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  1. Dominant enrichment of phenotypically activated CD38(+) HLA-DR(+) CD8(+) T cells, rather than CD38(+) HLA-DR(+) CD4(+) T cells, in HIV/HCV coinfected patients on antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    d'Ettorre, Gabriella; Ceccarelli, Giancarlo; Serafino, Sara; Giustini, Noemi; Cavallari, Eugenio Nelson; Bianchi, Luigi; Pavone, Paolo; Bellelli, Valeria; Turriziani, Ombretta; Antonelli, Guido; Stroffolini, Tommaso; Vullo, Vincenzo

    2016-08-01

    HIV infection may enhance immune-activation, while little is known regarding the role of HCV infection. This study investigates the impact of HCV in HIV coinfected patients with undetectable viraemia under HAART on the levels of peripheral T cell's immune-activation. We determined T lymphocytes subsets to characterize immune-activation defined as CD38 and/or HLA-DR expression in chronic monoinfected HCV, HIV, and HIV/HCV coinfected subjects. One hundred and fifty six patients were divided into three groups: (i) 77 HIV+ patients; (ii) 50 HCV+ patients; and (iii) 29 coinfected HIV/HCV patients. The level of CD4(+) was significantly higher in HCV+ than in HIV+ or in coinfected HIV/HCV subjects. The frequencies of CD4(+) CD38(+) /HLA-DR(-) , CD4(+) CD38(-) /HLA-DR(+) and CD4(+) CD38(+) /HLA-DR(+) in HIV+ patients were comparable to those measured in coinfected patients, but statistically higher than those observed in HCV+ subjects. The percentage of CD8(+) was comparable in HIV-1+ patients and coinfected HIV/HCV but the results obtained in both groups were significantly higher compared to the results obtained in HCV patients. The level of CD8(+) CD38(+) /HLA-DR(-) showed values lower in HIV+ patients than in that monoinfected HCV and coinfected HIV/HCV patients. The frequencies of CD8(+) CD38(-) /HLA-DR(+) were higher in HIV+ patients compared to HCV+ and coinfected HIV/HCV patients. HIV/HCV coinfected group showed highest levels of CD8(+) CD38(+) /HLA-DR(+) . HIV plays a pivotal role to determine the immune activation in the host. The role of HCV needs of further investigations but our data show that HCV mainly influences the immune-activation of the pool of CD8, but also probably plays a supporting additive effect on CD4 immune-activation. J. Med. Virol. 88:1347-1356, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26765625

  2. Hepatitis C virus core protein triggers expansion and activation of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells in chronic hepatitis C patients.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Naicui; Chi, Xiumei; Li, Tianyang; Song, Hongxiao; Li, Haijun; Jin, Xia; Crispe, Ian Nicholas; Su, Lishan; Niu, Junqi; Tu, Zhengkun

    2015-11-01

    CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) are increased in patients with chronic hepatitis C, which may contribute to the sustained suppression of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific T-cell responses and viral persistence in HCV-infected individuals. We postulated that HCV core protein (HCVc) directly contributes to the expansion of Tregs in HCV-infected patients, and we provide evidence to support this hypothesis in the report. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and sera were collected from 87 treatment-naïve chronic HCV-infected patients, CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs were measured by flow cytometry, and HCV RNA and HCVc levels were detected using qPCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. CD4(+), CD8(+), CD4(+)CD25(+) and CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells were purified from healthy donors and cultured with recombinant HCVc and Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands. Flow cytometry was used to analyze cell proliferation, and ELISA was performed to measure cytokine production. In the 87 chronic HCV-infected patients, HCVc showed a significant correlation with HCV RNA and CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs. Mechanistic studies showed that HCVc, together with anti-CD3 antibody, augmented CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg proliferation, but inhibited CD4(+)CD25(-) T-cell proliferation and IFN-γ production, in a dose-dependent and Treg-dependent manner. Moreover, unlike the TLR3 ligand (poly I:C) and the TLR4 ligand (lipopolysaccharide, LPS), the TLR2 ligand (lipoteichoic acid, LTA) and HCVc both inhibited TCR-induced CD4(+) T-cell proliferation and IFN-γ secretion in a Treg-dependent manner. These data indicate that HCVc, like other TLR2 ligands, triggers CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg activation and expansion to inhibit host immune responses, which may play a critical role in viral persistence in HCV-infected patients. PMID:25531392

  3. CD3+CD8+CD28− T Lymphocytes in Patients with Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Krajewska, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    The results of studies on the CD3+CD8+CD28− cells in SLE are inconsistent since several analyses describe CD3+CD8+CD28− as either immunosuppressive or cytotoxic. The aim of this study is to inquire whether the quantitative changes of CD3+CD8+CD28− T lymphocytes subpopulation are related to the clinical status of patients with lupus nephritis. Evaluation of Foxp3 expression on CD3+CD8+CD28− cells may shed some light on functional properties of these cells. 54 adult SLE patients and 19 sex and age matched healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study. There were 15 patients in inactive (SLEDAI ≤ 5) and 39 in active (SLEDAI > 5) phase of disease. We determined absolute count of CD3+CD8+CD28− and CD3+CD8+CD28−Foxp3+ subpopulations by flow cytometry. We observed a statistically significant increase in absolute count and percentage of CD3+CD8+CD28− in SLE patients compared to HC (p < 0.001). Moreover there was significant positive correlation between increasing absolute count of CD3+CD8+CD28− cells and disease activity measured by SLEDAI (rs = 0.281, p = 0.038). Active LN patients had increased absolute count of CD3+CD8+CD28− cells compared to HC. Positive correlation of CD3+CD8+CD28− number with disease activity, and lack of Foxp3 expression on these cells, suggests that CD3+CD8+CD28− lymphocytes might be responsible for an increased proinflammatory response in the exacerbation of SLE. PMID:27446964

  4. CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) T Lymphocytes in Patients with Lupus Nephritis.

    PubMed

    Żabińska, Marcelina; Krajewska, Magdalena; Kościelska-Kasprzak, Katarzyna; Klinger, Marian

    2016-01-01

    The results of studies on the CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) cells in SLE are inconsistent since several analyses describe CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) as either immunosuppressive or cytotoxic. The aim of this study is to inquire whether the quantitative changes of CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) T lymphocytes subpopulation are related to the clinical status of patients with lupus nephritis. Evaluation of Foxp3 expression on CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) cells may shed some light on functional properties of these cells. 54 adult SLE patients and 19 sex and age matched healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study. There were 15 patients in inactive (SLEDAI ≤ 5) and 39 in active (SLEDAI > 5) phase of disease. We determined absolute count of CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) and CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-)Foxp3(+) subpopulations by flow cytometry. We observed a statistically significant increase in absolute count and percentage of CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) in SLE patients compared to HC (p < 0.001). Moreover there was significant positive correlation between increasing absolute count of CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) cells and disease activity measured by SLEDAI (rs = 0.281, p = 0.038). Active LN patients had increased absolute count of CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) cells compared to HC. Positive correlation of CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) number with disease activity, and lack of Foxp3 expression on these cells, suggests that CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) lymphocytes might be responsible for an increased proinflammatory response in the exacerbation of SLE. PMID:27446964

  5. Bezafibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α agonist, decreases circulating CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Terasawa, Tomoko; Aso, Yoshimasa; Omori, Kyoko; Fukushima, Maiko; Momobayashi, Atsushi; Inukai, Toshihiko

    2015-02-01

    CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes are proinflammatory cells that produce tumor necrosis factor and interleukin (IL)-1β. The number of circulating CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes is increased in patients with chronic renal failure or coronary artery disease. We investigated the effect of bezafibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α agonist, on circulating CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes in patients with type 2 diabetes. Using cells isolated from type 2 diabetic subjects, we also examined the in vitro expression of CD16 messenger RNA (mRNA) by mononuclear cells (MNCs) exposed to bezafibrate. The percentage of CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes among all CD14(+) monocytes was significantly higher in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (P < 0.01) or type 2 diabetes (P < 0.05) than in those with normal glucose tolerance. The percentage of CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes was significantly lower in patients with type 2 diabetes who were taking bezafibrate (400 mg/d) than in patients not taking it (P < 0.01). Treatment with bezafibrate for 12 weeks significantly reduced the percentage of circulating CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes from 45.4 ± 25.2% to 38.3 ± 21.8% (P = 0.0144). In an in vitro study, the expression of CD16 mRNA by MNCs from 6 diabetic subjects was decreased after 24 hours of treatment with 10 μg/mL of bezafibrate (P < 0.05). Expression of IL-1β mRNA by MNCs was also decreased after 24 hours of treatment with 10 μg/mL of bezafibrate, whereas the IL-1β level in the culture supernatant was significantly decreased after treatment of MNCs with either 1 or 10 μg/mL of bezafibrate. In conclusion, bezafibrate decreased circulating CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes in patients with type 2 diabetes, probably by inhibiting the expression of CD16 mRNA. PMID:25134759

  6. Increased Protease-Activated Receptor-2 (PAR-2) Expression on CD14++CD16+ Peripheral Blood Monocytes of Patients with Severe Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha Palikhe, Nami; Nahirney, Drew; Laratta, Cheryl; Gandhi, Vivek Dipak; Vethanayagam, Dilini; Bhutani, Mohit; Mayers, Irvin

    2015-01-01

    Background Protease-Activated Receptor-2 (PAR-2), a G protein coupled receptor activated by serine proteases, is widely expressed in humans and is involved in inflammation. PAR-2 activation in the airways plays an important role in the development of allergic airway inflammation. PAR-2 expression is known to be upregulated in the epithelium of asthmatic subjects, but its expression on immune and inflammatory cells in patients with asthma has not been studied. Methods We recruited 12 severe and 24 mild/moderate asthmatics from the University of Alberta Hospital Asthma Clinics and collected baseline demographic information, medication use and parameters of asthma severity. PAR-2 expression on blood inflammatory cells was analyzed by flow cytometry. Results Subjects with severe asthma had higher PAR-2 expression on CD14++CD16+ monocytes (intermediate monocytes) and also higher percentage of CD14++CD16+PAR-2+ monocytes (intermediate monocytes expressing PAR-2) in blood compared to subjects with mild/moderate asthma. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis showed that the percent of CD14++CD16+PAR-2+ in peripheral blood was able to discriminate between patients with severe and those with mild/moderate asthma with high sensitivity and specificity. In addition, among the whole populations, subjects with a history of asthma exacerbations over the last year had higher percent of CD14++CD16+ PAR-2+ cells in peripheral blood compared to subjects without exacerbations. Conclusions PAR-2 expression is increased on CD14++CD16+ monocytes in the peripheral blood of subjects with severe asthma and may be a biomarker of asthma severity. Our data suggest that PAR-2 -mediated activation of CD14++CD16+ monocytes may play a role in the pathogenesis of severe asthma. PMID:26658828

  7. Elevated serum IL-35 and increased expression of IL-35-p35 or -EBI3 in CD4+CD25+ T cells in patients with active tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Bin; Liu, Gan-Bin; Zhang, Jun-Ai; Fu, Xiao-Xia; Xiang, Wen-Yu; Gao, Yu-Chi; Lu, Yuan-Bin; Wu, Xian-Jing; Qiu, Feng; Wang, Wan-Dang; Yi, Lai-Long; Zhong, Ji-Xin; Chen, Zheng W; Xu, Jun-Fa

    2016-01-01

    Despite the recent appreciation of interleukin 35 (IL-35) function in inflammatory diseases, little is known for IL-35 response in patients with active tuberculosis (ATB). In the current study, we demonstrated that ATB patients exhibited increases in serum IL-35 and in mRNA expression of both subunits of IL-35 (p35 and EBI3) in white blood cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Consistently, anti-TB drug treatment led to reduction in serum IL-35 level and p35 or EBI3 expression. TB infection was associated with expression of p35 or EBI3 protein in CD4+ but not CD8+ T cells. Most p35+CD4+ T cells and EBI3+CD4+ T cells expressed Treg-associated marker CD25. Our findings may be important in understanding immune pathogenesis of TB. IL-35 in the blood may potentially serve as a biomarker for immune status and prognosis in TB. PMID:27158354

  8. Impaired NK cells' activity and increased numbers of CD4 + CD25+ regulatory T cells in multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Fan, Renhua; Xiang, Yangen; Yang, Li; Liu, Yanke; Chen, Pingsheng; Wang, Lei; Feng, Wenjun; Yin, Ke; Fu, Manjiao; Xu, Yixin; Wu, Jialin

    2016-05-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) often causes persistent infection and chemotherapy failure, which brings heavy burden of society and family. Many immune cell subsets and regulatory mechanisms may operate throughout the various stages of infection. The presence of regulatory T cells (Tregs) is thought to be an important mechanism that TB successfully evades the immune system. Tregs play a central role in the prevention of autoimmunity and in the control of immune responses. The role of Tregs in MDR-TB infection and persistence is inadequately documented. The current study was designed to determine whether CD4 + CD25+ regulatory T cells may modulate innate immunity (such as NK cells) against human tuberculosis. Our results indicated that the numbers of CD4 + CD25+ Treg cells increased in MDR-TB patients' blood, and the cytokine production of IL-10 increased from MDR-patients compared with healthy subjects, along with the lower activity and low CD69 expression of NK cells in patients. These results suggested that immunity to MDR-TB patients induced circulating CD4 + CD25+ T regulatory cells expansion, which may be related to the persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) infection, and to the balance between effectors immune responses and suppression immune responses. PMID:27156613

  9. Differential Expression of NK Receptors CD94 and NKG2A by T Cells in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients in Remission Compared to Active Disease

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Ceara E.; Ryan, Elizabeth J.; O’Farrelly, Cliona; Golden-Mason, Lucy; FitzGerald, Oliver; Veale, Douglas J.; Bresnihan, Barry; Fearon, Ursula

    2011-01-01

    Objective TNF inhibitors (TNFi) have revolutionised the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Natural killer (NK) cells and Natural Killer Cell Receptor+ T (NKT) cells comprise important effector lymphocytes whose activity is tightly regulated through surface NK receptors (NKRs). Dysregulation of NKRs in patients with autoimmune diseases has been shown, however little is known regarding NKRs expression in patients with TNFi-induced remission and in those who maintain remission vs disease flare following TNFi withdrawal. Methods Patients with RA were recruited for this study, (i) RA patients in clinical remission following a minimum of one year of TNFi therapy (n = −15); (2) Active RA patients, not currently or ever receiving TNFi (n = 18); and healthy control volunteers (n = 15). Patients in remission were divided into two groups: those who were maintained on TNFi and those who withdrew from TNFi and maintained on DMARDS. All patients underwent full clinical assessment. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated and NKR (CD94, NKG2A, CD161, CD69, CD57, CD158a, CD158b) expression on T-(CD3+CD56−), NK-(CD3−CD56+) and NKT-(CD3+CD56+) cells was determined by flow cytometry. Results Following TNFi withdrawal, percentages and numbers of circulating T cells, NK cells or NKT cell populations were unchanged in patients in remission versus active RA or HCs. Expression of the NKRs CD161, CD57, CD94 and NKG2A was significantly increased on CD3+CD56-T cells from patients in remission compared to active RA (p<0.05). CD3+CD56-T cell expression of CD94 and NKG2A was significantly increased in patients who remained in remission compared with patients whose disease flared (p<0.05), with no differences observed for CD161 and CD57. CD3+CD56− cell expression of NKG2A was inversely related to DAS28 (r = −0.612, p<0.005). Conclusion High CD94/NKG2A expression by T cells was demonstrated in remission patients following TNFi therapy compared to active RA

  10. Blocking of CD1d Decreases Trypanosoma cruzi-Induced Activation of CD4-CD8- T Cells and Modulates the Inflammatory Response in Patients With Chagas Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Passos, Lívia Silva Araújo; Villani, Fernanda Nobre Amaral; Magalhães, Luísa Mourão Dias; Gollob, Kenneth J; Antonelli, Lis Ribeiro do Vale; Nunes, Maria Carmo Pereira; Dutra, Walderez Ornelas

    2016-09-15

    The control of inflammatory responses to prevent the deadly cardiac pathology in human Chagas disease is a desirable and currently unattained goal. Double-negative (DN) T cells are important sources of inflammatory and antiinflammatory cytokines in patients with Chagas heart disease and those with the indeterminate clinical form of Chagas disease, respectively. Given the importance of DN T cells in immunoregulatory processes and their potential as targets for controlling inflammation-induced pathology, we studied the involvement of CD1 molecules in the activation and functional profile of Trypanosoma cruzi-specific DN T cells. We observed that parasite stimulation significantly increased the expression of CD1a, CD1b, CD1c, and CD1d by CD14(+) cells from patients with Chagas disease. Importantly, among the analyzed molecules, only CD1d expression showed an association with the activation of DN T cells, as well as with worse ventricular function in patients with Chagas disease. Blocking of CD1d-mediated antigen presentation led to a clear reduction of DN T-cell activation and a decrease in the expression of interferon γ (IFN-γ) by DN T cells. Thus, our results showed that antigen presentation via CD1d is associated with activation of DN T cells in Chagas disease and that CD1d blocking leads to downregulation of IFN-γ by DN T cells from patients with Chagas heart disease, which may be a potential target for preventing progression of inflammation-mediated dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:27368347

  11. Expression of CD26 and its association with dipeptidyl peptidase IV activity in lymphocytes of type 2 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Bellé, Luziane Potrich; Bitencourt, Paula Eliete Rodrigues; de Bona, Karine Santos; Zanette, Régis Adriel; Moresco, Rafael Noal; Moretto, Maria Beatriz

    2011-11-01

    Immune response and inflammation were suggested to play certain roles in the development and complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The main objective of this study was to investigate the CD26 expression and its relationship with adenosine deaminase (ADA), dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV), γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT), and N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase (NAG) activities in lymphocytes of type 2 diabetics (T2DM) patients. These parameters were assessed in 25 T2DM patients and 20 control subjects. We observed a decrease in CD26 expression and a significant increase in the ADA activity in T2DM patients when compared with control subjects. There were no differences between activities of DPP-IV, NAG, and GGT in lymphocytes of T2DM patients and control subjects. Meanwhile, a significant negative correlation was observed between CD26 expression and DPP-IV activity in lymphocytes of T2DM patients. Moreover, a positive correlation was found between DPPIV and ADA activities. The results suggest that the reduction of CD26 expression may be associated in the regulation of DPP-IV in T2DM patients. PMID:21614532

  12. Altered E-NTPDase/E-ADA activities and CD39 expression in platelets of sickle cell anemia patients.

    PubMed

    Castilhos, Lívia G; Doleski, Pedro H; Adefegha, Stephen A; Becker, Lara V; Ruchel, Jader B; Leal, Daniela B R

    2016-04-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is a hemoglobinopathy characterized by hemolysis and vaso-occlusions caused by rigidly distorted red blood cells. Sickle cell crisis is associated with extracellular release of nucleotides and platelets, which are critical mediators of hemostasis participating actively in purinergic thromboregulatory enzymes system.This study aimed to investigate the activities of purinergic system ecto-enzymes present on the platelet surface as well as CD39 and CD73 expressions on platelets of SCA treated patients. Fifteen SCA treated patients and 30 health subjects (control group) were selected. Ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (E-NTPDase), ecto-5'-nucleotidase (E-5'-NT) and ecto-adenosine deaminase (E-ADA) activities were measured in platelets isolated from these individuals. Results demonstrated an increase of 41 % in the E-NTPDase for ATP hydrolysis, 52% for ADP hydrolysis and 60 % in the E-ADA activity in SCA patients (P<0.05); however, a two folds decrease in the CD39 expression in platelets was observed in the same group (P<0.01). The increased E-NTPDase activity could be a compensatory mechanism associated with the low expression of CD39 in platelets. Besides, alteration of these enzymes activities suggests that the purinergic system could be involved in the thromboregulatory process in SCA patients. PMID:27044834

  13. Increased serum levels of soluble l-selectin (CD62L) in patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)

    PubMed Central

    Font, J; Pizcueta, P; Ramos-Casals, M; Cervera, R; García-Carrasco, M; Navarro, M; Ingelmo, M; Engel, P

    2000-01-01

    The adhesion molecule l-selectin (CD62L) mediates lymphocyte recirculation and leucocyte rolling on vascular endothelium at sites of inflammation. Serum levels of soluble l-selectin (sl-selectin) were measured in patients with SLE in order to relate these levels to clinical activity and immunological parameters. An ELISA was used to detect the soluble form of human l-selectin (CD62L) in 42 patients with SLE and in 33 healthy individuals. The mean ± s.e.m. values of sl-selectin were 1285 ± 121 ng/ml for patients with SLE and 986 ± 180 ng/ml for healthy blood donors, but there was no significant difference. When patients with active SLE were analysed, higher levels of circulating sl-selectin were found when compared with patients without activity (1497 ± 167 ng/ml versus 941 ± 150 ng/ml; P = 0.028). We found a significant correlation between the levels of sl-selectin and of dsDNA antibodies (r = 0.36, P = 0.044) and between levels of sl-selectin and SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) score (r = 0.42, P = 0.003). Patients with active SLE studied cross-sectionally showed significant elevations of sl-selectin (CD62L) compared with controls. Thus, the levels of this soluble adhesion molecule correlated with active disease and levels of anti-dsDNA antibodies. PMID:10606979

  14. Transient expansion of activated CD8+ T cells characterizes tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in patients with HIV: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background CD4+ T cell activation indicators have been reported to be a common phenomenon underlying diverse manifestations of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). However, we have found that a high frequency of circulating CD8+ T cells is a specific risk factor for mycobacterial IRIS. Therefore, we investigated whether CD8+ T cells from patients who develop TB IRIS were specifically activated. Methods We obtained PBMCs from HIV+ patients prior to and 4, 8, 12, 24, 52 and 104 weeks after initiating antiretroviral therapy. CD38 and HLADR expression on naive, central memory and effector memory CD8+ and CD4+ T cells were determined by flow cytometry. Absolute counts and frequencies of CD8+ T cell subsets were compared between patients who developed TB IRIS, who developed other IRIS forms and who remained IRIS-free. Results TB IRIS patients showed significantly higher counts of naive CD8+ T cells than the other groups at most time points, with a contraction of the effector memory subpopulation occurring later in the follow-up period. Activated (CD38+ HLADR+) CD8+ T cells from all groups decreased with treatment but transiently peaked in TB IRIS patients. This increase was due to an increase in activated naive CD8+ T cell counts during IRIS. Additionally, the CD8+ T cell subpopulations of TB IRIS patients expressed HLADR without CD38 more frequently and expressed CD38 without HLADR less frequently than cells from other groups. Conclusions CD8+ T cell activation is specifically relevant to TB IRIS. Different IRIS forms may involve different alterations in T cell subsets, suggesting different underlying inflammatory processes. PMID:23688318

  15. Activated platelet chemiluminescence and presence of CD45+ platelets in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Gabbasov, Zufar; Ivanova, Oxana; Kogan-Yasny, Victor; Ryzhkova, Evgeniya; Saburova, Olga; Vorobyeva, Inna; Vasilieva, Elena

    2014-01-01

    It has been found that in 15% of acute myocardial infarction patients' platelets generate reactive oxygen species that can be detected with luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence of platelet-rich plasma within 8-10 days after acute myocardial infarction. This increase in generate reactive oxygen species production coincides with the emergence of CD45(+) platelets. The ability of platelets to carry surface leukocyte antigen implies their participation in exchange of specific proteins in the course of acute myocardial infarction. Future studies of CD45(+) platelets in peripheral blood of acute myocardial infarction patients in association with generate reactive oxygen species production may provide a new insight into the complex mechanisms of cell-cell interactions associated with acute myocardial infarction. PMID:24102264

  16. Genetic polymorphisms in the CD14 gene are associated with monocyte activation and carotid intima-media thickness in HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Yean K.; Shankar, Esaki M.; Westhorpe, Clare L.V.; Maisa, Anna; Spelman, Tim; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Crowe, Suzanne M.; Lewin, Sharon R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy (ART) are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Given the relationship between innate immune activation and CVD, we investigated the association of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in TLR4 and CD14 and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT), a surrogate measurement for CVD, in HIV-infected individuals on ART and HIV-uninfected controls as a cross-sectional, case-control study. We quantified the frequency of monocyte subsets (CD14, CD16), markers of monocyte activation (CD38, HLA-DR), and endothelial adhesion (CCR2, CX3CR1, CD11b) by flow cytometry. Plasma levels of lipopolysaccharide, sCD163, sCD14, sCX3CL1, and sCCL2, were measured by ELISA. Genotyping of TLR4 and CD14 SNPs was also performed. The TT genotype for CD14/−260SNP but not the CC/CT genotype was associated with elevated plasma sCD14, and increased frequency of CD11b+CD14+ monocytes in HIV-infected individuals. The TT genotype was associated with lower cIMT in HIV-infected patients (n = 47) but not in HIV-uninfected controls (n = 37). The AG genotype for TLR4/+896 was associated with increased CX3CR1 expression on total monocytes among HIV-infected individuals and increased sCCL2 and fibrinogen levels in HIV-uninfected controls. SNPs in CD14/−260 and TLR4/+896 were significantly associated with different markers of systemic and monocyte activation and cIMT that differed between HIV-infected participants on ART and HIV-uninfected controls. Further investigation on the relationship of these SNPs with a clinical endpoint of CVD is warranted in HIV-infected patients on ART. PMID:27495090

  17. Genetic polymorphisms in the CD14 gene are associated with monocyte activation and carotid intima-media thickness in HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Yong, Yean K; Shankar, Esaki M; Westhorpe, Clare L V; Maisa, Anna; Spelman, Tim; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Crowe, Suzanne M; Lewin, Sharon R

    2016-08-01

    HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy (ART) are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Given the relationship between innate immune activation and CVD, we investigated the association of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in TLR4 and CD14 and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT), a surrogate measurement for CVD, in HIV-infected individuals on ART and HIV-uninfected controls as a cross-sectional, case-control study. We quantified the frequency of monocyte subsets (CD14, CD16), markers of monocyte activation (CD38, HLA-DR), and endothelial adhesion (CCR2, CX3CR1, CD11b) by flow cytometry. Plasma levels of lipopolysaccharide, sCD163, sCD14, sCX3CL1, and sCCL2, were measured by ELISA. Genotyping of TLR4 and CD14 SNPs was also performed. The TT genotype for CD14/-260SNP but not the CC/CT genotype was associated with elevated plasma sCD14, and increased frequency of CD11b+CD14+ monocytes in HIV-infected individuals. The TT genotype was associated with lower cIMT in HIV-infected patients (n = 47) but not in HIV-uninfected controls (n = 37). The AG genotype for TLR4/+896 was associated with increased CX3CR1 expression on total monocytes among HIV-infected individuals and increased sCCL2 and fibrinogen levels in HIV-uninfected controls. SNPs in CD14/-260 and TLR4/+896 were significantly associated with different markers of systemic and monocyte activation and cIMT that differed between HIV-infected participants on ART and HIV-uninfected controls. Further investigation on the relationship of these SNPs with a clinical endpoint of CVD is warranted in HIV-infected patients on ART. PMID:27495090

  18. Interaction with activated monocytes enhances cytokine expression and suppressive activity of human CD4+CD45RO+CD25+CD127low regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Gina J.; Evans, Hayley G.; Menon, Bina; Gullick, Nicola J.; Kirkham, Bruce W.; Cope, Andrew P.; Geissmann, Frédéric; Taams, Leonie S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Despite the high frequency of CD4+ T cells with a regulatory phenotype (CD25+CD127lowFoxP3+) in the joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), inflammation persists. One possible explanation is that human Tregs are converted into pro-inflammatory IL-17-producing cells by inflammatory mediators and thereby lose their suppressive function. We investigated whether activated monocytes, which are potent producers of inflammatory cytokines and abundantly present in the rheumatic joint, induce pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in human Tregs and impair their regulatory function. Methods The presence and phenotype of CD4+CD45RO+CD25+CD127low T cells (memory Tregs) and CD14+ monocytes in the peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) from patients with RA was investigated by flow cytometry. FACS-sorted memory Tregs from healthy controls were co-cultured with autologous activated monocytes and stimulated with anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody. Intracellular cytokine expression, phenotype and function of cells were determined by flow cytometry, ELISA and proliferation assays. Results Patients with RA showed higher frequencies of CD4+CD45RO+CD25+CD127low Tregs and activated CD14+ monocytes in SF relative to PB. In vitro-activated monocytes induced an increase in the percentage of IL-17+, IFNγ+ and TNF-α+, but also IL-10+ Tregs. The observed increase in IL-17+ and IFNγ+ Tregs was driven by monocyte-derived IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α and was mediated by both CD14+CD16− and CD14+CD16+ monocyte subsets. Despite enhanced cytokine expression, cells maintained their CD25+FoxP3+CD39+ Treg phenotype and showed enhanced capacity to suppress proliferation and IL-17 production by effector T cells. Conclusion Tregs exposed to a pro-inflammatory environment show increased cytokine expression as well as enhanced suppressive activity. PMID:23280063

  19. Brief Report: Macrophage Activation in HIV-2-Infected Patients Is Less Affected by Antiretroviral Treatment-sCD163 in HIV-1, HIV-2, and HIV-1/2 Dually Infected Patients.

    PubMed

    Hønge, Bo L; Andersen, Morten N; Jespersen, Sanne; Medina, Candida; Correira, Faustino G; Jakobsen, Martin R; Laursen, Alex; Erikstrup, Christian; Møller, Holger J; Wejse, Christian

    2016-07-01

    The course of disease among HIV-2, HIV-1, and HIV-1/2 dually infected patients is different. We investigated the macrophage activation marker soluble CD163 (sCD163) dynamics in 212 HIV-1, HIV-2, and HIV-1/2 dually infected patients. There were no differences in sCD163 levels at baseline or during follow-up without antiretroviral therapy (ART). At follow-up on ART, median sCD163 levels were decreased for HIV-1-infected patients (P < 0.001), but not among HIV-2 (P = 0.093) or HIV-1/2 dually infected patients (P = 0.145). The larger decrease in sCD163 levels among HIV-1-infected patients during ART may indicate an HIV type-dependent differential effect of ART on macrophage activation during HIV infection. PMID:26825178

  20. Soluble CD163, a Novel Marker of Activated Macrophages, Is Elevated and Associated With Noncalcified Coronary Plaque in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Burdo, Tricia H.; Lo, Janet; Abbara, Suhny; Wei, Jeffrey; DeLelys, Michelle E.; Preffer, Fred; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Williams, Kenneth C.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Pro-inflammatory monocytes/macrophages may contribute to increased atherosclerosis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected patients. We investigate—to our knowledge, for the first time—sCD163 and other markers of monocyte activation in relationship to atherosclerotic plaque in HIV-infected patients. Methods. One hundred two HIV-infected and 41 HIV-seronegative men with equivalent cardiovascular risk factors and without history of coronary artery disease were prospectively recruited and underwent computed tomography coronary angiography. Results. sCD163 levels and presence of plaque were significantly higher among antiretroviral-treated subjects with undetectable HIV RNA levels, compared with seronegative controls (1172 ± 646 vs. 883 ± 561 ng/mL [P = .02] for sCD163 and 61% vs. 39% [P = .03] for presence of plaque). After adjusting for age, race, lipids, blood pressure, glucose, smoking, sCD14, and HIV infection, sCD163 remained independently associated with noncalcified plaque (P = .008). Among HIV-infected patients, sCD163 was associated with coronary segments with noncalcified plaque (r = 0.21; P = .04), but not with calcium score. In contrast, markers of generalized inflammation, including C-reactive protein level, and D-dimer were not associated with sCD163 or plaque among HIV-infected patients. Conclusions. sCD163, a monocyte/macrophage activation marker, is increased in association with noncalcified coronary plaque in men with chronic HIV infection and low or undetectable viremia. These data suggest a potentially important role of chronic monocyte/macrophage activation in the development of noncalcified vulnerable plaque. Clinical Trial Registration. NCT00455793. PMID:21917896

  1. Identification of glypican-3-derived long peptides activating both CD8+ and CD4+ T cells; prolonged overall survival in cancer patients with Th cell response

    PubMed Central

    Sayem, Mohammad A.; Tomita, Yusuke; Yuno, Akira; Hirayama, Masatoshi; Irie, Atsushi; Tsukamoto, Hirotake; Senju, Satoru; Yuba, Eiji; Yoshikawa, Toshiaki; Kono, Kenji; Nakatsura, Tetsuya; Nishimura, Yasuharu

    2016-01-01

    In a recent phase I clinical trial, a vaccine consisting of glypican-3 (GPC3)-derived CTL epitopes was found to be safe and induced measurable immune and clinical responses in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The aim of this study was to identify GPC3-derived long peptides (GPC3-LPs) carrying promiscuous HLA class II-restricted T helper (Th) cell epitopes. Using a computer algorithm, we predicted GPC3-LPs that can bind to promiscuous HLA class II molecules. Their antigenicity for induction of specific CD4+ T cells in healthy donors or patients with HCC, before and after vaccination with GPC3-SPs, was proven by IFNγ enzyme-linked immunospot assays. Natural processing of these epitopes was confirmed by the immune response of helper T cells to dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with GPC3 proteins. Cross-presentation capacity was assessed in vitro using human DCs and LPs encapsulated in liposomes and in vivo in HLA-A2 transgenic mice (Tgm). All five LPs could induce Th1 cells and were presented by several frequently occurring HLA class II molecules in vitro. Four of them were likely to be naturally processed. One of the LPs encapsulated in liposomes was well cross-presented in vitro; it cross-primed CTLs in HLA-A2 Tgm. LP-specific and HLA class II-restricted CD4+ T-cell responses were observed in 14 of 20 HCC patients vaccinated with GPC3-SPs. Repeated vaccinations enhanced GPC3-LP-specific responses in 8 of 13 patients with HCC. Moreover, the presence of the specific Th cell was correlated with prolonged overall survival (OS). GPC3-LPs can be useful for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26942076

  2. Increase in frequencies of circulating Th-17 cells correlates with microbial translocation, immune activation and exhaustion in HIV-1 infected patients with poor CD4 T-cell reconstitution.

    PubMed

    Valiathan, Ranjini; Asthana, Deshratn

    2016-05-01

    We analyzed the association of circulating Th-17 cells (cTh-17) with immune activation (IA), immune exhaustion (IE) and regulatory T-cells (T-regs) in 20 human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infected patients with impaired restoration of CD4 T-cell counts despite prolonged suppression of plasma viremia (discordant) and compared it with 20 HIV-1 infected patients showing good immunologic and virologic responses (concordant) following highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Discordant HIV-1 infected patients showed significantly higher frequencies of cTh-17 cells compared to concordant patients and healthy controls after PMA+Ionomicin stimulation. Discordant patients also showed higher CD4 T-cell immune activation (HLA-DR+CD38+) than concordant patients which directly correlated with microbial translocation. Additionally, CD4 T-cells of discordant patients showed higher frequencies of CD4 T-cells expressing multiple immune exhaustion markers (Tim3+PD-1+) which correlated with immune activation indicating that combined analysis of inhibitory molecules along with PD-1 might be a better predictor for immune exhaustion of CD4 T-cells. Increased cTh-17 cell frequency correlated inversely with CD4 T-cell percentages and absolute counts and directly with CD4 T-cell immune activation and T-reg frequencies. Persistent CD4 T-cell immune activation might favor differentiation of activated CD4 T-cells toward cTh-17 phenotype in discordant patients. Discordant patients had significantly lower baseline CD4 T-cell counts and higher viral load at the initiation of HAART and higher immune activation and immune exhaustion after being on HAART for long time indicating that these factors might be associated with an increase in cTh-17 cell frequency, thus, increasing the risk of disease progression despite virologic control. PMID:26817581

  3. The combination of milatuzumab, a humanized anti-CD74 antibody, and veltuzumab, a humanized anti-CD20 antibody, demonstrates activity in patients with relapsed and refractory B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Christian, Beth A; Poi, Ming; Jones, Jeffrey A; Porcu, Pierluigi; Maddocks, Kami; Flynn, Joseph M; Benson, Don M; Phelps, Mitch A; Wei, Lai; Byrd, John C; Wegener, William A; Goldenberg, David M; Baiocchi, Robert A; Blum, Kristie A

    2015-06-01

    As a result of the anti-tumour activity observed in vitro and in vivo with combined anti-CD20 and anti-CD74 antibodies, we initiated a phase I/II trial of veltuzumab and milatuzumab in patients with relapsed or refractory B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Patients received an induction of veltuzumab 200 mg/m(2) weekly combined with escalating doses of milatuzumab at 8, 16 and 20 mg/kg weekly for 4 weeks. Patients without disease progression could receive an extended induction with treatment on weeks 12, 20, 28 and 36. A total of 35 patients enrolled on the study. Median age was 63 years, median number of prior therapies was 3, and 63% of patients were rituximab refractory. No dose-limiting toxicities were observed in the phase I study. Related grade 3-4 toxicities included lymphopenia, leucopenia, neutropenia, anaemia, infusion reactions, hyperglycaemia, fatigue and atrial tachycardia. Median weeks of therapy was 12 and 29% of patients completed all 36 weeks of therapy. The overall response rate was 24%, median duration of response was 12 months, and responses were observed at all dose levels and in 50% of patients refractory to rituximab. Combination therapy with veltuzumab and milatuzumab demonstrated activity in a population of heavily pre-treated patients with relapsed or refractory indolent NHL. PMID:25847298

  4. A Broad Profile of Co-Dominant Epitopes Shapes the Peripheral Mycobacterium tuberculosis Specific CD8+ T-Cell Immune Response in South African Patients with Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Axelsson-Robertson, Rebecca; Loxton, André G.; Walzl, Gerhard; Ehlers, Marthie M.; Kock, Marleen M.; Zumla, Alimuddin; Maeurer, Markus

    2013-01-01

    We studied major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I peptide-presentation and nature of the antigen-specific CD8+ T-cell response from South African tuberculosis (TB) patients with active TB. 361 MHC class I binding epitopes were identified from three immunogenic TB proteins (ESAT-6 [Rv3875], Ag85B [Rv1886c], and TB10.4 [Rv0288], including amino acid variations for Rv0288, i.e., A10T, G13D, S27N, and A71S for MHC allotypes common in a South African population (e.g., human leukocyte antigen [HLA]-A*30, B*58, and C*07). Inter-allelic differences were identified regarding the broadness of the peptide-binding capacity. Mapping of frequencies of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) antigen-specific CD8+ T-cells using 48 different multimers, including the newly constructed recombinant MHC class I alleles HLA-B*58:01 and C*0701, revealed a low frequency of CD8+ T-cell responses directed against a broad panel of co-dominant M. tb epitopes in the peripheral circulation of most patients. The antigen-specific responses were dominated by CD8+ T-cells with a precursor-like phenotype (CD45RA+CCR7+). The data show that the CD8+ T-cell response from patients with pulmonary TB (prior to treatment) is directed against subdominant epitopes derived from secreted and non-secreted M. tb antigens and that variant, natural occurring M. tb Rv0288 ligands, have a profound impact on T-cell recognition. PMID:23555576

  5. Increased CD40+ fibrocytes in patients with idiopathic orbital inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Brian J; Atkins, Stephen; Ginter, Anna; Elner, Victor M; Nelson, Christine C; Douglas, Raymond S

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the phenotypic and functional characteristics of peripheral and tissue-infiltrating stem cells, called fibrocytes in patients with idiopathic orbital inflammation (IOI). Methods Seven patients with IOI were studied. In the three patients requiring orbital biopsy, fibrocytes were identified in orbital tissue from patients with IOI compared to healthy controls using immunohistochemistry. Fibrocytes from the peripheral blood of all seven patients and controls were quantified and phenotyped by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence for expression of CD34, alpha smooth muscle actin, CD40 and Collagen 1. Quantitation of CD40-mediated IL-6 production was measured using ELISA. Results Orbital biopsy specimens from patients with IOI demonstrate tissue infiltration by fibrocytes (n=3). Fibrocytes are present in the peripheral blood of IOI patients (n= 7) but are scarce in healthy donors (n=19). Fibrocytes from IOI patients express substantial levels of CD40 and ligation of CD40 increases IL-6 expression. Conclusions Fibrocytes are present in the peripheral blood and orbital tissues of patients with IOI and constitutively express CD40 and express IL-6 in response to ligation. This site-specific predilection of CD34+ fibrocytes to sites of orbital inflammation and fibrosis may suggest a role in IOI. Moreover CD40-mediated activation cytokine production may contribute to the proinflammatory and profibrotic features of IOI and may provide a mechanism for future targeted therapy. PMID:25098443

  6. Anti-HIV-1 activity of salivary MUC5B and MUC7 mucins from HIV patients with different CD4 counts

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background We have previously shown that MUC5B and MUC7 mucins from saliva of HIV negative individuals inhibit HIV-1 activity by 100% in an in vitro assay. The purpose of this subsequent study was to investigate whether MUC5B and MUC7 from saliva of HIV patients or with full blown AIDS had a similar inhibitory activity against the virus. Methods Salivary MUC5B and MUC7 from HIV patients with different CD4 counts (< 200, 200-400 and > 400) were incubated with HIV-1 prior to infection of the human T lymphoblastoid cell line (CEM SS cells). Cells were then cultured and viral replication was measured by a qualitative p24 antigen assay. The size, charge and immunoreactivity of mucins from HIV negative and positive individuals was also analysed by SDS-PAGE, Western blot and ELISA respectively. Results It was shown that irrespective of their CD4 counts both MUC5B and MUC7 from HIV patients, unlike the MUC5B and MUC7 from HIV negative individuals, did not inhibit HIV-1 activity. Size, charge and immunoreactivity differences between the mucins from HIV negative and positive individuals and among the mucins from HIV patients of different CD4 count was observed by SDS-PAGE, Western blot and ELISA. Conclusions Purified salivary mucins from HIV positive patients do not inhibit the AIDS virus in an in vitro assay. Although the reason for the inability of mucins from infected individuals to inhibit the virus is not known, it is likely that there is an alteration of the glycosylation pattern, and therefore of charge of mucin, in HIV positive patients. The ability to inhibit the virus by aggregation by sugar chains is thus diminished. PMID:20946627

  7. Receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL) and CD 31 expressions in chronic periodontitis patients before and after surgery

    PubMed Central

    Friedmann, Anton; Bernimoulin, Jean-Pierre; Kleber, Bernd-Michael; Ayhan, Eylem; Aykan, Tuba; Gökmenoğlu, Ceren

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the study The present study investigated the hypothesis that upregulation of receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL) expression may be associated with upregulation of endothelial cell activitiy, which is common for periods of periodontal bone loss in chronic periodontitis. Material and methods RANKL expression of activated cells in soft tissue biopsies with CD 31 activity and the presence of RANKL and osteoprotegerin (OPG) in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) were assessed in chronic periodontitis patients. Biopsies from 17 patients and 10 healthy subjects were immunohistochemically analyzed. Clinical measurements [plaque index (PI), the gingival index (GI), probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment level (CAL) and gingival bleeding index (GBI)] and GCF samples were obtained before and after periodontal therapy. Results CD31 staining did not support the assumption that endothelium-like cells were predominantly associated with RANKL expression. Conclusions RANKL-positive cells were widely distributed in periodontitis patients giving only partial support to the hypothesis that RANKL expression is restricted to T- and B-cell activation. PMID:26155171

  8. CD142+/CD61+, CD146+ and CD45+ microparticles predict cardiovascular events in high risk patients following a Mediterranean diet supplemented with nuts.

    PubMed

    Chiva-Blanch, Gemma; Crespo, Javier; Suades, Rosa; Arderiu, Gemma; Padro, Teresa; Vilahur, Gemma; Cubedo, Judith; Corella, Dolores; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Arós, Fernando; Martínez-González, Miguel-Angel; Ros, Emilio; Fitó, Montse; Estruch, Ramon; Badimon, Lina

    2016-07-01

    Circulating microparticles (cMPs) are small phospholipid-rich microvesicles shed by activated cells that play a pivotal role in cell signalling related to the pathogenesis of atherothrombosis. We aimed to investigate the prognostic value of cMPs released from different vascular cells for cardiovascular event (CVE) presentation in asymptomatic patients at high cardiovascular risk factors under nutritional and pharmacologic treatment. This is a nested case-control study of 50 patients from the five-year follow-up prospective PREDIMED trial enrolled in the nuts arm of the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet-nuts). We randomly selected 25 patients who had suffered a CVE during follow-up and pair-matched them for sex, age, and classical CV risk factors to 25 patients who remained asymptomatic (no-CVE). Total Annexin V-(AV)+ cMPs and cMPs from cells of the vascular compartment were quantified by flow cytometry at baseline and after one year follow-up. MedDiet-nuts and pharmacological treatment neither modified levels nor source of MP shedding in CVE patients. However, no-CVE patients showed 40-86 % decreased total AV+, PAC-1+/AV+, CD61+/AV+, CD142+/CD61+/AV+, CD62P+/AV+, CD146+/AV+, CD63+/AV+ and CD11a+/AV+ cMPs at one year follow-up (p≤0.046, all). CD142+/CD61+/AV+, CD146+/AV+ and CD45+/AV+ cMPs were decreased in no-CVE patients compared to CVE patients. A ROC-curve clustered model for CD142+/CD61+/AV+, CD45+/AV+ and CD146+/AV+ cMPs predicted a future CVE [p<0.0001, AUC=0.805 (0.672 to 0.938)]. In patients at high CV risk profile treated with a controlled MedDiet supplemented with nuts and receiving up-to-date CV drug treatment, reduced cMPs derived from activated platelets, leukocytes and endothelial cells are predictive of protection against CVE within the next four years. PMID:27052787

  9. CD26 Expression on T Helper Populations and sCD26 Serum Levels in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, Oscar J.; Varela-Calviño, Rubén; López-González, Tania; Calviño-Sampedro, Cristina; Viñuela, Juan E.; Mouriño, Coral; Hernández-Rodríguez, Íñigo; Rodríguez-López, Marina; Aspe de la Iglesia, Bruno; Pego, José María

    2015-01-01

    We studied dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV, CD26) expression in different T helper cells and serum soluble DPP-IV/sCD26 levels in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, correlated these with disease activity score (DAS), and examined how they were affected by different therapies, conventional or biological (anti-TNF, anti-CD20 and anti-IL6R or Ig-CTLA4). The percentage of CD4+CD45R0+CD26- cells was greatly reduced in patients (up to 50%) when compared with healthy subjects. Three other subsets of CD4 cells, including a CD26high Th1-associated population, changed variably with therapies. Data from these subsets (frequency and staining density) significantly correlated with DAS28 or DAS28 components but different in each group of patients undergoing the different therapies. Th17 and Th22 subsets were implicated in RA as independent CCR4+ and CCR4- populations each, with distinct CD26 expression, and were targeted with varying efficiency by each therapy. Serum DPP-IV activity rather than sCD26 levels was lower in RA patients compared to healthy donors. DPP-IV and sCD26 serum levels were found related to specific T cell subsets but not to disease activity. We conclude that, according to their CD26 expression, different cell subsets could serve to monitor RA course, and an uncharacterized T helper CD26- subset, not targeted by therapies, should be monitored for early diagnosis. PMID:26177310

  10. Expression of activated molecules on CD5(+)B lymphocytes in autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongli; Xu, Wenyan; Liu, Hong; Wang, Huaquan; Fu, Rong; Wu, Yuhong; Qu, Wen; Wang, Guojin; Guan, Jing; Song, Jia; Xing, Limin; Shao, Zonghong

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the expression of activation molecules on CD5(+)B lymphocytes in peripheral blood of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA)/Evans patients. The expression of CD80, CD86, and CD69 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes was detected using flow cytometry in 30 AIHA/Evans patients, 18 normal controls (NC) and nine chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients. CD80 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes in untreated patients was higher than that in remission patients (P < 0.05), NC (P < 0.01) and CLL patients (P < 0.01). CD80 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes was higher than that on CD5(-)B lymphocytes in untreated patients (P > 0.05), but lower than those of CD5(-)B lymphocytes in remission patients and NC (P < 0.05). CD86 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes of untreated patients was higher than that of remission patients (P < 0.05), NC (P < 0.01). CD86 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes of CLL was higher than that of NC, remission (P < 0.05), and untreated patients (P > 0.05). CD80 and CD86 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes was negatively correlated with hemoglobin (HB), C3, C4 (P < 0.05) and positively correlated with reticulocyte (Ret) (P < 0.05). CD69 on CD5(+) and CD5(-)B lymphocytes of CLL was higher than those of AIHA/Evans patients and NC (P < 0.05). The active molecules on CD5(+)B lymphocytes in peripheral blood of AIHA/Evans patients differ from those on CD5(-) and clonal CD5(+)B lymphocytes. PMID:26968550

  11. Immunomodulation by vitamin B12: augmentation of CD8+ T lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cell activity in vitamin B12-deficient patients by methyl-B12 treatment.

    PubMed

    Tamura, J; Kubota, K; Murakami, H; Sawamura, M; Matsushima, T; Tamura, T; Saitoh, T; Kurabayshi, H; Naruse, T

    1999-04-01

    It has been suggested that vitamin B12 (vit.B12) plays an important role in immune system regulation, but the details are still obscure. In order to examine the action of vit.B12 on cells of the human immune system, lymphocyte subpopulations and NK cell activity were evaluated in 11 patients with vit.B12 deficiency anaemia and in 13 control subjects. Decreases in the number of lymphocytes and CD8+ cells and in the proportion of CD4+ cells, an abnormally high CD4/CD8 ratio, and suppressed NK cell activity were noted in patients compared with control subjects. In all 11 patients and eight control subjects, these immune parameters were evaluated before and after methyl-B12 injection. The lymphocyte counts and number of CD8+ cells increased both in patients and in control subjects. The high CD4/CD8 ratio and suppressed NK cell activity were improved by methyl-B12 treatment. Augmentation of CD3-CD16+ cells occurred in patients after methyl-B12 treatment. In contrast, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity, lectin-stimulated lymphocyte blast formation, and serum levels of immunoglobulins were not changed by methyl-B12 treatment. These results indicate that vit.B12 might play an important role in cellular immunity, especially relativing to CD8+ cells and the NK cell system, which suggests effects on cytotoxic cells. We conclude that vit.B12 acts as an immunomodulator for cellular immunity. PMID:10209501

  12. Interleukin-17- and interleukin-22-secreting myelin-specific CD4(+) T cells resistant to corticoids are related with active brain lesions in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Wing, Ana Cristina; Hygino, Joana; Ferreira, Thais B; Kasahara, Taissa M; Barros, Priscila O; Sacramento, Priscila M; Andrade, Regis M; Camargo, Solange; Rueda, Fernanda; Alves-Leon, Soniza V; Vasconcelos, Claudia Cristina; Alvarenga, Regina; Bento, Cleonice A M

    2016-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is thought to be an autoimmune disorder. It is believed that immunological events in the early stages have great impact on the disease course. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the cytokine profile of myelin basic protein (MBP)-specific T cells from MS patients in the early phase of the disease and correlate it to clinical parameters, as well as to the effect of in vitro corticoid treatment. Peripheral T cells from MS patients were stimulated with MBP with our without hydrocortisone for 5 days. The cytokines level were determined by ELISA. The number of active brain lesions was determined by MRI scans, and the neurological disabilities were assessed by Expanded Disability Status Scale scores. Our results demonstrated that MS-derived T cells responded to MBP by producing high levels of T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th17 cytokines. Although the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, IL-17 and IL-22 was less sensitive to hydrocortisone inhibition, only IL-17 and IL-22 levels correlated with active brain lesions. The ability of hydrocortisone to inhibit IL-17 and IL-22 production by MBP-specific CD4(+) T cells was inversely related to the number of active brain lesions. Finally, the production of both cytokines was significantly higher in cell cultures from Afrodescendant patients and it was less sensitive to hydrocortisone inhibition. In summary, our data suggest that IL-17- and IL-22-secreting CD4(+) T cells resistant to corticoids are associated with radiological activity of the MS in early stages of the disease, mainly among Afrodescendant patients who, normally, have worse prognosis. PMID:26781085

  13. Tissue-specific promoters active in CD44+CD24-/low breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bauerschmitz, Gerd J; Ranki, Tuuli; Kangasniemi, Lotta; Ribacka, Camilla; Eriksson, Minna; Porten, Marius; Herrmann, Isabell; Ristimäki, Ari; Virkkunen, Pekka; Tarkkanen, Maija; Hakkarainen, Tanja; Kanerva, Anna; Rein, Daniel; Pesonen, Sari; Hemminki, Akseli

    2008-07-15

    It has been proposed that human tumors contain stem cells that have a central role in tumor initiation and posttreatment relapse. Putative breast cancer stem cells may reside in the CD44(+)CD24(-/low) population. Oncolytic adenoviruses are attractive for killing of these cells because they enter through infection and are therefore not susceptible to active and passive mechanisms that render stem cells resistant to many drugs. Although adenoviruses have been quite safe in cancer trials, preclinical work suggests that toxicity may eventually be possible with more active agents. Therefore, restriction of virus replication to target tissues with tissues-specific promoters is appealing for improving safety and can be achieved without loss of efficacy. We extracted CD44(+)CD24(-/low) cells from pleural effusions of breast cancer patients and found that modification of adenovirus type 5 tropism with the serotype 3 knob increased gene delivery to CD44(+)CD24(-/low) cells. alpha-Lactalbumin, cyclo-oxygenase 2, telomerase, and multidrug resistance protein promoters were studied for activity in CD44(+)CD24(-/low) cells, and a panel of oncolytic viruses was subsequently constructed. Each virus featured 5/3 chimerism of the fiber and a promoter controlling expression of E1A, which was also deleted in the Rb binding domain for additional tumor selectivity. Cell killing assays identified Ad5/3-cox2L-d24 and Ad5/3-mdr-d24 as the most active agents, and these viruses were able to completely eradicate CD44(+)CD24(-/low) cells in vitro. In vivo, these viruses had significant antitumor activity in CD44(+)CD24(-/low)-derived tumors. These findings may have relevance for elimination of cancer stem cells in humans. PMID:18632604

  14. Effects of interleukin-2 therapy on the proliferation and differentiation of CD4/CD25 positive and CD4/CD25 negative cells in HIV+ patients.

    PubMed

    Caggiari, L; Zanussi, S; D'Andrea, M; Bortolin, M T; Crepaldi, C; Caffau, C; Paoli, P D

    2001-01-01

    Interleukin-2 has been widely used in HIV-1+ subjects as an immunoactivating agent. In this study, we investigated cytokine production, Ki67 antigen expression and the modulation of the surface phenotype of the CD4/CD25+ subset as compared to the reciprocal CD4/CD25- subset in IL-2-treated HIV+ patients. Our findings suggest that CD4 T cells are heterogeneous in responding to IL-2, because CD4/CD25+ cells sharply increased their "memory" phenotype, their Ki67 antigen expression and were the main in vivo targets for IL-2-dependent proliferation during therapy, while the percentages of IFN-gamma+ (terminally differentiated) cells remained unchanged at the end of therapy. Conversely, the CD4+/CD25- subpopulation showed an expansion of differentiated cells and a slight increase in the proliferation rate. The use of anti-retroviral therapy alone (HAART) reduced the proliferation and increased the differentiation of both CD4 subsets. Our data suggest that IL-2 has a moderate capacity to activate resting T cells in vivo and is probably unable to boost HIV-1 from latency to the replicative state. PMID:11566623

  15. Prognostic significance of CD169-positive lymph node sinus macrophages in patients with endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Koji; Yamaguchi, Munekage; Erdenebaatar, Chimeddulam; Saito, Fumitaka; Tashiro, Hironori; Katabuchi, Hidetaka; Takeya, Motohiro; Komohara, Yoshihiro

    2016-06-01

    Lymph node (LN) macrophages play critical roles in anti-tumor immunity, which develops via the activation of cytotoxic T cells (CTL) and NK cells. The present study aims to determine the prognostic significance of CD169(+) LN macrophages in patients with endometrial carcinoma (EC). The number of CD169(+) cells or the CD169(+) -to-CD68(+) macrophage ratio in regional LN (RLN), and the number of CD8(+) CTL or CD57(+) NK cells in tumor tissues were investigated by immunohistochemistry in paraffin-embedded tissue samples from 79 patients with EC. A high density of CD169(+) cells in the RLN of patients with EC was correlated with an early clinical stage or no LN metastasis. A high number of CD169(+) cells and a high CD169(+) -to-CD68(+) macrophage ratio were significantly associated with longer overall survival in EC. We also found that the density of CD169(+) macrophages was positively correlated with the number of CD8(+) CTL and CD57(+) NK cells that infiltrated into tumor tissues. A high density of CD57(+) cells in EC tissues was associated with a better prognosis, while a high density of CD8(+) cells was not linked to an altered prognosis. The present study showed that the density of CD169(+) macrophages in RLN was associated with an improved prognosis in EC patients. CD169(+) macrophages in RLN might represent a useful marker for assessing clinical prognoses and monitoring anti-tumor immunity in patients with EC. PMID:26991548

  16. Increased CD4+/CD8+ Double-Positive T Cells in Chronic Chagasic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Giraldo, Nicolas A.; Bolaños, Natalia I.; Cuellar, Adriana; Guzman, Fanny; Uribe, Ana Maria; Bedoya, Astrid; Olaya, Natalia; Cucunubá, Zulma M.; Roa, Nubia; Rosas, Fernando; Velasco, Víctor; Puerta, Concepción J.; González, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Background CD4+/CD8+ double positive (DP) T cells have been described in healthy individuals as well as in patients with autoimmune and chronic infectious diseases. In chronic viral infections, this cell subset has effector memory phenotype and displays antigen specificity. No previous studies of double positive T cells in parasite infections have been carried out. Methodology/Principal Findings Seventeen chronic chagasic patients (7 asymptomatic and 10 symptomatic) and 24 non-infected donors, including 12 healthy and 12 with non-chagasic cardiomyopathy donors were analyzed. Peripheral blood was stained for CD3, CD4, CD8, HLA-DR and CD38, and lymphocytes for intracellular perforin. Antigen specificity was assessed using HLA*A2 tetramers loaded with T. cruzi K1 or influenza virus epitopes. Surface expression of CD107 and intracellular IFN-γ production were determined in K1-specific DP T cells from 11 chagasic donors. Heart tissue from a chronic chagasic patient was stained for both CD8 and CD4 by immunochemistry. Chagasic patients showed higher frequencies of DP T cells (2.1%±0.9) compared with healthy (1.1%±0.5) and non-chagasic cardiomyopathy (1.2%±0.4) donors. DP T cells from Chagasic patients also expressed more HLA-DR, CD38 and perforin and had higher frequencies of T. cruzi K1-specific cells. IFN-γ production in K1-specific cells was higher in asymptomatic patients after polyclonal stimulation, while these cells tended to degranulate more in symptomatic donors. Immunochemistry revealed that double positive T cells infiltrate the cardiac tissue of a chagasic donor. Conclusions Chagasic patients have higher percentages of circulating double positive T cells expressing activation markers, potential effector molecules and greater class I antigenic specificity against T. cruzi. Although K1 tetramer positive DP T cell produced little IFN-γ, they displayed degranulation activity that was increased in symptomatic patients. Moreover, K1-specific DP T cells can

  17. Characterization of CD30/CD30L+ Cells in Peripheral Blood and Synovial Fluid of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Dolcino, Marzia; Tinazzi, Elisa; Rigo, Antonella; Argentino, Giuseppe; Patuzzo, Giuseppe; Beri, Ruggero; Puccetti, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The CD30/CD30L signalling system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several autoimmune and inflammatory conditions. In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), soluble CD30 (sCD30) levels reflect the recruitment of CD30+ T cells into the inflamed joints and correlate with a positive response to immunosuppressive therapy. The aim of our report was to clarify the role of CD30/CD30L signalling system in the pathogenesis of RA. Our analysis of the CD30L+ T cell subsets in peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) of RA patients and of the related cytokine profiles suggests the involvement of CD30/CD30L signalling in polarization of T cells towards a Th17 phenotype with proinflammatory features. Moreover, in RA SF nearly 50% of Treg cells express CD30, probably as an attempt to downmodulate the ongoing inflammation. We also show here that the engagement of CD30L on neutrophils stimulated with CD30/Fc chimera may play a crucial role in RA inflammation since activated neutrophils release IL-8, thus potentially amplifying the local inflammatory damage. In conclusion, the results obtained suggest that the complex CD30/CD30L signalling pathway is implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of RA synovitis through a concerted action on several immune effector cells. PMID:26090498

  18. Lymphocyte Gene Expression Signatures from Patients and Mouse Models of Hereditary Hemochromatosis Reveal a Function of HFE as a Negative Regulator of CD8+ T-Lymphocyte Activation and Differentiation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Mónica; Cruz, Eugénia; Oliveira, Susana; Benes, Vladimir; Ivacevic, Tomi; Silva, Maria João; Vieira, Inês; Dias, Francisco; Fonseca, Sónia; Gonçalves, Marta; Lima, Margarida; Leitão, Catarina; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Pinto, Jorge; Porto, Graça

    2015-01-01

    Abnormally low CD8+ T-lymphocyte numbers is characteristic of some patients with hereditary hemochromatosis (HH), a MHC-linked disorder of iron overload. Both environmental and genetic components are known to influence CD8+ T-lymphocyte homeostasis but the role of the HH associated protein HFE is still insufficiently understood. Genome-wide expression profiling was performed in peripheral blood CD8+ T lymphocytes from HH patients selected according to CD8+ T-lymphocyte numbers and from Hfe-/- mice maintained either under normal or high iron diet conditions. In addition, T-lymphocyte apoptosis and cell cycle progression were analyzed by flow cytometry in HH patients. HH patients with low CD8+ T-lymphocyte numbers show a differential expression of genes related to lymphocyte differentiation and maturation namely CCR7, LEF1, ACTN1, NAA50, P2RY8 and FOSL2, whose expression correlates with the relative proportions of naïve, central and effector memory subsets. In addition, expression levels of LEF1 and P2RY8 in memory cells as well as the proportions of CD8+ T cells in G2/M cell cycle phase are significantly different in HH patients compared to controls. Hfe-/- mice do not show alterations in CD8+ T-lymphocyte numbers but differential gene response patterns. We found an increased expression of S100a8 and S100a9 that is most pronounced in high iron diet conditions. Similarly, CD8+ T lymphocytes from HH patients display higher S100a9 expression both at the mRNA and protein level. Altogether, our results support a role for HFE as a negative regulator of CD8+ T-lymphocyte activation. While the activation markers S100a8 and S100a9 are strongly increased in CD8+ T cells from both, Hfe-/- mice and HH patients, a differential profile of genes related to differentiation/maturation of CD8+ T memory cells is evident in HH patients only. This supports the notion that HFE contributes, at least in part, to the generation of low peripheral blood CD8+ T lymphocytes in HH. PMID

  19. The CD14+CD16+ Inflammatory Monocyte Subset Displays Increased Mitochondrial Activity and Effector Function During Acute Plasmodium vivax Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Antonelli, Lis R. V.; Leoratti, Fabiana M. S.; Costa, Pedro A. C.; Rocha, Bruno C.; Diniz, Suelen Q.; Tada, Mauro S.; Pereira, Dhelio B.; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andrea; Golenbock, Douglas T.; Gonçalves, Ricardo; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.

    2014-01-01

    Infection with Plasmodium vivax results in strong activation of monocytes, which are important components of both the systemic inflammatory response and parasite control. The overall goal of this study was to define the role of monocytes during P. vivax malaria. Here, we demonstrate that P. vivax–infected patients display significant increase in circulating monocytes, which were defined as CD14+CD16− (classical), CD14+CD16+ (inflammatory), and CD14loCD16+ (patrolling) cells. While the classical and inflammatory monocytes were found to be the primary source of pro-inflammatory cytokines, the CD16+ cells, in particular the CD14+CD16+ monocytes, expressed the highest levels of activation markers, which included chemokine receptors and adhesion molecules. Morphologically, CD14+ were distinguished from CD14lo monocytes by displaying larger and more active mitochondria. CD14+CD16+ monocytes were more efficient in phagocytizing P. vivax-infected reticulocytes, which induced them to produce high levels of intracellular TNF-α and reactive oxygen species. Importantly, antibodies specific for ICAM-1, PECAM-1 or LFA-1 efficiently blocked the phagocytosis of infected reticulocytes by monocytes. Hence, our results provide key information on the mechanism by which CD14+CD16+ cells control parasite burden, supporting the hypothesis that they play a role in resistance to P. vivax infection. PMID:25233271

  20. The CD14+CD16+ inflammatory monocyte subset displays increased mitochondrial activity and effector function during acute Plasmodium vivax malaria.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, Lis R V; Leoratti, Fabiana M S; Costa, Pedro A C; Rocha, Bruno C; Diniz, Suelen Q; Tada, Mauro S; Pereira, Dhelio B; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andrea; Golenbock, Douglas T; Gonçalves, Ricardo; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T

    2014-09-01

    Infection with Plasmodium vivax results in strong activation of monocytes, which are important components of both the systemic inflammatory response and parasite control. The overall goal of this study was to define the role of monocytes during P. vivax malaria. Here, we demonstrate that P. vivax-infected patients display significant increase in circulating monocytes, which were defined as CD14(+)CD16- (classical), CD14(+)CD16(+) (inflammatory), and CD14loCD16(+) (patrolling) cells. While the classical and inflammatory monocytes were found to be the primary source of pro-inflammatory cytokines, the CD16(+) cells, in particular the CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes, expressed the highest levels of activation markers, which included chemokine receptors and adhesion molecules. Morphologically, CD14(+) were distinguished from CD14lo monocytes by displaying larger and more active mitochondria. CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes were more efficient in phagocytizing P. vivax-infected reticulocytes, which induced them to produce high levels of intracellular TNF-α and reactive oxygen species. Importantly, antibodies specific for ICAM-1, PECAM-1 or LFA-1 efficiently blocked the phagocytosis of infected reticulocytes by monocytes. Hence, our results provide key information on the mechanism by which CD14(+)CD16(+) cells control parasite burden, supporting the hypothesis that they play a role in resistance to P. vivax infection. PMID:25233271

  1. Circulating (CD3−CD19+CD20−IgD−CD27highCD38high) Plasmablasts: A Promising Cellular Biomarker for Immune Activity for Anti-PLA2R1 Related Membranous Nephropathy?

