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Sample records for active cell wall

  1. Compounds active against cell walls of medically important fungi.

    PubMed Central

    Hector, R F

    1993-01-01

    A number of substances that directly or indirectly affect the cell walls of fungi have been identified. Those that actively interfere with the synthesis or degradation of polysaccharide components share the property of being produced by soil microbes as secondary metabolites. Compounds specifically interfering with chitin or beta-glucan synthesis have proven effective in studies of preclinical models of mycoses, though they appear to have a restricted spectrum of coverage. Semisynthetic derivatives of some of the natural products have offered improvements in activity, toxicology, or pharmacokinetic behavior. Compounds which act on the cell wall indirectly or by a secondary mechanism of action, such as the azoles, act against diverse fungi but are usually fungistatic in nature. Overall, these compounds are attractive candidates for further development. PMID:8457977

  2. Nutrient depletion modifies cell wall adsorption activity of wine yeast.

    PubMed

    Sidari, R; Caridi, A

    2016-06-01

    Yeast cell wall is a structure that helps yeasts to manage and respond to many environmental stresses. The mannosylphosphorylation is a modification in response to stress that provides the cell wall with negative charges able to bind compounds present in the environment. Phenotypes related to the cell wall modification such as the filamentous growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are affected by nutrient depletion. The present work aimed at describing the effect of carbon and/or nitrogen limitation on the aptitude of S. cerevisiae strains to bind coloured polyphenols. Carbon- and nitrogen-rich or deficient media supplemented with grape polyphenols were used to simulate different grape juice conditions-early, mid, 'adjusted' for nitrogen, and late fermentations. In early fermentation condition, the R+G+B values range from 106 (high adsorption, strain Sc1128) to 192 (low adsorption, strain Σ1278b), in mid-fermentation the values range from 111 (high adsorption, strain Sc1321) to 258 (low adsorption, strain Sc2306), in 'adjusted' for nitrogen conditions the values range from 105 (high adsorption, strain Sc1321) to 194 (low adsorption, strain Sc2306) while in late fermentation conditions the values range from 101 (high adsorption, strain Sc384) to 293 (low adsorption, strain Sc2306). The effect of nutrient availability is not univocal for all the strains and the different media tested modified the strains behaviour. In all the media the strains show significant differences. Results demonstrate that wine yeasts decrease/increase their parietal adsorption activity according to the nutrient availability. The wide range of strain variability observed could be useful in selecting wine starters. PMID:27116955

  3. Activity of quinones from teak (Tectona grandis) on fungal cell wall stress.

    PubMed

    Sumthong, Pattarawadee; Damveld, Robbert A; Choi, Young H; Arentshorst, Mark; Ram, Arthur F; van den Hondel, Cees A; Verpoorte, Rob

    2006-08-01

    Teak ( Tectona grandis L.f., Verbenaceae) sawdust extract inhibited the growth of Aspergillus niger. Centrifugal partition chromatography was used to isolate the active compounds. By (1)H-NMR the active compounds were identified as deoxylapachol and tectoquinone. Two A. niger transgenic strains which show induction of 1,3 -alpha-D-glucan synthase were used as a cell wall damage model. The result showed that deoxylapachol from T. grandis extract induced fungal cell wall stress. PMID:16972200

  4. Evaluation of the damage of cell wall and cell membrane for various extracellular polymeric substance extractions of activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuesong; Liu, Junxin; Xiao, Benyi

    2014-10-20

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) are susceptible to contamination by intracellular substances released during the extraction of EPS owing to the damage caused to microbial cell structures. The damage to cell walls and cell membranes in nine EPS extraction processes of activated sludge was evaluated in this study. The extraction of EPS (including proteins, carbohydrates and DNA) was the highest using the NaOH extraction method and the lowest using formaldehyde extraction. All nine EPS extraction methods in this study resulted in cell wall and membrane damage. The damage to cell walls, evaluated by 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate (KDO) and N-acetylglucosamine content changes in extracted EPS, was the most significant in the NaOH extraction process. Formaldehyde extraction showed a similar extent of damage to cell walls to those detected in the control method (centrifugation), while those in the formaldehyde-NaOH and cation exchange resin extractions were slightly higher than those detected in the control. N-acetylglucosamine was more suitable than KDO for the evaluation of cell wall damage in the EPS extraction of activated sludge. The damage to cell membranes was characterized by two fluorochromes (propidium iodide and FITC Annexin V) with flow cytometry (FCM) measurement. The highest proportion of membrane-damaged cells was detected in NaOH extraction (26.54% of total cells) while membrane-damaged cells comprised 8.19% of total cells in the control. PMID:25173614

  5. Cell-wall-bound lytic activity in Chlorella fusca: function and characterization of an endo-mannanase.

    PubMed

    Loos, E; Meindl, D

    1985-12-01

    A cell-wall-degrading activity was solubilized from young cells and from mother cell walls of Chlorella fusca by treatment with LiCl. The cytoplasmic enzyme hexokinase was not detectable in these extracts. The LiCl-solubilized activity increased in the cell cycle parallel to the release of autospores. The enzyme was purified on a chromatofocusing column followed by gel filtration. Sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacryl amide gel electrophoresis of the purified enzyme revealed a molecular weight of 44 kDa, whereas gel filtration indicated a molecular weight of 25 kDa. Cell-wall-lytic activity and β-1,4-mannanase activity coeluted in gel filtration and were separated from β-D-fucosidase activity. The enzyme degraded isolated cell walls and ivory nut mannan primarily to oligosaccharides with an estimated degree of polymerization ≧6. The soluble degradation products of the cell wall consisted of 92-96% mannose and 4-8% glucose. It is concluded that the cell-wall-lytic activity is caused by an endo-mannanase. In vivo, this enzyme probably degrades the mother cell wall and, after autospore release, remains bound to it as well as to the surface of the daughter cells by ionic forces. The identity of this bound enzyme with a soluble wall-degrading enzyme previously obtained from mother cells is discussed. PMID:24241623

  6. Effects of multivalent cations on cell wall-associated acid phosphatase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, S.I.; Brouillette, J.N.; Nagahashi, G.; Kumosinski, T.F.

    1988-09-01

    Primary cell walls, free from cytoplasmic contamination were prepared from corn (Zea mays L.) roots and potato (Solanum tuberosum) tubers. After EDTA treatment, the bound acid phosphatase activities were measured in the presence of various multivalent cations. Under the conditions of minimized Donnan effect and at pH 4.2, the bound enzyme activity of potato tuber cell walls (PCW) was stimulated by Cu/sup 2 +/, Mg/sup 2 +/, Za/sup 2 +/, and Mn/sup 2 +/; unaffected by Ba/sup 2 +/, Cd/sup 2 +/, and Pb/sup 2 +/; and inhibited by Al/sup 3 +/. The bound acid phosphatase of PCW was stimulated by a low concentration but inhibited by a higher concentration of Hg/sup 2 +/. On the other hand, in the case of corn root cells walls (CCW), only inhibition of the bound acid phosphatase by Al/sup 3 +/ and Hg/sup 2 +/ was observed. Kinetic analyses revealed that PCW acid phosphatase exhibited a negative cooperativity under all employed experimental conditions except in the presence of Mg/sup 2 +/. In contrast, CCW acid phosphatase showed no cooperative behavior. The presence of Ca/sup 2 +/ significantly reduced the effects of Hg/sup 2 +/ or Al/sup 3 +/, but not Mg/sup 2 +/, to the bound cell wall acid phosphatases. The salt solubilized (free) acid phosphatases from both PCW and CCW were not affected by the presence of tested cations except for Hg/sup 2 +/ or Al/sup 3 +/ which caused a Ca/sup 2 +/-insensitive inhibition of the enzymes. The induced stimulation or inhibition of bound acid phosphatases was quantitatively related to cation binding in the cell wall structure.

  7. Cell wall integrity

    PubMed Central

    Pogorelko, Gennady; Lionetti, Vincenzo; Bellincampi, Daniela; Zabotina, Olga

    2013-01-01

    The plant cell wall, a dynamic network of polysaccharides and glycoproteins of significant compositional and structural complexity, functions in plant growth, development and stress responses. In recent years, the existence of plant cell wall integrity (CWI) maintenance mechanisms has been demonstrated, but little is known about the signaling pathways involved, or their components. Examination of key mutants has shed light on the relationships between cell wall remodeling and plant cell responses, indicating a central role for the regulatory network that monitors and controls cell wall performance and integrity. In this review, we present a short overview of cell wall composition and discuss post-synthetic cell wall modification as a valuable approach for studying CWI perception and signaling pathways. PMID:23857352

  8. The Lamportian cell wall

    SciTech Connect

    Keiliszewski, M.; Lamport, D. )

    1991-05-01

    The Lamportian Warp-Weft hypothesis suggests a cellulose-extensin interpenetrating network where extensin mechanically couples the load-bearing cellulose microfibrils in a wall matrix that is best described as a microcomposite. This model is based on data gathered from the extensin-rich walls of tomato and sycamore cell suspension culture, wherein extensin precursors are insolubilized into the wall by undefined crosslinks. The authors recent work with cell walls isolated from intact tissue as well as walls from suspension cultured cells of the graminaceous monocots maize and rice, the non-graminaceous monocot asparagus, the primitive herbaceous dicot sugar beet, and the gymnosperm Douglas Fir indicate that although extensins are ubiquitous to all plant species examined, they are not the major structural protein component of most walls examined. Amino acid analyses of intact and HF-treated walls shows a major component neither an HRGP, nor directly comparable to the glycine-rich wall proteins such as those associated with seed coat walls or the 67 mole% glycine-rich proteins cloned from petunia and soybean. Clearly, structural wall protein alternatives to extensin exist and any cell wall model must take that into account. If we assume that extracellular matrices are a priori network structures, then new Hypless' structural proteins in the maize cell wall raise questions about the sort of network these proteins create: the kinds of crosslinks involved; how they are formed; and the roles played by the small amounts of HRGPs.

  9. Glycoconjugates and polysaccharides of fungal cell wall and activation of immune system

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, M.R.; Barreto-Bergter, E.; Taborda, C.P.

    2008-01-01

    Glycoproteins, glycosphingolipids and polysaccharides exposed at the most external layers of the wall are involved in several types of interactions of fungal cells with the exocellular environment. These molecules are fundamental building blocks of organisms, contributing to the structure, integrity, cell growth, differentiation and signaling. Several of them are immunologically active compounds with potential as regulators of pathogenesis and the immune response of the host. Some of these structures can be specifically recognized by antibodies from patients’ sera, suggesting that they can be also useful in the diagnosis of fungal infections. PMID:24031202

  10. Glycoside Hydrolase Activities in Cell Walls of Sclerenchyma Cells in the Inflorescence Stems of Arabidopsis thaliana Visualized in Situ.

    PubMed

    Banasiak, Alicja; Ibatullin, Farid M; Brumer, Harry; Mellerowicz, Ewa J

    2014-01-01

    Techniques for in situ localization of gene products provide indispensable information for understanding biological function. In the case of enzymes, biological function is directly related to activity, and therefore, knowledge of activity patterns is central to understanding the molecular controls of plant development. We have previously developed a novel type of fluorogenic substrate for revealing glycoside hydrolase activity in planta, based on resorufin β-glycosides Here, we explore a wider range of such substrates to visualize glycoside hydrolase activities in Arabidopsis inflorescence stems in real time, especially highlighting distinct distribution patterns of these activities in the secondary cell walls of sclerenchyma cells. The results demonstrate that β-1,4-glucosidase, β-1,4-glucanase and β-1,4-galactosidase activities accompany secondary wall deposition. In contrast, xyloglucanase activity follows a different pattern, with the highest signal observed in mature cells, concentrated in the middle lamella. These data further the understanding of the process of cell wall deposition and function in sclerenchymatic tissues of plants. PMID:27135517

  11. Calpain-Mediated Positional Information Directs Cell Wall Orientation to Sustain Plant Stem Cell Activity, Growth and Development.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhe; Brown, Roy C; Fletcher, Jennifer C; Opsahl-Sorteberg, Hilde-Gunn

    2015-09-01

    Eukaryotic development and stem cell control depend on the integration of cell positional sensing with cell cycle control and cell wall positioning, yet few factors that directly link these events are known. The DEFECTIVE KERNEL1 (DEK1) gene encoding the unique plant calpain protein is fundamental for development and growth, being essential to confer and maintain epidermal cell identity that allows development beyond the globular embryo stage. We show that DEK1 expression is highest in the actively dividing cells of seeds, meristems and vasculature. We further show that eliminating Arabidopsis DEK1 function leads to changes in developmental cues from the first zygotic division onward, altered microtubule patterns and misshapen cells, resulting in early embryo abortion. Expression of the embryonic marker genes WOX2, ATML1, PIN4, WUS and STM, related to axis organization, cell identity and meristem functions, is also altered in dek1 embryos. By monitoring cell layer-specific DEK1 down-regulation, we show that L1- and 35S-induced down-regulation mainly affects stem cell functions, causing severe shoot apical meristem phenotypes. These results are consistent with a requirement for DEK1 to direct layer-specific cellular activities and set downstream developmental cues. Our data suggest that DEK1 may anchor cell wall positions and control cell division and differentiation, thereby balancing the plant's requirement to maintain totipotent stem cell reservoirs while simultaneously directing growth and organ formation. A role for DEK1 in regulating microtubule-orchestrated cell wall orientation during cell division can explain its effects on embryonic development, and suggests a more general function for calpains in microtubule organization in eukaryotic cells. PMID:26220906

  12. Cell wall substrate specificity of six different lysozymes and lysozyme inhibitory activity of bacterial extracts.

    PubMed

    Nakimbugwe, Dorothy; Masschalck, Barbara; Deckers, Daphne; Callewaert, Lien; Aertsen, Abram; Michiels, Chris W

    2006-06-01

    We have investigated the specificity of six different lysozymes for peptidoglycan substrates obtained by extraction of a number of gram-negative bacteria and Micrococcus lysodeikticus with chloroform/Tris-HCl buffer (chloroform/buffer). The lysozymes included two that are commercially available (hen egg white lysozyme or HEWL, and mutanolysin from Streptomyces globisporus or M1L), and four that were chromatographically purified (bacteriophage lambda lysozyme or LaL, bacteriophage T4 lysozyme or T4L, goose egg white lysozyme or GEWL, and cauliflower lysozyme or CFL). HEWL was much more effective on M. lysodeikticus than on any of the gram-negative cell walls, while the opposite was found for LaL. Also the gram-negative cell walls showed remarkable differences in susceptibility to the different lysozymes, even for closely related species like Escherichia coli and Salmonella Typhimurium. These differences could not be due to the presence of lysozyme inhibitors such as Ivy from E. coli in the cell wall substrates because we showed that chloroform extraction effectively removed this inhibitor. Interestingly, we found strong inhibitory activity to HEWL in the chloroform/buffer extracts of Salmonella Typhimurium, and to LaL in the extracts of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, suggesting that other lysozyme inhibitors than Ivy exist and are probably widespread in gram-negative bacteria. PMID:16684100

  13. Evidence from a carbohydrate incorporation assay for direct activation of bone marrow myelopoietic precursor cells by bacterial cell wall constitutents.

    PubMed Central

    Monner, D A; Gmeiner, J; Mühlradt, P F

    1981-01-01

    The stimulation of incorporation of [3H]galactose into membrane glycoconjugates, measured in a precipitation test, was used as a criterion for activation of bone marrow cells. In this assay, purified bacterial lipopolysaccharide, lipoprotein, and murein monomer and dimer fragments all activated rat bone marrow cells in vitro. The response was dose dependent, followed a defined time course, and was not serum dependent. O-Acetylated murein dimer fragments from Proteus mirabilis were much less active than their unsubstituted counterparts, indicating a structural specificity for murein activation. Removal of adherent and phagocytizing cells from the marrow suspensions did not alter these results. The labeled, activated cells constituted a distinct population of buoyant density 1.064 to 1.069 g/cm3 when centrifuged on a continuous gradient of Percoll. Enrichment of the target cell population was achieved by a combination of adherent cell removal and discontinuous density gradient centrifugation to remove granulocytes and erythropoietic cells. It was concluded that a population of myelopoietic precursors could be activated by direct contact with bacterial cell wall constituents. The stimulation of galactose incorporation was not coupled to active deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis in the marrow cells. Thus, the activation was interpreted as an induction of differentiation rather than a mitotic event. PMID:7014467

  14. Requirement of glucose for mycolic acid biosynthetic activity localized in the cell wall of Bacterionema matruchotii.

    PubMed

    Shimakata, T; Tsubokura, K; Kusaka, T

    1986-06-01

    When the localization of mycolic acid biosynthetic activity was examined with Bacterionema matruchotii cells disrupted by the ultrasonic vibration method, activity was detected only in the cell wall fraction, not in the inner membrane nor in the 78,000g supernatant. Either the supernatant or sugar was absolutely required for the incorporation of [14C]palmitate into mycolic acids. Among sugars examined, glucose was most effective, with maltose being second. Unexpectedly, trehalose was inert. As to substrate, the present system utilized free palmitic acid rather than palmitoyl-CoA. The reaction products from palmitate and glucose were glucose mycolate and trehalose monomycolate, in which the label from [14C]palmitate or [14C]glucose was incorporated. Glucose palmitate was also formed. Addition of trehalose resulted in a shift from glucose mycolate to trehalose monomycolate. These data clearly indicate that sugars play an important role in the synthesis of mycolic acids from free fatty acids. PMID:3717946

  15. Arterial Wall Stress Controls NFAT5 Activity in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Clemens; Pfisterer, Larissa; Wagner, Andreas H.; Hödebeck, Maren; Cattaruzza, Marco; Hecker, Markus; Korff, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background Nuclear factor of activated T‐cells 5 (NFAT5) has recently been described to control the phenotype of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Although an increase in wall stress or stretch (eg, elicited by hypertension) is a prototypic determinant of VSMC activation, the impact of this biomechanical force on the activity of NFAT5 is unknown. This study intended to reveal the function of NFAT5 and to explore potential signal transduction pathways leading to its activation in stretch‐stimulated VSMCs. Methods and Results Human arterial VSMCs were exposed to biomechanical stretch and subjected to immunofluorescence and protein‐biochemical analyses. Stretch promoted the translocation of NFAT5 to the nucleus within 24 hours. While the protein abundance of NFAT5 was regulated through activation of c‐Jun N‐terminal kinase under these conditions, its translocation required prior activation of palmitoyltransferases. DNA microarray and ChiP analyses identified the matrix molecule tenascin‐C as a prominent transcriptional target of NFAT5 under these conditions that stimulates migration of VSMCs. Analyses of isolated mouse femoral arteries exposed to hypertensive perfusion conditions verified that NFAT5 translocation to the nucleus is followed by an increase in tenascin‐C abundance in the vessel wall. Conclusions Collectively, our data suggest that biomechanical stretch is sufficient to activate NFAT5 both in native and cultured VSMCs where it regulates the expression of tenascin‐C. This may contribute to an improved migratory activity of VSMCs and thus promote maladaptive vascular remodeling processes such as hypertension‐induced arterial stiffening. PMID:24614757

  16. Targeting Bacterial Cell Wall Peptidoglycan Synthesis by Inhibition of Glycosyltransferase Activity.

    PubMed

    Mesleh, Michael F; Rajaratnam, Premraj; Conrad, Mary; Chandrasekaran, Vasu; Liu, Christopher M; Pandya, Bhaumik A; Hwang, You Seok; Rye, Peter T; Muldoon, Craig; Becker, Bernd; Zuegg, Johannes; Meutermans, Wim; Moy, Terence I

    2016-02-01

    Synthesis of bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan requires glycosyltransferase enzymes that transfer the disaccharide-peptide from lipid II onto the growing glycan chain. The polymerization of the glycan chain precedes cross-linking by penicillin-binding proteins and is essential for growth for key bacterial pathogens. As such, bacterial cell wall glycosyltransferases are an attractive target for antibiotic drug discovery. However, significant challenges to the development of inhibitors for these targets include the development of suitable assays and chemical matter that is suited to the nature of the binding site. We developed glycosyltransferase enzymatic activity and binding assays using the natural products moenomycin and vancomycin as model inhibitors. In addition, we designed a library of disaccharide compounds based on the minimum moenomycin fragment with peptidoglycan glycosyltransferase inhibitory activity and based on a more drug-like and synthetically versatile disaccharide building block. A subset of these disaccharide compounds bound and inhibited the glycosyltransferase enzymes, and these compounds could serve as chemical entry points for antibiotic development. PMID:26358369

  17. Cell Wall Polymers of Bacillus sphaericus: Activities of Enzymes Involved in Peptidoglycan Precursor Synthesis During Sporulation

    PubMed Central

    Linnett, Paul E.; Tipper, Donald J.

    1974-01-01

    In synchronously sporulating cells of Bacillus sphaericus 9602, the specific activities of those enzymes specifically required for the synthesis of the UDP-N-acetyl-muramyl-pentapeptide precursor of vegetative cell wall peptidoglycan decay by 50% after the end of exponential cell division, probably as a consequence of dilution by newly synthesized protein. The meso-diaminopimelate ligase is the only new activity whose synthesis is required for synthesis of the nucleotide-pentapeptide precursor of spore cortex peptidoglycan. The addition of d-Ala-d-Ala to the nucleotide tripeptide is catalyzed by an enzyme present in both vegetative and sporulating cells, which apparently does not discriminate between lysine- and diaminopimelate-containing acceptors. The activities of the l-Ala and d-Ala-d-Ala ligases and of the d-Ala-d-Ala synthetase increases in parallel with the appearance of the diaminopimelate ligase, indicating coordinate derepression and suggesting operon-like organization of the appropriate structural genes. PMID:4417383

  18. MYB58 and MYB63 are transcriptional activators of the lignin biosynthetic pathway during secondary cell wall formation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianli; Lee, Chanhui; Zhong, Ruiqin; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2009-01-01

    It has previously been shown that SECONDARY WALL-ASSOCIATED NAC DOMAIN PROTEIN1 (SND1) is a key transcription factor regulating secondary cell wall formation, including the biosynthesis of cellulose, xylan, and lignin. In this study, we show that two closely related SND1-regulated MYB transcription factors, MYB58 and MYB63, are transcriptional regulators specifically activating lignin biosynthetic genes during secondary wall formation in Arabidopsis thaliana. MYB58 and MYB63 are phylogenetically distinct from previously characterized MYBs shown to be associated with secondary wall formation or phenylpropanoid metabolism. Expression studies showed that MYB58 and MYB63 are specifically expressed in fibers and vessels undergoing secondary wall thickening. Dominant repression of their functions led to a reduction in secondary wall thickening and lignin content. Overexpression of MYB58 and MYB63 resulted in specific activation of lignin biosynthetic genes and concomitant ectopic deposition of lignin in cells that are normally unlignified. MYB58 was able to activate directly the expression of lignin biosynthetic genes and a secondary wall-associated laccase (LAC4) gene. Furthermore, the expression of MYB58 and MYB63 was shown to be regulated by the SND1 close homologs NST1, NST2, VND6, and VND7 and their downstream target MYB46. Together, our results indicate that MYB58 and MYB63 are specific transcriptional activators of lignin biosynthesis in the SND1-mediated transcriptional network regulating secondary wall formation. PMID:19122102

  19. Effect of immunochemotherapy with OK-432 and yeast cell wall on the activities of peritoneal macrophages of mice.

    PubMed

    Mashiba, H; Matsunaga, K; Gojobori, M

    1979-10-01

    The effect of chemotherapy combined with immunostimulants on the activities of macrophages in mice was studied. The number of macrophages and exudate cells in the peritoneal cavity increased 3 days after ip injection with mitomycin-C, cyclophosphamide, and 5-fluorouracil together with OK-432 or yeast cell wall and decreased to normal level after 9 days, while the number of the cells remained decreased in mice receiving multi-drugs alone. Acid phosphatase activity of the macrophages of mice was elevated after the simultaneous injection of yeast cell wall and OK-432, and high activity was preserved in the macrophages of mice receiving yeast cell wall even after 9 days. Spreading of these cells was also enhanced. Macrophage activities examined by these assays were maximal in every respect 6 days after combination therapy. Cytostatic activity of the cells was strengthened after 6 days by combined use of OK-432 or yeast cell wall. Role of the activated macrophages in combination therapy was discussed. PMID:520759

  20. Uronic Acid products release from enzymically active cell wall from tomato fruit and its dependency on enzyme quantity and distribution.

    PubMed

    Huber, D J; Lee, J H

    1988-07-01

    Isolated cell wall from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv Rutgers) fruit released polymeric (degree of polymerization [DP] > 8), oligomeric, and monomeric uronic acids in a reaction mediated by bound polygalacturonase (PG) (EC 3.2.1.15). Wall autolytic capacity increased with ripening, reflecting increased levels of bound PG; however, characteristic oligomeric and monomeric products were recovered from all wall isolates exhibiting net pectin release. The capacity of wall from fruit at early ripening (breaker, turning) to generate oligomeric and monomeric uronic acids was attributed to the nonuniform ripening pattern of the tomato fruit and, consequently, a locally dense distribution of enzyme in wall originating from those fruit portions at more temporally advanced stages of ripening. Artificial autolytically active wall, prepared by permitting solubilized PG to bind to enzymically inactive wall from maturegreen fruit, released products which were similar in size characteristics to those recovered from active wall isolates. Extraction of wall-bound PG using high concentrations of NaCl (1.2 molar) did not attenuate subsequent autolytic activity but greatly suppressed the production of oligomeric and monomeric products. An examination of water-soluble uronic acids recovered from ripe pericarp tissue disclosed the presence of polymeric and monomeric uronic acids but only trace quantities of oligomers. The significance in autolytic reactions of enzyme quantity and distribution and their possible relevance to in vivo pectin degradation will be discussed. PMID:16666191

  1. A serine protease zymogen in insect plasma. Purification and activation by microbial cell wall components.

    PubMed

    Katsumi, Y; Kihara, H; Ochiai, M; Ashida, M

    1995-03-15

    A protease zymogen present in the plasma fraction of the hemolymph of silkworm, Bombyx mori, was purified to homogeneity as judged by SDS/PAGE and IEF/PAGE. An activating system for the zymogen was also isolated from the plasma fraction and was shown to be triggered by zymosan (yeast cell wall polysaccharide containing beta-1,3-glucan) or peptidoglycan. Using this system, the purified zymogen was activated and the active enzyme was purified to homogeneity. The physiological function of the zymogen or its active form is not yet known, but the active form was shown to have narrower substrate specificity than trypsin. Among 33 peptide derivatives examined, Boc-Gln-Arg-Arg-NH-Mec and Boc-Val-Pro-Arg-NH-Mec (Boc = tert-butoxycarbonyl, NH-Mec = 4-methylcoumaryl-7-amide) were the best and the second best substrates, respectively. The purified zymogen was determined to be a 39-kDa protein consisting of a single polypeptide. The active form of the zymogen was labeled with [3H]diisopropylfluorophosphate and was completely inactivated by (p-amidinophenyl)methanesulfonyl fluoride. The molecular mass of the [3H]-labeled enzyme was determined to be 38 kDa in SDS/PAGE under reducing conditions. These results indicate that the 39-kDa protein purified in the present study is a zymogen of a serine-type protease and that the activation of the zymogen occurs by limited proteolysis. PMID:7737188

  2. Catalysts of plant cell wall loosening

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    The growing cell wall in plants has conflicting requirements to be strong enough to withstand the high tensile forces generated by cell turgor pressure while selectively yielding to those forces to induce wall stress relaxation, leading to water uptake and polymer movements underlying cell wall expansion. In this article, I review emerging concepts of plant primary cell wall structure, the nature of wall extensibility and the action of expansins, family-9 and -12 endoglucanases, family-16 xyloglucan endotransglycosylase/hydrolase (XTH), and pectin methylesterases, and offer a critical assessment of their wall-loosening activity PMID:26918182

  3. Cell Wall Free Space of Cucumis Hypocotyls Contains NAD and a Blue Light-Regulated Peroxidase Activity.

    PubMed

    Shinkle, J R; Swoap, S J; Simon, P; Jones, R L

    1992-04-01

    Solutions were obtained from the cell wall free space of red light-grown cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) hypocotyl sections by a low-speed centrifugation technique. The centrifugate contained NAD and peroxidase but no detectable cytoplasmic contamination, as indicated by the absence of the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from the cell wall solution. Peroxidase activity centrifuged from the cell wall of red light-grown cucumber hypocotyl section could be resolved into at least three cathodic isoforms and two anodic isoforms by isoelectric focusing. Treatment of red light-grown cucumber seedlings with a 10-minute pulse of high-intensity blue light increased the level of cell wall peroxidase by about 60% and caused a qualitative change in the anodic isoforms of this enzyme. The increase in peroxidase activity was detectable within 25 minutes after the start of the blue light pulse, was maximal at 35 minutes, and declined to control levels by 45 minutes of irradiation. The inhibitory effect of blue light on hypocotyl elongation was more rapid than the effect of blue light on total wall peroxidase activity, leading to the conclusion that growth and peroxidase activity are not causally related. PMID:16668797

  4. Cell Wall Free Space of Cucumis Hypocotyls Contains NAD and a Blue Light-Regulated Peroxidase Activity 1

    PubMed Central

    Shinkle, James R.; Swoap, Steven J.; Simon, Patrice; Jones, Russell L.

