Science.gov

Sample records for active cavity modes

  1. Generation of picosecond pulses and frequency combs in actively mode locked external ring cavity quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Wójcik, Aleksander K.; Belyanin, Alexey; Malara, Pietro; Blanchard, Romain; Mansuripur, Tobias S.; Capasso, Federico

    2013-12-02

    We propose a robust and reliable method of active mode locking of mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers and develop its theoretical description. Its key element is the use of an external ring cavity, which circumvents fundamental issues undermining the stability of mode locking in quantum cascade lasers. We show that active mode locking can give rise to the generation of picosecond pulses and phase-locked frequency combs containing thousands of the ring cavity modes.

  2. Active mode locking of quantum cascade lasers in an external ring cavity.

    PubMed

    Revin, D G; Hemingway, M; Wang, Y; Cockburn, J W; Belyanin, A

    2016-05-05

    Stable ultrashort light pulses and frequency combs generated by mode-locked lasers have many important applications including high-resolution spectroscopy, fast chemical detection and identification, studies of ultrafast processes, and laser metrology. While compact mode-locked lasers emitting in the visible and near infrared range have revolutionized photonic technologies, the systems operating in the mid-infrared range where most gases have their strong absorption lines, are bulky and expensive and rely on nonlinear frequency down-conversion. Quantum cascade lasers are the most powerful and versatile compact light sources in the mid-infrared range, yet achieving their mode-locked operation remains a challenge, despite dedicated effort. Here we report the demonstration of active mode locking of an external-cavity quantum cascade laser. The laser operates in the mode-locked regime at room temperature and over the full dynamic range of injection currents.

  3. Active mode locking of quantum cascade lasers in an external ring cavity

    PubMed Central

    Revin, D. G.; Hemingway, M.; Wang, Y.; Cockburn, J. W.; Belyanin, A.

    2016-01-01

    Stable ultrashort light pulses and frequency combs generated by mode-locked lasers have many important applications including high-resolution spectroscopy, fast chemical detection and identification, studies of ultrafast processes, and laser metrology. While compact mode-locked lasers emitting in the visible and near infrared range have revolutionized photonic technologies, the systems operating in the mid-infrared range where most gases have their strong absorption lines, are bulky and expensive and rely on nonlinear frequency down-conversion. Quantum cascade lasers are the most powerful and versatile compact light sources in the mid-infrared range, yet achieving their mode-locked operation remains a challenge, despite dedicated effort. Here we report the demonstration of active mode locking of an external-cavity quantum cascade laser. The laser operates in the mode-locked regime at room temperature and over the full dynamic range of injection currents. PMID:27147409

  4. Active mode locking of quantum cascade lasers in an external ring cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revin, D. G.; Hemingway, M.; Wang, Y.; Cockburn, J. W.; Belyanin, A.

    2016-05-01

    Stable ultrashort light pulses and frequency combs generated by mode-locked lasers have many important applications including high-resolution spectroscopy, fast chemical detection and identification, studies of ultrafast processes, and laser metrology. While compact mode-locked lasers emitting in the visible and near infrared range have revolutionized photonic technologies, the systems operating in the mid-infrared range where most gases have their strong absorption lines, are bulky and expensive and rely on nonlinear frequency down-conversion. Quantum cascade lasers are the most powerful and versatile compact light sources in the mid-infrared range, yet achieving their mode-locked operation remains a challenge, despite dedicated effort. Here we report the demonstration of active mode locking of an external-cavity quantum cascade laser. The laser operates in the mode-locked regime at room temperature and over the full dynamic range of injection currents.

  5. Piezo activated mode tracking system for widely tunable mode-hop-free external cavity mid-IR semiconductor lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wysocki, Gerard (Inventor); Tittel, Frank K. (Inventor); Curl, Robert F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A widely tunable, mode-hop-free semiconductor laser operating in the mid-IR comprises a QCL laser chip having an effective QCL cavity length, a diffraction grating defining a grating angle and an external cavity length with respect to said chip, and means for controlling the QCL cavity length, the external cavity length, and the grating angle. The laser of claim 1 wherein said chip may be tuned over a range of frequencies even in the absence of an anti-reflective coating. The diffraction grating is controllably pivotable and translatable relative to said chip and the effective QCL cavity length can be adjusted by varying the injection current to the chip. The laser can be used for high resolution spectroscopic applications and multi species trace-gas detection. Mode-hopping is avoided by controlling the effective QCL cavity length, the external cavity length, and the grating angle so as to replicate a virtual pivot point.

  6. When can the magnetosphere support cavity modes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartinger, Michael; Welling, Daniel; Moldwin, Mark; Ridley, Aaron

    2014-05-01

    The Earth's magnetosphere supports several types of Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) waves; these include trapped fast mode waves often referred to as cavity modes, waveguide modes, and tunneling modes/virtual resonance. All trapped fast mode waves require a stable outer boundary to sustain wave activity. The magnetopause, often treated as the outer boundary for cavity/waveguide modes in the dayside magnetosphere, is often not stable, particularly during geomagnetic storms. We examine how magnetopause motion affects the magnetosphere's ability to sustain trapped fast mode waves on the dayside using idealized simulations obtained from the BATSRUS global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code. We present the first observations of cavity modes in BATSRUS, replicating results from other global MHD codes. We further show how varying solar wind conditions - in particular, increasing density and dynamic pressure fluctuations - affect magnetopause motion and, in turn, trapped fast mode waves.

  7. Facing rim cavities fluctuation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalino, Damiano; Ribeiro, André F. P.; Fares, Ehab

    2014-06-01

    Cavity modes taking place in the rims of two opposite wheels are investigated through Lattice-Boltzmann CFD simulations. Based on previous observations carried out by the authors during the BANC-II/LAGOON landing gear aeroacoustic study, a resonance mode can take place in the volume between the wheels of a two-wheel landing gear, involving a coupling between shear-layer vortical fluctuations and acoustic modes resulting from the combination of round cavity modes and wheel-to-wheel transversal acoustic modes. As a result, side force fluctuations and tonal noise side radiation take place. A parametric study of the cavity mode properties is carried out in the present work by varying the distance between the wheels. Moreover, the effects due to the presence of the axle are investigated by removing the axle from the two-wheel assembly. The azimuthal properties of the modes are scrutinized by filtering the unsteady flow in narrow bands around the tonal frequencies and investigating the azimuthal structure of the filtered fluctuation modes. Estimation of the tone frequencies with an ad hoc proposed analytical formula confirms the observed modal properties of the filtered unsteady flow solutions. The present study constitutes a primary step in the description of facing rim cavity modes as a possible source of landing gear tonal noise.

  8. When can the magnetosphere support cavity modes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartinger, Michael; Ridley, Aaron; Moldwin, Mark; Welling, Daniel

    The Earth’s magnetosphere supports several types of Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) waves; these include trapped fast mode waves often referred to as cavity modes, waveguide modes, and tunneling modes/virtual resonance. All trapped fast mode waves require a stable outer boundary to sustain wave activity. The magnetopause, often treated as the outer boundary for cavity/waveguide modes in the dayside magnetosphere, is often not stable, particularly during geomagnetic storms. It is usually not possible to treat moving boundary condition problems analytically, and thus no previous analytic models have studied the effect of magnetopause boundary motion on cavity modes. However, simulations that can treat boundary motion in a self-consistent manner can address this problem. We examine how magnetopause motion affects the magnetosphere’s ability to sustain trapped fast mode waves on the dayside using idealized simulations obtained from the BATSRUS global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code. We present the first observations of cavity modes in BATSRUS, replicating results from other global MHD codes. We further show how varying solar wind conditions - in particular, increasing density and dynamic pressure fluctuations - affect magnetopause motion and, in turn, trapped fast mode waves.

  9. Mode suppression means for gyrotron cavities

    DOEpatents

    Chodorow, Marvin; Symons, Robert S.

    1983-08-09

    In a gyrotron electron tube of the gyro-klystron or gyro-monotron type, having a cavity supporting an electromagnetic mode with circular electric field, spurious resonances can occur in modes having noncircular electric field. These spurious resonances are damped and their frequencies shifted by a circular groove in the cavity parallel to the electric field.

  10. Experiments in two-mode cavity QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, David Glenn

    Cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) allows the study of light-matter interactions at the most basic level, through precise identification of the coherent and incoherent (dissipative) parts of the system evolution. We present measurements of light from a cavity QED system consisting of a high-finesse optical resonator coupled to a beam of cold Rb atoms. The novelty of the design lies in the interplay of two degenerate and orthogonal polarization modes. One mode (driven) behaves as the canonical cavity mode of the Jaynes-Cummings Hamiltonian, coherently exciting the atoms with a modest coupling strength; the other mode (undriven) collects a small fraction of spontaneously emitted light and provides a probe of the dissipative processes. We first demonstrate the ability to detect individual atoms passing through the cavity modes in real time by coincidence detection of photons from the undriven mode. Calculation of statistics and correlation functions from the complete photon detection record allows the determination of detection probabilities and the reconstruction of atomic trajectories. We next present evidence of quantum coherence that is created, modified, and measured in the excitation-spontaneous emission cycle. The coherence appears as a long-lived quantum beat at the ground-state Larmor frequency, visible in the intensity autocorrelation function of the undriven mode. Quantum jumps of the atomic state, occurring in between the detections of photons from the cavity, result in substantial changes in the frequency and spectral width of the beats. We present the results of a full quantum Monte Carlo calculation in order to quantitatively explain the measurements.

  11. Wall compliance and violin cavity modes.

    PubMed

    Bissinger, George

    2003-03-01

    Violin corpus wall compliance, which has a substantial effect on cavity mode frequencies, was added to Shaw's two-degree-of-freedom (2DOF) network model for A0 ("main air") and A1 (lowest length mode included in "main wood") cavity modes. The 2DOF model predicts a V(-0.25) volume dependence for A0 for rigid violin-shaped cavities, to which a semiempirical compliance correction term, V(-x(c)) (optimization parameter x(c)) consistent with cavity acoustical compliance and violin-based scaling was added. Optimizing x(c) over A0 and A1 frequencies measured for a Hutchins-Schelleng violin octet yielded x(c) approximately 0.08. This markedly improved A0 and A1 frequency predictions to within approximately +/- 10% of experiment over a range of about 4.5:1 in length, 10:1 in f-hole area, 3:1 in top plate thickness, and 128:1 in volume. Compliance is a plausible explanation for A1 falling close to the "main wood" resonance, not increasingly higher for the larger instruments, which were scaled successively shorter compared to the violin for ergonomic and practical reasons. Similarly incorporating compliance for A2 and A4 (lowest lower-/upper-bout modes, respectively) improves frequency predictions within +/-20% over the octet. PMID:12656403

  12. Wall compliance and violin cavity modes.

    PubMed

    Bissinger, George

    2003-03-01

    Violin corpus wall compliance, which has a substantial effect on cavity mode frequencies, was added to Shaw's two-degree-of-freedom (2DOF) network model for A0 ("main air") and A1 (lowest length mode included in "main wood") cavity modes. The 2DOF model predicts a V(-0.25) volume dependence for A0 for rigid violin-shaped cavities, to which a semiempirical compliance correction term, V(-x(c)) (optimization parameter x(c)) consistent with cavity acoustical compliance and violin-based scaling was added. Optimizing x(c) over A0 and A1 frequencies measured for a Hutchins-Schelleng violin octet yielded x(c) approximately 0.08. This markedly improved A0 and A1 frequency predictions to within approximately +/- 10% of experiment over a range of about 4.5:1 in length, 10:1 in f-hole area, 3:1 in top plate thickness, and 128:1 in volume. Compliance is a plausible explanation for A1 falling close to the "main wood" resonance, not increasingly higher for the larger instruments, which were scaled successively shorter compared to the violin for ergonomic and practical reasons. Similarly incorporating compliance for A2 and A4 (lowest lower-/upper-bout modes, respectively) improves frequency predictions within +/-20% over the octet.

  13. Three-dimensional field structure in open unstable cavities Part II: Active cavity results.

    PubMed

    Oughstun, K; Khamnei, C

    1999-05-10

    The three-dimensional field distribution of the diffractive cavity mode structure in an active, open, unstable laser resonator is presented as a function of the equivalent Fresnel number of the cavity. The active cavity mode structures are compared to that of the corresponding passive cavity so that the effects of a spatially extended, homogeneously broadened, saturable gain medium on the cavity field structure may be ascertained. The qualitative structure of this intracavity field distribution, including the central intensity core (or oscillator filament), is explained in terms of the Fresnel zone structure defined over the cavity feedback aperture. PMID:19396296

  14. Extra-broadband wavelength-tunable actively mode-locked short-cavity fiber ring laser using a bismuth-based highly nonlinear erbium-doped fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuchi, Yutaka; Hirata, Kouji; Ikeoka, Hiroshi

    We demonstrate an ultra-wideband wavelength-tunable actively mode-locked short-cavity laser employing a 151-cm-long bismuth-based highly nonlinear erbium-doped fiber (Bi-HNL-EDF). A wavelength tuning range of 87 nm from 1533 nm to 1620 nm can be achieved because the Bi-HNL-EDF has an ultra-wide gain bandwidth. High nonlinearity of the Bi-HNL-EDF also collaborates with spectral filtering by an optical bandpass filter to suppress the supermode noise quite effectively. Total length of the fiber ring cavity is as short as 16 m. Thus, stable and clean 5.6-6.1 ps pulses with a repetition rate of 10 GHz are successfully obtained over the wavelength tuning range almost completely covering both the conventional wavelength band (1530-1565 nm) and the longer wavelength band (1565-1625 nm). The bismuth-based short-cavity fiber laser also shows good performance in the back-to-back bit-error-rate measurements, and maintains bit-error-free mode-locking operation throughout the entire wavelength tuning range.

  15. Interaction between dual cavity modes in a planar photonic microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, Elizabeth; Nair, Rajesh V.; Jagatap, B. N.

    2016-10-01

    We theoretically study the interaction between dual cavity modes in a planar photonic microcavity structure in the optical communication wavelength range. The merging and splitting of cavity mode is analysed with realistic microcavity structures. The merging of dual cavity resonance into a single cavity resonance is achieved by changing the number of layers between the two cavities. The splitting of single cavity resonance into dual cavity resonance is obtained with an increase in the reflectivity of mirrors in the front and rear side of the microcavity structure. The threshold condition for the merging and splitting of cavity mode is established in terms of structural parameters. The physical origin of the merging of dual cavity modes into a single cavity resonance is discussed in terms of the electric field intensity distribution in the microcavity structure. The microcavity structure with dual cavity modes is useful for the generation of entangled photon pairs, for achieving the strong-coupling regime between exciton and photon and for high-resolution multi-wavelength filters in optical communication.

  16. Indirect coupling between two cavity modes via ferromagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyde, Paul; Bai, Lihui; Harder, Michael; Match, Christophe; Hu, Can-Ming

    2016-10-01

    We experimentally realize an indirect coupling between two cavity modes via strong coupling with ferromagnetic resonance in Yttrium Iron Garnet. We find that some indirectly coupled modes of this system can have a higher microwave transmission than the individual uncoupled modes. Using a coupled harmonic oscillator model, the influence of the oscillation phase difference between the two cavity modes on the nature of the indirect coupling is revealed. The properties of the indirectly coupled modes can be controlled using an external magnetic field or by tuning the cavity height. The relation between cavity transmission and the relative phase difference between cavity modes should be useful for developing tunable optical devices and improved information processing technologies.

  17. Coupling of Solute Vibrational Modes with a Fabry-Perot Optical Cavity Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkelberger, Adam; Compton, Ryan; Fears, Kenan; Spann, Bryan; Long, James; Simpkins, Blake; Owrutsky, Jeffrey

    2015-03-01

    Electronic transitions of systems confined in optical microcavities can strongly couple to cavity modes, giving rise to new, mixed-character modes. Recent studies have demonstrated similar coherent coupling between the vibrational modes of a thin polymer film and a Fabry-Perot optical cavity mode. This coupling manifests experimentally as a splitting of the transmissive cavity mode into two dispersive branches separated by the vacuum Rabi splitting. Here we present recent experimental results for the coupling of solution-phase compounds with an optical cavity. Solutions of W(CO)6, Mo(CO)6, and NCS- contained in cavities show strong coupling between the solute chromophores in the mid-infrared and cavity modes. We show that the methodology established with polymer-filled cavities is generally applicable to liquids but that the fluidity of the sample complicates the cavity construction. Varied cavity thicknesses can give rise to spatial gradients in coupling strength and difficulty in targeting a specific cavity-mode order. We also compare the transmission of the mixed vibrational-cavity modes in cavities constructed from either metallic or dielectric reflectors which impacts the cavity resonance line width. NRC Postdoctoral Fellow.

  18. Damping of unwanted modes in SRF deflecting/crabbing cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, Graeme; Wang, Haipeng

    2014-01-01

    As deflecting and crab cavities do not use the fundamental acceleration mode for their operation, the spectrum of unwanted modes is significantly different from that of accelerating cavities. The fundamental acceleration mode is now unwanted and can cause energy spread in the beam; in addition this mode frequency is often close to or lower than that of the deflecting mode, making it difficult to damp. This is made more complex in some of the compact crab cavities as there small beampipes often attenuate the fields very sharply. In addition in some crab cavities there can be an orthogonal transverse mode similar to the deflecting mode, known as the same order mode. The degeneracy of these modes must be split by polarising the cavity and if the polarisation is not large enough, dampers should be placed at either an electric or magnetic field null of the crabbing mode to effectively damp the unwanted polarisation. Various concepts for dealing with unwanted modes in various SRF deflecting cavities will be reviewed.

  19. IMAGE Observations of Sounder Stimulated and Naturally Occurring Fast Z mode Cavity Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonwalkar, V. S.; Taylor, C.; Reddy, A.

    2015-12-01

    We report first observations of sounder stimulated and naturally occurring fast Z mode (ZM) cavity noise detected by the Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) on the IMAGE satellite. The fast Z mode cavity noise is a banded, structure-less radio emission trapped inside fast Z mode cavities, which are characterized by a minimum (fz,min) in fast Z mode cut-off frequency (fz) along a geomagnetic field line [Gurnett et al., JGR, 1983]. Fast Z mode waves reflect at fz ~ f, where f is the wave frequency. Waves in the frequency range fz,min < f < fz,max, where fz,max is the maximum fz above fz,min altitude, are trapped within the cavity as they bounce back and forth between reflection altitudes (fz ~ f) above and below the fz,min altitude. These trapped waves will be observed by a satellite passing through the cavity. The observed cavity noise lower cutoff is at the local Z mode cut-off frequency (fz,Sat) and the upper cut-off is presumably close to fz,max. The cavity noise is observed typically inside the plasmasphere. Comparison of cavity noise as observed on the plasmagram obtained during active sounding with that observed on the dynamic spectra obtained from the interspersed passive wave measurements indicate that the cavity noise is either stimulated by transmissions from the sounder (RPI) or is of natural origin. The sounder stimulated noise is often accompanied by fast Z mode echoes. The naturally occurring cavity noise is observed on both the plasmagram and the dynamic spectra. We believe the stimulated cavity noise is generated due to scattering from small-scale irregularities of waves transmitted by RPI. One potential candidate for the source of naturally occurring Z mode cavity noise is the ring current electrons that can generate fast ZM waves via higher order cyclotron resonance [Nishimura et al., Earth Planets Space, 2007].

  20. An optical cavity with a strongly focused mode

    SciTech Connect

    Durak, Kadir; Victor, Leong Xu Heng; Huan, Nguyen Chi; Maslennikov, Gleb; Kurtsiefer, Christian

    2013-12-16

    Atom-photon interfaces are one of the building blocks of the future quantum information protocols. Accomplishing a strong interaction between the atom and the photons can be successfully done by high finesse and small mode volume cavities. However, this method requires sophisticated dielectric coatings and stabilization of the cavity against even small vibrations and small line width of those cavities impose higher input photon numbers if spontaneously emitted photons are to be used, which make it seem hard to scale up such atom-light interfaces to form quantum networks. An alternative method is to use a nearly concentric cavity, which has a strongly focused optical mode.

  1. Cavity modes and their excitations in elliptical plasmonic patch nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, Ayan; Wang, Feng; Minkowski, Fred; Sun, Kai; Wei, Qi-Huo

    2012-05-21

    We present experimental and theoretical studies of two dimensional periodic arrays of elliptical plasmonic patch nanoantennas. Experimental and simulation results demonstrate that the azimuthal symmetry breaking of the metal patches leads to the occurrence of even and odd resonant cavity modes and the excitation geometries dependent on their modal symmetries. We show that the cavity modes can be described by the product of radial and angular Mathieu functions with excellent agreements with both simulations and experiments. The effects of the patch periodicity on the excitation of the surface plasmon and its coupling with the cavity modes are also discussed. PMID:22714147

  2. III-nitride tunable cup-cavities supporting quasi whispering gallery modes from ultraviolet to infrared

    PubMed Central

    Shubina, T. V.; Pozina, G.; Jmerik, V. N.; Davydov, V. Yu.; Hemmingsson, C.; Andrianov, A. V.; Kazanov, D. R.; Ivanov, S. V.

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly developing nanophotonics needs microresonators for different spectral ranges, formed by chip-compatible technologies. In addition, the tunable ones are much in demand. Here, we present site-controlled III-nitride monocrystal cup-cavities grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The cup-cavities can operate from ultraviolet to near-infrared, supporting quasi whispering gallery modes up to room temperature. Besides, their energies are identical in large ’ripened’ crystals. In these cavities, the refractive index variation near an absorption edge causes the remarkable effect of mode switching, which is accompanied by the spatial redistribution of electric field intensity with concentration of light into a subwavelength volume. Our results shed light on the mode behavior in semiconductor cavities and open the way for single-growth-run manufacturing the devices comprising an active region and a cavity with tunable mode frequencies. PMID:26656267

  3. III-nitride tunable cup-cavities supporting quasi whispering gallery modes from ultraviolet to infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubina, T. V.; Pozina, G.; Jmerik, V. N.; Davydov, V. Yu.; Hemmingsson, C.; Andrianov, A. V.; Kazanov, D. R.; Ivanov, S. V.

    2015-12-01

    Rapidly developing nanophotonics needs microresonators for different spectral ranges, formed by chip-compatible technologies. In addition, the tunable ones are much in demand. Here, we present site-controlled III-nitride monocrystal cup-cavities grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The cup-cavities can operate from ultraviolet to near-infrared, supporting quasi whispering gallery modes up to room temperature. Besides, their energies are identical in large ’ripened’ crystals. In these cavities, the refractive index variation near an absorption edge causes the remarkable effect of mode switching, which is accompanied by the spatial redistribution of electric field intensity with concentration of light into a subwavelength volume. Our results shed light on the mode behavior in semiconductor cavities and open the way for single-growth-run manufacturing the devices comprising an active region and a cavity with tunable mode frequencies.

  4. Optimum cavity length and absolute cavity detuning in acousto-optically mode-locked argon-ion lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruddock, I. S.; Illingworth, R.

    1987-09-01

    Acousto-optic mode-locking in an argon-ion laser was investigated in detail. Measurement of the discharge current is shown to be an accurate means of locating the optimum cavity length which depends strongly on level of excitation. The absolute cavity mismatch between the optimum length and that corresponding to c/4 vRF was determined by direct measurement and by using a cw dye laser as an active interferometer.

  5. Preparation of Macroscopic Quantum Superposition States of Cavity Modes Using rf-SQUIDs in a Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo

    2008-06-01

    We propose a potential scheme of preparing Schrödinger-cat state of the cavity mode by placing an rf-superconducting quantum interference device (rf-SQUID) in a single-mode microwave cavity. By properly adjusting the detuning and the strength regarding the radiation fields, we show how to generate single-mode Schrödinger-cat state. Generalizing this method we discuss the generation of the engtangled coherent states. The experimental feasibility of our scheme is discussed under consideration of the cavity decay.

  6. Power Enhancement Cavity for Burst-Mode Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yun

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel optical cavity scheme and locking method that can realize the power enhancement of picosecond UV laser pulses operating at a burst mode with arbitrary burst (macropulse) lengths and repetition rates.

  7. Temperature switching of cavity modes in InN microcrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kazanov, D. R. Kaibyshev, V. H.; Davydov, V. Yu.; Smirnov, A. N.; Jmerik, V. N.; Kuznetsova, N. V.; Kopiev, P. S.; Ivanov, S. V.; Shubina, T. V.

    2015-11-15

    InN optical cavities supporting low-order whispering-gallery modes up to room temperature are formed by molecular-beam epitaxy on patterned substrates. The observed switching of the mode type with increasing temperature is explained in terms of changes in the optical parameters due to a shift of the absorption edge and modification of its shape. Modeling taking into account a variation in the refractive index reproduces the typical distributions of the electromagnetic-field intensity in the cavities.

  8. Coupled mode theory for photonic crystal cavity-waveguide interaction.

    PubMed

    Waks, Edo; Vuckovic, Jelena

    2005-06-27

    We derive a coupled mode theory for the interaction of an optical cavity with a waveguide that includes waveguide dispersion. The theory can be applied to photonic crystal cavity waveguide structures. We derive an analytical solution to the add and drop spectra arising from such interactions in the limit of linear dispersion. In this limit, the spectra can accurately predict the cold cavity quality factor (Q) when the interaction is weak. We numerically solve the coupled mode equations for the case of a cavity interacting with the band edge of a periodic waveguide, where linear dispersion is no longer a good approximation. In this regime, the density of states can distort the add and drop spectra. This distortion can lead to more than an order of magnitude overestimation of the cavity Q.

  9. The role of mode match in fiber cavities.

    PubMed

    Bick, A; Staarmann, C; Christoph, P; Hellmig, O; Heinze, J; Sengstock, K; Becker, C

    2016-01-01

    We study and realize asymmetric fiber-based cavities with optimized mode match to achieve high reflectivity on resonance. This is especially important for mutually coupling two physical systems via light fields, e.g., in quantum hybrid systems. Our detailed theoretical and experimental analysis reveals that on resonance, the interference effect between the directly reflected non-modematched light and the light leaking back out of the cavity can lead to large unexpected losses due to the mode filtering of the incoupling fiber. Strong restrictions for the cavity design result out of this effect and we show that planar-concave cavities are clearly best suited. We validate our analytical model using numerical calculations and demonstrate an experimental realization of an asymmetric fiber Fabry-Pérot cavity with optimized parameters. PMID:26827304

  10. The role of mode match in fiber cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bick, A.; Staarmann, C.; Christoph, P.; Hellmig, O.; Heinze, J.; Sengstock, K.; Becker, C.

    2016-01-01

    We study and realize asymmetric fiber-based cavities with optimized mode match to achieve high reflectivity on resonance. This is especially important for mutually coupling two physical systems via light fields, e.g., in quantum hybrid systems. Our detailed theoretical and experimental analysis reveals that on resonance, the interference effect between the directly reflected non-modematched light and the light leaking back out of the cavity can lead to large unexpected losses due to the mode filtering of the incoupling fiber. Strong restrictions for the cavity design result out of this effect and we show that planar-concave cavities are clearly best suited. We validate our analytical model using numerical calculations and demonstrate an experimental realization of an asymmetric fiber Fabry-Pérot cavity with optimized parameters.

  11. Reflectionless compact plasmonic waveguide mode converter by using a mode-selective cavity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joonsoo; Lee, Seung-Yeol; Park, Hyeonsoo; Lee, Kyookeun; Lee, Byoungho

    2015-04-01

    A compact transmissive plasmonic waveguide mode converter which aims for the elimination of reflection and transmission of unconverted mode is proposed. The proposed scheme exploits a cavity formed by mode selective mirrors, which only allows two output modes: the transmission of the target mode and the reflection of the input mode. By appropriately tuning cavity lengths, the reflection of the input mode can also be suppressed to near zero by destructive interference, thereby all the residual outgoing modes are suppressed. The proposed device might be useful in the design of integrated photonic system since it relaxes the problem of unwanted reflection.

  12. Mode coupling and cavity-quantum-dot interactions in a fiber-coupled microdisk cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, Kartik; Painter, Oskar

    2007-02-15

    A quantum master equation model for the interaction between a two-level system and whispering-gallery modes (WGMs) of a microdisk cavity is presented, with specific attention paid to current experiments involving a semiconductor quantum dot (QD) embedded in a fiber-coupled Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As microdisk cavity. In standard single mode cavity QED, three important rates characterize the system: the QD-cavity coupling rate g, the cavity decay rate {kappa}, and the QD dephasing rate {gamma}{sub (perpendicular)}. A more accurate model of the microdisk cavity includes two additional features. The first is a second cavity mode that can couple to the QD, which for an ideal microdisk corresponds to a traveling wave WGM propagating counter to the first WGM. The second feature is a coupling between these two traveling wave WGMs, at a rate {beta}, due to backscattering caused by surface roughness that is present in fabricated devices. We consider the transmitted and reflected signals from the cavity for different parameter regimes of {l_brace}g,{beta},{kappa},{gamma}{sub (perpendicular)}{r_brace}. A result of this analysis is that even in the presence of negligible roughness-induced backscattering, a strongly coupled QD mediates coupling between the traveling wave WGMs, resulting in an enhanced effective coherent coupling rate g={radical}(2)g{sub 0} corresponding to that of a standing wave WGM with an electric field maximum at the position of the QD. In addition, analysis of the second-order correlation function of the reflected signal from the cavity indicates that regions of strong photon antibunching or bunching may be present depending upon the strength of coupling of the QD to each of the cavity modes. Such intensity correlation information will likely be valuable in interpreting experimental measurements of a strongly coupled QD to a bimodal WGM cavity.

  13. Field flatness tuning of TM110 mode cavities with closely spaced modes

    SciTech Connect

    Leo Bellantoni et al.

    2003-10-31

    Superconducting cavities for the CKM RF separated kaon beamline at Fermilab have modes that are closely spaced compared to the resonance bandwidths when warm, and this complicates the field flatness (warm) tuning process. Additionally, it is necessary to maintain the azimuthal orientation of the mode during the tuning deformations. the authors present two analytic techniques to warm-tune cavities with overlapping modes, a finite-element analysis of the tuning process, the design of a warm tuner which maintains mode polarization, and the results of tuning a cavity in which initial manufacturing variations caused the desired {pi} and nearby {pi}-1 modes to be indistinguishable before field flatness tuning.

  14. Dual-cavity mode converter for a fundamental mode output in an over-moded relativistic backward-wave oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiawei; Xiao, Renzhen; Bai, Xianchen; Zhang, Yuchuan; Zhang, Xiaowei; Zhu, Qi; Shao, Hao; Chen, Changhua; Huang, Wenhua

    2015-03-01

    A dual-cavity TM02-TM01 mode converter is designed for a dual-mode operation over-moded relativistic backward-wave oscillator. With the converter, the fundamental mode output is achieved. Particle-in-cell simulation shows that the efficiency of beam-wave conversion was over 46% and a pureTM01 mode output was obtained. Effects of end reflection provided by the mode converter were studied. Adequate TM01 mode feedback provided by the converter enhances conversion efficiency. The distance between the mode converter and extraction cavity critically affect the generation of microwaves depending on the reflection phase of TM01 mode feedback.

  15. Widely tunable mode-hop free external cavity quantum cascade laser for high resolution spectroscopic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysocki, G.; Curl, R. F.; Tittel, F. K.; Maulini, R.; Bulliard, J. M.; Faist, J.

    2005-10-01

    An external cavity (EC) quantum cascade laser (QCL) configuration with the thermoelectrically cooled gain medium fabricated using a bound-to-continuum design and operating in continuous wave at ˜5.2 μm is reported. The EC architecture employs a piezo-activated cavity mode tracking system for mode-hop free operation suitable for high resolution spectroscopic applications and multiple species trace-gas detection. The performance of the EC-QCL exhibits coarse single mode tuning over 35 cm-1 and a continuous mode-hop free fine tuning range of ˜1.2 cm-1.

  16. A Q-switched, mode-locked fiber laser employing subharmonic cavity modulation.

    PubMed

    Chang, You Min; Lee, Junsu; Lee, Ju Han

    2011-12-19

    We present a new and simple approach for the generation of Q-switched, mode-locked pulses from a laser cavity. The approach is based on cavity loss modulation that employs a subharmonic frequency of the fundamental intermode frequency spacing. A range of experiments have been carried out using an erbium-doped fiber-based ring cavity laser in order to verify that this simple approach can readily produce high quality Q-switched, mode-locked pulses. An active tuning of the Q-switched envelope repetition rate is also shown to be easily achievable by adjusting the order of the applied subharmonic frequency.

  17. Cavity mode frequencies and strong optomechanical coupling in two-membrane cavity optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Xuereb, André; Malossi, Nicola; Vitali, David

    2016-08-01

    We study the cavity mode frequencies of a Fabry-Pérot cavity containing two vibrating dielectric membranes. We derive the equations for the mode resonances and provide approximate analytical solutions for them as a function of the membrane positions, which act as an excellent approximation when the relative and center-of-mass position of the two membranes are much smaller than the cavity length. With these analytical solutions, one finds that extremely large optomechanical coupling of the membrane relative motion can be achieved in the limit of highly reflective membranes when the two membranes are placed very close to a resonance of the inner cavity formed by them. We also study the cavity finesse of the system and verify that, under the conditions of large coupling, it is not appreciably affected by the presence of the two membranes. The achievable large values of the ratio between the optomechanical coupling and the cavity decay rate, g/κ , make this two-membrane system the simplest promising platform for implementing cavity optomechanics in the strong coupling regime.

  18. Application of impedance measurement techniques to accelerating cavity mode characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, S. M.; Stefan, P. M.

    1993-11-01

    Impedance measurements, using a central wire to simulate the electron beam, were performed on a 52 MHz accelerating cavity at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). This cavity was recently installed in the X-ray storage ring at the NSLS as a part of an upgrade of the ring. To damp higher-order modes (HOM) in this cavity, damping antennas have been installed. We implemented the impedance measurement technique to characterize the cavity modes up to 1 GHz and confirm the effectiveness of the damping antennas. Scattering parameters were measured using a network analyzer (HP 8510B) with a personal computer as a controller. Analysis based on S and T parameters for the system was used to solve for the cavity impedance, Z( ω), as a function of the measured transmission response, S21( ω). Search techniques were used to find the shunt resistance Rsh, and Q from the calculated Z( ω) for different modes. Our results for {R}/{Q} showed good agreement with URMEL simulations. The values of Q were compared with other independent Q measurement techniques. Our analytical technique offers an alternative approach for cases where full thru-reflection-line (TRL) calibration is not feasible and a more time-effective technique for obtaining {R}/{Q}, compared with the bead-pull method.

  19. Long-cavity all-fiber ring laser actively mode locked with an in-fiber bandpass acousto-optic modulator.

    PubMed

    Cuadrado-Laborde, C; Bello-Jiménez, M; Díez, A; Cruz, J L; Andrés, M V

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate low-frequency active mode locking of an erbium-doped all-fiber ring laser. As the mode locker, we used a new in-fiber bandpass acousto-optic modulator showing 74% modulation depth, 3.7 dB power insertion losses, 4.5 nm of optical bandwidth, and 20 dB of nonresonant light suppression. The laser generates 330 ps mode-locked pulses over a 10 ns pedestal, at a 1.538 MHz frequency, with 130 mW of pump power.

  20. Higher order mode damping in an ALS test cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, A.F.; Lamberston, G.R. ); Barry, W. )

    1990-06-01

    The higher order mode attenuation scheme proposed for the Advanced Light Source accelerating cavities consists of two broad-band dampers placed 90{degrees} apart on the outer edge. In order to assess the damping efficiency a test assembly was built. The HOM damping was obtained by comparing the peak values of the transmission through the cavity for both the damped and the undamped case. Because of the high number of modes and frequency shifts due to the damping gear, the damping was assessed statistically, by averaging over several modes. In the frequency range from 1.5 to 5.5 GHz, average damping greater than 100 was obtained. 1 ref., 6 figs.

  1. Cavity quantum electrodynamics with Anderson-localized modes.

    PubMed

    Sapienza, Luca; Thyrrestrup, Henri; Stobbe, Søren; Garcia, Pedro David; Smolka, Stephan; Lodahl, Peter

    2010-03-12

    A major challenge in quantum optics and quantum information technology is to enhance the interaction between single photons and single quantum emitters. This requires highly engineered optical cavities that are inherently sensitive to fabrication imperfections. We have demonstrated a fundamentally different approach in which disorder is used as a resource rather than a nuisance. We generated strongly confined Anderson-localized cavity modes by deliberately adding disorder to photonic crystal waveguides. The emission rate of a semiconductor quantum dot embedded in the waveguide was enhanced by a factor of 15 on resonance with the Anderson-localized mode, and 94% of the emitted single photons coupled to the mode. Disordered photonic media thus provide an efficient platform for quantum electrodynamics, offering an approach to inherently disorder-robust quantum information devices.

  2. Optical cavity modes of a single crystalline zinc oxide microsphere.

    PubMed

    Moirangthem, Rakesh Singh; Cheng, Pi-Ju; Chien, Paul Ching-Hang; Ngo, Buu Trong Huynh; Chang, Shu-Wei; Tien, Chung-Hao; Chang, Yia-Chung

    2013-02-11

    A detailed study on the optical cavity modes of zinc oxide microspheres under the optical excitation is presented. The zinc oxide microspheres with diameters ranging from 1.5 to 3.0 µm are prepared using hydrothermal growth technique. The photoluminescence measurement of a single microsphere shows prominent resonances of whispering gallery modes at room temperature. The experimentally observed whispering gallery modes in the photoluminescence spectrum are compared with theoretical calculations using analytical and finite element methods in order to clarify resonance properties of these modes. The comparison between theoretical analysis and experiment suggests that the dielectric constant of the ZnO microsphere is somewhat different from that for bulk ZnO. The sharp resonances of whispering gallery modes in zinc oxide microspheres cover the entire visible window. They may be utilized in realizations of optical resonators, light emitting devices, and lasers for future chip integrations with micro/nano optoelectronic circuits, and developments of optical biosensors. PMID:23481759

  3. Dual-cavity mode converter for a fundamental mode output in an over-moded relativistic backward-wave oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jiawei; Huang, Wenhua; Xiao, Renzhen; Bai, Xianchen; Zhang, Yuchuan; Zhang, Xiaowei; Shao, Hao; Chen, Changhua; Zhu, Qi

    2015-03-16

    A dual-cavity TM{sub 02}–TM{sub 01} mode converter is designed for a dual-mode operation over-moded relativistic backward-wave oscillator. With the converter, the fundamental mode output is achieved. Particle-in-cell simulation shows that the efficiency of beam-wave conversion was over 46% and a pureTM{sub 01} mode output was obtained. Effects of end reflection provided by the mode converter were studied. Adequate TM{sub 01} mode feedback provided by the converter enhances conversion efficiency. The distance between the mode converter and extraction cavity critically affect the generation of microwaves depending on the reflection phase of TM{sub 01} mode feedback.

  4. Array mode selection utilizing an external cavity configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Yaeli, J.; Streifer, W.; Scifres, D.R.; Cross, P.S.; Thornton, R.L.; Burnham, R.D.

    1985-07-15

    We report operation of a ten-stripe, gain-guided, phase-locked diode laser in an external cavity configuration. The laser radiates in a single narrow (1/sup 0/) lobe. Such lasers generally lase in the highest order array mode, L = 10, which radiates in a twin-lobe far-field pattern. With one antireflection-coated facet and a slit spatial filter, the laser has been operated in the L = 1, 2, 3 or 10 array modes. A theoretical explanation of the spatial filter function is included.

  5. Optical storage based on coupling of one-way edge modes and cavity modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Y.; Ni, Zh.; He, H. Q.; Jiang, T.

    2015-08-01

    We design a new kind of optical storage composed of a ring resonator that is based on both the one-way property of the edge modes of magneto-optical photonic crystals and the coupling effect of cavities. The ring resonator can be served as an optical storage through a close field circulation. Through another edge waveguide and coupling cavity, the electromagnetic signals can either be written into the storage or be taken out from it.

  6. A Dual-Moded Cavity for RF Breakdown Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Nantista, Christopher; Adolphsen, Chris; Wang, Faya; /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    The phenomenon of rf breakdown presents a technological limitation in the application of high-gradient particle acceleration in normal conducting rf structures. Attempts to understand the onset of this phenomenon and to study its limits with different materials, cell shapes, and pulse widths has been driven in recent years by linear collider development. One question of interest is the role magnetic field plays relative to electric field. A design is presented for a single, nonaccelerating, rf cavity resonant in two modes, which, driven independently, allow the rf magnetic field to be increased on the region of highest electric field without affecting the latter. The design allows for the potential reuse of the cavity with different samples in the high-field region. High power data is not yet available.

  7. Comb mode filtering silver mirror cavity for spectroscopic distance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šmíd, R.; Hänsel, A.; Pravdová, L.; Sobota, J.; Číp, O.; Bhattacharya, N.

    2016-09-01

    In this work we present a design of an external optical cavity based on Fabry-Perot etalons applied to a 100 MHz Er-doped fiber optical frequency comb working at 1560 nm to increase its repetition frequency. A Fabry-Perot cavity is constructed based on a transportable cage system with two silver mirrors in plano-concave geometry including the mode-matching lenses, fiber coupled collimation package and detection unit. The system enables full 3D angle mirror tilting and x-y off axis movement as well as distance between the mirrors. We demonstrate the increase of repetition frequency by direct measurement of the beat frequency and spectrally by using the virtually imaged phased array images.

  8. Goldstone and Higgs modes of photons inside a cavity

    PubMed Central

    Yi-Xiang, Yu; Ye, Jinwu; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Goldstone and Higgs modes have been detected in various condensed matter, cold atom and particle physics experiments. Here, we demonstrate that the two modes can also be observed in optical systems with only a few (artificial) atoms inside a cavity. We establish this connection by studying the U(1)/Z2 Dicke model where N qubits (atoms) coupled to a single photon mode. We determine the Goldstone and Higgs modes inside the super-radiant phase and their corresponding spectral weights by performing both 1/J = 2/N expansion and exact diagonalization (ED) study at a finite N. We find nearly perfect agreements between the results achieved by the two approaches when N gets down even to N = 2. The quantum finite size effects at a few qubits make the two modes quite robust against an effectively small counterrotating wave term. We present a few schemes to reduce the critical coupling strength, so the two modes can be observed in several current available experimental systems by just conventional optical measurements. PMID:24327105

  9. Optothermal transport behavior in whispering gallery mode optical cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Soltani, Soheil; Armani, Andrea M.

    2014-08-04

    Over the past century, whispering gallery mode optical cavities have enabled numerous advances in science and engineering, such as discoveries in quantum mechanics and non-linear optics, as well as the development of optical gyroscopes and add drop filters. One reason for their widespread appeal is their ability to confine light for long periods of time, resulting in high circulating intensities. However, when sufficiently large amounts of optical power are coupled into these cavities, they begin to experience optothermal or photothermal behavior, in which the optical energy is converted into heat. Above the optothermal threshold, the resonance behavior is no longer solely defined by electromagnetics. Previous work has primarily focused on the role of the optothermal coefficient of the material in this instability. However, the physics of this optothermal behavior is significantly more complex. In the present work, we develop a predictive theory based on a generalizable analytical expression in combination with a geometry-specific COMSOL Multiphysics finite element method model. The simulation couples the optical and thermal physics components, accounting for geometry variations as well as the temporal and spatial profile of the optical field. To experimentally verify our theoretical model, the optothermal thresholds of a series of silica toroidal resonant cavities are characterized at different wavelengths (visible through near-infrared) and using different device geometries. The silica toroid offers a particularly rigorous case study for the developed optothermal model because of its complex geometrical structure which provides multiple thermal transport paths.

  10. A 10-GHz film-thickness-mode cavity optomechanical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Fong, King Y.; Tang, Hong X.

    2015-04-01

    We report on the advance of chip-scale cavity optomechanical resonators to beyond 10 GHz by exploiting the fundamental acoustic thickness mode of an aluminum nitride micro-disk. By engineering the mechanical anchor to minimize the acoustic loss, a quality factor of 1830 and hence a frequency-quality factor product of 1.9 × 1013 Hz are achieved in ambient air at room temperature. Actuated by strong piezo-electric force, the micro-disk resonator shows an excellent electro-optomechanical transduction efficiency. Our detailed analysis of the electro-optomechanical coupling allows identification and full quantification of various acoustic modes spanning from super-high to X-band microwave frequencies measured in the thin film resonator.

  11. Mode analysis of photonic crystal L3 cavities in self-suspended lithium niobate membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Diziain, Séverine Geiss, Reinhard; Zilk, Matthias; Schrempel, Frank; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Pertsch, Thomas; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2013-12-16

    We report on a multimodal analysis of photonic crystal L3 cavities milled in lithium niobate free-standing membranes. The classical L3 cavity geometry is compared to an L3 cavity containing a second lattice superimposed on the primary one. Those two different geometries are investigated in terms of vertical radiation and quality (Q) factor for each mode of the cavities. Depending on the cavity geometry, some modes undergo an enhancement of their vertical radiation into small angles while other modes experience a higher Q factor. Experimental characterizations are corroborated by three-dimensional finite difference time domain simulations.

  12. Robust double Z-type cavity mode locked Yb:KYW ultrafast laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sha; Han, Jing-hua; Wang, Yan-biao; Feng, Guo-ying; Zhou, Shou-huan

    2015-12-01

    Semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) mode locked Yb doped ultrafast lasers have been widely used in industrial applications. High laser stability against environment change and delivery process are required for industrial laser systems. A double Z-type ultrafast laser cavity was demonstrated experimentally and theoretically. Compared with the conventional Z-type cavity, this double Z-type cavity SESAM mode locked laser is less sensitive to misalignment and can tolerate more arm length changes while still staying cw mode locking.

  13. Multi-normal mode-splitting for an optical cavity with electromagnetically induced transparency medium.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xudong; Zhang, Jing

    2010-03-01

    We theoretically study the cavity transmission spectra with three-level atoms coupled by a coherent external control field in the superstrong coupling regime (atoms-cavity coupling strength g [square root] N is near or larger than the cavity free-spectral range DeltaFSR). When satisfying the superstrong coupling condition by increasing the number of the interaction atoms, more than one FSR cavity modes interact with atoms and each mode will split three peaks, which can be well explained by the linear dispersion enhancement of electromagnetically induced transparency medium due to the largely increased atomic density in the cavity.

  14. Mode-locking optimization with a real-time feedback system in a Nd:yttrium lithium fluoride laser cavity.

    PubMed

    Marengoni, C; Canova, F; Batani, D; Benocci, R; Librizzi, M; Narayanan, V; Gomareschi, M; Lucchini, G; Kilpio, A; Shashkov, E; Stuchebrukhov, I; Vovchenko, V; Chernomyrdin, V; Krasuyk, I; Hall, T; Bittanti, S

    2007-01-01

    We present a control system, which allows an automatic optimization of the pulse train stability in a mode-locked laser cavity. In order to obtain real-time corrections, we chose a closed loop approach. The control variable is the cavity length, mechanically adjusted by gear system acting on the rear cavity mirror, and the controlled variable is the envelope modulation of the mode-locked pulse train. Such automatic control system maintains the amplitude of the mode-locking pulse train stable within a few percent rms during the working time of the laser. Full implementation of the system on an Nd:yttrium lithium fluoride actively mode-locked laser is presented.

  15. Line splitting and modified atomic decay of atoms coupled with N quantized cavity modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yifu

    1992-05-01

    We study the interaction of a two-level atom with N non-degenerate quantized cavity modes including dissipations from atomic decay and cavity damps. In the strong coupling regime, the absorption or emission spectrum of weakly excited atom-cavity system possesses N + 1 spectral peaks whose linewidths are the weighted averages of atomic and cavity linewidths. The coupled system shows subnatural (supernatural) atomic decay behavior if the photon loss rates from the N cavity modes are smaller (larger) than the atomic decay rate. If N cavity modes are degenerate, they can be treated effectively as a single mode. In addition, we present numerical calculations for N = 2 to characterize the system evolution from the weak coupling to strong coupling limits.

  16. Higher order modes of a 3rd harmonic cavity with an increased end-cup iris

    SciTech Connect

    T. Khabibouline; N. Solyak; R. Wanzenberg

    2003-05-19

    The cavity design for a 3rd harmonic cavity for the TTF 2 photoinjector has been revised to increase the coupling between the main coupler and the cavity cells. The iris radius of the end cup of the cavity has been increased to accomplish a better coupling. The basic rf-parameters and the higher order modes of the modified design are summarized in this report.

  17. Long-term stabilization of single longitudinal mode in external cavity semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Hanyi; Zhou Jianying; Wu Yuanxing; Li Jian; Pang Zhengwu; Zhou Bingkun

    1988-05-01

    Long-term frequency stabilization of a single longitudinal mode (SLM) external cavity semiconductor laser has been demonstrated by using multisegment composite-cavity configuration and automatic frequency control loop with feedback to control the external cavity length. The time period of mode-hopping free SLM operation has been observed to be more than 24 hours with a frequency shift of about 28 MHz and a linewidth of less than 200 kHz.

  18. Higher Order Modes HOM___s in Coupled Cavities of the Flash Module ACC39

    SciTech Connect

    Shinton, I.R.R.; Jones, R.M.; Li, Z.; Zhang, P.; /Manchester U. /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /DESY

    2012-09-14

    We analyse the higher order modes (HOM's) in the 3.9GHz bunch shaping cavities installed in the FLASH facility at DESY. A suite of finite element computer codes (including HFSS and ACE3P) and globalised scattering matrix calculations (GSM) are used to investigate the modes in these cavities. This study is primarily focused on the dipole component of the multiband expansion of the wakefield, with the emphasis being on the development of a HOM-based BPM system for ACC39. Coupled inter-cavity modes are simulated together with a limited band of trapped modes.

  19. Generation of broadband two-mode squeezed light in cascaded double-cavity optomechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Ma, Sheng-li; Li, Fu-li

    2015-08-01

    The generation of two-mode broadband squeezed light is investigated in cascading double-cavity optomechanical systems. The cavities are driven by amplitude-modulated lasers with two frequency tones, one of which is red detuning and other blue detuning from the cavity fields. It is shown that a two-mode squeezed field can be generated in a single double-cavity system via dissipation of the mechanical resonator. To generate broadband and strong squeezing of the cavity fields, many identical double-cavity optomechanical systems are connected together in a cascading way. The vacuum noise fed into the cavities and the thermal noise coupled to the mechanical resonator can be greatly depressed in the cascading system. As a result, the very strong and constant squeezing can be achieved in a large frequency range when the number of cascaded optomechanical systems becomes large.

  20. Higher Order Modes in Third Harmonic Cavities for XFEL/FLASH

    SciTech Connect

    Shinton, I.R.R.; Baboi, N.; Eddy, N.; Flisgen, T.; Glock, H.W.; Jones, R.M.; Juntong, N.; Khabiboulline, T.N.; van Rienen, U; Zhang, P.; /Manchester U. /DESY /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.

    2010-06-01

    We analyse higher order modes in the 3.9 GHz bunch shaping cavities recently installed in the FLASH facility at DESY. We report on recent experimental results on the frequency spectrum from probe based measurements made at CMTB at DESY. These are compared to those predicted by finite difference and finite element computer codes. This study is focused mainly on the dipole component of the multi-pole expansion of the wakefield. The modes are readily identifiable as single-cavity modes provided the frequencies of these modes are below the cut-off of the inter-connecting beam pipes. The modes above cut-off are coupled to the 4 cavities and are distinct from single cavity modes.

  1. Dissonant Modes of Bottle-shaped Thermoacoustic Prime Movers Part 1: Mode Transitions with Varying Cavity Length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Jacob; Andersen, Bonnie

    2012-10-01

    Dissonant overtones of closed bottle-shaped thermoacoustic prime movers are discussed. The resonator consists of two concentric cylinders with differing cross-sectional areas, closed at the outer ends. The condition for resonance results in a transcendental equation, which is solved numerically. The neck and cavity behave as coupled resonators, where the neck is a quarter-wave resonator and the cavity is a half-wave resonator. A variable cylindrical cavity with a sliding piston was constructed to study the nature of the device as the cavity length is varied. The stack is located in the neck region and the length and inner diameter of the neck are 5.39 and 1.91 cm, respectively. The inner diameter of the cavity is 4.76 cm and has a maximum length of 38 cm. The dominant mode of operation depends on the length of the cavity, favoring successively higher modes as the cavity length increases. The volume filling factor of the stack material was varied from 2 to 5% to determine whether the amount of stack material affects the transitions. These filling factors were selected to yield hydraulic radii comparable to the thermal penetration depth for the highest and lowest possible fundamental frequencies of the system. The transition to higher modes occurs roughly where the higher mode overlaps with the fundamental frequency of the neck region, and is independent of the stack filling factor. With the given dimensions, three transitions to higher modes were observed, with frequencies consistent with the model.

  2. Coupled-cavity terahertz quantum cascade lasers for single mode operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Manceau, J. M.; Andronico, A.; Jagtap, V.; Sirtori, C.; Li, L. H.; Linfield, E. H.; Davies, A. G.; Barbieri, S.

    2014-06-01

    We demonstrate the operation of coupled-cavity terahertz frequency quantum-cascade lasers composed of two sub-cavities separated by an air gap realized by optical lithography and dry etching. This geometry allows stable, single mode operation with typical side mode suppression ratios in the 30-40 dB range. We employ a transfer matrix method to model the mode selection mechanism. The obtained results are in good agreement with the measurements and allow prediction of the operating frequency.

  3. Atomic hydrogen maser active oscillator cavity and bulb design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, H. E.; Washburn, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    The performance characteristics and reliability of the active oscillator atomic hydrogen maser depend upon oscillation parameters which characterize the interaction region of the maser, the resonant cavity and atom storage bulb assembly. With particular attention to use of the cavity frequency switching servo (1) to reduce cavity pulling, it is important to maintain high oscillation level, high atomic beam flux utilization efficiency, small spin exchange parameter and high cavity quality factor. It is also desirable to have a small and rigid cavity and bulb structure and to minimize the cavity temperature sensitivity. Curves for a novel hydrogen maser cavity configuration which is partially loaded with a quartz dielectric cylinder and show the relationships between cavity length, cavity diameter, bulb size, dielectric thickness, cavity quality factor, filling factor and cavity frequency temperature coefficient are presented. The results are discussed in terms of improvement in maser performance resulting from particular design choices.

  4. A scheme for approximate conditional teleportation of entangled two-mode cavity state without Bell state measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Zhi-Rong

    2008-05-01

    An alternative scheme to approximately conditionally teleport entangled two-mode cavity state without Bell state measurement in cavity QED is proposed. The scheme is based on the resonant interaction of a ladder-type three-level atom with two bimodal cavities. The entangled cavity state is reconstructed with only one atom interacting with the two cavities successively.

  5. Intra-cavity frequency-doubled mode-locked semiconductor disk laser at 325 nm.

    PubMed

    Bek, Roman; Baumgärtner, Stefan; Sauter, Fabian; Kahle, Hermann; Schwarzbäck, Thomas; Jetter, Michael; Michler, Peter

    2015-07-27

    We present a passively mode-locked semiconductor disk laser (SDL) emitting at 650nm with intra-cavity second harmonic generation to the ultraviolet (UV) spectral range. Both the gain and the absorber structure contain InP quantum dots (QDs) as active material. In a v-shaped cavity using the semiconductor samples as end mirrors, a beta barium borate (BBO) crystal is placed in front of the semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) for pulsed UV laser emission in one of the two outcoupled beams. Autocorrelation (AC) measurements at the fundamental wavelength reveal a FWHM pulse duration of 1.22ps. With a repetition frequency of 836MHz, the average output power is 10mW per beam for the red emission and 0.5mW at 325nm.

  6. Coupling of cavities: the way to impose control over their modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivinskaya, Aliaksandra M.; Lavrinenko, Andrei V.; Sukhorukov, Andrey A.; Shyroki, Dzmitry M.; Ha, Sangwoo; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2010-05-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that the compound mode properties of coupled photonic-crystal cavities can depend critically on the interplay of distance between cavities and their longitudinal shifts. Thus the robust control over the cavity modes can be imposed. The simple coupled-mode theory employed for such systems predicts a peculiar behavior of band dispersion in the slow light regime at the photonic band-edge. In particular, it reveals an interesting effect that the frequency detuning of the fundamental supermodes in the coupled cavities can be reduced down to zero. We anticipate that this property will be generic for side-coupled cavity systems irrespectively of the individual cavity design, e.g. point-defect cavities in a photonic crystal or linear cavities in one-dimensional arrays of elements (rods or holes). We report here about the finite-difference frequency-domain method (FDFD) developed by us to analyze nanocavities with a very high Q-factor. The method is utilized to confirm by simulations the coupled-mode theory predictions. As an example we choose coupled cavities in one-dimensional periodic arrays of holes in dielectric nanowires known also as nanobeams.

  7. Higher Order Modes Damping Analysis for the SPX Deflecting Cavity Cryomodule

    SciTech Connect

    L. Xiao, Z. Li, C.-K. Ng, A. Nassiri, G.J. Waldschmidt, G. Wu, R.A. Rimmer, H. Wang

    2012-07-01

    A single-cell superconducting deflecting cavity operating at 2.812 GHz has been proposed and designed for the Short Pulse X-ray (SPX) project for the Advanced Photon Source upgrade. A cryomodule of 4 such cavities will be needed to produce the required 2-MV deflecting voltage. Each deflecting cavity is equipped with one fundamental power coupler (FPC), one lower order mode (LOM) coupler, and two higher order mode (HOM) couplers to achieve the stringent damping requirements for the unwanted modes. The damping of the HOM/LOM modes below the beampipe cutoff has been analyzed in the single cavity geometry and shown to meet the design requirements. The HOMs above beam pipe cutoff in the 4-cavity cyromodule, however, may result in cross coupling which may affect the HOM damping and potentially trapped modes between the cavities which could produce RF heating to the beamline bellows and even be detrimental to the beam. We have evaluated the HOM damping and trapped modes in the 4-cavity cryomodule using the parallel finite element EM code ACE3P developed at SLAC. We will present the results of the cryomodule analysis in this paper.

  8. Cavity Alighment Using Beam Induced Higher Order Modes Signals in the TTF Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M.; Frisch, J.; Hacker, K.E.; Jones, R.M.; McCormick, D.; O'Connell, C.; Smith, T.; Napoly, O.; Paparella, R.; Baboi, N.; Wendt, M.; /DESY

    2005-07-06

    Each nine cell superconducting (SC) accelerator cavity in the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) at DESY [1] has two higher order mode (HOM) couplers that efficiently remove the HOM power [2]. They can also provide useful diagnostic signals. The most interesting modes are in the first 2 cavity dipole passbands. They are easy to identify and their amplitude depends linearly on the beam offset from the cavity axis making them excellent beam position monitors (BPM). By steering the beam through an eight-cavity cryomodule, we can use the HOM signals to estimate internal residual alignment errors and minimize wakefield related beam emittance growth. We built and tested a time-domain based waveform recorder system that captures information from each mode in these two bands on each beam pulse. In this paper we present a preliminary experimental study of the single-bunch generated HOM signals at the TTF linac including estimates of cavity alignment precision and HOM BPM resolution.

  9. Mode-locking external-cavity laser-diode sensor for displacement measurements of technical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarske, Jürgen; Möbius, Jasper; Moldenhauer, Karsten

    2005-09-01

    A novel laser sensor for position measurements of technical solid-state surfaces is proposed. An external Fabry-Perot laser cavity is assembled by use of an antireflection-coated laser diode together with the technical surface. Mode locking results from pumping the laser diode synchronously to the mode spacing of the cavity. The laser cavity length, i.e., the distance to the measurement object, is determined by evaluation of the modulation transfer function of the cavity by means of a phase-locked loop. The mode-locking external-cavity laser sensor incorporates a resonance effect that results in highly resolving position and displacement measurements. More than a factor-of-10 higher resolution than with conventional nonresonant sensing principles is achieved. Results of the displacement measurements of various technical surfaces are reported. Experimental and theoretical investigations are in good agreement.

  10. Cavity -Quantum Dot interactions and mode coupling in a nanocavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasisomayajula, Vijay; Russo, Onofrio

    2009-03-01

    We describe an approach for realizing effective manipulation of single electron state level transitions for quantum dots mediated by a nano-cavity. The two quantum dots interact with the cavity for the two dot system in the coulomb blockade energy region. Because of the zero dimensional structure of the quantum dots, the system can be implemented to be a characteristic entity for an efficient generator of single photons. This process is emphatically more selective in the coulomb/spin blockade region, where also, the system efficiency of the single photon event is most likely more probable. Whereas, it is clear that the photon efficiency is small, the cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) nature suggests an enhancement in the electron energy state being occupied by the second quantum dot. This is more likely with very strong coupling of the quantum dots to the cavity with cavity quality factors larger than perhaps 10^5. Quality factors in excess of 10^5 have been demonstrated experimentally^1. 1. K. Srinivasan, M. Borselli, T. J. Johnson, P. E. Barclay, O. Painter, A. Stintz, and S. Krishna, Appl. Phys. Lett. 86, 151106 (2005). [ISI

  11. Computational imaging using a mode-mixing cavity at microwave frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Fromenteze, Thomas; Decroze, Cyril; Carsenat, David; Yurduseven, Okan; Imani, Mohammadreza F.; Gollub, Jonah; Smith, David R.

    2015-05-11

    We present a 3D computational imaging system based on a mode-mixing cavity at microwave frequencies. The core component of this system is an electrically large rectangular cavity with one corner re-shaped to catalyze mode mixing, often called a Sinai Billiard. The front side of the cavity is perforated with a grid of periodic apertures that sample the cavity modes and project them into the imaging scene. The radiated fields are scattered by the scene and are measured by low gain probe antennas. The complex radiation patterns generated by the cavity thus encode the scene information onto a set of frequency modes. Assuming the first Born approximation for scattering dynamics, the received signal is processed using computational methods to reconstruct a 3D image of the scene with resolution determined by the diffraction limit. The proposed mode-mixing cavity is simple to fabricate, exhibits low losses, and can generate highly diverse measurement modes. The imaging system demonstrated in this letter can find application in security screening and medical diagnostic imaging.

