisited.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingwei; Kinney, Elizabeth P; Yang, Zhi

    2003-09-19

    Palladium acetate was shown to be an extremely active catalyst for the Heck reaction of aryl bromides. Both the base and the solvent were found to have a fundamental influence on the efficiency of the reaction, with K(3)PO(4) and N,N-dimethylacetamide being the optimal base and solvent, respectively. PMID:12968913

  11. The calculation of surface orbital energies for specific types of active sites on dispersed metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, R.L.; Lahanas, K.M.; Cole, F.

    1992-11-01

    An angular overlap calculation has been used to determine the s, p, and d orbital energy levels of the different types of surface sites present on dispersed metal catalysts. These data can permit a Frontier Molecular Orbital treatment of specific site activities as long as the surface orbital availability for overlap with adsorbed substrates is considered along with its energy value and symmetry.

  12. The calculation of surface orbital energies for specific types of active sites on dispersed metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, R.L.; Lahanas, K.M.; Cole, F.

    1992-01-01

    An angular overlap calculation has been used to determine the s, p, and d orbital energy levels of the different types of surface sites present on dispersed metal catalysts. These data can permit a Frontier Molecular Orbital treatment of specific site activities as long as the surface orbital availability for overlap with adsorbed substrates is considered along with its energy value and symmetry.

  13. Ligand-free Heck reaction: Pd(OAc)2 as an active catalyst revisited.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingwei; Kinney, Elizabeth P; Yang, Zhi

    2003-09-19

    Palladium acetate was shown to be an extremely active catalyst for the Heck reaction of aryl bromides. Both the base and the solvent were found to have a fundamental influence on the efficiency of the reaction, with K(3)PO(4) and N,N-dimethylacetamide being the optimal base and solvent, respectively.

  14. PREPARATION, CHARACTERIZATION AND ACTIVITY OF AL2O3-SUPPORTED V2O5 CATALYSTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of activated alumina supported vanadium oxide catalysts with various V2O5 loadings ranging from 5 to 25 wt% has been prepared by wet impregnation technique. A combination of various physico-chemical techniques such as BET surface areas, oxygen chemisorption, X-ray diffra...

  15. Alkene Isomerization Using a Solid Acid as Activator and Support for a Homogeneous Catalyst

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seen, Andrew J.

    2004-01-01

    An upper-level undergraduate experiment that, in addition to introducing students to catalysis using an air sensitive transition-metal complex, introduces the use of a solid acid as an activator and support for the catalyst is developed. The increased stability acquired in the course of the process affords the opportunity to characterize the…

  16. Graphene-supported hemin as a highly active biomimetic oxidation catalyst.

    PubMed

    Xue, Teng; Jiang, Shan; Qu, Yongquan; Su, Qiao; Cheng, Rui; Dubin, Sergey; Chiu, Chin-Yi; Kaner, Richard; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2012-04-16

    Well supported: stable hemin-graphene conjugates formed by immobilization of monomeric hemin on graphene, showed excellent catalytic activity, more than 10 times better than that of the recently developed hemin-hydrogel system and 100 times better than that of unsupported hemin. The catalysts also showed excellent binding affinities and catalytic efficiencies approaching that of natural enzymes. PMID:22368046

  17. Preparation, characterization, and activity of α-Ti(HPO4)2 supported metallocene catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yasai; Yuan, Yuan; Xu, Qinghong; Yi, Jianjun

    2016-10-01

    A series of heterogeneous catalysts by loading metallocenes on surface of α-Ti(HPO4)2, a kind of solid acid, has been synthesized. Polymerization of alkenes, including ethylene and propylene, based on participation of the heterogeneous catalysts were studied and the results were compared to metallocenes supported on silica gel, α-Zr(HPO4)2 and clay. Higher catalytic activity, larger polymer molecular weight and narrow distribution of polymer molecular weight were obtained. Acidic strength of the support and its influence to metallocenes were studied to discover intrinsic factors in the polymerizations.

  18. Method for preparing high activity silica supported hydrotreating catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M.S.

    1986-03-04

    A method is described for preparing a silica supported hydrotreating catalyst containing from about 10-25%w molybdenum and from about 1-5%w nickel and/or cobalt as hydrogenation metals. The method consists of: (a) reacting a mixture of MoCl/sub 5/ and a compound selected from the group consisting of Ni(H/sub 2/O)/sub 6/Cl/sub 2/, Co(H/sub 2/O)/sub 6/Cl/sub 2/ and mixutres in amounts to provide a desired catalytic metals concentration of the support in the presence of a solubilizing amount of acetonitrile; (b) heating the mixture to between about 25/sup 0/ and 80/sup 0/C until most of the metal compounds have reacted and/or dissolved; (c) removing any undissolved solids from the solution; (d) impregnating the dried silica support with the hydrogenation metals-containing solution in one or more steps; and (e) drying the impregnated silica support at elevated temperature.

  19. Structure–activity relationship of Au/ZrO2 catalyst on formation of hydroxyl groups and its influence on CO oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Karwacki, Christopher J.; Ganesh, P.; Kent, Paul R. C.; Gordon, Wesley O.; Peterson, Gregory W.; Niu, Jun Jie; Gogotsi, Yury

    2013-01-01

    The effect of changes in morphology and surface hydroxyl species upon thermal treatment of zirconia on the oxidation activity of Au/ZrO2 catalyst was studied. We observed using transmission fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy progressive changes in the presence of monodentate (type I), bidentate (type II) and hydrogen bridged species (type III) for each of the thermally treated (85 to 500 C) supports consisting of bare zirconia and Au/ZrO2 catalysts. Furthermore, structural changes in zirconia were accompanied by an increase in crystal size (7 to 58 nm) and contraction of the supports porosity (SSA 532 to 7 m2/g) with increasing thermal treatment. Deposition of gold nanoparticles under similar preparation conditions on different thermally treated zirconia resulted in changes in the mean gold cluster size, ranging from 3.7 to 5.6 nm. Changes in the surface hydroxyl species, support structure and size of the gold centers are important parameters responsible for the observed decrease (> 90 %) in CO conversion activity for the Au/ZrO2 catalysts. Density functional theory calculations provide evidence of increased CO binding to Au nanoclusters in the presence of surface hydroxyls on zirconia, which increases charge transfer at the perimeter of the gold nanocluster on zirconia support. This further helps in reducing a model CO-oxidation reaction barrier in the presence of surface hydroxyls. This work demonstrates the need to understand the structure-activity relationship of both the support and active particles for the design of catalytic materials.

  20. Highly active cobalt phosphate and borate based oxygen evolving catalysts operating in neutral and natural waters

    SciTech Connect

    Esswein, AJ; Surendranath, Y; Reece, SY; Nocera, DG

    2011-02-01

    A high surface area electrode is functionalized with cobalt-based oxygen evolving catalysts (Co-OEC = electrodeposited from pH 7 phosphate, Pi, pH 8.5 methylphosphonate, MePi, and pH 9.2 borate electrolyte, Bi). Co-OEC prepared from MePi and operated in Pi and Bi achieves a current density of 100 mA cm(-2) for water oxidation at 442 and 363 mV overpotential, respectively. The catalyst retains activity in near-neutral pH buffered electrolyte in natural waters such as those from the Charles River (Cambridge, MA) and seawater (Woods Hole, MA). The efficacy and ease of operation of anodes functionalized with Co-OEC at appreciable current density together with its ability to operate in near neutral pH buffered natural water sources bodes well for the translation of this catalyst to a viable renewable energy storage technology.

  1. Method of treating intermetallic alloy hydrogenation/oxidation catalysts for improved impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration and increased activity

    DOEpatents

    Wright, R.B.

    1992-01-14

    Alternate, successive high temperature oxidation and reduction treatments, in either order, of intermetallic alloy hydrogenation and intermetallic alloy oxidation catalysts unexpectedly improves the impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration capacity and/or activity of the catalysts. The particular alloy, and the final high temperature treatment given alloy (oxidation or reduction) will be chosen to correspond to the function of the catalyst (oxidation or hydrogenation). 23 figs.

  2. Pt5Gd as a highly active and stable catalyst for oxygen electroreduction.

    PubMed

    Escudero-Escribano, María; Verdaguer-Casadevall, Arnau; Malacrida, Paolo; Grønbjerg, Ulrik; Knudsen, Brian P; Jepsen, Anders K; Rossmeisl, Jan; Stephens, Ifan E L; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2012-10-10

    The activity and stability of Pt(5)Gd for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) have been studied, using a combination of electrochemical measurements, angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AR-XPS), and density functional theory calculations. Sputter-cleaned, polycrystalline Pt(5)Gd shows a 5-fold increase in ORR activity, relative to pure Pt at 0.9 V, approaching the most active in the literature for catalysts prepared in this way. AR-XPS profiles after electrochemical measurements in 0.1 M HClO(4) show the formation of a thick Pt overlayer on the bulk Pt(5)Gd, and the enhanced ORR activity can be explained by means of compressive strain effects. Furthermore, these novel bimetallic electrocatalysts are highly stable, which, in combination with their enhanced activity, makes them very promising for the development of new cathode catalysts for fuel cells. PMID:22998588

  3. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of carbon-silica hybrid catalyst from rice straw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janaun, J.; Safie, N. N.; Siambun, N. J.

    2016-07-01

    The hybrid-carbon catalyst has been studied because of its promising potential to have high porosity and surface area to be used in biodiesel production. Silica has been used as the support to produce hybrid carbon catalyst due to its mesoporous structure and high surface area properties. The chemical synthesis of silica-carbon hybrid is expensive and involves more complicated preparation steps. The presence of natural silica in rice plants especially rice husk has received much attention in research because of the potential as a source for solid acid catalyst synthesis. But study on rice straw, which is available abundantly as agricultural waste is limited. In this study, rice straw undergone pyrolysis and functionalized using fuming sulphuric acid to anchor -SO3H groups. The presence of silica and the physiochemical properties of the catalyst produced were studied before and after sulphonation. The catalytic activity of hybrid carbon silica acid catalyst, (H-CSAC) in esterification of oleic acid with methanol was also studied. The results showed the presence of silica-carbon which had amorphous structure and highly porous. The carbon surface consisted of higher silica composition, had lower S element detected as compared to the surface that had high carbon content but lower silica composition. This was likely due to the fact that Si element which was bonded to oxygen was highly stable and unlikely to break the bond and react with -SO3H ions. H-CSAC conversions were 23.04 %, 35.52 % and 34.2 7% at 333.15 K, 343.15 K and 353.15 K, respectively. From this research, rice straw can be used as carbon precursor to produce hybrid carbon-silica catalyst and has shown catalytic activity in biodiesel production. Rate equation obtained is also presented.

  4. The selectivity and activity of catalyst for CO hydrogenation to methanol and hydrocarbon: A comparative study on Cu, Co and Ni surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingbo; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Sun, Qiang; Chan, Siewhwa; Su, Haibin

    2016-03-01

    Typical Fischer-Tropsch catalysts display different selectivity and activity in catalyzing CO hydrogenation to diverse products. In this work, the preferable routes for CH3OH formation on Cu, chain growth on Co and CH4 formation on Ni are identified guided by the comprehensive reaction network that is mapped out by density function theory calculations. The difference in selectivity among catalysts is controlled delicately by several reactions, including CH3O + H ↔ CH3OH, CH3 + H ↔ CH4 and CH2 + CO ↔ CH2CO. The equilibrium shifts of CH2O + H ↔ CH3O and CH2 + H ↔ CH3 also make an impact on selectivity. The distinct selectivity can be understood further with the activity of catalysts. Our results show that the ability of surface to absorb species increases in the order Cu < Ni < Co. Generally, Cu catalyzes the association reaction better than Co and Ni, while Co facilitates the dissociation reaction. Two key factors, thermodynamic effect and kinetic effect, are identified in determining the activity of catalyst. We proof that surface with strong binding capability promotes the dissociation reaction, meanwhile impedes the association reaction when the thermodynamic effect is dominant in determining the barrier height. The Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi relation is observed for C-O bond breaking reactions. In addition, kinetic effect also affects the barrier when special transition state exists. The tilt of CO at the transition state for COH formation and chain growth reactions introduces the interaction of atom O with surface. The stronger binding of atom O on Co is crucial to branch the selectivity of Co to chain growth rather than methane. Present study provides a comprehensive picture on the activity and selectivity of catalysts, which is the essential to develop novel catalyst for syngas conversion.

  5. Atmospheric-Pressure DBD Cold Plasma for Preparation of High Active Au/P25 Catalysts for Low-Temperature CO Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, Lanbo; Zhan, Zhibin; Zhang, Xiuling; Qi, Bin; Xu, Weijie

    2016-05-01

    Cold plasma generated by dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) at atmospheric pressure was adopted for preparation of commercial TiO2 Degussa P25 supported Au catalysts (Au/P25-P) with the assistance of the deposition-precipitation procedure. The influences of the plasma reduction time and calcination on the performance of the Au/P25-P catalysts were investigated. CO oxidation was performed to investigate the catalytic activity of the Au/P25 catalysts. The results show that DBD cold plasma for the fabrication of Au/P25-P catalysts is a fast process, and Au/P25-P (4 min) exhibited the highest CO oxidation activity due to the complete reduction of Au compounds and less consumption of oxygen vacancies. In order to form more oxygen vacancies active species, Au/P25-P was calcined to obtain Au/P25-PC catalysts. Interestingly, Au/P25-PC exhibited the highest activity for CO oxidation among the Au/P25 samples. The results of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicated that the smaller size and high distribution of Au nanoparticles are the mean reasons for a high performance of Au/P25-PC. Atmospheric-pressure DBD cold plasma was proved to be of great efficiency in preparing high performance supported Au catalysts. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11505019, 21173028), the Science and Technology Research Project of Liaoning Provincial Education Department (No. L2013464), the Scientific Research Foundation for the Doctor of Liaoning Province (No. 20131004), and the Dalian Jinzhou New District Science and Technology Plan Project (No. KJCX-ZTPY-2014-0001)

  6. Highly selective plasma-activated copper catalysts for carbon dioxide reduction to ethylene

    DOE PAGES

    Mistry, Hemma; Varela, Ana Sofia; Bonifacio, Cecile S.; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Sinev, Ilya; Choi, Yong-Wook; Kisslinger, Kim; Stach, Eric A.; Yang, Judith C.; Strasser, Peter; et al

    2016-06-30

    There is an urgent need to develop technologies that use renewable energy to convert waste products such as carbon dioxide into hydrocarbon fuels. Carbon dioxide can be electrochemically reduced to hydrocarbons over copper catalysts, although higher efficiency is required. We have developed oxidized copper catalysts displaying lower overpotentials for carbon dioxide electroreduction and record selectivity towards ethylene (60%) through facile and tunable plasma treatments. Herein we provide insight into the improved performance of these catalysts by combining electrochemical measurements with microscopic and spectroscopic characterization techniques. Operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy and cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy show that copper oxides aremore » surprisingly resistant to reduction and copper+ species remain on the surface during the reaction. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that the roughness of oxide-derived copper catalysts plays only a partial role in determining the catalytic performance, while the presence of copper+ is key for lowering the onset potential and enhancing ethylene selectivity.« less

  7. Structure-activity correlations in a nickel-borate oxygen evolution catalyst.

    PubMed

    Bediako, D Kwabena; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Surendranath, Yogesh; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K; Nocera, Daniel G

    2012-04-18

    An oxygen evolution catalyst that forms as a thin film from Ni(aq)(2+) solutions containing borate electrolyte (Ni-B(i)) has been studied by in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. A dramatic increase in catalytic rate, induced by anodic activation of the electrodeposited films, is accompanied by structure and oxidation state changes. Coulometric measurements correlated with X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectra of the active catalyst show that the nickel centers in activated films possess an average oxidation state of +3.6, indicating that a substantial proportion of nickel centers exist in a formal oxidation state of Ni(IV). In contrast, nickel centers in nonactivated films exist predominantly as Ni(III). Extended X-ray absorption fine structure reveals that activated catalyst films comprise bis-oxo/hydroxo-bridged nickel centers organized into sheets of edge-sharing NiO(6) octahedra. Diminished long-range ordering in catalyst films is due to their ostensibly amorphous nature. Nonactivated films display a similar oxidic nature but exhibit a distortion in the local coordination geometry about nickel centers, characteristic of Jahn-Teller distorted Ni(III) centers. Our findings indicate that the increase in catalytic activity of films is accompanied by changes in oxidation state and structure that are reminiscent of those observed for conversion of β-NiOOH to γ-NiOOH and consequently challenge the long-held notion that the β-NiOOH phase is a more efficient oxygen-evolving catalyst. PMID:22417283

  8. Highly active trialkoxymolybdenum(VI) alkylidyne catalysts synthesized by a reductive recycle strategy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Kraft, Stefan; Moore, Jeffrey S

    2004-01-14

    A systematic study of alkyne metathesis catalyzed by trialkoxymolybdenum(VI) alkylidyne complexes is reported, in which substrate functional groups, alkynyl substituents, and catalyst ligands are varied. Sterically hindered trisamidomolybdenum(VI) propylidyne complex 5 was prepared conveniently through a previously communicated reductive recycle strategy. Alcoholysis of 5 with various phenols/alcohols provides a set of active catalysts for alkyne metathesis at room temperature, among which the catalyst with p-nitrophenol as ligand shows the highest catalytic activity and is compatible with a variety of functional groups and solvents. A key finding that enabled the use of highly active molybdenum(VI) catalysts is replacement of the commonly used propynyl substituents on the starting alkyne substrates with butynyl groups. Under reduced pressure using 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene as an involatile solvent, the alkyne metathesis of butynyl substituted compounds proceeds well at 30 degrees C providing high yields (83%-97%) of dimers. Rationalization of the special role played by butynyl substrates is discussed.

  9. Enhanced activity of urea electrooxidation on nickel catalysts supported on tungsten carbides/carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu; Du, Tingting; Cheng, Jin; Xie, Xing; Yang, Bolun; Li, Mingtao

    2015-04-01

    Nickel nanoparticles with tungsten carbides supported on the multi-walled carbon nanotubes, noted as Ni-WC/MWCNT catalyst, is prepared through an impregnation method and used for the electrooxidation of urea in alkaline conditions. The micro-morphology and composition of the Ni-WC/MWCNT particles are determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The electrooxidation activity and conductivity of the catalyst are investigated by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, respectively. Characterization results indicate that the Ni nanoparticles are uniformly distributed on the WC/MWCNT framework, and the Ni-WC/MWCNT catalyst shows an improved activity for the urea electrooxidation. The current densities of Ni-WC/MWCNT are over 3 times and 15 times higher than those of the Ni-WC/C and Ni/C catalysts, respectively, and the electrochemical impedance also decreases markedly. The higher activity on Ni-WC/MWCNT is attributed to the support effect of MWCNT as well as the synergistic effect between Ni and WC.

  10. Activity of platinum/carbon and palladium/carbon catalysts promoted by Ni2 P in direct ethanol fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoqiang; Feng, Ligang; Chang, Jinfa; Wickman, Björn; Grönbeck, Henrik; Liu, Changpeng; Xing, Wei

    2014-12-01

    Ethanol is an alternative fuel for direct alcohol fuel cells, in which the electrode materials are commonly based on Pt or Pd. Owing to the excellent promotion effect of Ni2 P that was found in methanol oxidation, we extended the catalyst system of Pt or Pd modified by Ni2 P in direct ethanol fuel cells. The Ni2 P-promoted catalysts were compared to commercial catalysts as well as to reference catalysts promoted with only Ni or only P. Among the studied catalysts, Pt/C and Pd/C modified by Ni2 P (30 wt %) showed both the highest activity and stability. Upon integration into the anode of a homemade direct ethanol fuel cell, the Pt-Ni2 P/C-30 % catalyst showed a maximum power density of 21 mW cm(-2) , which is approximately two times higher than that of a commercial Pt/C catalyst. The Pd-Ni2 P/C-30 % catalyst exhibited a maximum power density of 90 mW cm(-2) . This is approximately 1.5 times higher than that of a commercial Pd/C catalyst. The discharge stability on both two catalysts was also greatly improved over a 12 h discharge operation.

  11. ``Greener Shade of Ruthenium'': New Concepts of Activation, Immobilization, and Recovery of Ruthenium Catalysts For Green Olefin Metathesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michrowska, Anna; Gulajski, Lukasz; Grela, Karol

    The results described herewith demonstrate that the activity of ruthenium (Ru) metathesis catalysts can be enhanced by introduction of electron-withdrawing groups (EWGs) without detriment to catalysts stability. This principle can be used not only to increase the catalyst activity, but also to alter its physical-chemical properties, such as solubility in given medium or affinity to silica gel. An example of novel immobilisation strategy, based on this concept is presented. The ammonium-tagged Hoveyda-type catalysts can be successfully applied in aqueous media as well as in ionic liquids (IL). Substitution of a benzylidene fragment can be used not only to immobilize the organometallic complex in such media, but also to increase its catalytic activity by electronic activation. The high stability and good application profiles of such modified catalysts in conjunction with their facile removal from organic products can be expected to offer new opportunities in green applications of olefin metathesis.

  12. Electrochemical catalyst recovery method

    DOEpatents

    Silva, Laura J.; Bray, Lane A.

    1995-01-01

    A method of recovering catalyst material from latent catalyst material solids includes: a) combining latent catalyst material solids with a liquid acid anolyte solution and a redox material which is soluble in the acid anolyte solution to form a mixture; b) electrochemically oxidizing the redox material within the mixture into a dissolved oxidant, the oxidant having a potential for oxidation which is effectively higher than that of the latent catalyst material; c) reacting the oxidant with the latent catalyst material to oxidize the latent catalyst material into at least one oxidized catalyst species which is soluble within the mixture and to reduce the oxidant back into dissolved redox material; and d) recovering catalyst material from the oxidized catalyst species of the mixture. The invention is expected to be particularly useful in recovering spent catalyst material from petroleum hydroprocessing reaction waste products having adhered sulfides, carbon, hydrocarbons, and undesired metals, and as well as in other industrial applications.

  13. Electrochemical catalyst recovery method

    DOEpatents

    Silva, L.J.; Bray, L.A.

    1995-05-30

    A method of recovering catalyst material from latent catalyst material solids includes: (a) combining latent catalyst material solids with a liquid acid anolyte solution and a redox material which is soluble in the acid anolyte solution to form a mixture; (b) electrochemically oxidizing the redox material within the mixture into a dissolved oxidant, the oxidant having a potential for oxidation which is effectively higher than that of the latent catalyst material; (c) reacting the oxidant with the latent catalyst material to oxidize the latent catalyst material into at least one oxidized catalyst species which is soluble within the mixture and to reduce the oxidant back into dissolved redox material; and (d) recovering catalyst material from the oxidized catalyst species of the mixture. The invention is expected to be particularly useful in recovering spent catalyst material from petroleum hydroprocessing reaction waste products having adhered sulfides, carbon, hydrocarbons, and undesired metals, and as well as in other industrial applications. 3 figs.

  14. In situ generated highly active copper oxide catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction at low overpotential in alkaline solutions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang; Cui, Shengsheng; Qian, Manman; Sun, Zijun; Du, Pingwu

    2016-04-25

    Developing efficient water oxidation catalysts made up of earth-abundant elements has attracted much attention as a step toward for future clean energy production. Herein we report a simple one-step method to generate a low cost copper oxide catalyst film in situ from a copper(ii) ethylenediamine complex. The resulting catalyst has excellent activity toward the oxygen evolution reaction in alkaline solutions. A catalytic current density of 1.0 mA cm(-2) and 10 mA cm(-2) for the catalyst film requires the overpotentials of only ∼370 mV and ∼475 mV in 1.0 M KOH, respectively. This catalytic performance shows that the new catalyst is one of the best Cu-based heterogeneous OER catalysts to date. PMID:27020763

  15. Low-temperature catalyst activator: mechanism of dense carbon nanotube forest growth studied using synchrotron radiation

    PubMed Central

    Takashima, Akito; Izumi, Yudai; Ikenaga, Eiji; Ohkochi, Takuo; Kotsugi, Masato; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Muro, Takayuki; Kawabata, Akio; Murakami, Tomo; Nihei, Mizuhisa; Yokoyama, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of the one-order-of-magnitude increase in the density of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) achieved by a recently developed thermal chemical vapor deposition process was studied using synchrotron radiation spectroscopic techniques. In the developed process, a Ti film is used as the underlayer for an Fe catalyst film. A characteristic point of this process is that C2H2 feeding for the catalyst starts at a low temperature of 450°C, whereas conventional feeding temperatures are ∼800°C. Photoemission spectroscopy using soft and hard X-rays revealed that the Ti underlayer reduced the initially oxidized Fe layer at 450°C. A photoemission intensity analysis also suggested that the oxidized Ti layer at 450°C behaved as a support for nanoparticle formation of the reduced Fe, which is required for dense CNT growth. In fact, a CNT growth experiment, where the catalyst chemical state was monitored in situ by X-ray absorption spectroscopy, showed that the reduced Fe yielded a CNT forest at 450°C. Contrarily, an Fe layer without the Ti underlayer did not yield such a CNT forest at 450°C. Photoemission electron microscopy showed that catalyst annealing at the conventional feeding temperature of 800°C caused excess catalyst agglomeration, which should lead to sparse CNTs. In conclusion, in the developed growth process, the low-temperature catalyst activation by the Ti underlayer before the excess Fe agglomeration realised the CNT densification. PMID:25075343

  16. Influence of liquid medium on the activity of a low-alpha Fischer-Tropsch catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Gormley, R.J.; Zarochak, M.F.; Deffenbaugh, P.W.; Rao, K.R.P.M.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this research was to measure activity, selectivity, and the maintenance of these properties in slurry autoclave experiments with a Fischer-Tropsch (FT) catalyst that was used in the {open_quotes}FT II{close_quotes} bubble-column test, conducted at the Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) at LaPorte, Texas during May 1994. The catalyst contained iron, copper, and potassium and was formulated to produce mainly hydrocarbons in the gasoline range with lesser production of diesel-range products and wax. The probability of chain growth was thus deliberately kept low. Principal goals of the autoclave work have been to find the true activity of this catalyst in a stirred tank reactor, unhindered by heat or mass transfer effects, and to obtain a steady conversion and selectivity over the approximately 15 days of each test. Slurry autoclave testing of the catalyst in heavier waxes also allows insight into operation of larger slurry bubble column reactors. The stability of reactor operation in these experiments, particularly at loadings exceeding 20 weight %, suggests the likely stability of operations on a larger scale.

  17. Activity and stability of pyrolyzed iron ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid as cathode catalyst in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Liang, Peng; Zhang, Jian; Huang, Xia

    2011-04-01

    A low-cost and effective iron-chelated catalyst was developed as an electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The catalyst was prepared by pyrolyzing carbon mixed iron-chelated ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (PFeEDTA/C) in an argon atmosphere. Cyclic voltammetry measurements showed that PFeEDTA/C had a high catalytic activity for ORR. The MFC with a PFeEDTA/C cathode produced a maximum power density of 1122 mW/m(2), which was close to that with a Pt/C cathode (1166 mW/m(2)). The PFeEDTA/C was stable during an operation period of 31 days. Based on X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, quaternary-N modified with iron might be the active site for the oxygen reduction reaction. The total cost of a PFeEDTA/C catalyst was much lower than that of a Pt catalyst. Thus, PFeEDTA/C can be a good alternative to Pt in MFC practical applications.

  18. Catalyst suppliers consolidate further, offer more catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1995-10-02

    The list of suppliers of catalysts to the petroleum refining industry has decreased by five since Oil and Gas Journal`s survey of refining catalysts and catalytic additives was last published. Despite the consolidation, the list of catalyst designations has grown to about 950 in this latest survey, compared to 820 listed in 1993. The table divides the catalysts by use and gives data on their primary differentiating characteristics, feedstock, products, form, bulk density,catalyst support, active agents, availability, and manufactures.

  19. N-Butyl-2,4-dinitro-anilinium p-toluenesulfonate as a highly active and selective esterification catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Sattenapally, Narsimha; Wang, Wei; Liu, Huimin; Gao, Yong

    2013-01-01

    N-Butyl-2,4-dinitro-anilinium p-toluenesulfonate (1) was found to be a very active esterification catalyst that promotes condensation of equal mole amount of carboxylic acids and alcohols under mild conditions. This catalyst is also highly selective towards carboxylic acid and alcohol substrates at ambient temperature. PMID:24357885

  20. N-Butyl-2,4-dinitro-anilinium p-toluenesulfonate as a highly active and selective esterification catalyst.

    PubMed

    Sattenapally, Narsimha; Wang, Wei; Liu, Huimin; Gao, Yong

    2013-11-27

    N-Butyl-2,4-dinitro-anilinium p-toluenesulfonate (1) was found to be a very active esterification catalyst that promotes condensation of equal mole amount of carboxylic acids and alcohols under mild conditions. This catalyst is also highly selective towards carboxylic acid and alcohol substrates at ambient temperature.

  1. A new copper species based on an azo-compound utilized as a homogeneous catalyst for water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wei-Bin; He, Qing-Ya; Ma, Xiu-Fang; Shi, Hua-Tian; Wei, Xianwen

    2015-01-01

    A new azo-complex [(L)Cu(II)(NO3)] [L = (E)-3-(pyridin-2-yldiazenyl)naphthalen-2-ol (HL)], was prepared via a one-pot synthetic method at 60 °C and was structurally characterized by IR, EA, PXRD and single crystal X-ray diffraction. In addition, TGA studies indicated that the complex was stable in air. The redox properties were determined by cyclic voltammetry, which revealed that the complex could be utilized as a catalyst for water oxidation under mild conditions. Subsequently, the complex was employed as a catalyst to take part in water oxidation reaction in the presence of a Ce(IV) salt utilized as an oxidant at pH 11 in PBS (Phosphate Buffered Saline) solution. The results suggested that the catalyst exhibited a high stability and activity toward water oxidation reaction under these conditions with an initial TOF of 4.0 kPa h(-1). Calculation methodology was performed to study the mechanism of the reaction, which revealed that in this catalytic process, the initial oxidation of Cu(II) to Cu(III) occurred by the formation of an intermediate "Cu(III)-O-O-Cu(III)". The formation of this intermediate, resulted in a release of oxygen and closing of the catalytic cycle.

  2. Study of the active surface on titanium oxide catalysts for the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Khanmamedov, T.K.; Kalinkin, A.V.; Rakhimova, N.R.

    1989-02-01

    A study was carried out on the change in the composition of a Ti-Mo-W catalyst depending on the conditions for their treatment by H/sub 2/S-SO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S-O/sub 2/ gas mixtures, which serve as models for the technological gases in Klaus apparatuses and the direct catalytic oxidation of H/sub 2/S. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to establish the formation of sulfur as S/sup 2/minus// and S/sup 6+/ on the surface. The presence of S/sup 6+/ along with the changes in E/sub b/ of the electrons in the T-Mo-W catalyst indicates the formation of MoS/sub 2/ and TiO(SO/sub 4/) species.

  3. Characterization and HDS activity of Mo/TiO sub 2 and Ni(Co)-Mo/TiO sub 2 catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Quincy, R.B.; Houalla, M.; Hercules, D.M.

    1987-04-01

    A series of Mo/TiO{sub 2} catalysts ranging from 1 to 15 wt% MoO{sub 3} was prepared by incipient wetness impregnation. The catalysts were characterized by laser Raman spectroscopy (LRS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, ESCA), and gravimetric analysis. The Mo interaction species and MoO{sub 3} were identified and quantitated by Raman spectroscopy. The Mo interaction species increased with Mo loading up to 6 wt% MoO{sub 3} and leveled off at higher Mo loadings. MoO{sub 3} is detected at 7.5 wt% MoO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} and increased linearly with further Mo additions. The molybdenum speciation determined from Raman data is shown to correlate with ESCA and XRD measurements. The reduction characteristics of molybdenum on titania depend on Mo loading, and a lower average Mo oxidation state is found for Mo/TiO{sub 2} than previously reported for comparable loadings of Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. Correlation between structure and thiophene hydrodesulfurization activity is presented for the Mo/TiO{sub 2} series. The influence of nickel (cobalt) addition on the surface structure and the reactivity of the Mo/TiO{sub 2} catalysts is also examined.

  4. Promoting effect of vanadium on catalytic activity of Pt/Ce-Zr-O diesel oxidation catalysts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haifeng; Jiang, Bo; Gu, Lei; Qi, Zhonghua; Lu, Hanfeng

    2015-07-01

    A series of Pt-V/Ce-Zr-O diesel oxidation catalysts was prepared using the impregnation method. The catalytic activity and sulfur resistance of Pt-V/Ce-Zr-O were investigated in the presence of simulated diesel exhaust. The effect of vanadium on the structure and redox properties of the catalysts was also investigated using the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method, X-ray diffraction, H2 temperature-programmed reduction, CO temperature-programmed desorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy. Results showed that the Pt particles were well dispersed on the Ce-Zr-O carrier through the vanadium isolation effect, which significantly improved the oxidation activity toward CO and hydrocarbons. An electron-withdrawing phenomenon occurred from V to Pt, resulting in an increase in the metallic nature of platinum, which was beneficial to hydrocarbon molecular activation.

  5. Uniform 2 nm gold nanoparticles supported on iron oxides as active catalysts for CO oxidation reaction: structure-activity relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yu; Gu, Dong; Jin, Zhao; Du, Pei-Pei; Si, Rui; Tao, Jing; Xu, Wen-Qian; Huang, Yu-Ying; Senanayake, Sanjaya; Song, Qi-Sheng; Jia, Chun-Jiang; Schüth, Ferdi

    2015-03-01

    Uniform Au nanoparticles (~2 nm) with narrow size-distribution (standard deviation: 0.5-0.6 nm) supported on both hydroxylated (Fe_OH) and dehydrated iron oxide (Fe_O) have been prepared by either deposition-precipitation (DP) or colloidal-deposition (CD) methods. Different structural and textural characterizations were applied to the dried, calcined and used gold-iron oxide samples. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) showed high homogeneity in the supported Au nanoparticles. The ex situ and in situ X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) characterization monitored the electronic and short-range local structure of active gold species. The synchrotron-based in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD), together with the corresponding temperature-programmed reduction by hydrogen (H2-TPR), indicated a structural evolution of the iron-oxide supports, correlating to their reducibility. An inverse order of catalytic activity between DP (Au/Fe_OH < Au/Fe_O) and CD (Au/Fe_OH > Au/Fe_O) was observed. Effective gold-support interaction results in a high activity for gold nanoparticles, locally generated by the sintering of dispersed Au atoms on the oxide support in the DP synthesis, while a hydroxylated surface favors the reactivity of externally introduced Au nanoparticles on Fe_OH support for the CD approach. This work reveals why differences in the synthetic protocol translate to differences in the catalytic performance of Au/FeOx catalysts with very similar structural characteristics in CO oxidation.

  6. Uniform 2 nm gold nanoparticles supported on iron oxides as active catalysts for CO oxidation reaction: Structure-activity relationship

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Yu; Senanayake, Sanjaya; Gu, Dong; Jin, Zhao; Du, Pei -Pei; Si, Rui; Xu, Wen -Qian; Huang, Yu -Ying; Tao, Jing; Song, Qi -Sheng; et al

    2015-01-12

    Uniform Au nanoparticles (~2 nm) with narrow size-distribution (standard deviation: 0.5–0.6 nm) supported on both hydroxylated (Fe_OH) and dehydrated iron oxide (Fe_O) have been prepared by either deposition-precipitation (DP) or colloidal-deposition (CD) methods. Different structural and textural characterizations were applied to the dried, calcined and used gold-iron oxide samples. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) described the high homogeneity in the supported Au nanoparticles. The ex-situ and in-situ X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) characterization monitored the electronic and short-range local structure of active gold species. The synchrotron-based in-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD), together with the corresponding temperature-programmed reductionmore » by hydrogen (H₂-TPR), indicated a structural evolution of the iron-oxide supports, correlating to their reducibility. An inverse order of catalytic activity between DP (Au/Fe_OH < Au/Fe_O) and CD (Au/Fe_OH > Au/Fe_O) was observed. Effective gold-support interaction results in a high activity for gold nanoparticles, locally generated by the sintering of dispersed Au atoms on the oxide support in the DP synthesis, while a hydroxylated surface favors the reactivity of externally introduced Au nanoparticles on Fe_OH support for the CD approach. This work reveals why differences in the synthetic protocol translate to differences in the catalytic performance of Au/FeOx catalysts with very similar structural characteristics in CO oxidation.« less

  7. Uniform 2 nm gold nanoparticles supported on iron oxides as active catalysts for CO oxidation reaction: Structure-activity relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yu; Senanayake, Sanjaya; Gu, Dong; Jin, Zhao; Du, Pei -Pei; Si, Rui; Xu, Wen -Qian; Huang, Yu -Ying; Tao, Jing; Song, Qi -Sheng; Jia, Chun -Jia; Schueth, Ferdi

    2015-01-12

    Uniform Au nanoparticles (~2 nm) with narrow size-distribution (standard deviation: 0.5–0.6 nm) supported on both hydroxylated (Fe_OH) and dehydrated iron oxide (Fe_O) have been prepared by either deposition-precipitation (DP) or colloidal-deposition (CD) methods. Different structural and textural characterizations were applied to the dried, calcined and used gold-iron oxide samples. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) described the high homogeneity in the supported Au nanoparticles. The ex-situ and in-situ X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) characterization monitored the electronic and short-range local structure of active gold species. The synchrotron-based in-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD), together with the corresponding temperature-programmed reduction by hydrogen (H₂-TPR), indicated a structural evolution of the iron-oxide supports, correlating to their reducibility. An inverse order of catalytic activity between DP (Au/Fe_OH < Au/Fe_O) and CD (Au/Fe_OH > Au/Fe_O) was observed. Effective gold-support interaction results in a high activity for gold nanoparticles, locally generated by the sintering of dispersed Au atoms on the oxide support in the DP synthesis, while a hydroxylated surface favors the reactivity of externally introduced Au nanoparticles on Fe_OH support for the CD approach. This work reveals why differences in the synthetic protocol translate to differences in the catalytic performance of Au/FeOx catalysts with very similar structural characteristics in CO oxidation.

  8. Non-heme iron hydroperoxo species in superoxide reductase as a catalyst for oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Rat, S; Ménage, S; Thomas, F; Nivière, V

    2014-11-25

    The non-heme high-spin ferric iron hydroperoxo species formed in superoxide reductase catalyzes oxidative aldehyde deformylation through its nucleophilic character. This species also acts as an electrophile to catalyze oxygen atom transfer in sulfoxidation reactions, highlighting the oxidation potential of non-heme iron hydroperoxo species.

  9. Highly active non-PGM catalysts prepared from metal organic frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Barkholtz, Heather M.; Chong, Lina; Kaiser, Zachary B.; Xu, Tao; Liu, Di -Jia

    2015-06-11

    Finding inexpensive alternatives to platinum group metals (PGMs) is essential for reducing the cost of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Numerous materials have been investigated as potential replacements of Pt, of which the transition metal and nitrogen-doped carbon composites (TM/Nx/C) prepared from iron doped zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) are among the most active ones in catalyzing the oxygen reduction reaction based on recent studies. In this report, we demonstrate that the catalytic activity of ZIF-based TM/Nx/C composites can be substantially improved through optimization of synthesis and post-treatment processing conditions. Ultimately, oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalytic activity must be demonstrated in membrane-electrode assemblies (MEAs) of fuel cells. The process of preparing MEAs using ZIF-based non-PGM electrocatalysts involves many additional factors which may influence the overall catalytic activity at the fuel cell level. Evaluation of parameters such as catalyst loading and perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer to catalyst ratio were optimized. Our overall efforts to optimize both the catalyst and MEA construction process have yielded impressive ORR activity when tested in a fuel cell system.

  10. Highly active non-PGM catalysts prepared from metal organic frameworks

    DOE PAGES

    Barkholtz, Heather M.; Chong, Lina; Kaiser, Zachary B.; Xu, Tao; Liu, Di -Jia

    2015-06-11

    Finding inexpensive alternatives to platinum group metals (PGMs) is essential for reducing the cost of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Numerous materials have been investigated as potential replacements of Pt, of which the transition metal and nitrogen-doped carbon composites (TM/Nx/C) prepared from iron doped zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) are among the most active ones in catalyzing the oxygen reduction reaction based on recent studies. In this report, we demonstrate that the catalytic activity of ZIF-based TM/Nx/C composites can be substantially improved through optimization of synthesis and post-treatment processing conditions. Ultimately, oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalytic activity must be demonstratedmore » in membrane-electrode assemblies (MEAs) of fuel cells. The process of preparing MEAs using ZIF-based non-PGM electrocatalysts involves many additional factors which may influence the overall catalytic activity at the fuel cell level. Evaluation of parameters such as catalyst loading and perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer to catalyst ratio were optimized. Our overall efforts to optimize both the catalyst and MEA construction process have yielded impressive ORR activity when tested in a fuel cell system.« less

  11. Synergy between Two Metal Catalysts: A Highly Active Silica-Supported Bimetallic W/Zr Catalyst for Metathesis of n-Decane.

