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Sample records for active cell length

  1. Lack of correlation between telomere length and telomerase activity and expression in leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Januszkiewicz, Danuta; Wysoki, Jacek; Lewandowski, Krzysztof; Pernak, Monika; Nowicka, Karina; Rembowska, Jolanta; Nowak, Jerzy

    2003-12-01

    The expression of three components of telomerase complex (hTR, hTERT, TP1) along with telomerase activity and telomere length in leukemic cells was investigated. Cells were isolated from peripheral blood and/or bone marrow of children with acute lymphoblastic (ALL) and non-lymphoblastic (ANLL) leukemia. Expression of three components of telomerase as well as telomerase activity was found in all leukemic cells. Chemiluminescent detection of terminal restriction fragments (TRF) from DNA isolated from ALL cells showed variable patterns expressing considerable heterogeneity of telomere length. The ALL cells appeared to have both long and short telomere lengths, in contrast to normal peripheral lymphocytes, which produced limited pattern of TRF. The ANLL cells produced predominantly short telomere pattern despite high telomerase activity and expression. It can be concluded that high telomerase activity and expression in leukemic cells is not always correlated with long telomeres (TRF pattern).

  2. Myofilament length dependent activation.

    PubMed

    de Tombe, Pieter P; Mateja, Ryan D; Tachampa, Kittipong; Ait Mou, Younss; Farman, Gerrie P; Irving, Thomas C

    2010-05-01

    The Frank-Starling law of the heart describes the interrelationship between end-diastolic volume and cardiac ejection volume, a regulatory system that operates on a beat-to-beat basis. The main cellular mechanism that underlies this phenomenon is an increase in the responsiveness of cardiac myofilaments to activating Ca(2+) ions at a longer sarcomere length, commonly referred to as myofilament length-dependent activation. This review focuses on what molecular mechanisms may underlie myofilament length dependency. Specifically, the roles of inter-filament spacing, thick and thin filament based regulation, as well as sarcomeric regulatory proteins are discussed. Although the "Frank-Starling law of the heart" constitutes a fundamental cardiac property that has been appreciated for well over a century, it is still not known in muscle how the contractile apparatus transduces the information concerning sarcomere length to modulate ventricular pressure development.

  3. Myofilament length dependent activation

    SciTech Connect

    de Tombe, Pieter P.; Mateja, Ryan D.; Tachampa, Kittipong; Mou, Younss Ait; Farman, Gerrie P.; Irving, Thomas C.

    2010-05-25

    The Frank-Starling law of the heart describes the interrelationship between end-diastolic volume and cardiac ejection volume, a regulatory system that operates on a beat-to-beat basis. The main cellular mechanism that underlies this phenomenon is an increase in the responsiveness of cardiac myofilaments to activating Ca{sup 2+} ions at a longer sarcomere length, commonly referred to as myofilament length-dependent activation. This review focuses on what molecular mechanisms may underlie myofilament length dependency. Specifically, the roles of inter-filament spacing, thick and thin filament based regulation, as well as sarcomeric regulatory proteins are discussed. Although the 'Frank-Starling law of the heart' constitutes a fundamental cardiac property that has been appreciated for well over a century, it is still not known in muscle how the contractile apparatus transduces the information concerning sarcomere length to modulate ventricular pressure development.

  4. Effect of Heparin Oligomer Chain Length on the Activation of Valvular Interstitial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pedron, Sara; Kasko, Andrea M.; Peinado, Carmen; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2010-01-01

    A key event in connective tissue remodeling involves the transformation of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts, also revealed by expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). However, misregulation of this transition can lead to fibrosis, an overgrowth and hardening of tissue due to excess extracellular matrix deposition, a process that is linked to heart valve disease and many others. Both disease treatment and regenerative strategies would benefit from strategies for the controlled delivery and presentation of bioactive factors that can promote or suppress this transformation. In this regard, the ability of heparin to complex a plethora of growth factors offers a broad range of possibilities for this purpose. Here, the effects of heparin chain length and structure on valvular interstitial cell (VIC) phenotypic expression were explored. Heparin from porcine intestinal mucosa was depolymerized with heparinase and fractionated to obtain oligosaccharides of different sizes. VICs cultured with octasaccharides and decasaccharides exhibited higher expression of a-SMA when compared to other saccharides and full-length heparin. No activation of VICs was observed in response to full-length heparin presence in media. PMID:20446725

  5. Chinese hamster ovary cells contain transcriptionally active full-length type C proviruses.

    PubMed

    Lie, Y S; Penuel, E M; Low, M A; Nguyen, T P; Mangahas, J O; Anderson, K P; Petropoulos, C J

    1994-12-01

    We have isolated a genomic locus from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells that contains a full-length provirus. Nucleotide sequence analysis indicates that it is a defective member of the rodent type C retrovirus family with an env region that is similar to those of mouse amphotropic retrovirus and subgroup B feline leukemia virus. We were able to demonstrate that this provirus is a member of a closely related family of full-length proviruses in CHO cells and Chinese hamster liver. Hybridization probes generated from this genomic clone were used to characterize type C retrovirus RNA expression in CHO cells. Full-length genomic RNA and subgenomic envelope mRNA were detected in CHO cell lines but not in the human-derived 293 cell line. Interestingly, we discovered that the site of retrovirus integration lies within a G repeat sequence belonging to the short interspersed element family of retroposons.

  6. OsKinesin-13A Is an Active Microtubule Depolymerase Involved in Glume Length Regulation via Affecting Cell Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zhu Yun; Liu, Ling Tong; Li, Tang; Yan, Song; Kuang, Bai Jian; Huang, Shan Jin; Yan, Chang Jie; Wang, Tai

    2015-01-01

    Grain size is an important trait influencing both the yield and quality of rice and its major determinant is glume size. However, how glume size is regulated remains largely unknown. Here, we report the characterization of OsKinesin-13A, which regulates cell elongation and glume length in rice. The mutant of OsKinesin-13A, sar1, displayed length reduction in grains and other organs including internodes, leaves and roots. The grain phenotype in sar1 was directly caused by reduction in glume length, which in turn restricted caryopsis size. Histological results revealed that length decrease in sar1 organs resulted from abnormalities in cell elongation. The orientation of cellulose microfibrils was defective in sar1. Consistently, sar1 showed reduced transverse orientation of cortical microtubules. Further observations demonstrated that microtubule turnover was decreased in sar1. OsKinesin-13A was shown to be an active microtubule depolymerase and mainly distributed on vesicles derived from the Golgi apparatus and destined for the cell surface. Thus, our results suggest that OsKinesin-13A utilizes its microtubule depolymerization activity to promote microtubule turnover, which may not only influence transverse orientation of cortical microtubules but also facilitate vesicle transport from the Golgi apparatus to the cell surface, and thus affects cellulose microfibril orientation and cell elongation. PMID:25807460

  7. Identification of an IRF-1 splicing transcript in APL cells sharing similar transactivation activity of the full length one.

    PubMed

    Lou, Yejiang; Xia, Di; Yu, Mengxia; Tong, Jianhua; Jin, Jie

    2017-03-20

    Interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) is a member of the interferon regulatory factor family. It acts as a transcriptional activator and plays a critical role in antiviral defense, immune response, cell growth regulation, apoptosis and cell differentiation. Deletions, mutations or aberrant splicing of IRF-1 would result in its functional inactivation, and closely related to the tumorigenesis. In this work, we identified an IRF-1 splicing transcript (IRF-1-s) in all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-treated acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cell line NB4 cells. It lost the exon 8 and 9 of the full length IRF-1, expressed in numerous cell types and could be induced to expression by ATRA in NB4 cells. It turned out similar biological activity as full length IRF-1 to enhance the transcription of interferon stimulated response element (ISRE)-containing target genes. Identification of IRF-1-s in NB4 cells would be benefit for our further exploring the signaling pathway of ATRA and interferons, as well as the mechanisms of differentiation of APL cells.

  8. Effects of PCB126 and PCB153 on telomerase activity and telomere length in undifferentiated and differentiated HL-60 cells

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Xing; Senthilkumar, PK; Schnoor, Jerald L.; Ludewig, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    PCBs are persistent organic pollutants with carcinogenic, immune- and developmental toxicity. This suggests that they may interfere with normal cell maturation. Cancer and stem/progenitor cells have telomerase activity to maintain and protect the chromosome ends, but lose this activity during differentiation. We hypothesized that PCBs interfere with telomerase activity and the telomere complex thereby disturbing cell differentiation and stem/progenitor cell function. HL-60 cells are cancer cells that can differentiate to granulocytes and monocytes. We exposed HL-60 cells to the PCB126 (dioxin-like) and PCB153 (non-dioxin-like) 6 days before and during 3 days of differentiation. The differentiated cells showed G0/G1 phase arrest and very low telomerase activity. hTERT and hTR, two telomerase-related genes, were down-regulated. The telomere shelterins TRF1, TRF2, and POT were upregulated in granulocytes, TRF2 was up- and POT1 downregulated in monocytes. Both PCBs reduced telomerase activity in undifferentiated cells and further reduced telomerase activity in differentiated cells, but had only small effects on the differentiation and telomere-related genes. Long term treatment of undifferentiated HL-60 cells with PCB126 produced a downregulation of telomerase activity and decrease of hTERT, hTR, TRF1, and POT1 gene expression. With PCB153 the effects were less pronounced and some shelterin genes were increased after 30 days exposure. With each PCB no differentiation of cells was observed and cells continued to proliferate despite reduced telomerase activity, resulting in shortened telomeres after 30 days of exposure. These results indicate cell type and PCB congener specific effects on telomeres/telomerase-related genes and, although PCBs do not seem to strongly affect differentiation, they could influence the longevity of stem or progenitor cells through telomere attrition with potential long-term consequences for health. PMID:26330309

  9. Effects of PCB126 and PCB153 on telomerase activity and telomere length in undifferentiated and differentiated HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Xin, Xing; Senthilkumar, P K; Schnoor, Jerald L; Ludewig, Gabriele

    2016-02-01

    PCBs are persistent organic pollutants that are carcinogenic and immunotoxic and have developmental toxicity. This suggests that they may interfere with normal cell maturation. Cancer and stem/progenitor cells have telomerase activity to maintain and protect the chromosome ends, but lose this activity during differentiation. We hypothesized that PCBs interfere with telomerase activity and the telomere complex, thereby disturbing cell differentiation and stem/progenitor cell function. HL-60 cells are cancer cells that can differentiated into granulocytes and monocytes. We exposed HL-60 cells to PCB126 (dioxin-like) and PCB153 (nondioxin-like) 6 days before and during 3 days of differentiation. The differentiated cells showed G0/G1 phase arrest and very low telomerase activity. hTERT and hTR, two telomerase-related genes, were downregulated. The telomere shelterins TRF1, TRF2, and POT1 were upregulated in granulocytes, and TRF2 was upregulated and POT1 downregulated in monocytes. Both PCBs further reduced telomerase activity in differentiated cells, but had only small effects on the differentiation and telomere-related genes. Treatment of undifferentiated HL-60 cells for 30 days with PCB126 produced a downregulation of telomerase activity and a decrease of hTERT, hTR, TRF1, and POT1 gene expression. With PCB153, the effects were less pronounced and some shelterin genes were increased after 30 days of exposure. With each PCB, no differentiation of cells was observed and cells continued to proliferate despite reduced telomerase activity, resulting in shortened telomeres after 30 days of exposure. These results indicate cell-type and PCB congener-specific effects on telomere/telomerase-related genes. Although PCBs do not seem to strongly affect differentiation, they may influence stem or progenitor cells through telomere attrition with potential long-term consequences for health.

  10. In vitro aging of rat lung cells. Downregulation of telomerase activity and continuous decrease of telomere length are not incompatible with malignant transformation.

    PubMed

    Petitot, Fabrice; Lebeau, Jérôme; Dano, Laurent; Lectard, Bruno; Altmeyer, Sandrine; Levalois, Céline; Chevillard, Sylvie

    2003-05-15

    Most normal mammalian somatic cells cultivated in vitro enter replicative senescence after a finite number of divisions, as a consequence of the progressive shortening of telomeres during proliferation that reflects one aspect of organism/cellular aging. The situation appears more complex in rodent cells due to physiological telomerase expression in most somatic normal tissues, great telomere length, and the difficulties of finding suitable in vitro culture conditions. To study in vitro aging of rat lung epithelial cells, we have developed primary culture conditions adapted to rat fresh lung explants and have studied for 1 year (50 passages) the changes in cellular proliferation and mortality, genetic instability, telomerase activity, telomere length, and tumorigenic potential. We have observed an absence of senescence and/or crisis, a transient genetic instability, the persistence of a differentiated Clara cell phenotype, a steady decrease in telomerase activity followed by a low residual activity together with a continuous decrease in telomere length, a constant rate of proliferation, and the acquisition of tumorigenic potential. The bypass of the growth arrest and the acquisition of long-term growth properties could be explained by the loss of p16(INK4a) expression, the ARF/p53 pathway not being altered. In conclusion, these results clearly indicate that, in rat lung epithelial cells, in vitro transformation and acquisition of tumorigenic properties can occur even if the telomere length is still decreasing and telomerase activity remains downregulated.

  11. Telomerase activity is more significant for predicting the outcome of IVF treatment than telomere length in granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenjun; Chen, Hong; Li, Ruiqi; Ouyang, Nengyong; Chen, Jinghua; Huang, Lili; Mai, Meiqi; Zhang, Ningfeng; Zhang, Qingxue; Yang, Dongzi

    2014-05-01

    Our previous study has demonstrated that luteinized granulosa cells (GCs) have the potential to proliferate and that the telomerase activity (TA) of luteinized GCs may predict the clinical outcomes of IVF treatment. However, in the field of telomere research, there have always been different opinions regarding the significance of TA and telomere length (TL). Thus, in the present study, we compared the effects of these two parameters on IVF treatment outcomes in the same individuals. TL did not differ significantly between the pregnant group and the non-pregnant group. The TA, number of retrieved oocytes and rate of blastocyst transfer were significantly higher in the pregnant group than in the non-pregnant group (0.8825 OD×mm, 12.75±2.20 and 34.48%, respectively, in the pregnant group vs 0.513 OD×mm, 11.60±0.93 and 14.89%, respectively, in the non-pregnant group (P<0.05)), while basal FSH level was lower in the pregnant group than in the non-pregnant group. The subjects did not differ with regard to ovarian stimulation or other clinical characteristics. A TA increase of 1 OD×mm increased the chance of becoming pregnant 4.769-fold (odds ratio: 5.769, 95% CI: 1.434-23.212, P<0.014). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves were 0.576 for TL and 0.674 for TA (P=0.271 and P<0. 012 respectively). The corresponding cut-off points were 4.470 for TL and 0.650 OD×mm for TA. These results demonstrate that TA is a better predictor of pregnancy outcomes following IVF treatment than TL. No other clinical parameters, including age, baseline FSH level or peak oestradiol level, distinguished between the pregnant group and the non-pregnant group as effectively as TA.

  12. Mild hyperoxia limits hTR levels, telomerase activity, and telomere length maintenance in hTERT-transduced bone marrow endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Napier, Christine E; Veas, Laura A; Kan, Chin-Yi; Taylor, Lisa M; Yuan, Jun; Wen, Victoria W; James, Alexander; O'Brien, Tracey A; Lock, Richard B; MacKenzie, Karen L

    2010-10-01

    Reactivation of telomerase in endothelial cells (ECs) may be an effective approach to the treatment of vascular disorders associated with telomere attrition and EC senescence. However, overexpression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) does not prevent net telomere loss in ECs grown in standard culture medium with exposure to atmospheric oxygen (21% O(2)). Since these culture conditions are hyperoxic relative to normal tissue in vivo, where oxygen tension is estimated to be 1%-6%, we examined the effects of reduced exposure to oxidative stress (OS) on telomere length maintenance in hTERT-transduced bone marrow endothelial (BMhTERT) cells. Propagation of BMhTERT cells in the free radical scavenger, tert-butylhydroxylamine (tBN), and/or in 5% O(2) increased telomerase enzyme activity and facilitated telomere length maintenance. The enhancement of telomerase activity correlated with higher levels of the telomerase RNA component (hTR). We also investigated the role of the telomere binding protein, TRF1, in telomere length regulation under alternate OS conditions. Inhibition of TRF1 function had no effect on telomere length in BMhTERT cells grown under standard culture conditions. However, alleviation of OS by growth in tBN plus 5% O(2), elevated hTR levels, enhanced telomerase enzyme activity, and enabled progressive telomere lengthening. The direct impact of hTR levels on telomerase-mediated telomere lengthening was demonstrated by overexpression of hTR. BMhTERT cells transduced with hTR exhibited very high telomerase enzyme activity and underwent dramatic telomere lengthening under standard culture conditions. Overall, these results demonstrate that hTR levels are reduced by mild hyperoxia and limit telomerase-mediated telomere lengthening in hTERT-transduced ECs.

  13. The length of the bridging chain in ansa-metallocenes influences their antiproliferative activity against triple negative breast cancer cells (TNBC).

    PubMed

    Beauperin, Matthieu; Top, Siden; Richard, Marie-Aude; Plażuk, Damian; Pigeon, Pascal; Toma, Stefan; Poláčková, Viera; Jaouen, Gérard

    2016-08-16

    In order to examine whether the length of the bridging chain in ansa-ferrocenes affects their antiproliferative activity against MDA-MB-231 triple negative breast cancer cell lines (TNBC), we synthesized derivatives of the type 1-[bis-(4-hydroxyphenyl)]methylidene-[n]ferrocenophane and 1-[(4-hydroxyphenyl)-phenyl]methylidene-[n]ferrocenophane with n = 3, 4, 5. We found that the derivatives of [3]ferrocenophane, the compounds with the shortest bridging chains, are the most active. IC50 values were 0.09 ± 0.01, 2.41 ± 0.10, and 1.85 ± 0.25 μM for the dihydroxyphenyl derivatives, with n = 3, 4, 5, respectively. These differences can be explained in terms of modification of the key metabolites (radical versus quinone methides) within the ansa series depending on the length of the bridging chain. The derivative of [5]ferrocenophane, possessing two -[bis-(4-hydroxyphenyl)]methylidene groups, was also prepared. Surprisingly, this relatively large molecule is also active (IC50 = 2.7 ± 0.3 μM). Two ruthenocenophane analogs were also synthesized. These ruthenium compounds are practically inactive against MDA-MB-231 cells. The unusual chemistry of these different compounds is discussed in terms of elucidating the mechanism underlying their diverse antiproliferative activity, and their specific advantages are evaluated.

  14. Telomere length and telomerase activity in the context of menopause.

    PubMed

    Pines, A

    2013-12-01

    Telomere length is a marker of cell aging, since shorter telomeres and a higher rate of telomere shortening with time are associated with poorer health status and survival. Various factors may determine telomere length and the function of the telomere maintenance system, including the hereditary load and several modifiable variables such as diet and lifestyle. Telomere length and telomerase activity were investigated extensively in a variety of diseases, such as malignancies (i.e. breast and colon cancer), cardiovascular disease and its related metabolic risk factors, cognitive, mental and psychiatric conditions, and many others. Some evidence points at an association between longer endogenous estrogen exposure (length of reproductive years of life) and greater telomere length and lower telomerase activity. However, there is probably no correlation in regard to menopause per se or the use of hormone therapy. Changing the nutrition and implementing healthy lifestyles may improve the telomere/telomerase parameters in postmenopausal women, but better understanding of this system is still needed.

  15. Developmental control of telomere lengths and telomerase activity in plants.

    PubMed Central

    Riha, K; Fajkus, J; Siroky, J; Vyskot, B

    1998-01-01

    Telomere lengths and telomerase activity were studied during the development of a model dioecious plant, Melandrium album (syn Silene latifolia). Telomeric DNA consisted of Arabidopsis-type TTTAGGG tandem repeats. The terminal positions of these repeats were confirmed by both Bal31 exonuclease degradation and in situ hybridization. Analysis of terminal restriction fragments in different tissues and ontogenetic stages showed that telomere lengths are stabilized precisely and do not change during plant growth and development. Telomerase activity tested by using a semiquantitative telomerase repeat amplification protocol correlated with cell proliferation in the tissues analyzed. Highest activity was found in germinating seedlings and root tips, whereas we observed a 100-fold decrease in telomerase activity in leaves and no activity in quiescent seeds. Telomerase also was found in mature pollen grains. Telomerase activity in tissues containing dividing cells and telomere length stability during development suggest their precise control during plant ontogenesis; however, the telomere length regulation mechanism could be unbalanced during in vitro dedifferentiation. PMID:9761795

  16. NADH oxidase activity (NOX) and enlargement of HeLa cells oscillate with two different temperature-compensated period lengths of 22 and 24 minutes corresponding to different NOX forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S.; Pogue, R.; Morre, D. M.; Morre, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    NOX proteins are cell surface-associated and growth-related hydroquinone (NADH) oxidases with protein disulfide-thiol interchange activity. A defining characteristic of NOX proteins is that the two enzymatic activities alternate to generate a regular period length of about 24 min. HeLa cells exhibit at least two forms of NOX. One is tumor-associated (tNOX) and is inhibited by putative quinone site inhibitors (e.g., capsaicin or the antitumor sulfonylurea, LY181984). Another is constitutive (CNOX) and refractory to inhibition. The periodic alternation of activities and drug sensitivity of the NADH oxidase activity observed with intact HeLa cells was retained in isolated plasma membranes and with the solubilized and partially purified enzyme. At least two activities were present. One had a period length of 24 min and the other had a period length of 22 min. The lengths of both the 22 and the 24 min periods were temperature compensated (approximately the same when measured at 17, 27 or 37 degrees C) whereas the rate of NADH oxidation approximately doubled with each 10 degrees C rise in temperature. The rate of increase in cell area of HeLa cells when measured by video-enhanced light microscopy also exhibited a complex period of oscillations reflective of both 22 and 24 min period lengths. The findings demonstrate the presence of a novel oscillating NOX activity at the surface of cancer cells with a period length of 22 min in addition to the constitutive NOX of non-cancer cells and tissues with a period length of 24 min.

  17. Circulating cell-free DNA, telomere length and bilirubin in the Vienna Active Ageing Study: exploratory analysis of a randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Tosevska, Anela; Franzke, Bernhard; Hofmann, Marlene; Vierheilig, Immina; Schober-Halper, Barbara; Oesen, Stefan; Neubauer, Oliver; Wessner, Barbara; Wagner, Karl-Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Telomere length (TL) in blood cells is widely used in human studies as a molecular marker of ageing. Circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) as well as unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) are dynamic blood constituents whose involvement in age-associated diseases is largely unexplored. To our knowledge, there are no published studies integrating all three parameters, especially in individuals of advanced age. Here we present a secondary analysis from the Vienna Active Aging Study (VAAS), a randomized controlled intervention trial in institutionalized elderly individuals (n = 101). Using an exploratory approach we combine three blood-based molecular markers (TL, UCB and cfDNA) with a range of primary and secondary outcomes from the intervention. We further look at the changes occurring in these parameters after 6-month resistance exercise training with or without supplementation. A correlation between UCB and TL was evident at baseline (p < 0.05), and both were associated with increased chromosomal anomalies such as nucleoplasmatic bridges and nuclear buds (p < 0.05). Of the three main markers explored in this paper, only cfDNA decreased significantly (p < 0.05) after 6-month training and dietary intervention. No clear relationship could be established between cfDNA and either UCB or TL. The trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01775111). PMID:27905522

  18. Telomerase inhibitor imetelstat has preclinical activity across the spectrum of non-small cell lung cancer oncogenotypes in a telomere length dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Frink, Robin E.; Peyton, Michael; Schiller, Joan H.; Gazdar, Adi F.; Shay, Jerry W.; Minna, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Telomerase was evaluated as a therapeutic oncotarget by studying the efficacy of the telomerase inhibitor imetelstat in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines to determine the range of response phenotypes and identify potential biomarkers of response. A panel of 63 NSCLC cell lines was studied for telomere length and imetelstat efficacy in inhibiting colony formation and no correlation was found with patient characteristics, tumor histology, and oncogenotypes. While there was no overall correlation between imetelstat efficacy with initial telomere length (ranging from 1.5 to 20 kb), the quartile of NSCLC lines with the shortest telomeres was more sensitive than the quartile with the longest telomeres. Continuous long-term treatment with imetelstat resulted in sustained telomerase inhibition, progressive telomere shortening and eventual growth inhibition in a telomere-length dependent manner. Cessation of imetelstat therapy before growth inhibition was followed by telomere regrowth. Likewise, in vivo imetelstat treatment caused tumor xenograft growth inhibition in a telomere-length dependent manner. We conclude from these preclinical studies of telomerase as an oncotarget tested by imetelstat response that imetelstat has efficacy across the entire oncogenotype spectrum of NSCLC, continuous therapy is necessary to prevent telomere regrowth, and short telomeres appears to be the best treatment biomarker. PMID:27192120

  19. The activity and localization patterns of cathepsins B and X in cells of the mouse gastrointestinal tract differ along its length.

    PubMed

    Tamhane, Tripti; Arampatzidou, Maria; Gerganova, Veneta; Tacke, Marlene; Illukkumbura, Rukshala; Dauth, Stephanie; Schaschke, Norbert; Peters, Christoph; Reinheckel, Thomas; Brix, Klaudia

    2014-10-01

    Cysteine cathepsins are expressed in most tissues, including the gastrointestinal tract. We demonstrated an involvement of mouse intestinal cathepsin B in extracellular matrix remodeling for regeneration from trauma. The present study aimed at elucidating roles of cysteine cathepsins in the non-traumatized gastrointestinal tract of mice. Thus we investigated expression and localization patterns of cathepsin B and its closest relative, cathepsin X, along the length of the gastrointestinal tract, and determined the effects of their absence. Cathepsin B showed the highest protein levels in the anterior segments of the gastrointestinal tract, whereas the highest activity was observed in the jejunum, as revealed by cathepsin B-specific activity-based probe labeling. Cathepsin X was most abundant in the jejunum and protein levels were elevated in duodenum and colon of Ctsb-/- mice. The segmental pattern of cathepsin expression was reflected by a compartmentalized distribution of junction proteins and basal lamina constituents, changes in tissue architecture and altered activities of the brush border enzyme aminopeptidase N. In conclusion, we observed different compensatory effects and activity levels of cysteine peptidases along the length of the small and large intestines in a segment-specific manner suggesting specific in situ functions of these enzymes in particular parts of the gastrointestinal tract.

  20. Activity of telomerase and telomeric length in Apis mellifera.

    PubMed

    Korandová, Michala; Frydrychová, Radmila Čapková

    2016-06-01

    Telomerase is an enzyme that adds repeats of DNA sequences to the ends of chromosomes, thereby preventing their shortening. Telomerase activity is associated with proliferative status of cells, organismal development, and aging. We report an analysis of telomerase activity and telomere length in the honeybee, Apis mellifera. Telomerase activity was found to be regulated in a development and caste-specific manner. During the development of somatic tissues of larval drones and workers, telomerase activity declined to 10 % of its level in embryos and remained low during pupal and adult stages but was upregulated in testes of late pupae, where it reached 70 % of the embryo level. Upregulation of telomerase activity was observed in the ovaries of late pupal queens, reaching 160 % of the level in embryos. Compared to workers and drones, queens displayed higher levels of telomerase activity. In the third larval instar of queens, telomerase activity reached the embryo level, and an enormous increase was observed in adult brains of queens, showing a 70-fold increase compared to a brain of an adult worker. Southern hybridization of terminal TTAGG fragments revealed a high variability of telomeric length between different individuals, although the same pattern of hybridization signals was observed in different tissues of each individual.

  1. Toll-like receptor 2 activation by β2→1-fructans protects barrier function of T84 human intestinal epithelial cells in a chain length-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Leonie M; Meyer, Diederick; Pullens, Gerdie; Faas, Marijke M; Venema, Koen; Ramasamy, Uttara; Schols, Henk A; de Vos, Paul

    2014-07-01

    Dietary fiber intake is associated with lower incidence and mortality from disease, but the underlying mechanisms of these protective effects are unclear. We hypothesized that β2→1-fructan dietary fibers confer protection on intestinal epithelial cell barrier function via Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), and we studied whether β2→1-fructan chain-length differences affect this process. T84 human intestinal epithelial cell monolayers were incubated with 4 β2→1-fructan formulations of different chain-length compositions and were stimulated with the proinflammatory phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) was analyzed by electric cell substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) as a measure for tight junction-mediated barrier function. To confirm TLR2 involvement in barrier modulation by β2→1-fructans, ECIS experiments were repeated using TLR2 blocking antibody. After preincubation of T84 cells with short-chain β2→1-fructans, the decrease in TEER as induced by PMA (62.3 ± 5.2%, P < 0.001) was strongly attenuated (15.2 ± 8.8%, P < 0.01). However, when PMA was applied first, no effect on recovery was observed during addition of the fructans. By blocking TLR2 on the T84 cells, the protective effect of short-chain β2→1-fructans was substantially inhibited. Stimulation of human embryonic kidney human TLR2 reporter cells with β2→1-fructans induced activation of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, confirming that β2→1-fructans are specific ligands for TLR2. To conclude, β2→1-fructans exert time-dependent and chain length-dependent protective effects on the T84 intestinal epithelial cell barrier mediated via TLR2. These results suggest that TLR2 located on intestinal epithelial cells could be a target of β2→1-fructan-mediated health effects.

  2. Influence of the Length and Positioning of the Antiestrogenic Side Chain of Endoxifen and 4-Hydroxytamoxifen on Gene Activation and Growth of Estrogen Receptor Positive Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Tamoxifen has biologically active metabolites: 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4OHT) and endoxifen. The E-isomers are not stable in solution as Z-isomerization occurs. We have synthesized fixed ring (FR) analogues of 4OHT and endoxifen as well as FR E and Z isomers with methoxy and ethoxy side chains. Pharmacologic properties were documented in the MCF-7 cell line, and prolactin synthesis was assessed in GH3 rat pituitary tumor cells. The FR Z-isomers of 4OHT and endoxifen were equivalent to 4OHT and endoxifen. Other test compounds used possessed partial estrogenic activity. The E-isomers of FR 4OHT and endoxifen had no estrogenic activity at therapeutic serum concentrations. None of the newly synthesized compounds were able to down-regulate ER levels. Molecular modeling demonstrated that some compounds would each create a best fit with a novel agonist conformation of the ER. The results demonstrate modulation by the ER complex of cell replication or gene transcription in cancer. PMID:24805199

  3. Diffusion lengths in amphoteric GaAs heteroface solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashley, K. L.; Beal, S. W.

    1978-01-01

    Minority-carrier diffusion lengths in amphoteric GaAs:Si were investigated. Electron and hole diffusion lengths in p- and n-type, respectively, were determined to be 13 microns and 7 microns. Preliminary efficiency measurements on heteroface structures based on amphoteric GaAs:Si p-n junctions indicated that these devices should make excellent solar cells.

  4. Length regulation of active biopolymers by molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Johann, Denis; Erlenkämper, Christoph; Kruse, Karsten

    2012-06-22

    For biopolymers like cytoskeletal actin filaments and microtubules, assembly and disassembly are inherently dissipative processes. Molecular motors can affect the rates of subunit removal at filament ends. We introduce a driven lattice-gas model to study the effects of motor-induced depolymerization on the length of active biopolymers and find that increasing motor activity sharpens unimodal steady-state length distributions. Furthermore, for sufficiently fast moving motors, the relative width of the length distribution is determined only by the attachment rate of motors. Our results show how established molecular processes can be used to robustly regulate the size of cytoskeletal structures like mitotic spindles.

  5. Sound-induced length changes in outer hair cell stereocilia.

    PubMed

    Hakizimana, Pierre; Brownell, William E; Jacob, Stefan; Fridberger, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Hearing relies on mechanical stimulation of stereocilia bundles on the sensory cells of the inner ear. When sound hits the ear, each stereocilium pivots about a neck-like taper near their base. More than three decades of research have established that sideways deflection of stereocilia is essential for converting mechanical stimuli into electrical signals. Here we show that mammalian outer hair cell stereocilia not only move sideways but also change length during sound stimulation. Currents that enter stereocilia through mechanically sensitive ion channels control the magnitude of both length changes and bundle deflections in a reciprocal manner: the smaller the length change, the larger is the bundle deflection. Thus, the transduction current is important for maintaining the resting mechanical properties of stereocilia. Hair cell stimulation is most effective when bundles are in a state that ensures minimal length change.

  6. Physical activity and telomere length: Impact of aging and potential mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Arsenis, Nicole C; You, Tongjian; Ogawa, Elisa F; Tinsley, Grant M; Zuo, Li

    2017-03-30

    Telomeres protect the integrity of information-carrying DNA by serving as caps on the terminal portions of chromosomes. Telomere length decreases with aging, and this contributes to cell senescence. Recent evidence supports that telomere length of leukocytes and skeletal muscle cells may be positively associated with healthy living and inversely correlated with the risk of several age-related diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes, chronic pain, and stress. In observational studies, higher levels of physical activity or exercise are related to longer telomere lengths in various populations, and athletes tend to have longer telomere lengths than non-athletes. This relationship is particularly evident in older individuals, suggesting a role of physical activity in combating the typical age-induced decrements in telomere length. To date, a small number of exercise interventions have been executed to examine the potential influence of chronic exercise on telomere length, but these studies have not fully established such relationship. Several potential mechanisms through which physical activity or exercise could affect telomere length are discussed, including changes in telomerase activity, oxidative stress, inflammation, and decreased skeletal muscle satellite cell content. Future research is needed to mechanistically examine the effects of various modalities of exercise on telomere length in middle-aged and older adults, as well as in specific clinical populations.

  7. Effects of axotomy on telomere length, telomerase activity, and protein in activated microglia.

    PubMed

    Flanary, Barry E; Streit, Wolfgang J

    2005-10-15

    The adult central nervous system (CNS) is generally thought of as a postmitotic organ. However, DNA labeling studies have shown that one major population of nonneuronal cells, called microglia, retain significant mitotic potential. Microglial cell division is prominent during acute CNS injury involving neuronal damage or death. Prior work from this laboratory has shown that purified microglia maintained in vitro with continual mitogenic stimulation exhibit telomere shortening before entering senescence. In the current study, we sought to investigate whether telomere shortening occurs in dividing microglia in vivo. For this purpose, we used a nerve injury model that is known to trigger localized microglial proliferation in a well-defined CNS region, the facial motor nucleus. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats underwent facial nerve axotomy, and facial motor nuclei were microdissected after 1, 4, 7, and 10 days. Whole tissue samples were subjected to measurements of telomere length, telomerase activity, and telomerase protein. Results revealed a tendency for all of these parameters to be increased in lesioned samples. In addition, microglial cells isolated directly from axotomized facial nuclei with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) showed increased telomerase activity relative to unoperated controls, suggesting that microglia are the primary cell type responsible for the increases observed in whole tissue samples. Overall, the results show that microglia activated by injury are capable of maintaining telomere length via telomerase during periods of high proliferation in vivo. We conclude that molecular mechanisms pertaining to telomere maintenance are active in the injured CNS.

  8. Telomete length in peripheral blood mononuclear cells is associated with folate status in men

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human chromosomes are capped by tandem repeats of DNA and associated proteins termed telomeres. The length of the telomeres is reduced with increasing cell divisions except when the enzyme telomerase is active as seen in stem cells and germ cells. Telomere dysfunction has been associated with deve...

  9. Effects of anisosmotic stress on cardiac muscle cell length, diameter, area, and sarcomere length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, R.; Barnes, M. A.; Cooper, G. 4th; Zile, M. R.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of anisosmotic stress on adult mammalian cardiac muscle cell (cardiocyte) size. Cardiocyte size and sarcomere length were measured in cardiocytes isolated from 10 normal rats and 10 normal cats. Superfusate osmolarity was decreased from 300 +/- 6 to 130 +/- 5 mosM and increased to 630 +/- 8 mosM. Cardiocyte size and sarcomere length increased progressively when osmolarity was decreased, and there were no significant differences between cat and rat cardiocytes with respect to percent change in cardiocyte area or diameter; however, there were significant differences in cardiocyte length (2.8 +/- 0.3% in cat vs. 6.1 +/- 0.3% in rat, P < 0.05) and sarcomere length (3.3 +/- 0.3% in cat vs. 6.1 +/- 0.3% in rat, P < 0.05). To determine whether these species-dependent differences in length were related to diastolic interaction of the contractile elements or differences in relative passive stiffness, cardiocytes were subjected to the osmolarity gradient 1) during treatment with 7 mM 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM), which inhibits cross-bridge interaction, or 2) after pretreatment with 1 mM ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N, N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA), a bivalent Ca2+ chelator. Treatment with EGTA or BDM abolished the differences between cat and rat cardiocytes. Species-dependent differences therefore appeared to be related to the degree of diastolic cross-bridge association and not differences in relative passive stiffness. In conclusion, the osmolarity vs. cell size relation is useful in assessing the cardiocyte response to anisosmotic stress and may in future studies be useful in assessing changes in relative passive cardiocyte stiffness produced by pathological processes.

  10. Prostate Cancer Cell Telomere Length Variability and Stromal Cell Telomere Length as Prognostic Markers for Metastasis and Death

    PubMed Central

    Heaphy, Christopher M.; Yoon, Ghil Suk; Peskoe, Sarah B.; Joshu, Corinne E.; Lee, Thomas K.; Giovannucci, Edward; Mucci, Lorelei A.; Kenfield, Stacey A.; Stampfer, Meir J.; Hicks, Jessica L.; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Platz, Elizabeth A.; Meeker, Alan K.

    2013-01-01

    Current prognostic indicators are imperfect predictors of outcome in men with clinicallylocalized prostate cancer. Thus, tissue-based markers are urgently needed to improve treatment and surveillance decision-making. Given that shortened telomeres enhance chromosomal instability and such instability is a hallmark of metastatic lesions, we hypothesized that alterations in telomere length in the primary cancer would predict risk of progression to metastasis and prostate cancer death. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a prospective cohort study of 596 surgically treated men who participated in the ongoing Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Men who had the combination of more variable telomere length among prostate cancer cells (cell-to-cell) and shorter telomere length in prostate cancer-associated stromal cells were substantially more likely to progress to metastasis or die of their prostate cancer. These findings point to the translational potential of this telomere biomarker for prognostication and risk stratification for individualized therapeutic and surveillance strategies. PMID:23779129

  11. A Systematic Comparison of Mathematical Models for Inherent Measurement of Ciliary Length: How a Cell Can Measure Length and Volume

    PubMed Central

    Ludington, William B.; Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Serebrenik, Yevgeniy V.; Ritter, Alex; Hernandez-Lopez, Rogelio A.; Gunzenhauser, Julia; Kannegaard, Elisa; Marshall, Wallace F.

    2015-01-01

    Cells control organelle size with great precision and accuracy to maintain optimal physiology, but the mechanisms by which they do so are largely unknown. Cilia and flagella are simple organelles in which a single measurement, length, can represent size. Maintenance of flagellar length requires an active transport process known as intraflagellar transport, and previous measurements suggest that a length-dependent feedback regulates intraflagellar transport. But the question remains: how is a length-dependent signal produced to regulate intraflagellar transport appropriately? Several conceptual models have been suggested, but testing these models quantitatively requires that they be cast in mathematical form. Here, we derive a set of mathematical models that represent the main broad classes of hypothetical size-control mechanisms currently under consideration. We use these models to predict the relation between length and intraflagellar transport, and then compare the predicted relations for each model with experimental data. We find that three models—an initial bolus formation model, an ion current model, and a diffusion-based model—show particularly good agreement with available experimental data. The initial bolus and ion current models give mathematically equivalent predictions for length control, but fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments rule out the initial bolus model, suggesting that either the ion current model or a diffusion-based model is more likely correct. The general biophysical principles of the ion current and diffusion-based models presented here to measure cilia and flagellar length can be generalized to measure any membrane-bound organelle volume, such as the nucleus and endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:25809250

  12. Active Cells for Multifunctional Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-24

    techniques to explore a variety of cell designs.  Designed a simplified active cell using Nitinol as the actuation method and relying on Joule heating...for contraction of the cell.  Developed manufacturing techniques for reliably creating Nitinol spring coils in a variety of diameters and gauges...design of the active cells to maximum the stroked length of the active cells by tuning the stiffness of a passive spring in parallel with the Nitinol

  13. Sarcomere length fluctuations and flow in capillary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Russell, Robert J; Grubbs, Alexandria Y; Mangroo, Sunil P; Nakasone, Sandra E; Dickinson, Richard B; Lele, Tanmay P

    2011-03-01

    Tensile force within non-muscle tissue cells is generated in actomyosin stress fibers, which are composed of contractile units called sarcomeres. The number of sarcomeres and sarcomere lengths dynamically change in the cell but the mechanisms by which these processes occur are not understood. Using live cell imaging of labeled sarcomeres, we show that sarcomere lengths continually fluctuate, with a fluctuation relaxation time of about 20 min. New sarcomeres are formed at focal adhesions and are convected into the fiber at a speed that is independent of focal adhesion size, suggesting that the speed is independent of tension. Furthermore sarcomeres were observed to disappear at specific points or "sinks" along the stress fibers. These results show that stress fibers are highly dynamic structures despite their relatively static morphology, with nascent sarcomeres forming and being incorporated into the fiber at a nearly uniform, tension-independent velocity throughout the cell. The fluctuating length of individual sarcomeres under constant tension is consistent with a model whereby sarcomere contraction/expansion speed, rather than sarcomere length, is modulated by tension.

  14. Analysis of the age of Panax ginseng based on telomere length and telomerase activity.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jiabei; Jiang, Chao; Peng, Huasheng; Shi, Qinghua; Guo, Xiang; Yuan, Yuan; Huang, Luqi

    2015-01-23

    Ginseng, which is the root of Panax ginseng (Araliaceae), has been used in Oriental medicine as a stimulant and dietary supplement for more than 7,000 years. Older ginseng plants are substantially more medically potent, but ginseng age can be simulated using unscrupulous cultivation practices. Telomeres progressively shorten with each cell division until they reach a critical length, at which point cells enter replicative senescence. However, in some cells, telomerase maintains telomere length. In this study, to determine whether telomere length reflects ginseng age and which tissue is best for such an analysis, we examined telomerase activity in the main roots, leaves, stems, secondary roots and seeds of ginseng plants of known age. Telomere length in the main root (approximately 1 cm below the rhizome) was found to be the best indicator of age. Telomeric terminal restriction fragment (TRF) lengths, which are indicators of telomere length, were determined for the main roots of plants of different ages through Southern hybridization analysis. Telomere length was shown to be positively correlated with plant age, and a simple mathematical model was formulated to describe the relationship between telomere length and age for P. ginseng.

  15. Inositol pyrophosphates modulate cell cycle independently of alteration in telomere length.

    PubMed

    Banfic, Hrvoje; Crljen, Vladiana; Lukinovic-Skudar, Vesna; Dembitz, Vilma; Lalic, Hrvoje; Bedalov, Antonio; Visnjic, Dora

    2016-01-01

    Synthesis of inositol pyrophosphates through activation of Kcs1 plays an important role in the signalling response required for cell cycle progression after mating pheromone arrest. Overexpression of Kcs1 doubled the level of inositol pyrophosphates when compared to wild type cells and 30 min following the release from α-factor block further increase in inositol pyrophosphates was observed, which resulted that cells overexpressing Kcs1 reached G2/M phase earlier than wild type cells. Similar effect was observed in ipk1Δ cells, which are unable to synthesize IP6-derived inositol pyrophosphates (IP7 and IP8) but will synthesize IP5-derived inositol pyrophosphates (PP-IP4 and (PP)2-IP3). Although ipk1Δ cells have shorter telomeres than wild type cells, overexpression of Kcs1 in both strains have similar effect on cell cycle progression. As it is known that PP-IP4 regulates telomere length through Tel1, inositol polyphosphates, cell cycle and telomere length were determined in tel1Δ cells. The release of the cells from α-factor block and overexpression of Kcs1 in tel1Δ cells produced similar effects on inositol pyrophosphates level and cell cycle progression when compared to wild type cells, although tel1Δ cells possesses shorter telomeres than wild type cells. It can be concluded that telomere length does not affect cell cycle progression, since cells with short telomeres (ipk1Δ and tel1Δ) progress through cell cycle in a similar manner as wild type cells and that overexpression of Kcs1 in cells with either short or normal telomeres will increase S phase progression without affecting telomere length. Furthermore, IP5-derived inositol pyrophosphates can compensate for the loss of IP6-derived inositol pyrophosphates, in modulating S phase progression of the cell cycle.

  16. Regional variation in myofilament length-dependent activation.

    PubMed

    Cazorla, Olivier; Lacampagne, Alain

    2011-07-01

    The Frank-Starling law is an important regulatory mechanism of the heart that links the end-diastolic volume with the systolic ejection fraction. This beat-to-beat regulation of the heart, underlined at the cellular level by higher myofilament calcium sensitivity at longer sarcomere length, is known as length-dependent activation or stretch sensitization of activation. However, the heart is structurally and functionally heterogeneous and asymmetrical. Specifically, contractile properties are not uniform within the left ventricle partly due to transmural differences in action potential waveforms and calcium homeostasis. The present review will focus on the role of the contractile machinery in the transmural contractile heterogeneity and its adaptation to changes in muscle strain. The expression of different myosin isoforms, the level of titin-based passive tension, and thin and thick sarcomeric regulatory proteins are considered to explain the regional cellular contractile properties. Finally, the importance of transmural heterogeneity of length-dependent activation and the consequences of its modification on the heart mechanics are discussed. Despite extensive research since the characterization of the Frank-Starling law, the molecular mechanisms by which strain information is transduced to the contractile machinery have not been fully determined yet.

  17. Cycle length restitution in sinoatrial node cells: a theory for understanding spontaneous action potential dynamics.

    PubMed

    Glynn, Patric; Onal, Birce; Hund, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Normal heart rhythm (sinus rhythm) is governed by the sinoatrial node, a specialized and highly heterogeneous collection of spontaneously active myocytes in the right atrium. Sinoatrial node dysfunction, characterized by slow and/or asynchronous pacemaker activity and even failure, is associated with cardiovascular disease (e.g. heart failure, atrial fibrillation). While tremendous progress has been made in understanding the molecular and ionic basis of automaticity in sinoatrial node cells, the dynamics governing sinoatrial nodel cell synchrony and overall pacemaker function remain unclear. Here, a well-validated computational model of the mouse sinoatrial node cell is used to test the hypothesis that sinoatrial node cell dynamics reflect an inherent restitution property (cycle length restitution) that may give rise to a wide range of behavior from regular periodicity to highly complex, irregular activation. Computer simulations are performed to determine the cycle length restitution curve in the computational model using a newly defined voltage pulse protocol. The ability of the restitution curve to predict sinoatrial node cell dynamics (e.g., the emergence of irregular spontaneous activity) and susceptibility to termination is evaluated. Finally, ionic and tissue level factors (e.g. ion channel conductances, ion concentrations, cell-to-cell coupling) that influence restitution and sinoatrial node cell dynamics are explored. Together, these findings suggest that cycle length restitution may be a useful tool for analyzing cell dynamics and dysfunction in the sinoatrial node.

  18. Light absorption cell combining variable path and length pump

    DOEpatents

    Prather, William S.

    1993-01-01

    A device for use in making spectrophotometric measurements of fluid samples. In particular, the device is a measurement cell containing a movable and a fixed lens with a sample of the fluid therebetween and through which light shines. The cell is connected to a source of light and a spectrophotometer via optic fibers. Movement of the lens varies the path length and also pumps the fluid into and out of the cell. Unidirectional inlet and exit valves cooperate with the movable lens to assure a one-way flow of fluid through the cell. A linear stepper motor controls the movement of the lens and cycles it from a first position closer to the fixed lens and a second position farther from the fixed lens, preferably at least 10 times per minute for a nearly continuous stream of absorption spectrum data.

  19. Light absorption cell combining variable path and length pump

    DOEpatents

    Prather, W.S.

    1993-12-07

    A device is described for use in making spectrophotometric measurements of fluid samples. In particular, the device is a measurement cell containing a movable and a fixed lens with a sample of the fluid there between and through which light shines. The cell is connected to a source of light and a spectrophotometer via optic fibers. Movement of the lens varies the path length and also pumps the fluid into and out of the cell. Unidirectional inlet and exit valves cooperate with the movable lens to assure a one-way flow of fluid through the cell. A linear stepper motor controls the movement of the lens and cycles it from a first position closer to the fixed lens and a second position farther from the fixed lens, preferably at least 10 times per minute for a nearly continuous stream of absorption spectrum data. 2 figures.

  20. Local homogeneity of cell cycle length in developing mouse cortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, L.; Hayes, N. L.; Nowakowski, R. S.

    1997-01-01

    We have measured the amount of variation in the length of the cell cycle for cells in the pseudostratified ventricular epithelium (PVE) of the developing cortex of mice on embryonic day 14. Our measurements were made in three cortical regions (i.e., the neocortex, archicortex, and periarchicortex) using three different methods: the cumulative labeling method (CLM), the percent labeled mitoses (PLM) method, and a comparison of the time needed for the PLM to ascend from 0 to 100% with the time needed for the PLM to descend from 100 to 0%. These 3 different techniques provide different perspectives on the cytokinetic parameters. Theoretically, CLM gives an estimate for a maximum value of the total length of the cell cycle (TC), whereas PLM gives an estimate of a minimum value of TC. The difference between these two estimates indicates that the range for TC is +/-1% of the mean TC for periarchicortex, +/-7% for neocortex, and +/-8% for archicortex. This was confirmed by a lengthening of the PLM descent time in comparison with its ascent time. The sharpness of the transitions and the flatness of the plateau of the PLM curves indicate that 99% of the proliferating cells are within this narrow estimated range for TC; hence, only approximately 1% deviate outside of a relatively restricted range from the average TC of the population. In the context of the possible existence within the cortical PVE of two populations with markedly dissimilar cell cycle kinetics from the mean, one such population must comprise approximately 99% of the total population, and the other, if it exists, is only approximately 1% of the total. This seems to be true for all three cortical regions. The narrow range of TC indicates a homogeneity in the cell cycle length for proliferating cells in three different cortical regions, despite the fact that progenitor cells of different lineages may be present. It further predicts the existence of almost synchronous interkinetic nuclear movements of the

  1. Heregulin, a new regulator of telomere length in human cells.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Javier A; Rubio, Miguel A; Campisi, Judith; Lupu, Ruth

    2015-11-24

    The growth factor heregulin (HRG) promotes breast cancer (BC) tumorigenesis and metastasis and differentially modulates BC cell responses to DNA-damaging agents via its dual extracellular and nuclear localization. Given the central role of telomere dysfunction to drive carcinogenesis and to alter the chemotherapeutic profile of transformed cells, we hypothesized that an unanticipated nuclear function of HRG might be to regulate telomere length. Engineered overexpression of the HRGβ2 isoform in non-aggressive, HRG-negative MCF-7 BC cells resulted in a significant shortening of telomeres (up to 1.3 kb) as measured by Southern blotting of telomere terminal restriction fragments. Conversely, antisense-mediated suppression of HRGβ2 in highly aggressive, HRG-overexpressing MDA-MB-231 and Hs578T cells increased telomere length up to 3.0 kb. HRGβ2 overexpression promoted a marked upregulation of telomere-binding protein 2 (TRF2) protein expression, whereas its knockdown profoundly decreased TRF2 expression. Double staining of endogenous HRGβ2 with telomere-specific peptide nucleic acid probe/fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA/FISH) revealed the partial localization of HRG at the chromosome ends. Moreover, a predominantly nucleoplasmic staining pattern of endogenous HRGβ2 appeared to co-localize with TRF2 and, concomitantly with RAP1, a telomere regulator that specifically interacts with TRF2. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of HRG decreased the expression of TRF2 and RAP1, decreased their presence at chromosome ends, and coincidentally resulted in the formation of longer telomeres. This study uncovers a new function for HRGβ2 in controlling telomere length, in part due to its ability to regulate and interact with the telomere-associated proteins TRF2 and RAP1.

  2. Soybean cell enlargement oscillates with a temperature-compensated period length of ca. 24 min

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morre, D. J.; Pogue, R.; Morre, D. M.

    2001-01-01

    Rate of enlargement of epidermal cells from soybean, when measured at intervals of 1 min using a light microscope equipped with a video measurement system, oscillated with a period length of about 24 min. This oscillation parallels the 24-min periodicity observed for the oxidation of NADH by the external plasma membrane NADH oxidase. The increase in length was not only non-linear, but intervals of rapid increase in area alternated with intervals of rapid decrease in area. The length of the period was temperature compensated, and was approximately the same when measured at 14, 24 and 34 degrees C even though the rate of cell enlargement varied over this same range of temperatures. These observations represent the first demonstration of an oscillatory growth behavior correlated with a biochemical activity where the period length of both is independent of temperature (temperature compensated) as is the hallmark of clock-related biological phenomena.

  3. Direct chromosome-length haplotyping by single-cell sequencing.

    PubMed

    Porubský, David; Sanders, Ashley D; van Wietmarschen, Niek; Falconer, Ester; Hills, Mark; Spierings, Diana C J; Bevova, Marianna R; Guryev, Victor; Lansdorp, Peter M

    2016-11-01

    Haplotypes are fundamental to fully characterize the diploid genome of an individual, yet methods to directly chart the unique genetic makeup of each parental chromosome are lacking. Here we introduce single-cell DNA template strand sequencing (Strand-seq) as a novel approach to phasing diploid genomes along the entire length of all chromosomes. We demonstrate this by building a complete haplotype for a HapMap individual (NA12878) at high accuracy (concordance 99.3%), without using generational information or statistical inference. By use of this approach, we mapped all meiotic recombination events in a family trio with high resolution (median range ∼14 kb) and phased larger structural variants like deletions, indels, and balanced rearrangements like inversions. Lastly, the single-cell resolution of Strand-seq allowed us to observe loss of heterozygosity regions in a small number of cells, a significant advantage for studies of heterogeneous cell populations, such as cancer cells. We conclude that Strand-seq is a unique and powerful approach to completely phase individual genomes and map inheritance patterns in families, while preserving haplotype differences between single cells.

  4. Adhesive ligand tether length affects the size and length of focal adhesions and influences cell spreading and attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attwood, Simon J.; Cortes, Ernesto; Haining, Alexander William M.; Robinson, Benjamin; Li, Danyang; Gautrot, Julien; Del Río Hernández, Armando

    2016-09-01

    Cells are known to respond to physical cues from their microenvironment such as matrix rigidity. Discrete adhesive ligands within flexible strands of fibronectin connect cell surface integrins to the broader extracellular matrix and are thought to mediate mechanosensing through the cytoskeleton-integrin-ECM linkage. We set out to determine if adhesive ligand tether length is another physical cue that cells can sense. Substrates were covalently modified with adhesive arginylglycylaspartic acid (RGD) ligands coupled with short (9.5 nm), medium (38.2 nm) and long (318 nm) length inert polyethylene glycol tethers. The size and length of focal adhesions of human foreskin fibroblasts gradually decreased from short to long tethers. Furthermore, we found cell adhesion varies in a linker length dependent manner with a remarkable 75% reduction in the density of cells on the surface and a 50% reduction in cell area between the shortest and longest linkers. We also report the interplay between RGD ligand concentration and tether length in determining cellular spread area. Our findings show that without varying substrate rigidity or ligand density, tether length alone can modulate cellular behaviour.

  5. Adhesive ligand tether length affects the size and length of focal adhesions and influences cell spreading and attachment

    PubMed Central

    Attwood, Simon J.; Cortes, Ernesto; Haining, Alexander William M.; Robinson, Benjamin; Li, Danyang; Gautrot, Julien; del Río Hernández, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Cells are known to respond to physical cues from their microenvironment such as matrix rigidity. Discrete adhesive ligands within flexible strands of fibronectin connect cell surface integrins to the broader extracellular matrix and are thought to mediate mechanosensing through the cytoskeleton-integrin-ECM linkage. We set out to determine if adhesive ligand tether length is another physical cue that cells can sense. Substrates were covalently modified with adhesive arginylglycylaspartic acid (RGD) ligands coupled with short (9.5 nm), medium (38.2 nm) and long (318 nm) length inert polyethylene glycol tethers. The size and length of focal adhesions of human foreskin fibroblasts gradually decreased from short to long tethers. Furthermore, we found cell adhesion varies in a linker length dependent manner with a remarkable 75% reduction in the density of cells on the surface and a 50% reduction in cell area between the shortest and longest linkers. We also report the interplay between RGD ligand concentration and tether length in determining cellular spread area. Our findings show that without varying substrate rigidity or ligand density, tether length alone can modulate cellular behaviour. PMID:27686622

  6. Adhesive ligand tether length affects the size and length of focal adhesions and influences cell spreading and attachment.

    PubMed

    Attwood, Simon J; Cortes, Ernesto; Haining, Alexander William M; Robinson, Benjamin; Li, Danyang; Gautrot, Julien; Del Río Hernández, Armando

    2016-09-30

    Cells are known to respond to physical cues from their microenvironment such as matrix rigidity. Discrete adhesive ligands within flexible strands of fibronectin connect cell surface integrins to the broader extracellular matrix and are thought to mediate mechanosensing through the cytoskeleton-integrin-ECM linkage. We set out to determine if adhesive ligand tether length is another physical cue that cells can sense. Substrates were covalently modified with adhesive arginylglycylaspartic acid (RGD) ligands coupled with short (9.5 nm), medium (38.2 nm) and long (318 nm) length inert polyethylene glycol tethers. The size and length of focal adhesions of human foreskin fibroblasts gradually decreased from short to long tethers. Furthermore, we found cell adhesion varies in a linker length dependent manner with a remarkable 75% reduction in the density of cells on the surface and a 50% reduction in cell area between the shortest and longest linkers. We also report the interplay between RGD ligand concentration and tether length in determining cellular spread area. Our findings show that without varying substrate rigidity or ligand density, tether length alone can modulate cellular behaviour.

  7. Active-passive path-length encoded (APPLE) Doppler OCT

    PubMed Central

    Wartak, Andreas; Haindl, Richard; Trasischker, Wolfgang; Baumann, Bernhard; Pircher, Michael; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel active-passive path-length encoded (APPLE) swept source Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) approach, enabling three-dimensional velocity vector reconstruction of moving particles without prior knowledge of the orientation of motion. The developed APPLE DOCT setup allows for non-invasive blood flow measurements in vivo and was primarily designed for quantitative human ocular blood flow investigations. The system’s performance was demonstrated by in vitro flow phantom as well as in vivo retinal vessel bifurcation measurements. Furthermore, total retinal blood flow – a biomarker aiding in diagnosis and monitoring of major ocular diseases such as glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy or central/branch retinal vein occlusion – was determined in the eyes of healthy human volunteers. PMID:28018739

  8. The Influence of Epoch Length on Physical Activity Patterns Varies by Child's Activity Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nettlefold, Lindsay; Naylor, P. J.; Warburton, Darren E. R.; Bredin, Shannon S. D.; Race, Douglas; McKay, Heather A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Patterns of physical activity (PA) and sedentary time, including volume of bouted activity, are important health indicators. However, the effect of accelerometer epoch length on measurement of these patterns and associations with health outcomes in children remain unknown. Method: We measured activity patterns in 308 children (52% girls,…

  9. Design and biological evaluation of synthetic retinoids: probing length vs. stability vs. activity.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Graeme; Flower, Kevin R; Gardner, Peter; Henderson, Andrew P; Knowles, Jonathan P; Marder, Todd B; Whiting, Andrew; Przyborski, Stefan

    2013-12-01

    All trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) is widely used to direct the differentiation of cultured stem cells. When exposed to the pluripotent human embryonal carcinoma (EC) stem cell line, TERA2.cl.SP12, ATRA induces ectoderm differentiation and the formation of neuronal cell types. We report in this study that novel polyene chain length analogues of ATRA require a specific chain length to elicit a biological responses of the EC cells TERA2.cl.SP12, with synthetic retinoid AH61 being particularly active, and indeed more so than ATRA. The impacts of both the synthetic retinoid AH61 and natural ATRA on the TERA2.cl.SP12 cells were directly compared using both RT-PCR and Fourier Transform Infrared Micro-Spectroscopy (FT-IRMS) coupled with multivariate analysis. Analytical results produced from this study also confirmed that the synthetic retinoid AH61 had biological activity comparable or greater than that of ATRA. In addition to this, AH61 has the added advantage of greater compound stability than ATRA, therefore, avoiding issues of oxidation or decomposition during use with embryonic stem cells.

  10. Sera from cancer patients contain two oscillating ECTO-NOX activities with different period lengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Sui; Morre, Dorothy M.; Morre, D. James

    2003-01-01

    ECTO-NOX protein's are cell surface-associated and growth-related hydroquinone oxidases with both protein disulfide-thiol interchange activity and the capacity to oxidize NAD(P)H. The activities of these ECTO-NOX proteins are not steady state but fluctuate to create a repeating pattern of oscillations. Two forms of ECTO-NOX activities have been distinguished. The constitutive ECTO-NOX (CNOX), is hormone responsive and refractory to quinone-site inhibitors. A tumor-associated NOX (tNOX) is unregulated, refractory to hormones and growth factors and responds to quinone-site inhibitors. CNOX proteins are widely distributed and exhibit oscillations in enzymatic activity with a period length of 24 min. tNOX proteins are cancer specific and exhibit oscillations with a period length of about 22 min. Our findings now demonstrate the presence of the novel oscillating tNOX activity in sera of patients with cancer whereas the constitutive NOX of non-cancer cells is present in sera of both cancer patients and healthy volunteers. We conclude that ECTO-NOX proteins in sera exhibit oscillatory characteristics similar to those of ECTO-NOX forms of the cell surface.

  11. TP53-dependent chromosome instability is associated with transient reductions in telomere length in immortal telomerase-positive cell lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, J. L.; Jordan, R.; Liber, H.; Murnane, J. P.; Evans, H. H.

    2001-01-01

    Telomere shortening in telomerase-negative somatic cells leads to the activation of the TP53 protein and the elimination of potentially unstable cells. We examined the effect of TP53 gene expression on both telomere metabolism and chromosome stability in immortal, telomerase-positive cell lines. Telomere length, telomerase activity, and chromosome instability were measured in multiple clones isolated from three related human B-lymphoblast cell lines that vary in TP53 expression; TK6 cells express wild-type TP53, WTK1 cells overexpress a mutant form of TP53, and NH32 cells express no TP53 protein. Clonal variations in both telomere length and chromosome stability were observed, and shorter telomeres were associated with higher levels of chromosome instability. The shortest telomeres were found in WTK1- and NH32-derived cells, and these cells had 5- to 10-fold higher levels of chromosome instability. The primary marker of instability was the presence of dicentric chromosomes. Aneuploidy and other stable chromosome alterations were also found in clones showing high levels of dicentrics. Polyploidy was found only in WTK1-derived cells. Both telomere length and chromosome instability fluctuated in the different cell populations with time in culture, presumably as unstable cells and cells with short telomeres were eliminated from the growing population. Our results suggest that transient reductions in telomere lengths may be common in immortal cell lines and that these alterations in telomere metabolism can have a profound effect on chromosome stability. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Calcium-dependent regulation of the motor activity of recombinant full-length Physarum myosin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Kawamichi, Hozumi; Tanaka, Hideyuki; Yoshiyama, Shinji; Kohama, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Akio

    2012-08-01

    We successfully synthesized full-length and the mutant Physarum myosin and heavy meromyosin (HMM) constructs associated with Physarum regulatory light chain and essential light chain (PhELC) using Physarum myosin heavy chain in Sf-9 cells, and examined their Ca(2+)-mediated regulation. Ca(2+) inhibited the motility and ATPase activities of Physarum myosin and HMM. The Ca(2+) effect is also reversible at the in vitro motility of Physarum myosin. We demonstrated that full-length myosin increases the Ca(2+) inhibition more effectively than HMM. Furthermore, Ca(2+) did not affect the motility and ATPase activities of the mutant Physarum myosin with PhELC that lost Ca(2+)-binding ability. Therefore, we conclude that PhELC plays a critical role in Ca(2+)-dependent regulation of Physarum myosin.

  13. Ongoing network state controls the length of sleep spindles via inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Barthó, Péter; Slézia, Andrea; Mátyás, Ferenc; Faradzs-Zade, Lejla; Ulbert, István; Harris, Kenneth D; Acsády, László

    2014-06-18

    Sleep spindles are major transient oscillations of the mammalian brain. Spindles are generated in the thalamus; however, what determines their duration is presently unclear. Here, we measured somatic activity of excitatory thalamocortical (TC) cells together with axonal activity of reciprocally coupled inhibitory reticular thalamic cells (nRTs) and quantified cycle-by-cycle alterations in their firing in vivo. We found that spindles with different durations were paralleled by distinct nRT activity, and nRT firing sharply dropped before the termination of all spindles. Both initial nRT and TC activity was correlated with spindle length, but nRT correlation was more robust. Analysis of spindles evoked by optogenetic activation of nRT showed that spindle probability, but not spindle length, was determined by the strength of the light stimulus. Our data indicate that during natural sleep a dynamically fluctuating thalamocortical network controls the duration of sleep spindles via the major inhibitory element of the circuits, the nRT.

  14. Caspase 3 inactivates biologically active full length interleukin-33 as a classical cytokine but does not prohibit nuclear translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Shafaqat; Nguyen, Dang Quan; Falk, Werner; Martin, Michael Uwe

    2010-01-15

    IL-33 is a member of the IL-1 family of cytokines with dual function which either activates cells via the IL-33 receptor in a paracrine fashion or translocates to the nucleus to regulate gene transcription in an intracrine manner. We show that full length murine IL-33 is active as a cytokine and that it is not processed by caspase 1 to mature IL-33 but instead cleaved by caspase 3 at aa175 to yield two products which are both unable to bind to the IL-33 receptor. Full length IL-33 and its N-terminal caspase 3 breakdown product, however, translocate to the nucleus. Finally, bioactive IL-33 is not released by cells constitutively or after activation. This suggests that IL-33 is not a classical cytokine but exerts its function in the nucleus of intact cells and only activates others cells via its receptor as an alarm mediator after destruction of the producing cell.

  15. Activation of mouse and human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARα) by perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) of 5, 7, 8, 11, and 12 carbon chain lengths in C05-1 cells.

    EPA Science Inventory

    PFAAs are surfactants that have been found globally in the environment and in tissues of humans and wildlife. They adversely affect perinatal survival and development in rodents and PPARα is involved in inducing these effects. Our previous study demonstrated that some PFAAs activ...

  16. Pre-diagnostic obesity and physical inactivity are associated with shorter telomere length in prostate stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Joshu, Corinne E; Peskoe, Sarah B; Heaphy, Christopher M; Kenfield, Stacey A; Van Blarigan, Erin L; Mucci, Lorelei A; Giovannucci, Edward L; Stampfer, Meir J; Yun, GhilSuk; Lee, Thomas K; Hicks, Jessica L; De Marzo, Angelo M; Meeker, Alan K; Platz, Elizabeth A

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and inactivity have been with associated advanced stage prostate cancer, and poor prostate cancer outcomes, though the underlying mechanism(s) is unknown. To determine if telomere shortening, which has been associated with lethal prostate cancer, may be a potential underlying mechanism, we prospectively evaluated the association between measures of adiposity, physical activity and telomere length in 596 participants in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, who were surgically treated for prostate cancer. Using tissue microarrays, we measured telomere length in cancer and benign cells using a telomere-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization assay. Adiposity and activity were assessed via questionnaire within 2 years of diagnosis. Adjusting for age, pathologic stage and grade, the median and standard deviation of the per cell telomere signals were determined for each man for stromal cells and cancer cells by adiposity and activity categories. Overweight/obese men (54%) were similar to normal weight men on most factors, but had higher Gleason sum and lower activity levels. Overweight/obese men had 7.4% shorter telomeres in stromal cells than normal weight men (P=0.06). The least active men had shorter telomeres in stromal cells than more active men (P-trend=0.002). Men who were overweight/obese and the least active had the shortest telomeres in stromal cells (20.7% shorter; P=0.0005) compared to normal weight men who were the most active. Cancer cell telomere length and telomere length variability did not differ by measures of adiposity or activity. Telomere shortening in prostate cells may be one mechanism through which lifestyle influences prostate cancer risk and outcomes. PMID:25990087

  17. Endogenous GABA controls oligodendrocyte lineage cell number, myelination, and CNS internode length

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Laura E.; Arancibia‐Carcamo, I. Lorena; Kougioumtzidou, Eleni; Matthey, Moritz; Káradóttir, Ragnhildur; Whiteley, Louise; Bergersen, Linda H.; Richardson, William D.; Attwell, David

    2016-01-01

    Adjusting the thickness and internodal length of the myelin sheath is a mechanism for tuning the conduction velocity of axons to match computational needs. Interactions between oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) and developing axons regulate the formation of myelin around axons. We now show, using organotypic cerebral cortex slices from mice expressing eGFP in Sox10‐positive oligodendrocytes, that endogenously released GABA, acting on GABAA receptors, greatly reduces the number of oligodendrocyte lineage cells. The decrease in oligodendrocyte number correlates with a reduction in the amount of myelination but also an increase in internode length, a parameter previously thought to be set by the axon diameter or to be a property intrinsic to oligodendrocytes. Importantly, while TTX block of neuronal activity had no effect on oligodendrocyte lineage cell number when applied alone, it was able to completely abolish the effect of blocking GABAA receptors, suggesting that control of myelination by endogenous GABA may require a permissive factor to be released from axons. In contrast, block of AMPA/KA receptors had no effect on oligodendrocyte lineage cell number or myelination. These results imply that, during development, GABA can act as a local environmental cue to control myelination and thus influence the conduction velocity of action potentials within the CNS. GLIA 2017;65:309–321 PMID:27796063

  18. Endogenous GABA controls oligodendrocyte lineage cell number, myelination, and CNS internode length.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Nicola B; Clarke, Laura E; Arancibia-Carcamo, I Lorena; Kougioumtzidou, Eleni; Matthey, Moritz; Káradóttir, Ragnhildur; Whiteley, Louise; Bergersen, Linda H; Richardson, William D; Attwell, David

    2017-02-01

    Adjusting the thickness and internodal length of the myelin sheath is a mechanism for tuning the conduction velocity of axons to match computational needs. Interactions between oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) and developing axons regulate the formation of myelin around axons. We now show, using organotypic cerebral cortex slices from mice expressing eGFP in Sox10-positive oligodendrocytes, that endogenously released GABA, acting on GABAA receptors, greatly reduces the number of oligodendrocyte lineage cells. The decrease in oligodendrocyte number correlates with a reduction in the amount of myelination but also an increase in internode length, a parameter previously thought to be set by the axon diameter or to be a property intrinsic to oligodendrocytes. Importantly, while TTX block of neuronal activity had no effect on oligodendrocyte lineage cell number when applied alone, it was able to completely abolish the effect of blocking GABAA receptors, suggesting that control of myelination by endogenous GABA may require a permissive factor to be released from axons. In contrast, block of AMPA/KA receptors had no effect on oligodendrocyte lineage cell number or myelination. These results imply that, during development, GABA can act as a local environmental cue to control myelination and thus influence the conduction velocity of action potentials within the CNS. GLIA 2017;65:309-321.