  12. On The Anomalous Fast Ion Energy Diffusion in Toroidal Plasmas Due to Cavity Modes

    SciTech Connect

    N.N. Gorelenkov, N.J. Fisch and E. Fredrickson

    2010-03-09

    An enormous wave-particle diffusion coefficient along paths suitable for alpha channeling had been deduced in mode converted ion Bernstein wave experiments on Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) the only plausible explanation advanced for such a large diffusion coefficient was the excitation of internal cavity modes which induce particle diffusion along identical diffusion paths, but at much higher rates. Although such a mode was conjectured, it was never observed. However, recent detailed observations of high frequency compressional Alfven eigenmodes (CAEs) on the National Spherical torus Experiment (NSTX) indirectly support the existence of the related conjectured modes on TFTR. The eigenmodes responsible for the high frequency magnetic activity can be identified as CAEs through the polarization of the observed magnetic field oscillations in NSTX and through a comparison with the theoretically derived freuency dispersion relation. Here, we show how these recent observations of high frequency CAEs lend support to this explanation of the long-standing puzzle of anomalous fast ion energy diffusion on TFTR. The support of the conjecure that these internal modes could have caused the remarkable ion energy diffusion on TFTR carries significant and favorable implications for the possibilities in achieving the alpha channeling effect with small injected power in a tokamak reactor.

  13. Calculation, normalization, and perturbation of quasinormal modes in coupled cavity-waveguide systems.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Philip Trøst; de Lasson, Jakob Rosenkrantz; Gregersen, Niels

    2014-11-15

    We show how one can use a nonlocal boundary condition, which is compatible with standard frequency domain methods, for numerical calculation of quasinormal modes in optical cavities coupled to waveguides. In addition, we extend the definition of the quasinormal mode norm by use of the theory of divergent series to provide a framework for modeling of optical phenomena in such coupled cavity-waveguide systems. As example applications, we calculate the Purcell factor and study perturbative changes in the complex resonance frequency of a photonic crystal cavity coupled to a defect waveguide.

  14. Techniques for Identifying and Measuring High Order Modes in RF Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, D.A.; Rimmer, R.A.

    1997-05-01

    We report on a number of techniques which can be used to unravel the higher-order-mode spectrum of an RF cavity. Most of these techniques involve the application of basic symmetry principles and require for their application only that the cavity exhibit some basic symmetry, possibly broken by the presence of couplers, apertures, etc., which permits a classification of these modes in terms of some property characterized by that symmetry, e.g., multipolarity for a cavity which is basically a figure of revolution. Several examples of the application of these techniques are given.

  15. Calculation, normalization, and perturbation of quasinormal modes in coupled cavity-waveguide systems.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Philip Trøst; de Lasson, Jakob Rosenkrantz; Gregersen, Niels

    2014-11-15

    We show how one can use a nonlocal boundary condition, which is compatible with standard frequency domain methods, for numerical calculation of quasinormal modes in optical cavities coupled to waveguides. In addition, we extend the definition of the quasinormal mode norm by use of the theory of divergent series to provide a framework for modeling of optical phenomena in such coupled cavity-waveguide systems. As example applications, we calculate the Purcell factor and study perturbative changes in the complex resonance frequency of a photonic crystal cavity coupled to a defect waveguide. PMID:25490468

  16. Non-destructive splitter of twisted light based on modes splitting in a ring cavity.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Zhou, Zhi-Yuan; Ding, Dong-Sheng; Zhang, Wei; Shi, Shuai; Shi, Bao-Sen; Guo, Guang-Can

    2016-02-01

    Efficiently discriminating beams carrying different orbital angular momentum (OAM) is of fundamental importance for various applications including high capacity optical communication and quantum information processing. We design and experimentally verify a distinguished method for effectively splitting different OAM-carried beams by introducing Dove prisms in a ring cavity. Because of rotational symmetry broken of two OAM-carried beams with opposite topological charges, their transmission spectra will split. When mode and impedance matches between the cavity and one OAM-carried beam are achieved, this beam will transmit through the cavity and other beam will be reflected, both beams keep their spatial shapes. In this case, the cavity acts like a polarized beam splitter. Besides, the transmitting beam can be selected at your will, the splitting efficiency can reach unity if the cavity is lossless and it completely matches the beam. Furthermore, beams carry multi-OAMs can also be split by cascading ring cavities. PMID:26906792

  17. Generating single-mode behavior in fiber-coupled optical cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Busch, Jonathan; Beige, Almut

    2010-11-15

    We propose to turn two resonant distant cavities effectively into one by coupling them via an optical fiber which is coated with two-level atoms [J. D. Franson et al., Phys. Rev. A 70, 062302 (2004)]. The purpose of the atoms is to destructively measure the evanescent electric field of the fiber on a time scale which is long compared to the time it takes a photon to travel from one cavity to the other. Moreover, the boundary conditions imposed by the setup should support a small range of standing waves inside the fiber, including one at the frequency of the cavities. In this way, the fiber provides an additional decay channel for one common cavity field mode but not for the other. If the corresponding decay rate is sufficiently large, this mode decouples effectively from the system dynamics. A single nonlocal resonator mode is created.

  18. Investigation of higher spanwise Helmholtz resonance modes in slender covered cavities.

    PubMed

    de Jong, A T; Bijl, H

    2010-10-01

    Cavity aeroacoustic noise is relevant for aerospace and automotive industries and widely investigated since the 1950s. Most investigations so far consider cavities where opening length and width are of similar scale. The present investigation focuses on a less investigated setup, namely cavities that resemble the door gaps of automobiles. These cavities are both slender (width much greater than length or depth) and partially covered. Furthermore they are under influence of a low Mach number flow with a relatively thick boundary layer. Under certain conditions, these gaps can produce tonal noise. The present investigation attempts to reveal the aeroacoustic mechanism of this tonal noise for higher resonance modes. Experiments have been conducted on a simplified geometry, where unsteady internal pressures have been measured at different spanwise locations. With increasing velocity, several resonance modes occur. In order to obtain higher mode shapes, the cavity acoustic response is simulated and compared with experiment. Using the frequency-filtered simulation pressure field, the higher modes shapes are retrieved. The mode shapes can be interpreted as the slender cavity self-organizing into separate Helmholtz resonators that interact with each other. Based on this, an analytical model is derived that shows good agreement with the simulations and experimental results. PMID:20968339

  19. Transition of lasing modes in polymeric opal photonic crystal resonating cavity.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lan-Ting; Zheng, Mei-Ling; Jin, Feng; Dong, Xian-Zi; Chen, Wei-Qiang; Zhao, Zhen-Sheng; Duan, Xuan-Ming

    2016-06-10

    We demonstrate the transition of lasing modes in the resonating cavity constructed by polystyrene opal photonic crystals and 7 wt. % tert-butyl Rhodamine B doped polymer film. Both single mode and multiple mode lasing emission are observed from the resonating cavity. The lasing threshold is determined to be 0.81  μJ/pulse for single mode lasing emission and 2.25  μJ/pulse for multiple mode lasing emission. The single mode lasing emission is attributed to photonic lasing resulting from the photonic bandgap effect of the opal photonic crystals, while the multiple mode lasing emission is assigned to random lasing due to the defects in the photonic crystals. The result would benefit the development of low threshold polymeric solid state photonic crystal lasers. PMID:27409036

  20. Transition of lasing modes in polymeric opal photonic crystal resonating cavity.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lan-Ting; Zheng, Mei-Ling; Jin, Feng; Dong, Xian-Zi; Chen, Wei-Qiang; Zhao, Zhen-Sheng; Duan, Xuan-Ming

    2016-06-10

    We demonstrate the transition of lasing modes in the resonating cavity constructed by polystyrene opal photonic crystals and 7 wt. % tert-butyl Rhodamine B doped polymer film. Both single mode and multiple mode lasing emission are observed from the resonating cavity. The lasing threshold is determined to be 0.81  μJ/pulse for single mode lasing emission and 2.25  μJ/pulse for multiple mode lasing emission. The single mode lasing emission is attributed to photonic lasing resulting from the photonic bandgap effect of the opal photonic crystals, while the multiple mode lasing emission is assigned to random lasing due to the defects in the photonic crystals. The result would benefit the development of low threshold polymeric solid state photonic crystal lasers.

  1. Higher order mode filter design for double quarter wave crab cavity for the LHC high luminosity upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, B.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burt, G.; Calaga, R.; Capatina, O.; Hall, B.; Jones, T.; Skaritka, J.; Verdu-Andres, S.; Wu, Q.

    2015-05-03

    A Double Quarter Wave Crab Cavity (DQWCC) was designed for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade. A compact Higher Order Mode (HOM) filter with wide stop band at the deflecting mode is developed for this cavity. Multiphysics finite element simulation results are presented. The integration of this design to the cavity cryomodule is described.

  2. Optical resonance modes in InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum-well microring cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, K.C.; Dai, L.; Lin, J.Y.; Jiang, H.X.

    1999-10-01

    Microrings of varying sizes have been fabricated from In{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}N/GaN (x{approximately}0.15) multiple quantum wells (MQWs). Photolithography and dry etching techniques including both ion-beam and inductively coupled plasma etching were employed to pattern the III{endash}nitride MQW microrings. Individual microrings were optically pumped and optical resonance modes were observed. The observed mode spacings were consistent with those expected for whispering-gallery (WG) modes within a resonant cavity of cylindrical symmetry, refractive index, and dimensions of the rings under investigation. The results obtained from the microring cavities were compared with those of the III{endash}nitride MQW microdisk cavities. Our results have indicated that resonance modes corresponding to the radial and the WG modes are simultaneously present in microdisk cavities, but only WG modes are available from the microring cavities. Implications of our results on future GaN-based microcavity light emitters have been discussed. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Large ion Coulomb crystals: A near-ideal medium for coupling optical cavity modes to matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dantan, A.; Albert, M.; Marler, J. P.; Herskind, P. F.; Drewsen, M.

    2009-10-01

    We present an investigation of the coherent coupling of various transverse field modes of an optical cavity to ion Coulomb crystals. The obtained experimental results, which include the demonstration of identical collective coupling rates for different transverse modes of a cavity field to ions in the same large Coulomb crystal, are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. The results furthermore suggest that Coulomb crystals in the future may serve as near-ideal media for high-fidelity multimode quantum information processing and communication purposes, including the generation and storage of single-photon qubits encoded in different transverse modes.

  4. Coupled-cavity terahertz quantum cascade lasers for single mode operation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H. Manceau, J. M.; Andronico, A.; Jagtap, V.; Sirtori, C.; Barbieri, S.; Li, L. H.; Linfield, E. H.; Davies, A. G.

    2014-06-16

    We demonstrate the operation of coupled-cavity terahertz frequency quantum-cascade lasers composed of two sub-cavities separated by an air gap realized by optical lithography and dry etching. This geometry allows stable, single mode operation with typical side mode suppression ratios in the 30–40 dB range. We employ a transfer matrix method to model the mode selection mechanism. The obtained results are in good agreement with the measurements and allow prediction of the operating frequency.

  5. Higher order mode damping studies on the PEP-II B-Factory RF cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Rimmer, R.; Goldberg, D.; Lambertson, G.; Voelker, F. ); Ko, K.; Kroll, N.; Pendleton, R.; Schwarz, H. ); Adams, F.; De Jong, M. )

    1992-03-01

    We describe studies of the higher-order-mode (HOM) properties of the prototype 476 MHz RF cavity for the proposed PEP-II B-Factory and a waveguide damping scheme to reduce possible HOM-driven coupled-bunch beam instability growth. Numerical studies include modelling of the HOM spectrum using MAFIA and ARGUS, and calculation of the loaded Q's of the damped modes using data from these codes and the Kroll-Yu method. We discuss briefly the experimental investigations of the modes, which will be made in a full-size low-power test cavity, using probes, wire excitation and bead perturbation methods.

  6. Higher order mode damping studies on the PEP-II B-Factory RF cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Rimmer, R.; Goldberg, D.; Lambertson, G.; Voelker, F.; Ko, K.; Kroll, N.; Pendleton, R.; Schwarz, H.; Adams, F.; De Jong, M.

    1992-03-01

    We describe studies of the higher-order-mode (HOM) properties of the prototype 476 MHz RF cavity for the proposed PEP-II B-Factory and a waveguide damping scheme to reduce possible HOM-driven coupled-bunch beam instability growth. Numerical studies include modelling of the HOM spectrum using MAFIA and ARGUS, and calculation of the loaded Q`s of the damped modes using data from these codes and the Kroll-Yu method. We discuss briefly the experimental investigations of the modes, which will be made in a full-size low-power test cavity, using probes, wire excitation and bead perturbation methods.

  7. Mode selectivity study of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, G.; Seurin, J.; Chuang, S.L.; Babic, D.I.; Corzine, S.W.; Tan, M.; Barnes, D.C.; Tiouririne, T.N.

    1998-08-01

    Mode selectivity of an air-post index-guided vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser structure operating at 1550 nm is investigated using a full-vector Maxwell-equation solver with a finite-difference time-domain method. The resonance wavelengths, quality factors, and spatial field distributions are calculated for the three lowest-order modes. Transverse-mode competition is quantitatively described as a function of the cavity size and the pillar etch depth. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Higher Order Modes Damping Analysis for the SPX Deflecting Cavity Cyromodule

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, L; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Nassiri, A.; Waldschmidt, G.; Wu, G.; Wang, H.; Rimmer, R.; /Jefferson Lab

    2012-06-06

    A single-cell superconducting deflecting cavity operating at 2.815 GHz has been proposed and designed for the Short Pulse X-ray (SPX) project for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) upgrade. A cryomodule of 4 such cavities will be needed to produce the required 2-MV deflecting voltage. Each deflecting cavity is equipped with one fundamental power coupler (FPC), one lower order mode (LOM) coupler, and two higher order mode (HOM) couplers to achieve the stringent damping requirements for the unwanted modes. The damping of the LOM/HOM below the beampipe cutoff has been analyzed in the single cavity geometry and shown to meet the design requirements. The HOM above the beampipe cutoff in the 4-cavity cyromodule, however, may result in cross coupling which may affect the HOM damping and potentially be trapped between the cavities which could produce RF heating to the beamline bellows. We have evaluated the HOM damping in the 4-cavity cryomodule using the parallel finite element EM code suite ACE3P developed at SLAC. We will present the results of the cryomodule analysis in this paper.

  9. [The influence of breathing mode on the oral cavity].

    PubMed

    Surtel, Anna; Klepacz, Robert; Wysokińska-Miszczuk, Joanna

    2015-12-01

    Nose breathing is one of the key factors in the proper development and functioning of the oral cavity. The air passing through the nasal cavity is warmed and humidified while dust and other particulate matter is removed. It is also important as far as bone formation is concerned. The obstruction or congestions of the upper respiratory tract may negatively affect the correct and most optimal (nasal) respiratory tract. The switch from nasal to mouth breathing may lead to serious clinical consequences. Children with the clinical diagnosis of mouth breathing are usually pale, apathetic and they lack concentration and often get tired. Disorders resulting from hypoxy may also be the reason from sleep disturbances, such as frequent waking-up, nocturia, difficulties falling aslee. The main clinical manifestations of mouth breathing appear in the craniofacial structures. Mouth breathers frequently suffer from dental malocclusions and craniofacial bone abnormalities. Chronic muscle tension around the oral cavity could result in the widening of cranio-vertebral angle, posterior position of mandibula and narrow maxillary arch. Among dental alterations the most common are class II malocclusion (total or partial) with the protrusion of the anterior teeth, cross bite (unilateral or bilateral), anterior open bite and primary crowded teeth. Apart from malocclusion, chronic gingivitis, periodontitis, candida infections and halitosis are frequently present in mouth--breathing patients. PMID:26802697

  10. [The influence of breathing mode on the oral cavity].

    PubMed

    Surtel, Anna; Klepacz, Robert; Wysokińska-Miszczuk, Joanna

    2015-12-01

    Nose breathing is one of the key factors in the proper development and functioning of the oral cavity. The air passing through the nasal cavity is warmed and humidified while dust and other particulate matter is removed. It is also important as far as bone formation is concerned. The obstruction or congestions of the upper respiratory tract may negatively affect the correct and most optimal (nasal) respiratory tract. The switch from nasal to mouth breathing may lead to serious clinical consequences. Children with the clinical diagnosis of mouth breathing are usually pale, apathetic and they lack concentration and often get tired. Disorders resulting from hypoxy may also be the reason from sleep disturbances, such as frequent waking-up, nocturia, difficulties falling aslee. The main clinical manifestations of mouth breathing appear in the craniofacial structures. Mouth breathers frequently suffer from dental malocclusions and craniofacial bone abnormalities. Chronic muscle tension around the oral cavity could result in the widening of cranio-vertebral angle, posterior position of mandibula and narrow maxillary arch. Among dental alterations the most common are class II malocclusion (total or partial) with the protrusion of the anterior teeth, cross bite (unilateral or bilateral), anterior open bite and primary crowded teeth. Apart from malocclusion, chronic gingivitis, periodontitis, candida infections and halitosis are frequently present in mouth--breathing patients.

  11. A novel experiment for coupling a Bose-Einstein condensate with two crossed cavity modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donner, Tobias; Leonard, Julian; Lee, Moojnoo; Morales, Andrea; Karg, Thomas; Esslinger, Tilman

    2014-05-01

    Over the last decade, combining cavity quantum electrodynamics and quantum gases allowed to explore the coupling of quantized light fields to coherent matter waves, leading e.g. to new optomechanical phenomena and the realization of quantum phase transitions. Triggered by the interest to study setups with more complex cavity geometries, we built a novel, highly flexible experimental system for coupling a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) with optical cavities, which allows to switch the cavity setups by means of an interchangeable science platform. The BEC is generated from a cloud of laser-cooled 87-Rb atoms which is first loaded into a hybrid trap, formed by a combined magnetic and optical potential, and then optically transported into the cavity setup, where it is cooled down to quantum degeneracy. At first we aim to explore the coupling of a BEC with two crossed cavity modes. We report on our progress on the implementation of a science setup involving two cavities intersecting under an angle of 60°. his setup will allow us to study the coherent interaction of a BEC and the two cavity modes both in internal lambda-level transitions and in spatial self-organization processes in dynamical hexagonal lattices.

  12. Nonradiating and radiating modes excited by quantum emitters in open epsilon-near-zero cavities

    PubMed Central

    Liberal, Iñigo; Engheta, Nader

    2016-01-01

    Controlling the emission and interaction properties of quantum emitters (QEs) embedded within an optical cavity is a key technique in engineering light-matter interactions at the nanoscale, as well as in the development of quantum information processing. State-of-the-art optical cavities are based on high quality factor photonic crystals and dielectric resonators. However, wealthier responses might be attainable with cavities carved in more exotic materials. We theoretically investigate the emission and interaction properties of QEs embedded in open epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) cavities. Using analytical methods and numerical simulations, we demonstrate that open ENZ cavities present the unique property of supporting nonradiating modes independently of the geometry of the external boundary of the cavity (shape, size, topology, etc.). Moreover, the possibility of switching between radiating and nonradiating modes enables a dynamic control of the emission by, and the interaction between, QEs. These phenomena provide unprecedented degrees of freedom in controlling and trapping fields within optical cavities, as well as in the design of cavity opto- and acoustomechanical systems.

  13. Surface-plasmon-polariton hybridized cavity modes in submicrometer slits in a thin Au film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, R.; Fritz, S.; Müller, E.; Schneider, R.; Maniv, T.; Cohen, H.; Matyssek, C.; Busch, K.; Gerthsen, D.

    2016-06-01

    The excitation of cavity standing waves in double-slit structures in thin gold films, with slit lengths between 400 and 2560 nm, was probed with a strongly focused electron beam in a transmission electron microscope. The energies and wavelengths of cavity modes up to the 11 th mode order were measured with electron energy loss spectroscopy to derive the corresponding dispersion relation. For all orders, a significant redshift of mode energies accompanied by a wavelength elongation relative to the expected resonator energies and wavelengths is observed. The resultant dispersion relation is found to closely follow the well-known dispersion law of surface-plasmon polaritons (SPPs) propagating on a gold/air interface, thus providing direct evidence for the hybridized nature of the detected cavity modes with SPPs.

  14. Cavity quantum electrodynamics with separate photon storage and qubit readout modes.

    PubMed

    Leek, P J; Baur, M; Fink, J M; Bianchetti, R; Steffen, L; Filipp, S; Wallraff, A

    2010-03-12

    We present the realization of a cavity quantum electrodynamics setup in which photons of strongly different lifetimes are engineered in different harmonic modes of the same cavity. We achieve this in a superconducting transmission line resonator with superconducting qubits coupled to the different modes. One cavity mode is strongly coupled to a detection line for qubit state readout, while a second long lifetime mode is used for photon storage and coherent quantum operations. We demonstrate sideband-based measurement of photon coherence, generation of n photon Fock states and the scaling of the sideband Rabi frequency with square root of n using a scheme that may be extended to realize sideband-based two-qubit logic gates.

  15. An Explicitly Solvable Case of the Construction of the Fundamental Cavity Mode in the Form of a Gaussian Beam with a Complex Astigmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudashov, V. N.; Plachenov, A. B.; Radin, A. M.

    2000-01-01

    An analysis is carried out of the ring cavities whose fundamental modes represent Gaussian beams with complex astigmatism. The analysis is made for the case where the block B or C in the cavity ray matrix ABCD of dimension 4×4 is a symmetric nondegenerate matrix. Explicit formulas are obtained, which permits the expression of beam characteristics directly in terms of the cavity ray matrix without the laborious process of finding its eigenvectors. The results obtained in the study can be used for controlling astigmatism in lasers and laser systems, the calculation of polarization of three-dimensional active media in linear and ring optical cavities of complex configuration, etc.

  16. High-power single-mode vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samal, Nigamananda

    High-power single-mode vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSEL) have a great potential to replace the distributed feedback (DFB) and Fabry-Perot (FP) edge emitting lasers that are currently used in optical communication. VCSELs also have tremendous potential in many niche applications such as "optical read and write," laser printing, bar code scanning and sensing. Despite many of their inherent advantages over its rivals, VCSELs still suffer from some outstanding issues. Most prominent are "limited power" and "multi-mode behavior" at higher injection. This work aims at a few solutions for these fundamental issues. Using strain-compensated GaAsSb as an active material and a standard single-aperture design, 1.3 mum VCSELs are demonstrated and characterized. These devices face basic issues such as "limited output power" and "multi-mode behavior." These VCSELs achieved room temperature CW operation with power outputs from 50--200 muW for wavelengths ranging from 1245 to 1290 nm. To resolve the issue of limited power, several on-wafer thermal-management schemes are proposed. One of the schemes is pursued in this work. To resolve the issue of multi-mode behavior, a novel device design using asymmetric double oxide-apertures is proposed, theoretically modeled, and implemented in this work. The optical mode behavior of this novel design is compared with a traditional single-aperture design using fabricated devices and theoretical modeling. A clear trend of spectral purity in the modal behavior of the devices, under both continuous wave (CW) and pulsed conditions, is demonstrated and is in good agreement with theoretical predictions. One of the novel designs tested on an InGaAs VCSEL has shown a multi-mode power more than 23 mW with maximum wall plug efficiency of 32%, threshold current of 2.5 mA, threshold voltage of 1.2 V, and a slope efficiency of 0.83 W/A. The best design demonstrated a room temperature CW single-mode output power of more than 7 mW with a side

  17. Acoustic properties of multiple cavity resonance liner for absorbing higher-order duct modes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Di; Wang, Xiaoyu; Jing, Xiaodong; Sun, Xiaofeng

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes analytical and experimental studies conducted to investigate the acoustic properties of axially non-uniform multiple cavity resonance liner for absorbing higher-order duct modes. A three-dimensional analytical model is proposed based upon transfer element method. The model is assessed by making a comparison with results of a liner performance experiment concerning higher-order modes propagation, and the agreement is good. According to the present results, it is found that the performance of multiple cavity resonance liner is related to the incident sound waves. Moreover, an analysis of the corresponding response of liner perforated panel-cavity system is performed, in which the features of resonance frequency and dissipation of the system under grazing or oblique incidence condition are revealed. The conclusions can be extended to typical non-locally reacting liners with single large back-cavity, and it would be beneficial for future non-locally reacting liner design to some extent. PMID:27586753

  18. Cryogenic Test of a Coaxial Coupling Scheme for Fundamental and Higher Order Modes in Superconducting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    J.K. Sekutowicz, P. Kneisel

    2009-05-01

    A coaxial coupling device located in the beam pipe of the TESLA type superconducting cavities provides for better propagation of Higher Order Modes (HOMs) and their strong damping in appropriate HOM couplers. Additionally, it also provides efficient coupling for fundamental mode RF power into the superconducting cavity. The whole coupling device can be designed as a detachable system. If appropriately dimensioned, the magnetic field can be minimized to a negligible level at the flange position. This scheme, presented previously*, provides for several advantages: strong HOM damping, flangeable solution, exchangeability of the HOM damping device on a cavity, less complexity of the superconducting cavity, possible cost advantages. This contribution will describe the results of the first cryogenic test.

  19. Single-mode quantum cascade lasers employing a candy-cane shaped monolithic coupled cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peter Q.; Sladek, Kamil; Wang, Xiaojun; Fan, Jen-Yu; Gmachl, Claire F.

    2011-12-01

    We demonstrate single-mode quantum cascade lasers emitting at ˜4.5 μm by employing a monolithic "candy-cane" shaped coupled-cavity consisting of a straight section connecting at one end to a spiral section. The fabrication process is identical to those for simple Fabry-Perot-type ridge lasers. Continuously tunable single-mode emission across ˜8 cm-1 with side mode suppression ratio up to ˜25 dB and a single-mode operating current range of more than 70% above the threshold current is achieved when the lasers are operated in pulsed-mode from 80 K to 155 K.

  20. Power enhancement of burst-mode UV pulses using a doubly-resonant optical cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Rahkman, Abdurahim; Notcutt, Mark; Liu, Yun

    2015-11-24

    We report a doubly-resonant enhancement cavity (DREC) that can realize a simultaneous enhancement of two incoming laser beams at different wavelengths and different temporal structures. The double-resonance condition is theoretically analyzed and different DREC locking methods are experimentally investigated. Simultaneous locking of a Fabry-Perot cavity to both an infrared (IR, 1064 nm) and its frequency tripled ultraviolet (UV, 355 nm) pulses has been demonstrated by controlling the frequency difference between the two beams with a fiber optic frequency shifter. The DREC technique opens a new paradigm in the applications of optical cavities to power enhancement of burst-mode lasers with arbitrary macropulse width and repetition rate.

  1. Enhanced Sensitivity in a Superluminal Single Mode DPAL Cavity at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abi-Salloum, Tony; Yablon, Joshua; Tseng, Shih; Shahriar, Selim

    2012-06-01

    The note beat between two counter-propagating beams in a cavity is used to measure the effective change of the length of the cavity or interferometer for applications such as optical gyroscopes, vibrometers, and gravitational wave detectors. We show in this talk how a superluminal single mode laser cavity can enhance the measured note beat dramatically. We consider the inhomogeneous broadening case and study the dependence of the enhancement factor on few key parameters. We also show how Diode Pump Alkali Lasers (DPAL) are excellent candidates for such devices. Using a Rubidium based DPAL, we study the characteristics of these lasers and their effect on the proposed enhanced sensitivity.

  2. Power enhancement of burst-mode ultraviolet pulses using a doubly resonant optical cavity.

    PubMed

    Rakhman, Abdurahim; Notcutt, Mark; Liu, Yun

    2015-12-01

    We report a doubly resonant enhancement cavity (DREC) that can realize a simultaneous enhancement of two incoming laser beams at different wavelengths and different temporal structures. The double-resonance condition is theoretically analyzed, and different DREC locking methods are experimentally investigated. Simultaneous locking of a Fabry-Perot cavity to both an infrared (1064 nm) and its frequency-tripled ultraviolet (355 nm) pulses has been demonstrated by controlling the frequency difference between the two beams with a fiber-optic frequency shifter. The DREC technique enables novel applications of optical cavities to power enhancement of burst-mode lasers with arbitrary macropulse width and repetition rate. PMID:26625051

  3. Actively mode-locked Raman fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuezong; Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Huawei; Fan, Tingwei; Feng, Yan

    2015-07-27

    Active mode-locking of Raman fiber laser is experimentally investigated for the first time. An all fiber connected and polarization maintaining loop cavity of ~500 m long is pumped by a linearly polarized 1120 nm Yb fiber laser and modulated by an acousto-optic modulator. Stable 2 ns width pulse train at 1178 nm is obtained with modulator opening time of > 50 ns. At higher power, pulses become longer, and second order Raman Stokes could take place, which however can be suppressed by adjusting the open time and modulation frequency. Transient pulse evolution measurement confirms the absence of relaxation oscillation in Raman fiber laser. Tuning of repetition rate from 392 kHz to 31.37 MHz is obtained with harmonic mode locking. PMID:26367642

  4. Classical dynamics of the optomechanical modes of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a ring cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.; Goldbaum, D. S.; Bhattacharya, M.; Meystre, P.

    2010-05-15

    We consider a cavity optomechanical system consisting of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) interacting with two counterpropagating traveling-wave modes in an optical ring cavity. In contrast to the more familiar case where the condensate is driven by the standing-wave field of a high-Q Fabry-Perot cavity we find that both symmetric and antisymmetric collective density side modes of the BEC are mechanically excited by the light field. In the semiclassical, mean-field limit where the light field and the zero-momentum mode of the condensate are treated classically the system is found to exhibit a rich multistable behavior, including the appearance of isolated branches of solutions (isolas). We also present examples of the dynamics of the system as input parameters such as the frequency of the driving lasers are varied.

  5. Dynamics of the collective modes of an inhomogeneous spin ensemble in a cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Wesenberg, Janus H.; Kurucz, Zoltan; Moelmer, Klaus

    2011-02-15

    We study the excitation dynamics of an inhomogeneously broadened spin ensemble coupled to a single cavity mode. The collective excitations of the spin ensemble can be described in terms of generalized spin waves, and, in the absence of the cavity, the free evolution of the spin ensemble can be described as a drift in the wavenumber without dispersion. In this article we show that the dynamics in the presence of coupling to the cavity mode can be described solely by a modified time evolution of the wavenumbers. In particular, we show that collective excitations with a well-defined wavenumber pass without dispersion from negative to positive-valued wavenumbers without populating the zero wavenumber spin wave mode. The results are relevant for multimode collective quantum memories where qubits are encoded in different spin waves.

  6. Vibration Method for Tracking the Resonant Mode and Impedance of a Microwave Cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M.; Iny, O.; Yiin, T.; Khan, I.

    1995-01-01

    A vibration technique his been developed to continuously maintain mode resonance and impedance much between a constant frequency magnetron source and resonant cavity. This method uses a vibrating metal rod to modulate the volume of the cavity in a manner equivalent to modulating an adjustable plunger. A similar vibrating metal rod attached to a stub tuner modulates the waveguide volume between the source and cavity. A phase sensitive detection scheme determines the optimum position of the adjustable plunger and stub turner during processing. The improved power transfer during the heating of a 99.8% pure alumina rod was demonstrated using this new technique. Temperature-time and reflected power-time heating curves are presented for the cases of no tracking, impedance tracker only, mode tracker only and simultaneous impedance and mode tracking. Controlled internal melting of an alumina rod near 2000 C using both tracking units was also demonstrated.

  7. Optical and electrical mappings of surface plasmon cavity modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Fan; Merlo, Juan M.; Burns, Michael J.; Naughton, Michael J.

    2014-04-01

    Plasmonics is a rapidly expanding field, founded in physics but now with a growing number of applications in biology (biosensing), nanophotonics, photovoltaics, optical engineering and advanced information technology. Appearing as charge density oscillations along a metal surface, excited by electromagnetic radiation (e.g., light), plasmons can propagate as surface plasmon polaritons, or can be confined as standing waves along an appropriately-prepared surface. Here, we review the latter manifestation, both their origins and the manners in which they are detected, the latter dominated by near field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM/SNOM). We include discussion of the "plasmonic halo" effect recently observed by the authors, wherein cavity-confined plasmons are able to modulate optical transmission through step-gap nanostructures, yielding a novel form of color (wavelength) selection.

  8. Identification of spin wave modes in yttrium iron garnet strongly coupled to a co-axial cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, N. J.; Ferguson, A. J.; Haigh, J. A.

    2015-02-07

    We demonstrate, at room temperature, the strong coupling of the fundamental and non-uniform magnetostatic modes of an yttrium iron garnet ferrimagnetic sphere to the electromagnetic modes of a co-axial cavity. The well-defined field profile within the cavity yields a specific coupling strength for each magnetostatic mode. We experimentally measure the coupling strength for the different magnetostatic modes and, by calculating the expected coupling strengths, we are able to identify the modes themselves.

  9. Actively mode-locked all fiber laser with cylindrical vector beam output.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Wang, Anting; Gu, Chun; Sun, Biao; Xu, Lixin; Li, Feng; Chung, Dick; Zhan, Qiwen

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrated an all fiber actively mode-locked laser that emits a cylindrical vector beam. An intra-cavity few-mode fiber Bragg grating inscribed in a short section of four-mode fiber is employed to provide mode selection and spectrum filtering functions. Mode coupling is achieved by offset splicing between the single-mode fiber and the four-mode fiber in the laser cavity. A LiNbO3 Mach-Zehnder modulator is used to achieve active mode-locking in the laser. The laser operates at 1547 nm with 30 dB spectrum width of 0.2 nm. The mode-locked pulses have a duration of 2 ns and repetition of 12.06 MHz. Through adjusting the polarization state in the laser cavity, both radially and azimuthally polarized beams have been obtained with high mode purity.

  10. Actively mode-locked all fiber laser with cylindrical vector beam output.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Wang, Anting; Gu, Chun; Sun, Biao; Xu, Lixin; Li, Feng; Chung, Dick; Zhan, Qiwen

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrated an all fiber actively mode-locked laser that emits a cylindrical vector beam. An intra-cavity few-mode fiber Bragg grating inscribed in a short section of four-mode fiber is employed to provide mode selection and spectrum filtering functions. Mode coupling is achieved by offset splicing between the single-mode fiber and the four-mode fiber in the laser cavity. A LiNbO3 Mach-Zehnder modulator is used to achieve active mode-locking in the laser. The laser operates at 1547 nm with 30 dB spectrum width of 0.2 nm. The mode-locked pulses have a duration of 2 ns and repetition of 12.06 MHz. Through adjusting the polarization state in the laser cavity, both radially and azimuthally polarized beams have been obtained with high mode purity. PMID:26907420

  11. Additive mode-locked resembling pulses in a Tm-doped fiber laser with a hybrid cavity configuration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weicheng; Lin, Wei; Qiao, Tian; Yang, Zhongmin

    2015-10-19

    We report on the generation of modulated spikes distributed across a mode-locked pulse profile, which is termed as "additive mode-locked resembling (AMLR)", in a Tm-doped fiber laser with a hybrid cavity configuration based on nonlinear polarization rotation (NPR) technique. The hybrid cavity configuration is composed of a ring cavity containing a micro Fabry-Perot (F-P) cavity. The F-P cavity is used to take the cavity-trip frequency (CTF) modulation on the mode-locked pulses for forming AMLR pulses. We observe AMLR pulses with uniform and chirped modulation depths, as well as uniform and nonuniform spike separations, respectively. Numerical simulations confirm the experimental observations and show that the filtering effect of the F-P cavity is the main mechanism for taking CTF modulation on mode-locked pulses to generate AMLR pulses. PMID:26480459

  12. Atom-mediated effective interactions between modes of a bimodal cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Prado, F. O.; Luiz, F. S.; Villas-Boas, J. M.; Alcalde, A. M.; Duzzioni, E. I.; Sanz, L.

    2011-11-15

    We show a procedure for engineering effective interactions between two modes in a bimodal cavity. Our system consists of one or more two-level atoms, excited by a classical field, interacting with both modes. The two effective Hamiltonians have forms similar to beam-splitter and quadratic beam-splitter interactions. We also demonstrate that the nonlinear Hamiltonian can be used to prepare an entangled coherent state, also known as a multidimensional entangled coherent state, which has been pointed out as an important entanglement resource. We show that the nonlinear interaction parameter can be enhanced considering N independent atoms trapped inside a high-finesse optical cavity.

  13. Pulse shaping in mode-locked fiber lasers by in-cavity spectral filter.

    PubMed

    Boscolo, Sonia; Finot, Christophe; Karakuzu, Huseyin; Petropoulos, Periklis

    2014-02-01

    We numerically show the possibility of pulse shaping in a passively mode-locked fiber laser by inclusion of a spectral filter into the laser cavity. Depending on the amplitude transfer function of the filter, we are able to achieve various regimes of advanced temporal waveform generation, including ones featuring bright and dark parabolic-, flat-top-, triangular- and saw-tooth-profiled pulses. The results demonstrate the strong potential of an in-cavity spectral pulse shaper for controlling the dynamics of mode-locked fiber lasers.

  14. Cavity length dependence of mode beating in passively Q-switched Nd-solid state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zameroski, Nathan D.; Wanke, Michael; Bossert, David

    2013-03-01

    The temporal intensity profile of pulse(s) from passively Q-switched and passively Q-switched mode locked (QSML) solid-state lasers is known to be dependent on cavity length. In this work, the pulse width, modulation depth, and beat frequencies of a Nd:Cr:GSGG laser using a Cr+4:YAG passive Q-switch are investigated as function cavity length. Measured temporal widths are linearly correlated with cavity length but generally 3-5 ns larger than theoretical predictions. Some cavity lengths exhibit pulse profiles with no modulation while other lengths exhibit complete amplitude modulation. The observed beat frequencies at certain cavity lengths cannot be accounted for with passively QSML models in which the pulse train repetition rate is τRT-1, τRT= round-trip time. They can be explained, however, by including coupled cavity mode-locking effects. A theoretical model developed for a two section coupled cavity semiconductor laser is adapted to a solid-state laser to interpret measured beat frequencies. We also numerically evaluate the temporal criterion required to achieve temporally smooth Q-switched pulses, versus cavity length and pump rate. We show that in flash lamp pumped systems, the difference in buildup time between longitudinal modes is largely dependent on the pump rate. In applications where short pulse delay is important, the pumping rate may limit the ability to achieve temporally smooth pulses in passively Q-switched lasers. Simulations support trends in experimental data. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  15. Single-mode enhancement in coupled-cavity quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuc, M.; Sarzała, R. P.; Czyszanowski, T.; Bugajski, M.

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports on numerical analysis of longitudinal mode discrimination in coupled-cavity AlInAs/InGaAs/InP quantum cascade lasers. Using a three dimensional, self-consistent model of physical phenomena in edge emitting laser we performed exhaustive analysis of geometrical parameters of CC QCL on spectral characteristics. We discuss the enhancement of the single mode operation in multi-section designs concerning variable dimensions of sections and air gaps between sections and provide designing guidelines assuring single-mode operation. We also show impact of independent current tuning of laser sections inducing Stark effect and heating as additional elements enhancing single mode operation.

  16. Raman-assisted Rabi resonances in two-mode cavity QED

    SciTech Connect

    Gruenwald, P.; Singh, S. K.; Vogel, W.

    2011-06-15

    The dynamics of a vibronic system in a lossy two-mode cavity is studied, with the first mode being resonant to the electronic transition and the second one being nearly resonant due to Raman transitions. We derive analytical solutions for the dynamics of this system. For a properly chosen detuning of the second mode from the exact Raman resonance, we obtain conditions that are closely related to the phenomenon of Rabi resonance as it is well known in laser physics. Such resonances can be observed in the spontaneous emission spectra, where the spectrum of the second mode in the case of weak Raman coupling is enhanced substantially.

  17. Dynamics of a passively mode-locked semiconductor laser subject to dual-cavity optical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaurigue, Lina; Nikiforov, Oleg; Schöll, Eckehard; Breuer, Stefan; Lüdge, Kathy

    2016-02-01

    We study the influence of dual-cavity optical feedback on the emission dynamics and timing stability of a passively mode-locked semiconductor laser using a delay differential equation model and verify the timing stability results by an initial experiment. By bifurcation analysis in dependence of the feedback delay times and feedback strength bistability, quasiperiodic and chaotic dynamics, as well as fundamental mode-locking are investigated, yielding a comprehensive overview on the nonlinear emission dynamics arising due to dual-cavity optical feedback. Optimum self-locking ranges for improving the timing stability by dual-cavity optical feedback are identified. A timing jitter reduction and an increase of the repetition rate tuning range of up to a factor of three, compared with single-cavity feedback, are predicted for the parameter ranges investigated. Improved timing stability on short and long timescales is predicted for dual-cavity feedback through the suppression of noise-induced fluctuations. Based on the numerical predictions, experimentally, a maximum timing jitter reduction up to a factor of 180 is found, accompanied by a side-band reduction by a factor of 58 dB, when both feedback cavities are resonant.

  18. Pulse dynamics in carbon nanotube mode-locked fiber lasers near zero cavity dispersion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinzhang; Cai, Zhiping; Xu, Ping; Du, Geguo; Wang, Fengqiu; Ruan, Shuangchen; Sun, Zhipei; Hasan, Tawfique

    2015-04-20

    We numerically and experimentally analyze the output characteristics and pulse dynamics of carbon nanotube mode-locked fiber lasers near zero cavity dispersion (from 0.02 to ~-0.02 ps(2)). We focus on such near zero dispersion cavities to reveal the dispersion related transition between different mode-locking regimes (such as soliton-like, stretched-pulse and self-similar regimes). Using our proposed model, we develop a nanotube-mode-locked fiber laser setup generating ~97 fs pulse which operates in the stretched-pulse regime. The corresponding experimental results and pulse dynamics are in good agreement with the numerical results. Also, the experimental results from soliton-like and self-similar regimes exhibit the same trends with simulations. Our study will aid design of different mode-locking regimes based on other new saturable absorber materials to achieve ultra-short pulse duration.

  19. Exploring the distinction between experimental resonant modes and theoretical eigenmodes: from vibrating plates to laser cavities.

    PubMed

    Tuan, P H; Wen, C P; Yu, Y T; Liang, H C; Huang, K F; Chen, Y F

    2014-02-01

    Experimentally resonant modes are commonly presumed to correspond to eigenmodes in the same bounded domain. However, the one-to-one correspondence between theoretical eigenmodes and experimental observations is never reached. Theoretically, eigenmodes in numerous classical and quantum systems are the solutions of the homogeneous Helmholtz equation, whereas resonant modes should be solved from the inhomogeneous Helmholtz equation. In the present paper we employ the eigenmode expansion method to derive the wave functions for manifesting the distinction between eigenmodes and resonant modes. The derived wave functions are successfully used to reconstruct a variety of experimental results including Chladni figures generated from the vibrating plate, resonant patterns excited from microwave cavities, and lasing modes emitted from the vertical cavity. PMID:25353549

  20. The design of the fundamental mode damper and the HOM dampers for the 56 MHz SRF cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Choi,E.M.; Hahn, H.; Bellavia, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    2009-05-04

    A 56 MHz Superconducting RF cavity is under development for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) aiming at luminosity enhancement The 56 MHz SRF cavity can adiabatically rebucket the beam from the 28 MHz accelerating cavities, provide shorter bunches and significantly enhance the luminosity. The 56 MHz SRF cavity will be turned on at store, therefore, the fundamental mode should be damped while the beam is injected and accelerated. The feature requires a fundamental mode damper (FD). The mechanical design of the FD is challenging since the fundamental mode damper has to be physically withdrawn while the cavity is turned on. This motion introduces a frequency change of the cavity. Since for stability the cavity frequency must be kept below the beam frequency in this phase, we chose a judicious axial placement of the FD to minimize the frequency shift. Various studies of the FD were done with prototype cavity tests and numerical simulations. The engineering issues were addressed. Higher-order mode (HOM) dampers are necessary for stable operation of RHIC with the 56 MHz SRF cavity. The physics study of the HOM dampers will be presented in the paper. Based on the stability criteria of the cavity, the HOMs are properly damped by having two HOM dampers. The fundamental mode is filtered out by a 5 element high pass filter. The HOMs were identified and the external Q factors were obtained from tests of the prototype cavity and compared to simulations with the CST Microwave Studio{reg_sign} program.

  1. Measurement of electrodynamics characteristics of higher order modes for harmonic cavity at 2400 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shashkov, Ya V.; Sobenin, N. P.; Gusarova, M. A.; Lalayan, M. V.; Bazyl, D. S.; Donetskiy, R. V.; Orlov, A. I.; Zobov, M. M.; Zavadtsev, A. A.

    2016-09-01

    In the frameworks of the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) upgrade program an application of additional superconducting harmonic cavities operating at 800 MHz is currently under discussion. As a possible candidate, an assembly of two cavities with grooved beam pipes connected by a drift tube and housed in a common cryomodule, was proposed. In this article we discuss measurements of loaded Q-factors of higher order modes (HOM) performed on a scaled aluminium single cell cavity prototype with the fundamental frequency of 2400 MHz and on an array of two such cavities connected by a narrow beam pipe. The measurements were performed for the system with and without the matching load in the drift tube..

  2. New Developed Cylindrical TM010 Mode EPR Cavity for X-Band In Vivo Tooth Dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Junwang, Guo; Qingquan, Yuan; Jianbo, Cong; Lei, Ma; Guofu, Dong; Guoshan, Yang; Ke, Wu

    2014-01-01

    EPR tooth in vivo dosimetry is an attractive approach for initial triage after unexpected nuclear events. An X-band cylindrical TM010 mode resonant cavity was developed for in vivo tooth dosimetry and used in EPR applications for the first time. The cavity had a trapezoidal measuring aperture at the exact position of the cavity’s cylindrical wall where strong microwave magnetic field H1 concentrated and weak microwave electric field E1 distributed. Theoretical calculations and simulations were used to design and optimize the cavity parameters. The cavity features were evaluated by measuring DPPH sample, intact incisor samples embed in a gum model and the rhesus monkey teeth. The results showed that the cavity worked at designed frequency and had the ability to make EPR spectroscopy in relative high sensitivity. Sufficient modulation amplitude and microwave power could be applied into the aperture. Radiation induced EPR signal could be observed remarkably from 1 Gy irradiated intact incisor within only 30 seconds, which was among the best in scan time and detection limit. The in vivo spectroscopy was also realized by acquiring the radiation induced EPR signal from teeth of rhesus monkey whose teeth was irradiated by dose of 2 Gy. The results suggested that the cavity was sensitive to meet the demand to assess doses of significant level in short time. This cavity provided a very potential option for the development of X-band in vivo dosimetry. PMID:25222483

  3. High-finesse fiber Fabry-Perot cavities: stabilization and mode matching analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, J.; Ghosh, S.; Alavi, S. K.; Alt, W.; Martinez-Dorantes, M.; Meschede, D.; Ratschbacher, L.

    2016-03-01

    Fiber Fabry-Perot cavities, formed by micro-machined mirrors on the end-facets of optical fibers, are used in an increasing number of technical and scientific applications, where they typically require precise stabilization of their optical resonances. Here, we study two different approaches to construct fiber Fabry-Perot resonators and stabilize their length for experiments in cavity quantum electrodynamics with neutral atoms. A piezo-mechanically actuated cavity with feedback based on the Pound-Drever-Hall locking technique is compared to a novel rigid cavity design that makes use of the high passive stability of a monolithic cavity spacer and employs thermal self-locking and external temperature tuning. Furthermore, we present a general analysis of the mode matching problem in fiber Fabry-Perot cavities, which explains the asymmetry in their reflective line shapes and has important implications for the optimal alignment of the fiber resonators. Finally, we discuss the issue of fiber-generated background photons. We expect that our results contribute toward the integration of high-finesse fiber Fabry-Perot cavities into compact and robust quantum-enabled devices in the future.

  4. Proposal for preparing entangled coherent states using atom-cavity-mode Raman interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, K.-H.; Zang, W.-J.; Guo, G.-C.

    2002-08-01

    Eur. Phys. J. D 19, 267 269 (2002) We have proposed a scheme for preparing entangled coherent states using atom-cavity-mode Raman interaction. In our proposal, the relation between the cavities lifetime and the atomic state lifetime was discussed in detail. Besides, we also discussed the conditions on preparing the states. It is also pointed out that there is sufficient time to achieve our generation of the states by using Rydberg atom of long lifetime and by choosing superconducting microwave cavities with an enough high-Q factor. However, after this paper published we become aware that a paper by Zheng [1] has presented the scheme for the generation of multi-mode Schrödinger cat states essentially using the same method. We must apologize for not being able to see the Zheng's article published in Quantum Semiclassical Optics B. [1] S.B. Zheng, Quant. Semiclass. Opt. B 10, 691 (1998).

  5. Double Quarter Wave Crab Cavity Field Profile Analysis and Higher Order Mode Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Marques, Carlos; Xiao, B. P.; Belomestnykh, S.

    2014-06-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is underway for a major upgrade to increase its luminosity by an order of magnitude beyond its original design specifications. This novel machine configuration known as the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) will rely on various innovative technologies including very compact and ultra-precise superconducting crab cavities for beam rotation. A double quarter wave crab cavity (DQWCC) has been designed at Brookhaven National Laboratory for the HL-LHC. This cavity as well as the structural support components were fabricated and assembled at Niowave. The field profile of the crabbing mode for the DQWCC was investigated using a phase shift bead pulling technique and compared with simulated results to ensure proper operation or discover discrepancies from modeled results and/or variation in fabrication tolerances. Higher-Order Mode (HOM) characterization was also performed and correlated with simulations.

  6. Magnetic modulation of surface plasmon modes in magnetoplasmonic metal-insulator-metal cavities.

    PubMed

    Ferreiro-Vila, E; García-Martín, J M; Cebollada, A; Armelles, G; González, M U

    2013-02-25

    The magnetic modulation of the surface plasmon-polariton (SPP) wavevector is experimentally and theoretically studied for the plasmonic modes excited in metal-insulator-metal (MIM) magnetoplasmonic cavities. For this purpose, Ag/SiO₂/Ag multilayers with different SiO₂ layer thickness in which a thin Co layer is positioned near the top Ag/SiO₂ interface, near the bottom SiO₂/Ag one, or near both of them, are studied. The magnetoplasmonic MIM cavities present symmetric (SM) and antisymmetric (AM) plasmonic modes, of different wavevector and electromagnetic field profiles inside the MIM cavity. We show that the magnetic SPP wavevector modulation strongly depends on which mode is considered, the cavity thickness, and the number and specific location of Co layers within the structure. With only one ferromagnetic layer, a net modulation is obtained, of higher magnitude as we reduce the SiO₂ layer thickness. The introduction of a second Co layer in the structure reduces the modulation due to the non-reciprocal character of SPP modes under an applied magnetic field. Moreover, we demonstrate that the non-reciprocal nature of the SPP modulation can be experimentally visualized in the magnetic hysteresis loops under plasmon excitation conditions by using two Co layers with different magnetization switching fields. PMID:23482025

  7. Transverse Mode Dynamics and Ultrafast Modulation of Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ning, Cun-Zheng; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We show that multiple transverse mode dynamics of VCSELs (Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers) can be utilized to generate ultrafast intensity modulation at a frequency over 100 GHz, much higher than the relaxation oscillation frequency. Such multimode beating can be greatly enhanced by taking laser output from part of the output facet.

  8. Magnetic modulation of surface plasmon modes in magnetoplasmonic metal-insulator-metal cavities.

    PubMed

    Ferreiro-Vila, E; García-Martín, J M; Cebollada, A; Armelles, G; González, M U

    2013-02-25

    The magnetic modulation of the surface plasmon-polariton (SPP) wavevector is experimentally and theoretically studied for the plasmonic modes excited in metal-insulator-metal (MIM) magnetoplasmonic cavities. For this purpose, Ag/SiO₂/Ag multilayers with different SiO₂ layer thickness in which a thin Co layer is positioned near the top Ag/SiO₂ interface, near the bottom SiO₂/Ag one, or near both of them, are studied. The magnetoplasmonic MIM cavities present symmetric (SM) and antisymmetric (AM) plasmonic modes, of different wavevector and electromagnetic field profiles inside the MIM cavity. We show that the magnetic SPP wavevector modulation strongly depends on which mode is considered, the cavity thickness, and the number and specific location of Co layers within the structure. With only one ferromagnetic layer, a net modulation is obtained, of higher magnitude as we reduce the SiO₂ layer thickness. The introduction of a second Co layer in the structure reduces the modulation due to the non-reciprocal character of SPP modes under an applied magnetic field. Moreover, we demonstrate that the non-reciprocal nature of the SPP modulation can be experimentally visualized in the magnetic hysteresis loops under plasmon excitation conditions by using two Co layers with different magnetization switching fields.

  9. Tunable multiwavelength mode-locked fiber laser using intra-cavity polarization and wavelength dependent loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Ankita; Chandra, Nishanth; Anchal, Abhishek; Kumar K, Pradeep

    2016-09-01

    We report a tunable multiwavelength mode-locked fiber ring laser in C-band. Multiwavelength characteristic and tuning of laser wavelengths is achieved by inducing polarization and wavelength dependent loss in the cavity by using a combination of two polarization controllers (PCs) and an intensity modulator, inserted between the two PCs. With this technique we obtained pulses of 14 ps (FWHM) at a repetition rate of 10 GHz by actively mode-locking the laser. We obtained simultaneous lasing of 5 wavelengths with 3-dB spectral width of 0.2 nm for each lasing wavelength. We measured short-term stability of the pulses and corresponding spectra by continuously collecting time and spectral domain data for 600 s, sampled at an interval of 20 s. The pulsewidth was measured to be stable to within ±732 fs and peak power fluctuations were within ±0.16 mW. For simultaneous lasing of two wavelengths, the linewidth was found to be stable within ±0.07 nm with a peak power fluctuation of ±1 dB.

  10. Cavity modes with optical orbital angular momentum in a metamaterial ring based on transformation optics.

    PubMed

    Wu, H W; Wang, F; Dong, Y Q; Shu, F Z; Zhang, K; Peng, R W; Xiong, X; Wang, Mu

    2015-12-14

    In this work, we theoretically study the cavity modes with transverse orbital angular momentum in metamaterial ring based on transformation optics. The metamaterial ring is designed to transform the straight trajectory of light into the circulating one by enlarging the azimuthal angle, effectively presenting the modes with transverse orbital angular momentum. The simulation results confirm the theoretical predictions, which state that the transverse orbital angular momentum of the mode not only depends on the frequency of the incident light, but also depends on the transformation scale of the azimuthal angle. Because energy dissipation inevitably reduces the field amplitude of the modes, the confined electromagnetic energy and the quality factor of the modes inside the ring are also studied in order to evaluate the stability of those cavity modes. The results show that the metamaterial ring can effectively confine light with a high quality factor and maintain steady modes with the orbital angular momentum, even if the dimension of the ring is much smaller than the wavelength of the incident light. This technique for exploiting the modes with optical transverse orbital angular momentum may provides a unique platform for applications related to micromanipulation.

  11. All-fiber, narrow linewidth and linearly polarized fiber laser in a single-mode-multimode-single-mode cavity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Man; Xu, Haiyang; Zhou, Pu; Zhao, Guomin; Gu, Xijia

    2016-08-01

    We report the design of an all-fiber, linearly polarized Yb-doped fiber laser at 1064 nm with a narrow linewidth and high output power required by the master oscillator of the amplifier for high-power spectral beam combining. The laser has achieved linearly polarized output with a polarization extinction ratio of 23 dB, a narrow linewidth of ≤52  pm, and an output power of 32.7 W. Such performance was obtained by the cavity design that incorporated a wavelength-shifted PM fiber Bragg grating pair and single-mode-multimode-single-mode structure. PMID:27505397

  12. Integrated system modeling analysis of a cryogenic multi-cell deflecting-mode cavity resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Young-Min; Church, Michael

    2013-09-15

    A deflecting mode cavity is the integral element for six-dimensional phase-space beam control in bunch compressors and emittance transformers at high energy beam test facilities. RF performance of a high-Q device is, however, highly sensitive to operational conditions, in particular in a cryo-cooling environment. Using analytic calculations and RF simulations, we examined cavity parameters and deflecting characteristics of TM{sub 110,π} mode of a 5 cell resonator in a liquid nitrogen cryostat, which has long been used at the Fermilab A0 Photoinjector (A0PI). The sensitivity analysis indicated that the cavity could lose 30%–40% of deflecting force due to defective input power coupling accompanying non-uniform field distribution across the cells with 40 ∼ 50 MeV electron beam and 70–80 kW klystron power. Vacuum-cryomodules of the 5 cell cavity are planned to be installed at the Fermilab Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator facility. Comprehensive modeling analysis integrated with multi-physics simulation tools showed that RF loading of 1 ms can cause a ∼5 K maximum temperature increase, corresponding to a ∼4.3 μm/ms deformation and a 1.32 MHz/K maximum frequency shift. The integrated system modeling analysis will improve design process of a high-Q cavity with more accurate prediction of cryogenic RF performance under a high power pulse operation.

  13. Plasmonic TM-like cavity modes and the hybridization in multilayer metal-dielectric nanoantenna.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X M; Xiao, J J; Zhang, Q; Li, L M; Yao, Y

    2015-06-15

    Plasmonic hybridized transverse magnetic like (TM-like) cavity modes in multi-layered metal-dielectric circular nanoantenna are systematically studied. The main purpose is to explore the symmetry features of the vertical modal profile and its impact on the in-plane interference of gap plasmonic waves that are responsible to the resonant mode. It is found that only vertically in-phase modes are excitable when illuminated by a plane wave under normal incidence and more could be selectively excited using a dipole source, within the wavelength range from 430 nm-1250 nm. More specifically, the excitation of localized cavity modes is shown to be highly sensitive to the dipole position which determines symmetry matching and the degree of field overlap between the dipole source and the cavity mode pattern. Furthermore, we show that the resonance frequencies can be approximately predicted by the dispersion relations of plasmonic wave in the corresponding two-dimensional multilayered structure. Our results would be helpful for the design of photonic nanoantennas with alternative metal and dielectric medium. PMID:26193585

  14. Comparative Simulation Studies of Multipacting in Higher-Order-Mode Couplers of Superconducting RF Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y. M.; Liu, Kexin; Geng, Rongli

    2014-02-01

    Multipacting (MP) in higher-order-mode (HOM) couplers of the International Linear Collider (ILC) baseline cavity and the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) 12 GeV upgrade cavity is studied by using the ACE3P suites, developed by the Advanced Computations Department at SLAC. For the ILC cavity HOM coupler, the simulation results show that resonant trajectories exist in three zones, corresponding to an accelerating gradient range of 0.6-1.6 MV/m, 21-34 MV/m, 32-35 MV/m, and > 40MV/m, respectively. For the CEBAF 12 GeV upgrade cavity HOM coupler, resonant trajectories exist in one zone, corresponding to an accelerating gradient range of 6-13 MV/m. Potential implications of these MP barriers are discussed in the context of future high energy pulsed as well as medium energy continuous wave (CW) accelerators based on superconducting radio frequency cavities. Frequency scaling of MP's predicted in HOM couplers of the ILC, CBEAF upgrade, SNS and FLASH third harmonic cavity is given and found to be in good agreement with the analytical result based on the parallel plate model.

  15. Near-field coupling and resonant cavity modes in plasmonic nanorod metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Song, Haojie; Zhang, Junxi; Fei, Guangtao; Wang, Junfeng; Jiang, Kang; Wang, Pei; Lu, Yonghua; Iorsh, Ivan; Xu, Wei; Jia, Junhui; Zhang, Lide; Kivshar, Yuri S; Zhang, Lin

    2016-10-14

    Plasmonic resonant cavities are capable of confining light at the nanoscale, resulting in both enhanced local electromagnetic fields and lower mode volumes. However, conventional plasmonic resonant cavities possess large Ohmic losses at metal-dielectric interfaces. Plasmonic near-field coupling plays a key role in a design of photonic components based on the resonant cavities because of the possibility to reduce losses. Here, we study the plasmonic near-field coupling in the silver nanorod metamaterials treated as resonant nanostructured optical cavities. Reflectance measurements reveal the existence of multiple resonance modes of the nanorod metamaterials, which is consistent with our theoretical analysis. Furthermore, our numerical simulations show that the electric field at the longitudinal resonances forms standing waves in the nanocavities due to the near-field coupling between the adjacent nanorods, and a new hybrid mode emerges due to a coupling between nanorods and a gold-film substrate. We demonstrate that this coupling can be controlled by changing the gap between the silver nanorod array and gold substrate.

  16. Near-field coupling and resonant cavity modes in plasmonic nanorod metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Haojie; Zhang, Junxi; Fei, Guangtao; Wang, Junfeng; Jiang, Kang; Wang, Pei; Lu, Yonghua; Iorsh, Ivan; Xu, Wei; Jia, Junhui; Zhang, Lide; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Zhang, Lin

    2016-10-01

    Plasmonic resonant cavities are capable of confining light at the nanoscale, resulting in both enhanced local electromagnetic fields and lower mode volumes. However, conventional plasmonic resonant cavities possess large Ohmic losses at metal-dielectric interfaces. Plasmonic near-field coupling plays a key role in a design of photonic components based on the resonant cavities because of the possibility to reduce losses. Here, we study the plasmonic near-field coupling in the silver nanorod metamaterials treated as resonant nanostructured optical cavities. Reflectance measurements reveal the existence of multiple resonance modes of the nanorod metamaterials, which is consistent with our theoretical analysis. Furthermore, our numerical simulations show that the electric field at the longitudinal resonances forms standing waves in the nanocavities due to the near-field coupling between the adjacent nanorods, and a new hybrid mode emerges due to a coupling between nanorods and a gold-film substrate. We demonstrate that this coupling can be controlled by changing the gap between the silver nanorod array and gold substrate.