    1992-01-01

    Solutions were obtained from the cell wall free space of red light-grown cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) hypocotyl sections by a low-speed centrifugation technique. The centrifugate contained NAD and peroxidase but no detectable cytoplasmic contamination, as indicated by the absence of the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from the cell wall solution. Peroxidase activity centrifuged from the cell wall of red light-grown cucumber hypocotyl section could be resolved into at least three cathodic isoforms and two anodic isoforms by isoelectric focusing. Treatment of red light-grown cucumber seedlings with a 10-minute pulse of high-intensity blue light increased the level of cell wall peroxidase by about 60% and caused a qualitative change in the anodic isoforms of this enzyme. The increase in peroxidase activity was detectable within 25 minutes after the start of the blue light pulse, was maximal at 35 minutes, and declined to control levels by 45 minutes of irradiation. The inhibitory effect of blue light on hypocotyl elongation was more rapid than the effect of blue light on total wall peroxidase activity, leading to the conclusion that growth and peroxidase activity are not causally related. ImagesFigure 2 PMID:16668797

  5. Augmenting the Activity of Monoterpenoid Phenols against Fungal Pathogens Using 2-Hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde that Target Cell Wall Integrity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong H; Chan, Kathleen L; Mahoney, Noreen

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of cell wall integrity system should be an effective strategy for control of fungal pathogens. To augment the cell wall disruption efficacy of monoterpenoid phenols (carvacrol, thymol), antimycotic potency of benzaldehyde derivatives that can serve as chemosensitizing agents were evaluated against strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild type (WT), slt2Δ and bck1Δ (mutants of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and MAPK kinase kinase, respectively, in the cell wall integrity pathway). Among fourteen compounds investigated, slt2Δ and bck1Δ showed higher susceptibility to nine benzaldehydes, compared to WT. Differential antimycotic activity of screened compounds indicated "structure-activity relationship" for targeting the cell wall integrity, where 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde (2H4M) exhibited the highest antimycotic potency. The efficacy of 2H4M as an effective chemosensitizer to monoterpenoid phenols (viz., 2H4M + carvacrol or thymol) was assessed in yeasts or filamentous fungi (Aspergillus, Penicillium) according to European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing or Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute M38-A protocols, respectively. Synergistic chemosensitization greatly lowers minimum inhibitory or fungicidal concentrations of the co-administered compounds. 2H4M also overcame the tolerance of two MAPK mutants (sakAΔ, mpkCΔ) of Aspergillus fumigatus to fludioxonil (phenylpyrrole fungicide). Collectively, 2H4M possesses chemosensitizing capability to magnify the efficacy of monoterpenoid phenols, which improves target-based (viz., cell wall disruption) antifungal intervention. PMID:26569223

  6. Augmenting the Activity of Monoterpenoid Phenols against Fungal Pathogens Using 2-Hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde that Target Cell Wall Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong H.; Chan, Kathleen L.; Mahoney, Noreen

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of cell wall integrity system should be an effective strategy for control of fungal pathogens. To augment the cell wall disruption efficacy of monoterpenoid phenols (carvacrol, thymol), antimycotic potency of benzaldehyde derivatives that can serve as chemosensitizing agents were evaluated against strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild type (WT), slt2Δ and bck1Δ (mutants of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and MAPK kinase kinase, respectively, in the cell wall integrity pathway). Among fourteen compounds investigated, slt2Δ and bck1Δ showed higher susceptibility to nine benzaldehydes, compared to WT. Differential antimycotic activity of screened compounds indicated “structure-activity relationship” for targeting the cell wall integrity, where 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde (2H4M) exhibited the highest antimycotic potency. The efficacy of 2H4M as an effective chemosensitizer to monoterpenoid phenols (viz., 2H4M + carvacrol or thymol) was assessed in yeasts or filamentous fungi (Aspergillus, Penicillium) according to European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing or Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute M38-A protocols, respectively. Synergistic chemosensitization greatly lowers minimum inhibitory or fungicidal concentrations of the co-administered compounds. 2H4M also overcame the tolerance of two MAPK mutants (sakAΔ, mpkCΔ) of Aspergillus fumigatus to fludioxonil (phenylpyrrole fungicide). Collectively, 2H4M possesses chemosensitizing capability to magnify the efficacy of monoterpenoid phenols, which improves target-based (viz., cell wall disruption) antifungal intervention. PMID:26569223

  7. Bacterial Cell Wall Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginsberg, Cynthia; Brown, Stephanie; Walker, Suzanne

    Bacterial cell-surface polysaccharides cells are surrounded by a variety of cell-surface structures that allow them to thrive in extreme environments. Components of the cell envelope and extracellular matrix are responsible for providing the cells with structural support, mediating intercellular communication, allowing the cells to move or to adhere to surfaces, protecting the cells from attack by antibiotics or the immune system, and facilitating the uptake of nutrients. Some of the most important cell wall components are polysaccharide structures. This review discusses the occurrence, structure, function, and biosynthesis of the most prevalent bacterial cell surface polysaccharides: peptidoglycan, lipopolysaccharide, arabinogalactan, and lipoarabinomannan, and capsular and extracellular polysaccharides. The roles of these polysaccharides in medicine, both as drug targets and as therapeutic agents, are also described.

  8. Growth maintenance of the maize primary root at low water potentials involves increases in cell-wall extension properties, expansin activity, and wall susceptibility to expansins.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Y; Sharp, R E; Durachko, D M; Cosgrove, D J

    1996-01-01

    Previous work on the growth biophysics of maize (Zea mays L.) primary roots suggested that cell walls in the apical 5 mm of the elongation zone increased their yielding ability as an adaptive response to low turgor and water potential (psi w). To test this hypothesis more directly, we measured the acid-induced extension of isolated walls from roots grown at high (-0.03 MPa) or low (-1.6 MPa) psi w using an extensometer. Acid-induced extension was greatly increased in the apical 5 mm and was largely eliminated in the 5- to 10-mm region of roots grown at low psi w. This pattern is consistent with the maintenance of elongation toward the apex and the shortening of the elongation zone in these roots. Wall proteins extracted from the elongation zone possessed expansin activity, which increased substantially in roots grown at low psi w. Western blots likewise indicated higher expansin abundance in the roots at low psi w. Additionally, the susceptibility of walls to expansin action was higher in the apical 5 mm of roots at low psi w than in roots at high psi w. The basal region of the elongation zone (5-10 mm) did not extend in response to expansins, indicating that loss of susceptibility to expansins was associated with growth cessation in this region. Our results indicate that both the increase in expansin activity and the increase in cell-wall susceptibility to expansins play a role in enhancing cell-wall yielding and, therefore, in maintaining elongation in the apical region of maize primary roots at low psi w. PMID:11536740

  9. Bacterial cell wall components as immunomodulators--II. The bacterial cell wall extract OM-85 BV as unspecific activator, immunogen and adjuvant in mice.

    PubMed

    Bessler, W G; Huber, M; Baier, W

    1997-01-01

    The bacterial extract Broncho-Vaxom used for the prevention and treatment of recurrent respiratory tract infections is an immunomodulator in vitro and in vivo, as determined in a murine model. The extract acts, on the one hand, as macrophage activator and polyclonal B-lymphocyte stimulant. On the other hand, after repeated intraperitoneal or oral immunizations, the extract is immunogenic, inducing serum IgG binding to the bacterial strains used for the preparation of the extract. On bacteria, the sera recognize the cell wall components porin, lipoprotein/lipopeptide and murein. The bacterial extract also exhibits adjuvant properties when applied in mixture with antigens, such as TNP-BSA or an influenza vaccine preparation. The unspecific and the immunospecific stimulatory effect of the extract as well as its adjuvant properties could be of importance for understanding its therapeutic effect. PMID:9637353

  10. Uptake of poly-dispersed single-walled carbon nanotubes and decline of functions in mouse NK cells undergoing activation.

    PubMed

    Alam, Anwar; Puri, Niti; Saxena, Rajiv K

    2016-09-01

    The interaction of poly-dispersed acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (AF-SWCNT) with NK cells undergoing activation was examined. Exposure to AF-SWCNT during NK activation in vitro by interleukin (IL)-2, and in vivo by Poly(I:C) significantly lowered cytotoxic activity generated against YAC-1 tumor cells. Recoveries of spleen NK1.1(+) cells as well as the activated subset of NK cells (NK1.1(+)CD69(+) cells) were significantly reduced by the AF-SWCNT exposure. The proportion of apoptotic NK cells (NK1.1(+) phosphatidylserine(+)) in the spleen cell preparations activated in vitro was also significantly elevated. Expression levels of CD107a [for assessing NK cell degranulation] as well as of FasL marker [mediating non-secretory pathway of NK cell killing] were significantly lower in cells exposed to AF-SWCNT during the activation phase. Intracellular levels of interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in the cells were also significantly reduced. Fluorescent AF-SWCNT (FAF-SWCNT) were internalized by the NK cells and uptake was significantly greater in activated cells. Confocal microscopy indicated the internalized FAF-SWCNT were localized to the cytoplasm of the NK cells. These results indicated that AF-SWCNT were internalized by NK cells and caused a general down-regulation of a variety of parameters associated with NK cell cytotoxicity and other cellular functions. PMID:27416475

  11. Calpain-Mediated positional information directs cell wall orientation to sustain plant stem cell activity, growth and development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eukaryotic development and stem cell control depend on the integration of cell positional sensing with cell cycle control and cell wall positioning, yet few factors that directly link these events are known. The DEFECTIVE KERNEL1 (DEK1) gene encoding the unique plant calpain protein is fundamental f...

  12. Carbon-Nanotubes-Supported Pd Nanoparticles for Alcohol Oxidations in Fuel Cells: Effect of Number of Nanotube Walls on Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Lu, Shanfu; Xiang, Yan; Shen, Pei Kang; Liu, Jian; Jiang, San Ping

    2015-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are well known electrocatalyst supports due to their high electrical conductivity, structural stability, and high surface area. Here, we demonstrate that the number of inner tubes or walls of CNTs also have a significant promotion effect on the activity of supported Pd nanoparticles (NPs) for alcohol oxidation reactions of direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFCs). Pd NPs with similar particle size (2.1-2.8 nm) were uniformly assembled on CNTs with different number of walls. The results indicate that Pd NPs supported on triple-walled CNTs (TWNTs) have the highest mass activity and stability for methanol, ethanol, and ethylene glycol oxidation reactions, as compared to Pd NPs supported on single-walled and multi-walled CNTs. Such a specific promotion effect of TWNTs on the electrocatalytic activity of Pd NPs is not related to the contribution of metal impurities in CNTs, oxygen-functional groups of CNTs or surface area of CNTs and Pd NPs. A facile charge transfer mechanism via electron tunneling between the outer wall and inner tubes of CNTs under electrochemical driving force is proposed for the significant promotion effect of TWNTs for the alcohol oxidation reactions in alkaline solutions. PMID:25900368

  13. Cell Wall-Anchored Nuclease of Streptococcus sanguinis Contributes to Escape from Neutrophil Extracellular Trap-Mediated Bacteriocidal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Nakata, Masanobu; Okahashi, Nobuo; Wada, Satoshi; Yamashiro, Takashi; Hayashi, Mikako; Hamada, Shigeyuki; Sumitomo, Tomoko; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis, a member of the commensal mitis group of streptococci, is a primary colonizer of the tooth surface, and has been implicated in infectious complications including bacteremia and infective endocarditis. During disease progression, S. sanguinis may utilize various cell surface molecules to evade the host immune system to survive in blood. In the present study, we discovered a novel cell surface nuclease with a cell-wall anchor domain, termed SWAN (streptococcal wall-anchored nuclease), and investigated its contribution to bacterial resistance against the bacteriocidal activity of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Recombinant SWAN protein (rSWAN) digested multiple forms of DNA including NET DNA and human RNA, which required both Mg2+ and Ca2+ for optimum activity. Furthermore, DNase activity of S. sanguinis was detected around growing colonies on agar plates containing DNA. In-frame deletion of the swan gene mostly reduced that activity. These findings indicated that SWAN is a major nuclease displayed on the surface, which was further confirmed by immuno-detection of SWAN in the cell wall fraction. The sensitivity of S. sanguinis to NET killing was reduced by swan gene deletion. Moreover, heterologous expression of the swan gene rendered a Lactococcus lactis strain more resistant to NET killing. Our results suggest that the SWAN nuclease on the bacterial surface contributes to survival in the potential situation of S. sanguinis encountering NETs during the course of disease progression. PMID:25084357

  14. Cell wall glycosidase activities and protein content variations during fruit development and ripening in three texture contrasted tomato cultivars.

    PubMed

    Konozy, Emadeldin H E; Causse, Mathilde; Faurobert, Mireille

    2012-07-01

    Excessive softening is the main factor limiting fruit shelf life and storage. It is generally acceptable now that softening of fruit which occurs during the ripening is due to synergistic actions of several enzymes on cell wall polysaccharides. As a subject for this study, we have assayed some glycosidase activities using three tomato species (Lycopersicon esculentum) contrasted for their texture phenotypes; the cherry tomato line Cervil (Solanum lycopersicum var. cerasiforme), a common taste tomato line Levovil (S. lycopersicum Mill.) and VilB a modern line, large, firmer and with good storage capability. Four glycosidase activities namely α-galactosidase, β-galactosidase, β-mannosidase and β-glucosidase were extracted from tomato's cell wall of the three species. Cell wall protein from fruits pericarp was extracted and compared among the three cultivars at the following stages; 14 days post anthesis (14DPA) fruit; 21 days post anthesis (21DPA), turning (breaker), red and over ripe. When glycolytic activities were also compared among these cultivars at the precited development stages, gross variations were noticed from stage to stage and also from species to species in accordance with the fruit firmness status. Interestingly, VilB cultivar, the firmer among the other two, though possessed the highest total protein content, exhibited the lowest enzymatic activities. Taken together, these results may therefore allow us to conclude that studies of glycolytic activities in a single tomato cultivar cannot be generalized to all species. On the other hand, relating fruit development to glycosidase activities should logically be coupled to these enzymes from cell wall compartment. PMID:23961187

  15. Cell Wall Remodeling Enzymes Modulate Fungal Cell Wall Elasticity and Osmotic Stress Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ene, Iuliana V.; Walker, Louise A.; Schiavone, Marion; Lee, Keunsook K.; Martin-Yken, Hélène; Dague, Etienne; Gow, Neil A. R.; Munro, Carol A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The fungal cell wall confers cell morphology and protection against environmental insults. For fungal pathogens, the cell wall is a key immunological modulator and an ideal therapeutic target. Yeast cell walls possess an inner matrix of interlinked β-glucan and chitin that is thought to provide tensile strength and rigidity. Yeast cells remodel their walls over time in response to environmental change, a process controlled by evolutionarily conserved stress (Hog1) and cell integrity (Mkc1, Cek1) signaling pathways. These mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways modulate cell wall gene expression, leading to the construction of a new, modified cell wall. We show that the cell wall is not rigid but elastic, displaying rapid structural realignments that impact survival following osmotic shock. Lactate-grown Candida albicans cells are more resistant to hyperosmotic shock than glucose-grown cells. We show that this elevated resistance is not dependent on Hog1 or Mkc1 signaling and that most cell death occurs within 10 min of osmotic shock. Sudden decreases in cell volume drive rapid increases in cell wall thickness. The elevated stress resistance of lactate-grown cells correlates with reduced cell wall elasticity, reflected in slower changes in cell volume following hyperosmotic shock. The cell wall elasticity of lactate-grown cells is increased by a triple mutation that inactivates the Crh family of cell wall cross-linking enzymes, leading to increased sensitivity to hyperosmotic shock. Overexpressing Crh family members in glucose-grown cells reduces cell wall elasticity, providing partial protection against hyperosmotic shock. These changes correlate with structural realignment of the cell wall and with the ability of cells to withstand osmotic shock. PMID:26220968

  16. Fluorescent Labeling of Yeast Cell Wall Components.

    PubMed

    Okada, Hiroki; Ohya, Yoshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Yeast cells stained with a fluorescent dye that specifically binds to one of the cell wall components can be observed under a fluorescent microscope. Visualization of the components 1,3-β-glucan, mannoproteins, and/or chitin not only provides information concerning the cell wall, but also reveals clues about various cellular activities such as cell polarity, vesicular transport, establishment of budding pattern, apical and isotropic bud growth, and replicative cell age. This protocol describes a standard method for visualizing different components of the yeast cell wall. PMID:27480714

  17. Genetic and Biochemical Characterization of the Cell Wall Hydrolase Activity of the Major Secreted Protein of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG

    PubMed Central

    Claes, Ingmar J. J.; Schoofs, Geert; Regulski, Krzysztof; Courtin, Pascal; Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre; Rolain, Thomas; Hols, Pascal; von Ossowski, Ingemar; Reunanen, Justus; de Vos, Willem M.; Palva, Airi; Vanderleyden, Jos; De Keersmaecker, Sigrid C. J.; Lebeer, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) produces two major secreted proteins, designated here Msp1 (LGG_00324 or p75) and Msp2 (LGG_00031 or p40), which have been reported to promote the survival and growth of intestinal epithelial cells. Intriguingly, although each of these proteins shares homology with cell wall hydrolases, a physiological function that correlates with such an enzymatic activity remained to be substantiated in LGG. To investigate the bacterial function, we constructed knock-out mutants in the corresponding genes aiming to establish a genotype to phenotype relation. Microscopic examination of the msp1 mutant showed the presence of rather long and overly extended cell chains, which suggests that normal daughter cell separation is hampered. Subsequent observation of the LGG wild-type cells by immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that the Msp1 protein accumulates at the septum of exponential-phase cells. The cell wall hydrolyzing activity of the Msp1 protein was confirmed by zymogram analysis. Subsequent analysis by RP-HPLC and mass spectrometry of the digestion products of LGG peptidoglycan (PG) by Msp1 indicated that the Msp1 protein has D-glutamyl-L-lysyl endopeptidase activity. Immunofluorescence microscopy and the failure to construct a knock-out mutant suggest an indispensable role for Msp2 in priming septum formation in LGG. PMID:22359601

  18. Gibberellin (GA3) enhances cell wall invertase activity and mRNA levels in elongating dwarf pea (Pisum sativum) shoots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L. L.; Mitchell, J. P.; Cohn, N. S.; Kaufman, P. B.

    1993-01-01

    The invertase (EC 3.2.1.26) purified from cell walls of dwarf pea stems to homogeneity has a molecular mass of 64 kilodaltons (kD). Poly(A)+RNA was isolated from shoots of dwarf pea plants, and a cDNA library was constructed using lambda gt11 as an expression vector. The expression cDNA library was screened with polyclonal antibodies against pea cell wall invertase. One invertase cDNA clone was characterized as a full-length cDNA with 1,863 base pairs. Compared with other known invertases, one homologous region in the amino acid sequence was found. The conserved motif, Asn-Asp-Pro-Asn-Gly, is located near the N-terminal end of invertase. Northern blot analysis showed that the amount of invertase mRNA (1.86 kb) was rapidly induced to a maximal level 4 h after GA3 treatment, then gradually decreased to the control level. The mRNA level at 4 h in GA3-treated peas was fivefold higher than that of the control group. The maximal increase in activity of pea cell wall invertase elicited by GA3 occcured at 8 h after GA3 treatment. This invertase isoform was shown immunocytochemically to be localized in the cell walls, where a 10-fold higher accumulation occurred in GA3-treated tissue compared with control tissue. This study indicates that the expression of the pea shoot cell-wall invertase gene could be regulated by GA3 at transcriptional and/or translational levels.

  19. Cell wall proteomics of crops

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Setsuko; Yanagawa, Yuki

    2012-01-01

    Cell wall proteins play key roles in cell structure and metabolism, cell enlargement, signal transduction, responses to environmental stress, and many other physiological events. Agricultural crops are often used for investigating stress tolerance because cultivars with differing degrees of tolerance are available. Abiotic and biotic stress factors markedly influence the geographical distribution and yields of many crop species. Crop cell wall proteomics is of particular importance for improving crop productivity, particularly under unfavorable environmental conditions. To better understand the mechanisms underlying stress response in crops, cell wall proteomic analyses are being increasingly utilized. In this review, the methods of purification and purity assays of cell wall protein fractions from crops are described, and the results of protein identification using gel-based and gel-free proteomic techniques are presented. Furthermore, protein composition of the cell walls of rice, wheat, maize, and soybean are compared, and the role of cell wall proteins in crops under flooding and drought stress is discussed. This review will be useful for clarifying the role of the cell wall of crops in response to environmental stresses. PMID:23403621

  20. Shape dynamics of growing cell walls.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Shiladitya; Scherer, Norbert F; Dinner, Aaron R

    2016-04-14

    We introduce a general theoretical framework to study the shape dynamics of actively growing and remodeling surfaces. Using this framework we develop a physical model for growing bacterial cell walls and study the interplay of cell shape with the dynamics of growth and constriction. The model allows us to derive constraints on cell wall mechanical energy based on the observed dynamics of cell shape. We predict that exponential growth in cell size requires a constant amount of cell wall energy to be dissipated per unit volume. We use the model to understand and contrast growth in bacteria with different shapes such as spherical, ellipsoidal, cylindrical and toroidal morphologies. Coupling growth to cell wall constriction, we predict a discontinuous shape transformation, from partial constriction to cell division, as a function of the chemical potential driving cell wall synthesis. Our model for cell wall energy and shape dynamics relates growth kinetics with cell geometry, and provides a unified framework to describe the interplay between shape, growth and division in bacterial cells. PMID:26953519

  1. Cell Wall Metabolism in Ripening Fruit

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Ahmed Elrayah; Labavitch, John M.

    1980-01-01

    Mature `Bartlett' pear (Pyrus communis) fruits were ripened at 20 C. Fruits at different stages of ripeness were homogenized, and extracts of the low speed pellet (crude cell wall) were prepared. These extracts contained polygalacturonase, pectin esterase, and activity against seven p-nitrophenyl glycoside substrates. Polygalacturonase, α-galactosidase, and α-mannosidase increased in activity as the fruit ripened. Cellulase and activities against pear wall xylan and arabinan were absent from the extracts. PMID:16661276

  2. SH3b Cell wall binding domains can enhance anti-staphylococcal activity of endolysin lytic domains.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteriophage endolysins are peptidoglycan hydrolases and a potential new source of antimicrobials. A large subset of these proteins contain a C-terminal SH3b_5 cell wall binding domain that has been shown [for some] to be essential for accurate cell wall recognition and subsequent staphylolytic ac...

  3. Discovery of LPMO activity on hemicelluloses shows the importance of oxidative processes in plant cell wall degradation.

    PubMed

    Agger, Jane W; Isaksen, Trine; Várnai, Anikó; Vidal-Melgosa, Silvia; Willats, William G T; Ludwig, Roland; Horn, Svein J; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Westereng, Bjørge

    2014-04-29

    The recently discovered lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are known to carry out oxidative cleavage of glycoside bonds in chitin and cellulose, thus boosting the activity of well-known hydrolytic depolymerizing enzymes. Because biomass-degrading microorganisms tend to produce a plethora of LPMOs, and considering the complexity and copolymeric nature of the plant cell wall, it has been speculated that some LPMOs may act on other substrates, in particular the hemicelluloses that tether to cellulose microfibrils. We demonstrate that an LPMO from Neurospora crassa, NcLPMO9C, indeed degrades various hemicelluloses, in particular xyloglucan. This activity was discovered using a glycan microarray-based screening method for detection of substrate specificities of carbohydrate-active enzymes, and further explored using defined oligomeric hemicelluloses, isolated polymeric hemicelluloses and cell walls. Products generated by NcLPMO9C were analyzed using high performance anion exchange chromatography and multidimensional mass spectrometry. We show that NcLPMO9C generates oxidized products from a variety of substrates and that its product profile differs from those of hydrolytic enzymes acting on the same substrates. The enzyme particularly acts on the glucose backbone of xyloglucan, accepting various substitutions (xylose, galactose) in almost all positions. Because the attachment of xyloglucan to cellulose hampers depolymerization of the latter, it is possible that the beneficial effect of the LPMOs that are present in current commercial cellulase mixtures in part is due to hitherto undetected LPMO activities on recalcitrant hemicellulose structures. PMID:24733907

  4. Discovery of LPMO activity on hemicelluloses shows the importance of oxidative processes in plant cell wall degradation

    PubMed Central

    Agger, Jane W.; Isaksen, Trine; Várnai, Anikó; Vidal-Melgosa, Silvia; Willats, William G. T.; Ludwig, Roland; Horn, Svein J.; Eijsink, Vincent G. H.; Westereng, Bjørge

    2014-01-01

    The recently discovered lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are known to carry out oxidative cleavage of glycoside bonds in chitin and cellulose, thus boosting the activity of well-known hydrolytic depolymerizing enzymes. Because biomass-degrading microorganisms tend to produce a plethora of LPMOs, and considering the complexity and copolymeric nature of the plant cell wall, it has been speculated that some LPMOs may act on other substrates, in particular the hemicelluloses that tether to cellulose microfibrils. We demonstrate that an LPMO from Neurospora crassa, NcLPMO9C, indeed degrades various hemicelluloses, in particular xyloglucan. This activity was discovered using a glycan microarray-based screening method for detection of substrate specificities of carbohydrate-active enzymes, and further explored using defined oligomeric hemicelluloses, isolated polymeric hemicelluloses and cell walls. Products generated by NcLPMO9C were analyzed using high performance anion exchange chromatography and multidimensional mass spectrometry. We show that NcLPMO9C generates oxidized products from a variety of substrates and that its product profile differs from those of hydrolytic enzymes acting on the same substrates. The enzyme particularly acts on the glucose backbone of xyloglucan, accepting various substitutions (xylose, galactose) in almost all positions. Because the attachment of xyloglucan to cellulose hampers depolymerization of the latter, it is possible that the beneficial effect of the LPMOs that are present in current commercial cellulase mixtures in part is due to hitherto undetected LPMO activities on recalcitrant hemicellulose structures. PMID:24733907

  5. Enzyme degradation and proinflammatory activity in arthritogenic and nonarthritogenic Eubacterium aerofaciens cell walls.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Rimpiläinen, M; Simelyte, E; Toivanen, P

    2001-12-01

    Two almost-identical strains of Eubacterium aerofaciens isolated from the normal human gut flora were used. The cell wall (CW) of one strain with a peptidoglycan (PG) type A4alpha induces chronic arthritis in the rat after a single intraperitoneal injection, whereas CW of the other with PG type A4beta induces only a transient acute arthritis. The CW of the arthritogenic E. aerofaciens was a twofold-more-potent stimulator of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) than the nonarthritogenic CW. After degradation with mutanolysin, the capacity of the arthritogenic PG to stimulate production of TNF-alpha and MCP-1 was significantly increased, whereas that of the nonarthritogenic PG was significantly decreased. In other words, after enzyme degradation the arthritogenic PG had a four- to fivefold-stronger stimulatory capacity than that of the enzyme-treated nonarthritogenic PG. These findings indicate that the arthritogenicity of CW or a PG is not dependent on the enzyme resistance alone but also on how the PG fragments released by enzyme degradation stimulate the production of proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:11705898

  6. Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes in Pythium and Their Role in Plant Cell Wall and Storage Polysaccharide Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Zerillo, Marcelo M.; Adhikari, Bishwo N.; Hamilton, John P.; Buell, C. Robin; Lévesque, C. André; Tisserat, Ned

    2013-01-01

    Carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes) are involved in the metabolism of glycoconjugates, oligosaccharides, and polysaccharides and, in the case of plant pathogens, in the degradation of the host cell wall and storage compounds. We performed an in silico analysis of CAZymes predicted from the genomes of seven Pythium species (Py. aphanidermatum, Py. arrhenomanes, Py. irregulare, Py. iwayamai, Py. ultimum var. ultimum, Py. ultimum var. sporangiiferum and Py. vexans) using the “CAZymes Analysis Toolkit” and “Database for Automated Carbohydrate-active Enzyme Annotation” and compared them to previously published oomycete genomes. Growth of Pythium spp. was assessed in a minimal medium containing selected carbon sources that are usually present in plants. The in silico analyses, coupled with our in vitro growth assays, suggest that most of the predicted CAZymes are involved in the metabolism of the oomycete cell wall with starch and sucrose serving as the main carbohydrate sources for growth of these plant pathogens. The genomes of Pythium spp. also encode pectinases and cellulases that facilitate degradation of the plant cell wall and are important in hyphal penetration; however, the species examined in this study lack the requisite genes for the complete saccharification of these carbohydrates for use as a carbon source. Genes encoding for xylan, xyloglucan, (galacto)(gluco)mannan and cutin degradation were absent or infrequent in Pythium spp.. Comparative analyses of predicted CAZymes in oomycetes indicated distinct evolutionary histories. Furthermore, CAZyme gene families among Pythium spp. were not uniformly distributed in the genomes, suggesting independent gene loss events, reflective of the polyphyletic relationships among some of the species. PMID:24069150

  7. Molecular regulation of plant cell wall extensibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    Gravity responses in plants often involve spatial and temporal changes in cell growth, which is regulated primarily by controlling the ability of the cell wall to extend. The wall is thought to be a cellulose-hemicellulose network embedded in a hydrated matrix of complex polysaccharides and a small amount of structural protein. The wall extends by a form of polymer creep, which is mediated by expansins, a novel group of wall-loosening proteins. Expansins were discovered during a molecular dissection of the "acid growth" behavior of cell walls. Expansin alters the rheology of plant walls in profound ways, yet its molecular mechanism of action is still uncertain. It lacks detectable hydrolytic activity against the major components of the wall, but it is able to disrupt noncovalent adhesion between wall polysaccharides. The discovery of a second family of expansins (beta-expansins) sheds light on the biological role of a major group of pollen allergens and implies that expansins have evolved for diverse developmental functions. Finally, the contribution of other processes to wall extensibility is briefly summarized.