    PubMed

    Samantaray, Manoja K; Dey, Raju; Kavitake, Santosh; Abou-Hamad, Edy; Bendjeriou-Sedjerari, Anissa; Hamieh, Ali; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2016-07-13

    A well-defined, silica-supported bimetallic precatalyst [≡Si-O-W(Me)5≡Si-O-Zr(Np)3] (4) has been synthesized for the first time by successively grafting two organometallic complexes [W(Me)6 (1) followed by ZrNp4 (2)] on a single silica support. Surprisingly, multiple-quantum NMR characterization demonstrates that W and Zr species are in close proximity to each other. Hydrogenation of this bimetallic catalyst at room temperature showed the easy formation of zirconium hydride, probably facilitated by tungsten hydride which was formed at this temperature. This bimetallic W/Zr hydride precatalyst proved to be more efficient (TON = 1436) than the monometallic W hydride (TON = 650) in the metathesis of n-decane at 150 °C. This synergy between Zr and W suggests that the slow step of alkane metathesis is the C-H bond activation that occurs on Zr. The produced olefin resulting from a β-H elimination undergoes easy metathesis on W. PMID:27248839

  12. Catalysts possessing augmented C-O and C-N hydrogenolysis activity. Progress report No. 1, October-December 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Massoth, F.E.; Shabtai, J.S.

    1984-01-09

    The aim of the proposed research is to synthesize and investigate new sulfided catalyst systems having higher carbon-heteroatom hydrogenolysis activity as compared to ring hydrogenation activity. A fundamental approach is planned to gain understanding of the basic catalytic properties which relate to hydrogenolysis, hydrogenation and cracking functions of the catalysts. This will involve preparation of new catalysts, characterization of their properties and model compound reactivity studies. In another part of the project, selected catalysts will be applied in studies of more complex O- and N- containing model compounds with the objective of providing fundamental data on the stereochemistry of HDO and HDN reactions. These data will be used to develop steric surface-reactant models for sulfided catalysts. During this quarter additional catalysts were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation using solutions at various pH levels. Catalysts prepared by this method included: 3% and 6% Co, or 3% and 6% Ni with either 8% Mo or with 4.5% Cr supported on ..gamma.. alumina. Five catalysts were tested for hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) and hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) activity using model compounds indole and dibenzofuran. 5 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  13. Investigation of the Structure and Active Sites of TiO2 Nanorod Supported VOx Catalysts by High-Field and Fast-Spinning 51V MAS NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Z.; Xu, Suochang; Li, Weizhen; Hu, Mary Y.; Deng, Xuchu; Dixon, David A.; Vasiliu, Monica; Craciun, Raluca; Wang, Yong; Bao, Xinhe; Peden, Charles HF

    2015-07-02

    Supported VOx/TiO2-Rod catalysts were studied by 51V MAS NMR at high field using a sample spinning rate of 55 kHz. The superior spectral resolution allows for the observation of at least five vanadate species. The assignment of these vanadate species was carried out by quantum mechanical calculations of 51V NMR chemical shifts of model V-surface structures. Methanol oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) was used to establish the correlation between the reaction rate and the various surface V-sites. It is found that monomeric V-species dominated the catalyst at low vanadium loadings with two peaks observed at about -502 and -529 ppm. V-dimers with two bridged oxygen appeare at about -555 ppm. Vanadate dimers and polyvanadates connected by one bridged oxygen atom between two adjacent V atoms resonate at about -630 ppm. A positive correlation is found between the V-dimers related to the -555 ppm peak and the ODH rate while a better correlation is obtained by including monomeric contributions. This result indicates that surface V-dimers related to the -555 ppm peak are the major active sites for ODH reaction despite mono-V species are more catalytic active but their relative ratios are decreased dramatically at high V-loadings. Furthermore, a portion of the V-species is found invisible. In particular, the level of such invisibility increases with decreased level of V-loading, suggesting the existence of paramagnetic V-species at the surface.

  14. ALTERNATIVE ROUTES FOR CATALYST PREPARATION: USE OF ULTRASOUND AND MICROWAVE IRRADIATION FOR THE PREPARATION OF VANADIUM PHOSPHORUS OXIDE CATALYST AND ITS ACTIVITY FOR HYDROCARBON OXIDATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vanadium phosphorus oxide (VPO) is a well-known catalyst used for the vapor phase n-butane oxidation to maleic anhydride. It is prepared by a variety of methods, all of which, however, eventually result in the same active phase. The two main methods for the preparation of its pr...

  15. Comparative dimerization of 1-butene with a variety of metal catalysts, and the investigation of a new catalyst for C=H bond activation.

    PubMed

    Small, Brooke L; Schmidt, Roland

    2004-02-20

    Catalytic dimerization of 1-butene by a variety of catalysts is carried out, and the products are analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Catalysts based on cobalt and iron can produce highly linear dimers, with the cobalt-based dimers exceeding 97 % linearity. Catalysts based on vanadium and aluminum prefer to make branched dimers, which are most often methyl-heptenes in the case of vanadium and almost exclusively 2-ethyl-1-butene in the case of aluminum. The vanadium catalyst also produces substantial amounts of dienes and alkanes, suggesting a competing hydrogenation/dehydrogenation pathway that appears to involve vinyl Cbond;H bond activation. Nickel catalysts are generally less selective than those based on iron or cobalt for making linear dimers, but they can make dimers with 60 % linearity. The major by-products for the nickel systems are trisubstituted internal olefins. An important side reaction that must be considered for dimerization reactions is 1-butene isomerization to 2-butene, which makes recycling the butene difficult for a linear dimerization process. Aluminum, iron, and vanadium systems promote very little isomerization, but nickel and cobalt systems tend to isomerize the undimerized substrate heavily. PMID:14978828

  16. Activation and regeneration of a NiMo/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] hydrotreatment catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Teixeira da Silva, V.L.S.; Schmal, M. ); Frety, R. . Inst. de Reserches sur la Catalyse)

    1994-07-01

    Activation and regeneration procedures applied to a nickel-molybdenum on alumina catalyst, both fresh and spent, were tested by the hydrodesulfurization of thiophene. Characterization techniques used included temperature programmed reduction and oxidation (TPR,TPO), diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The fresh catalyst was treated by sulfiding, reoxidation, and resulfiding. This sequence was found to be more effective than one sulfiding step, possibly because of the formation of a nickel molybdate phase during reoxidation. The spent catalyst could not be regenerated completely although its original surface properties were attained. The loss of activity of the spent catalysts was alluded by TPO to result from nickel-molybdenum segregation which probably happened because of the excessive heat from burning the coke present on the catalyst.

  17. The effect of H2O and pretreatment on the activity of a Pt/SnO2 catalyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannorman, John D.; Brown, Kenneth G.; Schryer, Jacqueline; Schryer, David R.; Upchurch, Billy T.; Sidney, Barry D.

    1990-01-01

    CO oxidation catalysts with high activity at 25 C to 100 C are important for long-life, closed-cycle operation of pulsed CO2 lasers. A reductive pretreatment with either CO or H2 has been shown to significantly enhance the activity of a commercially available platinum on tin (IV) oxide (Pt/SnO2) catalyst relative to an oxidative or inert pretreatment or no pretreatment. Pretreatment at temperatures of 175 C and above causes an initial dip in the observed CO2 yield before the steady-state yield is attained. This dip has been found to be caused by dehydration of the catalyst during pretreatment and is readily eliminated by humidifying the catalyst or the reaction gas mixture. It is hypothesized that the effect of humidification is to increase the concentration of OH groups on the catalyst surface which play a role in the reaction mechanism.

  18. Active Site Dependent Reaction Mechanism over Ru/CeO2 Catalyst toward CO2 Methanation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; He, Shan; Chen, Hao; Wang, Bin; Zheng, Lirong; Wei, Min; Evans, David G; Duan, Xue

    2016-05-18

    Oxygen vacancy on the surface of metal oxides is one of the most important defects which acts as the reactive site in a variety of catalytic reactions. In this work, operando spectroscopy methodology was employed to study the CO2 methanation reaction catalyzed by Ru/CeO2 (with oxygen vacancy in CeO2) and Ru/α-Al2O3 (without oxygen vacancy), respectively, so as to give a thorough understanding on active site dependent reaction mechanism. In Ru/CeO2 catalyst, operando XANES, IR, and Raman were used to reveal the generation process of Ce(3+), surface hydroxyl, and oxygen vacancy as well as their structural evolvements under practical reaction conditions. The steady-state isotope transient kinetic analysis (SSITKA)-type in situ DRIFT infrared spectroscopy undoubtedly substantiates that CO2 methanation undergoes formate route over Ru/CeO2 catalyst, and the formate dissociation to methanol catalyzed by oxygen vacancy is the rate-determining step. In contrast, CO2 methanation undergoes CO route over Ru surface in Ru/α-Al2O3 with the absence of oxygen vacancy, demonstrating active site dependent catalytic mechanism toward CO2 methanation. In addition, the catalytic activity evaluation and the oscillating reaction over Ru/CeO2 catalyst further prove that the oxygen vacancy catalyzes the rate-determining step with a much lower activation temperature compared with Ru surface in Ru/α-Al2O3 (125 vs 250 °C).

  19. Zirconia supported catalysts for bioethanol steam reforming: Effect of active phase and zirconia structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benito, M.; Padilla, R.; Rodríguez, L.; Sanz, J. L.; Daza, L.

    Three new catalysts have been prepared in order to study the active phase influence in ethanol steam reforming reaction. Nickel, cobalt and copper were the active phases selected and were supported on zirconia with monoclinic and tetragonal structure, respectively. To characterize the behaviour of the catalysts in reaction conditions a study of catalytic activity with temperature was performed. The highest activity values were obtained at 973 K where nickel and cobalt based catalysts achieved an ethanol conversion of 100% and a selectivity to hydrogen close to 70%. Nickel supported on tetragonal zirconia exhibited the highest hydrogen production efficiency, higher than 4.5 mol H 2/mol EtOH fed. The influence of steam/carbon (S/C) ratio on product distribution was another parameter studied between the range 3.2-6.5. Nickel supported on tetragonal zirconia at S/C = 3.2 operated at 973 K without by-product production such as ethylene or acetaldehyde. In order to consider a further application in an ethanol processor, a long-term reaction experiment was performed at 973 K, S/C = 3.2 and atmospheric pressure. After 60 h, nickel supported on tetragonal zirconia exhibited high stability and selectivity to hydrogen production.

  20. Lewis acid activation of carbodicarbene catalysts for Rh-catalyzed hydroarylation of dienes.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Courtney C; Matías, Desirée M; Goldfogel, Matthew J; Meek, Simon J

    2015-05-27

    The activation of carbodicarbene (CDC)-Rh(I) pincer complexes by secondary binding of metal salts is reported for the catalytic site-selective hydro-heteroarylation of dienes (up to 98% yield and >98:2 γ:α). Reactions are promoted by 5 mol % of a readily available tridentate (CDC)-Rh complex in the presence of an inexpensive lithium salt. The reaction is compatible with a variety of terminal and internal dienes and tolerant of ester, alkyl halide, and boronate ester functional groups. X-ray data and mechanistic experiments provide support for the role of the metal salts on catalyst activation and shed light on the reaction mechanism. The increased efficiency (120 to 22 °C) made available by catalytic amounts of metal salts to catalysts containing C(0) donors is a significant aspect of the disclosed studies. PMID:25961506

  1. Highly Active and Robust Metalloporphyrin Catalysts for the Synthesis of Cyclic Carbonates from a Broad Range of Epoxides and Carbon Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Chihiro; Shimonishi, Junta; Miyazaki, Ray; Hasegawa, Jun-Ya; Ema, Tadashi

    2016-05-01

    Bifunctional metalloporphyrins with quaternary ammonium bromides (nucleophiles) at the meta, para, or ortho positions of meso-phenyl groups were synthesized as catalysts for the formation of cyclic carbonates from epoxides and carbon dioxide under solvent-free conditions. The meta-substituted catalysts exhibited high catalytic performance, whereas the para- and ortho-substituted catalysts showed moderate and low activity, respectively. DFT calculations revealed the origin of the advantage of the meta-substituted catalyst, which could use the flexible quaternary ammonium cation at the meta position to stabilize various anionic species generated during catalysis. A zinc(II) porphyrin with eight nucleophiles at the meta positions showed very high catalytic activity (turnover number (TON)=240 000 at 120 °C, turnover frequency (TOF)=31 500 h(-1) at 170 °C) at an initial CO2 pressure of 1.7 MPa; catalyzed the reaction even at atmospheric CO2 pressure (balloon) at ambient temperature (20 °C); and was applicable to a broad range of substrates, including terminal and internal epoxides.

  2. Enhanced catalytic activity over MIL-100(Fe) loaded ceria catalysts for the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH₃ at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Sun, Hong; Quan, Xie; Chen, Shuo

    2016-01-15

    The development of catalysts for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) reactions that are highly active at low temperatures and show good resistance to SO2 and H2O is still a challenge. In this study, we have designed and developed a high-performance SCR catalyst based on nano-sized ceria encapsulated inside the pores of MIL-100(Fe) that combines excellent catalytic power with a metal organic framework architecture synthesized by the impregnation method (IM). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the encapsulation of ceria in the cavities of MIL-100(Fe). The prepared IM-CeO2/MIL-100(Fe) catalyst shows improved catalytic activity both at low temperatures and throughout a wide temperature window. The temperature window for 90% NOx conversion ranges from 196 to 300°C. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFT) analysis indicated that the nano-sized ceria encapsulated inside MIL-100(Fe) promotes the production of chemisorbed oxygen on the catalyst surface, which greatly enhances the formation of the NO2 species responsible for fast SCR reactions.

  3. A General Method for Multimetallic Platinum Alloy Nanowires as Highly Active and Stable Oxygen Reduction Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Bu, Lingzheng; Ding, Jiabao; Guo, Shaojun; Zhang, Xu; Su, Dong; Zhu, Xing; Yao, Jianlin; Guo, Jun; Lu, Gang; Huang, Xiaoqing

    2015-11-25

    An unconventional class of high-performance Pt alloy multimetallic nanowires (NWs) is produced by a general method. The obtained PtNi NWs exhibit amazingly specific and mass oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities with improvement factors of 51.1 and 34.6 over commercial Pt/C catalysts, respectively, and are also stable in ORR conditions, making them among the most efficient electrocatalysts for ORR.

  4. Reductive alkylation of active methylene compounds with carbonyl derivatives, calcium hydride and a heterogeneous catalyst.

    PubMed

    Guyon, Carole; Duclos, Marie-Christine; Sutter, Marc; Métay, Estelle; Lemaire, Marc

    2015-07-01

    A one-pot two-step reaction (Knoevenagel condensation - reduction of the double bond) has been developed using calcium hydride as a reductant in the presence of a supported noble metal catalyst. The reaction between carbonyl compounds and active methylene compounds such as methylcyanoacetate, 1,3-dimethylbarbituric acid, dimedone and the more challenging dimethylmalonate, affords the corresponding monoalkylated products in moderate to good yields (up to 83%) with minimal reduction of the starting carbonyl compounds. PMID:26053131

  5. Dry Reforming of Methane on a Highly-Active Ni-CeO2 Catalyst: Effects of Metal-Support Interactions on C-H Bond Breaking.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zongyuan; Grinter, David C; Lustemberg, Pablo G; Nguyen-Phan, Thuy-Duong; Zhou, Yinghui; Luo, Si; Waluyo, Iradwikanari; Crumlin, Ethan J; Stacchiola, Dario J; Zhou, Jing; Carrasco, Javier; Busnengo, H Fabio; Ganduglia-Pirovano, M Verónica; Senanayake, Sanjaya D; Rodriguez, José A

    2016-06-20

    Ni-CeO2 is a highly efficient, stable and non-expensive catalyst for methane dry reforming at relative low temperatures (700 K). The active phase of the catalyst consists of small nanoparticles of nickel dispersed on partially reduced ceria. Experiments of ambient pressure XPS indicate that methane dissociates on Ni/CeO2 at temperatures as low as 300 K, generating CHx and COx species on the surface of the catalyst. Strong metal-support interactions activate Ni for the dissociation of methane. The results of density-functional calculations show a drop in the effective barrier for methane activation from 0.9 eV on Ni(111) to only 0.15 eV on Ni/CeO2-x (111). At 700 K, under methane dry reforming conditions, no signals for adsorbed CHx or C species are detected in the C 1s XPS region. The reforming of methane proceeds in a clean and efficient way. PMID:27144344

  6. Dry Reforming of Methane on a Highly-Active Ni-CeO2 Catalyst: Effects of Metal-Support Interactions on C-H Bond Breaking.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zongyuan; Grinter, David C; Lustemberg, Pablo G; Nguyen-Phan, Thuy-Duong; Zhou, Yinghui; Luo, Si; Waluyo, Iradwikanari; Crumlin, Ethan J; Stacchiola, Dario J; Zhou, Jing; Carrasco, Javier; Busnengo, H Fabio; Ganduglia-Pirovano, M Verónica; Senanayake, Sanjaya D; Rodriguez, José A

    2016-06-20

    Ni-CeO2 is a highly efficient, stable and non-expensive catalyst for methane dry reforming at relative low temperatures (700 K). The active phase of the catalyst consists of small nanoparticles of nickel dispersed on partially reduced ceria. Experiments of ambient pressure XPS indicate that methane dissociates on Ni/CeO2 at temperatures as low as 300 K, generating CHx and COx species on the surface of the catalyst. Strong metal-support interactions activate Ni for the dissociation of methane. The results of density-functional calculations show a drop in the effective barrier for methane activation from 0.9 eV on Ni(111) to only 0.15 eV on Ni/CeO2-x (111). At 700 K, under methane dry reforming conditions, no signals for adsorbed CHx or C species are detected in the C 1s XPS region. The reforming of methane proceeds in a clean and efficient way.

  7. Oxyhydrochlorination catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Charles E.; Noceti, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    An improved catalyst and method for the oxyhydrochlorination of methane is disclosed. The catalyst includes a pyrogenic porous support on which is layered as active material, cobalt chloride in major proportion, and minor proportions of an alkali metal chloride and of a rare earth chloride. On contact of the catalyst with a gas flow of methane, HCl and oxygen, more than 60% of the methane is converted and of that converted more than 40% occurs as monochloromethane. Advantageously, the monochloromethane can be used to produce gasoline boiling range hydrocarbons with the recycle of HCl for further reaction. This catalyst is also of value for the production of formic acid as are analogous catalysts with lead, silver or nickel chlorides substituted for the cobalt chloride.

  8. Redox-Active Nitroxide Radical Polymers: From Green Catalysts to Energy Storage Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waskitoaji, Wihatmoko; Suga, Takeo; Nishide, Hiroyuki

    2009-09-01

    Robust but redox-active radical polymers bearing 2, 2, 6, 6-tetramethylpiperidin-N-oxy (TEMPO) were investigated as a metal-free, green mediator/catalyst for the oxidation of alcohol derivatives, and as a new electrode-active and charge-storage material. The TEMPO-mediated oxidation of the primary alcohol group of the natural cellulose improved the water-dispersivity of cellulose, and the polymer-supported catalysts or redox resins allow facile removal of catalysts from products by simple filtration. Other radical molecule (e.g. galvinoxyl) was also used as a mediator, which is coupled with the molecular oxygen. A reversible one-electron redox reaction of TEMPO allowed its application as an electrode-active material featuring high cyclability (>500 cycles), relatively high battery electrode capacity (100-135 mAh/g), and fast electrode kinetics, leading to the high power rate capability of the battery. The radical polymer-based electrodes also provided good processability and shape flexibility, which promised the paper-like and wearable energy-storage devices.

  9. Heterogeneous copper-silica catalyst from agricultural biomass and its catalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andas, Jeyashelly; Adam, Farook; Rahman, Ismail Ab.

    2013-11-01

    A series of highly mesoporous copper catalysts (5-20 wt.%) supported on silica rice husk were synthesized via sol-gel route at room temperature. The FT-IR and 29Si MAS NMR spectroscopic studies revealed the successful substitution of copper into the silica matrix. Copper in the +2 oxidation state was evidenced from the DR/UV-vis and XPS analyses. Introduction of copper up to 10 wt.% (RH-10Cu) results in a progressive enhancement in the BET surface area. The activity of the copper catalysts was studied in the liquid-phase oxidation of phenol with H2O2 yielding catechol (CAT) and hydroquinone (HQ). Phenol conversion was influenced by various experimental conditions such as temperature, catalyst dosage, molar ratio of reactants, nature of solvent and percentage metal loading. Excellent activity was achieved when 10 wt.% copper was used and decreased with further increase in the copper loading. RH-10Cu could be regenerated several times without significant loss in the catalytic activity.

  10. Activity and selectivity of palladium catalysts during the liquid-phase hydrogenation of phenol. Influence of temperature and pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Velasco, J.R.; Gonzalez-Marcos, M.P.; Arnaiz, S.; Gutierrez-Ortiz, J.I.; Gutierrez-Ortiz, M.A.

    1995-04-01

    Two series of highly dispersed palladium catalysts supported on alumina have been prepared by adsorption from solution, with palladium contents varying from 0.25 to 2.0 wt %. The first series was calcined at 773 K for 4 h in air, whereas the second series was just heated at 423 K for 1 h in nitrogen, before reduction. Complete dispersion of the metal has been found for the calcined catalysts, and metal dispersion was favored with low palladium contents for the noncalcined catalysts. The kinetic behavior of the catalysts has been analyzed for the liquid-phase hydrogenation of phenol in a stirred tank reactor, ensuring a chemically controlled regime for stirring speed above 750 rpm and catalyst particle below 0.08--0.16 mm in the studied conditions. Despite their higher metallic dispersion, the calcined catalysts presented lower activity than their corresponding noncalcined catalysts. The influence of hydrogen partial pressure on activity showed a reaction order of 2. The apparent activation energy resulted in 56.8 kJ/mol. Selectivity to cyclohexanone was found to be very high for all experiments. Some conclusions on the kinetic reaction rate equations and the apparent activation energies of phenol to cyclohexanone and cyclohexanone to cyclohexanol are given.

  11. Regeneration of field-spent activated carbon catalysts for low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Jong Ki; Kim, Hyeonjoo; Park, Young-Kwon; Peden, Charles HF; Kim, Do Heui

    2011-10-15

    In the process of producing liquid crystal displays (LCD), the emitted NOx is removed over an activated carbon catalyst by using selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with NH3 at low temperature. However, the catalyst rapidly deactivates primarily due to the deposition of boron discharged from the process onto the catalyst. Therefore, this study is aimed at developing an optimal regeneration process to remove boron from field-spent carbon catalysts. The spent carbon catalysts were regenerated by washing with a surfactant followed by drying and calcination. The physicochemical properties before and after the regeneration were investigated by using elemental analysis, TG/DTG (thermogravimetric/differential thermogravimetric) analysis, N2 adsorption-desorption and NH3 TPD (temperature programmed desorption). Spent carbon catalysts demonstrated a drastic decrease in DeNOx activity mainly due to heavy deposition of boron. Boron was accumulated to depths of about 50 {mu}m inside the granule surface of the activated carbons, as evidenced by cross-sectional SEM-EDX analysis. However, catalyst activity and surface area were significantly recovered by removing boron in the regeneration process, and the highest NOx conversions were obtained after washing with a non-ionic surfactant in H2O at 70 C, followed by treatment with N2 at 550 C.

  12. Design of a high activity and selectivity alcohol catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, H.C.; Mills, G.A.

    1992-02-07

    Results of the pyridine adsorption, studies on native and K-doped alumina provide fundamental grounding for the observed methanol dehydration activity of these samples. Both the reactor studies and the pyridine adsorption studies support the conclusion that the K-doped sample had reduced Lewis acidity. Moreover, we were able to measurably alter the acidity of the support surface by our ion exchange treatment. More significantly, when reactor results for transition-metal loaded samples are reconsidered in combination with their surface characteristics suggested by our pyridine adsorption studies, our hypothesis that Rh and Mo have ultimately titrated the support surface seems all the more convincing. Hence, in light of the pyridine adsorption results, the attenuation of a transition-metal based decomposition pathway for methanol on the metal-loaded samples-as seen in the reactor testing-is all the more reasonable.

  13. Identifying the role of N-heteroatom location in the activity of metal catalysts for alcohol oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Chan-Thaw, Carine E.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Villa, Alberto; Prati, Laura

    2015-04-02

    Here, this work focuses on understanding how the bonding of nitrogen heteroatoms contained on/in a activated carbon support influence the stability and reactivity of a supported Pd catalyst for the oxidation of alcohols in solution. The results show that simply adding N groups via solution chemistry is insufficient to improve catalytic properties. Instead a strongly bound N moiety is required to activate the catalyst and stabilize the metal particles.

  14. Highly active Pd-In/mesoporous alumina catalyst for nitrate reduction.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhenwei; Zhang, Yonggang; Li, Deyi; Werth, Charles J; Zhang, Yalei; Zhou, Xuefei

    2015-04-01

    The catalytic reduction of nitrate is a promising technology for groundwater purification because it transforms nitrate into nitrogen and water. Recent studies have mainly focused on new catalysts with higher activities for the reduction of nitrate. Consequently, metal nanoparticles supported on mesoporous metal oxides have become a major research direction. However, the complex surface chemistry and porous structures of mesoporous metal oxides lead to a non-uniform distribution of metal nanoparticles, thereby resulting in a low catalytic efficiency. In this paper, a method for synthesizing the sustainable nitrate reduction catalyst Pd-In/Al2O3 with a dimensional structure is introduced. The TEM results indicated that Pd and In nanoparticles could efficiently disperse into the mesopores of the alumina. At room temperature in CO2-buffered water and under continuous H2 as the electron donor, the synthesized material (4.9 wt% Pd) was the most active at a Pd-In ratio of 4, with a first-order rate constant (k(obs) = 0.241 L min(-1) g(cata)(-1)) that was 1.3× higher than that of conventional Pd-In/Al2O3 (5 wt% Pd; 0.19 L min(-1) g(cata)(-1)). The Pd-In/mesoporous alumina is a promising catalyst for improving the catalytic reduction of nitrate. PMID:25600582

  15. Conversion of isoamyl alcohol over acid catalysts: Reaction dependence on nature of active centers

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, G.P.; Murthy, R.S.; Krishnan, V.

    1997-02-01

    Acid catalysts are known to catalyze the dehydration of alcohols. In addition some oxide catalysts with basic properties have also been shown to play an important role in such dehydration reactions. The dehydration of aliphatic alcohols to olefins has been studied in detail using alumina silica-alumina and zeolite catalysts. The olefin products further undergo isomerization in presence of acidic sites. The reaction of isoamyl alcohol on catalytic surfaces has not been investigated in greater detail. The dehydration of isoamyl alcohol is of considerable interest in fine chemicals. Isoamyl alcohol may also undergo dehydrogenation as observed in the case of n-butanol. The scope of the present work is to identify the nature of the active sites selective for dehydration and dehydrogenation of isoamyl alcohol and to modify the active sites to promote isomerization of dehydrated products. Four catalytic surfaces on which the acidic strength can be varied, as well as selectively suppressed, are chosen for this study. 17 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  16. Synthesis, characterization, and catalytic activity in Suzuki coupling and catalase-like reactions of new chitosan supported Pd catalyst.

    PubMed

    Baran, Talat; Inanan, Tülden; Menteş, Ayfer

    2016-07-10

    The aim of this study is to analyze the synthesis of a new chitosan supported Pd catalyst and examination of its catalytic activity in: Pd catalyst was synthesized using chitosan as a biomaterial and characterized with FTIR, TG/DTG, XRD, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, SEM-EDAX, ICP-OES, Uv-vis spectroscopies, and magnetic moment, along with molar conductivity analysis. Biomaterial supported Pd catalyst indicated high activity and long life time as well as excellent turnover number (TON) and turnover frequency (TOF) values in Suzuki reaction. Biomaterial supported Pd catalyst catalyzed H2O2 decomposition reaction with considerable high activity using comparatively small loading catalyst (10mg). Redox potential of biomaterial supported Pd catalyst was still high without negligible loss (13% decrease) after 10 cycles in reusability tests. As a consequence, eco-friendly biomaterial supported Pd catalyst has superior properties such as high thermal stability, long life time, easy removal from reaction mixture and durability to air, moisture and high temperature. PMID:27106147

  17. Synthesis, characterization, and catalytic activity in Suzuki coupling and catalase-like reactions of new chitosan supported Pd catalyst.

    PubMed

    Baran, Talat; Inanan, Tülden; Menteş, Ayfer

    2016-07-10

    The aim of this study is to analyze the synthesis of a new chitosan supported Pd catalyst and examination of its catalytic activity in: Pd catalyst was synthesized using chitosan as a biomaterial and characterized with FTIR, TG/DTG, XRD, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, SEM-EDAX, ICP-OES, Uv-vis spectroscopies, and magnetic moment, along with molar conductivity analysis. Biomaterial supported Pd catalyst indicated high activity and long life time as well as excellent turnover number (TON) and turnover frequency (TOF) values in Suzuki reaction. Biomaterial supported Pd catalyst catalyzed H2O2 decomposition reaction with considerable high activity using comparatively small loading catalyst (10mg). Redox potential of biomaterial supported Pd catalyst was still high without negligible loss (13% decrease) after 10 cycles in reusability tests. As a consequence, eco-friendly biomaterial supported Pd catalyst has superior properties such as high thermal stability, long life time, easy removal from reaction mixture and durability to air, moisture and high temperature.

  18. Thermodynamic explanation of the universal correlation between oxygen evolution activity and corrosion of oxide catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binninger, Tobias; Mohamed, Rhiyaad; Waltar, Kay; Fabbri, Emiliana; Levecque, Pieter; Kötz, Rüdiger; Schmidt, Thomas J.

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) has attracted increased research interest due to its crucial role in electrochemical energy conversion devices for renewable energy applications. The vast majority of OER catalyst materials investigated are metal oxides of various compositions. The experimental results obtained on such materials strongly suggest the existence of a fundamental and universal correlation between the oxygen evolution activity and the corrosion of metal oxides. This corrosion manifests itself in structural changes and/or dissolution of the material. We prove from basic thermodynamic considerations that any metal oxide must become unstable under oxygen evolution conditions irrespective of the pH value. The reason is the thermodynamic instability of the oxygen anion in the metal oxide lattice. Our findings explain many of the experimentally observed corrosion phenomena on different metal oxide OER catalysts.

  19. Thermodynamic explanation of the universal correlation between oxygen evolution activity and corrosion of oxide catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Binninger, Tobias; Mohamed, Rhiyaad; Waltar, Kay; Fabbri, Emiliana; Levecque, Pieter; Kötz, Rüdiger; Schmidt, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) has attracted increased research interest due to its crucial role in electrochemical energy conversion devices for renewable energy applications. The vast majority of OER catalyst materials investigated are metal oxides of various compositions. The experimental results obtained on such materials strongly suggest the existence of a fundamental and universal correlation between the oxygen evolution activity and the corrosion of metal oxides. This corrosion manifests itself in structural changes and/or dissolution of the material. We prove from basic thermodynamic considerations that any metal oxide must become unstable under oxygen evolution conditions irrespective of the pH value. The reason is the thermodynamic instability of the oxygen anion in the metal oxide lattice. Our findings explain many of the experimentally observed corrosion phenomena on different metal oxide OER catalysts. PMID:26178185

  20. A general method for multimetallic platinum alloy nanowires as highly active and stable oxygen reduction catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Bu, Lingzheng; Ding, Jiabao; Yao, Jianlin; Huang, Xiaoqing; Guo, Shaojun; Zhang, Xu; Lu, Gang; Su, Dong; Zhu, Xing; Guo, Jun

    2015-10-13

    The production of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) with precise control over structures has always been a central target in various fields of chemistry and physics because the properties of NPs can be desirably manipulated by their structure.[1-4] There has been an intense search for high-performance noble metal NP catalysts particular for Pt.[5-9] Precious platinum (Pt) NPs are active catalysts for various heterogeneous reactions and show particularly superior performance in both the anodic oxidation reaction and the cathodic ORR in the fuel cells, but their rare content and high cost largely impede the practical application.[10-12] A potential strategy to address this tremendous challenge is alloying Pt NPs with the transition metals (TM).[13-16]

  1. A general method for multimetallic platinum alloy nanowires as highly active and stable oxygen reduction catalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Bu, Lingzheng; Ding, Jiabao; Yao, Jianlin; Huang, Xiaoqing; Guo, Shaojun; Zhang, Xu; Lu, Gang; Su, Dong; Zhu, Xing; Guo, Jun

    2015-10-13

    The production of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) with precise control over structures has always been a central target in various fields of chemistry and physics because the properties of NPs can be desirably manipulated by their structure.[1-4] There has been an intense search for high-performance noble metal NP catalysts particular for Pt.[5-9] Precious platinum (Pt) NPs are active catalysts for various heterogeneous reactions and show particularly superior performance in both the anodic oxidation reaction and the cathodic ORR in the fuel cells, but their rare content and high cost largely impede the practical application.[10-12] A potential strategy to address this tremendousmore » challenge is alloying Pt NPs with the transition metals (TM).[13-16]« less

  2. The Economics of Saving Endangered Species: A Teaching Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schug, Mark C.; Shaw, Jane S.

    1997-01-01

    Argues that well-intentioned government policies, such as the Endangered Species Act, can actually cause harm to endangered species by creating disincentives to preserving the habitat for endangered species. Maintains that the use of incentives can lead to voluntary species protection. Includes instructions for an in-class teaching activity. (MJP)

  3. Influence of the support on the activity and selectivity of high dispersion Fe catalysts in the Fischer-Tropsch reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Cagnoli, M.V.; Marchetti, S.G.; Gallegos, N.G.; Alvarez, A.M.; Mercader, R.C.; Yeramian, A.A. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, La Plata )

    1990-05-01

    In order to study the influence of the support on high dispersion catalysts used for the CO hydrogenation reaction, two catalysts, Fe/SiO{sub 2} and Fe/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, were prepared by the dry impregnation method. Selective chemisorption of CO, volumetric oxidation, and Moessbauer spectroscopy were used to determine the Fe species present as well as the metallic crystal size, the degree of dispersion, and the reduction percentage. The presence of small Fe{sup 0} crystallites with high dispersion was determined in both catalysts. Reaction rates were measured in a differential reactor and significant differences, about one order of magnitude less for the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} than for the SiO{sub 2} supported catalysts, were found in the methane turnover frequencies. They are attributed to the interaction between the metal and the supports. The selectivity differences is also discussed in connection with distinct surface properties.

  4. The contrasting catalytic efficiency and cancer cell antiproliferative activity of stereoselective organoruthenium transfer hydrogenation catalysts.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ying; Sanchez-Cano, Carlos; Soni, Rina; Romero-Canelon, Isolda; Hearn, Jessica M; Liu, Zhe; Wills, Martin; Sadler, Peter J

    2016-05-28

    The rapidly growing area of catalytic ruthenium chemistry has provided new complexes with potential as organometallic anticancer agents with novel mechanisms of action. Here we report the anticancer activity of four neutral organometallic Ru(II) arene N-tosyl-1,2-diphenylethane-1,2-diamine (TsDPEN) tethered transfer hydrogenation catalysts. The enantiomers (R,R)-[Ru(η(6)-C6H5(CH2)3-TsDPEN-N-Me)Cl] (8) and (S,S)-[Ru(η(6)-C6H5(CH2)3-TsDPEN-N-Me)Cl] (8a) exhibited higher potency than cisplatin against A2780 human ovarian cancer cells. When the N-methyl was replaced by N-H, i.e. to give (R,R)-[Ru(η(6)-Ph(CH2)3-TsDPEN-NH)Cl] (7) and (S,S)-[Ru(η(6)-Ph(CH2)3-TsDPEN-NH)Cl] (7a), respectively, anticancer activity decreased >5-fold. Their antiproliferative activity appears to be linked to their ability to accumulate in cells, and their mechanism of action might involve inhibition of tubulin polymerisation. This appears to be the first report of the potent anticancer activity of tethered Ru(II) arene complexes, and the structure-activity relationship suggests that the N-methyl substituents are important for potency. In the National Cancer Institute 60-cancer-cell-line screen, complexes 8 and 8a exhibited higher activity than cisplatin towards a broad range of cancer cell lines. Intriguingly, in contrast to their potent anticancer properties, complexes 8/8a are poor catalysts for asymmetric transfer hydrogenation, whereas complexes 7/7a are effective asymmetric hydrogenation catalysts. PMID:27109147

  5. Preparation and characterization of nanosized gold catalysts supported on Co3O4 and their activities for CO oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Joong; Song, Jae-Koon; Shin, Seong-Soo; Kang, Sang-Jun; Chung, Min-Chul; Jung, Sang-Chul; Jeong, Woon-Jo; Ahn, Ho-Geun

    2011-02-01

    Gold catalysts supported on Co3O4 were prepared by co-precipitation (CP), deposition-precipitation (DP), and impregnation (IMP) methods. The Au/Co3O4 catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and temperature programmed reduction (TPR) to understand the different activities for CO oxidation with different preparation methods. Gold particles below 5 nm supported on Co3O4 by DP method were found to be more exposed to the surface than those by CP and IMP methods, and this catalyst was highly active and stable in CO oxidation. Finally, catalytic activity of Au/Co3O4 catalyst for CO oxidation was strongly dependent on the gold particle size. PMID:21456247

  6. Catalytic Y-tailed amphiphilic homopolymers - aqueous nanoreactors for high activity, low loading SCS pincer catalysts.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Joseph P; Cotanda, Pepa; Kelley, Elizabeth G; Moughton, Adam O; Lu, Annhelen; Epps, Thomas H; O'Reilly, Rachel K

    2013-01-01

    A new amphiphilic homopolymer bearing an SCS pincer palladium complex has been synthesized by reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. The amphiphile has been shown to form spherical and worm-like micelles in water by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy and small angle neutron scattering. Segregation of reactive components within the palladium containing core results in increased catalytic activity of the pincer compound compared to small molecule analogues. This allows carbon-carbon bond forming reactions to be performed in water with reduced catalyst loadings and enhanced activity.

  7. Counting Active Sites on Titanium Oxide-Silica Catalysts for Hydrogen Peroxide Activation through In Situ Poisoning with Phenylphosphonic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, Todd R.; Boston, Andrew M.; Thompson, Anthony B.; Gray, Kimberly A.; Notestein, Justin M.

    2015-06-04

    Quantifying specific active sites in supported catalysts improves our understanding and assists in rational design. Supported oxides can undergo significant structural changes as surface densities increase from site-isolated cations to monolayers and crystallites, which changes the number of kinetically relevant sites. Herein, TiOx domains are titrated on TiOx–SiO2 selectively with phenylphosphonic acid (PPA). An ex situ method quantifies all fluid-accessible TiOx, whereas an in situ titration during cis-cyclooctene epoxidation provides previously unavailable values for the number of tetrahedral Ti sites on which H2O2 activation occurs. We use this method to determine the active site densities of 22 different catalysts with different synthesis methods, loadings, and characteristic spectra and find a single intrinsic turnover frequency for cis-cyclooctene epoxidation of (40±7) h-1. This simple method gives molecular-level insight into catalyst structure that is otherwise hidden when bulk techniques are used.

  8. The effect of catalyst preparation on the performance of alumina-supported ruthenium catalysts. I. The impact of catalytic precursor on particle size and catalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mieth, J.A.; Schwarz, J.A. )

    1989-07-01

    The effect of preparation method and the choice of metallic precursor on the performance of a series of Ru/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts were studied. Wet impregnation and incipient wetness were the methods employed; ruthenium nitrosylnitrate and ruthenium trichloride were the reagents. In the latter case, either Ru(III)/Ru(IV) chlorospecies or mixtures of Ru(II) hydrazine complexes were the catalytic precursors. The series of Ru/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts, with metal loadings from 0.7-5% by weight, were subjected to a battery of performance tests: CO temperature-programmed reaction, steady-state CO hydrogenation, and temperature-programmed surface reaction. The methanation activity and carbon deposited during steady-state reaction varied systematically with the dispersion of Ru on the alumina. High rates of methane production were found on catalysts containing a large reservoir of carbon-containing reaction intermediates. The performance of these catalysts depended on the precursor used in their preparation. The effects of weight loading, method of preparation, and variations in the impregnant pH were small within a group prepared from a common precursor.

  9. Study of new states in visible light active W, N co-doped TiO{sub 2} photo catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Sajjad, Ahmed Khan Leghari; Shamaila, Sajjad; Zhang, Jinlong

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ► Visible light efficient W, N co-doped TiO{sub 2} photo catalysts are prepared by sol–gel. ► Oxygen vacancies are detected in the form of new linkages as N-Ti-O, N-W-O, Ti-O-N and W-O-N. ► W, N co-doped titania has new energy states which narrows the band gap effectively. ► Oxygen vacancies are proved to be the cause for high photo catalytic activity. ► W and N co-doping plays the major role to make the composite thermally stable. -- Abstract: The visible light efficient W, N co-doped TiO{sub 2} photo catalysts are prepared by sol–gel method. New linkages of N, W and O are formed as N-Ti-O, N-W-O, Ti-O-N and W-O-N. Electron paramagnetic resonance illustrates the presence of oxygen vacancies in W, N co-doped TiO{sub 2} acting as trapping agencies for electrons to produce active species. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirms the presence of new energy states. New linkages and oxygen vacancies are proved to be the main cause for the improved photo catalytic performances. W, N co-doped TiO{sub 2} has new energy states which narrow the band gap effectively. W, N co-doped TiO{sub 2} is thermally stable and retains its anatase phase up to 900 °C. 4.5% W, N co-doped TiO{sub 2} showed superior activity for the degradation of Rhodamine B and 2,4-dichlorophenol as compared to pure titania, Degussa P-25, traditional N-doped TiO{sub 2} and pure WO{sub 3}.