  17. Near-field coupling and resonant cavity modes in plasmonic nanorod metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Song, Haojie; Zhang, Junxi; Fei, Guangtao; Wang, Junfeng; Jiang, Kang; Wang, Pei; Lu, Yonghua; Iorsh, Ivan; Xu, Wei; Jia, Junhui; Zhang, Lide; Kivshar, Yuri S; Zhang, Lin

    2016-10-14

    Plasmonic resonant cavities are capable of confining light at the nanoscale, resulting in both enhanced local electromagnetic fields and lower mode volumes. However, conventional plasmonic resonant cavities possess large Ohmic losses at metal-dielectric interfaces. Plasmonic near-field coupling plays a key role in a design of photonic components based on the resonant cavities because of the possibility to reduce losses. Here, we study the plasmonic near-field coupling in the silver nanorod metamaterials treated as resonant nanostructured optical cavities. Reflectance measurements reveal the existence of multiple resonance modes of the nanorod metamaterials, which is consistent with our theoretical analysis. Furthermore, our numerical simulations show that the electric field at the longitudinal resonances forms standing waves in the nanocavities due to the near-field coupling between the adjacent nanorods, and a new hybrid mode emerges due to a coupling between nanorods and a gold-film substrate. We demonstrate that this coupling can be controlled by changing the gap between the silver nanorod array and gold substrate. PMID:27607837

  18. Thermal analysis of bulk filled composite resin polymerization using various light curing modes according to the curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall

    PubMed Central

    CHANG, Hoon-Sang; CHO, Kyu-Jeong; PARK, Su-Jung; LEE, Bin-Na; HWANG, Yun-Chan; OH, Won-Mann; HWANG, In-Nam

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the polymerization temperature of a bulk filled composite resin light-activated with various light curing modes using infrared thermography according to the curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall. Material and Methods Composite resin (AeliteFlo, Bisco, Schaumburg, IL, USA) was inserted into a Class II cavity prepared in the Teflon blocks and was cured with a LED light curing unit (Dr's Light, GoodDoctors Co., Seoul, Korea) using various light curing modes for 20 s. Polymerization temperature was measured with an infrared thermographic camera (Thermovision 900 SW/TE, Agema Infra-red Systems AB, Danderyd, Sweden) for 40 s at measurement spots adjacent to the cavity wall and in the middle of the cavity from the surface to a 4 mm depth. Data were analyzed according to the light curing modes with one-way ANOVA, and according to curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall with two-way ANOVA. Results The peak polymerization temperature of the composite resin was not affected by the light curing modes. According to the curing depth, the peak polymerization temperature at the depth of 1 mm to 3 mm was significantly higher than that at the depth of 4 mm, and on the surface. The peak polymerization temperature of the spots in the middle of the cavity was higher than that measured in spots adjacent to the cavity wall. Conclusion In the photopolymerization of the composite resin, the temperature was higher in the middle of the cavity compared to the outer surface or at the internal walls of the prepared cavity. PMID:24037066

  19. Theoretical study on mode competition between fundamental and second harmonic modes in a 0.42 THz gyrotron with gradually tapered complex cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Qixiang Yu, Sheng; Zhang, Tianzhong; Li, Xiang

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, the nonlinear dynamics of mode competition in the complex cavity gyrotron are studied by using multi-frequency, time-dependent theory with the cold-cavity longitudinal profile approximation. Based on the theory, a code is written to simulate the mode competition in the gradually tapered complex cavity gyrotron operating at second harmonic oscillation. The simulations tracking seven competition modes show that single mode oscillation of the desired mode TE{sub 17.4} at 150 kW level can be expected with proper choice of operating parameters. Through studying on mode competition, it is proved that the complex cavity has a good capability for suppressing the mode competition. Meanwhile, it is found that TE{sub 17.3} could be excited in the first cavity as a competition mode when the gyrotron operating at large beam current, which leads to that TE{sub 17.3} and TE{sub 17.4} with different frequencies can coexist stably in the complex cavity gyrotron with very close amplitudes. Thus, the complex cavity might be used for multi-frequency output gyrotron.

  20. Long-term frequency stabilization system for external cavity diode laser based on mode boundary detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhouxiang; Huang, Kaikai; Jiang, Yunfeng; Lu, Xuanhui

    2011-12-01

    We have realized a long-term frequency stabilization system for external cavity diode laser (ECDL) based on mode boundary detection method. In this system, the saturated absorption spectroscopy was used. The current and the grating of the ECDL were controlled by a computer-based feedback control system. By checking if there are mode boundaries in the spectrum, the control system determined how to adjust current to avoid mode hopping. This procedure was executed periodically to ensure the long-term stabilization of ECDL in the absence of mode hops. This diode laser system with non-antireflection coating had operated in the condition of long-term mode-hop-free stabilization for almost 400 h, which is a significant improvement of ECDL frequency stabilization system.

  1. Quantum phases and dynamics of bosonic atoms trapped in a single-mode optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundar, Bhuvanesh; Mueller, Erich

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by experiments performed by R. Landig et al. (arXiv:1511.00007), we theoretically explore the behavior of bosonic atoms trapped in a single-mode cavity in the presence of a two-dimensional optical lattice. As explained by arXiv:1511.00007, Rayleigh scattering of light from the lattice-inducing beams into the cavity produces infinite-range cavity-mediated interactions between the atoms, leading to competition between superfluid, supersolid, Mott insulating and charge density wave phases. We calculate the phase diagram for a uniform trap using a variation of the Gutzwiller Ansatz. We also calculate the spatial distribution of the different phases in the gas in the presence of a harmonic trap. We explore hysteretic behavior when parameters of the system are changed.

  2. Power enhancement of burst-mode UV pulses using a doubly-resonant optical cavity

    DOE PAGES

    Rahkman, Abdurahim; Notcutt, Mark; Liu, Yun

    2015-11-24

    We report a doubly-resonant enhancement cavity (DREC) that can realize a simultaneous enhancement of two incoming laser beams at different wavelengths and different temporal structures. The double-resonance condition is theoretically analyzed and different DREC locking methods are experimentally investigated. Simultaneous locking of a Fabry-Perot cavity to both an infrared (IR, 1064 nm) and its frequency tripled ultraviolet (UV, 355 nm) pulses has been demonstrated by controlling the frequency difference between the two beams with a fiber optic frequency shifter. The DREC technique opens a new paradigm in the applications of optical cavities to power enhancement of burst-mode lasers with arbitrarymore » macropulse width and repetition rate.« less

  3. Comparison of higher order modes damping techniques for 800 MHz single cell superconducting cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shashkov, Ya. V.; Sobenin, N. P.; Petrushina, I. I.; Zobov, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    At present, applications of 800 MHz harmonic cavities in both bunch lengthening and shortening regimes are under consideration and discussion in the framework of the High Luminosity LHC project. In this paper we study electromagnetic characteristics of high order modes (HOMs) for a single cell 800 MHz superconducting cavity and arrays of such cavities connected by drifts tubes. Different techniques for the HOMs damping such as beam pipe grooves, coaxial-notch loads, fluted beam pipes etc. are investigated and compared. The influence of the sizes and geometry of the drift tubes on the HOMs damping is analyzed. The problems of a multipacting discharge in the considered structures are discussed and the operating frequency detuning due to the Lorentz force is evaluated.

  4. Asymptotic entanglement dynamics phase diagrams for two electromagnetic field modes in a cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Drumond, R. C.; Souza, L. A. M.; Terra Cunha, M.

    2010-10-15

    We investigate theoretically an open dynamics for two modes of electromagnetic field inside a microwave cavity. The dynamics is Markovian and determined by two types of reservoirs: the ''natural'' reservoirs due to dissipation and temperature of the cavity, and an engineered one, provided by a stream of atoms passing trough the cavity, as devised by Pielawa et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 240401 (2007)]. We found that, depending on the reservoir parameters, the system can have distinct ''phases'' for the asymptotic entanglement dynamics: it can disentangle at finite time or it can have persistent entanglement for large times, with the transition between them characterized by the possibility of asymptotical disentanglement. Incidentally, we also discuss the effects of dissipation on the scheme proposed in the above reference for generation of entangled states.

  5. Nanotube-mode-locked linear-cavity fiber laser delivering switchable ultrafast solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, X. X.

    2015-02-01

    We propose a linear-cavity switchable fiber laser based on a single-wall carbon nanotube mode-locker for the first time to the best of our knowledge. Two chirped fiber Bragg gratings (CFBGs) in series and an optical circulator are employed as end mirrors of the linear cavity. The linear-cavity fiber laser is simple and cost-efficient. By adjusting the polarization controllers, a switchable mode-locking operation is obtained at 1551.3 and 1557.9 nm respectively, corresponding to the central wavelengths of two series-wound CFBGs. The pulse duration and spectral bandwidth of ultrafast solitons are ~4.4 ps and ~0.65 nm for the short wavelength operation at 1551.3 nm and ~3.9 ps and ~0.71 nm for the long wavelength operation at 1557.9 nm, respectively. Our experimental observations are well confirmed by the numerical results. The linear-cavity all-fiber laser reduces the cost and is very attractive for ultrafast optics.

  6. Single-nanoparticle detection with slot-mode photonic crystal cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Cheng; Kita, Shota; Lončar, Marko; Quan, Qimin; Li, Yihang

    2015-06-29

    Optical cavities that are capable for detecting single nanoparticles could lead to great progress in early stage disease diagnostics and the study of biological interactions on the single-molecule level. In particular, photonic crystal (PhC) cavities are excellent platforms for label-free single-nanoparticle detection, owing to their high quality (Q) factors and wavelength-scale modal volumes. Here, we demonstrate the design and fabrication of a high-Q (>10{sup 4}) slot-mode PhC nanobeam cavity, which is able to strongly confine light in the slotted regions. The enhanced light-matter interaction results in an order of magnitude improvement in both refractive index sensitivity (439 nm/RIU) and single-nanoparticle sensitivity compared with conventional dielectric-mode PhC cavities. Detection of single polystyrene nanoparticles with radii of 20 nm and 30 nm is demonstrated in aqueous environments (D{sub 2}O), without additional laser and temperature stabilization techniques.

  7. A new boundary integral approach to the determination of the resonant modes of arbitrary shaped cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Arcioni, P.; Bressan, M.; Perregrini, L.

    1995-08-01

    Computer codes for the electromagnetic analysis of arbitrarily shaped cavities are very important for many applications, in particular for the design of interaction structures for particle accelerators. The design of accelerating cavities results in complicated shapes, that are obtained carrying on repeated analyses to optimize a number of parameters, such as Q-factors, beam coupling impedances, higher-order-mode spectrum, and so on. The interest in the calculation of many normalized modes derives also from the important role they play in the eigenvector expansion of the electromagnetic field in a closed region. The authors present an efficient algorithm to determine the resonant frequencies and the normalized modal fields of arbitrarily shaped cavity resonators filled with a lossless, isotropic, and homogeneous medium. The algorithm is based on the boundary integral method (BIM). The unknown current flowing on the cavity wall is considered inside a spherical resonator, rather than in free-space, as it is usual in the standard BIM. The electric field is expressed using the Green`s function of the spherical resonator, approximated by a real rational function of the frequency. Consequently, the discretized problem can be cast into the form of a real matrix linear eigenvalue problem, whose eigenvalues and eigenvectors yield the resonant frequencies and the associated modal currents. Since the algorithm does not require any frequency-by-frequency recalculation of the system matrices, computing time is much shorter than in the standard BIM, especially when many resonances must be found.

  8. Cavity quantum optomechanics of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice: Normal-mode splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacherjee, Aranya B.

    2009-10-15

    We consider the dynamics of a movable mirror (cantilever) of a cavity coupled through radiation pressure to the light scattered from ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. Scattering from different atomic quantum states creates different quantum states of the scattered light, which can be distinguished by measurements of the displacement spectrum of the cantilever. We show that for large pump intensities the steady-state displacement of the cantilever shows bistable behavior. Due to atomic back action, the displacement spectrum of the cantilever is modified and depends on the position of the condensate in the Brillouin zone. We further analyze the occurrence of splitting of the normal mode into three modes due to mixing of the mechanical motion with the fluctuations of the cavity field and the fluctuations of the condensate with finite atomic two-body interaction.

  9. Single-mode selection for hard x-ray cavity resonance.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Wei; Chang, Ying-Yi; Wu, Yu-Hsin; Liu, Wen-Chung; Peng, Chou-Chi; Hsieh, Wen-Feng; Chang, Shih-Lin

    2015-07-01

    Single-mode selection is realized for hard x-ray cavity resonance using a three-mirror crystal device. The developed device consists of two coupled Si Fabry-Perot resonators (FPRs) and uses (12 4 0) backward diffraction to reflect back and forth the incident 14.4388 keV x-ray beam. The coupling between the two cavities gives an effective single-mode spectrum with a bandwidth of 0.81 meV. This method can be used to enhance the longitudinal coherent length without affecting transverse coherence, and is potentially useful in generating nearly total coherent beams in synchrotron or free-electron laser facilities.

  10. Analysis of Higher Order Modes Damping Techniques in 9 Cell Cavity with Modified Drift Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shashkov, Ya. V.; Mitrofanov, A. A.; Sobenin, N. P.; Zvyagintsev, V. L.

    Electrodynamic characteristics (EDC) of higher order modes (HOM) were calculated for a superconducting 9-cell accelerating cavity of eLinac accelerator with operating frequency of 1300 MHz. Several HOM damping techniques including damping with grooved, fluted and ridged beam pipes were analyzed and compared. The influence of the parameters of the drift tube on the HOM damping and on the parameters of the fundamental wave was analyzed.

  11. Dynamical Two-Mode Squeezing of Thermal Fluctuations in a Cavity Optomechanical System.

    PubMed

    Pontin, A; Bonaldi, M; Borrielli, A; Marconi, L; Marino, F; Pandraud, G; Prodi, G A; Sarro, P M; Serra, E; Marin, F

    2016-03-11

    We report the experimental observation of two-mode squeezing in the oscillation quadratures of a thermal micro-oscillator. This effect is obtained by parametric modulation of the optical spring in a cavity optomechanical system. In addition to stationary variance measurements, we describe the dynamic behavior in the regime of pulsed parametric excitation, showing an enhanced squeezing effect surpassing the stationary 3 dB limit. While the present experiment is in the classical regime, our technique can be exploited to produce entangled, macroscopic quantum optomechanical modes. PMID:27015479

  12. Dynamical Two-Mode Squeezing of Thermal Fluctuations in a Cavity Optomechanical System.

    PubMed

    Pontin, A; Bonaldi, M; Borrielli, A; Marconi, L; Marino, F; Pandraud, G; Prodi, G A; Sarro, P M; Serra, E; Marin, F

    2016-03-11

    We report the experimental observation of two-mode squeezing in the oscillation quadratures of a thermal micro-oscillator. This effect is obtained by parametric modulation of the optical spring in a cavity optomechanical system. In addition to stationary variance measurements, we describe the dynamic behavior in the regime of pulsed parametric excitation, showing an enhanced squeezing effect surpassing the stationary 3 dB limit. While the present experiment is in the classical regime, our technique can be exploited to produce entangled, macroscopic quantum optomechanical modes.

  13. Mode-locked long fibre master oscillator with intra-cavity power management and pulse energy > 12 µJ.

    PubMed

    Ivanenko, Alexey; Kobtsev, Sergey; Smirnov, Sergey; Kemmer, Anna

    2016-03-21

    Combined lengthening of the cavity of a passive mode-locked fibre master oscillator and implementation of a new concept of intra-cavity power management led to achievement of a record-high pulse energy directly at the output of the mode-locked fibre master oscillator (without any subsequent amplification) exceeding 12 µJ. Output powers at the level of > 12 µJ obtainable from a long-cavity mode-locked fibre master oscillator open new possibilities of application of all pulse types that can be generated in such oscillators.

  14. Adaptive Batch Mode Active Learning.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Shayok; Balasubramanian, Vineeth; Panchanathan, Sethuraman

    2015-08-01

    Active learning techniques have gained popularity to reduce human effort in labeling data instances for inducing a classifier. When faced with large amounts of unlabeled data, such algorithms automatically identify the exemplar and representative instances to be selected for manual annotation. More recently, there have been attempts toward a batch mode form of active learning, where a batch of data points is simultaneously selected from an unlabeled set. Real-world applications require adaptive approaches for batch selection in active learning, depending on the complexity of the data stream in question. However, the existing work in this field has primarily focused on static or heuristic batch size selection. In this paper, we propose two novel optimization-based frameworks for adaptive batch mode active learning (BMAL), where the batch size as well as the selection criteria are combined in a single formulation. We exploit gradient-descent-based optimization strategies as well as properties of submodular functions to derive the adaptive BMAL algorithms. The solution procedures have the same computational complexity as existing state-of-the-art static BMAL techniques. Our empirical results on the widely used VidTIMIT and the mobile biometric (MOBIO) data sets portray the efficacy of the proposed frameworks and also certify the potential of these approaches in being used for real-world biometric recognition applications.

  15. Investigations of the Wideband Spectrum of Higher Order Modes Measured on TESLA-style Cavities at the FLASH Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Molloy, S.; Adolphsen, C.; Bane, K.; Frisch, J.; Li, Z.; May, J.; McCormick, D.; Smith, T.; Baboi, N.; Eddy, N.; Piccoli, L.; Rechenmacher, R.; Jones, R.; /Manchester U.

    2007-06-27

    Higher Order Modes (HOMs) excited by the passage of the beam through an accelerating cavity depend on the properties of both the cavity and the beam. It is possible, therefore, to draw conclusions on the inner geometry of the cavities based on observations of the properties of the HOM spectrum. A data acquisition system based on two 20 GS/s, 6 GHz scopes has been set up at the FLASH facility, DESY, in order to measure a significant fraction of the HOM spectrum predicted to be generated by the TESLA cavities used for the acceleration of its beam. The HOMs from a particular cavity at FLASH were measured under a range of known beam conditions. The dipole modes have been identified in the data. 3D simulations of different manufacturing errors have been made, and it has been shown that these simulations can predict the measured modes.

  16. Cavities

    MedlinePlus

    ... The tooth may hurt even without stimulation (spontaneous toothache). If irreversible damage to the pulp occurs and ... To detect cavities early, a dentist inquires about pain, examines the teeth, probes the teeth with dental instruments, and may take x-rays. People should ...

  17. CARE activities on superconducting RF cavities at INFN Milano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosotti, A.; Pierini, P.; Michelato, P.; Pagani, C.; Paparella, R.; Panzeri, N.; Monaco, L.; Paulon, R.; Novati, M.

    2005-09-01

    The SC RF group at INFN Milano-LASA is involved both in the TESLA/TTF collaboration and in the research and design activity on superconducting cavities for proton accelerators. Among these activities, some are supported by the European community within the CARE project. In the framework of the JRASRF collaboration we are developing a coaxial blade tuner for ILC (International Linear Collider) cavities, integrated with piezoelectric actuators for the compensation of the Lorenz force detuning and microphonics perturbation. Another activity, regarding the improved component design on SC technology, based on the information retrieving about the status of art on ancillaries and experience of various laboratories involved in SCRF, has started in our laboratory. Finally, in the framework of the HIPPI collaboration, we are testing two low beta superconducting cavities, built for the Italian TRASCO project, to verify the possibility to use them for pulsed operation. All these activities will be described here, together with the main results and the future perspectives.

  18. Mini-cavity plasma core reactors for dual-mode space nuclear power/propulsion systems. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, S.

    1976-01-01

    A mini-cavity plasma core reactor is investigated for potential use in a dual-mode space power and propulsion system. In the propulsive mode, hydrogen propellant is injected radially inward through the reactor solid regions and into the cavity. The propellant is heated by both solid driver fuel elements surrounding the cavity and uranium plasma before it is exhausted out the nozzle. The propellant only removes a fraction of the driver power, the remainder is transferred by a coolant fluid to a power conversion system, which incorporates a radiator for heat rejection. Neutronic feasibility of dual mode operation and smaller reactor sizes than those previously investigated are shown to be possible. A heat transfer analysis of one such reactor shows that the dual-mode concept is applicable when power generation mode thermal power levels are within the same order of magnitude as direct thrust mode thermal power levels.

  19. Use of a variable frequency source with a single-mode cavity to process ceramic filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, G.J.; Regan, A.H.; Rohlev, A.S.; Curtin, M.T.

    1995-09-01

    Rapid feedback control is needed for practical microwave processing of continuous ceramic oxide filaments to regulate the process temperature where the -dielectric properties of the filaments change rapidly with temperature. These dielectric changes can produce large rapid changes in the resonant frequency, the reflectivity, and the power density of the cavity. A broadband traveling wave tube (TWT) amplifier provides a highly versatile process control platform for filament processing. By comparing a RF signal from the cavity to a reference signal from the TWT, phase information can be used in a negative feedback loop to allow the oscillator to track the cavity frequency as it shifts due to the changing dielectric constant in the filaments being heated. By sampling the electric field level in the cavity with a detector, amplitude control can be done to maintain a constant absorbed power in a fiber tow, which is important for controlling the tow heating and temperature. This paper describes the design and testing of feedback controller with mullite rods in a single-mode TE{sub 10n} resonator driven by a commercial TWT.

  20. Non-Markovian dynamics of a single-mode cavity strongly coupled to an inhomogeneously broadened spin ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimer, Dmitry O.; Putz, Stefan; Majer, Johannes; Rotter, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    We study the dynamics of a spin ensemble strongly coupled to a single-mode resonator driven by external pulses. When the mean frequency of the spin ensemble is in resonance with the cavity mode, damped Rabi oscillations are found between the spin ensemble and the cavity mode which we describe very accurately, including the dephasing effect of the inhomogeneous spin broadening. We demonstrate that a precise knowledge of this broadening is crucial both for a qualitative and a quantitative understanding of the temporal spin-cavity dynamics. On this basis we show that coherent oscillations between the spin ensemble and the cavity can be enhanced by a few orders of magnitude, when driving the system with pulses that match special resonance conditions. Our theoretical approach is tested successfully with an experiment based on an ensemble of negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond strongly coupled to a superconducting coplanar single-mode waveguide resonator.

  1. A study on the high-order mode oscillation in a four-cavity intense relativistic klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ying-Hui; Niu, Xin-Jian; Jia, Nan; Li, Zheng-Hong; Wang, Hui; Cheng, Hui; Yang, Xiao-Chuan; Duan, Yaoyong

    2016-07-01

    The high-order mode oscillation is studied in designing a four-cavity intense relativistic klystron amplifier. The reason for the oscillation caused by high-order modes and a method to suppress these kinds of spurious modes are found through theoretical analyses and the study on the influence of major parameters of a high frequency structure (such as the oscillation frequency of cavities, the cavity Q value, the length of drift tube section, and the characteristic impedance). Based on much simulation, a four-cavity intense relativistic klystron amplifier with a superior performance has been designed, built, and tested. An output power of 2.22 GW corresponding to 27.4% efficiency and 61 dB gain has been obtained. Moreover, the high-order mode oscillation is suppressed effectively, and an output power of 1.95 GW corresponding to 26% efficiency and 62 dB gain has been obtained in our laboratory.

  2. Proposal for efficient mode converter based on cavity quantum electrodynamics dark mode in a semiconductor quantum dot coupled to a bimodal microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jiahua; Yu, Rong; Ma, Jinyong; Wu, Ying

    2014-10-28

    The ability to engineer and convert photons between different modes in a solid-state approach has extensive technological implications not only for classical communication systems but also for future quantum networks. In this paper, we put forward a scheme for coherent mode conversion of optical photons by utilizing the intermediate coupling between a single quantum dot and a bimodal photonic crystal microcavity via a waveguide. Here, one mode of the photonic crystal microcavity is coherently driven by an external single-frequency continuous-wave laser field and the two cavity modes are not coupled to each other due to their orthogonal polarizations. The undriven cavity mode is thus not directly coupled to the input driving laser and the only way it can get light is via the quantum dot. The influences of the system parameters on the photon-conversion efficiency are analyzed in detail in the limit of weak probe field and it is found that high photon-conversion efficiency can be achieved under appropriate conditions. It is shown that the cavity dark mode, which is a superposition of the two optical modes and is decoupled from the quantum dot, can appear in such a hybrid optical system. We discuss the properties of the dark mode and indicate that the formation of the dark mode enables the efficient transfer of optical fields between the two cavity modes.

  3. Large Area Superconducting TES Spiderweb Bolometer for Multi-mode Cavity Microwave Detect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biasotti, M.; Bagliani, D.; Corsini, D.; De Bernardis, P.; Gatti, F.; Gualtieri, R.; Lamagna, L.; Masi, S.; Pizzigoni, G.; Schillaci, A.

    2014-05-01

    For the cosmic microwave background, the increase of the sensitivity of present superconducting TES Spiderweb Bolometers can be done coupling them to a large set of modes of the EM radiation inside the cavity. This will require a proper shaping of the horn-cavity assembly for the focal plane of the microwave telescope and the use of large area bolometers. Large area spiderweb bolometers of 8 mm diameter and a mesh size of 250 μm are fabricated in order to couple with approximately the first 20 modes of the cavity at about 140 GHz. These bolometers are fabricated with micro machining techniques from silicon wafer covered with SiO2 - Si3N4 CVD thick films, 0.3 μm and 1 μm respectively. The sensor is a Ti/Au/Ti 3 layer TES sensor with Tc tuned in the 330-380 mK and 2 mK transition width. The TES is electronically coupled to the EM gold absorber that is grown on to the spiderweb mesh in order to sense the temperature of the electron gas heated by the EM radiation. The gold absorber mesh has 5 um beam size over a Si3N4 10 μm beam size supporting mesh. The Si3N4 mesh is then fully suspended by means of DRIE back etching of the Si substrate. Here we present the first results of these large area bolometers.

  4. 1000-1400-nm partially mode-locked pulse from a simple all-fiber cavity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoming; Xu, Yiqing; Wong, Kenneth K Y

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate a partially mode-locked pulse laser delivering ultra-wideband optical spectrum, i.e., 1000-1400 nm at 30 dB, from a simple all-fiber short cavity with all-normal dispersion. Examined by both real-time temporal and spectral analyzers, the partially mode-locked pulse exhibits double-scale noise-like characteristics-the fast L-shaped mode-locked pulse modulated by slow free-running Q-switched envelopes. Moreover, the statistical analysis as a function of its optical bandwidth shows that the spectral tuning does not compromise the temporal stability, but affects the pulsing periodicity. It is believed that the wide spectrum of knowledge obtained here would enrich the field of noise-like pulse, such as being beneficial to the rogue wave generation. PMID:26125353

  5. Transverse-mode dynamics in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with optical feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Torre, M.S.; Masoller, C.; Mandel, Paul

    2002-11-01

    We study the transverse-mode dynamics of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with weak optical feedback. We use a model that takes into account the spatial dependence of the transverse modes and of two carrier density profiles, associated with confined carriers in the quantum well region of the laser and unconfined carriers in the barrier region. Optical feedback is included as in the Lang-Kobayashi model. We find that for adequate parameter values antiphase dynamics occurs. As the injection current varies, the antiphase dynamics is destroyed through a sequence of periodic mixed states leading to in-phase dynamics. In these mixed states there are time intervals in which the modes are in phase, followed by time intervals in which they are in antiphase. We study the origin of the antiphase dynamics, assessing the role of the different spatial profiles. We show that the competition between the different profiles leads to the observed antiphase behavior.

  6. Mode switching in a multi-wavelength distributed feedback quantum cascade laser using an external micro-cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Sidler, Meinrad; Rauter, Patrick; Blanchard, Romain; Métivier, Pauline; Capasso, Federico; Mansuripur, Tobias S.; Wang, Christine; Huang, Yong; Ryou, Jae-Hyun; Dupuis, Russell D.; Faist, Jérôme

    2014-02-03

    We demonstrate a multi-wavelength distributed feedback (DFB) quantum cascade laser (QCL) operating in a lensless external micro-cavity and achieve switchable single-mode emission at three distinct wavelengths selected by the DFB grating, each with a side-mode suppression ratio larger than 30 dB. Discrete wavelength tuning is achieved by modulating the feedback experienced by each mode of the multi-wavelength DFB QCL, resulting from a variation of the external cavity length. This method also provides a post-fabrication control of the lasing modes to correct for fabrication inhomogeneities, in particular, related to the cleaved facets position.

  7. Generation and entanglement of multi-dimensional multi-mode coherent fields in cavity QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Y.

    2016-08-01

    We introduce generalized multi-mode superposition of multi-dimensional coherent field states and propose a generation scheme of such states in a cavity QED scenario. An appropriate encoding of information on these states is employed, which maps the states to the Hilbert space of some multi-qudit states. The entanglement of these states is characterized based on such proper encodings. A detailed study of entanglement in general multi-qudit coherent states is presented, and in addition to establishing some explicit expressions for quantifying entanglement of such systems, several important features of entanglement in these system states are exposed. Furthermore, the effects of both cavity decay and channel noise on these system states are studied and their properties are illustrated.

  8. Analysis of the hot-cavity mode composition of an X-band overmoded relativistic backward wave oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yuzhang; Zhang, Jun; Zhong, Huihuang; Zhang, Dian

    2016-07-01

    Overmoded RBWO (Relativistic Backward Wave Oscillators) is utilized more and more often for its high power capacity. However, both sides of SWS (Slow Wave Structure) of overmoded RBWO consist multi TM0n modes; in order to achieve the design of reflector, it is essential to make clear of the mode composition of TM0n. NUDT (National University of Defence Technology) had done research of the output mode composition in overmoded O-type Cerenkov HPM (High Power Microwave) Oscillators in detail, but in the area where the electron beam exists, the influence of electron beam must be taken into account. Hot-cavity dispersion equation is figured out in this article first, and then analyzes the hot-cavity mode composition of an X-band overmoded RBWO tentatively. The results show that in collimating hole, the hot-cavity mode analysis is more accurate.

  9. Mode confinement in photonic quasicrystal point-defect cavities for particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Gennaro, E.; Savo, S.; Andreone, A.; Galdi, V.; Castaldi, G.; Pierro, V.; Masullo, M. Rosaria

    2008-10-01

    In this letter, we present a study of the confinement properties of point-defect resonators in finite-size photonic-bandgap structures composed of aperiodic arrangements of dielectric rods, with special emphasis on their use for the design of cavities for particle accelerators. Specifically, for representative geometries, we study the properties of the fundamental mode (as a function of the filling fraction, structure size, and losses) via two-dimensional and three-dimensional full-wave numerical simulations, as well as microwave measurements at room temperature. Results indicate that for reduced-size structures, aperiodic geometries exhibit superior confinement properties by comparison with periodic ones.

  10. Large area TES spiderweb bolometer for multi-mode cavity microwave detect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biasotti, M.; Bagliani, D.; Ceriale, V.; Corsini, D.; De Bernardis, P.; Gatti, F.; Gualtieri, R.; Lamagna, L.; Masi, S.; Pizzigoni, G.; Schillaci, A.

    2014-07-01

    Large area spiderweb bolometers of 8 mm diameter and a mesh size of 250 μm are fabricated in order to couple with approximately the first 20 modes of a multimode EM cavity at about 140 GHz. The sensor is a Ti/Au/Ti 3 layer TES with Tc tuned in the 330-380 mK and 2 mK transition width. We describe the detector design and the fabrication process, early TES electro-thermal measurements. We also report optical coupling measurement and show the multimode coupling.

  11. Externally mode-matched cavity quantum electrodynamics with charge-tunable quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Rakher, M T; Stoltz, N G; Coldren, L A; Petroff, P M; Bouwmeester, D

    2009-03-01

    We present coherent reflection spectroscopy on a charge and dc Stark tunable quantum dot embedded in a high-quality and externally mode-matched microcavity. The addition of an exciton to a single-electron-charged quantum dot forms a trion that interacts with the microcavity just below the strong-coupling regime of cavity quantum electrodynamics. Such an integrated, monolithic system is a crucial step towards the implementation of scalable hybrid quantum-information schemes that are based on an efficient interaction between a single photon and a confined electron spin.

  12. Creation of four-mode weighted cluster states with atomic ensembles in high-Q ring cavities.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li-hui; Chen, Yan-qin; Li, Gao-xiang

    2012-01-30

    Two schemes for the preparation of weighted continuous variable cluster states with four atomic ensembles are proposed. In the first scheme, the four separated atomic ensembles inside a two-mode ring cavity are driven by pulse laser fields. The basic idea of the scheme is to transfer the ensemble bosonic modes into suitable linear combinations that can be prepared in a pure cluster state by a sequential application of the laser pulses with the aid of the cavity dissipation. In the second one, we take two separate two-mode cavities, each containing two atomic ensembles. The distant cavities are coupled by dissipation in a cascade way. It has been found that the mixed cluster state can be produced. These schemes may contribute towards implementing continuous variable quantum computation, quantum communication and networking based on atomic ensembles.

  13. Extending the mode-hop-free tuning range of an external-cavity diode laser by synchronous tuning with mode matching.

    PubMed

    Gong, Hai; Liu, Zhigang; Zhou, Yangli; Zhang, Weibo

    2014-11-20

    We present an effective method to extend the mode-hop-free (MHF) tuning range of an external-cavity diode laser (ECDL) by synchronous tuning of the longitudinal modes of the external cavity and the internal cavity, with the mode also matched in the initial state. Both the principle of synchronous tuning and the condition of mode matching in a Littman-configuration ECDL are introduced. The necessary tuning parameters could simply be estimated by the output power curve of the tuning with a single photodiode. By using this tuning method, we increased the MHF tuning range of an ECDL with a nonoptimized reflector pivot position from several gigahertzes to over 78 GHz around 774.5 nm. The tuning performance of the ECDL could meet the requirement of frequency scanned interferometry. PMID:25607863

  14. Direct measurement of optical force induced by near-field plasmonic cavity using dynamic mode AFM

    DOE PAGES

    Guan, Dongshi; Hang, Zhi Hong; Marset, Zsolt; Liu, Hui; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Chan, Ho Bun; Chan, C. T.; Tong, Penger

    2015-11-20

    Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention in recent years because of their potential applications in optical manipulation through near-field enhancement. Continuing experimental efforts have been made to develop accurate techniques to directly measure the near-field optical force induced by the plasmonic nanostructures in the visible frequency range. In this work, we report a new application of dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (DM-AFM) in the measurement of the enhanced optical force acting on a nano-structured plasmonic resonant cavity. The plasmonic cavity is made of an upper gold-coated glass sphere and a lower quartz substrate patterned with an array of subwavelength goldmore » disks. In the near-field when the sphere is positioned close to the disk array, plasmonic resonance is excited in the cavity and the induced force by a 1550 nm infrared laser is found to be increased by an order of magnitude compared with the photon pressure generated by the same laser light. Lastly, the experiment demonstrates that DM-AFM is a powerful tool for the study of light induced forces and their enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures.« less

  15. Direct measurement of optical force induced by near-field plasmonic cavity using dynamic mode AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Dongshi; Hang, Zhi Hong; Marset, Zsolt; Liu, Hui; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Chan, Ho Bun; Chan, C. T.; Tong, Penger

    2015-11-20

    Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention in recent years because of their potential applications in optical manipulation through near-field enhancement. Continuing experimental efforts have been made to develop accurate techniques to directly measure the near-field optical force induced by the plasmonic nanostructures in the visible frequency range. In this work, we report a new application of dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (DM-AFM) in the measurement of the enhanced optical force acting on a nano-structured plasmonic resonant cavity. The plasmonic cavity is made of an upper gold-coated glass sphere and a lower quartz substrate patterned with an array of subwavelength gold disks. In the near-field when the sphere is positioned close to the disk array, plasmonic resonance is excited in the cavity and the induced force by a 1550 nm infrared laser is found to be increased by an order of magnitude compared with the photon pressure generated by the same laser light. Lastly, the experiment demonstrates that DM-AFM is a powerful tool for the study of light induced forces and their enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures.

  16. Direct Measurement of Optical Force Induced by Near-Field Plasmonic Cavity Using Dynamic Mode AFM

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Dongshi; Hang, Zhi Hong; Marcet, Zsolt; Liu, Hui; Kravchenko, I. I.; Chan, C. T.; Chan, H. B.; Tong, Penger

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention in recent years because of their potential applications in optical manipulation through near-field enhancement. Continuing experimental efforts have been made to develop accurate techniques to directly measure the near-field optical force induced by the plasmonic nanostructures in the visible frequency range. In this work, we report a new application of dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (DM-AFM) in the measurement of the enhanced optical force acting on a nano-structured plasmonic resonant cavity. The plasmonic cavity is made of an upper gold-coated glass sphere and a lower quartz substrate patterned with an array of subwavelength gold disks. In the near-field when the sphere is positioned close to the disk array, plasmonic resonance is excited in the cavity and the induced force by a 1550 nm infrared laser is found to be increased by an order of magnitude compared with the photon pressure generated by the same laser light. The experiment demonstrates that DM-AFM is a powerful tool for the study of light induced forces and their enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures. PMID:26586455

  17. Active Wavelength Control of an External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Tracy; Wysocki, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    We present an active wavelength control system for grating-based external cavity lasers that increases the accuracy of predicting the lasing wavelength based on the grating equation and significantly improves scan-to-scan wavelength/frequency repeatability. The ultimate 3σ precision of a frequency scan is determined by the scan-to-scan repeatability of 0.042 cm−1. Since this control method can be applied to any external cavity laser with little to no modification, such a precision provides an excellent opportunity for spectroscopic applications that target molecular absorption lines at standard atmospheric conditions. PMID:23483850

  18. High gain selective amplification in whispering gallery mode resonators: analysis by cavity ring down method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Féron, P.; Rasoloniaina, A.; Huet, V.; Le Cren, E.; Trebaol, S.; Nunzi Conti, G.; Serier-Brault, H.; Mortier, M.; Dumeige, Y.

    2013-03-01

    We study both theoretically and experimentally the dispersive properties of single whispering gallery mode resonators. We present a simple experimental protocol which allows us to obtain in detail its coupling regime and thus their dispersive properties. We demonstrate a compact optical amplifier with a gain up to 20dB in an Erbium doped fluoride microsphere of 135μm in diameter coupled via a tapered fiber. The model is also applied to analyze the dynamic behavior of the modal coupling between two degenerate resonances of the same cavity. In particular, this can be used to describe the coupling of counterpropagating whispering gallery modes (WGM) by Rayleigh scattering. The theory is successfully compared to experiments carried out in silica microspheres

  19. Probing the fundamental limit of niobium in high radiofrequency fields by dual mode excitation in superconducting radiofrequency cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Eremeev, Grigory; Geng, Rongli; Palczewski, Ari

    2011-07-01

    We have studied thermal breakdown in several multicell superconducting radiofrequency cavity by simultaneous excitation of two TM{sub 010} passband modes. Unlike measurements done in the past, which indicated a clear thermal nature of the breakdown, our measurements present a more complex picture with interplay of both thermal and magnetic effects. JLab LG-1 that we studied was limited at 40.5 MV/m, corresponding to B{sub peak} = 173 mT, in 8{pi}/9 mode. Dual mode measurements on this quench indicate that this quench is not purely magnetic, and so we conclude that this field is not the fundamental limit in SRF cavities.

  20. Microwave band gap and cavity mode in spoof-insulator-spoof waveguide with multiscale structured surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiang; Xiao, Jun Jun; Han, Dezhuan; Qin, Fei Fei; Zhang, Xiao Ming; Yao, Yong

    2015-05-01

    We propose a multiscale spoof-insulator-spoof (SIS) waveguide by introducing periodic geometry modulation in the wavelength scale to a SIS waveguide made of a perfect electric conductor. The MSIS consists of multiple SIS subcells. The dispersion relationship of the fundamental guided mode of the spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SSPPs) is studied analytically within the small gap approximation. It is shown that the multiscale SIS possesses microwave band gap (MBG) due to the Bragg scattering. The ‘gap maps’ in the design parameter space are provided. We demonstrate that the geometry of the subcells can efficiently adjust the effective refraction index of the elementary SIS and therefore further control the width and the position of the MBG. The results are in good agreement with numerical calculations by the finite element method (FEM). For finite-sized MSIS of given geometry in the millimeter scale, FEM calculations show that the first-order symmetric SSPP mode has zero transmission in the MBG within frequency range from 4.29 to 5.1 GHz. A cavity mode is observed inside the gap at 4.58 GHz, which comes from a designer ‘point defect’ in the multiscale SIS waveguide. Furthermore, ultrathin MSIS waveguides are shown to have both symmetric and antisymmetric modes with their own MBGs, respectively. The deep-subwavelength confinement and the great degree of control of the propagation of SSPPs in such structures promise potential applications in miniaturized microwave device.

  1. Bistability characteristics of different types of optical modes amplified by quantum dot vertical cavity semiconductor optical amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qasaimeh, Omar

    2016-04-01

    We have studied the characteristics of optical bistability of different types of optical modes amplified by small-size quantum dot vertical cavity semiconductor optical amplifiers operated in reflection. Our analysis reveals that TE01 mode exhibits stronger intensity-dependent non-linearity in small radius devices, which results in stronger optical phase modulation and therefore larger hysteresis width compared with the other modes. The effect of the wavelength detuning of the input signal on the shape of the hysteresis loop is studied. We find that butterfly hysteresis loop exhibits the largest hysteresis width compared with clockwise and counterclockwise loops. Our analysis reveals that doping the quantum dots with p-type doping slightly reduces the hysteresis width while doping the dots with n-type doping clearly increases the hysteresis width for any wavelength detuning. We estimate that the hysteresis width of quantum dot active layer will exhibit higher hysteresis width compared with quantum well active layer having the same threshold gain.

  2. Quasinormal mode theory and design of on-chip single photon emitters in photonic crystal coupled-cavity waveguides.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, T; Ge, R-C; Kamandar Dezfouli, M; Badolato, A; Vamivakas, N; Hughes, S

    2016-06-13

    Using a quasinormal mode (QNM) theory for open cavity systems, we present detailed calculations and designs of a photonic crystal nanocavity (PCN) side-coupled to a photonic crystal waveguide (PCW) for on-chip single photon source applications. We investigate various cavity-waveguide geometries using an L3 PCN coupled to a W1 PCW, obtaining the quality factors, effective mode volumes, and single photon Purcell factors of the complete loaded cavity-waveguide system as a function of spatial separation between the two. We also show that the quality factor does not monotonically increase with increasing separation between the PCN and PCW, and we identify a particular hole/defect which acts as the key structural parameter in the cavity-waveguide coupling.

  3. Higher order mode damping in a five-cell superconducting rf cavity with a photonic band gap coupler cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenyev, Sergey A.; Temkin, Richard J.; Shchegolkov, Dmitry Yu.; Simakov, Evgenya I.; Boulware, Chase H.; Grimm, Terry L.; Rogacki, Adam R.

    2016-08-01

    We present a study of higher order mode (HOM) damping in the first multicell superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavity with a photonic band gap (PBG) coupler cell. Achieving higher average beam currents is particularly desirable for future light sources and particle colliders based on SRF energy-recovery linacs (ERLs). Beam current in ERLs is limited by the beam breakup instability, caused by parasitic HOMs interacting with the beam in accelerating cavities. A PBG cell incorporated in an accelerating cavity can reduce the negative effect of HOMs by providing a frequency selective damping mechanism, thus allowing significantly higher beam currents. The five-cell cavity with a PBG cell was designed and optimized for HOM damping. Monopole and dipole HOMs were simulated. The SRF cavity was fabricated and tuned. External quality factors for some HOMs were measured in a cold test. The measurements agreed well with the simulations.

  4. Stability and astigmatic compensation analysis of five- and six- or seven-mirror cavities for mode-locked dye lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Cojocaru, E.; Julea, T.; Herisanu, N.

    1989-07-01

    An analysis of the stability and astigmatic compensation of five- and six- or seven-mirror cavities for mode-locked dye lasers and simple relations for the folding angle to get a maximum stability region are given in this paper. Analytical relations referring to equivalent resonators are deduced. We draw attention to the lack of opportunity to use long cavity approximation to obtain stability diagrams and made some considerations on beam waist sizes.

  5. Measurement of the high-field Q drop in the TM010 and TE011 modes in a niobium cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Gianluigi Ciovati; Peter Kneisel

    2006-04-01

    In the last few years superconducting radio-frequency (rf) cavities made of high-purity (residual resistivity ratio>200) niobium achieved accelerating gradients close to the theoretical limits. An obstacle towards achieving reproducibly higher fields is represented by ''anomalous'' losses causing a sharp degradation of the cavity quality factor when the peak surface magnetic field (Bp) is above about 90 mT, in the absence of field emission. This effect, called ''Q drop'' has been measured in many laboratories with single- and multicell cavities mainly in the gigahertz range. In addition, a low-temperature (100-140 C) ''in situ'' baking of the cavity was found to be beneficial in reducing the Q drop. In order to gain some understanding of the nature of these losses, a single-cell cavity has been tested in the TM010 and TE011 modes at 2 K. The feature of the TE011 mode is to have zero electric field on the cavity surface, so that electric field effects can be excluded as a source for the Q drop. This article will present some of the experimental results for different cavity treatments and will compare them with existing models.

  6. Towards monolithic integration of mode-locked vertical cavity surface emitting laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldaz, Rafael I.

    2007-12-01

    The speed and performance of today's high end computing and communications systems have placed difficult but still feasible demands on off-chip electrical interconnects. However, future interconnect systems may need aggregate bandwidths well into the terahertz range thereby making electrical bandwidth, density, and power targets impossible to meet. Optical interconnects, and specifically compact semiconductor mode-locked lasers, could alleviate this problem by providing short pulses in time at 10s of GHz repetition rates for Optical Time Division Multiplexing (OTDM) and clock distribution applications. Furthermore, the characteristic spectral comb of frequencies of these lasers could also serve as a multi-wavelength source for Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) applications. A fully integrated mode-locked Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) is proposed as a low-cost high-speed source for these applications. The fundamental laser platform for such a device has been developed and a continuous-wave version of these lasers has been fabricated and demonstrated excellent results. Output powers close to 60mW have been obtained with very high beam quality factor of M2 < 1.07. The mode-locked laser utilizes a passive mode-locking region provided by a semiconductor saturable absorber integrated together with the gain region. Such an aggressive integration forces the resonant beam in the cavity to have the same area on the gain and absorber sections, placing high demands on the saturation fluence and absorption coefficient for the saturable absorber. Quantum Wells (QWs), excitons in QWs and Quantum Dots (QDs) have been investigated as possible saturable absorbers for the proposed device. QDs have been found to have the lowest saturation fluence and total absorption, necessary to meet the mode-locking requirements for this configuration. The need to further understand QDs as saturable absorbers has led to the development of a theoretical model on the dynamics of

  7. All fiber actively mode-locked fiber laser emitting cylindrical vector beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yong; Wang, Anting; Gu, Chun; Xu, Lixin; Zhan, Qiwen

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrated an all fiber actively mode-locked laser emitting cylindrical vector beam. A few-mode fiber Bragg grating is adopted to achieve mode selecting and spectrum filtering. An offset splicing of single-mode fiber with fourmode fiber is utilized as a mode coupler in the laser cavity. A LiNbO3 Mach-Zehnder modulator is used to achieve active mode locking in the laser. The laser operates at 1547nm with 30 dB spectrum width of 0.3nm. The emitted modelocked pulses have a duration of 1ns and repetition of 12.06MHz. Both radially and azimuthally polarized beams have been obtained with very good modal symmetry by adjusting the polarization in the laser cavity.

  8. Vertical cavity surface emitting laser based optoelectronic asynchronous transfer mode switch

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmsen, C.W.; Duan, C.; Collington, J.R.; Dames, M.P.; Crossland, W.A.

    1999-07-01

    Large broadband asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) switching nodes require novel hardware solutions that could benefit from the inclusion of optical interconnect technology, since electronic solutions are limited by pin out and by the capacitance/inductance of the interconnections. We propose, analyze and demonstrate a new three stage free space optical switch that utilizes vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) for the optical interconnections, a liquid crystal spatial light modulator (SLM) as a reconfigurable shutter and relatively simple optics for fan out and fan in. A custom complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) chip is required to introduce a time delay in the optical bit stream and to drive the VCSELs. Analysis shows that the switch should be scalable to 1024{times}1024, which would require 2048 {approximately}2 mW VCSELs. {copyright} {ital 1999 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.}

  9. Time-delay signatures in multi-transverse mode VCSELs subject to double-cavity polarization-rotated optical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hong; Khurram, Aliza; Hong, Yanhua

    2016-10-01

    Time delay (TD) signatures are studied experimentally in orthogonal polarizations and in individual transverse modes respectively in a VCSEL operating with three transverse modes. Different types of concealment of the TD signatures are observed when the polarization of feedback is rotated through large angles. Effects of feedback strength and external cavity length on the TD signatures are investigated. Weak feedback leads to better concealment of the TD signatures in the dominant polarization. When the round-trip time difference between the two external cavities is close to a half of the relaxation oscillation period, the TD signatures are minimized.

  10. Time-Gating Processes in Intra-Cavity Mode-Locking Devices Like Saturable Absorbers and Kerr Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Narasimha; Roychoudhuri, Chandrasekhar

    2010-01-01

    Photons are non-interacting entities. Light beams do not interfere by themselves. Light beams constituting different laser modes (frequencies) are not capable of re-arranging their energies from extended time-domain to ultra-short time-domain by themselves without the aid of light-matter interactions with suitable intra-cavity devices. In this paper we will discuss the time-gating properties of intra-cavity "mode-locking" devices that actually help generate a regular train of high energy wave packets.

  11. Hypnotic induction decreases anterior default mode activity.

    PubMed

    McGeown, William J; Mazzoni, Giuliana; Venneri, Annalena; Kirsch, Irving

    2009-12-01

    The 'default mode' network refers to cortical areas that are active in the absence of goal-directed activity. In previous studies, decreased activity in the 'default mode' has always been associated with increased activation in task-relevant areas. We show that the induction of hypnosis can reduce anterior default mode activity during rest without increasing activity in other cortical regions. We assessed brain activation patterns of high and low suggestible people while resting in the fMRI scanner and while engaged in visual tasks, in and out of hypnosis. High suggestible participants in hypnosis showed decreased brain activity in the anterior parts of the default mode circuit. In low suggestible people, hypnotic induction produced no detectable changes in these regions, but instead deactivated areas involved in alertness. The findings indicate that hypnotic induction creates a distinctive and unique pattern of brain activation in highly suggestible subjects. PMID:19782614

  12. Failure mode analysis of degraded InGaAs-AlGaAs strained quantum well multi-mode vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sin, Yongkun; Lingley, Zachary; Brodie, Miles; Huang, Michael; Bushmaker, Adam; Theiss, Jesse; Presser, Nathan; Foran, Brendan; Moss, Steven C.

    2016-03-01

    Remarkable progress made in vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) emitting at 850 and 980 nm has led them to find an increasing number of applications in high speed data communications as well as in potential space satellite systems. However, little has been reported on reliability and failure modes of InGaAs VCSELs emitting at ~980 nm although it is crucial to understand failure modes and underlying degradation mechanisms in developing these VCSELs that exceed lifetime requirements for space missions. The active layer of commercial VCSELs that we studied consisted of two or three InGaAs quantum wells. The laser structures were fabricated into deep mesas followed by a steam oxidation process to form oxide-apertures for current and optical confinements. Our multi- mode VCSELs showed a laser threshold of ~ 0.5 mA at RT. Failures were generated via accelerated life-testing of VCSELs. For the present study, we report on failure mode analysis of degraded oxide-VCSELs using various techniques. We employed nondestructive techniques including electroluminescence (EL), optical beam induced current (OBIC), and electron beam induced current (EBIC) techniques as well as destructive techniques including focused ion beam (FIB) and high-resolution TEM techniques to study VCSELs that showed different degradation behaviors. Especially, we employed FIB systems to locally remove a portion of top-DBR mirrors of degraded VCSELs, which made it possible for our subsequent EBIC and OBIC techniques to locate damaged areas that were generated as a result of degradation processes and also for our HR-TEM technique to prepare TEM cross sections from damaged areas. Our nondestructive and destructive physical analysis results are reported including defect and structural analysis results from pre-aged VCSELs as well as from degraded VCSELs life-tested under different test conditions.

  13. Dissipative soliton in actively mode-locked fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruixin; Dai, Yitang; Yan, Li; Wu, Jian; Xu, Kun; Li, Yan; Lin, Jintong

    2012-03-12

    A dissipative soliton in an all-normal-dispersion actively mode-locked ytterbium-doped fiber laser is reported for the first time. Pulses with 10-ps duration and edge-to-edge bandwidth of 9 nm are generated, and then extra-cavity compressed down to 560 fs due to the large chirp. Widely wavelength tuning between 1031 and 1080 nm is achieved by adjusting the driving frequency only. Our simulation shows that the proposed laser operates in the dissipative soliton shaping regime.

  14. Coexistence of Scattering Enhancement and Suppression by Plasmonic Cavity Modes in Loaded Dimer Gap-Antennas

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Xiao, Jun-Jun; Li, Meili; Han, Dezhuan; Gao, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic nanoantenna is of promising applications in optical sensing and detection, enhancement of optical nonlinear effect, surface optical spectroscopy, photoemission, etc. Here we show that in a carefully-designed dimer gap-antenna made by two metallic nanorods, the longitudinal plasmon antenna mode (AM) of bonding dipoles can compete with the transverse plasmonic cavity modes (CMs), yielding dramatically enhanced or suppressed scattering efficiency, depending on the CMs symmetry characteristics. More specifically, it is demonstrated that an appropriately loaded gap layer enables substantial excitation of toroidal moment and its strong interaction with the AM dipole moment, resulting in Fano- or electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT)-like profile in the scattering spectrum. However, for CMs with nonzero azimuthal number, the spectrum features a cumulative signature of the respective AM and CM resonances. We supply both detailed near-field and far-field analysis, showing that the modal overlap and phase relationship between the fundamental moments of different order play a crucial role. Finally, we show that the resonance bands of the AM and CMs can be tuned by adjusting the geometry parameters and the permittivity of the load. Our results may be useful in plasmonic cloaking, spin-polarized directional light emission, ultra-sensitive optical sensing, and plasmon-mediated photoluminescence. PMID:26611726

  15. Coexistence of Scattering Enhancement and Suppression by Plasmonic Cavity Modes in Loaded Dimer Gap-Antennas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Xiao, Jun-Jun; Li, Meili; Han, Dezhuan; Gao, Lei

    2015-11-27

    Plasmonic nanoantenna is of promising applications in optical sensing and detection, enhancement of optical nonlinear effect, surface optical spectroscopy, photoemission, etc. Here we show that in a carefully-designed dimer gap-antenna made by two metallic nanorods, the longitudinal plasmon antenna mode (AM) of bonding dipoles can compete with the transverse plasmonic cavity modes (CMs), yielding dramatically enhanced or suppressed scattering efficiency, depending on the CMs symmetry characteristics. More specifically, it is demonstrated that an appropriately loaded gap layer enables substantial excitation of toroidal moment and its strong interaction with the AM dipole moment, resulting in Fano- or electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT)-like profile in the scattering spectrum. However, for CMs with nonzero azimuthal number, the spectrum features a cumulative signature of the respective AM and CM resonances. We supply both detailed near-field and far-field analysis, showing that the modal overlap and phase relationship between the fundamental moments of different order play a crucial role. Finally, we show that the resonance bands of the AM and CMs can be tuned by adjusting the geometry parameters and the permittivity of the load. Our results may be useful in plasmonic cloaking, spin-polarized directional light emission, ultra-sensitive optical sensing, and plasmon-mediated photoluminescence.

  16. Coexistence of Scattering Enhancement and Suppression by Plasmonic Cavity Modes in Loaded Dimer Gap-Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiang; Xiao, Jun-Jun; Li, Meili; Han, Dezhuan; Gao, Lei

    2015-11-01

    Plasmonic nanoantenna is of promising applications in optical sensing and detection, enhancement of optical nonlinear effect, surface optical spectroscopy, photoemission, etc. Here we show that in a carefully-designed dimer gap-antenna made by two metallic nanorods, the longitudinal plasmon antenna mode (AM) of bonding dipoles can compete with the transverse plasmonic cavity modes (CMs), yielding dramatically enhanced or suppressed scattering efficiency, depending on the CMs symmetry characteristics. More specifically, it is demonstrated that an appropriately loaded gap layer enables substantial excitation of toroidal moment and its strong interaction with the AM dipole moment, resulting in Fano- or electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT)-like profile in the scattering spectrum. However, for CMs with nonzero azimuthal number, the spectrum features a cumulative signature of the respective AM and CM resonances. We supply both detailed near-field and far-field analysis, showing that the modal overlap and phase relationship between the fundamental moments of different order play a crucial role. Finally, we show that the resonance bands of the AM and CMs can be tuned by adjusting the geometry parameters and the permittivity of the load. Our results may be useful in plasmonic cloaking, spin-polarized directional light emission, ultra-sensitive optical sensing, and plasmon-mediated photoluminescence.

  17. Semianalytical quasi-normal mode theory for the local density of states in coupled photonic crystal cavity-waveguide structures.

    PubMed

    de Lasson, Jakob Rosenkrantz; Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Mørk, Jesper; Gregersen, Niels

    2015-12-15

    We present and validate a semianalytical quasi-normal mode (QNM) theory for the local density of states (LDOS) in coupled photonic crystal (PhC) cavity-waveguide structures. By means of an expansion of the Green's function on one or a few QNMs, a closed-form expression for the LDOS is obtained, and for two types of two-dimensional PhCs, with one and two cavities side-coupled to an extended waveguide, the theory is validated against numerically exact computations. For the single cavity, a slightly asymmetric spectrum is found, which the QNM theory reproduces, and for two cavities, a nontrivial spectrum with a peak and a dip is found, which is reproduced only when including both the two relevant QNMs in the theory. In both cases, we find relative errors below 1% in the bandwidth of interest.

  18. Suppression of Bragg scattering by collective interference of spatially ordered atoms with a high-Q cavity mode.

    PubMed

    Zippilli, Stefano; Morigi, Giovanna; Ritsch, Helmut

    2004-09-17

    When N driven atoms emit in phase into a high-Q cavity mode, the intracavity field generated by collective scattering interferes destructively with the pump driving the atoms. Hence atomic fluorescence is suppressed and cavity loss becomes the dominant decay channel for the whole ensemble. Microscopically, 3D light-intensity minima are formed in the vicinity of the atoms that prevent atomic excitation and form a regular lattice. The effect gets more pronounced for large atom numbers, when the sum of the atomic decay rates exceeds the rate of cavity losses and one would expect the opposite behavior. These results provide new insight into recent experiments on collective atomic dynamics in cavities. PMID:15447259

  19. Resonant modes of a bottle-shaped cavity and their effects in the response of finite and infinite gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depine, Ricardo A.; Skigin, Diana C.

    2000-04-01

    The resonant frequencies of a one-dimensional bottle-shaped cavity embedded in a ground plane are calculated using a modal approach for s and p polarizations. The same formalism is used to solve the problem of scattering from a surface with a finite number of cavities and from an infinite periodic grating. We show numerical results where the resonant behavior is evidenced as dips in the curve of intensity specularly reflected from a surface with one or several bottle-shaped grooves. The surface shape resonances of a single cavity are also shown to have a great influence on the efficiency distribution of the diffracted orders from infinite gratings made of bottle-shaped cavities. The excitation of even and odd modes is analyzed for both polarizations.

  20. Higher-order modes of storage ring rf cavities and their interaction with the beam at the Advanced Photon Source (APS)

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.J.; Harkay, K.C.; Kang, Y.W.

    1997-09-01

    The higher-order modes (HOMs) of APS storage ring (SR) rf cavities and waveguides were measured under various operating conditions. The HOMs of the 352-MHz rf cavity can be one of the major contributors to the coupled bunch (CB) instability. The distribution of HOMs under various conditions of beam current, cavity temperature, cavity tuning, single-bunch and multi-bunch operation, and fill patterns, are presented. The HOMs` shunt impedance of the loaded cavities were also measured. The effect of stagger tuning of the 16 cavities and their waveguide system is compared, and the HOM dampers are examined.

  1. Active control of multiple resistive wall modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Yadikin, D.; Gregoratto, D.; Paccagnella, R.; Liu, Y. Q.; Bolzonella, T.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.; Kuldkepp, M.; Manduchi, G.; Marchiori, G.; Marrelli, L.; Martin, P.; Menmuir, S.; Ortolani, S.; Rachlew, E.; Spizzo, G.; Zanca, P.

    2005-12-01

    A two-dimensional array of saddle coils at Mc poloidal and Nc toroidal positions is used on the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch (Brunsell P R et al 2001 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43 1457) to study active control of resistive wall modes (RWMs). Spontaneous growth of several RWMs with poloidal mode number m = 1 and different toroidal mode number n is observed experimentally, in agreement with linear MHD modelling. The measured plasma response to a controlled coil field and the plasma response computed using the linear circular cylinder MHD model are in quantitive agreement. Feedback control introduces a linear coupling of modes with toroidal mode numbers n, n' that fulfil the condition |n - n'| = Nc. Pairs of coupled unstable RWMs are present in feedback experiments with an array of Mc × Nc = 4 × 16 coils. Using intelligent shell feedback, the coupled modes are generally not controlled even though the field is suppressed at the active coils. A better suppression of coupled modes may be achieved in the case of rotating modes by using the mode control feedback scheme with individually set complex gains. In feedback with a larger array of Mc × Nc = 4 × 32 coils, the coupling effect largely disappears, and with this array, the main internal RWMs n = -11, -10, +5, +6 are all simultaneously suppressed throughout the discharge (7 8 wall times). With feedback there is a two-fold extension of the pulse length, compared to discharges without feedback.