  8. Plant cell walls to ethanol.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conversion of plant cell walls to ethanol constitutes generation 2 bioethanol production. The process consists of several steps: biomass selection/genetic modification, physiochemical pretreatment, enzymatic saccharification, fermentation, and separation. Ultimately, it is desired to combine as man...

  9. Regulation of Cell Wall Biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: The Cell Wall Integrity Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Levin, David E.

    2011-01-01

    The yeast cell wall is a strong, but elastic, structure that is essential not only for the maintenance of cell shape and integrity, but also for progression through the cell cycle. During growth and morphogenesis, and in response to environmental challenges, the cell wall is remodeled in a highly regulated and polarized manner, a process that is principally under the control of the cell wall integrity (CWI) signaling pathway. This pathway transmits wall stress signals from the cell surface to the Rho1 GTPase, which mobilizes a physiologic response through a variety of effectors. Activation of CWI signaling regulates the production of various carbohydrate polymers of the cell wall, as well as their polarized delivery to the site of cell wall remodeling. This review article centers on CWI signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae through the cell cycle and in response to cell wall stress. The interface of this signaling pathway with other pathways that contribute to the maintenance of cell wall integrity is also discussed. PMID:22174182

  10. Plasma membrane/cell wall perturbation activates a novel cell cycle checkpoint during G1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kono, Keiko; Al-Zain, Amr; Schroeder, Lea; Nakanishi, Makoto; Ikui, Amy E

    2016-06-21

    Cellular wound healing or the repair of plasma membrane/cell wall damage (plasma membrane damage) occurs frequently in nature. Although various cellular perturbations, such as DNA damage, spindle misalignment, and impaired daughter cell formation, are monitored by cell cycle checkpoint mechanisms in budding yeast, whether plasma membrane damage is monitored by any of these checkpoints remains to be addressed. Here, we define the mechanism by which cells sense membrane damage and inhibit DNA replication. We found that the inhibition of DNA replication upon plasma membrane damage requires GSK3/Mck1-dependent degradation of Cdc6, a component of the prereplicative complex. Furthermore, the CDK inhibitor Sic1 is stabilized in response to plasma membrane damage, leading to cell integrity maintenance in parallel with the Mck1-Cdc6 pathway. Cells defective in both Cdc6 degradation and Sic1 stabilization failed to grow in the presence of plasma membrane damage. Taking these data together, we propose that plasma membrane damage triggers G1 arrest via Cdc6 degradation and Sic1 stabilization to promote the cellular wound healing process. PMID:27274080

  11. A Monoclonal Antibody Directed against a Candida albicans Cell Wall Mannoprotein Exerts Three Anti-C. albicans Activities

    PubMed Central

    Moragues, María D.; Omaetxebarria, Miren J.; Elguezabal, Natalia; Sevilla, María J.; Conti, Stefania; Polonelli, Luciano; Pontón, José

    2003-01-01

    Antibodies are believed to play a role in the protection against Candida albicans infections by a number of mechanisms, including the inhibition of adhesion or germ tube formation, opsonization, neutralization of virulence-related enzymes, and direct candidacidal activity. Although some of these biological activities have been demonstrated individually in monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), it is not clear if all these anti-C. albicans activities can be displayed by a single antibody. In this report, we characterized a monoclonal antibody raised against the main target of salivary secretory immunoglobulin A in the cell wall of C. albicans, which exerts three anti-C. albicans activities: (i) inhibition of adherence to HEp-2 cells, (ii) inhibition of germination, and (iii) direct candidacidal activity. MAb C7 reacted with a proteinic epitope from a mannoprotein with a molecular mass of >200 kDa predominantly expressed on the C. albicans germ tube cell wall surface as well as with a number of antigens from Candida lusitaniae, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Scedosporium prolificans. MAb C7 caused a 31.1% inhibition in the adhesion of C. albicans to HEp-2 monolayers and a 55.3% inhibition in the adhesion of C. albicans to buccal epithelial cells, produced a 38.5% decrease in the filamentation of C. albicans, and exhibited a potent fungicidal effect against C. albicans, C. lusitaniae, Cryptococcus neoformans, A. fumigatus, and S. prolificans, showing reductions in fungal growth ranging from 34.2 to 88.7%. The fungicidal activity showed by MAb C7 seems to be related to that reported by antibodies mimicking the activity of a killer toxin produced by the yeast Pichia anomala, since one of these MAbs also reacted with the C. albicans mannoprotein with a molecular mass of >200 kDa. Results presented in this study support the concept of a family of microbicidal antibodies that could be useful in the treatment of a wide range of microbial infections when used

  12. Combining proteomics and transcriptome sequencing to identify active plant-cell-wall-degrading enzymes in a leaf beetle

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The primary plant cell wall is a complex mixture of polysaccharides and proteins encasing living plant cells. Among these polysaccharides, cellulose is the most abundant and useful biopolymer present on earth. These polysaccharides also represent a rich source of energy for organisms which have evolved the ability to degrade them. A growing body of evidence suggests that phytophagous beetles, mainly species from the superfamilies Chrysomeloidea and Curculionoidea, possess endogenous genes encoding complex and diverse families of so-called plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs). The presence of these genes in phytophagous beetles may have been a key element in their success as herbivores. Here, we combined a proteomics approach and transcriptome sequencing to identify PCWDEs present in larval gut contents of the mustard leaf beetle, Phaedon cochleariae. Results Using a two-dimensional proteomics approach, we recovered 11 protein bands, isolated using activity assays targeting cellulose-, pectin- and xylan-degrading enzymes. After mass spectrometry analyses, a total of 13 proteins putatively responsible for degrading plant cell wall polysaccharides were identified; these proteins belong to three glycoside hydrolase (GH) families: GH11 (xylanases), GH28 (polygalacturonases or pectinases), and GH45 (β-1,4-glucanases or cellulases). Additionally, highly stable and proteolysis-resistant host plant-derived proteins from various pathogenesis-related protein (PRs) families as well as polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) were also identified from the gut contents proteome. In parallel, transcriptome sequencing revealed the presence of at least 19 putative PCWDE transcripts encoded by the P. cochleariae genome. All of these were specifically expressed in the insect gut rather than the rest of the body, and in adults as well as larvae. The discrepancy observed in the number of putative PCWDEs between transcriptome and proteome analyses could be

  13. XET Activity is Found Near Sites of Growth and Cell Elongation in Bryophytes and Some Green Algae: New Insights into the Evolution of Primary Cell Wall Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Van Sandt, Vicky S. T.; Stieperaere, Herman; Guisez, Yves; Verbelen, Jean-Pierre; Vissenberg, Kris

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims In angiosperms xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET)/hydrolase (XTH) is involved in reorganization of the cell wall during growth and development. The location of oligo-xyloglucan transglucosylation activity and the presence of XTH expressed sequence tags (ESTs) in the earliest diverging extant plants, i.e. in bryophytes and algae, down to the Phaeophyta was examined. The results provide information on the presence of an XET growth mechanism in bryophytes and algae and contribute to the understanding of the evolution of cell wall elongation in general. Methods Representatives of the different plant lineages were pressed onto an XET test paper and assayed. XET or XET-related activity was visualized as the incorporation of fluorescent signal. The Physcomitrella genome database was screened for the presence of XTHs. In addition, using the 3′ RACE technique searches were made for the presence of possible XTH ESTs in the Charophyta. Key Results XET activity was found in the three major divisions of bryophytes at sites corresponding to growing regions. In the Physcomitrella genome two putative XTH-encoding cDNA sequences were identified that contain all domains crucial for XET activity. Furthermore, XET activity was located at the sites of growth in Chara (Charophyta) and Ulva (Chlorophyta) and a putative XTH ancestral enzyme in Chara was identified. No XET activity was identified in the Rhodophyta or Phaeophyta. Conclusions XET activity was shown to be present in all major groups of green plants. These data suggest that an XET-related growth mechanism originated before the evolutionary divergence of the Chlorobionta and open new insights in the evolution of the mechanisms of primary cell wall expansion. PMID:17098750

  14. Improving the Lethal Effect of Cpl-7, a Pneumococcal Phage Lysozyme with Broad Bactericidal Activity, by Inverting the Net Charge of Its Cell Wall-Binding Module

    PubMed Central

    Díez-Martínez, Roberto; de Paz, Héctor; Bustamante, Noemí; García, Ernesto; Menéndez, Margarita

    2013-01-01

    Phage endolysins are murein hydrolases that break the bacterial cell wall to provoke lysis and release of phage progeny. Recently, these enzymes have also been recognized as powerful and specific antibacterial agents when added exogenously. In the pneumococcal system, most cell wall associated murein hydrolases reported so far depend on choline for activity, and Cpl-7 lysozyme constitutes a remarkable exception. Here, we report the improvement of the killing activity of the Cpl-7 endolysin by inversion of the sign of the charge of the cell wall-binding module (from −14.93 to +3.0 at neutral pH). The engineered variant, Cpl-7S, has 15 amino acid substitutions and an improved lytic activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae (including multiresistant strains), Streptococcus pyogenes, and other pathogens. Moreover, we have demonstrated that a single 25-μg dose of Cpl-7S significantly increased the survival rate of zebrafish embryos infected with S. pneumoniae or S. pyogenes, confirming the killing effect of Cpl-7S in vivo. Interestingly, Cpl-7S, in combination with 0.01% carvacrol (an essential oil), was also found to efficiently kill Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas putida, an effect not described previously. Our findings provide a strategy to improve the lytic activity of phage endolysins based on facilitating their pass through the negatively charged bacterial envelope, and thereby their interaction with the cell wall target, by modulating the net charge of the cell wall-binding modules. PMID:23959317

  15. Improving the lethal effect of cpl-7, a pneumococcal phage lysozyme with broad bactericidal activity, by inverting the net charge of its cell wall-binding module.

    PubMed

    Díez-Martínez, Roberto; de Paz, Héctor D; de Paz, Héctor; Bustamante, Noemí; García, Ernesto; Menéndez, Margarita; García, Pedro

    2013-11-01

    Phage endolysins are murein hydrolases that break the bacterial cell wall to provoke lysis and release of phage progeny. Recently, these enzymes have also been recognized as powerful and specific antibacterial agents when added exogenously. In the pneumococcal system, most cell wall associated murein hydrolases reported so far depend on choline for activity, and Cpl-7 lysozyme constitutes a remarkable exception. Here, we report the improvement of the killing activity of the Cpl-7 endolysin by inversion of the sign of the charge of the cell wall-binding module (from -14.93 to +3.0 at neutral pH). The engineered variant, Cpl-7S, has 15 amino acid substitutions and an improved lytic activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae (including multiresistant strains), Streptococcus pyogenes, and other pathogens. Moreover, we have demonstrated that a single 25-μg dose of Cpl-7S significantly increased the survival rate of zebrafish embryos infected with S. pneumoniae or S. pyogenes, confirming the killing effect of Cpl-7S in vivo. Interestingly, Cpl-7S, in combination with 0.01% carvacrol (an essential oil), was also found to efficiently kill Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas putida, an effect not described previously. Our findings provide a strategy to improve the lytic activity of phage endolysins based on facilitating their pass through the negatively charged bacterial envelope, and thereby their interaction with the cell wall target, by modulating the net charge of the cell wall-binding modules. PMID:23959317

  16. Evidence for adhesin activity in the acid-stable moiety of the phosphomannoprotein cell wall complex of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Kanbe, T; Cutler, J E

    1994-01-01

    Previously, we showed that Candida albicans hydrophilic yeast cells adhere specifically to mouse splenic marginal-zone macrophages. The adhesins are part of the yeast cell wall phosphomannoprotein complex, and one adhesin site, which reacts with the monoclonal antibody 10G, was identified as a beta-1,2-linked tetramannose in the acid-labile portion of the complex. We report here that the acid-stable part of the complex, which has not been reported previously to have adhesin activity, is in large part responsible for yeast cell binding to the splenic marginal zone. The phosphomannoprotein complex, termed Fr.II, was isolated from C. albicans serotype B yeast cells by beta-mercaptoethanol extraction and concanavalin A-agarose affinity chromatography. Fr.II is devoid of the serotype A-specific antigen factor 6, which functions in yeast cell attachment to epithelial cells. The acid-stable part of Fr.II (i.e., Fr.IIS) was obtained by mild acid hydrolysis and size exclusion fractionation. Fr.IIS was further fractionated into four fractions, Fr.IIS1, Fr.IIS2, Fr.IIS3, and Fr.IIS4, by concanavalin A-agarose column chromatography and elution with a linear gradient of alpha-methyl-D-mannopyranoside. Adhesin activity of these fractions was determined by their ability to block yeast cell binding to the splenic marginal zone. Fr.IIS1 and Fr.IIS2 yielded more material and stronger adhesin activity than either Fr.IIS3 or Fr.IIS4. Only Fr.IIS1 did not react with antibodies (anti-factor 5 and monoclonal antibody 10G) specific for the acid-labile beta-1,2-linked oligosaccharides. Fr.IIS1-coated latex beads attached specifically to the marginal zone in a pattern identical to that of yeast cell binding. Furthermore, Fr.IIS1-latex bead attachment was inhibited by soluble Fr.II or Fr.IIS. Initial chemical analyses indicate that the adhesin site on Fr.IIS1 is a carbohydrate because adhesin activity was destroyed by periodate oxidation but not by proteinase K digestion. Images PMID:8168927

  17. Functional Divergence in Shrimp Anti-Lipopolysaccharide Factors (ALFs): From Recognition of Cell Wall Components to Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Rafael Diego; Vergnes, Agnès; de Lorgeril, Julien; Goncalves, Priscila; Perazzolo, Luciane Maria; Sauné, Laure; Romestand, Bernard; Fievet, Julie; Gueguen, Yannick; Bachère, Evelyne; Destoumieux-Garzón, Delphine

    2013-01-01

    Antilipopolysaccharide factors (ALFs) have been described as highly cationic polypeptides with a broad spectrum of potent antimicrobial activities. In addition, ALFs have been shown to recognize LPS, a major component of the Gram-negative bacteria cell wall, through conserved amino acid residues exposed in the four-stranded β-sheet of their three dimensional structure. In penaeid shrimp, ALFs form a diverse family of antimicrobial peptides composed by three main variants, classified as ALF Groups A to C. Here, we identified a novel group of ALFs in shrimp (Group D ALFs), which corresponds to anionic polypeptides in which many residues of the LPS binding site are lacking. Both Group B (cationic) and Group D (anionic) shrimp ALFs were produced in a heterologous expression system. Group D ALFs were found to have impaired LPS-binding activities and only limited antimicrobial activity compared to Group B ALFs. Interestingly, all four ALF groups were shown to be simultaneously expressed in an individual shrimp and to follow different patterns of gene expression in response to a microbial infection. Group B was by far the more expressed of the ALF genes. From our results, nucleotide sequence variations in shrimp ALFs result in functional divergence, with significant differences in LPS-binding and antimicrobial activities. To our knowledge, this is the first functional characterization of the sequence diversity found in the ALF family. PMID:23861837

  18. The Putative Lactococcal Extracytoplasmic Function Anti-Sigma Factor Llmg2447 Determines Resistance to the Cell Wall-Active Bacteriocin Lcn972

    PubMed Central

    Roces, Clara; Pérez, Verónica; Campelo, Ana B.; Blanco, Diego; Kok, Jan; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Rodríguez, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Lactococcin 972 (Lcn972) is a cell wall-active bacteriocin that inhibits cell wall biosynthesis in Lactococcus lactis. In this work, the transcriptomes of the Lcn972-resistant (Lcnr) mutant L. lactis D1 and its parent strain were compared to identify factors involved in Lcn972 resistance. Upregulated genes included members of the cell envelope stress (CesSR) regulon, the penicillin-binding protein pbpX gene and gene llmg2447, which may encode a putative extracytoplasmic function (ECF) anti-sigma factor. The gene llmg2447 is located downstream of the nonfunctional ECF gene sigXpseudo. Nisin-controlled expression of llmg2447 led to high Lcn972 resistance in L. lactis, with no cross-resistance to other cell wall-active antimicrobials. Upregulation of llmg2447 in L. lactis D1 (Lcnr) was linked to the integration of insertion element IS981 into the llmg2447 promoter region, replacing the native −35 box and activating the otherwise silent promoter P2447. This is the first example of an orphan ECF anti-sigma factor involved in bacteriocin resistance. This new role in neutralizing cell wall-active compounds (e.g., Lcn972) could have evolved from a putative primary function of Llmg2447 in sensing cell envelope stress. PMID:22890757

  19. Back wall solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, H. W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A solar cell is disclosed which comprises a first semiconductor material of one conductivity type with one face having the same conductivity type but more heavily doped to form a field region arranged to receive the radiant energy to be converted to electrical energy, and a layer of a second semiconductor material, preferably highly doped, of opposite conductivity type on the first semiconductor material adjacent the first semiconductor material at an interface remote from the heavily doped field region. Instead of the opposite conductivity layer, a metallic Schottky diode layer may be used, in which case no additional back contact is needed. A contact such as a gridded contact, previous to the radiant energy may be applied to the heavily doped field region of the more heavily doped, same conductivity material for its contact.

  20. Cofactor bypass variants reveal a conformational control mechanism governing cell wall polymerase activity.

    PubMed

    Markovski, Monica; Bohrhunter, Jessica L; Lupoli, Tania J; Uehara, Tsuyoshi; Walker, Suzanne; Kahne, Daniel E; Bernhardt, Thomas G

    2016-04-26

    To fortify their cytoplasmic membrane and protect it from osmotic rupture, most bacteria surround themselves with a peptidoglycan (PG) exoskeleton synthesized by the penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs). As their name implies, these proteins are the targets of penicillin and related antibiotics. We and others have shown that the PG synthases PBP1b and PBP1a of Escherichia coli require the outer membrane lipoproteins LpoA and LpoB, respectively, for their in vivo function. Although it has been demonstrated that LpoB activates the PG polymerization activity of PBP1b in vitro, the mechanism of activation and its physiological relevance have remained unclear. We therefore selected for variants of PBP1b (PBP1b*) that bypass the LpoB requirement for in vivo function, reasoning that they would shed light on LpoB function and its activation mechanism. Several of these PBP1b variants were isolated and displayed elevated polymerization activity in vitro, indicating that the activation of glycan polymer growth is indeed one of the relevant functions of LpoB in vivo. Moreover, the location of amino acid substitutions causing the bypass phenotype on the PBP1b structure support a model in which polymerization activation proceeds via the induction of a conformational change in PBP1b initiated by LpoB binding to its UB2H domain, followed by its transmission to the glycosyl transferase active site. Finally, phenotypic analysis of strains carrying a PBP1b* variant revealed that the PBP1b-LpoB complex is most likely not providing an important physical link between the inner and outer membranes at the division site, as has been previously proposed. PMID:27071112

  1. Augmenting the activity of monoterpenoid phenols against fungal pathogens using 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde that target cell wall integrity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to identify benzaldehydes to which the fungal cell wall integrity signaling mutants showed increased sensitivity. These compounds could then function as chemosensitizing agents in combination with monoterpenoid phenols, such as carvacrol or thymol, to enhance antifungal act...

  2. Cell Wall Metabolism in Ripening Fruit (VII. Biologically Active Pectin Oligomers in Ripening Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) Fruits).

    PubMed

    Melotto, E.; Greve, L. C.; Labavitch, J. M.

    1994-10-01

    A water-soluble, ethanol-insoluble extract of autolytically inactive tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) pericarp tissue contains a series of galacturonic acid-containing (pectic) oligosaccharides that will elicit a transient increase in ethylene biosynthesis when applied to pericarp discs cut from mature green fruit. The concentration of these oligosaccharides in extracts (2.2 [mu]g/g fresh weight) is in excess of that required to promote ethylene synthesis. Oligomers in extracts of ripening fruits were partially purified by preparative high-performance liquid chromatography, and their compositions are described. Pectins were extracted from cell walls prepared from mature green fruit using chelator and Na2CO3 solutions. These pectins are not active in eliciting ethylene synthesis. However, treatment of the Na2CO3-soluble, but not the chelator-soluble, pectin with pure tomato polygalacturonase 1 generates oligomers that are similar to those extracted from ripening fruit (according to high-performance liquid chromatography analysis) and are active as elicitors. The possibility that pectin-derived oligomers are endogenous regulators of ripening is discussed. PMID:12232350

  3. Two endogenous proteins that induce cell wall extension in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQueen-Mason, S.; Durachko, D. M.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Plant cell enlargement is regulated by wall relaxation and yielding, which is thought to be catalyzed by elusive "wall-loosening" enzymes. By employing a reconstitution approach, we found that a crude protein extract from the cell walls of growing cucumber seedlings possessed the ability to induce the extension of isolated cell walls. This activity was restricted to the growing region of the stem and could induce the extension of isolated cell walls from various dicot stems and the leaves of amaryllidaceous monocots, but was less effective on grass coleoptile walls. Endogenous and reconstituted wall extension activities showed similar sensitivities to pH, metal ions, thiol reducing agents, proteases, and boiling in methanol or water. Sequential HPLC fractionation of the active wall extract revealed two proteins with molecular masses of 29 and 30 kD associated with the activity. Each protein, by itself, could induce wall extension without detectable hydrolytic breakdown of the wall. These proteins appear to mediate "acid growth" responses of isolated walls and may catalyze plant cell wall extension by a novel biochemical mechanism.

  4. Plant and algal cell walls: diversity and functionality

    PubMed Central

    Popper, Zoë A.; Ralet, Marie-Christine; Domozych, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although plants and many algae (e.g. the Phaeophyceae, brown, and Rhodophyceae, red) are only very distantly related they are united in their possession of carbohydrate-rich cell walls, which are of integral importance being involved in many physiological processes. Furthermore, wall components have applications within food, fuel, pharmaceuticals, fibres (e.g. for textiles and paper) and building materials and have long been an active topic of research. As shown in the 27 papers in this Special Issue, as the major deposit of photosynthetically fixed carbon, and therefore energy investment, cell walls are of undisputed importance to the organisms that possess them, the photosynthetic eukaryotes (plants and algae). The complexities of cell wall components along with their interactions with the biotic and abiotic environment are becoming increasingly revealed. Scope The importance of plant and algal cell walls and their individual components to the function and survival of the organism, and for a number of industrial applications, are illustrated by the breadth of topics covered in this issue, which includes papers concentrating on various plants and algae, developmental stages, organs, cell wall components, and techniques. Although we acknowledge that there are many alternative ways in which the papers could be categorized (and many would fit within several topics), we have organized them as follows: (1) cell wall biosynthesis and remodelling, (2) cell wall diversity, and (3) application of new technologies to cell walls. Finally, we will consider future directions within plant cell wall research. Expansion of the industrial uses of cell walls and potentially novel uses of cell wall components are both avenues likely to direct future research activities. Fundamentally, it is the continued progression from characterization (structure, metabolism, properties and localization) of individual cell wall components through to defining their roles in almost every

  5. Honey Glycoproteins Containing Antimicrobial Peptides, Jelleins of the Major Royal Jelly Protein 1, Are Responsible for the Cell Wall Lytic and Bactericidal Activities of Honey

    PubMed Central

    Brudzynski, Katrina; Sjaarda, Calvin

    2015-01-01

    We have recently identified the bacterial cell wall as the cellular target for honey antibacterial compounds; however, the chemical nature of these compounds remained to be elucidated. Using Concavalin A- affinity chromatography, we found that isolated glycoprotein fractions (glps), but not flow-through fractions, exhibited strong growth inhibitory and bactericidal properties. The glps possessed two distinct functionalities: (a) specific binding and agglutination of bacterial cells, but not rat erythrocytes and (b) non-specific membrane permeabilization of both bacterial cells and erythrocytes. The isolated glps induced concentration- and time-dependent changes in the cell shape of both E. coli and B. subtilis as visualized by light and SEM microscopy. The appearance of filaments and spheroplasts correlated with growth inhibition and bactericidal effects, respectively. The time-kill kinetics showed a rapid, >5-log10 reduction of viable cells within 15 min incubation at 1xMBC, indicating that the glps-induced damage of the cell wall was lethal. Unexpectedly, MALDI-TOF and electrospray quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry, (ESI-Q-TOF-MS/MS) analysis of glps showed sequence identity with the Major Royal Jelly Protein 1 (MRJP1) precursor that harbors three antimicrobial peptides: Jelleins 1, 2, and 4. The presence of high-mannose structures explained the lectin-like activity of MRJP1, while the presence of Jelleins in MRJP1 may explain cell wall disruptions. Thus, the observed damages induced by the MRJP1 to the bacterial cell wall constitute the mechanism by which the antibacterial effects were produced. Antibacterial activity of MRJP1 glps directly correlated with the overall antibacterial activity of honey, suggesting that it is honey’s active principle responsible for this activity. PMID:25830314

  6. Honey glycoproteins containing antimicrobial peptides, Jelleins of the Major Royal Jelly Protein 1, are responsible for the cell wall lytic and bactericidal activities of honey.

    PubMed

    Brudzynski, Katrina; Sjaarda, Calvin

    2015-01-01

    We have recently identified the bacterial cell wall as the cellular target for honey antibacterial compounds; however, the chemical nature of these compounds remained to be elucidated. Using Concavalin A-affinity chromatography, we found that isolated glycoprotein fractions (glps), but not flow-through fractions, exhibited strong growth inhibitory and bactericidal properties. The glps possessed two distinct functionalities: (a) specific binding and agglutination of bacterial cells, but not rat erythrocytes and (b) non-specific membrane permeabilization of both bacterial cells and erythrocytes. The isolated glps induced concentration- and time-dependent changes in the cell shape of both E. coli and B. subtilis as visualized by light and SEM microscopy. The appearance of filaments and spheroplasts correlated with growth inhibition and bactericidal effects, respectively. The time-kill kinetics showed a rapid, >5-log10 reduction of viable cells within 15 min incubation at 1xMBC, indicating that the glps-induced damage of the cell wall was lethal. Unexpectedly, MALDI-TOF and electrospray quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry, (ESI-Q-TOF-MS/MS) analysis of glps showed sequence identity with the Major Royal Jelly Protein 1 (MRJP1) precursor that harbors three antimicrobial peptides: Jelleins 1, 2, and 4. The presence of high-mannose structures explained the lectin-like activity of MRJP1, while the presence of Jelleins in MRJP1 may explain cell wall disruptions. Thus, the observed damages induced by the MRJP1 to the bacterial cell wall constitute the mechanism by which the antibacterial effects were produced. Antibacterial activity of MRJP1 glps directly correlated with the overall antibacterial activity of honey, suggesting that it is honey's active principle responsible for this activity. PMID:25830314

  7. Unique aspects of the grass cell wall

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grasses are amongst the most important crops worldwide, and the composition of their cell walls is critical for uses as food, feed, and energy crops. Grass cell walls differ dramatically from dicot cell walls in terms of the major structural polysaccharides present, how those polysaccharides are lin...

