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Sample records for active catalyst surface

  1. Patched bimetallic surfaces are active catalysts for ammonia decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei; Vlachos, Dionisios G.

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia decomposition is often used as an archetypical reaction for predicting new catalytic materials and understanding the very reason of why some reactions are sensitive on material's structure. Core–shell or surface-segregated bimetallic nanoparticles expose outstanding activity for many heterogeneously catalysed reactions but the reasons remain elusive owing to the difficulties in experimentally characterizing active sites. Here by performing multiscale simulations in ammonia decomposition on various nickel loadings on platinum (111), we show that the very high activity of core–shell structures requires patches of the guest metal to create and sustain dual active sites: nickel terraces catalyse N−H bond breaking and nickel edge sites drive atomic nitrogen association. The structure sensitivity on these active catalysts depends profoundly on reaction conditions due to kinetically competing relevant elementary reaction steps. We expose a remarkable difference in active sites between transient and steady-state studies and provide insights into optimal material design. PMID:26443525

  2. Patched bimetallic surfaces are active catalysts for ammonia decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Wei; Vlachos, Dionisios G.

    2015-10-07

    In this study, ammonia decomposition is often used as an archetypical reaction for predicting new catalytic materials and understanding the very reason of why some reactions are sensitive on material’s structure. Core–shell or surface-segregated bimetallic nanoparticles expose outstanding activity for many heterogeneously catalysed reactions but the reasons remain elusive owing to the difficulties in experimentally characterizing active sites. Here by performing multiscale simulations in ammonia decomposition on various nickel loadings on platinum (111), we show that the very high activity of core–shell structures requires patches of the guest metal to create and sustain dual active sites: nickel terraces catalyse N-H bond breaking and nickel edge sites drive atomic nitrogen association. The structure sensitivity on these active catalysts depends profoundly on reaction conditions due to kinetically competing relevant elementary reaction steps. We expose a remarkable difference in active sites between transient and steady-state studies and provide insights into optimal material design.

  3. NREL Team Creates High-Activity, Durable Platinum Extended Surface Catalyst for Fuel Cells (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    Researchers with NREL's Fuel Cell team showed that platinum can replace copper nanowires in such a way that high-surface-area and high-specific-activity catalysts are produced, potentially allowing for lower-cost catalysts.

  4. Patched bimetallic surfaces are active catalysts for ammonia decomposition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Guo, Wei; Vlachos, Dionisios G.

    2015-10-07

    In this study, ammonia decomposition is often used as an archetypical reaction for predicting new catalytic materials and understanding the very reason of why some reactions are sensitive on material’s structure. Core–shell or surface-segregated bimetallic nanoparticles expose outstanding activity for many heterogeneously catalysed reactions but the reasons remain elusive owing to the difficulties in experimentally characterizing active sites. Here by performing multiscale simulations in ammonia decomposition on various nickel loadings on platinum (111), we show that the very high activity of core–shell structures requires patches of the guest metal to create and sustain dual active sites: nickel terraces catalyse N-Hmore » bond breaking and nickel edge sites drive atomic nitrogen association. The structure sensitivity on these active catalysts depends profoundly on reaction conditions due to kinetically competing relevant elementary reaction steps. We expose a remarkable difference in active sites between transient and steady-state studies and provide insights into optimal material design.« less

  5. Support chemistry, surface area, and preparation effects on sulfided NiMo catalyst activity

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, T.J.; McLaughlin, L.I.; Sandoval, R.S.

    1996-06-01

    Hydrous Metal Oxides (HMOs) are chemically synthesized materials which contain a homogeneous distribution of ion exchangeable alkali cations that provide charge compensation to the metal-oxygen framework. In terms of the major types of inorganic ion exchangers defined by Clearfield, these amorphous HMO materials are similar to both hydrous oxides and layered oxide ion exchangers (e.g., alkali metal titanates). For catalyst applications, the HMO material serves as an ion exchangeable support which facilitates the uniform incorporation of catalyst precursor species. Following catalyst precursor incorporation, an activation step is required to convert the catalyst precursor to the desired active phase. Considerable process development activities at Sandia National Laboratories related to HMO materials have resulted in bulk hydrous titanium oxide (HTO)- and silica-doped hydrous titanium oxide (HTO:Si)-supported NiMo catalysts that are more active in model reactions which simulate direct coal liquefaction (e.g., pyrene hydrogenation) than commercial {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported NiMo catalysts. However, a fundamental explanation does not exist for the enhanced activity of these novel catalyst materials; possible reasons include fundamental differences in support chemistry relative to commercial oxides, high surface area, or catalyst preparation effects (ion exchange vs. incipient wetness impregnation techniques). The goals of this paper are to identify the key factors which control sulfided NiMo catalyst activity, including those characteristics of HTO- and HTO:Si-supported NiMo catalysts which uniquely set them apart from conventional oxide supports.

  6. Catalyst activator

    DOEpatents

    McAdon, Mark H.; Nickias, Peter N.; Marks, Tobin J.; Schwartz, David J.

    2001-01-01

    A catalyst activator particularly adapted for use in the activation of metal complexes of metals of Group 3-10 for polymerization of ethylenically unsaturated polymerizable monomers, especially olefins, comprising two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms and a ligand structure including at least one bridging group connecting ligands on the two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms.

  7. The calculation of surface orbital energies for specific types of active sites on dispersed metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, R.L.; Lahanas, K.M.; Cole, F.

    1992-11-01

    An angular overlap calculation has been used to determine the s, p, and d orbital energy levels of the different types of surface sites present on dispersed metal catalysts. These data can permit a Frontier Molecular Orbital treatment of specific site activities as long as the surface orbital availability for overlap with adsorbed substrates is considered along with its energy value and symmetry.

  8. The calculation of surface orbital energies for specific types of active sites on dispersed metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, R.L.; Lahanas, K.M.; Cole, F.

    1992-01-01

    An angular overlap calculation has been used to determine the s, p, and d orbital energy levels of the different types of surface sites present on dispersed metal catalysts. These data can permit a Frontier Molecular Orbital treatment of specific site activities as long as the surface orbital availability for overlap with adsorbed substrates is considered along with its energy value and symmetry.

  9. Characterization of the surface chemical properties of activated carbons for catalyst preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Noh, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    The demands placed on activated carbon based technologies have outpaced fundamental studies of the relationship between the surface properties of carbons and their performance as adsorbents or as catalyst supports. This research is directed toward an understanding how the surface functionalities of activated carbons affect the catalytic phase impregnated onto the carbon support. The surface functionalities were characterized by acidity measurements employing gaseous base adsorption and aqueous base neutralization procedures. The results were examined with a simple amphoteric surface ionization model. An alternative technique to conventional potentiometric titration, designated mass titration, was developed. Employing this method, the point of zero charge (PZC) of the adsorbent was determined by the asymptotic pH value in the plot of pH vs. mass fraction of solid added to water. The methodology developed here for evaluating the PZC was used to investigate the effects of surface treatment with nitric acid on the PZC of carbons. The PZC decreased from 10 for the untreated carbon to 3.5 for the carbon receiving the most intense oxidation treatment. The carbon supported nickel precursors derived from the ion exchange procedures were characterized by temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), and their properties as a gasification catalyst were evaluated. The hydrogen consumption during TPR increased and the ignition temperature decreased as either the acidity of the carbon support increased or the PZC decreased. It is proposed that the PZC can be used as an index to characterize the carbon surface as a suitable support for a heterogeneous catalyst.

  10. Impact of carbon on the surface and activity of silica-carbon supported copper catalysts for reduction of nitrogen oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spassova, I.; Stoeva, N.; Nickolov, R.; Atanasova, G.; Khristova, M.

    2016-04-01

    Composite catalysts, prepared by one or more active components supported on a support are of interest because of the possible interaction between the catalytic components and the support materials. The supports of combined hydrophilic-hydrophobic type may influence how these materials maintain an active phase and as a result a possible cooperation between active components and the support material could occur and affects the catalytic behavior. Silica-carbon nanocomposites were prepared by sol-gel, using different in specific surface areas and porous texture carbon materials. Catalysts were obtained after copper deposition on these composites. The nanocomposites and the catalysts were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, TG, XRD, TEM- HRTEM, H2-TPR, and XPS. The nature of the carbon predetermines the composite's texture. The IEPs of carbon materials and silica is a force of composites formation and determines the respective distribution of the silica and carbon components on the surface of the composites. Copper deposition over the investigated silica-carbon composites leads to formation of active phases in which copper is in different oxidation states. The reduction of NO with CO proceeds by different paths on different catalysts due to the textural differences of the composites, maintaining different surface composition and oxidation states of copper.

  11. Study of the active surface on titanium oxide catalysts for the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Khanmamedov, T.K.; Kalinkin, A.V.; Rakhimova, N.R.

    1989-02-01

    A study was carried out on the change in the composition of a Ti-Mo-W catalyst depending on the conditions for their treatment by H/sub 2/S-SO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S-O/sub 2/ gas mixtures, which serve as models for the technological gases in Klaus apparatuses and the direct catalytic oxidation of H/sub 2/S. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to establish the formation of sulfur as S/sup 2/minus// and S/sup 6+/ on the surface. The presence of S/sup 6+/ along with the changes in E/sub b/ of the electrons in the T-Mo-W catalyst indicates the formation of MoS/sub 2/ and TiO(SO/sub 4/) species.

  12. On the design of Pt based catalysts. Combining porous architecture with surface modification by Sn for electrocatalytic activity enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flórez-Montaño, Jonathan; García, Gonzalo; Rodríguez, José L.; Pastor, Elena; Cappellari, Paula; Planes, Gabriel A.

    2015-05-01

    Metallic mesoporous (MP) catalysts with large surface area can be obtained in-situ, in a single step, by electrochemical reduction. In this work, the electrochemical behavior of MPPt and Sn modified mesoporous Pt (MPPt/Sn) was studied and compared with commercial carbon supported PtSn alloy (3:1). The electrochemical activity toward carbon monoxide and methanol oxidation reactions were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry, whereas X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to determine the surface composition and oxidation state of the atoms in the top layers of the catalysts. The analysis of methanol conversion to CO2 was performed with aid of differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS). Results reveal a better performance of the MPPt/Sn, which shows higher current density and energy conversion efficiency of fuel to CO2 than conventional carbon supported PtSn alloy (3:1).

  13. Effect of surface oxidation of the support on the thiophene hydrodesulfurization activity of Mo, Ni, and NiMo catalysts supported on activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Calafat, A. |; Lopez-Agudo, A.; Palacios, J.M.

    1996-08-01

    The present investigation attempts to provide a better understanding of the influence of the nature of the carbon support on the HDS activity of Mo, Ni, and NiMo catalysts. For this purpose a high purity activated carbon was subjected to oxidative treatments with HNO{sub 3} to modify its surface properties. NiMo catalysts supported on the resulting activated carbons were prepared and characterized by TPR, XRD, and SEM-EDX, and their activity for HDS of thiophene at 30 bars and 375{degrees}C was evaluated. The results obtained showed that oxidation of the carbon surface does not affect the HDS activity and other characteristics of the supported Mo phase. In contrast, the HDS activity of the Ni catalysts is enhanced by acid treatments of the carbon support. In this case, introduction of oxygen-containing functional groups (O{sub (s)}) leads to a strong interaction of O{sub (s)}-Ni during impregnation, which becomes essential to achieving and preserving high nickel dispersion. This effect on NiMo/C catalysts. The synergistic effect of the bimetallic catalysts is observed only when oxygen functional groups are present on the carbon surface, which are necessary for a good HDS activity, mainly because they enhance Ni-Mo interactions that produce the highly active Ni-Mo-S phase. A NiMoO{sub 4}-like phase formed during impregnation seems to be the precursor for the active sulfide phase over the present NiMo/C catalysts. 34 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Plasmonic Nanorattles as Next-Generation Catalysts for Surface Plasmon Resonance-Mediated Oxidations Promoted by Activated Oxygen.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Anderson G M; Rodrigues, Thenner S; Correia, Valquírio G; Alves, Tiago V; Alves, Rafael S; Ando, Rômulo A; Ornellas, Fernando R; Wang, Jiale; Andrade, Leandro H; Camargo, Pedro H C

    2016-06-13

    Nanorattles, comprised of a nanosphere inside a nanoshell, were employed as the next generation of plasmonic catalysts for oxidations promoted by activated O2 . After investigating how the presence of a nanosphere inside a nanoshell affected the electric-field enhancements in the nanorattle relative to a nanoshell and a nanosphere, the SPR-mediated oxidation of p-aminothiophenol (PATP) functionalized at their surface was investigated to benchmark how these different electric-field intensities affected the performances of Au@AgAu nanorattles, AgAu nanoshells and Au nanoparticles having similar sizes. The high performance of the nanorattles enabled the visible-light driven synthesis of azobenzene from aniline under ambient conditions. As the nanorattles allow the formation of electromagnetic hot spots without relying on the uncontrolled aggregation of nanostructures, it enables their application as catalysts in liquid phase under mild conditions using visible light as the main energy input. PMID:27159199

  15. Influence of the preparation method on the surface characteristics and activity of boron-nitride-supported noble metal catalysts.

    PubMed

    Postole, Georgeta; Gervasini, Antonella; Guimon, Claude; Auroux, Aline; Bonnetot, Bernard

    2006-06-29

    In this article, we report how variations in the preparation method of boron-nitride-supported noble metal catalysts may influence the surface characteristics of the active phase and consequently the potential applications as catalysts for oxidation reactions. The deposition and the dispersion of the active phase are strongly influenced by the preparation process and in particular by the protic or aprotic solvent used as the dispersing phase; in this study, benzene, glyme, water, tetrahydrofuran, diglyme, 2-propanol, and glycol have been investigated. Characterization techniques, such as Brunauer-Emmett-Teller, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis, have been used to study the influence of the choice of a solvent phase on the particle size and dispersion of the metal deposited on the BN support. The modifications undergone by the support during the deposition of palladium in different solvents have also been studied. Through the use of the same deposition procedure, different noble metal coatings (Pt, Pd, Au, and Ag) have been prepared. The acidic and redox characteristics of the resulting samples were characterized by temperature-programmed reduction and adsorption microcalorimetry. The catalytic performances of these materials were tested in the total oxidation of methane in lean conditions (excess oxygen and presence of water). PMID:16800586

  16. Surface Chemistry and Properties of Oxides as Catalyst Supports

    SciTech Connect

    DeBusk, Melanie Moses; Narula, Chaitanya Kumar; Contescu, Cristian I

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous catalysis relies on metal-oxides as supports for the catalysts. Catalyst supports are an indispensable component of most heterogeneous catalysts, but the role of the support is often minimized in light of the one played by the catalytically active species it supports. The active species of supported catalysts are located on the surface of the support where their contact with liquid or gas phase reactants will be greatest. Considering that support plays a major role in distribution and stability of active species, the absorption and retention of reactive species, and in some cases in catalytic reaction, the properties and chemistry that can occur at the surface of an oxide support are important for understanding their impact on the activity of a supported catalyst. This chapter examines this rich surface chemistry and properties of oxides used as catalyst supports, and explores the influence of their interaction with the active species.

  17. Mesoporous carbon-supported Pd nanoparticles with high specific surface area for cyclohexene hydrogenation: Outstanding catalytic activity of NaOH-treated catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puskás, R.; Varga, T.; Grósz, A.; Sápi, A.; Oszkó, A.; Kukovecz, Á.; Kónya, Z.

    2016-06-01

    Extremely high specific surface area mesoporous carbon-supported Pd nanoparticle catalysts were prepared with both impregnation and polyol-based sol methods. The silica template used for the synthesis of mesoporous carbon was removed by both NaOH and HF etching. Pd/mesoporous carbon catalysts synthesized with the impregnation method has as high specific surface area as 2250 m2/g. In case of NaOH-etched impregnated samples, the turnover frequency of cyclohexene hydrogenation to cyclohexane at 313 K was obtained ~ 14 molecules • site- 1 • s- 1. The specific surface area of HF-etched samples was higher compared to NaOH-etched samples. However, catalytic activity was ~ 3-6 times higher on NaOH-etched samples compared to HF-etched samples, which can be attributed to the presence of sodium and surface hydroxylgroups of the catalysts etched with NaOH solution.

  18. Availability of surface boron species in improved oxygen reduction activity of Pt catalysts: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Libo; Zhou, Gang

    2016-04-01

    The oxidation process of boron (B) species on the Pt(111) surface and the beneficial effects of boron oxides on the oxygen reduction activity are investigated by first-principles calculations. The single-atom B anchored on the Pt surface has a great attraction for the oxygen species in the immediate environment. With the dissociation of molecular oxygen, a series of boron oxides is formed in succession, both indicating exothermic oxidation reactions. After BO2 is formed, the subsequent O atom immediately participates in the oxygen reduction reaction. The calculated O adsorption energy is appreciably decreased as compared to Pt catalysts, and more approximate to the optimal value of the volcano plot, from which is clear that O hydrogenation kinetics is improved. The modulation mechanism is mainly based on the electron-deficient nature of stable boron oxides, which normally reduces available electronic states of surface Pt atoms that bind the O by facilitating more electron transfer. This modification strategy from the exterior opens the new way, different from the alloying, to efficient electrocatalyst design for PEMFCs.

  19. Availability of surface boron species in improved oxygen reduction activity of Pt catalysts: A first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Libo; Zhou, Gang

    2016-04-14

    The oxidation process of boron (B) species on the Pt(111) surface and the beneficial effects of boron oxides on the oxygen reduction activity are investigated by first-principles calculations. The single-atom B anchored on the Pt surface has a great attraction for the oxygen species in the immediate environment. With the dissociation of molecular oxygen, a series of boron oxides is formed in succession, both indicating exothermic oxidation reactions. After BO2 is formed, the subsequent O atom immediately participates in the oxygen reduction reaction. The calculated O adsorption energy is appreciably decreased as compared to Pt catalysts, and more approximate to the optimal value of the volcano plot, from which is clear that O hydrogenation kinetics is improved. The modulation mechanism is mainly based on the electron-deficient nature of stable boron oxides, which normally reduces available electronic states of surface Pt atoms that bind the O by facilitating more electron transfer. This modification strategy from the exterior opens the new way, different from the alloying, to efficient electrocatalyst design for PEMFCs. PMID:27083744

  20. Clustering of metal atoms in organic media. 9. High-activity Ni/MgO catalysts prepared by metal vapor methods. Surface area and particle size effects

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuo, K.; Klabunde, K.J.

    1982-02-01

    A metal vapor method was employed to prepare highly dispersed Ni metal catalysts (solvated metal atom dispersed = SMAD catalyst) supported on MgO. Compared with conventional Ni/MgO compositions, the SMAD catalysts showed much greater activities for all reactions studied (hydrogenolysis of methylcyclopentane, MCP; hydrogenation/hydrogenolysis of toluene, TOL; methanation of carbon monoxide, CO; dehydration of isopropyl alcohol, IPA). These high activities for the SMAD catalysts are attributed to the high surface area of Ni on MgO and the high percentage of this Ni in a zero-valent state (reduction degree). Conventional methods for preparing Ni/MgO catalysts did not yield nearly such favorable surface areas or reduction degrees. Nickel particle size effects were observed during hydrogenolysis studies of MCP and hydrogenation studies of TOL. These phenomena are explained by assuming the size of an active Ni particle to be largest for hydrogenolysis of MCP > hydrogenation of TOL > methanation of CO approx. = dehydrogenation of IPA. 8 figures, 2 tables.

  1. The selectivity and activity of catalyst for CO hydrogenation to methanol and hydrocarbon: A comparative study on Cu, Co and Ni surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingbo; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Sun, Qiang; Chan, Siewhwa; Su, Haibin

    2016-03-01

    Typical Fischer-Tropsch catalysts display different selectivity and activity in catalyzing CO hydrogenation to diverse products. In this work, the preferable routes for CH3OH formation on Cu, chain growth on Co and CH4 formation on Ni are identified guided by the comprehensive reaction network that is mapped out by density function theory calculations. The difference in selectivity among catalysts is controlled delicately by several reactions, including CH3O + H ↔ CH3OH, CH3 + H ↔ CH4 and CH2 + CO ↔ CH2CO. The equilibrium shifts of CH2O + H ↔ CH3O and CH2 + H ↔ CH3 also make an impact on selectivity. The distinct selectivity can be understood further with the activity of catalysts. Our results show that the ability of surface to absorb species increases in the order Cu < Ni < Co. Generally, Cu catalyzes the association reaction better than Co and Ni, while Co facilitates the dissociation reaction. Two key factors, thermodynamic effect and kinetic effect, are identified in determining the activity of catalyst. We proof that surface with strong binding capability promotes the dissociation reaction, meanwhile impedes the association reaction when the thermodynamic effect is dominant in determining the barrier height. The Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi relation is observed for C-O bond breaking reactions. In addition, kinetic effect also affects the barrier when special transition state exists. The tilt of CO at the transition state for COH formation and chain growth reactions introduces the interaction of atom O with surface. The stronger binding of atom O on Co is crucial to branch the selectivity of Co to chain growth rather than methane. Present study provides a comprehensive picture on the activity and selectivity of catalysts, which is the essential to develop novel catalyst for syngas conversion.

  2. Ni- and Mn-Promoted Mesoporous Co3O4: A Stable Bifunctional Catalyst with Surface-Structure-Dependent Activity for Oxygen Reduction Reaction and Oxygen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenqiao; Ren, Zheng; Chen, Sheng-Yu; Meng, Yongtao; Biswas, Sourav; Nandi, Partha; Elsen, Heather A; Gao, Pu-Xian; Suib, Steven L

    2016-08-17

    Efficient bifunctional catalysts for electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) are highly desirable due to their wide applications in fuel cells and rechargeable metal air batteries. However, the development of nonprecious metal catalysts with comparable activities to noble metals is still challenging. Here we report a one-step wet-chemical synthesis of Ni-/Mn-promoted mesoporous cobalt oxides through an inverse micelle process. Various characterization techniques including powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), N2 sorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirm the successful incorporation of Ni and Mn leading to the formation of Co-Ni(Mn)-O solid solutions with retained mesoporosity. Among these catalysts, cobalt oxide with 5% Ni doping demonstrates promising activities for both ORR and OER, with an overpotential of 399 mV for ORR (at -3 mA/cm(2)) and 381 mV (at 10 mA/cm(2)) for OER. Furthermore, it shows better durability than precious metals featuring little activity decay throughout 24 h continuous operation. Analyses of cyclic voltammetry (CV), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman, and O2-temperature-programmed desorption (O2-TPD) reveal that redox activity of Co(3+) to Co(4+) is crucial for OER performance, while the population of surface oxygen vacancies and surface area determine ORR activities. The comprehensive investigation of the intrinsic active sites for ORR and OER by correlating different physicochemical properties to the electrochemical activities is believed to provide important insight toward the rational design of high-performance electrocatalysts for ORR and OER reactions. PMID:27458646

  3. Acetaldehyde partial oxidation on the Au(111) model catalyst surface: C-C bond activation and formation of methyl acetate as an oxidative coupling product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatok, Mustafa; Vovk, Evgeny I.; Shah, Asad A.; Turksoy, Abdurrahman; Ozensoy, Emrah

    2015-11-01

    Partial oxidation of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) on the oxygen pre-covered Au(111) single crystal model catalyst was investigated via Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) and Temperature Programmed Reaction Spectroscopy (TPRS) techniques, where ozone (O3) was utilized as the oxygen delivery agent providing atomic oxygen to the reacting surface. We show that for low exposures of O3 and small surface oxygen coverages, two partial oxidation products namely, methyl acetate (CH3COOCH3) and acetic acid (CH3COOH) can be generated without the formation of significant quantities of carbon dioxide. The formation of methyl acetate as the oxidative coupling reaction product implies that oxygen pre-covered Au(111) single crystal model catalyst surface can activate C-C bonds. In addition to the generation of these products; indications of the polymerization of acetaldehyde on the gold surface were also observed as an additional reaction route competing with the partial and total oxidation pathways. The interplay between the partial oxidation, total oxidation and polymerization pathways reveals the complex catalytic chemistry associated with the interaction between the acetaldehyde and atomic oxygen on catalytic gold surfaces.

  4. Activation of molecular catalysts using semiconductor quantum dots

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, Thomas J.; Sykora, Milan; Klimov, Victor I.

    2011-10-04

    Photocatalytic materials based on coupling of semiconductor nanocrystalline quantum dots (NQD) and molecular catalysts. These materials have capability to drive or catalyze non-spontaneous chemical reactions in the presence of visible radiation, ultraviolet radiation, or both. The NQD functions in these materials as a light absorber and charge generator. Following light absorption, the NQD activates a molecular catalyst adsorbed on the surface of the NQD via transfer of one or more charges (either electrons or electron-holes) from the NQD to the molecular catalyst. The activated molecular catalyst can then drive a chemical reaction. A photoelectrolytic device that includes such photocatalytic materials is also described.

  5. Surface coatings and catalyst production by electrodeposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Chester B.; Riley, Clyde; Coble, H. Dwain; Loo, Boon H.

    1987-01-01

    Electrodeposition and electrocodeposition in low gravity are discussed. The goal is to provide a better understanding of the role of convection and buoyancy in the mechanisms of formation of some electrodeposited surfaces, fluid flow in the vicinity of electrodepositing surfaces, the influence of a moving medium upon codeposition, the effect of gravity upon the dispersion (coagulation) of neutral particles that are desired for codeposition and preparation of improved surface coatings and metal catalysts.

  6. The role of catalyst activation on the activity and attrition of precipitated iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Datye, A.K.; Shroff, M.D.; Harrington, M.S.; Coulter, K.E.; Sault, A.G.; Jackson, N.B.

    1995-12-31

    The results of this work indicate that magnetite is not catalytically active for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) in precipitated, unsupported iron catalysts, but the formation of the carbide phase is necessary to obtain FTS activity. The transformation of magnetite to carbide, though essential to obtain FTS activity, also causes the catalyst to break down. This can lead to severe problems during operation in a commercial slurry phase reactor. The results presented here imply that activation and attrition are simultaneous and complementary processes. In another study, we show that the catalyst can also under go attrition on a micron scale which is caused by lack of strength of the forces binding the catalyst primary particles in the agglomerates. Both these processes can make wax separation and product recovery extremely difficult. In this study, we have also shown that H{sub 2} reduction of this catalyst to metallic iron is detrimental to subsequent catalyst activity and causes a loss of surface area due to sintering of the iron crystallites. Reduction to metallic Fe also causes impurities such as S to segregate to the surface causing a complete loss of FTS activity. It has been shown that even submonolayer amounts of S can cause a dramatic decrease in FTS activity, hence reduction to metallic Fe should be avoided during activation of these catalysts. We have shown, however, that a mild H{sub 2} reduction to magnetite does not lead to S segregation to the surface, and is therefore acceptable.

  7. Characterisation of the surface of freshly prepared precious metal catalysts.

    PubMed

    Parker, Stewart F; Adroja, Devashibhai; Jiménez-Ruiz, Mónica; Tischer, Markus; Möbus, Konrad; Wieland, Stefan D; Albers, Peter

    2016-07-14

    A combination of electron microscopy, X-ray and neutron spectroscopies and computational methods has provided new insights into the species present on the surface of freshly prepared precious metal catalysts. The results show that in all cases, at least half of the surface is metallic or nearly so, with the remainder covered by oxygen, largely as hydroxide. Water is also present and is strongly held; weeks of pumping under high vacuum is insufficient to remove it. The hydroxyls are reactive as shown by their reaction with or displacement by CO and can be removed by hydrogenation. This clearly has implications for how precious metal catalysts are activated after preparation. PMID:26986759

  8. Activation Energies of Plasmonic Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsoo; Dumett Torres, Daniel; Jain, Prashant K

    2016-05-11

    The activation energy of a catalytic reaction serves not only as a metric of the efficacy of a catalyst but also as a potential indicator of mechanistic differences between the catalytic and noncatalytic reaction. However, activation energies are quite underutilized in the field of photocatalysis. We characterize in detail the effect of visible light excitation on the activation enthalpy of an electron transfer reaction photocatalyzed by plasmonic Au nanoparticles. We find that in the presence of visible light photoexcitation, the activation enthalpy of the Au nanoparticle-catalyzed electron transfer reaction is significantly reduced. The reduction in the activation enthalpy depends on the excitation wavelength, the incident laser power, and the strength of a hole scavenger. On the basis of these results, we argue that the activation enthalpy reduction is directly related to the photoelectrochemical potential built-up on the Au nanoparticle under steady-state light excitation, analogous to electrochemical activation. Under optimum light excitation conditions, a potential as high as 240 mV is measured. The findings constitute more precise insights into the mechanistic role and energetic contribution of plasmonic excitation to chemical reactions catalyzed by transition metal nanoparticles. PMID:27064549

  9. SURFACE-MODIFIED COALS FOR ENHANCED CATALYST DISPERSION AND LIQUEFACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Yaw D. Yeboah

    1999-09-01

    This is the final report of the Department of Energy Sponsored project DE-FGF22-95PC95229 entitled, surface modified coals for enhanced catalyst dispersion and liquefaction. The aims of the study were to enhance catalyst loading and dispersion in coal for improved liquefaction by preadsorption of surfactants and catalysts on the coal and to train and educate minority scientists in catalysts and separation science. Illinois No. 6 Coal (DEC-24) was selected for the study. The surfactants investigated included dodecyl dimethyl ethyl ammonium bromide (DDAB), a cationic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate, an anionic surfactant, and Triton x-100, a neutral surfactant. Ammonium molybdate tetrahydrate was used as the molybdenum catalyst precursor. Zeta potential, BET, FTIR, AFM, UV-Vis and luminescence intensity measurements were undertaken to assess the surface properties and the liquefaction activities of the coal. The parent coal had a net negative surface charge over the pH range 2-12. However, in the presence of DDAB the negativity of the surface charge decreased. At higher concentrations of DDAB, a positive surface charge resulted. In contrast to the effect of DDAB, the zeta potential of the coal became more negative than the parent coal in the presence of SDS. Adsorption of Triton reduced the net negative charge density of the coal samples. The measured surface area of the coal surface was about 30 m{sup 2}/g compared to 77m{sup 2}/g after being washed with deionized water. Addition of the surfactants decreased the surface area of the samples. Adsorption of the molybdenum catalyst increased the surface area of the coal sample. The adsorption of molybdenum on the coal was significantly promoted by preadsorption of DDAB and SDS. Molybdenum adsorption showed that, over a wide range of concentrations and pH values, the DDAB treated coal adsorbed a higher amount of molybdenum than the samples treated with SDS. The infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and the atomic force

  10. Determination of surface coverage of catalysts: Temperature programmed experiments on platinum and iridium sponge catalysts after low temperature ammonia oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Broek, A.C.M. van den; Grondelle, J. van; Santen, R.A. van

    1999-07-25

    The activity of iridium and platinum sponge catalysts was studied in the low temperature gas phase oxidation of ammonia with oxygen. Under the reaction conditions used, iridium was found to be more active and more selective to nitrogen than platinum. Furthermore it was established from activity measurements that both catalysts lose activity as a function of time on stream due to inhibition of the surface by reaction intermediates. The used catalysts were studied by XPS and temperature programmed techniques. It was found that the surface of the catalysts had a high coverage of NH and OH and some additional NH{sub 2}. It seems most likely that the reaction mechanism proceeds through a stepwise dehydrogenation of the ammonia molecule. It appears that the last dehydrogenation step (NH by OH to N and water) is the rate determining step. The high selectivity of iridium to nitrogen can be explained by the higher activity of iridium in dissociating NO.

  11. Modelling catalyst surfaces using DFT cluster calculations.

    PubMed

    Czekaj, Izabela; Wambach, Jörg; Kröcher, Oliver

    2009-10-01

    We review our recent theoretical DFT cluster studies of a variety of industrially relevant catalysts such as TiO(2), gamma-Al(2)O(3), V(2)O(5)-WO(3)-TiO(2) and Ni/Al(2)O(3). Aspects of the metal oxide surface structure and the stability and structure of metal clusters on the support are discussed as well as the reactivity of surfaces, including their behaviour upon poisoning. It is exemplarily demonstrated how such theoretical considerations can be combined with DRIFT and XPS results from experimental studies. PMID:20057947

  12. Modelling Catalyst Surfaces Using DFT Cluster Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Czekaj, Izabela; Wambach, Jörg; Kröcher, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    We review our recent theoretical DFT cluster studies of a variety of industrially relevant catalysts such as TiO2, γ-Al2O3, V2O5-WO3-TiO2 and Ni/Al2O3. Aspects of the metal oxide surface structure and the stability and structure of metal clusters on the support are discussed as well as the reactivity of surfaces, including their behaviour upon poisoning. It is exemplarily demonstrated how such theoretical considerations can be combined with DRIFT and XPS results from experimental studies. PMID:20057947

  13. Identifying active surface phases for metal oxide electrocatalysts: a study of manganese oxide bi-functional catalysts for oxygen reduction and water oxidation catalysis.

    PubMed

    Su, Hai-Yan; Gorlin, Yelena; Man, Isabela C; Calle-Vallejo, Federico; Nørskov, Jens K; Jaramillo, Thomas F; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2012-10-28

    Progress in the field of electrocatalysis is often hampered by the difficulty in identifying the active site on an electrode surface. Herein we combine theoretical analysis and electrochemical methods to identify the active surfaces in a manganese oxide bi-functional catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). First, we electrochemically characterize the nanostructured α-Mn(2)O(3) and find that it undergoes oxidation in two potential regions: initially, between 0.5 V and 0.8 V, a potential region relevant to the ORR and, subsequently, between 0.8 V and 1.0 V, a potential region between the ORR and the OER relevant conditions. Next, we perform density function theory (DFT) calculations to understand the changes in the MnO(x) surface as a function of potential and to elucidate reaction mechanisms that lead to high activities observed in the experiments. Using DFT, we construct surface Pourbaix and free energy diagrams of three different MnO(x) surfaces and identify 1/2 ML HO* covered Mn(2)O(3) and O* covered MnO(2), as the active surfaces for the ORR and the OER, respectively. Additionally, we find that the ORR occurs through an associative mechanism and that its overpotential is highly dependent on the stabilization of intermediates through hydrogen bonds with water molecules. We also determine that OER occurs through direct recombination mechanism and that its major source of overpotential is the scaling relationship between HOO* and HO* surface intermediates. Using a previously developed Sabatier model we show that the theoretical predictions of catalytic activities match the experimentally determined onset potentials for the ORR and the OER, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Consequently, the combination of first-principles theoretical analysis and experimental methods offers an understanding of manganese oxide oxygen electrocatalysis at the atomic level, achieving fundamental insight that can potentially be

  14. Molecular metal catalysts on supports: organometallic chemistry meets surface science.

    PubMed

    Serna, Pedro; Gates, Bruce C

    2014-08-19

    -support bonding and structure, which identify the supports as ligands with electron-donor properties that influence reactivity and catalysis. Each of the catalyst design variables has been varied independently, illustrated by mononuclear and tetranuclear iridium on zeolite HY and on MgO and by isostructural rhodium and iridium (diethylene or dicarbonyl) complexes on these supports. The data provide examples resolving the roles of the catalyst design variables and place the catalysis science on a firm foundation of organometallic chemistry linked with surface science. Supported molecular catalysts offer the advantages of characterization in the absence of solvents and with surface-science methods that do not require ultrahigh vacuum. Families of supported metal complexes have been made by replacement of ligands with others from the gas phase. Spectroscopically identified catalytic reaction intermediates help to elucidate catalyst performance and guide design. The methods are illustrated for supported complexes and clusters of rhodium, iridium, osmium, and gold used to catalyze reactions of small molecules that facilitate identification of the ligands present during catalysis: alkene dimerization and hydrogenation, H-D exchange in the reaction of H2 with D2, and CO oxidation. The approach is illustrated with the discovery of a highly active and selective MgO-supported rhodium carbonyl dimer catalyst for hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene to give butenes. PMID:25036259

  15. The surface of iron molybdate catalysts used for the selective oxidation of methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Benjamin R.; Pudge, Geoffrey J. F.; Bugler, Keith G.; Rushby, Alice V.; Kondrat, Simon; Bartley, Jonathan; Golunski, Stanislaw; Taylor, Stuart H.; Gibson, Emma; Wells, Peter. P.; Brookes, Catherine; Bowker, Michael; Hutchings, Graham J.

    2016-06-01

    The oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde is a major chemical process carried out catalytically and iron molybdate is one of the major catalysts for this process. In this paper we explore the nature of the active and selective surfaces of iron molybdate catalysts and show that the effective catalysts comprise molybdenum rich surfaces. We conclude that it is therefore important to maximise the surface area of these active catalysts and to this end we have studied catalysts made using a new physical grinding method with oxalic acid. For super-stoichiometric materials (Fe:Mo = 1:2.2) the reaction data show that physical mixing produces effective catalysts, possibly offering an improvement over the conventional co-precipitation method.

  16. Highly Stable and Active Catalyst for Sabatier Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Jianli; Brooks, Kriston P.

    2012-01-01

    Highly active Ru/TiO2 catalysts for Sabatier reaction have been developed. The catalysts have shown to be stable under repeated shutting down/startup conditions. When the Ru/TiO2 catalyst is coated on the engineered substrate Fe-CrAlY felt, activity enhancement is more than doubled when compared with an identically prepared engineered catalyst made from commercial Degussa catalyst. Also, bimetallic Ru-Rh/TiO2 catalysts show high activity at high throughput.

  17. Diagnosis of industrial catalyst deactivation by surface characterization techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, P.G. . Lab. voor Petrochemische Techniek Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg . Dept. of Engineering Chemistry)

    1994-06-01

    The exact nature of the catalyst surface and the various ways of catalyst deactivation are subjects of great scientific interest and enormous economic importance. A brief review like the present one has to be very selective, giving only the underlying principles and representative examples. The focus of this review is on industrial catalysts, in particular, on the most commonly used supported metal and mixed-oxide type catalysts. Here again, only typical examples are chosen and cited to illustrate the specific types of problems involved in catalyst deactivation and how these problems wee diagnosed by a judicious application of the experimental techniques available today. Of the types of catalyst deactivation caused by coking, poisoning, and solid-state transformations, the emphasis in this review is on the last type. Changes in the chemical composition of the catalyst surface, restructuring or reconstruction of the surface, phase transformations, gradual enrichment/depletion of a particular catalyst component on/from the catalyst surface, these are the topics of prominence in this review. Even here, emphasis is on normally unexpected or unsuspected types of deactivation and the catalyst metamorphosis produced by the catalytic reaction itself, as distinct from the purely thermal effects at the reaction temperature. This review is aimed to provide some essential background information and possibly to serve as a reference guide for trouble-shooting when a catalyst is deactivated for rather mysterious reasons. 147 refs.

  18. Surface coordination number and surface redox couples on catalyst oxides, a new approach of the interpretation of activity and selectivity III. Interpretation of chemical and catalytic oxidation reactions on some oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaud, Y. P.

    The concepts of surface coordination number n, and of surface redox couples MO [ n] /MO ( n+1) presented previously, are exploited to explain experimental results. Two cases are considered: reactions of chemical gaseous species such as CO, CO 2, H 2, H 2O,N 2O, propene and methanol on the surface of the oxides NiO, TiO 2, and Cr 2O 3, in the absence of oxygen: activated catalytic reactions of oxygen on reductive species such as CO, H 2,C 2H 6, and CH 3OH. The knowledge of the potential of surface redox couples permits a rationalization of the study of these reactions. The efficiency of the two concepts is obvious in many cases. For example, the origin of an athermal oxidative process occurring for the oxidations of CO or H 2 on TiO 2 is easily understood, as well as those of the poisoning of the catalysts or of the inactivity of a surface saturated by oxygen. In addition, the study of chemical reactions on the oxides confirms and completes the theoretical approach used. Particularly, the existence of the surface states, which are postulated in the case of Cr 2O 3, is corroborated by experimental observations concerning the number of surface states and the value of the chemical potentials. Even though the theory is based upon thermodynamical and structural data, it also leads to a better understanding of kinetic features.

  19. Catalyst design for enhanced sustainability through fundamental surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Personick, Michelle L; Montemore, Matthew M; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Madix, Robert J; Biener, Juergen; Friend, Cynthia M

    2016-02-28

    Decreasing energy consumption in the production of platform chemicals is necessary to improve the sustainability of the chemical industry, which is the largest consumer of delivered energy. The majority of industrial chemical transformations rely on catalysts, and therefore designing new materials that catalyse the production of important chemicals via more selective and energy-efficient processes is a promising pathway to reducing energy use by the chemical industry. Efficiently designing new catalysts benefits from an integrated approach involving fundamental experimental studies and theoretical modelling in addition to evaluation of materials under working catalytic conditions. In this review, we outline this approach in the context of a particular catalyst-nanoporous gold (npAu)-which is an unsupported, dilute AgAu alloy catalyst that is highly active for the selective oxidative transformation of alcohols. Fundamental surface science studies on Au single crystals and AgAu thin-film alloys in combination with theoretical modelling were used to identify the principles which define the reactivity of npAu and subsequently enabled prediction of new reactive pathways on this material. Specifically, weak van der Waals interactions are key to the selectivity of Au materials, including npAu. We also briefly describe other systems in which this integrated approach was applied. PMID:26755756

  20. Controllably interfacing with metal: a strategy for enhancing CO oxidation on oxide catalysts by surface polarization.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yu; Zhang, Wenhua; Zhang, Zhenhua; Zhou, Jie; Wang, Xijun; Wang, Chengming; Huang, Weixin; Jiang, Jun; Xiong, Yujie

    2014-10-22

    Heterogeneous catalysis often involves charge transfer from catalyst surface to adsorbed molecules, whose activity thus depends on the surface charge density of catalysts. Here, we demonstrate a unique solution-phase approach to achieve controllable interfacial lengths in oxide-metal hybrid structures. Resulting from their different work functions, surface polarization is induced by the Ag-CuO interface and acts to tailor the surface charge state of CuO. As a result, the designed hybrid catalysts exhibit enhanced intrinsic activities in catalyzing CO oxidation in terms of apparent activation energy, as compared with their counterparts. Moreover, the CO conversion rate can be enhanced by maximizing the Ag-CuO interfacial length and thus the number of active sites on the CuO. This work provides a new strategy for tuning catalytic performance by controlling interface in hybrid catalysts. PMID:25296380

  1. An Auger electron spectroscopy study of the activation of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. II. Carbon monoxide activation

    SciTech Connect

    Sault, A.G. ); Datye, A.K. )

    1993-03-01

    Activation procedures can have a dramatic effect on the activity of iron-based catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis. CO conversion over a 100 Fe/3 Cu/0.2 K catalyst (parts by weight) can vary by nearly a factor of 3, depending on activation treatment. In contrast, a 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/25 SiO[sub 2] catalyst displays little dependence of F-T activity on activation treatment. An ultra-high vacuum surface analysis chamber coupled to an atmospheric reactor has been used to measure the surface composition of these catalysts following activation in carbon monoxide at 280[degrees]C, while transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and BET surface area measurements have been used to investigate catalyst morphology. CO activation of the 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/25 SiO[sub 2] catalyst at 280[degrees]C results in partial reduction of iron to a mixture of Fe[sub x]O and Fe[sub 3]O[sub 4], and an overall surface composition very similar to that obtained following hydrogen activation at 220 or 280[degrees]C, consistent with the invariance of F-T activity with activation treatment for this catalyst. Activation of the 100 Fe/3 Cu/0.2 K catalyst in CO at 280[degrees]C results in the formation of iron carbide particles, growth of graphitic carbon (C[sub g]) filaments, and formation of a thick, porous, C[sub g] layer covering the carbide particles. Differences in F-T activity between the hydrogen- and CO-activated 100 Fe/3 Cu/0.2 K catalyst are discussed in terms of surface composition and catalyst morphology. The difference in sensitivity of the two catalysts to activation conditions is related to differences in the extent of reduction of the catalysts. 45 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Studies of potassium-promoted nickel catalysts for methane steam reforming: Effect of surface potassium location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowiecki, Tadeusz; Denis, Andrzej; Rawski, Michał; Gołębiowski, Andrzej; Stołecki, Kazimierz; Dmytrzyk, Jaromir; Kotarba, Andrzej

    2014-05-01

    The effect of potassium addition to the Ni/Al2O3 steam reforming catalyst has been investigated on several model systems, including K/Al2O3 with various amounts of alkali promoters (1-4 wt% of K2O), a model catalyst 90%NiO-10%Al2O3 promoted with potassium and a commercial catalyst. The potassium surface state and stability were investigated by means of the Species Resolved Thermal Alkali Desorption method (SR-TAD). The activity of the catalysts in the steam reforming of methane and their coking-resistance were also evaluated. The results reveal that the beneficial effect of potassium addition is strongly related to its location in the catalysts. The catalyst surface should be promoted with potassium in order to obtain high coking-resistant catalysts. Moreover, the catalyst preparation procedure should ensure a direct interaction of potassium with the Al2O3 support surface. Due to the low stability of potassium on θ-Al2O3 this phase is undesirable during the preparation of a stable steam reforming catalyst.

  3. The surface chemistry of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, D.J.; Hardenburgh, J.H.

    1986-04-01

    The indirect conversion of coal to liquid hydrocarbons via steam gasification followed by synthesis gas (CO/H/sub 2/) chemistry has been the subject of intensive study for a number of decades. A key technological challenge facing researchers in this area is control over the product distribution during the hydrocarbon synthesis step. In the case of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, it has been known that the addition of alkali to the metal catalyst has a significant impact on the product distribution. Iron catalysts treated with alkali produce less methane more alkenes and higher molecular weight products. In spite of numerous investigations, the details of this promotional effect are not understood on a molecular level. To explore the role of alkali in the surface chemistry of iron catalysts, the authors have carried out a combined surface science and catalytic kinetic study of a model iron catalyst with and without surface alkali.

  4. Upgrading of coal-derived liquids. 1. Catalytic activities of zeolite catalysts and commercial HDS catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, R.; Hara, S.; Yoshida, T.; Yokoyama, S.; Nakata, Y.; Goto, Y.; Maekawa, Y.

    1983-01-01

    The applicability of various zeolite catalysts and commercial hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalysts to the secondary hydrotreatment of coal-derived liquids was examined in relation to the chemical structure of upgraded liquids. The catalytic activities of zeolite catalysts for HI conversion is lower than are the activities of Ni-Mo, Ni-Co-Mo, Co-Mo and Ni-W catalysts. However, as regards hydrogenation and the removal of nitrogen, zeolite catalysts such as natural clinoptilolite and mordenite have almost the same activity as do Co-Mo and Ni-W catalysts. As to the removal of oxygen, it was proved that zeolite catalysts had a functionality to remove oxygen as CO/sub x/ gas, and HDS catalysts had a high activity for hydrodeoxygenation. 10 references, 3 figures, 4 tables.

  5. Surface acidity and degree of carburization of modified silver catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Pestryakov, A.N.; Belousova, V.N.; Roznina, M.I.

    1993-11-10

    The effect has been studied of some compounds as modifying additives on the surface acidity, degree of carburization, aggregation and silver entrainement of silver-pumice catalysts for methanol oxidation. Catalyst samples have been tested in an industrial reactor. The probable mechanism of modifying action of the additives is discussed.

  6. Morphological and surface studies of ultrasonically treated Raney nickel hydrogen-deuterium exchange catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Cioffi, E.A. ); Willis, W.S.; Suib, S.L. )

    1990-02-01

    Previous surface studies of ultrasonicated Raney nickel catalysts have shown that ultrasonication leads to reduction of surface Ni species to the metallic state. Surface impurities that may poison the Raney nickel catalyst have also been removed during ultrasonication. Negligible increases in surface area are observed after ultrasound treatment of the catalysts even though their activities and selectivities in {sup 2}H incorporation into carbohydrates and glycosphingolipids are markedly improved. The surface and morphological changes taking place during ultrasonic treatment are the focus of this paper. Cr{sup 3+}- and Mo{sup 6+}-doped Raney Ni catalysts have been studied before and after ultrasonciation with scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry.

  7. An Auger electron spectroscopy study of the activation of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. I. Hydrogen activation

    SciTech Connect

    Sault, A.G. )

    1993-03-01

    Activation procedures can have a dramatic effect on the activity of iron-based catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis. CO conversion over a 100 Fe/3 Cu/0.2 K catalyst (parts by weight) can vary by nearly a factor of 3, depending on activation. In contrast, a 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/25 SiO[sub 2] catalyst displays only minor variations in activity with activation conditions. An ultra-high vacuum surface analysis chamber coupled to an atmospheric pressure reactor has been used to measure the surface compositions of these catalysts following various hydrogen activation procedures. Activation of the 100 Fe/3 Cu/0.2 K catalyst in H[sub 2] results in rapid reduction of iron to the metallic state, and segregation of sulfur to the catalyst surface. The sulfur arises from bulk sulfate impurities present in the metal nitrates used to prepare the catalyst. Sulfur coverage increases with both activation time and temperature, due to an increase in the rate of sulfur diffusion with temperature. F-T activity of this catalyst varies inversely with sulfur coverage, consistent with the well-known poisoning effect of sulfur on F-T synthesis. For the 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/25 SiO[sub 2] catalyst no significant variations in surface composition are observed as a function of hydrogen activation temperature, consistent with the absence of any variations in catalyst activity. Only partial reduction of iron to a mixture of Fe[sub x]O and Fe[sub 3]O[sub 4] is observed for this catalyst for all activation conditions investigated. Using electron beam effects to remove potassium and silica shows that one or both of these components inhibits reduction of iron to the metallic state in the 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/25 SiO[sub 2] catalyst. 48 refs., 3 tabs.

  8. Amorphous alloy catalysis: VII. Activation and surface characterization of an amorphous Cu-Ti alloy catalyst precursor in the dehydrogenation of 2-propanol and comparison with Cu-Zr

    SciTech Connect

    Katona, T.; Molnar, A.

    1995-05-01

    The activation and catalytic properties of Cu-Ti and Cu-Zr metallic glass precursors in the dehydrogenation of 2-propanol differ substantially. In contrast with Cu-Zr, Cu-Ti can only be activated with HF solution. The pretreatment of Cu-Ti results in catalysts with BET and copper surface areas one order of magnitude smaller than those of Cu-Zr under the same conditions. Cu-Ti exhibits decreasing catalytic activity, while Cu-Zr displays stable activity in the course of the reaction. Crystallization of the metallic glasses prior to HF treatment results in a weaker reactivity toward hydrogen fluoride for both alloys. Scanning electron micrographs of the alloys reveal that HF etching results in surfaces with deep grooves, and copper-rich flakes, a Raney-Cu-like catalyst. Auger electron spectroscopic studies show copper enrichment in the surface region on both alloys after HF treatment. On the surface of Cu-Ti, mostly Cu(II) is detected, whereas Cu(O) and Cu(II) coexist on Cu-Zr. 54 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Linking morphology with activity through the lifetime of pretreated PtNi nanostructured thin film catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, David A.; Lopez-Haro, Miguel; Bayle-Guillemaud, Pascale; Debe, Mark; Steinbach, Andrew J.; Guetaz, L.

    2015-04-10

    In this study, the nanoscale morphology of highly active Pt3Ni7 nanostructured thin film fuel cell catalysts is linked with catalyst surface area and activity following catalyst pretreatments, conditioning and potential cycling. The significant role of fuel cell conditioning on the structure and composition of these extended surface catalysts is demonstrated by high resolution imaging, elemental mapping and tomography. The dissolution of Ni during fuel cell conditioning leads to highly complex, porous structures which were visualized in 3D by electron tomography. Quantification of the rendered surfaces following catalyst pretreatment, conditioning, and cycling shows the important role pore structure plays in surface area, activity, and durability.

  10. Catalyst Activity Comparison of Alcohols over Zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Wang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol transformation to transportation fuel range hydrocarbon on HZSM-5 (SiO2 / Al2O3 = 30) catalyst was studied at 360oC and 300psig. Product distributions and catalyst life were compared using methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol or 1-butanol as a feed. The catalyst life for 1-propanol and 1-butanol was more than double compared to that for methanol and ethanol. For all the alcohols studied, the product distributions (classified to paraffin, olefin, napthene, aromatic and naphthalene compounds) varied with time on stream (TOS). At 24 hours TOS, liquid product from 1-propanol and 1-butanol transformation primarily contains higher olefin compounds. The alcohol transformation process to higher hydrocarbon involves a complex set of reaction pathways such as dehydration, oligomerization, dehydrocyclization, and hydrogenation. Compared to ethylene generated from methanol and ethanol, oligomerization of propylene and butylene has a lower activation energy and can readily take place on weaker acidic sites. On the other hand, dehydrocyclization of propylene and butylene to form the cyclic compounds requires the sits with stronger acid strength. Combination of the above mentioned reasons are the primary reasons for olefin rich product generated in the later stage of the time on stream and for the extended catalyst life time for 1 propanol and 1 butanol compared to methanol and ethanol conversion over HZSM-5.

  11. Activity and Stability of Nanoscale Oxygen Reduction Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Shao-Horn, Yang

    2015-07-28

    Design of highly active and stable nanoscale catalysts for electro-oxidation of small organic molecules is of great importance to the development of efficient fuel cells. The amount and instability of Pt-based catalysts in the cathode limits the cost, efficiency and lifetime of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. We developed a microscopic understanding of the factors governing activity and stability in Pt and PtM alloys. Experimental efforts were focused on probing the size and shape dependence of ORR activity of Pt-based nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes. A microscopic understanding of the activity was achieved by correlating voltammetry and rotating ring disk electrodes to surface atomic and electronic structures, which were elucidated predominantly by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Scanning transmission electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (STEM-EDS) and synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS).

  12. Linking morphology with activity through the lifetime of pretreated PtNi nanostructured thin film catalysts

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cullen, David A.; Lopez-Haro, Miguel; Bayle-Guillemaud, Pascale; Debe, Mark; Steinbach, Andrew J.; Guetaz, L.

    2015-04-10

    In this study, the nanoscale morphology of highly active Pt3Ni7 nanostructured thin film fuel cell catalysts is linked with catalyst surface area and activity following catalyst pretreatments, conditioning and potential cycling. The significant role of fuel cell conditioning on the structure and composition of these extended surface catalysts is demonstrated by high resolution imaging, elemental mapping and tomography. The dissolution of Ni during fuel cell conditioning leads to highly complex, porous structures which were visualized in 3D by electron tomography. Quantification of the rendered surfaces following catalyst pretreatment, conditioning, and cycling shows the important role pore structure plays in surfacemore » area, activity, and durability.« less

  13. A molecular catalyst for water oxidation that binds to metal oxide surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, Stafford W.; Thomsen, Julianne M.; Hintermair, Ulrich; Crabtree, Robert H.; Brudvig, Gary W.; Schmuttenmaer, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular catalysts are known for their high activity and tunability, but their solubility and limited stability often restrict their use in practical applications. Here we describe how a molecular iridium catalyst for water oxidation directly and robustly binds to oxide surfaces without the need for any external stimulus or additional linking groups. On conductive electrode surfaces, this heterogenized molecular catalyst oxidizes water with low overpotential, high turnover frequency and minimal degradation. Spectroscopic and electrochemical studies show that it does not decompose into iridium oxide, thus preserving its molecular identity, and that it is capable of sustaining high activity towards water oxidation with stability comparable to state-of-the-art bulk metal oxide catalysts. PMID:25757425

  14. Process of activation of a palladium catalyst system

    DOEpatents

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly; Rossin, Joseph A.; Knapke, Michael J.

    2011-08-02

    Improved processes for activating a catalyst system used for the reduction of nitrogen oxides are provided. In one embodiment, the catalyst system is activated by passing an activation gas stream having an amount of each of oxygen, water vapor, nitrogen oxides, and hydrogen over the catalyst system and increasing a temperature of the catalyst system to a temperature of at least 180.degree. C. at a heating rate of from 1-20.degree./min. Use of activation processes described herein leads to a catalyst system with superior NOx reduction capabilities.

  15. Mechanochemical approach for selective deactivation of external surface acidity of ZSM-5 zeolite catalyst.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Satoshi; Sato, Koki; Hayashi, Shunsuke; Tatami, Junichi; Kubota, Yoshihiro; Wakihara, Toru

    2015-03-01

    The acid sites associated with the external surface of zeolite particles are responsible for undesirable consecutive reactions, such as isomerization, alkylation, and oligomerization, resulting in a lower selectivity to a target product; therefore, the selective modification (deactivation) of the external surface of zeolite particles has been an important issue in zeolite science. Here, a new method for surface deactivation of zeolite catalyst was tested via a mechanochemical approach using powder composer. Postsynthetic mechanochemical treatment of ZSM-5 zeolite causes a selective deactivation of catalytically active sites existing only on the external surface, as a potentially useful catalyst for highly selective production of p-xylene. PMID:25654542

  16. Effects of Weak Surface Modification on Co/SiO2 Catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Wensheng; Shen, Hehong; Jin, Yangfu; Yang, Xiazhen

    2015-01-01

    A weak surface modification is applied to Co/SiO2 catalyst by hydrothermal treatment at 180°C for 5 h. Aluminum is introduced to Co/SiO2 catalysts during the surface modification. The effects of surface modification on Co/SiO2 catalyst are studied by changing the operating sequences of surface modification and cobalt impregnation in the catalyst preparation. Surface modification before cobalt impregnation makes Co3O4 particle small and dispersed into the deep part of enlarged pore in SiO2, while surface modification after cobalt impregnation does not obviously change the particle size of Co3O4. The improved amplitude of catalytic activity is similar for the two kinds of catalysts, but they are benefited from different factors. The content of iso-hydrocarbons in the products is increased by the surface modifications. PMID:25938725

  17. Effects of Weak Surface Modification on Co/SiO2 Catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch Reaction.

    PubMed

    Ning, Wensheng; Shen, Hehong; Jin, Yangfu; Yang, Xiazhen

    2015-01-01

    A weak surface modification is applied to Co/SiO2 catalyst by hydrothermal treatment at 180°C for 5 h. Aluminum is introduced to Co/SiO2 catalysts during the surface modification. The effects of surface modification on Co/SiO2 catalyst are studied by changing the operating sequences of surface modification and cobalt impregnation in the catalyst preparation. Surface modification before cobalt impregnation makes Co3O4 particle small and dispersed into the deep part of enlarged pore in SiO2, while surface modification after cobalt impregnation does not obviously change the particle size of Co3O4. The improved amplitude of catalytic activity is similar for the two kinds of catalysts, but they are benefited from different factors. The content of iso-hydrocarbons in the products is increased by the surface modifications. PMID:25938725

  18. Understanding support mediated activity by investigating highly active, thermally stable, silica supported gold catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Veith, Gabriel M; Lupini, Andrew R; Rashkeev, Sergey; Pennycook, Stephen J; Schwartz, Viviane; Mullins, David R; Dudney, Nancy J

    2009-01-01

    2.5 nm gold nanoparticles were grown on a fumed silica support using the physical vapor deposition technique magnetron sputtering. Combining electron microscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, and catalytic studies revealed that the silica supported gold catalysts are thermally stable when annealed in an oxygen containing environment up to at least 500oC. This surprising stability is attributed to the absence of residual halide impurities and a strong bond between gold and defects at the silica surface (2.7 - 3.8 eV), as estimated from density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The Au/SiO2 catalysts are slightly less active for CO oxidation than the prototypical Au/TiO2 catalysts, however they can be regenerated far more easily, fully recovering the activity of a freshly prepared catalyst after deactivation.

  19. Surface-oxidized carbon black as a catalyst for the water oxidation and alcohol oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Suryanto, Bryan H R; Zhao, Chuan

    2016-05-11

    Carbon black (CB) is popularly used as a catalyst support for metal/metal oxide nanoparticles due to its large surface area, excellent conductivity and stability. Herein, we show that surface oxidized CB itself, after acidic treatment and electrochemical oxidation, exhibits significant catalytic activity for the electrochemical oxidation of water and alcohols. PMID:27097802

  20. Spatially Resolved Quantification of the Surface Reactivity of Solid Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bing; Xiao, Li; Lu, Juntao; Zhuang, Lin

    2016-05-17

    A new property is reported that accurately quantifies and spatially describes the chemical reactivity of solid surfaces. The core idea is to create a reactivity weight function peaking at the Fermi level, thereby determining a weighted summation of the density of states of a solid surface. When such a weight function is defined as the derivative of the Fermi-Dirac distribution function at a certain non-zero temperature, the resulting property is the finite-temperature chemical softness, termed Fermi softness (SF ), which turns out to be an accurate descriptor of the surface reactivity. The spatial image of SF maps the reactive domain of a heterogeneous surface and even portrays morphological details of the reactive sites. SF analyses reveal that the reactive zones on a Pt3 Y(111) surface are the platinum sites rather than the seemingly active yttrium sites, and the reactivity of the S-dimer edge of MoS2 is spatially anisotropic. Our finding is of fundamental and technological significance to heterogeneous catalysis and industrial processes demanding rational design of solid catalysts. PMID:27072349

  1. Activation of catalysts for synthesizing methanol from synthesis gas

    DOEpatents

    Blum, David B.; Gelbein, Abraham P.

    1985-01-01

    A method for activating a methanol synthesis catalyst is disclosed. In this method, the catalyst is slurried in an inert liquid and is activated by a reducing gas stream. The activation step occurs in-situ. That is, it is conducted in the same reactor as is the subsequent step of synthesizing methanol from a methanol gas stream catalyzed by the activated catalyst still dispersed in a slurry.

  2. Catalytic and surface properties of nanocrystalline gold water gas shift catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang Hwan

    A series of CeO2 supported gold catalysts were prepared and found to possess a high activities for the water gas shift reaction (WGS), a critical step in the production of H2 for use in petroleum refining, chemicals synthesis, and proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The deposition-precipitation method was employed in synthesizing these highly active, nanocrystalline gold catalysts. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and dynamic sorption analyses were performed to characterize the gold catalysts. While some of these catalysts were initially four times more active than a commercial Cu-based catalyst, they were susceptible to deactivation. Characterization using techniques including temperature programmed oxidation, XPS, and FT-IR indicated that the deactivation was caused primarily by blockage of the active sites by carbonates and/or formates. Formation of these carbonaceous species appeared to be facilitated by oxygen deficient sites on the ceria surface and may have been associated with hydroxyl groups formed on the nanocrystalline gold particles under the H2 rich conditions. The deactivation could be managed by conditioning the CeO2 surface or adding constituents to minimize oxygen deficiency. The catalytic activity was fully recovered by calcining the deactivated materials in flowing air at elevated temperatures. The gold catalyst was washcoated onto microporous Fe-Al alloy foams for use in a micro-channel WGS reactor. The performance of these coated foams was inferior to that of the powder catalyst; however, a two stage micro-channel WGS reactor employing the gold catalyst was sufficient for a 100 W fuel processor system.

  3. Platinum-group elements: quantification in collected exhaust fumes and studies of catalyst surfaces.

    PubMed

    Palacios, M A; Gómez, M M; Moldovan, M; Morrison, G; Rauch, S; Mcleod, C; Ma, R; Laserna, J; Lucena, P; Caroli, S; Alimonti, A; Petrucci, F; Bocca, B; Schramel, P; Lustig, S; Zischka, M; Wass, U; Stenbom, B; Luna, M; Saenz, J C; Santamaría, J; Torrens, J M

    2000-07-20

    Automotive catalytic converters, in which Pt, Pd and Rh (platinum-group elements; PGEs) are the active components for eliminating several noxious components from exhaust fumes, have become the main source of environmental urban pollution by PGEs. This work reports on the catalyst morphology through changes in catalyst surface by scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX) and laser-induced breakdown spectrometry (LIBS) from fresh to aged catalytic converters. The distribution of these elements in the fresh catalysts analysed (Pt-Pd-Rh gasoline catalyst) is not uniform and occurs mainly in a longitudinal direction. This heterogeneity seems to be greater for Pt and Pd. PGEs released by the catalysts, fresh and aged 30,000 km, were studied in parallel. Whole raw exhaust fumes from four catalysts of three different types were also examined. Two of these were gasoline catalysts (Pt-Pd Rh and Pd-Rh) and the other two were diesel catalysts (Pt). Samples were collected following the 91,441 EUDC driving cycle for light-duty vehicle testing. The results show that at 0 km the samples collected first have the highest content of particulate PGEs and although the general tendency is for the release to decrease with increasing number of samples taken, exceptions are frequent. At 30,000 km the released PGEs in gasoline and diesel catalysts decreased significantly. For fresh gasoline catalysts the mean of the total amount released was approximately 100, 250 and 50 ng km(-1) for Pt, Pd and Rh, respectively. In diesel catalysts the Pt release varied in the range 400-800 ng km-1. After ageing the catalysts up to 30,000 km, the gasoline catalysts released amounts of Pt between 6 and 8 ng km(-1), Pd between 12 and 16 ng km(-1) and Rh between 3 and 12 ng km(-1). In diesel catalysts the Pt release varied in the range 108-150 ng km(-1). The soluble portion of PGEs in the HNO3 collector solution represented less than 5% of the total amount for fresh catalysts

  4. Infrared Laser Generation Of Heterogeneous Catalysts And Laser-Induced Reactions At Catalytic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danen, Wayne C.; Cheng, , Sheng-San; Iyer, Pradeep K.; Chiou, Shane-Jaw

    1984-05-01

    It has been demonstrated that continuous wave infrared CO2 laser radiation can be util-ized to rapidly produce active catalysts from inert precursors. The activity and selectiv-ity of Ca0 produced from Ca(OH)2 for the isomerization of 1-butene to cis- and trans-2-but-ene is discussed. Variation of the laser irradiation time produces catalytic activity and selectivity qualitatively similar to that resulting from conventional calcination at different temperatures. Pulsed infrared laser-induced reactions at catalytic surfaces are also discussed with emphasis on the dehydrobromination of 2-bromopropane and ethylene elimination from glycine ethyl ester hydrochloride at BaSO4 , A1PO4, and similar surfaces. Correlations are made of the extent of reaction with various experimental parameters including nature of the catalyst, laser frequency, laser fluence, number of laser pulses, and reagent-catalyst ratio.

  5. Development of highly active and stable hybrid cathode catalyst for PEMFCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Won Suk

    stability under 30,000 potential cycles between 0.6 and 1.0 V. To further increase the stability of the catalyst at high potential cycles (1.0-1.5 V), high temperature treatment is used to obtain graphitized carbon having optimum BET surface area. The novel catalyst synthesis procedure developed in this study was successfully applied for the synthesis of Co-doped Pt catalysts supported on the graphitized carbon which showed high activity and enhanced stability at high potentials.

  6. Model heterogeneous acid catalysts and metal-support interactions: A combined surface science and catalysis study

    SciTech Connect

    Boszormenyi, I.

    1991-05-01

    This (<100 [Angstrom]) silica-alumina layers were tested as potential model heterogeneous acid catalysts for combined surface science and catalysis studies. Three preparation methods were used: oxidation of r3 [times] r3 R30 Al/Si(111) structure in UHV; deposition on Si(lll) from aqueous solution; and argon ion beam sputter deposition in UHV. The homogeneous thin layers are amorphous, and the chemical environment of surface atoms is similar to that of Si, Al and oxygen atoms on high surface area acid catalysts. Since the ion beam-deposited thin layer of silica-alumina has the same composition as the target zeolite this deposition method is a promising tool to prepare model catalysts using practical catalyst targets. The silica-alumina layers are active in cumene cracking, a typical acid catalyzed reaction. In order to clearly distinguish background reactions and the acid catalyzed reaction at least 20 cm[sup 2] catalyst surface area is needed. Two series of model platinum-alumina catalysts were prepared in a combined UHV -- high pressure reactor cell apparatus by depositing alumina on polycrystalline Pt foil and by vapor depositing Pt on a thin alumina layer on Au. Both model surfaces have been prepared with and without chlorine. AES, CO desorption as well as methyl cyclopentane (MCP) hydrogenolysis studies indicate that the Pt surface area is always higher if a chlorination step is involved. Selectivity patterns in MCP ring opening on Pt-on-alumina'' and on alumina-on-Pt'' are different; only the former is a linear combination of selective and statistical ring opening. Product distribution, however, changes with coverage and reaction time. The properties of the two model catalyst systems and role of chlorine in MCP hydrogenolysis are also discussed.

  7. Model heterogeneous acid catalysts and metal-support interactions: A combined surface science and catalysis study

    SciTech Connect

    Boszormenyi, I.

    1991-05-01

    This (<100 {Angstrom}) silica-alumina layers were tested as potential model heterogeneous acid catalysts for combined surface science and catalysis studies. Three preparation methods were used: oxidation of r3 {times} r3 R30 Al/Si(111) structure in UHV; deposition on Si(lll) from aqueous solution; and argon ion beam sputter deposition in UHV. The homogeneous thin layers are amorphous, and the chemical environment of surface atoms is similar to that of Si, Al and oxygen atoms on high surface area acid catalysts. Since the ion beam-deposited thin layer of silica-alumina has the same composition as the target zeolite this deposition method is a promising tool to prepare model catalysts using practical catalyst targets. The silica-alumina layers are active in cumene cracking, a typical acid catalyzed reaction. In order to clearly distinguish background reactions and the acid catalyzed reaction at least 20 cm{sup 2} catalyst surface area is needed. Two series of model platinum-alumina catalysts were prepared in a combined UHV -- high pressure reactor cell apparatus by depositing alumina on polycrystalline Pt foil and by vapor depositing Pt on a thin alumina layer on Au. Both model surfaces have been prepared with and without chlorine. AES, CO desorption as well as methyl cyclopentane (MCP) hydrogenolysis studies indicate that the Pt surface area is always higher if a chlorination step is involved. Selectivity patterns in MCP ring opening on ``Pt-on-alumina`` and on ``alumina-on-Pt`` are different; only the former is a linear combination of selective and statistical ring opening. Product distribution, however, changes with coverage and reaction time. The properties of the two model catalyst systems and role of chlorine in MCP hydrogenolysis are also discussed.

  8. Reducing Pt use in the catalysts for formic acid electrooxidation via nanoengineered surface structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Mengyin; Wang, Yulu; Chen, Guoqin; Zhou, Hua; Li, Yunhua; Zhong, Chuan-Jian; Chen, Bing H.

    2014-07-01

    The design of active and durable catalysts for formic acid (FA) electrooxidation requires controlling the amount of three neighboring platinum atoms in the surface of Pt-based catalysts. Such requirement is studied by preparing Pt decorated Pd/C (donated as Pt-Pd/C) with various Pt:Pd molar ratios via galvanic displacement making the amount of three neighboring Pt atoms in the surface of Pt-Pd/C tunable. The decorated nanostructures are confirmed by XPS, HS-LEIS, cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometric measurements, demonstrating that Pt-Pd/C (the optimal molar ratio, Pt:Pd = 1:250) exhibits superior activity and durability than Pd/C and commercial Pt/C (J-M, 20%) catalysts for FA electrooxidation. The mass activity of Pt-Pd/C (Pt:Pd = 1:250) (3.91 A mg-1) is about 98 and 6 times higher than that of commercial Pt/C (0.04 A mg-1) and Pd/C (0.63 A mg-1) at a given potential of 0.1 V vs SCE, respectively. The controlled synthesis of Pt-Pd/C lead to the formation of largely discontinuous Pd and Pt sites and inhibition of CO formation, exhibiting unprecedented electrocatalytic performance toward FA electrooxidation while the cost of the catalyst almost the same as Pd/C. These findings have profound implications to the design and nanoengineering of decorated surfaces of catalysts for FA electrooxidation.

  9. Pd/MgO: Catalyst characterization and phenol hydrogenation activity

    SciTech Connect

    Claus, P.; Berndt, H.; Mohr, C.; Radnik, J.; Shin, E.J.; Keane, M.A.