  10. Active Hydrogenation Catalyst with a Structured, Peptide-Based Outer-Coordination Sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Avijita; Buchko, Garry W.; Reback, Matthew L.; O'Hagan, Molly J.; Ginovska-Pangovska, Bojana; Linehan, John C.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2012-10-05

    The synthesis, catalytic activity, and structural features of a rhodium-based hydrogenation catalyst containing a phosphine ligand coupled to a 14-residue peptide are reported. Both CD and NMR spectroscopy show that the peptide adopts a helical structure in 1:1:1 TFE/MeCN/H2O that is maintained when the peptide is attached to the ligand and when the ligand is attached to the metal complex. The metal complex hydrogenates aqueous solutions of 3-butenol to 1-butanol at 360 ± 50 turnovers/Rh/h at 294 K. This peptide- based catalyst represents a starting point for developing and characterizing a peptide-based outer-coordination sphere that can be used to introduce enzyme-like features into molecular catalysts. This work was funded by the US DOE Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geoscience and Biosciences Division (AJ, JCL and WJS), the Office of Science Early Career Research Program through the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (GWB, MLR and WJS). Part of the research was conducted at the W.R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Biolog-ical and Environmental Research (BER) program located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  11. A simple synthesis method of sulfur-free Fe-N-C catalyst witih high ORR activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Zhongfen; Johnston, Christina M; Zelenay, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    To try to deconvolute which factors affect the activity and durability of metal-nitrogen-carbon (M-N-C) type non-precious catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), M-N-C catalysts based on ion chloride, polyaniline (PANI) and Ketjen Black carbon support were synthesized using different synthetic conditions. The catalysts were characterized electrochemically and tested as cathodes for Hydrogen fuel cells. PANI is usually chemically oxidative polymerized using ammonium persulfate (APS) as oxidant. To eliminate sulfur in the synthesized catalysts, a simple synthesis method using ion chloride as oxidant for aniline polymerization was developed. Two different aniline polymerization conditions led to very different product morphologies. Synthesized at low initial proton concentration, the final product was composed of dense micrometer sized particles. A decomposable salt was found to be able to prohibit PANI cross linking during the drying and annealing process and thus led to porous product. The porous catalyst has much higher ORR activity than the dense product due to more accessible active sites. Synthesized at high proton concentration, the catalyst appeared to be porous. The decomposable salt treatment did not make too much improvement in the porous structure and electrochemical activity. However, fuel cell testing using air as cathode feeder indicates that the salt treatment improves mass transfer in the cathode layer. Catalyst synthesized using this simple method has performance comparable to our state-of-the art catalyst synthesized in a much more complicated procedure. The factor that sulfur sources are completely eliminated in the synthesis suggests that sulfur is not necessary for the ORR catalysis activity.

  12. Identifying active functionalities on few-layered graphene catalysts for oxidative dehydrogenation of isobutane.

    PubMed

    Dathar, Gopi Krishna Phani; Tsai, Yu-Tung; Gierszal, Kamil; Xu, Ye; Liang, Chengdu; Rondinone, Adam J; Overbury, Steven H; Schwartz, Viviane

    2014-02-01

    The general consensus in the studies of nanostructured carbon catalysts for oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of alkanes to olefins is that the oxygen functionalities generated during synthesis and reaction are responsible for the catalytic activity of these nanostructured carbons. Identification of the highly active oxygen functionalities would enable engineering of nanocarbons for ODH of alkanes. Few-layered graphenes were used as model catalysts in experiments to synthesize reduced graphene oxide samples with varying oxygen concentrations, to characterize oxygen functionalities, and to measure the activation energies for ODH of isobutane. Periodic density functional theory calculations were performed on graphene nanoribbon models with a variety of oxygen functionalities at the edges to calculate their thermal stability and to model reaction mechanisms for ODH of isobutane. Comparing measured and calculated thermal stability and activation energies leads to the conclusion that dicarbonyls at the zigzag edges and quinones at armchair edges are appropriately balanced for high activity, relative to other model functionalities considered herein. In the ODH of isobutane, both dehydrogenation and regeneration of catalytic sites are relevant at the dicarbonyls, whereas regeneration is facile compared with dehydrogenation at quinones. The catalytic mechanism involves weakly adsorbed isobutane reducing functional oxygen and leaving as isobutene, and O2 in the feed, weakly adsorbed on the hydrogenated functionality, reacting with that hydrogen and regenerating the catalytic sites.

  13. The influence of carbon support porosity on the activity of PtRu/Sibunit anode catalysts for methanol oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, V.; Simonov, P. A.; Savinova, E. R.; Plaksin, G. V.; Cherepanova, S. V.; Kryukova, G. N.; Stimming, U.

    In this paper we analyse the promises of homemade carbon materials of Sibunit family prepared through pyrolysis of natural gases on carbon black surfaces as supports for the anode catalysts of direct methanol fuel cells. Specific surface area ( SBET) of the support is varied in the wide range from 6 to 415 m 2 g -1 and the implications on the electrocatalytic activity are scrutinized. Sibunit supported PtRu (1:1) catalysts are prepared via chemical route and the preparation conditions are adjusted in such a way that the particle size is constant within ±1 nm in order to separate the influence of support on the (i) catalyst preparation and (ii) fuel cell performance. Comparison of the metal surface area measured by gas phase CO chemisorption and electrochemical CO stripping indicates close to 100% utilisation of nanoparticle surfaces for catalysts supported on low (22-72 m 2 g -1) surface area Sibunit carbons. Mass activity and specific activity of PtRu anode catalysts change dramatically with SBET of the support, increasing with the decrease of the latter. 10%PtRu catalyst supported on Sibunit with specific surface area of 72 m 2 g -1 shows mass specific activity exceeding that of commercial 20%PtRu/Vulcan XC-72 by nearly a factor of 3.

  14. Core-shell Fe3O4@MIL-101(Fe) composites as heterogeneous catalysts of persulfate activation for the removal of Acid Orange 7.

    PubMed

    Yue, Xinxin; Guo, Weilin; Li, Xianghui; Zhou, Haihong; Wang, Ruiqin

    2016-08-01

    In this study, a novel core-shell Fe3O4@MIL-101 (MIL stands for Materials of Institute Lavoisier) composite was successfully synthesized by hydrothermal method and was fully characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectra, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The composite was introduced as a catalyst to generate powerful radicals from persulfate for the removal of Acid Orange 7 in an aqueous solution. Effects of the central metal ions of MIL-101, amino group content of MIL-101, and pH were evaluated in batch experiments. It was found that both hydroxyl and sulfate radicals were generated; importantly, sulfate radicals were speculated to serve as the dominant active species in the catalytic oxidation of Acid Orange 7. In addition, a possible mechanism was proposed. This study provides new physical insights for the rational design of advanced metal-organic frameworks (MOF)-based catalysts for improved environmental remediation. PMID:27098883

  15. Active Site Dependent Reaction Mechanism over Ru/CeO2 Catalyst toward CO2 Methanation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; He, Shan; Chen, Hao; Wang, Bin; Zheng, Lirong; Wei, Min; Evans, David G; Duan, Xue

    2016-05-18

    Oxygen vacancy on the surface of metal oxides is one of the most important defects which acts as the reactive site in a variety of catalytic reactions. In this work, operando spectroscopy methodology was employed to study the CO2 methanation reaction catalyzed by Ru/CeO2 (with oxygen vacancy in CeO2) and Ru/α-Al2O3 (without oxygen vacancy), respectively, so as to give a thorough understanding on active site dependent reaction mechanism. In Ru/CeO2 catalyst, operando XANES, IR, and Raman were used to reveal the generation process of Ce(3+), surface hydroxyl, and oxygen vacancy as well as their structural evolvements under practical reaction conditions. The steady-state isotope transient kinetic analysis (SSITKA)-type in situ DRIFT infrared spectroscopy undoubtedly substantiates that CO2 methanation undergoes formate route over Ru/CeO2 catalyst, and the formate dissociation to methanol catalyzed by oxygen vacancy is the rate-determining step. In contrast, CO2 methanation undergoes CO route over Ru surface in Ru/α-Al2O3 with the absence of oxygen vacancy, demonstrating active site dependent catalytic mechanism toward CO2 methanation. In addition, the catalytic activity evaluation and the oscillating reaction over Ru/CeO2 catalyst further prove that the oxygen vacancy catalyzes the rate-determining step with a much lower activation temperature compared with Ru surface in Ru/α-Al2O3 (125 vs 250 °C). PMID:27135417

  16. Hydrodesulfurization on Transition Metal Catalysts: Elementary Steps of C-S Bond Activation and Consequences of Bifunctional Synergies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yik, Edwin Shyn-Lo

    The presence of heteroatoms (e.g. S, N) in crude oil poses formidable challenges in petroleum refining processes as a result of their irreversible binding on catalytically active sites at industrially relevant conditions. With increasing pressures from legislation that continues to lower the permissible levels of sulfur content in fuels, hydrodesulfurization (HDS), the aptly named reaction for removing heteroatoms from organosulfur compounds, has become an essential feedstock pretreatment step to remove deleterious species from affecting downstream processing. Extensive research in the area has identified the paradigm catalysts for desulfurization; MoSx or WSx, promoted with Co or Ni metal; however, despite the vast library of both empirical and fundamental studies, a clear understanding of site requirements, the elementary steps of C-S hydrogenolysis, and the properties that govern HDS reactivity and selectivity have been elusive. While such a lack of rigorous assessments has not prevented technological advancements in the field of HDS catalysis, fundamental interpretations can inform rational catalyst and process design, particularly in light of new requirements for "deep" desulfurization and in the absence of significant hydrotreatment catalyst developments in recent decades. We report HDS rates of thiophene, which belongs to a class of compounds that are most resistant to sulfur removal (i.e. substituted alkyldibenzothiophenes), over a range of industrially relevant temperatures and pressures, measured at differential conditions and therefore revealing their true kinetic origins. These rates, normalized by the number of exposed metal atoms, on various SiO 2-supported, monometallic transition metals (Re, Ru, Pt), range several orders of magnitude. Under relevant HDS conditions, Pt and Ru catalysts form a layer of chemisorbed sulfur on surfaces of a metallic bulk, challenging reports that assume the latter exists as its pyrite sulfide phase during reaction. While

  17. Catalyst dispersion and activity under conditions of temperature- staged liquefaction. Technical progress report, July--September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.; Schobert, H.H.; Mitchell, G.D.; Artok, L.

    1992-02-01

    The general objectives of this research are (1) to investigate the use of highly dispersed catalysts for the pretreatment of coal by mild hydrogenation, (2) to identify the active forms of catalysts under reaction conditions and (3) to clarify the mechanisms of catalysis. The ultimate objective is to ascertain if mild catalytic hydrogenation resulting in very limited or no coal solubilization is an advantageous pretreatment for the transformation of coal into transportable fuels. The experimental program will focus upon the development of effective methods of impregnating coal with catalysts, evaluating the conditions under which the catalysts are most active and establishing the relative impact of improved impregnation on conversion and product distributions obtained from coal hydrogenation.

  18. Catalyst dispersion and activity under conditions of temperature-staged liquefaction. Technical progress report, October--December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.; Schobert, H.H.; Mitchell, G.D.; Artok, L.

    1992-02-01

    The general objectives of this research are (1) to investigate the use of highly dispersed catalysts for the pretreatment of coal by mild hydrogenation, (2) to identify the active forms of the catalysts under reaction conditions and (3) to clarify the mechanisms of catalysis. The ultimate objective is to ascertain if mild catalytic hydrogenation resulting in very limited or no coal solubilization is an advantageous pretreatment for the transformation of coal into transportable fuels. The experimental program will focus upon the development of effective methods of impregnating coal with catalysts, evaluating the conditions under which the catalysts are most active and establishing the relative impact of improved impregnation on conversion and product distributions obtained from coal hydrogenation.

  19. In-line localized monitoring of catalyst activity in selective catalytic NO.sub.x reduction systems

    DOEpatents

    Muzio, Lawrence J.; Smith, Randall A.

    2009-12-22

    Localized catalyst activity in an SCR unit for controlling emissions from a boiler, power plant, or any facility that generates NO.sub.x-containing flue gases is monitored by one or more modules that operate on-line without disrupting the normal operation of the facility. Each module is positioned over a designated lateral area of one of the catalyst beds in the SCR unit, and supplies ammonia, urea, or other suitable reductant to the catalyst in the designated area at a rate that produces an excess of the reductant over NO.sub.x on a molar basis through the designated area. Sampling probes upstream and downstream of the designated area draw samples of the gas stream for NO.sub.x analysis, and the catalyst activity is determined from the difference in NO.sub.x levels between the two probes.

  20. Trimetallic Au/Pt/Rh Nanoparticles as Highly Active Catalysts for Aerobic Glucose Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haijun; Cao, Yingnan; Lu, Lilin; Cheng, Zhong; Zhang, Shaowei

    2015-02-01

    This paper reports the findings of an investigation of the correlations between the catalytic activity for aerobic glucose oxidation and the composition of Au/Pt/Rh trimetallic nanoparticles (TNPs) with average diameters of less than 2.0 nm prepared by rapid injection of NaBH4. The prepared TNPs were characterized by UV-Vis, TEM, and HR-TEM. The catalytic activity of the alloy-structured TNPs for aerobic glucose oxidation is several times higher than that of Au monometallic nanoparticles with nearly the same particle size. The catalytic activities of the TNP catalysts were dependent not only on the composition, but also on the electronic structure. The high catalytic activities of the Au/Pt/Rh TNPs can be ascribed to the formed negative-charged Au atoms due to electron donation of Rh neighboring atoms acting as catalytically active sites for aerobic glucose oxidation.

  1. Remarkable enhancement of O₂ activation on yttrium-stabilized zirconia surface in a dual catalyst bed.

    PubMed

    Richard, Mélissandre; Can, Fabien; Duprez, Daniel; Gil, Sonia; Giroir-Fendler, Anne; Bion, Nicolas

    2014-10-13

    Yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) has been extensively studied as an electrolyte material for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) but its performance in heterogeneous catalysis is also the object of a growing number of publications. In both applications, oxygen activation on the YSZ surface remains the step that hinders utilization at moderate temperature. It was demonstrated by oxygen isotope exchange that a dual catalyst bed system consisting of two successive LaMnO3 and YSZ beds without intimate contact drastically enhances oxygen activation on the YSZ surface at 698 K. It can be concluded that LaMnO3 activates the triplet ground-state of molecular oxygen into a low-lying singlet state, thereby facilitating the activation of the O2 molecule on the YSZ oxygen vacancy sites. This phenomenon is shown to improve the catalytic activity of the LaMnO3-Pd/YSZ system for the partial oxidation of methane.

  2. Degradation of flumequine in aqueous solution by persulfate activated with common methods and polyhydroquinone-coated magnetite/multi-walled carbon nanotubes catalysts.

    PubMed

    Feng, Mingbao; Qu, Ruijuan; Zhang, Xiaoling; Sun, Ping; Sui, Yunxia; Wang, Liansheng; Wang, Zunyao

    2015-11-15

    In recent years, flumequine (FLU) has been ubiquitously detected in surface waters and municipal wastewaters. In light of its potential negative impacts to aquatic species, growing concern has been arisen for the removal of this antibiotic from natural waters. In this study, the kinetics, degradation mechanisms and pathways of aqueous FLU by persulfate (PS) oxidation were systematically determined. Three common activation methods, including heat, Fe(2+) and Cu(2+), and a novel heterogeneous catalyst, namely, polyhydroquinone-coated magnetite/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (Fe3O4/MWCNTs/PHQ), were investigated to activate PS for FLU removal. It was found that these three common activators enhanced FLU degradation obviously, while several influencing factors, such as solution pH, inorganic ions (especially HCO3(-) at 5 mmol/L) and dissolved organic matter extracts, exerted their different effects on FLU removal. The catalysts were characterized, and an efficient catalytic degradation performance, high stability and excellent reusability were observed. The measured total organic carbon levels suggested that FLU can be effectively mineralized by using the catalysts. Radical mechanism was studied by combination of the quenching tests and electron paramagnetic resonance analysis. It was assumed that sulfate radicals predominated in the activation of PS with Fe3O4/MWCNTs/PHQ for FLU removal, while hydroxyl radicals also contributed to the catalytic oxidation process. In addition, a total of fifteen reaction intermediates of FLU were identified, from which two possible pathways were proposed involving hydroxylation, decarbonylation and ring opening. Overall, this study represented a systematical evaluation regarding the transformation process of FLU by PS, and showed that the heterogeneous catalysts can efficiently activate PS for FLU removal from the water environment.

  3. Identifying low-coverage surface species on supported noble metal nanoparticle catalysts by DNP-NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Robert L.; Perras, Frédéric A.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Schwartz, Thomas J.; Dumesic, James A.; Shanks, Brent H.; Pruski, Marek

    2015-11-20

    DNP-NMR spectroscopy has been applied to enhance the signal for organic molecules adsorbed on γ-Al2O3-supported Pd nanoparticles. In addition, by offering >2500-fold time savings, the technique enabled the observation of 13C-13C cross-peaks for low coverage species, which were assigned to products from oxidative degradation of methionine adsorbed on the nanoparticle surface.

  4. Identifying low-coverage surface species on supported noble metal nanoparticle catalysts by DNP-NMR

    DOE PAGES

    Johnson, Robert L.; Perras, Frédéric A.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Schwartz, Thomas J.; Dumesic, James A.; Shanks, Brent H.; Pruski, Marek

    2015-11-20

    DNP-NMR spectroscopy has been applied to enhance the signal for organic molecules adsorbed on γ-Al2O3-supported Pd nanoparticles. In addition, by offering >2500-fold time savings, the technique enabled the observation of 13C-13C cross-peaks for low coverage species, which were assigned to products from oxidative degradation of methionine adsorbed on the nanoparticle surface.

  5. Cross-Couplings Using Aryl Ethers via C-O Bond Activation Enabled by Nickel Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Tobisu, Mamoru; Chatani, Naoto

    2015-06-16

    Arene synthesis has been revolutionized by the invention of catalytic cross-coupling reactions, wherein aryl halides can be coupled with organometallic and organic nucleophiles. Although the replacement of aryl halides with phenol derivatives would lead to more economical and ecological methods, success has been primarily limited to activated phenol derivatives such as triflates. Aryl ethers arguably represent one of the most ideal substrates in terms of availability, cost, safety, and atom efficiency. However, the robust nature of the C(aryl)-O bonds of aryl ethers renders it extremely difficult to use them in catalytic reactions among the phenol derivatives. In 1979, Wenkert reported a seminal work on the nickel-catalyzed cross-coupling of aryl ethers with Grignard reagents. However, it was not until 2004 that the unique ability of a low-valent nickel species to activate otherwise unreactive C(aryl)-O bonds was appreciated with Dankwardt's identification of the Ni(0)/PCy3 system, which significantly expanded the efficiency of the Wenkert reaction. Application of the nickel catalyst to cross-couplings with other nucleophiles was first accomplished in 2008 by our group using organoboron reagents. Later on, several other nucleophiles, including organozinc reagents, amines, hydrosilane, and hydrogen were shown to be coupled with aryl ethers under nickel catalysis. Despite these advances, progress in this field is relatively slow because of the low reactivity of benzene derivatives (e.g., anisole) compared with polyaromatic substrates (e.g., methoxynaphthalene), particularly when less reactive and synthetically useful nucleophiles are used. The "naphthalene problem" has been overcome by the use of N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligands bearing bulky N-alkyl substituents, which enables a wide range of aryl ethers to be coupled with organoboron nucleophiles. Moreover, the use of N-alkyl-substituted NHC ligands allows the use of alkynylmagnesium reagents, thereby realizing

  6. Comparison of the Activity and the Stability in CO Oxidation of Au-Cu Catalysts Supported on TiO2 in Anatase or Rutile Phase.

    PubMed

    Zanella, Rodolfo; Bokhimi, Xim; Maturano, Viridiana; Morales, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    Au-Cu catalysts supported on anatase or rutile phases were prepared by deposition-precipitation method. The titania polymorph used as the support determined the catalytic behavior. For the Au-Cu/rutile catalysts, the metallic phase had smaller dimensions than for the Au-Cu/anatase catalysts. The catalysts supported on anatase, however, were more active and stable than those supported on rutile. A systematic study of the catalytic activity for CO oxidation as a function of the temperature of activation and the aging time was performed. The catalytic properties were correlated with the properties of the catalysts analyzed with X-ray powder diffraction, refinement of the crystalline structures with the Rietveld method, and transmission electron microscopy. When the support was anatase, a pretreatment at 400 degrees C in air led to the most active catalysts, whereas when the support was rutile, a pretreatment between 200 and 300 degrees C in air led to the most active catalysts; activation under hydrogen generated less active catalysts. The Au-Cu catalysts activated in air were more active for the oxidation of CO than the respective monometallic gold catalysts, indicating a promoting effect between gold and copper to catalyze this reaction.

  7. Hydrodesulfurization on Transition Metal Catalysts: Elementary Steps of C-S Bond Activation and Consequences of Bifunctional Synergies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yik, Edwin Shyn-Lo

    The presence of heteroatoms (e.g. S, N) in crude oil poses formidable challenges in petroleum refining processes as a result of their irreversible binding on catalytically active sites at industrially relevant conditions. With increasing pressures from legislation that continues to lower the permissible levels of sulfur content in fuels, hydrodesulfurization (HDS), the aptly named reaction for removing heteroatoms from organosulfur compounds, has become an essential feedstock pretreatment step to remove deleterious species from affecting downstream processing. Extensive research in the area has identified the paradigm catalysts for desulfurization; MoSx or WSx, promoted with Co or Ni metal; however, despite the vast library of both empirical and fundamental studies, a clear understanding of site requirements, the elementary steps of C-S hydrogenolysis, and the properties that govern HDS reactivity and selectivity have been elusive. While such a lack of rigorous assessments has not prevented technological advancements in the field of HDS catalysis, fundamental interpretations can inform rational catalyst and process design, particularly in light of new requirements for "deep" desulfurization and in the absence of significant hydrotreatment catalyst developments in recent decades. We report HDS rates of thiophene, which belongs to a class of compounds that are most resistant to sulfur removal (i.e. substituted alkyldibenzothiophenes), over a range of industrially relevant temperatures and pressures, measured at differential conditions and therefore revealing their true kinetic origins. These rates, normalized by the number of exposed metal atoms, on various SiO 2-supported, monometallic transition metals (Re, Ru, Pt), range several orders of magnitude. Under relevant HDS conditions, Pt and Ru catalysts form a layer of chemisorbed sulfur on surfaces of a metallic bulk, challenging reports that assume the latter exists as its pyrite sulfide phase during reaction. While

  8. Doped-CuCl2/Al2O3 catalysts for ethylene oxychlorination: Influence of additives on the nature of active phase and reducibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianolio, D.; Muddada, N. B.; Olsbye, U.; Lamberti, C.

    2012-08-01

    Doped CuCl2/Al2O3 is an industrial catalyst used to produce dichloroethane, key intermediate of the polyvinyl chloride (PVC) chemistry. Using in situ and operando X-ray absorption spectroscopies, combined with laboratory techniques, we succeeded in understanding the nature of the active phase and the role played by most used additives for fluid and fixed beds technologies (LiCl, KCl, CsCl, MgCl2, and LaCl3). Moreover we were able to quantify relative fraction, reducibility and dispersion of Cu-phases adjoining catalytic tests in a pulse reactor. EXAFS and XANES highlighted that all additives contribute more or less efficiently in increasing the fraction of the active species (supported CuCl2). EXAFS directly, UV-vis and IR spectroscopies indirectly proved the formation of mixed salts, when KCl or CsCl are added, so displacing the rate determining step from the CuCl oxidation to the CuCl2 reduction. Fully oxidized catalyst is inactive, so copper in the working catalyst, exhibits a I/II mixed valence state. Coupling the ethylene conversion, measured with a pulse reactor, with XANES spectra collected after interaction with C2H4, we could differentiate the ability of doped samples to be reduced by ethylene. We obtained slightly different results explainable by the different dispersion of the active phase, measured by CO chemisorption.

  9. Promotion of the electrocatalytic activity of a bimetallic platinum-ruthenium catalyst by repetitive redox treatments for direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Sheng-Yang; Yeh, Chuin-Tih

    Pt-Ru/C catalyst (12 wt%) was prepared by the incipient wetness impregnation method followed by a redox heat-treatment. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results revealed uniformly distributed metallic crystallites of Pt-Ru alloy nanoparticles (d PtRu = 2.1 ± 1.0 nm). The effect of redox treatments of the impregnated catalysts on methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) was examined by cyclic voltammetry (CV). The MOR activity of the PtRu/C was significantly improved after each oxidation step of the redox treatment cycles. The enhanced catalytic activity was found to be quite stable in chronoamperometry (CA) measurements. CV, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results strongly suggested that the improved catalytic activity was due to the formation of a stable c-RuO x (x = 2-3) domain during the oxidation treatments. A bifunctional based mechanism was proposed for the MOR on the oxidized PtRu/C catalysts. Formation of Ru-OH species on the surface of c-RuO x domains was suggested as stale sites for the oxidation of carbon monoxide adsorbed on the Pt catalytic sites.

  10. Sol-gel derived mesoporous cobalt silica catalyst: Synthesis, characterization and its activity in the oxidation of phenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andas, Jeyashelly; Adam, Farook; Rahman, Ismail Ab.

    2014-10-01

    Highly mesoporous cobalt silica rice husk catalysts with (5-15 wt.%) Co2+ loading were prepared via a simple sol-gel technique at room temperature. The successful insertion of cobalt ions into silica matrix was evidenced from FT-IR, NMR, XPS and AAS analyses. Preservation of the mesoporosity nature of silica upon incorporating Co2+ was confirmed from the N2-sorption studies. The topography and morphology viewed by TEM analysis differs as the cobalt concentration varies from 5 to 15 wt.%. Parallel pore channels and spherical nanoparticles of 9.44 nm were achieved for cobalt silica catalysts with 10 and 15 wt.% respectively. Cobalt catalysts were active in the liquid-phase oxidation of phenol with H2O2 as an oxygen source. The performances of the catalysts were greatly influenced by various parameters such as reaction temperature, catalyst amount, molar ratio of substrate to oxidant, nature of solvent, metal loading and homogeneous precursor salt. Water served as the best reaction medium for this oxidation system. The regeneration studies confirmed cobalt catalyst could be reused for five cycles without experiencing large loss in the conversion. Both leaching and reusability studies testified that the catalysts were truly heterogeneous.

  11. The Influence of the Anionic Counter-Ion on the Activity of Ammonium Substituted Hoveyda-Type Olefin Metathesis Catalysts in Aqueous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gułajski, Łukasz; Grela, Karol

    Polar olefin metathesis catalysts, bearing an ammonium group are presented. The electron withdrawing ammonium group not only activates the catalysts electronically, but at the same time makes the catalysts more hydrophilic. Catalysts can be therefore efficiently used not only in traditional media, such as methylene chloride and toluene, but also in technical-grade alcohols, alcohol— water mixtures and in neat water. Finally, in this overview the influence of the anionic counter-ion on the activity of ammonium substituted Hoveyda-type olefin metathesis catalysts in aqueous media is presented.

  12. Electro-catalytic activity of Ni–Co-based catalysts for oxygen evolution reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Hua; Li, Zhihu; Xu, Yanhui

    2015-04-15

    Graphical abstract: The electro-catalytic activity of different electro-catalysts with a porous electrode structure was compared considering the real electrode area that was evaluated by cyclic measurement. - Highlights: • Ni–Co-based electro-catalysts for OER have been studied and compared. • The real electrode area is calculated and used for assessing the electro-catalysts. • Exchange current and reaction rate constant are estimated. • Ni is more useful for OER reaction than Co. - Abstract: In the present work, Ni–Co-based electrocatalysts (Ni/Co = 0:6, 1:5, 2:4, 3:3, 4:2, 5:1 and 6:0) have been studied for oxygen evolution reaction. The phase structure has been analyzed by X-ray diffraction technique. Based on the XRD and SEM results, it is believed that the synthesized products are poorly crystallized. To exclude the disturbance of electrode preparation technology on the evaluation of electro-catalytic activity, the real electrode surface area is calculated based on the cyclic voltammetry data, assumed that the specific surface capacitance is 60 μF cm{sup −2} for metal oxide electrode. The real electrode area data are used to calculate the current density. The reaction rate constant of OER at different electrodes is also estimated based on basic reaction kinetic equations. It is found that the exchange current is 0.05–0.47 mA cm{sup −2} (the real surface area), and the reaction rate constant has an order of magnitude of 10{sup −7}–10{sup −6} cm s{sup −1}. The influence of the electrode potential on OER rate has been also studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique. Our investigation has shown that the nickel element has more contribution than the cobalt; the nickel oxide has the best electro-catalytic activity toward OER.

  13. Tin-containing zeolites are highly active catalysts for the isomerization of glucose in water

    SciTech Connect

    Moliner, Manuel; Roman-Leshkov, Yuriy; Davis, Mark E.

    2010-04-06

    The isomerization of glucose into fructose is a large-scale reaction for the production of high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS; reaction performed by enzyme catalysts) and recently is being considered as an intermediate step in the possible route of biomass to fuels and chemicals. Here, it is shown that a large-pore zeolite that contains tin (Sn-Beta) is able to isomerize glucose to fructose in aqueous media with high activity and selectivity. Specifically, a 10% (wt/wt) glucose solution containing a catalytic amount of Sn-Beta (1:50 Sn:glucose molar ratio) gives product yields of approximately 46% (wt/wt) glucose, 31% (wt/wt) fructose, and 9% (wt/wt) mannose after 30 min and 12 min of reaction at 383 K and 413 K, respectively. This reactivity is achieved also when a 45 wt% glucose solution is used. The properties of the large-pore zeolite greatly influence the reaction behavior because the reaction does not proceed with a medium-pore zeolite, and the isomerization activity is considerably lower when the metal centers are incorporated in ordered mesoporous silica (MCM-41). The Sn-Beta catalyst can be used for multiple cycles, and the reaction stops when the solid is removed, clearly indicating that the catalysis is occurring heterogeneously. Most importantly, the Sn-Beta catalyst is able to perform the isomerization reaction in highly acidic, aqueous environments with equivalent activity and product distribution as in media without added acid. This enables Sn-Beta to couple isomerizations with other acid-catalyzed reactions, including hydrolysis/isomerization or isomerization/dehydration reaction sequences [starch to fructose and glucose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) demonstrated here].

  14. Same-View Nano-XAFS/STEM-EDS Imagings of Pt Chemical Species in Pt/C Cathode Catalyst Layers of a Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Takao, Shinobu; Sekizawa, Oki; Samjeské, Gabor; Nagamatsu, Shin-ichi; Kaneko, Takuma; Yamamoto, Takashi; Higashi, Kotaro; Nagasawa, Kensaku; Uruga, Tomoya; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro

    2015-06-01

    We have made the first success in the same-view imagings of 2D nano-XAFS and TEM/STEM-EDS under a humid N2 atmosphere for Pt/C cathode catalyst layers in membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) with Nafion membrane to examine the degradation of Pt/C cathodes by anode gas exchange cycles (start-up/shut-down simulations of PEFC vehicles). The same-view imaging under the humid N2 atmosphere provided unprecedented spatial information on the distribution of Pt nanoparticles and oxidation states in the Pt/C cathode catalyst layer as well as Nafion ionomer-filled nanoholes of carbon support in the wet MEA, which evidence the origin of the formation of Pt oxidation species and isolated Pt nanoparticles in the nanohole areas of the cathode layer with different Pt/ionomer ratios, relevant to the degradation of PEFC catalysts.

  15. Gold nanoparticles-graphene hybrids as active catalysts for Suzuki reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yang; Fan, Xiaobin; Qi, Junjie; Ji, Junyi; Wang, Shulan; Zhang, Guoliang; Zhang, Fengbao

    2010-10-15

    Graphene was successfully modified with gold nanoparticles in a facile route by reducing chloroauric acid in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate, which is used as both a surfactant and reducing agent. The gold nanoparticles-graphene hybrids were characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and energy X-ray spectroscopy. We demonstrate for the first time that the gold nanoparticles-graphene hybrids can act as efficient catalysts for the Suzuki reaction in water under aerobic conditions. The catalytic activity of gold nanoparticles-graphene hybrids was influenced by the size of the gold nanoparticles.

  16. Diarylrhodates as promising active catalysts for the arylation of vinyl ethers with Grignard reagents.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Takanori; Miyata, Yoshinori; Akimoto, Ryo; Fujii, Yuuki; Kuniyasu, Hitoshi; Kambe, Nobuaki

    2014-07-01

    Anionic diarylrhodium complexes, generated by reacting [RhCl(cod)]2 with 2 equiv of aryl Grignard reagents, were found to be effective active catalysts in cross-coupling reactions of vinyl ethers with aryl Grignard reagents, giving rise to the production of vinyl arenes. In this catalytic system, vinyl-O bonds were preferably cleaved over Ar-O or Ar-Br bonds. A lithium rhodate complex was isolated, and its crystal structure was determined by X-ray crystallography. PMID:24957673

  17. Active and Durable Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Catalyst Derived from Pd-Doped Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jitang; Xia, Guoliang; Jiang, Peng; Yang, Yang; Li, Ren; Shi, Ruohong; Su, Jianwei; Chen, Qianwang

    2016-06-01

    The water electrolysis is of critical importance for sustainable hydrogen production. In this work, a highly efficient and stable PdCo alloy catalyst (PdCo@CN) was synthesized by direct annealing of Pd-doped metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) under N2 atmosphere. In 0.5 M H2SO4 solution, PdCo@CN displays remarkable electrocatalytic performance with overpotential of 80 mV, a Tafel slope of 31 mV dec(-1), and excellent stability of 10 000 cycles. Our studies reveal that noble metal doped MOFs are ideal precursors for preparing highly active alloy electrocatalysts with low content of noble metal.

  18. Physico-Chemical Property and Catalytic Activity of a CeO2-Doped MnO(x)-TiO2 Catalyst with SO2 Resistance for Low-Temperature NH3-SCR of NO(x).

    PubMed

    Shin, Byeongkil; Chun, Ho Hwan; Cha, Jin-Sun; Shin, Min-Chul; Lee, Heesoo

    2016-05-01

    The effects of CeO2 addition on the catalytic activity and the SO2 resistance of CeO2-doped MnO(x)-TiO2 catalysts were investigated for the low-temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with NH3 of NO(x) emissions in marine applications. The most active catalyst was obtained from 30 wt% CeO2-MnO(x)-TiO2 catalyst in the whole temperature range of 100-300 degrees C at a low gas hourly space velocity (GHSV) of 10,000 h(-)1, and its de-NO(x) efficiency was higher than 90% over 250 degrees C. The enhanced catalytic activity may contribute to the dispersion state and catalytic acidity on the catalyst surface, and the highly dispersed Mn and Ce on the nano-scaled TiO2 catalyst affects the increase of Lewis and Brønsted acid sites. A CeO2-rich additive on MnO(x)-TiO2 could provide stronger catalytic acid sites, associated with NH3 adsorption and the SCR performance. As the results of sulfur resistance in flue gas that contains SO2, the de-NO(x) efficiency of MnO(x)-TiO2 decreased by 15% over 200 degrees C, whereas that of 30 wt% ceria-doped catalyst increased by 14-21% over 150 degrees C. The high SO2 resistance of CeO2-MnO(x)-TiO2 catalysts that resulted from the addition of ceria suppressed the formation of Mn sulfate species, which led to deactivation on the surface of nano-catalyst. PMID:27483759

  19. Physico-Chemical Property and Catalytic Activity of a CeO2-Doped MnO(x)-TiO2 Catalyst with SO2 Resistance for Low-Temperature NH3-SCR of NO(x).

    PubMed

    Shin, Byeongkil; Chun, Ho Hwan; Cha, Jin-Sun; Shin, Min-Chul; Lee, Heesoo

    2016-05-01

    The effects of CeO2 addition on the catalytic activity and the SO2 resistance of CeO2-doped MnO(x)-TiO2 catalysts were investigated for the low-temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with NH3 of NO(x) emissions in marine applications. The most active catalyst was obtained from 30 wt% CeO2-MnO(x)-TiO2 catalyst in the whole temperature range of 100-300 degrees C at a low gas hourly space velocity (GHSV) of 10,000 h(-)1, and its de-NO(x) efficiency was higher than 90% over 250 degrees C. The enhanced catalytic activity may contribute to the dispersion state and catalytic acidity on the catalyst surface, and the highly dispersed Mn and Ce on the nano-scaled TiO2 catalyst affects the increase of Lewis and Brønsted acid sites. A CeO2-rich additive on MnO(x)-TiO2 could provide stronger catalytic acid sites, associated with NH3 adsorption and the SCR performance. As the results of sulfur resistance in flue gas that contains SO2, the de-NO(x) efficiency of MnO(x)-TiO2 decreased by 15% over 200 degrees C, whereas that of 30 wt% ceria-doped catalyst increased by 14-21% over 150 degrees C. The high SO2 resistance of CeO2-MnO(x)-TiO2 catalysts that resulted from the addition of ceria suppressed the formation of Mn sulfate species, which led to deactivation on the surface of nano-catalyst.

  20. Enhancing catalytic activity and stability for CO2 methanation on Ni@MOF-5 via control of active species dispersion.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Wenlong; Li, Bo; Lu, Gongxuan; Ma, Jiantai

    2015-01-31

    A novel, highly active catalyst Ni@MOF-5 showed unexpected activity at low temperature for CO2 methanation. The characterization results indicated that Ni was uniformly and highly dispersed over MOF-5. This catalyst showed high stability and almost no deactivation in long term stability tests up to 100 h. PMID:25518948

  1. The effect of soot on ammonium nitrate species and NO2 selective catalytic reduction over Cu-zeolite catalyst-coated particulate filter.

    PubMed

    Mihai, Oana; Tamm, Stefanie; Stenfeldt, Marie; Olsson, Louise

    2016-02-28

    interacting with the ammonium nitrate species on the CuxOy or other copper species on the surface of the zeolite particles, which reduces the ammonium nitrate blocking of the catalyst and thereby results in higher NO2 SCR activity.

  2. The effect of soot on ammonium nitrate species and NO2 selective catalytic reduction over Cu-zeolite catalyst-coated particulate filter.

    PubMed

    Mihai, Oana; Tamm, Stefanie; Stenfeldt, Marie; Olsson, Louise

    2016-02-28

    interacting with the ammonium nitrate species on the CuxOy or other copper species on the surface of the zeolite particles, which reduces the ammonium nitrate blocking of the catalyst and thereby results in higher NO2 SCR activity. PMID:26755757

  3. Surface state and catalytic activity and selectivity of nickel catalysts in hydrogenation reactions--3. Electronic and catalytic properties of nickel catalysts. [Butylene oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Y.; Nitta, Y.; Imanaka, T.; Teranishi, S.

    1980-08-01

    A relationship between a parameter ..delta.. q and the ESCA chemical shift was derived from available extended Hueckel calculation results and ESCA data for nickel boride and nickel phosphide. The ..delta.. q parameter described the change in electron density at the nickel metal that occurred due to the electron transfer between nickel and the other element. The ..delta.. q parameters were estimated for Rayney nickel and Urushibara nickel, which contained aluminum and zinc alloy components, respectively, from product ratios and rate ratios measured for cyclohexene and cyclooctene hydrogenation on these catalysts. The ..delta.. q parameter correlated the increase in specific activities with increasing electron density in the hydrogenation of styrene, the increase in poisoning coefficient for carbon disulfide and triphenylphosphine with increasing electron density in the hydrogenation of styrene, and the selectivity for n-butyl alcohol in the hydrogenation of 1,2-butylene oxide on various nickel catalysts.

  4. Antifungal activity of heartwood extracts from three Juniperus species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heartwood samples from three species of Juniperus (i.e., J. virginianna, J. occidentalis, and J. ashei) were extracted with hexane, ethanol and methanol and the hexane and ethanol extracts were tested for antifungal activity against four species of wood-rot fungi. These three species represent the ...