  2. A non-uniform three-gap buncher cavity with suppression of transverse-electromagnetic mode leakage in the triaxial klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Zumin; Zhang, Jun Zhong, Huihuang; Zhu, Danni; Qiu, Yongfeng

    2014-01-15

    The triaxial klystron amplifier is an efficient high power relativistic klystron amplifier operating at high frequencies due to its coaxial structure with large radius. However, the coaxial structures result in coupling problems among the cavities as the TEM mode is not cut-off in the coaxial tube. Therefore, the suppression of the TEM mode leakage, especially the leakage from the buncher cavity to the input cavity, is crucial in the design of a triaxial klystron amplifier. In this paper, a non-uniform three-gap buncher cavity is proposed to suppress the TEM mode leakage. The cold cavity analysis shows that the non-uniform three-gap buncher cavity can significantly suppress the TEM mode generation compared to a uniform three-gap buncher cavity. Particle-in-cell simulation shows that the power leakage to the input cavity is less than 1.5‰ of the negative power in the buncher cavity and the buncher cavity can efficiently modulate an intense relativistic electron beam free of self-oscillations. A fundamental current modulation depth of 117% is achieved by employing the proposed non-uniform buncher cavity into an X-band triaxial amplifier, which results in the high efficiency generation of high power microwave.

  3. A non-uniform three-gap buncher cavity with suppression of transverse-electromagnetic mode leakage in the triaxial klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zumin; Zhang, Jun; Zhong, Huihuang; Zhu, Danni; Qiu, Yongfeng

    2014-01-01

    The triaxial klystron amplifier is an efficient high power relativistic klystron amplifier operating at high frequencies due to its coaxial structure with large radius. However, the coaxial structures result in coupling problems among the cavities as the TEM mode is not cut-off in the coaxial tube. Therefore, the suppression of the TEM mode leakage, especially the leakage from the buncher cavity to the input cavity, is crucial in the design of a triaxial klystron amplifier. In this paper, a non-uniform three-gap buncher cavity is proposed to suppress the TEM mode leakage. The cold cavity analysis shows that the non-uniform three-gap buncher cavity can significantly suppress the TEM mode generation compared to a uniform three-gap buncher cavity. Particle-in-cell simulation shows that the power leakage to the input cavity is less than 1.5‰ of the negative power in the buncher cavity and the buncher cavity can efficiently modulate an intense relativistic electron beam free of self-oscillations. A fundamental current modulation depth of 117% is achieved by employing the proposed non-uniform buncher cavity into an X-band triaxial amplifier, which results in the high efficiency generation of high power microwave.

  4. Active/passive mode-locked laser oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Fountain, William D.; Johnson, Bertram C.

    1977-01-01

    A Q-switched/mode-locked Nd:YAG laser oscillator employing simultaneous active (electro-optic) and passive (saturable absorber) loss modulation within the optical cavity is described. This "dual modulation" oscillator can produce transform-limited pulses of duration ranging from about 30 psec to about 5 nsec with greatly improved stability compared to other mode-locked systems. The pulses produced by this system lack intrapulse frequency or amplitude modulation, and hence are idealy suited for amplification to high energies and for other applications where well-defined pulses are required. Also, the pulses of this system have excellent interpulse characteristics, wherein the optical noise between the individual pulses of the pulse train has a power level well below the power of the peak pulse of the train.

  5. Raman-driven destabilization of mode-locked long cavity fiber lasers: fundamental limitations to energy scalability.

    PubMed

    Aguergaray, Claude; Runge, Antoine; Erkintalo, Miro; Broderick, Neil G R

    2013-08-01

    We report on the destabilization of the mode-locking operation of a long cavity fiber laser. We show that the destabilization is accompanied by the abrupt emergence of a strong frequency-downshifted Stokes signal, and simultaneously, we find that the laser output displays characteristics typical of noise-like pulses. We use numerical simulations to illustrate how the Stokes signal grows from stimulated Raman scattering and plays a key role in the destabilization of the laser output. Our results indicate that stimulated Raman scattering may impose an ultimate limit on the energy scalability via cavity lengthening. PMID:23903099

  6. Ultrafast pulse amplification in mode-locked vertical external-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Böttge, C. N. Hader, J.; Kilen, I.; Moloney, J. V.; Koch, S. W.

    2014-12-29

    A fully microscopic many-body Maxwell–semiconductor Bloch model is used to investigate the influence of the non-equilibrium carrier dynamics on the short-pulse amplification in mode-locked semiconductor microlaser systems. The numerical solution of the coupled equations allows for a self-consistent investigation of the light–matter coupling dynamics, the carrier kinetics in the saturable absorber and the multiple-quantum-well gain medium, as well as the modification of the light field through the pulse-induced optical polarization. The influence of the pulse-induced non-equilibrium modifications of the carrier distributions in the gain medium and the saturable absorber on the single-pulse amplification in the laser cavity is identified. It is shown that for the same structure, quantum wells, and gain bandwidth the non-equilibrium carrier dynamics lead to two preferred operation regimes: one with pulses in the (sub-)100 fs-regime and one with multi-picosecond pulses. The recovery time of the saturable absorber determines in which regime the device operates.

  7. Encoding a Qubit into a Cavity Mode in Circuit-QED using Phase Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terhal, Barbara; Weigand, Daniel

    Gottesman, Kitaev and Preskill have formulated a way of encoding a qubit into an oscillator such that the qubit is protected against small shifts (translations) in phase space. The idea underlying this encoding is that error processes of low rate can be expanded into small shift errors. The qubit space is defined as an eigenspace of two mutually commuting displacement operators which act as large shifts/translations in phase space. We propose and analyze the approximate creation of these qubit states by coupling the oscillator to a sequence of ancilla qubits realizing the protocol of approximate phase estimation for a displacement operator. We analyze the performance of repeated and adaptive phase estimation as the experimentally most viable schemes given a realistic upper limit on the number of photons in the oscillator. We propose a physical implementation of the protocol using the dispersive coupling between an ancilla transmon qubit and a cavity mode in circuit-QED. We estimate that in a current experimental set-up one can prepare a good code state from a squeezed vacuum state using 8 rounds of adaptive phase estimation lasting in total about 4 microsec., with at least 80

  8. Encoding a qubit into a cavity mode in circuit QED using phase estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terhal, B. M.; Weigand, D.

    2016-01-01

    Gottesman, Kitaev, and Preskill have formulated a way of encoding a qubit into an oscillator such that the qubit is protected against small shifts (translations) in phase space. The idea underlying this encoding is that error processes of low rate can be expanded into small shift errors. The qubit space is defined as an eigenspace of two mutually commuting displacement operators Sp and Sq which act as large shifts or translations in phase space. We propose and analyze the approximate creation of these qubit states by coupling the oscillator to a sequence of ancilla qubits. This preparation of the states uses the idea of phase estimation where the phase of the displacement operator, say Sp, is approximately determined. We consider several possible forms of phase estimation. We analyze the performance of repeated and adaptive phase estimation as the simplest and experimentally most viable schemes given a realistic upper limit on the number of photons in the oscillator. We propose a detailed physical implementation of this protocol using the dispersive coupling between a transmon ancilla qubit and a cavity mode in circuit QED. We provide an estimate that in a current experimental setup one can prepare a good code state from a squeezed vacuum state using eight rounds of adaptive phase estimation, lasting in total about 4 μ s , with 94 % (heralded) chance of success.

  9. Widely Tunable Mode-Hop-Free External-Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wysocki, Gerard; Curl, Robert F.; Tittel, Frank K.

    2010-01-01

    The external-cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL) system is based on an optical configuration of the Littrow type. It is a room-temperature, continuous wave, widely tunable, mode-hop-free, mid-infrared, EC-QCL spectroscopic source. It has a single-mode tuning range of 155 cm(exp -1) (approximately equal to 8% of the center wavelength) with a maximum power of 11.1 mW and 182 cm(exp -1) (approximately equal to 15% of the center wavelength), and a maximum power of 50 mW as demonstrated for 5.3 micron and 8.4 micron EC-QCLs, respectively. This technology is particularly suitable for high-resolution spectroscopic applications, multi-species tracegas detection, and spectroscopic measurements of broadband absorbers. Wavelength tuning of EC-QCL spectroscopic source can be implemented by varying three independent parameters of the laser: (1) the optical length of the gain medium (which, in this case, is equivalent to QCL injection current modulation), (2) the length of the EC (which can be independently varied in the Rice EC-QCL setup), and (3) the angle of beam incidence at the diffraction grating (frequency tuning related directly to angular dispersion of the grating). All three mechanisms of frequency tuning have been demonstrated and are required to obtain a true mode-hop-free laser frequency tuning. The precise frequency tuning characteristics of the EC-QCL output have been characterized using a variety of diagnostic tools available at Rice University (e.g., a monochromator, FTIR spectrometer, and a Fabry-Perot spectrometer). Spectroscopic results were compared with available databases (such as HITRAN, PNNL, EPA, and NIST). These enable precision verification of complete spectral parameters of the EC-QCL, such as wavelength, tuning range, tuning characteristics, and line width. The output power of the EC-QCL is determined by the performance of the QC laser chip, its operating conditions, and parameters of the QC laser cavity such as mirror reflectivity or intracavity

  10. Terahertz plasmon-polariton modes in graphene driven by electric field inside a Fabry-Pérot cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, C. X.; Li, L. L.; Zhang, C.; Xu, W.; Peeters, F. M.

    2015-06-14

    We present a theoretical study on plasmon-polariton modes in graphene placed inside an optical cavity and driven by a source-to-drain electric field. The electron velocity and electron temperature are determined by solving self-consistently the momentum- and energy-balance equations in which electron interactions with impurities, acoustic-, and optic-phonons are included. Based on many-body self-consistent field theory, we develop a tractable approach to study plasmon-polariton in an electron gas system. We find that when graphene is placed inside a Fabry-Pérot cavity, two branches of the plasmon-polariton modes can be observed and these modes are very much optic- or plasmon-like. The frequencies of these modes depend markedly on driving electric field especially at higher resonant frequency regime. Moreover, the plasmon-polariton frequency in graphene is in terahertz (THz) bandwidth and can be tuned by changing the cavity length, gate voltage, and driving electric field. This work is pertinent to the application of graphene-based structures as tunable THz plasmonic devices.

  11. Resonant cavity mode dependence of anomalous and inverse spin Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sang-Il; Seo, Min-Su; Park, Seung-young

    2014-05-07

    The direct current electric voltage induced by the Inverse Spin Hall Effect (ISHE) and Anomalous Hall Effect (AHE) was investigated in the TE{sub 011} and TE{sub 102} cavities. The ISHE and AHE components were distinguishable through the fitting of the voltage spectrum. The unwanted AHE was minimized by placing the DUT (Device Under Test) at the center of both the TE{sub 011} and TE{sub 102} cavities. The voltage of ISHE in the TE{sub 011} cavity was larger than that in the TE{sub 102} cavity due to the higher quality factor of the former. Despite optimized centering, AHE voltage from TE{sub 011} cavity was also higher. The reason was attributed to the E-field distribution inside the cavity. In the case of the TE{sub 011} cavity, the DUT was easily exposed to the E-field in all directions. Therefore, the parasitic AHE voltage in the TE{sub 102} cavity was less sensitive than that in the TE{sub 011} cavity to decentering problem.

  12. HIGH POWER TEST OF A 3.9 GHZ 5-CELL DEFLECTING-MODE CAVITY IN A CRYOGENIC OPERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Young-Min; Church, Michael

    2013-11-24

    A 3.9 GHz deflecting mode (S, TM110) cavity has been long used for six-dimensional phase-space beam manipulation tests [1-5] at the A0 Photo-Injector Lab (16 MeV) in Fermilab and their extended applications with vacuum cryomodules are currently planned at the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) user facility (> 50 MeV). Despite the successful test results, the cavity, however, demonstrated limited RF performance during liquid nitrogen (LN2) ambient operation that was inferior to theoretical prediction. We have been performing full analysis of the designed cavity by analytic calculation and comprehensive system simulation analysis to solve complex thermodynamics and mechanical stresses. The re-assembled cryomodule is currently under the test with a 50 kW klystron at the Fermilab A0 beamline, which will benchmark the modeling analysis. The test result will be used to design vacuum cryomodules for the 3.9 GHz deflecting mode cavity that will be employed at the ASTA facility for beam diagnostics and phase-space control.

  13. Dynamical Casimir effect for TE and TM modes in a resonant cavity bisected by a plasma sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Naylor, W.; Matsuki, S.; Kido, Y.; Nishimura, T.

    2009-10-15

    Parametric photon creation via the dynamical Casimir effect (DCE) is evaluated numerically, in a three-dimensional rectangular resonant cavity bisected by a semiconductor diaphragm (SD), which is irradiated by a pulsed laser with frequency of GHz order. The aim of this paper is to determine some of the optimum conditions required to detect DCE photons relevant to an experimental detection system. We expand upon the thin plasma sheet model [M. Crocce et al., Phys. Rev. A 70, 033811 (2004)] to estimate the number of photons for both transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) modes at any given SD position. Numerical calculations are performed considering up to 51 intermode couplings by varying the SD location, driving period and laser power without any perturbations. It is found that the number of photons created for TE modes strongly depends on SD position, where the strongest enhancement occurs at the midpoint (not near the cavity wall); while TM modes have weak dependence on SD position. Another important finding is the fact that significant photon production for TM{sub 111} modes still takes place at the midpoint even for a low-laser power of 0.01 {mu}J/pulse, although the number of TE{sub 111} photons decreases almost proportionately with laser power. We also find a relatively wide tuning range for both TE and TM modes that is correlated with the frequency variation in the instantaneous mode functions caused by the interaction between the cavity photons and conduction electrons in the SD excited by a pulsed laser.

  14. Wide single-mode tuning in quantum cascade lasers with asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometer type cavities with separately biased arms

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Mei C. Gmachl, Claire F.; Liu, Peter Q.; Wang, Xiaojun; Fan, Jen-Yu; Troccoli, Mariano

    2013-11-18

    We report on the experimental demonstration of a widely tunable single mode quantum cascade laser with Asymmetric Mach-Zehnder (AMZ) interferometer type cavities with separately biased arms. Current and, consequently, temperature tuning of the two arms of the AMZ type cavity resulted in a single mode tuning range of 20 cm{sup −1} at 80 K in continuous-wave mode operation, a ten-fold improvement from the lasers under a single bias current. In addition, we also observed a five fold increase in the tuning rate as compared to the AMZ cavities controlled by one bias current.

  15. Polarization-mode hopping in single-mode vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers: Theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Nagler, Bob; Peeters, Michael; Albert, Jan; Verschaffelt, Guy; Panajotov, Krassimir; Thienpont, Hugo; Veretennicoff, Irina; Danckaert, Jan; Barbay, Sylvain; Giacomelli, Giovanni; Marin, Francesco

    2003-07-01

    In this paper, we present a theoretical and experimental analysis of stochastic effects observed in polarization switching vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers. We make a thorough comparison between theoretical predictions and experiments, comparing measured quasipotentials and dwell times. The correspondence between our theoretical model based on stochastic intensity rate equations and the experiments is found to be very good.

  16. Use of a variable frequency source with a single-mode cavity to process ceramic filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, G.J.; Regan, A.H.; Rohlev, A.S.; Curtin, M.T.

    1995-05-01

    =Rapid feedback control is needed for practical microwave processing of continuous ceramic oxide filaments to regulate the process temperature where the dielectric properties of the filaments change rapidly with temperature. A broadband traveling wave tube (TWT) amplifier provides a highly versatile process control platform for filament processing. By comparing a rf signal from the cavity to a reference signal from the TWT, phase information can be used in a negative feedback loop to allow the oscillator to track the cavity frequency as it shifts due to the changing dielectric constant in the filaments being heated. By sampling the field level in the cavity with a detector, amplitude control can be done to maintain a consistent electric field level in the cavity, which is important for controlling the filament heating and temperature. The system design will be discussed along with application data for commercial ceramic samples.

  17. Microplasma mode transition and corresponding propagation characteristics controlled by manipulating electric field strength in a microchannel-cavity hybrid structure device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Ni, J. H.; Zhong, S.; Zhang, X.; Liang, Z.; Liu, C.; Park, S.-J.; Eden, J. G.

    2016-10-01

    Plasma redistribution in a symmetric microchannel-cavity hybrid structure device has been investigated by modulating the applied electric field strength. The device array has been operated in 200 Torr of argon, driven by a 20 kHz bipolar waveform. With the existence of the intervening microchannel between microcavities, several stable modes of operation of the microplasma have been observed, including cavity mode, hybrid mode and channel mode. Transition between the modes occurs with modulation of the applied voltage from 800 to 1100 V. The characteristics of microplasma propagation in different modes are investigated and the propagation speed along diagonal direction of the device in cavity mode, hybrid and channel mode are calculated to be ~48, ~29 and ~32 km s-1, respectively. Nonhomogeneous electric field strength distribution and plasma interaction have been discussed to explain these experimental results. Emission intensity and propagation speed differences in the cavity mode between the polarities of the applied voltage are interpreted through spatially resolved measurements of the emission profile in a partial channel-cavity array.

  18. RF-wave generation using external cavity laser diodes frequency-stabilized to single optical cavity by using orthogonal polarized modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehara, Tomoyuki; Hagiwara, Kohei; Tanigaki, Hidetoshi; Tsuji, Kenichiro; Onodera, Noriaki

    2014-03-01

    We propose a novel stabilization technique for two 1550-nm band external cavity laser diodes (ECLDs) used in optical generation of microwave and millimeter wave signals. Using FM sideband technique, those two ECLDs are simultaneously locked to two resonant modes of a single Fabry-Perot cavity. In the scheme, a new Υ-type optical configuration is used for simultaneous phase modulation of orthogonally polarized two wavelengths transmitted through slow and fast axis of polarization maintaining fiber. The Υ-type optical configuration, which consists of a phase modulator and a Faraday rotator mirror combined with an optical circulator, is a simple and compact apparatus to achieve double-pass phase modulation with the same modulation index . In this paper, we show the results of frequency stabilization of two ECLDs using Υ-type configuration, and compare with the results obtained in conventional non-Υ-type configuration. Short-term stability of 200 kHz at an averaging of 10 ms is achieved in the simple Υ-type configuration.

  19. Nonclassical Correlation Dynamics in a System of Mesoscopic Josephson Junction Coupled to Single-mode Optical Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Shao-Hua; Zhao, Yu-Jing; Zhu, Xi-Xiang; Song, Ke-Hui

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the time evolutions of the continuous-variable entanglement and Gaussian quantum discord in a system consisting of a mesoscopic Josephson junction coupled to a single-mode optical cavity field. We can obtain the time-dependent covariance matrix using known symplectic operation and local canonical transformations. We compare the dynamics of Gaussian quantum discord with that of entanglement. It is shown that the entanglement dynamics of two-mode squeezed thermal state is richer and undergoes three different features: periodical oscillation, sudden death and revival, and no-creation of entanglement, conditioned on the average number of thermal photons in each mode, whereas the Gaussian quantum discord can only exhibit a periodical oscillation behavior during the evolution.

  20. Single-mode, narrow-linewidth external cavity quantum cascade laser through optical feedback from a partial-reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Cendejas, Richard A.; Phillips, Mark C.; Myers, Tanya L.; Taubman, Matthew S.

    2010-11-30

    An external-cavity (EC) quantum cascade (QC) laser using optical feedback from a partial-reflector is reported. With this configuration, the otherwise multi-mode emission of a Fabry-Perot QC laser was made single-mode with optical output powers exceeding 40 mW. A mode-hop free tuning range of 2.46 cm-1 was achieved by synchronously tuning the EC length and QC laser current. The linewidth of the partial-reflector EC-QC laser was measured for integration times from 100 μs to 4 s, and compared to a distributed feedback QC laser. Linewidths as small as 480 kHz were recorded for the EC-QC laser

  1. Single-mode, narrow-linewidth external cavity quantum cascade laser through optical feedback from a partial-reflector.

    PubMed

    Cendejas, Richard A; Phillips, Mark C; Myers, Tanya L; Taubman, Matthew S

    2010-12-01

    An external-cavity (EC) quantum cascade (QC) laser using optical feedback from a partial-reflector is reported. With this configuration, the otherwise multi-mode emission of a Fabry-Perot QC laser was made single-mode with optical output powers exceeding 40 mW. A mode-hop free tuning range of 2.46 cm(-1) was achieved by synchronously tuning the EC length and QC laser current. The linewidth of the partial-reflector EC-QC laser was measured for integration times from 100 μs to 4 seconds, and compared to a distributed feedback QC laser. Linewidths as small as 480 kHz were recorded for the EC-QC laser.

  2. Resolution study of higher-order-mode-based beam position diagnostics using custom-built electronics in strongly coupled 3.9-GHz multi-cavity accelerating module

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, P.; Baboi, N.; Jones, R.M.; Eddy, N.

    2012-11-01

    Beam-excited higher order modes (HOMs) can provide remote diagnostics information of the beam position and cavity misalignment. In this paper we report on recent studies on the resolution with specially selected series of modes with custom-built electronics. This constitutes the first report of measurements of these cavities in which we obtained a resolution of 20 micron in beam offset. Details of the setup of the electronics and HOM measurements are provided.

  3. Geometric phase and o-mode blueshift in a chiral anisotropic medium inside a Fabry-Pérot cavity.

    PubMed

    Timofeev, Ivan V; Gunyakov, Vladimir A; Sutormin, Vitaly S; Myslivets, Sergey A; Arkhipkin, Vasily G; Vetrov, Stepan Ya; Lee, Wei; Zyryanov, Victor Ya

    2015-11-01

    Anomalous spectral shift of transmission peaks is observed in a Fabry-Pérot cavity filled with a chiral anisotropic medium. The effective refractive index value resides out of the interval between the ordinary and the extraordinary refractive indices. The spectral shift is explained by contribution of a geometric phase. The problem is solved analytically using the approximate Jones matrix method, numerically using the accurate Berreman method, and geometrically using the generalized Mauguin-Poincaré rolling cone method. The o-mode blueshift is measured for a 4-methoxybenzylidene-4'-n-butylaniline twisted-nematic layer inside the Fabry-Pérot cavity. The twist is electrically induced due to the homeoplanar-twisted configuration transition in an ionic-surfactant-doped liquid crystal layer. Experimental evidence confirms the validity of the theoretical model.

  4. Radio frequency accelerating cavity having slotted irises for damping certain electromagnetic modes

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, R.B.

    1991-05-21

    An accelerating cavity is disclosed having one or more iris structures mounted therein for strongly damping unwanted frequencies that are generated in the cavity by bunches of particles in a particle beam that is accelerated through the cavity during its operation. Each of the iris structures is characterized by containing a plurality of radial slots therein that extend from the central aperture through the iris member to the perimeter thereof. The outer end of each of the radial slots includes an enlarged portion that is effective to prevent undesired frequencies from being reflected back into the center aperture of the iris member. Waveguide means connect the outer ends of the radial slots to frequency damping means or to a dump or dumps. 17 figures.

  5. Radio frequency accelerating cavity having slotted irises for damping certain electromagnetic modes

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, Robert B.

    1991-01-01

    An accelerating cavity having one or more iris structures mounted therein for strongly damping unwanted frequencies that are generated in the cavity by bunches of particles in a particle beam that is accelerated through the cavity during its operation. Each of the iris structures is characterized by containing a plurality of radial slots therein that extend from the central aperture through the iris member to the perimeter thereof. The outer end of each of the radial slots includes an enlarged portion that is effective to prevent undesired frequencies from being reflected back into the center aperture of the iris member. Waveguide means connect the outer ends of the radial slots to frequency damping means or to a dump or dumps.

  6. Use of a variable frequency source with a single-mode-cavity to process ceramic filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, G.T.; Regan, A.H.; Rohlev, A.S.; Curtin, M.T.

    1995-12-31

    Rapid feedback control is needed for practical microwave processing of continuous ceramic oxide filaments to regulate the process temperature where the dielectric properties of the filaments change rapidly with temperature. A broadband traveling wave tube (TWT) amplifier provides a highly versatile process control platform for filament processing. By comparing a RF signal from the cavity to a reference signal from the TWT, phase information can be used in a negative feedback loop to allow the oscillator to track the cavity frequency as it shifts due to the changing dielectric constant in the filaments being heated. By sampling the electric field level in the cavity with a detector, amplitude control can be done to maintain a constant absorbed power in a fiber tow, which is important for controlling the tow heating and temperature. The system design will be discussed along with application data for commercial ceramic samples.

  7. A study of beam position diagnostics using beam-excited dipole modes in third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities at a free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pei; Baboi, Nicoleta; Jones, Roger M; Shinton, Ian R R; Flisgen, Thomas; Glock, Hans-Walter

    2012-08-01

    We investigate the feasibility of beam position diagnostics using higher order mode (HOM) signals excited by an electron beam in the third harmonic 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH. After careful theoretical and experimental assessment of the HOM spectrum, three modal choices have been narrowed down to fulfill different diagnostics requirements. These are localized dipole beam-pipe modes, trapped cavity modes from the fifth dipole band, and propagating modes from the first two dipole bands. These modes are treated with various data analysis techniques: modal identification, direct linear regression (DLR), and singular value decomposition (SVD). Promising options for beam diagnostics are found from all three modal choices. This constitutes the first prediction, subsequently confirmed by experiments, of trapped HOMs in third harmonic cavities, and also the first direct comparison of DLR and SVD in the analysis of HOM-based beam diagnostics.

  8. A study of beam position diagnostics using beam-excited dipole modes in third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities at a free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Pei; Baboi, Nicoleta; Jones, Roger M.; Shinton, Ian R. R.; Flisgen, Thomas; Glock, Hans-Walter

    2012-08-15

    We investigate the feasibility of beam position diagnostics using higher order mode (HOM) signals excited by an electron beam in the third harmonic 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH. After careful theoretical and experimental assessment of the HOM spectrum, three modal choices have been narrowed down to fulfill different diagnostics requirements. These are localized dipole beam-pipe modes, trapped cavity modes from the fifth dipole band, and propagating modes from the first two dipole bands. These modes are treated with various data analysis techniques: modal identification, direct linear regression (DLR), and singular value decomposition (SVD). Promising options for beam diagnostics are found from all three modal choices. This constitutes the first prediction, subsequently confirmed by experiments, of trapped HOMs in third harmonic cavities, and also the first direct comparison of DLR and SVD in the analysis of HOM-based beam diagnostics.

  9. Structural sensing of interior sound for active control of noise in structural-acoustic cavities.

    PubMed

    Bagha, Ashok K; Modak, S V

    2015-07-01

    This paper proposes a method for structural sensing of acoustic potential energy for active control of noise in a structural-acoustic cavity. The sensing strategy aims at global control and works with a fewer number of sensors. It is based on the established concept of radiation modes and hence does not add too many states to the order of the system. Acoustic potential energy is sensed using a combination of a Kalman filter and a frequency weighting filter with the structural response measurements as the inputs. The use of Kalman filter also makes the system robust against measurement noise. The formulation of the strategy is presented using finite element models of the system including that of sensors and actuators so that it can be easily applied to practical systems. The sensing strategy is numerically evaluated in the framework of Linear Quadratic Gaussian based feedback control of interior noise in a rectangular box cavity with a flexible plate with single and multiple pairs of piezoelectric sensor-actuator patches when broadband disturbances act on the plate. The performance is compared with an "acoustic filter" that models the complete transfer function from the structure to the acoustic domain. The sensing performance is also compared with a direct estimation strategy.

  10. Characteristics of the Single-Longitudinal-Mode Planar-Waveguide External Cavity Diode Laser at 1064 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji; Alalusi, Mazin; Stolpner, Lew; Margaritis, Georgios; Camp, Jordan B.; Krainak, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the characteristics of the planar-waveguide external cavity diode laser (PW-ECL). To the best of our knowledge, it is the first butterfly-packaged 1064-nm semiconductor laser that is stable enough to be locked to an external frequency reference. We evaluated its performance from the viewpoint of precision experiments. Especially, using a hyperfine absorption line of iodine, we suppressed its frequency noise by a factor of up to104 at 10 mHz. The PW-ECLs compactness and low cost make it a candidate to replace traditional Nd:YAGnon-planar ring oscillators and fiber lasers in applications which require a single longitudinal-mode.

  11. Characteristics of the Single-Longitudinal-Mode Planar-Waveguide External Cavity Diode Laser at 1064 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji; Alalusi, Mazin; Stolpner, Lew; Margaritis, Georgios; Camp, Jordan; Krainak, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We describe the characteristics of the planar-waveguide external cavity diode laser (PW-ECL). To the best of our knowledge, it is the first butterfly-packaged 1064 nm semiconductor laser that is stable enough to be locked to an external frequency reference. We evaluated its performance from the viewpoint of precision experiments. Using a hyperfine absorption line of iodine, we suppressed its frequency noise by a factor of up to 104 at 10 mHz. The PWECL's compactness and low cost make it a candidate to replace traditional Nd:YAG nonplanar ring oscillators and fiber lasers in applications that require a single longitudinal mode.

  12. Coupled-resonator vertical-cavity lasers with two active gain regions

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Arthur J.; Choquette, Kent D.; Chow, Weng W.

    2003-05-20

    A new class of coupled-resonator vertical-cavity semiconductor lasers has been developed. These lasers have multiple resonant cavities containing regions of active laser media, resulting in a multi-terminal laser component with a wide range of novel properties.

  13. Chaotic dynamics of mode competition in a vertical-cavity surface emitting laser diode under dc excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Richie, D.A.; Zhang, T.; Zachman, J.C.; Tabatabaie, N. . Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering); Choquette, K.D. ); Leibenguth, R.E. )

    1994-11-01

    The authors discuss the dynamics of transverse mode competition in an etched air-post vertical-cavity laser diode under dc excitation using an annular ring contact as a spatial filter. Distinct regions of operation are found for various ranges of fixed bias currents. At 1.5 times threshold, the device enters a region which exhibits chaotic fluctuations between the fundamental and a higher order lasing mode. The dynamics of these fluctuations are studied using the method of delays, and a calculation of the power spectrum and the correlation dimension are reported. It is found that the dynamics of the chaotic fluctuations have a correlation dimension of approximately 2.8. The results are indicative of a low-dimensional strange attractor underlying the modal competition noise.

  14. Widely tunable mode-hop free external cavity quantum cascade lasers for high resolution spectroscopy and chemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysocki, G.; Lewicki, R.; Curl, R. F.; Tittel, F. K.; Diehl, L.; Capasso, F.; Troccoli, M.; Hofler, G.; Bour, D.; Corzine, S.; Maulini, R.; Giovannini, M.; Faist, J.

    2008-09-01

    Recent progress in the development of room temperature, continuous wave, widely tunable, mode-hop-free mid-infrared external cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL) spectroscopic sources is reported. A single mode tuning range of 155 cm-1 (˜ 8% of the center wavelength) with a maximum power of 11.1 mW and 182 cm-1 (˜ 15% of the center wavelength) with a maximum power of 50 mW was obtained for 5.3 and 8.4 μm EC-QCLs respectively. This technology is particularly suitable for high resolution spectroscopic applications, multi species trace-gas detection and spectroscopic measurements of broadband absorbers. Several examples of spectroscopic measurements performed using EC-QCL based spectrometers are demonstrated.

  15. All-epitaxial, lithographically defined, current- and mode-confined vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser based on selective interfacial fermi-level pinning

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, J.; Lu, D.; Deppe, D.G.

    2005-01-10

    An approach is presented to fabricate a current- and mode-confined vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser that is all-epitaxial and lithographically defined. The device uses selective Fermi level pinning to self-align the electrical injection to a mode-confining intracavity phase-shifting mesa.

  16. Doubly active Q switching and mode locking of an all-fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Cuadrado-Laborde, Christian; Díez, Antonio; Cruz, Jose L; Andrés, Miguel V

    2009-09-15

    Simultaneous and independent active Q switching and active mode locking of an erbium-doped fiber laser is demonstrated using all-fiber modulation techniques. A magnetostrictive rod attached to the output fiber Bragg grating modulates the Q factor of the Fabry-Perot cavity, whereas active mode locking is achieved by amplitude modulation with a Bragg-grating-based acousto-optic device. Fully modulated Q-switched mode-locked trains of optical pulses were obtained for a wide range of pump powers and repetition rates. For a Q-switched repetition rate of 500 Hz and a pump power of 100 mW, the laser generates trains of 12-14 mode-locked pulses of about 1 ns each, within an envelope of 550 ns, an overall energy of 0.65 microJ, and a peak power higher than 250 W for the central pulses of the train.

  17. Fifty-ps Raman fiber laser with hybrid active-passive mode locking.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, A G; Kharenko, D S; Podivilov, E V; Babin, S A

    2016-07-25

    Actively mode locked Raman lasing in a ring PM-fiber cavity pumped by a linearly polarized Yb-doped fiber laser is studied. At co-propagating pumping, a stochastic pulse with duration defined by the AOM switching time (~15 ns) is generated with the round-trip period. At counter-propagating pumping, one or several sub-ns pulses (within the AOM switching envelope) are formed. It has been found that the formation of such stable multi-pulse structure is defined by the single-pulse energy limit (~20 nJ) set by the second-order Raman generation. Adding a NPE-based saturable absorber in the actively mode locked cavity, results in sufficient shortening of the generated pulses both in single- and multi-pulse regimes (down to 50 ps). A model is developed adequately describing the regimes. PMID:27464081

  18. Strong optomechanical coupling in a slotted photonic crystal nanobeam cavity with an ultrahigh quality factor-to-mode volume ratio.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Katharina; Seidler, Paul

    2016-06-27

    We describe the design, fabrication, and characterization of a one-dimensional silicon photonic crystal cavity in which a central slot is used to enhance the overlap between highly localized optical and mechanical modes. The optical mode has an extremely small mode volume of 0.017(λvac / n)3, and an optomechanical vacuum coupling rate of 310 kHz is measured for a mechanical mode at 2.69 GHz. With optical quality factors up to 1.2 × 105, fabricated devices are in the resolved-sideband regime. The electric field has its maximum at the slot wall and couples to the in-plane breathing motion of the slot. The optomechanical coupling is thus dominated by the moving-boundary effect, which we simulate to be six times greater than the photoelastic effect, in contrast to most structures, where the photoelastic effect is often the primary coupling mechanism. PMID:27410548

  19. Position-independent normal-mode splitting in cavities filled with zero-index metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hai-Tao; Xu, Xiao-Hu; Wang, Zi-Li; Li, Yun-Hui; Yi, Yasha; Chen, Hong

    2012-03-12

    We study the normal-mode splitting when an oscillator is placed in a two-dimensional photonic crystal microcavity embedded with an impedance-matched or an impedance-mismatched zero-index medium (ZIM). Because of the (nearly) uniform localized fields in the ZIM, the normal-mode splitting remains (almost) invariant no matter where the oscillator is. When a split ring resonator is coupled to a transmission-line- based effective ZIM at various locations, nearly position-independent mode splitting is observed. PMID:22418516

  20. Beam-induced wakefield observation in X -band choke-mode cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Hao; Jing, Chunguang; Qiu, Jiaqi; Wisniewski, Eric E.; Conde, Manoel; Power, John G.; Doran, Darrell S.; Liu, Wanming; Shi, Jiaru; Li, Chen; Gai, Wei; Chen, Huaibi

    2016-08-01

    The X -band choke-mode structure is currently being studied as an alternative design for the accelerating structure of the compact linear collider (CLIC) main linac. The geometry of the choke-mode structure is designed to ensure the strong suppression of the beam-induced long-range transverse wakefield and therefore maintain the stability and quality of the beam in the CLIC main linac. Experiments conducted at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Facility are presented in this study to verify the design of the wakefield suppressor. The beam-induced radio frequency (rf) signals in a three-cell choke-mode structure were measured, and measured results show good agreement with the simulation results. The measured results also show strong damping in high-order dipolar modes with a quality factor Q of 10 to 20. The difference between the frequencies of the first and second dipole modes is about 3 GHz, which validates the special design of the cancelling dipole modes at the time of the succeeding bunch (0.5 ns).

  1. Intrinsic Fabry-Pérot cavity sensor based on chemical etching of a multimode graded index fiber spliced to a single mode fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tafulo, Paula A. R.; Frazão, O.; Jorge, P. A. S.; Araújo, F. M.

    2010-09-01

    An intrinsic Fabry-Pérot cavity for high temperature and strain measurement is presented. The in-fibre cavity is formed by a chemical etched graded index optical fiber spliced to a single mode fiber. The intrinsic sensor obtained shows high sensitivity to strain (6.2 pm/μɛ) and rather low sensitivity to temperature (0.9 pm/°C), being suitable for applications as a strain gauge at high temperature.

  2. Comparing the antibacterial activity of gaseous ozone and chlorhexidine solution on a tooth cavity model

    PubMed Central

    Öztaş, Nurhan; Sümer, Zeynep

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the antibacterial activity of gaseous ozone and chlorhexidine solution on a tooth cavity model. Study Design: Twenty-one human molars were divided into 3 groups. Cavities were then cut into the teeth (4 per tooth, 28 cavities per group). After sterilization, the teeth were left in broth cultures of 106 colony-forming units (CFU) ml-1 of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) at 36°C for 48 h. The appropriate treatment followed (group A, control; group B, 2% chlorhexidine solution; and group C, 80s of treatment with ozone, and the cavities were then filled with composite resin. After 72h, the restorations were removed, dentin chips were collected with an excavator, and the total number of microorganisms was determined. Results: Both of the treatments significantly reduced the number of S. mutans present compared with the control group and there was a significant difference between the all groups in terms of the amount of the microorganisms grown (p < 0.05). Group B was beter than group C; and group C was better than group A. Moreover, it was found that the amount of the growth in the group of chlorhexidine was significantly less than that of the ozone group (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Chlorhexidine solution was the antibacterial treatment most efficacious on S. mutans; however, ozone application could be an anlternative cavity disinfection method because of ozone’s cavity disinfection activity. Key words:Antibacterial activity, chlorhexidine, ozone, streptococcus mutans, tooth cavity. PMID:24455068

  3. Generation of dissipative solitons in an actively mode-locked ultralong fibre laser

    SciTech Connect

    Koliada, N A; Nyushkov, B N; Ivanenko, A V; Kobtsev, Sergey M; Harper, Paul; Turitsyn, Sergei K; Denisov, Vladimir I; Pivtsov, V S

    2013-02-28

    A single-pulse actively mode-locked fibre laser with a cavity length exceeding 1 km has been developed and investigated for the first time. This all-fibre erbium-doped laser has a normal intracavity dispersion and generates dissipative 8-ns solitons with a fundamental repetition rate of 163.8 kHz; the energy per pulse reaches 34 nJ. The implemented mode locking, based on the use of intracavity intensity modulator, provides self-triggering and high stability of pulsed lasing. A possibility of continuous tuning of the centre lasing wavelength in the range of 1558 - 1560 nm without any tunable spectral selective elements in the cavity is demonstrated. The tuning occurs when controlling the modulation signal frequency due to the forced change in the pulse repetition time (group delay) under the conditions of intracavity chromatic dispersion. (laser optics 2012)

  4. Carbon nanotube mode-locked vertical external-cavity surface-emitting laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seger, K.; Meiser, N.; Choi, S. Y.; Jung, B. H.; Yeom, D.-I.; Rotermund, F.; Okhotnikov, O.; Laurell, F.; Pasiskevicius, V.

    2014-03-01

    Mode-locking an optically pumped semiconductor disk laser has been demonstrated using low-loss saturable absorption containing a mixture of single-walled carbon nanotubes in PMM polymer. The modulator was fabricated by a simple spin-coating technique on fused silica substrate and was operating in transmission. Stable passive fundamental modelocking was obtained at a repetition rate of 613 MHz with a pulse length of 1.23 ps. The mode-locked semiconductor disk laser in a compact geometry delivered a maximum average output power of 136 mW at 1074 nm.

  5. Highly efficient TEM00 mode LD-pumping 1063nm Nd:GdVO4 laser with short cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaojuan; Fu, Shenggui; Ge, Xiaolu; Yuan, Changkun

    2011-11-01

    A highly efficient TEM00 mode 1063 nm Nd:GdVO4 laser is accomplished with a simple plano-plano resonator. The laser threshold pump power is 856 mW. The maximum laser power of 2.05W is achieved when the pump power is 3.76 W, corresponding to a slope-efficiency of 70% to absorbed pump power. The quality of the output beam is analyzed with a laser beam quality analyzer. The perfect laser beam quality is partially attributed to the short cavity length of 11 mm and the precise temperature control to the Nd:GdVO4 crystal. The output laser central wavelength is 1063.1 nm with a laser linewidth of 0.06 nm.

  6. Mode-locked thulium-bismuth codoped fiber laser using graphene saturable absorber in ring cavity.

    PubMed

    Zen, D I M; Saidin, N; Damanhuri, S S A; Harun, S W; Ahmad, H; Ismail, M A; Dimyati, K; Halder, A; Paul, M C; Das, S; Pal, M; Bhadra, S K

    2013-02-20

    We demonstrate mode locking of a thulium-bismuth codoped fiber laser (TBFL) operating at 1901.6 nm, using a graphene-based saturable absorber (SA). In this work, a single layer graphene is mechanically exfoliated using the scotch tape method and directly transferred onto the surface of a fiber pigtail to fabricate the SA. The obtained Raman spectrum characteristic indicates that the graphene on the core surface has a single layer. At 1552 nm pump power of 869 mW, the mode-locked TBFL self starts to generate an optical pulse train with a repetition rate of 16.7 MHz and pulse width of 0.37 ps. This is a simple, low-cost, stable, and convenient laser oscillator for applications where eye-safe and low-photon-energy light sources are required, such as sensing and biomedical diagnostics.

  7. Room temperature, single mode emission from two-section coupled cavity InGaAs/AlGaAs/GaAs quantum cascade laser

    SciTech Connect

    Pierściński, K. Pierścińska, D.; Pluska, M.; Gutowski, P.; Sankowska, I.; Karbownik, P.; Czerwinski, A.; Bugajski, M.

    2015-10-07

    Room temperature, single mode, pulsed emission from two-section coupled cavity InGaAs/AlGaAs/GaAs quantum cascade laser fabricated by focused ion beam processing is demonstrated and analyzed. The single mode emission is centered at 1059.4 cm{sup −1} (9.44 μm). A side mode suppression ratio of 43 dB was achieved. The laser exhibits a peak output power of 15 mW per facet at room temperature. The stable, single mode emission is observed within temperature tuning range, exhibiting shift at rate of 0.59 nm/K.

  8. Broadband radiation modes: Estimation and active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2002-03-01

    In this paper we give a formulation of the most efficiently radiating vibration patterns of a vibrating body, the radiation modes, in the time domain. The radiation modes can be used to arrive at efficient weighting schemes for an array of sensors in order to reduce the controller dimensionality. Because these particular radiation modes are optimum in a broadband sense, they are termed broadband radiation modes. Methods are given to obtain these modes from measured data. The broadband radiation modes are used for the design of an actuator array in a feedback control system to reduce the sound power radiated from a plate. Three methods for the design of the actuator are compared, taking into account the reduction of radiated sound power in the controlled frequency range, but also the possible increase of radiated sound power in the uncontrolled frequency range.

  9. Retrieving the spatial distribution of cavity modes in dielectric resonators by near-field imaging and electrodynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Goñi, Alejandro R; Güell, Frank; Pérez, Luis A; López-Vidrier, Julian; Ossó, J Oriol; Coronado, Eduardo A; Morante, Joan R

    2012-03-01

    For good performance of photonic devices whose working principle is based on the enhancement of electromagnetic fields obtained by confining light into dielectric resonators with dimensions in the nanometre length scale, a detailed knowledge of the optical mode structure becomes essential. However, this information is usually lacking and can only be indirectly obtained by conventional spectroscopic techniques. Here we unraveled the influence of wire size, incident wavelength, degree of polarization and the presence of a substrate on the optical near fields generated by cavity modes of individual hexagonal ZnO nanowires by combining scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) with electrodynamics calculations within the discrete dipole approximation (DDA). The near-field patterns obtained with very high spatial resolution, better than 50 nm, exhibit striking size and spatial-dispersion effects, which are well accounted for within DDA, using a wavevector-dependent dipolar interaction and considering the dielectric anisotropy of ZnO. Our results show that both SNOM and DDA simulations are powerful tools for the design of optoelectronic devices able to manipulate light at the nanoscale.

  10. Graphene-Based Active Random Metamaterials for Cavity-Free Lasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marini, A.; García de Abajo, F. J.

    2016-05-01

    Manipulating and controlling the optical energy flow inside random media is a research frontier of photonics and the basis of novel laser designs. Here, we show that a metamaterial consisting of randomly dispersed graphene nanoflakes embedded within an optically pumped gain medium (rhodamine 6G) can operate as a cavity-free laser thanks to its extraordinarily low threshold for saturable absorption. The emitted light is self-organized into a well-determined spatial pattern, which depends on the graphene flake density and can be externally controlled through the optical pump. We provide different examples of tunable laser operation ranging from stable single-mode to chaoticlike behavior. Our metamaterial design holds great potential for the optical control of light amplification, as well as for the development of single-mode beam-engineered cavity-free lasers.

  11. Graphene-Based Active Random Metamaterials for Cavity-Free Lasing.

    PubMed

    Marini, A; García de Abajo, F J

    2016-05-27

    Manipulating and controlling the optical energy flow inside random media is a research frontier of photonics and the basis of novel laser designs. Here, we show that a metamaterial consisting of randomly dispersed graphene nanoflakes embedded within an optically pumped gain medium (rhodamine 6G) can operate as a cavity-free laser thanks to its extraordinarily low threshold for saturable absorption. The emitted light is self-organized into a well-determined spatial pattern, which depends on the graphene flake density and can be externally controlled through the optical pump. We provide different examples of tunable laser operation ranging from stable single-mode to chaoticlike behavior. Our metamaterial design holds great potential for the optical control of light amplification, as well as for the development of single-mode beam-engineered cavity-free lasers. PMID:27284672

  12. Lasing with well-defined cavity modes in dye-infiltrated silica inverse opals.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Yoshiaki; Ueno, Kosei; Juodkazis, Saulius; Mizeikis, Vygantas; Fujiwara, Hideki; Sasaki, Keiji; Misawa, Hiroaki

    2009-02-16

    Lasing in dye solution-embedded inverse silica opal structures was investigated. The opal films were prepared by sedimentation of polystyrene microspheres on a cover glass. The polystyrene structures were inverted using sol-gel infiltration of silica and subsequent removal of polystyrene. Photoluminescence of rhodamine (rhodamine B, 6G and sulfo-rhodamine 101) dye solutions embedded into the inverse silica opal structures exhibited clear signatures of the lasing via a distributed feedback (DFB) and gain modulation. The refractive index contrast between the dye and the inverse opal was small enough (approximately 0.03%) for the formation of refractive index coupling between the lasing modes. The lasing spectrum exhibited a highly regular periodic structure of modal peaks, rather than the chaotic superposition of peaks reported in previous studies. Lasing modes having a spectral width of about 0.25 nm and a free spectral range of about 0.75 nm appeared at the position of the maximum gain (the maximum fluorescence of the dye).

  13. Dual-wavelength filters based on two-dimensional photonic crystal degenerate modes with a ring dielectric rod inside the defect cavity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huizhen; Zhong, Ronghua; Wang, Xiulin; Huang, Xin

    2015-05-10

    A tunable dual-wavelength filter based on degenerate modes with a ring dielectric rod inside the single point defect cavity is proposed. The band structures and mode profiles are computed by the plane-wave expansion method. The normalized transmission spectra for this structure are investigated by using the two-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method. The two orthogonal output modes of the filter can be regarded as the combination of the original degenerate cavity modes and both excited due to the introduced perturbation rod. The influences of the perturbation rod on the localized modes, band separations, and the tuning ranges are all investigated and analyzed based on the perturbation theory. With the ring dielectric rod being introduced into the defect, a narrower wavelength bandwidth and a wider wavelength tuning range can be obtained, which are superior to that of the filter based on a cavity with a larger radius rod. Besides, the perturbation rod can also be used for splitting degenerate modes for multiwavelength filters. The proposed filter has a simple structure and may be potentially applied in various integrated circuits, such as multiwavelength filters.

  14. Transform-limited pulse generation in normal cavity dispersion erbium doped single-walled carbon nanotubes mode-locked fiber ring laser.

    PubMed

    Chernysheva, M A; Krylov, A A; Ogleznev, A A; Arutyunyan, N R; Pozharov, A S; Obraztsova, E D; Dianov, E M

    2012-10-01

    We demonstrate an erbium doped fiber ring laser mode-locked with a carboxymetylcellulose high-optical quality film with dispersed single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). The laser with large normal net cavity dispersion generates near bandwidth-limited picosecond inverse modified soliton pulses at 1.56 µm.

  15. Interaction of a single mode field cavity with the 1D XY model: Energy spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonchev, H.; Donkov, A. A.; Chamati, H.

    2016-02-01

    In this work we use the fundamental in quantum optics Jaynes-Cummings model to study the response of spin 1/2chain to a single mode of a laser light falling on one of the spins, a focused interaction model between the light and the spin chain. For the spin-spin interaction along the chain we use the XY model. We report here the exact analytical results, obtained with the help of a computer algebra system, for the energy spectrum in this model for chains of up to 4 spins with nearest neighbors interactions, either for open or cyclic chain configurations. Varying the sign and magnitude of the spin exchange coupling relative to the light-spin interaction we have investigated both cases of ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic spin chains.

  16. The self-started 10 GHz harmonic mode-locking of a hybrid weak-resonant-cavity laser diode and fiber ring link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chun-Ju; Chi, Yu-Chieh; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2013-06-01

    A self-started harmonic mode-locking of a hybrid weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diode and fiber ring link is demonstrated to serve as a pulsed optical for future 10 Gb s-1 RZ data transmission. Beginning with the optical injection-locking rate equation describing the optoelectronic oscillator structure, the pulsewidth formula in the active mode-locking theory is modified and illuminates the shortening of the pulsewidth as a function of the optical feedback ratio and the microwave power gain. The pulsewidth is narrower with the higher optical injection power and the higher microwave power gain because of the gain saturation of the laser diode and the increase of the modulation depth. The lowest jitter and pulsewidth of the pulse train are 0.9 ps and 20 ps, respectively. With the higher microwave power gain, the SNR and ER are improved up to 10.2 dB and 13.8 dB, respectively, due to the enhancement of the peak power and the elimination of the residual carrier. Under the optimized operation condition, the pulsed optical carrier can be externally encoded at 10 Gbit/s for RZ-OOK data transmission.

  17. Determining the average path length of amplified spontaneous emission in a four-level laser near the 1/3 mode-degeneracy cavity configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ching-Hsu; Lu, Ming-Lun; Tai, Po-Tse

    2015-08-01

    We determine the average path length ls of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) by comparing the numerical slope of a straight line with the experimental slope in the graph of the square of relaxation oscillation frequency versus normalized pump ratio. The simple method is applied in an end-pumped Nd:YVO4 laser with the 1/3 mode-degeneracy cavity having the transverse mode spacing equal to 1/3 of the longitudinal mode spacing. We find that ls is larger at the degeneracy than that far from the degeneracy. This result indicates the existence of stronger ASE at the degeneracy, which is confirmed below the threshold. This is because many spontaneous emission photons can undergo amplification not only before escaping from the gain medium but also after leaving the gain medium, owing to cavity reflection. Our method can be applied in the situations where the Auger upconversion effect is absent, weak, or well-known.

  18. Active mode-locking of mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers with short gain recovery time.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongrui; Belyanin, Alexey

    2015-02-23

    We investigate the dynamics of actively modulated mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) using space- and time-domain simulations of coupled density matrix and Maxwell equations with resonant tunneling current taken into account. We show that it is possible to achieve active mode locking and stable generation of picosecond pulses in high performance QCLs with a vertical laser transition and a short gain recovery time by bias modulation of a short section of a monolithic Fabry-Perot cavity. In fact, active mode locking in QCLs with a short gain recovery time turns out to be more robust to the variation of parameters as compared to previously studied lasers with a long gain recovery time. We investigate the effects of spatial hole burning and phase locking on the laser output.

  19. Self-mode-locked 2 μm Tm(3+)-doped double-clad fiber laser with a simple linear cavity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun; Luo, Zhengqian; Huang, Yizhong; Qu, Biao; Cheng, Huihui; Wang, Ying; Wu, Duanduan; Xu, Huiying; Cai, Zhiping

    2014-02-10

    We demonstrate the self-mode-locking operation of a thulium (Tm)-doped fiber laser (TDFL) with a simple linear cavity. Since the laser cavity does not include any specific mode-locker, we experimentally investigate and analyze the self-mode-locking mechanism. The mode-locking operation is attributed to the combination of the self-phase modulation effect and the weak saturable absorption of the high-concentration Tm-doped fiber. The mode-locked TDFL operates at a central wavelength of 1985.5 nm with the 3 dB spectral linewidth of 0.18 nm. The self-mode-locking generates a large pulse energy of 32.7 nJ with a pulsed repetition rate of 2.05 MHz and is stable with a radio-frequency signal-to-noise ratio of more than 54 dB. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first demonstration of a 2 μm Tm-doped fiber laser mode-locked by such technique.

  20. How tilting and cavity-mode-resonant absorption contribute to light harvesting in 3D radial junction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jiawen; Qian, Shengyi; Yu, Zhongwei; Misra, Soumyadeep; Yu, Linwei; Xu, Jun; Shi, Yi; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere; Chen, Kunji

    2015-09-21

    Radial junction (RJ) architecture has proven beneficial in boosting light harvesting and fast carrier separation in thin film solar cells. While a comprehensive understanding of the detailed absorption distribution and light incoupling mechanism within such a 3D RJ configuration remains largely unexplored. Taking hydrogenated amorphous Si (a-Si:H) RJ solar cells as an example, we here address in both experimental and theoretical manners the impacts of tilting and spacing configuration on the light absorption and external quantum efficiency (EQE) responses. A nice agreement between the calculated and experimental EQE responses indicates that the light harvesting realized within RJ thin film solar cells is quite robust against geometric variations and shadowing effects. Following the concepts of optical fiber injection, we have been able to single out the contribution arising solely from a resonant-mode-incoupling into the RJ cavities against a sidewall scattering incidence scenario. These results provide insightful viewpoints as well as practical guides in developing a new generation of high performance RJ thin film solar cells.

  1. Nd:YAG laser with passive-active mode-locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weijiang; Chen, Zhenlei; Ren, Deming; Qu, Yanchen; Mo, Shuang; Huang, Jinjer; Andreev, Yury M.; Gorobets, Vadim A.; Petukhov, Vladimir O.; Zemlyanov, Aleksei A.

    2008-03-01

    All solid-state flash-lamp pumped passive-active mode-locked Nd3+:YAG laser is designed and experimentally studded. Saturation absorber Cr4+:YAG with initial transparency 25 and 47% are used as a passive Q-switcher and acousto-optical fused quartz modulator as an active mode-locker. Efficient length of the laser cavity with fixed mirror positions (1.45 m spaced) is droved by changes of 100% flat mirror for concave mirrors with different focus lengths. Changeable output mirrors with transparencies of 15 and 50% are used. Driving of the cavity parameters, laser and acousto-optical modulator power supply voltages let us to control output pulse train and single pulse parameters. As it goes from the analyses of oscillograms fixed with pyroelectric detector (τ=0.5 ns) and 1 GHz oscilloscope, over 95% of pulse output energy has been mode-locked. Average duration of the pulse train envelope of 5 to 50 single pulses at FWHM has been droved within 50 to 600 ns. When this single pulse duration is controlled but did not exceed 2 ns.

  2. Extracellular Glycoside Hydrolase Activities in the Human Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Lauren C.; Dodds, Michael W. J.; Hanley, A. Bryan

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate availability shifts when bacteria attach to a surface and form biofilm. When salivary planktonic bacteria form an oral biofilm, a variety of polysaccharides and glycoproteins are the primary carbon sources; however, simple sugar availabilities are limited due to low diffusion from saliva to biofilm. We hypothesized that bacterial glycoside hydrolase (GH) activities would be higher in a biofilm than in saliva in order to maintain metabolism in a low-sugar, high-glycoprotein environment. Salivary bacteria from 13 healthy individuals were used to grow in vitro biofilm using two separate media, one with sucrose and the other limiting carbon sources to a complex carbohydrate. All six GHs measured were higher in vitro when grown in the medium with complex carbohydrate as the sole carbon source. We then collected saliva and overnight dental plaque samples from the same individuals and measured ex vivo activities for the same six enzymes to determine how oral microbial utilization of glycoconjugates shifts between the planktonic phase in saliva and the biofilm phase in overnight dental plaque. Overall higher GH activities were observed in plaque samples, in agreement with in vitro observation. A similar pattern was observed in GH activity profiles between in vitro and ex vivo data. 16S rRNA gene analysis showed that plaque samples had a higher abundance of microorganisms with larger number of GH gene sequences. These results suggest differences in sugar catabolism between the oral bacteria located in the biofilm and those in saliva. PMID:26048943

  3. Extracellular Glycoside Hydrolase Activities in the Human Oral Cavity.

    PubMed

    Inui, Taichi; Walker, Lauren C; Dodds, Michael W J; Hanley, A Bryan

    2015-08-15

    Carbohydrate availability shifts when bacteria attach to a surface and form biofilm. When salivary planktonic bacteria form an oral biofilm, a variety of polysaccharides and glycoproteins are the primary carbon sources; however, simple sugar availabilities are limited due to low diffusion from saliva to biofilm. We hypothesized that bacterial glycoside hydrolase (GH) activities would be higher in a biofilm than in saliva in order to maintain metabolism in a low-sugar, high-glycoprotein environment. Salivary bacteria from 13 healthy individuals were used to grow in vitro biofilm using two separate media, one with sucrose and the other limiting carbon sources to a complex carbohydrate. All six GHs measured were higher in vitro when grown in the medium with complex carbohydrate as the sole carbon source. We then collected saliva and overnight dental plaque samples from the same individuals and measured ex vivo activities for the same six enzymes to determine how oral microbial utilization of glycoconjugates shifts between the planktonic phase in saliva and the biofilm phase in overnight dental plaque. Overall higher GH activities were observed in plaque samples, in agreement with in vitro observation. A similar pattern was observed in GH activity profiles between in vitro and ex vivo data. 16S rRNA gene analysis showed that plaque samples had a higher abundance of microorganisms with larger number of GH gene sequences. These results suggest differences in sugar catabolism between the oral bacteria located in the biofilm and those in saliva.

  4. Cavity magnomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xufeng; Zou, Chang-Ling; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong X.

    2016-01-01

    A dielectric body couples with electromagnetic fields through radiation pressure and electrostrictive forces, which mediate phonon-photon coupling in cavity optomechanics. In a magnetic medium, according to the Korteweg-Helmholtz formula, which describes the electromagnetic force density acting on a medium, magneostrictive forces should arise and lead to phonon-magnon interaction. We report such a coupled phonon-magnon system based on ferrimagnetic spheres, which we term as cavity magnomechanics, by analogy to cavity optomechanics. Coherent phonon-magnon interactions, including electromagnetically induced transparency and absorption, are demonstrated. Because of the strong hybridization of magnon and microwave photon modes and their high tunability, our platform exhibits new features including parametric amplification of magnons and phonons, triple-resonant photon-magnon-phonon coupling, and phonon lasing. Our work demonstrates the fundamental principle of cavity magnomechanics and its application as a new information transduction platform based on coherent coupling between photons, phonons, and magnons. PMID:27034983

  5. Cavity magnomechanics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xufeng; Zou, Chang-Ling; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong X

    2016-03-01

    A dielectric body couples with electromagnetic fields through radiation pressure and electrostrictive forces, which mediate phonon-photon coupling in cavity optomechanics. In a magnetic medium, according to the Korteweg-Helmholtz formula, which describes the electromagnetic force density acting on a medium, magneostrictive forces should arise and lead to phonon-magnon interaction. We report such a coupled phonon-magnon system based on ferrimagnetic spheres, which we term as cavity magnomechanics, by analogy to cavity optomechanics. Coherent phonon-magnon interactions, including electromagnetically induced transparency and absorption, are demonstrated. Because of the strong hybridization of magnon and microwave photon modes and their high tunability, our platform exhibits new features including parametric amplification of magnons and phonons, triple-resonant photon-magnon-phonon coupling, and phonon lasing. Our work demonstrates the fundamental principle of cavity magnomechanics and its application as a new information transduction platform based on coherent coupling between photons, phonons, and magnons. PMID:27034983

  6. Pharmacokinetics in the oral cavity: fluoride and other active ingredients.

    PubMed

    Duckworth, Ralph M

    2013-01-01

    Modern commercial toothpastes contain therapeutic ingredients to combat various oral conditions, for example, caries, gingivitis, calculus and tooth stain. The efficient delivery and retention of such ingredients in the mouth is essential for good performance. The aim of this chapter is to review the literature on the oral pharmacokinetics of, primarily, fluoride but also other active ingredients, mainly anti-plaque agents. Elevated levels of fluoride have been found in saliva, plaque and the oral soft tissues after use of fluoridated toothpaste, which persist at potentially active concentrations for hours. Both experiment and mathematical modelling suggest that the soft tissues are the main oral reservoir for fluoride. Qualitatively similar observations have been made for anti-plaque agents such as triclosan and metal cations, though their oral substantivity is generally greater. Scope for improved retention and subsequent efficacy exists. PMID:23817065

  7. Narrow linewidth comb realized with a mode-locked fiber laser using an intra-cavity waveguide electro-optic modulator for high-speed control.