    2000-05-15

    The gas-phase hydrogenation of phenol has been studied over a 1% w/w Pd/MgO catalyst prepared by impregnation of MgO with (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}PdCl{sub 6}. The catalyst precursor was activated by precalcination in air at 473 K followed by reduction in hydrogen at 573 K. Temperature-programmed reduction/desorption has revealed the presence of ammonium carbonate and/or ammonium hydrogen carbonate on the active surface in addition to a metallic palladium component. Whereas the latter was not detectable by X-ray diffraction due to the high metal dispersion, transmission electron microscopy revealed that the mean palladium particle diameter is 1.3 {+-} 0.2 nm, which corresponds to a palladium dispersion of D{sub Pd} = 71%. Impregnation followed by calcination is shown to transform MgO to Mg(OH){sub 2} while the additional reduction step generates a surface phase that is composed of both needle-like Periclase MgO and Mg(OH){sub 2}. X-ray photoelectron spectrometric analyses of the activated catalyst has established the presence of zero-valent palladium which appears to be electron rich as a result of metal-support interaction; a degree of palladium charging is also evident as well as residual surface chlorine. The effects on fractional phenol conversion and reaction selectivity of varying such process variables as reaction time, temperature, and phenol molar feed rate are considered and the possibility of thermodynamic limitations is addressed. Hydrogenation was observed to proceed in a stepwise fashion with cyclohexanone as the partially hydrogenated product and cyclohexanol as the fully hydrogenated product. The catalyst delivered a 96% selectivity with respect to cyclohexanone production at 423 K but the cyclohexanone yield decreased at higher temperatures as conversion declined and cyclohexanol was increasingly preferred. Conversion and selectivity were both stable with prolonged catalyst use, i.e., time on stream in excess of 55 h.

  10. Surface modified coals for enhanced catalyst dispersion and liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Yaw D. Yeboah

    1998-10-29

    The aim of the study is to enhance catalyst loading and dispersion in coal for improved liquefaction by preadsorption of surfactants and catalysts on to the coal. During this reporting period, zeta potential measurements were conducted to assess the surface charge on the raw, pretreated and catalyzed coal samples. The surface area, transmission spectroscopy and luminescence intensity of the raw coal and pretreated coal samples were also determined to assess the quality of the coal surface. Across a broad range of pH values, the raw coal had an overall negative charge. Coal treated with anionic surfactant SDS maintained an overall net negative surface negative charge. The interaction between the coal and cationic surfactant DDAB caused the opposite effect resulting in a more positive coal surface charge. Although one would have expected little or no effect of the neutral surfactant Triton X-100, there appears to be some difference in the results of the raw coal and the coal treated with Triton X-100. The authors believe that the Triton not only binds to the nonpolar sites but also has a strong affinity for the polar sites through electrostatic bonding and interaction between the hydrophobic tails. The addition of molybdenum to coal pretreated with DDAB caused a reduction in the positive charge of the coal surface probably due to possible ionic interaction between the coal surface, the surfactant and the catalyst. The adsorption isotherm of the coal was characteristic of isotherms for porous samples and the surface area of the coal increased from 30 m{sup 2}/g to 77 m{sup 2}/g when washed with deionized water. This suggests coal washing may be one method of increasing the surface area for surfactant adsorption. Although the transmission measurements provided valuable information about the coal it resulted in little information on the amount of adsorbed Triton. However, the maximum solid-liquid ratio for optimum surfactant loading of Triton X-100 was determined via

  11. How strain affects the reactivity of surface metal oxide catalysts.

    PubMed

    Amakawa, Kazuhiko; Sun, Lili; Guo, Chunsheng; Hävecker, Michael; Kube, Pierre; Wachs, Israel E; Lwin, Soe; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Patlolla, Anitha; Hermann, Klaus; Schlögl, Robert; Trunschke, Annette

    2013-12-16

    Highly dispersed molybdenum oxide supported on mesoporous silica SBA-15 has been prepared by anion exchange resulting in a series of catalysts with changing Mo densities (0.2-2.5 Mo atoms nm(-2) ). X-ray absorption, UV/Vis, Raman, and IR spectroscopy indicate that doubly anchored tetrahedral dioxo MoO4 units are the major surface species at all loadings. Higher reducibility at loadings close to the monolayer measured by temperature-programmed reduction and a steep increase in the catalytic activity observed in metathesis of propene and oxidative dehydrogenation of propane at 8 % of Mo loading are attributed to frustration of Mo oxide surface species and lateral interactions. Based on DFT calculations, NEXAFS spectra at the O-K-edge at high Mo loadings are explained by distorted MoO4 complexes. Limited availability of anchor silanol groups at high loadings forces the MoO4 groups to form more strained configurations. The occurrence of strain is linked to the increase in reactivity. PMID:24259425

  12. Controlled Surface Segregation Leads to Efficient Coke-Resistant Nickel/Platinum Bimetallic Catalysts for the Dry Reforming of Methane

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Lidong; Zhou, Lu; Ould-Chikh, Samy; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Kanoun, Mohammed B.; Scaranto, Jessica; Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Khalid, Syed; Laveille, Paco V.; Lawrence D'Souza; Clo, Alain; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2015-02-03

    The surface composition and structure are of vital importance for heterogeneous catalysts, especially for bimetallic catalysts, which often vary as a function of reaction conditions (known as surface segregation). The preparation of bimetallic catalysts with controlled metal surface composition and structure is very challenging. In this study, we synthesize a series of Ni/Pt bimetallic catalysts with controlled metal surface composition and structure using a method derived from surface organometallic chemistry. Moreover, the evolution of the surface composition and structure of the obtained bimetallic catalysts under simulated reaction conditions is investigated by various techniques, which include CO-probe IR spectroscopy, high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis, X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis, XRD, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is demonstrated that the structure of the bimetallic catalyst is evolved from Pt monolayer island-modified Ni nanoparticles to core–shell bimetallic nanoparticles composed of a Ni-rich core and a Ni/Pt alloy shell upon thermal treatment. The catalysts are active for the dry reforming of methane, and their catalytic activities, stabilities, and carbon formation vary with their surface composition and structure.

  13. Comparison of iridium- and ruthenium-based, Pt-surface-enriched, nanosize catalysts for the oxygen-reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, D.; Goor, M.; Alon, M.; Tsizin, S.; Burstein, L.; Rosenberg, Y.; Popov, I.; Peled, E.

    2016-02-01

    Pt-surface-enriched nanosize catalysts (Pt-SENS catalysts) with ruthenium and iridium cores, supported on XC72, were synthesized and characterized. The structure and composition of the catalysts are determined by Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Electrochemical characterization tests, including oxygen-reduction-catalysis activity and durability studies of catalysts are performed with the use of cyclic-voltammetry and rotating-disk-electrode (RDE) techniques at room temperature. The ORR activity of the homemade catalysts is also compared to ORR activity of commercial 50%Pt/C catalyst. It is determined that the Ir-based catalyst (Pt/Ir/XC72) shows higher ORR activity in terms of A g-1 of Pt (at 0.85 V vs. RHE) than the Ru-based catalyst (Pt/Ru/XC72) and the commercial 50%Pt/C. The Ru-based catalyst shows similar ORR activity in terms of A g-1 of Pt, to that of the commercial 50%Pt/C, but with much lower durability.

  14. Role of Surface Cobalt Silicate in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Synthesis from Silica-Supported Cobalt Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Li, N.; Wang, X; Derrouiche, S; Haller, G; Pfefferle, L

    2010-01-01

    A silica-supported cobalt catalyst has been developed via incipient wetness impregnation for high-yield synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Co/SiO{sub 2}-impregnated catalysts have not been observed to be efficient for SWNT synthesis. Using an appropriately chosen precursor, we show that effective catalysts can be obtained for SWNT synthesis with yields up to 75 wt %. Detailed characterization indicates that the active sites for SWNT synthesis are small cobalt particles resulting from the reduction of a highly dispersed surface cobalt silicate species. The SWNTs produced by this catalyst are of high quality and easy to purify, and the process is simple and scalable.

  15. Tuning the surface electronic structure of a Pt3Ti(111) electro catalyst.

    PubMed

    Paßens, M; Caciuc, V; Atodiresei, N; Moors, M; Blügel, S; Waser, R; Karthäuser, S

    2016-07-21

    Increasing the efficiency and stability of bimetallic electro catalysts is particularly important for future clean energy technologies. However, the relationship between the surface termination of these alloys and their catalytic activity is poorly understood. Therefore, we report on fundamental UHV-SPM, LEED, and DFT calculations of the Pt3Ti(111) single crystal surface. Using voltage dependent imaging the surface termination of Pt3Ti(111) was studied with atomic resolution. Combining these images with simulated STM maps based on ab initio DFT calculations allowed us to identify the three upper layers of the Pt3Ti(111) single crystal and their influence upon the surface electronic structure. Our results show that small changes in the composition of the second and third atomic layer are of significant influence upon the surface electronic structure of the Pt3Ti electro catalyst. Furthermore, we provide relevant insights into the dependence of the surface termination on the preparation conditions. PMID:26865393

  16. Atomic Scale Structure-Chemistry Relationships at Oxide Catalyst Surfaces and Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBriarty, Martin E.

    Oxide catalysts are integral to chemical production, fuel refining, and the removal of environmental pollutants. However, the atomic-scale phenomena which lead to the useful reactive properties of catalyst materials are not sufficiently understood. In this work, the tools of surface and interface science and electronic structure theory are applied to investigate the structure and chemical properties of catalytically active particles and ultrathin films supported on oxide single crystals. These studies focus on structure-property relationships in vanadium oxide, tungsten oxide, and mixed V-W oxides on the surfaces of alpha-Al2O3 and alpha-Fe2O 3 (0001)-oriented single crystal substrates, two materials with nearly identical crystal structures but drastically different chemical properties. In situ synchrotron X-ray standing wave (XSW) measurements are sensitive to changes in the atomic-scale geometry of single crystal model catalyst surfaces through chemical reaction cycles, while X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveals corresponding chemical changes. Experimental results agree with theoretical calculations of surface structures, allowing for detailed electronic structure investigations and predictions of surface chemical phenomena. The surface configurations and oxidation states of V and W are found to depend on the coverage of each, and reversible structural shifts accompany chemical state changes through reduction-oxidation cycles. Substrate-dependent effects suggest how the choice of oxide support material may affect catalytic behavior. Additionally, the structure and chemistry of W deposited on alpha-Fe 2O3 nanopowders is studied using X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements in an attempt to bridge single crystal surface studies with real catalysts. These investigations of catalytically active material surfaces can inform the rational design of new catalysts for more efficient and sustainable chemistry.

  17. Tuning the surface electronic structure of a Pt3Ti(111) electro catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paßens, M.; Caciuc, V.; Atodiresei, N.; Moors, M.; Blügel, S.; Waser, R.; Karthäuser, S.

    2016-07-01

    Increasing the efficiency and stability of bimetallic electro catalysts is particularly important for future clean energy technologies. However, the relationship between the surface termination of these alloys and their catalytic activity is poorly understood. Therefore, we report on fundamental UHV-SPM, LEED, and DFT calculations of the Pt3Ti(111) single crystal surface. Using voltage dependent imaging the surface termination of Pt3Ti(111) was studied with atomic resolution. Combining these images with simulated STM maps based on ab initio DFT calculations allowed us to identify the three upper layers of the Pt3Ti(111) single crystal and their influence upon the surface electronic structure. Our results show that small changes in the composition of the second and third atomic layer are of significant influence upon the surface electronic structure of the Pt3Ti electro catalyst. Furthermore, we provide relevant insights into the dependence of the surface termination on the preparation conditions.Increasing the efficiency and stability of bimetallic electro catalysts is particularly important for future clean energy technologies. However, the relationship between the surface termination of these alloys and their catalytic activity is poorly understood. Therefore, we report on fundamental UHV-SPM, LEED, and DFT calculations of the Pt3Ti(111) single crystal surface. Using voltage dependent imaging the surface termination of Pt3Ti(111) was studied with atomic resolution. Combining these images with simulated STM maps based on ab initio DFT calculations allowed us to identify the three upper layers of the Pt3Ti(111) single crystal and their influence upon the surface electronic structure. Our results show that small changes in the composition of the second and third atomic layer are of significant influence upon the surface electronic structure of the Pt3Ti electro catalyst. Furthermore, we provide relevant insights into the dependence of the surface termination on the

  18. Surface Modified Coals for Enhanced Catalyst Dispersion and Liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Yaw D. Yeboah

    1998-12-04

    The aim of this study is to enhance catalyst loading and dispersion in coal for improved liquefaction by preadsorption of surfactants and catalysts on to the coal. During this reporting period, liquefaction experiments were conducted with the raw coal and catalyst loaded samples. Pretreatment of the coal and catalyst-loaded samples were done using the surfactants presented in previous reports. Liquefaction samples were tested using 6.6 g of solvent, 3.3 g coal, 6.9 MPa ambient hydrogen pressure, 425 0 C and 30 minutes. The liquid and solid products were removed from the reactor using tetrahydrofuran (THF). Coal conversions were calculated based on THF and heptane solubility. The results showed that in the absence of a catalyst, 33.8% heptane solubles was obtained with the parent coal compared to 27.8% and 27.3% with the SDS and DDAB surfactants. The presence of molybdenum, as expected, resulted in enhanced heptane solubles with or without surfactants. In the absence of surfactants, 50% heptane solubles was obtained compared to 40-47% with surfactants. Thus, it appears that pretreatment, unexpectedly, had a negative effect on liquefaction activity. It is unclear if the observed differences in results are significant. Clearly, additional experiments are needed before any firm deductions and conclusions can be drawn from the results.

  19. Activity and selectivity of Fe catalysts from organometallic and inorganic precursors for hydrocracking of 4-(1-naphthylmethyl) bibenzyl

    SciTech Connect

    Song, C.; Schmidt, E.; Schobert, H.H.

    1995-12-31

    Various iron containing catalysts have been investigated for their use in hydroliquefaction of coal ever since Bergius demonstrated the feasibility of the process. Conventional iron catalysts have been widely used either unsupported or as catalysts dispersed directly onto coal. Iron catalysts have generally a lower cost and lower environmental detriment than Mo, Ni and Co catalyst precursors. The search for active high surface area iron particles has become recently an important pan in the development of a cost effective direct coal liquefaction process. To examine what determines the activity and selectivity of Fe catalysts for hydrogenation and hydrocracking, various molecular precursors with Fe in different chemical environments have been tested in this work to help understand the influence of precursor structure and the effect of sulfur addition on the activity and selectivity of resulting Fe catalysts in model reactions of 4-(naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl (NMBB).

  20. On factors controlling activity of submonolayer bimetallic catalysts: Nitrogen desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Wei; Vlachos, Dionisios G.

    2014-01-07

    We model N{sub 2} desorption on submonolayer bimetallic surfaces consisting of Co clusters on Pt(111) via first-principles density functional theory-based kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. We find that submonolayer structures are essential to rationalize the high activity of these bimetallics in ammonia decomposition. We show that the N{sub 2} desorption temperature on Co/Pt(111) is about 100 K higher than that on Ni/Pt(111), despite Co/Pt(111) binding N weaker at low N coverages. Co/Pt(111) has substantially different lateral interactions than single metals and Ni/Pt. The lateral interactions are rationalized with the d-band center theory. The activity of bimetallic catalysts is the result of heterogeneity of binding energies and reaction barriers among sites, and the most active site can differ on various bimetallics. Our results are in excellent agreement with experimental data and demonstrate for the first time that the zero-coverage descriptor, used until now, for catalyst activity is inadequate due not only to lacking lateral interactions but importantly to presence of multiple sites and a complex interplay of thermodynamics (binding energies, occupation) and kinetics (association barriers) on those sites.

  1. Method for regeneration and activity improvement of syngas conversion catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Lucki, Stanley J.; Brennan, James A.

    1980-01-01

    A method is disclosed for the treatment of single particle iron-containing syngas (synthes.s gas) conversion catalysts comprising iron, a crystalline acidic aluminosilicate zeolite having a silica to alumina ratio of at least 12, a pore size greater than about 5 Angstrom units and a constraint index of about 1-12 and a matrix. The catalyst does not contain promoters and the treatment is applicable to either the regeneration of said spent single particle iron-containing catalyst or for the initial activation of fresh catalyst. The treatment involves air oxidation, hydrogen reduction, followed by a second air oxidation and contact of the iron-containing single particle catalyst with syngas prior to its use for the catalytic conversion of said syngas. The single particle iron-containing catalysts are prepared from a water insoluble organic iron compound.

  2. Catalytic deactivation of methane steam reforming catalysts. I. Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Agnelli, M.E.; Demicheli, M.C.; Ponzi, E.N.

    1987-08-01

    An alumina-supported catalyst was studied both in its original state and after activation and sintering. Chemical composition and textural properties were determined, and crystalline compounds were identified. Active-phase and support transformations occurring during activation were determined by differential thermoanalysis (DTA), temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), and X-ray diffraction. The catalyst activated by means of various procedures was characterized by measuring crystallite size.

  3. Comparison of the activities of fine-particle size catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Stohl, F.V.; Diegert, K.V.; Goodnow, D.C.

    1994-12-31

    The objectives of Sandia`s fine-particle size catalyst testing project are to evaluate and compare the activities of the fine-particle size catalysts being developed in DOE/PETCs Advanced Research Coal Liquefaction Program by using standard coal liquefaction test procedures. The standard procedures use Blind Canyon coal, phenanthrene as the reaction solvent, and a factorial experimental design with temperatures from 350{degrees}C to 400{degrees}C, reaction times from 20 to 60 minutes, and catalyst loadings up to 1 wt%. Catalytic activity is measured in terms of tetrahydrofuran conversion, heptane conversion, the amount of 9,10-dihydrophenanthrene in the product, and the gas yield. Several catalysts have been evaluated including a commercially available pyrite, a sulfated iron oxide from the University of Pittsburgh, and several preparations of 6-line ferrihydrites from Pacific Northwest Laboratories. Results have demonstrated that significant differences in activity can be detected among these catalysts.

  4. Highly active water-soluble olefin metathesis catalyst.

    PubMed

    Hong, Soon Hyeok; Grubbs, Robert H

    2006-03-22

    A novel water-soluble ruthenium olefin metathesis catalyst supported by a poly(ethylene glycol) conjugated saturated 1,3-dimesityl-4,5-dihydroimidazol-2-ylidene ligand is reported. The catalyst displays improved activity in ring-opening metathesis polymerization, ring-closing metathesis, and cross-metathesis reactions in aqueous media. PMID:16536510

  5. Quantifying the density and utilization of active sites in non-precious metal oxygen electroreduction catalysts.

    PubMed

    Sahraie, Nastaran Ranjbar; Kramm, Ulrike I; Steinberg, Julian; Zhang, Yuanjian; Thomas, Arne; Reier, Tobias; Paraknowitsch, Jens-Peter; Strasser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Carbon materials doped with transition metal and nitrogen are highly active, non-precious metal catalysts for the electrochemical conversion of molecular oxygen in fuel cells, metal air batteries, and electrolytic processes. However, accurate measurement of their intrinsic turn-over frequency and active-site density based on metal centres in bulk and surface has remained difficult to date, which has hampered a more rational catalyst design. Here we report a successful quantification of bulk and surface-based active-site density and associated turn-over frequency values of mono- and bimetallic Fe/N-doped carbons using a combination of chemisorption, desorption and (57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. Our general approach yields an experimental descriptor for the intrinsic activity and the active-site utilization, aiding in the catalyst development process and enabling a previously unachieved level of understanding of reactivity trends owing to a deconvolution of site density and intrinsic activity. PMID:26486465

  6. Quantifying the density and utilization of active sites in non-precious metal oxygen electroreduction catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahraie, Nastaran Ranjbar; Kramm, Ulrike I.; Steinberg, Julian; Zhang, Yuanjian; Thomas, Arne; Reier, Tobias; Paraknowitsch, Jens-Peter; Strasser, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Carbon materials doped with transition metal and nitrogen are highly active, non-precious metal catalysts for the electrochemical conversion of molecular oxygen in fuel cells, metal air batteries, and electrolytic processes. However, accurate measurement of their intrinsic turn-over frequency and active-site density based on metal centres in bulk and surface has remained difficult to date, which has hampered a more rational catalyst design. Here we report a successful quantification of bulk and surface-based active-site density and associated turn-over frequency values of mono- and bimetallic Fe/N-doped carbons using a combination of chemisorption, desorption and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. Our general approach yields an experimental descriptor for the intrinsic activity and the active-site utilization, aiding in the catalyst development process and enabling a previously unachieved level of understanding of reactivity trends owing to a deconvolution of site density and intrinsic activity.

  7. Quantifying the density and utilization of active sites in non-precious metal oxygen electroreduction catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Sahraie, Nastaran Ranjbar; Kramm, Ulrike I.; Steinberg, Julian; Zhang, Yuanjian; Thomas, Arne; Reier, Tobias; Paraknowitsch, Jens-Peter; Strasser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Carbon materials doped with transition metal and nitrogen are highly active, non-precious metal catalysts for the electrochemical conversion of molecular oxygen in fuel cells, metal air batteries, and electrolytic processes. However, accurate measurement of their intrinsic turn-over frequency and active-site density based on metal centres in bulk and surface has remained difficult to date, which has hampered a more rational catalyst design. Here we report a successful quantification of bulk and surface-based active-site density and associated turn-over frequency values of mono- and bimetallic Fe/N-doped carbons using a combination of chemisorption, desorption and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. Our general approach yields an experimental descriptor for the intrinsic activity and the active-site utilization, aiding in the catalyst development process and enabling a previously unachieved level of understanding of reactivity trends owing to a deconvolution of site density and intrinsic activity. PMID:26486465

  8. Highly Effective Pt-Based Water-Gas Shift Catalysts by Surface Modification with Alkali Hydroxide Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Kusche, Matthias; Bustillo, Karen; Agel, Friederike; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2015-01-29

    Here, we describe an economical and convenient method to improve the performance of Pt/alumina catalysts for the water–gas shift reaction through surface modification of the catalysts with alkali hydroxides according to the solid catalyst with ionic liquid layer approach. The results are in agreement with our findings reported earlier for methanol steam reforming. This report indicates that alkali doping of the catalyst plays an important role in the observed catalyst activation. In addition, the basic and hygroscopic nature of the salt coating contributes to a significant improvement in the performance of the catalyst. During the reaction, a partly liquid film of alkali hydroxide forms on the alumina surface, which increases the availability of H2O at the catalytically active sites. Kinetic studies reveal a negligible effect of the KOH coating on the rate dependence of CO and H2O partial pressures. In conclusion, TEM studies indicate an agglomeration of the active Pt clusters during catalyst preparation; restructuring of Pt nanoparticles occurs under reaction conditions, which leads to a highly active and stable system over 240h time on stream. Excessive pore fillings with KOH introduce a mass transfer barrier as indicated in a volcano-shaped curve of activity versus salt loading. The optimum KOH loading was found to be 7.5wt%.

  9. Highly Effective Pt-Based Water-Gas Shift Catalysts by Surface Modification with Alkali Hydroxide Salts

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kusche, Matthias; Bustillo, Karen; Agel, Friederike; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2015-01-29

    Here, we describe an economical and convenient method to improve the performance of Pt/alumina catalysts for the water–gas shift reaction through surface modification of the catalysts with alkali hydroxides according to the solid catalyst with ionic liquid layer approach. The results are in agreement with our findings reported earlier for methanol steam reforming. This report indicates that alkali doping of the catalyst plays an important role in the observed catalyst activation. In addition, the basic and hygroscopic nature of the salt coating contributes to a significant improvement in the performance of the catalyst. During the reaction, a partly liquid filmmore » of alkali hydroxide forms on the alumina surface, which increases the availability of H2O at the catalytically active sites. Kinetic studies reveal a negligible effect of the KOH coating on the rate dependence of CO and H2O partial pressures. In conclusion, TEM studies indicate an agglomeration of the active Pt clusters during catalyst preparation; restructuring of Pt nanoparticles occurs under reaction conditions, which leads to a highly active and stable system over 240h time on stream. Excessive pore fillings with KOH introduce a mass transfer barrier as indicated in a volcano-shaped curve of activity versus salt loading. The optimum KOH loading was found to be 7.5wt%.« less

  10. Highly Effective Pt-Based Water–Gas Shift Catalysts by Surface Modification with Alkali Hydroxide Salts

    PubMed Central

    Kusche, Matthias; Bustillo, Karen; Agel, Friederike; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we describe an economical and convenient method to improve the performance of Pt/alumina catalysts for the water–gas shift reaction through surface modification of the catalysts with alkali hydroxides according to the solid catalyst with ionic liquid layer approach. The results are in agreement with our findings reported earlier for methanol steam reforming. This report indicates that alkali doping of the catalyst plays an important role in the observed catalyst activation. In addition, the basic and hygroscopic nature of the salt coating contributes to a significant improvement in the performance of the catalyst. During the reaction, a partly liquid film of alkali hydroxide forms on the alumina surface, which increases the availability of H2O at the catalytically active sites. Kinetic studies reveal a negligible effect of the KOH coating on the rate dependence of CO and H2O partial pressures. TEM studies indicate an agglomeration of the active Pt clusters during catalyst preparation; restructuring of Pt nanoparticles occurs under reaction conditions, which leads to a highly active and stable system over 240 h time on stream. Excessive pore fillings with KOH introduce a mass transfer barrier as indicated in a volcano-shaped curve of activity versus salt loading. The optimum KOH loading was found to be 7.5 wt %. PMID:26413174

  11. Structure and activity of tellurium/molybdenum oxide acrylonitrile catalysts. [Ammoxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Bart, J.C.J.; Giordano, N.

    1980-08-01

    The tellurium/molybdenum mixed oxides ((TeMo)O) catalyst system was investigated as part of the development of an industrial cerium/tellurium/molybdenum mixed oxides catalyst for propylene ammoxidation Catalysts containing 25% active phase on silica were prepared, characterized by BET surface area measurement, mercury porosimetry, X-ray diffraction, and optical microscopy, and tested for the ammoxidation of propylene at 400/sup 0/-460/sup 0/C in a flow reactor. The results suggested that Te/sub 2/MoO/sub 7/ is the active phase. The mechanism probably involves activation of propylene on a tellurium site and oxygen insertion at isolated and highly distorted MoO/sub 6/ octahedral sites. The addition of cerium to the binary catalyst prevents the reductive degradation of (TeMo)O which occurs under reactor flow conditions by a phase-separation process.

  12. Surface-mediated synthesis of dimeric rhodium catalysts on MgO: tracking changes in the nuclearity and ligand environment of the catalytically active sites by X-ray absorption and infrared spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Yardimci, Dicle; Serna, Pedro; Gates, Bruce C

    2013-01-21

    The preparation of dinuclear rhodium clusters and their use as catalysts is challenging because these clusters are unstable, evolving readily into species with higher nuclearities. We now present a novel synthetic route to generate rhodium dimers on the surface of MgO by a stoichiometrically simple surface-mediated reaction involving [Rh(C(2)H(4))(2)] species and H(2). X-ray absorption and IR spectra were used to characterize the changes in the nuclearity of the essentially molecular surface species as they formed, including the ligands on the rhodium and the metal-support interactions. The support plays a key role in stabilizing the dinuclear rhodium species, allowing the incorporation of small ligands (ethyl, hydride, and/or CO) and enabling a characterization of the catalytic performance of the supported species for the hydrogenation of ethylene as a function of the metal nuclearity and ligand environment. A change in the nuclearity from one to two Rh atoms leads to a 58-fold increase in the catalytic activity for ethylene hydrogenation, a reaction involving unsaturated, but stable, dimeric rhodium species. PMID:23208893

  13. Shape-selective catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch chemistry : iron-containing particulate catalysts. Activity report : January 1, 2001 - December 31, 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Cronauer, D.; Chemical Engineering

    2006-05-12

    organo-silicate onto the CAER catalyst. The second was the acidic precipitation of an organo-silicate with aging to form fractal particles that were then deposited onto the CAER catalyst. Several resulting FT catalysts were as active as the coarse catalyst on which they were prepared. The most active ones were those with the least amount of coating, namely about 2.2 wt% SiO{sub 2}. In the case of the latter acid technique, the use of HCl and HNO{sub 3} was much more effective than that of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe and analyze as-received and treated FT catalysts. It was observed that (1) spherical particles of CAER FT catalyst were made up of agglomerates of particles that were, in turn, also agglomerates; (2) the spray drying process of CAER apparently concentrated the Si precursor at the surface during drying; (3) while SEM pointed out broad differences in the appearance of the prepared catalyst particles, there was little indication that the catalysts were being uniformly coated with a cage-like protective surface, with perhaps the exception of HNO{sub 3}-precipitated catalyst; and (4) there was only a limited penetration of carbon (i.e., CO) into the FT catalyst during the conditioning and FT reaction steps.

  14. High surface area ThO/sub 2/ catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Colmenares, C.A.; Somorjai, G.A.; Maj, J.J.

    1983-06-21

    A ThO/sub 2/ catalyst having a high surface area of about 80 to 125m/sup 2//g is synthesized. The compound is synthesized by simultaneously mixing an aqueous solution of ThNO/sub 3/(NO/sub 3/)/sub 4/.4H/sub 2/O with an aqueous solution of Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/.H/sub 2/O, to produce a solution and solid ThOCO/sub 3/. The solid ThOCO/sub 3/ is separated from the solution, and then calcined at a temperature of about 225 to 300/sup 0/C for about 40 to 55 hours to produce ThO/sub 2/. The ThO/sub 2/ catalyst produced includes Na present as a substitutional cation in an amount equal to about 5 to 10 at. %.

  15. A novel process for the preparation of Cu/ZnO and Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ultrafine catalyst: Structure, surface properties, and activity for methanol synthesis from CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Qi; Zhang, Yu-Long; Chen, Hai-Ying

    1997-04-01

    Cu/ZnO and Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ultrafine particle catalysts have been prepared by a novel oxalate gel coprecipitation method. XRD, TEM, TG/DTG, and EXAFS were used to characterize the phases, morphology, and particle sizes of the precursors of the catalysts and reduced catalysts. The results showed that isomorphous substitution took place between copper and zinc in the precipitates. The addition of Al to the binary system made the copper and zinc in the catalyst exist in much smaller crystallites and exhibit an amorphous-like structure. The effects of composition, structure, and surface property of the catalysts as well as the reaction condition on the activity and selectivity to methanol for methanol synthesis from CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2} were investigated. The activity was found to increase with the in- crease of surface area of metallic copper in the range of 10-60% of copper content, but it decreased as the copper content exceeded 60%, although the metallic copper surface area was higher. This was explained by the strong synergy between copper and zinc oxide. The effect of contact time on the relative selectivity ({gamma} = S{sub CH3OH}/S{sub CO}) and selectivity of methanol was also investigated. The results indicated that methanol was formed directly from hydrogenation of CO{sub 2}.

  16. Activation studies with a precipitated iron catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. II. Reaction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bukur, D.B.; Nowicki, L.; Manne, R.K.; Lang, Xiaosu

    1995-09-01

    Effects of pretreatment conditions on catalyst performance (activity, selectivity, and stability with time) during Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis were studied in a fixed-bed reactor using a commercial precipitated iron catalyst (100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2K/25 SiO{sub 2} on a mass basis). The catalyst activity increased slightly with time-on-stream after hydrogen reductions, which was accompanied with conversion of metallic iron and part of iron oxides to {epsilon}{prime}-carbide ({epsilon}{prime}-Fe{sub 22}C). Initial activity of the H{sub 2}-reduced catalyst at 280{degrees}C for 8 or 24 h was markedly lower than that obtained in other tests. This is attributed to slow carburization of large oxide particles and partial poisoning of catalyst sites by migration of sulfur from the bulk to the surface of the catalyst during the reduction. Pretreatments with carbon monoxide and syngas resulted in partial conversion of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} to {chi}-carbide ({chi}-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2}). During FT synthesis the CO- and the syngas-pretreated catalyst deactivated slowly with time-on-stream, due to partial conversion of {chi}-carbide to less active iron oxide phases and buildup of carbonaceous deposits which block the active sites. The hydrogen-reduced catalyst at 280{degrees}C, for 1-24h, produced more methane and gaseous hydrocarbons than the CO- or the syngas-pretreated catalyst and favored secondary reactions (1-olefin hydrogenation, isomerization, and readsorption). 41 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Ruthenium-based olefin metathesis catalysts bearing pH-responsive ligands: External control of catalyst solubility and activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balof, Shawna Lynn

    2011-12-01

    Sixteen novel, Ru-based olefin metathesis catalysts bearing pH responsive ligands were synthesized. The pH-responsive groups employed with these catalysts included dimethylamino (NMe2) modified NHC ligands as well as N-donor dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) and 3-(o-pyridyl)propylidene ligands. These pH-responsive ligands provided the means by which the solubility and/or activity profiles of the catalysts produced could be controlled via acid addition. The main goal of this dissertation was to design catalyst systems capable of performing ring opening metathesis (ROMP) and ring closing metathesis (RCM) reactions in both organic and aqueous media. In an effort to quickly gain access to new catalyst structures, a template synthesis for functionalized NHC ligand precursors was designed, in addition to other strategies, to obtain ligand precursors with ancillary NMe2 groups. Kinetic studies for the catalysts produced from these precursors showed external control of catalyst solubility was afforded via protonation of the NMe2 groups of their NHC ligands. Additionally, this protonation afforded external control of catalyst propagation rates for several catalysts. This is the first known independent external control for the propagation rates of ROMP catalysts. The incorporation of pH-responsive N-donor ligands into catalyst structures also provided the means for the external control of metathesis activity, as the protonation of these ligands resulted in an increased initiation rate based on their fast and irreversible dissociation from the metal center. The enhanced external control makes these catalysts applicable to a wide range of applications, some of which have been explored by us and/or through collaboration. Three of the catalysts designed showed remarkable metathesis activity in aqueous media. These catalysts displayed comparable RCM activity in aqueous media to a class of water-soluble catalysts reported by Grubbs et al., considered to be the most active catalyst for

  18. Multifunctionality of organometallic quinonoid metal complexes: surface chemistry, coordination polymers, and catalysts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Bok; Pike, Robert D; Sweigart, Dwight A

    2013-11-19

    rhodium complex showed catalytic activity in Suzuki-Miyaura type reaction. As a result of the excellent stability of the homogeneous catalyst [(quinone)Rh(COD)](-) in water, we also successfully demonstrated catalyst recycling in 1,2- and 1,4-addition reactions. The compound [(quinone)Ir(COD)](-) showed significantly poorer catalytic activity in 1,4-addition reactions. Following upon the excellent coordination ability of the quinonoid rhodium complexes to metal centers, we synthesized organometallic coordination polymer nanocatalysts and silica gel-supported quinonoid rhodium catalysts, the latter using a surface sol-gel technique. The resulting heterogeneous catalysts showed activity in the stereospecific polymerization of phenylacetylene. PMID:23745596

  19. Surface modification processes during methane decomposition on Cu-promoted Ni–ZrO2 catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Wolfbeisser, Astrid; Klötzer, Bernhard; Mayr, Lukas; Rameshan, Raffael; Zemlyanov, Dmitry; Bernardi, Johannes; Rupprechter, Günther

    2015-01-01

    The surface chemistry of methane on Ni–ZrO2 and bimetallic CuNi–ZrO2 catalysts and the stability of the CuNi alloy under reaction conditions of methane decomposition were investigated by combining reactivity measurements and in situ synchrotron-based near-ambient pressure XPS. Cu was selected as an exemplary promoter for modifying the reactivity of Ni and enhancing the resistance against coke formation. We observed an activation process occurring in methane between 650 and 735 K with the exact temperature depending on the composition which resulted in an irreversible modification of the catalytic performance of the bimetallic catalysts towards a Ni-like behaviour. The sudden increase in catalytic activity could be explained by an increase in the concentration of reduced Ni atoms at the catalyst surface in the active state, likely as a consequence of the interaction with methane. Cu addition to Ni improved the desired resistance against carbon deposition by lowering the amount of coke formed. As a key conclusion, the CuNi alloy shows limited stability under relevant reaction conditions. This system is stable only in a limited range of temperature up to ~700 K in methane. Beyond this temperature, segregation of Ni species causes a fast increase in methane decomposition rate. In view of the applicability of this system, a detailed understanding of the stability and surface composition of the bimetallic phases present and the influence of the Cu promoter on the surface chemistry under relevant reaction conditions are essential. PMID:25815163

  20. Decoupling HZSM-5 catalyst activity from deactivation during upgrading of pyrolysis oil vapors.

    PubMed

    Wan, Shaolong; Waters, Christopher; Stevens, Adam; Gumidyala, Abhishek; Jentoft, Rolf; Lobban, Lance; Resasco, Daniel; Mallinson, Richard; Crossley, Steven

    2015-02-01

    The independent evaluation of catalyst activity and stability during the catalytic pyrolysis of biomass is challenging because of the nature of the reaction system and rapid catalyst deactivation that force the use of excess catalyst. In this contribution we use a modified pyroprobe system in which pulses of pyrolysis vapors are converted over a series of HZSM-5 catalysts in a separate fixed-bed reactor controlled independently. Both the reactor-bed temperature and the Si/Al ratio of the zeolite are varied to evaluate catalyst activity and deactivation rates independently both on a constant surface area and constant acid site basis. Results show that there is an optimum catalyst-bed temperature for the production of aromatics, above which the production of light gases increases and that of aromatics decrease. Zeolites with lower Si/Al ratios give comparable initial rates for aromatics production, but far more rapid catalyst deactivation rates than those with higher Si/Al ratios. PMID:25504857

  1. Nanoscale attrition during activation of precipitated iron Fischer- Tropsch catalysts: Implications for catalyst design

    SciTech Connect

    Datye, A.K.; Shroff, M.D.; Jin, Y.; Brooks, R.P.; Wilder, J.A.; Harrington, M.S.; Sault, A.G.; Jackson, N.B.

    1996-06-01

    This work has shown that the kaolin binder that has been used in commercial Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis catalysts doe not offer any significant attrition resistance. This is due in part to its morphology (plate-like) and to its particle size being much greater than the primary crystallite size of the iron oxide catalyst. From a microscopic examination of these catalysts, it appears that if the nanoscale attrition of the iron catalyst is to be avoided, the iron must be well dispersed on the binder, and the binder must provide an interlocking microstructure that provides strength and stability to the 30-70 {mu}m agglomerates. The study of Fe/SiO{sub 2} catalysts has shown that co-precipitation of the iron and silica leads to formation of an amorphous glassy phase which is difficult to reduce even at 723K. On the other hand, when the iron was precipitated on a preformed silica, 25-40% of the iron could be reduced and carbided. The supported iron catalyst, after reduction, formed 15-20 nm iron carbide particles that look very similar to those on the unsupported catalyst. The major difference is these nanometer sized particles are anchored on a support and therefore would not be expected to breakup further and contribute to the fines generated as catalyst attrition proceeds. However, since only a fraction of the silica-supported iron can be reduced to the active carbide phase, our present efforts are devoted to moderating the Fe/SiO{sub 2} interaction by introducing an interfacial oxide phase. We are also studying the role of added Cu on the ease of reducibility of Fe/SiO{sub 2}. The implication of this work is that other binder materials should be explored that have a morphology that can strengthen the agglomerates and minimize the Fe-SiO{sub 2} interfacial reactions. This work is presently underway in our laboratory.

  2. Effects of catalyst surface and hydrogen bond on ethanol dehydrogenation to ethoxy on Cu catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Kang; Zhang, Minhua; Wang, Lichang

    2013-10-01

    Ethanol and ethanol dimer dehydrogenation to ethoxy on Cu surfaces were studied using DFT calculations with the PBE/DNP method. The dehydrogenation barrier decreases from 1.15 eV on Cu(1 1 1) to 0.72 eV on Cu(1 1 0) and further to 0.67 eV on Cu(1 0 0). The presence of hydrogen bond decreases the barrier to 1.02 eV on Cu(1 1 1) and 0.67 eV on Cu(1 1 0), but increases the barrier to 0.75 eV on Cu(1 0 0). Thus, the most effective catalyst surface is the clean Cu(1 0 0) and the ethanol adsorbed Cu(1 1 0). These results were analyzed based on the d-band center theory and the structural information of the adsorbed molecules.

  3. Hydrogenation of biofuels with formic acid over a palladium-based ternary catalyst with two types of active sites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Zhang, Bingsen; Meng, Xiangju; Su, Dang Sheng; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2014-06-01

    A composite catalyst including palladium nanoparticles on titania (TiO2) and on nitrogen-modified porous carbon (Pd/TiO2@N-C) is synthesized from palladium salts, tetrabutyl titanate, and chitosan. N2 sorption isotherms show that the catalyst has a high BET surface area (229 m(2)  g(-1)) and large porosity. XPS and TEM characterization of the catalyst shows that palladium species with different chemical states are well dispersed across the TiO2 and nitrogen-modified porous carbon, respectively. The Pd/TiO2@N-C catalyst is very active and shows excellent stability towards hydrogenation of vanillin to 2-methoxy-4-methylphenol using formic acid as hydrogen source. This activity can be attributed to a synergistic effect between the Pd/TiO2 (a catalyst for dehydrogenation of formic acid) and Pd/N-C (a catalyst for hydrogenation of vanillin) sites. PMID:24861954

  4. Low Temperature Activation of Supported Metathesis Catalysts by Organosilicon Reducing Agents

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Alkene metathesis is a widely and increasingly used reaction in academia and industry because of its efficiency in terms of atom economy and its wide applicability. This reaction is notably responsible for the production of several million tons of propene annually. Such industrial processes rely on inexpensive silica-supported tungsten oxide catalysts, which operate at high temperatures (>350 °C), in contrast with the mild room temperature reaction conditions typically used with the corresponding molecular alkene metathesis homogeneous catalysts. This large difference in the temperature requirements is generally thought to arise from the difficulty in generating active sites (carbenes or metallacyclobutanes) in the classical metal oxide catalysts and prevents broader applicability, notably with functionalized substrates. We report here a low temperature activation process of well-defined metal oxo surface species using organosilicon reductants, which generate a large amount of active species at only 70 °C (0.6 active sites/W). This high activity at low temperature broadens the scope of these catalysts to functionalized substrates. This activation process can also be applied to classical industrial catalysts. We provide evidence for the formation of a metallacyclopentane intermediate and propose how the active species are formed. PMID:27610418

  5. Low Temperature Activation of Supported Metathesis Catalysts by Organosilicon Reducing Agents.

    PubMed

    Mougel, Victor; Chan, Ka-Wing; Siddiqi, Georges; Kawakita, Kento; Nagae, Haruki; Tsurugi, Hayato; Mashima, Kazushi; Safonova, Olga; Copéret, Christophe

    2016-08-24

    Alkene metathesis is a widely and increasingly used reaction in academia and industry because of its efficiency in terms of atom economy and its wide applicability. This reaction is notably responsible for the production of several million tons of propene annually. Such industrial processes rely on inexpensive silica-supported tungsten oxide catalysts, which operate at high temperatures (>350 °C), in contrast with the mild room temperature reaction conditions typically used with the corresponding molecular alkene metathesis homogeneous catalysts. This large difference in the temperature requirements is generally thought to arise from the difficulty in generating active sites (carbenes or metallacyclobutanes) in the classical metal oxide catalysts and prevents broader applicability, notably with functionalized substrates. We report here a low temperature activation process of well-defined metal oxo surface species using organosilicon reductants, which generate a large amount of active species at only 70 °C (0.6 active sites/W). This high activity at low temperature broadens the scope of these catalysts to functionalized substrates. This activation process can also be applied to classical industrial catalysts. We provide evidence for the formation of a metallacyclopentane intermediate and propose how the active species are formed. PMID:27610418

  6. Atomic layer deposition-Sequential self-limiting surface reactions for advanced catalyst "bottom-up" synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Junling; Elam, Jeffrey W.; Stair, Peter C.

    2016-06-01

    Catalyst synthesis with precise control over the structure of catalytic active sites at the atomic level is of essential importance for the scientific understanding of reaction mechanisms and for rational design of advanced catalysts with high performance. Such precise control is achievable using atomic layer deposition (ALD). ALD is similar to chemical vapor deposition (CVD), except that the deposition is split into a sequence of two self-limiting surface reactions between gaseous precursor molecules and a substrate. The unique self-limiting feature of ALD allows conformal deposition of catalytic materials on a high surface area catalyst support at the atomic level. The deposited catalytic materials can be precisely constructed on the support by varying the number and type of ALD cycles. As an alternative to the wet-chemistry based conventional methods, ALD provides a cycle-by-cycle "bottom-up" approach for nanostructuring supported catalysts with near atomic precision. In this review, we summarize recent attempts to synthesize supported catalysts with ALD. Nucleation and growth of metals by ALD on oxides and carbon materials for precise synthesis of supported monometallic catalyst are reviewed. The capability of achieving precise control over the particle size of monometallic nanoparticles by ALD is emphasized. The resulting metal catalysts with high dispersions and uniformity often show comparable or remarkably higher activity than those prepared by conventional methods. For supported bimetallic catalyst synthesis, we summarize the strategies for controlling the deposition of the secondary metal selectively on the primary metal nanoparticle but not on the support to exclude monometallic formation. As a review of the surface chemistry and growth behavior of metal ALD on metal surfaces, we demonstrate the ways to precisely tune size, composition and structure of bimetallic metal nanoparticles. The cycle-by-cycle "bottom up" construction of bimetallic (or multiple

  7. Highly Active Multidentate Ligand-Based Alkyne Metathesis Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Du, Ya; Yang, Haishen; Zhu, Chengpu; Ortiz, Michael; Okochi, Kenji D; Shoemaker, Richard; Jin, Yinghua; Zhang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Alkyne metathesis catalysts composed of molybdenum(VI) propylidyne and multidentate tris(2-hydroxylbenzyl)methane ligands have been developed, which exhibit excellent stability (remains active in solution for months at room temperature), high activity, and broad functional-group tolerance. The homodimerization and cyclooligomerization of monopropynyl or dipropynyl substrates, including challenging heterocycle substrates (e.g., pyridine), proceed efficiently at 40-55 °C in a closed system. The ligand structure and catalytic activity relationship has been investigated, which shows that the ortho groups of the multidentate phenol ligands are critical to the stability and activity of such a catalyst system. PMID:27113640

  8. Active site densities, oxygen activation and adsorbed reactive oxygen in alcohol activation on npAu catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu-Cun; Friend, C M; Fushimi, Rebecca; Madix, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    The activation of molecular O2 as well as the reactivity of adsorbed oxygen species is of central importance in aerobic selective oxidation chemistry on Au-based catalysts. Herein, we address the issue of O2 activation on unsupported nanoporous gold (npAu) catalysts by applying a transient pressure technique, a temporal analysis of products (TAP) reactor, to measure the saturation coverage of atomic oxygen, its collisional dissociation probability, the activation barrier for O2 dissociation, and the facility with which adsorbed O species activate methanol, the initial step in the catalytic cycle of esterification. The results from these experiments indicate that molecular O2 dissociation is associated with surface silver, that the density of reactive sites is quite low, that adsorbed oxygen atoms do not spill over from the sites of activation onto the surrounding surface, and that methanol reacts quite facilely with the adsorbed oxygen atoms. In addition, the O species from O2 dissociation exhibits reactivity for the selective oxidation of methanol but not for CO. The TAP experiments also revealed that the surface of the npAu catalyst is saturated with adsorbed O under steady state reaction conditions, at least for the pulse reaction. PMID:27376884

  9. Development of catalytically active and highly stable catalyst supports for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taekeun; Xie, Tianyuan; Jung, Wonsuk; Gadala-Maria, Francis; Ganesan, Prabhu; Popov, Branko N.

    2015-01-01

    Novel procedures are developed for the synthesis of highly stable carbon composite catalyst supports (CCCS-800 °C and CCCS-1100 °C) and an activated carbon composite catalyst support (A-CCCS). These supports are synthesized through: (i) surface modification with acids and inclusion of oxygen groups, (ii) metal-catalyzed pyrolysis, and (iii) chemical leaching to remove excess metal used to dope the support. The procedure results in increasing carbon graphitization and inclusion of non-metallic active sites on the support surface. Catalytic activity of CCCS indicates an onset potential of 0.86 V for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) with well-defined kinetic and mass-transfer regions and ∼2.5% H2O2 production in rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) studies. Support stability studies at 1.2 V constant potential holding for 400 h indicate high stability for the 30% Pt/A-CCCS catalyst with a cell potential loss of 27 mV at 800 mA cm-2 under H2-air, 32% mass activity loss, and 30% ECSA loss. Performance evaluation in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell shows power densities (rated) of 0.18 and 0.23 gPt kW-1 for the 30% Pt/A-CCCS and 30% Pt/CCCS-800 °C catalysts, respectively. The stabilities of various supports developed in this study are compared with those of a commercial Pt/C catalyst.

  10. Engineering catalytic activity via ion beam bombardment of catalyst supports for vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, A. E.; Zakharov, D.; Stach, E. A.; Nikoleav, P.; Amama, P. B.; Sargent, G.; Saber, S.; Huffman, D.; Erford, M.; Semiatin, S. L.; Maruyama, B.

    2015-09-16

    Carbon nanotube growth depends on the catalytic activity of metal nanoparticles on alumina or silica supports. The control on catalytic activity is generally achieved by variations in water concentration, carbon feed, and sample placement on a few types of alumina or silica catalyst supports obtained via thin film deposition. We have recently expanded the choice of catalyst supports by engineering inactive substrates like c-cut sapphire via ion beam bombardment. The deterministic control on the structure and chemistry of catalyst supports obtained by tuning the degree of beam-induced damage have enabled better regulation of the activity of Fe catalysts only in the ion beam bombarded areas and hence enabled controllable super growth of carbon nanotubes. A wide range of surface characterization techniques were used to monitor the catalytically active surface engineered via ion beam bombardment. The proposed method offers a versatile way to control carbon nanotube growth in patterned areas and also enhances the current understanding of the growth process. As a result, with the right choice of water concentration, carbon feed and sample placement, engineered catalyst supports may extend the carbon nanotube growth yield to a level that is even higher than the ones reported here, and thus offers promising applications of carbon nanotubes in electronics, heat exchanger, and energy storage.

  11. Engineering catalytic activity via ion beam bombardment of catalyst supports for vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Islam, A. E.; Zakharov, D.; Stach, E. A.; Nikoleav, P.; Amama, P. B.; Sargent, G.; Saber, S.; Huffman, D.; Erford, M.; Semiatin, S. L.; et al

    2015-09-16

    Carbon nanotube growth depends on the catalytic activity of metal nanoparticles on alumina or silica supports. The control on catalytic activity is generally achieved by variations in water concentration, carbon feed, and sample placement on a few types of alumina or silica catalyst supports obtained via thin film deposition. We have recently expanded the choice of catalyst supports by engineering inactive substrates like c-cut sapphire via ion beam bombardment. The deterministic control on the structure and chemistry of catalyst supports obtained by tuning the degree of beam-induced damage have enabled better regulation of the activity of Fe catalysts only inmore » the ion beam bombarded areas and hence enabled controllable super growth of carbon nanotubes. A wide range of surface characterization techniques were used to monitor the catalytically active surface engineered via ion beam bombardment. The proposed method offers a versatile way to control carbon nanotube growth in patterned areas and also enhances the current understanding of the growth process. As a result, with the right choice of water concentration, carbon feed and sample placement, engineered catalyst supports may extend the carbon nanotube growth yield to a level that is even higher than the ones reported here, and thus offers promising applications of carbon nanotubes in electronics, heat exchanger, and energy storage.« less

  12. Air Oxidation of Activated Carbon to Synthesize a Biomimetic Catalyst for Hydrolysis of Cellulose.

    PubMed

    Shrotri, Abhijit; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Fukuoka, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    Oxygenated carbon catalyzes the hydrolysis of cellulose present in lignocellulosic biomass by utilizing the weakly acidic functional groups on its surface. Here we report the synthesis of a biomimetic carbon catalyst by simple and economical air-oxidation of a commercially available activated carbon. Air- oxidation at 450-500 °C introduced 2000-2400 μmol g(-1) of oxygenated functional groups on the material with minor changes in the textural properties. Selectivity towards the formation of carboxylic groups on the catalyst surface increased with the increase in oxidation temperature. The degree of oxidation on carbon catalyst was found to be proportional to its activity for hydrolysis of cellulose. The hydrolysis of eucalyptus in the presence of carbon oxidized at 475 °C afforded glucose yield of 77 % and xylose yield of 67 %. PMID:27115288

  13. Support effects on hydrotreating activity of NiMo catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez-Crespo, M.A. Arce-Estrada, E.M.; Torres-Huerta, A.M.

    2007-10-15

    The effect of the gamma alumina particle size on the catalytic activity of NiMoS{sub x} catalysts prepared by precipitation method of aluminum acetate at pH = 10 was studied. The structural characterization of the supports was measured by using XRD, pyridine FTIR-TPD and nitrogen physisorption. NiMo catalysts were characterized during the preparation steps (annealing and sulfidation) using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Hydrogen TPR studies of the NiMo catalysts were also carried out in order to correlate their hydrogenating properties and their catalytic functionality. Catalytic tests were carried out in a pilot plant at 613, 633 and 653 K temperatures. The results showed that the rate constants of hydrodesulfurization (HDS), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrodearomatizing (HDA) at 613-653 K decreased in the following order: A > B > C corresponding to the increase of NiMoS particle size associated to these catalysts.

  14. PREPARATION, CHARACTERIZATION AND ACTIVITY OF AL2O3-SUPPORTED V2O5 CATALYSTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of activated alumina supported vanadium oxide catalysts with various V2O5 loadings ranging from 5 to 25 wt% has been prepared by wet impregnation technique. A combination of various physico-chemical techniques such as BET surface areas, oxygen chemisorption, X-ray diffra...

  15. Impact of transition metal on nitrogen retention and activity of iron-nitrogen-carbon oxygen reduction catalysts.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Selvarani; Leonard, Nathaniel; Barton, Scott Calabrese

    2014-03-14

    Iron based nitrogen doped carbon (FeNC) catalysts are synthesized by high-pressure pyrolysis of carbon and melamine with varying amounts of iron acetate in a closed, constant-volume reactor. The optimum nominal amount of Fe (1.2 wt%) in FeNC catalysts is established through oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) polarization. Since the quantity of iron used in FeNCs is very small, the amount of Fe retained in FeNC catalysts after leaching is determined by UV-VIS spectroscopy. As nitrogen is considered to be a component of active sites, the amount of bulk and surface nitrogen retention in FeNC catalysts are measured using elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. It is found that increasing nominal Fe content in FeNC catalysts leads to a decreased level of nitrogen retention. Thermogravimetric analysis demonstrates that increasing nominal Fe content leads to increased weight loss during pyrolysis, particularly at high temperatures. Catalysts are also prepared in the absence of iron source, and with iron removed by washing with hot aqua regia post-pyrolysis. FeNC catalysts prepared with no Fe show high retained nitrogen content but poor ORR activity, and aqua regia washed catalysts demonstrate similar activity to Fe-free catalysts, indicating that Fe is an active site component. PMID:24457909

  16. Superresolution fluorescence mapping of single-nanoparticle catalysts reveals spatiotemporal variations in surface reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuwei; Lucas, J. Matthew; Song, Ping; Beberwyck, Brandon; Fu, Qiang; Xu, Weilin; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2015-01-01

    For the practical application of nanocatalysts, it is desirable to understand the spatiotemporal fluctuations of nanocatalytic activity at the single-nanoparticle level. Here we use time-lapsed superresolution mapping of single-molecule catalysis events on individual nanoparticles to observe time-varying changes in the spatial distribution of catalysis events on Sb-doped TiO2 nanorods and Au triangle nanoplates. Compared with the active sites on well-defined surface facets, the defects of the nanoparticle catalysts possess higher intrinsic reactivity but lower stability. Corners and ends are more reactive but also less stable than flat surfaces. Averaged over time, the most stable sites dominate the total apparent activity of single nanocatalysts. However, the active sites with higher intrinsic activity but lower stability show activity at earlier time points before deactivating. Unexpectedly, some active sites are found to recover their activity (“self-healing”) after deactivation, which is probably due to desorption of the adsorbate. Our superresolution measurement of different types of active catalytic sites, over both space and time, leads to a more comprehensive understanding of reactivity patterns and may enable the design of new and more productive heterogeneous catalysts. PMID:26150516

  17. Superresolution fluorescence mapping of single-nanoparticle catalysts reveals spatiotemporal variations in surface reactivity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuwei; Lucas, J Matthew; Song, Ping; Beberwyck, Brandon; Fu, Qiang; Xu, Weilin; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2015-07-21

    For the practical application of nanocatalysts, it is desirable to understand the spatiotemporal fluctuations of nanocatalytic activity at the single-nanoparticle level. Here we use time-lapsed superresolution mapping of single-molecule catalysis events on individual nanoparticles to observe time-varying changes in the spatial distribution of catalysis events on Sb-doped TiO2 nanorods and Au triangle nanoplates. Compared with the active sites on well-defined surface facets, the defects of the nanoparticle catalysts possess higher intrinsic reactivity but lower stability. Corners and ends are more reactive but also less stable than flat surfaces. Averaged over time, the most stable sites dominate the total apparent activity of single nanocatalysts. However, the active sites with higher intrinsic activity but lower stability show activity at earlier time points before deactivating. Unexpectedly, some active sites are found to recover their activity ("self-healing") after deactivation, which is probably due to desorption of the adsorbate. Our superresolution measurement of different types of active catalytic sites, over both space and time, leads to a more comprehensive understanding of reactivity patterns and may enable the design of new and more productive heterogeneous catalysts. PMID:26150516

  18. Active Gold-Ceria and Gold-Ceria/titania Catalysts for CO Oxidation. From Single-Crystal Model Catalysts to Powder Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Jose A.; Si, Rui; Evans, Jaime; Xu, Wenqian; Hanson, Jonathan C.; Tao, Jing; Zhu, Yimei

    2014-07-23

    We studied CO oxidation on model and powder catalysts of Au-CeO2 and Au-CeOx/TiO2. Phenomena observed in Au-CeO2(1 1 1) and Au-CeO2/TiO2(1 1 0) provided useful concepts for designing and preparing highly active and stable Au-CeOx/TiO2 powder catalysts for CO oxidation. Small particles of Au dispersed on CeO2(1 1 1) displayed high catalytic activity, making Au-CeO2(1 1 1) a better CO oxidation catalyst than Au-TiO2(1 1 0) or Au-MgO(1 0 0). An excellent support for gold was found after depositing nanoparticles of ceria on TiO2(1 1 0). The CeOx nanoparticles act as nucleation centers for gold, improving dispersion of the supported metal and helping in the creation of reaction sites efficient for the adsorption of CO and the dissociation of the O2 molecule. High-surface area catalysts were prepared by depositing gold on ceria nanorods and CeOx/TiO2 powders. The samples were tested for the low-temperature (10–70 °C) oxygen-rich (1%CO/4%O2/He) CO oxidation reaction after pre-oxidation (20%O2/He, 300 °C) and pre-reduction (5%H2/He, 300 °C) treatments. Moreover, synchrotron-based operando X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption (XAS) spectroscopy were used to study the Au-CeO2 and Au-CeOx/TiO2 catalysts under reaction conditions. Our operando findings indicate that the most active phase of these catalysts for low-temperature CO oxidation consist of small particles of metallic Au dispersed on CeO2 or CeOx/TiO2.

  19. Surface chemistry and catalytic properties of VOX/Ti-MCM-41 catalysts for dibenzothiophene oxidation in a biphasic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, J.; Chen, L. F.; Wang, J. A.; Manríquez, Ma.; Limas, R.; Schachat, P.; Navarrete, J.; Contreras, J. L.

    2016-08-01

    A series of vanadium oxide supported on Ti-MCM-41 catalysts was synthesized via the incipient impregnation method by varying the vanadia loading from 5 wt% to 10, 15, 20 and 25 wt%. These catalysts were characterized by a variety of advanced techniques for investigating their crystalline structure, textural properties, and surface chemistry information including surface acidity, reducibility, vanadium oxidation states, and morphological features. The catalytic activities of the catalysts were evaluated in a biphasic reaction system for oxidative desulfurization (ODS) of a model diesel containing 300 ppm of dibenzothiophene (DBT) where acetonitrile was used as extraction solvent and H2O2 as oxidant. ODS activity was found to be proportional to the V5+/(V4+ + V5+) values of the catalysts, indicating that the surface vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) was the active phase. Reaction temperature would influence significantly the ODS efficiency; high temperature, i.e., 80 °C, would lead to low ODS reaction due to the partial decomposition of oxidant. All the catalysts contained both Lewis and Brønsted acid sites but the former was predominant. The catalysts with low vanadia loading (5 or 10 wt%V2O5) had many Lewis acid sites and could strongly adsorb DBT molecule via the electron donation/acceptance action which resulted in an inhibition for the reaction of DBT with the surface peroxometallic species. The catalyst with high vanadia loading (25wt%V2O5/Ti-MCM-41) showed the highest catalytic activity and could remove 99.9% of DBT at 60 °C within 60 min.

  20. The nature of the active surface of the Cu/ZSM-5 catalyst in the reaction of NO reduction with hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Ilichev, A.N.; Ukharskii, A.A.; Matyshak, V.A.

    1995-03-01

    Data are obtained on the concentration of Cu{sup 2+}{sub isol}, Cu{sub ass}, and Cu{sup +} ions and the activity in the reaction of NO reduction with propane on copper-containing zeolites (0.15-2.86% Cu/ZSM-5). A correlation between the NO conversion and Cu{sup 2+}{sub isol} concentration is found and discussed.

  1. The influence of carbon support porosity on the activity of PtRu/Sibunit anode catalysts for methanol oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, V.; Simonov, P. A.; Savinova, E. R.; Plaksin, G. V.; Cherepanova, S. V.; Kryukova, G. N.; Stimming, U.

    In this paper we analyse the promises of homemade carbon materials of Sibunit family prepared through pyrolysis of natural gases on carbon black surfaces as supports for the anode catalysts of direct methanol fuel cells. Specific surface area ( SBET) of the support is varied in the wide range from 6 to 415 m 2 g -1 and the implications on the electrocatalytic activity are scrutinized. Sibunit supported PtRu (1:1) catalysts are prepared via chemical route and the preparation conditions are adjusted in such a way that the particle size is constant within ±1 nm in order to separate the influence of support on the (i) catalyst preparation and (ii) fuel cell performance. Comparison of the metal surface area measured by gas phase CO chemisorption and electrochemical CO stripping indicates close to 100% utilisation of nanoparticle surfaces for catalysts supported on low (22-72 m 2 g -1) surface area Sibunit carbons. Mass activity and specific activity of PtRu anode catalysts change dramatically with SBET of the support, increasing with the decrease of the latter. 10%PtRu catalyst supported on Sibunit with specific surface area of 72 m 2 g -1 shows mass specific activity exceeding that of commercial 20%PtRu/Vulcan XC-72 by nearly a factor of 3.

  2. Cationic zinc enolates as highly active catalysts for acrylate polymerization.

    PubMed

    Garner, Logan E; Zhu, Hongping; Hlavinka, Mark L; Hagadorn, John R; Chen, Eugene Y-X

    2006-11-22

    Unprecedented cationic zinc enolates have been generated by a novel activation route involving the amido to imino ligand transformation with B(C6F5)3, structurally characterized, and utilized as highly active catalysts for the production of high molecular weight polyacrylates at ambient temperature. PMID:17105289

  3. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of carbon-silica hybrid catalyst from rice straw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janaun, J.; Safie, N. N.; Siambun, N. J.

    2016-07-01

    The hybrid-carbon catalyst has been studied because of its promising potential to have high porosity and surface area to be used in biodiesel production. Silica has been used as the support to produce hybrid carbon catalyst due to its mesoporous structure and high surface area properties. The chemical synthesis of silica-carbon hybrid is expensive and involves more complicated preparation steps. The presence of natural silica in rice plants especially rice husk has received much attention in research because of the potential as a source for solid acid catalyst synthesis. But study on rice straw, which is available abundantly as agricultural waste is limited. In this study, rice straw undergone pyrolysis and functionalized using fuming sulphuric acid to anchor -SO3H groups. The presence of silica and the physiochemical properties of the catalyst produced were studied before and after sulphonation. The catalytic activity of hybrid carbon silica acid catalyst, (H-CSAC) in esterification of oleic acid with methanol was also studied. The results showed the presence of silica-carbon which had amorphous structure and highly porous. The carbon surface consisted of higher silica composition, had lower S element detected as compared to the surface that had high carbon content but lower silica composition. This was likely due to the fact that Si element which was bonded to oxygen was highly stable and unlikely to break the bond and react with -SO3H ions. H-CSAC conversions were 23.04 %, 35.52 % and 34.2 7% at 333.15 K, 343.15 K and 353.15 K, respectively. From this research, rice straw can be used as carbon precursor to produce hybrid carbon-silica catalyst and has shown catalytic activity in biodiesel production. Rate equation obtained is also presented.

  4. Monitoring surface processes during heterogeneous asymmetric hydrogenation of ketones on a chirally modified platinum catalyst by operando spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Meemken, Fabian; Hungerbühler, Konrad; Baiker, Alfons

    2014-08-11

    Surface processes occurring at the catalytic chiral surface of a cinchona-modified Pt catalyst during the asymmetric hydrogenation of activated ketones have been monitored for the first time using operando ATR-IR spectroscopy. Fundamental information about this catalytic system could be gained, including the chiral modification process of the catalyst, the surface interaction of reactant ketone with preadsorbed chiral modifier, the role of hydrogen as well as the influence of the product enantiomers in the catalytic cycle. The formation of a diastereomeric transient surface complex between ketone and chiral modifier was found to be related to the ketone consumption. Among the studied activated ketones, a correlation between stereoselection and the strength of the intermolecular hydrogen bond was identified. Dissociated hydrogen from the catalytic surface is found to play a crucial role in the formation of the diastereomeric surface complex. PMID:24777839

  5. Surface-reconstructed graphite nanofibers as a support for cathode catalysts of fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Gan, Lin; Du, Hongda; Li, Baohua; Kang, Feiyu

    2011-04-01

    Graphite nanofibers (GNFs), on which surface graphite edges were reconstructed into nano-loops, were explored as a cathode catalyst support for fuel cells. The high degree of graphitization, as well as the surface-reconstructed nano-loops that possess topological defects for uniform metal deposition, resulted in an improved performance of the GNF-supported Pt catalyst. PMID:21336405

  6. Catalyst dispersion and activity under conditions of temperature- staged liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.; Schobert, H.H.; Mitchell, G.D.; Artok, L.

    1991-09-01

    The general objectives of this research are (1) to investigate the use of highly dispersed catalysts for the pretreatment of coal by mild hydrogenation, (2) to identify the active forms of the catalysts under reaction conditions and (3) to clarify the mechanisms of catalysis. The ultimate objective is to ascertain if mild catalytic hydrogenation resulting in very limited or no coal solubilization is an advantageous pretreatment for the transformation of coal into transportable fuels. The experimental program will focus upon the development of effective methods of impregnating coal with catalysts, evaluating the conditions under which the catalysts are most active and establishing the relative impact of improved impregnation on conversion and product distributions obtained from coal hydrogenation. Liquefaction experiments of solvent-treated and untreated Blind Canyon (DECS-6) and Texas lignite (DECS-1) have been performed using ammonium tetrathiomolybdate (ATTM) and bis (dicarbonylcyclopentadienyl) iron (CPI) as catalyst precursors using temperature-staged conditions (275{degrees}C, 30 min; 425{degrees}C, 30 min). Solid state {sup 13}C NMR analysis was carried out for each coal and for selected residues. 12 refs., 14 figs., 9 tabs.

  7. Preparation of active HDS catalysts by controlling the dispersion of active species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamura, Kazuhiro; Uchikawa, Kei; Matsuda, Satoshi; Akai, Yoshio

    1997-11-01

    It is demonstrated that the structural control of the metal ion precursors in the impregnating solution by adding the chelating agents is effective to prepare the higher active CoMo supported on alumina catalysts ( Co-Mo/Al 2O 3) for hydrodesulfurization (HDS). Coordination structures of the Co and Mo complexes in the CoMo impregnating solution and distributions of the Co and Mo complexes were evaluated by spectroscopic characterization techniques and by using a computational calculation, respectively. An addition of a chelating agent, such as NTA (nitrilotriacetic acid) and Glu (L-glutamic acid), in the CoMo solution results in the selective formation of the Co complexes, while the amount of the Mo complex is negligibly small at the practical pH of 9.2. The addition of the chelating agent increases the thiophene HDS activity of the sulfided catalysts typically by 50%, compared with that prepared without the chelating agent. Dispersion results of Co and Mo species on both oxidic and sulfided catalysts indicate that the higher HDS activity is explained by the higher degree of surface exposure of Co sites (namely the dispersion of Co) rather than that of Mo sites. The selective formation of the Co-chelate complexes keeps Co ions stable in solution up to high concentration. Furthermore, the Co complexes are estimated to be stable on the support even in the initial step of calcination, which would depress the formation of crystalline Co compounds, such as CoAl 2O 4 and CoMoO 4. These effects result in the higher dispersion of the active Co surface species.

  8. The effect of H2O and pretreatment on the activity of a Pt/SnO2 catalyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannorman, John D.; Brown, Kenneth G.; Schryer, Jacqueline; Schryer, David R.; Upchurch, Billy T.; Sidney, Barry D.

    1990-01-01

    CO oxidation catalysts with high activity at 25 C to 100 C are important for long-life, closed-cycle operation of pulsed CO2 lasers. A reductive pretreatment with either CO or H2 has been shown to significantly enhance the activity of a commercially available platinum on tin (IV) oxide (Pt/SnO2) catalyst relative to an oxidative or inert pretreatment or no pretreatment. Pretreatment at temperatures of 175 C and above causes an initial dip in the observed CO2 yield before the steady-state yield is attained. This dip has been found to be caused by dehydration of the catalyst during pretreatment and is readily eliminated by humidifying the catalyst or the reaction gas mixture. It is hypothesized that the effect of humidification is to increase the concentration of OH groups on the catalyst surface which play a role in the reaction mechanism.

  9. The surface sulfur doping induced enhanced performance of cobalt catalysts in oxygen evolution reactions.

    PubMed

    Al-Mamun, Mohammad; Zhu, Zhengju; Yin, Huajie; Su, Xintai; Zhang, Haimin; Liu, Porun; Yang, Huagui; Wang, Dan; Tang, Zhiyong; Wang, Yun; Zhao, Huijun

    2016-08-01

    A novel surface sulfur (S) doped cobalt (Co) catalyst for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is theoretically designed through the optimisation of the electronic structure of highly reactive surface atoms which is also validated by electrocatalytic OER experiments. PMID:27377872

  10. Activity and selectivity of molybdenum catalysts in coal liquefaction reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.; Pellegrino, J.L. )

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate how effectively three different molybdenum catalysts promote reactions involving heteroatom removal and cleavage of alkyl bridge hydrodeoxygenation (HDO), hydrodesulfurization (HDS), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrocracking (HYC). Both model and coal liquefaction reactions were performed to test the activity and selectivity of three different molybdenum catalysts. The three catalysts used were molybdenum naphthenate, molybdenum supported on gamma alumina (Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and precipitated, poorly crystalline molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}). The model compounds, chosen to mimic coal structure, on which the effectiveness of the catalysts for the model reactions was tested were: 1-methylnaphthalene, representing aromatic hydrocarbons, for hydrogenation; 1-naphthol, representing oxygen containing compounds, for deoxygenation; benzothiophene, representing sulfur containing compounds, for desulfurization; indole, representing nitrogen containing compounds, for denitrogenation; and bibenzyl, representing alkyl bridging structures, for hydrocracking. Catalytic reactions of combinations of reactants were performed to simulate a complex coal matrix. Thermal and catalytic coal liquefaction reactions were performed using Illinois No. 6 coal with anthracene as a solvent. The efficacy of the catalysts was determined by comparing the product and compound class fractions obtained from the liquefaction reactions.

  11. Activity and selectivity of molybdenum catalysts in coal liquefaction reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.; Pellegrino, J.L. )

    1988-06-01

    During coal liquefaction, coal fragments forming a liquid product with reduced heteroatom content. Coal can be considered to be a large network of polynuclear aromatic species connected by heteroatoms and alkyl bridging structures. Predominant heteroatoms contained in coal are sulfur, oxygen, and nitrogen. Predominant alkyl bridges are methylene and ethylene structures. The purpose of this work is to evaluate how effectively three different molybdenum catalysts promote reactions involving heteroatom removal and cleavage of alkyl bridge structures. The reactions studied include: hydrogenation (HYD), hydrodeoxygenation (HDO), hydrosulfurization (HDS), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrocracking (HYC). Both model and coal liquefaction reactions were performed to test the activity and selectivity of three different molybdenum catalysts. The three catalysts used were molybdenum napththenate, molybdenum supported on gamma alumina (Mo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/) and precipitated, poorly crystalline molybdenum disulfide (MoS/sub 2/). The model compounds, chosen to mimic coal structure, on which the effectiveness of the catalysts for the model reactions was tested were: 1-methylnaphthalene, representing aromatic hydrocarbons, for hydrogenation; 1-naphthol, representing oxygen containing compounds, for deoxygenation; benzothiophene, representing sulfur containing compounds, for desulfurization; indole, representing nitrogen containing compounds, for denitrogenation; and bibenzyl, representing alkyl bridging structures, for hydrocracking. Catalytic reactions of combinations of reactants were performed to simulate a complex coal matrix. Thermal and catalytic coal liquefaction reactions were performed using Illinois No. 6 coal with anthracene as a solvent. The efficacy of the catalysts was determined by comparing the product and compound class fractions obtained from the liquefaction reactions.