  5. Synchronizing Substrate Activation Rates in Multicomponent Reactions with Metal-Organic Framework Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Díaz, Lina María; Iglesias, Marta; Snejko, Natalia; Gutiérrez-Puebla, Enrique; Monge, M Ángeles

    2016-05-01

    A study on the influence of the cation coordination number, number of Lewis acid centers, concurrent existence of Lewis base sites, and structure topology on the catalytic activity of six new indium MOFs, has been carried out for multicomponent reactions (MCRs). The new indium polymeric frameworks, namely [In8 (OH)6 (popha)6 (H2 O)4 ]⋅3 H2 O (InPF-16), [In(popha)(2,2'-bipy)]⋅3 H2 O (InPF-17), [In3 (OH)3 (popha)2 (4,4'-bipy)]⋅4 H2 O (InPF-18), [In2 (popha)2 (4,4'-bipy)2 ]⋅3 H2 O (InPF-19), [In(OH)(Hpopha)]⋅0.5 (1,7-phen) (InPF-20), and [In(popha)(1,10-phen)]⋅4 H2 O (InPF-21) (InPF=indium polymeric framework, H3 popha=5-(4-carboxy-2-nitrophenoxy)isophthalic acid, phen=phenanthroline, bipy=bipyridine), have been hydrothermally obtained by using both conventional heating (CH) and microwave (MW) procedures. These indium frameworks show efficient Lewis acid behavior for the solvent-free cyanosilylation of carbonyl compounds, the one pot Passerini 3-component (P-3CR) and the Ugi 4-component (U-4CR) reactions. In addition, InPF-17 was found to be a highly reactive, recyclable, and environmentally benign catalyst, which allows the efficient synthesis of α-aminoacyl amides. The relationship between the Lewis base/acid active site and the catalytic performance is explained by the 2D seven-coordinated indium framework of the catalyst InPF-17. This study is an attempt to highlight the main structural and synthetic factors that have to be taken into account when planning a new, effective MOF-based heterogeneous catalyst for multicomponent reactions.

  6. Hierarchical Pd-Sn Alloy Nanosheet Dendrites: An Economical and Highly Active Catalyst for Ethanol Electrooxidation

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Liang-Xin; Wang, An-Liang; Ou, Yan-Nan; Li, Qi; Guo, Rui; Zhao, Wen-Xia; Tong, Ye-Xiang; Li, Gao-Ren

    2013-01-01

    Hierarchical alloy nanosheet dendrites (ANSDs) are highly favorable for superior catalytic performance and efficient utilization of catalyst because of the special characteristics of alloys, nanosheets, and dendritic nanostructures. In this paper, we demonstrate for the first time a facile and efficient electrodeposition approach for the controllable synthesis of Pd-Sn ANSDs with high surface area. These synthesized Pd-Sn ANSDs exhibit high electrocatalytic activity and superior long-term cycle stability toward ethanol oxidation in alkaline media. The enhanced electrocataytic activity of Pd-Sn ANSDs may be attributed to Pd-Sn alloys, nanosheet dendrite induced promotional effect, large number of active sites on dendrite surface, large surface area, and good electrical contact with the base electrode. Because of the simple implement and high flexibility, the proposed approach can be considered as a general and powerful strategy to synthesize the alloy electrocatalysts with high surface areas and open dendritic nanostructures. PMID:23383368

  7. Stabilizing a Platinum1 Single-Atom Catalyst on Supported Phosphomolybdic Acid without Compromising Hydrogenation Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Asakura, Hiroyuki; Zhang, Jia; Zhang, Jiaguang; De, Sudipta; Yan, Ning

    2016-07-11

    In coordination chemistry, catalytically active metal complexes in a zero- or low-valent state often adopt four-coordinate square-planar or tetrahedral geometry. By applying this principle, we have developed a stable Pt1 single-atom catalyst with a high Pt loading (close to 1 wt %) on phosphomolybdic acid(PMA)-modified active carbon. This was achieved by anchoring Pt on the four-fold hollow sites on PMA. Each Pt atom is stabilized by four oxygen atoms in a distorted square-planar geometry, with Pt slightly protruding from the oxygen planar surface. Pt is positively charged, absorbs hydrogen easily, and exhibits excellent performance in the hydrogenation of nitrobenzene and cyclohexanone. It is likely that the system described here can be extended to a number of stable SACs with superior catalytic activities.

  8. Composite catalyst surfaces: Effect of inert and active heterogeneities on pattern formation

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, M.; Bangia, A.K.; Kevrekidis, I.G.; Haas, G.; Rotermund, H.H.; Ertl, G.

    1996-12-05

    Spatiotemporal dynamics in reaction-diffusion systems can be altered through the properties (reactivity, diffusivity) of the medium in which they occur. We construct active heterogeneous media (composite catalytic surfaces with inert as well as active illusions) using microelectronics fabrication techniques and study the spatiotemporal dynamics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions on these catalysts. In parallel, we perform simulations as well as numerical stability and bifurcation analysis of these patterns using mechanistic models. At the limit of large heterogeneity `grain size` (compared to the wavelength of spontaneously arising structures) the interaction patterns with inert or active boundaries dominates (e.g., pinning, transmission, and boundary breakup of spirals, interaction of pulses with corners, `pacemaker` effects). At the opposite limit of very small or very finely distributed heterogeneity, effective behavior is observed (slight modulation of pulses, nearly uniform oscillations, effective spirals). Some representative studies of transitions between the two limits are presented. 48 refs., 11 figs.

  9. Selenium-ligated palladium(II) complexes as highly active catalysts for carbon-carbon coupling reactions: the Heck reaction.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingwei; Kinney, Elizabeth P; Zheng, Chong

    2004-08-19

    Three selenium-ligated Pd(II) complexes were readily synthesized and shown to be extremely active catalysts for the Heck reaction of various aryl bromides, including deactivated and heterocyclic ones. The catalytic activity of the selenide-based Pd(II) complexes not only rivals but vastly outperforms that of the corresponding phosphorus and sulfur analogues. Practical advantages of the selenium-based catalysts include their straightforward synthesis and high activity in the absence of any additives as well as the enhanced stability of the selenide ligands toward air oxidation. PMID:15330667

  10. Selenium-ligated palladium(II) complexes as highly active catalysts for carbon-carbon coupling reactions: the Heck reaction.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingwei; Kinney, Elizabeth P; Zheng, Chong

    2004-08-19

    Three selenium-ligated Pd(II) complexes were readily synthesized and shown to be extremely active catalysts for the Heck reaction of various aryl bromides, including deactivated and heterocyclic ones. The catalytic activity of the selenide-based Pd(II) complexes not only rivals but vastly outperforms that of the corresponding phosphorus and sulfur analogues. Practical advantages of the selenium-based catalysts include their straightforward synthesis and high activity in the absence of any additives as well as the enhanced stability of the selenide ligands toward air oxidation.

  11. Active sites and mechanisms for H2O2 decomposition over Pd catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Plauck, Anthony; Stangland, Eric E.; Dumesic, James A.; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2016-01-01

    A combination of periodic, self-consistent density functional theory (DFT-GGA-PW91) calculations, reaction kinetics experiments on a SiO2-supported Pd catalyst, and mean-field microkinetic modeling are used to probe key aspects of H2O2 decomposition on Pd in the absence of cofeeding H2. We conclude that both Pd(111) and OH-partially covered Pd(100) surfaces represent the nature of the active site for H2O2 decomposition on the supported Pd catalyst reasonably well. Furthermore, all reaction flux in the closed catalytic cycle is predicted to flow through an O–O bond scission step in either H2O2 or OOH, followed by rapid H-transfer steps to produce the H2O and O2 products. The barrier for O–O bond scission is sensitive to Pd surface structure and is concluded to be the central parameter governing H2O2 decomposition activity. PMID:27006504

  12. Antimicrobial activities of silver used as a polymerization catalyst for a wound-healing matrix

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Ranjith; Zhang, Jianying; Beckman, Eric J.; Virji, Mohammed; Pasculle, William A.; Wells, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex and orchestrated process that re-establishes the barrier and other functions of the skin. While wound healing proceeds apace in healthy individual, bacterial overgrowth and infection disrupts this process with significant morbidity and mortality. As such, any artificial matrix to promote wound healing must also control infecting microbes. We had earlier developed a two-part space-conforming gel backbone based on polyethyleneglycol (PEG) or lactose, which used ionic silver as the catalyst for gelation. As silver is widely used as an in vitro antimicrobial, use of silver as a catalyst for gelation provided the opportunity to assess its function as an anti-microbial agent in the gels. We found that these gels show bacteriostatic and bactericidal activity for a range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive organisms, including aerobic as well as anaerobic bacteria. This activity lasted for days, as silver leached out of the formed gels over a day in the manner of second-order decay. Importantly the gels did not limit either cell growth or viability, though cell migration was affected. Adding collagen I fragments to the gels corrected this effect on cell migration. We also found that the PEG gel did not interfere with hemostasis. These observations provide the basis for use of the gel backbones for incorporation of anesthetic agents and factors that promote wound repair. In conclusion, silver ions can serve dual functions of catalyzing gelation and providing anti-microbial properties to a biocompatible polymer. PMID:16635526

  13. Isoselenazolones as catalysts for the activation of bromine: bromolactonization of alkenoic acids and oxidation of alcohols.

    PubMed

    Balkrishna, Shah Jaimin; Prasad, Ch Durga; Panini, Piyush; Detty, Michael R; Chopra, Deepak; Kumar, Sangit

    2012-11-01

    Isoselenazolones were synthesized by a copper-catalyzed Se-N bond forming reaction between 2-halobenzamides and selenium powder. The catalytic activity of the various isoselenazolones was studied in the bromolactonization of pent-4-enoic acid. Isoselenazolone 9 was studied as a catalyst in several reactions: the bromolactonization of a series of alkenoic acids with bromine or N-bromosuccinimide (NBS) in the presence of potassium carbonate as base, the bromoesterification of a series of alkenes using NBS and a variety of carboxylic acids, and the oxidation of secondary alcohols to ketones using bromine as an oxidizing reagent. Mechanistic details of the isoselenazolone-catalyzed bromination reaction were revealed by (77)Se NMR spectroscopic and ES-MS studies. The oxidative addition of bromine to the isoselenazolone gives the isoselenazolone(IV) dibromide, which could be responsible for the activation of bromine under the reaction conditions. Steric effects from an N-phenylethyl group on the amide of the isoselenazolone and electron-withdrawing fluoro substituents on the benzo fused-ring of the isoselenazolone appear to enhance the stability of the isoselenazolone as a catalyst for the bromination reaction. PMID:23046286

  14. Reaction of deuterium with olefins on nickel catalysts: evidence for adsorbed vinylic species

    SciTech Connect

    Mintsa-Eya, V.; Hilaire, L.; Choplin, A.; Touroude, R.; Gault, F.G.

    1983-08-01

    The interaction of deuterium with 1,2-dimethylcyclopentene, 2,3-dimethylcyclopentene, 1-methyl-2-methylenecyclopentane, 1,2-dimethylcyclobutene, 1-methyl-2-methylenecyclobutane, bicyclo(2,2,1)heptene, but-1-ene, and cis-but-2-ene was studied from -85 to 50/sup 0/C on nickel films in a static apparatus and on Ni/pumice in a flow system. Unexpected d/sub 3/ and d/sub 4/ molecules were obtained in the deuteration of bicyclo(2,2,1)heptene. The position of the double bond in the ring of the other cycloolefins was the main factor governing their behavior: in the deuteration of 1,2-dimethylcycloalkenes, the saturated products, especially the trans somers, were much more exchanged and the percentage of trans was lower than when the starting material consisted of the olefins with the double bond in 2,3 or exocyclic positions. The hyperfine distribution, obtained by microwave analysis, of the exchanged d/sub 1/ but-1-ene, revealed that the major part of the deuterium was introduced on C/sub 2/; the cis-trans isomerization was much faster than the double bond migration with the introduction of zero or one deuterium atom while the isomerized but-1-ene showed a multiple exchange up to d/sub 4/; in the isomerized d/sub 1/ but-1-ene, the deuterium atom was distributed on the three carbon atoms C/sub 1/, C/sub 2/, C/sub 3/. Most of these results clearly show that the classical Horiuti-Polanyi mechanism is not the only one taking part in the reactions. The introduction of other intermediaries, sigma-vinylic, sigma-vinylic ..pi..-olefinic, and sigma-vinylic ..pi..-allylic species, provides a coherent explanation for all our findings. It is shown that nickel and iron behave in a very similar way. 5 tables.

  15. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1991-01-01

    The efficient production of environmentally acceptable distillate fuels requires catalysts for hydrogenation and cleavage of the coal macromolecules and removal of oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur heteroatoms. The goal of the proposed research is to develop new catalysts for the direct liquefaction of coal. This type of catalyst consists of fine clay particles that have been treated with reagents which form pillaring structures between the aluminosilicate layers of the clay. The pillars not only hold the layers apart but also constitute the active catalytic sites for hydrogenation of the coal and the solvent used in the liquefaction. The pillaring catalytic sites are composed of pyrrhotite, which has been previously demonstrated to be active for coal liquefaction. The pyrrhotite sites are generated in situ by sulfiding the corresponding oxyiron species. The size of the catalyst will be less than 40 nm in order to promote intimate contact with the coal material. Since the clays and reagents for pillaring and activating the clays are inexpensive, the catalysts can be discarded after use, rather than regenerated by a costly process. The proposed work will evaluate methods for preparing the fine particle iron-pillared clay dispersions and for activating the particles to generate the catalysts. Characterization studies of the pillared clays and activated catalysts will be performed. The effectiveness of the pillared clay dispersion for hydrogenation and coal liquefaction will be determined in several types of testing.

  16. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1991-01-01

    The efficient production of environmentally acceptable distillate fuels requires catalysts for hydrogenation and cleavage of the coal macromolecules and removal of oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur heteroatoms. The goal of the proposed research is to develop new catalysts for the direct liquefaction of coal. This type of catalyst consists of fine clay particles that have been treated with reagents which form pillaring structures between the aluminosilicate layers of the clay. The pillars not only hold the layers apart but also constitute the active catalytic sites for hydrogenation of the coal and solvent used in the liquefaction. The pillaring catalytic sites are composed of pyrrhotite, which has been previously demonstrated to be active for coal liquefaction. The pyrrhotite sites are generated in situ by sulfiding the corresponding oxyiron species. The size of the catalyst will be less than 40 nm in order to promote intimate contact with the coal material. Since the clays and reagents for pillaring and activating the clays are inexpensive, the catalysts can be discarded after use, rather than regenerated by a costly process. The proposed work will evaluate methods for preparing the fine particle iron-pillared clay dispersions and for activating the particles to generate the catalysts. Characterization studies of the pillared clays and activated catalysts will performed. The effectiveness of the pillared clay dispersion for hydrogenation and coal liquefaction will be determined in several types of testing. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  17. Ruthenium carbenes supported on mesoporous silicas as highly active and selective hybrid catalysts for olefin metathesis reactions under continuous flow.

    PubMed

    Bru, Miriam; Dehn, Richard; Teles, J Henrique; Deuerlein, Stephan; Danz, Manuel; Müller, Imke B; Limbach, Michael

    2013-08-26

    In the search for a highly active and selective heterogenized metathesis catalyst, we systematically varied the pore geometry and size of various silica-based mesoporous (i.e., MCM-41, MCM-48, and SBA-15) and microporous (ZSM-5 and MWW) versus macroporous materials (D11-10 and Aerosil 200), besides other process parameters (temperature, dilution, and mean residence time). The activity and, especially, selectivity of such "linker-free" supports for ruthenium metathesis catalysts were evaluated in the cyclodimerization of cis-cyclooctene to form 1,9-cyclohexadecadiene, a valuable intermediate in the flavor and fragrance industry. The optimized material showed not only exceptionally high selectivity to the valuable product, but also turned out to be a truly heterogeneous catalyst with superior activity relative to the unsupported homogeneous complex. PMID:23852995

  18. Ruthenium carbenes supported on mesoporous silicas as highly active and selective hybrid catalysts for olefin metathesis reactions under continuous flow.

    PubMed

    Bru, Miriam; Dehn, Richard; Teles, J Henrique; Deuerlein, Stephan; Danz, Manuel; Müller, Imke B; Limbach, Michael

    2013-08-26

    In the search for a highly active and selective heterogenized metathesis catalyst, we systematically varied the pore geometry and size of various silica-based mesoporous (i.e., MCM-41, MCM-48, and SBA-15) and microporous (ZSM-5 and MWW) versus macroporous materials (D11-10 and Aerosil 200), besides other process parameters (temperature, dilution, and mean residence time). The activity and, especially, selectivity of such "linker-free" supports for ruthenium metathesis catalysts were evaluated in the cyclodimerization of cis-cyclooctene to form 1,9-cyclohexadecadiene, a valuable intermediate in the flavor and fragrance industry. The optimized material showed not only exceptionally high selectivity to the valuable product, but also turned out to be a truly heterogeneous catalyst with superior activity relative to the unsupported homogeneous complex.

  19. Replacing tin in lactide polymerization: design of highly active germanium-based catalysts.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jia; Haquette, Pierre; Martin, Juliette; Salim, Karine; Thomas, Christophe M

    2013-12-16

    Most germane: Hexacoordinate germanium(IV) species exhibit unprecedented activities, yet controlled behavior, as initiators for the ring-opening polymerization of rac-lactide to form polylactide polymers.

  20. Facile synthesis of a platinum-lead oxide nanocomposite catalyst with high activity and durability for ethanol electrooxidation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei-Hua; Wang, Hong-Hui; Chen, De-Hao; Zhou, Zhi-You; Sun, Shi-Gang

    2012-12-21

    Aimed at searching for highly active and stable nano-scale Pt-based catalysts that can improve significantly the energy conversion efficiency of direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs), a novel Pt-PbO(x) nanocomposite (Pt-PbO(x) NC) catalyst with a mean size of 3.23 nm was synthesized through a simple wet chemistry method without using a surfactant, organometallic precursors and high temperature. Electrocatalytic tests demonstrated that the as-prepared Pt-PbO(x) NC catalyst possesses a much higher catalytic activity and a longer durability than Pt nanoparticles (nm-Pt) and commercial Pt black catalysts for ethanol electrooxidation. For instance, Pt-PbO(x) NC showed an onset potential that was 30 mV and 44 mV less positive, together with a peak current density 1.7 and 2.6 times higher than those observed for nm-Pt and Pt black catalysts in the cyclic voltammogram tests. The ratio of current densities per unit Pt mass on Pt-PbO(x) NC, nm-Pt and Pt black catalysts is 27.3 : 3.4 : 1 for the long-term (2 hours) chronoamperometric experiments measured at -0.4 V (vs. SCE). In situ FTIR spectroscopic studies revealed that the activity of breaking C-C bonds of ethanol of the Pt-PbO(x) NC is as high as 5.17 times that of the nm-Pt, which illustrates a high efficiency of ethanol oxidation to CO(2) on the as-prepared Pt-PbO(x) NC catalyst.

  1. Catalyst increases COS conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Goodboy, K.P.

    1985-02-18

    Increasingly stringent air quality legislation is placing greater emphasis on conversion of COS and CS/sub 2/ in Claus plants for the maximum sulfur recovery. Overall sulfur recovery goals are dependent upon outstanding service from the Claus catalyst in each reactor because catalyst activity is a major factor influencing plant performance. Today's catalyst are much improved over those used 10 years ago for the Claus (H/sub 2/S/SO/sub 2/) reaction. Recent technical efforts have focused on the conversion of COS and CS/sub 2/. These carbon-sulfur compounds can account for as much as 50% of the sulfur going to the incinerator, which essentially converts all remaining sulfur species to SO/sub 2/ for atmospheric dispersion. Previously, the mechanism of Claus COS conversion, i.e., hydrolysis or oxidation by SO/sub 2/, was studied and the conclusion was that oxidation by SO/sub 2/ appears to be the predominate mode of COS conversion on sulfated alumina catalysts.

  2. Dinuclear thiazolylidene copper complex as highly active catalyst for azid-alkyne cycloadditions.

    PubMed

    Schöffler, Anne L; Makarem, Ata; Rominger, Frank; Straub, Bernd F

    2016-01-01

    A dinuclear N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) copper complex efficiently catalyzes azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) "click" reactions. The ancillary ligand comprises two 4,5-dimethyl-1,3-thiazol-2-ylidene units and an ethylene linker. The three-step preparation of the complex from commercially available starting compounds is more straightforward and cost-efficient than that of the previously described 1,2,4-triazol-5-ylidene derivatives. Kinetic experiments revealed its high catalytic CuAAC activity in organic solvents at room temperature. The activity increases upon addition of acetic acid, particularly for more acidic alkyne substrates. The modular catalyst design renders possible the exchange of N-heterocyclic carbene, linker, sacrificial ligand, and counter ion. PMID:27559407

  3. Nonactivated and Activated Biochar Derived from Bananas as Alternative Cathode Catalyst in Microbial Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Haoran; Deng, Lifang; Qi, Yujie; Kobayashi, Noriyuki; Tang, Jiahuan

    2014-01-01

    Nonactivated and activated biochars have been successfully prepared by bananas at different thermotreatment temperatures. The activated biochar generated at 900°C (Biochar-act900) exhibited improved oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) performances in alkaline media, in terms of the onset potential and generated current density. Rotating disk electron result shows that the average of 2.65 electrons per oxygen molecule was transferred during ORR of Biochar-act900. The highest power density of 528.2 mW/m2 and the maximum stable voltage of 0.47 V were obtained by employing Biochar-act900 as cathode catalyst, which is comparable to the Pt/C cathode. Owning to these advantages, it is expected that the banana-derived biochar cathode can find application in microbial fuel cell systems. PMID:25243229

  4. Nonactivated and activated biochar derived from bananas as alternative cathode catalyst in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Haoran; Deng, Lifang; Qi, Yujie; Kobayashi, Noriyuki; Tang, Jiahuan

    2014-01-01

    Nonactivated and activated biochars have been successfully prepared by bananas at different thermotreatment temperatures. The activated biochar generated at 900°C (Biochar-act900) exhibited improved oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) performances in alkaline media, in terms of the onset potential and generated current density. Rotating disk electron result shows that the average of 2.65 electrons per oxygen molecule was transferred during ORR of Biochar-act900. The highest power density of 528.2 mW/m(2) and the maximum stable voltage of 0.47 V were obtained by employing Biochar-act900 as cathode catalyst, which is comparable to the Pt/C cathode. Owning to these advantages, it is expected that the banana-derived biochar cathode can find application in microbial fuel cell systems.

  5. Methane-induced Activation Mechanism of Fused Ferric Oxide-Alumina Catalysts during Methane Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Reddy Enakonda, Linga; Zhou, Lu; Saih, Youssef; Ould-Chikh, Samy; Lopatin, Sergei; Gary, Daniel; Del-Gallo, Pascal; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2016-08-01

    Activation of Fe2 O3 -Al2 O3 with CH4 (instead of H2 ) is a meaningful method to achieve catalytic methane decomposition (CMD). This reaction of CMD is more economic and simple against commercial methane steam reforming (MSR) as it produces COx -free H2 . In this study, for the first time, structure changes of the catalyst were screened during CH4 reduction with time on stream. The aim was to optimize the pretreatment conditions through understanding the activation mechanism. Based on results from various characterization techniques, reduction of Fe2 O3 by CH4 proceeds in three steps: Fe2 O3 →Fe3 O4 →FeO→Fe0. Once Fe0 is formed, it decomposes CH4 with formation of Fe3 C, which is the crucial initiation step in the CMD process to initiate formation of multiwall carbon nanotubes. PMID:27345621

  6. Dinuclear thiazolylidene copper complex as highly active catalyst for azid–alkyne cycloadditions

    PubMed Central

    Schöffler, Anne L; Makarem, Ata; Rominger, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Summary A dinuclear N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) copper complex efficiently catalyzes azide–alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) “click” reactions. The ancillary ligand comprises two 4,5-dimethyl-1,3-thiazol-2-ylidene units and an ethylene linker. The three-step preparation of the complex from commercially available starting compounds is more straightforward and cost-efficient than that of the previously described 1,2,4-triazol-5-ylidene derivatives. Kinetic experiments revealed its high catalytic CuAAC activity in organic solvents at room temperature. The activity increases upon addition of acetic acid, particularly for more acidic alkyne substrates. The modular catalyst design renders possible the exchange of N-heterocyclic carbene, linker, sacrificial ligand, and counter ion. PMID:27559407

  7. Pt-Co Bimetallic Catalyst Supported on Single Walled Carbon Nanotube: XAS and Aqueous Phase Reforming Activity Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Li, N; Pfefferle, L; Haller, G

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a simple method to create a catalyst with atomically dispersed Pt on top of Co nanoparticles on single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) supports by sequential impregnation of Pt(II) and Co(II) solutions following by hydrogen reduction. The aqueous phase reforming activity is much higher than for Pt monometallic catalysts on SWNT supports prepared by several methods, either pre-reduced in hydrogen or in the liquid phase. The high selectivity of the monometallic catalysts is maintained for the bimetallic systems. The Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) results at the Pt LIII edge show no observable Pt-Pt bond. Only Pt-Co bonds were observed, indicating high dispersion of Pt. The enhanced activity comes from two sources: the high dispersion of Pt and the effect of the Co as co-catalyst or modifier. This contribution demonstrates the possibility to further engineer bimetallic catalysts to improve the aqueous phase reforming activity, especially to retain good selectivity at high conversion.

  8. Enhancing low-temperature activity and durability of Pd-based diesel oxidation catalysts using ZrO2 supports

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Mi -Young; Kyriakidou, Eleni A.; Choi, Jae -Soon; Toops, Todd J.; Binder, Andrew J.; Thomas, Cyril; Schwartz, Viviane; Chen, Jihua; Hensley, Dale K.; Parks, II, James E.

    2016-01-18

    In this study, we investigated the impact of ZrO2 on the performance of palladium-based oxidation catalysts with respect to low-temperature activity, hydrothermal stability, and sulfur tolerance. Pd supported on ZrO2 and SiO2 were synthesized for a comparative study. Additionally, in an attempt to maximize the ZrO2 surface area and improve sulfur tolerance, a Pd support with ZrO2-dispersed onto SiO2 was studied. The physicochemical properties of the catalysts were examined using ICP, N2 sorption, XRD, SEM, TEM, and NH3-, CO2-, and NOx-TPD. The activity of the Pd catalysts were measured from 60 to 600 °C in a flow of 4000 ppmmore » CO, 500 ppm NO, 1000 ppm C3H6, 4% O2, 5% H2O, and Ar balance. The Pd catalysts were evaluated in fresh, sulfated, and hydrothermally aged states. Overall, the ZrO2-containing catalysts showed considerably higher CO and C3H6 oxidation activity than Pd/SiO2 under the reaction conditions studied.« less

  9. Highly active PtAu alloy nanoparticle catalysts for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianming; Chen, Guozhu; Guay, Daniel; Chaker, Mohamed; Ma, Dongling

    2014-02-21

    To enhance the catalytic activity of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for the hydrogenation of nitro-aromatic chemicals, Pt was introduced into AuNPs to form "bare" PtAu alloy NPs using a physical approach, pulsed laser ablation in liquid (PLAL), on single metal-mixture targets. These PLAL-NPs are deemed to favor catalysis due to the absence of any surfactant molecules on their unique "bare and clean" surface. The PLAL-NPs were facilely assembled onto CeO2 nanotubes (NTs) by simply mixing them without conducting any surface functionalization, representing another advantage of these NPs. Their catalytic activity was assessed in 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) hydrogenation. The reaction catalyzed by alloy-NP/CeO2-NT catalysts demonstrates a remarkably higher reaction rate in comparison with that catalyzed by pure Au and Pt NPs, and other similar Au and Pt containing catalysts reported recently. A "volcano-like" catalytic activity dependence of the alloy NPs on their chemical composition suggests a strong synergistic effect between Au and Pt in the 4-NP reduction, far beyond the simple sum of their individual contributions. It leads to the significantly enhanced catalytic activity of Pt30Au70 and Pt50Au50 alloy NPs, outperforming not only each single constituent, but also their physical mixtures and most recently reported AuNP based nanocatalysts. The favorable d-band center shift of Pt after alloying, and co-operative actions between Pt clusters and nearby Au (or mixed PtAu) sites were proposed as possible mechanisms to explain such a strong synergistic effect on catalysis.

  10. Synergistic "ping-pong" energy transfer for efficient light activation in a chromophore-catalyst dyad.

    PubMed

    Quaranta, Annamaria; Charalambidis, Georgios; Herrero, Christian; Margiola, Sofia; Leibl, Winfried; Coutsolelos, Athanassios; Aukauloo, Ally

    2015-10-01

    The synthesis of a porphyrin-Ru(II) polypyridine complex where the porphyrin acts as a photoactive unit and the Ru(II) polypyridine as a catalytic precursor is described. Comparatively, the free base porphyrin was found to outperform the ruthenium based chromophore in the yield of light induced electron transfer. Mechanistic insights indicate the occurrence of a ping-pong energy transfer from the (1)LC excited state of the porphyrin chromophore to the (3)MCLT state of the catalyst and back to the (3)LC excited state of the porphyrin unit. The latter, triplet-triplet energy transfer back to the chromophore, efficiently competes with fast radiationless deactivation of the excited state at the catalyst site. The energy thus recovered by the chromophore allows improved yield of formation of the oxidized form of the chromophore and concomitantly of the oxidation of the catalytic unit by intramolecular charge transfer. The presented results are among the rare examples where a porphyrin chromophore is successfully used to drive an oxidative activation process where reductive processes prevail in the literature.

  11. Subnanometer platinum clusters highly active and selective catalysts for the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane.

    SciTech Connect

    Vajda, S; Pellin, M. J.; Greeley, J. P.; Marshall, C. L.; Curtiss, L. A.; Ballentine, G. A.; Elam, J. W.; Catillon-Mucherie, S.; Redfern, P. C.; Mehmood, F.; Zapol, P.; Yale Univ.

    2009-03-01

    Small clusters are known to possess reactivity not observed in their bulk analogues, which can make them attractive for catalysis. Their distinct catalytic properties are often hypothesized to result from the large fraction of under-coordinated surface atoms. Here, we show that size-preselected Pt{sub 8-10} clusters stabilized on high-surface-area supports are 40-100 times more active for the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane than previously studied platinum and vanadia catalysts, while at the same time maintaining high selectivity towards formation of propylene over by-products. Quantum chemical calculations indicate that under-coordination of the Pt atoms in the clusters is responsible for the surprisingly high reactivity compared with extended surfaces. We anticipate that these results will form the basis for development of a new class of catalysts by providing a route to bond-specific chemistry, ranging from energy-efficient and environmentally friendly synthesis strategies to the replacement of petrochemical feedstocks by abundant small alkanes.

  12. Factors affecting activated carbon-based catalysts for selective hydrogen sulfide oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huixing; Monnell, J.D.; Alvin, M.A.; Vidic, R.D.

    2008-09-01

    The primary product of coal gasification processes is synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of CO, H2, CO2, H2O and a number of minor components. Among the most significant minor components in syngas is hydrogen sulfide (H2S). In addition to its adverse environmental impact, H2S poisons the catalysts and hydrogen purification membranes, and causes severe corrosion in gas turbines. Technologies that can remove H2S from syngas and related process streams are, therefore, of considerable practical interest. To meet this need, we work towards understanding the mechanism by which prospective H2S catalysts perform in simulated fuel gas conditions. Specifically, we show that for low-temperature gas clean-up (~1408C) using activated carbon fibers and water plays a significant role in H2S binding and helps to prolong the lifetime of the material. Basic surface functional groups were found to be imperative for significant conversion of H2S to daughter compounds, whereas metal oxides (La and Ce) did little to enhance this catalysis. We show that although thermal regeneration of the material is possible, the regenerated material has a substantially lower catalytic and sorption capacity.

  13. Selectivity, activity, and metal-support interactions of Rh bimetallic catalysts. Progress report, 15 November 1981-15 August 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, G L

    1982-08-01

    We report on a detailed investigation of the effect of TiO/sub 2/ support on Rh-Ag interaction as exhibited in catalytic activity. The temporal evolution of activity over Rh-Ag/TiO/sub 2/ for ethane hydrogenolysis and hydrogen chemisorption as a function of temperature, Ag to Rh ratio, the Rh particle size, Rh loading, and ambient gas were studied. Preliminary extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis of Rh/TiO/sub 2/ catalysts indicate that 100% exposed (dispersed) catalyst prepared by ion exchange may be atomically dispersed after low temperature reduction. 7 figures, 1 table.

  14. Activated Carbon Catalysts for the Production of Hydrogen for the Sulfur-Iodine Thermochemical Water Splitting Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Lucia M. Petkovic; Daniel M. Ginosar; Harry W. Rollins; Kyle C Burch; Cristina Deiana; Hugo S. Silva; Maria F. Sardella; Dolly Granados

    2009-05-01

    Seven activated carbon catalysts obtained from a variety of raw material sources and preparation methods were examined for their catalytic activity to decompose hydroiodic acid (HI) to produce hydrogen; a key reaction in the sulfur-iodine (S-I) thermochemical water splitting cycle. Activity was examined under a temperature ramp from 473 to 773 K. Within the group of ligno-cellulosic steam-activated carbon catalysts, activity increased with surface area. However, both a mineral-based steam-activated carbon and a ligno-cellulosic chemically-activated carbon displayed activities lower than expected based on their higher surface areas. In general, ash content was detrimental to catalytic activity while total acid sites, as determined by Bohem’s titrations, seemed to favor higher catalytic activity within the group of steam-activated carbons. These results suggest, one more time, that activated carbon raw materials and preparation methods may have played a significant role in the development of surface characteristics that eventually dictated catalyst activity and stability as well.

  15. Controlled leaching with prolonged activity for Co-LDH supported catalyst during treatment of organic dyes using bicarbonate activation of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Jawad, Ali; Li, Yibing; Lu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Zhuqi; Liu, Weidong; Yin, Guochuan

    2015-05-30

    The effluents from industries are commonly non-biodegradable and produce various hazardous intermediate products by chemical reactions that have direct impact on environment. In the present investigation, a series of Co-Mg/AL ternary LDH catalysts with fixed Mg/Al ratio were prepared by co-precipitation method. The effect of Co on the activity of the catalyst was monitored on the degradation of methylene blue (MB) as model compound at batch level using bicarbonate activation of H2O2 (BAP) system. On bench level, the best CoMgAl-4 catalyst can completely decolorize both methylene blue (MB) and methylene orange (MO) in short time, while in fixed bed, the catalyst was found stable for over 300 h with nearly 100% decolorization and excellent chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal. No leaching of Co was detected for the entire fixed experiment which may be accounted for long life stability and good activity of the catalyst. The ternary LDH catalysts were characterized by AES, XRD, FTIR, BET, and SEM for its compositional, phase structure, optical properties, textural, and surface morphology respectively. The XRD analysis confirmed characteristic pattern of hydrotalcite like structures without impurity phases. The formation of superoxide and hydroxyl radical as ROS was proposed with CoMgAl-4 by radical's scavengers.

  16. Gasification characteristics of an activated carbon catalyst during the decomposition of hazardous waste material in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Yukihiko; Nuessle, F.W.; Antal, M.J. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    Recently, carbonaceous materials including activated carbon were proven to be effective catalysts for hazardous waste gasification in supercritical water. Using coconut shell activated carbon catalyst, complete decomposition of industrial organic wastes including methanol and acetic acid was achieved. During this process, the total mass of the activated carbon catalyst changes by two competing processes: a decrease in weight via gasification of the carbon by supercritical water, or an increase in weight by deposition of carbonaceous materials generated by incomplete gasification of the biomass feedstocks. The deposition of carbonaceous materials does not occur when complete gasification is realized. Gasification of the activated carbon in supercritical water is often favored, resulting in changes in the quality and quantity of the catalyst. To thoroughly understand the hazardous waste decomposition process, a more complete understanding of the behavior of activated carbon in pure supercritical water is needed. The gasification rate of carbon by water vapor at subcritical pressures was studied in relation to coal gasification and generating activated carbon.

  17. Electron donor properties of claus catalysts--1. Influence of NaOH on the catalytic activity of silica gel

    SciTech Connect

    Dudzik, Z.; George, Z.M.

    1980-05-01

    ESR spectroscopy showed that SO/sub 2/ adsorbed on silica gel impregnated with NaOH formed the SO/sub 2//sup -/ anion radical. With increasing NaOH concentration, the SO/sub 2/ adsorption and the activity for the reaction of H/sub 2/S with SO/sub 2/ (Claus reaction) went through a maximum at 1.0-1.4% NaOH. The SO/sub 2/ anion radical apparently formed by electron transfer from the catalyst surface and was a reaction intermediate which reacted rapidly with H/sub 2/S. The NaOH catalyst had similar stability and activity as commercial alumina catalyst in five-day tests under Claus conditions.

  18. Gasification characteristics of an activated carbon catalyst during the decomposition of hazardous waste materials in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Yukihiko; Nuessle, F.W.; Antal, M.J. Jr.

    1996-10-01

    Recently, carbonaceous materials were proved to be effective catalysts for hazardous waste decomposition in supercritical water. Gasification of the carbonaceous catalyst itself is also expected, however, under supercritical conditions. Thus, it is essential to determine the gasification rate of the carbonaceous materials during this process to determine the active lifetime of the catalysts. For this purpose, the gasification characteristics of granular coconut shell activated carbon in supercritical water alone (600-650{degrees}C, 25.5-34.5 MPa) were investigated. The gasification rate at subatmospheric pressure agreed well with the gasification rate at supercritical conditions, indicating the same reaction mechanism. Methane generation under these conditions is via pyrolysis, and thus is not affected by the water pressure. An iodine number increase of 25% was observed as a result of the supercritical water gasification.

  19. XAFS study on structure-activity correlations of α-Co(OH)2 nanosheets water oxidation catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Junheng; Liu, Qinghua; Yao, Tao; Pan, Zhiyun; Wei, Shiqiang

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the structure-activity of the metal hydroxide materials is critical to the design of an efficient oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalyst for water oxidation. A challenge is to identify and collect surface active site relative to bulk. Here, we have prepared an ultrathin α-Co(OH)2 nanosheet with large exposed surface Co sites as an high-efficiency O2 evolution catalyst. Using XAFS technique, we have investigated the oxidation state and local structural evolutions of the α-Co(OH)2 nanosheets catalyst. A coordination-miss Co sites (CoO6-x) with oxidation state of +3.3 on the nanosheet surface is revealed after the OER procedure, indicating the in situ formation of y-CoOOH nanosheet is a key factor leading to an enhanced water oxidation performance.

  20. Preliminary results from screening tests of commercial catalysts with potential use in gas turbine combustors. I - Furnace studies of catalyst activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. N.

    1976-01-01

    Thirty commercially produced monolith and pellet catalysts were tested as part of a screening process to select catalysts suitable for use in a gas turbine combustor. The catalysts were contained in a 1.8 centimeter diameter quartz tube and heated to temperatures varying between 300 and 1200 K while a mixture of propane and air passed through the bed at space velocities of 44,000 to 70,000 per hour. The amount of propane oxidized was measured as a function of catalyst temperature. Of the samples tested, the most effective catalysts proved to be noble metal catalysts on monolith substrates.

  1. Preliminary results from screening tests of commercial catalysts with potential use in gas turbine combustors. Part 1: Furnace studies of catalyst activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. N.

    1976-01-01

    Thirty commercially produced monolith and pellet catalysts were tested as part of a screening process to select catalysts suitable for use in a gas turbine combustor. The catalysts were contained in a 1.8 centimeter diameter quartz tube and heated to temperatures varying between 300 and 1,200 K while a mixture of propane and air passed through the bed at space velocities of 44,000 to 70,000/hour. The amount of propane oxidized was measured as a function of catalyst temperature. Of the samples tested, the most effective catalysts proved to be noble metal catalysts on monolith substrates.