    PubMed

    Iwakuni, Kana; Inaba, Hajime; Nakajima, Yoshiaki; Kobayashi, Takumi; Hosaka, Kazumoto; Onae, Atsushi; Hong, Feng-Lei

    2012-06-18

    We have developed an optical frequency comb using a mode-locked fiber ring laser with an intra-cavity waveguide electro-optic modulator controlling the optical length in the laser cavity. The mode-locking is achieved with a simple ring configuration and a nonlinear polarization rotation mechanism. The beat note between the laser and a reference laser and the carrier envelope offset frequency of the comb were simultaneously phase locked with servo bandwidths of 1.3 MHz and 900 kHz, respectively. We observed an out-of-loop beat between two identical combs, and obtained a coherent δ-function peak with a signal to noise ratio of 70 dB/Hz.

  8. Enhanced stability of dispersion-managed mode-locked fiber lasers with near-zero net cavity dispersion by high-contrast saturable absorbers.

    PubMed

    Liu, H H; Chow, K K

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally investigate the stability of dispersion-managed mode-locked fiber lasers using carbon-nanotube-based saturable absorbers (SAs) with different modulation depths. An unstable operation region of the mode-locked fiber laser with near-zero net cavity dispersion is observed, where the laser produces random pulse burst rather than stable pulse train. Through the implementation of high-contrast SAs in the laser, the unstable region is found to be shrunk by ~31.3% when the modulation depth of the SAs increases from 6.4% to 12.5%. The numerical simulation is consistent with the experimental observation.

  9. Histochemical localisation of carboxylesterase activity in rat and mouse oral cavity mucosa.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Darren A; Bogdanffy, Matthew S; Reed, Celia J

    2002-12-01

    Vinyl acetate (VA) is widely used within the chemical industry, in the manufacture of polyvinyl alcohol, and as polyvinyl acetate emulsions in latex paints, adhesives, paper and paper board coatings. Chronic oral exposure of rodents to high concentrations of VA induces tumours within the oral cavity. Carboxylesterase-dependent hydrolysis of VA is thought to be critical in the development of nasal tumours following inhalation exposure of animals to VA. Therefore, carboxylesterase activity was determined histochemically in the oral cavities of male F344 rats and BDF mice in order to explore the potential role of carboxylesterase-dependent hydrolysis of VA in the development of oral tumours. Following fixation in 10% neutral buffered formalin heads were decalcified in neutral saturated EDTA, embedded in resin, sectioned at six levels (three each for the upper and lower jaws), and carboxylesterase activity revealed in the tissue using alpha-naphthyl butyrate as substrate. The localisation of carboxylesterase activity in freshly dissected rat oral tissue was compared to that of the resin sections and found to be identical, thus validating the decalcification process. A similar pattern of carboxylesterase activity was observed for the two species. Staining was low in areas surrounding the teeth, and medium/high in the buccal mucosa, the central/posterior upper palate and those regions of the lower jaw not proximal to the teeth. In general the intensity of staining was greater in sections from the rat compared to those from the mouse. By comparison, carboxylesterase activity was considerably higher in mouse nasal olfactory epithelium than in any of the oral tissues. Thus the mucosa of the oral cavity has the potential to hydrolyse VA to its metabolites, acetic acid and acetaldehyde, and the presence of carboxylesterases at this site is consistent with, and may be an important determining factor in, the development of oral cavity tumours following exposure to VA.

  10. Inherent calibration of a blue LED-CE-DOAS instrument to measure iodine oxide, glyoxal, methyl glyoxal, nitrogen dioxide, water vapour and aerosol extinction in open cavity mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalman, R.; Volkamer, R.

    2010-12-01

    The combination of Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (CEAS) with broad-band light sources (e.g. Light-Emitting Diodes, LEDs) lends itself to the application of cavity enhanced Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CE-DOAS) to perform sensitive and selective point measurements of multiple trace gases and aerosol extinction with a single instrument. In contrast to other broad-band CEAS techniques, CE-DOAS relies only on the measurement of relative intensity changes, i.e. does not require knowledge of the light intensity in the absence of trace gases and aerosols (I0). We have built a prototype LED-CE-DOAS instrument in the blue spectral range (420-490 nm) to measure nitrogen dioxide (NO2), glyoxal (CHOCHO), methyl glyoxal (CH3COCHO), iodine oxide (IO), water vapour (H2O) and oxygen dimers (O4). We demonstrate the first direct detection of methyl glyoxal, and the first CE-DOAS detection of CHOCHO and IO. The instrument is further inherently calibrated for light extinction from the cavity by observing O4 or H2O (at 477 nm and 443 nm) and measuring the pressure, relative humidity and temperature independently. This approach is demonstrated by experiments where laboratory aerosols of known size and refractive index were generated and their extinction measured. The measured extinctions were then compared to the theoretical extinctions calculated using Mie theory (3-7 × 10-7cm-1). Excellent agreement is found from both the O4 and H2O retrievals. This enables the first inherently calibrated CEAS measurement at blue wavelengths in open cavity mode, and eliminates the need for sampling lines to supply air to the cavity, i.e., keep the cavity enclosed and/or aerosol free. Measurements in open cavity mode are demonstrated for CHOCHO, CH3COCHO, NO2, H2O and aerosol extinction. Our prototype LED-CE-DOAS provides a low cost, yet research grade innovative instrument for applications in simulation chambers and in the open atmosphere.

  11. Inherent calibration of a novel LED-CE-DOAS instrument to measure iodine oxide, glyoxal, methyl glyoxal, nitrogen dioxide, water vapour and aerosol extinction in open cavity mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalman, R.; Volkamer, R.

    2010-06-01

    The combination of Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (CEAS) with broad-band light sources (e.g. Light-Emitting Diodes, LEDs) lends itself to the application of cavity enhanced Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CE-DOAS) to perform sensitive and selective point measurements of multiple trace gases and aerosol extinction with a single instrument. In contrast to other broad-band CEAS techniques, CE-DOAS relies only on the measurement of relative intensity changes, i.e. does not require knowledge of the light intensity in the absence of trace gases and aerosols (I0). We have built a prototype LED-CE-DOAS instrument in the blue spectral range (420-490 nm) to measure nitrogen dioxide (NO2), glyoxal (CHOCHO), methyl glyoxal (CH3COCHO), iodine oxide (IO), water vapour (H2O) and oxygen dimers (O4). We demonstrate the first CEAS detection of methyl glyoxal, and the first CE-DOAS detection of CHOCHO and IO. A further innovation consists in the measurement of extinction losses from the cavity, e.g. due to aerosols, at two wavelengths by observing O4 (477 nm) and H2O (443 nm) and measuring the pressure, relative humidity and temperature independently. This approach is demonstrated by experiments where laboratory aerosols of known size and refractive index were generated and their extinction measured. The measured extinctions were then compared to the theoretical extinctions calculated using Mie theory (3-7×10-7 cm-1). Excellent agreement is found from both the O4 and H2O retrievals. This enables the first inherently calibrated CEAS measurement in open cavity mode (mirrors facing the open atmosphere), and eliminates the need for sampling lines to supply air to the cavity, and/or keep the cavity enclosed and aerosol free. Measurements in open cavity mode are demonstrated for CHOCHO, CH3COCHO, NO2, H2O and aerosol extinction at 477 nm and 443 nm. Our prototype LED-CE-DOAS provides a low cost, yet research grade innovative instrument for applications in simulation

  12. Bulk filling of Class II cavities with a dual-cure composite: Effect of curing mode and enamel etching on marginal adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Bortolotto, Tissiana; Roig, Miguel; Krejci, Ivo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study attempted to find a simple adhesive restorative technique for class I and II cavities on posterior teeth. Study Design: The tested materials were a self-etching adhesive (Parabond, Coltène/Whaledent) and a dual-cure composite (Paracore, Coltène/Whaledent) used in bulk to restore the cavities. Class II MO cavities were performed and assigned to 4 groups depending on the orthophosphoric acid (H3PO4) conditioning of enamel and polymerization method used (chemical or dual). Specimens were subjected to quantitative marginal analysis before and after thermo-mechanical loading. Results: Higher percentages of marginal adaptation at the total margin length, both before and after thermo-mechanical loading, were found in groups in which enamel was etched with phosphoric acid, without significant differences between the chemically and dual-cured modes. The restorations performance was similar on enamel and dentin, obtaining low results of adaptation on occlusal enamel in the groups without enamel etching, the lowest scores were on cervical dentin in the group with no ortophosphoric acid and self-cured. Conclusions: A dual-cure composite applied in bulk on acid etched enamel obtained acceptable marginal adaptation results, and may be an alternative technique for the restoration of class II cavities. Key words:Dual-cure composite, bulk technique, class II restoration, selective enamel etching, marginal adaptation. PMID:25674316

  13. High energy pulses generation with giant spectrum bandwidth and submegahertz repetition rate from a passively mode-locked Yb-doped fiber laser in all normal dispersion cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.-H.; Wang, D.; Lin, K.-H.

    2011-01-01

    Robust passively mode-locked pulse generation with low pulse repetition rate and giant spectrum bandwidth in an all-fiber, all-normal-dispersion ytterbium-doped fiber laser has been experimentally demonstrated using nonlinear polarization evolution technique. The highest pulse energy over 20 nJ with spectrum bandwidth over 50 nm can be experimentally obtained at 175 mW pump power. The mode-locked pulses reveal broadened 3-dB pulsewidth about several nanosecond and widened pedestal in time trace that is resulted from enormous dispersion in laser cavity and gain dynamics. At certain mode-locking state, a spectrum gap around 1056 nm are observed between the three and four energy levels of Yb-doped fiber laser. By properly rotating the polarization controller, the gap can be eliminated due to four-wave mixing to produce more flattened spectrum output.

  14. 5.5 W continuous-wave TEM00-mode Nd:YAG solar laser by a light-guide/2V-shaped pump cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, J.; Liang, D.; Vistas, C. R.; Bouadjemine, R.; Guillot, E.

    2015-12-01

    A significant progress in TEM00-mode solar laser power and efficiency with heliostat-parabolic mirror system is reported here. A double-stage light-guide/2V-shaped pump cavity is used to efficiently couple and redistribute the concentrated pump light from a 2-m-diameter parabolic mirror to a 4-mm-diameter, 30-mm-length, 1.1 at.% Nd:YAG single-crystal rod. The light guide with large rectangular cross section enables a stable uniform pumping profile along the laser rod, resulting also in an enhanced tracking error compensation capacity. 5.5 W cw TEM00-mode solar laser power was measured at the output of a thermally near unstable asymmetric resonator. 150 and 157 % improvement in TEM00-mode solar laser collection efficiency and slope efficiency were obtained, respectively.

  15. Actively mode-locked Tm(3+)-doped silica fiber laser with wavelength-tunable, high average output power.

    PubMed

    Kneis, Christian; Donelan, Brenda; Berrou, Antoine; Manek-Hönninger, Inka; Robin, Thierry; Cadier, Benoît; Eichhorn, Marc; Kieleck, Christelle

    2015-04-01

    A diode-pumped, actively mode-locked high-power thulium (Tm3+)-doped double-clad silica fiber laser is demonstrated, providing an average output power in mode-locked (continuous wave) operation of 53 W (72 W) with a slope efficiency of 34% (38%). Mode-locking in the 6th-harmonic order was obtained by an acousto-optic modulator driven at 66 MHz without dispersion compensation. The shortest measured output pulse width was 200 ps. Owing to a diffraction grating as cavity end mirror, the central wavelength could be tuned from 1.95 to 2.13 μm. The measured beam quality in mode-locked and continuous wave operation has been close to the diffraction limit. PMID:25831360

  16. Actively mode-locked Tm(3+)-doped silica fiber laser with wavelength-tunable, high average output power.

    PubMed

    Kneis, Christian; Donelan, Brenda; Berrou, Antoine; Manek-Hönninger, Inka; Robin, Thierry; Cadier, Benoît; Eichhorn, Marc; Kieleck, Christelle

    2015-04-01

    A diode-pumped, actively mode-locked high-power thulium (Tm3+)-doped double-clad silica fiber laser is demonstrated, providing an average output power in mode-locked (continuous wave) operation of 53 W (72 W) with a slope efficiency of 34% (38%). Mode-locking in the 6th-harmonic order was obtained by an acousto-optic modulator driven at 66 MHz without dispersion compensation. The shortest measured output pulse width was 200 ps. Owing to a diffraction grating as cavity end mirror, the central wavelength could be tuned from 1.95 to 2.13 μm. The measured beam quality in mode-locked and continuous wave operation has been close to the diffraction limit.

  17. The cavity resonance mode of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 mesa terahertz sources as probed by scanning laser thermal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benseman, Timothy; Koshelev, Alexei; Vlasko-Vlasov, Vitalii; Welp, Ulrich; Kwok, Wai-Kwong; Hao, Yang; Gross, Boris; Lange, Matthias; Koelle, Dieter; Kleiner, Reinhold; Kadowaki, Kazuo

    Stacked Intrinsic Josephson Junctions (IJJs) in the extremely anisotropic high-Tc superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 are a promising solid-state source of coherent terahertz radiation in the so-called ``THz gap'' range. In these devices, a geometric resonant mode of a stack of IJJs of typical dimensions 300 x 60 x 1 microns3 acts to synchronize the individual junctions, resulting in coherent far-field THz emission. This resonance can be probed by scanning thermal laser microscopy, in which a modulated optical laser beam is rastered across the top surface of a stack. The resulting thermal perturbation to the stack's cavity mode can thus be mapped via the resulting xy-dependent modulation of the stack's electrical resistance. Here we discuss the experimentally measured scanning laser pattern of such a THz cavity mode, and the implications of its symmetry for the mechanism of IJJ synchronization in these devices. This research was supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. De-AC02-06CH11357.

  18. Active mode-locked lasers and other photonic devices using electro-optic whispering gallery mode resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsko, Andrey B. (Inventor); Ilchenko, Vladimir (Inventor); Savchenkov, Anatoliy (Inventor); Maleki, Lutfollah (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Techniques and devices using whispering gallery mode (WGM) optical resonators, where the optical materials of the WGM resonators exhibit an electro-optical effect to perform optical modulation. Examples of actively mode-locked lasers and other devices are described.

  19. A portable optical emission spectroscopy-cavity ringdown spectroscopy dual-mode plasma spectrometer for measurements of environmentally important trace heavy metals: initial test with elemental Hg.

    PubMed

    Sahay, Peeyush; Scherrer, Susan T; Wang, Chuji

    2012-09-01

    A portable optical emission spectroscopy-cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OES-CRDS) dual-mode plasma spectrometer is described. A compact, low-power, atmospheric argon microwave plasma torch (MPT) is utilized as the emission source when the spectrometer is operating in the OES mode. The same MPT serves as the atomization source for ringdown measurements in the CRDS mode. Initial demonstration of the instrument is carried out by observing OES of multiple elements including mercury (Hg) in the OES mode and by measuring absolute concentrations of Hg in the metastable state 6s6p (3)P(0) in the CRDS mode, in which a palm-size diode laser operating at a single wavelength 405 nm is incorporated in the spectrometer as the light source. In the OES mode, the detection limit for Hg is determined to be 44 parts per 10(9) (ppb). A strong radiation trapping effect on emission measurements of Hg at 254 nm is observed when the Hg solution concentration is higher than 50 parts per 10(6) (ppm). The radiation trapping effect suggests that two different transition lines of Hg at 253.65 nm and 365.01 nm be selected for emission measurements in lower (<50 ppm) and higher concentration ranges (>50 ppm), respectively. In the CRDS mode, the detection limit of Hg in the metastable state 6s6p (3)P(0) is achieved to be 2.24 parts per 10(12) (ppt) when the plasma is operating at 150 W with sample gas flow rate of 480 mL min(-1); the detection limit corresponds to 50 ppm in Hg sample solution. Advantage of this novel spectrometer has two-fold, it has a large measurement dynamic range, from a few ppt to hundreds ppm and the CRDS mode can serve as calibration for the OES mode as well as high sensitivity measurements. Measurements of seven other elements, As, Cd, Mn, Ni, P, Pb, and Sr, using the OES mode are also carried out with detection limits of 1100, 33, 30, 144, 576, 94, and 2 ppb, respectively. Matrix effect in the presence of other elements on Hg measurements has been found to increase the

  20. A portable optical emission spectroscopy-cavity ringdown spectroscopy dual-mode plasma spectrometer for measurements of environmentally important trace heavy metals: Initial test with elemental Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Sahay, Peeyush; Scherrer, Susan T.; Wang Chuji

    2012-09-15

    A portable optical emission spectroscopy-cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OES-CRDS) dual-mode plasma spectrometer is described. A compact, low-power, atmospheric argon microwave plasma torch (MPT) is utilized as the emission source when the spectrometer is operating in the OES mode. The same MPT serves as the atomization source for ringdown measurements in the CRDS mode. Initial demonstration of the instrument is carried out by observing OES of multiple elements including mercury (Hg) in the OES mode and by measuring absolute concentrations of Hg in the metastable state 6s6p {sup 3}P{sub 0} in the CRDS mode, in which a palm-size diode laser operating at a single wavelength 405 nm is incorporated in the spectrometer as the light source. In the OES mode, the detection limit for Hg is determined to be 44 parts per 10{sup 9} (ppb). A strong radiation trapping effect on emission measurements of Hg at 254 nm is observed when the Hg solution concentration is higher than 50 parts per 10{sup 6} (ppm). The radiation trapping effect suggests that two different transition lines of Hg at 253.65 nm and 365.01 nm be selected for emission measurements in lower (<50 ppm) and higher concentration ranges (>50 ppm), respectively. In the CRDS mode, the detection limit of Hg in the metastable state 6s6p {sup 3}P{sub 0} is achieved to be 2.24 parts per 10{sup 12} (ppt) when the plasma is operating at 150 W with sample gas flow rate of 480 mL min{sup -1}; the detection limit corresponds to 50 ppm in Hg sample solution. Advantage of this novel spectrometer has two-fold, it has a large measurement dynamic range, from a few ppt to hundreds ppm and the CRDS mode can serve as calibration for the OES mode as well as high sensitivity measurements. Measurements of seven other elements, As, Cd, Mn, Ni, P, Pb, and Sr, using the OES mode are also carried out with detection limits of 1100, 33, 30, 144, 576, 94, and 2 ppb, respectively. Matrix effect in the presence of other elements on Hg measurements

  1. Determination of Activated Carbon Residual Life using a Microwave Cavity Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, A.; Wylie, S.; Shaw, A.; Al-Shamma'a, A. I.; Thomas, A.; Keele, H.

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents the continuation of work conducted jointly between Dstl and LJMU. This unique body of work has been, largely, concerned with detecting the residual life of high performance filter materials using electromagnetic (EM) waves within a resonant cavity. Past work has considered both HEPA [1] and ASZM-TEDA[2] activated carbon filter materials. This paper continues the later work, considering the response of ASZM-TEDA activated carbon through the co-ageing of two distinct batches of the material. The paper briefly introduces activated carbon, discusses theory relevant to the work and the methodology used for investigation. A comprehensive set of results is included which seek to validate this technique for determining the residual lifespan of activated carbon.

  2. Phonon-assisted stimulated emission and ultra-thin active layers in cleaved-cavity and vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, S.D.

    1991-01-01

    Unique lasing processes in III-V semiconductor lasers are examined. The dynamics of stimulated photon emissions in thin AlGaAs/GaAs single quantum well lasers are observed experimentally and modeled by rate equations describing the electron and photon densities. Agreement between experiment and theory are achieved when the transition probability matrix, calculated with the spreading out of electron and hole wave functions taken into account, is used. The phonon assisted stimulated photon emission observed in this work is delayed with respect to the unassisted emission. This observation is modeled by using a weaker matrix element for the unassisted process which is expected from theory and thus supports the author' claim that this emission is phonon assisted. Rate equations developed to simulate doubly stimulated emission of photons and phonons do not describe the experimental data so the possibility of stimulated phonon emission is ruled out for the samples studied in this work. Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers are also studied since they can be designed to support unique lasing processes. The design and growth of vertical cavity surface emitting lasers are discussed and these concepts are applied to the realization of a vertical cavity surface emitting laser with the thinnest active layer of any laser yet reported. Stimulated emission supported across the sub-monolayer thick InAs single quantum well active region can be understood by considering the spreading of the electron and hole wavefunctions beyond the confines of the quantum well to increase the length of the effective gain region.

  3. Transient conduction-radiation analysis of an absolute active cavity radiometer using finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahan, J. R.; Kowsary, F.; Tira, N.; Gardiner, B. D.

    1987-01-01

    A NASA-developed finite element-based model of a generic active cavity radiometer (ACR) has been developed in order to study the dependence on operating temperature of the closed-loop and open-loop transient response of the instrument. Transient conduction within the sensing element is explored, and the transient temperature distribution resulting from the application of a time-varying radiative boundary condition is calculated. The results verify the prediction that operation of an ACR at cryogenic temperatures results in large gains in frequency response.

  4. Cavity turnover and equilibrium cavity densities in a cottonwood bottomland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sedgwick, James A.; Knopf, Fritz L.

    1992-01-01

    A fundamental factor regulating the numbers of secondary cavity nesting (SCN) birds is the number of extant cavities available for nesting. The number of available cavities may be thought of as being in an approximate equilibrium maintained by a very rough balance between recruitment and loss of cavities. Based on estimates of cavity recruitment and loss, we ascertained equilibrium cavity densities in a mature plains cottonwood (Populus sargentii) bottomland along the South Platte River in northeastern Colorado. Annual cavity recruitment, derived from density estimates of primary cavity nesting (PCN) birds and cavity excavation rates, was estimated to be 71-86 new cavities excavated/100 ha. Of 180 active cavities of 11 species of cavity-nesting birds found in 1985 and 1986, 83 were no longer usable by 1990, giving an average instantaneous rate of cavity loss of r = -0.230. From these values of cavity recruitment and cavity loss, equilibrium cavity density along the South Platte is 238-289 cavities/100 ha. This range of equilibrium cavity density is only slightly above the minimum of 205 cavities/100 ha required by SCN's and suggests that cavity availability may be limiting SCN densities along the South Platte River. We submit that snag management alone does not adequately address SCN habitat needs, and that cavity management, expressed in terms of cavity turnover and cavity densities, may be more useful.

  5. Engaging in activities involving information technology: dimensions, modes, and flow.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Henry; Sharafi, Parvaneh; Hedman, Leif R

    2004-01-01

    An engagement mode involves a subject (e.g., a user of information technology, or IT) who is engaged in an activity with an object in a certain manner (the mode). The purpose of this study is to develop a general model of engagement modes that may be used for understanding how IT-related activities are shaped by properties of the user and the IT object. A questionnaire involving items on IT engagement and the experience of flow was administered to 300 participants. The results supported an engagement mode (EM) model involving 5 different engagement modes (enjoying/acceptance, ambition/curiosity, avoidance/hesitation, frustration/ anxiety, and efficiency/productivity) characterized on 3 dimensions (evaluation of object, locus of control between subject and object, and intrinsic or extrinsic focus of motivation). The flow experience follows from a balance between enjoying/ acceptance and efficiency/productivity propelled by ambition/curiosity. The EM model could provide a platform for considering how IT users, IT applications, and IT environments should work together to yield both enjoyment and efficiency. Actual or potential applications of this research include designing IT training programs on different levels of specificity. PMID:15359681

  6. Fabrication of Isolated Metal-Organic Polyhedra in Confined Cavities: Adsorbents/Catalysts with Unusual Dispersity and Activity.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ying-Hu; Liu, Xiao-Dan; Yan, Ni; Jiang, Yao; Liu, Xiao-Qin; Sun, Lin-Bing; Li, Jian-Rong

    2016-05-18

    Metal-organic polyhedra (MOPs) have attracted great attention due to their intriguing structure. However, the applications of MOPs are severely hindered by two shortcomings, namely low dispersity and poor stability. Here we report the introduction of four MOPs (constructed from dicopper and carboxylates) to cavity-structured mesoporous silica SBA-16 via a double-solvent strategy to overcome both shortcomings simultaneously. By judicious design, the dimension of MOPs is just between the size of cavities and entrances of SBA-16, MOP molecules are thus confined in the cavities. This leads to the formation of isolated MOPs with unusual dispersion, making the active sites highly accessible. Hence, the adsorption capacity on carbon dioxide and propene as well as catalytic performance on ring opening are much superior to bulk MOPs. More importantly, the structure and catalytic activity of MOPs in confined cavities are well preserved after exposure to humid atmosphere, whereas those of bulk MOPs are degraded seriously. PMID:27049737

  7. Resistive wall mode active control physics design for KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y. S.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Bak, J. G.; Bialek, J. M.; Berkery, J. W.; Lee, S. G.; Oh, Y. K.

    2014-01-01

    As KSTAR H-mode operation approaches the region where the resistive wall mode (RWM) can be unstable, an important issue for future long pulse, high beta plasma operation is to evaluate RWM active feedback control performance using a planned active/passive RWM stabilization system on the device. In particular, an optimal design of feedback sensors allows mode stabilization up to the highest achievable βN close to the ideal with-wall limit, βNwall, with reduced control power requirements. The computed ideal n = 1 mode structure from the DCON code has been input to the VALEN-3D code to calculate the projected performance of an active RWM control system in the KSTAR three-dimensional conducting structure device geometry. Control performance with the midplane locked mode detection sensors, off-midplane saddle loops, and magnetic pickup coils is examined. The midplane sensors measuring the radial component of the mode perturbation is found to be strongly affected by the wall eddy current. The off-axis saddle loops with proper compensation of the prompt applied field are computed to provide stabilization at βN up to 86% of βNwall but the low RWM amplitude computed in the off-axis regions near the sensors can produce a low signal-to-noise ratio. The required control power and bandwidth are also estimated with varied noise levels in the feedback sensors. Further improvements have been explored by examining a new RWM sensor design motivated by the off-midplane poloidal magnetic field sensors in NSTX. The new sensors mounted off of the copper passive stabilizer plates near the device midplane show a clear advantage in control performance corresponding to achieving 99% of βNwall without the need of compensation of the prompt field. The result shows a significant improvement of RWM feedback stabilization using the new sensor set which motivates a future feedback sensor upgrade.

  8. Cavity cooling a single charged levitated nanosphere.

    PubMed

    Millen, J; Fonseca, P Z G; Mavrogordatos, T; Monteiro, T S; Barker, P F

    2015-03-27

    Optomechanical cavity cooling of levitated objects offers the possibility for laboratory investigation of the macroscopic quantum behavior of systems that are largely decoupled from their environment. However, experimental progress has been hindered by particle loss mechanisms, which have prevented levitation and cavity cooling in a vacuum. We overcome this problem with a new type of hybrid electro-optical trap formed from a Paul trap within a single-mode optical cavity. We demonstrate a factor of 100 cavity cooling of 400 nm diameter silica spheres trapped in vacuum. This paves the way for ground-state cooling in a smaller, higher finesse cavity, as we show that a novel feature of the hybrid trap is that the optomechanical cooling becomes actively driven by the Paul trap, even for singly charged nanospheres. PMID:25860743

  9. Ring resonant cavities for spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Martin, Juergen; Paldus, Barbara A.; Xie, Jinchun

    1999-01-01

    Ring-shaped resonant cavities for spectroscopy allow a reduction in optical feedback to the light source, and provide information on the interaction of both s- and p-polarized light with samples. A laser light source is locked to a single cavity mode. An intracavity acousto-optic modulator may be used to couple light into the cavity. The cavity geometry is particularly useful for Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS).

  10. Ring resonant cavities for spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, R.N.; Martin, J.; Paldus, B.A.; Xie, J.

    1999-06-15

    Ring-shaped resonant cavities for spectroscopy allow a reduction in optical feedback to the light source, and provide information on the interaction of both s- and p-polarized light with samples. A laser light source is locked to a single cavity mode. An intracavity acousto-optic modulator may be used to couple light into the cavity. The cavity geometry is particularly useful for Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS). 6 figs.

  11. Quantum-enhanced metrology with the single-mode coherent states of an optical cavity inside a quantum feedback loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Lewis A.; Stokes, Adam; Beige, Almut

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we use the nonlinear generator of dynamics of the individual quantum trajectories of an optical cavity inside an instantaneous quantum feedback loop to measure the phase shift between two pathways of light with a precision above the standard quantum limit. The feedback laser provides a reference frame and constantly increases the dependence of the state of the resonator on the unknown phase. Since our quantum metrology scheme can be implemented with current technology and does not require highly efficient single photon detectors, it should be of practical interest until highly entangled many-photon states become more readily available.

  12. Principle and applications of Faraday-Fabry-Perot cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, Nan; Zhao, Jianlin

    2010-10-01

    A Faraday-Fabry-Perot (FFP) cavity, composed of an Fabry-Perot (FP) cavity and a piece of Faraday magneto-optical material, is presented. The principle of FFP cavity and its polarization modulation effect are described by use of optical matrix analysis. The result shows that the Faraday rotation is able to be magnified by more than two orders of magnitude in resonant FFP cavity, while different elliptically polarized lights are obtained in non-resonant cavity. Furthermore two novel applications, that is, optical isolator based on passive FFP cavity (FOI) and Faraday-Zeeman dual-frequency laser (FZDL) based on active FFP cavity whose eigen modes operate as circularly polarized lights and whose frequency difference can be adjusted continuously by magnetic field, are introduced. The principles, typical parameters and performance characteristics are analyzed in both applications.

  13. CFD-based aero-optical analysis of flow fields over two-dimensional cavities with active flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yan

    Prediction and control of optical wave front distortions and aberrations in a high energy laser beam due to interaction with an unsteady highly non-uniform flow field is of great importance in the development of directed energy weapon systems for Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAV). The unsteady shear layer over the weapons bay cavity is the primary cause of this distortion of the optical wave front. The large scale vortical structure of the shear layer over the cavity can be significantly reduced by employing an active flow control technique combined with passive flow control. This dissertation explores various active and passive control methods to suppress the cavity oscillations and thereby improve the aero-optics of cavity flow. In active flow control technique, a steady or a pulsed jet is applied at the sharp leading edge of cavities of different aspect ratios L/D (=2, 4, 15), where L and D are the width and the depth of a cavity respectively. In the passive flow control approach, the sharp leading or trailing edge of the cavity is modified into a round edge of different radii. Both of these active and passive flow control approaches are studied independently and in combination. Numerical simulations are performed, with and without active flow control for subsonic free stream flow past two-dimensional sharp and round leading or trailing edge cavities using Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) equations with a two-equation Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence model or a hybrid SST/Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model. Aero-optical analysis is developed and applied to all the simulation cases. Index of refraction and Optical Path Difference (OPD) are compared for flow fields without and with active flow control. Root-Mean-Square (RMS) value of OPD is calculated and compared with the experimental data, where available. The effect of steady and pulsed blowing on buffet loading on the downstream face of the cavity is also computed. Using the numerical

  14. Meditation leads to reduced default mode network activity beyond an active task

    PubMed Central

    Garrison, Kathleen A.; Zeffiro, Thomas A.; Scheinost, Dustin; Constable, R. Todd; Brewer, Judson A.

    2015-01-01

    Meditation has been associated with relatively reduced activity in the default mode network, a brain network implicated in self-related thinking and mind wandering. However, previous imaging studies have typically compared meditation to rest despite other studies reporting differences in brain activation patterns between meditators and controls at rest. Moreover, rest is associated with a range of brain activation patterns across individuals that has only recently begun to be better characterized. Therefore, this study compared meditation to another active cognitive task, both to replicate findings that meditation is associated with relatively reduced default mode network activity, and to extend these findings by testing whether default mode activity was reduced during meditation beyond the typical reductions observed during effortful tasks. In addition, prior studies have used small groups, whereas the current study tested these hypotheses in a larger group. Results indicate that meditation is associated with reduced activations in the default mode network relative to an active task in meditators compared to controls. Regions of the default mode showing a group by task interaction include the posterior cingulate/precuneus and anterior cingulate cortex. These findings replicate and extend prior work indicating that suppression of default mode processing may represent a central neural process in long-term meditation, and suggest that meditation leads to relatively reduced default mode processing beyond that observed during another active cognitive task. PMID:25904238

  15. Meditation leads to reduced default mode network activity beyond an active task.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Kathleen A; Zeffiro, Thomas A; Scheinost, Dustin; Constable, R Todd; Brewer, Judson A

    2015-09-01

    Meditation has been associated with relatively reduced activity in the default mode network, a brain network implicated in self-related thinking and mind wandering. However, previous imaging studies have typically compared meditation to rest, despite other studies having reported differences in brain activation patterns between meditators and controls at rest. Moreover, rest is associated with a range of brain activation patterns across individuals that has only recently begun to be better characterized. Therefore, in this study we compared meditation to another active cognitive task, both to replicate the findings that meditation is associated with relatively reduced default mode network activity and to extend these findings by testing whether default mode activity was reduced during meditation, beyond the typical reductions observed during effortful tasks. In addition, prior studies had used small groups, whereas in the present study we tested these hypotheses in a larger group. The results indicated that meditation is associated with reduced activations in the default mode network, relative to an active task, for meditators as compared to controls. Regions of the default mode network showing a Group × Task interaction included the posterior cingulate/precuneus and anterior cingulate cortex. These findings replicate and extend prior work indicating that the suppression of default mode processing may represent a central neural process in long-term meditation, and they suggest that meditation leads to relatively reduced default mode processing beyond that observed during another active cognitive task.

  16. Batch Mode Active Sampling based on Marginal Probability Distribution Matching.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Rita; Wang, Zheng; Fan, Wei; Davidson, Ian; Panchanathan, Sethuraman; Ye, Jieping

    2012-01-01

    Active Learning is a machine learning and data mining technique that selects the most informative samples for labeling and uses them as training data; it is especially useful when there are large amount of unlabeled data and labeling them is expensive. Recently, batch-mode active learning, where a set of samples are selected concurrently for labeling, based on their collective merit, has attracted a lot of attention. The objective of batch-mode active learning is to select a set of informative samples so that a classifier learned on these samples has good generalization performance on the unlabeled data. Most of the existing batch-mode active learning methodologies try to achieve this by selecting samples based on varied criteria. In this paper we propose a novel criterion which achieves good generalization performance of a classifier by specifically selecting a set of query samples that minimizes the difference in distribution between the labeled and the unlabeled data, after annotation. We explicitly measure this difference based on all candidate subsets of the unlabeled data and select the best subset. The proposed objective is an NP-hard integer programming optimization problem. We provide two optimization techniques to solve this problem. In the first one, the problem is transformed into a convex quadratic programming problem and in the second method the problem is transformed into a linear programming problem. Our empirical studies using publicly available UCI datasets and a biomedical image dataset demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach in comparison with the state-of-the-art batch-mode active learning methods. We also present two extensions of the proposed approach, which incorporate uncertainty of the predicted labels of the unlabeled data and transfer learning in the proposed formulation. Our empirical studies on UCI datasets show that incorporation of uncertainty information improves performance at later iterations while our studies on 20

  17. High-Q and high-sensitivity width-modulated photonic crystal single nanobeam air-mode cavity for refractive index sensing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Daquan; Tian, Huiping; Ji, Yuefeng

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel optical sensor based on a one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal (PhC) single nanobeam air-mode cavity (SNAC). The performance of the device is investigated theoretically. By introducing a quadratically modulated width tapering structure, a waveguide-coupled 1D-PhC SNAC with a calculated high quality factor of 5.16×10(6) and an effective mode volume of V(eff)∼2.18(λ/n(si))(3) can be achieved. For the air mode mentioned above, the light field can be strongly localized inside the air region (low index) and overlaps sufficiently with the analytes. Thus, the suggested PhC SNAC can be used for high-sensitivity refractive index sensing with an estimated high sensitivity of 537.8 nm/RIU. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first PhC single nanobeam geometry that features both high Q-factors and high sensitivity, and is potentially an ideal platform for realizing ultracompact lab-on-a-chip applications with dense arrays of functionalized spots for multiplexed sensing. PMID:25966999

  18. Ultrafast direct modulation of transverse-mode coupled-cavity VCSELs far beyond the relaxation oscillation frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalir, Hamed; Koyama, Fumio

    2014-02-01

    A novel approach for bandwidth augmentation for direct modulation of VCSELs using transverse-coupled-cavity (TCC) scheme is raised, which enables us to tailor the modulation-transfer function. The base structure is similar to that of 3QW VCSELs with 980 nm wavelength operation. While the bandwidth of conventional VCSELs was limited by 9-10 GHz, the 3-dB bandwidth of TCC VCSEL with aperture diameters of 8.5×8.5μm2 and 3×3μm2 are increased by a factor of 3 far beyond the relaxation-oscillation frequency. Our current bandwidth achievement on the larger aperture size is 29 GHz which is limited by the used photo-detector. To the best of our knowledge this is the fastest 980 nm VCSEL.

  19. Characterization and analysis of timing jitter in normal-dispersion mode-locked Er-fiber lasers with intra-cavity filtering.

    PubMed

    Shin, Junho; Jung, Kwangyun; Song, Youjian; Kim, Jungwon

    2015-08-24

    We characterize and analyze the timing jitter of normal-dispersion mode-locked Er-fiber lasers with intra-cavity filtering. The timing jitter of Er-fiber lasers with 9-nm bandpass filters operating at + 0.0084 ps(2) is measured to be 3.46 fs (rms) when integrated from 10 kHz to 10 MHz offset frequency, which is similar to the jitter level of typical stretched-pulse or soliton Er-fiber lasers. The numerical simulation based on split-step Fourier transform method shows that the measured high-frequency jitter is quantum noise-limited performance. We also develop an analytical model for filtered normal-dispersion fiber lasers by modifying the well-established noise model of stretched-pulse fiber lasers. The analytical modeling reveals that the jitter performance is improved mostly by reducing the chirp parameter by intra-cavity filtering. Both numerical simulation and analytical model fit fairly well with the measured timing jitter result.

  20. High power, widely tunable, mode-hop free, continuous wave external cavity quantum cascade laser for multi-species trace gas detection

    SciTech Connect

    Centeno, R.; Marchenko, D.; Mandon, J.; Cristescu, S. M.; Harren, F. J. M.; Wulterkens, G.

    2014-12-29

    We present a high power, widely tunable, continuous wave external cavity quantum cascade laser designed for infrared vibrational spectroscopy of molecules exhibiting broadband and single line absorption features. The laser source exhibits single mode operation with a tunability up to 303 cm{sup −1} (∼24% of the center wavelength) at 8 μm, with a maximum optical output power of 200 mW. In combination with off-axis integrated output spectroscopy, trace-gas detection of broadband absorption gases such as acetone was performed and a noise equivalent absorption sensitivity of 3.7 × 10{sup −8 }cm{sup −1 }Hz{sup −1/2} was obtained.

  1. Kraus Operator-Sum Solution to the Master Equation Describing the Single-Mode Cavity Driven by an Oscillating External Field in the Heat Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiang-Guo; Wang, Ji-Suo; Gao, Hua-Chao

    2016-08-01

    Exploiting the thermo entangled state approach, we successfully solve the master equation for describing the single-mode cavity driven by an oscillating external field in the heat reservoir and then get the analytical time-evolution rule for the density operator in the infinitive Kraus operator-sum representation. It is worth noting that the Kraus operator M l, m is proved to be a trace-preserving quantum operation. As an application, the time-evolution for an initial coherent state ρ | β> = | β>< β| in such an environment is investigated, which shows that the initial coherent state decays to a new mixed state as a result of thermal noise, however the coherence can still be reserved for amplitude damping.

  2. Resistive wall mode active control physics design for KSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y. S. Sabbagh, S. A.; Bialek, J. M.; Berkery, J. W.; Bak, J. G.; Lee, S. G.; Oh, Y. K.

    2014-01-15

    As KSTAR H-mode operation approaches the region where the resistive wall mode (RWM) can be unstable, an important issue for future long pulse, high beta plasma operation is to evaluate RWM active feedback control performance using a planned active/passive RWM stabilization system on the device. In particular, an optimal design of feedback sensors allows mode stabilization up to the highest achievable β{sub N} close to the ideal with-wall limit, β{sub N}{sup wall}, with reduced control power requirements. The computed ideal n = 1 mode structure from the DCON code has been input to the VALEN-3D code to calculate the projected performance of an active RWM control system in the KSTAR three-dimensional conducting structure device geometry. Control performance with the midplane locked mode detection sensors, off-midplane saddle loops, and magnetic pickup coils is examined. The midplane sensors measuring the radial component of the mode perturbation is found to be strongly affected by the wall eddy current. The off-axis saddle loops with proper compensation of the prompt applied field are computed to provide stabilization at β{sub N} up to 86% of β{sub N}{sup wall} but the low RWM amplitude computed in the off-axis regions near the sensors can produce a low signal-to-noise ratio. The required control power and bandwidth are also estimated with varied noise levels in the feedback sensors. Further improvements have been explored by examining a new RWM sensor design motivated by the off-midplane poloidal magnetic field sensors in NSTX. The new sensors mounted off of the copper passive stabilizer plates near the device midplane show a clear advantage in control performance corresponding to achieving 99% of β{sub N}{sup wall} without the need of compensation of the prompt field. The result shows a significant improvement of RWM feedback stabilization using the new sensor set which motivates a future feedback sensor upgrade.

  3. In-flight shortwave calibrations of the active cavity radiometers using tungsten lamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Susan; Lee, Robert B.; Gibson, Michael A.; Wilson, Robert S.; Bolden, William C.

    1992-01-01

    The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) active cavity radiometers are used to measure the incoming solar, reflected shortwave solar, and emitted longwave radiations from the Earth and atmosphere. The radiometers are located on the NASA's Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) and the NOAA-9 and NOAA-10 spacecraft platforms. Two of the radiometers, one wide field of view (WFOV) and one medium field of view (MFOV), measure the total radiation in the spectral region of 0.2 to 50 microns and the other two radiometers (WFOV and MFOV) measure the shortwave radiation in the spectral region of 0.2 to 5.0 microns. For the in-flight calibrations, tungsten lamp and the sun are used as calibration sources for shortwave radiometers. Descriptions of the tungsten lamp and solar calibration procedures and mechanisms are presented. The tungsten lamp calibration measurements are compared with the measurements of solar calibration for ERBS and NOAA-9 instruments.

  4. HBT-EP Program: Active MHD Mode Dynamics and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navratil, G. A.; Bialek, J.; Boozer, A. H.; Byrne, P. J.; Donald, G. V.; Hughes, P. E.; Levesque, J. P.; Mauel, M. E.; Peng, Q.; Rhodes, D. J.; Stoafer, C. C.; Hansen, C. J.

    2015-11-01

    The HBT-EP active mode control research program aims to: (i) quantify external kink dynamics and multimode response to magnetic perturbations, (ii) understand the relationship between control coil configuration, conducting and ferritic wall effects, and active feedback control, and (iii) explore advanced feedback algorithms. Biorthogonal decomposition is used to observe multiple simultaneous resistive wall modes (RWM). A 512 core GPU-based low latency (14 μs) MIMO control system uses 96 inputs and 64 outputs for Adaptive Control of RWMs. An in-vessel adjustable ferritic wall is used to study ferritic RWMs with increased growth rates, RMP response, and disruptivity. A biased electrode in the plasma is used to control the rotation of external kinks and evaluate error fields. A Thomson scattering diagnostic measures Te and ne at 3 spatial points, soon to be extended to 10 points. A quasi-linear sharp-boundary model of the plasma's multimode response to error fields is developed to determine harmful error field structures and associated NTV and resonant torques. Upcoming machine upgrades will allow measurements and control of scrape-off-layer currents, and control of kink modes using optical diagnostics. Supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-86ER53222.

  5. Dynamic neutronic and stability analysis of a burst mode, single cavity gas core reactor Brayton cycle space power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugan, Edward T.; Kutikkad, Kiratadas

    The conceptual, burst-mode gaseous-core reactor (GCR) space nuclear power system presently subjected to reactor-dynamics and system stability studies operates on a closed Brayton cycle, via disk MHD generator for energy conversion. While the gaseous fuel density power coefficient of reactivity is found to be capable of rapidly stabilizing the GCR system, the power of this feedback renders standard external reactivity insertions inadequate for significant power-level changes during normal operation.

  6. Single-mode vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers for {sup 87}Rb-based chip-scale atomic clock

    SciTech Connect

    Derebezov, I. A. Haisler, V. A.; Bakarov, A. K.; Kalagin, A. K.; Toropov, A. I.; Kachanova, M. M.; Gavrilova, T. A.; Semenova, O. I.; Tretyakov, D. B.; Beterov, I. I.; Entin, V. M.; Ryabtsev, I. I.

    2010-11-15

    The results of numerical simulation and study of lasing characteristics of semiconductor verticalcavity surface-emitting lasers based on Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As alloys are presented. Lasers exhibit stable single-mode lasing at a wavelength of 795 nm at low operating currents {approx}1.5 mA and an output power of 350 {mu}W, which offers prospects of their applications in next-generation chip-scale atomic clocks

  7. Switchable and tunable dual-wavelength single-longitudinal-mode erbium-doped fiber laser with special subring-cavity and superimposed fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ting; Yan, Fengping; Liu, Shuo; Bai, Yan; Peng, Wanjing; Tan, Siyu

    2014-12-01

    A switchable and tunable dual-wavelength single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) has been proposed and demonstrated. Two superimposed fiber Bragg gratings (SI-FBG) have been used as one original wavelength selection component. A special subring-cavity was employed to select the SLM. By properly adjusting a polarization controller, single- and dual-wavelength switchable operations with high wavelength and power stability were realized experimentally. Regardless of which work mode, the signal to noise ratio was higher than 60 dB and the polarization extinction ratio was higher than 20 dB. The wavelength-spacing was 9.96 nm, indicating that it can be used to generate continuous-wave terahertz waves. The linewidth of each lasing wavelength measured by the delayed self-heterodyne method was approximately 1.25 kHz and 1 kHz, respectively. By stretching the SI-FBG, the EDFL had a wavelength-tunable range of 5.96 nm in both the single- and dual-wavelength operations.

  8. Mechanisms for multiple activity modes of VTA dopamine neurons

    PubMed Central

    Oster, Andrew; Faure, Philippe; Gutkin, Boris S.

    2015-01-01

    Midbrain ventral segmental area (VTA) dopaminergic neurons send numerous projections to cortical and sub-cortical areas, and diffusely release dopamine (DA) to their targets. DA neurons display a range of activity modes that vary in frequency and degree of burst firing. Importantly, DA neuronal bursting is associated with a significantly greater degree of DA release than an equivalent tonic activity pattern. Here, we introduce a single compartmental, conductance-based computational model for DA cell activity that captures the behavior of DA neuronal dynamics and examine the multiple factors that underlie DA firing modes: the strength of the SK conductance, the amount of drive, and GABA inhibition. Our results suggest that neurons with low SK conductance fire in a fast firing mode, are correlated with burst firing, and require higher levels of applied current before undergoing depolarization block. We go on to consider the role of GABAergic inhibition on an ensemble of dynamical classes of DA neurons and find that strong GABA inhibition suppresses burst firing. Our studies suggest differences in the distribution of the SK conductance and GABA inhibition levels may indicate subclasses of DA neurons within the VTA. We further identify, that by considering alternate potassium dynamics, the dynamics display burst patterns that terminate via depolarization block, akin to those observed in vivo in VTA DA neurons and in substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) DA cell preparations under apamin application. In addition, we consider the generation of transient burst firing events that are NMDA-initiated or elicited by a sudden decrease of GABA inhibition, that is, disinhibition. PMID:26283955

  9. Mode analysis for a quartz tuning fork coupled to acoustic resonances of fluid in a cylindrical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuoriniemi, J.; Rysti, J.; Salmela, A.; Manninen, M.

    2012-12-01

    Quartz tuning forks are precise electromechanical oscillators mass produced in different sizes around one millimeter for the purpose of providing the reference frequency for watches and such. Usually, they are designed to operate at 215 = 32768 Hz in vacuum at room temperature. When refrigerated to cryogenic conditions, they may show extremely high Q-values. Immersion of such an oscillator to fluid medium changes its response due to inertial forces and dissipation exerted by the medium. This makes it very useful in studies of pure and mixed helium fluids at low temperatures. When the wavelength of sound in the medium, determined by the frequency of oscillation and the speed of sound, corresponds to typical dimensions in the fluid volume, the oscillator may produce standing acoustic waves, observed as strong anomalies in the oscillator response. This can happen in helium fluids for both first and second sound under various conditions. We study the character of such modes by computational methods for typical fork geometries in a cylindrical volume. Reasonable correspondence with measurements in helium mixtures both below and above 1 K is obtained. This is the regime of vigorous second sound resonances, since the speed of this unusual mode compares nicely with the typical dimensions and frequency of the tuning forks. The nontrivial geometry of the fork in the cylinder makes the problem somewhat challenging for computations.

  10. Room-temperature lasing in microring cavities with an InAs/InGaAs quantum-dot active region

    SciTech Connect

    Kryzhanovskaya, N. V. Zhukov, A. E.; Nadtochy, A. M.; Maximov, M. V.; Moiseev, E. I.; Kulagina, M. M.; Savelev, A. V.; Arakcheeva, E. M.; Lipovskii, A. A.; Zubov, F. I.; Kapsalis, A.; Mesaritakis, C.; Syvridis, D.; Mintairov, A.; Livshits, D.

    2013-10-15

    Microring cavities (diameter D = 2.7-7 {mu}m) with an active region based on InAs/InGaAs quantum dots are fabricated and their characteristics are studied by the microphotoluminescence method and near-field optical microscopy. A value of 22 000 is obtained for the Q factor of a microring cavity with the diameter D = 6 {mu}m. Lasing up to room temperature is obtained in an optically pumped ring microlaser with a diameter of D = 2.7 {mu}m.

  11. Broadband cavity electromagnetically induced transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Xiaogang; Wang Yanhua; Zhang Jiepeng; Zhu Yifu

    2011-10-15

    Cavity electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is created in a three-level atomic system confined in a cavity and coupled to a free-space control laser and is manifested as a narrow transmission peak of a probe laser coupled into the cavity mode and tuned to the two-photon Raman resonance with the control laser. Cavity EIT can be observed with a control laser detuned from the atomic transition frequency in a range limited by the vacuum Rabi splitting of two cavity-atom normal modes. This leads to the broadband cavity EIT obtained in the coupled-cavity-atom system with a free-space, broadband control laser. We report an experimental observation of broadband cavity EIT in cold Rb atoms with a frequency-modulated control laser and discuss its application in multichannel and multifrequency light memory.

  12. Microstructure analysis of Fe3O4 heated by microwaves in a TE10 mode cavity: surface and volume characterization.

    PubMed

    Kato, Tomotsugu; Kobayashi, Kosei; Yoshikawa, Noboru; Taniguchi, Shoji

    2011-01-01

    Detailed observations of the single mode H-field heated magnetite was conducted. The heated magnetite contains a shiny area, which exists in the width of 5 mm and thickness in 1 mm. The observation of the area reveals wavy surface patterns. The microstructures of the shiny area consists of an undefined phase and a magnetite phase which fills the space among the undefined phases. The XRD pattern from the shiny area is different from that of the random magnetite crystals, which is caused by the magnetite grains having almost same orientation in large area. There are banded areas surrounding the undefined phase of several microns in thickness, in which the existence of nano-sized crystals is indicated by means of EBSD and TEM.

  13. Whistler mode illumination of the plasmaspheric resonant cavity via in situ injection of ELF/VLF waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, P.; Inan, U. S.; Bell, T. F.

    2006-10-01

    Numerical ray tracing indicates that the in situ injection of whistler mode waves of 1 kHz to 4 kHz can be used to illuminate the inner radiation belts and slot region. These results were derived by using the Stanford VLF Ray Tracing Program to simulate sources placed at a total of six points in the inner magnetosphere: L = 1.5, L = 2.0, and L = 2.5 at two geomagnetic latitudes, the equator and a latitude of 20° along each field line. The results demonstrate that an in situ source, by varying the frequency of the injected waves, can illuminate L shells both higher and lower than the source site, with wave frequencies below (above) the local lower hybrid resonance, fLHR, moving to higher (lower) L shells. Accounting for the limitations that would be imposed by a practical antenna immersed in the magnetospheric medium restricts the radiating wave frequency, f, to 0.9 fLHR ≤ F < (fLHR + 1 kHz), and the wave normal angle at injection to no farther than 3° from the resonance cone. Even after accounting for these restrictions, it requires only three in situ sources placed at the above locations to illuminate 1.4 ≃ L ≃ 2.7, which comprises the bulk of the inner radiation belt.

  14. Monochromatic radio frequency accelerating cavity

    DOEpatents

    Giordano, S.

    1984-02-09

    A radio frequency resonant cavity having a fundamental resonant frequency and characterized by being free of spurious modes. A plurality of spaced electrically conductive bars are arranged in a generally cylindrical array within the cavity to define a chamber between the bars and an outer solid cylindrically shaped wall of the cavity. A first and second plurality of mode perturbing rods are mounted in two groups at determined random locations to extend radially and axially into the cavity thereby to perturb spurious modes and cause their fields to extend through passageways between the bars and into the chamber. At least one body of lossy material is disposed within the chamber to damp all spurious modes that do extend into the chamber thereby enabling the cavity to operate free of undesired spurious modes.

  15. Monochromatic radio frequency accelerating cavity

    DOEpatents

    Giordano, Salvatore

    1985-01-01

    A radio frequency resonant cavity having a fundamental resonant frequency and characterized by being free of spurious modes. A plurality of spaced electrically conductive bars are arranged in a generally cylindrical array within the cavity to define a chamber between the bars and an outer solid cylindrically shaped wall of the cavity. A first and second plurality of mode perturbing rods are mounted in two groups at determined random locations to extend radially and axially into the cavity thereby to perturb spurious modes and cause their fields to extend through passageways between the bars and into the chamber. At least one body of lossy material is disposed within the chamber to damp all spurious modes that do extend into the chamber thereby enabling the cavity to operate free of undesired spurious modes.

  16. Activity of antimicrobial peptide mimetics in the oral cavity: I. Activity against biofilms of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Hua, J; Yamarthy, R; Felsenstein, S; Scott, R W; Markowitz, K; Diamond, G

    2010-12-01

    Naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides hold promise as therapeutic agents against oral pathogens such as Candida albicans but numerous difficulties have slowed their development. Synthetic, non-peptidic analogs that mimic the properties of these peptides have many advantages and exhibit potent, selective antimicrobial activity. Several series of mimetics (with molecular weight < 1000) were developed and screened against oral Candida strains as a proof-of-principle for their antifungal properties. One phenylalkyne and several arylamide compounds with reduced mammalian cytotoxicities were found to be active against C. albicans. These compounds demonstrated rapid fungicidal activity in liquid culture even in the presence of saliva, and demonstrated synergy with standard antifungal agents. When assayed against biofilms grown on denture acrylic, the compounds exhibited potent fungicidal activity as measured by metabolic and fluorescent viability assays. Repeated passages in sub-minimum inhibitory concentration levels did not lead to resistant Candida, in contrast to fluconazole. Our results demonstrate the proof-of principle for the use of these compounds as anti-Candida agents, and their further testing is warranted as novel anti-Candida therapies.

  17. Activity of Antimicrobial Peptide Mimetics in the Oral Cavity: I. Activity Against Biofilms of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Jianyuan; Yamarthy, Radha; Felsenstein, Shaina; Scott, Richard W.; Markowitz, Kenneth; Diamond, Gill

    2010-01-01

    Summary Naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides hold promise as therapeutic agents against oral pathogens such as Candida albicans, however numerous difficulties have slowed their development. Synthetic, non-peptidic analogs that mimic the properties of these peptides have many advantages and exhibit potent, selective antimicrobial activity. Several series of mimetics (MW <1,000) were developed and screened against oral Candida strains as a proof-of-principle for their antifungal properties. One phenylalkyne and several arylamide compounds with reduced mammalian cytotoxicities were found to be active against C. albicans. These compounds demonstrated rapid fungicidal activity in liquid culture even in the presence of saliva, and demonstrated synergy with standard antifungal agents. When assayed against biofilms grown on denture acrylic, the compounds exhibited potent fungicidal activity as measured by metabolic and fluorescent viability assays. Repeated passages in sub-MIC levels did not lead to resistant Candida in contrast to fluconazole. Our results demonstrate the proof-of principle for the use of these compounds as anti-Candida agents, and their further testing is warranted as novel anti-Candida therapies. PMID:21040515

  18. Antimicrobial activity of pure platelet-rich plasma against microorganisms isolated from oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Autologous platelet concentrates (PCs) have been extensively used in a variety of medical fields to promote soft and hard tissue regeneration. The significance behind their use lies in the abundance of growth factors in platelets α-granules that promotes wound healing. In addition, antibacterial properties of PCs against various bacteria have been recently pointed out. In this study, the antimicrobial effect of pure platelet-rich plasma (P-PRP) was evaluated against oral cavity microorganisms such as Enterococcus faecalis, Candida albicans, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus oralis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Blood samples were obtained from 17 patients who underwent oral surgery procedures involving the use of P-PRP. The antibacterial activity of P-PRP, evaluated as the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), was determined through the microdilution twofold serial method. Results P-PRP inhibited the growth of Enterococcus faecalis, Candida albicans, Streptococcus agalactiae and Streptococcus oralis, but not of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Conclusions P-PRP is a potentially useful substance in the fight against postoperative infections. This might represent a valuable property in adjunct to the enhancement of tissue regeneration. PMID:23442413

  19. Platelet Serotonin Transporter Function Predicts Default-Mode Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kasess, Christian H.; Meyer, Bernhard M.; Hofmaier, Tina; Diers, Kersten; Bartova, Lucie; Pail, Gerald; Huf, Wolfgang; Uzelac, Zeljko; Hartinger, Beate; Kalcher, Klaudius; Perkmann, Thomas; Haslacher, Helmuth; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Kasper, Siegfried; Freissmuth, Michael; Windischberger, Christian; Willeit, Matthäus; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Esterbauer, Harald; Brocke, Burkhard; Moser, Ewald; Sitte, Harald H.; Pezawas, Lukas

    2014-01-01

    Background The serotonin transporter (5-HTT) is abundantly expressed in humans by the serotonin transporter gene SLC6A4 and removes serotonin (5-HT) from extracellular space. A blood-brain relationship between platelet and synaptosomal 5-HT reuptake has been suggested, but it is unknown today, if platelet 5-HT uptake can predict neural activation of human brain networks that are known to be under serotonergic influence. Methods A functional magnetic resonance study was performed in 48 healthy subjects and maximal 5-HT uptake velocity (Vmax) was assessed in blood platelets. We used a mixed-effects multilevel analysis technique (MEMA) to test for linear relationships between whole-brain, blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) activity and platelet Vmax. Results The present study demonstrates that increases in platelet Vmax significantly predict default-mode network (DMN) suppression in healthy subjects independent of genetic variation within SLC6A4. Furthermore, functional connectivity analyses indicate that platelet Vmax is related to global DMN activation and not intrinsic DMN connectivity. Conclusion This study provides evidence that platelet Vmax predicts global DMN activation changes in healthy subjects. Given previous reports on platelet-synaptosomal Vmax coupling, results further suggest an important role of neuronal 5-HT reuptake in DMN regulation. PMID:24667541

  20. Cavity magnomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Chang-Ling; Zhang, Xufeng; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong

    2016-05-01

    Recently, cavity magnonics has attracted much attention for potential applications of coherent information transduction and hybrid quantum devices. The magnon is a collective spin wave excitation in ferromagnetic material. It is magnetically tunability, with long coherence time and non-reciprocical interaction with electro-magnetic fields. We report the coherent coupling between magnon, microwave photon and phonon. First, we demonstrate strong coupling and ultrastrong coupling between the magnon in YIG sphere and microwave photon in three-dimensional cavity. Then, based on the hybridized magnon-photon modes, we observe the triply resonant magnon-mcirowave photon-phonon coupling, where the ultrahigh-Q mechanical vibration of YIG sphere is dispersively coupled with the magnon via magnetostrictive interaction. We observe interesting phenomena, including electromagnetically induced transparency/absorption and parametric amplification. In particular, benefit from the large tunability of the magnon, we demonstrate a tunable microwave amplifier with gain as high as 30 dB. The single crystal YIG also has excellent optical properties, and thus provide a unique platform bridging MHz, GHz and THz information carriers. Finally, we present the latest progress towards coherent magnon to optical photon conversion.

  1. Analysis and active compensation of microphonics in continuous wave narrow-bandwidth superconducting cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, A.; Anders, W.; Kugeler, O.; Knobloch, J.

    2010-08-01

    Many proposals for next generation light sources based on single pass free electron lasers or energy recovery linac facilities require a continuous wave (cw) driven superconducting linac. The effective beam loading in such machines is very small and in principle the cavities can be operated at a bandwidth of a few Hz and with less than a few kW of rf power. However, a power reserve is required to ensure field stability. A major error source is the mechanical microphonics detuning of the niobium cavities. To understand the influence of cavity detuning on longitudinal beam stability, a measurement program has been started at the horizontal cavity test facility HoBiCaT at HZB to study TESLA-type cavities. The microphonics detuning spectral content, peak detuning values, and the driving terms for these mechanical oscillations have been analyzed. In combination with the characterization of cw-adapted fast tuning systems based on the piezoelectric effect this information has been used to design a detuning compensation algorithm. It has been shown that a compensation factor between 2-7 is achievable, reducing the typical detuning of 2-3 Hz rms to below 0.5 Hz rms. These results were included in rf-control simulations of the cavities, and it was demonstrated that a phase stability below 0.02° can be achieved.

  2. Diagnostic for two-mode variable valve activation device

    SciTech Connect

    Fedewa, Andrew M

    2014-01-07

    A method is provided for diagnosing a multi-mode valve train device which selectively provides high lift and low lift to a combustion valve of an internal combustion engine having a camshaft phaser actuated by an electric motor. The method includes applying a variable electric current to the electric motor to achieve a desired camshaft phaser operational mode and commanding the multi-mode valve train device to a desired valve train device operational mode selected from a high lift mode and a low lift mode. The method also includes monitoring the variable electric current and calculating a first characteristic of the parameter. The method also includes comparing the calculated first characteristic against a predetermined value of the first characteristic measured when the multi-mode valve train device is known to be in the desired valve train device operational mode.