  12. Surface structure and chemistry of Pt/Cu/Pt(1 1 1) near surface alloy model catalyst in CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Shibi; Nguyen, Luan; Cheng, Fang; Liu, Lacheng; Yu, Ying; Tao, Franklin (Feng)

    2014-11-01

    Near surface alloy (NSA) model catalyst Pt/Cu/Pt(1 1 1) was prepared on Pt(1 1 1) through a controlled vapor deposition of Cu atoms. Different coordination environments of Pt atoms of the topmost Pt layer with the underneath Cu atoms in the subsurface result in different local electronic structures of surface Pt atoms. Surface structure and chemistry of the NAS model catalyst in Torr pressure of CO were studied with high pressure scanning tunneling microscopy (HP-STM) and ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS). In Torr pressure of CO, the topmost Pt layer of Pt/Cu/Pt(1 1 1) is restructured to thin nanoclusters with size of about 1 nm. Photoemission feature of O 1s of CO on Pt/Cu/Pt(1 1 1) suggests CO adsorbed on both edge and surface of these formed nanoclusters. This surface is active for CO oxidation. Atomic layers of carbon are formed on Pt/Cu/Pt(1 1 1) at 573 K in 2 Torr of CO.

  13. Surface characterization of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Kuivila, C.S.; Butt, J.B.; Stair, P.C.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper the authors address XPS characterization of the iron phases associated with Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Results obtained for single-phase metal, oxide, and carbide samples are presented. Methods for estimating the extent of carbide formation during low conversion synthesis, and the extent of catalyst oxidation at high conversions are illustrated. This approach is used to monitor the evolution of an initially reduced, unsupported iron catalyst during synthesis at low conversion levels.

  14. Yeast cell surface display for lipase whole cell catalyst and its applications

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yun; Zhang, Rui; Lian, Zhongshuai; Wang, Shihui; Wright, Aaron T.

    2014-08-01

    The cell surface display technique allows for the expression of target proteins or peptides on the microbial cell surface by fusing an appropriate protein as an anchoring motif. Yeast display systems, such as Pichia pastoris, Yarowia lipolytica and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are ideal, alternative and extensive display systems with the advantage of simple genetic manipulation and post-translational modification of expressed heterologous proteins. Engineered yeasts show high performance characteristics and variant utilizations. Herein, we comprehensively summarize the variant factors affecting lipase whole cell catalyst activity and display efficiency, including the structure and size of target proteins, screening anchor proteins, type and chain length of linkers, and the appropriate matching rules among the above-mentioned display units. Furthermore, we also address novel approaches to enhance stability and activity of recombinant lipases, such as VHb gene co-expression, multi-enzyme co-display technique, and the micro-environmental interference and self-assembly techniques. Finally, we represent the variety of applications of whole cell surface displayed lipases on yeast cells in non-aqueous phases, including synthesis of esters, PUFA enrichment, resolution of chiral drugs, organic synthesis and biofuels. We demonstrate that the lipase surface display technique is a powerful tool for functionalizing yeasts to serve as whole cell catalysts, and increasing interest is providing an impetus for broad application of this technique.

  15. Regeneration of field-spent activated carbon catalysts for low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Jong Ki; Kim, Hyeonjoo; Park, Young-Kwon; Peden, Charles HF; Kim, Do Heui

    2011-10-15

    In the process of producing liquid crystal displays (LCD), the emitted NOx is removed over an activated carbon catalyst by using selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with NH3 at low temperature. However, the catalyst rapidly deactivates primarily due to the deposition of boron discharged from the process onto the catalyst. Therefore, this study is aimed at developing an optimal regeneration process to remove boron from field-spent carbon catalysts. The spent carbon catalysts were regenerated by washing with a surfactant followed by drying and calcination. The physicochemical properties before and after the regeneration were investigated by using elemental analysis, TG/DTG (thermogravimetric/differential thermogravimetric) analysis, N2 adsorption-desorption and NH3 TPD (temperature programmed desorption). Spent carbon catalysts demonstrated a drastic decrease in DeNOx activity mainly due to heavy deposition of boron. Boron was accumulated to depths of about 50 {mu}m inside the granule surface of the activated carbons, as evidenced by cross-sectional SEM-EDX analysis. However, catalyst activity and surface area were significantly recovered by removing boron in the regeneration process, and the highest NOx conversions were obtained after washing with a non-ionic surfactant in H2O at 70 C, followed by treatment with N2 at 550 C.

  16. Controlling the surface environment of heterogeneous catalysts using self-assembled monolayers.

    PubMed

    Schoenbaum, Carolyn A; Schwartz, Daniel K; Medlin, J Will

    2014-04-15

    Rationally designing and producing suitable catalysts to promote specific reaction pathways remains a major objective in heterogeneous catalysis. One approach involves using traditional catalytic materials modified with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) to create a more favorable surface environment for specific product formation. A major advantage of SAM-based modifiers is their tendency to form consistent, highly ordered assembly structures on metal surfaces. In addition, both the attachment chemistry and tail structures can easily be tuned to facilitate specific interactions between reactants and the catalyst. In this Account, we summarize our recent modification approaches for tuning monolayer structure to improve catalytic performance for hydrogenation reactions on palladium and platinum catalysts. Each approach serves to direct selectivity by tuning a particular aspect of the system including the availability of specific active sites (active-site selection), intermolecular interactions between the reactants and modifiers (molecular recognition), and general steric or crowding effects. We have demonstrated that the tail moiety can be tuned to control the density of SAM modifiers on the surface. Infrared spectra of adsorbed CO probe molecules reveal that increasing the density of the thiols restricts the availability of contiguous active sites on catalyst terraces while maintaining accessibility to sites located at particle edges and steps. This technique was utilized to direct selectivity for the hydrogenation of furfural. Results obtained from SAM coatings with different surface densities indicated that, for this reaction, formation of the desirable products occurs primarily at particle edges and steps, whereas the undesired pathway occurs on particle terrace sites. As an alternative approach, the tail structure of the SAM precursor can be tuned to promote specific intermolecular interactions between the modifier and reactant in order to position reactant

  17. High surface area graphite as alternative support for proton exchange membrane fuel cell catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira-Aparicio, P.; Folgado, M. A.; Daza, L.

    The suitability of a high surface area graphite (HSAG) as proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) catalyst support has been evaluated and compared with that of the most popular carbon black: the Vulcan XC72. It has been observed that Pt is arranged on the graphite surface resulting in different structures which depend on the catalysts synthesis conditions. The influence that the metal particle size and the metal-support interaction exert on the catalysts degradation rate is analyzed. Temperature programmed oxidation (TPO) under oxygen containing streams has been shown to be a useful method to assess the resistance of PEMFC catalysts to carbon corrosion. The synthesized Pt/HSAG catalysts have been evaluated in single cell tests in the cathode catalytic layer. The obtained results show that HSAG can be a promising alternative to the traditionally used Vulcan XC72 carbon black when suitable catalysts synthesis conditions are used.

  18. Surface characteristics and catalytic activity of binary oxides of alumina-yttria

    SciTech Connect

    Jayasree, J.; Narayanan, C.S. )

    1994-06-01

    A series of different compositions of Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]-Y[sub 2]O[sub 3] catalysts were prepared by coprecipitation with aqueous ammonia. The structure, thermal stability and surface properties of the catalysts were determined using XRD, TGA, SEM and MAS [sup 27]Al NMR. Acidity and basicity of catalysts were determined using Hammet indicators and surface area by BET method. Surface area and Bronsted acidity of the catalysts decreased with increasing amount of Y[sub 2]O[sub 3]. No basic sites were observed over catalyst samples with higher Y[sub 2]O[sub 3] content. (+)-Limonene oxide isomerization was carried out at 110 C over the catalysts. The activity and selectivity of catalysts varied with composition. Catalysts with high alumina content yielded more diol while less alumina containing samples produced more ketones.

  19. Improved reversibility in lithium-oxygen battery: Understanding elementary reactions and surface charge engineering of metal alloy catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byung Gon; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Back, Seoin; Nam, Kwan Woo; Jung, Yousung; Han, Young-Kyu; Choi, Jang Wook

    2014-02-01

    Most Li-O2 batteries suffer from sluggish kinetics during oxygen evolution reactions (OERs). To overcome this drawback, we take the lesson from other catalysis researches that showed improved catalytic activities by employing metal alloy catalysts. Such research effort has led us to find Pt3Co nanoparticles as an effective OER catalyst in Li-O2 batteries. The superior catalytic activity was reflected in the substantially decreased overpotentials and improved cycling/rate performance compared to those of other catalysts. Density functional theory calculations suggested that the low OER overpotentials are associated with the reduced adsorption strength of LiO2 on the outermost Pt catalytic sites. Also, the alloy catalyst generates amorphous Li2O2 conformally coated around the catalyst and thus facilitates easier decomposition and higher reversibility. This investigation conveys an important message that understanding elementary reactions and surface charge engineering of air-catalysts are one of the most effective approaches in resolving the chronic sluggish charging kinetics in Li-O2 batteries.

  20. Improved reversibility in lithium-oxygen battery: Understanding elementary reactions and surface charge engineering of metal alloy catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byung Gon; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Back, Seoin; Nam, Kwan Woo; Jung, Yousung; Han, Young-Kyu; Choi, Jang Wook

    2014-01-01

    Most Li-O2 batteries suffer from sluggish kinetics during oxygen evolution reactions (OERs). To overcome this drawback, we take the lesson from other catalysis researches that showed improved catalytic activities by employing metal alloy catalysts. Such research effort has led us to find Pt3Co nanoparticles as an effective OER catalyst in Li-O2 batteries. The superior catalytic activity was reflected in the substantially decreased overpotentials and improved cycling/rate performance compared to those of other catalysts. Density functional theory calculations suggested that the low OER overpotentials are associated with the reduced adsorption strength of LiO2 on the outermost Pt catalytic sites. Also, the alloy catalyst generates amorphous Li2O2 conformally coated around the catalyst and thus facilitates easier decomposition and higher reversibility. This investigation conveys an important message that understanding elementary reactions and surface charge engineering of air-catalysts are one of the most effective approaches in resolving the chronic sluggish charging kinetics in Li-O2 batteries. PMID:24573326

  1. RhPt/graphite catalysts for CO electrooxidation: Performance of mixed metal and alloyed surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, L.; Vidal-Iglesias, F. J.; Huxter, S. E.; Attard, G. A.; Wells, P. B.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been used to characterise novel PtRh mixed metal and surface alloyed active phases supported on 5% Pt/graphite catalysts (5% Pt/G). The active phases could be prepared using forced deposition or a combination of forced deposition and thermal annealing in a flowing 5% hydrogen in argon gas mixture at 700 K. The protocols employed originate directly from previous single crystal studies of Rh on Pt{100} whereby Rh overlayers (either singly adsorbed or as a 'sandwich structure' of alternate Pt/Rh/Pt layers) could be transformed into surface PtRh alloys by careful thermal annealing. We demonstrate that this method is also successful for the preparation of active supported catalysts for CO electrooxidation whereby a peak potential as low as 0.60 V (Pd/H) for the CO oxidation is reported (0.12 V lower than that on 5% Pt/G). Moreover, the onset potential for CO stripping is lowered to 0.33 V (Pd/H). The presence of alloyed PtRh phases gives rise to a small but reproducible 0.1-0.2 eV shift to higher binding energy of the Pt 4f7/2 XPS peak together with strongly modified Pt and Rh electrosorption features in the CV which correlate with changes in surface composition. Unusual kinetic behaviour in the CO stripping peaks from the PtRh catalyst as a function of CO coverage is ascribed to competition between electrochemical oxide on Rh and CO-induced blocking of electrochemical oxide formation sites at the highest CO coverage. For PtRh alloys, the onset of electrochemical oxide formation shifts to more positive potentials relative to Rh overlayers and so a different behaviour towards CO electrooxidation is observed.

  2. Directing reaction pathways by catalyst active-site selection using self-assembled monolayers.

    PubMed

    Pang, Simon H; Schoenbaum, Carolyn A; Schwartz, Daniel K; Medlin, J Will

    2013-01-01

    One key route for controlling reaction selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis is to prepare catalysts that exhibit only specific types of sites required for desired product formation. Here we show that alkanethiolate self-assembled monolayers with varying surface densities can be used to tune selectivity to desired hydrogenation and hydrodeoxygenation products during the reaction of furfural on supported palladium catalysts. Vibrational spectroscopic studies demonstrate that the selectivity improvement is achieved by controlling the availability of specific sites for the hydrogenation of furfural on supported palladium catalysts through the selection of an appropriate alkanethiolate. Increasing self-assembled monolayer density by controlling the steric bulk of the organic tail ligand restricts adsorption on terrace sites and dramatically increases selectivity to desired products furfuryl alcohol and methylfuran. This technique of active-site selection simultaneously serves both to enhance selectivity and provide insight into the reaction mechanism. PMID:24025780

  3. A packed bed membrane reactor for production of biodiesel using activated carbon supported catalyst.

    PubMed

    Baroutian, Saeid; Aroua, Mohamed K; Raman, Abdul Aziz A; Sulaiman, Nik M N

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a novel continuous reactor has been developed to produce high quality methyl esters (biodiesel) from palm oil. A microporous TiO2/Al2O3 membrane was packed with potassium hydroxide catalyst supported on palm shell activated carbon. The central composite design (CCD) of response surface methodology (RSM) was employed to investigate the effects of reaction temperature, catalyst amount and cross flow circulation velocity on the production of biodiesel in the packed bed membrane reactor. The highest conversion of palm oil to biodiesel in the reactor was obtained at 70 °C employing 157.04 g catalyst per unit volume of the reactor and 0.21 cm/s cross flow circulation velocity. The physical and chemical properties of the produced biodiesel were determined and compared with the standard specifications. High quality palm oil biodiesel was produced by combination of heterogeneous alkali transesterification and separation processes in the packed bed membrane reactor. PMID:20888219

  4. Highly active cobalt phosphate and borate based oxygen evolving catalysts operating in neutral and natural waters

    SciTech Connect

    Esswein, AJ; Surendranath, Y; Reece, SY; Nocera, DG

    2011-02-01

    A high surface area electrode is functionalized with cobalt-based oxygen evolving catalysts (Co-OEC = electrodeposited from pH 7 phosphate, Pi, pH 8.5 methylphosphonate, MePi, and pH 9.2 borate electrolyte, Bi). Co-OEC prepared from MePi and operated in Pi and Bi achieves a current density of 100 mA cm(-2) for water oxidation at 442 and 363 mV overpotential, respectively. The catalyst retains activity in near-neutral pH buffered electrolyte in natural waters such as those from the Charles River (Cambridge, MA) and seawater (Woods Hole, MA). The efficacy and ease of operation of anodes functionalized with Co-OEC at appreciable current density together with its ability to operate in near neutral pH buffered natural water sources bodes well for the translation of this catalyst to a viable renewable energy storage technology.

  5. Interfacial Cu+ promoted surface reactivity: Carbon monoxide oxidation reaction over polycrystalline copper-titania catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; Pappoe, Naa Adokaley; Nguyen-Phan, Thuy-Duong; Luo, Si; Li, Yuanyuan; Xu, Wenqian; Liu, Zongyuan; Mudiyanselage, Kumudu; Johnston-Peck, Aaron C.; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Heckler, Ilana; Stacchiola, Dario; Rodriguez, José A.

    2016-10-01

    We have studied the catalytic carbon monoxide (CO) oxidation (CO + 0.5O2 → CO2) reaction using a powder catalyst composed of both copper (5 wt.% loading) and titania (CuOx-TiO2). Our study was focused on revealing the role of Cu, and the interaction between Cu and TiO2, by systematic comparison between two nanocatalysts, CuOx-TiO2 and pure CuOx. We interrogated these catalysts under in situ conditions using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) to probe the structure and electronic properties of the catalyst at all stages of the reaction and simultaneously probe the surface states or intermediates of this reaction. With the aid of several ex situ characterization techniques including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the local catalyst morphology and structure were also studied. Our results show that a CuOx-TiO2 system is more active than bulk CuOx for the CO oxidation reaction due to its lower onset temperature and better stability at higher temperatures. Our results also suggest that surface Cu+ species observed in the CuOx-TiO2 interface are likely to be a key player in the CO oxidation mechanism, while implicating that the stabilization of this species is probably associated with the oxide-oxide interface. Both in situ DRIFTS and XAFS measurements reveal that there is likely to be a Cu(Ti)-O mixed oxide at this interface. We discuss the nature of this Cu(Ti)-O interface and interpret its role on the CO oxidation reaction.

  6. Predictive modeling of surface morphology of multicomponent catalysts for their optimum performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, Altaf; Shah, Syed Islamuddin

    Multi-component microstructures of artificially engineered catalysts are promising for the best ever performance in alternative fuel production. We have designed and implemented a set of intelligent algorithms capable of predicting the surface morphology of multicomponent catalysts for their optimum performance. For example we come up with three kinds of different catalysts. Based on a database obtained from the density functional theory based kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, the first kind of single component catalytic surface promotes and helps dissociative adsorption of chemical species, but it hinders the diffusion of intermediate species. On the other hand, the second kind of single component catalytic surface promotes the diffusion of intermediate species, but suppresses the reactions and desorption processes. However the third kind of single component catalytic surfaces can significantly enhance reactions among intermediate species. Therefore no single component material surface would be a suitable candidate for becoming a good catalyst. However a combination of all above mentioned kind of materials may exhibit the maximum ever performance. Our algorithm models the surface morphology of these multicomponent catalysts by varying the surface area of each component and also by changing the shape of each component in such a way that the catalyst gives the highest rate of chemical formation. Our results confirm the best ever performance of our artificially engineered catalysts.

  7. Palladium nanoparticles on hierarchical carbon surfaces: A new architecture for robust nano-catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijwani, Hema; Mukhopadhyay, Sharmila M.

    2012-12-01

    Surface activity of heterogeneous catalysts can be enhanced if their sizes are reduced to nanometers. However, loose nanomaterials pose potential health and environmental risks. This issue has been addressed by attachment of palladium nanoparticles on multi-scale hierarchical carbon supports that have exceptionally high surface area per volume. The supports consist of porous carbon foam whose surface has been either chemically functionalized, or morphologically altered by grafting of carbon-nanotubes. It is seen that whereas chemical functionalization does provide some increase in nano-catalyst loading, morphological modification is significantly more powerful. It has the potential to create orders of magnitude increase in catalytic activity within the same overall volume. The synthesis techniques have been investigated in sufficient detail to provide significant control over the density and size of nanoparticles. Abundant distribution of nanoparticles is observed even within the deeper pores of the microcellular foam. The nanoparticles are seen to be metallic Pd having face centered cubic structure. Additionally, the nano-particles and nanotubes are durable, and remain attached to the base support after long periods of rapid rotation in water. These robust hybrid structures show promise in future applications such as sensors, water purification systems, fuel cell electrodes and hydrogen storage sponges.

  8. Constant-distance mode SECM as a tool to visualize local electrocatalytic activity of oxygen reduction catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Nebel, Michaela; Erichsen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Summary Multidimensional shearforce-based constant-distance mode scanning electrochemical microscopy (4D SF/CD-SECM) was utilized for the investigation of the activity distribution of oxygen reduction catalysts. Carbon-supported Pt model catalyst powders have been immobilized in recessed microelectrodes and compared to a spot preparation technique. Microcavities serve as platform for the binder-free catalyst sample preparation exhibiting beneficial properties for constant-distance mode SECM imaging concerning modified surface area and catalyst loading. The integration of the redox competition mode of SECM into the detection scheme of the 4D SF/CD mode is demonstrated for specifically adapting high-resolution SECM experiments to powder-based catalyst preparations. PMID:24600538

  9. Preparation and characterization of nanosized gold catalysts supported on Co3O4 and their activities for CO oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Joong; Song, Jae-Koon; Shin, Seong-Soo; Kang, Sang-Jun; Chung, Min-Chul; Jung, Sang-Chul; Jeong, Woon-Jo; Ahn, Ho-Geun

    2011-02-01

    Gold catalysts supported on Co3O4 were prepared by co-precipitation (CP), deposition-precipitation (DP), and impregnation (IMP) methods. The Au/Co3O4 catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and temperature programmed reduction (TPR) to understand the different activities for CO oxidation with different preparation methods. Gold particles below 5 nm supported on Co3O4 by DP method were found to be more exposed to the surface than those by CP and IMP methods, and this catalyst was highly active and stable in CO oxidation. Finally, catalytic activity of Au/Co3O4 catalyst for CO oxidation was strongly dependent on the gold particle size. PMID:21456247

  10. Surface Grafted Hyper-Branched Polyglycerol Stabilized Ag and AuNPs Heterogeneous Catalysts for Efficient Reduction of Congo Red.

    PubMed

    Murugan, Eagambaram; Shanmugam, Paramasivam

    2016-01-01

    Six types of insoluble polymer-supported beads immobilized with Ag and AuNPs nanoparticle catalysts were synthesized using newly prepared three different types of polymer-supported poly(styrene)-co-poly(vinyl benzene chloride) matrix (PS-PVBC), surface grafted with (i) triethanolamine (TEA), (ii) glycidyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (GTMAC) and (iii) hyper-branched polyglycerol (HPG) and Ag and AuNPs as a catalytic moiety and thus yield polymer-supported nanoparticle catalysts viz., PS-PVBC-TEA-AgNPs and AuNPs, PS-PVBC-g-GTMAC-AgNPs and AuNPs and PS-PVBC-g-GTMAC-AgNPs and AuNPs catalyst respectively. These bead-shaped heterogonous nanoparticle catalysts were characterized by UV-Vis, FTIR, FESEM, HRTEM and TGA techniques. The efficiency for stabilization/loading of metal nanoparticles with respect to varied intensities of hyper-branched chain grafted onto their matrix was screened by determining their comparative catalytic activity. The catalytic potential of these catalysts was inspected through reduction of Congo Red (CR) keeping pseudo first order identical reaction condition. The observed k(obs) values reveal that irrespective of metal the catalyst derived from hyper-branched polyglycerol as stabilizing agent viz., PS-PVBC-g-HPG-AgNPs and PS-PVBC-g-HPG-AuNPs shows (k(obs) = 3.98 x 10⁻² min⁻¹ and k(obs) = 4.54 x 10⁻² min⁻¹) four and two times greater activity than the catalyst derived from TEA and GTMAC hyper-branched chain. Further, for the same reaction PS-PVBC-g-HPG-AuNPs showed more efficiency than the PS-PVBC-g-HPG AgNPs catalyst. The stability and reusability of the superior catalyst viz., PS-PVBC-g-HPG-AuNPs catalyst was observed to be good even at the sixth cycle. This catalyst can be continuously used to conduct the reduction of various dyes in continuous mode operation in industrial scale. PMID:27398471

  11. Phase-Transfer Activation of Transition Metal Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Tuba, Robert; Xi, Zhenxing; Bazzi, Hassan S; Gladysz, John A

    2015-11-01

    With metal-based catalysts, it is quite common that a ligand (L) must first dissociate from a catalyst precursor (L'n M-L) to activate the catalyst. The resulting coordinatively unsaturated active species (L'n M) can either back react with the ligand in a k-1 step, or combine with the substrate in a k2 step. When dissociation is not rate determining and k-1 [L] is greater than or comparable to k2 [substrate], this slows the rate of reaction. By introducing a phase label onto the ligand L and providing a suitable orthogonal liquid or solid phase, dramatic rate accelerations can be achieved. This phenomenon is termed "phase-transfer activation". In this Concept, some historical antecedents are reviewed, followed by successful applications involving fluorous/organic and aqueous/organic liquid/liquid biphasic catalysis, and liquid/solid biphasic catalysis. Variants that include a chemical trap for the phase-labeled ligands are also described. PMID:26338471

  12. Novel catalysts for methane activation. Quarterly report No. 6, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschon, A.S,; Wu, H.J.; Malhotra, R.; Wilson, R.B.

    1994-05-24

    Fullerenes are a recently discovered allotrope of carbon that have been found to possess unusual properties, some of which may be ideal for methane activation. This project is designed to evaluate these carbon based materials for conversion of methane into higher hydrocarbons. The project is divided into three technical tasks. Task 1 deals with the synthesis and characterization of the fullerenes and fullerene soots, Task 2 with the testing of the catalysts, and Task 3 with the evaluation of the results and technical reporting requirements. The results and accomplishments for this quarter are as follows: A fullerene soot (obtained from Ulvick Labs) and an extracted soot (obtained from MER) were treated with carbon dioxide to obtain high surface area soots of greater than 600 m{sup 2}/g; A palladium-C{sub 60} complex was synthesized and characterized by a surface analysis by laser ionization (SALI) instrument; Fullerene soot and Norit-A carbon were tested as catalysts for methane activation and the order of reactivity was found to be Soot > Norit-A > no catalyst; Increases in surface area of the soot did not significantly alter the methane conversion activity; Hydrogen and helium were tested as diluents, with helium causing an increase in selectivity towards C{sub 2} hydrocarbons for the fullerene soot catalyzed reactions; and The MER extracted soot was found to be more reactive towards methane conversion, but less selective towards C{sub 2} hydrocarbons than the Ulvick fullerene soot.

  13. Surface morphology of orthorhombic Mo2C catalyst and high coverage hydrogen adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Tian, Xinxin; Yang, Yong; Li, Yong-Wang; Wang, Jianguo; Beller, Matthias; Jiao, Haijun

    2016-09-01

    High coverage hydrogen adsorption on twenty two terminations of orthorhombic Mo2C has been systematically studied by using density functional theory and ab initio thermodynamics. Hydrogen stable coverage on the surfaces highly depends on temperatures and H2 partial pressure. The estimated hydrogen desorption temperatures under ultra-high vacuum condition on Mo2C are in reasonable agreement with the available temperature-programmed desorption data. Obviously, hydrogen adsorption can affect the surface stability and therefore modify the surface morphology of Mo2C. Upon increasing the chemical potential of hydrogen which can be achieved by increasing the H2 partial pressure and/or decreasing the temperature, the proportions of the (001), (010), (011) and (100) surfaces increase, while those of the (101), (110) and (111) surfaces decrease. Among these surfaces, the (100) surface is most sensitive upon hydrogen adsorption and the (111) surface is most exposed under a wide range of conditions. Our study clearly reveals the role of hydrogen on the morphology of orthorhombic Mo2C catalyst in conjugation with hydro-treating activity.

  14. Surface-inspired molecular vanadium oxide catalysts for the oxidative dehydrogenation of alcohols: evidence for metal cooperation and peroxide intermediates.

    PubMed

    Werncke, C Gunnar; Limberg, Christian; Knispel, Christina; Mebs, Stefan

    2011-10-17

    On the basis that thiacalix[4]arene (H(4)T4A) complex (PPh(4) )(2) [H(2)T4A(VO(2))](2) (Ia) was found to be an adequate functional model for surface species occurring on vanadium oxide based catalysts and itself catalyses the oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of alcohols, an analogue containing 2,2'-thiobis(2,4-di-tert-butylphenolate), (S)L(2-), as ligand, namely, (PPh(4))(2)[(S)LVO(2)](2) (II) was investigated in the same context. Despite the apparent similarity of Ia and II, studies on II revealed several novel insights, which are also valuable in connection with surfaces of vanadia catalysts: 1) For Ia and II similar turnover numbers (TONs) were found for the ODH of activated alcohols, which indicates that the additional OH units inherent to Ia do not contribute particularly to the activity of this complex, for instance, through prebinding of the alcohol. 2) On dissolution II enters into an equilibrium with a monomeric form, which is the predominant species in solution; nevertheless, ODH proceeds exclusively at the dimeric form, and this stresses the need for cooperation of two vanadium centres. 3) By omitting O(2) from the system during the oxidation of 9-fluorenol, the reduced form of the catalyst could be isolated and fully characterised (including single-crystal X-ray analysis). The corresponding intermediate had been elusive in case of thiacalixarene system Ia. 4) Reoxidation was found to proceed via a peroxide intermediate that also oxidises one alcohol equivalent. As the peroxide can also perform mono- and dioxygenation of the thioether group in II, after a number of turnovers the active catalyst contains a sulfone group. The reduced form of this ultimate catalyst was also isolated and structurally characterised. Possible implications of 1)-4) for the function of heterogeneous vanadia catalysts are discussed. PMID:21915928

  15. Oxidation catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Ceyer, Sylvia T.; Lahr, David L.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

  16. Shape-selective sieving layers on an oxide catalyst surface.

    PubMed

    Canlas, Christian P; Lu, Junling; Ray, Natalie A; Grosso-Giordano, Nicolas A; Lee, Sungsik; Elam, Jeffrey W; Winans, Randall E; Van Duyne, Richard P; Stair, Peter C; Notestein, Justin M

    2012-12-01

    New porous materials such as zeolites, metal-organic frameworks and mesostructured oxides are of immense practical utility for gas storage, separations and heterogeneous catalysis. Their extended pore structures enable selective uptake of molecules or can modify the product selectivity (regioselectivity or enantioselectivity) of catalyst sites contained within. However, diffusion within pores can be problematic for biomass and fine chemicals, and not all catalyst classes can be readily synthesized with pores of the correct dimensions. Here, we present a novel approach that adds reactant selectivity to existing, non-porous oxide catalysts by first grafting the catalyst particles with single-molecule sacrificial templates, then partially overcoating the catalyst with a second oxide through atomic layer deposition. This technique is used to create sieving layers of Al(2)O(3) (thickness, 0.4-0.7 nm) with 'nanocavities' (<2 nm in diameter) on a TiO(2) photocatalyst. The additional layers result in selectivity (up to 9:1) towards less hindered reactants in otherwise unselective, competitive photocatalytic oxidations and transfer hydrogenations. PMID:23174984

  17. Shape-selective sieving layers on an oxide catalyst surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canlas, Christian P.; Lu, Junling; Ray, Natalie A.; Grosso-Giordano, Nicolas A.; Lee, Sungsik; Elam, Jeffrey W.; Winans, Randall E.; van Duyne, Richard P.; Stair, Peter C.; Notestein, Justin M.

    2012-12-01

    New porous materials such as zeolites, metal-organic frameworks and mesostructured oxides are of immense practical utility for gas storage, separations and heterogeneous catalysis. Their extended pore structures enable selective uptake of molecules or can modify the product selectivity (regioselectivity or enantioselectivity) of catalyst sites contained within. However, diffusion within pores can be problematic for biomass and fine chemicals, and not all catalyst classes can be readily synthesized with pores of the correct dimensions. Here, we present a novel approach that adds reactant selectivity to existing, non-porous oxide catalysts by first grafting the catalyst particles with single-molecule sacrificial templates, then partially overcoating the catalyst with a second oxide through atomic layer deposition. This technique is used to create sieving layers of Al2O3 (thickness, 0.4-0.7 nm) with ‘nanocavities’ (<2 nm in diameter) on a TiO2 photocatalyst. The additional layers result in selectivity (up to 9:1) towards less hindered reactants in otherwise unselective, competitive photocatalytic oxidations and transfer hydrogenations.

  18. A comparison of the activity, selectivity and kinetics of several iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Dictor, R.A.; Bell, A.T.

    1986-03-01

    Much attention in the area of Fischer-Tropsch chemistry has been directed at slurry-phase reactor systems because of facilitated temperature control and the ability to operate continuously using hydrogen-lean feeds. The ability to predict and control the behavior of bubble column Ft reactors requires a detailed understanding of the reaction kinetics and mass transfer limitations. The authors examined the effects of temperature, reactant partial pressures, gas velocity and feed ratio on catalyst activity and selectivity for a number of catalysts: Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, potassium-promoted Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Fe, Fe/sub 3/C, and a fused iron ammonia synthesis catalyst. The goal of this communication is to determine the effects of structural features (e.g., surface area, promoters, etc.) on the activities and selectivities of these catalysts.

  19. Role of surface Ni and Ce species of Ni/CeO2 catalyst in CO2 methanation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guilin; Liu, Huiran; Cui, Kaikai; Jia, Aiping; Hu, Gengshen; Jiao, Zhaojie; Liu, Yunqi; Zhang, Xianming

    2016-10-01

    CeO2, which was used as support to prepare mesoporous Ni/CeO2 catalyst, was prepared by the hard-template method. The prepared NiO/CeO2 precursor and Ni/CeO2 catalyst were studied by H2-TPR, in-situ XPS, and in-situ FT-IR. The catalytic properties of the prepared Ni/CeO2 catalyst were also investigated by CO2 catalytic hydrogenation methanation. H2-TPR and in-situ XPS results showed that metal Ni species and surface oxygen vacancies could be formed by H2 reduction. In-situ FT-IR and in-situ XPS results indicated that CO2 molecules could be reduced by active metal Ni species and surface oxygen vacancies to generate active CO species and promote CO2 methanation. The Ni/CeO2 catalyst presented the high CO2 methanation activity, and CO2 conversion and CH4 selectivity reached 91.1% and 100% at 340 °C and atmospheric pressure.

  20. XAFS study on structure-activity correlations of α-Co(OH)2 nanosheets water oxidation catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Junheng; Liu, Qinghua; Yao, Tao; Pan, Zhiyun; Wei, Shiqiang

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the structure-activity of the metal hydroxide materials is critical to the design of an efficient oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalyst for water oxidation. A challenge is to identify and collect surface active site relative to bulk. Here, we have prepared an ultrathin α-Co(OH)2 nanosheet with large exposed surface Co sites as an high-efficiency O2 evolution catalyst. Using XAFS technique, we have investigated the oxidation state and local structural evolutions of the α-Co(OH)2 nanosheets catalyst. A coordination-miss Co sites (CoO6-x) with oxidation state of +3.3 on the nanosheet surface is revealed after the OER procedure, indicating the in situ formation of y-CoOOH nanosheet is a key factor leading to an enhanced water oxidation performance.

  1. Dependence of the adsorption and catalytic properties of a copper-platinum catalyst on the structure of metal particles and the composition of the catalyst surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagodovskii, V. D.; Lobanov, N. N.; Bratchikova, I. G.; Galimova, N. A.; Platonov, E. A.; Eremina, O. V.

    2011-10-01

    The kinetics of H2 desorption from the surface of a copper-platinum catalyst deposited on silica gel ([1 wt % Pt + 0.15 wt % Cu]/SiO2) and the kinetics of C6H12 dehydrogenation were studied. The effects of copper introduction in a platinum catalyst on the structural characteristics of platinum particles, the composition of their surface, and the effects of plasmochemical treatments on these parameters were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The metal-H atom bond energies ( E Pt-H) and the catalytic activity were found to increase in the presence of Cu. This was explained by the formation of new hydrogen adsorption centers (due to the Cu+δ adatoms) and catalytic centers composed of Cu+δ adatoms and carbon atoms. The mean diameter of Pt particles ( D) increased twofold. The microstresses (ɛ) in the particles increased after the catalyst was treated with glow discharge plasma in Ar and O2 and with high-frequency plasma in H2 (HF-H2). The observed changes in the bond energy E Pt-H and kinetic parameters were explained by the increase in microstresses in Pt particles.

  2. Active frequency selective surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchwald, Walter R.; Hendrickson, Joshua; Cleary, Justin W.; Guo, Junpeng

    2013-05-01

    Split ring resonator arrays are investigated for use as active elements for the realization of voltage controllable frequency selective surfaces. Finite difference time domain simulations suggest the absorptive and reflective properties of such surfaces can be externally controlled through modifications of the split ring resonator gap impedance. In this work, such voltage-controlled resonance tuning is obtained through the addition of an appropriately designed high electron mobility transistor positioned across the split ring resonator gap. It is shown that a 0.5μm gate length high electron mobility transistor allows voltage controllable switching between the two resonant conditions associated with a split ring resonator and that of a closed loop geometry when the surface is illuminated with THz radiation. Partial switching between these two resonant conditions is observed at larger gate lengths. Such active frequency selective surfaces are proposed, for example, for use as modulators in THz detection schemes and as RF filters in radar applications when scaled to operate at GHz frequencies.

  3. Hierarchical Pd-Sn Alloy Nanosheet Dendrites: An Economical and Highly Active Catalyst for Ethanol Electrooxidation

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Liang-Xin; Wang, An-Liang; Ou, Yan-Nan; Li, Qi; Guo, Rui; Zhao, Wen-Xia; Tong, Ye-Xiang; Li, Gao-Ren

    2013-01-01

    Hierarchical alloy nanosheet dendrites (ANSDs) are highly favorable for superior catalytic performance and efficient utilization of catalyst because of the special characteristics of alloys, nanosheets, and dendritic nanostructures. In this paper, we demonstrate for the first time a facile and efficient electrodeposition approach for the controllable synthesis of Pd-Sn ANSDs with high surface area. These synthesized Pd-Sn ANSDs exhibit high electrocatalytic activity and superior long-term cycle stability toward ethanol oxidation in alkaline media. The enhanced electrocataytic activity of Pd-Sn ANSDs may be attributed to Pd-Sn alloys, nanosheet dendrite induced promotional effect, large number of active sites on dendrite surface, large surface area, and good electrical contact with the base electrode. Because of the simple implement and high flexibility, the proposed approach can be considered as a general and powerful strategy to synthesize the alloy electrocatalysts with high surface areas and open dendritic nanostructures. PMID:23383368

  4. Highly active composite catalysts for reforming of methane into syngas

    SciTech Connect

    Inui, T.; Saigo, K.; Ichino, K.

    1997-12-31

    Development in highly active catalysts for the reforming of methane with H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O + CO{sub 2}, and partial oxidation of methane was conducted to produce hydrogen with high reaction rates. A Ni-based four component catalyst, Ni-Ce{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Pt-Rh supported on an alumina wash-coated ceramic fiber in a plate shape was suitable for the objective reaction. By combining the catalytic combustion reaction, methane conversion was markedly enhanced. Furthermore, by combining the combustion of ethane or ethylene, significantly high space-time yields of hydrogen such as 6,731 mol/1-h or 6,907 mol/l{center_dot}h, respectively at 700{degrees}C. In a reaction of CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-O{sub 2} on the four component catalyst, an extraordinary high space-time yield of hydrogen, 12,190 mol/l{center_dot}h was realized even under the very rapid operation conditions as 3 m-sec short contact time.

  5. Sol immobilization technique: a delicate balance between activity, selectivity and stability for gold catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Alberto; Wang, Di; Veith, Gabriel M; Prati, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Sol immobilization is a widely used method to prepare gold catalysts. The presence of the protective layer can have a significant influence on catalyst properties by mediating metal-support and reactantmetal interactions. This paper details the effect of a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) protecting groups on the activity of a supported gold catalysts as well as its selectivity towards glycerol oxidation.

  6. The evolution of catalyst layer morphology and sub-surface growth of CNTs over the hot filament grown Fe-Cr thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasha, M. Akbarzadeh; Ranjbar, M.; Vesaghi, M. A.; Shafiekhani, A.

    2010-12-01

    In this study a hot filament chemical vapour deposition (HFCVD) technique was used to prepare Fe-Cr films on Si substrate as catalysts for thermal CVD (TCVD) growing of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) from liquid petroleum gas (LPG) at 800 °C. To characterize the catalysts or CNTs, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy were used. The XPS spectra obtained at different stages of Ar + sputtering revealed that in the depth of catalyst layers, the relative Fe-Cr concentrations are higher than the top-surface. SEM images of samples after TCVD indicate a significant CNT growing at the backside of catalyst layer compared with its top which is accompanied with morphological changes on catalyst layer such as formation of cone-shape structures, rippling, cracking and rolling of the layer. These observations were attributed to the more catalytic activity of the sub-surface beside the poor activity of the top-surface as well as the presence of individual active islands over the surface of the catalyst thin film.

  7. Structure, Mobility, and Composition of Transition Metal Catalyst Surfaces. High-Pressure Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Ambient-Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Zhongwei

    2013-12-06

    Surface structure, mobility, and composition of transition metal catalysts were studied by high-pressure scanning tunneling microscopy (HP-STM) and ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS) at high gas pressures. HP-STM makes it possible to determine the atomic or molecular rearrangement at catalyst surfaces, particularly at the low-coordinated active surface sites. AP-XPS monitors changes in elemental composition and chemical states of catalysts in response to variations in gas environments. Stepped Pt and Cu single crystals, the hexagonally reconstructed Pt(100) single crystal, and Pt-based bimetallic nanoparticles with controlled size, shape and composition, were employed as the model catalysts for experiments in this thesis.

  8. Activation of molecular oxygen and the nature of the active oxygen species for CO oxidation on oxide supported Au catalysts.

    PubMed

    Widmann, D; Behm, R J

    2014-03-18

    Although highly dispersed Au catalysts with Au nanoparticles (NPs) of a few nanometers in diameter are well-known for their high catalytic activity for several oxidation and reduction reactions already at rather low temperatures for almost 30 years, central aspects of the reaction mechanism are still unresolved. While most studies focused on the active site, the active Au species, and the effect of the support material, the most crucial step during oxidation reactions, the activation of molecular oxygen and the nature of the resulting active oxygen species (Oact), received more attention just recently. This is topic of this Account, which focuses on the formation, location, and nature of the Oact species present on metal oxide supported Au catalysts under typical reaction conditions, at room temperature and above. It is mainly based on quantitative temporal analysis of products (TAP) reactor measurements, which different from most spectroscopic techniques are able to detect and quantify these species even at the extremely low concentrations present under realistic reaction conditions. Different types of pulse experiments were performed, during which the highly dispersed, realistic powder catalysts are exposed to very low amounts of reactants, CO and/or O2, in order to form and reactively remove Oact species and gain information on their formation, nature, and the active site for Oact formation. Our investigations have shown that the active oxygen species for CO oxidation on Au/TiO2 for reaction at 80 °C and higher is a highly stable atomic species, which at 80 °C is formed only at the perimeter of the Au-oxide interface and whose reactive removal by CO is activated, but not its formation. From these findings, it is concluded that surface lattice oxygen represents the Oact species for the CO oxidation. Accordingly, the CO oxidation proceeds via a Au-assisted Mars-van Krevelen mechanism, during which surface lattice oxygen close to the Au NPs is removed by reaction

  9. One-Pot synthesis of phosphorylated mesoporous carbon heterogeneous catalysts with tailored surface acidity

    SciTech Connect

    Fulvio, Pasquale F; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Mayes, Richard T; Bauer, Christopher; Wang, Xiqing; Veith, Gabriel M; Dai, Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Soft-templated phosphorylated mesoporous carbons with homogeneous distributions of phosphate groups were prepared by a 'one-pot' synthesis method using mixtures of phosphoric acid with hydrochloric, or nitric acids in the presence of Pluronic F127 triblock copolymer. Adjusting the various ratios of phosphoric acid used in these mixtures resulted in carbons with distinct adsorption, structural and surface acidity properties. The pore size distributions (PSDs) from nitrogen adsorption at -196 C showed that mesoporous carbons exhibit specific surface areas as high as 551 m{sup 2}/g and mesopores as large as 13 nm. Both structural ordering of the mesopores and the final phosphate contents were strongly dependent on the ratios of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} in the synthesis gels, as shown by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron (XPS) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The number of surface acid sites determined from temperature programmed desorption of ammonia (NH{sub 3}-TPD) were in the range of 0.3-1.5 mmol/g while the active surface areas are estimated to comprise 5-54% of the total surface areas. Finally, the conversion temperatures for the isopropanol dehydration were lowered by as much as 100 C by transitioning from the least acidic to the most acidic catalysts surface.

  10. Highly efficient Ni@Ni-Pt/La2O3 catalyst for hydrogen generation from hydrous hydrazine decomposition: Effect of Ni-Pt surface alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yu-Jie; Dai, Hong-Bin; Jiang, Yuan-Yuan; Chen, De-Min; Zhu, Min; Sun, Li-Xian; Wang, Ping

    2015-12-01

    Hydrous hydrazine has received increasing attention as a promising hydrogen carrier owing to its many favorable attributes, such as high hydrogen content, low material cost, stable liquid state at ambient conditions, and free of solid decomposition byproduct. Herein, we report the synthesis of a supported core-shell structured Ni@Ni-Pt/La2O3 catalyst by a combination of co-precipitation and galvanic replacement methods. The catalyst exhibits high catalytic activity and 100% selectivity towards hydrogen generation from hydrous hydrazine at mild conditions, which outperforms most reported hydrous hydrazine decomposition catalysts. The favorable catalytic performance of the Ni@Ni-Pt/La2O3 catalyst is correlated with the Pt-induced electronic and geometric modifications on the catalyst surface.

  11. Growth of carbon nanotubes on surfaces: the effects of catalyst and substrate.

    PubMed

    Murcia, Angel Berenguer; Geng, Junfeng

    2013-08-01

    We report a study of synthesising air-stable, nearly monodispersed bimetallic colloids of Co/Pd and Fe/Mo of varying compositions as active catalysts for the growth of carbon nanotubes. Using these catalysts we have investigated the effects of catalyst and substrate on the carbon nanostructures formed in a plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) process. We will show how it is possible to assess the influence of both the catalyst and the support on the controlled growth of carbon nanotube and nanofiber arrays. The importance of the composition of the catalytic nuclei will be put into perspective with other results from the literature. Furthermore, the influence of other synthetic parameters such as the nature of the nanoparticle catalysts will also be analysed and discussed in detail. PMID:23882847

  12. Conversion of isoamyl alcohol over acid catalysts: Reaction dependence on nature of active centers

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, G.P.; Murthy, R.S.; Krishnan, V.

    1997-02-01

    Acid catalysts are known to catalyze the dehydration of alcohols. In addition some oxide catalysts with basic properties have also been shown to play an important role in such dehydration reactions. The dehydration of aliphatic alcohols to olefins has been studied in detail using alumina silica-alumina and zeolite catalysts. The olefin products further undergo isomerization in presence of acidic sites. The reaction of isoamyl alcohol on catalytic surfaces has not been investigated in greater detail. The dehydration of isoamyl alcohol is of considerable interest in fine chemicals. Isoamyl alcohol may also undergo dehydrogenation as observed in the case of n-butanol. The scope of the present work is to identify the nature of the active sites selective for dehydration and dehydrogenation of isoamyl alcohol and to modify the active sites to promote isomerization of dehydrated products. Four catalytic surfaces on which the acidic strength can be varied, as well as selectively suppressed, are chosen for this study. 17 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  13. Surface Grafting via Photo-Induced Copper-Mediated Radical Polymerization at Extremely Low Catalyst Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Laun, Joachim; Vorobii, Mariia; de los Santos Pereira, Andres; Pop-Georgievski, Ognen; Trouillet, Vanessa; Welle, Alexander; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher; Rodriguez-Emmenegger, Cesar; Junkers, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Surface-initiated photo-induced copper-mediated radical polymerization is employed to graft a wide range of polyacrylate brushes from silicon substrates at extremely low catalyst concentrations. This is the first time that the controlled nature of the reported process is demonstrated via block copolymer formation and re-initiation experiments. In addition to unmatched copper catalyst concentrations in the range of few ppb, film thicknesses up to almost 1 μm are achieved within only 1 h. PMID:26149622

  14. Surface composition of magnetron sputtered Pt-Co thin film catalyst for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorokhta, Mykhailo; Khalakhan, Ivan; Václavů, Michal; Kovács, Gábor; Kozlov, Sergey M.; Kúš, Peter; Skála, Tomáš; Tsud, Natalia; Lavková, Jaroslava; Potin, Valerie; Matolínová, Iva; Neyman, Konstantin M.; Matolín, Vladimír

    2016-03-01

    Recently we have tested a magnetron sputtered Pt-Co catalyst in a hydrogen-fed proton exchange membrane fuel cell and showed its high catalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction. Here we present further investigation of the magnetron sputtered Pt-Co thin film catalyst by both experimental and theoretical methods. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy experiments confirmed the nanostructured character of the catalyst. The surface composition of as-deposited and annealed at 773 K Pt-Co films was investigated by surface analysis techniques, such as synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Modeling based on density functional theory showed that the surface of 6 nm large 1:1 Pt-Co nanoparticles is almost exclusively composed of Pt atoms (>90%) at typical operation conditions and the Co content does not exceed 20% at 773 K, in agreement with the experimental characterization of such films annealed in vacuum. According to experiment, the density of valence states of surface atoms in Pt-Co nanostructures is shifted by 0.3 eV to higher energies, which can be associated with their higher activity in the oxygen reduction reaction. The changes in electronic structure caused by alloying are also reflected in the measured Pt 4f, Co 3p and Co 2p photoelectron peak binding energies.

  15. Activated Carbon Catalysts for the Production of Hydrogen for the Sulfur-Iodine Thermochemical Water Splitting Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Lucia M. Petkovic; Daniel M. Ginosar; Harry W. Rollins; Kyle C Burch; Cristina Deiana; Hugo S. Silva; Maria F. Sardella; Dolly Granados

    2009-05-01

    Seven activated carbon catalysts obtained from a variety of raw material sources and preparation methods were examined for their catalytic activity to decompose hydroiodic acid (HI) to produce hydrogen; a key reaction in the sulfur-iodine (S-I) thermochemical water splitting cycle. Activity was examined under a temperature ramp from 473 to 773 K. Within the group of ligno-cellulosic steam-activated carbon catalysts, activity increased with surface area. However, both a mineral-based steam-activated carbon and a ligno-cellulosic chemically-activated carbon displayed activities lower than expected based on their higher surface areas. In general, ash content was detrimental to catalytic activity while total acid sites, as determined by Bohem’s titrations, seemed to favor higher catalytic activity within the group of steam-activated carbons. These results suggest, one more time, that activated carbon raw materials and preparation methods may have played a significant role in the development of surface characteristics that eventually dictated catalyst activity and stability as well.

  16. Cyclic alkyl amino carbene (CAAC) ruthenium complexes as remarkably active catalysts for ethenolysis.

    PubMed

    Marx, Vanessa M; Sullivan, Alexandra H; Melaimi, Mohand; Virgil, Scott C; Keitz, Benjamin K; Weinberger, David S; Bertrand, Guy; Grubbs, Robert H

    2015-02-01

    An expanded family of ruthenium-based metathesis catalysts bearing cyclic alkyl amino carbene (CAAC) ligands was prepared. These catalysts exhibited exceptional activity in the ethenolysis of the seed-oil derivative methyl oleate. In many cases, catalyst turnover numbers (TONs) of more than 100,000 were achieved, at a catalyst loading of only 3 ppm. Remarkably, the most active catalyst system was able to achieve a TON of 340,000, at a catalyst loading of only 1 ppm. This is the first time a series of metathesis catalysts has exhibited such high performance in cross-metathesis reactions employing ethylene gas, with activities sufficient to render ethenolysis applicable to the industrial-scale production of linear α-olefins (LAOs) and other terminal-olefin products. PMID:25522160

  17. Oxidative dehydrogenation of propane over vanadia-based catalysts supported on high-surface-area mesoporous MgAl2O4

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Owen R.; Bell, Alexis T.; Tilley, T. Don

    2004-06-01

    The oxidative dehydrogenation of propane to propene was investigated over a series of novel vanadia-based catalysts supported on high-surface-area magnesium spinel. A mesoporous MgAl2O4 support was synthesized via a low-temperature sol gel process involving the heterobimetallic alkoxide precursor, Mg[Al(O iPr)4]2. A high-purity catalyst support was obtained after calcination at 1173 K under O2 atmosphere and active vanadia catalysts were prepared from the thermolysis of OV(O tBu)3 after grafting onto the spinel support. MgAl2O4-supported catalysts prepared in this manner have BET surface areas of 234 245 m2/g. All of the catalysts were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, and Raman, solid-state NMR, and diffuse-reflectance UV vis spectroscopy. At all vanadium loadings the vanadia supported on MgAl2O4 exist as a combination of isolated monovanadate and tetrahedral polyvanadate species. As the vanadium surface density increases for these catalysts the ratio of polyvanadate species to isolated monovanadate species increases. In addition, as the vanadium surface density increases for these catalysts, the initial rate of propane ODH per V atom increases and reaches a maximum value at 6 VOx/nm2. Increasing the vanadium surface density past this point results in a decrease in the rate of propane ODH owing to the formation of multilayer species in which subsurface vanadium atoms are essentially rendered catalytically inactive. The initial propene selectivity increases with increasing vanadium surface density and reaches a plateau of {approx}95 percent for the V/MgAl catalysts. Rate coefficients for propane ODH (k1), propane combustion (k2), and propene combustion (k3) were calculated for these catalysts. The value of k1 increases with increasing VOx surface density, reaching a maximum at about 5.5 VOx/nm2. On the other hand, the ratio (k2/k1) for V/MgAl decreases with increasing VOx surface density. The ratio (k3/k1) for both sets of catalysts shows no dependence on

  18. The promotional effect of surface defects on the catalytic performance of supported nickel-based catalysts.

    PubMed

    Li, Yizhen; Yu, Jiaying; Li, Wei; Fan, Guoli; Yang, Lan; Li, Feng

    2016-03-01

    Controlling the metal-support interactions, as well as the nature of support materials, is of vital importance for enhancing the catalytic performance of supported metal catalysts. In the present work, supported nickel nanocatalysts with abundant surface defects (e.g. oxygen vacancies, Ti(3+) species) were directly synthesized via a facile single-source Ni-Ti layered double hydroxide precursor route, and their catalytic performance in the liquid phase selective hydrogenation of chloronitrobenzenes to chloroanilines was investigated. A series of characterization techniques including XRD, TEM, STEM, PL, XPS, H2-TPR and H2 chemisorption clearly demonstrated that the resultant Ni nanoparticles were uniformly dispersed on the surface of the Ni-Ti mixed metal oxide support formed in situ, thereby leading to strong metal-support interactions and the formation of a large amount of surface oxygen vacancies and Ti(3+) species. Compared with that prepared using a conventional impregnation method, the as-formed Ni-based nanocatalysts exhibited significantly enhanced catalytic performance with a high chloroaniline yield of 99.0% under mild reaction conditions (i.e. a low hydrogen pressure of 0.2 MPa). Such an unprecedented catalytic efficiency was mainly attributed to the promotional effect of surface defects. Furthermore, the present Ni-based nanocatalysts could be reused five times without serious aggregation of active species and remarkable activity loss, indicative of high stability. PMID:26864098

  19. Tungsten Carbide Modified High Surface Area Carbon as Fuel Cell Catalyst Support

    SciTech Connect

    M Shao; B Merzougui; K Shoemaker; L Stolar; L Protsailo; Z Mellinger; I Hsu; J Chen

    2011-12-31

    Phase pure WC nanoparticles were synthesized on high surface area carbon black (800 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}) by a temperature programmed reaction (TPR) method. The particle size of WC can be controlled under 30 nm with a relatively high coverage on the carbon surface. The electrochemical testing results demonstrated that the corrosion resistance of carbon black was improved by 2-fold with a surface modification by phase pure WC particles. However, the WC itself showed some dissolution under potential cycling. Based on the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analysis, most of the WC on the surface was lost or transformed to oxides after 5000 potential cycles in the potential range of 0.65-1.2 V. The Pt catalyst supported on WC/C showed a slightly better ORR activity than that of Pt/C, with the Pt activity loss rate for Pt/WC/C being slightly slower compared to that of Pt/C. The performance and decay rate of Pt/WC/C were also evaluated in a fuel cell.

  20. Active Site Dependent Reaction Mechanism over Ru/CeO2 Catalyst toward CO2 Methanation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; He, Shan; Chen, Hao; Wang, Bin; Zheng, Lirong; Wei, Min; Evans, David G; Duan, Xue

    2016-05-18

    Oxygen vacancy on the surface of metal oxides is one of the most important defects which acts as the reactive site in a variety of catalytic reactions. In this work, operando spectroscopy methodology was employed to study the CO2 methanation reaction catalyzed by Ru/CeO2 (with oxygen vacancy in CeO2) and Ru/α-Al2O3 (without oxygen vacancy), respectively, so as to give a thorough understanding on active site dependent reaction mechanism. In Ru/CeO2 catalyst, operando XANES, IR, and Raman were used to reveal the generation process of Ce(3+), surface hydroxyl, and oxygen vacancy as well as their structural evolvements under practical reaction conditions. The steady-state isotope transient kinetic analysis (SSITKA)-type in situ DRIFT infrared spectroscopy undoubtedly substantiates that CO2 methanation undergoes formate route over Ru/CeO2 catalyst, and the formate dissociation to methanol catalyzed by oxygen vacancy is the rate-determining step. In contrast, CO2 methanation undergoes CO route over Ru surface in Ru/α-Al2O3 with the absence of oxygen vacancy, demonstrating active site dependent catalytic mechanism toward CO2 methanation. In addition, the catalytic activity evaluation and the oscillating reaction over Ru/CeO2 catalyst further prove that the oxygen vacancy catalyzes the rate-determining step with a much lower activation temperature compared with Ru surface in Ru/α-Al2O3 (125 vs 250 °C). PMID:27135417

  1. Immobilisation of homogeneous olefin polymerisation catalysts. Factors influencing activity and stability.

    PubMed

    Severn, John R; Chadwick, John C

    2013-07-01

    The activity and stability of homogeneous olefin polymerisation catalysts, when immobilised on a support, are dependent on both chemical and physical effects. Chemical factors affecting catalyst activity include the ease of formation of the active species, which is strongly dependent on the transition metal. Catalyst productivity is dependent on the balance between activity and stability. Immobilisation can lead to a lower proportion of active species and therefore lower initial polymerisation activity, but nevertheless give higher polymer yields in cases where increased catalyst stability is obtained. Important physical factors are support porosity and the ability of a support to undergo progressive fragmentation during polymerisation, facilitating monomer diffusion through the growing catalyst/polymer particle. This article illustrates the importance of these factors in olefin polymerisation with both early- and late-transition metal catalysts, with particular reference to the use of silica and magnesium chloride supports as well as to effects of immobilisation on polymer structure and properties. PMID:23467461

  2. Active carbon-ceramic sphere as support of ruthenium catalysts for catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of resin effluent.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-Min; Hu, Yi-Qiang; Tu, Shan-Tung

    2010-07-15

    Active carbon-ceramic sphere as support of ruthenium catalysts were evaluated through the catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of resin effluent in a packed-bed reactor. Active carbon-ceramic sphere and ruthenium catalysts were characterized by N(2) adsorption and chemisorption measurements. BET surface area and total pore volume of active carbon (AC) in the active carbon-ceramic sphere increase with increasing KOH-to-carbon ratio, and AC in the sample KC-120 possesses values as high as 1100 m(2) g(-1) and 0.69 cm(3) g(-1) (carbon percentage: 4.73 wt.%), especially. Active carbon-ceramic sphere supported ruthenium catalysts were prepared using the RuCl(3) solution impregnation onto these supports, the ruthenium loading was fixed at 1-5 wt.% of AC in the support. The catalytic activity varies according to the following order: Ru/KC-120>Ru/KC-80>Ru/KC-60>KC-120>without catalysts. It is found that the 3 wt.% Ru/KC-120 catalyst displays highest stability in the CWAO of resin effluent during 30 days. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) and phenol removal were about 92% and 96%, respectively at the reaction temperature of 200 degrees C, oxygen pressure of 1.5 MPa, the water flow rate of 0.75 L h(-1) and the oxygen flow rate of 13.5 L h(-1). PMID:20362394

  3. Redox properties and VOC oxidation activity of Cu catalysts supported on Ce₁-xSmxOδ mixed oxides.

    PubMed

    Konsolakis, Michalis; Carabineiro, Sónia A C; Tavares, Pedro B; Figueiredo, José L

    2013-10-15

    A series of Cu catalysts supported on Ce1-xSmxOδ mixed oxides with different molar contents (x=0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1), was prepared by wet impregnation and evaluated for volatile organic compounds (VOC) abatement, employing ethyl acetate as model molecule. An extensive characterization study was undertaken in order to correlate the morphological, structural and surface properties of catalysts with their oxidation activity. The optimum performance was obtained with Cu/CeO2 catalyst, which offers complete conversion of ethyl acetate into CO2 at temperatures as low as 260°C. The catalytic performance of Cu/Ce1-xSmxOδ was interpreted on the basis of characterization studies, showing that incorporation of samarium in ceria has a detrimental effect on the textural characteristics and reducibility of catalysts. Moreover, high Sm/Ce atomic ratios (from 1 to 3) resulted in a more reduced copper species, compared to CeO2-rich supports, suggesting the inability of these species to take part in the redox mechanism of VOC abatement. Sm/Ce surface atomic ratios are always much higher than the nominal ratios indicating an impoverishment of catalyst surface in cerium oxide, which is detrimental for VOC activity. PMID:23995554

  4. Quantification of zinc atoms in a surface alloy on copper in an industrial-type methanol synthesis catalyst.

    PubMed

    Kuld, Sebastian; Conradsen, Christian; Moses, Poul Georg; Chorkendorff, Ib; Sehested, Jens

    2014-06-01

    Methanol has recently attracted renewed interest because of its potential importance as a solar fuel. Methanol is also an important bulk chemical that is most efficiently formed over the industrial Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst. The identity of the active site and, in particular, the role of ZnO as a promoter for this type of catalyst is still under intense debate. Structural changes that are strongly dependent on the pretreatment method have now been observed for an industrial-type methanol synthesis catalyst. A combination of chemisorption, reaction, and spectroscopic techniques provides a consistent picture of surface alloying between copper and zinc. This analysis enables a reinterpretation of the methods that have been used for the determination of the Cu surface area and provides an opportunity to independently quantify the specific Cu and Zn areas. This method may also be applied to other systems where metal-support interactions are important, and this work generally addresses the role of the carrier and the nature of the interactions between carrier and metal in heterogeneous catalysts. PMID:24764288

  5. Promotion of oxygen reduction reaction durability of carbon-supported PtAu catalysts by surface segregation and TiO₂ addition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen-Wei; Chen, Hong-Shuo; Lai, Chien-Ming; Lin, Jiunn-Nan; Tsai, Li-Duan; Wang, Kuan-Wen

    2014-02-12

    Highly effective carbon supported-Pt75Au25 catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are prepared though titanium dioxide modification and post heat treatment. After accelerated durability test (ADT) of 1700 cycles, the ORR activity of PtAu/C catalysts modified by TiO2 and air heat treatment is 3 times higher than that of the commercial Pt/C. The enhancement of ORR activity is attributed to surface and structural alteration by air-induced Pt surface segregation and lower unfilled d states. On the contrary, for TiO2 modified and H2 treated PtAu/C catalysts, the deterioration of the ORR activity may be due to the loss of electrochemical surface area after ADT and the increase of d-band vacancy. PMID:24447040

  6. Heterogeneous copper-silica catalyst from agricultural biomass and its catalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andas, Jeyashelly; Adam, Farook; Rahman, Ismail Ab.

    2013-11-01

    A series of highly mesoporous copper catalysts (5-20 wt.%) supported on silica rice husk were synthesized via sol-gel route at room temperature. The FT-IR and 29Si MAS NMR spectroscopic studies revealed the successful substitution of copper into the silica matrix. Copper in the +2 oxidation state was evidenced from the DR/UV-vis and XPS analyses. Introduction of copper up to 10 wt.% (RH-10Cu) results in a progressive enhancement in the BET surface area. The activity of the copper catalysts was studied in the liquid-phase oxidation of phenol with H2O2 yielding catechol (CAT) and hydroquinone (HQ). Phenol conversion was influenced by various experimental conditions such as temperature, catalyst dosage, molar ratio of reactants, nature of solvent and percentage metal loading. Excellent activity was achieved when 10 wt.% copper was used and decreased with further increase in the copper loading. RH-10Cu could be regenerated several times without significant loss in the catalytic activity.

  7. Modification of isomerization activity and selectivity over sulfated zirconia catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Soled, S.L.; Iglesia, E.; Kramer, G.M.; McVicker, G.B.

    1993-12-31

    The family of anion-modified oxide strong solid acid catalysts (oxides of Zr, Ti, Sn, or Fe, modified with sulfate) that have been recently reported in the literature were examined for the isomerization of C{sub 5}-C{sub 8} n-paraffins. Isomerization of C{sub 7+} feeds on conventional solid and liquid acids leads to extensive cracking; in particular, paraffins with seven or more carbon atoms are known to undergo acid cracking to undesirable light gases during isomerization over acid catalysts; thus, commercial isomerization practice is limited to C{sub 4}-C{sub 6} feeds. Cracking occurs because isobutane and propane are excellent leaving groups in carbonium ion rearrangements. Since both isomerization and cracking occur on strong acid sites it has been difficult to control one at the expense of the other. The authors have observed that low levels of that low levels of adamantane, a hydride transfer agent, added to a heptane or octain feed will double the isomerization rate while dramatically limiting cracking reactions. The adamantane enhances the rate determining hydride transfer step and limits the surface residence time of carbocation intermediates. This behavior contrasts with that of aromatic addition where poisoning of strong acid sites inhibits cracking but dramatically decreases the isomerization rate. This paper will suggest a mechanism that involves a nonfunctional acid catalyzed chain mechanism proceeding through intermolecular hydride transfer reactions. Finally we will discuss the remaining issues in obtaining a viable C{sub 7}+ isomerization process.

  8. Highly durable and active non-precious air cathode catalyst for zinc air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhu; Choi, Ja-Yeon; Wang, Haijiang; Li, Hui; Chen, Zhongwei

    The electrochemical stability of non-precious FeCo-EDA and commercial Pt/C cathode catalysts for zinc air battery have been compared using accelerated degradation test (ADT) in alkaline condition. Outstanding oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) stability of the FeCo-EDA catalyst was observed compared with the commercial Pt/C catalyst. The FeCo-EDA catalyst retained 80% of the initial mass activity for ORR whereas the commercial Pt/C catalyst retained only 32% of the initial mass activity after ADT. Additionally, the FeCo-EDA catalyst exhibited a nearly three times higher mass activity compared to that of the commercial Pt/C catalyst after ADT. Furthermore, single cell test of the FeCo-EDA and Pt/C catalysts was performed where both catalysts exhibited pseudolinear behaviour in the 12-500 mA cm -2 range. In addition, 67% higher peak power density was observed from the FeCo-EDA catalyst compared with commercial Pt/C. Based on the half cell and single cell tests the non-precious FeCo-EDA catalyst is a very promising ORR electrocatalyst for zinc air battery.

  9. Nanoscale attrition during activation of precipitated iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts: Implications for catalyst design

    SciTech Connect

    Datye, A.K.; Shroff, M.D.; Jin, Y.; Brooks, R.P.; Wilder, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    The Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) for the production of liquid hydrocarbons from coal-based synthesis gas has been the subject of renewed interest for conversion of coal to liquid fuels. The use of synthesis gas from modem energy-efficient gasifiers requires catalysts that can operate under low H{sub 2}/CO ratios, typically 0.7-0.9. Since the FTS stoichiometry requires a H{sub 2}/CO ratio of 2.0, catalysts that operate at lower ratios must catalyze the water gas shift reaction to make up the deficit in H{sub 2}. The use of iron-based catalysts for the process is attractive in view of their low cost, ready availability and high water-gas shift reactivity. Furthermore, iron catalysts at elevated pressures (10-15 atmospheres) produce the desired range of liquid hydrocarbons. AU these features make the use of Fe as an F-T catalyst extremely desirable. Since the reaction is highly exothermic, the preferred reactor type for industrial operation is the slurry bubble column reactor. The catalyst for this reactor is precipitated iron oxide which is spray dried to yield particles with diameter of 30-70 {mu}m. One major limitation of these catalysts is that they tend to undergo attrition during use, leading to problems in catalyst separation and recovery of liquid products from the reactor.

  10. Revisiting the CO oxidation reaction on various Au/TiO2 catalysts: roles of the surface OH groups and the reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhanfeng; Jia, Jianfeng; Zhong, Ziyi

    2014-09-01

    This work aims to understand the influence of TiO2 surface structure in Au/TiO2 catalysts on CO oxidation. Au nanoparticles (3 wt%) in the range of 4 to 8 nm were loaded onto four kinds of TiO2 surfaces, which had different surface structures and were synthesized by calcining hydrogen titanate nanotubes at various temperatures and in different atmospheres. The Au catalyst supported on anatase nanorods exhibited the highest activity in CO oxidation at 30 degrees C among all the five Au/TiO2 catalysts including the reference catalyst of Au/TiO2-P25. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and infrared emission spectra (IES) results indicate that the anatase nanorods have the most active surface on which water molecules can be strongly adsorbed and OH groups can be formed readily. Theoretical calculation indicates that the surface OH can facilitate the O2 adsorption on the anatase surface. Such active surface features are conducive to the O2 activation and CO oxidation. PMID:25924345

  11. Cationic Silica-Supported N-Heterocyclic Carbene Tungsten Oxo Alkylidene Sites: Highly Active and Stable Catalysts for Olefin Metathesis.

    PubMed

    Pucino, Margherita; Mougel, Victor; Schowner, Roman; Fedorov, Alexey; Buchmeiser, Michael R; Copéret, Christophe

    2016-03-18

    Designing supported alkene metathesis catalysts with high activity and stability is still a challenge, despite significant advances in the last years. Described herein is the combination of strong σ-donating N-heterocyclic carbene ligands with weak σ-donating surface silanolates and cationic tungsten sites leading to highly active and stable alkene metathesis catalysts. These well-defined silica-supported catalysts, [(≡SiO)W(=O)(=CHCMe2 Ph)(IMes)(OTf)] and [(≡SiO)W(=O)(=CHCMe2 Ph)(IMes)(+) ][B(Ar(F) )4 (-) ] [IMes=1,3-bis(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)-imidazol-2-ylidene, B(Ar(F) )4 =B(3,5-(CF3 )2 C6 H3 )4 ] catalyze alkene metathesis, and the cationic species display unprecedented activity for a broad range of substrates, especially for terminal olefins with turnover numbers above 1.2 million for propene. PMID:26928967

  12. Effect of gold subsurface layer on the surface activity and segregation in Pt/Au/Pt3M (where M = 3d transition metals) alloy catalyst from first-principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang-Eun; Lim, Dong-Hee; Jang, Jong Hyun; Kim, Hyoung Juhn; Yoon, Sung Pil; Han, Jonghee; Nam, Suk Woo; Hong, Seong-Ahn; Soon, Aloysius; Ham, Hyung Chul

    2015-01-01

    The effect of a subsurface hetero layer (thin gold) on the activity and stability of Pt skin surface in Pt3M system (M = 3d transition metals) is investigated using the spin-polarized density functional theory calculation. First, we find that the heterometallic interaction between the Pt skin surface and the gold subsurface in Pt/Au/Pt3M system can significantly modify the electronic structure of the Pt skin surface. In particular, the local density of states projected onto the d states of Pt skin surface near the Fermi level is drastically decreased compared to the Pt/Pt/Pt3M case, leading to the reduction of the oxygen binding strength of the Pt skin surface. This modification is related to the increase of surface charge polarization of outmost Pt skin atoms by the electron transfer from the gold subsurface atoms. Furthermore, a subsurface gold layer is found to cast the energetic barrier to the segregation loss of metal atoms from the bulk (inside) region, which can enhance the durability of Pt3M based catalytic system in oxygen reduction condition at fuel cell devices. This study highlights that a gold subsurface hetero layer can provide an additional mean to tune the surface activity toward oxygen species and in turn the oxygen reduction reaction, where the utilization of geometric strain already reaches its practical limit.