    PubMed Central

    Beukinga, Ingrid; Willard-Gallo, Karen; Nortier, Joëlle; Pradier, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Membranous nephropathy (MN) is a kidney specific autoimmune disease mainly mediated by anti-phospholipase A2 receptor 1 autoantibody (PLA2R1 Ab). The adequate assessment of chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, rituximab (RTX), efficacy is still needed to improve clinical outcome of patient with MN. We evaluated the modification of plasmablasts (CD3−CD19+CD20−IgD−CD27highCD38high), a useful biomarker of RTX response in other autoimmune diseases, and memory (CD3−CD19+CD20+IgD−CD27+CD38−) and naive (CD3−CD19+CD20+IgD+CD27−CD38low) B cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis in PLA2R1 related MN in one patient during the 4 years of follow-up after RTX. RTX induced complete disappearance of CD19+ B cells, plasmablasts, and memory B cells as soon as day 15. Despite severe CD19+ lymphopenia, plasmablasts and memory B cells reemerged early before naive B cells (days 45, 90, and 120, resp.). During the follow-up, plasmablasts decreased more rapidly than memory B cells but still remained elevated as compared to day 0 of RTX. Concomitantly, anti-PLA2R1 Ab increased progressively. Our single case report suggests that, besides monitoring of serum anti-PLA2R1 Ab level, enumeration of circulating plasmablasts and memory B cells represents an attractive and complementary tool to assess immunological activity and efficacy of RTX induced B cells depletion in anti-PLA2R1 Ab related MN. PMID:27493452

  2. Circulating CD14+ monocytes in patients with aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Shimoni, Sara; Meledin, Valery; Bar, Iris; Fabricant, Jacob; Gandelman, Gera; George, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Background Calcific aortic stenosis (AS) is an active process sharing similarities with atherosclerosis and chronic inflammation. The pathophysiology of AS is notable for three cardinal components: inflammation, fibrosis and calcification. Monocytes play a role in each of these processes. The role of circulating monocytes in AS is not clear. The aim of the present study was to study an association between circulating apoptotic and non apoptotic CD14+ monocytes and AS features. Methods We assessed the number of CD14+ monocytes and apoptotic monocytes in 54 patients with significant AS (aortic valve area 0.74 ± 0.27 cm2) and compared them to 33 patients with similar risk factors and no valvular disease. The level of CD14+ monocytes and apoptotic monocytes was assessed by flow cytometry. Results There was no difference in the risk factor profile and known coronary or peripheral vascular diseases between patients with AS and controls. Patients with AS exhibited increased numbers of CD14+ monocytes as compared to controls (9.9% ± 4.9% vs. 7.7% ± 3.9%, P = 0.03). CD14+ monocyte number was related to age and the presence and severity of AS. In patients with AS, both CD14+ monocytes and apoptotic monocytes were inversely related to aortic valve area. Conclusions Patients with significant AS have increased number of circulating CD14+ monocytes and there is an inverse correlation between monocyte count and aortic valve area. These findings may suggest that inflammation is operative not only in early valve injury phase, but also at later developed stages such as calcification when AS is severe. PMID:26918018

  3. CD19 CAR–T cells of defined CD4+:CD8+ composition in adult B cell ALL patients

    PubMed Central

    Turtle, Cameron J.; Hanafi, Laïla-Aïcha; Berger, Carolina; Gooley, Theodore A.; Cherian, Sindhu; Hudecek, Michael; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Melville, Katherine; Pender, Barbara; Budiarto, Tanya M.; Robinson, Emily; Steevens, Natalia N.; Chaney, Colette; Soma, Lorinda; Chen, Xueyan; Li, Daniel; Cao, Jianhong; Heimfeld, Shelly; Jensen, Michael C.; Riddell, Stanley R.; Maloney, David G.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. T cells that have been modified to express a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) have antitumor activity in B cell malignancies; however, identification of the factors that determine toxicity and efficacy of these T cells has been challenging in prior studies in which phenotypically heterogeneous CAR–T cell products were prepared from unselected T cells. METHODS. We conducted a clinical trial to evaluate CD19 CAR–T cells that were manufactured from defined CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets and administered in a defined CD4+:CD8+ composition to adults with B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia after lymphodepletion chemotherapy. RESULTS. The defined composition product was remarkably potent, as 27 of 29 patients (93%) achieved BM remission, as determined by flow cytometry. We established that high CAR–T cell doses and tumor burden increase the risks of severe cytokine release syndrome and neurotoxicity. Moreover, we identified serum biomarkers that allow testing of early intervention strategies in patients at the highest risk of toxicity. Risk-stratified CAR–T cell dosing based on BM disease burden decreased toxicity. CD8+ T cell–mediated anti-CAR transgene product immune responses developed after CAR–T cell infusion in some patients, limited CAR–T cell persistence, and increased relapse risk. Addition of fludarabine to the lymphodepletion regimen improved CAR–T cell persistence and disease-free survival. CONCLUSION. Immunotherapy with a CAR–T cell product of defined composition enabled identification of factors that correlated with CAR–T cell expansion, persistence, and toxicity and facilitated design of lymphodepletion and CAR–T cell dosing strategies that mitigated toxicity and improved disease-free survival. TRIAL REGISTRATION. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01865617. FUNDING. R01-CA136551; Life Science Development Fund; Juno Therapeutics; Bezos Family Foundation. PMID:27111235

  4. Phenotypic, Functional, and Gene Expression Profiling of Peripheral CD45RA+ and CD45RO+ CD4+CD25+CD127low Treg Cells in Patients With Chronic Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Gina J.; Fleskens, Veerle; Frederiksen, Klaus S.; Rajasekhar, Megha; Menon, Bina; Gerwien, Jens G.; Evans, Hayley G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Conflicting evidence exists regarding the suppressive capacity of Treg cells in the peripheral blood (PB) of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of this study was to determine whether Treg cells are intrinsically defective in RA. Methods Using a range of assays on PB samples from patients with chronic RA and healthy controls, CD3+CD4+CD25+CD127low Treg cells from the CD45RO+ or CD45RA+ T cell compartments were analyzed for phenotype, cytokine expression (ex vivo and after in vitro stimulation), suppression of Teff cell proliferation and cytokine production, suppression of monocyte‐derived cytokine/chemokine production, and gene expression profiles. Results No differences between RA patients and healthy controls were observed with regard to the frequency of Treg cells, ex vivo phenotype (CD4, CD25, CD127, CD39, or CD161), or proinflammatory cytokine profile (interleukin‐17 [IL‐17], interferon‐γ [IFNγ], or tumor necrosis factor [TNF]). FoxP3 expression was slightly increased in Treg cells from RA patients. The ability of Treg cells to suppress the proliferation of T cells or the production of cytokines (IFNγ or TNF) upon coculture with autologous CD45RO+ Teff cells and monocytes was not significantly different between RA patients and healthy controls. In PB samples from some RA patients, CD45RO+ Treg cells showed an impaired ability to suppress the production of certain cytokines/chemokines (IL‐1β, IL‐1 receptor antagonist, IL‐7, CCL3, or CCL4) by autologous lipopolysaccharide‐activated monocytes. However, this was not observed in all patients, and other cytokines/chemokines (TNF, IL‐6, IL‐8, IL‐12, IL‐15, or CCL5) were generally suppressed. Finally, gene expression profiling of CD45RA+ or CD45RO+ Treg cells from the PB revealed no statistically significant differences between RA patients and healthy controls. Conclusion Our findings indicate that there is no global defect in either CD45RO+ or CD45RA+ Treg cells in

  5. Reduced CD5(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) and interleukin-10(+) regulatory B cells in active anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated vasculitis permit increased circulating autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Aybar, L T; McGregor, J G; Hogan, S L; Hu, Y; Mendoza, C E; Brant, E J; Poulton, C J; Henderson, C D; Falk, R J; Bunch, D O

    2015-05-01

    Pathogenesis of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis is B cell-dependent, although how particular B cell subsets modulate immunopathogenesis remains unknown. Although their phenotype remains controversial, regulatory B cells (Bregs ), play a role in immunological tolerance via interleukin (IL)-10. Putative CD19(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) and CD19(+) CD24(hi) CD27(+) Bregs were evaluated in addition to their CD5(+) subsets in 69 patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). B cell IL-10 was verified by flow cytometry following culture with CD40 ligand and cytosine-phosphate-guanosine (CpG) DNA. Patients with active disease had decreased levels of CD5(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B cells and IL-10(+) B cells compared to patients in remission and healthy controls (HCs). As IL-10(+) and CD5(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B cells normalized in remission within an individual, ANCA titres decreased. The CD5(+) subset of CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B cells decreases in active disease and rebounds during remission similarly to IL-10-producing B cells. Moreover, CD5(+) B cells are enriched in the ability to produce IL-10 compared to CD5(neg) B cells. Together these results suggest that CD5 may identify functional IL-10-producing Bregs . The malfunction of Bregs during active disease due to reduced IL-10 expression may thus permit ANCA production. PMID:25376552

  6. Lung function decline in asthma patients with elevated bronchial CD8, CD4 and CD3 cells.

    PubMed

    den Otter, Irene; Willems, Luuk N A; van Schadewijk, Annemarie; van Wijngaarden, Simone; Janssen, Kirsten; de Jeu, Ronald C; Sont, Jacob K; Sterk, Peter J; Hiemstra, Pieter S

    2016-08-01

    Which inflammatory markers in the bronchial mucosa of asthma patients are associated with decline of lung function during 14 years of prospective follow-up?To address this question, 19 mild-to-moderate, atopic asthmatic patients underwent spirometry and bronchoscopy at baseline and after 14 years of follow-up (t=14). Baseline bronchial biopsies were analysed for reticular layer thickness, eosinophil cationic protein (EG2), mast cell tryptase (AA1), CD3, CD4 and CD8. Follow-up biopsies were stained for EG2, AA1, neutrophil elastase, CD3, CD4, CD8, CD20, granzyme B, CD68, DC-SIGN, Ki67 and mucins.Decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) % predicted was highest in patients with high CD8 (p=0.01, both pre- and post-bronchodilator) or high CD4 counts at baseline (p=0.04 pre-bronchodilator, p=0.03 post-bronchodilator). Patients with high CD8, CD3 or granzyme B counts at t=14 also exhibited faster decline in FEV1 (p=0.00 CD8 pre-bronchodilator, p=0.04 CD8 post-bronchodilator, p=0.01 granzyme B pre-bronchodilator, and p<0.01 CD3 pre-bronchodilator).Long-term lung function decline in asthma is associated with elevation of bronchial CD8 and CD4 at baseline, and CD8, CD3 and granzyme B at follow-up. This suggests that high-risk groups can be identified on the basis of inflammatory phenotypes. PMID:27230446

  7. CD86+/CD206+, Diametrically Polarized Tumor-Associated Macrophages, Predict Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patient Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Pingping; Ma, Lijie; Liu, Longzi; Zhao, Guangxi; Zhang, Si; Dong, Ling; Xue, Ruyi; Chen, She

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), the most abundant infiltrating immune cells in tumor microenvironment, have distinct functions in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) progression. CD68+ TAMs represent multiple polarized immune cells mainly containing CD86+ antitumoral M1 macrophages and CD206+ protumoral M2 macrophages. TAMs expression and density were assessed by immunohistochemical staining of CD68, CD86, and CD206 in tissue microarrays from 253 HCC patients. Clinicopathologic features and prognostic value of these markers were evaluated. We found that CD68+ TAMs were not associated with clinicopathologic characteristics and prognosis in HCC. Low presence of CD86+ TAMs and high presence of CD206+ TAMs were markedly correlated with aggressive tumor phenotypes, such as multiple tumor number and advanced tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage; and were associated with poor overall survival (OS) (p = 0.027 and p = 0.024, respectively) and increased time to recurrence (TTR) (p = 0.037 and p = 0.031, respectively). In addition, combined analysis of CD86 and CD206 provided a better indicator for OS (p = 0.011) and TTR (p = 0.024) in HCC than individual analysis of CD86 and CD206. Moreover, CD86+/CD206+ TAMs predictive model also had significant prognosis value in α-fetoprotein (AFP)-negative patients (OS: p = 0.002, TTR: p = 0.005). Thus, these results suggest that combined analysis of immune biomarkers CD86 and CD206 could be a promising HCC prognostic biomarker. PMID:26938527

  8. Cancer Immunology Miniatures: Immune activation and a 9-year ongoing complete remission following CD40 antibody therapy and metastasectomy in a patient with metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Bajor, David L.; Xu, Xiaowei; Torigian, Drew A.; Mick, Rosemarie; Garcia, Laura R.; Richman, Lee P.; Desmarais, Cindy; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Schuchter, Lynn M.; Kalos, Michael; Vonderheide, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Direct immune activation via agonistic monoclonal antibodies (mAb) is a potentially complementary approach to therapeutic blockade of inhibitory immune receptors in cancer. Here, we provide genetic analysis of the immunological consequences associated with the use of an agonistic CD40 mAb in a patient with metastatic melanoma who responded, underwent a single metastasectomy, and then achieved a complete remission ongoing for more than 9 years after starting therapy. Tumor microenvironment after immunotherapy was associated with pro-inflammatory modulations and emergence of a de novo T-cell repertoire as detected by next-generation sequencing of T-cell receptors (TCR) in the tumor and blood. The de-novo T-cell repertoire identified in the post-treatment metastasectomy sample was also present – and in some cases expanded – in the circulation years after completion of therapy. Comprehensive study of this “exceptional responder” highlights the emerging potential of direct immune agonists in the next wave of cancer immunotherapies and a potential role for TCR deep sequencing in cancer immune assessment. PMID:25252722

  9. CD38, CD81 and BAFFR combined expression by transitional B cells distinguishes active from inactive systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Ana; Silva, Isabel; Inês, Luís; Souto-Carneiro, M Margarida; Pais, M Luísa; Trindade, Hélder; da Silva, José António Pereira; Paiva, Artur

    2016-05-01

    In view of its heterogeneous presentation and unpredictable course, clinical management of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is difficult. There is a need for biomarkers and diagnostic aids to monitor SLE disease activity and severity prior to, during and after treatment. We undertook this study to search for unique phenotypic patterns in each peripheral blood (PB) B cell subset, capable of distinguishing SLE patients with inactive disease versus SLE patients with active disease versus controls by using an automated population separator (APS) visualization strategy. PB was collected from 41 SLE patients and 28 age- and gender-matched controls. We analyzed the cell surface markers (in a tube CD20/CD27/CD19/CD45/CD38/CD81/BAFFR combination) expression on PB B cell subsets using principal component analysis, implemented in the APS software tool. Overall, our analysis indicates that active SLE can be distinguished from inactive SLE on the basis of a single tube analysis, focused on the decreased expression of CD38, CD81 and BAFFR in transitional B cells. The cluster analysis of immunophenotypic profiles of B cell subsets highlighted disease-specific abnormalities on transitional B cells that emerge as promising surrogate markers for disease activity. Further validation is needed with larger samples and prospective follow-up of patients. PMID:25894569

  10. In vitro soluble CD30 levels in patients with chronic stable coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, Mohammad Jafar; Hedayat, Mona; Rezaei, Nima; Saboor-Yaraghi, Ali-Akbar; Mahmoudi, Maryam

    2011-12-01

    The CD30 antigen seems to play a costimulatory role in maintaining the physiological balance between T-helper (Th)1/Th2 immune responses. In this study, plasma and in vitro soluble CD30 (sCD30) secretion was investigated in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) as a plausible marker of dysregulated immune response.Twenty one patients with angiographically confirmed CAD and 31 healthy controls took part in this study. The levels of the activation marker sCD30 were determined in plasma and phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated and unstimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures by ELISA. Plasma sCD30 levels did not differ significantly between the patients and controls. However, spontaneous sCD30 secretion was significantly lower in patients with CAD compared to controls (p < 0.001). The soluble CD30 levels were significantly increased in the supernatant of PHA-stimulated PBMCs compared to unstimulated cultures in both groups of patients and controls (p < 0.001). PHA-stimulated sCD30 secretion was found to be lower in patients compared to controls; however, the difference was not statistically significant. Plasma sCD30 levels were not statistically different in patients with chronic stable CAD, a well-known Th1-mediated disease, compared to controls; whereas decreased spontaneous and PHA-stimulated sCD30 secretion in patients with CAD might indicate the progressive shift towards a Th1 immune response. PMID:22184265

  11. Atypical manifestation of progressive outer retinal necrosis in AIDS patient with CD4+ T-cell counts more than 100 cells/microL on highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Vichitvejpaisal, Pornpattana; Reeponmahar, Somporn; Tantisiriwat, Woraphot

    2009-06-01

    Typical progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) is an acute ocular infectious disease in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients with extremely low CD4+ T-cell counts. It is a form of the Varicella- zoster virus (VZV) infection. This destructive infection has an extremely rapid course that may lead to blindness in affected eyes within days or weeks. Attempts at its treatment have had limited success. We describe the case of a bilateral PORN in an AIDS patient with an initial CD4+ T-cell count >100 cells/microL that developed after initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). A 29-year-old Thai female initially diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in 1998, presented with bilaterally decreased visual acuity after initiating HAART two months earlier. Multiple yellowish spots appeared in the deep retina without evidence of intraocular inflammation or retinal vasculitis. Her CD4+ T-cell count was 127 cells/microL. She was diagnosed as having PORN based on clinical features and positive VZV in the aqueous humor and vitreous by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Despite combined treatment with intravenous acyclovir and intravitreous ganciclovir, the patient's visual acuity worsened with no light-perception in either eye. This case suggests that PORN should be included in the differential diagnosis of reduced visual acuity in AIDS patients initiating HAART with higher CD4+ T-cell counts. PORN may be a manifestation of the immune reconstitution syndrome. PMID:19702067

  12. CD45 Isoform Profile Identifies Natural Killer (NK) Subsets with Differential Activity

    PubMed Central

    Krzywinska, Ewelina; Cornillon, Amelie; Allende-Vega, Nerea; Vo, Dang-Nghiem; Rene, Celine; Lu, Zhao-Yang; Pasero, Christine; Olive, Daniel; Fegueux, Nathalie; Ceballos, Patrick; Hicheri, Yosr; Sobecki, Michal; Rossi, Jean-François; Cartron, Guillaume; Villalba, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The leucocyte-specific phosphatase CD45 is present in two main isoforms: the large CD45RA and the short CD45RO. We have recently shown that distinctive expression of these isoforms distinguishes natural killer (NK) populations. For example, co-expression of both isoforms identifies in vivo the anti tumor NK cells in hematological cancer patients. Here we show that low CD45 expression associates with less mature, CD56bright, NK cells. Most NK cells in healthy human donors are CD45RA+CD45RO-. The CD45RA-RO+ phenotype, CD45RO cells, is extremely uncommon in B or NK cells, in contrast to T cells. However, healthy donors possess CD45RAdimRO- (CD45RAdim cells), which show immature markers and are largely expanded in hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients. Blood borne cancer patients also have more CD45RAdim cells that carry several features of immature NK cells. However, and in opposition to their association to NK cell progenitors, they do not proliferate and show low expression of the transferrin receptor protein 1/CD71, suggesting low metabolic activity. Moreover, CD45RAdim cells properly respond to in vitro encounter with target cells by degranulating or gaining CD69 expression. In summary, they are quiescent NK cells, with low metabolic status that can, however, respond after encounter with target cells. PMID:27100180

  13. T-cell activation profiles in different granulomatous interstitial lung diseases--a role for CD8+CD28(null) cells?

    PubMed

    Heron, M; Claessen, A M E; Grutters, J C; van den Bosch, J M M

    2010-05-01

    Lymphocytes play a crucial role in lung inflammation. Different interstitial lung diseases may show distinct lymphocyte activation profiles. The aim of this study was to examine the expression of a variety of activation markers on T lymphocyte subsets from blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of patients with different granulomatous interstitial lung diseases and healthy controls. Bronchoalveolar lavage cells and blood cells from 23 sarcoidosis patients, seven patients with hypersensitivity pneumonitis and 24 healthy controls were analysed. Lymphocyte activation status was determined by flow cytometry. Lymphocytes were stained with antibodies against CD3, CD4, CD8, CD25, CD28, CD69, very late antigen-1 (VLA)-1, VLA-4 and human leucocyte antigen D-related (HLA-DR). In general, CD28, CD69 and VLA-1 expression on BALF CD4+ lymphocytes and HLA-DR expression on BALF CD8+ lymphocytes was different in patients with hypersensitivity pneumonitis and sarcoidosis patients with parenchymal involvement. This BALF lymphocyte phenotype correlated with carbon monoxide diffusing lung capacity (Dlco) values across interstitial lung diseases (ILD) (r2 = 0.48, P = 0.0002). In sarcoidosis patients, CD8+CD28(null) blood lymphocytes correlated with lower Dlco values (r = -0.66, P = 0.004), chronic BALF lymphocyte activation phenotype (r2 = 0.65, P < 0.0001), radiographic staging (stage I versus stage II and higher, P = 0.006) and with the need for corticosteroid treatment (P = 0.001). Higher expression of CD69, VLA-1 and HLA-DR and lower expression of CD28 on BALF lymphocytes suggests prolonged stimulation and chronic lymphocyte activation in patients with ILD. In sarcoidosis, blood CD8+CD28(null) cells might be a new biomarker for disease severity but needs further investigation. PMID:20030671

  14. Aberrant phenotypic expression of CD15 and CD56 identifies poor prognostic acute promyelocytic leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; De Propris, Maria Stefania; Minotti, Clara; Stefanizzi, Caterina; Raponi, Sara; Colafigli, Gioia; Latagliata, Roberto; Guarini, Anna; Foà, Robin

    2014-02-01

    Limited information is available on the relationship between expression of some additional aberrant phenotypic features and outcome of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patients. Here, we set out to assess the frequency of CD15 and CD56 expression, and their prognostic value in a large series of APL patients. One hundred and fourteen adult patients consecutively diagnosed with PML/RARα-positive APL and homogeneously treated with the AIDA induction schedule at a single institution were included in the study. Twelve (10.5%) and 9 (8%) of the 114 patients expressed CD15 and CD56, respectively. CD15 expression identified a subset of patients with a classic morphologic subtype (92%), a prevalent association with a bcr1 expression (67%) with an unexpectedly higher frequency of relapses (42% vs 20% for the CD15- patients, p=0.03) and a low overall survival (OS) (median OS at 5 years 58% vs 85% for the CD15- patients, p=0.01). CD56 expression was detected only in patients with a classic morphologic subtype, a prevalent bcr3 expression (67%), high incidence of differentiation syndrome (55%), higher frequency of relapse (34% vs 20% for the CD56- population, p=0.04) and a low OS (60% vs 85% for the CD56- population p=0.02). We hereby confirm the negative prognostic value of CD56 and we show that the same applies also to cases expressing CD15. These aberrant markers may be considered for the refinement of risk-adapted therapeutic strategies in APL patients. PMID:24296270

  15. Elevated postinjury thrombospondin 1-CD47 triggering aids differentiation of patients' defective inflammatory CD1a+dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Gautam; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjukta; Bankey, Paul E; Miller-Graziano, Carol L

    2014-11-01

    A subset of Pts develops dysfunctional MO to inflammatory DC differentiation and immunosuppression. MDDC, a newly described DC subset, is pivotal in initiating antibacterial responses. Endogenous proteins are known to alter MO to MDDC differentiation. In particular, trauma-elevated TSP-1, a protein that is known to affect MO functions, could trigger MDDC differentiation defects. We hypothesized that TSP-1-deranged differentiation of inflammatory CD1a(+)MDDC would negatively alter activation of immune functions, thereby increasing the risk of postinjury infections. Post-trauma increased TSP-1 levels in patients' plasma and MO correlated with two distinct MDDC differentiation dysfunctions: the previously described decreased CD1a(+)DC yields but also, development of an immunoincompetent CD1a(+)MDDC. The Pts' development of Dysf DC correlated to increased infectious complications. TSP-1 triggered its inhibitory receptor, CD47, activating an inhibitory phosphatase, SHP-1. Increased pSHP-1, decreased antigen processing, and depressed T cell stimulation characterized Pt Dysf DC. TSP-1 mimics added during Cnt MDDC differentiation depressed CD1a(+)DC yields but more importantly, also induced defective CD1a(+)MDDC, reproducing Pts' MDDC differentiation dysfunctions. CD47 triggering during Cnt MDDC differentiation increased SHP-1 activation, inhibiting IL-4-induced STAT-6 activation (critical for CD1a(+)MDDC differentiation). SHP-1 inhibition during MDDC differentiation in the presence of TSP-1 mimics restored pSTAT-6 levels and CD1a(+)MDDC immunogenicity. Thus, postinjury-elevated TSP-1 can decrease CD1a(+)DC yields but more critically, also induces SHP-1 hyperactivity, deviating MDDC differentiation to defective CD1a(+) inflammatory MDDCs by inhibiting STAT-6. PMID:25001859

  16. Identification and Characterization of CD44RC, a Novel Alternatively Spliced Soluble CD44 Isoform that can Potentiate the Hyaluronan Binding Activity of Cell Surface CD44

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Roland K; Carpenito, Carmine; Dougherty, Shona T; Hayes, Gregory M; Dougherty, Graeme J

    1999-01-01

    Abstract Soluble CD44 proteins generated by proteolytic cleavage or aberrant intron retention have been shown to antagonize the ligand binding activity of the corresponding cell surface receptor, inducing apoptosis and inhibiting tumor growth. Interestingly, such findings appear to contradict recent studies demonstrating a correlation between the presence of high levels of soluble CD44 in the serum of cancer patients and poor prognosis. In the present study, we report the cloning of a novel, naturally occurring, differentially expressed, soluble CD44 isoform, designated CD44RC, which, in contrast to previously described soluble CD44 proteins, can dramatically enhance the hyaluronan binding activity of cell surface CD44. Sequence analysis suggests that CD44RC is generated by an alternative splicing event in which the 3′ end of CD44 exon 2 is spliced into an internal splice acceptor site present within exon 18, altering reading frame and giving rise to a soluble protein with a unique COOH terminus. Functional studies suggest that CD44RC enhances hyaluronan binding by adhering to chondroitin sulfate side-chains attached to cell surface CD44, generating a multivalent complex with increased avidity for hyaluronan. PMID:10933060

  17. Modulation of CD44 Activity by A6-Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Finlayson, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is a non-sulfated glycosaminoglycan distributed throughout the extracellular matrix that plays a major role in cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation. CD44, a multifunctional cell surface glycoprotein, is a receptor for HA. In addition, CD44 is known to interact with other receptors and ligands, and to mediate a number of cellular functions as well as disease progression. Studies have shown that binding of HA to CD44 in cancer cells activates survival pathways resulting in cancer cell survival. This effect can be blocked by anti-CD44 monoclonal antibodies. A6 is a capped, eight l-amino acid peptide (Ac-KPSSPPEE-NH2) derived from the biologically active connecting peptide domain of the serine protease, human urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA). A6 neither binds to the uPA receptor (uPAR) nor interferes with uPA/uPAR binding. A6 binds to CD44 resulting in the inhibition of migration, invasion, and metastasis of tumor cells, and the modulation of CD44-mediated cell signaling. A6 has been shown to have no dose-limiting toxicity in animal studies. A6 has demonstrated efficacy and an excellent safety profile in Phase 1a, 1b, and 2 clinical trials. In animal models, A6 has also exhibited promising results for the treatment of diabetic retinopathy and wet age-related macular degeneration through the reduction of retinal vascular permeability and inhibition of choroidal neovascularization, respectively. Recently, A6 has been shown to be directly cytotoxic for B-lymphocytes obtained from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia expressing the kinase, ZAP-70. This review will discuss the activity of A6, A6 modulation of HA and CD44, and a novel strategy for therapeutic intervention in disease. PMID:25870596

  18. The importance of sCD40 and sCD40L concentration in patients with chronic HCV infection and HIV co-infection.

    PubMed

    Lapiński, Tadeusz Wojciech; Pogorzelska, Joanna; Grzeszczuk, Anna; Swiderska, Magdalena; Kowalczuk, Oksana; Nikliński, Jacek; Flisiak, Robert

    2014-01-01

    CD40 receptor is activated by ligand CD40L (CD154) which is synthesized in inflammation by NK cells, monocytes and lymphocytes B. TRAF proteins are activated in cells by CD40 stimulation and next they stimulate different enzymatic pathways. High concentrations of CD40L stimulate CD40, and consequently STAT enzyme system inhibits the expression ofnonstructural proteins ofHCV NS3 and NS5A and E2 core in infected human hepatocytes. PURPOSE. The aim of the study was to evaluate the concentration of soluble components of the complex: sCD40 and sCD40L in the serum of patients infected with HCV and HCV/HIV-1 co-infected. The effect ofHCV genotype, HIV and HCV viral load and rs12979860 polymorphism on serum sCD40 and sCD40L was established among the patients. The influence of the number of CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ on the concentrations of sCD40 and sCD40L was evaluated in the HIV-1 infected group MATERIALS AND METHODS. Serum concentrations of sCD40 and sCD40L were determined using ELISA in 68 HCV infected patients including 39 HCV monoinfected and 29 HCV/HIV-1 co-infected. RESULTS. Serum concentration of sCD40 and sCD40L was significantly higher in HCV and HCV/HIV coinfected patients compared to healthy subjects (25.7 and 23.2 v. 8.5 pg/ml and 12.7 and 7.3 v. 0.79 ng/ml). The concentration of sCD40L in patients with genotype CC rs12979860 was significantly higher compared to patients with Non-CC genotypes (11.8 v. 7.6 ng/ml, p < 0.018). CONCLUSIONS. High levels of sCD40 and sCD40L were detected among patients with chronic HCV and HCV/ HIV-1 infection The high concentration of sCD40L correlates with CC rs12979860 genotype. PMID:25004625

  19. F protein increases CD4+CD25+ T cell population in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Hashempour, Tayebeh; Bamdad, Taravat; Bergamini, Alberto; Lavergne, Jean Pierre; Haj-Sheykholeslami, Arghavan; Brakier-Gingras, Léa; Ajorloo, Mehdi; Merat, Shahin

    2015-06-01

    HCV is a global health problem with an estimated 230 million chronically infected people worldwide. It has been reported that a 17-kd protein translated from core-encoding genomic region can contribute to immune-mediated mechanisms associated with the development of the chronic disease. Also, Treg cells can be contributed to an inadequate response against the viruses, leading to chronic infection. Here we evaluated the ability of protein F to modulate the frequency of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+T and IL-10+T cells in patients with chronic HCV infection. F gene was amplified and cloned in the expression vector. The protein was purified and used for stimulation of PBMCs in the HCV chronic patients and the control groups. The frequency of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T cell-like populations and IL-10-producing CD4+CD25+ T cells was assessed in the HCV-infected patients and in the healthy controls by flow cytometry, which showed an increase of both CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T cell-like population and IL-10-producing CD4+CD25+ T cells in the HCV-infected patients positive for anti-F antibody. Our results suggest the potential involvement of F and core antigens in increasing the frequency of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T cell-like population and IL-10-producing CD4+CD25+ T cells which may be associated with HCV-persistent infection. PMID:25862675

  20. Anti-DNA antibody production by CD5+ and CD5- B cells of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, N; Sakane, T; Engleman, E G

    1990-01-01

    Although the presence of anti-DNA antibody is a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), neither the subsets of B cells that secrete anti-DNA antibody nor the stimuli responsible for the induction of anti-DNA secretion is known. In particular, the role of CD5+ B cells in human SLE, a distinct subpopulation of antibody-secreting cells shown previously to be a source of anti-DNA antibody in murine models of SLE, is unknown. To approach these questions, we developed a sensitive enzyme-linked immunospot (ELIspot) assay to measure spontaneous secretion of antibody to single-stranded (ss) DNA, double-stranded (ds) DNA, tetanus toxoid, and polyclonal immunoglobulin (Ig) by purified CD5+ and CD5- B cells of 15 SLE patients and 15 healthy control subjects. The B cells of only 1 of 15 healthy subjects secreted a significant level of anti-ssDNA antibody, and none secreted anti-dsDNA. By contrast, in the majority of SLE patients both CD5+ and CD5- B cells secreted IgG and/or IgM anti-ssDNA as well as anti-dsDNA antibody. Further analysis of the anti-ssDNA response revealed that the level of IgG and IgM anti-DNA antibody secretion by CD5- B cells correlated closely with the level of polyclonal Ig production by the same subpopulation (r = 0.81 and 0.70, respectively). In contrast, production of anti-DNA by CD5+ B cells occurred independently of polyclonal Ig production by both CD5+ and CD5- B cell subpopulations. These results suggest that in human SLE there exist two anti-DNA antibody-producing B cell subpopulations with distinct induction mechanisms: one (CD5+), which independently secretes anti-DNA, and another (CD5-), which produces anti-DNA as an apparent consequence of polyclonal B cell activation. PMID:1688569

  1. LAP TGF-Beta Subset of CD4+CD25+CD127− Treg Cells is Increased and Overexpresses LAP TGF-Beta in Lung Adenocarcinoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Islas-Vazquez, Lorenzo; Prado-Garcia, Heriberto; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores; Meneses-Flores, Manuel; Galicia-Velasco, Miriam; Romero-Garcia, Susana; Camacho-Mendoza, Catalina; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Adenocarcinoma, the most commonly diagnosed histologic type of lung cancer, is associated with smoking. Cigarette smoke promotes inflammation on the airways, which might be mediated by Th17 cells. This inflammatory environment may contribute to tumor development. In contrast, some reports indicate that tumors may induce immunosuppressive Treg cells to dampen immune reactivity, supporting tumor growth and progression. Thus, we aimed to analyze whether chronic inflammation or immunosuppression predominates at the systemic level in lung adenocarcinoma patients, and several cytokines and Th17 and Treg cells were studied. Higher proportions of IL-17-producing CD4+ T-cells were found in smoking control subjects and in lung adenocarcinoma patients compared to nonsmoking control subjects. In addition, lung adenocarcinoma patients increased both plasma concentrations of IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, and IL-10, and proportions of Latency Associated Peptide (LAP) TGF-β subset of CD4+CD25+CD127− Treg cells, which overexpressed LAP TGF-β. This knowledge may lead to the development of immunotherapies that could inhibit the suppressor activity mediated by the LAP TGF-β subset of CD4+CD25+CD127− Treg cells to promote reactivity of immune cells against lung adenocarcinoma cells. PMID:26582240

  2. CD4+CD25hiCD127low Regulatory T Cells Are Increased in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Kue Peng; Chun, Nicole Ai Leng; Ismail, Siti Mazlipah; Abraham, Mannil Thomas; Yusoff, Mohd Nury; Zain, Rosnah Binti; Ngeow, Wei Cheong; Ponniah, Sathibalan; Cheong, Sok Ching

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs), a subset of CD4+ T cells plays a pivotal role in regulating the immune system. An increase in Treg numbers enables cancer progression by dampening the immune system and allowing tumor cells to evade immune detection and destruction. An increase in Treg numbers and expression of inhibitory cytokines including TGF-β and IL-10 are mechanisms by which Tregs exert their immune suppressive function. However, the presence of Tregs and inhibitory cytokines in oral cancer patients is still unclear. In this study, the presence of circulating Tregs in 39 oral cancer patients and 24 healthy donors was examined by studying the presence of the CD4+CD25hiCD127low cell population in their peripheral blood mononuclear cells using flow cytometry. Serum levels of TGF-β and IL-10 were measured by ELISA. T cell subsets of OSCC patients were found to differ significantly from healthy donors where a decrease in CD8+ cytotoxic T cells and an increase in Tregs (CD4+CD25hiCD127low) were observed. Further, the ratio of CD8+ T cells/Tregs was also decreased in patients compared to healthy donors. The presence of Tregs was accompanied by a decrease in IL-10 but not TGF-β secretion in OSCC patients when compared to donors; in addition, the analysis also revealed that an increased presence of Tregs was accompanied by better patient survival. Amongst OSCC patients, smokers had significantly higher levels of TGF-β. It is apparent that the immune system is compromised in OSCC patients and the characterization of the Treg subpopulation could form a basis for improving our understanding of the perturbations in the immune system that occur during OSCC tumorigenesis. PMID:25153698

  3. Changes in the monocytic subsets CD14(dim)CD16(+) and CD14(++)CD16(-) in chronic systolic heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Amir, Offer; Spivak, Ilia; Lavi, Idit; Rahat, Michal Amit

    2012-01-01

    Different monocytic subsets are important in inflammation and tissue remodelling, but although heart failure (HF) is associated with local and systemic inflammation, their roles in HF are yet unknown. We recruited 59 chronic systolic HF patients (aged 58 ± 13 years, 45 males and 14 females) and 29 age-matched controls with no pervious heart disease. Compared to the controls, we found no change in the distribution of the CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytic subset, whereas the classical CD14(++)CD16(-) subset was decreased by 11% (P < 0.001), and the nonclassical CD14(dim)CD16(+) subset was expanded by 4% (P < 0.001) in HF patients and was inversely associated with severe HF (P = 0.015), as assessed by increased end-diastolic dimension (EDD). Compared to the control group, serum TNFα, IL-1β, IL-10, and IL-13 levels were significantly elevated in the HF patients. Specifically, IL-13 levels were positively correlated to the CD1CD14(dim)CD16(+) monocytic subset (r = 0.277, P = 0.017), and intracellular staining of IL-13 demonstrated that some of these monocytes produce the cytokine in HF patients, but not in the controls. We suggest that the inverse association between EDD values and the expansion of CD14(dim)CD16(+) monocytes that can produce IL-13 could be explained as a measure to counterbalance adverse remodelling, which is a central process in HF. PMID:23226928

  4. Changes in the Monocytic Subsets CD14dimCD16+ and CD14++CD16− in Chronic Systolic Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Amir, Offer; Spivak, Ilia; Lavi, Idit; Rahat, Michal Amit

    2012-01-01

    Different monocytic subsets are important in inflammation and tissue remodelling, but although heart failure (HF) is associated with local and systemic inflammation, their roles in HF are yet unknown. We recruited 59 chronic systolic HF patients (aged 58 ± 13 years, 45 males and 14 females) and 29 age-matched controls with no pervious heart disease. Compared to the controls, we found no change in the distribution of the CD14+CD16+ monocytic subset, whereas the classical CD14++CD16− subset was decreased by 11% (P < 0.001), and the nonclassical CD14dimCD16+ subset was expanded by 4% (P < 0.001) in HF patients and was inversely associated with severe HF (P = 0.015), as assessed by increased end-diastolic dimension (EDD). Compared to the control group, serum TNFα, IL-1β, IL-10, and IL-13 levels were significantly elevated in the HF patients. Specifically, IL-13 levels were positively correlated to the CD1CD14dimCD16+ monocytic subset (r = 0.277, P = 0.017), and intracellular staining of IL-13 demonstrated that some of these monocytes produce the cytokine in HF patients, but not in the controls. We suggest that the inverse association between EDD values and the expansion of CD14dimCD16+ monocytes that can produce IL-13 could be explained as a measure to counterbalance adverse remodelling, which is a central process in HF. PMID:23226928

  5. Dysfunctional phenotypes of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are comparable in patients initiating ART during early or chronic HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Amu, Sylvie; Lantto Graham, Rebecka; Bekele, Yonas; Nasi, Aikaterini; Bengtsson, Carina; Rethi, Bence; Sorial, Sam; Meini, Genny; Zazzi, Maurizio; Hejdeman, Bo; Chiodi, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Early initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) is becoming a common clinical practice according to current guidelines recommending treatment to all HIV-1-infected patients. However, it is not known whether ART initiated during the early phase of infection prevents the establishment of abnormal phenotypic features previously reported in CD4+ and CD8+T cells during chronic HIV-1 infection. In this cross-sectional study, blood specimens were obtained from 17 HIV-1-infected patients who began ART treatment shortly after infection (early ART [EA]), 17 age-matched HIV-1-infected patients who started ART during chronic phase of infection (late ART [LA]), and 25 age-matched non-HIV-1-infected controls. At collection of specimens, patients in EA and LA groups had received ART for comparable periods of time. Total HIV-1 DNA was measured in white blood cells by quantitative PCR. The concentration of 9 inflammatory parameters and 1 marker of fibrosis, including sCD14 and β-2 microglobulin, was measured in plasma. Furthermore, expression of markers of abnormal immune activation (human leukocyte antigen - antigen D related [HLA-DR] and CD38), exhaustion (programmed death 1, CD28, CD57) and terminal differentiation (CD127) was measured on CD4+ and CD8+T cells. T-cell proliferation was measured through Ki67 expression. The copies of total HIV-1 DNA in blood were significantly lower (P = 0.009) in EA compared with that in LA group. Only the expression of HLA-DR on naïve CD4+ T cells distinguished EA from LA, whereas expression of 3 surface markers distinguished T-cell populations of HIV-1-infected patients from controls. These included HLA-DR distinguishing CD4+ T cells from EA compared with controls, and also CD38 and CD127 on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, respectively, distinguishing both groups of patients from controls. The sCD14 levels were significantly higher in EA patients, and β-2 microglobulin levels were higher in LA group compared with that in controls. Our

  6. Dysfunctional phenotypes of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are comparable in patients initiating ART during early or chronic HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Amu, Sylvie; Lantto Graham, Rebecka; Bekele, Yonas; Nasi, Aikaterini; Bengtsson, Carina; Rethi, Bence; Sorial, Sam; Meini, Genny; Zazzi, Maurizio; Hejdeman, Bo; Chiodi, Francesca

    2016-06-01

    Early initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) is becoming a common clinical practice according to current guidelines recommending treatment to all HIV-1-infected patients. However, it is not known whether ART initiated during the early phase of infection prevents the establishment of abnormal phenotypic features previously reported in CD4+ and CD8+T cells during chronic HIV-1 infection. In this cross-sectional study, blood specimens were obtained from 17 HIV-1-infected patients who began ART treatment shortly after infection (early ART [EA]), 17 age-matched HIV-1-infected patients who started ART during chronic phase of infection (late ART [LA]), and 25 age-matched non-HIV-1-infected controls. At collection of specimens, patients in EA and LA groups had received ART for comparable periods of time. Total HIV-1 DNA was measured in white blood cells by quantitative PCR. The concentration of 9 inflammatory parameters and 1 marker of fibrosis, including sCD14 and β-2 microglobulin, was measured in plasma. Furthermore, expression of markers of abnormal immune activation (human leukocyte antigen - antigen D related [HLA-DR] and CD38), exhaustion (programmed death 1, CD28, CD57) and terminal differentiation (CD127) was measured on CD4+ and CD8+T cells. T-cell proliferation was measured through Ki67 expression. The copies of total HIV-1 DNA in blood were significantly lower (P = 0.009) in EA compared with that in LA group. Only the expression of HLA-DR on naïve CD4+ T cells distinguished EA from LA, whereas expression of 3 surface markers distinguished T-cell populations of HIV-1-infected patients from controls. These included HLA-DR distinguishing CD4+ T cells from EA compared with controls, and also CD38 and CD127 on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, respectively, distinguishing both groups of patients from controls. The sCD14 levels were significantly higher in EA patients, and β-2 microglobulin levels were higher in LA group compared with that in controls. Our results

  7. Lyn is involved in CD24-induced ERK1/2 activation in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and aim CD24 expression is associated with human colorectal cancer (CRC). Our previous data indicated that CD24 promoted the proliferation and invasion of colorectal cancer cells through the activation of ERK1/2. Since Src family kinases are frequently deregulated in CRC and closely related to the MAPK signaling pathway, we investigated the impact of Lyn, an important member of SFKs, on CD24-induced ERK1/2 activation in CRC. Methods and Results The interaction of CD24 and Lyn was identified by co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) and ectopic expression of CD24-induced Lyn activation. Inhibition of Lyn activation by phosphatase PP2 in SW480CD24cells abrogated CD24-induced invasion. The results of the Co-IP and immunofluorescence assay revealed that overexpression of CD24 enhanced the interaction of Lyn and ERK1/2 and induced the nuclear translocation of Lyn. However, inhibition of Lyn activity attenuated CD24-induced ERK1/2 activation, and depletion of CD24 disrupted Lyn-ERK1/2 interaction. Immunohistochemistry analysis for 202 cases of CRC showed that the expression of both CD24 and Lyn was positively correlated with tumor grade, stage, lymph node and distant metastasis. Patients with lower expression of CD24 or Lyn had a higher survival rate. The Cox multivariate analysis showed that CD24 expression, but not Lyn expression, was an independent prognostic factor of CRC. Conclusions Our results suggest that Lyn is involved in CD24-induced ERK1/2 activation in CRC. The expression of CD24 is associated with activation of Lyn and ERK1/2, which might be a novel mechanism related to CD24-mediated regulation of CRC development. PMID:22731636

  8. Redistribution, Hyperproliferation, Activation of Natural Killer Cells and CD8 T Cells, and Cytokine Production During First-in-Human Clinical Trial of Recombinant Human Interleukin-15 in Patients With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Conlon, Kevin C.; Lugli, Enrico; Welles, Hugh C.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Fojo, Antonio Tito; Morris, John C.; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Dubois, Sigrid P.; Perera, Liyanage P.; Stewart, Donn M.; Goldman, Carolyn K.; Bryant, Bonita R.; Decker, Jean M.; Chen, Jing; Worthy, Tat'Yana A.; Figg, William D.; Peer, Cody J.; Sneller, Michael C.; Lane, H. Clifford; Yovandich, Jason L.; Creekmore, Stephen P.; Roederer, Mario; Waldmann, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Interleukin-15 (IL-15) has significant potential in cancer immunotherapy as an activator of antitumor CD8 T and natural killer (NK) cells. The primary objectives of this trial were to determine safety, adverse event profile, dose-limiting toxicity, and maximum-tolerated dose of recombinant human IL-15 (rhIL-15) administered as a daily intravenous bolus infusion for 12 consecutive days in patients with metastatic malignancy. Patients and Methods We performed a first in-human trial of Escherichia coli–produced rhIL-15. Bolus infusions of 3.0, 1.0, and 0.3 μg/kg per day of IL-15 were administered for 12 consecutive days to patients with metastatic malignant melanoma or metastatic renal cell cancer. Results Flow cytometry of peripheral blood lymphocytes revealed dramatic efflux of NK and memory CD8 T cells from the circulating blood within minutes of IL-15 administration, followed by influx and hyperproliferation yielding 10-fold expansions of NK cells that ultimately returned to baseline. Up to 50-fold increases of serum levels of multiple inflammatory cytokines were observed. Dose-limiting toxicities observed in patients receiving 3.0 and 1.0 μg/kg per day were grade 3 hypotension, thrombocytopenia, and elevations of ALT and AST, resulting in 0.3 μg/kg per day being determined the maximum-tolerated dose. Indications of activity included clearance of lung lesions in two patients. Conclusion IL-15 could be safely administered to patients with metastatic malignancy. IL-15 administration markedly altered homeostasis of lymphocyte subsets in blood, with NK cells and γδ cells most dramatically affected, followed by CD8 memory T cells. To reduce toxicity and increase efficacy, alternative dosing strategies have been initiated, including continuous intravenous infusions and subcutaneous IL-15 administration. PMID:25403209

  9. TIGIT and PD-1 impair tumor antigen–specific CD8+ T cells in melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Chauvin, Joe-Marc; Pagliano, Ornella; Fourcade, Julien; Sun, Zhaojun; Wang, Hong; Sander, Cindy; Kirkwood, John M.; Chen, Tseng-hui Timothy; Maurer, Mark; Korman, Alan J.; Zarour, Hassane M.

    2015-01-01

    T cell Ig and ITIM domain (TIGIT) is an inhibitory receptor expressed by activated T cells, Tregs, and NK cells. Here, we determined that TIGIT is upregulated on tumor antigen–specific (TA-specific) CD8+ T cells and CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) from patients with melanoma, and these TIGIT-expressing CD8+ T cells often coexpress the inhibitory receptor PD-1. Moreover, CD8+ TILs from patients exhibited downregulation of the costimulatory molecule CD226, which competes with TIGIT for the same ligand, supporting a TIGIT/CD226 imbalance in metastatic melanoma. TIGIT marked early T cell activation and was further upregulated by T cells upon PD-1 blockade and in dysfunctional PD-1+TIM-3+ TA-specific CD8+ T cells. PD-1+TIGIT+, PD-1–TIGIT+, and PD-1+TIGIT– CD8+ TILs had similar functional capacities ex vivo, suggesting that TIGIT alone, or together with PD-1, is not indicative of T cell dysfunction. However, in the presence of TIGIT ligand–expressing cells, TIGIT and PD-1 blockade additively increased proliferation, cytokine production, and degranulation of both TA-specific CD8+ T cells and CD8+ TILs. Collectively, our results show that TIGIT and PD-1 regulate the expansion and function of TA-specific CD8+ T cells and CD8+ TILs in melanoma patients and suggest that dual TIGIT and PD-1 blockade should be further explored to elicit potent antitumor CD8+ T cell responses in patients with advanced melanoma. PMID:25866972

  10. Expression of costimulatory molecules (CD80, CD86, CD28, CD152), accessory molecules (TCR alphabeta, TCR gammadelta) and T cell lineage molecules (CD4+, CD8+) in PBMC of leprosy patients using Mycobacterium leprae antigen (MLCWA) with murabutide and T cell peptide of Trat protein.

    PubMed

    Sridevi, K; Neena, Khanna; Chitralekha, K T; Arif, A K; Tomar, D; Rao, D N

    2004-01-01

    In leprosy, cell-mediated immunity (CMI) is more significant than humoral response to eliminate intracellular pathogen. T cell defect is a common feature in lepromatous leprosy (LL) patients as compared to tuberculoid type (TT) patients. For efficient initiation of CD4+, T cell response requires T cell receptor (TCR) activation and costimulation provided by molecules on antigen-presenting cells (APC) and their counter receptors on T cells. In our previous study, the defective T cell function in LL patients was restored to a proliferating state with the release of TH1 type cytokines using mycobacterial antigen(s) with two immunomodulators (Murabutide (MDP-BE) and T cell epitope of Trat protein of Escherichia coli) by presenting the antigen in particulate form in vitro to PBMC derived from leprosy patients. This observation prompted us to study the expression of the costimulatory molecules (CD80, CD86, CD28, CD152), other accessory molecules (TCR alphabeta/gammadelta) and T cell lineage molecules (CD4+ and CD8+) during constitutive and activated state of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) derived from normal and leprosy individuals using different formulations of Mycobacterium leprae total cell wall antigen (MLCWA), Trat and MDP-BE using flow cytometric analysis. An increased surface expression of CD80, CD86 and CD28 but decreased CD152 expression was observed when PBMC of normal, BT/TT (tuberculoid) and BL/LL (lepromatous) patients were stimulated in vitro with MLCWA+MDP-BE+Trat peptide using liposomal mode of antigen delivery, while opposite results were obtained with the antigen alone. Antibody inhibition study using antihuman CD80 or CD86 completely abolished the T cell lymphoproliferation, thereby reconfirming the importance of these costimulatory molecules during T cell activation/differentiation. Though the liposome-entrapped antigen formulation has no effect on expression of alphabeta/gammadelta T cell receptor, the constitutive levels of TCR

  11. Pathogenic anti-DNA autoantibody-inducing T helper cell lines from patients with active lupus nephritis: isolation of CD4-8- T helper cell lines that express the gamma delta T-cell antigen receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopalan, S; Zordan, T; Tsokos, G C; Datta, S K

    1990-01-01

    The antigen responsible for autoimmunization in systemic lupus erythematosus is unknown. In spite of this obstacle, we show that T helper (Th) cell lines that are functionally relevant to this disease can be established in vitro. We derived a total of 396 interleukin 2-dependent T-cell lines from the in vivo activated T cells of five patients with lupus nephritis. Only 59 (approximately 15%) of these lines had the ability to selectively augment the production of pathogenic anti-DNA autoantibodies that were IgG in class, cationic in charge, specific for native DNA, and clonally restricted in spectrotype. Forty-nine of these autoantibody-inducing Th lines were CD4+ and expressed the alpha beta T-cell receptor (TCR). The other 10 were CD4-8- (double negative), 3 expressing the alpha beta TCR and 7 expressing the gamma delta TCR. All of the autoantibody-inducing Th lines responded to some endogenous antigen presented by autologous B cells. The autoreactive responses of the CD4+ Th lines were restricted to HLA class II antigens, whereas those of the double-negative cells were not. Endogenous heat shock or stress proteins of the HSP60 family that were expressed by the lupus patients' B cells were involved in stimulating an autoreactive proliferation of the gamma delta Th cells. These studies demonstrate a novel helper activity of certain gamma delta T cells in a spontaneous autoimmune response. Images PMID:2144899

  12. Defective circulating CD25 regulatory T cells in patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jin; Heck, Susanne; Patel, Vivek; Levan, Jared; Yu, Yu; Bussel, James B.

    2008-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is characterized by the presence of antiplatelet autoantibodies as a result of loss of tolerance. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are important for maintenance of peripheral tolerance. Decreased levels of peripheral Tregs in patients with ITP have been reported. To test whether inefficient production or reduced immunosuppressive activity of Tregs contributes to loss of tolerance in patients with chronic ITP, we investigated the frequency and function of their circulating CD4+CD25hi Tregs. We found a com-parable frequency of circulating CD4+CD25hiFoxp3+ Tregs in patients and controls (n = 16, P > .05). However, sorted CD4+CD25hi cells from patients with chronic ITP (n = 13) had a 2-fold reduction of in vitro immunosuppressive activity compared with controls (n = 10, P < .05). The impaired suppression was specific to Tregs as shown by cross-mixing experiments with T cells from controls. These data suggest that functional defects in Tregs contribute to breakdown of self-tolerance in patients with chronic ITP. PMID:18420827

  13. CD4:CD8 ratio as a frontier marker for clinical outcome, immune dysfunction and viral reservoir size in virologically suppressed HIV-positive patients

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wei; Mehraj, Vikram; Vyboh, Kishanda; Cao, Wei; Li, Taisheng; Routy, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Absolute CD4 T cell count and plasma viral load have been established as predictors of HIV disease progression, and CD4 T cell count is used as an indicator for initiation of antiretroviral therapy. Following long-term therapy, patients generally present with significant CD4 T cell recovery contrasting with persistently elevated CD8 T cell counts, which leads to a partial restoration of CD4:CD8 ratio. This review focuses on the relevance of the CD4:CD8 ratio on clinical outcomes, immune dysfunction and HIV reservoir size in long-term treated patients. Method We conducted a comprehensive literature review of publications in English language using major electronic databases. Our search was focused on factors contributing to CD4:CD8 T cell ratio and clinical outcome in adult HIV-positive patients in the context of treated infection. Discussion Low CD4:CD8 ratio has been linked to ageing and acts as a predictor of mortality in the general population. This ratio may represent the combined effects of inflammation and immunological changes called “inflammaging.” Although the mechanisms underlying partial correction of the CD4:CD8 ratio and persistently elevated CD8 T cell count in long-term treated patients remain poorly understood, it has been recently indicated that patients with optimal CD4 T cell recovery and low CD4:CD8 ratio still harbour increased immune activation, an immune senescent phenotype and have a higher risk of non-AIDS morbidity and mortality. This review reconsiders CD4:CD8 ratio in the light of advances in the understanding of immune dysfunction and examines its pathophysiological features and implications on clinical outcome and HIV reservoir size in long-term treated HIV-positive adults. Conclusion The CD4:CD8 ratio can contribute to the immunological evaluation of treated patients in a long-term follow-up and may be applied for monitoring both immune dysfunction and viral reservoir size in immune-based clinical trials. PMID:26130226

  14. Increased Soluble CD155 in the Serum of Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Iguchi-Manaka, Akiko; Okumura, Genki; Kojima, Hiroshi; Cho, Yukiko; Hirochika, Rei; Bando, Hiroko; Sato, Toyomi; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Hara, Hisato; Shibuya, Akira; Shibuya, Kazuko

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that DNAM-1 (CD226) play an important role in the recognition of tumor cells and their lysis by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and NK cells. Although the DNAM-1 ligand CD155 is ubiquitously expressed in various tissues, many human tumors significantly upregulate the expression of CD155; DNAM-1 on CTL and NK cells may be involved in tumor immunity. However, unlike those in mice, human tissues also express soluble isoforms of CD155 (sCD155) that lack the transmembrane region. Here, we show that sCD155 levels were significantly higher in the sera of 262 patients with lung, gastrointestinal, breast, and gynecologic cancers than in sera from healthy donors. In addition, the sCD155 levels were significantly higher in patients with early stage (stages 1 and 2) gastric cancer than in healthy donors, and were significantly higher in patients with advanced stage (stages 3 and 4) disease than in patients in those with early stage disease and healthy donors. Moreover, the sCD155 levels were significantly decreased after surgical resection of cancers. Thus, sCD155 level in serum may be potentially useful as a biomarker for cancer development and progression. PMID:27049654

  15. Increased Soluble CD155 in the Serum of Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Iguchi-Manaka, Akiko; Okumura, Genki; Kojima, Hiroshi; Cho, Yukiko; Hirochika, Rei; Bando, Hiroko; Sato, Toyomi; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Hara, Hisato; Shibuya, Akira; Shibuya, Kazuko

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that DNAM-1 (CD226) play an important role in the recognition of tumor cells and their lysis by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and NK cells. Although the DNAM-1 ligand CD155 is ubiquitously expressed in various tissues, many human tumors significantly upregulate the expression of CD155; DNAM-1 on CTL and NK cells may be involved in tumor immunity. However, unlike those in mice, human tissues also express soluble isoforms of CD155 (sCD155) that lack the transmembrane region. Here, we show that sCD155 levels were significantly higher in the sera of 262 patients with lung, gastrointestinal, breast, and gynecologic cancers than in sera from healthy donors. In addition, the sCD155 levels were significantly higher in patients with early stage (stages 1 and 2) gastric cancer than in healthy donors, and were significantly higher in patients with advanced stage (stages 3 and 4) disease than in patients in those with early stage disease and healthy donors. Moreover, the sCD155 levels were significantly decreased after surgical resection of cancers. Thus, sCD155 level in serum may be potentially useful as a biomarker for cancer development and progression. PMID:27049654

  16. Elevated soluble CD8 in the synovial fluid from patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, A B; Eisenbeis, C H; Carrabis, S; Brown, M C; Ip, S H

    1990-01-01

    Suppressor/cytotoxic T cells express the surface marker CD8, which can be measured in a soluble form in culture supernatants of activated human lymphocytes. Using a sandwich immunoassay, we assessed the levels of soluble CD8 (sCD8) in serum from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA; n = 82), patients with degenerative joint disease (DJD; n = 40), and healthy controls. There were no differences in serum sCD8 levels among these groups. In contrast, the levels of soluble CD8 in the synovial fluid (SF) from patients with RA (n = 53) were significantly increased compared with the levels in 23 samples from patients with DJD (821 +/- 110 U/ml versus 213 +/- 13 U/ml, p less than 0.001). Synovial fluid sCD8 levels in the RA group were strikingly elevated, to a maximum value of 5,026 U/ml. In the majority of RA SF specimens (39 of 53), the values were significantly higher in the SF than the serum. Although the RA group had higher values of sCD8, such values were not significantly correlated with measured laboratory or clinical parameters. Current clinical and laboratory methods of evaluating patients may not be adequate in dealing with the complexity and heterogeneity of RA. Soluble CD8 values may be useful in further grouping patients with this disease. PMID:2121924

  17. CD8+CD122+CD49dlow regulatory T cells maintain T-cell homeostasis by killing activated T cells via Fas/FasL-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Akane, Kazuyuki; Kojima, Seiji; Mak, Tak W; Shiku, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Haruhiko

    2016-03-01

    The Fas/FasL (CD95/CD178) system is required for immune regulation; however, it is unclear in which cells, when, and where Fas/FasL molecules act in the immune system. We found that CD8(+)CD122(+) cells, which are mostly composed of memory T cells in comparison with naïve cells in the CD8(+)CD122(-) population, were previously shown to include cells with regulatory activity and could be separated into CD49d(low) cells and CD49d(high) cells. We established in vitro and in vivo experimental systems to evaluate the regulatory activity of CD122(+) cells. Regulatory activity was observed in CD8(+)CD122(+)CD49d(low) but not in CD8(+)CD122(+)CD49d(high) cells, indicating that the regulatory cells in the CD8(+)CD122(+) population could be narrowed down to CD49d(low) cells. CD8(+)CD122(-) cells taken from lymphoproliferation (lpr) mice were resistant to regulation by normal CD122(+) Tregs. CD122(+) Tregs taken from generalized lymphoproliferative disease (gld) mice did not regulate wild-type CD8(+)CD122(-) cells, indicating that the regulation by CD122(+) Tregs is Fas/FasL-dependent. CD122(+) Tregs taken from IL-10-deficient mice could regulate CD8(+)CD122(-) cells as equally as wild-type CD122(+) Tregs both in vitro and in vivo. MHC class I-missing T cells were not regulated by CD122(+) Tregs in vitro. CD122(+) Tregs also regulated CD4(+) cells in a Fas/FasL-dependent manner in vitro. These results suggest an essential role of Fas/FasL as a terminal effector of the CD122(+) Tregs that kill activated T cells to maintain immune homeostasis. PMID:26869716

  18. A Subset of CD4/CD8 Double-Negative T Cells Expresses HIV Proteins in Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    DeMaster, Laura K.; Liu, Xiaohe; VanBelzen, D. Jake; Trinité, Benjamin; Zheng, Lingjie; Agosto, Luis M.; Migueles, Stephen A.; Connors, Mark; Sambucetti, Lidia; Levy, David N.; Pasternak, Alexander O.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A major goal in HIV eradication research is characterizing the reservoir cells that harbor HIV in the presence of antiretroviral therapy (ART), which reseed viremia after treatment is stopped. In general, it is assumed that the reservoir consists of CD4+ T cells that express no viral proteins. However, recent findings suggest that this may be an overly simplistic view and that the cells that contribute to the reservoir may be a diverse population that includes both CD4+ and CD4− cells. In this study, we directly infected resting CD4+ T cells and used fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and fiber-optic array scanning technology (FAST) to identify and image cells expressing HIV Gag. We found that Gag expression from integrated proviruses occurred in resting cells that lacked surface CD4, likely resulting from Nef- and Env-mediated receptor internalization. We also extended our approach to detect cells expressing HIV proteins in patients suppressed on ART. We found evidence that rare Gag+ cells persist during ART and that these cells are often negative for CD4. We propose that these double-negative α/β T cells that express HIV protein may be a component of the long-lived reservoir. IMPORTANCE A reservoir of infected cells persists in HIV-infected patients during antiretroviral therapy (ART) that leads to rebound of virus if treatment is stopped. In this study, we used flow cytometry and cell imaging to characterize protein expression in HIV-infected resting cells. HIV Gag protein can be directly detected in infected resting cells and occurs with simultaneous loss of CD4, consistent with the expression of additional viral proteins, such as Env and Nef. Gag+ CD4− cells can also be detected in suppressed patients, suggesting that a subset of infected cells express proteins during ART. Understanding the regulation of viral protein expression during ART will be key to designing effective strategies to eradicate HIV reservoirs. PMID:26537682

  19. The loss of telomerase activity in highly differentiated CD8+CD28-CD27- T cells is associated with decreased Akt (Ser473) phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Plunkett, Fiona J; Franzese, Ornella; Finney, Helene M; Fletcher, Jean M; Belaramani, Lavina L; Salmon, Mike; Dokal, Inderjeet; Webster, David; Lawson, Alastair D G; Akbar, Arne N

    2007-06-15

    The enzyme telomerase is essential for maintaining the replicative capacity of memory T cells. Although CD28 costimulatory signals can up-regulate telomerase activity, human CD8(+) T cells lose CD28 expression after repeated activation. Nevertheless, telomerase is still inducible in CD8(+)CD28(-) T cells. To identify alternative costimulatory pathways that may be involved, we introduced chimeric receptors containing the signaling domains of CD28, CD27, CD137, CD134, and ICOS in series with the CD3 zeta (zeta) chain into primary human CD8(+) T cells. Although CD3 zeta-chain signals alone were ineffective, triggering of all the other constructs induced proliferation and telomerase activity. However, not all CD8(+)CD28(-) T cells could up-regulate this enzyme. The further fractionation of CD8(+)CD28(-) T cells into CD8(+)CD28(-) CD27(+) and CD8(+)CD28(-)CD27(-) subsets showed that the latter had significantly shorter telomeres and extremely poor telomerase activity. The restoration of CD28 signaling in CD8(+)CD28(-)CD27(-) T cells could not reverse the low telomerase activity that was not due to decreased expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase, the enzyme catalytic subunit. Instead, the defect was associated with decreased phosphorylation of the kinase Akt, that phosphorylates human telomerase reverse transcriptase to induce telomerase activity. Furthermore, the defective Akt phosphorylation in these cells was specific for the Ser(473) but not the Thr(308) phosphorylation site of this molecule. Telomerase down-regulation in highly differentiated CD8(+)CD28(-)CD27(-) T cells marks their inexorable progress toward a replicative end stage after activation. This limits the ability of memory CD8(+) T cells to be maintained by continuous proliferation in vivo. PMID:17548608

  20. High serum levels of soluble CD40-L in patients with undifferentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma: pathogenic and clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Caggiari, Laura; Guidoboni, Massimo; Vaccher, Emanuela; Barzan, Luigi; Franchin, Giovanni; Gloghini, Annunziata; Martorelli, Debora; Zancai, Paola; Bortolin, Maria Teresa; Mazzucato, Mario; Serraino, Diego; Carbone, Antonino; De Paoli, Paolo; Dolcetti, Riccardo

    2007-01-01

    Background Engagement of CD40 promotes survival of undifferentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (UNPC) cells and similar effects are induced by the EBV oncoprotein LMP-1 that is expressed in a fraction of cases. Considering that CD40 may be activated also by the soluble isoform of CD40L (sCD40L), we investigated the serum levels of sCD40L in a series of 61 UNPC patients from Italy, a non-endemic area for this disease. Results At diagnosis, serum samples of UNPC patients contained significantly higher levels of sCD40L than age-matched healthy controls (p < 0.001). High levels of sCD40L (i.e., >18 ng/ml) were more frequently found in patients <40 years of age (p = 0.03) and with distant metastases at presentation (p = 0.03). Serum levels of sCD40L were inversely associated with the expression of the EBV oncoprotein LMP-1 (p = 0.03), which mimics a constitutively activated CD40. The amount of sCD40L decreased in a fraction of patients treated with local radiotherapy alone. Moreover, CD40L+ lymphoid cells admixed to neoplastic UNPC cells were detected in cases with high serum levels of sCD40L, suggesting that sCD40L is probably produced within the tumor mass. Conclusion sCD40L may contribute to CD40 activation in UNPC cells, particularly of LMP-1-negative cases, further supporting the crucial role of CD40 signalling in the pathogenesis of UNPC. sCD40L levels may be useful to identify UNPC patients with occult distant metastases at presentation. PMID:17331231

  1. Oligoclonality of CD8+ T cells in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, K.; Fetten, J.; Khalili, H.; Hajdu, S.; Busch, E.; Pergolizzi, R.; Vinciguerra, V.; Chang, M. D.

    1997-01-01

    Substantial evidence has suggested that T cells play an important role in antitumor immunity. T cells with cytotoxic activity against tumors have been isolated from in vitro culture of tumor-infiltrated lymphocytes of cancer patients. In addition, clonal expansions of T cells have been identified in lesions of tumors by using a PCR-based CDR3 analysis of T cell receptors (TCR). Since the CDR3 region of the T cell receptor directly interacts with the antigen-MHC complex and is thus highly polymorphic, a dominant CDR3 length in a particular TCR V beta population will indicate the clonal expansion of a specific T cell clone. Utilizing this technique, we have analyzed the T cell repertoire in lymph nodes (LNs) and peripheral blood of 20 breast cancer patients. Our results show that in most cases, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PB-MCs) and LN express dominant CD8+ T cell clones in different V beta gene families, and the number of dominant clones is higher in PBMC than in the LN. Furthermore, in 7 out of 16 patients' lymph nodes, there is a dominant V beta 18 T cell clonal expansion in the CD8+ T cell subset. The frequency of an oligoclonal expansion of V beta 18 CD8+ T cells in non-breast cancer lymph nodes is 1 out of 9, but no obvious motif in the CDR3 region of V beta 18 TCR can be identified. The prevalence of the clonal dominance found in breast cancer is discussed in the context of a possible tumor-related antigen stimulation. Images FIG. 1 p841-a FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 PMID:9440117

  2. Immunohistochemical CD3 staining detects additional patients with celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Mubarak, Amani; Wolters, Victorien M; Houwen, Roderick HJ; ten Kate, Fiebo JW

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether performing immunohistochemical CD3 staining, in order to improve the detection of intra-epithelial lymphocytosis, has an additional value in the histological diagnosis of celiac disease. METHODS: Biopsies obtained from 159 children were stained by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) and evaluated using the Marsh classification. CD3 staining was subsequently evaluated separately and independently. RESULTS: Differences in evaluation between the routine HE sections and CD3 staining were present in 20 (12.6%) cases. In 10 (6.3%) patients the diagnosis of celiac disease (Marsh II and III) changed on examination of CD3 staining: in 9 cases, celiac disease had initially been missed on the HE sections, while 1 patient had been over-diagnosed on the routine sections. In all patients, the final diagnosis based on CD3 staining, was concordant with serological results, which was not found previously. In the other 10 (12.3%) patients, the detection of sole intra-epithelial lymphocytosis (Marsh I) improved. Nine patients were found to have Marsh I on CD3 sections, which had been missed on routine sections. Interestingly, the only patient with negative serology had Giardiasis. Finally, in 1 patient with negative serology, in whom Marsh I was suspected on HE sections, this diagnosis was withdrawn after evaluation of the CD3 sections. CONCLUSION: Staining for CD3 has an additional value in the histological detection of celiac disease lesions, and CD3 staining should be performed when there is a discrepancy between serology and the diagnosis made on HE sections. PMID:26140002

  3. Neutrophil CD64 expression: a reliable diagnostic marker of infection in advanced cancer patients?

    PubMed

    Comolli, Giuditta; Torchio, Martina; Lenta, Elisa; Franceschetti, Benvenuto; Chiesa, Antonella; Calarota, Sandra A; Baldanti, Fausto; Scudeller, Luigia; Marone, Piero; Danova, Marco; Marco, Danova

    2015-07-01

    Infection and sepsis are major health problems in cancer patients. There is a need for the identification and validation of biomarkers to improve their early diagnosis and treatment. Emerging evidence showed that neutrophil CD64 is a highly sensitive and specific marker for systemic infection and sepsis in critically ill patients with various diseases but data on patients bearing solid tumors are still lacking. Using a dedicated flow cytometric assay we evaluated neutrophil CD64 expression in patients with advanced cancer without active infections to verify if it could be utilized as a reliable biomarker of early infections also in oncologic patients. PMID:26147145

  4. Large-Scale Depletion of CD25+ Regulatory T Cells from Patient Leukapheresis Samples

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Daniel J.; Parker, Linda L.; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    2006-01-01

    Summary The ability to selectively enrich or deplete T lymphocytes of specific phenotype and function holds significant promise for application in adoptive immunotherapy protocols. Although CD4+ T cells can have an impact on CD8+ T-cell effector function, memory, and maintenance, a subset of CD4+ T cells, CD25+ regulatory T cells (Treg), can regulate peripheral self tolerance and possess the ability to suppress antitumor responses. The authors report the ability to selectively deplete CD25+ Treg cells from patient leukapheresis samples using a clinical-grade, large-scale immunomagnetic system. Using leukapheresis samples containing up to 1.3 × 1010 white blood cells, efficient depletion of Treg cells was measured by flow cytometric analysis of CD25 expression and FOXP3 expression on post-depletion products. Remnant CD25+ cells could not be detected in CD25-depleted products after short-term culture in IL-2 or enriched following secondary immunomagnetic selection for CD25+ cells, confirming that efficient depletion had occurred. In parallel to efficient enrichment of CD25− cells, immunomagnetic selection resulted in the recovery of Treg cells, since CD25+ lymphocytes removed during depletion were primarily composed of CD4+ T cells that expressed high levels of FOXP3 and possessed suppressive activity against autologous TCR-stimulated CD4+ CD25− T cells in vitro. These results show that selective separation of functional CD25+ Treg cells from large-scale samples can be performed in large scale under clinical-grade conditions with sufficient selection, recovery, viability, ability to expand, and function for potential use in adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:16000960

  5. Quantitation of CD38 activation antigen expression on CD8+ T cells in HIV-1 infection using CD4 expression on CD4+ T lymphocytes as a biological calibrator.

    PubMed

    Hultin, L E; Matud, J L; Giorgi, J V

    1998-10-01

    For some membrane-associated antigens, the number of molecules expressed per cell carries information about the cell's differentiation and activation state. Quantitating antigen expression by flow cytometry has immediate application in monitoring CD38 expression on CD8+ T cells in human immunodeficiency virus 1-associated disease, where elevated CD38 antigen expression is a marker of CD8+ T-cell activation and a poor prognostic indicator. Reproducible methods are needed in order to quantify such antigens. Here we describe a reproducible method for quantitative fluorescence cytometry (QFCM) that depends on the tightly regulated expression of CD4 antigen on human CD4+ T lymphocytes, which we estimated in a study of 57 normal donors to have an interperson coefficient of variation of 4.9%. Using phycoerythrin (PE)-conjugated CD4 monoclonal antibody (mAb) with a nominal fluorochrome to protein ratio of 1:1 and a nominal published value of approximately 50,000 CD4 antibody molecules bound per CD4+ T lymphocyte, we estimated the number of PE molecules detected per relative fluorescence intensity (RFI) unit on our flow cytometer to be 41 (19, 20). This value is called the "RFI multiplier." To estimate the number of CD38 antibodies bound per CD8+ T cell (CD38-ABC) on patient samples, we multiply the measured CD38 RFI value of CD38 staining using a nominal 1:1 conjugate of CD38-PE by the "RFI multiplier." The measurements for CD4 and CD38 were stable for 2 years despite the use of different mAb lots and the potential for drift in instrumentation. We used this approach in a study of nine flow cytometers in which the interinstrument interlaboratory coefficients of variation for CD3-ABC ranged from 3.3% to 5.8% and those for CD38-ABC ranged from 9.8% to 13.8%. These data indicate that CD4 expression can serve as a biological calibrator to standardize fluorescence intensity measurements in longitudinal and multicenter studies. PMID:9773872

  6. CD19 and CD20 Targeted Vectors Induce Minimal Activation of Resting B Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Schwenkert, Michael; Cosset, François-Loic; Verhoeyen, Els; Buchholz, Christian J.

    2013-01-01

    B lymphocytes are an important cell population of the immune system. However, until recently it was not possible to transduce resting B lymphocytes with retro- or lentiviral vectors, making them unsusceptible for genetic manipulations by these vectors. Lately, we demonstrated that lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with modified measles virus (MV) glycoproteins hemagglutinin, responsible for receptor recognition, and fusion protein were able to overcome this transduction block. They use either the natural MV receptors, CD46 and signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM), for cell entry (MV-LV) or the vector particles were further modified to selectively enter via the CD20 molecule, which is exclusively expressed on B lymphocytes (CD20-LV). It has been shown previously that transduction by MV-LV does not induce B lymphocyte activation. However, if this is also true for CD20-LV is still unknown. Here, we generated a vector specific for another B lymphocyte marker, CD19, and compared its ability to transduce resting B lymphocytes with CD20-LV. The vector (CD19ds-LV) was able to stably transduce unstimulated B lymphocytes, albeit with a reduced efficiency of about 10% compared to CD20-LV, which transduced about 30% of the cells. Since CD20 as well as CD19 are closely linked to the B lymphocyte activation pathway, we investigated if engagement of CD20 or CD19 molecules by the vector particles induces activating stimuli in resting B lymphocytes. Although, activation of B lymphocytes often involves calcium influx, we did not detect elevated calcium levels. However, the activation marker CD71 was substantially up-regulated upon CD20-LV transduction and most importantly, B lymphocytes transduced with CD20-LV or CD19ds-LV entered the G1b phase of cell cycle, whereas untransduced or MV-LV transduced B lymphocytes remained in G0. Hence, CD20 and CD19 targeting vectors induce activating stimuli in resting B lymphocytes, which most likely renders them susceptible for lentiviral

  7. Multifunctional CD40L: pro- and anti-neoplastic activity.

    PubMed

    Korniluk, Aleksandra; Kemona, Halina; Dymicka-Piekarska, Violetta

    2014-10-01

    The CD40 ligand is a type I transmembrane protein that belongs to a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily. It is present not only on the surface of activated CD4+ T cells, B cells, blood platelets, monocytes, and natural killer (NK) cells but also on cancer cells. The receptor for ligand is constitutively expressed on cells, TNF family protein: CD40. The role of the CD40/CD40L pathway in the induction of body immunity, in inflammation, or in hemostasis has been well documented, whereas its involvement in neoplastic disease is still under investigation. CD40L ligand may potentiate apoptosis of tumor cells by activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), AP-1, CD95, or caspase-depended pathways and stimulate host immunity to defend against cancer. Although CD40L has a major contribution to anti-cancer activity, many reports point at its ambivalent nature. CD40L enhance release of strongly pro-angiogenic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and activator of coagulation, TF, the level of which is correlated with tumor metastasis. CD40L involvement in the inhibition of tumor progression has led to the emergence of not only therapy using recombinant forms of the ligand and vaccines in the treatment of cancer but also therapy consisting of inhibiting platelets-main source of CD40L. This article is a review of studies on the ambivalent role of CD40L in neoplastic diseases. PMID:25117071

  8. Carbon analysis in CdTe by nuclear activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chibani, H.; Stoquert, J. P.; Hage-Ali, M.; Koebel, J. M.; Abdesselam, M.; Siffert, P.

    1991-06-01

    We describe the capabilities of the nuclear reaction 12C(d, n) 13Nlimit→β +13C the measurement of absolute concentrations of C in CdTe by the charged particle activation (CPA) method. This technique is used to determine the segregation coefficient of C introduced as an impurity in CdTe.

  9. MWCNT/CdS hybrid nanocomposite for enhanced photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Deepti; Khare, Neeraj; Vankar, V. D.

    2016-05-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT)/CdS hybrid nanocomposite were synthesized by one step hydrothermal method. MWCNTs were used as a substrate for the growth of CdS nanoparticles. MWCNT/CdS nanocomposite and pure CdS were characterized by XRD, TEM, UV-vis and photoluminescence spectroscopy. HRTEM study confirms the intimate contact of CdS with MWCNT. The photocatalytic activity of nanocomposite was studied for the degradation of methylene blue dye under UV irradiation. The enhanced photocatalytic activity of MWCNT/CdS nanocomposite as compared to pure CdS has been attributed to reduced recombination of photogenerated charge carriers due to interfacial electron transfer from CdS to MWCNT.

  10. Herpesvirus orthologues of CD200 bind host CD200R but not related activating receptors.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Lai Shan; Akkaya, Munir; Barclay, A Neil; Hatherley, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Several herpesviruses have acquired the gene for the CD200 membrane protein from their hosts and can downregulate myeloid activity through interaction of this viral CD200 orthologue with the host receptor for CD200, namely CD200R, which can give inhibitory signals. This receptor is a 'paired receptor', meaning proteins related to the inhibitory CD200R are present but differ in that they can give activating signals and also give a negligible interaction with CD200. We showed that the viral orthologues e127 from rat cytomegalovirus and K14 from human herpesvirus 8 do not bind the activating CD200R-like proteins from their respective species, although they do bind the inhibitory receptors. It is thought that the activating receptors have evolved in response to pathogens targeting the inhibitory receptor. In this case, the CD200 orthologue is not trapped by the activating receptor but has maintained the specificity of the host from which it was acquired, suggesting that the activating members of the CD200R family have evolved to protect against a different pathogen. PMID:26538068

  11. Intracellular expression of interleukin-4 and interferon-γ by a Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen-stimulated CD4+ CD57+ T-cell subpopulation with memory phenotype in tuberculosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Martínez, Maria C; Linares, Marisela; Báez, Renata; Montaño, Luis F; Martínez-Cairo, Salvador; Gorocica, Patricia; Chávez, Raúl; Zenteno, Edgar; Lascurain, Ricardo

    2004-01-01

    In some chronic pathological conditions, antigen persistence activates and expands the CD4+ CD57+ T-cell subset. The host immune response against tuberculosis infection is maintained through the continuous presence of antigen-stimulated effector/memory helper T cells. To determine whether CD4+ CD57+ T cells were also expanded in human tuberculosis, we analysed (by flow cytometry) the phenotype of peripheral blood CD4+ T cells from 30 tuberculosis patients and 30 healthy controls. We observed a significant increase in the CD4+ CD57+ T-cell subset in tuberculosis patients in comparison to healthy controls (P < 0.001). Most CD4+ CD57+ T cells exhibited a CD28− CD45RO+ CD62L− phenotype, which is associated with memory cells. In vitro, a higher number of antigen-stimulated CD4+ CD57+ T cells produced intracellular interferon-γ and interleukin-4 compared with antigen-stimulated CD4+ CD57− T cells (P < 0.001). These findings suggest that the majority of CD4+ CD57+ T cells correspond to a phenotype of activated memory T cells. PMID:14678204

  12. Phenotype transition of CD4{sup +} T cells from CD45RA to CD45RO is accompanied by cell activation and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Johannisson, A.; Festin, R.

    1995-04-01

    An investigation of proliferation and activation events in subsets of human CD4{sup +} cells, defined by their expression of CD45RA and CD45RO, is reported. A single-laser based assay for the study of multiple surface antigens and two-parameter cell cycle analysis was used for sorting of and subsequent analysis of proliferation in CD4{sup +}CD45RA{sup +}CD45RO{sup {minus}}, CD4{sup +}CD45RA{sup {minus}}CD45RO{sup +} subsets and phenotypically intermediate stages. After labelling with BrdUrd, cells were sorted with flow cytometry on the basis of light-scattering properties and staining with anti-CD45RA, anti-CD45RO, and anti-CD4 markers. Sorted cells were double stained with anti-BrdUrd-antibodies and PI, and the frequencies of proliferating cells were determined. After 48 h, the highest rate of proliferation was found among cells with a phenotype intermediate between CD4{sup +}CD45RA{sup +}CD45RO{sup {minus}} and CD4{sup +}CD45RA{sup {minus}}CD45RO{sup +}. After 72 h of culture, the situation was changed insofar as the point of highest proliferation had shifted towards the CD4{sup +}CD45RA{sup {minus}}CD45RO{sup +} population. These findings were further corroborated by four-color staining with anti-CD4, anti-CD45RA, anti-CD45RO, and Hoechst 33342. This indicates that the phenotype transition is accompanied by cell proliferation. The correlated temporal expression of antigens related to activation (HLA-DR, CD25, CD69, CD71) and cell adhesion (CD11a, CD54, L-selectin) in each of the different subsets was also investigated. All the activation markers CD25, CD69, and CD71 show a more heterogeneous pattern of expression among the CD4{sup +} CD45RA{sup {minus}}CD45RO{sup +} cells than the CD4{sup +} CD45RA{sup +}CD45RO{sup {minus}} cells, indicating a subpopulation of CD4{sup +}CD45RA{sup {minus}}CD45RO{sup +} cells responding more slowly to the mitogenic stimulation. 32 refs., 8 figs.

  13. CD40 Activation Rescues Antiviral CD8+ T Cells from PD-1-Mediated Exhaustion

    PubMed Central

    Isogawa, Masanori; Chung, Josan; Murata, Yasuhiro; Kakimi, Kazuhiro; Chisari, Francis V.