  3. Crystal Structures of a Multidrug-Resistant Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Protease Reveal an Expanded Active-Site Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Logsdon, Bradley C.; Vickrey, John F.; Martin, Philip; Proteasa, Gheorghe; Koepke, Jay I.; Terlecky, Stanley R.; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Winters, Mark A.; Merigan, Thomas C.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2010-03-08

    The goal of this study was to use X-ray crystallography to investigate the structural basis of resistance to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitors. We overexpressed, purified, and crystallized a multidrug-resistant (MDR) HIV-1 protease enzyme derived from a patient failing on several protease inhibitor-containing regimens. This HIV-1 variant contained codon mutations at positions 10, 36, 46, 54, 63, 71, 82, 84, and 90 that confer drug resistance to protease inhibitors. The 1.8-{angstrom} crystal structure of this MDR patient isolate reveals an expanded active-site cavity. The active-site expansion includes position 82 and 84 mutations due to the alterations in the amino acid side chains from longer to shorter (e.g., V82A and I84V). The MDR isolate 769 protease 'flaps' stay open wider, and the difference in the flap tip distances in the MDR 769 variant is 12 {angstrom}. The MDR 769 protease crystal complexes with lopinavir and DMP450 reveal completely different binding modes. The network of interactions between the ligands and the MDR 769 protease is completely different from that seen with the wild-type protease-ligand complexes. The water molecule-forming hydrogen bonds bridging between the two flaps and either the substrate or the peptide-based inhibitor are lacking in the MDR 769 clinical isolate. The S1, S1', S3, and S3' pockets show expansion and conformational change. Surface plasmon resonance measurements with the MDR 769 protease indicate higher k{sub off} rates, resulting in a change of binding affinity. Surface plasmon resonance measurements provide k{sub on} and k{sub off} data (K{sub d} = k{sub off}/k{sub on}) to measure binding of the multidrug-resistant protease to various ligands. This MDR 769 protease represents a new antiviral target, presenting the possibility of designing novel inhibitors with activity against the open and expanded protease forms.

  4. Default-mode-like network activation in awake rodents.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Jaymin; Baker, Scott J; Chandran, Prasant; Miller, Loan; Lee, Younglim; Marek, Gerard J; Sakoglu, Unal; Chin, Chih-Liang; Luo, Feng; Fox, Gerard B; Day, Mark

    2011-01-01

    During wakefulness and in absence of performing tasks or sensory processing, the default-mode network (DMN), an intrinsic central nervous system (CNS) network, is in an active state. Non-human primate and human CNS imaging studies have identified the DMN in these two species. Clinical imaging studies have shown that the pattern of activity within the DMN is often modulated in various disease states (e.g., Alzheimer's, schizophrenia or chronic pain). However, whether the DMN exists in awake rodents has not been characterized. The current data provides evidence that awake rodents also possess 'DMN-like' functional connectivity, but only subsequent to habituation to what is initially a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) environment as well as physical restraint. Specifically, the habituation process spanned across four separate scanning sessions (Day 2, 4, 6 and 8). At Day 8, significant (p<0.05) functional connectivity was observed amongst structures such as the anterior cingulate (seed region), retrosplenial, parietal, and hippocampal cortices. Prior to habituation (Day 2), functional connectivity was only detected (p<0.05) amongst CNS structures known to mediate anxiety (i.e., anterior cingulate (seed region), posterior hypothalamic area, amygdala and parabracial nucleus). In relating functional connectivity between cingulate-default-mode and cingulate-anxiety structures across Days 2-8, a significant inverse relationship (r = -0.65, p = 0.0004) was observed between these two functional interactions such that increased cingulate-DMN connectivity corresponded to decreased cingulate anxiety network connectivity. This investigation demonstrates that the cingulate is an important component of both the rodent DMN-like and anxiety networks.

  5. Tailoring surface plasmon resonance and dipole cavity plasmon modes of scattering cross section spectra on the single solid-gold/gold-shell nanorod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou Chau, Yuan-Fong; Lim, Chee Ming; Lee, Chuanyo; Huang, Hung Ji; Lin, Chun-Ting; Kumara, N. T. R. N.; Yoong, Voo Nyuk; Chiang, Hai-Pang

    2016-09-01

    Tunable surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and dipole cavity plasmon modes of the scattering cross section (SCS) spectra on the single solid-gold/gold-shell nanorod have been numerically investigated by using the finite element method. Various effects, such as the influence of SCS spectra under x- and y-polarizations on the surface of the single solid-gold/gold-shell nanorod, are discussed in detail. With the single gold-shell nanorod, one can independently tune the relative SCS spectrum width by controlling the rod length and rod diameter, and the surface scattering by varying the shell thickness and polarization direction, as well as the dipole peak energy. These behaviors are consistent with the properties of localized SPRs and offer a way to optically control and produce selected emission wavelengths from the single solid-gold/gold-shell nanorod. The electric field and magnetic distributions provide us a qualitative idea of the geometrical properties of the single solid-gold/gold-shell nanorod on plasmon resonance.

  6. Dielectric properties of oil sands at 2.45 GHz with TE1,0,11 mode determined by a rectangular cavity resonator.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, Levent; Akyel, Cevdet; Ghannouchi, Fadhel M

    2011-01-01

    Oil obtained from oil sands resources constitute an important portion of the oil industry in Canada. Extraction of the bitumen from oil sands is very crucial process because of its cost and environmental impact. Microwave energy applicators by heating oil sands at microwave frequencies can be an excellent alternative to extract bitumen with the advantages of being potentially cost-effective and environmentally friendly method of extraction. In order to design and manufacture a microwave energy applicator, its dielectric properties must be known. In this study, as the first part of our ultimate microwave energy applicator project, in advance, the complex permittivity of oil sands was measured by using rectangular cavity resonator, designed and fabricated in Ecole Polytechnique de Montréal laboratories, at 2.45 GHz with TE1,0,1 mode. The accuracy of the permittivity measurement results obtained with the developed system was verified against those obtained using a commercial open-ended probe system as well the values of well known materials documented in open literature. Since there is no study found in the literature about the complex permittivity values of oil sands at 2.45 GHz, the present study would be of great help and important guide for those who plan to design and manufacture microwave energy applicators in order to extract the bitumen from the oil sands. PMID:24427869

  7. CAVITY EXCITATION CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Franck, J.V.

    1959-10-20

    An electronic oscillator is described for energizing a resonant cavity and to a system for stabilizing the operatin g frequency of the oscillator at the particular frequency necessary to establish a particular preferred field configuration or mode in the cavity, in this instance a linear accelerator. A freely rnnning oscillator has an output coupled to a resonant cavity wherein a field may be built up at any one of several adjacent frequencies. A pickup loop in the cavity is suitably shielded and positioned in the cavity so that only energy at the panticular desired frequency is fed back to stabilize the oscillator. A phase and gain control is in cluded in the feedback line.

  8. Cavity-state preparation using adiabatic transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Jonas; Andersson, Erika

    2005-05-01

    We show how to prepare a variety of cavity field states for multiple cavities. The state preparation technique used is related to the method of stimulated adiabatic Raman passage. The cavity modes are coupled by atoms, making it possible to transfer an arbitrary cavity field state from one cavity to another and also to prepare nontrivial cavity field states. In particular, we show how to prepare entangled states of two or more cavities, such as an Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen state and a W state, as well as various entangled superpositions of coherent states in different cavities, including Schrödinger cat states. The theoretical considerations are supported by numerical simulations.

  9. Optical filter finesses enhancement based on nested coupled cavities and active medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adib, George A.; Sabry, Yasser M.; Khalil, Diaa

    2016-04-01

    Optical filters with relatively large FSR and narrow linewidth are simultaneously needed for different applications. The ratio between the FSR and the 3-dB linewidth is given by finesse of the filter, which is solely determined by the different energy loss mechanisms limited by the technology advancement. In this work, we present a novel coupled-cavity configuration embedding an optical filter and a gain medium; allowing an overall finesse enhancement and simultaneous FSR and 3-dB linewidth engineering beyond the technological limits of the filter fabrication method. The configuration consists of two resonators. An active ring resonator comprises an optical gain medium and a passive resonator. In one configuration, the optical filter is the passive resonator itself. In a second configuration, the passive resonator is another ring resonator that embeds the optical filter. The presented configurations using a semiconductor optical amplifier are applied one time to a mechanically Fabry-Perot filter in the first presented configuration; and a second time to a fiber ring filter in the second presented configuration. The mechanical filter has an original 3-dB linewidth of 1nm and an FSR that is larger than 100nm while the enhanced linewidth is about 0.3nm. The fiber ring filter length is 4 m and directional coupler ratios of 90/10corresponding to a 3-dBlinewidth of about 4MHz and an FSR of 47 MHz. The enhanced 3- dBlinewidth of the overall filter configuration is 200kHz, demonstrating finesse enhancement up to20 times the original finesse of the filter.

  10. Active noise control using a distributed mode flat panel loudspeaker.

    PubMed

    Zhu, H; Rajamani, R; Dudney, J; Stelson, K A

    2003-07-01

    A flat panel distributed mode loudspeaker (DML) has many advantages over traditional cone speakers in terms of its weight, size, and durability. However, its frequency response is uneven and complex, thus bringing its suitability for active noise control (ANC) under question. This paper presents experimental results demonstrating the effective use of panel DML speakers in an ANC application. Both feedback and feedforward control techniques are considered. Effective feedback control with a flat panel speaker could open up a whole range of new noise control applications and has many advantages over feedforward control. The paper develops a new control algorithm to attenuate tonal noise of a known frequency by feedback control. However, due to the uneven response of the speakers, feedback control is found to be only moderately effective even for this narrow-band application. Feedforward control proves to be most capable for the flat panel speaker. Using feedforward control, the sound pressure level can be significantly reduced in close proximity to an error microphone. The paper demonstrates an interesting application of the flat panel in which the panel is placed in the path of sound and effectively used to block sound transmission using feedforward control. This is a new approach to active noise control enabled by the use of flat panels and can be used to prevent sound from entering into an enclosure in the first place rather than the traditional approach of attempting to cancel sound after it enters the enclosure.

  11. Tone Noise and Nearfield Pressure Produced by Jet-Cavity Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raman, Ganesh; Envia, Edmane; Bencic, Timothy J.

    1998-01-01

    Cavity flow resonance can cause numerous problems in aerospace applications. While our long-term goal is to understand cavity flows well enough to devise effective cavity resonance suppression techniques, this paper describes a fundamental study of resonant tones produced by jet-cavity interaction at subsonic and supersonic speeds. Our specific jet-cavity configuration can also be used as a test bed for evaluating active and passive flow resonance control concepts. Two significant findings emerge from this study. 1) Originally, we expected that tones produced by jet-cavity interaction would resemble cavity tones or jet tones or would involve some simple combinations of each. The experimental data do not support these expectations: instead, the jet cavity interaction produce a unique set of tones. We propose simple yet and physically insightful correlations for these tones. Although the pressure patterns on the cavity floor display very complex variations with the Mach number for a length/depth = 8 cavity, the tones correspond to the acoustic modes of the cavity-independent of flow. For a length/ depth = 3 cavity, however, a surprise emerges: the pressure patterns on the cavity floor are not so complex but the tones depend significantly on the flow. Additionally, we examine the role of external feedback unique to jet-cavity interaction. 2) Previous research led us to expect that traditional classifications (open, transitional, or closed) for cavities in an infinite flight stream would be insensitive to small changes in Mach number and would depend primarily on cavity length/depth ratios. Use of the novel high resolution photoluminescent pressure sensitive paint shows that the classifications are actually quite sensitive to jet Mach number for a length/depth = 8 cavity. However, these classifications provide no guidance whatsoever for tone amplitude or frequency. Detailed experimental data and insights presented here will assist researchers who are performing

  12. Selective oxidization cavity confinement for low threshold vertical cavity transistor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, M. K.; Liu, M.; Tan, F.; Feng, M.; Holonyak, N.

    2013-07-01

    Data are presented for a low threshold n-p-n vertical cavity transistor laser (VCTL) with improved cavity confinement by trench opening and selective oxidation. The oxide-confined VCTL with a 6.5 × 7.5 μm2 oxide aperture demonstrates a threshold base current of 1.6 mA and an optical power of 150 μW at IB = 3 mA operating at -80 °C due to the mismatch between the quantum well emission peak and the resonant cavity optical mode. The VCTL operation switching from spontaneous to coherent stimulated emission is clearly observed in optical output power L-VCE characteristics. The collector output IC-VCE characteristics demonstrate the VCTL can lase in transistor's forward-active mode with a collector current gain β = 0.48.

  13. A WRKY transcription factor recruits the SYG1-like protein SHB1 to activate gene expression and seed cavity enlargement.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xiaojun; Li, Wei; Zhou, Yun; Ni, Min

    2013-01-01

    Seed development in Arabidopsis and in many dicots involves an early proliferation of the endosperm to form a large embryo sac or seed cavity close to the size of the mature seed, followed by a second phase during which the embryo grows and replaces the endosperm. Short hypocotyl under BLUE1 (SHB1) is a member of the SYG1 protein family in fungi, Caenorhabditis elegans, flies, and mammals. SHB1 gain-of-function enhances endosperm proliferation, increases seed size, and up-regulates the expression of the WRKY transcription factor gene MINISEED3 (MINI3) and the LRR receptor kinase gene HAIKU2 (IKU2). Mutations in either IKU2 or MINI3 retard endosperm proliferation and reduce seed size. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the establishment of the seed cavity and hence the seed size remain largely unknown. Here, we show that the expression of MINI3 and IKU2 is repressed before fertilization and after 4 days after pollination (DAP), but is activated by SHB1 from 2 to 4 DAP prior to the formation of the seed cavity. SHB1 associates with their promoters but without a recognizable DNA binding motif, and this association is abolished in mini3 mutant. MINI3 binds to W-boxes in, and recruits SHB1 to, its own and IKU2 promoters. Interestingly, SHB1, but not MINI3, activates transcription of pMINI3::GUS or pIKU2::GUS. We reveal a critical developmental switch through the activation of MINI3 expression by SHB1. The recruitment of SHB1 by MINI3 to its own and IKU2 promoters represents a novel two-step amplification to counter the low expression level of IKU2, which is a trigger for endosperm proliferation and seed cavity enlargement. PMID:23505389

  14. Operation of the 56 MHz superconducting RF cavity in RHIC during run 14

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Q.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Hayes, T.; Mernick, K.; Severino, F.; Smith, K.; Zaltsman, A.

    2015-09-11

    A 56 MHz superconducting RF cavity was designed and installed in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). It is the first superconducting quarter wave resonator (QWR) operating in a high-energy storage ring. We discuss herein the cavity operation with Au+Au collisions, and with asymmetrical Au+He3 collisions. The cavity is a storage cavity, meaning that it becomes active only at the energy of experiment, after the acceleration cycle is completed. With the cavity at 300 kV, an improvement in luminosity was detected from direct measurements, and the bunch length has been reduced. The uniqueness of the QWR demands an innovative design of the higher order mode dampers with high-pass filters, and a distinctive fundamental mode damper that enables the cavity to be bypassed during the acceleration stage.

  15. Cavity-free plasmonic nanolasing enabled by dispersionless stopped light

    PubMed Central

    Pickering, Tim; Hamm, Joachim M.; Page, A. Freddie; Wuestner, Sebastian; Hess, Ortwin

    2014-01-01

    When light is brought to a standstill, its interaction with gain media increases dramatically due to a singularity in the density of optical states. Concurrently, stopped light engenders an inherent and cavity-free feedback mechanism, similar in effect to the feedback that has been demonstrated and exploited in large-scale disordered media and random lasers. Here we study the spatial, temporal and spectral signatures of lasing in planar gain-enhanced nanoplasmonic structures at near-infrared frequencies and show that the stopped-light feedback mechanism allows for nanolasing without a cavity. We reveal that in the absence of cavity-induced feedback, the subwavelength lasing mode forms dynamically as a phase-locked superposition of quasi dispersion-free waveguide modes. This mechanism proves remarkably robust against interface roughness and offers a new route towards nanolasing, the experimental realization of ultra-thin surface emitting lasers, and cavity-free active quantum plasmonics. PMID:25230337

  16. Herbicide activity of monosulfuron and its mode of action.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhi-Jin; Ai, Ying-Wei; Qian, Chuan-Fan; Li, Zheng-Ming

    2005-01-01

    Monosulfuron was developed for weed control in the field of wheat (Triticum, aestivum L.) and millet (Panicum miliaceum L.) with the application rate ranging from 15 to 60 g ai/hm2. Herbicidal activity of monosulfuron was evaluated systematically by bioassay using maize (Zea mays L.) taproot as indicator and weed fresh weight of Acalypha australis L. and Echinochloa phyllopogon. Maize CAU 3138 was the most tolerant cultivars to monosulfuron with IC50 (concentration of 50% inhibition) of 85 microg/kg, Yedan 13 was one of the most sensitive cultivars to monosulfuron with IC50 of 6.4 microg/kg. Monosulfuron inhibited the growth of Acalypha australis L. strongly comparing with that of Echinochloa phyllopogon. Monosulfuron was a good acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitor in vitro, the I50 (50% of inhibition) of monosulfuron, chlorsulfuron, tribenuron-methyl and nicosulfuron for CAU 3138 were 32, 2, 19 and 26 nmol/L respectively, for Yedan 13 the I50 were 15, 3, 17 and 65 nmol/L respectively. In vivo ALS inhibition occurred only in higher concentration of 4 sulfonylurea herbicide tested. Comparison study of this test indicated that the mode of action of monosulfuron was the same as that of other sulfonylurea herbicides such as chlorsulfuron, tribenuron-methyl and nicosulfuron, they were all inhibitors targeted at the ALS. PMID:16083111

  17. Modes of action of three disinfectant active substances: a review.

    PubMed

    Wessels, Stephen; Ingmer, Hanne

    2013-12-01

    This review deals with three categories of active substances for disinfectant products, their modes of action (MOA), and how MOA can help predict propensity for resistance in microorganisms. Within the European Union applications for approval of disinfectants of all kinds must be submitted in a few years, and documentation on MOA and resistance must be part of those applications. Peracetic acid is an unspecific, pervasive oxidizer of C-C double bonds and reduced atoms. This MOA would imply poor chance for development of resistance in microorganisms, as borne out by the absence of such reports in the literature. The quaternary ammonium compounds (QAC's) are much more specific in their antimicrobial mechanism. Even very low concentrations cause damage to the cytoplasmic membrane due to perturbation of the bilayers by the molecules' alkyl chains. Development of microbial resistance to QAC's, as well as cross-resistance to antibiotics, are particularly well documented. The polymer PHMB is antimicrobial because it disturbs the cell membrane's bilayer by interacting with it along the surface of the membrane. Resistance to the polymer appears not to develop despite many years of use in many fields. However, PHMB's toxicity to humans upon inhalation dictates great caution when deploying the substance.

  18. Technique for locking a second-harmonic generation cavity with an electro-optic active nonlinear crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Cesar, Claudio L.

    2001-08-01

    A new technique for generating an error signal for locking a second-harmonic generation (SHG) enhancement cavity is presented. The calculations are developed within a linear system framework treated with a Laplace transform. The error-signal generation is based on FM sidebands, but it differs from the Pound--Drever--Hall technique by performing the modulation on the (assumed) electro-optic active nonlinear crystal in the cavity. This new technique for generating the error signal has some advantages over the former one in that (i) the shape of the error signal is independent of the relative phase of the rf signal between the photodiode and the local oscillator; (ii) it provides a handy, high-bandwidth actuator to improve the cavity lock, which can improve the average SHG power; and (iii) it decreases cost and complexity by not requiring an external electro-optical modulator. The specific case of SHG in KNbO{sub 3} is treated as an example of the feasibility of the technique. {copyright} 2001 Optical Society of America

  19. A novel active optical approach for acceleration measurement based on a Y-shaped cavity dual-frequency laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Guangzong; Long, Xingwu; Zhang, Bin; Jin, Shilong

    2012-03-01

    A novel active optical approach for acceleration measurement based on a Y-shaped cavity dual-frequency laser is presented and demonstrated. Applied acceleration causes a change in the refractivity of sensing gas in one of the two cavities, resulting in a beat frequency variation between two orthogonal polarized lights. As a result, this approach produces a modulation of beat frequency strictly proportional to the input acceleration. Preliminary experiments with a 632.8 nm Y-shaped cavity He-Ne dual-frequency laser confirm the validity of the laser sensor. The experimental results show that the laser sensor in this approach characterizes a nearly linear response to the input acceleration, which is a projection of gravitational acceleration. The experimental values of the scale factors are mostly in good agreement with theoretical ones. By optimizing the optical and geometrical parameters of the laser sensor, an acceleration measurement resolution of 10 -5-10 -6 gravitational acceleration (within ±5 g measurement range) could be expected. Furthermore, we investigate the principle about the sign of the scale factor in detail, and propose a simple but efficient method to distinguish the direction of the acceleration acted on the laser sensor.

  20. Shocks and Cavities from Multiple Outbursts in the Galaxy Group NGC 5813: A Window to Active Galactic Nucleus Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, S. W.; Forman, W. R.; Giacintucci, S.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Sun, M.; Jones, C.; Churazov, E.; David, L. P.; Kraft, R.; Donahue, M.; Blanton, E. L.; Simionescu, A.; Werner, N.

    2011-01-01

    We present results from new Chandra, GMRT, and SOAR observations of NGC 5813, the dominant central galaxy in a nearby galaxy group. The system shows three pairs of collinear cavities at 1 kpc, 8 kpc, and 20 kpc from the central source, from three distinct outbursts of the central active galactic nucleus (AGN), which occurred 3 × 106, 2 × 107, and 9 × 107 yr ago. The Hα and X-ray observations reveal filaments of cool gas that has been uplifted by the X-ray cavities. The inner two cavity pairs are filled with radio-emitting plasma, and each pair is associated with an elliptical surface brightness edge, which we unambiguously identify as shocks (with measured temperature jumps) with Mach numbers of M ≈ 1.7 and M ≈ 1.5 for the inner and outer shocks, respectively. Such clear signatures from three distinct AGN outbursts in an otherwise dynamically relaxed system provide a unique opportunity to study AGN feedback and outburst history. The mean power of the two most recent outbursts differs by a factor of six, from (1.5-10)×1042 erg s-1, indicating that the mean jet power changes significantly over long (~107 yr) timescales. The total energy output of the most recent outburst is also more than an order of magnitude less than the total energy of the previous outburst (1.5 × 1056 erg versus 4 × 1057 erg), which may be a result of the lower mean power, or may indicate that the most recent outburst is ongoing. The outburst interval implied by both the shock and cavity ages (~107 yr) indicates that, in this system, shock heating alone is sufficient to balance radiative cooling close to the central AGN, which is the relevant region for regulating feedback between the intracluster medium and the central supermassive black hole.

  1. Dielectric cavity relativistic magnetron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, S. M. A.

    2010-02-01

    An alteration in the structure of the A6 relativistic magnetron is proposed, which introduces an extra degree of freedom to its design and enhances many of its quality factors. This modification involves the partial filling of the cavities of the device with a low-loss dielectric material. The operation of a dielectric-filled A6 is simulated; the results indicate single-mode operation at the desired π mode and a substantially cleaner rf spectrum.

  2. Crab Cavities for Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.; Carter, R.; Dexter, A.; Tahir, I.; Beard, C.; Dykes, M.; Goudket, P.; Kalinin, A.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; Shulte, D.; Jones, Roger M.; Bellantoni, L.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; Khabouline, T.; Latina, A.; Adolphsen, C.; Li, Z.; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2011-11-08

    Crab cavities have been proposed for a wide number of accelerators and interest in crab cavities has recently increased after the successful operation of a pair of crab cavities in KEK-B. In particular crab cavities are required for both the ILC and CLIC linear colliders for bunch alignment. Consideration of bunch structure and size constraints favour a 3.9 GHz superconducting, multi-cell cavity as the solution for ILC, whilst bunch structure and beam-loading considerations suggest an X-band copper travelling wave structure for CLIC. These two cavity solutions are very different in design but share complex design issues. Phase stabilisation, beam loading, wakefields and mode damping are fundamental issues for these crab cavities. Requirements and potential design solutions will be discussed for both colliders.

  3. Optical Resonant Cavity in a Nanotaper

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang Hyun; Goto, Takenari; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Chang, Jiho; Yao, Takafumi

    2010-01-01

    The present study describes an optical resonant cavity in a nanotaper with scale reduction from micro to several nanometers. Both experimental results and a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD)-based simulation suggested that the nanometer-scale taper with a diameter similar to the wavelength of light acted as a mirror, which facilitated the formation of a laser cavity and caused lasing in ZnO nanotapers. As the light inside the nanotaper propagated toward the apex, the lateral mode was reduced and reflection occurred. This report suggests that use of the resonant optical cavities in nanotapers might result in novel active and passive optical components, which will broaden the horizons of photonic technology.

  4. GaN-based vertical-cavity laser performance improvements using tunnel-junction-cascaded active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Piprek, Joachim

    2014-07-07

    This Letter investigates the output power enhancement achieved by tunnel junction insertion into the InGaN multi-quantum well (MQW) active region of a 410 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser which enables the repeated use of carriers for light generation (carrier recycling). While the number of quantum wells remains unchanged, the tunnel junction eliminates absorption caused by the non-uniform MQW carrier distribution. The thermal resistance drops and the excess bias lead to a surprisingly small rise in self-heating.

  5. Active suppression of air refractive index fluctuation using a Fabry-Perot cavity and a piezoelectric volume actuator

    SciTech Connect

    Banh, Tuan Quoc; Ohkubo, Yuria; Murai, Yoshinosuke; Aketagawa, Masato

    2011-01-01

    Air refractive index fluctuation ({Delta}n{sub air}) is one of the largest uncertainty sources in precision interferometry systems that require a resolution of nanometer order or less. We introduce a method for the active suppression of {Delta}n{sub air} inside a normal air-environment chamber using a Fabry-Perot cavity and a piezoelectric volume actuator. The temporal air refractive index (n{sub air}) at a local point is maintained constant with an expanded uncertainty of {approx}4.2x10{sup -9} (k=2), a sufficiently low uncertainty for precise measurements unaffected by {Delta}n{sub air} to be made inside a chamber.

  6. [Impact of abdominal cavity open EHF irradiation on activity of adhesive process in peritonitis].

    PubMed

    Boĭko, V V; Ivanova, Iu V; Gamidov, A N; Andreeshchev, S A

    2015-01-01

    In experiment on 45 rats a purulent peritonitis was simulated. There was established, that on background of a standard therapy for peritonitis application of abdominal cavity open irradiation of extreme high frequency (EHF) have promoted rapid stabilization of the lipid metabolism indices and the blood coagulation system, the reduction of intensity of lipids peroxidal oxidation processes and severity of systemic inflammatory reaction. Under the influence of complex treatment the severity of adhesive process was reduced in 5.4 times, comparing with such in animals, to whom a standard treatment was conducted only. The revealed pathogenetic aspects of the adhesions formation witnesses the expediency to add EHF irradiation to complex therapy of peritonitis.

  7. High peak-power picosecond pulse generation at 1.26 µm using a quantum-dot-based external-cavity mode-locked laser and tapered optical amplifier.

    PubMed

    Ding, Y; Aviles-Espinosa, R; Cataluna, M A; Nikitichev, D; Ruiz, M; Tran, M; Robert, Y; Kapsalis, A; Simos, H; Mesaritakis, C; Xu, T; Bardella, P; Rossetti, M; Krestnikov, I; Livshits, D; Montrosset, Ivo; Syvridis, D; Krakowski, M; Loza-Alvarez, P; Rafailov, E

    2012-06-18

    In this paper, we present the generation of high peak-power picosecond optical pulses in the 1.26 μm spectral band from a repetition-rate-tunable quantum-dot external-cavity passively mode-locked laser (QD-ECMLL), amplified by a tapered quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifier (QD-SOA). The laser emission wavelength was controlled through a chirped volume Bragg grating which was used as an external cavity output coupler. An average power of 208.2 mW, pulse energy of 321 pJ, and peak power of 30.3 W were achieved. Preliminary nonlinear imaging investigations indicate that this system is promising as a high peak-power pulsed light source for nonlinear bio-imaging applications across the 1.0 μm - 1.3 μm spectral range. PMID:22714493

  8. Fate of gamma-interferon-activated killer blood monocytes adoptively transferred into the abdominal cavity of patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, H.C.; Keenan, A.M.; Woodhouse, C.; Ottow, R.T.; Miller, P.; Steller, E.P.; Foon, K.A.; Abrams, P.G.; Beman, J.; Larson, S.M.

    1987-11-15

    Five patients with colorectal cancer widely metastatic to peritoneal surfaces have been treated i.p. with infusions of autologous blood monocytes made cytotoxic by in vitro incubation with human gamma-interferon. The monocytes were purified by a combination of cytapheresis and counter-current centrifugal elutriation procedures; each week approximately 350 million activated monocytes were given to patients as adoptive immunotherapy by a single i.p. instillation. On the eighth cycle of treatment the trafficking of i.p. infused blood monocytes was studied in two patients by prelabeling the cells with /sup 111/In. These activated cells became distributed widely within the peritoneal cavity. Two and 5 days after infusion their position within the peritoneum had not changed. When peritoneal specimens were obtained 36 h after /sup 111/In-labeled monocyte infusion, labeled monocytes were demonstrated to be associated with the serosal surfaces by autoradiographic analysis. Scintiscanning structures outside the abdominal cavity revealed that /sup 111/In-labeled monocytes infused i.p. did not traffic to other organs during the 5 days of the study. We conclude that i.p. adoptive transfer of autologous killer blood monocytes is an effective way of delivering these cytotoxic cells to sites of tumor burden on peritoneal surfaces in these cancer patients.

  9. Vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser device

    DOEpatents

    Hadley, G. Ronald; Lear, Kevin L.; Awyoung, Adelbert; Choquette, Kent D.

    1999-01-01

    A vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser device. The vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) device comprises one or more VCSELs with each VCSEL having a mode-control region thereabout, with the mode-control region forming an optical cavity with an effective cavity length different from the effective cavity length within each VCSEL. Embodiments of the present invention can be formed as single VCSELs and as one- or two-dimensional arrays of VCSELs, with either an index-guided mode of operation or an index anti-guided mode of operation being defined by a sign of the difference in the two effective cavity lengths.

  10. Power coupler for the ILC crab cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, G.; Dexter, A.; Jenkins, R.; Beard, C.; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.A.; Bellantoni, Leo; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The ILC crab cavity will require the design of an appropriate power coupler. The beam-loading in dipole mode cavities is considerably more variable than accelerating cavities, hence simulations have been performed to establish the required external Q. Simulations of a suitable coupler were then performed and were verified using a normal conducting prototype with variable coupler tips.

  11. Analysis of the characteristics of solar oscillation modes in active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabello-Soares, M. Cristina; Bogart, Richard S.; Basu, Sarbani

    2008-10-01

    We analyze the characteristics of high-degree solar acoustic modes in the vicinity of magnetic active regions and compare with those of magnetically quiet regions at the same latitude and at nearly the same time. We applied ring-diagram analysis to GONG+ and MDI data, using the 13-parameter mode-fitting model of Basu & Antia [1]. We explore the correlations of variations in mode frequencies, amplitudes, widths, and asymmetries with the total magnetic flux of the analyzed regions.

  12. External kink modes as a model for MHD activity associated with ELMs

    SciTech Connect

    Manickam, J.

    1992-01-01

    Tokamak plasmas in the high confinement mode of operation are known to exhibit edge localized activity referred to as ELMs. A model is proposed for the underlying cause in terms of the external kink mode. The build up of the current density near the plasma edge is shown to decrease the shear in the safety-factor, q, profile and lead to destabilization of the kink mode. The role of the plasma geometry and equilibrium profiles is discussed.

  13. CONTROLLING THE CHARACTERISTICS OF LASER PULSES: Obtaining monochromatic radiation from a free-electron laser by means of a system of coupled cavities (a mode selection method)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, V. I.; Bessonov, Evgenii G.; Vnukova, M. L.

    1993-06-01

    The idea of reducing the wavelength spread of the output from parametric free-electron lasers by means of a system of coupled cavities has been studied. Possibilities for optimizing the parameters of the system have also been studied. The intensity of the radiation from the laser can be kept essentially constant as the degree of monochromaticity is increased.

  14. Biosensing operations based on whispering-gallery-mode optical cavities in single 1.0-µm diameter hexagonal GaN microdisks grown by radio-frequency plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouno, Tetsuya; Sakai, Masaru; Kishino, Katsumi; Hara, Kazuhiko

    2016-05-01

    Biosensing operations based on a whispering-gallery-mode optical cavity in a single hexagonal GaN microdisk of approximately 1.0 µm diameter were demonstrated here. The sharp resonant peak in the photoluminescence spectrum obtained from the microdisk in aqueous sucrose solution redshifts with a change in sucrose concentration. The results indicate that an extremely small microdisk could be used as an optical transducer for sensing sugar, namely, as a biosensor. Furthermore, we investigate the relationship between the diameter of the microdisk and the sensitivity of the biosensor.

  15. Temperature-controlled encapsulation and release of an active enzyme in the cavity of a self-assembled DNA nanocage.

    PubMed

    Juul, Sissel; Iacovelli, Federico; Falconi, Mattia; Kragh, Sofie L; Christensen, Brian; Frøhlich, Rikke; Franch, Oskar; Kristoffersen, Emil L; Stougaard, Magnus; Leong, Kam W; Ho, Yi-Ping; Sørensen, Esben S; Birkedal, Victoria; Desideri, Alessandro; Knudsen, Birgitta R

    2013-11-26

    We demonstrate temperature-controlled encapsulation and release of the enzyme horseradish peroxidase using a preassembled and covalently closed three-dimensional DNA cage structure as a controllable encapsulation device. The utilized cage structure was covalently closed and composed of 12 double-stranded B-DNA helices that constituted the edges of the structure. The double stranded helices were interrupted by short single-stranded thymidine linkers constituting the cage corners except for one, which was composed by four 32 nucleotide long stretches of DNA with a sequence that allowed them to fold into hairpin structures. As demonstrated by gel-electrophoretic and fluorophore-quenching experiments this design imposed a temperature-controlled conformational transition capability to the structure, which allowed entrance or release of an enzyme cargo at 37 °C while ensuring retainment of the cargo in the central cavity of the cage at 4 °C. The entrapped enzyme was catalytically active inside the DNA cage and was able to convert substrate molecules penetrating the apertures in the DNA lattice that surrounded the central cavity of the cage. PMID:24168393

  16. Coupled-cavity drift-tube linac

    DOEpatents

    Billen, J.H.

    1996-11-26

    A coupled-cavity drift-tube linac (CCDTL) combines features of the Alvarez drift-tube linac (DTL) and the {pi}-mode coupled-cavity linac (CCL). In one embodiment, each accelerating cavity is a two-cell, 0-mode DTL. The center-to-center distance between accelerating gaps is {beta}{lambda}, where {lambda} is the free-space wavelength of the resonant mode. Adjacent accelerating cavities have oppositely directed electric fields, alternating in phase by 180 degrees. The chain of cavities operates in a {pi}/2 structure mode so the coupling cavities are nominally unexcited. The CCDTL configuration provides an rf structure with high shunt impedance for intermediate velocity charged particles, i.e., particles with energies in the 20-200 MeV range. 5 figs.

  17. Coupled-cavity drift-tube linac

    DOEpatents

    Billen, James H.

    1996-01-01

    A coupled-cavity drift-tube linac (CCDTL) combines features of the Alvarez drift-tube linac (DTL) and the .pi.-mode coupled-cavity linac (CCL). In one embodiment, each accelerating cavity is a two-cell, 0-mode DTL. The center-to-center distance between accelerating gaps is .beta..lambda., where .lambda. is the free-space wavelength of the resonant mode. Adjacent accelerating cavities have oppositely directed electric fields, alternating in phase by 180 degrees. The chain of cavities operates in a .pi./2 structure mode so the coupling cavities are nominally unexcited. The CCDTL configuration provides an rf structure with high shunt impedance for intermediate velocity charged particles, i.e., particles with energies in the 20-200 MeV range.

  18. Theoretical study of mode evolution in active long tapered multimode fiber.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chen; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu; Xu, Xiaojun; Lu, Qisheng

    2016-08-22

    A concise and effective model based on coupled mode theory to describe mode evolution in long tapered active fiber is presented in this manuscript. The mode coupling due to variation of core radius and slight perturbation have been analyzed and local gain with transverse spatial hole burning (TSHB) effect, loss and curvature have been taken into consideration in our model. On the base of this model, the mode evolution behaviors under different factors have been numerically investigated. Our model and results can provide instructive suggestions when designing long tapered fiber based laser and amplifiers. PMID:27557225

  19. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy and vibronic activity of benzo[ghi]perylene.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaofeng; Salama, Farid

    2005-07-01

    Gas-phase cavity ring-down spectroscopy of jet-cooled benzo[ghi]perylene (C22H12) in the 26 950-28 600-cm(-1) spectral range is reported for the first time. This study is part of our extensive laboratory astrophysics program for the study of interstellar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The observed spectrum shows an intermediate level structure and significant broadening and is associated with the vibronically coupled S1(1A1)<--S0(1A1) and S2(1B1)<--S0(1A1) electronic transitions. Time-dependent density-functional calculations were performed to calculate the energetics, vibrational frequencies, and normal coordinates of the S1 and S2 states. A simple vibronic model was employed to account for the vibronic interaction between the vibronic levels of the S1 and S2 states. The calculated vibronic spectrum is found to be in good agreement with the experimental spectrum. PMID:16035840

  20. Compact Superconducting Crabbing and Deflecting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    De Silva, Payagalage Subashini Uddika

    2012-09-01

    Recently, new geometries for superconducting crabbing and deflecting cavities have been developed that have significantly improved properties over those the standard TM{sub 110} cavities. They are smaller, have low surface fields, high shunt impedance and, more importantly for some of them, no lower-order-mode with a well-separated fundamental mode. This talk will present the status of the development of these cavities.

  1. Novel Geometries for the LHC Crab Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, B.; Burt, G.; Smith, J. D.A.; Rimmer, R.; Wang, H.; Delayen, J.; Calaga, R.

    2009-05-01

    In 2017 the LHC is envisioned to increase its luminosity via an upgrade. This upgrade is likely to require a large crossing angle hence a crab cavity is required to align the bunches prior to collision. There are two possible schemes for crab cavity implementation, global and local. In a global crab cavity the crab cavity is far from the IP and the bunch rotates back and forward as it traverses around the accelerator in a closed orbit. For this scheme a two-cell elliptical squashed cavity at 800 MHz is preferred. To avoid any potential beam instabilities all the parasitic modes of the cavities must be damped strongly, however crab cavities have lower order and same order modes in addition to the usual higher order modes and hence a novel damping scheme must be used to provide sufficient damping of these modes. In the local scheme two crab cavities are placed at each side of the IP two start and stop rotation of the bunches. This would require crab cavities much smaller transversely than in the global scheme but the frequency cannot be increased any higher due to the long bunch length of the LHC beam. This will require a novel compact crab cavity design. A superconducting version of a two rod coaxial deflecting cavity as a suitable design is proposed in this paper.

  2. Fuzzy-logic-based hybrid locomotion mode classification for an active pelvis orthosis: Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kebin; Parri, Andrea; Yan, Tingfang; Wang, Long; Munih, Marko; Vitiello, Nicola; Wang, Qining

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a fuzzy-logic-based hybrid locomotion mode classification method for an active pelvis orthosis. Locomotion information measured by the onboard hip joint angle sensors and the pressure insoles is used to classify five locomotion modes, including two static modes (sitting, standing still), and three dynamic modes (level-ground walking, ascending stairs, and descending stairs). The proposed method classifies these two kinds of modes first by monitoring the variation of the relative hip joint angle between the two legs within a specific period. Static states are then classified by the time-based absolute hip joint angle. As for dynamic modes, a fuzzy-logic based method is proposed for the classification. Preliminary experimental results with three able-bodied subjects achieve an off-line classification accuracy higher than 99.49%.

  3. Fuzzy-logic-based hybrid locomotion mode classification for an active pelvis orthosis: Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kebin; Parri, Andrea; Yan, Tingfang; Wang, Long; Munih, Marko; Vitiello, Nicola; Wang, Qining

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a fuzzy-logic-based hybrid locomotion mode classification method for an active pelvis orthosis. Locomotion information measured by the onboard hip joint angle sensors and the pressure insoles is used to classify five locomotion modes, including two static modes (sitting, standing still), and three dynamic modes (level-ground walking, ascending stairs, and descending stairs). The proposed method classifies these two kinds of modes first by monitoring the variation of the relative hip joint angle between the two legs within a specific period. Static states are then classified by the time-based absolute hip joint angle. As for dynamic modes, a fuzzy-logic based method is proposed for the classification. Preliminary experimental results with three able-bodied subjects achieve an off-line classification accuracy higher than 99.49%. PMID:26737144

  4. [Adaptation of acrylic resin dentures polymerized using various activation modes].

    PubMed

    Takamata, T; Inoue, Y; Hashimoto, K; Sugitou, S; Arakawa, H; Kurasawa, I

    1989-12-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the dimensional accuracy of maxillary dentures made using a conventional heat-activated PMMA resin, a pour resin, a visible light-activated resin, and a microwave-activated acrylic resin. Two simple methods for measuring dimensional accuracy were used: (1) weight of impression material entrapped between the base and master die and (2) measurement of the posterior border gap at five locations. The volume of space between the denture base and the master die was determined by (1) computation and (2) estimation. Statistical analysis (Bartlett, ANOVA and Tukey's Tests) supported the following conclusions: (1) all groups showed a processing contraction, most apparent from buccal flange to buccal flange, (2) the poorest fitting group was processed in a brass flask and a water bath at a temperature which rose from 70 to 100 degrees C, using a heat activated resin (Acron), (3) the visible light activated resin (Triad) produced dentures of intermediate accuracy, as did Acupac 20 when either heat or microwave activated, (4) the two best fitting groups were prepared from a chemically activated resin system using pressure at low heat (PER form), and the resin developed for microwave activation (Acron MC).

  5. Analysis of the visual artifact in range-gated active imaging, especially in burst mode.

    PubMed

    Matwyschuk, Alexis

    2014-09-20

    After the demonstration of the occurrence of visual artifacts with an active imaging system in burst mode in a previous paper, the analysis of this phenomenon was realized. A visual artifact resulting from a remote zone in the scene can appear in the image of the real visualized zone when the duty cycle of laser pulses is close to 50%, as in the burst mode. Therefore, the elements of this remote zone will create confusion in the image, with erroneous estimated distances. These misinterpretations can be very embarrassing to those attempting to determine the distance of a target in the scene. From the modeling realized and validated in the previous paper, the behavior of the visual artifact was analyzed with two types of burst mode used in active imaging, the duration of the laser pulse being identical to the duration of the temporal aperture of the imager. In the first mode, the width of the visualized zone is set, depending on the distance. The second mode increases the width of the visualized zone so that the foreground of the zone is constantly visible. The results showed that the distance of the visual artifacts in variable mode increased much more quickly than the distance in fixed mode. In both modes, the most intense visual artifacts appear when the range of the visualized zone remains within the first kilometer. When this range is very short, the illuminance of the visual artifact in fixed mode is much more intense than the illuminance in variable mode. On the other hand, for long distances, the illuminance of the visual artifact in variable mode is greater than the illuminance in fixed mode, but decreases quickly beyond a certain distance, making it insignificant.

  6. A single-mode external cavity diode laser using an intra-cavity atomic Faraday filter with short-term linewidth <400 kHz and long-term stability of <1 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keaveney, James; Hamlyn, William J.; Adams, Charles S.; Hughes, Ifan G.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the development of a diode laser system - the "Faraday laser" - using an atomic Faraday filter as the frequency-selective element. In contrast to typical external-cavity diode laser systems which offer tunable output frequency but require additional control systems in order to achieve a stable output frequency, our system only lases at a single frequency, set by the peak transmission frequency of the internal atomic Faraday filter. Our system has both short-term and long-term stability of less than 1 MHz, which is less than the natural linewidth of alkali-atomic D-lines, making similar systems suitable for use as a "turn-key" solution for laser-cooling experiments.

  7. Superconducting cavities and modulated RF

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, Z.D.

    1981-02-01

    If a cavity has an infinite Q/sub o/, 81.5% of the energy contained in a pulse incident upon the cavity is transferred into the cavity by the end of the pulse if the cavity Q/sub e/ is chosen so that the cavity time constant is 0.796 pulse width (T/sub a/). As Q/sug o/ decreases, the energy in the cavity at the end of the pulse decreases very slowly as long as T/sub a/ is much less than the unloaded cavity time constant, T/sub co/. SC cavities with very high Q/sub o/ enable one to obtain very high gradients with a low power cw source. At high gradients, however, one often does not attain the high Q/sub o/ predicted by theory. Therefore, if one is inteerested in attaining maximum energy in the cavity, as is the case for RF processing and diagnostics, for a given available source energy there is no point in keeping the power on for longer than 0.1 T/sub co/ because the energy expended after 0.1 T/sub co/ is wasted. Therefore, to attain high fields at moderate Q/sub o/, pulsed operation is indicated. This note derives the fields and energy stored and dissipated in the cavity when Q/sub e/ is optimized for a given T/sub a/. It shows how to use this data to measure Q/sub o/ of an SC cavity as a function of field level, how to process the cavity with high RF fields, how to operate SC cavities in the pulsed mode to obtain higher efficiencies and gradients. Experimental results are also reported.

  8. Two stage activated sludge plants--influence of different operational modes on sludge bulking and nitrification.

    PubMed

    Wandl, G; Müller-Rechberger, H; Matsché, N; Svardal, K; Winkler, S

    2002-01-01

    Conventional two stage activated sludge plants often lack sufficient nutrient removal performance due to substrate limitation for denitrification in the second stage. For the extension of the Vienna Main WWTP a two stage concept has been developed and tested by means of a pilot plant (scale 1:10.000). The new concept enables the operation of two different modes: In BYPASS-mode a portion of the primary clarifier effluent is fed directly to the second stage; the HYBRID-mode includes the exchange of mixed liquor between the two stages; over the course of the pilot plant investigations it turned out that nutrient removal is strongly increased in comparison to conventional two stage mode, but the two modes of operation lead to different results with regard to the sludge quality and the nitrification performance. BYPASS mode yields a higher SVI in both stages and a lower nitrification performance in comparison to HYBRID mode. This is caused by the negative influence of the primary effluent on the biocoenosis of the second stage. Additionally, the reduced sludge loading of the first stage in this mode results in a higher sludge age which favours the growth of filaments (Microthrix and Nocardia). In HYBRID-mode the higher load of the first stage results in a lower sludge age, fatty components are metabolized and incorporated in the sludge, thus, the growth of filaments is significantly reduced. Additionally, nitrification inhibiting substances are degraded in the first stage, which results in a higher nitrification performance in the second stage.

  9. Long wavelength vertical cavity surface emitting laser

    DOEpatents

    Choquette, Kent D.; Klem, John F.

    2005-08-16

    Selectively oxidized vertical cavity lasers emitting near 1300 nm using InGaAsN quantum wells are reported for the first time which operate continuous wave below, at and above room temperature. The lasers employ two n-type Al.sub.0.94 Ga.sub.0.06 As/GaAs distributed Bragg reflectors each with a selectively oxidized current aperture adjacent to the active region, and the top output mirror contains a tunnel junction to inject holes into the active region. Continuous wave single mode lasing is observed up to 55.degree. C.

  10. Nanofriction in Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, T; Cormick, C; Landa, H; Stojanović, Vladimir M; Demler, E; Morigi, Giovanna

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of cold trapped ions in a high-finesse resonator results from the interplay between the long-range Coulomb repulsion and the cavity-induced interactions. The latter are due to multiple scatterings of laser photons inside the cavity and become relevant when the laser pump is sufficiently strong to overcome photon decay. We study the stationary states of ions coupled with a mode of a standing-wave cavity as a function of the cavity and laser parameters, when the typical length scales of the two self-organizing processes, Coulomb crystallization and photon-mediated interactions, are incommensurate. The dynamics are frustrated and in specific limiting cases can be cast in terms of the Frenkel-Kontorova model, which reproduces features of friction in one dimension. We numerically recover the sliding and pinned phases. For strong cavity nonlinearities, they are in general separated by bistable regions where superlubric and stick-slip dynamics coexist. The cavity, moreover, acts as a thermal reservoir and can cool the chain vibrations to temperatures controlled by the cavity parameters and by the ions' phase. These features are imprinted in the radiation emitted by the cavity, which is readily measurable in state-of-the-art setups of cavity quantum electrodynamics. PMID:26684118

  11. Nanofriction in Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, T; Cormick, C; Landa, H; Stojanović, Vladimir M; Demler, E; Morigi, Giovanna

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of cold trapped ions in a high-finesse resonator results from the interplay between the long-range Coulomb repulsion and the cavity-induced interactions. The latter are due to multiple scatterings of laser photons inside the cavity and become relevant when the laser pump is sufficiently strong to overcome photon decay. We study the stationary states of ions coupled with a mode of a standing-wave cavity as a function of the cavity and laser parameters, when the typical length scales of the two self-organizing processes, Coulomb crystallization and photon-mediated interactions, are incommensurate. The dynamics are frustrated and in specific limiting cases can be cast in terms of the Frenkel-Kontorova model, which reproduces features of friction in one dimension. We numerically recover the sliding and pinned phases. For strong cavity nonlinearities, they are in general separated by bistable regions where superlubric and stick-slip dynamics coexist. The cavity, moreover, acts as a thermal reservoir and can cool the chain vibrations to temperatures controlled by the cavity parameters and by the ions' phase. These features are imprinted in the radiation emitted by the cavity, which is readily measurable in state-of-the-art setups of cavity quantum electrodynamics.

  12. Nanofriction in Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogarty, T.; Cormick, C.; Landa, H.; Stojanović, Vladimir M.; Demler, E.; Morigi, Giovanna

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of cold trapped ions in a high-finesse resonator results from the interplay between the long-range Coulomb repulsion and the cavity-induced interactions. The latter are due to multiple scatterings of laser photons inside the cavity and become relevant when the laser pump is sufficiently strong to overcome photon decay. We study the stationary states of ions coupled with a mode of a standing-wave cavity as a function of the cavity and laser parameters, when the typical length scales of the two self-organizing processes, Coulomb crystallization and photon-mediated interactions, are incommensurate. The dynamics are frustrated and in specific limiting cases can be cast in terms of the Frenkel-Kontorova model, which reproduces features of friction in one dimension. We numerically recover the sliding and pinned phases. For strong cavity nonlinearities, they are in general separated by bistable regions where superlubric and stick-slip dynamics coexist. The cavity, moreover, acts as a thermal reservoir and can cool the chain vibrations to temperatures controlled by the cavity parameters and by the ions' phase. These features are imprinted in the radiation emitted by the cavity, which is readily measurable in state-of-the-art setups of cavity quantum electrodynamics.

  13. Hydroforming of elliptical cavities

    DOE PAGES

    Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Jelezov, I.; Kneisel, Peter

    2015-02-27

    Activities of the past several years in developing the technique of forming seamless (weldless) cavity cells by hydroforming are summarized. An overview of the technique developed at DESY for the fabrication of single cells and multicells of the TESLA cavity shape is given and the major rf results are presented. The forming is performed by expanding a seamless tube with internal water pressure while simultaneously swaging it axially. Prior to the expansion the tube is necked at the iris area and at the ends. Tube radii and axial displacements are computer controlled during the forming process in accordance with resultsmore » of finite element method simulations for necking and expansion using the experimentally obtained strain-stress relationship of tube material. In cooperation with industry different methods of niobium seamless tube production have been explored. The most appropriate and successful method is a combination of spinning or deep drawing with flow forming. Several single-cell niobium cavities of the 1.3 GHz TESLA shape were produced by hydroforming. They reached accelerating gradients Eacc up to 35 MV/m after buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and up to 42 MV/m after electropolishing (EP). More recent work concentrated on fabrication and testing of multicell and nine-cell cavities. Several seamless two- and three-cell units were explored. Accelerating gradients Eacc of 30–35 MV/m were measured after BCP and Eacc up to 40 MV/m were reached after EP. Nine-cell niobium cavities combining three three-cell units were completed at the company E. Zanon. These cavities reached accelerating gradients of Eacc = 30–35 MV/m. One cavity is successfully integrated in an XFEL cryomodule and is used in the operation of the FLASH linear accelerator at DESY. Additionally the fabrication of bimetallic single-cell and multicell NbCu cavities by hydroforming was successfully developed. Several NbCu clad single-cell and double-cell cavities of the TESLA shape have

  14. Hydroforming of elliptical cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Jelezov, I.; Kneisel, Peter

    2015-02-27

    Activities of the past several years in developing the technique of forming seamless (weldless) cavity cells by hydroforming are summarized. An overview of the technique developed at DESY for the fabrication of single cells and multicells of the TESLA cavity shape is given and the major rf results are presented. The forming is performed by expanding a seamless tube with internal water pressure while simultaneously swaging it axially. Prior to the expansion the tube is necked at the iris area and at the ends. Tube radii and axial displacements are computer controlled during the forming process in accordance with results of finite element method simulations for necking and expansion using the experimentally obtained strain-stress relationship of tube material. In cooperation with industry different methods of niobium seamless tube production have been explored. The most appropriate and successful method is a combination of spinning or deep drawing with flow forming. Several single-cell niobium cavities of the 1.3 GHz TESLA shape were produced by hydroforming. They reached accelerating gradients Eacc up to 35 MV/m after buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and up to 42 MV/m after electropolishing (EP). More recent work concentrated on fabrication and testing of multicell and nine-cell cavities. Several seamless two- and three-cell units were explored. Accelerating gradients Eacc of 30–35 MV/m were measured after BCP and Eacc up to 40 MV/m were reached after EP. Nine-cell niobium cavities combining three three-cell units were completed at the company E. Zanon. These cavities reached accelerating gradients of Eacc = 30–35 MV/m. One cavity is successfully integrated in an XFEL cryomodule and is used in the operation of the FLASH linear accelerator at DESY. Additionally the fabrication of bimetallic single-cell and multicell NbCu cavities by hydroforming was successfully developed. Several NbCu clad single-cell and double

  15. Terraced-heterostructure large-optical-cavity AlGaAs diode laser - A new type of high-power CW single-mode device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botez, D.; Connolly, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    A new terraced lateral wave confining structure is obtained by liquid phase epitaxy over channeled substrates misoriented perpendicular to the channels' direction. Single spatial and longitudinal mode CW operation is achieved to 50 mW from one facet, in large spot sizes (2 x 7.5 micron, 1/e squared points in intensity) and narrow beams (6 deg x 23 deg), full width half-power). At 70 C ambient temperature CW lasing is obtained to 15 mW from one facet. Weak mode confinement in an asymmetric lateral waveguides provides discrimination against high-order mode oscillation.

  16. Design and control of a prosthetic leg for above-knee amputees operated in semi-active and active modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jinhyuk; Yoon, Gun-Ha; Kang, Je-Won; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2016-08-01

    This paper proposes a new prosthesis operated in two different modes; the semi-active and active modes. The semi-active mode is achieved from a flow mode magneto-rheological (MR) damper, while the active mode is obtained from an electronically commutated (EC) motor. The knee joint part of the above knee prosthesis is equipped with the MR damper and EC motor. The MR damper generates reaction force by controlling the field-dependent yield stress of the MR fluid, while the EC motor actively controls the knee joint angle during gait cycle. In this work, the MR damper is designed as a two-end type flow mode mechanism without air chamber for compact size. On other hand, in order to predict desired knee joint angle to be controlled by EC motor, a polynomial prediction function using a statistical method is used. A nonlinear proportional-derivative controller integrated with the computed torque method is then designed and applied to both MR damper and EC motor to control the knee joint angle. It is demonstrated that the desired knee joint angle is well achieved in different walking velocities on the ground ground.

  17. Geometrically induced surface polaritons in planar nanostructured metallic cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, P. S.; Intravia, F; Dalvit, Diego A.

    2014-01-14

    We examine the modal structure and dispersion of periodically nanostructured planar metallic cavities within the scattering matrix formulation. By nanostructuring a metallic grating in a planar cavity, artificial surface excitations or spoof plasmon modes are induced with dispersion determined by the periodicity and geometric characteristics of the grating. These spoof surface plasmon modes are shown to give rise to new cavity polaritonic modes at short mirror separations that modify the density of modes in nanostructured cavities. The increased modal density of states form cavity polarirons have a large impact on the fluctuation induced electromagnetic forces and enhanced hear transfer at short separations.

  18. Cellular Renewal and Improvement of Local Cell Effector Activity in Peritoneal Cavity in Response to Infectious Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    dos Anjos Cassado, Alexandra; de Albuquerque, José Antônio Tavares; Sardinha, Luiz Roberto; de Lima Buzzo, Carina; Faustino, Lucas; Nascimento, Rogério; Ghosn, Eliver Eid Bou; D'Império Lima, Maria Regina; Alvarez, Jose Maria Mosig; Bortoluci, Karina Ramalho

    2011-01-01

    The peritoneal cavity (PerC) is a singular compartment where many cell populations reside and interact. Despite the widely adopted experimental approach of intraperitoneal (i.p.) inoculation, little is known about the behavior of the different cell populations within the PerC. To evaluate the dynamics of peritoneal macrophage (MØ) subsets, namely small peritoneal MØ (SPM) and large peritoneal MØ (LPM), in response to infectious stimuli, C57BL/6 mice were injected i.p. with zymosan or Trypanosoma cruzi. These conditions resulted in the marked modification of the PerC myelo-monocytic compartment characterized by the disappearance of LPM and the accumulation of SPM and monocytes. In parallel, adherent cells isolated from stimulated PerC displayed reduced staining for β-galactosidase, a biomarker for senescence. Further, the adherent cells showed increased nitric oxide (NO) and higher frequency of IL-12-producing cells in response to subsequent LPS and IFN-γ stimulation. Among myelo-monocytic cells, SPM rather than LPM or monocytes, appear to be the central effectors of the activated PerC; they display higher phagocytic activity and are the main source of IL-12. Thus, our data provide a first demonstration of the consequences of the dynamics between peritoneal MØ subpopulations by showing that substitution of LPM by a robust SPM and monocytes in response to infectious stimuli greatly improves PerC effector activity. PMID:21799778

  19. Picosecond pulse generation at two wavelengths by simultaneous active mode locking in an Er-doped fiber laser with wide-bandwidth (>1 nm) nonchirped fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deparis, Olivier; Kiyan, Roman V.; Salik, Ertan; Starodubov, Dmitry S.; Feinberg, Jack; Pottiez, Olivier; Megret, Patrice; Blondel, Michel

    1999-11-01

    Generation of picosecond pulses at two distinct wavelengths is interesting for wavelength-division-multiplexing, fiber communication and sensing. For this purpose, we achieved harmonic active mode locking simultaneously at two wavelengths separated by about 15 m in an Erbium-doped fiber laser. Dual- wavelength lasing was obtained with two wide-bandwidth (greater than 1 nm) nonchirped high-reflectivity fiber Bragg gratings inserted in the laser cavity. The fiber Bragg gratings were written with 275-nm light from an Ar laser in hydrogen-loaded fibers. Optical path lengths and losses were carefully adjusted at each wavelength to obtain perfect mode locking at both wavelengths. Total cavity dispersion was set in the anomalous dispersion regime and optimized at each wavelength independently to generate solitons. Pulses at 3-GHz repetition rate were obtained at two wavelengths simultaneously with pulse widths of 16 ps and 13 ps, at 1547 nm and 1562 nm respectively. Time-bandwidth products of 0.37 and 0.34 respectively confirmed that the pulses were nearly transform-limited at each wavelength.

  20. Shape Determination for Deformed Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Lie-Quan; Akcelik, Volkan; Chen, Sheng; Ge, Lixin; Li, Zenghai; Ng, Cho; Xiao, Liling; Ko, Kwok; Ghattas, Omar; /Texas U.

    2006-10-04

    A realistic superconducting RF cavity has its shape deformed comparing to its designed shape due to the loose tolerance in the fabrication process and the frequency tuning for its accelerating mode. A PDE-constrained optimization problem is proposed to determine the deformation of the cavity. A reduce space method is used to solve the PDE-constrained optimization problem where design sensitivities were computed using a continuous adjoint approach. A proof-of-concept example is given in which the deformation parameters of a single cavity-cell with two different types of deformation were computed.

  1. Actively mode-locked fiber ring laser by intermodal acousto-optic modulation.

    PubMed

    Bello-Jiménez, M; Cuadrado-Laborde, C; Sáez-Rodríguez, D; Diez, A; Cruz, J L; Andrés, M V

    2010-11-15

    We report an actively mode-locked fiber ring laser. A simple and low-insertion-loss acousto-optic modulator driven by standing flexural waves, which couples core-to-cladding modes in a standard single-mode optical fiber, is used as an active mechanism for mode locking. Among the remarkable features of the modulator, we mention its high modulation depth (72%), broad bandwidth (187 GHz), easy tunability in the optical wavelength, and low insertion losses (0.7 dB). The narrowest optical pulses obtained were of 95 ps time width, 21 mW peak power, repetition rate of 4.758 MHz, and 110 mW of pump power.

  2. Optical cavity and electron beam requirements for the operation of a 1.5 {angstrom} LCLS in a regenerative amplifier mode

    SciTech Connect

    Tatchyn, R.

    1995-12-31

    Current conceptual designs for Linac Coherent Light Sources (LCLSs) in the 100-1 {angstrom} wavelength range are based on Free Electron Lasers (FELs) that are designed to saturate in a single pass of the electron beam through the undulator. This, in practice, leads to insertion devices several tens of meters in length, which greatly dominates the component costs of the overall LCLS system. Although it is well known that amplification within a cavity would enable much shorter and more economical undulators to be employed, two major practical problems are currently adduced to discount the use of such configurations in the sub-100 {angstrom} wavelength regime: (1) the temporal jitter of the (sub-picosecond) electron bunches required for such FELs can be comparable to or larger that the durations of the bunches themselves, rendering reliable synchronization extremely difficult, and (2) the lack of optical elements of sufficient reflectivity and bandwidth out of which adequately efficient optical cavities can be constructed. In this paper we reasssess the requirements associated with these two aspects of x-ray optics as a possible approach to resolving or making more tractable the resolution of some of the basic problems involved.