  8. The cell wall of Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Schoffelmeer, E A; Klis, F M; Sietsma, J H; Cornelissen, B J

    1999-01-01

    Sugar analysis of isolated cell walls from three formae speciales of Fusarium oxysporum showed that they contained not only glucose and (N-acetyl)-glucosamine, but also mannose, galactose, and uronic acids, presumably originating from cell wall glycoproteins. Cell wall glycoproteins accounted for 50-60% of the total mass of the wall. X-ray diffraction studies showed the presence of alpha-1, 3-glucan in the alkali-soluble cell wall fraction and of beta-1, 3-glucan and chitin in the alkali-insoluble fraction. Electron microscopy and lectin binding studies indicated that glycoproteins form an external layer covering an inner layer composed of chitin and glucan. PMID:10441453

  9. A general method for assaying homo- and hetero-transglycanase activities that act on plant cell-wall polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Franková, Lenka; Fry, Stephen C

    2015-04-01

    Transglycanases (endotransglycosylases) cleave a polysaccharide (donor-substrate) in mid-chain, and then transfer a portion onto another poly- or oligosaccharide (acceptor-substrate). Such enzymes contribute to plant cell-wall assembly and/or re-structuring. We sought a general method for revealing novel homo- and hetero-transglycanases, applicable to diverse polysaccharides and oligosaccharides, separating transglycanase-generated (3)H-polysaccharides from unreacted (3)H-oligosaccharides--the former immobilized (on filter-paper, silica-gel or glass-fiber), the latter eluted. On filter-paper, certain polysaccharides [e.g. (1→3, 1→4)-β-D-glucans] remained satisfactorily adsorbed when water-washed; others (e.g. pectins) were partially lost. Many oligosaccharides (e.g. arabinan-, galactan-, xyloglucan-based) were successfully eluted in appropriate solvents, but others (e.g. [(3)H]xylohexaitol, [(3)H]mannohexaitol [(3)H]cellohexaitol) remained immobile. On silica-gel, all (3)H-oligosaccharides left an immobile 'ghost' spot (contaminating any (3)H-polysaccharides), which was diminished but not prevented by additives e.g. sucrose or Triton X-100. The best stratum was glass-fiber (GF), onto which the reaction-mixture was dried then washed in 75% ethanol. Washing led to minimal loss or lateral migration of (3)H-polysaccharides if conducted by slow percolation of acidified ethanol. The effectiveness of GF-blotting was well demonstrated for Chara vulgaris trans-β-mannanase. In conclusion, our novel GF-blotting technique efficiently frees transglycanase-generated (3)H-polysaccharides from unreacted (3)H-oligosaccharides, enabling high-throughput screening of multiple postulated transglycanase activities utilising chemically diverse donor- and acceptor-substrates. PMID:25641334

  10. Modifying crops to increase cell wall digestibility.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hans-Joachim G; Samac, Deborah A; Sarath, Gautam

    2012-04-01

    Improving digestibility of roughage cell walls will improve ruminant animal performance and reduce loss of nutrients to the environment. The main digestibility impediment for dicotyledonous plants is highly lignified secondary cell walls, notably in stem secondary xylem, which become almost non-digestible. Digestibility of grasses is slowed severely by lignification of most tissues, but these cell walls remain largely digestible. Cell wall lignification creates an access barrier to potentially digestible wall material by rumen bacteria if cells have not been physically ruptured. Traditional breeding has focused on increasing total dry matter digestibility rather than cell wall digestibility, which has resulted in minimal reductions in cell wall lignification. Brown midrib mutants in some annual grasses exhibit small reductions in lignin concentration and improved cell wall digestibility. Similarly, transgenic approaches down-regulating genes in monolignol synthesis have produced plants with reduced lignin content and improved cell wall digestibility. While major reductions in lignin concentration have been associated with poor plant fitness, smaller reductions in lignin provided measurable improvements in digestibility without significantly impacting agronomic fitness. Additional targets for genetic modification to enhance digestibility and improve roughages for use as biofuel feedstocks are discussed; including manipulating cell wall polysaccharide composition, novel lignin structures, reduced lignin/polysaccharide cross-linking, smaller lignin polymers, enhanced development of non-lignified tissues, and targeting specific cell types. Greater tissue specificity of transgene expression will be needed to maximize benefits while avoiding negative impacts on plant fitness.cauliflower mosiac virus (CaMV) 35S promoter. PMID:22325867

  11. Phylogenetic variation in glycosidases and glycanases acting on plant cell wall polysaccharides, and the detection of transglycosidase and trans-β-xylanase activities.

    PubMed

    Franková, Lenka; Fry, Stephen C

    2011-08-01

    Wall polysaccharide chemistry varies phylogenetically, suggesting a need for variation in wall enzymes. Although plants possess the genes for numerous putative enzymes acting on wall carbohydrates, the activities of the encoded proteins often remain conjectural. To explore phylogenetic differences in demonstrable enzyme activities, we extracted proteins from 57 rapidly growing plant organs with three extractants, and assayed their ability to act on six oligosaccharides 'modelling' selected cell-wall polysaccharides. Based on reaction products, we successfully distinguished exo- and endo-hydrolases and found high taxonomic variation in all hydrolases screened: β-D-xylosidase, endo-(1→4)-β-D-xylanase, β-D-mannosidase, endo-(1→4)-β-D-mannanase, α-D-xylosidase, β-D-galactosidase, α-L-arabinosidase and α-L-fucosidase. The results, as GHATAbase, a searchable compendium in Excel format, also provide a compilation for selecting rich sources of enzymes acting on wall carbohydrates. Four of the hydrolases were accompanied, sometimes exceeded, by transglycosylase activities, generating products larger than the substrate. For example, during β-xylosidase assays on (1→4)-β-D-xylohexaose (Xyl₆), Marchantia, Selaginella and Equisetum extracts gave negligible free xylose but approximately equimolar Xyl₅ and Xyl₇, indicating trans-β-xylosidase activity, also found in onion, cereals, legumes and rape. The yield of Xyl₉ often exceeded that of Xyl₇₋₈, indicating that β-xylanase was accompanied by an endotransglycosylase activity, here called trans-β-xylanase, catalysing the reaction 2Xyl₆ → Xyl₃ + Xyl₉. Similar evidence also revealed trans-α-xylosidase, trans-α-arabinosidase and trans-α-arabinanase activities acting on xyloglucan oligosaccharides and (1→5)-α-L-arabino-oligosaccharides. In conclusion, diverse plants differ dramatically in extractable enzymes acting on wall carbohydrate, reflecting differences in wall polysaccharide

  12. Plant cell wall dynamics and wall-related susceptibility in plant–pathogen interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bellincampi, Daniela; Cervone, Felice; Lionetti, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    The cell wall is a dynamic structure that often determines the outcome of the interactions between plants and pathogens. It is a barrier that pathogens need to breach to colonize the plant tissue. While fungal necrotrophs extensively destroy the integrity of the cell wall through the combined action of degrading enzymes, biotrophic fungi require a more localized and controlled degradation of the cell wall in order to keep the host cells alive and utilize their feeding structures. Also bacteria and nematodes need to degrade the plant cell wall at a certain stage of their infection process, to obtain nutrients for their growth. Plants have developed a system for sensing pathogens and monitoring the cell wall integrity, upon which they activate defense responses that lead to a dynamic cell wall remodeling required to prevent the disease. Pathogens, on the other hand, may exploit the host cell wall metabolism to support the infection. We review here the strategies utilized by both plants and pathogens to prevail in the cell wall battleground. PMID:24904623

  13. Moss cell walls: structure and biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Alison W.; Roberts, Eric M.; Haigler, Candace H.

    2012-01-01

    The genome sequence of the moss Physcomitrella patens has stimulated new research examining the cell wall polysaccharides of mosses and the glycosyl transferases that synthesize them as a means to understand fundamental processes of cell wall biosynthesis and plant cell wall evolution. The cell walls of mosses and vascular plants are composed of the same classes of polysaccharides, but with differences in side chain composition and structure. Similarly, the genomes of P. patens and angiosperms encode the same families of cell wall glycosyl transferases, yet, in many cases these families have diversified independently in each lineage. Our understanding of land plant evolution could be enhanced by more complete knowledge of the relationships among glycosyl transferase functional diversification, cell wall structural and biochemical specialization, and the roles of cell walls in plant adaptation. As a foundation for these studies, we review the features of P. patens as an experimental system, analyses of cell wall composition in various moss species, recent studies that elucidate the structure and biosynthesis of cell wall polysaccharides in P. patens, and phylogenetic analysis of P. patens genes potentially involved in cell wall biosynthesis. PMID:22833752

  14. Inhibition of /sup 125/I-labeled ristocetin binding to Micrococcus luteus cells by the peptides related to bacterial cell wall mucopeptide precursors: quantitative structure-activity relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.H.; Martin, Y.; Otis, E.; Mao, J.

    1989-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) of N-Ac amino acids, N-Ac dipeptides, and N-Ac tripeptides in inhibition of /sup 125/I-labeled ristocetin binding to Micrococcus luteus cell wall have been developed to probe the details of the binding between ristocetin and N-acetylated peptides. The correlation equations indicate that (1) the binding is stronger for peptides in which the side chain of the C-terminal amino acid has a large molar refractivity (MR) value, (2) the binding is weaker for peptides with polar than for those with nonpolar C-terminal side chains, (3) the N-terminal amino acid in N-Ac dipeptides contributes 12 times that of the C-terminal amino acid to binding affinity, and (4) the interactions between ristocetin and the N-terminal amino acid of N-acetyl tripeptides appear to be much weaker than those with the first two amino acids.

  15. Architecture of dermatophyte cell Walls: Electron microscopic and biochemical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nozawa, Y.; Kitajima, Y.

    1984-01-01

    A review with 83 references on the cell wall structure of dermatophytes is presented. Topics discussed include separation and preparation of cell walls; microstructure of cell walls by electron microscopy; chemical composition of cell walls; structural model of cell walls; and morphological structure of cell walls.

  16. Self-enhanced targeted delivery of a cell wall- and membrane-active antibiotics, daptomycin, against staphylococcal pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong; Xiong, Meimei; Bi, Qiuyan; Wang, Ying; Li, Chong

    2016-07-01

    Considering that some antibacterial agents can identify the outer structure of pathogens like cell wall and/or cell membrane, we explored a self-enhanced targeted delivery strategy by which a small amount of the antibiotic molecules were modified on the surface of carriers as targeting ligands of certain bacteria while more antibiotic molecules were loaded inside the carriers, and thus has the potential to improve the drug concentration at the infection site, enhance efficacy and reduce potential toxicity. In this study, a novel targeted delivery system against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) pneumonia was constructed with daptomycin, a lipopeptide antibiotic, which can bind to the cell wall of S. aureus via its hydrophobic tail. Daptomycin was conjugated with N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-polyethylene glycol-1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine to synthesize a targeting compound (Dapt-PEG-DSPE) which could be anchored on the surface of liposomes, while additional daptomycin molecules were encapsulated inside the liposomes. These daptomycin-modified, daptomycin-loaded liposomes (DPD-L[D]) showed specific binding to MRSA as detected by flow cytometry and good targeting capabilities in vivo to MRSA-infected lungs in a pneumonia model. DPD-L[D] exhibited more favorable antibacterial efficacy against MRSA than conventional PEGylated liposomal daptomycin both in vitro and in vivo. Our study demonstrates that daptomycin-modified liposomes can enhance MRSA-targeted delivery of encapsulated antibiotic, suggesting a novel drug delivery approach for existing antimicrobial agents. PMID:27471672

  17. Engineering the Oryza sativa cell wall with rice NAC transcription factors regulating secondary wall formation

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Kouki; Sakamoto, Shingo; Kawai, Tetsushi; Kobayashi, Yoshinori; Sato, Kazuhito; Ichinose, Yasunori; Yaoi, Katsuro; Akiyoshi-Endo, Miho; Sato, Hiroko; Takamizo, Tadashi; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Mitsuda, Nobutaka

    2013-01-01

    Plant tissues that require structural rigidity synthesize a thick, strong secondary cell wall of lignin, cellulose and hemicelluloses in a complicated bridged structure. Master regulators of secondary wall synthesis were identified in dicots, and orthologs of these regulators have been identified in monocots, but regulation of secondary cell wall formation in monocots has not been extensively studied. Here we demonstrate that the rice transcription factors SECONDARY WALL NAC DOMAIN PROTEINs (SWNs) can regulate secondary wall formation in rice (Oryza sativa) and are potentially useful for engineering the monocot cell wall. The OsSWN1 promoter is highly active in sclerenchymatous cells of the leaf blade and less active in xylem cells. By contrast, the OsSWN2 promoter is highly active in xylem cells and less active in sclerenchymatous cells. OsSWN2 splicing variants encode two proteins; the shorter protein (OsSWN2S) has very low transcriptional activation ability, but the longer protein (OsSWN2L) and OsSWN1 have strong transcriptional activation ability. In rice, expression of an OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN2 promoter, resulted in stunted growth and para-wilting (leaf rolling and browning under normal water conditions) due to impaired vascular vessels. The same OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN1 promoter, caused a reduction of cell wall thickening in sclerenchymatous cells, a drooping leaf phenotype, reduced lignin and xylose contents and increased digestibility as forage. These data suggest that OsSWNs regulate secondary wall formation in rice and manipulation of OsSWNs may enable improvements in monocotyledonous crops for forage or biofuel applications. PMID:24098302

  18. Engineering the Oryza sativa cell wall with rice NAC transcription factors regulating secondary wall formation.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kouki; Sakamoto, Shingo; Kawai, Tetsushi; Kobayashi, Yoshinori; Sato, Kazuhito; Ichinose, Yasunori; Yaoi, Katsuro; Akiyoshi-Endo, Miho; Sato, Hiroko; Takamizo, Tadashi; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Mitsuda, Nobutaka

    2013-01-01

    Plant tissues that require structural rigidity synthesize a thick, strong secondary cell wall of lignin, cellulose and hemicelluloses in a complicated bridged structure. Master regulators of secondary wall synthesis were identified in dicots, and orthologs of these regulators have been identified in monocots, but regulation of secondary cell wall formation in monocots has not been extensively studied. Here we demonstrate that the rice transcription factors SECONDARY WALL NAC DOMAIN PROTEINs (SWNs) can regulate secondary wall formation in rice (Oryza sativa) and are potentially useful for engineering the monocot cell wall. The OsSWN1 promoter is highly active in sclerenchymatous cells of the leaf blade and less active in xylem cells. By contrast, the OsSWN2 promoter is highly active in xylem cells and less active in sclerenchymatous cells. OsSWN2 splicing variants encode two proteins; the shorter protein (OsSWN2S) has very low transcriptional activation ability, but the longer protein (OsSWN2L) and OsSWN1 have strong transcriptional activation ability. In rice, expression of an OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN2 promoter, resulted in stunted growth and para-wilting (leaf rolling and browning under normal water conditions) due to impaired vascular vessels. The same OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN1 promoter, caused a reduction of cell wall thickening in sclerenchymatous cells, a drooping leaf phenotype, reduced lignin and xylose contents and increased digestibility as forage. These data suggest that OsSWNs regulate secondary wall formation in rice and manipulation of OsSWNs may enable improvements in monocotyledonous crops for forage or biofuel applications. PMID:24098302

  19. Natural Paradigms of Plant Cell Wall Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, H.; Xu, Q.; Taylor, L. E.; Baker, J. O.; Tucker, M. P.; Ding, S. Y.

    2009-01-01

    Natural processes of recycling carbon from plant cell walls are slow but very efficient, generally involving microbial communities and their secreted enzymes. Efficient combinations of microbial communities and enzymes act in a sequential and synergistic manner to degrade plant cell walls. Recent understanding of plant cell wall ultra-structure, as well as the carbon metabolism, ATP production, and ecology of participating microbial communities, and the biochemical properties of their cellulolytic enzymes have led to new perspectives on saccharification of biomass. Microbial communities are dynamic functions of the chemical and structural compositions of plant cell wall components. The primitive 'multicellularity' exhibited by certain cellulolytic microorganisms may play a role in facilitating cell-cell communication and cell-plant cell wall-substrate interaction.

  20. How do plant cell walls extend?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    This article briefly summarizes recent work that identifies the biophysical and biochemical processes that give rise to the extension of plant cell walls. I begin with the biophysical notion of stress relaxation of the wall and follow with recent studies of wall enzymes thought to catalyze wall extension and relaxation. Readers should refer to detailed reviews for more comprehensive discussion of earlier literature (Taiz, 1984; Carpita and Gibeaut, 1993; Cosgrove, 1993).

  1. Type 2C protein phosphatase Ptc6 participates in activation of the Slt2-mediated cell wall integrity pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sharmin, Dilruba; Sasano, Yu; Sugiyama, Minetaka; Harashima, Satoshi

    2015-04-01

    The phosphorylation status of cellular proteins results from an equilibrium between the activities of protein kinases and protein phosphatases (PPases). Reversible protein phosphorylation is an important aspect of signal transduction that regulate many biological processes in eukaryotic cells. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome encodes 40 PPases, including seven members of the protein phosphatase 2C subfamily (PTC1 to PTC7). In contrast to other PPases, the cellular roles of PTCs have not been investigated in detail. Here, we sought to determine the cellular role of PTC6 in S. cerevisiae with disruption of PTC genes. We found that cells with Δptc6 disruption were tolerant to the cell wall-damaging agents Congo red (CR) and calcofluor white (CFW); however, cells with simultaneous disruption of PTC1 and PTC6 were very sensitive to these agents. Thus, simultaneous disruption of PTC1 and PTC6 gave a synergistic response to cell wall damaging agents. The level of phosphorylated Slt2 increased significantly after CR treatment in Δptc1 cells and more so in Δptc1Δptc6 cells; therefore, deletion of PTC6 enhanced Slt2 phosphorylation in the Δptc1 disruptant. The level of transcription of KDX1 upon exposure to CR increased to a greater extent in the Δptc1Δptc6 double disruptant than the Δptc1 single disruptant. The Δptc1Δptc6 double disruptant cells showed normal vacuole formation under standard growth conditions, but fragmented vacuoles were present in the presence of CR or CFW. Our analyses indicate that S. cerevisiae PTC6 participates in the negative regulation of Slt2 phosphorylation and vacuole morphogenesis under cell wall stress conditions. PMID:25449759

  2. Modifying crops to increase cell wall digestibility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improving digestibility of roughage cell walls will improve ruminant animal performance and reduce loss of nutrients to the environment. The main digestibility impediment for dicotyledonous plants are highly lignified secondary cell walls, notably in stem secondary xylem, which become almost non-dig...

  3. Safranine fluorescent staining of wood cell walls.

    PubMed

    Bond, J; Donaldson, L; Hill, S; Hitchcock, K

    2008-06-01

    Safranine is an azo dye commonly used for plant microscopy, especially as a stain for lignified tissues such as xylem. Safranine fluorescently labels the wood cell wall, producing green/yellow fluorescence in the secondary cell wall and red/orange fluorescence in the middle lamella (ML) region. We examined the fluorescence behavior of safranine under blue light excitation using a variety of wood- and fiber-based samples of known composition to interpret the observed color differentiation of different cell wall types. We also examined the basis for the differences in fluorescence emission using spectral confocal microscopy to examine lignin-rich and cellulose-rich cell walls including reaction wood and decayed wood compared to normal wood. Our results indicate that lignin-rich cell walls, such as the ML of tracheids, the secondary wall of compression wood tracheids, and wood decayed by brown rot, tend to fluoresce red or orange, while cellulose-rich cell walls such as resin canals, wood decayed by white rot, cotton fibers and the G-layer of tension wood fibers, tend to fluoresce green/yellow. This variation in fluorescence emission seems to be due to factors including an emission shift toward red wavelengths combined with dye quenching at shorter wavelengths in regions with high lignin content. Safranine fluorescence provides a useful way to differentiate lignin-rich and cellulose-rich cell walls without counterstaining as required for bright field microscopy. PMID:18802812

  4. Deficient sucrose synthase activity in developing wood does not specifically affect cellulose biosynthesis, but causes an overall decrease in cell wall polymers.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Lorenz; Zhang, Bo; Roach, Melissa; Rende, Umut; Gorzsás, András; Kumar, Manoj; Burgert, Ingo; Niittylä, Totte; Sundberg, Björn

    2014-09-01

    The biosynthesis of wood in aspen (Populus) depends on the metabolism of sucrose, which is the main transported form of carbon from source tissues. The largest fraction of the wood biomass is cellulose, which is synthesized from UDP-glucose. Sucrose synthase (SUS) has been proposed previously to interact directly with cellulose synthase complexes and specifically supply UDP-glucose for cellulose biosynthesis. To investigate the role of SUS in wood biosynthesis, we characterized transgenic lines of hybrid aspen with strongly reduced SUS activity in developing wood. No dramatic growth phenotypes in glasshouse-grown trees were observed, but chemical fingerprinting with pyrolysis-GC/MS, together with micromechanical analysis, showed notable changes in chemistry and ultrastructure of the wood in the transgenic lines. Wet chemical analysis showed that the dry weight percentage composition of wood polymers was not changed significantly. However, a decrease in wood density was observed and, consequently, the content of lignin, hemicellulose and cellulose was decreased per wood volume. The decrease in density was explained by a looser structure of fibre cell walls as shown by increased wall shrinkage on drying. The results show that SUS is not essential for cellulose biosynthesis, but plays a role in defining the total carbon incorporation to wood cell walls. PMID:24920335

  5. Exploiting fungal cell wall components in vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Levitz, Stuart M.; Huang, Haibin; Ostroff, Gary R.; Specht, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    Innate recognition of fungi leads to strong adaptive immunity. Investigators are trying to exploit this observation in vaccine development by combining antigens with evolutionarily conserved fungal cell wall carbohydrates to induce protective responses. Best studied is β-1,3-glucan, a glycan that activates complement and is recognized by Dectin-1. Administration of antigens in association with β-1,3-glucan, either by direct conjugation or complexed in glucan particles, results in robust humoral and cellular immune responses. While the host has a host of mannose receptors, responses to fungal mannoproteins generally are amplified if cells are cooperatively stimulated with an additional danger signal such as a toll-like receptor agonist. Chitosan, a polycationic homopolymer of glucosamine manufactured by the deacetylation of chitin, is being studied as an adjuvant in DNA and protein-based vaccines. It appears particularly promising in mucosal vaccines. Finally, universal and organism-specific fungal vaccines have been formulated by conjugating fungal cell wall glycans to carrier proteins. A major challenge will be to advance these experimental findings so that at risk patients can be protected. PMID:25404118

  6. Exploiting fungal cell wall components in vaccines.

    PubMed

    Levitz, Stuart M; Huang, Haibin; Ostroff, Gary R; Specht, Charles A

    2015-03-01

    Innate recognition of fungi leads to strong adaptive immunity. Investigators are trying to exploit this observation in vaccine development by combining antigens with evolutionarily conserved fungal cell wall carbohydrates to induce protective responses. Best studied is β-1,3-glucan, a glycan that activates complement and is recognized by dectin-1. Administration of antigens in association with β-1,3-glucan, either by direct conjugation or complexed in glucan particles, results in robust humoral and cellular immune responses. While the host has a host of mannose receptors, responses to fungal mannoproteins generally are amplified if cells are cooperatively stimulated with an additional danger signal such as a toll-like receptor agonist. Chitosan, a polycationic homopolymer of glucosamine manufactured by the deacetylation of chitin, is being studied as an adjuvant in DNA and protein-based vaccines. It appears particularly promising in mucosal vaccines. Finally, universal and organism-specific fungal vaccines have been formulated by conjugating fungal cell wall glycans to carrier proteins. A major challenge will be to advance these experimental findings so that at risk patients can be protected. PMID:25404118

  7. 2003 Plant Cell Walls Gordon Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel J. Cosgrove

    2004-09-21

    This conference will address recent progress in many aspects of cell wall biology. Molecular, genetic, and genomic approaches are yielding major advances in our understanding of the composition, synthesis, and architecture of plant cell walls and their dynamics during growth, and are identifying the genes that encode the machinery needed to make their biogenesis possible. This meeting will bring together international scientists from academia, industry and government labs to share the latest breakthroughs and perspectives on polysaccharide biosynthesis, wood formation, wall modification, expansion and interaction with other organisms, and genomic & evolutionary analyses of wall-related genes, as well as to discuss recent ''nanotechnological'' advances that take wall analysis to the level of a single cell.

  8. Refractive index of plant cell walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gausman, H. W.; Allen, W. A.; Escobar, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    Air was replaced with media of higher refractive indices by vacuum infiltration in leaves of cucumber, blackeye pea, tomato, and string bean plants, and reflectance of noninfiltrated and infiltrated leaves was spectrophotometrically measured. Infiltrated leaves reflected less light than noninfiltrated leaves over the 500-2500-nm wavelength interval because cell wall-air interfaces were partly eliminated. Minimal reflectance should occur when the average refractive index of plant cell walls was matched by the infiltrating fluid. Although refractive indices that resulted in minimal reflectance differed among the four plant genera, an average value of 1.425 approximates the refractive index of plant cell walls for the four plant genera.