  19. Degradation of bulk diffusion length in CZ silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reiss, J.H.; King, R.R.; Mitchell, K.W.

    1995-08-01

    Commercially-produced, unencapsulated, CZ silicon solar cells can lose 3 to 4% of their initial efficiency after exposure to light. After this initial, rapid ( < 30 min.) decrease, the cell power output remains stable. The cell performance recovers in a matter of hours in the dark at room temperature, and degrades again under light exposure. The different conditions under which CZ silicon cells degrade, and the reverse process, annealing, are characterized with the methods of spectral response and current-voltage (I-V) measurements. Iron impurities are a possible cause of this effect.

  20. Microtubule-sliding activity of a kinesin-8 promotes spindle assembly and spindle-length control.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaolei; Arellano-Santoyo, Hugo; Portran, Didier; Gaillard, Jeremie; Vantard, Marylin; Thery, Manuel; Pellman, David

    2013-08-01

    Molecular motors play critical roles in the formation of mitotic spindles, either through controlling the stability of individual microtubules, or by crosslinking and sliding microtubule arrays. Kinesin-8 motors are best known for their regulatory roles in controlling microtubule dynamics. They contain microtubule-destabilizing activities, and restrict spindle length in a wide variety of cell types and organisms. Here, we report an antiparallel microtubule-sliding activity of the budding yeast kinesin-8, Kip3. The in vivo importance of this sliding activity was established through the identification of complementary Kip3 mutants that separate the sliding activity and microtubule-destabilizing activity. In conjunction with Cin8, a kinesin-5 family member, the sliding activity of Kip3 promotes bipolar spindle assembly and the maintenance of genome stability. We propose a slide-disassemble model where the sliding and destabilizing activity of Kip3 balance during pre-anaphase. This facilitates normal spindle assembly. However, the destabilizing activity of Kip3 dominates in late anaphase, inhibiting spindle elongation and ultimately promoting spindle disassembly.

  1. Word Length and Lexical Activation: Longer Is Better

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitt, Mark A.; Samuel, Arthur G.

    2006-01-01

    Many models of spoken word recognition posit the existence of lexical and sublexical representations, with excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms used to affect the activation levels of such representations. Bottom-up evidence provides excitatory input, and inhibition from phonetically similar representations leads to lexical competition. In such a…

  2. Effects of Telomerase and Telomere Length on Epidermal Stem Cell Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Ignacio; Cayuela, María L.; Blasco, María A.

    2005-08-01

    A key process in organ homeostasis is the mobilization of stem cells out of their niches. We show through analysis of mouse models that telomere length, as well as the catalytic component of telomerase, Tert, are critical determinants in the mobilization of epidermal stem cells. Telomere shortening inhibited mobilization of stem cells out of their niche, impaired hair growth, and resulted in suppression of stem cell proliferative capacity in vitro. In contrast, Tert overexpression in the absence of changes in telomere length promoted stem cell mobilization, hair growth, and stem cell proliferation in vitro. The effects of telomeres and telomerase on stem cell biology anticipate their role in cancer and aging.

  3. Influence of the Length and Charge on the Activity of α-Helical Amphipathic Antimicrobial Peptides.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Marie-Claude; Strandberg, Erik; Grau-Campistany, Ariadna; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Reichert, Johannes; Bürck, Jochen; Rabanal, Francesc; Auger, Michèle; Paquin, Jean-François; Ulrich, Anne S

    2017-03-21

    Hydrophobic mismatch is important for pore-forming amphipathic antimicrobial peptides, as demonstrated recently [Grau-Campistany, A., et al. (2015) Sci. Rep. 5, 9388]. A series of different length peptides have been generated with the heptameric repeat sequence KIAGKIA, called KIA peptides, and it was found that only those helices sufficiently long to span the hydrophobic thickness of the membrane could induce leakage in lipid vesicles; there was also a clear length dependence of the antimicrobial and hemolytic activities. For the original KIA sequences, the cationic charge increased with peptide length. The goal of this work is to examine whether the charge also has an effect on activity; hence, we constructed two further series of peptides with a sequence similar to those of the KIA peptides, but with a constant charge of +7 for all lengths from 14 to 28 amino acids. For both of these new series, a clear length dependence similar to that of KIA peptides was observed, indicating that charge has only a minor influence. Both series also showed a distinct threshold length for peptides to be active, which correlates directly with the thickness of the membrane. Among the longer peptides, the new series showed activities only slightly lower than those of the original KIA peptides of the same length that had a higher charge. Shorter peptides, in which Gly was replaced with Lys, showed activities similar to those of KIA peptides of the same length, but peptides in which Ile was replaced with Lys lost their helicity and were less active.

  4. Increased telomere length and proliferative potential in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of adults of different ages stimulated with concanavalin A

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recently, a direct correlation with telomere length, proliferative potential and telomerase activity has been found in the process of aging in peripheral blood cells. The objective of the study was to evaluate telomere length and proliferative potential in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) after stimulation with Concanavalin A (ConA) of young adults compared with older adults. Methods Blood samples were obtained from 20 healthy young males (20–25 years old) (group Y) and 20 males (60–65 years old) (group O). We compared PBMC proliferation before and after stimulation with ConA. DNA was isolated from cells separated before and after culture with ConA for telomeric measurement by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results In vitro stimulation of PBMCs from young subjects induced an increase of telomere length as well as a higher replicative capacity of cell proliferation. Samples from older adults showed higher loss of telomeric DNA (p = 0.03) and higher levels of senescent (≤6.2 kb) telomeric DNA (p = 0.02) and displayed a marked decrease of proliferation capacity. Viability cell counts and CFSE tracking in 72-h-old cell cultures indicated that group O PBMCs (CD8+ and CD4+ T cells) underwent fewer mitotic cycles and had shorter telomeres than group Y (p = 0.04). Conclusions Our findings confirm that telomere length in older-age adults is shorter than in younger subjects. After stimulation with ConA, cells are not restored to the previous telomere length and undergo replicative senescence. This is in sharp contrast to the response observed in young adults after ConA stimulation where cells increase in telomere length and replicative capacity. The mechanisms involved in this phenomenon are not yet clear and merit further investigation. PMID:24063536

  5. Acoustic stimulation causes tonotopic alterations in the length of isolated outer hair cells from guinea pig hearing organ.

    PubMed Central

    Canlon, B; Brundin, L; Flock, A

    1988-01-01

    Isolated outer hair cells from the mammalian cochlea exhibit a motile response to electrical or chemical stimulation. Here we show that isolated outer hair cells can also respond to acoustic stimulation, in the form of a tone burst of 200 Hz, by either shortening or lengthening depending on their cochlear location. Cells from the apical region of the cochlea (long cells) responded by increasing their length, whereas those from more basal regions (short cells) responded by decreasing their length. Cells from intermediate positions showed an equal probability for either elongating or shortening. Both the elongating and shortening response was inhibited by 3 microM poly(L-lysine). It is suggested that this tonotopic and bidirectional acoustic response may be one of the active components underlying the specific phase and frequency displacement of the basilar membrane. Images PMID:3413135

  6. Effect of polymer chain length on membrane perturbation activity of cationic phenylene ethynylene oligomers and polymers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Jones, Emmalee M; Tang, Yanli; Ji, Eunkyung; Lopez, Gabriel P; Chi, Eva Y; Schanze, Kirk S; Whitten, David G

    2011-09-06

    The interactions of poly(phenylene ethynylene)- (PPE-) based cationic conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPEs) and oligo(phenylene ethynylene)s (OPEs) with different model lipid membrane systems were investigated to gain insight into the relationship between molecular structure and membrane perturbation ability. The CPE and OPE compounds exhibit broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, and cell walls and membranes are believed to be their main targets. To better understand how the size, in terms of the number of repeat units, of the CPEs and OPEs affects their membrane disruption activities, a series of PPE-based CPEs and OPEs were synthesized and studied. A number of photophysical techniques were used to investigate the interactions of CPEs and OPEs with model membranes, including unilamellar vesicles and lipid monolayers at the air/water interface. CPE- or OPE-induced dye leakage from vesicles reveals that the CPEs and OPEs selectively perturb model bacterial membranes and that their membrane perturbation abilities are highly dependent on molecular size. Consistent with dye-leakage assay results, the CPEs and OPEs also exhibit chain-length-dependent ability to insert into 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'-rac-glycerol) (DPPG) monolayers. Our results suggest that, for PPE-based CPE and OPE antimicrobials, chain length can be tuned to optimize their membrane perturbation ability.

  7. The length-response properties of cells in the feline perigeniculate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Jones, H E; Sillito, A M

    1994-07-01

    Perigeniculate cells receive visual input from the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) and from the visual cortex. In contrast to the extensive literature documenting dLGN and cortical cell responses, comparatively little quantitative data exists for perigeniculate nucleus cells, and very little is known about the role of the corticofugal input to the perigeniculate nucleus. We have previously shown that dLGN relay cells have sharply length-tuned receptive fields and that a significant component of this is dependent on the corticofugal system. In this report, we have explored the length-response properties of perigeniculate nucleus cells in the presence and absence of corticofugal feedback. The response profiles of most perigeniculate nucleus cells contrasted markedly with the sharply length-tuned fields of dLGN cells, but exhibited a notable resemblance to those exhibited by VI cells with short summation lengths, which have recently been shown to constitute a considerable proportion of the layer VI cell population. This might suggest that the responses of perigeniculate nucleus cells to long bars derive from their cortical input. However, our data failed to reveal a discernible change in their profiles after removal of the corticofugal drive. This surprising observation implies that their length-tuning profiles follow from subcortical circuitry. The ways in which this might occur are discussed.

  8. Leg length inequality, pelvic tilt and lumbar back muscle activity during standing.

    PubMed

    Vink, P; Kamphuisen, H A

    1989-05-01

    The influence of an artificial leg length discrepancy on lateral pelvic tilt and on activity of the intrinsic lumbar back muscles was investigated. An artificial leg length discrepancy of up to 50 mm was created by putting boards of different height under the right foot. Lateral pelvic tilt increased linearly with increasing artificial leg length discrepancies. The rectified and averaged e.m.g. of the intrinsic lumbar back muscles showed a small increase at the longer leg side. It increased non-linearly with an increment in slope above a certain artificial leg length discrepancy (mean 34 mm).

  9. The effect of muscle length on force depression after active shortening in soleus muscle of mice.

    PubMed

    Van Noten, Pieter; Van Leemputte, Marc

    2011-07-01

    Isometric muscle force after active shortening is reduced [force depression (FD)]. The mechanism is incompletely understood but work delivered during shortening has been suggested to be the main determinant of FD. However, whether muscle length affects the sensitivity of FD to work is unknown, although this information might add to the understanding of the phenomenon. The aim of this study is to investigate the length dependence of the FD/work ratio (Q). Therefore, isometric force production (ISO) of 10 incubated mouse soleus muscles was compared to isometric force after 0.6, 1.2, and 2.4 mm shortening (IAS) at different end lengths ranging from L(0) - 3 to L(0) + 1.8 mm in steps of 0.6 mm. FD was calculated as the force difference between an ISO and IAS contraction at the same activation time (6 s) and end length. We confirm the strong relation between FD and work at L(0) (R² = 0.92) and found that FD is length dependent with a maximum of 8.8 ± 0.3% at L(0) + 1.2 mm for 0.6 mm shortening amplitude. Q was only constant for short muscle lengths (<85% L(0)) but increased exponentially with increasing muscle length. The observed length dependence of Q indicates that FD is not only determined by work produced during shortening but also by a length-dependent factor, possibly actin compliance, which should be incorporated in any mechanism explaining FD.

  10. Diffusion length measurements in solar cells: An analysis and comparison of techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollam, J. A.; Khan, A. A.; Soukup, R. J.; Hermann, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    A brief review of the major techniques for measuring minority carrier diffusion lengths in solar cells is given. Emphasis is placed on comparing limits of applicability for each method, especially as applied to silicon cells or to gallium arsenide cells, including the effects of radiation damage.

  11. Estimation of minority carrier diffusion lengths in InP/GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, R. K.; Flood, D. J.

    1990-01-01

    Minority carrier diffusion length is one of the most important parameters affecting the solar cell performance. An attempt is made to estimate the minority carrier diffusion lengths is the emitter and base of InP/GaAs heteroepitaxial solar cells. The PC-1D computer model was used to simulate the experimental cell results measured at NASA Lewis under AMO (air mass zero) spectrum at 25 C. A 16 nm hole diffusion length in the emitter and a 0.42 micron electron diffusion length in the base gave very good agreement with the I-V curve. The effect of varying minority carrier diffusion lengths on cell short current, open circuit voltage, and efficiency was studied. It is also observed that the front surface recombination velocity has very little influence on the cell performance. The poor output of heteroepitaxial cells is caused primarily by the large number of dislocations generated at the interfaces that propagate through the bulk indium phosphide layers. Cell efficiency as a function of dislocation density was calculated and the effect of improved emitter bulk properties on cell efficiency is presented. It is found that cells with over 16 percent efficiencies should be possible, provided the dislocation density is below 10(exp 6)/sq cm.

  12. Method to extract diffusion length from solar cell parameters—Application to polycrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taretto, K.; Rau, U.; Werner, J. H.

    2003-05-01

    A closed form, analytical expression for the interdependence of the effective diffusion length Leff and the open-circuit voltage of solar cells is derived for the parallel connection of recombination in the space-charge region and in the neutral base region. This expression allows for the calculation of Leff from the open-circuit voltage, the short-circuit current, and the base doping of the solar cell as the only quantities that need to be determined experimentally. Values of Leff calculated with our method match with an accuracy of 35% values that are determined experimentally by quantum-efficiency measurements of silicon solar cells. The agreement holds in a range 0.3 μm cell via an analytical expression for the Leff -dependence of carrier collection. Again, we find a good match between the measured Leff and the values calculated by this method. We further analyze photovoltaic output parameters from literature data of polycrystalline silicon solar cells covering grain sizes from 10-2 to 104 μm. We calculate Leff for these solar cells with our method and interpret the results in terms of grain-boundary recombination velocity SGB. We find that the data points split into two distinct groups, one with 105 cm/scells with low SGB have a {220} surface texture, we ascribe the low-recombination velocity of grain boundaries to the low-electronic activity of [110]-tilt grain boundaries in these films.

  13. Acute effects of wheel running on adult hippocampal precursor cells in mice are not caused by changes in cell cycle length or S phase length

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Tim J.; Walker, Tara L.; Overall, Rupert W.; Brandt, Moritz D.; Kempermann, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    Exercise stimulates cellular brain plasticity by extending the pool of proliferating neural precursor cells in the adult hippocampus. This effect has been investigated extensively, but the most immediate cellular effect induced by exercise that results in this acute increase in the number of cycling cells remained unclear. In the developing brain as well as adult pathological models, cell cycle alterations have a major influence on the balance between proliferative and neurogenic divisions. In this study we investigated whether this might also apply to the acute physiological pro-neurogenic stimulus of physical exercise in adulthood. Do changes in cell cycle precede the measurable increase in proliferation? After 5 days of voluntary wheel running, however, we measured only a very small, statistically not significant acceleration in cell cycle, which could not quantitatively explain the observed increase in proliferating cells after exercise. Thus, at this acute stage, changes at the level of cell cycle control is not the primary causal mechanism for the expansion of the precursor cell population, although with time after the stimulus changes in cell cycle of the entire population of labeled cells might be the result of the expanded pool of cells that have progressed to the advanced neurogenic stages with shorter cell cycle length. PMID:25339861

  14. Active stabilization of a fiber-optic two-photon interferometer using continuous optical length control.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seok-Beom; Kim, Heonoh

    2016-05-16

    The practical realization of long-distance entanglement-based quantum communication systems strongly rely on the observation of highly stable quantum interference between correlated single photons. This task must accompany active stabilization of the optical path lengths within the single-photon coherence length. Here, we provide two-step interferometer stabilization methods employing continuous optical length control and experimentally demonstrate two-photon quantum interference using an actively stabilized 6-km-long fiber-optic Hong-Ou-Mandel interferometer. The two-step active control techniques are applied for measuring highly stable two-photon interference fringes by scanning the optical path-length difference. The obtained two-photon interference visibilities with and without accidental subtraction are found to be approximately 90.7% and 65.4%, respectively.

  15. Modified Sagnac interferometer for contact-free length measurement of a direct absorption cell.

    PubMed

    Elandaloussi, Hadj; Rouillé, Christian; Marie-Jeanne, Patrick; Janssen, Christof

    2016-03-10

    Accurate path length measurements in absorption cells are recurrent requirements in quantitative molecular absorption spectroscopy. A new twin path laser interferometer for length measurements in a simple direct path absorption geometry is presented, along with a full uncertainty budget. The path in an absorption cell is determined by measuring the optical path length change due to the diminution of the refractive index when the cell originally filled with nitrogen gas is evacuated. The performance of the instrument based on a stabilized HeNe laser is verified by comparison with the results of direct mechanical length measurements of a roughly 45 mm long, specially designed absorption cell. Due to a resolution of about 1/300 of a HeNe fringe, an expanded (coverage factor k=2) uncertainty of 16 μm in the length measurement is achieved, providing an expanded relative uncertainty of 3.6·10⁻⁴ for the length of our test absorption cell. This value is about 8 times lower than what has been reported previously. The instrument will be useful for precision measurements of absorption cross sections of strong absorbers which require short light paths, such as ozone, halogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and volatile organic compounds in the UV.

  16. Cardiac troponin I threonine 144: role in myofilament length dependent activation.

    PubMed

    Tachampa, Kittipong; Wang, Helen; Farman, Gerrie P; de Tombe, Pieter P

    2007-11-26

    Myofilament length-dependent activation is the main cellular mechanism responsible for the Frank-Starling law of the heart. All striated muscle display length-dependent activation properties, but it is most pronounced in cardiac muscle and least in slow skeletal muscle. Cardiac muscle expressing slow skeletal troponin (ssTn)I instead of cardiac troponin (cTn)I displays reduced myofilament length-dependent activation. The inhibitory region of troponin (Tn)I differs by a single residue, proline at position 112 in ssTnI versus threonine at position 144 in cTnI. Here we tested whether this substitution was important for myofilament length-dependent activation; using recombinant techniques, we prepared wild-type cTnI, ssTnI, and 2 mutants: cTnI(Thr>Pro) and ssTnI(Pro>Thr). Purified proteins were complexed with recombinant cardiac TnT/TnC and exchanged into skinned rat cardiac trabeculae. Force-Ca2+ relationships were determined to derive myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity (EC50) at 2 sarcomere lengths: 2.0 and 2.2 microm (n=7). Myofilament length-dependent activation was indexed as deltaEC50, the difference in EC50 between sarcomere lengths of 2.0 and 2.2 microm. Incorporation of ssTnI compared with cTnI into the cardiac sarcomere reduced deltaEC50 from 1.26+/-0.30 to 0.19+/-0.04 micromol/L. A similar reduction also could be observed when Tn contained cTnI(Thr>Pro) (deltaEC50=0.24+/-0.04 micromol/L), whereas the presence of ssTnI(Pro>Thr) increased deltaEC50 to 0.94+/-0.12 micromol/L. These results suggest that Thr144 in cardiac TnI modulates cardiac myofilament length-dependent activation.

  17. Genetically predicted longer telomere length is associated with increased risk of B-cell lymphoma subtypes.

    PubMed

    Machiela, Mitchell J; Lan, Qing; Slager, Susan L; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Teras, Lauren R; Camp, Nicola J; Cerhan, James R; Spinelli, John J; Wang, Sophia S; Nieters, Alexandra; Vijai, Joseph; Yeager, Meredith; Wang, Zhaoming; Ghesquières, Hervé; McKay, James; Conde, Lucia; de Bakker, Paul I W; Cox, David G; Burdett, Laurie; Monnereau, Alain; Flowers, Christopher R; De Roos, Anneclaire J; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R; Giles, Graham G; Melbye, Mads; Gu, Jian; Jackson, Rebecca D; Kane, Eleanor; Purdue, Mark P; Vajdic, Claire M; Albanes, Demetrius; Kelly, Rachel S; Zucca, Mariagrazia; Bertrand, Kimberly A; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Lawrence, Charles; Hutchinson, Amy; Zhi, Degui; Habermann, Thomas M; Link, Brian K; Novak, Anne J; Dogan, Ahmet; Asmann, Yan W; Liebow, Mark; Thompson, Carrie A; Ansell, Stephen M; Witzig, Thomas E; Tilly, Hervé; Haioun, Corinne; Molina, Thierry J; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Glimelius, Bengt; Adami, Hans-Olov; Roos, Göran; Bracci, Paige M; Riby, Jacques; Smith, Martyn T; Holly, Elizabeth A; Cozen, Wendy; Hartge, Patricia; Morton, Lindsay M; Severson, Richard K; Tinker, Lesley F; North, Kari E; Becker, Nikolaus; Benavente, Yolanda; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Foretova, Lenka; Maynadie, Marc; Staines, Anthony; Lightfoot, Tracy; Crouch, Simon; Smith, Alex; Roman, Eve; Diver, W Ryan; Offit, Kenneth; Zelenetz, Andrew; Klein, Robert J; Villano, Danylo J; Zheng, Tongzhang; Zhang, Yawei; Holford, Theodore R; Turner, Jenny; Southey, Melissa C; Clavel, Jacqueline; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Riboli, Elio; Vineis, Paolo; Kaaks, Rudolph; Boeing, Heiner; Tjønneland, Anne; Angelucci, Emanuele; Di Lollo, Simonetta; Rais, Marco; De Vivo, Immaculata; Giovannucci, Edward; Kraft, Peter; Huang, Jinyan; Ma, Baoshan; Ye, Yuanqing; Chiu, Brian C H; Liang, Liming; Park, Ju-Hyun; Chung, Charles C; Weisenburger, Dennis D; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Salles, Gilles; Glenn, Martha; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Curtin, Karen; Wu, Xifeng; Smedby, Karin E; de Sanjose, Silvia; Skibola, Christine F; Berndt, Sonja I; Birmann, Brenda M; Chanock, Stephen J; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2016-04-15

    Evidence from a small number of studies suggests that longer telomere length measured in peripheral leukocytes is associated with an increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). However, these studies may be biased by reverse causation, confounded by unmeasured environmental exposures and might miss time points for which prospective telomere measurement would best reveal a relationship between telomere length and NHL risk. We performed an analysis of genetically inferred telomere length and NHL risk in a study of 10 102 NHL cases of the four most common B-cell histologic types and 9562 controls using a genetic risk score (GRS) comprising nine telomere length-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms. This approach uses existing genotype data and estimates telomere length by weighing the number of telomere length-associated variant alleles an individual carries with the published change in kb of telomere length. The analysis of the telomere length GRS resulted in an association between longer telomere length and increased NHL risk [four B-cell histologic types combined; odds ratio (OR) = 1.49, 95% CI 1.22-1.82,P-value = 8.5 × 10(-5)]. Subtype-specific analyses indicated that chronic lymphocytic leukemia or small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL) was the principal NHL subtype contributing to this association (OR = 2.60, 95% CI 1.93-3.51,P-value = 4.0 × 10(-10)). Significant interactions were observed across strata of sex for CLL/SLL and marginal zone lymphoma subtypes as well as age for the follicular lymphoma subtype. Our results indicate that a genetic background that favors longer telomere length may increase NHL risk, particularly risk of CLL/SLL, and are consistent with earlier studies relating longer telomere length with increased NHL risk.

  18. Effect of length of molecular recognition moiety on enzymatic activity switching.

    PubMed

    Oshiba, Yuhei; Tamaki, Takanori; Ohashi, Hidenori; Hirakawa, Hidehiko; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Nagamune, Teruyuki; Yamaguchi, Takeo

    2013-10-01

    We site-specifically conjugated biotin-PEG derivatives with spacer arms of different lengths to mutant P450cam (3mD) and evaluated the activity of and structural changes in the conjugates as a first step toward clarifying the mechanism whereby the activity of the 3mD conjugate is inhibited. 3mD was prepared by site-specific mutation to inhibit its enzymatic activity artificially, after which the derivative compounds were conjugated to the enzyme. 3mD has one cysteine on its surface with a reactive thiol group that can react with compounds near the active site, where a conformational change will be induced after conjugation. The activity of 3mD was retained in the biotin-PEG₂-3mD conjugate, but was dramatically reduced in the biotin-PEG₁₁-3mD conjugate. To investigate the effect of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) length on the enzymatic activity after conjugation, PEGs of different lengths, exceeding that in biotin-PEG₁₁, and whose termini were not biotin, were conjugated to 3mD. The activity of 3mD decreased in all these conjugates. This indicates that the activity of 3mD in these conjugates decreased after its conjugation with PEG molecules that exceeded a certain length. The biotin-PEG₂-3mD, which retains enzymatic activity after conjugation, showed avidin responsiveness; the enzymatic activity decreased after avidin binding.

  19. Allometric relations of total volumes of prolactin cells and corticotropic cells to body length in the annual cyprinodont Cynolebias whitei: effects of environmental salinity, stress and ageing.

    PubMed

    Ruijter, J M; Wendelaar Bonga, S E

    1987-09-01

    An analysis of the allometric relations of the total volumes occupied by prolactin (PRL) and corticotropic (ACTH) cells (PRL volume and ACTH volume, respectively) to body length and a study of the immunocytochemical staining intensity of PRL and ACTH cells were used to determine the differences in activity of PRL and ACTH cells in freshwater-reared and in saltwater-reared Cynolebias whitei during the entire lifespan of this annual cyprinodont fish. An inflection in the allometric relation of PRL volume to body length was observed in fish of one-week old. The relatively large PRL volume in younger fish may be related to PRL cell activity before hatching. No inflections were observed in the allometric relations of PRL volume and ACTH volume to body length at the onset of maturation and the onset of ageing, indicating that the increased pituitary growth in maturing and ageing C. whitei is not the result of changes in PRL or ACTH cells. The slope of the allometric relation of PRL volume to body length in freshwater-reared fish was significantly steeper than the slope in saltwater-reared fish. The PRL volume in adult freshwater-reared fish was eight times larger than that in saltwater-reared fish of the same length. The intensity of immunocytochemical staining of saltwater PRL cells was significantly reduced. These volumetric and staining differences correspond to the low functional demand put upon PRL cells in saltwater-adapted fish. In contrast, the slope of the allometric relation of ACTH volume to body length and the intensity of immunocytochemical staining of ACTH cells were similar in freshwater-reared and in saltwater-reared fish.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Effect of altering starting length and activation timing of muscle on fiber strain and muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Timothy A; Herzog, Walter

    2006-05-01

    Muscle strain injuries are some of the most frequent injuries in sports and command a great deal of attention in an effort to understand their etiology. These injuries may be the culmination of a series of subcellular events accumulated through repetitive lengthening (eccentric) contractions during exercise, and they may be influenced by a variety of variables including fiber strain magnitude, peak joint torque, and starting muscle length. To assess the influence of these variables on muscle injury magnitude in vivo, we measured fiber dynamics and joint torque production during repeated stretch-shortening cycles in the rabbit tibialis anterior muscle, at short and long muscle lengths, while varying the timing of activation before muscle stretch. We found that a muscle subjected to repeated stretch-shortening cycles of constant muscle-tendon unit excursion exhibits significantly different joint torque and fiber strains when the timing of activation or starting muscle length is changed. In particular, measures of fiber strain and muscle injury were significantly increased by altering activation timing and increasing the starting length of the muscle. However, we observed differential effects on peak joint torque during the cyclic stretch-shortening exercise, as increasing the starting length of the muscle did not increase torque production. We conclude that altering activation timing and muscle length before stretch may influence muscle injury by significantly increasing fiber strain magnitude and that fiber dynamics is a more important variable than muscle-tendon unit dynamics and torque production in influencing the magnitude of muscle injury.

  1. PCB153 reduces telomerase activity and telomere length in immortalized human skin keratinocytes (HaCaT) but not in human foreskin keratinocytes (NFK).

    PubMed

    Senthilkumar, P K; Robertson, L W; Ludewig, G

    2012-02-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), ubiquitous environmental pollutants, are characterized by long term-persistence in the environment, bioaccumulation, and biomagnification in the food chain. Exposure to PCBs may cause various diseases, affecting many cellular processes. Deregulation of the telomerase and the telomere complex leads to several biological disorders. We investigated the hypothesis that PCB153 modulates telomerase activity, telomeres and reactive oxygen species resulting in the deregulation of cell growth. Exponentially growing immortal human skin keratinocytes (HaCaT) and normal human foreskin keratinocytes (NFK) were incubated with PCB153 for 48 and 24days, respectively, and telomerase activity, telomere length, superoxide level, cell growth, and cell cycle distribution were determined. In HaCaT cells exposure to PCB153 significantly reduced telomerase activity, telomere length, cell growth and increased intracellular superoxide levels from day 6 to day 48, suggesting that superoxide may be one of the factors regulating telomerase activity, telomere length and cell growth compared to untreated control cells. Results with NFK cells showed no shortening of telomere length but reduced cell growth and increased superoxide levels in PCB153-treated cells compared to untreated controls. As expected, basal levels of telomerase activity were almost undetectable, which made a quantitative comparison of treated and control groups impossible. The significant down regulation of telomerase activity and reduction of telomere length by PCB153 in HaCaT cells suggest that any cell type with significant telomerase activity, like stem cells, may be at risk of premature telomere shortening with potential adverse health effects for the affected organism.

  2. PCB153 reduces Telomerase Activity and Telomere Length in Immortalized Human Skin Kerantinocytes (HaCaT) but not in Human Foreskin Keratinocytes (NFK)

    PubMed Central

    Senthilkumar, P.K.; Robertson, L.W.; Ludewig, G.

    2012-01-01

    Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs), ubiquitous environmental pollutants, are characterized by long term-persistence in the environment, bioaccumulation, and biomagnification in the food chain. Exposure to PCBs may cause various diseases, affecting many cellular processes. Deregulation of the telomerase and the telomere complex leads to several biological disorders. We investigated the hypothesis that PCB153 modulates telomerase activity, telomeres and reactive oxygen species resulting in the deregulation of cell growth. Exponentially growing immortal human skin keratinocytes (HaCaT) and normal human foreskin keratinocytes (NFK) were incubated with PCB153 for 48 and 24 days, respectively, and telomerase activity, telomere length, superoxide level, cell growth, and cell cycle distribution were determined. In HaCaT cells exposure to PCB153 significantly reduced telomerase activity, telomere length, cell growth and increased intracellular superoxide levels from day 6 to day 48, suggesting that superoxide may be one of the factors regulating telomerase activity, telomere length and cell growth compared to untreated control cells. Results with NFK cells showed no shortening of telomere length but reduced cell growth and increased superoxide levels in PCB153-treated cells compared to untreated controls. As expected, basal levels of telomerase activity were almost undetectable, which made a quantitative comparison of treated and control groups impossible. The significant down regulation of telomerase activity and reduction of telomere length by PCB153 in HaCaT cells suggest that any cell type with significant telomerase activity, like stem cells, may be at risk of premature telomere shortening with potential adverse health effects for the affected organism. PMID:22210444

  3. Purification and Activity Testing of the Full-Length YycFGHI Proteins of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Türck, Michael; Bierbaum, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    Background The YycFG two-component regulatory system (TCS) of Staphylococcus aureus represents the only essential TCS that is almost ubiquitously distributed in Gram-positive bacteria with a low G+C-content. YycG (WalK/VicK) is a sensor histidine-kinase and YycF (WalR/VicR) is the cognate response regulator. Both proteins play an important role in the biosynthesis of the cell envelope and mutations in these proteins have been involved in development of vancomycin and daptomycin resistance. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we present high yield expression and purification of the full-length YycG and YycF proteins as well as of the auxiliary proteins YycH and YycI of Staphylococcus aureus. Activity tests of the YycG kinase and a mutated version, that harbours an Y306N exchange in its cytoplasmic PAS domain, in a detergent-micelle-model and a phosholipid-liposome-model showed kinase activity (autophosphorylation and phosphoryl group transfer to YycF) only in the presence of elevated concentrations of alkali salts. A direct comparison of the activity of the kinases in the liposome-model indicated a higher activity of the mutated YycG kinase. Further experiments indicated that YycG responds to fluidity changes in its microenvironment. Conclusions/Significance The combination of high yield expression, purification and activity testing of membrane and membrane-associated proteins provides an excellent experimental basis for further protein-protein interaction studies and for identification of all signals received by the YycFGHI system. PMID:22276191

  4. Calibration of effective optical path length for hollow-waveguide based gas cell using absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lin; Du, Zhenhui; Li, Jinyi

    2016-10-01

    The Hollow Waveguide (HWG) has emerged as a novel tool to transmit laser power. Owing to its long Effective Optical Path Length (EOPL) within a relatively small volume, it is suitable for the application as a gas cell in concentration measurement by using laser spectroscopy. The measurement of effective optical path length for a hollow waveguide, which possesses the physical length of 284.0 cm, by using Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) was demonstrated. Carbon dioxide was used as a sample gas for a hollow waveguide calibration. A 2004 nm Distributed Feed-Back (DFB) laser was used as the light source to cover a CO2 line near 2003 nm, which was selected as the target line in the measurement. The reference direct absorption spectroscopy signal was obtained by delivering CO2 into a reference cell possessing a length of 29.4 cm. Then the effective optical path length of HWG was calculated by least-squares fitting the measured absorption signal to the reference absorption signal. The measured EOPL of HWG was 282.8 cm and the repeatability error of effective optical path length was calculated as 0.08 cm. A detection limit of 0.057 cm (with integral time 5 s) characterized by the Allan variance, was derived. The effective optical path length is obtained as the significant parameter to calculate the concentration of gases and it is of great importance to precise measurement of absorption spectroscopy.

  5. Active tension adaptation at a shortened arterial muscle length: inhibition by cytochalasin-D.

    PubMed

    Bednarek, Melissa L; Speich, John E; Miner, Amy S; Ratz, Paul H

    2011-04-01

    Unlike the static length-tension curve of striated muscle, airway and urinary bladder smooth muscles display a dynamic length-tension curve. Much less is known about the plasticity of the length-tension curve of vascular smooth muscle. The present study demonstrates that there were significant increases of ∼15% in the phasic phase and ∼10% in the tonic phase of a third KCl-induced contraction of a rabbit femoral artery ring relative to the first contraction after a 20% decrease in length from an optimal muscle length (L(0)) to 0.8-fold L(0). Typically, three repeated contractions were necessary for full length adaptation to occur. The tonic phase of a third KCl-induced contraction was increased by ∼50% after the release of tissues from 1.25-fold to 0.75-fold L(o). The mechanism for this phenomenon did not appear to lie in thick filament regulation because there was no increase in myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation to support the increase in tension nor was length adaptation abolished when Ca(2+) entry was limited by nifedipine and when Rho kinase (ROCK) was blocked by H-1152. However, length adaptation of both the phasic and tonic phases was abolished when actin polymerization was inhibited through blockade of the plus end of actin by cytochalasin-D. Interestingly, inhibition of actin polymerization when G-actin monomers were sequestered by latrunculin-B increased the phasic phase and had no effect on the tonic phase of contraction during length adaptation. These data suggest that for a given level of cytosolic free Ca(2+), active tension in the femoral artery can be sensitized not only by regulation of MLC phosphatase via ROCK and protein kinase C, as has been reported by others, but also by a nonmyosin regulatory mechanism involving actin polymerization. Dysregulation of this form of active tension modulation may provide insight into alterations of large artery stiffness in hypertension.

  6. Full-length RNA-seq from single cells using Smart-seq2.

    PubMed

    Picelli, Simone; Faridani, Omid R; Björklund, Asa K; Winberg, Gösta; Sagasser, Sven; Sandberg, Rickard

    2014-01-01

    Emerging methods for the accurate quantification of gene expression in individual cells hold promise for revealing the extent, function and origins of cell-to-cell variability. Different high-throughput methods for single-cell RNA-seq have been introduced that vary in coverage, sensitivity and multiplexing ability. We recently introduced Smart-seq for transcriptome analysis from single cells, and we subsequently optimized the method for improved sensitivity, accuracy and full-length coverage across transcripts. Here we present a detailed protocol for Smart-seq2 that allows the generation of full-length cDNA and sequencing libraries by using standard reagents. The entire protocol takes ∼2 d from cell picking to having a final library ready for sequencing; sequencing will require an additional 1-3 d depending on the strategy and sequencer. The current limitations are the lack of strand specificity and the inability to detect nonpolyadenylated (polyA(-)) RNA.

  7. PCB153 reduces telomerase activity and telomere length in immortalized human skin keratinocytes (HaCaT) but not in human foreskin keratinocytes (NFK)

    SciTech Connect

    Senthilkumar, P.K.; Robertson, L.W.; Ludewig, G.

    2012-02-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), ubiquitous environmental pollutants, are characterized by long term-persistence in the environment, bioaccumulation, and biomagnification in the food chain. Exposure to PCBs may cause various diseases, affecting many cellular processes. Deregulation of the telomerase and the telomere complex leads to several biological disorders. We investigated the hypothesis that PCB153 modulates telomerase activity, telomeres and reactive oxygen species resulting in the deregulation of cell growth. Exponentially growing immortal human skin keratinocytes (HaCaT) and normal human foreskin keratinocytes (NFK) were incubated with PCB153 for 48 and 24 days, respectively, and telomerase activity, telomere length, superoxide level, cell growth, and cell cycle distribution were determined. In HaCaT cells exposure to PCB153 significantly reduced telomerase activity, telomere length, cell growth and increased intracellular superoxide levels from day 6 to day 48, suggesting that superoxide may be one of the factors regulating telomerase activity, telomere length and cell growth compared to untreated control cells. Results with NFK cells showed no shortening of telomere length but reduced cell growth and increased superoxide levels in PCB153-treated cells compared to untreated controls. As expected, basal levels of telomerase activity were almost undetectable, which made a quantitative comparison of treated and control groups impossible. The significant down regulation of telomerase activity and reduction of telomere length by PCB153 in HaCaT cells suggest that any cell type with significant telomerase activity, like stem cells, may be at risk of premature telomere shortening with potential adverse health effects for the affected organism. -- Highlights: ► Human immortal (HaCaT) and primary (NFK) keratinocytes were exposed to PCB153. ► PCB153 significantly reduced telomerase activity and telomere length in HaCaT. ► No effect on telomere length and

  8. T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Smith-Garvin, Jennifer E; Koretzky, Gary A; Jordan, Martha S

    2009-01-01

    This year marks the 25th anniversary of the first Annual Review of Immunology article to describe features of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR). In celebration of this anniversary, we begin with a brief introduction outlining the chronology of the earliest studies that established the basic paradigm for how the engaged TCR transduces its signals. This review continues with a description of the current state of our understanding of TCR signaling, as well as a summary of recent findings examining other key aspects of T cell activation, including cross talk between the TCR and integrins, the role of costimulatory molecules, and how signals may negatively regulate T cell function.Acronyms and DefinitionsAdapter protein: cellular protein that functions to bridge molecular interactions via characteristic domains able to mediate protein/protein or protein/lipid interactions Costimulation: signals delivered to T cells by cell surface receptors other than the TCR itself that potentiate T cell activation cSMAC: central supramolecular activation cluster Immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM): a short peptide sequence in the cytoplasmic tails of key surface receptors on hematopoietic cells that is characterized by tyrosine residues that are phosphorylated by Src family PTKs, enabling the ITAM to recruit activated Syk family kinases Inside-out signaling: signals initiated by engagement of immunoreceptors that lead to conformational changes and clustering of integrins, thereby increasing the affinity and avidity of the integrins for their ligands NFAT: nuclear factor of activated T cells PI3K: phosphoinositide 3-kinase PKC: protein kinase C PLC: phospholipase C pMHC: peptide major histocompatibility complex (MHC) complex pSMAC: peripheral supramolecular activation cluster PTK: protein tyrosine kinase Signal transduction: biochemical events linking surface receptor engagement to cellular responses TCR: T cell antigen receptor

  9. Investigation of the Sequence and Length Dependence for Cell-Penetrating Prenylated Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Wollack, James W.; Zeliadt, Nicholette A.; Ochocki, Joshua D.; Mullen, Daniel G.; Barany, George; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V.

    2009-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides are useful delivery tools for introducing molecules of interest into cells. A new class of cell penetrating molecules has been recently reported--cell penetrating, prenylated peptides. In this study a series of such peptides was synthesized to examine the relationship between peptide sequence and level of peptide internalization and to probe their mechanism of internalization. This study revealed that prenylated peptides internalize via a non-endocytotic pathway regardless of sequence. Sequence length and identity was found to play a role in peptide uptake but prenylated sequences as short as two amino acids were found to exhibit significant cell penetrating properties. PMID:20004573

  10. Cesium oscillator strengths measured with a multiple-path-length absorption cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Exton, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Absorption-oscillator-strength measurements for the principal series in cesium were measured using a multiple-path-length cell. The optical arrangement included a movable transverse path for checking the uniformity of the alkali density along the length of the cell and which also allowed strength measurements to be made simultaneously on both strong and weak lines. The strengths measured on the first 10 doublets indicate an increasing trend in the doublet ratio. The individual line strengths are in close agreement with the high resolution measurements of Pichler (1974) and with the calculations of Norcross (1973).

  11. Threshold effect of growth rate on population variability of Escherichia coli cell lengths

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    A long-standing question in biology is the effect of growth on cell size. Here, we estimate the effect of Escherichia coli growth rate (r) on population cell size distributions by estimating the coefficient of variation of cell lengths (CVL) from image analysis of fixed cells in DIC microscopy. We find that the CVL is constant at growth rates less than one division per hour, whereas above this threshold, CVL increases with an increase in the growth rate. We hypothesize that stochastic inhibition of cell division owing to replication stalling by a RecA-dependent mechanism, combined with the growth rate threshold of multi-fork replication (according to Cooper and Helmstetter), could form the basis of such a threshold effect. We proceed to test our hypothesis by increasing the frequency of stochastic stalling of replication forks with hydroxyurea (HU) treatment and find that cell length variability increases only when the growth rate exceeds this threshold. The population effect is also reproduced in single-cell studies using agar-pad cultures and ‘mother machine’-based experiments to achieve synchrony. To test the role of RecA, critical for the repair of stalled replication forks, we examine the CVL of E. coli ΔrecA cells. We find cell length variability in the mutant to be greater than wild-type, a phenotype that is rescued by plasmid-based RecA expression. Additionally, we find that RecA-GFP protein recruitment to nucleoids is more frequent at growth rates exceeding the growth rate threshold and is further enhanced on HU treatment. Thus, we find growth rates greater than a threshold result in increased E. coli cell lengths in the population, and this effect is, at least in part, mediated by RecA recruitment to the nucleoid and stochastic inhibition of division. PMID:28386413

  12. Interaction of β(3) /β(2) -peptides, consisting of Val-Ala-Leu segments, with POPC giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) and white blood cancer cells (U937)--a new type of cell-penetrating peptides, and a surprising chain-length dependence of their vesicle- and cell-lysing activity.

    PubMed

    Kolesinska, Beata; Eyer, Klaus; Robinson, Tom; Dittrich, Petra S; Beck, Albert K; Seebach, Dieter; Walde, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Many years ago, β(2) /β(3) -peptides, consisting of alternatively arranged β(2) - and β(3) h-amino-acid residues, have been found to undergo folding to a unique type of helix, the 10/12-helix, and to exhibit non-polar, lipophilic properties (Helv. Chim. Acta 1997, 80, 2033). We have now synthesized such 'mixed' hexa-, nona-, dodeca-, and octadecapeptides, consisting of Val-Ala-Leu triads, with N-terminal fluorescein (FAM) labels, i.e., 1-4, and studied their interactions with POPC (=1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) and with human white blood cancer cells U937. The methods used were microfluidic technology, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), a flow-cytometry assay, a membrane-toxicity assay with the dehydrogenase G6PDH as enzymatic reporter, and visual microscopy observations. All β(3) /β(2) -peptide derivatives penetrate the GUVs and/or the cells. As shown with the isomeric β(3) /β(2) -, β(3) -, and β(2) -nonamers, 2, 5, and 6, respectively, the derivatives 5 and 6 consisting exclusively of β(3) - or β(2) -amino-acid residues, respectively, interact neither with the vesicles nor with the cells. Depending on the method of investigation and on the pretreatment of the cells, the β(3) /β(2) -nonamer and/or the β(3) /β(2) -dodecamer derivative, 2 and/or 3, respectively, cause a surprising disintegration or lysis of the GUVs and cells, comparable with the action of tensides, viral fusion peptides, and host-defense antimicrobial peptides. Possible sources of the chain-length-dependent destructive potential of the β(3) /β(2) -nona- and β(3) /β(2) -dodecapeptide derivatives, and a possible relationship with the phosphate-to-phosphate and hydrocarbon thicknesses of GUVs, and eukaryotic cells are discussed. Further investigations with other types of GUVs and of eukaryotic or prokaryotic cells will be necessary to elucidate the mechanism(s) of interaction of 'mixed' β(3) /β(2) -peptides with

  13. Lip EMG activity during vowel production in apraxia of speech: phrase context and word length effects.

    PubMed

    Hough, M S; Klich, R J

    1998-08-01

    This investigation examined the timing relationships of EMG activity underlying vowel production in 2 normal individuals and in 2 individuals with marked-to-severe apraxia of speech of approximately two-and-one-half years duration. The timing of lip muscle activity was investigated in monosyllabic words embedded in phrases and in syllable word stems as a function of changes in word length. Specifically, the onset and offset of EMG activity of lip muscles used for production of /u/ in the monosyllables and word stems were examined. The results revealed that the relative amounts of time devoted to onset and offset of EMG activity for lip rounding are disorganized in apraxia of speech. Word length appeared to affect the timing of the onset of muscle activity for both the normal speakers and the speakers with apraxia of speech. Word length also influenced the offset of muscle activity, but its effect was less systematic for the speakers with apraxia of speech. The findings suggest that termination of EMG activity may be at least as disturbed as the initiation of EMG activity in apraxia of speech.

  14. Raman activated cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Song, Yizhi; Yin, Huabing; Huang, Wei E

    2016-08-01

    Single cell Raman spectra (SCRS) are intrinsic biochemical profiles and 'chemical images' of single cells which can be used to characterise phenotypic changes, physiological states and functions of cells. On the base of SCRS, Raman activated cell sorting (RACS) provides a label-free cell sorting approach, which can link single cells to their chemical or phenotypic profiles. Overcoming naturally weak Raman signals, establishing Raman biomarker as sorting criteria to RACS and improving specific sorting technology are three challenges of developing RACS. Advances on Raman spectroscopy such as stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and pre-screening helped to increase RACS sorting speed. Entire SCRS can be characterised using pattern recognition methods, and specific Raman bands can be extracted as biomarkers for RACS. Recent advances on cell sorting technologies based on microfluidic device and surface-ejection enable accurate and reliable single cell sorting from complex samples. A high throughput RACS will be achievable in near future by integrating fast Raman detection system such as SRS with microfluidic RACS and Raman activated cell ejection (RACE).

  15. A Variable Path Length Cell for Transverse Acoustic Studies of Superfluid 3He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collett, C. A.; Nguyen, M. D.; Li, J. I. A.; Zimmerman, A. M.; Halperin, W. P.; Davis, J. P.

    2015-03-01

    Transverse sound has recently emerged as an effective probe of the order parameter of superfluid 3He. Both the transverse acoustic impedance and attenuation have been shown to couple to surface bound states in 3He- B, which are predicted to be Majorana states in the specular scattering limit. In order to measure the attenuation at different path lengths to separate surface from bulk effects, as well as reduce the cavity size to the micron scale where transverse sound propagation should be measurable in the normal state, we have constructed a variable path length cell. Using a 4He-actuated diaphragm we demonstrate in-situ changes to the cavity length at dilution temperatures, and report our progress in deploying the cell at sub-mK temperatures. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation grant DMR-1103625.

  16. Construction and biological activity of a full-length molecular clone of human Torque teno virus (TTV) genotype 6.

    PubMed

    Kakkola, Laura; Tommiska, Johanna; Boele, Linda C L; Miettinen, Simo; Blom, Tea; Kekarainen, Tuija; Qiu, Jianming; Pintel, David; Hoeben, Rob C; Hedman, Klaus; Söderlund-Venermo, Maria

    2007-09-01

    Torque teno virus (TTV) is a non-enveloped human virus with a circular negative-sense (approximately 3800 nucleotides) ssDNA genome. TTV resembles in genome organization the chicken anemia virus, the animal pathogen of the Circoviridae family, and is currently classified as a member of a new, floating genus, Anellovirus. Molecular and cell biological research on TTV has been restricted by the lack of permissive cell lines and functional, replication-competent plasmid clones. In order to examine the key biological activities (i.e. RNA transcription and DNA replication) of this still poorly characterized ssDNA virus, we cloned the full-length genome of TTV genotype 6 and transfected it into cells of several types. TTV mRNA transcription was detected by RT-PCR in all the cell types: KU812Ep6, Cos-1, 293, 293T, Chang liver, Huh7 and UT7/Epo-S1. Replicating TTV DNA was detected in the latter five cell types by a DpnI-based restriction enzyme method coupled with Southern analysis, a novel approach to assess TTV DNA replication. The replicating full-length clone, the cell lines found to support TTV replication, and the methods presented here will facilitate the elucidation of the molecular biology and the life cycle of this recently identified human virus.

  17. Shape deformation of the organ of Corti associated with length changes of outer hair cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmermann, U.; Fermin, C.

    1996-01-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHC) are commonly assumed to function as mechanical effectors as well as sensory receptors in the organ of Corti (OC) of the inner ear. OHC in vitro and in organ explants exhibit mechanical responses to electrical, chemical or mechanical stimulation which may represent an aspect of their effector process that is expected in vivo. A detailed description, however, of an OHC effector operation in situ is still missing. Specifically, little is known as to how OHC movements influence the geometry of the OC in situ. Previous work has demonstrated that the motility of isolated OHCs in response to electrical stimulation and to K(+)-gluconate is probably under voltage control and causes depolarisation (shortening) and hyperpolarization (elongation). This work was undertaken to investigate if the movements that were observed in isolated OHC, and which are induced by ionic stimulation, could change the geometry of the OC. A synchronized depolarization of OHC was induced in guinea pig cochleae by exposing the entire OC to artificial endolymph (K+). Subsequent morphometry of mid-modiolar sections from these cochleae revealed that the distance between the basilar membrane (BM) and the reticular lamina (RL) had decreased considerably. Furthermore, in the three upper turns OHC had significantly shortened in all rows. The results suggest that OHC can change their length in the organ of Corti (OC) thus deforming the geometry of the OC. The experiments reveal a tonic force generation within the OC that may change the position of RL and/or BM, contribute to damping, modulate the BM-RL-distance and control the operating points of RL and sensory hair bundles. Thus, the results suggest active self-adjustments of cochlear mechanics by slow OHC length changes. Such mechanical adjustments have recently been postulated to correspond to timing elements of animal communication, speech or music.

  18. Effects of Circular DNA Length on Transfection Efficiency by Electroporation into HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hornstein, Benjamin D.; Roman, Dany; Arévalo-Soliz, Lirio M.; Engevik, Melinda A.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to produce extremely small and circular supercoiled vectors has opened new territory for improving non-viral gene therapy vectors. In this work, we compared transfection of supercoiled DNA vectors ranging from 383 to 4,548 bp, each encoding shRNA against GFP under control of the H1 promoter. We assessed knockdown of GFP by electroporation into HeLa cells. All of our vectors entered cells in comparable numbers when electroporated with equal moles of DNA. Despite similar cell entry, we found length-dependent differences in how efficiently the vectors knocked down GFP. As vector length increased up to 1,869 bp, GFP knockdown efficiency per mole of transfected DNA increased. From 1,869 to 4,257 bp, GFP knockdown efficiency per mole was steady, then decreased with increasing vector length. In comparing GFP knockdown with equal masses of vectors, we found that the shorter vectors transfect more efficiently per nanogram of DNA transfected. Our results rule out cell entry and DNA mass as determining factors for gene knockdown efficiency via electroporation. The length-dependent effects we have uncovered are likely explained by differences in nuclear translocation or transcription. These data add an important step towards clinical applications of non-viral vector delivery. PMID:27918590

  19. The effect of activation level on muscle function during locomotion: are optimal lengths and velocities always used?

    PubMed Central

    Holt, N. C.; Azizi, E.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle exhibits broad functional diversity, despite its inherent length and velocity constraints. The observed variation in morphology and physiology is assumed to have evolved to allow muscle to operate at its optimal length and velocity during locomotion. Here, we used the variation in optimum lengths and velocities that occurs with muscle activation level to experimentally test this assumption. Muscle ergometry and sonomicrometry were used to characterize force–length and power–velocity relationships, and in vivo operating lengths and velocities, at a range of activation levels. Operating lengths and velocities were mapped onto activation level specific force–length and power–velocity relationships to determine whether they tracked changing optima. Operating velocities decreased in line with decreased optimal velocities, suggesting that optimal velocities are always used. However, operating lengths did not change with changing optima. At high activation levels, fibres used an optimal range of lengths. However, at lower activation levels, fibres appeared to operate on the ascending limb of sub-maximally activated force–length relationships. This suggests that optimal lengths are only used when demand is greatest. This study provides the first mapping of operating lengths to activation level-specific optima, and as such, provides insight into our assumptions about the factors that determine muscle performance during locomotion. PMID:26817770

  20. Secretion of full-length tau or tau fragments in a cell culture model.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Mar; Cuadros, Raquel; Hernández, Félix; Avila, Jesús

    2016-11-10

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein that plays an important role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Several studies have suggested that tau may be secreted to extracellular medium and may be responsible of spreading of neurodegeneration. The overexpression of tau in cultured non-neuronal cells leads to the secretion of this protein. The proline-rich region of tau may serve as a membrane-binding site during the secretion of the full-length tau molecule. Tau fragments lacking this proline-region are either not secreted or are secreted in a distinct manner to the full-length molecule.

  1. Optical study of thin-film photovoltaic cells with apparent optical path length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Changsoon; Jeong, Seonju; Lee, Jung-Yong

    2016-09-01

    Extending the insufficient optical path length (OPL) in thin-film photovoltaic cells (PVs) is the key to achieving a high power conversion efficiency (PCE) in devices. Here, we introduce the apparent OPL (AOPL) as a figure of merit for light absorbing capability in thin-film PVs. The optical characteristics such as the structural effects and angular responses in thin-film PVs were analyzed in terms of the AOPL. Although the Lambertian scattering surface yields a broadband absorption enhancement in thin-film PVs, the enhancement is not as effective as in thick-film PVs. On the other hand, nanophotonic schemes are introduced as an approach to increasing the single-pass AOPL by inducing surface plasmon resonance. The scheme using periodic metal gratings is proved to increase the AOPL in a narrow wavelength range and specific polarization, overcoming the Yablonovitch limit. The AOPL calculation can be also adopted in the experimental analysis and a maximum AOPL of 4.15d (where d is the active layer thickness) is exhibited in the absorption band edge region of PTB7:PC70BM-based polymer PVs.

  2. Diffusion length measurements of thin GaAs solar cells by means of energetic electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonross, O.

    1980-01-01

    A calculation of the short circuit current density (j sub sc) of a thin GaAs solar cell induced by fast electrons is presented. It is shown that in spite of the disparity in thickness between the N-type portion of the junction and the P-type portion of the junction, the measurement of the bulk diffusion length L sub p of the N-type part of the junction is seriously hampered due to the presence of a sizable contribution to the j sub sc from the P-type region of the junction. Corrections of up to 50% had to be made in order to interpret the data correctly. Since these corrections were not amenable to direct measurements it is concluded that the electron beam method for the determination of the bulk minority carrier diffusion length, which works so well for Si solar cells, is a poor method when applied to thin GaAs cells.

  3. Optimization of Active Muscle Force-Length Models Using Least Squares Curve Fitting.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Goran Abdulrahman; Hou, Ming

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this paper is to propose an asymmetric Gaussian function as an alternative to the existing active force-length models, and to optimize this model along with several other existing models by using the least squares curve fitting method. The minimal set of coefficients is identified for each of these models to facilitate the least squares curve fitting. Sarcomere simulated data and one set of rabbits extensor digitorum II experimental data are used to illustrate optimal curve fitting of the selected force-length functions. The results shows that all the curves fit reasonably well with the simulated and experimental data, while the Gordon-Huxley-Julian model and asymmetric Gaussian function are better than other functions in terms of statistical test scores root mean squared error and R-squared. However, the differences in RMSE scores are insignificant (0.3-6%) for simulated data and (0.2-5%) for experimental data. The proposed asymmetric Gaussian model and the method of parametrization of this and the other force-length models mentioned above can be used in the studies on active force-length relationships of skeletal muscles that generate forces to cause movements of human and animal bodies.

  4. Lifetime and diffusion length measurements on silicon material and solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Othmer, S.; Chen, S. C.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental methods were evaluated for the determination of lifetime and diffusion length in silicon intentionally doped with potentially lifetime-degrading impurities found in metallurgical grade silicon, impurities which may be residual in low-cost silicon intended for use in terrestrial flat-plate arrays. Lifetime measurements were made using a steady-state photoconductivity method. Diffusion length determinations were made using short-circuit current measurements under penetrating illumination. Mutual consistency among all experimental methods was verified, but steady-state photoconductivity was found preferable to photoconductivity decay at short lifetimes and in the presence of traps. The effects of a number of impurities on lifetime in bulk material, and on diffusion length in cells fabricated from this material, were determined. Results are compared with those obtained using different techniques. General agreement was found in terms of the hierarchy of impurities which degrade the lifetime.

  5. Interaural correlations in normal and traumatized cochleas: length and sensory cell loss

    SciTech Connect

    Bohne, B.A.; Bozzay, D.G.; Harding, G.W.

    1986-12-01

    Sizable intraspecies variations have been found in both the length of the organ of Corti (OC) and the amount of damage resulting from exposure to a particular ototraumatic agent. These variations have made it difficult to address certain research questions such as the susceptibility of the previously injured ear to further damage. If intra-animal correlation is high, the variability problem could be circumvented by using the two ears from a given animal for different aspects of the same study. Therefore, correlation coefficients were calculated for OC length and for percentage of missing inner (IHCs) and outer hair cells (OHCs) in a large sample of chinchillas which included controls and animals which had been exposed to noise or treated with ionizing radiation. The correlation coefficients were +0.96 for OC length, +0.93 for IHC loss, and +0.97 for OHC loss.

  6. Critical telomerase activity for uncontrolled cell growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesch, Neil L.; Burlock, Laura J.; Gooding, Robert J.

    2016-08-01

    The lengths of the telomere regions of chromosomes in a population of cells are modelled using a chemical master equation formalism, from which the evolution of the average number of cells of each telomere length is extracted. In particular, the role of the telomere-elongating enzyme telomerase on these dynamics is investigated. We show that for biologically relevant rates of cell birth and death, one finds a critical rate, R crit, of telomerase activity such that the total number of cells diverges. Further, R crit is similar in magnitude to the rates of mitosis and cell death. The possible relationship of this result to replicative immortality and its associated hallmark of cancer is discussed.

  7. Active gel model of amoeboid cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callan-Jones, A. C.; Voituriez, R.

    2013-02-01

    We develop a model of amoeboid cell motility based on active gel theory. Modeling the motile apparatus of a eukaryotic cell as a confined layer of finite length of poroelastic active gel permeated by a solvent, we first show that, due to active stress and gel turnover, an initially static and homogeneous layer can undergo a contractile-type instability to a polarized moving state in which the rear is enriched in gel polymer. This agrees qualitatively with motile cells containing an actomyosin-rich uropod at their rear. We find that the gel layer settles into a steadily moving, inhomogeneous state at long times, sustained by a balance between contractility and filament turnover. In addition, our model predicts an optimal value of the gel-substrate adhesion leading to maximum layer speed, in agreement with cell motility assays. The model may be relevant to motility of cells translocating in complex, confining environments that can be mimicked experimentally by cell migration through microchannels.

  8. Cycle Length Dependence of Stellar Magnetic Activity and Solar Cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hwajin; Lee, Jeongwoo; Oh, Suyeon; Kim, Bogyeong; Kim, Hoonkyu; Yi, Yu

    2015-03-01

    Solar cycle (SC) 23 was extraordinarily long with remarkably low magnetic activity. We have investigated whether this is a common behavior of solar-type stars. From the Ca ii H and K line intensities of 111 stars observed at Mount Wilson Observatory from 1966 to 1991, we have retrieved data of all 23 G-type stars and recalculated their cycle lengths using the damped least-squares method for the chromospheric activity index S as a function of time. A regression analysis was performed to find relations between the derived cycle length, Pavg, and the index for excess chromospheric emission, RHK\\prime . As a noteworthy result, we found a segregation between young and old solar-type stars in the cycle length-activity correlation. We incorporated the relation for the solar-type stars into the previously known rule for stellar chromospheric activity and brightness to estimate the variation of solar brightness from SC 22 to SC 23 as (0.12 ± 0.06)%, much higher than the actual variation of total solar irradiance (TSI) ≤0.02%. We have then examined solar spectral irradiance (SSI) to find a good phase correlation with a sunspot number in the wavelength range of 170-260 nm, which is close to the spectral range effective in heating the Earth’s atmosphere. Therefore, it appears that SSI rather than TSI is a good indicator of the chromospheric activity, and its cycle length dependent variation would be more relevant to the possible role of the Sun in the cyclic variation of the Earth’s atmosphere.

  9. Diffusion lengths in irradiated N/P InP-on-Si solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtczuk, Steven; Colerico, Claudia; Summers, Geoffrey P.; Walters, Robert J.; Burke, Edward A.

    1995-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) solar cells are being made on silicon (Si) wafers (InP/Si) to take advantage of both the radiation-hardness properties of the InP solar cell and the light weight and low cost of Si wafers compared to InP or germanium (Ge) wafers. The InP/Si cell application is for long duration and/or high radiation orbit space missions. InP/Si cells have higher absolute efficiency after a high radiation dose than gallium arsenide (GaAs) or silicon (Si) solar cells. In this work, base electron diffusion lengths in the N/P cell are extracted from measured AM0 short-circuit photocurrent at various irradiation levels out to an equivalent 1 MeV fluence of 1017 1 MeV electrons/sq cm for a 1 sq cm 12% BOL InP/Si cell. These values are then checked for consistency by comparing measured Voc data with a theoretical Voc model that includes a dark current term that depends on the extracted diffusion lengths.

  10. Sarcomere length uniformity determined from three-dimensional reconstructions of resting isolated heart cell striation patterns.

    PubMed Central

    Roos, K P

    1987-01-01

    A- and I-band striation positions have been obtained, three-dimensionally reconstructed, and statistically analyzed from the volumes of resting isolated heart cells. Striation patterns from optically discrete subvolumes are imaged along the length of these myocytes with a computer-interfaced optical microscope imaging system. Planar striation maps are reconstructed by the computer from sequentially obtained striation pattern images displaced across the width or depth of the cell in controlled steps. Multiple planar maps are combined to form full three-dimensional (3-D) reconstructions that illustrate the sarcomeric structure and ordering throughout the volume of the cell. These reconstructions demonstrate a high degree of striation registration throughout most regions of cardiac cells. The striation registration is often slightly (less than 10 degrees) skewed across the width or depth of nearly every cell and is occasionally disrupted between adjacent groups of sarcomeres. These disruptions in registration are always associated with the locations of the nuclei. Rigorous statistical analyses indicate small volumetric regions of the cell delineated by these disruptions can have significantly (0.014-0.113 micron) shorter or longer average sarcomere length periodicities. Unlike skeletal muscle "fibrillenstruktur," these data from cardiac cells exhibit no evidence of helical packing schemes for sarcomere order. These observations suggest that the relatively large nuclei displace and disrupt the normal registration of the sarcomeres, which is probably mediated by internal cytoskeletal structures. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:3663835

  11. Force- and length-dependent catastrophe activities explain interphase microtubule organization in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Foethke, Dietrich; Makushok, Tatyana; Brunner, Damian; Nédélec, François

    2009-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is essential for the maintenance of cell morphology in eukaryotes. In fission yeast, for example, polarized growth sites are organized by actin, whereas microtubules (MTs) acting upstream control where growth occurs. Growth is limited to the cell poles when MTs undergo catastrophes there and not elsewhere on the cortex. Here, we report that the modulation of MT dynamics by forces as observed in vitro can quantitatively explain the localization of MT catastrophes in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. However, we found that it is necessary to add length-dependent catastrophe rates to make the model fully consistent with other previously measured traits of MTs. We explain the measured statistical distribution of MT-cortex contact times and re-examine the curling behavior of MTs in unbranched straight tea1Delta cells. Importantly, the model demonstrates that MTs together with associated proteins such as depolymerizing kinesins are, in principle, sufficient to mark the cell poles.

  12. The prognostic value of tumor length to resectable esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangwei; Wang, Yang; Li, Cheng; Helmersson, Jing; Jiang, Yuanzhu; Ma, Guoyuan; Wang, Guanghui; Dong, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Background The current TNM classification system does not consider tumor length for patients with esophageal carcinoma (EC). This study explored the effect of tumor length, in addition to tumor depth and lymph node involvement, on survival in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Methods A total of 498 ESCC patients who underwent surgical resection as the primary treatment were selected in the retrospective study. Pathological details were collected, which included tumor type, TNM stage, differentiation. Other collected information were: the types of esophageal resection, ABO blood group, family history and demographic and lifestyle factors. A time-dependent receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and a regression tree for survival were used to identify the cut-off point of tumor length, which was 3 cm. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to identify the prognostic factors to ESCC. Results & Discussion The 1-, 3-, 5-year overall survival rates were found to be 82.5%, 55.6%, and 35.1%, respectively. Patients who had larger tumor length (>3 cm) had a higher risk for death than the rest patients. From the univariate Cox proportional hazards regression model, the overall survival rate was significantly influenced by the depth of the tumor and lymph node involvement (either as dummy or continuous variables), Sex, and tumor length. Using these four variables in the multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression model, we found that the overall survival was significantly influenced by all variables except Sex. Therefore, in addition to the depth of the tumor and lymph node involvement (as either dummy or continuous variables), the tumor length is also an independent prognostic factor for ESCC. The overall survival rate was higher in a group with smaller tumor length (≤3 cm) than those patients with larger tumor length (>3 cm), no matter what the tumor stage was. Conclusion The tumor length was found

  13. Increasing Supercycle Lengths of Active SU UMa-type Dwarf Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otulakowska-Hypka, M.; Olech, A.

    2014-12-01

    We present observational evidence that supercycle lengths of the most active SU UMa-type stars are increasing during the past decades. We analyzed a large number of photometric measurements from available archives and found that this effect is generic for this class of stars, independently of their evolutionary status. This finding is in agreement with previous predictions and the most recent work of Patterson et al. (2012) on BK Lyn.

  14. Diffusion lengths in irradiated N/P InP-on-Si solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtczuk, Steven; Colerico, Claudia; Summers, Geoffrey P.; Walters, Robert J.; Burke, Edward A.

    1996-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) solar cells were made on silicon (Si) wafers (InP/Si) by to take advantage of both the radiation-hardness properties of the InP solar cell and the light weight and low cost of Si wafers. The InP/Si cell application is for long duration and/or high radiation orbit space missions. Spire has made N/P InP/Si cells of sizes up to 2 cm by 4 cm with beginning-of-life (BOL) AM0 efficiencies over 13% (one-sun, 28C). These InP/Si cells have higher absolute efficiency and power density after a high radiation dose than gallium arsenide (GaAs) or silicon (Si) solar cells after a fluence of about 2e15 1 MeV electrons/sq. cm. In this work, we investigate the minority carrier (electron) base diffusion lengths in the N/P InP/Si cells. A quantum efficiency model was constructed for a 12% BOL AM0 N/P InP/Si cell which agreed well with the absolutely measured quantum efficiency and the sun-simulator measured AM0 photocurrent (30.1 mA/sq. cm). This model was then used to generate a table of AM0 photocurrents for a range of base diffusion lengths. AM0 photocurrents were then measured for irradiations up to 7.7e16 1 MeV electrons/sq. cm (the 12% BOL cell was 8% after the final irradiation). By comparing the measured photocurrents with the predicted photocurrents, base diffusion lengths were assigned at each fluence level. A damage coefficient K of 4e-8 and a starting (unirradiated) base electron diffusion length of 0.8 microns fits the data well. The quantum efficiency was measured again at the end of the experiment to verify that the photocurrent predicted by the model (25.5 mA/sq. cm) agreed with the simulator-measured photocurrent after irradiation (25.7 mA/sq. cm).