  3. 4-Alkynylphenylsilatranes: Insecticidal activity, mammalian toxicity, and mode of action

    SciTech Connect

    Horsham, M.A.; Palmer, C.J.; Cole, L.M.; Casida, J.E. )

    1990-08-01

    4-Ethynyl- and 4-(prop-1-ynyl)phenylsilatranes (N(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O){sub 3}SiR, R = C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-4-C{triple bond}CH or C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-4-C{triple bond}CCH{sub 3}) are highly toxic to houseflies (pretreated with piperonyl butoxide) and milkweed bugs (topical LD{sub 50}s 3-14 {mu}g/g) and to mice (intraperitoneal LD{sub 50}s 0.4-0.9 mg/kg), and they are moderately potent inhibitors of the ({sup 35}S)-tert-butylbicyclophosphorothionate or TBPS binding site (GABA-gated chloride channel) of mouse brain membranes. Scatchard analysis indicates noncompetitive interaction of 4-ethynylphenylsilatrane with the TBPS binding site. Phenylsilatrane analogues with 4-substituents of H, CH{sub 3}, Cl, Br, and C{triple bond}CSi(CH{sub 3}){sub 3} are highly toxic to mice but have little or no activity in the insect and receptor assays. Radioligand binding studies with (4-{sup 3}H)phenylsilatrane failed to reveal a specific binding site in mouse brain. Silatranes with R = H, CH{sub 3}, CH{sub 2}Cl, CH{double bond}CH{sub 2}, OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 3}, and C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-4-CH{sub 2}CH{sub 3} are of little or no activity in the insect and mouse toxicity and TBPS binding site assays as are the trithia and monocyclic analogues of phenylsilatrane. 4-Alkynylphenylsilatranes are new probes to examine the GABA receptor-ionophore complex of insects and mammals.

  4. Influence of Activity Mode on Feeling States of High School Physical Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannon, James C.; Pellet, Tracey L.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if changes in positive well-being, psychological distress, fatigue, and enjoyment vary as a function of physical activity mode. Fifty-five senior high school students participated in one of four fitness activities including two defined as traditional (running and step-aerobics) and two defined as…

  5. Quantifying radio-mode feedback from Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabala, Stanislav

    2015-08-01

    Galaxy formation models routinely invoke feedback from radio-loud Active Galactic Nuclei to explain the observed masses and red colours of the most massive galaxies since z~1. Whether or not the observed AGN population can provide the required feedback, however, is an open question.We present a new dynamical model that relates AGN physical parameters to the observed properties of radio AGN. This model combines a traditional approach to modeling radio AGN with a semi-analytic description of AGN environments. The model reproduces a number of key features of the observed radio AGN populations, and we determine the energetics (specifically, jet kinetic powers and AGN lifetimes) of the observed local (z<0.1) radio AGN population, as a function of host galaxy properties.We find a broad distribution of jet powers that is largely independent of host galaxy mass, consistent with the idea that these radio AGN are fed by gas cooling from hot haloes in near heating-cooling equilibrium. On the other hand, the duration of the AGN phase appears strongly mass-dependent: massive galaxies host AGN that are longer-lived, and can therefore impart feedback for longer and on larger spatial scales. Finally, we compare the cumulative AGN energy output from ubiquitous weak AGN with their rare powerful counterparts, and find that radio AGN of all luminosities deliver a comparable amount of energy to their surroundings.I will outline how this approach can provide useful insights into AGN triggering and feedback mechanisms, as well as be used to correct for selection effects in large radio surveys. I will also outline the challenges (and solutions) to performing an AGN energetics analysis at high redshift.

  6. Acoustic cavity technology for high performance injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of damping more than one mode of rocket engine combustion instability by means of differently tuned acoustic cavities sharing a common entrance was shown. Analytical procedures and acoustic modeling techniques for predicting the stability behavior of acoustic cavity designs in hot firings were developed. Full scale testing of various common entrance, dual cavity configurations, and subscale testing for the purpose of obtaining motion pictures of the cavity entrance region, to aid in determining the mechanism of cavity damping were the two major aspects of the program.

  7. Multiple dynamo modes as a mechanism for long-term solar activity variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käpylä, M. J.; Käpylä, P. J.; Olspert, N.; Brandenburg, A.; Warnecke, J.; Karak, B. B.; Pelt, J.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Solar magnetic activity shows both smooth secular changes, such as the modern Grand Maximum, and quite abrupt drops that are denoted as grand minima, such as the Maunder Minimum. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of convection-driven dynamos offer one way of examining the mechanisms behind these events. Aims: In this work, we analyze a solution of a solar-like DNS that was evolved for roughly 80 magnetic cycles of 4.9 years and where epochs of irregular behavior are detected. The emphasis of our analysis is to find physical causes for such behavior. Methods: The DNS employed is a semi-global (wedge-shaped) magnetoconvection model. For the data analysis tasks we use Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition and phase dispersion methods, as they are well suited for analyzing cyclic (non-periodic) signals. Results: A special property of the DNS is the existence of multiple dynamo modes at different depths and latitudes. The dominant mode is solar-like (equatorward migration at low latitudes and poleward at high latitudes). This mode is accompanied by a higher frequency mode near the surface and at low latitudes, showing poleward migration, and a low-frequency mode at the bottom of the convection zone. The low-frequency mode is almost purely antisymmetric with respect to the equator, while the dominant mode has strongly fluctuating mixed parity. The overall behavior of the dynamo solution is extremely complex, exhibiting variable cycle lengths, epochs of disturbed and even ceased surface activity, and strong short-term hemispherical asymmetries. Surprisingly, the most prominent suppressed surface activity epoch is actually a global magnetic energy maximum; during this epoch the bottom toroidal magnetic field obtains a maximum, demonstrating that the interpretation of grand minima-type events is non-trivial. The hemispherical asymmetries are seen only in the magnetic field, while the velocity field exhibits considerably weaker asymmetry. Conclusions: We interpret

  8. Polarization statistical properties of emission from single-mode vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with equally-lived laser levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubev, Yu M.; Golubeva, T. Yu; Giacobino, E.

    2004-12-01

    The full quantum statistical theory of the vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) is constructed for arbitrary relations between frequency parameters. In our approach we follow Hermier et al (2002 Phys. Rev. A 65 053825) and Golubev et al (2004 Phys. Rev. A at press; Preprint quant-ph/0407006) and formulate the theory in the form of quantum Langevin equations. For detailed analysis the theory is applied to lasers with equally-lived laser levels. Spectral densities of the Stokes parameter fluctuations are obtained in explicit analytical form. A role of physical phenomena such as spin-flip and optical anisotropy (linear birefringence and linear dichroism) in semiconductor crystals is discussed. It is shown that random sub-level electron distributions do not worsen shot noise reduction efficiency. Comparing our results with the phenomenological ones (Mulet et al 2001 Phys. Rev. A 64 023817), the serious differences are disclosed. The reasons for these differences are explained.

  9. Dual resin cement knoop hardness after different activation modes through dental ceramics.

    PubMed

    Valentino, Thiago Assunção; Borges, Gilberto Antonio; Borges, Luis Henrique; Vishal, Jain; Martins, Luis Roberto Marcondes; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of ceramic compositions on Knoop Hardness Number (KHN) immediately and 24 h after polymerization and the effect of activation modes on the KHN of a resin cement. Ten Panavia F 2.0 resin cement discs were activated either directly using curing light, or chemically without light, or through 1.2-thick ceramic discs. The following ceramics were evaluated: Duceram, Cergogold, IPS Empress, IPS Empress 2, Procera, Cercon, In Ceram Alumina and In Ceram Zirconia. The KHN was obtained immediately and after 24-h testing time. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test were performed for statistical analysis (p<0.05). Direct activation showed higher KHN than activation through ceramics and chemical activation for both immediate and 24-h post activation. The KHN for 24-h post activation time was higher than that of the immediate post activation time except for the direct activation mode. The glass and di-silicate based ceramics showed higher KHN than alumina- and zirconia-based ceramics, immediately and after 24-h. The reinforced and opaque ceramics had the lowest KHN. The ceramic composition resulted in light attenuation, lower polymerization and lower KHN, and the 24-h testing time promoted an improvement of KHN except for direct activation mode.

  10. [Application of biologically active suture materials in emergency surgery of abdominal cavity organs].

    PubMed

    Mokhov, E M; Chumakov, R Iu; Sergeev, A N

    2012-01-01

    An investigation of specific course of the wound process and near results of operations on 398 patients with emergency abdominal surgical pathology has revealed advantages of using new biologically active suture materials "Nikant" (with doxicyclin) and "Nikant-P" (with doxicyclin and stimulator of regeneration from the group of hermanium-containing organic compounds) in performing surgical interventions. Total number of patients with complications at the early postoperative period, operated using threads "Nikant" (38-29.9%) and "Nikant-P" (30-23.8%) proved to be reliably less than in patients of the control group (71-48.9%). The results of operations improved at the expense of considerable reduction of the number of postoperative local pyo-inflammatory processes.

  11. Echo-resonance and hydraulic perturbations in magma cavities: application to the volcanic tremor of Etna (Italy) in relation to its eruptive activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montalto, A.; Longo, V.; Patanè, G.

    1995-08-01

    A study is presented of spectral features of volcanic tremor recorded at Mount Etna (Sicily, Italy) following the methods of analysis suggested by the resonant scattering formalism of Gaunaurd and Überall (1978, 1979a, 1979b) and the model for hydraulic origin of Seidl et al. (1981). The periods investigated include summit and flank eruptions that occurred between 1984 and 1993. Recordings from a permanent station located near the top of the volcano were used, and the temporal patterns associated with (a) the average spacing (bar Δ ) between consecutive spectral peaks in the frequency range 1 6 Hz, (b) the spectral shape and (c) the overall spectral amplitude were analyzed. bar Δ values are thought to depend on the physical properties of magma, such as its density, which, in turn, is controlled by the degree of gas exsolution. Variations in the spectral shape are tentatively attributed to changes in the geometrical scattering from the boundary of resonant conduits and magma batches. Finally, the overall amplitude at the station should essentially reflect the state of turbulence of magma within the superficial ascending path. A limit in the application of the resonant scattering formalism to the study of volcanic tremor is given by the fact that the fundamental modes and integer harmonics are difficult to identify in the frequency spectra, as tremor sources are likely within cavities of very complex geometry, rather than in spherical or cylindrical chambers, as expected by theory. This study gives evidence of some correlations between the analyzed temporal patterns and the major events in the volcanic activity, related to both lava flow and explosions at the summit vents. In particular, relatively high values of bar Δ have been attained during the SE crater eruption of 1984, the complex eruptive phases of September October 1989 and the 1991 1993 flank eruption, suggesting the presence of a relatively dense magma for all of these events. Conversely, very low

  12. Validation of Spacecraft Active Cavity Radiometer Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) Long Term Measurement Trends Using Proxy TSI Least Squares Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Robert Benjamin, III; Wilson, Robert S.

    2003-01-01

    Long-term, incoming total solar irradiance (TSI) measurement trends were validated using proxy TSI values, derived from indices of solar magnetic activity. Spacecraft active cavity radiometers (ACR) are being used to measure longterm TSI variability, which may trigger global climate changes. The TSI, typically referred to as the solar constant, was normalized to the mean earth-sun distance. Studies of spacecraft TSI data sets confirmed the existence of a 0.1 %, long-term TSI variability component within a 10-year period. The 0.1% TSI variability component is clearly present in the spacecraft data sets from the 1984-2004 time frame. Typically, three overlapping spacecraft data sets were used to validate long-term TSI variability trends. However, during the years of 1978-1984, 1989-1991, and 1993-1996, three overlapping spacecraft data sets were not available in order to validate TSI trends. The TSI was found to vary with indices of solar magnetic activity associated with recent 10-year sunspot cycles. Proxy TSI values were derived from least squares analyses of the measured TSI variability with the solar indices of 10.7-cm solar fluxes, and with limb-darked sunspot fluxes. The resulting proxy TSI values were compared to the spacecraft ACR measurements of TSI variability to detect ACR instrument degradation, which may be interpreted as TSI variability. Analyses of ACR measurements and TSI proxies are presented primarily for the 1984-2004, Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) ACR solar monitor data set. Differences in proxy and spacecraft measurement data sets suggest the existence of another TSI variability component with an amplitude greater than or equal to 0.5 Wm-2 (0.04%), and with a cycle of 20 years or more.

  13. Control of Cavity Resonance Using Oscillatory Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarfe, Alison Lamp; Chokani, Ndaona

    2000-01-01

    The near-zero net mass oscillatory blowing control of a subsonic cavity flow has been experimentally investigated. An actuator was designed and fabricated to provide both steady and oscillatory blowing over a range of blowing amplitudes and forcing frequencies. The blowing was applied just upstream of the cavity front Wall through interchangeable plate configurations These configurations enabled the effects of hole size, hole shape, and blowing angle to be examined. A significant finding is that in terms of the blowing amplitude, the near zero net mass oscillatory blowing is much more effective than steady blowing; momentum coefficients Lip two orders of magnitude smaller than those required for steady blowing are sufficient to accomplish the same control of cavity resonance. The detailed measurements obtained in the experiment include fluctuating pressure data within the cavity wall, and hot-wire measurements of the cavity shear layer. Spectral and wavelet analysis techniques are applied to understand the dynamics and mechanisms of the cavity flow with control. The oscillatory blowing, is effective in enhancing the mixing in the cavity shear layer and thus modifying the feedback loop associated with the cavity resonance. The nonlinear interactions in the cavity flow are no longer driven by the resonant cavity modes but by the forcing associated with the oscillatory blowing. The oscillatory blowing does not suppress the mode switching behavior of the cavity flow, but the amplitude modulation is reduced.

  14. Micron dimensioned cavity array supported lipid bilayers for the electrochemical investigation of ionophore activity.

    PubMed

    Maher, Sean; Basit, Hajra; Forster, Robert J; Keyes, Tia E

    2016-12-01

    Microcavity supported lipid bilayers, MSLBs, were applied to an electrochemical investigation of ionophore mediated ion transport. The arrays comprise of a 1cm(2) gold electrode imprinted with an ordered array of uniform spherical-cap pores of 2.8μm diameter prepared by gold electrodeposition through polystyrene templating spheres. The pores were pre-filled with aqueous buffer prior to Langmuir-Blodgett assembly of a 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayer. Fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy enabled by the micron dimensions of the pores permitted study of lipid diffusion across single apertures, yielding a diffusion coefficient of 12.58±1.28μm(2)s(-1) and anomalous exponent of 1.03±0.02, consistent with Brownian motion. From FLCS, the MSLBs were stable over 3days and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of the membrane with and without ionic gradient over experimental windows of 6h showed excellent stability. Two ionophores were studied at the MSLBs; Valinomycin, a K(+) uniporter and Nigericin, a K(+)/H(+) antiporter. Ionophore reconstituted into the DOPC bilayer resulted in a decrease and increase in membrane resistance and capacitance respectively. Significant increases in Valinomycin and Nigericin activity were observed, reflected in large decreases in membrane resistance when K(+) was present in the contacting buffer and in the presence of H(+) ionic gradient across the membrane respectively. PMID:27420132

  15. Micron dimensioned cavity array supported lipid bilayers for the electrochemical investigation of ionophore activity.

    PubMed

    Maher, Sean; Basit, Hajra; Forster, Robert J; Keyes, Tia E

    2016-12-01

    Microcavity supported lipid bilayers, MSLBs, were applied to an electrochemical investigation of ionophore mediated ion transport. The arrays comprise of a 1cm(2) gold electrode imprinted with an ordered array of uniform spherical-cap pores of 2.8μm diameter prepared by gold electrodeposition through polystyrene templating spheres. The pores were pre-filled with aqueous buffer prior to Langmuir-Blodgett assembly of a 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayer. Fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy enabled by the micron dimensions of the pores permitted study of lipid diffusion across single apertures, yielding a diffusion coefficient of 12.58±1.28μm(2)s(-1) and anomalous exponent of 1.03±0.02, consistent with Brownian motion. From FLCS, the MSLBs were stable over 3days and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of the membrane with and without ionic gradient over experimental windows of 6h showed excellent stability. Two ionophores were studied at the MSLBs; Valinomycin, a K(+) uniporter and Nigericin, a K(+)/H(+) antiporter. Ionophore reconstituted into the DOPC bilayer resulted in a decrease and increase in membrane resistance and capacitance respectively. Significant increases in Valinomycin and Nigericin activity were observed, reflected in large decreases in membrane resistance when K(+) was present in the contacting buffer and in the presence of H(+) ionic gradient across the membrane respectively.

  16. Validation of 1985-1997 Active Cavity Radiometer Spacecraft Measurements of Total Solar Irradiance Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Robert B., III; Wilson, Robert S.

    1998-01-01

    Since 1978, long-term variations in the total solar irradiance (solar constant) have been monitored using spacecraft radiometers, at the 0.01% precision level. The irradiance measurements were performed from the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite [ERBS], Nimbus-7, Solar Maximum Mission [SMM], Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite [UARS], European Retrievable Carrier (EURECA), Solar and Heliospheric Observatory [SOHO], and the Space Shuttle Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science [ATLAS] spacecraft platforms. Radiometer responses can drift or shift at precision levels of a few hundreds of a percent. In-flight calibration sources are not available to detect radiometer response changes at radiometric accuracy or precision levels near the 0.01% (0.1 W/sq m) level. Inconsistent trends among the sets were used to identify possible instrumental drifts or shifts which may be incorrectly interpreted as solar irradiance changes while consistent trends among the different measurement sets were used to detect long-term irradiance variability components. In this paper, 1991-1998 corresponding ERBS, UARS, SOHO, and ATLAS irradiance measurements are inter-compared with each other as well as with the ERBS empirical irradiance fit. The empirical irradiance fit is based upon 10.7-cm solar radio flux (F10) and photometric sunspot index (PSI), indices of solar magnetic activity. Analyses of recent data sets identified no long-term shifts and drifts in the ERBS, SOHO, or UARS data sets. The typical value of the total solar irradiance is approximately 1365 Watts per meter squared (W/sq m).

  17. Oral administration of lipopolysaccharides activates B-1 cells in the peritoneal cavity and lamina propria of the gut and induces autoimmune symptoms in an autoantibody transgenic mouse

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    About a half of the antierythrocyte autoantibody transgenic (autoAb Tg) mice, in which almost all B cells are detected in the spleen, lymph nodes, and Peyer's patches, but not in the peritoneal cavity, suffer from autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The occurrence of this disease is strongly linked to production of autoAb by activated peritoneal B-1 cells in the Tg mice. In this study, we have shown that oral administration of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) activated B-1 cells in the lamina propria of the gut as well as the peritoneal cavity in the healthy Tg mice and induced the autoimmune symptoms in all the Tg mice. The activation of peritoneal and lamina propria B-1 cells by enteric LPS is found not only in the anti-RBC autoAb Tg mice and normal mice but also in the aly mice which congenitally lack lymph nodes and Peyer's patches. These results suggest that B-1 cells in the two locations may form a common pool independent of Peyer's patches and lymph nodes, and can be activated by enteric thymus-independent antigens or polyclonal activators such as LPS. The induction of autoimmune hemolytic anemia in the Tg mice by enteric LPS through the activation of B-1 cells in the lamina propria of gut and in the peritoneal cavity suggests that B-1 cells and bacterial infection may play a pathogenic role in the onset of autoimmune diseases. PMID:8006578

  18. Cavity Femtochemistry: Manipulating Nonadiabatic Dynamics at Avoided Crossings.

    PubMed

    Kowalewski, Markus; Bennett, Kochise; Mukamel, Shaul

    2016-06-01

    Molecular potential energy surfaces can be actively manipulated by light. This is usually done by strong classical laser light but was recently demonstrated for the quantum field in an optical cavity. The photonic vacuum state of a localized cavity mode can be strongly mixed with the molecular degrees of freedom to create hybrid field-matter states known as polaritons. We simulate the avoided crossing of sodium iodide in a cavity by incorporating the quantized cavity field into the nuclear wave packet dynamics calculation. The quantized field is represented on a numerical grid in quadrature space, thus avoiding the limitations set by the rotating wave approximation (RWA) when the field is expanded in Fock space. This approach allows the investigation of cavity couplings in the vicinity of naturally occurring avoided crossings and conical intersections, which is too expensive in the fock space expansion when the RWA does not apply. Numerical results show how the branching ratio between the covalent and ionic dissociation channels can be strongly manipulated by the optical cavity. PMID:27186666

  19. Structural basis for PPAR partial or full activation revealed by a novel ligand binding mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelli, Davide; Cerchia, Carmen; Montanari, Roberta; Loiodice, Fulvio; Tortorella, Paolo; Laghezza, Antonio; Cervoni, Laura; Pochetti, Giorgio; Lavecchia, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear receptors involved in the regulation of the metabolic homeostasis and therefore represent valuable therapeutic targets for the treatment of metabolic diseases. The development of more balanced drugs interacting with PPARs, devoid of the side-effects showed by the currently marketed PPARγ full agonists, is considered the major challenge for the pharmaceutical companies. Here we present a structure-based virtual screening approach that let us identify a novel PPAR pan-agonist with a very attractive activity profile and its crystal structure in the complex with PPARα and PPARγ, respectively. In PPARα this ligand occupies a new pocket whose filling is allowed by the ligand-induced switching of the F273 side chain from a closed to an open conformation. The comparison between this pocket and the corresponding cavity in PPARγ provides a rationale for the different activation of the ligand towards PPARα and PPARγ, suggesting a novel basis for ligand design.

  20. Diffraction-limited Fabry-Perot cavity in the near concentric regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durak, K.; Nguyen, C. H.; Leong, V.; Straupe, S.; Kurtsiefer, C.

    2014-10-01

    Nearly concentric optical cavities can be used to prepare optical fields with a very small mode volume. We implement an anaclastic design of such a cavity that significantly simplifies mode matching to the fundamental cavity mode. The cavity is shown to have diffraction-limited performance for a mode volume of ≈ {{10}4}{{λ }3}. This is in sharp contrast with the behavior of cavities with plano-concave mirrors, where aberrations significantly decrease the coupling of the input mode to the fundamental mode of the cavity and increase the coupling to the higher-order modes. We estimate the related cavity quantum electrodynamics parameters and show that the proposed cavity design allows for strong coupling without a need for high finesse or small physical-cavity volume.

  1. Modulation of activation-loop phosphorylation by JAK inhibitors is binding mode dependent

    PubMed Central

    Bonenfant, Débora; Rubert, Joëlle; Vangrevelinghe, Eric; Scheufler, Clemens; Marque, Fanny; Régnier, Catherine H.; De Pover, Alain; Ryckelynck, Hugues; Bhagwat, Neha; Koppikar, Priya; Goel, Aviva; Wyder, Lorenza; Tavares, Gisele; Baffert, Fabienne; Pissot-Soldermann, Carole; Manley, Paul W.; Gaul, Christoph; Voshol, Hans; Levine, Ross L.; Sellers, William R.; Hofmann, Francesco; Radimerski, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    JAK inhibitors are being developed for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, myeloproliferative neoplasms and leukemias. Most of these drugs target the ATP-binding pocket and stabilize the active conformation of the JAK kinases. This type-I binding mode leads to an increase in JAK activation-loop phosphorylation, despite blockade of kinase function. Here we report that stabilizing the inactive state via type-II inhibition acts in the opposite manner, leading to a loss of activation-loop phosphorylation. We used X-ray crystallography to corroborate the binding mode and report for the first time the crystal structure of the JAK2 kinase domain in an inactive conformation. Importantly, JAK inhibitor-induced activation-loop phosphorylation requires receptor interaction, as well as intact kinase and pseudokinase domains. Hence, depending on the respective conformation stabilized by a JAK inhibitor, hyperphosphorylation of the activation-loop may or may not be elicited. PMID:22684457

  2. Optical single photons on-demand teleported from microwave cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzanjeh, Sh; Vitali, D.; Tombesi, P.

    2013-03-01

    We propose a scheme for entangling the optical and microwave output modes of the respective cavities by using a micro mechanical resonator. The micro mechanical resonator, on one side, is capacitively coupled to the microwave cavity and, on the other side, it is coupled to a high-finesses optical cavity. We then show how this continuous variable entanglement can be profitably used to teleport the non-Gaussian number state |1> and the superposition (|0\\rangle +|1\\rangle )/\\sqrt 2 from the microwave cavity output mode onto an output of the optical cavity mode with fidelity much larger than the no-cloning limit.

  3. Design of rf conditioner cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Govil, R.; Rimmer, R.A.; Sessler, A.; Kirk, H.G.

    1992-06-01

    Theoretical studies are made of radio frequency structures which can be used to condition electron beams so as to greatly reduce the stringent emittance requirements for successful lasing in a free-electron laser. The basic strategy of conditioning calls for modulating an electron beam in the transverse dimension, by a periodic focusing channel, while it traverses a series of rf cavities, each operating in a TM{sub 210} mode. In this paper, we analyze the cavities both analytically and numerically (using MAFIA simulations). We find that when cylindrical symmetry is broken the coupling impedance can be greatly enhanced. We present results showing various performance characteristics as a function of cavity parameters, as well as possible designs for conditioning cavities.

  4. X-mode reflectometry for magnetohydrodynamic activity associated with q=1 surface measurements on Tore Supra

    SciTech Connect

    Vermare, L.; Clairet, F.; Gabillet, F.; Sabot, R.; Sirinelli, A.; Heuraux, S.; Leclert, G.

    2004-10-01

    Tore Supra is equipped with two 20 {mu}s fast sweep X-mode reflectometers operating between 50-110 GHz dedicated to density profile determination and an X-mode fixed frequency reflectometer operating between 105-155 GHz for density fluctuation measurements. Heterodyne and sine-cosine detection provide measurements of the reflected signal with high sensitivity. Operating profile reflectometer in burst mode (5 {mu}s dead time between two consecutive sweeps) allows quasi-simultaneous measurements at fixed frequency over a broad frequency band. Thus, information on plasma fluctuations, such as magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity, up to 20 kHz as well as a radial localization of the modes is accessible. The temporal evolution of the q=1 rational surface during sawtooth crash activity has been recorded in the plasma center with high spatial resolution. In addition, a direct comparison between signals associated with a central MHD mode from both profile and fluctuation reflectometers, positioned at different toroidal angles, allows one to determine the plasma toroidal velocity.

  5. Shape Determination for Deformed Electromagnetic Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Akcelik, Volkan; Ko, Kwok; Lee, Lie-Quan; Li, Zhenghai; Ng, Cho-Kuen; Xiao, Liling; /SLAC

    2007-12-10

    The measured physical parameters of a superconducting cavity differ from those of the designed ideal cavity. This is due to shape deviations caused by both loose machine tolerances during fabrication and by the tuning process for the accelerating mode. We present a shape determination algorithm to solve for the unknown deviations from the ideal cavity using experimentally measured cavity data. The objective is to match the results of the deformed cavity model to experimental data through least-squares minimization. The inversion variables are unknown shape deformation parameters that describe perturbations of the ideal cavity. The constraint is the Maxwell eigenvalue problem. We solve the nonlinear optimization problem using a line-search based reduced space Gauss-Newton method where we compute shape sensitivities with a discrete adjoint approach. We present two shape determination examples, one from synthetic and the other from experimental data. The results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is very effective in determining the deformed cavity shape.

  6. Different pulse pattern generation by frequency detuning in pulse modulated actively mode-locked ytterbium doped fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, He; Chen, Sheng-Ping; Si, Lei; Zhang, Bin; Jiang, Zong-Fu

    2015-10-01

    We report the results of our recent experimental investigation of the modulation frequency detuning effect on the output pulse dynamics in a pulse modulated actively mode-locked ytterbium doped fiber laser. The experimental study shows the existence of five different mode-locking states that mainly depend on the modulation frequency detuning, which are: (a) amplitude-even harmonic/fundamental mode-locking, (b) Q-switched harmonic/fundamental mode-locking, (c) sinusoidal wave modulation mode, (d) pulses bundle state, and (e) noise-like state. A detailed experimental characterization of the output pulses dynamics in each operating mode is presented.

  7. Analysis of cavity and window for THz gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Alaria, Mukesh Kumar; Mukherjee, P.; Rao, R.R.; Sinha, A.K. E-mail: aksinha@ceeri.ernet.in

    2011-07-01

    In this paper study of cavity and window has been carried out using Ansoft HFSS for Terahertz Gyrotron. Eigen mode analysis of the cavity has been carried out at 1 THz. An idea about the operating modes in the cavity of the Gyrotron and obtained the simulated Eigen frequency and field pattern of the modes. The design of window for 1 THz Gyrotron has also been carried out using HFSS. The simulated results have also been compared with ST microwave studio. (author)

  8. Folded cavity design for a ruby resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arunkumar, K. A.; Trolinger, James D.

    1988-01-01

    A folded cavity laser resonator operating in the TEM(00) mode has been built and tested. The new oscillator configuration leads to an increase in efficiency and to better line narrowing due to the increased number of passes through the laser rod and tuning elements, respectively. The modification is shown to lead to cavity ruggedization.

  9. Compact microwave cavity for hydrogen atomic clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Dejun; Zhang, Yan; Fu, Yigen; Zhang, Yanjun

    1992-01-01

    A summary is presented that introduces the compact microwave cavity used in the hydrogen atomic clock. Special emphasis is placed on derivation of theoretical calculating equations of main parameters of the microwave cavity. A brief description is given of several methods for discriminating the oscillating modes. Experimental data and respective calculated values are also presented.

  10. Active thermal lensing elements for mode matching optimization in optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulda, Paul

    2014-03-01

    In interferometric gravitational wave detectors of the advanced era and beyond, the high laser powers used lead to the generation of thermal lenses in the optics. This can lead to a reduction in the coupling between the various optical cavities comprising the detector, thus reducing its overall sensitivity. We present here an active device which can be used to compensate for such thermal effects, as well as static mismatches between cavities. The device uses a 4 segmented heater to heat a transmissive optic, generating a spherical or astigmatic lens which can be used to compensate other thermal lenses within an optical system. We report on in-vacuum tests of the device, including an interferometric measurement of the wavefront distortions induced by the device, and measurements of the dynamic range and response time. The device was shown to have no observable detrimental effect on wavefront distortion, a focal power dynamic range of 0 to -40 mD, and a response time of the order 1000 s. Supported by NSF grant PHY-1205512.

  11. Active Noise Control of Low Speed Fan Rotor-Stator Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.; Hu, Ziqiang; Pla, Frederic G.; Heidelberg, Laurence J.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the Active Noise Cancellation System designed by General Electric and tested in the NASA Lewis Research Center's 48 inch Active Noise Control Fan. The goal of this study was to assess the feasibility of using wall mounted secondary acoustic sources and sensors within the duct of a high bypass turbofan aircraft engine for active noise cancellation of fan tones. The control system is based on a modal control approach. A known acoustic mode propagating in the fan duct is cancelled using an array of flush-mounted compact sound sources. Controller inputs are signals from a shaft encoder and a microphone array which senses the residual acoustic mode in the duct. The canceling modal signal is generated by a modal controller. The key results are that the (6,0) mode was completely eliminated at 920 Hz and substantially reduced elsewhere. The total tone power was reduced 9.4 dB. Farfield 2BPF SPL reductions of 13 dB were obtained. The (4,0) and (4,1) modes were reduced simultaneously yielding a 15 dB modal PWL decrease. Global attenuation of PWL was obtained using an actuator and sensor system totally contained within the duct.

  12. Wavelength-tunable actively mode-locked erbium-doped fiber ring laser using a distributed feedback semiconductor laser as mode locker and tunable filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shenping; Chan, K. T.

    1999-07-01

    A wavelength-tunable actively mode-locked erbium fiber ring laser was demonstrated using a distributed feedback semiconductor laser as an intensity mode locker and a tunable optical filter. Very stable optical pulse trains at gigabit repetition rates were generated using harmonica mode locking. The supermode noise was suppressed to 60 dB below the signal level and the root-mean-square timing jitter (0.45 kHz-1 MHz) was found to be about 1% of the pulse duration. A continuous wavelength tuning range of 1.8 nm was achieved by changing the semiconductor laser temperature from 11.4 to 30 °C.

  13. Theoretical study of cw to short pulse conversion in an active cw-injected ring cavity with a Yb3+:YAG amplifier.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhiyun; Bourdet, Gilbert L

    2007-05-10

    The short laser pulse generated from an active cw-injected ring cavity with Yb3+:YAG crystal, which is treated as the homogeneously broadened amplifier, is studied theoretically. Based on the derived results, the impacts of the amplifier length, the seeding laser intensity and frequency, the pump intensity, the efficiency of the acousto-optic modulator (AOM), and the frequency shift generated by the AOM on the performance of the laser pulse are analyzed. PMID:17446920

  14. Tornillos modeled as self-oscillations of fluid filling a cavity: Application to the 1992-1993 activity at Galeras volcano, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinou, K. I.

    2015-01-01

    Tornillos are quasi-monochromatic seismic signals with a slowly decaying coda that are observed near active volcanoes and geothermal areas worldwide. In this work a lumped parameter model describing the tornillo source process as the self-oscillations of fluid filling a cavity is investigated. A nonlinear ordinary differential equation is derived that governs the behavior of the model taking into account viscous and nonlinear damping as well as the reaction force of the fluid inside the cavity. This equation is numerically integrated both for different cavity sizes and different fluids of volcanological interest, such as gas (H2O + CO2, H2O + SO2) and gas-particle mixtures (ash-SO2, water droplets-H2O). This cavity model predicts that when the filling fluid is a mixture of ash and SO2 the signal duration will increase until the mixture becomes enriched in ash and then the duration exhibits a decrease. Additionally, the damping coefficients (=1/2Q) of the synthetic signals are estimated in the range between 0.002 and 0.014. Both results agree well with the temporal variation of tornillos duration and the estimated Q quality factors/damping coefficients observed at Galeras volcano. In the context of the cavity model, tornillo frequency variations from 4 Hz to 1 Hz observed prior to eruptions can be interpreted as the result of fluid composition changes as more ash particles are added. This is in agreement with the observation that gas accumulation at Galeras was a steady rather than an episodic process and that tornillos were most likely triggered after a fluid pressure threshold had been exceeded.

  15. Analysis of time-resolved interaction force mode AFM imaging using active and passive probes.

    PubMed

    Giray Oral, Hasan; Parlak, Zehra; Levent Degertekin, F

    2012-09-01

    We present an in-depth analysis of time-resolved interaction force (TRIF) mode imaging for atomic force microscopy (AFM). A nonlinear model of an active AFM probe, performing simultaneous topography and material property imaging on samples with varying elasticity and adhesion is implemented in Simulink®. The model is capable of simulating various imaging modes, probe structures, sample material properties, tip-sample interaction force models, and actuation and feedback schemes. For passive AFM cantilevers, the model is verified by comparing results from the literature. As an example of an active probe, the force sensing integrated readout and active tip (FIRAT) probe is used. Simulation results indicate that the active and damped nature of FIRAT provides a significant level of control over the force applied to the sample, minimizing sample indentation and topography error. Active tip control (ATC) preserves constant contact time during force control for stable contact while preventing the loss of material property information such as elasticity and adhesive force. Simulation results are verified by TRIF mode imaging of the samples with both soft and stiff regions. PMID:22813887

  16. Impacts of human activity modes and climate on heavy metal "spread" in groundwater are biased.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Qin, Xiaosheng; Zeng, Guangming; Li, Jian

    2016-06-01

    Groundwater quality deterioration has attracted world-wide concerns due to its importance for human water supply. Although more and more studies have shown that human activities and climate are changing the groundwater status, an investigation on how different groundwater heavy metals respond to human activity modes (e.g. mining, waste disposal, agriculture, sewage effluent and complex activity) in a varying climate has been lacking. Here, for each of six heavy metals (i.e. Fe, Zn, Mn, Pb, Cd and Cu) in groundwater, we use >330 data points together with mixed-effect models to indicate that (i) human activity modes significantly influence the Cu and Mn but not Zn, Fe, Pb and Cd levels, and (ii) annual mean temperature (AMT) only significantly influences Cu and Pb levels, while annual precipitation (AP) only significantly affects Fe, Cu and Mn levels. Given these differences, we suggest that the impacts of human activity modes and climate on heavy metal "spread" in groundwater are biased. PMID:27003366

  17. Impacts of human activity modes and climate on heavy metal "spread" in groundwater are biased.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Qin, Xiaosheng; Zeng, Guangming; Li, Jian

    2016-06-01

    Groundwater quality deterioration has attracted world-wide concerns due to its importance for human water supply. Although more and more studies have shown that human activities and climate are changing the groundwater status, an investigation on how different groundwater heavy metals respond to human activity modes (e.g. mining, waste disposal, agriculture, sewage effluent and complex activity) in a varying climate has been lacking. Here, for each of six heavy metals (i.e. Fe, Zn, Mn, Pb, Cd and Cu) in groundwater, we use >330 data points together with mixed-effect models to indicate that (i) human activity modes significantly influence the Cu and Mn but not Zn, Fe, Pb and Cd levels, and (ii) annual mean temperature (AMT) only significantly influences Cu and Pb levels, while annual precipitation (AP) only significantly affects Fe, Cu and Mn levels. Given these differences, we suggest that the impacts of human activity modes and climate on heavy metal "spread" in groundwater are biased.

  18. High-average-power actively-mode-locked Tm3+ fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckerle, Michael; Kieleck, Christelle; Hübner, Philipp; Świderski, Jacek; Jackson, Stuart D.; Mazé, Gwenael; Eichhorn, Marc

    2012-02-01

    Fiber lasers emitting in the 2 μm wavelength range doped with thulium ions can be used as highly efficient pump sources for nonlinear converters to generate mid-infrared radiation. For spectroscopic purposes, illumination and countermeasures, a broad mid-infrared emission spectrum is advantageous. This can be reached by supercontinuum generation in fibers, e.g. fluoride fibers, which up to now has, however, only been presented with either low average power, complex Raman-shifted 1.55 μm pump sources or multi-stage amplifier pump schemes. Here we present recent results of a new actively-mode-locked single-oscillator scheme that can provide the high-repetition rate sub-ns pump pulses needed for pumping supercontinuum generators. A thulium-doped silica fiber laser is presented that provides > 11 W of average power CW-mode-locked pulses at 38 MHz repetition rate at ~ 38 ps pulse width. Upgrading the setup to allow Q-switched mode-locked operation yields mode-locked 40 MHz pulses arranged in 60 kHz bunched Q-switch envelopes and thus increases further the available peak power. In this Q-switched mode-locked regime over 5 W of average power has been achieved.

  19. A Multi-Mode Blade Damping Control using Shunted Piezoelectric Transducers with Active Feedback Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Benjamin; Morrison, Carlos; Min, James

    2009-01-01

    The Structural Dynamics and. Mechanics branch (RXS) is developing smart adaptive structures to improve fan blade damping at resonances using piezoelectric (PE) transducers. In this presentation, only one shunted PE transducer was used to demonstrate active control of multi-mode blade resonance damping on a titanium alloy (Ti-6A1-4V) flat plate model, regardless of bending, torsion, and 2-stripe modes. This work would have a significant impact on the conventional passive shunt damping world because the standard feedback control design tools can now be used to design and implement electric shunt for vibration control. In other words, the passive shunt circuit components using massive inductors and. resistors for multi-mode resonance control can be replaced with digital codes. Furthermore, this active approach with multi patches can simultaneously control several modes in the engine operating range. Dr. Benjamin Choi presented the analytical and experimental results from this work at the Propulsion-Safety and. Affordable Readiness (P-SAR) Conference in March, 2009.

  20. Active and passive kink mode studies in a tokamak with a movable ferromagnetic walla)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levesque, J. P.; Hughes, P. E.; Bialek, J.; Byrne, P. J.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.; Peng, Q.; Rhodes, D. J.; Stoafer, C. C.

    2015-05-01

    High-resolution active and passive kink mode studies are conducted in a tokamak with an adjustable ferromagnetic wall near the plasma surface. Ferritic tiles made from 5.6 mm thick Hiperco® 50 alloy have been mounted on the plasma-facing side of half of the in-vessel movable wall segments in the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse device [D. A. Maurer et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 53, 074016 (2011)] in order to explore ferritic resistive wall mode stability. Low-activation ferritic steels are a candidate for structural components of a fusion reactor, and these experiments examine MHD stability of plasmas with nearby ferromagnetic material. Plasma-wall separation for alternating ferritic and non-ferritic wall segments is adjusted between discharges without opening the vacuum vessel. Amplification of applied resonant magnetic perturbations and plasma disruptivity are observed to increase when the ferromagnetic wall is close to plasma surface instead of the standard stainless steel wall. Rapidly rotating m / n = 3 / 1 external kink modes have higher growth rates with the nearby ferritic wall. Feedback suppression of kinks is still as effective as before the installation of ferritic material in vessel, in spite of increased mode growth rates.

  1. Active and passive kink mode studies in a tokamak with a movable ferromagnetic wall

    SciTech Connect

    Levesque, J. P.; Hughes, P. E.; Bialek, J.; Byrne, P. J.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.; Peng, Q.; Rhodes, D. J.; Stoafer, C. C.

    2015-05-15

    High-resolution active and passive kink mode studies are conducted in a tokamak with an adjustable ferromagnetic wall near the plasma surface. Ferritic tiles made from 5.6 mm thick Hiperco{sup ®} 50 alloy have been mounted on the plasma-facing side of half of the in-vessel movable wall segments in the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse device [D. A. Maurer et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 53, 074016 (2011)] in order to explore ferritic resistive wall mode stability. Low-activation ferritic steels are a candidate for structural components of a fusion reactor, and these experiments examine MHD stability of plasmas with nearby ferromagnetic material. Plasma-wall separation for alternating ferritic and non-ferritic wall segments is adjusted between discharges without opening the vacuum vessel. Amplification of applied resonant magnetic perturbations and plasma disruptivity are observed to increase when the ferromagnetic wall is close to plasma surface instead of the standard stainless steel wall. Rapidly rotating m/n=3/1 external kink modes have higher growth rates with the nearby ferritic wall. Feedback suppression of kinks is still as effective as before the installation of ferritic material in vessel, in spite of increased mode growth rates.

  2. Superconducting cavity driving with FPGA controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarski, Tomasz; Koprek, Waldemar; Poźniak, Krzysztof T.; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Simrock, Stefan; Brandt, Alexander; Chase, Brian; Carcagno, Ruben; Cancelo, Gustavo; Koeth, Timothy W.

    2006-12-01

    A digital control of superconducting cavities for a linear accelerator is presented. FPGA-based controller, supported by Matlab system, was applied. Electrical model of a resonator was used for design of a control system. Calibration of the signal path is considered. Identification of cavity parameters has been carried out for adaptive control algorithm. Feed-forward and feedback modes were applied in operating the cavities. Required performance has been achieved; i.e. driving on resonance during filling and field stabilization during flattop time, while keeping reasonable level of the power consumption. Representative results of the experiments are presented for different levels of the cavity field gradient.

  3. Large Scale Shape Optimization for Accelerator Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Akcelik, Volkan; Lee, Lie-Quan; Li, Zenghai; Ng, Cho; Xiao, Li-Ling; Ko, Kwok; /SLAC

    2011-12-06

    We present a shape optimization method for designing accelerator cavities with large scale computations. The objective is to find the best accelerator cavity shape with the desired spectral response, such as with the specified frequencies of resonant modes, field profiles, and external Q values. The forward problem is the large scale Maxwell equation in the frequency domain. The design parameters are the CAD parameters defining the cavity shape. We develop scalable algorithms with a discrete adjoint approach and use the quasi-Newton method to solve the nonlinear optimization problem. Two realistic accelerator cavity design examples are presented.

  4. Development of a compact vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser end-pumped actively Q-switched laser for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuo; Liu, Lei; Chen, Rongzhang; Nelsen, Bryan; Huang, Xi; Lu, Yongfeng; Chen, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports the development of a compact and portable actively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and its applications in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The laser was end-pumped by a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL). The cavity lases at a wavelength of 1064 nm and produced pulses of 16 ns with a maximum pulse energy of 12.9 mJ. The laser exhibits a reliable performance in terms of pulse-to-pulse stability and timing jitter. The LIBS experiments were carried out using this laser on NIST standard alloy samples. Shot-to-shot LIBS signal stability, crater profile, time evolution of emission spectra, plasma electron density and temperature, and limits of detection were studied and reported in this paper. The test results demonstrate that the VCSEL-pumped solid-state laser is an effective and compact laser tool for laser remote sensing applications. PMID:27036765

  5. Development of a compact vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser end-pumped actively Q-switched laser for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuo; Liu, Lei; Chen, Rongzhang; Nelsen, Bryan; Huang, Xi; Lu, Yongfeng; Chen, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports the development of a compact and portable actively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and its applications in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The laser was end-pumped by a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL). The cavity lases at a wavelength of 1064 nm and produced pulses of 16 ns with a maximum pulse energy of 12.9 mJ. The laser exhibits a reliable performance in terms of pulse-to-pulse stability and timing jitter. The LIBS experiments were carried out using this laser on NIST standard alloy samples. Shot-to-shot LIBS signal stability, crater profile, time evolution of emission spectra, plasma electron density and temperature, and limits of detection were studied and reported in this paper. The test results demonstrate that the VCSEL-pumped solid-state laser is an effective and compact laser tool for laser remote sensing applications.

  6. Atom-mirror entanglement via cavity dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lingchao; Hu, Xiangming; Rao, Shi; Xu, Jun

    2015-05-01

    We present a cavity dissipation scheme to prepare a hybrid system of an atomic ensemble and a moving mirror in squeezed and entangled states. This scheme is based on four-wave mixing in the atoms and radiation pressure on the mirror, both of which combine to lead to Bogoliubov interactions of the atoms and the mirror with the cavity fields. Under adiabatic conditions, the cavity fields cause the hybrid Bogoliubov modes to evolve into the vacuum states, which correspond to the two-mode squeezed and entangled states. The dependence of the hybrid entanglement on the system parameters is also presented in and beyond the Bogoliubov interactions.

  7. Cysteine Proteases: Modes of Activation and Future Prospects as Pharmacological Targets

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Sonia; Dixit, Rajnikant; Pandey, Kailash C.

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes are crucial for a variety of biological processes in organisms ranging from lower (virus, bacteria, and parasite) to the higher organisms (mammals). Proteases cleave proteins into smaller fragments by catalyzing peptide bonds hydrolysis. Proteases are classified according to their catalytic site, and distributed into four major classes: cysteine proteases, serine proteases, aspartic proteases, and metalloproteases. This review will cover only cysteine proteases, papain family enzymes which are involved in multiple functions such as extracellular matrix turnover, antigen presentation, processing events, digestion, immune invasion, hemoglobin hydrolysis, parasite invasion, parasite egress, and processing surface proteins. Therefore, they are promising drug targets for various diseases. For preventing unwanted digestion, cysteine proteases are synthesized as zymogens, and contain a prodomain (regulatory) and a mature domain (catalytic). The prodomain acts as an endogenous inhibitor of the mature enzyme. For activation of the mature enzyme, removal of the prodomain is necessary and achieved by different modes. The pro-mature domain interaction can be categorized as protein–protein interactions (PPIs) and may be targeted in a range of diseases. Cysteine protease inhibitors are available that can block the active site but no such inhibitor available yet that can be targeted to block the pro-mature domain interactions and prevent it activation. This review specifically highlights the modes of activation (processing) of papain family enzymes, which involve auto-activation, trans-activation and also clarifies the future aspects of targeting PPIs to prevent the activation of cysteine proteases. PMID:27199750

  8. Cysteine Proteases: Modes of Activation and Future Prospects as Pharmacological Targets.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sonia; Dixit, Rajnikant; Pandey, Kailash C

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes are crucial for a variety of biological processes in organisms ranging from lower (virus, bacteria, and parasite) to the higher organisms (mammals). Proteases cleave proteins into smaller fragments by catalyzing peptide bonds hydrolysis. Proteases are classified according to their catalytic site, and distributed into four major classes: cysteine proteases, serine proteases, aspartic proteases, and metalloproteases. This review will cover only cysteine proteases, papain family enzymes which are involved in multiple functions such as extracellular matrix turnover, antigen presentation, processing events, digestion, immune invasion, hemoglobin hydrolysis, parasite invasion, parasite egress, and processing surface proteins. Therefore, they are promising drug targets for various diseases. For preventing unwanted digestion, cysteine proteases are synthesized as zymogens, and contain a prodomain (regulatory) and a mature domain (catalytic). The prodomain acts as an endogenous inhibitor of the mature enzyme. For activation of the mature enzyme, removal of the prodomain is necessary and achieved by different modes. The pro-mature domain interaction can be categorized as protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and may be targeted in a range of diseases. Cysteine protease inhibitors are available that can block the active site but no such inhibitor available yet that can be targeted to block the pro-mature domain interactions and prevent it activation. This review specifically highlights the modes of activation (processing) of papain family enzymes, which involve auto-activation, trans-activation and also clarifies the future aspects of targeting PPIs to prevent the activation of cysteine proteases. PMID:27199750

  9. Melatonin and Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Murat İnanç; Cengiz, Seda; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2012-01-01

    While initially the oral cavity was considered to be mainly a source of various bacteria, their toxins and antigens, recent studies showed that it may also be a location of oxidative stress and periodontal inflammation. Accordingly, this paper focuses on the involvement of melatonin in oxidative stress diseases of oral cavity as well as on potential therapeutic implications of melatonin in dental disorders. Melatonin has immunomodulatory and antioxidant activities, stimulates the proliferation of collagen and osseous tissue, and acts as a protector against cellular degeneration associated with aging and toxin exposure. Arising out of its antioxidant actions, melatonin protects against inflammatory processes and cellular damage caused by the toxic derivates of oxygen. As a result of these actions, melatonin may be useful as a coadjuvant in the treatment of certain conditions of the oral cavity. However, the most important effect of melatonin seems to result from its potent antioxidant, immunomodulatory, protective, and anticancer properties. Thus, melatonin could be used therapeutically for instance, locally, in the oral cavity damage of mechanical, bacterial, fungal, or viral origin, in postsurgical wounds caused by tooth extractions and other oral surgeries. Additionally, it can help bone formation in various autoimmunological disorders such as Sjorgen syndrome, in periodontal diseases, in toxic effects of dental materials, in dental implants, and in oral cancers. PMID:22792106

  10. Default-Mode Network Activity Identified by Group Independent Component Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Conghui; Zhuang, Jie; Peng, Danling; Yu, Guoliang; Yang, Yanhui

    Default-mode network activity refers to some regional increase in blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal during baseline than cognitive tasks. Recent functional imaging studies have found co-activation in a distributed network of cortical regions, including ventral anterior cingulate cortex (vACC) and posterior cingulate cortex (PPC) that characterize the default mode of human brain. In this study, general linear model and group independent component analysis (ICA) were utilized to analyze the fMRI data obtained from two language tasks. Both methods yielded similar, but not identical results and detected a resting deactivation network at some midline regions including anterior and posterior cingulate cortex and precuneus. Particularly, the group ICA method segregated functional elements into two separate maps and identified ventral cingulate component and fronto-parietal component. These results suggest that these two components might be linked to different mental function during "resting" baseline.

  11. Perturbing Open Cavities: Anomalous Resonance Frequency Shifts in a Hybrid Cavity-Nanoantenna System.

    PubMed

    Ruesink, Freek; Doeleman, Hugo M; Hendrikx, Ruud; Koenderink, A Femius; Verhagen, Ewold

    2015-11-13

    The influence of a small perturbation on a cavity mode plays an important role in fields like optical sensing, cavity quantum electrodynamics, and cavity optomechanics. Typically, the resulting cavity frequency shift directly relates to the polarizability of the perturbation. Here, we demonstrate that particles perturbing a radiating cavity can induce strong frequency shifts that are opposite to, and even exceed, the effects based on the particles' polarizability. A full electrodynamic theory reveals that these anomalous results rely on a nontrivial phase relation between cavity and nanoparticle radiation, allowing backaction via the radiation continuum. In addition, an intuitive model based on coupled mode theory is presented that relates the phenomenon to retardation. Because of the ubiquity of dissipation, we expect these findings to benefit the understanding and engineering of a wide class of systems. PMID:26613442

  12. Stability of the Tilt Modes of an Actively Controlled Flywheel Analyzed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Gerald V.; Kascak, Albert F.

    1999-01-01

    Applications of strongly gyroscopic rotors are becoming important, including flywheels for terrestrial and space energy storage and various attitude control devices for spacecraft. Some of these applications, especially the higher speed ones for energy storage, will have actively controlled magnetic bearings. These bearings will be required where speeds are too high for conventional bearings, where adequate lubrication is undesirable or impossible, or where bearing losses must be minimized for efficient energy storage. Flywheel rotors are highly gyroscopic, and above some speed that depends on the bandwidth of the feedback system, they always become unstable in an actively controlled magnetic bearing system. To assess ways to prevent instability until speeds well above the desired operating range, researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center used a commercial controls code to calculate the eigenvalues of the tilt modes of a rigid gyroscopic rotor supported by active magnetic bearings. The real part of the eigenvalue is the negative of the damping of the mode, and the imaginary part is approximately equal to the mode s frequency.

  13. Vacuum field energy and spontaneous emission in anomalously dispersive cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, Douglas H.; Di Rosa, Michael D.

    2011-05-15

    Anomalously dispersive cavities, particularly white-light cavities, may have larger bandwidth to finesse ratios than their normally dispersive counterparts. Partly for this reason, they have been proposed for use in laser interferometer gravitational-wave observatory (LIGO)-like gravity-wave detectors and in ring-laser gyroscopes. In this paper we analyze the quantum noise associated with anomalously dispersive cavity modes. The vacuum field energy associated with a particular cavity mode is proportional to the cavity-averaged group velocity of that mode. For anomalously dispersive cavities with group index values between 1 and 0, this means that the total vacuum field energy associated with a particular cavity mode must exceed ({h_bar}/2{pi}){omega}/2. For white-light cavities in particular, the group index approaches zero and the vacuum field energy of a particular spatial mode may be significantly enhanced. We predict enhanced spontaneous emission rates into anomalously dispersive cavity modes and broadened laser linewidths when the linewidth of intracavity emitters is broader than the cavity linewidth.

  14. Optimization of the Low Loss SRF Cavity for the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Sekutowicz, J.S.; Kneisel, P.; Higo, T.; Morozumi, Y.; Saito, K.; Ge, L.; Ko, Yong-kyu; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.K.; Schussman, G.L.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2008-01-18

    The Low-Loss shape cavity design has been proposed as a possible alternative to the baseline TESLA cavity design for the ILC main linacs. The advantages of this design over the TESLA cavity are its lower cryogenic loss, and higher achievable gradient due to lower surface fields. High gradient prototypes for such designs have been tested at KEK (ICHIRO) and TJNAF (LL). However, issues related to HOM damping and multipacting still need to be addressed. Preliminary numerical studies of the prototype cavities have shown unacceptable damping factors for some higher-order dipole modes if the typical TESLA HOM couplers are directly adapted to the design. The resulting wakefield will dilute the beam emittance thus reducing the machine luminosity. Furthermore, high gradient tests on a 9-cell prototype at KEK have experienced multipacting barriers although a single LL cell had achieved a high gradient. From simulations, multipacting activities are found to occur in the end-groups of the cavity. In this paper, we will present the optimization results of the end-groups for the Low-Loss designs for effective HOM damping and alleviation of multipacting.

  15. Physics of the Flow over a Rectangular Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kegerise, M. A.; Spina, E. F.; Cattafesta, L. N., III

    1998-11-01

    Certain rectangular cavity flows, typified by the flow past aircraft wheel wells, are characterized by high-amplitude, periodic pressure fluctuations caused by self-sustaining oscillations. They are ripe for both active and passive flow control techniques, but additional flow physics details are needed first. The velocity and density fields of the flow over a rectangular cavity (L/D = 2) in a subsonic free stream (M=0.25) were measured. The velocity field was obtained using normal- and cross-wire anemometry. The time-resolved density-gradient field was obtained via a quantitative Schlieren technique in which real-time light-intensity fluctuations are measured at discrete points. The pressure signal from a microphone located in the rear wall of the cavity was acquired simultaneously with the velocity and density-gradient signals during surveys of the cavity and reattachment region. Using the microphone as a reference, phase-locked movies of the velocity and density fields were constructed for each cavity shear-layer mode. The movies provide excellent insight into the nature of the physical feedback loop, including the development and convection of vortical structures and their impingement at the trailing edge.

  16. Mode of Action of Lactoperoxidase as Related to Its Antimicrobial Activity: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Bafort, F.; Parisi, O.; Perraudin, J.-P.; Jijakli, M. H.

    2014-01-01

    Lactoperoxidase is a member of the family of the mammalian heme peroxidases which have a broad spectrum of activity. Their best known effect is their antimicrobial activity that arouses much interest in in vivo and in vitro applications. In this context, the proper use of lactoperoxidase needs a good understanding of its mode of action, of the factors that favor or limit its activity, and of the features and properties of the active molecules. The first part of this review describes briefly the classification of mammalian peroxidases and their role in the human immune system and in host cell damage. The second part summarizes present knowledge on the mode of action of lactoperoxidase, with special focus on the characteristics to be taken into account for in vitro or in vivo antimicrobial use. The last part looks upon the characteristics of the active molecule produced by lactoperoxidase in the presence of thiocyanate and/or iodide with implication(s) on its antimicrobial activity. PMID:25309750

  17. Tunable-cavity QED with phase qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, Jed D.; da Silva, Fabio; Allman, Michael Shane; Lecocq, Florent; Cicak, Katarina; Sirois, Adam; Teufel, John; Aumentado, Jose; Simmonds, Raymond W.

    2014-03-01

    We describe a tunable-cavity QED architecture with an rf SQUID phase qubit inductively coupled to a single-mode, resonant cavity with a tunable frequency that allows for both tunneling and dispersive measurements. Dispersive measurement is well characterized by a three-level model, strongly dependent on qubit anharmonicity, qubit-cavity coupling and detuning. The tunable cavity frequency provides dynamic control over the coupling strength and qubit-cavity detuning helping to minimize Purcell losses and cavity-induced dephasing during qubit operation. The maximum decay time T1 = 1 . 5 μs is limited by dielectric losses from a design geometry similar to planar transmon qubits. This work supported by NIST and NSA grant EAO140639.

  18. 800MHz Crab Cavity Conceptual Design For the LHC Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Liling; Li, Zenghai; Ng, Cho-Kuen; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2009-05-26

    In this paper, we present an 800 MHz crab cavity conceptual design for the LHC upgrade. The cell shape is optimized for lower maximum peak surface fields as well as higher transverse R/Q. A compact coax-to-coax coupler scheme is proposed to damp the LOM/SOM modes. A two-stub antenna with a notch filter is used as the HOM coupler to damp the HOM modes in the horizontal plane and rejects the operating mode at 800MHz. Multipacting (MP) simulations show that there are strong MP particles at the disks. Adding grooves along the short axis without changing the operating mode's RF characteristics can suppress the MP activities. Possible input coupler configurations are discussed.

  19. Cavity quantum electrodynamics on a nanofiber using a composite photonic crystal cavity.

    PubMed

    Yalla, Ramachandrarao; Sadgrove, Mark; Nayak, Kali P; Hakuta, Kohzo

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrate cavity QED conditions in the Purcell regime for single quantum emitters on the surface of an optical nanofiber. The cavity is formed by combining an optical nanofiber and a nanofabricated grating to create a composite photonic crystal cavity. By using this technique, significant enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate into the nanofiber guided modes is observed for single quantum dots. Our results pave the way for enhanced on-fiber light-matter interfaces with clear applications to quantum networks.

  20. Single-photon emission at a rate of 143 MHz from a deterministic quantum-dot microlens triggered by a mode-locked vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser

    SciTech Connect

    Schlehahn, A.; Gschrey, M.; Schnauber, P.; Schulze, J.-H.; Rodt, S.; Strittmatter, A.; Heindel, T. Reitzenstein, S.; Gaafar, M.; Vaupel, M.; Stolz, W.; Rahimi-Iman, A.; Koch, M.

    2015-07-27

    We report on the realization of a quantum dot (QD) based single-photon source with a record-high single-photon emission rate. The quantum light source consists of an InGaAs QD which is deterministically integrated within a monolithic microlens with a distributed Bragg reflector as back-side mirror, which is triggered using the frequency-doubled emission of a mode-locked vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser (ML-VECSEL). The utilized compact and stable laser system allows us to excite the single-QD microlens at a wavelength of 508 nm with a pulse repetition rate close to 500 MHz at a pulse width of 4.2 ps. Probing the photon statistics of the emission from a single QD state at saturation, we demonstrate single-photon emission of the QD-microlens chip with g{sup (2)}(0) < 0.03 at a record-high single-photon flux of (143 ± 16) MHz collected by the first lens of the detection system. Our approach is fully compatible with resonant excitation schemes using wavelength tunable ML-VECSELs, which will optimize the quantum optical properties of the single-photon emission in terms of photon indistinguishability.