  9. Plant expansins: diversity and interactions with plant cell walls

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Expansins were discovered two decades ago as cell wall proteins that mediate acid-induced growth by catalyzing loosening of plant cell walls without lysis of wall polymers. In the interim our understanding of expansins has gotten more complex through bioinformatic analysis of expansin distribution and evolution, as well as through expression analysis, dissection of the upstream transcription factors regulating expression, and identification of additional classes of expansin by sequence and structural similarities. Molecular analyses of expansins from bacteria have identified residues essential for wall loosening activity and clarified the bifunctional nature of expansin binding to complex cell walls. Transgenic modulation of expansin expression modifies growth and stress physiology of plants, but not always in predictable and even understandable ways. PMID:26057089

  10. Tensile Strength of Cell Walls of Living Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Carpita, Nicholas C.

    1985-01-01

    A gas decompression technique was used to determine the breaking strength of cell walls of single cells. Breaking strengths of the bacterium Salmonella typhimurium and the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas eugametos were 100 and 95 atmospheres, respectively, while those of sporophytes of the water mold Blastocladiella emersonii were 65 atmospheres, and those of suspension cultured cells of carrot were only 30 atmospheres. Estimation of wall tensile stress based on breaking pressures, cell radii, and estimation of wall thickness, indicates that microfibrillar walls are not necessarily stronger than walls of primitive organisms. Hence, alternative hypotheses for their evolution must be considered. PMID:16664436

  11. Adventitial Vessel Growth and Progenitor Cells Activation in an Ex Vivo Culture System Mimicking Human Saphenous Vein Wall Strain after Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Prandi, Francesca; Piola, Marco; Soncini, Monica; Colussi, Claudia; D’Alessandra, Yuri; Penza, Eleonora; Agrifoglio, Marco; Vinci, Maria Cristina; Polvani, Gianluca; Gaetano, Carlo; Fiore, Gianfranco Beniamino; Pesce, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Saphenous vein graft disease is a timely problem in coronary artery bypass grafting. Indeed, after exposure of the vein to arterial blood flow, a progressive modification in the wall begins, due to proliferation of smooth muscle cells in the intima. As a consequence, the graft progressively occludes and this leads to recurrent ischemia. In the present study we employed a novel ex vivo culture system to assess the biological effects of arterial-like pressure on the human saphenous vein structure and physiology, and to compare the results to those achieved in the presence of a constant low pressure and flow mimicking the physiologic vein perfusion. While under both conditions we found an activation of Matrix Metallo-Proteases 2/9 and of microRNAs-21/146a/221, a specific effect of the arterial-like pressure was observed. This consisted in a marked geometrical remodeling, in the suppression of Tissue Inhibitor of Metallo-Protease-1, in the enhanced expression of TGF-β1 and BMP-2 mRNAs and, finally, in the upregulation of microRNAs-138/200b/200c. In addition, the veins exposed to arterial-like pressure showed an increase in the density of the adventitial vasa vasorum and of cells co-expressing NG2, CD44 and SM22α markers in the adventitia. Cells with nuclear expression of Sox-10, a transcription factor characterizing multipotent vascular stem cells, were finally found in adventitial vessels. Our findings suggest, for the first time, a role of arterial-like wall strain in the activation of pro-pathologic pathways resulting in adventitial vessels growth, activation of vasa vasorum cells, and upregulation of specific gene products associated to vascular remodeling and inflammation. PMID:25689822

  12. PRO40 Is a Scaffold Protein of the Cell Wall Integrity Pathway, Linking the MAP Kinase Module to the Upstream Activator Protein Kinase C

    PubMed Central

    Teichert, Ines; Steffens, Eva Katharina; Schnaß, Nicole; Fränzel, Benjamin; Krisp, Christoph; Wolters, Dirk A.; Kück, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways are crucial signaling instruments in eukaryotes. Most ascomycetes possess three MAPK modules that are involved in key developmental processes like sexual propagation or pathogenesis. However, the regulation of these modules by adapters or scaffolds is largely unknown. Here, we studied the function of the cell wall integrity (CWI) MAPK module in the model fungus Sordaria macrospora. Using a forward genetic approach, we found that sterile mutant pro30 has a mutated mik1 gene that encodes the MAPK kinase kinase (MAPKKK) of the proposed CWI pathway. We generated single deletion mutants lacking MAPKKK MIK1, MAPK kinase (MAPKK) MEK1, or MAPK MAK1 and found them all to be sterile, cell fusion-deficient and highly impaired in vegetative growth and cell wall stress response. By searching for MEK1 interaction partners via tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we identified previously characterized developmental protein PRO40 as a MEK1 interaction partner. Although fungal PRO40 homologs have been implicated in diverse developmental processes, their molecular function is currently unknown. Extensive affinity purification, mass spectrometry, and yeast two-hybrid experiments showed that PRO40 is able to bind MIK1, MEK1, and the upstream activator protein kinase C (PKC1). We further found that the PRO40 N-terminal disordered region and the central region encompassing a WW interaction domain are sufficient to govern interaction with MEK1. Most importantly, time- and stress-dependent phosphorylation studies showed that PRO40 is required for MAK1 activity. The sum of our results implies that PRO40 is a scaffold protein for the CWI pathway, linking the MAPK module to the upstream activator PKC1. Our data provide important insights into the mechanistic role of a protein that has been implicated in sexual and asexual development, cell fusion, symbiosis, and pathogenicity in different fungal systems. PMID:25188365

  13. Secondary cell walls: biosynthesis and manipulation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Campbell, Liam; Turner, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Secondary cell walls (SCWs) are produced by specialized plant cell types, and are particularly important in those cells providing mechanical support or involved in water transport. As the main constituent of plant biomass, secondary cell walls are central to attempts to generate second-generation biofuels. Partly as a consequence of this renewed economic importance, excellent progress has been made in understanding how cell wall components are synthesized. SCWs are largely composed of three main polymers: cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. In this review, we will attempt to highlight the most recent progress in understanding the biosynthetic pathways for secondary cell wall components, how these pathways are regulated, and how this knowledge may be exploited to improve cell wall properties that facilitate breakdown without compromising plant growth and productivity. While knowledge of individual components in the pathway has improved dramatically, how they function together to make the final polymers and how these individual polymers are incorporated into the wall remain less well understood. PMID:26663392

  14. Cell wall remodeling under abiotic stress

    PubMed Central

    Tenhaken, Raimund

    2015-01-01

    Plants exposed to abiotic stress respond to unfavorable conditions on multiple levels. One challenge under drought stress is to reduce shoot growth while maintaining root growth, a process requiring differential cell wall synthesis and remodeling. Key players in this process are the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and peroxidases, which initially cross-link phenolic compounds and glycoproteins of the cell walls causing stiffening. The function of ROS shifts after having converted all the peroxidase substrates in the cell wall. If ROS-levels remain high during prolonged stress, OH°-radicals are formed which lead to polymer cleavage. In concert with xyloglucan modifying enzymes and expansins, the resulting cell wall loosening allows further growth of stressed organs. PMID:25709610

  15. Differential scanning calorimetry of plant cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Liangshiou; Varner, J.E. ); Yuen, H.K. )

    1991-03-15

    High-sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry has been used to study the phase transition of cell wall preparations of the elongating and mature regions of soybean hypocotyls and of celery epidermis and collenchyma strands. A step-like transition believed to be glass transition was observed in walls isolated from the elongating region of soybean hypocotyls at 52.9C. Addition of 1 mM CaCl{sub 2} to the cell wall preparation increased the transition temperature to 60.8C and greatly reduced the transition magnitude. In walls from the mature region, the transition was small and occurred at a higher temperature (60.1C). Addition of calcium to the mature region cell wall had little effect on the transition. Based on the known interactions between calcium and pectin, the authors propose that calcium affects the glass transition by binding to the polygalacturonate backbone of wall pectin, resulting in a more rigid wall with a smaller transition at a higher temperature. The mature region either has more calcium in the wall or has more methyl-esterified pectin, making it less responsive to added calcium.

  16. Role of cell wall deconstructing enzymes in the proanthocyanidin-cell wall adsorption-desorption phenomena.

    PubMed

    Castro-López, Liliana del Rocío; Gómez-Plaza, Encarna; Ortega-Regules, Ana; Lozada, Daniel; Bautista-Ortín, Ana Belén

    2016-04-01

    The transference of proanthocyanidins from grapes to wine is quite low. This could be due, among other causes, to proanthocyanidins being bound to grape cell wall polysaccharides, which are present in high concentrations in the must. Therefore, the effective extraction of proanthocyanidins from grapes will depend on the ability to disrupt these associations, and, in this respect, enzymes that degrade these polysaccharides could play an important role. The main objective of this work was to test the behavior of proanthocyanidin-cell wall interactions when commercial maceration enzymes are present in the solution. The results showed that cell wall polysaccharides adsorbed a high amount of proanthocyanidins and only a limited quantity of proanthocyanidins could be desorbed from the cell walls after washing with a model solution. The presence of enzymes in the solution reduced the proanthocyanidin-cell wall interaction, probably through the elimination of pectins from the cell wall network. PMID:26593523

  17. Cell-wall dynamics in growing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furchtgott, Leon; Wingreen, Ned; Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2010-03-01

    Bacterial cells come in a large variety of shapes, and cell shape plays an important role in the regulation of many biological functions. Cell shape in bacterial cells is dictated by a cell wall composed of peptidoglycan, a polymer made up of long, stiff glycan strands and flexible peptide crosslinks. Although much is understood about the structural properties of peptidoglycan, little is known about the dynamics of cell wall organization in bacterial cells. In particular, during cell growth, how does the bacterial cell wall continuously expand and reorganize while maintaining cell shape? In order to investigate this question quantitatively, we model the cell wall of the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli using a simple elastic model, in which glycan and peptide subunits are treated as springs with different spring constants and relaxed lengths. We consider the peptidoglycan network as a single-layered network of these springs under tension due to an internal osmotic pressure. Within this model, we simulate possible hypotheses for cell growth as different combinations of addition of new springs and breakage of old springs.

  18. Minimum Chemical Requirements for Adhesin Activity of the Acid-Stable Part of Candida albicans Cell Wall Phosphomannoprotein Complex

    PubMed Central

    Kanbe, Toshio; Cutler, Jim E.

    1998-01-01

    This study was conducted to define adhesive characteristics of the acid-stable moiety of the Candida albicans phosphomannoprotein complex (PMPC) on adherence of this fungus to marginal zone macrophages of the mouse spleen. Complete digestion of the acid-stable moiety (Fr.IIS) of the C. albicans PMPC with an α-mannosidase or hydrolysis with 0.6 N sulfuric acid destroyed adhesin activity, as determined by the inability of the soluble digests to inhibit yeast cell adherence to the splenic marginal zone. Fr.IIS adhesin activity was decreased following digestion with an α-1,2-specific mannosidase. Oligomannosyls consisting of one to six mannose units, which were isolated from the acid-stable part of the PMPC, did not inhibit yeast cell binding and thus do not function alone as adhesin sites in the PMPC. To gain more insight into the minimum requirements for adhesin activity, PMPCs were isolated from a Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type strain and from mutant strains mnn1, mnn2, and mnn4; the PMPCs were designated scwt/Fr.II, scmn1/Fr.II, scmn2/Fr.II, and scmn4/Fr.II, respectively. S. cerevisiae scmn2/Fr.II lacks oligomannosyl side chain branches from the outer core mannan, and scmn2/Fr.II was the only PMPC without adhesin activity. S. cerevisiae scwt/Fr.II, scmn1/Fr.II, and scmn4/Fr.II showed adhesin activities less than that of C. albicans Fr.II. These three S. cerevisiae PMPCs are generally similar to Fr.IIS, except that the S. cerevisiae structure has fewer and shorter side chains. Immunofluorescence microscopy show that the acid-stable part of the PMPC is displayed homogeneously on the C. albicans yeast cell surface, which would be expected for a surface adhesin. Our results indicate that both the mannan core and the oligomannosyl side chains are responsible for the adhesin activity of the acid-stable part of the PMPC. PMID:9826359

  19. Vesicular transport across the fungal cell wall

    PubMed Central

    Casadevall, Arturo; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Williamson, Peter; Rodrigues, Marcio L.

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that fungi use vesicular transport to deliver substances across their cell walls. Fungal vesicles are similar to mammalian exosomes and could originate from cytoplasmic multivesicular bodies. Vesicular transport enables the export of large molecules across the cell wall, and vesicles contain lipids, proteins and polysaccharides, many of which are associated with virulence. Concentration of fungal products in vesicles could increase their efficiency in food acquisition and/or delivering potentially noxious substances to other cells, such as amoebae or phagocytes. The discovery of vesicular transport in fungi opens many new avenues for investigation in basic cell biology and pathogenesis. PMID:19299133

  20. Structure of Plant Cell Walls 1

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Tadashi; Thomas, Jerry; Darvill, Alan; Albersheim, Peter

    1989-01-01

    Considerable information has been obtained about the primary structures of suspension-cultured sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) cell-wall pectic polysaccharides, i.e. rhamnogalacturonan I, rhamnogalacturonan II, and homogalacturonan. However, these polysaccharides, which are solubilized from the walls by endo-α-1,4-polygalacturonase, account for only about half of the pectic polysaccharides known to be present in sycamore cell walls. We now report that, after exhaustive treatment with endo-α-1,4-polygalacturonase, additional pectic polysaccharides were extracted from sycamore cell walls by treatment with Na2CO3 at 1 and 22°C. These previously uncharacterized polysaccharides accounted for ∼4% of the cell wall. Based on the glycosyl and glycosyl-linkage compositions and the nature of the products obtained by treating the quantitatively predominant NaCO3-extracted polysaccharides with lithium metal dissolved in ethylenediamine, the polysaccharides were found to strongly resemble rhamnogalacturonan I. However, unlike rhamnogalacturonan I that characteristically had equal amounts of 2- and 2,4-linked rhamnosyl residues in its backbone, the polysaccharides extracted in Na2CO3 at 1°C had markedly disparate ratios of 2- to 2,4-linked rhamnosyl residues. We concluded that polysaccharides similar to rhamnogalacturonan I but with different degrees of branching are present in the walls of suspension-cultured sycamore cells. PMID:16666559

  1. Modes of deformation of walled cells.

    PubMed

    Dumais, Jacques

    2013-11-01

    The bewildering morphological diversity found in cells is one of the starkest illustrations of life's ability to self-organize. Yet the morphogenetic mechanisms that produce the multifarious shapes of cells are still poorly understood. The shared similarities between the walled cells of prokaryotes, many protists, fungi, and plants make these groups particularly appealing to begin investigating how morphological diversity is generated at the cell level. In this review, I attempt a first classification of the different modes of surface deformation used by walled cells. Five modes of deformation were identified: inextensional bending, equi-area shear, elastic stretching, processive intussusception, and chemorheological growth. The two most restrictive modes-inextensional and equi-area deformations-are embodied in the exine of pollen grains and the wall-like pellicle of euglenoids, respectively. For these modes, it is possible to express the deformed geometry of the cell explicitly in terms of the undeformed geometry and other easily observable geometrical parameters. The greatest morphogenetic power is reached with the processive intussusception and chemorheological growth mechanisms that underlie the expansive growth of walled cells. A comparison of these two growth mechanisms suggests a possible way to tackle the complexity behind wall growth. PMID:24014868

  2. Identification of Novel Cell Wall Components

    SciTech Connect

    Michelle Momany

    2009-10-26

    Our DOE Biosciences-funded work focused on the fungal cell wall and morphogenesis. We are especially interested in how new cell wall material is targeted to appropriate areas for polar (asymmetric) growth. Polar growth is the only way that filamentous fungi explore the environment to find suitable substrates to degrade. Work funded by this grant has resulted in a total of twenty peer-reviewed publications. In work funded by this grant, we identified nine Aspergillus nidulans temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants that fail to send out a germ tube and show a swollen cell phenotype at restrictive temperature, the swo mutants. In other organisms, a swollen cell phenotype is often associated with misdirected growth or weakened cell walls. Our work shows that several of the A. nidulans swo mutants have defects in the establishment and maintenance of polarity. Cloning of several swo genes by complementation also showed that secondary modification of proteins seems is important in polarity. We also investigated cell wall biosynthesis and branching based on leads in literature from other organisms and found that branching and nuclear division are tied and that the cell wall reorganizes during development. In our most recent work we have focused on gene expression during the shift from isotropic to polar growth. Surprisingly we found that genes previously thought to be involved only in spore formation are important in early vegetative growth as well.

  3. Planctomycetes do possess a peptidoglycan cell wall

    PubMed Central

    Jeske, Olga; Schüler, Margarete; Schumann, Peter; Schneider, Alexander; Boedeker, Christian; Jogler, Mareike; Bollschweiler, Daniel; Rohde, Manfred; Mayer, Christoph; Engelhardt, Harald; Spring, Stefan; Jogler, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Most bacteria contain a peptidoglycan (PG) cell wall, which is critical for maintenance of shape and important for cell division. In contrast, Planctomycetes have been proposed to produce a proteinaceous cell wall devoid of PG. The apparent absence of PG has been used as an argument for the putative planctomycetal ancestry of all bacterial lineages. Here we show, employing multiple bioinformatic methods, that planctomycetal genomes encode proteins required for PG synthesis. Furthermore, we biochemically demonstrate the presence of the sugar and the peptide components of PG in Planctomycetes. In addition, light and electron microscopic experiments reveal planctomycetal PG sacculi that are susceptible to lysozyme treatment. Finally, cryo-electron tomography demonstrates that Planctomycetes possess a typical PG cell wall and that their cellular architecture is thus more similar to that of other Gram-negative bacteria. Our findings shed new light on the cellular architecture and cell division of the maverick Planctomycetes. PMID:25964217

  4. Genetic resources for maize cell wall biology.

    PubMed

    Penning, Bryan W; Hunter, Charles T; Tayengwa, Reuben; Eveland, Andrea L; Dugard, Christopher K; Olek, Anna T; Vermerris, Wilfred; Koch, Karen E; McCarty, Donald R; Davis, Mark F; Thomas, Steven R; McCann, Maureen C; Carpita, Nicholas C

    2009-12-01

    Grass species represent a major source of food, feed, and fiber crops and potential feedstocks for biofuel production. Most of the biomass is contributed by cell walls that are distinct in composition from all other flowering plants. Identifying cell wall-related genes and their functions underpins a fundamental understanding of growth and development in these species. Toward this goal, we are building a knowledge base of the maize (Zea mays) genes involved in cell wall biology, their expression profiles, and the phenotypic consequences of mutation. Over 750 maize genes were annotated and assembled into gene families predicted to function in cell wall biogenesis. Comparative genomics of maize, rice (Oryza sativa), and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) sequences reveal differences in gene family structure between grass species and a reference eudicot species. Analysis of transcript profile data for cell wall genes in developing maize ovaries revealed that expression within families differed by up to 100-fold. When transcriptional analyses of developing ovaries before pollination from Arabidopsis, rice, and maize were contrasted, distinct sets of cell wall genes were expressed in grasses. These differences in gene family structure and expression between Arabidopsis and the grasses underscore the requirement for a grass-specific genetic model for functional analyses. A UniformMu population proved to be an important resource in both forward- and reverse-genetics approaches to identify hundreds of mutants in cell wall genes. A forward screen of field-grown lines by near-infrared spectroscopic screen of mature leaves yielded several dozen lines with heritable spectroscopic phenotypes. Pyrolysis-molecular beam mass spectrometry confirmed that several nir mutants had altered carbohydrate-lignin compositions. PMID:19926802

  5. Cell Wall Development in Maize Coleoptiles 1

    PubMed Central

    Carpita, Nicholas C.

    1984-01-01

    The physical bases for enhancement of growth rates induced by auxin involve changes in cell wall structure. Changes in the chemical composition of the primary walls during maize (Zea mays L. cv WF9 × Bear 38) coleoptile development were examined to provide a framework to study the nature of auxin action. This report documents that the primary walls of maize cells vary markedly depending on developmental state; polymers synthesized and deposited in the primary wall during cell division are substantially different from those formed during cell elongation. The embryonal coleoptile wall is comprised of mostly glucuronoarabinoxylan (GAX), xyloglucan, and polymers enriched in 5-arabinosyl linkages. During development, both GAX and xyloglucan are synthesized, but the 5-arabinosyls are not. Rapid coleoptile elongation is accompanied by synthesis of a mixed-linked glucan that is nearly absent from the embryonal wall. A GAX highly substituted with mostly terminal arabinofuranosyl units is also synthesized during elongation and, based on pulse-chase studies, exhibits turnover possibly to xylans with less substitution via loss of the arabinosyl and glucuronosyl linkages. Images Fig. 2 PMID:16663799

  6. The Structure of Plant Cell Walls

    PubMed Central

    McNeil, Michael; Albersheim, Peter; Taiz, Lincoln; Jones, Russell L.

    1975-01-01

    The walls of barley (Hordeum vulgare var. Himalaya) aleurone cells are composed of two major polysaccharides, arabinoxylan (85%) and cellulose (8%). The cell wall preparations contain 6% protein, but this protein does not contain detectable amounts of hydroxyproline. The arabinoxylan has a linear 1,4-xylan backbone; 33% of the xylosyl residues are substituted at the 2 and/or 3 position with single arabinofuranosyl residues. The results of in vitro cellulose binding experiments support the hypothesis that noncovalent bonds between the arabinoxylan chains and cellulose fibers play a part in maintaining wall structure. It is suggested that bonding between the arabinoxylan chains themselves is also utilized in forming the walls. PMID:16659029

  7. Cell-wall polysaccharide composition and glycanase activity of Silene vulgaris callus transformed with rolB and rolC genes.

    PubMed

    Günter, Elena A; Shkryl, Yury N; Popeyko, Oxana V; Veremeichik, Galina N; Bulgakov, Victor P

    2015-03-15

    The aim of this research is to investigate the effects of the Agrobacterium rhizogenes rol genes on the composition of cell-wall polysaccharides and glycanase activity in the campion callus. The expression of the rolC gene reduces the yield of campion pectin, while the expression of the rolB or rolC gene inhibits the volumetric production of both pectin and intracellular arabinogalactan. The rol genes are involved in regulating the activity of glycanases and esterases, thereby contributing to the modification of polysaccharide structures, their molecular weight (Mw) and the degree of pectin methyl esterification (DE). The increase in pectin arabinose residue appears to be connected to a decrease in intracellular and extracellular α-l-arabinofuranosidase activity in transgenic campion calluses. In transgenic calluses expressing the rolB and rolC genes, the increase in pectin galactose residue is likely due to a decrease in β-galactosidase activity. The decrease in the Mw of pectin and its d-galacturonic acid content appears to be connected to an increase in extracellular polygalacturonase activity. Finally, the increase in pectinesterase activity causes a decrease in the DE of pectin. Thus, the expression of rolB and rolC genes in campion callus has a considerable effect on pectin's sugar composition, DE and Mw, while it appears to have an insignificant influence on intracellular and extracellular arabinogalactans. PMID:25542107

  8. Control of cell wall extensibility during pollen tube growth.

    PubMed

    Hepler, Peter K; Rounds, Caleb M; Winship, Lawrence J

    2013-07-01

    In this review, we address the question of how the tip-growing pollen tube achieves its rapid rate of elongation while maintaining an intact cell wall. Although turgor is essential for growth to occur, the local expansion rate is controlled by local changes in the viscosity of the apical wall. We focus on several different structures and underlying processes that are thought to be major participants including exocytosis, the organization and activity of the actin cytoskeleton, calcium and proton physiology, and cellular energetics. We think that the actin cytoskeleton, in particular the apical cortical actin fringe, directs the flow of vesicles to the apical domain, where they fuse with the plasma membrane and contribute their contents to the expanding cell wall. While pH gradients, as generated by a proton-ATPase located on the plasma membrane along the side of the clear zone, may regulate rapid actin turnover and new polymerization in the fringe, the tip-focused calcium gradient biases secretion towards the polar axis. The recent data showing that exocytosis of new wall material precedes and predicts the process of cell elongation provide support for the idea that the intussusception of newly secreted pectin contributes to decreases in apical wall viscosity and to cell expansion. Other prime factors will be the localization and activity of the enzyme pectin methyl-esterase, and the chelation of calcium by pectic acids. Finally, we acknowledge a role for reactive oxygen species in the control of wall viscosity. PMID:23770837

  9. Control of Cell Wall Extensibility during Pollen Tube Growth

    PubMed Central

    Hepler, Peter K.

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we address the question of how the tip-growing pollen tube achieves its rapid rate of elongation while maintaining an intact cell wall. Although turgor is essential for growth to occur, the local expansion rate is controlled by local changes in the viscosity of the apical wall. We focus on several different structures and underlying processes that are thought to be major participants including exocytosis, the organization and activity of the actin cytoskeleton, calcium and proton physiology, and cellular energetics. We think that the actin cytoskeleton, in particular the apical cortical actin fringe, directs the flow of vesicles to the apical domain, where they fuse with the plasma membrane and contribute their contents to the expanding cell wall. While pH gradients, as generated by a proton-ATPase located on the plasma membrane along the side of the clear zone, may regulate rapid actin turnover and new polymerization in the fringe, the tip-focused calcium gradient biases secretion towards the polar axis. The recent data showing that exocytosis of new wall material precedes and predicts the process of cell elongation provide support for the idea that the intussusception of newly secreted pectin contributes to decreases in apical wall viscosity and to cell expansion. Other prime factors will be the localization and activity of the enzyme pectin methyl-esterase, and the chelation of calcium by pectic acids. Finally, we acknowledge a role for reactive oxygen species in the control of wall viscosity. PMID:23770837

  10. Highly Dynamic and Specific Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate, Septin, and Cell Wall Integrity Pathway Responses Correlate with Caspofungin Activity against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Badrane, Hassan; Nguyen, M Hong; Clancy, Cornelius J

    2016-06-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] activates the yeast cell wall integrity pathway. Candida albicans exposure to caspofungin results in the rapid redistribution of PI(4,5)P2 and septins to plasma membrane foci and subsequent fungicidal effects. We studied C. albicans PI(4,5)P2 and septin dynamics and protein kinase C (PKC)-Mkc1 cell wall integrity pathway activation following exposure to caspofungin and other drugs. PI(4,5)P2 and septins were visualized by live imaging of C. albicans cells coexpressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-pleckstrin homology (PH) domain and red fluorescent protein-Cdc10p, respectively. PI(4,5)P2 was also visualized in GFP-PH domain-expressing C. albicans mkc1 mutants. Mkc1p phosphorylation was measured as a marker of PKC-Mkc1 pathway activation. Fungicidal activity was assessed using 20-h time-kill assays. Caspofungin immediately induced PI(4,5)P2 and Cdc10p colocalization to aberrant foci, a process that was highly dynamic over 3 h. PI(4,5)P2 levels increased in a dose-response manner at caspofungin concentrations of ≤4× MIC and progressively decreased at concentrations of ≥8× MIC. Caspofungin exposure resulted in broad-based mother-daughter bud necks and arrested septum-like structures, in which PI(4,5)P2 and Cdc10 colocalized. PKC-Mkc1 pathway activation was maximal within 10 min, peaked in response to caspofungin at 4× MIC, and declined at higher concentrations. The caspofungin-induced PI(4,5)P2 redistribution remained apparent in mkc1 mutants. Caspofungin exerted dose-dependent killing and paradoxical effects at ≤4× and ≥8× MIC, respectively. Fluconazole, amphotericin B, calcofluor white, and H2O2 did not impact the PI(4,5)P2 or Cdc10p distribution like caspofungin did. Caspofungin exerts rapid PI(4,5)P2-septin and PKC-Mkc1 responses that correlate with the extent of C. albicans killing, and the responses are not induced by other antifungal agents. PI(4,5)P2-septin regulation is crucial in early

  11. Co-delivery of cell-wall-forming enzymes in the same vesicle for coordinated fungal cell wall formation.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Martin; Martin-Urdiroz, Magdalena; Higuchi, Yujiro; Hacker, Christian; Kilaru, Sreedhar; Gurr, Sarah J; Steinberg, Gero

    2016-01-01

    Fungal cells are surrounded by an extracellular cell wall. This complex matrix of proteins and polysaccharides protects against adverse stresses and determines the shape of fungal cells. The polysaccharides of the fungal wall include 1,3-β-glucan and chitin, which are synthesized by membrane-bound synthases at the growing cell tip. A hallmark of filamentous fungi is the class V chitin synthase, which carries a myosin-motor domain. In the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis, the myosin-chitin synthase Mcs1 moves to the plasma membrane in secretory vesicles, being delivered by kinesin-1 and myosin-5. The myosin domain of Mcs1 enhances polar secretion by tethering vesicles at the site of exocytosis. It remains elusive, however, how other cell-wall-forming enzymes are delivered and how their activity is coordinated post secretion. Here, we show that the U. maydis class VII chitin synthase and 1,3-β-glucan synthase travel in Mcs1-containing vesicles, and that their apical secretion depends on Mcs1. Once in the plasma membrane, anchorage requires enzyme activity, which suggests co-synthesis of chitin and 1,3-β-glucan polysaccharides at sites of exocytosis. Thus, delivery of cell-wall-forming enzymes in Mcs1 vesicles ensures local foci of fungal cell wall formation. PMID:27563844

  12. Genome-wide identification, 3D modeling, expression and enzymatic activity analysis of cell wall invertase gene family from cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz).

    PubMed

    Yao, Yuan; Geng, Meng-Ting; Wu, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Jiao; Li, Rui-Mei; Hu, Xin-Wen; Guo, Jian-Chun

    2014-01-01

    The cell wall invertases play a crucial role on the sucrose metabolism in plant source and sink organs. In this research, six cell wall invertase genes (MeCWINV1-6) were cloned from cassava. All the MeCWINVs contain a putative signal peptide with a predicted extracellular location. The overall predicted structures of the MeCWINV1-6 are similar to AtcwINV1. Their N-terminus domain forms a β-propeller module and three conserved sequence domains (NDPNG, RDP and WECP(V)D), in which the catalytic residues are situated in these domains; while the C-terminus domain consists of a β-sandwich module. The predicted structure of Pro residue from the WECPD (MeCWINV1, 2, 5, and 6), and Val residue from the WECVD (MeCWINV3 and 4) are different. The activity of MeCWINV1 and 3 were higher than other MeCWINVs in leaves and tubers, which suggested that sucrose was mainly catalyzed by the MeCWINV1 and 3 in the apoplastic space of cassava source and sink organs. The transcriptional levels of all the MeCWINVs and their enzymatic activity were lower in tubers than in leaves at all the stages during the cassava tuber development. It suggested that the major role of the MeCWINVs was on the regulation of carbon exportation from source leaves, and the ratio of sucrose to hexose in the apoplasts; the role of these enzymes on the sucrose unloading to tuber was weaker. PMID:24786092

  13. Identification of Cell Wall Synthesis Regulatory Genes Controlling Biomass Characteristics and Yield in Rice (Oryza Sativa)

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Zhaohua PEng; Ronald, Palmela; Wang, Guo-Liang

    2013-04-26

    synthesis pathway genes are induced by removal of cell wall, some cell wall synthesis apparatus must be shared in both cases. The cell wall re-synthesis mechanism may have broad application because our preliminary assay indicates that the cell wall characteristics are highly different from those produced during cytokinesis. A thorough understanding on the regulation of cell wall re-synthesis may lead to improvement of cell wall characteristics. b) Removal of cell wall results in chromatin decondensation Another interesting observation was that removal of cell wall was associated with substantial chromatin change. Our DNA DAPI stain, chromatin MNase digestion, histone modification proteomics, protein differential expression analysis, and DNA oligo array studies all supported that substantial chromatin change was associated with removal of cell wall treatment. It is still under investigation if the chromatin change is associated with activation of cell wall synthesis genes, in which chromatin remodeling is required. Another possibility is that the cell wall is required for stabilizing the chromatin structure in plant cells. Given that spindle fiber is directly connected with both chromatin structure and cell wall synthesis, it is possible that there is an intrinsic connection between cell wall and chromatin.