  13. Effect of gold subsurface layer on the surface activity and segregation in Pt/Au/Pt3M (where M = 3d transition metals) alloy catalyst from first-principles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang-Eun; Lim, Dong-Hee; Jang, Jong Hyun; Kim, Hyoung Juhn; Yoon, Sung Pil; Han, Jonghee; Nam, Suk Woo; Hong, Seong-Ahn; Soon, Aloysius; Ham, Hyung Chul

    2015-01-21

    The effect of a subsurface hetero layer (thin gold) on the activity and stability of Pt skin surface in Pt3M system (M = 3d transition metals) is investigated using the spin-polarized density functional theory calculation. First, we find that the heterometallic interaction between the Pt skin surface and the gold subsurface in Pt/Au/Pt3M system can significantly modify the electronic structure of the Pt skin surface. In particular, the local density of states projected onto the d states of Pt skin surface near the Fermi level is drastically decreased compared to the Pt/Pt/Pt3M case, leading to the reduction of the oxygen binding strength of the Pt skin surface. This modification is related to the increase of surface charge polarization of outmost Pt skin atoms by the electron transfer from the gold subsurface atoms. Furthermore, a subsurface gold layer is found to cast the energetic barrier to the segregation loss of metal atoms from the bulk (inside) region, which can enhance the durability of Pt3M based catalytic system in oxygen reduction condition at fuel cell devices. This study highlights that a gold subsurface hetero layer can provide an additional mean to tune the surface activity toward oxygen species and in turn the oxygen reduction reaction, where the utilization of geometric strain already reaches its practical limit. PMID:25612725

  14. Effect of gold subsurface layer on the surface activity and segregation in Pt/Au/Pt{sub 3}M (where M = 3d transition metals) alloy catalyst from first-principles

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chang-Eun; Lim, Dong-Hee; Jang, Jong Hyun; Kim, Hyoung Juhn; Yoon, Sung Pil; Han, Jonghee; Nam, Suk Woo; Hong, Seong-Ahn; Soon, Aloysius E-mail: hchahm@kist.re.kr; Ham, Hyung Chul E-mail: hchahm@kist.re.kr

    2015-01-21

    The effect of a subsurface hetero layer (thin gold) on the activity and stability of Pt skin surface in Pt{sub 3}M system (M = 3d transition metals) is investigated using the spin-polarized density functional theory calculation. First, we find that the heterometallic interaction between the Pt skin surface and the gold subsurface in Pt/Au/Pt{sub 3}M system can significantly modify the electronic structure of the Pt skin surface. In particular, the local density of states projected onto the d states of Pt skin surface near the Fermi level is drastically decreased compared to the Pt/Pt/Pt{sub 3}M case, leading to the reduction of the oxygen binding strength of the Pt skin surface. This modification is related to the increase of surface charge polarization of outmost Pt skin atoms by the electron transfer from the gold subsurface atoms. Furthermore, a subsurface gold layer is found to cast the energetic barrier to the segregation loss of metal atoms from the bulk (inside) region, which can enhance the durability of Pt{sub 3}M based catalytic system in oxygen reduction condition at fuel cell devices. This study highlights that a gold subsurface hetero layer can provide an additional mean to tune the surface activity toward oxygen species and in turn the oxygen reduction reaction, where the utilization of geometric strain already reaches its practical limit.

  15. Highly active Pd-In/mesoporous alumina catalyst for nitrate reduction.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhenwei; Zhang, Yonggang; Li, Deyi; Werth, Charles J; Zhang, Yalei; Zhou, Xuefei

    2015-04-01

    The catalytic reduction of nitrate is a promising technology for groundwater purification because it transforms nitrate into nitrogen and water. Recent studies have mainly focused on new catalysts with higher activities for the reduction of nitrate. Consequently, metal nanoparticles supported on mesoporous metal oxides have become a major research direction. However, the complex surface chemistry and porous structures of mesoporous metal oxides lead to a non-uniform distribution of metal nanoparticles, thereby resulting in a low catalytic efficiency. In this paper, a method for synthesizing the sustainable nitrate reduction catalyst Pd-In/Al2O3 with a dimensional structure is introduced. The TEM results indicated that Pd and In nanoparticles could efficiently disperse into the mesopores of the alumina. At room temperature in CO2-buffered water and under continuous H2 as the electron donor, the synthesized material (4.9 wt% Pd) was the most active at a Pd-In ratio of 4, with a first-order rate constant (k(obs) = 0.241 L min(-1) g(cata)(-1)) that was 1.3× higher than that of conventional Pd-In/Al2O3 (5 wt% Pd; 0.19 L min(-1) g(cata)(-1)). The Pd-In/mesoporous alumina is a promising catalyst for improving the catalytic reduction of nitrate. PMID:25600582

  16. Novel windows for "solar commodities": a device for CO2 reduction using plasmonic catalyst activation.

    PubMed

    Navarrete, Alexander; Muñoz, Sergio; Sanz-Moral, Luis M; Brandner, Juergen J; Pfeifer, Peter; Martín, Ángel; Dittmeyer, Roland; Cocero, María J

    2015-01-01

    A novel plasmonic reactor concept is proposed and tested to work as a visible energy harvesting device while allowing reactions to transform CO2 to be carried out. Particularly the reverse water gas shift (RWGS) reaction has been tested as a means to introduce renewable energy into the economy. The development of the new reactor concept involved the synthesis of a new composite capable of plasmonic activation with light, the development of an impregnation method to create a single catalyst reactor entity, and finally the assembly of a reaction system to test the reaction. The composite developed was based on a Cu/ZnO catalyst dispersed into transparent aerogels. This allows efficient light transmission and a high surface area for the catalyst. An effective yet simple impregnation method was developed that allowed introduction of the composites into glass microchannels. The activation of the reaction was made using LEDs that covered all the sides of the reactor allowing a high power delivery. The results of the reaction show a stable process capable of low temperature transformations. PMID:26392210

  17. Optical properties and photocatalytic activities of tungsten oxide (WO3) with platinum co-catalyst addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widiyandari, Hendri; Firdaus, Iqbal; Kadarisman, Vincencius Gunawan Slamet; Purwanto, Agus

    2016-02-01

    This research reported the optical properties and photocatalytic activities of tungsten oxide with platinum co-catalyst addition (WO3/Pt) film. The platinum was deposited on the surface of WO3 particle using photo deposition method, while the film formation of WO3/Pt on the glass substrate was prepared using spray deposition method. The addition of Pt of 0, 1, 2, and 4 wt.% resulted that the energy band gap value of the films were shifted to 2.840, 2.752, 2.623 and 2.507 eV, respectively. The as-prepared films were tested for methylene blue (MB) dye photo-degradation using the LED (light emitting diode) lamp as a visible domestic source light. The enhancement of photocatalytic activity was observed after the addition of Pt as a co-catalyst. The degradation kinetics analysis of the photo-catalyst showed that the Pt addition resulted increasing of photo-catalysis reaction rate constant, k.

  18. Structure-Activity Relationship in Nanostructured Copper-Ceria-Based Preferential CO Oxidation Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Gamarra,D.; Munuera, G.; Hungria, A.; Fernandez-Garcia, M.; Conesa, J.; Midgley, P.; Wang, X.; Hanson, J.; Rodriguez, J.; Martinez-Arias, A.

    2007-01-01

    Two series of nanostructured oxidized copper-cerium catalysts with varying copper loadings, and prepared, respectively, by impregnation of ceria and by coprecipitation of the two components within reverse microemulsions, have been characterized in detail at structural and electronic levels by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM), X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) (including Ar{sup +}-sputtering), and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). These results have been correlated with analysis of their catalytic properties for preferential oxidation of CO in a H{sub 2}-rich stream (CO-PROX), complemented by Operando-DRIFTS. A relevant difference between the two series of catalysts concerns the nature of the support for the surface-dispersed copper oxide entities, which is essentially ceria for the samples prepared by impregnation and a Ce-Cu mixed oxide for those prepared by microemulsion-coprecipitation. The existence of copper segregation in the form of copper oxide or copper-enriched Cu-Ce mixed oxides for the latter type of samples is uniquely revealed by nanoprobe XEDS and XPS Ar{sup +}-sputtering experiments. The CO oxidation activity under CO-PROX conditions is correlated to the degree of support-promoted reduction achieved by the dispersed copper oxide particles under reaction conditions. Nevertheless, catalysts which display higher CO oxidation activity are generally more efficient also for the undesired H{sub 2} oxidation reaction. The balance between both reactions results in differences in the CO-PROX activity between the two series of catalysts which are examined on the basis of the structural differences found.

  19. Surface texture and physicochemical characterization of mesoporous carbon--wrapped Pd-Fe catalysts for low-temperature CO catalytic oxidation.

    PubMed

    Han, Weiliang; Zhang, Guodong; Zhao, Kun; Lu, Gongxuan; Tang, Zhicheng

    2015-11-21

    In this paper, mesoporous carbon (meso-C) with three-dimensional mesoporous channels was synthesized through a nanocasting route using three-dimensional mesoporous silica KIT-6 as the template. Mesoporous carbon wrapped Pd-Fe nanocomposite catalysts were synthesized by the co-precipitation method. The effects of the experimental conditions, such as pH value, Fe loading content and calcination temperature, on CO oxidation were studied in detail. The prepared Pd-Fe/meso-C catalysts showed excellent catalytic activity after optimizing the experimental conditions. The surface tetravalent Pd content, existing forms of Fe species, surface chemical adsorbed oxygen concentration, and pore channels of mesoporous carbon played vital roles in achieving the highest performance for the Pd-Fe/meso-C catalyst. The reaction pathway was conjectured according to the XPS analysis of the Pd-Fe/meso-C catalysts for CO oxidation, which maybe adhered to the Langmuir-Hinshelwood + redox mechanism. The effect of moisture on CO conversion was investigated, and the superior Pd-Fe/meso-C catalyst could maintain its activity beyond 12 h. This catalyst also showed excellent activity compared to the reported values in the existing literature. PMID:26456796

  20. Effect of the functional groups of carbon on the surface and catalytic properties of Ru/C catalysts for hydrogenolysis of glycerol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallegos-Suarez, E.; Pérez-Cadenas, M.; Guerrero-Ruiz, A.; Rodriguez-Ramos, I.; Arcoya, A.

    2013-12-01

    Ruthenium catalysts supported on activated carbons, original (AC) and treated with nitric acid (AC-Ox) were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation from either chloride (Cl) or nitroxyl nitrate (n) precursors. These catalysts were characterized by TG, XPS, TEM, TPD-MS and CO adsorption microcalorimetry and evaluated in the hydrogenolysis of glycerol in the liquid phase, at 453 K and 8 MPa. Studies by TEM show that ruthenium particles supported on AC-Ox are larger than on AC, without any effect of the nature of the metal precursor. However, adsorption of CO on the ex-chloride catalysts is inhibited in comparison with that of the ex-nitroxyl nitrate catalysts. Catalysts characterization by TG, TPD-MS and XPS reveals that the nitric acid treatment and the nitroxyl nitrate precursor generate oxygenated groups on the carbon surface, which provide acid properties to the catalysts, although they are partly destroyed during the reduction treatment applied to the catalysts. The sequence of the overall TOF, Ru(Cl)/AC < Ru(n)/AC < Ru(Cl)/AC-Ox ≈ Ru(n)/AC-Ox, reasonably parallels the population increase of surface acid groups. Participation of the sbnd COOH groups in the transformation of glycerol into 1,2-propanediol is verified by using the admixture Ru(Cl)/AC+AC-Ox as catalyst. In this case, since AC-Ox was not thermally treated and no loss of oxygenated groups occurred, TOF and selectivity toward 1,2-propanediol improve in comparison with those of the more active catalysts.

  1. Electro-catalytic activity of Ni–Co-based catalysts for oxygen evolution reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Hua; Li, Zhihu; Xu, Yanhui

    2015-04-15

    Graphical abstract: The electro-catalytic activity of different electro-catalysts with a porous electrode structure was compared considering the real electrode area that was evaluated by cyclic measurement. - Highlights: • Ni–Co-based electro-catalysts for OER have been studied and compared. • The real electrode area is calculated and used for assessing the electro-catalysts. • Exchange current and reaction rate constant are estimated. • Ni is more useful for OER reaction than Co. - Abstract: In the present work, Ni–Co-based electrocatalysts (Ni/Co = 0:6, 1:5, 2:4, 3:3, 4:2, 5:1 and 6:0) have been studied for oxygen evolution reaction. The phase structure has been analyzed by X-ray diffraction technique. Based on the XRD and SEM results, it is believed that the synthesized products are poorly crystallized. To exclude the disturbance of electrode preparation technology on the evaluation of electro-catalytic activity, the real electrode surface area is calculated based on the cyclic voltammetry data, assumed that the specific surface capacitance is 60 μF cm{sup −2} for metal oxide electrode. The real electrode area data are used to calculate the current density. The reaction rate constant of OER at different electrodes is also estimated based on basic reaction kinetic equations. It is found that the exchange current is 0.05–0.47 mA cm{sup −2} (the real surface area), and the reaction rate constant has an order of magnitude of 10{sup −7}–10{sup −6} cm s{sup −1}. The influence of the electrode potential on OER rate has been also studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique. Our investigation has shown that the nickel element has more contribution than the cobalt; the nickel oxide has the best electro-catalytic activity toward OER.

  2. Effect of Mo on the active sites of VPO catalysts upon the selective oxidation of n-butane

    SciTech Connect

    Irusta, S.; Boix, A.; Pierini, B.; Caspani, C.; Petunchi, J.

    1999-10-25

    The effect of the addition of Mo to VPO formulations on the physiochemical and catalytic properties of VPO solids was studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Laser Raman spectroscopy (LRS), temperature-programmed reduction, and a flow reactor system. The addition of Mo to the oxides increases the activity and selectivity of the VPO catalysts. The promoting effect is a function of both the Mo loading and the way such cation was added to the VPO matrix. The best catalyst was obtained when 1% Mo was impregnated on the NOHPO{sub 4}-0.5H{sub 2}O phase. At 400 C 36% of molar yield to maleic anhydride was obtained in this catalyst against 12% of the unpromoted catalysts and only 3% of the solids where Mo was added during the phosphatation step. The impregnated 1% Mo catalyst achieved a molar yield of 50% after 700 h under reaction stream (equilibrated catalysts). (VO){sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} was the only phase detected by XRD and LRS in all the catalysts studied. They showed comparable BET surface areas and crystallinity after 400 h under reaction conditions. A local order distortion of the O{sub 3}-P-O-P-O{sub 3} structure was detected by LRS in the impregnated Mo VPO catalysts. After 400 h on stream, both promoted and unpromoted solids only showed V{sup IV} on the surface layer. The main effect on the addition of Mo by impregnation to VPO oxides was enhanced by the very strong Lewis acid sites and the liability of the oxygen of (VO){sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}. This suggests that the promoting effect is more electronic in nature than structural. Polymeric MO{sub 3} species were detected neither by TPR nor by LRS. All the promoted catalysts presented a surface molybdenum enrichment but whereas the coprecipitated Mo VPO solid only shows surface Mo{sup VI}, both Mo{sup VI} coexist in the impregnated catalyst.

  3. Fe3-xCuxO4 as highly active heterogeneous Fenton-like catalysts toward elemental mercury removal.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Changsong; Sun, Lushi; Zhang, Anchao; Wu, Xiaofeng; Ma, Chuan; Su, Sheng; Hu, Song; Xiang, Jun

    2015-04-01

    A series of novel spinel Fe3-xCuxO4 (0active heterogeneous Fenton-like catalysts to remove elemental mercury (Hg0) from the simulated flue gases. Inductively coupled plasma-Atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, and X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS) were used to characterize the catalysts. The catalysts were confirmed the presence of the redox pairs Fesurf2+/Fesurf3+ and Cusurf+/Cusurf2+ on the surface of the cubic structure. The performance of heterogeneous Fenton-like reactions for Hg0 removal was evaluated in a lab-scale bubbling reactor at the solution temperature of 50°C. The systematic studies on the effects of different catalysts, H2O2 concentration and solution pH values on Hg0 removal efficiencies were performed. The recycling of the Fe3-xCuxO4 catalysts in Fenton-like solution is stable and Hg0 removal efficiency remain above 90% after 3 cycles. The active hydroxyl radical (OH) generated during heterogeneous Fenton-like reactions was confirmed through electron spin resonance (ESR) spin-trapping technique. The Hg0 removal mechanism has been discussed based on the experimental and analytical results. PMID:25655441

  4. Counting Active Sites on Titanium Oxide-Silica Catalysts for Hydrogen Peroxide Activation through In Situ Poisoning with Phenylphosphonic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, Todd R.; Boston, Andrew M.; Thompson, Anthony B.; Gray, Kimberly A.; Notestein, Justin M.

    2015-06-04

    Quantifying specific active sites in supported catalysts improves our understanding and assists in rational design. Supported oxides can undergo significant structural changes as surface densities increase from site-isolated cations to monolayers and crystallites, which changes the number of kinetically relevant sites. Herein, TiOx domains are titrated on TiOx–SiO2 selectively with phenylphosphonic acid (PPA). An ex situ method quantifies all fluid-accessible TiOx, whereas an in situ titration during cis-cyclooctene epoxidation provides previously unavailable values for the number of tetrahedral Ti sites on which H2O2 activation occurs. We use this method to determine the active site densities of 22 different catalysts with different synthesis methods, loadings, and characteristic spectra and find a single intrinsic turnover frequency for cis-cyclooctene epoxidation of (40±7) h-1. This simple method gives molecular-level insight into catalyst structure that is otherwise hidden when bulk techniques are used.

  5. Direct growth of carbon nanotubes on metal surfaces without an external catalyst and nanocomposite production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baddour, Carole Emilie

    The research work presented in this thesis deals with carbon nanotubes (CNTs), an allotrope of carbon with a cylindrical structure consisting of a rolled up graphene sheet. CNTs are generally produced by the decomposition of a carbon source in the presence of a metal catalyst at elevated temperatures. CNTs have outstanding properties and have attracted immense attention in both industry and academia. However, the development of commercial applications of CNTs is slow due to limitations in the large scale production of CNTs and their high cost. Another limitation is the interface resistance generated by external catalyst nanoparticles used in traditional CNT growth methods. In order to eliminate the interface resistance and simultaneously provide CNT growth over large surfaces and varying geometries, a method called direct CNT growth is established to enable the extraction of the CNT structure directly from the metal surface. The novel process for the production of CNTs developed in the present thesis is applied to planar surfaces and spherical particles made of stainless steel (SS) 304. The method is based on the establishment of nanometer scale structures at the surface which act as catalyst nanoparticles while at the same time being integral parts of the material. It uses first a mild chemical etching of the surface, followed by a specific heat treatment performed using either standard chemical vapour deposition (standard-CVD) or fluidized bed CVD (FBCVD) techniques. Acetylene (C2H2) is used as the carbon source and SS 304 acts as both the catalyst and the substrate in the growth process. This direct CNT growth with this substrate dual function eliminates the need of external catalyst nanoparticles deposited onto the surface. The active sites necessary for CNT growth are tailored on the SS itself by means of the two-step treatment process. MWNTs of 20-70 nm in diameter are produced. The CNTs are characterized by Raman Spectroscopy, Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA

  6. Surface and Structural Investigation of a MnOx Birnessite-Type Water Oxidation Catalyst Formed under Photocatalytic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Deibert, Benjamin J; Zhang, Jingming; Smith, Paul F; Chapman, Karena W; Rangan, Sylvie; Banerjee, Debasis; Tan, Kui; Wang, Hao; Pasquale, Nicholas; Chen, Feng; Lee, Ki-Bum; Dismukes, G Charles; Chabal, Yves J; Li, Jing

    2015-09-28

    Catalytically active MnOx species have been reported to form in situ from various Mn-complexes during electrocatalytic and solution-based water oxidation when employing cerium(IV) ammonium ammonium nitrate (CAN) oxidant as a sacrificial reagent. The full structural characterization of these oxides may be complicated by the presence of support material and lack of a pure bulk phase. For the first time, we show that highly active MnOx catalysts form without supports in situ under photocatalytic conditions. Our most active (4)MnOx catalyst (∼0.84 mmol O2  mol Mn(-1) s(-1)) forms from a Mn4O4 bearing a metal-organic framework. (4)MnOx is characterized by pair distribution function analysis (PDF), Raman spectroscopy, and HR-TEM as a disordered, layered Mn-oxide with high surface area (216 m(2) g(-1)) and small regions of crystallinity and layer flexibility. In contrast, the (S)MnOx formed from Mn(2+) salt gives an amorphous species of lower surface area (80 m(2) g(-1)) and lower activity (∼0.15 mmol O2  mol Mn(-1) s(-1)). We compare these catalysts to crystalline hexagonal birnessite, which activates under the same conditions. Full deconvolution of the XPS Mn2p3/2 core levels detects enriched Mn(3+) and Mn(2+) content on the surfaces, which indicates possible disproportionation/comproportionation surface equilibria. PMID:26263021

  7. Evaluation of fine-particle catalysts: Activity testing results and phase identification using Mossbauer spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Stohl, F.V.; Diegert, K.V.; Goodnow, D.; Rao, K.R.P.M.; Huggins, F.; Huffman, G.P.

    1994-10-01

    To evaluate and compare the activities/selectivities of fine- particle size catalysts being developed in the DOE/PETC Advanced Research (AR) Coal Liquefaction program by using standard coal liquefaction activity test procedures. Previously reported results have described the standard test procedure that was developed at Sandia to evaluate fine-particle size iron catalysts being developed in DOE/PETC`s AR Coal Liquefaction Program. This test uses DECS-17 Blind Canyon Coal, phenanthrene as the reaction solvent, and a factorial experimental design that enables evaluation of a catalyst over ranges of temperature (350 to 400{degrees}C), time (20 to 60 minutes), and catalyst loading (0 to 1 wt% on a dmmf coal basis). Testing has been performed on Pacific Northwest Laboratories` (PNL) 6-line ferrihydrite catalyst. Results showed that this catalyst is more active than the University of Pittsburgh`s sulfated iron oxide catalyst that was evaluated previously. PNL has also produced two additional batches of catalyst in an effort to optimize their preparation procedures for larger batches. Sandia has observed significant differences in activities among these three catalysts; these differences might be due to particle size effects, the type of drying procedure, or the amount of moisture present. Mossbauer characterization of the iron phases in the coal, catalyst precursors, and tetrahydrofuran (THF) insoluble material from liquefaction reactions has been performed on the University of Pittsburgh`s catalyst and the first PNL catalyst that was tested at Sandia. The Mossbauer results were obtained at the University of Kentucky and will be presented. Future work will include testing additional catalysts being developed in the AR Coal Liquefaction Program, developing procedures to characterize reaction products, and determining the kinetics of the reactions.

  8. The formation of silica, alumina and zirconia supported high surface area monometallic and bimetallic catalysts. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, R.D.

    1993-12-01

    During the current granting period, 12/01/92--11/30/93, studies have progressed along four fronts: (1) Preparation of high surface area Pt/SiO{sub 2} catalysts; (2) preparation of high surface area Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts; (3) preparation of high surface area promoted zirconia superacid catalysts and, (4) stabilization and sintering of porous Pt/SiO{sub 2} catalysts. In addition to these current studies a major review article on previously funded DOE research has been completed and will appear in Catalysis Reviews. Results of these studies are briefly described.

  9. Controlled leaching with prolonged activity for Co-LDH supported catalyst during treatment of organic dyes using bicarbonate activation of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Jawad, Ali; Li, Yibing; Lu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Zhuqi; Liu, Weidong; Yin, Guochuan

    2015-05-30

    The effluents from industries are commonly non-biodegradable and produce various hazardous intermediate products by chemical reactions that have direct impact on environment. In the present investigation, a series of Co-Mg/AL ternary LDH catalysts with fixed Mg/Al ratio were prepared by co-precipitation method. The effect of Co on the activity of the catalyst was monitored on the degradation of methylene blue (MB) as model compound at batch level using bicarbonate activation of H2O2 (BAP) system. On bench level, the best CoMgAl-4 catalyst can completely decolorize both methylene blue (MB) and methylene orange (MO) in short time, while in fixed bed, the catalyst was found stable for over 300 h with nearly 100% decolorization and excellent chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal. No leaching of Co was detected for the entire fixed experiment which may be accounted for long life stability and good activity of the catalyst. The ternary LDH catalysts were characterized by AES, XRD, FTIR, BET, and SEM for its compositional, phase structure, optical properties, textural, and surface morphology respectively. The XRD analysis confirmed characteristic pattern of hydrotalcite like structures without impurity phases. The formation of superoxide and hydroxyl radical as ROS was proposed with CoMgAl-4 by radical's scavengers. PMID:25725338

  10. Catalyst surfaces for the chromous/chromic redox couple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giner, J. D.; Cahill, K. J. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An electricity producing cell of the reduction-oxidation (REDOX) type divided into two compartments by a membrane is disclosed. A ferrous/ferric couple in a chloride solution serves as a cathode fluid to produce a positive electric potential. A chromic/chromous couple in a chloride solution serves as an anode fluid to produce a negative potential. The electrode is an electrically conductive, inert material plated with copper, silver or gold. A thin layer of lead plates onto the copper, silver or gold layer when the cell is being charged, the lead ions being available from lead chloride which has been added to the anode fluid. If the REDOX cell is then discharged, the lead deplates from the negative electrode and the metal coating on the electrode acts as a catalyst to increase current density.

  11. Catalyst surfaces for the chromous/chromic redox couple

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giner, J. D.; Cahill, K. J.

    1981-06-01

    An electricity producing cell of the reduction-oxidation (REDOX) type divided into two compartments by a membrane is disclosed. A ferrous/ferric couple in a chloride solution serves as a cathode fluid to produce a positive electric potential. A chromic/chromous couple in a chloride solution serves as an anode fluid to produce a negative potential. The electrode is an electrically conductive, inert material plated with copper, silver or gold. A thin layer of lead plates onto the copper, silver or gold layer when the cell is being charged, the lead ions being available from lead chloride which has been added to the anode fluid. If the REDOX cell is then discharged, the lead deplates from the negative electrode and the metal coating on the electrode acts as a catalyst to increase current density.

  12. Catalyst surfaces for the chromous/chromic REDOX couple

    SciTech Connect

    Giner, J.D.; Cahill, K.J.

    1981-06-01

    An electricity producing cell of the reduction-oxidation (REDOX) type divided into two compartments by a membrane is disclosed. A ferrous/ferric couple in a chloride solution serves as a cathode fluid to produce a positive electric potential. A chromic/chromous couple in a chloride solution serves as an anode fluid to produce a negative potential. The electrode is an electrically conductive, inert material plated with copper, silver or gold. A thin layer of lead plates onto the copper, silver or gold layer when the cell is being charged, the lead ions being available from lead chloride which has been added to the anode fluid. If the REDOX cell is then discharged, the lead deplates from the negative electrode and the metal coating on the electrode acts as a catalyst to increase current density.

  13. Oxovanadium(V) tetrathiacalix[4]arene complexes and their activity as oxidation catalysts.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Elke; Limberg, Christian

    2007-01-01

    With the aim of modeling reactive moieties and relevant intermediates on the surfaces of vanadium oxide based catalysts during oxygenation/dehydrogenation of organic substrates, mono- and dinuclear vanadium oxo complexes of doubly deprotonated p-tert-butylated tetrathiacalix[4]arene (H4TC) have been synthesized and characterized: PPh4[(H2TC)VOCl(2)] (1) and (PPh4)2[{(H2TC)V(O)(mu-O)}2] (2). According to the NMR spectra of the dissolved complexes they both retain the structures adopted in the crystalline state, as revealed by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. Compounds 1 and 2 were tested as catalysts for the oxidation of alcohols with O(2) at 80 degrees C. Both 1 and 2 efficiently catalyze the oxidation of benzyl alcohol, crotyl alcohol, 1-phenyl-1-propanol, and fluorenol, and in most cases dinuclear complex 2 is more active than mononuclear complex 1. Moreover, the two thiacalixarene complexes 1 and 2 are in many instances more active than oxovanadium(V) complexes containing "classical" calixarene ligands tested previously. Complexes 1 and 2 also show significant activity in the oxidation of dihydroanthracene. Further investigations led to the conclusion that 1 acts as precatalyst that is converted to the active species PPh4[(TC)V==O] (3) at 80 degrees C by double intramolecular HCl elimination. For complex 2, the results of mechanistic investigations indicated that the oxidation chemistry takes place at the bridging oxo ligands and that the two vanadium centers cooperate during the process. The intermediate (PPh4)2[{H2TCV(O)}2(mu-OH)(mu-OC13H9)] (4) was isolated and characterized, also with respect to its reactivity, and the results afforded a mechanistic proposal for a reasonable catalytic cycle. The implications which these findings gathered in solution may have for oxidation mechanisms on the surfaces of V-based heterogeneous catalysts are discussed. PMID:17566134

  14. Electron donor properties of claus catalysts--1. Influence of NaOH on the catalytic activity of silica gel

    SciTech Connect

    Dudzik, Z.; George, Z.M.

    1980-05-01

    ESR spectroscopy showed that SO/sub 2/ adsorbed on silica gel impregnated with NaOH formed the SO/sub 2//sup -/ anion radical. With increasing NaOH concentration, the SO/sub 2/ adsorption and the activity for the reaction of H/sub 2/S with SO/sub 2/ (Claus reaction) went through a maximum at 1.0-1.4% NaOH. The SO/sub 2/ anion radical apparently formed by electron transfer from the catalyst surface and was a reaction intermediate which reacted rapidly with H/sub 2/S. The NaOH catalyst had similar stability and activity as commercial alumina catalyst in five-day tests under Claus conditions.

  15. High-activity mesoporous Pt/Ru catalysts for methanol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Franceschini, Esteban A; Bruno, Mariano M; Williams, Federico J; Viva, Federico A; Corti, Horacio R

    2013-11-13

    High activity mesoporous Pt/Ru catalysts with 2D-hexagonal structure were synthesized using a triblock poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(propylene oxide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) copolymer (Pluronic F127) template. The normalized mass activities for the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) of the Pt/Ru catalysts with a regular array of pores is higher than those reported for nanoparticulated Pt/Ru catalysts. Different kinetic parameters, as Tafel slope and activation energy, were obtained for the MOR on the mesoporous catalysts. Results indicated that catalysts performance depends on pore size. Mass activities and the CO2 conversion efficiency for large pore size mesoporous catalysts (10 nm) are greater than those reported for smaller pore size mesoporous catalysts with similar composition. The effect of pore size on catalysts performance is related to the greater accessibility of methanol to the active areas inside large pores. Consequently, the overall residence time of methanol increases as compared with mesoporous catalyst with small pores. PMID:24083938

  16. A nanometric Rh overlayer on a metal foil surface as a highly efficient three-way catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Misumi, Satoshi; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Hinokuma, Satoshi; Sato, Tetsuya; Machida, Masato

    2016-01-01

    Pulsed arc-plasma (AP) deposition of an Rh overlayer on an Fe–Cr–Al stainless steel foil produced a composite material that exhibited high activity for automotive three-way catalysis (TWC). The AP pulses deposited metallic Rh nanoparticles 1–3 nm in size, whose density on the surface increased with the number of pulses. This led to coalescence and grain growth on the foil surface and the eventual formation of a uniform two-dimensional Rh overlayer. Full coverage of the 51 μm-thick flat foil by a 3.2 nm-thick Rh overlayer was achieved after 1,000 pulses. A simulated TWC reaction using a miniature honeycomb fabricated using flat and corrugated foils with the Rh overlayers exhibited successful light-off at a practical gaseous hourly space velocity of 1.2 × 105 h−1. The turnover frequency for the NO–CO reaction over the metallic honeycomb catalyst was ca. 80-fold greater than that achieved with a reference Rh/ZrO2-coated cordierite honeycomb prepared using a conventional wet impregnation and slurry coating procedure. Despite the nonporosity and low surface area of the foil-supported Rh overlayer compared with conventional powder catalysts (Rh/ZrO2), it is a promising alternative design for more efficient automotive catalysts that use less Rh loading. PMID:27388976

  17. A nanometric Rh overlayer on a metal foil surface as a highly efficient three-way catalyst.

    PubMed

    Misumi, Satoshi; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Hinokuma, Satoshi; Sato, Tetsuya; Machida, Masato

    2016-01-01

    Pulsed arc-plasma (AP) deposition of an Rh overlayer on an Fe-Cr-Al stainless steel foil produced a composite material that exhibited high activity for automotive three-way catalysis (TWC). The AP pulses deposited metallic Rh nanoparticles 1-3 nm in size, whose density on the surface increased with the number of pulses. This led to coalescence and grain growth on the foil surface and the eventual formation of a uniform two-dimensional Rh overlayer. Full coverage of the 51 μm-thick flat foil by a 3.2 nm-thick Rh overlayer was achieved after 1,000 pulses. A simulated TWC reaction using a miniature honeycomb fabricated using flat and corrugated foils with the Rh overlayers exhibited successful light-off at a practical gaseous hourly space velocity of 1.2 × 10(5) h(-1). The turnover frequency for the NO-CO reaction over the metallic honeycomb catalyst was ca. 80-fold greater than that achieved with a reference Rh/ZrO2-coated cordierite honeycomb prepared using a conventional wet impregnation and slurry coating procedure. Despite the nonporosity and low surface area of the foil-supported Rh overlayer compared with conventional powder catalysts (Rh/ZrO2), it is a promising alternative design for more efficient automotive catalysts that use less Rh loading. PMID:27388976

  18. A nanometric Rh overlayer on a metal foil surface as a highly efficient three-way catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misumi, Satoshi; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Hinokuma, Satoshi; Sato, Tetsuya; Machida, Masato

    2016-07-01

    Pulsed arc-plasma (AP) deposition of an Rh overlayer on an Fe–Cr–Al stainless steel foil produced a composite material that exhibited high activity for automotive three-way catalysis (TWC). The AP pulses deposited metallic Rh nanoparticles 1–3 nm in size, whose density on the surface increased with the number of pulses. This led to coalescence and grain growth on the foil surface and the eventual formation of a uniform two-dimensional Rh overlayer. Full coverage of the 51 μm-thick flat foil by a 3.2 nm-thick Rh overlayer was achieved after 1,000 pulses. A simulated TWC reaction using a miniature honeycomb fabricated using flat and corrugated foils with the Rh overlayers exhibited successful light-off at a practical gaseous hourly space velocity of 1.2 × 105 h‑1. The turnover frequency for the NO–CO reaction over the metallic honeycomb catalyst was ca. 80-fold greater than that achieved with a reference Rh/ZrO2-coated cordierite honeycomb prepared using a conventional wet impregnation and slurry coating procedure. Despite the nonporosity and low surface area of the foil-supported Rh overlayer compared with conventional powder catalysts (Rh/ZrO2), it is a promising alternative design for more efficient automotive catalysts that use less Rh loading.

  19. Fraction of platinum surface covered with carbonaceous species following hydrogenolysis of hexane on platinum alumina catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera Latas, F.J.

    1986-01-01

    Catalytic naphtha reforming plays a major role in satisfying the demand for unleaded, high octane gasoline. Hydrogen containing carbonaceous deposits (coke) accumulation on the surface of the catalysts during reforming operation. This study investigated the following question: what is the fraction of the platinum surface covered with the deposits following a typical reforming reaction. These observations prompted us to prepare a platinum-alumina catalyst with a high metal content (5%) to enhance the sensitivity of experiments designed to examine the platinum surface following hexane hydrogenolysis. The reaction was selected because it is a good model reaction for catalytic reforming and it was also studied by the Somorjai group in the higher temperature range of their work. Hydrogenolysis of hexane was carried out in a flow system for 3 h at 713 K, at atmospheric pressure, and around 0.1 total conversion. The catalyst was cooled down to room temperature in the reactant mixture, and the fraction of surface platinum atoms exposed was measured in situ by four independent methods: titration of adsorbed oxygen by dihydrogen, chemisorption of carbon monoxide, infra-red spectroscopy of carbon monoxide bonded to platinum, and rate of ethylene hydrogenation. Independent gravimetric studies showed that coke deposits of around 1% by weight were formed on the same catalyst during hydrogenolysis of hexane under similar conditions. Each of the four methods indicate that approximately 50% of the platinum surface remains exposed under the conditions.

  20. Surface Termination of M1 Phase and Rational Design of Propane Ammoxidation Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Guliants, Vadim

    2015-02-16

    This final report describes major accomplishments in this research project which has demonstrated that the M1 phase is the only crystalline phase required for propane ammoxidation to acrylonitrile and that a surface monolayer terminating the ab planes of the M1 phase is responsible for their activity and selectivity in this reaction. Fundamental studies of the topmost surface chemistry and mechanism of propane ammoxidation over the Mo-V-(Te,Sb)-(Nb,Ta)-O M1 and M2 phases resulted in the development of quantitative understanding of the surface molecular structure – reactivity relationships for this unique catalytic system. These oxides possess unique catalytic properties among mixed metal oxides, because they selectively catalyze three alkane transformation reactions, namely propane ammoxidation to acrylonitrile, propane oxidation to acrylic acid and ethane oxidative dehydrogenation, all of considerable economic significance. Therefore, the larger goal of this research was to expand this catalysis to other alkanes of commercial interest, and more broadly, demonstrate successful approaches to rational design of improved catalysts that can be applied to other selective (amm)oxidation processes.

  1. Highly active copper-network catalyst for the direct aldol reaction.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Hidetoshi; Uozumi, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Yoichi M A

    2011-09-01

    The development of a highly active solid-phase catechol-copper network catalyst for direct aldol reaction is described. The catalyst was prepared from an alkyl-chain-linked bis(catechol) and a copper(II) complex. The direct aldol reaction between carbonyl compounds (aldehydes and ketones) and methyl isocyanoacetate was carried out using 0.1-1 mol% [Cu] catalyst to give the corresponding oxazolines at yields of up to 99% and a trans/cis ratio of >99:1. The catalyst was reused with no loss of catalytic activity. A plausible reaction pathway is also described. PMID:21751405

  2. Enhancing low-temperature activity and durability of Pd-based diesel oxidation catalysts using ZrO2 supports

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, Mi -Young; Kyriakidou, Eleni A.; Choi, Jae -Soon; Toops, Todd J.; Binder, Andrew J.; Thomas, Cyril; Schwartz, Viviane; Chen, Jihua; Hensley, Dale K.; Parks, II, James E.

    2016-01-18

    In this study, we investigated the impact of ZrO2 on the performance of palladium-based oxidation catalysts with respect to low-temperature activity, hydrothermal stability, and sulfur tolerance. Pd supported on ZrO2 and SiO2 were synthesized for a comparative study. Additionally, in an attempt to maximize the ZrO2 surface area and improve sulfur tolerance, a Pd support with ZrO2-dispersed onto SiO2 was studied. The physicochemical properties of the catalysts were examined using ICP, N2 sorption, XRD, SEM, TEM, and NH3-, CO2-, and NOx-TPD. The activity of the Pd catalysts were measured from 60 to 600 °C in a flow of 4000 ppmmore » CO, 500 ppm NO, 1000 ppm C3H6, 4% O2, 5% H2O, and Ar balance. The Pd catalysts were evaluated in fresh, sulfated, and hydrothermally aged states. Overall, the ZrO2-containing catalysts showed considerably higher CO and C3H6 oxidation activity than Pd/SiO2 under the reaction conditions studied.« less

  3. Nanosized IrO(x)-Ir Catalyst with Relevant Activity for Anodes of Proton Exchange Membrane Electrolysis Produced by a Cost-Effective Procedure.

    PubMed

    Lettenmeier, Philipp; Wang, Li; Golla-Schindler, Ute; Gazdzicki, Pawel; Cañas, Natalia A; Handl, Michael; Hiesgen, Renate; Hosseiny, Seyed S; Gago, Aldo S; Friedrich, Kaspar A

    2016-01-11

    We have developed a highly active nanostructured iridium catalyst for anodes of proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis. Clusters of nanosized crystallites are obtained by reducing surfactant-stabilized IrCl3 in water-free conditions. The catalyst shows a five-fold higher activity towards oxygen evolution reaction (OER) than commercial Ir-black. The improved kinetics of the catalyst are reflected in the high performance of the PEM electrolyzer (1 mg(Ir) cm(-2)), showing an unparalleled low overpotential and negligible degradation. Our results demonstrate that this enhancement cannot be only attributed to increased surface area, but rather to the ligand effect and low coordinate sites resulting in a high turnover frequency (TOF). The catalyst developed herein sets a benchmark and a strategy for the development of ultra-low loading catalyst layers for PEM electrolysis. PMID:26616747

  4. Elucidating the mechanism and active site of the cyclohexanol dehydrogenation on copper-based catalysts: A density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ziyun; Liu, Xinyi; Rooney, D. W.; Hu, P.

    2015-10-01

    The dehydrogenation of cyclohexanol to cyclohexanone is very important in the manufacture of nylon. Copper-based catalysts are the most popular catalysts for this reaction, and on these catalysts the reaction mechanism and active site are in debate. In order to elucidate the mechanism and active site of the cyclohexanol dehydrogenation on copper-based catalysts, density functional theory with dispersion corrections were performed on up to six facets of copper in two different oxidation states: monovalent copper and metallic copper. By calculating the surface energies of these facets, Cu(111) and Cu2O(111) were found to be the most stable facets for metallic copper and for monovalent copper, respectively. On these two facets, all the possible elementary steps in the dehydrogenation pathway of cyclohexanol were calculated, including the adsorption, dehydrogenation, hydrogen coupling and desorption. Two different reaction pathways for dehydrogenation were considered on both surfaces. It was revealed that the dehydrogenation mechanisms are different on these two surfaces: on Cu(111) the hydrogen belonging to the hydroxyl is removed first, then the hydrogen belonging to the carbon is subtracted, while on Cu2O(111) the hydrogen belonging to the carbon is removed followed by the subtraction of the hydrogen in the hydroxyl group. Furthermore, by comparing the energy profiles of these two surfaces, Cu2O(111) was found to be more active for cyclohexanol dehydrogenation than Cu(111). In addition, we found that the coordinatively unsaturated copper sites on Cu2O(111) are the reaction sites for all the steps. Therefore, the coordinatively unsaturated copper site on Cu2O(111) is likely to be the active site for cyclohexanol dehydrogenation on the copper-based catalysts.

  5. Fischer-Tropsch activity for non-promoted cobalt-on-alumina catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Singleton, Alan H.; Oukaci, Rachid; Goodwin, James G.

    2001-01-01

    Cobalt catalysts, and processes employing these inventive catalysts, for hydrocarbon synthesis. The inventive catalyst comprises cobalt on an alumina support and is not promoted with any noble or near noble metals. In one aspect of the invention, the alumina support preferably includes a dopant in an amount effective for increasing the activity of the inventive catalyst. The dopant is preferably a titanium dopant. In another aspect of the invention, the cobalt catalyst is preferably reduced in the presence of hydrogen at a water vapor partial pressure effective to increase the activity of the cobalt catalyst for hydrocarbon synthesis. The water vapor partial pressure is preferably in the range of from 0 to about 0.1 atmospheres.

  6. Correlation between Fischer-Tropsch catalytic activity and composition of catalysts.

    PubMed

    Ali, Sardar; Mohd Zabidi, Noor Asmawati; Subbarao, Duvvuri

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the synthesis and characterization of monometallic and bimetallic cobalt and iron nanoparticles supported on alumina. The catalysts were prepared by a wet impregnation method. Samples were characterized using temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO), CO-chemisorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM-EDX) and N2-adsorption analysis. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) was carried out in a fixed-bed microreactor at 543 K and 1 atm, with H2/CO = 2 v/v and space velocity, SV = 12L/g.h. The physicochemical properties and the FTS activity of the bimetallic catalysts were analyzed and compared with those of monometallic cobalt and iron catalysts at similar operating conditions.H2-TPR analysis of cobalt catalyst indicated three temperature regions at 506°C (low), 650°C (medium) and 731°C (high). The incorporation of iron up to 30% into cobalt catalysts increased the reduction, CO chemisorption and number of cobalt active sites of the catalyst while an opposite trend was observed for the iron-riched bimetallic catalysts. The CO conversion was 6.3% and 4.6%, over the monometallic cobalt and iron catalysts, respectively. Bimetallic catalysts enhanced the CO conversion. Amongst the catalysts studied, bimetallic catalyst with the composition of 70Co30Fe showed the highest CO conversion (8.1%) while exhibiting the same product selectivity as that of monometallic Co catalyst. Monometallic iron catalyst showed the lowest selectivity for C5+ hydrocarbons (1.6%). PMID:22047220

  7. Correlation between Fischer-Tropsch catalytic activity and composition of catalysts

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the synthesis and characterization of monometallic and bimetallic cobalt and iron nanoparticles supported on alumina. The catalysts were prepared by a wet impregnation method. Samples were characterized using temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO), CO-chemisorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM-EDX) and N2-adsorption analysis. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) was carried out in a fixed-bed microreactor at 543 K and 1 atm, with H2/CO = 2 v/v and space velocity, SV = 12L/g.h. The physicochemical properties and the FTS activity of the bimetallic catalysts were analyzed and compared with those of monometallic cobalt and iron catalysts at similar operating conditions. H2-TPR analysis of cobalt catalyst indicated three temperature regions at 506°C (low), 650°C (medium) and 731°C (high). The incorporation of iron up to 30% into cobalt catalysts increased the reduction, CO chemisorption and number of cobalt active sites of the catalyst while an opposite trend was observed for the iron-riched bimetallic catalysts. The CO conversion was 6.3% and 4.6%, over the monometallic cobalt and iron catalysts, respectively. Bimetallic catalysts enhanced the CO conversion. Amongst the catalysts studied, bimetallic catalyst with the composition of 70Co30Fe showed the highest CO conversion (8.1%) while exhibiting the same product selectivity as that of monometallic Co catalyst. Monometallic iron catalyst showed the lowest selectivity for C5+ hydrocarbons (1.6%). PMID:22047220

  8. Catalyst surfaces for the chromous/chromic redox couple

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giner, J. D.; Cahill, K. J.

    1980-03-01

    An electricity producing cell of the reduction-oxidation (REDOX) type is described. The cell is divided into two compartments by a membrane, each compartment containing a solid inert electrode. A ferrous/ferric couple in a chloride solution serves as a cathode fluid which is circulated through one of the compartments to produce a positive electric potential disposed therein. A chromic/chromous couple in a chloride solution serves as an anode fluid which is circulated through the second compartment to produce a negative potential on an electrode disposed therein. The electrode is an electrically conductive, inert material plated with copper, silver or gold. A thin layer of lead plates onto the copper, silver or gold layer when the cell is being charged, the lead ions being available from lead chloride which was added to the anode fluid. If the REDOX cell is then discharged, the current flows between the electrodes causing the lead to deplate from the negative electrode and the metal coating on the electrode will act as a catalyst to cause increased current density.

  9. Catalyst surfaces for the chromous/chromic Redox couple

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, K.J.; Frosch, R.A.; Giner, J.D.

    1981-06-02

    There is disclosed an electricity producing cell of the reduction-oxidation (Redox) type divided into two compartments by a membrane, each compartment containing a solid inert electrode. A ferrous/ferric couple in a chloride solution serves as a cathode fluid which is circulated through one of the compartments to produce a positive electric potential disposed therein. A chromic/chromous couple in a chloride solution serves as an anode fluid which is circulated through the second compartment to produce a negative potential on an electrode disposed therein. The electrode is an electrically conductive, inert material plated with copper, silver or gold. A thin layer of lead plates onto the copper, silver or gold layer when the cell is being charged, the lead ions being available from lead chloride which has been added to the anode fluid. If the redox cell is then discharged, the current flows between the electrodes causing the lead to deplate from the negative electrode and the metal coating on the electrode will act as a catalyst to cause increased current density.

  10. Catalyst surfaces for the chromous/chromic redox couple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giner, J. D.; Cahill, K. J. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An electricity producing cell of the reduction-oxidation (REDOX) type is described. The cell is divided into two compartments by a membrane, each compartment containing a solid inert electrode. A ferrous/ferric couple in a chloride solution serves as a cathode fluid which is circulated through one of the compartments to produce a positive electric potential disposed therein. A chromic/chromous couple in a chloride solution serves as an anode fluid which is circulated through the second compartment to produce a negative potential on an electrode disposed therein. The electrode is an electrically conductive, inert material plated with copper, silver or gold. A thin layer of lead plates onto the copper, silver or gold layer when the cell is being charged, the lead ions being available from lead chloride which was added to the anode fluid. If the REDOX cell is then discharged, the current flows between the electrodes causing the lead to deplate from the negative electrode and the metal coating on the electrode will act as a catalyst to cause increased current density.

  11. Shape-selective catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch chemistry : atomic layer deposition of active catalytic metals. Activity report : January 1, 2005 - September 30, 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Cronauer, D. C.

    2011-04-15

    Argonne National Laboratory is carrying out a research program to create, prepare, and evaluate catalysts to promote Fischer-Tropsch (FT) chemistry - specifically, the reaction of hydrogen with carbon monoxide to form long-chain hydrocarbons. In addition to needing high activity, it is desirable that the catalysts have high selectivity and stability with respect to both mechanical strength and aging properties. The broad goal is to produce diesel fraction components and avoiding excess yields of both light hydrocarbons and heavy waxes. Originally the goal was to prepare shape-selective catalysts that would limit the formation of long-chain products and yet retain the active metal sites in a protected 'cage.' Such catalysts were prepared with silica-containing fractal cages. The activity was essentially the same as that of catalysts without the cages. We are currently awaiting follow-up experiments to determine the attrition strength of these catalysts. A second experimental stage was undertaken to prepare and evaluate active FT catalysts formed by atomic-layer deposition [ALD] of active components on supported membranes and particulate supports. The concept was that of depositing active metals (i.e. ruthenium, iron or cobalt) upon membranes with well defined flow channels of small diameter and length such that the catalytic activity and product molecular weight distribution could be controlled. In order to rapidly evaluate the catalytic membranes, the ALD coating processes were performed in an 'exploratory mode' in which ALD procedures from the literature appropriate for coating flat surfaces were applied to the high surface area membranes. Consequently, the Fe and Ru loadings in the membranes were likely to be smaller than those expected for complete monolayer coverage. In addition, there was likely to be significant variation in the Fe and Ru loading among the membranes due to difficulties in nucleating these materials on the aluminum oxide surfaces. The first

  12. Polymerization process for carboxyl containing polymers utilizing oil soluble ionic surface active agents

    SciTech Connect

    Uebele, C.E.; Ball, L.E.; Jorkasky, R.J. II; Wardlow, E. Jr.

    1987-09-08

    This patent describes a method for polymerizing olefinically unsaturated carboxylic acid monomers containing at least one activated carbon to carbon olefinic double bond and at least one carboxyl group. The monomers are polymerized in an organic media consisting essentially of organic liquids, in the presence of free radical forming catalysts and at least one oil soluble ionic surface active agent selected from the group consisting of: (a) anionic surface active agents; (b) cationic surface active agents; and (c) amphoteric surface active agents.

  13. Active sites and mechanisms for H2O2 decomposition over Pd catalysts.

    PubMed

    Plauck, Anthony; Stangland, Eric E; Dumesic, James A; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2016-04-01

    A combination of periodic, self-consistent density functional theory (DFT-GGA-PW91) calculations, reaction kinetics experiments on a SiO2-supported Pd catalyst, and mean-field microkinetic modeling are used to probe key aspects of H2O2 decomposition on Pd in the absence of cofeeding H2 We conclude that both Pd(111) and OH-partially covered Pd(100) surfaces represent the nature of the active site for H2O2 decomposition on the supported Pd catalyst reasonably well. Furthermore, all reaction flux in the closed catalytic cycle is predicted to flow through an O-O bond scission step in either H2O2 or OOH, followed by rapid H-transfer steps to produce the H2O and O2 products. The barrier for O-O bond scission is sensitive to Pd surface structure and is concluded to be the central parameter governing H2O2 decomposition activity. PMID:27006504

  14. Surface Tuning of La0.5Sr0.5CoO3 Perovskite Catalysts by Acetic Acid for NOx Storage and Reduction.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yue; Si, Wenzhe; Luo, Jinming; Su, Wenkang; Chang, Huazhen; Li, Junhua; Hao, Jiming; Crittenden, John

    2016-06-21

    Selective dissolution of perovskite A site (A of ABO3 structure) was performed on the La1 - xSrxCoO3 catalysts for the NOx storage and reduction (NSR) reaction. The surface area of the catalysts were enhanced using dilute HNO3 impregnation to dissolve Sr. Inactive SrCO3 was removed effectively within 6 h, and the catalyst preserved the perovskite framework after 24 h of treatment. The tuned catalysts exhibited higher NSR performance (both NOx storage and NO-to-NO2 oxidation) under lean-burn and fuel-rich cycles at 250 °C. Large amounts of NOx adsorption were due to the increase of nitrate/nitrite species bonding to the A site and the growth of newly formed monodentate nitrate species. Nitrate species were stored stably on the partial exposed Sr(2+) cations. These exposed Sr(2+) cations played an important role on the NOx reduction by C3H6. High NO-to-NO2 oxidation ability was due to the generation of oxygen defects and Co(2+)-Co(3+) redox couples, which resulted from B-site exsolution induced by A-site dissolution. Hence, our method is facile to modify the surface structures of perovskite catalysts and provides a new strategy to obtain highly active catalysts for the NSR reaction. PMID:27233105

  15. Activation and promotion studies in a mixed slurry reactor with an iron-manganese Fischer-Tropsch catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Pennline, H.W.; Zarochak, M.F.; Stencel, J.M.; Diehl, J.R.

    1987-03-01

    Synthesis gas was reacted over a coprecipitated iron-manganese Fischer-Tropsch catalyst in a slurry reactor. The effect of various activation parameters - temperature, pressure, and gas composition - on subsequent catalyst activity and product selectivity was investigated. The gas composition had the most dramatic effect on the catalyst activation and the ensuing synthesis gas conversion. The effect of potassium promotion on catalyst activity and product selectivity was also studied in slurry reactor tests.

  16. Ultrafast Electron Transfer Between Dye and Catalyst on a Mesoporous NiO Surface.

    PubMed

    Brown, Allison M; Antila, Liisa J; Mirmohades, Mohammad; Pullen, Sonja; Ott, Sascha; Hammarström, Leif

    2016-07-01

    The combination of molecular dyes and catalysts with semiconductors into dye-sensitized solar fuel devices (DSSFDs) requires control of efficient interfacial and surface charge transfer between the components. The present study reports on the light-induced electron transfer processes of p-type NiO films cosensitized with coumarin C343 and a bioinspired proton reduction catalyst, [FeFe](mcbdt)(CO)6 (mcbdt = 3-carboxybenzene-1,2-dithiolate). By transient optical spectroscopy we find that ultrafast interfacial electron transfer (τ ≈ 200 fs) from NiO to the excited C343 ("hole injection") is followed by rapid (t1/2 ≈ 10 ps) and efficient surface electron transfer from C343(-) to the coadsorbed [FeFe](mcbdt)(CO)6. The reduced catalyst has a clear spectroscopic signature that persists for several tens of microseconds, before charge recombination with NiO holes occurs. The demonstration of rapid surface electron transfer from dye to catalyst on NiO, and the relatively long lifetime of the resulting charge separated state, suggests the possibility to use these systems for photocathodes on DSSFDs. PMID:27314570

  17. Evaluation of the Two-Dimensional Performances of Low Activity Planar Catalysts: Development and Validation of a True Scanning Reactor.

    PubMed

    Marelli, M; Nemenyi, A; Dal Santo, V; Psaro, R; Ostinelli, L; Monticelli, D; Dossi, C; Recchia, S

    2016-01-11

    The development of a scanning reactor for planar catalysts is presented here. With respect to other existing models, this reactor is able to scan catalysts even with low turnover frequencies with a minimum sensed circular area of approximately 6 mm in diameter. The downstream gas analysis is performed with a quaprupole mass spectrometer. The apparatus performances are presented for two different reactions: the hydrogenation of butadiene over palladium films and the oxidation of CO over a gold/titania catalyst. With the final setup, true scans in both X and Y directions (or even in a previously defined complex directional pattern) are possible within a scan speed ranging from 0.1 to 5.0 mm/min. Finally, this apparatus aims at becoming a valuable tool for high throughput and combinatorial experimentation to test patterned active surfaces and catalytic libraries. PMID:26616670

  18. Creating single-atom Pt-ceria catalysts by surface step decoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvořák, Filip; Farnesi Camellone, Matteo; Tovt, Andrii; Tran, Nguyen-Dung; Negreiros, Fabio R.; Vorokhta, Mykhailo; Skála, Tomáš; Matolínová, Iva; Mysliveček, Josef; Matolín, Vladimír; Fabris, Stefano

    2016-02-01

    Single-atom catalysts maximize the utilization of supported precious metals by exposing every single metal atom to reactants. To avoid sintering and deactivation at realistic reaction conditions, single metal atoms are stabilized by specific adsorption sites on catalyst substrates. Here we show by combining photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning tunnelling microscopy and density functional theory calculations that Pt single atoms on ceria are stabilized by the most ubiquitous defects on solid surfaces--monoatomic step edges. Pt segregation at steps leads to stable dispersions of single Pt2+ ions in planar PtO4 moieties incorporating excess O atoms and contributing to oxygen storage capacity of ceria. We experimentally control the step density on our samples, to maximize the coverage of monodispersed Pt2+ and demonstrate that step engineering and step decoration represent effective strategies for understanding and design of new single-atom catalysts.

  19. Creating single-atom Pt-ceria catalysts by surface step decoration.

    PubMed

    Dvořák, Filip; Farnesi Camellone, Matteo; Tovt, Andrii; Tran, Nguyen-Dung; Negreiros, Fabio R; Vorokhta, Mykhailo; Skála, Tomáš; Matolínová, Iva; Mysliveček, Josef; Matolín, Vladimír; Fabris, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Single-atom catalysts maximize the utilization of supported precious metals by exposing every single metal atom to reactants. To avoid sintering and deactivation at realistic reaction conditions, single metal atoms are stabilized by specific adsorption sites on catalyst substrates. Here we show by combining photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning tunnelling microscopy and density functional theory calculations that Pt single atoms on ceria are stabilized by the most ubiquitous defects on solid surfaces--monoatomic step edges. Pt segregation at steps leads to stable dispersions of single Pt(2+) ions in planar PtO4 moieties incorporating excess O atoms and contributing to oxygen storage capacity of ceria. We experimentally control the step density on our samples, to maximize the coverage of monodispersed Pt(2+) and demonstrate that step engineering and step decoration represent effective strategies for understanding and design of new single-atom catalysts. PMID:26908356

  20. In situ studies of surface of NiFe2O4 catalyst during complete oxidation of methane

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Shiran; Shan, Junjun; Nie, Longhui; Nguyen, Luan; Wu, Zili; Tao, Franklin

    2015-12-21

    Here, NiFe2O4 with an inverse spinel structure exhibits high activity for a complete oxidation of methane at 400 °C–425 °C and a higher temperature. The surface of the catalyst and its adsorbates were well characterized with ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS) and in situ infrared spectroscopy (IR). In situ studies of the surface of NiFe2O4 using AP-XPS suggest the formation of methoxy-like and formate-like intermediates at a temperature lower than 200 °C, supported by the observed vibrational signatures in in situ IR studies. Evolutions of C1s photoemission features and the nominal atomic ratios of C/(Ni + Fe) of themore » catalyst surface suggest that the formate-like intermediate is transformed to product molecules CO2 and H2O in the temperature range of 250–300 °C. In situ studies suggest the formation of a spectator, – Olattice – CH2 – Olattice –. It strongly bonds to surface through C–O bonds and cannot be activated even at 400 °C.« less

  1. In situ studies of surface of NiFe2O4 catalyst during complete oxidation of methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shiran; Shan, Junjun; Nie, Longhui; Nguyen, Luan; Wu, Zili; Tao, Franklin (Feng)

    2016-06-01

    NiFe2O4 with an inverse spinel structure exhibits high activity for a complete oxidation of methane at 400 °C-425 °C and a higher temperature. The surface of the catalyst and its adsorbates were well characterized with ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS) and in situ infrared spectroscopy (IR). In situ studies of the surface of NiFe2O4 using AP-XPS suggest the formation of methoxy-like and formate-like intermediates at a temperature lower than 200 °C, supported by the observed vibrational signatures in in situ IR studies. Evolutions of C1s photoemission features and the nominal atomic ratios of C/(Ni + Fe) of the catalyst surface suggest that the formate-like intermediate is transformed to product molecules CO2 and H2O in the temperature range of 250-300 °C. In situ studies suggest the formation of a spectator, - Olatticesbnd CH2sbnd Olattice -. It strongly bonds to surface through Csbnd O bonds and cannot be activated even at 400 °C.

  2. Effects of various poisoning compounds on the activity and stereospecificity of heterogeneous Ziegler-Natta catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangjituabun, Kitti; Kim, Sang Yull; Hiraoka, Yuichi; Taniike, Toshiaki; Terano, Minoru; Jongsomjit, Bunjerd; Praserthdam, Piyasan

    2008-04-01

    A TiCl4/ethylbenzoate/MgCl2 Ziegler-Natta catalyst was pretreated with chemically different poisoning compounds to investigate their effects on the catalyst activity and stereospecificity for propylene polymerization. The poisoning power on the activity was in the order of methanol > acetone > ethyl acetate. A kinetic analysis using the stopped-flow method revealed that addition of the poisoning materials decreased the activity through the reduction of the number of active sites, whereas the catalyst isospecificity was hardly affected by these materials.

  3. Stabilizing a Platinum1 Single-Atom Catalyst on Supported Phosphomolybdic Acid without Compromising Hydrogenation Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Asakura, Hiroyuki; Zhang, Jia; Zhang, Jiaguang; De, Sudipta; Yan, Ning

    2016-07-11

    In coordination chemistry, catalytically active metal complexes in a zero- or low-valent state often adopt four-coordinate square-planar or tetrahedral geometry. By applying this principle, we have developed a stable Pt1 single-atom catalyst with a high Pt loading (close to 1 wt %) on phosphomolybdic acid(PMA)-modified active carbon. This was achieved by anchoring Pt on the four-fold hollow sites on PMA. Each Pt atom is stabilized by four oxygen atoms in a distorted square-planar geometry, with Pt slightly protruding from the oxygen planar surface. Pt is positively charged, absorbs hydrogen easily, and exhibits excellent performance in the hydrogenation of nitrobenzene and cyclohexanone. It is likely that the system described here can be extended to a number of stable SACs with superior catalytic activities. PMID:27240266

  4. A new iron-based carbon monoxide oxidation catalyst: structure-activity correlation.

    PubMed

    Schoch, Roland; Huang, Heming; Schünemann, Volker; Bauer, Matthias

    2014-12-01

    A new iron-based catalyst for carbon monoxide oxidation, as a potential substitute for precious-metal systems, has been prepared by using a facile impregnation method with iron tris-acetylacetonate as a precursor on γ-Al2 O3 . Light-off and full conversion temperatures as low as 235 and 278 °C can be reached. However, the catalytic activity strongly depends on the loading; lower loadings perform better than higher ones. The different activities can be explained by variations of the structures formed. The structures are thoroughly characterized by a multimethodic approach by using X-ray diffraction, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface areas, and Mössbauer spectroscopy combined with diffuse reflectance UV/Vis and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Consequently, isolated tetrahedrally coordinated Fe(3+) centers and phases of AlFeO3 are identified as structural requirements for high activity in the oxidation of carbon monoxide. PMID:25212843

  5. Surface characterization studies of CuO-CeO2-ZrO2 catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiulin; Xu, Lisi; Ning, Ping; Gu, Junjie; Guan, Qingqing

    2014-10-01

    A series of CuO-CeO2-ZrO2 catalysts were prepared by different methods and applied to the selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH3 reaction at low temperature. The results showed that the SCR activities, morphology, particles dimension, and the surface chemical state of CuO-CeO2-ZrO2 catalysts were obviously influenced by the preparation method. The SCR performance results showed that the CuO-CeO2-ZrO2 catalyst prepared by co-precipitation method presented the best activity in the temperature range of 125-180 °C. The characterization results showed that the Ce4+, Ce3+, Cu2+ and Cu+ species were coexistence in the CuO-CeO2-ZrO2 catalysts, and the Cu species mainly existed as Cu2+. It was also found that the high surface area, the synergistic effect between copper and ceria, enhanced acidity and the highly dispersed copper species were responsible for the high SCR activity of the CuO-CeO2-ZrO2 catalyst.

  6. Photogeneration of active formate decomposition catalysts to produce hydrogen from formate and water

    DOEpatents

    King, Jr., Allen D.; King, Robert B.; Sailers, III, Earl L.

    1983-02-08

    A process for producing hydrogen from formate and water by photogenerating an active formate decomposition catalyst from transition metal carbonyl precursor catalysts at relatively low temperatures and otherwise mild conditions is disclosed. Additionally, this process may be expanded to include the generation of formate from carbon monoxide and hydroxide such that the result is the water gas shift reaction.

  7. A Frontier Molecular Orbital determination of the active sites on dispersed metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, R.L.; Lahanas, K.M.

    1992-01-01

    An angular overlap calculation has been used to determine the s, p and d orbital energy levels of the different types of surface sites present on a dispersed metal catalysts. The basis for these calculations is the reported finding that a large number of catalyzed reactions take place on single atom active sites on the metal surface. Thus, these sites can be considered as surface complexes made up of the central active atom surrounded by near-neighbor metal atom ligands'' with localized surface orbitals perturbed only by these ligands''. These complexes'' are based on a twelve coordinate species with the ligands'' attached to the t{sub 2g} orbitals and the coordinate axes coincident with the direction of the e{sub g} orbitals on the central atom. These data can permit a Frontier Molecular Orbital treatment of specific site activities as long as the surface orbital availability for overlap with adsorbed substrates is considered along with its energy value and symmetry.

  8. A Frontier Molecular Orbital determination of the active sites on dispersed metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, R.L.; Lahanas, K.M.

    1992-11-01

    An angular overlap calculation has been used to determine the s, p and d orbital energy levels of the different types of surface sites present on a dispersed metal catalysts. The basis for these calculations is the reported finding that a large number of catalyzed reactions take place on single atom active sites on the metal surface. Thus, these sites can be considered as surface complexes made up of the central active atom surrounded by near-neighbor metal atom ``ligands`` with localized surface orbitals perturbed only by these ``ligands``. These ``complexes`` are based on a twelve coordinate species with the ``ligands`` attached to the t{sub 2g} orbitals and the coordinate axes coincident with the direction of the e{sub g} orbitals on the central atom. These data can permit a Frontier Molecular Orbital treatment of specific site activities as long as the surface orbital availability for overlap with adsorbed substrates is considered along with its energy value and symmetry.

  9. Catalyst dispersion and activity under conditions of temperature- staged liquefaction. [Catalyst precursors for molybdenum-based catalyst and iron-based catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.; Schobert, H.H.; Mitchell, G.D.; Artok, L.

    1992-07-01

    Two coals, a Texas subbituminous C and a Utah high volatile A bituminous, were used to examine the effects of solvent swelling and catalyst impregnation on liquefaction conversion behavior in temperature staged reactions for 30 minutes each at 275{degree} and 425{degree}C in H{sub 2} and 95:5 H{sub 2}:H{sub 2}S atmospheres. Methanol, pyridine, tetrahydrofuran, and tetrabutylammonium hydroxide were used as swelling agents. Molybdenum-based catalyst precursors were ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, molybdenum trisulfide, molybdenum hexacarbonyl, and bis(tricarbonylcyclopentadienyl-molybdenum). Ferrous sulfate and bis(dicarbonylcyclo-pentadienyliron) served as iron-based catalyst precursors. In addition, ion exchange was used for loading iron onto the subbituminous coal. For most experiments, liquefaction in H{sub 2}:H{sub 2}S was superior to that in H{sub 2}, regardless of the catalyst precursor. The benefit of the H{sub 2}S was greater for the subbituminous, presumably because of its higher iron content relative to the hvab coal. Tetrabutylammonium hydroxide was the only swelling agent to enhance conversion of the hvab coal significantly; it also caused a remarkable increase in conversion of the subbituminous coal. The combined application of solvent swelling and catalyst impregnation also improves liquefaction, mainly through increased oil yields from the hvab coal and increased asphaltenes from the subbituminous. A remarkable effect from use of ammonium tetrathiomolybdate as a catalyst precursor is substantial increase in pristane and phytane yields. Our findings suggest that these compounds are, at least in part, bound to the coal matrix.

  10. Searching for active binary rutile oxide catalyst for water splitting from first principles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Fang, Ya-Hui; Liu, Zhi-Pan

    2012-12-28

    Water electrolysis is an important route to large-scale hydrogen production using renewable energy, in which the oxygen evolution reaction (OER: 2H(2)O → O(2) + 4H(+) + 4e(-)) causes the largest energy loss in traditional electrocatalysts involving Ru-Ir mixed oxides. Following our previous mechanistic studies on the OER on RuO(2)(110) (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2010, 132, 18214), this work aims to provide further insight into the key parameters relevant to the activity of OER catalysts by investigating a group of rutile-type binary metal oxides, including RuNiO(2), RuCoO(2), RuRhO(2), RuIrO(2) and OsIrO(2). Two key aspects are focused on, namely the surface O coverage at the relevant potential conditions and the kinetics of H(2)O activation on the O-covered surfaces. The O coverage for all the oxides investigated here is found to be 1 ML at the concerned potential (1.23 V) with all the exposed metal cations being covered by terminal O atoms. The calculated free energy barrier for the H(2)O dissociation on the O covered surfaces varies significantly on different surfaces. The highest OER activity occurs at RuCoO(2) and RuNiO(2) oxides with a predicted activity about 500 times higher than pure RuO(2). On these oxides, the surface bridging O near the terminal O atom has a high activity for accepting the H during H(2)O splitting. It is concluded that while the differential adsorption energy of the terminal O atom influences the OER activity to the largest extent, the OER activity can still be tuned by modifying the electronic structure of surface bridging O. PMID:22941355

  11. Investigation of hybrid plasma-catalytic removal of acetone over CuO/γ-Al2O3 catalysts using response surface method.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinbo; Tu, Xin; Mei, Danhua; Zheng, Chenghang; Zhou, Jinsong; Gao, Xiang; Luo, Zhongyang; Ni, Mingjiang; Cen, Kefa

    2016-07-01

    In this work, plasma-catalytic removal of low concentrations of acetone over CuO/γ-Al2O3 catalysts was carried out in a cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor. The combination of plasma and the CuO/γ-Al2O3 catalysts significantly enhanced the removal efficiency of acetone compared to the plasma process using the pure γ-Al2O3 support, with the 5.0 wt% CuO/γ-Al2O3 catalyst exhibiting the best acetone removal efficiency of 67.9%. Catalyst characterization was carried out to understand the effect the catalyst properties had on the activity of the CuO/γ-Al2O3 catalysts in the plasma-catalytic reaction. The results indicated that the formation of surface oxygen species on the surface of the catalysts was crucial for the oxidation of acetone in the plasma-catalytic reaction. The effects that various operating parameters (discharge power, flow rate and initial concentration of acetone) and the interactions between these parameters had on the performance of the plasma-catalytic removal of acetone over the 5.0 wt% CuO/γ-Al2O3 catalyst were investigated using central composite design (CCD). The significance of the independent variables and their interactions were evaluated by means of the Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). The results showed that the gas flow rate was the most significant factor affecting the removal efficiency of acetone, whilst the initial concentration of acetone played the most important role in determining the energy efficiency of the plasma-catalytic process. PMID:27093635

  12. Effects of plasmochemical treatments and cerium additions on the structural characteristics and activity of copper catalyst particles in isopropanol dehydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platonov, E. A.; Lobanov, N. N.; Galimova, N. A.; Protasova, I. A.; Yagodovskii, V. D.

    2012-08-01

    The effect of the treatment of the 5 wt % Cu/SiO2 (I) and (5 wt % Cu + 0.5 wt % Ce)/SiO2 (II) catalysts with glow discharge plasma in O2, H2, and Ar on their structural characteristics was studied by X-ray phase analysis; the influence of cerium additions and plasmochemical treatments on the catalyst activity in isopropanol dehydrogenation was also investigated. Under the plasmochemical treatment, the diameters of Cu particles in catalyst I nearly doubled and microstresses in the metal particles also changed. Catalyst II was X-ray amorphous both before and after plasmochemical treatments. The activity of I after plasmochemical treatment increased because of the increase in the number of centers and changes in their composition. Growth of the activity of I compared with the activity of II was explained by the formation of new catalytic centers due to positive charging of the Ce+α adatom on the surface of the copper particle.