  2. Fe3-xCuxO4 as highly active heterogeneous Fenton-like catalysts toward elemental mercury removal.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Changsong; Sun, Lushi; Zhang, Anchao; Wu, Xiaofeng; Ma, Chuan; Su, Sheng; Hu, Song; Xiang, Jun

    2015-04-01

    A series of novel spinel Fe3-xCuxO4 (0active heterogeneous Fenton-like catalysts to remove elemental mercury (Hg0) from the simulated flue gases. Inductively coupled plasma-Atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, and X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS) were used to characterize the catalysts. The catalysts were confirmed the presence of the redox pairs Fesurf2+/Fesurf3+ and Cusurf+/Cusurf2+ on the surface of the cubic structure. The performance of heterogeneous Fenton-like reactions for Hg0 removal was evaluated in a lab-scale bubbling reactor at the solution temperature of 50°C. The systematic studies on the effects of different catalysts, H2O2 concentration and solution pH values on Hg0 removal efficiencies were performed. The recycling of the Fe3-xCuxO4 catalysts in Fenton-like solution is stable and Hg0 removal efficiency remain above 90% after 3 cycles. The active hydroxyl radical (OH) generated during heterogeneous Fenton-like reactions was confirmed through electron spin resonance (ESR) spin-trapping technique. The Hg0 removal mechanism has been discussed based on the experimental and analytical results. PMID:25655441

  3. Manganese Catalysts for C–H activation: An Experimental/Theoretical Study Identifies the Stereoelectronic Factor that Controls the Switch between Hydroxylation and Desaturation Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Jonathan F.; Balcells, David; Sauer, Effiette L. O.; Raynaud, Christophe; Brudvig, Gary W.; Crabtree, Robert H.; Eisenstein, Odile

    2010-01-01

    We describe competitive C–H activation chemistry of two types, desaturation and hydroxylation, using synthetic manganese catalysts with several substrates. 9,10-dihydrophenanthrene (DHP) gives the highest desaturation activity, the final products being phenanthrene (P1) and phenanthrene-9,10-oxide (P3), the latter being thought to arise from epoxidation of some of the phenanthrene. The hydroxylase pathway also occurs as suggested by the presence of the dione product, phenanthrene-9,10-dione (P2), thought to arise from further oxidation of hydroxylation intermediate 9-hydroxy-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene. The experimental work together with the DFT calculations shows that the postulated Mn oxo active species, [Mn(O)(tpp)(Cl)] (tpp = tetraphenyl porphyrin), can promote the oxidation of dihydrophenanthrene by either desaturation or hydroxylation pathways. The calculations show that these two competing reactions have a common initial step – radical H abstraction from one of the DHP sp3 C–H bonds. The resulting Mn hydroxo intermediate is capable of promoting not only OH rebound (hydroxylation) but also a second H abstraction adjacent to the first (desaturation). Like the active MnV=O species, this MnIV-OH species also has radical character on oxygen and can thus give H abstraction. Both steps have very low and therefore very similar energy barriers, leading to a product mixture. Since the radical character of the catalyst is located on the oxygen p orbital perpendicular to the MnIV-OH plane, the orientation of the organic radical with respect to this plane determines which reaction, desaturation or hydroxylation, will occur. Stereoelectronic factors such as the rotational orientation of the OH in the enzyme active site is thus likely to constitute the switch between hydroxylation and desaturation behavior. PMID:20481432

  4. Spatially and size selective synthesis of Fe-based nanoparticles on ordered mesoporous supports as highly active and stable catalysts for ammonia decomposition.

    PubMed

    Lu, An-Hui; Nitz, Joerg-Joachim; Comotti, Massimiliano; Weidenthaler, Claudia; Schlichte, Klaus; Lehmann, Christian W; Terasaki, Osamu; Schüth, Ferdi

    2010-10-13

    Uniform and highly dispersed γ-Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles with a diameter of ∼6 nm supported on CMK-5 carbons and C/SBA-15 composites were prepared via simple impregnation and thermal treatment. The nanostructures of these materials were characterized by XRD, Mössbauer spectroscopy, XPS, SEM, TEM, and nitrogen sorption. Due to the confinement effect of the mesoporous ordered matrices, γ-Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles were fully immobilized within the channels of the supports. Even at high Fe-loadings (up to about 12 wt %) on CMK-5 carbon no iron species were detected on the external surface of the carbon support by XPS analysis and electron microscopy. Fe(2)O(3)/CMK-5 showed the highest ammonia decomposition activity of all previously described Fe-based catalysts in this reaction. Complete ammonia decomposition was achieved at 700 °C and space velocities as high as 60,000 cm(3) g(cat)(-1) h(-1). At a space velocity of 7500 cm(3) g(cat)(-1) h(-1), complete ammonia conversion was maintained at 600 °C for 20 h. After the reaction, the immobilized γ-Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles were found to be converted to much smaller nanoparticles (γ-Fe(2)O(3) and a small fraction of nitride), which were still embedded within the carbon matrix. The Fe(2)O(3)/CMK-5 catalyst is much more active than the benchmark NiO/Al(2)O(3) catalyst at high space velocity, due to its highly developed mesoporosity. γ-Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles supported on carbon-silica composites are structurally much more stable over extended periods of time but less active than those supported on carbon. TEM observation reveals that iron-based nanoparticles penetrate through the carbon layer and then are anchored on the silica walls, thus preventing them from moving and sintering. In this way, the stability of the carbon-silica catalyst is improved. Comparison with the silica supported iron oxide catalyst reveals that the presence of a thin layer of carbon is essential for increased catalytic activity. PMID:20849104

  5. Structural and mechanistic basis for the high activity of Fe–N–C catalysts toward oxygen reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jingkun; Ghoshal, Shraboni; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Halevi, Barr; McKinney, Samuel; McCool, Geoff; Ma, Chunrong; Yuan, Xianxia; Ma, Zi-Feng; Mukerjee, Sanjeev; Jia, Qingying

    2016-01-01

    The development of efficient non-platinum group metal (non-PGM) catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is of paramount importance for clean and sustainable energy storage and conversion devices. The major bottleneck in developing Fe–N–C materials as the leading non-PGM catalysts lies in the poor understanding of the nature of active sites and reaction mechanisms. Herein, we report a scalable metal organic framework-derived Fe–N–C catalyst with high ORR activity demonstrated in practical H2/air fuel cells, and an unprecedented turnover frequency (TOF) in acid in rotating disk electrode. By characterizing the catalyst under both ex situ and operando conditions using combined microscopic and spectroscopic techniques, we show that the structures of active sites under ex situ and working conditions are drastically different. Resultantly, the active site proposed here, a non-planar ferrous Fe–N4 moiety embedded in distorted carbon matrix characterized by a high Fe2+/3+ redox potential, is in contrast with those proposed hitherto derived from ex situ characterizations. This site reversibly switches to an in-plane ferric Fe–N4 moiety poisoned by oxygen adsorbates during the redox transition, with the population of active sites controlled by the Fe2+/3+ redox potential. The unprecedented TOF of the active site is correlated to its near-optimal Fe2+/3+ redox potential, and essentially originated from its favorable biomimetic dynamic nature that balances the site-blocking effect and O2 dissociation. The porous and disordered carbon matrix of the catalyst plays pivotal roles for its measured high ORR activity by hosting high population of reactant-accessible active sites.

  6. Promoting Active Species Generation by Plasmon-Induced Hot-Electron Excitation for Efficient Electrocatalytic Oxygen Evolution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guigao; Li, Peng; Zhao, Guixia; Wang, Xin; Kong, Jintao; Liu, Huimin; Zhang, Huabin; Chang, Kun; Meng, Xianguang; Kako, Tetsuya; Ye, Jinhua

    2016-07-27

    Water splitting represents a promising technology for renewable energy conversion and storage, but it is greatly hindered by the kinetically sluggish oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Here, using Au-nanoparticle-decorated Ni(OH)2 nanosheets [Ni(OH)2-Au] as catalysts, we demonstrate that the photon-induced surface plasmon resonance (SPR) excitation on Au nanoparticles could significantly activate the OER catalysis, specifically achieving a more than 4-fold enhanced activity and meanwhile affording a markedly decreased overpotential of 270 mV at the current density of 10 mA cm(-2) and a small Tafel slope of 35 mV dec(-1) (no iR-correction), which is much better than those of the benchmark IrO2 and RuO2, as well as most Ni-based OER catalysts reported to date. The synergy of the enhanced generation of Ni(III/IV) active species and the improved charge transfer, both induced by hot-electron excitation on Au nanoparticles, is proposed to account for such a markedly increased activity. The SPR-enhanced OER catalysis could also be observed over cobalt oxide (CoO)-Au and iron oxy-hydroxide (FeOOH)-Au catalysts, suggesting the generality of this strategy. These findings highlight the possibility of activating OER catalysis by plasmonic excitation and could open new avenues toward the design of more-energy-efficient catalytic water oxidation systems with the assistance of light energy. PMID:27380539

  7. Catalyst poisoning during tar-sands bitumen upgrading

    SciTech Connect

    Carruthers, J.D.; Brinen, J.S.; Komar, D.A.; Greenhouse, S.

    1994-12-31

    A number of hydrotreating catalysts are used in commercial heavy oil upgrading facilities. One of these, a CoO/MoO{sub 3}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst has been evaluated in a pilot plant CSTR for Tar-Sands Bitumen upgrading. Following its use in a test of 200 hours duration, the catalyst was removed, de-oiled, regenerated by air-calcination to remove the coke, and then re-tested. Samples of the coked, fresh and regenerated catalyst were each examined using surface analytical techniques. ESCA and SIMS analysis of the coked and regenerated catalyst samples show, as expected, significant contamination of the catalyst with Ni and V. In addition, the SIMS analysis clearly reveals that the edges of the catalyst pellets are rich in Ca, Mg and Fe while the Ni, V and coke are evenly distributed. Regeneration of the catalyst by calcination removes the carbonaceous material but appears not to change the distribution of the metal contaminants. Retesting of the regenerated catalyst shows a performance similar to that of the fresh catalyst. These data serve to support the view that catalyst deactivation during early use is not due to the skin of Ca and Mg on the pellets but rather via the poisoning of active sites by carbonaceous species.

  8. Catalyst Additives to Enhance Mercury Oxidation and Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Jared W. Cannon; Thomas K. Gale

    2004-12-31

    Preliminary research has shown that SCR catalysts employed for nitrogen-oxide reduction can effectively oxidize mercury. This report discusses initial results from fundamental investigations into the behavior of mercury species in the presence of SCR catalysts at Southern Research Institute. Three different SCR catalysts are being studied. These are honeycomb-type, plate-type, and a hybrid-type catalyst. The catalysts are manufactured and supplied by Cormetech Inc., Hitachi America Ltd., and Haldor-Topsoe Inc., respectively. Test methods and experimental procedures were developed for current and future testing. The methods and procedures equalize factors influencing mercury adsorption and oxidation (surface area, catalyst activity, and pore structure) that normally differ for each catalyst type. Initial testing was performed to determine the time necessary for each catalyst to reach surface-adsorption equilibrium. In addition, the fraction of Hg oxidized by each of the SCR catalyst types is being investigated, for a given amount of catalyst and flow rate of mercury and flue gas. The next major effort will be to examine the kinetics of mercury oxidation across the SCR catalysts with respect to changes in mercury concentration and with respect to HCl concentration. Hg-sorption equilibrium times will also be investigated with respect to ammonia concentration in the simulated flue gas.

  9. Periodic trends in the hydrodenitrogenation activity of carbon-supported transition metal sulfide catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Eijsbouts, S.; De Beer, V.H.J.; Prins, R.

    1988-01-01

    Periodic trends of transition metals for the catalysis of reactions such as hydrogenation, hydrogenolysis, isomerization and hydrogen oxidation have been well studied. When activity versus position of the transition metal in the periodic table is plotted, quite often these trends are manifested in the form of so-called volcano-type curves. In the present study, the authors have chosen the HDN of quinoline at moderately high pressure as a model reaction, and they have used the same carbon-supported transition metal sulfide catalysts studied by Vissers et al. Results are shown for the following transition metals: V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Mo, Ru, Rh, Pd, W, Re, Os, Ir, and Pt. 9 references.

  10. The active component of vanadium-molybdenum catalysts for the oxidation of acrolein to acrylic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Andrushkevich, T.V.; Kuznetsova, T.G.

    1986-12-01

    The catalytic properties of the vanadium-molybdenum oxide system were investigated in the oxidation of acrolein to acrylic acid. The active component of the catalyst is the compound VMo/sub 3/O/sub 11/, the maximum amount of which is observed at a content of 7-15 mole% V/sub 2/O/sub 4/. The compound VMo/sub 3/O/sub 11/ is formed in the thermodecomposition of silicomolybdovanadium heteropoly acids or isopoly compounds, reduced with respect to vanadium, and contains V/sup 4 +/ and Mo/sup 6 +/. The optimum treatment for the formation of this compound is treatment in the reaction mixture at 400 degrees C.

  11. Active and Durable Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Catalyst Derived from Pd-Doped Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jitang; Xia, Guoliang; Jiang, Peng; Yang, Yang; Li, Ren; Shi, Ruohong; Su, Jianwei; Chen, Qianwang

    2016-06-01

    The water electrolysis is of critical importance for sustainable hydrogen production. In this work, a highly efficient and stable PdCo alloy catalyst (PdCo@CN) was synthesized by direct annealing of Pd-doped metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) under N2 atmosphere. In 0.5 M H2SO4 solution, PdCo@CN displays remarkable electrocatalytic performance with overpotential of 80 mV, a Tafel slope of 31 mV dec(-1), and excellent stability of 10 000 cycles. Our studies reveal that noble metal doped MOFs are ideal precursors for preparing highly active alloy electrocatalysts with low content of noble metal. PMID:27112733

  12. Effect of the detonation nanodiamond surface on the catalytic activity of deposited nickel catalysts in the hydrogenation of acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tveritinova, E. A.; Kulakova, I. I.; Zhitnev, Yu. N.; Kharlanov, A. N.; Fionov, A. V.; Chen, W.; Buyanova, I.; Lunin, V. V.

    2013-07-01

    A comparative study is performed of the catalytic activity of nanosized nickel deposited on detonation synthesis nanodiamond (DND) and coal (CSUG) produced by burning sugar and crystalline quartz in the hydrogenation of acetylene. Nanosized nickel is obtained through the thermal decomposition of nickel formate under a dynamic vacuum. The catalysts are studied by means of scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray fluorescence, IR-spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and pulse microcatalytic method. It is shown that Ni/DND is an active catalyst of acetylene hydrogenation, considerably surpassing Ni/quartz and Ni/CSUG. The apparent activation energy of the hydrogenation of acetylene is calculated, and the region of the reaction are determined for all catalysts. It is found that the influence of the structure and nature of a functional coating of nanodiamond on the catalytic activity of Ni/DND deposited catalyst in the hydrogenation of acetylene. The ability of Ni/DND to hold active hydrogen is detected.

  13. Stable and catalytically active iron porphyrin-based porous organic polymer: Activity as both a redox and Lewis acid catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Oveisi, Ali R.; Zhang, Kainan; Khorramabadi-zad, Ahmad; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    A new porphyrin-based porous organic polymer (POP) with BET surface area ranging from 780 to 880 m2/g was synthesized in free-base form via the reaction of meso-tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl) porphyrin and a rigid trigonal building block, hexahydroxytriphenylene. The material was then metallated with Fe(III) imparting activity for Lewis acid catalysis (regioselective methanolysis ring-opening of styrene oxide), oxidative cyclization catalysis (conversion of bis(2-hydroxy-1-naphthyl)methanes to the corresponding spirodienone), and a tandem catalytic processes: an in situ oxidation-cyclic aminal formation-oxidation sequence, which selectively converts benzyl alcohol to 2-phenyl-quinazolin-4(3H)-one. Notably, the catalyst is readily recoverable and reusable, with little loss in catalytic activity. PMID:26177563

  14. Effect of surface oxidation of the support on the thiophene hydrodesulfurization activity of Mo, Ni, and NiMo catalysts supported on activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Calafat, A. |; Lopez-Agudo, A.; Palacios, J.M.

    1996-08-01

    The present investigation attempts to provide a better understanding of the influence of the nature of the carbon support on the HDS activity of Mo, Ni, and NiMo catalysts. For this purpose a high purity activated carbon was subjected to oxidative treatments with HNO{sub 3} to modify its surface properties. NiMo catalysts supported on the resulting activated carbons were prepared and characterized by TPR, XRD, and SEM-EDX, and their activity for HDS of thiophene at 30 bars and 375{degrees}C was evaluated. The results obtained showed that oxidation of the carbon surface does not affect the HDS activity and other characteristics of the supported Mo phase. In contrast, the HDS activity of the Ni catalysts is enhanced by acid treatments of the carbon support. In this case, introduction of oxygen-containing functional groups (O{sub (s)}) leads to a strong interaction of O{sub (s)}-Ni during impregnation, which becomes essential to achieving and preserving high nickel dispersion. This effect on NiMo/C catalysts. The synergistic effect of the bimetallic catalysts is observed only when oxygen functional groups are present on the carbon surface, which are necessary for a good HDS activity, mainly because they enhance Ni-Mo interactions that produce the highly active Ni-Mo-S phase. A NiMoO{sub 4}-like phase formed during impregnation seems to be the precursor for the active sulfide phase over the present NiMo/C catalysts. 34 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Stabilizing and enhancing activity of Ag as a catalyst for oxygen redaction reaction on hydrogen fuel cell cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolbov, Sergey; Alcantara Ortigoza, Marisol

    2013-03-01

    Progress in searching for cost-effective and highly active catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on hydrogen fuel cell cathodes is hindered by the fact that only a few elements (expensive and scarce Pt, Ir, Au) do not dissolve in the reaction environment (acidic medium at the expected operating potential +0.8 to +1.0 V vs SHE). Yet, in this work, we explore silver as an active element for the ORR catalysts. Although the dissolution potential (DP) of elemental Ag is 0.8 V, we rely on our finding that binding of a metal monolayer (ML) to a reactive substrate can significantly increase its DP. Using our approach, we select Ag/Ru/W, Ag/Nb, and Ag/Ta as promising candidates for the ORR catalysts (where Ag and Ru are MLs). Our evaluation of DP within density functional theory (DFT) shows that, indeed, in the selected structures, DP of Ag significantly increases as compared to that of Ag(111) and, in the case of Ag/Nb, even exceeds that of Pt. The ORR free-energy diagrams calculated within DFT suggest that the above systems are more active toward ORR than Pt. We thus predict here three highly active and truly cost-effective ORR catalysts. This work was supported by NSF under Grant CBET-1249134

  16. Activity modulation of core and shell in nanozeolite@enzyme bi-functional catalyst for dynamic kinetic resolution.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Yan, Yueer; Wang, Wanlu; Zhang, Yahong; Tang, Yi

    2015-01-15

    A core-shell nanozeolite@enzyme bi-functional catalyst is prepared by using nanozeolite β as acidic core and immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) as enzyme shell for the purpose of dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR), and polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (PDDA) is used as interlayer to compart core and shell. The activities of core and shell in bi-functional catalyst are modulated to achieve the matching between racemization and kinetic resolution (KR) rates in DKR, i.e., a slow racemization rate on core while a fast KR rate on shell. Nanozeolite β with intermediate SiO2/Al2O3 ratio provides proper acid amount for racemization step. A relatively thick layer of PDDA not only improves the activity of CALB by its coverage for surface acidic sites but also limits the accessibility and diffusion of substrate towards the acidic core. The CALB shell with larger immobilized amount and higher enzyme activity offers enhanced driving force of DKR process, leading to higher conversion, selectivity and yield. The preparation and activity modulation of core-shell catalyst provide an ideal method to improve the catalytic performance of bi-functional catalyst.

  17. Impact of carbon on the surface and activity of silica-carbon supported copper catalysts for reduction of nitrogen oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spassova, I.; Stoeva, N.; Nickolov, R.; Atanasova, G.; Khristova, M.

    2016-04-01

    Composite catalysts, prepared by one or more active components supported on a support are of interest because of the possible interaction between the catalytic components and the support materials. The supports of combined hydrophilic-hydrophobic type may influence how these materials maintain an active phase and as a result a possible cooperation between active components and the support material could occur and affects the catalytic behavior. Silica-carbon nanocomposites were prepared by sol-gel, using different in specific surface areas and porous texture carbon materials. Catalysts were obtained after copper deposition on these composites. The nanocomposites and the catalysts were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, TG, XRD, TEM- HRTEM, H2-TPR, and XPS. The nature of the carbon predetermines the composite's texture. The IEPs of carbon materials and silica is a force of composites formation and determines the respective distribution of the silica and carbon components on the surface of the composites. Copper deposition over the investigated silica-carbon composites leads to formation of active phases in which copper is in different oxidation states. The reduction of NO with CO proceeds by different paths on different catalysts due to the textural differences of the composites, maintaining different surface composition and oxidation states of copper.

  18. Active low-valent niobium catalysts from NbCl5 and hydrosilanes for selective intermolecular cycloadditions.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Yasushi; Obora, Yasushi

    2011-10-21

    An active niobium catalyst was developed via a simple and nontoxic reduction method from NbCl(5)/hydrosilane and utilized for the selective [2 + 2 + 2] cycloaddition reaction of terminal alkynes and alkenes/α,ω-dienes, to give 1,3-cyclohexadiene derivatives in high yields with excellent chemo- and regioselectivity. PMID:21919436

  19. Combinatorial high-throughput screening for highly active Pd-Ir-Ce based ternary catalysts in electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Hyeon; Choi, Chang Hyuck; Koh, Jae Kang; Pak, Chanho; Jin, Seon-ah; Woo, Seong Ihl

    2013-11-11

    A combinatorial library having 66 different ternary compositions of Pd-Ir-Ce was prepared via the impregnation method to find the optimum ternary composition with the highest performance toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acid media. Its performance in ORR activity of the combinatorial array was evaluated through two different combinatorial high-throughput screening methods to gain validity: (1) multielectrode half-cell method and (2) optical screening method. From the combinatorial results, the spot at 79:12:9 for Pd-Ir-Ce (at. %) in the array showed the highest ORR activity. The electrochemical characterizations of the single catalyst demonstrates that the optimized Pd79Ir12Ce9/C catalyst shows 1.5 times the ORR activity compared to that of Pd/C catalyst at 0.85 V (vs. RHE). In the Pd-Ir-Ce based catalysts, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results reveal that Ir and Ce are present in the form of IrO2 and CeO2, respectively, and the electron configuration of Pd is effectively modified through the decoration with IrO2 and CeO2. From the results, we suggest that the electro-modification of Pd through strong metal-metal oxide interaction with IrO2-CeO2 was a reason for the enhanced ORR activity.

  20. Effects of plasmochemical treatments and cerium additions on the structural characteristics and activity of copper catalyst particles in isopropanol dehydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platonov, E. A.; Lobanov, N. N.; Galimova, N. A.; Protasova, I. A.; Yagodovskii, V. D.

    2012-08-01

    The effect of the treatment of the 5 wt % Cu/SiO2 (I) and (5 wt % Cu + 0.5 wt % Ce)/SiO2 (II) catalysts with glow discharge plasma in O2, H2, and Ar on their structural characteristics was studied by X-ray phase analysis; the influence of cerium additions and plasmochemical treatments on the catalyst activity in isopropanol dehydrogenation was also investigated. Under the plasmochemical treatment, the diameters of Cu particles in catalyst I nearly doubled and microstresses in the metal particles also changed. Catalyst II was X-ray amorphous both before and after plasmochemical treatments. The activity of I after plasmochemical treatment increased because of the increase in the number of centers and changes in their composition. Growth of the activity of I compared with the activity of II was explained by the formation of new catalytic centers due to positive charging of the Ce+α adatom on the surface of the copper particle.

  1. Methane conversion to aromatics on Mo/H-ZSM5: Structure of molybdenum species in working catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Weiping; Li, Senzi; Meitzner, George D.; Iglesia, Enrique

    2000-10-27

    The structure and density of Mo species in Mo/H-ZSM5 during catalytic CH4 reactions was investigated using in-situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), temperature-programmed oxidation after reaction, and the isotopic exchange of D2 with OH groups in H-ZSM5 before and after CH4 reactions. These methods reveal that CH4 reactions cause exchanged Mo2O52+ dimers, formed from physical mixtures of MoO3 and H-ZSM5, to reduce and carburize to form small (0.6-1 nm) MoCx clusters with the concurrent regeneration of the bridging OH groups that were initially replaced by Mo oxo dimers during exchange. In this manner, catalytically inactive Mo oxo species activate in contact with CH4 to form the two sites required for the conversion of CH4 to aromatics: MoCx for C-H bond activation and initial C-C bond formation and acid sites for oligomerization and cyclization of C2+ hydrocarbons to form stable aromatics. These MoCx clusters resist agglomeration during methane reactions at 950 K for > 10 h. The Bronsted acid sites formed during carburization and oligomerization of MoCx species ultimately become covered with hydrogen-deficient reaction intermediates (H/C{sup X} 0.2) or unreactive deposits. The highly dispersed nature of the MoCx clusters was confirmed by detailed simulations of the XAS radial structure function and by the low temperatures required for the complete oxidation of these MoCx species compared with bulk Mo2C. Initial CH4 reactions with MoOx precursors are stoichiometric and lead first to the removal of oxygen as CO, CO2, and H2O and to the introduction of carbidic carbons into the reduced structures. As carbidic carbon passivates the surface, C-H bond activation reactions become catalytic by the coupling of this activation step with the removal of the resulting CHx species to form C2 hydrocarbons, which desorb to re-form the MoCx sites required for C-H bond activation steps.

  2. Exceptional methanol electro-oxidation activity by bimetallic concave and dendritic Pt-Cu nanocrystals catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying-Xia; Zhou, Hui-Jing; Sun, Ping-Chuan; Chen, Tie-Hong

    2014-01-01

    PtCux (x = 1, 2 and 3) bimetallic nanocrystals with concave surface and dendritic morphology were prepared and used as electrocatalysts in methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. The bimetallic nanocrystals were synthesized via one-pot co-reduction of H2PtCl6 and Cu(acac)2 by oleylamine and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) in an autoclave at 180 °C. The concave dendritic bimetallic nanostructure consisted of a core rich in Cu and nanodendrites rich in Pt, which was formed via galvanic replacement of Cu by Pt. It was found that PVP played an important role in initiating, facilitating, and directing the replacement reaction. The electrochemical properties of the PtCux were characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry (CA). The concave dendritic PtCu2/C nanocrystals exhibited exceptionally high activity and strong poisoning resistance in MOR. At 0.75 V (vs. reversible hydrogen electrode, RHE) the mass activity and specific activity of PtCu2/C were 3.3 and 4.1 times higher than those of the commercial Pt/C catalysts, respectively. The enhanced catalytic activity could be attributed to the unique concave dendritic morphology of the bimetallic nanocrystals.

  3. A highly active and stable hydrogen evolution catalyst based on pyrite-structured cobalt phosphosulfide

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen; Hu, Enyuan; Jiang, Hong; Xiang, Yingjie; Weng, Zhe; Li, Min; Fan, Qi; Yu, Xiqian; Altman, Eric I.; Wang, Hailiang

    2016-01-01

    Rational design and controlled synthesis of hybrid structures comprising multiple components with distinctive functionalities are an intriguing and challenging approach to materials development for important energy applications like electrocatalytic hydrogen production, where there is a great need for cost effective, active and durable catalyst materials to replace the precious platinum. Here we report a structure design and sequential synthesis of a highly active and stable hydrogen evolution electrocatalyst material based on pyrite-structured cobalt phosphosulfide nanoparticles grown on carbon nanotubes. The three synthetic steps in turn render electrical conductivity, catalytic activity and stability to the material. The hybrid material exhibits superior activity for hydrogen evolution, achieving current densities of 10 mA cm−2 and 100 mA cm−2 at overpotentials of 48 mV and 109 mV, respectively. Phosphorus substitution is crucial for the chemical stability and catalytic durability of the material, the molecular origins of which are uncovered by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and computational simulation. PMID:26892437

  4. Activity and selectivity control by niobium for the preferential oxidation of co on pt supported catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, S.; Miller, J.T.; Wolf, E.E.

    2010-10-22

    The promotional effect of Nb on Pt supported on alumina or on niobia, was studied for the preferential oxidation of CO (PROX) in hydrogen. The results show a unique effect of Nb as a promoter to Pt. At low Nb loadings on Pt/alumina, the CO oxidation activity and selectivity are significantly increased. The CO selectivity is 100% at conversions up to about 60%. For Pt supported on Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}, however, the CO oxidation activity is strongly suppressed with low CO conversion but high H{sub 2} oxidation activity. Pt on niobia, therefore, is poorly selective for the PROX reaction, but is an active hydrogen oxidation catalyst, resistant to CO poisoning. For Pt supported on highly loaded Nb-alumina or Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}, XPS indicate an increase in the Pt and Nb oxidation states. These surface changes also correlate with changes in the DRIFTS spectra suggesting that CO is more weakly adsorbed on Pt/Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} compared to Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, or Pt/Nb-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  5. A highly active and stable hydrogen evolution catalyst based on pyrite-structured cobalt phosphosulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wen; Hu, Enyuan; Jiang, Hong; Xiang, Yingjie; Weng, Zhe; Li, Min; Fan, Qi; Yu, Xiqian; Altman, Eric I.; Wang, Hailiang

    2016-02-01

    Rational design and controlled synthesis of hybrid structures comprising multiple components with distinctive functionalities are an intriguing and challenging approach to materials development for important energy applications like electrocatalytic hydrogen production, where there is a great need for cost effective, active and durable catalyst materials to replace the precious platinum. Here we report a structure design and sequential synthesis of a highly active and stable hydrogen evolution electrocatalyst material based on pyrite-structured cobalt phosphosulfide nanoparticles grown on carbon nanotubes. The three synthetic steps in turn render electrical conductivity, catalytic activity and stability to the material. The hybrid material exhibits superior activity for hydrogen evolution, achieving current densities of 10 mA cm-2 and 100 mA cm-2 at overpotentials of 48 mV and 109 mV, respectively. Phosphorus substitution is crucial for the chemical stability and catalytic durability of the material, the molecular origins of which are uncovered by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and computational simulation.

  6. A highly-active and stable hydrogen evolution catalyst based on pyrite-structured cobalt phosphosulfide

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Wen; Hu, Enyuan; Jiang, Hong; Xiang, Yingjie; Weng, Zhe; Li, Min; Fan, Qi; Yu, Xiqian; Altman, Eric I.; Wang, Hailiang

    2016-02-19

    Rational design and controlled synthesis of hybrid structures comprising multiple components with distinctive functionalities are an intriguing and challenging approach to materials development for important energy applications like electrocatalytic hydrogen production, where there is a great need for cost effective, active and durable catalyst materials to replace the precious platinum. Here we report a structure design and sequential synthesis of a highly active and stable hydrogen evolution electrocatalyst material based on pyrite-structured cobalt phosphosulfide nanoparticles grown on carbon nanotubes. The three synthetic steps in turn render electrical conductivity, catalytic activity and stability to the material. The hybrid material exhibits superiormore » activity for hydrogen evolution, achieving current densities of 10 mA cm–2 and 100 mA cm–2 at overpotentials of 48 mV and 109 mV, respectively. Lastly, phosphorus substitution is crucial for the chemical stability and catalytic durability of the material, the molecular origins of which are uncovered by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and computational simulation.« less

  7. Structure and Activity of Pt-Ni Catalysts Supported on Modified Al2O3 for Ethanol Steam Reforming.

    PubMed

    Navarro, R M; Sanchez-Sanchez, M C; Fierro, J L G

    2015-09-01

    Modification of alumina with La-, Ce-, Zr- and Mg-oxides was studied with the aim to use them as supports of bimetallic Pt-Ni catalysts for the steam reforming of ethanol. Activity results showed that modifications of Al2O3 support with the incorporation of La, Ce, Zr or Mg oxides play an essential role in the catalytic behaviour of PtNi catalysts. Bimetallic PtNi catalyst supported on bare Al2O3 showed evolution of the reaction products with time on stream consisting in the increase of C2H4 production with concomitant decrease of CH4 and CO2 production. The addition of Mg or Zr to γ-A1203 did not inhibit the appearance of ethylene but delayed its production. In the case of Ce- or La-supported catalysts, the product selectivities were stable with time-on-stream, with no changes being observed in the product distribution for 24 h. Characterization results showed that La- and Ce-containing supports improves the Pt and Ni metal exposure values. The better stability achieved for Ce and La containing catalysts was inferred to be related with a participation/assistance of lanthanum and cerium entities in the gasification of coke deposits together with a modification of Pt and Ni dispersion which lower the probability of the nucleation of coke precursors on their surfaces. PMID:26716216

  8. Production of biodiesel fuel from canola oil with dimethyl carbonate using an active sodium methoxide catalyst prepared by crystallization.

    PubMed

    Kai, Takami; Mak, Goon Lum; Wada, Shohei; Nakazato, Tsutomu; Takanashi, Hirokazu; Uemura, Yoshimitsu

    2014-07-01

    In this study, a novel method for the production of biodiesel under mild conditions using fine particles of sodium methoxide formed in dimethyl carbonate (DMC) is proposed. Biodiesel is generally produced from vegetable oils by the transesterification of triglycerides with methanol. However, this reaction produces glycerol as a byproduct, and raw materials are not effectively utilized. Transesterification with DMC has recently been studied because glycerol is not formed in the process. Although solid-state sodium methoxide has been reported to be inactive for this reaction, the catalytic activity dramatically increased with the preparation of fine catalyst powders by crystallization. The transesterification of canola oil with DMC was studied using this catalyst for the preparation of biodiesel. A conversion greater than 96% was obtained at 65°C for 2h with a 3:1M ratio of DMC and oil and 2.0 wt% catalyst. PMID:24813567

  9. Production of biodiesel fuel from canola oil with dimethyl carbonate using an active sodium methoxide catalyst prepared by crystallization.

    PubMed

    Kai, Takami; Mak, Goon Lum; Wada, Shohei; Nakazato, Tsutomu; Takanashi, Hirokazu; Uemura, Yoshimitsu

    2014-07-01

    In this study, a novel method for the production of biodiesel under mild conditions using fine particles of sodium methoxide formed in dimethyl carbonate (DMC) is proposed. Biodiesel is generally produced from vegetable oils by the transesterification of triglycerides with methanol. However, this reaction produces glycerol as a byproduct, and raw materials are not effectively utilized. Transesterification with DMC has recently been studied because glycerol is not formed in the process. Although solid-state sodium methoxide has been reported to be inactive for this reaction, the catalytic activity dramatically increased with the preparation of fine catalyst powders by crystallization. The transesterification of canola oil with DMC was studied using this catalyst for the preparation of biodiesel. A conversion greater than 96% was obtained at 65°C for 2h with a 3:1M ratio of DMC and oil and 2.0 wt% catalyst.

  10. Effect of a catalyst on the kinetics of reduction of celestite (SrSO{sub 4}) by active charcoal

    SciTech Connect

    Sonawane, R.S.; Kale, B.B.; Apte, S.K.; Dongare, M.K.

    2000-02-01

    Reduction of celestite (SrSO{sub 4}) powder with particles of active charcoal has been studied extensively in the absence and presence of catalysts. The optimum temperature at the charging zone has been optimized to get a maximum water-soluble strontium sulfide value. The strontium value has been analyzed using a chemical method, which was verified by the instrumental method using an inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrophotometer (ICP-OES). The conversion-time data have been analyzed by using a modified volume-reaction (MVR) model, and the effect of the catalyst on kinetic parameters has been elucidated. It was found that potassium carbonate, potassium dichromate, sodium carbonate, and sodium dichromate catalysts were found to enhance the reaction rate quite satisfactorily in the reduction of the celestite (SrSO{sub 4}).

  11. Volatile species in halide-activated-diffusion coating packs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bianco, Robert; Rapp, Robert A.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1992-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure sampling mass spectrometer was used to identify the vapor species generated in a halide-activated cementation pack. Pack powder mixtures containing a Cr-Al binary masteralloy powder, an NH4Cl activator salt, and either ZrO2 or Y2O3 (or neither) were analyzed at 1000 C. Both the equilibrium calculations for the pack and mass spectrometer results indicated that volatile AlCl(x) and CrCl(y) species were generated by the pack powder mixture; in packs containing the reactive element oxide, volatile ZrCl(z) and YCl(w) species were formed by the conversion of their oxide sources.

  12. Ti or Sn doping as a way to increase activity and sulfur tolerance of Mn/CeO2 catalyst for low temperature NH3 selective catalytic reduction of NO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yan; Tang, Changjin; Dong, Lin

    2015-04-01

    Mn/CeO2 catalysts modified by doping of Ti or Sn were investigated for low temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by NH3 with the aim of studying the effects of Ti, Sn doping on the catalytic performance. Ceria-based solid solutions (Ce0.8Ti0.2O2 and Ce0.8Sn0.2O2) were synthesized via inverse co-precipitation, and used as supports to prepare MnOx/Ce0.8M0.2O2 (M =Ti4+, Sn4+) catalysts through wetness impregnation method. The results showed that doping of Ti or Sn to the CeO2 support increase the NO removal efficiency. A NO conversion of more than 90 % was obtained over the Mn/CeTi catalyst at the temperature window of 175 ~ 300 °C under a gas hourly space velocity (GHSV) of 60,000 mL•g-1•h-1. Catalysts modified by Ti and Sn were also found to obtain higher SO2 resistance than Mn/CeO2 catalyst. More than 90% NO conversion and 95% N2 selectivity could be provided by Mn/CeTi catalyst in the presence of 100 ppm SO2 at 250 °C for 10 h. A series of characterization techniques, namely XRD, BET, H2-TPR, XPS, NH3-TPD and in situ DRIFTS were used to elucidate the structure and surface properties of the obtained supports and catalysts. The results indicate that doping of Ti or Sn brings about catalysts with favorable properties such as higher BET surface area, better oxygen storage capacity and stronger surface acidity. The relative amount of Mn4+, Ce3+, adsorbed oxygen species and oxygen vacancies on the surface of catalysts are in the order of Mn/CeTi>Mn/CeSn>Mn/CeO2, which is thought to make positive a contribution to the low-temperature SCR activity. The promoted SCR activity is considered as well to be related to the dual redox cycles in Mn/CeTi (Mn4+ + Ce3+ ↔ Mn3+ + Ce4+, Ce4+ + Ti3+ ↔ Ce3+ + Ti4+) and Mn/CeSn (Mn4+ + Ce3+ ↔ Mn3+ + Ce4+, Ce4+ + Sn2+ ↔ Ce3+ + Sn4+ ) catalysts.

  13. PEMFC catalyst layers: the role of micropores and mesopores on water sorption and fuel cell activity.

    PubMed

    Soboleva, Tatyana; Malek, Kourosh; Xie, Zhong; Navessin, Titichai; Holdcroft, Steven

    2011-06-01

    The effects of carbon microstructure and ionomer loading on water vapor sorption and retention in catalyst layers (CLs) of PEM fuel cells are investigated using dynamic vapor sorption. Catalyst layers based on Ketjen Black and Vulcan XC-72 carbon blacks, which possess distinctly different surface areas, pore volumes, and microporosities, are studied. It is found that pores <20 nm diameter facilitate water uptake by capillary condensation in the intermediate range of relative humidities. A broad pore size distribution (PSD) is found to enhance water retention in Ketjen Black-based CLs whereas the narrower mesoporous PSD of Vulcan CLs is shown to have an enhanced water repelling action. Water vapor sorption and retention properties of CLs are correlated to electrochemical properties and fuel cell performance. Water sorption enhances electrochemical properties such as the electrochemically active surface area (ESA), double layer capacitance and proton conductivity, particularly when the ionomer content is very low. The hydrophilic properties of a CL on the anode and the cathode are adjusted by choosing the PSD of carbon and the ionomer content. It is shown that a reduction of ionomer content on either cathode or anode of an MEA does not necessarily have a significant detrimental effect on the MEA performance compared to the standard 30 wt % ionomer MEA. Under operation in air and high relative humidity, a cathode with a narrow pore size distribution and low ionomer content is shown to be beneficial due to its low water retention properties. In dry operating conditions, adequate ionomer content on the cathode is crucial, whereas it can be reduced on the anode without a significant impact on fuel cell performance.

  14. Increasing FCC regenerator catalyst level

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, R.F. )

    1993-11-01

    A Peruvian FCC unit's operations were improved by increasing the regenerator's catalyst level. This increase resulted in lower stack losses, an improved temperature profile, increased catalyst activity and a lower catalyst consumption rate. A more stable operation saved this Peruvian refiner over $131,000 per year in catalyst alone. These concepts and data may be suitable for your FCC unit as well.

  15. Searching for active binary rutile oxide catalyst for water splitting from first principles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Fang, Ya-Hui; Liu, Zhi-Pan

    2012-12-28

    Water electrolysis is an important route to large-scale hydrogen production using renewable energy, in which the oxygen evolution reaction (OER: 2H(2)O → O(2) + 4H(+) + 4e(-)) causes the largest energy loss in traditional electrocatalysts involving Ru-Ir mixed oxides. Following our previous mechanistic studies on the OER on RuO(2)(110) (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2010, 132, 18214), this work aims to provide further insight into the key parameters relevant to the activity of OER catalysts by investigating a group of rutile-type binary metal oxides, including RuNiO(2), RuCoO(2), RuRhO(2), RuIrO(2) and OsIrO(2). Two key aspects are focused on, namely the surface O coverage at the relevant potential conditions and the kinetics of H(2)O activation on the O-covered surfaces. The O coverage for all the oxides investigated here is found to be 1 ML at the concerned potential (1.23 V) with all the exposed metal cations being covered by terminal O atoms. The calculated free energy barrier for the H(2)O dissociation on the O covered surfaces varies significantly on different surfaces. The highest OER activity occurs at RuCoO(2) and RuNiO(2) oxides with a predicted activity about 500 times higher than pure RuO(2). On these oxides, the surface bridging O near the terminal O atom has a high activity for accepting the H during H(2)O splitting. It is concluded that while the differential adsorption energy of the terminal O atom influences the OER activity to the largest extent, the OER activity can still be tuned by modifying the electronic structure of surface bridging O.