  1. YANA – a software tool for analyzing flux modes, gene-expression and enzyme activities

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Roland; Musch, Patrick; von Kamp, Axel; Engels, Bernd; Schirmer, Heiner; Schuster, Stefan; Dandekar, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Background A number of algorithms for steady state analysis of metabolic networks have been developed over the years. Of these, Elementary Mode Analysis (EMA) has proven especially useful. Despite its low user-friendliness, METATOOL as a reliable high-performance implementation of the algorithm has been the instrument of choice up to now. As reported here, the analysis of metabolic networks has been improved by an editor and analyzer of metabolic flux modes. Analysis routines for expression levels and the most central, well connected metabolites and their metabolic connections are of particular interest. Results YANA features a platform-independent, dedicated toolbox for metabolic networks with a graphical user interface to calculate (integrating METATOOL), edit (including support for the SBML format), visualize, centralize, and compare elementary flux modes. Further, YANA calculates expected flux distributions for a given Elementary Mode (EM) activity pattern and vice versa. Moreover, a dissection algorithm, a centralization algorithm, and an average diameter routine can be used to simplify and analyze complex networks. Proteomics or gene expression data give a rough indication of some individual enzyme activities, whereas the complete flux distribution in the network is often not known. As such data are noisy, YANA features a fast evolutionary algorithm (EA) for the prediction of EM activities with minimum error, including alerts for inconsistent experimental data. We offer the possibility to include further known constraints (e.g. growth constraints) in the EA calculation process. The redox metabolism around glutathione reductase serves as an illustration example. All software and documentation are available for download at . Conclusion A graphical toolbox and an editor for METATOOL as well as a series of additional routines for metabolic network analyses constitute a new user-friendly software for such efforts. PMID:15929789

  2. Accessible cultural mind-set modulates default mode activity: evidence for the culturally situated brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenbo; Oyserman, Daphna; Liu, Qiang; Li, Hong; Han, Shihui

    2013-01-01

    Self-construal priming modulates human behavior and associated neural activity. However, the neural activity associated with the self-construal priming procedure itself remains unknown. It is also unclear whether and how self-construal priming affects neural activity prior to engaging in a particular task. To address this gap, we scanned Chinese adults, using functional magnetic resonance imaging, during self-construal priming and a following resting state. We found that, relative to a calculation task, both interdependent and independent self-construal priming activated the ventral medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC). The contrast of interdependent vs. independent self-construal priming also revealed increased activity in the dorsal MPFC and left middle frontal cortex. The regional homogeneity analysis of the resting-state activity revealed increased local synchronization of spontaneous activity in the dorsal MPFC but decreased local synchronization of spontaneous activity in the PCC when contrasting interdependent vs. independent self-construal priming. The functional connectivity analysis of the resting-state activity, however, did not show significant difference in synchronization of activities in remote brain regions between different priming conditions. Our findings suggest that accessible collectivistic/individualistic mind-set induced by self-construal priming is associated with modulations of both task-related and resting-state activity in the default mode network.

  3. Plasmonic external cavity laser refractometric sensor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meng; Lu, Meng; Ge, Chun; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2014-01-01

    Combining the high sensitivity properties of surface plasmon resonance refractive index sensing with a tunable external cavity laser, we demonstrate a plasmonic external cavity laser (ECL) for high resolution refractometric sensing. The plasmonic ECL utilizes a plasmonic crystal with extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) as the wavelength-selective element, and achieves single mode lasing at the transmission peak of the EOT resonance. The plasmonic ECL refractometric sensor maintains the high sensitivity of a plasmonic crystal sensor, while simultaneously providing a narrow spectral linewidth through lasing emission, resulting in a record high figure of merit for refractometric sensing with an active or passive optical resonator. We demonstrate single-mode and continuous-wave operation of the electrically-pumped laser system, and show the ability to measure refractive index changes with a 3σ detection limit of 1.79 × 10−6 RIU. The demonstrated approach is a promising path towards label-free optical biosensing with enhanced signal-to-noise ratios for challenging applications in small molecule drug discovery and pathogen sensing. PMID:25321243

  4. Plasmonic external cavity laser refractometric sensor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng; Lu, Meng; Ge, Chun; Cunningham, Brian T

    2014-08-25

    Combining the high sensitivity properties of surface plasmon resonance refractive index sensing with a tunable external cavity laser, we demonstrate a plasmonic external cavity laser (ECL) for high resolution refractometric sensing. The plasmonic ECL utilizes a plasmonic crystal with extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) as the wavelength-selective element, and achieves single mode lasing at the transmission peak of the EOT resonance. The plasmonic ECL refractometric sensor maintains the high sensitivity of a plasmonic crystal sensor, while simultaneously providing a narrow spectral linewidth through lasing emission, resulting in a record high figure of merit for refractometric sensing with an active or passive optical resonator. We demonstrate single-mode and continuous-wave operation of the electrically-pumped laser system, and show the ability to measure refractive index changes with a 3σ detection limit of 1.79 × 10(-6) RIU. The demonstrated approach is a promising path towards label-free optical biosensing with enhanced signal-to-noise ratios for challenging applications in small molecule drug discovery and pathogen sensing.

  5. Structural basis for PPAR partial or full activation revealed by a novel ligand binding mode

    PubMed Central

    Capelli, Davide; Cerchia, Carmen; Montanari, Roberta; Loiodice, Fulvio; Tortorella, Paolo; Laghezza, Antonio; Cervoni, Laura; Pochetti, Giorgio; Lavecchia, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear receptors involved in the regulation of the metabolic homeostasis and therefore represent valuable therapeutic targets for the treatment of metabolic diseases. The development of more balanced drugs interacting with PPARs, devoid of the side-effects showed by the currently marketed PPARγ full agonists, is considered the major challenge for the pharmaceutical companies. Here we present a structure-based virtual screening approach that let us identify a novel PPAR pan-agonist with a very attractive activity profile and its crystal structure in the complex with PPARα and PPARγ, respectively. In PPARα this ligand occupies a new pocket whose filling is allowed by the ligand-induced switching of the F273 side chain from a closed to an open conformation. The comparison between this pocket and the corresponding cavity in PPARγ provides a rationale for the different activation of the ligand towards PPARα and PPARγ, suggesting a novel basis for ligand design. PMID:27708429

  6. Injector Cavities Fabrication, Vertical Test Performance and Primary Cryomodule Design

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haipeng; Cheng, Guangfeng; Clemens, William; Davis, G; Macha, Kurt; Overton, Roland; Spell, D.

    2015-09-01

    After the electromagnetic design and the mechanical design of a β=0.6, 2-cell elliptical SRF cavity, the cavity has been fabricated. Then both 2-cell and 7-cell cavities have been bench tuned to the target values of frequency, coupling external Q and field flatness. After buffer chemistry polishing (BCP) and high pressure rinses (HPR), Vertical 2K cavity test results have been satisfied the specifications and ready for the string assembly. We will report the cavity performance including Lorenz Force Detuning (LFD) and Higher Order Modes (HOM) damping data. Its integration with cavity tuners to the cryomodule design will be reported.

  7. Vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser device

    DOEpatents

    Hadley, G.R.; Lear, K.L.; Awyoung, A.; Choquette, K.D.

    1999-05-11

    A vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser device is disclosed. The vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) device comprises one or more VCSELs with each VCSEL having a mode-control region thereabout, with the mode-control region forming an optical cavity with an effective cavity length different from the effective cavity length within each VCSEL. Embodiments of the present invention can be formed as single VCSELs and as one- or two-dimensional arrays of VCSELs, with either an index-guided mode of operation or an index anti-guided mode of operation being defined by a sign of the difference in the two effective cavity lengths. 10 figs.

  8. Dual mode antibacterial activity of ion substituted calcium phosphate nanocarriers for bone infections.

    PubMed

    Sampath Kumar, T S; Madhumathi, K; Rubaiya, Y; Doble, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology has tremendous potential for the management of infectious diseases caused by multi-drug resistant bacteria, through the development of newer antibacterial materials and efficient modes of antibiotic delivery. Calcium phosphate (CaP) bioceramics are commonly used as bone substitutes due to their similarity to bone mineral and are widely researched upon for the treatment of bone infections associated with bone loss. CaPs can be used as local antibiotic delivery agents for bone infections and can be substituted with antibacterial ions in their crystal structure to have a wide spectrum, sustained antibacterial activity even against drug resistant bacteria. In the present work, a dual mode antibiotic delivery system with antibacterial ion substituted calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) nanoparticles has been developed. Antibacterial ions such as zinc, silver, and strontium have been incorporated into CDHA at concentrations of 6, 0.25-0.75, and 2.5-7.5 at. %, respectively. The samples were found to be phase pure, acicular nanoparticles of length 40-50 nm and width 5-6 nm approximately. The loading and release profile of doxycycline, a commonly used antibiotic, was studied from the nanocarriers. The drug release was studied for 5 days and the release profile was influenced by the ion concentrations. The release of antibacterial ions was studied over a period of 21 days. The ion substituted CDHA samples were tested for antibacterial efficacy on Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli by MIC/MBC studies and time-kill assay. AgCDHA and ZnCDHA showed high antibacterial activity against both bacteria, while SrCDHA was weakly active against S. aureus. Present study shows that the antibiotic release can provide the initial high antibacterial activity, and the sustained ion release can provide a long-term antibacterial activity. Such dual mode antibiotic and antibacterial ion release offers an efficient and potent way to treat an incumbent drug

  9. Self-amplified lock of an ultra-narrow linewidth optical cavity.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Kiwamu; Sigg, Daniel; Barsotti, Lisa

    2014-09-15

    High finesse optical cavities are an essential tool in modern precision laser interferometry. The incident laser field is often controlled and stabilized with an active feedback system such that the field resonates in the cavity. The Pound-Drever-Hall reflection locking technique is a convenient way to derive a suitable error signal. However, it only gives a strong signal within the cavity linewidth. This poses a problem for locking an ultra-narrow linewidth cavity. We present a novel technique for acquiring lock by utilizing an additional weak control signal, but with a much larger capture range. We numerically show that this technique can be applied to the laser frequency stabilization system used in the Laser Interferometric Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO), which has a linewidth of 0.8 Hz. This new technique will allow us to robustly and repeatedly lock the LIGO laser frequency to the common mode of the interferometer. PMID:26466252

  10. Fiber Bragg grating Fabry-Perot cavity sensor based on pulse laser demodulation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fangfang; Chen, Jianfeng; Liu, Yunqi; Wang, Tingyun

    2011-12-01

    We demonstrate a fiber laser sensing technique based on fiber Bragg grating Fabry-Perot (FBG-FP) cavity interrogated by pulsed laser, where short pulses generated from active mode-locked erbium-doped fiber ring laser and current modulated DFB laser are adopted. The modulated laser pulses launched into the FBG-FP cavity produce a group of reflected pulses. The optical loss in the cavity can be determined from the power ratio of the first two pulses reflected from the cavity. This technique does not require high reflectivity FBGs and is immune to the power fluctuation of the light source. Two short pulse laser sources were compared experimentally with each other on pulse width, pulse stability, pulse chirp and sensing efficiency.

  11. Coriandrum sativum L. (Coriander) essential oil: antifungal activity and mode of action on Candida spp., and molecular targets affected in human whole-genome expression.

    PubMed

    Freires, Irlan de Almeida; Murata, Ramiro Mendonça; Furletti, Vivian Fernandes; Sartoratto, Adilson; Alencar, Severino Matias de; Figueira, Glyn Mara; de Oliveira Rodrigues, Janaina Aparecida; Duarte, Marta Cristina Teixeira; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz

    2014-01-01

    Oral candidiasis is an opportunistic fungal infection of the oral cavity with increasingly worldwide prevalence and incidence rates. Novel specifically-targeted strategies to manage this ailment have been proposed using essential oils (EO) known to have antifungal properties. In this study, we aim to investigate the antifungal activity and mode of action of the EO from Coriandrum sativum L. (coriander) leaves on Candida spp. In addition, we detected the molecular targets affected in whole-genome expression in human cells. The EO phytochemical profile indicates monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes as major components, which are likely to negatively impact the viability of yeast cells. There seems to be a synergistic activity of the EO chemical compounds as their isolation into fractions led to a decreased antimicrobial effect. C. sativum EO may bind to membrane ergosterol, increasing ionic permeability and causing membrane damage leading to cell death, but it does not act on cell wall biosynthesis-related pathways. This mode of action is illustrated by photomicrographs showing disruption in biofilm integrity caused by the EO at varied concentrations. The EO also inhibited Candida biofilm adherence to a polystyrene substrate at low concentrations, and decreased the proteolytic activity of Candida albicans at minimum inhibitory concentration. Finally, the EO and its selected active fraction had low cytotoxicity on human cells, with putative mechanisms affecting gene expression in pathways involving chemokines and MAP-kinase (proliferation/apoptosis), as well as adhesion proteins. These findings highlight the potential antifungal activity of the EO from C. sativum leaves and suggest avenues for future translational toxicological research.

  12. Fluence Rate Differences in Photodynamic Therapy Efficacy and Activation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor after Treatment of the Tumor-Involved Murine Thoracic Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Craig E.; Carter, Shirron L.; Czupryna, Julie; Wang, Le; Putt, Mary E.; Busch, Theresa M.

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) of the thoracic cavity can be performed in conjunction with surgery to treat cancers of the lung and its pleura. However, illumination of the cavity results in tissue exposure to a broad range of fluence rates. In a murine model of intrathoracic PDT, we studied the efficacy of 2-(1-hexyloxyethyl)-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH; Photochlor®)-mediated PDT in reducing the burden of non-small cell lung cancer for treatments performed at different incident fluence rates (75 versus 150 mW/cm). To better understand a role for growth factor signaling in disease progression after intrathoracic PDT, the expression and activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was evaluated in areas of post-treatment proliferation. The low fluence rate of 75 mW/cm produced the largest reductions in tumor burden. Bioluminescent imaging and histological staining for cell proliferation (anti-Ki-67) identified areas of disease progression at both fluence rates after PDT. However, increased EGFR activation in proliferative areas was detected only after treatment at the higher fluence rate of 150 mW/cm. These data suggest that fluence rate may affect the activation of survival factors, such as EGFR, and weaker activation at lower fluence rate could contribute to a smaller tumor burden after PDT at 75 mW/cm. PMID:26784170

  13. Diffraction-limited high-finesse optical cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kleckner, Dustin; Irvine, William T. M.; Oemrawsingh, Sumant S. R.; Bouwmeester, Dirk

    2010-04-15

    High-quality optical cavities with wavelength-sized end mirrors are important to the growing field of micro-optomechanical systems. We present a versatile method for calculating the modes of diffraction limited optical cavities and show that it can be used to determine the effect of a wide variety of cavity geometries and imperfections. Additionally, we show these calculations agree remarkably well with FDTD simulations for wavelength-sized optical modes, even though our method is based on the paraxial approximation.

  14. Tuning micropillar cavity birefringence by laser induced surface defects

    SciTech Connect

    Bonato, Cristian; Ding Dapeng; Gudat, Jan; Exter, Martin P. van; Thon, Susanna; Kim, Hyochul; Petroff, Pierre M.; Bouwmeester, Dirk

    2009-12-21

    We demonstrate a technique to tune the optical properties of micropillar cavities by creating small defects on the sample surface near the cavity region with an intense focused laser beam. Such defects modify strain in the structure, changing the birefringence in a controllable way. We apply the technique to make the fundamental cavity mode polarization-degenerate and to fine tune the overall mode frequencies, as needed for applications in quantum information science.

  15. Quantization of Electromagnetic Fields in Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kakazu, Kiyotaka; Oshiro, Kazunori

    1996-01-01

    A quantization procedure for the electromagnetic field in a rectangular cavity with perfect conductor walls is presented, where a decomposition formula of the field plays an essential role. All vector mode functions are obtained by using the decomposition. After expanding the field in terms of the vector mode functions, we get the quantized electromagnetic Hamiltonian.

  16. Unconventional Bifunctional Lewis-Brønsted Acid Activation Mode in Bicyclic Guanidine-Catalyzed Conjugate Addition Reactions.

    PubMed

    Cho, Bokun; Wong, Ming Wah

    2015-08-18

    DFT calculations have demonstrated that the unconventional bifunctional Brønsted-Lewis acid activation mode is generally applicable to a range of nucleophilic conjugate additions catalyzed by bicyclic guanidine catalysts. It competes readily with the conventional bifunctional Brønsted acid mode of activation. The optimal pro-nucleophiles for this unconventional bifunctional activation are acidic substrates with low pKa, while the best electrophiles are flexible 1,4-diamide and 1,4-diester conjugated systems.

  17. Mitigation of wind tunnel wall interactions in subsonic cavity flows

    DOE PAGES

    Wagner, Justin L.; Casper, Katya Marie; Beresh, Steven J.; Henfling, John F.; Spillers, Russell Wayne; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2015-03-06

    In this study, the flow over an open aircraft bay is often represented in a wind tunnel with a cavity. In flight, this flow is unconfined, though in experiments, the cavity is surrounded by wind tunnel walls. If untreated, wind tunnel wall effects can lead to significant distortions of cavity acoustics in subsonic flows. To understand and mitigate these cavity–tunnel interactions, a parametric approach was taken for flow over an L/D = 7 cavity at Mach numbers 0.6–0.8. With solid tunnel walls, a dominant cavity tone was observed, likely due to an interaction with a tunnel duct mode. Furthermore, anmore » acoustic liner opposite the cavity decreased the amplitude of the dominant mode and its harmonics, a result observed by previous researchers. Acoustic dampeners were also placed in the tunnel sidewalls, which further decreased the dominant mode amplitudes and peak amplitudes associated with nonlinear interactions between cavity modes. This then indicates that cavity resonance can be altered by tunnel sidewalls and that spanwise coupling should be addressed when conducting subsonic cavity experiments. Though mechanisms for dominant modes and nonlinear interactions likely exist in unconfined cavity flows, these effects can be amplified by the wind tunnel walls.« less

  18. Mitigation of wind tunnel wall interactions in subsonic cavity flows

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Justin L.; Casper, Katya Marie; Beresh, Steven J.; Henfling, John F.; Spillers, Russell Wayne; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2015-03-06

    In this study, the flow over an open aircraft bay is often represented in a wind tunnel with a cavity. In flight, this flow is unconfined, though in experiments, the cavity is surrounded by wind tunnel walls. If untreated, wind tunnel wall effects can lead to significant distortions of cavity acoustics in subsonic flows. To understand and mitigate these cavity–tunnel interactions, a parametric approach was taken for flow over an L/D = 7 cavity at Mach numbers 0.6–0.8. With solid tunnel walls, a dominant cavity tone was observed, likely due to an interaction with a tunnel duct mode. Furthermore, an acoustic liner opposite the cavity decreased the amplitude of the dominant mode and its harmonics, a result observed by previous researchers. Acoustic dampeners were also placed in the tunnel sidewalls, which further decreased the dominant mode amplitudes and peak amplitudes associated with nonlinear interactions between cavity modes. This then indicates that cavity resonance can be altered by tunnel sidewalls and that spanwise coupling should be addressed when conducting subsonic cavity experiments. Though mechanisms for dominant modes and nonlinear interactions likely exist in unconfined cavity flows, these effects can be amplified by the wind tunnel walls.

  19. All fiber laser using a ring cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Alberto Varguez; Pérez, Georgina Beltrán; Aguirre, Severino Muñoz; Mixcóatl, Juan Castillo

    2008-04-01

    Mode-locked laser have a number of potential applications, depending on the wavelength and pulse width. They could be used as sources in communications systems for time division multiplexing (TDM) or wavelength-division-multiplexing (WDM) as spectroscopic tools in the laboratory for time-resolved studies of fast nonlinear phenomena in semiconductors, or as seeds for solid-state amplifers such as Nd:Glass, color center alexandrite, or Ti:Sapphire. Short pulses also have potential use in electro-optic sampling systems, as a source for pulsed sensors, or as tunable seed pulses for lasers in medical applications. Applications such as optical coherent tomography could take advantage of the broad bandwidth of a mode-locked fiber laser rather that the temporal ultra-short pulse width. This work shows the characterization of active mode-locking all-fiber laser by using an acousto-optic frequency shifter to the ring cavity, an erbium doped fiber (EDF) and polarization controllers (PC). The results shows a highly stable mode-locked, low noise of pulse generation with repetition rate of 10 MHz and width of 1.6 ns

  20. Mechanical squeezing and photonic anti-bunching in a coupled two-cavity optomechanical system.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qiu-Hua; Xiao, Yin; Yu, Ya-Fei; Zhang, Zhi-Ming

    2016-09-01

    We propose a scheme for generating the squeezing of a mechanical mode and the anti-bunching of photonic modes in an optomechanical system. In this system, there are two photonic modes (the left cavity-mode and the right cavity-mode) and one mechanical mode. Both the left cavity-mode and the right cavity-mode are driven by two lasers, respectively. The power of the driving lasers and the detuning between them play a key role in generating squeezing of the mechanical mode. We find that the squeezing of the mechanical mode can be achieved even at a high temperature by increasing the power of the driving lasers. We also find that the cavity-modes can show photonic anti-bunching under suitable conditions. PMID:27607612

  1. Cavities for electron spin resonance: predicting the resonant frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colton, John; Miller, Kyle; Meehan, Michael; Spencer, Ross

    Microwave cavities are used in electron spin resonance to enhance magnetic fields. Dielectric resonators (DRs), pieces of high dielectric material, can be used to tailor the resonant frequency of a cavity. However, designing cavities with DRs to obtain desired frequencies is challenging and in general can only be done numerically with expensive software packages. We present a new method for calculating the resonant frequencies and corresponding field modes for cylindrically symmetric cavities and apply it to a cavity with vertically stacked DRs. The modes of an arbitrary cavity are expressed as an expansion of empty cavity modes. The wave equation for D gives rise to an eigenvalue equation whose eigenvalues are the resonant frequencies and whose eigenvectors yield the electric and magnetic fields of the mode. A test against theory for an infinitely long dielectric cylinder inside an infinite cavity yields an accuracy better than 0.4% for nearly all modes. Calculated resonant frequencies are also compared against experiment for quasi-TE011 modes in resonant cavities with ten different configurations of DRs; experimental results agree with predicted values with an accuracy better than 1.0%. MATLAB code is provided at http://www.physics.byu.edu/research/coltonlab/cavityresonance.

  2. Learning about Modes in Atomic Force Microscopy by Means of Hands-On Activities Based on a Simple Apparatus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phuapaiboon, Unchada; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Osotchan, Tanakorn

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the results of using a low-cost hands-on setup in combination with accompanying activities to promote understanding of the contact mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM). This contact mode setup enabled learners to study how AFM works by hand scanning using probing cantilevers with different characteristics on…

  3. Piezoelectric tunable microwave superconducting cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, N. C.; Fan, Y.; Tobar, M. E.

    2016-09-01

    In the context of engineered quantum systems, there is a demand for superconducting tunable devices, able to operate with high-quality factors at power levels equivalent to only a few photons. In this work, we developed a 3D microwave re-entrant cavity with such characteristics ready to provide a very fine-tuning of a high-Q resonant mode over a large dynamic range. This system has an electronic tuning mechanism based on a mechanically amplified piezoelectric actuator, which controls the resonator dominant mode frequency by changing the cavity narrow gap by very small displacements. Experiments were conducted at room and dilution refrigerator temperatures showing a large dynamic range up to 4 GHz and 1 GHz, respectively, and were compared to a finite element method model simulated data. At elevated microwave power input, nonlinear thermal effects were observed to destroy the superconductivity of the cavity due to the large electric fields generated in the small gap of the re-entrant cavity.

  4. The Negative Mode Proteome with Activated Ion Negative Electron Transfer Dissociation (AI-NETD)*

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Nicholas M.; Rush, Matthew J. P.; Rose, Christopher M.; Richards, Alicia L.; Kwiecien, Nicholas W.; Bailey, Derek J.; Hebert, Alexander S.; Westphall, Michael S.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2015-01-01

    The field of proteomics almost uniformly relies on peptide cation analysis, leading to an underrepresentation of acidic portions of proteomes, including relevant acidic posttranslational modifications. Despite the many benefits negative mode proteomics can offer, peptide anion analysis remains in its infancy due mainly to challenges with high-pH reversed-phase separations and a lack of robust fragmentation methods suitable for peptide anion characterization. Here, we report the first implementation of activated ion negative electron transfer dissociation (AI-NETD) on the chromatographic timescale, generating 7,601 unique peptide identifications from Saccharomyces cerevisiae in single-shot nLC-MS/MS analyses of tryptic peptides—a greater than 5-fold increase over previous results with NETD alone. These improvements translate to identification of 1,106 proteins, making this work the first negative mode study to identify more than 1,000 proteins in any system. We then compare the performance of AI-NETD for analysis of peptides generated by five proteases (trypsin, LysC, GluC, chymotrypsin, and AspN) for negative mode analyses, identifying as many as 5,356 peptides (1,045 proteins) with LysC and 4,213 peptides (857 proteins) with GluC in yeast—characterizing 1,359 proteins in total. Finally, we present the first deep-sequencing approach for negative mode proteomics, leveraging offline low-pH reversed-phase fractionation prior to online high-pH separations and peptide fragmentation with AI-NETD. With this platform, we identified 3,467 proteins in yeast with trypsin alone and characterized a total of 3,730 proteins using multiple proteases, or nearly 83% of the expressed yeast proteome. This work represents the most extensive negative mode proteomics study to date, establishing AI-NETD as a robust tool for large-scale peptide anion characterization and making the negative mode approach a more viable platform for future proteomic studies. PMID:26193884

  5. Antiviral activity and specific modes of action of bacterial prodigiosin against Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Zeng, Cheng; Liu, RenHua; Chen, Jie; Li, Ru; Wang, XinYan; Bai, WenWen; Liu, XiaoYuan; Xiang, TingTing; Zhang, Lin; Wan, YongJi

    2016-05-01

    Prodigiosin, the tripyrrole red pigment, is a bacterial secondary metabolite with multiple bioactivities; however, the antiviral activity has not been reported yet. In the present study, we found the antiviral activity of bacterial prodigiosin on Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV)-infected cells in vitro, with specific modes of action. Prodigiosin at nontoxic concentrations selectively killed virus-infected cells, inhibited viral gene transcription, especially viral early gene ie-1, and prevented virus-mediated membrane fusion. Under prodigiosin treatment, both progeny virus production and viral DNA replication were significantly inhibited. Fluorescent assays showed that prodigiosin predominantly located in cytoplasm which suggested it might interact with cytoplasm factors to inhibit virus replication. In conclusion, the present study clearly indicates that prodigiosin possesses significant antiviral activity against BmNPV.

  6. Dynamic Multiscale Modes of Resting State Brain Activity Detected by Entropy Field Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Frank, Lawrence R; Galinsky, Vitaly L

    2016-09-01

    The ability of functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) to noninvasively measure fluctuations in brain activity in the absence of an applied stimulus offers the possibility of discerning functional networks in the resting state of the brain. However, the reconstruction of brain networks from these signal fluctuations poses a significant challenge because they are generally nonlinear and nongaussian and can overlap in both their spatial and temporal extent. Moreover, because there is no explicit input stimulus, there is no signal model with which to compare the brain responses. A variety of techniques have been devised to address this problem, but the predominant approaches are based on the presupposition of statistical properties of complex brain signal parameters, which are unprovable but facilitate the analysis. In this article, we address this problem with a new method, entropy field decomposition, for estimating structure within spatiotemporal data. This method is based on a general information field-theoretic formulation of Bayesian probability theory incorporating prior coupling information that allows the enumeration of the most probable parameter configurations without the need for unjustified statistical assumptions. This approach facilitates the construction of brain activation modes directly from the spatial-temporal correlation structure of the data. These modes and their associated spatial-temporal correlation structure can then be used to generate space-time activity probability trajectories, called functional connectivity pathways, which provide a characterization of functional brain networks. PMID:27391678

  7. Evidence for a Clathrin-independent mode of endocytosis at a continuously active sensory synapse.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Michaela; Brandstätter, Johann Helmut; Regus-Leidig, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic vesicle exocytosis at chemical synapses is followed by compensatory endocytosis. Multiple pathways including Clathrin-mediated retrieval of single vesicles, bulk retrieval of large cisternae, and kiss-and-run retrieval have been reported to contribute to vesicle recycling. Particularly at the continuously active ribbon synapses of retinal photoreceptor and bipolar cells, compensatory endocytosis plays an essential role to provide ongoing vesicle supply. Yet, little is known about the mechanisms that contribute to endocytosis at these highly complex synapses. To identify possible specializations in ribbon synaptic endocytosis during different states of activity, we exposed mice to controlled lighting conditions and compared the distribution of endocytotic proteins at rod and cone photoreceptor, and ON bipolar cell ribbon synapses with light and electron microscopy. In mouse ON bipolar cell terminals, Clathrin-mediated endocytosis seemed to be the dominant mode of endocytosis at all adaptation states analyzed. In contrast, in mouse photoreceptor terminals in addition to Clathrin-coated pits, clusters of membranously connected electron-dense vesicles appeared during prolonged darkness. These clusters labeled for Dynamin3, Endophilin1, and Synaptojanin1, but not for AP180, Clathrin LC, and hsc70. We hypothesize that rod and cone photoreceptors possess an additional Clathrin-independent mode of vesicle retrieval supporting the continuous synaptic vesicle supply during prolonged high activity.

  8. Applications of cavity optomechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalfe, Michael

    2014-09-15

    Cavity-optomechanics” aims to study the quantum properties of mechanical systems. A common strategy implemented in order to achieve this goal couples a high finesse photonic cavity to a high quality factor mechanical resonator. Then, using feedback forces such as radiation pressure, one can cool the mechanical mode of interest into the quantum ground state and create non-classical states of mechanical motion. On the path towards achieving these goals, many near-term applications of this field have emerged. After briefly introducing optomechanical systems and describing the current state-of-the-art experimental results, this article summarizes some of the more exciting practical applications such as ultra-sensitive, high bandwidth accelerometers and force sensors, low phase noise x-band integrated microwave oscillators and optical signal processing such as optical delay-lines, wavelength converters, and tunable optical filters. In this rapidly evolving field, new applications are emerging at a fast pace, but this article concentrates on the aforementioned lab-based applications as these are the most promising avenues for near-term real-world applications. New basic science applications are also becoming apparent such as the generation of squeezed light, testing gravitational theories and for providing a link between disparate quantum systems.

  9. A scanning cavity microscope.

    PubMed

    Mader, Matthias; Reichel, Jakob; Hänsch, Theodor W; Hunger, David

    2015-01-01

    Imaging the optical properties of individual nanosystems beyond fluorescence can provide a wealth of information. However, the minute signals for absorption and dispersion are challenging to observe, and only specialized techniques requiring sophisticated noise rejection are available. Here we use signal enhancement in a high-finesse scanning optical microcavity to demonstrate ultra-sensitive imaging. Harnessing multiple interactions of probe light with a sample within an optical resonator, we achieve a 1,700-fold signal enhancement compared with diffraction-limited microscopy. We demonstrate quantitative imaging of the extinction cross-section of gold nanoparticles with a sensitivity less than 1 nm(2); we show a method to improve the spatial resolution potentially below the diffraction limit by using higher order cavity modes, and we present measurements of the birefringence and extinction contrast of gold nanorods. The demonstrated simultaneous enhancement of absorptive and dispersive signals promises intriguing potential for optical studies of nanomaterials, molecules and biological nanosystems. PMID:26105690

  10. Dual frequency optical cavity

    DOEpatents

    George, E.V.; Schipper, J.F.

    Method and apparatus for generating two distinct laser frequencies in an optical cavity, using a T configuration laser cavity and means for intermittently increasing or decreasing the index of refraction n of an associated transmission medium in one arm of the optical cavity to enhance laser action in one arm or the second arm of the cavity.

  11. Dual frequency optical cavity

    DOEpatents

    George, E. Victor; Schipper, John F.

    1985-01-01

    Method and apparatus for generating two distinct laser frequencies in an optical cavity, using a "T" configuration laser cavity and means for intermittently increasing or decreasing the index of refraction n of an associated transmission medium in one arm of the optical cavity to enhance laser action in one arm or the second arm of the cavity.

  12. Single and coupled L3 photonic crystal cavities for cavity-QED experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonato, Cristian; Hagemeier, Jenna; Gerace, Dario; Thon, Susanna M.; Kim, Hyochul; Beirne, Gareth; Bakker, Morten; Andreani, Lucio C.; Petroff, Pierre M.; van Exter, Martin P.; Bouwmeester, Dirk

    2012-06-01

    Here we discuss the experimental characterization of the spatial far-field profiles for the confined modes in a photonic crystal cavity of the L3 type, finding a good agreement with FDTD simulations. We then link the far-field profiles to relevant features of the cavity mode near-fields, using a simple Fabry-Perot resonator model. Finally, we describe a technique for independent all-electrical control of the wavelength of quantum dots in separated L3 cavities, coupled by a waveguide, by electrical isolation via proton implantation

  13. Antimicrobial Activity of Amine Oxides: Mode of Action and Structure-Activity Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Šubík, Július; Takácsová, Gizela; Pšenák, Mikuláš; Devínsky, Ferdinand

    1977-01-01

    The effect of N-alkyl derivatives of saturated heterocyclic amine oxides on the growth and metabolism of microorganisms has been studied. 4-Dodecylmorpholine-N-oxide inhibited the differentiation and growth of Bacillus cereus, of different species of filamentous fungi, and of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. For vegetative cells, the effect of 4-dodecylmorpholine-N-oxide was lethal. Cells of S. cerevisiae, after interaction with 4-dodecylmorpholine-N-oxide, released intracellular K+ and were unable to oxidize or ferment glucose. The functions of isolated yeast mitochondria were also impaired. 4-Dodecylmorpholine-N-oxide at growth-inhibiting concentrations induced rapid lysis of osmotically stabilized yeast protoplasts, with the rate of lysis a function of temperature and of amine oxide concentration. A study of the relationships between structure, antimicrobial activity, and cytolytic activity was made with a group of structurally different amine oxides involving a series of homologous 4-alkylmorpholine-N-oxides, 1-alkylpiperidine-N-oxides, 1-dodecylpyrrolidine-N-oxide, 1-dodecylperhydroasepine-N-oxide, and N,N-dimethyldodecylamine oxide. Disorganization of the membrane structure after interaction of cells with the tested amine oxides was primarily responsible for the antimicrobial activity of the amine oxides. This activity was found to be dependent on the chain length of the hydrophobic alkyl group and was only moderately influenced by other substituents of the polarized N-oxide group. PMID:409340

  14. Basketballs as spherical acoustic cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Daniel A.

    2010-06-01

    The sound field resulting from striking a basketball is found to be rich in frequency content, with over 50 partials in the frequency range of 0-12 kHz. The frequencies are found to closely match theoretical expectations for standing wave patterns inside a spherical cavity. Because of the degenerate nature of the mode shapes, explicit identification of the modes is not possible without internal investigation with a microphone probe. A basketball proves to be an interesting application of a boundary value problem involving spherical coordinates.

  15. Optomechanic interactions in phoxonic cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram; Oudich, Mourad; Pennec, Yan; El-Jallal, Said

    2014-12-15

    Phoxonic crystals are periodic structures exhibiting simultaneous phononic and photonic band gaps, thus allowing the confinement of both excitations in the same cavity. The phonon-photon interaction can be enhanced due to the overlap of both waves in the cavity. In this paper, we discuss some of our recent theoretical works on the strength of the optomechanic coupling, based on both photoelastic and moving interfaces mechanisms, in different (2D, slabs, strips) phoxonic crystals cavities. The cases of two-dimensional infinite and slab structures will enable us to mention the important role of the symmetry and degeneracy of the modes, as well as the role of the materials whose photoelastic constants can be wavelength dependent. Depending on the phonon-photon pair, the photoelastic and moving interface mechanisms can contribute in phase or out-of-phase. Then, the main part of the paper will be devoted to the optomechanic interaction in a corrugated nanobeam waveguide exhibiting dual phononic/photonic band gaps. Such structures can provide photonic modes with very high quality factor, high frequency phononic modes of a few GHz inside a gap and optomechanical coupling rate reaching a few MHz.

  16. Methylphenidate remediates error-preceding activation of the default mode brain regions in cocaine addicted individuals

    PubMed Central

    Matuskey, David; Luo, Xi; Zhang, Sheng; Morgan, Peter T.; Abdelghany, Osama; Malison, Robert T.; Li, Chiang-shan R.

    2013-01-01

    Many previous studies suggest the potential of psychostimulants in improving cognitive functioning. Our earlier pharmacological brain imaging study showed that intravenous methylphenidate (MPH) improves inhibitory control by altering cortico-striato-thalamic activations in cocaine dependent (CD) individuals. Here we provide additional evidence for the effects of MPH in restoring cerebral activations during cognitive performance. Ten CD individuals performed a stop signal task (SST) during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in two sessions, in which either MPH (0.5 mg/Kg BW) or saline was administered intravenously. In the SST, a frequent go signal instructs participants to make a speeded response and a less frequent stop signal instructs them to withhold the response. Our previous work described increased activation of the precuneus/posterior cingulate cortex and ventromedial prefrontal cortex – regions of the default mode network (DMN) – before participants committed a stop error in healthy control but not CD individuals (Bednarski et al., 2011). The current results showed that, compared to saline, MPH restored error-preceding activations of DMN regions in CD individuals. The extent of the changes in precuneus activity was correlated with MPH-elicited increase in systolic blood pressure. These findings suggest that the influence of MPH on cerebral activations may extend beyond cognitive control and provide additional evidence warranting future studies to investigate the neural mechanisms and physiological markers of the efficacy of agonist therapy in cocaine dependence. PMID:23973363

  17. Variability in the Southern Annular Mode determines wildfire activity in Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holz, Andrés; Veblen, Thomas T.

    2011-07-01

    Under the current global warming trend, wildfire activity is expected to decrease in biomass-limited fire regimes but increase in drought-limited fire regimes with abundant biomass. We examined the effects of the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) on interannual variability in wildfire activity in xeric woodland and temperate rainforest ecosystems across a latitudinal range of 10° in temperate southwestern South America (SSA). Based on 42 fire history sites based on nearly 600 fire-scarred trees (the largest available dataset of annually resolved tree-ring records of fire activity in the Southern Hemisphere), we show that years of widespread fire in both xeric woodland and rainforest ecosystems are associated with positive departures of SAM. The association of positive SAM with increased fire activity is explained by the teleconnection of SAM to spring drought across most of SSA. During the late 20th century, only the rainforest ecosystem shows a strong increase in fire activity, which is consistent both with upward trends in SAM and with warming conditions. We attribute the lack of increased burning in the xeric woodland environment to socioeconomic factors and fire behavior (low severity) that facilitate more effective fire suppression in the xeric woodland habitat. Given projected future increases in SAM and the associated warm-dry trend, wildfire activity in much of SSA is likely to increase during the 21st century.

  18. Effects of modulated electron beams and cavities on reditrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, T.J.T.; Davis, H.A.; Fulton, R.D.; Sherwood, E.G.

    1988-01-01

    The virtual cathode, when formed in a cavity, can generate microwaves at different cavity modes depending on the geometry of the cavity. We found that the formation and the oscillation frequency of the virtual cathode in a reditron can be significantly influenced by cavity designs. The length of a cavity can play a role in frequency and mode selection. Our simulations showed that TM/sub 012/ and TM/sub 033/ were excited for cavity lengths of 15.0 cm and 22.5 cm, respectively. In addition to the cavity effects on reditrons, we discovered that highly modulated electron beams can be produced in reditrons. Full modulation (100/percent/) of the transmitted electron beam current has been confirmed in our simulations. We further showed that incorporation of an inverse diode configuration can achieve microwave production efficiency of 26/percent/. 11 refs., 8 figs.

  19. Dual Mode Antibacterial Activity of Ion Substituted Calcium Phosphate Nanocarriers for Bone Infections

    PubMed Central

    Sampath Kumar, T. S.; Madhumathi, K.; Rubaiya, Y.; Doble, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology has tremendous potential for the management of infectious diseases caused by multi-drug resistant bacteria, through the development of newer antibacterial materials and efficient modes of antibiotic delivery. Calcium phosphate (CaP) bioceramics are commonly used as bone substitutes due to their similarity to bone mineral and are widely researched upon for the treatment of bone infections associated with bone loss. CaPs can be used as local antibiotic delivery agents for bone infections and can be substituted with antibacterial ions in their crystal structure to have a wide spectrum, sustained antibacterial activity even against drug resistant bacteria. In the present work, a dual mode antibiotic delivery system with antibacterial ion substituted calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) nanoparticles has been developed. Antibacterial ions such as zinc, silver, and strontium have been incorporated into CDHA at concentrations of 6, 0.25–0.75, and 2.5–7.5 at. %, respectively. The samples were found to be phase pure, acicular nanoparticles of length 40–50 nm and width 5–6 nm approximately. The loading and release profile of doxycycline, a commonly used antibiotic, was studied from the nanocarriers. The drug release was studied for 5 days and the release profile was influenced by the ion concentrations. The release of antibacterial ions was studied over a period of 21 days. The ion substituted CDHA samples were tested for antibacterial efficacy on Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli by MIC/MBC studies and time-kill assay. AgCDHA and ZnCDHA showed high antibacterial activity against both bacteria, while SrCDHA was weakly active against S. aureus. Present study shows that the antibiotic release can provide the initial high antibacterial activity, and the sustained ion release can provide a long-term antibacterial activity. Such dual mode antibiotic and antibacterial ion release offers an efficient and potent way to treat an incumbent

  20. TESLA cavity driving with FPGA controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarski, Tomasz; Pozniak, Krzysztof; Romaniuk, Ryszard; Simrock, Stefan

    2005-09-01

    The digital control of the TESLA (TeV-Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator) resonator is presented. The laboratory setup of the CHECHIA cavity in DESY-Hamburg has been driven by the FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) technology system. This experiment focused attention to the general recognition of the cavity features and projected control methods. The electrical model of the resonator is taken as a consideration origin. The calibration of the signal channel is considered as a key preparation for an efficient cavity driving. The identification of the resonator parameters is confirmed as a proper approach for the required performance: driving on resonance during filling and field stabilization during flattop time with reasonable power consumption. The feed-forward and feedback modes were applied successfully for the CHECHIA cavity driving. Representative results of experiments are presented for different levels of the cavity field gradient.

  1. Voltage control of cavity magnon polariton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, S.; Yao, B. M.; Rao, J. W.; Gui, Y. S.; Hu, C.-M.

    2016-07-01

    We have experimentally investigated the microwave transmission of the cavity-magnon-polariton (CMP) generated by integrating a low damping magnetic insulator onto a 2D microwave cavity. The high tunability of our planar cavity allows the cavity resonance frequency to be precisely controlled using a DC voltage. By appropriately tuning the voltage and magnetic bias, we can observe the cavity photon magnon coupling and the magnetic coupling between a magnetostatic mode and the generated CMP. The dispersion of the generated CMP was measured by either tuning the magnetic field or the applied voltage. This electrical control of CMP may open up avenues for designing advanced on-chip microwave devices that utilize light-matter interaction.

  2. Rotation in a reversed field pinch with active feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconello, M.; Menmuir, S.; Brunsell, P. R.; Kuldkepp, M.

    2006-09-01

    Active feedback stabilization of multiple resistive wall modes (RWMs) has been successfully proven in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch. One of the features of plasma discharges operated with active feedback stabilization, in addition to the prolongation of the plasma discharge, is the sustainment of the plasma rotation. Sustained rotation is observed both for the internally resonant tearing modes (TMs) and the intrinsic impurity oxygen ions. Good quantitative agreement between the toroidal rotation velocities of both is found: the toroidal rotation is characterized by an acceleration phase followed, after one wall time, by a deceleration phase that is slower than in standard discharges. The TMs and the impurity ions rotate in the same poloidal direction with also similar velocities. Poloidal and toroidal velocities have comparable amplitudes and a simple model of their radial profile reproduces the main features of the helical angular phase velocity. RWMs feedback does not qualitatively change the TMs behaviour and typical phenomena such as the dynamo and the 'slinky' are still observed. The improved sustainment of the plasma and TMs rotation occurs also when feedback only acts on internally non-resonant RWMs. This may be due to an indirect positive effect, through non-linear coupling between TMs and RWMs, of feedback on the TMs or to a reduced plasma-wall interaction affecting the plasma flow rotation. Electromagnetic torque calculations show that with active feedback stabilization the TMs amplitude remains well below the locking threshold condition for a thick shell. Finally, it is suggested that active feedback stabilization of RWMs and current profile control techniques can be employed simultaneously thus improving both the plasma duration and its confinement properties.

  3. Semi-active sliding mode control of vehicle suspension with magneto-rheological damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hailong; Wang, Enrong; Zhang, Ning; Min, Fuhong; Subash, Rakheja; Su, Chunyi

    2015-01-01

    The vehicle semi-active suspension with magneto-rheological damper(MRD) has been a hot topic since this decade, in which the robust control synthesis considering load variation is a challenging task. In this paper, a new semi-active controller based upon the inverse model and sliding mode control (SMC) strategies is proposed for the quarter-vehicle suspension with the magneto-rheological (MR) damper, wherein an ideal skyhook suspension is employed as the control reference model and the vehicle sprung mass is considered as an uncertain parameter. According to the asymptotical stability of SMC, the dynamic errors between the plant and reference systems are used to derive the control damping force acquired by the MR quarter-vehicle suspension system. The proposed modified Bouc-wen hysteretic force-velocity ( F- v) model and its inverse model of MR damper, as well as the proposed continuous modulation (CM) filtering algorithm without phase shift are employed to convert the control damping force into the direct drive current of the MR damper. Moreover, the proposed semi-active sliding mode controller (SSMC)-based MR quarter-vehicle suspension is systematically evaluated through comparing the time and frequency domain responses of the sprung and unsprung mass displacement accelerations, suspension travel and the tire dynamic force with those of the passive quarter-vehicle suspension, under three kinds of varied amplitude harmonic, rounded pulse and real-road measured random excitations. The evaluation results illustrate that the proposed SSMC can greatly suppress the vehicle suspension vibration due to uncertainty of the load, and thus improve the ride comfort and handling safety. The study establishes a solid theoretical foundation as the universal control scheme for the adaptive semi-active control of the MR full-vehicle suspension decoupled into four MR quarter-vehicle sub-suspension systems.

  4. Generation of Fock state and quantum entanglement in a coupled ladder atom-cavity system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Shang-qing; Feng, Xun-li; Xu, Zhi-zhan

    2003-02-01

    We investigate the behaviour of an atom-cavity system via an adiabatic passage technique using a three-level ladder atom both for one-mode and for two-mode cavity QED. For one-mode cavity QED, we find that a single-photon Fock state can be generated via the technique of stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in the microwave domain. For two-mode cavity QED, we find that a two-photon pair can be generated via the technique of Stark shift rapid adiabatic passage (SRAP). We also find, for the two-mode cavity QED system, that an entangled state of the two modes in a microwave cavity can be prepared via the SRAP technique, in which the number of steps required is significantly reduced due to the adiabatic passage of the ladder atom-cavity coupled system.

  5. Exploration of very high gradient cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Eremeev, Grigory

    2011-07-01

    Several of the 9-cell ILC cavities processed at Jlab within ongoing ILC R&D program have shown interesting behavior at high fields, such as mode mixing and sudden field emission turn-on during quench. Equipped with thermometry and oscillating superleak transducer (OST) system for quench detection, we couple our RF measurements with local dissipation measurements. In this contribution we report on our findings with high gradient SRF cavities.

  6. Extra-cavity feedback into unstable resonators.

    PubMed

    Corkum, P B; Baldis, H A

    1979-05-01

    Unstable resonators constructed of totally reflecting optics are particularly sensitive to extra-cavity feedback. This is demonstrated experimentally by reflecting the attenuated output of an injection mode-locked TEA CO(2) laser, fitted with a confocal unstable resonator, back into the laser resonator. Even after attenuation by ~10(6), significant perturbation ( greater, similar10%) could be observed in the temporal characteristics of the output train. A theory of extra-cavity feedback in the geometric limit is presented. PMID:20212847

  7. The psychedelic state induced by ayahuasca modulates the activity and connectivity of the default mode network.

    PubMed

    Palhano-Fontes, Fernanda; Andrade, Katia C; Tofoli, Luis F; Santos, Antonio C; Crippa, Jose Alexandre S; Hallak, Jaime E C; Ribeiro, Sidarta; de Araujo, Draulio B

    2015-01-01

    The experiences induced by psychedelics share a wide variety of subjective features, related to the complex changes in perception and cognition induced by this class of drugs. A remarkable increase in introspection is at the core of these altered states of consciousness. Self-oriented mental activity has been consistently linked to the Default Mode Network (DMN), a set of brain regions more active during rest than during the execution of a goal-directed task. Here we used fMRI technique to inspect the DMN during the psychedelic state induced by Ayahuasca in ten experienced subjects. Ayahuasca is a potion traditionally used by Amazonian Amerindians composed by a mixture of compounds that increase monoaminergic transmission. In particular, we examined whether Ayahuasca changes the activity and connectivity of the DMN and the connection between the DMN and the task-positive network (TPN). Ayahuasca caused a significant decrease in activity through most parts of the DMN, including its most consistent hubs: the Posterior Cingulate Cortex (PCC)/Precuneus and the medial Prefrontal Cortex (mPFC). Functional connectivity within the PCC/Precuneus decreased after Ayahuasca intake. No significant change was observed in the DMN-TPN orthogonality. Altogether, our results support the notion that the altered state of consciousness induced by Ayahuasca, like those induced by psilocybin (another serotonergic psychedelic), meditation and sleep, is linked to the modulation of the activity and the connectivity of the DMN. PMID:25693169

  8. The brain on art: intense aesthetic experience activates the default mode network

    PubMed Central

    Vessel, Edward A.; Starr, G. Gabrielle; Rubin, Nava

    2012-01-01

    Aesthetic responses to visual art comprise multiple types of experiences, from sensation and perception to emotion and self-reflection. Moreover, aesthetic experience is highly individual, with observers varying significantly in their responses to the same artwork. Combining fMRI and behavioral analysis of individual differences in aesthetic response, we identify two distinct patterns of neural activity exhibited by different sub-networks. Activity increased linearly with observers' ratings (4-level scale) in sensory (occipito-temporal) regions. Activity in the striatum (STR) also varied linearly with ratings, with below-baseline activations for low-rated artworks. In contrast, a network of frontal regions showed a step-like increase only for the most moving artworks (“4” ratings) and non-differential activity for all others. This included several regions belonging to the “default mode network” (DMN) previously associated with self-referential mentation. Our results suggest that aesthetic experience involves the integration of sensory and emotional reactions in a manner linked with their personal relevance. PMID:22529785

  9. The Psychedelic State Induced by Ayahuasca Modulates the Activity and Connectivity of the Default Mode Network

    PubMed Central

    Palhano-Fontes, Fernanda; Andrade, Katia C.; Tofoli, Luis F.; Santos, Antonio C.; Crippa, Jose Alexandre S.; Hallak, Jaime E. C.; Ribeiro, Sidarta; de Araujo, Draulio B.

    2015-01-01

    The experiences induced by psychedelics share a wide variety of subjective features, related to the complex changes in perception and cognition induced by this class of drugs. A remarkable increase in introspection is at the core of these altered states of consciousness. Self-oriented mental activity has been consistently linked to the Default Mode Network (DMN), a set of brain regions more active during rest than during the execution of a goal-directed task. Here we used fMRI technique to inspect the DMN during the psychedelic state induced by Ayahuasca in ten experienced subjects. Ayahuasca is a potion traditionally used by Amazonian Amerindians composed by a mixture of compounds that increase monoaminergic transmission. In particular, we examined whether Ayahuasca changes the activity and connectivity of the DMN and the connection between the DMN and the task-positive network (TPN). Ayahuasca caused a significant decrease in activity through most parts of the DMN, including its most consistent hubs: the Posterior Cingulate Cortex (PCC)/Precuneus and the medial Prefrontal Cortex (mPFC). Functional connectivity within the PCC/Precuneus decreased after Ayahuasca intake. No significant change was observed in the DMN-TPN orthogonality. Altogether, our results support the notion that the altered state of consciousness induced by Ayahuasca, like those induced by psilocybin (another serotonergic psychedelic), meditation and sleep, is linked to the modulation of the activity and the connectivity of the DMN. PMID:25693169

  10. The psychedelic state induced by ayahuasca modulates the activity and connectivity of the default mode network.

    PubMed

    Palhano-Fontes, Fernanda; Andrade, Katia C; Tofoli, Luis F; Santos, Antonio C; Crippa, Jose Alexandre S; Hallak, Jaime E C; Ribeiro, Sidarta; de Araujo, Draulio B

    2015-01-01

    The experiences induced by psychedelics share a wide variety of subjective features, related to the complex changes in perception and cognition induced by this class of drugs. A remarkable increase in introspection is at the core of these altered states of consciousness. Self-oriented mental activity has been consistently linked to the Default Mode Network (DMN), a set of brain regions more active during rest than during the execution of a goal-directed task. Here we used fMRI technique to inspect the DMN during the psychedelic state induced by Ayahuasca in ten experienced subjects. Ayahuasca is a potion traditionally used by Amazonian Amerindians composed by a mixture of compounds that increase monoaminergic transmission. In particular, we examined whether Ayahuasca changes the activity and connectivity of the DMN and the connection between the DMN and the task-positive network (TPN). Ayahuasca caused a significant decrease in activity through most parts of the DMN, including its most consistent hubs: the Posterior Cingulate Cortex (PCC)/Precuneus and the medial Prefrontal Cortex (mPFC). Functional connectivity within the PCC/Precuneus decreased after Ayahuasca intake. No significant change was observed in the DMN-TPN orthogonality. Altogether, our results support the notion that the altered state of consciousness induced by Ayahuasca, like those induced by psilocybin (another serotonergic psychedelic), meditation and sleep, is linked to the modulation of the activity and the connectivity of the DMN.

  11. Cavity-Controlled Chemistry in Molecular Ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Felipe; Spano, Frank C.

    2016-06-01

    The demonstration of strong and ultrastrong coupling regimes of cavity QED with polyatomic molecules has opened new routes to control chemical dynamics at the nanoscale. We show that strong resonant coupling of a cavity field with an electronic transition can effectively decouple collective electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom in a disordered molecular ensemble, even for molecules with high-frequency quantum vibrational modes having strong electron-vibration interactions. This type of polaron decoupling can be used to control chemical reactions. We show that the rate of electron transfer reactions in a cavity can be orders of magnitude larger than in free space for a wide class of organic molecular species.

  12. Clamshell microwave cavities having a superconductive coating

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, D. Wayne; Arendt, Paul N.; Piel, Helmut

    1994-01-01

    A microwave cavity including a pair of opposing clamshell halves, such halves comprised of a metal selected from the group consisting of silver, copper, or a silver-based alloy, wherein the cavity is further characterized as exhibiting a dominant TE.sub.011 mode is provided together with an embodiment wherein the interior concave surfaces of the clamshell halves are coated with a superconductive material. In the case of copper clamshell halves, the microwave cavity has a Q-value of about 1.2.times.10.sup.5 as measured at a temperature of 10K and a frequency of 10 GHz.

  13. Cavity-Assisted Spin Orbit Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chuanzhou; Dong, Lin; Pu, Han

    We consider a single ultracold atom trapped inside a single-mode optical cavity, where a two-photon Raman process induces an effective coupling between atom's pseudo-spin and external center-of-mass (COM) motion. Without the COM motion, this system is described by the Jaynes-Cummings (JC) model. We show how the atomic COM motion dramatically modifies the predictions based on the JC model. We also investigated the situation when cavity pumping and decay are taken into account. We take a quantum Master equation approach to study this open system and again show how the cavity-induced spin-orbit coupling affects the properties of the system.

  14. Multicolor quadripartite entanglement from an optomechanical cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Tan Huatang; Li Gaoxiang

    2011-08-15

    We investigate the generation of multicolor quadripartite entangled beams of light with continuous variables via optomechanical coupling in an optical cavity. It is found that the genuine quadripartite entanglement can be achieved among the Stokes and anti-Stokes sidebands of two driven cavity fields. This entanglement still exists for the environment temperature up to about 50 K. We also show that the obtained genuine quadripartite entanglement actually results from concurrent four-wave-mixing processes in the system, which can, in principle, be generalized to obtain a genuine 2N-partite entangled state of light from a generic N-mode cavity optomechanical system.

  15. Dielectric detection by an electromagnetic cavity method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weatherall, James C.; Beckley, Howard F.; Gatto, Joseph A.

    2004-09-01

    A method to screen for flammable and explosive materials in bottles by electromagnetic measurement is described. The technique makes use of an aluminum cavity having strong electromagnetic resonances in the radio wave band. An object inserted into the cavity changes the internal field configuration, and causes small, but measurable shifts in the resonant frequencies. The response depends on the electrical permittivity, or dielectric constant, of the material. By measuring the frequency change of many different cavity modes, the dielectric constant of the perturbing object can be inferred independently of the object's size and shape. We demonstrate the detection of materials in bottles using an experimental device.

  16. Michelson-Morley with a Birefringent Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsalve, Francisco J.; Hohensee, Michael; Müller, Holger

    2012-06-01

    We report on the progress of a birefringent cavity test of the isotropy of the speed of light. Previous experimental tests have constrained anisotropies in the speed of light at the level of parts in 10^17 [1-2]. These experiments search for frame-dependent variations in the resonant frequencies of two orthogonally mounted optical cavities. Uncorrelated fluctuations in the cavity lengths are a significant challenge for such experiments. Our experiment uses a single dielectric-filled cavity, and measures the difference in the resonant frequency of two orthogonally polarized modes. Anisotropies in the speed of light will manifest as a frame-dependent strain on the dielectric [3-4], giving rise to a frame-dependent variation in the cavity birefringence. By making the length of each cavity mode identical, we expect that our experiment will be less sensitive to thermal cavity fluctuations. [4pt] [1] S. Herrmann, A. Senger, K. M"ohle, M. Nagel, E.V. Kovalchuk and A. Peters, PRD 80, 105011 (2009).[2] Ch. Eisel, A. Yu. Nevsky, and S. Schiller, PRL 103, 090401 (2009).[3] H. M"uller, PRD 71, 045004 (2005).[4] V.A. Kosteleck'y and M. Mewes, PRD 80, 015020 (2009).

  17. Optimized Multi-Ion Cavity Coupling.

    PubMed

    Begley, Stephen; Vogt, Markus; Gulati, Gurpreet Kaur; Takahashi, Hiroki; Keller, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Recent technological advances in cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) are paving the way to utilize multiple quantum emitters confined in a single optical cavity. In such systems, it is crucially important to control the quantum mechanical coupling of individual emitters to the cavity mode. In this regard, combining ion trap technologies with CQED provides a particularly promising approach due to the well-established motional control over trapped ions. Here, we experimentally demonstrate coupling of up to five trapped ions in a string to a high-finesse optical cavity. By changing the axial position and spacing of the ions in a fully deterministic manner, we systematically characterize their coupling to the cavity mode through visibility measurements of the cavity emission. In good agreement with the theoretical model, the results demonstrate that the geometrical configuration of multiple trapped ions can be manipulated to obtain optimal cavity coupling. Our system presents a new ground for exploring CQED with multiple quantum emitters, enabled by the highly controllable collective light-matter interaction. PMID:27314716

  18. Optimized Multi-Ion Cavity Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begley, Stephen; Vogt, Markus; Gulati, Gurpreet Kaur; Takahashi, Hiroki; Keller, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Recent technological advances in cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) are paving the way to utilize multiple quantum emitters confined in a single optical cavity. In such systems, it is crucially important to control the quantum mechanical coupling of individual emitters to the cavity mode. In this regard, combining ion trap technologies with CQED provides a particularly promising approach due to the well-established motional control over trapped ions. Here, we experimentally demonstrate coupling of up to five trapped ions in a string to a high-finesse optical cavity. By changing the axial position and spacing of the ions in a fully deterministic manner, we systematically characterize their coupling to the cavity mode through visibility measurements of the cavity emission. In good agreement with the theoretical model, the results demonstrate that the geometrical configuration of multiple trapped ions can be manipulated to obtain optimal cavity coupling. Our system presents a new ground for exploring CQED with multiple quantum emitters, enabled by the highly controllable collective light-matter interaction.

  19. High-differential-quantum-efficiency, long-wavelength vertical-cavity lasers using five-stage bipolar-cascade active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Koda, R.; Wang, C.S.; Lofgreen, D.D.; Coldren, L.A.

    2005-05-23

    We present five-stage bipolar-cascade vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers emitting at 1.54 {mu}m grown monolithically on an InP substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. A differential quantum efficiency of 120%, was measured with a threshold current density of 767 A/cm{sup 2} and voltage of 4.49 V, only 0.5 V larger than 5x0.8 V, the aggregate photon energy. Diffraction loss study on deeply etched pillars indicates that diffraction loss is a major loss mechanism for such multiple-active region devices larger than 20 {mu}m. We also report a model on the relationship of diffraction loss to the number of active stages.

  20. Semi-active damping with negative stiffness for multi-mode cable vibration mitigation: approximate collocated control solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, F.; Distl, H.

    2015-11-01

    This paper derives an approximate collocated control solution for the mitigation of multi-mode cable vibration by semi-active damping with negative stiffness based on the control force characteristics of clipped linear quadratic regulator (LQR). The control parameters are derived from optimal modal viscous damping and corrected in order to guarantee that both the equivalent viscous damping coefficient and the equivalent stiffness coefficient of the semi-active cable damper force are equal to their desired counterparts. The collocated control solution with corrected control parameters is numerically validated by free decay tests of the first four cable modes and combinations of these modes. The results of the single-harmonic tests demonstrate that the novel approach yields 1.86 times more cable damping than optimal modal viscous damping and 1.87 to 2.33 times more damping compared to a passive oil damper whose viscous damper coefficient is optimally tuned to the targeted mode range of the first four modes. The improvement in case of the multi-harmonic vibration tests, i.e. when modes 1 and 3 and modes 2 and 4 are vibrating at the same time, is between 1.55 and 3.81. The results also show that these improvements are obtained almost independent of the cable anti-node amplitude. Thus, the proposed approximate real-time applicable collocated semi-active control solution which can be realized by magnetorheological dampers represents a promising tool for the efficient mitigation of stay cable vibrations.