  13. Heterogeneous adsorption and catalytic oxidation of benzene, toluene and xylene over spent and chemically regenerated platinum catalyst supported on activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Wang Geun; Kim, Sang Chai

    2010-06-01

    The heterogeneous adsorption and catalytic oxidation of benzene, toluene and o-xylene (BTX) over the spent platinum catalyst supported on activated carbon (Pt/AC) as well as the chemically treated spent catalysts were studied to understand their catalytic and adsorption activities. Sulfuric aqueous acid solution (0.1N, H 2SO 4) was used to regenerate the spent Pt/AC catalyst. The physico-chemical properties of the catalysts in the spent and chemically treated states were analyzed by using nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherm and elemental analysis (EDX). The gravimetric adsorption and the light-off curve analysis were employed to study the BTX adsorption and oxidation on the spent catalyst and its modified Pt/AC catalysts. The experimental results indicate that the spent Pt/AC catalyst treated with the H 2SO 4 aqueous solution has a higher toluene adsorption and conversion ability than that of the spent Pt/AC catalyst. A further studies of H 2SO 4 treated Pt/AC catalyst on their catalytic and heterogeneous adsorption behaviours for BTX revealed that the activity of the H 2SO 4 treated Pt/AC catalyst follows the sequence of benzene > toluene > o-xylene. The adsorption equilibrium isotherms of BTX on the H 2SO 4 treated Pt/AC were measured at different temperatures ranging from 120 to 180 °C. To correlate the equilibrium data and evaluate their adsorption affinity for BTX, the two sites localized Langmuir (L2m) isotherm model was employed. The heterogeneous surface feature of the H 2SO 4 treated Pt/AC was described in detail with the information obtained from the results of isosteric enthalpy of adsorption and adsorption energy distributions. Furthermore, the activity of H 2SO 4 treated Pt/AC about BTX was found to be directly related to the Henry's constant, isosteric enthalpy of adsorption and adsorption energy distribution functions.

  14. Synthesis and chemical functionalization of high surface area dendrimer-based xerogels and their use as new catalyst supports

    SciTech Connect

    Kriesel, J.W.; Tilley, T.D.

    2000-04-01

    Second- and third-generation alkoxysilyl-terminated carbosilane dendrimers have been used as building blocks for the synthesis of high surface area xerogels, which were characterized by {sup 29}Si CP MAS NMR spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption/desorption porosimetry, IR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). These gels were shown to be very selective and significantly more active (in terms of yield and initial rate) than the Shell catalyst derived from treatment of silica with Ti(O{sup i}Pr){sub 4}.

  15. Distinguishing molecular environments in supported Pt catalysts and their influences on activity and selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Louis Chin

    This thesis entails the synthesis, automated catalytic testing, and in situ molecular characterization of supported Pt and Pt-alloy nanoparticle (NP) catalysts, with emphasis on how to assess the molecular distributions of Pt environments that are affecting overall catalytic activity and selectivity. We have taken the approach of (a) manipulating nucleation and growth of NPs using oxide supports, surfactants, and inorganic complexes to create Pt NPs with uniform size, shape, and composition, (b) automating batch and continuous flow catalytic reaction tests, and (c) characterizing the molecular environments of Pt surfaces using in situ infrared (IR) spectroscopy and solid-state 195Pt NMR. The following will highlight the synthesis and characterization of Ag-doped Pt NPs and their influence on C 2H2 hydrogenation selectivity, and the implementation of advanced solid-state 195Pt NMR techniques to distinguish how distributions of molecular Pt environments vary with nanoparticle size, support, and surface composition.

  16. Precious metal-free catalyst for purification of automotive exhausts: NO dissociation on Cu oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Hideaki; Padama, Allan Abraham; Moreno, Joaquin Lorenzo

    2014-03-01

    The dissociation of NOx molecule on catalysts is the rate-limiting step for its reduction process and is the subject of recent investigations related to exhaust gas purification. Three-way catalysts which are composed of Rh, Pd and Pt, are known to work well for such purpose; however, their expensive cost hinders their applicability. In this work, Computational Materials Design based on density functional theory was employed to test the efficiency of Cu-based catalysts for NO dissociation. It was found that the dissociation path of NO on Cu-terminated Cu2O(111) and CuO(110) surfaces is comparable with Rh(111). This is attributed to the modified electronic structure of the surface Cu atoms of Cu oxides in comparison with Cu(111). The calculated NO dissociation barriers are lower and the binding energies of co-adsorbed N and O atoms are weaker on Cu oxides than on Rh(111), which is favorable for subsequent reactions. Our experimental collaborator had also verified that Cu oxides can be better catalysts than Rh, Pd and Pt for the purification of exhaust gases. The details of this work and the oxidation of CO in the presence of dissociated NO will be discussed in the meeting.

  17. Structure and Activity of Pt-Ni Catalysts Supported on Modified Al2O3 for Ethanol Steam Reforming.

    PubMed

    Navarro, R M; Sanchez-Sanchez, M C; Fierro, J L G

    2015-09-01

    Modification of alumina with La-, Ce-, Zr- and Mg-oxides was studied with the aim to use them as supports of bimetallic Pt-Ni catalysts for the steam reforming of ethanol. Activity results showed that modifications of Al2O3 support with the incorporation of La, Ce, Zr or Mg oxides play an essential role in the catalytic behaviour of PtNi catalysts. Bimetallic PtNi catalyst supported on bare Al2O3 showed evolution of the reaction products with time on stream consisting in the increase of C2H4 production with concomitant decrease of CH4 and CO2 production. The addition of Mg or Zr to γ-A1203 did not inhibit the appearance of ethylene but delayed its production. In the case of Ce- or La-supported catalysts, the product selectivities were stable with time-on-stream, with no changes being observed in the product distribution for 24 h. Characterization results showed that La- and Ce-containing supports improves the Pt and Ni metal exposure values. The better stability achieved for Ce and La containing catalysts was inferred to be related with a participation/assistance of lanthanum and cerium entities in the gasification of coke deposits together with a modification of Pt and Ni dispersion which lower the probability of the nucleation of coke precursors on their surfaces. PMID:26716216

  18. Surface structure and reaction property of CuCl2-PdCl2 bimetallic catalyst in methanol oxycarbonylation: A DFT approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qingsen; Wang, Shengping; Shen, Yongli; Yan, Bing; Wu, Yuanxin; Ma, Xinbin

    2014-02-01

    Surface structure of CuCl2-PdCl2 bimetallic catalyst (Wacker-type catalyst) was built employing density functional theory (DFT) calculations, and the reaction mechanism of methanol oxycarbonylation over the CuCl2-PdCl2 surfaces was also investigated. On the CuCl2-PdCl2 surface, the active site for methanol oxidation was confirmed as Cu-Cl-Cu (Pd). Comparing with pure CuCl2 surface, the introduction of Pd atom causes the electron repopulation on the surface and lowers the energy barrier for methanol oxidation, but the number of the active site decreases with the increasing of Pd doping volume. Agreed with previous experimental results, the Pd site is most favorable for the CO insertion, indicated by the lowest activation barrier for the formation of COOCH3 on Pd atom. The lowest energy barrier for the formation of DMC appears when COOCH3 species adsorbed on Pd atom and methoxyl adsorbed on Cu atoms, which is 0.42 eV. Finally, the reconstruction of the unsaturated surface is a spontaneous and exothermic process. Comparing with other surfaces, the rate-limiting step, methanol oxidation, on CuCl2-PdCl2 surface with Pd/Cu = 1:17 has the lowest energy barrier, which is agreed with the experimental observation that PdCl2-CuCl2 catalyst with Pd/Cu = 1:20 has the favorable activity. The adsorbed methoxyl will further lower the activation barrier of methanol oxidation, which is agreed with experimental observation that the Wacker-type catalysts have an induction period in the methanol oxidative carbonylation system.

  19. Irreversible Catalyst Activation Enables Hyperpolarization and Water Solubility for NMR Signal Amplification by Reversible Exchange

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Activation of a catalyst [IrCl(COD)(IMes)] (IMes = 1,3-bis(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)imidazol-2-ylidene; COD = cyclooctadiene)] for signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) was monitored by in situ hyperpolarized proton NMR at 9.4 T. During the catalyst-activation process, the COD moiety undergoes hydrogenation that leads to its complete removal from the Ir complex. A transient hydride intermediate of the catalyst is observed via its hyperpolarized signatures, which could not be detected using conventional nonhyperpolarized solution NMR. SABRE enhancement of the pyridine substrate can be fully rendered only after removal of the COD moiety; failure to properly activate the catalyst in the presence of sufficient substrate can lead to irreversible deactivation consistent with oligomerization of the catalyst molecules. Following catalyst activation, results from selective RF-saturation studies support the hypothesis that substrate polarization at high field arises from nuclear cross-relaxation with hyperpolarized 1H spins of the hydride/orthohydrogen spin bath. Importantly, the chemical changes that accompanied the catalyst’s full activation were also found to endow the catalyst with water solubility, here used to demonstrate SABRE hyperpolarization of nicotinamide in water without the need for any organic cosolvent—paving the way to various biomedical applications of SABRE hyperpolarization methods. PMID:25372972

  20. Copper catalyst activation driven by photoinduced electron transfer: a prototype photolatent click catalyst.

    PubMed

    Harmand, Lydie; Cadet, Sarah; Kauffmann, Brice; Scarpantonio, Luca; Batat, Pinar; Jonusauskas, Gediminas; McClenaghan, Nathan D; Lastécouères, Dominique; Vincent, Jean-Marc

    2012-07-16

    PET cat. While the copper(II) tren ketoprofenate precatalyst 1 (see picture) is inactive at room temperature in methanol, it is quantitatively and rapidly reduced to its cuprous state upon light irradiation to provide a highly reactive click catalyst. By simply introducing air into the reaction medium the catalysis can be switched off and then switched on again by bubbling argon followed by irradiation. PMID:22777953

  1. Interaction of carbon monoxide and oxygen at the surface of inverse titania/Au model catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magkoev, Tamerlan T.

    2007-07-01

    Interaction of carbon monoxide and oxygen on the surface of titania/Au(1 1 1) inverse model catalyst held at 200 K has been studied by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy. It was found that CO adsorbs on the oxide/Au perimeter interface, whereas no or very weak adsorption was observed on Au(1 1 1) or titania surface, respectively. Exposing of such species to oxygen results in their decay possibly due to carbon dioxide formation. Efficiency of this effect is higher at lower CO initial concentration which points at the importance of free surface sites for the reaction process.

  2. Surface characterization studies on the interaction of V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalyst for low temperature SCR of NO with NH3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shule; Zhong, Qin

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at elucidating the surface characterization of V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalyst to investigate the interaction of V, W and Ti species for the improvement of the catalytic activity in the SCR reaction at low-temperature. Analysis by XRD, UV-vis, PL spectra and DFT theoretical calculations, XPS, EPR and in situ DRIFT showed that WO3 could interact with TiO2 to improve the electrons transfer, and the WO3 hybridization with V2O5 could also improve the reducibility and formation of reduced V2O5 species for the V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalyst. These aspects resulted in the NO oxidation and NO3 - decomposition that were responsible for the high catalytic activity of V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalyst.

  3. Chemisorbed Oxygen on the Surface of Catalyst-Improved Cataluminescence Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Siming; Shi, Wenying; Lu, Chao

    2016-05-01

    It is a critical scientific challenge to improve the selectivity of cataluminescence (CTL). Chemisorbed oxygen on the surface of catalysts is one of the essential factors for catalytic oxidization of gaseous reactant molecules during the CTL process. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the influence of chemisorbed oxygen on the CTL. There exists different chemisorbed oxygen content on the surface of Y2O3 and its precursor, layered rare-earth yttrium hydroxides (Y-NO3-LRHs). In this work, both of them were employed as catalyst models to catalytically oxidize common volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in order to explore the relationship between chemisorbed oxygen and CTL selectivity. It was found that LRHs demonstrated a superior selectivity toward ethyl ether in comparison with Y2O3. The mechanism study showed that only ethyl ether demonstrated the CTL behavior through the catalytical oxidation into CH3CHO* intermediates on the surface of LRHs, while no CTL emissions occurred for the other VOCs because the insufficient chemisorbed oxygen of LRHs was incapable of oxidizing these VOCs into CO2* intermediates. In addition, the luminescent rare-earth Eu(3+) ions were doped in Y-NO3-LRHs to further improve the CTL intensity of ethyl ether through the efficient energy transfer between CH3CHO* intermediates and Eu(3+) ions. Our work opens up a new route to improve CTL selectivity by tuning the chemisorbed oxygen on the surface of catalysts, different from the previous strategies of exploiting new solid catalysts or decreasing CTL reaction temperature. PMID:27054376

  4. Identifying low-coverage surface species on supported noble metal nanoparticle catalysts by DNP-NMR.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Robert L; Perras, Frédéric A; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Schwartz, Thomas J; Dumesic, James A; Shanks, Brent H; Pruski, Marek

    2016-01-31

    DNP-NMR spectroscopy has been applied to enhance the signal for organic molecules adsorbed on γ-Al2O3-supported Pd nanoparticle catalysts. By offering >2500-fold time savings, the technique enabled the observation of (13)C-(13)C cross-peaks for low coverage species, which were assigned to products from oxidative degradation of methionine adsorbed on the nanoparticle surface. PMID:26675287

  5. Microwave and Beam Activation of Nanostructured Catalysts for Environmentally Friendly, Energy Efficient Heavy Crude Oil Processing

    SciTech Connect

    2009-03-01

    This factsheet describes a study whose goal is initial evaluation and development of energy efficient processes which take advantage of the benefits offered by nanostructured catalysts which can be activated by microwave, RF, or radiation beams.

  6. Crystallographic dependence of CO activation on cobalt catalysts: HCP versus FCC.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-Xun; Su, Hai-Yan; Sun, Da-Peng; Zhang, Bing-Yan; Li, Wei-Xue

    2013-11-01

    Identifying the structure sensitivity of catalysts in reactions, such as Fischer-Tropsch synthesis from CO and H2 over cobalt catalysts, is an important yet challenging issue in heterogeneous catalysis. Based on a first-principles kinetic study, we find for the first time that CO activation on hexagonal close-packed (HCP) Co not only has much higher intrinsic activity than that of face centered-cubic (FCC) Co but also prefers a different reaction route, i.e., direct dissociation with HCP Co but H-assisted dissociation on the FCC Co. The origin is identified from the formation of various denser yet favorable active sites on HCP Co not available for FCC Co, due to their distinct crystallographic structure and morphology. The great dependence of the activity on the crystallographic structure and morphology of the catalysts revealed here may open a new avenue for better, stable catalysts with maximum mass-specific reactivity. PMID:24147726

  7. Electroreduction of carbon monoxide over a copper nanocube catalyst: Surface structure and pH dependence on selectivity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Roberts, F. Sloan; Kuhl, Kendra P.; Nilsson, Anders

    2016-02-16

    The activity and selectivity for CO2/CO reduction over copper electrodes is strongly dependent on the local surface structure of the catalyst and the pH of the electrolyte. Here we investigate a unique, copper nanocube surface (CuCube) as a CO reduction electrode under neutral and basic pH, using online electrochemical mass spectroscopy (OLEMS) to determine the onset potentials and relative intensities of methane and ethylene production. To relate the unique selectivity to the surface structure, the CuCube surface reactivity is compared to polycrystalline copper and three single crystals under the same reaction conditions. Here, we find that the high selectivity formore » ethylene over the CuCube surface is most comparable to the Cu(100) surface, which has the cubic unit cell. However, the suppression of methane production over CuCube is unique to that particular surface. Basic pH is also shown to enhance ethylene selectivity on all surfaces, again with the CuCube surface being unique.« less

  8. Catalyst dispersion and activity under conditions of temperature-staged liquefaction. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.; Schobert, H.H.; Mitchell, G.D.; Artok, L.

    1993-02-01

    This research program involves the investigation of the use of highly dispersed catalyst precursors for the pretreatment of coals by mild hydrogenation. During the course of this effort solvent preswelling of the coal was evaluated as a means of deeply impregnating catalysts into coal, active phases of catalysts under reaction conditions were studied and the impact of these techniques were evaluated during pretreatment and temperature-staged liquefaction. Two coals, a Texas subbituminous and a Utah high volatile A bituminous, were used to examine the effects of solvent swelling pretreatment and catalyst impregnation on conversion behavior at 275{degrees}C, representative of the first, low-temperature stage in a temperature-staged liquefaction reaction. Ferrous sulfate, iron pentacarbonyl, ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, and molybdenum hexacarbonyl were used as catalyst precursors. Without swelling pretreatment, impregnation of both coals increased conversion, mainly through increased yields of preasphaltenes.

  9. Catalyst dispersion and activity under conditions of temperature-staged liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.; Schobert, H.H.; Mitchell, G.D.; Artok, L.

    1993-02-01

    This research program involves the investigation of the use of highly dispersed catalyst precursors for the pretreatment of coals by mild hydrogenation. During the course of this effort solvent preswelling of the coal was evaluated as a means of deeply impregnating catalysts into coal, active phases of catalysts under reaction conditions were studied and the impact of these techniques were evaluated during pretreatment and temperature-staged liquefaction. Two coals, a Texas subbituminous and a Utah high volatile A bituminous, were used to examine the effects of solvent swelling pretreatment and catalyst impregnation on conversion behavior at 275[degrees]C, representative of the first, low-temperature stage in a temperature-staged liquefaction reaction. Ferrous sulfate, iron pentacarbonyl, ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, and molybdenum hexacarbonyl were used as catalyst precursors. Without swelling pretreatment, impregnation of both coals increased conversion, mainly through increased yields of preasphaltenes.

  10. Europa's Active Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    A newly discovered impact crater can be seen just right of the center of this image of Jupiter's moon Europa returned by NASA's Galileo spacecraft camera. The crater is about 30 kilometers (18.5 miles) in diameter. The impact excavated into Europa's icy crust, throwing debris (seen as whitish material) across the surrounding terrain. Also visible is a dark band, named Belus Linea, extending east-west across the image. This type of feature, which scientists call a 'triple band,' is characterized by a bright stripe down the middle. The outer margins of this and other triple bands are diffuse, suggesting that the dark material was put there as a result of possible geyser-like activity which shot gas and rocky debris from Europa's interior. The curving 'X' pattern seen in the lower left corner of the image appears to represent fracturing of the icy crust and infilling by slush which froze in place. The crater is centered at about 2 degrees north latitude by 239 degrees west longitude. The image was taken from a distance of 156,000 kilometers (about 96,300 miles) on June 27, 1996, during Galileo's first orbit around Jupiter. The area shown is 860 by 700 kilometers (530 by 430 miles), or about the size of Oregon and Washington combined. The Galileo mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  11. Influence of reductive pretreatments on the activity and selectivity of vanadium-phosphorus oxide catalysts for n-butane partial oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Hodnett, B.K.; Delmon, B.

    1984-11-01

    The catalytic activities for n-butane conversion to maleic anhydride of two series of vanadium-phosphorus oxide catalysts with phosphorus:vanadium ratios in the range 0.94 to 1.10 and calcined at 773 or 923 K were compared before and after reduction by hydrogen. In almost all cases studied, reduction gave rise to increased conversion, and for catalysts with low phosphorus:vanadium ratios increased selectivity was also noted. When n-butane was contacted with these catalysts in the absence of gas phase oxygen, maleic anhydride and total oxidation products continued to be formed until changes in average oxidation state of vanadium of up to -1.5 were recorded. From considerations of the dynamic state of the catalysts during catalysis, it was concluded that a morphology consisting of oxidized surface layers on a reduced core favors high activities and selectivities for this process.

  12. Morphology-dependent bactericidal activities of Ag/CeO2 catalysts against Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lian; He, Hong; Yu, Yunbo; Sun, Li; Liu, Sijin; Zhang, Changbin; He, Lian

    2014-06-01

    Silver-loaded CeO2 nanomaterials (Ag/CeO2) including Ag/CeO2 nanorods, nanocubes, nanoparticles were prepared with hydrothermal and impregnation methods. Catalytic inactivation of Escherichia coli with Ag/CeO2 catalysts through the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was investigated. For comparison purposes, the bactericidal activities of CeO2 nanorods, nanocubes and nanoparticles were also studied. There was a 3-4 log order improvement in the inactivation of E. coli with Ag/CeO2 catalysts compared with CeO2 catalysts. Temperature-programmed reduction of H2 showed that Ag/CeO2 catalysts had higher catalytic oxidation ability than CeO2 catalysts, which was the reason for that Ag/CeO2 catalysts exhibited stronger bactericidal activities than CeO2 catalysts. Further, the bactericidal activities of CeO2 and Ag/CeO2 depend on their shapes. Results of 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide spin-trapping measurements by electron spin resonance and addition of catalase as a scavenger indicated the formation of OH, O2(-), and H2O2, which caused the obvious bactericidal activity of catalysts. The stronger chemical bond between Ag and CeO2 nanorods led to lower Ag(+) elution concentrations. The toxicity of Ag(+) eluted from the catalysts did not play an important role during the bactericidal process. Experimental results also indicated that Ag/CeO2 induced the production of intracellular ROS and disruption of the cell wall and cell membrane. A possible production mechanism of ROS and bactericidal mechanism of catalytic oxidation were proposed. PMID:24662462

  13. Design of a high activity and selectivity alcohol catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, H.C.; Mills, G.A.

    1992-02-07

    Results of the pyridine adsorption, studies on native and K-doped alumina provide fundamental grounding for the observed methanol dehydration activity of these samples. Both the reactor studies and the pyridine adsorption studies support the conclusion that the K-doped sample had reduced Lewis acidity. Moreover, we were able to measurably alter the acidity of the support surface by our ion exchange treatment. More significantly, when reactor results for transition-metal loaded samples are reconsidered in combination with their surface characteristics suggested by our pyridine adsorption studies, our hypothesis that Rh and Mo have ultimately titrated the support surface seems all the more convincing. Hence, in light of the pyridine adsorption results, the attenuation of a transition-metal based decomposition pathway for methanol on the metal-loaded samples-as seen in the reactor testing-is all the more reasonable.

  14. Activity and stability of nanostructured gold-cerium oxide catalysts for the water-gas shift reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Qi

    Advanced low-temperature water-gas shift (LTS) catalysts of high activity and stability are under development to produce essentially CO-free hydrogen to feed PEM fuel cells for power generation. Materials based on nanocrystalline cerium oxide (ceria) are among the most promising LTS catalysts. Understanding the structural properties relationship with the WGS activity is fundamentally important in order to rational design the catalysts. Various gold structures, such as metallic gold nanoparticles, cluster and cations were found in gold-ceria sample containing 4--8 at% gold. To discriminate between the various gold species, leaching of the gold-ceria in sodium cyanide was conducted. The metallic gold and all other gold species not in close association with ceria were removed by leaching. A small amount of gold remained in the leached samples. The exact content of non-leachable gold was a function of the parent catalyst properties. Similar data were collected from Pt-ceria samples. STEM or HRTEM, coupled with EDX showed no gold or platinum particles remaining; only what appeared to be very fine clusters or atomically dispersed gold or platinum. Cationic gold or platinum was identified in these samples by XPS. The unexpected finding was that the catalytic activity of the leached samples was similar or slightly better than that of the parent catalyst after removal of the metallic gold or platinum particles by cyanide leaching. Thus, metallic nanoparticles are not necessary; they are mere spectators in the water-gas shift reaction. Nonmetallic gold or platinum species strongly associated with surface cerium-oxygen groups are responsible for the activity, since the extra gold or platinum present in the parent material does not increase the reaction rate; nor does it change the activation energy of the reaction. The importance of the oxide support properties became clear by this work. The amount of gold or platinum retained in active form depends on the surface properties

  15. Stable and catalytically active iron porphyrin-based porous organic polymer: Activity as both a redox and Lewis acid catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Oveisi, Ali R.; Zhang, Kainan; Khorramabadi-zad, Ahmad; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    A new porphyrin-based porous organic polymer (POP) with BET surface area ranging from 780 to 880 m2/g was synthesized in free-base form via the reaction of meso-tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl) porphyrin and a rigid trigonal building block, hexahydroxytriphenylene. The material was then metallated with Fe(III) imparting activity for Lewis acid catalysis (regioselective methanolysis ring-opening of styrene oxide), oxidative cyclization catalysis (conversion of bis(2-hydroxy-1-naphthyl)methanes to the corresponding spirodienone), and a tandem catalytic processes: an in situ oxidation-cyclic aminal formation-oxidation sequence, which selectively converts benzyl alcohol to 2-phenyl-quinazolin-4(3H)-one. Notably, the catalyst is readily recoverable and reusable, with little loss in catalytic activity. PMID:26177563

  16. Causes of Activation and Deactivation of Modified Nanogold Catalysts during Prolonged Storage and Redox Treatments.

    PubMed

    Kolobova, Ekaterina; Kotolevich, Yulia; Pakrieva, Ekaterina; Mamontov, Grigory; Farías, Mario H; Bogdanchikova, Nina; Cortés Corberán, Vicente; Pestryakov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    The catalytic properties of modified Au/TiO₂ catalysts for low-temperature CO oxidation are affected by deactivation and reactivation after long-term storage and by redox treatments. The effect of these phenomena on the catalysts was studied by HRTEM, BET, SEM, FTIR CO, XPS and H₂ TPR methods. The main cause for the deactivation and reactivation of catalytic properties is the variation in the electronic state of the supported gold, mainly, the proportion of singly charged ions Au⁺. The most active samples are those with the highest proportion of singly charged gold ions, while catalysts with a high content of trivalent gold ions are inactive at low-temperatures. Active states of gold, resistant to changes caused by the reaction process and storage conditions, can be stabilized by modification of the titanium oxide support with transition metals oxides. The catalyst modified with lanthanum oxide shows the highest stability and activity. PMID:27089310

  17. Correlations between surface structure and catalytic activity/selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, D.W.

    1992-10-01

    Objective is to address the keys to understanding the relation between surface structure and catalytic activity/selectivity. Of concern are questions related to enhanced catalytic properties of mixed-metal catalysts and critical active site requirements for molecular synthesis and rearrangement. The experimental approach utilizes a microcatalytic reactor contiguous to a surface analysis system, an arrangement which allows in vacuo transfer of the catalyst from one chamber to the other. Surface techniques being used include Auger (AES), UV and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (UPS and XPS), temperature programmed desorption (TPD), low energy electron diffraction (LEED), high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) and infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRAS). Our research program builds upon our previous experience relating the results of single crystal kinetic measurements with the results obtained with supported analogs. As well we are exploiting our recent work on the preparation, the characterization, and the determination of the catalytic properties of ultra-thin metal and metal oxide films. The program is proceeding toward the study of the unique catalytic properties of ultrathin metal films; the investigation of the critical ensemble size requirements for principal catalytic reaction types; and the modelling of supported catalysts using ultra-thin planar oxide surfaces.

  18. Sulphate-activated growth of bamboo-like carbon nanotubes over copper catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jarrn-Horng; Chen, Ching-Shiun; Zeng, Zhi-Yan; Chang, Chia-Wei; Chen, Hsiu-Wei

    2012-07-01

    A sulphate-activated mechanism is proposed to describe the growth of bamboo-like carbon nanotubes (CNTs) over copper catalysts using chemical vapour deposition with helium-diluted ethylene. Sulphate-assisted copper catalysts afford a high-yield growth of bamboo-like CNTs at a mild temperature, 800 °C however, non-sulphate-assisted copper catalysts, e.g., copper acetate and copper nitrate prepared catalysts, were inert to CNT growth and only gave amorphous carbons (a-C) surrounding copper nanoparticles under the same conditions. Nevertheless, the addition of sulphate ions in the preparation step for the two inert catalysts can activate their abilities for CNT growth with remarkable yields. Furthermore, Raman spectra analysis demonstrates a linear dependence between the concentration of sulphate ions in copper catalysts and the ratio of CNT-a-C in the as-grown carbon soot. The sulphate-activated effect on CNT growth over copper catalysts could be related to a three-way interaction of sulphate ions, copper nanoparticles and support. In situ TEM images of an as-grown CNT irradiated by electron beams without the inlet of carbon sources reveal a new pathway of carbon diffusion through the bulk of copper nanoparticles and an enlarged inner-wall thickness of the on-site CNT. This carbon diffusion model over copper catalysts can provide new insights into the CNT growth mechanism over non-magnetic metal catalysts.A sulphate-activated mechanism is proposed to describe the growth of bamboo-like carbon nanotubes (CNTs) over copper catalysts using chemical vapour deposition with helium-diluted ethylene. Sulphate-assisted copper catalysts afford a high-yield growth of bamboo-like CNTs at a mild temperature, 800 °C however, non-sulphate-assisted copper catalysts, e.g., copper acetate and copper nitrate prepared catalysts, were inert to CNT growth and only gave amorphous carbons (a-C) surrounding copper nanoparticles under the same conditions. Nevertheless, the addition of

  19. Role of pH in the formation of structurally stable and catalytically active supported gold catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Veith, Gabriel M; Lupini, Andrew R; Dudney, Nancy J

    2009-01-01

    We report the investigation of titania (Degussa P25) supported gold catalysts prepared by magnetron sputtering. Catalysts grown on natural fumed titania were structurally unstable, resulting in the rapid coarsening of 2.4 nm gold clusters into large {approx}20 nm gold clusters in a few days at room temperature under normal atmospheric conditions. However, treating the titania support powder to a mock deposition-precipitation process, at pH 4, followed by the subsequent deposition of gold onto this treated powder produced a remarkable enhancement in gold particle stability and a 20-fold enhancement of catalytic activity. Furthermore, it was found that treating the titania under basic conditions (pH 10) resulted in a further enhancement of structural stability and a further doubling of the reaction rate to 0.28 mol of CO/mol of Au {center_dot} s. This enhancement cannot be attributed to removing surface Cl{sup -} species from the titania, the formation of oxygen vacancies on the TiO{sub 2} surface, or an electronic effect. Instead, it appears to be associated with the formation of strongly bound hydroxyl species on the TiO{sub 2} surface. The formation of surface hydroxyls during the deposition-precipitation method is coincidental and contributes significantly to the properties of Au/TiO{sub 2} catalysts.

  20. Factors affecting activated carbon-based catalysts for selective hydrogen sulfide oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huixing; Monnell, J.D.; Alvin, M.A.; Vidic, R.D.

    2008-09-01

    The primary product of coal gasification processes is synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of CO, H2, CO2, H2O and a number of minor components. Among the most significant minor components in syngas is hydrogen sulfide (H2S). In addition to its adverse environmental impact, H2S poisons the catalysts and hydrogen purification membranes, and causes severe corrosion in gas turbines. Technologies that can remove H2S from syngas and related process streams are, therefore, of considerable practical interest. To meet this need, we work towards understanding the mechanism by which prospective H2S catalysts perform in simulated fuel gas conditions. Specifically, we show that for low-temperature gas clean-up (~1408C) using activated carbon fibers and water plays a significant role in H2S binding and helps to prolong the lifetime of the material. Basic surface functional groups were found to be imperative for significant conversion of H2S to daughter compounds, whereas metal oxides (La and Ce) did little to enhance this catalysis. We show that although thermal regeneration of the material is possible, the regenerated material has a substantially lower catalytic and sorption capacity.

  1. Probing the surfaces of heterogeneous catalysts by in situ IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lamberti, Carlo; Zecchina, Adriano; Groppo, Elena; Bordiga, Silvia

    2010-12-01

    This critical review describes the reactivity of heterogeneous catalysts from the point of view of four simple, but essential for Chemistry, molecules (namely dihydrogen, carbon monoxide, nitrogen monoxide and ethylene) that are considered as probes or as reactants in combination with "in situ" controlled temperature and pressure Infrared spectroscopy. The fundamental properties of H(2), CO, NO and C(2)H(4) are shortly described in order to justify their different behaviour in respect of isolated sites in different environments, extended surfaces, clusters, crystalline or amorphous materials. The description is given by considering some "key studies" and trying to evidence similarities and differences among surfaces and probes (572 references). PMID:21038053

  2. Effect of Support on the Activity of Ag-based Catalysts for Formaldehyde Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianghao; Li, Yaobin; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Min; Wang, Lian; Zhang, Changbin; He, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Ag-based catalysts with different supports (TiO2, Al2O3 and CeO2) were prepared by impregnation method and subsequently tested for the catalytic oxidation of formaldehyde (HCHO) at low temperature. The Ag/TiO2 catalyst showed the distinctive catalytic performance, achieving the complete HCHO conversion at around 95 °C. In contrast, the Ag/Al2O3 and Ag/CeO2 catalysts displayed much lower activity and the 100% conversion was reached at 110 °C and higher than 125 °C, respectively. The Ag-based catalysts were next characterized by several methods. The characterization results revealed that supports have the dramatic influence on the Ag particle sizes and dispersion. Kinetic tests showed that the Ag based catalyst on the TiO2, Al2O3 or CeO2 supports have the similar apparent activation energy of 65 kJ mol−1, indicating that the catalytic mechanism keep immutability over these three catalysts. Therefore, Ag particle size and dispersion was confirmed to be the main factor affecting the catalytic performance for HCHO oxidation. The Ag/TiO2 catalyst has the highest Ag dispersion and the smallest Ag particle size, accordingly presenting the best catalytic performance for HCHO oxidation. PMID:26263506

  3. Nanoparticles of Ag with a Pt and Pd rich surface supported on carbon as a new catalyst for the oxygen electroreduction reaction (ORR) in acid electrolytes: Part 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pech-Pech, I. E.; Gervasio, Dominic F.; Pérez-Robles, J. F.

    2015-02-01

    In the first part of this work, the feasibility of developing a catalyst with high activity for the oxygen electroreduction reaction (ORR) in acid media and with low Pt loading was demonstrated by over coating a silver (Ag) nanoparticle with a shell of platinum (Pt) and palladium (Pd) [7]. The results show that best activity is not directly related to a higher PtPd loading on the surface of the Ag. The best catalyst in a series of this type of catalyst is found with Ag@Pt0.3Pd0.3/C which gives a specific activity for oxygen reduction, jk (in units of mA cm-2 of real area), of 0.07 mA cm-2 at 0.85 V vs. NHE, as compared to 0.04 mA cm-2 when with a commercial Pt on carbon catalyst (Pt20/C) is used in an identical electrode except for the catalyst. The mass activity, jm (in units of mA μg-1 of Pt), for Ag@Pt0.3Pd0.3/C is 0.04 mA μg-1 of Pt at 0.85 V vs. NHE, whereas that for the Pt20/C gives 0.02 mA μg-1 of Pt, showing Ag@Pt0.3Pd0.3/C is a lower-cost catalyst, because using a Ag core and Pd with Pt in the shell gives the highest catalytic activity using less Pt.

  4. Active particles on curved surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fily, Yaouen; Baskaran, Aparna; Hagan, Michael

    Active systems have proved to be very sensitive to the geometry of their environment. This is often achieved by spending significant time at the boundary, probing its shape by gliding along it. I will discuss coarse graining the microscopic dynamics of self-propelled particles on a general curved surface to predict the way the density profile on the surface depends on its geometry. Beyond confined active particles, this formalism is a natural starting point to study objects that cannot leave the boundary at all, such as cells crawling on a curved substrate, animals running on uneven ground, or active colloids trapped at an interface.

  5. High surface area ThO.sub.2 catalyst and method of preparing it

    DOEpatents

    Colmenares, Carlos A.; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Maj, Joseph J.

    1985-01-01

    A ThO.sub.2 catalyst having a high surface area of about 80-125 m.sup.2 /g is synthesized. The compound is synthesized by simultaneously mixing an aqueous solution of ThNO.sub.3 (NO.sub.3).sub.4.4H.sub.2 O with an aqueous solution of Na.sub.2 CO.sub.3.H.sub.2 O, to produce a solution and solid ThOCO.sub.3. The solid ThOCO.sub.3 is separated from the solution, and then calcined at a temperature of about 225.degree.-300.degree. C. for about 40-55 hours to produce ThO.sub.2. The ThO.sub.2 catalyst produced includes Na present as a substitutional cation in an amount equal to about 5-10 atom percent.

  6. Modeling carbon nanotube growth on the catalyst-substrate surface subjected to reactive plasma [

    SciTech Connect

    Tewari, Aarti; Sharma, Suresh C.

    2014-06-15

    The paper presents a theoretical model to study the growth of the carbon nanotube (CNT) on the catalyst substrate surface subjected to reactive plasma. The charging rate of the CNT, kinetics of electron, ions and neutral atoms, the growth rate of the CNT because of diffusion and accretion of ions on the catalyst nanoparticle inclusion of the issue of the plasma sheath is undertaken in the present model. Numerical calculations on the effect of ion density and temperature and the substrate bias on the growth of the CNT have been carried out for typical glow discharge plasma parameters. It is found that the height of CNT increases with the ion density of carbon ions and radius of CNT decreases with hydrogen ion density. The substrate bias also affects the growth rate of the CNT. The field emission characteristics from the CNTs can be analyzed from the results obtained.

  7. Method of treating intermetallic alloy hydrogenation/oxidation catalysts for improved impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration and increased activity

    DOEpatents

    Wright, Randy B.

    1992-01-01

    Alternate, successive high temperature oxidation and reduction treatments, in either order, of intermetallic alloy hydrogenation and intermetallic alloy oxidation catalysts unexpectedly improves the impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration capacity and/or activity of the catalysts. The particular alloy, and the final high temperature treatment given alloy (oxidation or reduction) will be chosen to correspond to the function of the catalyst (oxidation or hydrogenation).

  8. An optimization study of PtSn/C catalysts applied to direct ethanol fuel cell: Effect of the preparation method on the electrocatalytic activity of the catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, T. S.; Palma, L. M.; Leonello, P. H.; Morais, C.; Kokoh, K. B.; De Andrade, A. R.

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work was to perform a systematic study of the parameters that can influence the composition, morphology, and catalytic activity of PtSn/C nanoparticles and compare two different methods of nanocatalyst preparation, namely microwave-assisted heating (MW) and thermal decomposition of polymeric precursors (DPP). An investigation of the effects of the reducing and stabilizing agents on the catalytic activity and morphology of Pt75Sn25/C catalysts prepared by microwave-assisted heating was undertaken for optimization purposes. The effect of short-chain alcohols such as ethanol, ethylene glycol, and propylene glycol as reducing agents was evaluated, and the use of sodium acetate and citric acid as stabilizing agents for the MW procedure was examined. Catalysts obtained from propylene glycol displayed higher catalytic activity compared with catalysts prepared in ethylene glycol. Introduction of sodium acetate enhanced the catalytic activity, but this beneficial effect was observed until a critical acetate concentration was reached. Optimization of the MW synthesis allowed for the preparation of highly dispersed catalysts with average sizes lying between 2.0 and 5.0 nm. Comparison of the best catalyst prepared by MW with a catalyst of similar composition prepared by the polymeric precursors method showed that the catalytic activity of the material can be improved when a proper condition for catalyst preparation is achieved.

  9. Effect of Ce addition on the surface properties and n-dodecane dehydrogenation performance of Pt-Sn/Ce-Al2O3 catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xianru; He, Songbo; Wei, Huangzhao; Luo, Sha; Gu, Bin; Sun, Chenglin

    2015-08-01

    Ce-modified alumina carriers with different Ce content were prepared by vacuum isovolume impregnation method aiming to improve the n-dodecane catalytic dehydrogenation performance of PtSn/Al2O3 catalyst. The support and catalyst were characterized by XRD, N2 adsorption-desorption, NH3-TPD, H2-TPR, CO-pulse adsorption and TG-DTG. Results showed that Ce addition decreased the surface acid amount significantly and inhibited the reduction of SnO x species. Besides, Ce containing catalyst showed higher n-dodecane dehydrogenation activity and stability and lower coke deposition amount and coke burning temperature. In our study, the optimal Ce addition amount for n-dodecane dehydrogenation was 2%.

  10. An alternative approach to PEPPSI catalysts: from palladium isonitriles to highly active unsymmetrically substituted PEPPSI catalysts.

    PubMed

    Zeiler, Anna; Rudolph, Matthias; Rominger, Frank; Hashmi, A Stephen K

    2015-07-27

    A series of new pyridine-enhanced precatalyst preparation, stabilization, and initiation (PEPPSI)-type complexes bearing different types of carbene ligands was prepared by the modular and convergent template synthesis strategy. Nitrogen acyclic carbenes, saturated and unsaturated five-membered NHC, saturated six-membered NHCs, and five-membered N-heterocyclic oxo-carbene (NHOC) ligands on palladium were prepared this way. These new organometallic compounds then were tested in Suzuki and Negishi cross-coupling reactions by using substrates with one or two substituents in ortho-position of the new CC bond being formed. Both aryl chlorides and bromides were tested as coupling partners. In some cases, the new ligands gave results similar to Organ's successful IPr-based and IPent-based PEPPSI derivatives, with aryl bromides 0.05 mol % catalyst load still gave satisfactory results, with aryl chlorides 0.5 mol % were needed. PMID:26096141

  11. Enhancement of Glycerol Steam Reforming Activity and Thermal Stability by Incorporating CeO2 and TiO2 in Ni- and Co-MCM-41 Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dade, William N.

    Hydrogen (H2) has many applications in industry with current focus shifted to production of hydrocarbon fuels and valuable oxygenates using the Fischer-Tropsch technology and direct use in proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Hydrogen is generally produced via steam reforming of natural gas or alcohols like methanol and ethanol. Glycerol, a by-product of biodiesel production process, is currently considered to be one of the most attractive sources of sustainable H2 due to its high H/C ratio and bio-based origin. Ni and Co based catalysts have been reported to be active in glycerol steam reforming (GSR); however, deactivation of the catalysts by carbon deposition and sintering under GSR operating conditions is a major challenge. In this study, a series of catalysts containing Ni and Co nanoparticles incorporated in CeO2 and TiO2 modified high surface area MCM-41 have been synthesized using one-pot method. The catalysts are tested for GSR (at H2O/Glycerol mole ratio of 12 and GHSV of 2200 h-1) to study the effect of support modification and reaction temperature (450 - 700 °C) on the product selectivity and long term stability. GSR results revealed that all the catalysts performed significantly well exhibiting over 85% glycerol conversion at 650 °C except Ni catalysts that showed better low temperature activities. Deactivation studies of the catalysts conducted at 650 °C indicated that the Ni-TiO2-MCM-41 and Ni-CeO 2-MCM-41 were resistant to deactivation with ˜100% glycerol conversion for 40 h. In contrast, Co-TiO2-MCM-41 perform poorly as the catalyst rapidly deactivated after 12 h to yield ˜20% glycerol conversion after 40 h. The WAXRD and TGA-DSC analyses of spent catalysts showed a significant amount of coke deposition that might explain catalysts deactivation. The flattening shape of the original BET type IV isotherm with drastic reduction of catalyst surface area can also be responsible for observed drop in catalysts activities.

  12. Fischer-Tropsch Cobalt Catalyst Activation and Handling Through Wax Enclosure Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klettlinger, Jennifer L. S.; Yen, Chia H.; Nakley, Leah M.; Surgenor, Angela D.

    2016-01-01

    Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis is considered a gas to liquid process which converts syn-gas, a gaseous mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide, into liquids of various hydrocarbon chain length and product distributions. Cobalt based catalysts are used in F-T synthesis and are the focus of this paper. One key concern with handling cobalt based catalysts is that the active form of catalyst is in a reduced state, metallic cobalt, which oxidizes readily in air. In laboratory experiments, the precursor cobalt oxide catalyst is activated in a fixed bed at 350 ?C then transferred into a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) with inert gas. NASA has developed a process which involves the enclosure of active cobalt catalyst in a wax mold to prevent oxidation during storage and handling. This improved method allows for precise catalyst loading and delivery into a CSTR. Preliminary results indicate similar activity levels in the F-T reaction in comparison to the direct injection method. The work in this paper was supported by the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Subsonics Fixed Wing Project.

  13. Renewable phenols production by catalytic microwave pyrolysis of Douglas fir sawdust pellets with activated carbon catalysts.

    PubMed

    Bu, Quan; Lei, Hanwu; Wang, Lu; Wei, Yi; Zhu, Lei; Liu, Yupeng; Liang, Jing; Tang, Juming

    2013-08-01

    The effects of different activated carbon (AC) catalysts based on various carbon sources on products yield and chemical compositions of upgraded pyrolysis oils were investigated using microwave pyrolysis of Douglas fir sawdust pellets. Results showed that high amounts of phenols were obtained (74.61% and 74.77% in the upgraded bio-oils by DARCO MRX (wood based) and DARCO 830 (lignite coal based) activated carbons, respectively). The catalysts recycling test of the selected catalysts indicated that the carbon catalysts can be reused for at least 3-4 times and produced high concentrations of phenol and phenolic compounds. The chemical reaction mechanism for phenolics production during microwave pyrolysis of biomass was analyzed. PMID:23765005

  14. Highly selective plasma-activated copper catalysts for carbon dioxide reduction to ethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mistry, Hemma; Varela, Ana Sofia; Bonifacio, Cecile S.; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Sinev, Ilya; Choi, Yong-Wook; Kisslinger, Kim; Stach, Eric A.; Yang, Judith C.; Strasser, Peter; Cuenya, Beatriz Roldan

    2016-06-01

    There is an urgent need to develop technologies that use renewable energy to convert waste products such as carbon dioxide into hydrocarbon fuels. Carbon dioxide can be electrochemically reduced to hydrocarbons over copper catalysts, although higher efficiency is required. We have developed oxidized copper catalysts displaying lower overpotentials for carbon dioxide electroreduction and record selectivity towards ethylene (60%) through facile and tunable plasma treatments. Herein we provide insight into the improved performance of these catalysts by combining electrochemical measurements with microscopic and spectroscopic characterization techniques. Operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy and cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy show that copper oxides are surprisingly resistant to reduction and copper+ species remain on the surface during the reaction. Our results demonstrate that the roughness of oxide-derived copper catalysts plays only a partial role in determining the catalytic performance, while the presence of copper+ is key for lowering the onset potential and enhancing ethylene selectivity.

  15. Highly selective plasma-activated copper catalysts for carbon dioxide reduction to ethylene.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Hemma; Varela, Ana Sofia; Bonifacio, Cecile S; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Sinev, Ilya; Choi, Yong-Wook; Kisslinger, Kim; Stach, Eric A; Yang, Judith C; Strasser, Peter; Cuenya, Beatriz Roldan

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need to develop technologies that use renewable energy to convert waste products such as carbon dioxide into hydrocarbon fuels. Carbon dioxide can be electrochemically reduced to hydrocarbons over copper catalysts, although higher efficiency is required. We have developed oxidized copper catalysts displaying lower overpotentials for carbon dioxide electroreduction and record selectivity towards ethylene (60%) through facile and tunable plasma treatments. Herein we provide insight into the improved performance of these catalysts by combining electrochemical measurements with microscopic and spectroscopic characterization techniques. Operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy and cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy show that copper oxides are surprisingly resistant to reduction and copper(+) species remain on the surface during the reaction. Our results demonstrate that the roughness of oxide-derived copper catalysts plays only a partial role in determining the catalytic performance, while the presence of copper(+) is key for lowering the onset potential and enhancing ethylene selectivity. PMID:27356485

  16. Highly selective plasma-activated copper catalysts for carbon dioxide reduction to ethylene

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Hemma; Varela, Ana Sofia; Bonifacio, Cecile S.; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Sinev, Ilya; Choi, Yong-Wook; Kisslinger, Kim; Stach, Eric A.; Yang, Judith C.; Strasser, Peter; Cuenya, Beatriz Roldan

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need to develop technologies that use renewable energy to convert waste products such as carbon dioxide into hydrocarbon fuels. Carbon dioxide can be electrochemically reduced to hydrocarbons over copper catalysts, although higher efficiency is required. We have developed oxidized copper catalysts displaying lower overpotentials for carbon dioxide electroreduction and record selectivity towards ethylene (60%) through facile and tunable plasma treatments. Herein we provide insight into the improved performance of these catalysts by combining electrochemical measurements with microscopic and spectroscopic characterization techniques. Operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy and cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy show that copper oxides are surprisingly resistant to reduction and copper+ species remain on the surface during the reaction. Our results demonstrate that the roughness of oxide-derived copper catalysts plays only a partial role in determining the catalytic performance, while the presence of copper+ is key for lowering the onset potential and enhancing ethylene selectivity. PMID:27356485

  17. Production of Light Olefins Through Catalytic Cracking of C5 Raffinate Over Surface-Modified ZSM-5 Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joongwon; Park, Seungwon; Hong, Ung Gi; Jun, Jin Oh; Song, In Kyu

    2015-10-01

    Surface modification of phosphorous-containing porous ZSM-5 catalyst (P/C-ZSM5-Sil.(X)) was carried out by a chemical liquid deposition (CLD) method using tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) as a silylation agent. Different amount of TEOS (X = 5, 10, 20, and 30 wt%) was introduced into P/C-ZSM5il.(X) catalysts for surface modification. The catalysts were used for the production of light olefins (ethylene and propylene) through catalytic cracking of C5 raffinate. It was found that external surface acidity of P/C-ZSM5-Sil.(X) catalysts significantly decreased with increasing TEOS content. In the catalytic reaction, both conversion of C5 raffinate and yield for light olefins showed volcano-shaped curves with respect to TEOS content. Among the catalysts tested, P/C-ZSM5-Sil.(20) catalyst exhibited the best catalytic performance in terms of conversion of C5 raffinate and yield for light olefins. Thus, an optimal TEOS content was required for CLD treatment to maximize light olefin production in the catalytic cracking of C5 raffinate over P/C-ZSM5-Sil.(X) catalysts. PMID:26726509

  18. New catalysts active for the mild oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Laperdrix, E.; Costentin, G.; Guyen, N.N.; Saur, O.; Lavalley, J.C.

    1999-10-25

    Nickel iron phosphates were studied for the selective oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfur. Nickel iron phosphate and Fe/Cr samples were more active than simple iron, chromium, and mixed iron-chromium oxides, which has been previously studied. Nickel iron phosphate catalyst prepared by solid-solid method with, consequently, a very low specific surface area was intrinsically active and selective to sulfur (conversion 17%, S{sub n} selectivity 97%); no rapid deactivation was observed. Even though higher specific surface area samples, prepared according to a solution method at various calcination temperatures, showed better performance (conversion 76%, S{sub n}selectivity {gt}90%), the specific activity depended on the crystallinity of the samples. The reaction is apparently structure sensitive. The structure of the catalytic material must facilitate electronic exchange, evidence by Moessbauer characterization. The establishment of the mixed valency Fe{sub 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} under catalytic feed was shown to be an essential factor in this reaction.

  19. Pd-embedded graphene: An efficient and highly active catalyst for oxidation of CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Nematollahi, Parisa; Nurazar, Roghaye

    2016-04-01

    Despite numerous efforts performed on the elimination of toxic gases from the air, the oxidation of carbon monoxide (CO) with metal-embedded nanostructures still remains a challenge. The geometry, electronic structure and catalytic properties of Pd-doped graphene (Pd-graphene) are investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The large atomic radius of Pd dopant in graphene can induce the local surface curvature and modulate the electronic structure of the sheet through the charge redistribution effects. Also, Pd-graphene can facilitate the O2 adsorption. Therefore, the catalytic activity of the Pd-graphene for CO oxidation reaction is enhanced. Moreover, the complete CO oxidation reactions on the Pd-graphene include a two-step process of the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) reaction, in which the first step is almost barrier-less (Eact = 0.002 eV) and the second step exhibits an energy barrier of 0.2 eV. The results indicate that the surface activity of graphene-based materials can be drastically improved by introducing the Pd dopants, so Pd-graphene can be a clue for fabricating graphene-based catalysts with high activity toward the oxidation of CO molecule.

  20. H2 Desorption from MgH2 Surfaces with Steps and Catalyst-Dopants

    SciTech Connect

    Reich, Jason M.; Wang, Lin-Lin; Johnson, Duane D.

    2014-03-10

    Light-metal hydrides, like MgH2, remain under scrutiny as prototypes for reversible H-storage materials. For MgH2, we assess hydrogen desorption/adsorption properties (enthalpy and kinetic barriers) for stepped, catalyst-doped surfaces occurring, e.g., from ball-milling in real samples. Employing density functional theory and simulated annealing in a slab model, we studied initial H2 desorption from stepped surfaces with(out) titanium (Ti) catalytic dopant. Extensive simulated annealing studies were performed to find the dopant’s site preferences. For the most stable initial and final (possibly magnetic) states, nudged elastic band (NEB) calculations were performed to determine the H2-desorption activation energy. We used a moment-transition NEB method to account for the dopant’s transition to the lowest-energy magnetic state at each image along the band. We identify a dopant-related surface-desorption mechanism that reloads via bulk H diffusion. While reproducing the observed bulk enthalpy of desorption, we find a decrease of 0.24 eV (a 14% reduction) in the activation energy on doped stepped surface; together with a 22% reduction on a doped flat surface, this brackets the assessed 18% reduction in kinetic barrier for ball-milled MgH2 samples with low concentration of Ti from experiment.

  1. Exceptional thermal stability of Pd@CeO2 core-shell catalyst nanostructures grafted onto an oxide surface.

    PubMed

    Adijanto, Lawrence; Bennett, David A; Chen, Chen; Yu, Anthony S; Cargnello, Matteo; Fornasiero, Paolo; Gorte, Raymond J; Vohs, John M

    2013-05-01

    Monolayer films of highly catalytically active Pd@CeO2 core-shell nanocomposites were grafted onto a planar YSZ(100) (yttria-stabilized zirconia, YSZ) single crystal support that was functionalized with a CVD-deposited layer of triethoxy(octyl)silane (TEOOS). The resulting monolayer films were found to exhibit exceptionally high thermal stability compared to bare Pd nanoparticles with the Pd@CeO2 nanostructures remaining intact and highly dispersed upon calcining in air at temperatures in excess of 1000 K. The CeO2 shells were also shown to be more easily reduced than bulk CeO2, which may partially explain their unique activity as oxidation catalysts. The use of both TEOOS and tetradecylphosphonic acid (TDPA) as coupling agents for dispersing Pd@CeO2 core-shell nanocomposites onto a high surface area γ-Al2O3 support is also demonstrated. PMID:23557343

  2. Spectroscopic and XRD characterisation of zeolite catalysts active for the oxidative methylation of benzene with methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adebajo, Moses O.; Long, Mervyn A.; Frost, Ray L.

    2004-03-01

    The benzene methylation with methane over zeolite catalysts was previously shown in our laboratory to require the presence of oxygen. Thus, a two-step mechanism involving the intermediate formation of methanol by partial oxidation of methane followed by the methylation of benzene with methanol in the second step, was postulated. This paper now reports the results of the characterisation of the zeolite catalysts used for the oxidative benzene methylation reaction in order to provide some information about their composition, structure, properties and their behaviour before and after the reaction. The catalysts were characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD), inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), FT-IR and solid state NMR. XRD results indicate that the crystalline structures of all the ZSM-5 and H-beta catalysts remained unchanged after batch reaction of benzene with methane over the catalysts in agreement with the observation that the catalysts recovered from the reactor could be reused without loss of activity. Elemental analyses and FT-IR data show that as the level of metal ion exchange increases, the Brönsted acid concentration decreases but this metal ion exchange does not totally remove Brönsted acidity. FT-IR results further show that only a small amount of acid sites is actually necessary for a catalyst to be active since used catalysts containing highly reduced Brönsted acidity are found to be reusable without any loss of their activity. 29Si and 27Al magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR together with FT-IR spectra also show that all the active zeolites catalysts contain some extra-framework octahedral aluminium in addition to the normal tetrahedral framework aluminium. The presence of this extra-lattice aluminium does not, however, have any adverse effect on the crystallinity of the catalysts both before and after oxidative benzene methylation reaction. There appears also to be no significant dealumination

  3. Fischer Tropsch synthesis : influence of Mn on the carburization rates and activities of Fe-based catalysts by TPR-EXAFS/XANES and catalyst testing.

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro, M. C.; Jacobs, G.; Pendyala, R.; Davis, B. H.; Cronauer, D. C.; Kropf, A. J.; Marshall, C. L.

    2011-03-24

    Fe-based catalysts containing different amounts of Mn were tested for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis using a stirred tank reactor at 270 C, 1.21 MPa, and H{sub 2}:CO = 0.7. Catalyst activation by carburization with 10% CO/He was followed by Temperature Programmed Reduction/X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (TPR-EXAFS/XANES) from room temperature to 300 C. {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} was converted into iron carbides, whereas MnO{sub x} was reduced to oxygen deficient MnO. Mn hindered Fe carburization, such that the carburized catalyst displayed higher Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} content than the catalyst without Mn. EXAFS fitting indicates that the carburized catalyst contained a mixture of Hgg carbide, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, and Mn oxides. Increasing Mn content led to higher CH{sub 4} and light product selectivities, and lower light olefin selectivities. Higher and stable conversions were obtained with a catalyst containing an almost equimolar Fe/Mn ratio relative to the catalyst without Mn. Selectivity trends are attributed to the higher WGS rates observed on the FeMn catalysts, consistent with the structural differences observed.

  4. Enhancing the available specific surface area of carbon supports to boost the electroactivity of nanostructured Pt catalysts.

    PubMed

    Holade, Yaovi; Morais, Claudia; Servat, Karine; Napporn, Teko W; Kokoh, K Boniface

    2014-12-14

    We report increasing improvements in the available specific surface area of the commonly used Vulcan XC 72R and Ketjenblack EC-600JD carbons by simple thermal pre-treatment. The treated Vulcan and Ketjenblack substrates have a specific surface area of 322 and 1631 m(2) g(-1), respectively, instead of 262 and 1102 m(2) g(-1) for the as-received materials, which is a 23 and 48% improvement. Subsequently, when used as platinum nanoparticle (3 nm) supports, the electrochemical active surface area is enhanced by factors of 2.2 and 1.2 for treated Vulcan and Ketjenblack carbons, respectively. Furthermore, electrochemical investigations have highlighted a surprisingly improved catalytic activity for the pre-treated Vulcan XC 72R and Ketjenblack EC-600JD supported Pt nanoparticles. In fact, the synthesized nanostructures from the so-called "Bromide Anion Exchange" method exhibit good catalytic activity toward glucose electrooxidation, both in the alkaline medium and the phosphate buffered solution at pH 7.4. More importantly, the present catalysts are four times more active than those in the literature prepared under similar conditions for glucose dehydrogenation at low potential (0.27 V vs. Reversible Hydrogen Electrode). Consequently, these remarkable trends uncovered herein provide ample new strategic routes for the pre-treatment of Vulcan XC 72R and Ketjenblack carbons for widespread uses. PMID:25351933

  5. Nanoparticles of Ag with a Pt and Pd rich surface supported on carbon as a new catalyst for the oxygen electroreduction reaction (ORR) in acid electrolytes: Part 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pech-Pech, I. E.; Gervasio, Dominic F.; Godínez-Garcia, A.; Solorza-Feria, O.; Pérez-Robles, J. F.

    2015-02-01

    Silver (Ag) nanoparticles enriched with platinum (Pt) and palladium (Pd) on their surfaces (Ag@Pt0.1Pd0.1) are supported on Vulcan XC-72 carbon (C) to form a new catalyst (Ag@Pt0.1Pd0.1/C) for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acid electrolytes. This catalyst is prepared in one pot by reducing Ag and then Pt and Pd metal salts with sodium borohydride in the presence of trisodium citrate then adding XC-72 while applying intense ultrasound. The metallic Ag@Pt0.1Pd0.1 nanoparticles contain 2 weight percent of Pt, are spherical and have an average size less than 10 nm as determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). At the ORR potentials, Ag nanoparticles on carbon (Ag/C) rapidly lose Ag by dissolution and show no more catalytic activity for the ORR than the carbon support, whereas Ag@Pt0.1Pd0.1/C is a stable catalyst and exhibits 1.4 and 1.6 fold greater specific activity, also 3.6 and 2.8 fold greater mass activity for ORR in 0.5 M H2SO4 solution than comparable Pt/C and Pt0.5Pd0.5/C catalysts with the same Pt loading as determined for thin-films of these catalysts on a rotating-disk electrode (TF-RDE). Using silver nanoparticles increases Pt utilization and therefore decreases Pt-loading and cost of a catalyst for a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) electrode.

  6. Design Strategies for CeO2-MoO3 Catalysts for DeNOx and Hg(0) Oxidation in the Presence of HCl: The Significance of the Surface Acid-Base Properties.

    PubMed

    Chang, Huazhen; Wu, Qingru; Zhang, Tao; Li, Mingguan; Sun, Xiaoxu; Li, Junhua; Duan, Lei; Hao, Jiming

    2015-10-20

    A series of CeMoOx catalysts with different surface Ce/Mo ratios was synthesized by a coprecipitation method via changing precipitation pH value. The surface basicity on selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts (CeMoOx and VMo/Ti) was characterized and correlated to the durability and activity of catalyst for simultaneous elimination of NOx and Hg(0). The pH value in the preparation process affected the surface concentrations of Ce and Mo, the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) specific surface area, and the acid-base properties over the CeMoOx catalysts. The O 1s X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra and CO2-temperature programmed desorption (TPD) suggested that the surface basicity increased as the pH value increased. The existence of strong basic sites contributed to the deactivation effect of HCl over the VMo/Ti and CeMoOx catalysts prepared at pH = 12. For the CeMoOx catalysts prepared at pH = 9 and 6, the appearance of surface molybdena species replaced the surface -OH, and the existence of appropriate medium-strength basic sites contributed to their resistance to HCl poisoning in the SCR reaction. Moreover, these sites facilitated the adsorption and activation of HCl and enhanced Hg(0) oxidation. On the other hand, the inhibitory effect of NH3 on Hg(0) oxidation was correlated with the competitive adsorption of NH3 and Hg(0) on acidic surface sites. Therefore, acidic surface sites may play an important role in Hg(0) adsorption. The characterization and balance of basicity and acidity of an SCR catalyst is believed to be helpful in preventing deactivation by acid gas in the SCR reaction and simultaneous Hg(0) oxidation. PMID:26421943

  7. Fe/S doped granular activated carbon as a highly active heterogeneous persulfate catalyst toward the degradation of Orange G and diethyl phthalate.

    PubMed

    Pu, Mengjie; Ma, Yongwen; Wan, Jinquan; Wang, Yan; Huang, Mingzhi; Chen, Yangmei

    2014-03-15

    Fe/S doped granular activated carbon (Fe/SGAC) was synthesized with ferric nitrate, Na2S2O3 and (NH4)2S2O8 via an impregnation-precipitation, reduction-oxidation combining with aqueous-phase synthesis method treatment. Surface density of functional groups, surface area changes as well as the chemical state inside Fe/SGAC catalyst were studied by Boehm titration, N2 adsorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The reactivity of the catalysts was tested by degrading Orange G (OG) and diethyl phthalate (DEP). The Fe/SGAC catalysts could significantly enhance the removal rate of OG as compared to persulfate alone and PS/GAC. And the catalytic capacity was also enhanced by S doping. But the degradation of DEP under the similar condition was inhibited by adsorption process because of the different hydrophobicities of OG and DEP molecule. Fe2O3/FeOOH (Fe(3+)) (represents ferrihydrite) together with FeO/Fe3O4 (Fe(2+)) and Fe2O3-satellite, which provide the new active site for persulfate catalyst was found to be the major components of iron element in Fe/SGAC catalyst; the existence of FeS2(S(-)) for sulfur element verified the assumption that the doped S element promoted the electron transfer between the persulfate species and iron oxide at the interface. COD removal experiment further confirmed that mostly contaminant removal was owed to the Fe/SGAC catalytic persulfate oxidation process. PMID:24461853

  8. Graphene nanosheets-polypyrrole hybrid material as a highly active catalyst support for formic acid electro-oxidation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sudong; Shen, Chengmin; Liang, Yanyu; Tong, Hao; He, Wei; Shi, Xuezhao; Zhang, Xiaogang; Gao, Hong-jun

    2011-08-01

    A novel electrode material based on graphene oxide (GO)-polypyrrole (PPy) composites was synthesized by in situ chemical oxidation polymerization. Palladium nanoparticles (NPs) with a diameter of 4.0 nm were loaded on the reduced graphene oxide(RGO)-PPy composites by a microwave-assisted polyol process. Microstructure analysis showed that a layer of coated PPy film with monodisperse Pd NPs is present on the RGO surface. The Pd/RGO-PPy catalysts exhibit excellent catalytic activity and stability for formic acid electro-oxidation when the weight feed ratio of GO to pyrrole monomer is 2:1. The superior performance of Pd/RGO-PPy catalysts may arise from utilization of heterogeneous nucleation sites for NPs and the greatly increased electronic conductivity of the supports. PMID:21713273

  9. Computational approaches to the determination of active site structures and reaction mechanisms in heterogeneous catalysts.

    PubMed

    Catlow, C R A; French, S A; Sokol, A A; Thomas, J M

    2005-04-15

    We apply quantum chemical methods to the study of active site structures and reaction mechanisms in mesoporous silica and metal oxide catalysts. Our approach is based on the use of both molecular cluster and embedded cluster (QM/MM) techniques, where the active site and molecular complex are described using density functional theory (DFT) and the embedding matrix simulated by shell model potentials. We consider three case studies: alkene epoxidation over the microporous TS-1 catalyst; methanol synthesis on ZnO and Cu/ZnO and C-H bond activation over Li-doped MgO. PMID:15901543

  10. Exceptional methanol electro-oxidation activity by bimetallic concave and dendritic Pt-Cu nanocrystals catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying-Xia; Zhou, Hui-Jing; Sun, Ping-Chuan; Chen, Tie-Hong

    2014-01-01

    PtCux (x = 1, 2 and 3) bimetallic nanocrystals with concave surface and dendritic morphology were prepared and used as electrocatalysts in methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. The bimetallic nanocrystals were synthesized via one-pot co-reduction of H2PtCl6 and Cu(acac)2 by oleylamine and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) in an autoclave at 180 °C. The concave dendritic bimetallic nanostructure consisted of a core rich in Cu and nanodendrites rich in Pt, which was formed via galvanic replacement of Cu by Pt. It was found that PVP played an important role in initiating, facilitating, and directing the replacement reaction. The electrochemical properties of the PtCux were characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry (CA). The concave dendritic PtCu2/C nanocrystals exhibited exceptionally high activity and strong poisoning resistance in MOR. At 0.75 V (vs. reversible hydrogen electrode, RHE) the mass activity and specific activity of PtCu2/C were 3.3 and 4.1 times higher than those of the commercial Pt/C catalysts, respectively. The enhanced catalytic activity could be attributed to the unique concave dendritic morphology of the bimetallic nanocrystals.

  11. Effect of thermal treatments on the properties of nickel and cobalt activated-charcoal-supported catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Gandia, L.M.; Montes, M. )

    1994-02-01

    The effect of thermal pretreatment in N[sub 2] up to 723 K and the activation treatments in H[sub 2] and an inert atmosphere on the properties of Ni and Co activated-charcoal-supported catalysts were studied. Catalysts were characterized by means of N[sub 2] adsorption at 77 K, H[sub 2] chemisorption at room temperature, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The catalysts' activity and selectivity for acetone hydrogenation to 2-propanol under unusual and severe conditions (473 K and high overall acetone conversion) were also measured. TGA and XRD evidence was found for the charcoal-support-promoted NiO and CoO reduction to the metallic states when the catalysts were subjected to an inert atmosphere above 723 K caused a loss of acetone hydrogenation activity (calculated on a metal load basis) for both the Ni and Co activated-charcoal-supported catalysts, with respect to that of the low-temperature (573 K) activation treatments. In a series of activated-charcoal-supported Ni catalysts, a large decrease in the H[sub 2] chemisorption uptake was also found for a sample pretreated in N[sub 2] at 723 K prior to H[sub 2] reduction. These results were not due to nickel or cobalt sintering, as shown by XRD line broadening measurements. The catalytic activity loss was accompanied by a decrease (in the case of Ni) and an increase (in the case of Co) in the 2-propanol selectivity. 44 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Enhanced oxygen evolution activity of IrO2 and RuO2 (100) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Stoerzinger, Kelsey; Qiao, Liang; Biegalski, Michael D; Christen, Hans M; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2014-01-01

    The activities of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) on IrO2 and RuO2 catalysts are among the highest known to date. However, the intrinsic OER activities of surfaces with defined crystallographic orientations are not well established experimentally. Here we report that the (100) surface of IrO2 and RuO2 is more active than the (110) surface that has been traditionally explored by density functional theory studies. The relation between the OER activity and density of coordinatively undersaturated metal sites exposed on each rutile crystallographic facet is discussed. The surface-orientation dependent activities can guide the design of high-surface-area catalysts with increased activity for electrolyzers, metal-air batteries, and photoelectrochemical water splitting applications.

  13. ZrO2 -Based Alternatives to Conventional Propane Dehydrogenation Catalysts: Active Sites, Design, and Performance.

    PubMed

    Otroshchenko, Tatyana; Sokolov, Sergey; Stoyanova, Mariana; Kondratenko, Vita A; Rodemerck, Uwe; Linke, David; Kondratenko, Evgenii V

    2015-12-21

    Non-oxidative dehydrogenation of propane to propene is an established large-scale process that, however, faces challenges, particularly in catalyst development; these are the toxicity of chromium compounds, high cost of platinum, and catalyst durability. Herein, we describe the design of unconventional catalysts based on bulk materials with a certain defect structure, for example, ZrO2 promoted with other metal oxides. Comprehensive characterization supports the hypothesis that coordinatively unsaturated Zr cations are the active sites for propane dehydrogenation. Their concentration can be adjusted by varying the kind of ZrO2 promoter and/or supporting tiny amounts of hydrogenation-active metal. Accordingly designed Cu(0.05 wt %)/ZrO2 -La2 O3 showed industrially relevant activity and durability over ca. 240 h on stream in a series of 60 dehydrogenation and oxidative regeneration cycles between 550 and 625 °C. PMID:26566072

  14. Copper on responsive polymer microgels: a recyclable catalyst exhibiting tunable catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qingshi; Cheng, Han; Chang, Aiping; Bai, Xue; Lu, Fan; Wu, Weitai

    2014-11-25

    Copper has been immobilized on a chitosan-based responsive polymer microgel by simply stirring the microgel dispersion with copper sulfate. The ensuing catalyst is highly active for a model azide-alkyne [3+2]-cycloaddition reaction, and can be recycled at least 5 times; the catalytic activity can be tuned via swelling-deswelling transitions of the polymer gels. PMID:25283806

  15. Preparation, surface characterization and performance of a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst of cobalt supported on silica nanosprings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kengne, Blaise-Alexis Fouetio; Alayat, Abdulbaset M.; Luo, Guanqun; McDonald, Armando G.; Brown, Justin; Smotherman, Hayden; McIlroy, David N.

    2015-12-01

    The reduction of cobalt (Co) catalyst supported on silica nanosprings for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) has been monitored by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and compared to FT catalytic activity. The cobalt is present in the starting catalyst as a Co3O4 spinel phase. A two-step reduction of Co3O4 to CoO and then to Co0 is observed, which is consistent with the results of H2-temperature programmed reduction. During the reduction the two steps occur concurrently. The deconvolution of the Co 2p core level state for the catalyst reduced at 385 °C and 1.0 × 10-6 Torr of H2 revealed signatures of Co0, CoO, and Co3O4. The reduction saturates at a Coo concentration of approximately 41% after 20 h, which correlates with the activity and lifetime of the catalyst during FTS testing. Conversely, at 680 °C and 10 Torr of H2, the catalyst is completely reduced after 10 h. The evolution of the Co d-band at the Fermi level in the valence band XPS spectrum definitively verifies the metallic phase of Co. FTS evaluation of the Co/NS catalyst reduced at 609 °C showed higher production rate (3-fold) of C6-C17 hydrocarbons than the catalyst reduced at 409 °C and is consistent with the XPS analysis.