  16. Ultrasound enhanced heterogeneous activation of peroxymonosulfate by a bimetallic Fe-Co/SBA-15 catalyst for the degradation of Orange II in water.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chun; Zhang, Hui; Zhong, Xing; Hou, Liwei

    2015-01-01

    Mesoporous silica SBA-15 supported iron and cobalt (Fe-Co/SBA-15) was prepared and used as catalyst in the ultrasound (US) enhanced heterogeneous activation of peroxymonosulfate (PMS, HSO5(-)) process. The effects of some important reaction parameters on the removal of Orange II by US/Fe-Co/SBA-15/PMS process were investigated. The results indicated that the removal rate of Orange II was not significantly affected by the initial pH, and it increased with the higher PMS concentration, reaction temperature, Fe-Co/SBA-15 dosage and ultrasonic power. Furthermore, sulfate radicals (SO4(-)) were assumed to be the dominating reactive species for the Orange II decolorization. Moreover, the Fe-Co/SBA-15 catalyst showed high activity during the repeated experiments. The intermediate products were identified by GC-MS, thereby a plausible degradation pathway is proposed. In addition, the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies at 2 and 24h were 56.8% and 80.1%, respectively and the corresponding total organic carbon (TOC) removal efficiencies were 33.8 and 53.3%. Finally, toxicity tests with activated sludge showed that the toxicity of the solution increased during the first stage and then decreased significantly with the progress of the oxidation. PMID:25262480

  17. New catalysts active for the mild oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Laperdrix, E.; Costentin, G.; Guyen, N.N.; Saur, O.; Lavalley, J.C.

    1999-10-25

    Nickel iron phosphates were studied for the selective oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfur. Nickel iron phosphate and Fe/Cr samples were more active than simple iron, chromium, and mixed iron-chromium oxides, which has been previously studied. Nickel iron phosphate catalyst prepared by solid-solid method with, consequently, a very low specific surface area was intrinsically active and selective to sulfur (conversion 17%, S{sub n} selectivity 97%); no rapid deactivation was observed. Even though higher specific surface area samples, prepared according to a solution method at various calcination temperatures, showed better performance (conversion 76%, S{sub n}selectivity {gt}90%), the specific activity depended on the crystallinity of the samples. The reaction is apparently structure sensitive. The structure of the catalytic material must facilitate electronic exchange, evidence by Moessbauer characterization. The establishment of the mixed valency Fe{sub 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} under catalytic feed was shown to be an essential factor in this reaction.

  18. Pd-embedded graphene: An efficient and highly active catalyst for oxidation of CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Nematollahi, Parisa; Nurazar, Roghaye

    2016-04-01

    Despite numerous efforts performed on the elimination of toxic gases from the air, the oxidation of carbon monoxide (CO) with metal-embedded nanostructures still remains a challenge. The geometry, electronic structure and catalytic properties of Pd-doped graphene (Pd-graphene) are investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The large atomic radius of Pd dopant in graphene can induce the local surface curvature and modulate the electronic structure of the sheet through the charge redistribution effects. Also, Pd-graphene can facilitate the O2 adsorption. Therefore, the catalytic activity of the Pd-graphene for CO oxidation reaction is enhanced. Moreover, the complete CO oxidation reactions on the Pd-graphene include a two-step process of the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) reaction, in which the first step is almost barrier-less (Eact = 0.002 eV) and the second step exhibits an energy barrier of 0.2 eV. The results indicate that the surface activity of graphene-based materials can be drastically improved by introducing the Pd dopants, so Pd-graphene can be a clue for fabricating graphene-based catalysts with high activity toward the oxidation of CO molecule.

  19. Microwave enhanced alcoholysis of non-edible (algal, jatropha and pongamia) oils using chemically activated egg shell derived CaO as heterogeneous catalyst.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Girdhar; Rawat, Devendra S; Sharma, Amit Kumar; Pandey, Jitendra K

    2016-11-01

    Microwave enhanced fast and efficient alcoholysis (methanolysis and ethanolysis) of non-edible oils (algal, jatropha and pongamia) is achieved using chemically activated waste egg shell derived CaO (i.e. CaO(cesp)) as heterogeneous catalyst. CaO(cesp) was extracted from waste chicken egg shell and further activated chemically by supporting transition metal oxide. The maximum conversion was achieved using 3wt% catalysts under 700W microwave irradiation and 10:1 alcohol/oil ratio in 6min. Alcoholysis using ZnO activated CaO(cesp) catalyst has shown higher reaction yields in comparison to other modified catalysts. Methanolysis has shown better biodiesel conversion in comparison to ethanolysis. The catalyst has shown longer lifetime and sustained activity after being used for four cycles. Due to more saturated fatty acid content; algal biodiesel has shown improved fuel properties in comparison to other biodiesels. PMID:27521785

  20. Microwave enhanced alcoholysis of non-edible (algal, jatropha and pongamia) oils using chemically activated egg shell derived CaO as heterogeneous catalyst.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Girdhar; Rawat, Devendra S; Sharma, Amit Kumar; Pandey, Jitendra K

    2016-11-01

    Microwave enhanced fast and efficient alcoholysis (methanolysis and ethanolysis) of non-edible oils (algal, jatropha and pongamia) is achieved using chemically activated waste egg shell derived CaO (i.e. CaO(cesp)) as heterogeneous catalyst. CaO(cesp) was extracted from waste chicken egg shell and further activated chemically by supporting transition metal oxide. The maximum conversion was achieved using 3wt% catalysts under 700W microwave irradiation and 10:1 alcohol/oil ratio in 6min. Alcoholysis using ZnO activated CaO(cesp) catalyst has shown higher reaction yields in comparison to other modified catalysts. Methanolysis has shown better biodiesel conversion in comparison to ethanolysis. The catalyst has shown longer lifetime and sustained activity after being used for four cycles. Due to more saturated fatty acid content; algal biodiesel has shown improved fuel properties in comparison to other biodiesels.

  1. Activity, stability and deactivation behavior of Au/CeO 2 catalysts in the water gas shift reaction at increased reaction temperature (300 °C)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El-Moemen, A.; Karpenko, A.; Denkwitz, Y.; Behm, R. J.

    The effect of increasing the reaction temperature to 300 °C on the activity, stability and deactivation behavior of a 4.5 wt.% Au/CeO 2 catalyst in the water gas shift (WGS) reaction in idealized reformate was studied by kinetic and spectroscopic measurements at 300 °C and comparison with previously reported data for reaction at 180 °C under similar reaction conditions [A. Karpenko, Y. Denkwitz, V. Plzak, J. Cai, R. Leppelt, B. Schumacher, R.J. Behm, Catal. Lett. 116 (2007) 105]. Different procedures for catalyst pretreatment were used, including annealing at 400 °C in oxidative, reductive or inert atmospheres as well as redox processing. The formation/removal of stable adsorbed reaction intermediates and side products (surface carbonates, formates, OH ad, CO ad) was followed by in situ IR spectroscopy (DRIFTS), the presence of differently oxidized surface species (Au 0, Au 0‧, Au 3+, Ce 3+) was evaluated by XPS. The reaction characteristics at 300 °C generally resemble those at 180 °C, including (i) significantly higher reaction rates, (ii) comparable apparent activation energies (44 ± 1/50 ± 1 kJ mol -1 vs. 40 ± 1 kJ mol -1 at 180 °C), (iii) a correlation between deactivation of the catalyst and the build-up of stable surface carbonates, and (iv) a decrease of the initially significant differences in activity after different pretreatment procedures with reaction time. Different than expected, the tendency for deactivation did not decrease with higher temperature, due to enhanced carbonate decomposition, but increases.

  2. Elucidating the mechanism and active site of the cyclohexanol dehydrogenation on copper-based catalysts: A density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ziyun; Liu, Xinyi; Rooney, D. W.; Hu, P.

    2015-10-01

    The dehydrogenation of cyclohexanol to cyclohexanone is very important in the manufacture of nylon. Copper-based catalysts are the most popular catalysts for this reaction, and on these catalysts the reaction mechanism and active site are in debate. In order to elucidate the mechanism and active site of the cyclohexanol dehydrogenation on copper-based catalysts, density functional theory with dispersion corrections were performed on up to six facets of copper in two different oxidation states: monovalent copper and metallic copper. By calculating the surface energies of these facets, Cu(111) and Cu2O(111) were found to be the most stable facets for metallic copper and for monovalent copper, respectively. On these two facets, all the possible elementary steps in the dehydrogenation pathway of cyclohexanol were calculated, including the adsorption, dehydrogenation, hydrogen coupling and desorption. Two different reaction pathways for dehydrogenation were considered on both surfaces. It was revealed that the dehydrogenation mechanisms are different on these two surfaces: on Cu(111) the hydrogen belonging to the hydroxyl is removed first, then the hydrogen belonging to the carbon is subtracted, while on Cu2O(111) the hydrogen belonging to the carbon is removed followed by the subtraction of the hydrogen in the hydroxyl group. Furthermore, by comparing the energy profiles of these two surfaces, Cu2O(111) was found to be more active for cyclohexanol dehydrogenation than Cu(111). In addition, we found that the coordinatively unsaturated copper sites on Cu2O(111) are the reaction sites for all the steps. Therefore, the coordinatively unsaturated copper site on Cu2O(111) is likely to be the active site for cyclohexanol dehydrogenation on the copper-based catalysts.

  3. Highly active and durable core-corona structured bifunctional catalyst for rechargeable metal-air battery application.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhu; Yu, Aiping; Higgins, Drew; Li, Hui; Wang, Haijiang; Chen, Zhongwei

    2012-04-11

    A new class of core-corona structured bifunctional catalyst (CCBC) consisting of lanthanum nickelate centers supporting nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (NCNT) has been developed for rechargeable metal-air battery application. The nanostructured design of the catalyst allows the core and corona to catalyze the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), respectively. These materials displayed exemplary OER and ORR activity through half-cell testing, comparable to state of the art commercial lanthanum nickelate (LaNiO(3)) and carbon-supported platinum (Pt/C), with added bifunctional capabilities allowing metal-air battery rechargeability. LaNiO(3) and Pt/C are currently the most accepted benchmark electrocatalyst materials for the OER and ORR, respectively; thus with comparable activity toward both of these reactions, CCBC are presented as a novel, inexpensive catalyst component for the cathode of rechargeable metal-air batteries. Moreover, after full-range degradation testing (FDT) CCBC retained excellent activity, retaining 3 and 13 times greater ORR and OER current upon comparison to state of the art Pt/C. Zinc-air battery performances of CCBC is in good agreement with the half-cell experiments with this bifunctional electrocatalyst displaying high activity and stability during battery discharge, charge, and cycling processes. Owing to its outstanding performance toward both the OER and ORR, comparable with the highest performing commercial catalysts to date for each of the respective reaction, coupled with high stability and rechargeability, CCBC is presented as a novel class of bifunctional catalyst material that is very applicable to future generation rechargeable metal-air batteries.

  4. Highly active and durable core-corona structured bifunctional catalyst for rechargeable metal-air battery application.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhu; Yu, Aiping; Higgins, Drew; Li, Hui; Wang, Haijiang; Chen, Zhongwei

    2012-04-11

    A new class of core-corona structured bifunctional catalyst (CCBC) consisting of lanthanum nickelate centers supporting nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (NCNT) has been developed for rechargeable metal-air battery application. The nanostructured design of the catalyst allows the core and corona to catalyze the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), respectively. These materials displayed exemplary OER and ORR activity through half-cell testing, comparable to state of the art commercial lanthanum nickelate (LaNiO(3)) and carbon-supported platinum (Pt/C), with added bifunctional capabilities allowing metal-air battery rechargeability. LaNiO(3) and Pt/C are currently the most accepted benchmark electrocatalyst materials for the OER and ORR, respectively; thus with comparable activity toward both of these reactions, CCBC are presented as a novel, inexpensive catalyst component for the cathode of rechargeable metal-air batteries. Moreover, after full-range degradation testing (FDT) CCBC retained excellent activity, retaining 3 and 13 times greater ORR and OER current upon comparison to state of the art Pt/C. Zinc-air battery performances of CCBC is in good agreement with the half-cell experiments with this bifunctional electrocatalyst displaying high activity and stability during battery discharge, charge, and cycling processes. Owing to its outstanding performance toward both the OER and ORR, comparable with the highest performing commercial catalysts to date for each of the respective reaction, coupled with high stability and rechargeability, CCBC is presented as a novel class of bifunctional catalyst material that is very applicable to future generation rechargeable metal-air batteries. PMID:22372510

  5. In situ oxidation of carbon-encapsulated cobalt nanocapsules creates highly active cobalt oxide catalysts for hydrocarbon combustion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Han; Chen, Chunlin; Zhang, Yexin; Peng, Lixia; Ma, Song; Yang, Teng; Guo, Huaihong; Zhang, Zhidong; Su, Dang Sheng; Zhang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Combustion catalysts have been extensively explored to reduce the emission of hydrocarbons that are capable of triggering photochemical smog and greenhouse effect. Palladium as the most active material is widely applied in exhaust catalytic converter and combustion units, but its high capital cost stimulates the tremendous research on non-noble metal candidates. Here we fabricate highly defective cobalt oxide nanocrystals via a controllable oxidation of carbon-encapsulated cobalt nanoparticles. Strain gradients induced in the nanoconfined carbon shell result in the formation of a large number of active sites featuring a considerable catalytic activity for the combustion of a variety of hydrocarbons (methane, propane and substituted benzenes). For methane combustion, the catalyst displays a unique activity being comparable or even superior to the palladium ones. PMID:26074206

  6. In situ oxidation of carbon-encapsulated cobalt nanocapsules creates highly active cobalt oxide catalysts for hydrocarbon combustion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Chen, Chunlin; Zhang, Yexin; Peng, Lixia; Ma, Song; Yang, Teng; Guo, Huaihong; Zhang, Zhidong; Su, Dang Sheng; Zhang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Combustion catalysts have been extensively explored to reduce the emission of hydrocarbons that are capable of triggering photochemical smog and greenhouse effect. Palladium as the most active material is widely applied in exhaust catalytic converter and combustion units, but its high capital cost stimulates the tremendous research on non-noble metal candidates. Here we fabricate highly defective cobalt oxide nanocrystals via a controllable oxidation of carbon-encapsulated cobalt nanoparticles. Strain gradients induced in the nanoconfined carbon shell result in the formation of a large number of active sites featuring a considerable catalytic activity for the combustion of a variety of hydrocarbons (methane, propane and substituted benzenes). For methane combustion, the catalyst displays a unique activity being comparable or even superior to the palladium ones.

  7. In situ oxidation of carbon-encapsulated cobalt nanocapsules creates highly active cobalt oxide catalysts for hydrocarbon combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Han; Chen, Chunlin; Zhang, Yexin; Peng, Lixia; Ma, Song; Yang, Teng; Guo, Huaihong; Zhang, Zhidong; Su, Dang Sheng; Zhang, Jian

    2015-06-01

    Combustion catalysts have been extensively explored to reduce the emission of hydrocarbons that are capable of triggering photochemical smog and greenhouse effect. Palladium as the most active material is widely applied in exhaust catalytic converter and combustion units, but its high capital cost stimulates the tremendous research on non-noble metal candidates. Here we fabricate highly defective cobalt oxide nanocrystals via a controllable oxidation of carbon-encapsulated cobalt nanoparticles. Strain gradients induced in the nanoconfined carbon shell result in the formation of a large number of active sites featuring a considerable catalytic activity for the combustion of a variety of hydrocarbons (methane, propane and substituted benzenes). For methane combustion, the catalyst displays a unique activity being comparable or even superior to the palladium ones.

  8. In situ oxidation of carbon-encapsulated cobalt nanocapsules creates highly active cobalt oxide catalysts for hydrocarbon combustion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Chen, Chunlin; Zhang, Yexin; Peng, Lixia; Ma, Song; Yang, Teng; Guo, Huaihong; Zhang, Zhidong; Su, Dang Sheng; Zhang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Combustion catalysts have been extensively explored to reduce the emission of hydrocarbons that are capable of triggering photochemical smog and greenhouse effect. Palladium as the most active material is widely applied in exhaust catalytic converter and combustion units, but its high capital cost stimulates the tremendous research on non-noble metal candidates. Here we fabricate highly defective cobalt oxide nanocrystals via a controllable oxidation of carbon-encapsulated cobalt nanoparticles. Strain gradients induced in the nanoconfined carbon shell result in the formation of a large number of active sites featuring a considerable catalytic activity for the combustion of a variety of hydrocarbons (methane, propane and substituted benzenes). For methane combustion, the catalyst displays a unique activity being comparable or even superior to the palladium ones. PMID:26074206

  9. Assessment of the ethanol oxidation activity and durability of Pt catalysts with or without a carbon support using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Farhana S.; Easton, E. Bradley

    2014-01-01

    We compared the stability and performance of 3 commercially available Johnson Matthey catalysts with various Pt loadings (20, 40 and 100%) using two different accelerated durability testing (ADT) protocols. The various Pt-loaded catalysts were tested by means of a series of intermittent life tests (1, 200, 400, 1000, 2000, 3000 and 4000 cycles). The electrochemical surface area (ECSA) loss of electrode was investigated by electrochemical technique (CV). The use of EIS as an accelerated-testing protocol distinctly elucidates the extent of degradation of Johnson Matthey catalysts with various Pt loading. Using EIS, it was possible to show that Pt-black catalyst layers suffer from increased electronic resistance over the course of ADT which is not observed when a corrosion stable carbon support is present. The effect of Pt loading was further elucidated by comparing the electrocatalytic activity of the catalyst layers towards ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR). The catalyst layer with the lowest Pt loading showed the enhanced EOR performance.

  10. Particle size distribution and morphological changes in activated carbon-metal oxide hybrid catalysts prepared under different heating conditions.

    PubMed

    Barroso-Bogeat, A; Alexandre-Franco, M; Fernández-González, C; Gómez-Serrano, V

    2016-03-01

    In catalysis processes, activated carbon (AC) and metal oxides (MOs) are widely used either as catalysts or as catalyst supports because of their unique properties. A combination of AC and a MO in a single hybrid material entails changes not only in the composition, microstructure and texture but also in the morphology, which may largely influence the catalytic behaviour of the resulting product. This work is aimed at investigating the modifications in the morphology and particle size distribution (PSD) for AC-MO hybrid catalysts as a result of their preparation under markedly different heating conditions. From a commercial AC and six MO (Al2O3, Fe2O3, ZnO, SnO2, TiO2 and WO3) precursors, two series of such catalysts are prepared by wet impregnation, oven-drying at 120 ºC, and subsequent heat treatment at 200 ºC or 850 ºC in inert atmosphere. The resulting samples are characterized in terms of their morphology and PSD by scanning electron microscopy and ImageJ processing program. Obtained results indicate that the morphology, PSD and degree of dispersion of the supported catalysts are strongly dependent both on the MO precursor and the heat treatment temperature. With the temperature rise, trends are towards the improvement of crystallinity, the broadening of the PSD and the increase in the average particle size, thus suggesting the involvement of sintering mechanisms. Such effects are more pronounced for the Fe, Sn and W catalysts due to the reduction of the corresponding MOs by AC during the heat treatment at 850 ºC.

  11. A novel Pt-Co alloy hydrogen anode catalyst with superlative activity, CO-tolerance and robustness.

    PubMed

    Shi, G Y; Yano, H; Tryk, D A; Watanabe, M; Iiyama, A; Uchida, H

    2016-08-01

    PtCo nanoparticles, having two atomic layers of stabilized Pt skin, supported on carbon black (Pt2AL-PtCo/C), exhibited superlative mass activity for the CO-tolerant hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR), together with high robustness with respect to air exposure, as a novel anode catalyst in reformate gas-based polymer electrolyte fuel cells. The high area-specific HOR activity and CO tolerance are consistent with DFT calculations. PMID:26952735

  12. Copper-homoscorpionate complexes as active catalysts for atom transfer radical addition to olefins.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Molina, José María; Caballero, Ana; Díaz-Requejo, M Mar; Trofimenko, Swiatoslaw; Belderraín, Tomas R; Pérez, Pedro J

    2007-09-17

    Cu(I) complexes containing trispyrazolylborate ligands efficiently catalyze the atom transfer radical addition (ATRA) of polyhalogenated alkanes to various olefins under mild conditions. The catalytic activity is enhanced when bulky and electron donating Tpx ligands are employed. Kinetic data have allowed the proposal of a mechanistic interpretation that includes a Cu(II) pentacoordinated species that regulates the catalytic cycle.

  13. Amorphous molybdenum sulfides as hydrogen evolution catalysts.

    PubMed

    Morales-Guio, Carlos G; Hu, Xile

    2014-08-19

    Providing energy for a population projected to reach 9 billion people within the middle of this century is one of the most pressing societal issues. Burning fossil fuels at a rate and scale that satisfy our near-term demand will irreversibly damage the living environment. Among the various sources of alternative and CO2-emission-free energies, the sun is the only source that is capable of providing enough energy for the whole world. Sunlight energy, however, is intermittent and requires an efficient storage mechanism. Sunlight-driven water splitting to make hydrogen is widely considered as one of the most attractive methods for solar energy storage. Water splitting needs a hydrogen evolution catalyst to accelerate the rate of hydrogen production and to lower the energy loss in this process. Precious metals such as Pt are superior catalysts, but they are too expensive and scarce for large-scale applications. In this Account, we summarize our recent research on the preparation, characterization, and application of amorphous molybdenum sulfide catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction. The catalysts can be synthesized by electrochemical deposition under ambient conditions from readily available and inexpensive precursors. The catalytic activity is among the highest for nonprecious catalysts. For example, at a loading of 0.2 mg/cm(2), the optimal catalyst delivers a current density of 10 mA/cm(2) at an overpotential of 160 mV. The growth mechanism of the electrochemically deposited film catalysts was revealed by an electrochemical quartz microcrystal balance study. While different electrochemical deposition methods produce films with different initial compositions, the active catalysts are the same and are identified as a "MoS(2+x)" species. The activity of the film catalysts can be further promoted by divalent Fe, Co, and Ni ions, and the origins of the promotional effects have been probed. Highly active amorphous molybdenum sulfide particles can also be prepared

  14. Comparison of cytotoxic activities of extracts from Selaginella species

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Lei, Xiang; Chen, Ke-li

    2014-01-01

    Background: Selaginella species are resurrection plants, which are known, possess various molecular bioactivities depending on species, but only a few species have been detailed observe in the advanced research. Objective: The objective of the following study is to compare the chemical profiles of different species of Selaginella and to investigate cytotoxicity and induction of apoptosis activities of some species of Selaginella. Materials and Methods: The high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was developed for chemical analysis. Ethyl acetate, ethanol and water-soluble extracts from seven Selaginella species were submitted to 3-(4,5-dimenthyl thizol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay, flow cytometry, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) laddering analysis and caspase-3 expression using Bel-7402, HT-29 and HeLa cells. Results: The HPLC analysis revealed two major common peaks, which were identified as amentoflavone and robustaflavone and another three main peaks in their chromatograms. The results showed that S. labordei, Selaginella tamariscina and Selaginella uncinata had relatively stronger activities on Bel-7402 and HeLa cells and Selaginella moellendorfii had moderate antiproliferation activities, but Selaginella remotifolia and Selaginella pulvinata had almost no inhibitory activities. The main active components were in the ethyl acetate extracts which had abundant biflavonoids. The effects of these extracts on cell proliferation and apoptosis in different cells were not the same, they were more apparent on HeLa cells than on HT-29 cells. The assay of DNA laddering analysis and caspase-3 expression further confirmed that inducing cell apoptosis was one of antitumor mechanisms and antitumor activities of Selaginella species were related to apoptosis induced by caspase family. Conclusion: S. labordei, S. tamariscina and S. uncinata would be potential antitumor agents. PMID:25422557

  15. Boron-doped graphene as promising support for platinum catalyst with superior activity towards the methanol electrooxidation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yongrong; Du, Chunyu; An, Meichen; Du, Lei; Tan, Qiang; Liu, Chuntao; Gao, Yunzhi; Yin, Geping

    2015-12-01

    We report the synthesis of boron-doped graphene by thermally annealing the mixture of graphene oxide and boric acid, and its usage as the support of Pt catalyst towards the methanol oxidation reaction. The composition, structure and morphology of boron-doped graphene and its supported Pt nanoparticles (Pt/BG) are characterized by transmission electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is revealed that boron atoms are doped into graphene network in the form of BC2O and BCO2 bonds, which lead to the increase in defect sites and facilitate the subsequent deposition of Pt nanoparticles. Therefore, the Pt/BG catalyst presents smaller particle size and narrower size distribution than the graphene supported Pt (Pt/G) catalyst. When evaluated as the electrocatalyst for the methanol oxidation reaction, the Pt/BG catalyst exhibits excellent electrochemical activity and stability demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry tests. The enhanced activity is mainly ascribed to the electronic interaction between boron-doped graphene and Pt nanoparticles, which lowers the d-band center of Pt and thus weakens the absorption of the poisoning intermediate CO. Our work provides an alternative approach of improving the reaction kinetics for the oxidation of small organic molecules.

  16. Role of metal-support interactions on the activity of Pt and Rh catalysts for reforming methane and butane.

    SciTech Connect

    Rossignol, C.; Krause, T.; Krumpelt, M.

    2002-01-11

    For residential fuel cell systems, reforming of natural gas is one option being considered for providing the H{sub 2} necessary for the fuel cell to operate. Industrially, natural gas is reformed using Ni-based catalysts supported on an alumina substrate, which has been modified to inhibit coke formation. At Argonne National Laboratory, we have developed a new family of catalysts derived from solid oxide fuel cell technology for reforming hydrocarbon fuels to generate H{sub 2}. These catalysts consist of a transition metal supported on an oxide-ion-conducting substrate, such as ceria, that has been doped with a small amount of a non-reducible element, such as gadolinium, samarium, or zirconium. Unlike alumina, the oxide-ion-conducting substrate has been shown to induce strong metal-support interactions. Metal-support interactions are known to play an important role in influencing the catalytic activity of many metals supported on oxide supports. Based on results from temperature-programmed reduction/oxidation and kinetic reaction studies, this paper discusses the role of the metal and the substrate in the metal-support interactions, and how these interactions influence the activity and the selectivity of the catalyst in reforming methane and butane to hydrogen for use in fuel cell power systems.

  17. Are intramolecular frustrated Lewis pairs also intramolecular catalysts? A theoretical study on H2 activation.

    PubMed

    Zeonjuk, Lei Liu; St Petkov, Petko; Heine, Thomas; Röschenthaler, Gerd-Volker; Eicher, Johannes; Vankova, Nina

    2015-04-28

    We investigate computationally a series of intramolecular frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs), with the general formula Mes2PCHRCH2B(C6F5)2, that are known from the literature to either activate molecular hydrogen (FLPs with R = H (1) or Me (4)), or remain inert (FLPs with R = Ph (2) or SiMe3 (3)). The prototypical system Mes2PCH2CH2B(C6F5)2 (1) has been described in the literature (Grimme et al., Angew. Chem., Int. Ed., 2010; Rokob et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2013) as an intramolecular reactant that triggers the reaction with H2 in a bimolecular concerted fashion. In the current study, we show that the concept of intramolecular H2 activation by linked FLPs is not able to explain the inertness of the derivative compounds 2 and 3 towards H2. To cope with this, we propose an alternative intermolecular mechanism for the investigated reaction, assuming stacking of two open-chain FLP conformers, and formation of a dimeric reactant with two Lewis acid–base domains, that can split up to two hydrogen molecules. Using quantum-chemical methods, we compute the reaction profiles describing these alternative mechanisms, and compare the derived predictions with earlier reported experimental results. We show that only the concept of intermolecular H2 activation could explain both the activity of the FLPs having small substituents in the bridging molecular region, and the inertness of the FLPs with a bulkier substitution, in a consistent way. Importantly, the intermolecular H2 activation driven by intramolecular FLPs indicates the key role of steric factors and noncovalent interactions for the design of metal-free systems that can efficiently split H2, and possibly serve as metal-free hydrogenation catalysts.

  18. Amorphous Silicate Smokes as Catalysts for the Production of Complex Organic Species in the Primitive Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, J. A., III; Hill, H. G. M.

    2002-01-01

    Amorphous Mg-silicates are excellent Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that convert H2 and CO into hydrocarbons almost as well as Fe-silicates. Mg-silicates do not catalyze formation of ammonia. N is incorporated into the organics if CO, N2 and H2 are used. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  19. An efficient, selective, and reducing agent-free copper catalyst for the atom-transfer radical addition of halo compounds to activated olefins.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Molina, José María; Belderraín, Tomás R; Pérez, Pedro J

    2010-01-18

    Efficient and selective ATRA reactions of CCl(4), CBr(4), TsCl (Ts = tosyl), or Cl(3)CCO(2)Et with activated olefins (styrene, methyl methacrylate, n-butyl methacrylate, tert-butyl methacrylate) using the Tp(tBu)Cu(NCMe) complex as a catalyst have been achieved in the absence of any reductant and with low catalyst loadings.

  20. A self-reductive mesoporous CuO(x)/Fe/silicate nanocomposite as a highly active and stable catalyst for methanol reforming.

    PubMed

    Li, Chien-Cheng; Chen, Yan-Wun; Lin, Ran-Jin; Chang, Ching-Chun; Chen, Kuei-Hsien; Lin, Hong-Ping; Chen, Li-Chyong

    2011-09-01

    A simple and convenient one-pot synthetic route to directly prepare a self-reductive mesoporous copper-iron-silicate (CuO(x)-Fe-silicate)-based catalyst has been developed. The resultant catalyst is highly active and stable in methanol reforming without needing a pre-reduction procedure. PMID:21773606

  1. Clean Donor Oxidation Enhances the H2 Evolution Activity of a Carbon Quantum Dot-Molecular Catalyst Photosystem.

    PubMed

    Martindale, Benjamin C M; Joliat, Evelyne; Bachmann, Cyril; Alberto, Roger; Reisner, Erwin

    2016-08-01

    Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) are new-generation light absorbers for photocatalytic H2 evolution in aqueous solution, but the performance of CQD-molecular catalyst systems is currently limited by the decomposition of the molecular component. Clean oxidation of the electron donor by donor recycling prevents the formation of destructive radical species and non-innocent oxidation products. This approach allowed a CQD-molecular nickel bis(diphosphine) photocatalyst system to reach a benchmark lifetime of more than 5 days and a record turnover number of 1094±61 molH2  (molNi )(-1) for a defined synthetic molecular nickel catalyst in purely aqueous solution under AM1.5G solar irradiation. PMID:27355200

  2. Oxidation catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Ceyer, Sylvia T.; Lahr, David L.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

  3. Unraveling the role of support surface hydroxyls and its effect on the selectivity of C2 species over Rh/γ-Al2O3 catalyst in syngas conversion: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Riguang; Duan, Tian; Wang, Baojun; Ling, Lixia

    2016-08-01

    The supported Rh-based catalysts exhibit the excellent catalytic performances for syngas conversion to C2 species. In this study, all possible elementary steps leading to C2 species from syngas have been explored to identify the role of support and its surface hydroxyls over Rh/γ-Al2O3 catalyst; Here, the results are obtained using density functional theory (DFT) method. Two models: Rh4 cluster supported on the dry γ-Al2O3(110) surface, D(Rh4), and on the hydroxylated γ-Al2O3(110) surface, H(Rh4), have been used to model Rh/γ-Al2O3 catalyst. Our results show that CO prefers to be hydrogenated to CHO, subsequently, starting from CHO species, CH and CH2 species are the dominate monomers among CHx(x = 1-3) species rather than CH3 and CH3OH on D(Rh4) and H(Rh4) surfaces, suggesting that γ-Al2O3-supported Rh catalyst exhibits the high selectivity towards CHx formation compared to the pure Rh catalyst. On the other hand, D(Rh4) is more favorable for C2 hydrocarbon (C2H2) formation, whereas H(Rh4) surface easily produces C2 hydrocarbon (C2H2) and C2 oxygenates (CHCO,CH2CHO), indicating that the surface hydroxyls of support can affect the selectivity of C2 species over Rh/γ-Al2O3 catalyst in syngas conversion. Moreover, compared to the pure Rh(111) surface, Rh/γ-Al2O3 catalyst can achieve the excellent catalytic performances for syngas conversion to C2 species.

  4. Nanostructured manganese oxides as highly active water oxidation catalysts: a boost from manganese precursor chemistry.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Prashanth W; Indra, Arindam; Littlewood, Patrick; Schwarze, Michael; Göbel, Caren; Schomäcker, Reinhard; Driess, Matthias

    2014-08-01

    We present a facile synthesis of bioinspired manganese oxides for chemical and photocatalytic water oxidation, starting from a reliable and versatile manganese(II) oxalate single-source precursor (SSP) accessible through an inverse micellar molecular approach. Strikingly, thermal decomposition of the latter precursor in various environments (air, nitrogen, and vacuum) led to the three different mineral phases of bixbyite (Mn2 O3 ), hausmannite (Mn3 O4 ), and manganosite (MnO). Initial chemical water oxidation experiments using ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) gave the maximum catalytic activity for Mn2 O3 and MnO whereas Mn3 O4 had a limited activity. The substantial increase in the catalytic activity of MnO in chemical water oxidation was demonstrated by the fact that a phase transformation occurs at the surface from nanocrystalline MnO into an amorphous MnOx (1activities of water oxidation catalysts has been proposed by determining the amount of accessible manganese centers. PMID:25044528

  5. Nanostructured manganese oxides as highly active water oxidation catalysts: a boost from manganese precursor chemistry.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Prashanth W; Indra, Arindam; Littlewood, Patrick; Schwarze, Michael; Göbel, Caren; Schomäcker, Reinhard; Driess, Matthias

    2014-08-01

    We present a facile synthesis of bioinspired manganese oxides for chemical and photocatalytic water oxidation, starting from a reliable and versatile manganese(II) oxalate single-source precursor (SSP) accessible through an inverse micellar molecular approach. Strikingly, thermal decomposition of the latter precursor in various environments (air, nitrogen, and vacuum) led to the three different mineral phases of bixbyite (Mn2 O3 ), hausmannite (Mn3 O4 ), and manganosite (MnO). Initial chemical water oxidation experiments using ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) gave the maximum catalytic activity for Mn2 O3 and MnO whereas Mn3 O4 had a limited activity. The substantial increase in the catalytic activity of MnO in chemical water oxidation was demonstrated by the fact that a phase transformation occurs at the surface from nanocrystalline MnO into an amorphous MnOx (1activities of water oxidation catalysts has been proposed by determining the amount of accessible manganese centers.

  6. Metalloenzyme-mimicking supramolecular catalyst for highly active and selective intramolecular alkyne carboxylation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Li-Chen; Zhao, Yan

    2014-04-16

    Creation of synthetic catalysts with enzyme-like behavior is challenging despite strong interest in such systems. Extraction of tetrachloroaurate into the hydrophilic core of an interfacially cross-linked reverse micelle (ICRM) produced an artificial "metalloenzyme" with highly unusual catalytic properties. The ICRM pulled the substrate toward the catalytic metal, which converted it efficiently to the product that was rapidly ejected. These features enabled greatly reduced catalyst loading (30-100 times lower than typical levels used in literature examples), constant high reaction rate throughout the course of the reaction, lack of the hydrolyzed side product, and substrate selectivity unobserved in conventional gold catalysts.

  7. Catalyst enhances Claus operations

    SciTech Connect

    Dupin, T.; Voizin, R.

    1982-11-01

    An improved Claus catalyst offers superior activity that emphasizes hydrolysis of CS/sub 2/ in the first converter. The catalyst is insensitive to oxygen action at concentrations generally found in Claus gas feeds. It also has an excellent resistance to hydrothermal shocks that may occur during shutdown of the sulfur line. Collectively, these properties make this catalyst the most active formula now available for optimum Claus yields and COS/CS/sub 2/ hydrolysis conversion.

  8. Quantitatively analyzing metathesis catalyst activity and structural features in silica-supported tungsten imido-alkylidene complexes.

    PubMed

    Mougel, Victor; Santiago, Celine B; Zhizhko, Pavel A; Bess, Elizabeth N; Varga, Jeno; Frater, Georg; Sigman, Matthew S; Copéret, Christophe

    2015-05-27

    A broad series of fully characterized, well-defined silica-supported W metathesis catalysts with the general formula [(≡SiO)W(═NAr)(═CHCMe2R)(X)] (Ar = 2,6-iPr2C6H3 (AriPr), 2,6-Cl2C6H3 (ArCl), 2-CF3C6H4 (ArCF3), and C6F5 (ArF5); X = OC(CF3)3 (OtBuF9), OCMe(CF3)2 (OtBuF6), OtBu, OSi(OtBu)3, 2,5-dimethylpyrrolyl (Me2Pyr) and R = Me or Ph) was prepared by grafting bis-X substituted complexes [W(NAr)(═CHCMe2R)(X)2] on silica partially dehydroxylated at 700 °C (SiO2-(700)), and their activity was evaluated with the goal to obtain detailed structure-activity relationships. Quantitative influence of the ligand set on the activity (turnover frequency, TOF) in self-metathesis of cis-4-nonene was investigated using multivariate linear regression analysis tools. The TOF of these catalysts (activity) can be well predicted from simple steric and electronic parameters of the parent protonated ligands; it is described by the mutual contribution of the NBO charge of the nitrogen or the IR intensity of the symmetric N-H stretch of the ArNH2, corresponding to the imido ligand, together with the Sterimol B5 and pKa of HX, representing the X ligand. This quantitative and predictive structure-activity relationship analysis of well-defined heterogeneous catalysts shows that high activity is associated with the combination of X and NAr ligands of opposite electronic character and paves the way toward rational development of metathesis catalysts.

  9. Shape-selective catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch chemistry : atomic layer deposition of active catalytic metals. Activity report : January 1, 2005 - September 30, 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Cronauer, D. C.

    2011-04-15

    Argonne National Laboratory is carrying out a research program to create, prepare, and evaluate catalysts to promote Fischer-Tropsch (FT) chemistry - specifically, the reaction of hydrogen with carbon monoxide to form long-chain hydrocarbons. In addition to needing high activity, it is desirable that the catalysts have high selectivity and stability with respect to both mechanical strength and aging properties. The broad goal is to produce diesel fraction components and avoiding excess yields of both light hydrocarbons and heavy waxes. Originally the goal was to prepare shape-selective catalysts that would limit the formation of long-chain products and yet retain the active metal sites in a protected 'cage.' Such catalysts were prepared with silica-containing fractal cages. The activity was essentially the same as that of catalysts without the cages. We are currently awaiting follow-up experiments to determine the attrition strength of these catalysts. A second experimental stage was undertaken to prepare and evaluate active FT catalysts formed by atomic-layer deposition [ALD] of active components on supported membranes and particulate supports. The concept was that of depositing active metals (i.e. ruthenium, iron or cobalt) upon membranes with well defined flow channels of small diameter and length such that the catalytic activity and product molecular weight distribution could be controlled. In order to rapidly evaluate the catalytic membranes, the ALD coating processes were performed in an 'exploratory mode' in which ALD procedures from the literature appropriate for coating flat surfaces were applied to the high surface area membranes. Consequently, the Fe and Ru loadings in the membranes were likely to be smaller than those expected for complete monolayer coverage. In addition, there was likely to be significant variation in the Fe and Ru loading among the membranes due to difficulties in nucleating these materials on the aluminum oxide surfaces. The first

  10. CeO2 nanocubes-graphene oxide as durable and highly active catalyst support for proton exchange membrane fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Lei, M; Wang, Z B; Li, J S; Tang, H L; Liu, W J; Wang, Y G

    2014-01-01

    Rapid degradation of cell performance still remains a significant challenge for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). In this work, we develop novel CeO2 nanocubes-graphene oxide nanocomposites as durable and highly active catalyst support for proton exchange membrane fuel cell. We show that the use of CeO2 as the radical scavenger in the catalysts remarkably improves the durability of the catalyst. The catalytic activity retention of Pt-graphene oxide-8 wt.% CeO2 nanocomposites reaches as high as 69% after 5000 CV-cycles at a high voltage range of 0.8-1.23 V, in contrast to 19% for that of the Pt-graphene oxide composites. The excellent durability of the Pt-CeO2 nanocubes-graphene oxide catalyst is attributed to the free radical scavenging activity of CeO2, which significantly slows down the chemical degradation of Nafion binder in catalytic layers, and then alleviates the decay of Pt catalysts, resulting in the excellent cycle life of Pt-CeO2-graphene oxide nanocomposite catalysts. Additionally, the performance of single cell assembled with Nafion 211 membrane and Pt-CeO2-graphene oxide catalysts with different CeO2 contents in the cathode as well as the Pt-C catalysts in the anode are also recorded and discussed in this study.