  14. Cell wall integrity signalling in human pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Dichtl, Karl; Samantaray, Sweta; Wagener, Johannes

    2016-09-01

    Fungi are surrounded by a rigid structure, the fungal cell wall. Its plasticity and composition depend on active regulation of the underlying biosynthesis and restructuring processes. This involves specialised signalling pathways that control gene expression and activities of biosynthetic enzymes. The cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway is the central signalling cascade required for the adaptation to a wide spectrum of cell wall perturbing conditions, including heat, oxidative stress and antifungals. In the recent years, great efforts were made to analyse the CWI pathway of diverse fungi. It turned out that the CWI signalling cascade is mostly conserved in the fungal kingdom. In this review, we summarise as well as compare the current knowledge on the canonical CWI pathway in the human pathogenic fungi Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Aspergillus fumigatus and Cryptococcus neoformans. Understanding the differences and similarities in the stress responses of these organisms could become a key to improving existing or developing new antifungal therapies. PMID:27155139

  15. Inhibitors targeting on cell wall biosynthesis pathway of MRSA.

    PubMed

    Hao, Haihong; Cheng, Guyue; Dai, Menghong; Wu, Qinghua; Yuan, Zonghui

    2012-11-01

    Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), widely known as a type of new superbug, has aroused world-wide concern. Cell wall biosynthesis pathway is an old but good target for the development of antibacterial agents. Peptidoglycan and wall teichoic acids (WTAs) biosynthesis are two main processes of the cell wall biosynthesis pathway (CWBP). Other than penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), some key factors (Mur enzymes, lipid I or II precursor, etc.) in CWBP are becoming attractive molecule targets for the discovery of anti-MRSA compounds. A number of new compounds, with higher affinity for PBPs or with inhibitory activity on such molecule targets in CWBP of MRSA, have been in the pipeline recently. This review concludes recent research achievements and provides a complete picture of CWBP of MRSA, including the peptidoglycan and wall teichoic acids synthesis pathway. The potential inhibitors targeting on CWBP are subsequently presented to improve development of novel therapeutic strategies for MRSA. PMID:22898792

  16. Roles of membrane trafficking in plant cell wall dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ebine, Kazuo; Ueda, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The cell wall is one of the characteristic components of plant cells. The cell wall composition differs among cell types and is modified in response to various environmental conditions. To properly generate and modify the cell wall, many proteins are transported to the plasma membrane or extracellular space through membrane trafficking, which is one of the key protein transport mechanisms in eukaryotic cells. Given the diverse composition and functions of the cell wall in plants, the transport of the cell wall components and proteins that are involved in cell wall-related events could be specialized for each cell type, i.e., the machinery for cell wall biogenesis, modification, and maintenance could be transported via different trafficking pathways. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in the current understanding of the roles and mechanisms of membrane trafficking in plant cells and focus on the biogenesis and regulation of the cell wall. PMID:26539200

  17. Macrophages inhibit human osteosarcoma cell growth after activation with the bacterial cell wall derivative liposomal muramyl tripeptide in combination with interferon-γ

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In osteosarcoma, the presence of tumor-infiltrating macrophages positively correlates with patient survival in contrast to the negative effect of tumor-associated macrophages in patients with other tumors. Liposome-encapsulated muramyl tripeptide (L-MTP-PE) has been introduced in the treatment of osteosarcoma patients, which may enhance the potential anti-tumor activity of macrophages. Direct anti-tumor activity of human macrophages against human osteosarcoma cells has not been described so far. Hence, we assessed osteosarcoma cell growth after co-culture with human macrophages. Methods Monocyte-derived M1-like and M2-like macrophages were polarized with LPS + IFN-γ, L-MTP-PE +/− IFN-γ or IL-10 and incubated with osteosarcoma cells. Two days later, viable tumor cell numbers were analyzed. Antibody-dependent effects were investigated using the therapeutic anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab. Results M1-like macrophages inhibited osteosarcoma cell growth when activated with LPS + IFN-γ. Likewise, stimulation of M1-like macrophages with liposomal muramyl tripeptide (L-MTP-PE) inhibited tumor growth, but only when combined with IFN-γ. Addition of the tumor-reactive anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab did not further improve the anti-tumor activity of activated M1-like macrophages. The inhibition was mediated by supernatants of activated M1-like macrophages, containing TNF-α and IL-1β. However, specific blockage of these cytokines, nitric oxide or reactive oxygen species did not inhibit the anti-tumor effect, suggesting the involvement of other soluble factors released upon macrophage activation. While LPS + IFN-γ–activated M2-like macrophages had low anti-tumor activity, IL-10–polarized M2-like macrophages were able to reduce osteosarcoma cell growth in the presence of the anti-EGFR cetuximab involving antibody-dependent tumor cell phagocytosis. Conclusion This study demonstrates that human macrophages can be induced to exert direct anti

  18. Involvement of major components from Sporothrix schenckii cell wall in the caspase-1 activation, nitric oxide and cytokines production during experimental sporotrichosis.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Amanda Costa; Maia, Danielle Cardoso Geraldo; Ferreira, Lucas Souza; Monnazzi, Luis Gustavo Silva; Alegranci, Pâmela; Placeres, Marisa Campos Polesi; Batista-Duharte, Alexander; Carlos, Iracilda Zeppone

    2015-02-01

    Sporotrichosis is a chronic infection caused by the dimorphic fungus Sporothrix schenckii, involving all layers of skin and the subcutaneous tissue. The role of innate immune toll-like receptors 2 and 4 in the defense against this fungus has been reported, but so far, there were no studies on the effect of cell wall major components over the cytosolic oligo-merization domain (NOD)-like receptors, important regulators of inflammation and responsible for the maturation of IL-1β and IL-18, whose functions are dependents of the caspase-1 activation, that can participate of inflammasome. It was evaluated the percentage of activation of caspase-1, the production of IL-1β, IL-18, IL-17, IFN-γ and nitric oxide in a Balb/c model of S. schenckii infection. It was observed a decreased activity of caspase-1 during the fourth and sixth weeks of infection accompanied by reduced secretion of the cytokines IL-1β, IL-18 and IL-17 and high production of nitric oxide. IFN-γ levels were elevated during the entire time course of infection. This temporal reduction in caspase-1 activity coincides exactly with the reported period of fungal burden associated with a transitory immunosuppression induced by this fungus and detected in similar infection models. These results indicate the importance of interaction between caspase-1, cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 in the host defense against S. schenckii infection, suggesting a participation the inflammasome in this response. PMID:25205196

  19. Profiling the Hydrolysis of Isolated Grape Berry Skin Cell Walls by Purified Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Zietsman, Anscha J J; Moore, John P; Fangel, Jonatan U; Willats, William G T; Vivier, Melané A

    2015-09-23

    The unraveling of crushed grapes by maceration enzymes during winemaking is difficult to study because of the complex and rather undefined nature of both the substrate and the enzyme preparations. In this study we simplified both the substrate, by using isolated grape skin cell walls, and the enzyme preparations, by using purified enzymes in buffered conditions, to carefully follow the impact of the individual and combined enzymes on the grape skin cell walls. By using cell wall profiling techniques we could monitor the compositional changes in the grape cell wall polymers due to enzyme activity. Extensive enzymatic hydrolysis, achieved with a preparation of pectinases or pectinases combined with cellulase or hemicellulase enzymes, completely removed or drastically reduced levels of pectin polymers, whereas less extensive hydrolysis only opened up the cell wall structure and allowed extraction of polymers from within the cell wall layers. Synergistic enzyme activity was detectable as well as indications of specific cell wall polymer associations. PMID:26309153

  20. Colletotrichum higginsianum Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase ChMK1: Role in Growth, Cell Wall Integrity, Colony Melanization, and Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Xiong, Ying; Zhu, Wenjun; Wang, Nancong; Yang, Guogen; Peng, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Colletotrichum higginsianum is an economically important pathogen that causes anthracnose disease in a wide range of cruciferous crops. To facilitate the efficient control of anthracnose disease, it will be important to understand the mechanism by which the cruciferous crops and C. higginsianum interact. A key step in understanding this interaction is characterizing the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathway of C. higginsianum. MAPK plays important roles in diverse physiological processes of multiple pathogens. In this study, a Fus3/Kss1-related MAPK gene, ChMK1, from C. higginsianum was analyzed. The results showed that the Fus3/Kss1-related MAPK ChMK1 plays a significant role in cell wall integrity. Targeted deletion of ChMK1 resulted in a hypersensitivity to cell wall inhibitors, reduced conidiation and albinistic colonies. Further, the deletion mutant was also unable to form melanized appressorium, a specialized infection structure that is necessary for successful infection. Therefore, the deletion mutant loses pathogenicity on A. thaliana leaves, demonstrating that ChMK1 plays an essential role in the early infection step. In addition, the ChMK1 deletion mutant showed an attenuated growth rate that is different from that of its homolog in Colletotrichum lagenarium, indicating the diverse roles that Fus3/Kss1-related MAPKs plays in phytopathogenic fungi. Furthermore, the expression level of three melanin synthesis associated genes were clearly decreased in the albinistic ChMK1 mutant compared to that of the wild type strain, suggesting that ChMK1 is also required for colony melanization in C. higginsianum. PMID:27536296

  1. Colletotrichum higginsianum Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase ChMK1: Role in Growth, Cell Wall Integrity, Colony Melanization, and Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Xiong, Ying; Zhu, Wenjun; Wang, Nancong; Yang, Guogen; Peng, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Colletotrichum higginsianum is an economically important pathogen that causes anthracnose disease in a wide range of cruciferous crops. To facilitate the efficient control of anthracnose disease, it will be important to understand the mechanism by which the cruciferous crops and C. higginsianum interact. A key step in understanding this interaction is characterizing the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathway of C. higginsianum. MAPK plays important roles in diverse physiological processes of multiple pathogens. In this study, a Fus3/Kss1-related MAPK gene, ChMK1, from C. higginsianum was analyzed. The results showed that the Fus3/Kss1-related MAPK ChMK1 plays a significant role in cell wall integrity. Targeted deletion of ChMK1 resulted in a hypersensitivity to cell wall inhibitors, reduced conidiation and albinistic colonies. Further, the deletion mutant was also unable to form melanized appressorium, a specialized infection structure that is necessary for successful infection. Therefore, the deletion mutant loses pathogenicity on A. thaliana leaves, demonstrating that ChMK1 plays an essential role in the early infection step. In addition, the ChMK1 deletion mutant showed an attenuated growth rate that is different from that of its homolog in Colletotrichum lagenarium, indicating the diverse roles that Fus3/Kss1-related MAPKs plays in phytopathogenic fungi. Furthermore, the expression level of three melanin synthesis associated genes were clearly decreased in the albinistic ChMK1 mutant compared to that of the wild type strain, suggesting that ChMK1 is also required for colony melanization in C. higginsianum. PMID:27536296

  2. Cell wall peptidoglycan architecture in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Hayhurst, Emma J.; Kailas, Lekshmi; Hobbs, Jamie K.; Foster, Simon J.

    2008-01-01

    The bacterial cell wall is essential for viability and shape determination. Cell wall structural dynamics allowing growth and division, while maintaining integrity is a basic problem governing the life of bacteria. The polymer peptidoglycan is the main structural component for most bacteria and is made up of glycan strands that are cross-linked by peptide side chains. Despite study and speculation over many years, peptidoglycan architecture has remained largely elusive. Here, we show that the model rod-shaped bacterium Bacillus subtilis has glycan strands up to 5 μm, longer than the cell itself and 50 times longer than previously proposed. Atomic force microscopy revealed the glycan strands to be part of a peptidoglycan architecture allowing cell growth and division. The inner surface of the cell wall has a regular macrostructure with ≈50 nm-wide peptidoglycan cables [average 53 ± 12 nm (n = 91)] running basically across the short axis of the cell. Cross striations with an average periodicity of 25 ± 9 nm (n = 96) along each cable are also present. The fundamental cabling architecture is also maintained during septal development as part of cell division. We propose a coiled-coil model for peptidoglycan architecture encompassing our data and recent evidence concerning the biosynthetic machinery for this essential polymer. PMID:18784364

  3. Cell wall peptidoglycan architecture in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Hayhurst, Emma J; Kailas, Lekshmi; Hobbs, Jamie K; Foster, Simon J

    2008-09-23

    The bacterial cell wall is essential for viability and shape determination. Cell wall structural dynamics allowing growth and division, while maintaining integrity is a basic problem governing the life of bacteria. The polymer peptidoglycan is the main structural component for most bacteria and is made up of glycan strands that are cross-linked by peptide side chains. Despite study and speculation over many years, peptidoglycan architecture has remained largely elusive. Here, we show that the model rod-shaped bacterium Bacillus subtilis has glycan strands up to 5 microm, longer than the cell itself and 50 times longer than previously proposed. Atomic force microscopy revealed the glycan strands to be part of a peptidoglycan architecture allowing cell growth and division. The inner surface of the cell wall has a regular macrostructure with approximately 50 nm-wide peptidoglycan cables [average 53 +/- 12 nm (n = 91)] running basically across the short axis of the cell. Cross striations with an average periodicity of 25 +/- 9 nm (n = 96) along each cable are also present. The fundamental cabling architecture is also maintained during septal development as part of cell division. We propose a coiled-coil model for peptidoglycan architecture encompassing our data and recent evidence concerning the biosynthetic machinery for this essential polymer. PMID:18784364

  4. Characterization of the Sclerotinia sclerotiorum cell wall proteome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Longzhou; Free, Stephen J

    2016-08-01

    We used a proteomic analysis to identify cell wall proteins released from Sclerotinia sclerotiorum hyphal and sclerotial cell walls via a trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (TFMS) digestion. Cell walls from hyphae grown in Vogel's glucose medium (a synthetic medium lacking plant materials), from hyphae grown in potato dextrose broth and from sclerotia produced on potato dextrose agar were used in the analysis. Under the conditions used, TFMS digests the glycosidic linkages in the cell walls to release intact cell wall proteins. The analysis identified 24 glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored cell wall proteins and 30 non-GPI-anchored cell wall proteins. We found that the cell walls contained an array of cell wall biosynthetic enzymes similar to those found in the cell walls of other fungi. When comparing the proteins in hyphal cell walls grown in potato dextrose broth with those in hyphal cell walls grown in the absence of plant material, it was found that a core group of cell wall biosynthetic proteins and some proteins associated with pathogenicity (secreted cellulases, pectin lyases, glucosidases and proteases) were expressed in both types of hyphae. The hyphae grown in potato dextrose broth contained a number of additional proteins (laccases, oxalate decarboxylase, peroxidase, polysaccharide deacetylase and several proteins unique to Sclerotinia and Botrytis) that might facilitate growth on a plant host. A comparison of the proteins in the sclerotial cell wall with the proteins in the hyphal cell wall demonstrated that sclerotia formation is not marked by a major shift in the composition of cell wall protein. We found that the S. sclerotiorum cell walls contained 11 cell wall proteins that were encoded only in Sclerotinia and Botrytis genomes. PMID:26661933

  5. The role of the cell wall in plant immunity

    PubMed Central

    Malinovsky, Frederikke G.; Fangel, Jonatan U.; Willats, William G. T.

    2014-01-01

    The battle between plants and microbes is evolutionarily ancient, highly complex, and often co-dependent. A primary challenge for microbes is to breach the physical barrier of host cell walls whilst avoiding detection by the plant’s immune receptors. While some receptors sense conserved microbial features, others monitor physical changes caused by an infection attempt. Detection of microbes leads to activation of appropriate defense responses that then challenge the attack. Plant cell walls are formidable and dynamic barriers. They are constructed primarily of complex carbohydrates joined by numerous distinct connection types, and are subject to extensive post-synthetic modification to suit prevailing local requirements. Multiple changes can be triggered in cell walls in response to microbial attack. Some of these are well described, but many remain obscure. The study of the myriad of subtle processes underlying cell wall modification poses special challenges for plant glycobiology. In this review we describe the major molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie the roles of cell walls in plant defense against pathogen attack. In so doing, we also highlight some of the challenges inherent in studying these interactions, and briefly describe the analytical potential of molecular probes used in conjunction with carbohydrate microarray technology. PMID:24834069

  6. Cell Wall Heterogeneity in Root Development of Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Somssich, Marc; Khan, Ghazanfar Abbas; Persson, Staffan

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell walls provide stability and protection to plant cells. During growth and development the composition of cell walls changes, but provides enough strength to withstand the turgor of the cells. Hence, cell walls are highly flexible and diverse in nature. These characteristics are important during root growth, as plant roots consist of radial patterns of cells that have diverse functions and that are at different developmental stages along the growth axis. Young stem cell daughters undergo a series of rapid cell divisions, during which new cell walls are formed that are highly dynamic, and that support rapid anisotropic cell expansion. Once the cells have differentiated, the walls of specific cell types need to comply with and support different cell functions. For example, a newly formed root hair needs to be able to break through the surrounding soil, while endodermal cells modify their walls at distinct positions to form Casparian strips between them. Hence, the cell walls are modified and rebuilt while cells transit through different developmental stages. In addition, the cell walls of roots readjust to their environment to support growth and to maximize nutrient uptake. Many of these modifications are likely driven by different developmental and stress signaling pathways. However, our understanding of how such pathways affect cell wall modifications and what enzymes are involved remain largely unknown. In this review we aim to compile data linking cell wall content and re-modeling to developmental stages of root cells, and dissect how root cell walls respond to certain environmental changes. PMID:27582757

  7. Cell Wall Heterogeneity in Root Development of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Somssich, Marc; Khan, Ghazanfar Abbas; Persson, Staffan

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell walls provide stability and protection to plant cells. During growth and development the composition of cell walls changes, but provides enough strength to withstand the turgor of the cells. Hence, cell walls are highly flexible and diverse in nature. These characteristics are important during root growth, as plant roots consist of radial patterns of cells that have diverse functions and that are at different developmental stages along the growth axis. Young stem cell daughters undergo a series of rapid cell divisions, during which new cell walls are formed that are highly dynamic, and that support rapid anisotropic cell expansion. Once the cells have differentiated, the walls of specific cell types need to comply with and support different cell functions. For example, a newly formed root hair needs to be able to break through the surrounding soil, while endodermal cells modify their walls at distinct positions to form Casparian strips between them. Hence, the cell walls are modified and rebuilt while cells transit through different developmental stages. In addition, the cell walls of roots readjust to their environment to support growth and to maximize nutrient uptake. Many of these modifications are likely driven by different developmental and stress signaling pathways. However, our understanding of how such pathways affect cell wall modifications and what enzymes are involved remain largely unknown. In this review we aim to compile data linking cell wall content and re-modeling to developmental stages of root cells, and dissect how root cell walls respond to certain environmental changes. PMID:27582757

  8. The antimicrobial activity of Cbf-K16 against MRSA was enhanced by β-lactamantibiotics through cell wall non-integrity.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Kang, Wei; Liu, Hanhan; Wang, Yanrong; Yu, Changzhong; Zhu, Xinyi; Dou, Jie; Cai, Haibo; Zhou, Changlin

    2016-07-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has emerged as one of the most important pathogens both in health care and in community-onset infections. Cbf-K16, a cathelicidin-like antimicrobial peptide, presented broad antimicrobial activity during our previous studies. We evaluated the potential for synergy of Cbf-K16 with ceftazidime/ampicilin against MRSA, which was resistant to these two antibiotics with the minimum inhibitory concentration more than 64 μg/ml. The combinations showed a synergistic effect by a checkerboard assay with a fractional inhibitory concentration index ≤0.5. The killing curves of the combination treatment against MRSA showed that CFU counts decreased rapidly within 4 h by almost five logs, while single medication groups and the control group exhibited little inhibitory effect. In addition, in a mice bacteremia model, studies indicated that the combination treatment significantly prolonged the survival time of mice infected with MRSA, with a death protection rate of 80 %. Flow cytometry analysis and transmission electron microscopy indicated that combination-treated MRSA was completely ruptured with the cellular contents leaked out. The synergistic effect showed that Cbf-K16 selectively killed cells with non-integrity induced by cell wall inhibition antibiotics, suggesting that Cbf-K16 is a potential therapeutic agent and adjuvant for antimicrobial chemotherapy. PMID:27287456

  9. Degradation of isolated tomato cell walls by purified polygalacturonase in vitro.

    PubMed

    Themmen, A P; Tucker, G A; Grierson, D

    1982-01-01

    Cell wall preparations from green pericarp of normal and mutant Neverripe (Nr) and ripening inhibitor (rin) tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) fruit were all equally degraded in vitro by a cell wall-bound protein extract from ripe normal tomatoes.Similar cell wall-bound protein extracts from ripe Nr fruit were not as effective and those from ripe rin fruit gave no cell wall degradation at all in vitro. This was correlated with the absence of polygalacturonase in rin and low activity of Nr extracts.Purified polygalacturonase was capable of in vitro cell wall degradation and it seems that this enzyme can account for the cell wall degradation observed with the total cell wall-bound protein extracts from ripe fruit. PMID:16662142

  10. Fluorescent tags to explore cell wall structure and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Gonneau, Martine; Höfte, Herman; Vernhettes, Samantha

    2012-01-01

    Plant cell walls are highly dynamic and heterogeneous structures, which vary between cell types, growth stages but also between microdomains within a single cell wall. In this review, we summarize the imaging techniques using fluorescent tags that are currently being used and which should in the coming years revolutionize our understanding of the dynamics of cell wall architecture and the cellular processes involved in the synthesis of cell wall components. PMID:22783266

  11. Polymer mobility in cell walls of cucumber hypocotyls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenwick, K. M.; Apperley, D. C.; Cosgrove, D. J.; Jarvis, M. C.

    1999-01-01

    Cell walls were prepared from the growing region of cucumber (Cucumis sativus) hypocotyls and examined by solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy, in both enzymically active and inactivated states. The rigidity of individual polymer segments within the hydrated cell walls was assessed from the proton magnetic relaxation parameter, T2, and from the kinetics of cross-polarisation from 1H to 13C. The microfibrils, including most of the xyloglucan in the cell wall, as well as cellulose, behaved as very rigid solids. A minor xyloglucan fraction, which may correspond to cross-links between microfibrils, shared a lower level of rigidity with some of the pectic galacturonan. Other pectins, including most of the galactan side-chain residues of rhamnogalacturonan I, were much more mobile and behaved in a manner intermediate between the solid and liquid states. The only difference observed between the enzymically active and inactive cell walls, was the loss of a highly mobile, methyl-esterified galacturonan fraction, as the result of pectinesterase activity.

  12. Viscoelastic properties of cell walls of single living plant cells determined by dynamic nanoindentation

    PubMed Central

    Hayot, Céline M.; Forouzesh, Elham; Goel, Ashwani; Avramova, Zoya; Turner, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    Plant development results from controlled cell divisions, structural modifications, and reorganizations of the cell wall. Thereby, regulation of cell wall behaviour takes place at multiple length scales involving compositional and architectural aspects in addition to various developmental and/or environmental factors. The physical properties of the primary wall are largely determined by the nature of the complex polymer network, which exhibits time-dependent behaviour representative of viscoelastic materials. Here, a dynamic nanoindentation technique is used to measure the time-dependent response and the viscoelastic behaviour of the cell wall in single living cells at a micron or sub-micron scale. With this approach, significant changes in storage (stiffness) and loss (loss of energy) moduli are captured among the tested cells. The results reveal hitherto unknown differences in the viscoelastic parameters of the walls of same-age similarly positioned cells of the Arabidopsis ecotypes (Col 0 and Ws 2). The technique is also shown to be sensitive enough to detect changes in cell wall properties in cells deficient in the activity of the chromatin modifier ATX1. Extensive computational modelling of the experimental measurements (i.e. modelling the cell as a viscoelastic pressure vessel) is used to analyse the influence of the wall thickness, as well as the turgor pressure, at the positions of our measurements. By combining the nanoDMA technique with finite element simulations quantifiable measurements of the viscoelastic properties of plant cell walls are achieved. Such techniques are expected to find broader applications in quantifying the influence of genetic, biological, and environmental factors on the nanoscale mechanical properties of the cell wall. PMID:22291130

  13. Viscoelastic properties of cell walls of single living plant cells determined by dynamic nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Hayot, Céline M; Forouzesh, Elham; Goel, Ashwani; Avramova, Zoya; Turner, Joseph A

    2012-04-01

    Plant development results from controlled cell divisions, structural modifications, and reorganizations of the cell wall. Thereby, regulation of cell wall behaviour takes place at multiple length scales involving compositional and architectural aspects in addition to various developmental and/or environmental factors. The physical properties of the primary wall are largely determined by the nature of the complex polymer network, which exhibits time-dependent behaviour representative of viscoelastic materials. Here, a dynamic nanoindentation technique is used to measure the time-dependent response and the viscoelastic behaviour of the cell wall in single living cells at a micron or sub-micron scale. With this approach, significant changes in storage (stiffness) and loss (loss of energy) moduli are captured among the tested cells. The results reveal hitherto unknown differences in the viscoelastic parameters of the walls of same-age similarly positioned cells of the Arabidopsis ecotypes (Col 0 and Ws 2). The technique is also shown to be sensitive enough to detect changes in cell wall properties in cells deficient in the activity of the chromatin modifier ATX1. Extensive computational modelling of the experimental measurements (i.e. modelling the cell as a viscoelastic pressure vessel) is used to analyse the influence of the wall thickness, as well as the turgor pressure, at the positions of our measurements. By combining the nanoDMA technique with finite element simulations quantifiable measurements of the viscoelastic properties of plant cell walls are achieved. Such techniques are expected to find broader applications in quantifying the influence of genetic, biological, and environmental factors on the nanoscale mechanical properties of the cell wall. PMID:22291130

  14. Production of Bacteriolytic Enzymes by Streptomyces globisporus Regulated by Exogenous Bacterial Cell Walls.

    PubMed

    Brönneke, V; Fiedler, F

    1994-03-01

    Mutanolysin biosynthesis and pigment production in Streptomyces globisporus ATCC 21553 were stimulated by adding bacterial cell walls to the medium. The increased bacteriolytic activity in the supernatant correlated with an increased de novo synthesis of mutanolysin and was between 4- and 20-fold higher than in cultures grown without bacterial cell walls. The increase in mutanolysin synthesis was brought about by enhanced transcription of the mutanolysin gene. The stimulation was only observed in medium which contained dextrin or starch as the carbon source. Glucose abolished the stimulation and also inhibited the low constitutive synthesis of mutanolysin. The induction of lytic activity was observed to require minimally 0.4 mg of bacterial cell walls per ml, whereas 0.6 mg of bacterial cell walls per ml yielded maximal lytic activity. Further supplements of bacterial cell walls did not result in enhanced lytic activity. The stimulation could be achieved independently of the phase of growth of the Streptomyces strain. Cultures grown in the presence of bacterial cell walls exhibited a higher growth yield. However, the accelerated growth was not the reason for the increased amount of mutanolysin produced. The growth of cultures with peptidoglycan monomers added to the medium instead of cell walls was similarly increased, but an effect on the biosynthesis of mutanolysin was not observed. All bacterial cell walls tested were capable of eliciting the stimulation of lytic activity, including cell walls of archaea, which contained pseudomurein. PMID:16349213

  15. A cytoplasmic peptidoglycan amidase homologue controls mycobacterial cell wall synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Boutte, Cara C; Baer, Christina E; Papavinasasundaram, Kadamba; Liu, Weiru; Chase, Michael R; Meniche, Xavier; Fortune, Sarah M; Sassetti, Christopher M; Ioerger, Thomas R; Rubin, Eric J

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of cell wall assembly is essential for bacterial survival and contributes to pathogenesis and antibiotic tolerance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). However, little is known about how the cell wall is regulated in stress. We found that CwlM, a protein homologous to peptidoglycan amidases, coordinates peptidoglycan synthesis with nutrient availability. Surprisingly, CwlM is sequestered from peptidoglycan (PG) by localization in the cytoplasm, and its enzymatic function is not essential. Rather, CwlM is phosphorylated and associates with MurA, the first enzyme in PG precursor synthesis. Phosphorylated CwlM activates MurA ~30 fold. CwlM is dephosphorylated in starvation, resulting in lower MurA activity, decreased cell wall metabolism, and increased tolerance to multiple antibiotics. A phylogenetic analysis of cwlM implies that localization in the cytoplasm drove the evolution of this factor. We describe a system that controls cell wall metabolism in response to starvation, and show that this regulation contributes to antibiotic tolerance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14590.001 PMID:27304077

  16. A cytoplasmic peptidoglycan amidase homologue controls mycobacterial cell wall synthesis.

    PubMed

    Boutte, Cara C; Baer, Christina E; Papavinasasundaram, Kadamba; Liu, Weiru; Chase, Michael R; Meniche, Xavier; Fortune, Sarah M; Sassetti, Christopher M; Ioerger, Thomas R; Rubin, Eric J

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of cell wall assembly is essential for bacterial survival and contributes to pathogenesis and antibiotic tolerance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). However, little is known about how the cell wall is regulated in stress. We found that CwlM, a protein homologous to peptidoglycan amidases, coordinates peptidoglycan synthesis with nutrient availability. Surprisingly, CwlM is sequestered from peptidoglycan (PG) by localization in the cytoplasm, and its enzymatic function is not essential. Rather, CwlM is phosphorylated and associates with MurA, the first enzyme in PG precursor synthesis. Phosphorylated CwlM activates MurA ~30 fold. CwlM is dephosphorylated in starvation, resulting in lower MurA activity, decreased cell wall metabolism, and increased tolerance to multiple antibiotics. A phylogenetic analysis of cwlM implies that localization in the cytoplasm drove the evolution of this factor. We describe a system that controls cell wall metabolism in response to starvation, and show that this regulation contributes to antibiotic tolerance. PMID:27304077

  17. An optimized microplate assay system for quantitative evaluation of plant cell wall-degrading enzyme activity of fungal culture extracts.