    2013-01-01

    The intrahepatic immune environment is normally biased towards tolerance. Nonetheless, effective antiviral immune responses can be induced against hepatotropic pathogens. To examine the immunological basis of this paradox we studied the ability of hepatocellularly expressed hepatitis B virus (HBV) to activate immunologically naïve HBV-specific CD8+ T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic T cells after adoptive transfer to HBV transgenic mice. Intrahepatic priming triggered vigorous in situ T cell proliferation but failed to induce interferon gamma production or cytolytic effector function. In contrast, the same T cells differentiated into cytolytic effector T cells in HBV transgenic mice if Programmed Death 1 (PD-1) expression was genetically ablated, suggesting that intrahepatic antigen presentation per se triggers negative regulatory signals that prevent the functional differentiation of naïve CD8+ T cells. Surprisingly, coadministration of an agonistic anti-CD40 antibody (αCD40) inhibited PD-1 induction and restored T cell effector function, thereby inhibiting viral gene expression and causing a necroinflammatory liver disease. Importantly, the depletion of myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) strongly diminished the αCD40 mediated functional differentiation of HBV-specific CD8+ T cells, suggesting that activation of mDCs was responsible for the functional differentiation of HBV-specific CD8+ T cells in αCD40 treated animals. These results demonstrate that antigen-specific, PD-1-mediated CD8+ T cell exhaustion can be rescued by CD40-mediated mDC-activation. PMID:23853599

  14. Elevated levels of soluble CD163 in sera and fluids from rheumatoid arthritis patients and inhibition of the shedding of CD163 by TIMP-3

    PubMed Central

    MATSUSHITA, N; KASHIWAGI, M; WAIT, R; NAGAYOSHI, R; NAKAMURA, M; MATSUDA, T; HOGGER, P; GUYRE, P M; NAGASE, H; MATSUYAMA, T

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate levels of soluble CD 163 in sera and fluids from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and elucidate the mechanism that regulates the shedding of CD163. Levels of soluble CD163 in sera and fluids from RA patients were examined by a sandwich enzyme immunoassay and Western blotting. To determine the effects of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMPs) on the shedding of CD163 from monocytes/macrophages, levels of soluble CD163 in cultures of monocytes/macrophages and the expression of CD163 on monocytes/macrophages in the presence or absence of TIMPs were examined by a sandwich enzyme immunoassay and flow cytometry, respectively. The clinical marker that was most associated with serum levels of soluble CD163 was levels of CRP. TIMP-3, but not TIMP-1 or TIMP-2, inhibited the shedding of CD163 from monocytes/macrophages. It was shown that serum levels of soluble CD163 are a sensitive and reliable marker to monitor activated macrophages in synovitis from RA patients and the results imply that the responsible proteinase for the shedding of CD163 is not a member of the matrix metalloproteinases, but is likely to be a member of ADAMs. PMID:12296867

  15. E4BP4 overexpression: a protective mechanism in CD4+ T cells from SLE patients.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming; Liu, Qian; Liang, Gongping; Wang, Litao; Luo, Shuangyan; Tang, Qian; Zhao, Hongjun; Su, Yuwen; Yung, Susan; Chan, Tak Mao; Lu, Qianjin

    2013-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a prototype autoimmune disease characterized by various immunological abnormalities, including dysregulated activation of T and B lymphocytes, which trigger autoantibody production and immune-complex deposition. E4BP4, also known as NFIL3, has emerged as a major transcription factor that regulates the development and function of immune cells in a number of lineages. E4BP4 has been shown to regulate cytokines expression, and its synthesis is in turn controlled by various cytokines. To date, the roles of E4BP4 in immune dysregulation and autoimmune disorders are unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that E4BP4 expression is increased in CD4(+) T cells isolated from patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), especially in patients treated with glucocorticoid (GC). Increased expression of E4BP4 inhibited the activation and self-reactivity of T cells stimulated by anti-CD3/CD28 antibodies. In contrast, the self-reactivity was enhanced in CD4(+) T cells from SLE patients following E4BP4 gene silencing and the production of autoantibody was increased in autologous B cells. We further demonstrated that E4BP4 directly regulated CD40L expression by binding to the promoter region and altering histone acetylation and methylation of the CD40L loci. Taken together, our data provide evidence that E4BP4 can inhibit CD40L expression through epigenetic modifications in the promoter region of CD40L, thus negatively regulating self-reactivity of SLE CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that overexpression of E4BP4 initiates a protective mechanism in SLE CD4(+) T cells, which may be a promising target in the therapy for SLE. PMID:23340290

  16. Antibody Therapy Targeting CD47 and CD271 Effectively Suppresses Melanoma Metastasis in Patient-Derived Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Michael; Han, Arum; Lakatos, Anita; Sahoo, Debashis; Hachey, Stephanie J; Weiskopf, Kipp; Beck, Andrew H; Weissman, Irving L; Boiko, Alexander D

    2016-08-01

    The high rate of metastasis and recurrence among melanoma patients indicates the existence of cells within melanoma that have the ability to both initiate metastatic programs and bypass immune recognition. Here, we identify CD47 as a regulator of melanoma tumor metastasis and immune evasion. Protein and gene expression analysis of clinical melanoma samples reveals that CD47, an anti-phagocytic signal, correlates with melanoma metastasis. Antibody-mediated blockade of CD47 coupled with targeting of CD271(+) melanoma cells strongly inhibits tumor metastasis in patient-derived xenografts. This therapeutic effect is mediated by drastic changes in the tumor and metastatic site immune microenvironments, both of whichwhich exhibit greatly increased density of differentiated macrophages and significantly fewer inflammatory monocytes, pro-metastatic macrophages (CCR2(+)/VEGFR1(+)), and neutrophils, all of which are associated with disease progression. Thus, antibody therapy that activates the innate immune response in combination with selective targeting of CD271(+) melanoma cells represents a powerful therapeutic approach against metastatic melanoma. PMID:27477289

  17. Interaction of CTLA‐4 (CD152) with CD80 or CD86 inhibits human T‐cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Vandenborre, K; Van Gool, S W; Kasran, A; Ceuppens, J L; Boogaerts, M A; Vandenberghe, P

    1999-01-01

    Occupancy of CTLA‐4 (cytotoxic T‐lymphocyte antigen‐4 or CD152) negatively regulates the activation of mouse T lymphocytes, as indicated by the fate of CTLA‐4‐deficient mice, by the impact of anti‐CTLA‐4 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) on mouse T‐cell activation in vitro and by the impact of CTLA‐4 blockade on the course of experimental tumoral, autoimmune, alloimmune or infectious disease in this animal. The function of human CTLA‐4, however, remains less clear. The expression and function of human CTLA‐4 were further explored. CTLA‐4 was expressed under mitogenic conditions only, its expression being, at least partially, dependent on the secretion of interleukin‐2. Memory T cells expressed CTLA‐4 with faster kinetics than naive T cells. The functional role of human CTLA‐4 was assessed utilizing a panel of four anti‐CTLA‐4 mAbs that blocked the interaction between CTLA‐4 and its ligands. These mAbs, in immobilized form, profoundly inhibited the activation of T cells by immobilized anti‐CD3 mAb in the absence of anti‐CD28 mAb, but co‐stimulated T‐cell activation in the presence of anti‐CD28 mAb. Finally, and importantly, blockade of the interaction of CTLA‐4 with its ligands using soluble anti‐CTLA‐4 mAbs, in intact form or as Fab fragments, enhanced T‐cell activation in several polyclonal or alloantigen‐specific CD80‐ or CD80/CD86‐dependent assays, as measured by cytokine production, cellular proliferation or cytotoxic responses. It is concluded that interaction of CTLA‐4 with its functional ligands, CD80 or CD86, can down‐regulate human T‐cell responses, probably by intracellular signalling events and independent of CD28 occupancy. PMID:10583602

  18. Antitumor activity of an anti-CD98 antibody.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Gregory M; Chinn, Lawrence; Cantor, Joseph M; Cairns, Belinda; Levashova, Zoia; Tran, Hoang; Velilla, Timothy; Duey, Dana; Lippincott, John; Zachwieja, Joseph; Ginsberg, Mark H; H van der Horst, Edward

    2015-08-01

    CD98 is expressed on several tissue types and specifically upregulated on fast-cycling cells undergoing clonal expansion. Various solid (e.g., nonsmall cell lung carcinoma) as well as hematological malignancies (e.g., acute myeloid leukemia) overexpress CD98. We have identified a CD98-specific mouse monoclonal antibody that exhibits potent preclinical antitumor activity against established lymphoma tumor xenografts. Additionally, the humanized antibody designated IGN523 demonstrated robust tumor growth inhibition in leukemic cell-line derived xenograft models and was as efficacious as standard of care carboplatin in patient-derived nonsmall lung cancer xenografts. In vitro studies revealed that IGN523 elicited strong ADCC activity, induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization and inhibited essential amino acid transport function, ultimately resulting in caspase-3 and -7-mediated apoptosis of tumor cells. IGN523 is currently being evaluated in a Phase I clinical trial for acute myeloid leukemia (NCT02040506). Furthermore, preclinical data support the therapeutic potential of IGN523 in solid tumors. PMID:25556716

  19. Central Muscarinic Cholinergic Activation Alters Interaction between Splenic Dendritic Cell and CD4+CD25- T Cells in Experimental Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, Valentin A.; Tracey, Kevin J.; Khafipour, Ehsan; Ghia, Jean-Eric

    2014-01-01

    Background The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway (CAP) is based on vagus nerve (VN) activity that regulates macrophage and dendritic cell responses in the spleen through alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (a7nAChR) signaling. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients present dysautonomia with decreased vagus nerve activity, dendritic cell and T cell over-activation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether central activation of the CAP alters the function of dendritic cells (DCs) and sequential CD4+/CD25−T cell activation in the context of experimental colitis. Methods The dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid model of experimental colitis in C57BL/6 mice was used. Central, intracerebroventricular infusion of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist McN-A-343 was used to activate CAP and vagus nerve and/or splenic nerve transection were performed. In addition, the role of α7nAChR signaling and the NF-kB pathway was studied. Serum amyloid protein (SAP)-A, colonic tissue cytokines, IL-12p70 and IL-23 in isolated splenic DCs, and cytokines levels in DC-CD4+CD25−T cell co-culture were determined. Results McN-A-343 treatment reduced colonic inflammation associated with decreased pro-inflammatory Th1/Th17 colonic and splenic cytokine secretion. Splenic DCs cytokine release was modulated through α7nAChR and the NF-kB signaling pathways. Cholinergic activation resulted in decreased CD4+CD25−T cell priming. The anti-inflammatory efficacy of central cholinergic activation was abolished in mice with vagotomy or splenic neurectomy. Conclusions Suppression of splenic immune cell activation and altered interaction between DCs and T cells are important aspects of the beneficial effect of brain activation of the CAP in experimental colitis. These findings may lead to improved therapeutic strategies in the treatment of IBD. PMID:25295619

  20. Soluble CD163 is increased in patients with acute pancreatitis independent of disease severity.

    PubMed

    Karrasch, Thomas; Brünnler, Tanja; Hamer, Okka W; Schmid, Karin; Voelk, Markus; Herfarth, Hans; Buechler, Christa

    2015-10-01

    Macrophages are crucially involved in the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis. Soluble CD163 (sCD163) is specifically released from macrophages and systemic levels are increased in inflammatory diseases. Here, sCD163 was measured in serum of 50 patients with acute pancreatitis to find out possible associations with disease activity. Admission levels of systemic sCD163 were nearly three-fold higher in patients with acute pancreatitis compared to controls. In patients sCD163 did not correlate with C-reactive protein and leukocyte count as established markers of inflammation. Levels were not associated with disease severity assessed by the Schroeder score, Balthazar score, Acute Physiology, Age, and Chronic Health Evaluation (Apache) II score and peripancreatic necrosis score. Soluble CD163 was not related to complications of acute pancreatitis. These data show that serum sCD163 is increased in acute pancreatitis indicating activation of macrophages but is not associated with disease severity and outcome. PMID:26209500

  1. Identification of heme oxygenase-1–specific regulatory CD8+ T cells in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Mads Hald; Sørensen, Rikke Bæk; Brimnes, Marie K.; Svane, Inge Marie; Becker, Jürgen C.; thor Straten, Per

    2009-01-01

    Treg deficiencies are associated with autoimmunity. Conversely, CD4+ and CD8+ Tregs accumulate in the tumor microenvironment and are associated with prevention of antitumor immunity and anticancer immunotherapy. Recently, CD4+ Tregs have been much studied, but little is known about CD8+ Tregs and the antigens they recognize. Here, we describe what we believe to be the first natural target for CD8+ Tregs. Naturally occurring HLA-A2–restricted CD8+ T cells specific for the antiinflammatory molecule heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) were able to suppress cellular immune responses with outstanding efficacy. HO-1–specific CD8+ T cells were detected ex vivo and in situ among T cells from cancer patients. HO-1–specific T cells isolated from the peripheral blood of cancer patients inhibited cytokine release, proliferation, and cytotoxicity of other immune cells. Notably, the inhibitory effect of HO-1–specific T cells was far more pronounced than that of conventional CD4+CD25+CD127– Tregs. The inhibitory activity of HO-1–specific T cells seemed at least partly to be mediated by soluble factors. Our data link the cellular stress response to the regulation of adaptive immunity, expand the role of HO-1 in T cell–mediated immunoregulation, and establish a role for peptide-specific CD8+ T cells in regulating cellular immune responses. Identification of potent antigen-specific CD8+ Tregs may open new avenues for therapeutic interventions in both autoimmune diseases and cancer. PMID:19662679

  2. Comparative study of CD4 and CD45RO T cells and CD20 B cells in cerebrospinal fluid of syphilitic meningitis and tuberculous meningitis patients.

    PubMed

    Yu, Nian; Zhang, Qiao-Quan; Zhang, Kang; Xie, Yuan; Zhu, Hai-Qing; Lin, Xing-Jian; Di, Qing

    2016-09-01

    This study was to investigate the differences of lymphocyte in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with syphilis meningitis (SM) and tuberculous meningitis (TBM) for new diagnostic insights. Totally, 79 cases of SM and 45 cases of TBM were enrolled. In the CSF, the CD4, CD45RO or CD20 positive lymphocytes were detected by immunohistochemistry. The proportion of CD4 T cells in the CSF lymphocytes in patients with SM was significantly higher than that in patients with TBM (p < 0.05). After medical therapy, there was a significantly decline trend of the CD4 T-cell proportion in both groups (p < 0.05). The proportion of CD45RO T cells in CSF lymphocytes of patients with SM was less than that of patients with TBM (p < 0.05). After medical therapy, the positive ratio of CD45RO T cells was increased in the CSF of both group patients (p < 0.05). The proportion of CD20B cells in the CSF lymphocytes was not obviously different between the two groups during every stage. In conclusion, there are strong differences of CD4 and CD45RO T-cell ratio, but not the CD20 B cells in the meningitis. CD4 and CD45RO T cells in CSF are a useful complement in differentially diagnosing SM and TBM; it contributes to further understand the pathogenesis and prognosis of SM and TBM. PMID:27467195

  3. Determination of soluble CD21 as a parameter of B cell activation.

    PubMed

    Huemer, H P; Larcher, C; Prodinger, W M; Petzer, A L; Mitterer, M; Falser, N

    1993-08-01

    In this study we established a novel solid-phase immunoassay for CD21 using the time-resolved fluorescence of lanthanide chelates. The capture assay was able to detect concentrations of as low as 100 pg of CD21 antigen per millilitre of sample and was used for quantitative determination of CD21 in lysates of different cell lines as well as in patient serum specimens. CD21 was measured in lysates of tonsils and cell lines of B, T cell and myelomonocyte lineage, and appeared to consist of monomeric antigen under the detergent conditions used. Elevated levels of soluble CD21 were observed in serum of patients with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, a disease known to be associated with polyclonal B cell activation, and in infection with the lymphotropic rubella virus. Significantly increased levels were also found in malignancies which are associated with EBV. In patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), a correlation with the titre of EBV-specific IgA was observed, thus supporting a possible role of soluble CD21 as a marker for disease activity in certain malignancies. Our data suggest that measurement of soluble CD21 could serve as a marker for activation of the immune system and diseases involving the B cell lymphoid system. Possible mechanisms and functions of soluble CD21 are discussed. PMID:8348744

  4. Canine CD4+CD8+ double positive T cells in peripheral blood have features of activated T cells.

    PubMed

    Bismarck, Doris; Schütze, Nicole; Moore, Peter; Büttner, Mathias; Alber, Gottfried; Buttlar, Heiner v

    2012-10-15

    In dogs a CD4(+)CD8(+) double positive T cell subpopulation exists that has not been phenotypically defined yet. We demonstrate that canine CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells are mature CD1a(-) and TCRαβ(+) T cells. To analyse the activation potential of CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells, PBMC from dogs vaccinated against canine distemper virus (CDV) were re-stimulated with CDV. Upon antigen-specific stimulation, the CD4(+)CD8(+) T cell fraction increases and consists nearly exclusively of proliferated cells. Similarly, other features of activated effector/memory T cells such as up-regulation of CD25 and MHC-II as well as down-regulation of CD62L (L-selectin) were observed in CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells after stimulation. Canine CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells are less abundant, but more heterogeneous than porcine ones, comprising a small proportion expressing the β chain of CD8 in addition to the CD8α chain, like human CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells. In summary, this analysis provides the basis for functional characterisation of the in vivo relevance of CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells in T-cell mediated immunity. PMID:22789871

  5. CD83 Modulates B Cell Activation and Germinal Center Responses.

    PubMed

    Krzyzak, Lena; Seitz, Christine; Urbat, Anne; Hutzler, Stefan; Ostalecki, Christian; Gläsner, Joachim; Hiergeist, Andreas; Gessner, André; Winkler, Thomas H; Steinkasserer, Alexander; Nitschke, Lars

    2016-05-01

    CD83 is a maturation marker for dendritic cells. In the B cell lineage, CD83 is expressed especially on activated B cells and on light zone B cells during the germinal center (GC) reaction. The function of CD83 during GC responses is unclear. CD83(-/-) mice have a strong reduction of CD4(+) T cells, which makes it difficult to analyze a functional role of CD83 on B cells during GC responses. Therefore, in the present study we generated a B cell-specific CD83 conditional knockout (CD83 B-cKO) model. CD83 B-cKO B cells show defective upregulation of MHC class II and CD86 expression and impaired proliferation after different stimuli. Analyses of GC responses after immunization with various Ags revealed a characteristic shift in dark zone and light zone B cell numbers, with an increase of B cells in the dark zone of CD83 B-cKO mice. This effect was not accompanied by alterations in the level of IgG immune responses or by major differences in affinity maturation. However, an enhanced IgE response was observed in CD83 B-cKO mice. Additionally, we observed a strong competitive disadvantage of CD83-cKO B cells in GC responses in mixed bone marrow chimeras. Furthermore, infection of mice with Borrelia burgdorferi revealed a defect in bacterial clearance of CD83 B-cKO mice with a shift toward a Th2 response, indicated by a strong increase in IgE titers. Taken together, our results show that CD83 is important for B cell activation and modulates GC composition and IgE Ab responses in vivo. PMID:26983787

  6. Immunophenotype and increased presence of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cui-Ping; Qing, Xi; Wu, Cui-Yun; Zhu, Hong; Zhou, Hai-Yan

    2012-02-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), cancer of the white blood cells, is a heterogeneous disease that mainly occurs due to the malignant cloning of original and naive lymphocytes. The aim of this study was to explore the immunophenotype, the percentage of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) and the expression of cytokines interleukin (IL)-2, IL-10 and TGF-β in patients with ALL. The immunophenotype and levels of CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs were detected using flow cytometry in the peripheral blood of 35 ALL patients, with 18 healthy individuals being selected as controls. The results suggested that 22 patients had B cell ALL (B-ALL) and 13 had T cell ALL (T-ALL) among the 35 ALL patients. In B-ALL patients, the surface antigen CD19 was most commonly expressed; in T-ALL patients, CD7 was most common. Furthermore, the percentage of CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells in the peripheral blood of B-ALL and T-ALL patients was higher compared to that of healthy individuals (P<0.05). Additionally, IL-10 and TGF-β levels in cell culture supernatants from B-ALL and T-ALL patients were higher compared to those in the controls (P<0.05); IL-2 levels were lower in ALL patients. No significant differences were observed in the levels of CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells, IL-2, IL-10 or TGF-β in B-ALL versus T-ALL patients. The authors concluded that CD19 and CD7 may serve as diagnostic markers of B-ALL and T-ALL, respectively. The increased presence of CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells and the altered levels of secreted cytokines are indicative of an immunosuppressive mechanism in the pathogenesis of ALL. PMID:22740924

  7. Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells from Patients with Dermatophytosis Restrict the Growth of Trichophyton rubrum and Induce CD4-T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Karla; Bomfim, Gisele Facholi; Criado, Paulo Ricardo; Almeida, Sandro Rogerio

    2014-01-01

    Dermatophytes are the most common agents of superficial mycoses that are caused by mold fungi. Trichophyton rubrum is the most common pathogen causing dermatophytosis. The immunology of dermatophytosis is currently poorly understood. Recently, our group investigated the interaction of T. rubrum conidia with peritoneal mouse macrophages. We found that macrophages phagocytose T. rubrum conidia resulted in a down-modulation of class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens and in the expression of co-stimulatory molecules. Furthermore, it induced the production of IL-10, and T. rubrum conidia differentiated into hyphae that grew and killed the macrophages after 8 hrs of culture. This work demonstrated that dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages, from patients or normal individuals, avidly interact with pathogenic fungus T. rubrum. The dermatophyte has two major receptors on human monocyte-derived DC: DC-SIGN and mannose receptor. In contrast macrophage has only mannose receptor that participates in the phagocytosis or bound process. Another striking aspect of this study is that unlike macrophages that permit rapid growth of T. rubrum, human DC inhibited the growth and induces Th activation. The ability of DC from patients to interact and kill T. rubrum and to present Ags to T cells suggests that DC may play an important role in the host response to T. rubrum infection by coordinating the development of cellular immune response. PMID:25372145

  8. Human mesenchymal stem cells elevate CD4+CD25+CD127low/- regulatory T cells of asthmatic patients via heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-guo; Zhuan-sun, Yong-xun; Wen, Bing; Wu, Hao; Huang, Feng-ting; Ghimire, Hridaya bibhu; Ran, Pi-xin

    2013-09-01

    Up-regulation of CD4+CD25+CD127low/- regulatory T cells (Tregs) is a new target in the treatment of asthma. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can up-regulate CD4+CD25+CD127low/- regulatory T cells in vitro, meanwhile, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays an important role in the development and maintenance of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells. However the mechanism has not yet been adequately understood. Hence, we wondered what effect of Heme Oxygenase-1 made on regulation of CD4+CD25+CD127low/- regulatory T cells mediated by mesenchymal stem cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from asthmatic patients and healthy controls were co-cultured with human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells which were pretreated with Hemin (the revulsive of Heme Oxygenase-1), Protoporphyrin Ⅸ zinc (the inhibitor of Heme Oxygenase-1) and saline. The expression of Heme Oxygenase-1 in MSCs was enhanced by Hemin and inhibited by Protoporphyrin  zinc in vitro. Overexpression of Heme Oxygenase-1 elevated the proportion of CD4+CD25+CD127low/- regulatory T cells in CD4+ T cells, meanwhile, inhibition of Heme Oxygenase-1 decreased the proportion of CD4+CD25+CD127low/- regulatory T cells in CD4+ T cells as compared with mesenchymal stem cells alone. Taken together, these data demonstrated that Heme Oxygenase-1 contributed to the up-regulation of CD4+CD25+CD127low/- regulatory T cells mediated by mesenchymal stem cells in asthma.  PMID:23893806

  9. CD4+ T cell activation in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Verselis, S J; Goust, J M

    1987-02-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) production by CD4-enriched T cells from multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and normal individuals stimulated with concanavalin A (conA) and/or autologous and allogeneic B lymphoid cell lines (B-LCL) was evaluated 24, 48 and 96 h after stimulation. ConA-stimulated CD4+ cells from MS patients did not produce significantly more IL-2 than normal CD4+ cells. In contrast, autologous B-LCL-induced IL-2 production by MS CD4+ cells significantly (P = 0.026) exceeded that produced by normal CD4+ cells identically stimulated after 24 h in culture. Differences in IL-2 production by CD4+ cells from MS patients reached highest significance using allogeneic B-LCL, whose stimulatory capacity was similar, whether established from normal individuals or MS patients. This increased IL-2 production in response to B-LCL may represent a supranormal response of CD4+ cells from MS patients to class II major histocompatibility (MHC)-associated stimuli. It suggests that the deficiency of suppressor T cell functions postulated to play a role in MS does not arise from a lack of IL-2 induction and might indicate that bursts of IL-2 production could play a role in MS. PMID:3492511

  10. Novel perforin mutation in a patient with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and CD45 abnormal splicing.

    PubMed

    McCormick, James; Flower, Darren R; Strobel, Stephan; Wallace, Diana L; Beverley, Peter C L; Tchilian, Elma Z

    2003-03-15

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) composes a group of rare heterogenous disorders characterized by uncontrolled accumulation and infiltration of activated T lymphocytes and macrophages. Cytotoxic T and natural killer cell activity is significantly reduced or absent in these patients. Mutations in the important mediator of lymphocyte cytotoxicity perforin were identified in a number of HLH individuals. Here we report a novel missense mutation thr435met in the conserved Ca(2+) binding domain of perforin in a patient with HLH. Prediction of the 3-dimensional structure of the thr435met perforin mutant using comparative molecular modeling indicates that the protein's ability to bind Ca(2+), and therefore its cytolytic function, would be strongly compromised. In addition, this patient exhibited abnormal CD45 splicing caused by a C77G mutation in the gene encoding CD45 (PTPRC). Our findings suggest a combined role for perforin mutation and abnormal CD45 splicing as significant contributory factors in the pathogenesis of HLH. PMID:12599189

  11. Expression and significance of CD4+CD25+CD127- regulatory T cells in peripheral blood of patients with different phenotypes of Guillain-Barré syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Li, Li; Zhang, Yin; Pan, Shu-Chao; Chen, An-Qiang; Qian, Wei-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to investigate the changes of immune status and significance in patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). Methods: The proportion of CD4+CD25+CD127- regulatory T cells in peripheral blood before immunotherapy for 41 patients with GBS (including 29 classic type and 12 variant type) and 42 normal control patients (healthy volunteers) were evaluated by flow cytometry. And molybdenum three phenol red method was used to detect cerebrospinal fluid protein content of 28 patients with GBS (including 19 with classic type and 9 with variant type). Results: Compared with healthy control group, the CD4+CD25+CD127- of GBS group had obvious difference (P<0.05). Of which, the CD4+CD25+CD127- regulatory T cells of the classic GBS group had no significant changes compared with the variant group (P>0.05), as well as the cerebrospinal fluid protein content between classic and variant GBS groups. The decrease of the proportion of CD4+CD25+CD127- regulatory T cells suggested abnormal expression of immune function in GBS patients. Conclusion: The decrease of GBS regulatory T cell number or function indicated that the immune regulatory T cells mediated imbalance of immune regulation involved in the pathogenesis of GBS. PMID:26770543

  12. The relationship of HLA-DR, CD38 and CD71 markers to activation, proliferation and differentiation of some human leukemia and lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Glasová, M; Koníková, E; Stasáková, J; Babusíková, O

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the expression-percentage as well as MESF values ("molecules of equivalent soluble fluorochrom" that represent approximately the density of marker expression) of HLA-DR, CD71 and CD38 markers in some human leukemias (ALL, AML, CLL, CML) and lymphomas. They are non-lineage restricted and are supposed to be activation markers except for cases where they represent pathological phenotype like HLA-DR in pre B-ALL, CD38 in some M0 AML or in plasmocytoma or CD38 and CD71 in less mature T-ALL. We used flow cytometry, immunofluorescent staining, DNA staining by propidium iodide and quantification by calibration particles. We demonstrated increased MESF values of HLA-DR compared with controls in all investigated disorders, what could have a prognostic value. We demonstrated significantly higher MESF values of HLA-DR in cALL (37,300-46,000) in comparison with AML (9400-12,400), what could represent another important parameter when distinguishing between these two groups of leukemia. In cells of CML patients with lower CD38% and CD71% increased MESF values (5100 for CD38 and 7900 for CD71), were found while in some T-ALL, AML and cALL patients with high percentages of CD71 and CD38 there were lower MESF values what could indicate a possible connection of higher stage of cell maturation with increased density of CD38 and CD71 markers. We investigated possible relationship between percentage of expression of HLA-DR, CD38 and CD71 and proliferation rate by DNA analysis of the cell cycle. In a group of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients, there was no significant increase of proliferation index of malignant cells compared with control. The correlation between percentage of expression of mentioned parameters and proliferation index was not significant. In one patient with Burkitt's lymphoma we demonstrated significant increase of proliferation index of CD71+ subpopulation compared with CD71- one, what indicates that in aggressive form of NHL CD71 can be evaluated not

  13. Molecular analysis of CD133-positive circulating tumor cells from patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Edwin E; Gillard, Marc; Duggan, Ryan; Wroblewski, Kristen; Kregel, Steven; Isikbay, Masis; Kach, Jacob; Brechka, Hannah; Weele, David J Vander; Szmulewitz, Russell Z; Griend, Donald J Vander

    2015-01-01

    The function and clinical utility of stem cell markers in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) remains unresolved, and their expression may confer important therapeutic opportunities for staging and therapy. In the adult human prostate, CD133 (PROM1) expression identifies infrequent prostate epithelial progenitor cells and putative cancer stem cells. Previous work demonstrated an association with CD133 and cancer cell proliferation using in vitro model systems. The primary objective here was to investigate the expression of CD133 in circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from patients with mCRPC and to test the hypothesis that patients with mCRPC had CD133-positive CTCs associated with increased cell proliferation, changes in the androgen receptor (AR) protein expression, or AR nuclear co-localization. We utilized ImageStreamX technology, which combines flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy, to capture and analyze CD45-negative/EpCAM-positive CTCs for CD133, Ki-67, and AR. All patient samples (20/20) contained CD133-positive populations of CTCs, and on average 50.9 ± 28.2% (range of 18.2% to 100%) of CTCs were CD133-positive. CD133-positive CTCs have increased Ki-67 protein expression compared to CD133-negative CTCs, implying that CD133-positive CTCs may have greater proliferative potential when compared to their CD133-negative counterparts. CD133-positive and CD133-negative CTCs have similar levels of AR protein expression and cellular co-localization with nuclear markers, implying that CD133 expression is independent of AR pathway activity and an AR-independent marker of mCRPC proliferation. These studies demonstrate the presence of CD133-positive populations in CTCs from mCRPC with increased proliferative potential. PMID:26753099

  14. CD46 activation regulates miR-150-mediated control of GLUT1 expression and cytokine secretion in human CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    King, Ben C.; Esguerra, Jonathan L. S.; Golec, Ewelina; Eliasson, Lena; Kemper, Claudia; Blom, Anna M.

    2015-01-01

    CD46 is a cell surface complement inhibitor widely expressed in human tissues, in contrast to mice, where expression is limited to the testes. In humans, it has been identified as an important T cell costimulatory receptor, and patients deficient in CD46 or its endogenous ligands are unable to mount effective Th1 T cell responses. Stimulation of human CD4+ T cells with CD3 and CD46 also leads to the differentiation of a ‘switched’ Th1 population, which shuts down IFN-γ secretion and upregulates IL-10, and is believed to be important for negative feedback regulation of the Th1 response. We show here that CD46 costimulation leads to amplified microRNA expression changes in human CD4+ T cells, with associated increases in activation more potent than that mediated by the ‘classic’ costimulator CD28. Blockade of cell-surface CD46 inhibited CD28-mediated costimulation, identifying autocrine CD46 signaling as downstream of CD28. We also identify a downregulation of microRNA-150 in CD46-costimulated T cells, and identify the glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1) encoding transcript SLC2A1 as a target of microRNA-150 regulation, connecting microRNA-150 with modulation of glucose uptake. We also investigated microRNA expression profiles of CD46-induced ‘switched’ IL-10-secreting Th1 T cells and found increased expression of microRNA-150, compared to IFN-γ-secreting Th1 cells. Knockdown of microRNA-150 led to a reduction in IL-10 but not IFN-γ. CD46 therefore controls both Th1 activation and regulation via a miRNA-150-dependent mechanism. PMID:26746193

  15. CD46 Activation Regulates miR-150-Mediated Control of GLUT1 Expression and Cytokine Secretion in Human CD4+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    King, Ben C; Esguerra, Jonathan L S; Golec, Ewelina; Eliasson, Lena; Kemper, Claudia; Blom, Anna M

    2016-02-15

    CD46 is a cell surface complement inhibitor widely expressed in human tissues, in contrast to mice, where expression is limited to the testes. In humans, it has been identified as an important T cell costimulatory receptor, and patients deficient in CD46 or its endogenous ligands are unable to mount effective Th1 T cell responses. Stimulation of human CD4(+) T cells with CD3 and CD46 also leads to the differentiation of a "switched" Th1 population, which shuts down IFN-γ secretion and upregulates IL-10 and is thought to be important for negative feedback regulation of the Th1 response. In the present study, we show that CD46 costimulation leads to amplified microRNA (miR) expression changes in human CD4(+) T cells, with associated increases in activation more potent than those mediated by the "classic" costimulator CD28. Blockade of cell surface CD46 inhibited CD28-mediated costimulation, identifying autocrine CD46 signaling as downstream of CD28. We also identify a downregulation of miR-150 in CD46-costimulated T cells and identify the glucose transporter 1 encoding transcript SLC2A1 as a target of miR-150 regulation, connecting miR-150 with modulation of glucose uptake. We also investigated microRNA expression profiles of CD46-induced switched IL-10-secreting Th1 T cells and found increased expression of miR-150, compared with IFN-γ-secreting Th1 cells. Knockdown of miR-150 led to a reduction in IL-10 but not IFN-γ. CD46 therefore controls both Th1 activation and regulation via a miR-150-dependent mechanism. PMID:26746193

  16. CD4+ and CD8+ T Cell Activation Are Associated with HIV DNA in Resting CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cockerham, Leslie R.; Siliciano, Janet D.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; O'Doherty, Una; Palmer, Sarah; Yukl, Steven A.; Strain, Matt C.; Chomont, Nicolas; Hecht, Frederick M.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Richman, Douglas D.; Deeks, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    The association between the host immune environment and the size of the HIV reservoir during effective antiretroviral therapy is not clear. Progress has also been limited by the lack of a well-accepted assay for quantifying HIV during therapy. We examined the association between multiple measurements of HIV and T cell activation (as defined by markers including CD38, HLA-DR, CCR5 and PD-1) in 30 antiretroviral-treated HIV-infected adults. We found a consistent association between the frequency of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressing HLA-DR and the frequency of resting CD4+ T cells containing HIV DNA. This study highlights the need to further examine this relationship and to better characterize the biology of markers commonly used in HIV studies. These results may also have implications for reactivation strategies. PMID:25340755

  17. Altered CD94/NKG2A and perforin expression reduce the cytotoxic activity in malignant pleural effusions.

    PubMed

    Pace, Elisabetta; Di Sano, Caterina; Ferraro, Maria; Tipa, Annalisa; Olivieri, Dario; Spatafora, Mario; Santagata, Roberta; Bellia, Vincenzo; Gjomarkaj, Mark

    2011-01-01

    CD94/NKG2A is an inhibitory receptor expressed by NK cells and cytotoxic lymphocytes and, upon activation by HLA-E, downregulates the cytolytic activities of these cells thus representing a tumour immune escape mechanism. This study was aimed at assessing whether cytotoxic lymphocytes (CD8+) and NK cells from malignant pleural effusions have a deregulated expression of CD94/NKG2A. The expression of membrane CD94/NKG2A and perforin was evaluated by flow-cytometry in CD8+ and NK cells from pleural effusions and autologous peripheral blood of cancer (n=19) and congestive heart failure (CHF) (n=11) patients. Intracellular CD94/NKG2A expression was evaluated by flow-cytometry in pleural effusion CD8+ and NK cells from cancer patients (n=10). Cytotoxic activity against cancer cells exerted by pleural and autologous peripheral blood T lymphocytes from cancer patients was assessed by flow-cytometry assay. Pleural CD8+ from cancer patients showed a reduced expression of membrane CD94/NKG2A and perforin when compared to autologous peripheral blood and CHF pleural effusions. Reduced numbers of NK cells were present in pleural effusions from both cancer and CHF patients. Pleural NK from cancer patients showed a reduced expression of membrane CD94/NKG2A and perforin when compared to autologous peripheral blood. Pleural T lymphocytes from cancer patients exhibited a reduced cytotoxic activity against cancer cells when compared to autologous peripheral blood T lymphocytes. The intracellular expression of CD94/NKG2A in CD8+ and NK cells from cancer patients was higher than membrane expression. In conclusion, this study provides compelling evidences of new mechanisms underlying the reduced host defence against cancer within the pleural space. PMID:20932742

  18. Elevated expression of T-bet in mycobacterial antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells from patients with tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bingfen; Zhai, Fei; Jiang, Jing; Wang, Xinjing; Cao, Zhihong; Cheng, Xiaoxing

    2015-01-01

    T-bet is a T-box transcriptional factor that controls the differentiation and effector functions of CD4 T cells. In this study, we studied the role of T-bet in regulating CD4(+) T cell immunity against tuberculosis (TB). T-bet expression in Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells was significantly higher in patients with active TB than in individuals with latent TB infection (p<0.0001). Comparison of T-bet expression in TCM and TEM subsets showed that CD4(+)T-bet(+)M. tuberculosis antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells had significantly lower frequency of TCM (p=0.003) and higher frequency of TEM (p=0.003) than CD4(+)T-bet(-) cells. The expression of PD-1 in antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells was significantly higher in patients with TB than in individuals with latent TB infection (p=0.006). CD4(+)CD154(+)T-bet(+) T cells had significantly higher expression of PD-1 than CD4(+)CD154(+)T-bet(-) T cells (p=0.0028). It is concluded that T-bet expression might be associated with differentiation into effector memory cells and PD-1 expression in mycobacterial antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells. PMID:26302932

  19. Evaluation of the circulating CD34+, CD309+, and endothelial progenitor cells in patients with first attack of optic neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Etemadifar, Masoud; Dehghani, Leila; Ganji, Hamid; Soleimani, Reza; Talebi, Maedeh; Eskandari, Nahid; Samani, Fazel Sahraneshin; Meamar, Rokhsareh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are present in circulation and contribute to vasculogenesis in adults. The aim of the present study was to determine the number of circulating EPCs in patients with optic neuritis (ON). Materials and Methods: Fifty patients with ON were diagnosed by expert neurologist and optometrist at the Feiz Hospital, Isfahan, Iran (2012–2013). Blood samples were collected from ON patients in the first attack. The number of EPCs was measured by flow cytometry through the assessment of CD34+ and CD309+ in patients and healthy individuals. Results: With using flow cytometry, CD34+ and CD309+ cells detected in peripheral blood cells of patients (n = 50) with ON, and healthy individuals (n = 30). Patients with ON had (mean = 66.71 ± 17.82) CD34+ and CD309+ cells compared with healthy controls (mean = 28.72 ± 22.46). In addition, there was no significant difference in CD309+ cells in both groups. Conclusion: This study showed elevated CD34+ and CD309+ cells in the early stage of the disease. Regarded to EPC increment in neural repair, it expected the EPC level be increased in these patients, but no detectable differences were observed among both markers in healthy and patient with first attack. PMID:26380236

  20. Percentage of Peripheral CD19+CD24hiCD38hi Regulatory B Cells in Neonatal Sepsis Patients and Its Functional Implication

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiao; Ji, Zuoquan; Xue, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Background As a major cause of mortality in neonates, neonatal sepsis is often accompanied by immune dysfunctions, which are frequently caused by dysregulated T cell sub-populations. The role of regulatory B cells in neonatal sepsis, however, remains unknown. Therefore, this study investigated the percentage and functional variation of CD19+CD24hiCD38hi regulatory B cells in peripheral blood of neonatal sepsis patients in an attempt to elucidate the role of these regulatory B cells in pathogenesis of sepsis. Material/Methods Flow cytometry was used to quantify the percentage of CD19+CD24hiCD38hi regulatory B cells from peripheral blood samples. The correlation between B cell percentage and C reactive protein (CRP) level was analyzed. Secretion level of interleukin-10 (IL-10) and effects on the proliferation of naïve CD4+ T cells were further analyzed. Results The percentage of CD19+CD24hiCD38hi regulatory B cells in neonatal sepsis patients was significantly higher compared to healthy controls (p<0.05), and was positively correlated with serum CRP level. The percentage of IL-10+ CD19+CD24hiCD38hi regulatory B cells was also higher in sepsis patients, and also had more potent inhibition on naïve CD4+ T cells (p<0.01). Conclusions The elevation of CD19+CD24hiCD38hi regulatory B cells in neonatal sepsis can inhibit body immune function and thus may participate in the pathogenesis of sepsis. PMID:27389933

  1. Ex vivo activation of CD56(+) immune cells that eradicate neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Rujkijyanont, Piya; Chan, Wing Keung; Eldridge, Paul W; Lockey, Timothy; Holladay, Martha; Rooney, Barbara; Davidoff, Andrew M; Leung, Wing; Vong, Queenie

    2013-04-15

    Despite the use of intensive contemporary multimodal therapy, the overall survival of patients with high-risk neuroblastoma is still less than 50%. Therefore, immunotherapy without cross-resistance and overlapping toxicity has been proposed. In this study, we report the development of a novel strategy to specifically activate and expand human CD56(+) (NCAM1) natural killer (NK) immune cells from normal donors and patients with neuroblastoma. Enriched CD56(+) cells from peripheral blood were mixed with CD56(-) fraction at 1:1 ratio and cultured in the presence of OKT3, interleukin (IL)-2, and -15 for five days and then without OKT3 for 16 more days. The final products contained more than 90% CD56(+) cells and could kill neuroblastoma cells effectively that were originally highly resistant to nonprocessed NK cells. Mechanistically, cytolysis of neuroblastoma was mediated through natural cytotoxicity receptor (NCR), DNAX accessory molecule-1 (DNAM-1; CD226), perforin, and granzyme B. Successful clinical scale-up in a good manufacturing practices (GMP)-compliant bioreactor yielded effector cells that in a neuroblastoma xenograft model slowed tumor growth and extended survival without GVHD. Investigation of CD56(+) cells from patients with neuroblastoma revealed a similar postactivation phenotype and lytic activity. Our findings establish a novel and clinically expedient strategy to generate allogeneic or autologous CD56(+) cells that are highly cytotoxic against neuroblastoma with minimal risk of GVHD. PMID:23440424

  2. Characterization of a novel subset of CD8(+) T cells that expands in patients receiving interleukin-12.

    PubMed

    Gollob, J A; Schnipper, C P; Orsini, E; Murphy, E; Daley, J F; Lazo, S B; Frank, D A; Neuberg, D; Ritz, J

    1998-08-01

    IL-12 has significant antitumor activity in mice that may be mediated by CD8(+) T cells. We show in this report that repeated subcutaneous injections of IL-12 in patients with cancer resulted in the selective expansion of a subset of peripheral blood CD8(+) T cells. This T cell subset expressed high levels of CD18 and upregulated IL-12 receptor expression after IL-12 treatment in vivo. In normal subjects, these CD3(+)CD8(+)CD18(bright) T cells expressed IL-12 and IL-2 receptors and adhesion/costimulatory molecules to a greater degree than other CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells. They appeared morphologically as large granular lymphocytes, although they did not express NK cell markers such as CD56. In addition, CD8(+)CD18(bright) T cells were almost exclusively T cell receptor (TCR) alphabeta+, and exhibited a TCR Vbeta repertoire that was strikingly oligoclonal, whereas the Vbeta repertoire of CD18(dim) T cells was polyclonal. Although CD8+CD18(bright) T cells demonstrated little functional responsiveness to IL-12 or IL-2 alone in vitro, they responded to the combination of IL-12+IL-2 with strong IFN-gamma production and proliferation and enhanced non-MHC-restricted cytolytic activity. In contrast, CD18(dim) T cells were not activated by IL-12 or IL-2, alone or in combination. These findings demonstrate that CD8+CD18(bright) T cells are a unique population of peripheral blood lymphocytes with features of both memory and effector cells that are capable of TCR-independent activation through combined stimulation with IL-12+IL-2. As this activation results in IFN-gamma production and enhanced cytolytic activity, these T cells may play a role in innate as well as acquired immunity to tumors and infectious pathogens. Additional studies will be necessary to determine whether CD8+CD18(bright) T cells mediate the antitumor effect of IL-12 or IL-2 administered to cancer patients, and if so, whether maximal activation of these T cells with the combination of IL-12+IL-2 in vivo can

  3. CD4(+)and CD8(+)T-cell reactions against leukemia-associated- or minor-histocompatibility-antigens in AML-patients after allogeneic SCT.

    PubMed

    Steger, Brigitte; Milosevic, Slavoljub; Doessinger, Georg; Reuther, Susanne; Liepert, Anja; Braeu, Marion; Schick, Julia; Vogt, Valentin; Schuster, Friedhelm; Kroell, Tanja; Busch, Dirk H; Borkhardt, Arndt; Kolb, Hans-Jochem; Tischer, Johanna; Buhmann, Raymund; Schmetzer, Helga

    2014-04-01

    T-cells play an important role in the remission-maintenance in AML-patients (pts) after SCT, however the role of LAA- (WT1, PR1, PRAME) or minor-histocompatibility (mHag, HA1) antigen-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+)T-cells is not defined. A LAA/HA1-peptide/protein stimulation, cloning and monitoring strategy for specific CD8(+)/CD4(+)T-cells in AML-pts after SCT is given. Our results show that (1) LAA-peptide-specific CD8+T-cells are detectable in every AML-pt after SCT. CD8(+)T-cells, recognizing two different antigens detectable in 5 of 7 cases correlate with long-lasting remissions. Clonal TCR-Vβ-restriction exemplarily proven by spectratyping in PRAME-specific CD8(+)T-cells; high PRAME-peptide-reactivity was CD4(+)-associated, as shown by IFN-γ-release. (2) Two types of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) were tested for presentation of LAA/HA1-proteins to CD4(+)T-cells: miniEBV-transduced lymphoblastoid cells (B-cell-source) and CD4-depleted MNC (source for B-cell/monocyte/DC). We provide a refined cloning-system for proliferating, CD40L(+)CD4(+)T-cells after LAA/HA1-stimulation. CD4(+)T-cells produced cytokines (GM-CSF, IFN-γ) upon exposure to LAA/HA1-stimulation until after at least 7 restimulations and demonstrated cytotoxic activity against naive blasts, but not fibroblasts. Antileukemic activity of unstimulated, stimulated or cloned CD4(+)T-cells correlated with defined T-cell-subtypes and the clinical course of the disease. In conclusion we provide immunological tools to enrich and monitor LAA/HA1-CD4(+)- and CD8(+)T-cells in AML-pts after SCT and generate data with relevant prognostic value. We were able to demonstrate the presence of LAA-peptide-specific CD8(+)T-cell clones in AML-pts after SCT. In addition, we were also able to enrich specific antileukemic reactive CD4(+)T-cells without GvH-reactivity upon repeated LAA/HA1-protein stimulation and limiting dilution cloning. PMID:24315637

  4. Elevated postinjury thrombospondin 1–CD47 triggering aids differentiation of patients' defective inflammatory CD1a+dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Gautam; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjukta; Bankey, Paul E.; Miller-Graziano, Carol L.

    2014-01-01

    A subset of Pts develops dysfunctional MO to inflammatory DC differentiation and immunosuppression. MDDC, a newly described DC subset, is pivotal in initiating antibacterial responses. Endogenous proteins are known to alter MO to MDDC differentiation. In particular, trauma-elevated TSP-1, a protein that is known to affect MO functions, could trigger MDDC differentiation defects. We hypothesized that TSP-1-deranged differentiation of inflammatory CD1a+MDDC would negatively alter activation of immune functions, thereby increasing the risk of postinjury infections. Post-trauma increased TSP-1 levels in patients' plasma and MO correlated with two distinct MDDC differentiation dysfunctions: the previously described decreased CD1a+DC yields but also, development of an immunoincompetent CD1a+MDDC. The Pts' development of Dysf DC correlated to increased infectious complications. TSP-1 triggered its inhibitory receptor, CD47, activating an inhibitory phosphatase, SHP-1. Increased pSHP-1, decreased antigen processing, and depressed T cell stimulation characterized Pt Dysf DC. TSP-1 mimics added during Cnt MDDC differentiation depressed CD1a+DC yields but more importantly, also induced defective CD1a+MDDC, reproducing Pts' MDDC differentiation dysfunctions. CD47 triggering during Cnt MDDC differentiation increased SHP-1 activation, inhibiting IL-4-induced STAT-6 activation (critical for CD1a+MDDC differentiation). SHP-1 inhibition during MDDC differentiation in the presence of TSP-1 mimics restored pSTAT-6 levels and CD1a+MDDC immunogenicity. Thus, postinjury-elevated TSP-1 can decrease CD1a+DC yields but more critically, also induces SHP-1 hyperactivity, deviating MDDC differentiation to defective CD1a+ inflammatory MDDCs by inhibiting STAT-6. PMID:25001859

  5. Elevated soluble CD8 antigen and soluble interleukin-2 receptors in the sera of patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lipnick, R N; Sfikakis, P P; Klipple, G L; Tsokos, G C

    1993-07-01

    Activated T lymphocytes release various molecules including soluble CD8 (sCD8) antigen and soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2R). Elevated serum sCD8 antigen levels have been found in patients with viral infections, certain hematologic malignancies, and rheumatoid arthritis. On the other hand, elevated serum levels of sIL-2R have been found in various diseases including juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). We measured sCD8 antigen and sIL-2R levels using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in the sera of 49 afebrile patients with JRA (systemic 15, polyarticular 16, and pauciarticular 18) and 16 normal children. Disease activity was classified as mild, moderate, and severe. Sera from patients with severe JRA expressed statistically significant higher levels of both sCD8 and sIL-2R, whereas patients with mild disease had the lowest levels. There were no differences in the serum sCD8 and sIL-2R levels between the groups of patients with pauciarticular-, systemic-, and polyarticular-onset disease. Patients who were treated with prednisone had statistically nonsignificant higher serum levels of sCD8 and sIL-2R. A statistically significant positive correlation was found between sCD8 and sIL-2R levels, sCD8 levels and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and sIL-2R levels and ESR. Our findings further suggest the presence of activated lymphocytes in patients with JRA and show that sCD8 antigen serum levels correlate with both serum levels of sIL-2R and ESR and thus may represent alternative indicators of disease activity. PMID:8513595

  6. Functional role of lipid rafts in CD20 activity?

    PubMed

    Janas, Eva; Priest, Richard; Malhotra, Rajneesh

    2005-01-01

    CD20 is a B-lymphocyte-specific integral membrane protein, implicated in the regulation of transmembrane calcium conductance, cell-cycle progression and B-lymphocyte proliferation. CD20 is proposed to function as a SOCC (store-operated calcium channel). SOCCs are activated by receptor-stimulated calcium depletion of intracellular stores. Sustained calcium conductivity across the plasma membrane mediated by SOCC activity is required for long-term calcium-dependent processes, such as transcriptional control and gene expression. Cross-linking of CD20 by antibodies (e.g. Rituxan) has been reported to induce a rapid redistribution of CD20 into specialized microdomains at the plasma membrane, known as lipid rafts. Recruitment of CD20 into lipid rafts and its homo-oligomerization are suggested to be crucial for CD20 activity and regulation. This review outlines recent biochemical studies characterizing the role of CD20 in calcium signalling in B-lymphocytes and evaluates an engagement of lipid rafts in the regulation of CD20-mediated calcium conductivity. PMID:15649140

  7. T-cell ligands modulate the cytolytic activity of the CD33/CD3 BiTE antibody construct, AMG 330

    PubMed Central

    Laszlo, G S; Gudgeon, C J; Harrington, K H; Walter, R B

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical and emerging clinical studies demonstrate that bispecific T-cell engaging (BiTE) antibody constructs can potently lyse targeted tumor cells, but the determinants for their activity remain incompletely understood. Using human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines engineered to overexpress individual T-cell ligands, we found that expression of the inhibitory ligands, PD-L1 and PD-L2, reduced the cytolytic activity of the BiTE antibody construct targeting CD33, AMG 330; conversely, expression of the activating ligands, CD80 and CD86, augmented the cytotoxic activity of AMG 330. Consistent with these findings, treatment with an activating antibody directed at the co-stimulatory T-cell receptor, CD28, significantly increased AMG 330-induced cytotoxicity in human AML cell lines. Using specimens from 12 patients with newly diagnosed or relapsed/refractory AML, we found that activation of CD28 also increased the activity of AMG 330 in primary human AML cells (P=0.023). Together, our findings indicate that T-cell ligands and co-receptors modulate the anti-tumor activity of the CD33/CD3 BiTE antibody construct, AMG 330. These findings suggest that such ligands/co-receptors could serve as biomarkers of response and that co-treatment strategies with pharmacological modulators of T-cell receptor signaling could be utilized to further enhance the activity of this targeted therapeutic. PMID:26295610

  8. T-cell ligands modulate the cytolytic activity of the CD33/CD3 BiTE antibody construct, AMG 330.

    PubMed

    Laszlo, G S; Gudgeon, C J; Harrington, K H; Walter, R B

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical and emerging clinical studies demonstrate that bispecific T-cell engaging (BiTE) antibody constructs can potently lyse targeted tumor cells, but the determinants for their activity remain incompletely understood. Using human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines engineered to overexpress individual T-cell ligands, we found that expression of the inhibitory ligands, PD-L1 and PD-L2, reduced the cytolytic activity of the BiTE antibody construct targeting CD33, AMG 330; conversely, expression of the activating ligands, CD80 and CD86, augmented the cytotoxic activity of AMG 330. Consistent with these findings, treatment with an activating antibody directed at the co-stimulatory T-cell receptor, CD28, significantly increased AMG 330-induced cytotoxicity in human AML cell lines. Using specimens from 12 patients with newly diagnosed or relapsed/refractory AML, we found that activation of CD28 also increased the activity of AMG 330 in primary human AML cells (P=0.023). Together, our findings indicate that T-cell ligands and co-receptors modulate the anti-tumor activity of the CD33/CD3 BiTE antibody construct, AMG 330. These findings suggest that such ligands/co-receptors could serve as biomarkers of response and that co-treatment strategies with pharmacological modulators of T-cell receptor signaling could be utilized to further enhance the activity of this targeted therapeutic. PMID:26295610

  9. Aggressive Peripheral CD70-positive T-cell Lymphoma Associated with Severe Chronic Active EBV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, Donald R.; Sheehan, Andrea M.; Yi, Zhongzhen; Rodgers, Cheryl C; Bollard, Catherine M; Brenner, Malcolm K; Rooney, Cliona M; Heslop, Helen E; Gottschalk, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Severe chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection (CAEBV) in T or NK cells is a rare complication of latent EBV infection. CAEBV associated T-cell lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) consists of polyclonal lesions as well as aggressive lymphomas. Here we report such a patient. In addition, we show that this primary CAEBV associated T-cell lymphoma expresses CD70 and is sensitive to killing by CD70-specific T cells, identifying CD70 as a potential immunotherapeutic target for CAEBV-associated T-cell lymphoma. PMID:21994111

  10. Poor survival in glioblastoma patients is associated with early signs of immunosenescence in the CD4 T-cell compartment after surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fornara, Olesja; Odeberg, Jenny; Wolmer Solberg, Nina; Tammik, Charlotte; Skarman, Petra; Peredo, Inti; Stragliotto, Giuseppe; Rahbar, Afsar; Söderberg-Nauclér, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) are immunosuppressed and have a broad range of immunological defects in both innate and adaptive immune responses. GBMs are frequently infected with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a virus capable of causing immunosuppression. In 42 HCMV-positive GBM patients in a clinical trial (VIGAS), we investigated T-cell phenotypes in the blood and assessed their relation to survival. Blood was collected before and 3, 12, and 24 weeks after surgery, and the frequency of T-cell subsets was compared with that in 26 age-matched healthy controls. GBM patients had lower levels of CD3 cells than the controls, but had significantly higher levels of CD4+CD28− T cells before and 3 and 12 weeks after surgery and increased levels of CD4+CD57+ and CD4+CD57+CD28+ T cells at all-time points. These T-cell subsets were associated with both immunosenescence and HCMV infection. GBM patients also had higher levels of γδ T cells at all-times after surgery and lower levels of CD4+CD25+ cells before and 3 weeks after surgery than healthy controls. Overall survival was significantly shorter in patients with higher levels of CD4+CD28− T cells (p = 0.025), CD4+CD57+ T (p = 0.025) cells, and CD4+CD28−CD57+CD28− T cells (p < 0.0004) at 3 weeks after surgery. Our findings indicate that signs of immunosenescence in the CD4+ compartment are associated with poor prognosis in patients with HCMV-positive GBMs and may reflect the HCMV activity in their tumors. PMID:26405601

  11. Immune activation during the implantation phase causes preeclampsia-like symptoms via the CD40-CD40 ligand pathway in pregnant mice.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Keiichi; Matsubara, Yuko; Mori, Miki; Uchikura, Yuka; Hamada, Katsuyuki; Fujioka, Toru; Hashimoto, Hisashi; Matsumoto, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    The CD40 ligand (CD40L) is expressed by T cells and has a critical role in immune system regulation. Interventions targeting CD40L interactions following embryo implantation represent an approach to preventing preeclampsia (PE). To better understand the role of CD40L in PE, we developed a PE mouse model in which we examined how CD40L-induced immune activation affects embryo implantation. Blastocysts were incubated with CD40L-expressing adenovirus and then were transferred into the uterine horns of pseudopregnant ICR mice. Histology, biochemistry and flow cytometry experiments were performed to examine the characteristics of the mouse model. In early pregnancy, decidualization and spiral artery remodeling were reduced in CD40L-transfected mice (CD40L mice) compared with control mice. Hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining revealed hemorrhaging and excess fibrin deposition at the labyrinth layer-junctional zone interface of the placenta, and PAS staining demonstrated prominent focal and segmental sclerosis with collapsed glomerular capillaries in the kidneys of the CD40L mice. Flow cytometry data showed that interferon-γ production derived from CD4(+) T cells was elevated in the splenic cells of CD40L mice. Blood pressure (measured by the tail-cuff method) and urine albumin concentrations were significantly increased in CD40L mice compared with control mice. Furthermore, the plasma concentrations of soluble Flt-1 and soluble endoglin were increased in CD40L mice, as occurs in human patients with PE. Thus, CD40L-induced T-helper cell type 1 differentiation during embryo implantation may have a critical role in the pathogenesis of a PE-like presentation in a novel mouse model of PE. PMID:26763855

  12. T Cell-Extrinsic CD18 Attenuates Antigen-Dependent CD4+ T cell Activation In Vivo1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xingxin; Lahiri, Amit; Sarin, Ritu; Abraham, Clara

    2015-01-01

    The β2 integrins (CD11/CD18) are heterodimeric leukocyte adhesion molecules expressed on hematopoietic cells. The role of T cell-intrinsic CD18 in trafficking of naïve T cells to secondary lymphoid organs, and in antigen-dependent T cell activation in vitro and in vivo has been well-defined. However, the T cell-extrinsic role for CD18, including on antigen presenting cells (APC), in contributing to T cell activation in vivo is less well understood. We examined the role for T cell-extrinsic CD18 in the activation of WT CD4+ T cells in vivo through the adoptive transfer of DO11.10 Ag-specific CD4+ T cells into CD18−/− mice. We found that T cell-extrinsic CD18 was required for attenuating OVA-induced T cell proliferation in peripheral lymph nodes (PLN). The increased proliferation of WT DO11.10 CD4+ T cells in CD18−/− PLN was associated with a higher percentage of APC, and these APC demonstrated an increased activation profile and increased Ag-uptake, in particular in F4/80+ APC. Depletion of F4/80+ cells both reduced and equalized antigen-dependent T cell proliferation in CD18−/− relative to littermate control PLN, demonstrating that these cells play a critical role in the enhanced T cell proliferation in CD18−/− mice. Consistently, CD11b blockade, which is expressed on F4/80+ macrophages, enhanced the proliferation of DO11.10+ T cells in CD18+/− PLN. Thus, in contrast to the T cell-intrinsic essential role for CD18 in T cell activation, T cell-extrinsic expression of CD18 attenuates antigen-dependent CD4+ T cell activation in PLN in vivo. PMID:25801431

  13. The Broad Anti-AML Activity of the CD33/CD3 BiTE Antibody Construct, AMG 330, Is Impacted by Disease Stage and Risk

    PubMed Central

    Laszlo, George S.; Newhall, Kathryn J.; Sinclair, Angus M.; Frankel, Stanley R.; Kischel, Roman; Chen, Guang; Walter, Roland B.

    2015-01-01

    The CD33/CD3-bispecific T-cell engaging (BiTE) antibody construct, AMG 330, potently lyses CD33+ leukemic cells in vitro. Using specimens from 41 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), we studied the factors that might contribute to clinical response or resistance. For this purpose, thawed aliquots of primary AML samples were immunophenotypically characterized and subjected to various doses of AMG 330 in the presence or absence of healthy donor T-cells. After 48 hours, drug-specific cytotoxicity was quantified and correlated with CD33 expression levels, amounts of T-cells present, and other disease characteristics. AMG 330 caused modest cytotoxicity that was correlated with the amount of autologous T-cells (P = 0.0001) but not CD33 expression, as AMG 330 exerted marked cytotoxic effects in several specimens with minimal CD33 expression. With healthy donor T-cells added, AMG 330 cytotoxicity depended on the drug dose and effector:target (E:T) cell ratio. High cytotoxic activity was observed even with minimal CD33 expression, and AMG 330 cytotoxicity and CD33 expression correlated only at high E:T cell ratio and high AMG 330 doses (P<0.003). AMG 330 resulted in significantly higher cytotoxicity in specimens from patients with newly diagnosed AML than those with relapsed/refractory disease despite similar levels of CD33 on myeloblasts. AMG 330 cytotoxicity also appeared greater in specimens from patients with favorable-risk disease as compared to other specimens. Together, our data demonstrate that AMG 330 is highly active in primary AML specimens across the entire disease spectrum, while suggesting the presence of yet undefined, CD33-independent, relative resistance mechanisms in specific patient subsets. PMID:26305211

  14. Study of Basic Coagulation Parameters among HIV Patients in Correlation to CD4 Counts and ART Status

    PubMed Central

    Manimaran, D; Rachakatla, Praveen; Bharathi, K; Afroz, Tameem; Sagar, Radha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HIV infection is known to cause coagulation abnormalities by various mechanism, especially during its late course. Aim The objective of this study was to analyse platelet count, prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time among HIV infected patients and to analyse these parameters with respect to their CD4 count and ART status. Materials and Methods A case control study was conducted with 120 HIV infected patients and 40 normal individuals. The blood samples were collected after obtaining consent from the subjects. The blood samples were processed for platelet count, prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time and CD4 count. The results were tabulated and analysed with statistical package. Results The platelet count was significantly decreased in HIV infected patients compared to controls. Though HIV patients with CD4 count less than 200cells/mm3 showed a decreased platelet count compared to those with CD4 count greater than 200cells/mm3, it was not statistically significant. Prothrombin Time (PT) and Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time (aPTT) was significantly prolonged in HIV patients, but only aPTT showed significant inverse correlation with CD4 count. None of the parameters showed statistical significance on comparing HIV patients on ART with those not on ART. Conclusion Basic coagulation tests like platelet count, PT and especially aPTT can be used as prospective screening test to assess severity in HIV patients in resource limited settings where CD4 count is not available. PMID:27437222

  15. Antiretroviral Therapy Normalizes Autoantibody Profile of HIV Patients by Decreasing CD33+CD11b+HLA-DR+ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Zhefeng; Du, Ling; Hu, Ningjie; Byrd, Daniel; Amet, Tohti; Desai, Mona; Shepherd, Nicole; Lan, Jie; Han, Renzhi; Yu, Qigui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune manifestations are common in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients. However, the autoantibody spectrum associated with HIV infection and the impact of antiretroviral therapy (ART) remains to be determined. The plasma autoantibody spectrum for HIV patients was characterized by protein microarrays containing 83 autoantigens and confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Regulatory T cells (Tregs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) were analyzed by flow cytometry and their effects on autoantibodies production were determined by B cell ELISpot. Higher levels of autoantibody and higher prevalence of elevated autoantibodies were observed in ART-naive HIV patients compared to healthy subjects and HIV patients on ART. The highest frequency of CD33+CD11b+HLA-DR+ cells was observed in ART-naive HIV patients and was associated with the quantity of elevated autoantibodies. In addition, CD33+CD11b+HLA-DR+ cells other than Tregs or MDSCs boost the B cell response in a dose-dependent manner by in vitro assay. In summary, HIV infection leads to elevation of autoantibodies while ART suppresses the autoimmune manifestation by decreasing CD33+CD11b+HLA-DR+ cells in vivo. The roles of CD33+CD11b+HLA-DR+ cells on disease progression in HIV patients needs further assessment. PMID:27082567

  16. Differential requirement of CD28 costimulation for activation of murine CD8+ intestinal intraepithelial lymphocyte subsets and lymph node cells.

    PubMed

    Gelfanov, V; Lai, Y G; Gelfanova, V; Dong, J Y; Su, J P; Liao, N S

    1995-07-01

    The CD8+CD4- (CD8+) murine small intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) contain two subpopulations, one expressing alpha alpha-CD8 homodimers and another alpha beta-CD8 heterodimers. In this study, plate-bound anti-TCR beta-chain (TCR-beta) mAb alone or combined with anti-CD28 mAb is used as a model system to study activation requirement of these two CD8+ IEL subsets. In contrast to CD8+ lymph node (LN) cells that require both TCR and CD28 triggering for activation, alpha beta-CD8+ IELs proliferate and produce IL-2 and IFN-gamma when stimulated with anti-TCR-beta mAb alone, and soluble CTLA-4 Ig has no effect on their responses. On the other hand, alpha alpha-CD8+ IELs neither make IL-2 or IFN-gamma nor proliferate even when both stimuli are provided. However, alpha alpha-CD8+ IELs are capable of proliferation in both CD8+ IEL subsets is lower than in CD8+ LN cells, which contributes to the weaker and delayed response of CD8+ IELs. PMID:7602124

  17. CD19+ B cell subsets in the peripheral blood and skin lesions of psoriasis patients and their correlations with disease severity.

    PubMed

    Lu, J; Ding, Y; Yi, X; Zheng, J

    2016-01-01

    T lymphocytes are important in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, and increasing evidence indicates that B cells also play an important role. The mechanisms of action, however, remain unclear. We evaluated the ratios of CD19+ B cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 157 patients with psoriasis (65 patients with psoriasis vulgaris, 32 patients with erythrodermic psoriasis, 30 patients with arthropathic psoriasis, and 30 patients with pustular psoriasis) and 35 healthy controls (HCs). Ratios of CD19+ B cells in skin lesions were compared with non-lesions in 7 erythrodermic psoriasis patients. The Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI) was used to measure disease severity. CD19+ B cell ratios in PBMCs from psoriasis vulgaris (at both the active and stationary stage) and arthropathic psoriasis patients were higher compared with HCs (P<0.01), but ratios were lower in erythrodermic and pustular psoriasis patients (P<0.01). CD19+ B cell ratios in erythrodermic psoriasis skin lesions were higher than in non-lesion areas (P<0.001). Different subsets of CD19+CD40+, CD19+CD44+, CD19+CD80+, CD19+CD86+, CD19+CD11b+, and CD19+HLA-DR+ B cells in PBMCs were observed in different psoriasis clinical subtypes. PASI scores were positively correlated with CD19+ B cell ratios in psoriasis vulgaris and arthropathic psoriasis cases (r=0.871 and r=0.692, respectively, P<0.01), but were negatively correlated in pustular psoriasis (r=-0.569, P<0.01). The results indicated that similar to T cells, B cells activation may also play important roles in different pathological stages of psoriasis. PMID:27532281

  18. CD19+ B cell subsets in the peripheral blood and skin lesions of psoriasis patients and their correlations with disease severity

    PubMed Central

    Lu, J.; Ding, Y.; Yi, X.; Zheng, J.

    2016-01-01

    T lymphocytes are important in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, and increasing evidence indicates that B cells also play an important role. The mechanisms of action, however, remain unclear. We evaluated the ratios of CD19+ B cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 157 patients with psoriasis (65 patients with psoriasis vulgaris, 32 patients with erythrodermic psoriasis, 30 patients with arthropathic psoriasis, and 30 patients with pustular psoriasis) and 35 healthy controls (HCs). Ratios of CD19+ B cells in skin lesions were compared with non-lesions in 7 erythrodermic psoriasis patients. The Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI) was used to measure disease severity. CD19+ B cell ratios in PBMCs from psoriasis vulgaris (at both the active and stationary stage) and arthropathic psoriasis patients were higher compared with HCs (P<0.01), but ratios were lower in erythrodermic and pustular psoriasis patients (P<0.01). CD19+ B cell ratios in erythrodermic psoriasis skin lesions were higher than in non-lesion areas (P<0.001). Different subsets of CD19+CD40+, CD19+CD44+, CD19+CD80+, CD19+CD86+, CD19+CD11b+, and CD19+HLA-DR+ B cells in PBMCs were observed in different psoriasis clinical subtypes. PASI scores were positively correlated with CD19+ B cell ratios in psoriasis vulgaris and arthropathic psoriasis cases (r=0.871 and r=0.692, respectively, P<0.01), but were negatively correlated in pustular psoriasis (r=-0.569, P<0.01). The results indicated that similar to T cells, B cells activation may also play important roles in different pathological stages of psoriasis. PMID:27532281

  19. The Early Activation Marker CD69 Regulates the Expression of Chemokines and CD4 T Cell Accumulation in Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Radulovic, Katarina; Rossini, Valerio; Manta, Calin; Holzmann, Karlheinz; Kestler, Hans A.; Niess, Jan Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    Migration of naïve and activated lymphocytes is regulated by the expression of various molecules such as chemokine receptors and ligands. CD69, the early activation marker of C-type lectin domain family, is also shown to regulate the lymphocyte migration by affecting their egress from the thymus and secondary lymphoid organs. Here, we aimed to investigate the role of CD69 in accumulation of CD4 T cells in intestine using murine models of inflammatory bowel disease. We found that genetic deletion of CD69 in mice increases the expression of the chemokines CCL-1, CXCL-10 and CCL-19 in CD4+ T cells and/or CD4− cells. Efficient in vitro migration of CD69-deficient CD4 T cells toward the chemokine stimuli was the result of increased expression and/or affinity of chemokine receptors. In vivo CD69−/− CD4 T cells accumulate in the intestine in higher numbers than B6 CD4 T cells as observed in competitive homing assay, dextran sodium sulphate (DSS)-induced colitis and antigen-specific transfer colitis. In DSS colitis CD69−/− CD4 T cell accumulation in colonic lamina propria (cLP) was associated with increased expression of CCL-1, CXCL-10 and CCL-19 genes. Furthermore, treatment of DSS-administrated CD69−/− mice with the mixture of CCL-1, CXCL-10 and CCL-19 neutralizing Abs significantly decreased the histopathological signs of colitis. Transfer of OT-II×CD69−/− CD45RBhigh CD4 T cells into RAG−/− hosts induced CD4 T cell accumulation in cLP. This study showed CD69 as negative regulator of inflammatory responses in intestine as it decreases the expression of chemotactic receptors and ligands and reduces the accumulation of CD4 T cells in cLP during colitis. PMID:23776480

  20. Elevated Serum Levels of Soluble CD30 in Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients and Its Association with Disease Severity-Related Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Rongfen; Sun, Wei; Chen, Yu; Su, Yuying; Wang, Chenqiong; Dong, Lingli

    2015-01-01

    Soluble CD30 (sCD30), a transmembrane glycoprotein that belongs to the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily, has been shown to be associated with various pathological conditions. This study was designed to measure the levels of serum sCD30 in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and to evaluate the relationships between serum sCD30 levels and other disease severity-related indexes, including bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index (BASDAI), ankylosing spondylitis disease activity score (ASDAS), and bath ankylosing spondylitis functional index (BASFI). Our results demonstrated significantly elevated sCD30 levels in AS patients compared to healthy controls (HCs) with mean values of 32.0 ± 12.2 and 24.9 ± 8.0 ng/mL, respectively (P** = 0.007), suggesting a potential role of sCD30 in the pathogenesis of AS. However, no significant correlations of sCD30 with BASDAI, ASDAS, or BASFI were detected in our study (P > 0.05). Therefore, sCD30 cannot be used as a reliable marker for reflecting disease activity and functional ability of AS patients. PMID:26273636

  1. Association of CD30 transcripts with Th1 responses and proinflammatory cytokines in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Velásquez, Sonia Y; Opelz, Gerhard; Rojas, Mauricio; Süsal, Caner; Alvarez, Cristiam M

    2016-05-01

    High serum sCD30 levels are associated with inflammatory disorders and poor outcome in renal transplantation. The contribution to these phenomena of transcripts and proteins related to CD30-activation and -cleavage is unknown. We assessed in peripheral blood of end-stage renal disease patients (ESRDP) transcripts of CD30-activation proteins CD30 and CD30L, CD30-cleavage proteins ADAM10 and ADAM17, and Th1- and Th2-type immunity-related factors t-bet and GATA3. Additionally, we evaluated the same transcripts and release of sCD30 and 32 cytokines after allogeneic and polyclonal T-cell activation. In peripheral blood, ESRDP showed increased levels of t-bet and GATA3 transcripts compared to healthy controls (HC) (both P<0.01) whereas levels of CD30, CD30L, ADAM10 and ADAM17 transcripts were similar. Polyclonal and allogeneic stimulation induced higher levels of CD30 transcripts in ESRDP than in HC (both P<0.001). Principal component analysis (PCA) in allogeneic cultures of ESRDP identified two correlation clusters, one consisting of sCD30, the Th-1 cytokine IFN-γ, MIP-1α, RANTES, sIL-2Rα, MIP-1β, TNF-β, MDC, GM-CSF and IL-5, and another one consisting of CD30 and t-bet transcripts, IL-13 and proinflammatory proteins IP-10, IL-8, IL-1Rα and MCP-1. Reflecting an activated immune state, ESRDP exhibited after allostimulation upregulation of CD30 transcripts in T cells, which was associated with Th1 and proinflammatory responses. PMID:26970513

  2. Evaluation of soluble CD44 splice variant v5 in the diagnosis and follow-up in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kittl, E M; Ruckser, R; Selleny, S; Samek, V; Hofmann, J; Huber, K; Reiner, A; Ogris, E; Hinterberger, W; Bauer, K

    1997-01-01

    Aberrant expression of CD44 splice variants has been detected on a variety of human tumor cells. Overexpression of specific isoforms has been shown to be associated with metastasis and poor prognosis in breast cancer. We evaluated the possible utility of soluble CD44 splice variant v5 (sCD44v5) as a circulating, tumor-associated marker in breast cancer patients. Serum levels of sCD44v5 were determined in 147 healthy volunteers, in 53 patients with nonmalignant breast disease, in 85 patients with breast cancer at presentation, in 13 patients with recurrence and in 73 patients with active metastatic disease. Statistically, the levels at presentation in stages I-IV, in benign disease, and in a female control group were not significantly different. First longitudinal studies over 1-2 years in the follow-up of 28 patients who have remained tumor-free showed considerable between-patient variation while the intrapatient levels remained within relatively narrow limits. In patients with active metastatic disease, elevated levels of sCD44v5 (> 58 ng.ml-1) were detected in 50% of the cases with marked elevation in only 26%. In these cases, sCD44v5 correlated with the extent of metastatic disease and fell during clinical response to cytoreductive therapy. In comparison with CA15-3 in the patients' follow-up serum levels of sCD44v5 proved to be much less sensitive concerning lead time, percentage of raised serum levels at the time of recurrence and in metastatic disease. The value of sCD44v5 determinations in breast cancer patients was further limited by the poor diagnostic specificity of this marker due to elevated levels in smokers and chronic inflammatory disease. PMID:9523162

  3. Immunoregulatory CD4+ CD45R+ suppressor/inducer T lymphocyte subsets and impaired cell-mediated immunity in patients with Down's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Raziuddin, S; Elawad, M E

    1990-01-01

    The monoclonal antibodies 2H4 and 4B4 allow CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes to be subdivided into CD45R+ and CDW29+ functional subpopulations. The CD4+ CD45R+ lymphocytes are designated as suppressor/inducer and CD4+ CDW29+ as helper/inducer subsets. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from 19 patients with Down's syndrome and 19 age- and sex-matched normal controls were analysed for the CD45R+ and CDW29+ subsets from the CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes. The percentage of CD4+ CD45R+ cells (suppressor inducer) was markedly increased and of CD4+ CDW29+ cells (helper/inducer) decreased in all patients with Down's syndrome. In contract, the percentage of CD8+ CD45R+ and CD8+ CDW29+ subsets showed no major differences between patients with Down's syndrome and normal controls. Moreover, an alteration in the CD4+ and CD45R+ and CD4+ CDW29+ T cell subsets was accompanied by a markedly reduced proliferative response to phytohaemagglutinin and concanavalin A stimulation of the CD4+ T lymphocytes. Thus, a deficiency exists in patients with Down's syndrome in the CD4+ CDW29+ helper/inducer T cell subset which may contribute to their impaired cell-mediated immunity. PMID:1967994

  4. Anti-CD3 and anti-CD2-induced T-cell activation in primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gerli, R; Bertotto, A; Cernetti, C; Agea, E; Crupi, S; Arcangeli, C; Spinozzi, F; Galandrini, R; Rambotti, P

    1989-01-01

    Because T-cell dysfunctions have been reported in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS), peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proliferation obtained with anti-CD3 and anti-CD2 monoclonal antibodies was evaluated in these patients. Anti-CD3-induced mitogenesis, which varied widely among the patients, was lower in subjects with evidence of anti-SSA and anti-SSB antibodies than in controls. Moreover, the anti-CD2-induced response was depressed in about half the patients and the nonresponders were mainly those with anti-SSA and anti-SSB antibodies. Phorbol myristate acetate, a protein kinase C activator, used alone or added to anti-CD3, induced greater proliferation in patients than in control PBMC. In contrast, exogenous recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL-2) did not significantly enhance the anti-CD2-induced response of patients' PBMC, as it did in normal PBMC. Peripheral blood and parotid T cells from a patient with well-defined primary SS and parotid enlargement also responded poorly to anti-CD2 stimulation. Exogenous rIL-2 restored T-cell proliferation only in the salivary gland cultures of this patient. The present findings suggest that there is a T-cell activation defect in subjects with primary SS, particularly in those with circulating anti-SSA and anti-SSB antibodies. In addition, the difference in the response to IL-2 of peripheral blood and parotid-infiltrating T cells would seem to indicate that T-cell subsets are differently distributed in the blood and inflammation site. PMID:2575023

  5. Breast cancer cells expressing stem cell markers CD44+ CD24lo are eliminated by Numb-1 peptide-activated T cells

    PubMed Central

    Mine, Takashi; Matsueda, Satoko; Li, Yufeng; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi; Gao, Hui; Danes, Cristopher; Wong, Kwong-Kwok; Wang, Xinhui; Ferrone, Soldano; Ioannides, Constantin G.