  11. CeO2 nanocubes-graphene oxide as durable and highly active catalyst support for proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    PubMed Central

    Lei, M.; Wang, Z. B.; Li, J. S.; Tang, H. L.; Liu, W. J.; Wang, Y. G.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid degradation of cell performance still remains a significant challenge for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). In this work, we develop novel CeO2 nanocubes-graphene oxide nanocomposites as durable and highly active catalyst support for proton exchange membrane fuel cell. We show that the use of CeO2 as the radical scavenger in the catalysts remarkably improves the durability of the catalyst. The catalytic activity retention of Pt-graphene oxide-8 wt.% CeO2 nanocomposites reaches as high as 69% after 5000 CV-cycles at a high voltage range of 0.8–1.23 V, in contrast to 19% for that of the Pt-graphene oxide composites. The excellent durability of the Pt-CeO2 nanocubes-graphene oxide catalyst is attributed to the free radical scavenging activity of CeO2, which significantly slows down the chemical degradation of Nafion binder in catalytic layers, and then alleviates the decay of Pt catalysts, resulting in the excellent cycle life of Pt-CeO2-graphene oxide nanocomposite catalysts. Additionally, the performance of single cell assembled with Nafion 211 membrane and Pt-CeO2-graphene oxide catalysts with different CeO2 contents in the cathode as well as the Pt-C catalysts in the anode are also recorded and discussed in this study. PMID:25491655

  12. Progress in Synthesis of Highly Active and Stable Nickel-Based Catalysts for Carbon Dioxide Reforming of Methane.

    PubMed

    Kawi, Sibudjing; Kathiraser, Yasotha; Ni, Jun; Oemar, Usman; Li, Ziwei; Saw, Eng Toon

    2015-11-01

    In recent decades, rising anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions (mainly CO2 and CH4 ) have increased alarm due to escalating effects of global warming. The dry carbon dioxide reforming of methane (DRM) reaction is a sustainable way to utilize these notorious greenhouse gases. This paper presents a review of recent progress in the development of nickel-based catalysts for the DRM reaction. The enviable low cost and wide availability of nickel compared with noble metals is the main reason for persistent research efforts in optimizing the synthesis of nickel-based catalysts. Important catalyst features for the rational design of a coke-resistant nickel-based nanocatalyst for the DRM reaction are also discussed. In addition, several innovative developments based on salient features for the stabilization of nickel nanocatalysts through various means (which include functionalization with precursors, synthesis by plasma treatment, stabilization/confinement on mesoporous/microporous/carbon supports, and the formation of metal oxides) are highlighted. The final part of this review covers major issues and proposed improvement strategies pertaining to the rational design of nickel-based catalysts with high activity and stability for the DRM reaction.

  13. Progress in Synthesis of Highly Active and Stable Nickel-Based Catalysts for Carbon Dioxide Reforming of Methane.

    PubMed

    Kawi, Sibudjing; Kathiraser, Yasotha; Ni, Jun; Oemar, Usman; Li, Ziwei; Saw, Eng Toon

    2015-11-01

    In recent decades, rising anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions (mainly CO2 and CH4 ) have increased alarm due to escalating effects of global warming. The dry carbon dioxide reforming of methane (DRM) reaction is a sustainable way to utilize these notorious greenhouse gases. This paper presents a review of recent progress in the development of nickel-based catalysts for the DRM reaction. The enviable low cost and wide availability of nickel compared with noble metals is the main reason for persistent research efforts in optimizing the synthesis of nickel-based catalysts. Important catalyst features for the rational design of a coke-resistant nickel-based nanocatalyst for the DRM reaction are also discussed. In addition, several innovative developments based on salient features for the stabilization of nickel nanocatalysts through various means (which include functionalization with precursors, synthesis by plasma treatment, stabilization/confinement on mesoporous/microporous/carbon supports, and the formation of metal oxides) are highlighted. The final part of this review covers major issues and proposed improvement strategies pertaining to the rational design of nickel-based catalysts with high activity and stability for the DRM reaction. PMID:26440576

  14. Dispersion and activity of molybdena-alumina catalysts prepared by impregnation and solid/solid wetting methods

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, B.M.; Reddy, E.P.; Srinivas, S.T. )

    1992-07-01

    Alumina-supported molybdena catalysts were prepared by both the standard incipient wetness method and by mixing MoO{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (solid/solid wetting), followed by thermal treatment of 500 C under dry or wet O{sub 2} atmospheric conditions. These catalysts were characterized by means of O{sub 2} chemisorption at {minus}78 C, CO{sub 2} uptake at ambient temperature, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and electron spin resonance (ESR) techniques. Activities of the catalysts were determined for partial oxidation of methanol and hydrodesulfurization of thiophene at atmospheric pressure. XRD results suggest high dispersion of Mo-oxide on alumina support irrespective of their method of preparation. However, O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} uptake measurements reveal partial coverage of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} support surface by the Mo-oxide phase and appear to depend on the gas atmosphere (wet or dry O{sub 2}) during heat treatments in case of solid/solid wetting method. ESR, oxygen and carbon dioxide uptakes and the catalytic properties clearly demonstrate that spontaneous spreading of MoO{sub 3} on the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} support at 500 C in the presence of wet O{sub 2} is a most effective alternative method for preparing molybdenum-alumina catalysts.

  15. Activation of Single-Component Nickel(II) Polyethylene Catalysts via Phase Transfer of Fluorous Phosphine Ligands.

    PubMed

    Xi, Zhenxing; Bazzi, Hassan S; Gladysz, John A

    2015-09-01

    The nickel salicylaldiminato phosphine complexes [1,2,3-C6H3(9-anthracenyl)O(CH═N(2,6-C6H3(iPr)2)]Ni(Me)[P(4-C6H4R)3] (4; R = a, (CH2)2Rf8; b, (CH2)3Rf8; c, H (Rf8 = (CF2)7CF3)) are prepared from the corresponding phosphines 3a-c and nickel NCMe adduct (46-68%). These are applied as catalysts for ethylene polymerization in toluene and fluorous/toluene liquid/liquid biphasic mixtures. Under the latter conditions, the fluorous phosphines 3a,b that must dissociate to generate the active catalyst migrate to the fluorous phase (partition coefficients 97.5:2.5 and 66.6:33.4 vs <0.5:>99.5 for 4a,b). Catalysts 4a,b show marked accelerations under biphasic conditions, but 4c (which has a lipophilic phosphine ligand) does not. Under all conditions, 4a,b are faster catalysts than the Ni(Ph)(PPh3) analogue, a previously reported benchmark. PMID:26300472

  16. Catalyst system comprising a first catalyst system tethered to a supported catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Angelici, Robert J.; Gao, Hanrong

    1998-08-04

    The present invention provides new catalyst formats which comprise a supported catalyst tethered to a second and different catalyst by a suitable tethering ligand. A preferred system comprises a heterogeneous supported metal catalyst tethered to a homogeneous catalyst. This combination of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts has a sufficient lifetime and unusually high catalytic activity in arene hydrogenations, and potentially many other reactions as well, including, but not limited to hydroformylation, hydrosilation, olefin oxidation, isomerization, hydrocyanation, olefin metathesis, olefin polymerization, carbonylation, enantioselective catalysis and photoduplication. These catalysts are easily separated from the products, and can be reused repeatedly, making these systems very economical.

  17. Catalyst system comprising a first catalyst system tethered to a supported catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Angelici, R.J.; Gao, H.

    1998-08-04

    The present invention provides new catalyst formats which comprise a supported catalyst tethered to a second and different catalyst by a suitable tethering ligand. A preferred system comprises a heterogeneous supported metal catalyst tethered to a homogeneous catalyst. This combination of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts has a sufficient lifetime and unusually high catalytic activity in arene hydrogenations, and potentially many other reactions as well, including, but not limited to hydroformylation, hydrosilication, olefin oxidation, isomerization, hydrocyanidation, olefin metathesis, olefin polymerization, carbonylation, enantioselective catalysis and photoduplication. These catalysts are easily separated from the products, and can be reused repeatedly, making these systems very economical. 2 figs.

  18. What are the active carbon species during graphene chemical vapor deposition growth?

    PubMed

    Shu, Haibo; Tao, Xiao-Ming; Ding, Feng

    2015-02-01

    The dissociation of carbon feedstock is a crucial step for understanding the mechanism of graphene chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth. Using first-principles calculations, we performed a comprehensive theoretical study for the population of various active carbon species, including carbon monomers and various radicals, CHi (i = 1, 2, 3, 4), on four representative transition-metal surfaces, Cu(111), Ni(111), Ir(111) and Rh(111), under different experimental conditions. On the Cu surface, which is less active, the population of CH and C monomers at the subsurface is found to be very high and thus they are the most important precursors for graphene CVD growth. On the Ni surface, which is more active than Cu, C monomers at the subsurface dominate graphene CVD growth under most experimental conditions. In contrast, on the active Ir and Rh surfaces, C monomers on the surfaces are found to be very stable and thus are the main precursors for graphene growth. This study shows that the mechanism of graphene CVD growth depends on the activity of catalyst surfaces and the detailed graphene growth process at the atomic level can be controlled by varying the temperature or partial pressure of hydrogen.

  19. Environmentally-benign catalysts for the selective catalytic reduction of NO(x) from diesel engines: structure-activity relationship and reaction mechanism aspects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fudong; Yu, Yunbo; He, Hong

    2014-08-11

    Selective catalytic reduction of NOx using NH3 or hydrocarbons (NH3-SCR or HC-SCR) in oxygen-rich exhaust from diesel engines remains a major challenge in environmental catalysis. The development of highly efficient, stable and environmentally-benign catalysts for SCR processes is very important for practical use. In this feature article, the structure-activity relationship of vanadium-free catalysts in the NH3-SCR reaction is discussed in detail, including Fe-, Ce-based oxide catalysts and Fe-, Cu-based zeolite catalysts, which is beneficial for catalyst redesign and activity improvement. Based on our research, a comprehensive mechanism contributing to the performance of Ag/Al2O3 in HC-SCR is provided, giving a clue to the design of a catalytic system with high efficiency.

  20. Comparison of catalytic activities for photocatalytic and sonocatalytic degradation of methylene blue in present of anatase TiO2-CNT catalysts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kan; Zhang, Feng Jun; Chen, Ming Liang; Oh, Won Chun

    2011-05-01

    Anatase TiO(2)-CNT catalysts with high specific surface areas were prepared by depositing TiO(2) particles on the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using a modified sol-gel technique. These catalysts prepared with different amounts of CNTs were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, Fourier Transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy. The catalytic activity of the anatase TiO(2)-CNT catalysts was assessed by examining the degradation of methylene blue (MB) from model aqueous solutions as a probe reaction under visible light and ultrasonic irradiation. The synergistic effect of the greater surface area and catalytic activities of the composite catalysts was examined in terms of the strong adsorption ability and interphase interaction by comparing the different amounts and roles of CNTs in the catalysts.

  1. The effects of cerium doping concentration on the properties and photocatalytic activity of bimetallic Mo/Ce catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaedini, Ghazaleh; Tasirin, Siti Masrinda; Aminayi, Payam

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the characterization and photocatalytic activity of MoO3 nanoparticles doped with various doping concentrations of cerium have been investigated. The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra of the prepared catalysts confirmed that MoO3 particles have been successfully doped by cerium. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) was performed to visualize the surface morphology of the obtained catalysts. The XRD patterns suggested that the crystallinity of the sample with the lowest doping concentration of 15 mol % was higher in comparison with samples of higher doping concentrations. The volume-averaged crystal sizes of the obtained catalysts were calculated to be 25, 28, and 32 nm for 15, 35, and 60 mol % samples, respectively. The photocatalytic activity along with the reaction kinetics of Ce-doped MoO3 nanoparticles have also been investigated through the dye degradation of methyl orange. The synthesized Ce-doped MoO3 particles with the lowest dopant concentration of 15 mol % exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity for methyl orange dye degradation. It was observed that photo-degradation activity decreased with an increase in the doping concentration of cerium. The predicted rate constants for samples with 15, 35, and 60 mol % doping concentrations were found to be 0.0432, 0.035, and 0.029 min-1, respectively.

  2. A novel Pt-Co alloy hydrogen anode catalyst with superlative activity, CO-tolerance and robustness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, G. Y.; Yano, H.; Tryk, D. A.; Watanabe, M.; Iiyama, A.; Uchida, H.

    2016-07-01

    PtCo nanoparticles, having two atomic layers of stabilized Pt skin, supported on carbon black (Pt2AL-PtCo/C), exhibited superlative mass activity for the CO-tolerant hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR), together with high robustness with respect to air exposure, as a novel anode catalyst in reformate gas-based polymer electrolyte fuel cells. The high area-specific HOR activity and CO tolerance are consistent with DFT calculations.PtCo nanoparticles, having two atomic layers of stabilized Pt skin, supported on carbon black (Pt2AL-PtCo/C), exhibited superlative mass activity for the CO-tolerant hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR), together with high robustness with respect to air exposure, as a novel anode catalyst in reformate gas-based polymer electrolyte fuel cells. The high area-specific HOR activity and CO tolerance are consistent with DFT calculations. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, TEM images and particle size distribution histograms of all catalysts, and details of the DFT calculations. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00778c

  3. Ruthenium(0) nanoparticles supported on multiwalled carbon nanotube as highly active catalyst for hydrogen generation from ammonia-borane.

    PubMed

    Akbayrak, Serdar; Ozkar, Saim

    2012-11-01

    Ruthenium(0) nanoparticles supported on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (Ru(0)@MWCNT) were in situ formed during the hydrolysis of ammonia-borane (AB) and could be isolated from the reaction solution by filtration and characterized by ICP-OES, XRD, TEM, SEM, EDX, and XPS techniques. The results reveal that ruthenium(0) nanoparticles of size in the range 1.4-3.0 nm are well-dispersed on multiwalled carbon nanotubes. They were found to be highly active catalyst in hydrogen generation from the hydrolysis of AB with a turnover frequency value of 329 min⁻¹. The reusability experiments show that Ru(0)@MWCNTs are isolable and redispersible in aqueous solution; when redispersed they are still active catalyst in the hydrolysis of AB exhibiting a release of 3.0 equivalents of H₂ per mole of NH₃BH₃ and preserving 41% of the initial catalytic activity even after the fourth run of hydrolysis. The lifetime of Ru(0)@MWCNTs was measured as 26400 turnovers over 29 h in the hydrolysis of AB at 25.0 ± 0.1 °C before deactivation. The work reported here also includes the kinetic studies depending on the temperature to determine the activation energy of the reaction (E(a) = 33 ± 2 kJ/mol) and the effect of catalyst concentration on the rate of the catalytic hydrolysis of AB, respectively. PMID:23113804

  4. Ruthenium(0) nanoparticles supported on multiwalled carbon nanotube as highly active catalyst for hydrogen generation from ammonia-borane.

    PubMed

    Akbayrak, Serdar; Ozkar, Saim

    2012-11-01

    Ruthenium(0) nanoparticles supported on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (Ru(0)@MWCNT) were in situ formed during the hydrolysis of ammonia-borane (AB) and could be isolated from the reaction solution by filtration and characterized by ICP-OES, XRD, TEM, SEM, EDX, and XPS techniques. The results reveal that ruthenium(0) nanoparticles of size in the range 1.4-3.0 nm are well-dispersed on multiwalled carbon nanotubes. They were found to be highly active catalyst in hydrogen generation from the hydrolysis of AB with a turnover frequency value of 329 min⁻¹. The reusability experiments show that Ru(0)@MWCNTs are isolable and redispersible in aqueous solution; when redispersed they are still active catalyst in the hydrolysis of AB exhibiting a release of 3.0 equivalents of H₂ per mole of NH₃BH₃ and preserving 41% of the initial catalytic activity even after the fourth run of hydrolysis. The lifetime of Ru(0)@MWCNTs was measured as 26400 turnovers over 29 h in the hydrolysis of AB at 25.0 ± 0.1 °C before deactivation. The work reported here also includes the kinetic studies depending on the temperature to determine the activation energy of the reaction (E(a) = 33 ± 2 kJ/mol) and the effect of catalyst concentration on the rate of the catalytic hydrolysis of AB, respectively.

  5. Highly Active Chiral Ruthenium Catalysts for Asymmetric Ring-Closing Olefin Metathesis

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Timothy W.; Berlin, Jacob M.

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis of olefin metathesis catalysts containing chiral, monodentate N-heterocyclic carbenes and their application to asymmetric ring-closing metathesis (ARCM) is reported. These catalysts retain the high levels of reactivity found in the related achiral variants (1a and 1b). Using the parent chiral catalysts 2a and 2b and derivatives that contain steric bulk in the meta positions of the N-bound aryl rings (catalysts 3-5), five- through seven-membered rings were formed in up to 92% ee. The addition of sodium iodide to catalysts 2a-4a (to form 2b-4bin situ) caused a dramatic increase in enantioselectivity for many substrates. Catalyst 5a, which gave high enantiomeric excesses for certain substrates without the addition of NaI, could be used in loadings of ≤1 mol %. Mechanistic explanations for the large sodium iodide effect as well as possible mechanistic pathways leading to the observed products are discussed. PMID:16464082

  6. Catalyst activity maintenance study for the liquid phase dimethyl ether process

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, X.D.; Toseland, B.A.; Underwood, R.P.

    1995-12-31

    The co-production of dimethyl ether (DME) and methanol from syngas is a process of considerable commercial attractiveness. DME coproduction can double the productivity of a LPMEOH process when using coal-derived syngas. This in itself may offer chemical producers and power companies increased flexibility and more profitable operation. DME is also known as a clean burning liquid fuel; Amoco and Haldor-Topsoe have recently announced the use of DME as an alternative diesel fuel. Moreover, DME can be an interesting intermediate in the production of chemicals such as olefins and vinyl acetate. The current APCl liquid phase dimethyl ether (LPDME) process utilizes a physical mixture of a commercial methanol synthesis catalyst and a dehydration catalyst (e.g., {gamma}-alumina). While this arrangement provides a synergy that results in much higher syngas conversion per pass compared to the methanol-only process, the stability of the catalyst system suffers. The present project is aimed at reducing catalyst deactivation both by understanding the cause(s) of catalyst deactivation and by developing modified catalyst systems. This paper describes the current understanding of the deactivation mechanism.

  7. Characteristics of polyaniline cobalt supported catalysts for epoxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Grzegorz; Pielichowski, Jan; Grzesik, Mirosław

    2014-01-01

    A study of polyaniline (PANI) doping with various cobalt compounds, that is, cobalt(II) chloride, cobalt(II) acetate, and cobalt(II) salen, is presented. The catalysts were prepared by depositing cobalt compounds onto the polymer surface. PANI powders containing cobalt ions were obtained by one- or two-step method suspending PANI in the following acetonitrile/acetic acid solution or acetonitrile and then acetic acid solution. Moreover different ratios of Co(II) : PANI were studied. Catalysts obtained with both methods and at all ratios were investigated using various techniques including AAS and XPS spectroscopy. The optimum conditions for preparation of PANI/Co catalysts were established. Catalytic activity of polyaniline cobalt(II) supported catalysts was tested in dec-1-ene epoxidation with molecular oxygen at room temperature. The relationship between the amount of cobalt species, measured with both AAS and XPS techniques, and the activity of PANI-Co catalysts has been established.

  8. Reactivation of a Ruthenium-Based Olefin Metathesis Catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Tabari, Daniel S.; Tolentino, Daniel R.; Schrodi, Yann

    2013-01-01

    1st Generation Hoveyda-Grubbs olefin metathesis catalyst was purposely decomposed in the presence of ethylene yielding inorganic species that are inactive in the ring-closing metathesis (RCM) of benchmark substrate diethyldiallyl malonate (DEDAM). The decomposed catalyst was treated with 1-(3,5-diisopropoxyphenyl)-1-phenylprop-2-yn-1-ol (3) to generate an olefin metathesis active ruthenium indenylidene-ether complex in 43 % yield. This complex was also prepared independently by reacting RuCl2(p-cymene)(PCy3) with organic precursor 3. The activity of the isolated reactivated catalyst in the RCM of DEDAM is similar to that of the independently prepared complex. PMID:23355756

  9. Reactivation of a Ruthenium-Based Olefin Metathesis Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Tabari, Daniel S; Tolentino, Daniel R; Schrodi, Yann

    2013-01-14

    1(st) Generation Hoveyda-Grubbs olefin metathesis catalyst was purposely decomposed in the presence of ethylene yielding inorganic species that are inactive in the ring-closing metathesis (RCM) of benchmark substrate diethyldiallyl malonate (DEDAM). The decomposed catalyst was treated with 1-(3,5-diisopropoxyphenyl)-1-phenylprop-2-yn-1-ol (3) to generate an olefin metathesis active ruthenium indenylidene-ether complex in 43 % yield. This complex was also prepared independently by reacting RuCl(2)(p-cymene)(PCy(3)) with organic precursor 3. The activity of the isolated reactivated catalyst in the RCM of DEDAM is similar to that of the independently prepared complex.

  10. New Enantiomerically Pure Alkylimido Mo-Based Complexes. Synthesis, Characterization, and Activity as Chiral Olefin Metathesis Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Pilyugina, Tatiana S.; Schrock, Richard R.; Müller, Peter; Hoveyda, Amir H.

    2008-01-01

    Molybdenum olefin metathesis catalysts that contain aliphatic 1-phenylcyclohexylimido (NPhCy) and 2-phenyl-2-adamantylimido (NPhAd) groups and (S)-Biphen or (R)-Trip)(THF) ligands (Biphen = 3,3′-di-tert-butyl-5,5′,6,6′-tetramethyl-1,1′-biphenyl-2,2′-diolate; Trip = 3,3′-bis(2,4,6-triisopropylphenyl)-2,2′-binaphtholate) have been prepared. Their catalytic activity and enantioselectivity in desymmetrization reactions such as ring-closing metathesis of amines and lactams and ring-opening/cross-metathesis of substituted norborneols with styrene were compared to the results obtained with the only known alkylimido catalyst Mo(NAd)(CHCMe2Ph)[(S)-Biphen]. The activities and enantioselectivities provided by these new chiral complexes vary significantly, but in virtually all instances explored were not superior to the adamantylimido analogs. PMID:19079732

  11. Diversity and Activity of Lysobacter Species from Disease Suppressive Soils

    PubMed Central

    Gómez Expósito, Ruth; Postma, Joeke; Raaijmakers, Jos M.; De Bruijn, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The genus Lysobacter includes several species that produce a range of extracellular enzymes and other metabolites with activity against bacteria, fungi, oomycetes, and nematodes. Lysobacter species were found to be more abundant in soil suppressive against the fungal root pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, but their actual role in disease suppression is still unclear. Here, the antifungal and plant growth-promoting activities of 18 Lysobacter strains, including 11 strains from Rhizoctonia-suppressive soils, were studied both in vitro and in vivo. Based on 16S rRNA sequencing, the Lysobacter strains from the Rhizoctonia-suppressive soil belonged to the four species Lysobacter antibioticus, Lysobacter capsici, Lysobacter enzymogenes, and Lysobacter gummosus. Most strains showed strong in vitro activity against R. solani and several other pathogens, including Pythium ultimum, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporum, and Xanthomonas campestris. When the Lysobacter strains were introduced into soil, however, no significant and consistent suppression of R. solani damping-off disease of sugar beet and cauliflower was observed. Subsequent bioassays further revealed that none of the Lysobacter strains was able to promote growth of sugar beet, cauliflower, onion, and Arabidopsis thaliana, either directly or via volatile compounds. The lack of in vivo activity is most likely attributed to poor colonization of the rhizosphere by the introduced Lysobacter strains. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that Lysobacter species have strong antagonistic activities against a range of pathogens, making them an important source for putative new enzymes and antimicrobial compounds. However, their potential role in R. solani disease suppressive soil could not be confirmed. In-depth omics'–based analyses will be needed to shed more light on the potential contribution of Lysobacter species to the collective activities of microbial consortia in disease suppressive soils. PMID:26635735

  12. Diversity and Activity of Lysobacter Species from Disease Suppressive Soils.

    PubMed

    Gómez Expósito, Ruth; Postma, Joeke; Raaijmakers, Jos M; De Bruijn, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The genus Lysobacter includes several species that produce a range of extracellular enzymes and other metabolites with activity against bacteria, fungi, oomycetes, and nematodes. Lysobacter species were found to be more abundant in soil suppressive against the fungal root pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, but their actual role in disease suppression is still unclear. Here, the antifungal and plant growth-promoting activities of 18 Lysobacter strains, including 11 strains from Rhizoctonia-suppressive soils, were studied both in vitro and in vivo. Based on 16S rRNA sequencing, the Lysobacter strains from the Rhizoctonia-suppressive soil belonged to the four species Lysobacter antibioticus, Lysobacter capsici, Lysobacter enzymogenes, and Lysobacter gummosus. Most strains showed strong in vitro activity against R. solani and several other pathogens, including Pythium ultimum, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporum, and Xanthomonas campestris. When the Lysobacter strains were introduced into soil, however, no significant and consistent suppression of R. solani damping-off disease of sugar beet and cauliflower was observed. Subsequent bioassays further revealed that none of the Lysobacter strains was able to promote growth of sugar beet, cauliflower, onion, and Arabidopsis thaliana, either directly or via volatile compounds. The lack of in vivo activity is most likely attributed to poor colonization of the rhizosphere by the introduced Lysobacter strains. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that Lysobacter species have strong antagonistic activities against a range of pathogens, making them an important source for putative new enzymes and antimicrobial compounds. However, their potential role in R. solani disease suppressive soil could not be confirmed. In-depth omics'-based analyses will be needed to shed more light on the potential contribution of Lysobacter species to the collective activities of microbial consortia in disease suppressive soils. PMID:26635735

  13. Diversity and Activity of Lysobacter Species from Disease Suppressive Soils.

    PubMed

    Gómez Expósito, Ruth; Postma, Joeke; Raaijmakers, Jos M; De Bruijn, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The genus Lysobacter includes several species that produce a range of extracellular enzymes and other metabolites with activity against bacteria, fungi, oomycetes, and nematodes. Lysobacter species were found to be more abundant in soil suppressive against the fungal root pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, but their actual role in disease suppression is still unclear. Here, the antifungal and plant growth-promoting activities of 18 Lysobacter strains, including 11 strains from Rhizoctonia-suppressive soils, were studied both in vitro and in vivo. Based on 16S rRNA sequencing, the Lysobacter strains from the Rhizoctonia-suppressive soil belonged to the four species Lysobacter antibioticus, Lysobacter capsici, Lysobacter enzymogenes, and Lysobacter gummosus. Most strains showed strong in vitro activity against R. solani and several other pathogens, including Pythium ultimum, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporum, and Xanthomonas campestris. When the Lysobacter strains were introduced into soil, however, no significant and consistent suppression of R. solani damping-off disease of sugar beet and cauliflower was observed. Subsequent bioassays further revealed that none of the Lysobacter strains was able to promote growth of sugar beet, cauliflower, onion, and Arabidopsis thaliana, either directly or via volatile compounds. The lack of in vivo activity is most likely attributed to poor colonization of the rhizosphere by the introduced Lysobacter strains. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that Lysobacter species have strong antagonistic activities against a range of pathogens, making them an important source for putative new enzymes and antimicrobial compounds. However, their potential role in R. solani disease suppressive soil could not be confirmed. In-depth omics'-based analyses will be needed to shed more light on the potential contribution of Lysobacter species to the collective activities of microbial consortia in disease suppressive soils.

  14. ANTIVENOM ACTIVITIES OF SOME SPECIES OF ANDROGRAPHIS WALL

    PubMed Central

    Balu, S.; Alagesaboopathi, C.

    1995-01-01

    Antivenom activities of the alcoholic extracts of three species of Andrographis wall, were measured at a concentration of 10,25,50,75 and 100 μg/ml by in vitro assay of HRBC membrane lysis. All the extracts were found to be effective in the inhibition of in vitro HRBC lysis. The maximum antivenom activity was found in the alcoholicextract of Andrographis paniculata Nees. PMID:22556697

  15. Activity of double wash-coat monolith catalyst with noble metals and zeolites in selective catalytic reduction of NO(x) with C3H6.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Dae; Kim, Ki-Joong; Kim, Yong-Hwa; Jeon, Gyung-Soo; Choi, Young-Key; Ahn, Ho-Geun

    2008-10-01

    The selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO(x) with C3H6 was studied in the presence of oxygen. The double wash-coat monolith catalysts for SCR comprised a lower layer of Au (or Pt)/Al2O3 and a upper layer of zeolites. The catalytic performance of the double wash-coated catalyst was remarkably improved to broaden the temperature window. The Au and Pt particles were dispersed uniformly on the monolith with particle sizes range of 3 approximately 5 nm and 5 approximately 10 nm, respectively. The catalyst binders used were colloidal silica, potassium silicate and tetraethyl orthosilicate, and the best catalyst activity was achieved with using colloidal silica as a binder. The zeolites used for the catalyst upper layer were MCM-41, FER, Y5.3-Zeolite and ZSM5, among which the NH4-ZSM5-coated catalyst showed the highest activity. The experimental results confirmed the promising potential of the double wash-coat, monolith catalyst for SCR of NO(x) with C3H6 due to the effective combination of noble metal monolith catalyst with zeolite for the removal of NO(x) by SCR with hydrocarbons.

  16. A nickel iron diselenide-derived efficient oxygen-evolution catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiang; Song, Fang; Hu, Xile

    2016-08-01

    Efficient oxygen-evolution reaction catalysts are required for the cost-effective generation of solar fuels. Metal selenides have been reported as promising oxygen-evolution catalysts; however, their active forms are yet to be elucidated. Here we show that a representative selenide catalyst, nickel selenide, is entirely converted into nickel hydroxide under oxygen-evolution conditions. This result indicates that metal selenides are unstable during oxygen evolution, and the in situ generated metal oxides are responsible for their activity. This knowledge inspired us to synthesize nanostructured nickel iron diselenide, a hitherto unknown metal selenide, and to use it as a templating precursor to a highly active nickel iron oxide catalyst. This selenide-derived oxide catalyses oxygen evolution with an overpotential of only 195 mV for 10 mA cm-2. Our work underscores the importance of identifying the active species of oxygen-evolution catalysts, and demonstrates how such knowledge can be applied to develop better catalysts.

  17. A highly active and coke-resistant steam reforming catalyst comprising uniform nickel-iron alloy nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Koike, Mitsuru; Li, Dalin; Nakagawa, Yoshinao; Tomishige, Keiichi

    2012-12-01

    Doing fine with Ni-Fe: The calcination and reduction of a hydrotalcite precursor containing Ni and Fe ions gives uniform Ni-Fe alloy nanoparticles mixed with Mg(Ni, Fe, Al)O particles. The uniformity of the Ni-Fe alloy nanoparticles is connected to the catalyst's high activity and resistance to coke formation in toluene and phenol steam reforming reactions.

  18. A Simple, Efficient Synthesis of 2-Aryl Benzimidazoles Using Silica Supported Periodic Acid Catalyst and Evaluation of Anticancer Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sontakke, Vyankat A.; Ghosh, Sougata; Lawande, Pravin P.; Chopade, Balu A.; Shinde, Vaishali S.

    2013-01-01

    A new, efficient method for the synthesis of 2-aryl substituted benzimidazole by using silica supported periodic acid (H5IO6-SiO2) as a catalyst has been developed. The salient feature of the present method includes mild reaction condition, short reaction time, high yield and easy workup procedure. The synthesized benzimidazoles exhibited potent anticancer activity against MCF7 and HL60 cell lines. PMID:24052861

  19. Design of a high activity and selectivity alcohol catalyst. Eighth quarterly report, May 7, 1992--August 7, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, H.C.; Mills, G.A.

    1992-07-30

    In methanol dehydration by K-doped Rh-Mo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, while higher K levels reduced the dehydration propensity of the surface, at higher levels the potassium oxide layer formed after doping and calcining the surface interferes detrimentally with the Rh-Mo active metallic sites. Silica- and alumina-supported catalysts with 0.5% Rh loading were synthesized and tested for hydrogenation of CO.

  20. Catalyst-Free Difunctionalization of Activated Alkenes in Water: Efficient Synthesis of β-Keto Sulfides and Sulfones.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huamin; Wang, Guangyu; Lu, Qingquan; Chiang, Chien-Wei; Peng, Pan; Zhou, Jiufu; Lei, Aiwen

    2016-10-01

    Difunctionalization of activated alkenes, a powerful strategy in chemical synthesis, has been accomplished for direct synthesis of a series of β-keto sulfides and β-keto sulfones. The transformation, mediated by O2 , proceeds smoothly in water and without any catalyst. Prominent advantages of this method include mild reaction conditions, purification simplicity, and gram-scale synthesis, underlining the practical utility of this methodology. PMID:27500979

  1. Antioxidant, antimicrobial and antiproliferative activities of five lichen species.

    PubMed

    Mitrović, Tatjana; Stamenković, Slaviša; Cvetković, Vladimir; Tošić, Svetlana; Stanković, Milan; Radojević, Ivana; Stefanović, Olgica; Comić, Ljiljana; Dačić, Dragana; Curčić, Milena; Marković, Snežana

    2011-01-01

    The antioxidative, antimicrobial and antiproliferative potentials of the methanol extracts of the lichen species Parmelia sulcata, Flavoparmelia caperata, Evernia prunastri, Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea were evaluated. The total phenolic content of the tested extracts varied from 78.12 to 141.59 mg of gallic acid equivalent (GA)/g of extract and the total flavonoid content from 20.14 to 44.43 mg of rutin equivalent (Ru)/g of extract. The antioxidant capacities of the lichen extracts were determined by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals scavenging. Hypogymnia physodes with the highest phenolic content showed the strongest DPPH radical scavenging effect. Further, the antimicrobial potential of the lichen extracts was determined by a microdilution method on 29 microorganisms, including 15 strains of bacteria, 10 species of filamentous fungi and 4 yeast species. A high antimicrobial activity of all the tested extracts was observed with more potent inhibitory effects on the growth of Gram (+) bacteria. The highest antimicrobial activity among lichens was demonstrated by Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea. Finally, the antiproliferative activity of the lichen extracts was explored on the colon cancer adenocarcinoma cell line HCT-116 by MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) viability assay and acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining. The methanol extracts of Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea showed a better cytotoxic activity than the other extracts. All lichen species showed the ability to induce apoptosis of HCT-116 cells.

  2. Antioxidant, Antimicrobial and Antiproliferative Activities of Five Lichen Species

    PubMed Central

    Mitrović, Tatjana; Stamenković, Slaviša; Cvetković, Vladimir; Tošić, Svetlana; Stanković, Milan; Radojević, Ivana; Stefanović, Olgica; Čomić, Ljiljana; Đačić, Dragana; Ćurčić, Milena; Marković, Snežana

    2011-01-01

    The antioxidative, antimicrobial and antiproliferative potentials of the methanol extracts of the lichen species Parmelia sulcata, Flavoparmelia caperata, Evernia prunastri, Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea were evaluated. The total phenolic content of the tested extracts varied from 78.12 to 141.59 mg of gallic acid equivalent (GA)/g of extract and the total flavonoid content from 20.14 to 44.43 mg of rutin equivalent (Ru)/g of extract. The antioxidant capacities of the lichen extracts were determined by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals scavenging. Hypogymnia physodes with the highest phenolic content showed the strongest DPPH radical scavenging effect. Further, the antimicrobial potential of the lichen extracts was determined by a microdilution method on 29 microorganisms, including 15 strains of bacteria, 10 species of filamentous fungi and 4 yeast species. A high antimicrobial activity of all the tested extracts was observed with more potent inhibitory effects on the growth of Gram (+) bacteria. The highest antimicrobial activity among lichens was demonstrated by Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea. Finally, the antiproliferative activity of the lichen extracts was explored on the colon cancer adenocarcinoma cell line HCT-116 by MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) viability assay and acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining. The methanol extracts of Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea showed a better cytotoxic activity than the other extracts. All lichen species showed the ability to induce apoptosis of HCT-116 cells. PMID:21954369

  3. Hydrodeoxygenation of prairie cordgrass bio-oil over Ni based activated carbon synergistic catalysts combined with different metals.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shouyun; Wei, Lin; Zhao, Xianhui; Kadis, Ethan; Cao, Yuhe; Julson, James; Gu, Zhengrong

    2016-06-25

    Bio-oil can be upgraded through hydrodeoxygenation (HDO). Low-cost and effective catalysts are crucial for the HDO process. In this study, four inexpensive combinations of Ni based activated carbon synergistic catalysts including Ni/AC, Ni-Fe/AC, Ni-Mo/AC and Ni-Cu/AC were evaluated for HDO of prairie cordgrass (PCG) bio-oil. The tests were carried out in the autoclave under mild operating conditions with 500psig of H2 pressure and 350°C temperature. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The results show that all synergistic catalysts had significant improvements on the physicochemical properties (water content, pH, oxygen content, higher heating value and chemical compositions) of the upgraded PCG bio-oil. The higher heating value of the upgraded bio-oil (ranging from 29.65MJ/kg to 31.61MJ/kg) improved significantly in comparison with the raw bio-oil (11.33MJ/kg), while the oxygen content reduced to only 21.70-25.88% from 68.81% of the raw bio-oil. Compared to raw bio-oil (8.78% hydrocarbons and no alkyl-phenols), the Ni/AC catalysts produced the highest content of gasoline range hydrocarbons (C6-C12) at 32.63% in the upgraded bio-oil, while Ni-Mo/AC generated the upgraded bio-oil with the highest content of gasoline blending alkyl-phenols at 38.41%.

  4. Hydrodeoxygenation of prairie cordgrass bio-oil over Ni based activated carbon synergistic catalysts combined with different metals.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shouyun; Wei, Lin; Zhao, Xianhui; Kadis, Ethan; Cao, Yuhe; Julson, James; Gu, Zhengrong

    2016-06-25

    Bio-oil can be upgraded through hydrodeoxygenation (HDO). Low-cost and effective catalysts are crucial for the HDO process. In this study, four inexpensive combinations of Ni based activated carbon synergistic catalysts including Ni/AC, Ni-Fe/AC, Ni-Mo/AC and Ni-Cu/AC were evaluated for HDO of prairie cordgrass (PCG) bio-oil. The tests were carried out in the autoclave under mild operating conditions with 500psig of H2 pressure and 350°C temperature. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The results show that all synergistic catalysts had significant improvements on the physicochemical properties (water content, pH, oxygen content, higher heating value and chemical compositions) of the upgraded PCG bio-oil. The higher heating value of the upgraded bio-oil (ranging from 29.65MJ/kg to 31.61MJ/kg) improved significantly in comparison with the raw bio-oil (11.33MJ/kg), while the oxygen content reduced to only 21.70-25.88% from 68.81% of the raw bio-oil. Compared to raw bio-oil (8.78% hydrocarbons and no alkyl-phenols), the Ni/AC catalysts produced the highest content of gasoline range hydrocarbons (C6-C12) at 32.63% in the upgraded bio-oil, while Ni-Mo/AC generated the upgraded bio-oil with the highest content of gasoline blending alkyl-phenols at 38.41%. PMID:26902668

  5. Exploring the activity of a novel Au/TiC(001) model catalyst towards CO and CO2 hydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asara, Gian Giacomo; Ricart, Josep M.; Rodriguez, Jose A.; Illas, Francesc

    2015-10-01

    Small metallic nanoparticles supported on transition metal carbides exhibit an unexpected high activity towards a series of chemical reactions. In particular, the Au/TiC system has proven to be an excellent catalyst for SO2 decomposition, thiophene hydrodesulfurization, O2 and H2 dissociation and the water gas shift reaction. Recent studies have shown that Au/TiC is a very good catalyst for the reverse water-gas shift (CO2 + H2 → CO + H2O) and CO2 hydrogenation to methanol. The present work further expands the range of applicability of this novel type of systems by exploring the catalytic activity of Au/TiC towards the hydrogenation of CO or CO2 with periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations on model systems. Hydrogen dissociates easily on Au/TiC but direct hydrogenation of CO to methanol is hindered by very high activation barriers implying that, on this model catalyst, methanol production from CO2 involves the hydrogenation of a HOCO-like intermediate. When dealing with mixtures of syngas (CO/CO2/H2/H2O), CO could be transformed into CO2 through the water gas shift reaction with subsequent hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol.

  6. Exploring the activity of a novel Au/TiC(001) model catalyst towards CO and CO2 hydrogenation

    DOE PAGES

    Asara, Gian Giacomo; Ricart, Josep M.; Rodriguez, Jose A.; Illas, Francesc

    2015-02-02

    Small metallic nanoparticles supported on transition metal carbides exhibit an unexpected high activity towards a series of chemical reactions. In particular, the Au/TiC system has proven to be an excellent catalyst for SO2 decomposition, thiophene hydrodesulfurization, O2 and H2 dissociation and the water gas shift reaction. Recent studies have shown that Au/TiC is a very good catalyst for the reverse water–gas shift (CO2 + H2 → CO + H2O) and CO2 hydrogenation to methanol. The present work further expands the range of applicability of this novel type of systems by exploring the catalytic activity of Au/TiC towards the hydrogenation ofmore » CO or CO2 with periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations on model systems. Hydrogen dissociates easily on Au/TiC but direct hydrogenation of CO to methanol is hindered by very high activation barriers implying that, on this model catalyst, methanol production from CO2 involves the hydrogenation of a HOCO-like intermediate. Thus, when dealing with mixtures of syngas (CO/CO2/H2/H2O), CO could be transformed into CO2 through the water gas shift reaction with subsequent hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol.« less

  7. Design and preparation of highly active carbon nanotube-supported sulfated TiO 2 and platinum catalysts for methanol electrooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Huanqiao; Xiao, Pu; Qiu, Xinping; Zhu, Wentao

    A novel electrocatalyst structure of carbon nanotube-supported sulfated TiO 2 and Pt (Pt-S-TiO 2/CNT) is reported. The Pt-S-TiO 2/CNT catalysts are prepared by a combination of improved sol-gel and ethylene glycol reduction methods. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction show that the sulfated TiO 2 is amorphous and is coated uniformly on the surface of the CNTs. Pt nanoparticles of about 3.6 nm in size are homogenously dispersed on the sulfated TiO 2 surface. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis proves that the CNT surfaces are modified with sulfated TiO 2 and a high concentration of SO x, and adsorbed OH species exist on the surface of the sulfated TiO 2. Electrochemical studies are carried out using chronoamperometry, cyclic voltammetry, CO stripping voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy. The results indicate that Pt-S-TiO 2/CNT catalysts have much higher catalytic activity and CO tolerance for methanol electrooxidation than Pt/TiO 2/CNTs, Pt/CNTs and commercial Pt/C.