    PubMed

    King, Brian C; Donnelly, Marie K; Bergstrom, Gary C; Walker, Larry P; Gibson, Donna M

    2009-03-01

    Developing enzyme cocktails for cellulosic biomass hydrolysis complementary to current cellulase systems is a critical step needed for economically viable biofuels production. Recent genomic analysis indicates that some plant pathogenic fungi are likely a largely untapped resource in which to prospect for novel hydrolytic enzymes for biomass conversion. In order to develop high throughput screening assays for enzyme bioprospecting, a standardized microplate assay was developed for rapid analysis of polysaccharide hydrolysis by fungal extracts, incorporating biomass substrates. Fungi were grown for 10 days on cellulose- or switchgrass-containing media to produce enzyme extracts for analysis. Reducing sugar released from filter paper, Avicel, corn stalk, switchgrass, carboxymethylcellulose, and arabinoxylan was quantified using a miniaturized colorimetric assay based on 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid. Significant interactions were identified among fungal species, growth media composition, assay substrate, and temperature. Within a small sampling of plant pathogenic fungi, some extracts had crude activities comparable to or greater than T. reesei, particularly when assayed at lower temperatures and on biomass substrates. This microplate assay system should prove useful for high-throughput bioprospecting for new sources of novel enzymes for biofuel production. PMID:18973283

  18. STREAMLINED METHOD FOR BIOMASS WHOLE-CELL-WALL STRUCTURAL PROFILING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In wide-ranging research aimed at altering plant cell wall characteristics by conventional breeding or modern genetic methods, one of the biggest problems is in delineating the effects on the cell wall. Plant cell walls are a complex conglomerate of a variety of polysaccharides and lignin. Each comp...

  19. Wall relaxation and the driving forces for cell expansive growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    When water uptake by growing cells is prevented, the turgor pressure and the tensile stress in the cell wall are reduced by continued wall loosening. This process, termed in vivo stress relaxation, provides a new way to study the dynamics of wall loosening and to measure the wall yield threshold and the physiological wall extensibility. Stress relaxation experiments indicate that wall stress supplies the mechanical driving force for wall yielding. Cell expansion also requires water absorption. The driving force for water uptake during growth is created by wall relaxation, which lowers the water potential of the expanding cells. New techniques for measuring this driving force show that it is smaller than believed previously; in elongating stems it is only 0.3 to 0.5 bar. This means that the hydraulic resistance of the water transport pathway is small and that rate of cell expansion is controlled primarily by wall loosening and yielding.

  20. Monoclonal antibodies against plant cell wall polysaccharides

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, M.G.; Bucheli, E.; Darvill, A.; Albersheim, P. )

    1989-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) are useful tools to probe the structure of plant cell wall polysaccharides and to localize these polysaccharides in plant cells and tissues. Murine McAbs were generated against the pectic polysaccharide, rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I), isolated from suspension-cultured sycamore cells. The McAbs that were obtained were grouped into three classes based upon their reactivities with a variety of plant polysaccharides and membrane glycoproteins. Eleven McAbs (Class I) recognize epitope(s) that appear to be immunodominant and are found in RG-I from sycamore and maize, citrus pectin, polygalacturonic acid, and membrane glycoproteins from suspension-cultured cells of sycamore, maize, tobacco, parsley, and soybean. A second group of five McAbs (Class II) recognize epitope(s) present in sycamore RG-I, but do not bind to any of the other polysaccharides or glycoproteins recognized by Class I. Lastly, one McAb (Class III) reacts with sycamore RG-I, sycamore and tamarind xyloglucan, and sycamore and rice glucuronoarabinoxylan, but does not bind to maize RG-I, polygalacturonic acid or the plant membrane glycoproteins recognized by Class I. McAbs in Classes II and III are likely to be useful in studies of the structure, biosynthesis and localization of plant cell wall polysaccharides.

  1. The Aspergillus fumigatus pkcAG579R Mutant Is Defective in the Activation of the Cell Wall Integrity Pathway but Is Dispensable for Virulence in a Neutropenic Mouse Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Marina Campos; de Godoy, Krissia Franco; de Castro, Patrícia Alves; Hori, Juliana Issa; Bom, Vinícius Leite Pedro; Brown, Neil Andrew; da Cunha, Anderson Ferreira; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique; Malavazi, Iran

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an opportunistic human pathogen, which causes the life-threatening disease, invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. In fungi, cell wall homeostasis is controlled by the conserved Cell Wall Integrity (CWI) pathway. In A. fumigatus this signaling cascade is partially characterized, but the mechanisms by which it is activated are not fully elucidated. In this study we investigated the role of protein kinase C (PkcA) in this signaling cascade. Our results suggest that pkcA is an essential gene and is activated in response to cell wall stress. Subsequently, we constructed and analyzed a non-essential A. fumigatus pkcAG579R mutant, carrying a Gly579Arg substitution in the PkcA C1B regulatory domain. The pkcAG579R mutation has a reduced activation of the downstream Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase, MpkA, resulting in the altered expression of genes encoding cell wall-related proteins, markers of endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response. Furthermore, PkcAG579R is involved in the formation of proper conidial architecture and protection to oxidative damage. The pkcAG579R mutant elicits increased production of TNF-α and phagocytosis but it has no impact on virulence in a murine model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. These results highlight the importance of PkcA to the CWI pathway but also indicated that additional regulatory circuits may be involved in the biosynthesis and/or reinforcement of the A. fumigatus cell wall during infection. PMID:26295576

  2. The Aspergillus fumigatus pkcA G579R Mutant Is Defective in the Activation of the Cell Wall Integrity Pathway but Is Dispensable for Virulence in a Neutropenic Mouse Infection Model.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Marina Campos; Godoy, Krissia Franco de; de Castro, Patrícia Alves; Hori, Juliana Issa; Bom, Vinícius Leite Pedro; Brown, Neil Andrew; Cunha, Anderson Ferreira da; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique; Malavazi, Iran

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an opportunistic human pathogen, which causes the life-threatening disease, invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. In fungi, cell wall homeostasis is controlled by the conserved Cell Wall Integrity (CWI) pathway. In A. fumigatus this signaling cascade is partially characterized, but the mechanisms by which it is activated are not fully elucidated. In this study we investigated the role of protein kinase C (PkcA) in this signaling cascade. Our results suggest that pkcA is an essential gene and is activated in response to cell wall stress. Subsequently, we constructed and analyzed a non-essential A. fumigatus pkcAG579R mutant, carrying a Gly579Arg substitution in the PkcA C1B regulatory domain. The pkcAG579R mutation has a reduced activation of the downstream Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase, MpkA, resulting in the altered expression of genes encoding cell wall-related proteins, markers of endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response. Furthermore, PkcAG579R is involved in the formation of proper conidial architecture and protection to oxidative damage. The pkcAG579R mutant elicits increased production of TNF-α and phagocytosis but it has no impact on virulence in a murine model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. These results highlight the importance of PkcA to the CWI pathway but also indicated that additional regulatory circuits may be involved in the biosynthesis and/or reinforcement of the A. fumigatus cell wall during infection. PMID:26295576

  3. Plant cell wall proteomics: the leadership of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Albenne, Cécile; Canut, Hervé; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Plant cell wall proteins (CWPs) progressively emerged as crucial components of cell walls although present in minor amounts. Cell wall polysaccharides such as pectins, hemicelluloses, and cellulose represent more than 90% of primary cell wall mass, whereas hemicelluloses, cellulose, and lignins are the main components of lignified secondary walls. All these polymers provide mechanical properties to cell walls, participate in cell shape and prevent water loss in aerial organs. However, cell walls need to be modified and customized during plant development and in response to environmental cues, thus contributing to plant adaptation. CWPs play essential roles in all these physiological processes and particularly in the dynamics of cell walls, which requires organization and rearrangements of polysaccharides as well as cell-to-cell communication. In the last 10 years, plant cell wall proteomics has greatly contributed to a wider knowledge of CWPs. This update will deal with (i) a survey of plant cell wall proteomics studies with a focus on Arabidopsis thaliana; (ii) the main protein families identified and the still missing peptides; (iii) the persistent issue of the non-canonical CWPs; (iv) the present challenges to overcome technological bottlenecks; and (v) the perspectives beyond cell wall proteomics to understand CWP functions. PMID:23641247

  4. Plant cell wall lignification and monolignol metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yin; Chantreau, Maxime; Sibout, Richard; Hawkins, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Plants are built of various specialized cell types that differ in their cell wall composition and structure. The cell walls of certain tissues (xylem, sclerenchyma) are characterized by the presence of the heterogeneous lignin polymer that plays an essential role in their physiology. This phenolic polymer is composed of different monomeric units – the monolignols – that are linked together by several covalent bonds. Numerous studies have shown that monolignol biosynthesis and polymerization to form lignin are tightly controlled in different cell types and tissues. However, our understanding of the genetic control of monolignol transport and polymerization remains incomplete, despite some recent promising results. This situation is made more complex since we know that monolignols or related compounds are sometimes produced in non-lignified tissues. In this review, we focus on some key steps of monolignol metabolism including polymerization, transport, and compartmentation. As well as being of fundamental interest, the quantity of lignin and its nature are also known to have a negative effect on the industrial processing of plant lignocellulose biomass. A more complete view of monolignol metabolism and the relationship that exists between lignin and other monolignol-derived compounds thereby appears essential if we wish to improve biomass quality. PMID:23847630

  5. KRE5 Suppression Induces Cell Wall Stress and Alternative ER Stress Response Required for Maintaining Cell Wall Integrity in Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Masato; Ito, Fumie; Aoyama, Toshio; Sato-Okamoto, Michiyo; Takahashi-Nakaguchi, Azusa; Chibana, Hiroji; Shibata, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    The maintenance of cell wall integrity in fungi is required for normal cell growth, division, hyphae formation, and antifungal tolerance. We observed that endoplasmic reticulum stress regulated cell wall integrity in Candida glabrata, which possesses uniquely evolved mechanisms for unfolded protein response mechanisms. Tetracycline-mediated suppression of KRE5, which encodes a predicted UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase localized in the endoplasmic reticulum, significantly increased cell wall chitin content and decreased cell wall β-1,6-glucan content. KRE5 repression induced endoplasmic reticulum stress-related gene expression and MAP kinase pathway activation, including Slt2p and Hog1p phosphorylation, through the cell wall integrity signaling pathway. Moreover, the calcineurin pathway negatively regulated cell wall integrity, but not the reduction of β-1,6-glucan content. These results indicate that KRE5 is required for maintaining both endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis and cell wall integrity, and that the calcineurin pathway acts as a regulator of chitin-glucan balance in the cell wall and as an alternative mediator of endoplasmic reticulum stress in C. glabrata. PMID:27548283

  6. KRE5 Suppression Induces Cell Wall Stress and Alternative ER Stress Response Required for Maintaining Cell Wall Integrity in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yutaka; Sasaki, Masato; Ito, Fumie; Aoyama, Toshio; Sato-Okamoto, Michiyo; Takahashi-Nakaguchi, Azusa; Chibana, Hiroji; Shibata, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    The maintenance of cell wall integrity in fungi is required for normal cell growth, division, hyphae formation, and antifungal tolerance. We observed that endoplasmic reticulum stress regulated cell wall integrity in Candida glabrata, which possesses uniquely evolved mechanisms for unfolded protein response mechanisms. Tetracycline-mediated suppression of KRE5, which encodes a predicted UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase localized in the endoplasmic reticulum, significantly increased cell wall chitin content and decreased cell wall β-1,6-glucan content. KRE5 repression induced endoplasmic reticulum stress-related gene expression and MAP kinase pathway activation, including Slt2p and Hog1p phosphorylation, through the cell wall integrity signaling pathway. Moreover, the calcineurin pathway negatively regulated cell wall integrity, but not the reduction of β-1,6-glucan content. These results indicate that KRE5 is required for maintaining both endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis and cell wall integrity, and that the calcineurin pathway acts as a regulator of chitin-glucan balance in the cell wall and as an alternative mediator of endoplasmic reticulum stress in C. glabrata. PMID:27548283

  7. Seed coat mucilage cells of Arabidopsis thaliana as a model for plant cell wall research.

    PubMed

    Arsovski, Andrej A; Haughn, George W; Western, Tamara L

    2010-07-01

    Plant cells are encased within a complex polysaccharide wall that strengthens the cell and has key roles in all aspects of plant cell growth, differentiation, and interaction with the environment. This dynamic structure is under continual modification during plant development, and its synthesis and modification require the activity of a myriad of enzymes. The mucilage secretory cells (MSCs) of the Arabidopsis thaliana seed coat provide a model for the discovery of novel genes involved in the synthesis, secretion and modification of cell wall components, particularly pectin. These cells synthesize copious amounts of pectinaceous mucilage during development and, upon hydration of the desiccated seed, the mucilage rapidly swells, bursts from the MSCs and surrounds the seed in a gelatinous capsule. Several genes affecting MSC differentiation, pectin synthesis, and mucilage release have been identified and additional genes involved in these and related processes including pectin secretion and the mechanical alteration of cell walls await to be discovered. PMID:20505351

  8. Cell wall sorting of lipoproteins in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Navarre, W W; Daefler, S; Schneewind, O

    1996-01-01

    Many surface proteins are thought to be anchored to the cell wall of gram-positive organisms via their C termini, while the N-terminal domains of these molecules are displayed on the bacterial surface. Cell wall anchoring of surface proteins in Staphylococcus aureus requires both an N-terminal leader peptide and a C-terminal cell wall sorting signal. By fusing the cell wall sorting of protein A to the C terminus of staphylococcal beta-lactamase, we demonstrate here that lipoproteins can also be anchored to the cell wall of S. aureus. The topology of cell wall-anchored beta-lactamase is reminiscent of that described for Braun's murein lipoprotein in that the N terminus of the polypeptide chain is membrane anchored whereas the C-terminal end is tethered to the bacterial cell wall. PMID:8550464

  9. XTH31, Encoding an in Vitro XEH/XET-Active Enzyme, Regulates Aluminum Sensitivity by Modulating in Vivo XET Action, Cell Wall Xyloglucan Content, and Aluminum Binding Capacity in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiao Fang; Shi, Yuan Zhi; Lei, Gui Jie; Fry, Stephen C.; Zhang, Bao Cai; Zhou, Yi Hua; Braam, Janet; Jiang, Tao; Xu, Xiao Yan; Mao, Chuan Zao; Pan, Yuan Jiang; Yang, Jian Li; Wu, Ping; Zheng, Shao Jian

    2012-01-01

    Xyloglucan endohydrolase (XEH) and xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET) activities, encoded by xyloglucan endotransglucosylase-hydrolase (XTH) genes, are involved in cell wall extension by cutting or cutting and rejoining xyloglucan chains, respectively. However, the physiological significance of this biochemical activity remains incompletely understood. Here, we find that an XTH31 T-DNA insertion mutant, xth31, is more Al resistant than the wild type. XTH31 is bound to the plasma membrane and the encoding gene is expressed in the root elongation zone and in nascent leaves, suggesting a role in cell expansion. XTH31 transcript accumulation is strongly downregulated by Al treatment. XTH31 expression in yeast yields a protein with an in vitro XEH:XET activity ratio of >5000:1. xth31 accumulates significantly less Al in the root apex and cell wall, shows remarkably lower in vivo XET action and extractable XET activity, has a lower xyloglucan content, and exhibits slower elongation. An exogenous supply of xyloglucan significantly ameliorates Al toxicity by reducing Al accumulation in the roots, owing to the formation of an Al-xyloglucan complex in the medium, as verified by an obvious change in chemical shift of 27Al-NMR. Taken together, the data indicate that XTH31 affects Al sensitivity by modulating cell wall xyloglucan content and Al binding capacity. PMID:23204407

  10. XTH31, encoding an in vitro XEH/XET-active enzyme, regulates aluminum sensitivity by modulating in vivo XET action, cell wall xyloglucan content, and aluminum binding capacity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao Fang; Shi, Yuan Zhi; Lei, Gui Jie; Fry, Stephen C; Zhang, Bao Cai; Zhou, Yi Hua; Braam, Janet; Jiang, Tao; Xu, Xiao Yan; Mao, Chuan Zao; Pan, Yuan Jiang; Yang, Jian Li; Wu, Ping; Zheng, Shao Jian

    2012-11-01

    Xyloglucan endohydrolase (XEH) and xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET) activities, encoded by xyloglucan endotransglucosylase-hydrolase (XTH) genes, are involved in cell wall extension by cutting or cutting and rejoining xyloglucan chains, respectively. However, the physiological significance of this biochemical activity remains incompletely understood. Here, we find that an XTH31 T-DNA insertion mutant, xth31, is more Al resistant than the wild type. XTH31 is bound to the plasma membrane and the encoding gene is expressed in the root elongation zone and in nascent leaves, suggesting a role in cell expansion. XTH31 transcript accumulation is strongly downregulated by Al treatment. XTH31 expression in yeast yields a protein with an in vitro XEH:XET activity ratio of >5000:1. xth31 accumulates significantly less Al in the root apex and cell wall, shows remarkably lower in vivo XET action and extractable XET activity, has a lower xyloglucan content, and exhibits slower elongation. An exogenous supply of xyloglucan significantly ameliorates Al toxicity by reducing Al accumulation in the roots, owing to the formation of an Al-xyloglucan complex in the medium, as verified by an obvious change in chemical shift of (27)Al-NMR. Taken together, the data indicate that XTH31 affects Al sensitivity by modulating cell wall xyloglucan content and Al binding capacity. PMID:23204407

  11. Hormonal regulation of secondary cell wall formation.

    PubMed

    Didi, Vojtěch; Jackson, Phil; Hejátko, Jan

    2015-08-01

    Secondary cell walls (SCWs) have critical functional importance but also constitute a high proportion of the plant biomass and have high application potential. This is true mainly for the lignocellulosic constituents of the SCWs in xylem vessels and fibres, which form a structured layer between the plasma membrane and the primary cell wall (PCW). Specific patterning of the SCW thickenings contributes to the mechanical properties of the different xylem cell types, providing the plant with mechanical support and facilitating the transport of solutes via vessels. In the last decade, our knowledge of the basic molecular mechanisms controlling SCW formation has increased substantially. Several members of the multi-layered regulatory cascade participating in the initiation and transcriptional regulation of SCW formation have been described, and the first cellular components determining the pattern of SCW at the subcellular resolution are being uncovered. The essential regulatory role of phytohormones in xylem development is well known and the molecular mechanisms that link hormonal signals to SCW formation are emerging. Here, we review recent knowledge about the role of individual plant hormones and hormonal crosstalk in the control over the regulatory cascades guiding SCW formation and patterning. Based on the analogy between many of the mechanisms operating during PCW and SCW formation, recently identified mechanisms underlying the hormonal control of PCW remodelling are discussed as potentially novel mechanisms mediating hormonal regulatory inputs in SCW formation. PMID:26002972

  12. Structural Variations of the Cell Wall Precursor Lipid II and Their Influence on Binding and Activity of the Lipoglycopeptide Antibiotic Oritavancin

    PubMed Central

    Münch, Daniela; Engels, Ina; Müller, Anna; Reder-Christ, Katrin; Falkenstein-Paul, Hildegard; Bierbaum, Gabriele; Grein, Fabian; Bendas, Gerd; Sahl, Hans-Georg

    2014-01-01

    Oritavancin is a semisynthetic derivative of the glycopeptide antibiotic chloroeremomycin with activity against Gram-positive pathogens, including vancomycin-resistant staphylococci and enterococci. Compared to vancomycin, oritavancin is characterized by the presence of two additional residues, a hydrophobic 4′-chlorobiphenyl methyl moiety and a 4-epi-vancosamine substituent, which is also present in chloroeremomycin. Here, we show that oritavancin and its des-N-methylleucyl variant (des-oritavancin) effectively inhibit lipid I- and lipid II-consuming peptidoglycan biosynthesis reactions in vitro. In contrast to that for vancomycin, the binding affinity of oritavancin to the cell wall precursor lipid II appears to involve, in addition to the d-Ala-d-Ala terminus, other species-specific binding sites of the lipid II molecule, i.e., the crossbridge and d-isoglutamine in position 2 of the lipid II stem peptide, both characteristic for a number of Gram-positive pathogens, including staphylococci and enterococci. Using purified lipid II and modified lipid II variants, we studied the impact of these modifications on the binding of oritavancin and compared it to those of vancomycin, chloroeremomycin, and des-oritavancin. Analysis of the binding parameters revealed that additional intramolecular interactions of oritavancin with the peptidoglycan precursor appear to compensate for the loss of a crucial hydrogen bond in vancomycin-resistant strains, resulting in enhanced binding affinity. Augmenting previous findings, we show that amidation of the lipid II stem peptide predominantly accounts for the increased binding of oritavancin to the modified intermediates ending in d-Ala-d-Lac. Corroborating our conclusions, we further provide biochemical evidence for the phenomenon of the antagonistic effects of mecA and vanA resistance determinants in Staphylococcus aureus, thus partially explaining the low frequency of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) acquiring high

  13. Orbital wall infarction in child with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Janssens, C; Claeys, L; Maes, P; Boiy, T; Wojciechowski, M

    2015-12-01

    We present the case of a 17-year-old boy, known with homozygous sickle cell disease, who was admitted because of generalised pain. He developed bilateral periorbital oedema and proptosis, without pain or visual disturbances. In addition to hyperhydration, oxygen and analgesia IV antibiotics were started, to cover a possible osteomyelitis. Patients with sickle cell disease are at risk for vaso-occlusive crises, when the abnormally shaped red blood cells aggregate and block the capillaries. Such a crisis typically presents at a location with high bone marrow activity, as the vertebrae and long bones. At an early age, the bone marrow is still active at other sites, for example the orbital wall, and thus infarction can also occur there. Thus, in young persons with sickle cell disease, it is important to consider orbital wall infarction in the differential diagnosis, since the approach is different from osteomyelitis. If the disease is complicated by an orbital compression syndrome, corticosteroids or surgical intervention may be necessary to preserve the vision. In our patient, an MRI of the orbitae demonstrated periorbital oedema with bone anomalies in the orbital and frontal bones, confirming orbital wall infarction. Ophthalmological examination revealed no signs of pressure on the nervus opticus. The patient recovered gradually with conservative treatment. PMID:26790559

  14. The Candida albicans HYR1 gene, which is activated in response to hyphal development, belongs to a gene family encoding yeast cell wall proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, D A; Feldmann, P J; Bovey, M; Gow, N A; Brown, A J

    1996-01-01

    A hyphally regulated gene (HYR1) from the dimorphic human pathogenic fungus Candida albicans was isolated and characterized. Northern (RNA) analyses showed that the HYR1 mRNA was induced specifically in response to hyphal development when morphogenesis was stimulated by serum addition and temperature elevation, increases in both culture pH and temperature, or N-acetylglucosamine addition. The HYR1 gene sequence revealed a 937-codon open reading frame capable of encoding a protein with an N-terminal signal sequence, a C-terminal glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchoring domain, 17 potential N glycosylation sites, and a large domain rich in serine and threonine (51% of 230 residues). These features are observed in many yeast cell wall proteins, but no homologs are present in the databases. In addition, Hyr1p contained a second domain rich in glycine, serine, and asparagine (79% of 239 residues). The HYR1 locus in C. albicans CAI4 was disrupted by "Ura-blasting," but the resulting homozygous delta hyr1/delta hyr1 null mutant displayed no obvious morphological phenotype. The growth rates for yeast cells and hyphae and the kinetics of germ tube formation in the null mutant were unaffected. Aberrant expression of HYR1 in yeast cells, when an ADH1-HYR1 fusion was used, did not stimulate hyphal formation in C. albicans or pseudohyphal growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. HYR1 appears to encode a nonessential component of the hyphal cell wall. PMID:8808922

  15. Enzymes and other agents that enhance cell wall extensibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    Polysaccharides and proteins are secreted to the inner surface of the growing cell wall, where they assemble into a network that is mechanically strong, yet remains extensible until the cells cease growth. This review focuses on the agents that directly or indirectly enhance the extensibility properties of growing walls. The properties of expansins, endoglucanases, and xyloglucan transglycosylases are reviewed and their postulated roles in modulating wall extensibility are evaluated. A summary model for wall extension is presented, in which expansin is a primary agent of wall extension, whereas endoglucanases, xyloglucan endotransglycosylase, and other enzymes that alter wall structure act secondarily to modulate expansin action.

  16. Anthocyanins influence tannin-cell wall interactions.

    PubMed

    Bautista-Ortín, Ana Belén; Martínez-Hernández, Alejandro; Ruiz-García, Yolanda; Gil-Muñoz, Rocío; Gómez-Plaza, Encarna

    2016-09-01

    The rate of tannin extraction was studied in a vinification of red grapes and the results compared with another vinification made with white grapes fermented as for typical red wine, in the presence of skins and seeds. Even though the grapes presented a quite similar skin and seed tannin content, the differences in tannin concentration between both vinifications was very large, despite the fact that the only apparent difference between the phenolic composition of both wines was the anthocyanin content. This suggests that anthocyanins play an important role in tannin extractability, perhaps because they affect the extent of the tannin-cell wall interaction, a factor that largely controls the resulting quantity of tannins in wines. To confirm this observation, the effect of anthocyanins on the tannin extractability from grape seeds and skin and on the interaction between tannins and grape cell walls suspended in model solutions were studied. The results indicated that anthocyanins favored skin and seed tannin extraction and that there is a competition for the adsorption sites between anthocyanins and tannins that increases the tannin content when anthocyanins are present. PMID:27041322

  17. Disruption of cell walls for enhanced lipid recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Knoshaug, Eric P; Donohoe, Bryon S; Gerken, Henri; Laurens, Lieve; Van Wychen, Stefanie Rose

    2015-03-24

    Presented herein are methods of using cell wall degrading enzymes for recovery of internal lipid bodies from biomass sources such as algae. Also provided are algal cells that express at least one exogenous gene encoding a cell wall degrading enzyme and methods for recovering lipids from the cells.

  18. A summary of staphylococcal C-terminal SH3b_5 cell wall binding domains.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Staphylococcal peptidoglycan hydrolases are a potential new source of antimicrobials. A large subset of these proteins contain a C-terminal SH3b_5 cell wall binding domain that has been shown for some to be essential for accurate cell wall recognition and subsequent staphylolytic activity, propert...