    2009-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) are resistant to chemoand radiotherapy. To eliminate cells with phenotypic markers of CSC-like we characterized: (1) expression of CD44, CD24, CD133 and MIC-A/B (NKG2 receptors) in breast (MCF7) and ovarian (SK-OV-3) cells resistant to gemcitabine (GEM), paclitaxel (PTX) and 5-Xuorouracil (5-FU) and (2) their elimination by Numb- and Notch-peptide activated CTL. The number of cells in all populations with the luminal CSC phenotype [epithelial specific antigen+ (ESA) CD44hi CD24lo, CD44hi CD133+, and CD133+ CD24lo] increased in drug-resistant MCF7 and SK-OV-3 cells. Similarly, the number of cells with expressed MIC-A/B increased 4 times in drug-resistant tumor cells compared with drug-sensitive cells. GEMRes MCF7 cells had lower levels of the Notch-1-extracellular domain (NECD) and Notch trans-membrane intracellular domain (TMIC) than GEMSens MCF7. The levels of Numb, and Numb-L-[P]-Ser265 were similar in GEMRes and GEMSens MCF7 cells. Only the levels of Numb-L (long)-Ser295 decreased slightly. This finding suggests that Notch-1 cleavage to TMIC is inhibited in GEMRes MCF7 cells. PBMC activated by natural immunogenic peptides Notch-1 (2112−2120) and Numb-1 (87−95) eliminated NICDpositive, CD24hi CD24lo MCF7 cells. It is likely that the immunogenic Numb-1 peptide in MCF7 cells originated from Numb, [P]-lated by an unknown kinase, because staurosporine but not wortmannin and MAPK-inhibitors decreased peptide presentation. Numb and Notch are antagonistic proteins which degrade each other to stop and activate cell proliferation, respectively. Their peptides are presented alternatively. Targeting both antagonistic proteins should be useful to prevent metastases in patients whose tumors are resistant to conventional treatments. PMID:19048252

  6. Ligand stimulation of CD95 induces activation of Plk3 followed by phosphorylation of caspase-8

    PubMed Central

    Helmke, Christina; Raab, Monika; Rödel, Franz; Matthess, Yves; Oellerich, Thomas; Mandal, Ranadip; Sanhaji, Mourad; Urlaub, Henning; Rödel, Claus; Becker, Sven; Strebhardt, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Upon interaction of the CD95 receptor with its ligand, sequential association of the adaptor molecule FADD (MORT1), pro-forms of caspases-8/10, and the caspase-8/10 regulator c-FLIP leads to the formation of a death-inducing signaling complex. Here, we identify polo-like kinase (Plk) 3 as a new interaction partner of the death receptor CD95. The enzymatic activity of Plk3 increases following interaction of the CD95 receptor with its ligand. Knockout (KO) or knockdown of caspase-8, CD95 or FADD prevents activation of Plk3 upon CD95 stimulation, suggesting a requirement of a functional DISC for Plk3 activation. Furthermore, we identify caspase-8 as a new substrate for Plk3. Phosphorylation occurs on T273 and results in stimulation of caspase-8 proapoptotic function. Stimulation of CD95 in cells expressing a non-phosphorylatable caspase-8-T273A mutant in a rescue experiment or in Plk3-KO cells generated by CRISPR/Cas9 reduces the processing of caspase-8 prominently. Low T273 phosphorylation correlates significantly with low Plk3 expression in a cohort of 95 anal tumor patients. Our data suggest a novel mechanism of kinase activation within the Plk family and propose a new model for the stimulation of the extrinsic death pathway in tumors with high Plk3 expression. PMID:27325299

  7. Ligand stimulation of CD95 induces activation of Plk3 followed by phosphorylation of caspase-8.

    PubMed

    Helmke, Christina; Raab, Monika; Rödel, Franz; Matthess, Yves; Oellerich, Thomas; Mandal, Ranadip; Sanhaji, Mourad; Urlaub, Henning; Rödel, Claus; Becker, Sven; Strebhardt, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    Upon interaction of the CD95 receptor with its ligand, sequential association of the adaptor molecule FADD (MORT1), pro-forms of caspases-8/10, and the caspase-8/10 regulator c-FLIP leads to the formation of a death-inducing signaling complex. Here, we identify polo-like kinase (Plk) 3 as a new interaction partner of the death receptor CD95. The enzymatic activity of Plk3 increases following interaction of the CD95 receptor with its ligand. Knockout (KO) or knockdown of caspase-8, CD95 or FADD prevents activation of Plk3 upon CD95 stimulation, suggesting a requirement of a functional DISC for Plk3 activation. Furthermore, we identify caspase-8 as a new substrate for Plk3. Phosphorylation occurs on T273 and results in stimulation of caspase-8 proapoptotic function. Stimulation of CD95 in cells expressing a non-phosphorylatable caspase-8-T273A mutant in a rescue experiment or in Plk3-KO cells generated by CRISPR/Cas9 reduces the processing of caspase-8 prominently. Low T273 phosphorylation correlates significantly with low Plk3 expression in a cohort of 95 anal tumor patients. Our data suggest a novel mechanism of kinase activation within the Plk family and propose a new model for the stimulation of the extrinsic death pathway in tumors with high Plk3 expression. PMID:27325299

  8. [THE IMMUNOMODULATORY ACTIVITY OF PLASMA OF PATIENTS INFECTED WITH HUMAN HIV VIRUS].

    PubMed

    Selimova, L M; Kalnina, L B; Serebrovskaya, L V; Ivanova, L A; Gulyaeva, A N; Nosik, D M

    2015-10-01

    The study was carried out to investigate impact of plasma of patients infected with human HIV virus receiving and not receiving highly active antiviral therapy on: expression of phenotypic markers of lymphocytes (CD3+, CD3+/CD4+, CD3+/CD8+, CD19+, CD3-/CD (16+56)+, CD3+/CD(16+56)+, CD3+/HLA-DR+, CD4+/CD62L+, CD8+/CD38+) in mononuclear cells of blood of donors and secretion of pro-inflammatory (interleukin-1β, interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-4 and interleukin-10) cytokines. After 24 hours of activation of mononuclear cells with plasmas it was demonstrated that as compared with control groups, in of plasmas of patients with highly active antiviral therapy increasing of number of CD4+ T-cells and decreasing of CD8+ T-cells is observed. The plasmas of patients with highly active antiviral therapy activate in most instances CD4+ T-cells whereas plasmas of patients without treatment--CD8+ T-cells. The results of detection of cytokines in blood indicate that in patients without treatment inflammatory potential is increased as compared with group of highly active antiviral therapy. The data concerning accumulation of interleukin-1β under cultivation of mononuclear cells with plasmas indicates at its role in preservation of vitality of natural killers. The analysis of immunomodulatory activity of plasma of patients infected with human HIV virus can be recommended as an additional technique of evaluation of functioning of immune system. PMID:26841673

  9. Differential Dynamics of CD4+ and CD8+ T-Lymphocyte Proliferation and Activation in Acute Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Amitinder; Hale, Corrina L.; Ramanujan, Saroja; Jain, Rakesh K.; Johnson, R. Paul

    2000-01-01

    Although lymphocyte turnover in chronic human immunodeficiency virus and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection has been extensively studied, there is little information on turnover in acute infection. We carried out a prospective kinetic analysis of lymphocyte proliferation in 13 rhesus macaques inoculated with pathogenic SIV. A short-lived dramatic increase in circulating Ki-67+ lymphocytes observed at 1 to 4 weeks was temporally related to the onset of SIV replication. A 5- to 10-fold increase in Ki-67+ CD8+ T lymphocytes and a 2- to 3-fold increase in Ki-67+ CD3− CD8+ natural killer cells accounted for >85% of proliferating lymphocytes at peak proliferation. In contrast, there was little change in the percentage of Ki-67+ CD4+ T lymphocytes during acute infection, although transient increases in Ki-67− and Ki-67+ CD4+ T lymphocytes expressing CD69, Fas, and HLA-DR were observed. A two- to fourfold decline in CD4+ T lymphocytes expressing CD25 and CD69 was seen later in SIV infection. The majority of Ki-67+ CD8+ T lymphocytes were phenotypically CD45RA− CD49dhi Fashi CD25− CD69− CD28− HLA-DR− and persisted at levels twofold above baseline 6 months after SIV infection. Increased CD8+ T-lymphocyte proliferation was associated with cell expansion, paralleled the onset of SIV-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity, and had an oligoclonal component. Thus, divergent patterns of proliferation and activation are exhibited by CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes in early SIV infection and may determine how these cells are differentially affected in AIDS. PMID:10954541

  10. The Expression of TLR-9, CD86, and CD95 Phenotypes in Circulating B Cells of Patients with Chronic Viral Hepatitis B or C before and after Antiviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ping-wei; Ma, Liang; Ji, Hui-fan; Yu, Lei; Feng, Jun-yan; Liu, Ming-yuan; Jiang, Yan-fang

    2015-01-01

    Aims. This study aimed to assess the differential expression of specific B cell subtypes in patients with chronic viral hepatitis. Methods. The frequencies of differential expression of specific B cell subtypes in patients with chronic viral hepatitis and healthy controls were assessed by flow cytometry using monoclonal antibodies specific for CD38, CD27, CD86, CD95, TLR-9, and IgD. The effect of adefovir treatment on B cell subsets in HBV patients was determined. The values of clinical parameters in the patients were also measured. Results. The frequency of CD86+ B cells was not significantly different in chronic HBV patients but was higher in HCV patients compared with that in healthy controls. CD95 and IgD levels were lower in HBV and HCV patients than in healthy controls. A significant negative correlation occurred between the proportion of CD95+ B cells and HBV DNA viral load. The frequency of TLR-9 on the B cells in HBV and HCV patients was higher compared with that of healthy controls. After treatment with adefovir, the frequency of CD95 and IgD expressed on B cells was increased in HBV patients. Conclusions. Activated B cells and exhausted B cells homeostasis were commonly disturbed in HBV and HCV patients. PMID:25892855

  11. The differential frequency of Lineage(-)CRTH2(-)CD45(+)NKp44(-)CD117(-)CD127(+)ILC subset in the inflamed terminal ileum of patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Doty, Andria L; Iqbal, Atif; Glover, Sarah C

    2016-01-01

    Deregulation of various components of the immune system has been reported in the inflamed gut of Crohn's disease (CD) patients. Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are novel innate effector lymphocytes which can rapidly respond to danger signals, from invading pathogens or tissue damage, to maintain homeostasis, especially along the mucosal surfaces. The purpose of this study is to compare composition of the intestinal ILCs subsets of CD patients with differential inflammatory conditions of the terminal ileum, which are marked by distinct histological appearances and mucosal profiles of cytokines. We observed alterations in the frequency of Lineage(-)CRTH2(-)CD45(+)NKp44(-)CD117(-)CD127(+)ILC subset in the inflamed terminal ileum. PMID:27215784

  12. IL-12 and IL-4 activate a CD39-dependent intrinsic peripheral tolerance mechanism in CD8(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Noble, Alistair; Mehta, Hema; Lovell, Andrew; Papaioannou, Eleftheria; Fairbanks, Lynette

    2016-06-01

    Immune responses to protein antigens involve CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, which follow distinct programs of differentiation. Naïve CD8 T cells rapidly develop cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) activity after T-cell receptor stimulation, and we have previously shown that this is accompanied by suppressive activity in the presence of specific cytokines, i.e. IL-12 and IL-4. Cytokine-induced CD8(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells are one of several Treg-cell phenotypes and are Foxp3(-) IL-10(+) with contact-dependent suppressive capacity. Here, we show they also express high level CD39, an ecto-nucleotidase that degrades extracellular ATP, and this contributes to their suppressive activity. CD39 expression was found to be upregulated on CD8(+) T cells during peripheral tolerance induction in vivo, accompanied by release of IL-12 and IL-10. CD39 was also upregulated during respiratory tolerance induction to inhaled allergen and on tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells. Production of IL-10 and expression of CD39 by CD8(+) T cells was independently regulated, being respectively blocked by extracellular ATP and enhanced by an A2A adenosine receptor agonist. Our results suggest that any CTL can develop suppressive activity when exposed to specific cytokines in the absence of alarmins. Thus negative feedback controls CTL expansion under regulation from both nucleotide and cytokine environment within tissues. PMID:26990545

  13. CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ Regulatory T Cells Suppress Anti-Tumor Immune Responses in Patients with Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Plant, Andrea; Wright, Kate L.; El-Shanawany, Tariq M.; Harrop, Richard; Torkington, Jared; Rees, Brian I.; Williams, Geraint T.

    2006-01-01

    Background A wealth of evidence obtained using mouse models indicates that CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Treg) maintain peripheral tolerance to self-antigens and also inhibit anti-tumor immune responses. To date there is limited information about CD4+ T cell responses in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). We set out to measure T cell responses to a tumor-associated antigen and examine whether Treg impinge on those anti-tumor immune responses in CRC patients. Methodology and Principal Findings Treg were identified and characterized as CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ using flow cytometry. An increased frequency of Treg was demonstrated in both peripheral blood and mesenteric lymph nodes of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) compared with either healthy controls or patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Depletion of Treg from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of CRC patients unmasked CD4+ T cell responses, as observed by IFNγ release, to the tumor associated antigen 5T4, whereas no effect was observed in a healthy age-matched control group. Conclusions/Significance Collectively, these data demonstrate that Treg capable of inhibiting tumor associated antigen-specific immune responses are enriched in patients with CRC. These results support a rationale for manipulating Treg to enhance cancer immunotherapy. PMID:17205133

  14. CD252 regulates mast cell mediated, CD1d-restricted NKT-cell activation in mice.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez Roldan, Nestor; Orinska, Zane; Ewers, Hanno; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2016-02-01

    The interaction between tissue-resident mast cells (MCs) and recruited immune cells contributes to tissue immunosurveillance. However, the cells, mechanisms, and receptors involved in this crosstalk remain ill defined. Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are CD1d-restricted innate lymphocytes that recognize glycolipid antigens and have emerged as critical players in immunity. Here, we show that primary mouse peritoneal MCs express surface CD1d, which is upregulated in vivo following administration of alpha-galactosylceramide. In contrast, in BM-derived MCs CD1d was found to be stored intracellularly and to relocate at the cell surface upon IgE-mediated degranulation. Activated BM-derived MCs expressing surface CD1d and loaded with alpha-galactosylceramide were found to induce iNKT-cell proliferation and the release of IFN-γ, IL-13, and IL-4 in a CD1d-restricted manner. Moreover, the costimulatory molecules CD48, CD137L, CD252, CD274, and CD275 affected MC-induced IFN-γ release and iNKT-cell proliferation. Interestingly, among the costimulatory molecules, CD48 and CD252 exhibited a distinctly regulatory activity on iNKT-cell release of both IFN-γ and IL-13. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the crosstalk between MCs and iNKT cells may regulate inflammatory immune responses. PMID:26564814

  15. APC Activation Restores Functional CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cells in NOD Mice that Can Prevent Diabetes Development

    PubMed Central

    Manirarora, Jean N.; Kosiewicz, Michele M.; Parnell, Sarah A.; Alard, Pascale

    2008-01-01

    Background Defects in APC and regulatory cells are associated with diabetes development in NOD mice. We have shown previously that NOD APC are not effective at stimulating CD4+CD25+ regulatory cell function in vitro. We hypothesize that failure of NOD APC to properly activate CD4+CD25+ regulatory cells in vivo could compromise their ability to control pathogenic cells, and activation of NOD APC could restore this defect, thereby preventing disease. Methodology/Principal Findings To test these hypotheses, we used the well-documented ability of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), an APC activator, to prevent disease in NOD mice. Phenotype and function of CD4+CD25+ regulatory cells from untreated and CFA-treated NOD mice were determined by FACS, and in vitro and in vivo assays. APC from these mice were also evaluated for their ability to activate regulatory cells in vitro. We have found that sick NOD CD4+CD25+ cells expressed Foxp3 at the same percentages, but decreased levels per cell, compared to young NOD or non-NOD controls. Treatment with CFA increased Foxp3 expression in NOD cells, and also increased the percentages of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ cells infiltrating the pancreas compared to untreated NOD mice. Moreover, CD4+CD25+ cells from pancreatic LN of CFA-treated, but not untreated, NOD mice transferred protection from diabetes. Finally, APC isolated from CFA-treated mice increased Foxp3 and granzyme B expression as well as regulatory function by NOD CD4+CD25+ cells in vitro compared to APC from untreated NOD mice. Conclusions/Significance These data suggest that regulatory T cell function and ability to control pathogenic cells can be enhanced in NOD mice by activating NOD APC. PMID:19011680

  16. A phase 1 study of the bispecific anti-CD30/CD16A antibody construct AFM13 in patients with relapsed or refractory Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Rothe, Achim; Sasse, Stephanie; Topp, Max S.; Eichenauer, Dennis A.; Hummel, Horst; Reiners, Katrin S.; Dietlein, Markus; Kuhnert, Georg; Kessler, Joerg; Buerkle, Carolin; Ravic, Miroslav; Knackmuss, Stefan; Marschner, Jens-Peter; Pogge von Strandmann, Elke; Borchmann, Peter

    2015-01-01

    AFM13 is a bispecific, tetravalent chimeric antibody construct (TandAb) designed for the treatment of CD30-expressing malignancies. AFM13 recruits natural killer (NK) cells via binding to CD16A as immune effector cells. In this phase 1 dose-escalation study, 28 patients with heavily pretreated relapsed or refractory Hodgkin lymphoma received AFM13 at doses of 0.01 to 7 mg/kg body weight. Primary objectives were safety and tolerability. Secondary objectives included pharmacokinetics, antitumor activity, and pharmacodynamics. Adverse events were generally mild to moderate. The maximum tolerated dose was not reached. Pharmacokinetics assessment revealed a half-life of up to 19 hours. Three of 26 evaluable patients achieved partial remission (11.5%) and 13 patients achieved stable disease (50%), with an overall disease control rate of 61.5%. AFM13 was also active in brentuximab vedotin–refractory patients. In 13 patients who received doses of ≥1.5 mg/kg AFM13, the overall response rate was 23% and the disease control rate was 77%. AFM13 treatment resulted in a significant NK-cell activation and a decrease of soluble CD30 in peripheral blood. In conclusion, AFM13 represents a well-tolerated, safe, and active targeted immunotherapy of Hodgkin lymphoma. A phase 2 study is currently planned to optimize the dosing schedule in order to further improve the therapeutic efficacy. This phase 1 study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01221571. PMID:25887777

  17. Continuous Activation of Autoreactive CD4+ CD25+ Regulatory T Cells in the Steady State

    PubMed Central

    Fisson, Sylvain; Darrasse-Jèze, Guillaume; Litvinova, Elena; Septier, Franck; Klatzmann, David; Liblau, Roland; Salomon, Benoît L.

    2003-01-01

    Despite a growing interest in CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells (Treg) that play a major role in self-tolerance and immunoregulation, fundamental parameters of the biology and homeostasis of these cells are poorly known. Here, we show that this population is composed of two Treg subsets that have distinct phenotypes and homeostasis in normal unmanipulated mice. In the steady state, some Treg remain quiescent and have a long lifespan, in the order of months, whereas the other Treg are dividing extensively and express multiple activation markers. After adoptive transfer, tissue-specific Treg rapidly divide and expand preferentially in lymph nodes draining their target self-antigens. These results reveal the existence of a cycling Treg subset composed of autoreactive Treg that are continuously activated by tissue self-antigens. PMID:12939344

  18. The tetraspanin CD9 is preferentially expressed on the human CD4+CD45RA+ naive T cell population and is involved in T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    KOBAYASHI, H; HOSONO, O; IWATA, S; KAWASAKI, H; KUWANA, M; TANAKA, H; DANG, N H; MORIMOTO, C

    2004-01-01

    Human CD4+ T cells can be divided into reciprocal memory and naive T cell subsets based on their expression of CD45 isoforms and CD29/integrin beta1 subunit. To identify unique cell surface molecules on human T cells, we developed a new monoclonal antibody termed anti5H9. Binding of anti5H9 triggers a co-stimulatory response in human peripheral blood T cells. Retrovirus-mediated expression cloning has revealed that the antigen recognized by anti5H9 is identical to the tetraspanin CD9. We now show that human CD9 is preferentially expressed on the CD4+CD45RA+ naive T cell subset, and that CD9+CD45RA+ T cells respond preferentially to the recombinant beta2-glycoprotein I, compared to CD9–CD45RA+ T cells. Furthermore, anti5H9 inhibits both the recombinant beta2-glycoprotein I- and the recall antigen tetanus toxoid-specific T cell proliferation. These results suggest that the tetraspanin CD9 plays an important role in T cell activation. PMID:15196249

  19. Spatiotemporally Distinct Interactions with Dendritic Cell Subsets Facilitates CD4+ and CD8+ T Cell Activation to Localized Viral Infection.

    PubMed

    Hor, Jyh Liang; Whitney, Paul G; Zaid, Ali; Brooks, Andrew G; Heath, William R; Mueller, Scott N

    2015-09-15

    The dynamics of when and where CD4(+) T cells provide help for CD8(+) T cell priming and which dendritic cells (DCs) activate CD4(+) T cells in vivo after localized infection are poorly understood. By using a cutaneous herpes simplex virus infection model combined with intravital 2-photon imaging of the draining lymph node (LN) to concurrently visualize pathogen-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, we found that early priming of CD4(+) T cells involved clustering with migratory skin DCs. CD8(+) T cells did not interact with migratory DCs and their activation was delayed, requiring later clustering interactions with LN-resident XCR1(+) DCs. CD4(+) T cells interacted with these late CD8(+) T cell clusters on resident XCR1(+) DCs. Together, these data reveal asynchronous T cell activation by distinct DC subsets and highlight the key role of XCR1(+) DCs as the central platform for cytotoxic T lymphocyte activation and the delivery of CD4(+) T cell help. PMID:26297566

  20. Asymmetric pallidal neuronal activity in patients with cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    Moll, Christian K E; Galindo-Leon, Edgar; Sharott, Andrew; Gulberti, Alessandro; Buhmann, Carsten; Koeppen, Johannes A; Biermann, Maxine; Bäumer, Tobias; Zittel, Simone; Westphal, Manfred; Gerloff, Christian; Hamel, Wolfgang; Münchau, Alexander; Engel, Andreas K

    2014-01-01

    The origin of asymmetric clinical manifestation of symptoms in patients suffering from cervical dystonia (CD) is hitherto poorly understood. Dysregulated neuronal activity in the basal ganglia has been suggested to have a role in the pathophysiology of CD. Here, we re-assessed the question to what extent relative changes occur in the direct vs. indirect basal ganglia pathway in CD, whether these circuit changes are lateralized, and how these alterations relate to CD symptoms. To this end, we recorded ongoing single cell and local field potential (LFP) activity from the external (GPe) and internal pallidal segment (GPi) of 13 CD patients undergoing microelectrode-guided stereotactic surgery for deep brain stimulation in the GPi. We compared pallidal recordings from CD patients operated under local anaesthesia (LA) with those obtained in CD patients operated under general anaesthesia (GA). In awake patients, mean GPe discharge rate (52 Hz) was lower than that of GPi (72 Hz). Mean GPi discharge ipsilateral to the side of head turning was higher than contralateral and correlated with torticollis symptom severity. Lateralized differences were absent at the level of the GPe and in recordings from patients operated under GA. Furthermore, in the GPi of CD patients there was a subpopulation of theta-oscillatory cells with unique bursting characteristics. Power and coherence of GPe- and GPi-LFPs were dominated by a theta peak and also exhibited band-specific interhemispheric differences. Strong cross-frequency coupling of low-gamma amplitude to theta phase was a feature of pallidal LFPs recorded under LA, but not GA. These results indicate that CD is associated with an asymmetric pallidal outflow. Based on the finding of symmetric neuronal discharges in the GPe, we propose that an imbalanced interhemispheric direct pathway gain may be involved in CD pathophysiology. PMID:24574981

  1. Low CD4/CD8 Ratio Is Associated with Non AIDS-Defining Cancers in Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy: ANRS CO8 (Aproco/Copilote) Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Hema, Mariam Noelie; Ferry, Tristan; Dupon, Michel; Cuzin, Lise; Verdon, Renaud; Thiébaut, Rodolphe; Protopopescu, Camelia; Leport, Catherine; Raffi, François; Le Moing, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To study the association between CD4/CD8 ratio and morbidity in HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods The APROCO/COPILOTE cohort enrolled patients initiating a protease inhibitor-containing ART in 1997–1999. The association between occurrence of first non AIDS-defining severe events (NADE) and time-dependent measures of immune restoration was assessed by 4 Cox models with different definitions of restoration, CD4+ cell counts (CD4), CD4/CD8 ratio, both CD4 and CD4/CD8 ratio, or a composite variable (CD4< 500/mm3, CD4 > 500/mm3 and CD4/CD8 ratio < 1, CD4 > 500/mm3 and CD4/CD8 ratio > 1). Models adjusted on baseline characteristics and time-dependent viral load were compared using Akaike Information Criterion. Results We included 1227 patients. Median duration of follow-up was 9.2 years (IQR: 4.2–11.4). Median CD4 was 530/mm3 at 9 years. Median CD4/CD8 ratio was 0.3 (IQR: 0.2–0.5) at baseline and 0.6 (IQR: 0.4–0.9) after 9 years. Incidence of first NADE was 7.4/100 person-years, the most common being bacterial infections (21%), cardiovascular events (14%) and cancers (10%). For both bacterial infections and cardiovascular events, the CD4/CD8 ratio did not add predictive information to the CD4 cell count. However, low CD4/CD8 ratio was the best predictor of non-AIDS cancers (adjusted HR = 2.13 for CD4/CD8 < 0.5; 95% CI = 1.32–3.44). Conclusions CD4/CD8 ratio remains < 1 in most HIV-infected patients despite long-term CD4+ cell counts restoration on ART. A CD4/CD8 ratio < 0.5 could identify patients who require a more intensive strategy of cancer prevention or screening. PMID:27548257

  2. [Regulatory B cells activated by CpG-ODN combined with anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody inhibit CD4(+)T cell proliferation].

    PubMed

    Wang, Keng; Tao, Lei; Su, Jianbing; Zhang, Yueyang; Zou, Binhua; Wang, Yiyuan; Li, Xiaojuan

    2016-09-01

    Objective To observe the immunosuppressive function of regulatory B cells (Bregs) in vitro after activated by CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG-ODN) and anti-CD40 mAb. Methods Mice splenic CD5(+)CD1d(high)B cells and CD5(-)CD1d(low)B cells were sorted by flow cytometry. These B cells were first stimulated with CpG-ODN combined with anti-CD40 mAb for 24 hours, and then co-cultured with purified CD4(+)T cells. The interleukin 10 (IL-10) expression in the activated Bregs and other B cell subset, as well as the proliferation and interferon γ (IFN-γ) expression in the CD4(+) T cells activated by anti-CD3 mAb plus anti-CD28 mAb were determined by flow cytometry. Results CD5(+)CD1d(high) B cells activated by CpG-ODN plus anti-CD40 mAb blocked the up-regulated CD4(+)T proliferation and significantly reduced the IFN-γ level. At the same time, activated CD5(-)CD1d(low)B cells showed no inhibitory effect on CD4(+)T cells. Further study revealed that IL-10 expression in the CD5(+)CD1d(high) B cells were much higher than that in the CD5(-)CD1d(low)B cells after stimulated with CpG-ODN combined with anti-CD40 mAb for 24 hours. Conclusion CD5(+)CD1d(high) B cells activated by CpG-ODN combined with anti-CD40 mAb have immune inhibitory effects on CD4(+)T cell activation in vitro , which possibly due to IL-10 secretion. PMID:27609568

  3. Circulating activated T cell subsets in autoimmune thyroid diseases: differences between untreated and treated patients.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, H; Okugawa, T; Itoh, M

    1991-11-01

    To investigate the relationships between lymphocyte subsets and thyroid function, peripheral blood lymphocytes were analysed with cell surface antigens of activated (HLA-DR+) T, helper T (CD4+ 2H4-, CD4+ 4B4+) and suppressor-inducer T (CD4+ 2H4+, CD4+ 4B4-) cells subsets in 56 patients with Graves' disease, 16 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, 7 patients with typical subacute thyroiditis and 2 patients with the thyrotoxic phase of autoimmune thyroiditis. Both patients with Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis had increased percentages of HLA-DR+ T (Ia+ CD3+) cells as well as HLA-DR+ helper-inducer T (Ia+ CD4+) cells, which seemed to be independent of treatments. The percentage of HLA-DR+ suppressor-cytotoxic T (Ia+ CD8+) cells was increased in euthyroid or hypothyroid patients with Graves' disease following treatment, but was normal in hyperthyroid patients. The percentages of Ia+ CD4+ cells and Ia+ CD8+ were also increased in patients with thyroiditis, whereas these abnormal values normalized in the remission phase. These findings suggest that an increase in Ia+ CD4+ cells characteristically occurs during immune system activation in patients with hyperthyroid Graves' disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis and the thyrotoxic phase of subacute thyroiditis, whereas the activated CD8+ cells in Graves' disease are induced by antithyroidal therapy. PMID:1684685

  4. CD3brightCD56+ T cells associate with pegylated interferon-alpha treatment nonresponse in chronic hepatitis B patients

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chuang; Shen, Xiaokun; Fu, Binqing; Liu, Yanyan; Chen, Yongyan; Ni, Fang; Ye, Ying; Sun, Rui; Li, Jiabin; Tian, Zhigang; Wei, Haiming

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection is a serious and prevalent health concern worldwide, and the development of effective drugs and strategies to combat this disease is urgently needed. Currently, pegylated interferon-alpha (peg-IFNα) and nucleoside/nucleotide analogues (NA) are the most commonly prescribed treatments. However, sustained response rates in patients remain low, and the reasons are not well understood. Here, we observed that CHB patients preferentially harbored CD3brightCD56+ T cells, a newly identified CD56+ T cell population. Patients with this unique T cell population exhibited relatively poor responses to peg-IFNα treatment. CD3brightCD56+ T cells expressed remarkably high levels of the inhibitory molecule NKG2A as well as low levels of CD8. Even if patients were systematically treated with peg-IFNα, CD3brightCD56+ T cells remained in an inhibitory state throughout treatment and exhibited suppressed antiviral function. Furthermore, peg-IFNα treatment rapidly increased inhibitory TIM-3 expression on CD3brightCD56+ T cells, which negatively correlated with IFNγ production and might have led to their dysfunction. This study identified a novel CD3brightCD56+ T cell population preferentially shown in CHB patients, and indicated that the presence of CD3brightCD56+ T cells in CHB patients may be useful as a new indicator associated with poor therapeutic responses to peg-IFNα treatment. PMID:27174425

  5. CD3(bright)CD56(+) T cells associate with pegylated interferon-alpha treatment nonresponse in chronic hepatitis B patients.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chuang; Shen, Xiaokun; Fu, Binqing; Liu, Yanyan; Chen, Yongyan; Ni, Fang; Ye, Ying; Sun, Rui; Li, Jiabin; Tian, Zhigang; Wei, Haiming

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection is a serious and prevalent health concern worldwide, and the development of effective drugs and strategies to combat this disease is urgently needed. Currently, pegylated interferon-alpha (peg-IFNα) and nucleoside/nucleotide analogues (NA) are the most commonly prescribed treatments. However, sustained response rates in patients remain low, and the reasons are not well understood. Here, we observed that CHB patients preferentially harbored CD3(bright)CD56(+) T cells, a newly identified CD56(+) T cell population. Patients with this unique T cell population exhibited relatively poor responses to peg-IFNα treatment. CD3(bright)CD56(+) T cells expressed remarkably high levels of the inhibitory molecule NKG2A as well as low levels of CD8. Even if patients were systematically treated with peg-IFNα, CD3(bright)CD56(+) T cells remained in an inhibitory state throughout treatment and exhibited suppressed antiviral function. Furthermore, peg-IFNα treatment rapidly increased inhibitory TIM-3 expression on CD3(bright)CD56(+) T cells, which negatively correlated with IFNγ production and might have led to their dysfunction. This study identified a novel CD3(bright)CD56(+) T cell population preferentially shown in CHB patients, and indicated that the presence of CD3(bright)CD56(+) T cells in CHB patients may be useful as a new indicator associated with poor therapeutic responses to peg-IFNα treatment. PMID:27174425

  6. [Effect of a complex treatment, including glutargin and erbisol on the blood plasma content of protein P53, apoptotic markers of type II, activity of caspases and the level of sCD 117 in patients with autonomic-vascular dystonia].

    PubMed

    Krychun, I I

    2008-01-01

    It has been established that the blood content of protein P53 diminishes by 27%, the blood level of sTRAIL increases by 22%, sCD 117 increases by 44% in patients with vegeto-vascular dystonia of the hypertonic type that is accompanied by an increase of the activity of caspases-1 however the activity of caspases-3 and - 8 as well as the blood content of TNF-alpha do not change. Multimodality therapy using glutargin does not influence on the level of the blood plasma TNF-alpha and the activity of caspases-1,-3,-8, normalizes the blood content of sTRAIL and sCD 117, however does not change the plasma concentration of protein P53 which remains lower by 35% than the control indices. In patients with vegeto-vascular dystonia of the hypotonic type the concentration of blood plasma protein P53, TNF-alpha and sTRAIL and the activity of caspases-1,-3,-8 correspond to the control values against a background of an almost twofold increase of the plasma sCD 117 level. The use of erbisol in a complex of therapeutic agents does not change the activity of caspases-l,-3,-8 and does not influence on the blood content of protein p53, TNF-alpha and sTRAIL and diminishes the plasma level of sCD 117 up to control values. A considerable elevation of the blood content of type II apoptotic factors is characteristic of the mixed type of vegeto-vascular dystonia: the level of protein p53 increases 2,4 times, TNF-alpha - 1,9 times, sTRAIL - 2,3 times that is accompanied by an increased activity of caspase-1 - 4,1 times, caspase-3 - 3,3 times, caspase-8 - 3,8 times and an increase of the plasma concentration of sCD 117 - 3,5 times. The use of erbisol and glutargin in multimodality therapy normalizes the plasma concentration of TNF-alpha and diminishes the blood content of protein P53 by 33% and sTRAIL - by 42% which, nevertheless remains higher than the control value by 58% and 36% respectively. The combined effects of glutargin and erbisol in patients of this group are characterized by a

  7. Differential effects of CD45 CD45R and CD45R0 monoclonal antibodies in modulating human B cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Deane, D L; Harvey, E; Steel, C M

    1991-01-01

    We have examined the effect of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) to different epitopes of the leucocyte common antigen (LCA), CD45, on anti-human immunoglobulin-primed B cell activation. Binding of MoAbs to restricted epitopes present on CD45 glycoproteins of 180 kD and 220 kD (designated CD45R0 and CD45R, respectively) was found to promote B cell proliferation in the presence of T cells. CD45 MoAbs reactive with 'public' determinants on all four constituent members of the LCA family (180, 190, 205, and 220 kD) had either little effect or inhibited the basal B cell response to anti-immunoglobulin priming. Simultaneous immunofluorescent analysis of 5-bromodeoxyuridine incorporation and the expression of CD19 (B cell specific) or CD2 (T cell specific) identified the majority of responder cells as B lymphocytes. CD45R MoAbs significantly enhanced the B cell response to sub-optimal concentrations of interleukin-2. CD45 and CD45R0 MoAbs failed to elicit a similar response. Antibody to the interleukin-2 receptor (anti-Tac) partially blocked the CD45R-driven, T cell-dependent B cell proliferation. PMID:1703055

  8. Melanoma Expressed-CD70 Is Regulated by RhoA and MAPK Pathways without Affecting Vemurafenib Treatment Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sarrabayrouse, Guillaume; Gallardo, Franck; Gence, Rémi; Tilkin-Mariamé, Anne-Françoise

    2016-01-01

    CD70 is a costimulatory molecule member of the Tumor Necrosis Factor family that is expressed on activated immune cells. Its ectopic expression has been described in several types of cancer cells including lymphomas, renal cell carcinomas and glioblastomas. We have recently described its expression in a part of tumor cells from the vast majority of melanoma biopsies and human melanoma cell lines, and found that CD70 expression decreased over time as the disease progressed. Here, we show that RhoA, BRAF and Mitogen Activating Protein Kinase pathways are involved in the positive transcriptional regulation of CD70 expression in melanomas. Interestingly, the clinical inhibitor of the common BRAF V600E/D variants, Vemurafenib (PLX-4032), which is currently used to treat melanoma patients with BRAF V600E/D-mutated metastatic melanomas, decreased CD70 expression in human CD70+ melanoma cell lines. This decrease was seen in melanoma cells both with and without the BRAFV600E/D mutation, although was less efficient in those lacking the mutation. But interestingly, by silencing CD70 in CD70+ melanoma cell lines we show that PLX-4032-induced melanoma cell killing and its inhibitory effect on MAPK pathway activation are unaffected by CD70 expression. Consequently, our work demonstrates that CD70 ectopic expression in melanomas is not a valuable biomarker to predict tumor cells sensitivity to BRAF V600 inhibitors. PMID:26828592

  9. Melanoma Expressed-CD70 Is Regulated by RhoA and MAPK Pathways without Affecting Vemurafenib Treatment Activity.

    PubMed

    Pich, Christine; Teiti, Iotefa; Sarrabayrouse, Guillaume; Gallardo, Franck; Gence, Rémi; Tilkin-Mariamé, Anne-Françoise

    2016-01-01

    CD70 is a costimulatory molecule member of the Tumor Necrosis Factor family that is expressed on activated immune cells. Its ectopic expression has been described in several types of cancer cells including lymphomas, renal cell carcinomas and glioblastomas. We have recently described its expression in a part of tumor cells from the vast majority of melanoma biopsies and human melanoma cell lines, and found that CD70 expression decreased over time as the disease progressed. Here, we show that RhoA, BRAF and Mitogen Activating Protein Kinase pathways are involved in the positive transcriptional regulation of CD70 expression in melanomas. Interestingly, the clinical inhibitor of the common BRAF V600E/D variants, Vemurafenib (PLX-4032), which is currently used to treat melanoma patients with BRAF V600E/D-mutated metastatic melanomas, decreased CD70 expression in human CD70+ melanoma cell lines. This decrease was seen in melanoma cells both with and without the BRAFV600E/D mutation, although was less efficient in those lacking the mutation. But interestingly, by silencing CD70 in CD70+ melanoma cell lines we show that PLX-4032-induced melanoma cell killing and its inhibitory effect on MAPK pathway activation are unaffected by CD70 expression. Consequently, our work demonstrates that CD70 ectopic expression in melanomas is not a valuable biomarker to predict tumor cells sensitivity to BRAF V600 inhibitors. PMID:26828592

  10. High frequencies of activated B cells and T follicular helper cells are correlated with disease activity in patients with new-onset rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J; Shan, Y; Jiang, Z; Feng, J; Li, C; Ma, L; Jiang, Y

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the frequency of different subsets of circulating B and T follicular helper (Tfh) cells in patients with new-onset rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and following standard therapies. Twenty-five RA patients and 15 healthy controls (HC) were recruited for characterizing the frequency of CD27+, immunoglobulin (Ig)D+, CD86+, CD95+, Toll-like receptor (TLR)-9+ B cells and inducible T cell co-stimulator (ICOS) and programmed death 1 (PD-1)-positive Tfh cells and the level of serum interleukin (IL)-21. The potential correlation between the frequency of different subsets of B and Tfh cells and the values of clinical measures in RA patients was analysed. In comparison with HC, significantly higher percentages of circulating IgD+CD27−CD19+ naive B, CD86+CD19+ and CD95+CD19+ activated B, CD3+CD4+CXCR5+, CD3+CD4+CXCR5+ICOS+, CD3+CD4+CXCR5+PD-1+ and CD3+CD4+CXCR5+ICOS+PD-1+ Tfh cells but lower IgD+CD27+CD19+ preswitch memory B cells were detected, accompanied by significantly higher levels of serum IL-21 in the RA patients. Furthermore, the percentages of CD95+ B cells were correlated positively with the frequency of PD-1+ Tfh cells, but negatively with ICOS+ Tfh cells. The percentages of CD86+ B cells and ICOS+ Tfh cells were correlated positively with the values of disease activity score 28 (DAS28). Following the drug therapies for 1 month, the percentages of CD86+ B and PD-1+ Tfh cells were reduced significantly in the drug-responding patients. Our data suggest that activated B and Tfh cells may contribute to the pathogenesis of RA and the frequency of activated B and Tfh cells may be used as biomarkers for evaluating the therapeutic responses of individual patients with RA. PMID:23786438

  11. Normal mouse kidneys contain activated and CD3+CD4−CD8− double-negative T lymphocytes with a distinct TCR repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Ascon, Dolores B.; Ascon, Miguel; Satpute, Shailesh; Lopez-Briones, Sergio; Racusen, Lorraine; Colvin, Robert B.; Soloski, Mark J.; Rabb, Hamid

    2008-01-01

    Healthy liver, intestine, lung, and skin harbor resident lymphocytes with conventional and unconventional phenotypes. Lymphocytes also have been detected in healthy mice kidneys; however, these cells have not been well studied and have been largely overlooked. To better characterize the intra-renal lymphocytes, we extensively perfused C57BL/6J mice with PBS and then isolated mononuclear cells for flow cytometry analysis. We observed T cells, B cells, and NK cells in normal mice kidneys after extensive perfusion. Approximately 50% of kidney T lymphocytes expressed intermediate levels of CD3 (CD3int T cells). Similar to liver and lung, a high percentage of unconventional CD3+CD4−CD8− double-negative T cells was observed in normal mice kidneys, from which 11% expressed B220 antigen. Unlike the spleen and blood, the classic CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes in the kidney had a high proportion of activated CD69+ and effector/memory CD44CD62L ligand phenotypes. Also, a small percentage of CD4+CD25+forkhead box p3+ and NKT cells was observed in perfused and exanguinated kidneys. In addition, a distinct TCR repertoire was found on intra-renal conventional and unconventional T cells compared with those from the spleen. Finally, after 24 h of renal ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI), increased production of cytokines IFN-γ and TNF-α by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, isolated from perfused kidneys, was observed. These data suggest that some of these cells harbored in the kidney could be implicated in the immune response of the IRI pathogenic process. PMID:18765477

  12. MIF-CD74 GUIDED THERAPEUTIC STRATEGY FOR THE UPFRONT TREATMENT OF GBM PATIENTS WITH AN UNMETHYLATED MGMT PROMOTER

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Kerrie L; Ha, Wendy; Sevim, Hatice

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Promoter methylation of the DNA repair gene, MGMT is associated with improved treatment outcome for newly diagnosed glioblastoma (GBM) treated with standard chemoradiation. Currently, there are no universally effective systemic treatments available for patients with an unmethylated MGMT promoter or treatments for patients whose tumor recurs after primary treatment, irrespective of MGMT methylation status. We used SELDI-TOF MS to identify low molecular weight proteins associated with poor survival. We report a new therapeutic strategy with potential to overcome the drug resistance conferred by MGMT when applied as an adjunct therapy to the standard chemoradiation for patients. METHODS: We screened the low molecular weight proteome of patients' tumors, which were non-responsive to chemoradiotherapy (survival <12 months). Proteins of significant abundance in the non-responsive patients were purified, identified and validated in a larger cohort of GBM (n = 230). Inhibitors were sourced and efficacy of the drug was tested in patient derived tumor models. RESULTS: High expression of the inflammatory related protein Macrophage Inhibitory Factor (MIF) and its receptor, CD74 were found in patients who were non-responsive to chemoradiation. Heightened expression of both MIF and CD74 were identified in 57% of GBM (n = 230) and co-segregated with poor prognosis. CD74 forms a complex with CD44 at the cell surface. After MIF binds to the CD74/44 complex, Src is recruited. Src recruitment then initiates the activation of multiple pathways including Ras/MAPK and Akt resulting in tumor proliferation. Pro-angiogenic effects have also been attributed to this complex. Because of its involvement in tumorigenesis, inhibition of the MIF/CD74/CD44 complex with specific inhibitors in combination with chemoradiotherapy will likely abate the resistance to standard treatment and result in longer survival. Ibudilast (AV411; 3-isobutyryl-2-isopropylpyrazolo-[1,5-a] pyridine) is an

  13. The effect of timing of antiretroviral therapy on CD4+ T-cell reconstitution in the intestine of HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Allers, K; Puyskens, A; Epple, H-J; Schürmann, D; Hofmann, J; Moos, V; Schneider, T

    2016-01-01

    Whether and to what extent gut mucosal CD4(+) T cells of HIV-infected patients can be restored by combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) is not yet fully resolved. We studied absolute numbers, differentiation, and activation of mucosal CD4(+) T cells at different stages of HIV infection and assessed the effect of timing of cART initiation on this cell population. Mucosal CD4(+) T-cell numbers were severely reduced at all stages of chronic infection, but normal in patients with acute infection. In patients with initiation of cART during chronic HIV infection, mucosal CD4(+) T cells restored to less than half of the numbers in controls. However, in patients who initiated cART during acute HIV infection, mucosal CD4(+) T-cell numbers were fully preserved and markers of microbial translocation and inflammation reversed to normal. The proportion of mucosal effector memory CD4(+) T cells normalized only if cART was initiated at >350 CD4(+) T cells per μl blood but not with delayed treatment. In conclusion, mucosal CD4(+) T-cell numbers can be preserved if cART is initiated in acute HIV infection. In chronically HIV-infected patients, early cART improves mucosal CD4(+) T-cell differentiation but cannot prevent the persistent lack of total CD4(+) T cells. PMID:26129649

  14. Compensation of CD55 Underexpression on Red Blood Cells of β-Thalassemia Major Patients.

    PubMed

    Obaid, Jamil M A S; Abo El-Nazar, Salma Y; Ghanem, Amal M; El-Hadidi, Abeer S; Mersal, Basma H M

    2015-01-01

    β-Thalassemia (β-thal), is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations at the β gene locus. β-Thalassemia major (β-TM) is a severe form of the disease, characterized by severe hypochromic and hemolytic anemia with an increased need for transfusion. Hemolysis is caused by intoxication, whereas mechanical removal of the affected cells caused by macrophage. Immunological implications are also reported and occur via antibodies and complement. We found previously that complement inhibitor receptor CD55 is underexpressed in these patients. This study concerns the compensatory mechanisms of this diminished expression upon flow cytometry analysis of CD55 and CD59 on the red blood cells (RBCs) of β-thal patients. This study was conducted on 24 patients and 10 healthy controls. Full history and transfusion data was obtained, then a complete blood count (CBC) and flow cytometry analysis of CD55 and CD59 on erythrocytes were carried out. Within our 24 patients, we found a diminished expression of CD55 with a normal expression of CD59. The percentage of cells that express CD55 was significantly different from that of the controls. The mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of CD55 and CD59 with correlation studies reveals that different factors affect the underexpression of CD55 and also revealed compensatory changes of the defect to minimize the hemolysis occurring in β-thal patients. Compensation of CD55 underexpression in the deficient patients occurred when an increase in the MFI of both the receptor CD55, on the positive cells, and another complement inhibitor receptor CD59. PMID:25897480

  15. Isolation of Mycobacterium avium Subspecies paratuberculosis Reactive CD4 T Cells from Intestinal Biopsies of Crohn's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Ingrid; Tollefsen, Stig; Aagaard, Claus; Reitan, Liv J.; Bannantine, John P.; Andersen, Peter; Sollid, Ludvig M.; Lundin, Knut E. A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic granulomatous inflammation of the intestine. The etiology is unknown, but an excessive immune response to bacteria in genetically susceptible individuals is probably involved. The response is characterized by a strong Th1/Th17 response, but the relative importance of the various bacteria is not known. Methodology/Principal Findings In an attempt to address this issue, we made T-cell lines from intestinal biopsies of patients with CD (n = 11), ulcerative colitis (UC) (n = 13) and controls (n = 10). The T-cell lines were tested for responses to various bacteria. A majority of the CD patients with active disease had a dominant response to Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP). The T cells from CD patients also showed higher proliferation in response to MAP compared to UC patients (p<0.025). MAP reactive CD4 T-cell clones (n = 28) were isolated from four CD patients. The T-cell clones produced IL-17 and/or IFN-γ, while minimal amounts of IL-4 were detected. To further characterize the specificity, the responses to antigen preparations from different mycobacterial species were tested. One T-cell clone responded only to MAP and the very closely related M. avium subspecies avium (MAA) while another responded to MAP, MAA and Mycobacterium intracellulare. A more broadly reactive T-cell clone reacted to MAP1508 which belongs to the esx protein family. Conclusions/Significance The presence of MAP reactive T cells with a Th1 or Th1/Th17 phenotype may suggest a possible role of mycobacteria in the inflammation seen in CD. The isolation of intestinal T cells followed by characterization of their specificity is a valuable tool to study the relative importance of different bacteria in CD. PMID:19479064

  16. Isopentenyl pyrophosphate activated CD56+ γδ T lymphocytes display potent anti-tumor activity towards human squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Alan A.Z.; Maniar, Amudhan; Cummings, Jean-Saville; Hebbeler, Andrew M.; Schulze, Dan H.; Gastman, Brian R.; Pauza, C. David; Strome, Scott E.; Chapoval, Andrei I.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The expression of CD56, a natural killer (NK) cell-associated molecule, on αβ T lymphocytes correlates with their increased anti-tumor effector function. CD56 is also expressed on a subset of γδ T cells. However, anti-tumor effector functions of CD56+ γδ T cells are poorly characterized. Experimental design To investigate the potential effector role of CD56+ γδ T cells in tumor killing, we employed isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) and IL-2 expanded γδ T cells from PBMC of healthy donors. Results Thirty to 70% of IPP+IL-2 expanded γδ T cells express CD56 on their surface. Interestingly, while both CD56+ and CD56− γδ T cells express comparable levels of receptors involved in the regulation of γδ T cell cytotoxicity (e.g. NKG2D and CD94) only CD56+ γδ T lymphocytes are capable of killing squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and other solid tumor cell lines. This effect is likely mediated by the enhanced release of cytolytic granules, since CD56+ γδ T lymphocytes expressed higher levels of CD107a compared to CD56− controls, following exposure to tumor cell lines. Lysis of tumor cell lines is blocked by concanomycin A and a combination of anti-γδTCR + anti-NKG2D mAb, suggesting that the lytic activity of CD56+ γδ T cells involves the perforin-granzyme pathway and is mainly γδTCR/NKGD2 dependent. Importantly, CD56 expressing γδ T lymphocytes are resistant to Fas ligand and chemically induced apoptosis. Conclusions Our data indicate that CD56+ γδ T cells are potent anti-tumor effectors capable of killing SCC and may play an important therapeutic role in patients with head and neck cancer and other malignancies. PMID:18594005

  17. Human CD4+CD39+ regulatory T cells produce adenosine upon co-expression of surface CD73 or contact with CD73+ exosomes or CD73+ cells

    PubMed Central

    Schuler, P J; Saze, Z; Hong, C-S; Muller, L; Gillespie, D G; Cheng, D; Harasymczuk, M; Mandapathil, M; Lang, S; Jackson, E K; Whiteside, T L

    2014-01-01

    While murine CD4+CD39+ regulatory T cells (Treg) co-express CD73 and hydrolyze exogenous (e) adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to immunosuppressive adenosine (ADO), surface co-expression of CD73 on human circulating CD4+CD39+ Treg is rare. Therefore, the ability of human Treg to produce and utilize ADO for suppression remains unclear. Using mass spectrometry, we measured nucleoside production by subsets of human CD4+CD39+ and CD4+CD39(–)CD73+ T cells or CD19+ B cells isolated from blood of 30 volunteers and 14 cancer patients. CD39 and CD73 expression was evaluated by flow cytometry, Western blots, confocal microscopy or reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT–PCR). Circulating CD4+CD39+ Treg which hydrolyzed eATP to 5′-AMP contained few intracytoplasmic granules and had low CD73 mRNA levels. Only ∼1% of these Treg were CD39+CD73+. In contrast, CD4+CD39negCD73+ T cells contained numerous CD73+ granules in the cytoplasm and strongly expressed surface CD73. In vitro-generated Treg (Tr1) and most B cells were CD39+CD73+. All these CD73+ T cell subsets and B cells hydrolyzed 5′-AMP to ADO. Exosomes isolated from plasma of normal control (NC) or cancer patients carried enzymatically active CD39 and CD73+ and, when supplied with eATP, hydrolyzed it to ADO. Only CD4+CD39+ Treg co-incubated with CD4+CD73+ T cells, B cells or CD39+CD73+ exosomes produced ADO. Thus, contact with membrane-tethered CD73 was sufficient for ADO production by CD4+CD39+ Treg. In microenvironments containing CD4+CD73+ T cells, B cells or CD39+CD73+ exosomes, CD73 is readily available to CD4+CD39+CD73neg Treg for the production of immunosuppressive ADO. PMID:24749746

  18. CD19(+) CD20(-) CD27(hi) IL-s10-producing B cells are overrepresented in R-CHOP-treated DLBCL patients in complete remission.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Huiying; Li, Junguo; Feng, Zhenjun; Yuan, Joanna; Lu, Jie; Hu, Xiaoxia; Gao, Lei; Lv, Shuqing; Yang, Jianmin; Chen, Lei

    2016-09-01

    Treatment of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) with rituximab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, has resulted in significantly improved patient responses with longer event-free intervals and higher overall survival rates. However, since rituximab depletes all CD20-expressing cells, including noncancerous B cells, the effects of rituximab on the normal immunity of DLBCL patients under remission need to be examined. Here, we observed that DLBCL patients under remission contained significantly lower frequencies of total B cells, with a significantly overrepresented interleukin (IL)-10-producing B cell (B10) population in the peripheral blood. Further examination confirmed that a large fraction of B10 cells was CD20(-) CD27(hi) plasmablasts, possibly explaining the persistence of B10 cells after R-CHOP treatment. We also observed that the percentage of B10 cells in DLBCL patients in remission gradually reduced during the first year of achieving complete remission, primarily due to the replenishment of non-B10 B cells. Despite this, the percentage of B10 cells in DLBCL patients after 1 year of achieving complete remission was still higher than that in controls. CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells cocultured with B10-enriched B cells secreted significantly lower levels of proinflammatory cytokines IFN-g and TNF-a, compared to those incubated with B10-depleted B cells. Together, our data observed a long-lasting overrepresentation of B10 cells in DLBCL patients under remission. Whether this change could impact on the overall anti-tumor immunity during remission requires further studies. PMID:27247195

  19. Stromal CD4/CD25 positive T-cells are a strong and independent prognostic factor in non-small cell lung cancer patients, especially with adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Gian; Schulte-Uentrop, Luzie; Sienel, Wulf; Werner, Martin; Fisch, Paul; Passlick, Bernward; Zur Hausen, Axel; Stremmel, Christian

    2012-06-01

    Within the concert of immune reactions against tumour cells cytotoxic and regulatory T-cells are of utmost importance. Several studies revealed contradictory results on this issue. We therefore focused on functional expression patterns and localization of tumour-infiltrating T-lymphocytes in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and their impact on patient's survival. 232 curatively operated NSCLC patients were included. After histological reevaluation and construction of tissue-multi-arrays immunohistochemical doublestains for CD3/CD8 and CD4/CD25 were performed to evaluate the total number of T-cells and their subsets of cytotoxic and activated T-cells. Additionally, the localization of the lymphocytes was included in the analysis. Hereby, T-cells within the tumour stroma were regarded as stromal, those among cancer cells as intraepithelial. The number of lymphocytes differed significantly between the histological subtypes being most prominent in large cell carcinomas. Survival analysis showed that high numbers of stromal T-lymphocytes are of beneficial prognostic influence in NSCLC patients. This also proved to be an independent prognostic factor in adenocarcinomas. Thus, in a large and well characterized cohort of NSCLC this is the first study to determine the prognostic value of stromal T-lymphocytes, as these are an independent prognosticator in NSCLC especially in adenocarcinomas whereas intraepithelial T-cells are not. PMID:22300751

  20. Infection frequency of dendritic cells and CD4+ T lymphocytes in spleens of human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients.

    PubMed Central

    McIlroy, D; Autran, B; Cheynier, R; Wain-Hobson, S; Clauvel, J P; Oksenhendler, E; Debré, P; Hosmalin, A

    1995-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are specialized antigen-presenting leukocytes that are responsible for the activation of naive as well as memory T lymphocytes. If infected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), DC may transfer virus to CD4+ lymphocytes. However, the question of whether DC are infected in vivo is controversial. As HIV infection is more active in secondary lymphoid organs than in blood, infection of splenic DC isolated from HIV-seropositive patients was investigated. Splenic DC were first enriched and characterized by flow cytometry from HIV- donors. After direct isolation, they were negative for monocyte and T- and B-lymphocyte markers, negative for CD1a, but positive for major histocompatibility complex class II and CD4. After in vitro maturation, major histocompatibility complex class II expression increased, while CD4 expression was lost. Extensive purification from the spleens of seven HIV+ patients was performed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The frequency of cells harboring HIV DNA in purified populations was quantified by limiting-dilution PCR. Directly isolated DC (average, 1/3,000; range, 1/720 to 1/18,000) were in each patient 10 to 100 times less infected than CD4+ T lymphocytes (average, 1/52; range, 1/17 to 1/190). On average, 1/1,450 (1/320 to 1/6,100) unseparated mononuclear splenocytes (containing 5% CD4+ lymphocytes) harbored HIV DNA. In conclusion, in these HIV+ patient spleens, DC seem to be infected, but HIV-DNA positive CD4+ T lymphocytes accounted for the vast majority of infected mononuclear splenocytes. PMID:7609039

  1. Maraviroc intensification in patients with suppressed HIV viremia has limited effects on CD4+ T cell recovery and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Beliakova-Bethell, Nadejda; Jain, Sonia; Woelk, Christopher H.; Witt, Mallory D.; Sun, Xiaoying; Lada, Steven M.; Spina, Celsa A.; Goicoechea, Miguel; Rought, Steffney E.; Haubrich, Richard; Dubé, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Addition of the CCR5 inhibitor Maraviroc (MVC) to ongoing antiretroviral therapy increases CD4+ T cell counts in some virologically suppressed patients with suboptimal CD4+ T cell recovery. To understand the mechanisms by which MVC elicits increases in CD4+ T cell counts, the present study was undertaken to identify host factors (i.e. genes) that are modulated and are correlated with CD4+ T cell recovery during the 24 weeks of MVC intensification in 32 subjects. Median changes of CD4+ T cell counts over 24 weeks of MVC compared to baseline were 38 cells/mm3 (p < 0.001). The median slope of CD4+ T cell recovery was 39 cells/mm3 per year before initiation of MVC and 76 cells/mm3 per year during MVC intensification, however, this increase was not statistically significant (p = 0.33). Microarray analysis (N = 31,426 genes) identified a single differentially expressed gene, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF), which was modestly (1.44-fold, p < 0.001) downregulated by MVC at week 24 compared to baseline. TNF differential expression was evaluated using an independent method of droplet digital PCR, but the difference was not significant (p = 0.6). Changes in gene expression did not correlate with CD4+ T cell recovery or any changes in the CD4+ T cell maturation, proliferation and activation phenotypes. In summary, our data suggest that modest improvements of CD4+ T cell counts during MVC intensification cannot be explained by changes in gene expression elicited by MVC. However, the modest changes in T cell composition, including reduction of the percentages of Tregs, proliferating CD4+ T cells and senescent CD8+ T cells, suggest immunologically favorable effects of MVC. PMID:24769244

  2. CD4+ CCR5+ and CD4+ CCR3+ lymphocyte subset and monocyte apoptosis in patients with acute visceral leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Potestio, Marcella; D'Agostino, Pietro; Romano, Giuseppina Colonna; Milano, Salvatore; Ferlazzo, Viviana; Aquino, Alessandra; Di Bella, Gloria; Caruso, Rosalba; Gambino, Giuseppe; Vitale, Giustina; Mansueto, Serafino; Cillari, Enrico

    2004-01-01

    The potential involvement of apoptosis in the pathogenesis of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) was examined by studying spontaneous and Leishmania antigen (LAg)-induced apoptosis using cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of Sicilian patients with VL. Results indicate that monocytes and T lymphocytes from acute VL patients show a significantly higher level of apoptosis compared with that observed in healed subjects. The percentage of apoptotic cells was higher in monocytes than in T lymphocytes. T cells involved in programmed cell death (PCD) were mainly of the CD4+ phenotype. In particular, the T helper 1-type (Th1) subset, as evaluated by chemokine receptor-5 (CCR5) expression, is involved in this process. Cell death in Th1-type uses a CD95-mediated mechanism. Furthermore, Th1-type CCR5+ cells are prone to cell suicide in an autocrine or paracrine way, as attested by enhanced expression of CD95L in acute VL patients. The reduction in Th1-type cells by apoptosis was confirmed by the decrease in interferon-γ secretion. In conclusion, apoptosis of monocytes, CD4+ and CD4+ CCR5+ T cells could be involved in the failure of cell mediated immunity that is responsible for severe immune-depression in VL. PMID:15379987

  3. Quantitative Assessment of Intra-Patient Variation in CD4+ T Cell Counts in Stable, Virologically-Suppressed, HIV-Infected Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Claire L.; Cheng, Allen C.; Cameron, Paul U.; Bailey, Michael; Crowe, Suzanne M.; Mills, John

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Counts of absolute CD4+ T lymphocytes (CD4+ T cells) are known to be highly variable in untreated HIV-infected individuals, but there are no data in virologically-suppressed individuals. We investigated CD4+ T cell variability in stable, virologically-suppressed, HIV-1 infected adults on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Methods From a large hospital database we selected patients with stable virological suppression on cART for >3 years with >10 CD4+ T cell measurements performed over a further >2 years; and a control group of 95 patients not on cART. Results We identified 161 HIV-infected patients on cART without active HCV or HBV infection, with stable virological suppression for a median of 6.4 years. Over the study period 88 patients had reached a plateau in their absolute CD4+ T cell counts, while 65 patients had increasing and 8 patients had decreasing absolute CD4+ T cell counts. In patients with plateaued CD4+ T cell counts, variability in absolute CD4+ T cell counts was greater than in percent CD4+ T cells (median coefficient of variation (CV) 16.6% [IQR 13.8-20.1%] and CV 9.6% [IQR 7.4-13.0%], respectively). Patients with increasing CD4+ T cell counts had greater variability in absolute CD4+ T cell counts than those with plateaued CD4 T cell counts (CV 19.5% [IQR 16.1-23.8%], p<0.001) while there was no difference in percent CD4+ T cell variability between the two groups. As previously reported, untreated patients had CVs significantly higher than patients on cART (CVs of 21.1% [IQR 17.2-32.0%], p<0.001 and 15.2% (IQR 10.7-20.0%), p<0.001, respectively). Age or sex did not affect the degree of CD4+ variation. Conclusions Adults with stable, virologically-suppressed HIV infection continue to have significant variations in individual absolute CD4+ T cell and percent CD4+ T cell counts; this variation can be of clinical relevance especially around CD4+ thresholds. However, the variation seen in individuals on cART is substantially less

  4. Prognostic Significance of CD169+ Lymph Node Sinus Macrophages in Patients with Malignant Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoichi; Ohnishi, Koji; Miyashita, Azusa; Nakahara, Satoshi; Fujiwara, Yukio; Horlad, Hasita; Motoshima, Takanobu; Fukushima, Satoshi; Jinnin, Masatoshi; Ihn, Hironobu; Takeya, Motohiro; Komohara, Yoshihiro

    2015-12-01

    CD169 (sialoadhesin) is a sialic acid receptor that is specifically expressed on macrophages, including lymph node sinus macrophages. Animal studies suggest that CD169(+) macrophages in lymph nodes have properties in preventing cancers. In order to determine the significance of CD169(+) macrophages in patients with malignant melanoma, we evaluated tissue samples from 93 patients to investigate CD169 expression in regional lymph nodes (RLN) and determine the relationship of this expression with overall survival and various clinicopathologic factors. Higher densities of CD169(+) cells were significantly associated with longer overall survival (P = 0.001). A multivariate analysis showed that the density of CD169(+) cells was an independent prognostic factor, with higher densities correlating with higher density of CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells within tumor sites. High CD169 expression in macrophages could be stimulated by IFNα in vitro, and in RLNs, IFNα-producing macrophages and CD303(+) plasmacytoid dendritic cells were identified surrounding CD169(+) macrophages. These data suggest that IFNα-stimulated CD169(+) macrophages in RLNs are closely involved in T-cell-mediated antitumor immunity and may be a useful marker for assessing the clinical prognosis and monitoring antitumor immunity in patients with malignant melanoma. PMID:26297710

  5. Diminished adhesion and activation of platelets and neutrophils with CD47 functionalized blood contacting surfaces.

    PubMed

    Finley, Matthew J; Rauova, Lubica; Alferiev, Ivan S; Weisel, John W; Levy, Robert J; Stachelek, Stanley J

    2012-08-01

    CD47 is a ubiquitously expressed transmembrane protein that, through signaling mechanisms mediated by signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα1), functions as a biological marker of 'self-recognition'. We showed previously that inflammatory cell attachment to polymeric surfaces is inhibited by the attachment of biotinylated recombinant CD47 (CD47B). We test herein the hypothesis that CD47 modified blood conduits can reduce platelet and neutrophil activation under clinically relevant conditions. We appended a poly-lysine tag to the C-terminus of recombinant CD47 (CD47L) allowing for covalent linkage to the polymer. SIRPα1 expression was confirmed in isolated platelets. We then compared biocompatibility between CD47B and CD47L functionalized polyvinyl chloride (PVC) surfaces and unmodified control PVC surfaces. Quantitative and Qualitative analysis of blood cell attachment to CD47B and CD47L surfaces, via scanning electron microscopy, showed strikingly fewer platelets attached to CD47 modified surfaces compared to control. Flow cytometry analysis showed that activation markers for neutrophils (CD62L) and platelets (CD62P) exposed to CD47 modified PVC were equivalent to freshly acquired control blood, while significantly elevated in the unmodified PVC tubing. In addition, ethylene oxide gas sterilization did not inhibit the efficacy of the CD47 modification. In conclusion, CD47 modified PVC inhibits both the adhesion and activation of platelets and neutrophils. PMID:22613135

  6. Immunological and histological evaluation of clinical samples from psoriasis patients treated with anti-CD6 itolizumab

    PubMed Central

    Aira, Lazaro E; López-Requena, Alejandro; Fuentes, Dasha; Sánchez, Liset; Pérez, Teresita; Urquiza, Aleida; Bautista, Heber; Falcón, Leopoldina; Hernández, Patricia; Mazorra, Zaima

    2014-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease with a prevalence of approximately 2–3% in the general population. The majority of diagnosed patients have plaque psoriasis, and about 20% have moderate-to-severe disease. Itolizumab, a new monoclonal antibody specific for the CD6 molecule mainly expressed on T lymphocytes, has demonstrated to inhibit in vitro ligand-induced proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine production. We assessed the immunological and histopathological effect of the antibody using clinical samples taken from 26 patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis included in a clinical trial. The precursor frequency of lymphocytes activated with anti-CD2/CD3/CD28 beads, as well as the number of interferon (IFN)-γ-secreting T cells after stimulation, were measured at different time points of the study. Serum cytokine levels and anti-idiotypic antibody response to itolizumab were also evaluated. Additionally, lymphocyte infiltration and epidermis hyperplasia were studied in five patients. A significant reduction in T cell proliferation capacity and number of IFN-γ-producing T cells was found in treated patients. Serum levels of interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor and IFN-γ showed an overall trend toward reduction. No anti-idiotypic antibody response was detected. A significant reduction in the epidermis hyperplasia was observed in analyzed patients. These results support the relevance of the CD6 molecule as a therapeutic target for the treatment of this disease. PMID:24594862

  7. CD40 agonist antibody mediated improvement of chronic Cryptosporidium infection in patients with X-linked hyper IgM syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome (XHM) is a combined immune deficiency disorder caused by mutations in CD40 ligand. We tested CP-870,893, a human CD40 agonist monoclonal antibody, in the treatment of two XHM patients with biliary Cryptosporidiosis. CP-870,893 activated B cells and APCs in vitro, restori...

  8. IVIg immune reconstitution treatment alleviates the state of persistent immune activation and suppressed CD4 T cell counts in CVID.