  15. Telomere Length in Elderly Caucasians Weakly Correlates with Blood Cell Counts

    PubMed Central

    Witecka, Joanna; Koscinska-Marczewska, Justyna; Szwed, Malgorzata; Owczarz, Magdalena; Mossakowska, Malgorzata; Milewicz, Andrzej; Zejda, Jan; Wiecek, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Background. Age-related decrease in bone marrow erythropoietic capacity is often accompanied by the telomere length shortening in peripheral white blood cells. However, limited and conflicting data hamper the conclusive opinion regarding this relationship. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess an association between telomere length and peripheral blood cell count parameters in the Polish elderly population. Material and Methods. The substudy included 1573 of 4981 subjects aged 65 years or over, participants of the population-based PolSenior study. High-molecular-weight DNA was isolated from blood mononuclear cells. Telomere length (TL) was measured by QRT-PCR as abundance of telomere template versus a single gene copy encoding acidic ribosomal phosphoprotein P0. Results. Only white blood count (WBC) was significantly different in TL tertile subgroups in all subjects (P = 0.02) and in men (P = 0.01), but not in women. Merely in men significant but weak positive correlations were found between TL and WBC (r = 0.11, P < 0.05) and RBC (r = 0.08, P < 0.05). The multiple regression analysis models confirmed a weak, independent contribution of TL to both RBC and WBC. Conclusions. In the elderly, telomere shortening limits hematopoiesis capacity to a very limited extent. PMID:24453794

  16. Activation of mouse and human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha by perfluoroalkyl acids of different functional groups and chain lengths.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Cynthia J; Takacs, Margy L; Schmid, Judith E; Lau, Christopher; Abbott, Barbara D

    2008-11-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are surfactants used in consumer products and persist in the environment. Some PFAAs elicit adverse effects on rodent development and survival. PFAAs can activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) and may act via PPARalpha to produce some of their effects. This study evaluated the ability of numerous PFAAs to induce mouse and human PPARalpha activity in a transiently transfected COS-1 cell assay. COS-1 cells were transfected with either a mouse or human PPARalpha receptor-luciferase reporter plasmid. After 24 h, cells were exposed to either negative controls (water or dimethyl sulfoxide, 0.1%); positive control (WY-14643, PPARalpha agonist); perfluorooctanoic acid or perfluorononanoic acid at 0.5-100 microM; perfluorobutanoic acid, perfluorohexanoic acid, perfluorohexane sulfonate, or perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA) at 5-100 microM; or perfluorobutane sulfonate or perfluorooctane sulfonate at 1-250 microM. After 24 h of exposure, luciferase activity from the plasmid was measured. Each PFAA activated both mouse and human PPARalpha in a concentration-dependent fashion, except PFDA with human PPARalpha. Activation of PPARalpha by PFAA carboxylates was positively correlated with carbon chain length, up to C9. PPARalpha activity was higher in response to carboxylates compared to sulfonates. Activation of mouse PPARalpha was generally higher compared to that of human PPARalpha. We conclude that, in general, (1) PFAAs of increasing carbon backbone chain lengths induce increasing activity of the mouse and human PPARalpha with a few exceptions, (2) PFAA carboxylates are stronger activators of mouse and human PPARalpha than PFAA sulfonates, and (3) in most cases, the mouse PPARalpha appears to be more sensitive to PFAAs than the human PPARalpha in this model.

  17. Diffusion length variation in 0.5- and 3-MeV-proton-irradiated, heteroepitaxial indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Weinberg, Irving; Flood, Dennis J.

    1993-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) solar cells are more radiation resistant than gallium arsenide (GaAs) and silicon (Si) solar cells, and their growth by heteroepitaxy offers additional advantages leading to the development of light weight, mechanically strong, and cost-effective cells. Changes in heteroepitaxial InP cell efficiency under 0.5- and 3-MeV proton irradiations have been explained by the variation in the minority-carrier diffusion length. The base diffusion length versus proton fluence was calculated by simulating the cell performance. The diffusion length damage coefficient, K(sub L), was also plotted as a function of proton fluence.

  18. Full-length dysferlin expression driven by engineered human dystrophic blood derived CD133+ stem cells.

    PubMed

    Meregalli, Mirella; Navarro, Claire; Sitzia, Clementina; Farini, Andrea; Montani, Erica; Wein, Nicolas; Razini, Paola; Beley, Cyriaque; Cassinelli, Letizia; Parolini, Daniele; Belicchi, Marzia; Parazzoli, Dario; Garcia, Luis; Torrente, Yvan

    2013-12-01

    The protein dysferlin is abundantly expressed in skeletal and cardiac muscles, where its main function is membrane repair. Mutations in the dysferlin gene are involved in two autosomal recessive muscular dystrophies: Miyoshi myopathy and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B. Development of effective therapies remains a great challenge. Strategies to repair the dysferlin gene by skipping mutated exons, using antisense oligonucleotides (AONs), may be suitable only for a subset of mutations, while cell and gene therapy can be extended to all mutations. AON-treated blood-derived CD133+ stem cells isolated from patients with Miyoshi myopathy led to partial dysferlin reconstitution in vitro but failed to express dysferlin after intramuscular transplantation into scid/blAJ dysferlin null mice. We thus extended these experiments producing the full-length dysferlin mediated by a lentiviral vector in blood-derived CD133+ stem cells isolated from the same patients. Transplantation of engineered blood-derived CD133+ stem cells into scid/blAJ mice resulted in sufficient dysferlin expression to correct functional deficits in skeletal muscle membrane repair. Our data suggest for the first time that lentivirus-mediated delivery of full-length dysferlin in stem cells isolated from Miyoshi myopathy patients could represent an alternative therapeutic approach for treatment of dysferlinopathies.

  19. Influence of Linker Length and Composition on Enzymatic Activity and Ribosomal Binding of Neomycin Dimers

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Derrick; Kumar, Sunil; Green, Keith D.

    2015-01-01

    The human and bacterial A site rRNA binding as well as the aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme (AME) activity against a series of neomycin B (NEO) dimers is presented. The data indicate that by simple modifications of linker length and composition, substantial differences in rRNA selectivity and AME activity can be obtained. We tested five different AMEs with dimeric NEO dimers that were tethered via triazole, urea, and thiourea linkages. We show that triazole-linked dimers were the worst substrates for most AMEs, with those containing the longer linkers showing the largest decrease in activity. Thiourea-linked dimers that showed a decrease in activity by AMEs also showed increased bacterial A site binding, with one compound (compound 14) even showing substantially reduced human A site binding. The urea-linked dimers showed a substantial decrease in activity by AMEs when a conformationally restrictive phenyl linker was introduced. The information learned herein advances our understanding of the importance of the linker length and composition for the generation of dimeric aminoglycoside antibiotics capable of avoiding the action of AMEs and selective binding to the bacterial rRNA over binding to the human rRNA. PMID:25896697

  20. Triptycences as thermally activated delayed fluorescence materials: Effect of π-conjugation length and donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ying; Su, Tan; Wu, Yong; Geng, Yun; Zhang, Min; Su, Zhong-Min

    2016-12-01

    Based on a thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) triptycene compound 1, compounds 2-7 were designed by varying electron-donating units (2-5) and increasing π-conjugation length (6 and 7). The results indicate that singlet-triplet energy splitting (ΔEST) of compounds 2-5 is reduced largely, but their improvement of radiative decay rate (kr) is slightly small. However, the compound 6 not only reduces the ΔEST but also enhances kr. For compound 7, the kr value is comparable with compound 6, but ΔEST value is quite large. Therefore, possessing an appropriate π-conjugation length might be helpful to improve TADF performances for the materials investigated here.

  1. Diffusion length and grain boundary recombination activity determination by means of induced current methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabelnikova, Yana; Yakimov, Eugene

    2016-11-01

    The application of induced current methods for a quantitative description of multicrystalline silicon solar cell properties is demonstrated. For the minority carriers' diffusion length (L) and grain boundary recombination velocity (Vs) determination three types of measurements were used. They included the measurement of EBIC signal dependence on electron beam energy and of EBIC and XBIC grain boundary contrast profiles. The L and Vs values obtained by means of minimization the residual function between measured and model induced current curves are presented. The inaccuracy of obtained parameters is discussed for each of three types of measurements.

  2. Cardiac Myosin-binding Protein C and Troponin-I Phosphorylation Independently Modulate Myofilament Length-dependent Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Mohit; Govindan, Suresh; Zhang, Mengjie; Khairallah, Ramzi J.; Martin, Jody L.; Sadayappan, Sakthivel; de Tombe, Pieter P.

    2015-01-01

    β-Adrenergic stimulation in heart leads to increased contractility and lusitropy via activation of protein kinase A (PKA). In the cardiac sarcomere, both cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMyBP-C) and troponin-I (cTnI) are prominent myofilament targets of PKA. Treatment of permeabilized myocardium with PKA induces enhanced myofilament length-dependent activation (LDA), the cellular basis of the Frank-Starling cardiac regulatory mechanism. It is not known, however, which of these targets mediates the altered LDA and to what extent. Here, we employed two genetic mouse models in which the three PKA sites in cMyBP-C were replaced with either phospho-mimic (DDD) or phospho-null (AAA) residues. AAA- or DDD-permeabilized myocytes (n = 12–17) were exchanged (∼93%) for recombinant cTnI in which the two PKA sites were mutated to either phospho-mimic (DD) or phospho-null (AA) residues. Force-[Ca2+] relationships were determined at two sarcomere lengths (SL = 1.9 μm and SL = 2.3 μm). Data were fit to a modified Hill equation for each individual cell preparation at each SL. LDA was indexed as ΔEC50, the difference in [Ca2+] required to achieve 50% force activation at the two SLs. We found that PKA-mediated phosphorylation of cMyBP-C and cTnI each independently contribute to enhance myofilament length-dependent activation properties of the cardiac sarcomere, with relative contributions of ∼67 and ∼33% for cMyBP-C for cTnI, respectively. We conclude that β-adrenergic stimulation enhances the Frank-Starling regulatory mechanism predominantly via cMyBP-C PKA-mediated phosphorylation. We speculate that this molecular mechanism enhances cross-bridge formation at long SL while accelerating cross-bridge detachment and relaxation at short SLs. PMID:26453301

  3. Contribution of HN protein length diversity to Newcastle disease virus virulence, replication and biological activities

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jihui; Zhao, Jing; Ren, Yingchao; Zhong, Qi; Zhang, Guozhong

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the contribution of length diversity in the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein to the pathogenicity, replication and biological characteristics of Newcastle disease virus (NDV), we used reverse genetics to generate a series of recombinant NDVs containing truncated or extended HN proteins based on an infectious clone of genotype VII NDV (SG10 strain). The mean death times and intracerebral pathogenicity indices of these viruses showed that the different length mutations in the HN protein did not alter the virulence of NDV. In vitro studies of recombinant NDVs containing truncated or extended HN proteins revealed that the extension of HN protein increased its hemagglutination titer, receptor-binding ability and impaired its neuraminidase activity, fusogenic activity and replication ability. Furthermore, the hemadsorption, neuraminidase and fusogenic promotion activities at the protein level were consistent with those of viral level. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the HN biological activities affected by the C-terminal extension are associated with NDV replication but not the virulence. PMID:27833149

  4. The necessary length of carbon nanotubes required to optimize solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Vaezzadeh, Majid; Saeedi, Mohammad Reza; Barghi, Tirdad; Sadeghi, Mohammad Reza

    2007-01-01

    Background In recent years scientists have been trying both to increase the efficiency of solar cells, whilst at the same time reducing dimensions and costs. Increases in efficiency have been brought about by implanting carbon nanotubes onto the surface of solar cells in order to reduce the reflection of sunrays, as well as through the insertion of polymeric arrays into the intrinsic layer for charge separation. Results The experimental results show power rising linearly for intrinsic layer thicknesses between 0–50 nm. Wider thicknesses increase the possibility of recombination of electrons and holes, leading to perturbation of the linear behaviour of output power. This effect is studied and formulated as a function of thickness. Recognition of the critical intrinsic layer thickness can permit one to determine the length of carbon nanotube necessary for optimizing solar cells. Conclusion In this study the behaviour of output power as a function of intrinsic layer thicknesses has been described physically and also simulated. In addition, the implantation of carbon nanotubes into the intrinsic layer and the necessary nanotube length required to optimize solar cells have been suggested. PMID:17908295

  5. Length of Residence and Vehicle Ownership in Relation to Physical Activity Among U.S. Immigrants.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, Dale; Ornelas, India; Saelens, Brian

    2017-04-01

    Physical activity among U.S. immigrants over time is not well understood. Transportation may affect this trajectory. Using a survey of documented immigrants (N = 7240), we performed simple, then multivariable logistic regression to calculate ORs and 95 % CIs between length of residence (LOR) and both light-to-moderate (LPA) and vigorous (VPA) activity. We adjusted for demographic variables, then vehicle ownership to assess changes in ORs. Compared to new arrivals, all four LOR time-intervals were associated with lower odds of LPA and higher odds of VPA in simple analysis. All ORs for LPA remained significant after including demographics, but only one remained significant after adding vehicle ownership. Two ORs for VPA remained significant after including demographics and after adding vehicle ownership. Immigrants lower their light-to-moderate activity the longer they reside in the U.S., partly from substituting driving for walking. Efforts to maintain walking for transportation among immigrants are warranted.

  6. Mechanism of activation gating in the full-length KcsA K[superscript +] channel

    SciTech Connect

    Uysal, Serdar; Cuello, Luis G.; Cortes, D. Marien; Koide, Shohei; Kossiakoff, Anthony A.; Perozo, Eduardo

    2012-10-25

    Using a constitutively active channel mutant, we solved the structure of full-length KcsA in the open conformation at 3.9 {angstrom}. The structure reveals that the activation gate expands about 20 {angstrom}, exerting a strain on the bulge helices in the C-terminal domain and generating side windows large enough to accommodate hydrated K{sup +} ions. Functional and spectroscopic analysis of the gating transition provides direct insight into the allosteric coupling between the activation gate and the selectivity filter. We show that the movement of the inner gate helix is transmitted to the C-terminus as a straightforward expansion, leading to an upward movement and the insertion of the top third of the bulge helix into the membrane. We suggest that by limiting the extent to which the inner gate can open, the cytoplasmic domain also modulates the level of inactivation occurring at the selectivity filter.

  7. TIN2, a new regulator of telomere length in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sahn-Ho

    1999-11-05

    Telomeres are DNA-protein structures that cap linear chromosomes and are essential for maintaining genomic stability and cell phenotype. The authors identified a novel human telomere-associated protein, TIN2, by interaction cloning using the telomeric DNA binding protein TRF1 as a bait. TIN2 interacted with TRF1 in vitro and in cells, and co-localized with TRF1 in nuclei and metaphase chromosomes. A TIN2 mutant that lacks N-terminal sequences markedly elongated human telomeres in a telomerase-dependent manner. These findings suggest that TRF1 is insufficient for telomere length control in human cells, and that TIN2 is an essential mediator of TRF1 function.

  8. A Unidirectional Cell Switching Gate by Engineering Grating Length and Bending Angle

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shu Fan; Gopalakrishnan, Singaram; Xu, Yuan Hao; Yang, Jie; Lam, Yun Wah; Pang, Stella W.

    2016-01-01

    On a microgrooved substrate, cells migrate along the pattern, and at random positions, reverse their directions. Here, we demonstrate that these reversals can be controlled by introducing discontinuities to the pattern. On “V-shaped grating patterns”, mouse osteogenic progenitor MC3T3-E1 cells reversed predominately at the bends and the ends. The patterns were engineered in a way that the combined effects of angle- and length-dependence could be examined in addition to their individual effects. Results show that when the bend was placed closer to one end, migration behaviour of cells depends on their direction of approach. At an obtuse bend (135°), more cells reversed when approaching from the long segment than from the short segment. But at an acute bend (45°), this relationship was reversed. Based on this anisotropic behaviour, the designed patterns effectively allowed cells to move in one direction but blocked migrations in the opposing direction. This study demonstrates that by the strategic placement of bends and ends on grating patterns, we can engineer effective unidirectional switching gates that can control the movement of adherent cells. The knowledge developed in this study could be utilised in future cell sorting or filtering platforms without the need for chemotaxis or microfluidic control. PMID:26821058

  9. Effect of rain boot shaft length on lower extremity muscle activity during treadmill walking

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Hwan; Yoo, Kyung-Tae

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the extent of lower extremity muscle activity before and after walking based on rain boot shaft length. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects, 12 young and healthy females, were divided into three groups based on rain boot shaft length (long, middle, and short). They walked on a treadmill for 30 minutes. Activity of the rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, semitendinosus, tibialis anterior, peroneus longus, and gastrocnemius was measured using electromyography before and after walking. Two-way repeated measures analysis of variance was performed to compare the muscle activities of each group. [Results] There were no significant differences in terms of the interactive effects between group and time for all muscles, the main effects of group, or the main effects of time. [Conclusion] The results of this study may indicate that movement of the lower extremities was not significantly limited by friction force based on the characteristics of the boot material or the circumference of the boot shaft. Thus, it may be helpful instead to consider the material of the sole or the weight of the boots when choosing which rain boots to wear. PMID:27799685

  10. Active Stream Length Dynamics in Headwater Catchments Spanning Physiographic Provinces in the Appalachian Highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, C.; McGuire, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    One of the most basic descriptions of streams is the presence of channelized flow. However, this seemingly simple query goes unanswered for the majority of headwater networks, as stream length expands and contracts with the wetness of catchments seasonally, interannually, and in response to storm events. Although streams are known to grow and shrink, a lack of information on longitudinal dynamics across different geographic regions precludes effective management. Understanding the temporal variation in temporary network length over a broad range of settings is critical for policy decisions that impact aquatic ecosystem health. This project characterizes changes in active stream length for forested headwater catchments spanning four physiographic provinces of the Appalachian Highlands: the New England at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, New Hampshire; Valley and Ridge at Poverty Creek and the North Fork of Big Stony Creek in Jefferson National Forest, Virginia; Blue Ridge at Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory, North Carolina; and Appalachian Plateau at Fernow Experimental Forest, West Virginia. Multivariate statistical analysis confirms these provinces exhibit characteristic topographies reflecting differences in climate, geology, and environmental history and, thus, merit separate consideration. The active streams of three watersheds (<45 ha) in each study area were mapped six times to capture a variety of moderate flow conditions that can be expected most of the time (i.e., exceedance probabilities between 25 to 75%). The geomorphic channel and channel heads were additionally mapped to determine how active stream length variability relates to the development of the geomorphic network. We found that drainage density can vary up to four-fold with discharge. Stream contraction primarily proceeds by increasing disconnection and disintegration into pools, while the number of flow origins remains constant except at high and low extremes of discharge. This work demonstrates

  11. Cardiac Myosin Binding Protein-C Phosphorylation Modulates Myofilament Length-Dependent Activation

    PubMed Central

    Mamidi, Ranganath; Gresham, Kenneth S.; Verma, Sujeet; Stelzer, Julian E.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) phosphorylation is an important regulator of contractile function, however, its contributions to length-dependent changes in cross-bridge (XB) kinetics is unknown. Therefore, we performed mechanical experiments to quantify contractile function in detergent-skinned ventricular preparations isolated from wild-type (WT) hearts, and hearts expressing non-phosphorylatable cMyBP-C [Ser to Ala substitutions at residues Ser273, Ser282, and Ser302 (i.e., 3SA)], at sarcomere length (SL) 1.9 μm or 2.1μm, prior and following protein kinase A (PKA) treatment. Steady-state force generation measurements revealed a blunting in the length-dependent increase in myofilament Ca2+-sensitivity of force generation (pCa50) following an increase in SL in 3SA skinned myocardium compared to WT skinned myocardium. Dynamic XB behavior was assessed at submaximal Ca2+-activations by imposing an acute rapid stretch of 2% of initial muscle length, and measuring both the magnitudes and rates of resultant phases of force decay due to strain-induced XB detachment and delayed force rise due to recruitment of additional XBs with increased SL (i.e., stretch activation). The magnitude (P2) and rate of XB detachment (krel) following stretch was significantly reduced in 3SA skinned myocardium compared to WT skinned myocardium at short and long SL, and prior to and following PKA treatment. Furthermore, the length-dependent acceleration of krel due to decreased SL that was observed in WT skinned myocardium was abolished in 3SA skinned myocardium. PKA treatment accelerated the rate of XB recruitment (kdf) following stretch at both SL's in WT but not in 3SA skinned myocardium. The amplitude of the enhancement in force generation above initial pre-stretch steady-state levels (P3) was not different between WT and 3SA skinned myocardium at any condition measured. However, the magnitude of the entire delayed force phase which can dip below initial pre-stretch steady

  12. Endothelial progenitor cell-dependent angiogenesis requires localization of the full-length form of uPAR in caveolae.

    PubMed

    Margheri, Francesca; Chillà, Anastasia; Laurenzana, Anna; Serratì, Simona; Mazzanti, Benedetta; Saccardi, Riccardo; Santosuosso, Michela; Danza, Giovanna; Sturli, Niccolò; Rosati, Fabiana; Magnelli, Lucia; Papucci, Laura; Calorini, Lido; Bianchini, Francesca; Del Rosso, Mario; Fibbi, Gabriella

    2011-09-29

    Endothelial urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is thought to provide a regulatory mechanism in angiogenesis. Here we studied the proangiogenic role of uPAR in endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs), a cell population identified in human umbilical blood that embodies all of the properties of an endothelial progenitor cell matched with a high proliferative rate. By using caveolae-disrupting agents and by caveolin-1 silencing, we have shown that the angiogenic properties of ECFCs depend on caveolae integrity and on the presence of full-length uPAR in such specialized membrane invaginations. Inhibition of uPAR expression by antisense oligonucleotides promoted caveolae disruption, suggesting that uPAR is an inducer of caveolae organization. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) promoted accumulation of uPAR in ECFC caveolae in its undegraded form. We also demonstrated that VEGF-dependent ERK phosphorylation required integrity of caveolae as well as caveolar uPAR expression. VEGF activity depends on inhibition of ECFC MMP12 production, which results in impairment of MMP12-dependent uPAR truncation. Further, MMP12 overexpression in ECFC inhibited vascularization in vitro and in vivo. Our data suggest that intratumor homing of ECFCs suitably engineered to overexpress MMP12 could have the chance to control uPAR-dependent activities required for tumor angiogenesis and malignant cells spreading.

  13. Effect of eddy length scale on mechanical loading of blood cells in turbulent flow.

    PubMed

    Dooley, Patrick N; Quinlan, Nathan J

    2009-12-01

    Non-physiological turbulent blood flow is known to occur in and near implanted cardiovascular devices, but its effects on blood are poorly understood. The objective of this work is to investigate the effect of turbulent eddy length scale on blood cell damage, and in particular to test the hypothesis that only eddies similar in size to blood cells can cause damage. The microscale flow near a red blood cell (RBC) in an idealized turbulent eddy is modeled computationally using an immersed boundary method. The model is validated for the special case of a tank-treading RBC. In comparisons between turbulent flow fields, based on Kolmogorov theory, the model predicts that damage due to the smallest eddies is almost independent of the Kolmogorov length scale. The model predicts that within a given flow field, however, eddies of sub-cellular scale are less damaging than larger eddies. Eddy decay time and the turbulent energy spectral density are highlighted as important factors. The results suggest that Kolmogorov scale is not an adequate predictor of flow-induced blood trauma, and highlights the need for deeper understanding of the microscale structure of turbulent blood flow.

  14. Ground-up circular Higgs Factory ring design and cell length optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talman, Richard

    2017-02-01

    A “ground-up” Higgs Factory design methodology is described. For concreteness, numerical parameter choices are drawn primarily from CEPC, the Circular Electron Positron Collider. The goals are to find: (i) optimal parameters, (ii) improved understanding , (iii) a tentative lattice design. As illustration of the method, six chromaticity-corrected lattices, with cell lengths ranging from 45 m to 280 m, all with identical βy = 2 mm or βy = 10 mm intersection region optics, are designed and their properties compared. For simplicity only a single “toy ring,” circumference (76 km), with one interaction point, and a single beam energy (120 GeV) is considered. For the cell-length optimization a figure of merit FOM (essentially integrated luminosity) is maximized consistent with a dimensionless “fine tuning penalty function” or figure of demerit FOD not being allowed to exceed a conservatively chosen upper limit. The tentative recommendation from this investigation is that the optimal CEPC route is (except for obvious changes) to simply copy LEP: 80 m cell length and two-in-one single-ring operation. The main luminosity-increasing improvements are increased radius and power, top-off-full-energy-injection, noninterleaved sextupoles, more than 100 beam bunch operation, and improved intersection region design. Local chromaticity compensation (with its inevitable intense hard X-rays incident on the detectors) is found to be unnecessary. With these changes luminosity in excess of 1034cm‑2s‑1 is projected to be achievable.

  15. Running rescues defective adult neurogenesis by shortening the length of the cell cycle of neural stem and progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Farioli-Vecchioli, Stefano; Mattera, Andrea; Micheli, Laura; Ceccarelli, Manuela; Leonardi, Luca; Saraulli, Daniele; Costanzi, Marco; Cestari, Vincenzo; Rouault, Jean-Pierre; Tirone, Felice

    2014-07-01

    Physical exercise increases the generation of new neurons in adult neurogenesis. However, only few studies have investigated the beneficial effects of physical exercise in paradigms of impaired neurogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that running fully reverses the deficient adult neurogenesis within the hippocampus and subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle, observed in mice lacking the antiproliferative gene Btg1. We also evaluated for the first time how running influences the cell cycle kinetics of stem and precursor subpopulations of wild-type and Btg1-null mice, using a new method to determine the cell cycle length. Our data show that in wild-type mice running leads to a cell cycle shortening only of NeuroD1-positive progenitor cells. In contrast, in Btg1-null mice, physical exercise fully reactivates the defective hippocampal neurogenesis, by shortening the S-phase length and the overall cell cycle duration of both neural stem (glial fibrillary acidic protein(+) and Sox2(+)) and progenitor (NeuroD1(+)) cells. These events are sufficient and necessary to reactivate the hyperproliferation observed in Btg1-null early-postnatal mice and to expand the pool of adult neural stem and progenitor cells. Such a sustained increase of cell proliferation in Btg1-null mice after running provides a long-lasting increment of proliferation, differentiation, and production of newborn neurons, which rescues the impaired pattern separation previously identified in Btg1-null mice. This study shows that running positively affects the cell cycle kinetics of specific subpopulations of newly generated neurons and suggests that the plasticity of neural stem cells without cell cycle inhibitory control is reactivated by running, with implications for the long-term modulation of neurogenesis.

  16. Enhancing light absorption within the carrier transport length in quantum junction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yulan; Hara, Yukihiro; Miller, Christopher W; Lopez, Rene

    2015-09-10

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) solar cells have attracted tremendous attention because of their tunable absorption spectrum window and potentially low processing cost. Recently reported quantum junction solar cells represent a promising approach to building a rectifying photovoltaic device that employs CQD layers on each side of the p-n junction. However, the ultimate efficiency of CQD solar cells is still highly limited by their high trap state density in both p- and n-type CQDs. By modeling photonic structures to enhance the light absorption within the carrier transport length and by ensuring that the carrier generation and collection efficiencies were both augmented, our work shows that overall device current density could be improved. We utilized a two-dimensional numerical model to calculate the characteristics of patterned CQD solar cells based on a simple grating structure. Our calculation predicts a short circuit current density as high as 31  mA/cm2, a value nearly 1.5 times larger than that of the conventional flat design, showing the great potential value of patterned quantum junction solar cells.

  17. Chord length sampling method for analyzing VHTR unit cells in continuous energy simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, C.; Ji, W.; Brown, F. B.

    2012-07-01

    The chord length sampling method (CLS) is studied in the continuous energy simulations by applying it to analyzing two types of Very High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (VHTR) unit cells: the fuel compact cell in the prismatic type VHTR and the fuel pebble cell in the pebble-bed type VHTR. Infinite multiplication factors of the unit cells are calculated by the CLS and compared to the benchmark simulations at different volume packing fractions from 5% to 30%. It is shown that the accuracy of the CLS is affected by the boundary effect, which is induced by the CLS procedure itself and results in a reduction in the total volume packing fraction of the fuel particles. To mitigate the boundary effect, three correction schemes based on the research of 1) Murata et al. 2) Ji and Martin 3) Griesheimer et al. are used to improve the accuracy by applying a corrected value of the volume packing fraction to the CLS. These corrected values are calculated based on 1) a simple linear relationship, 2) an iterative self-consistent simulation correction method, and 3) a theoretically derived non-linear relationship, respectively. The CLS simulation using the corrected volume packing fraction shows excellent improvements in the infinite multiplication factors for the VHTR unit cells. Ji and Martin's self-consistent correction method shows the best improvement. (authors)

  18. OBSERVING EVOLUTION IN THE SUPERGRANULAR NETWORK LENGTH SCALE DURING PERIODS OF LOW SOLAR ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, Scott W.; Rast, Mark P.; Leamon, Robert J.; Hock, Rachel A.; Ulrich, Roger K.

    2011-03-20

    We present the initial results of an observational study into the variation of the dominant length scale of quiet solar emission: supergranulation. The distribution of magnetic elements in the lanes that from the network affects, and reflects, the radiative energy in the plasma of the upper solar chromosphere and transition region at the magnetic network boundaries forming as a result of the relentless interaction of magnetic fields and convective motions of the Suns' interior. We demonstrate that a net difference of {approx}0.5 Mm in the supergranular emission length scale occurs when comparing observation cycle 22/23 and cycle 23/24 minima. This variation in scale is reproduced in the data sets of multiple space- and ground-based instruments and using different diagnostic measures. By means of extension, we consider the variation of the supergranular length scale over multiple solar minima by analyzing a subset of the Mount Wilson Solar Observatory Ca II K image record. The observations and analysis presented provide a tantalizing look at solar activity in the absence of large-scale flux emergence, offering insight into times of 'extreme' solar minimum and general behavior such as the phasing and cross-dependence of different components of the spectral irradiance. Given that the modulation of the supergranular scale imprints itself in variations of the Suns' spectral irradiance, as well as in the mass and energy transport into the entire outer atmosphere, this preliminary investigation is an important step in understanding the impact of the quiet Sun on the heliospheric system.

  19. Observing Evolution in the Supergranular Network Length Scale During Periods of Low Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Scott W.; Leamon, Robert J.; Hock, Rachel A.; Rast, Mark P.; Ulrich, Roger K.

    2011-03-01

    We present the initial results of an observational study into the variation of the dominant length scale of quiet solar emission: supergranulation. The distribution of magnetic elements in the lanes that from the network affects, and reflects, the radiative energy in the plasma of the upper solar chromosphere and transition region at the magnetic network boundaries forming as a result of the relentless interaction of magnetic fields and convective motions of the Suns' interior. We demonstrate that a net difference of ~0.5 Mm in the supergranular emission length scale occurs when comparing observation cycle 22/23 and cycle 23/24 minima. This variation in scale is reproduced in the data sets of multiple space- and ground-based instruments and using different diagnostic measures. By means of extension, we consider the variation of the supergranular length scale over multiple solar minima by analyzing a subset of the Mount Wilson Solar Observatory Ca II K image record. The observations and analysis presented provide a tantalizing look at solar activity in the absence of large-scale flux emergence, offering insight into times of "extreme" solar minimum and general behavior such as the phasing and cross-dependence of different components of the spectral irradiance. Given that the modulation of the supergranular scale imprints itself in variations of the Suns' spectral irradiance, as well as in the mass and energy transport into the entire outer atmosphere, this preliminary investigation is an important step in understanding the impact of the quiet Sun on the heliospheric system.

  20. Quantifying the Length and Variance of the Eukaryotic Cell Cycle Phases by a Stochastic Model and Dual Nucleoside Pulse Labelling

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Tom Serge; Jaehnert, Irene; Schichor, Christian; Or-Guil, Michal; Carneiro, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental property of cell populations is their growth rate as well as the time needed for cell division and its variance. The eukaryotic cell cycle progresses in an ordered sequence through the phases and and is regulated by environmental cues and by intracellular checkpoints. Reflecting this regulatory complexity, the length of each phase varies considerably in different kinds of cells but also among genetically and morphologically indistinguishable cells. This article addresses the question of how to describe and quantify the mean and variance of the cell cycle phase lengths. A phase-resolved cell cycle model is introduced assuming that phase completion times are distributed as delayed exponential functions, capturing the observations that each realization of a cycle phase is variable in length and requires a minimal time. In this model, the total cell cycle length is distributed as a delayed hypoexponential function that closely reproduces empirical distributions. Analytic solutions are derived for the proportions of cells in each cycle phase in a population growing under balanced growth and under specific non-stationary conditions. These solutions are then adapted to describe conventional cell cycle kinetic assays based on pulse labelling with nucleoside analogs. The model fits well to data obtained with two distinct proliferating cell lines labelled with a single bromodeoxiuridine pulse. However, whereas mean lengths are precisely estimated for all phases, the respective variances remain uncertain. To overcome this limitation, a redesigned experimental protocol is derived and validated in silico. The novelty is the timing of two consecutive pulses with distinct nucleosides that enables accurate and precise estimation of both the mean and the variance of the length of all phases. The proposed methodology to quantify the phase length distributions gives results potentially equivalent to those obtained with modern phase-specific biosensor-based fluorescent

  1. Cross-bridge kinetics in rat myocardium: effect of sarcomere length and calcium activation.

    PubMed

    Wannenburg, T; Heijne, G H; Geerdink, J H; Van Den Dool, H W; Janssen, P M; De Tombe, P P

    2000-08-01

    We tested the hypotheses that Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]) and sarcomere length (SL) modulate force development via graded effects on cross-bridge kinetics in chemically permeabilized rat cardiac trabeculae. Using sinusoidal length perturbations, we derived the transfer functions of stiffness over a range of [Ca(2+)] at a constant SL of 2.1 micrometer (n = 8) and at SL of 2.0, 2.1, and 2.2 micrometer (n = 4). We found that changes in SL affected only the magnitude of stiffness, whereas [Ca(2+)] affected the magnitude and phase-frequency relations. The data were fit to complex functions of two exponential processes. The characteristic frequencies (b and c) of these processes are indexes of cross-bridge kinetics, with b relating to cross-bridge attachment to and c to detachment from certain non-force-generating states. Both were significantly affected by [Ca(2+)], with an increase in b and c of 140 and 44%, respectively, over the range of [Ca(2+)] studied (P < 0.01). In contrast, SL had no effect on the characteristic frequencies (P > 0.6). We conclude that Ca(2+) activation modulates force development in rat myocardium, at least in part, via a graded effect on cross-bridge kinetics, whereas SL effects are mediated mainly by recruitment of cross bridges.

  2. Rational Design for Rotaxane Synthesis through Intramolecular Slippage: Control of Activation Energy by Rigid Axle Length.

    PubMed

    Masai, Hiroshi; Terao, Jun; Fujihara, Tetsuaki; Tsuji, Yasushi

    2016-05-04

    We describe a new concept for rotaxane synthesis through intramolecular slippage using π-conjugated molecules as rigid axles linked with organic soluble and flexible permethylated α-cyclodextrins (PM α-CDs) as macrocycles. Through hydrophilic-hydrophobic interactions and flipping of PM α-CDs, successful quantitative conversion into rotaxanes was achieved without covalent bond formation. The rotaxanes had high activation barrier for their de-threading, so that they were kinetically isolated and derivatized even under conditions unfavorable for maintaining the rotaxane structures. (1) H NMR spectroscopy experiments clearly revealed that the restricted motion of the linked macrocycle with the rigid axle made it possible to control the kinetic stability by adjusting the length of the rigid axle in the precursor structure rather than the steric bulkiness of the stopper unit.

  3. Fluorescence activated cell sorting.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, W. A.; Hulett, H. R.; Sweet, R. G.; Herzenberg, L. A.

    1972-01-01

    An instrument has been developed for sorting biological cells. The cells are rendered differentially fluorescent and incorporated into a small liquid stream illuminated by a laser beam. The cells pass sequentially through the beam, and fluorescent light from the cells gives rise to electrical signals. The stream is broken into a series of uniform size drops downstream of the laser. The cell signals are used to give appropriate electrostatic charges to drops containing the cells. The drops then pass between two charged plates and are deflected to appropriate containers. The system has proved capable of providing fractions containing large numbers of viable cells highly enriched in a particular functional type.

  4. Fabrication and Testing of Full-Length Single-Cell Externally Fueled Converters for Thermionic Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Alfred

    1994-06-01

    The preceding paper described designs and analyses of thermionic reactors employing full-core-length single-cell converters with their heated emitters located on the outside of their internally cooled collectors, and it presented results of detailed parametric analyses which illustrate the benefits of this unconventional design. The present paper describes the fabrication and testing of full-length prototypical converters, both unfueled and fueled, and presents parametric results of electrically heated tests. The unfueled converter tests demonstrated the practicality of operating such long converters without shorting across a 0.3-mm interelectrode gap. They produced a measured peak output of 751 watts(e) from a single diode and a peak efficiency of 15.4%. The fueled converter tests measured the parametric performance of prototypic UO(subscript 2)-fueled converters designed for subsequent in-pile testing. They employed revolver-shaped tungsten elements with a central emitter hole surrounded by six fuel chambers. The full-length converters were heated by a water-cooled RF-induction coil inside an ion-pumped vacuum chamber. This required development of high-vacuum coaxial RF feedthroughs. In-pile test rules required multiple containment of the UO (subscript 2)-fuel, which complicated the fabrication of the test article and required successful development of techniques for welding tungsten and other refractory components. The test measured a peak power output of 530 watts(e) or 7.1 watts/cm (superscript 2) at an efficiency of 11.5%. There are three copies in the file. Cross-Reference a copy FSC-ESD-217-94-529 in the ESD files with a CID #8574.

  5. Individual sarcomere length determination from isolated cardiac cells using high-resolution optical microscopy and digital image processing.

    PubMed Central

    Roos, K P; Brady, A J

    1982-01-01

    Discrete sarcomere lengths have been determined from dynamically contracting isolated cardiac cells with a high-speed, high-resolution direct optical imaging system. Calcium-tolerant cardiac cells from the rat are isolated by perfusion with collagenase and hyaluronidase. Individual sarcomere lengths can be determined by directly imaging the cell's striation pattern onto a solid-state charge-coupled device (CCD) detector interfaced with a digital computer. The precision of detection in a real light microscopic optical system is discussed in relation to the type of image detector, optical contract enhancement techniques, and digital image processing. The optical performance of the direct striation pattern image apparatus has been determined empirically with test grids under standard bright-field and Nomarski-differential interference contrast (DIC) conditions for application to real muscle imaging. Discrete striation positions of isolated cells have been detected and followed with high precision during phasic contraction-relaxation cycles down to average sarcomere lengths as short as 1.43 +/- 0.053 microns. The maximum rates of contraction and relaxation are rapid and synchronous in time course along the length of the cell. These results indicate that direct optical imaging can provide an accurate means to monitor discrete striations and sarcomere lengths along the length of Ca2+-tolerant heart cells. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 4 PMID:7183337

  6. Activated full-length myosin-X moves processively on filopodia with large steps toward diverse two-dimensional directions

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Osamu; Jung, Hyun Suk; Komatsu, Satoshi; Tsukasaki, Yoshikazu; Watanabe, Tomonobu M.; Homma, Kazuaki; Ikebe, Mitsuo

    2017-01-01

    Myosin-X, (Myo 10), is an unconventional myosin that transports the specific cargos to filopodial tips, and is associated with the mechanism underlying filopodia formation and extension. To clarify the innate motor characteristic, we studied the single molecule movement of a full-length myosin-X construct with leucine zipper at the C-terminal end of the tail (M10FullLZ) and the tail-truncated myosin-X without artificial dimerization motif (BAP-M101–979HMM). M10FullLZ localizes at the tip of filopodia like myosin-X full-length (M10Full). M10FullLZ moves on actin filaments in the presence of PI(3,4,5)P3, an activator of myosin-X. Single molecule motility analysis revealed that the step sizes of both M10FullLZ and BAP-M101–979HMM are widely distributed on single actin filaments that is consistent with electron microscopy observation. M10FullLZ moves on filopodial actin bundles of cells with a mean step size (~36 nm), similar to the step size on single actin filaments (~38 nm). Cartesian plot analysis revealed that M10FullLZ meandered on filopodial actin bundles to both x- and y- directions. These results suggest that the lever-arm of full-length myosin-X is flexible enough to processively steps on different actin filaments within the actin bundles of filopodia. This characteristic of myosin-X may facilitate actin filament convergence for filopodia production. PMID:28287133

  7. Leukocyte telomere length and mortality among U.S. adults: Effect modification by physical activity behaviour.

    PubMed

    Loprinzi, Paul D; Loenneke, Jeremy P

    2017-02-17

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association between leukocyte telomere length (LTL) and mortality (outcome variable), with consideration by physical activity behaviour. Data from the 1999-2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were employed (N = 6,611; 20-85 yrs), with follow-up mortality assessment through 31 December 2006. DNA was extracted from whole blood to assess LTL via quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Compared to those in the first LTL tertile, the adjusted hazard ratio for all-cause mortality for those in the 2(nd) and 3(rd) LTL tertiles, respectively, was 0.82 (95% CI: 0.60-1.12; P = .22) and 0.76 (95% CI: 0.50-1.14; P = .18). However, after adjustments, LTL tertile 3 (vs. 1) was associated with all-cause mortality (HR = 0.37; 95% CI: 0.14-0.93; P = .03) for those who engaged in moderate-intensity exercise. Similarly, LTL was associated with CVD-specific mortality for those who engaged in moderate-intensity exercise (HR = 0.17; 95% CI: 0.04-0.73; P = .02). Longer telomeres are associated with increased survival, particularly among men and those who are active, underscoring the importance of promotion of physical activity behaviour.

  8. Shaping the shoot: the relative contribution of cell number and cell shape to variations in internode length between parent and hybrid apple trees.

    PubMed

    Ripetti, V; Escoute, J; Verdeil, J L; Costes, E

    2008-01-01

    Genetic control of plant size and shape is a promising perspective, particularly in fruit trees, in order to select desirable genotypes. A recent study on architectural traits in an apple progeny showed that internode length was a highly heritable character. However, few studies have been devoted to internode cellular patterning in dicotyledonous stems, and the interplay between the two elementary cell processes that contribute to their length, i.e. cell division and elongation, is not fully understood. The present study aimed at unravelling their contributions in the genetic variation of internode length in a selection of F(1) and parent genotypes of apple tree, by exploring the number of cells and cell shape within mature internodes belonging to the main axes. The results highlighted that both the variables were homogeneous in samples collected either along a sagital line or along the pith width, and suggest that cell lengthening was homogeneous during internode development. They allowed the total number of cells to be estimated on the internode scale and opened up new perspectives for simplifying tissue sampling procedures for further investigations. Differences in internode length were observed between the genotypes, in particular between the parents, and partly resulted from a compensation between cell number and cell length. However, genetic variations in internode length primarily involved the number of cells, while cell length was more secondary. These results argue for an interplay between cellular and organismal control of internode shape that may involve the rib meristem.

  9. The cell adhesion molecule Fasciclin2 regulates brush border length and organization in Drosophila renal tubules

    PubMed Central

    Halberg, Kenneth A.; Rainey, Stephanie M.; Veland, Iben R.; Neuert, Helen; Dornan, Anthony J.; Klämbt, Christian; Davies, Shireen-Anne; Dow, Julian A. T.

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular organisms rely on cell adhesion molecules to coordinate cell–cell interactions, and to provide navigational cues during tissue formation. In Drosophila, Fasciclin 2 (Fas2) has been intensively studied due to its role in nervous system development and maintenance; yet, Fas2 is most abundantly expressed in the adult renal (Malpighian) tubule rather than in neuronal tissues. The role Fas2 serves in this epithelium is unknown. Here we show that Fas2 is essential to brush border maintenance in renal tubules of Drosophila. Fas2 is dynamically expressed during tubule morphogenesis, localizing to the brush border whenever the tissue is transport competent. Genetic manipulations of Fas2 expression levels impact on both microvilli length and organization, which in turn dramatically affect stimulated rates of fluid secretion by the tissue. Consequently, we demonstrate a radically different role for this well-known cell adhesion molecule, and propose that Fas2-mediated intermicrovillar homophilic adhesion complexes help stabilize the brush border. PMID:27072072

  10. MODEL AND CELL MEMBRANE PARTITIONING OF PERFLUOROOCTANESULFONATE IS INDEPENDENT OF THE LIPID CHAIN LENGTH

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wei; Ludewig, Gabriele; Wang, Kai; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim

    2009-01-01

    Perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) is a persistent environmental pollutant that may cause adverse health effects in humans and animals by interacting with and disturbing of the normal properties of biological lipid assemblies. To gain further insights into these interactions, we investigated the effect of PFOS potassium salt on dimyristoyl- (DMPC), dipalmitoyl- (DPPC) and distearoylphosphatidylcholine (DSPC) model membranes using fluorescence anisotropy measurements and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and on the cell membrane of HL-60 human leukemia cells and freshly isolated rat alveolar macrophages using fluorescence anisotropy measurements. PFOS caused a concentration-dependent decrease of the main phase transition temperature (Tm) and an increased peak width (ΔTw) in both the fluorescence anisotropy and the DSC experiments, with a rank order DMPC > DPPC > DSPC. PFOS caused a fluidization of the gel phase of all phosphatidylcholines investigated, but had the opposite effect on the liquid crystalline phase. The apparent partition coefficients of PFOS between the phosphatidylcholine bilayer and the bulk aqueous phase were largely independent of the phosphatidylcholine chain length and ranged from 4.4 × 104 to 8.8 × 104. PFOS also significantly increased the fluidity of membranes of cells. These findings suggest that PFOS readily partitions into lipid assemblies, independent of their composition, and may cause adverse biological effects by altering their fluidity in a manner that depends on the membrane cooperativity and state (e.g., gel versus liquid crystalline phase) of the lipid assembly. PMID:19932010

  11. Enhancing electron collection efficiency and effective diffusion length in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Wong, Daniel Kwan-Pang; Ku, Chen-Hao; Chen, Yen-Ru; Chen, Guan-Ren; Wu, Jih-Jen

    2009-10-19

    Intensity-modulated photocurrent spectroscopy and intensity-modulated photovoltage spectroscopy are employed to measure the dynamics of electron transport and recombination in the ZnO nanowire (NW) array-ZnO/layered basic zinc acetate (LBZA) nanoparticle (NP) composite dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The roles of the vertical ZnO NWs and insulating LBZA in the electron collection and transport in DSSCs are investigated by comparing the results to those in the TiO(2)-NP, horizontal TiO(2)-NW and vertical ZnO-NW-array DSSCs. The electron transport rate and electron lifetime in the ZnO NW/NP composite DSSC are superior to those in the conventional TiO(2)-NP cell due to the existence of the vertical ZnO NWs and insulating LBZA. It indicates that the ZnO NW/NP composite anode is able to sustain efficient electron collection over much greater thickness than the TiO(2)-NP cell does. Consequently, a larger effective electron diffusion length is available in the ZnO composite DSSC.

  12. Lateral Chain Length in Polyalkyl Acrylates Determines the Mobility of Fibronectin at the Cell/Material Interface

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cells, by interacting with surfaces indirectly through a layer of extracellular matrix proteins, can respond to a variety of physical properties, such as topography or stiffness. Polymer surface mobility is another physical property that is less well understood but has been indicated to hold the potential to modulate cell behavior. Polymer mobility is related to the glass-transition temperature (Tg) of the system, the point at which a polymer transitions from an amorphous solid to a more liquid-like state. This work shows that changes in polymer mobility translate to interfacial mobility of extracellular matrix proteins adsorbed on the material surface. This study has utilized a family of polyalkyl acrylates with similar chemistry but different degrees of mobility, obtained through increasing length of the side chain. These materials are used, in conjunction with fluorescent fibronectin, to determine the mobility of this interfacial layer of protein that constitutes the initial cell–material interface. Furthermore, the extent of fibronectin domain availability (III9, III10, - the integrin binding site), cell-mediated reorganization, and cell differentiation was also determined. A nonmonotonic dependence of fibronectin mobility on polymer surface mobility was observed, with a similar trend noted in cell-mediated reorganization of the protein layer by L929 fibroblasts. The availability of the integrin-binding site was higher on the more mobile surfaces, where a similar organization of the protein into networks at the material interface was observed. Finally, differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts was seen to be highly sensitive to surface mobility upon inhibition of cell contractility. Altogether, these findings show that polymer mobility is a subtle influence that translates to the cell/material interface through the protein layer to alter the biological activity of the surface. PMID:26715432

  13. Electrochemical cell apparatus having axially distributed entry of a fuel-spent fuel mixture transverse to the cell lengths

    DOEpatents

    Reichner, P.; Dollard, W.J.

    1991-01-08

    An electrochemical apparatus is made having a generator section containing axially elongated electrochemical cells, a fresh gaseous feed fuel inlet, a gaseous feed oxidant inlet, and at least one gaseous spent fuel exit channel, where the spent fuel exit channel passes from the generator chamber to combine with the fresh feed fuel inlet at a mixing apparatus, reformable fuel mixture channel passes through the length of the generator chamber and connects with the mixing apparatus, that channel containing entry ports within the generator chamber, where the axis of the ports is transverse to the fuel electrode surfaces, where a catalytic reforming material is distributed near the reformable fuel mixture entry ports. 2 figures.

  14. Bacterial activation of mast cells.

    PubMed

    Chi, David S; Walker, Elaine S; Hossler, Fred E; Krishnaswamy, Guha

    2006-01-01

    Mast cells often are found in a perivascular location but especially in mucosae, where they may response to various stimuli. They typically associate with immediate hypersensitive responses and are likely to play a critical role in host defense. In this chapter, a common airway pathogen, Moraxella catarrhalis, and a commensal bacterium, Neiserria cinerea, are used to illustrate activation of human mast cells. A human mast cell line (HMC-1) derived from a patient with mast cell leukemia was activated with varying concentrations of heat-killed bacteria. Active aggregation of bacteria over mast cell surfaces was detected by scanning electron microscopy. The activation of mast cells was analyzed by nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation and cytokine production in culture supernatants. Both M. catarrhalis and N. cinerea induce mast cell activation and the secretion of two key inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-6 and MCP-1. This is accompanied by NF-kappaB activation. Direct bacterial contact with mast cells appears to be essential for this activation because neither cell-free bacterial supernatants nor bacterial lipopolysaccharide induce cytokine secretion.

  15. The Aeromonas caviae AHA0618 gene modulates cell length and influences swimming and swarming motility.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Rebecca C; Parker, Jennifer L; Kumbhar, Ramhari; Mesnage, Stephane; Shaw, Jonathan G; Stafford, Graham P

    2014-12-17

    cell length and hence influencing motility.

  16. Paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria phenotype cells and leucocyte subset telomere length in childhood acquired aplastic anaemia.

    PubMed

    Tutelman, Perri R; Aubert, Geraldine; Milner, Ruth A; Dalal, Bakul I; Schultz, Kirk R; Deyell, Rebecca J

    2014-03-01

    The significance of paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria (PNH(pos) ) cells and leucocyte subset telomere lengths in paediatric aplastic anaemia (AA) is unknown. Among 22 children receiving immunosuppressive therapy (IST) for AA, 73% (16/22) were PNH(pos) , of whom 94% achieved at least a partial response (PR) to IST; 11/16 (69%) achieved complete response (CR). Only 2/6 (33%) PNH(neg) patients achieved PR. PNH(pos) patients were less likely to fail IST compared to PNH(neg) patients (odds ratio 0·033; 95% confidence interval 0·002-0·468; P = 0·012). Children with AA had short granulocyte (P = 7·8 × 10(-9) ), natural killer cell (P = 6·0 × 10(-4) ), naïve T lymphocyte (P = 0·002) and B lymphocyte (P = 0·005) telomeres compared to age-matched normative data.

  17. Synergistic action of auxin and ethylene on root elongation inhibition is caused by a reduction of epidermal cell length

    PubMed Central

    Alarcón, M Victoria; Lloret, Pedro G; Salguero, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Auxin and ethylene have been largely reported to reduce root elongation in maize primary root. However the effects of auxin are greater than those caused by ethylene. Although auxin stimulates ethylene biosynthesis through the specific increase of ACC synthase, the auxin inhibitory effect on root elongation is not mediated by the auxin-induced increase of ethylene production. Recently it has been demonstrated that root inhibition by the application of the synthetic auxin NAA (1-naphtalenacetic acid) is increased if combined with the ethylene precursor ACC (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxilic acid) when both compounds are applied at very low concentrations. Root elongation is basically the result of two processes: a) cell divisions in the meristem where meristematic cells continuously generate new cells and b) subsequently polarized growth by elongation along the root axis as cells leave the meristem and enter the root elongation zone. Our results indicate that exogenous auxin reduced both root elongation and epidermal cell length. In a different way, ethylene at very low concentrations only inhibited root elongation without affecting significantly epidermal cell length. However, these concentrations of ethylene increased the inhibitory effect of auxin on root elongation and cell length. Consequently the results support the hypothesis that ethylene acts synergistically with auxin in the regulation of root elongation and that inhibition by both hormones is due, at least partially, to the reduction of cell length in the epidermal layer. PMID:24598313

  18. Synergistic action of auxin and ethylene on root elongation inhibition is caused by a reduction of epidermal cell length.

    PubMed

    Alarcón, M Victoria; Lloret, Pedro G; Salguero, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Auxin and ethylene have been largely reported to reduce root elongation in maize primary root. However the effects of auxin are greater than those caused by ethylene. Although auxin stimulates ethylene biosynthesis through the specific increase of ACC synthase, the auxin inhibitory effect on root elongation is not mediated by the auxin-induced increase of ethylene production. Recently it has been demonstrated that root inhibition by the application of the synthetic auxin NAA (1-naphtalenacetic acid) is increased if combined with the ethylene precursor ACC (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxilic acid) when both compounds are applied at very low concentrations.   Root elongation is basically the result of two processes: a) cell divisions in the meristem where meristematic cells continuously generate new cells and b) subsequently polarized growth by elongation along the root axis as cells leave the meristem and enter the root elongation zone. Our results indicate that exogenous auxin reduced both root elongation and epidermal cell length. In a different way, ethylene at very low concentrations only inhibited root elongation without affecting significantly epidermal cell length. However, these concentrations of ethylene increased the inhibitory effect of auxin on root elongation and cell length. Consequently the results support the hypothesis that ethylene acts synergistically with auxin in the regulation of root elongation and that inhibition by both hormones is due, at least partially, to the reduction of cell length in the epidermal layer.

  19. Rer1p maintains ciliary length and signaling by regulating γ-secretase activity and Foxj1a levels

    PubMed Central

    Jurisch-Yaksi, Nathalie; Rose, Applonia J.; Lu, Huiqi; Raemaekers, Tim; Munck, Sebastian; Baatsen, Pieter; Baert, Veerle; Vermeire, Wendy; Scales, Suzie J.; Verleyen, Daphne; Vandepoel, Roel; Tylzanowski, Przemko; Yaksi, Emre; de Ravel, Thomy; Yost, H. Joseph; Froyen, Guy; Arrington, Cammon B.

    2013-01-01

    Cilia project from the surface of most vertebrate cells and are important for several physiological and developmental processes. Ciliary defects are linked to a variety of human diseases, named ciliopathies, underscoring the importance of understanding signaling pathways involved in cilia formation and maintenance. In this paper, we identified Rer1p as the first endoplasmic reticulum/cis-Golgi–localized membrane protein involved in ciliogenesis. Rer1p, a protein quality control receptor, was highly expressed in zebrafish ciliated organs and regulated ciliary structure and function. Both in zebrafish and mammalian cells, loss of Rer1p resulted in the shortening of cilium and impairment of its motile or sensory function, which was reflected by hearing, vision, and left–right asymmetry defects as well as decreased Hedgehog signaling. We further demonstrate that Rer1p depletion reduced ciliary length and function by increasing γ-secretase complex assembly and activity and, consequently, enhancing Notch signaling as well as reducing Foxj1a expression. PMID:23479743

  20. Influence of alkyl chain length on the surface activity of antibacterial polymers derived from ROMP.

    PubMed

    Altay, Esra; Yapaöz, Melda Altıkatoğlu; Keskin, Bahadır; Yucesan, Gundoğ; Eren, Tarik

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the antibacterial properties of cationic polymers on solid surfaces by investigating the structure-activity relationships. The polymer synthesis was carried via ring opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) of oxanorbornene derivatives. Modulation of molecular weights and alkyl chain lengths of the polymers were studied to investigate the antibacterial properties on the glass surface. Fluorescein (Na salt) staining contact angle measurements were used to characterize the positive charge density and hydrophobicity on the polymer coated surfaces. Positive charge density for the surface coated polymers with molecular weights of 3000 and 10,000 g mol(-1) is observed to be in the range of 2.3-28.5 nmol cm(-2). The ROMP based cationic pyridinium polymer with hexyl unit exhibited the highest bactericidal efficiency against Escherichia coli on solid surface killing 99% of the bacteria in 5 min. However, phenyl and octyl functionalized quaternary pyridinium groups exhibited lower biocidal properties on the solid surfaces compared to their solution phase biocidal properties. Studying the effect of threshold polymer concentrations on the antibacterial properties indicated that changing the concentrations of polymer coatings on the solid surface dramatically influences antibacterial efficiency.

  1. Sedentary behavior, physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness on leukocyte telomere length

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Meghan K.; Loprinzi, Paul D.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Emerging work is starting to investigate the cumulative effects of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), sedentary behavior and cardiorespiratory fitness on health. The objective of this study was to examine the cumulative and independent associations of MVPA, sedentary behavior and cardiorespiratory fitness on leukocyte telomere length (LTL). Methods: Data from the 1999-2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) were used (N = 1868 adults 20+ years); analyzed in 2016. Sedentary behavior and MVPA were subjectively assessed with cardiorespiratory fitness determined from a submaximal treadmill-based test; participants were classified as above or below the median values for each of these three parameters. A blood sample was obtained from each participant to assess LTL via quantitative polymerase chain reaction, with participants grouped into LTL tertiles. Results: Participants who engaged in higher MVPA, sat less and had higher cardiorespiratory fitness had an increased odds (ranging from 85% to 105%) of being in LTL tertile 3 (vs. 1). In an extended adjusted multinomial logistic regression model, only MVPA was positively associated with LTL (odds ration [OR] = 1.37; 95% CI: 0.99-1.90; P = 0.05). Conclusion: All three behavior characteristics, but particularly MVPA, may be important in preserving LTLs. PMID:28058238

  2. Sedentary behavior, physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness on leukocyte telomere length.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Meghan K; Loprinzi, Paul D

    2017-01-01

    Background: Emerging work is starting to investigate the cumulative effects of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), sedentary behavior and cardiorespiratory fitness on health. The objective of this study was to examine the cumulative and independent associations of MVPA, sedentary behavior and cardiorespiratory fitness on leukocyte telomere length (LTL). Methods: Data from the 1999-2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) were used (N = 1868 adults 20+ years); analyzed in 2016. Sedentary behavior and MVPA were subjectively assessed with cardiorespiratory fitness determined from a submaximal treadmill-based test; participants were classified as above or below the median values for each of these three parameters. A blood sample was obtained from each participant to assess LTL via quantitative polymerase chain reaction, with participants grouped into LTL tertiles. Results: Participants who engaged in higher MVPA, sat less and had higher cardiorespiratory fitness had an increased odds (ranging from 85% to 105%) of being in LTL tertile 3 (vs. 1). In an extended adjusted multinomial logistic regression model, only MVPA was positively associated with LTL (odds ration [OR] = 1.37; 95% CI: 0.99-1.90; P = 0.05). Conclusion: All three behavior characteristics, but particularly MVPA, may be important in preserving LTLs.

  3. Short-term inhibition of TERT induces telomere length-independent cell cycle arrest and apoptotic response in EBV-immortalized and transformed B cells

    PubMed Central

    Celeghin, Andrea; Giunco, Silvia; Freguja, Riccardo; Zangrossi, Manuela; Nalio, Silvia; Dolcetti, Riccardo; De Rossi, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Besides its canonical role in stabilizing telomeres, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) may promote tumorigenesis through extra-telomeric functions. The possible therapeutic effects of BIBR1532 (BIBR), a powerful TERT inhibitor, have been evaluated in different cellular backgrounds, but no data are currently available regarding Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-driven B-cell malignancies. Our aim was to characterize the biological effects of TERT inhibition by BIBR on EBV-immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) and fully transformed Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) cell lines. We found that BIBR selectively inhibits telomerase activity in TERT-positive 4134/Late and 4134/TERT+ LCLs and EBV-negative BL41 and EBV-positive BL41/B95.8 BL cell lines. TERT inhibition led to decreased cell proliferation, accumulation of cells in the S-phase and ultimately to increased apoptosis, compared with mock-treated control cells. All these effects occurred within 72 h and were not observed in BIBR-treated TERT-negative 4134/TERT- and U2OS cells. The cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, consequent upon short-term TERT inhibition, were associated with and likely dependent on the activation of the DNA damage response (DDR), highlighted by the increased levels of γH2AX and activation of ATM and ATR pathways. Analyses of the mean and range of telomere lengths and telomere dysfunction-induced foci indicated that DDR after short-term TERT inhibition was not related to telomere dysfunction, thus suggesting that TERT, besides stabilizing telomere, may protect DNA via telomere-independent mechanisms. Notably, TERT-positive LCLs treated with BIBR in combination with fludarabine or cyclophosphamide showed a significant increase in the number of apoptotic cells with respect to those treated with chemotherapeutic agents alone. In conclusion, TERT inhibition impairs cell cycle progression and enhances the pro-apoptotic effects of chemotherapeutic agents in TERT-positive cells. These results support new

  4. Leukocyte Telomere Length in Healthy White and Black Adolescents: Relations to Race, Sex, Adiposity, Adipokines and Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Haidong; Wang, Xiaoling; Gutin, Bernard; Davis, Catherine L.; Keeton, Daniel; Thomas, Jeffrey; Stallmann-Jorgensen, Inger; Mooken, Grace; Bundy, Vanessa; Snieder, Harold; van der Harst, Pim; Dong, Yanbin

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To examine the relations of race, sex, adiposity, adipokines and physical activity to telomere length in adolescents. Study design Leukocyte telomere length (T/S ratio) was assessed cross-sectionally in 667 adolescents (aged 14–18 years, 48% blacks, 51% girls) using a quantitative PCR method. Generalized Estimating Equations analyses were performed. Results Black adolescents had longer telomeres than white adolescents (age and sex adjusted T/S ratio ± SE: 1.32 ± 0.01 vs. 1.27 ± 0.01, p=0.014) and girls had longer telomeres than boys (age and race adjusted T/S ratio ± SE: 1.31 ± 0.01 vs. 1.27 ± 0.01, p=0.007). None of the adiposity or adipokine measures explained a significant proportion of the variance in telomere length. Vigorous physical activity was positively associated with telomere length (adjusted R2=0.019, p=0.009) and accounted for 1.9% of the total variance only in girls. Conclusion This study, conducted in a biracial adolescent cohort, demonstrated that: (1) race and sex differences in telomere length have already emerged during adolescence; (2) adiposity and adipokines are not associated with telomere length at this age; and (3) the anti-aging effect of vigorous physical activity may begin in youth especially in girls. PMID:20855079

  5. Relationship of Length of Vocational Agriculture Teacher Contract to Supervised Occupational Experience Program Scope and FFA Chapter Activity Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arrington, Larry R.

    A study examined the relationship of length of vocational agriculture teacher contract to supervised occupational experience program scope and Future Farmers of America (FFA) chapter activity level. A questionnaire measuring the activity level of the FFA chapter and soliciting information on various extraneous variables was administered to the…

  6. Complex relationship between meiotic recombination frequency and autosomal synaptonemal complex length per cell in normal human males.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhenzhen; Yang, Qingling; Ye, Nan; Wang, Liu; Li, Jianhua; Yu, Dexin; Cooke, Howard J; Shi, Qinghua

    2012-03-01

    Although the relationship between meiotic recombination frequency and synaptonemal complex (SC) length has been of interest for a long time, how recombination frequency is related to SC length has not been carefully explored. To address this question, we have measured the meiotic recombination frequency as represented by MLH1 foci in 889 pachytene spermatocytes and measured the length of 19,558 autosomal SCs from 10 human males. A complex relationship between the number of MLH1 foci and total autosomal SC length per cell was observed. A positive correlation with significant correlation coefficients between the two variables was found in eight of the ten donors examined, with three donors showing weak correlation, and five showing moderate correlation. Two donors who did not show any correlation between the two variables were identified for the first time. Moreover, most cells with similar total autosomal SC length showed very different numbers of MLH1 foci both between individuals and even within an individual, and vice versa. Our data provide the first evidence for a complex relationship between the recombination frequency and total length of autosomal SCs per cell in human males.

  7. Antibacterial Low Molecular Weight Cationic Polymers: Dissecting the Contribution of Hydrophobicity, Chain Length and Charge to Activity.

    PubMed

    Grace, James L; Huang, Johnny X; Cheah, Soon-Ee; Truong, Nghia P; Cooper, Matthew A; Li, Jian; Davis, Thomas P; Quinn, John F; Velkov, Tony; Whittaker, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    The balance of cationicity and hydrophobicity can profoundly affect the performance of antimicrobial polymers. To this end a library of 24 cationic polymers with uniquely low degrees of polymerization was synthesized via Cu(0)-mediated polymerization, using three different cationic monomers and two initiators: providing two different hydrocarbon chain tail lengths (C2 and C12). The polymers exhibited structure-dependent antibacterial activity when tested against a selection of bacteria, viz, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213, Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 13883, Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 19606, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 as a representative palette of Gram-positive and Gram-negative ESKAPE pathogens. The five best-performing polymers were identified for additional testing against the polymyxin-resistant A. baumannii ATCC 19606R strain. Polymers having the lowest DP and a C12 hydrophobic tail were shown to provide the broadest antimicrobial activity against the bacteria panel studied as evidenced by lower minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). An optimal polymer composition was identified, and its mechanism of action investigated via membrane permeability testing against Escherichia coli. Membrane disruption was identified as the most probable mechanism for bacteria cell killing.

  8. Absolute air refractive index measurement and tracking based on variable length vacuum cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiangzhi; Zhang, Tieli; Ellis, Jonathan D.

    2016-06-01

    A refractometer system using four modified Wu-type heterodyne interferometers with a variable length vacuum cell is presented. The proposed system has two working modes: (1) a moving mode for measuring the absolute air refractive index at the start of a measurement and (2) a static mode for monitoring the air refractive index fluctuation with the same bandwidth as a traditional displacement interferometer. The system requires no gas filling or pumping during the measurement and can be used for real-time refractive index compensation. Comparison experiments with empirical equations are conducted to investigate the feasibility and performance of the proposed system. The standard deviation of the measurement difference between the proposed system and empirical equation is 2.8 parts in 107, which is close to the uncertainty of our refractive index reference based on the accuracy of the environmental sensors. The relative refractive index tracking is a few parts in 108 with a bandwidth of 10 Hz, but high bandwidths are readily achievable.

  9. Monocyte activation in response to polyethylene glycol hydrogels grafted with RGD and PHSRN separated by interpositional spacers of various lengths.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, David Richard; Kao, Weiyuan John

    2007-12-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is often cited as a "stealth" polymer, capable of resisting both protein adsorption and cell adhesion. By extension, PEG would then be expected to limit the host response. Monocyte-derived macrophages play an integral role in inflammation, and thus their response to a material can potentially dictate the overall host response to a biomaterial. In the present study, monocyte responses following interaction with a photopolymerized PEG hydrogel were compared with those from standard tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS). Additionally, the effect of the spacing between RGD and PHSRN, the corresponding synergy sequence on fibronectin (FN), was evaluated using peptides with differing spacer lengths grafted to the PEG hydrogel. Monocyte adherent density on the PEG-only hydrogel was comparable with that of TCPS; however, the secretion of the proinflammatory molecules interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) increased dramatically following monocyte interaction with PEG-only hydrogels as compared with TCPS. The matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) concentration was similar for all surfaces, while both the matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and FN concentrations were above the range of the assay for all substrates. Cell density was higher on the PHSRNG(13)RGD grafted substrate as compared with PHSRNG(6)RGD, but neither sequence increased cell density versus RGD alone. Although protein concentration did sometimes vary with different peptides, this variation was minimal in comparison with the surface effects between TCPS and the PEG-only hydrogel. This study explores the roles of PEG and FN-derived peptides on monocyte activation.

  10. Electrochemical cell apparatus having axially distributed entry of a fuel-spent fuel mixture transverse to the cell lengths

    DOEpatents

    Reichner, Philip; Dollard, Walter J.

    1991-01-01

    An electrochemical apparatus (10) is made having a generator section (22) containing axially elongated electrochemical cells (16), a fresh gaseous feed fuel inlet (28), a gaseous feed oxidant inlet (30), and at least one gaseous spent fuel exit channel (46), where the spent fuel exit channel (46) passes from the generator chamber (22) to combine with the fresh feed fuel inlet (28) at a mixing apparatus (50), reformable fuel mixture channel (52) passes through the length of the generator chamber (22) and connects with the mixing apparatus (50), that channel containing entry ports (54) within the generator chamber (22), where the axis of the ports is transverse to the fuel electrode surfaces (18), where a catalytic reforming material is distributed near the reformable fuel mixture entry ports (54).

  11. Insulin and IGF-1 regularize energy metabolites in neural cells expressing full-length mutant huntingtin.

    PubMed

    Naia, Luana; Ribeiro, Márcio; Rodrigues, Joana; Duarte, Ana I; Lopes, Carla; Rosenstock, Tatiana R; Hayden, Michael R; Rego, A Cristina

    2016-08-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder linked to the expression of mutant huntingtin. Bioenergetic dysfunction has been described to contribute to HD pathogenesis. Thus, treatment paradigms aimed to ameliorate energy deficits appear to be suitable candidates in HD. In previous studies, we observed protective effects of insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in YAC128 and R6/2 mice, two HD mouse models, whereas IGF-1 and/or insulin halted mitochondrial-driven oxidative stress in mutant striatal cells and mitochondrial dysfunction in HD human lymphoblasts. Here, we analyzed the effect of IGF-1 versus insulin on energy metabolic parameters using striatal cells derived from HD knock-in mice and primary cortical cultures from YAC128 mice. STHdh(Q111/Q111) cells exhibited decreased ATP/ADP ratio and increased phosphocreatine levels. Moreover, pyruvate levels were increased in mutant cells, most probably in consequence of a decrease in pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) protein expression and increased PDH phosphorylation, reflecting its inactivation. Insulin and IGF-1 treatment significantly decreased phosphocreatine levels, whereas IGF-1 only decreased pyruvate levels in mutant cells. In a different scenario, primary cortical cultures derived from YAC128 mice also displayed energetic abnormalities. We observed a decrease in both ATP/ADP and phosphocreatine levels, which were prevented following exposure to insulin or IGF-1. Furthermore, decreased lactate levels in YAC128 cultures occurred concomitantly with a decline in lactate dehydrogenase activity, which was ameliorated with both insulin and IGF-1. These data demonstrate differential HD-associated metabolic dysfunction in striatal cell lines and primary cortical cultures, both of which being alleviated by insulin and IGF-1.

  12. Para-aminobenzamidine linked regenerated cellulose membranes for plasminogen activator purification: effect of spacer arm length and ligand density.