  8. [Catalytic activity of TiO2 pillared bentonite for degradation of gaseous toluene: relationship between the effect of humidity and the catalyst structure].

    PubMed

    Jin, Su-jun; Chen, Xia-sheng; Li, Shuang; Zhang, Xing-wang; Shen, Xue-you

    2008-12-01

    Titania pillared bentonite was prepared by the sol method. The results of N2 adsorption-desorption showed that the specific surface areas of the catalysts calcined at 573, 673 and 773 K were 140.15, 110.13 and 88.38 m2/g, respectively. Their catalytic activities were evaluated for the gas phase degradation of toluene. The effects of humidity on the activity were studied in a continuous system. Results indicated that competitive adsorption between toluene and water molecules occurred on the catalyst surface, thus the photoactivities decreased with the increasing humidity. The photodegradation matched well with the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) kinetic model, and the adsorption constants of water for the catalysts calcined at 573, 673, and 773 K were 2.8 x 10(-5) , 4.1 x 10(-5) and 1.8 x 10(-4) m3 x mg(-1), respectively. The photoactivity of the catalyst calcined at 573 K was worst under low humidity but was best under high humidity compared with those of the catalysts calcined at 673 K and 773 K, suggesting it was most capable of resisting the impact of humidity. The thermal desorption was adopted to analyse the adsorption capability of toluene on catalysts. As the relative humidity increased from 25% to 75%, the adsorption amount of toluene for the catalysts calcined at 573, 673, and 773 K decreased from 184.8 to 3.25 microg/g, 130.5 to 1.92 microg/g, 77.6 to 1.65 microg/g, respectively. Adsorption capability of catalysts increased with the specific surface area, thus the apparent adsorption constant of water was reduced and the ability to resist the effect of humidity was enhanced. Experimental results indicate that during practical application of titania pillared bentonite for gaseous pollutants degradation, the environmental humidity and catalyst structure should be considered to screen out the catalyst with best activity.

  9. Structure and catalytic activity of Ru(Rh)/ThO sub 2 CO hydrogenation and NiW/Al sub 2 O sub 3 hydrodesulfurization catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.S.

    1989-01-01

    The surface structures of catalysts prepared from oxidation of Ru{sub x}Th{sub y} intermetallics and Ru/ThO{sub 2} supported catalysts prepared by impregnation were studied using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (ESCA or XPS), ion scattering spectroscopy (ISS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), gravimetric analysis and chemisorption. XRD measurements and gravimetric analysis indicate that all Ru{sub x}Th{sub y} intermetallics are extensively decomposed on oxidation at 350{degree}C. ESCA and ISS studies showed surface enrichment in Th for all intermetallic-derived catalysts. The structure of the intermetallic-derived catalysts can best be described as Ru particles embedded in a ThO{sub 2}-rich overlayer. In contrast, ESCA and ISS measurements indicate that the surface structure of the impregnated catalyst consists of Ru particles deposited on top of the ThO{sub 2} carrier. The methane selectivity for the catalysts derived from oxidation of Ru{sub 3}Th{sub 7} is significantly higher than that for the corresponding supported Ru/ThO{sub 2} catalyst. The TOF for CO hydrogenation of the catalyst derived from oxidation of Ru{sub 3}Th{sub 7} is two orders of magnitude higher than that of the corresponding Ru/ThO{sub 2} catalyst. The CO hydrogenation TOF of Rh/ThO{sub 2} catalysts prepared from Rh(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}, was not affected by Rh dispersion, impregnation medium and activation procedure. A modified ESCA method, was used to determine the extent of Ni reduction and sulfidation in a series of Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. The extent of Ni reduction and sulfidation measured by the modified ESCA method correlated well with the data obtained by gravimetric analysis and chemical extraction.

  10. Correction: Particle shape optimization by changing from an isotropic to an anisotropic nanostructure: preparation of highly active and stable supported Pt catalysts in microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Parapat, Riny Y; Wijaya, Muliany; Schwarze, Michael; Selve, Sören; Willinger, Marc; Schomäcker, Reinhard

    2016-04-01

    Correction for 'Particle shape optimization by changing from an isotropic to an anisotropic nanostructure: preparation of highly active and stable supported Pt catalysts in microemulsions' by Riny Y. Parapat et al., Nanoscale, 2013, 5, 796-805. PMID:26961853

  11. Correction: Particle shape optimization by changing from an isotropic to an anisotropic nanostructure: preparation of highly active and stable supported Pt catalysts in microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parapat, Riny Y.; Wijaya, Muliany; Schwarze, Michael; Selve, Sören; Willinger, Marc; Schomäcker, Reinhard

    2016-03-01

    Correction for `Particle shape optimization by changing from an isotropic to an anisotropic nanostructure: preparation of highly active and stable supported Pt catalysts in microemulsions' by Riny Y. Parapat et al., Nanoscale, 2013, 5, 796-805.

  12. Turning aluminium into a noble-metal-like catalyst for low-temperature activation of molecular hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Irinder S; Chaudhuri, Santanu; Veyan, Jean François; Chabal, Yves J

    2011-11-01

    Activation of molecular hydrogen is the first step in producing many important industrial chemicals that have so far required expensive noble-metal catalysts and thermal activation. We demonstrate here that aluminium doped with very small amounts of titanium can activate molecular hydrogen at temperatures as low as 90 K. Using an approach that uses CO as a probe molecule, we identify the atomistic arrangement of the catalytically active sites containing Ti on Al(111) surfaces, combining infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy and first-principles modelling. CO molecules, selectively adsorbed on catalytically active sites, form a complex with activated hydrogen that is removed at remarkably low temperatures (115 K; possibly as a molecule). These results provide the first direct evidence that Ti-doped Al can carry out the essential first step of molecular hydrogen activation under nearly barrierless conditions, thereby challenging the monopoly of noble metals in hydrogen activation. PMID:21946610

  13. Iron(II) Active Species in Iron-Bisphosphine Catalyzed Kumada and Suzuki-Miyaura Cross-Couplings of Phenyl Nucleophiles and Secondary Alkyl Halides.

    PubMed

    Daifuku, Stephanie L; Kneebone, Jared L; Snyder, Benjamin E R; Neidig, Michael L

    2015-09-01

    While previous studies have identified FeMes2(SciOPP) as the active catalyst species in iron-SciOPP catalyzed Kumada cross-coupling of mesitylmagnesium bromide and primary alkyl halides, the active catalyst species in cross-couplings with phenyl nucleophiles, where low valent iron species might be prevalent due to accessible reductive elimination pathways, remains undefined. In the present study, in situ Mössbauer and magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopic studies combined with inorganic syntheses and reaction studies are employed to evaluate the in situ formed iron species and identify the active catalytic species in iron-SciOPP catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura and Kumada cross-couplings of phenyl nucleophiles and secondary alkyl halides. While reductive elimination to form Fe(η(6)-biphenyl)(SciOPP) occurs upon reaction of FeCl2(SciOPP) with phenyl nucleophiles, this iron(0) species is not found to be kinetically competent for catalysis. Importantly, mono- and bis-phenylated iron(II)-SciOPP species that form prior to reductive elimination are identified, where both species are found to be reactive toward electrophile at catalytically relevant rates. The higher selectivity toward the formation of cross-coupled product observed for the monophenylated species combined with the undertransmetalated nature of the in situ iron species in both Kumada and Suzuki-Miyaura reactions indicates that Fe(Ph)X(SciOPP) (X = Br, Cl) is the predominant reactive species in cross-coupling. Overall, these studies demonstrate that low-valent iron is not required for the generation of highly reactive species for effective aryl-alkyl cross-couplings. PMID:26266698

  14. Iron(II) Active Species in Iron-Bisphosphine Catalyzed Kumada and Suzuki-Miyaura Cross-Couplings of Phenyl Nucleophiles and Secondary Alkyl Halides.

    PubMed

    Daifuku, Stephanie L; Kneebone, Jared L; Snyder, Benjamin E R; Neidig, Michael L

    2015-09-01

    While previous studies have identified FeMes2(SciOPP) as the active catalyst species in iron-SciOPP catalyzed Kumada cross-coupling of mesitylmagnesium bromide and primary alkyl halides, the active catalyst species in cross-couplings with phenyl nucleophiles, where low valent iron species might be prevalent due to accessible reductive elimination pathways, remains undefined. In the present study, in situ Mössbauer and magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopic studies combined with inorganic syntheses and reaction studies are employed to evaluate the in situ formed iron species and identify the active catalytic species in iron-SciOPP catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura and Kumada cross-couplings of phenyl nucleophiles and secondary alkyl halides. While reductive elimination to form Fe(η(6)-biphenyl)(SciOPP) occurs upon reaction of FeCl2(SciOPP) with phenyl nucleophiles, this iron(0) species is not found to be kinetically competent for catalysis. Importantly, mono- and bis-phenylated iron(II)-SciOPP species that form prior to reductive elimination are identified, where both species are found to be reactive toward electrophile at catalytically relevant rates. The higher selectivity toward the formation of cross-coupled product observed for the monophenylated species combined with the undertransmetalated nature of the in situ iron species in both Kumada and Suzuki-Miyaura reactions indicates that Fe(Ph)X(SciOPP) (X = Br, Cl) is the predominant reactive species in cross-coupling. Overall, these studies demonstrate that low-valent iron is not required for the generation of highly reactive species for effective aryl-alkyl cross-couplings.

  15. Iron(II) Active Species in Iron–Bisphosphine Catalyzed Kumada and Suzuki–Miyaura Cross-Couplings of Phenyl Nucleophiles and Secondary Alkyl Halides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    While previous studies have identified FeMes2(SciOPP) as the active catalyst species in iron–SciOPP catalyzed Kumada cross-coupling of mesitylmagnesium bromide and primary alkyl halides, the active catalyst species in cross-couplings with phenyl nucleophiles, where low valent iron species might be prevalent due to accessible reductive elimination pathways, remains undefined. In the present study, in situ Mössbauer and magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopic studies combined with inorganic syntheses and reaction studies are employed to evaluate the in situ formed iron species and identify the active catalytic species in iron–SciOPP catalyzed Suzuki–Miyaura and Kumada cross-couplings of phenyl nucleophiles and secondary alkyl halides. While reductive elimination to form Fe(η6-biphenyl)(SciOPP) occurs upon reaction of FeCl2(SciOPP) with phenyl nucleophiles, this iron(0) species is not found to be kinetically competent for catalysis. Importantly, mono- and bis-phenylated iron(II)–SciOPP species that form prior to reductive elimination are identified, where both species are found to be reactive toward electrophile at catalytically relevant rates. The higher selectivity toward the formation of cross-coupled product observed for the monophenylated species combined with the undertransmetalated nature of the in situ iron species in both Kumada and Suzuki–Miyaura reactions indicates that Fe(Ph)X(SciOPP) (X = Br, Cl) is the predominant reactive species in cross-coupling. Overall, these studies demonstrate that low-valent iron is not required for the generation of highly reactive species for effective aryl-alkyl cross-couplings. PMID:26266698

  16. Visible light active, nano-architectured metal oxide photo-catalysts for solar fuel applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaTempa, Thomas Joseph, Jr.

    Large-scale implementation of renewable energy sources such as solar requires the development of an efficient energy capture, conversion and storage scheme. Harnessing solar energy to create storable fuels, i.e., solar fuels, provides a unique strategy to meet this objective. In this regard, hydrogen generation through water photoelectrolysis and methane generation via the photocatalytic conversion of carbon dioxide and water vapor are investigated. The primary motivation of this work lies in the development of efficient, low cost materials for solar fuel applications. Metal oxide semiconductors such as n-type titanium dioxide (TiO 2) have generated significant interest in the scientific community due to their low cost, stability and high photocatalytic activity under band gap illumination. The implementation of nano-structured materials has significantly enhanced the conversion efficiency obtained with TiO2 in applications such as water photoelectrolysis. Despite these advancements, TiO2 has an inherently poor photoresponse due its wide band gap (3.0-3.2 eV), which accounts for ≈ 5% of the solar spectrum energy. Therefore, the primary objective of this work is to develop materials with a photocatalytic activity approaching that of TiO2, while shifting the photo-response to harness the visible light portion of the solar spectrum. Two differing approaches are evaluated in this work to meet this objective. Hematite (alpha-Fe2O3) has a band gap ≈ 2.2 eV, well suited for capturing solar energy, but suffers from intrinsically poor electrical characteristics. To overcome these limitations, iron oxide nanotubes were developed using a temperature controlled anodization technique. This provides greater control over the film morphology to create high aspect ratio nano-structures approximately 1-4 mum in length, sufficient to harness solar energy, with a wall thickness approaching 10 nm to improve the electrical characteristics for photocatalytic application. The

  17. Pincer Ligand Modifications To Tune the Activation Barrier for H2 Elimination in Water Splitting Milstein Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Sandhya, Karakkadparambil S; Remya, Geetha S; Suresh, Cherumuttathu H

    2015-12-01

    Modifications on the ligand environment of Milstein ruthenium(II) pincer hydride catalysts have been proposed to fine-tune the activation free energy, ΔG(⧧) for the key step of H2 elimination in the water splitting reaction. This study conducted at the B3LYP level of density functional theory including the solvation effect reveals that changing the bulky t-butyl group at the P-arm of the pincer ligand by methyl or ethyl group can reduce the ΔG(⧧) by a substantial margin, ∼ 10 kcal/mol. The reduction in the steric effect of the pincer ligand causes exothermic association of the water molecule to the metal center and leads to significant stabilization of all the subsequent reaction intermediates and the transition state compared to those of the original Milstein catalyst that promotes endothermic association of the water molecule. Though electron donating groups on the pyridyl unit of the pincer ligand are advantageous for reducing the activation barrier in the gas phase, the effect is only 1-1.4 kcal/mol compared to that of an electron withdrawing group. The absolute minimum of the electrostatic potential at the hydride ligand and carbonyl stretching frequency of the catalyst are useful parameters to gauge the effect of ligand environment on the H2 elimination step of the water splitting reaction. PMID:26575086

  18. Modification of Pd-CeO 2 catalyst by different treatments: Effect on the structure and CO oxidation activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Weng, Duan; Wu, Xiaodong; Ran, Rui

    2011-02-01

    To investigate the interaction between noble metal and CeO2, a Pd-doped CeO2 catalyst was prepared by sol-gel method, and the catalyst was then treated in static air and a H2/O2 alternating flow at 800 °C, respectively. It is found by step-scanning XRD that Pd ions migrate out of the ceria lattice during the redox treatment, while the exudation of Pd is not so obvious after the oxidative treatment. For the CO oxidation activity, the redox treated catalyst is seriously weakened compared with the oxidative-treated one. This difference is ascribed to the encapsulation of Pd crystallites by the CeO2 support during the redox treatment, which is confirmed by XPS and CO-TPR. Based on the activity and FTIR results, it is proposed that, CO oxidation at low temperatures proceeds mainly via the reaction between the adsorbed CO on Pd sites and the lattice oxygen of surface CeO2 at the Pd-Ce interface.

  19. High catalytic activity and pollutants resistivity using Fe-AAPyr cathode catalyst for microbial fuel cell application

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Carlo; Serov, Alexey; Villarrubia, Claudia W. Narvaez; Stariha, Sarah; Babanova, Sofia; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Schuler, Andrew J.; Atanassov, Plamen

    2015-01-01

    For the first time, a new generation of innovative non-platinum group metal catalysts based on iron and aminoantipyrine as precursor (Fe-AAPyr) has been utilized in a membraneless single-chamber microbial fuel cell (SCMFC) running on wastewater. Fe-AAPyr was used as an oxygen reduction catalyst in a passive gas-diffusion cathode and implemented in SCMFC design. This catalyst demonstrated better performance than platinum (Pt) during screening in “clean” conditions (PBS), and no degradation in performance during the operation in wastewater. The maximum power density generated by the SCMFC with Fe-AAPyr was 167 ± 6 μW cm−2 and remained stable over 16 days, while SCMFC with Pt decreased to 113 ± 4 μW cm−2 by day 13, achieving similar values of an activated carbon based cathode. The presence of S2− and showed insignificant decrease of ORR activity for the Fe-AAPyr. The reported results clearly demonstrate that Fe-AAPyr can be utilized in MFCs under the harsh conditions of wastewater. PMID:26563922

  20. Spectroscopic investigation of heterogeneous Ziegler-Natta catalysts: Ti and Mg chloride tetrahydrofuranates, their interaction compound, and the role of the activator.

    PubMed

    Seenivasan, Kalaivani; Sommazzi, Anna; Bonino, Francesca; Bordiga, Silvia; Groppo, Elena

    2011-07-25

    X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), Infrared, Raman, and UV/Vis spectroscopy have been used to investigate the structural, vibrational, and optical properties of Ti and Mg chloride tetrahydrofuranates as precursors of heterogeneous Ziegler-Natta catalysts for polyethylene production; as well as their interaction compound (pro-catalyst) and the final catalyst obtained after interaction with the AlR(3) activator. Although the structure of the precursors and of the pro-catalyst were well known, that of the catalyst (obtained by reaction of the pro-catalyst with AlR(3)) was not easily obtainable from XRPD data. IR and Raman spectroscopy provided important information on tetrahydrofuran (thf) coordination and on the ν(M-Cl) region; whereas UV/Vis spectroscopy gave the direct proof on both the formal oxidation state and the coordination environment of the active Ti sites. Those presented herein are among the first direct experimental data on the structure of the active Ti sites in Ziegler-Natta catalysts, and can be used to validate the many computational studies that have been increasing exponentially in the last few decades.

  1. Morphological transformation during activation and reaction of an iron Fischer-Tropsch catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, N.B.; Kohler, S.; Harrington, M.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this project is to support the development of slurry-phase bubble column processes being studied at the La Porte Alternative Fuel Development Unit. This paper describes the aspects of Sandia`s recent work regarding the advancement and understanding of the iron catalyst used in the slurry phase process. A number of techniques were used to understand the chemical and physical effects of pretreatment and reaction on the attrition and carbon deposition characteristics of iron catalysts. Unless otherwise stated, the data discussed was derived form experiments carried out on the catalyst chosen for the summer 1994 Fischer-Tropsch run at LaPorte, UCI 1185-78-370, (an L 3950 type) that is 88% Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 11% CuO, and 0.052%K{sub 2}O.

  2. Selectivity loss of Pt/CeO{sub 2} PROX catalysts at low CO concentrations: mechanism and active site study.

    SciTech Connect

    Polster, C. S.; Zhang, R.; Cyb, M. T.; Miller, J. T.; Baertsch, C. D.

    2010-07-01

    CO and H{sub 2} oxidation were studied over a series of Pt/CeO{sub 2} catalysts with differing Pt loadings and dispersions. Kinetic rate analysis confirms the presence of dual Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) and Mars and van Krevelen (M-vK) pathways and is used to explain the loss in CO oxidation selectivity at low CO concentrations. In situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) shows the strong CO coverage dependence on both CO and O{sub 2} concentrations and explains the transition from L-H to M-vK reaction character. Redox site measurements are performed on Pt/CeO{sub 2} catalysts by anaerobic titrations under conditions where the M-vK pathway dominates the reaction rate. Similar redox site densities per interfacial Pt atom suggest that interfacial Pt-O-Ce sites are responsible for M-vK redox activity.

  3. Immobilization of a Metal-Nitrogen-Carbon Catalyst on Activated Carbon with Enhanced Cathode Performance in Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wulin; Logan, Bruce E

    2016-08-23

    Applications of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are limited in part by low power densities mainly due to cathode performance. Successful immobilization of an Fe-N-C co-catalyst on activated carbon (Fe-N-C/AC) improved the oxygen reduction reaction to nearly a four-electron transfer, compared to a twoelectron transfer achieved using AC. With acetate as the fuel, the maximum power density was 4.7±0.2 W m(-2) , which is higher than any previous report for an air-cathode MFC. With domestic wastewater as a fuel, MFCs with the Fe-N-C/AC cathode produced up to 0.8±0.03 W m(-2) , which was twice that obtained with a Pt-catalyzed cathode. The use of this Fe-N-C/AC catalyst can therefore substantially increase power production, and enable broader applications of MFCs for renewable electricity generation using waste materials.

  4. Graphene nanosheets-polypyrrole hybrid material as a highly active catalyst support for formic acid electro-oxidation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sudong; Shen, Chengmin; Liang, Yanyu; Tong, Hao; He, Wei; Shi, Xuezhao; Zhang, Xiaogang; Gao, Hong-jun

    2011-08-01

    A novel electrode material based on graphene oxide (GO)-polypyrrole (PPy) composites was synthesized by in situ chemical oxidation polymerization. Palladium nanoparticles (NPs) with a diameter of 4.0 nm were loaded on the reduced graphene oxide(RGO)-PPy composites by a microwave-assisted polyol process. Microstructure analysis showed that a layer of coated PPy film with monodisperse Pd NPs is present on the RGO surface. The Pd/RGO-PPy catalysts exhibit excellent catalytic activity and stability for formic acid electro-oxidation when the weight feed ratio of GO to pyrrole monomer is 2:1. The superior performance of Pd/RGO-PPy catalysts may arise from utilization of heterogeneous nucleation sites for NPs and the greatly increased electronic conductivity of the supports.

  5. On the design of Pt based catalysts. Combining porous architecture with surface modification by Sn for electrocatalytic activity enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flórez-Montaño, Jonathan; García, Gonzalo; Rodríguez, José L.; Pastor, Elena; Cappellari, Paula; Planes, Gabriel A.

    2015-05-01

    Metallic mesoporous (MP) catalysts with large surface area can be obtained in-situ, in a single step, by electrochemical reduction. In this work, the electrochemical behavior of MPPt and Sn modified mesoporous Pt (MPPt/Sn) was studied and compared with commercial carbon supported PtSn alloy (3:1). The electrochemical activity toward carbon monoxide and methanol oxidation reactions were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry, whereas X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to determine the surface composition and oxidation state of the atoms in the top layers of the catalysts. The analysis of methanol conversion to CO2 was performed with aid of differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS). Results reveal a better performance of the MPPt/Sn, which shows higher current density and energy conversion efficiency of fuel to CO2 than conventional carbon supported PtSn alloy (3:1).

  6. Graphene nanosheets-polypyrrole hybrid material as a highly active catalyst support for formic acid electro-oxidation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sudong; Shen, Chengmin; Liang, Yanyu; Tong, Hao; He, Wei; Shi, Xuezhao; Zhang, Xiaogang; Gao, Hong-jun

    2011-08-01

    A novel electrode material based on graphene oxide (GO)-polypyrrole (PPy) composites was synthesized by in situ chemical oxidation polymerization. Palladium nanoparticles (NPs) with a diameter of 4.0 nm were loaded on the reduced graphene oxide(RGO)-PPy composites by a microwave-assisted polyol process. Microstructure analysis showed that a layer of coated PPy film with monodisperse Pd NPs is present on the RGO surface. The Pd/RGO-PPy catalysts exhibit excellent catalytic activity and stability for formic acid electro-oxidation when the weight feed ratio of GO to pyrrole monomer is 2:1. The superior performance of Pd/RGO-PPy catalysts may arise from utilization of heterogeneous nucleation sites for NPs and the greatly increased electronic conductivity of the supports. PMID:21713273

  7. Plant species richness increases phosphatase activities in an experimental grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, Nina; Wilcke, Wolfgang; Oelmann, Yvonne

    2014-05-01

    Plant species richness has been shown to increase aboveground nutrient uptake requiring the mobilization of soil nutrient pools. For phosphorus (P) the underlying mechanisms for increased P release in soil under highly diverse grassland mixtures remain obscure because aboveground P storage and concentrations of inorganic and organic P in soil solution and differently reactive soil P pools are unrelated (Oelmann et al. 2011). The need of plants and soil microorganisms for P can increase the exudation of enzymes hydrolyzing organically bound P (phosphatases) which might represent an important release mechanism of inorganic P in a competitive environment such as highly diverse grassland mixtures. Our objectives were to test the effects of i) plant functional groups (legumes, grasses, non-leguminous tall and small herbs), and of (ii) plant species richness on microbial P (Pmic) and phosphatase activities in soil. In autumn 2013, we measured Pmic and alkaline phosphomonoesterase and phosphodiesterase activities in soil of 80 grassland mixtures comprising different community compositions and species richness (1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 60) in the Jena Experiment. In general, Pmic and enzyme activities were correlated (r = 0.59 and 0.46 for phosphomonoesterase and phosphodiesterase activities, respectively; p

  8. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of extracts prepared from Polygonaceae species.

    PubMed

    Orbán-Gyapai, Orsolya; Lajter, Ildikó; Hohmann, Judit; Jakab, Gusztáv; Vasas, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    The xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitory activity of aqueous and organic extracts of 27 selected species belonging in five genera (Fallopia, Oxyria, Persicaria, Polygonum and Rumex) of the family Polygonaceae occurring in the Carpathian Basin were tested in vitro. From different plant parts (aerial parts, leaves, flowers, fruits and roots), a total of 196 extracts were prepared by subsequent extraction with methanol and hot H2O and solvent-solvent partition of the MeOH extract yielding n-hexane, chloroform and 50% MeOH subextracts. It was found that the chloroform subextracts and/or the remaining 50% MeOH extracts of Fallopia species (F. bohemica, F. japonica and F. sachalinensis), Rumex species (R. acetosa, R. acetosella, R. alpinus, R. conglomeratus, R. crispus, R. hydrolapathus, R. pulcher, R. stenophyllus, R. thyrsiflorus, R. obtusifolius subsp. subalpinus, R. patientia) and Polygonum bistorta, Polygonum hydropiper, Polygonum lapathifolium and Polygonum viviparum demonstrated the highest XO inhibitory activity (>85% inhibition) at 400 µg/mL. The IC50 values of the active extracts were also determined. On the basis of the results, these plants, and especially P. hydropiper and R. acetosella, are considered worthy of activity-guided phytochemical investigations.

  9. Effect of pretreatment on the activity of a Ru-promoted Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} Fischer-Tropsch catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Belambe, A.R.; Oukaci, R.; Goodwin, J.G. Jr.

    1997-02-01

    The effect of calcination and reduction temperatures on the activity of a Ru-promoted Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst for the CO hydrogenation reaction has been studied. The catalyst was prepared by the incipient wetness impregnation method and calcined and reduced at various temperatures. Along with overall steady-state rate analysis, steady-state isotopic transient kinetic analysis was used to investigate the effect of the pretreatment conditions on the intrinsic activity and coverages of surface intermediates. Catalyst characterization techniques such as XRD, TPR, and hydrogen chemisorption were also used. The calcination temperature was found to have a pronounced effect on the overall activity of the catalyst but not on the intrinsic activity of the catalyst sites. On the other hand, the reduction temperature had only a negligible effect on the overall and intrinsic activities. The decrease in rate at high calcination temperatures was caused by a decrease in the number of surface active sites due to a decrease in the reducibility of the catalyst. Neither the reduction nor the calcination conditions had any effect on chain growth probability. Calcination temperature did have, however, a small effect on CH{sub 4} selectivity. 38 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. A Light-Activated Olefin Metathesis Catalyst Equipped with a Chromatic Orthogonal Self-Destruct Function.

    PubMed

    Sutar, Revannath L; Levin, Efrat; Butilkov, Danielle; Goldberg, Israel; Reany, Ofer; Lemcoff, N Gabriel

    2016-01-11

    A sulfur-chelated photolatent ruthenium olefin metathesis catalyst has been equipped with supersilyl protecting groups on the N-heterocyclic carbene ligand. The silyl groups function as an irreversible chromatic kill switch, thus decomposing the catalyst when it is irradiated with 254 nm UV light. Therefore, different types of olefin metathesis reactions may be started by irradiation with 350 nm UV light and prevented by irradiation with shorter wavelengths. The possibility to induce and impede catalysis just by using light of different frequencies opens the pathway for stereolithographic applications and novel light-guided chemical sequences.

  11. A Light-Activated Olefin Metathesis Catalyst Equipped with a Chromatic Orthogonal Self-Destruct Function.

    PubMed

    Sutar, Revannath L; Levin, Efrat; Butilkov, Danielle; Goldberg, Israel; Reany, Ofer; Lemcoff, N Gabriel

    2016-01-11

    A sulfur-chelated photolatent ruthenium olefin metathesis catalyst has been equipped with supersilyl protecting groups on the N-heterocyclic carbene ligand. The silyl groups function as an irreversible chromatic kill switch, thus decomposing the catalyst when it is irradiated with 254 nm UV light. Therefore, different types of olefin metathesis reactions may be started by irradiation with 350 nm UV light and prevented by irradiation with shorter wavelengths. The possibility to induce and impede catalysis just by using light of different frequencies opens the pathway for stereolithographic applications and novel light-guided chemical sequences. PMID:26586469

  12. Robust and efficient amide-based nonheme manganese(III) hydrocarbon oxidation catalysts: substrate and solvent effects on involvement and partition of multiple active oxidants.

    PubMed

    Song, Young Joo; Lee, Sun Hwa; Park, Hyun Min; Kim, Soo Hyun; Goo, Hyo Geun; Eom, Geun Hee; Lee, Ju Hoon; Lah, Myoung Soo; Kim, Youngmee; Kim, Sung-Jin; Lee, Ju Eun; Lee, Hong-In; Kim, Cheal

    2011-06-20

    Two new mononuclear nonheme manganese(III) complexes of tetradentate ligands containing two deprotonated amide moieties, [Mn(bpc)Cl(H(2)O)] (1) and [Mn(Me(2)bpb)Cl(H(2)O)]⋅CH(3)OH (2), were prepared and characterized. Complex 2 has also been characterized by X-ray crystallography. Magnetic measurements revealed that the complexes are high spin (S = 5/2) Mn(III) species with typical magnetic moments of 4.76 and 4.95 μ(B), respectively. These nonheme Mn(III) complexes efficiently catalyzed olefin epoxidation and alcohol oxidation upon treatment with MCPBA under mild experimental conditions. Olefin epoxidation by these catalysts is proposed to involve the multiple active oxidants Mn(V)=O, Mn(IV)=O, and Mn(III)-OO(O)CR. Evidence for this approach was derived from reactivity and Hammett studies, KIE (k(H)/k(D)) values, H(2)(18)O-exchange experiments, and the use of peroxyphenylacetic acid as a mechanistic probe. In addition, it has been proposed that the participation of Mn(V)=O, Mn(IV)=O, and Mn(III)-OOR could be controlled by changing the substrate concentration, and that partitioning between heterolysis and homolysis of the O-O bond of a Mn-acylperoxo intermediate (Mn-OOC(O)R) might be significantly affected by the nature of solvent, and that the O-O bond of the Mn-OOC(O)R might proceed predominantly by heterolytic cleavage in protic solvent. Therefore, a discrete Mn(V)=O intermediate appeared to be the dominant reactive species in protic solvents. Furthermore, we have observed close similarities between these nonheme Mn(III) complex systems and Mn(saloph) catalysts previously reported, suggesting that this simultaneous operation of the three active oxidants might prevail in all the manganese-catalyzed olefin epoxidations, including Mn(salen), Mn(nonheme), and even Mn(porphyrin) complexes. This mechanism provides the greatest congruity with related oxidation reactions by using certain Mn complexes as catalysts.

  13. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of Lychnophora species from Brazil ("Arnica").

    PubMed

    Filha, Z S Ferraz; Vitolo, I F; Fietto, L G; Lombardi, J A; Saúde-Guimarães, D A

    2006-08-11

    Twenty-two extracts from five Lychnophora species and one Lychnophoriopsis species, traditionally used in Brazil as analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and to treat bruise and rheumatism were examined for the inhibition of xanthine oxidase (XO), the enzyme that catalyses the metabolism of hypoxanthine and xanthine into uric acid. Sixteen extracts were tested. All of them were found to have excellent XO inhibitory activity, with inhibitions greater than 38% at 100 microg/mL in the assay mixture. The most active plants examined were Lychnophora trichocarpha, Lychnophora ericoides, Lychnophora staavioides and Lychnophoriopsis candelabrum, with inhibitions of 77%, 78%, 66% and 63% at 100 microg/mL, respectively, and IC(50) values of 6.16, 8.28, 33.97 and 37.70 microg/mL, respectively.

  14. Catalytic Y-tailed amphiphilic homopolymers – aqueous nanoreactors for high activity, low loading SCS pincer catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Joseph P.; Cotanda, Pepa; Kelley, Elizabeth G.; Moughton, Adam O.; Lu, Annhelen; Epps, Thomas H.; O’Reilly, Rachel K.

    2013-01-01

    A new amphiphilic homopolymer bearing an SCS pincer palladium complex has been synthesized by reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. The amphiphile has been shown to form spherical and worm-like micelles in water by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy and small angle neutron scattering. Segregation of reactive components within the palladium containing core results in increased catalytic activity of the pincer compound compared to small molecule analogues. This allows carbon-carbon bond forming reactions to be performed in water with reduced catalyst loadings and enhanced activity. PMID:23539324

  15. Nickel phosphide nanoparticles-nitrogen-doped graphene hybrid as an efficient catalyst for enhanced hydrogen evolution activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yuan; Yang, Na; Chen, Yinjuan; Lin, Yan; Li, Yanpeng; Liu, Yunqi; Liu, Chenguang

    2015-11-01

    Development of hybrid catalysts with high activity, good stability and low cost is extremely desirable for hydrogen production by electrolysis of water. In this work, a hybrid composed of Ni2P nanoparticles (NPs) on N-doped reduced graphene oxide (NRGO) is synthesized via an in situ thermal decomposition approach for the first time and investigated as a catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). The as-synthesized Ni2P/NRGO hybrid exhibits an enhanced catalytic activity with low onset overpotential (37 mV), a small Tafel slope (59 mV dec-1), a much larger exchange current density (4.9 × 10-5 A cm-2), and lower HER activation energy (46.9 kJ mol-1) than Ni2P/RGO hybrid. In addition, the Ni2P/NRGO hybrid maintains its catalytic activity for at least 60‧000 s in acidic media. The enhanced catalytic activity is attributed to the synergistic effect of N-doped RGO and Ni2P NPs, the charged natures of Ni and P, as well as the high electrical conductivity of Ni2P/NRGO hybrid. This study may offer a new strategy for improving the electrocatalytic activity for hydrogen production.

  16. Behavior of Au species in Au/Fe2O3 catalysts characterized by novel in situ heating techniques and aberration-corrected STEM imaging.

    PubMed

    Allard, Lawrence F; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Overbury, Steven H

    2010-08-01

    The recent advent of a novel design of in situ heating technology for electron microscopes has permitted unprecedented control of elevated temperature studies of catalytic materials, particularly when coupled with the sub-Angström imaging performance of a modern aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). Using micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS)-based Aduro heating chips from Protochips, Inc. (Raleigh, NC, USA) allows nearly instantaneous heating and cooling of catalyst powders, avoiding effects of temperature ramping as experienced with standard heating stages. The heating technology also provides stable operation limited only by the inherent drift in the microscope stage, thus allowing full image resolution to be achieved even at elevated temperatures. The present study details the use of both the high X-Y spatial resolution in both dark-field and simultaneous bright-field imaging, along with the high resolution in Z (depth sectioning) provided by the large probe incidence semiangle in the aberration-corrected instrument, to characterize the evolution of microstructure in a commercial Au/Fe2O3 water-gas shift catalyst during elevated temperature treatment. The phenomenon of Au diffusion to the surface of hematite support particles to form discrete crystalline Au nanoparticles in the 1-2 nm size range, after a prior leaching treatment to remove surface Au species has been characterized.

  17. A systematic investigation of quaternary ammonium ions as asymmetric phase-transfer catalysts. Application of quantitative structure activity/selectivity relationships.

    PubMed

    Denmark, Scott E; Gould, Nathan D; Wolf, Larry M

    2011-06-01

    Although the synthetic utility of asymmetric phase-transfer catalysis continues to expand, the number of proven catalyst types and design criteria remains limited. At the origin of this scarcity is a lack in understanding of how catalyst structural features affect the rate and enantioselectivity of phase transfer catalyzed reactions. Described in this paper is the development of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) and -selectivity relationships (QSSR) for the alkylation of a protected glycine imine with libraries of quaternary ammonium ion catalysts. Catalyst descriptors including ammonium ion accessibility, interfacial adsorption affinity, and partition coefficient were found to correlate meaningfully with catalyst activity. The physical nature of the descriptors was rationalized through differing contributions of the interfacial and extraction mechanisms to the reaction under study. The variation in the observed enantioselectivity was rationalized employing a comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) using both the steric and electrostatic fields of the catalysts. A qualitative analysis of the developed model reveals preferred regions for catalyst binding to afford both configurations of the alkylated product.

  18. Highly active Ce 1- xCu xO 2 nanocomposite catalysts for the low temperature oxidation of CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, Hailing; Zhang, Dengsong; Shi, Liyi; Yan, Tingting; Li, Hongrui

    2011-06-01

    A series of Ce 1- xCu xO 2 nanocomposite catalysts with various copper contents were synthesized by a simple hydrothermal method at low temperature without any surfactants, using mixed solutions of Cu(II) and Ce(III) nitrates as metal sources. These bimetal oxide nanocomposites were characterized by means of XRD, TEM, HRTEM, EDS, N 2 adsorption, H 2-TPR and XPS. The influence of Cu loading (5-25 mol%) and calcination temperature on the surface area, particle size and catalytic behavior of the nanocomposites have been discussed. The catalytic activity of Ce 1- xCu xO 2 nanocomposites was investigated using the test of CO oxidation reaction. The optimized performance was achieved for the Ce 0.80Cu 0.20O 2 nanocomposite catalyst, which exhibited superior reaction rate of 11.2 × 10 -4 mmol g -1 s -1 and high turnover frequency of 7.53 × 10 -2 s -1 (1% CO balanced with air at a rate of 40 mL min -1, at 90 °C). No obvious deactivation was observed after six times of catalytic reactions for Ce 0.80Cu 0.20O 2 nanocomposite catalyst.

  19. Optimization of Cu/activated carbon catalyst in low temperature selective catalytic reduction of NO process using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Amanpour, Javad; Salari, Dariush; Niaei, Aligholi; Mousavi, Seyed Mahdi; Panahi, Parvaneh Nakhostin

    2013-01-01

    Preparation of Cu/Activated Carbon (Cu/AC) catalyst was optimized for low temperature selective catalytic reduction of NO by using response surface methodology. A central composite design (CCD) was used to investigate the effects of three independent variables, namely pre-oxidization degree (HNO3%), Cu loading (wt.%) and calcination temperature on NO conversion efficiency. The CCD was consisted of 20 different preparation conditions of Cu/AC catalysts. The prepared catalysts were characterized by XRD and SEM techniques. Predicting NO conversion was carried out using a second order model obtained from designed experiments and statistical software Minitab 14. Regression and Pareto graphic analysis showed that all of the chosen parameters and some interactions were effective on the NO conversion. The optimal values were pre-oxidization in 10.2% HNO3, 6.1 wt.% Cu loading and 480°C for calcination temperature. Under the optimum condition, NO conversion (94.3%) was in a good agreement with predicted value (96.12%).

  20. Catalyst design based on agostic interactions: synthesis, characterization, and catalytic activity of bis(pyrazolyl)borate copper complexes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hou-Ji; Zhao, Qianyi; Zhang, Qian-Fan; Li, Jiaxuan; Hamilton, Ewan J M; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Lai-Sheng; Chen, Xuenian

    2016-06-21

    Agostic interactions are often used to activate inert C-H bonds, and thus facilitate new reactions. We report the first example of designed catalysts based on the agostic interaction. Novel copper(i) complexes [BBN(pz(x))2]Cu(PPh3)n (BBN = 9-borabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane; pz(x) = 3-substituted pyrazole; x = H, n = 2; x = Me, n = 1) and {[BBN(pz(iPr))2]Cu}2 have been synthesized and characterized. Single crystal studies of the three compounds show weak intramolecular C-HCu interactions which can be assigned as agostic or anagostic interactions. Catalytic studies of these complexes toward carbenoid insertion into N-H bonds indicate these weak interactions act as a "switch" which will be turned "on" if interacting with the substrate and "off" if eliminating the product and regenerating the weak interaction. The process of the "switch" turning "on" or "off", which is related to the catalytic effect, is found to be influenced by both steric effects and the solvent: a less sterically hindered catalyst in non-coordinating benzene results in high yield, while a more sterically hindered catalyst in coordinating THF results in relatively low yield. PMID:27171346