    PubMed

    Paquin-Proulx, Dominic; Santos, Bianca A N; Carvalho, Karina I; Toledo-Barros, Myrthes; Barreto de Oliveira, Ana Karolina; Kokron, Cristina M; Kalil, Jorge; Moll, Markus; Kallas, Esper G; Sandberg, Johan K

    2013-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is characterized by defective B cell function, impaired antibody production, and increased susceptibility to bacterial infections. Here, we addressed the hypothesis that poor antibody-mediated immune control of infections may result in substantial perturbations in the T cell compartment. Newly diagnosed CVID patients were sampled before, and 6-12 months after, initiation of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy. Treatment-naïve CVID patients displayed suppressed CD4 T cell counts and myeloid dendritic cell (mDC) levels, as well as high levels of immune activation in CD8 T cells, CD4 T cells, and invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells. Expression of co-stimulatory receptors CD80 and CD83 was elevated in mDCs and correlated with T cell activation. Levels of both FoxP3+ T regulatory (Treg) cells and iNKT cells were low, whereas soluble CD14 (sCD14), indicative of monocyte activation, was elevated. Importantly, immune reconstitution treatment with IVIg partially restored the CD4 T cell and mDC compartments. Treatment furthermore reduced the levels of CD8 T cell activation and mDC activation, whereas levels of Treg cells and iNKT cells remained low. Thus, primary deficiency in humoral immunity with impaired control of microbial infections is associated with significant pathological changes in cell-mediated immunity. Furthermore, therapeutic enhancement of humoral immunity with IVIg infusions alleviates several of these defects, indicating a relationship between poor antibody-mediated immune control of infections and the occurrence of abnormalities in the T cell and mDC compartments. These findings help our understanding of the immunopathogenesis of primary immunodeficiency, as well as acquired immunodeficiency caused by HIV-1 infection. PMID:24130688

  9. Per a 10 protease activity modulates CD40 expression on dendritic cell surface by nuclear factor-kappaB pathway

    PubMed Central

    Goel, C; Kalra, N; Dwarakanath, B S; Gaur, S N; Arora, N

    2015-01-01

    Serine protease activity of Per a 10 from Periplaneta americana modulates dendritic cell (DC) functions by a mechanism(s) that remains unclear. In the present study, Per a 10 protease activity on CD40 expression and downstream signalling was evaluated in DCs. Monocyte-derived DCs from cockroach-allergic patients were treated with proteolytically active/heat-inactivated Per a 10. Stimulation with active Per a 10 demonstrated low CD40 expression on DCs surface (P < 0·05), while enhanced soluble CD40 level in the culture supernatant (P < 0·05) compared to the heat-inactivated Per a 10, suggesting cleavage of CD40. Per a 10 activity reduced the interleukin (IL)-12 and interferon (IFN)-γ secretion by DCs (P < 0·05) compared to heat-inactivated Per a 10, indicating that low CD40 expression is associated with low levels of IL-12 secretion. Active Per a 10 stimulation caused low nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation in DCs compared to heat-inactivated Per a 10. Inhibition of the NF-κB pathway suppressed the CD40 expression and IL-12 secretion by DCs, further indicating that NF-κB is required for CD40 up-regulation. CD40 expression activated the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6), thereby suggesting its involvement in NF-κB activation. Protease activity of Per a 10 induced p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation that showed no significant effect on CD40 expression by DCs. However, inhibiting p38 MAPK or NF-κB suppressed the secretion of IL-12, IFN-γ, IL-6 and TNF-α by DCs. Such DCs further reduced the secretion of IL-4, IL-6, IL-12 and TNF-α by CD4+ T cells. In conclusion, protease activity of Per a 10 reduces CD40 expression on DCs. CD40 down-regulation leads to low NF-κB levels, thereby modulating DC-mediated immune responses. PMID:25492061

  10. CD44 sensitivity of platelet activation, membrane scrambling and adhesion under high arterial shear rates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guilai; Liu, Guoxing; Alzoubi, Kousi; Chatterjee, Madhumita; Walker, Britta; Münzer, Patrick; Luo, Dong; Umbach, Anja T; Elvira, Bernat; Chen, Hong; Voelkl, Jakob; Föller, Michael; Mak, Tak W; Borst, Oliver; Gawaz, Meinrad; Lang, Florian

    2016-01-01

    CD44 is required for signalling of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), an anti-apoptotic pro-inflammatory cytokine. MIF is expressed and released from blood platelets, key players in the orchestration of occlusive vascular disease. Nothing is known about a role of CD44 in the regulation of platelet function. The present study thus explored whether CD44 modifies degranulation (P-selectin exposure), integrin activation, caspase activity, phosphatidylserine exposure on the platelet surface, platelet volume, Orai1 protein abundance and cytosolic Ca(2+)-activity ([Ca2+]i). Platelets from mice lacking CD44 (cd44(-/-)) were compared to platelets from corresponding wild-type mice (cd44(+/+)). In resting platelets, P-selectin abundance, α(IIb)β3 integrin activation, caspase-3 activity and phosphatidylserine exposure were negligible in both genotypes and Orai1 protein abundance, [Ca2+]i, and volume were similar in cd44(-/-) and cd44(+/+) platelets. Platelet degranulation and α(IIb)β3 integrin activation were significantly increased by thrombin (0.02 U/ml), collagen related peptide (CRP, 2 µg/ml and Ca(2+)-store depletion with thapsigargin (1 µM), effects more pronounced in cd44(-/-) than in cd44(+/+) platelets. Thrombin (0.02 U/ml) increased platelet [Ca2+]i, caspase-3 activity, phosphatidylserine exposure and Orai1 surface abundance, effects again significantly stronger in cd44(-/-) than in cd44(+/+) platelets. Thrombin further decreased forward scatter in cd44(-/-) and cd44(+/+) platelets, an effect which tended to be again more pronounced in cd44(-/-) than in cd44(+/+) platelets. Platelet adhesion and in vitro thrombus formation under high arterial shear rates (1,700 s(-1)) were significantly augmented in cd44(-/-) mice. In conclusion, genetic deficiency of CD44 augments activation, apoptosis and pro-thrombotic potential of platelets. PMID:26355696

  11. Increased numbers and functional activity of CD56+ T cells in healthy cytomegalovirus positive subjects

    PubMed Central

    Almehmadi, Mazen; Flanagan, Brian F; Khan, Naeem; Alomar, Suliman; Christmas, Stephen E

    2014-01-01

    Human T cells expressing CD56 are capable of tumour cell lysis following activation with interleukin-2 but their role in viral immunity has been less well studied. Proportions of CD56+ T cells were found to be highly significantly increased in cytomegalovirus-seropositive (CMV+) compared with seronegative (CMV−) healthy subjects (9·1 ± 1·5% versus 3·7 ± 1·0%; P < 0·0001). Proportions of CD56+ T cells expressing CD28, CD62L, CD127, CD161 and CCR7 were significantly lower in CMV+ than CMV− subjects but those expressing CD4, CD8, CD45RO, CD57, CD58, CD94 and NKG2C were significantly increased (P < 0·05), some having the phenotype of T effector memory cells. Levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and CD107a were significantly higher in CD56+ T cells from CMV+ than CMV− subjects following stimulation with CMV antigens. This also resulted in higher levels of proliferation in CD56+ T cells from CMV+ than CMV− subjects. Using Class I HLA pentamers, it was found that CD56+ T cells from CMV+ subjects contained similar proportions of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells to CD56− T cells in donors of several different HLA types. These differences may reflect the expansion and enhanced functional activity of CMV-specific CD56+ memory T cells. In view of the link between CD56 expression and T-cell cytotoxic function, this strongly implicates CD56+ T cells as being an important component of the cytotoxic T-cell response to CMV in healthy carriers. PMID:24433347

  12. Frequently Increased but Functionally Impaired CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cells in Patients with Oral Lichen Planus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Leilei; Cao, Tianyi; Wang, Yufeng; Yao, Hui; Du, Guanhuan; Chen, Guangjie; Niu, Xiaoyin; Tang, Guoyao

    2016-06-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a T cell-mediated chronic inflammatory mucosal disease, and CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) are considered involved in the pathogenesis of OLP. In this study, to investigate whether there are intrinsic factors that might cause functional changes in Tregs in this disease, we evaluated the frequency of Tregs in peripheral blood and oral lesions and the expression levels of function-related transcription factors, forkhead/winged-helix transcription factor box P3 (FOXP3), transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), interleukin 10 (IL-10), and TGF-β receptors (TβRI and TβRII) mRNAs in Tregs of patients with oral lichen planus (OLP). We also investigated the frequency of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-17A) producing Foxp3(+) regulatory cells. Increased proportions of Tregs were found in OLP patients. The expression of FOXP3 on mRNA and protein level was elevated in the Tregs of OLP. The expression of TGF-β was lower both on the mRNA and serum level, whereas the expression of IL-10 showed no significant difference between the OLP patients and normal controls. The percentages of CD4(+)FOXP3(+)IL-17(+) T cells were significantly higher than that of normal controls, whereas the percentages of CD4(+)FOXP3(+)IFN-γ(+) T cells did not differ significantly. Furthermore, impaired suppressive function of CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells was demonstrated in OLP patients by in vitro proliferation assay. These data indicate that Tregs in OLP are frequently expanded but functionally deficient. This could explain, at least in part, why the increased Tregs in OLP fail to control the pathogenesis and development of this autoimmune disease. PMID:27106476

  13. Expression of the Hermes-1 (CD44) and ICAM-1 (CD54) molecule on the surface of thyroid cells from patients with Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Fukazawa, H; Yoshida, K; Ichinohasama, R; Sawai, T; Hiromatsu, Y; Mori, K; Kikuchi, K; Aizawa, Y; Abe, K; Wall, J R

    1993-01-01

    From studies of binding of 51Cr-labeled T cells to human thyroid monolayers, we have postulated the existence of tissue "homing-like" receptors on thyroid cells in patients with Graves' disease (GD). In this study we have investigated whether the CD44 (Hermes-1) protein, well known as a putative human lymphocyte homing receptor, is expressed on thyroid cells in patients with GD, and if so whether its expression is influenced by interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). Cell surface CD44, as well as CD54 (ICAM-1), another putative homing receptor, antigens were analyzed by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. CD44 and CD54 were both expressed on thyroid cells from untreated patients with GD, which, in the case of CD44, appeared as two peaks. IFN-gamma treatment enhanced the expression of the CD54 protein on Graves' thyroid cells and inhibited the expression of the larger of the two CD44 peaks, but not the other. Only small amounts of CD44 and CD54 were detected on normal thyroid cells, neither of which was affected by IFN-gamma. The CD44 protein was also demonstrated on both GD and normal thyroid cells by immunohistochemistry. These findings suggest that CD44, and possibly CD54, may induce putative adhesion pathways that lead to the homing of lymphocytes to the thyroid in patients who develop Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Graves' disease. PMID:7509669

  14. The Oncogenic Lung Cancer Fusion Kinase CD74-ROS Activates a Novel Invasiveness Pathway Through E-Syt1 Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Hyun Jung; Johnson, Hannah; Bronson, Roderick T.; de Feraudy, Sebastien; White, Forest; Charest, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Patients with lung cancer often present with metastatic disease and therefore have a very poor prognosis. The recent discovery of several novel ROS receptor tyrosine kinase molecular alterations in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) presents a therapeutic opportunity for the development of new targeted treatment strategies. Here, we report that the NSCLC-derived fusion CD74-ROS, which accounts for 30% of all ROS fusion kinases in NSCLC, is an active and oncogenic tyrosine kinase. We found that CD74-ROS expressing cells were highly invasive in vitro and metastatic in vivo. Pharmacological inhibition of CD74-ROS kinase activity reversed its transforming capacity by attenuating downstrream signaling networks. Using quantitative phosphoproteomics, we uncovered a mechanism by which CD74-ROS activates a novel pathway driving cell invasion. Expression of CD74-ROS resulted in the phosphorylation of the extended synaptotagmin-like protein E-Syt1. Elimination of E-Syt1 expression drastically reduced invasiveness both in vitro and in vivo without modifying the oncogenic activity of CD74-ROS. Furthermore, expression of CD74-ROS in non-invasive NSCLC cell lines readily confered invasive properties that paralleled the acquisition of E-Syt1 phosphorylation. Taken together, our findings indicate that E-Syt1 is a mediator of cancer cell invasion and molecularly define ROS fusion kinases as therapeutic targets in the treatment of NSCLC. PMID:22659450

  15. CD271 Expression on Patient Melanoma Cells Is Unstable and Unlinked to Tumorigenicity.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Samantha E; Fedele, Clare G; Corbin, Vincent; Wybacz, Elisha; Szeto, Pacman; Lewin, Jeremy; Young, Richard J; Wong, Annie; Fuller, Robert; Spillane, John; Speakman, David; Donahoe, Simon; Pohl, Miklos; Gyorki, David; Henderson, Michael A; Johnstone, Ricky W; Papenfuss, Anthony T; Shackleton, Mark

    2016-07-01

    The stability of markers that identify cancer cells that propagate disease is important to the outcomes of targeted therapy strategies. In human melanoma, conflicting data exist as to whether hierarchical expression of CD271/p75/NGFR (nerve growth factor receptor) marks cells with enriched tumorigenicity, which would compel their specific targeting in therapy. To test whether these discrepancies relate to differences among groups in assay approaches, we undertook side-by-side testing of published methods of patient-derived melanoma xenografting (PDX), including comparisons of tissue digestion procedures or coinjected Matrigel formulations. We found that CD271(-) and CD271(+) melanoma cells from each of seven patients were similarly tumorigenic, regardless of assay variations. Surprisingly variable CD271 expression patterns were observed in the analyses of sibling PDX tumors (n = 68) grown in the same experiments from either CD271(-) or CD271(+) cells obtained from patients. This indicates unstable intratumoral lineage relationships between CD271(-) and CD271(+) melanoma cells that are inconsistent with classical, epigenetically based theories of disease progression, such as the cancer stem cell and plasticity models. SNP genotyping of pairs of sibling PDX tumors grown from phenotypically identical CD271(-) or CD271(+) cells showed large pairwise differences in copy number (28%-48%). Differences were also apparent in the copy number profiles of CD271(-) and CD271(+) cells purified directly from each of the four melanomas (1.4%-23%). Thus, CD271 expression in patient melanomas is unstable, not consistently linked to increased tumorigenicity and associated with genetic heterogeneity, undermining its use as a marker in clinical studies. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3965-77. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27325642

  16. Reduced LAK cytotoxicity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in patients with bladder cancer: Decreased LAK cytotoxicity caused by a low incidence of CD56+ and CD57+ mononuclear blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hermann, G.G.; Petersen, K.R.; Steven, K.; Zeuthen, J. )

    1990-11-01

    The cytotoxicity of unstimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (US-PBMC), phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated PBMC (PS-PBMC) and interleukin-2 (IL-2)-activated PBMC (LAK cells) was assessed in patients with noninvasive and invasive transitional-cell bladder cancer and compared with those determined in healthy controls. The differences in the cytotoxicities were correlated with specific changes in the subsets of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). PBMC from 37 patients and 13 healthy controls were tested against the bladder cancer cell line T24 in {sup 51}Cr-release assays. The PBMC subsets were analyzed using monoclonal antibodies against T cells, natural killer (NK) -cells, monocytes, and activation markers. The cytotoxicities of US-PBMC, PS-PBMC, and LAK cells were all significantly lower in the cancer patients than in the controls (P less than 0.05). The percentages of PBMC positive for the NK-cell markers CD56 and CD57 were lowest in the patients and were correlated to the decrease in cytotoxicity. Depletion of CD56+ or CD57+ cells from PBMC prior to or after 2 days stimulation with IL-2 demonstrated that these cells are the major source of LAK-cell cytotoxicity and showed that the reduced ability of bladder cancer patient PBMC to develop LAK-cell cytotoxicity is a result of a low incidence of CD56+ and CD57+ cells in the blood. These findings indicate that IL-2 therapy alone might not be a sufficient therapy of bladder cancer patients.

  17. Multifunctional human CD56low CD16low natural killer cells are the prominent subset in bone marrow of both healthy pediatric donors and leukemic patients

    PubMed Central

    Stabile, Helena; Nisti, Paolo; Morrone, Stefania; Pagliara, Daria; Bertaina, Alice; Locatelli, Franco; Santoni, Angela; Gismondi, Angela

    2015-01-01

    We phenotypically and functionally characterized a distinct CD56low natural killer cell subset based on CD16 expression levels in bone marrow and peripheral blood of healthy children and pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that CD56lowCD16low natural killer cells are more abundant in bone marrow than in peripheral blood and that their frequency is further increased in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Bone marrow and peripheral blood CD56lowCD16low natural killer cells compared with CD56lowCD16high natural killer cells express lower levels of killer inhibitory receptors, higher levels of CD27, CD127, CD122, CD25, but undetectable levels of CD57, suggesting that they have a higher proliferative and differentiation potential. Moreover, CD56lowCD16low natural killer cells display higher levels of CXCR4 and undetectable levels of CX3CR1 and can be consistently and rapidly mobilized in peripheral blood in response to CXCR4 antagonist. Unlike CD56lowCD16high, both bone marrow and peripheral blood CD56lowCD16low natural killer cells release IFNγ following cytokine stimulation, and represent the major cytotoxic natural killer cell population against K562 or acute lymphoblastic leukemia target cells. All these data suggest that CD56lowCD16low natural killer cells are multifunctional cells, and that the presence of hematologic malignancies affects their frequency and functional ability at both tumor site and in the periphery. PMID:25596273

  18. Expression of CD55 on red blood cells of β-thalassemia patients.

    PubMed

    Obaid, Jamil M A S; Abo El-Nazar, Salma Y; Ghanem, Amal M; El-Hadidi, Abeer S; Mersal, Basma H M

    2014-01-01

    CD55 is a complement regulatory protein expressed by cells to protect them from bystander lysis by complement. It prevents the formation of C3/C5 convertase. In β-thalassemia (β-thal), the defective hemoglobin (Hb) production makes red blood cells (RBCs) lyse early and frequently. Loss of CD55 expression in those patients compromises the complement regulatory function, thereby accelerating RBC lysis. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the expression of CD55 on erythrocytes of β-thal patients. Flow cytometry analysis of CD55 was conducted on RBCs of 21 β-thalassemia major (β-TM) patients, 11 β-thalassemia intermedia (β-TI) patients and 10 healthy volunteers. The results showed a significant decrease in CD55 expression in β-TM (57.5 ± 16.7%), while there was a slight decrease in β-TI patients (81.8 ± 3.8%) in comparison with that of the normal controls (88.7 ± 0.8%). The diminished expression of CD55 was not accompanied by decrease in CD59 expression in β-thal patients (97.2 ± 2.3%). This could suggest a mechanism (could be genetic) responsible for low CD55 expression. It may be related to defective Hb genes in thalassemia, but it does not relate to cell membrane changes. PMID:25026028

  19. An anti-CD11/CD18 monoclonal antibody in patients with acute myocardial infarction having percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (the FESTIVAL study).

    PubMed

    Rusnak, J M; Kopecky, S L; Clements, I P; Gibbons, R J; Holland, A E; Peterman, H S; Martin, J S; Saoud, J B; Feldman, R L; Breisblatt, W M; Simons, M; Gessler, C J; Yu, A S

    2001-09-01

    Maximal benefits of coronary reperfusion after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) with ST-segment elevation may be attenuated by neutrophil-mediated reperfusion injury. Inflammatory mediators released from potentially viable myocytes cause activation of neutrophils, which traverse the endothelium and enter the myocardium. This process involves interaction between the neutrophil-expressed CD11/CD18 and endothelial-expressed intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). Preclinical studies have shown that monoclonal antibodies (MAb) to CD18 can limit infarct size and preserve left ventricular function. We sought to determine the initial clinical safety and tolerability of Hu23F2G (LeukArrest), a humanized MAb to CD11/CD18, in patients with AMI who underwent percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA). Sixty patients with AMI were randomized to low- (0.3 mg/kg) or high-dose (1.0 mg/kg) Hu23F2G or to placebo immediately before PTCA. We found no clinically significant differences in vital signs, physical examination, laboratory evaluation, or need for subsequent cardiac interventions. In Hu23F2G treatment groups, serum concentration of Hu23F2G increased rapidly to 3,234 +/- 1,298 microg/L (low-dose group) and 15,558 +/- 4409 microg/L (high-dose group) between 5 and 60 minutes, then declined over 72 hours to near-baseline values. Myocardial single-photon emission computed tomographic imaging 120 to 260 hours after PTCA showed no statistically significant differences in final left ventricular defect size. Hu23F2G was well tolerated, with no increase in adverse events, including infections. Thus, Hu23F2G appears safe and well tolerated in patients undergoing PTCA for AMI. PMID:11524054

  20. A Recombinant Bispecific CD20×CD95 Antibody With Superior Activity Against Normal and Malignant B-cells.

    PubMed

    Nalivaiko, Kristina; Hofmann, Martin; Kober, Karina; Teichweyde, Nadine; Krammer, Peter H; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Grosse-Hovest, Ludger; Jung, Gundram

    2016-02-01

    Monoclonal antibodies directed to the B-cell-specific CD20-antigen are successfully used for the treatment of lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. Here, we compare the anti-B-cell activity of three different antibodies directed to CD20: (i) a chimeric, monospecific antibody, (ii) an Fc-optimized variant thereof, and (iii) a bispecific CD20×CD95-antibody in a newly developed recombinant format, termed Fabsc. The bispecific antibody specifically triggers the CD95 death receptor on malignant, as well as activated, normal B-cells. We found that the capability of this antibody to suppress the growth of malignant B-cells in vitro and in vivo and to specifically deplete normal, activated B-cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures was superior to that of the Fc-optimized monospecific antibody. This antibody in turn was more effective than its nonoptimized variant. Moreover, the bispecific antibody was the only reagent capable of significantly suppressing antibody production in vitro. Our findings imply that the bispecific CD20×CD95-antibody might become a new, prototypical reagent for the treatment of B-cell-mediated autoimmune disease. PMID:26581163

  1. Increased CD45RA+FoxP3low Regulatory T Cells with Impaired Suppressive Function in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiwei; Shan, Jianping; Lin, Fujun; Jiang, Gengru; Yang, Yuan H.; Wang, Die; Xu, Dakang; Shen, Lisong

    2012-01-01

    Background The role of naturally occurring regulatory T cells (Treg) in the control of the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has not been well defined. Therefore, we dissect the phenotypically heterogeneous CD4+FoxP3+ T cells into subpopulations during the dynamic SLE development. Methodlogy/Principal Findings To evaluate the proliferative and suppressive capacities of different CD4+ T cell subgroups between active SLE patients and healthy donors, we employed CD45RA and CD25 as surface markers and carboxyfluorescein diacetatesuccinimidyl ester (CFSE) dilution assay. In addition, multiplex cytokines expression in active SLE patients was assessed using Luminex assay. Here, we showed a significant increase in the frequency of CD45RA+FoxP3low naive Treg cells (nTreg cells) and CD45RA−FoxP3low (non-Treg) cells in patients with active SLE. In active SLE patients, the increased proportions of CD45RA+FoxP3low nTreg cells were positively correlated with the disease based on SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) and the status of serum anti-dsDNA antibodies. We found that the surface marker combination of CD25+CD45RA+ can be used to defined CD45RA+FoxP3low nTreg cells for functional assays, wherein nTreg cells from active SLE patients demonstrated defective suppression function. A significant correlation was observed between inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6, IL-12 and TNFα, and the frequency of nTreg cells. Furthermore, the CD45RA+FoxP3low nTreg cell subset increased when cultured with SLE serum compared to healthy donor serum, suggesting that the elevated inflammatory cytokines of SLE serum may promote nTreg cell proliferation/expansion. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that impaired numbers of functional CD45RA+FoxP3low naive Treg cell and CD45RA−FoxP3low non-suppressive T cell subsets in inflammatory conditions may contribute to SLE development. Therefore, analysis of subsets of FoxP3+ T cells, using a combination of FoxP3, CD25 and CD

  2. Expression of CD39 on Activated T Cells Impairs their Survival in Older Individuals.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fengqin; Yu, Mingcan; Cavanagh, Mary M; Hutter Saunders, Jessica; Qi, Qian; Ye, Zhongde; Le Saux, Sabine; Sultan, William; Turgano, Emerson; Dekker, Cornelia L; Tian, Lu; Weyand, Cornelia M; Goronzy, Jörg J

    2016-02-01

    In an immune response, CD4(+) T cells expand into effector T cells and then contract to survive as long-lived memory cells. To identify age-associated defects in memory cell formation, we profiled activated CD4(+) T cells and found an increased induction of the ATPase CD39 with age. CD39(+) CD4(+) T cells resembled effector T cells with signs of metabolic stress and high susceptibility to undergo apoptosis. Pharmacological inhibition of ATPase activity dampened effector cell differentiation and improved survival, suggesting that CD39 activity influences T cell fate. Individuals carrying a low-expressing CD39 variant responded better to vaccination with an increase in vaccine-specific memory T cells. Increased inducibility of CD39 after activation may contribute to the impaired vaccine response with age. PMID:26832412

  3. Pharmacokinetics and tolerability of human mouse chimeric anti-CD22 monoclonal antibody in Chinese patients with CD22-positive non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Su; Zhang, Dongsheng; Sun, Jian; Li, Zhinming; Deng, Liting; Zou, Benyan; Zhan, Jing

    2012-01-01

    The safety and pharmacokinetics assessment of antibodies targeting CD22 (e.g., epratuzumab) have been established in western Caucasian populations, but there are no reports of the effects in Chinese populations. This dose-escalation study examines the safety, pharmacokinetics and biologic effects of multiple doses of anti-CD22 human-murine chimeric monoclonal antibody SM03 in 21 Chinese patients with CD22-positive non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Most of drug-related adverse events (AEs) were mild and reversible. Two patients experienced serious AEs (hemorrhage); one patient had grade 4 neutropenia; one patient had asymptomatic grade III prolongation of activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). Major AEs included fever (71%), prolongation of APTT (42.8%), leukocytopenia (44.4%), alanine transaminase elevation (28.6%), elevated serum creatinine (23.8%) and injection site skin redness (14.3%). Circulating B cells transiently decreased without significant effects on T cells or immunoglobulin levels. Pharmacokinetic data revealed that mean maximum observed SM03 concentration and mean AUC from time zero to infinity increased in a dose-dependent manner up to 360 mg/m2 SM03. Mean clearance was similar at doses ≤360 mg/m2 and decreased significantly at dose 480 mg/m2, supporting saturation of B-cell binding at 360 mg/m2. Across all dose levels and histologies, one patient achieved partial response at 480 mg/m2 dose; 14 patients had stable disease as best response and four patients progressed. Overall, SM03 was tolerated at doses ranging from 60–480 mg/m2 and had potential efficacy in Chinese patients with follicular lymphoma. PMID:22453099

  4. Phase I study of IMGN901, a CD56-targeting antibody-drug conjugate, in patients with CD56-positive solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Shah, Manisha H; Lorigan, Paul; O'Brien, Mary E R; Fossella, Frank V; Moore, Kathleen N; Bhatia, Shailender; Kirby, Maurice; Woll, Penella J

    2016-06-01

    Background IMGN901 is a CD56-targeting antibody-drug conjugate designed for tumor-selective delivery of the cytotoxic maytansinoid DM1. This phase 1 study investigated the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and preliminary activity of IMGN901 in patients with CD56-expressing solid tumors. Methods Patients were enrolled in cohorts of escalating IMGN901 doses, administered intravenously, on 3 consecutive days every 21 days. A dose-expansion phase accrued patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC), Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), or ovarian cancer. Results Fifty-two patients were treated at doses escalating from 4 to 94 mg/m(2)/day. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was determined to be 75 mg/m(2). Dose-limiting toxicities included fatigue, neuropathy, headache or meningitis-like symptoms, chest pain, dyspnea, and myalgias. In the dose-expansion phase (n = 45), seven patients received 75 mg/m(2) and 38 received 60 mg/m(2) for up to 21 cycles. The recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D) was established at 60 mg/m(2) during dose expansion. Overall, treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) were experienced by 96.9 % of all patients, the majority of which were Grade 1 or 2. The most commonly reported Grade 3 or 4 TEAEs were hyponatremia and dyspnea (each 8.2 %). Responses included 1 complete response (CR), 1 clinical CR, and 1 unconfirmed partial response (PR) in MCC; and 1 unconfirmed PR in SCLC. Stable disease was seen for 25 % of all evaluable patients who received doses ≥60 mg/m(2). Conclusions The RP2D for IMGN901 of 60 mg/m(2) administered for 3 consecutive days every 3 weeks was associated with an acceptable tolerability profile. Objective responses were observed in patients with advanced CD56+ cancers. PMID:26961907

  5. Differences in B7 and CD28 family gene expression in the peripheral blood between newly diagnosed young-onset and adult-onset type 1 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Pruul, K; Kisand, K; Alnek, K; Metsküla, K; Reimand, K; Heilman, K; Peet, A; Varik, K; Peetsalu, M; Einberg, Ü; Tillmann, V; Uibo, R

    2015-09-01

    Type-1 diabetes (T1D) is a heterogeneous autoimmune disease, and there are pathogenetic differences between young- and adult-onset T1D patients. We hypothesized that the expressions of genes involved in costimulatory immune system pathways in peripheral blood are differently regulated in young- and adult-onset T1D. Study group I consisted of 80 children, adolescents, and young adults (age range 1.4-21.4 y; 31 controls and 49 T1D patients). Study group II consisted of 48 adults (age range 22.0-78.4 y; 30 controls and 18 T1D patients). The mRNA expression levels of CD86, CD28, CD25, CD226, CD40, BTLA, GITR, PDCD1, FoxP3, TGF-β, ICOS, sCTLA4, flCTLA4, and CD80 were measured in peripheral blood. Genetic polymorphisms (HLA haplotypes; rs231806, rs231775, and rs3087243 in CTLA4; rs763361 in CD226; and rs706778 in CD25) and T1D-associated autoantibodies were analyzed. In group I, there was significantly lower expression of CD226 in T1D patients than in the controls. In group II, there were significantly higher expression levels of CD86 and TGF-β in T1D patients than in the controls. In the T1D patients in group I, the upregulated CD80 expression correlated with the expression of both CTLA4 splice variants (sCTLA4 and flCTLA4). In contrast, in group II, upregulated CD86 correlated with TGF-β and CD25. In group I, the inhibitory CD80-CTLA4 pathway was activated, whereas, in group II, the activation CD86-CD28 pathway and TGF-β production were activated. These results emphasize the differences between young-onset and adult-onset T1D in the regulation of costimulatory pathways. These differences should be considered when developing novel treatments for T1D. PMID:25980680

  6. Peripheral blood non-MAIT CD8+CD161hi cells are decreased in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients treated with interferon beta.

    PubMed

    Negrotto, Laura; Cantó, Ester; Río, Jordi; Tintoré, Mar; Montalban, Xavier; Comabella, Manuel

    2015-11-15

    CD8+CD161hi cells, comprising MAIT and non-MAIT cells, have been involved in multiple sclerosis (MS) pathogenesis. Here, we investigated the frequency of CD8+CD161hi, MAIT and non-MAIT cells by flow cytometry in peripheral blood samples from 41 untreated MS patients, 48 patients receiving disease modifying therapies, and 17 healthy controls (HC). IFNβ treatment was associated with a decrease in the frequency of Tc17 cells compared to untreated patients (p=0.019). No significant differences were observed between untreated MS patients and HC for any of the study cell populations. These results suggest previously unknown mechanisms of action of IFNβ. PMID:26531701

  7. CD26 surface molecule involvement in T cell activation and lymphokine synthesis in rheumatoid and other inflammatory synovitis.

    PubMed

    Gerli, R; Muscat, C; Bertotto, A; Bistoni, O; Agea, E; Tognellini, R; Fiorucci, G; Cesarotti, M; Bombardieri, S

    1996-07-01

    T cell surface expression and the functional role of CD26 antigen (Ag), a surface ectoenzyme involved in T cell activation and migration across the extracellular matrix, were analyzed in the peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) from patients with inflammatory arthritides. CD26 membrane expression on T cells was detected by cytofluorometry using two different monoclonal antibodies, anti-Ta1 and anti-1F7, while cell proliferation and both IL-2 and IFN-gamma production were evaluated in anti-CD3- or anti-CD2-stimulated cell cultures after Ag surface modulation with anti-1F7. The results showed that Ta1 and 1F7 Ag expression were increased on T cells from PB of patients with active, but not inactive, rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Most SF T cells from RA or other inflammatory arthritides displayed the memory marker CD45R0 and the Ta1 Ag, but lacked the 1F7 molecule. In addition, in vitro 1F7 modulation, which enhanced RA PB T cell proliferation and both IL-2 and IFN-gamma synthesis, did not synergize with anti-CD3 or anti-CD2 in inducing IL-2-dependent activation of SF T cells, but reduced IFN-gamma production. A spontaneous reappearance of 1F7 Ag on the SF T cell surface was seen after 2-5 days in culture. Phorbol myristate acetate, able to accelerate its reexpression, also restored a normal response of SF T cells to anti-1F7 comitogenic effects. These data confirm a role of the CD26 surface molecule in regulating T cell activation and lymphokine synthesis. This observation may have important implications in the regulation of T cell activity at the joint level during chronic inflammatory processes. PMID:8674237

  8. SF2 and SRp55 regulation of CD45 exon 4 skipping during T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, R; Winne, A; Sarkissian, M; Lafyatis, R

    1999-03-01

    CD45 is an alternatively spliced membrane phosphatase required for T cell activation. Exons 4, 5 and 6 can be included or skipped from spliced mRNA resulting in several protein isoforms that include or exclude epitopes referred to as RA, RB or RC, respectively. T cells reciprocally express CD45RA or CD45RO (lacking all three exons), corresponding to naive versus memory T cells. Overexpression of the alternative splicing regulators, SF2 or SWAP, induces skipping of CD45 exon 4 in transfected COS cells. We show here that the arginine/serine-rich domain of SWAP and the RNA recognition motifs of SF2 are required for skipping of CD45 exon 4. Unlike SWAP, SF2 specifically regulated alternative splicing of CD45 exon 4, having no effect on a non-regulated exon of CD45 (exon 9). Like SF2 and SWAP, the SR proteins SC35, SRp40 and SRp75, but not SRp55 also induced CD45 exon 4 skipping. In contrast, antisense inhibition of SRp55 induced exon 4 skipping. SF2 and SRp55 proteins were not detectable or expressed at a very low level in freshly isolated CD45RA+ and CD45RO+ T cells. Activation of CD45RA+ T cells shifted CD45 expression from CD45RA to CD45RO, and induced a large increase in expression of both SF2 and SRp55. Thus, SF2 at least in part determines splicing of CD45 exon 4 during T cell activation. SRp55, SR protein phosphorylation, or other splicing factors likely regulate CD45 splicing in CD45RO+ memory T cells. The different SR proteins expressed by memory and activated T cells emphasize the different phenotypes of these cell types that both express CD45RO. PMID:10092085

  9. CD33-specific chimeric antigen receptor T cells exhibit potent preclinical activity against human acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kenderian, S S; Ruella, M; Shestova, O; Klichinsky, M; Aikawa, V; Morrissette, J J D; Scholler, J; Song, D; Porter, D L; Carroll, M; June, C H; Gill, S

    2015-08-01

    Patients with chemo-refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have a dismal prognosis. Chimeric antigen receptor T (CART) cell therapy has produced exciting results in CD19+ malignancies and may overcome many of the limitations of conventional leukemia therapies. We developed CART cells to target CD33 (CART33) using the anti-CD33 single chain variable fragment used in gemtuzumab ozogamicin (clone My96) and tested the activity and toxicity of these cells. CART33 exhibited significant effector functions in vitro and resulted in eradication of leukemia and prolonged survival in AML xenografts. CART33 also resulted in human lineage cytopenias and reduction of myeloid progenitors in xenograft models of hematopoietic toxicity, suggesting that permanently expressed CD33-specific CART cells would have unacceptable toxicity. To enhance the viability of CART33 as an option for AML, we designed a transiently expressed mRNA anti-CD33 CAR. Gene transfer was carried out by electroporation into T cells and resulted in high-level expression with potent but self-limited activity against AML. Thus our preclinical studies show potent activity of CART33 and indicate that transient expression of anti-CD33 CAR by RNA modification could be used in patients to avoid long-term myelosuppression. CART33 therapy could be used alone or as part of a preparative regimen prior to allogeneic transplantation in refractory AML. PMID:25721896

  10. Production of an active anti-CD20-hIL-2 immunocytokine in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Marusic, Carla; Novelli, Flavia; Salzano, Anna M; Scaloni, Andrea; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Pioli, Claudio; Donini, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    Anti-CD20 murine or chimeric antibodies (Abs) have been used to treat non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) and other diseases characterized by overactive or dysfunctional B cells. Anti-CD20 Abs demonstrated to be effective in inducing regression of B-cell lymphomas, although in many cases patients relapse following treatment. A promising approach to improve the outcome of mAb therapy is the use of anti-CD20 antibodies to deliver cytokines to the tumour microenvironment. In particular, IL-2-based immunocytokines have shown enhanced antitumour activity in several preclinical studies. Here, we report on the engineering of an anti-CD20-human interleukin-2 (hIL-2) immunocytokine (2B8-Fc-hIL2) based on the C2B8 mAb (Rituximab) and the resulting ectopic expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. The scFv-Fc-engineered immunocytokine is fully assembled in plants with minor degradation products as assessed by SDS-PAGE and gel filtration. Purification yields using protein-A affinity chromatography were in the range of 15-20 mg/kg of fresh leaf weight (FW). Glycopeptide analysis confirmed the presence of a highly homogeneous plant-type glycosylation. 2B8-Fc-hIL2 and the cognate 2B8-Fc antibody, devoid of hIL-2, were assayed by flow cytometry on Daudi cells revealing a CD20 binding activity comparable to that of Rituximab and were effective in eliciting antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity of human PBMC versus Daudi cells, demonstrating their functional integrity. In 2B8-Fc-hIL2, IL-2 accessibility and biological activity were verified by flow cytometry and cell proliferation assay. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a recombinant immunocytokine based on the therapeutic Rituximab antibody scaffold, whose expression in plants may be a valuable tool for NHLs treatment. PMID:25879373

  11. How, with whom and when: an overview of CD147-mediated regulatory networks influencing matrix metalloproteinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Grass, G. Daniel; Toole, Bryan P.

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) comprise a family of 23 zinc-dependent enzymes involved in various pathologic and physiologic processes. In cancer, MMPs contribute to processes from tumour initiation to establishment of distant metastases. Complex signalling and protein transport networks regulate MMP synthesis, cell surface presentation and release. Earlier attempts to disrupt MMP activity in patients have proven to be intolerable and with underwhelming clinical efficacy; thus targeting ancillary proteins that regulate MMP activity may be a useful therapeutic approach. Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) was originally characterized as a factor present on lung cancer cells, which stimulated collagenase (MMP-1) production in fibroblasts. Subsequent studies demonstrated that EMMPRIN was identical with several other protein factors, including basigin (Bsg), all of which are now commonly termed CD147. CD147 modulates the synthesis and activity of soluble and membrane-bound [membrane-type MMPs (MT-MMPs)] in various contexts via homophilic/heterophilic cell interactions, vesicular shedding or cell-autonomous processes. CD147 also participates in inflammation, nutrient and drug transporter activity, microbial pathology and developmental processes. Despite the hundreds of manuscripts demonstrating CD147-mediated MMP regulation, the molecular underpinnings governing this process have not been fully elucidated. The present review summarizes our present knowledge of the complex regulatory systems influencing CD147 biology and provides a framework to understand how CD147 may influence MMP activity. PMID:26604323

  12. Interluekin-12 enhances the function and anti-tumor activity in murine and human CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Mark P.; Su, Ee Wern; Suriano, Samantha; Cloud, Colleen A.; Andrijauskaite, Kristina; Kesarwani, Pravin; Schwartz, Kristina M.; Williams, Katelyn; Johnson, C. Bryce; Li, Mingli; Scurti, Gina M.; Salem, Mohamed L.; Paulos, Chrystal M.; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Mehrotra, Shikhar; Cole, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Mouse CD8+ T cells conditioned with Interleukin (IL)-12 ex vivo mediate the potent regression of established melanoma when transferred into lymphodepleted mice. However, the quantitative and qualitative changes induced by IL-12 in the responding mouse CD8+ T cells have not been well defined. Moreover, the mechanisms by which IL-12-conditioning impacts human CD8+ T cells, and how such cells might be expanded prior to infusion into patients is not known. We found that ex vivo IL-12-conditioning of mouse CD8+ T cells led to a 10- to 100-fold increase in persistence and anti-tumor efficacy upon adoptive transfer into lymphodepleted mice. The enhancing effect of IL-12 was associated with maintenance of functional avidity. Importantly, in the context of ongoing ACT clinical trials, human CD8+ T cells genetically modified with a tyrosinase-specific T-cell receptor exhibited significantly enhanced functional activity when conditioned with IL-12 as indicated by heightened granzyme B expression and elevated peptide-specific CD107a degranulation. This effect was sustainable despite the 20 days of in vitro cellular expansion required to expand cells over 1,000-fold allowing adequate cell numbers for administration to cancer patients. Overall, these findings support the efficacy and feasibility of ex vivo IL-12-conditioning of TCR-modified human CD8+ T cells for adoptive transfer and cancer therapy. PMID:25676709

  13. [TLR9 expression is positively correlated with the levels of CD38, HLA-DR and CD95 on peripheral blood mononuclear cells in chronic HBV infected patients].

    PubMed

    Mao, Xuefeng; Peng, Lishan; Liu, Xian; Yang, Yang; Wang, Qihui; Wang, Dengrong; Xiao, Jian; Leng, Jing

    2016-05-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between the expression of TLR9 and the levels of CD38, HLA-DR and CD95 on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infected patients. Methods70 chronic HBV infected patients and 12 healthy donors were enrolled in this study, and density gradient centrifugation was used to isolate PBMCs from peripheral blood with EDTA for anticoagulation. Flow cytometry was used to detect the levels of TLR9, CD38, HLA-DR and CD95 on PBMCs. Results Compared to the healthy donors, chronic HBV infected patients with low viral load or high viral load had significantly higher levels of TLR9, HLA-DR and CD95 on PMBCs. Furthermore, the co-expression rates of TLR9 and CD38, HLA-DR, CD95 on PBMCs were obviously higher than those of the healthy donors. Correlation analysis showed that the expression of TLR9 was positively correlated with CD38 (r=0.345), HLA-DR (r=0.334), CD95 (r=0.227) on PBMCs in the patients with chronic HBV infection. Conclusion The expression of TLR9 increased and was positively associated with CD38, HLA-DR and CD95 on PBMCs during chronic HBV infection. PMID:27126946

  14. Gene expression patterns in CD4+ peripheral blood cells in healthy subjects and stage IV melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Felts, Sara J; Van Keulen, Virginia P; Scheid, Adam D; Allen, Kathleen S; Bradshaw, Renee K; Jen, Jin; Peikert, Tobias; Middha, Sumit; Zhang, Yuji; Block, Matthew S; Markovic, Svetomir N; Pease, Larry R

    2015-11-01

    Melanoma patients exhibit changes in immune responsiveness in the local tumor environment, draining lymph nodes, and peripheral blood. Immune-targeting therapies are revolutionizing melanoma patient care increasingly, and studies show that patients derive clinical benefit from these newer agents. Nonetheless, predicting which patients will benefit from these costly therapies remains a challenge. In an effort to capture individual differences in immune responsiveness, we are analyzing patterns of gene expression in human peripheral blood cells using RNAseq. Focusing on CD4+ peripheral blood cells, we describe multiple categories of immune regulating genes, which are expressed in highly ordered patterns shared by cohorts of healthy subjects and stage IV melanoma patients. Despite displaying conservation in overall transcriptome structure, CD4+ peripheral blood cells from melanoma patients differ quantitatively from healthy subjects in the expression of more than 2000 genes. Moreover, 1300 differentially expressed genes are found in transcript response patterns following activation of CD4+ cells ex vivo, suggesting that widespread functional discrepancies differentiate the immune systems of healthy subjects and melanoma patients. While our analysis reveals that the transcriptome architecture characteristic of healthy subjects is maintained in cancer patients, the genes expressed differentially among individuals and across cohorts provide opportunities for understanding variable immune states as well as response potentials, thus establishing a foundation for predicting individual responses to stimuli such as immunotherapeutic agents. PMID:26245876

  15. Synthesis and enzymatic photo-activity of an O2 tolerant hydrogenase-CdSe@CdS quantum rod bioconjugate.

    PubMed

    Hamon, C; Ciaccafava, A; Infossi, P; Puppo, R; Even-Hernandez, P; Lojou, E; Marchi, V

    2014-05-21

    This communication reports on the preparation of stable and photo-active nano-heterostructures composed of O2 tolerant [NiFe] hydrogenase extracted from the Aquifex aeolicus bacterium grafted onto hydrophilic CdSe/CdS quantum rods in view of the development of H2/O2 biofuel cells. The resulting complex is efficient towards H2 oxidation, displays good stability and new photosensitive properties. PMID:24468861

  16. Expression of serum sCD163 in patients with liver diseases and inflammatory disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Yu, Ye; Yang, Ying; Wu, Shan Shan; Zhu, Hai Hong; Liu, Yan Ning; Liu, Wei Xia; Hu, Ying; Wu, Wei; Xia, Cai Xia; Chen, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the diagnostic values of soluble cluster of differentiation 163 (sCD163) in patients with liver failure or various inflammations. Methods: Serum samples were collected from patients admitted to the First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University from October 2013 to January 2015 for treatment of with liver diseases, including liver failure (n=38), hepatitis B virus (HBV)-induced liver cancer (HBsAg positive) (n=40), HBV-induced hepatic cirrhosis (HBsAg positive) (n=40), chronic hepatitis B (n=38), HBV carrier (n=40), fatty liver patients without HBV infection (n=40), chronic glomerulonephritis (n=38), community acquired pneumonia (n=38) and acute pancreatitis (n=38). The CD163/sCD163 was determined using commercial ELISA kits according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Results: Significant decrease was noticed in the sCD163 in patients with fatty liver and HBV carrier compared with that of patients with chronic hepatitis B (P < 0.05). Compared with the healthy controls, the level of sCD163 was remarkably increased in the other groups (P < 0.05). The serum sCD163 in patients with HBV-induced liver cancer showed statistical difference compared with those of the patients with fatty liver, HBV carrier, as well as those with liver failure (P < 0.05). The expression of sCD163 was remarkably elevated in patients with liver failure compared with the patients with liver cancer, HBV-induced hepatic cirrhosis, chronic hepatitis B, fatty liver, or HBV carrier (P < 0.05). No significant difference was noticed in the sCD163 in patients with chronic hepatitis B, community acquired pneumonia, chronic glomerulonephritis, and acute pancreatitis (P > 0.05). Conclusions: sCD163 is a sensitive marker protein for liver failure. The elevation of sCD163 was closely related to the progression of the liver failure. No statistical difference was noticed in the sCD163 in patients with inflammatory disorders, indicating sCD163 showed no organ specificity. PMID

  17. Preserved Activity of CD20-Specific Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Expressing T Cells in the Presence of Rituximab.

    PubMed

    Rufener, Gregory A; Press, Oliver W; Olsen, Philip; Lee, Sang Yun; Jensen, Michael C; Gopal, Ajay K; Pender, Barbara; Budde, Lihua E; Rossow, Jeffrey K; Green, Damian J; Maloney, David G; Riddell, Stanley R; Till, Brian G

    2016-06-01

    CD20 is an attractive immunotherapy target for B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas, and adoptive transfer of T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) targeting CD20 is a promising strategy. A theoretical limitation is that residual serum rituximab might block CAR binding to CD20 and thereby impede T cell-mediated anti-lymphoma responses. The activity of CD20 CAR-modified T cells in the presence of various concentrations of rituximab was tested in vitro and in vivo CAR-binding sites on CD20(+) tumor cells were blocked by rituximab in a dose-dependent fashion, although at 37°C blockade was incomplete at concentrations up to 200 μg/mL. T cells with CD20 CARs also exhibited modest dose-dependent reductions in cytokine secretion and cytotoxicity, but not proliferation, against lymphoma cell lines. At rituximab concentrations of 100 μg/mL, CAR T cells retained ≥50% of baseline activity against targets with high CD20 expression, but were more strongly inhibited when target cells expressed low CD20. In a murine xenograft model using a rituximab-refractory lymphoma cell line, rituximab did not impair CAR T-cell activity, and tumors were eradicated in >85% of mice. Clinical residual rituximab serum concentrations were measured in 103 lymphoma patients after rituximab therapy, with the median level found to be only 38 μg/mL (interquartile range, 19-72 μg/mL). Thus, despite modest functional impairment in vitro, the in vivo activity of CD20-targeted CAR T cells remains intact at clinically relevant levels of rituximab, making use of these T cells clinically feasible. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(6); 509-19. ©2016 AACRSee related Spotlight by Sadelain, p. 473. PMID:27197068

  18. Effects of CD4 monitoring frequency on clinical endpoints in clinically stable HIV-infected patients with viral suppression

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jin Young; Boettiger, David; Law, Matthew; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Yunihastuti, Evy; Chaiwarith, Romanee; Lee, Man Po; Sim, Benedict LH; Oka, Shinichi; Wong, Wingwai; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Kantipong, Pacharee; Phanuphak, Praphan; Ng, Oon Tek; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Zhang, Fujie; Pujari, Sanjay; Ditangco, Rossana; Ratanasuwan, Winai; Merati, Tuti Parwati; Saphonn, Vonthanak; Sohn, Annette H.; Choi, Jun Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background Current treatment guidelines for HIV infection recommend routine CD4+ lymphocyte (CD4) count monitoring in patients with viral suppression. This may have a limited impact on influencing care as clinically meaningful CD4 decline rarely occurs during viral suppression. Methods In a regional HIV observational cohort in the Asia-Pacific, patients with viral suppression (2 consecutive viral loads <400 copies/mL) and a CD4 count ≥200 cells/μL who had CD4 testing 6 monthly were analyzed. Main study endpoints were occurrence of one CD4 count <200 cells/μL (single CD4<200) and two CD4 counts <200 cells/μL within a 6-month period (confirmed CD4<200). A comparison of time to single and confirmed CD4<200 with biannual or annual CD4 assessment was performed by generating a hypothetical group comprised of the same patients with annual CD4 testing by removing every second CD4 count. Results Among 1538 patients, the rate of single CD4<200 was 3.45/100 patient-years, and of confirmed CD4<200 was 0.77/100 patient-years. During 5 years of viral suppression, patients with baseline CD4 200-249 cells/μL were significantly more likely to experience confirmed CD4<200 compared with patients with higher baseline CD4 (hazard ratio 55.47 [95% confidence interval 7.36–418.20], p<0.001 versus baseline CD4 ≥500 cells/μL). Cumulative probabilities of confirmed CD4<200 was also higher in patients with baseline CD4 200-249 cells/μL compared with patients with higher baseline CD4. There was no significant difference in time to confirmed CD4<200 between biannual and annual CD4 measurement (p=0.336). Conclusions Annual CD4 monitoring in virally suppressed HIV patients with a baseline CD4 ≥250 cells/μL may be sufficient for clinical management. PMID:25850606

  19. NSOM/QD-Based Direct Visualization of CD3-Induced and CD28-Enhanced Nanospatial Coclustering of TCR and Coreceptor in Nanodomains in T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoxu; Wang, Richard C.; Gong, Guangming; Yan, Lin; Huang, Dan; Chen, Zheng W.

    2009-01-01

    Direct molecular imaging of nano-spatial relationship between T cell receptor (TCR)/CD3 and CD4 or CD8 co-receptor before and after activation of a primary T cell has not been reported. We have recently innovated application of near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) and immune-labeling quantum dots (QD) to image Ag-specific TCR response during in vivo clonal expansion, and now up-graded the NSOM/QD-based nanotechnology through dipole-polarization and dual-color imaging. Using this imaging system scanning cell-membrane molecules at a best-optical lateral resolution, we demonstrated that CD3, CD4 or CD8 molecules were distinctly distributed as single QD-bound molecules or nano-clusters equivalent to 2–4 QD fluorescence-intensity/size on cell-membrane of un-stimulated primary T cells, and ∼6–10% of CD3 were co-clustering with CD4 or CD8 as 70–110 nm nano-clusters without forming nano-domains. The ligation of TCR/CD3 on CD4 or CD8 T cells led to CD3 nanoscale co-clustering or interaction with CD4 or CD8 co-receptors forming 200–500 nm nano-domains or >500 nm micro-domains. Such nano-spatial co-clustering of CD3 and CD4 or CD3 and CD8 appeared to be an intrinsic event of TCR/CD3 ligation, not purely limited to MHC engagement, and be driven by Lck phosphorylation. Importantly, CD28 co-stimulation remarkably enhanced TCR/CD3 nanoscale co-clustering or interaction with CD4 co-receptor within nano- or micro-domains on the membrane. In contrast, CD28 co-stimulation did not enhance CD8 clustering or CD3–CD8 co-clustering in nano-domains although it increased molecular number and density of CD3 clustering in the enlarged nano-domains. These nanoscale findings provide new insights into TCR/CD3 interaction with CD4 or CD8 co-receptor in T-cell activation. PMID:19536289

  20. NSOM/QD-based direct visualization of CD3-induced and CD28-enhanced nanospatial coclustering of TCR and coreceptor in nanodomains in T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Liyun; Zeng, Gucheng; Lu, Xiaoxu; Wang, Richard C; Gong, Guangming; Yan, Lin; Huang, Dan; Chen, Zheng W

    2009-01-01

    Direct molecular imaging of nano-spatial relationship between T cell receptor (TCR)/CD3 and CD4 or CD8 co-receptor before and after activation of a primary T cell has not been reported. We have recently innovated application of near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) and immune-labeling quantum dots (QD) to image Ag-specific TCR response during in vivo clonal expansion, and now up-graded the NSOM/QD-based nanotechnology through dipole-polarization and dual-color imaging. Using this imaging system scanning cell-membrane molecules at a best-optical lateral resolution, we demonstrated that CD3, CD4 or CD8 molecules were distinctly distributed as single QD-bound molecules or nano-clusters equivalent to 2-4 QD fluorescence-intensity/size on cell-membrane of un-stimulated primary T cells, and approximately 6-10% of CD3 were co-clustering with CD4 or CD8 as 70-110 nm nano-clusters without forming nano-domains. The ligation of TCR/CD3 on CD4 or CD8 T cells led to CD3 nanoscale co-clustering or interaction with CD4 or CD8 co-receptors forming 200-500 nm nano-domains or >500 nm micro-domains. Such nano-spatial co-clustering of CD3 and CD4 or CD3 and CD8 appeared to be an intrinsic event of TCR/CD3 ligation, not purely limited to MHC engagement, and be driven by Lck phosphorylation. Importantly, CD28 co-stimulation remarkably enhanced TCR/CD3 nanoscale co-clustering or interaction with CD4 co-receptor within nano- or micro-domains on the membrane. In contrast, CD28 co-stimulation did not enhance CD8 clustering or CD3-CD8 co-clustering in nano-domains although it increased molecular number and density of CD3 clustering in the enlarged nano-domains. These nanoscale findings provide new insights into TCR/CD3 interaction with CD4 or CD8 co-receptor in T-cell activation. PMID:19536289

  1. Clinical Evaluation of the BD FACSPresto™ Near-Patient CD4 Counter in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Angira, Francis; Akoth, Benta; Omolo, Paul; Opollo, Valarie; Bornheimer, Scott; Judge, Kevin; Tilahun, Henok; Lu, Beverly; Omana-Zapata, Imelda; Zeh, Clement

    2016-01-01

    Background The BD FACSPresto™ Near-Patient CD4 Counter was developed to expand HIV/AIDS management in resource-limited settings. It measures absolute CD4 counts (AbsCD4), percent CD4 (%CD4), and hemoglobin (Hb) from a single drop of capillary or venous blood in approximately 23 minutes, with throughput of 10 samples per hour. We assessed the performance of the BD FACSPresto system, evaluating accuracy, stability, linearity, precision, and reference intervals using capillary and venous blood at KEMRI/CDC HIV-research laboratory, Kisumu, Kenya, and precision and linearity at BD Biosciences, California, USA. Methods For accuracy, venous samples were tested using the BD FACSCalibur™ instrument with BD Tritest™ CD3/CD4/CD45 reagent, BD Trucount™ tubes, and BD Multiset™ software for AbsCD4 and %CD4, and the Sysmex™ KX-21N for Hb. Stability studies evaluated duration of staining (18–120-minute incubation), and effects of venous blood storage <6–24 hours post-draw. A normal cohort was tested for reference intervals. Precision covered multiple days, operators, and instruments. Linearity required mixing two pools of samples, to obtain evenly spaced concentrations for AbsCD4, total lymphocytes, and Hb. Results AbsCD4 and %CD4 venous/capillary (N = 189/ N = 162) accuracy results gave Deming regression slopes within 0.97–1.03 and R2 ≥0.96. For Hb, Deming regression results were R2 ≥0.94 and slope ≥0.94 for both venous and capillary samples. Stability varied within 10% 2 hours after staining and for venous blood stored less than 24 hours. Reference intervals results showed that gender—but not age—differences were statistically significant (p<0.05). Precision results had <3.5% coefficient of variation for AbsCD4, %CD4, and Hb, except for low AbsCD4 samples (<6.8%). Linearity was 42–4,897 cells/μL for AbsCD4, 182–11,704 cells/μL for total lymphocytes, and 2–24 g/dL for Hb. Conclusions The BD FACSPresto system provides accurate, precise clinical

  2. Tetraspanin CD9 modulates human lymphoma cellular proliferation via histone deacetylase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Herr, Michael J.; Longhurst, Celia M.; Baker, Benjamin; Homayouni, Ramin; Speich, Henry E.; Kotha, Jayaprakash; Jennings, Lisa K.

    2014-05-16

    Highlights: • CD9 is differentially expressed in human Burkitt’s lymphoma cells. • We found that CD9 expression promotes these cells proliferation. • CD9 expression also increases HDAC activity. • HDAC inhibition decreased both cell proliferation and importantly CD9 expression. • CD9 may dictate HDAC efficacy and play a role in HDAC regulation. - Abstract: Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) is a type of hematological malignancy that affects two percent of the overall population in the United States. Tetraspanin CD9 is a cell surface protein that has been thoroughly demonstrated to be a molecular facilitator of cellular phenotype. CD9 expression varies in two human lymphoma cell lines, Raji and BJAB. In this report, we investigated the functional relationship between CD9 and cell proliferation regulated by histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity in these two cell lines. Introduction of CD9 expression in Raji cells resulted in significantly increased cell proliferation and HDAC activity compared to Mock transfected Raji cells. The increase in CD9–Raji cell proliferation was significantly inhibited by HDAC inhibitor (HDACi) treatment. Pretreatment of BJAB cells with HDAC inhibitors resulted in a significant decrease in endogenous CD9 mRNA and cell surface expression. BJAB cells also displayed decreased cell proliferation after HDACi treatment. These results suggest a significant relationship between CD9 expression and cell proliferation in human lymphoma cells that may be modulated by HDAC activity.

  3. Increased expression of IRF4 and ETS1 in CD4+cells from patients with intermittent allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Bruhn, Sören; Barrenäs, Fredrik; Mobini, Reza; Andersson, Bengt A.; Chavali, Sreenivas; Egan, Brian S.; Hovig, Eivind; Sandve, Geir Kjetil; Langston, Michael A.; Rogers, Gary; Wang, Hui; Benson, Mikael

    2011-01-01

    Background The transcription factor (TF) IRF4 is involved in the regulation of Th1, Th2, Th9 and Th17 cells, and animal studies have indicated an important role in allergy. However, IRF4 and its target genes have not been examined in human allergy. Methods IRF4 and its target genes were examined in allergen-challenged CD4+ cells from patients with IAR using combined gene expression microarrays and chromatin immunoprecipitation chips (ChIP-chips), computational target prediction and RNAi knockdowns. Results IRF4 increased in allergen-challenged CD4+ cells from patients with IAR and functional studies supported its role in Th2 cell activation. IRF4 ChIP-chip showed that IRF4 regulated a large number of genes relevant for Th cell differentiation. However, neither Th1 nor Th2 cytokines were the direct targets of IRF4. To examine if IRF4 induced Th2 cytokines via one or more down-stream TFs, we combined gene expression microarrays, ChIP-chips and computational target prediction and found a putative intermediary TF, namely ETS1 in allergen-challenged CD4+ cells from allergic patients. ETS1 increased significantly in allergen-challenged CD4+ cells from patients compared to controls. Gene expression microarrays before and after ETS1 RNAi knockdown showed that ETS1 induced Th2 cytokines as well as disease-related pathways. Conclusions Increased expression of IRF4 in allergen-challenged CD4+ cells from patients with intermittent allergic rhinitis, leads to activation of a complex transcriptional program, including Th2 cytokines. PMID:21919915

  4. Bevacizumab specifically decreases elevated levels of circulating KIT+CD11b+ cells and IL-10 in metastatic breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Cattin, Sarah; Fellay, Benoît; Pradervand, Sylvain; Trojan, Andreas; Ruhstaller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background Whether bevacizumab exerts its anti-tumor properties through systemic effects beyond local inhibition of angiogenesis and how these effects can be monitored in patients, remain largely elusive. To address these questions, we investigated bone marrow-derived cells and cytokines in the peripheral blood of metastatic breast cancer patients undergoing therapy with bevacizumab. Methods Circulating endothelial cells (CEC), circulating endothelial progenitor (CEP) and circulating CD11b+ cells in metastatic breast cancer patients before and during therapy with paclitaxel alone (n = 11) or in combination with bevacizumab (n = 10) were characterized using flow cytometry, real time PCR and RNASeq. Circulating factors were measured by ELISA. Aged-matched healthy donors were used as baseline controls (n = 12). Results Breast cancer patients had elevated frequencies of CEC, CEP, TIE2+CD11b+ and KIT+CD11b+ cell subsets. CEC decreased during therapy, irrespective of bevacizumab, while TIE2+CD11b+ remained unchanged. KIT+CD11b+ cells decreased in response to paclitaxel with bevacizumab, but not paclitaxel alone. Cancer patients expressed higher mRNA levels of the M2 polarization markers CD163, ARG1 and IL-10 in CD11b+ cells and increased levels of the M2 cytokines IL-10 and CCL20 in plasma. M1 activation markers and cytokines were low or equally expressed in cancer patients compared to healthy donors. Chemotherapy with paclitaxel and bevacizumab, but not with paclitaxel alone, significantly decreased IL-10 mRNA in CD11b+ cells and IL-10 protein in plasma. Conclusions This pilot study provides evidence of systemic immunomodulatory effects of bevacizumab and identified circulating KIT+CD11b+ cells and IL-10 as candidate biomarkers of bevacizumab activity in metastatic breast cancer patients. PMID:26840567

  5. CD163 promotes hematoma absorption and improves neurological functions in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wen-jing; Yu, Hong-quan; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Qun; Meng, Hong-mei

    2016-01-01

    Clinical outcomes are positively associated with hematoma absorption. The monocyte-macrophage scavenger receptor, CD163, plays an important role in the metabolism of hemoglobin, and a soluble form of CD163 is present in plasma and other tissue fluids; therefore, we speculated that serum CD163 affects hematoma absorption after intracerebral hemorrhage. Patients with intracerebral hemorrhage were divided into high- and low-level groups according to the average CD163 level (1,977.79 ± 832.91 ng/mL). Compared with the high-level group, the low-level group had a significantly slower hematoma absorption rate, and significantly increased National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores and modified Rankin Scale scores. These results suggest that CD163 promotes hematoma absorption and the recovery of neurological function in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage.

  6. Human complement C3 deficiency: Th1 induction requires T cell-derived complement C3a and CD46 activation.

    PubMed

    Ghannam, Arije; Fauquert, Jean-Luc; Thomas, Caroline; Kemper, Claudia; Drouet, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Human T helper type 1 (Th1) responses are essential in defense. Although T cell receptor (TCR) and co-stimulator engagement are indispensable for T cell activation, stimulation of additional receptor pathways are also necessary for effector induction. For example, engagement of the complement regulator CD46 by its ligand C3b generated upon TCR activation is required for IFN-γ production as CD46-deficient patients lack Th1 responses. Utilizing T cells from two C3-deficient patients we demonstrate here that normal Th1 responses also depend on signals mediated by the anaphylatoxin C3a receptor (C3aR). Importantly, and like in CD46-deficient patients, whilst Th1 induction are impaired in C3-deficient patients in vitro, their Th2 responses are unaffected. Furthermore, C3-deficient CD4(+) T cells present with reduced expression of CD25 and CD122, further substantiating the growing notion that complement fragments regulate interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) assembly and that disturbance of complement-guided IL-2R assembly contributes to aberrant Th1 effector responses. Lastly, sustained intrinsic production of complement fragments may participate in the Th1 contraction phase as both C3a and CD46 engagement regulate IL-10 co-expression in Th1 cells. These data suggest that C3aR and CD46 activation via intrinsic generation of their respective ligands is an integral part of human Th1 (but not Th2) immunity. PMID:24321396

  7. Reduced sTWEAK and Increased sCD163 Levels in HIV-Infected Patients: Modulation by Antiretroviral Treatment, HIV Replication and HCV Co-Infection

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán, Luis M.; García Morillo, José S.; Egido, Jesús; Noval, Manuel Leal; Ferrando-Martinez, Sara; Blanco-Colio, Luis M.; Genebat, Miguel; Villar, José R.; Moreno-Luna, Rafael; Moreno, Juan Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease due to increased inflammation and persistent immune activation. CD163 is a macrophage scavenger receptor that is involved in monocyte-macrophage activation in HIV-infected patients. CD163 interacts with TWEAK, a member of the TNF superfamily. Circulating levels of sTWEAK and sCD163 have been previously associated with cardiovascular disease, but no previous studies have fully analyzed their association with HIV. Objective The aim of this study was to analyze circulating levels of sTWEAK and sCD163 as well as other known markers of inflammation (hsCRP, IL-6 and sTNFRII) and endothelial dysfunction (sVCAM-1 and ADMA) in 26 patients with HIV before and after 48 weeks of antiretroviral treatment (ART) and 23 healthy subjects. Results Patients with HIV had reduced sTWEAK levels and increased sCD163, sVCAM-1, ADMA, hsCRP, IL-6 and sTNFRII plasma concentrations, as well as increased sCD163/sTWEAK ratio, compared with healthy subjects. Antiretroviral treatment significantly reduced the concentrations of sCD163, sVCAM-1, hsCRP and sTNFRII, although they remained elevated when compared with healthy subjects. Antiretroviral treatment had no effect on the concentrations of ADMA and sTWEAK, biomarkers associated with endothelial function. The use of protease inhibitors as part of antiretroviral therapy and the presence of HCV-HIV co-infection and/or active HIV replication attenuated the ART-mediated decrease in sCD163 plasma concentrations. Conclusion HIV-infected patients showed a proatherogenic profile characterized by increased inflammatory, immune-activation and endothelial-dysfunction biomarkers that partially improved after ART. HCV-HIV co-infection and/or active HIV replication enhanced immune activation despite ART. PMID:24594990

  8. Enrichment of CD56dimKIR+CD57+ highly cytotoxic NK cells in tumor infiltrated lymph nodes of melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Mortarini, Roberta; Anichini, Andrea; Garofalo, Cinzia; Tallerico, Rossana; Santinami, Mario; Gulletta, Elio; Ietto, Caterina; Galgani, Mario; Matarese, Giuseppe; Bifulco, Maurizio; Ferrone, Soldano; Colucci, Francesco; Moretta, Alessandro; Kärre, Klas; Carbone, Ennio

    2014-01-01

    An important checkpoint in the progression of melanoma is the metastasis to lymph nodes. Here, to investigate the role of lymph node NK cells in disease progression, we analyze frequency, phenotype and functions of NK cells from tumor-infiltrated (TILN) and tumor-free ipsilateral lymph nodes (TFLN) of the same patients. We show an expansion of CD56dimCD57dimCD69+CCR7+KIR+ NK cells in TILN. TILN NK cells display robust cytotoxic activity against autologous melanoma cells. In the blood of metastatic melanoma patients the frequency of NK cells expressing the receptors for CXCL8 receptor is increased compared to healthy subjects, and blood NK cells also express the receptors for CCL2 and IL6. These factors are produced in high amount in TILN and in vitro switch the phenotype of blood NK cells from healthy donors to the phenotype associated with TILN. Our data suggest that the microenvironment of TILN generates and/or recruits a particularly effective NK cell subset. PMID:25472612

  9. CD73 Predicts Favorable Prognosis in Patients with Nonmuscle-Invasive Urothelial Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wettstein, Marian S.; Buser, Lorenz; Hermanns, Thomas; Roudnicky, Filip; Eberli, Daniel; Baumeister, Philipp; Sulser, Tullio; Wild, Peter; Poyet, Cédric

    2015-01-01

    Aims. CD73 is a membrane associated 5′-ectonucleotidase that has been proposed as prognostic biomarker in various solid tumors. The aim of this study is to evaluate CD73 expression in a cohort of patients with primary bladder cancer in regard to its association with clinicopathological features and disease course. Methods. Tissue samples from 174 patients with a primary urothelial carcinoma were immunohistochemically assessed on a tissue microarray. Associations between CD73 expression and retrospectively obtained clinicopathological data were evaluated by contingency analysis. Survival analysis was performed to investigate the predictive value of CD73 within the subgroup of pTa and pT1 tumors in regard to progression-free survival (PFS). Results. High CD73 expression was found in 46 (26.4%) patients and was significantly associated with lower stage, lower grade, less adjacent carcinoma in situ and with lower Ki-67 proliferation index. High CD73 immunoreactivity in the subgroup of pTa and pT1 tumors (n = 158) was significantly associated with longer PFS (HR: 0.228; p = 0.047) in univariable Cox regression analysis. Conclusion. High CD73 immunoreactivity was associated with favorable clinicopathological features. Furthermore, it predicts better outcome in the subgroup of pTa and pT1 tumors and may thus serve as additional tool for the selection of patients with favorable prognosis. PMID:26543299

  10. Selection of transduced CD34+ progenitors and enzymatic correction of cells from Gaucher patients, with bicistronic vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Migita, M; Medin, J A; Pawliuk, R; Jacobson, S; Nagle, J W; Anderson, S; Amiri, M; Humphries, R K; Karlsson, S

    1995-01-01

    The gene transfer efficiency of human hematopoietic stem cells is still inadequate for efficient gene therapy of most disorders. To overcome this problem, a selectable retroviral vector system for gene therapy has been developed for gene therapy of Gaucher disease. We constructed a bicistronic retroviral vector containing the human glucocerebrosidase (GC) cDNA and the human small cell surface antigen CD24 (243 bp). Expression of both cDNAs was controlled by the long terminal repeat enhancer/promoter of the Molony murine leukemia virus. The CD24 selectable marker was placed downstream of the GC cDNA and its translation was enhanced by inclusion of the long 5' untranslated region of encephalomyocarditis virus internal ribosomal entry site. Virus-producing GP+envAM12 cells were created by multiple supernatant transductions to create vector producer cells. The vector LGEC has a high titer and can drive expression of GC and the cell surface antigen CD24 simultaneously in transduced NIH 3T3 cells and Gaucher skin fibroblasts. These transduced cells have been successfully separated from untransduced cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, based on cell surface expression of CD24. Transduced and sorted NIH 3T3 cells showed higher GC enzyme activity than the unsorted population, demonstrating coordinated expression of both genes. Fibroblasts from Gaucher patients were transduced and sorted for CD24 expression, and GC enzyme activity was measured. The transduced sorted Gaucher fibroblasts had a marked increase in enzyme activity (149%) compared with virgin Gaucher fibroblasts (17% of normal GC enzyme activity). Efficient transduction of CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors (20-40%) was accomplished and fluorescence-activated cell sorted CD24(+)-expressing progenitors generated colonies, all of which (100%) were vector positive. The sorted, CD24-expressing progenitors generated erythroid burst-forming units, colony-forming units (CFU)-granulocyte, CFU-macrophage, CFU

  11. CD4 lymphocyte dynamics in Tanzanian pulmonary tuberculosis patients with and without hiv co-infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The interaction of HIV and tuberculosis (TB) on CD4 levels over time is complex and has been divergently reported. Methods CD4 counts were assessed from time of diagnosis till the end of TB treatment in a cohort of pulmonary TB patients with and without HIV co-infection and compared with cross-sectional data on age- and sex-matched non-TB controls from the same area. Results Of 1,605 study participants, 1,250 were PTB patients and 355 were non-TB controls. At baseline, HIV was associated with 246 (95% CI: 203; 279) cells per μL lower CD4 counts. All PTB patients had 100 cells per μL lower CD4 counts than the healthy controls. The CD4 levels were largely unchanged during a five-month of TB treatment. HIV infected patients not receiving ART at any time and those already on ART at baseline had no increase in CD4 counts after 5 months of TB treatment, whereas those prescribed ART between baseline and 2 months, and between 2 and 5 months increased by 69 (22;117) and 110 (52; 168) CD4 cells per μL after 5 months. Conclusions The increase in circulating CD4 levels observed in PTB in patients is acquired after 2 months of treatment irrespective of HIV status. Initiation of ART is the strongest factor correlated with CD4 increase during TB treatment. Trial registration number Clinical trials.gov: NCT00311298 PMID:22436147

  12. Expression and functional role of 1F7 (CD26) antigen on peripheral blood and synovial fluid T cells in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Muscat, C; Bertotto, A; Agea, E; Bistoni, O; Ercolani, R; Tognellini, R; Spinozzi, F; Cesarotti, M; Gerli, R

    1994-11-01

    The expression and the functional role of the CD26 (1F7) T cell surface molecule, an ectoenzyme which seems to represent a functional collagen receptor of T lymphocytes and to have a role in T cell activation, were analysed in both peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) T cell samples from patients with active and inactive rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Although patients with active disease displayed higher percentages of PB CD26+ CD4+ T cells than inactive RA and control subjects, CD26 antigen expression on RA SF T lymphocytes was low. The anti-1F7 binding to the T cell surface, that led to CD26 antigen modulation and enhancement of both IL-2 synthesis by, and 3H-TdR incorporation of, anti-CD3- or anti-CD2-triggered PB T cells in RA and control subjects, was unable to affect significantly both expression and functional activity of RA SF T lymphocytes. Since the 1F7 antigen spontaneously reappeared on the surface of unstimulated SF T cells after 2-5 days of culturing, the low 1F7 antigen expression of anti-1F7 in the SF T cell compartment may be the result of in vivo molecule modulation exerted by the natural ligand in the joint, with important implications for T cell activation and lymphokine synthesis. PMID:7955530

  13. The Early Expression of HLA-DR and CD64 Myeloid Markers Is Specifically Compartmentalized in the Blood and Lungs of Patients with Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Mikaszewska-Sokolewicz, Małgorzata; Hoser, Grażyna; Zielińska-Borkowska, Urszula

    2016-01-01

    Identification of reliable biomarkers is key to guide targeted therapies in septic patients. Expression monitoring of monocyte HLA-DR and neutrophil CD64 could fulfill the above need. However, it is unknown whether their expression on circulating cells reflects the status of tissue resident cells. We compared expressions of HLA-DR and CD64 markers in the circulation and airways of septic shock patients and evaluated their outcome prognostic value. The expression of CD64 on neutrophils and HLA-DR on monocytes was analyzed in the peripheral blood and mini-bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cells by flow cytometry. Twenty-seven patients with septic shock were enrolled into the study. The fluorescence intensity of HLA-DR on circulating monocytes was 3.5-fold lower than on the pulmonary monocytes (p = 0.01). The expression of CD64 on circulating and airway neutrophils was similar (p = 0.47). Only the expression of CD64 on circulating neutrophils was higher in nonsurvivors versus survivors (2.8-fold; p = 0.031). Pulmonary monocytes display a higher level of HLA-DR activation compared to peripheral blood monocytes but the expression of neutrophil CD64 is similar on lung and circulating cells. Death in septic patients was effectively predicted by neutrophil CD64 but not monocytic HLA-DR. Prognostic value of cellular activation markers in septic shock appears to strongly depend on their level of compartmentalization. PMID:27413252

  14. T-cell receptor. gamma. chain-CD3 complex: implication in the cytotoxic activity of a CD3/sup +/ CD4/sup -/ CD8/sup -/ human natural killer clone

    SciTech Connect

    Alarcon, B.; De Vries, J.; Pettey, C.; Boylston, A.; Yssel, H.; Terhorst, C.; Spits, H.

    1987-06-01

    A subset of human T cells has recently been described. These cells express the CD3 complex but they do not carry the classical T-cell receptor (TCR)-..gamma../-..beta.. heterodimer on their surface (WT31/sup -/ CD3/sup +/). Instead, they express a TCR-..gamma.. chain associated with another type of polypeptide termed TCR-delta. The authors report here that a T-cell clone with natural killer (NK)-like activity, WM-14, had a disulfide bridged TCR-..gamma.. homodimer associated with CD3 on its surface. The TCR-..gamma.. chains of WM-14 cells were present in three different glycosylation forms of 43, 40, and 38 kDa, but they appeared to contain the same polypeptide backbone. Since cytotoxicity by WM-14 could be inhibited by anti-CD3 antibodies, they concluded that the TCR-..gamma..-CD3 complex was involved in the NK-like unrestricted killer activity. Although normal CD3-..gamma.., CD3-delta, and CD3-element of chains were present in this clone, the association with the TCR-..gamma.. homodimer may be the cause of a complete processing of the N-linked oligosaccharides attached to the CD3-delta chain.

  15. SECTM1 Produced by Tumor Cells Attracts Human Monocytes Via CD7-mediated Activation of the PI3K Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Ge, Yingbin; Xiao, Min; Lopez-Coral, Alfonso; Li, Ling; Roesch, Alexander; Huang, Catherine; Alexander, Peter; Vogt, Thomas; Xu, Xiaowei; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Lieu, Melissa; Belser, Eric; Liu, Rui; Somasundaram, Rajasekharan; Herlyn, Meenhard; Kaufman, Russel E.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play essential roles in tumor progression and metastasis. Tumor cells recruit myeloid progenitors and monocytes to the tumor site, where they differentiate into TAMs; however, this process is not well studied in humans. Here we show that human CD7, a T cell and NK cell receptor, is highly expressed by monocytes and macrophages. Expression of CD7 decreases in M-CSF differentiated macrophages and in Melanoma-conditioned Medium Induced Macrophages (MCMI/Mϕ) in comparison to monocytes. A ligand for CD7, SECTM1 (Secreted and transmembrane protein 1), is highly expressed in many tumors, including melanoma cells. We show that SECTM1 binds to CD7 and significantly increases monocyte migration by activation of the PI3K pathway. In human melanoma tissues, tumor-infiltrating macrophages expressing CD7 are present. These melanomas, with CD7-positive inflammatory cell infiltrations, frequently highly express SECTM1, including an N-terminal, soluble form, which can be detected in the sera of metastatic melanoma patients but not in normal sera. Taken together, our data demonstrate that CD7 is present on monocytes and tumor macrophages, and that its ligand, SECTM1, is frequently expressed in corresponding melanoma tissues, possibly acting as a chemoattractant for monocytes to modulate the melanoma microenvironment. PMID:24157461

  16. Preparation of aminodextran-CdS nanoparticle complexes and biologically active antibody-aminodextran-CdS nanoparticle conjugates

    SciTech Connect

    Sondi, I.; Siiman, O.; Koester, S.; Matijevic, E.

    2000-04-04

    Stable aqueous dispersions consisting of CdS nanoparticles having modal diameters, ranging between 2 and 8 nm, were prepared with amino-derivatized polysaccharides (aminodextrans, hence abbreviated as Amdex) as the stabilizing agents. The size, stability, and luminescence intensity of such dispersions were shown to be dependent on the types of the cadmium salts and aminodextrans used, as well as on the reactant concentrations. Specifically, it was demonstrated that the degree of substitution of amino groups in the aminodextran molecules greatly affected the properties of the dispersions; i.e., with higher degree of substitution, smaller CdS particles and higher luminescence intensity were achieved. It was also shown that the Amdex-CdS nanoparticle complexes could be activated and conjugated with antibody by conventional means. Molecular weight ranges of the Amdex and their complexes with CdS nanoparticles and the purity of antibody-Amdex-CdS nanoparticle conjugates were determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis combined with Coomassie blue staining of resultant gel bands. The purified conjugate of the aminodextran-CdS nanoparticle complex with anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody was mixed with a whole blood control, followed by indirect sheep antimouse antibody-phycoerythrin (SAM-PE) labeling of washed cells incubated with T4-5X-Amdex-CdS. Red blood cells were then lysed and quenched, and the resulting mixture, which was run on a flow cytometer with 488.0 nm argon ion laser excitation, suggested that the T4 antibody from the conjugate was present specifically on lymphocytes.