    PubMed

    Fasoli, Ezio; Reyes, Yiaslin Ruiz; Guzman, Osiris Martinez; Rosado, Alexandra; Cruz, Vivian Rodriguez; Borges, Amaris; Martinez, Edmarie; Bansal, Vibha

    2013-07-01

    Despite membrane-based separations offering superior alternative to packed bed chromatographic processes, there has been a substantial lacuna in their actual application to separation processes. One of the major reasons behind this is the lack of availability of appropriately modified or end-group modifiable membranes. In this paper, an affinity membrane was developed using a commercially available serine protease inhibitor, para-aminobenzamidine (pABA). The membrane modification was optimized for protein binding capacity by varying: (i) the length of the spacer arm (SA; 5-atoms, 7-atoms, and 14-atoms) linking the ligand to membrane surface; (ii) the affinity ligand (pABA) density on membrane surface (5-25nmol/cm(2)). Resulting membranes were tested for their ability to bind plasminogen activators (PAs) from mono- and multi-component systems in batch mode. The membrane containing pABA linked through 7-atoms SA but similar ligand density as in the case of 5- or 14-atoms long SA was found to bind up to 1.6-times higher amounts of PA per nmoles of immobilized ligand from conditioned HeLa cell culture media. However, membranes with similar ligand densities but different lengths of SA, showed comparable binding capacities in mono-component system. In addition, the length of SA did not affect the selectivity of the ligand for PA. A clear inverse linear correlation was observed between ligand density and binding capacity until the point of PA binding optima was reached (11±1.0nmol/cm(2)) in mono- and multi-component systems for 7- as well as 14-atoms SA. Up to 200-fold purification was achieved in a single step separation of PA from HeLa conditioned media using these affinity membranes. The issues of ligand leaching and reuse of the membranes were also investigated. An extensive regeneration procedure allowed the preservation of approximately 95% of the PA binding capacity of the membranes even after five cycles of use.

  13. Socioeconomic status and length of hospital stay in children with vaso-occlusive crises of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ellison, Angela M.; Bauchner, Howard

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between socioeconomic status and length of hospital stay for vaso-occlusive crises in children with sickle cell disease. METHODS: 19,174 discharges (aged 1-20 years), with a primary diagnosis of sickle cell disease with crisis were analyzed from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kid Inpatient Database 2000. Socioeconomic status was assessed using an area-based measure, median household income by ZIP code and an individual-level measure, insurance status. We adjusted for age, gender, hospital location/teaching status, presence of pneumonia, number of diagnoses on record and number of procedures performed. Negative binomial regression models using generalized estimating equations (GEE) were used to assess length of stay. RESULTS: Socioeconomic status as measured by income was not associated with length of stay (incidence rate ratio (highest versus lowest category) = 1.04 (95% CI: 0.98, 1.11)). In contrast, socioeconomic status as measured by insurance was associated with length of stay [adjusted incidence rate ratio = 1.04 (95% CI: 1.01, 1.08)), although the magnitude of this difference is small and not likely to be clinically important. CONCLUSIONS: We found no evidence to suggest that socioeconomic status has any clinically important effect on length of hospital stay in children with vaso-occlusive crises in sickle cell disease. PMID:17393942

  14. Cell envelope components influencing filament length in the heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Burnat, Mireia; Schleiff, Enrico; Flores, Enrique

    2014-12-01

    Heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria grow as chains of cells (known as trichomes or filaments) that can be hundreds of cells long. The filament consists of individual cells surrounded by a cytoplasmic membrane and peptidoglycan layers. The cells, however, share a continuous outer membrane, and septal proteins, such as SepJ, are important for cell-cell contact and filament formation. Here, we addressed a possible role of cell envelope components in filamentation, the process of producing and maintaining filaments, in the model cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. We studied filament length and the response of the filaments to mechanical fragmentation in a number of strains with mutations in genes encoding cell envelope components. Previously published peptidoglycan- and outer membrane-related gene mutants and strains with mutations in two genes (all5045 and alr0718) encoding class B penicillin-binding proteins isolated in this work were used. Our results show that filament length is affected in most cell envelope mutants, but the filaments of alr5045 and alr2270 gene mutants were particularly fragmented. All5045 is a dd-transpeptidase involved in peptidoglycan elongation during cell growth, and Alr2270 is an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of lipid A, a key component of lipopolysaccharide. These results indicate that both components of the cell envelope, the murein sacculus and the outer membrane, influence filamentation. As deduced from the filament fragmentation phenotypes of their mutants, however, none of these elements is as important for filamentation as the septal protein SepJ.

  15. Distinct contributions of the thin and thick filaments to length-dependent activation in heart muscle

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuemeng; Kampourakis, Thomas; Yan, Ziqian; Sevrieva, Ivanka; Irving, Malcolm; Sun, Yin-Biao

    2017-01-01

    The Frank-Starling relation is a fundamental auto-regulatory property of the heart that ensures the volume of blood ejected in each heartbeat is matched to the extent of venous filling. At the cellular level, heart muscle cells generate higher force when stretched, but despite intense efforts the underlying molecular mechanism remains unknown. We applied a fluorescence-based method, which reports structural changes separately in the thick and thin filaments of rat cardiac muscle, to elucidate that mechanism. The distinct structural changes of troponin C in the thin filaments and myosin regulatory light chain in the thick filaments allowed us to identify two aspects of the Frank-Starling relation. Our results show that the enhanced force observed when heart muscle cells are maximally activated by calcium is due to a change in thick filament structure, but the increase in calcium sensitivity at lower calcium levels is due to a change in thin filament structure. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24081.001 PMID:28229860

  16. Octasaccharide is the minimal length unit required for efficient binding of cyclophilin B to heparin and cell surface heparan sulphate

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Cyclophilin B (CyPB) is a heparin-binding protein first identified as a receptor for cyclosporin A. In previous studies, we reported that CyPB triggers chemotaxis and integrin-mediated adhesion of T-lymphocytes by way of interaction with two types of binding sites. The first site corresponds to a signalling receptor; the second site has been identified as heparan sulphate (HS) and appears crucial to induce cell adhesion. Characterization of the HS-binding unit is critical to understand the requirement of HS in pro-adhesive activity of CyPB. By using a strategy based on gel mobility shift assays with fluorophore-labelled oligosaccharides, we demonstrated that the minimal heparin unit required for efficient binding of CyPB is an octasaccharide. The mutants CyPBKKK− [where KKK− refers to the substitutions K3A(Lys3→Ala)/K4A/K5A] and CyPBΔYFD (where Tyr14-Phe-Asp16 has been deleted) failed to interact with octasaccharides, confirming that the Y14FD16 and K3KK5 clusters are required for CyPB binding. Molecular modelling revealed that both clusters are spatially arranged so that they may act synergistically to form a binding site for the octasaccharide. We then demonstrated that heparin-derived octasaccharides and higher degree of polymerization oligosaccharides inhibited the interaction between CyPB and fluorophore-labelled HS chains purified from T-lymphocytes, and strongly reduced the HS-dependent pro-adhesive activity of CyPB. However, oligosaccharides or heparin were unable to restore adhesion of heparinase-treated T-lymphocytes, indicating that HS has to be present on the cell membrane to support the pro-adhesive activity of CyPB. Altogether, these results demonstrate that the octasaccharide is likely to be the minimal length unit required for efficient binding of CyPB to cell surface HS and consequent HS-dependent cell responses. PMID:15109301

  17. Effects of in vivo-like activation frequency on the length-dependent force generation of skeletal muscle fibre bundles.

    PubMed

    Zuurbier, C J; Lee-de Groot, M B; Van der Laarse, W J; Huijing, P A

    1998-05-01

    It is known that a range of firing frequencies can be observed during in vivo muscle activity, yet information is lacking as to how different in vivo-like frequencies may affect force generation of skeletal muscle. This study examined the effects of constant (CSF, constant within one contraction) and decreasing stimulation frequencies (DSF) on mean sarcomere length-force characteristics of rat gastrocnemius medialis fibre bundles. The CSF resulted in an optimal mean sarcomere length (lso) of 2.30 (SEM 0.02), 2.46 (SEM 0.03), 2.76 (SEM 0.03) and more than 2.99 (SEM 0.07) lm, for 100, 50, 30 and 15 Hz, respectively. Compared to 100-Hz stimulation, both lso and the ascending limb of the relationship significantly shifted to higher lengths with lower frequencies. No shift was encountered for the initial part of the descending limb. The DSF reduced the frequency-induced shift to higher mean lengths [lso 2.33 (SEM 0.02), 2.52 (SEM 0.08) and more than 2.92 (SEM 0.10) microm, respectively, for 50, 30 and 15 Hz]. No effect of activation time on length-force characteristics was observed. It was concluded from these studies that the frequency and history of stimulation is a major determinant of the length-force characteristics of muscle fibre bundles, and should be taken into account when analysing animal and human locomotion. The previously observed frequency-induced shift in whole muscle length-force relationship resides mainly at the level of fibre bundles.

  18. Measurement of diffusion length and surface recombination velocity in Interdigitated Back Contact (IBC) and Front Surface Field (FSF) solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verlinden, Pierre; Van de Wiele, Fernand

    1985-03-01

    A method is proposed for measuring the diffusion length and surface recombination velocity of Interdigitated Back Contact (IBC) solar cells by means of a simple linear regression on experimental quantum efficiency values versus the inverse of the absorption coefficient. This method is extended to the case of Front Surface Field (FSF) solar cells. Under certain conditions, the real or the effective surface recombination velocity may be measured.

  19. In Situ Time-Resolved FRET Reveals Effects of Sarcomere Length on Cardiac Thin-Filament Activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, King-Lun; Rieck, Daniel; Solaro, R. John; Dong, Wenji

    2014-01-01

    During cardiac thin-filament activation, the N-domain of cardiac troponin C (N-cTnC) binds to Ca2+ and interacts with the actomyosin inhibitory troponin I (cTnI). The interaction between N-cTnC and cTnI stabilizes the Ca2+-induced opening of N-cTnC and is presumed to also destabilize cTnI–actin interactions that work together with steric effects of tropomyosin to inhibit force generation. Recently, our in situ steady-state FRET measurements based on N-cTnC opening suggested that at long sarcomere length, strongly bound cross-bridges indirectly stabilize this Ca2+-sensitizing N-cTnC–cTnI interaction through structural effects on tropomyosin and cTnI. However, the method previously used was unable to determine whether N-cTnC opening depends on sarcomere length. In this study, we used time-resolved FRET to monitor the effects of cross-bridge state and sarcomere length on the Ca2+-dependent conformational behavior of N-cTnC in skinned cardiac muscle fibers. FRET donor (AEDANS) and acceptor (DDPM)-labeled double-cysteine mutant cTnC(T13C/N51C)AEDANS-DDPM was incorporated into skinned muscle fibers to monitor N-cTnC opening. To study the structural effects of sarcomere length on N-cTnC, we monitored N-cTnC opening at relaxing and saturating levels of Ca2+ and 1.80 and 2.2-μm sarcomere length. Mg2+-ADP and orthovanadate were used to examine the structural effects of noncycling strong-binding and weak-binding cross-bridges, respectively. We found that the stabilizing effect of strongly bound cross-bridges on N-cTnC opening (which we interpret as transmitted through related changes in cTnI and tropomyosin) become diminished by decreases in sarcomere length. Additionally, orthovanadate blunted the effect of sarcomere length on N-cTnC conformational behavior such that weak-binding cross-bridges had no effect on N-cTnC opening at any tested [Ca2+] or sarcomere length. Based on our findings, we conclude that the observed sarcomere length-dependent positive feedback

  20. In situ time-resolved FRET reveals effects of sarcomere length on cardiac thin-filament activation.

    PubMed

    Li, King-Lun; Rieck, Daniel; Solaro, R John; Dong, Wenji

    2014-08-05

    During cardiac thin-filament activation, the N-domain of cardiac troponin C (N-cTnC) binds to Ca(2+) and interacts with the actomyosin inhibitory troponin I (cTnI). The interaction between N-cTnC and cTnI stabilizes the Ca(2+)-induced opening of N-cTnC and is presumed to also destabilize cTnI-actin interactions that work together with steric effects of tropomyosin to inhibit force generation. Recently, our in situ steady-state FRET measurements based on N-cTnC opening suggested that at long sarcomere length, strongly bound cross-bridges indirectly stabilize this Ca(2+)-sensitizing N-cTnC-cTnI interaction through structural effects on tropomyosin and cTnI. However, the method previously used was unable to determine whether N-cTnC opening depends on sarcomere length. In this study, we used time-resolved FRET to monitor the effects of cross-bridge state and sarcomere length on the Ca(2+)-dependent conformational behavior of N-cTnC in skinned cardiac muscle fibers. FRET donor (AEDANS) and acceptor (DDPM)-labeled double-cysteine mutant cTnC(T13C/N51C)AEDANS-DDPM was incorporated into skinned muscle fibers to monitor N-cTnC opening. To study the structural effects of sarcomere length on N-cTnC, we monitored N-cTnC opening at relaxing and saturating levels of Ca(2+) and 1.80 and 2.2-μm sarcomere length. Mg(2+)-ADP and orthovanadate were used to examine the structural effects of noncycling strong-binding and weak-binding cross-bridges, respectively. We found that the stabilizing effect of strongly bound cross-bridges on N-cTnC opening (which we interpret as transmitted through related changes in cTnI and tropomyosin) become diminished by decreases in sarcomere length. Additionally, orthovanadate blunted the effect of sarcomere length on N-cTnC conformational behavior such that weak-binding cross-bridges had no effect on N-cTnC opening at any tested [Ca(2+)] or sarcomere length. Based on our findings, we conclude that the observed sarcomere length-dependent positive

  1. Immunotherapy and mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Carlos, A G; Carlos, M L; Santos, M A; Pedro, E; Santos, S; Lopes-Pregal, A

    1998-10-01

    Tryptase is the more specific markers for mast cell activation and mediators release and can be used as an index of mast cell activation after challenge. Nasal provocation tests have been done in patients allergic to the pollen of Parietaria (pellitory wall) before and after specific systemic immunotherapy and tryptase release evaluated in nasal lavage fluid. After specific immunotherapy the concentration of tryptase in nasal lavage was significantly decreased to all the concentrations used in challenge and the peack of tryptase release was delayed. These results confirm that assays of tryptase in nasal fluid after nasal provocation are a reliable markers of mast cell activation. Immunotherapy with specific allergen decreases mast cell reactivity to the same allergen.

  2. Fabrication and Testing of Full-Length Single-Cell Externally Fueled Converters for Thermionic Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Alfred

    1995-08-01

    Paper presented at the 29th IECEC in Monterey, CA in August 1994. The present paper describes the fabrication and testing of full-length prototypcial converters, both unfueled and fueled, and presents parametric results of electrically heated tests.

  3. DEPENDENCE OF LASER SINGLE-PULSE CHARACTERISTICS ON ACTIVE ROD LENGTH,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The dependence of population inversion on rod length in the case of ruby and neodymium glass laser rods was investigated. The required pumping rates...switching, provided the dependence of emitted power on the coefficient of useful losses is investigated and the position of its maximum is determined.

  4. Failure analysis of fuel cell electrodes using three-dimensional multi-length scale X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhrel, A.; El Hannach, M.; Orfino, F. P.; Dutta, M.; Kjeang, E.

    2016-10-01

    X-ray computed tomography (XCT), a non-destructive technique, is proposed for three-dimensional, multi-length scale characterization of complex failure modes in fuel cell electrodes. Comparative tomography data sets are acquired for a conditioned beginning of life (BOL) and a degraded end of life (EOL) membrane electrode assembly subjected to cathode degradation by voltage cycling. Micro length scale analysis shows a five-fold increase in crack size and 57% thickness reduction in the EOL cathode catalyst layer, indicating widespread action of carbon corrosion. Complementary nano length scale analysis shows a significant reduction in porosity, increased pore size, and dramatically reduced effective diffusivity within the remaining porous structure of the catalyst layer at EOL. Collapsing of the structure is evident from the combination of thinning and reduced porosity, as uniquely determined by the multi-length scale approach. Additionally, a novel image processing based technique developed for nano scale segregation of pore, ionomer, and Pt/C dominated voxels shows an increase in ionomer volume fraction, Pt/C agglomerates, and severe carbon corrosion at the catalyst layer/membrane interface at EOL. In summary, XCT based multi-length scale analysis enables detailed information needed for comprehensive understanding of the complex failure modes observed in fuel cell electrodes.

  5. Multi-walled carbon nanotube length as a critical determinant of bioreactivity with primary human pulmonary alveolar cells

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Sinbad; Berhanu, Deborah; Misra, Superb K.; Thorley, Andrew J.; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Tetley, Teresa D.

    2015-01-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) length is suggested to critically determine their pulmonary toxicity. This stems from in vitro and in vivo rodent studies and in vitro human studies using cell lines (typically cancerous). There is little data using primary human lung cells. We addressed this knowledge gap, using highly relevant, primary human alveolar cell models exposed to precisely synthesized and thoroughly characterized MWCNTs. In this work, transformed human alveolar type-I-like epithelial cells (TT1), primary human alveolar type-II epithelial cells (ATII) and alveolar macrophages (AM) were treated with increasing concentrations of MWCNTs before measuring cytotoxicity, inflammatory mediator release and MAP kinase signalling. Strikingly, we observed that short MWCNTs (~0.6 µm in length) induced significantly greater responses from the epithelial cells, whilst AM were particularly susceptible to long MWCNTs (~20 µm). These differences in the pattern of mediator release were associated with alternative profiles of JNK, p38 and ERK1/2 MAP kinase signal transduction within each cell type. This study, using highly relevant target human alveolar cells and well defined and characterized MWCNTs, shows marked cellular responses to the MWCNTs that vary according to the target cell type, as well as the aspect ratio of the MWCNT. PMID:25780270

  6. Inhibitors of aminoglycoside resistance activated in cells.

    PubMed

    Vong, Kenward; Tam, Ingrid S; Yan, Xuxu; Auclair, Karine

    2012-03-16

    The most common mechanism of resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics entails bacterial expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes, such as the clinically widespread aminoglycoside N-6'-acetyltransferase (AAC(6')). Aminoglycoside-CoA bisubstrates are highly potent AAC(6') inhibitors; however, their inability to penetrate cells precludes in vivo studies. Some truncated bisubstrates are known to cross cell membranes, yet their activities against AAC(6') are in the micromolar range at best. We report here the synthesis and biological activity of aminoglycoside-pantetheine derivatives that, although devoid of AAC(6') inhibitory activity, can potentiate the antibacterial activity of kanamycin A against an aminoglycoside-resistant strain of Enterococcus faecium. Biological studies demonstrate that these molecules are potentially extended to their corresponding full-length bisubstrates by enzymes of the coenzyme A biosynthetic pathway. This work provides a proof-of-concept for the utility of prodrug compounds activated by enzymes of the coenzyme A biosynthetic pathway, to resensitize resistant strains of bacteria to aminoglycoside antibiotics.

  7. Tired telomeres: Poor global sleep quality, perceived stress, and telomere length in immune cell subsets in obese men and women.

    PubMed

    Prather, Aric A; Gurfein, Blake; Moran, Patricia; Daubenmier, Jennifer; Acree, Michael; Bacchetti, Peter; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Lin, Jue; Blackburn, Elizabeth; Hecht, Frederick M; Epel, Elissa S

    2015-07-01

    Poor sleep quality and short sleep duration are associated with increased incidence and progression of a number of chronic health conditions observed at greater frequency among the obese and those experiencing high levels of stress. Accelerated cellular aging, as indexed by telomere attrition in immune cells, is a plausible pathway linking sleep and disease risk. Prior studies linking sleep and telomere length are mixed. One factor may be reliance on leukocytes, which are composed of varied immune cell types, as the sole measure of telomere length. To better clarify these associations, we investigated the relationships of global sleep quality, measured by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and diary-reported sleep duration with telomere length in different immune cell subsets, including granulocytes, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), CD8+ and CD4+ T lymphocytes, and B lymphocytes in a sample of 87 obese men and women (BMI mean=35.4, SD=3.6; 81.6% women; 62.8% Caucasian). Multiple linear regression analyses were performed adjusting for age, gender, race, education, BMI, sleep apnea risk, and perceived stress. Poorer PSQI global sleep quality was associated with statistically significantly shorter telomere length in lymphocytes but not granulocytes and in particular CD8+ T cells (b=-56.8 base pairs per one point increase in PSQI, SE=20.4, p=0.007) and CD4+ T cells (b=-37.2, SE=15.9, p=0.022). Among separate aspects of global sleep quality, low perceived sleep quality and decrements in daytime function were most related to shorter telomeres. In addition, perceived stress moderated the sleep-CD8+ telomere association. Poorer global sleep quality predicted shorter telomere length in CD8+ T cells among those with high perceived stress but not in low stress participants. These findings provide preliminary evidence that poorer global sleep quality is related to telomere length in several immune cell types, which may serve as a pathway linking sleep and

  8. Bursts of Active Transport in Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Kuo, James; Granick, Steve

    2013-11-01

    We show, using a large new data set, that the temporally resolved speed of active cargo transport in living cells follows a scaling law over several decades of time and length. The statistical regularities display a time-averaged shape that we interpret to reflect stress buildup, followed by rapid release. The scaling power law agrees quantitatively with those reported in inanimate systems (jammed colloids and granular media, and magnetic Barkhausen noise), suggesting a common origin in pushing through a crowded environment in a weak force regime. The implied regulation of the speed of active cellular transport due to environmental obstruction results in bursts of speed and acceleration. These findings extend the classical notion of molecular crowding.

  9. Bursts of active transport in living cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Kuo, James; Granick, Steve

    2013-11-15

    We show, using a large new data set, that the temporally resolved speed of active cargo transport in living cells follows a scaling law over several decades of time and length. The statistical regularities display a time-averaged shape that we interpret to reflect stress buildup, followed by rapid release. The scaling power law agrees quantitatively with those reported in inanimate systems (jammed colloids and granular media, and magnetic Barkhausen noise), suggesting a common origin in pushing through a crowded environment in a weak force regime. The implied regulation of the speed of active cellular transport due to environmental obstruction results in bursts of speed and acceleration. These findings extend the classical notion of molecular crowding.

  10. Regulatory mechanism of length-dependent activation in skinned porcine ventricular muscle: role of thin filament cooperative activation in the Frank-Starling relation.

    PubMed

    Terui, Takako; Shimamoto, Yuta; Yamane, Mitsunori; Kobirumaki, Fuyu; Ohtsuki, Iwao; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi; Kurihara, Satoshi; Fukuda, Norio

    2010-10-01

    Cardiac sarcomeres produce greater active force in response to stretch, forming the basis of the Frank-Starling mechanism of the heart. The purpose of this study was to provide the systematic understanding of length-dependent activation by investigating experimentally and mathematically how the thin filament "on-off" switching mechanism is involved in its regulation. Porcine left ventricular muscles were skinned, and force measurements were performed at short (1.9 µm) and long (2.3 µm) sarcomere lengths. We found that 3 mM MgADP increased Ca(2+) sensitivity of force and the rate of rise of active force, consistent with the increase in thin filament cooperative activation. MgADP attenuated length-dependent activation with and without thin filament reconstitution with the fast skeletal troponin complex (sTn). Conversely, 20 mM of inorganic phosphate (Pi) decreased Ca(2+) sensitivity of force and the rate of rise of active force, consistent with the decrease in thin filament cooperative activation. Pi enhanced length-dependent activation with and without sTn reconstitution. Linear regression analysis revealed that the magnitude of length-dependent activation was inversely correlated with the rate of rise of active force. These results were quantitatively simulated by a model that incorporates the Ca(2+)-dependent on-off switching of the thin filament state and interfilament lattice spacing modulation. Our model analysis revealed that the cooperativity of the thin filament on-off switching, but not the Ca(2+)-binding ability, determines the magnitude of the Frank-Starling effect. These findings demonstrate that the Frank-Starling relation is strongly influenced by thin filament cooperative activation.

  11. Regulatory mechanism of length-dependent activation in skinned porcine ventricular muscle: role of thin filament cooperative activation in the Frank-Starling relation

    PubMed Central

    Terui, Takako; Shimamoto, Yuta; Yamane, Mitsunori; Kobirumaki, Fuyu; Ohtsuki, Iwao; Ishiwata, Shin’ichi; Kurihara, Satoshi

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac sarcomeres produce greater active force in response to stretch, forming the basis of the Frank-Starling mechanism of the heart. The purpose of this study was to provide the systematic understanding of length-dependent activation by investigating experimentally and mathematically how the thin filament “on–off” switching mechanism is involved in its regulation. Porcine left ventricular muscles were skinned, and force measurements were performed at short (1.9 µm) and long (2.3 µm) sarcomere lengths. We found that 3 mM MgADP increased Ca2+ sensitivity of force and the rate of rise of active force, consistent with the increase in thin filament cooperative activation. MgADP attenuated length-dependent activation with and without thin filament reconstitution with the fast skeletal troponin complex (sTn). Conversely, 20 mM of inorganic phosphate (Pi) decreased Ca2+ sensitivity of force and the rate of rise of active force, consistent with the decrease in thin filament cooperative activation. Pi enhanced length-dependent activation with and without sTn reconstitution. Linear regression analysis revealed that the magnitude of length-dependent activation was inversely correlated with the rate of rise of active force. These results were quantitatively simulated by a model that incorporates the Ca2+-dependent on–off switching of the thin filament state and interfilament lattice spacing modulation. Our model analysis revealed that the cooperativity of the thin filament on–off switching, but not the Ca2+-binding ability, determines the magnitude of the Frank-Starling effect. These findings demonstrate that the Frank-Starling relation is strongly influenced by thin filament cooperative activation. PMID:20876361

  12. Biochemical Activities of the Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Homology Region 2 Domains of Sarcomere Length Short (SALS) Protein.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Mónika Ágnes; Majoros, Andrea Kinga; Vig, Andrea Teréz; Migh, Ede; Nyitrai, Miklós; Mihály, József; Bugyi, Beáta

    2016-01-08

    Drosophila melanogaster sarcomere length short (SALS) is a recently identified Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein homology 2 (WH2) domain protein involved in skeletal muscle thin filament regulation. SALS was shown to be important for the establishment of the proper length and organization of sarcomeric actin filaments. Here, we present the first detailed characterization of the biochemical activities of the tandem WH2 domains of SALS (SALS-WH2). Our results revealed that SALS-WH2 binds both monomeric and filamentous actin and shifts the monomer-filament equilibrium toward the monomeric actin. In addition, SALS-WH2 can bind to but fails to depolymerize phalloidin- or jasplakinolide-bound actin filaments. These interactions endow SALS-WH2 with the following two major activities in the regulation of actin dynamics: SALS-WH2 sequesters actin monomers into non-polymerizable complexes and enhances actin filament disassembly by severing, which is modulated by tropomyosin. We also show that profilin does not influence the activities of the WH2 domains of SALS in actin dynamics. In conclusion, the tandem WH2 domains of SALS are multifunctional regulators of actin dynamics. Our findings suggest that the activities of the WH2 domains do not reconstitute the presumed biological function of the full-length protein. Consequently, the interactions of the WH2 domains of SALS with actin must be tuned in the cellular context by other modules of the protein and/or sarcomeric components for its proper functioning.

  13. North Atlantic Basin Tropical Cyclone Activity in Relation to Temperature and Decadal- Length Oscillation Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    Yearly frequencies of North Atlantic basin tropical cyclones, their locations of origin, peak wind speeds, average peak wind speeds, lowest pressures, and average lowest pressures for the interval 1950-2008 are examined. The effects of El Nino and La Nina on the tropical cyclone parametric values are investigated. Yearly and 10-year moving average (10-yma) values of tropical cyclone parameters are compared against those of temperature and decadal-length oscillation, employing both linear and bi-variate analysis, and first differences in the 10-yma are determined. Discussion of the 2009 North Atlantic basin hurricane season, updating earlier results, is given.

  14. How does active substance use at psychiatric admission impact suicide risk and hospital length-of-stay?

    PubMed

    Miller, Keith A; Hitschfeld, Mario J; Lineberry, Timothy W; Palmer, Brian A

    2016-01-01

    Despite their high prevalence, little is known about the effects of substance use disorders and active substance use on the suicide risk or length-of-stay of psychiatric inpatients. This study examines the relationship between active substance use at the time of psychiatric hospitalization and changes in suicide risk measures and length-of-stay. Admission and discharge ratings on the Suicide Status Form-II-R, diagnoses, and toxicology data from 2,333 unique psychiatric inpatients were examined. Data for patients using alcohol, tetrahydrocannabinol, methamphetamines, cocaine, benzodiazepines, opiates, barbiturates, phencyclidine, and multiple substances on admission were compared with data from 1,426 admissions without substance use. Patients with substance use by toxicology on admission had a 0.9 day shorter length-of-stay compared to toxicology-negative patients. During initial nurse evaluation on the inpatient unit, these patients reported lower suicide measures (i.e., suicidal ideation frequency, overall suicide risk, and wish-to-die). No significant between-group differences were seen at discharge. Patients admitted with a substance use disorder diagnosis had a 1.0 day shorter length-of-stay than those without, while those with a substance use disorder diagnosis and positive toxicology reported the lowest measures of suicidality on admission. These results remained independent of psychiatric diagnosis. For acute psychiatric inpatients, suicide risk is higher and length-of-stay is longer in patients with substance use disorders who are NOT acutely intoxicated compared with patients without a substance use disorder. Toxicology-positive patients are less suicidal on admission and improve faster than their toxicology-negative counterparts. This study gives support to the clinical observation that acutely intoxicated patients may stabilize quickly with regard to suicidal urges and need for inpatient care.

  15. Strategic Cell-Cycle Regulatory Features That Provide Mammalian Cells with Tunable G1 Length and Reversible G1 Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Pfeuty, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Transitions between consecutive phases of the eukaryotic cell cycle are driven by the catalytic activity of selected sets of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks). Yet, their occurrence and precise timing is tightly scheduled by a variety of means including Cdk association with inhibitory/adaptor proteins (CKIs). Here we focus on the regulation of G1-phase duration by the end of which cells of multicelled organisms must decide whether to enter S phase or halt, and eventually then, differentiate, senesce or die to obey the homeostatic rules of their host. In mammalian cells, entry in and progression through G1 phase involve sequential phosphorylation and inactivation of the retinoblastoma Rb proteins, first, by cyclin D-Cdk4,6 with the help of CKIs of the Cip/Kip family and, next, by the cyclin E-Cdk2 complexes that are negatively regulated by Cip/Kip proteins. Using a dynamical modeling approach, we show that the very way how the Rb and Cip/Kip regulatory modules interact differentially with cyclin D-Cdk4,6 and cyclin E-Cdk2 provides to mammalian cells a powerful means to achieve an exquisitely-sensitive control of G1-phase duration and fully reversible G1 arrests. Consistently, corruption of either one of these two modules precludes G1 phase elongation and is able to convert G1 arrests from reversible to irreversible. This study unveils fundamental design principles of mammalian G1-phase regulation that are likely to confer to mammalian cells the ability to faithfully control the occurrence and timing of their division process in various conditions. PMID:22558136

  16. Spinal transection induces widespread proliferation of cells along the length of the spinal cord in a weakly electric fish

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Antiño R.; Smith, G. Troy

    2013-01-01

    The ability to regenerate spinal cord tissue after tail amputation has been well studied in several species of teleost fish. The present study examined proliferation and survival of cells following complete spinal cord transection rather than tail amputation in the weakly electric fish Apteronotus leptorhynchus. To quantify cell proliferation along the length of the spinal cord, fish were given a single bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) injection immediately after spinal transection or sham surgery. Spinal transection significantly increased the density of BrdU+ cells along the entire length of the spinal cord at 1 day post transection (dpt), and most newly generated cells survived up to 14 dpt. To examine longer term survival of the newly proliferated cells, BrdU was injected for 5 days after the surgery, and fish were sacrificed 14 or 30 dpt. Spinal transection significantly increased proliferation and/or survival, as indicated by an elevated density of BrdU+ cells in the spinal cords of spinally transected compared to sham-operated and intact fish. At 14 dpt, BrdU+ cells were abundant at all levels of the spinal cord. By 30 dpt, the density of BrdU+ cells decreased at all levels of the spinal cord except at the tip of the tail. Thus, newly generated cells in the caudal-most segment of the spinal cord survived longer than those in more rostral segments. Our findings indicate that spinal cord transection stimulates widespread cellular proliferation; however, there were regional differences in the survival of the newly generated cells. PMID:23147638

  17. Nutrient demand interacts with grass particle length to affect digestion responses and chewing activity in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Kammes, K L; Allen, M S

    2012-02-01

    Effects of grass particle length on dry matter intake (DMI), milk production, ruminal fermentation and pool sizes, digestion and passage kinetics, and chewing activity and the relationship of these effects with preliminary DMI (pDMI) were evaluated using 15 ruminally and duodenally cannulated Holstein cows in a crossover design with a 14-d preliminary period and two 18-d treatment periods. During the preliminary period, pDMI of individual cows ranged from 22.6 to 29.8 kg/d (mean=25.8 kg/d) and 3.5% fat-corrected milk yield ranged from 29.2 to 56.9 kg/d (mean=41.9 kg/d). Experimental treatments were diets containing orchardgrass silage chopped to either (a) 19-mm (long) or (b) 10-mm (short) theoretical length of cut as the sole forage. Grass silages contained approximately 46% neutral detergent fiber (NDF); diets contained 50% forage, 23% forage NDF, and 28% total NDF. Preliminary DMI, an index of nutrient demand, was determined during the last 4 d of the preliminary period when cows were fed a common diet and used as a covariate. Main effects of grass particle length and their interaction with pDMI were tested by ANOVA. Grass particle length and its interaction with pDMI did not affect milk yield, milk composition, or rumen pH. Long particle length tended to decrease DMI compared with short particle length, which might have been limited by rumen fill or chewing time, or both. Passage rates of feed fractions did not differ between long and short particle lengths and were not related to level of intake. As pDMI increased, long particles decreased ruminal digestion rate of potentially digestible NDF at a faster rate than short particles. As a result, long particles decreased or tended to decrease rates of ruminal turnover for NDF, organic matter, and dry matter and increased their rumen pools compared with short particles for cows with high pDMI. Long particles increased eating time, which affected cows with high intake to the greatest extent, and total chewing time

  18. Full-Length Fibronectin Drives Fibroblast Accumulation at the Surface of Collagen Microtissues during Cell-Induced Tissue Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Foolen, Jasper; Shiu, Jau-Ye; Mitsi, Maria; Zhang, Yang; Chen, Christopher S.; Vogel, Viola

    2016-01-01

    Generating and maintaining gradients of cell density and extracellular matrix (ECM) components is a prerequisite for the development of functionality of healthy tissue. Therefore, gaining insights into the drivers of spatial organization of cells and the role of ECM during tissue morphogenesis is vital. In a 3D model system of tissue morphogenesis, a fibronectin-FRET sensor recently revealed the existence of two separate fibronectin populations with different conformations in microtissues, i.e. ‘compact and adsorbed to collagen’ versus ‘extended and fibrillar’ fibronectin that does not colocalize with the collagen scaffold. Here we asked how the presence of fibronectin might drive this cell-induced tissue morphogenesis, more specifically the formation of gradients in cell density and ECM composition. Microtissues were engineered in a high-throughput model system containing rectangular microarrays of 12 posts, which constrained fibroblast-populated collagen gels, remodeled by the contractile cells into trampoline-shaped microtissues. Fibronectin’s contribution during the tissue maturation process was assessed using fibronectin-knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts (Fn-/- MEFs) and floxed equivalents (Fnf/f MEFs), in fibronectin-depleted growth medium with and without exogenously added plasma fibronectin (full-length, or various fragments). In the absence of full-length fibronectin, Fn-/- MEFs remained homogenously distributed throughout the cell-contracted collagen gels. In contrast, in the presence of full-length fibronectin, both cell types produced shell-like tissues with a predominantly cell-free compacted collagen core and a peripheral surface layer rich in cells. Single cell assays then revealed that Fn-/- MEFs applied lower total strain energy on nanopillar arrays coated with either fibronectin or vitronectin when compared to Fnf/f MEFs, but that the presence of exogenously added plasma fibronectin rescued their contractility. While collagen

  19. Evaluating the thermal stability of multi-pass cells' effective optical path length using optical frequency domain reflectometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hong; Cao, Xiuhan; Li, Jinyi; Du, Zhenhui

    2016-10-01

    Multi-pass cells (MPCs) are commonly used to improve the sensitivity for trace gas detection using spectroscopy technologies. The determination of Effective Optical Path Length (EOPL) of a MPC is very important and challenging in applications which aim at absolute measurements. It is well-known that the temperature changing will exercise some influence on the MPCs' spatial structure, however, measurements of the influence haven't been reported which might due to the limitation of measuring method. In this paper, we used a direct high-precision measuring method with Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometer (OFDR) to evaluate the thermal stability of a multi-pass cell. To simulate the environment with a large range of temperature changing, this paper gave a series of experiments by setting the temperature control unit in system from 25 to 175 degree Celsius, and the MPC's EOPL was measured simultaneously for the investigation of temperature response. The results showed that the effective optical path length increase monotonically along with the variation of the temperature, and the rising rate is 0.5 mm/ºC with the total length of about 3 meters which should be pay attention to when the ultra-high accuracy results are demanded. To stabilize the EOPL of the system, if it is possible, the environment temperature of gas cell can be controlled with a constant temperature. In practical applications, the real-time monitoring of EOPL with a direct measuring method may be necessary.

  20. Relationships of survival time, productivity and cause of death with telomere lengths of cows produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Kazuyuki; Yonai, Miharu; Kaneyama, Kanako; Ito, Satoshi; Matsuda, Hideo; Yoshioka, Hajime; Nagai, Takashi; Imai, Kei

    2011-10-01

    The reproductive ability, milk-producing capacity, survival time and relationships of these parameters with telomere length were investigated in 4 groups of cows produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Each group was produced using the same donor cells (6 Holstein (1H), 3 Holstein (2H), 4 Jersey (1J) and 5 Japanese Black (1B) cows). As controls, 47 Holstein cows produced by artificial insemination were used. The SCNT cows were artificially inseminated, and multiple deliveries were performed after successive rounds of breeding and conception. No correlation was observed between the telomere length and survival time in the SCNT cows. Causes of death of SCNT cows included accidents, accident-associated infections, inappropriate management, acute mastitis and hypocalcemia. The lifetime productivity of SCNT cows was superior to those of the controls and cell donor cows. All SCNT beef cows with a relatively light burden of lactation remained alive and showed significantly prolonged survival time compared with the cows in the SCNT dairy breeds. These results suggest that the lifetime productivity of SCNT cows was favorable, and their survival time was more strongly influenced by environmental burdens, such as pregnancy, delivery, lactation and feeding management, than by the telomere length.

  1. Stretch and shortening of skeletal muscles activated along the ascending limb of the force-length relation.

    PubMed

    Rassier, Dilson E; Pun, Clara

    2010-01-01

    There is a history dependence of skeletal muscle contraction. When muscles are activated and subsequently stretched, they produce a long lasting force enhancement. When muscles are activated and subsequently shortened, they produce a long-lasting force depression. The purposes of the studies shown in this chapter were (1) to evaluate if force enhancement and force depression are present along the ascending limb of the force-length (FL) relation, (2) to evaluate if the history-dependent properties of force production are associated with sarcomere length (SL) non-uniformity, and (3) to determine the effects of cross-bridge (de)activation on force depression. Isolated myofibrils were activated by either Ca²(+) or MgADP and were subjected to consecutive stretches or shortenings along the ascending limb of the FL relation, separated by periods (approximately 5 s) of isometric contraction. Force after stretch was higher than force after shortening when the contractions were produced at similar SLs. The difference in force could not be explained by SL non-uniformity. After shortening, MgADP activation produced forces that were higher than Ca²(+) activation. Since MgADP induces the formation of strongly bound cross-bridges, the result suggests that force depression following shortening is associated with cross-bridge deactivation.

  2. Length heterogeneity at conserved sequence block 2 in human mitochondrial DNA acts as a rheostat for RNA polymerase POLRMT activity

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Benedict G.; Wellesley, Frederick C.; Savery, Nigel J.; Szczelkun, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    The guanine (G)-tract of conserved sequence block 2 (CSB 2) in human mitochondrial DNA can result in transcription termination due to formation of a hybrid G-quadruplex between the nascent RNA and the nontemplate DNA strand. This structure can then influence genome replication, stability and localization. Here we surveyed the frequency of variation in sequence identity and length at CSB 2 amongst human mitochondrial genomes and used in vitro transcription to assess the effects of this length heterogeneity on the activity of the mitochondrial RNA polymerase, POLRMT. In general, increased G-tract length correlated with increased termination levels. However, variation in the population favoured CSB 2 sequences which produced efficient termination while particularly weak or strong signals were avoided. For all variants examined, the 3′ end of the transcripts mapped to the same downstream sequences and were prevented from terminating by addition of the transcription factor TEFM. We propose that CSB 2 length heterogeneity allows variation in the efficiency of transcription termination without affecting the position of the products or the capacity for regulation by TEFM. PMID:27436287

  3. Diffusion length variation and proton damage coefficients for InP/In(x)Ga(1-x)As/GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, R. K.; Weinberg, I.; Flood, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Indium phosphide solar cells are more radiation resistant than gallium arsenide and silicon solar cells, and their growth by heteroepitaxy offers additional advantages leading to the development of lighter, mechanically strong and cost-effective cells. Changes in heteroepitaxial InP cell efficiency under 0.5 and 3 MeV proton irradiations are explained by the variation in the minority-carrier diffusion length. The base diffusion length versus proton fluence is calculated by simulating the cell performance. The diffusion length damage coefficient K(L) is plotted as a function of proton fluence.

  4. Human anti-EGFL7 recombinant full-length antibodies selected from a mammalian cell-based antibody display library.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Liu, Yan-Hong; Li, Yan-Wen; Ju, Qian; Chen, Lin; Xie, Ping-Li; Li, Yue-Hui; Li, Guan-Cheng

    2012-06-01

    Epidermal growth factor-like domain 7 (EGFL7) has been implicated in promoting solid tumor growth and metastasis via stimulating tumor-associated angiogenesis. The advent of antibody display technology (phage, bacteria, and yeast) led to an enormous revival in the use of antibodies as diagnostic and therapeutic tools for fighting cancer. However, problems with protein folding, posttranslational modification, and codon usage still limit the number of improved antibodies that can be obtained. We describe here the isolation of an EGFL7-specific antibody from a mammalian cell-based full-length antibody display library generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. Using a novel vector, contained glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor and restriction enzyme sites NheI and ClaI, antibody libraries are displayed as whole IgG molecules on the cell surface and screened for specific antigen binding by a combination of magnetic beads and measured by cell ELISA. Anti-EGFL7 antibody was successfully isolated from the library. The mammalian cell-based full-length antibody display library is a great potential application for rapid identification and cloning of human mAbs of targeting hepatocellular carcinoma.

  5. Strategies to Maximize Burst Lengths in Rhythmic Anti-Phase Activity of Networks with Reciprocal Inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Amitabha; Rubin, Jonathan E.

    2015-06-01

    We consider repetitive activity patterns in which a pair of oscillators take turns becoming active, motivated by anti-phase bursting activity in neuronal networks. In our framework, when one unit is active, it inhibits the other, as occurs with inhibitory synaptic coupling of neurons; when the inhibition is strong enough, the inhibited unit is prevented from activating. We assume that the coupling resources available to each oscillator are constrained and allow each unit to select the amount of input that it provides to the other each time that it activates. In this setting, we investigate the strategies that each oscillator should utilize in order to maximize the number of spikes it can fire (or equivalently the amount of time it is active), corresponding to a burst of spikes in a neuron, before the other unit takes over. We derive a one-dimensional map whose fixed points correspond to periodic anti-phase bursting solutions. We introduce a novel numerical method to obtain the graph of this map and we extend the analysis to select solutions that achieve consistency between coupling resource use and recovery. Our analysis shows that corresponding to each fixed point of the map, there is actually an infinite number of related strategies that yield the same number of spikes per burst.

  6. Hibiscus latent Fort Pierce virus in Brazil and synthesis of its biologically active full-length cDNA clone.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ruimin; Niu, Shengniao; Dai, Weifang; Kitajima, Elliot; Wong, Sek-Man

    2016-10-01

    A Brazilian isolate of Hibiscus latent Fort Pierce virus (HLFPV-BR) was firstly found in a hibiscus plant in Limeira, SP, Brazil. RACE PCR was carried out to obtain the full-length sequences of HLFPV-BR which is 6453 nucleotides and has more than 99.15 % of complete genomic RNA nucleotide sequence identity with that of HLFPV Japanese isolate. The genomic structure of HLFPV-BR is similar to other tobamoviruses. It includes a 5' untranslated region (UTR), followed by open reading frames encoding for a 128-kDa protein and a 188-kDa readthrough protein, a 38-kDa movement protein, 18-kDa coat protein, and a 3' UTR. Interestingly, the unique feature of poly(A) tract is also found within its 3'-UTR. Furthermore, from the total RNA extracted from the local lesions of HLFPV-BR-infected Chenopodium quinoa leaves, a biologically active, full-length cDNA clone encompassing the genome of HLFPV-BR was amplified and placed adjacent to a T7 RNA polymerase promoter. The capped in vitro transcripts from the cloned cDNA were infectious when mechanically inoculated into C. quinoa and Nicotiana benthamiana plants. This is the first report of the presence of an isolate of HLFPV in Brazil and the successful synthesis of a biologically active HLFPV-BR full-length cDNA clone.

  7. Impact of chain length on antibacterial activity and hemocompatibility of quaternary N-alkyl and n,n-dialkyl chitosan derivatives.

    PubMed

    Sahariah, Priyanka; Benediktssdóttir, Berglind E; Hjálmarsdóttir, Martha Á; Sigurjonsson, Olafur E; Sørensen, Kasper K; Thygesen, Mikkel B; Jensen, Knud J; Másson, Már

    2015-05-11

    A highly efficient method for chemical modification of chitosan biopolymers by reductive amination to yield N,N-dialkyl chitosan derivatives was developed. The use of 3,6-O-di-tert-butyldimethylsilylchitosan as a precursor enabled the first 100% disubstitution of the amino groups with long alkyl chains. The corresponding mono N-alkyl derivatives were also synthesized, and all the alkyl compounds were then quaternized using an optimized procedure. These well-defined derivatives were studied for antibacterial activity against Gram positive S. aureus, E. faecalis, and Gram negative E. coli, P. aeruginosa, which could be correlated to the length of the alkyl chain, but the order was dependent on the bacterial strain. Toxicity against human red blood cells and human epithelial Caco-2 cells was found to be proportional to the length of the alkyl chain. The most active chitosan derivatives were found to be more selective for killing bacteria than the quaternary ammonium disinfectants cetylpyridinium chloride and benzalkonium chloride, as well as the antimicrobial peptides melittin and LL-37.

  8. An ancestral host defence peptide within human β-defensin 3 recapitulates the antibacterial and antiviral activity of the full-length molecule

    PubMed Central

    Nigro, Ersilia; Colavita, Irene; Sarnataro, Daniela; Scudiero, Olga; Zambrano, Gerardo; Granata, Vincenzo; Daniele, Aurora; Carotenuto, Alfonso; Galdiero, Stefania; Folliero, Veronica; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Urbanowicz, Richard A.; Ball, Jonathan K.; Salvatore, Francesco; Pessi, Antonello

    2015-01-01

    Host defence peptides (HDPs) are critical components of innate immunity. Despite their diversity, they share common features including a structural signature, designated “γ-core motif”. We reasoned that for each HDPs evolved from an ancestral γ-core, the latter should be the evolutionary starting point of the molecule, i.e. it should represent a structural scaffold for the modular construction of the full-length molecule, and possess biological properties. We explored the γ-core of human β-defensin 3 (HBD3) and found that it: (a) is the folding nucleus of HBD3; (b) folds rapidly and is stable in human serum; (c) displays antibacterial activity; (d) binds to CD98, which mediates HBD3 internalization in eukaryotic cells; (e) exerts antiviral activity against human immunodeficiency virus and herpes simplex virus; and (f) is not toxic to human cells. These results demonstrate that the γ-core within HBD3 is the ancestral core of the full-length molecule and is a viable HDP per se, since it is endowed with the most important biological features of HBD3. Notably, the small, stable scaffold of the HBD3 γ-core can be exploited to design disease-specific antimicrobial agents. PMID:26688341

  9. Synaptic background activity influences spatiotemporal integration in single pyramidal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bernander, O; Douglas, R J; Martin, K A; Koch, C

    1991-01-01

    The standard one-dimensional Rall cable model assumes that the electrotonic structure of neurons does not change in response to synaptic input. This model is used in a great number of both theoretical and anatomical-physiological structure-function studies. In particular, the membrane time constant, tau m, the somatic input resistance, Rin, and the electrotonic length are used to characterize single cells. However, these studies do not take into account that neurons are embedded in a network of spontaneously active cells. Synapses from these cells will contribute significantly to the membrane conductance, especially if recent evidence of very high specific membrane resistance, Rm = 100 k omega.cm2, is taken into account. We numerically simulated the electrical behavior of an anatomically reconstructed layer V cortical pyramidal cell receiving input from 4000 excitatory and 1000 inhibitory cells firing spontaneously at 0-7 Hz. We found that, over this range of synaptic background activity, tau m and Rin change by a factor of 10 (80-7 msec, 110-14 M omega) and the electrotonic length of the cell changes by a factor of 3. We show that this significantly changes the response of the cell to temporal desynchronized versus temporal synchronized synaptic input distributed throughout the neuron. Thus, the global activity of the network can control how individual cells perform spatial and temporal integration. PMID:1763072

  10. Photoperiod length paces the temporal orchestration of cell cycle and carbon-nitrogen metabolism in Crocosphaera watsonii.

    PubMed

    Dron, Anthony; Rabouille, Sophie; Claquin, Pascal; Talec, Amélie; Raimbault, Virginie; Sciandra, Antoine

    2013-12-01

    We analysed the effect of photoperiod length (PPL) (16:8 and 8:16 h of light-dark regime, named long and short PPL, respectively) on the temporal orchestration of the two antagonistic, carbon and nitrogen acquisitions in the unicellular, diazotrophic cyanobacterium Crocosphaera watsonii strain WH8501 growing diazotrophically. Carbon and nitrogen metabolism were monitored at high frequency, and their patterns were compared with the cell cycle progression. The oxygen-sensitive N2 fixation process occurred mainly during the dark period, where photosynthesis cannot take place, inducing a light-dark cycle of cellular C : N ratio. Examination of circadian patterns in the cell cycle revealed that cell division occurred during the midlight period, (8 h and 4 h into the light in the long and short PPL conditions, respectively), thus timely separated from the energy-intensive diazotrophic process. Results consistently show a nearly 5 h time lag between the end of cell division and the onset of N2 fixation. Shorter PPLs affected DNA compaction of C. watsonii cells and also led to a decrease in the cell division rate. Therefore, PPL paces the growth of C. watsonii: a long PPL enhances cell division while a short PPL favours somatic growth (biomass production) with higher carbon and nitrogen cell contents.

  11. Postpartum reproductive activities and gestation length in Martina Franca jennies, an endangered Italian donkey breed.

    PubMed

    Tosi, Umberto; Bernabò, Nicola; Verni, Fabiana; Valbonetti, Luca; Muttini, Aurelio; Mattioli, Mauro; Barboni, Barbara

    2013-07-15

    The donkey reproductive physiology is still partially known despite the increasing risk of extinction involving several breeds. The present study was designed to describe the postpartum (PP) reproductive performance of an Italian endangered breed: the Martina Franca donkey. To this aim, 52 jennies were monitored to define the foal-heat (FH) and the first and second PP estrus episodes (1st PPe and 2nd PPe). The data indicate that jennies spontaneously recovered reproduction in approximately 10 days after delivery. Then heats occur with a regular interval of approximately 23 days. Estrus length was 1 week in FH and the 2nd PPe and significantly shorter in the 1st PPe. Estrus-ovulation, and delivery-ovulation interval and follicle growth were similar in all animals tested. Pregnancy rate (PR) was lower when natural mating occurred during the FH and 2nd PPe (approximately 60%) than during the 1st PPe (approximately 70%; P < 0.01). In addition, the higher PR (>80%; P < 0.01) was recorded in jennies when the FH occurred after the first week PP and it dropped (<50%) in early FH animals. The PR was also affected by the season and by age: it significantly declined during the autumn-winter season and in subjects older than the sixth year of age. For the first time, the reproductive performance of PP donkeys were defined on a large number of Martina Franca jennies thus offering useful information to improve farm management with an immediate benefit to increase livestock production. This aspect of management improvement might be particularly important if applied to an endangered breed such as Martina Franca donkeys.

  12. Length-dependent CTG·CAG triplet-repeat expansion in myotonic dystrophy patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jintang; Campau, Erica; Soragni, Elisabetta; Jespersen, Christine; Gottesfeld, Joel M.

    2013-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is an inherited dominant muscular dystrophy caused by expanded CTG·CAG triplet repeats in the 3′ untranslated region of the DMPK1 gene, which produces a toxic gain-of-function CUG RNA. It has been shown that the severity of disease symptoms, age of onset and progression are related to the length of the triplet repeats. However, the mechanism(s) of CTG·CAG triplet-repeat instability is not fully understood. Herein, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were generated from DM1 and Huntington's disease patient fibroblasts. We isolated 41 iPSC clones from DM1 fibroblasts, all showing different CTG·CAG repeat lengths, thus demonstrating somatic instability within the initial fibroblast population. During propagation of the iPSCs, the repeats expanded in a manner analogous to the expansion seen in somatic cells from DM1 patients. The correlation between repeat length and expansion rate identified the interval between 57 and 126 repeats as being an important length threshold where expansion rates dramatically increased. Moreover, longer repeats showed faster triplet-repeat expansion. However, the overall tendency of triplet repeats to expand ceased on differentiation into differentiated embryoid body or neurospheres. The mismatch repair components MSH2, MSH3 and MSH6 were highly expressed in iPSCs compared with fibroblasts, and only occupied the DMPK1 gene harboring longer CTG·CAG triplet repeats. In addition, shRNA silencing of MSH2 impeded CTG·CAG triplet-repeat expansion. The information gained from these studies provides new insight into a general mechanism of triplet-repeat expansion in iPSCs. PMID:23933738

  13. The spacer arm length in cell-penetrating peptides influences chitosan/siRNA nanoparticle delivery for pulmonary inflammation treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Eun Ju; Choi, Moonhwan; Lee, Jangwook; Rhim, Taiyoun; Lee, Kuen Yong

    2015-11-01

    Although chitosan and its derivatives have been frequently utilized as delivery vehicles for small interfering RNA (siRNA), it is challenging to improve the gene silencing efficiency of chitosan-based nanoparticles. In this study, we hypothesized that controlling the spacer arm length between a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) and a nanoparticle could be critical to enhancing the cellular uptake as well as the gene silencing efficiency of conventional chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles. A peptide consisting of nine arginine units (R9) was used as a CPP, and the spacer arm length was controlled by varying the number of glycine units between the peptide (R9Gn) and the nanoparticle (n = 0, 4, and 10). Various physicochemical characteristics of R9Gn-chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles were investigated in vitro. Increasing the spacing arm length did not significantly affect the complex formation between R9Gn-chitosan and siRNA. However, R9G10-chitosan was much more effective in delivering genes both in vitro and in vivo compared with non-modified chitosan (without the peptide) and R9-chitosan (without the spacer arm). Chitosan derivatives modified with oligoarginine containing a spacer arm can be considered as potential delivery vehicles for various genes.Although chitosan and its derivatives have been frequently utilized as delivery vehicles for small interfering RNA (siRNA), it is challenging to improve the gene silencing efficiency of chitosan-based nanoparticles. In this study, we hypothesized that controlling the spacer arm length between a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) and a nanoparticle could be critical to enhancing the cellular uptake as well as the gene silencing efficiency of conventional chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles. A peptide consisting of nine arginine units (R9) was used as a CPP, and the spacer arm length was controlled by varying the number of glycine units between the peptide (R9Gn) and the nanoparticle (n = 0, 4, and 10). Various physicochemical characteristics of

  14. Effects of Assimilation Window Length and Radiatively Active Water Ice Clouds on Martian Thermal Tides and Martian Atmosphere Predictability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Greybush, S. J.; Kalnay, E.; Hoffman, R. N.; Wilson, R.

    2013-12-01

    Martian therrnal tides are a particularly prominent feature that contribute much to the Martian atmospheric circulation and dust transport. To study the Mars diurnal features (or thermal tides), data assimilation based on the GFDL Mars Global Climate Model (MGCM) with the 4D-Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (4D-LETKF) is used to perform a reanalysis of spacecraft temperature retrievals from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) and Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) instruments. Since the traditional 6-hr assimilation cycle induces spurious resonance in the Kelvin waves represented in both surface pressure and mid-level temperature, short assimilation window lengths (1-hour and 2-hour) are introduced in 4D-LETKF. In order to compare the performances of different assimilation window lengths, 10-sol forecasts based on the hour 00 and 12 reanalysis are evaluated and compared. The shorter windows show improved forecast root mean square difference with respect to observations, and not only remove the spurious resonance but also better compensate for the absence of radiatively active water ice clouds (RAC). The predictability of Martian atmosphere is also studied using multi-sol forecasts initiated from analyses employing different assimilation window lengths, and the effect of RAC on Martian atmospheric predictability is also discussed.

  15. Desmoplakin controls microvilli length but not cell adhesion or keratin organization in the intestinal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Sumigray, Kaelyn D.; Lechler, Terry

    2012-01-01

    Maintaining proper cell–cell adhesion in the intestine is essential for tissue homeostasis and barrier function. This adhesion is thought to be mediated by cell adhesion structures, including tight junctions, adherens junctions, and desmosomes, which concentrate in the apical junctional region. While clear roles for adherens and tight junctions have been established in simple epithelia, the function of desmosomes has not been addressed. In stratified epithelia, desmosomes impart mechanical strength to tissues by organizing and anchoring the keratin filament network. In this paper, we report that the desmosomal protein desmoplakin (DP) is not essential for cell adhesion in the intestinal epithelium. Surprisingly, when DP is lacking, keratin filament localization is also unperturbed, although keratin filaments no longer anchor at desmosomes. Unexpectedly, DP is important for proper microvillus structure. Our study highlights the tissue-specific functions of desmosomes and reveals that the canonical functions for these structures are not conserved in simple epithelium. PMID:22238362

  16. Microbial quantities and enzyme activity in soil irrigated with sewage for different lengths of time.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoming; Ma, Teng; Chen, Liuzhu; Cui, Yahui; Du, Peng; Liao, Yuan

    2014-12-01

    Sewage is widely used on agricultural soils in peri-urban areas of developing countries to meet shortages of water resource. Although sewage is a good source of plant nutrients, it also increases the heavy metals loads to soils. Microbial responses to these contaminants may serve as early warning indicators of adverse effects of sewage irrigation on soil quality. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of time of sewage irrigation on soil microbial indicators. Soil samples were collected from seven soil sites (S1-S7) irrigated with 0 years, 16 years, 23 years, 25 years, 27 years, 32 years and 52 years, respectively in Shijiazhuang of China and analyzed. For each soil sample, we determined the quantities of bacteria, fungi and actinomycete, and enzyme activities of urease, sucrase, phosphatase, dehydrogenase and catalase. Our results showed that the soils of S2-S7 irrigated with sewage effluents for different times (ranged between 16 and 52 years) exhibited higher densities of bacteria, actinomycete, urease, sucrase and phosphatase but lower densities of fungi when compared with S1 irrigated with sewage effluents for 0 years. The soil S7 irrigated with sewage effluents for longest times (52 years) contained lowest activities of catalase when compared with the soils of S1-S6. The densities of bacteria (R = 0.877, p < 0.01), actinomycete (R = 0.875, p < 0.01), sucrase (R = 0.858, p < 0.01) and phosphatase (R = 0.804, p < 0.05) were significantly correlated in a positive manner with time of sewage irrigation. Soil fungi quantities and urease, dehydrogenase and catalase activities did not change significantly with irrigation time. This study confirms that sewage irrigation had negative effects on microbial properties including fungi, catalase and dehydrogenase in the long term, so there is a need for continuous monitoring for sustainable soil health.

  17. Seeing the Forest in Lieu of the Trees: Continuum Simulations of Cell Membranes at Large Length Scales

    PubMed Central

    Sapp, Kayla; Shlomovitz, Roie; Maibaum, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    Biological membranes exhibit long-range spatial structure in both chemical composition and geometric shape, which gives rise to remarkable physical phenomena and important biological functions. Continuum models that describe these effects play an important role in our understanding of membrane biophysics at large length scales. We review the mathematical framework used to describe both composition and shape degrees of freedom, and present best practices to implement such models in a computer simulation. We discuss in detail two applications of continuum models of cell membranes: the formation of microemulsion and modulated phases, and the effect of membrane-mediated interactions on the assembly of membrane proteins. PMID:26366141

  18. Cell length growth in fission yeast: an analysis of its bilinear character and the nature of its rate change transition.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Anna; Rácz-Mónus, Anna; Buchwald, Peter; Sveiczer, Ákos

    2013-11-01

    During their mitotic cycle, cylindrical fission yeast cells grow exclusively at their tips. Length growth starts at birth and halts at mitotic onset when the cells begin to prepare for division. While the growth pattern was initially considered to be exponential, during the last three decades an increasing amount of evidence indicated that it is rather a bilinear function [two linear segments separated by a rate change point (RCP)]. The main focus of this work was to clarify this and to elucidate the further question of whether the rate change occurs abruptly at the RCP or more smoothly during a transition period around it. We have analyzed the individual growth patterns obtained by time-lapse microscopy of 60 wild-type cells separately as well as that of the 'average' cell generated from their superposition. Linear, exponential, and bilinear functions were fitted to the data, and their suitability was compared using objective model selection criteria. This analysis found the overwhelming majority of the cells (70%) to have a bilinear growth pattern with close to half of them showing a smooth and not an abrupt transition. The growth pattern of the average cell was also found to be bilinear with a smooth transition.

  19. REAL-Select: full-length antibody display and library screening by surface capture on yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Rhiel, Laura; Krah, Simon; Günther, Ralf; Becker, Stefan; Kolmar, Harald; Hock, Björn

    2014-01-01

    We describe a novel approach named REAL-Select for the non-covalent display of IgG-molecules on the surface of yeast cells for the purpose of antibody engineering and selection. It relies on the capture of secreted native full-length antibodies on the cell surface via binding to an externally immobilized ZZ domain, which tightly binds antibody Fc. It is beneficial for high-throughput screening of yeast-displayed IgG-libraries during antibody discovery and development. In a model experiment, antibody-displaying yeast cells were isolated from a 1:1,000,000 mixture with control cells confirming the maintenance of genotype-phenotype linkage. Antibodies with improved binding characteristics were obtained by affinity maturation using REAL-Select, demonstrating the ability of this system to display antibodies in their native form and to detect subtle changes in affinity by flow cytometry. The biotinylation of the cell surface followed by functionalization with a streptavidin-ZZ fusion protein is an approach that is independent of the genetic background of the antibody-producing host and therefore can be expected to be compatible with other eukaryotic expression hosts such as P. pastoris or mammalian cells.

  20. The spacer arm length in cell-penetrating peptides influences chitosan/siRNA nanoparticle delivery for pulmonary inflammation treatment.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Eun Ju; Choi, Moonhwan; Lee, Jangwook; Rhim, Taiyoun; Lee, Kuen Yong

    2015-12-21

    Although chitosan and its derivatives have been frequently utilized as delivery vehicles for small interfering RNA (siRNA), it is challenging to improve the gene silencing efficiency of chitosan-based nanoparticles. In this study, we hypothesized that controlling the spacer arm length between a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) and a nanoparticle could be critical to enhancing the cellular uptake as well as the gene silencing efficiency of conventional chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles. A peptide consisting of nine arginine units (R9) was used as a CPP, and the spacer arm length was controlled by varying the number of glycine units between the peptide (R9Gn) and the nanoparticle (n = 0, 4, and 10). Various physicochemical characteristics of R9Gn-chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles were investigated in vitro. Increasing the spacing arm length did not significantly affect the complex formation between R9Gn-chitosan and siRNA. However, R9G10-chitosan was much more effective in delivering genes both in vitro and in vivo compared with non-modified chitosan (without the peptide) and R9-chitosan (without the spacer arm). Chitosan derivatives modified with oligoarginine containing a spacer arm can be considered as potential delivery vehicles for various genes.

  1. Dorsomedial hypothalamic lesions counteract decreases in locomotor activity in male Syrian hamsters transferred from long to short day lengths.

    PubMed

    Jarjisian, Stephan G; Butler, Matthew P; Paul, Matthew J; Place, Ned J; Prendergast, Brian J; Kriegsfeld, Lance J; Zucker, Irving

    2015-02-01

    The dorsomedial nucleus (DMN) of the hypothalamus has been implicated in seasonal control of reproduction. Syrian hamsters with DMN lesions, unlike control hamsters, do not undergo testicular regression after transfer from a long day length (14 h of light per day; LD) to a short day length (8 h of light per day; SD). SDs also markedly reduce hamster locomotor activity (LMA). To assess whether the DMN is a component of the neural circuitry that mediates seasonal variation in LMA, neurologically intact males (controls) and hamsters that had sustained lesions of the DMN (DMNx) were housed in an LD or SD photoperiod for 26 weeks. DMNx that prevented testicular regression counteracted decreases in LMA during 8 to10 weeks of SD treatment; steroid-independent effects of SDs did not override high levels of LMA in DMNx males. As in previous studies, testosterone (T) restoration increased LMA in LD but not SD castrated control males. In the present study, T also failed to increase LMA in SD-DMNx hamsters. The DMN is not necessary to maintain decreased responsiveness of locomotor activity systems to T in SDs, which presumably is mediated by other central nervous system androgen target tissues. Finally, DMNx did not interfere with the spontaneous increase in LMA exhibited by photorefractory hamsters after 26 weeks of SD treatment. We propose that DMN is an essential part of the substrate that mediates seasonal decreases in LMA as day length decreases but is not required to sustain decreased SD responsiveness to T or for development of refractoriness to SDs.

  2. Dorsomedial Hypothalamic Lesions Counteract Decreases in Locomotor Activity in Male Syrian Hamsters Transferred from Long to Short Day Lengths

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Matthew J.; Place, Ned J.; Prendergast, Brian J.; Kriegsfeld, Lance J.; Zucker, Irving

    2015-01-01

    The dorsomedial nucleus (DMN) of the hypothalamus has been implicated in seasonal control of reproduction. Syrian hamsters with DMN lesions, unlike control hamsters, do not undergo testicular regression after transfer from a long day length (14 h of light per day; LD) to a short day length (8 h of light per day; SD). SDs also markedly reduce hamster locomotor activity (LMA). To assess whether the DMN is a component of the neural circuitry that mediates seasonal variation in LMA, neurologically intact males (controls) and hamsters that had sustained lesions of the DMN (DMNx) were housed in an LD or SD photoperiod for 26 weeks. DMNx that prevented testicular regression counteracted decreases in LMA during 8 to10 weeks of SD treatment; steroid-independent effects of SDs did not override high levels of LMA in DMNx males. As in previous studies, testosterone (T) restoration increased LMA in LD but not SD castrated control males. In the present study, T also failed to increase LMA in SD-DMNx hamsters. The DMN is not necessary to maintain decreased responsiveness of locomotor activity systems to T in SDs, which presumably is mediated by other central nervous system androgen target tissues. Finally, DMNx did not interfere with the spontaneous increase in LMA exhibited by photorefractory hamsters after 26 weeks of SD treatment. We propose that DMN is an essential part of the substrate that mediates seasonal decreases in LMA as day length decreases but is not required to sustain decreased SD responsiveness to T or for development of refractoriness to SDs. PMID:25512303

  3. Serrano (sano) functions with the planar cell polarity genes to control tracheal tube length.

    PubMed

    Chung, SeYeon; Vining, Melissa S; Bradley, Pamela L; Chan, Chih-Chiang; Wharton, Keith A; Andrew, Deborah J

    2009-11-01

    Epithelial tubes are the functional units of many organs, and proper tube geometry is crucial for organ function. Here, we characterize serrano (sano), a novel cytoplasmic protein that is apically enriched in several tube-forming epithelia in Drosophila, including the tracheal system. Loss of sano results in elongated tracheae, whereas Sano overexpression causes shortened tracheae with reduced apical boundaries. Sano overexpression during larval and pupal stages causes planar cell polarity (PCP) defects in several adult tissues. In Sano-overexpressing pupal wing cells, core PCP proteins are mislocalized and prehairs are misoriented; sano loss or overexpression in the eye disrupts ommatidial polarity and rotation. Importantly, Sano binds the PCP regulator Dishevelled (Dsh), and loss or ectopic expression of many known PCP proteins in the trachea gives rise to similar defects observed with loss or gain of sano, revealing a previously unrecognized role for PCP pathway components in tube size control.

  4. Photocatalytic Activity and Photocurrent Properties of TiO2 Nanotube Arrays Influenced by Calcination Temperature and Tube Length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Jian; Zhang, Min; Yan, Guotian; Yang, Jianjun

    2012-06-01

    In this article, titanium oxide nanotube arrays (TiO2-NTAs) were fabricated by anodic oxidation in an ethylene glycol (EG) electrolyte solution containing 0.25 wt.% NH4F. By varying anodized time and annealed temperature, the obtained nanotube arrays behaved different photocatalytic (PC) activities and photocurrent properties. These samples were characterized by scanning electronic microscope (SEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). It was indicated in SEM images that TiO2 nanotube manifests highly ordered structure which, however, has been completely destroyed when the temperature comes to 800°C. XRD manifested that TiO2 nanotubes with various kinds of length all possessed anatase crystallite when annealed at 500°C; meanwhile, with certain length, TiO2-NTAs annealed at series calcination temperature range of 300-600°C also presented anatase crystallite, which is gradually enhanced with the increment of temperature. At 700°C, mixed structure was observed which was made up of proportions of overwhelming anatase and toothful rutile. Methyl blue (MB) degradation and photocurrent measurement testified that TiO2-NTAs under 4 h oxidation and 3 h of 600°C calcination manifested the highest activity and photocurrent density.

  5. Viral Evasion of Natural Killer Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yi; Li, Xiaojuan; Kuang, Ersheng

    2016-04-12

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a key role in antiviral innate defenses because of their abilities to kill infected cells and secrete regulatory cytokines. Additionally, NK cells exhibit adaptive memory-like antigen-specific responses, which represent a novel antiviral NK cell defense mechanism. Viruses have evolved various strategies to evade the recognition and destruction by NK cells through the downregulation of the NK cell activating receptors. Here, we review the recent findings on viral evasion of NK cells via the impairment of NK cell-activating receptors and ligands, which provide new insights on the relationship between NK cells and viral actions during persistent viral infections.