  16. Synergistic effects of Ir-Au/TiO₂ catalysts in the total oxidation of propene: influence of the activation conditions.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Tapia, Antonio; Zanella, Rodolfo; Calers, Christophe; Louis, Catherine; Delannoy, Laurent

    2015-11-14

    Iridium was added to the Au/TiO2 system to try to enhance its catalytic activity in the reaction of propene oxidation, performed under conditions close to those used in the studies of decomposition of volatile organic compounds (1200 ppm propene and 9 vol% O2 in He). Titania supported Ir-Au (Ir/Au = 1) was prepared by sequential deposition-precipitation with urea (DPU) of Ir then Au. The effect of the activation conditions (hydrogen or air at 400 °C) was investigated. The study of the activation conditions of Ir-Au/TiO2 showed that activation under hydrogen at 400 °C generated a catalyst more active than the monometallic ones, while Ir-Au/TiO2 activated in air remained as poorly active as Au/TiO2. TEM characterization showed the formation of metallic particles of similar size (2-3 nm) in both monometallic Au/TiO2 and bimetallic Ir-Au/TiO2. Characterization especially by DRIFTS using CO as a probe molecule suggests the presence of Ir-Au interaction, IrO2-Au(0) interaction when the sample is calcined and Ir(0)-Au(0) bimetallic particles when it is reduced. XPS and TPR characterization techniques showed that gold hinders to some extent the reoxidation of iridium in the reduced bimetallic Ir-Au/TiO2 catalyst. The enhanced catalytic activity of the reduced bimetallic Ir-Au/TiO2 catalyst is attributed to a surface Ir(0)-Au(0) synergism. PMID:25785784

  17. Modification of Pd-CeO 2 catalyst by different treatments: Effect on the structure and CO oxidation activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Weng, Duan; Wu, Xiaodong; Ran, Rui

    2011-02-01

    To investigate the interaction between noble metal and CeO2, a Pd-doped CeO2 catalyst was prepared by sol-gel method, and the catalyst was then treated in static air and a H2/O2 alternating flow at 800 °C, respectively. It is found by step-scanning XRD that Pd ions migrate out of the ceria lattice during the redox treatment, while the exudation of Pd is not so obvious after the oxidative treatment. For the CO oxidation activity, the redox treated catalyst is seriously weakened compared with the oxidative-treated one. This difference is ascribed to the encapsulation of Pd crystallites by the CeO2 support during the redox treatment, which is confirmed by XPS and CO-TPR. Based on the activity and FTIR results, it is proposed that, CO oxidation at low temperatures proceeds mainly via the reaction between the adsorbed CO on Pd sites and the lattice oxygen of surface CeO2 at the Pd-Ce interface.

  18. Preparation and characterization of mesoporous N-doped and sulfuric acid treated anatase TiO 2 catalysts and their photocatalytic activity under UV and Vis illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kun, Robert; Tarján, Sándor; Oszkó, Albert; Seemann, Torben; Zöllmer, Volker; Busse, Matthias; Dékány, Imre

    2009-11-01

    Nitrogen-doped TiO 2 catalysts were prepared by a precipitation method. The samples were calcined at 400 °C for 4 h in air. X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), low temperature N 2-adsorption was used for structural characterization and UV-diffuse reflectance (UV-DR) was applied to investigate the optical properties of the as-prepared samples. It was found that microporous N-doped catalysts have solely anatase crystalline structure. Acidic treatment of the calcined samples was performed using sulfuric acid agitation. The crystalline structure remained unchanged due to surface treatment, while the porosity and the surface areas (aBETS) were decreased dramatically. Optical characterization of the doped catalysts showed that they could be excited by visible light photons in the 400-500 nm wavelength range ( λ g,1=˜390 nm, λ g,2=˜510 nm). It was also established that surface treatment enhances the Vis-light absorption of the N-TiO 2 powders. Finally the catalysts were tested in the photocatalytic degradation of phenol in aqueous suspensions. Two different light sources were used; one of them was a UV-rich high pressure Hg-lamp, while the other was a tubular visible light source. We found that using visible light illumination N-doped, acid treated TiO 2 samples were more catalytically active than non-doped TiO 2 catalysts.

  19. Morphological effects of the nanostructured ceria support on the activity and stability of CuO/CeO2 catalysts for the water-gas shift reaction.

    PubMed

    Yao, S Y; Xu, W Q; Johnston-Peck, A C; Zhao, F Z; Liu, Z Y; Luo, S; Senanayake, S D; Martínez-Arias, A; Liu, W J; Rodriguez, J A

    2014-08-28

    Three CuO/CeO2 catalyst with different morphologies of ceria, namely nanospheres, nanorods and nanocubes, were synthesized and used to catalyze the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction. The reactivity tests showed that the Cu supported on the ceria nanospheres exhibited both the highest activity and superior stability when compared with the nanocube and nanorod ceria catalysts. Operando X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) methods were used to characterize these catalysts in their working state. High resolution electron microscopy (HRTEM, STEM) was used to look at the local atomic structure and nano-scale morphology. Our results show that the morphology of the ceria support, which can involve different crystal faces and concentrations of defects and imperfections, has a critical impact on the catalytic properties and influences: (1) the dispersion of CuO in the as-synthesized catalyst; (2) the particle size of metallic Cu upon reduction during the WGS reaction, (3) the stability of the metallic Cu upon variations of temperature, and (4) the dissociation of water on the ceria support. The nanosphere ceria catalyst showed an excellent water dissociation capability, the best dispersion of Cu and a strong Cu-Ce interaction, therefore delivering the best performance among the three WGS catalysts. The metallic Cu, which is the active species during the WGS reaction, was more stabilized on the nanospheres than on the nanorods and nanocubes and thus led to a better stability of the nanosphere catalyst than the other two architectures. Each catalyst exhibited a distinctive line-shape in the 800-1600 cm(-1) region of the DRIFTS spectra, pointing to the existence of different types of carbonate or carboxylate species as surface intermediates for the WGS. PMID:25012908

  20. Key structure-activity relationships in the vanadium phosphorus oxide catalyst system

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M.R. ); Ebner, J.R. )

    1990-04-01

    The crystal structure of vanadyl pyrophosphate has been redetermined using single crystals obtained from a near solidified melt of a microcrystalline catalyst sample. Crystals that index as vanadyl pyrophosphate obtained from this melt are variable in color. Crystallographic refinement of the single crystal x-ray diffraction data indicates that structural differences among these materials can be described in terms of crystal defects associated with linear disorder of the vanadium atoms. The importance of the disorder is outlined in the context of its effect on the proposed surface topology parallel to (1,0,0). Models of the surface topology simply and intuitively account for the non-stoichometric surface atomic P/V ratio exhibited by selective catalysts of this phase. These models also point to the possible role of the excess phosphorus in providing site isolation of reactive centers at the surface. 33 refs., 7 figs.

  1. Alkane oxidation by an immobilized nickel complex catalyst: structural and reactivity differences induced by surface-ligand density on mesoporous silica.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Jun; Hori, Tomoaki; Stack, T Daniel P; Hikichi, Shiro

    2013-06-01

    Immobilized nickel catalysts SBA*-L-x/Ni (L = bis(2-pyridylmethyl)(1H-1,2,3-triazol-4-ylmethyl)amine) with various ligand densities (L content (x) = 0.5, 1, 2, 4 mol % Si) have been prepared from azidopropyl-functionalized mesoporous silicas SBA-N3-x. Related homogeneous ligand L(tBu) and its Ni(II) complexes, [Ni(L(tBu))(OAc)2(H2O)] (L(tBu)/Ni) and [Ni(L(tBu))2]BF4 (2 L(tBu)/Ni), have been synthesized. The L/Ni ratio (0.9-1.7:1) in SBA*-L-x/Ni suggests the formation of an inert [NiL2] site on the surface at higher ligand loadings. SBA*-L-x/Ni has been applied to the catalytic oxidation of cyclohexane with m-chloroperbenzoic acid (mCPBA). The catalyst with the lowest loading shows high activity in its initial use as the homogeneous L(tBu)/Ni catalyst, with some metal leaching. As the ligand loading increases, the activity and Ni leaching are suppressed. The importance of site-density control for the development of immobilized catalysts has been demonstrated. PMID:23584984

  2. Effect of calcination temperature on the activity of solid Ca/Al composite oxide-based alkaline catalyst for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yong-Lu; Wang, Bo-Yang; Li, Shu-Fen; Tian, Song-Jiang; Zhang, Min-Hua

    2013-01-01

    A solid Ca/Al composite oxide-based alkaline catalyst containing Ca(12)Al(14)O(33) and CaO was prepared by chemical synthesis and thermal activation from sodium aluminate solution and calcium hydroxide emulsion. The effect of calcination temperatures ranging from 120 °C to 1000 °C on activity of the catalyst was investigated. The catalyst calcined at 600 °C showed the highest activity with >94% yield of fatty acid methyl esters (i.e. biodiesel) when applied to the transesterification of rapeseed oil at a methanol:oil molar ratio of 15:1 at 65 °C for 3h. Structure and properties of the catalyst were studied and the characterizations with XRD, TGA, FTIR, BET, and SEM demonstrated that the performance of the catalyst was closely related to its specific surface area and crystalline structure. In particular, the generation of crystalline Ca(12)Al(14)O(33) improved the catalytic activity due its synergistic effect with CaO. PMID:23196252

  3. Rapid mechanochemical synthesis of VOx/TiO2 as highly active catalyst for HCB removal.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuzhen; Huang, Jun; Yang, Yang; Li, Yuancheng; Wang, Bin; Wang, Yujue; Deng, Shubo; Yu, Gang

    2015-12-01

    A rapid (1.5h) one-step ball milling (BM) method was developed to synthesize VOx/TiO2 (VTi-BM) and WOx or MoOx doped VOx/TiO2 (VWTi-BM or VMoTi-BM). Catalytic activity on gaseous POPs removal was tested using hexachlorobenzene (HCB) as surrogate. Catalytic performance decreased in the order of VWTi-BM (T50%=230°C)>VMoTi-BM (260°C)>VTi-BM (270°C)>VTi-WI (300°C; VOx/TiO2 synthesized by wetness impregnation method). The intermediates from oxidation of HCB were analyzed by off gas analysis, from which 2,2,4,5-tetrachloro-4-cyclopentene-1,3-dione (TCCD), dichloromaleic anhydride (DCMA) and tetrachloro-1,4-bezoquinone (TCBQ) were identified. Furthermore, a possible mechanism for the oxidation of HCB over VOx/TiO2 catalysts was proposed. Mechanism studies showed that BM samples possess better dispersion of the VOx species and more surface chemisorbed oxygen. Doping WOx or MoOx into VOx/TiO2 by ball milling can further enhance catalytic performance by increasing surface acid sites. PMID:26218787

  4. Metal organic framework-mediated synthesis of highly active and stable Fischer-Tropsch catalysts.

    PubMed

    Santos, Vera P; Wezendonk, Tim A; Jaén, Juan José Delgado; Dugulan, A Iulian; Nasalevich, Maxim A; Islam, Husn-Ubayda; Chojecki, Adam; Sartipi, Sina; Sun, Xiaohui; Hakeem, Abrar A; Koeken, Ard C J; Ruitenbeek, Matthijs; Davidian, Thomas; Meima, Garry R; Sankar, Gopinathan; Kapteijn, Freek; Makkee, Michiel; Gascon, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Depletion of crude oil resources and environmental concerns have driven a worldwide research on alternative processes for the production of commodity chemicals. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is a process for flexible production of key chemicals from synthesis gas originating from non-petroleum-based sources. Although the use of iron-based catalysts would be preferred over the widely used cobalt, manufacturing methods that prevent their fast deactivation because of sintering, carbon deposition and phase changes have proven challenging. Here we present a strategy to produce highly dispersed iron carbides embedded in a matrix of porous carbon. Very high iron loadings (>40 wt %) are achieved while maintaining an optimal dispersion of the active iron carbide phase when a metal organic framework is used as catalyst precursor. The unique iron spatial confinement and the absence of large iron particles in the obtained solids minimize catalyst deactivation, resulting in high active and stable operation. PMID:25740709

  5. Metal organic framework-mediated synthesis of highly active and stable Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Vera P.; Wezendonk, Tim A.; Jaén, Juan José Delgado; Dugulan, A. Iulian; Nasalevich, Maxim A.; Islam, Husn-Ubayda; Chojecki, Adam; Sartipi, Sina; Sun, Xiaohui; Hakeem, Abrar A.; Koeken, Ard C. J.; Ruitenbeek, Matthijs; Davidian, Thomas; Meima, Garry R.; Sankar, Gopinathan; Kapteijn, Freek; Makkee, Michiel; Gascon, Jorge

    2015-03-01

    Depletion of crude oil resources and environmental concerns have driven a worldwide research on alternative processes for the production of commodity chemicals. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is a process for flexible production of key chemicals from synthesis gas originating from non-petroleum-based sources. Although the use of iron-based catalysts would be preferred over the widely used cobalt, manufacturing methods that prevent their fast deactivation because of sintering, carbon deposition and phase changes have proven challenging. Here we present a strategy to produce highly dispersed iron carbides embedded in a matrix of porous carbon. Very high iron loadings (>40 wt %) are achieved while maintaining an optimal dispersion of the active iron carbide phase when a metal organic framework is used as catalyst precursor. The unique iron spatial confinement and the absence of large iron particles in the obtained solids minimize catalyst deactivation, resulting in high active and stable operation.

  6. Synthesis of highly dispersed and active palladium/carbon nanofiber catalyst for formic acid electrooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yuan-Hang; Yue-Jiang; Yang, Hou-Hua; Zhang, Xin-Sheng; Zhou, Xing-Gui; Niu, Li; Yuan, Wei-Kang

    2011-05-01

    Highly dispersed and active palladium/carbon nanofiber (Pd/CNF) catalyst is synthesized by NaBH4 reduction with trisodium citrate as the stabilizing agent. The obtained Pd/CNF catalyst is characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that the Pd nanoparticles with an average particle size of ca. 3.8 nm are highly dispersed on the CNF support even with a small ratio of citrate to Pd precursor, which is believed to be due to the pH adjustment of citrate stabilized colloidal Pd nanoparticles. The cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry techniques show that the obtained Pd/CNF catalyst exhibits good catalytic activity and stability for the electrooxidation of formic acid.

  7. Thin film hydrous metal oxide catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Dosch, Robert G.; Stephens, Howard P.

    1995-01-01

    Thin film (<100 nm) hydrous metal oxide catalysts are prepared by 1) synthesis of a hydrous metal oxide, 2) deposition of the hydrous metal oxide upon an inert support surface, 3) ion exchange with catalytically active metals, and 4) activating the hydrous metal oxide catalysts.

  8. The development and characterization of methanol decomposition catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Logsdon, B.W.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of catalyst doping was investigated using 2% and 3% palladium catalysts. The dopant was found to have a significant effect on the activity, selectivity, and thermal stability of the catalysts. The lithium, sodium, and barium-doped catalysts deactivated when exposed to a thermal cycle, whereas, the rubidium, cesium, and lanthanum-doped catalysts did not. Catalyst doping generally resulted in a decrease in the initial catalyst activity. This varied from a small decrease for the lanthana-doped catalyst to a large decrease for the alkali-doped catalysts. Selectivity for CO and H{sub 2} was increased by doping due to the neutralization of acid sites on the alumina. To avoid the use of large quantities of rare materials in the catalysts, two approaches were taken: (1) Development of a catalyst using 0.5% Pd, and (2) development of a base metal catalyst. Lowering the palladium content of the catalysts resulted in severe deactivation of all catalysts. The base metal catalyst development showed iron, cobalt and copper catalysts to be unacceptable due to severe deactivation. Nickel catalysts operating under the proper conditions were found to be adequate methanol decomposition catalysts. A final study demonstrated the feasibility of developing a high temperature methanol decomposition catalysts for use in hypersonic aircraft. The second phase of the study was the characterization of the palladium catalysts. Chemisorption results indicated that the palladium dispersion was affected by the dopant. The dispersion of the palladium, however, cannot account for the variation in the initial catalyst activity. CO{sub 2} thermal desorption results indicated that the alkali metal dopants effectively neutralized the acidic sites on the alumina support and produced a basic surface.

  9. Catalyst activation, deactivation, and degradation in palladium-mediated Negishi cross-coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Böck, Katharina; Feil, Julia E; Karaghiosoff, Konstantin; Koszinowski, Konrad

    2015-03-27

    Pd-mediated Negishi cross-coupling reactions were studied by a combination of kinetic measurements, electrospray-ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry, (31)P NMR and UV/Vis spectroscopy. The kinetic measurements point to a rate-determining oxidative addition. Surprisingly, this step seems to involve not only the Pd catalyst and the aryl halide substrate, but also the organozinc reagent. In this context, the ESI-mass spectrometric observation of heterobimetallic Pd-Zn complexes [L2 PdZnR](+) (L=S-PHOS, R=Bu, Ph, Bn) is particularly revealing. The inferred presence of these and related neutral complexes with a direct Pd-Zn interaction in solution explains how the organozinc reagent can modulate the reactivity of the Pd catalyst. Previous theoretical calculations by González-Pérez et al. (Organometallics- 2012, 31, 2053) suggest that the complexation by the organozinc reagent lowers the activity of the Pd catalyst. Presumably, a similar effect also causes the rate decrease observed upon addition of ZnBr2 . In contrast, added LiBr apparently counteracts the formation of Pd-Zn complexes and restores the high activity of the Pd catalyst. At longer reaction times, deactivation processes due to degradation of the S-PHOS ligand and aggregation of the Pd catalyst come into play, thus further contributing to the appreciable complexity of the title reaction. PMID:25709062

  10. Stable amorphous georgeite as a precursor to a high-activity catalyst.

    PubMed

    Kondrat, Simon A; Smith, Paul J; Wells, Peter P; Chater, Philip A; Carter, James H; Morgan, David J; Fiordaliso, Elisabetta M; Wagner, Jakob B; Davies, Thomas E; Lu, Li; Bartley, Jonathan K; Taylor, Stuart H; Spencer, Michael S; Kiely, Christopher J; Kelly, Gordon J; Park, Colin W; Rosseinsky, Matthew J; Hutchings, Graham J

    2016-03-01

    Copper and zinc form an important group of hydroxycarbonate minerals that include zincian malachite, aurichalcite, rosasite and the exceptionally rare and unstable--and hence little known and largely ignored--georgeite. The first three of these minerals are widely used as catalyst precursors for the industrially important methanol-synthesis and low-temperature water-gas shift (LTS) reactions, with the choice of precursor phase strongly influencing the activity of the final catalyst. The preferred phase is usually zincian malachite. This is prepared by a co-precipitation method that involves the transient formation of georgeite; with few exceptions it uses sodium carbonate as the carbonate source, but this also introduces sodium ions--a potential catalyst poison. Here we show that supercritical antisolvent (SAS) precipitation using carbon dioxide (refs 13, 14), a process that exploits the high diffusion rates and solvation power of supercritical carbon dioxide to rapidly expand and supersaturate solutions, can be used to prepare copper/zinc hydroxycarbonate precursors with low sodium content. These include stable georgeite, which we find to be a precursor to highly active methanol-synthesis and superior LTS catalysts. Our findings highlight the value of advanced synthesis methods in accessing unusual mineral phases, and show that there is room for exploring improvements to established industrial catalysts. PMID:26878237

  11. Stable amorphous georgeite as a precursor to a high-activity catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrat, Simon A.; Smith, Paul J.; Wells, Peter P.; Chater, Philip A.; Carter, James H.; Morgan, David J.; Fiordaliso, Elisabetta M.; Wagner, Jakob B.; Davies, Thomas E.; Lu, Li; Bartley, Jonathan K.; Taylor, Stuart H.; Spencer, Michael S.; Kiely, Christopher J.; Kelly, Gordon J.; Park, Colin W.; Rosseinsky, Matthew J.; Hutchings, Graham J.

    2016-03-01

    Copper and zinc form an important group of hydroxycarbonate minerals that include zincian malachite, aurichalcite, rosasite and the exceptionally rare and unstable—and hence little known and largely ignored—georgeite. The first three of these minerals are widely used as catalyst precursors for the industrially important methanol-synthesis and low-temperature water-gas shift (LTS) reactions, with the choice of precursor phase strongly influencing the activity of the final catalyst. The preferred phase is usually zincian malachite. This is prepared by a co-precipitation method that involves the transient formation of georgeite; with few exceptions it uses sodium carbonate as the carbonate source, but this also introduces sodium ions—a potential catalyst poison. Here we show that supercritical antisolvent (SAS) precipitation using carbon dioxide (refs 13, 14), a process that exploits the high diffusion rates and solvation power of supercritical carbon dioxide to rapidly expand and supersaturate solutions, can be used to prepare copper/zinc hydroxycarbonate precursors with low sodium content. These include stable georgeite, which we find to be a precursor to highly active methanol-synthesis and superior LTS catalysts. Our findings highlight the value of advanced synthesis methods in accessing unusual mineral phases, and show that there is room for exploring improvements to established industrial catalysts.

  12. Characterization of the activity and stability of supported cobalt catalysts for the steam reforming of ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, Marcelo S.; Santos, Rudye K. S.; Assaf, Elisabete M.; Assaf, José M.; Ticianelli, Edson A.

    This paper reports results of studies of the catalytic activity and stability of supported cobalt catalysts for steam reforming of ethanol. Co/Al 2O 3, Co/SiO 2, and Co/MgO catalysts were prepared by an impregnation method and characterized by X-ray diffraction, atomic absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and temperature programmed reduction with hydrogen. The results showed the presence of Co 3O 4 and CoO x species interacting with Al 2O 3 or MgO and formed after a calcination step. It was evident that only Co 0 sites are active for the steam reforming of ethanol. All materials showed high levels of ethanol conversion, with molar yields of about 70% of hydrogen and 30% of CO+CO 2+CH 4 in the gaseous mixture. The Co/Al 2O 3 catalyst also produced ethylene through a dehydration reaction of ethanol. It is proposed that the methane formation on Co/SiO 2 catalysts occurs by methanation of CO and by ethanol decomposition. After 9 h of reaction, 14-24% (w/w) of carbon was deposited on all catalysts, indicating that a well characterized deactivation of the materials is due to coke deposition.

  13. Pathway and Surface Mechanism Studies of 1,3-butadiene Selective Oxidation Over Vanadium-Molybdenum-Oxygen Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    William David Schroeder

    2002-05-27

    The partial oxidation of 1,3-butadiene has been investigated over VMoO catalysts synthesized by sol-gel techniques. Surface areas were 9-14 m{sup 2}/g, and compositions were within the solid solution regime, i.e. below 15.0 mol % MoO{sub 3}/(MoO{sub 3} + V{sub 2}O{sub 5}). Laser Raman Spectroscopy and XRD data indicated that solid solutions were formed, and pre- and post-reaction XPS data indicated that catalyst surfaces contained some V{sup +4} and were further reduced in 1,3-butadiene oxidation. A reaction pathway for 1,3-butadiene partial oxidation to maleic anhydride was shown to involve intermediates such as 3,4-epoxy-1-butene, crotonaldehyde, furan, and 2-butene-1,4-dial. The addition of water to the reaction stream substantially increased catalyst activity and improved selectivity to crotonaldehyde and furan at specific reaction temperatures. At higher water addition concentrations, furan selectivity increased from 12% to over 25%. The catalytic effects of water addition were related to competitive adsorption with various V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-based surface sites, including the vanadyl V=O, corner sharing V-O-V and edge sharing V-O oxygen. Higher levels of water addition were proposed to impose acidic character by dissociative adsorption. In addition, a novel combinatorial synthesis technique for VMoO was used to investigate the phase transitions of V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, solid solutions of Mo in V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, V{sub 9}Mo{sub 6}O{sub 40}, and other reduced VMoO compounds, characterized by laser Raman spectroscopy. The natural composition gradient imposed by the sputter deposition apparatus was used to create VMoO arrays containing 225 samples ranging from 7.0-42 mol% MoO{sub 3}/(V{sub 2}O{sub 5} + MoO{sub 3}), determined by EDS analysis.

  14. Nanocrystalline Ferrihydrite-Based Catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis: Part II. Effects of Activation Gases on the Catalytic Performance.

    PubMed

    Rhim, Geun Bae; Hong, Seok Yong; Park, Ji Chan; Jung, Heon; Rhee, Young Woo; Chun, Dong Hyun

    2016-02-01

    Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) was carried out over nanocrystalline ferrihydrite-based (Fe9O2(OH)23) catalysts activated by different reducing agents: syngas (H2+CO), CO, and H2. The syngas activation successfully changed the ferrihydrite-based catalysts into an active and stable catalytic structure with chi-carbide (Fe2.5 C) and epsilon'-carbide (Fe2.2 C). The crystal structure of the catalysts obtained by syngas activation was similar to the structure obtained by CO activation; this similarity was probably due to the peculiar reduction behavior of the ferrihydrite-based catalysts, which exhibit much greater reducibility in CO atmosphere than in H2 atmosphere. The performance of the catalysts activated by syngas was much higher than the performance of the catalysts activated by H2 and was comparable to the performance of the catalysts activated by CO. This strongly demonstrates that the ferrihydrite-based catalysts are advantageous for industrial FTS processes because syngas can be commonly used for both activation pre-treatment and subsequent reaction. PMID:27433672

  15. Environment-friendly Pd free surface activation technics for ABS surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Zengnian; Wang, Xu

    2012-05-01

    An environment-friendly surface etching and activation technics for acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) surface metallization were investigated as a replacement for conventional chromic acid etching bath and palladium catalyst. After etching by H2SO4-MnO2 colloid, the ABS surfaces became roughness; meanwhile the carboxyl and hydroxyl groups were formed on the surface. With absorption and a reduction by a dimethylamineborane solution, copper particles were deposited on the ABS surface, which serves as a catalyst replacement for SnCl2/PdCl2 colloid. The effects of CuSO4 concentration, (CH3)2NHBH3 concentration, reduction temperature and reduction time on the adhesion strength between the ABS surface and the electroless copper film were investigated. And the average adhesion strengths reached 1.31 kN m-1, which is near the values (1.19 kN m-1) obtained by SnCl2/PdCl2 colloid.

  16. Commercial runs show TiO/sub 2/ Claus catalyst retains activity

    SciTech Connect

    Nougayrede, J.; Philippe, A.; Quesmerel, E.; Vermeersch, R.

    1987-08-10

    Commercial data are given for the CRS 31 Claus catalyst, jointly developed by Rhone Poulenc and Societe Nationale Elf Aquitane (Production) (SNEA). The data confirm laboratory results that show the catalyst's ability to deliver more complete hydrolysis in the first reactor of Claus sulfur recovery plants, and its ability to maintain activity in the second and third reactors. The most important losses in sulfur yields in Claus plants generally come from COS and CS/sub 2/ formed in the thermal steps of the process in the first reactor, and from the low Claus activity of alumina-based catalysts in the second and third reactors. In the first reactor, loaded with alumina-based catalyst, hydrolysis is only partial. Low Claus activity in second and third reactors is caused by the inevitable sulfation of the alumina. Catalytic-activity decrease of aluminas is caused particularly by the presence of oxygen, even in trace amounts, in the Claus gases. Therefore, in the first reactor, the CS/sub 2/ hydrolysis rate is lowered in the subsequent reactors, the H/sub 2/ + SO/sub 2/ conversion significantly drops. The chemical composition of CRS 31, TiO/sub 2/ only, in the same operating conditions, causes a significant improvement in activity because of its increased resistance to sulfation. The economics of the process are given.

  17. Morphology and activity of vanadium-containing catalysts for the selective oxidation of benzene to maleic anhydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosumov, K.; Ergazieva, G. E.

    2012-11-01

    The morphology and activity of vanadium catalysts are studied using a number of physicochemical methods: electron microscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance, and infrared spectroscopy. It is found that the active agent of the conversion of benzene to maleic anhydride over modified vanadium catalysts is the V4+ ion in the vanadyl configuration.

  18. Analysis of Cell-Surface Receptor Dynamics through Covalent Labeling by Catalyst-Tethered Antibody.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takahiro; Yasueda, Yuki; Tamura, Tomonori; Takaoka, Yousuke; Hamachi, Itaru

    2015-04-29

    A general technique for introducing biophysical probes into selected receptors in their native environment is valuable for the study of their structure, dynamics, function, and molecular interactions. A number of such techniques rely on genetic engineering, which is not applicable for the study of endogenous proteins, and such approaches often suffer from artifacts due to the overexpression and bulky size of the probes/protein tags used. Here we designed novel catalyst-antibody conjugates capable of introducing small chemical probes into receptor proteins such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) in a selective manner on the surface of living cells. Because of the selectivity and efficiency of this labeling technique, we were able to monitor the cellular dynamics and lifetime of HER2 endogenously expressed on cancer cells. More significantly, the current labeling technique comprises a stable covalent bond, which combined with a peptide mass fingerprinting analysis allowed epitope mapping of antibodies on living cells and identification of potential binding sites of anti-EGFR affibody. Although as yet unreported in the literature, the binding sites predicted by our labeling method were consistently supported by the subsequent mutation and binding assay experiments. In addition, this covalent labeling method provided experimental evidence that HER2 exhibits a more dynamic structure than expected on the basis of crystallographic analysis alone. Our novel catalyst-antibody conjugates are expected to provide a general tool for investigating the protein trafficking, fluctuation, and molecular interactions of an important class of cell-surface receptors on live cell surfaces. PMID:25853648

  19. Leaching zinc from spent catalyst: process optimization using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengyong; Peng, Jinhui; Srinivasakannan, C; Zhang, Zebiao; Zhang, Libo; Fernández, Y; Menéndez, J A

    2010-04-15

    The spent catalyst from vinyl acetate synthesis contains large quantity of zinc. The present study attempts to leach zinc using a mixture of ammonia, ammonium carbonate and water solution, after microwave treatment. The effect of important parameters such as leaching time, liquid/solid ratio and the ammonia concentration was investigated and the process conditions were optimized using surface response methodology (RSM) based on central composite design (CCD). The optimum condition for leaching of zinc from spent catalyst was identified to be a leaching time of 2.50 h, a liquid/solid ratio of 6 and ammonia concentration 5.37 mol/L. A maximum of 97% of zinc was recovered under the optimum experimental conditions. The proposed model equation using RSM has shown good agreement with the experimental data, with a correlation coefficient (R(2)) of 0.95. The samples were characterized before and after leaching using X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption and scanning electron microscope (SEM). PMID:20060224

  20. Methanol oxidation on Fe2O3 catalysts and the effects of surface Mo.

    PubMed

    Bowker, M; Gibson, E K; Silverwood, I P; Brookes, C

    2016-07-01

    The adsorption of methanol on haematite has been investigated using temperature programmed methods, combined with in situ DRIFTS. Model catalysts based on this material have then been made with a shell-core configuration of molybdenum oxide monolayers on top of the haematite core. These are used as models of industrial iron molybdate catalysts, used to selectively oxidise methanol to formaldehyde, one of the major chemical outlets for methanol. Haematite itself is completely ineffective in this respect since it oxidises it to CO2 and the DRIFTS shows that this occurs by oxidation of methoxy to formate at around 200 °C. The decomposition behaviour is affected by the absence or presence of oxygen in the gas phase; oxygen destabilises the methoxy and enhances formate production. In contrast, when a monolayer of molybdena is placed onto the surface by incipient wetness, and it remains there after calcination, the pathway to formate production is blocked and formaldehyde is the main gas phase product in TPD after methanol dosing. PMID:27101412

  1. Highly Active Carbon Supported Pd-Ag Nanofacets Catalysts for Hydrogen Production from HCOOH.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenhui; He, Ting; Liu, Xuehua; He, Weina; Cong, Hengjiang; Shen, Yangbin; Yan, Liuming; Zhang, Xuetong; Zhang, Jinping; Zhou, Xiaochun

    2016-08-17

    Hydrogen is regarded as a future sustainable and clean energy carrier. Formic acid is a safe and sustainable hydrogen storage medium with many advantages, including high hydrogen content, nontoxicity, and low cost. In this work, a series of highly active catalysts for hydrogen production from formic acid are successfully synthesized by controllably depositing Pd onto Ag nanoplates with different Ag nanofacets, such as Ag{111}, Ag{100}, and the nanofacet on hexagonal close packing Ag crystal (Ag{hcp}). Then, the Pd-Ag nanoplate catalysts are supported on Vulcan XC-72 carbon black to prevent the aggregation of the catalysts. The research reveals that the high activity is attributed to the formation of Pd-Ag alloy nanofacets, such as Pd-Ag{111}, Pd-Ag{100}, and Pd-Ag{hcp}. The activity order of these Pd-decorated Ag nanofacets is Pd-Ag{hcp} > Pd-Ag{111} > Pd-Ag{100}. Particularly, the activity of Pd-Ag{hcp} is up to an extremely high value, i.e., TOF{hcp} = 19 000 ± 1630 h(-1) at 90 °C (lower limit value), which is more than 800 times higher than our previous quasi-spherical Pd-Ag alloy nanocatalyst. The initial activity of Pd-Ag{hcp} even reaches (3.13 ± 0.19) × 10(6) h(-1) at 90 °C. This research not only presents highly active catalysts for hydrogen generation but also shows that the facet on the hcp Ag crystal can act as a potentially highly active catalyst. PMID:27454194

  2. Ab Initio Approach for Prediction of Oxide Surface Structure, Stoichiometry, and Electrocatalytic Activity in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Rong, Xi; Kolpak, Alexie M

    2015-05-01

    The design of efficient, stable, and inexpensive catalysts for oxygen evolution and reduction is crucial for the development of electrochemical energy conversion devices such as fuel cells and metal-air batteries. Currently, such design is limited by challenges in atomic-scale experimental characterization and computational modeling of solid-liquid interfaces. Here, we begin to address these issues by developing a general-, first-principles-, and electrochemical-principles-based framework for prediction of catalyst surface structure, stoichiometry, and stability as a function of pH, electrode potential, and aqueous cation concentration. We demonstrate the approach by determining the surface phase diagram of LaMnO3, which has been studied for oxygen evolution and reduction and computing the reaction overpotentials on the relevant surface phases. Our results illustrate the critical role of solvated cation species in governing the catalyst surface structure and stoichiometry, and thereby catalytic activity, in aqueous solution. PMID:26263350

  3. Coatings of active and heat-resistant cobalt-aluminium xerogel catalysts.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Miriam; Schubert, Lennart; Thomé, Andreas; Kiewidt, Lars; Rosebrock, Christopher; Thöming, Jorg; Roessner, Frank; Bäumer, Marcus

    2016-09-01

    The application of catalytically coated metallic foams in catalytic processes has a high potential for exothermic catalytic reactions such as CO2 methanation or Fischer-Tropsch synthesis due to good heat conductivity, improved turbulent flow properties and high catalyst efficiencies. But the preparation of homogenous catalyst coats without pore blocking is challenging with conventional wash coating techniques. Here, we report on a stable and additive free colloidal CoAlOOH suspension (sol) for the preparation of catalytically active Co/Al2O3 xerogel catalysts and coatings. Powders with 18wt% Co3O4 prepared from this additive free synthesis route show a catalytic activity in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and CO2 methanation which is similar to a catalyst prepared by incipient wetness impregnation (IWI) after activating the material under flowing hydrogen at 430°C. Yet, the xerogel catalyst exhibits a much higher thermal stability as compared to the IWI catalyst, as demonstrated in catalytic tests after different heat agings between 430°C and 580°C. It was also found that the addition of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to the sol influences the catalytic properties of the formed xerogels negatively. Only non-reducible cobalt spinels were formed from a CoAlOOH sol with 20wt% PEG. Metallic foams with pores sizes between 450 and 1200μm were coated with the additive free CoAlOOH sol, which resulted in homogenous xerogel layers. First catalytic tests of the coated metal foams (1200μm) showed good performance in CO2 methanation. PMID:27240245

  4. Effect of nitrogen-containing impurities on the activity of perovskitic catalysts for the catalytic combustion of methane.

    PubMed

    Buchneva, Olga; Gallo, Alessandro; Rossetti, Ilenia

    2012-11-01

    LaMnO(3), either pure or doped with 10 mol % Sr, has been prepared by flame pyrolysis in nanostructured form. Such catalysts have been tested for the catalytic flameless combustion of methane, achieving very high catalytic activity. The resistance toward poisoning by some model N-containing impurities has been checked in order to assess the possibility of operating the flameless catalytic combustion with biogas, possibly contaminated by S- or N-based compounds. This would be a significant improvement from the environmental point of view because the application of catalytic combustion to gas turbines would couple improved energy conversion efficiency and negligible noxious emissions, while the use of biogas would open the way to energy production from a renewable source by means of very efficient technologies. A different behavior has been observed for the two catalysts; namely, the undoped sample was more or less heavily poisoned, whereas the Sr-doped sample showed slightly increasing activity upon dosage of N-containing compounds. A possible reaction mechanism has been suggested, based on the initial oxidation of the organic backbone, with the formation of NO. The latter may adsorb more or less strongly depending on the availability of surface oxygen vacancies (i.e., depending on doping). Decomposition of NO may leave additional activated oxygen species on the surface, available for low-temperature methane oxidation and so improving the catalytic performance. PMID:23039114

  5. The effect of supports on the activity and selectivity of Co - Ni alloy catalysts for CO hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, Tatsumi; Horiuchi, Nobuhiko; Eguchi, Koichi; Arai, Hiromichi )

    1991-07-01

    The CO hydrogenation activity of 50Co50Ni alloy catalysts strongly depended on the oxide support. Electron-donating oxides such as MgO, PbO, and ZnO lowered the overall activity of the 50Co50Ni metal. The CO conversion as well as the chain growth probability was high over 50Co50Ni/TiO{sub 2} and 50Co50Ni/MnO{sub 2}. The infrared spectra of adsorbed NO indicated that the electron density of the 50Co50Ni metal was low when it was supported on electron-accepting oxide. The results of desorption measurements suggest that metal-support interaction has a great influence on the surface concentration of hydrogen and carbon monoxide, and adsorption of carbon monoxide and hydrogen is weakened by increasing the electronegativity of the oxide support. Since the rate of H{sub 2}-D{sub 2} exchange correlated well with the CO hydrogenation rate, activation of hydrogen is of primary importance in this catalyst system. The low electron density of the alloy supported on the electron-accepting oxides such as TiO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2} weakens CO adsorption, resulting in an increase in surface coverage of hydrogen. Thus sufficient coverage of hydrogen leads to a high CO hydrogenation rate.

  6. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Varnell, Jason A.; Tse, Edmund C. M.; Schulz, Charles E.; Fister, Tim T.; Haasch, Richard T.; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Gewirth, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites. PMID:27538720

  7. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts.

    PubMed

    Varnell, Jason A; Tse, Edmund C M; Schulz, Charles E; Fister, Tim T; Haasch, Richard T; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Gewirth, Andrew A

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites. PMID:27538720

  8. Highly active Ce 1- xCu xO 2 nanocomposite catalysts for the low temperature oxidation of CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, Hailing; Zhang, Dengsong; Shi, Liyi; Yan, Tingting; Li, Hongrui

    2011-06-01

    A series of Ce 1- xCu xO 2 nanocomposite catalysts with various copper contents were synthesized by a simple hydrothermal method at low temperature without any surfactants, using mixed solutions of Cu(II) and Ce(III) nitrates as metal sources. These bimetal oxide nanocomposites were characterized by means of XRD, TEM, HRTEM, EDS, N 2 adsorption, H 2-TPR and XPS. The influence of Cu loading (5-25 mol%) and calcination temperature on the surface area, particle size and catalytic behavior of the nanocomposites have been discussed. The catalytic activity of Ce 1- xCu xO 2 nanocomposites was investigated using the test of CO oxidation reaction. The optimized performance was achieved for the Ce 0.80Cu 0.20O 2 nanocomposite catalyst, which exhibited superior reaction rate of 11.2 × 10 -4 mmol g -1 s -1 and high turnover frequency of 7.53 × 10 -2 s -1 (1% CO balanced with air at a rate of 40 mL min -1, at 90 °C). No obvious deactivation was observed after six times of catalytic reactions for Ce 0.80Cu 0.20O 2 nanocomposite catalyst.

  9. Alkene Isomerization Using a Solid Acid as Activator and Support for a Homogeneous Catalyst

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seen, Andrew J.

    2004-01-01

    An upper-level undergraduate experiment that, in addition to introducing students to catalysis using an air sensitive transition-metal complex, introduces the use of a solid acid as an activator and support for the catalyst is developed. The increased stability acquired in the course of the process affords the opportunity to characterize the…

  10. Graphene-supported hemin as a highly active biomimetic oxidation catalyst.

    PubMed

    Xue, Teng; Jiang, Shan; Qu, Yongquan; Su, Qiao; Cheng, Rui; Dubin, Sergey; Chiu, Chin-Yi; Kaner, Richard; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2012-04-16

    Well supported: stable hemin-graphene conjugates formed by immobilization of monomeric hemin on graphene, showed excellent catalytic activity, more than 10 times better than that of the recently developed hemin-hydrogel system and 100 times better than that of unsupported hemin. The catalysts also showed excellent binding affinities and catalytic efficiencies approaching that of natural enzymes. PMID:22368046

  11. Ligand-free Heck reaction: Pd(OAc)2 as an active catalyst revisited.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingwei; Kinney, Elizabeth P; Yang, Zhi

    2003-09-19

    Palladium acetate was shown to be an extremely active catalyst for the Heck reaction of aryl bromides. Both the base and the solvent were found to have a fundamental influence on the efficiency of the reaction, with K(3)PO(4) and N,N-dimethylacetamide being the optimal base and solvent, respectively. PMID:12968913

  12. Active sites for NO reduction over Fe-ZSM-5 catalysts.

    PubMed

    Schwidder, M; Santhosh Kumar, M; Brückner, A; Grünert, W

    2005-02-14

    A study of Fe-ZSM-5 catalysts with variable amounts of isolated, oligomeric and heavily aggregated Fe3+ oxo sites (as evidenced by UV-Vis and EPR spectroscopic data) and their catalytic properties in the selective catalytic reduction of NO by isobutane or by NH3 is presented, which allows development of a unified concept of the active Fe sites in these reactions, according to which isolated Fe sites catalyse both SCR reactions while oligomeric sites, though also involved in the selective reduction path, limit the catalyst performance by causing the total oxidation of the reductant. PMID:15685345

  13. Preparation and characterization of mesoporous N-doped and sulfuric acid treated anatase TiO{sub 2} catalysts and their photocatalytic activity under UV and Vis illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Kun, Robert; Tarjan, Sandor; Oszko, Albert; Seemann, Torben; Zoellmer, Volker; Busse, Matthias; Dekany, Imre

    2009-11-15

    Nitrogen-doped TiO{sub 2} catalysts were prepared by a precipitation method. The samples were calcined at 400 deg. C for 4 h in air. X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), low temperature N{sub 2}-adsorption was used for structural characterization and UV-diffuse reflectance (UV-DR) was applied to investigate the optical properties of the as-prepared samples. It was found that microporous N-doped catalysts have solely anatase crystalline structure. Acidic treatment of the calcined samples was performed using sulfuric acid agitation. The crystalline structure remained unchanged due to surface treatment, while the porosity and the surface areas (a{sub BET}{sup S}) were decreased dramatically. Optical characterization of the doped catalysts showed that they could be excited by visible light photons in the 400-500 nm wavelength range (lambda{sub g,1}={approx}390 nm, lambda{sub g,2}={approx}510 nm). It was also established that surface treatment enhances the Vis-light absorption of the N-TiO{sub 2} powders. Finally the catalysts were tested in the photocatalytic degradation of phenol in aqueous suspensions. Two different light sources were used; one of them was a UV-rich high pressure Hg-lamp, while the other was a tubular visible light source. We found that using visible light illumination N-doped, acid treated TiO{sub 2} samples were more catalytically active than non-doped TiO{sub 2} catalysts. - Graphical abstract: The effect of the acid treatment on the visible-light-driven photocatalytic activity of the N-doped, anatase TiO{sub 2} catalysts.

  14. Novel catalysts for methane activation. Quarterly report No. 3, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschon, A.S.; Malhotra, R.; Wilson, R.B.

    1993-08-31

    The objectives of this project are to test novel fullerene based catalysts for application in methane activation. Fullerenes are a recently discovered allotrope of carbon that have been found to possess unusual properties, some of which may be ideal for methane conversion to higher hydrocarbons. The project is divided into three technical tasks. Task 1 deals with the synthesis and characterization of the fullerenes and fullerene soots, Task 2 with the testing of the catalysts, and Task 3 with the evaluation of the results and technical reporting requirements. This quarter we prepared fuuerene soot and metallized fullerene soot and rebuilt our experimental testing system to be more suitable for the evaluation of the catalysts. The results and accomplishments are presented.

  15. Toward Design of Synergistically Active Carbon-Based Catalysts for Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Replacement of precious Pt catalyst with cost-effective alternatives would be significantly beneficial for hydrogen production via electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). All candidates thus far are exclusively metallic catalysts, which suffer inherent corrosion and oxidation susceptibility during acidic proton-exchange membrane electrolysis. Herein, based on theoretical predictions, we designed and synthesized nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) dual-doped graphene as a nonmetallic electrocatalyst for sustainable and efficient hydrogen production. The N and P heteroatoms could coactivate the adjacent C atom in the graphene matrix by affecting its valence orbital energy levels to induce a synergistically enhanced reactivity toward HER. As a result, the dual-doped graphene showed higher electrocatalytic HER activity than single-doped ones and comparable performance to some of the traditional metallic catalysts. PMID:24779586

  16. Activity and structure of perovskites as diesel reforming catalysts for solid oxide fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D.-J.; Krumpelt, M.; Chemical Engineering

    2005-01-01

    Recent progress in developing perovskite materials as more cost-effective catalysts in autothermal reforming (ATR) of diesel fuel to hydrogen-rich reformate for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) application is reported. Perovskite-type metal oxides with B sites partially exchanged by ruthenium were prepared and evaluated under ATR reaction conditions. The hydrogen yield, reforming efficiency, and CO{sub x} selectivity of these catalysts were investigated using diesel surrogate fuel with 50 ppm sulfur. The catalyst performances have approached or exceeded a benchmark, high-cost rhodium-based material. In parallel with the reactivity study, we also investigated the physical properties of B-site doped perovskites and their impact on the reforming performance using various characterization techniques such as BET, X-ray powder diffraction, temperature programmable reduction, scanning electron microscopy, and synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy. We found that ruthenium is highly dispersed into perovskite lattice and its redox behavior is directly associated with reforming activity.

  17. Method of treating intermetallic alloy hydrogenation/oxidation catalysts for improved impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration and increased activity

    DOEpatents

    Wright, R.B.

    1992-01-14

    Alternate, successive high temperature oxidation and reduction treatments, in either order, of intermetallic alloy hydrogenation and intermetallic alloy oxidation catalysts unexpectedly improves the impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration capacity and/or activity of the catalysts. The particular alloy, and the final high temperature treatment given alloy (oxidation or reduction) will be chosen to correspond to the function of the catalyst (oxidation or hydrogenation). 23 figs.

  18. Pt5Gd as a highly active and stable catalyst for oxygen electroreduction.

    PubMed

    Escudero-Escribano, María; Verdaguer-Casadevall, Arnau; Malacrida, Paolo; Grønbjerg, Ulrik; Knudsen, Brian P; Jepsen, Anders K; Rossmeisl, Jan; Stephens, Ifan E L; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2012-10-10

    The activity and stability of Pt(5)Gd for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) have been studied, using a combination of electrochemical measurements, angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AR-XPS), and density functional theory calculations. Sputter-cleaned, polycrystalline Pt(5)Gd shows a 5-fold increase in ORR activity, relative to pure Pt at 0.9 V, approaching the most active in the literature for catalysts prepared in this way. AR-XPS profiles after electrochemical measurements in 0.1 M HClO(4) show the formation of a thick Pt overlayer on the bulk Pt(5)Gd, and the enhanced ORR activity can be explained by means of compressive strain effects. Furthermore, these novel bimetallic electrocatalysts are highly stable, which, in combination with their enhanced activity, makes them very promising for the development of new cathode catalysts for fuel cells. PMID:22998588

  19. Combined UHV/high-pressure catalysis setup for depth-resolved near-surface spectroscopic characterization and catalytic testing of model catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayr, Lukas; Rameshan, Raffael; Klötzer, Bernhard; Penner, Simon; Rameshan, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    An ultra-high vacuum (UHV) setup for "real" and "inverse" model catalyst preparation, depth-resolved near-surface spectroscopic characterization, and quantification of catalytic activity and selectivity under technologically relevant conditions is described. Due to the all-quartz reactor attached directly to the UHV-chamber, transfer of the catalyst for in situ testing without intermediate contact to the ambient is possible. The design of the UHV-compatible re-circulating batch reactor setup allows the study of reaction kinetics under close to technically relevant catalytic conditions up to 1273 K without contact to metallic surfaces except those of the catalyst itself. With the attached differentially pumped exchangeable evaporators and the quartz-microbalance thickness monitoring equipment, a reproducible, versatile, and standardised sample preparation is possible. For three-dimensional near-surface sample characterization, the system is equipped with a hemispherical analyser for X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electron-beam or X-ray-excited Auger-electron spectroscopy, and low-energy ion scattering measurements. Due the dedicated geometry of the X-ray gun (54.7°, "magic angle") and the rotatable sample holder, depth analysis by angle-resolved XPS measurements can be performed. Thus, by the combination of characterisation methods with different information depths, a detailed three-dimensional picture of the electronic and geometric structure of the model catalyst can be obtained. To demonstrate the capability of the described system, comparative results for depth-resolved sample characterization and catalytic testing in methanol steam reforming on PdGa and PdZn near-surface intermetallic phases are shown.

  20. Combined UHV/high-pressure catalysis setup for depth-resolved near-surface spectroscopic characterization and catalytic testing of model catalysts.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Lukas; Rameshan, Raffael; Klötzer, Bernhard; Penner, Simon; Rameshan, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    An ultra-high vacuum (UHV) setup for "real" and "inverse" model catalyst preparation, depth-resolved near-surface spectroscopic characterization, and quantification of catalytic activity and selectivity under technologically relevant conditions is described. Due to the all-quartz reactor attached directly to the UHV-chamber, transfer of the catalyst for in situ testing without intermediate contact to the ambient is possible. The design of the UHV-compatible re-circulating batch reactor setup allows the study of reaction kinetics under close to technically relevant catalytic conditions up to 1273 K without contact to metallic surfaces except those of the catalyst itself. With the attached differentially pumped exchangeable evaporators and the quartz-microbalance thickness monitoring equipment, a reproducible, versatile, and standardised sample preparation is possible. For three-dimensional near-surface sample characterization, the system is equipped with a hemispherical analyser for X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electron-beam or X-ray-excited Auger-electron spectroscopy, and low-energy ion scattering measurements. Due the dedicated geometry of the X-ray gun (54.7°, "magic angle") and the rotatable sample holder, depth analysis by angle-resolved XPS measurements can be performed. Thus, by the combination of characterisation methods with different information depths, a detailed three-dimensional picture of the electronic and geometric structure of the model catalyst can be obtained. To demonstrate the capability of the described system, comparative results for depth-resolved sample characterization and catalytic testing in methanol steam reforming on PdGa and PdZn near-surface intermetallic phases are shown. PMID:24880412

  1. Combined UHV/high-pressure catalysis setup for depth-resolved near-surface spectroscopic characterization and catalytic testing of model catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Mayr, Lukas; Klötzer, Bernhard; Penner, Simon; Rameshan, Raffael; Rameshan, Christoph

    2014-05-15

    An ultra-high vacuum (UHV) setup for “real” and “inverse” model catalyst preparation, depth-resolved near-surface spectroscopic characterization, and quantification of catalytic activity and selectivity under technologically relevant conditions is described. Due to the all-quartz reactor attached directly to the UHV-chamber, transfer of the catalyst for in situ testing without intermediate contact to the ambient is possible. The design of the UHV-compatible re-circulating batch reactor setup allows the study of reaction kinetics under close to technically relevant catalytic conditions up to 1273 K without contact to metallic surfaces except those of the catalyst itself. With the attached differentially pumped exchangeable evaporators and the quartz-microbalance thickness monitoring equipment, a reproducible, versatile, and standardised sample preparation is possible. For three-dimensional near-surface sample characterization, the system is equipped with a hemispherical analyser for X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electron-beam or X-ray-excited Auger-electron spectroscopy, and low-energy ion scattering measurements. Due the dedicated geometry of the X-ray gun (54.7°, “magic angle”) and the rotatable sample holder, depth analysis by angle-resolved XPS measurements can be performed. Thus, by the combination of characterisation methods with different information depths, a detailed three-dimensional picture of the electronic and geometric structure of the model catalyst can be obtained. To demonstrate the capability of the described system, comparative results for depth-resolved sample characterization and catalytic testing in methanol steam reforming on PdGa and PdZn near-surface intermetallic phases are shown.

  2. A Systematic Investigation of Quaternary Ammonium Ions as Asymmetric Phase Transfer Catalysts. Synthesis of Catalyst Libraries and Evaluation of Catalyst Activity

    PubMed Central

    Denmark, Scott E.; Gould, Nathan D.; Wolf, Larry M.

    2011-01-01

    Despite over three decades of research into asymmetric phase transfer catalysis (APTC), a fundamental understanding of the factors that affect the rate and stereoselectivity of this important process are still obscure. This paper describes the initial stages of a long-term program aimed at elucidating the physical organic foundations of APTC employing a chemoinformatic analysis of the alkylation of a protected glycine imine with a libraries of enantiomerically enriched quaternary ammonium ions. The synthesis of the quaternary ammonium ions follows a diversity oriented approach wherein the tandem inter[4+2]/intra[3+2] cycloaddition of nitroalkenes serves as the key transformation. A two part synthetic strategy comprised of: (1) preparation of enantioenriched scaffolds and (2) development of parallel synthesis procedures is described. The strategy allows for the facile introduction of four variable groups in the vicinity of a stereogenic quaternary ammonium ion. The quaternary ammonium ions exhibited a wide range of activity and to a lesser degree enantioselectivity. Catalyst activity and selectivity are rationalized in a qualitative way based on the effective positive potential of the ammonium ion. PMID:21446721

  3. Bifunctional enhancement of oxygen reduction reaction activity on Ag catalysts due to water activation on LaMnO3 supports in alkaline media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Shin-Ae; Lee, Eun-Kyung; Song, Hannah; Kim, Yong-Tae

    2015-08-01

    Ag is considered to be one of the best candidates for oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalysts in alkaline media for application in various electrochemical energy devices. In this study, we demonstrate that water activation is a key factor in enhancing the ORR activity in alkaline media, unlike in acid environments. Ag supported on LaMnO3 having a high oxophilicity showed a markedly higher ORR activity than that on carbon with inert surfaces. Through various electrochemical tests, it was revealed that the origin of the enhanced ORR activity of Ag/LaMnO3 is the bifunctional effect mainly due to the water activation at the interface between Ag and LaMnO3. Furthermore, the ligand effect due to the charge transfer from Mn to Ag leads to the enhancement of both oxygen activation on Ag and water activation on Mn sites, and hence, an improvement in the ORR activity of Ag/LaMnO3. On the other hand, the strain effect based on the fine structure variation in the lattice was negligible. We therefore suggest that the employment of a co-catalyst or support with highly oxophilic nature and the maximization of the interface between catalyst and support should be considered in the design of electrocatalysts for the ORR in alkaline media.

  4. Bifunctional enhancement of oxygen reduction reaction activity on Ag catalysts due to water activation on LaMnO3 supports in alkaline media.

    PubMed

    Park, Shin-Ae; Lee, Eun-Kyung; Song, Hannah; Kim, Yong-Tae

    2015-01-01

    Ag is considered to be one of the best candidates for oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalysts in alkaline media for application in various electrochemical energy devices. In this study, we demonstrate that water activation is a key factor in enhancing the ORR activity in alkaline media, unlike in acid environments. Ag supported on LaMnO3 having a high oxophilicity showed a markedly higher ORR activity than that on carbon with inert surfaces. Through various electrochemical tests, it was revealed that the origin of the enhanced ORR activity of Ag/LaMnO3 is the bifunctional effect mainly due to the water activation at the interface between Ag and LaMnO3. Furthermore, the ligand effect due to the charge transfer from Mn to Ag leads to the enhancement of both oxygen activation on Ag and water activation on Mn sites, and hence, an improvement in the ORR activity of Ag/LaMnO3. On the other hand, the strain effect based on the fine structure variation in the lattice was negligible. We therefore suggest that the employment of a co-catalyst or support with highly oxophilic nature and the maximization of the interface between catalyst and support should be considered in the design of electrocatalysts for the ORR in alkaline media. PMID:26310526

  5. Bifunctional enhancement of oxygen reduction reaction activity on Ag catalysts due to water activation on LaMnO3 supports in alkaline media

    PubMed Central

    Park, Shin-Ae; Lee, Eun-Kyung; Song, Hannah; Kim, Yong-Tae

    2015-01-01

    Ag is considered to be one of the best candidates for oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalysts in alkaline media for application in various electrochemical energy devices. In this study, we demonstrate that water activation is a key factor in enhancing the ORR activity in alkaline media, unlike in acid environments. Ag supported on LaMnO3 having a high oxophilicity showed a markedly higher ORR activity than that on carbon with inert surfaces. Through various electrochemical tests, it was revealed that the origin of the enhanced ORR activity of Ag/LaMnO3 is the bifunctional effect mainly due to the water activation at the interface between Ag and LaMnO3. Furthermore, the ligand effect due to the charge transfer from Mn to Ag leads to the enhancement of both oxygen activation on Ag and water activation on Mn sites, and hence, an improvement in the ORR activity of Ag/LaMnO3. On the other hand, the strain effect based on the fine structure variation in the lattice was negligible. We therefore suggest that the employment of a co-catalyst or support with highly oxophilic nature and the maximization of the interface between catalyst and support should be considered in the design of electrocatalysts for the ORR in alkaline media. PMID:26310526

  6. Multiply twinned AgNi alloy nanoparticles as highly active catalyst for multiple reduction and degradation reactions.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mukesh; Deka, Sasanka

    2014-09-24

    Size dependent surface characteristics of nanoparticles lead to use of these nanomaterials in many technologically important fields, including the field of catalysis. Here Ag(1-x)Ni(x) bimetallic alloy nanoparticles have been developed having a 5-fold twinned morphology, which could be considered as an important alloy because of their excellent and unique catalytic and magnetic properties. Alloying between Ag and Ni atoms on a nanoscale has been confirmed with detailed X-ray diffraction, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and magnetization measurements. Although introduced for the first time as a catalyst due to having high active surface sites, the as-synthesized nanoparticles showed one of the best multiple catalytic activity in the industrially important (electro)-catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) and 4-nitroaniline (4-NA) to corresponding amines with noticeable reduced reaction time and increased rate constant without the use of any large area support. Additionally the same catalyst showed enhanced catalytic activity in degradation of environment polluting dye molecules. The highest ever activity parameter we report here for Ag0.6Ni0.4 composition is 156 s(-1)g(-1) with an apparent rate constant of 31.1 × 10(-3) s(-1) in a 4-NP reduction reaction where the amount of catalyst used was 0.2 mg and the time taken for complete conversion of 4-NP to 4-aminophenol was 60 s. Similarly, an incredible reaction rate constant (115 s(-1)) and activity parameter (576.6 s(-1)g(-1)) were observed for the catalytic degradation of methyl orange dye where 15 s is the maximum time for complete degradation of the dye molecules. The high catalytic performance of present AgNi alloy NPs over the other catalysts has been attributed to size, structural (twinned defect) and electronic effects. This study may lead to use of these bimetallic nanostructures with excellent recyclable catalytic

  7. Enhanced activity of urea electrooxidation on nickel catalysts supported on tungsten carbides/carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu; Du, Tingting; Cheng, Jin; Xie, Xing; Yang, Bolun; Li, Mingtao

    2015-04-01

    Nickel nanoparticles with tungsten carbides supported on the multi-walled carbon nanotubes, noted as Ni-WC/MWCNT catalyst, is prepared through an impregnation method and used for the electrooxidation of urea in alkaline conditions. The micro-morphology and composition of the Ni-WC/MWCNT particles are determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The electrooxidation activity and conductivity of the catalyst are investigated by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, respectively. Characterization results indicate that the Ni nanoparticles are uniformly distributed on the WC/MWCNT framework, and the Ni-WC/MWCNT catalyst shows an improved activity for the urea electrooxidation. The current densities of Ni-WC/MWCNT are over 3 times and 15 times higher than those of the Ni-WC/C and Ni/C catalysts, respectively, and the electrochemical impedance also decreases markedly. The higher activity on Ni-WC/MWCNT is attributed to the support effect of MWCNT as well as the synergistic effect between Ni and WC.

  8. Surface-Regulated Nano-SnO2/Pt3Co/C Cathode Catalysts for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells Fabricated by a Selective Electrochemical Sn Deposition Method.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Kensaku; Takao, Shinobu; Nagamatsu, Shin-ichi; Samjeské, Gabor; Sekizawa, Oki; Kaneko, Takuma; Higashi, Kotaro; Yamamoto, Takashi; Uruga, Tomoya; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro

    2015-10-14

    We have achieved significant improvements for the oxygen reduction reaction activity and durability with new SnO2-nanoislands/Pt3Co/C catalysts in 0.1 M HClO4, which were regulated by a strategic fabrication using a new selective electrochemical Sn deposition method. The nano-SnO2/Pt3Co/C catalysts with Pt/Sn = 4/1, 9/1, 11/1, and 15/1 were characterized by STEM-EDS, XRD, XRF, XPS, in situ XAFS, and electrochemical measurements to have a Pt3Co core/Pt skeleton-skin structure decorated with SnO2 nanoislands at the compressive Pt surface with the defects and dislocations. The high performances of nano-SnO2/Pt3Co/C originate from efficient electronic modification of the Pt skin surface (site 1) by both the Co of the Pt3Co core and surface nano-SnO2 and more from the unique property of the periphery sites of the SnO2 nanoislands at the compressive Pt skeleton-skin surface (more active site 2), which were much more active than expected from the d-band center values. The white line peak intensity of the nano-SnO2/Pt3Co/C revealed no hysteresis in the potential up-down operations between 0.4 and 1.0 V versus RHE, unlike the cases of Pt/C and Pt3Co/C, resulting in the high ORR performance. Here we report development of a new class of cathode catalysts with two different active sites for next-generation polymer electrolyte fuel cells. PMID:26412503

  9. Novel catalysts for methane activation. Quarterly report No. 7, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschon, A.S.; Wu, H.J.; Malhotra, R.; Wilson, R.B.

    1994-09-01

    Fullerenes are a recently discovered allotrope of carbon that have been found to possess unusual properties, some of which may be ideal for methane activation. This project is designed to evaluate these carbon based materials for conversion of methane into higher hydrocarbons. The project is divided into three technical tasks. Task 1 deals with the synthesis and characterization of the fullerenes and fullerene soots, Task 2 with the testing of the catalysts, and Task 3 with the evaluation of the results and technical reporting requirements. The results and accomplishments for this quarter are summarized below; soots were prepared either by extraction in toluene or sublimation of the lower fullerenes (such as C{sub 60}/C{sub 70}); a fullerene soot was prepared by adding C{sub 60} to an extracted soot; fullerene soot was doped with platinum and nickel by incipient wetness techniques, and a nickel fullerene complex was synthesized using organometallic techniques; soot from three manufactures were tested for methane activation and found to exhibit small but notable differences in reactivity; increasing the surface area of soots by partial oxidation with C0{sub 2} did not cause significant changes in the reactivities; the effect of the extraction and sublimation of C{sub 60}/C{sub 70} was determined to be minor; the effect of added C{sub 60} to an extracted MER soot was determined to be beneficial; acetylene black was tested and found to have higher activity and lower selectivity than a Norit-A carbon; and nickel and platinum doped soots were found to be more active than the undoped soots.

  10. Nanostructured manganese oxides as highly active water oxidation catalysts: a boost from manganese precursor chemistry.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Prashanth W; Indra, Arindam; Littlewood, Patrick; Schwarze, Michael; Göbel, Caren; Schomäcker, Reinhard; Driess, Matthias

    2014-08-01

    We present a facile synthesis of bioinspired manganese oxides for chemical and photocatalytic water oxidation, starting from a reliable and versatile manganese(II) oxalate single-source precursor (SSP) accessible through an inverse micellar molecular approach. Strikingly, thermal decomposition of the latter precursor in various environments (air, nitrogen, and vacuum) led to the three different mineral phases of bixbyite (Mn2 O3 ), hausmannite (Mn3 O4 ), and manganosite (MnO). Initial chemical water oxidation experiments using ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) gave the maximum catalytic activity for Mn2 O3 and MnO whereas Mn3 O4 had a limited activity. The substantial increase in the catalytic activity of MnO in chemical water oxidation was demonstrated by the fact that a phase transformation occurs at the surface from nanocrystalline MnO into an amorphous MnOx (1activities of water oxidation catalysts has been proposed by determining the amount of accessible manganese centers. PMID:25044528

  11. Process optimization of preparation of ZnO-porous carbon composite from spent catalysts using one step activation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Wen; Qu, Wen-Wen; Srinivasakannan, C; Peng, Jin-Hui; Duan, Xin-Hui; Zhang, Shi-Min

    2012-08-01

    The process parameters of one step preparation of ZnO/Activated Carbon (AC) composite materials, from vinyl acetate synthesis spent catalyst were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM) and the central composite rotatable design (CCD). Regeneration temperature, time and flow rate of CO2 were the process variables, while the iodine number and the yield were the response variables. All the three process variables were found to significantly influence the yield of the regenerated carbon, while only the regeneration temperature and CO2 flow rate were found to significantly affect the iodine number. The optimized process conditions that maximize the yield and iodine adsorption capacity were identified to be a regeneration temperature of 950 degrees C, time of 120 min and flow rate of CO2 of 600 ml/min, with the corresponding yield and iodine number to be in excess of 50% and 1100 mg/g. The BET surface area of the regenerated composite was estimated to be 1263 m2/g, with micropore to mesopore ratio of 0.75. The pore volume was found to have increased 6 times as compared to the spent catalyst. The composite material (AC/ZnO) with high surface area and pore volume coupled with high yield augur economic feasibility of the process. EDS and XRD spectrum indicate presence of ZnO in the regenerated samples. PMID:22962730

  12. Activity and stability enhancement of copper-alumina catalysts using cerium and zinc promoters for the selective production of hydrogen via steam reforming of methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Sanjay; Pant, K. K.

    The catalytic activity and hydrogen selectivity of cerium and zinc promoted copper-alumina catalysts have been investigated for the selective production of hydrogen via steam reforming of methanol (SRM). The SRM was carried out in a fixed bed tubular reactor at atmospheric pressure over a temperature range 200-300 °C. The major reaction products were hydrogen and carbon dioxide with traces of carbon monoxide. Catalysts of varying compositions were prepared by the wet impregnation method and characterized by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), BET surface area, pore volume, pore size, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetry analysis (TGA). Results revealed that the methanol conversion, hydrogen selectivity and carbon monoxide formation varied with the type of promoter and content of copper in the catalyst. Cerium promoted Cu-Zn-Ce-Al-oxide catalysts improved the activity and hydrogen selectivity greatly and also kept the CO formation very low. Using cerium the SRM could be carried out at lower temperature with high methanol conversion, results in suppression of methanol decomposition and reverse water gas shift reactions eventually end-up with the low carbon monoxide and hydrogen rich product stream. Cerium also stabilizes the copper-alumina catalysts effectively that was confirmed by deactivation studies in which cerium promoted Cu-Zn-Ce-Al-oxide catalysts gave the consistent performance for a long run-time compared to catalysts containing only zinc promoter. The optimum operating conditions for SRM have been investigated by detailed study of effects of reaction temperature, contact time and steam to methanol molar ratio on methanol conversion, hydrogen selectivity and CO formation. Reaction pathway has been proposed for the SRM based on results obtained.

  13. Molecular Insight in Structure and Activity of Highly Efficient, Low-Ir Ir-Ni Oxide Catalysts for Electrochemical Water Splitting (OER).

    PubMed

    Reier, Tobias; Pawolek, Zarina; Cherevko, Serhiy; Bruns, Michael; Jones, Travis; Teschner, Detre; Selve, Sören; Bergmann, Arno; Nong, Hong Nhan; Schlögl, Robert; Mayrhofer, Karl J J; Strasser, Peter

    2015-10-14

    Mixed bimetallic oxides offer great opportunities for a systematic tuning of electrocatalytic activity and stability. Here, we demonstrate the power of this strategy using well-defined thermally prepared Ir-Ni mixed oxide thin film catalysts for the electrochemical oxygen evolution reaction (OER) under highly corrosive conditions such as in acidic proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzers and photoelectrochemical cells (PEC). Variation of the Ir to Ni ratio resulted in a volcano type OER activity curve with an unprecedented 20-fold improvement in Ir mass-based activity over pure Ir oxide. In situ spectroscopic probing of metal dissolution indicated that, against common views, activity and stability are not directly anticorrelated. To uncover activity and stability controlling parameters, the Ir-Ni mixed thin oxide film catalysts were characterized by a wide array of spectroscopic, microscopic, scattering, and electrochemical techniques in conjunction with DFT theoretical computations. By means of an intuitive model for the formation of the catalytically active state of the bimetallic Ir-Ni oxide surface, we identify the coverage of reactive surface hydroxyl groups as a suitable descriptor for the OER activity and relate it to controllable synthetic parameters. Overall, our study highlights a novel, highly active oxygen evolution catalyst; moreover, it provides novel important insights into the structure and performance of bimetallic oxide OER electrocatalysts in corrosive acidic environments. PMID:26355767

  14. Structure-activity relationship of Au-ZrO2 catalyst on formation of hydroxyl groups and its influence on CO oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Karwacki, Christopher J; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Kent, P. R. C.; Gordon, Wesley O; Peterson, Gregory W; Niu, Jun Jie; Gogotsi, Yury G.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of changes in morphology and surface hydroxyl species upon thermal treatment of zirconia on the oxidation activity of Au/ZrO2 catalyst was studied. We observed using transmission Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy progressive changes in the presence of monodentate (type I), bidentate (type II) and hydrogen bridged species (type III) for each of the thermally treated (85 to 500 C) supports consisting of bare zirconia and Au/ZrO2 catalysts. Furthermore, structural changes in zirconia were accompanied by an increase in crystal size (7 to 58 nm) and contraction of the supports porosity (SSA 532 to 7 m2 g 1) with increasing thermal treatment. Deposition of gold nanoparticles under similar preparation conditions on different thermally treated zirconia resulted in changes in the mean gold cluster size, ranging from 3.7 to 5.6 nm. Changes in the surface hydroxyl species, support structure and size of the gold centers are important parameters responsible for the observed decrease (>90%) in CO conversion activity for the Au/ZrO2 catalysts. Density functional theory calculations provide evidence of increased CO binding to Au nanoclusters in the presence of surface hydroxyls on zirconia, which increases charge transfer at the perimeter of the gold nanocluster on zirconia support. This further helps in reducing a model CO-oxidation reaction barrier in the presence of surface hydroxyls. This work demonstrates the need to understand the structure activity relationship of both the support and active particles for the design of catalytic materials.

  15. Structure–activity relationship of Au/ZrO2 catalyst on formation of hydroxyl groups and its influence on CO oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Karwacki, Christopher J.; Ganesh, P.; Kent, Paul R. C.; Gordon, Wesley O.; Peterson, Gregory W.; Niu, Jun Jie; Gogotsi, Yury

    2013-01-01

    The effect of changes in morphology and surface hydroxyl species upon thermal treatment of zirconia on the oxidation activity of Au/ZrO2 catalyst was studied. We observed using transmission fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy progressive changes in the presence of monodentate (type I), bidentate (type II) and hydrogen bridged species (type III) for each of the thermally treated (85 to 500 C) supports consisting of bare zirconia and Au/ZrO2 catalysts. Furthermore, structural changes in zirconia were accompanied by an increase in crystal size (7 to 58 nm) and contraction of the supports porosity (SSA 532 to 7 m2/g) with increasing thermal treatment. Deposition of gold nanoparticles under similar preparation conditions on different thermally treated zirconia resulted in changes in the mean gold cluster size, ranging from 3.7 to 5.6 nm. Changes in the surface hydroxyl species, support structure and size of the gold centers are important parameters responsible for the observed decrease (> 90 %) in CO conversion activity for the Au/ZrO2 catalysts. Density functional theory calculations provide evidence of increased CO binding to Au nanoclusters in the presence of surface hydroxyls on zirconia, which increases charge transfer at the perimeter of the gold nanocluster on zirconia support. This further helps in reducing a model CO-oxidation reaction barrier in the presence of surface hydroxyls. This work demonstrates the need to understand the structure-activity relationship of both the support and active particles for the design of catalytic materials.

  16. In-situ Moessbauer Spectroscopy of Supported Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts During Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Motjope, Thato R.; Dlamini, Thulani H.