  17. The retinal specific CD147 Ig0 domain: from molecular structure to biological activity.

    PubMed

    Redzic, Jasmina S; Armstrong, Geoffrey S; Isern, Nancy G; Jones, David N M; Kieft, Jeffrey S; Eisenmesser, Elan Zohar

    2011-08-01

    CD147 is a type I transmembrane protein that is involved in inflammatory diseases, cancer progression, and multiple human pathogens utilize CD147 for efficient infection. CD147 expression is so high in several cancers that it is now used as a prognostic marker. The two primary isoforms of CD147 that are related to cancer progression have been identified, differing in their number of immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains. These include CD147 Ig1-Ig2, which is ubiquitously expressed in most tissues, and CD147 Ig0-Ig1-Ig2, which is retinal specific and implicated in retinoblastoma. However, little is known in regard to the retinal specific CD147 Ig0 domain despite its potential role in retinoblastoma. We present the first crystal structure of the human CD147 Ig0 domain and show that the CD147 Ig0 domain is a crystallographic dimer with an I-type domain structure, which maintained in solution. Furthermore, we have utilized our structural data together with mutagenesis to probe the biological activity of CD147-containing proteins, both with and without the CD147 Ig0 domain, within several model cell lines. Our findings reveal that the CD147 Ig0 domain is a potent stimulator of interleukin-6 and suggest that the CD147 Ig0 domain has its own receptor distinct from that of the other CD147 Ig-like domains, CD147 Ig1-Ig2. Finally, we show that the CD147 Ig0 dimer is the functional unit required for activity and can be disrupted by a single point mutation. PMID:21620857

  18. CD8+ T lymphocytes of patients with AIDS maintain normal broad cytolytic function despite the loss of human immunodeficiency virus-specific cytotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Pantaleo, G; De Maria, A; Koenig, S; Butini, L; Moss, B; Baseler, M; Lane, H C; Fauci, A S

    1990-01-01

    In this study, we have investigated the potential mechanisms responsible for the loss of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-specific cytolytic activity in the advanced stages of HIV-1 infection. We have demonstrated that HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes are predominantly contained within the CD8+DR+ subset. Furthermore, we have shown by a redirected killing assay that there is a dichotomy between HIV-1-specific cytolytic activity and broad cytolytic potential since the cytolytic machinery of CD8+DR+ cells is still functioning even in patients with AIDS who have lost their HIV-1-specific cytolytic activity. In addition, by comparative analysis of these two types of cytolytic activity over time we have demonstrated a progressive loss of HIV-1-specific cytolytic activity in the advanced stages of the disease, whereas the cytolytic potential remained unchanged regardless of the clinical stage. As previously shown in patients with AIDS, even in asymptomatic HIV-1-seropositive patients, CD8+DR+ cells from the same patient, compared to CD8+DR- lymphocytes, showed a substantial reduction in their ability to proliferate in vitro in response to different stimuli, such as mitogens (phytohemagglutinin and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate) and monoclonal antibodies directed against CD3, CD2, and CD28 molecules, and displayed a defective clonogenic potential. Thus, on the basis of these results we propose that the loss of HIV-1-specific cytolytic activity in HIV-1-infected individuals may result at least in part from a progressive decrease in the pool of HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes belonging to the CD8+DR+ subset whose ability to expand has been impaired. Images PMID:2112749

  19. Elevated CTLA-4 expression on CD4 T cells from periodontitis patients stimulated with Porphyromonas gingivalis outer membrane antigen

    PubMed Central

    Aoyagi, T; Yamazaki, K; Kabasawa-Katoh, Y; Nakajima, T; Yamashita, N; Yoshie, H; Hara, K

    2000-01-01

    To characterize the T cell response to Porphyromonas gingivalis, we examined the expression of costimulatory molecules on T cells derived from adult periodontitis patients with high serum antibody titre to P. gingivalis. The expression of CD28, CTLA-4, CD40 ligand (CD40L) on CD4+ T cells was analysed by flow cytometry. IL-10 and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) mRNA expression were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and subsequent image analysis. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) derived from periodontitis patients showed higher proliferative responses to P. gingivalis outer membrane (OM) than those from healthy controls (P < 0.05). The percentage of CTLA-4+ cells within CD4+ T cells of patients was significantly higher than that of healthy controls after P. gingivalis OM stimulation (33.0% versus 11.9%, P < 0.01). There was no significant difference in the percentages of CD28+ cells and CD40L+ cells, and the percentage of CD40L+ cells was low in both groups even after stimulation. Stimulation of PBMC with P. gingivalis OM induced significantly higher IL-10 mRNA expression in periodontitis patients than in healthy controls (P < 0.05). The level of TGF-β mRNA expression of patients tended to be higher than that of healthy controls, but there was no significant difference. To elucidate the functional role of CTLA-4, we further investigated the secondary proliferative response to P. gingivalis OM. Interestingly, P. gingivalis OM stimulation did not enhance antigen-specific secondary response. Anti-CTLA-4 MoAb had no effect on proliferation in the presence of P. gingivalis OM. CTLA-4Ig suppressed the proliferative response significantly (P < 0.01). These results suggest that T cell responses to P. gingivalis OM may be regulated by CTLA-4 that is expressed at the late phase of T cell activation, and, in part, immunosuppressive cytokines. Taken together, CTLA-4 may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of chronic

  20. Complement Regulatory Activity of Normal Human Intraocular Fluid Is Mediated by MCP, DAF, and CD59

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Jeong-Hyeon; Kaplan, Henry J.; Suk, Hye-Jung; Bora, Puran S.; Bora, Nalini S.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To identify the molecules in normal human intraocular fluid (aqueous humor and vitreous) that inhibit the functional activity of the complement system. Methods Aqueous humor and vitreous were obtained from patients with noninflammatory ocular disease at the time of surgery. Samples were incubated with normal human serum (NHS), and the mixture assayed for inhibition of the classical and alternative complement pathways using standard CH50 and AH50 hemolytic assays, respectively. Both aqueous humor and vitreous were fractionated by microconcentrators and size exclusion column chromatography. The inhibitory molecules were identified by immunoblotting as well as by studying the effect of depletion of membrane cofactor protein (MCP), decay-accelerating factor (DAF), and CD59 on inhibitory activity. Results Both aqueous humor and vitreous inhibited the activity of the classical pathway (CH50). Microcentrifugation revealed the major inhibitory activity resided in the fraction with an Mr ≥ 3 kDa. Chromatography on an S-100-HR column demonstrated that the most potent inhibition was associated with the high-molecular-weight fractions (≥ 19.5 kDa). In contrast to unfractionated aqueous and vitreous, fractions with an Mr ≥ 3 kDa also had an inhibitory effect on the alternative pathway activity (AH50). The complement regulatory activity in normal human intraocular fluid was partially blocked by monoclonal antibodies against MCP, DAF, and CD59. Immunoblot analysis confirmed the presence of these three molecules in normal intraocular fluid. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that normal human intraocular fluid (aqueous humor and vitreous) contains complement inhibitory factors. Furthermore, the high-molecular-weight factors appear to be the soluble forms of MCP, DAF, and CD59. PMID:11095615

  1. The Amaranthus leucocarpus lectin enhances the anti-CD3 antibody-mediated activation of human peripheral blood CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Urrea, Francisco; Ortiz-Quintero, Blanca; Sanchez-Garcia, Francisco Javier; Blanco-Favela, Francisco; Garfias, Yonathan; Lascurain, Ricardo; Zenteno, Edgar

    2010-08-01

    Activation of CD4(+) T cells plays a main role in adaptive immune response by regulating cellular and humoral immunity via processes associated with changes in cell surface oligosaccharide receptors. Lectins are glycoproteins that specifically recognize oligosaccharides and have been used to characterize changes in oligosaccharides present on T cell surface and their effects on activation. A lectin from Amaranthus leucocarpus seeds (ALL) is specific for glycoprotein structures containing galactose-N-acetylgalactosamine and is able to bind to human and murine CD4(+) T cells, however, its effect on activation remains unclear. We examined the effect of ALL on the activation of peripheral blood human CD4(+) T cells and analyzed cell proliferation, expression of the activation-associated molecule CD25, secretion of the activation-dependent cytokine interleukin (IL)-2 and intracellular calcium influx changes using flow cytometry. CD4(+) T cells were stimulated with anti-CD3 antibodies that provided the first activation signal in the presence or absence of ALL. ALL alone did not induce CD4(+) T cell activation but when also stimulated with anti-CD3 antibodies, ALL up-regulated CD25 expression, cell proliferation, IL-2 secretion and an intracellular calcium influx in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, ALL recognized CD4(+) T cells expressing the CD69 and Ki67 molecules expressed only by activated T cells and induced production of the TH1-type cytokine interferon-gamma. Our findings indicate that ALL binds to human activated CD4(+) T cells and enhances the degree of activation of CD4(+) T cells that are stimulated with anti-CD3 antibodies. ALL provides a new tool for analyzing T cell activation mechanisms. PMID:20644342

  2. Azithromycin suppresses CD4+ T-cell activation by direct modulation of mTOR activity

    PubMed Central

    Ratzinger, F.; Haslacher, H.; Poeppl, W.; Hoermann, G.; Kovarik, J. J.; Jutz, S.; Steinberger, P.; Burgmann, H.; Pickl, W. F.; Schmetterer, K. G.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced macrolides, such as azithromycin (AZM) or clarithromycin (CLM), are antibiotics with immunomodulatory properties. Here we have sought to evaluate their in vitro influence on the activation of CD4+ T-cells. Isolated CD4+ T-cells were stimulated with agonistic anti-CD3/anti-CD28 monoclonal antibodies in the presence of 0.6 mg/L, 2.5 mg/L, 10 mg/L or 40 mg/L AZM or CLM. Cell proliferation, cytokine level in supernatants and cell viability was assessed. Intracellular signaling pathways were evaluated using reporter cell lines, FACS analysis, immunoblotting and in vitro kinase assays. AZM inhibited cell proliferation rate and cytokine secretion of CD4+ T-cells in a dose-dependent manner. Similarly, high concentrations of CLM (40 mg/L) also suppressed these T-cell functions. Analysis of molecular signaling pathways revealed that exposure to AZM reduced the phosphorylation of the S6 ribosomal protein, a downstream target of mTOR. This effect was also observed at 40 mg/L CLM. In vitro kinase studies using recombinant mTOR showed that AZM inhibited mTOR activity. In contrast to rapamycin, this inhibition was independent of FKBP12. We show for the first time that AZM and to a lesser extent CLM act as immunosuppressive agents on CD4+ T-cells by inhibiting mTOR activity. Our results might have implications for the clinical use of macrolides. PMID:25500904

  3. The adhesion receptor CD44 promotes atherosclerosis by mediating inflammatory cell recruitment and vascular cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Cuff, Carolyn A.; Kothapalli, Devashish; Azonobi, Ijeoma; Chun, Sam; Zhang, Yuanming; Belkin, Richard; Yeh, Christine; Secreto, Anthony; Assoian, Richard K.; Rader, Daniel J.; Puré, Ellen

    2001-01-01

    Atherosclerosis causes most acute coronary syndromes and strokes. The pathogenesis of atherosclerosis includes recruitment of inflammatory cells to the vessel wall and activation of vascular cells. CD44 is an adhesion protein expressed on inflammatory and vascular cells. CD44 supports the adhesion of activated lymphocytes to endothelium and smooth muscle cells. Furthermore, ligation of CD44 induces activation of both inflammatory and vascular cells. To assess the potential contribution of CD44 to atherosclerosis, we bred CD44-null mice to atherosclerosis-prone apoE-deficient mice. We found a 50–70% reduction in aortic lesions in CD44-null mice compared with CD44 heterozygote and wild-type littermates. We demonstrate that CD44 promotes the recruitment of macrophages to atherosclerotic lesions. Furthermore, we show that CD44 is required for phenotypic dedifferentiation of medial smooth muscle cells to the “synthetic” state as measured by expression of VCAM-1. Finally, we demonstrate that hyaluronan, the principal ligand for CD44, is upregulated in atherosclerotic lesions of apoE-deficient mice and that the low-molecular-weight proinflammatory forms of hyaluronan stimulate VCAM-1 expression and proliferation of cultured primary aortic smooth muscle cells, whereas high-molecular-weight forms of hyaluronan inhibit smooth muscle cell proliferation. We conclude that CD44 plays a critical role in the progression of atherosclerosis through multiple mechanisms. PMID:11581304

  4. Increased expression of TLR2 in CD4(+) T cells from SLE patients enhances immune reactivity and promotes IL-17 expression through histone modifications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Liao, Jieyue; Zhao, Ming; Wu, Haijing; Yung, Susan; Chan, Tak Mao; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Lu, Qianjin

    2015-09-01

    The innate immune system has been shown to play an important pathologic role in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). TLR2, a PRR, recognizes exogenous PAMPs, and endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns and has been implicated in the initiation and maintenance of the perpetuated inflammatory reactions in autoimmune diseases. Here, we report increased expression of TLR2 in CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, CD19(+) B cells, and CD14(+) monocytes from SLE patients. Conventional treatment, such as hydroxychloroquine and corticosteroids, showed no effect on TLR2 expression in CD4(+) T cells from SLE patients. In vitro stimulation of TLR2 in CD4(+) T cells from SLE patients increased CD40L and CD70 expression, as well as secretion of IL-6, IL-17A, IL-17F, and TNF-α, while Foxp3 transcription decreased. This effect was reversed by TLR2 siRNA. Moreover, TLR2 activation upregulated H3K4 tri-methylation and H4 acetylation levels while downregulated H3K9 tri-methylation level in the IL-17A promoter region. In addition, it also increased H4 acetylation levels and decreased H3K9 tri-methylation levels in the IL-17F promoter region. In summary, our findings demonstrate that increased expression of TLR2 contributes to immune reactivity and promotes IL-17A and IL-17F expression through histone modifications in SLE. PMID:26079624

  5. CD38 Ligation in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of Myeloma Patients Induces Release of Protumorigenic IL-6 and Impaired Secretion of IFNγ Cytokines and Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Fedele, Giorgio; Di Girolamo, Marco; Recine, Umberto; Palazzo, Raffaella; Urbani, Francesca; Horenstein, Alberto L.; Malavasi, Fabio; Ausiello, Clara Maria

    2013-01-01

    CD38, a surface receptor that controls signals in immunocompetent cells, is densely expressed by cells of multiple myeloma (MM). The immune system of MM patients appears as functionally impaired, with qualitative and quantitative defects in T cell immune responses. This work answers the issue whether CD38 plays a role in the impairment of T lymphocyte response. To this aim, we analyzed the signals implemented by monoclonal antibodies (mAb) ligation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) obtained from MM patients and compared to benign monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). PBMC from MM both failed to proliferate and secrete IFNγ induced by CD38 ligation while it retained the ability to respond to TCR/CD3. The impaired CD38-dependent proliferative response likely reflects an arrest in the progression of cell cycle, as indicated by the reduced expression of PCNA. CD38 signaling showed an enhanced ability to induce IL-6 secretion. PBMC from MM patients displays a deregulated response possibly due to defects of CD38 activation pathways and CD38 may be functionally involved in the progression of this pathology via the secretion of high levels of IL-6 that protects neoplastic cells from apoptosis. PMID:24489445

  6. Patient derived cell culture and isolation of CD133⁺ putative cancer stem cells from melanoma.

    PubMed

    Welte, Yvonne; Davies, Cathrin; Schäfer, Reinhold; Regenbrecht, Christian R A

    2013-01-01

    Despite improved treatments options for melanoma available today, patients with advanced malignant melanoma still have a poor prognosis for progression-free and overall survival. Therefore, translational research needs to provide further molecular evidence to improve targeted therapies for malignant melanomas. In the past, oncogenic mechanisms related to melanoma were extensively studied in established cell lines. On the way to more personalized treatment regimens based on individual genetic profiles, we propose to use patient-derived cell lines instead of generic cell lines. Together with high quality clinical data, especially on patient follow-up, these cells will be instrumental to better understand the molecular mechanisms behind melanoma progression. Here, we report the establishment of primary melanoma cultures from dissected fresh tumor tissue. This procedure includes mincing and dissociation of the tissue into single cells, removal of contaminations with erythrocytes and fibroblasts as well as primary culture and reliable verification of the cells' melanoma origin. Recent reports revealed that melanomas, like the majority of tumors, harbor a small subpopulation of cancer stem cells (CSCs), which seem to exclusively fuel tumor initiation and progression towards the metastatic state. One of the key markers for CSC identification and isolation in melanoma is CD133. To isolate CD133(+) CSCs from primary melanoma cultures, we have modified and optimized the Magnetic-Activated Cell Sorting (MACS) procedure from Miltenyi resulting in high sorting purity and viability of CD133(+) CSCs and CD133(-) bulk, which can be cultivated and functionally analyzed thereafter. PMID:23525090

  7. Cytotoxicity of CD56(bright) NK cells towards autologous activated CD4+ T cells is mediated through NKG2D, LFA-1 and TRAIL and dampened via CD94/NKG2A.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Natasja; Ødum, Niels; Ursø, Birgitte; Lanier, Lewis L; Spee, Pieter

    2012-01-01

    In mouse models of chronic inflammatory diseases, Natural Killer (NK) cells can play an immunoregulatory role by eliminating chronically activated leukocytes. Indirect evidence suggests that NK cells may also be immunoregulatory in humans. Two subsets of human NK cells can be phenotypically distinguished as CD16(+)CD56(dim) and CD16(dim/-)CD56(bright). An expansion in the CD56(bright) NK cell subset has been associated with clinical responses to therapy in various autoimmune diseases, suggesting an immunoregulatory role for this subset in vivo. Here we compared the regulation of activated human CD4(+) T cells by CD56(dim) and CD56(bright) autologous NK cells in vitro. Both subsets efficiently killed activated, but not resting, CD4(+) T cells. The activating receptor NKG2D, as well as the integrin LFA-1 and the TRAIL pathway, played important roles in this process. Degranulation by NK cells towards activated CD4(+) T cells was enhanced by IL-2, IL-15, IL-12+IL-18 and IFN-α. Interestingly, IL-7 and IL-21 stimulated degranulation by CD56(bright) NK cells but not by CD56(dim) NK cells. NK cell killing of activated CD4(+) T cells was suppressed by HLA-E on CD4(+) T cells, as blocking the interaction between HLA-E and the inhibitory CD94/NKG2A NK cell receptor enhanced NK cell degranulation. This study provides new insight into CD56(dim) and CD56(bright) NK cell-mediated elimination of activated autologous CD4(+) T cells, which potentially may provide an opportunity for therapeutic treatment of chronic inflammation. PMID:22384114

  8. Activation of cord T lymphocytes. III. Role of LFA-1/ICAM-1 and CD2/LFA-3 adhesion molecules in CD3-induced proliferative response.

    PubMed

    Gerli, R; Agea, E; Muscat, C; Tognellini, R; Fiorucci, G; Spinozzi, F; Cernetti, C; Bertotto, A

    1993-04-15

    As cord T cells, a model of antigen (Ag)-unprimed cell, display a functional defect when stimulated through the CD3 molecule, the role of lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1(LFA-1)/intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and CD2/lymphocyte function-associated antigen 3 (LFA-3) receptor-ligand pairs in cord CD3-triggered T-cell activation was analyzed using specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against each adhesion molecule. The addition of anti-CD11a, anti-CD18, or anti-CD2 to both adult and cord peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) cultures led to a decrease in CD3-induced proliferation. In contrast, CD3-stimulated cord, but not adult, PBMC proliferation was markedly enhanced when anti-CD54 or anti-CD58 were added. Despite the fact that ICAM-1 and LFA-3 molecules were virtually absent on cord resting T cells, mAb against these two molecules boosted both mitogenesis of and interleukin (IL)-2 production by purified cord T cells stimulated with plastic immobilized anti-CD3. Cord T-cell supernatant levels of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) were undetectable with CD3 stimulation, slightly raised with CD58/CD3 costimulation, but normal when T cells were preincubated with IL-2 for 24 hr before being costimulated with anti-CD3/CD58. Evidence that IL-2 and IFN-gamma play a pivotal role in fully activating cord T cells came from the demonstration that IL-2 and IFN-gamma are able to bypass the CD3-proliferative defect through differential up-regulation of the adhesion molecules. It would, therefore, seem that ICAM-1 and LFA-3 molecules are crucially implicated in the CD3-activation pathway of Ag-unprimed T cells. PMID:7684326

  9. Bystander Activation and Anti-Tumor Effects of CD8+ T Cells Following Interleukin-2 Based Immunotherapy Is Independent of CD4+ T Cell Help

    PubMed Central

    Grossenbacher, Steven K.; Hsiao, Hui-Hua; Zamora, Anthony E.; Mirsoian, Annie; Koehn, Brent; Blazar, Bruce R.; Weiss, Jonathan M.; Wiltrout, Robert H.; Sckisel, Gail D.; Murphy, William J.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that immunotherapy combining agonistic anti-CD40 and IL-2 (IT) results in synergistic anti-tumor effects. IT induces expansion of highly cytolytic, antigen-independent “bystander-activated” (CD8+CD44high) T cells displaying a CD25−NKG2D+ phenotype in a cytokine dependent manner, which were responsible for the anti-tumor effects. While much attention has focused on CD4+ T cell help for antigen-specific CD8+ T cell expansion, little is known regarding the role of CD4+ T cells in antigen-nonspecific bystander-memory CD8+ T cell expansion. Utilizing CD4 deficient mouse models, we observed a significant expansion of bystander-memory T cells following IT which was similar to the non-CD4 depleted mice. Expanded bystander-memory CD8+ T cells upregulated PD-1 in the absence of CD4+ T cells which has been published as a hallmark of exhaustion and dysfunction in helpless CD8+ T cells. Interestingly, compared to CD8+ T cells from CD4 replete hosts, these bystander expanded cells displayed comparable (or enhanced) cytokine production, lytic ability, and in vivo anti-tumor effects suggesting no functional impairment or exhaustion and were enriched in an effector phenotype. There was no acceleration of the post-IT contraction phase of the bystander memory CD8+ response in CD4-depleted mice. The response was independent of IL-21 signaling. These results suggest that, in contrast to antigen-specific CD8+ T cell expansion, CD4+ T cell help is not necessary for expansion and activation of antigen-nonspecific bystander-memory CD8+ T cells following IT, but may play a role in regulating conversion of these cells from a central memory to effector phenotype. Additionally, the expression of PD-1 in this model appears to be a marker of effector function and not exhaustion. PMID:25119341

  10. Monocyte activation by circulating fibronectin fragments in HIV-1-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Trial, JoAnn; Rubio, Jose A; Birdsall, Holly H; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria; Rossen, Roger D

    2004-08-01

    To identify signals that can alter leukocyte function in patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), we analyzed single blood samples from 74 HIV-1-infected patients and additional blood was collected at 90-day intervals from 51 HIV-1-infected patients over a 516 +/- 172 (mean +/- SD) day interval. Despite the absence of circulating immune complexes and normalization of phagocytic function, compared with controls, the fraction of patients' monocytes expressing CD49e and CD62L was decreased and expression of CD11b and CD86 increased. Plasma from 63% of patients but none from normal controls contained 110-120 kDa fibronectin fragments (FNf). Presence of FNf did not reflect poor adherence to therapy. Addition of FNf to normal donor blood in vitro replicated changes in monocyte CD49e, CD62L, CD11b, and CD86 seen in vivo. FNf also induced monocytes to release a serine proteinase, nominally identified as proteinase-3, that hydrolyzed cell surface CD49e. alpha(1)-Antitrypsin blocked FNf-induced shedding of CD49e in a dose-dependent manner. Plasma with a normal frequency of CD49e(+) monocytes contained antiproteases that partially blocked FNf-induced monocyte CD49e shedding, whereas plasma from patients with a low frequency of CD49e(+) monocytes did not block this effect of FNf. Electrophoretic analyses of plasma from the latter group of patients suggested that a significant fraction of their alpha(1)-antitrypsin was tied up in high molecular mass complexes. These results suggest that monocyte behavior in HIV-1-infected patients may be influenced by FNf and the ratio of protease and antiproteases in the cells' microenvironment. PMID:15265957

  11. The effect of extracorporeal photopheresis alone or in combination therapy on circulating CD4+Foxp3+CD25- T-cells in patients with leukemic cutaneous T-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Shiue, Lisa H.; Couturier, Jacob; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Wei, Caimiao; Ni, Xiao; Duvic, Madeleine

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) alone or in combination therapy is effective for treatment of leukemic cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (L-CTCL), but its mechanism(s) of action remain unclear. This study was designed to investigate the effect of ECP on regulatory T-cell and CD8+ T-cells in L-CTCL patients. Experimental Design Peripheral blood from 18 L-CTCL patients at baseline, Day 2, 1-month, 3-month, and 6-month post-ECP therapy were analyzed by flow cytometry for CD4+CD25+/high, CD4+Foxp3+CD25+/-, CD3+CD8+, CD3+CD8+CD69+, and CD3+CD8+IFN-γ+ T-cells. Clinical responses were assessed and correlated with changes in these T-cell subsets. Results Twelve of 18 patients achieved clinical responses. The average baseline number of CD4+CD25+/high T-cells of PBMCs in L-CTCL patients was normal (2.2%), but increased at 6-month post-therapy (4.3%, p<0.01). The average baseline number of CD4+Foxp3+ T-cells out of CD4+ T-cells in 9 evaluable patients was high (66.8±13.7%), mostly CD25 negative. The levels of CD4+Foxp3+ T cells in responders were higher (n=6, 93.1±5.7%) than non-responders (n=3, 14.2±16.0%, p<0.01), and they declined in parallel with malignant T-cells. The numbers of CD3+CD8+CD69+ and CD3+CD8+ IFN-γ+ T-cells increased at 3-month post-therapy in 5 of 6 patients studied. Conclusions ECP alone or in combination therapy might be effective in L-CTCL patients whose malignant T-cells have a CD4+Foxp3+CD25- phenotype. PMID:25772268

  12. Amaranthus leucocarpus lectin recognizes a moesin-like O-glycoprotein and costimulates murine CD3-activated CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Arenas-Del Ángel, Maria; Legorreta-Herrera, Martha; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Garfias, Yonathan; Chávez, Raul; Zenteno, Edgar; Lascurain, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    The Galβ1,3GalNAcα1,O-Ser/Thr specific lectin from Amaranthus leucocarpus (ALL) binds a ∼70 kDa glycoprotein on murine T cell surface. We show that in the absence of antigen presenting cells, murine CD4+ T cells activated by an anti-CD3 antibody plus ALL enhanced cell proliferation similar to those cells activated via CD3/CD28 at 48 h of culture. Moreover, ALL induced the production of IL-4, IL-10, TNF-alpha, and TGF-beta in CD3-activated cells. Proteomic assay using two-dimensional electrophoresis and far-Western blotting, ALL recognized two prominent proteins associated to the lipid raft microdomains in CD3/CD28-activated CD4+ T cells. By mass spectrometry, the peptide fragments from ALL-recognized proteins showed sequences with 33% homology to matricin (gi|347839 NCBInr) and 41% identity to an unnamed protein related to moesin (gi|74186081 NCBInr). Confocal microscopy analysis of CD3/CD28-activated CD4+ T cells confirmed that staining by ALL colocalized with anti-moesin FERM domain antibody along the plasma membrane and in the intercellular contact sites. Our findings suggest that a moesin-like O-glycoprotein is the ALL-recognized molecule in lipid rats, which induces costimulatory signals on CD4+ T cells. PMID:26417436

  13. Amaranthus leucocarpus lectin recognizes a moesin-like O-glycoprotein and costimulates murine CD3-activated CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Arenas-Del Ángel, Maria; Legorreta-Herrera, Martha; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Garfias, Yonathan; Chávez, Raul; Zenteno, Edgar; Lascurain, Ricardo

    2015-09-01

    The Galβ1,3GalNAcα1,O-Ser/Thr specific lectin from Amaranthus leucocarpus (ALL) binds a ∼70 kDa glycoprotein on murine T cell surface. We show that in the absence of antigen presenting cells, murine CD4(+) T cells activated by an anti-CD3 antibody plus ALL enhanced cell proliferation similar to those cells activated via CD3/CD28 at 48 h of culture. Moreover, ALL induced the production of IL-4, IL-10, TNF-alpha, and TGF-beta in CD3-activated cells. Proteomic assay using two-dimensional electrophoresis and far-Western blotting, ALL recognized two prominent proteins associated to the lipid raft microdomains in CD3/CD28-activated CD4(+) T cells. By mass spectrometry, the peptide fragments from ALL-recognized proteins showed sequences with 33% homology to matricin (gi|347839 NCBInr) and 41% identity to an unnamed protein related to moesin (gi|74186081 NCBInr). Confocal microscopy analysis of CD3/CD28-activated CD4(+) T cells confirmed that staining by ALL colocalized with anti-moesin FERM domain antibody along the plasma membrane and in the intercellular contact sites. Our findings suggest that a moesin-like O-glycoprotein is the ALL-recognized molecule in lipid rats, which induces costimulatory signals on CD4(+) T cells. PMID:26417436

  14. Immunohistochemical evaluation of CD20 expression in patients with multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Yavasoglu, Irfan; Sargin, Gokhan; Kadikoylu, Gurhan; Doger, Firuzan Kacar; Bolaman, Zahit

    2014-01-01

    Objective CD20 expression was reported at different rates in patients with multiple myeloma. The importance of this B-cell antigen for plasma cells is still unknown. This study aimed to investigate CD20 expression of myeloma cells in bone marrow, and any relationship between the stage of disease, isotype and clinical features. Methods Sixty-one patients who were admitted to the hematology clinic of the Adnan Menderes Medical School with the diagnosis of multiple myeloma according to the criteria of the “International Myeloma Working Group” were enrolled in this study. Age, gender, Durie–Salmon stage, history of autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and the distribution pattern and positivity of CD20 expression on multiple myeloma cells in bone marrow were evaluated. The Mann–Whitney U and chi-square tests were used for statistical analysis with a p-value < 0.05 being accepted as statistically significant. Results Thirty patients (48.9%) had positive scores for CD20 with the distribution pattern being most likely interstitial in 55.6% of the cases. There was no statistically significant difference between immunohistochemical positivity for CD20 expression on multiple myeloma cells, immunoglobulin type, and the stage of disease. Conclusion The combination of immunohistochemical studies with flow cytometry may reveal the importance of CD20 positivity in patients with multiple myeloma more clearly. PMID:25638765

  15. HIV-Infected Individuals with Low CD4/CD8 Ratio despite Effective Antiretroviral Therapy Exhibit Altered T Cell Subsets, Heightened CD8+ T Cell Activation, and Increased Risk of Non-AIDS Morbidity and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Serrano-Villar, Sergio; Sainz, Talia; Lee, Sulggi A.; Hunt, Peter W.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Ferre, April L.; Hayes, Timothy L.; Somsouk, Ma; Hsue, Priscilla Y.; Van Natta, Mark L.; Meinert, Curtis L.; Lederman, Michael M.; Hatano, Hiroyu; Jain, Vivek; Huang, Yong; Hecht, Frederick M.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; McCune, Joseph M.; Moreno, Santiago; Deeks, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    A low CD4/CD8 ratio in elderly HIV-uninfected adults is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. A subset of HIV-infected adults receiving effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) fails to normalize this ratio, even after they achieve normal CD4+ T cell counts. The immunologic and clinical characteristics of this clinical phenotype remain undefined. Using data from four distinct clinical cohorts and three clinical trials, we show that a low CD4/CD8 ratio in HIV-infected adults during otherwise effective ART (after CD4 count recovery above 500 cells/mm3) is associated with a number of immunological abnormalities, including a skewed T cell phenotype from naïve toward terminally differentiated CD8+ T cells, higher levels of CD8+ T cell activation (HLADR+CD38+) and senescence (CD28− and CD57+CD28−), and higher kynurenine/tryptophan ratio. Changes in the peripheral CD4/CD8 ratio are also reflective of changes in gut mucosa, but not in lymph nodes. In a longitudinal study, individuals who initiated ART within six months of infection had greater CD4/CD8 ratio increase compared to later initiators (>2 years). After controlling for age, gender, ART duration, nadir and CD4 count, the CD4/CD8 ratio predicted increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Hence, a persistently low CD4/CD8 ratio during otherwise effective ART is associated with increased innate and adaptive immune activation, an immunosenescent phenotype, and higher risk of morbidity/mortality. This ratio may prove useful in monitoring response to ART and could identify a unique subset of individuals needed of novel therapeutic interventions. PMID:24831517

  16. Antiretroviral Regimens and CD4/CD8 Ratio Normalization in HIV-Infected Patients during the Initial Year of Treatment: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    De Salvador-Guillouët, F.; Sakarovitch, C.; Durant, J.; Risso, K.; Demonchy, E.; Roger, P. M.; Fontas, E.

    2015-01-01

    Background As CD4/CD8 ratio inversion has been associated with non-AIDS morbidity and mortality, predictors of ratio normalization after cART need to be studied. Here, we aimed to investigate the association of antiretroviral regimens with CD4/CD8 ratio normalization within an observational cohort. Methods We selected, from a French cohort at the Nice University Hospital, HIV-1 positive treatment-naive patients who initiated cART between 2000 and 2011 with a CD4/CD8 ratio <1. Association between cART and ratio normalization (>1) in the first year was assessed using multivariate logistic regression models. Specific association with INSTI-containing regimens was examined. Results 567 patients were included in the analyses; the median CD4/CD8 ratio was 0.36. Respectively, 52.9%, 29.6% and 10.4% initiated a PI-based, NNRTI-based or NRTI-based cART regimens. About 8% of the population started an INSTI-containing regimen. 62 (10.9%) patients achieved a CD4/CD8 ratio ≥1 (N group). cART regimen was not associated with normalization when coded as PI-, NNRTI- or NRTI-based regimen. However, when considering INSTI-containing regimens alone, there was a strong association with normalization [OR, 7.67 (2.54–23.2)]. Conclusions Our findings suggest an association between initiation of an INSTI-containing regimen and CD4/CD8 ratio normalization at one year in naïve patients. Should it be confirmed in a larger population, it would be another argument for their use as first-line regimen as it is recommended in the recent update of the “Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents in HIV-1-Infected Adults and Adolescents”. PMID:26485149

  17. Patients with lung cancer and paraneoplastic Hu syndrome harbor HuD-specific type 2 CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Wendy K.; Deluca, Ilana J.; Thomas, Ashby; Fak, John; Williams, Travis; Buckley, Noreen; Dousmanis, Athanasios G.; Posner, Jerome B.; Darnell, Robert B.

    2009-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurologic disorders (PNDs) offer an uncommon opportunity to study human tumor immunity and autoimmunity. In small cell lung cancer (SCLC), expression of the HuD neuronal antigen is thought to lead to immune recognition, suppression of tumor growth, and, in a subset of patients, triggering of the Hu paraneoplastic neurologic syndrome. Antigen-specific CTLs believed to contribute to disease pathophysiology were described 10 years ago in paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Despite parallel efforts, similar cells have not been defined in Hu patients. Here, we have identified HuD-specific T cells in Hu patients and provided an explanation for why their detection has been elusive. Different Hu patients harbored 1 of 2 kinds of HuD-specific CD8+ T cells: classical IFN-γ–producing CTLs or unusual T cells that produced type 2 cytokines, most prominently IL-13 and IL-5, and lacked cytolytic activity. Further, we found evidence that SCLC tumor cells produced type 2 cytokines and that these cytokines trigger naive CD8+ T cells to adopt the atypical type 2 phenotype. These observations demonstrate the presence of an unusual noncytotoxic CD8+ T cell in patients with the Hu paraneoplastic syndrome and suggest that SCLC may evade tumor immune surveillance by skewing tumor antigen–specific T cells to this unusual noncytolytic phenotype. PMID:19509467

  18. A clinical exploratory study with itolizumab, an anti-CD6 monoclonal antibody, in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Pedro C.; Torres-Moya, Roberto; Reyes, Gil; Molinero, Claudino; Prada, Dinorah; Lopez, Ana M.; Hernandez, Isabel M.; Hernandez, Maria V.; Martinez, Jose P.; Hernandez, Xochel; Casaco, Angel; Ramos, Mayra; Avila, Yisel; Barrese, Yinet; Montero, Enrique; Hernandez, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    T cells are involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). CD6 is a co-stimulatory molecule, predominantly expressed on lymphocytes, that has been linked to autoreactive responses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety, immunogenicity and preliminary efficacy of itolizumab, a humanized anti-CD6 monoclonal antibody, in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis. Fifteen patients were enrolled in a phase I, open-label, dose-finding study. Five cohorts of patients received a weekly antibody monotherapy with a dose-range from 0.1 to 0.8 mg/kg. Itolizumab showed a good safety profile, with no severe or serious adverse events reported so far. No signs or symptoms associated with immunosuppression were observed in the study. Objective clinical responses were achieved in more than 80% of patients after treatment completion, and these responses tend to be sustained afterwards. This clinical study constitutes the first evidence of the safety and positive clinical effect of a monotherapy using an anti-CD6 antibody in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:24371585

  19. Analysis of Ancestral and Functionally Relevant CD5 Variants in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients

    PubMed Central

    Consuegra, Marta; Bonet, Lizette; Carnero-Montoro, Elena; Armiger, Noelia; Caballero-Baños, Miguel; Arias, Maria Teresa; Benitez, Daniel; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; de Ramón, Enrique; Sabio, José Mario; García–Hernández, Francisco J.; Tolosa, Carles; Suárez, Ana; González-Gay, Miguel A.; Bosch, Elena; Martín, Javier; Lozano, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Objective CD5 plays a crucial role in autoimmunity and is a well-established genetic risk factor of developing RA. Recently, evidence of positive selection has been provided for the CD5 Pro224-Val471 haplotype in East Asian populations. The aim of the present work was to further analyze the functional relevance of non-synonymous CD5 polymorphisms conforming the ancestral and the newly derived haplotypes (Pro224-Ala471 and Pro224-Val471, respectively) as well as to investigate the potential role of CD5 on the development of SLE and/or SLE nephritis. Methods The CD5 SNPs rs2241002 (C/T; Pro224Leu) and rs2229177 (C/T; Ala471Val) were genotyped using TaqMan allelic discrimination assays in a total of 1,324 controls and 681 SLE patients of Spanish origin. In vitro analysis of CD3-mediated T cell proliferative and cytokine response profiles of healthy volunteers homozygous for the above mentioned CD5 haplotypes were also analyzed. Results T-cell proliferation and cytokine release were significantly increased showing a bias towards to a Th2 profile after CD3 cross-linking of peripheral mononuclear cells from healthy individuals homozygous for the ancestral Pro224-Ala471 (CC) haplotype, compared to the more recently derived Pro224-Val471 (CT). The same allelic combination was statistically associated with Lupus nephritis. Conclusion The ancestral Ala471 CD5 allele confers lymphocyte hyper-responsiveness to TCR/CD3 cross-linking and is associated with nephritis in SLE patients. PMID:25402503

  20. The retinal specific CD147 Ig0 domain: from molecular structure to biological activity

    SciTech Connect

    Redzic, Jasmina S.; Armstrong, Geoffrey S.; Isern, Nancy G.; Jones, David N.M.; Kieft, Jeffrey S.; Eisenmesser, Elan Z.

    2011-06-18

    CD147 is a type I transmembrane protein that is involved in inflammatory diseases, cancer progression, and multiple human pathogens utilize CD147 for efficient infection. In several cancers, CD147 expression is so high that it is now used as a prognostic marker. The two primary isoforms of CD147 that are related to cancer progression have been identified, differing in their number of immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains. These include CD147 Ig1-Ig2 that is ubiquitously expressed in most tissues and CD147 Ig0-Ig1-Ig2 that is retinal specific and implicated in retinoblastoma. However, little is known in regard to the retinal specific CD147 Ig0 domain despite its potential role in retinoblastoma. Thus, here we have extensively characterized the CD147 Ig0 domain by elucidating its three-dimensional structure through crystallography and its solution behavior through several biophysical methods that include nuclear magnetic resonance. Furthermore, we have utilized this data together with mutagenesis to probe the biological activity of CD147-containing proteins both with and without the CD147 Ig0 domain within several model cell lines. Our findings reveal that the CD147 Ig0 domain is a potent stimulator of interleukin-6, which is a well-known contributor to retinoblastoma and suggest that the CD147 Ig0 domain has its own receptor distinct from that of the other CD147 Ig-like domains, CD147 Ig1-Ig2. Furthermore, we show that the CD147 Ig0 dimer is the functional unit required for activity and can be disrupted by a single point mutation.

  1. CD62L+ NKT cells have prolonged persistence and antitumor activity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Gengwen; Courtney, Amy N.; Jena, Bipulendu; Heczey, Andras; Liu, Daofeng; Marinova, Ekaterina; Guo, Linjie; Xu, Xin; Torikai, Hiroki; Mo, Qianxing; Dotti, Gianpietro; Cooper, Laurence J.; Metelitsa, Leonid S.

    2016-01-01

    Vα24-invariant natural killer T cells (NKTs) localize to tumors and have inherent antitumor properties, making them attractive chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) carriers for redirected cancer immunotherapy. However, clinical application of CAR-NKTs has been impeded, as mechanisms responsible for NKT expansion and the in vivo persistence of these cells are unknown. Here, we demonstrated that antigen-induced expansion of primary NKTs in vitro associates with the accumulation of a CD62L+ subset and exhaustion of CD62L– cells. Only CD62L+ NKTs survived and proliferated in response to secondary stimulation. When transferred to immune-deficient NSG mice, CD62L+ NKTs persisted 5 times longer than CD62L– NKTs. Moreover, CD62L+ cells transduced with a CD19-specific CAR achieved sustained tumor regression in a B cell lymphoma model. Proliferating CD62L+ cells downregulated or maintained CD62L expression when activated via T cell receptor alone or in combination with costimulatory receptors. We generated HLAnull K562 cell clones that were engineered to express CD1d and costimulatory ligands. Clone B-8-2 (HLAnullCD1dmedCD86high4-1BBLmedOX40Lhigh) induced the highest rates of NKT expansion and CD62L expression. B-8-2–expanded CAR-NKTs exhibited prolonged in vivo persistence and superior therapeutic activities in models of lymphoma and neuroblastoma. Therefore, we have identified CD62L as a marker of a distinct NKT subset endowed with high proliferative potential and have developed artificial antigen-presenting cells that generate CD62L-enriched NKTs for effective cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27183388

  2. CD62L+ NKT cells have prolonged persistence and antitumor activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tian, Gengwen; Courtney, Amy N; Jena, Bipulendu; Heczey, Andras; Liu, Daofeng; Marinova, Ekaterina; Guo, Linjie; Xu, Xin; Torikai, Hiroki; Mo, Qianxing; Dotti, Gianpietro; Cooper, Laurence J; Metelitsa, Leonid S

    2016-06-01

    Vα24-invariant natural killer T cells (NKTs) localize to tumors and have inherent antitumor properties, making them attractive chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) carriers for redirected cancer immunotherapy. However, clinical application of CAR-NKTs has been impeded, as mechanisms responsible for NKT expansion and the in vivo persistence of these cells are unknown. Here, we demonstrated that antigen-induced expansion of primary NKTs in vitro associates with the accumulation of a CD62L+ subset and exhaustion of CD62L- cells. Only CD62L+ NKTs survived and proliferated in response to secondary stimulation. When transferred to immune-deficient NSG mice, CD62L+ NKTs persisted 5 times longer than CD62L- NKTs. Moreover, CD62L+ cells transduced with a CD19-specific CAR achieved sustained tumor regression in a B cell lymphoma model. Proliferating CD62L+ cells downregulated or maintained CD62L expression when activated via T cell receptor alone or in combination with costimulatory receptors. We generated HLAnull K562 cell clones that were engineered to express CD1d and costimulatory ligands. Clone B-8-2 (HLAnullCD1dmedCD86high4-1BBLmedOX40Lhigh) induced the highest rates of NKT expansion and CD62L expression. B-8-2-expanded CAR-NKTs exhibited prolonged in vivo persistence and superior therapeutic activities in models of lymphoma and neuroblastoma. Therefore, we have identified CD62L as a marker of a distinct NKT subset endowed with high proliferative potential and have developed artificial antigen-presenting cells that generate CD62L-enriched NKTs for effective cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27183388

  3. High frequencies of circulating melanoma-reactive CD8+ T cells in patients with advanced melanoma.

    PubMed

    Letsch, A; Keilholz, U; Schadendorf, D; Nagorsen, D; Schmittel, A; Thiel, E; Scheibenbogen, C

    2000-09-01

    To determine whether circulating tumor-reactive T cells are present in melanoma patients, unstimulated T cells from peripheral blood were tested for recognition of HLA-A2- or HLA-A1-matched melanoma cell lines using the ELISPOT assay. Eleven out of 19 patients with metastatic melanoma had a T-cell response with up to 0.81%, 0.78%, 0. 53%, 0.12%, 0.10%, 0.09%, 0.07%, 0.06%, 0.06%, 0.04%, and 0.04% of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) secreting IFNgamma upon exposure to various HLA-A2- or HLA-A1-matched melanoma cell lines. These T-cell responses were mediated by CD8+ T cells and could specifically be blocked by an anti-HLA-A2 antibody in HLA-A2-positive patients. Separation experiments performed in one melanoma patient showed tumor-reactive T cells in both the CD8+ effector T cell (CD45RA+/IFNgamma+) as well as the CD8+ memory T-cell compartment (CD45RO+/IFNgamma+). In 3 out of 5 patients, in whom autologous cell lines were available, similar frequencies of T cells in response to HLA-A1- or HLA-A2-matched allogeneic and autologous tumor cells were observed, while 2 patients had a T-cell response restricted to either the autologous or the allogeneic cell lines. These results give evidence for the presence of tumor-reactive CD8+ T cells in more than half of melanoma patients tested. Although some of these patients have clinical evidence for an immunological-mediated tumor control, several patients have growing tumors suggesting presence of escape mechanisms. PMID:10925359

  4. Ex Vivo Apoptosis in CD8+ Lymphocytes Predicts Rectal Cancer Patient Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Haderlein, Marlen

    2016-01-01

    Background. Apoptotic rates in peripheral blood lymphocytes can predict radiation induced normal tissue toxicity. We studied whether apoptosis in lymphocytes has a prognostic value for therapy outcome. Methods. Lymphocytes of 87 rectal cancer patients were ex vivo irradiated with 2 Gy, 8 Gy, or a combination of 2 Gy ionizing radiation and Oxaliplatin. Cells were stained with Annexin V and 7-Aminoactinomycin D and apoptotic and necrotic rates were analyzed by multicolor flow cytometry. Results. After treatment, apoptotic and necrotic rates in CD8+ cells are consistently higher than in CD4+ cells, with lower corresponding necrotic rates. Apoptotic and necrotic rates of CD4+ cells and CD8+ cells correlated well within the 2 Gy, 8 Gy, and 2 Gy and Oxaliplatin arrangements (p ≤ 0.009). High apoptotic CD8+ rates after 2 Gy, 8 Gy, and 2 Gy + Oxaliplatin treatment were prognostically favorable for metastasis-free survival (p = 0.009, p = 0.038, and p = 0.009) and disease-free survival (p = 0.013, p = 0.098, and p = 0.013). Conclusions. Ex vivo CD8+ apoptotic rates are able to predict the patient outcome in regard to metastasis-free or disease-free survival. Patients with higher CD8+ apoptotic rates in the peripheral blood have a more favorable prognosis. In addition to the prediction of late-toxicity by utilization of CD4+ apoptotic rates, the therapy outcome can be predicted by CD8+ apoptotic rates. PMID:27340400

  5. Activated CD4+ T cells preferentially take up lipid microspheres, but resting cells do not.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, K

    1995-01-01

    Lipid microspheres (LM) used as drug carriers increase the effectiveness and reduce the toxicity of incorporated drugs. The present study is designed to determine whether or not activated T lymphocytes, which were the cells chosen first from the 'inflammatory cells', can take up LM in vitro. LM were labelled with a fluorescent probe, DiI (DiI-LM), to examine the kinetics. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that in freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), monocytes principally took up DiI-LM, while lymphocytes and granulocytes did not. When PBMC were stimulated with immobilized anti-CD3 MoAb and IL-2, cells expressing CD3, CD4, CD8 and CD16 incorporated DiI-LM. Purified CD4+ T cells, obtained by positive panning selection, were stimulated with this system. They were CD25, CD71, LFA-1-positive, and also showed an ability to take up DiI-LM, which resting cells did not. The findings were confirmed by flow cytometry and quantitative analysis of DiI. Confocal micrographs showed fluorescent granules from the probe in the cytoplasm of stimulated CD4+ T cells after incubation with DiI-LM. These results suggest that immunomodulatory agents incorporated into LM might selectively regulate the function of CD4+ or CD8+ T cells when these are activated. Images Fig. 4 PMID:7882572

  6. Small molecule agonists of integrin CD11b/CD18 do not induce global conformational changes and are significantly better than activating antibodies in reducing vascular injury

    PubMed Central

    Faridi, Mohd Hafeez; Altintas, Mehmet M.; Gomez, Camilo; Duque, Juan Camilo; Vazquez-Padron, Roberto I.; Gupta, Vineet

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND CD11b/CD18 is a key adhesion receptor that mediates leukocyte adhesion, migration and immune functions. We recently identified novel compounds, leukadherins, that allosterically enhance CD11b/CD18-dependent cell adhesion and reduce inflammation in vivo, suggesting integrin activation to be a novel mechanism of action for the development of anti-inflammatory therapeutics. Since a number of well-characterized anti-CD11b/CD18 activating antibodies are currently available, we wondered if such biological agonists could also become therapeutic leads following this mechanism of action. METHODS We compared the two types of agonists using in vitro cell adhesion and wound-healing assays and using animal model systems. We also studied effects of the two types of agonists on outside-in signaling in treated cells. RESULTS Both types of agonists similarly enhanced integrin-mediated cell adhesion and decreased cell migration. However, unlike leukadherins, the activating antibodies produced significant CD11b/CD18 macro clustering and induced phosphorylation of key proteins involved in outside-in signaling. Studies using conformation reporter antibodies showed that leukadherins did not induce global conformational changes in CD11b/CD18 explaining the reason behind their lack of ligand-mimetic outside-in signaling. In vivo, leukadherins reduced vascular injury in a dose-dependent fashion, but, surprisingly, the anti-CD11b activating antibody ED7 was ineffective. CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that small molecule allosteric agonists of CD11b/CD18 have clear advantages over the biologic activating antibodies and provide a mechanistic basis for the difference. GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE CD11b/CD18 activation represents a novel strategy for reducing inflammatory injury. Our study establishes small molecule leukadherins as preferred agonists over activating antibodies for future development as novel anti-inflammatory therapeutics. PMID:23454649

  7. Altered Responses to Homeostatic Cytokines in Patients with Idiopathic CD4 Lymphocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Mouthon, Luc; Landires, Ivan; Rohrlich, Pierre; Pestre, Vincent; Thèze, Jacques; Lortholary, Olivier; Chakrabarti, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic CD4 lymphocytopenia (ICL) is a rare immune deficiency characterized by a protracted CD4+ T cell loss of unknown etiology and by the occurrence of opportunistic infections similar to those seen in AIDS. We investigated whether a defect in responses to cytokines that control CD4+ T cell homeostasis could play a role in ICL. Immunophenotype and signaling responses to interleukin-7 (IL-7), IL-2, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) were analyzed by flow cytometry in CD4+ T cells from 15 ICL patients and 15 healthy blood donors. The induction of phospho-STAT5 after IL-7 stimulation was decreased in memory CD4+ T cells of some ICL patients, which correlated with a decreased expression of the IL-7Rα receptor chain (R = 0.74, p<0.005) and with lower CD4+ T cell counts (R = 0.69, p<0.005). IL-2 responses were also impaired, both in the Treg and conventional memory subsets. Decreased IL-2 responses correlated with decreased IL-7 responses (R = 0.75, p<0.005), pointing to combined defects that may significantly perturb CD4+ T cell homeostasis in a subset of ICL patients. Unexpectedly, responses to the IL-7-related cytokine TSLP were increased in ICL patients, while they remained barely detectable in healthy controls. TSLP responses correlated inversely with IL-7 responses (R = −0.41; p<0.05), suggesting a cross-regulation between the two cytokine systems. In conclusion, IL-7 and IL-2 signaling are impaired in ICL, which may account for the loss of CD4+ T cell homeostasis. Increased TSLP responses point to a compensatory homeostatic mechanism that may mitigate defects in γc cytokine responses. PMID:23383227

  8. Constitutive STAT3 Phosphorylation in Circulating CD4+ T Lymphocytes Associates with Disease Activity and Treatment Response in Recent-Onset Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kuuliala, Krista; Kuuliala, Antti; Koivuniemi, Riitta; Oksanen, Suvi; Hämäläinen, Mari; Moilanen, Eeva; Kautiainen, Hannu; Leirisalo-Repo, Marjatta; Repo, Heikki

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine constitutive signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation in circulating leukocytes as a candidate biomarker in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). 25 patients with recent-onset, untreated RA provided samples for whole blood flow cytometric determination of intracellular STAT3 phosphorylation, expressed as relative fluorescence units. The occurrence of constitutive STAT3 phosphorylation was evaluated by determining proportion of STAT3-phosphorylated cells among different leukocyte subtypes. Plasma levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-17 and IL-21 were measured by immunoassay, radiographs of hands and feet were examined and disease activity score (DAS28) was determined. Biomarkers were restudied and treatment response (according to European League Against Rheumatism) was determined after 12 months of treatment with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. At baseline, constitutive phosphorylation of STAT3 occurred in CD4+ T cells of 14 (56%) patients, CD8+ T cells of 13 (52%) patients, in CD19+ B cells of 7 (28%) patients, and in CD14+ monocytes of 12 (48%) patients. STAT3 phosphorylation levels of CD4+ T cells associated with DAS28, and those of all leukocyte subtypes studied associated with erosive disease. The presence of constitutive STAT3 phosphorylation in CD4+ T lymphocytes, pSTAT3 fluorescence intensity of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels at baseline associated with good treatment response. In conclusion, constitutive STAT3 phosphorylation in circulating CD4+ T cells is common in recent-onset untreated RA and associates with good treatment response in patients characterized by high disease activity and the presence of systemic inflammation. PMID:26353115

  9. CD4CD8αα lymphocytes, a novel human regulatory T cell subset induced by colonic bacteria and deficient in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Sarrabayrouse, Guillaume; Bossard, Céline; Chauvin, Joe-Marc; Jarry, Anne; Meurette, Guillaume; Quévrain, Elodie; Bridonneau, Chantal; Preisser, Laurence; Asehnoune, Karim; Labarrière, Nathalie; Altare, Frédéric; Sokol, Harry; Jotereau, Francine

    2014-04-01

    How the microbiota affects health and disease is a crucial question. In mice, gut Clostridium bacteria are potent inducers of colonic interleukin (IL)-10-producing Foxp3 regulatory T cells (Treg), which play key roles in the prevention of colitis and in systemic immunity. In humans, although gut microbiota dysbiosis is associated with immune disorders, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. In contrast with mice, the contribution of Foxp3 Treg in colitis prevention has been questioned, suggesting that other compensatory regulatory cells or mechanisms may exist. Here we addressed the regulatory role of the CD4CD8 T cells whose presence had been reported in the intestinal mucosa and blood. Using colonic lamina propria lymphocytes (LPL) and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from healthy individuals, and those with colon cancer and irritable bowel disease (IBD), we demonstrated that CD4CD8αα (DP8α) T lymphocytes expressed most of the regulatory markers and functions of Foxp3 Treg and secreted IL-10. Strikingly, DP8α LPL and PBL exhibited a highly skewed repertoire toward the recognition of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, a major Clostridium species of the human gut microbiota, which is decreased in patients with IBD. Furthermore, the frequencies of DP8α PBL and colonic LPL were lower in patients with IBD than in healthy donors and in the healthy mucosa of patients with colon cancer, respectively. Moreover, PBL and LPL from most patients with active IBD failed to respond to F. prausnitzii in contrast to PBL and LPL from patients in remission and/or healthy donors. These data (i) uncover a Clostridium-specific IL-10-secreting Treg subset present in the human colonic LP and blood, (ii) identify F. prausnitzii as a major inducer of these Treg, (iii) argue that these cells contribute to the control or prevention of colitis, opening new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for IBD, and (iv) provide new tools to address the systemic impact of both these Treg and the

  10. CD4CD8αα Lymphocytes, A Novel Human Regulatory T Cell Subset Induced by Colonic Bacteria and Deficient in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sarrabayrouse, Guillaume; Bossard, Céline; Chauvin, Joe-Marc; Jarry, Anne; Meurette, Guillaume; Quévrain, Elodie; Bridonneau, Chantal; Preisser, Laurence; Asehnoune, Karim; Labarrière, Nathalie; Altare, Frédéric; Sokol, Harry; Jotereau, Francine

    2014-01-01

    How the microbiota affects health and disease is a crucial question. In mice, gut Clostridium bacteria are potent inducers of colonic interleukin (IL)-10-producing Foxp3 regulatory T cells (Treg), which play key roles in the prevention of colitis and in systemic immunity. In humans, although gut microbiota dysbiosis is associated with immune disorders, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. In contrast with mice, the contribution of Foxp3 Treg in colitis prevention has been questioned, suggesting that other compensatory regulatory cells or mechanisms may exist. Here we addressed the regulatory role of the CD4CD8 T cells whose presence had been reported in the intestinal mucosa and blood. Using colonic lamina propria lymphocytes (LPL) and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from healthy individuals, and those with colon cancer and irritable bowel disease (IBD), we demonstrated that CD4CD8αα (DP8α) T lymphocytes expressed most of the regulatory markers and functions of Foxp3 Treg and secreted IL-10. Strikingly, DP8α LPL and PBL exhibited a highly skewed repertoire toward the recognition of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, a major Clostridium species of the human gut microbiota, which is decreased in patients with IBD. Furthermore, the frequencies of DP8α PBL and colonic LPL were lower in patients with IBD than in healthy donors and in the healthy mucosa of patients with colon cancer, respectively. Moreover, PBL and LPL from most patients with active IBD failed to respond to F. prausnitzii in contrast to PBL and LPL from patients in remission and/or healthy donors. These data (i) uncover a Clostridium-specific IL-10-secreting Treg subset present in the human colonic LP and blood, (ii) identify F. prausnitzii as a major inducer of these Treg, (iii) argue that these cells contribute to the control or prevention of colitis, opening new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for IBD, and (iv) provide new tools to address the systemic impact of both these Treg and the

  11. Evolution of the CD4 family: teleost fish possess two divergent forms of CD4 in addition to lymphocyte activation gene-3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laing, K.J.; Zou, J.J.; Purcell, M.K.; Phillips, R.; Secombes, C.J.; Hansen, J.D.

    2006-01-01

    The T cell coreceptor CD4 is a transmembrane glycoprotein belonging to the Ig superfamily and is essential for cell-mediated immunity. Two different genes were identified in rainbow trout that resemble mammalian CD4. One (trout CD4) encodes four extracellular Ig domains reminiscent off mammalian CD4, whereas the other (CD4REL) codes for two Ig domains. Structural motifs within the amino acid sequences suggest that the two Ig domains of CD4REL duplicated to generate the four-domain molecule of CD4 and the related gene, lymphocyte activation gene-3. Here we present evidence that both of these molecules in trout are homologous to mammalian CD4 and that teleosts encode an additional CD4 family member, lymphocyte activation gene-3, which is a marker for activated T cells. The syntenic relationships of similar genes in other teleost and non-fish genomes provide evidence for the likely evolution of CD4-related molecules in vertebrates, with CD4REL likely representing the primordial form in fish. Expression of both CD4 genes is highest in the thymus and spleen, and mRNA expression of these genes is limited to surface IgM- lymphocytes, consistent with a role for T cell functionality. Finally, the intracellular regions of both CD4 and CD4REL possess the canonical CXC motif involved in the interaction off CD4 with p56LCK, implying that similar mechanisms for CD4 + T cell activation are present in all vertebrates. Our results therefore raise new questions about T cell development and functionality in lower vertebrates that cannot be answered by current mammalian models and, thus, is of fundamental importance for understanding the evolution of cell-mediated immunity in gnathosomes. Copyright ?? 2006 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  12. Clonal predominance of CD8+ T cells in patients with unexplained neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Wlodarski, Marcin Wojciech; Nearman, Zachary; Jiang, Ying; Lichtin, Alan; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw Pawel

    2008-01-01

    Objective T-cell-mediated autoimmunity may be involved in some cases of idiopathic neutropenia. We hypothesized that a precise T-cell receptor repertoire analysis may uncover cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) expansions that are less pronounced than those seen in T large granular lymphocyte leukemia (T-LGL), but are pathophysiologically analogous and thus can serve as markers of a T-cell-mediated process. Materials and Methods Using rational algorithms for T-cell receptor analysis and in vivo tracking of CTL responses previously established in our laboratory, we studied patients with unexplained chronic neutropenia (n = 20), T-LGL (n = 15), and healthy controls (n = 12). We further investigated the involvement of soluble inhibitory factors by coculture assays. To determine the level of immune activation, we studied interferon-g expression in CD8+cells using Taqman polymerase chain reaction. Results Fifteen expanded (immunodominant) CTL clones were detected in 12 of 20 patients. In comparison to LGL leukemia, these clones were less immunodominant, but clearly discernible from subclinical lymphoproliferations in controls. As a surrogate of cytotoxic activity, we found markedly increased production of interferon-γ in most of the neutropenia patients, irrespective of the presence of immunodominant CTL clones. Conclusions These results suggest that, while immunodominant CTL clones are detectable in a proportion of patients only, CTL-mediated pathophysiology may be a general mechanism operating in idiopathic neutropenia. Oligogoclonal CTL expansions in chronic neutropenia may indicate an ongoing autoimmune process, while highly polarized monoclonalities in a subset of neutropenic LGL patients may represent the “extreme” end of the clonal continuum. PMID:18279717

  13. CdS loaded on coal based activated carbon nanofibers with enhanced photocatalytic property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jixi; Guo, Mingxi; Jia, Dianzeng; Song, Xianli; Tong, Fenglian

    2016-08-01

    The coal based activated carbon nanofibers (CBACFs) were prepared by electrospinning a mixture of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and acid treated coal. Cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles loaded on CBACFs were fabricated by solvothermal method. The obtained samples were characterized by FESEM, TEM, and XRD. The results reveal that the CdS nanoparticles are homogeneously dispersed on the surfaces of CBACFs. The CdS/CBACFs nanocomposites exhibited higher photoactivity for photodegradation of methyl blue (MB) under visible light irradiation than pure CdS nanoparticles. CBACFs can be used as low cost support materials for the preparation of nanocomposites with high photocatalytic activity.

  14. Comparison of CD63 Upregulation Induced by NSAIDs on Basophils and Monocytes in Patients with NSAID Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Abuaf, N.; Rostane, H.; Barbara, J.; Toly-Ndour, C.; Gaouar, H.; Mathelier-Fusade, P.; Leynadier, F.; Francès, C.; Girot, R.

    2012-01-01

    Background. An in vitro basophil activation test, based on the detection of CD63 upregulation induced by NSAIDs, has been described. Its clinical significance remains controversial. Objectives. In patients with a history of nonallergic NSAID hypersensitivity, stratified according to the severity of the symptoms, to assess with NSAIDs the predictive value of basophil (BAT) and monocyte (MAT) activation tests. Patients/Methods. Sixty patients who had NSAIDs-induced or exacerbated urticaria/angiooedema and 20 controls was included. After incubation with NSAIDs or acetaminophen, leukocytes were analysed for CD63 upregulation. Results. With aspirin, the sensitivity (37%) and specificity (90%) of BAT agree with already published results. In contrast, when patients had had cutaneous and visceral reactions, the frequency of positive BAT 14/22 (64%, P < 0.001) or MAT 10/22 (46%, P < 0.01) were increased. Conclusions. Positive tests were more frequent among patients having a severe hypersensitivity contrasting with the other patients who had results similar to controls. PMID:22187572

  15. IL-13-producing CD8+ T cells mediate dermal fibrosis in patients with systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fuschiotti, Patrizia; Larregina, Adriana T.; Ho, Johnan; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol; Medsger, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Fibrosis is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality in systemic sclerosis (SSc). T cells are the predominant inflammatory infiltrate in affected tissues and are thought to produce cytokines that drive the synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins by fibroblasts, resulting in excessive fibrosis. We showed that aberrant IL-13 production by peripheral blood effector CD8+ T cells from SSc patients correlates with the extent of skin fibrosis. Here we investigate the role of IL-13 production by CD8+ T cells in dermal fibrosis, an early and specific manifestation of SSc. METHODS Extracellular matrix production by normal dermal fibroblasts co-cultured with SSc CD8+ T-cell-supernatants was determined by quantitative PCR and Western blot. Skin-homing receptor expression and IL-13 production by peripheral blood SSc CD8+ T cells were measured by flow cytometry, whereas immunohistochemistry identified IL-13+ and CD8+ cells in sclerotic skin. RESULTS IL-13-producing circulating SSc CD8+ T cells express skin-homing receptors and induce a pro-fibrotic phenotype in normal dermal fibroblasts that is inhibited by an anti-IL-13 antibody. High numbers of CD8+ T cells and IL-13+ cells are found in the skin lesions of patients, particularly in the early inflammatory phase of the disease. Thus, IL-13-producing CD8+ T cells are directly involved in modulating dermal fibrosis in SSc. CONCLUSIONS We make an important mechanistic contribution to understanding the pathogenesis of dermal fibrosis in SSc by showing that CD8+ T cells homing to the skin early in the disease are associated with accumulation of IL-13 and may represent an important target for future therapeutic intervention. PMID:23001877

  16. CD44 variant 9 is a potential biomarker of tumor initiating cells predicting survival outcome in hepatitis C virus-positive patients with resected hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kakehashi, Anna; Ishii, Naomi; Sugihara, Eiji; Gi, Min; Saya, Hideyuki; Wanibuchi, Hideki

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated whether the expression of CD44 variant 9 (CD44v9) might be a functional marker of tumor-initiating stem-like cells in primary hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) of hepatitis C virus (HCV)(+) patients and provide an indicator of patient survival, as well as associated mechanisms. A total of 90 HCV(+) HCC patients who underwent surgery from 2006 to 2011 were enrolled and monitored for 2-8 years. Expression of CD44v9 was validated immunohistochemically in all HCCs, followed by comparative proteome, survival, and clinicopathological analyses. CD44 variant 8--10 was further evaluated in diethylnitrosamine-induced HCCs of C57Bl/6J mice. Focally localized CD44v(+) cells with a membranous staining pattern were detected in human HCV(+) and mouse HCCs. CD44v9(+) cells of HCCs were predominantly negative for Ki67 and P-p38, indicating decrease of cell proliferation in the CD44v9(+) tumor cell population, likely to be related to suppression of intracellular oxidative stress due to activation of Nrf2-mediated signaling, DNA repair, and inhibition of xenobiotic metabolism. CD44v9 IHC evaluation in 90 HCV(+) HCC cases revealed that positive expression was significantly associated with poor overall and recurrence-free survival, a younger age, poor histological differentiation of HCCs, and high alkaline phosphatase levels compared with patients with negative expression. CD44v9 is concluded to be a potential biomarker of tumor-initiating stem-like cells and a prognostic marker in HCV(+) HCC patients associated with Nrf2-mediated resistance to oxidative stress. PMID:26882440

  17. Association of Low Numbers of CD206-Positive Cells with Loss of ICC in the Gastric Body of Patients with Diabetic Gastroparesis

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Cheryl; Gibbons, Simon J.; Mann, Inderjit S.; Froschauer, Lukas; Parkman, Henry P.; Harbison, Sean; Abell, Thomas L.; Snape, William J.; Hasler, William L.; McCallum, Richard W.; Sarosiek, Irene; Nguyen, Linda Anh B.; Koch, Kenneth L.; Tonascia, James; Hamilton, Frank A.; Kendrick, Michael L.; Shen, K. Robert; Pasricha, Pankaj J.; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2014-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence for specific cellular changes in the stomach of patients with diabetic (DG) and idiopathic (IG) gastroparesis. The most significant findings are loss of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC), neuronal abnormalities and an immune cellular infiltrate. Studies done in diabetic mice have shown a cytoprotective effect of CD206+ M2 macrophages. Aim: Q uantify overall immune cellular infiltrate, identify macrophage populations and quantify CD206+ and iNOS+ cells. Investigate associations between cellular phenotypes and ICC. Methods Full thickness gastric body biopsies were obtained from non-diabetic controls (C), diabetic controls (DC), DG, and IG patients. Sections were labeled for CD45, CD206, Kit, iNOS and putative human macrophage markers (HAM56, CD68 and EMR1). Immunoreactive cells were quantified from the circular muscle layer. Results Significantly fewer ICC were detected in DG and IG tissues but there were no differences in the numbers of cells immunoreactive for other markers between patient groups. There was a significant correlation between the number of CD206+ cells and ICC in DG and DC patients but not in C and IG and a significant correlation between iNOS+ cells and ICC in the DC group but not the other groups. CD68 and HAM56 reliably labeled the same cell populations but EMR1 labeled other cell types. Conclusions Depletion of ICC and correlation with changes in CD206+ cell numbers in DC and DG patients suggests that in humans, like mice, CD206+ macrophages may play a cytoprotective role in diabetes. These findings may lead to novel therapeutic options, targeting alternatively activated macrophages. PMID:25041465

  18. Secreted Thrombospondin-1 Regulates Macrophage Interleukin-1β Production and Activation through CD47

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Erica V.; Miller, Thomas W.; Ivins-O’Keefe, Kelly; Kaur, Sukhbir; Roberts, David D.

    2016-01-01

    Thrombospondin-1 regulates inflammation by engaging several cell surface receptors and by modulating activities of other secreted factors. We have uncovered a novel role of thrombospondin-1 in modulating production and activation of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β by human and murine macrophages. Physiological concentrations of thrombospondin-1 limit the induction by lipopolysaccharide of IL-1β mRNA and total protein production by human macrophages. This inhibition can be explained by the ability of thrombospondin-1 to disrupt the interaction between CD47 and CD14, thereby limiting activation of NFκB/AP-1 by lipopolysaccharide. Only the CD47-binding domain of thrombospondin-1 exhibits this activity. In contrast, CD47, CD36, and integrin-binding domains of thrombospondin-1 independently enhance the inflammasome-dependent maturation of IL-1β in human THP-1 monocyte-derived macrophages. Correspondingly, mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages that lack either thrombospondin-1 or CD47 exhibit diminished induction of mature IL-1β in response to lipopolysaccharide. Lack of CD47 also limits lipopolysaccharide induction of IL-1β, NLRP3, and caspase-1 mRNAs. These data demonstrate that thrombospondin-1 exerts CD47-dependent and -independent pro-and anti-inflammatory effects on the IL-1β pathway. Therefore, thrombospondin-1 and its receptor CD47 may be useful targets for limiting the pro-inflammatory effects of lipopolysaccharide and for treating endotoxemia. PMID:26813769

  19. Role of acid sphingomyelinase bioactivity in human CD4+ T-cell activation and immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Bai, A; Kokkotou, E; Zheng, Y; Robson, S C

    2015-01-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM), a lipid hydrolase enzyme, has the potential to modulate various cellular activation responses via the generation of ceramide and by interaction with cellular receptors. We have hypothesized that ASM modulates CD4+ T-cell receptor activation and impacts immune responses. We first observed interactions of ASM with the intracellular domains of both CD3 and CD28. ASM further mediates T-cell proliferation after anti-CD3/CD28 antibody stimulation and alters CD4+ T-cell activation signals by generating ceramide. We noted that various pharmacological inhibitors of ASM or knockdown of ASM using small hairpin RNA inhibit CD3/CD28-mediated CD4+ T-cell proliferation and activation. Furthermore, such blockade of ASM bioactivity by biochemical inhibitors and/or molecular-targeted knockdown of ASM broadly abrogate T-helper cell responses. In conclusion, we detail immune, pivotal roles of ASM in adaptive immune T-cell responses, and propose that these pathways might provide novel targets for the therapy of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. PMID:26203857

  20. Tumor-derived vaccines containing CD200 inhibit immune activation: implications for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zhengming; Ampudia-Mesias, Elisabet; Shaver, Rob; Horbinski, Craig M; Moertel, Christopher L; Olin, Michael R

    2016-09-01

    There are over 400 ongoing clinical trials using tumor-derived vaccines. This approach is especially attractive for many types of brain tumors, including glioblastoma, yet so far the clinical response is highly variable. One contributor to poor response is CD200, which acts as a checkpoint blockade, inducing immune tolerance. We demonstrate that, in response to vaccination, glioma-derived CD200 suppresses the anti-tumor immune response. In contrast, a CD200 peptide inhibitor that activates antigen-presenting cells overcomes immune tolerance. The addition of the CD200 inhibitor significantly increased leukocyte infiltration into the vaccine site, cytokine and chemokine production, and cytolytic activity. Our data therefore suggest that CD200 suppresses the immune system's response to vaccines, and that blocking CD200 could improve the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27485078

  1. Detection of the GD2+/CD56+/CD45- immunophenotype by flow cytometry in cerebrospinal fluids from a patient with retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hongqiang; Tang, Yongmin; Xu, Xiaojun; Tang, Hongfeng

    2013-02-01

    Triple-color flow cytometry with a panel of antibodies comprising GD2, CD56, and CD45 was performed to analyze cerebrospinal fluids (CSF) from a patient with retinoblastoma who was suspicious of meningeal metastasis based on clinical presentation. Our results showed that the cells in CSF demonstrated the immunophenotype positive for GD2 and CD56 but negative for CD45 antigen, which suggested the presence of CSF metastasis of retinoblastoma. At the end of eight cycles of intrathecal chemotherapy, CSF specimen was analyzed with Flow cytometry immunophenotyping (FCI) again and the result showed no detectable malignant cells with the same immunophenotype. Our conclusion is that FCI can be a quick and reliable method for the diagnosis of CSF metastasis of retinoblastoma and the immunophenotype (GD2+, CD56+, and CD45-) can be used to recognize residual retinoblastoma cells in CSF. PMID:23126274

  2. Effects of active bufadienolide compounds on human cancer cells and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in mitogen-activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Bo; He, Jing; Kisoh, Keishi; Hayashi, Hideki; Tanaka, Sachiko; Si, Nan; Zhao, Hai-Yu; Hirano, Toshihiko; Bian, Baolin; Takagi, Norio

    2016-09-01

    The growth inhibitory effects of bufadienolide compounds were investigated in two intractable cancer cells, a human glioblastoma cell line U-87 and a pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990. Among four bufadienolide compounds, a dose-dependent cytotoxicity was observed in these cancer cells after treatment with gamabufotalin and arenobufagin. The IC50 values of the two compounds were 3-5 times higher in normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) than these values for both cancer cell lines. However, similar phenomena were not observed for two other bufadienolide compounds, telocinobufagin and bufalin. These results thus suggest that gamabufotalin and arenobufagin possess selective cytotoxic activity against tumor cells rather than normal cells. Moreover, a clear dose-dependent lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, a well-known hallmark of necrosis, was observed in both cancer cells treated with gamabufotalin, suggesting that gamabufotalin-mediated cell death is predominantly associated with a necrosis-like phenotype. Of most importance, treatment with as little as 8 ng/ml of gamabufotalin, even an almost non-toxic concentration to PBMCs, efficiently downregulated the percentages of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulator T (Treg) cells in mitogen-activated PBMCs. Given that Treg cells play a critical role in tumor immunotolerance by suppressing antitumor immunity, these results suggest that gamabufotalin may serve as a promising candidate, as an adjuvant therapeutic agent by manipulating Treg cells to enhance the efficacy of conventional anticancer drugs and lessen their side-effects. These findings provide insights into the clinical application of gamabufotalin for cancer patients with glioblastoma/pancreatic cancer based on its cytocidal effect against tumor cells as well as its depletion of Treg cells. PMID:27431260

  3. Preparations of intravenous immunoglobulins diminish the number and proinflammatory response of CD14+CD16++ monocytes in common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) patients.

    PubMed

    Siedlar, Maciej; Strach, Magdalena; Bukowska-Strakova, Karolina; Lenart, Marzena; Szaflarska, Anna; Węglarczyk, Kazimierz; Rutkowska, Magdalena; Baj-Krzyworzeka, Monika; Pituch-Noworolska, Anna; Kowalczyk, Danuta; Grodzicki, Tomasz; Ziegler-Heitbrock, Loems; Zembala, Marek

    2011-05-01

    We have studied the effect of intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) on monocyte subpopulations and cytokine production in patients with CVID. The absolute number of CD14(+)CD16(++) monocytes decreased on average 2.5-fold 4h after IVIG and after 20h returned to the baseline. The cytokine level in the supernatants of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) after ex vivo LPS stimulation demonstrated the >2-fold decrease in TNF production 4h after IVIG. The TNF expression, which is higher in the CD14(+)CD16(++) monocytes, was decreased in these cells by IVIG in 4/7 CVID cases. In vitro exposure of the healthy individuals' monocytes to the IVIG preparation resulted in reduced TNF production, which was overcome by blockade of the FcγRIIB in the CD14(+)CD16(++) CD32B(high) monocytes. Our data suggest that reduction in the number of CD14(+)CD16(++) monocytes and the blockade of their cytokine production via triggering CD32B can contribute to the anti-inflammatory action of IVIG. PMID:21300572

  4. Interleukin-18 and CD30 serum levels in patients with moderate-severe depression.

    PubMed

    Merendino, Rosaria Alba; Di Rosa, Antonio Enrico; Di Pasquale, Giuseppe; Minciullo, Paola Lucia; Mangraviti, Carmela; Costantino, Antonella; Ruello, Antonella; Gangemi, Sebastiano

    2002-08-01

    Interleukin-18 (IL-18), a pro-inflammatory cytokine that plays an important role in the T-cell-helper type 1 response, is a new member of the family of cytokines produced in the brain. CD30 is a marker of T-cell-helper type 2 lymphocytes. We evaluated IL-18 and CD30 serum levels in 10 patients affected by moderate-severe depression (MSD). We demonstrated for the first time that serum IL-18 levels of MSD patients were significantly higher than those of healthy donors. On the contrary, no significant difference was found between serum CD30 levels of MSD patients compared with those of healthy donors. These data strengthen the hypothesis that MSD disease is associated with an inflammatory response, mainly T-cell-helper type 1, and suggest an important role for IL-18 in the pathophysiology of MSD. PMID:12396479

  5. Refractory platelet transfusion in a patient with CD36 deficiency due to pseudothrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiao-Lin; Shen, Wei-Dong; Chen, Yong-Sheng; Zhou, Yan; Zhang, Xin-Huan

    2011-01-01

    Type I CD36 deficiency is defined by the absence of CD36 on both platelets and monocytes. Pseudothrombocytopenia (PTCP) is characterized by a false reduction in the number of platelets in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-anticoagulated blood. Here we report a rare case of concomitant CD36 deficiency and PTCP. The patient was a 7-year-old boy who suffered comminuted fractures of the left humeral condyle. In the pre-operative examination, he was found to have thrombopenia and assumed to have idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. After immunotherapy and platelet transfusion, the platelet count remained low, suggesting that the patient was refractory to platelet transfusion. Serum was collected for the detection of platelet antibodies, and antibodies against CD36 were found. Flow cytometry verified the absence of CD36 on both the platelets and monocytes of this patient. However, the platelet count was normal when capillary blood smears were analysed; in addition, platelet coagulation was noted under the microscope when EDTA-anticoagulated peripheral blood was used. The patient underwent surgery without platelet transfusion and recovered uneventfully. PMID:21143025

  6. Characterisation of CdO thin films deposited by activated reactive evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishna Reddy, K. T.; Sravani, C.; Miles, R. W.