  6. Association of murine lupus and thymic full-length endogenous retroviral expression maps to a bone marrow stem cell

    SciTech Connect

    Krieg, A.M.; Gourley, M.F.; Steinberg, A.D. )

    1991-05-01

    Recent studies of thymic gene expression in murine lupus have demonstrated 8.4-kb (full-length size) modified polytropic (Mpmv) endogenous retroviral RNA. In contrast, normal control mouse strains do not produce detectable amounts of such RNA in their thymuses. Prior studies have attributed a defect in experimental tolerance in murine lupus to a bone marrow stem cell rather than to the thymic epithelium; in contrast, infectious retroviral expression has been associated with the thymic epithelium, rather than with the bone marrow stem cell. The present study was designed to determine whether the abnormal Mpmv expression associated with murine lupus mapped to thymic epithelium or to a marrow precursor. Lethally irradiated control and lupus-prone mice were reconstituted with T cell depleted bone marrow; one month later their thymuses were studied for endogenous retroviral RNA and protein expression. Recipients of bone marrow from nonautoimmune donors expressed neither 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA nor surface MCF gp70 in their thymuses. In contrast, recipients of bone marrow from autoimmune NZB or BXSB donors expressed thymic 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA and mink cell focus-forming gp70. These studies demonstrate that lupus-associated 8.4-kb Mpmv endogenous retroviral expression is determined by bone marrow stem cells.

  7. Improved current and power density with a micro-scale microbial fuel cell due to a small characteristic length.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hao; Torres, César I; Parameswaran, Prathap; Rittmann, Bruce E; Chae, Junseok

    2014-11-15

    A microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a bio-electrochemical converter that can extract electricity from biomass by the catabolic reaction of microorganisms. This work demonstrates the impact of a small characteristic length in a Geobacteraceae-enriched, micro-scale microbial fuel cell (MFC) that achieved a high power density. The small characteristic length increased the surface-area-to-volume ratio (SAV) and the mass transfer coefficient. Together, these factors made it possible for the 100-µL MFC to achieve among the highest areal and volumetric power densities - 83 μW/cm(2) and 3300 μW/cm(3), respectively - among all micro-scale MFCs to date. Furthermore, the measured Coulombic efficiency (CE) was at least 79%, which is 2.5-fold greater than the previously reported maximum CE in micro-scale MFCs. The ability to improve these performance metrics may make micro-scale MFCs attractive for supplying power in sub-100 µW applications, especially in remote or hazardous conditions, where conventional powering units are hard to establish.

  8. A strong correlation exists between the distribution of retinal ganglion cells and nose length in the dog.

    PubMed

    McGreevy, Paul; Grassi, Tanya D; Harman, Alison M

    2004-01-01

    The domestic dog, CANIS LUPUS FAMILIARIS, is a subspecies of the gray wolf, CANIS LUPUS, with almost identical mitochondrial DNA. The dog is the most diverse species on earth, with skull length varying between 7 and 28 cm whereas the wolf skull is around 30 cm long. However, eye size in dogs does not appear to vary as much. For example, small dogs such as the chihuahua appear to have very large eyes in proportion to the skull. Our aim was to examine eye size and retinal cell numbers and distribution to determine whether the dog eye exhibits as much variation as the skull. We found a correlation between eye radius and skull dimensions. However, the most surprising finding was that the distribution of ganglion cells in the eye varied tremendously from a horizontally aligned visual streak of fairly even density across the retina (as seen in the wolf) to a strong area centralis with virtually no streak (for example, as observed in a pug from the current series). This variation in ganglion cell density within a single species is quite unique. Intriguingly, the ratio of peak ganglion cell density in the area centralis to visual streak was highly negatively correlated with skull length (r = -0.795, n = 22) and positively correlated with cephalic index (r = 0.687, n = 22). The orientation of eyelid aperture was also correlated with cephalic index (r = 0.648, n = 22). Therefore, the genetic manipulation of selective breeding, which has produced an abnormal shortening of the skull and eyelids with less lateral apertures, has also produced a considerably more pronounced area centralis in the dog.

  9. Physical Fidelity in Particle-In-Cell Modeling of Small Debye-Length Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shadwick, B.A.; Schroeder, C.B.

    2008-08-01

    The connection between macro-particle shape functions and non-physical phase-space"heating" in the particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm is examined. The development of fine-scale phasespace structures starting from a cold initial condition is shown to be related to spatial correlations in the interpolated fields used in the Lorentz force. It is shown that the plasma evolution via the PIC algorithm from a cold initial condition leads to a state that is not consistent with that of a thermal plasma.

  10. Physical Fidelity in Particle-In-Cell Modeling of Small Debye-Length Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shadwick, B. A.; Schroeder, C. B.

    2009-01-22

    The connection between macro-particle shape functions and non-physical phase-space 'heating' in the particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm is examined. The development of fine-scale phase-space structures starting from a cold initial condition is shown to be related to spatial correlations in the interpolated fields used in the Lorentz force. It is shown that the plasma evolution via the PIC algorithm from a cold initial condition leads to a state that is not consistent with that of a thermal plasma.

  11. Full-length mRNA-Seq from single-cell levels of RNA and individual circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Ramsköld, Daniel; Luo, Shujun; Wang, Yu-Chieh; Li, Robin; Deng, Qiaolin; Faridani, Omid R; Daniels, Gregory A; Khrebtukova, Irina; Loring, Jeanne F; Laurent, Louise C; Schroth, Gary P; Sandberg, Rickard

    2012-08-01

    Genome-wide transcriptome analyses are routinely used to monitor tissue-, disease- and cell type–specific gene expression, but it has been technically challenging to generate expression profiles from single cells. Here we describe a robust mRNA-Seq protocol (Smart-Seq) that is applicable down to single cell levels. Compared with existing methods, Smart-Seq has improved read coverage across transcripts, which enhances detailed analyses of alternative transcript isoforms and identification of single-nucleotide polymorphisms. We determined the sensitivity and quantitative accuracy of Smart-Seq for single-cell transcriptomics by evaluating it on total RNA dilution series. We found that although gene expression estimates from single cells have increased noise, hundreds of differentially expressed genes could be identified using few cells per cell type. Applying Smart-Seq to circulating tumor cells from melanomas, we identified distinct gene expression patterns, including candidate biomarkers for melanoma circulating tumor cells. Our protocol will be useful for addressing fundamental biological problems requiring genome-wide transcriptome profiling in rare cells.

  12. Linker length and flexibility induces new cellobiohydrolase activity of PoCel6A from Penicillium oxalicum.

    PubMed

    Gao, Le; Wang, Lushan; Jiang, Xukai; Qu, Yinbo

    2015-06-01

    In a previous study, a novel cellobiohydrolase, PoCel6A, with new enzymatic activity against p-nitrophenyl-β-D-cellobioside (pNPC), was purified from Penicillium oxalicum. The cellulose-binding module and catalytic domain of PoCel6A showed a high degree of sequence similarity with other fungal Cel6As. However, PoCel6A had 11 more amino acids in the linker region than other Cel6As. To evaluate the relationship between the longer linker of PoCel6A and its enzymatic activity, 11 amino acids were deleted from the linker region of PoCel6A. The shortened PoCel6A linker nullified the enzymatic activity against pNPC but dramatically increased the enzyme's capacity for crystalline cellulose degradation. The shortened linker segment appeared to have no effect on the secondary structural conformation of PoCel6A. Another variant (PoCel6A-6pro) with six consecutive proline residues in the interdomain linker had a higher rigid linker, and no enzymatic activity was observed against soluble and insoluble substrate. The flexibility of the linker had an important function in the formation of active cellulase. The length and flexibility of the linker is clearly able to modify the function of PoCel6A and induce new characteristics of Cel6A.

  13. Genomic integration of the full-length dystrophin coding sequence in Duchenne muscular dystrophy induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Farruggio, Alfonso P; Bhakta, Mital S; du Bois, Haley; Ma, Julia; P Calos, Michele

    2017-04-01

    The plasmid vectors that express the full-length human dystrophin coding sequence in human cells was developed. Dystrophin, the protein mutated in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, is extraordinarily large, providing challenges for cloning and plasmid production in Escherichia coli. The authors expressed dystrophin from the strong, widely expressed CAG promoter, along with co-transcribed luciferase and mCherry marker genes useful for tracking plasmid expression. Introns were added at the 3' and 5' ends of the dystrophin sequence to prevent translation in E. coli, resulting in improved plasmid yield. Stability and yield were further improved by employing a lower-copy number plasmid origin of replication. The dystrophin plasmids also carried an attB site recognized by phage phiC31 integrase, enabling the plasmids to be integrated into the human genome at preferred locations by phiC31 integrase. The authors demonstrated single-copy integration of plasmid DNA into the genome and production of human dystrophin in the human 293 cell line, as well as in induced pluripotent stem cells derived from a patient with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Plasmid-mediated dystrophin expression was also demonstrated in mouse muscle. The dystrophin expression plasmids described here will be useful in cell and gene therapy studies aimed at ameliorating Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  14. Data on correlations between T cell subset frequencies and length of partial remission in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Narsale, Aditi; Moya, Rosita; Robertson, Hannah Kathryn; Davies, Joanna Davida

    2016-09-01

    Partial remission in patients newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes is a period of good glucose control that can last from several weeks to over a year. The clinical significance of the remission period is that patients might be more responsive to immunotherapy if treated within this period. This article provides clinical data that indicates the level of glucose control and insulin-secreting β-cell function of each patient in the study at baseline (within 3 months of diagnosis), and at 3, 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24 months post-baseline. The relative frequency of immune cell subsets in the PBMC of each patient and the association between the frequency of immune cell subsets measured and length of remission is also shown. These data support the findings reported in the accompanying publication, "A pilot study showing associations between frequency of CD4+ memory cell subsets at diagnosis and duration of partial remission in type 1 diabetes" (Moya et al., 2016) [1], where a full interpretation, including biological relevance of the study can be found.

  15. The adjuvant activity of fatty acid esters. The role of acyl chain length and degree of saturation.

    PubMed Central

    Bomford, R

    1981-01-01

    Water-in-oil emulsions of metabolizable fatty acid esters, with the non-toxic surfactant Pluronic L122 as emulsifying agent, potentiated the humoral response to bovine serum albumin and staphylococcal toxoid in the mouse. Adjuvant activity was increased by changing the chemical nature of the esters as follows: (i) using a series of ethyl esters, adjuvant activity appeared when the acyl chain length of the fatty acid component was 16 or greater; (ii) isobutyl and isopropyl esters of palmitic acid (C16:0) were superior to ethyl; (iii) the ethyl esters of oleic (C18:1) and linoleic (C18:2) acids were better than stearic (C18:0). Since emulsions prepared with longer chain saturated esters are very viscous or solid at room temperature, and unsaturated esters are chemically reactive, emulsions were prepared with differing proportions of ethyl caprate (C10:0) and butyl stearate. At a ratio of 9:1 the emulsions possessed the low viscosity of ethyl caprate, but gained the adjuvant activity of butyl stearate. 125I-labelled BSA was retained in the footpad to a significantly greater extent than with a caprate emulsion, but reasons are given for believing that slow release of antigen is not the only mechanism of adjuvant activity. The ester emulsions caused more acute but less chronic local inflammation (footpad swelling) than Freund's incomplete adjuvant. PMID:7275184

  16. Activity-based probes for detection of active MALT1 paracaspase in immune cells and lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Eitelhuber, Andrea C; Vosyka, Oliver; Nagel, Daniel; Bognar, Miriam; Lenze, Dido; Lammens, Katja; Schlauderer, Florian; Hlahla, Daniela; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Lenz, Georg; Hummel, Michael; Verhelst, Steven H L; Krappmann, Daniel

    2015-01-22

    MALT1 paracaspase is activated upon antigen receptor stimulation to promote lymphocyte activation. In addition, deregulated MALT1 protease activity drives survival of distinct lymphomas such as the activated B cell type of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (ABC-DLBCL). Here, we designed fluorophore or biotin-coupled activity based-probes (ABP) that covalently modify the active center of MALT1. MALT1-ABPs are exclusively labeling an active modified full length form of MALT1 upon T cell stimulation. Further, despite the CARMA1 requirement for initial MALT1 activation, the MALT1-ABPs show that protease activity is not confined to the high-molecular CARMA1-BCL10-MALT1 (CBM) complex. Using biotin-coupled ABPs, we developed a robust assay for sensitive and selective detection of active MALT1 in cell lines, primary lymphocytes, and DLBCL tumor biopsies. Taken together, MALT1-ABPs represent powerful chemical tools to measure cellular MALT1 activation, determine efficacy of small molecule inhibitors, and classify lymphomas based on MALT1 activity status.

  17. Asbestos fibre length-dependent detachment injury to alveolar epithelial cells in vitro: role of a fibronectin-binding receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, K.; Miller, B. G.; Sara, E.; Slight, J.; Brown, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    A short and a long fibre sample of amosite asbestos were tested for their effects on cells of the human Type 2 alveolar epithelial cell-line A549 in vitro. The long amosite sample was found to cause a rapid detachment of the epithelial cells live from their substratum. At the highest dose, on average 28% of the cells present were detached in this way. Studies on the mechanism of the detachment injury showed that it did not involve oxidants since it was not ameliorated by scavengers of active oxygen species. Neither was the effect reduced by treatment of the fibres with the iron chelator Desferal. Treatments reported to increase the interaction between fibres and cells, serum and poly-L-lysine, did not influence the detachment injury, nor did lung lining fluid. Conversely, the fibronectin tripeptide RGD alone could cause detachment which suggested that a fibronectin-binding integrin was involved. This receptor could be reduced in activity by long fibre exposure, leading to detachment. The detaching effect of fibre could be mimicked by the protein kinase C activator PMA, and so the second messenger system of the cell could also be involved. This type of injury could be important in the pathology associated with exposure to long fibres. PMID:8392859

  18. Partial resistance to malonate-induced striatal cell death in transgenic mouse models of Huntington's disease is dependent on age and CAG repeat length.

    PubMed

    Hansson, O; Castilho, R F; Korhonen, L; Lindholm, D; Bates, G P; Brundin, P

    2001-08-01

    Transgenic Huntington's disease (HD) mice, expressing exon 1 of the HD gene with an expanded CAG repeat, are totally resistant to striatal lesion induced by excessive NMDA receptor activation. We now show that striatal lesions induced by the mitochondrial toxin malonate are reduced by 70-80% in transgenic HD mice compared with wild-type littermate controls. This occurred in 6- and 12-week-old HD mice with 150 CAG repeats (line R6/2) and in 18-week-old, but not 6-week-old, HD mice with 115 CAG repeats (line R6/1). Therefore, we show for the first time that the resistance to neurotoxin in transgenic HD mice is dependent on both the CAG repeat length and the age of the mice. Importantly, most HD patients develop symptoms in adulthood and exhibit an inverse relationship between CAG repeat length and age of onset. Transgenic mice expressing a normal CAG repeat (18 CAG) were not resistant to malonate. Although endogenous glutamate release has been implicated in malonate-induced cell death, glutamate release from striatal synaptosomes was not decreased in HD mice. Malonate-induced striatal cell death was reduced by 50-60% in wild-type mice when they were treated with either the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 or the caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk. These two compounds did not reduce lesion size in transgenic R6/1 mice. This might suggest that NMDA receptor- and caspase-mediated cell death pathways are inhibited and that the limited malonate-induced cell death still occurring in HD mice is independent of these pathways. There were no changes in striatal levels of the two anti cell death proteins Bcl-X(L) and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), before or after the lesion in transgenic HD mice. We propose that mutant huntingtin causes a sublethal grade of metabolic stress which is CAG repeat length-dependent and results in up-regulation over time of cellular defense mechanisms against impaired energy metabolism and excitotoxicity.

  19. Effects of stereochemistry, saturation, and hydrocarbon chain length on the ability of synthetic constrained azacyclic sphingolipids to trigger nutrient transporter down-regulation, vacuolation, and cell death.

    PubMed

    Perryman, Michael S; Tessier, Jérémie; Wiher, Timothy; O'Donoghue, Heather; McCracken, Alison N; Kim, Seong M; Nguyen, Dean G; Simitian, Grigor S; Viana, Matheus; Rafelski, Susanne; Edinger, Aimee L; Hanessian, Stephen

    2016-09-15

    Constrained analogs containing a 2-hydroxymethylpyrrolidine core of the natural sphingolipids sphingosine, sphinganine, N,N-dimethylsphingosine and N-acetyl variants of sphingosine and sphinganine (C2-ceramide and dihydro-C2-ceramide) were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to down-regulate nutrient transporter proteins and trigger cytoplasmic vacuolation in mammalian cells. In cancer cells, the disruptions in intracellular trafficking produced by these sphingolipids lead to cancer cell death by starvation. Structure activity studies were conducted by varying the length of the hydrocarbon chain, the degree of unsaturation and the presence or absence of an aryl moiety on the appended chains, and stereochemistry at two stereogenic centers. In general, cytotoxicity was positively correlated with nutrient transporter down-regulation and vacuolation. This study was intended to identify structural and functional features in lead compounds that best contribute to potency, and to develop chemical biology tools that could be used to isolate the different protein targets responsible for nutrient transporter loss and cytoplasmic vacuolation. A molecule that produces maximal vacuolation and transporter loss is expected to have the maximal anti-cancer activity and would be a lead compound.

  20. The full-length transcript of a caulimovirus is a polycistronic mRNA whose genes are trans activated by the product of gene VI.

    PubMed

    Scholthof, H B; Gowda, S; Wu, F C; Shepherd, R J

    1992-05-01

    Gene expression of figwort mosaic virus (FMV), a caulimovirus, was investigated by electroporation of Nicotiana edwardsonii cell suspension protoplasts with cloned viral constructs in which a reporter gene was inserted at various positions on the genome. The results showed that the genome of FMV contains two promoters; one is used for the production of a full-length RNA and another initiates synthesis of a separate monocistronic RNA for gene VI. Evidence is provided that the full-length transcript, the probable template for reverse transcription, can serve as a polycistronic mRNA for translation of genes I through V and perhaps also gene VI. Expression of all the genes on the polycistronic mRNA is trans activated by the gene VI protein. Reporter gene expression appears most efficient when its start codon is in close proximity to the stop codon of the preceding gene, as for the native genes of caulimoviruses. We propose that the gene VI product enables expression of the polycistronic mRNA by promoting reinitiation of ribosomes to give translational coupling of individual genes.

  1. Telomere length, genetic variants and risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck in Southeast Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yayun; Yu, Chengxiao; Miao, Limin; Wang, Lihua; Xu, Chongquan; Xue, Wenjie; Du, Jiangbo; Yuan, Hua; Dai, Juncheng; Jin, Guangfu; Hu, Zhibin; Ma, Hongxia; Shen, Hongbing

    2016-01-01

    Telomere dysfunction participates in malignant transformation and tumorigenesis. Previous studies have explored the associations between telomere length (TL) and cancer susceptibility; however, the findings are inconclusive. The associations between genetic variants and TL have been verified by quite a few genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Yet, to date, there was no published study on the relationship between TL, related genetic variants and susceptibility to squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) in Chinese. Hence, we detected relative telomere length (RTL) by using quantitative PCR and genotyped seven selected single nucleotide polymorphisms by TaqMan allelic discrimination assay in 510 SCCHN cases and 913 controls in southeast Chinese. The results showed that RTL was significantly associated with SCCHN risk [(adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.08–1.32, P = 0.001]. Furthermore, among seven selected SNPs, only G allele of rs2736100 related to RTL in Caucasians was significantly associated with both the decreased RTL (P = 0.002) and the increased susceptibility to SCCHN in Chinese (additive model: adjusted OR = 1.17, 95%CI = 1.00–1.38, P = 0.049). These findings provide evidence that shortened TL is a risk factor for SCCHN, and genetic variants can contribute to both TL and the susceptibility to SCCHN in southeast Chinese population. PMID:26857734

  2. Controlling T-Cell Activation with Synthetic Dendritic Cells Using the Multivalency Effect

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) have recently gained a lot of attention. They efficiently activate T cells and serve as powerful replacements for dendritic cells in cancer immunotherapy. Focusing on a specific class of polymer-based aAPCs, so-called synthetic dendritic cells (sDCs), we have investigated the importance of multivalent binding on T-cell activation. Using antibody-functionalized sDCs, we have tested the influence of polymer length and antibody density. Increasing the multivalent character of the antibody-functionalized polymer lowered the effective concentration required for T-cell activation. This was evidenced for both early and late stages of activation. The most important effect observed was the significantly prolonged activation of the stimulated T cells, indicating that multivalent sDCs sustain T-cell signaling. Our results highlight the importance of multivalency for the design of aAPCs and will ultimately allow for better mimics of natural dendritic cells that can be used as vaccines in cancer treatment. PMID:28393131

  3. A glycosyltransferase with a length-controlling activity as a mechanism to regulate the size of polysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Ciocchini, Andrés E.; Guidolin, L. Soledad; Casabuono, Adriana C.; Couto, Alicia S.; Iñón de Iannino, Nora; Ugalde, Rodolfo A.

    2007-01-01

    Cyclic β-1,2-glucans (CβG) are osmolyte homopolysaccharides with a cyclic β-1,2-backbone of 17–25 glucose residues present in the periplasmic space of several bacteria. Initiation, elongation, and cyclization, the three distinctive reactions required for building the cyclic structure, are catalyzed by the same protein, the CβG synthase. The initiation activity catalyzes the transference of the first glucose from UDP-glucose to a yet-unidentified amino acid residue in the same protein. Elongation proceeds by the successive addition of glucose residues from UDP-glucose to the nonreducing end of the protein-linked β-1,2-oligosaccharide intermediate. Finally, the protein-linked intermediate is cyclized, and the cyclic glucan is released from the protein. These reactions do not explain, however, the mechanism by which the number of glucose residues in the cyclic structure is controlled. We now report that control of the degree of polymerization (DP) is carried out by a β-1,2-glucan phosphorylase present at the CβG synthase C-terminal domain. This last activity catalyzes the phosphorolysis of the β-1,2-glucosidic bond at the nonreducing end of the linear protein-linked intermediate, releasing glucose 1-phosphate. The DP is thus regulated by this “length-controlling” phosphorylase activity. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a control of the DP of homopolysaccharides. PMID:17921247

  4. Platform technologies for decellularization, tunic-specific cell seeding, and in vitro conditioning of extended length, small diameter vascular grafts.

    PubMed

    Fercana, George; Bowser, Devon; Portilla, Margarita; Langan, Eugene M; Carsten, Christopher G; Cull, David L; Sierad, Leslie N; Simionescu, Dan T

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to generate extended length, small diameter vascular scaffolds that could serve as potential grafts for treatment of acute ischemia. Biological tissues are considered excellent scaffolds, which exhibit adequate biological, mechanical, and handling properties; however, they tend to degenerate, dilate, and calcify after implantation. We hypothesized that chemically stabilized acellular arteries would be ideal scaffolds for development of vascular grafts for peripheral surgery applications. Based on promising historical data from our laboratory and others, we chose to decellularize bovine mammary and femoral arteries and test them as scaffolds for vascular grafting. Decellularization of such long structures required development of a novel "bioprocessing" system and a sequence of detergents and enzymes that generated completely acellular, galactose-(α1,3)-galactose (α-Gal) xenoantigen-free scaffolds with preserved collagen, elastin, and basement membrane components. Acellular arteries exhibited excellent mechanical properties, including burst pressure, suture holding strength, and elastic recoil. To reduce elastin degeneration, we treated the scaffolds with penta-galloyl glucose and then revitalized them in vitro using a tunic-specific cell approach. A novel atraumatic endothelialization protocol using an external stent was also developed for the long grafts and cell-seeded constructs were conditioned in a flow bioreactor. Both decellularization and revitalization are feasible but cell retention in vitro continues to pose challenges. These studies support further efforts toward clinical use of small diameter acellular arteries as vascular grafts.

  5. Long-Term Effects of Radiation Exposure and Metabolic Status on Telomere Length of Peripheral Blood T Cells in Atomic Bomb Survivors.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kengo; Misumi, Munechika; Kubo, Yoshiko; Yamaoka, Mika; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Ohishi, Waka; Hayashi, Tomonori; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    2016-10-01

    In a series of studies of atomic bomb survivors, radiation-dose-dependent alterations in peripheral T-cell populations have been reported. For example, reduced size in naïve T-cell pools and impaired proliferation ability of T cells were observed. Because these alterations are also generally observed with human aging, we hypothesized that radiation exposure may accelerate the aging process of the T-cell immune system. To further test this hypothesis, we conducted cross-sectional analyses of telomere length, a hallmark of cellular aging, of naïve and memory CD4 T cells and total CD8 T cells in the peripheral blood of 620 atomic bomb survivors as it relates to age and radiation dose, using fluorescence in situ hybridization with flow cytometry. Since telomere shortening has been recently demonstrated in obesity-related metabolic abnormalities and diseases, the modifying effects of metabolic status were also examined. Our results indicated nonlinear relationships between T-cell telomere length and prior radiation exposure, i.e., longer telomeres with lower dose exposure and a decreasing trend of telomere length with individuals exposed to doses higher than 0.5 Gy. There were associations between shorter T-cell telomeres and higher hemoglobin Alc levels or fatty liver development. In naïve and memory CD4 T cells, radiation dose and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol were found to positively interact with telomere length, suggesting that the decreasing trend of telomere length from a higher radiation dose was less conspicuous in individuals with a higher HDL cholesterol. It is therefore likely that radiation exposure perturbs T-cell homeostasis involving telomere length maintenance by multiple biological mechanisms, depending on dose, and that long-term-radiation-induced effects on the maintenance of T-cell telomeres may be modified by the subsequent metabolic conditions of individuals.

  6. Muscle activation and blood flow do not explain the muscle length-dependent variation in quadriceps isometric endurance.

    PubMed

    Kooistra, R D; de Ruiter, C J; de Haan, A

    2005-03-01

    We investigated the role of central activation in muscle length-dependent endurance. Central activation ratio (CAR) and rectified surface electromyogram (EMG) were studied during fatigue of isometric contractions of the knee extensors at 30 and 90 degrees knee angles (full extension = 0 degree). Subjects (n = 8) were tested on a custom-built ergometer. Maximal voluntary isometric knee extension with supramaximal superimposed burst stimulation (three 100-mus pulses; 300 Hz) was performed to assess CAR and maximal torque capacity (MTC). Surface EMG signals were obtained from vastus lateralis and rectus femoris muscles. At each angle, intermittent (15 s on 6 s off) isometric exercise at 50% MTC with superimposed stimulation was performed to exhaustion. During the fatigue task, a sphygmomanometer cuff around the upper thigh ensured full occlusion (400 mmHg) of the blood supply to the knee extensors. At least 2 days separated fatigue tests. MTC was not different between knee angles (30 degrees : 229.6 +/- 39.3 N.m vs. 90 degrees: 215.7 +/- 13.2 N.m). Endurance times, however, were significantly longer (P < 0.05) at 30 vs. 90 degrees (87.8 +/- 18.7 vs. 54.9 +/- 12.1 s, respectively) despite the CAR not differing between angles at torque failure (30 degrees: 0.95 +/- 0.05 vs. 90 degrees: 0.96 +/- 0.03) and full occlusion of blood supply to the knee extensors. Furthermore, rectified surface EMG values of the vastus lateralis (normalized to prefatigue maximum) were also similar at torque failure (30 degrees : 56.5 +/- 12.5% vs. 90 degrees : 58.3 +/- 15.2%), whereas rectus femoris EMG activity was lower at 30 degrees (44.3 +/- 12.4%) vs. 90 degrees (69.5 +/- 25.3%). We conclude that differences in endurance at different knee angles do not find their origin in differences in central activation and blood flow but may be a consequence of muscle length-related differences in metabolic cost.

  7. Analysis of the association of peptides of optimal length to class I molecules on the surface of cells.

    PubMed Central

    Rock, K L; Rothstein, L; Benacerraf, B

    1992-01-01

    The association of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules on the surface of cells with synthetic antigenic peptides of eight or nine amino acid residues was examined. Peptides were synthesized that correspond to the antigenic sequences from ovalbumin and influenza nucleoprotein believed to be naturally processed and presented by cells with Kb and Db MHC class I molecules, respectively. Consistent with the results of others, these peptides were 10(3)-10(5) times more active in stimulating specific T cells as compared to peptides of longer sequences. When cells are incubated with these peptides at less than 0.01-0.1 microM, the association of the peptides with class I molecules is dependent on (i) the reassociation of free beta 2-microglobulin from the extracellular fluids, (ii) a process that requires cells to be metabolically active, or (iii) stabilization of class I heterodimers by chemical crosslinking. In contrast, when cells are incubated with these peptides at greater than 0.1-1.0 microM, the peptides associate with class I molecules in the absence of exogenous beta 2-microglobulin, energy, or chemical crosslinking. Antigen competition experiments suggest that the class I molecules that bind peptides offered at high concentration become only transiently receptive to binding peptide. The concentration of peptides required for presentation to T cells under these conditions corresponds to those that stabilize Kb molecules on the surface of RMA-S mutant cells in the absence of exogenous beta 2-microglobulin. These results support the concept that the receptivity of class I molecules on cells is determined by the dissociation of beta 2-microglobulin from MHC class I that lacks bound peptides. PMID:1409586

  8. Mast cells enhance T cell activation: Importance of mast cell-derived TNF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakae, Susumu; Suto, Hajime; Kakurai, Maki; Sedgwick, Jonathon D.; Tsai, Mindy; Galli, Stephen J.

    2005-05-01

    Mast cells are not only important effector cells in immediate hypersensitivity reactions and immune responses to pathogens but also can contribute to T cell-mediated disorders. However, the mechanisms by which mast cells might influence T cells in such settings are not fully understood. We find that mast cells can enhance proliferation and cytokine production in multiple T cell subsets. Mast cell-dependent enhancement of T cell activation can be promoted by FcRI-dependent mast cell activation, TNF production by both mast cells and T cells, and mast cell-T cell contact. However, at high concentrations of cells, mast cells can promote T cell activation independent of IgE or TNF. Finally, mast cells also can promote T cell activation by means of soluble factors. These findings identify multiple mechanisms by which mast cells can influence T cell proliferation and cytokine production. allergy | asthma | autoimmunity | cytokines | immune response

  9. Role of Active Contraction and Tropomodulins in Regulating Actin Filament Length and Sarcomere Structure in Developing Zebrafish Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Mazelet, Lise; Parker, Matthew O.; Li, Mei; Arner, Anders; Ashworth, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Whilst it is recognized that contraction plays an important part in maintaining the structure and function of mature skeletal muscle, its role during development remains undefined. In this study the role of movement in skeletal muscle maturation was investigated in intact zebrafish embryos using a combination of genetic and pharmacological approaches. An immotile mutant line (cacnb1ts25) which lacks functional voltage-gated calcium channels (dihydropyridine receptors) in the muscle and pharmacological immobilization of embryos with a reversible anesthetic (Tricaine), allowed the study of paralysis (in mutants and anesthetized fish) and recovery of movement (reversal of anesthetic treatment). The effect of paralysis in early embryos (aged between 17 and 24 hours post-fertilization, hpf) on skeletal muscle structure at both myofibrillar and myofilament level was determined using both immunostaining with confocal microscopy and small angle X-ray diffraction. The consequences of paralysis and subsequent recovery on the localization of the actin capping proteins Tropomodulin 1 & 4 (Tmod) in fish aged from 17 hpf until 42 hpf was also assessed. The functional consequences of early paralysis were investigated by examining the mechanical properties of the larval muscle. The length-force relationship, active and passive tension, was measured in immotile, recovered and control skeletal muscle at 5 and 7 day post-fertilization (dpf). Recovery of muscle function was also assessed by examining swimming patterns in recovered and control fish. Inhibition of the initial embryonic movements (up to 24 hpf) resulted in an increase in myofibril length and a decrease in width followed by almost complete recovery in both moving and paralyzed fish by 42 hpf. In conclusion, myofibril organization is regulated by a dual mechanism involving movement-dependent and movement-independent processes. The initial contractile event itself drives the localization of Tmod1 to its sarcomeric position

  10. Uniquely identifying cell orientation and sarcomere length in the intact rodent heart with oblique plane remote focussing microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, A. D.; Burton, R. A. B.; Bub, G.; Wilson, T.

    2015-07-01

    In cardiac imaging, the spacing between sub-cellular sarcomere structures is of great importance to physiologists in understanding muscle design and performance. Making accurate measurements of the sarcomere length (SL) presents a significant imaging challenge owing to the size of the SL (~2μm) and its naturally low variability (<6%), requiring a high level of precision to determine subtle changes between heart disease models. Moreover, measurements of SL from traditional two-photon imaging have so far been ambiguous to within a factor of cos(α), where α is the inclination of the tissue with respect to the focal plane. By remotely focussing a customised two-photon microscope, it is possible to image heart cells at two oblique angles within 200ms. The oblique images uniquely resolve the tissue inclination ambiguity and reduce the variance of SL measures by as much as 23%. This improved precision is crucial in discerning between pathological models of chronic hypertension. As well as improving measurement precision, the distribution of α across the field of view provides additional structural information which can be related to disease morphology. To validate this new imaging protocol, the value of α calculated from the oblique planes provided the input to a rigid model cell which was used to predict the appearance of the cell in the conventional focal plane. The comparison of the model to the image data provided a confidence metric for our measurements. Finally, by considering the optical transfer function, the range of cell orientations for which the method is valid could be calculated.

  11. Nuclear cathepsin L activity is required for cell cycle progression of colorectal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tamhane, Tripti; Lllukkumbura, Rukshala; Lu, Shiying; Maelandsmo, Gunhild M; Haugen, Mads H; Brix, Klaudia

    2016-03-01

    Prominent tasks of cysteine cathepsins involve endo-lysosomal proteolysis and turnover of extracellular matrix constituents or plasma membrane proteins for maintenance of intestinal homeostasis. Here we report on enhanced levels and altered subcellular localization of distinct cysteine cathepsins in adenocarcinoma tissue in comparison to adjacent normal colon. Immunofluorescence and immunoblotting investigations revealed the presence of cathepsin L in the nuclear compartment in addition to its expected endo-lysosomal localization in colorectal carcinoma cells. Cathepsin L was represented as the full-length protein in the nuclei of HCT116 cells from which stefin B, a potent cathepsin L inhibitor, was absent. Fluorescence activated cell sorting analyses with synchronized cell cultures revealed deceleration of cell cycle progression of HCT116 cells upon inhibition of cathepsin L activity, while expression of cathepsin L-enhanced green fluorescent protein chimeras accelerated S-phase entry. We conclude that the activity of cathepsin L is high in the nucleus of colorectal carcinoma cells because of lacking stefin B inhibitory activity. Furthermore, we hypothesize that nuclear cathepsin L accelerates cell cycle progression of HCT116 cells thereby supporting the notion that cysteine cathepsins may play significant roles in carcinogenesis due to deregulated trafficking.

  12. Double-stranded microRNA mimics can induce length- and passenger strand-dependent effects in a cell type-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Goldgraben, Mae A; Russell, Roslin; Rueda, Oscar M; Caldas, Carlos; Git, Anna

    2016-02-01

    MicroRNAs are short (17-26) noncoding RNAs driving or modulating physiological and pathological cellular events. Overexpression of miR-155 is pathogenic in B-cell malignancy but was also reported in a number of solid tumors-in particular, in breast cancer, where its role remains unclear and often contradictory. Using representative cell line models, we sought to determine whether the discrepant miR-155 effects in breast cancer could be explained by the heterogeneity of the disease. The growth of six breast cancer cell lines transfected with several miRNA mimics was analyzed. We found MCF-7 cell growth to be inhibited by miR-155 and miR-145 mimics, both 23-nt long, but not by a number of shorter mimics, including a universal commercial negative control. Microarray and Western blot analyses revealed induction of apoptosis, associated with interferon-β after activation of the double-stranded RNA sensor pathway. 3' Trimming of the miRNA mimics to 21 nt substantially reduced their growth-inhibitory potency. Mutating the canonical seed of the miR-155 mimic had no effect on the induced inhibition, which was abolished by mutating the miRNA seed of the artificial passenger strand. A panel of breast cancer cell lines showed a wide range of sensitivities to 23-mer mimics, broadly consistent with the sensitivity of the cell lines to Poly (I:C). We demonstrate two sources for nonspecific in vitro effects by miRNA mimics: duplex length and the artificial passenger strand. We highlight the danger of a universal 21-mer negative control and the importance of using matched seed mutants for reliable interpretation of phenotypes.

  13. Myosin II Activity Softens Cells in Suspension

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chii J.; Ekpenyong, Andrew E.; Golfier, Stefan; Li, Wenhong; Chalut, Kevin J.; Otto, Oliver; Elgeti, Jens; Guck, Jochen; Lautenschläger, Franziska

    2015-01-01

    The cellular cytoskeleton is crucial for many cellular functions such as cell motility and wound healing, as well as other processes that require shape change or force generation. Actin is one cytoskeleton component that regulates cell mechanics. Important properties driving this regulation include the amount of actin, its level of cross-linking, and its coordination with the activity of specific molecular motors like myosin. While studies investigating the contribution of myosin activity to cell mechanics have been performed on cells attached to a substrate, we investigated mechanical properties of cells in suspension. To do this, we used multiple probes for cell mechanics including a microfluidic optical stretcher, a microfluidic microcirculation mimetic, and real-time deformability cytometry. We found that nonadherent blood cells, cells arrested in mitosis, and naturally adherent cells brought into suspension, stiffen and become more solidlike upon myosin inhibition across multiple timescales (milliseconds to minutes). Our results hold across several pharmacological and genetic perturbations targeting myosin. Our findings suggest that myosin II activity contributes to increased whole-cell compliance and fluidity. This finding is contrary to what has been reported for cells attached to a substrate, which stiffen via active myosin driven prestress. Our results establish the importance of myosin II as an active component in modulating suspended cell mechanics, with a functional role distinctly different from that for substrate-adhered cells. PMID:25902426

  14. Active cell mechanics: Measurement and theory.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Wylie W; Fodor, Étienne; Betz, Timo

    2015-11-01

    Living cells are active mechanical systems that are able to generate forces. Their structure and shape are primarily determined by biopolymer filaments and molecular motors that form the cytoskeleton. Active force generation requires constant consumption of energy to maintain the nonequilibrium activity to drive organization and transport processes necessary for their function. To understand this activity it is necessary to develop new approaches to probe the underlying physical processes. Active cell mechanics incorporates active molecular-scale force generation into the traditional framework of mechanics of materials. This review highlights recent experimental and theoretical developments towards understanding active cell mechanics. We focus primarily on intracellular mechanical measurements and theoretical advances utilizing the Langevin framework. These developing approaches allow a quantitative understanding of nonequilibrium mechanical activity in living cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology.

  15. Choreography of MAGUKs during T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Rincón, Mercedes; Davis, Roger J

    2007-02-01

    T cell receptor activation requires the membrane-associated guanylate kinase CARMA1. A new study finds that a second such kinase, Dlgh1, is also required specifically for activation of the alternative p38 kinase pathway.

  16. Potency of Full- Length MGF to Induce Maximal Activation of the IGF-I R Is Similar to Recombinant Human IGF-I at High Equimolar Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Joseph A. M. J. L.; Hofland, Leo J.; Strasburger, Christian J.; van den Dungen, Elisabeth S. R.; Thevis, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Aims To compare full-length mechano growth factor (full-length MGF) with human recombinant insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and human recombinant insulin (HI) in their ability to activate the human IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR), the human insulin receptor (IR-A) and the human insulin receptor-B (IR-B), respectively. In addition, we tested the stimulatory activity of human MGF and its stabilized analog Goldspink-MGF on the IGF-IR. Methods The effects of full-length MGF, IGF-I, human mechano growth factor (MGF), Goldspink-MGF and HI were compared using kinase specific receptor activation (KIRA) bioassays specific for IGF-I, IR-A or IR-B, respectively. These assays quantify activity by measuring auto-phosphorylation of the receptor upon ligand binding. Results IGF-IR: At high equimolar concentrations maximal IGF-IR stimulating effects generated by full-length MGF were similar to that of IGF-I (89-fold vs. 77-fold, respectively). However, EC50 values of IGF-I and full-length MGF for the IGF-I receptor were 0.86 nmol/L (95% CI 0.69–1.07) and 7.83 nmol/L (95% CI: 4.87–12.58), respectively. No IGF-IR activation was observed by human MGF and Goldspink-MGF, respectively. IR-A/IR-B: At high equimolar concentrations similar maximal IR-A stimulating effects were observed for full -length MGF and HI, but maximal IR-B stimulation achieved by full -length MGF was stronger than that by HI (292-fold vs. 98-fold). EC50 values of HI and full-length MGF for the IR-A were 1.13 nmol/L (95% CI 0.69–1.84) and 73.11 nmol/L (42.87–124.69), respectively; for IR-B these values were 1.28 nmol/L (95% CI 0.64–2.57) and 35.10 nmol/L (95% 17.52–70.33), respectively. Conclusions Full-length MGF directly stimulates the IGF-IR. Despite a higher EC50 concentration, at high equimolar concentrations full-length MGF showed a similar maximal potency to activate the IGF-IR as compared to IGF-I. Further research is needed to understand the actions of full-length MGF in vivo and to define the

  17. Structure and Function of the First Full-Length Murein Peptide Ligase (Mpl) Cell Wall Recycling Protein

    PubMed Central

    Das, Debanu; Hervé, Mireille; Feuerhelm, Julie; Farr, Carol L.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Elsliger, Marc-André; Knuth, Mark W.; Klock, Heath E.; Miller, Mitchell D.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Deacon, Ashley M.; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Wilson, Ian A.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial cell walls contain peptidoglycan, an essential polymer made by enzymes in the Mur pathway. These proteins are specific to bacteria, which make them targets for drug discovery. MurC, MurD, MurE and MurF catalyze the synthesis of the peptidoglycan precursor UDP-N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanyl-γ-D-glutamyl-meso-diaminopimelyl-D-alanyl-D-alanine by the sequential addition of amino acids onto UDP-N-acetylmuramic acid (UDP-MurNAc). MurC-F enzymes have been extensively studied by biochemistry and X-ray crystallography. In Gram-negative bacteria, ∼30–60% of the bacterial cell wall is recycled during each generation. Part of this recycling process involves the murein peptide ligase (Mpl), which attaches the breakdown product, the tripeptide L-alanyl-γ-D-glutamyl-meso-diaminopimelate, to UDP-MurNAc. We present the crystal structure at 1.65 Å resolution of a full-length Mpl from the permafrost bacterium Psychrobacter arcticus 273-4 (PaMpl). Although the Mpl structure has similarities to Mur enzymes, it has unique sequence and structure features that are likely related to its role in cell wall recycling, a function that differentiates it from the MurC-F enzymes. We have analyzed the sequence-structure relationships that are unique to Mpl proteins and compared them to MurC-F ligases. We have also characterized the biochemical properties of this enzyme (optimal temperature, pH and magnesium binding profiles and kinetic parameters). Although the structure does not contain any bound substrates, we have identified ∼30 residues that are likely to be important for recognition of the tripeptide and UDP-MurNAc substrates, as well as features that are unique to Psychrobacter Mpl proteins. These results provide the basis for future mutational studies for more extensive function characterization of the Mpl sequence-structure relationships. PMID:21445265

  18. In contrast to agonist monoclonal antibodies, both C-terminal truncated form and full length form of Pleiotrophin failed to activate vertebrate ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase)?

    PubMed

    Mathivet, Thomas; Mazot, Pierre; Vigny, Marc

    2007-12-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase essentially and transiently expressed during development in specific regions of the central and peripheral nervous system. ALK expression persists at a lower level in the adult brain. Thus, it might play an important role in both the normal development and function of the nervous system. The nature of the cognate ligand of this receptor in vertebrates is still a matter of debate. Pleiotrophin and midkine have been proposed as ligands of ALK but several independent studies do not confirm this hypothesis. Interestingly, a recent study proposed that a C-terminal truncated form of Pleiotrophin (Pleiotrophin.15) and not the full length form (Pleiotrophin.18) promotes glioblastoma proliferation in an ALK-dependent fashion. These data were obviously a strong basis to conciliate the conflicting results so far reported in the literature. In the present study, we first purified to homogeneity the two forms of Pleiotrophin secreted by HEK 293 cells. In contrast to agonist monoclonal antibodies, both Pleiotrophin.15 and Pleiotrophin.18 failed to activate ALK in neuroblastoma and glioblastoma cells expressing this receptor. Thus, for our point of view, ALK is still an orphan receptor in vertebrates.

  19. Genetic basis of incidence and period length of circadian rhythm for locomotor activity in populations of a seed beetle.

    PubMed

    Harano, T; Miyatake, T

    2010-09-01

    Circadian rhythms are ubiquitous in a wide variety of organisms, although their genetic variation has been analyzed in only a few species. We found genetic differences in the circadian rhythm of adult locomotor activity among strains of the adzuki bean beetle, Callosobruchus chinensis, which differed in origin and have been maintained in isolation. All beetles in some strains clearly had free-running rhythms in constant darkness whereas most beetles in other strains were arrhythmic. The period of free-running rhythm varied from approximately 19 to 23 h between the strains. F(1) males from reciprocal crosses among strains with different periods of circadian rhythms had circadian periods that were intermediate between their parental strains. Segregation of the circadian rhythm appeared in the F(2) generation. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that variation in the period length of circadian rhythm is explained by a major autosomal gene with additive effects and no dominance. This hypothesis was supported by the joint scaling test for the free-running period in the F(1) and F(2) generations. We discuss possible causes for genetic variation in circadian rhythm in the C. chinensis strains in terms of random factors and selection.

  20. Relationship between the length of cell cycles, cleavage pattern and developmental competence in bovine embryos generated by in vitro fertilization or parthenogenesis.

    PubMed

    Somfai, Tamás; Inaba, Yasushi; Aikawa, Yoshio; Ohtake, Masaki; Kobayashi, Shuji; Konishi, Kazuyuki; Imai, Kei

    2010-04-01

    This study was conducted to study the kinetics of initial cell divisions in relation with the cleavage patterns in viable (with the ability to develop to the blastocyst stage) and non-viable bovine embryos and parthenotes. The kinetics of in vitro development and cleavage patterns were observed by time lapse cinematography. The length of the first and second but not third cell cycle differed significantly between the viable and non-viable embryos after IVF or parthenogenesis. Viable embryos had significantly shorter first and second cell cycles than non-viable ones. The presence of fragments, protrusions and unequally-sized blastomeres was associated with an extended one-cell stage and reduced ability to develop to the blastocyst stage; however, the lengths of the second and third cell cycles were not altered. Oocytes showing direct division from one cell to 3 or 4 blastomeres showed similar developmental ability and embryonic cell numbers to those showing normal division, although, with a high frequency of chromosomal abnormalities. Our results suggest that the differences in the first cell cycles between viable and non-viable embryos were not sperm-related, whereas direct cleavage of 1-cell embryos to 3 or more blastomeres and protrusion formation are related to sperm-driven factors. The length of the first and second cell cycles and the cleavage pattern should be examined simultaneously to predict developmental competence of embryos at early cleavage stages.

  1. Enhanced Ca2+ binding of cardiac troponin reduces sarcomere length dependence of contractile activation independently of strong crossbridges.

    PubMed

    Korte, F Steven; Feest, Erik R; Razumova, Maria V; Tu, An-Yue; Regnier, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Calcium sensitivity of the force-pCa relationship depends strongly on sarcomere length (SL) in cardiac muscle and is considered to be the cellular basis of the Frank-Starling law of the heart. SL dependence may involve changes in myofilament lattice spacing and/or myosin crossbridge orientation to increase probability of binding to actin at longer SLs. We used the L48Q cardiac troponin C (cTnC) variant, which has enhanced Ca(2+) binding affinity, to test the hypotheses that the intrinsic properties of cTnC are important in determining 1) thin filament binding site availability and responsiveness to crossbridge activation and 2) SL dependence of force in cardiac muscle. Trabeculae containing L48Q cTnC-cTn lost SL dependence of the Ca(2+) sensitivity of force. This occurred despite maintaining the typical SL-dependent changes in maximal force (F(max)). Osmotic compression of preparations at SL 2.0 μm with 3% dextran increased F(max) but not pCa(50) in L48Q cTnC-cTn exchanged trabeculae, whereas wild-type (WT)-cTnC-cTn exchanged trabeculae exhibited increases in both F(max) and pCa(50). Furthermore, crossbridge inhibition with 2,3-butanedione monoxime at SL 2.3 μm decreased F(max) and pCa(50) in WT cTnC-cTn trabeculae to levels measured at SL 2.0 μm, whereas only F(max) was decreased with L48Q cTnC-cTn. Overall, these results suggest that L48Q cTnC confers reduced crossbridge dependence of thin filament activation in cardiac muscle and that changes in the Ca(2+) sensitivity of force in response to changes in SL are at least partially dependent on properties of thin filament troponin.

  2. Three determinants in ezrin are responsible for cell extension activity.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, M; Roy, C; Montcourrier, P; Sahuquet, A; Mangeat, P

    1997-01-01

    The ERM proteins--ezrin, radixin, and moesin--are key players in membrane-cytoskeleton interactions. In insect cells infected with recombinant baculoviruses, amino acids 1-115 of ezrin were shown to inhibit an actin- and tubulin-dependent cell-extension activity located in ezrin C-terminal domain (ezrin310-586), whereas full-length ezrin1-586 did not induce any morphological change. To refine the mapping of functional domains of ezrin, 30 additional constructs were overexpressed in Sf9 cells, and the resulting effect of each was qualitatively and semiquantitatively compared. The removal of amino acids 13-30 was sufficient to release a cell-extension phenotype. This effect was abrogated if the 21 distal-most C-terminal amino acids were subsequently deleted (ezrin31-565), confirming the existence of a head-to-tail regulation in the whole molecule. Surprisingly, the deletion in full-length ezrin of the same 21 amino acids provided strong cell-extension competence to ezrin1-565, and this property was recovered in N-terminal constructs as short as ezrin1-310. Within ezrin1-310, amino acid sequences 13-30 and 281-310 were important determinants and acted in cooperation to induce cytoskeleton mobilization. In addition, these same residues are part of a new actin-binding site characterized in vitro in ezrin N-terminal domain. Images PMID:9285824

  3. The functional polymorphism rs73598374:G>A (p.Asp8Asn) of the ADA gene is associated with telomerase activity and leukocyte telomere length.

    PubMed

    Concetti, Fabio; Carpi, Francesco M; Nabissi, Massimo; Picciolini, Matteo; Santoni, Giorgio; Napolioni, Valerio

    2015-02-01

    Recent evidence demonstrated a relevant role of adenosine deaminase (ADA) in replicative senescence of T cells through its capacity to modulate telomerase activity (TA). Herein, we tested the impact of the functional polymorphism ADA rs73598374:G>A (c.22G>A, p.Asp8Asn) on telomere biology, by measuring TA and leukocyte telomere length (LTL) in healthy subjects selected according to rs73598374 genotype. rs73598374-A carriers showed lower TA (P=0.019) and shorter LTL (P=0.003), respectively, compared to G/G carriers. rs73598374-A carriers showed a stronger cross-sectional age reduction of LTL (r=-0.314, P=0.005) compared to G/G carriers (r=-0.243, P=0.022). The reduced ADA activity associated to rs73598374-A variant predisposes those carriers to display higher levels of adenosine compared to G/G carriers. Consequently, it may lead to an accelerated process of replicative senescence, causing a stronger reduction of TA and in turn shorter LTL. In conclusion, the crucial role played by replicative senescence of the immune system in several human diseases and in the aging process underscores the relevance of the present findings and also spurs interest into the possible involvement of rs73598374 in shaping the susceptibility to several age-related diseases.

  4. Measurement of myeloid cell immune suppressive activity.

    PubMed

    Dolcetti, Luigi; Peranzoni, Elisa; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2010-11-01

    This unit presents simple methods to assess the immunosuppressive properties of immunoregulatory cells of myeloid origin, such as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), both in vitro and in vivo. These methods are general and could be adapted to test the impact of different suppressive populations on T cell activation, proliferation, and cytotoxic activity; moreover they could be useful to assess the influence exerted on immune suppressive pathways by genetic modifications, chemical inhibitors, and drugs.

  5. Influence of Linker Length Variations on the Biomass-Degrading Performance of Heat-Active Enzyme Chimeras.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Mazen; Antranikian, Garabed; Elleuche, Skander

    2016-04-01

    Plant cell walls are composed of complex polysaccharides such as cellulose and hemicellulose. In order to efficiently hydrolyze cellulose, the synergistic action of several cellulases is required. Some anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria form multienzyme complexes, namely cellulosomes, while other microorganisms produce a portfolio of diverse enzymes that work in synergistic fashion. Molecular biological methods can mimic such effects through the generation of artificial bi- or multifunctional fusion enzymes. Endoglucanase and β-glucosidase from extremely thermophilic anaerobic bacteria Fervidobacterium gondwanense and Fervidobacterium islandicum, respectively, were fused end-to-end in an approach to optimize polysaccharide degradation. Both enzymes are optimally active at 90 °C and pH 6.0-7.0 representing excellent candidates for fusion experiments. The direct linkage of both enzymes led to an increased activity toward the substrate specific for β-glucosidase, but to a decreased activity of endoglucanase. However, these enzyme chimeras were superior over 1:1 mixtures of individual enzymes, because combined activities resulted in a higher final product yield. Therefore, such fusion enzymes exhibit promising features for application in industrial bioethanol production processes.

  6. Age-related declines in immune response in a wild mammal are unrelated to immune cell telomere length

    PubMed Central

    Waring, Laura; McDonald, Robbie A.; Delahay, Richard; Young, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Senescence has been hypothesized to arise in part from age-related declines in immune performance, but the patterns and drivers of within-individual age-related changes in immunity remain virtually unexplored in natural populations. Here, using a long-term epidemiological study of wild European badgers (Meles meles), we (i) present evidence of a within-individual age-related decline in the response of a key immune-signalling cytokine, interferon-gamma (IFNγ), to ex vivo lymphocyte stimulation, and (ii) investigate three putative drivers of individual variation in the rate of this decline (sex, disease and immune cell telomere length; ICTL). That the within-individual rate of age-related decline markedly exceeded that at the population level suggests that individuals with weaker IFNγ responses are selectively lost from this population. IFNγ responses appeared to decrease with the progression of bovine tuberculosis infection (independent of age) and were weaker among males than females. However, neither sex nor disease influenced the rate of age-related decline in IFNγ response. Similarly, while ICTL also declines with age, variation in ICTL predicted neither among- nor within-individual variation in IFNγ response. Our findings provide evidence of within-individual age-related declines in immune performance in a wild mammal and highlight the likely complexity of the mechanisms that generate them. PMID:26888036

  7. Age-related declines in immune response in a wild mammal are unrelated to immune cell telomere length.

    PubMed

    Beirne, Christopher; Waring, Laura; McDonald, Robbie A; Delahay, Richard; Young, Andrew

    2016-02-24

    Senescence has been hypothesized to arise in part from age-related declines in immune performance, but the patterns and drivers of within-individual age-related changes in immunity remain virtually unexplored in natural populations. Here, using a long-term epidemiological study of wild European badgers (Meles meles), we (i) present evidence of a within-individual age-related decline in the response of a key immune-signalling cytokine, interferon-gamma (IFNγ), to ex vivo lymphocyte stimulation, and (ii) investigate three putative drivers of individual variation in the rate of this decline (sex, disease and immune cell telomere length; ICTL). That the within-individual rate of age-related decline markedly exceeded that at the population level suggests that individuals with weaker IFNγ responses are selectively lost from this population. IFNγ responses appeared to decrease with the progression of bovine tuberculosis infection (independent of age) and were weaker among males than females. However, neither sex nor disease influenced the rate of age-related decline in IFNγ response. Similarly, while ICTL also declines with age, variation in ICTL predicted neither among- nor within-individual variation in IFNγ response. Our findings provide evidence of within-individual age-related declines in immune performance in a wild mammal and highlight the likely complexity of the mechanisms that generate them.

  8. Medium-chain-length poly-3-hydroxyalkanoates-carbon nanotubes composite anode enhances the performance of microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Hindatu, Y; Annuar, M S M; Subramaniam, R; Gumel, A M

    2017-03-25

    Insufficient power generation from a microbial fuel cell (MFC) hampers its progress towards utility-scale development. Electrode modification with biopolymeric materials could potentially address this issue. In this study, medium-chain-length poly-3-hydroxyalkanoates (PHA)/carbon nanotubes (C) composite (CPHA) was successfully applied to modify the surface of carbon cloth (CC) anode in MFC. Characterization of the functional groups on the anodic surface and its morphology was carried out. The CC-CPHA composite anode recorded maximum power density of 254 mW/m(2), which was 15-53% higher than the MFC operated with CC-C (214 mW/m(2)) and pristine CC (119 mW/m(2)) as the anode in a double-chambered MFC operated with Escherichia coli as the biocatalyst. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry showed that power enhancement was attributed to better electron transfer capability by the bacteria for the MFC setup with CC-CPHA anode.

  9. Haplotyping the human T-cell receptor. beta. -chain gene complex by use of restriction fragment length polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Charmley, P.; Chao, A.; Gatti, R.A. ); Concannon, P. ); Hood, L. )

    1990-06-01

    The authors have studied the genetic segregation of human T-cell receptor {beta}-chain (TCR{beta}) genes on chromosome 7q in 40 CEPH (Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain) families by using restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs). They constructed haplotypes from eight RFLPs by using variable- and constant-region cDNA probes, which detect polymorphisms that span more than 600 kilobases of the TCR{beta} gene complex. Analysis of allele distributions between TCR{beta} genes revealed significant linkage disequilibrium between only 6 of the 28 different pairs of RFLPs. This linkage disequilibrium strongly influences the most efficient order to proceed for typing of these RFLPs in order to achieve maximum genetic informativeness, which in this study revealed a 97.3% level of heterozygosity within the TCR{beta} gene complex. The results should provide new insight into recent reports of disease associations with the TCR{beta} gene complex and should assist in designing future experiments to detect or confirm the existence of disease-susceptibility loci in this region of the human genome.

  10. Effect of automated red cell exchanges on oxygen saturation on-air, blood parameters and length of hospitalization in sickle cell disease patients with acute chest syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Aneke, John C.; Huntley, Nancy; Porter, John; Eleftheriou, Perla

    2016-01-01

    Background: Red cell exchanges (RCEs) lead to improvement in tissue oxygenation and reduction in inflammatory markers in sickle cell disease (SCD) patients who present with acute chest syndrome (ACS). The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of automated-RCE (auto-RCE) on oxygen saturation (SpO2) on-air, blood counts, the time to correct the parameters and length of hospitalization after the exchange in SCD patients presenting with ACS. Subjects and Methods: This was 2 years study involving five SCD patients; the time for SpO2 on air to increase to ≥95% and chest symptoms to resolve, postprocedure, as well as the length of in-patient hospitalization was recorded. All data were entered into Statistical Package for Social Sciences Version 20.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) computer software for analyses. Results: The study involved 4 (80%) hemoglobin (Hb) SS and 1 (20%) HbSC patients. The median time of SpO2 recovery was 24 h, ranging from 6 to 96 h. About 60% (3/5) of patients achieved optimal SpO2 within 24 h post-RCE, while discharge from intensive care unit was 24 h after auto-RCE in one patient. The Hb concentration was significantly higher, while the total white cell and absolute neutrophil counts were significantly lower at the time of resolution of symptoms, compared to before auto-RCE (P < 0.05). The average post auto-red cell transfusion symptoms duration was 105.6 (24–240) h while mean inpatient stay was 244.8 (144–456) h. Conclusion: Auto-RCE could reverse hypoxia in ACS within 24 h. PMID:27397962

  11. Combined influence of epoch length, cut-point and bout duration on accelerometry-derived physical activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It is difficult to compare accelerometer-derived estimates of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) between studies due to differences in data processing procedures. We aimed to evaluate the effects of accelerometer processing options on total and bout-accumulated time spent in MVPA in adults. Methods 267 participants from the ProActive Trial provided 1236 days of valid physical activity (PA) data, collected using a 5-s epoch with ActiGraph GT1M accelerometers. We integrated data over 5-s to 60-s epoch lengths (EL) and applied two-level mixed effects regression models to MVPA time, defined using 1500 to 2500 counts/minute (cpm) cut-points (CP) and bout durations (BD) from 1 to 15 min. Results Total MVPA time was lower on longer EL and higher CP (47 vs 26 min/day and 26 vs 5 min/day on 1500 vs 2500 cpm on 5-s and 60-s epoch, respectively); this could be approximated as MVPA = exp[2.197 + 0.279*log(CP) + 6.120*log(EL) - 0.869*log(CP)*log(EL)] with an 800 min/day wear-time. In contrast, EL was positively associated with time spent in bout-accumulated MVPA; the approximating equation being MVPA = exp[54.679 - 6.268*log(CP) + 6.387*log(EL) - 10.000*log(BD) - 0.162*log(EL)*log(BD) - 0.626*log(CP)*log(EL) + 1.033*log(CP)*log(BD)]. BD and CP were inversely associated with MVPA, with higher values attenuating the influence of EL. Conclusions EL, CP and BD interact to influence estimates of accelerometer-determined MVPA. In general, higher CP and longer BD result in lower MVPA but the direction of association for EL depends on BD. Reporting scaling coefficients for these key parameters across their frequently used ranges would facilitate comparisons of population-level accelerometry estimates of MVPA. PMID:24612726

  12. Cloning and recombinant expression of active full-length xylosyltransferase I (XT-I) and characterization of subcellular localization of XT-I and XT-II.

    PubMed

    Schön, Sylvia; Prante, Christian; Bahr, Claudia; Kuhn, Joachim; Kleesiek, Knut; Götting, Christian

    2006-05-19

    Xylosyltransferase I (XT-I) catalyzes the transfer of xylose from UDP-xylose to serine residues in proteoglycan core proteins. This is the first and apparently rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of the tetrasaccharide linkage region in glycosaminoglycan-containing proteoglycans. The XYLT-II gene codes for a highly homologous protein, but its physiological function is not yet known. Here we present for the first time the construction of a vector encoding the full-length GFP-tagged human XT-I and the recombinant expression of the active enzyme in mammalian cells. We expressed XT-I-GFP and various GFP-tagged XT-I and XT-II mutants with C-terminal truncations and deletions in HEK-293 and SaOS-2 cells in order to investigate the intracellular localization of XT-I and XT-II. Immunofluorescence analysis showed a distinct perinuclear pattern of XT-I-GFP and XT-II-GFP similar to that of alpha-mannosidase II, which is a known enzyme of the Golgi cisternae. Furthermore, a co-localization of native human XT-I and alpha-mannosidase II could also be demonstrated in untransfected cells. Using brefeldin A, we could also show that both xylosyltransferases are resident in the early cisternae of the Golgi apparatus. For its complete Golgi retention, XT-I requires the N-terminal 214 amino acids. Unlike XT-I, for XT-II, the first 45 amino acids are sufficient to target and retain the GFP reporter in the Golgi compartment. Here we show evidence that the stem regions were indispensable for Golgi localization of XT-I and XT-II.

  13. The effect of activity-based financing on hospital length of stay for elderly patients suffering from heart diseases in Norway

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Whether activity-based financing of hospitals creates incentives to treat more patients and to reduce the length of each hospital stay is an empirical question that needs investigation. This paper examines how the level of the activity-based component in the financing system of Norwegian hospitals influences the average length of hospital stays for elderly patients suffering from ischemic heart diseases. During the study period, the activity-based component changed several times due to political decisions at the national level. Methods The repeated cross-section data were extracted from the Norwegian Patient Register in the period from 2000 to 2007, and included patients with angina pectoris, congestive heart failure, and myocardial infarction. Data were analysed with a log-linear regression model at the individual level. Results The results show a significant, negative association between the level of activity-based financing and length of hospital stays for elderly patients who were suffering from ischemic heart diseases. The effect is small, but an increase of 10 percentage points in the activity-based component reduced the average length of each hospital stay by 1.28%. Conclusions In a combined financing system such as the one prevailing in Norway, hospitals appear to respond to economic incentives, but the effect of their responses on inpatient cost is relatively meagre. Our results indicate that hospitals still need to discuss guidelines for reducing hospitalisation costs and for increasing hospital activity in terms of number of patients and efficiency. PMID:23651910

  14. Lack of activation of UCP1 in isolated brown adipose tissue mitochondria by glucose-O-ω-modified saturated fatty acids of various chain lengths.

    PubMed

    Breen, Eamon P; Pilgrim, Wayne; Clarke, Kieran J; Yssel, Cristy; Farrell, Mark; Zhou, Jian; Murphy, Paul V; Porter, Richard K

    2013-03-27

    We previously demonstrated that uncoupling protein 1 activity, as measured in isolated brown adipose tissue mitochondria (and as a native protein reconstituted into liposome membranes), was not activated by the non-flippable modified saturated fatty acid, glucose-O-ω-palmitate, whereas activity was stimulated by palmitate alone (40 nM free final concentration). In this study, we investigated whether fatty acid chain length had any bearing on the ability of glucose-O-ω-fatty acids to activate uncoupling protein 1. Glucose-O-ω-saturated fatty acids of various chain lengths were synthesized and tested for their potential to activate GDP-inhibited uncoupling protein 1-dependent oxygen consumption in brown adipose tissue mitochondria, and the results were compared with equivalent non-modified fatty acid controls. Here we demonstrate that laurate (12C), palmitate (16C) and stearate (18C) could activate GDP-inhibited uncoupling protein 1-dependent oxygen consumption in brown adipose tissue mitochondria, whereas there was no activation with glucose-O-ω-laurate (12C), glucose-O-ω-palmitate (16C), glucose-O-ω-stearate (18C), glucose-O-ω-arachidate (20C) or arachidate alone. We conclude that non-flippable fatty acids cannot activate uncoupling protein 1 irrespective of chain length. Our data further undermine the cofactor activation model of uncoupling protein 1 function but are compatible with the model that uncoupling protein 1 functions by flipping long-chain fatty acid anions.

  15. Receptor Dissociation and B-Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianying; Reth, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) is one of the most abundant receptors on the surface of B cells with roughly 100,000-200,000 copies per cell. Signaling through the BCR is crucial for the activation and differentiation of B cells. Unlike other receptors, the BCR can be activated by a large set of structurally different ligands, but the molecular mechanism of BCR activation is still a matter of controversy. Although dominant for a long time, the cross-link model (CLM) of BCR activation is not supported by recent studies of the nanoscale organization of the BCR on the surface of resting B cells. In contrast to the prediction of CLM, the numerous BCR complexes on these cells are not randomly distributed monomers but rather form oligomers which reside within membrane confinements. This finding is more in line with the dissociation activation model (DAM), wherein B-cell activation is accompanied by an opening of the auto-inhibited BCR oligomers instead of a cross-linking of the BCR monomers. In this review, we discuss in detail the new findings and their implications for BCR signaling.

  16. Integration of the full-length HPV16 genome in cervical cancer and Caski and Siha cell lines and the possible ways of HPV integration.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Cao, Meng; Shi, Qinfeng; Chen, Hongwei; Wang, Yili; Li, Xu

    2015-04-01

    Integration of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) into the host genome is a key event for cervical carcinogenesis. Different methods have been used to explore the physical states of the HPV genome to reveal the mechanisms for malignant transformation of the infected cells. Consensus has been reached that, although variable portions of the HPV genome are deleted in the integrated HPV sequences, common disruption of the viral E2 gene has been demonstrated in different studies. The head-to-tail concatemers of the full-length HPV16 genome is another typical integration pattern of HPV16, typically found in Caski cell lines, but its prevalence in cervical cancer has never been tested. Here, by introducing a modified PCR, we identified this head-to-tail concatemers of full-length HPV genomes in advanced cervical cancer with HPV16 single positive. Our results show that more than half of the cases contain this integrated head-to-tail concatemers of full-length HPV16 genomes. Further studies in two cervical cell lines, Caski cells and Siha cells, revealed a correlation between the prevalence of the spliced variants of integrated HPV16 sequences and the full-length transcription of the integrated head-to-tail concatemers of the full-length HPV16 genome. Based on these results, we propose that HPV16 integrated into host cells by two mechanisms: one mechanism is shared by other DNA virus and cause integration of the head-to-tail concatemers of the viral genome; another is related to the reverse transcription process, which the integrated HPV sequence is generated by the reverse transcription of the viral mRNA.

  17. Characterization of the cloned full-length and a truncated human target of rapamycin: Activity, specificity, and enzyme inhibition as studied by a high capacity assay

    SciTech Connect

    Toral-Barza, Lourdes; Zhang Weiguo; Lamison, Craig; LaRocque, James; Gibbons, James; Yu, Ker . E-mail: yuk@wyeth.com

    2005-06-24

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR/TOR) is implicated in cancer and other human disorders and thus an important target for therapeutic intervention. To study human TOR in vitro, we have produced in large scale both the full-length TOR (289 kDa) and a truncated TOR (132 kDa) from HEK293 cells. Both enzymes demonstrated a robust and specific catalytic activity towards the physiological substrate proteins, p70 S6 ribosomal protein kinase 1 (p70S6K1) and eIF4E binding protein 1 (4EBP1), as measured by phosphor-specific antibodies in Western blotting. We developed a high capacity dissociation-enhanced lanthanide fluorescence immunoassay (DELFIA) for analysis of kinetic parameters. The Michaelis constant (K {sub m}) values of TOR for ATP and the His6-S6K substrate were shown to be 50 and 0.8 {mu}M, respectively. Dose-response and inhibition mechanisms of several known inhibitors, the rapamycin-FKBP12 complex, wortmannin and LY294002, were also studied in DELFIA. Our data indicate that TOR exhibits kinetic features of those shared by traditional serine/threonine kinases and demonstrate the feasibility for TOR enzyme screen in searching for new inhibitors.

  18. Three-dimensional 10% cyclic strain reduces bovine aortic endothelial cell angiogenic sprout length and augments tubulogenesis in tubular fibrin hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Gassman, Andrew A; Kuprys, Tomas; Ucuzian, Areck A; Brey, Eric; Matsumura, Akie; Pang, Yonggang; Larson, Jef; Greisler, Howard P

    2011-05-01

    The development of a functional microvasculature is critical to the long-term survival of implanted tissue-engineered constructs. Dynamic culture conditions have been shown to significantly modulate phenotypic characteristics and stimulate proliferation of cells within hydrogel-based tissue engineered blood vessels. Although prior work has described the effects uniaxial or equibiaxial mechanical stimulation has on endothelial cells, no work has outlined effects of three-dimensional mechanical stimulation on endothelial cells within tubular vessel analogues. We demonstrate here that 7 days of 10% cyclic volumetric distension has a deleterious effect on the average length and density of angiogenic sprouts derived from pellets of bovine aortic endothelial cells. Although both groups demonstrated lumen formation, the sprouts grown under dynamic culture conditions typically had wider, less-branching sprout patterns. These results suggest that prolonged mechanical stimulation could represent a cue for angiogenic sprouts to preferentially develop larger lumens over cellular migration and subsequent sprout length.