    2005-04-26

    The behavior of Fe based catalysts supported on ZrO2, SiO2, {gamma}-Al2O3, CeO2 and TiO2 during calcination, reduction and FT synthesis have been studied via in situ Moessbauer spectroscopy. It was found that the type of metal support interaction i.e. surface migration or bulk diffusion during calcination was dependant on the type of support used. Surface migration of Fe3+ during calcination was dominant for ZrO2, CeO2 and {gamma}-Al2O3 and this resulted in the sintering of {alpha}-Fe2O3 crystallites. Whereas bulk diffusion was observed mainly for the catalysts prepared using SiO2 and TiO2, causing a stabilization of the small crystallites of Fe3+ that interacted strongly with the support. Upon reduction, the large crystallites of {alpha}-Fe2O3 were found to reduce readily compared to the small crystallites of Fe3+, except for the catalyst prepared using {gamma}-Al2O3, as a support, where the presence of Al3+ resulted in the formation of spinel like species with the formula (Fe{sup 3+}{sub 2-x}Al{sup 3+}{sub x}Fe{sup 2+})O{sub 4} which are resistant to reduction. Upon exposure to synthesis gas, it was found that catalysts supported on ZrO2 and CeO2 carburized readily resulting in the formation of circa 80% {chi}-Fe2.5C. From this study it was observed that {gamma}-Al2O3 is not the preferred support for Fe based FT catalysts, as it forms the least amount of Fe carbides during FT synthesis.

  17. A highly active water-soluble cross-coupling catalyst based on dendritic polyglycerol N-heterocyclic carbene palladium complexes.

    PubMed

    Meise, Markus; Haag, Rainer

    2008-01-01

    A new water-soluble polyglycerol derivative functionalized with N-heterocyclic carbene palladium complexes was prepared and applied as catalyst for Suzuki cross-coupling reactions in water. The complex displays a metal loading of around 65 metal centers per dendrimeric molecule, which is estimated to contain 130 chelating groups and thus corresponds approximately to the formation of 2:1 NHC/metal complexes. Monomeric analogues were also synthesized to validate the reactivity of the dendritic catalyst. Both types of catalysts were tested with various aryl bromides and arylboronic acids. Turnover frequencies of up to 2586 h(-1) at 80 degrees C were observed with the dendritic catalyst along with turnover numbers of up to 59 000, which are among the highest turnover numbers reported for polymer-supported catalysts in neat water. The dendritic catalyst could be used (reused) in five consecutive reactions without loss in activity. PMID:18702166

  18. In situ generated highly active copper oxide catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction at low overpotential in alkaline solutions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang; Cui, Shengsheng; Qian, Manman; Sun, Zijun; Du, Pingwu

    2016-04-25

    Developing efficient water oxidation catalysts made up of earth-abundant elements has attracted much attention as a step toward for future clean energy production. Herein we report a simple one-step method to generate a low cost copper oxide catalyst film in situ from a copper(ii) ethylenediamine complex. The resulting catalyst has excellent activity toward the oxygen evolution reaction in alkaline solutions. A catalytic current density of 1.0 mA cm(-2) and 10 mA cm(-2) for the catalyst film requires the overpotentials of only ∼370 mV and ∼475 mV in 1.0 M KOH, respectively. This catalytic performance shows that the new catalyst is one of the best Cu-based heterogeneous OER catalysts to date. PMID:27020763

  19. A facile reflux procedure to increase active surface sites form highly active and durable supported palladium@platinum bimetallic nanodendrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qin; Li, Yingjun; Liu, Baocang; Xu, Guangran; Zhang, Geng; Zhao, Qi; Zhang, Jun

    2015-11-01

    A series of well-dispersed bimetallic Pd@Pt nanodendrites uniformly supported on XC-72 carbon black are fabricated by using different capping agents. These capping agents are essential for the branched morphology control. However, the surfactant adsorbed on the nanodendrites surface blocks the access of reactant molecules to the active surface sites, and the catalytic activities of these bimetallic nanodendrites are significantly restricted. Herein, a facile reflux procedure to effectively remove the capping agent molecules without significantly affecting their sizes is reported for activating supported nanocatalysts. More significantly, the structure and morphology of the nanodendrites can also be retained, enhancing the numbers of active surface sites, catalytic activity and stability toward methanol and ethanol electro-oxidation reactions. The as-obtained hot water reflux-treated Pd@Pt/C catalyst manifests superior catalytic activity and stability both in terms of surface and mass specific activities, as compared to the untreated catalysts and the commercial Pt/C and Pd/C catalysts. We anticipate that this effective and facile removal method has more general applicability to highly active nanocatalysts prepared with various surfactants, and should lead to improvements in environmental protection and energy production.

  20. Low-temperature catalyst activator: mechanism of dense carbon nanotube forest growth studied using synchrotron radiation

    PubMed Central

    Takashima, Akito; Izumi, Yudai; Ikenaga, Eiji; Ohkochi, Takuo; Kotsugi, Masato; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Muro, Takayuki; Kawabata, Akio; Murakami, Tomo; Nihei, Mizuhisa; Yokoyama, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of the one-order-of-magnitude increase in the density of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) achieved by a recently developed thermal chemical vapor deposition process was studied using synchrotron radiation spectroscopic techniques. In the developed process, a Ti film is used as the underlayer for an Fe catalyst film. A characteristic point of this process is that C2H2 feeding for the catalyst starts at a low temperature of 450°C, whereas conventional feeding temperatures are ∼800°C. Photoemission spectroscopy using soft and hard X-rays revealed that the Ti underlayer reduced the initially oxidized Fe layer at 450°C. A photoemission intensity analysis also suggested that the oxidized Ti layer at 450°C behaved as a support for nanoparticle formation of the reduced Fe, which is required for dense CNT growth. In fact, a CNT growth experiment, where the catalyst chemical state was monitored in situ by X-ray absorption spectroscopy, showed that the reduced Fe yielded a CNT forest at 450°C. Contrarily, an Fe layer without the Ti underlayer did not yield such a CNT forest at 450°C. Photoemission electron microscopy showed that catalyst annealing at the conventional feeding temperature of 800°C caused excess catalyst agglomeration, which should lead to sparse CNTs. In conclusion, in the developed growth process, the low-temperature catalyst activation by the Ti underlayer before the excess Fe agglomeration realised the CNT densification. PMID:25075343

  1. Organorhenium surface and catalytic chemistry: silica-supported alkene metathesis catalysts derived from dodecacarbonyltetrakis(. mu. -hydrido)-tetrahedro-tetrarhenium and tetrakis(tricarbonyl(. mu. -hydroxo)rhenium)

    SciTech Connect

    Kirlin, P.S.; Gates, B.C.

    1985-11-06

    Silica-supported (Re(CO)/sub 3/OH)/sub 4/ was formed by direct deposition from solution and, alternatively, by reaction of (H/sub 4/Re/sub 4/(CO)/sub 12/) with adsorbed water, as shown by comparisons of infrared, ultraviolet, and /sup 1/H NMR spectra of the surface and of the complex extracted into tetrahydrofuran. The supported (Re(CO)/sub 3/OH)/sub 4/ is inferred to be hydrogen bonded to surface -OH groups; its chemistry is similar to that of (Re(CO)/sub 3/OH)/sub 4/ in solution, but new reactivity is induced by the surface, with adsorbed (HRe/sub 3/(CO)/sub 14/) being formed from (Re(CO)/sub 3/OH)/sub 4/ (or (H/sub 3/Re/sub 3/(CO)/sub 12/)) in the presence of CO at 150/sup 0/C. The supported (Re(CO)/sub 3/OH)/sub 4/ is the precursor of a highly active and stable catalyst for the metathesis of propene: the activity is associated with a small fraction of the rhenium in a higher oxidation state. The oxidation to form the active species takes place under conditions so mild that more highly oxidized species, which are active for alkene polymerization and coke formation, are not formed, and the catalyst is consequently resistant to deactivation. 38 references, 10 figures, 2 tables.

  2. Influence of liquid medium on the activity of a low-alpha Fischer-Tropsch catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Gormley, R.J.; Zarochak, M.F.; Deffenbaugh, P.W.; Rao, K.R.P.M.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this research was to measure activity, selectivity, and the maintenance of these properties in slurry autoclave experiments with a Fischer-Tropsch (FT) catalyst that was used in the {open_quotes}FT II{close_quotes} bubble-column test, conducted at the Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) at LaPorte, Texas during May 1994. The catalyst contained iron, copper, and potassium and was formulated to produce mainly hydrocarbons in the gasoline range with lesser production of diesel-range products and wax. The probability of chain growth was thus deliberately kept low. Principal goals of the autoclave work have been to find the true activity of this catalyst in a stirred tank reactor, unhindered by heat or mass transfer effects, and to obtain a steady conversion and selectivity over the approximately 15 days of each test. Slurry autoclave testing of the catalyst in heavier waxes also allows insight into operation of larger slurry bubble column reactors. The stability of reactor operation in these experiments, particularly at loadings exceeding 20 weight %, suggests the likely stability of operations on a larger scale.

  3. Highly selective plasma-activated copper catalysts for carbon dioxide reduction to ethylene

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mistry, Hemma; Varela, Ana Sofia; Bonifacio, Cecile S.; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Sinev, Ilya; Choi, Yong-Wook; Kisslinger, Kim; Stach, Eric A.; Yang, Judith C.; Strasser, Peter; et al

    2016-06-30

    There is an urgent need to develop technologies that use renewable energy to convert waste products such as carbon dioxide into hydrocarbon fuels. Carbon dioxide can be electrochemically reduced to hydrocarbons over copper catalysts, although higher efficiency is required. We have developed oxidized copper catalysts displaying lower overpotentials for carbon dioxide electroreduction and record selectivity towards ethylene (60%) through facile and tunable plasma treatments. Herein we provide insight into the improved performance of these catalysts by combining electrochemical measurements with microscopic and spectroscopic characterization techniques. Operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy and cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy show that copper oxides aremore » surprisingly resistant to reduction and copper+ species remain on the surface during the reaction. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that the roughness of oxide-derived copper catalysts plays only a partial role in determining the catalytic performance, while the presence of copper+ is key for lowering the onset potential and enhancing ethylene selectivity.« less

  4. Catalyst suppliers consolidate further, offer more catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1995-10-02

    The list of suppliers of catalysts to the petroleum refining industry has decreased by five since Oil and Gas Journal`s survey of refining catalysts and catalytic additives was last published. Despite the consolidation, the list of catalyst designations has grown to about 950 in this latest survey, compared to 820 listed in 1993. The table divides the catalysts by use and gives data on their primary differentiating characteristics, feedstock, products, form, bulk density,catalyst support, active agents, availability, and manufactures.

  5. Artist's rendering of Lunar Surface Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Lunar Surface Activities: Instruments erected on the surface are a seismometer to record any subsurface activity of the Moon, a laser reflector, a solar wind collector, and possibly an antenna for improving communications and television picture transmission.

  6. Bulk-surface relationship of an electronic structure for high-throughput screening of metal oxide catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kweun, Joshua Minwoo; Li, Chenzhe; Zheng, Yongping; Cho, Maenghyo; Kim, Yoon Young; Cho, Kyeongjae

    2016-05-01

    Designing metal-oxides consisting of earth-abundant elements has been a crucial issue to replace precious metal catalysts. To achieve efficient screening of metal-oxide catalysts via bulk descriptors rather than surface descriptors, we investigated the relationship between the electronic structure of bulk and that of the surface for lanthanum-based perovskite oxides, LaMO3 (M = Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu). Through density functional theory calculations, we examined the d-band occupancy of the bulk and surface transition-metal atoms (nBulk and nSurf) and the adsorption energy of an oxygen atom (Eads) on (001), (110), and (111) surfaces. For the (001) surface, we observed strong correlation between the nBulk and nSurf with an R-squared value over 94%, and the result was interpreted in terms of ligand field splitting and antibonding/bonding level splitting. Moreover, the Eads on the surfaces was highly correlated with the nBulk with an R-squared value of more than 94%, and different surface relaxations could be explained by the bulk electronic structure (e.g., LaMnO3 vs. LaTiO3). These results suggest that a bulk-derived descriptor such as nBulk can be used to screen metal-oxide catalysts.

  7. Active site formation mechanism of carbon-based oxygen reduction catalysts derived from a hyperbranched iron phthalocyanine polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraike, Yusuke; Saito, Makoto; Niwa, Hideharu; Kobayashi, Masaki; Harada, Yoshihisa; Oshima, Masaharu; Kim, Jaehong; Nabae, Yuta; Kakimoto, Masa-aki

    2015-04-01

    Carbon-based cathode catalysts derived from a hyperbranched iron phthalocyanine polymer (HB-FePc) were characterized, and their active-site formation mechanism was studied by synchrotron-based spectroscopy. The properties of the HB-FePc catalyst are compared with those of a catalyst with high oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity synthesized from a mixture of iron phthalocyanine and phenolic resin (FePc/PhRs). Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that the HB-FePc catalyst does not lose its ORR activity up to 900°C, whereas that of the FePc/PhRs catalyst decreases above 700°C. Hard X-ray photoemission spectra reveal that the HB-FePc catalysts retain more nitrogen components than the FePc/PhRs catalysts between pyrolysis temperatures of 600°C and 800°C. This is because the linked structure of the HB-FePc precursor has high thermostability against nitrogen desorption. Consequently, effective doping of active nitrogen species into the sp 2 carbon network of the HB-FePc catalysts may occur up to 900°C.

  8. Enhanced catalyst stability for cyclic co methanation operations

    DOEpatents

    Risch, Alan P.; Rabo, Jule A.

    1983-01-01

    Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams are passed over a catalyst to deposit a surface layer of active surface carbon thereon essentially without the formation of inactive coke. The active carbon is thereafter reacted with steam or hydrogen to form methane. Enhanced catalyst stability for long term, cyclic operation is obtained by the incorporation of an alkali or alkaline earth dopant in a silica binding agent added to the catalyst-support additive composition.

  9. Promoting effect of vanadium on catalytic activity of Pt/Ce-Zr-O diesel oxidation catalysts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haifeng; Jiang, Bo; Gu, Lei; Qi, Zhonghua; Lu, Hanfeng

    2015-07-01

    A series of Pt-V/Ce-Zr-O diesel oxidation catalysts was prepared using the impregnation method. The catalytic activity and sulfur resistance of Pt-V/Ce-Zr-O were investigated in the presence of simulated diesel exhaust. The effect of vanadium on the structure and redox properties of the catalysts was also investigated using the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method, X-ray diffraction, H2 temperature-programmed reduction, CO temperature-programmed desorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy. Results showed that the Pt particles were well dispersed on the Ce-Zr-O carrier through the vanadium isolation effect, which significantly improved the oxidation activity toward CO and hydrocarbons. An electron-withdrawing phenomenon occurred from V to Pt, resulting in an increase in the metallic nature of platinum, which was beneficial to hydrocarbon molecular activation. PMID:26141886

  10. Reforming catalyst comprising low valence TI, V or CR composited with non-oxidizing high surface area support

    SciTech Connect

    Gleim, W.K.T.

    1984-09-11

    This invention relates to a novel catalyst for reforming gasoline comprising a low valence titanium, vanadium and/or chromium metallic component composited with a non-oxidizing high surface area support. The low valence metallic component is present in divalent form or as a combination of the metallic state and the divalent form - preferably as a chloride and/or bromide. The preferred support is a high surface area coke.

  11. Modification of Au/TiO2 nanosystems by SiO2 monolayers: Toward the control of the catalyst activity and stability

    SciTech Connect

    Sergey N. Rashkeev

    2010-02-01

    The activity and stability of Au/TiO2 catalysts depend on several different factors such as the anchoring strength of Au particles at the TiO2 surface, the particle sintering, and the surface mobility of individual gold atoms and/or gold particles. Au/TiO2 catalysts can be made resistant to sintering by ALD deposition of a layer of SiO2 onto the catalysts. In this study, first-principles density-functional calculations are used to investigate how stability of Au nanoparticles is modified when a partial monolayer of SiO2 is deposited on a Au/TiO2 catalyst. We find that SiO2 structures deposited on a pure TiO2 substrate exhibits lattice-mismatch instabilities which result in a formation of additional strong anchoring sites for Au atoms/nanoparticles. An atomic-scale roughness introduced by a partial monolayer of SiO2 may slow down the atomic surface diffusion and inhibit Au nanoparti-cles growth/sintering, in agreement with previous experimental results.

  12. Highly reusability surface loaded metal particles magnetic catalyst microspheres (MCM-MPs) for treatment of dye-contaminated water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ying; Zhang, Kun; Yin, Xiaoshuang; Yang, Wenzhong; Zhu, Hongjun

    2016-04-01

    The metal-deposited magnetic catalyst microspheres (MCM-MPs) were successfully synthesized by one facile, high yield and controllable approach. Here, the bare magnetic microspheres were firstly synthesized according to the solvothermal method. Then silica shell were coated on the surface of the magnetic microspheres via sol-gel method, and subsequently with surface modifying with amino in the purpose to form SiO2-NH2 shell. Thus, metal particles were easily adsorbed into the SiO2-NH2 shell and in-situ reduced by NaBH4 solution. All the obtained products (MCM-Cu, MCM-Ag, MCM-Pd) which were monodisperse and constitutionally stable were exhibited high magnetization and excellent catalytic activity towards dyes solution reduction. The catalytic rate ratio of MCM-Pd: MCM-Cu: MCM-Ag could be 10:3:1. Besides, some special coordination compound Cu2(OH)3Br had been generated in the in-situ reduced process of MCM-Cu, which produced superior cyclical stability (>20 times) than that of MCM-Ag and MCM-Pd. In all, those highly reusability and great catalytic efficiency of MCM-MPs show promising and great potential for treatment of dye-contaminated water.

  13. Highly active non-PGM catalysts prepared from metal organic frameworks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Barkholtz, Heather M.; Chong, Lina; Kaiser, Zachary B.; Xu, Tao; Liu, Di -Jia

    2015-06-11

    Finding inexpensive alternatives to platinum group metals (PGMs) is essential for reducing the cost of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Numerous materials have been investigated as potential replacements of Pt, of which the transition metal and nitrogen-doped carbon composites (TM/Nx/C) prepared from iron doped zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) are among the most active ones in catalyzing the oxygen reduction reaction based on recent studies. In this report, we demonstrate that the catalytic activity of ZIF-based TM/Nx/C composites can be substantially improved through optimization of synthesis and post-treatment processing conditions. Ultimately, oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalytic activity must be demonstratedmore » in membrane-electrode assemblies (MEAs) of fuel cells. The process of preparing MEAs using ZIF-based non-PGM electrocatalysts involves many additional factors which may influence the overall catalytic activity at the fuel cell level. Evaluation of parameters such as catalyst loading and perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer to catalyst ratio were optimized. Our overall efforts to optimize both the catalyst and MEA construction process have yielded impressive ORR activity when tested in a fuel cell system.« less

  14. Highly active non-PGM catalysts prepared from metal organic frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Barkholtz, Heather M.; Chong, Lina; Kaiser, Zachary B.; Xu, Tao; Liu, Di -Jia

    2015-06-11

    Finding inexpensive alternatives to platinum group metals (PGMs) is essential for reducing the cost of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Numerous materials have been investigated as potential replacements of Pt, of which the transition metal and nitrogen-doped carbon composites (TM/Nx/C) prepared from iron doped zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) are among the most active ones in catalyzing the oxygen reduction reaction based on recent studies. In this report, we demonstrate that the catalytic activity of ZIF-based TM/Nx/C composites can be substantially improved through optimization of synthesis and post-treatment processing conditions. Ultimately, oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalytic activity must be demonstrated in membrane-electrode assemblies (MEAs) of fuel cells. The process of preparing MEAs using ZIF-based non-PGM electrocatalysts involves many additional factors which may influence the overall catalytic activity at the fuel cell level. Evaluation of parameters such as catalyst loading and perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer to catalyst ratio were optimized. Our overall efforts to optimize both the catalyst and MEA construction process have yielded impressive ORR activity when tested in a fuel cell system.

  15. In situ studies of surface of NiFe2O4 catalyst during complete oxidation of methane

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shiran; Shan, Junjun; Nie, Longhui; Nguyen, Luan; Wu, Zili; Tao, Franklin

    2015-12-21

    Here, NiFe2O4 with an inverse spinel structure exhibits high activity for a complete oxidation of methane at 400 °C–425 °C and a higher temperature. The surface of the catalyst and its adsorbates were well characterized with ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS) and in situ infrared spectroscopy (IR). In situ studies of the surface of NiFe2O4 using AP-XPS suggest the formation of methoxy-like and formate-like intermediates at a temperature lower than 200 °C, supported by the observed vibrational signatures in in situ IR studies. Evolutions of C1s photoemission features and the nominal atomic ratios of C/(Ni + Fe) of the catalyst surface suggest that the formate-like intermediate is transformed to product molecules CO2 and H2O in the temperature range of 250–300 °C. In situ studies suggest the formation of a spectator, – Olattice – CH2 – Olattice –. It strongly bonds to surface through C–O bonds and cannot be activated even at 400 °C.

  16. Synthesis and characterizations of palladium catalysts with high activity and stability for formic acid oxidation by hydrogen reduction in ethylene glycol at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Meixia; Li, Muwu; Wu, Xin; Li, Yuexia; Zeng, Jianhuang; Liao, Shijun

    2015-10-01

    In this work, a Pd/C catalyst with high activity as well as excellent stability has been prepared by hydrogen gas reduction of Pd(II) precursor in ethylene glycol solution with the assistance of appropriate amount of sodium citrate. Pd nanoparticles with an average particle size of 3.8 nm and excellent uniformity are obtained. The Pd/C catalyst synthesized in this work shows an electrochemical surface area of 68.6 m2 g-1 and displays activities of 819 A g-1. Strikingly, the Pd/C catalyst also exhibits excellent stability, which has been confirmed by its slow activity decay under repeated potential cycles as well as chronoamperometric test. The activity for Pd/C at the 300th and 500th cycle remains at 5.5 and 2.4 mA cm-2, respectively, which is 25% and 11% of its initial value, respectively. The oxidation currents at the Pd/C and Pd/C-Citrate (control) at 0 V decrease to 44% and 25% of their initial values. Transmission electron microscopy observations on the Pd/C catalyst after 1000 potential cycles reveal that, in addition to carbon support corrosion, Pd agglomeration together with more serious Pd dissolution occur at the same time, leading to a decrease of the electrocatalytic performance.

  17. Highly active carbon supported palladium catalysts decorated by a trace amount of platinum by an in-situ galvanic displacement reaction for formic acid oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zuopeng; Li, Muwu; Han, Mingjia; Wu, Xin; Guo, Yong; Zeng, Jianhuang; Li, Yuexia; Liao, Shijun

    2015-03-01

    Aimed at reducing platinum usage and improved catalytic activity for formic acid oxidation, a series of Pt decorated Pd/C catalysts are prepared by an in-situ galvanic displacement reaction between freshly prepared Pd/C ink and H2PtCl6 in an aqueous solution. The catalysts with 4 nm particle sizes and 20 wt.% loadings have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The electrochemical evaluations by cyclic voltammetry are conducted to test out the CO tolerance and catalytic activities. In addition to XPS analysis, a theoretical calculation has been attempted the first time to find out the surface Pd/Pt molar ratios. The decay rate of the catalysts has been evaluated by the percentage of the forward/backward peak current retained using the value at the 20th cycle divided by that in the first cycle. Compared with a Pd/C benchmark, all Pt decorated Pd/C register enhanced activity while the cost remains virtually unchanged. The optimized catalyst is found to have a Pd/Pt molar ratio of 75:1 but with 2.5 times activity relative to that of Pd/C.

  18. Modeling preparation condition and composition-activity relationship of perovskite-type LaxSr1-xFeyCo1-yO3 nano catalyst.

    PubMed

    Oskoui, Samira Arefi; Niaei, Aligholi; Tseng, Hui-Hsin; Salari, Dariush; Izadkhah, Behrang; Hosseini, Seyed Ali

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, an artificial neural network (ANN) is first applied to perovskite catalyst design. A series of perovskite-type oxides with the LaxSr1-xFeyCo1-yO3 general formula were prepared with a sol-gel autocombustion method under different preparation conditions. A three-layer perceptron neural network was used for modeling and optimization of the catalytic combustion of toluene. A high R2 value was obtained for training and test sets of data: 0.99 and 0.976, respectively. Due to the presence of full active catalysts, there was no necessity to use an optimizer algorithm. The optimum catalysts were La0.9Sr0.1Fe0.5Co0.5O3 (Tc=700 and 800 °C and [citric acid/nitrate]=0.750), La0.9Sr0.1Fe0.82Co0.18O3 (Tc=700 °C, [citric acid/nitrate]=0.750), and La0.8Sr0.2Fe0.66Co0.34O3 (Tc=650 °C, [citric acid/nitrate]=0.525) exhibiting 100% conversion for toluene. More evaluation of the obtained model revealed the relative importance and criticality of preparation parameters of optimum catalysts. The structure, morphology, reducibility, and specific surface area of catalysts were investigated with XRD, SEM, TPR, and BET, respectively. PMID:24102474

  19. Surface spectroscopic studies of a model silica-supported copper catalyst: Adsorption and reactions of CO, H[sub 2]O, and NO

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X.; Vesecky, S.M.; He, J.; Goodman, D.W. )

    1993-07-01

    A model silica-supported copper catalyst has been studied with temperature programmed desorption, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, infrared reflection--absorption spectroscopy, and scanning tunneling microscopy. The reactions of water and nitric oxide on the Cu/SiO[sub 2] catalyst were also investigated. The model catalyst was prepared by evaporating copper onto a silica thin film ([similar to]100 A) which was, in turn, supported on a Mo(110) surface. Copper forms small metallic clusters on the silica surface with a small fraction being partially oxidized. Water dissociates on the Cu/SiO[sub 2] catalyst to yield dihydrogen at 400 K and surface oxygen during temperature programmed reaction. Nitric oxide reacts with the model silica-supported copper catalyst to produce nitrous oxide and surface oxygen, which does not desorb until copper evaporates at high temperatures.

  20. ALTERNATIVE ROUTES FOR CATALYST PREPARATION: USE OF ULTRASOUND AND MICROWAVE IRRADIATION FOR THE PREPARATION OF VANADIUM PHOSPHORUS OXIDE CATALYST AND ITS ACTIVITY FOR HYDROCARBON OXIDATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vanadium phosphorus oxide (VPO) is a well-known catalyst used for the vapor phase n-butane oxidation to maleic anhydride. It is prepared by a variety of methods, all of which, however, eventually result in the same active phase. The two main methods for the preparation of its pr...

  1. Catalytic oxidation of pulping effluent by activated carbon-supported heterogeneous catalysts.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Bholu Ram; Garg, Anurag

    2016-01-01

    The present study deals with the non-catalytic and catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) for the removal of persistent organic compounds from the pulping effluent. Two activated carbon-supported heterogeneous catalysts (Cu/Ce/AC and Cu/Mn/AC) were used for CWO after characterization by the following techniques: temperature-programmed reduction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermo-gravimetric analysis. The oxidation reaction was performed in a batch high-pressure reactor (capacity = 0.7  L) at moderate oxidation conditions (temperature = 190°C and oxygen pressure = 0.9 MPa). With Cu/Ce/AC catalyst, the maximum chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC) and lignin removals of 79%, 77% and 88% were achieved compared to only 50% removal during the non-catalytic process. The 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) to COD ratio (a measure for biodegradability) of the pulping effluent was improved to 0.52 from an initial value of 0.16. The mass balance calculations for solid recovered after CWO reaction showed 8% and 10% deduction in catalyst mass primarily attributed to the loss of carbon and metal leaching. After the CWO process, carbon deposition was also observed on the recovered catalyst which was responsible for around 3-4% TOC reduction. PMID:26508075

  2. Nitrogen-doped graphene/carbon nanotube hybrids: in situ formation on bifunctional catalysts and their superior electrocatalytic activity for oxygen evolution/reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Tian, Gui-Li; Zhao, Meng-Qiang; Yu, Dingshan; Kong, Xiang-Yi; Huang, Jia-Qi; Zhang, Qiang; Wei, Fei

    2014-06-12

    There is a growing interest in oxygen electrode catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER), as they play a key role in a wide range of renewable energy technologies such as fuel cells, metal-air batteries, and water splitting. Nevertheless, the development of highly-active bifunctional catalysts at low cost for both ORR and OER still remains a huge challenge. Herein, we report a new N-doped graphene/single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) hybrid (NGSH) material as an efficient noble-metal-free bifunctional electrocatalyst for both ORR and OER. NGSHs were fabricated by in situ doping during chemical vapor deposition growth on layered double hydroxide derived bifunctional catalysts. Our one-step approach not only provides simultaneous growth of graphene and SWCNTs, leading to the formation of three dimensional interconnected network, but also brings the intrinsic dispersion of graphene and carbon nanotubes and the dispersion of N-containing functional groups within a highly conductive scaffold. Thus, the NGSHs possess a large specific surface area of 812.9 m(2) g(-1) and high electrical conductivity of 53.8 S cm(-1) . Despite of relatively low nitrogen content (0.53 at%), the NGSHs demonstrate a high ORR activity, much superior to two constituent components and even comparable to the commercial 20 wt% Pt/C catalysts with much better durability and resistance to crossover effect. The same hybrid material also presents high catalytic activity towards OER, rendering them high-performance cheap catalysts for both ORR and OER. Our result opens up new avenues for energy conversion technologies based on earth-abundant, scalable, noble-metal-free catalysts. PMID:24574006

  3. Design of a high activity and selectivity alcohol catalyst. Final status report and summary of accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, H.C.; Mills, G.A.

    1994-07-15

    This final DOE report for grant award number DE-FG22-90PC 90291 presents the results of our efforts to better understand the Rh-Mo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O3 catalytic system for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide to selectively form oxygenated products. The content of this report is divided into three major sections and a fourth, concluding section which addresses our major research accomplishments, as well as documents the most significant publications and presentations associated with this grant. The three main sections which make up the body of this report are presented in the in form of manuscripts which, in turn, summarize our progress in three areas of this project. The three body sections are organized as follows: Section I--Evidence for site isolation in Rh-Mo bimetallic catalysts derived from organometallic clusters; Section II--Surface Chemistry of Rh-Mo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}: An analysis of surface acidity; and Section III--Comparative study of Rh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Rh-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} Catalysts. Section IV summarizes major accomplishments. The content of this final report is meant to generally highlight our progress in both characterizing the nature of the Rh-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} system and probing its reactivity for insight on the oxygenate synergy present in this class of catalysts.

  4. Novel catalysts for methane activation. Quarterly report No. 8, July 1, 1994--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschon, A.S.; Wu, H.J.; Malhotra, R.; Wilson, R.B.

    1994-11-28

    Fullerenes are a recently discovered allotrope of carbon that have been found to possess unusual properties, some of which may be ideal for methane activation. This project is designed to evaluate these carbon based materials for conversion of methane into higher hydrocarbons. The project is divided into three technical tasks. Task 1 deals with the synthesis and characterization of the fullerenes and fullerene soots, Task 2 with the testing of the catalysts, and Task 3 with the evaluation of the results and technical reporting requirements. The results and accomplishments for this quarter are summarized below. In addition, the authors recently presented work on the use of fullerene based catalysts for methane activation at the American Chemical Society in Washington, DC this Fall. The paper is found in Appendix A of this report.

  5. Active sites of ligand-protected Au25 nanoparticle catalysts for CO2 electroreduction to CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonso, Dominic R.; Kauffman, Douglas; Matranga, Christopher

    2016-05-01

    Recent experimental studies have reported the electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) into CO at atomically precise negatively charged Au25- nanoclusters. The studies showed CO2 conversion at remarkably low overpotentials, but the exact mechanisms and nature of the active sites remain unclear. We used first-principles density functional theory and continuum solvation models to examine the role of the cluster during electrochemical CO2 reduction and analyze the free energies of proposed intermediate species. Contrary to previous assumptions, our results show that the fully ligand protected cluster is not an active CO2 reduction catalyst because formation of the crucial carboxyl intermediate required very high electrochemical potentials. Instead, our calculations suggest that the reduction process likely occurs on a dethiolated gold site, and adsorbed carboxyl intermediate formation was significantly stabilized at dethiolated gold sites. These findings point to the crucial role of exposed metal sites during electrochemical CO2 reduction at gold nanocluster catalysts.

  6. A Rhodium Catalyst Superior to Iridium Congeners for Enantioselective Radical Amination Activated by Visible Light.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaodong; Harms, Klaus; Marsch, Michael; Meggers, Eric

    2016-06-27

    A bis-cyclometalated rhodium(III) complex catalyzes a visible-light-activated enantioselective α-amination of 2-acyl imidazoles with up to 99 % yield and 98 % ee. The rhodium catalyst is ascribed a dual function as a chiral Lewis acid and, simultaneously, as a light-activated smart initiator of a radical-chain process through intermediate aminyl radicals. Notably, related iridium-based photoredox catalysts reported before were unsuccessful in this enantioselective radical C-N bond formation. The surprising preference for rhodium over iridium is attributed to much faster ligand-exchange kinetics of the rhodium complexes involved in the catalytic cycle, which is crucial to keep pace with the highly reactive and thus short-lived nitrogen-centered radical intermediate. PMID:27145893

  7. Lewis acid activation of carbodicarbene catalysts for Rh-catalyzed hydroarylation of dienes.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Courtney C; Matías, Desirée M; Goldfogel, Matthew J; Meek, Simon J

    2015-05-27

    The activation of carbodicarbene (CDC)-Rh(I) pincer complexes by secondary binding of metal salts is reported for the catalytic site-selective hydro-heteroarylation of dienes (up to 98% yield and >98:2 γ:α). Reactions are promoted by 5 mol % of a readily available tridentate (CDC)-Rh complex in the presence of an inexpensive lithium salt. The reaction is compatible with a variety of terminal and internal dienes and tolerant of ester, alkyl halide, and boronate ester functional groups. X-ray data and mechanistic experiments provide support for the role of the metal salts on catalyst activation and shed light on the reaction mechanism. The increased efficiency (120 to 22 °C) made available by catalytic amounts of metal salts to catalysts containing C(0) donors is a significant aspect of the disclosed studies. PMID:25961506

  8. Active sites of ligand-protected Au25 nanoparticle catalysts for CO2 electroreduction to CO.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Dominic R; Kauffman, Douglas; Matranga, Christopher

    2016-05-14

    Recent experimental studies have reported the electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) into CO at atomically precise negatively charged Au25 (-) nanoclusters. The studies showed CO2 conversion at remarkably low overpotentials, but the exact mechanisms and nature of the active sites remain unclear. We used first-principles density functional theory and continuum solvation models to examine the role of the cluster during electrochemical CO2 reduction and analyze the free energies of proposed intermediate species. Contrary to previous assumptions, our results show that the fully ligand protected cluster is not an active CO2 reduction catalyst because formation of the crucial carboxyl intermediate required very high electrochemical potentials. Instead, our calculations suggest that the reduction process likely occurs on a dethiolated gold site, and adsorbed carboxyl intermediate formation was significantly stabilized at dethiolated gold sites. These findings point to the crucial role of exposed metal sites during electrochemical CO2 reduction at gold nanocluster catalysts. PMID:27179498

  9. Preparation of new catalysts by the immobilization of palladium(II) species onto silica: an investigation of their catalytic activity for the cyclization of aminoalkynes.

    PubMed

    Richmond, M K; Scott, S L; Alper, H

    2001-10-31

    Silica-immobilized palladium catalysts are readily prepared by treating partially dehydroxylated silica with solutions of the palladium(II) complexes, cis-[PdMeXL2] (X = Me, L2 = dmpe; X = Cl, L2 = dmpe, dppe, phen, bipy, 2PMe3), trans-[PdMeXL2] (X = Cl, NO3, OTf, L = PMe3; X = Cl, L = PPh3), or [PdPh(OH)L]2 (L = PPh3, PCy3), at room temperature. A chemisorption reaction is presumed to occur on the surface Si-OH groups, with elimination of 1 equiv of methane, benzene, or water and the initial formation of a covalent Pd-O bond to the silica surface. The amount of chemisorbed material is strongly dependent on the nature of the complex employed, and the Pd content of the materials, determined by ICP analysis, was found to vary widely (from 1.47 to 0.021 wt %). It appears that the complexes stabilized by more basic ligands undergo a more facile reaction with the surface. The catalytic activity of the materials was first tested in the cyclization of 6-aminohex-1-yne. Higher conversions were found for those catalysts containing more basic ligands, due to the higher loadings, and for those complexes containing more weakly coordinating anions. Silica/trans-[PdMe(NO3)(PMe3)2] was identified as the best catalyst and was used to test the generality of the catalytic cyclization method with two other alkynes, namely, 5-phenyl-4-pentyn-1-amine and 6-phenyl-5-hexyn-1-amine. The catalysts prepared here show rates comparable to, or greater than, those found for homogeneous late transition metal complexes, including their molecular precursors. Furthermore, the supported catalysts are only slightly air-sensitive and can be recycled, after filtration in air, with only moderate loss of activity. PMID:11673983

  10. Uniform 2 nm gold nanoparticles supported on iron oxides as active catalysts for CO oxidation reaction: Structure-activity relationship

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Guo, Yu; Senanayake, Sanjaya; Gu, Dong; Jin, Zhao; Du, Pei -Pei; Si, Rui; Xu, Wen -Qian; Huang, Yu -Ying; Tao, Jing; Song, Qi -Sheng; et al

    2015-01-12

    Uniform Au nanoparticles (~2 nm) with narrow size-distribution (standard deviation: 0.5–0.6 nm) supported on both hydroxylated (Fe_OH) and dehydrated iron oxide (Fe_O) have been prepared by either deposition-precipitation (DP) or colloidal-deposition (CD) methods. Different structural and textural characterizations were applied to the dried, calcined and used gold-iron oxide samples. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) described the high homogeneity in the supported Au nanoparticles. The ex-situ and in-situ X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) characterization monitored the electronic and short-range local structure of active gold species. The synchrotron-based in-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD), together with the corresponding temperature-programmed reductionmore » by hydrogen (H₂-TPR), indicated a structural evolution of the iron-oxide supports, correlating to their reducibility. An inverse order of catalytic activity between DP (Au/Fe_OH < Au/Fe_O) and CD (Au/Fe_OH > Au/Fe_O) was observed. Effective gold-support interaction results in a high activity for gold nanoparticles, locally generated by the sintering of dispersed Au atoms on the oxide support in the DP synthesis, while a hydroxylated surface favors the reactivity of externally introduced Au nanoparticles on Fe_OH support for the CD approach. This work reveals why differences in the synthetic protocol translate to differences in the catalytic performance of Au/FeOx catalysts with very similar structural characteristics in CO oxidation.« less

  11. Uniform 2 nm gold nanoparticles supported on iron oxides as active catalysts for CO oxidation reaction: Structure-activity relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yu; Senanayake, Sanjaya; Gu, Dong; Jin, Zhao; Du, Pei -Pei; Si, Rui; Xu, Wen -Qian; Huang, Yu -Ying; Tao, Jing; Song, Qi -Sheng; Jia, Chun -Jia; Schueth, Ferdi

    2015-01-12

    Uniform Au nanoparticles (~2 nm) with narrow size-distribution (standard deviation: 0.5–0.6 nm) supported on both hydroxylated (Fe_OH) and dehydrated iron oxide (Fe_O) have been prepared by either deposition-precipitation (DP) or colloidal-deposition (CD) methods. Different structural and textural characterizations were applied to the dried, calcined and used gold-iron oxide samples. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) described the high homogeneity in the supported Au nanoparticles. The ex-situ and in-situ X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) characterization monitored the electronic and short-range local structure of active gold species. The synchrotron-based in-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD), together with the corresponding temperature-programmed reduction by hydrogen (H₂-TPR), indicated a structural evolution of the iron-oxide supports, correlating to their reducibility. An inverse order of catalytic activity between DP (Au/Fe_OH < Au/Fe_O) and CD (Au/Fe_OH > Au/Fe_O) was observed. Effective gold-support interaction results in a high activity for gold nanoparticles, locally generated by the sintering of dispersed Au atoms on the oxide support in the DP synthesis, while a hydroxylated surface favors the reactivity of externally introduced Au nanoparticles on Fe_OH support for the CD approach. This work reveals why differences in the synthetic protocol translate to differences in the catalytic performance of Au/FeOx catalysts with very similar structural characteristics in CO oxidation.

  12. A General Method for Multimetallic Platinum Alloy Nanowires as Highly Active and Stable Oxygen Reduction Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Bu, Lingzheng; Ding, Jiabao; Guo, Shaojun; Zhang, Xu; Su, Dong; Zhu, Xing; Yao, Jianlin; Guo, Jun; Lu, Gang; Huang, Xiaoqing

    2015-11-25

    An unconventional class of high-performance Pt alloy multimetallic nanowires (NWs) is produced by a general method. The obtained PtNi NWs exhibit amazingly specific and mass oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities with improvement factors of 51.1 and 34.6 over commercial Pt/C catalysts, respectively, and are also stable in ORR conditions, making them among the most efficient electrocatalysts for ORR. PMID:26459261

  13. Surface Science Studies of Strong Metal-Oxide Interactions on Model Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowker, Michael; Bennett, Roger A.

    Here we report on recent model studies of a phenomenon known in catalysis as the “Strong Metal-Support Interaction” (SMSI for short). Decoration of the surfaces of precious metal single crystals, films, and nanoparticles supported on titania produces beautiful long-range ordered structures which can often be resolved at atomic resolution using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Such surfaces show reduced binding for CO and effectively lower the activity of the surface. Consideration is given to the cause and composition of the surface layer, that is, whether it is a kind of intermetallic layer, or is simply a thin layer of titanium (sub-)oxide.

  14. CATALYST ACTIVITY MAINTENANCE FOR THE LIQUID PHASE SYNTHESIS GAS-TO-DIMETHYL ETHER PROCESS PART II: DEVELOPMENT OF ALUMINUM PHOSPHATE AS THE DEHYDRATION CATALYST FOR THE SINGLE-STEP LIQUID PHASE SYNGAS-TO-DME PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang-Dong Peng

    2002-05-01

    At the heart of the single-step liquid phase syngas-to-DME process (LPDME{trademark}) is a catalyst system that can be active as well as stable. In the Alternative Fuels I program, a dual-catalyst system containing a Cu-based commercial methanol synthesis catalyst (BASF S3-86) and a commercial dehydration material ({gamma}-alumina) was demonstrated. It provided the productivity and selectivity expected from the LPDME process. However, the catalyst system deactivated too rapidly to warrant a viable commercial process [1]. The mechanistic investigation in the early part of the DOE's Alternative Fuels II program revealed that the accelerated catalyst deactivation under LPDME conditions is due to detrimental interaction between the methanol synthesis catalyst and methanol dehydration catalyst [2,3]. The interaction was attributed to migration of Cu- and/or Zn-containing species from the synthesis catalyst to the dehydration catalyst. Identification of a dehydration catalyst that did not lead to this detrimental interaction while retaining adequate dehydration activity was elusive. Twenty-nine different dehydration materials were tested, but none showed the desired performance [2]. The search came to a turning point when aluminum phosphate was tested. This amorphous material is prepared by precipitating a solution containing Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} with NH{sub 4}OH, followed by washing, drying and calcination. The aluminum phosphate catalyst has adequate dehydration activity and good stability. It can co-exist with the Cu-based methanol synthesis catalyst without negatively affecting the latter catalyst's stability. This report documents the details of the development of this catalyst. These include initial leads, efforts in improving activity and stability, investigation and development of the best preparation parameters and procedures, mechanistic understanding and resulting preparation guidelines, and the accomplishments of this work.

  15. Bridging the pressure and material gap in heterogeneous catalysis: cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts from surface science to industrial application.

    PubMed

    Oosterbeek, Heiko

    2007-07-21

    The Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process is the heart of many natural gas conversion processes as it enables the conversion of a mixture of CO and H(2) into valuable long-chain hydrocarbons. Here we report on the use of state-of-the-art surface science techniques to obtain information on the relationship between the surface atomic structure of model catalysts and their performance in the Fischer-Tropsch reaction. Cobalt single crystals and polycrystals were modified with non-reducible oxides as to resemble industrial catalysts. Reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy was used for examining the CO adsorption behaviour at room temperature as well as at 493 K at CO pressures spanning 10(-7) to 300 mbar on both (modified) Co single/polycrystals and an industrial catalyst. Polarization modulation was applied to cancel the CO gas phase absorption. Subsequently, they were subjected to reaction tests in the same apparatus at 1 bar and 493 K. This allowed us to close the material, pressure and instrument gap in the field of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on cobalt-based catalysts. PMID:17612722

  16. Surface-Initiated Titanium-Mediated Coordination Polymerization from Catalyst-Functionalized Single and Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Priftis, Dimitrios; Petzetakis, Nikolaos; Sakellariou, Georgios; Pitsikalis, Marinos; Baskaran, Durairaj; Mays, Jimmy; Hadjichristidis, Nikos

    2009-01-01

    Single (SWNTs) and multiwalled (MWNTs) carbon nanotubes were functionalized with a titanium alkoxide catalyst through a Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction. The catalyst-functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were used for the surface initiated titanium-mediated coordination polymerizations of L-lactide (L-LA), -caprolactone (-CL) and n-hexyl isocyanate (HIC) employing the grafting from technique. 1H NMR, IR and Raman spectra showed that the precursor catalyst was successfully synthesized and covalently attached on the CNTs surface. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) revealed that the grafted poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) content could be controlled with time. The final polymer-grafted CNTs were readily dissolved in organic solvents as compared to the insoluble pristine and catalyst-functionalized CNTs. The presence of thick layers of polymers around the CNTs was observed through transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) proved that the glass transition (Tg) and melting (Tm) temperatures of the PLLA are affected by the presence of the CNTs, while PLLA R-helix conformation remains intact, as revealed by the circular dichroism (CD) spectra.

  17. Characterization of the surfaces of platinum/tin oxide based catalysts by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keiser, Joseph T.; Upchurch, Billy T.

    1990-01-01

    A Pt/SnO2 catalyst has been developed at NASA Langley that is effective for the oxidation of CO at room temperature (1). A mechanism has been proposed to explain the effectiveness of this catalyst (2), but most of the species involved in this mechanism have not been observed under actual catalytic conditions. A number of these species are potentially detectable by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), e.g., HOSnO sub x, HO sub y PtO sub z, Pt-CO, and SnHCO3. Therefore a preliminary investigation was conducted to determine what might be learned about this particular catalyst by transmission FTIR. The main advantage of FTIR for this work is that the catalyst can be examined under conditions similar to the actual catalytic conditions. This can be of critical importance since some surface species may exist only when the reaction gases are present. Another advantage of the infrared approach is that since vibrations are probed, subtle chemical details may be obtained. The main disadvantage of this approach is that FTIR is not nearly as sensitive as the Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) surface analytical techniques such as Auger, Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA), Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS), etc. Another problem is that the assignment of the observed infrared bands may be difficult.

  18. Oxyhydrochlorination catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Charles E.; Noceti, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    An improved catalyst and method for the oxyhydrochlorination of methane is disclosed. The catalyst includes a pyrogenic porous support on which is layered as active material, cobalt chloride in major proportion, and minor proportions of an alkali metal chloride and of a rare earth chloride. On contact of the catalyst with a gas flow of methane, HCl and oxygen, more than 60% of the methane is converted and of that converted more than 40% occurs as monochloromethane. Advantageously, the monochloromethane can be used to produce gasoline boiling range hydrocarbons with the recycle of HCl for further reaction. This catalyst is also of value for the production of formic acid as are analogous catalysts with lead, silver or nickel chlorides substituted for the cobalt chloride.

  19. Synthesis, Characterization, and Catalytic Oxygen Electroreduction Activities of Carbon-Supported PtW Nanoparticle Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Liufeng; More, Karren Leslie; He, Ting

    2010-01-01

    Carbon-supported PtW (PtW/C) alloy nanoparticle catalysts with well-controlled particle size, dispersion, and composition uniformity, have been synthesized by wet chemical methods of decomposition of carbonyl cluster complexes, hydrolysis of metal salts, and chemical reactions within a reverse microemulsion. The synthesized PtW/C catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive spectroscopy. The catalytic oxygen electroreduction activities were measured by the hydrodynamic rotating disk electrode technique in an acidic electrolyte. The influence of the synthesis method on PtW particle size, size distribution, composition uniformity, and catalytic oxygen electroreduction activity, have been investigated. Among the synthesis methods studied, PtW/C catalysts prepared by the decomposition of carbonyl cluster complexes displayed the best platinum mass activity for oxygen reduction reaction under the current small scale production; a 3.4-fold catalytic enhancement was achieved in comparison to a benchmark Pt/C standard.

  20. Hydrodesulfurization on Transition Metal Catalysts: Elementary Steps of C-S Bond Activation and Consequences of Bifunctional Synergies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yik, Edwin Shyn-Lo

    The presence of heteroatoms (e.g. S, N) in crude oil poses formidable challenges in petroleum refining processes as a result of their irreversible binding on catalytically active sites at industrially relevant conditions. With increasing pressures from legislation that continues to lower the permissible levels of sulfur content in fuels, hydrodesulfurization (HDS), the aptly named reaction for removing heteroatoms from organosulfur compounds, has become an essential feedstock pretreatment step to remove deleterious species from affecting downstream processing. Extensive research in the area has identified the paradigm catalysts for desulfurization; MoSx or WSx, promoted with Co or Ni metal; however, despite the vast library of both empirical and fundamental studies, a clear understanding of site requirements, the elementary steps of C-S hydrogenolysis, and the properties that govern HDS reactivity and selectivity have been elusive. While such a lack of rigorous assessments has not prevented technological advancements in the field of HDS catalysis, fundamental interpretations can inform rational catalyst and process design, particularly in light of new requirements for "deep" desulfurization and in the absence of significant hydrotreatment catalyst developments in recent decades. We report HDS rates of thiophene, which belongs to a class of compounds that are most resistant to sulfur removal (i.e. substituted alkyldibenzothiophenes), over a range of industrially relevant temperatures and pressures, measured at differential conditions and therefore revealing their true kinetic origins. These rates, normalized by the number of exposed metal atoms, on various SiO 2-supported, monometallic transition metals (Re, Ru, Pt), range several orders of magnitude. Under relevant HDS conditions, Pt and Ru catalysts form a layer of chemisorbed sulfur on surfaces of a metallic bulk, challenging reports that assume the latter exists as its pyrite sulfide phase during reaction. While

  1. Atomic Layer-by-Layer Deposition of Pt on Pd Nanocubes for Catalysts with Enhanced Activity and Durability toward Oxygen Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Shuifen; Choi, Sang; Lu, Ning; Roling, Luke T.; Herron, Jeffrey A.; Zhang, Lei; Park, Jinho; Wang, Jinguo; Kim, Moon J.; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Mavrikakis, Manos; Xia, Younan

    2014-06-11

    An effective strategy for reducing the Pt content while retaining the activity of a Pt-based catalyst is to deposit the Pt atoms as ultrathin skins of only a few atomic layers thick on nanoscale substrates made of another metal. During deposition, however, the Pt atoms often take an island growth mode because of a strong bonding between Pt atoms. Here we report a versatile route to the conformal deposition of Pt as uniform, ultrathin shells on Pd nanocubes in a solution phase. The introduction of the Pt precursor at a relatively slow rate and high temperature allowed the deposited Pt atoms to spread across the entire surface of a Pd nanocube to generate a uniform shell. The thickness of the Pt shell could be controlled from one to six atomic layers by varying the amount of Pt precursor added into the system. Compared to a commercial Pt/C catalyst, the Pd@PnL (n = 1-6) core-shell nanocubes showed enhancements in specific activity and durability toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Density functional theory (DFT) calculations on model (100) surfaces suggest that the enhancement in specific activity can be attributed to the weakening of OH binding through ligand and strain effects, which, in turn, increases the rate of OH hydrogenation. A volcano-type relationship between the ORR specific activity and the number of Pt atomic layers was derived, in good agreement with the experimental results. Both theoretical and experimental studies indicate that the ORR specific activity was maximized for the catalysts based on Pd@Pt2-3L nanocubes. Because of the reduction in Pt content used and the enhancement in specific activity, the Pd@Pt1L nanocubes showed a Pt mass activity with almost three-fold enhancement relative to the Pt/C catalyst.

  2. MESOPOROUS IRON PHOSPHATE AS AN ACTIVE, SELECTIVE AND RECYCLABLE CATALYST FOR THE SYNTHESIS OF NOPOL BY PRINS CONDENSATION

    EPA Science Inventory


    Mesoporous iron phosphate is found to be a highly active and recyclable heterogeneous catalyst for the selective synthesis of nopol by Prins condensation of ?-pinene and paraformaldehyde in acetonitrile at 80 oC.



  3. Surface properties of the Ni-silica gel catalyst precursors for the vegetable oil hydrogenation process: N2 sorption and XPS studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolova, D.; Krstić, J.; Spasov, L.; Simeonov, D.; Lončarević, D.; Stefanov, Pl.; Jovanović, D.

    2011-12-01

    The effect of the type of the silica gel pore structure on the surface properties of the Ni-silica gel catalyst precursors for the vegetable oil hydrogenation process has been examined applying N2 sorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques. The nickel catalyst precursors with identical composition (SiO2/Ni = 1.0) has been synthesized by precipitation of Ni(NO3)2 · 6H2O solution with Na2CO3 solution on the three types of silica gel with different pore structures. It is shown that the usage of the silica gel supports with different texture as source of SiO2 causes different location of Ni-species into the support pores and on the external surface area. The XPS data confirm the formation of surface species with different strength of interaction and different dispersion. These surface characteristics of the precursors will predetermine the formation of the active nickel metallic phase as well as the mass transfer of the reactants and products to and from the catalytic sites.

  4. Probing the coordinative unsaturation and local environment of Ti³⁺ sites in an activated high-yield Ziegler-Natta catalyst.

    PubMed

    Morra, Elena; Giamello, Elio; Van Doorslaer, Sabine; Antinucci, Giuseppe; D'Amore, Maddalena; Busico, Vincenzo; Chiesa, Mario

    2015-04-13

    The typical activation of a fourth generation Ziegler-Natta catalyst TiCl4/MgCl2/phthalate with triethyl aluminum generates Ti(3+) centers that are investigated by multi-frequency continuous wave and pulse EPR methods. Two families of isolated, molecule-like Ti(3+) species have been identified. A comparison of the experimentally derived g tensors and (35,37)Cl hyperfine and nuclear-quadrupole tensors with DFT-computed values suggests that the dominant EPR-active Ti(3+)  species is located on MgCl2(110) surfaces (or equivalent MgCl2 terminations with tetra-coordinated Mg). O2 reactivity tests show that a fraction of these Ti sites is chemically accessible, an important result in view of the search for the true catalyst active site in olefin polymerization. PMID:25706346

  5. Surface reactions of hydrocarbons as a probe for the characterization of RhCu/SiO sub 2 catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Coq, B.; Dutartre, R.; Figueras, F. ); Rouco, A. , Bahia Blanca )

    1989-06-15

    RhCu/SiO{sub 2} catalysts of various compositions were prepared from nitrate precursors and characterized by transmission electron microscopy and chemisorption. The catalytic properties were determined in a flow microreactor, at low conversion, for the hydrogenation of benzene, poisoned or not by thiophene, and the conversion of a series of alkanes: n-hexane (n-H), 2-methylpentane (2MP), 2,2-dimethylbutane (22DMB), 2,2,3,3-tetramethylbutane (2233TMB), methylcyclopentane (MCP). The conversion of alkanes at 493 K gives mainly hydrogenolysis of C-C bonds. The rate of cleavage depends on the degree of substitution of the carbon atoms and on the Cu/Rh ratio. Cu inhibits all reactions; however, the magnitude of this effect depends on the structure of the reactant. The comparison of the alloying effect with the effect of Rh particle size on the same set of reactions (Coq et. al.) shows that on the one hand 2233TMB has a lower sensitivity to alloying than to particle size; the selectivity to i-C{sub 4} remains high and characteristic of large particles of rhodium up to Cu/Rh = 1. On the other hand n-H, 2MP, and MCP are more sensitive to alloying than to change of particle size. These results suggest that Cu occupies preferentially the sites of low coordination, edges, and corners, and Rh the sites of high coordination on dense planes. This set of reactions, therefore, probes the extent of surface segregation on RhCu-supported particles.. By addition of thiophene a monotonic decrease of activity in the hydrogenation of benzene occurs due to sulfurization of the surface. The rate of poisoning is faster when the local density of states at the Fermi level of Rh surface atoms is higher. Dilution of Rh by Cu has little effect on the thioresistance which remains low even at high Cu content. Very likely little electronic interaction occurs between Rh and Cu.

  6. The formation of alumina surface active in methanol decomposition and exoemission in thermocycling experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krylova, I. V.

    2008-11-01

    The nature of the alumina surface irradiated with electrons active in methanol dehydration was studied by exoemission in comparison with the initial surface. Methanol decomposition and thermal treatment in a vacuum were found to influence the formation of the active surface of the catalyst. Methanol dehydration occurred on centers formed with the participation of low-coordinate surface oxygen, Oδ-, which represented exoemission centers. The desorption of methanol and its decomposition products was accompanied by the emission of negative charges. A possible reaction mechanism is discussed.

  7. Identifying the role of N-heteroatom location in the activity of metal catalysts for alcohol oxidation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chan-Thaw, Carine E.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Villa, Alberto; Prati, Laura

    2015-04-02

    Here, this work focuses on understanding how the bonding of nitrogen heteroatoms contained on/in a activated carbon support influence the stability and reactivity of a supported Pd catalyst for the oxidation of alcohols in solution. The results show that simply adding N groups via solution chemistry is insufficient to improve catalytic properties. Instead a strongly bound N moiety is required to activate the catalyst and stabilize the metal particles.

  8. Identifying the Role of N-Heteroatom Location in the Activity of Metal Catalysts for Alcohol Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Chan-Thaw, Carine E.; Veith, Gabriel M; Villa, Alberto; Prati, Laura

    2015-01-01

    This work focuses on understanding how the bonding of nitrogen heteroatoms contained on/in a activated carbon support influence the stability and reactivity of a supported Pd catalyst for the oxidation of alcohols in solution. The results show that simply adding N groups via solution chemistry is insufficient to improve catalytic properties. Instead a strongly bound N moiety is required to activate the catalyst and stabilize the metal particles.

  9. Porous Silica-Coated Gold Nanorods: A Highly Active Catalyst for the Reduction of 4-Nitrophenol.

    PubMed

    Mohanta, Jagdeep; Satapathy, Smithsagar; Si, Satyabrata

    2016-02-01

    The successful coating of thin porous silica layers of various thicknesses [(10±1), (12±1), and (14±1) nm] on cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) capped gold nanorods was achieved through a modified Stöber procedure. The resulting material was applied as a novel catalyst for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol. The catalytic activities of the gold nanorods increased up to eight times after coating with a layer of porous silica and the reaction followed a zero-order kinetics, having a rate constant as high as 2.92×10(-1) mol L(-1) min(-1). The spectral changes during the reduction reaction of 4-nitrophenol were observed within a very short span of time and a complete conversion to 4-aminophenol occured within 5-6 mins, including the induction period of ≈2 mins. The reusability of the catalyst was studied by running the catalytic reaction during five consecutive cycles with good efficiency without destroying the nanostructure. The methodology can be effectively applied to the development of composite catalysts with highly enhanced catalytic activity. PMID:26663755

  10. Highly active nanoporous Pt-based alloy as anode and cathode catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoting; Jiang, Yingying; Sun, Junzhe; Jin, Chuanhong; Zhang, Zhonghua

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we explore nanoporous PtPdAlCu (np-PtPdAlCu) quaternary alloy through ball-milling with the subsequent two-step dealloying strategy. The microstructure and catalytic performance of the np-PtPdAlCu catalyst have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and electrochemical measurements. The np-PtPdAlCu catalyst exhibits an open bi-continuous interpenetrating ligament/channel structure with a length scale of 2.3 ± 0.5 nm. The np-PtPdAlCu catalyst shows 2 and 3.5 times enhancement in the mass activity and area specific activity towards methanol oxidation at anode respectively, compared to the Johnson Matthey (JM) Pt/C (40 wt.%) catalyst. Moreover, the CO stripping peak of np-PtPdAlCu is 0.49 V (vs. SCE), indicating a 180 mV negative shift in comparison with the Pt/C catalyst (0.67 V vs. SCE). In addition, the np-PtPdAlCu catalyst also shows an enhanced oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity at cathode compared to Pt/C. The present study provides a facile and effective route to design high-performance catalysts for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs).

  11. Synthesis, characterization, and catalytic activity in Suzuki coupling and catalase-like reactions of new chitosan supported Pd catalyst.

    PubMed

    Baran, Talat; Inanan, Tülden; Menteş, Ayfer

    2016-07-10

    The aim of this study is to analyze the synthesis of a new chitosan supported Pd catalyst and examination of its catalytic activity in: Pd catalyst was synthesized using chitosan as a biomaterial and characterized with FTIR, TG/DTG, XRD, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, SEM-EDAX, ICP-OES, Uv-vis spectroscopies, and magnetic moment, along with molar conductivity analysis. Biomaterial supported Pd catalyst indicated high activity and long life time as well as excellent turnover number (TON) and turnover frequency (TOF) values in Suzuki reaction. Biomaterial supported Pd catalyst catalyzed H2O2 decomposition reaction with considerable high activity using comparatively small loading catalyst (10mg). Redox potential of biomaterial supported Pd catalyst was still high without negligible loss (13% decrease) after 10 cycles in reusability tests. As a consequence, eco-friendly biomaterial supported Pd catalyst has superior properties such as high thermal stability, long life time, easy removal from reaction mixture and durability to air, moisture and high temperature. PMID:27106147

  12. Pt-Au/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] catalysts: Preparation, characterization, and dehydrogenation activity

    SciTech Connect

    Rouabah, D.; Fraissard, J. )

    1993-11-01

    The physicochemical characteristics of Pt-Au catalysts, such as the dispersion, chemisorption, and thermodesorption of hydrogen, have been studied in terms of gold content. The catalysts were prepared by coimpregnation of a [gamma]-alumina by a mixture of hexachloroplatinic and tetrachloroauric acids, calcination in oxygen and slow reduction in H[sub 2]-He from 25 to 400[degrees]C. The most outstanding result is the very large increase in the dispersion with the gold concentration. For example, with the alloy containing 80% gold more than 70% of the detectable particles are below 10 [angstrom]. In the same way, the activity per site and the selectivity in the dehydrogenation of methylcyclohexane to toluene increase with the gold concentration. 26 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. AgI/TiO2 nanobelts monolithic catalyst with enhanced visible light photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Yi, Junhui; Huang, Lingling; Wang, Hongjuan; Yu, Hao; Peng, Feng

    2015-03-01

    AgI nanoparticles (NPs) have been decorated on the TiO2 nanobelts (NBs) immobilized on a metal Ti substrate by a simple impregnating-precipitation method. The as-achieved AgI/TiO2 monolithic catalyst exhibits a high and stable visible photocatalytic activity toward acid orange II (AO-II) degradation, which is attributed to the suitable energy band match of AgI NPs and TiO2 NBs, leading to the efficient transfer of photo-generated electrons. In addition, it was found that ·O2(-) radicals and h(+) are the main reactive species for the degradation of AO-II under visible light irradiation. A reasonable photocatalytic mechanism of AgI/TiO2 photocatalyst toward AO-II degradation was discussed. This monolithic catalyst provides an advantage over the drawback encountered with powder suspension. PMID:25463235

  14. Thermodynamic explanation of the universal correlation between oxygen evolution activity and corrosion of oxide catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Binninger, Tobias; Mohamed, Rhiyaad; Waltar, Kay; Fabbri, Emiliana; Levecque, Pieter; Kötz, Rüdiger; Schmidt, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) has attracted increased research interest due to its crucial role in electrochemical energy conversion devices for renewable energy applications. The vast majority of OER catalyst materials investigated are metal oxides of various compositions. The experimental results obtained on such materials strongly suggest the existence of a fundamental and universal correlation between the oxygen evolution activity and the corrosion of metal oxides. This corrosion manifests itself in structural changes and/or dissolution of the material. We prove from basic thermodynamic considerations that any metal oxide must become unstable under oxygen evolution conditions irrespective of the pH value. The reason is the thermodynamic instability of the oxygen anion in the metal oxide lattice. Our findings explain many of the experimentally observed corrosion phenomena on different metal oxide OER catalysts. PMID:26178185

  15. A general method for multimetallic platinum alloy nanowires as highly active and stable oxygen reduction catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Bu, Lingzheng; Ding, Jiabao; Yao, Jianlin; Huang, Xiaoqing; Guo, Shaojun; Zhang, Xu; Lu, Gang; Su, Dong; Zhu, Xing; Guo, Jun

    2015-10-13

    The production of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) with precise control over structures has always been a central target in various fields of chemistry and physics because the properties of NPs can be desirably manipulated by their structure.[1-4] There has been an intense search for high-performance noble metal NP catalysts particular for Pt.[5-9] Precious platinum (Pt) NPs are active catalysts for various heterogeneous reactions and show particularly superior performance in both the anodic oxidation reaction and the cathodic ORR in the fuel cells, but their rare content and high cost largely impede the practical application.[10-12] A potential strategy to address this tremendous challenge is alloying Pt NPs with the transition metals (TM).[13-16]

  16. Thermodynamic explanation of the universal correlation between oxygen evolution activity and corrosion of oxide catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binninger, Tobias; Mohamed, Rhiyaad; Waltar, Kay; Fabbri, Emiliana; Levecque, Pieter; Kötz, Rüdiger; Schmidt, Thomas J.

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) has attracted increased research interest due to its crucial role in electrochemical energy conversion devices for renewable energy applications. The vast majority of OER catalyst materials investigated are metal oxides of various compositions. The experimental results obtained on such materials strongly suggest the existence of a fundamental and universal correlation between the oxygen evolution activity and the corrosion of metal oxides. This corrosion manifests itself in structural changes and/or dissolution of the material. We prove from basic thermodynamic considerations that any metal oxide must become unstable under oxygen evolution conditions irrespective of the pH value. The reason is the thermodynamic instability of the oxygen anion in the metal oxide lattice. Our findings explain many of the experimentally observed corrosion phenomena on different metal oxide OER catalysts.

  17. A general method for multimetallic platinum alloy nanowires as highly active and stable oxygen reduction catalysts

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bu, Lingzheng; Ding, Jiabao; Yao, Jianlin; Huang, Xiaoqing; Guo, Shaojun; Zhang, Xu; Lu, Gang; Su, Dong; Zhu, Xing; Guo, Jun

    2015-10-13

    The production of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) with precise control over structures has always been a central target in various fields of chemistry and physics because the properties of NPs can be desirably manipulated by their structure.[1-4] There has been an intense search for high-performance noble metal NP catalysts particular for Pt.[5-9] Precious platinum (Pt) NPs are active catalysts for various heterogeneous reactions and show particularly superior performance in both the anodic oxidation reaction and the cathodic ORR in the fuel cells, but their rare content and high cost largely impede the practical application.[10-12] A potential strategy to address this tremendousmore » challenge is alloying Pt NPs with the transition metals (TM).[13-16]« less

  18. Structural and chemical characteristics of atomically smooth GaN surfaces prepared by abrasive-free polishing with Pt catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, Junji; Sadakuni, Shun; Okamoto, Takeshi; Hattori, Azusa N.; Yagi, Keita; Sano, Yasuhisa; Arima, Kenta; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2012-06-01

    This paper reports the structural and chemical characteristics of atomically flat gallium nitride (GaN) surfaces prepared by abrasive-free polishing with platinum (Pt) catalyst. Atomic force microscopy revealed regularly alternating wide and narrow terraces with a step height equivalent to that of a single bilayer on the flattened GaN surfaces, which originate from the differences in etching rate of two neighboring terraces. The material removal characteristics of the method for GaN surfaces were investigated in detail. We confirmed that an atomically smooth GaN surface with an extremely small number of surface defects, including pits and scratches, can be achieved, regardless of the growth method, surface polarity, and doping concentration. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that the flattening method produces clean GaN surfaces with only trace impurities such as Ga oxide and metallic Ga. Contamination with the Pt catalyst was also evaluated using total-reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis. A wet cleaning method with aqua regia is proposed, which markedly eliminates this Pt contamination without affecting the surface morphology.

  19. Kinetically Controlling Surface Structure to Construct Defect-Rich Intermetallic Nanocrystals: Effective and Stable Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Rong, Hongpan; Mao, Junjie; Xin, Pingyu; He, Dongsheng; Chen, Yuanjun; Wang, Dingsheng; Niu, Zhiqiang; Wu, Yuen; Li, Yadong

    2016-04-01

    Kinetic control of surface defects is achieved, and cubic, concave cubic, and defect-rich cubic intermetallic Pt3 Sn nanocrystals are prepared for the electro-oxidation of formic acid. The generality of this kinetic approach is demonstrated by the fabrication of Pt-Mn nanocrystals with different surface defects. The defect-rich nanocrystals exhibit high catalytic activity and stability concurrently, indicating their potential application in fuel cells. PMID:26836038

  20. Enhanced catalytic activity over MIL-100(Fe) loaded ceria catalysts for the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH₃ at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Sun, Hong; Quan, Xie; Chen, Shuo

    2016-01-15

    The development of catalysts for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) reactions that are highly active at low temperatures and show good resistance to SO2 and H2O is still a challenge. In this study, we have designed and developed a high-performance SCR catalyst based on nano-sized ceria encapsulated inside the pores of MIL-100(Fe) that combines excellent catalytic power with a metal organic framework architecture synthesized by the impregnation method (IM). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the encapsulation of ceria in the cavities of MIL-100(Fe). The prepared IM-CeO2/MIL-100(Fe) catalyst shows improved catalytic activity both at low temperatures and throughout a wide temperature window. The temperature window for 90% NOx conversion ranges from 196 to 300°C. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFT) analysis indicated that the nano-sized ceria encapsulated inside MIL-100(Fe) promotes the production of chemisorbed oxygen on the catalyst surface, which greatly enhances the formation of the NO2 species responsible for fast SCR reactions. PMID:26414927

  1. Surface Interrogation Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy of Ni(1-x)Fe(x)OOH (0 < x < 0.27) Oxygen Evolving Catalyst: Kinetics of the "fast" Iron Sites.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hyun S; Bard, Allen J

    2016-01-13

    Nickel-iron mixed metal oxyhydroxides have attracted significant attention as an oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalyst for solar fuel renewable energy applications. Here, we performed surface-selective and time-dependent redox titrations to directly measure the surface OER kinetics of Ni(IV) and Fe(IV) in NiOOH, FeOOH, and Ni(1-x)Fe(x)OOH (0 < x < 0.27) electrodes. Most importantly, two types of surface sites exhibiting "fast" and "slow" kinetics were found, where the fraction of "fast" sites in Ni(1-x)Fe(x)OOH matched the iron atom content in the film. This finding provides experimental support to the theory-proposed model of active sites in Ni(1-x)Fe(x)OOH. The OER rate constant of the "fast" site was 1.70 s(-1) per atom. PMID:26645678

  2. The contrasting catalytic efficiency and cancer cell antiproliferative activity of stereoselective organoruthenium transfer hydrogenation catalysts.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ying; Sanchez-Cano, Carlos; Soni, Rina; Romero-Canelon, Isolda; Hearn, Jessica M; Liu, Zhe; Wills, Martin; Sadler, Peter J

    2016-05-28

    The rapidly growing area of catalytic ruthenium chemistry has provided new complexes with potential as organometallic anticancer agents with novel mechanisms of action. Here we report the anticancer activity of four neutral organometallic Ru(II) arene N-tosyl-1,2-diphenylethane-1,2-diamine (TsDPEN) tethered transfer hydrogenation catalysts. The enantiomers (R,R)-[Ru(η(6)-C6H5(CH2)3-TsDPEN-N-Me)Cl] (8) and (S,S)-[Ru(η(6)-C6H5(CH2)3-TsDPEN-N-Me)Cl] (8a) exhibited higher potency than cisplatin against A2780 human ovarian cancer cells. When the N-methyl was replaced by N-H, i.e. to give (R,R)-[Ru(η(6)-Ph(CH2)3-TsDPEN-NH)Cl] (7) and (S,S)-[Ru(η(6)-Ph(CH2)3-TsDPEN-NH)Cl] (7a), respectively, anticancer activity decreased >5-fold. Their antiproliferative activity appears to be linked to their ability to accumulate in cells, and their mechanism of action might involve inhibition of tubulin polymerisation. This appears to be the first report of the potent anticancer activity of tethered Ru(II) arene complexes, and the structure-activity relationship suggests that the N-methyl substituents are important for potency. In the National Cancer Institute 60-cancer-cell-line screen, complexes 8 and 8a exhibited higher activity than cisplatin towards a broad range of cancer cell lines. Intriguingly, in contrast to their potent anticancer properties, complexes 8/8a are poor catalysts for asymmetric transfer hydrogenation, whereas complexes 7/7a are effective asymmetric hydrogenation catalysts. PMID:27109147

  3. Amorphous Molybdenum Sulfide on Graphene-Carbon Nanotube Hybrids as Highly Active Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Pham, Kien-Cuong; Chang, Yung-Huang; McPhail, David S; Mattevi, Cecilia; Wee, Andrew T S; Chua, Daniel H C

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we report on the deposition of amorphous molybdenum sulfide (MoSx, with x ≈ 3) on a high specific surface area conductive support of Graphene-Carbon Nanotube hybrids (GCNT) as the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction (HER) catalysts. We found that the high surface area GCNT electrode could support the deposition of MoSx at much higher loadings compared with simple porous carbon paper or flat graphite paper. The morphological study showed that MoSx was successfully deposited on and was in good contact with the GCNT support. Other physical characterization techniques suggested the amorphous nature of the deposited MoSx. With a typical catalyst loading of 3 mg cm(-2), an overpotential of 141 mV was required to obtain a current density of 10 mA cm(-2). A Tafel slope of 41 mV decade(-1) was demonstrated. Both measures placed the MoSx-deposited GCNT electrode among the best performing molybdenum sulfide-based HER catalysts reported to date. The electrode showed a good stability with only a 25 mV increase in overpotential required for a current density of 10 mA cm(-2), after undergoing 500 potential sweeps with vigorous bubbling present. The current density obtained at -0.5 V vs SHE (Standard Hydrogen Electrode potential) decreased less than 10% after the stability test. The deposition of MoSx on high specific surface area conductive electrodes demonstrated to be an efficient method to maximize the catalytic performance toward HER. PMID:26864503

  4. In Situ Observation of Active Oxygen Species in Fe-Containing Ni-Based Oxygen Evolution Catalysts: The Effect of pH on Electrochemical Activity.