    1998-02-01

    The paper describes the preparation of cadmium oxide thin films produced by "activated reactive evaporation" onto heated glass substrates. The structural, electrical and optical properties of the deposited films were investigated and the effect of substrate temperature on the different physical properties of the films investigated. Highly conducting, polycrystalline CdO films with good transmittances were prepared by controlling the deposition temperature. These layers can be used to produce CdO/CdTe solar cells with efficiencies > 7%.

  7. Human CD38hiCD138+ Plasma Cells Can Be Generated In Vitro from CD40-Activated Switched-Memory B Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Itoua Maïga, Rayelle; Tremblay Rochette, Josiane; Néron, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    B lymphocyte differentiation into long-lived plasma cells is the keystone event for the production of long-term protective antibodies. CD40-CD154 and CD27-CD70 interactions are involved in human B lymphocyte differentiation into CD38hiCD138+ cells in vivo as well as in vitro. In this study, we have compared these interactions in their capacity to drive switched-memory B lymphocytes differentiation into CD38hiCD138+ plasma cells. The targeted B lymphocytes were isolated from human peripheral blood, expanded for 19 days, and then submitted to CD70 or CD154 interactions for 14 days. The expanded B lymphocytes were constitutively expressing CD39, whereas CD31's expression was noticed only following the in vitro differentiation step (day 5) and was exclusively present on the CD38hi cell population. Furthermore, the generated CD38hiCD138+ cells showed a higher proportion of CD31+ cells than the CD38hiCD138− cells. Besides, analyses done with human blood and bone marrow plasma cells showed that in vivo and de novo generated CD38hiCD138+ cells have a similar CD31 expression profile but are distinct according to their reduced CD39 expression level. Overall, we have evidences that in vitro generated plasma cells are heterogeneous and appear as CD39+ precursors to the ones present in bone marrow niches. PMID:25759831

  8. Fractionated neem leaf extract is safe and increases CD4+ cell levels in HIV/AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Mbah, A U; Udeinya, I J; Shu, E N; Chijioke, C P; Nubila, T; Udeinya, F; Muobuike, Angela; Mmuobieri, Ancila; Obioma, Maria S

    2007-01-01

    The safety and effect of an acetone-water neem leaf extract (IRAB) on CD4 cells was investigated in 60 HIV/AIDS patients as part of an ongoing study to determine the influence of neem on immunity and viral load in HIV/AIDS. Patients were confirmed as HIV I or II positive, as having CD4 cell count, less than 300 cells/microL, and as antiretrovirally naïve. They were given oral IRAB (1.0 g daily for 12 weeks). Clinical and laboratory tests were carried out at baseline and at 4 weekly intervals. Thus, the patients served as their own controls. Sixty patients completed treatment. Fifty (83.33%) were completely compliant with respect to laboratory tests. Increase in mean CD4 cells, 266 cells/microL (159%), for the 50 patients was significant (P < 0.001) between baseline and week 12. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (64 mm/hr at baseline) was 16 mm/hr at week 12, whereas total number of incidences of HIV/AIDS-related pathologies decreased from 120 at baseline to 5. Mean bodyweight, hemoglobin concentration, and lymphocyte differential count increased significantly by 12% (P < 0.05), 24% (P < 0.0001), and 20% (P < 0.0001), respectively. There were no adverse effects and no abnormalities in kidney and liver function parameters. The results support the safety of IRAB in HIV/AIDS, and its significant influence on CD4 cells may be useful in the formulation of multidrug combination therapies for HIV/AIDS. However, its antiretroviral activity is being evaluated in our laboratory. PMID:17667213

  9. Targeting CD20 in melanoma patients at high risk of disease recurrence.

    PubMed

    Pinc, Alice; Somasundaram, Rajasekharan; Wagner, Christine; Hörmann, Marcus; Karanikas, Georgios; Jalili, Ahmad; Bauer, Wolfgang; Brunner, Patrick; Grabmeier-Pfistershammer, Katharina; Gschaider, Melanie; Lai, Chiou-Yan; Hsu, Mei-Yu; Herlyn, Meenhard; Stingl, Georg; Wagner, Stephan N

    2012-05-01

    Melanomas contain distinct cell subpopulations. Several of these subpopulations, including one expressing CD20, may harbor stem cell-like or tumor-initiating characteristics. We hypothesized that patients at high risk of disease recurrence could benefit from an adjuvant anti-CD20 therapy. Therefore, we initiated a small pilot trial to study the effect of the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab in a group of melanoma patients with stage IV metastatic disease who had been rendered without evident disease by way of surgery, chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. The major objective was safety, while secondary objectives were description of recurrence-free intervals (RFI) and overall survival (OS). Nine patients received rituximab at 375 mg/m(2) qw for 4 weeks followed by a maintenance therapy every 8 weeks. Treatment was discontinued after 2 years or with disease recurrence. Treatment was well tolerated. After a median observation of 42 months, the median neither of RFI nor of OS has been reached. Despite therapy that ended after 2 years, six out of nine patients are still alive and five of them are recurrence-free. Though the patient number is too small for definitive conclusions, our data may represent a first example of the potential therapeutic value of targeting CD20(+) cell populations-at least for a subset of patients. PMID:22354376

  10. Fullerene modification CdSe/TiO2 and modification of photocatalytic activity under visible light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Ze-Da; Zhu, Lei; Ye, Shu; Sun, Qian; Ullah, Kefayat; Cho, Kwang-Youn; Oh, Won-Chun

    2013-04-01

    CdSe, CdSe-TiO2, and CdSe-C60/TiO2 composites were prepared using sol-gel method, and their photocatalytic activity was evaluated by measuring the degradation of rhodamine B solutions under visible light. The surface area, surface structure, crystal phase, and elemental identification of these composites were characterized by nitrogen adsorption isotherms, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and UV-visible (vis) absorption spectrophotometry. XRD showed that the CdSe-C60/TiO2 composite contained a typical single and clear anatase phase. SEM of the CdSe-C60/TiO2 composites revealed a homogenous composition in the particles. EDX revealed the presence of C and Ti with strong Cd and Se peaks in the CdSe-C60/TiO2 composite. The degradation of dye was determined by UV-vis spectrophotometry. An increase in photocatalytic activity was observed and attributed to an increase in the photoabsorption effect by fullerene and the cooperative effect of the CdSe. The repeatability of photocatalytic activity was also tested in order to investigate the stability of C60 and CdS-C60/TiO2 composites.

  11. Pulse interleukin-2 with famotidine induces CD56+ lymphocytes in the peripheral blood of patients with metastatic melanoma or kidney cancer.

    PubMed

    Quan, Walter D Y; Gagnon, Gregory A; Walker, Paul R; Quan, Francine M

    2011-02-01

    Increased lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cell numbers and cytotoxicity against tumor cell lines have been seen in patients receiving high-dose continuous and bolus infusion interleukin-2 (IL-2) regimens. LAK are CD56 positive on flow cytometry. Daily intravenous doses of IL-2 of 18-21.6 MIU/m(2) over 15-30 minutes ("pulses") have been developed to attempt to lessen the toxicity of this therapy. It has been previously shown that the patients with metastatic melanoma or kidney cancer may be treated safely with pulse IL-2 daily for 5 days preceded by intravenous famotidine. Cycles were repeated every 21 days. Because LAK numbers have not been previously described with this regimen, the present study has examined CD56 numbers via peripheral blood flow cytometry in 11 patients with samples scheduled at baseline, after two cycles, and after four cycles. Eight (8) patients had melanoma and 3 had kidney cancer. Median CD56 counts after two cycles was significantly higher than baseline (p = 0.001). Similarly, CD56 counts at 2 months later were also greater than baseline (p = 0.009). There was no difference between median values after two cycles versus after four cycles. Patients who were clinical responders had a median CD56 count of 650 after two cycles when compared with nonresponders who had a median CD56 count of 290 (p = 0.005). CD56 counts are significantly elevated in patients treated with pulse IL-2 with famotidine and clinical responders have significantly higher CD56 than nonresponders. PMID:21348776

  12. High CD4+ T cell density is associated with poor prognosis in patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qinglei; Hao, Chongli; Cheng, Guangzhou; Wang, Lei; Wang, Xiang; Li, Chang; Qiu, Juhui; Ding, Kejia

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of CD4+ T cells in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) tissues in situ. Methods: Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the distribution of CD4+ T cells in 131 NMIBC tissues. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression models were applied to estimate overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS). Results: NMIBC patients were divided into two groups based on the median frequency of CD4+ T cells (median, 1/×400 high resolution). On univariate analysis, CD4+ T cell density was inversely associated with overall survival (P = 0.01). In those patients with high CD4+ T density, 5-year OS rates was only 77%, compared with 86% in those with low density, respectively. Although CD4+ T cell density showed no prognostic significance for RFS (P = 0.36), 5-year RFS rates of patients with high CD4+ T density (58%) was lower than those of patients with low CD4+ T density (65%, respectively). By multivariate analysis, tumor infiltrating CD4+ T cell density emerged as an independent prognostic factor for OS (HR, 2.75; P = 0.004). In addition, no association was found between CD4+ T cell density and any clinicopathological variables (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that CD4+ T cells could potentially serve as a poor prognostic marker for patients with NMIBC. PMID:26617883

  13. Synthesis and photocatalytic activity of three-dimensional ZnS/CdS composites

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shuling Li, Honglin; Yan, Lu

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • 3D urchin-like ZnS/CdS composites were synthesized via a two-step method. • The CdS nanoparticles were assembled on the thorns of 3D ZnS urchins. • The ZnS/CdS composites show excellent photocatalytic degradation activities. • The modification of CdS on ZnS is responsible for the enhanced property. - Abstract: Urchin-like ZnS/CdS semiconductor composites were successfully synthesized by combining solvothermal route with homogeneous precipitation process. The as-obtained samples were characterized by means of XRD, EDX, TEM, HR-TEM, ED and FE-SEM techniques. The results show that the as-obtained composites were comprised of the hexagonal structure ZnS and CdS, and CdS nanoparticles were assembled on the surfaces of the thorns of urchin-like ZnS. In addition, the optical properties and photocatalytic activities of the as-prepared ZnS/CdS composites toward some organic dyes (such as Methyl Orange, Pyronine B, Rhodamine B and Methylene Blue) were separately investigated. It is found that the ZnS/CdS composites exhibit excellent photocatalytic degradation activity for these dyes under UV irradiation, as compared to corresponding pure ZnS urchins and commercial anatase TiO{sub 2} (P-25). This enhanced activity may be related to the modification of CdS nanoparticles on the surfaces of thorns of ZnS urchins and a tentative mechanism for the enhanced photocatalytic degradation activities of the ZnS/CdS composite catalyst was proposed.

  14. Contribution of NADPH Oxidase to Membrane CD38 Internalization and Activation in Coronary Arterial Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ming; Li, Xiao-Xue; Ritter, Joseph K.; Abais, Justine M.; Zhang, Yang; Li, Pin-Lan

    2013-01-01

    The CD38-ADP-ribosylcyclase-mediated Ca2+ signaling pathway importantly contributes to the vasomotor response in different arteries. Although there is evidence indicating that the activation of CD38-ADP-ribosylcyclase is associated with CD38 internalization, the molecular mechanism mediating CD38 internalization and consequent activation in response to a variety of physiological and pathological stimuli remains poorly understood. Recent studies have shown that CD38 may sense redox signals and is thereby activated to produce cellular response and that the NADPH oxidase isoform, NOX1, is a major resource to produce superoxide (O2·−) in coronary arterial myocytes (CAMs) in response to muscarinic receptor agonist, which uses CD38-ADP-ribosylcyclase signaling pathway to exert its action in these CAMs. These findings led us hypothesize that NOX1-derived O2·− serves in an autocrine fashion to enhance CD38 internalization, leading to redox activation of CD38-ADP-ribosylcyclase activity in mouse CAMs. To test this hypothesis, confocal microscopy, flow cytometry and a membrane protein biotinylation assay were used in the present study. We first demonstrated that CD38 internalization induced by endothelin-1 (ET-1) was inhibited by silencing of NOX1 gene, but not NOX4 gene. Correspondingly, NOX1 gene silencing abolished ET-1-induced O2·− production and increased CD38-ADP-ribosylcyclase activity in CAMs, while activation of NOX1 by overexpression of Rac1 or Vav2 or administration of exogenous O2·− significantly increased CD38 internalization in CAMs. Lastly, ET-1 was found to markedly increase membrane raft clustering as shown by increased colocalization of cholera toxin-B with CD38 and NOX1. Taken together, these results provide direct evidence that Rac1-NOX1-dependent O2·− production mediates CD38 internalization in CAMs, which may represent an important mechanism linking receptor activation with CD38 activity in these cells. PMID:23940720

  15. Activation of Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor γ (PPARγ) and CD36 Protein Expression: THE DUAL PATHOPHYSIOLOGICAL ROLES OF PROGESTERONE.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Wenwen; Chen, Yuanli; Li, Yan; Sun, Lei; Liu, Ying; Liu, Mengyang; Yu, Miao; Li, Xiaoju; Han, Jihong; Duan, Yajun

    2016-07-15

    Progesterone or its analog, one of components of hormone replacement therapy, may attenuate the cardioprotective effects of estrogen. However, the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Expression of CD36, a receptor for oxidized LDL (oxLDL) that enhances macrophage/foam cell formation, is activated by the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ). CD36 also functions as a fatty acid transporter to influence fatty acid metabolism and the pathophysiological status of several diseases. In this study, we determined that progesterone induced macrophage CD36 expression, which is related to progesterone receptor (PR) activity. Progesterone enhanced cellular oxLDL uptake in a CD36-dependent manner. Mechanistically, progesterone increased PPARγ expression and PPARγ promoter activity in a PR-dependent manner and the binding of PR with the progesterone response element in the PPARγ promoter. Specific deletion of macrophage PPARγ (MφPPARγ KO) expression in mice abolished progesterone-induced macrophage CD36 expression and cellular oxLDL accumulation. We also determined that, associated with gestation and increased serum progesterone levels, CD36 and PPARγ expression in mouse adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and peritoneal macrophages were substantially activated. Taken together, our study demonstrates that progesterone can play dual pathophysiological roles by activating PPARγ expression, in which progesterone increases macrophage CD36 expression and oxLDL accumulation, a negative effect on atherosclerosis, and enhances the PPARγ-CD36 pathway in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle, a protective effect on pregnancy. PMID:27226602

  16. Characterization of the human CD4 gene promoter: transcription from the CD4 gene core promoter is tissue-specific and is activated by Ets proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, P; Giovane, A; Wasylyk, B; Klatzmann, D

    1993-01-01

    We analyzed the 5' transcription control sequences of the human CD4 gene. We located the transcription initiation site and showed that the CD4 core promoter (positions -40 to +16) lacks a classical "TATA" or initiator positioning consensus sequence but directs precise and efficient transcription when coupled to the ubiquitously active simian virus 40 enhancer. The transcriptional activity of the CD4 gene promoter correlated with CD4 expression in various cell types. Interestingly, the CD4 core promoter also displayed a tissue-specific transcriptional activity. Within this fragment, three nucleic acid sequences are completely conserved in the murine CD4 gene. One of these sequences contains a perfect ETS consensus sequence. Another ETS consensus sequence is located 1060 nt upstream. Electrophoretic-mobility-shift assays showed that the core promoter ETS motif binds an Ets-related protein specifically expressed at high levels in CD4+ cells. Moreover, in CD4- cells, overexpression of Ets-1 or Ets-2 efficiently and specifically activated transcription from the CD4 promoter and core promoter. These data indicate that Ets transcription factors play a central role in controlling CD4 gene expression, by binding to both a classical remote site and an unusual proximal activator sequence. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:8356078

  17. Variables in the Quantification of CD4 in Normals and Hairy Cell Leukemia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lili; Abbasi, Fatima; Jasper, Gregory A; Kreitman, Robert J; Liewehr, David; Marti, Gerald E.; Stetler-Stevenson, Maryalice

    2010-01-01

    Background Quantitative flow cytometry (QFCM) is being applied in the clinical flow cytometry laboratory. Quantitative normal T-cell CD4 expression represents a biologic standard and quality control agent. However, low levels of CD4 expression were detected in normal T-cells in Hairy Cell Leukemia (HCL) samples. Methods The QuantiBrite System® was used to determine the level of CD4 expression (mean antibody bound per cell, ABC) in fresh and shipped HCL blood and fresh normal donor blood (NDB). The effects of shipping, lysing reagent, cell preparation method and antibody lot were evaluated. Results Shipped HCL specimens (n = 69) had a significantly lower mean CD4 ABC of 38,788 (CV = 9.1%) compared to fresh specimens (n = 105) CD4 value of 40,330 (CV = 8.4%) (p < 0 .05). In NDB, significant differences were seen for fresh versus shipped specimens using the stain/lyse method but not for lyse/stain method. Consistent differences in CD4 ABC based upon antibody lot were observed in fresh HCL and NDB samples. Stain/lyse and lyse/stain methods using NH4Cl lyse were compared in NDB using identical samples and antibodies. The NDB CD4 ABC values obtained with the lyse (NH4Cl )/stain method (45,562, 3.7% CV) were lower than those obtained with the stain/lyse (NH4Cl) method (49,955, 3.3% CV) with p<0.001. Conclusions CD4 expression in HCL patient samples is not inherently different from that observed in NDB and therefore may serve as a biological control in clinical QFCM. Technical variables impact significantly on QFCM of CD4. PMID:20687201

  18. DNA methylation analysis of CD4+ T cells in patients with psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Park, Geon Tae; Han, Jihye; Park, Sin-Gi; Kim, Sangsoo; Kim, Tae-Yoon

    2014-04-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that is characterized by aberrant cross-talk between keratinocytes and immune cells such as CD4+ T cells, resulting in keratinocyte hyperproliferation in the epidermis. DNA methylation, one of several epigenetic mechanisms, plays an important role in gene expression without changing the DNA sequence. Several studies have suggested the involvement of epigenetic regulation in skin lesions from patients with psoriasis. In this study, we investigated the genome-wide DNA methylation status of CD4+ T cells in patients with psoriasis compared with healthy subjects using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation sequencing (MeDIP-Seq). The results of MeDIP-Seq showed that the global methylation values of CD4+ T cells are higher in patients with psoriasis than in healthy controls, particularly in the promoter regions. Among the most hypermethylated genes in the promoter regions, we selected the genes whose expression is significantly reduced in the CD4+ T cells of psoriasis patients. Studies using the methylation inhibitor 5-azacytidine in vitro methylation assays have shown that the differential expression levels were associated with the methylation status of each gene. Bisulfite sequencing of the transcription start region of phosphatidic acid phosphatase type 2 domain containing 3 (PPAPDC3), one of the selected genes, showed hypermethylation in the CD4+ T cells of psoriasis patients. These results suggested that the methylation status, which is identified by MeDIP-Seq of the genes, was correlated with the mRNA expression level of the genes. Collectively, the DNA methylation status in CD4+ T cells might be associated with the pathogenesis of psoriasis. PMID:24323136

  19. Differential Expression of O-Glycans in CD4(+) T Lymphocytes from Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Martínez, Edgar; Lascurain, Ricardo; Tenorio, Eda Patricia; Sánchez-González, Antonio; Chávez-Rueda, Karina; Chávez-Sánchez, Luis; Jara-Quezada, Luis J; Chávez-Sánchez, Raúl; Zenteno, Edgar; Blanco-Favela, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    T cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) show a decreased activation threshold and increased apoptosis. These processes seem to be regulated by glycosylated molecules on the T cell surface. Here, we determined through flow cytometry the expression of mucin-type O-glycans on T helper cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 23 SLE patients and its relation with disease activity. We used lectins specific for the disaccharide Gal-GalNAc, such as Amaranthus leucocarpus lectin (ALL), Artocarpus integrifolia lectin (jacalin) and Arachis hypogaea lectin (peanut agglutinin, PNA), as well as lectins for sialic acid such as Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA) and Maakia amurensis agglutinin (MAA). The results showed that ALL, but not jacalin or PNA, identified significant differences in O-glycan expression on T helper cells from active SLE patients (n = 10). Moreover, an inverse correlation was found between the frequency of T helper cells recognized by ALL and SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) score in SLE patients. In contrast, SNA and MAA lectins did not identify any differences between CD4(+) T cells from SLE patients. There was no difference in the recognition by ALL on activated T helper cells and T regulatory (Treg) cells. Our findings point out that activation of SLE disease diminishes the expression of O-glycans in T helper cells; ALL could be considered as a marker to determine activity of the disease. PMID:27600584

  20. In vivo Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis Facility for Total Body Nitrogen and Cd

    SciTech Connect

    Munive, Marco; Revilla, Angel; Solis, Jose L.

    2007-10-26

    A Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) system has been designed and constructed to measure the total body nitrogen and Cd for in vivo studies. An aqueous solution of KNO{sub 3} was used as phantom for system calibration. The facility has been used to monitor total body nitrogen (TBN) of mice and found that is related to their diet. Some mice swallowed diluted water with Cl{sub 2}Cd, and the presence of Cd was detected in the animals. The minimum Cd concentration that the system can detect was 20 ppm.

  1. Induction of IL-10 and TGFβ from CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T Cells Correlates with Parasite Load in Indian Kala-azar Patients Infected with Leishmania donovani

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Pradyot; Ghosh, Smriti; Ejazi, Sarfaraz Ahmad; Rahaman, Mehebubar; Pandey, Krishna; Ravi Das, Vidya Nand; Das, Pradeep; Goswami, Rama Prosad; Saha, Bibhuti; Ali, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    Background Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is distinguished by a complex interplay of immune response and parasite multiplication inside host cells. However, the direct association between different immunological correlates and parasite numbers remains largely unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined the plasma levels of different disease promoting/protective as well as Th17 cytokines and found IL-10, TGFβ and IL-17 to be significantly correlated with parasite load in VL patients (r = 0.52, 0.53 and 0.51 for IL-10, TGFβ and IL-17, respectively). We then extended our investigation to a more antigen-specific response and found leishmanial antigen stimulated levels of both IL-10 and TGFβ to be significantly associated with parasite load (r = 0.71 and 0.72 for IL-10 and TGFβ respectively). In addition to cytokines we also looked for different cellular subtypes that could contribute to cytokine secretion and parasite persistence. Our observations manifested an association between different Treg cell markers and disease progression as absolute numbers of CD4+CD25+ (r = 0.55), CD4+CD25hi (r = 0.61) as well as percentages of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T cells (r = 0.68) all correlated with parasite load. Encouraged by these results, we investigated a link between these immunological components and interestingly found both CD4+CD25+ and CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Treg cells to secrete significantly (p<0.05) higher amounts of not only IL-10 but also TGFβ in comparison to corresponding CD25- T cells. Conclusions/Significance Our findings shed some light on source(s) of TGFβ and suggest an association between these disease promoting cytokines and Treg cells with parasite load during active disease. Moreover, the direct evidence of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Treg cells as a source of IL-10 and TGFβ during active VL could open new avenues for immunotherapy towards cure of this potentially fatal disease. PMID:26829554

  2. The CD4/CD8 Ratio is Inversely Associated with Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Progression in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients on Antiretroviral Treatment.

    PubMed

    Bernal Morell, Enrique; Serrano Cabeza, José; Muñoz, Ángeles; Marín, Irene; Masiá, Mar; Gutiérrez, Félix; Cano, Alfredo

    2016-07-01

    Inversion of the CD4/CD8 ratio (<1) has been identified as a surrogate marker of immunosenescence and an independent predictor of AIDS events in HIV-infected patients and mortality in the general population. We aimed to assess the association between the CD4/CD8 ratio and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) progression in treated HIV-infected patients as a marker of coronary heart disease. A longitudinal study was conducted during 3 years in 96 virally suppressed HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART). We analyzed the associations between the CD4/CD8 ratio, cardiovascular risk factors, and antiretroviral treatment (ART) and progression of subclinical atherosclerosis assessed using cIMT at baseline and after 3 years. Finally, 96 patients completed the study. Seventy six (79.1%) patients were male, aged 44 ± 10 years; 39 (40.6%) were on treatment with protease inhibitors; 49 (51.04%) with nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, 6 (6.25%) with integrase inhibitors, 3 (3.12%) with maraviroc, and 2 (2.08%) just with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. The mean of ART exposition was 6.9 ± 5.9 years. Twenty six (27%) patients had family history of ischemic heart disease, 51 (53.12%) were smokers, 12 (12.5%) were hypertensive, 4 (4.16%) had type 2 diabetes, 23 (23.9%) had dyslipidemia, and 31 (32.3%) were infected with hepatitis C virus. Baseline cIMT was significantly associated with age (rho = 0.497; p < .001), basal glucemia (rho = 0.323; p = .001), triglycerides (rho = 0.232; p = .023), Framingham risk score (rho = 0.324; p = .001), CD4/CD8 ratio (rho = -0.176; p = .05), and dyslipidemia (0.72 ± 0.16 mm vs. 0.63 ± 0.11 mm; p = .029). In multivariable analysis where cardiovascular risk factor and ART were included, cIMT progression was inversely associated with CD4/CD8 ratio [odds ratio (OR) = 0.283; confidence interval (95% CI) 0.099-0.809; p = .019

  3. CD4+CD25bright T cells in human intestinal lamina propria as regulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Makita, Shin; Kanai, Takanori; Oshima, Shigeru; Uraushihara, Koji; Totsuka, Teruji; Sawada, Taisuke; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Koganei, Kazutaka; Fukushima, Tsuneo; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2004-09-01

    It is well known that immune responses in the intestine remain in a state of controlled inflammation, suggesting that not only active suppression by regulatory T cells plays an important role in the normal intestinal homeostasis, but also its dysregulation leads to the development of inflammatory bowel disease. In this study, we demonstrate that the CD4(+)CD25(bright) T cells reside in the human intestinal lamina propria (LP) and functionally retain regulatory activities. All human LP CD4(+) T cells regardless of CD25 expression constitutively expressed CTLA-4, glucocorticoid-induced TNFR family-related protein, and Foxp3 and proliferate poorly. Although LP CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells showed an activated and anergic/memory phenotype, they did not retain regulatory activity. In LP CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells, however, cells expressing CD25 at high levels (CD4(+)CD25(bright)) suppressed the proliferation and various cytokine productions of CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells. LP CD4(+)CD25(bright) T cells by themselves produced fewer amounts of IL-2, IFN-gamma, and IL-10. Interestingly, LP CD4(+)CD25(bright) T cells with regulatory T activity were significantly increased in patients with active inflammatory bowel disease. These results suggest that CD4(+)CD25(bright) T cells found in the normal and inflamed intestinal mucosa selectively inhibit the host immune response and therefore may contribute to the intestinal immune homeostasis. PMID:15322172

  4. The CD44s splice isoform is a central mediator for invadopodia activity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Pu; Xu, Yilin; Wei, Yong; Qiu, Qiong; Chew, Teng-Leong; Kang, Yibin; Cheng, Chonghui

    2016-04-01

    The ability for tumor cells to spread and metastasize to distant organs requires proteolytic degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM). This activity is mediated by invadopodia, actin-rich membrane protrusions that are enriched for proteases. However, the mechanisms underlying invadopodia activity are not fully understood. Here, we report that a specific CD44 splice isoform, CD44s, is an integral component in invadopodia. We show that CD44s, but not another splice isoform CD44v, is localized in invadopodia. Small hairpin (sh)RNA-mediated depletion of CD44s abolishes invadopodia activity, prevents matrix degradation and decreases tumor cell invasiveness. Our results suggest that CD44s promotes cortactin phosphorylation and recruits MT1-MMP (also known as MMP14) to sites of matrix degradation, which are important activities for invadopodia function. Importantly, we show that depletion of CD44s inhibits breast cancer cell metastasis to the lung in animals. These findings suggest a crucial mechanism underlying the role of the CD44s splice isoform in breast cancer metastasis. PMID:26869223

  5. Absence of CD14 Delays Progression of Prion Diseases Accompanied by Increased Microglial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Keiko; Hasebe, Rie; Takahashi, Yusuke; Song, Chang-Hyun; Suzuki, Akio; Yamasaki, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders characterized by accumulation of PrPSc, vacuolation of neurons and neuropil, astrocytosis, and microglial activation. Upregulation of gene expressions of innate immunity-related factors, including complement factors and CD14, is observed in the brains of mice infected with prions even in the early stage of infections. When CD14 knockout (CD14−/−) mice were infected intracerebrally with the Chandler and Obihiro prion strains, the mice survived longer than wild-type (WT) mice, suggesting that CD14 influences the progression of the prion disease. Immunofluorescence staining that can distinguish normal prion protein from the disease-specific form of prion protein (PrPSc) revealed that deposition of PrPSc was delayed in CD14−/− mice compared with WT mice by the middle stage of the infection. Immunohistochemical staining with Iba1, a marker for activated microglia, showed an increased microglial activation in prion-infected CD14−/− mice compared to WT mice. Interestingly, accompanied by the increased microglial activation, anti-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) appeared to be expressed earlier in prion-infected CD14−/− mice. In contrast, IL-1β expression appeared to be reduced in the CD14−/− mice in the early stage of infection. Double immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that CD11b- and Iba1-positive microglia mainly produced the anti-inflammatory cytokines, suggesting anti-inflammatory status of microglia in the CD14−/− mice in the early stage of infection. These results imply that CD14 plays a role in the disease progression by suppressing anti-inflammatory responses in the brain in the early stage of infection. PMID:24089559

  6. [Determination of activated platelets: evaluation of methodology and application for patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, S; Oshida, M; Kiyokawa, T; Aochi, H; Honda, S; Tomiyama, Y; Kurata, Y

    2001-12-01

    Platelet activation causes a change in surface expression of several endogenous proteins, such as CD62P, CD63 and CD40L. Therefore, it is possible to analyze the functional in vivo status of the circulating platelet population directly by flow cytometry. In this study we developed the method to be suitable for use in clinical studies. We used EDTA-2K as anticoagulant since the sample anticoagulated with EDTA-2K, sodium citrate or ACD-A showed no difference in the data of activated platelets. We determined whether fixation of sample is necessary. The samples stained before or without fixation showed abnormally high level of activated platelets, indicating that fixation is necessary before staining. It is controversial whether activated platelets circulate in patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura(ITP). We measured activated platelets in patients with ITP using our optimised method. The percentages of CD62P, CD63 and CD40L positive platelets were significantly high in patients with ITP and 24%, 55% and 36% (respectively) of ITP patients showed elevated level of activated platelets. These data indicate that activated platelets circulate in ITP patients. PMID:11797399

  7. Ionizing Radiation Induces Macrophage Foam Cell Formation and Aggregation Through JNK-Dependent Activation of CD36 Scavenger Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, Ikuo; Hotokezaka, Yuka; Matsuyama, Toshifumi; Sumi, Tadateru; Nakamura, Takashi

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: Irradiated arteries of cancer patients can be associated with atherosclerosis-like lesions containing cholesterol-laden macrophages (foam cells). Endothelial cell damage by irradiation does not completely explain the foam cell formation. We investigated the possible underlying mechanisms for ionizing radiation (IR)-induced foam cell formation. Methods and Materials: Human peripheral blood monocytes were activated by macrophage colony-stimulating factor and then treated with varying doses of IR in vitro in the absence of endothelial cells. Scavenger receptor expression and foam cell formation of IR-treated macrophages were investigated in the presence or absence of oxidized low-density lipoprotein. We also assessed the importance of mitogen-activated protein kinase activity in the macrophage colony-stimulating factor-activated human monocytes (macrophages) for the foam cell formation. Results: We found that IR treatment of macrophage colony-stimulating factor-activated human peripheral blood monocytes resulted in the enhanced expression of CD36 scavenger receptors and that cholesterol accumulated in the irradiated macrophages with resultant foam cell formation in the presence of oxidized low-density lipoprotein. Furthermore, when cultured on collagen gels, human macrophages formed large foam cell aggregates in response to IR. Antibodies against CD36 inhibited the IR-induced foam cell formation and aggregation, indicating that the IR-induced foam cell formation and the subsequent aggregation are dependent on functional CD36. In addition, we found that IR of human macrophages resulted in c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation and that c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibition suppressed IR-induced CD36 expression and the subsequent foam cell formation and aggregation. Conclusion: Taken together, these results suggest that IR-induced foam cell formation is mediated by c-Jun N-terminal kinase-dependent CD36 activation.

  8. Expanded lung T-bet+RORγT+ CD4+ T-cells in sarcoidosis patients with a favourable disease phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Ylva; Lepzien, Rico; Kullberg, Susanna; Eklund, Anders; Smed-Sörensen, Anna; Grunewald, Johan

    2016-08-01

    Disease phenotypes of pulmonary sarcoidosis are distinguished by clinical rather than immunological criteria. We aimed to characterise patterns of CD4(+) T-cell lineage plasticity underlying the differences in clinical presentation and disease course between the acute form, Löfgren's syndrome, and the heterogeneous, potentially progressive "non-Löfgren" form.33 pulmonary sarcoidosis patients and nine controls underwent bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage. CD4(+) T-cell transcription factor, chemokine receptor and T-cell receptor expression, proliferation and cytokine production were assessed in the lavage fluid and peripheral blood using flow cytometry and multicolour FluoroSpot.CD4(+) T-cells simultaneously expressing the T-helper cell (Th)1 and Th17 transcriptional regulators T-bet and RORγT (T-bet(+)RORγT(+)) were identified in the lavage, but not blood, of all subjects, and to a significantly higher degree in Löfgren's patients. T-bet(+)RORγT(+) cells proliferated actively, produced interferon (IFN)γ and interleukin (IL)-17A, co-expressed the chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CCR6, and correlated with nonchronic disease. T-cell receptor-restricted Vα2.3(+)Vβ22(+) T-cells strongly co-expressed T-bet/RORγT and CXCR3/CCR6. Cytokine production was more heterogeneous in Löfgren's patients, with significantly higher IL-17A, IL-10, IL-22 and IL-2, but lower IFNγ.Here we demonstrate the presence of lung T-bet(+)RORγT(+)CXCR3(+)CCR6(+) CD4(+) T-cells and Th17-associated cytokines especially in sarcoidosis patients with a favourable prognosis, suggesting a Th1/Th17-permissive environment in the lung with implications for disease resolution. PMID:27230441

  9. Antibody-dependent complement-mediated cytotoxicity in sera from patients with HIV-1 infection is controlled by CD55 and CD59.

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, J; Zimmer, J P; Kluxen, B; Aries, S; Bögel, M; Gigli, I; Schmitz, H

    1995-01-01

    Various immune mechanisms have been reported to contribute to the progressive destruction of Th cells in HIV-1-infected patients. Among these, complement mediated lysis of infected cells has been suggested. An increased sensitivity of lymphocytes from HIV-1-infected patients to lysis by monoclonal antibodies directed to MHC class I antigen and complement has been directly correlated with a decreased expression of the decay accelerating factor (CD55). It also has been reported that the expression of the membrane inhibitor of reactive lysis (CD59) is decreased during HIV-1 infection. We examined the effect of antibodies in the serum of HIV-1-positive individuals and normal human serum (NHS) as source of complement on several HIV-1-infected cell lines differing in their expression of CD55 and CD59. When HIV-1-infected target cells without membrane expression of CD55 and CD59 were used, a highly significant cytotoxic effect was observed in the presence of heat inactivated anti-HIV-1-positive sera and NHS, while heat-inactivated anti-HIV-1-negative sera and NHS were unable to induce cytolysis. Similar results were obtained using purified IgG isolated from HIV-1-positive sera and either NHS or guinea pig serum as source of complement. Lysis of HIV-1-infected cells correlated with expression of viral antigens on the cell surface. HIV-1-infected CD55 and CD59 positive target cells showed specific lysis, when the function of these molecules was abrogated by blocking antibodies to CD55 and CD59. The finding of anti-HIV-1-specific cytotoxic antibodies in sera from HIV-1-infected patients should be considered in the pathogenesis of the HIV-1-infection. PMID:7544808

  10. Exhaustion of Activated CD8 T Cells Predicts Disease Progression in Primary HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hickling, Stephen; Hurst, Jacob; Meyerowitz, Jodi; Willberg, Christian B.; Robinson, Nicola; Brown, Helen; Kinloch, Sabine; Babiker, Abdel; Nwokolo, Nneka; Fox, Julie; Fidler, Sarah; Phillips, Rodney; Frater, John

    2016-01-01

    The rate at which HIV-1 infected individuals progress to AIDS is highly variable and impacted by T cell immunity. CD8 T cell inhibitory molecules are up-regulated in HIV-1 infection and associate with immune dysfunction. We evaluated participants (n = 122) recruited to the SPARTAC randomised clinical trial to determine whether CD8 T cell exhaustion markers PD-1, Lag-3 and Tim-3 were associated with immune activation and disease progression. Expression of PD-1, Tim-3, Lag-3 and CD38 on CD8 T cells from the closest pre-therapy time-point to seroconversion was measured by flow cytometry, and correlated with surrogate markers of HIV-1 disease (HIV-1 plasma viral load (pVL) and CD4 T cell count) and the trial endpoint (time to CD4 count <350 cells/μl or initiation of antiretroviral therapy). To explore the functional significance of these markers, co-expression of Eomes, T-bet and CD39 was assessed. Expression of PD-1 on CD8 and CD38 CD8 T cells correlated with pVL and CD4 count at baseline, and predicted time to the trial endpoint. Lag-3 expression was associated with pVL but not CD4 count. For all exhaustion markers, expression of CD38 on CD8 T cells increased the strength of associations. In Cox models, progression to the trial endpoint was most marked for PD-1/CD38 co-expressing cells, with evidence for a stronger effect within 12 weeks from confirmed diagnosis of PHI. The effect of PD-1 and Lag-3 expression on CD8 T cells retained statistical significance in Cox proportional hazards models including antiretroviral therapy and CD4 count, but not pVL as co-variants. Expression of ‘exhaustion’ or ‘immune checkpoint’ markers in early HIV-1 infection is associated with clinical progression and is impacted by immune activation and the duration of infection. New markers to identify exhausted T cells and novel interventions to reverse exhaustion may inform the development of novel immunotherapeutic approaches. PMID:27415828

  11. Exhaustion of Activated CD8 T Cells Predicts Disease Progression in Primary HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Matthias; Pantazis, Nikos; Martin, Genevieve E; Hickling, Stephen; Hurst, Jacob; Meyerowitz, Jodi; Willberg, Christian B; Robinson, Nicola; Brown, Helen; Fisher, Martin; Kinloch, Sabine; Babiker, Abdel; Weber, Jonathan; Nwokolo, Nneka; Fox, Julie; Fidler, Sarah; Phillips, Rodney; Frater, John

    2016-07-01

    The rate at which HIV-1 infected individuals progress to AIDS is highly variable and impacted by T cell immunity. CD8 T cell inhibitory molecules are up-regulated in HIV-1 infection and associate with immune dysfunction. We evaluated participants (n = 122) recruited to the SPARTAC randomised clinical trial to determine whether CD8 T cell exhaustion markers PD-1, Lag-3 and Tim-3 were associated with immune activation and disease progression. Expression of PD-1, Tim-3, Lag-3 and CD38 on CD8 T cells from the closest pre-therapy time-point to seroconversion was measured by flow cytometry, and correlated with surrogate markers of HIV-1 disease (HIV-1 plasma viral load (pVL) and CD4 T cell count) and the trial endpoint (time to CD4 count <350 cells/μl or initiation of antiretroviral therapy). To explore the functional significance of these markers, co-expression of Eomes, T-bet and CD39 was assessed. Expression of PD-1 on CD8 and CD38 CD8 T cells correlated with pVL and CD4 count at baseline, and predicted time to the trial endpoint. Lag-3 expression was associated with pVL but not CD4 count. For all exhaustion markers, expression of CD38 on CD8 T cells increased the strength of associations. In Cox models, progression to the trial endpoint was most marked for PD-1/CD38 co-expressing cells, with evidence for a stronger effect within 12 weeks from confirmed diagnosis of PHI. The effect of PD-1 and Lag-3 expression on CD8 T cells retained statistical significance in Cox proportional hazards models including antiretroviral therapy and CD4 count, but not pVL as co-variants. Expression of 'exhaustion' or 'immune checkpoint' markers in early HIV-1 infection is associated with clinical progression and is impacted by immune activation and the duration of infection. New markers to identify exhausted T cells and novel interventions to reverse exhaustion may inform the development of novel immunotherapeutic approaches. PMID:27415828

  12. Activation of AMPKα2 Is Not Required for Mitochondrial FAT/CD36 Accumulation during Exercise.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Cynthia; Whitfield, Jamie; Jain, Swati S; Spriet, Lawrence L; Bonen, Arend; Holloway, Graham P

    2015-01-01

    Exercise has been shown to induce the translocation of fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36), a fatty acid transport protein, to both plasma and mitochondrial membranes. While previous studies have examined signals involved in the induction of FAT/CD36 translocation to sarcolemmal membranes, to date the signaling events responsible for FAT/CD36 accumulation on mitochondrial membranes have not been investigated. In the current study muscle contraction rapidly increased FAT/CD36 on plasma membranes (7.5 minutes), while in contrast, FAT/CD36 only increased on mitochondrial membranes after 22.5 minutes of muscle contraction, a response that was exercise-intensity dependent. Considering that previous research has shown that AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) α2 is not required for FAT/CD36 translocation to the plasma membrane, we investigated whether AMPK α2 signaling is necessary for mitochondrial FAT/CD36 accumulation. Administration of 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) induced AMPK phosphorylation, and resulted in FAT/CD36 accumulation on SS mitochondria, suggesting AMPK signaling may mediate this response. However, SS mitochondrial FAT/CD36 increased following acute treadmill running in both wild-type (WT) and AMPKα 2 kinase dead (KD) mice. These data suggest that AMPK signaling is not required for SS mitochondrial FAT/CD36 accumulation. The current data also implicates alternative signaling pathways that are exercise-intensity dependent, as IMF mitochondrial FAT/CD36 content only occurred at a higher power output. Taken altogether the current data suggests that activation of AMPK signaling is sufficient but not required for exercise-induced accumulation in mitochondrial FAT/CD36. PMID:25965390

  13. CD8+ T Lymphocyte Expansion, Proliferation and Activation in Dengue Fever

    PubMed Central

    de Matos, Andréia Manso; Carvalho, Karina Inacio; Rosa, Daniela Santoro; Villas-Boas, Lucy Santos; da Silva, Wanessa Cardoso; Rodrigues, Célia Luiza de Lima; Oliveira, Olímpia Massae Nakasone Peel Furtado; Levi, José Eduardo; Araújo, Evaldo Stanislau Affonso; Pannuti, Claudio Sergio; Luna, Expedito José Albuquerque; Kallas, Esper George

    2015-01-01

    Dengue fever induces a robust immune response, including massive T cell activation. The level of T cell activation may, however, be associated with more severe disease. In this study, we explored the level of CD8+ T lymphocyte activation in the first six days after onset of symptoms during a DENV2 outbreak in early 2010 on the coast of São Paulo State, Brazil. Using flow cytometry we detected a progressive increase in the percentage of CD8+ T cells in 74 dengue fever cases. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 30 cases were thawed and evaluated using expanded phenotyping. The expansion of the CD8+ T cells was coupled with increased Ki67 expression. Cell activation was observed later in the course of disease, as determined by the expression of the activation markers CD38 and HLA-DR. This increased CD8+ T lymphocyte activation was observed in all memory subsets, but was more pronounced in the effector memory subset, as defined by higher CD38 expression. Our results show that most CD8+ T cell subsets are expanded during DENV2 infection and that the effector memory subset is the predominantly affected sub population. PMID:25675375

  14. CD8+ T lymphocyte expansion, proliferation and activation in dengue fever.

    PubMed

    de Matos, Andréia Manso; Carvalho, Karina Inacio; Rosa, Daniela Santoro; Villas-Boas, Lucy Santos; da Silva, Wanessa Cardoso; Rodrigues, Célia Luiza de Lima; Oliveira, Olímpia Massae Nakasone Peel Furtado; Levi, José Eduardo; Araújo, Evaldo Stanislau Affonso; Pannuti, Claudio Sergio; Luna, Expedito José Albuquerque; Kallas, Esper George

    2015-02-01

    Dengue fever induces a robust immune response, including massive T cell activation. The level of T cell activation may, however, be associated with more severe disease. In this study, we explored the level of CD8+ T lymphocyte activation in the first six days after onset of symptoms during a DENV2 outbreak in early 2010 on the coast of São Paulo State, Brazil. Using flow cytometry we detected a progressive increase in the percentage of CD8+ T cells in 74 dengue fever cases. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 30 cases were thawed and evaluated using expanded phenotyping. The expansion of the CD8+ T cells was coupled with increased Ki67 expression. Cell activation was observed later in the course of disease, as determined by the expression of the activation markers CD38 and HLA-DR. This increased CD8+ T lymphocyte activation was observed in all memory subsets, but was more pronounced in the effector memory subset, as defined by higher CD38 expression. Our results show that most CD8+ T cell subsets are expanded during DENV2 infection and that the effector memory subset is the predominantly affected sub population. PMID:25675375

  15. Analysis of subsets of B cells, Breg, CD4Treg and CD8Treg cells in adult patients with primary selective IgM deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Ankmalika Gupta; Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Gupta, Sudhir

    2016-01-01

    Primary selective IgM deficiency (SIGMD) is a rare and recently IUIS-recognized primary immunodeficiency disease with increased susceptibility to infections, allergy, and autoimmune diseases. The pathogenesis of selective IgM remains unclear. The objective of the study was to understand the pathogenesis of selective IgM deficiency via a comprehensive analysis of subsets of B cells, naïve and memory subsets of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and Breg, CD4Treg, and CD8Treg cells. Twenty adult patients with SIGMD (serum IgM 4 mg/dl-32 mg/dl) and age-and gender-matched healthy controls were studied. Naïve B cells, transitional B cells, marginal zone B cells, germinal center B cells, IgM memory B cells, switched memory B cells, plasmablasts, CD21low B cells, B1 cells, CXCR3+ naive and memory B cells; naïve, central memory, and effector memory subsets of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and CD4Treg, CD8Treg and Breg were phenotypically analyzed using multicolor flow cytometry. A significant increase in CD21low, IgM memory B cells, Breg and CD8Treg, and a significant decreased in germinal center B cells, and CXCR3+ naïve and memory B cells were observed in SIGMD. These alterations in subsets of B cells, and Breg and CD8Treg cells may play a role in the pathogenesis of SIGMD. PMID:27168952

  16. IL-6 down-regulates HLA class II expression and IL-12 production of human dendritic cells to impair activation of antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yosuke; Kitamura, Hidemitsu; Takahashi, Norihiko; Ohtake, Junya; Kaneumi, Shun; Sumida, Kentaro; Homma, Shigenori; Kawamura, Hideki; Minagawa, Nozomi; Shibasaki, Susumu; Taketomi, Akinobu

    2016-02-01

    Immunosuppression in tumor microenvironments critically affects the success of cancer immunotherapy. Here, we focused on the role of interleukin (IL)-6/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT3) signaling cascade in immune regulation by human dendritic cells (DCs). IL-6-conditioned monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs) impaired the presenting ability of cancer-related antigens. Interferon (IFN)-γ production attenuated by CD4(+) T cells co-cultured with IL-6-conditioned MoDCs corresponded with decreased DC IL-12p70 production. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR and CD86 expression was significantly reduced in CD11b(+)CD11c(+) cells obtained from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of healthy donors by IL-6 treatment and was STAT3 dependent. Arginase-1 (ARG1), lysosomal protease, cathepsin L (CTSL), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) were involved in the reduction of surface HLA-DR expression. Gene expressions of ARG1, CTSL, COX2, and IL6 were higher in tumor-infiltrating CD11b(+)CD11c(+) cells compared with PBMCs isolated from colorectal cancer patients. Expression of surface HLA-DR and CD86 on CD11b(+)CD11c(+) cells was down-regulated, and T cell-stimulating ability was attenuated compared with PBMCs, suggesting that an immunosuppressive phenotype might be induced by IL-6, ARG1, CTSL, and COX2 in tumor sites of colorectal cancer patients. There was a relationship between HLA-DR expression levels in tumor tissues and the size of CD4(+) T and CD8(+) T cell compartments. Our findings indicate that IL-6 causes a dysfunction in human DCs that activates cancer antigen-specific Th cells, suggesting that blocking the IL-6/STAT3 signaling pathway might be a promising strategy to improve cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26759006

  17. Comparative Analysis of Telomerase Activity in CD117+CD34+ Cardiac Telocytes with Bone Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Cardiac Fibroblasts and Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Lu, Shan-Shan; Xu, Ting; Zhang, Hong-Qi; Li, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study characterized the cardiac telocyte (TC) population both in vivo and in vitro, and investigated its telomerase activity related to mitosis. Methods: Using transmission electron microscopy and a phase contrast microscope, the typical morphological features of cardiac TCs were observed; by targeting the cell surface proteins CD117 and CD34, CD117+CD34+ cardiac TCs were sorted via flow cytometry and validated by immunofluorescence based on the primary cell culture. Then the optimized basal nutrient medium for selected population was examined with the cell counting kit 8. Under this conditioned medium, the process of cell division was captured, and the telomerase activity of CD117+CD34+ cardiac TCs was detected in comparison with bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), cardiac fibroblasts (CFBs), cardiomyocytes (CMs). Results: Cardiac TCs projected characteristic telopodes with thin segments (podomers) in alternation with dilation (podoms). In addition, 64% of the primary cultured cardiac TCs were composed of CD117+CD34+ cardiac TCs; which was verified by immunofluorescence. In a live cell imaging system, CD117+CD34+ cardiac TCs were observed to enter into cell division in a short time, followed by an significant invagination forming across the middle of the cell body. Using a real-time quantitative telomeric-repeat amplification assay, the telomerase concentration in CD117+CD34+ cardiac TCs was obviously lower than in BMSCs and CFBs, and significantly higher than in CMs. Conclusions: Cardiac TCs represent a unique cell population and CD117+CD34+ cardiac TCs have relative low telomerase activity that differs from BMSCs, CFBs and CMs and thus they might play an important role in maintaining cardiac homeostasis. PMID:26168836

  18. Interleukin-7 is required for CD4(+) T cell activation and autoimmune neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Brian R; Gonzalez-Quintial, Rosana; Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Farrar, Michael A; Miller, Stephen D; Sauer, Karsten; McGavern, Dorian B; Kono, Dwight H; Baccala, Roberto; Theofilopoulos, Argyrios N

    2015-12-01

    IL-7 is known to be vital for T cell homeostasis but has previously been presumed to be dispensable for TCR-induced activation. Here, we show that IL-7 is critical for the initial activation of CD4(+) T cells in that it provides some of the necessary early signaling components, such as activated STAT5 and Akt. Accordingly, short-term in vivo IL-7Rα blockade inhibited the activation and expansion of autoantigen-specific CD4(+) T cells and, when used to treat experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), prevented and ameliorated disease. Our studies demonstrate that IL-7 signaling is a prerequisite for optimal CD4(+) T cell activation and that IL-7R antagonism may be effective in treating CD4(+) T cell-mediated neuroinflammation and other autoimmune inflammatory conditions. PMID:26319414

  19. Activated Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule (ALCAM or CD166) Modulates Bone Phenotype and Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Hooker, R. Adam; Chitteti, Brahmananda R.; Egan, Patrick H.; Cheng, Ying-Hua; Himes, Evan R.; Meijome, Tomas; Srour, Edward F.; Fuchs, Robyn K.; Kacena, Melissa A.

    2015-01-01

    Activated Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule (ALCAM/CD166), is expressed on osteoblasts (OB) and hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) residing in the hematopoietic niche, and may have important regulatory roles in bone formation. Because HSC numbers are reduced 77% in CD166−/− mice, we hypothesized that changes in bone phenotype and consequently the endosteal niche may partially be responsible for this alteration. Therefore, we investigated bone phenotype and OB function in CD166−/− mice. Although osteoclastic measures were not affected by loss of CD166, CD166−/− mice exhibited a modest increase in trabecular bone fraction (42%), and increases in osteoid deposition (72%), OB number (60%), and bone formation rate (152%). Cortical bone geometry was altered in CD166−/− mice resulting in up to 81% and 49% increases in stiffness and ultimate force, respectively. CD166−/− OB displayed elevated alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralization, and increased mRNA expression of Fra 1, ALP, and osteocalcin. Overall, CD166−/− mice displayed modestly elevated trabecular bone volume fraction with increased OB numbers and deposition of osteoid, and increased OB differentiation in vitro, possibly suggesting more mature OB are secreting more osteoid. This may explain the decline in HSC number in vivo because immature OB are mainly responsible for hematopoiesis enhancing activity. PMID:25730656

  20. Low Frequency of Circulating CD8+ T Stem Cell Memory Cells in Chronic Chagasic Patients with Severe Forms of the Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mateus, Jose; Lasso, Paola; Pavia, Paula; Rosas, Fernando; Roa, Nubia; Valencia-Hernández, Carlos Andrés; González, John Mario; Puerta, Concepción J.; Cuéllar, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Background CD8+ T cells have been shown to play a crucial role in Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Memory CD8+ T cells can be categorised based on their distinct differentiation stages and functional activities as follows: stem cell memory (TSCM), central memory (TCM), transitional memory (TTM), effector memory (TEM) and terminal effector (TTE) cells. Currently, the immune mechanisms that control T. cruzi in the chronic phase of the infection are unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings To characterise the CD8+ T cell subsets that could be participating in the control of T. cruzi infection, in this study, we compared total and T. cruzi-specific circulating CD8+ T cells with distinctive phenotypic and functional features in chronic chagasic patients (CCPs) with different degrees of cardiac dysfunction. We observed a decreased frequency of total TSCM along with an increased frequency of TTE in CCPs with severe disease. Antigen-specific TSCM cells were not detectable in CCPs with severe forms of the disease. A functional profile of CD8+ T cell subsets among CCPs revealed a high frequency of monofunctional CD8+ T cells in the most severe patients with IFN-γ+- or TNF-α+-producing cells. Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that CD8+ TSCM cells may be associated with the immune response to T. cruzi and outcome of Chagas disease, given that these cells may be involved in repopulating the T cell pool that controls infection. PMID:25569149

  1. Activation of cord T lymphocytes. IV. Analysis of surface expression and functional role of 1F7 (CD26) molecule.

    PubMed

    Gerli, R; Agea, E; Muscat, C; Ercolani, R; Bistoni, O; Tognellini, R; Mariggió, M A; Spinozzi, F; Bertotto, A

    1994-04-15

    A role for CD26 surface antigen (Ag) in both CD3- and CD2-mediated T cell activation has been previously demonstrated. To analyze the functional role of CD26 in the CD3- and CD2-induced activation pathways of cord T cells, which represent the most reliable source of Ag-unprimed T cells, we employed a newly developed anti-CD26 monoclonal antibody, termed anti-1F7, anti-CD3 and anti-CD2 in activating T lymphocytes. The results showed that CD26 Ag is expressed on the surface of almost all resting cord T cells and that its fluorescence intensity is enhanced by activation. The binding of anti-1F7 induced a decrease in CD26 membrane expression, with no detectable effect on the surface expression of other cord T cell-related molecules. Moreover, the modulation of CD26 resulted in an increase in anti-CD3-mediated cord T cell activation through an enhancement in intracellular calcium levels, IL-2 receptor expression, and IL-2 synthesis, whereas it had no effect on cord T cell activation induced by anti-CD2 or anti-CD2 plus exogenous IL-2. The fact that the selective involvement of CD26 in the activation pathway triggered by anti-CD3, but not anti-CD2, could be reversed by prior stimulation of cord T cells with anti-CD3 suggests that this functional feature, which resembles that of mature thymocytes, may be linked to the Ag-unprimed cell phenotype of cord T lymphocytes. PMID:7909498

  2. Human Dendritic Cells Activated by TSLP and CD40L Induce Proallergic Cytotoxic T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gilliet, Michel; Soumelis, Vassili; Watanabe, Norihiko; Hanabuchi, Shino; Antonenko, Svetlana; de Waal-Malefyt, Rene; Liu, Yong-Jun

    2003-01-01

    Human thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is a novel epithelial cell–derived cytokine, which induces dendritic cell (DC)-mediated CD4+ T cell responses with a proallergic phenotype. Although the participation of CD8+ T cells in allergic inflammation is well documented, their functional properties as well as the pathways leading to their generation remain poorly understood. Here, we show that TSLP-activated CD11c+ DCs potently activate and expand naive CD8+ T cells, and induce their differentiation into interleukin (IL)-5 and IL-13–producing effectors exhibiting poor cytolytic activity. Additional CD40L triggering of TSLP-activated DCs induced CD8+ T cells with potent cytolytic activity, producing large amounts of interferon (IFN)-γ, while retaining their capacity to produce IL-5 and IL-13. These data further support the role of TSLP as initial trigger of allergic T cell responses and suggest that CD40L-expressing cells may act in combination with TSLP to amplify and sustain pro-allergic responses and cause tissue damage by promoting the generation of IFN-γ–producing cytotoxic effectors. PMID:12707303

  3. Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide can activate 70Z/3 cells via CD14.

    PubMed Central

    Kirkland, T; Viriyakosol, S; Perez-Perez, G I; Blaser, M J

    1997-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori persistently colonizes the human gastrointestinal tract and is associated with chronic gastritis and, in some cases, peptic ulcer disease or gastric neoplasms. One factor in the persistence of this organism may be its inability to elicit a strong inflammatory response. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a proinflammatory substance found in the cell walls of all gram-negative bacteria. H. pylori LPS has been found by several different measures to be less active than LPS from Enterobacteriaceae. This study addresses the role of CD14 and LPS-binding protein in the cellular response to H. pylori LPS. We report that H. pylori LPS activates mammalian cells expressing CD14 at much lower LPS concentrations than those for control cells not expressing CD14. The maximal activation of CD14-70Z/3 cells by H. pylori LPS also requires LPS-binding protein. H. pylori LPS at concentrations as high as 30 microg/ml does not elicit an interleukin-8 (IL-8) response from the epithelial cell line SW620 in the presence of CD14; 10 ng of Escherichia coli LPS per ml elicits a maximal IL-8 response. Furthermore, in contrast to some other types of LPS with little activity, H. pylori LPS does not inhibit the CD14-70Z/3 cell response to E. coli LPS. From these studies, we conclude that H. pylori LPS, though much less active than E. coli LPS, stimulates cells via CD14. PMID:9009319

  4. Preliminary studies on CD36 gene in type 2 diabetic patients from north India

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Sunaina; Agrawal, C.G.; Bid, Hemant Kumar; Banerjee, Monisha

    2011-01-01

    Background & objectives: The greater tendency to diabetes in Indians may be due to genetic factors in addition to environment and diet. CD36, a class B scavenger cell surface receptor mediates internalization of oxidized low density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) leading to the formation of macrophage foam cells. CD36 deficiency is related to phenotypic expression of the metabolic syndrome, frequently associated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases resulting in raised levels of glucose thereby contributing to type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Therefore, the association of human CD36 gene mutation to T2DM needs investigation. We undertook this study to investigate CD36 gene status in north Indian subjects by screening for the deletion of exons 3, 4 and 5 and certain polymorphisms. Methods: Clinical characteristics were compared between 300 T2DM patients and 100 healthy controls. Deletion analysis was carried out for exons 3, 4 and 5 of CD36 gene in 300 T2DM patients using PCR and agarose gel electrophoresis. Genotype analysis for two polymorphisms 478C>T and delAC in exons 4 and 5 respectively was carried out using PCR-RFLP method. Results: Biochemical parameters such as fasting and post-prandial glucose levels, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and blood pressure were slightly raised in the T2DM patients when compared with controls with lowered HDL-cholesterol. No exonic deletion was observed in the 300 patients and 100 controls screened. All individuals were found to be homozygous (CC and -/-) for the two polymorphisms studied. Interpretation & conclusions: Although no exonic deletion was found in T2DM patients, our study suggests that all 15 exons need to be screened for mutations which lead to CD36 deficiency. Genotyping studies of the two SNPs in the CD36 gene confirmed the absence of exons 4 and 5 deletion. This is perhaps the first report from India suggesting that CD36 is one of the several important genes that need to be explored in relation to T2DM. PMID:21808142

  5. Superior photoluminescence and photocatalytic activity of CdS (core)-SiO2 (shell) nanostructures obtained by CdS photoetching and Au deposition.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nidhi; Pal, Bonamali

    2013-07-01

    Core-shell morphology of silica (SiO2) coated CdS nanocomposites (SiO2@CdS) of different shapes have been made for better stability, luminescence and photochemical activity of CdS nanoparticles. A thin layer (thickness 1-1.4 nm) of SiO2 shell is deposited over CdS nanorods (CdS-NR) of aspect ratio = 21 and CdS nanospheres (CdS-NS) of size 6-8 nm by alkyl silane agents. Synthesized nanostructures were characterized by diffuse reflectance spectra, HR-TEM, BET surface measurement, LB surface film, and absorption and photoluminescence analysis. Photoetching (PE) of CdS core led to blue shift of the absorbance onset of SiO2@CdS-NR along with the appearance of an exciton band at 485 nm due to the quantum confinement effect. Photodissolution of CdS core shifts the band gap energy from initial 2.4 to 2.6 eV for CdS-NR and 2.5 to 2.67 eV for CdS-NS. TEM images reveal the increase in aspect ratio of NR from 21 to 31 and decrease in the spherical core to 2.5 nm from 6-8 nm after PE. Photoetched SiO2@CdS-NC displayed highly intense fluorescence emission (SiO2@CdS-NS > SiO2@CdS-NR) than unetched SiO2@CdS-NC at 488 nm corresponding to band edge position. The Au (0.5 wt.%) deposition onto photoetched SiO2@CdS-NR(PE) composites highly enhanced the fluorescence intensity in comparison to 1 wt.% of Au and Ag loading. SiO2@CdS-NC(PE) displayed improved photocatalytic activity during benzaldehyde photooxidation under UV (125 W, Hg-arc, 10.4 mW/cm2) irradiation. Silica coating onto CdS particles improves the photostability and photoactivity of CdS upon long UV irradiation. PMID:23901532

  6. In vivo ultraviolet-exposed human epidermal cells activate T suppressor cell pathways that involve CD4+CD45RA+ suppressor-inducer T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Baadsgaard, O.; Salvo, B.; Mannie, A.; Dass, B.; Fox, D.A.; Cooper, K.D. )

    1990-11-01

    In vivo UV exposure of human epidermis abrogates the function of CD1+DR+ Langerhans cells and induces the appearance of CD1-DR+ Ag-presenting macrophages. Epidermal cells from UV-exposed skin, in contrast to epidermal cells from normal skin, potently activate autologous CD4+ T cells, and, in particular, the CD45RA+ (2H4+) (suppressor-inducer) subset. We therefore determined whether UV-exposure in humans leads to a T cell response in which suppression dominates. Autologous blood T cells were incubated with epidermal cell suspensions from in vivo UV-irradiated skin. After activation, repurified T cells were transferred in graded numbers to autologous mononuclear cells (MNC) stimulated with PWM and the resultant IgG production analyzed by ELISA. Relative to T cells activated by unirradiated control epidermal cells, T cells activated by UV-exposed epidermal cells demonstrated enhanced capacity to suppress IgG production (n = 6; p less than or equal to 0.03). Within the T cell population, CD8+ cells stimulated by UV-exposed epidermal cells could be directly activated to suppress PWM-stimulated MNC Ig production if IL-2 was provided in the reaction mixture. The suppressive activity was also transferable with purified CD4+ T cells stimulated by UV-exposed epidermal cells (n = 10; p less than or equal to 0.01), and was radiosensitive. Suppression was decreased when PWM-stimulated MNC were depleted of CD8+ T cells before mixing with CD4+ T cells activated by UV-exposed epidermal cells, suggesting indirect induction of CD8+ Ts cells contained within the responding MNC populations. Indeed, physical depletion of CD45RA+ cells resulted in total abrogation of the suppressor function contained in the CD4+ T cells. Activation of suppressor function was critically dependent on DR+ APC contained in UV-exposed epidermis.

  7. Serum level of soluble interleukin-2 receptor correlates with CD25 expression in patients with T lymphoblastic lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Toji, Tomohiro; Takata, Katsuyoshi; Sato, Yasuharu; Miyata-Takata, Tomoko; Hayashi, Eiko; Habara, Toshiyuki; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Yoshino, Tadashi

    2015-08-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia/lymphoma (ALL/LBL) is an aggressive form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) affecting B-cells or T-cells, respectively. The serum level of soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2R) is known to reflect the immune activity and tumour volume in aggressive NHL; however, the release of sIL-2R in LBL has not been extensively studied. Further, the relationship between sIL-2R release and the expression level of IL-2R α subunit (CD25) remains unknown. In the present study, we examined the serum level of sIL-2R in 23 patients with T lymphoblactic lymphoma (T-LBL) and compared these with the levels in 20 patient with T acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL), 40 patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and 40 patients with peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL), not otherwise specified. The release of sIL-2R into the serum in patients with T-LBL was significantly lower than that for T-ALL, DLBCL and PTCL (p<0.001). Immunohistochemistry revealed that CD25 expression was correlated with the serum level of sIL-2R in T-LBL (p=0.0069), whereas no correlation was found to exist between serum sIL-2R levels and CD25 expression in patients with DLBCL (p=0.348) and PTCL (p=0.266). Furthermore, double immunohistochemical analysis revealed that CD25-positive cells were also found to be Foxp3-positive non-neoplastic T-cells. In conclusion, CD25-positive non-neoplastic T-cells in T-LBL are presumed to be the primary source of sIL-2R, and the low number of cells present results in a lower level of sIL-2R released into the serum compared with the other aggressive and highly aggressive lymphomas. PMID:25935549

  8. CD133 promotes gallbladder carcinoma cell migration through activating Akt phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Jiaojiao; Ai, Zhilong

    2016-01-01

    Gallbladder carcinoma (GBC) is the fifth most common malignancy of gastrointestinal tract. The prognosis of gallbladder carcinoma is extremely terrible partially due to metastasis. However, the mechanisms underlying gallbladder carcinoma metastasis remain largely unknown. CD133 is a widely used cancer stem cell marker including in gallbladder carcinoma. Here, we found that CD133 was highly expressed in gallbladder carcinoma as compared to normal tissues. CD133 was located in the invasive areas in gallbladder carcinoma. Down-regulation expression of CD133 inhibited migration and invasion of gallbladder carcinoma cell without obviously reducing cell proliferation. Mechanism analysis revealed that down-regulation expression of CD133 inhibited Akt phosphorylation and increased PTEN protein level. The inhibitory effect of CD133 down-regulation on gallbladder carcinoma cell migration could be rescued by Akt activation. Consistent with this, addition of Akt inhibitor Wortmannin markedly inhibited the migration ability of CD133-overexpressing cells. Thus, down-regulation of CD133 inhibits migration of gallbladder carcinoma cells through reducing Akt phosphorylation. These findings explore the fundamental biological aspect of CD133 in gallbladder carcinoma progression, providing insights into gallbladder carcinoma cell migration. PMID:26910892

  9. Increased caspase-3 expression and activity contribute to reduced CD3zeta expression in systemic lupus erythematosus T cells.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Sandeep; Kiang, Juliann G; Fisher, Carolyn U; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P; Nguyen, Hang T; Kyttaris, Vasileios C; Chowdhury, Bhabadeb; Rus, Violeta; Tsokos, George C

    2005-09-01

    T cells isolated from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) express low levels of CD3zeta-chain, a critical molecule involved in TCR-mediated signaling, but the involved mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study we examined caspase-3 as a candidate for cleaving CD3zeta in SLE T cells. We demonstrate that SLE T cells display increased expression and activity of caspase-3. Treatment of SLE T cells with the caspase-3 inhibitor Z-Asp-Glu-Val-Asp-FMK reduced proteolysis of CD3zeta and enhanced its expression. In addition, Z-Asp-Glu-Val-Asp-FMK treatment increased the association of CD3zeta with lipid rafts and simultaneously reversed the abnormal lipid raft preclustering, heightened TCR-induced calcium responses, and reduced the expression of FcRgamma-chain exclusively in SLE T cells. We conclude that caspase-3 inhibitors can normalize SLE T cell function by limiting the excessive digestion of CD3zeta-chain and suggest that such molecules can be considered in the treatment of this disease. PMID:16116236

  10. CdWO{sub 4} polymorphs: Selective preparation, electronic structures, and photocatalytic activities

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Tingjiang; Li, Liping; Tong, Wenming; Zheng, Jing; Wang, Yunjian; Li, Guangshe

    2011-02-15

    This work explored the selective synthesis of polymorphs of CdWO{sub 4} in either tetragonal or monoclinic phase by optimizing the experimental parameters. Systematic characterization indicated that both polymorphs possessed similar spherical morphologies but different structural building blocks. Electronic structures calculations for both polymorphs demonstrated the same constructions of conduction band or valence band, while the conduction band widths of both polymorphs were quite different. Both CdWO{sub 4} polymorphs exhibited good photocatalytic activity for degradation of methyl orange under UV light irradiation. When comparing to some other well-known tungstate oxide materials, the photocatalytic activity was found to follow such a consequence, monoclinic CdWO{sub 4{approx}}monoclinic ZnWO{sub 4}>tetragonal CdWO{sub 4}>tetragonal CaWO{sub 4}. The specific photocatalytic activity of monoclinic CdWO{sub 4} was even higher than that of commercial TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst (Degussa P25). The increased activity from the tetragonal CdWO{sub 4} to the monoclinic was consistent with the trend of the decreased symmetry, and this could be explained in terms of the geometric structures and electronic structures for both polymorphs. -- Graphical abstract: Monoclinic CdWO{sub 4} exhibited a much higher photocatalytic activity than the tetragonal form owing to the lower symmetry, more distorted geometric structure, and the dispersive band configuration. Display Omitted Research highlights: > Polymorphs of CdWO{sub 4} in either tetragonal or monoclinic phase were selectively synthesized. > Both polymorphs possessed similar spherical morphologies, while the relevant structural building blocks were different. > Photocatalytic activities of CdWO{sub 4} polymorphs depended strongly on the symmetry, geometric structure, as well as band configuration.

  11. Prolonged Activation of Virus-Specific CD8+T Cells after Acute B19 Infection

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Background Human parvovirus B19 (B19) is a ubiquitous and clinically significant pathogen, causing erythema infectiosum, arthropathy, transient aplastic crisis, and intrauterine fetal death. The phenotype of CD8+ T cells in acute B19 infection has not been studied previously. Methods and Findings The number and phenotype of B19-specific CD8+ T cell responses during and after acute adult infection was studied using HLA–peptide multimeric complexes. Surprisingly, these responses increased in magnitude over the first year post-infection despite resolution of clinical symptoms and control of viraemia, with T cell populations specific for individual epitopes comprising up to 4% of CD8+ T cells. B19-specific T cells developed and maintained an activated CD38+ phenotype, with strong expression of perforin and CD57 and downregulation of CD28 and CD27. These cells possessed strong effector function and intact proliferative capacity. Individuals tested many years after infection exhibited lower frequencies of B19-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes, typically 0.05%–0.5% of CD8+ T cells, which were perforin, CD38, and CCR7 low. Conclusion This is the first example to our knowledge of an “acute” human viral infection inducing a persistent activated CD8+ T cell response. The likely explanation—analogous to that for cytomegalovirus infection—is that this persistent response is due to low-level antigen exposure. CD8+ T cells may contribute to the long-term control of this significant pathogen and should be considered during vaccine development. PMID:16253012

  12. CD45RO enriches for activated, highly mutated human germinal center B cells

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Stephen M.; Harp, Natessa; Patel, Darshna; Zhang, Jeffrey; Willson, Savannah; Kim, Yoon J.; Clanton, Christian

    2007-01-01

    To date, there is no consensus regarding the influence of different CD45 isoforms during peripheral B-cell development. Examining correlations between surface CD45RO expression and various physiologic processes ongoing during the germinal center (GC) reaction, we hypothesized that GC B cells, like T cells, that up-regulate surface RO should progressively acquire phenotypes commonly associated with activated, differentiating lymphocytes. GC B cells (IgD−CD38+) were subdivided into 3 surface CD45RO fractions: RO−, RO+/−, and RO+. We show here that the average number of mutations per IgVH transcript increased in direct correlation with surface RO levels. Conjunctional use of RO and CD69 further delineated low/moderately and highly mutated fractions. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) mRNA was slightly reduced among RO+ GC B cells, suggesting that higher mutation averages are unlikely due to elevated somatic mutation activity. Instead, RO+ GC B cells were negative for Annexin V, comprised mostly (93%) of CD77− centrocytes, and were enriched for CD69+ cells. Collectively, RO+ GC B cells occupy what seems to be a specialized niche comprised mostly of centrocytes that may be in transition between activation states. These findings are among the first to sort GC B cells into populations enriched for live mutated cells solely using a single extracellular marker. PMID:17644737

  13. Early kinetic window of target T cell susceptibility to CD25+ regulatory T cell activity.

    PubMed

    Sojka, Dorothy K; Hughson, Angela; Sukiennicki, Teresa L; Fowell, Deborah J

    2005-12-01

    Peripheral tolerance is maintained in part by thymically derived CD25+CD4+ T cells (regulatory T cells (Tregs)). Their mechanism of action has not been well characterized. Therefore, to get a better understanding of Treg action, we investigated the kinetics of murine Treg activity in vitro. Tregs were suppressive within a surprisingly narrow kinetic window: necessary and sufficient only in the first 6-10 h of culture. Visualization of this time frame, using a sensitive single-cell assay for IL-2, revealed the early elaboration of target cell IL-2 producers in the first 6 h despite the presence of CD25+CD4+ Tregs. However, after 6 h, a rapid rise in the number of IL-2 producers in the absence of Tregs was dramatically abrogated by the presence of Tregs. Importantly, the timing of suppression was dictated by the kinetics of target T cell activation suggesting that early target T cell signals may alter susceptibility to suppression. Modulating target T cell activation signals with provision of CD28, IL-2, or high Ag dose all abrogated suppression of proliferation late in culture. However, only CD28 signals enabled target T cells to resist the early Treg-induced down-regulation of IL-2. Therefore the quality of early target T cell activation signals, in particular engagement of CD28, represents an important control point in the balance between vulnerability and resistance to Treg suppression. PMID:16301632

  14. Role of the frequency of blood CD4{sup +} CXCR5{sup +} CCR6{sup +} T cells in autoimmunity in patients with Sjoegren's syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xue-yi; Wu, Zhen-biao; Ding, Jin; Zheng, Zhao-hui; Li, Xiao-yan; Chen, Li-na; Zhu, Ping

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The frequency of CD4{sup +} CXCR5{sup +} CCR6{sup +} T cells increased in pSS patients and positively correlated with autoantibodies in the blood. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD4{sup +} CXCR5{sup +} CCR6{sup +} T cells in blood invariably coexpressed PD-1, ICOS, CD40L, Bcl-6 and secreted IL-21 after stimulated by PHA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD4{sup +} CXCR5{sup +} CCR6{sup +} Tfh cells in blood may be suitable biomarkers for the evaluation of the active immune stage of pSS patients. -- Abstract: The blood CD4{sup +} CXCR5{sup +} T cells, known as 'circulating' Tfh, have been shown to efficiently induce naieve B cells to produce immunoglobulin. They play an important role in certain autoimmune diseases. In the present study, we show for the first time that the frequency of CD4{sup +} CXCR5{sup +} T cells is increased in pSS patients and positively correlated with autoantibodies in the blood. The concentration of Th17-like subsets (CD4{sup +} CXCR5{sup +} CCR6{sup +}) in pSS patients was found to be significantly higher than in healthy controls. Functional assays showed that activated Th17-like subtypes in the blood display the key features of Tfh cells, including invariably coexpressed PD-1, ICOS, CD40L and IL-21. Th17 subsets were found to highly express Bcl-6 protein and Th1 and Th2 were not. Bcl-6 is believed to be a master transforming factor for Tfh cell differentiation and facilitate B cell proliferation and somatic hypermutation within the germinal center. These data indicate that Th17 subsets of CD4{sup +} CXCR5{sup +} T cells in the blood may participate in the antibody-related immune responses and that high frequency of CD4{sup +} CXCR5{sup +} CCR6{sup +} Tfh cells in blood may be suitable biomarkers for the evaluation of the active immune stage of pSS patients. It might provide insights into the pathogenesis and perhaps help researchers identify novel therapeutic targets for pSS.