  19. T cell activation requires force generation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Kenneth H.

    2016-01-01

    Triggering of the T cell receptor (TCR) integrates both binding kinetics and mechanical forces. To understand the contribution of the T cell cytoskeleton to these forces, we triggered T cells using a novel application of atomic force microscopy (AFM). We presented antigenic stimulation using the AFM cantilever while simultaneously imaging with optical microscopy and measuring forces on the cantilever. T cells respond forcefully to antigen after calcium flux. All forces and calcium responses were abrogated upon treatment with an F-actin inhibitor. When we emulated the forces of the T cell using the AFM cantilever, even these actin-inhibited T cells became activated. Purely mechanical stimulation was not sufficient; the exogenous forces had to couple through the TCR. These studies suggest a mechanical–chemical feedback loop in which TCR-triggered T cells generate forceful contacts with antigen-presenting cells to improve access to antigen. PMID:27241914

  20. [Hydrogen ion activity in the cell].

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Z A

    1976-07-01

    Literature data and results of our experiments evidence for a heterogenous hydrogen distribution in cells. Intracellular pH should be regarded as a mean activity of hydrogen ions which is the sum of activities in different phases of a cell. Intracellular pH value does not depend on the transmembrane action potential difference, and is resistant to respiratory and metabolic disorders of acid-base equilibrium in the body. It also slightly changes with changing the electrolyte composition and pH of the medium and is not influenced by metabolic inhibitors. A low hydrogen activity in the cell has a certain functional significance. The pH stability is ensured by a number of regulatory mechanism: the buffer properties of the protoplasm itself, and the active hydrogen transport into the medium. Hydrogen released from cells is supposed to be connected with functioning of a specific respiratory chain of superficial protoplasmic membranes.

  1. Intestinal cell kinase, a protein associated with endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia syndrome, is a key regulator of cilia length and Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Moon, Heejung; Song, Jieun; Shin, Jeong-Oh; Lee, Hankyu; Kim, Hong-Kyung; Eggenschwiller, Jonathan T; Bok, Jinwoong; Ko, Hyuk Wan

    2014-06-10

    Endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia (ECO) syndrome is a recessive genetic disorder associated with multiple congenital defects in endocrine, cerebral, and skeletal systems that is caused by a missense mutation in the mitogen-activated protein kinase-like intestinal cell kinase (ICK) gene. In algae and invertebrates, ICK homologs are involved in flagellar formation and ciliogenesis, respectively. However, it is not clear whether this role of ICK is conserved in mammals and how a lack of functional ICK results in the characteristic phenotypes of human ECO syndrome. Here, we generated Ick knockout mice to elucidate the precise role of ICK in mammalian development and to examine the pathological mechanisms of ECO syndrome. Ick null mouse embryos displayed cleft palate, hydrocephalus, polydactyly, and delayed skeletal development, closely resembling ECO syndrome phenotypes. In cultured cells, down-regulation of Ick or overexpression of kinase-dead or ECO syndrome mutant ICK resulted in an elongation of primary cilia and abnormal Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling. Wild-type ICK proteins were generally localized in the proximal region of cilia near the basal bodies, whereas kinase-dead ICK mutant proteins accumulated in the distal part of bulged ciliary tips. Consistent with these observations in cultured cells, Ick knockout mouse embryos displayed elongated cilia and reduced Shh signaling during limb digit patterning. Taken together, these results indicate that ICK plays a crucial role in controlling ciliary length and that ciliary defects caused by a lack of functional ICK leads to abnormal Shh signaling, resulting in congenital disorders such as ECO syndrome.

  2. Kinetic discrimination in T-cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Rabinowitz, J D; Beeson, C; Lyons, D S; Davis, M M; McConnell, H M

    1996-01-01

    We propose a quantitative model for T-cell activation in which the rate of dissociation of ligand from T-cell receptors determines the agonist and antagonist properties of the ligand. The ligands are molecular complexes between antigenic peptides and proteins of the major histocompatibility complex on the surfaces of antigen-presenting cells. Binding of ligand to receptor triggers a series of biochemical reactions in the T cell. If the ligand dissociates after these reactions are complete, the T cell receives a positive activation signal. However, dissociation of ligand after completion of the first reaction but prior to generation of the final products results in partial T-cell activation, which acts to suppress a positive response. Such a negative signal is brought about by T-cell ligands containing the variants of antigenic peptides referred to as T-cell receptor antagonists. Results of recent experiments with altered peptide ligands compare favorably with T-cell responses predicted by this model. PMID:8643643

  3. Changes in nucleosome repeat lengths precede replication in the early replicating metallothionein II gene region of cells synchronized in early S phase

    SciTech Connect

    D'Anna, J.A.; Tobey, R.A. )

    1989-04-04

    Previous investigations showed that inhibition of DNA synthesis by hydroxyurea, aphidicolin, or 5-fluorodeoxyuridine produced large changes in the composition and nucleosome repeat lengths of bulk chromatin. There the authors report results of investigations to determine whether the changes in nucleosome repeat lengths might be localized in the initiated replicons, as postulated. In most experiments, Chinese hamster (line CHO) cells were synchronized in G1, or they were synchronized in early S phase by allowing G1 cells to enter S phase in medium containing 1 mM hydroxyurea or 5 {mu}g mL{sup {minus}1} aphidicolin, a procedure believed to produce an accumulation of initiated replicons that arise from normally early replicating DNA. Measurements of nucleosome repeat lengths of bulk chromatin, the early replicating unexpressed metallothionein II (MTII) gene region, and a later replicating repeated sequence indicate that the changes in repeat lengths occur preferentially in the early replicating MTII gene region as G1 cells enter and become synchronized in early S phase. During that time, the MTII gene region is not replicated nor is there any evidence for induction of MTII messenger RNA. Thus, the results are consistent with the hypothesis that changes in chromatin structure occur preferentially in the early replicating (presumably initiated) replicons at initiation or that changes in chromatin structure can precede replication during inhibition of DNA synthesis. The shortened repeat lengths that precede MTII replication are, potentially, reversible, because they become elongated when the synchronized early S-phase cells are released to resume cell cycle progression.

  4. DNA-directed alkylating agents. 3. Structure-activity relationships for acridine-linked aniline mustards: consequences of varying the length of the linker chain.

    PubMed

    Valu, K K; Gourdie, T A; Boritzki, T J; Gravatt, G L; Baguley, B C; Wilson, W R; Wakelin, L P; Woodgate, P D; Denny, W A

    1990-11-01

    Four series of acridine-linked aniline mustards have been prepared and evaluated for in vitro cytotoxicity, in vivo antitumor activity, and DNA cross-linking ability. The anilines were attached to the DNA-intercalating acridine chromophores by link groups (-O-, -CH2-, -S-, and -SO2-) of widely varying electronic properties, providing four series of widely differing mustard reactivity where the alkyl chain linking the acridine and mustard moieties was varied from two to five carbons. Relationships were sought between chain length and biological properties. Within each series, increasing the chain length did not alter the reactivity of the alkylating moiety but did appear to position it differently on the DNA, since cross-linking ability (measured by agarose gel assay) altered with chain length, being maximal with the C4 analogue. The in vivo antitumor activities of the compounds depended to some extent on the reactivity of the mustard, with the least reactive SO2 compounds being inactive. However, DNA-targeting did appear to allow the use of less reactive mustards, since the S-linked acridine mustards showed significant activity whereas the parent S-mustard did not. Within each active series, the most active compound was the C4 homologue, suggesting some relationship between activity and extent of DNA alkylation.

  5. Activated Membrane Patches Guide Chemotactic Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, Inbal; Skoge, Monica L.; Charest, Pascale G.; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Firtel, Richard A.; Loomis, William F.; Levine, Herbert; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2011-01-01

    Many eukaryotic cells are able to crawl on surfaces and guide their motility based on environmental cues. These cues are interpreted by signaling systems which couple to cell mechanics; indeed membrane protrusions in crawling cells are often accompanied by activated membrane patches, which are localized areas of increased concentration of one or more signaling components. To determine how these patches are related to cell motion, we examine the spatial localization of RasGTP in chemotaxing Dictyostelium discoideum cells under conditions where the vertical extent of the cell was restricted. Quantitative analyses of the data reveal a high degree of spatial correlation between patches of activated Ras and membrane protrusions. Based on these findings, we formulate a model for amoeboid cell motion that consists of two coupled modules. The first module utilizes a recently developed two-component reaction diffusion model that generates transient and localized areas of elevated concentration of one of the components along the membrane. The activated patches determine the location of membrane protrusions (and overall cell motion) that are computed in the second module, which also takes into account the cortical tension and the availability of protrusion resources. We show that our model is able to produce realistic amoeboid-like motion and that our numerical results are consistent with experimentally observed pseudopod dynamics. Specifically, we show that the commonly observed splitting of pseudopods can result directly from the dynamics of the signaling patches. PMID:21738453

  6. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Adverse Childhood Events, and Buccal Cell Telomere Length in Elderly Swiss Former Indentured Child Laborers.

    PubMed

    Küffer, Andreas Lorenz; O'Donovan, Aoife; Burri, Andrea; Maercker, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with increased risk for age-related diseases and early mortality. Accelerated biological aging could contribute to this elevated risk. The aim of the present study was to assess buccal cell telomere length (BTL) - a proposed marker of biological age - in men and women with and without PTSD. The role of childhood trauma was assessed as a potential additional risk factor for shorter telomere length. The sample included 62 former indentured Swiss child laborers (age: M = 76.19, SD = 6.18) and 58 healthy controls (age: M = 71.85, SD = 5.97). Structured clinical interviews were conducted to screen for PTSD and other psychiatric disorders. The Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) was used to assess childhood trauma exposure. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to measure BTL. Covariates include age, sex, years of education, self-evaluated financial situation, depression, and mental and physical functioning. Forty-eight (77.42%) of the former indentured child laborers screened positive for childhood trauma, and 21 (33.87%) had partial or full-blown PTSD. Results did not support our hypotheses that PTSD and childhood trauma would be associated with shorter BTL. In fact, results revealed a trend toward longer BTL in participants with partial or full PTSD [F(2,109) = 3.27, p = 0.04, η(2) = 0.06], and longer BTL was marginally associated with higher CTQ scores (age adjusted: β = 0.17 [95% CI: -0.01 to 0.35], t = 1.90, p = 0.06). Furthermore, within-group analyses indicated no significant association between BTL and CTQ scores. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study exploring the association between childhood trauma and BTL in older individuals with and without PTSD. Contrary to predictions, there were no significant differences in BTL between participants with and without PTSD in our adjusted analyses, and childhood adversity was not associated with BTL

  7. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Adverse Childhood Events, and Buccal Cell Telomere Length in Elderly Swiss Former Indentured Child Laborers

    PubMed Central

    Küffer, Andreas Lorenz; O’Donovan, Aoife; Burri, Andrea; Maercker, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with increased risk for age-related diseases and early mortality. Accelerated biological aging could contribute to this elevated risk. The aim of the present study was to assess buccal cell telomere length (BTL) – a proposed marker of biological age – in men and women with and without PTSD. The role of childhood trauma was assessed as a potential additional risk factor for shorter telomere length. The sample included 62 former indentured Swiss child laborers (age: M = 76.19, SD = 6.18) and 58 healthy controls (age: M = 71.85, SD = 5.97). Structured clinical interviews were conducted to screen for PTSD and other psychiatric disorders. The Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) was used to assess childhood trauma exposure. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to measure BTL. Covariates include age, sex, years of education, self-evaluated financial situation, depression, and mental and physical functioning. Forty-eight (77.42%) of the former indentured child laborers screened positive for childhood trauma, and 21 (33.87%) had partial or full-blown PTSD. Results did not support our hypotheses that PTSD and childhood trauma would be associated with shorter BTL. In fact, results revealed a trend toward longer BTL in participants with partial or full PTSD [F(2,109) = 3.27, p = 0.04, η2 = 0.06], and longer BTL was marginally associated with higher CTQ scores (age adjusted: β = 0.17 [95% CI: −0.01 to 0.35], t = 1.90, p = 0.06). Furthermore, within-group analyses indicated no significant association between BTL and CTQ scores. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study exploring the association between childhood trauma and BTL in older individuals with and without PTSD. Contrary to predictions, there were no significant differences in BTL between participants with and without PTSD in our adjusted analyses, and childhood adversity was not associated with

  8. Bursts of activity in collective cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Chepizhko, Oleksandr; Giampietro, Costanza; Mastrapasqua, Eleonora; Nourazar, Mehdi; Ascagni, Miriam; Sugni, Michela; Fascio, Umberto; Leggio, Livio; Malinverno, Chiara; Scita, Giorgio; Santucci, Stéphane; Alava, Mikko J.; Zapperi, Stefano; La Porta, Caterina A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Dense monolayers of living cells display intriguing relaxation dynamics, reminiscent of soft and glassy materials close to the jamming transition, and migrate collectively when space is available, as in wound healing or in cancer invasion. Here we show that collective cell migration occurs in bursts that are similar to those recorded in the propagation of cracks, fluid fronts in porous media, and ferromagnetic domain walls. In analogy with these systems, the distribution of activity bursts displays scaling laws that are universal in different cell types and for cells moving on different substrates. The main features of the invasion dynamics are quantitatively captured by a model of interacting active particles moving in a disordered landscape. Our results illustrate that collective motion of living cells is analogous to the corresponding dynamics in driven, but inanimate, systems. PMID:27681632

  9. Effect of polyethyleneglycol (PEG) chain length on the bio-nano-interactions between PEGylated lipid nanoparticles and biological fluids: from nanostructure to uptake in cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzi, Daniela; Colapicchioni, Valentina; Caracciolo, Giulio; Piovesana, Susy; Capriotti, Anna Laura; Palchetti, Sara; de Grossi, Stefania; Riccioli, Anna; Amenitsch, Heinz; Laganà, Aldo

    2014-02-01

    When nanoparticles (NPs) enter a physiological environment, medium components compete for binding to the NP surface leading to formation of a rich protein shell known as the ``protein corona''. Unfortunately, opsonins are also adsorbed. These proteins are immediately recognized by the phagocyte system with rapid clearance of the NPs from the bloodstream. Polyethyleneglycol (PEG) coating of NPs (PEGylation) is the most efficient anti-opsonization strategy. Linear chains of PEG, grafted onto the NP surface, are able to create steric hindrance, resulting in a significant inhibition of protein adsorption and less recognition by macrophages. However, excessive PEGylation can lead to a strong inhibition of cellular uptake and less efficient binding with protein targets, reducing the potential of the delivery system. To reach a compromise in this regard we employed a multi-component (MC) lipid system with uncommon properties of cell uptake and endosomal escape and increasing length of PEG chains. Nano liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (nanoLC-MS/MS) analysis allowed us to accurately determine the corona composition showing that apolipoproteins are the most abundant class in the corona and that increasing the PEG length reduced the protein adsorption and the liposomal surface affinity for apolipoproteins. Due to the abundance of apolipoproteins, we exploited the ``protein corona effect'' to deliver cationic liposome-human plasma complexes to human prostate cancer PC3 cells that express a high level of scavenger receptor class B type 1 in order to evaluate the cellular uptake efficiency of the systems used. Combining laser scanning confocal microscopy with flow cytometry analysis in PC3 cells we demonstrated that MC-PEG2k is the best compromise between an anti-opsonization strategy and active targeting and could be a promising candidate to treat prostate cancer in vivo.When nanoparticles (NPs) enter a physiological environment, medium components

  10. The influence of active cell design on a monolithic organic photovoltaic module: fabrication and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Hong-Kun; Sim, Jun Hyoung; Jeong, Seonju; Woo, Sung-Ho; Shin, Jang-Kyoo; Han, Yoon Soo

    2011-09-01

    In this study, the influence of an active cell design on the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of a monolithic organic photovoltaic (OPV) module was investigated using experimental methods and circuit simulation. For circuit simulation using computer simulation-based study, the organic PV cell was described by a circuit-based two-diode model and the modules were simulated under several conditions including shading effect, diode model parameters, series resistance and shunt resistance, etc. A unit organic PV cell as a reference device and four types of monolithic organic PV modules with different active cell length were fabricated together on the same glass substrate. The characteristics of the fabricated unit OPV cell were measured and the electrical parameters were extracted to use them for the simulation of four types of monolithic organic PV modules. To analyze the influence of OPV cell design on the PCE of monolithic organic PV modules, the current-voltage (I-V) characteristic curves and the PCEs of the four type monolithic OPV modules with different active cell length were obtained and compared with the simulated results. The simulated I-V curves were matched well with the measured I-V curves for the four types of monolithic organic PV modules with different active cell length. The highest PCE of the monolithic OPV module was 2.86 % with the active cell length of 11.6 mm. We expect that this work is meaningful to enhance the performance of a monolithic OPV module to a certain extent and it offers a method to design a high-efficiency large-area monolithic OPV module.

  11. Structural evolution triggers a dynamic reduction in active glacier length during rapid retreat: Evidence from Falljökull, SE Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Emrys; Finlayson, Andrew; Bradwell, Tom; Everest, Jez; Jones, Lee

    2014-10-01

    Over the past two decades Iceland's glaciers have been undergoing a phase of accelerated retreat set against a backdrop of warmer summers and milder winters. This paper demonstrates how the dynamics of a steep outlet glacier in maritime SE Iceland have changed as it adjusts to recent significant changes in mass balance. Geomorphological evidence from Falljökull, a high-mass turnover temperate glacier, clearly shows that between 1990 and 2004 the ice front was undergoing active retreat resulting in seasonal oscillations of its margin. However, in 2004-2006 this glacier crossed an important dynamic threshold and effectively reduced its active length by abandoning its lower reaches to passive retreat processes. A combination of ice surface structural measurements with radar, lidar, and differential Global Navigation Satellite Systems data are used to show that the upper active section of Falljökull is still flowing forward but has become detached from and is being thrust over its stagnant lower section. The reduction in the active length of Falljökull over the last several years has allowed it to rapidly reequilibrate to regional snowline rise in SE Iceland over the past two decades. It is possible that other steep, mountain glaciers around the world may respond in a similar way to significant changes in their mass balance, rapidly adjusting their active length in response to recent atmospheric warming.

  12. Multispectral reflectance imaging of brain activation in rodents: methodological study of the differential path length estimations and first in vivo recordings in the rat olfactory bulb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaud, Rémi; Martin, Claire; Gurden, Hirac; Pain, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic maps of relative changes in blood volume and oxygenation following brain activation are obtained using multispectral reflectance imaging. The technique relies on optical absorption modifications linked to hemodynamic changes. The relative variation of hemodynamic parameters can be quantified using the modified Beer-Lambert Law if changes in reflected light intensities are recorded at two wavelengths or more and the differential path length (DP) is known. The DP is the mean path length in tissues of backscattered photons and varies with wavelength. It is usually estimated using Monte Carlo simulations in simplified semi-infinite homogeneous geometries. Here we consider the use of multilayered models of the somatosensory cortex (SsC) and olfactory bulb (OB), which are common physiological models of brain activation. Simulations demonstrate that specific DP estimation is required for SsC and OB, specifically for wavelengths above 600 nm. They validate the hypothesis of a constant path length during activation and show the need for specific DP if imaging is performed in a thinned-skull preparation. The first multispectral reflectance imaging data recorded in vivo during OB activation are presented, and the influence of DP on the hemodynamic parameters and the pattern of oxymetric changes in the activated OB are discussed.

  13. Enhancement of the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 through spatial structuring and particle size control: from subnanometric to submillimetric length scale.

    PubMed

    Aprile, Carmela; Corma, Avelino; Garcia, Hermenegildo

    2008-02-14

    This review summarizes the physical approaches towards enhancement of the photocatalytic activity of titanium dioxide by controlling this semiconductor in a certain length scale from subnanometric to submillimetric distances and provides examples in which the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 is not promoted by doping or changes in the chemical composition, but rather by application of physical concepts and spatial structuring of the semiconductor. Thus, encapsulation inside the micropores and cavities of zeolites (about 1 nm) renders small titanium oxide clusters with harnessed photocatalytic activity. On the other hand, nanometric titanium particles can be ordered forming structured periodic mesoporous materials with high specific surface area and well defined porosity. Titiania nanotubes of micrometric length, either independent or forming a membrane, also exhibit unique photocatalytic activity as consequence of the long diffusion length of charge carriers along the nanotube axis. Finally, photonic crystals with an inverse opal structure and the even more powerful concept of photonic sponges can serve to slow down visible light photons inside the material, increasing the effective optical path in such a way that light absorption near the absorption onset of the material is enhanced considerably. All these physical-based approaches have shown their potential in enhancing the photocatalytic activity of titania, paving the way for a new generation of novel structured photocatalysts in which physical and chemical concepts are combined.

  14. Body length rather than routine metabolic rate and body condition correlates with activity and risk-taking in juvenile zebrafish Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Polverino, G; Bierbach, D; Killen, S S; Uusi-Heikkilä, S; Arlinghaus, R

    2016-11-01

    In this study, the following hypotheses were explored using zebrafish Danio rerio: (1) individuals from the same cohort differ consistently in activity and risk-taking and (2) variation in activity and risk-taking is linked to individual differences in metabolic rate, body length and body condition. To examine these hypotheses, juvenile D. rerio were tested for routine metabolic rate and subsequently exposed to an open field test. Strong evidence was found for consistent among-individual differences in activity and risk-taking, which were overall negatively correlated with body length, i.e. larger D. rerio were found to be less active in a potentially dangerous open field and a similar trend was found with respect to a more direct measure of their risk-taking tendency. In contrast, routine metabolic rate and body condition were uncorrelated with both activity and risk-taking of juvenile D. rerio. These findings suggest that body length is associated with risk-related behaviours in juvenile D. rerio for which larger, rather than smaller, individuals may have a higher risk of predation, while the role for routine metabolic rate is relatively limited or non-existent, at least under the conditions of the present study.

  15. Metabolic activity is necessary for activation of T suppressor cells by B cells

    SciTech Connect

    Elkins, K.L.; Stashak, P.W.; Baker, P.J. )

    1990-04-15

    Ag-primed B cells must express cell-surface IgM, but not IgD or Ia Ag, and must remain metabolically active, in order to activate suppressor T cells (Ts) specific for type III pneumococcal polysaccharide. Ag-primed B cells that were gamma-irradiated with 1000r, or less, retained the ability to activate Ts; however, Ag-primed B cells exposed to UV light were not able to do so. gamma-Irradiated and UV-treated Ag-primed B cells both expressed comparable levels of cell-surface IgM, and both localized to the spleen after in vivo transfer; neither could proliferate in vitro in response to mitogens. By contrast, gamma-irradiated primed B cells were still able to synthesize proteins, whereas UV-treated primed B cells could not. These findings suggest that in order for Ag-primed B cells to activate Ts, they must (a) express cell-associated IgM (sIgM) antibody bearing the idiotypic determinants of antibody specific for type III pneumococcal polysaccharide, and (b) be able to synthesize protein for either the continued expression of sIgM after cell transfer, or for the elaboration of another protein molecule that is also required for the activation of Ts; this molecule does not appear to be Ia Ag.

  16. Density and length of stomatal and epidermal cells in "living fossil" trees grown under elevated CO 2 and a polar light regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogaya, R.; Llorens, L.; Peñuelas, J.

    2011-07-01

    During the Cretaceous and early Tertiary, when the climate was warm and the atmospheric CO 2 concentration ([CO 2]) was at least double that of the present-day, polar forests populated high latitude landmasses. We investigated the density and length of stomata and other epidermal cells of two deciduous and three evergreen "living fossil" tree species representative of these ancient forests. These tree species were grown in a simulated Cretaceous high latitude environment at either ambient (400 ppmv) or elevated (800 ppmv) [CO 2] during four years. After 4 years growing at elevated [CO 2], the leaf stomatal density and index (percentage of leaf epidermal cells that are stomata) of these plants were similar to those of their counterparts growing at ambient [CO 2]. While the CO 2 enrichment only modified the stomatal pore length in two of the five studied species, it increased significantly the overall length of the epidermal cells of all the species, reducing their density. These results revealed that leaf epidermal cells of these "living fossil" species were more sensitive than stomata to an experimental doubling of atmospheric CO 2 concentration.

  17. Effects of chronic treatment with the eNOS stimulator Impaza on penis length and sexual behaviors in rats with a high baseline of sexual activity.

    PubMed

    Chu, X; Zhavbert, E S; Dugina, J L; Kheyfets, I A; Sergeeva, S A; Epstein, O I; Agmo, A

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) has an important role in erection, and it also affects aspects of sexual behavior. In this experiment, we determined whether a compound enhancing the activity of eNOS, Impaza, could stimulate any aspect of sexual behavior and increase penis length in rats with a high baseline of sexual activity. For comparison, the PDE5 inhibitor sildenafil was included. Male rats were orally treated with Impaza or sildenafil for 28 days. Impaza (3 ml kg(-1)) was given daily while sildenafil (3 mg kg(-1)) was given twice weekly. Tests for sexual incentive motivation and copulatory behavior were performed just before drug treatment and at days 7, 14 and 28 of treatment. In addition, the length of the protruding penis at mount, intromission and ejaculation was measured. Impaza but not sildenafil increased penis length at mount after 14 and 28 days of treatment. The compounds failed to modify sexual incentive motivation or copulatory behavior. It is suggested that Impaza enhanced intracavernous pressure, as such a pressure increase is the most likely explanation for enhanced penis length at mount. This effect, together with an absence of motivational actions, suggests that Impaza may be the most valuable treatment for erectile dysfunction.

  18. Effect of cation type, alkyl chain length, adsorbate size on adsorption kinetics and isotherms of bromide ionic liquids from aqueous solutions onto microporous fabric and granulated activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Safia; Duclaux, Laurent; Lévêque, Jean-Marc; Reinert, Laurence; Farooq, Amjad; Yasin, Tariq

    2014-11-01

    The adsorption from aqueous solution of imidazolium, pyrrolidinium and pyridinium based bromide ionic liquids (ILs) having different alkyl chain lengths was investigated on two types of microporous activated carbons: a fabric and a granulated one, well characterized in terms of surface chemistry by "Boehm" titrations and pH of point of zero charge measurements and of porosity by N2 adsorption at 77 K and CO2 adsorption at 273 K. The influence of cation type, alkyl chain length and adsorbate size on the adsorption properties was analyzed by studying kinetics and isotherms of eight different ILs using conductivity measurements. Equilibrium studies were carried out at different temperatures in the range [25-55 °C]. The incorporation of ILs on the AC porosity was studied by N2 adsorption-desorption measurements at 77 K. The experimental adsorption isotherms data showed a good correlation with the Langmuir model. Thermodynamic studies indicated that the adsorption of ILs onto activated carbons was an exothermic process, and that the removal efficiency increased with increase in alkyl chain length, due to the increase in hydrophobicity of long chain ILs cations determined with the evolution of the calculated octanol-water constant (Kow). The negative values of free energies indicated that adsorption of ILs with long chain lengths having hydrophobic cations was more spontaneous at the investigated temperatures.

  19. Investigating the role of chain and linker length on the catalytic activity of an H 2 production catalyst containing a β-hairpin peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Reback, Matthew L.; Ginovska, Bojana; Buchko, Garry W.; Dutta, Arnab; Priyadarshani, Nilusha; Kier, Brandon L.; Helm, Monte L.; Raugei, Simone; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2016-06-02

    Building on our recent report of an active H2 production catalyst [Ni(PPh2NProp-peptide)2]2+ (Prop=para-phenylpropionic acid, peptide (R10)=WIpPRWTGPR-NH2, p=D-proline, and P2N=1-aza-3,6-diphosphacycloheptane) that contains structured -hairpin peptides, here we investigate how H2 production is effected by: (1) the length of the hairpin (eight or ten residues) and (2) limiting the flexibility between the peptide and the core complex by altering the length of the linker: para-phenylpropionic acid (three carbons) or para-benzoic acid (one carbon). Reduction of the peptide chain length from ten to eight residues increases or maintains the catalytic current for H2 production for all complexes, suggesting a non-productive steric interaction at longer peptide lengths. While the structure of the hairpin appears largely intact for the complexes, NMR data are consistent with differences in dynamic behavior which may contribute to the observed differences in catalytic activity. Molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that complexes with a one-carbon linker have the desired effect of restricting the motion of the hairpin relative to the complex; however, the catalytic currents are significantly reduced compared to complexes containing a three-carbon linker as a result of the electron withdrawing nature of the -COOH group. These results demonstrate the complexity and interrelated nature of the outer coordination sphere on catalysis.

  20. Immunomodulation of activated hepatic stellate cells by mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Parekkadan, Biju; Poll, Daan van; Megeed, Zaki; Kobayashi, Naoya; Tilles, Arno W.; Berthiaume, Francois; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2007-11-16

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been reported to prevent the development of liver fibrosis in a number of pre-clinical studies. Marked changes in liver histopathology and serological markers of liver function have been observed without a clear understanding of the therapeutic mechanism by which stem cells act. We sought to determine if MSCs could modulate the activity of resident liver cells, specifically hepatic stellate cells (SCs) by paracrine mechanisms using indirect cocultures. Indirect coculture of MSCs and activated SCs led to a significant decrease in collagen deposition and proliferation, while inducing apoptosis of activated SCs. The molecular mechanisms underlying the modulation of SC activity by MSCs were examined. IL-6 secretion from activated SCs induced IL-10 secretion from MSCs, suggesting a dynamic response of MSCs to the SCs in the microenvironment. Blockade of MSC-derived IL-10 and TNF-{alpha} abolished the inhibitory effects of MSCs on SC proliferation and collagen synthesis. In addition, release of HGF by MSCs was responsible for the marked induction of apoptosis in SCs as determined by antibody-neutralization studies. These findings demonstrate that MSCs can modulate the function of activated SCs via paracrine mechanisms provide a plausible explanation for the protective role of MSCs in liver inflammation and fibrosis, which may also be relevant to other models of tissue fibrosis.

  1. Soda and Cell Aging: Associations Between Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption and Leukocyte Telomere Length in Healthy Adults From the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Laraia, Barbara A.; Needham, Belinda L.; Rehkopf, David H.; Adler, Nancy E.; Lin, Jue; Blackburn, Elizabeth H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We tested whether leukocyte telomere length maintenance, which underlies healthy cellular aging, provides a link between sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption and the risk of cardiometabolic disease. Methods. We examined cross-sectional associations between the consumption of SSBs, diet soda, and fruit juice and telomere length in a nationally representative sample of healthy adults. The study population included 5309 US adults, aged 20 to 65 years, with no history of diabetes or cardiovascular disease, from the 1999 to 2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys. Leukocyte telomere length was assayed from DNA specimens. Diet was assessed using 24-hour dietary recalls. Associations were examined using multivariate linear regression for the outcome of log-transformed telomere length. Results. After adjustment for sociodemographic and health-related characteristics, sugar-sweetened soda consumption was associated with shorter telomeres (b = –0.010; 95% confidence interval [CI] = −0.020, −0.001; P = .04). Consumption of 100% fruit juice was marginally associated with longer telomeres (b = 0.016; 95% CI = −0.000, 0.033; P = .05). No significant associations were observed between consumption of diet sodas or noncarbonated SSBs and telomere length. Conclusions. Regular consumption of sugar-sweetened sodas might influence metabolic disease development through accelerated cell aging. PMID:25322305

  2. A Study of the Correlation Between Dislocations and Diffusion Length in In(49)Ga(51)P Solar Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    Length in In49Ga51P 6. AUTHOR(S) Scott Edward Williams 5 . FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate...1 B. PURPOSE OF THESIS................................................................................... 5 C. MILITARY...RELEVANCE............................................................................. 5 D. THESIS OVERVIEW

  3. Nucleosomes and neutrophil activation in sickle cell disease painful crisis.

    PubMed

    Schimmel, Marein; Nur, Erfan; Biemond, Bart J; van Mierlo, Gerard J; Solati, Shabnam; Brandjes, Dees P; Otten, Hans-Martin; Schnog, John-John; Zeerleder, Sacha

    2013-11-01

    Activated polymorphonuclear neutrophils play an important role in the pathogenesis of vaso-occlusive painful sickle cell crisis. Upon activation, polymorphonuclear neutrophils can form neutrophil extracellular traps. Neutrophil extracellular traps consist of a meshwork of extracellular DNA, nucleosomes, histones and neutrophil proteases. Neutrophil extracellular traps have been demonstrated to be toxic to endothelial and parenchymal cells. This prospective cohort study was conducted to determine neutrophil extracellular trap formation in sickle cell patients during steady state and painful crisis. As a measure of neutrophil extracellular traps, plasma nucleosomes levels were determined and polymorphonuclear neutrophil activation was assessed measuring plasma levels of elastase-α1-antitrypsin complexes in 74 patients in steady state, 70 patients during painful crisis, and 24 race-matched controls using Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Nucleosome levels in steady state sickle cell patients were significantly higher than levels in controls. During painful crisis levels of both nucleosomes and elastase-α1-antitrypsin complexes increased significantly. Levels of nucleosomes correlated significantly to elastase-α1-antitrypsin complex levels during painful crisis, (Sr = 0.654, P<0.001). This was seen in both HbSS/HbSβ(0)-thalassemia (Sr=0.55, P<0.001) and HbSC/HbSβ(+-)thalassemia patients (Sr=0.90, P<0.001) during painful crisis. Levels of nucleosomes showed a correlation with length of hospital stay and were highest in patients with acute chest syndrome. These data support the concept that neutrophil extracellular trap formation and neutrophil activation may play a role in the pathogenesis of painful sickle cell crisis and acute chest syndrome.

  4. Peptide length and folding state govern the capacity of staphylococcal β-type phenol-soluble modulins to activate human formyl-peptide receptors 1 or 2.

    PubMed

    Kretschmer, Dorothee; Rautenberg, Maren; Linke, Dirk; Peschel, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Most staphylococci produce short α-type PSMs and about twice as long β-type PSMs that are potent leukocyte attractants and toxins. PSMs are usually secreted with the N-terminal formyl group but are only weak agonists for the leukocyte FPR1. Instead, the FPR1-related FPR2 senses PSMs efficiently and is crucial for leukocyte recruitment in infection. Which structural features distinguish FPR1 from FPR2 ligands has remained elusive. To analyze which peptide properties may govern the capacities of β-type PSMs to activate FPRs, full-length and truncated variants of such peptides from Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Staphylococcus lugdunensis were synthesized. FPR2 activation was observed even for short N- or C-terminal β-type PSM variants once they were longer than 18 aa, and this activity increased with length. In contrast, the shortest tested peptides were potent FPR1 agonists, and this property declined with increasing peptide length. Whereas full-length β-type PSMs formed α-helices and exhibited no FPR1-specific activity, the truncated peptides had less-stable secondary structures, were weak agonists for FPR1, and required N-terminal formyl-methionine residues to be FPR2 agonists. Together, these data suggest that FPR1 and FPR2 have opposed ligand preferences. Short, flexible PSM structures may favor FPR1 but not FPR2 activation, whereas longer peptides with α-helical, amphipathic properties are strong FPR2 but only weak FPR1 agonists. These findings should help to unravel the ligand specificities of 2 critical human PRRs, and they may be important for new, anti-infective and anti-inflammatory strategies.

  5. (+)-Catechin attenuates activation of hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Bragança de Moraes, Cristina Machado; Bitencourt, Shanna; de Mesquita, Fernanda Cristina; Mello, Denizar; de Oliveira, Leticia Paranhos; da Silva, Gabriela Viegas; Lorini, Vinicius; Caberlon, Eduardo; de Souza Basso, Bruno; Schmid, Julia; Ferreira, Gabriela Acevedo; de Oliveira, Jarbas Rodrigues

    2014-04-01

    (+)-Catechin is a type of catechin present in large amounts in açaí fruits and cocoa seeds. Besides its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, little is known about its effects in the liver, especially during hepatic fibrosis. We report here the effects of (+)-catechin on hepatic stellate cells. (+)-Catechin induced quiescent phenotype in GRX cells, along with an increase in lipid droplets. Proliferator-activated receptor γ mRNA expression was upregulated, whereas type I collagen mRNA expression was downregulated. Pro-inflammatory cytokines were not influenced by (+)-catechin, whereas the levels of interleukin 10 were significantly increased. The data provide evidence that (+)-catechin can reduce hepatic stellate cell activation.

  6. Entangled active matter: From cells to ants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, D. L.; Phonekeo, S.; Altshuler, E.; Brochard-Wyart, F.

    2016-07-01

    Both cells and ants belong to the broad field of active matter, a novel class of non-equilibrium materials composed of many interacting units that individually consume energy and collectively generate motion or mechanical stresses. However cells and ants differ from fish and birds in that they can support static loads. This is because cells and ants can be entangled, so that individual units are bound by transient links. Entanglement gives cells and ants a set of remarkable properties usually not found together, such as the ability to flow like a fluid, spring back like an elastic solid, and self-heal. In this review, we present the biology, mechanics and dynamics of both entangled cells and ants. We apply concepts from soft matter physics and wetting to characterize these systems as well as to point out their differences, which arise from their differences in size. We hope that our viewpoints will spur further investigations into cells and ants as active materials, and inspire the fabrication of synthetic active matter.

  7. Lentivirally engineered dendritic cells activate AFP-specific T cells which inhibit hepatocellular carcinoma growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Butterfield, Lisa H; Fu, Xiaohui; Song, Zhenshun; Zhang, Xiaoping; Lu, Chongde; Ding, Guanghui; Wu, Mengchao

    2011-07-01

    α-fetoprotein (AFP), a tumor-associated antigen for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), is an established biomarker for HCC. In this study, we created a lentivirus expressing the AFP antigen and investigated the anti-tumor activity of AFP-specific CD8+ T cells, with and without CD4+ T cells, which were activated by either AFP peptide-pulsed or Lenti-AFP-engineered Dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro and in vivo. AFP-specific T cells could efficiently kill HepG2 HCC cells, and produced IL-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α, perforin and granzyme B, with minimal production of IL-10 (a negative regulator of T cell activation). Both strategies activated AFP-specific T cells, but the lentiviral strategy was superior by several measures. Data also support an impact of CD4+ T cells in supporting anti-tumor activity. In vivo studies in a xenograft HCC tumor model also showed that AFP-specific T cells could markedly suppress HCC tumor formation and morbidity in tumor-bearing nude mice, as well as regulate serum levels of related cytokines and anti-tumor molecules. In parallel with human in vitro T cell cultures, the in vivo model demonstrated superior anti-tumor effects and Th1-skewing with Lenti-AFP-DCs. This study supports the superiority of a full-length antigen lentivirus-based DCs vaccine strategy over peptides, and provides new insight into the design of DCs-based vaccines.

  8. Aging and defective lymphoid cell activation.

    PubMed

    Coffman, F D; Cohen, S

    1989-01-01

    Activation of lymphocytes for proliferation is a crucial process in the immune response. Age-related deficiencies in this cellular response strongly correlate with deficiencies in the immune system response, with concomitant increase in disease severity and mortality. Defects associated with the transmission of the initial activation signal and with IL-2 production contribute to the depressed response, but defects in the IL-2 response mechanism also play important roles. A major factor in this area is the inability of the nuclei of these cells to respond to the intracellular factor ADR, which plays a crucial role in the initiation of DNA replication. These cells produce normal levels of ADR; thus, either the nuclei cannot bind ADR in a productive manner or the defect lies beyond the point of ADR binding, perhaps in one of the other proteins of the initiation complex. An interesting contrast to the age-related failure of nuclei to respond to ADR is the failure of neoplastic nuclei to respond to the ADR inhibitor. This inhibitor, found in the cytoplasm of quiescent cells, suppresses both the activation of quiescent nuclei by ADR and the ongoing DNA synthesis in isolated nuclei from activated cells. Nuclei from spontaneous proliferating cell lines were not affected by this inhibitor, which may be an important factor in the uncontrolled growth seen in neoplastic cells. The investigation of ADR has given hints that perhaps two of the fundamental questions in biology, namely why some cells don't proliferate and why some others won't stop proliferating, may be two sides of the same coin.

  9. Investigation of double bond conversion, mechanical properties, and antibacterial activity of dental resins with different alkyl chain length quaternary ammonium methacrylate monomers (QAM).

    PubMed

    He, Jingwei; Söderling, Eva; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo V J

    2013-01-01

    In order to endow dental resin with antibacterial activity, a series of antibacterial quaternary ammonium methacrylate monomers (QAM) with different substituted alkyl chain length (from 10 to 18) were incorporated into commonly used 2,2-bis[4-(2'-hydroxy-3'-methacryloyloxy-propoxy)-phenyl]propane (Bis-GMA)/triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) (50 wt/50 wt) dental resin as immobilized antibacterial agents. Double bond conversion (DC), flexural strength (FS) and modulus (FM), and young and mature biofilms inhibition effectiveness of prepared dental resins were studied and Bis-GMA/TEGDMA without QAM was used as reference. Results showed that there was no significant difference on DC, FS, and FM between copolymer with and without 5 wt% QAM. Substituted alkyl chain length of QAM had no influence on DC, FS, and FM of copolymer, but had influence on antibacterial activity of copolymer. Antibacterial activity of copolymer increased with increasing of substituted alkyl chain length of QAM, and the sequence followed as 5%C10 < 5%C11 ≈ 5%C12 < 5%C16 ≈ 5%C18. Copolymers containing C18 and C16 had the best inhibition effectiveness on both young biofilm and mature biofilm, copolymers containing C12 and C11 only had inhibition effectiveness on young biofilm and copolymer containing C10 had none inhibition effectiveness on neither young biofilm nor mature biofilm.

  10. Evaluation of the minority carrier diffusion length and surface-recombination velocity in GaAs p/n solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakimzadeh, Roshanak; Moeller, Hans J.; Bailey, Sheila

    1991-01-01

    The minority carrier diffusion length (Lp) and the surface recombination velocity (Vs) were measured as a function of distance (x) from the p-n junction in GaAs p/n concentrator solar cells. The measured Vs values were used in a theoretical expression for the normalized electron-beam-induced current. A fitting procedure was then used to fit this expression with experimental values to obtain Lp. The results show that both Vs and Lp vary with x. Lp measured in irradiated cells showed a marked reduction. These values were compared to those measured previously which did not account for Vs.

  11. A dual-route perspective on brain activation in response to visual words: evidence for a length by lexicality interaction in the visual word form area (VWFA).

    PubMed

    Schurz, Matthias; Sturm, Denise; Richlan, Fabio; Kronbichler, Martin; Ladurner, Gunther; Wimmer, Heinz

    2010-02-01

    Based on our previous work, we expected the Visual Word Form Area (VWFA) in the left ventral visual pathway to be engaged by both whole-word recognition and by serial sublexical coding of letter strings. To examine this double function, a phonological lexical decision task (i.e., "Does xxx sound like an existing word?") presented short and long letter strings of words, pseudohomophones, and pseudowords (e.g., Taxi, Taksi and Tazi). Main findings were that the length effect for words was limited to occipital regions and absent in the VWFA. In contrast, a marked length effect for pseudowords was found throughout the ventral visual pathway including the VWFA, as well as in regions presumably engaged by visual attention and silent-articulatory processes. The length by lexicality interaction on brain activation corresponds to well-established behavioral findings of a length by lexicality interaction on naming latencies and speaks for the engagement of the VWFA by both lexical and sublexical processes.

  12. A general strategy for generating intact, full-length IgG antibodies that penetrate into the cytosol of living cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Dong-Ki; Bae, Jeomil; Shin, Seung-Min; Shin, Ju-Yeon; Kim, Sunghoon; Kim, Yong-Sung

    2014-01-01

    Full-length IgG antibodies cannot cross cell membranes of living cells; this limits their use for direct targeting of cytosolic proteins. Here, we describe a general strategy for the generation of intact, full-length IgG antibodies, herein called cytotransmabs, which internalize into living cells and localize in the cytosol. We first generated a humanized light chain variable domain (VL) that could penetrate into the cytosol of living cells and was engineered for association with various subtypes of human heavy chain variable domains (VHs). When light chains with humanized VL were co-expressed with 3 heavy chains (HCs), including 2 HCs of the clinically approved adalimumab (Humira®) and bevacizumab (Avastin®), all 3 purified IgG antibodies were internalized into the cytoplasm of living cells. Cytotransmabs primarily internalized into living cells by the clathrin-mediated endocytic pathway through interactions with heparin sulfate proteoglycan that was expressed on the cell surface. The cytotransmabs escaped into the cytosol from early endosomes without being further transported into other cellular compartments, like the lysosomes, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, and nucleus. Furthermore, we generated a cytotransmab that co-localized with the targeted cytosolic protein when it was incubated with living cells, demonstrating that the cytotransmab can directly target cytosolic proteins. Internalized cytotransmabs did not show any noticeable cytotoxicity and remained in the cytosol for more than 6 h before being degraded by proteosomes. These results suggest that cytotransmabs, which efficiently enter living cells and reach the cytosolic space, will find widespread uses as research, diagnostic, and therapeutic agents. PMID:25484049

  13. Mechanically activated artificial cell by using microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Kenneth K. Y.; Lee, Lap Man; Liu, Allen P.

    2016-01-01

    All living organisms sense mechanical forces. Engineering mechanosensitive artificial cell through bottom-up in vitro reconstitution offers a way to understand how mixtures of macromolecules assemble and organize into a complex system that responds to forces. We use stable double emulsion droplets (aqueous/oil/aqueous) to prototype mechanosensitive artificial cells. In order to demonstrate mechanosensation in artificial cells, we develop a novel microfluidic device that is capable of trapping double emulsions into designated chambers, followed by compression and aspiration in a parallel manner. The microfluidic device is fabricated using multilayer soft lithography technology, and consists of a control layer and a deformable flow channel. Deflections of the PDMS membrane above the main microfluidic flow channels and trapping chamber array are independently regulated pneumatically by two sets of integrated microfluidic valves. We successfully compress and aspirate the double emulsions, which result in transient increase and permanent decrease in oil thickness, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the influx of calcium ions as a response of our mechanically activated artificial cell through thinning of oil. The development of a microfluidic device to mechanically activate artificial cells creates new opportunities in force-activated synthetic biology. PMID:27610921

  14. Mechanically activated artificial cell by using microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Kenneth K. Y.; Lee, Lap Man; Liu, Allen P.

    2016-09-01

    All living organisms sense mechanical forces. Engineering mechanosensitive artificial cell through bottom-up in vitro reconstitution offers a way to understand how mixtures of macromolecules assemble and organize into a complex system that responds to forces. We use stable double emulsion droplets (aqueous/oil/aqueous) to prototype mechanosensitive artificial cells. In order to demonstrate mechanosensation in artificial cells, we develop a novel microfluidic device that is capable of trapping double emulsions into designated chambers, followed by compression and aspiration in a parallel manner. The microfluidic device is fabricated using multilayer soft lithography technology, and consists of a control layer and a deformable flow channel. Deflections of the PDMS membrane above the main microfluidic flow channels and trapping chamber array are independently regulated pneumatically by two sets of integrated microfluidic valves. We successfully compress and aspirate the double emulsions, which result in transient increase and permanent decrease in oil thickness, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the influx of calcium ions as a response of our mechanically activated artificial cell through thinning of oil. The development of a microfluidic device to mechanically activate artificial cells creates new opportunities in force-activated synthetic biology.

  15. Parthenolide enhances dacarbazine activity against melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Koprowska, Kamila; Hartman, Mariusz L; Sztiller-Sikorska, Malgorzata; Czyz, Malgorzata E

    2013-09-01

    Dacarbazine induces a clinical response only in 15% of melanoma patients. New treatment strategies may involve combinations of drugs with different modes of action to target the tumor heterogeneity. We aimed to determine whether the combined treatment of heterogeneous melanoma cell populations in vitro with the alkylating agent dacarbazine and the nuclear factor-κB inhibitor parthenolide could be more effective than either drug alone. A panel of melanoma cell lines, including highly heterogeneous populations derived from surgical specimens, was treated with dacarbazine and parthenolide. The effect of drugs on the viable cell number was examined using an acid phosphatase activity assay, and the combination effect was determined by median-effect analysis. Cell death and cell-cycle arrest were assessed by flow cytometry. Gene expression was measured by real-time PCR and changes in the protein levels were evaluated by western blotting. Secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor and interleukin-8 was determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The self-renewing capacity was assessed using a clonogenic assay. Dacarbazine was less effective in heterogeneous melanoma populations than in the A375 cell line. Parthenolide and dacarbazine synergistically reduced the viable cell numbers. Both drugs induced cell-cycle arrest and apoptotic cell death. Importantly, parthenolide abrogated the baseline and dacarbazine-induced vascular endothelial growth factor secretion from melanoma cells in heterogeneous populations, whereas interleukin-8 secretion was not significantly affected by either drug. Parthenolide eradicated melanoma cells with self-renewing capacity also in cultures simultaneously treated with dacarbazine. The combination of parthenolide and dacarbazine might be considered as a new therapeutic modality against metastatic melanoma.

  16. Relativistic Length Agony Continued

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redzic, D. V.

    2014-06-01

    We made an attempt to remedy recent confusing treatments of some basic relativistic concepts and results. Following the argument presented in an earlier paper (Redzic 2008b), we discussed the misconceptions that are recurrent points in the literature devoted to teaching relativity such as: there is no change in the object in Special Relativity, illusory character of relativistic length contraction, stresses and strains induced by Lorentz contraction, and related issues. We gave several examples of the traps of everyday language that lurk in Special Relativity. To remove a possible conceptual and terminological muddle, we made a distinction between the relativistic length reduction and relativistic FitzGerald-Lorentz contraction, corresponding to a passive and an active aspect of length contraction, respectively; we pointed out that both aspects have fundamental dynamical contents. As an illustration of our considerations, we discussed briefly the Dewan-Beran-Bell spaceship paradox and the 'pole in a barn' paradox.

  17. Key Immune Cell Cytokines Affects the Telomere Activity of Cord Blood Cells In vitro

    PubMed Central

    Brazvan, Balal; Farahzadi, Raheleh; Mohammadi, Seyede Momeneh; Montazer Saheb, Soheila; Shanehbandi, Dariush; Schmied, Laurent; Soleimani Rad, Jafar; Darabi, Masoud; Nozad Charoudeh, Hojjatollah

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Telomere is a nucleoprotein complex at the end of eukaryotic chromosomes and its length is regulated by telomerase. The number of DNA repeat sequence (TTAGGG)n is reduced with each cell division in differentiated cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of SCF (Stem Cell Factor), Flt3 (Fms- Like tyrosine kinase-3), Interleukin-2, 7 and 15 on telomere length and hTERT gene expression in mononuclear and umbilical cord blood stem cells (CD34+ cells) during development to lymphoid cells. Methods: The mononuclear cells were isolated from umbilical cord blood by Ficoll-Paque density gradient. Then cells were cultured for 21 days in the presence of different cytokines. Telomere length and hTERT gene expression were evaluated in freshly isolated cells, 7, 14 and 21 days of culture by real-time PCR. The same condition had been done for CD34+ cells but telomere length and hTERT gene expression were measured at initial and day 21 of the experiment. Results: Highest hTERT gene expression and maximum telomere length were measured at day14 of MNCs in the presence of IL-7 and IL-15. Also, there was a significant correlation between telomere length and telomerase gene expression in MNCs at 14 days in a combination of IL-7 and IL-15 (r = 0.998, p =0.04). In contrast, IL-2 showed no distinct effect on telomere length and hTERT gene expression in cells. Conclusion: Taken together, IL-7 and IL-15 increased telomere length and hTERT gene expression at 14 day of the experiment. In conclusion, it seems likely that cells maintain naïve phenotype due to prolonged exposure of IL-7 and IL-15. PMID:27478776

  18. Glycolate kinase activity in human red cells.

    PubMed

    Fujii, S; Beutler, E

    1985-02-01

    Human red cells manifest glycolate kinase activity. This activity copurifies with pyruvate kinase and is decreased in the red cells of subjects with hereditary pyruvate kinase deficiency. Glycolate kinase activity was detected in the presence of FDP or glucose-1,6-P2. In the presence of 1 mmol/L FDP, the Km for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was 0.28 mmol/L and a half maximum velocity for glycolate was obtained at 40 mmol/L. The pH optimum of the reaction was over 10.5 With 10 mumol/L FDP, 500 mumol/L glucose-1,6-P2, 2 mmol/L ATP, 5 mmol/L MgCl2, and 50 mmol/L glycolate at pH 7.5, glycolate kinase activity was calculated to be approximately 0.0013 U/mL RBC. In view of this low activity even in the presence of massive amounts of glycolate, the glycolate kinase reaction cannot account for the maintenance of the reported phosphoglycolate level in human red cells.

  19. Performance evaluation of titanium dioxide based dye-sensitized solar cells under the influence of anodization steps, nanotube length and ionic liquid-free redox electrolyte solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, Y. L.; Beh, K. P.; Yam, F. K.; Hassan, Z.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, highly ordered titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotube (NT) arrays were synthesized on titanium foil using electrochemical anodization method. The morphological aspects of the nanotubes based on different anodization duration and number of anodization steps (maximum two) have been investigated. The nanotube arrays subsequently used as photoanode in a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) assembly. The studies on the effects of different solvents for triiodide/iodide redox electrolyte and NT length towards the performance of DSSC were conducted. It is known that electrolyte solvent can significantly affect the photovoltaic conversion efficiency. It is noteworthy that longer NT length tends to yield higher efficiency due to better dye adsorption. However, when the NTs exceeded certain length the efficiency decreases instead. Meanwhile, a comparison of DSSC performance based on number of anodization steps on titanium was performed. Highly ordered NT arrays could be obtained using two-steps anodization, which proved to have positive effects on the DSSC performance. The highest photovoltaic conversion efficiency in this work is 2.04%, achieved by two-step anodization. The corresponding average nanotubes length was ˜18 μm, with acetonitrile (ACN) as the redox electrolyte solvent.

  20. Monovalent engagement of the BCR activates ovalbumin-specific transnuclear B cells

    PubMed Central

    Avalos, Ana M.; Bilate, Angelina M.; Witte, Martin D.; Tai, Albert K.; He, Jiang; Frushicheva, Maria P.; Thill, Peter D.; Meyer-Wentrup, Friederike; Theile, Christopher S.; Chakraborty, Arup K.; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2014-01-01

    Valency requirements for B cell activation upon antigen encounter are poorly understood. OB1 transnuclear B cells express an IgG1 B cell receptor (BCR) specific for ovalbumin (OVA), the epitope of which can be mimicked using short synthetic peptides to allow antigen-specific engagement of the BCR. By altering length and valency of epitope-bearing synthetic peptides, we examined the properties of ligands required for optimal OB1 B cell activation. Monovalent engagement of the BCR with an epitope-bearing 17-mer synthetic peptide readily activated OB1 B cells. Dimers of the minimal peptide epitope oriented in an N to N configuration were more stimulatory than their C to C counterparts. Although shorter length correlated with less activation, a monomeric 8-mer peptide epitope behaved as a weak agonist that blocked responses to cell-bound peptide antigen, a blockade which could not be reversed by CD40 ligation. The 8-mer not only delivered a suboptimal signal, which blocked subsequent responses to OVA, anti-IgG, and anti-kappa, but also competed for binding with OVA. Our results show that fine-tuning of BCR-ligand recognition can lead to B cell nonresponsiveness, activation, or inhibition. PMID:24493799

  1. Renal Failure in Sickle Cell Disease: Prevalence, Predictors of Disease, Mortality and Effect on Length of Hospital Stay.

    PubMed

    Yeruva, Sri L H; Paul, Yonette; Oneal, Patricia; Nouraie, Mehdi

    2016-09-01

    Renal dysfunction in sickle cell disease is not only a chronic comorbidity but also a mortality risk factor. Though renal dysfunction starts early in life in sickle cell patients, the predictors that can identify sickle cell disease patients at risk of developing renal dysfunction is not known. We used the Truven Health MarketScan(®) Medicaid Databases from 2007 to 2012. Incidence of new acute renal failure (ARF) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) was calculated in this cohort. There were 9481 patients with a diagnosis of sickle cell disease accounting for 64,201 hospital admissions, during the study period. Both ARF and CKD were associated with higher risk of inpatient mortality, longer duration of the hospital stay and expensive hospitalizations. The yearly incidence of new ARF in sickle cell disease patients was 1.4% and annual CKD incidence was 1.3%. The annual rate of new ARF and CKD in the control group was 0.4 and 0.6%, respectively. The most important predictors of new CKD were proteinuria, ARF and hypertension. Chronic kidney disease, hypertension and sickle cell crisis were the most important predictors of new ARF. The annual rate of incidences of ARF and CKD were 2- to 3-fold higher in sickle cell disease compared to the non sickle cell disease group. Besides the common risk factors for renal disease in the general population, it is imperative to monitor the sickle cell disease patients with more severe disease to prevent them from developing renal dysfunction.

  2. Cell Cholesterol Homeostasis: Mediation by Active Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Steck, Theodore L.; Lange, Yvonne

    2010-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the major pathways mediating cell cholesterol homeostasis respond to a common signal: active membrane cholesterol. Active cholesterol is that fraction which exceeds the complexing capacity of the polar bilayer lipids. Increments in plasma membrane cholesterol exceeding this threshold have an elevated chemical activity (escape tendency) and redistribute via diverse transport proteins to both circulating plasma lipoproteins and intracellular organelles. Active cholesterol prompts several feedback responses thereby. It is the substrate for its own esterification and for the synthesis of regulatory side-chain oxysterols. It also stimulates manifold pathways that down-regulate the biosynthesis, curtail the ingestion and increase the export of cholesterol. Thus, the abundance of cholesterol is tightly coupled to that of its polar lipid partners through active cholesterol. PMID:20843692

  3. Crystal structure of full-length human collagenase 3 (MMP-13) with peptides in the active site defines exosites in the catalytic domain

    PubMed Central

    Stura, Enrico A.; Visse, Robert; Cuniasse, Philippe; Dive, Vincent; Nagase, Hideaki

    2013-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 is one of the mammalian collagenases that play key roles in tissue remodelling and repair and in progression of diseases such as cancer, arthritis, atherosclerosis, and aneurysm. For collagenase to cleave triple helical collagens, the triple helical structure has to be locally unwound before hydrolysis, but this process is not well understood. We report crystal structures of catalytically inactive full-length human MMP-13(E223A) in complex with peptides of 14–26 aa derived from the cleaved prodomain during activation. Peptides are bound to the active site of the enzyme by forming an extended β-strand with Glu40 or Tyr46 inserted into the S1′ specificity pocket. The structure of the N-terminal part of the peptides is variable and interacts with different parts of the catalytic domain. Those areas are designated substrate-dependent exosites, in that they accommodate different peptide structures, whereas the precise positioning of the substrate backbone is maintained in the active site. These modes of peptide-MMP-13 interactions have led us to propose how triple helical collagen strands fit into the active site cleft of the collagenase.—Stura, E. A., Visse, R., Cuniasse, P., Dive, V., Nagase, H. Crystal structure of full-length human collagenase 3 (MMP-13) with peptides in the active site defines exosites in the catalytic domain. PMID:23913860

  4. Elongated phytoglycogen chain length in transgenic rice endosperm expressing active starch synthase IIa affects the altered solubility and crystallinity of the storage α-glucan

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Naoko; Toyosawa, Yoshiko; Utsumi, Yoshinori

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between the solubility, crystallinity, and length of the unit chains of plant storage α-glucan was investigated by manipulating the chain length of α-glucans accumulated in a rice mutant. Transgenic lines were produced by introducing a cDNA for starch synthase IIa (SSIIa) from an indica cultivar (SSIIa I, coding for active SSIIa) into an isoamylase1 (ISA1)-deficient mutant (isa1) that was derived from a japonica cultivar (bearing inactive SSIIa proteins). The water-soluble fraction accounted for >95% of the total α-glucan in the isa1 mutant, whereas it was only 35–70% in the transgenic SSIIa I /isa1 lines. Thus, the α-glucans from the SSIIa I /isa1 lines were fractionated into soluble and insoluble fractions prior to the following characterizations. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed a weak B-type crystallinity for the α-glucans of the insoluble fraction, while no crystallinity was confirmed for α-glucans in isa1. Concerning the degree of polymerization (DP) ≤30, the chain lengths of these α-glucans differed significantly in the order of SSIIa I /isa1 insoluble > SSIIa I /isa1 soluble > α-glucans in isa1. The amount of long chains with DP ≥33 was higher in the insoluble fraction α-glucans than in the other two α-glucans. No difference was observed in the chain length distributions of the β-amylase limit dextrins among these α-glucans. These results suggest that in the SSIIa I /isa1 transgenic lines, the unit chains of α-glucans were elongated by SSIIaI, whereas the expression of SSIIaI did not affect the branch positions. Thus, the observed insolubility and crystallinity of the insoluble fraction can be attributed to the elongated length of the outer chains due to SSIIaI. PMID:23048127

  5. Influence of posterior dental arch length on brain activity during chewing in patients with mandibular distal extension removable partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Shoi, K; Fueki, K; Usui, N; Taira, M; Wakabayashi, N

    2014-07-01

    It is well known that shortened dental arch decreases masticatory function. However, its potential to change brain activity during mastication is unknown. The present study investigates the effect of a shortened posterior dental arch with mandibular removable partial dentures (RPDs) on brain activity during gum chewing. Eleven subjects with missing mandibular molars (mean age, 66.1 years) on both sides received experimental RPDs with interchangeable artificial molars in a crossover trial design. Brain activity during gum chewing with RPDs containing (full dental arch) and lacking artificial molars (shortened dental arch) was measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Additionally, masticatory function was evaluated for each dental arch type. Food comminuting and mixing ability and the perceived chewing ability were significantly lower in subjects with a shortened dental arch than those with a full dental arch (P < 0.05). Brain activation during gum chewing with the full dental arch occurred in the middle frontal gyrus, primary sensorimotor cortex extending to the pre-central gyrus, supplementary motor area, putamen, insula and cerebellum. However, middle frontal gyrus activation was not observed during gum chewing with the shortened dental arch. These results suggest that shortened dental arch affects human brain activity in the middle frontal gyrus during gum chewing, and the decreased middle frontal gyrus activation may be associated with decreased masticatory function.

  6. T cell immunoregulation in active ocular toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Cynthia A; Vieira, Erica L M; Castro, Vinicius M; Dutra, Walderez O; Costa, Rogerio A; Orefice, Juliana L; Campos, Wesley R; Orefice, Fernando; Young, Lucy H; Teixeira, Antonio Lucio

    2017-04-01

    Toxoplasma gondii infection is an important cause of infectious ocular disease. The physiopathology of retinochoroidal lesions associated with this infection is not completely understood. The present study was undertaken to investigate cytokine production by T cells from individuals with active toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis (TR) comparing with controls. Eighteen patients with active TR and 15 healthy controls (6 controls IgG(+) to Toxoplasma and 9 negative controls) were included in the study. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were incubated in the presence or absence of T. gondii antigen (STAg), and stained against CD4, CD8, TNF, IL-10 and IFN-γ. Baseline expression of cytokines was higher in TR/IgG(+) patients in comparison with controls. Cytokine expression was not increased by STAg in vitro stimulation in controls. After stimulation, TR/IgG(+) patients' lymphocytes increased cytokine as compared to cultures from both controls. While T cells were the main source of IL-10, but also IFN-γ and TNF, other lymphocyte populations were relevant source of inflammatory cytokines. Interestingly, it was observed a negative correlation between ocular lesion size and IL-10 expression by CD4(+) lymphocytes. This study showed that T cells are the main lymphocyte populations expressing IL-10 in patients with TR. Moreover, expression of IL-10 plays a protective role in active TR.

  7. Revisiting the prediction of solar activity based on the relationship between the solar maximum amplitude and max-max cycle length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, V. M. S.; Vaquero, J. M.; Gallego, M. C.

    2017-01-01

    It is very important to forecast the future solar activity due to its effect on our planet and near space. Here, we employ the new version of the sunspot number index (version 2) to analyse the relationship between the solar maximum amplitude and max-max cycle length proposed by Du (2006). We show that the correlation between the parameters used by Du (2006) for the prediction of the sunspot number (amplitude of the cycle, Rm, and max-max cycle length for two solar cycles before, Pmax-2) disappears when we use solar cycles prior to solar cycle 9. We conclude that the correlation between these parameters depends on the time interval selected. Thus, the proposal of Du (2006) should definitively not be considered for prediction purposes.

  8. Prolonged exposure of naïve CD8+ T cells to interleukin-7 or interleukin-15 stimulates proliferation without differentiation or loss of telomere length

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Diana L; Bérard, Marion; Soares, Maria V D; Oldham, Janine; Cook, Joanne E; Akbar, Arne N; Tough, David F; Beverley, Peter C L

    2006-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-7 and IL-15 are cytokines implicated in homeostatic control of the peripheral CD8 T-cell pool. We compared the effects of IL-7 and IL-15 on survival and proliferation of purified human CD8+ T-cell subsets. Low concentrations of either cytokine reduced the spontaneous apoptosis of all subsets, and enhancement of survival corresponded to the extent of Bcl-2 up-regulation. Surprisingly, although minimal proliferation of naïve CD8+ T cells was observed during the first week of culture with cytokines, a marked expansion of these cells occurred at later time points, particularly in response to IL-15. This occurred largely without phenotypic change or acquisition of effector function, indicating a dissociation of differentiation from proliferation. Notably, progression of naïve CD8+ T cells through several cell divisions resulted in up-regulation of telomerase and the maintenance of telomere length. These data show that IL-7 and IL-15 induce cell proliferation and rescue from apoptosis in a concentration, time and subset-dependent manner, and have implications for the homeostatic expansion of the naïve CD8+ T-cell pool. PMID:17005004

  9. Effect of highly ordered single-crystalline TiO2 nanowire length on the photovoltaic performance of dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zheng-ji; Fan, Jun-qi; Wang, Xia; Zhou, Wen-hui; Du, Zu-liang; Wu, Si-xin

    2011-11-01

    One-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures grown directly onto transparent conducting oxide substrates with a high internal surface area are most desirable for high-efficiency dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Herein, we present a multicycle hydrothermal synthesis process to produce vertically aligned, single crystal rutile TiO(2) nanowires with different lengths between 1 and 8 μm for application as the working electrode in DSSCs. Optimum performance was obtained with a TiO(2) nanowire length of 2.0 μm, which may be ascribed to a smaller nanowire diameter with a high internal surface area and better optical transmittance with an increase in the incident light intensity on the N719 dye; as well as a firm connection at the FTO/TiO(2) nanowire interface.

  10. U-shaped association between telomere length and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma risk: a case-control study in Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Du, Jiangbo; Xue, Wenjie; Ji, Yong; Zhu, Xun; Gu, Yayun; Zhu, Meng; Wang, Cheng; Gao, Yong; Dai, Juncheng; Ma, Hongxia; Jiang, Yue; Chen, Jiaping; Hu, Zhibin; Jin, Guangfu; Shen, Hongbing

    2015-12-01

    Telomeres play a critical role in biological ageing by maintaining chromosomal integrity and preventing chromosome ends fusion. Epidemiological studies have suggested that inter-individual differences of telomere length could affect predisposition to multiple cancers, but evidence regarding esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) was still uncertain. Several telomere length-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (TLSNPs) in Caucasians have been reported in genome-wide association studies. However, the effects of telomere length and TL-SNPs on ESCC development are unclear. Therefore, we conducted a case-control study (1045 ESCC cases and 1433 controls) to evaluate the associations between telomere length, TL-SNPs, and ESCC risk in Chinese population. As a result, ESCC cases showed overall shorter relative telomere length (RTL) (median: 1.34) than controls (median: 1.50, P < 0.001). More interestingly, an evident nonlinear U-shaped association was observed between RTL and ESCC risk (P < 0.001), with odds ratios (95% confidence interval) equal to 2.40 (1.84-3.14), 1.36 (1.03-1.79), 1.01 (0.76-1.35), and 1.37 (1.03-1.82) for individuals in the 1st (the shortest), 2nd, 3rd, and 5th (the longest) quintile, respectively, compared with those in the 4th quintile as reference group. No significant associations were observed between the eight reported TL-SNPs and ESCC susceptibility. These findings suggest that either short or extremely long telomeres may be risk factors for ESCC in the Chinese population.

  11. Differential activation of the inflammasome in THP-1 cells exposed to chrysotile asbestos and Libby "six-mix" amphiboles and subsequent activation of BEAS-2B cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Muyao; Gunter, Mickey E; Fukagawa, Naomi K

    2012-12-01

    Inflammatory responses of THP-1 cells (macrophage cell line) exposed to chrysotile asbestos (Chry) and Libby six-mix (LIB) and the subsequent impact on bronchial epithelial cells were determined. Direct treatment of THP-1 cells with Chry caused cell death, activation of caspase-1 and release of IL-1β, while the addition of caspase-1 inhibitor, Z-YVAD-FMK, reduced IL-1β, suggesting that Chry activated the caspase-1 mediated Nod-like receptor protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome; by comparison, LIB had less effects on all of these parameters. Expression of antioxidant enzymes, protein oxidation and nitration, and lipid peroxides in THP-1 cells treated with the two particles suggest that LIB generated more reactive oxygen species (ROS) than the same dose of Chry. Differences in fiber length and surface area suggest a possible role for particulate size in the differential activation of the inflammasome. BEAS-2B cells, representing the bronchial epithelium, treated with supernatants of medium from Chry- or LIB-treated THP-1 cells (conditioned medium) activated the MAPK cascade, increased phosphorylation of ERK and Cot (MAP3K8), increased AP-1 binding activity and induced IL-6 release. To verify that IL-1β from THP-1 cells was responsible for activation of BEAS-2B, conditioned medium with added IL-1Ra, an IL-1β antagonist, was applied to BEAS-2B. Results show that IL-1Ra attenuated effects of conditioned medium, supporting a role of IL-1β, as a secondary mediator, in the transduction of inflammatory signaling from the macrophage to epithelial cells. The effects of LIB-conditioned medium appeared to be less dependent on IL-1β. In conclusion, Chry and LIB induce differential inflammatory responses in THP-1 cells that subsequently lead to differential effects in epithelial cells.

  12. The influence of increased cross-linker chain length in thermosensitive microspheres on potential sun-protection activity.

    PubMed

    Musiał, Witold; Kokol, Vanja; Voncina, Bojana

    2010-01-01

    The sun protection should involve substances with protecting activity against both UVB and UVA radiation. In this research the evaluation of thermosensitive microspheres as potential molecules for sunscreen formulations was approached, using modified Boots star rating system. The microspheres, thermosensitive N-isopropylacrylamide derivatives, have potential protecting activity against UV radiation. The MX and DX microspheres, with ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and diethylene glycol dimethacrylate crosslinker respectively, due to theirs thermosensitivity exhibit increase in protecting activity against UV radiation when heated to 45 degrees C. The MX microspheres have higher increase in terms of UV absorbance, comparing to DX microspheres, when heated in the 25 degrees C to 45 degrees C range. Studied microspheres have high potential for application as components of sun-screens used in elevated temperatures.