    PubMed

    Trześniewski, Bartek J; Diaz-Morales, Oscar; Vermaas, David A; Longo, Alessandro; Bras, Wim; Koper, Marc T M; Smith, Wilson A

    2015-12-01

    Ni-based oxygen evolution catalysts (OECs) are cost-effective and very active materials that can be potentially used for efficient solar-to-fuel conversion process toward sustainable energy generation. We present a systematic spectroelectrochemical characterization of two Fe-containing Ni-based OECs, namely nickel borate (Ni(Fe)-B(i)) and nickel oxyhydroxide (Ni(Fe)OOH). Our Raman and X-ray absorption spectroscopy results show that both OECs are chemically similar, and that the borate anions do not play an apparent role in the catalytic process at pH 13. Furthermore, we show spectroscopic evidence for the generation of negatively charged sites in both OECs (NiOO(-)), which can be described as adsorbed "active oxygen". Our data conclusively links the OER activity of the Ni-based OECs with the generation of those sites on the surface of the OECs. The OER activity of both OECs is strongly pH dependent, which can be attributed to a deprotonation process of the Ni-based OECs, leading to the formation of the negatively charged surface sites that act as OER precursors. This work emphasizes the relevance of the electrolyte effect to obtain catalytically active phases in Ni-based OECs, in addition to the key role of the Fe impurities. This effect should be carefully considered in the development of Ni-based compounds meant to catalyze the OER at moderate pHs. Complementarily, UV-vis spectroscopy measurements show strong darkening of those catalysts in the catalytically active state. This coloration effect is directly related to the oxidation of nickel and can be an important factor limiting the efficiency of solar-driven devices utilizing Ni-based OECs. PMID:26544169

  5. Optimization of two-step bioleaching of spent petroleum refinery catalyst by Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Srichandan, Haragobinda; Pathak, Ashish; Kim, Dong Jin; Lee, Seoung-Won

    2014-01-01

    A central composite design (CCD) combined with response surface methodology (RSM) was employed for maximizing bioleaching yields of metals (Al, Mo, Ni, and V) from as-received spent refinery catalyst using Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans. Three independent variables, namely initial pH, sulfur concentration, and pulp density were investigated. The pH was found to be the most influential parameter with leaching yields of metals varying inversely with pH. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) of the quadratic model indicated that the predicted values were in good agreement with experimental data. Under optimized conditions of 1.0% pulp density, 1.5% sulfur and pH 1.5, about 93% Ni, 44% Al, 34% Mo, and 94% V was leached from the spent refinery catalyst. Among all the metals, V had the highest maximum rate of leaching (Vmax) according to the Michaelis-Menten equation. The results of the study suggested that two-step bioleaching is efficient in leaching of metals from spent refinery catalyst. Moreover, the process can be conducted with as received spent refinery catalyst, thus making the process cost effective for large-scale applications. PMID:25320861

  6. Role of pH in the Formation of Structurally Stable and Catalytically Active TiO2-Supported Gold Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Veith, G.; Lupini, A; Dudney, N

    2008-01-01

    We report the investigation of titania (Degussa P25) supported gold catalysts prepared by magnetron sputtering. Catalysts grown on natural fumed titania were structurally unstable, resulting in the rapid coarsening of 2.4 nm gold clusters into large 20 nm gold clusters in a few days at room temperature under normal atmospheric conditions. However, treating the titania support powder to a mock deposition-precipitation process, at pH 4, followed by the subsequent deposition of gold onto this treated powder produced a remarkable enhancement in gold particle stability and a 20-fold enhancement of catalytic activity. Furthermore, it was found that treating the titania under basic conditions (pH 10) resulted in a further enhancement of structural stability and a further doubling of the reaction rate to 0.28 mol of CO/mol of Au s. This enhancement cannot be attributed to removing surface Cl- species from the titania, the formation of oxygen vacancies on the TiO2 surface, or an electronic effect. Instead, it appears to be associated with the formation of strongly bound hydroxyl species on the TiO2 surface. The formation of surface hydroxyls during the deposition-precipitation method is coincidental and contributes significantly to the properties of Au/TiO2 catalysts

  7. Effect of a carrier's nature on the activation of supported iron catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazak, V. O.; Chernavskii, P. A.; Pankina, G. V.; Khodakov, A. Y.; Ordomsky, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    The effect a carrier's nature has on the activation of supported iron catalysts in a stream of pure carbon monoxide CO is investigated. It is shown that iron is mainly present in the form of magnetite Fe3O4 in case of carbon supports and in the form of hematite Fe2O3 for silica gel supports. It is shown that all activated samples are chiefly made up of the Hägg carbide χ-Fe5C2, but its concentration is higher for the carbon supports.

  8. TOPICAL REVIEW: Nanoparticle catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshfegh, A. Z.

    2009-12-01

    In this review, the importance of nanoparticles (NPs), with emphasis on their general and specific properties, especially the high surface-to-volume ratio (A/V), in many technological and industrial applications is studied. Some physical and chemical preparation methods for growing several metallic and binary alloy NP catalysts are reviewed. The growth and mechanism of catalytic reactions for synthesis of 1D nanostructures such as ZnO nanowires and multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are discussed. Gas-phase production with emphasis on dependence of catalytic activity and selectivity on size, shape and structure of NPs is also investigated. Application of NP catalysts in several technological processes including H2 production and storage as well as antibacterial effect, gas sensors and fuel cells is discussed. The mechanism of H2 production from catalytic photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic degradation reactions of some organic dyes is discussed. Finally, the future outlook of NP catalysts in various disciplines is presented.

  9. Biomass Oxidation: Formyl C-H Bond Activation by the Surface Lattice Oxygen of Regenerative CuO Nanoleaves.

    PubMed

    Amaniampong, Prince N; Trinh, Quang Thang; Wang, Bo; Borgna, Armando; Yang, Yanhui; Mushrif, Samir H

    2015-07-27

    An integrated experimental and computational investigation reveals that surface lattice oxygen of copper oxide (CuO) nanoleaves activates the formyl C-H bond in glucose and incorporates itself into the glucose molecule to oxidize it to gluconic acid. The reduced CuO catalyst regains its structure, morphology, and activity upon reoxidation. The activity of lattice oxygen is shown to be superior to that of the chemisorbed oxygen on the metal surface and the hydrogen abstraction ability of the catalyst is correlated with the adsorption energy. Based on the present investigation, it is suggested that surface lattice oxygen is critical for the oxidation of glucose to gluconic acid, without further breaking down the glucose molecule into smaller fragments, because of C-C cleavage. Using CuO nanoleaves as catalyst, an excellent yield of gluconic acid is also obtained for the direct oxidation of cellobiose and polymeric cellulose, as biomass substrates. PMID:26119659

  10. Surfactant free RGO/Pd nanocomposites as highly active heterogeneous catalysts for the hydrolytic dehydrogenation of ammonia borane for chemical hydrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Xi, Pinxian; Chen, Fengjuan; Xie, Guoqiang; Ma, Cai; Liu, Hongyan; Shao, Changwei; Wang, Jun; Xu, Zhihong; Xu, Ximing; Zeng, Zhengzhi

    2012-09-21

    In this study, monodisperse palladium (Pd) nanoparticles on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) surfaces were successfully prepared by a "wet" and "clean" method in aqueous solution. Without any surface treatment, Pd nanoparticles are firmly attached to the RGO sheets. These RGO/Pd nanocomposites exhibited catalytic activity in hydrogen generation from the hydrolysis of ammonia borane (AB). Their hydrolysis completion time and activation energy were 12.5 min and 51 ± 1 kJ mol(-1), respectively, which were comparable to the best Pd-based catalyst reported. The TOF values (mol of H(2)× (mol of catalyst × min)(-1)) of RGO/Pd is 6.25, which appears to be one of the best catalysts reported so far. We also obtained a (11)B NMR spectrum to investigate the mechanism of this catalytic hydrolysis process. This simple and straightforward method is of significance for the facile preparation of metal nanocatalysts with high catalytic activity on proper supporting materials. PMID:22732933

  11. Theoretical Modelling and Facile Synthesis of a Highly Active Boron-Doped Palladium Catalyst for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Vo Doan, Tat Thang; Wang, Jingbo; Poon, Kee Chun; Tan, Desmond C L; Khezri, Bahareh; Webster, Richard D; Su, Haibin; Sato, Hirotaka

    2016-06-01

    A highly active alternative to Pt electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), which is the cathode-electrode reaction of fuel cells, is sought for higher fuel-cell performance. Our theoretical modelling reveals that B-doped Pd (Pd-B) weakens the absorption of ORR intermediates with nearly optimal binding energy by lowering the barrier associated with O2 dissociation, suggesting Pd-B should be highly active for ORR. In fact, Pd-B, facile synthesized by an electroless deposition process, exhibits 2.2 times and 8.8 times higher specific activity and 14 times and 35 times less costly than commercial pure Pd and Pt catalysts, respectively. Another computational result is that the surface core level of Pd is negatively shifted by B doping, as confirmed by XPS, and implies that filling the density of states related to the anti-bonding of oxygen to Pd surfaces with excess electrons from B doping, weakens the O bonding to Pd and boosts the catalytic activity. PMID:27086729

  12. Understanding Automotive Exhaust Catalysts Using a Surface Science Approach: Model NOx Storage Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Szanyi, Janos; Yi, Cheol-Woo W.; Mudiyanselage, Kumudu K.; Kwak, Ja Hun

    2013-11-01

    The structure-reactivity relationships of model BaO-based NOx storage/reduction catalysts were investigated under well controlled experimental conditions using surface science analysis techniques. The reactivity of BaO toward NO2, CO2, and H2O was studied as a function of BaO layer thickness [0\\hBaO\\30 monolayer (ML)], sample temperature, reactant partial pressure, and the nature of the substrate the NOx storage material was deposited onto. Most of the efforts focused on understanding the mechanism of NO2 storage either on pure BaO, or on BaO exposed to CO2 or H2O prior to NO2 exposure. The interaction of NO2 with a pure BaO film results in the initial formation of nitrite/nitrate ion pairs by a cooperative adsorption mechanism predicted by prior theoretical calculations. The nitrites are then further oxidized to nitrates to produce a fully nitrated surface. The mechanism of NO2 uptake on thin BaO films (\\4 ML), BaO clusters (\\1 ML) and mixed BaO/Al2O3 layers are fundamentally different: in these systems initially nitrites are formed only, and then converted to nitrates at longer NO2 exposure times. These results clarify the contradicting mechanisms presented in prior studies in the literature. After the formation of a nitrate layer the further conversion of the underlying BaO is slow, and strongly depends on both the sample temperature and the NO2 partial pressure. At 300 K sample temperature amorphous Ba(NO3)2 forms that then can be converted to crystalline nitrates at elevated temperatures. The reaction between BaO and H2O is facile, a series of Ba(OH)2 phases form under the temperature and H2O partial pressure regimes studied. Both amorphous and crystalline Ba(OH)2 phases react with NO2, and initially form nitrites only that can be converted to nitrates. The NO2 adsorption capacities of BaO and Ba(OH)2 are identical, i.e., both of these phases can completely be converted to Ba(NO3)2. In contrast, the interaction of CO2 with pure BaO results in the formation

  13. Active Hydrogenation Catalyst with a Structured, Peptide-Based Outer-Coordination Sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Avijita; Buchko, Garry W.; Reback, Matthew L.; O'Hagan, Molly J.; Ginovska-Pangovska, Bojana; Linehan, John C.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2012-10-05

    The synthesis, catalytic activity, and structural features of a rhodium-based hydrogenation catalyst containing a phosphine ligand coupled to a 14-residue peptide are reported. Both CD and NMR spectroscopy show that the peptide adopts a helical structure in 1:1:1 TFE/MeCN/H2O that is maintained when the peptide is attached to the ligand and when the ligand is attached to the metal complex. The metal complex hydrogenates aqueous solutions of 3-butenol to 1-butanol at 360 ± 50 turnovers/Rh/h at 294 K. This peptide- based catalyst represents a starting point for developing and characterizing a peptide-based outer-coordination sphere that can be used to introduce enzyme-like features into molecular catalysts. This work was funded by the US DOE Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geoscience and Biosciences Division (AJ, JCL and WJS), the Office of Science Early Career Research Program through the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (GWB, MLR and WJS). Part of the research was conducted at the W.R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Biolog-ical and Environmental Research (BER) program located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  14. One pot aqueous synthesis of nanoporous Au85Pt15 material with surface bound Pt islands: an efficient methanol tolerant ORR catalyst.

    PubMed

    Anandha Ganesh, P; Jeyakumar, D

    2014-11-01

    For the first time, we are reporting the synthesis of Au100-xPtx nanoporous materials in the size range of 7-10 nm through the galvanic replacement of Ag by Pt from Au100-xAg2x spherical nano-alloys (x = 20, 15, 10 and 5) in an aqueous medium. The galvanic replacement reaction follows the 'Volmer-Weber' growth mode, resulting in the formation of surface bound platinum islands on a nanoporous gold surface. The high angle annular dark field image and low angle X-ray diffraction studies confirm the presence of nanoporous Au100-xPtx NPs. The electrochemical studies using the Au85Pt15/C catalyst show excellent methanol tolerance behaviour and better performance towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in terms of high mass activity, mass-specific activity and figure of merit (FOM) when compared to HiSPEC Pt/C commercial catalyst. Preliminary studies on a full cell using nanoporous Au85Pt15/C (loading 1.0 mg cm(-2)) as the cathode material and Pt-Ru/C (loading: 0.5 mg cm(-2)) as the anode material performed better (38 mW cm(-2)) than the HiSPEC Pt/C cathode material (16 mW cm(-2)). PMID:25241856

  15. Novel catalysts for methane activation. Quarterly report No. 9, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschon, A.S.; Wu, H.J.; Malhotra, R.; Wilson, R.B.

    1995-04-20

    Fullerenes are a recently discovered allotrope of carbon that have been found to possess unusual properties, some of which may be ideal for methane activation. This project is designed to evaluate these carbon-based materials for conversion of methane into higher hydrocarbons. The project is divided into three technical tasks. Task 1 deals with synthesis and characterization of the fullerenes and fullerene soots, Task 2 with testing of the catalysts, and Task 3 with evaluation of the results and technical reporting. The results and accomplishments for this quarter are as follows: Reconstituted fullerene soot was prepared by adding C{sub 60} to a toluene-extracted Terrasimco fullerene soot; K-doped fullerene soots of different potassium concentrations were prepared; Fullerene soot doped with cesium was prepared by addition of cesium carbonate; The reconstituted fullerene soot was tested for methane activation. K-doped soots at different K concentrations were tested for methane activation. K-doped soot was examined for methane activation in the presence of co-feeds of either ethane or ethylene; a higher selectivity to C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} hydrocarbons was observed for the K-soot than when these reactions were conducted using soot as a catalyst, or when thermally induced. The Cs-doped soot was tested for methane activation; the selectivity for hydrocarbons from the methane conversion catalyzed by this soot was found to be higher than catalyzed by fullerene soot but lower than by K-soot.

  16. A simple synthesis method of sulfur-free Fe-N-C catalyst witih high ORR activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Zhongfen; Johnston, Christina M; Zelenay, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    To try to deconvolute which factors affect the activity and durability of metal-nitrogen-carbon (M-N-C) type non-precious catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), M-N-C catalysts based on ion chloride, polyaniline (PANI) and Ketjen Black carbon support were synthesized using different synthetic conditions. The catalysts were characterized electrochemically and tested as cathodes for Hydrogen fuel cells. PANI is usually chemically oxidative polymerized using ammonium persulfate (APS) as oxidant. To eliminate sulfur in the synthesized catalysts, a simple synthesis method using ion chloride as oxidant for aniline polymerization was developed. Two different aniline polymerization conditions led to very different product morphologies. Synthesized at low initial proton concentration, the final product was composed of dense micrometer sized particles. A decomposable salt was found to be able to prohibit PANI cross linking during the drying and annealing process and thus led to porous product. The porous catalyst has much higher ORR activity than the dense product due to more accessible active sites. Synthesized at high proton concentration, the catalyst appeared to be porous. The decomposable salt treatment did not make too much improvement in the porous structure and electrochemical activity. However, fuel cell testing using air as cathode feeder indicates that the salt treatment improves mass transfer in the cathode layer. Catalyst synthesized using this simple method has performance comparable to our state-of-the art catalyst synthesized in a much more complicated procedure. The factor that sulfur sources are completely eliminated in the synthesis suggests that sulfur is not necessary for the ORR catalysis activity.

  17. Effects of surface activation on the structural and catalytic properties of ruthenium nanoparticles supported on mesoporous silica.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xianfeng; Lin, Rui; Beuerle, Christopher; Jackson, James E; Obare, Sherine O; Ofoli, Robert Y

    2014-01-31

    Using colloid-based methods to prepare supported catalytic metallic nanoparticles (NPs) often faces the challenge of removing the stabilizer used during synthesis and activating the catalyst without modifying the particles or the support. We explored three surface activation protocols (thermal oxidation at 150 °C, thermal reduction at 350 °C, and argon-protected calcination at 650 °C) to activate ruthenium NPs supported on mesoporous silica (MSU-F), and assessed their effects on the structural and catalytic properties of the catalysts, and their activity by the aqueous phase hydrogenation of pyruvic acid. The NPs were synthesized by polyol reduction using poly-N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (PVP) as a stabilizer, and supported on MSU-F by sonication-assisted deposition. The NPs maintained their original morphology on the support during activation. Ar-protected calcination was the most efficient of the three for completely removing PVP from particle surfaces, and provided the highest degree of particle crystallinity and a metal dispersion comparable to commercial Ru/SiO2. Its catalytic performance was significantly higher than the other two protocols, although all three thermally activated catalysts achieved higher activity than the commercial catalyst at the same Ru loading. Post-reaction analysis also showed that the supported catalyst activated at 650 °C retained its morphology during the reaction, which is an important requirement for recyclability. PMID:24394435

  18. Effects of surface activation on the structural and catalytic properties of ruthenium nanoparticles supported on mesoporous silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xianfeng; Lin, Rui; Beuerle, Christopher; Jackson, James E.; Obare, Sherine O.; Ofoli, Robert Y.

    2014-01-01

    Using colloid-based methods to prepare supported catalytic metallic nanoparticles (NPs) often faces the challenge of removing the stabilizer used during synthesis and activating the catalyst without modifying the particles or the support. We explored three surface activation protocols (thermal oxidation at 150 ° C, thermal reduction at 350 ° C, and argon-protected calcination at 650 ° C) to activate ruthenium NPs supported on mesoporous silica (MSU-F), and assessed their effects on the structural and catalytic properties of the catalysts, and their activity by the aqueous phase hydrogenation of pyruvic acid. The NPs were synthesized by polyol reduction using poly-N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (PVP) as a stabilizer, and supported on MSU-F by sonication-assisted deposition. The NPs maintained their original morphology on the support during activation. Ar-protected calcination was the most efficient of the three for completely removing PVP from particle surfaces, and provided the highest degree of particle crystallinity and a metal dispersion comparable to commercial Ru/SiO2. Its catalytic performance was significantly higher than the other two protocols, although all three thermally activated catalysts achieved higher activity than the commercial catalyst at the same Ru loading. Post-reaction analysis also showed that the supported catalyst activated at 650 ° C retained its morphology during the reaction, which is an important requirement for recyclability.

  19. Synthesis, Characterization, and Catalytic Activity of Sulfided Silico-Alumino-Titanate (Si-Al-Ti) Mixed Oxides Xerogels Supported Ni-Mo Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Adwani, H.A.; Anthony, R.G.; Gardner, T.J.; Thammachote, N.

    1999-02-24

    Layered semicrystalline silico-alumino-titanate (Si-Al-Ti) mixed oxides were synthesized by a modified sol-gel method with hydrothermal synthesis temperatures less than 200 C and autogenic pressure. The solid products are semicrystalline materials with a surface area of 136-367 m{sup 2}/g and a monomodal pore size distribution with an average pore diameter of 3.6-4.7 nrn. The catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation in a batch reactor at 300 C and 500 psig was determined for sulfided Ni-Mo supported on the Si-Al-Ti mixed oxide. The activity was a function of the support composition the heat treatment before and after loading the active metals, the addition of organic templates, and different methods of metal loading. The most active sulfided Ni-Mo/Si-Al-Ti catalyst has an activity in the same range as the commercial catalyst, Shell 324, but the metal loading is 37% less than the commercial catalyst.

  20. Production of High Molecular Weight Organic Compounds on the Surfaces of Amorphous Iron Silicate Catalysts: Implications for Organic Synthesis in the Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilmour, I.; Hill, H. G. M.; Pearson, V. K.; Sephton, M. A.; Nuth, J. A., III

    2002-01-01

    The high molecular weight organic products of Fischer-Tropsch/Haber-Bosch syntheses on the surfaces of Fe-silicate catalysts have been studied by GCMS. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  1. In-line localized monitoring of catalyst activity in selective catalytic NO.sub.x reduction systems

    DOEpatents

    Muzio, Lawrence J.; Smith, Randall A.

    2009-12-22

    Localized catalyst activity in an SCR unit for controlling emissions from a boiler, power plant, or any facility that generates NO.sub.x-containing flue gases is monitored by one or more modules that operate on-line without disrupting the normal operation of the facility. Each module is positioned over a designated lateral area of one of the catalyst beds in the SCR unit, and supplies ammonia, urea, or other suitable reductant to the catalyst in the designated area at a rate that produces an excess of the reductant over NO.sub.x on a molar basis through the designated area. Sampling probes upstream and downstream of the designated area draw samples of the gas stream for NO.sub.x analysis, and the catalyst activity is determined from the difference in NO.sub.x levels between the two probes.

  2. Influence of the support on the activity and selectivity of high dispersion Fe catalysts in the Fischer-Tropsch reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Cagnoli, M.V.; Marchetti, S.G.; Gallegos, N.G.; Alvarez, A.M.; Mercader, R.C.; Yeramian, A.A. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, La Plata )

    1990-05-01

    In order to study the influence of the support on high dispersion catalysts used for the CO hydrogenation reaction, two catalysts, Fe/SiO{sub 2} and Fe/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, were prepared by the dry impregnation method. Selective chemisorption of CO, volumetric oxidation, and Moessbauer spectroscopy were used to determine the Fe species present as well as the metallic crystal size, the degree of dispersion, and the reduction percentage. The presence of small Fe{sup 0} crystallites with high dispersion was determined in both catalysts. Reaction rates were measured in a differential reactor and significant differences, about one order of magnitude less for the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} than for the SiO{sub 2} supported catalysts, were found in the methane turnover frequencies. They are attributed to the interaction between the metal and the supports. The selectivity differences is also discussed in connection with distinct surface properties.

  3. Trimetallic Au/Pt/Rh Nanoparticles as Highly Active Catalysts for Aerobic Glucose Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haijun; Cao, Yingnan; Lu, Lilin; Cheng, Zhong; Zhang, Shaowei

    2015-02-01

    This paper reports the findings of an investigation of the correlations between the catalytic activity for aerobic glucose oxidation and the composition of Au/Pt/Rh trimetallic nanoparticles (TNPs) with average diameters of less than 2.0 nm prepared by rapid injection of NaBH4. The prepared TNPs were characterized by UV-Vis, TEM, and HR-TEM. The catalytic activity of the alloy-structured TNPs for aerobic glucose oxidation is several times higher than that of Au monometallic nanoparticles with nearly the same particle size. The catalytic activities of the TNP catalysts were dependent not only on the composition, but also on the electronic structure. The high catalytic activities of the Au/Pt/Rh TNPs can be ascribed to the formed negative-charged Au atoms due to electron donation of Rh neighboring atoms acting as catalytically active sites for aerobic glucose oxidation.

  4. Physico-Chemical Property and Catalytic Activity of a CeO2-Doped MnO(x)-TiO2 Catalyst with SO2 Resistance for Low-Temperature NH3-SCR of NO(x).

    PubMed

    Shin, Byeongkil; Chun, Ho Hwan; Cha, Jin-Sun; Shin, Min-Chul; Lee, Heesoo

    2016-05-01

    The effects of CeO2 addition on the catalytic activity and the SO2 resistance of CeO2-doped MnO(x)-TiO2 catalysts were investigated for the low-temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with NH3 of NO(x) emissions in marine applications. The most active catalyst was obtained from 30 wt% CeO2-MnO(x)-TiO2 catalyst in the whole temperature range of 100-300 degrees C at a low gas hourly space velocity (GHSV) of 10,000 h(-)1, and its de-NO(x) efficiency was higher than 90% over 250 degrees C. The enhanced catalytic activity may contribute to the dispersion state and catalytic acidity on the catalyst surface, and the highly dispersed Mn and Ce on the nano-scaled TiO2 catalyst affects the increase of Lewis and Brønsted acid sites. A CeO2-rich additive on MnO(x)-TiO2 could provide stronger catalytic acid sites, associated with NH3 adsorption and the SCR performance. As the results of sulfur resistance in flue gas that contains SO2, the de-NO(x) efficiency of MnO(x)-TiO2 decreased by 15% over 200 degrees C, whereas that of 30 wt% ceria-doped catalyst increased by 14-21% over 150 degrees C. The high SO2 resistance of CeO2-MnO(x)-TiO2 catalysts that resulted from the addition of ceria suppressed the formation of Mn sulfate species, which led to deactivation on the surface of nano-catalyst. PMID:27483759

  5. Degradation of refractory dibutyl phthalate by peroxymonosulfate activated with novel catalysts cobalt metal-organic frameworks: Mechanism, performance, and stability.

    PubMed

    Li, Huanxuan; Wan, Jinquan; Ma, Yongwen; Wang, Yan; Chen, Xi; Guan, Zeyu

    2016-11-15

    In this work, a new effective and relatively stable heterogeneous catalyst of Metal-Organic Framework Co3(BTC)2·12H2O (Co-BTC) has been synthesized and tested to activate peroxymonosulfate (PMS) for removal of refractory dibutyl phthalate (DBP). Co-BTC(A) and Co-BTC(B) were synthesized by different methods, which resulted in different activity towards PMS. The results indicated that Co-BTC(A) showed better performance on DBP degradation. The highest degradation rate of 100% was obtained within 30min. The initial pH showed respective level on DBP degradation with a rank of 5.0>2.75>9.0>7.0>11.0 in PMS/Co-BTC(A) system. No remarkable reduction of DBP was observed in the catalytic activity of Co-BTC(A) at 2nd run as demonstrated by recycling. However, the DBP degradation efficiency decreased by 8.26%, 10.9% and 25.6% in the 3rd, 4th, and 5th runs, respectively. The loss of active catalytic sites of Co(II) from Co-BTC(A) is responsible for the activity decay. Sulfate radicals (SO4(-)) and hydroxyl radicals (OH) were found at pH 2.75. Here, we propose the possible mechanism for activation of PMS by Co-BTC(A), which is involved in homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions in the solutions and the surface of Co-BTC(A), respectively. PMID:27420387

  6. Influence of the oxidative/reductive treatments on the activity of Pt/Ce 0.67Zr 0.33O 2 catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jun; Wu, Xiaodong; Ran, Rui; Weng, Duan

    2005-05-01

    A Pt/Ce 0.67Zr 0.33O 2 powder catalyst was prepared by sol-gel method. The as-received sample was successively oxidized, reduced and re-oxidized. The samples were characterized by XRD, XPS, TPR and three-way catalytic activity evaluation. The results supported the re-organization of the support and the occurrence of a strong metal-support interaction (SMSI) effect between platinum and ceria-zirconia mixed oxides. The oxidative/reductive atmosphere affected the structure and performance of the catalyst by the SMSI. It was suggested that a migration of Ce 4+ from the bulk to the surface of the support took place during the reductive treatment, resulting in a formation of ceria-rich phase on the surface. The diffusion process was reversed when the atmosphere was switched to an oxidative one. The status of decoration or encapsulation of Pt by ceria-rich phase changed with the atmosphere, and hereby affected the activity of the catalyst. At temperatures below 300 °C, the re-oxidized sample exhibited the best activity while the reduced one behaved the worst on the conversion of NO and CO, and the as-received one showed the worst on the oxidation of HC. After then the activity of the four samples tends to be the similar. The surface and interfacial Pt 0 sites were both considered as the effective factors. Models were constructed to describe the diffusion of ions and oxygen vacancies as well as the possible surface structure serving as the carrier of Pt 0 site which impacted on the catalytic activity remarkably.

  7. Oxidation of ammonia to nitrogen over Pt/Fe/ZSM5 catalyst: influence of catalyst support on the low temperature activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Sung; Lee, Dae-Won; Chung, Sang-Ho; Hong, Yoon-Ki; Lee, Seong Ho; Oh, Seong-Hoon; Cho, Il-Hyoung; Lee, Kwan-Young

    2012-10-30

    In this study, Pt/Fe/ZSM5 catalysts were applied to oxidation of ammonia, where the catalysts showed good low-temperature activity (≤ 200°C) for converting ammonia into nitrogen. With 1.5% Pt/0.5% Fe/ZSM5 catalyst, we could obtain 81% NH(3) conversion and 93% N(2) selectivity at 175°C at the short contact-time of w/f=0.00012 g min/mL. Through the characterization studies using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray spectroscopies (XRD, XPS), we could find that the active species was collaborating Pt/Fe species, which structure and activity were largely influenced by support material - in a positive way by ZSM5, rather than by Al(2)O(3) and SiO(2). When using ZSM5 as the support material, Pt was highly dispersed exclusively on the Fe oxide, and the valence state and dispersion of Pt changed according to Fe loading amount. PMID:22954598

  8. Nanoporous gold as an active low temperature catalyst toward CO oxidation in hydrogen-rich stream

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongwei; Zhu, Ye; Wang, Hui; Ding, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Preferential CO oxidation (PROX) was investigated by using dealloyed nanoporous gold (NPG) catalyst under ambient conditions. Systematic investigations were carried out to characterize its catalytic performance by varying reaction parameters such as temperature and co-existence of CO2 and H2O, which revealed that NPG was a highly active and selective catalyst for PROX, especially at low temperature. At 20°C, the exit CO concentration could be reduced to less than 2 ppm with a turnover frequency of 4.1 × 10−2 s−1 at a space velocity of 120,000 mL h−1 g−1cat. and its high activity could retain for more than 24 hours. The presence of residual Ag species in the structure did not seem to improve the intrinsic activity of NPG for PROX; however, they contributed to the stabilization of the NPG structure and apparent catalytic activity. These results indicated that NPG might be readily applicable for hydrogen purification in fuel cell applications. PMID:24145317

  9. Nanoporous gold as an active low temperature catalyst toward CO oxidation in hydrogen-rich stream.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongwei; Zhu, Ye; Wang, Hui; Ding, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Preferential CO oxidation (PROX) was investigated by using dealloyed nanoporous gold (NPG) catalyst under ambient conditions. Systematic investigations were carried out to characterize its catalytic performance by varying reaction parameters such as temperature and co-existence of CO2 and H2O, which revealed that NPG was a highly active and selective catalyst for PROX, especially at low temperature. At 20°C, the exit CO concentration could be reduced to less than 2 ppm with a turnover frequency of 4.1 × 10(-2) s(-1) at a space velocity of 120,000 mL h(-1) g(-1)cat. and its high activity could retain for more than 24 hours. The presence of residual Ag species in the structure did not seem to improve the intrinsic activity of NPG for PROX; however, they contributed to the stabilization of the NPG structure and apparent catalytic activity. These results indicated that NPG might be readily applicable for hydrogen purification in fuel cell applications. PMID:24145317

  10. Improved oxygen reduction activity on Pt3Ni(111) via increased surface site availability.

    PubMed

    Stamenkovic, Vojislav R; Fowler, Ben; Mun, Bongjin Simon; Wang, Guofeng; Ross, Philip N; Lucas, Christopher A; Marković, Nenad M

    2007-01-26

    The slow rate of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is the main limitation for automotive applications. We demonstrated that the Pt3Ni(111) surface is 10-fold more active for the ORR than the corresponding Pt(111) surface and 90-fold more active than the current state-of-the-art Pt/C catalysts for PEMFC. The Pt3Ni(111) surface has an unusual electronic structure (d-band center position) and arrangement of surface atoms in the near-surface region. Under operating conditions relevant to fuel cells, its near-surface layer exhibits a highly structured compositional oscillation in the outermost and third layers, which are Pt-rich, and in the second atomic layer, which is Ni-rich. The weak interaction between the Pt surface atoms and nonreactive oxygenated species increases the number of active sites for O2 adsorption. PMID:17218494

  11. Hydrodesulfurization on Transition Metal Catalysts: Elementary Steps of C-S Bond Activation and Consequences of Bifunctional Synergies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yik, Edwin Shyn-Lo

    The presence of heteroatoms (e.g. S, N) in crude oil poses formidable challenges in petroleum refining processes as a result of their irreversible binding on catalytically active sites at industrially relevant conditions. With increasing pressures from legislation that continues to lower the permissible levels of sulfur content in fuels, hydrodesulfurization (HDS), the aptly named reaction for removing heteroatoms from organosulfur compounds, has become an essential feedstock pretreatment step to remove deleterious species from affecting downstream processing. Extensive research in the area has identified the paradigm catalysts for desulfurization; MoSx or WSx, promoted with Co or Ni metal; however, despite the vast library of both empirical and fundamental studies, a clear understanding of site requirements, the elementary steps of C-S hydrogenolysis, and the properties that govern HDS reactivity and selectivity have been elusive. While such a lack of rigorous assessments has not prevented technological advancements in the field of HDS catalysis, fundamental interpretations can inform rational catalyst and process design, particularly in light of new requirements for "deep" desulfurization and in the absence of significant hydrotreatment catalyst developments in recent decades. We report HDS rates of thiophene, which belongs to a class of compounds that are most resistant to sulfur removal (i.e. substituted alkyldibenzothiophenes), over a range of industrially relevant temperatures and pressures, measured at differential conditions and therefore revealing their true kinetic origins. These rates, normalized by the number of exposed metal atoms, on various SiO 2-supported, monometallic transition metals (Re, Ru, Pt), range several orders of magnitude. Under relevant HDS conditions, Pt and Ru catalysts form a layer of chemisorbed sulfur on surfaces of a metallic bulk, challenging reports that assume the latter exists as its pyrite sulfide phase during reaction. While

  12. Sol-gel derived mesoporous cobalt silica catalyst: Synthesis, characterization and its activity in the oxidation of phenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andas, Jeyashelly; Adam, Farook; Rahman, Ismail Ab.

    2014-10-01

    Highly mesoporous cobalt silica rice husk catalysts with (5-15 wt.%) Co2+ loading were prepared via a simple sol-gel technique at room temperature. The successful insertion of cobalt ions into silica matrix was evidenced from FT-IR, NMR, XPS and AAS analyses. Preservation of the mesoporosity nature of silica upon incorporating Co2+ was confirmed from the N2-sorption studies. The topography and morphology viewed by TEM analysis differs as the cobalt concentration varies from 5 to 15 wt.%. Parallel pore channels and spherical nanoparticles of 9.44 nm were achieved for cobalt silica catalysts with 10 and 15 wt.% respectively. Cobalt catalysts were active in the liquid-phase oxidation of phenol with H2O2 as an oxygen source. The performances of the catalysts were greatly influenced by various parameters such as reaction temperature, catalyst amount, molar ratio of substrate to oxidant, nature of solvent, metal loading and homogeneous precursor salt. Water served as the best reaction medium for this oxidation system. The regeneration studies confirmed cobalt catalyst could be reused for five cycles without experiencing large loss in the conversion. Both leaching and reusability studies testified that the catalysts were truly heterogeneous.

  13. Dynamic response of chlorine atoms on a RuO(2)(110) model catalyst surface.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Jan Philipp; Zweidinger, Stefan; Seitsonen, Ari Paavo; Farkas, Attila; Knapp, Marcus; Balmes, Olivier; Lundgren, Edvin; Andersen, Jesper N; Over, Herbert

    2010-12-21

    The dynamic behavior of surface accommodated chlorine atoms on RuO(2)(110) was studied by a variety of experimental methods including high resolution core level shift, thermal desorption-, and in situ infrared spectroscopy as well as in situ surface X-ray diffraction in combination with state-of-the-art density functional theory calculations. On the chlorinated RuO(2)(110) surface the undercoordinated oxygen atoms have been selectively replaced by chlorine. These strongly bound surface chlorine atoms shift from bridging to on-top sites when the sample is annealed in oxygen, while the reverse shift of Cl from on-top into bridge positions is observed during CO exposure; the vacant bridge position is then occupied by either chlorine or CO. For the CO oxidation reaction over chlorinated RuO(2)(110), the reactant induced site switching of chlorine causes a site-blocking of the catalytically active one-fold coordinatively unsaturated (1f-cus) Ru sites. This site blocking reduces the number of active sites and, even more important, on-top Cl blocks the free migration of the adsorbed reactants along the one-dimensional 1f-cus Ru rows, thus leading to a loss of catalytic activity. PMID:20967353

  14. Tin-containing zeolites are highly active catalysts for the isomerization of glucose in water

    SciTech Connect

    Moliner, Manuel; Roman-Leshkov, Yuriy; Davis, Mark E.

    2010-04-06

    The isomerization of glucose into fructose is a large-scale reaction for the production of high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS; reaction performed by enzyme catalysts) and recently is being considered as an intermediate step in the possible route of biomass to fuels and chemicals. Here, it is shown that a large-pore zeolite that contains tin (Sn-Beta) is able to isomerize glucose to fructose in aqueous media with high activity and selectivity. Specifically, a 10% (wt/wt) glucose solution containing a catalytic amount of Sn-Beta (1:50 Sn:glucose molar ratio) gives product yields of approximately 46% (wt/wt) glucose, 31% (wt/wt) fructose, and 9% (wt/wt) mannose after 30 min and 12 min of reaction at 383 K and 413 K, respectively. This reactivity is achieved also when a 45 wt% glucose solution is used. The properties of the large-pore zeolite greatly influence the reaction behavior because the reaction does not proceed with a medium-pore zeolite, and the isomerization activity is considerably lower when the metal centers are incorporated in ordered mesoporous silica (MCM-41). The Sn-Beta catalyst can be used for multiple cycles, and the reaction stops when the solid is removed, clearly indicating that the catalysis is occurring heterogeneously. Most importantly, the Sn-Beta catalyst is able to perform the isomerization reaction in highly acidic, aqueous environments with equivalent activity and product distribution as in media without added acid. This enables Sn-Beta to couple isomerizations with other acid-catalyzed reactions, including hydrolysis/isomerization or isomerization/dehydration reaction sequences [starch to fructose and glucose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) demonstrated here].

  15. Reducing-Agent-Free Instant Synthesis of Carbon-Supported Pd Catalysts in a Green Leidenfrost Droplet Reactor and Catalytic Activity in Formic Acid Dehydrogenation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Wook; Jin, Min-Ho; Lee, Young-Joo; Park, Ju-Hyoung; Lee, Chun-Boo; Park, Jong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The development of green synthesis methods for supported noble metal catalysts remains important challenges to improve their sustainability. Here we first synthesized carbon-supported Pd catalysts in a green Leidenfrost droplet reactor without reducing agents, high-temperature calcination and reduction procedures. When the aqueous solution containing Pd nitrate precursor, carbon support, and water is dripped on a hot plate, vapor layer is formed between a solution droplet and hot surface, which allow the solution droplet to be levitated on the hot surface (Leidenfrost phenomena). Subsequently, Pd nanoparticles can be prepared without reducing agents in a weakly basic droplet reactor created by the Leidenfrost phenomena, and then the as-prepared Pd nanoparticles are loaded on carbon supports during boiling down the droplet on hot surface. Compared to conventional incipient wetness and chemical synthetic methods, the Leidenfrost droplet reactor does not need energy-consuming, time-consuming, and environmentally unfriendly procedures, which leads to much shorter synthesis time, lower carbon dioxide emission, and more ecofriendly process in comparison with conventional synthesis methods. Moreover, the catalysts synthesized in the Leidenfrost droplet reactor provided much better catalytic activity for room-temperature formic acid decomposition than those prepared by the incipient wetness method. PMID:27198855

  16. Reducing-Agent-Free Instant Synthesis of Carbon-Supported Pd Catalysts in a Green Leidenfrost Droplet Reactor and Catalytic Activity in Formic Acid Dehydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Wook; Jin, Min-Ho; Lee, Young-Joo; Park, Ju-Hyoung; Lee, Chun-Boo; Park, Jong-Soo

    2016-05-01

    The development of green synthesis methods for supported noble metal catalysts remains important challenges to improve their sustainability. Here we first synthesized carbon-supported Pd catalysts in a green Leidenfrost droplet reactor without reducing agents, high-temperature calcination and reduction procedures. When the aqueous solution containing Pd nitrate precursor, carbon support, and water is dripped on a hot plate, vapor layer is formed between a solution droplet and hot surface, which allow the solution droplet to be levitated on the hot surface (Leidenfrost phenomena). Subsequently, Pd nanoparticles can be prepared without reducing agents in a weakly basic droplet reactor created by the Leidenfrost phenomena, and then the as-prepared Pd nanoparticles are loaded on carbon supports during boiling down the droplet on hot surface. Compared to conventional incipient wetness and chemical synthetic methods, the Leidenfrost droplet reactor does not need energy-consuming, time-consuming, and environmentally unfriendly procedures, which leads to much shorter synthesis time, lower carbon dioxide emission, and more ecofriendly process in comparison with conventional synthesis methods. Moreover, the catalysts synthesized in the Leidenfrost droplet reactor provided much better catalytic activity for room-temperature formic acid decomposition than those prepared by the incipient wetness method.

  17. Reducing-Agent-Free Instant Synthesis of Carbon-Supported Pd Catalysts in a Green Leidenfrost Droplet Reactor and Catalytic Activity in Formic Acid Dehydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Wook; Jin, Min-Ho; Lee, Young-Joo; Park, Ju-Hyoung; Lee, Chun-Boo; Park, Jong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The development of green synthesis methods for supported noble metal catalysts remains important challenges to improve their sustainability. Here we first synthesized carbon-supported Pd catalysts in a green Leidenfrost droplet reactor without reducing agents, high-temperature calcination and reduction procedures. When the aqueous solution containing Pd nitrate precursor, carbon support, and water is dripped on a hot plate, vapor layer is formed between a solution droplet and hot surface, which allow the solution droplet to be levitated on the hot surface (Leidenfrost phenomena). Subsequently, Pd nanoparticles can be prepared without reducing agents in a weakly basic droplet reactor created by the Leidenfrost phenomena, and then the as-prepared Pd nanoparticles are loaded on carbon supports during boiling down the droplet on hot surface. Compared to conventional incipient wetness and chemical synthetic methods, the Leidenfrost droplet reactor does not need energy-consuming, time-consuming, and environmentally unfriendly procedures, which leads to much shorter synthesis time, lower carbon dioxide emission, and more ecofriendly process in comparison with conventional synthesis methods. Moreover, the catalysts synthesized in the Leidenfrost droplet reactor provided much better catalytic activity for room-temperature formic acid decomposition than those prepared by the incipient wetness method. PMID:27198855

  18. Nano-clustered Pd catalysts formed on GaN surface for green chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, Motoi; Ueta, Yukiko; Konishi, Tomoya; Tsukamoto, Shiro

    2011-05-01

    We have succeeded in observing Pd nano-clusters, catalytic prime elements, on a GaN(0 0 0 1) surface by a scanning tunneling microscope for the first time. After the sample was reused, we found that nano-clusters (width: 11 nm, height: 2.2 nm) existed on the surface which still kept the catalytic activity, resulting that the neutral Pd atoms formed the nano-cluster. Moreover, the S-termination contributed to the formation of the dense and flat structure consisting of the Pd nano-clusters.

  19. Novel catalysts for methane activation. Quarterly report No. 12, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschon, A.S.; Du, Y.; Wu, H.J.

    1995-12-01

    Fullerenes are a recently discovered allotrope of carbon that possess unusual properties, some of which may be ideal for methane activation. This project is designed to evaluate these carbon-based materials for conversion of methane into higher hydrocarbons. The project is divided into three technical tasks. Task 1 deals with synthesis and characterization of the fullerenes and fullerene soots, Task 2 with testing of the catalysts, and Task 3 with evaluation of the results and technical reporting. Due to money constraints we have not done any technical work during this period. However, we hope to continue our work and produce a final report including recommendations for future research when funds are available.

  20. Diarylrhodates as promising active catalysts for the arylation of vinyl ethers with Grignard reagents.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Takanori; Miyata, Yoshinori; Akimoto, Ryo; Fujii, Yuuki; Kuniyasu, Hitoshi; Kambe, Nobuaki

    2014-07-01

    Anionic diarylrhodium complexes, generated by reacting [RhCl(cod)]2 with 2 equiv of aryl Grignard reagents, were found to be effective active catalysts in cross-coupling reactions of vinyl ethers with aryl Grignard reagents, giving rise to the production of vinyl arenes. In this catalytic system, vinyl-O bonds were preferably cleaved over Ar-O or Ar-Br bonds. A lithium rhodate complex was isolated, and its crystal structure was determined by X-ray crystallography. PMID:24957673

  1. Characterizing interstate vibrational coherent dynamics of surface adsorbed catalysts by fourth-order 3D SFG spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingmin; Wang, Jiaxi; Clark, Melissa L.; Kubiak, Clifford P.; Xiong, Wei

    2016-04-01

    We report the first fourth-order 3D SFG spectroscopy of a monolayer of the catalyst Re(diCN-bpy)(CO)3Cl on a gold surface. Besides measuring the vibrational coherences of single vibrational modes, the fourth-order 3D SFG spectrum also measures the dynamics of interstate coherences and vibrational coherences states between two vibrational modes. By comparing the 3D SFG to the corresponding 2D and third-order 3D IR spectroscopy of the same molecules in solution, we found that the interstate coherences exist in both liquid and surface systems, suggesting that the interstate coherence is not disrupted by surface interactions. However, by analyzing the 3D spectral lineshape, we found that the interstate coherences also experience non-negligible homogenous dephasing dynamics that originate from surface interactions. This unique ability of determining interstate vibrational coherence dynamics of the molecular monolayer can help in understanding of how energy flows within surface catalysts and other molecular monolayers.

  2. Extended Platinum Nanotubes as Fuel Cell Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Alia, S.; Pivovar, B. S.; Yan, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Energy consumption has relied principally on fossil fuels as an energy source; fuel cells, however, can provide a clean and sustainable alternative, an answer to the depletion and climate change concerns of fossil fuels. Within proton exchange membrane fuel cells, high catalyst cost and poor durability limit the commercial viability of the device. Recently, platinum nanotubes (PtNTs) were studied as durable, active catalysts, providing a platform to meet US Department of Energy vehicular activity targets.[1] Porous PtNTs were developed to increase nanotube surface area, improving mass activity for oxygen reduction without sacrificing durability.[2] Subsurface platinum was then replaced with palladium, forming platinum-coated palladium nanotubes.[3] By forming a core shell structure, platinum utilization was increased, reducing catalyst cost. Alternative substrates have also been examined, modifying platinum surface facets and increasing oxygen reduction specific activity. Through modification of the PtNT platform, catalyst limitations can be reduced, ensuring a commercially viable device.

  3. Electro-oxidation of ethanol on ternary non-alloyed Pt-Sn-Pr/C catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corradini, Patricia G.; Antolini, Ermete; Perez, Joelma

    2015-02-01

    Ternary Pt-Sn-Pr/C (70:10:20), (70:15:15) and (45:45:10) electro-catalysts were prepared by a modified formic acid method, and their activity for the ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR) was compared with that of Pt-Pr/C catalysts prepared by the same methods and that of commercial Pt-Sn/C (75:25) and Pt/C catalysts. Among all the catalysts, the Pt-Sn-Pr/C (45:45:10) catalyst presented both the highest mass activity and the highest specific activity. The steady state electrochemical stability of ternary Pt-Sn-Pr catalysts increased with the surface Sn/Pt atomic ratio. Following repetitive potential cycling (RPC), the activity for ethanol oxidation of Pt-Sn-Pr/C catalysts with high surface Sn/Pt atomic ratio was considerably higher than that of the corresponding as-prepared catalysts, and increased with increasing the Sn/Pt ratio. The increase of the EOR mass activity following RPC was ascribed to the increase of either the specific activity (for the Pt-Sn-Pr/C (70:15:15) catalyst) or the electrochemically active surface area (for the Pt-Sn-Pr/C (45:45:10) catalyst). Dissolution of Sn and Pr oxides from Pt-Sn-Pr/C catalyst surface was observed following RPC.

  4. Creating single-atom Pt-ceria catalysts by surface step decoration

    PubMed Central

    Dvořák, Filip; Farnesi Camellone, Matteo; Tovt, Andrii; Tran, Nguyen-Dung; Negreiros, Fabio R.; Vorokhta, Mykhailo; Skála, Tomáš; Matolínová, Iva; Mysliveček, Josef; Matolín, Vladimír; Fabris, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Single-atom catalysts maximize the utilization of supported precious metals by exposing every single metal atom to reactants. To avoid sintering and deactivation at realistic reaction conditions, single metal atoms are stabilized by specific adsorption sites on catalyst substrates. Here we show by combining photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning tunnelling microscopy and density functional theory calculations that Pt single atoms on ceria are stabilized by the most ubiquitous defects on solid surfaces—monoatomic step edges. Pt segregation at steps leads to stable dispersions of single Pt2+ ions in planar PtO4 moieties incorporating excess O atoms and contributing to oxygen storage capacity of ceria. We experimentally control the step density on our samples, to maximize the coverage of monodispersed Pt2+ and demonstrate that step engineering and step decoration represent effective strategies for understanding and design of new single-atom catalysts. PMID:26908356

  5. Bridging the pressure gap: In situ atomic-level investigations of model platinum catalyst surfaces under reaction conditions by scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, B.J.

    1994-05-01

    Results of this thesis show that STM measurements can provide information about the surfaces and their adsorbates. Stability of Pt(110) under high pressures of H2, O2, and CO was studied (Chap. 4). In situ UHV and high vacuum experiments were carried out for sulfur on Pt(111) (Chap.5). STM studies of CO/S/Pt(111) in high CO pressures showed that the Pt substrate undergoes a stacking-fault-domain reconstruction involving periodic transitions from fcc to hcp stacking of top-layer atoms (Chap.6). In Chap.7, the stability of propylene on Pt(111) and the decomposition products were studied in situ with the HPSTM. Finally, in Chap.8, results are presented which show how the Pt tip of the HPSTM was used to locally rehydrogenate and oxidize carbonaceous clusters deposited on the Pt(111) surface; the Pt tip acted as a catalyst after activation by short voltage pulses.

  6. Novel catalysts for methane activation. Quarterly report No. 2, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschon, A.S.; Malhotra, R.; Wilson, R.B.

    1993-07-07

    The objectives of this project are to test novel fullerene based catalysts for application in methane activation. Fullerenes are a recently discovered allotrope of carbon that have been found to possess unusual properties, some of which may be ideal for methane conversion to higher hydrocarbons. The project is divided into three technical tasks. Task 1 deals with the synthesis and characterization of the fullerenes and fullerene soots, Task 2 with the testing of the catalysts, and Task 3 with the evaluation of the results and technical reporting requirements. This quarter we prepared fullerene soot and conducted experiments to determined its reactivity towards methane, hydrogen, and ethylene. The results are summarized: (1) Soot containing approximately 12-14 wt % fullerenes was prepared by the discharge method of Haufler et al. SRI is in the process of developing methodology to produce large scale amounts of fullerenes and fullerene based materials and is working with a private company to that end. In order to provide a background of fullerene soot and describe some of these methods we have included Appendix A. (2) We conducted some preliminary experiments in order to determine the temperature regime at which fullerene based soot would begin to be active for methane activation. We also were interested to determine if the soot would interact with methane or any of the product gases to undergo hydrogenation or methanation reactions.

  7. Sunlight-driven copper-catalyst activation applied to photolatent click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Beniazza, Rédouane; Lambert, Romain; Harmand, Lydie; Molton, Florian; Duboc, Carole; Denisov, Sergey; Jonusauskas, Gedeminas; McClenaghan, Nathan D; Lastécouères, Dominique; Vincent, Jean-Marc

    2014-10-01

    The synthesis, full characterization, photoreduction properties, and catalytic activity for the copper(I)-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction of a copper(II)-DMEDA (N,N'-dimethylethylendiamine) complex is reported. Spectroscopic studies (UV/Vis, EPR) demonstrated that under daylight illumination highly effective copper(II) to copper(I) reduction occurs in this complex. These findings are in agreement with a high photoreduction quantum yield value of 0.22 in MeOH, and a value approaching unity as determined in THF. The reduction process, which can also be conducted by irradiation at 365 nm by using a standard TLC (thin layer chromatography) lamp, is ascribed to a highly efficient photoinduced electron transfer (PET) process mediated by the benzophenone photosensitizer present in the carboxylate counterion. Having deaerated the reaction mixture, the photogenerated copper(I) species proved to be highly active for the CuAAC reaction, demonstrated by reactions conducted with low catalyst loading (0.5 mol %) on a range of clickable protected and non-protected mono- and disaccharides. Once initiated, the reaction can be stopped at any time on introducing air into the reaction medium. Deoxygenation followed by irradiation restores the activity, making the copper(II)-DMEDA complex a switchable catalyst of practical value. PMID:25171758

  8. The active sites of supported silver particle catalysts in formaldehyde oxidation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yaxin; Huang, Zhiwei; Zhou, Meijuan; Hu, Pingping; Du, Chengtian; Kong, Lingdong; Chen, Jianmin; Tang, Xingfu

    2016-08-01

    Surface silver atoms with upshifted d-orbitals are identified as the catalytically active sites in formaldehyde oxidation by correlating their activity with the number of surface silver atoms, and the degree of the d-orbital upshift governs the catalytic performance of the active sites. PMID:27406403

  9. Surface Proton Hopping and Coupling Pathway of Water Oxidation on Cobalt Oxide Catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Hieu; Cheng, Mu-Jeng; Frei, Heinz; Wang, Lin-Wang

    We propose an oxidation pathway of water splitting on cobalt oxide surface with clear thermodynamic and kinetic details. The density-functional theory studies suggest that the coupled proton-electron transfer is not necessarily sequential and implicit in every elementary step of this mechanistic cycle. Instead, the initial O-O bond could be formed by the landing of water molecule on the surface oxos, which is then followed by the dispatch of protons through the hopping manner and subsequent release of di-oxygen. Our theoretical investigations of intermediates and transition states indicate that all chemical conversions in this pathway, including the proton transfers, are possible with low activation barriers, in addition to their favorable thermodynamics. Our hypothesis is supported by recent experimental observations of surface superoxide that is stabilized by hydrogen bonding to adjacent hydroxyl group, as an intermediate on fast-kinetics catalytic site.

  10. Synchronizing Substrate Activation Rates in Multicomponent Reactions with Metal-Organic Framework Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Díaz, Lina María; Iglesias, Marta; Snejko, Natalia; Gutiérrez-Puebla, Enrique; Monge, M Ángeles

    2016-05-01

    A study on the influence of the cation coordination number, number of Lewis acid centers, concurrent existence of Lewis base sites, and structure topology on the catalytic activity of six new indium MOFs, has been carried out for multicomponent reactions (MCRs). The new indium polymeric frameworks, namely [In8 (OH)6 (popha)6 (H2 O)4 ]⋅3 H2 O (InPF-16), [In(popha)(2,2'-bipy)]⋅3 H2 O (InPF-17), [In3 (OH)3 (popha)2 (4,4'-bipy)]⋅4 H2 O (InPF-18), [In2 (popha)2 (4,4'-bipy)2 ]⋅3 H2 O (InPF-19), [In(OH)(Hpopha)]⋅0.5 (1,7-phen) (InPF-20), and [In(popha)(1,10-phen)]⋅4 H2 O (InPF-21) (InPF=indium polymeric framework, H3 popha=5-(4-carboxy-2-nitrophenoxy)isophthalic acid, phen=phenanthroline, bipy=bipyridine), have been hydrothermally obtained by using both conventional heating (CH) and microwave (MW) procedures. These indium frameworks show efficient Lewis acid behavior for the solvent-free cyanosilylation of carbonyl compounds, the one pot Passerini 3-component (P-3CR) and the Ugi 4-component (U-4CR) reactions. In addition, InPF-17 was found to be a highly reactive, recyclable, and environmentally benign catalyst, which allows the efficient synthesis of α-aminoacyl amides. The relationship between the Lewis base/acid active site and the catalytic performance is explained by the 2D seven-coordinated indium framework of the catalyst InPF-17. This study is an attempt to highlight the main structural and synthetic factors that have to be taken into account when planning a new, effective MOF-based heterogeneous catalyst for multicomponent reactions. PMID:27010759

  11. Degradation of flumequine in aqueous solution by persulfate activated with common methods and polyhydroquinone-coated magnetite/multi-walled carbon nanotubes catalysts.

    PubMed

    Feng, Mingbao; Qu, Ruijuan; Zhang, Xiaoling; Sun, Ping; Sui, Yunxia; Wang, Liansheng; Wang, Zunyao

    2015-11-15

    In recent years, flumequine (FLU) has been ubiquitously detected in surface waters and municipal wastewaters. In light of its potential negative impacts to aquatic species, growing concern has been arisen for the removal of this antibiotic from natural waters. In this study, the kinetics, degradation mechanisms and pathways of aqueous FLU by persulfate (PS) oxidation were systematically determined. Three common activation methods, including heat, Fe(2+) and Cu(2+), and a novel heterogeneous catalyst, namely, polyhydroquinone-coated magnetite/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (Fe3O4/MWCNTs/PHQ), were investigated to activate PS for FLU removal. It was found that these three common activators enhanced FLU degradation obviously, while several influencing factors, such as solution pH, inorganic ions (especially HCO3(-) at 5 mmol/L) and dissolved organic matter extracts, exerted their different effects on FLU removal. The catalysts were characterized, and an efficient catalytic degradation performance, high stability and excellent reusability were observed. The measured total organic carbon levels suggested that FLU can be effectively mineralized by using the catalysts. Radical mechanism was studied by combination of the quenching tests and electron paramagnetic resonance analysis. It was assumed that sulfate radicals predominated in the activation of PS with Fe3O4/MWCNTs/PHQ for FLU removal, while hydroxyl radicals also contributed to the catalytic oxidation process. In addition, a total of fifteen reaction intermediates of FLU were identified, from which two possible pathways were proposed involving hydroxylation, decarbonylation and ring opening. Overall, this study represented a systematical evaluation regarding the transformation process of FLU by PS, and showed that the heterogeneous catalysts can efficiently activate PS for FLU removal from the water environment. PMID:26281959

  12. Heterogeneous Fenton-like discoloration of methyl orange using Fe3O4/MWCNTs as catalyst: process optimization by response surface methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Huan-Yan; Shi, Tian-Nuo; Zhao, Hang; Jin, Li-Guo; Wang, Feng-Chun; Wang, Chun-Yan; Qi, Shu-Yan

    2016-03-01

    Fe3O4/MWCNTs nanocomposites were prepared by chemical oxidation coprecipitation method and developed as highly efficient heterogeneous Fenton-like catalyst. XRD results revealed that Fe3O4 nanoparticles deposited onto MWCNTs surface remained the inverse spinel crystal structure of cubic Fe3O4 phase. The FTIR characteristic peaks of MWCNTs weakened or disappeared due to the anchor of Fe3O4 nanoparticles and Fe-O peak at 570 cm-1 was indicative of the formation of Fe3O4. TEM observation revealed that Fe3O4 nanoparticles were tightly anchored by MWCNTs. The Fenton-like catalytic activity of Fe3O4/MWCNTs nanocomposites for the discoloration of methyl orange (MO) was much higher than that of Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The process optimization of this heterogeneous Fenton-like system was implemented by response surface methodology (RSM). The optimum conditions for MO discoloration were determined to be of 12.3 mmol/L H2O2 concentration, 2.9 g/L catalyst dosage, solution pH 2.7 and 39.3 min reaction time, with the maximum predicted value for MO discoloration ratio of 101.85%. The corresponding experimental value under the identical conditions was obtained as 99.86%, which was very close to the predicted one with the absolute deviation of 1.99%.

  13. Titanium surface hydrophilicity enhances platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Alfarsi, Mohammed A; Hamlet, Stephen M; Ivanovski, Saso

    2014-01-01

    Titanium implant surface modification is a key strategy used to enhance osseointegration. Platelets are the first cells that interact with the implant surface whereupon they release a wide array of proteins that influence the subsequent healing process. This study therefore investigated the effect of titanium surface modification on the attachment and activation of human platelets. The surface characteristics of three titanium surfaces: smooth (SMO), micro-rough (SLA) and hydrophilic micro-rough (SLActive) and the subsequent attachment and activation of platelets following exposure to these surfaces were determined. The SLActive surface showed the presence of significant nanoscale topographical features. While attached platelets appeared to be morphologically similar, significantly fewer platelets attached to the SLActive surface compared to both the SMO and SLA surfaces. The SLActive surface however induced the release of the higher levels of chemokines β-thromboglobulin and platelet factor 4 from platelets. This study shows that titanium surface topography and chemistry have a significant effect on platelet activation and chemokine release. PMID:25311339

  14. One pot aqueous synthesis of nanoporous Au85Pt15 material with surface bound Pt islands: an efficient methanol tolerant ORR catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anandha Ganesh, P.; Jeyakumar, D.

    2014-10-01

    For the first time, we are reporting the synthesis of Au100-xPtx nanoporous materials in the size range of 7-10 nm through the galvanic replacement of Ag by Pt from Au100-xAg2x spherical nano-alloys (x = 20, 15, 10 and 5) in an aqueous medium. The galvanic replacement reaction follows the `Volmer-Weber' growth mode, resulting in the formation of surface bound platinum islands on a nanoporous gold surface. The high angle annular dark field image and low angle X-ray diffraction studies confirm the presence of nanoporous Au100-xPtx NPs. The electrochemical studies using the Au85Pt15/C catalyst show excellent methanol tolerance behaviour and better performance towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in terms of high mass activity, mass-specific activity and figure of merit (FOM) when compared to HiSPEC Pt/C commercial catalyst. Preliminary studies on a full cell using nanoporous Au85Pt15/C (loading 1.0 mg cm-2) as the cathode material and Pt-Ru/C (loading: 0.5 mg cm-2) as the anode material performed better (38 mW cm-2) than the HiSPEC Pt/C cathode material (16 mW cm-2).For the first time, we are reporting the synthesis of Au100-xPtx nanoporous materials in the size range of 7-10 nm through the galvanic replacement of Ag by Pt from Au100-xAg2x spherical nano-alloys (x = 20, 15, 10 and 5) in an aqueous medium. The galvanic replacement reaction follows the `Volmer-Weber' growth mode, resulting in the formation of surface bound platinum islands on a nanoporous gold surface. The high angle annular dark field image and low angle X-ray diffraction studies confirm the presence of nanoporous Au100-xPtx NPs. The electrochemical studies using the Au85Pt15/C catalyst show excellent methanol tolerance behaviour and better performance towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in terms of high mass activity, mass-specific activity and figure of merit (FOM) when compared to HiSPEC Pt/C commercial catalyst. Preliminary studies on a full cell using nanoporous Au85Pt15/C (loading 1.0 mg

  15. Surface passivation of CeO2 catalyst and its ultraviolet screening effect.

    PubMed

    Kang, Joo-Hee; Kim, Yun-Hee; Paek, Seung-Min; Choy, Jin-Ho

    2011-07-01

    A new strategy was attempted to fabricate CeO2 nanoparticles using the surface fluorination technique to control the particle size and suppress the catalytic activity. The fluorinated CeO2 nanoparticles are fully characterized with XRD, XANES, UV-vis spectroscopy, HR-TEM, XPS along with the evaluation of photo and thermal catalytic activities. XRD patterns were not affected by surface fluorination. That is to say, the crystalline structure of CeO2 was not deteriorated upon fluorination. The TEM analysis showed that the fluorinated CeO2 nanoparticles with the primary particle size of 7 nm could be prepared. According to the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis, overall XANES spectrum was not changed upon fluorination, suggesting that the local structure of fluorinated CeO2 resembled that of the starting CeO2 nanoparticles. It was also revealed that both photo and thermal catalytic activities could be almost totally suppressed at the fluorination level of ca. 6.0 wt%. It is suggested that the selective surface fluorination with fluoride could lead to fluorinated CeO2 nanoparticles, which could be applied to new fields such as the cosmetics industries. PMID:22121733

  16. Platinum-Promoted Ga/Al2O3 as Highly Active, Selective, and Stable Catalyst for the Dehydrogenation of Propane**

    PubMed Central

    Sattler, Jesper J H B; Gonzalez-Jimenez, Ines D; Luo, Lin; Stears, Brien A; Malek, Andrzej; Barton, David G; Kilos, Beata A; Kaminsky, Mark P; Verhoeven, Tiny W G M; Koers, Eline J; Baldus, Marc; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2014-01-01

    A novel catalyst material for the selective dehydrogenation of propane is presented. The catalyst consists of 1000 ppm Pt, 3 wt % Ga, and 0.25 wt % K supported on alumina. We observed a synergy between Ga and Pt, resulting in a highly active and stable catalyst. Additionally, we propose a bifunctional active phase, in which coordinately unsaturated Ga3+ species are the active species and where Pt functions as a promoter. PMID:24989975

  17. Effect of low Fe3+ doping on characteristics, sonocatalytic activity and reusability of TiO2 nanotubes catalysts for removal of Rhodamine B from water.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yean Ling; Abdullah, Ahmad Zuhairi

    2012-10-15

    Fe-doped titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) nanotubes were prepared using sol-gel followed by hydrothermal methods and characterized using various methods. The sonocatalytic activity was evaluated based on oxidation of Rhodamine B under ultrasonic irradiation. Iron ions (Fe(3+)) might incorporate into the lattice and intercalated in the interlayer spaces of TiO(2) nanotubes. The catalysts showed narrower band gap energies, higher specific surface areas, more active surface oxygen vacancies and significantly improved sonocatalytic activity. The optimum Fe doping at Fe:Ti=0.005 showed the highest sonocatalytic activity and exceeded that of un-doped TiO(2) nanotubes by a factor of 2.3 times. It was believed that Fe(3+) doping induced the formation of new states close to the valence band and conduction bands and accelerated the separation of charge carriers. Leached Fe(3+) could catalyze Fenton-like reaction and led to an increase in the hydroxyl radical (OH) generation. Fe-doped TiO(2) nanotubes could retain high degradation efficiency even after being reused for 4 cycles with minimal loss of Fe from the surface of the catalyst. PMID:22939090

  18. Promotion of the electrocatalytic activity of a bimetallic platinum-ruthenium catalyst by repetitive redox treatments for direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Sheng-Yang; Yeh, Chuin-Tih

    Pt-Ru/C catalyst (12 wt%) was prepared by the incipient wetness impregnation method followed by a redox heat-treatment. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results revealed uniformly distributed metallic crystallites of Pt-Ru alloy nanoparticles (d PtRu = 2.1 ± 1.0 nm). The effect of redox treatments of the impregnated catalysts on methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) was examined by cyclic voltammetry (CV). The MOR activity of the PtRu/C was significantly improved after each oxidation step of the redox treatment cycles. The enhanced catalytic activity was found to be quite stable in chronoamperometry (CA) measurements. CV, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results strongly suggested that the improved catalytic activity was due to the formation of a stable c-RuO x (x = 2-3) domain during the oxidation treatments. A bifunctional based mechanism was proposed for the MOR on the oxidized PtRu/C catalysts. Formation of Ru-OH species on the surface of c-RuO x domains was suggested as stale sites for the oxidation of carbon monoxide adsorbed on the Pt catalytic sites.

  19. Self-assembly of cobalt-centered metal organic framework and multiwalled carbon nanotubes hybrids as a highly active and corrosion-resistant bifunctional oxygen catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yiyun; Li, Xinzhe; Li, Feng; Lin, Xiaoqing; Tian, Min; Long, Xuefeng; An, Xingcai; Fu, Yan; Jin, Jun; Ma, Jiantai

    2016-09-01

    Metal organic frameworks (MOF) derived carbonaceous materials have emerged as promising bifunctional oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts for electrochemical energy conversion and storage. But previous attempts to overcome the poor electrical conductivity of MOFs hybrids involve a harsh high-template pyrolytic process to in situ form carbon, which suffer from extremely complex operation and inevitable carbon corrosion at high positive potentials when OER is operated. Herein, a self-assembly approach is presented to synthesize a non-precious metal-based, high active and strong durable Co-MOF@CNTs bifunctional catalyst for OER and ORR. CNTs not only improve the transportation of the electrons but also can sustain the harsh oxidative environment of OER without carbon corrosion. Meanwhile, the unique 3D hierarchical structure offers a large surface area and stable anchoring sites for active centers and CNTs, which enables the superior durability of hybrid. Moreover, a synergistic catalysis of Co(II), organic ligands and CNTs will enhance the bifunctional electrocatalytic performance. Impressively, the hybrid exhibits comparable OER and ORR catalytic activity to RuO2 and 20 wt% Pt/C catalysts and superior stability. This facile and versatile strategy to fabricating MOF-based hybrids may be extended to other electrode materials for fuel cell and water splitting applications.

  20. Dry Reforming of Methane on a Highly-Active Ni-CeO2 Catalyst: Effects of Metal-Support Interactions on C-H Bond Breaking.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zongyuan; Grinter, David C; Lustemberg, Pablo G; Nguyen-Phan, Thuy-Duong; Zhou, Yinghui; Luo, Si; Waluyo, Iradwikanari; Crumlin, Ethan J; Stacchiola, Dario J; Zhou, Jing; Carrasco, Javier; Busnengo, H Fabio; Ganduglia-Pirovano, M Verónica; Senanayake, Sanjaya D; Rodriguez, José A

    2016-06-20

    Ni-CeO2 is a highly efficient, stable and non-expensive catalyst for methane dry reforming at relative low temperatures (700 K). The active phase of the catalyst consists of small nanoparticles of nickel dispersed on partially reduced ceria. Experiments of ambient pressure XPS indicate that methane dissociates on Ni/CeO2 at temperatures as low as 300 K, generating CHx and COx species on the surface of the catalyst. Strong metal-support interactions activate Ni for the dissociation of methane. The results of density-functional calculations show a drop in the effective barrier for methane activation from 0.9 eV on Ni(111) to only 0.15 eV on Ni/CeO2-x (111). At 700 K, under methane dry reforming conditions, no signals for adsorbed CHx or C species are detected in the C 1s XPS region. The reforming of methane proceeds in a clean and efficient way. PMID:27144344