  15. Ouabain inhibits monocyte activation in vitro: prevention of the proinflammatory mCD14+/CD16+ subset appearance and cell-size progression

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Raphael C; Araujo, Elizabeth G; Rumjanek, Vivian M

    2012-01-01

    Classically described as a potent inhibitor of the sodium-potassium adenosine triphosphatase enzyme, ouabain has been further shown to act as an effective immunomodulator in mammals. Recently, our group showed that this hormone downregulates membrane CD14 (mCD14) in human monocytes, though it is not known whether monocyte activation status could modify ouabain influence. Hence, we aimed to investigate ouabain effect during monocyte activation in vitro, analyzing mCD14, CD16 and CD69 expression in total monocytes after two periods of adhesion (2 hours and 24 hours) or in small and large monocyte subpopulations separately. Ouabain (100 nM) inhibited monocyte-size increase, characteristic of activation, only when added to cells immediately after 2 hours’ adhesion. Moreover, downregulation of both mCD14 and CD16 expression by ouabain was more effective in small monocytes and in cells after 2 hours’ adhesion. Since monocytes after 24 hours’ adhesion showed no lack of ouabain binding and no CD69 upregulation, it seems that ouabain is somehow incapable of triggering an appropriate cell-signaling induction once monocytes become activated. Furthermore, though p38 MAPK activation was crucial for the impairment in cell-size progression induced by ouabain, its inhibition did not alter ouabain-induced CD69 upregulation, suggesting that other molecules may participate in the response to this hormone by monocytes. Our data suggest that ouabain inhibits monocyte activation in vitro, preventing both cell-size increase and the appearance of the proinflammatory mCD14+/CD16+ subpopulation. Thus, the findings suggest that individuals suffering from disorders commonly associated with high ouabain plasma levels, like hypertension, may present defective monocyte activation under inflammation or infection.

  16. Clinical impact of CD200 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia and correlation with other molecular prognostic factors

    PubMed Central

    Damiani, Daniela; Tiribelli, Mario; Raspadori, Donatella; Sirianni, Santina; Meneghel, Alessia; Cavalllin, Margherita; Michelutti, Angela; Toffoletti, Eleonora; Geromin, Antonella; Simeone, Erica; Bocchia, Monica; Fanin, Renato

    2015-01-01

    CD200, a protein belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily, has been associated with a poor prognosis in lymphoproliferative disorders and in acute leukemia. We studied the expression of CD200 in a series of 244 patients with diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), to evaluate its impact on outcome and its possible association with other known prognostic factors. CD200 was found in 136/244 (56%) patients, in 41 of whom (30%) with high intensity of expression (MFI ≥ 11). CD200 was more frequent in secondary compared to de novo leukemia (p = 0.0006), in CD34 positive cases (p = 0.00001), in Bcl2 overexpressing cases (p = 0.01), in those wild-type Flt3 (p = 0.004) and with favorable or unfavorable compared to intermediate karyotype (p = 0.0003). CD200+ patients have a two-fold lower probability to attain complete remission, both in univariate (p = 0.006) and multivariate (p = 0.04) analysis. The negative impact of CD200 was found also in overall survival (p = 0.02) and was correlated with the intensity of expression of the molecule (p = 0.024). CD200 has an additive negative impact on survival in patients with unfavorable cytogenetic (p = 0.046) and in secondary leukemia (p = 0.05), and is associate with a worsening of outcome in patients with favorable biological markers, such as mutated NPM (p = 0.02), wild-type Flt3 (p = 0.034), negativity of CD34 (p = 0.03) and of CD56 (p = 0.03). In conclusion, CD200 is emerging as both a prognostic factor and a potential target of novel therapeutic approaches for AML, aiming to reverse the “do not eat me” signal of CD200 or to manipulate the suppressive immune microenvironment induced by CD200 binding to its receptor. PMID:26338961

  17. Bystander hyperactivation of preimmune CD8+ T cells in chronic HCV patients

    PubMed Central

    Alanio, Cécile; Nicoli, Francesco; Sultanik, Philippe; Flecken, Tobias; Perot, Brieuc; Duffy, Darragh; Bianchi, Elisabetta; Lim, Annick; Clave, Emmanuel; van Buuren, Marit M; Schnuriger, Aurélie; Johnsson, Kerstin; Boussier, Jeremy; Garbarg-Chenon, Antoine; Bousquet, Laurence; Mottez, Estelle; Schumacher, Ton N; Toubert, Antoine; Appay, Victor; Heshmati, Farhad; Thimme, Robert; Pol, Stanislas; Mallet, Vincent; Albert, Matthew L

    2015-01-01

    Chronic infection perturbs immune homeostasis. While prior studies have reported dysregulation of effector and memory cells, little is known about the effects on naïve T cell populations. We performed a cross-sectional study of chronic hepatitis C (cHCV) patients using tetramer-associated magnetic enrichment to study antigen-specific inexperienced CD8+ T cells (i.e., tumor or unrelated virus-specific populations in tumor-free and sero-negative individuals). cHCV showed normal precursor frequencies, but increased proportions of memory-phenotype inexperienced cells, as compared to healthy donors or cured HCV patients. These observations could be explained by low surface expression of CD5, a negative regulator of TCR signaling. Accordingly, we demonstrated TCR hyperactivation and generation of potent CD8+ T cell responses from the altered T cell repertoire of cHCV patients. In sum, we provide the first evidence that naïve CD8+ T cells are dysregulated during cHCV infection, and establish a new mechanism of immune perturbation secondary to chronic infection. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07916.001 PMID:26568315

  18. Role of CD24 Protein in Predicting Metastatic Potential of Uterine Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Patients Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Ghee Young; Ha, Hongil; Ahn, Geunghwan; Park, Seon Young; Huh, Seung Jae; Park, Won

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: The protein CD24 is a cell surface protein that appears to function as an adhesion molecule; its expression has been shown to correlate with prognosis in a variety of tumors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the immunoreactivity of uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma to CD24 and determine whether CD24 is associated with clinical and pathologic parameters, including prognosis. Methods and Materials: The expression of CD24 protein was immunohistochemically studied in 73 cases of uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma. All patients were treated with definitive radiotherapy alone or with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Two pathologists independently analyzed the immunostaining; they did not have knowledge of the patient outcomes and evaluated any changes according to the percentage of tumor cells stained as follows: negative, <5% reactive; and positive, >5% reactive. Results: Positive staining was found in 43 cases (58.9%). The immunoreactivity did not correlate with age, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, lymph node metastasis, or tumor size. For patients who were CD24 negative, the total failure and distant metastasis rates were decreased about 20% compared with the rates for patients who were CD24 positive. On univariate analysis, the 5-year distant metastasis-free survival rate of CD24-negative patients was significantly greater than that of the CD24-positive patients (84.7% vs. 66.7%, respectively, p = 0.0497). The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage and CD24 expression were significantly associated with distant metastasis-free survival on multivariate analysis. Conclusions: CD24 expression was a significant independent prognostic factor for distant metastasis-free survival in patients with uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma. In the future, prospective determination of CD24 expression might aid clinical practice in the selection of the appropriate therapy for individual patients.

  19. Levels of circulating CD45dimCD34+VEGFR2+ progenitor cells correlate with outcome in metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Farace, F; Gross-Goupil, M; Tournay, E; Taylor, M; Vimond, N; Jacques, N; Billiot, F; Mauguen, A; Hill, C; Escudier, B

    2011-01-01

    Background: Predicting the efficacy of antiangiogenic therapy would be of clinical value in patients (pts) with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). We tested the hypothesis that circulating endothelial cell (CEC), bone marrow-derived CD45dimCD34+VEGFR2+ progenitor cell or plasma angiogenic factor levels are associated with clinical outcome in mRCC pts undergoing treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). Methods: Fifty-five mRCC pts were prospectively monitored at baseline (day 1) and day 14 during treatment (46 pts received sunitinib and 9 pts received sorafenib). Circulating endothelial cells (CD45−CD31+CD146+7-amino-actinomycin (7AAD)− cells) were measured in 1 ml whole blood using four-color flow cytometry (FCM). Circulating CD45dimCD34+VEGFR2+7AAD− progenitor cells were measured in progenitor-enriched fractions by four-color FCM. Plasma VEGF, sVEGFR2, SDF-1α and sVCAM-1 levels were determined by ELISA. Correlations between baseline CEC, CD45dimCD34+VEGFR2+7AAD− progenitor cells, plasma factors, as well as day 1–day 14 changes in CEC, CD45dimCD34+VEGFR2+7AAD− progenitor, plasma factor levels, and response to TKI, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were examined. Results: No significant correlation between markers and response to TKI was observed. No association between baseline CEC, plasma VEGF, sVEGFR-2, SDF-1α, sVCAM-1 levels with PFS and OS was observed. However, baseline CD45dimCD34+VEGFR2+7AAD− progenitor cell levels were associated with PFS (P=0.01) and OS (P=0.006). Changes in this population and in SDF-1α levels between day 1 and day 14 were associated with PFS (P=0.03, P=0.002). Changes in VEGF and SDF-1α levels were associated with OS (P=0.02, P=0.007). Conclusion: Monitoring CD45dimCD34+VEGFR2+ progenitor cells, plasma VEGF and SDF-1α levels could be of clinical interest in TKI-treated mRCC pts to predict outcome. PMID:21386843

  20. The endothelial cell markers von Willebrand Factor (vWF), CD31 and CD34 are lost in glomerulonephritis and no longer correlate with the morphological indices of glomerular sclerosis, interstitial fibrosis, activity and chronicity.

    PubMed

    Gluhovschi, Cristina; Gluhovschi, Gheorghe; Potencz, Elena; Herman, Diana; Trandafirescu, Virginia; Petrica, Ligia; Velciov, Silvia; Bozdog, Gheorghe; Bob, Flaviu; Vernic, Corina; Cioca, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are active participants of an inflammatory process in glomeruli. EC damage has been shown to play an important role in the progression of glomerulonephritis (GN). The degree of glomerular and peritubular capillary loss in models of progressive renal disease correlates with the severity of glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis. The aim of our study was to analyze the association of vWF, CD31 and CD34 immunoreactivity with the morphological indices of glomerular sclerosis, interstitial fibrosis, activity and chronicity in GN. A cross-sectional study of 22 patients with GN was conducted. Conventional stains (hematoxylin-eosin, periodic acid Schiff and Trichrome Gömöri stains) and immunohistochemistry (vWF, CD31 and CD34) were employed on kidney biopsies. Activity and chronicity of GN, as well as glomerular segmental sclerosis and interstitial fibrosis, were evaluated according to a scoring system initially used for lupus nephritis and antineutrophil-cytoplasmic-antibody-associated vasculitis. Immunohistochemistry was assessed using a semi-quantitative score. Statistical analysis was performed using EpiInfo 6.04. The mean patient age was 46.68+/-14.09; 14 patients were male, and eight were female. Performing Spearman's rank correlation test, no correlation was found between each marker and glomerular segmental sclerosis, interstitial fibrosis, activity and chronicity, which suggests a loss of these markers and microvasculature involvement. PMID:20675279

  1. Tumors induce a subset of inflammatory monocytes with immunosuppressive activity on CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Gallina, Giovanna; Dolcetti, Luigi; Serafini, Paolo; Santo, Carmela De; Marigo, Ilaria; Colombo, Mario P.; Basso, Giuseppe; Brombacher, Frank; Borrello, Ivan; Zanovello, Paola; Bicciato, Silvio; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2006-01-01

    Active suppression of tumor-specific T lymphocytes can limit the efficacy of immune surveillance and immunotherapy. While tumor-recruited CD11b+ myeloid cells are known mediators of tumor-associated immune dysfunction, the true nature of these suppressive cells and the fine biochemical pathways governing their immunosuppressive activity remain elusive. Here we describe a population of circulating CD11b+IL-4 receptor α+ (CD11b+IL-4Rα+), inflammatory-type monocytes that is elicited by growing tumors and activated by IFN-γ released from T lymphocytes. CD11b+IL-4Rα+ cells produced IL-13 and IFN-γ and integrated the downstream signals of these cytokines to trigger the molecular pathways suppressing antigen-activated CD8+ T lymphocytes. Analogous immunosuppressive circuits were active in CD11b+ cells present within the tumor microenvironment. These suppressor cells challenge the current idea that tumor-conditioned immunosuppressive monocytes/macrophages are alternatively activated. Moreover, our data show how the inflammatory response elicited by tumors had detrimental effects on the adaptive immune system and suggest novel approaches for the treatment of tumor-induced immune dysfunctions. PMID:17016559

  2. CD85/LIR-1/ILT2 and CD152 (cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4) inhibitory molecules down-regulate the cytolytic activity of human CD4+ T-cell clones specific for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Merlo, A; Saverino, D; Tenca, C; Grossi, C E; Bruno, S; Ciccone, E

    2001-10-01

    Antigen-specific cytolytic CD4+ T lymphocytes control Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection by secreting cytokines and by killing macrophages that have phagocytosed the pathogen. However, lysis of the latter cells promotes microbial dissemination, and other macrophages engulf the released bacteria. Subsequently, CD4+ T-cell-mediated killing of macrophages goes on, and this persistent process may hamper control of infection, unless regulatory mechanisms maintain a subtle balance between lysis of macrophages by cytolytic CD4+ cells and activation of cytolytic CD4+ cells by infected macrophages. We asked whether inhibitory molecules expressed by CD4+ cytolytic T lymphocytes could play a role in such a balance. To this end, human CD4+ T-cell clones specific for M. tuberculosis were produced that displayed an autologous major histocompatibility complex class II-restricted lytic ability against purified protein derivative (PPD)-pulsed antigen-presenting cells. All T-cell clones expressed CD152 (cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 [CTLA-4]) and CD85/leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor 1 (LIR-1)/immunoglobulin-like transcript 2 (ILT2) inhibitory receptors, but not CD94 and the killer inhibitory receptor (or killer immunoglobulin-like receptor [KIR]) p58.2. CD3-mediated activation of the clones was inhibited in a redirected killing assay in which CD152 and CD85/LIR-1/ILT2 were cross-linked. Specific antigen-mediated proliferation of the clones was also sharply reduced when CD152 and CD85/LIR-1/ILT2 were cross-linked by specific monoclonal antibody (MAb) followed by goat anti-mouse antiserum. In contrast, blockade of the receptors by specific MAb only increased their proliferation. Production of interleukin 2 (IL-2) and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) by the T-cell clones was also strongly reduced when CD152 and CD85/LIR-1/ILT2 were cross-linked. The lytic activity of the T-cell clones against PPD-pulsed autologous monocytes or Epstein-Barr virus-activated B cells was increased

  3. Tetraspanin CD9 regulates osteoclastogenesis via regulation of p44/42 MAPK activity

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, TacGhee; Kim, Hye-Jin; Cho, Je-Yoel; Woo, Kyung Mi; Ryoo, Hyun-Mo; Kim, Gwan-Shik; Baek, Jeong-Hwa . E-mail: baekjh@snu.ac.kr

    2006-08-18

    Tetraspanin CD9 has been shown to regulate cell-cell fusion in sperm-egg fusion and myotube formation. However, the role of CD9 in osteoclast, another multinucleated cell type, is not still clear. Therefore, we investigated the role of CD9 in osteoclast differentiation. CD9 was expressed in osteoclast lineage cells and its expression level increased during the progression of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. KMC8, a neutralizing antibody specific to CD9, significantly suppressed RANKL-induced multinucleated osteoclast formation and the mRNA expression of osteoclast differentiation marker genes. To define CD9-regulated osteoclastogenic signaling pathway, MAPK pathways were examined. KMC8 induced long-term phosphorylation of p44/42 MAPK, but not of p38 MAPK. Constitutive activation of p44/42 MAPK by overexpressing constitutive-active mutant of MEK1 almost completely blocked osteoclast differentiation. Taken together, these results suggest that CD9 expressed on osteoclast lineage cells might positively regulate osteoclastogenesis via the regulation of p44/42 MAPK activity.

  4. A CD28 superagonistic antibody elicits 2 functionally distinct waves of T cell activation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Nora; van den Brandt, Jens; Odoardi, Francesca; Tischner, Denise; Herath, Judith; Flügel, Alexander; Reichardt, Holger M.

    2008-01-01

    Administration of the CD28 superagonistic antibody JJ316 is an efficient means to treat autoimmune diseases in rats, but the humanized antibody TGN1412 caused devastating side effects in healthy volunteers during a clinical trial. Here we show that JJ316 treatment of rats induced a dramatic redistribution of T lymphocytes from the periphery to the secondary lymphoid organs, resulting in severe T lymphopenia. Live imaging of secondary lymphoid organs revealed that JJ316 administration almost instantaneously (<2 minutes) arrested T cells in situ. This reduction in T cell motility was accompanied by profound cytoskeletal rearrangements and increased cell size. In addition, surface expression of lymphocyte function–associated antigen-1 was enhanced, endothelial differentiation sphingolipid G protein–coupled receptor 1 and L selectin levels were downregulated, and the cells lost their responsiveness to sphingosine 1–phosphate–directed migration. These proadhesive alterations were accompanied by signs of strong activation, including upregulation of CD25, CD69, CD134, and proinflammatory mediators. However, this did not lead to a cytokine storm similar to the clinical trial. While most of the early changes disappeared within 48 hours, we observed that CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells experienced a second phase of activation, which resulted in massive cell enlargement, extensive polarization, and increased motility. These data suggest that CD28 superagonists elicit 2 qualitatively distinct waves of activation. PMID:18357346

  5. Cytofluorimetric identification of two populations of double positive (CD4+,CD8+) T lymphocytes in human peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Ortolani, C; Forti, E; Radin, E; Cibin, R; Cossarizza, A

    1993-03-15

    Two different subsets of CD4+,CD8+ T lymphocytes have been identified in peripheral blood collected from normal subjects and from patients with different diseases. The subpopulations differed in the degree of CD4 and CD8 antigen expression. Hence, it was possible to distinguish by cytofluorimetric analysis cells with a low (dim) or with a high (bright) fluorescence intensity after the staining with anti-CD4 or anti-CD8 mAbs. CD4+dim,CD8+bright lymphocytes were found in patients with EBV-infectious mononucleosis and were present for less than a month. CD4+bright,CD8+dim T cells were observed in neoplastic patients as well as in healthy subjects and were continuously present in similar percentages over a long period of time (at the moment, about 3 years). Both the subpopulations expressed CD2, CD3, CD5 antigens and had an alpha beta-TCR, but did not express CD1a or CD7. Only CD4+dim,CD8+bright cells expressed HLA-DR antigen and the activation marker CD38, while only CD4+bright,CD8+dim lymphocytes expressed CD56 and CD57 molecules. The hypothesis may be put forward that these two subsets represent an effort of the immune system to cope with different requirements, i.e., of viral or neoplastic origin, while it is not clear the meaning of these cells in healthy subjects. PMID:8461016

  6. CD95 co-stimulation blocks activation of naive T cells by inhibiting T cell receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lindquist, Jonathan A.; Arhel, Nathalie; Felder, Edward; Karl, Sabine; Haas, Tobias L.; Fulda, Simone; Walczak, Henning; Kirchhoff, Frank; Debatin, Klaus-Michael

    2009-01-01

    CD95 is a multifunctional receptor that induces cell death or proliferation depending on the signal, cell type, and cellular context. Here, we describe a thus far unknown function of CD95 as a silencer of T cell activation. Naive human T cells triggered by antigen-presenting cells expressing a membrane-bound form of CD95 ligand (CD95L) or stimulated by anti-CD3 and -CD28 antibodies in the presence of recombinant CD95L had reduced activation and proliferation, whereas preactivated, CD95-sensitive T cells underwent apoptosis. Triggering of CD95 during T cell priming interfered with proximal T cell receptor signaling by inhibiting the recruitment of ζ-chain–associated protein of 70 kD, phospholipase-γ, and protein kinase C-θ into lipid rafts, thereby preventing their mutual tyrosine protein phosphorylation. Subsequently, Ca2+ mobilization and nuclear translocation of transcription factors NFAT, AP1, and NF-κB were strongly reduced, leading to impaired cytokine secretion. CD95-mediated inhibition of proliferation in naive T cells could not be reverted by the addition of exogenous interleukin-2 and T cells primed by CD95 co-stimulation remained partially unresponsive upon secondary T cell stimulation. HIV infection induced CD95L expression in primary human antigeen-presenting cells, and thereby suppressed T cell activation, suggesting that CD95/CD95L-mediated silencing of T cell activation represents a novel mechanism of immune evasion. PMID:19487421

  7. Mesoporous CdS-pillared H2Ti3O7 nanohybrids with efficient photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Bizhou; Zhou, Yi; He, Liwen; Yang, Weiwei; Chen, Yilin; Gao, Bifen

    2015-04-01

    Heterostructured CdS-pillared H2Ti3O7 nanohybrids were prepared by the self-assembly of exfoliated trititanate nanosheets and CdS nanosol particles under the electrostatic interactions. It was revealed that the present nanohybrids were mesoporous with specific surface areas of about 90 m2 g-1. The nanohybrids exhibited high photocatalytic activity and good recurrence stability in the H2 evolution from water splitting. When the preparation molar ratio of H2Ti3O7/CdS was 2:1, the nanohybrid reached a high H2-evolution rate of 1523 μmol h-1 g-1 under a 300 W Xe lamp irradiation, which was 13 times higher than the bare CdS. Apart from the wider spectral responsive range, the superior photocatalytic performance of the nanohybrids was predominantly attributed to the efficient photogenerated charge separation between the trititanate nanosheets and the encapsulated CdS nanoparticles.

  8. Evaluating a 'biotic ligand model' applied to chloride-enhanced Cd uptake by Brassica juncea from nutrient solution at constant Cd2+ activity.

    PubMed

    López-Chuken, Ulrico J; Young, Scott D; Guzmán-Mar, Jorge L

    2010-03-01

    Evidence of chloride-enhanced cadmium uptake by plants in soil experiments has been reported. However, it is still unclear whether this finding is due to increased rates of Cd2+ diffusion to plant roots or the direct uptake of complexes such as CdC1+. A controlled hydroponic experiment was undertaken to distinguish and quantify the uptake rates of free and inorganic-complexed cadmium and to model the uptake of cadmium by Indian mustard plants with a 'biotic ligand model'. Plants were treated with NaCl (0 to 200 mM) including equivalent Na2SO4 treatments. Cadmium speciation in solution was calculated using the WHAM-VI model. Results of the current trials showed that higher Cl-concentrations in solution generally resulted in greater cadmium accumulation by plants than predicted by the Cd2+ activity. Activities of Cd-chloro complexes showed the best correlations with the cadmium concentrations in the plants compared with the activity of Cd2+. The biotic ligand model showed a reasonable good fit for the plants when assuming competition by Cd2+ and CdCl+ for sorption sites at root level. The relative values of the two reaction constants suggest that root affinity for Cd2+ is 3.4 times greater than for CdCl+. Nevertheless this clearly indicates a substantial role for chloro-complexed cadmium accumulation. PMID:20426272

  9. Immunosuppressive human anti-CD83 monoclonal antibody depletion of activated dendritic cells in transplantation.

    PubMed

    Seldon, T A; Pryor, R; Palkova, A; Jones, M L; Verma, N D; Findova, M; Braet, K; Sheng, Y; Fan, Y; Zhou, E Y; Marks, J D; Munro, T; Mahler, S M; Barnard, R T; Fromm, P D; Silveira, P A; Elgundi, Z; Ju, X; Clark, G J; Bradstock, K F; Munster, D J; Hart, D N J

    2016-03-01

    Current immunosuppressive/anti-inflammatory agents target the responding effector arm of the immune response and their nonspecific action increases the risk of infection and malignancy. These effects impact on their use in allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation and other forms of transplantation. Interventions that target activated dendritic cells (DCs) have the potential to suppress the induction of undesired immune responses (for example, graft versus host disease (GVHD) or transplant rejection) and to leave protective T-cell immune responses intact (for example, cytomegalovirus (CMV) immunity). We developed a human IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb), 3C12, specific for CD83, which is expressed on activated but not resting DC. The 3C12 mAb and an affinity improved version, 3C12C, depleted CD83(+) cells by CD16(+) NK cell-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, and inhibited allogeneic T-cell proliferation in vitro. A single dose of 3C12C prevented human peripheral blood mononuclear cell-induced acute GVHD in SCID mouse recipients. The mAb 3C12C depleted CMRF-44(+)CD83(bright) activated DC but spared CD83(dim/-) DC in vivo. It reduced human T-cell activation in vivo and maintained the proportion of CD4(+) FoxP3(+) CD25(+) Treg cells and also viral-specific CD8(+) T cells. The anti-CD83 mAb, 3C12C, merits further evaluation as a new immunosuppressive agent in transplantation. PMID:26286117

  10. Differential Frequency of CD8+ T Cell Subsets in Multiple Sclerosis Patients with Various Clinical Patterns.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Zahra; Doosti, Rozita; Beheshti, Masoumeh; Janzamin, Ehsan; Sahraian, Mohammad Ali; Izad, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence points to a pathogenic role for CD8+ cytotoxic T (Tc) cells in Multiple sclerosis (MS). Based on cytokine profile, Tc cells can be divided into different subsets: IFN-γ (Tc1), IL-4 (Tc2), IL-10 (Tc10), IL-17 (Tc17), IL-21 (Tc21), IL-22 (Tc22) and TNF-α producing cells. In this study we evaluated the frequency of Tc cell subsets and the serum level of Tc17 differentiation cytokines in MS patients with different clinical patterns. We analyzed Tc cell subsets percentage in peripheral blood of relapsing-remitting (RRMS) (n = 28), secondary-progressive (SPMS) (n = 10) and primary-progressive (PPMS) (n = 4) MS patients in comparison to healthy controls (n = 15) using flow cytometry. Serum level of TGF-β, IL-6 and IL-23 were measured by ELISA. We showed elevated levels of Tc1 and Tc17 cells in SPMS and RRMS patients in relapse phase, respectively (P = 0.04). Interestingly, the percentage of TNF-α producing CD8+ T cells in relapse and remission phase of RRMS and SPMS patients were higher than controls (P = 0.01, P = 0.004, P = 0.01, respectively) and Tc21 increased in remission phase of RRMS compared to SPMS (P = 0.03). We also found higher frequency of CD8+ IFN-γ+ TNF-α+ IL-17+ T cells in relapse phase of RRMS compared to remission phase, SPMS patients and controls (P = 0.01, P = 0.004 and P = 0.02, respectively). TGF- β increased in sera of RRMS patients in remission phase (P = 0.03) and SPMS (P = 0.05) compared to healthy subjects. Increased level of Tc17 and CD8+ IFN-γ+ TNF-α+ IL-17+ T cells in relapse phase highlights the critical role of IL-17 in RRMS pathogenesis. PMID:27467597

  11. Differential Frequency of CD8+ T Cell Subsets in Multiple Sclerosis Patients with Various Clinical Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Zahra; Doosti, Rozita; Beheshti, Masoumeh; Janzamin, Ehsan; Sahraian, Mohammad Ali; Izad, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence points to a pathogenic role for CD8+ cytotoxic T (Tc) cells in Multiple sclerosis (MS). Based on cytokine profile, Tc cells can be divided into different subsets: IFN-γ (Tc1), IL-4 (Tc2), IL-10 (Tc10), IL-17 (Tc17), IL-21 (Tc21), IL-22 (Tc22) and TNF-α producing cells. In this study we evaluated the frequency of Tc cell subsets and the serum level of Tc17 differentiation cytokines in MS patients with different clinical patterns. We analyzed Tc cell subsets percentage in peripheral blood of relapsing-remitting (RRMS) (n = 28), secondary-progressive (SPMS) (n = 10) and primary-progressive (PPMS) (n = 4) MS patients in comparison to healthy controls (n = 15) using flow cytometry. Serum level of TGF-β, IL-6 and IL-23 were measured by ELISA. We showed elevated levels of Tc1 and Tc17 cells in SPMS and RRMS patients in relapse phase, respectively (P = 0.04). Interestingly, the percentage of TNF-α producing CD8+ T cells in relapse and remission phase of RRMS and SPMS patients were higher than controls (P = 0.01, P = 0.004, P = 0.01, respectively) and Tc21 increased in remission phase of RRMS compared to SPMS (P = 0.03). We also found higher frequency of CD8+ IFN-γ+ TNF-α+ IL-17+ T cells in relapse phase of RRMS compared to remission phase, SPMS patients and controls (P = 0.01, P = 0.004 and P = 0.02, respectively). TGF- β increased in sera of RRMS patients in remission phase (P = 0.03) and SPMS (P = 0.05) compared to healthy subjects. Increased level of Tc17 and CD8+ IFN-γ+ TNF-α+ IL-17+ T cells in relapse phase highlights the critical role of IL-17 in RRMS pathogenesis. PMID:27467597

  12. Natural killer group 2D and CD28 receptors differentially activate mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin to alter murine effector CD8+ T-cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    McQueen, Bryan; Trace, Kelsey; Whitman, Emily; Bedsworth, Taylor; Barber, Amorette

    2016-03-01

    Memory CD8+ T cells are an essential component of anti-tumour and anti-viral immunity. Activation of the mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway has been implicated in regulating the differentiation of effector and memory T cells. However, the mechanisms that control mTOR activity during immunity to tumours and infections are not well known. Activation of co-stimulatory receptors, including CD28 and natural killer group 2D (NKG2D), activate phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase and subsequently may activate the mTOR pathway in CD8+ T cells. This study compared the activation of the mTOR signalling pathway after co-stimulation through CD28 or NKG2D receptors in murine effector CD8+ T cells. Compared with CD28 co-stimulation, activation through CD3 and NKG2D receptors had weaker activation of mTORc1, as shown by decreased phosphorylation of mTORc1 targets S6K1, ribosomal protein S6 and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1. NKG2D co-stimulation also showed increased gene expression of tuberous sclerosis protein 2, a negative regulator of mTORc1, whereas CD28 co-stimulation increased gene expression of Ras homologue enriched in brain, an activator of mTORc1, and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor-α, pro-angiogenic factors downstream of mTORc1. Strong mTORc1 activation in CD28-co-stimulated cells also increased expression of transcription factors that support effector cell differentiation, namely T-bet, B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein (BLIMP-1), interferon regulatory factor 4, and inhibitor of DNA binding 2, whereas low levels of mTORc1 activation allowed for the expression of Eomes, B-cell lymphoma 6 (BCL6), and inhibitor of DNA binding 3 during NKG2D stimulation, and increased expression of memory markers CD62 ligand and CD127. These data show that compared with CD28, co-stimulation through the NKG2D receptor leads to the differential activation of the mTOR signalling pathway and potentially supports

  13. CD56brightCD16- NK Cells Produce Adenosine through a CD38-Mediated Pathway and Act as Regulatory Cells Inhibiting Autologous CD4+ T Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Morandi, Fabio; Horenstein, Alberto L; Chillemi, Antonella; Quarona, Valeria; Chiesa, Sabrina; Imperatori, Andrea; Zanellato, Silvia; Mortara, Lorenzo; Gattorno, Marco; Pistoia, Vito; Malavasi, Fabio

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies suggested that human CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cells may play a role in the regulation of the immune response. Since the mechanism(s) involved have not yet been elucidated, in the present study we have investigated the role of nucleotide-metabolizing enzymes that regulate the extracellular balance of nucleotides/nucleosides and produce the immunosuppressive molecule adenosine (ADO). Peripheral blood CD56(dim)CD16(+) and CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cells expressed similar levels of CD38. CD39, CD73, and CD157 expression was higher in CD56(bright)CD16(-) than in CD56(dim)CD16(+) NK cells. CD57 was mostly expressed by CD56(dim)CD16(+) NK cells. CD203a/PC-1 expression was restricted to CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cells. CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cells produce ADO and inhibit autologous CD4(+) T cell proliferation. Such inhibition was 1) reverted pretreating CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cells with a CD38 inhibitor and 2) increased pretreating CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cells with a nucleoside transporter inhibitor, which increase extracellular ADO concentration. CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cells isolated from the synovial fluid of juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients failed to inhibit autologous CD4(+) T cell proliferation. Such functional impairment could be related to 1) the observed reduced CD38/CD73 expression, 2) a peculiar ADO production kinetics, and 3) a different expression of ADO receptors. In contrast, CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cells isolated from inflammatory pleural effusions display a potent regulatory activity. In conclusion, CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cells act as "regulatory cells" through ADO produced by an ectoenzymes network, with a pivotal role of CD38. This function may be relevant for the modulation of the immune response in physiological and pathological conditions, and it could be impaired during autoimmune/inflammatory diseases. PMID:26091716

  14. [Increased expressions of programmed death 1 (PD-1) and its ligands in peripheral CD3(+) T cells and CD19(+) B cells in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Chai, Lin; Liang, Junli; Lu, Zhizhong; Yang, Siwei

    2016-09-01

    Objective To investigate the changes of programmed death 1 (PD-1) and ligands, as well as interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods The peripheral blood was collected from 15 early HCC patients, 13 progressive HCC patients and 12 healthy volunteers. PBMCs was isolated from the peripheral blood. The expressions of PD-1, PD-L1 and PD-L2 in PBMCs were detected by flow cytometry; the serum level of IFN-γ was determined by ELISA; the correlation of PD-1 and IFN-γ was analyzed with Pearson's correlation and One-way ANOVA. Results The expression levels of PD-1, PD-L1 and PD-L2 in CD3(+) T cells and CD19(+) B cells and serum IFN-γ level in progressive HCC patients were significantly higher than those in the healthy group and early HCC patients. The expression levels of PD-1, PD-L1 and PD-L2 in the CD3(+) T cells and CD19(+) B cells of the HCC patients were positively correlated with IFN-γ. Conclusion The expression levels of PD-1, PD-L1 and PD-L2 increase in the PBMCs of HCC patients; PD-1 and PD-L1 are correlated with IFN-γ level. PMID:27609582

  15. Helenalin suppresses essential immune functions of activated CD4+ T cells by multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Berges, Carsten; Fuchs, Dominik; Opelz, Gerhard; Daniel, Volker; Naujokat, Cord

    2009-09-01

    Helenalin is a naturally occuring sesquiterpene lactone extracted from Arnica montana and Arnica chamissonis ssp. foliosa. Helenalin and its derivatives are known for anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory effects via inhibiting NF-kappaB and telomerase activity and impairing protein and DNA synthesis, suggesting that helenalin is a potential candidate for the treatment of deregulated and unwanted T cell-mediated immune responses. Here we show that helenalin induces apoptosis in activated CD4+ T cells by triggering the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Induction of apoptosis is accompanied by rapid stabilization of p53, nuclear localization of p53 and AIF, and an increase in ROS production that results in loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsim). Activated CD4+ T cells which survive exposure to helenalin undergo inhibition of proliferation by induction of G2/M cell cycle arrest. Cell cycle arrest is accompanied by the accumulation of cell cycle regulator proteins p21(WAF/CIP1), p2(KIP1) and cyclin D2, whereas abundance of cyclin A and B(1) is decreased. Cell surface expression of the activation-associated receptors CD25, CD27, CD28, CD120b as well as production of IL-2 are impaired. Transcriptional activation of genes encoding for CD25, IL-2 and IFN-gamma is mediated by transcription factors of the NFAT family, and we demonstrate that helenalin suppresses nuclear translocation of NFATc2 in activated CD4+ T cells. Thus, helenalin can be defined as a new immunosuppressive compound suited for the treatment of deregulated and unwanted T cell-mediated immune responses. PMID:19656571

  16. Recurrent activating mutations of CD28 in peripheral T-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Rohr, J; Guo, S; Huo, J; Bouska, A; Lachel, C; Li, Y; Simone, P D; Zhang, W; Gong, Q; Wang, C; Cannon, A; Heavican, T; Mottok, A; Hung, S; Rosenwald, A; Gascoyne, R; Fu, K; Greiner, T C; Weisenburger, D D; Vose, J M; Staudt, L M; Xiao, W; Borgstahl, G E O; Davis, S; Steidl, C; McKeithan, T; Iqbal, J; Chan, W C

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) comprise a heterogeneous group of mature T-cell neoplasms with a poor prognosis. Recently, mutations in TET2 and other epigenetic modifiers as well as RHOA have been identified in these diseases, particularly in angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL). CD28 is the major co-stimulatory receptor in T cells which, upon binding ligand, induces sustained T-cell proliferation and cytokine production when combined with T-cell receptor stimulation. We have identified recurrent mutations in CD28 in PTCLs. Two residues-D124 and T195-were recurrently mutated in 11.3% of cases of AITL and in one case of PTCL, not otherwise specified (PTCL-NOS). Surface plasmon resonance analysis of mutations at these residues with predicted differential partner interactions showed increased affinity for ligand CD86 (residue D124) and increased affinity for intracellular adaptor proteins GRB2 and GADS/GRAP2 (residue T195). Molecular modeling studies on each of these mutations suggested how these mutants result in increased affinities. We found increased transcription of the CD28-responsive genes CD226 and TNFA in cells expressing the T195P mutant in response to CD3 and CD86 co-stimulation and increased downstream activation of NF-κB by both D124V and T195P mutants, suggesting a potential therapeutic target in CD28-mutated PTCLs. PMID:26719098

  17. GITR ligand-costimulation activates effector and regulatory functions of CD4{sup +} T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Igarashi, Hanna; Cao, Yujia; Iwai, Hideyuki; Piao, Jinhua; Kamimura, Yosuke; Hashiguchi, Masaaki; Amagasa, Teruo; Azuma, Miyuki

    2008-05-16

    Engagement of glucocorticoid-induced TNFR-related protein (GITR) enables the costimulation of both CD25{sup -}CD4{sup +} effector (Teff) and CD25{sup +}CD4{sup +} regulatory (Treg) cells; however, the effects of GITR-costimulation on Treg function remain controversial. In this study, we examined the effects of GITR ligand (GITRL) binding on the respective functions of CD4{sup +} T cells. GITRL-P815 transfectants efficiently augmented anti-CD3-induced proliferation and cytokine production by Teff cells. Proliferation and IL-10 production in Treg were also enhanced by GITRL transfectants when exogenous IL-2 and stronger CD3 stimulation was provided. Concomitant GITRL-costimulation of Teff and Treg converted the anergic state of Treg into a proliferating state, maintaining and augmenting their function. Thus, GITRL-costimulation augments both effector and regulatory functions of CD4{sup +} T cells. Our results suggest that highly activated and increased ratios of Treg reverse the immune-enhancing effects of GITRL-costimulation in Teff, which may be problematic for therapeutic applications using strong GITR agonists.

  18. Immunophenotyping of rheumatoid arthritis reveals a linkage between HLA-DRB1 genotype, CXCR4 expression on memory CD4+ T cells, and disease activity

    PubMed Central

    Nagafuchi, Yasuo; Shoda, Hirofumi; Sumitomo, Shuji; Nakachi, Shinichiro; Kato, Rika; Tsuchida, Yumi; Tsuchiya, Haruka; Sakurai, Keiichi; Hanata, Norio; Tateishi, Shoko; Kanda, Hiroko; Ishigaki, Kazuyoshi; Okada, Yukinori; Suzuki, Akari; Kochi, Yuta; Fujio, Keishi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease that leads to destructive arthritis. Although the HLA class II locus is the strongest genetic risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis, the relationship between HLA class II alleles and lymphocyte activation remains unclear. We performed immunophenotyping of peripheral blood mononuclear cells on 91 HLA-DRB1-genotyped RA patients and 110 healthy donors. The frequency of memory CXCR4+CD4+ T cells, and not Th1 and Th17 cells, was significantly associated with disease severity by multiple linear regression analysis. RA patients with one or more susceptible HLA-DR haplotypes (shared epitope: SE) displayed a significantly higher frequency of memory CXCR4+CD4+ T cells. Moreover, the frequency of memory CXCR4+CD4+ T cells significantly correlated with the expression level of HLA-DR on B cells, which was elevated in RA patients with SE. In vitro analysis and transcriptomic pathway analysis suggested that the interaction between HLA-DR and T cell receptors is an important regulator of memory CXCR4+CD4+ T cells. Clinically, a higher frequency of memory CXCR4+CD4+ T cells predicted a better response to CTLA4-Ig. Memory CXCR4+CD4+ T cells may serve as a powerful biomarker for unraveling the linkage between HLA-DRB1 genotype and disease activity in RA. PMID:27385284

  19. CD38 expression labels an activated subset within chronic lymphocytic leukemia clones enriched in proliferating B cells

    PubMed Central

    Damle, Rajendra N.; Temburni, Sonal; Calissano, Carlo; Yancopoulos, Sophia; Banapour, Taraneh; Sison, Cristina; Allen, Steven L.; Rai, Kanti R.

    2007-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells are thought to have diminished cell-cycling capacity, a view challenged by their phenotypic resemblance to activated human B lymphocytes. The present study addresses the cell-cycling status of CLL cells, focusing on those leukemic cells expressing CD38, a molecule involved in signaling and activation that also serves as a prognostic marker in this disease. CD38+ and CD38− members of individual CLL clones were analyzed for coexpression of molecules associated with cellular activation (CD27, CD62L, and CD69), cell-cycle entry (Ki-67), signaling (ZAP-70), and protection from apoptosis (telomerase and Bcl-2). Regardless of the size of the CD38+ fraction within a CLL clone, CD38+ subclones are markedly enriched for expression of Ki-67, ZAP-70, human telomerase reverse transcriptase, and telomerase activity. Although the percentage of cells (approximately 2%) entering the cell cycle as defined by Ki-67 expression is small, the absolute number within a clone can be sizeable and is contained primarily within the CD38+ fraction. Despite these activation/proliferation differences, both CD38+ and CD38− fractions have similar telomere lengths, suggesting that CD38 expression is dynamic and transient. These findings may help explain why high percentages of CD38+ cells within clones are associated with poor clinical outcome. PMID:17684154

  20. CD36 Participates in PrP106–126-Induced Activation of Microglia

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Rongrong; Shi, Fushan; Lu, Yun; Zhang, Siming; Yin, Xiaomin; Zhou, Xiangmei; Zhao, Deming

    2012-01-01

    Microglial activation is a characteristic feature of the pathogenesis of prion diseases. The molecular mechanisms that underlie prion-induced microglial activation are not very well understood. In the present study, we investigated the role of the class B scavenger receptor CD36 in microglial activation induced by neurotoxic prion protein (PrP) fragment 106–126 (PrP106–126). We first examined the time course of CD36 mRNA expression upon exposure to PrP106–126 in BV2 microglia. We then analyzed different parameters of microglial activation in PrP106–126-treated cells in the presence or not of anti-CD36 monoclonal antibody (mAb). The cells were first incubated for 1 h with CD36 monoclonal antibody to block the CD36 receptor, and were then treated with neurotoxic prion peptides PrP106–126. The results showed that PrP106–126 treatment led to a rapid yet transitory increase in the mRNA expression of CD36, upregulated mRNA and protein levels of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α), increased iNOS expression and nitric oxide (NO) production, stimulated the activation of NF-κB and caspase-1, and elevated Fyn activity. The blockade of CD36 had no effect on PrP106–126-stimulated NF-κB activation and TNF-α protein release, abrogated the PrP106–126-induced iNOS stimulation, downregulated IL-1β and IL-6 expression at both mRNA and protein levels as well as TNF-α mRNA expression, decreased NO production and Fyn phosphorylation, reduced caspase-1 cleavage induced by moderate PrP106–126 –treatment, but had no effect on caspase-1 activation after treatment with a high concentration of PrP106–126. Together, these results suggest that CD36 is involved in PrP106–126-induced microglial activation and that the participation of CD36 in the interaction between PrP106–126 and microglia may be mediated by Src tyrosine kinases. Our findings provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying the activation of microglia by neurotoxic prion

  1. Regulatory Cell Populations in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS) Patients: Effect of Disease Activity and Treatment Regimens.

    PubMed

    Rodi, Maria; Dimisianos, Nikolaos; de Lastic, Anne-Lise; Sakellaraki, Panagiota; Deraos, George; Matsoukas, John; Papathanasopoulos, Panagiotis; Mouzaki, Athanasia

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) of autoimmune etiology that results from an imbalance between CNS-specific T effector cells and peripheral suppressive mechanisms mediated by regulatory cells (RC). In this research, we collected blood samples from 83 relapsing remitting MS (RRMS) patients and 45 healthy persons (HC), to assess the sizes of their RC populations, including CD4⁺CD25(high)Foxp3⁺ (nTregs), CD3⁺CD4⁺HLA(-)G⁺, CD3⁺CD8⁺CD28(-), CD3⁺CD56⁺, and CD56(bright) cells, and how RC are affected by disease activity (acute phase or remission) and types of treatment (methylprednisolone, interferon, or natalizumab). In addition, we isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and cultured them with peptides mapping to myelin antigens, to determine RC responsiveness to autoantigens. The results showed decreased levels of nTregs in patients in the acute phase ± methylprednisolone and in remission + natalizumab, but HC levels in patients in remission or receiving interferon. Patients + interferon had the highest levels of CD3⁺CD4⁺HLA(-)G⁺ and CD3⁺CD8⁺CD28(-) RC, and patients in the acute phase + methylprednisolone the lowest. Patients in remission had the highest levels of CD3⁺CD56⁺, and patients in remission + natalizumab the highest levels of CD56(bright) cells. Only nTregs responded to autoantigens in culture, regardless of disease activity or treatment. The highest suppressive activity was exhibited by nTregs from patients in remission. In conclusion, in RRMS disease activity and type of treatment affect different RC populations. nTregs respond to myelin antigens, indicating that it is possible to restore immunological tolerance through nTreg induction. PMID:27571060

  2. Theoretical analysis of non-radiative multiphonon recombination activity of intrinsic defects in CdTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasikov, D. N.; Scherbinin, A. V.; Knizhnik, A. A.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Potapkin, B. V.; Sommerer, T. J.

    2016-02-01

    We present an analysis of recombination activity of intrinsic defects (VCd, TeCd, VTe, and Tei) in CdTe based on the multiphonon single-mode carrier-capture model, with vibronic parameters obtained using hybrid density functional theory. This analysis allows us to determine the defects and the corresponding electronic processes that have high trapping rates for electrons, for holes, or for both. The latter, being potentially the most active recombination centers, decreases the carrier lifetime in the absorber layer of a CdTe solar cell. Taking into account the relatively high calculated capture cross-sections of the TeCd antisite defect (σ = 8.7× 10-15 cm2 for electron capture on TeCd+2 defect, σ = 6.8 × 10-14 cm2 for hole capture on TeCd+1 defect at room temperature) and its deep trapping level (0.41 eV for +2/+1 level), we conclude that this defect is the most active recombination center among the intrinsic defects in p-type CdTe. Other processes that do not lead to effective recombination are: (i) fast hole capture on Tei+1 defect (σ = 1.1 × 10-13 cm-2), (ii) electron capture on TeCd+1 defect (σ = 2.9 × 10-15 cm-2), (iii) somewhat slower hole capture on TeCd0 defect (σ = 9.4 × 10-20 cm-2), (iv) hole capture on VCd-1 defect (σ = 7 × 10-19 cm2), and (v) electron capture on Tei+1 defect (σ = 4.4 × 10-19 cm-2). The cross-sections are found to be negligibly small for the remaining capture processes.

  3. Chimpanzees Immunized with Recombinant Soluble CD4 Develop Anti-Self CD4 Antibody Responses with Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Mamoru; Boyson, Jonathan E.; Lord, Carol I.; Letvin, Norman L.

    1992-06-01

    In view of the efficiency with which human immunodeficiency virus replication can be blocked in vitro with anti-CD4 antibodies, the elicitation of an anti-CD4 antibody response through active immunization might represent a useful therapeutic strategy for AIDS. Here we demonstrate that immunization of chimpanzees with recombinant soluble human CD4 elicited an anti-CD4 antibody response. The elicited antibody bound self CD4 on digitonin-treated but not freshly isolated lymphocytes. Nevertheless, this antibody blocked human immunodeficiency virus replication in chimpanzee and human lymphocytes. These observations suggest that immunization with recombinant soluble CD4 from human immunodeficiency virus-infected humans may be feasible and therapeutically beneficial.

  4. Activating β-catenin signaling in CD133-positive dermal papilla cells increases hair inductivity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Linli; Yang, Kun; Xu, Mingang; Andl, Thomas; Millar, Sarah E; Boyce, Steven; Zhang, Yuhang

    2016-08-01

    Bioengineering hair follicles using cells isolated from human tissue remains a difficult task. Dermal papilla (DP) cells are known to guide the growth and cycling activities of hair follicles by interacting with keratinocytes. However, DP cells quickly lose their inductivity during in vitro passaging. Rodent DP cell cultures need external addition of growth factors, including WNT and BMP molecules, to maintain the hair inductive property. CD133 is expressed by a subpopulation of DP cells that are capable of inducing hair follicle formation in vivo. We report here that expression of a stabilized form of β-catenin promoted clonal growth of CD133-positive (CD133+) DP cells in in vitro three-dimensional hydrogel culture while maintaining expression of DP markers, including alkaline phosphatase (AP), CD133, and integrin α8. After a 2-week in vitro culture, cultured CD133+ DP cells with up-regulated β-catenin activity led to an accelerated in vivo hair growth in reconstituted skin compared to control cells. Further analysis showed that matrix cell proliferation and differentiation were significantly promoted in hair follicles when β-catenin signaling was up-regulated in CD133+ DP cells. Our data highlight an important role for β-catenin signaling in promoting the inductive capability of CD133+ DP cells for in vitro expansion and in vivo hair follicle regeneration, which could potentially be applied to cultured human DP cells. PMID:27312243

  5. The Phenotype of Circulating Follicular-Helper T Cells in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Defines CD200 as a Potential Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Chakera, Aron; Bennett, Sophia C.; Morteau, Olivier; Bowness, Paul; Luqmani, Raashid A.; Cornall, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease primarily affecting synovial joints in which the development of autoantibodies represents a failure of normal tolerance mechanisms, suggesting a role for follicular helper T cells (TFH) in the genesis of autoimmunity. To determine whether quantitative or qualitative abnormalities in the circulating TFH cell population exist, we analysed by flow cytometry the number and profile of these cells in 35 patients with RA and 15 matched controls. Results were correlated with patient characteristics, including the presence of autoantibodies, disease activity, and treatment with biologic agents. Circulating TFH cells from patients with RA show significantly increased expression of the immunoglobulin superfamily receptor CD200, with highest levels seen in seropositive patients (P = 0.0045) and patients treated with anti-TNFα agents (P = 0.0008). This occurs in the absence of any change in TFH numbers or overt bias towards Th1, Th2, or Th17 phenotypes. CD200 levels did not correlate with DAS28 scores (P = 0.887). Although the number of circulating TFH cells is not altered in the blood of patients with RA, the TFH cells have a distinct phenotype. These differences associate TFH cells with the pathogenesis of RA and support the relevance of the CD200/CD200R signalling pathway as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:23091555

  6. Factors associated with poor CD4 and viral load outcomes in patients with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Syed, Imran Ahmed; Sulaiman, Syed Azhar Syed; Hassali, Mohammad Azmi; Syed, Shahzad Hasan; Shan, Lau Hui; Lee, Christopher K C

    2016-05-01

    Suboptimal viral suppression and CD4 response to antiretroviral treatment (HAART) is known to cause poor outcomes with the increase cost of treatment. We aimed to assess factors associated with such control among HIV/AIDS patients in Malaysia. Four hundred and six HIV/AIDS patients, using Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) for at least the past three months, treated as outpatients at medication therapy adherence clinics (MTAC) were recruited. CD4 cell counts, viral load readings along with co-variants such as socio-demographic factors, adverse drug reactions, comorbidities, and medication record were obtained. Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS(®)) version 18 and STATA IC(®) version 12 were used for data analysis. CD4 counts were found highest among those within the age category 41-50 years (390.43 ± 272.28), female (402.64 ± 276.14), other ethnicities (400.20 ± 278.04), and participants with no formal education (414.87 ± 290.90). Patients experiencing adverse effects had a 2.28 (95%CI:1.25-4.18) fold greater risk of poor CD4 control, while patients with comorbidities had 2.46 (95%CI:1.02-5.91) fold greater risk of mild viral suppression. Adverse drug reactions, co-morbidities were found to be significantly associated with poor immunological and virological outcomes in HIV/AIDS patients. However, a comprehensive evaluation is needed to better understand other confounders. PMID:26399724

  7. Distinct APC Subtypes Drive Spatially Segregated CD4+ and CD8+ T-Cell Effector Activity during Skin Infection with HSV-1

    PubMed Central

    Macleod, Bethany L.; Bedoui, Sammy; Hor, Jyh Liang; Mueller, Scott N.; Russell, Tiffany A.; Hollett, Natasha A.; Heath, William R.; Tscharke, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Efficient infection control requires potent T-cell responses at sites of pathogen replication. However, the regulation of T-cell effector function in situ remains poorly understood. Here, we show key differences in the regulation of effector activity between CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells during skin infection with HSV-1. IFN-γ-producing CD4+ T cells disseminated widely throughout the skin and draining lymph nodes (LN), clearly exceeding the epithelial distribution of infectious virus. By contrast, IFN-γ-producing CD8+ T cells were only found within the infected epidermal layer of the skin and associated hair follicles. Mechanistically, while various subsets of lymphoid- and skin-derived dendritic cells (DC) elicited IFN-γ production by CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells responded exclusively to infected epidermal cells directly presenting viral antigen. Notably, uninfected cross-presenting DCs from both skin and LNs failed to trigger IFN-γ production by CD8+ T-cells. Thus, we describe a previously unappreciated complexity in the regulation of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell effector activity that is subset-specific, microanatomically distinct and involves largely non-overlapping types of antigen-presenting cells (APC). PMID:25121482

  8. Microparticulate β-glucan vaccine conjugates phagocytized by dendritic cells activate both naïve CD4 and CD8 T cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Berner, Vanessa K; duPre, Sally A; Redelman, Doug; Hunter, Kenneth W

    2015-01-01

    Microparticulate β-glucan (MG) conjugated to vaccine antigen has been shown to serve as an effective adjuvant in vivo. To further study antigen presentation by MG:vaccine conjugates, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC) were treated with MG conjugated to ovalbumin (OVA), then interacted with splenocytes from DO11.10 transgenic mice expressing an OVA peptide-specific T cell receptor. BMDC treated with MG:OVA induced significantly higher numbers of activated (CD25+CD69+) OVA-specific CD4+ T cells than BMDC treated with OVA alone. BMDC treated with MG:OVA upregulated CD86 and CD40 expression as well as MG alone, indicating that conjugation of OVA does not alter the immunostimulatory capacity of MG. Activation of CD8+ OVA-specific OT-1 cells showed that MG:OVA is also capable of enhancing cross-presentation by BMDC to CD8+ cytotoxic T cells. These results show that MG acts as an adjuvant to enhance antigen presentation by dendritic cells to naïve, antigen-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells. PMID:26549577

  9. Endotoxin activates human vascular smooth muscle cells despite lack of expression of CD14 mRNA or endogenous membrane CD14.

    PubMed Central

    Loppnow, H; Stelter, F; Schönbeck, U; Schlüter, C; Ernst, M; Schütt, C; Flad, H D

    1995-01-01

    During infection or inflammation, cells of the blood vessel wall, such as endothelial cells (EC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC), contribute to the regulation of the immune response by production of cytokines or expression of adhesion molecules. Little is known about the mechanism(s) involved in the stimulation of vascular cells by endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]). As reported previously, LPS antagonists reduce LPS-induced cytokine production or adhesion in vitro specifically, suggesting a specific LPS recognition mechanism. We thus investigated the role of CD14 for stimulation of vascular SMC by LPS. Complement-fixing antibodies directed against CD14 (LeuM3, RoMo I, or Mo2) lysed monocytes but failed to mediate lysis of EC or SMC, indicating the lack of endogenous membrane CD14 in vascular cells. In addition, we did not detect expression of CD14 protein on EC and SMC in cell sorting analysis or cell immunoassay experiments. These observations are in line with our finding that a CD14 probe did not hybridize with mRNA or EC or SMC in Northern (RNA) blot experiments, although it hybridized well with monocyte-derived mRNA. We obtained the same results with the much more sensitive reverse transcription-PCR. Since the vascular SMC did not express endogenous CD14, we investigated the role of human serum-derived soluble CD14 (sCD14) for activation of SMC by LPS. In medium containing human serum, anti-CD14 antibodies inhibited activation of SMC by LPS. In contrast, the same antibodies did not inhibit activation of cells cultured in medium containing fetal calf serum. SMC cultured in sCD14-depleted medium responded 1,000-fold less to LPS than cells cultured in presence of sCD14. Reconstitution of sCD14-depleted serum or supplementation of serum-free medium with recombinant CD14 restored the capacity of the cells to respond to LPS. These results show that specific activation of vascular SMC by LPS does not involve binding to endogenous membrane CD14, but that the

  10. The influence of statin therapy on platelet activity markers in hyperlipidemic patients after ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chmielewski, Henryk; Kaczorowska, Beata; Przybyła, Monika; Baj, Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) has been reported to increase platelet activation. Reducing the level of LDL-C with statins induces important pleiotropic effects such as platelet inhibition. This association between platelet activity and statin therapy may be clinically important in reducing the risk of ischemic stroke. We investigated the effect of simvastatin therapy on platelet activation markers (platelet CD62P, sP-selectin, and platelet-derived microparticles (PDMPs)) in hyperlipidemic patients after ischemic stroke. Material and methods The study group consisted of 21 hyperlipidemic patients after ischemic stroke confirmed by CT, and 20 healthy subjects served as controls. We assessed the CD62P expression on resting and thrombin-activated blood platelets. CD62P and PDMPs were analyzed by the use of monoclonal antibodies anti-CD61 and anti-CD62 on a flow cytometer. The level of sP-selectin in serum was measured by the ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) method. All markers were re-analyzed after 6 months of treatment with simvastatin (20 mg/day). Results Hyperlipidemic patients presented a significantly higher percentage of CD62+ platelets and higher reactivity to thrombin compared to control subjects. After simvastatin therapy hyperlipidemic patients showed a reduction of the percentage of resting CD62P(+) platelets (p = 0.005) and a reduction of expression and percentage of CD62P(+) platelets after activation by thrombin (median p < 0.05; percentage: p = 0.001). A decrease of sP-selectin levels (p = 0.001) and percentage of PDMPs (p < 0.05) in this group was also observed. Conclusions HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor therapy in stroke patients with hyperlipidemia may be useful not only due to the lipid-lowering effect but also because of a significant role in reduction of platelet activation and reactivity. PMID:25861297

  11. Characterization of CD200 Ectodomain Shedding

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fang; Khatri, Ismat; Huo, Qiang; Spaner, David E.; Gorczynski, Reginald M.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported the existence of a soluble form of CD200 (sCD200) in human plasma, and found sCD200 to be elevated in the plasma of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) patients. CLL cells release CD200 at a constitutive level, which could be attenuated partially by ADAM28 silencing. In this study, we further explored mechanisms of CD200 shedding beyond that of ADAM28, and performed biochemical analysis of sCD200 using materials derived from purified CLL cells and Hek293 cells stably transfected with CD200, and antibodies generated specifically against either the extracellular or cytoplasmic regions of CD200. CD200 shedding was enhanced by PMA stimulation, and the loss of cell surface CD200 could be monitored as a reduction in CD200 cell surface expression by flow cytometry, in parallel with an increase in the detection of sCD200 in the supernatant. Western blot analyses and functional studies using CD200R1 expressing Hek293 cells showed that the shed CD200 detected in CLL and Hek293-hCD200 supernatants lacked the cytoplasmic domain of CD200 but retained the functional extracellular domain required for binding to, and phosphorylation of, CD200R. These data confirms that a functionally active CD200 extracellular moiety can be cleaved from the surface of CD200 expressing cells following ectodomain shedding. PMID:27111430

  12. Imbalance between subsets of CD8+ peripheral blood T cells in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ming-Qiang; Liu, Hong-Ju; Xin, Jian-Bao; Zhang, Jian-Chu; Wu, Jiang-Hua; Meng, Zhao-Ji; Sun, Sheng-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Background. CD8+ T lymphocytes are known to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, systematic analyses of CD8+ T cell (Cytotoxic T cells, Tc) subsets in COPD patients have yet to be well conducted. Methods. The whole Tc subsets, including Tc1/2/10/17, CD8+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and CD8+α7+ T cells, were quantified by flow cytometry in peripheral blood from 24 stable COPD subjects (SCOPD), 14 patients during acute exacerbations (AECOPD), and 14 healthy nonsmokers (HN). Results. Acute exacerbations of COPD were accompanied by elevated levels of circulating CD8+ T cells. Tc1 cells were increased in both SCOPD and AECOPD patients, whereas the percentage of Tc2 cells was decreased in SCOPD patients but remained normal in AECOPD patients. Tc17 cells were increased only in AECOPD patients, and the percentage of Tc10 cells was reduced in both SCOPD and AECOPD patients. The imbalances of pro/anti-inflammatory Tc subsets observed in COPD may be caused by the lack of Tc10 cells and the impaired anti-inflammatory capacity of CD8+ Tregs. Conclusions. The imbalances between subsets of CD8+ peripheral blood T cells contribute to the immune response dysfunction in COPD pathogenesis. PMID:27547589

  13. WT1 PEPTIDE VACCINATIONS INDUCE CD4 AND CD8 T CELL IMMUNE RESPONSES IN PATIENTS WITH MESOTHELIOMA AND NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Krug, Lee M.; Dao, Tao; Brown, Andrew B.; Maslak, Peter; Travis, William; Bekele, Sara; Korontsvit, Tatyana; Zakhaleva, Victoria; Wolchok, Jedd; Yuan, Jianda; Li, Hao; Tyson, Leslie; Scheinberg, David A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The transcription factor, WT1, is highly overexpressed in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) and immunohistochemical stains for WT1 are used routinely to aid in its diagnosis. Using computer prediction analysis we designed analog peptides derived from WT1 sequences by substituting amino acids at key HLA-A0201 binding positions. We tested the safety and immunogenicity of a WT1 vaccine comprised of four class 1 and class 2 peptides in patients with thoracic neoplasms expressing WT1. METHODS Therapy consisted of six subcutaneous vaccinations administered with Montanide adjuvant on weeks 0, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12, with 6 additional monthly injections for responding patients. Injection sites were pre-stimulated with GM-CSF (70mcg). Immune responses were evaluated by DTH, CD4 T-cell proliferation, CD8 T-cell interferon gamma release, intracellular cytokine staining, WT1 peptide MHC-tetramer staining, and cytotoxicity against WT1 positive tumor cells. RESULTS Nine patients with MPM and 3 with NSCLC were vaccinated, with 8 patients receiving at least 6 vaccinations; in total, 10 patients were evaluable for immune response. Six out of nine patients tested demonstrated CD4 T-cell proliferation to WT1 specific peptides, and five of the six HLA-A0201 patients tested mounted a CD8 T-cell response. Stimulated T cells were capable of cytotoxicity against WT-1 positive cells. Vaccination also induced polyfunctional CD8 T cell responses. CONCLUSIONS This multivalent WT1 peptide analog vaccine induces immune responses in a high proportion of patients with thoracic malignancies with minimal toxicity. A randomized trial testing this vaccine as adjuvant therapy in MPM is planned. PMID:20532500

  14. Synthesis, characterization and photocatalytic activity of new photocatalyst CdBiYO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Huiyang; Luan, Jingfei

    2012-09-01

    CdBiYO4 was synthesized by a solid-state reaction method for the first time. The structural and photocatalytic properties of CdBiYO4 had been characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray spectrometry. CdBiYO4 crystallized with a tetragonal spinel structure by space group I41/amd. The lattice parameters for CdBiYO4 were a = b = 14.519 Å and c = 9.442 Å. The band gap of CdBiYO4 was estimated to be 2.41 eV. The photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB) was realized under visible light irradiation with CdBiYO4 as catalyst. The results showed that CdBiYO4 owned higher photocatalytic activity compared with pure TiO2 or N-doped TiO2 for photocatalytic degradation of MB under visible light irradiation. The photocatalytic degradation of MB with CdBiYO4 or N-doped TiO2 as catalyst followed the first-order reaction kinetics, and the first-order rate constant was 0.0137 or 0.0033 min-1. After visible light irradiation for 225 min with CdBiYO4 as catalyst, complete removal and mineralization of MB were observed. The reduction of the total organic carbon, the formation of inorganic products, SO42- and NO3-, and the evolution of CO2 revealed the continuous mineralization of MB during the photocatalytic process. The possible photocatalytic degradation pathway of MB was obtained under visible light irradiation. CdBiYO4/(visible light) photocatalysis system was found to be suitable for textile industry wastewater treatment and could be utilized to resolve other environmental chemical pollution problems.

  15. Tcf1 and Lef1 transcription factors establish CD8(+) T cell identity through intrinsic HDAC activity.

    PubMed

    Xing, Shaojun; Li, Fengyin; Zeng, Zhouhao; Zhao, Yunjie; Yu, Shuyang; Shan, Qiang; Li, Yalan; Phillips, Farrah C; Maina, Peterson K; Qi, Hank H; Liu, Chengyu; Zhu, Jun; Pope, R Marshall; Musselman, Catherine A; Zeng, Chen; Peng, Weiqun; Xue, Hai-Hui

    2016-06-01

    The CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell dichotomy is essential for effective cellular immunity. How individual T cell identity is established remains poorly understood. Here we show that the high-mobility group (HMG) transcription factors Tcf1 and Lef1 are essential for repressing CD4(+) lineage-associated genes including Cd4, Foxp3 and Rorc in CD8(+) T cells. Tcf1- and Lef1-deficient CD8(+) T cells exhibit histone hyperacetylation, which can be ascribed to intrinsic histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity in Tcf1 and Lef1. Mutation of five conserved amino acids in the Tcf1 HDAC domain diminishes HDAC activity and the ability to suppress CD4(+) lineage genes in CD8(+) T cells. These findings reveal that sequence-specific transcription factors can utilize intrinsic HDAC activity to guard cell identity by repressing lineage-inappropriate genes. PMID:27111144

  16. Oxidized High-Density Lipoprotein Impairs Endothelial Progenitor Cells' Function by Activation of CD36-MAPK-TSP-1 Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianxiang; He, Zhiqing; Gao, Xiang; Wu, Feng; Ding, Ru; Ren, Yusheng; Jiang, Qijun; Fan, Min

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: High-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels inversely correlate with cardiovascular events due to the protective effects on vascular wall and stem cells, which are susceptible to oxidative modifications and then lead to potential pro-atherosclerotic effects. We proposed that oxidized HDL (ox-HDL) might lead to endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) dysfunction and investigated underlying mechanisms. Results: ox-HDL was shown to increase apoptosis and intracellular reactive oxygen species levels, but to reduce migration, angiogenesis, and cholesterol efflux of EPCs in a dose-dependent manner. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and NF-κB were activated after ox-HDL stimulation, which also upregulated thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) expression without affecting vascular endothelial growth factor. Effects caused by ox-HDL could be significantly attenuated by pretreatment with short hairpin RNA-mediated CD36 knockdown or probucol. Data of in vivo experiments and the inverse correlation of ox-HDL and circulating EPC numbers among patients with coronary artery diseases (CAD) or CAD and type 2 diabetes also supported it. Meanwhile, HDL separated from such patients could significantly increase cultured EPC's caspase 3 activity, further supporting our proposal. Innovation: This is the most complete study to date of how ox-HDL would impair EPCs function, which was involved with activation of CD36-p38 MAPK-TSP-1 pathways and proved by not only the inverse relationship between ox-HDL and circulating EPCs in clinic but also pro-apoptotic effects of HDL separated from patients' serum. Conclusion: Activation of CD36-p38 MAPK-TSP-1 pathways contributes to the pathological effects of ox-HDL on EPCs' dysfunction, which might be one of the potential etiological factors responsible for the disturbed neovascularization in chronic ischemic disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 308–324. PMID:25313537

  17. Interferon-alpha stimulates production of interleukin-10 in activated CD4+ T cells and monocytes.

    PubMed

    Aman, M J; Tretter, T; Eisenbeis, I; Bug, G; Decker, T; Aulitzky, W E; Tilg, H; Huber, C; Peschel, C

    1996-06-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) on the expression of interleukin-10 (IL-10) mRNA and protein synthesis in human monocytes and CD4+ T cells. In mononuclear cells, IFN-alpha induced expression of IL-10 mRNA and further enhanced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated IL-10 expression. In purified monocytes, a strong expression of IL-10 mRNA induced by LPS was not further enhanced by IFN-alpha. In highly purified CD4+ T cells, IFN-alpha upregulated IL-10 mRNA upon activation with phytohemagglutinin and phorbol myristate acetate. In purified monocytes, an effect of IFN-alpha on IL-10 protein synthesis was dependent on costimulation with LPS. Maximal stimulation of IL-10 protein by IFN-alpha was seen after prolonged incubation periods of 48 to 96 hours, whereas IFN-gamma reduced IL-10 production in the early incubation period. Similar effects of IFN-alpha were observed in CD4+ T cells activated with CD3 and CD28 monoclonal antibodies. Addition of IFN-alpha caused an increase of IL-10 in culture supernatants of activated T-helper cells of more than 100% after 96 hours of incubation. In contrast, other cytokines, including IFN-gamma and IL-4, had no influence on IL-10 secretion stimulated by CD3 and CD28 in CD4+ T cells. In serum samples of IFN-alpha-treated individuals, we failed to detect an influence of cytokine treatment on IL-10 serum levels, confirming the requirement of additional activating signals for IFN-alpha-mediated effects on IL-10 synthesis. In conclusion, IFN-alpha enhances the late induction of IL-10, which physiologically occurs upon stimulation of monocytes and T cells. Biologically, this effect might enhance the negative-feedback mechanism ascribed to IL-10, which limits inflammatory reactions. PMID:8639843

  18. Extracellular 2'5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 2 mediates T-cell receptor CD3-ζ chain down-regulation via caspase-3 activation in oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Dar, Asif A; Pradhan, Trupti N; Kulkarni, Dakshayni P; Shah, Sagar U; Rao, Kanury V; Chaukar, Devendra A; D'Cruz, Anil K; Chiplunkar, Shubhada V

    2016-02-01

    Decreased expression of CD3-ζ chain, an adaptor protein associated with T-cell signalling, is well documented in patients with oral cancer, but the mechanistic justifications are fragmentary. Previous studies in patients with oral cancer have shown that decreased expression of CD3-ζ chain was associated with decreased responsiveness of T cells. Tumours are known to induce localized as well as systemic immune suppression. This study provides evidence that oral tumour-derived factors promote immune suppression by down-regulating CD3-ζ chain expression. 2'5'-Oligoadenylate synthetase 2 (OAS2) was identified by the proteomic approach and our results established a causative link between CD3-ζ chain down-regulation and OAS2 stimulation. The surrogate situation was established by over-expressing OAS2 in a HEK293 cell line and cell-free supernatant was collected. These supernatants when incubated with T cells resulted in down-regulation of CD3-ζ chain, which shows that the secreted OAS2 is capable of regulating CD3-ζ chain expression. Incubation of T cells with cell-free supernatants of oral tumours or recombinant human OAS2 (rh-OAS2) induced caspase-3 activation, which resulted in CD3-ζ chain down-regulation. Caspase-3 inhibition/down-regulation using pharmacological inhibitor or small interfering RNA restored down-regulated CD3-ζ chain expression in T cells induced by cell-free tumour supernatant or rh-OAS2. Collectively these results show that OAS2 leads to impairment in CD3-ζ chain expression, so offering an explanation that might be applicable to the CD3-ζ chain deficiency observed in cancer and diverse disease conditions. PMID:26595239

  19. Alterations in Activation, Cytotoxic Capacity and Trafficking Profile of Peripheral CD8 T Cells in Young Adult Binge Drinkers

    PubMed Central

    Zaldivar Fujigaki, José Luis; Arroyo Valerio, América Guadalupe; López Alvarenga, Juan Carlos; Gutiérrez Reyes, Esperanza Gabriela; Kershenobich, David; Hernández Ruiz, Joselin

    2015-01-01

    Background Excess of alcohol consumption is a public health problem and has documented effects on the immune system of humans and animals. Animal and in vitro studies suggest that alcohol abuse changes CD8 T cell (CD8) characteristics, however it remains unknown if the CD8 profile of binge drinkers is different in terms of activation, trafficking and cytotoxic capacity. Aim To analyze the peripheral CD8 cytotoxic capacity, activation and trafficking phenotypic profile of Mexican young adults with regard to alcohol consumption pattern. Methods 55 Mexican young adults were stratified as Light (20), Intermediate (18) or Binge drinkers (17) according to their reported alcohol consumption pattern. Blood samples were obtained and hematic biometry and liver enzyme analysis were performed. Peripheral CD8 profile was established by expression of Granzyme B (GB), CD137, CD127, CD69, TLR4, PD1, CCR2, CCR4, CCR5 and CXCR4 by FACS. Data was analyzed by ANOVA, posthoc DMS and Tamhane, and principal component analysis (PCA) with varimax rotation, p<0.05. Results The Binge drinking group showed increased γGT together with increased expression of CD69 and reduced expression of TLR4, PD1, CCR2 and CXCR4 in peripheral CD8 cells. Other parameters were also specific to Binge drinkers. PCA established 3 factors associated with alcohol consumption: “Early Activation” represented by CD69 and TLR4 expression in the CD8 population; “Effector Activation” by CD69 expression in CD8 CD127+CD137+ and CD8 CD25+ CD137+; and Trafficking by CXCR4 expression on total CD8 and CD8 GB+CXCR4+, and CCR2 expression on total CD8. Binge drinking pattern showed low expression of Early Activation and Trafficking factors while Light drinking pattern exhibited high expression of Effector Activation factor. Conclusions Alcohol consumption affects the immune phenotype of CD8 cells since binge drinking pattern was found to be associated with high CD69 and low TLR4, CXCR4 and CCR2 expression, which suggest

  20. Selective killing of breast cancer cells expressing activated CD44 using CD44 ligand-coated nanoparticles in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huizhen; Liu, Yiwen; Wang, Wenjuan; Du, Yan; Gao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The cell surface glycoprotein CD44 is expressed in cancer cells and has been used as a therapeutic target in preclinical studies. However, the ubiquitous expression of CD44 in numerous cell types, including hematopoietic cells, has hindered its application in targeted therapy. Here, we demonstrated that CD44 was activated on breast cancer cells but was inactive on normal cells in vitro and in vivo. We analyzed 34 clinical primary tumor and normal breast tissues and demonstrated that CD44 was in an active state on breast cancer cells but in an inactive state on normal cells. Furthermore, based on the binding property of CD44 with its ligand hyaluronan (HA), we self-assembled HA-coated nanoparticles and studied their selective targeting efficacy. Our results indicate that HA-coated nanoparticles bearing the CD44 ligand selectively targeted cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo, killing breast cancer cells while sparing normal cells. Our study suggested that the active state of CD44 plays a crucial role in the selective targeting of breast cancer cells by avoiding nonspecific toxicity to CD44-quiescent normal cells. These findings may provide a new idea for the selective targeting of cancer cells in other human cancers. PMID:25909172

  1. Characterization of the common acute lymphoblastic leukaemia antigen (CD10) as an activation molecule on mature human B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kiyokawa, N; Kokai, Y; Ishimoto, K; Fujita, H; Fujimoto, J; Hata, J I

    1990-01-01

    Distinct expression pattern of CD10 molecules during B cell activation was analysed using in vivo and in vitro systems. By two-colour flowcytometrical analysis, CD10 was found to be expressed at a specific stage of in vivo activating B cells. The expression of CD10 during B cell activation appeared to be unique from that of other activation-related B cell antigens including L29, MA6, OKT9 and OKT10. Although the expression of CD10 was associated with that of the activation-related B cell antigens, CD10+ B cells could be separated in the distinct fractions to those expressing other activation-related B cell antigens when fractionated by cell gravity. In particular, certain CD10+ B cells were detected positive for the resting B cell antigen, L30. In vitro studies revealed that CD10+ B cells arose from CD10- B cells at an early step of B cell activation, and disappeared lately when