  13. Uniformity of glycyl bridge lengths in the mature cell walls of fem mutants of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Shasad; Kim, Sung Joon; Labischinski, Harald; Chen, Jiawei; Schaefer, Jacob

    2013-04-01

    Peptidoglycan (PG) composition in intact cells of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and its isogenic Fem mutants has been characterized by measuring the glycine content of PG bridge structures by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The glycine content estimated from integrated intensities (rather than peak heights) in the cell walls of whole cells was increased by approximately 30% for the FemA mutant and was reduced by 25% for the FemB mutant relative to expected values for homogeneous structures. In contrast, the expected compositions were observed in isolated cell walls of the same mutants. For FemA mutant whole cells, the increase was due to the presence of triglycyl bridge PG units (confirmed directly by mass spectrometric analysis), which constituted 10% of the total PG. These species were coalesced in some sort of a lattice or aggregate with spatial proximity to other PG bridges. This result suggests that the triglycyl-bridged PG units form a PG-like structure that is not incorporated into the mature cell wall.

  14. Activated Allogeneic NK Cells Preferentially Kill Poor Prognosis B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martínez, Diego; Lanuza, Pilar M; Gómez, Natalia; Muntasell, Aura; Cisneros, Elisa; Moraru, Manuela; Azaceta, Gemma; Anel, Alberto; Martínez-Lostao, Luis; Villalba, Martin; Palomera, Luis; Vilches, Carlos; García Marco, José A; Pardo, Julián

    2016-01-01

    Mutational status of TP53 together with expression of wild-type (wt) IGHV represents the most widely accepted biomarkers, establishing a very poor prognosis in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) patients. Adoptive cell therapy using allogeneic HLA-mismatched Natural killer (NK) cells has emerged as an effective and safe alternative in the treatment of acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemias that do not respond to traditional therapies. We have described that allogeneic activated NK cells eliminate hematological cancer cell lines with multidrug resistance acquired by mutations in the apoptotic machinery. This effect depends on the activation protocol, being B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) the most effective stimulus to activate NK cells. Here, we have further analyzed the molecular determinants involved in allogeneic NK cell recognition and elimination of B-CLL cells, including the expression of ligands of the main NK cell-activating receptors (NKG2D and NCRs) and HLA mismatch. We present preliminary data suggesting that B-CLL susceptibility significantly correlates with HLA mismatch between NK cell donor and B-CLL patient. Moreover, we show that the sensitivity of B-CLL cells to NK cells depends on the prognosis based on TP53 and IGHV mutational status. Cells from patients with worse prognosis (mutated TP53 and wt IGHV) are the most susceptible to activated NK cells. Hence, B-CLL prognosis may predict the efficacy of allogenic activated NK cells, and, thus, NK cell transfer represents a good alternative to treat poor prognosis B-CLL patients who present a very short life expectancy due to lack of effective treatments.

  15. Activated Allogeneic NK Cells Preferentially Kill Poor Prognosis B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Martínez, Diego; Lanuza, Pilar M.; Gómez, Natalia; Muntasell, Aura; Cisneros, Elisa; Moraru, Manuela; Azaceta, Gemma; Anel, Alberto; Martínez-Lostao, Luis; Villalba, Martin; Palomera, Luis; Vilches, Carlos; García Marco, José A.; Pardo, Julián

    2016-01-01

    Mutational status of TP53 together with expression of wild-type (wt) IGHV represents the most widely accepted biomarkers, establishing a very poor prognosis in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) patients. Adoptive cell therapy using allogeneic HLA-mismatched Natural killer (NK) cells has emerged as an effective and safe alternative in the treatment of acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemias that do not respond to traditional therapies. We have described that allogeneic activated NK cells eliminate hematological cancer cell lines with multidrug resistance acquired by mutations in the apoptotic machinery. This effect depends on the activation protocol, being B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) the most effective stimulus to activate NK cells. Here, we have further analyzed the molecular determinants involved in allogeneic NK cell recognition and elimination of B-CLL cells, including the expression of ligands of the main NK cell-activating receptors (NKG2D and NCRs) and HLA mismatch. We present preliminary data suggesting that B-CLL susceptibility significantly correlates with HLA mismatch between NK cell donor and B-CLL patient. Moreover, we show that the sensitivity of B-CLL cells to NK cells depends on the prognosis based on TP53 and IGHV mutational status. Cells from patients with worse prognosis (mutated TP53 and wt IGHV) are the most susceptible to activated NK cells. Hence, B-CLL prognosis may predict the efficacy of allogenic activated NK cells, and, thus, NK cell transfer represents a good alternative to treat poor prognosis B-CLL patients who present a very short life expectancy due to lack of effective treatments. PMID:27833611

  16. Solid-State Mesostructured Perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 Solar Cells: Charge Transport, Recombination, and Diffusion Length.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yixin; Nardes, Alexandre M; Zhu, Kai

    2014-02-06

    We report on the effect of TiO2 film thickness on charge transport and recombination in solid-state mesostructured perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 (via one-step coating) solar cells using spiro-MeOTAD as the hole conductor. Intensity-modulated photocurrent/photovoltage spectroscopies show that the transport and recombination properties of solid-state mesostructured perovskite solar cells are similar to those of solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells. Charge transport in perovskite cells is dominated by electron conduction within the mesoporous TiO2 network rather than from the perovskite layer. Although no significant film-thickness dependence is found for transport and recombination, the efficiency of perovskite cells increases with TiO2 film thickness from 240 nm to about 650-850 nm owing primarily to the enhanced light harvesting. Further increasing film thickness reduces cell efficiency associated with decreased fill factor or photocurrent density. The electron diffusion length in mesostructured perovskite cells is longer than 1 μm for over four orders of magnitude of light intensity.

  17. Antibacterial Activity, in Vitro Cytotoxicity, and Cell Cycle Arrest of Gemini Quaternary Ammonium Surfactants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shanshan; Ding, Shiping; Yu, Jing; Chen, Xuerui; Lei, Qunfang; Fang, Wenjun

    2015-11-10

    Twelve gemini quaternary ammonium surfactants have been employed to evaluate the antibacterial activity and in vitro cytotoxicity. The antibacterial effects of the gemini surfactants are performed on Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) ranging from 2.8 to 167.7 μM. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis results show that these surfactants interact with the bacterial cell membrane, disrupt the integrity of the membrane, and consequently kill the bacteria. The data recorded on C6 glioma and HEK293 human kidney cell lines using an MTT assay exhibit low half inhibitory concentrations (IC50). The influences of the gemini surfactants on the cell morphology, the cell migration ability, and the cell cycle are observed through hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining, cell wound healing assay, and flow cytometric analyses, respectively. Both the values of MIC and IC50 decrease against the growth of the alkyl chain length of the gemini surfactants with the same spacer group. In the case of surfactants 12-s-12, the MICs and IC50s are found to decrease slightly with the spacer chain length changing from 2 to 8 and again to increase at higher spacer length (s = 10-12). All of the gemini surfactants show great antibacterial activity and cytotoxicity, and they might exhibit potential applications in medical fields.

  18. Amplification of hTERT and hTERC genes in leukemic cells with high expression and activity of telomerase.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Tomasz; Januszkiewicz, Danuta; Zawada, Mariola; Pernak, Monika; Lewandowski, Krzysztof; Rembowska, Jolanta; Nowicka, Karina; Mankowski, Przemyslaw; Nowak, Jerzy

    2006-08-01

    Reactivation of telomerase plays an important role in carcinogenesis. Malignant cells almost always possess high activity and expression of telomerase. The aim of this study was to see whether there is any relationship between telomerase activity and expression and hTERT and hTERC gene amplification in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and non-lymphoblastic leukemia (ANLL) cells. In addition telomere length was tested in leukemic cells at the time of diagnosis and during remission. Expression of the three components of telomerase (hTERT, hTERC and TP1) as well as telomerase activity was found both in ALL and ANLL cells. Telomerase activity was diminished in patients in remission. The leukemic cells showed considerable heterogeneity of terminal restriction fragments, that is telomere length. ALL cells showed a variable pattern of telomere length in contrast to ANLL cells which produced a predominantly short telomere pattern. Telomere length in the lymphocytes of leukemia patients was shorter in remission as compared to the time of diagnosis. FISH analysis revealed amplification of hTERT and hTERC genes in ALL and ANLL cells. Quantitative analysis showed that leukemic cells possess higher number of hTERT and hTERC copies than the normal PBL. Our results suggest that the activation of telomerase in leukemic cells is connected with amplification of hTERT and hTERC genes. The high expression and activity of telomerase found in leukemic cells may be partially explained by amplified hTERT and hTERC genes. Amplification of the telomerase genes seems to be a common event in carcinogenesis and may play a role in telomerase reactivation leading to cell immortalization.

  19. Length of the active-site crossover loop defines the substrate specificity of ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolases for ubiquitin chains.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zi-Ren; Zhang, Yu-Hang; Liu, Shuai; Song, Ai-Xin; Hu, Hong-Yu

    2012-01-01

    UCHs [Ub (ubiquitin) C-terminal hydrolases] are a family of deubiquitinating enzymes that are often thought to only remove small C-terminal peptide tails from Ub adducts. Among the four UCHs identified to date, neither UCH-L3 nor UCH-L1 can catalyse the hydrolysis of isopeptide Ub chains, but UCH-L5 can when it is present in the PA700 complex of the proteasome. In the present paper, we report that the UCH domain of UCH-L5, different from UCH-L1 and UCH-L3, by itself can process the K48-diUb (Lys48-linked di-ubiquitin) substrate by cleaving the isopeptide bond between two Ub units. The catalytic specificity of the four UCHs is dependent on the length of the active-site crossover loop. The UCH domain with a long crossover loop (usually >14 residues), such as that of UCH-L5 or BAP1 [BRCA1 (breast cancer early-onset 1)-associated protein 1], is able to cleave both small and large Ub derivatives, whereas the one with a short loop can only process small Ub derivatives. We also found that elongation of the crossover loop enables UCH-L1 to have isopeptidase activity for K48-diUb in a length-dependent manner. Thus the loop length of UCHs defines their substrate specificity for diUb chains, suggesting that the chain flexibility of the crossover loop plays an important role in determining its catalytic activity and substrate specificity for cleaving isopeptide Ub chains.

  20. Complement activation by a B cell superantigen.

    PubMed

    Kozlowski, L M; Soulika, A M; Silverman, G J; Lambris, J D; Levinson, A I

    1996-08-01

    Staphylococcal protein A (SpA), acting as a B cell superantigen, binds to the Fab region of human VH3+ Igs. Using SpA abrogated of its IgG Fc binding activity (Mod SpA) as a model B cell superantigen, we determined whether such an interaction causes complement activation. Addition of Mod SpA to human serum led to complement consumption and the generation of C3a. To determine whether this complement activation 1) was due to an interaction between VH3+ Igs and the Fab binding site of SpA and 2) proceeded via the classical complement pathway, we tested a panel of monoclonal IgM proteins for the ability to hind C1q following interaction with SpA. C1q binding was restricted to SpA-reactive, VH3+ IgM proteins. To formally determine whether the binding of SpA to the reactive VH3+ IgM proteins led to complement activation, we reconstituted the serum from a hypogammaglobulinemic patient with monoclonal IgM proteins and measured complement consumption and C3a generation following the addition of Mod SpA. We observed complement consumption and C3a production only in Mod SpA-treated serum reconstituted with a VH3+, SpA-binding, IgM protein. Taken together, these results provide compelling evidence that the interaction of the Fab binding site of SpA and VH3+ Igs can lead to complement activation via the classical pathway. This novel interaction may have significant implications for the in vivo properties of a B cell superantigen.

  1. Lyso-myristoyl phosphatidylcholine micelles sustain the activity of Dengue non-structural (NS) protein 3 protease domain fused with the full-length NS2B.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiwei; Li, Qingxin; Joy, Joma; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Ruiz-Carrillo, David; Hill, Jeffrey; Lescar, Julien; Kang, Congbao

    2013-12-01

    Dengue virus (DENV), a member of the flavivirus genus, affects 50-100 million people in tropical and sub-tropical regions. The DENV protease domain is located at the N-terminus of the NS3 protease and requires for its enzymatic activity a hydrophilic segment of the NS2B that acts as a cofactor. The protease is an important antiviral drug target because it plays a crucial role in virus replication by cleaving the genome-coded polypeptide into mature functional proteins. Currently, there are no drugs to inhibit DENV protease activity. Most structural and functional studies have been conducted using protein constructs containing the NS3 protease domain connected to a soluble segment of the NS2B membrane protein via a nine-residue linker. For in vitro structural and functional studies, it would be useful to produce a natural form of the DENV protease containing the NS3 protease domain and the full-length NS2B protein. Herein, we describe the expression and purification of a natural form of DENV protease (NS2BFL-NS3pro) containing the full-length NS2B protein and the protease domain of NS3 (NS3pro). The protease was expressed and purified in detergent micelles necessary for its folding. Our results show that this purified protein was active in detergent micelles such as lyso-myristoyl phosphatidylcholine (LMPC). These findings should facilitate further structural and functional studies of the protease and will facilitate drug discovery targeting DENV.

  2. Persistent neural activity in head direction cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taube, Jeffrey S.; Bassett, Joshua P.; Oman, C. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Many neurons throughout the rat limbic system discharge in relation to the animal's directional heading with respect to its environment. These so-called head direction (HD) cells exhibit characteristics of persistent neural activity. This article summarizes where HD cells are found, their major properties, and some of the important experiments that have been conducted to elucidate how this signal is generated. The number of HD and angular head velocity cells was estimated for several brain areas involved in the generation of the HD signal, including the postsubiculum, anterior dorsal thalamus, lateral mammillary nuclei and dorsal tegmental nucleus. The HD cell signal has many features in common with what is known about how neural integration is accomplished in the oculomotor system. The nature of the HD cell signal makes it an attractive candidate for using neural network models to elucidate the signal's underlying mechanisms. The conditions that any network model must satisfy in order to accurately represent how the nervous system generates this signal are highlighted and areas where key information is missing are discussed.

  3. Effects of potential shift and efficiency of charge collection on nanotube-based porphyrin-sensitized solar cells with conjugated links of varied length.

    PubMed

    Luo, Liyang; Lin, Chia-Jung; Hung, Chen-Shiung; Lo, Chen-Fu; Lin, Ching-Yao; Diau, Eric Wei-Guang

    2010-10-28

    For dye-sensitized solar-cell devices fabricated from porphyrin sensitizers with links of varied length (PE1-PE4) adsorbed on anodic titanium-oxide nanotube arrays, we measured induced photocurrent and photovoltage decays under constant bias illumination; the evaluated efficiencies of charge collection of the devices show a systematic trend PE4 > PE3 > PE2 > PE1 at a large short-circuit current, implying that a long link would improve the charge separation if the electrons were effectively injected into the semiconductor.

  4. Live-cell imaging of actin dynamics reveals mechanisms of stereocilia length regulation in the inner ear.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Meghan C; Barzik, Melanie; Bird, Jonathan E; Zhang, Duan-Sun; Lechene, Claude P; Corey, David P; Cunningham, Lisa L; Friedman, Thomas B

    2015-04-21

    The maintenance of sensory hair cell stereocilia is critical for lifelong hearing; however, mechanisms of structural homeostasis remain poorly understood. Conflicting models propose that stereocilia F-actin cores are either continually renewed every 24-48 h via a treadmill or are stable, exceptionally long-lived structures. Here to distinguish between these models, we perform an unbiased survey of stereocilia actin dynamics in more than 500 utricle hair cells. Live-imaging EGFP-β-actin or dendra2-β-actin reveal stable F-actin cores with turnover and elongation restricted to stereocilia tips. Fixed-cell microscopy of wild-type and mutant β-actin demonstrates that incorporation of actin monomers into filaments is required for localization to stereocilia tips. Multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry and live imaging of single differentiating hair cells capture stereociliogenesis and explain uniform incorporation of (15)N-labelled protein and EGFP-β-actin into nascent stereocilia. Collectively, our analyses support a model in which stereocilia actin cores are stable structures that incorporate new F-actin only at the distal tips.

  5. Transgelin-2 in B-Cells Controls T-Cell Activation by Stabilizing T Cell - B Cell Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Myoung-Won; Kim, Hye-Ran; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Jun, Chang-Duk; Park, Zee-Yong

    2016-01-01

    The immunological synapse (IS), a dynamic and organized junction between T-cells and antigen presenting cells (APCs), is critical for initiating adaptive immunity. The actin cytoskeleton plays a major role in T-cell reorganization during IS formation, and we previously reported that transgelin-2, an actin-binding protein expressed in T-cells, stabilizes cortical F-actin, promoting T-cell activation in response to antigen stimulation. Transgelin-2 is also highly expressed in B-cells, although no specific function has been reported. In this study, we found that deficiency in transgelin-2 (TAGLN2-/-) in B-cells had little effect on B-cell development and activation, as measured by the expression of CD69, MHC class II molecules, and CD80/86. Nevertheless, in B-cells, transgelin-2 accumulated in the IS during the interaction with T-cells. These results led us to hypothesize that transgelin-2 may also be involved in IS stability in B-cells, thereby influencing T-cell function. Notably, we found that transgelin-2 deficiency in B-cells reduced T-cell activation, as determined by the release of IL-2 and interferon-γ and the expression of CD69. Furthermore, the reduced T-cell activation was correlated with reduced B-cell–T-cell conjugate formation. Collectively, these results suggest that actin stability in B-cells during IS formation is critical for the initiation of adaptive T-cell immunity. PMID:27232882

  6. Effect of space length of mannose ligand on uptake of mannosylated liposome in RAW 264.7 cells: In vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hwan-Seok; Na, Kyung Sook; Hwang, Hyosook; Oh, Phil-Sun; Kim, Dong Hyun; Lim, Seok Tae; Sohn, Myung-Hee; Jeong, Hwan-Jeong

    2014-12-01

    The most widely used method for increasing uptake on macrophage is specific targeting for mannose receptor (MR) presented on macrophages. Efficiency of the uptake for MR is influenced by the space length and flexibility of mannose ligand in liposome (LP). We prepared mannosylated liposomes (M-EGn-LP-ICG) encapsulated indocyanine green (ICG) with mannose ligand of various ethylene glycol units (EG), LP-ICG, and mannosylated liposome (M-LP-ICG) incorporated with p-aminophenyl-α-d-mannopyranoside. We studied the effect of space length of the mannose ligand in vitro and in vivo with prepared liposomes. A space length of two ethylene glycol units at least was needed for uptake by macrophages and the uptake was increased as the space length increased up to EG4. We measured near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence intensity by ICG and the fluorescence value of cell-associated N-(4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole) (NBD) in liposome after cellular uptake. M-EG4-LP-ICG showed lower NIR fluorescence intensity but higher NBD fluorescence value than M-LP-ICG. The result of pre-treatment with d(+)-mannose as an inhibitor showed significant decreasing in uptake of mannosylated LP-ICG but no difference in LP-ICG. These were explained that mannosylated LP-ICG was taken up by macrophages through the MR and M-EG4-LP-ICG showed more specific uptake than M-LP-ICG. We obtained images as time passed in the NIR range after intravenous administration using a Balb/c mouse with inflammatory model. The results showed high uptake in liver at early time and rapid degradation of mannosylated LP-ICG. M-EG4-LP-ICG was more selectively taken up by macrophages than M-LP-ICG.

  7. Screening cDNA Libraries Using Partial Probes to Isolate Full-Length cDNAs from Vascular Cells.

    PubMed

    Csortos, C; Lazar, V; Garcia, J G

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of screening cDNA libraries is to isolate a particular cDNA clone encoding a mRNA and by implication, a protein, of interest. The screening is based on identification of the desired clone among a large number of recombinant clones within the library selected (1,2). As an example of both the utility and power of library screening, we will relate our own library screening efforts utilized to isolate the nonmuscle high molecular weight myosin light chain kinase isoform from a human umbilical vein endothelial cell cDNA library (3). This unique nonmuscle myosin light chain kinase isoform phosphorylates myosin light chains, thereby playing an essential role in agonist-mediated endothelial cell contraction, paracellular gap formation and increased vascular permeability. We are hopeful that this step-by-step approach will help the reader to understand the discussed methods.

  8. Conjugated Polyelectrolyte-Sensitized TiO2 Solar Cells: Effects of Chain Length and Aggregation on Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhenxing; Leem, Gyu; Cekli, Seda; Schanze, Kirk S

    2015-08-05

    Two sets of conjugated polyelectrolytes with different molecular weights (Mn) in each set were synthesized. All polymers feature the same conjugated backbone with alternating (1,4-phenylene) and (2,5-thienylene ethynylene) repeating units, but different linkages between the backbone and side chains, namely, oxy-methylene (-O-CH2-) (P1-O-n, where n = 7, 9, and 14) and methylene (-CH2-) (P2-C-n, n = 7, 12, and 18). They all bear carboxylic acid moieties as side chains, which bind strongly to titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles. The two sets of polymers were used as light-harvesting materials in dye-sensitized solar cells. Despite the difference in molecular weight, polymers within each set have very similar light absorption properties. Interestingly, under the same working conditions, the overall cell efficiency of the P1-O-n series increases with a decreasing molecular weight while the efficiency of the P2-C-n series remains constant regardless of the molecular weight. Steady state photophysical measurements and dynamic light scattering investigation prove that P1-O-n polymers aggregate in solution while P2-C-n series are in the monomeric state. In P1-O-n series, a higher-molecular weight polymer results in a larger aggregate, which reduces the amount of polymers that are adsorbed onto TiO2 films and overall cell efficiency.

  9. SU-E-J-141: Activity-Equivalent Path Length Approach for the 3D PET-Based Dose Reconstruction in Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Attili, A; Vignati, A; Giordanengo, S; Kraan, A; Dalmasso, F; Battistoni, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Ion beam therapy is sensitive to uncertainties from treatment planning and dose delivery. PET imaging of induced positron emitter distributions is a practical approach for in vivo, in situ verification of ion beam treatments. Treatment verification is usually done by comparing measured activity distributions with reference distributions, evaluated in nominal conditions. Although such comparisons give valuable information on treatment quality, a proper clinical evaluation of the treatment ultimately relies on the knowledge of the actual delivered dose. Analytical deconvolution methods relating activity and dose have been studied in this context, but were not clinically applied. In this work we present a feasibility study of an alternative approach for dose reconstruction from activity data, which is based on relating variations in accumulated activity to tissue density variations. Methods: First, reference distributions of dose and activity were calculated from the treatment plan and CT data. Then, the actual measured activity data were cumulatively matched with the reference activity distributions to obtain a set of activity-equivalent path lengths (AEPLs) along the rays of the pencil beams. Finally, these AEPLs were used to deform the original dose distribution, yielding the actual delivered dose. The method was tested by simulating a proton therapy treatment plan delivering 2 Gy on a homogeneous water phantom (the reference), which was compared with the same plan delivered on a phantom containing inhomogeneities. Activity and dose distributions were were calculated by means of the FLUKA Monte Carlo toolkit. Results: The main features of the observed dose distribution in the inhomogeneous situation were reproduced using the AEPL approach. Variations in particle range were reproduced and the positions, where these deviations originated, were properly identified. Conclusions: For a simple inhomogeneous phantom the 3D dose reconstruction from PET-activity

  10. Human lymphokine-activated killer cells are cytotoxic against cells infected with Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine whether human lymphokine- activated killer (LAK) cells are cytotoxic against cells infected with Toxoplasma gondii. Nylon wool nonadherent (NWNA) peripheral blood lymphocytes, as well as purified natural killer cell (NK) (CD3- CD16+ CD56+) and T (CD3+ CD16- CD56-) cells obtained from five healthy T. gondii seronegative volunteers exhibited minimal cytotoxic activity against T. gondii-infected cells. When standard LAK (S-LAK) cell preparations were induced by incubation of NWNA cells with recombinant interleukin 2, induction of remarkable cytotoxic activity against T. gondii-infected cells. When standard in LAK cell preparations from each of the volunteers. The phenotype of the LAK precursor and effector cells varied depending on the target cell used. Whereas the precursor and the effector cells of most of the LAK activity against K562 and Daudi cells were cells with NK phenotype, when T. gondii-infected cells were used as targets, both cells with NK and T cell phenotypes were precursors and effectors of the lysis. When cytotoxic activity of S-LAK cells was compared with the activity of adherent LAK (A-LAK) cells, A- LAK cells displayed higher cytotoxic activity against T. gondii- infected cells, as well as against K562 and Daudi cells. Cold target inhibition experiments suggested that there is a subset of LAK effector cells capable of lysing both T. gondii-infected cells and Daudi cells, whereas other subsets preferentially or exclusively lyse one of these target cells. PMID:1460415

  11. Probing cell activity in random access modality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacconi, L.; Crocini, C.; Lotti, J.; Coppini, R.; Ferrantini, C.; Tesi, C.; Yan, P.; Loew, L. M.; Cerbai, E.; Poggesi, C.; Pavone, F. S.

    2013-06-01

    We combined the advantage of an ultrafast random access microscope with novel labelling technologies to study the intra- and inter-cellular action potential propagation in neurons and cardiac myocytes with sub-millisecond time resolution. The random accesses microscopy was used in combination with a new fluorinated voltage sensitive dye with improved photostability to record membrane potential from multiple Purkinje cells with near simultaneous sampling. The RAMP system rapidly scanned between lines drawn in the membranes of neurons to perform multiplex measurements of the TPF signal. This recording was achieved by rapidly positioning the laser excitation with the AOD to sample a patch of membrane from each cell in <100 μs for recording from five cells, multiplexing permits a temporal resolution of 400 μs sufficient to capture every spike. The system is capable to record spontaneous activity over 800 ms from five neighbouring cells simultaneously, showing that spiking is not temporally correlated. The system was also used to investigate the electrical properties of tubular system (TATS) in isolated rat ventricular myocytes.

  12. Δ6-fatty acid desaturase and fatty acid elongase mRNA expression, phagocytic activity and weight-to-length relationships in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) fed alternative diets with soy oil and a probiotic.

    PubMed

    Santerre, A; Téllez-Bañuelos, M C; Casas-Solís, J; Castro-Félix, P; Huízar-López, M R; Zaitseva, G P; Horta-Fernández, J L; Trujillo-García, E A; de la Mora-Sherer, D; Palafox-Luna, J A; Juárez-Carrillo, E

    2015-09-22

    A time-course feeding trial was conducted for 120 days on juvenile channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) to study the effects of diets differing in oil source (fish oil or soy oil) and supplementation with a commercial probiotic. Relative levels of Δ6-fatty acid desaturase (Δ6-FAD) and fatty acid elongase (FAE) expression were assessed in brain and liver tissues. Both genes showed similar expression levels in all groups studied. Fish weight-to-length relationships were evaluated using polynomial regression analyses, which identified a burst in weight and length in the channel catfish on day 105 of treatment; this increase was related to an increase in gene expression. Mid-intestinal lactic acid bacterium (LAB) count was determined according to morphological and biochemical criteria using API strips. There was no indication that intestinal LAB count was affected by the modified diets. The Cunningham glass adherence method was applied to evaluate phagocytic cell activity in peripheral blood. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was assessed through the respiratory burst activity of spleen macrophages by the NBT reduction test. Probiotic-supplemented diets provided a good substrate for innate immune system function; the phagocytic index was significantly enhanced in fish fed soy oil and the probiotic, and at the end of the experimental period, ROS production increased in fish fed soy oil. The substitution of fish oil by soy oil is recommended for food formulation and will contribute to promoting sustainable aquaculture. Probiotics are also recommended for channel catfish farming as they may act as immunonutrients.

  13. Hymenoptera Allergy and Mast Cell Activation Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bonadonna, Patrizia; Bonifacio, Massimiliano; Lombardo, Carla; Zanotti, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) can be diagnosed in patients with recurrent, severe symptoms from mast cell (MC)-derived mediators, which are transiently increased in serum and are attenuated by mediator-targeting drugs. When KIT-mutated, clonal MC are detected in these patients, a diagnosis of primary MCAS can be made. Severe systemic reactions to hymenoptera venom (HV) represent the most common form of anaphylaxis in patients with mastocytosis. Patients with primary MCAS and HV anaphylaxis are predominantly males and do not have skin lesions in the majority of cases, and anaphylaxis is characterized by hypotension and syncope in the absence of urticaria and angioedema. A normal value of tryptase (≤11.4 ng/ml) in these patients does not exclude a diagnosis of mastocytosis. Patients with primary MCAS and HV anaphylaxis have to undergo lifelong venom immunotherapy, in order to prevent further potentially fatal severe reactions.

  14. The E1 copper binding domain of full-length amyloid precursor protein mitigates copper-induced growth inhibition in brain metastatic prostate cancer DU145 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gough, Mallory Blanthorn-Hazell, Sophee Delury, Craig Parkin, Edward

    2014-10-31

    Highlights: • Copper levels are elevated in the tumour microenvironment. • APP mitigates copper-induced growth inhibition of DU145 prostate cancer (PCa) cells. • The APP intracellular domain is a prerequisite; soluble forms have no effect. • The E1 CuBD of APP is also a prerequisite. • APP copper binding potentially mitigates copper-induced PCa cell growth inhibition. - Abstract: Copper plays an important role in the aetiology and growth of tumours and levels of the metal are increased in the serum and tumour tissue of patients affected by a range of cancers including prostate cancer (PCa). The molecular mechanisms that enable cancer cells to proliferate in the presence of elevated copper levels are, therefore, of key importance in our understanding of tumour growth progression. In the current study, we have examined the role played by the amyloid precursor protein (APP) in mitigating copper-induced growth inhibition of the PCa cell line, DU145. A range of APP molecular constructs were stably over-expressed in DU145 cells and their effects on cell proliferation in the presence of copper were monitored. Our results show that endogenous APP expression was induced by sub-toxic copper concentrations in DU145 cells and over-expression of the wild-type protein was able to mitigate copper-induced growth inhibition via a mechanism involving the cytosolic and E1 copper binding domains of the full-length protein. APP likely represents one of a range of copper binding proteins that PCa cells employ in order to ensure efficient proliferation despite elevated concentrations of the metal within the tumour microenvironment. Targeting the expression of such proteins may contribute to therapeutic strategies for the treatment of cancers.

  15. Ultrafast charge-transfer reactions of indoline dyes with anchoring alkyl chains of varying length in mesoporous ZnO solar cells.

    PubMed

    Rohwer, Egmont; Minda, Iulia; Tauscher, Gabriele; Richter, Christoph; Miura, Hidetoshi; Schlettwein, Derck; Schwoerer, Heinrich

    2015-04-07

    Dye-sensitized solar cells based on a mesoporous ZnO substrate were sensitized with the indoline derivatives DN91, DN216 and DN285. The chromophore is the same for each of these dyes. They differ from each other in the length of an alkyl chain, which provides a second anchor to the ZnO surface and prolongs cell lifetime. Ultrafast transient absorption measurements reveal a correlation between the length of the alkyl chain and the fastest electron-injection process. The depopulation of the excited state and the associated emergence of the oxidized molecules are dominant spectral features in the transient absorption of the dyes with shorter alkyl chains. A slower picosecond-scale decay proceeds at constant rate for all three derivatives and is assigned to electron transfer into the trap states of ZnO. All assignments are in good agreement with a higher quantum efficiency of charge injection leading to higher short-circuit currents J(sc) for dyes with shorter alkyl chains.

  16. Production of full-length soluble Plasmodium falciparum RH5 protein vaccine using a Drosophila melanogaster Schneider 2 stable cell line system.

    PubMed

    Hjerrild, Kathryn A; Jin, Jing; Wright, Katherine E; Brown, Rebecca E; Marshall, Jennifer M; Labbé, Geneviève M; Silk, Sarah E; Cherry, Catherine J; Clemmensen, Stine B; Jørgensen, Thomas; Illingworth, Joseph J; Alanine, Daniel G W; Milne, Kathryn H; Ashfield, Rebecca; de Jongh, Willem A; Douglas, Alexander D; Higgins, Matthew K; Draper, Simon J

    2016-07-26

    The Plasmodium falciparum reticulocyte-binding protein homolog 5 (PfRH5) has recently emerged as a leading candidate antigen against the blood-stage human malaria parasite. However it has proved challenging to identify a heterologous expression platform that can produce a soluble protein-based vaccine in a manner compliant with current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP). Here we report the production of full-length PfRH5 protein using a cGMP-compliant platform called ExpreS(2), based on a Drosophila melanogaster Schneider 2 (S2) stable cell line system. Five sequence variants of PfRH5 were expressed that differed in terms of mutagenesis strategies to remove potential N-linked glycans. All variants bound the PfRH5 receptor basigin and were recognized by a panel of monoclonal antibodies. Analysis following immunization of rabbits identified quantitative and qualitative differences in terms of the functional IgG antibody response against the P. falciparum parasite. The antibodies induced by one protein variant were shown to be qualitatively similar to responses induced by other vaccine platforms. This work identifies Drosophila S2 cells as a clinically-relevant platform suited for the production of 'difficult-to-make' proteins from Plasmodium parasites, and identifies a PfRH5 sequence variant that can be used for clinical production of a non-glycosylated, soluble full-length protein vaccine immunogen.

  17. Production of full-length soluble Plasmodium falciparum RH5 protein vaccine using a Drosophila melanogaster Schneider 2 stable cell line system

    PubMed Central

    Hjerrild, Kathryn A.; Jin, Jing; Wright, Katherine E.; Brown, Rebecca E.; Marshall, Jennifer M.; Labbé, Geneviève M.; Silk, Sarah E.; Cherry, Catherine J.; Clemmensen, Stine B.; Jørgensen, Thomas; Illingworth, Joseph J.; Alanine, Daniel G. W.; Milne, Kathryn H.; Ashfield, Rebecca; de Jongh, Willem A.; Douglas, Alexander D.; Higgins, Matthew K.; Draper, Simon J.

    2016-01-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum reticulocyte-binding protein homolog 5 (PfRH5) has recently emerged as a leading candidate antigen against the blood-stage human malaria parasite. However it has proved challenging to identify a heterologous expression platform that can produce a soluble protein-based vaccine in a manner compliant with current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP). Here we report the production of full-length PfRH5 protein using a cGMP-compliant platform called ExpreS2, based on a Drosophila melanogaster Schneider 2 (S2) stable cell line system. Five sequence variants of PfRH5 were expressed that differed in terms of mutagenesis strategies to remove potential N-linked glycans. All variants bound the PfRH5 receptor basigin and were recognized by a panel of monoclonal antibodies. Analysis following immunization of rabbits identified quantitative and qualitative differences in terms of the functional IgG antibody response against the P. falciparum parasite. The antibodies induced by one protein variant were shown to be qualitatively similar to responses induced by other vaccine platforms. This work identifies Drosophila S2 cells as a clinically-relevant platform suited for the production of ‘difficult-to-make’ proteins from Plasmodium parasites, and identifies a PfRH5 sequence variant that can be used for clinical production of a non-glycosylated, soluble full-length protein vaccine immunogen. PMID:27457156

  18. Central domain of IL-33 is cleaved by mast cell proteases for potent activation of group-2 innate lymphoid cells

    PubMed Central

    Lefrançais, Emma; Duval, Anais; Mirey, Emilie; Roga, Stéphane; Espinosa, Eric; Cayrol, Corinne; Girard, Jean-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-33 (IL-33) is an alarmin cytokine from the IL-1 family. IL-33 activates many immune cell types expressing the interleukin 1 receptor-like 1 (IL1RL1) receptor ST2, including group-2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s, natural helper cells, nuocytes), the major producers of IL-5 and IL-13 during type-2 innate immune responses and allergic airway inflammation. IL-33 is likely to play a critical role in asthma because the IL33 and ST2/IL1RL1 genes have been reproducibly identified as major susceptibility loci in large-scale genome-wide association studies. A better understanding of the mechanisms regulating IL-33 activity is thus urgently needed. Here, we investigated the role of mast cells, critical effector cells in allergic disorders, known to interact with ILC2s in vivo. We found that serine proteases secreted by activated mast cells (chymase and tryptase) generate mature forms of IL-33 with potent activity on ILC2s. The major forms produced by mast cell proteases, IL-3395–270, IL-33107–270, and IL-33109–270, were 30-fold more potent than full-length human IL-331–270 for activation of ILC2s ex vivo. They induced a strong expansion of ILC2s and eosinophils in vivo, associated with elevated concentrations of IL-5 and IL-13. Murine IL-33 is also cleaved by mast cell tryptase, and a tryptase inhibitor reduced IL-33–dependent allergic airway inflammation in vivo. Our study identifies the central cleavage/activation domain of IL-33 (amino acids 66–111) as an important functional domain of the protein and suggests that interference with IL-33 cleavage and activation by mast cell and other inflammatory proteases could be useful to reduce IL-33–mediated responses in allergic asthma and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:25313073

  19. The full-length DNA sequence of Epstein Barr virus from a human gastric carcinoma cell line, SNU-719.

    PubMed

    Song, Kyung-A; Yang, San-Duk; Hwang, Jinha; Kim, Jong-Il; Kang, Myung-Soo

    2015-12-01

    The consistent presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in malignant cells of EBV-associated gastric carcinoma (EBVaGC) suggests it plays an important role during the development of EBVaGC. However, the entire genomic sequence of EBV from EBVaGC has yet to be determined. This study first determined, annotated, and analyzed the full genomic sequence of EBV from the naturally infected gastric carcinoma cell line SNU-719 using next-generation sequencing and comparative analyses. In consistent with the notion that EBV sequence isolates better reflect their geographic area than tissue origin, the SNU-719 EBV (named as GC1) was categorized as an East Asian type I EBV. Compared with the prototype B95.8 sequence, SNU-719 EBV contained 1372 variations, with 937 and 435 within coding and non-coding regions, respectively. Of the 937 variations, 465 were non-synonymous changes, while 472 synonymous changes included partial internal deletions in the coding regions of LMP1 and gp350. The RNAseq transcriptome revealed that multiple BART transcripts comprised the majority of EBV RNA reads. The SNU-719 EBV expressed high levels of BART, LF3, BHLF1, and BNLF2. Evidence of RNA editing at multiple sites in the host chromosome was found; however, no evidence of genome integration was seen. The annotated SNU-719 EBV sequence will be a useful reference in future EBVaGC studies.

  20. Notch reporter activity in breast cancer cell lines identifies a subset of cells with stem cell activity.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Rosemarie C; Ouzounova, Maria; Davis, April; Choi, Daejin; Tchuenkam, Stevie M; Kim, Gwangil; Luther, Tahra; Quraishi, Ahmed A; Senbabaoglu, Yasin; Conley, Sarah J; Clouthier, Shawn G; Hassan, Khaled A; Wicha, Max S; Korkaya, Hasan

    2015-03-01

    Developmental pathways such as Notch play a pivotal role in tissue-specific stem cell self-renewal as well as in tumor development. However, the role of Notch signaling in breast cancer stem cells (CSC) remains to be determined. We utilized a lentiviral Notch reporter system to identify a subset of cells with a higher Notch activity (Notch(+)) or reduced activity (Notch(-)) in multiple breast cancer cell lines. Using in vitro and mouse xenotransplantation assays, we investigated the role of the Notch pathway in breast CSC regulation. Breast cancer cells with increased Notch activity displayed increased sphere formation as well as expression of breast CSC markers. Interestingly Notch(+) cells displayed higher Notch4 expression in both basal and luminal breast cancer cell lines. Moreover, Notch(+) cells demonstrated tumor initiation capacity at serial dilutions in mouse xenografts, whereas Notch(-) cells failed to generate tumors. γ-Secretase inhibitor (GSI), a Notch blocker but not a chemotherapeutic agent, effectively targets these Notch(+) cells in vitro and in mouse xenografts. Furthermore, elevated Notch4 and Hey1 expression in primary patient samples correlated with poor patient survival. Our study revealed a molecular mechanism for the role of Notch-mediated regulation of breast CSCs and provided a compelling rationale for CSC-targeted therapeutics.

  1. Notch reporter activity in breast cancer cell lines identifies a subset of cells with stem cell activity

    PubMed Central

    Davis, April; Choi, Daejin; Tchuenkam, Stevie M.; Kim, Gwangil; Luther, Tahra; Quraishi, Ahmed A.; Senbabaoglu, Yasin; Conley, Sarah J.; Clouthier, Shawn G.; Hassan, Khaled A.; Wicha, Max S.; Korkaya, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Developmental pathways such as Notch play a pivotal role in tissue specific stem cell self-renewal as well as in tumor development. However, the role of Notch signaling in breast cancer stem cells (CSC) remains to be determined. We utilized a lentiviral Notch reporter system to identify a subset of cells with a higher Notch activity (Notch+) or reduced activity (Notch-) in multiple breast cancer cell lines. Using in vitro and mouse xenotransplantation assays we investigated the role of Notch pathway in breast CSC regulation. Breast cancer cells with increased Notch activity displayed increased sphere formation as well as expression of breast CSC markers. Interestingly Notch+ cells displayed higher Notch4 expression in both basal and luminal breast cancer cell lines. Moreover, Notch+ cells demonstrated tumor initiation capacity at serial dilutions in mouse xenografts while Notch- cells failed to generate tumors. Gamma-secretase inhibitor (GSI), a Notch blocker but not a chemotherapeutic agent effectively targets these Notch+ cells in vitro and in mouse xenografts. Furthermore, elevated Notch4 and Hey1 expression in primary patient samples correlated with poor patient survival. Our studies reveal molecular mechanism for the role of Notch mediated regulation of breast CSCs and provide a compelling rationale for CSC targeted therapeutics. PMID:25673823

  2. Sertoli Cells Maintain Leydig Cell Number and Peritubular Myoid Cell Activity in the Adult Mouse Testis

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Ana; Milne, Laura; Cruickshanks, Lyndsey; Jeffrey, Nathan; Guillou, Florian; Freeman, Tom C.; Mitchell, Rod T.; Smith, Lee B.

    2014-01-01

    The Sertoli cells are critical regulators of testis differentiation and development. In the adult, however, their known function is restricted largely to maintenance of spermatogenesis. To determine whether the Sertoli cells regulate other aspects of adult testis biology we have used a novel transgenic mouse model in which Amh-Cre induces expression of the receptor for Diphtheria toxin (iDTR) specifically within Sertoli cells. This causes controlled, cell-specific and acute ablation of the Sertoli cell population in the adult animal following Diphtheria toxin injection. Results show that Sertoli cell ablation leads to rapid loss of all germ cell populations. In addition, adult Leydig cell numbers decline by 75% with the remaining cells concentrated around the rete and in the sub-capsular region. In the absence of Sertoli cells, peritubular myoid cell activity is reduced but the cells retain an ability to exclude immune cells from the seminiferous tubules. These data demonstrate that, in addition to support of spermatogenesis, Sertoli cells are required in the adult testis both for retention of the normal adult Leydig cell population and for support of normal peritubular myoid cell function. This has implications for our understanding of male reproductive disorders and wider androgen-related conditions affecting male health. PMID:25144714

  3. T helper cell activation and human retroviral pathogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, K F; Heeney, J L

    1996-01-01

    T helper (Th) cells are of central importance in regulating many critical immune effector mechanisms. The profile of cytokines produced by Th cells correlates with the type of effector cells induced during the immune response to foreign antigen. Th1 cells induce the cell-mediated immune response, while Th2 cells drive antibody production. Th cells are the preferential targets of human retroviruses. Infections with human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV) or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) result in the expansion of Th cells by the action of HTLV (adult T-cell leukemia) or the progressive loss of T cells by the action of HIV (AIDS). Both retrovirus infections impart a high-level activation state in the host immune cells as well as systemically. However, diverging responses to this activation state have contrasting effects on the Th-cell population. In HIV infection, Th-cell loss has been attributed to several mechanisms, including a selective elimination of cells by apoptosis. The induction of apoptosis in HIV infection is complex, with many different pathways able to induce cell death. In contrast, infection of Th cells with HTLV-1 affords the cell a protective advantage against apoptosis. This advantage may allow the cell to escape immune surveillance, providing the opportunity for the development of Th-cell cancer. In this review, we will discuss the impact of Th-cell activation and general immune activation on human retrovirus expression with a focus upon Th-cell function and the progression to disease. PMID:8987361

  4. TALENs-directed knockout of the full-length transcription factor Nrf1α that represses malignant behaviour of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yonggang; Qiu, Lu; Lü, Fenglin; Ru, Xufang; Li, Shaojun; Xiang, Yuancai; Yu, Siwang; Zhang, Yiguo

    2016-04-11

    The full-length Nrf1α is processed into distinct isoforms, which together regulate genes essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and organ integrity, and liver-specific loss of Nrf1 in mice results in spontaneous hepatoma. Herein, we report that the human constitutive Nrf1α, rather than smaller Nrf1β/γ, expression is attenuated or abolished in the case of low-differentiated high-metastatic hepatocellular carcinomas. Therefore, Nrf1α is of importance in the physio-pathological origin and development, but its specific pathobiological function(s) remains elusive. To address this, TALENs-directed knockout of Nrf1α, but not Nrf1β/γ, is created in the human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells. The resulting Nrf1α(-/-) cells are elongated, with slender spindle-shapes and enlarged gaps between cells observed under scanning electron microscope. When compared with wild-type controls, the invasive and migratory abilities of Nrf1α(-/-) cells are increased significantly, along with the cell-cycle G2-M arrest and S-phase reduction, as accompanied by suppressed apoptosis. Despite a modest increase in the soft-agar colony formation of Nrf1α(-/-) cells, its loss-of-function markedly promotes malgrowth of the subcutaneous carcinoma xenograft in nude mice with hepatic metastasis. Together with molecular expression results, we thus suppose requirement of Nrf1α (and major derivates) for gene regulatory mechanisms repressing cancer cell process (e.g. EMT) and malignant behaviour (e.g. migration).

  5. TALENs-directed knockout of the full-length transcription factor Nrf1α that represses malignant behaviour of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yonggang; Qiu, Lu; Lü, Fenglin; Ru, Xufang; Li, Shaojun; Xiang, Yuancai; Yu, Siwang; Zhang, Yiguo

    2016-01-01

    The full-length Nrf1α is processed into distinct isoforms, which together regulate genes essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and organ integrity, and liver-specific loss of Nrf1 in mice results in spontaneous hepatoma. Herein, we report that the human constitutive Nrf1α, rather than smaller Nrf1β/γ, expression is attenuated or abolished in the case of low-differentiated high-metastatic hepatocellular carcinomas. Therefore, Nrf1α is of importance in the physio-pathological origin and development, but its specific pathobiological function(s) remains elusive. To address this, TALENs-directed knockout of Nrf1α, but not Nrf1β/γ, is created in the human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells. The resulting Nrf1α−/− cells are elongated, with slender spindle-shapes and enlarged gaps between cells observed under scanning electron microscope. When compared with wild-type controls, the invasive and migratory abilities of Nrf1α−/− cells are increased significantly, along with the cell-cycle G2-M arrest and S-phase reduction, as accompanied by suppressed apoptosis. Despite a modest increase in the soft-agar colony formation of Nrf1α−/− cells, its loss-of-function markedly promotes malgrowth of the subcutaneous carcinoma xenograft in nude mice with hepatic metastasis. Together with molecular expression results, we thus suppose requirement of Nrf1α (and major derivates) for gene regulatory mechanisms repressing cancer cell process (e.g. EMT) and malignant behaviour (e.g. migration). PMID:27065079

  6. VERO stable cell lines expressing full-length human epidermal growth factor receptors 2 and 3: platforms for subtractive phage display.

    PubMed

    Hedayatizadeh-Omran, Akbar; Valadan, Reza; Rafiei, Alireza; Tehrani, Mohsen; Alizadeh-Navaei, Reza

    2015-09-01

    Cross-talk between human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 and 3 (HER2 and HER3) may potentially contribute to therapeutic resistance in human breast cancer. Subtractive phage display allows highly specific selection for antibody fragments directed against cells surface HER2 and HER3. The strategies to select conformation- and activation-specific antibodies against HER2 and HER3 require tightly regulated HER2 and HER3 expressing cells that allow controlled activation/inactivation of these receptors during panning procedures. To achieve this, first, we found that the VERO cell line is an appropriate cell line for heterogeneous expression of HER2 and HER3, and then we established a panel of VERO stable cell lines expressing high levels of HER2 and HER3 alone and in combination. We also showed that HER2 and HER3 expressed in VERO cells were biologically active and could form heterodimer following neuregulin1 treatment. The cell line established here not only provided platforms for phage display-based methods but also could be used in any HER-related studies.

  7. Kinase Activity Studied in Living Cells Using an Immunoassay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bavec, Aljos?a

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory exercise demonstrates the use of an immunoassay for studying kinase enzyme activity in living cells. The advantage over the classical method, in which students have to isolate the enzyme from cell material and measure its activity in vitro, is that enzyme activity is modulated and measured in living cells, providing a more…

  8. Finite length Taylor Couette flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streett, C. L.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1987-01-01

    Axisymmetric numerical solutions of the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations for flow between concentric rotating cylinders of finite length are obtained by a spectral collocation method. These representative results pertain to two-cell/one-cell exchange process, and are compared with recent experiments.

  9. Regulation of polymorphonuclear cell activation by thrombopoietin.

    PubMed Central

    Brizzi, M F; Battaglia, E; Rosso, A; Strippoli, P; Montrucchio, G; Camussi, G; Pegoraro, L

    1997-01-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) regulates early and late stages of platelet formation as well as platelet activation. TPO exerts its effects by binding to the receptor, encoded by the protooncogene c-mpl, that is expressed in a large number of cells of hematopoietic origin. In this study, we evaluated the expression of c-Mpl and the effects of TPO on human polymorphonuclear cells (PMN). We demonstrate that PMN express the TPO receptor c-Mpl and that TPO induces STAT1 tyrosine phosphorylation and the formation of a serum inducible element complex containing STAT1. The analysis of biological effects of TPO on PMN demonstrated that TPO, at concentrations of 1-10 ng/ml, primes the response of PMN to n-formyl-met-leu-phe (FMLP) by inducing an early oxidative burst. TPO-induced priming on FMLP-stimulated PMN was also detected on the tyrosine phosphorylation of a protein with a molecular mass of approximately 28 kD. Moreover, we demonstrated that TPO by itself was able to stimulate, at doses ranging from 0.05 to 10 ng/ml, early release and delayed synthesis of interleukin 8 (IL-8). Thus, our data indicate that, in addition to sustaining megakaryocytopoiesis, TPO may have an important role in regulating PMN activation. PMID:9120001

  10. Effects of dietary fats on learning, pain threshold, thermoregulation and motor activity in rats: interaction with the length of feeding period.

    PubMed

    Yehuda, S; Carasso, R L

    1987-02-01

    The effects of both a semisynthetic diet containing 20% fat from various sources (soybean oil, sunflower oil and lard) and a control diet on learning capacity, motor activity, pain threshold and thermoregulation were studied in rats which were fed on these diets for various lengths of feeding periods (1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks). Two weeks feeding period of soybean oil source induced an improvement in learning capacity, which was further enhanced by increasing the length of the feeding period. A 3-week feeding period was required to obtain an increase in the pain threshold, by which time the rats were also protected from d-amphetamine induced hypothermia. The analgesia induced by the diet is naloxone-dependent. None of the other diets, including the sunflower oil diet, which is richer in polyunsaturated fatty acids, differed from control diet. While the mode of action of this diet is still unknown, the effects of the soybean oil source diet cannot be attributed to nutritional factors such as changes in energy consumption or body weight.

  11. Full length and protease domain activity of chikungunya virus nsP2 differ from other alphavirus nsP2 proteases in recognition of small peptide substrates.

    PubMed

    Saisawang, Chonticha; Sillapee, Pornpan; Sinsirimongkol, Kwanhathai; Ubol, Sukathida; Smith, Duncan R; Ketterman, Albert J

    2015-04-22

    Alphavirus nsP2 proteins are multifunctional and essential for viral replication. The protease role of nsP2 is critical for virus replication as only the virus protease activity is used for processing of the viral non-structural polypeptide. Chikungunya virus is an emerging disease problem that is becoming a world-wide health issue. We have generated purified recombinant chikungunya virus nsP2 proteins, both full length and a truncated protease domain from the C-terminus of the nsP2 protein. Enzyme characterization shows that the protease domain alone has different properties compared with the full length nsP2 protease. We also show chikungunya nsP2 protease possesses different substrate specificity to the canonical alphavirus nsP2 polyprotein cleavage specificity. Moreover, the chikungunya nsP2 also appears to differ from other alphavirus nsP2 in its distinctive ability to recognize small peptide substrates.

  12. Full length and protease domain activity of chikungunya virus nsP2 differ from other alphavirus nsP2 proteases in recognition of small peptide substrates

    PubMed Central

    Saisawang, Chonticha; Sillapee, Pornpan; Sinsirimongkol, Kwanhathai; Ubol, Sukathida; Smith, Duncan R.; Ketterman, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Alphavirus nsP2 proteins are multifunctional and essential for viral replication. The protease role of nsP2 is critical for virus replication as only the virus protease activity is used for processing of the viral non-structural polypeptide. Chikungunya virus is an emerging disease problem that is becoming a world-wide health issue. We have generated purified recombinant chikungunya virus nsP2 proteins, both full length and a truncated protease domain from the C-terminus of the nsP2 protein. Enzyme characterization shows that the protease domain alone has different properties compared with the full length nsP2 protease. We also show chikungunya nsP2 protease possesses different substrate specificity to the canonical alphavirus nsP2 polyprotein cleavage specificity. Moreover, the chikungunya nsP2 also appears to differ from other alphavirus nsP2 in its distinctive ability to recognize small peptide substrates. PMID:26182358

  13. Length of stain dosimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueck, Dale E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Payload customers for the Space Shuttle have recently expressed concerns about the possibility of their payloads at an adjacent pad being contaminated by plume effluents from a shuttle at an active pad as they await launch on an inactive pad. As part of a study to satisfy such concerns a ring of inexpensive dosimeters was deployed around the active pad at the inter-pad distance. However, following a launch, dosimeters cannot be read for several hours after the exposure. As a consequence factors such as different substrates, solvent systems, and possible volatilization of HCl from the badges were studied. This observation led to the length of stain (LOS) dosimeters of this invention. Commercial passive LOS dosimeters are sensitive only to the extent of being capable of sensing 2 ppm to 20 ppm if the exposure is 8 hours. To map and quantitate the HCl generated by Shuttle launches, and in the atmosphere within a radius of 1.5 miles from the active pad, a sensitivity of 2 ppm HCl in the atmospheric gases on an exposure of 5 minutes is required. A passive length of stain dosimeter has been developed having a sensitivity rendering it capable of detecting a gas in a concentration as low as 2 ppm on an exposure of five minutes.

  14. A novel T cell receptor single-chain signaling complex mediates antigen-specific T cell activity and tumor control

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Jennifer D.; Harris, Daniel T.; Soto, Carolina M.; Chervin, Adam S.; Aggen, David H.; Roy, Edward J.; Kranz, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of genetically modified T cells to treat cancer has shown promise in several clinical trials. Two main strategies have been applied to redirect T cells against cancer: 1) introduction of a full-length T cell receptor (TCR) specific for a tumor-associated peptide-MHC, or 2) introduction of a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), including an antibody fragment specific for a tumor cell surface antigen, linked intracellularly to T cell signaling domains. Each strategy has advantages and disadvantages for clinical applications. Here, we present data on the in vitro and in vivo effectiveness of a single-chain signaling receptor incorporating a TCR variable fragment as the targeting element (referred to as TCR-SCS). This receptor contained a single-chain TCR (Vβ-linker-Vα) from a high-affinity TCR called m33, linked to the intracellular signaling domains of CD28 and CD3ζ. This format avoided mispairing with endogenous TCR chains, and mediated specific T cell activity when expressed in either CD4 or CD8 T cells. TCR-SCS-transduced CD8-negative cells showed an intriguing sensitivity, compared to full-length TCRs, to higher densities of less stable pepMHC targets. T cells that expressed this peptide-specific receptor persisted in vivo, and exhibited polyfunctional responses. Growth of metastatic antigen-positive tumors was significantly inhibited by T cells that expressed this receptor, and tumor cells that escaped were antigen loss variants. TCR-SCS receptors represent an alternative targeting receptor strategy that combines the advantages of single-chain expression, avoidance of TCR chain mispairing, and targeting of intracellular antigens presented in complex with MHC proteins. PMID:25082071

  15. Shorter telomeres and high telomerase activity correlate with a highly aggressive phenotype in breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ceja-Rangel, Hugo A; Sánchez-Suárez, Patricia; Castellanos-Juárez, Emilio; Peñaroja-Flores, Rubicelia; Arenas-Aranda, Diego J; Gariglio, Patricio; Benítez-Bribiesca, Luis

    2016-09-01

    Maintenance of telomere length is one function of human telomerase that is crucial for the survival of cancer cells and cancer progression. Both telomeres and telomerase have been proposed as possible biomarkers of cancer risk and cancer invasiveness; however, their clinical relevance is still under discussion. In order to improve our understanding of the relationship between telomere length and telomerase activity with cancer invasiveness, we studied telomere length as well as telomerase levels, activity, and intracellular localization in breast cancer cell lines with diverse invasive phenotypes. We found an apparently paradoxical coincidence of short telomeres and enhanced telomerase activity in the most invasive breast cancer cell lines. We also observed that hTERT intracellular localization could be correlated with its level of activity. There was no association between human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) protein expression levels and invasiveness. We propose that simultaneous evaluation of these two biomarkers-telomere length and telomerase activity-could be useful for the assessment of the invasive capacity and aggressiveness of tumor cells from breast cancer patients.

  16. Telomere Length of Individual Chromosomes in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Blinova, E A; Zinnatova, E V; Barkovskaya, M Sh; Borisov, V I; Sizikov, A E; Kozhevnikov, V S; Rubtsov, N B; Kozlov, V A

    2016-04-01

    We analyzed telomere length of individual chromosomes in peripheral blood lymphocytes of healthy individuals and patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Quantitative fluorescent in situ hybridization and subsequent computer analysis of metaphase chromosomes showed that distribution of telomere length on individual chromosomes is different under normal and pathological conditions. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis had significantly shorter chromosome 4p telomeres, which can be essential for pathogenesis of this multifactorial disease. Additionally, disease activity inversely correlated with telomere length on chromosome 10p carrying genes involved in T cell differentiation and proliferation.

  17. Epigenomics of T cell activation, differentiation and memory

    PubMed Central

    Cuddapah, Suresh; Barski, Artem; Zhao, Keji

    2010-01-01

    Activation of T cells is an essential step in the immunological response to infection. While activation of naïve T cells results in proliferation and slow differentiation into cytokine-producing effector cells, antigen engagement with memory cells leads to cytokine production immediately. Even though the cell surface signaling events are similar in both the cases, the outcome is different, suggesting that distinct regulatory mechanisms may exist downstream of the activation signals. Recent advances in the understanding of global epigenetic patterns in T cells have resulted in the appreciation of the role of epigenetic mechanisms in processes such as activation and differentiation. In this review we discuss recent data suggesting that naïve T cell activation, differentiation and lineage commitment results in epigenetic changes and a fine balance between different histone modifications is required. On the other hand, memory T cells are poised and do not require epigenetic changes for short-term activation. PMID:20226645

  18. Characterization of the Specificity, Functionality, and Durability of Host T‐Cell Responses Against the Full‐Length Hepatitis E Virus

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Anthony; Halliday, John S.; Swadling, Leo; Madden, Richie G.; Bendall, Richard; Hunter, Jeremy G.; Maggs, James; Simmonds, Peter; Smith, Donald B.; Vine, Louisa; McLaughlin, Cara; Collier, Jane; Bonsall, David; Jeffery, Katie; Dunachie, Susanna; Klenerman, Paul; Izopet, Jacques; Kamar, Nassim; Dalton, Harry R.

    2016-01-01

    The interplay between host antiviral immunity and immunopathology during hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection determines important clinical outcomes. We characterized the specificity, functionality, and durability of host T‐cell responses against the full‐length HEV virus and assessed a novel “Quantiferon” assay for the rapid diagnosis of HEV infection. Eighty‐nine volunteers were recruited from Oxford, Truro (UK), and Toulouse (France), including 44 immune‐competent patients with acute HEV infection, 18 HEV‐exposed immunosuppressed organ‐transplant recipients (8 with chronic HEV), and 27 healthy volunteers. A genotype 3a peptide library (616 overlapping peptides spanning open reading frames [ORFs] 1‐3) was used in interferon‐gamma (IFN‐γ) T‐cell ELISpot assays. CD4+/CD8+ T‐cell subsets and polyfunctionality were defined using ICCS and SPICE analysis. Quantification of IFN‐γ used whole‐blood stimulation with recombinant HEV‐capsid protein in the QuantiFERON kit. HEV‐specific T‐cell responses were detected in 41/44 immune‐competent HEV exposed volunteers (median magnitude: 397 spot‐forming units/106 peripheral blood mononuclear cells), most frequently targeting ORF2. High‐magnitude, polyfunctional CD4 and CD8+ T cells were detected during acute disease and maintained to 12 years, but these declined over time, with CD8+ responses becoming more monofunctional. Low‐level responses were detectable in immunosuppressed patients. Twenty‐three novel HEV CD4+ and CD8+ T‐cell targets were mapped predominantly to conserved genomic regions. QuantiFERON testing demonstrated an inverse correlation between IFN‐γ production and the time from clinical presentation, providing 100% specificity, and 71% sensitivity (area under the receiver operator characteristic curve of 0.86) for HEV exposure at 0.3 IU/mL. Conclusion: Robust HEV‐specific T‐cell responses generated during acute disease predominantly target ORF2, but decline in

  19. MAIT cells are activated during human viral infections.

    PubMed

    van Wilgenburg, Bonnie; Scherwitzl, Iris; Hutchinson, Edward C; Leng, Tianqi; Kurioka, Ayako; Kulicke, Corinna; de Lara, Catherine; Cole, Suzanne; Vasanawathana, Sirijitt; Limpitikul, Wannee; Malasit, Prida; Young, Duncan; Denney, Laura; Moore, Michael D; Fabris, Paolo; Giordani, Maria Teresa; Oo, Ye Htun; Laidlaw, Stephen M; Dustin, Lynn B; Ho, Ling-Pei; Thompson, Fiona M; Ramamurthy, Narayan; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip; Willberg, Christian B; Screaton, Gavin R; Klenerman, Paul

    2016-06-23

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are abundant in humans and recognize bacterial ligands. Here, we demonstrate that MAIT cells are also activated during human viral infections in vivo. MAIT cells activation was observed during infection with dengue virus, hepatitis C virus and influenza virus. This activation-driving cytokine release and Granzyme B upregulation-is TCR-independent but dependent on IL-18 in synergy with IL-12, IL-15 and/or interferon-α/β. IL-18 levels and MAIT cell activation correlate with disease severity in acute dengue infection. Furthermore, HCV treatment with interferon-α leads to specific MAIT cell activation in vivo in parallel with an enhanced therapeutic response. Moreover, TCR-independent activation of MAIT cells leads to a reduction of HCV replication in vitro mediated by IFN-γ. Together these data demonstrate MAIT cells are activated following viral infections, and suggest a potential role in both host defence and immunopathology.

  20. Nylon wool purification alters the activation of T cells.

    PubMed

    Wohler, Jillian E; Barnum, Scott R

    2009-02-01

    Purification of lymphocytes, particularly T cells, is commonly performed using nylon wool. This enrichment method selectively retains B cells and some myeloid cells allowing a significantly more pure T cell population to flow through a nylon wool column. T cells purified in this fashion are assumed to be unaltered and functionally naïve, however some studies have suggested aberrant in vitro T cell responses after nylon wool treatment. We found that nylon wool purification significantly altered T cell proliferation, expression of activation markers and production of cytokines. Our results suggest that nylon wool treatment modifies T cell activation responses and that caution should be used when choosing this purification method.

  1. The effect of temperature and length of heat shock treatment on the thermal tolerance and cell leakage of Cronobacter sakazakii BCRC 13988.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Hsiang; Chiang, Ming-Lun; Chou, Cheng-Chun

    2009-09-15

    Enterobacter sakazakii is an emerging opportunistic pathogen associated with life-threatening illnesses in infants, with infant formula serving as the principal mode of transmission. In the present study, C. sakazakii (formely E. sakazakii) BCRC 13988 was subjected to various heat shock treatments (42-48 degrees C for 5-15 min). Its subsequent survival at 51 degrees C and the leakage of intracellular materials was investigated. It was found that 47 degrees C was the maximum growth temperature of the test organism. In addition, heat shock enhanced the thermal tolerance of C. sakazakii BCRC 13988. Within heat shock temperatures between 42 and 47 degrees C, the thermal tolerance enhancing effect increased as the length or temperature of the heat shock treatment was increased. However, increasing the heat shock temperature to 48 degrees C reduced the thermal tolerance enhancing effect. Among the various heat shocked cells examined, the 47 degrees C-15 min-heat shocked C. sakazakii exhibited the highest thermal tolerance. Moreover, electron micrograph analysis showed that heat shock treatment caused damage and disruption in C. sakazakii cells. There was a significant increase (P<0.05) in the leakage of nucleic acid and protein in the supernatant of the heat shocked cell suspension that increased as the temperature and duration of heat shock increased.

  2. Repairing the Sickle Cell mutation. II. Effect of psoralen linker length on specificity of formation and yield of third strand-directed photoproducts with the mutant target sequence.

    PubMed

    Amosova, Olga; Broitman, Steven L; Fresco, Jacques R

    2003-08-15

    Three identical deoxyoligonucleotide third strands with a 3'-terminal psoralen moiety attached by linkers that differ in length (N = 16, 6 and 4 atoms) and structure were examined for their ability to form triplex-directed psoralen photoproducts with both the mutant T residue of the Sickle Cell beta-globin gene and the comparable wild-type sequence in linear duplex targets. Specificity and yield of UVA (365 nm) and visible (419 nm) light-induced photoadducts were studied. The total photoproduct yield varies with the linker and includes both monoadducts and crosslinks at various available pyrimidine sites. The specificity of photoadduct formation at the desired mutant T residue site was greatly improved by shortening the psoralen linker. In particular, using the N-4 linker, psoralen interaction with the residues of the non-coding duplex strand was essentially eliminated, while modification of the Sickle Cell mutant T residue was maximized. At the same time, the proportion of crosslink formation at the mutant T residue upon UV irradiation was much greater for the N-4 linker. The photoproducts formed with the wild-type target were fully consistent with its single base pair difference. The third strand with the N-4 linker was also shown to bind to a supercoiled plasmid containing the Sickle Cell mutation site, giving photoproduct yields comparable with those observed in the linear mutant target.

  3. Repairing the Sickle Cell mutation. II. Effect of psoralen linker length on specificity of formation and yield of third strand-directed photoproducts with the mutant target sequence

    PubMed Central

    Amosova, Olga; Broitman, Steven L.; Fresco, Jacques R.

    2003-01-01

    Three identical deoxyoligonucleotide third strands with a 3′-terminal psoralen moiety attached by linkers that differ in length (N = 16, 6 and 4 atoms) and structure were examined for their ability to form triplex-directed psoralen photoproducts with both the mutant T residue of the Sickle Cell β-globin gene and the comparable wild-type sequence in linear duplex targets. Specificity and yield of UVA (365 nm) and visible (419 nm) light-induced photoadducts were studied. The total photoproduct yield varies with the linker and includes both monoadducts and crosslinks at various available pyrimidine sites. The specificity of photoadduct formation at the desired mutant T residue site was greatly improved by shortening the psoralen linker. In particular, using the N-4 linker, psoralen interaction with the residues of the non-coding duplex strand was essentially eliminated, while modification of the Sickle Cell mutant T residue was maximized. At the same time, the proportion of crosslink formation at the mutant T residue upon UV irradiation was much greater for the N-4 linker. The photoproducts formed with the wild-type target were fully consistent with its single base pair difference. The third strand with the N-4 linker was also shown to bind to a supercoiled plasmid containing the Sickle Cell mutation site, giving photoproduct yields comparable with those observed in the linear mutant target. PMID:12907706

  4. Activation of rat intestinal mucosal mast cells by fat absorption.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yong; Sakata, Yasuhisa; Yang, Qing; Li, Xiaoming; Xu, Min; Yoder, Stephanie; Langhans, Wolfgang; Tso, Patrick

    2012-06-01

    Previous studies have linked certain types of gut mucosal immune cells with fat intake. We determined whether fat absorption activates intestinal mucosal mast cells (MMC), a key component of the gut mucosal immune system. Conscious intestinal lymph fistula rats were used. The mesenteric lymph ducts were cannulated, and the intraduodenal (i.d.) tubes were installed for the infusion of Liposyn II 20% (an intralipid emulsion). Lymphatic concentrations of histamine, rat MMC protease II (RMCPII), a specific marker of rat intestinal MMC degranulation, and prostaglandin D(2) (PGD(2)) were measured by ELISA. Intestinal MMC degranulation was visualized by immunofluorescent microscopy of jejunum sections taken at 1 h after Liposyn II gavage. Intraduodenal bolus infusion of Liposyn II 20% (4.4 kcal/3 ml) induced approximately a onefold increase in lymphatic histamine and PGD(2), ∼20-fold increase in lymphatic RMCPII, but only onefold increase in peripheral serum RMCPII concentrations. Release of RMCPII into lymph increased dose dependently with the amount of lipid fed. In addition, i.d. infusion of long-chain triacylglycerol trilinolein (C18:2 n-6, the major composite in Liposyn II) significantly increased the lymphatic RMCPII concentration, whereas medium-chain triacylglycerol tricaprylin (C8:0) did not alter lymph RMCPII secretion. Immunohistochemistry image revealed the degranulation of MMC into lamina propria after lipid feeding. These novel findings indicate that intestinal MMC are activated and degranulate to release MMC mediators to the circulation during fat absorption. This action of fatty acid is dose and chain length dependent.

  5. Polyester hydrolytic and synthetic activity catalyzed by the medium-chain-length poly(3-hydroxyalkanoate) depolymerase from Streptomyces venezuelae SO1.

    PubMed

    Santos, Marta; Gangoiti, Joana; Keul, Helmut; Möller, Martin; Serra, Juan L; Llama, María J

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanote (MCL-PHA) depolymerase from an isolate identified as Streptomyces venezuelae SO1 was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and characterized. The molecular mass and pI of the purified enzyme were approximately 27 kDa and 5.9, respectively. The depolymerase showed its maximum activity in the alkaline pH range and 50 °C and retained more than 70 % of its initial activity after 8 h at 40 °C. The MCL-PHA depolymerase hydrolyzes various p-nitrophenyl-alkanoates and polycaprolactone but not polylactide, poly-3-hydroxybutyrate, and polyethylene succinate. The enzymatic activity was markedly enhanced by the presence of low concentrations of detergents and organic solvents, being inhibited by dithiothreitol and EDTA. The potential of using the enzyme to produce (R)-3-hydroxyoctanoate in aqueous media or to catalyze ester-forming reactions in anhydrous media was investigated. In this sense, the MCL-PHA depolymerase catalyzes the hydrolysis of poly-3-hydroxyoctanoate to monomeric units and the ring-opening polymerization of β-butyrolactone and lactides, while ε-caprolactone and pentadecalactone were hardly polymerized.

  6. Safe-by-Design CuO Nanoparticles via Fe-Doping, Cu-O Bond Length Variation, and Biological Assessment in Cells and Zebrafish Embryos.

    PubMed

    Naatz, Hendrik; Lin, Sijie; Li, Ruibin; Jiang, Wen; Ji, Zhaoxia; Chang, Chong Hyun; Köser, Jan; Thöming, Jorg; Xia, Tian; Nel, Andre E; Mädler, Lutz; Pokhrel, Suman

    2017-01-24

    The safe implementation of nanotechnology requires nanomaterial hazard assessment in accordance with the material physicochemical properties that trigger the injury response at the nano/bio interface. Since CuO nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used industrially and their dissolution properties play a major role in hazard potential, we hypothesized that tighter bonding of Cu to Fe by particle doping could constitute a safer-by-design approach through decreased dissolution. Accordingly, we designed a combinatorial library in which CuO was doped with 1-10% Fe in a flame spray pyrolysis reactor. The morphology and structural properties were determined by XRD, BET, Raman spectroscopy, HRTEM, EFTEM, and EELS, which demonstrated a significant reduction in the apical Cu-O bond length while simultaneously increasing the planar bond length (Jahn-Teller distortion). Hazard screening was performed in tissue culture cell lines and zebrafish embryos to discern the change in the hazardous effects of doped vs nondoped particles. This demonstrated that with increased levels of doping there was a progressive decrease in cytotoxicity in BEAS-2B and THP-1 cells, as well as an incremental decrease in the rate of hatching interference in zebrafish embryos. The dissolution profiles were determined and the surface reactions taking place in Holtfreter's solution were validated using cyclic voltammetry measurements to demonstrate that the Cu(+)/Cu(2+) and Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) redox species play a major role in the dissolution process of pure and Fe-doped CuO. Altogether, a safe-by-design strategy was implemented for the toxic CuO particles via Fe doping and has been demonstrated for their safe use in the environment.

  7. Isomaltulose is actively metabolized in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Luguang; Birch, Robert G

    2011-12-01

    Isomaltulose is a structural isomer of sucrose (Suc). It has been widely used as a nonmetabolized sugar in physiological studies aimed at better understanding the regulatory roles and transport of sugars in plants. It is increasingly used as a nutritional human food, with some beneficial properties including low glycemic index and acariogenicity. Cloning of genes for Suc isomerases opened the way for direct commercial production in plants. The understanding that plants lack catabolic capabilities for isomaltulose indicated a possibility of enhanced yields relative to Suc. However, this understanding was based primarily on the treatment of intact cells with exogenous isomaltulose. Here, we show that sugarcane (Saccharum interspecific hybrids), like other tested plants, does not readily import or catabolize extracellular isomaltulose. However, among intracellular enzymes, cytosolic Suc synthase (in the breakage direction) and vacuolar soluble acid invertase (SAI) substantially catabolize isomaltulose. From kinetic studies, the specificity constant of SAI for isomaltulose is about 10% of that for Suc. Activity varied against other Suc isomers, with V(max) for leucrose about 6-fold that for Suc. SAI activities from other plant species varied substantially in substrate specificity against Suc and its isomers. Therefore, in physiological studies, the blanket notion of Suc isomers including isomaltulose as nonmetabolized sugars must be discarded. For example, lysis of a few cells may result in the substantial hydrolysis of exogenous isomaltulose, with profound downstream signal effects. In plant biotechnology, different V(max) and V(max)/K(m) ratios for Suc isomers may yet be exploited, in combination with appropriate developmental expression and compartmentation, for enhanced sugar yields.

  8. Hyperoxia Inhibits T Cell Activation in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Meissler, J.; Aguayo, E. T.; Globus, R.; Aguado, J.; Candelario, T.

    2013-02-01

    , spleens were removed and the splenocytes were isolated and kept as individual biological samples. We have also examined transcription factors (JASPAR) and pathways of the immune system to help us understand the mechanism of regulation. Results: Our recent mouse immunology experiment aboard STS-131 suggests that the early T cell immune response was inhibited in animals that have been exposed to spaceflight, even 24 hours after return to earth. Moreover, recent experiments in hyperoxic mice show that many of the same genes involved in early T cell activation were altered. Specifically, expression of IL-2Rα, Cxcl2, TNFα, FGF2, LTA and BCL2 genes are dysregulated in mice exposed to hyperoxia. Conclusions: If these hyperoxia-induced changes of gene expression in early T cell activation are additive to the changes seen in the microgravity of spaceflight, there could be an increased infection risk to EVA astronauts, which should be addressed prior to conducting a Mars or other long-term mission.

  9. Lysis of primary hepatic tumours by lymphokine activated killer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, K H; Shu, S Y; Lee, C S; Chu, C T; Yang, C S; Chang, K J

    1987-01-01

    Lymphokine activated killer cell is a newly described lytic system against a variety of solid tumours and is distinct in several respects from the classic cytolytic T cell and the natural killer systems. This study was conducted to evaluate the lytic activity of lymphokine activated killer cells against fresh autologous and allogeneic, as well as cultured hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Lymphokine activated killer cell was generated by incubating peripheral blood mononuclear cells with various concentrations of recombinant IL-2 (rIL-2, Cetus, USA) for various periods of time. A four hour 51Cr release assay was used to measure cytotoxicity. The results show that fresh and cultured hepatocellular carcinoma cells were only slightly susceptible to natural killer cells. Normal hepatocytes were resistant to lymphokine activated killer-mediated lysis. Lymphokine activated killer cells could be generated from mononuclear cells of hepatocellular carcinoma patients and normal subjects with lytic activity against fresh autologous and allogeneic and cultured hepatocellular carcinoma cells, but lymphokine activated killer cells from the former was less efficient than that from the latter. It is concluded that the adoptive immunotherapy with combined rIL-2 and lymphokine activated killer may be worth trying in early cases of primary hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:3030899

  10. In vivo blockade of neural activity alters dendritic development of neonatal CA1 pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Groc, Laurent; Petanjek, Zdravko; Gustafsson, Bengt; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Hanse, Eric; Khazipov, Roustem

    2002-11-01

    During development, neural activity has been proposed to promote neuronal growth. During the first postnatal week, the hippocampus is characterized by an oscillating neural network activity and a rapid neuronal growth. In the present study we tested in vivo, by injecting tetanus toxin into the hippocampus of P1 rats, whether this neural activity indeed promotes growth of pyramidal cells. We have previously shown that tetanus toxin injection leads to a strong reduction in the frequency of spontaneous GABA and glutamatergic synaptic currents, and to a complete blockade of the early neural network activity during the first postnatal week. Morphology of neurobiotin-filled CA1 pyramidal cells was analyzed at the end of the first postnatal week (P6-10). In activity-reduced neurons, the total length of basal dendritic tree was three times less than control. The number, but not the length, of basal dendritic branches was affected. The growth impairment was restricted to the basal dendrites. The apical dendrite, the axons, or the soma grew normally during activity deprivation. Thus, the in vivo neural activity in the neonate hippocampus seems to promote neuronal growth by initiating novel branches.

  11. Proteome Analysis of Liver Cells Expressing a Full- Length Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Replicon and Biopsy Specimens of Posttransplantation Liver from HCV-Infected Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Jon M.; Diamond, Deborah L.; Chan, Eric Y.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Qian, Weijun; Stastna, Miroslava; Baas, Tracey; Camp, David G.; Carithers, Jr., Robert L.; Smith, Richard D.; Katze, Michael G.

    2005-06-01

    The development of a reproducible model system for the study of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has the potential to significantly enhance the study of virus-host interactions and provide future direction for modeling the pathogenesis of HCV. While there are studies describing global gene expression changes associated with HCV infection, changes in the proteome have not been characterized. We report the first large scale proteome analysis of the highly permissive Huh-7.5 cell line containing a full length HCV replicon. We detected > 4,400 proteins in this cell line, including HCV replicon proteins, using multidimensional liquid chromatographic (LC) separations coupled to mass spectrometry (MS). The set of Huh-7.5 proteins confidently identified is, to our knowledge, the most comprehensive yet reported for a human cell line. Consistent with the literature, a comparison of Huh-7.5 cells (+) and (-) the HCV replicon identified expression changes of proteins involved in lipid metabolism. We extended these analyses to liver biopsy material from HCV-infected patients where > 1,500 proteins were detected from 2 {micro}g protein lysate using the Huh-7.5 protein database and the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag strategy. These findings demonstrate the utility of multidimensional proteome analysis of the HCV replicon model system for assisting the determination of proteins/pathways affected by HCV infection. Our ability to extend these analyses to the highly complex proteome of small liver biopsies with limiting protein yields offers the unique opportunity to begin evaluating the clinical significance of protein expression changes associated with HCV infection.

  12. Soil pretreatment and fast cell lysis for direct polymerase chain reaction from forest soils for terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of fungal communities.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Fei; Hou, Lin; Woeste, Keith; Shang, Zhengchun; Peng, Xiaobang; Zhao, Peng; Zhang, Shuoxin

    Humic substances in soil DNA samples can influence the assessment of microbial diversity and community composition. Using multiple steps during or after cell lysis adds expenses, is time-consuming, and causes DNA loss. A pretreatment of soil samples and a single step DNA extraction may improve experimental results. In order to optimize a protocol for obtaining high purity DNA from soil microbiota, five prewashing agents were compared in terms of their efficiency and effectiveness in removing soil contaminants. Residual contaminants were precipitated by adding 0.6mL of 0.5M CaCl2. Four cell lysis methods were applied to test their compatibility with the pretreatment (prewashing+Ca(2+) flocculation) and to ultimately identify the optimal cell lysis method for analyzing fungal communities in forest soils. The results showed that pretreatment with TNP+Triton X-100+skim milk (100mM Tris, 100mM Na4P2O7, 1% polyvinylpyrrolidone, 100mM NaCl, 0.05% Triton X-100, 4% skim milk, pH 10.0) removed most soil humic contaminants. When the pretreatment was combined with Ca(2+) flocculation, the purity of all soil DNA samples was further improved. DNA samples obtained by the fast glass bead-beating method (MethodFGB) had the highest purity. The resulting DNA was successfully used, without further purification steps, as a template for polymerase chain reaction targeting fungal internal transcribed spacer regions. The results obtained by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis indicated that the MethodFGB revealed greater fungal diversity and more distinctive community structure compared with the other methods tested. Our study provides a protocol for fungal cell lysis in soil, which is fast, convenient, and effective for analyzing fungal communities in forest soils.

  13. Alcohols induce rapid depletion of intracellular free Mg2+ in cerebral vascular muscle cells: relation to chain length and partition coefficient.

    PubMed

    Altura, B M; Zhang, A; Cheng, T P; Altura, B T

    1995-01-01

    Acute effects of a series of alcohols (methanol, ethanol, n-butanol) on intracellular free magnesium concentration ([Mg2+]i) in canine cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells was studied using mag-fura-2 and digital imaging microscopy. In 1.2 mM [Mg2+]o, basal [Mg2+]i was 500 +/- 30 microM. Exposure of cells to a low concentration (25 mM) of ethanol, but not methanol, for only 30 s resulted in significant loss of [Mg2+]i. Exposure to 100 mM methanol, ethanol, and butanol for 30 s resulted in a relative order of potency for [Mg2+]i depletion, where butanol > ethanol > methanol. The heterogeneous and relative subcellular compartmented concentrations of [Mg2+]i, where perinuclear > nuclear > peripheral (cytosolic) region, was not significantly altered by the alcohols. The degree of cellular depletion of [Mg2+]i was directly a function of each alcohol's partition coefficient and chain length. The latter is suggestive of the probability that alcohols promote intracellular depletion of Mg2+ by partitioning in membranes and disordering lipid bilayers.

  14. Repeat-length variation in a wheat cellulose synthase-like gene is associated with altered tiller number and stem cell wall composition.

    PubMed

    Hyles, J; Vautrin, S; Pettolino, F; MacMillan, C; Stachurski, Z; Breen, J; Berges, H; Wicker, T; Spielmeyer, W

    2017-03-28

    The tiller inhibition gene (tin) that reduces tillering in wheat (Triticum aestivum) is also associated with large spikes, increased grain weight, and thick leaves and stems. In this study, comparison of near-isogenic lines (NILs) revealed changes in stem morphology, cell wall composition, and stem strength. Microscopic analysis of stem cross-sections and chemical analysis of stem tissue indicated that cell walls in tin lines were thicker and more lignified than in free-tillering NILs. Increased lignification was associated with stronger stems in tin plants. A candidate gene for tin was identified through map-based cloning and was predicted to encode a cellulose synthase-like (Csl) protein with homology to members of the CslA clade. Dinucleotide repeat-length polymorphism in the 5'UTR region of the Csl gene was associated with tiller number in diverse wheat germplasm and linked to expression differences of Csl transcripts between NILs. We propose that regulation of Csl transcript and/or protein levels affects carbon partitioning throughout the plant, which plays a key role in the tin phenotype.

  15. Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, White Blood Cell Count, and Telomere Length in Newly Diagnosed, Antidepressant-Naïve Patients with Depression

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rizo, Clemente; Fernandez-Egea, Emilio; Miller, Brian J.; Oliveira, Cristina; Justicia, Azucena; Griffith, Jeffrey K.; Heaphy, Christopher M.; Bernardo, Miguel; Kirkpatrick, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Chronic mood disorders have been associated with a shortened telomere, a marker of increased mortality rate and ageing, and impaired cellular immunity. However, treatment may confound these relationships. We examined the relationship of glucose tolerance, white blood cell count and telomere length to depression in newly diagnosed, antidepressant-naïve patients. Subjects with major depression (n=15), and matched healthy control subjects (n=70) underwent a two-hour oral glucose tolerance test and evaluation of blood cell count and telomere content. The depression group had significantly higher two-hour glucose concentrations and a lower lymphocyte count than control subjects (respective means [SD] for two-hour glucose were 125.0 mg/dL [67.9] vs 84.6 [25.6] (p<.001); for lymphocyte count 2.1 × 109/L [0.6] vs. 2.5 ×109/L [0.7] p=.028).Telomere content was significantly shortened in the depression group (87.9 [7.6]) compared to control subjects (101.0 [14.3]; p<0.01). Abnormal glucose tolerance, lymphopenia and a shortened telomere are present early in the course of depression independently of the confounding effect of antidepressant treatment, supporting the concept of major depression as an accelerated ageing disease. PMID:23207109

  16. A Simple Laboratory Exercise Illustrating Active Transport in Yeast Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stambuk, Boris U.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a simple laboratory activity illustrating the chemiosmotic principles of active transport in yeast cells. Demonstrates the energy coupling mechanism of active a-glucoside uptake by Saccaromyces cerevisiae cells with a colorimetric transport assay using very simple equipment. (Contains 22 references.) (Author/YDS)

  17. Embedding metal electrodes in thick active layers for ITO-free plasmonic organic solar cells with improved performance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangjun; Mason, Daniel R; In, Sungjun; Park, Namkyoo

    2014-06-30

    We propose and numerically investigate the optical performance of a novel plasmonic organic solar cell with metallic nanowire electrodes embedded within the active layer. A significant improvement (~15%) in optical absorption over both a conventional ITO organic solar cell and a conventional plasmonic organic solar cell with top-loaded metallic grating is predicted in the proposed structure. Optimal positioning of the embedded metal electrodes (EME) is shown to preserve the condition for their strong plasmonic coupling with the metallic back-plane, meanwhile halving the hole path length to the anode which allows for a thicker active layer that increases the optical path length of propagating modes. With a smaller sheet resistance than a typical 100 nm thick ITO film transparent electrode, and an increased optical absorption and hole collection efficiency, our EME scheme could be an excellent alternative to ITO organic solar cells.

  18. Mechanism of human natural killer cell activation by Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Janowicz, Diane M; Fortney, Kate R; Katz, Barry P; Spinola, Stanley M

    2009-08-15

    The role of natural killer (NK) cells in the host response to Haemophilus ducreyi infection is unclear. In pustules obtained from infected human volunteers, there was an enrichment of CD56bright NK cells bearing the activation markers CD69 and HLA-DR, compared with peripheral blood. To study the mechanism by which H. ducreyi activated NK cells, we used peripheral blood mononuclear cells from uninfected volunteers. H. ducreyi activated NK cells only in the presence of antigen-presenting cells. H. ducreyi-infected monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages activated NK cells in a contact- and interleukin-18 (IL-18)-dependent manner, whereas monocyte-derived dendritic cells induced NK activation through soluble IL-12. More lesional NK cells than peripheral blood NK cells produced IFN-gamma in response to IL-12 and IL-18. We conclude that NK cells are recruited to experimental lesions and likely are activated by infected macrophages and dendritic cells. IFN-gamma produced by lesional NK cells may facilitate phagocytosis of H. ducreyi.

  19. The active layer morphology of organic solar cells probed with grazing incidence scattering techniques.

    PubMed

    Müller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2014-12-10

    Grazing incidence X-ray scattering (GIXS) provides unique insights into the morphology of active materials and thin film layers used in organic photovoltaic devices. With grazing incidence wide angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) the molecular arrangement of the material is probed. GIWAXS is sensitive to the crystalline parts and allows for the determination of the crystal structure and the orientation of the crystalline regions with respect to the electrodes. With grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) the nano-scale structure inside the films is probed. As GISAXS is sensitive to length scales from nanometers to several hundred nanometers, all relevant length scales of organic solar cells are detectable. After an introduction to GISAXS and GIWAXS, selected examples for application of both techniques to active layer materials are reviewed. The particular focus is on conjugated polymers, such as poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT).

  20. Active unjamming of confluent cell layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, M. Cristina

    Cell motion inside dense tissues governs many biological processes, including embryonic development and cancer metastasis, and recent experiments suggest that these tissues exhibit collective glassy behavior. Motivated by these observations, we have studied a model of dense tissues that combines self-propelled particle models and vertex models of confluent cell layers. In this model, referred to as self-propelled Voronoi (SPV), cells are described as polygons in a Voronoi tessellation with directed noisy cell motility and interactions governed by a shape energy that incorporates the effects of cell volume incompressibility, contractility and cell-cell adhesion. Using this model, we have demonstrated a new density-independent solid-liquid transition in confluent tissues controlled by cell motility and a cell-shape parameter measuring the interplay of cortical tension and cell-cell adhesion. An important insight of this work is that the rigidity and dynamics of cell layers depends sensitively on cell shape. We have also used the SPV model to test a new method developed by our group to determine cellular forces and tissue stresses from experimentally accessible cell shapes and traction forces, hence providing the spatio-temporal distribution of stresses in motile dense tissues. This work was done with Dapeng Bi, Lisa Manning and Xingbo Yang. MCM was supported by NSF-DMR-1305184 and by the Simons Foundation.

  1. Mycoplasma pneumoniae induces cytotoxic activity in guinea pig bronchoalveolar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kist, M.; Koester, H.; Bredt, W.

    1985-06-01

    Precultured guinea pig alveolar macrophages (AM) and freshly harvested alveolar cells (FHAC) activated by interaction with Mycoplasma pneumoniae were cytotoxic for xenogeneic /sup 75/selenomethionine-labeled tumor target cells. Phagocytosis of whole opsonized or nonopsonized M. pneumoniae cells was more effective in eliciting cytotoxicity than uptake of sonicated microorganisms. The addition of living mycoplasma cells to the assay system enhanced the cytotoxic effect considerably. Target cells were significantly more susceptible to the cytotoxic action of phagocytes if they were coated with mycoplasma antigen or cocultured together with M. pneumoniae. The activation of the phagocytes could be inhibited by 2-deoxy-D-glucose but not by antimicrobial substances suppressing mycoplasma protein synthesis. It was accompanied by /sup 51/Cr release without detectable signs of cell damage. The supernatants of activated cells were cytotoxic for approximately 24 h. Inhibition, release, and cytotoxic activity indicate the necessity of an intact metabolism of the effector cells and suggest a secretion of cytotoxic substances.

  2. On the Relationship Between the Length of Season and Tropical Cyclone Activity in the North Atlantic Basin During the Weather Satellite Era, 1960-2013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Officially, the North Atlantic basin tropical cyclone season runs from June 1 through November 30 of each year. During this 183-day interval, the vast majority of tropical cyclone onsets are found to occur. For example, in a study of the 715 tropical cyclones that occurred in the North Atlantic basin during the interval 1945-2010, it was found that about 97 percent of them had their onsets during the conventional hurricane season, with the bulk (78 percent) having had onset during the late summer-early fall months of August, September, and October and with none having had onset in the month of March. For the 2014 hurricane season, it already has had the onset of its first named storm on July 1 (day of year (DOY) 182), Arthur, which formed off the east coast of Florida, rapidly growing into a category-2 hurricane with peak 1-minute sustained wind speed of about 90 kt and striking the coast of North Carolina as a category-2 hurricane on July 3. Arthur is the first hurricane larger than category-1 to strike the United States (U.S.) since the year 2008 when Ike struck Texas as a category-2 hurricane and there has not been a major hurricane (category-3 or larger) to strike the U.S. since Wilma struck Florida as a category-3 hurricane in 2005. Only two category-1 hurricanes struck the U.S. in the year 2012 (Isaac and Sandy, striking Louisiana and New York, respectively) and there were no U.S. land-falling hurricanes in 2013 (also true for the years 1962, 1973, 1978, 1981, 1982, 1990, 1994, 2000, 2001, 2006, 2009, and 2010). In recent years it has been argued that the length of season (LOS), determined as the inclusive elapsed time between the first storm day (FSD) and the last storm day (LSD) of the yearly hurricane season (i.e., when peak 1-minute sustained wind speed of at least 34 kt occurred and the tropical cyclone was not classified as 'extratropical'), has increased in length with the lengthening believed to be due to the FSD occurring sooner and the LSD occurring

  3. Human Liver Stem Cells Suppress T-Cell Proliferation, NK Activity, and Dendritic Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Stefania; Grange, Cristina; Tapparo, Marta; Pasquino, Chiara; Romagnoli, Renato; Dametto, Ennia; Amoroso, Antonio; Tetta, Ciro; Camussi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Human liver stem cells (HLSCs) are a mesenchymal stromal cell-like population resident in the adult liver. Preclinical studies indicate that HLSCs could be a good candidate for cell therapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the immunogenicity and the immunomodulatory properties of HLSCs on T-lymphocytes, natural killer cells (NKs), and dendritic cells (DCs) in allogeneic experimental settings. We found that HLSCs inhibited T-cell proliferation by a mechanism independent of cell contact and dependent on the release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and on indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. When compared with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), HLSCs were more efficient in inhibiting T-cell proliferation. At variance with MSCs, HLSCs did not elicit NK degranulation. Moreover, HLSCs inhibited NK degranulation against K562, a NK-sensitive target, by a mechanism dependent on HLA-G release. When tested on DC generation from monocytes, HLSCs were found to impair DC differentiation and DCs ability to induce T-cell proliferation through PGE2. This study shows that HLSCs have immunomodulatory properties similar to MSCs, but, at variance with MSCs, they do not elicit a NK response. PMID:27127520

  4. Crystal Structure of Full-length Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv Glycogen Branching Enzyme; Insights of N-Terminal [beta]-Sandwich in Sustrate Specifity and Enzymatic Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, Kuntal; Kumar, Shiva; Sharma, Shikha; Garg, Saurabh Kumar; Alam, Mohammad Suhail; Xu, H. Eric; Agrawal, Pushpa; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam

    2010-07-13

    The open reading frame Rv1326c of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) H37Rv encodes for an {alpha}-1,4-glucan branching enzyme (MtbGlgB, EC 2.4.1.18, Uniprot entry Q10625). This enzyme belongs to glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 13 and catalyzes the branching of a linear glucose chain during glycogenesis by cleaving a 1 {yields} 4 bond and making a new 1 {yields} 6 bond. Here, we show the crystal structure of full-length MtbGlgB (MtbGlgBWT) at 2.33-{angstrom} resolution. MtbGlgBWT contains four domains: N1 {beta}-sandwich, N2 {beta}-sandwich, a central ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} domain that houses the catalytic site, and a C-terminal {beta}-sandwich. We have assayed the amylase activity with amylose and starch as substrates and the glycogen branching activity using amylose as a substrate for MtbGlgBWT and the N1 domain-deleted (the first 108 residues deleted) Mtb{Delta}108GlgB protein. The N1 {beta}-sandwich, which is formed by the first 105 amino acids and superimposes well with the N2 {beta}-sandwich, is shown to have an influence in substrate binding in the amylase assay. Also, we have checked and shown that several GH13 family inhibitors are ineffective against MtbGlgBWT and Mtb{Delta}108GlgB. We propose a two-step reaction mechanism, for the amylase activity (1 {yields} 4 bond breakage) and isomerization (1 {yields} 6 bond formation), which occurs in the same catalytic pocket. The structural and functional properties of MtbGlgB and Mtb{Delta}108GlgB are compared with those of the N-terminal 112-amino acid-deleted Escherichia coli GlgB (EC{Delta}112GlgB).

  5. Organizer activity of the polar cells during Drosophila oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Grammont, Muriel; Irvine, Kenneth D

    2002-11-01

    Patterning of the Drosophila egg requires the establishment of several distinct types of somatic follicle cells, as well as interactions between these follicle cells and the oocyte. The polar cells occupy the termini of the follicle and are specified by the activation of Notch. We have investigated their role in follicle patterning by creating clones of cells mutant for the Notch modulator fringe. This genetic ablation of polar cells results in cell fate defects within surrounding follicle cells. At the anterior, the border cells, the immediately adjacent follicle cell fate, are absent, as are the more distant stretched and centripetal follicle cells. Conversely, increasing the number of polar cells by expressing an activated form of the Notch receptor increases the number of border cells. At the posterior, elimination of polar cells results in abnormal oocyte localization. Moreover, when polar cells are mislocalized laterally, the surrounding follicle cells adopt a posterior fate, the oocyte is located adjacent to them, and the anteroposterior axis of the oocyte is re-oriented with respect to the ectopic polar cells. Our observations demonstrate that the polar cells act as an organizer that patterns surrounding follicle cells and establishes the anteroposterior axis of the oocyte. The origin of asymmetry during Drosophila development can thus be traced back to the specification of the polar cells during early oogenesis.

  6. Activating Cell Death Ligand Signaling Through Proteasome Inhibition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Activating Cell Death Ligand Signaling Through Proteasome Inhibition PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Steven R Schwarze...SUBTITLE Activating Cell Death Ligand Signaling Through 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Proteasome Inhibition 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-08-1-0392 5c...proteasome inhibition can act as an anti-neoplastic agent in vivo by sensitizing cancer cells to cell death ligands in the tumor microenvironment

  7. Barrier-protective effects of activated protein C in human alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Puig, Ferranda; Fuster, Gemma; Adda, Mélanie; Blanch, Lluís; Farre, Ramon; Navajas, Daniel; Artigas, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a clinical manifestation of respiratory failure, caused by lung inflammation and the disruption of the alveolar-capillary barrier. Preservation of the physical integrity of the alveolar epithelial monolayer is of critical importance to prevent alveolar edema. Barrier integrity depends largely on the balance between physical forces on cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts, and this balance might be affected by alterations in the coagulation cascade in patients with ALI. We aimed to study the effects of activated protein C (APC) on mechanical tension and barrier integrity in human alveolar epithelial cells (A549) exposed to thrombin. Cells were pretreated for 3 h with APC (50 µg/ml) or vehicle (control). Subsequently, thrombin (50 nM) or medium was added to the cell culture. APC significantly reduced thrombin-induced cell monolayer permeability, cell stiffening, and cell contraction, measured by electrical impedance, optical magnetic twisting cytometry, and traction microscopy, respectively, suggesting a barrier-protective response. The dynamics of the barrier integrity was also assessed by western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis of the tight junction ZO-1. Thrombin resulted in more elongated ZO-1 aggregates at cell-cell interface areas and induced an increase in ZO-1 membrane protein content. APC attenuated the length of these ZO-1 aggregates and reduced the ZO-1 membrane protein levels induced by thrombin. In conclusion, pretreatment with APC reduced the disruption of barrier integrity induced by thrombin, thus contributing to alveolar epithelial barrier protection.

  8. Immune activation: death, danger and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Pulendran, Bali

    2004-01-06

    Dendritic cells are critical for host immunity, and sense microbes with pathogen recognition receptors. New evidence indicates that these cells also sense uric acid crystals in dead cells, suggesting that the immune system is conscious not only of pathogens, but also of death and danger.

  9. Shape control and compartmentalization in active colloidal cells

    PubMed Central

    Spellings, Matthew; Engel, Michael; Klotsa, Daphne; Sabrina, Syeda; Drews, Aaron M.; Nguyen, Nguyen H. P.; Bishop, Kyle J. M.; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2015-01-01

    Small autonomous machines like biological cells or soft robots can convert energy input into control of function and form. It is desired that this behavior emerges spontaneously and can be easily switched over time. For this purpose we introduce an active matter system that is loosely inspired by biology and which we term an active colloidal cell. The active colloidal cell consists of a boundary and a fluid interior, both of which are built from identical rotating spinners whose activity creates convective flows. Similarly to biological cell motility, which is driven by cytoskeletal components spread throughout the entire volume of the cell, active colloidal cells are characterized by highly distributed energy conversion. We demonstrate that we can control the shape of the active colloidal cell and drive compartmentalization by varying the details of the boundary (hard vs. flexible) and the character of the spinners (passive vs. active). We report buckling of the boundary controlled by the pattern of boundary activity, as well as formation of core–shell and inverted Janus phase-separated configurations within the active cell interior. As the cell size is increased, the inverted Janus configuration spontaneously breaks its mirror symmetry. The result is a bubble–crescent configuration, which alternates between two degenerate states over time and exhibits collective migration of the fluid along the boundary. Our results are obtained using microscopic, non–momentum-conserving Langevin dynamics simulations and verified via a phase-field continuum model coupled to a Navier–Stokes equation. PMID:26253763

  10. Shape control and compartmentalization in active colloidal cells.

    PubMed

    Spellings, Matthew; Engel, Michael; Klotsa, Daphne; Sabrina, Syeda; Drews, Aaron M; Nguyen, Nguyen H P; Bishop, Kyle J M; Glotzer, Sharon C

    2015-08-25

    Small autonomous machines like biological cells or soft robots can convert energy input into control of function and form. It is desired that this behavior emerges spontaneously and can be easily switched over time. For this purpose we introduce an active matter system that is loosely inspired by biology and which we term an active colloidal cell. The active colloidal cell consists of a boundary and a fluid interior, both of which are built from identical rotating spinners whose activity creates convective flows. Similarly to biological cell motility, which is driven by cytoskeletal components spread throughout the entire volume of the cell, active colloidal cells are characterized by highly distributed energy conversion. We demonstrate that we can control the shape of the active colloidal cell and drive compartmentalization by varying the details of the boundary (hard vs. flexible) and the character of the spinners (passive vs. active). We report buckling of the boundary controlled by the pattern of boundary activity, as well as formation of core-shell and inverted Janus phase-separated configurations within the active cell interior. As the cell size is increased, the inverted Janus configuration spontaneously breaks its mirror symmetry. The result is a bubble-crescent configuration, which alternates between two degenerate states over time and exhibits collective migration of the fluid along the boundary. Our results are obtained using microscopic, non-momentum-conserving Langevin dynamics simulations and verified via a phase-field continuum model coupled to a Navier-Stokes equation.

  11. Arc Length Gone Global

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudreaux, Gregory M.; Wells, M. Scott

    2007-01-01

    Everyone with a thorough knowledge of single variable calculus knows that integration can be used to find the length of a curve on a given interval, called its arc length. Fortunately, if one endeavors to pose and solve more interesting problems than simply computing lengths of various curves, there are techniques available that do not require an…

  12. Hospital length of stay in the first 100 days after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for acute leukemia in remission: comparison among alternative graft sources.

    PubMed

    Ballen, Karen K; Joffe, Steven; Brazauskas, Ruta; Wang, Zhiwei; Aljurf, Mahmoud D; Akpek, Görgün; Dandoy, Christopher; Frangoul, Haydar A; Freytes, César O; Khera, Nandita; Lazarus, Hillard M; LeMaistre, Charles F; Mehta, Paulette; Parsons, Susan K; Szwajcer, David; Ustun, Celalettin; Wood, William A; Majhail, Navneet S

    2014-11-01

    Several studies have shown comparable survival outcomes with different graft sources, but the relative resource needs of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) by graft source have not been well studied. We compared total hospital length of stay in the first 100 days after HCT in 1577 patients with acute leukemia in remission who underwent HCT with an umbilical cord blood (UCB), matched unrelated donor (MUD), or mismatched unrelated donor (MMUD) graft between 2008 and 2011. To ensure a relatively homogenous study population, the analysis was limited to patients with acute myelogenous leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia in first or second complete remission who underwent HCT in the United States. To account for early deaths, we compared the number of days alive and out of the hospital in the first 100 days post-transplantation. For children who received myeloablative conditioning, the median time alive and out of the hospital in the first 100 days was 50 days for single UCB recipients, 54 days for double UCB recipients, and 60 days for MUD bone marrow (BM) recipients. In multivariate analysis, use of UCB was significantly associated with fewer days alive and out of the hospital compared with MUD BM. For adults who received myeloablative conditioning, the median time alive and out of the hospital in first 100 days was 52 days for single UCB recipients, 55 days for double UCB recipients, 69 days for MUD BM recipients, 75 days for MUD peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) recipients, 63 days for MMUD BM recipients, and 67 days for MMUD PBSC recipients. In multivariate analysis, UCB and MMUD BM recipients had fewer days alive and out of the hospital compared with recipients of other graft sources. For adults who received a reduced-intensity preparative regimen, the median time alive and out of the hospital during the first 100 days was 65 days for single UCB recipients, 63 days for double UCB recipients, 79 days for MUD PBSC recipients, and 79 days for MMUD PBSC

  13. Differentially active origins of DNA replication in tumor versus normal cells.

    PubMed

    Di Paola, Domenic; Price, Gerald B; Zannis-Hadjopoulos, Maria

    2006-05-15

    Previously, a degenerate 36 bp human consensus sequence was identified as a determinant of autonomous replication in eukaryotic cells. Random mutagenesis analyses further identified an internal 20 bp of the 36 bp consensus sequence as sufficient for acting as a core origin element. Here, we have located six versions of the 20 bp consensus sequence (20mer) on human chromosome 19q13 over a region spanning approximately 211 kb and tested them for ectopic and in situ replication activity by transient episomal replication assays and nascent DNA strand abundance analyses, respectively. The six versions of the 20mer alone were capable of supporting autonomous replication of their respective plasmids, unlike random genomic sequence of the same length. Furthermore, comparative analyses of the endogenous replication activity of these 20mers at their respective chromosomal sites, in five tumor/transformed and two normal cell lines, done by in situ chromosomal DNA replication assays, involving preparation of nascent DNA by the lambda exonuclease method and quantification by real-time PCR, showed that these sites coincided with chromosomal origins of DNA replication in all cell lines. Moreover, a 2- to 3-fold higher origin activity in the tumor/transformed cells by comparison to the normal cells was observed, suggesting a higher activation of these origins in tumor/transformed cell lines.

  14. Control of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis by T Cells Responding to Activated T Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohse, Ansgar W.; Mor, Felix; Karin, Nathan; Cohen, Irun R.

    1989-05-01

    T cell vaccination against experimental autoimmune disease is herein shown to be mediated in part by anti-ergotypic T cells, T cells that recognize and respond to the state of activation of other T cells. The anti-ergotypic response thus combines with the previously shown anti-idiotypic T cell response to regulate autoimmunity.

  15. Diacyltransferase Activity and Chain Length Specificity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis PapA5 in the Synthesis of Alkyl β-Diol Lipids

    SciTech Connect

    Touchette, Megan H.; Bommineni, Gopal R.; Delle Bovi, Richard J.; Gadbery, John; Nicora, Carrie D.; Shukla, Anil K.; Kyle, Jennifer E.; Metz, Thomas O.; Martin, Dwight W.; Sampson, Nicole S.; Miller, W. T.; Tonge, Peter J.; Seeliger, Jessica C.

    2015-09-08

    Although classified as Gram-positive bacteria, Corynebacterineae possess an asymmetric outer membrane that imparts structural and thereby physiological similarity to more distantly related Gram-negative bacteria. Like lipopolysaccharide in Gram-negative bacteria, lipids in the outer membrane of Corynebacterineae have been associated with the virulence of pathogenic species such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). For example, Mtb strains that lack long, branched-chain alkyl esters known as dimycocerosates (DIMs) are significantly attenuated in model infections. The resultant interest in the biosynthetic pathway of these unusual virulence factors has led to the elucidation of many of the steps leading to the final esterification of the alkyl beta-diol, phthiocerol, with branched-chain fatty acids know as mycocerosates. PapA5 is an acyltransferase implicated in these final reactions. We here show that PapA5 is indeed the terminal enzyme in DIM biosynthesis by demonstrating its dual esterification activity and chain-length preference using synthetic alkyl beta-diol substrate analogues. Applying these analogues to a series of PapA5 mutants, we also revise a model for the substrate binding within PapA5. Finally, we demonstrate that the Mtb Ser/Thr kinase PknB modifies PapA5 on three Thr residues, including two (T196, T198) located on an unresolved loop. These results clarify the DIM biosynthetic pathway and suggest possible mechanisms by which DIM biosynthesis may be regulated by the post-translational modification of PapA5.

  16. Recruitment and Activation of Natural Killer (Nk) Cells in Vivo Determined by the Target Cell Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Glas, Rickard; Franksson, Lars; Une, Clas; Eloranta, Maija-Leena; Öhlén, Claes; Örn, Anders; Kärre, Klas

    2000-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells can spontaneously lyse certain virally infected and transformed cells. However, early in immune responses NK cells are further activated and recruited to tissue sites where they perform effector functions. This process is dependent on cytokines, but it is unclear if it is regulated by NK cell recognition of susceptible target cells. We show here that infiltration of activated NK cells into the peritoneal cavity in response to tumor cells is controlled by the tumor major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I phenotype. Tumor cells lacking appropriate MHC class I expression induced NK cell infiltration, cytotoxic activation, and induction of transcription of interferon γ in NK cells. The induction of these responses was inhibited by restoration of tumor cell MHC class I expression. The NK cells responding to MHC class I–deficient tumor cells were ∼10 times as active as endogenous NK cells on a per cell basis. Although these effector cells showed a typical NK specificity in that they preferentially killed MHC class I–deficient cells, this specificity was even more distinct during induction of the intraperitoneal response. Observations are discussed in relation to a possible adaptive component of the NK response, i.e., recruitment/activation in response to challenges that only NK cells are able to neutralize. PMID:10620611

  17. Cutting edge: inhibition of T cell activation by TIM-2.

    PubMed

    Knickelbein, Jared E; de Souza, Anjali J; Tosti, Richard; Narayan, Preeti; Kane, Lawrence P

    2006-10-15

    T cell Ig and mucin domain protein 2 (TIM-2) has been shown to regulate T cell activation in vitro and T cell-mediated disease in vivo. However, it is still not clear whether TIM-2 acts mainly to augment T cell function or to inhibit it. We have directly examined the function of TIM-2 in murine and human T cell lines. Our results indicate that expression of TIM-2 significantly impairs the induction of NFAT and AP-1 transcriptional reporters by not only TCR ligation but also by the pharmacological stimuli PMA and ionomycin. This does not appear to be due to a general effect on cell viability, and the block in NFAT activation can be bypassed by expression of activated alleles of Ras or calcineurin, or MEK kinase, in the case of AP-1. Thus, our data are consistent with a model whereby TIM-2 inhibits T cell activation.

  18. Alloantigen presentation by B cells: analysis of the requirement for B-cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, J L; Cunningham, A C; Kirby, J A

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a model for investigation of the functional implications of B-cell activation for antigen presentation. Mixed lymphocyte cultures were used to assess the ability of freshly isolated B cells, mitogen-activated B cells and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B-cell lines to stimulate the activation and proliferation of allogeneic T cells under a variety of experimental conditions. It was found that resting B cells presented antigen poorly, while activated cells were highly immunogenic. Paraformaldehyde fixation completely eliminated antigen presentation by resting B cells, despite constitutive expression of class II MHC antigens. However, fixation had little effect on antigen presentation by activated B cells that expressed B7-1 and B7-2 in addition to class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. Arrest of B-cell activation by serial fixation after treatment with F(ab')2 fragments of goat anti-human IgM produced cells with variable antigen-presenting capacity. Optimal antigen presentation was observed for cells fixed 72 hr after the initiation of B-cell activation. Although both B7-1 and B7-2 antigen expression increased after B-cell activation, it was found that the rate of T-cell proliferation correlated most closely with B7-2 expression. Stimulation of T cells by fixed activated B lymphocytes could be blocked by antibodies directed at class II MHC molecules, indicating involvement of the T-cell antigen receptor. In addition, T-cell proliferation was inhibited by antibodies specific for B7-1 and B7-2 and by the fusion protein CTLA4-Ig, demonstrating a requirement for CD28 signal transduction. The sole requirement of B7 family expression for antigen presentation by B lymphocytes was shown by demonstration of T-cell stimulation by fixed resting B cells in the presence of CD28 antibody as a source of artificial costimulation. PMID:8550066

  19. Activation strategies for invariant natural killer T cells.

    PubMed

    Kohlgruber, Ayano C; Donado, Carlos A; LaMarche, Nelson M; Brenner, Michael B; Brennan, Patrick J

    2016-08-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are a specialized T cell subset that plays an important role in host defense, orchestrating both innate and adaptive immune effector responses against a variety of microbes. Specific microbial lipids and mammalian self lipids displayed by the antigen-presenting molecule CD1d can activate iNKT cells through their semi-invariant αβ T cell receptors (TCRs). iNKT cells also constitutively express receptors for inflammatory cytokines typically secreted by antigen-presenting cells (APCs) after recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), and they can be activated through these cytokine receptors either in combination with TCR signals, or in some cases even in the absence of TCR signaling. During infection, experimental evidence suggests that both TCR-driven and cytokine-driven mechanisms contribute to iNKT cell activation. While the relative contributions of these two signaling mechanisms can vary widely depending on the infectious context, both lipid antigens and PAMPs mediate reciprocal activation of iNKT cells and APCs, leading to downstream activation of multiple other immune cell types to promote pathogen clearance. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms involved in iNKT cell activation during infection, focusing on the central contributions of both lipid antigens and PAMP-induced inflammatory cytokines, and highlight in vivo examples of activation during bacterial, viral, and fungal infections.

  20. Visualizing how T cells collect activation signals in vivo.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Hélène D; Bousso, Philippe

    2014-02-01

    A decade ago the first movies depicting T cell behavior in vivo with the help of two-photon microscopy were generated. These initial experiments revealed that T cells migrate rapidly and randomly in secondary lymphoid organs at steady state and profoundly alter their behavior during antigen recognition, establishing both transient and stable contacts with antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Since then, in vivo imaging has continuously improved our understanding of T cell activation. In particular, recent studies uncovered how T cells may be guided in their search for the best APCs. Additionally, the development of more sophisticated fluorescent tools has permitted not only to visualize T cell-APC contacts but also to probe their functional impact on T cell activation. These recent progresses are providing new insights into how T cells sense antigen, collect activation signals during distinct types of interaction and integrate information over successive encounters.

  1. Screening for novel human genes associated with CRE pathway activation with cell microarray.

    PubMed

    Tian, Linjie; Wang, Pingzhang; Guo, Jinhai; Wang, Xinyu; Deng, Weiwei; Zhang, Chenying; Fu, Dongxu; Gao, Xia; Shi, Taiping; Ma, Dalong

    2007-07-01

    In this study, cell microarray technology is used to identify novel human genes associated with CRE pathway activation. By reverse transfection, expression plasmids containing full-length cDNAs were cotransfected with the reporter plasmid pCRE-d2EGFP to monitor the activation of the CRE pathway via enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) expression. Of the 575 predominantly novel genes screened, 22 exhibited relatively higher EGFP fluorescence compared with a negative control. After a functional validation with a dual luciferase reporter system that included both cis- and trans-luciferase assays, 4 of the 22 genes (RNF41, C8orf32, C6orf208, and MEIS3P1) were confirmed as CRE-pathway activators. Western blot analysis revealed that RNF41 can promote CREB phosphorylation. These results demonstrate the successful combination of cell microarray technology with this reporting system and the potential of this tool to characterize functions of novel genes in a highly parallel format.

  2. Transient ALT activation protects human primary cells from chromosome instability induced by low chronic oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Coluzzi, Elisa; Buonsante, Rossella; Leone, Stefano; Asmar, Anthony J.; Miller, Kelley L.; Cimini, Daniela; Sgura, Antonella

    2017-01-01

    Cells are often subjected to the effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a result of both intracellular metabolism and exposure to exogenous factors. ROS-dependent oxidative stress can induce 8-oxodG within the GGG triplet found in the G-rich human telomeric sequence (TTAGGG), making telomeres highly susceptible to ROS-induced oxidative damage. Telomeres are nucleoprotein complexes that protect the ends of linear chromosomes and their dysfunction is believed to affect a wide range of cellular and/or organismal processes. Acute oxidative stress was shown to affect telomere integrity, but how prolonged low level oxidative stress, which may be more physiologically relevant, affects telomeres is still poorly investigated. Here, we explored this issue by chronically exposing human primary fibroblasts to a low dose of hydrogen peroxide. We observed fluctuating changes in telomere length and fluctuations in the rates of chromosome instability phenotypes, such that when telomeres shortened, chromosome instability increased and when telomeres lengthened, chromosome instability decreased. We found that telomere length fluctuation is associated with transient activation of an alternative lengthening of telomere (ALT) pathway, but found no evidence of cell death, impaired proliferation, or cell cycle arrest, suggesting that ALT activation may prevent oxidative damage from reaching levels that threaten cell survival. PMID:28240303

  3. Tunable Length and Optical Properties of CsPbX3 (X = Cl, Br, I) Nanowires with a Few Unit Cells.

    PubMed

    Amgar, Daniel; Stern, Avigail; Rotem, Dvir; Porath, Danny; Etgar, Lioz

    2017-02-08

    Perovskite nanostructures, both hybrid organo-metal and fully inorganic perovskites, have gained a lot of interest in the past few years for their intriguing optical properties in the visible region. We report on inorganic cesium lead bromide (CsPbBr3) nanowires (NWs) having quantum confined dimensions corresponding to 5 unit cells. The addition of various hydrohalic acids (HX, X = Cl, Br, I) was found to highly affect the NW length, composition, and optical properties. Hydrochloric (HCl) and hydroiodic (HI) acids mixed in the reaction solution influence the crystal structure and optical properties and shorten the NWs, while the hydrobromic acid (HBr) addition results solely in shorter NWs, without any structural change. The addition of HX increases the acidity of the reaction solution, resulting in protonation of the oleylamine ligands from oleylamine into oleyl-ammonium cations that behave similarly to Cs(+) during crystallization. Therefore, the positions of the Cs(+) at the growing surface of the NWs are taken by the oleyl-ammonium cations, thus blocking further growth in the favored direction. The emission of the NWs is tunable between ∼423-505 nm and possesses a potential in the optoelectronic field. Moreover, electrical conductivity measurements of the NWs are discussed to give a new point of view regarding the conductivity of perovskite nanostructures.

  4. Proteome Response of Chicken Embryo Fibroblast Cells to Recombinant H5N1 Avian Influenza Viruses with Different Neuraminidase Stalk Lengths

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongtao; Ming, Fan; Huang, Huimin; Guo, Kelei; Chen, Huanchun; Jin, Meilin; Zhou, Hongbo

    2017-01-01

    The variation on neuraminidase (NA) stalk region of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus results in virulence change in animals. In our previous studies, the special NA stalk-motif of H5N1 viruses has been demonstrated to play a significant role in the high virulence and pathogenicity in chickens. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenicity of viruses with different NA stalk remain poorly understood. This study presents a comprehensive characterization of the proteome response of chicken cells to recombinant H5N1 virus with stalk-short NA (rNA-wt) and the stalkless NA mutant virus (rSD20). 208 proteins with differential abundance profiles were identified differentially expressed (DE), and these proteins were mainly related to stress response, transcription regulation, transport, metabolic process, cellular component and cytoskeleton. Through Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA), the significant biological functions of DE proteins represented included Post-Translational Modification, Protein Folding, DNA Replication, Recombination and Repair. It was interesting to find that most DE proteins were involved in the TGF-β mediated functional network. Moreover, the specific DE proteins may play important roles in the innate immune responses and H5N1 virus replication. Our data provide important information regarding the comparable host response to H5N1 influenza virus infection with different NA stalk lengths. PMID:28079188

  5. Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule regulates the interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei-Wei; Zhan, Shu-Hui; Geng, Chang-Xin; Sun, Xin; Erkan, Mert; Kleeff, Jörg; Xie, Xiang-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM/CD166) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that is involved in tumor progression and metastasis. In the present study, the expression and functional role of ALCAM in pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) was investigated. Tissue specimens were obtained from patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (n=56) or chronic pancreatitis (CP; n=10), who underwent pancreatic resection, and from normal pancreatic tissue samples (n=10). Immunohistochemistry was used to analyze the localization and expression of ALCAM in pancreatic tissues. Subsequently, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting were applied to assess the expression of ALCAM in pancreatic cancer Panc-1 and T3M4 cells, as well as in PSCs. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure ALCAM levels in cell culture medium stimulated by hypoxia, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and transforming growth factor-β. Silencing of ALCAM was performed using ALCAM small interfering (si)RNA and immunocytochemistry was used to analyze the inhibition efficiency. An invasion assay and a cell interaction assay were performed to assess the invasive ability and co-cultured adhesive potential of Panc-1 and T3M4 cells, as well as PSCs. Histologically, ALCAM expression was generally weak or absent in pancreatic cancer cells, but was markedly upregulated in PSCs in pancreatic cancer tissues. ALCAM was highly expressed in PSCs from CP tissues and PSCs surrounding pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias, as well as in pancreatic cancer cells. ALCAM mRNA was highly expressed in PSCs, with a low to moderate expression in T3M4 and Panc-1 cells. Similar to the mRNA expression, immunoblotting demonstrated that ALCAM protein levels were high in PSCs and T3M4 cells, but low in Panc-1 cells. The expression of TNF-α increased, while hypoxia decreased the secretion of ALCAM in pancreatic cancer Panc-1 and T3M4 cells, and also in

  6. Regulation of tissue factor coagulant activity on cell surfaces

    PubMed Central

    RAO, L.V.M.; PENDURTHI, U.R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Tissue factor (TF) is a transmembrane glycoprotein and an essential component of factor VIIa-TF enzymatic complex that triggers activation of the coagulation cascade. Formation of TF-FVIIa complexes on cell surfaces not only trigger the coagulation cascade but also transduce cell signaling via activation of protease-activated receptors. Tissue factor is expressed constitutively on cell surfaces of a variety of extravascular cell types, including fibroblasts and pericytes in and surrounding blood vessel walls and epithelial cells but generally absent on cells that come in contact with blood directly. However, TF expression could be induced in some blood cells, such as monocytes and endothelial cells, following an injury or pathological stimuli. Tissue factor is essential for hemostasis, but aberrant expression of TF leads to thrombosis. Therefore, a proper regulation of TF activity is critical for the maintenance of hemostatic balance and health in general. TF-FVIIa coagulant activity at the cell surface is influenced not only by TF protein expression levels but also independently by a variety of mechanisms, including alterations in membrane phospholipid composition and cholesterol content, thiol-dependent modifications of TF allosteric disulfide bond, and other post-translational modifications of TF. In this article, we critically review key literature on mechanisms by which TF coagulant activity is regulated at the cell surface in the absence of changes in TF protein levels with specific emphasis on recently published data and provide the authors’ perspective on the subject. PMID:23006890

  7. Activated AKT regulates NF-kappaB activation, p53 inhibition and cell survival in HTLV-1-transformed cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Soo-Jin; Pise-Masison, Cynthia A; Radonovich, Michael F; Park, Hyeon Ung; Brady, John N

    2005-10-06

    AKT activation enhances resistance to apoptosis and induces cell survival signaling through multiple downstream pathways. We now present evidence that AKT is activated in HTLV-1-transformed cells and that Tax activation of AKT is linked to NF-kappaB activation, p53 inhibition and cell survival. Overexpression of AKT wild type (WT), but not a kinase dead (KD) mutant, resulted in increased Tax-mediated NF-kappaB activation. Blocking AKT with the PI3K/AKT inhibitor LY294002 or AKT SiRNA prevented NF-kappaB activation and inhibition of p53. Treatment of C81 cells with LY294002 resulted in an increase in the p53-responsive gene MDM2, suggesting a role for AKT in the Tax-mediated regulation of p53 transcriptional activity. Further, we show that LY294002 treatment of C81 cells abrogates in vitro IKKbeta phosphorylation of p65 and causes a reduction of p65 Ser-536 phosphorylation in vivo, steps critical to p53 inhibition. Interestingly, blockage of AKT function did not affect IKKbeta phosphorylation of IkappaBalpha in vitro suggesting selective activity of AKT on the IKKbeta complex. Finally, AKT prosurvival function in HTLV-1-transformed cells is linked to expression of Bcl-xL. We suggest that AKT plays a role in the activation of prosurvival pathways in HTLV-1-transformed cells, possibly through NF-kappaB activation and inhibition of p53 transcription activity.

  8. Cytotoxic activity of CD4+ T cells against autologous tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Konomi, Y; Sekine, T; Takayama, T; Fuji, M; Tanaka, T

    1995-09-01

    The 51Cr-release assay is mostly applied to detecting the cytotoxic activity of CD8+ T cells, and little is known about the activity of CD4+ T cells. Therefore, the correlation between the cytotoxic activity of CD4+ or CD8+ T cells and the incubation period with autologous tumor cells was analyzed by two methods. The incubation periods were 4 and 20 h (4 h and 20 h assay) for the 51Cr-release assay. Eight pairs of tumor cells and T cells were assayed. T cells were fractionated into CD4+ and CD8+ T cells by using magnetic beads and panning methods, and those cells were activated by culture with recombinant interleukin-2 and immobilized anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody. In 6 out of 8 cases, no cytotoxic activity of CD4+ T cells was detected by the 4 h assay, whereas cytotoxic activity was detected in all cases in the 20 h assay. The cytotoxic activities in 20 h assay of CD4+ T cells were increased 67-fold in comparison with the activities in 4 h assay (range: 5-197). In the case of CD8+ T cells, cytotoxic activities were detected in 6 out of 8 cases in the 4 h assay. The lytic unit ratio of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells was calculated as 1.5 in the 20 h assay (range: 0.2- > 7.2) versus 0.4 in the 4 h assay (range: < 0.1-1.3). Cytotoxic activities in colorimetric assay using Crystal Violet with a 24 h incubation were similar to those in the 20 h 51Cr-release assay in all eight cases. These results indicate that CD4+ T cells have cytotoxic activity as strong as that of CD8+ T cells towards autologous tumor cells.

  9. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activation and suppression of inflammatory response by cell stretching in rabbit synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kunanusornchai, Wanlop; Muanprasat, Chatchai; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj

    2016-12-01

    Joint mobilization is known to be beneficial in osteoarthritis (OA) patients. This study aimed to investigate the effect of stretching on adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity and its role in modulating inflammation in rabbit synovial fibroblasts. Uniaxial stretching of isolated rabbit synovial fibroblasts for ten min was performed. Stretching-induced AMPK activation, its underlying mechanism, and its anti-inflammatory effect were investigated using Western blot. Static stretching at 20 % of initial length resulted in AMPK activation characterized by expression of phosphorylated AMPK and phosphorylated acetyl-Co A carboxylase. AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation peaked 1 h after stretching and declined toward resting activity. Using cell viability assays, static stretching did not appear to cause cellular damage. Activation of AMPK involves Ca(2+) influx via a mechanosensitive L-type Ca(2+) channel, which subsequently raises intracellular Ca(2+) and activates AMPK via Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ). Interestingly, stretching suppressed TNFα-induced expression of COX-2, iNOS, and phosphorylated NF-κB. These effects were prevented by pretreatment with compound C, an AMPK inhibitor. These results suggest that mechanical stretching suppressed inflammatory responses in synovial fibroblasts via a L-type Ca(2+)-channel-CaMKKβ-AMPK-dependent pathway which may underlie joint mobilization's ability to alleviate OA symptoms.

  10. Hepatitis B virus X protein mutants exhibit distinct biological activities in hepatoma Huh7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Xiaohong; Zhang Shuhui; Lin Jing; Zhang Shunmin; Feitelson, Mark A.; Gao Hengjun; Zhu Minghua

    2008-09-05

    The role of the hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) in hepatocarcinogenesis remains controversial. To investigate the biological impact of hepatitis B virus x gene (HBx) mutation on hepatoma cells, plasmids expressing the full-length HBx or HBx deletion mutants were constructed. The biological activities in these transfectants were analyzed by a series of assays. Results showed that HBx3'-20 and HBx3'-40 amino acid deletion mutants exhibited an increase in cellular proliferation, focus formation, tumorigenicity, and invasive growth and metastasis through promotion of the cell cycle from G0/G1 to the S phase, when compared with the full-length HBx. In contrast, HBx3'-30 amino acid deletion mutant repressed cell proliferation by blocking in G1 phase. The expression of P53, p21{sup WAF1}, p14{sup ARF}, and MDM2 proteins was regulated by expression of HBx mutants. In conclusions, HBx variants showed different effects and functions on cell proliferation and invasion by regulation of the cell cycle progression and its associated proteins expression.

  11. Automatically activated, 300 ampere-hour silver-zinc cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hennigan, T. J.

    1972-01-01

    A prototype silver zinc cell is reported for which the electrolyte is being stored in a separate tank; the cell is being activated when additional power is required by collapsing the neoprene bellows container and thus forcing the electrolyte into cell through a plastic connection. A solar array is proposed as main power source for the flow actuator.

  12. Reduced DNA topoisomerase II activity in ataxia-telangiectasia cells.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, S P; Mohamed, R; Salmond, C; Lavin, M F

    1988-01-01

    Considerable evidence supports a defect at the level of chromatin structure or recognition of that structure in cells from patients with the human genetic disorder ataxia-telangiectasia. Accordingly, we have investigated the activities of enzymes that alter the topology of DNA in Epstein Barr Virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cells from patients with this syndrome. Reduced activity of DNA topoisomerase II, determined by unknotting of P4 phage DNA, was observed in partially purified extracts from 5 ataxia-telangiectasia cell lines. The levels of enzyme activity was reduced substantially in 4 of these cell lines and to a lesser extent in the other cell line compared to controls. DNA topoisomerase I, assayed by relaxation of supercoiled DNA, was found to be present at comparable levels in both cell types. Reduced activity of topoisomerase II in ataxia-telangiectasia is compatible with the molecular, cellular and clinical changes described in this syndrome. Images PMID:2836804

  13. Effects of Neuroendocrine CB1 Activity on Adult Leydig Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cobellis, Gilda; Meccariello, Rosaria; Chianese, Rosanna; Chioccarelli, Teresa; Fasano, Silvia; Pierantoni, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Endocannabinoids control male reproduction acting at central and local level via cannabinoid receptors. The cannabinoid receptor CB1 has been characterized in the testis, in somatic and germ cells of mammalian and non-mammalian animal models, and its activity related to Leydig cell differentiation, steroidogenesis, spermiogenesis, sperm quality, and maturation. In this short review, we provide a summary of the insights concerning neuroendocrine CB1 activity in male reproduction focusing on adult Leydig cell ontogenesis and steroid biosynthesis. PMID:27375550

  14. Calcium alloy as active material in secondary electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Roche, Michael F.; Preto, Sandra K.; Martin, Allan E.

    1976-01-01

    Calcium alloys such as calcium-aluminum and calcium-silicon, are employed as active material within a rechargeable negative electrode of an electrochemical cell. Such cells can use a molten salt electrolyte including calcium ions and a positive electrode having sulfur, sulfides, or oxides as active material. The calcium alloy is selected to prevent formation of molten calcium alloys resulting from reaction with the selected molten electrolytic salt at the cell operating temperatures.

  15. Microwave-induced thermogenetic activation of single cells

    SciTech Connect

    Safronov, N. A.; Fedotov, I. V.; Ermakova, Yu. G.; Matlashov, M. E.; Belousov, V. V.; Sidorov-Biryukov, D. A.; Fedotov, A. B.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2015-04-20

    Exposure to a microwave field is shown to enable thermogenetic activation of individual cells in a culture of cell expressing thermosensitive ion channels. Integration of a microwave transmission line with an optical fiber and a diamond quantum thermometer has been shown to allow thermogenetic single-cell activation to be combined with accurate local online temperature measurements based on an optical detection of electron spin resonance in nitrogen–vacancy centers in diamond.

  16. Diacyltransferase Activity and Chain Length Specificity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis PapA5 in the Synthesis of Alkyl Beta-Diol Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Touchette, Megan H.; Bommineni, Gopal R.; Delle Bovi, Richard J.; Gadbery, John E.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Shukla, Anil K.; Kyle, Jennifer E.; Metz, Thomas O.; Martin, Dwight W.; Sampson, Nicole S.; Miller, W. Todd; Tonge, Peter J.; Seeliger, Jessica C.

    2015-01-01

    Although classified as Gram-positive bacteria, Corynebacterineae possess an asymmetric outer membrane that imparts structural and thereby physiological similarity to more distantly related Gram-negative bacteria. Like lipopolysaccharide in Gram-negative bacteria, lipids in the outer membrane of Corynebacterineae have been associated with the virulence of pathogenic species such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). For example, Mtb strains that lack long, branched-chain alkyl esters known as dimycocerosates (DIMs) are significantly attenuated in model infections. The resultant interest in the biosynthetic pathway of these unusual virulence factors has led to the elucidation of many of the steps leading to the final esterification of the alkyl beta-diol, phthiocerol, with branched-chain fatty acids known as mycocerosates. PapA5 is an acyltransferase implicated in these final reactions. We here show that PapA5 is indeed the terminal enzyme in DIM biosynthesis by demonstrating its dual esterification activity and chain-length preference using synthetic alkyl beta-diol substrate analogues. Applying these analogues to a series of PapA5 mutants, we also revise a model for the substrate binding within PapA5. Finally, we demonstrate that the Mtb Ser/Thr kinases PknB and PknE modify PapA5 on three overlapping Thr residues and a fourth Thr is unique to PknE phosphorylation. These results clarify the DIM biosynthetic pathway and indicate post-translational modifications that warrant further elucidation for their roles in regulation DIM biosynthesis. PMID:26271001

  17. Diacyltransferase Activity and Chain Length Specificity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis PapA5 in the Synthesis of Alkyl β-Diol Lipids.

    PubMed

    Touchette, Megan H; Bommineni, Gopal R; Delle Bovi, Richard J; Gadbery, John E; Nicora, Carrie D; Shukla, Anil K; Kyle, Jennifer E; Metz, Thomas O; Martin, Dwight W; Sampson, Nicole S; Miller, W Todd; Tonge, Peter J; Seeliger, Jessica C

    2015-09-08

    Although they are classified as Gram-positive bacteria, Corynebacterineae possess an asymmetric outer membrane that imparts structural and thereby physiological similarity to more distantly related Gram-negative bacteria. Like lipopolysaccharide in Gram-negative bacteria, lipids in the outer membrane of Corynebacterineae have been associated with the virulence of pathogenic species such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). For example, Mtb strains that lack long, branched-chain alkyl esters known as dimycocerosates (DIMs) are significantly attenuated in model infections. The resultant interest in the biosynthetic pathway of these unusual virulence factors has led to the elucidation of many of the steps leading to the final esterification of the alkyl β-diol, phthiocerol, with branched-chain fatty acids known as mycocerosates. PapA5 is an acyltransferase implicated in these final reactions. Here, we show that PapA5 is indeed the terminal enzyme in DIM biosynthesis by demonstrating its dual esterification activity and chain-length preference using synthetic alkyl β-diol substrate analogues. By applying these analogues to a series of PapA5 mutants, we also revise a model for the substrate binding within PapA5. Finally, we demonstrate that the Mtb Ser/Thr kinases PknB and PknE modify PapA5 on three overlapping Thr residues and that a fourth Thr is unique to PknE phosphorylation. These results clarify the DIM biosynthetic pathway and indicate post-translational modifications that warrant further elucidation for their roles in the regulation of DIM biosynthesis.

  18. Melanoma cells inhibit natural killer cell function by modulating the expression of activating receptors and cytolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Pietra, Gabriella; Manzini, Claudia; Rivara, Silvia; Vitale, Massimo; Cantoni, Claudia; Petretto, Andrea; Balsamo, Mirna; Conte, Romana; Benelli, Roberto; Minghelli, Simona; Solari, Nicola; Gualco, Marina; Queirolo, Paola; Moretta, Lorenzo; Mingari, Maria Cristina

    2012-03-15

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a key role in tumor immune surveillance. However, adoptive immunotherapy protocols using NK cells have shown limited clinical efficacy to date, possibly due to tumor escape mechanisms that inhibit NK cell function. In this study, we analyzed the effect of coculturing melanoma cells and NK cells on their phenotype and function. We found that melanoma cells inhibited the expression of major NK receptors that trigger their immune function, including NKp30, NKp44, and NKG2D, with consequent impairment of NK cell-mediated cytolytic activity against various melanoma cell lines. This inhibitory effect was primarily mediated by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Together, our findings suggest that immunosuppressive barriers erected by tumors greatly hamper the antitumor activity of human NK cells, thereby favoring tumor outgrowth and progression.

  19. The phosphorylation state of an aurora-like kinase marks the length of growing flagella in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Luo, Minna; Cao, Muqing; Kan, Yinan; Li, Guihua; Snell, William; Pan, Junmin

    2011-04-12

    Flagella and cilia are structurally polarized organelles whose lengths are precisely defined, and alterations in length are related to several human disorders. Intraflagellar transport (IFT) and protein signaling molecules are implicated in specifying flagellar and ciliary length, but evidence has been lacking for a flagellum and cilium length sensor that could participate in active length control or establishment of structural polarity. Previously, we showed that the phosphorylation state of the aurora-like protein kinase CALK in Chlamydomonas is a marker of the absence of flagella. Here we show that CALK phosphorylation state is also a marker for flagellar length. CALK is phosphorylated in cells without flagella, and during flagellar assembly it becomes dephosphorylated. Dephosphorylation is not simply a consequence of initiation of flagellar assembly or of time after experimentally induced flagellar loss, but instead requires flagella to be assembled to a threshold length. Analysis of cells with flagella of varying lengths shows that the threshold length for CALK dephosphorylation is ~6 μm (half length). Studies with short and long flagellar mutants indicate that cells detect absolute rather than relative flagellar length. Our results demonstrate that cells possess a mechanism for translating flagellar length into a posttranslational modification of a known flagellar regulatory protein.

  20. Effects of dexamethasone on palate mesenchymal cell phospholipase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bulleit, R.F.; Zimmerman, E.F.

    1984-09-15

    Corticosteroids will induce cleft palate in mice. One suggested mechanism for this effect is through inhibition of phospholipase activity. This hypothesis was tested by measuring the effects of dexamethasone, a synthetic corticosteroid, on phospholipase activity in cultures of palate mesenchymal cells. Palate mesenchymal cells were prelabeled with (3H)arachidonic acid. The cells were subsequently treated with various concentrations of dexamethasone. Concurrently, cultures of M-MSV-transformed 3T3 cells were prepared identically. After treatment, phospholipase activity was stimulated by the addition of serum or epidermal growth factor (EGF), and radioactivity released into the medium was taken as a measure of phospholipase activity. Dexamethasone (1 X 10(-5) or 1 X 10(-4) M) could inhibit serum-stimulated phospholipase activity in transformed 3T3 cells after 1 to 24 hr of treatment. However, no inhibition of activity was measured in palate mesenchymal cells following this period of treatment. Not until 120 hr of treatment with dexamethasone (1 X 10(-4) M) was any significant inhibition of serum-stimulated phospholipase activity observed in palate mesenchymal cells. When EGF was used to stimulate phospholipase activity, dexamethasone (1 X 10(-5) M) caused an increase in phospholipase activity in palate mesenchymal cells. These observations suggested that phospholipase in transformed 3T3 cells was sensitive to inhibition by dexamethasone. However, palate mesenchymal cell phospholipase is only minimally sensitive to dexamethasone, and in certain instances can be enhanced. These results cannot support the hypothesis that corticosteroids mediate their teratogenic effect via inhibition of phospholipase activity.

  1. Dormancy activation mechanism of oral cavity cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiang; Li, Xin; Zhao, Baohong; Shang, Dehao; Zhong, Ming; Deng, Chunfu; Jia, Xinshan

    2015-07-01

    Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are targeted primarily at rapidly proliferating cancer cells and are unable to eliminate cancer stem cells in the G0 phase. Thus, these treatments cannot prevent the recurrence and metastasis of cancer. Understanding the mechanisms by which cancer stem cells are maintained in the dormant G0 phase, and how they become active is key to developing new cancer therapies. The current study found that the anti-cancer drug 5-fluorouracil, acting on the oral squamous cell carcinoma KB cell line, selectively killed proliferating cells while sparing cells in the G0 phase. Bisulfite sequencing PCR showed that demethylation of the Sox2 promoter led to the expression of Sox2. This then resulted in the transformation of cancer stem cells from the G0 phase to the division stage and suggested that the transformation of cancer stem cells from the G0 phase to the division stage is closely related to an epigenetic modification of the cell.

  2. Nylon Wool Purification Alters the Activation of T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wohler, Jillian E.; Barnum, Scott R.

    2009-01-01

    Purification of lymphocytes, particularly T cells, is commonly performed using nylon wool. This enrichment method selectively retains B cells and some myeloid cells allowing a significantly more pure T cell population to flow through a nylon wool column. T cells purified in this fashion are assumed to be unaltered and functionally naïve, however some studies have suggested aberrant in vitro T cell responses after nylon wool treatment. We found that nylon wool purification significantly altered T cell proliferation, expression of activation markers and production of cytokines. Our results suggest that nylon wool treatment modifies T cell activation responses and that caution should be used when choosing this purification method. PMID:18952296

  3. Multiple activation of mitogen-activated protein kinas