  19. Shifting foundations: the mechanical cell wall and development.

    PubMed

    Braybrook, Siobhan A; Jönsson, Henrik

    2016-02-01

    The cell wall has long been acknowledged as an important physical mediator of growth in plants. Recent experimental and modelling work has brought the importance of cell wall mechanics into the forefront again. These data have challenged existing dogmas that relate cell wall structure to cell/organ growth, that uncouple elasticity from extensibility, and those which treat the cell wall as a passive and non-stressed material. Within this review we describe experiments and models which have changed the ways in which we view the mechanical cell wall, leading to new hypotheses and research avenues. It has become increasingly apparent that while we often wish to simplify our systems, we now require more complex multi-scale experiments and models in order to gain further insight into growth mechanics. We are currently experiencing an exciting and challenging shift in the foundations of our understanding of cell wall mechanics in growth and development. PMID:26799133

  20. Plant cell wall extensibility: connecting plant cell growth with cell wall structure, mechanics, and the action of wall-modifying enzymes.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    The advent of user-friendly instruments for measuring force/deflection curves of plant surfaces at high spatial resolution has resulted in a recent outpouring of reports of the 'Young's modulus' of plant cell walls. The stimulus for these mechanical measurements comes from biomechanical models of morphogenesis of meristems and other tissues, as well as single cells, in which cell wall stress feeds back to regulate microtubule organization, auxin transport, cellulose deposition, and future growth directionality. In this article I review the differences between elastic modulus and wall extensibility in the context of cell growth. Some of the inherent complexities, assumptions, and potential pitfalls in the interpretation of indentation force/deflection curves are discussed. Reported values of elastic moduli from surface indentation measurements appear to be 10- to >1000-fold smaller than realistic tensile elastic moduli in the plane of plant cell walls. Potential reasons for this disparity are discussed, but further work is needed to make sense of the huge range in reported values. The significance of wall stress relaxation for growth is reviewed and connected to recent advances and remaining enigmas in our concepts of how cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectins are assembled to make an extensible cell wall. A comparison of the loosening action of α-expansin and Cel12A endoglucanase is used to illustrate two different ways in which cell walls may be made more extensible and the divergent effects on wall mechanics. PMID:26608646

  1. Differential patterns of activity displayed by two exo-beta-1,3-glucanases associated with the Aspergillus fumigatus cell wall.

    PubMed Central

    Fontaine, T; Hartland, R P; Diaquin, M; Simenel, C; Latgé, J P

    1997-01-01

    Two exo-beta-1,3-glucanases (herein designated exoG-I and exoG-II) were isolated from the cell wall autolysate of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus and purified by ion-exchange, hydrophobic-interaction, and gel filtration chromatographies. Molecular masses estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and gel filtration chromatography were 82 kDa for the monomeric exoG-I and 230 kDa for the dimeric exoG-II. exoG-I and exoG-II were glycosylated, and N glycans accounted, respectively, for 2 and 44 kDa. Their pH optimum is 5.0. Their optimum temperatures are 55 degrees C for exoG-I and 65 degrees C for exoG-II. By a sensitive colorimetric method and high-performance anion-exchange chromatography for product analysis, two patterns of exo-beta-1,3-glucanase activities were found. The 230-kDa exoG-II enzyme acts on p-nitrophenyl-beta-D-glucoside, beta-1,6-glucan, and beta-1,3-glucan. This activity, which retains the anomeric configuration of glucose released, presented a multichain pattern of attack of the glucan chains and a decrease in the maximum initial velocity (Vm) with the increasing size of the substrate. In contrast, the 82-kDa exoG-I, which inverts the anomeric configuration of the glucose released, hydrolyzed exclusively the beta-1,3-glucan chain with a minimal substrate size of 4 glucose residues. This enzyme presented a repetitive-attack pattern, characterized by an increase in Vm with an increase in substrate size and by a degradation of the glucan chain until it reached laminaritetraose, the limit substrate size. The 82-kDa exoG-I and 230-kDa exoG-II enzymes correspond to a beta-1,3-glucan-glucohydrolase (EC 3.2.1.58) and to a beta-D-glucoside-glucohydrolase (EC 3.2.1.21), respectively. The occurrence and functions of these two classes of exo-beta-1,3-glucanases in other fungal species are discussed. PMID:9150209

  2. Cell wall invertase in tobacco crown gall cells : enzyme properties and regulation by auxin.

    PubMed

    Weil, M; Rausch, T

    1990-12-01

    The cell wall invertase from an Agrobacterium tumefaciens-transformed Nicotiana tabacum cell line (SR1-C58) was purified. The heterogeneously glycosylated enzyme has the following properties: M(r) 63,000, pH optimum at 4.7, K(m sucrose) 0.6 millimolar (at pH 4.7), pl 9.5. Enzyme activity is inhibited by micromolar concentrations of HgCl(2) but is insensitive to H(2)O(2), N-ethylmaleimide and dithiothreitol. Upon transfer of transformed cells from the stationary phase to fresh medium, a cycloheximide- and tunicamycin-sensitive de novo formation of cell wall invertase is demonstrated in the absence or presence of sucrose. While in an auxin mutant (lacking gene 1;SR1-3845) 1 micromolar 1-naphthaleneacetic acid led to a further increased activity, the wild-type transformed cell line (SR1-C58) responded with a decreased activity compared to the control. An analysis of cell wall invertase in and around tumors initiated with Agrobacterium tumefaciens (strain C58) on Nicotiana tabacum stem and Kalanchoë daigremontiana leaves revealed gradients of activity. The results indicate that the auxin-stimulated cell wall invertase is essential for the establishment of the tumor sink. PMID:16667892

  3. (1,3)-beta-D-glucan synthase activity in mycelial and cell wall-less phenotypes of the fz, sg, os-1 ("slime") mutant strain of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Polizeli, M del L; Noventa-Jordão, M A; da Silva, M M; Jorge, J A; Terenzi, H F

    1995-03-01

    The cell wall-less fz, sg, os-1 ("slime") triple mutant of Neurospora crassa lacks (1,3)-beta-D-glucan synthase activity. fz, sg, os-1 segregants from slime x wild-type crosses initially germinate as a plasmodium (slime-like), but develop hyphae in a few hours and acquire a stable mycelial phenotype (mycelial intermediate). The cell wall-less phenotype (stable slime) can be reisolated from mycelial intermediates by filtration-enrichment selection in medium of high osmolarity. Pairs of mycelial intermediate and stable slime obtained from a single slime-like segregant were comparatively studied. Mycelial intermediate strains synthesize a cell wall with normal amounts of (1,3)-beta-glucan, chitin, and other polysaccharides and possess (1,3)-beta-glucan synthase activity with apparently normal properties (i.e., association with membranes, stability, Km app, Vmax, stimulation by GTP). The enzyme was dissociated by treatment with Tergitol NP-40 and NaCl into a membrane-bound catalytic center and a soluble factor which activates the enzyme in the presence of GTP. Heterologous reconstitution assays demonstrated that stable slime spheroplasts had normal activity of the soluble activating factor, but were severely deficient in membrane-bound activity. The genetic composition of the viable progeny of stable slime or mycelial intermediate x wild-type crosses failed to show differences between the two extreme phenotypes of slime. However, the analysis of heterokaryons demonstrated that the stable slime homokaryotic progeny of stable slime/wild-type heterokaryons were not viable. In contrast, the behavior of mycelial intermediate/wild-type heterokaryons was normal. Apparently, stable slime strains differed from the original mycelial intermediate in a mutation(s) which arose spontaneously during the filtration-enrichment selection applied to mycelial intermediates in order to obtain the cell wall-less phenotype. This new trait impaired conidial germination and might be the actual

  4. Local Nanomechanical Motion of the Cell Wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelling, Andrew E.; Sehati, Sadaf; Gralla, Edith B.; Valentine, Joan S.; Gimzewski, James K.

    2004-08-01

    We demonstrate that the cell wall of living Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast) exhibits local temperature-dependent nanomechanical motion at characteristic frequencies. The periodic motions in the range of 0.8 to 1.6 kHz with amplitudes of ~3 nm were measured using the cantilever of an atomic force microscope (AFM). Exposure of the cells to a metabolic inhibitor causes the periodic motion to cease. From the strong frequency dependence on temperature, we derive an activation energy of 58 kJ/mol, which is consistent with the cell's metabolism involving molecular motors such as kinesin, dynein, and myosin. The magnitude of the forces observed (~10 nN) suggests concerted nanomechanical activity is operative in the cell.

  5. Stress analysis for wall structure in mobile hot cell design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrin, Muhammad Hannan; Rahman, Anwar Abdul; Hamzah, Mohd Arif; Mamat, Mohd Rizal; Azman, Azraf; Hasan, Hasni

    2016-01-01

    Malaysian Nuclear Agency is developing a Mobile Hot Cell (MHC) in order to handle and manage Spent High Activity Radioactive Sources (SHARS) such as teletherapy heads and irradiators. At present, there are only two units of MHC in the world, in South Africa and China. Malaysian Mobile Hot cell is developed by Malaysian Nuclear Agency with the assistance of IAEA expert, based on the design of South Africa and China, but with improved features. Stress analysis has been performed on the design in order to fulfil the safety requirement in operation of MHC. This paper discusses the loading analysis effect from the sand to the MHC wall structure.

  6. (The structure of pectins from cotton suspension culture cell walls)

    SciTech Connect

    Mort, A.

    1990-01-01

    We have made progress on several projects to do with determining the structure of pectins. These include: (1) Devising a new sensitive method to determine the degree of methyl esterification (DOM) of pectins; (2) solubilization of all of RGI from cotton cell walls; (3) solubilization of RGII from cotton cell walls; (4) characterization of xyloglucan from cotton cell walls; and (5) investigation giving an indication of a cross-link between extension and pectin.

  7. Lignin Formation in Wheat Coleoptile Cell Walls

    PubMed Central

    Whitmore, F. W.

    1971-01-01

    Four growth-influencing compounds—hydroxyproline, 2,2′-dipyridyl, 2-chloroethylphosphonic acid, and indoleacetic acid—were used to examine the relationship between lignin formation and growth of wheat coleoptile sections. Hydroxyproline and 2-chloroethylphosphonic acid, at low concentrations, inhibited growth and increased lignin content. Dipyridyl, which promoted coleoptile elongation, decreased lignin content. Indoleacetic acid caused a 300% increase in growth at 0.1 mm but resulted in lignin content no different from controls with no auxin. Chemical and anatomical evidence is given which indicates that lignin is present in the epidermal cell walls of the wheat coleoptile. It is thus possible that bonding between lignin and hemicellulose may have some influence on coleoptile growth. Images PMID:16657843

  8. An arabidopsis gene regulatory network for secondary cell wall synthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The plant cell wall is an important factor for determining cell shape, function and response to the environment. Secondary cell walls, such as those found in xylem, are composed of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin and account for the bulk of plant biomass. The coordination between transcriptiona...

  9. Experimental approaches to study plant cell walls during plant-microbe interactions

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Ye; Petti, Carloalberto; Williams, Mark A.; DeBolt, Seth

    2014-01-01

    Plant cell walls provide physical strength, regulate the passage of bio-molecules, and act as the first barrier of defense against biotic and abiotic stress. In addition to providing structural integrity, plant cell walls serve an important function in connecting cells to their extracellular environment by sensing and transducing signals to activate cellular responses, such as those that occur during pathogen infection. This mini review will summarize current experimental approaches used to study cell wall functions during plant-pathogen interactions. Focus will be paid to cell imaging, spectroscopic analyses, and metabolic profiling techniques. PMID:25352855

  10. The plant cell wall integrity maintenance mechanism--a case study of a cell wall plasma membrane signaling network.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Thorsten

    2015-04-01

    Some of the most important functions of plant cell walls are protection against biotic/abiotic stress and structural support during growth and development. A prerequisite for plant cell walls to perform these functions is the ability to perceive different types of stimuli in both qualitative and quantitative manners and initiate appropriate responses. The responses in turn involve adaptive changes in cellular and cell wall metabolism leading to modifications in the structures originally required for perception. While our knowledge about the underlying plant mechanisms is limited, results from Saccharomyces cerevisiae suggest the cell wall integrity maintenance mechanism represents an excellent example to illustrate how the molecular mechanisms responsible for stimulus perception, signal transduction and integration can function. Here I will review the available knowledge about the yeast cell wall integrity maintenance system for illustration purposes, summarize the limited knowledge available about the corresponding plant mechanism and discuss the relevance of the plant cell wall integrity maintenance mechanism in biotic stress responses. PMID:25446233

  11. Cell wall structure and biogenesis in Aspergillus species.

    PubMed

    Yoshimi, Akira; Miyazawa, Ken; Abe, Keietsu

    2016-09-01

    Aspergillus species are among the most important filamentous fungi from the viewpoints of industry, pathogenesis, and mycotoxin production. Fungal cells are exposed to a variety of environmental stimuli, including changes in osmolality, temperature, and pH, which create stresses that primarily act on fungal cell walls. In addition, fungal cell walls are the first interactions with host cells in either human or plants. Thus, understanding cell wall structure and the mechanism of their biogenesis is important for the industrial, medical, and agricultural fields. Here, we provide a systematic review of fungal cell wall structure and recent findings regarding the cell wall integrity signaling pathways in aspergilli. This accumulated knowledge will be useful for understanding and improving the use of industrial aspergilli fermentation processes as well as treatments for some fungal infections. PMID:27140698

  12. Visualization of cellulose synthases in Arabidopsis secondary cell walls.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Y; Meents, M J; McDonnell, L M; Barkwill, S; Sampathkumar, A; Cartwright, H N; Demura, T; Ehrhardt, D W; Samuels, A L; Mansfield, S D

    2015-10-01

    Cellulose biosynthesis in plant secondary cell walls forms the basis of vascular development in land plants, with xylem tissues constituting the vast majority of terrestrial biomass. We used plant lines that contained an inducible master transcription factor controlling xylem cell fate to quantitatively image fluorescently tagged cellulose synthase enzymes during cellulose deposition in living protoxylem cells. The formation of secondary cell wall thickenings was associated with a redistribution and enrichment of CESA7-containing cellulose synthase complexes (CSCs) into narrow membrane domains. The velocities of secondary cell wall-specific CSCs were faster than those of primary cell wall CSCs during abundant cellulose production. Dynamic intracellular of endomembranes, in combination with increased velocity and high density of CSCs, enables cellulose to be synthesized rapidly in secondary cell walls. PMID:26450210

  13. Modulation of Alternaria infectoria Cell Wall Chitin and Glucan Synthesis by Cell Wall Synthase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Chantal; Anjos, Jorge; Walker, Louise A.; Silva, Branca M. A.; Cortes, Luísa; Mota, Marta; Munro, Carol A.; Gow, Neil A. R.

    2014-01-01

    The present work reports the effects of caspofungin, a β-1,3-glucan synthase inhibitor, and nikkomycin Z, an inhibitor of chitin synthases, on two strains of Alternaria infectoria, a melanized fungus involved in opportunistic human infections and respiratory allergies. One of the strains tested, IMF006, bore phenotypic traits that conferred advantages in resisting antifungal treatment. First, the resting cell wall chitin content was higher and in response to caspofungin, the chitin level remained constant. In the other strain, IMF001, the chitin content increased upon caspofungin treatment to values similar to basal IMF006 levels. Moreover, upon caspofungin treatment, the FKS1 gene was upregulated in IMF006 and downregulated in IMF001. In addition, the resting β-glucan content was also different in both strains, with higher levels in IMF001 than in IMF006. However, this did not provide any advantage with respect to echinocandin resistance. We identified eight different chitin synthase genes and studied relative gene expression when the fungus was exposed to the antifungals under study. In both strains, exposure to caspofungin and nikkomycin Z led to modulation of the expression of class V and VII chitin synthase genes, suggesting its importance in the robustness of A. infectoria. The pattern of A. infectoria phagocytosis and activation of murine macrophages by spores was not affected by caspofungin. Monotherapy with nikkomycin Z and caspofungin provided only fungistatic inhibition, while a combination of both led to fungal cell lysis, revealing a strong synergistic action between the chitin synthase inhibitor and the β-glucan synthase inhibitor against this fungus. PMID:24614372

  14. In vivo activity of released cell wall lipids of Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin is due principally to trehalose mycolates.

    PubMed

    Geisel, Rachel E; Sakamoto, Kaori; Russell, David G; Rhoades, Elizabeth R

    2005-04-15

    The hallmark of Mycobacterium-induced pathology is granulomatous inflammation at the site of infection. Mycobacterial lipids are potent immunomodulators that contribute to the granulomatous response and are released in appreciable quantities by intracellular bacilli. Previously we investigated the granulomagenic nature of the peripheral cell wall lipids of Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) by coating the lipids onto 90-microm diameter microspheres that were mixed into Matrigel matrix with syngeneic bone marrow-derived macrophages and injected i.p. into mice. These studies demonstrated that BCG lipids elicit proinflammatory cytokines and recruit leukocytes. In the current study we determined the lipids responsible for this proinflammatory effect. BCG-derived cell wall lipids were fractionated and purified by liquid chromatography and preparative TLC. The isolated fractions including phosphatidylinositol dimannosides, cardiolipin, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, trehalose monomycolate, trehalose dimycolate, and mycoside B. Trehalose dimycolate, when delivered to bone marrow-derived murine macrophages, induced the greatest secretion of IL-1beta, IL-6, and TNF-alpha in vitro. Trehalose dimycolate similarly induced the greatest secretion of these proinflammatory cytokines in ex vivo matrices over the course of 12 days. Trehalose monomycolate and dimycolate also induced profound neutrophil recruitment in vivo. Experiments with TLR2 or TLR4 gene-deficient mice revealed no defects in responses to trehalose mycolates, although MyD88-deficient mice manifested significantly reduced cell recruitment and cytokine production. These results demonstrate that the trehalose mycolates, particularly trehalose dimycolate, are the most bioactive lipids in the BCG extract, inducing a proinflammatory cascade that influences granuloma formation. PMID:15814731

  15. Bacterial Cell Wall Polymer-Induced Granulomatous Inflammation

    PubMed

    Sartor; Herfarth; Van Tol EAF

    1996-04-01

    Local or systemic injection of peptidoglycan-polysaccharide polymers, which are the primary structural components of cell walls of nearly all bacteria, leads to acute inflammation, which can develop into chronic, spontaneously relapsing, granulomatous inflammation in a number of organs. Evolution into chronic granulomatous inflammation is dependent upon persistence of poorly biodegradable cell wall polymers within tissues, genetically determined host susceptibility, and generation of a T-lymphocyte-mediated immune response. Intraperitoneal injection of peptidoglycan-polysaccharide fragments from group A streptococci or selected intestinal bacteria into susceptible Lewis rats leads to chronic, spontaneously reactivating erosive arthritis and hepatic granulomas. Subserosal (intramural) injection of poorly biodegradable cell wall fragments into the distal intestine of Lewis rats induces chronic, spontaneously relapsing granulomatous enterocolitis with associated arthritis, hepatic granulomas, anemia, and leukocytosis. Chronic inflammation does not occur in T-lymphocyte-deficient rats and is prevented by cyclosporin-A therapy and degradation of peptidoglycan by the muralytic enzyme, mutanolysin. Moreover, resistant Buffalo and Fischer F344 rats, the latter sharing identical MHC antigens with Lewis rats, develop only acute inflammation with no chronic granulomatous response. Peptidoglycan-polysaccharide polymers activate almost every limb of the inflammatory response. Blockade of specific pathways suggests that interleukin-1, transforming growth factor-beta, plasma kallikrein, and T lymphocytes are dominant mediators of peptidoglycan-polysaccharide-induced arthritis, hepatic granulomas, and enterocolitis. Because of the similarity of immune mechanisms of these rat models to human disease, bacterial cell wall-induced inflammation provides unique opportunities to study pathogenic mechanisms of granuloma formation in response to ubiquitous microbial agents and to test

  16. Increased Cell-Wall Extensibility in Elevated CO2 and O3 Indicates Modification of Leaf Cell-Wall Structure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean leaf size is increased by growth in elevated [CO2] and decreased in elevated [O3]. The mechanism likely involves changes in cell biophysical properties. Cell growth rate is a function of cell-wall extensibility, a measure of how easily the wall expands in response to turgor. Modification of...

  17. Preparation of Cell Wall Antigens of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, J. J.; Tipper, Donald J.; Berman, David T.

    1970-01-01

    Cell walls were prepared from Staphylococcus aureus strains Copenhagen and 263 by high-speed mixing in the presence of glass beads followed by differential centrifugation. Insoluble peptidoglycan complexes were derived from cell walls by extraction of teichoic acid with 10% trichloroacetic acid. Intact teichoic acid was prepared from each strain by digestion of cell walls with lysostaphin and isolated by column chromatography. Soluble glycopeptide (peptidoglycan in which only the glycan has been fragmented) and the stable complex of teichoic acid with glycopeptide were prepared by digestion of cell walls with Chalaropsis B endo-N-acetylmuramidase and were separated by column chromatography. Amino acid and amino sugar contents of walls and subunits of walls were comparable to those reported by others. Images PMID:16557799

  18. Enzymology and molecular biology of cell wall biosynthesis. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, P.M.

    1993-03-20

    In order to be able to explore the control of cell wall polysaccharide synthesis at the molecular level, which inter alia might eventually lead to means for useful modification of plant biomass polysaccharide production, the immediate goals of this project are to identify polypeptides responsible for wall polysaccharide synthase activities and to obtain clones of the genes that encode them. We are concentrating on plasma membraneassociated (1,3)-{beta}-glucan synthase (glucan synthase-II or GS-II) and Golgi-associated (1,4)-{beta}-glucan synthase (glucan synthase-I or GS-I), of growing pea stem tissue. Our progress has been much more rapid with respect to GS-II than regarding GS-I.

  19. Assembly and enlargement of the primary cell wall in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    Growing plant cells are shaped by an extensible wall that is a complex amalgam of cellulose microfibrils bonded noncovalently to a matrix of hemicelluloses, pectins, and structural proteins. Cellulose is synthesized by complexes in the plasma membrane and is extruded as a self-assembling microfibril, whereas the matrix polymers are secreted by the Golgi apparatus and become integrated into the wall network by poorly understood mechanisms. The growing wall is under high tensile stress from cell turgor and is able to enlarge by a combination of stress relaxation and polymer creep. A pH-dependent mechanism of wall loosening, known as acid growth, is characteristic of growing walls and is mediated by a group of unusual wall proteins called expansins. Expansins appear to disrupt the noncovalent bonding of matrix hemicelluloses to the microfibril, thereby allowing the wall to yield to the mechanical forces generated by cell turgor. Other wall enzymes, such as (1-->4) beta-glucanases and pectinases, may make the wall more responsive to expansin-mediated wall creep whereas pectin methylesterases and peroxidases may alter the wall so as to make it resistant to expansin-mediated creep.

  20. Physcomitrella patens activates reinforcement of the cell wall, programmed cell death and accumulation of evolutionary conserved defense signals...upon Botrytis cinerea infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The moss Physcomitrella patens is an evolutionarily basal model system suitable to analyze plant defense responses activated after pathogen assault. Upon infection with the necrotroph Botrytis cinerea (B. cinerea), several defense mechanisms are induced in P. patens, including the fortification of t...

  1. Structural Studies of Complex Carbohydrates of Plant Cell Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Darvill, Alan; Hahn, Michael G.; O'Neill, Malcolm A.; York, William S.

    2015-02-17

    Most of the solar energy captured by land plants is converted into the polysaccharides (cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectin) that are the predominant components of the cell wall. These walls, which account for the bulk of plant biomass, have numerous roles in the growth and development of plants. Moreover, these walls have a major impact on human life as they are a renewable source of biomass, a source of diverse commercially useful polymers, a major component of wood, and a source of nutrition for humans and livestock. Thus, understanding the molecular mechanisms that lead to wall assembly and how cell walls and their component polysaccharides contribute to plant growth and development is essential to improve and extend the productivity and value of plant materials. The proposed research will develop and apply advanced analytical and immunological techniques to study specific changes in the structures and interactions of the hemicellulosic and pectic polysaccharides that occur during differentiation and in response to genetic modification and chemical treatments that affect wall biosynthesis. These new techniques will make it possible to accurately characterize minute amounts of cell wall polysaccharides so that subtle changes in structure that occur in individual cell types can be identified and correlated to the physiological or developmental state of the plant. Successful implementation of this research will reveal fundamental relationships between polysaccharide structure, cell wall architecture, and cell wall functions.

  2. Methods for degrading or converting plant cell wall polysaccharides

    DOEpatents

    Berka, Randy; Cherry, Joel

    2008-08-19

    The present invention relates to methods for converting plant cell wall polysaccharides into one or more products, comprising: treating the plant cell wall polysaccharides with an effective amount of a spent whole fermentation broth of a recombinant microorganism, wherein the recombinant microorganism expresses one or more heterologous genes encoding enzymes which degrade or convert the plant cell wall polysaccharides into the one or more products. The present invention also relates to methods for producing an organic substance, comprising: (a) saccharifying plant cell wall polysaccharides with an effective amount of a spent whole fermentation broth of a recombinant microorganism, wherein the recombinant microorganism expresses one or more heterologous genes encoding enzymes which degrade or convert the plant cell wall polysaccharides into saccharified material; (b) fermenting the saccharified material of step (a) with one or more fermenting microoganisms; and (c) recovering the organic substance from the fermentation.

  3. Tissue-specific cell wall hydration in sugarcane stalks.

    PubMed

    Maziero, Priscila; Jong, Jennifer; Mendes, Fernanda M; Gonçalves, Adilson R; Eder, Michaela; Driemeier, Carlos

    2013-06-19

    Plant cell walls contain water, especially under biological and wet processing conditions. The present work characterizes this water in tissues of sugarcane stalks. Environmental scanning electron microscopy shows tissue deformation upon drying. Dynamic vapor sorption determines the equilibrium and kinetics of moisture uptake. Thermoporometry by differential scanning calorimetry quantifies water in nanoscale pores. Results show that cell walls from top internodes of stalks are more deformable, slightly more sorptive to moisture, and substantially more porous. These differences of top internode are attributed to less lignified walls, which is confirmed by lower infrared spectral signal from aromatics. Furthermore, cell wall nanoscale porosity, an architectural and not directly compositional characteristic, is shown to be tissue-specific. Nanoscale porosities are ranked as follows: pith parenchyma > pith vascular bundles > rind. This ranking coincides with wall reactivity and digestibility in grasses, suggesting that nanoscale porosity is a major determinant of wall recalcitrance. PMID:23738592

  4. Identification of a Streptococcus salivarius Cell Wall Component Mediating Coaggregation with Veillonella alcalescens VI

    PubMed Central

    Weerkamp, Anton H.; McBride, Barry C.

    1981-01-01

    Cell walls of Streptococcus salivarius HB aggregated Veillonella alcalescens V1, but cell walls of the mutant S. salivarius HB-V5 did not. We found no correlation between the presence of fimbriae on streptococcal walls and the ability to aggregate Veillonella strains. Treatment of the walls with lysozyme solubilized a fraction which possessed Veillonella-aggregating activity. Solubilized cell wall preparations of strain HB contained three major (glyco)proteins as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and at least four antigens as determined by immunoelectrophoresis with antiserum prepared against strain HB walls. A specific antiserum, which was obtained by adsorption of anti-HB serum on strain HB-V5 cells, contained monospecific antibody that reacted with the solubilized strain HB wall preparation. Similar fractions prepared from strain HB-V5 cell walls did not possess aggregating activity and lacked one protein band (protein I) after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and one antigen (antigen b) after immunoelectrophoresis. The same antigen was absent when lysozyme-solubilized wall preparations of strain HB were reacted with anti-HB-V5 serum. Crossed-immunoisoelectric focusing indicated that this specific (glyco)protein and this antigen were identical and had an isoelectric point of 4.60. Protein I and antigen b were specifically adsorbed when solubilized strain HB cell walls were incubated with V. alcalescens V1 but were not adsorbed by nonaggregating Veillonella parvula ATCC 10790 cells. Culture supernatants of strain HB contained V. alcalescens V1-aggregating activity. Antigen b was present in the culture supernatant, but was not found in cultures of strain HB-V5. A total of 18 S. salivarius isolates possessing the streptococcal group K antigen released aggregating activity and antigen b into the culture medium, but 11 strains which lacked the K-antigen did not. Images PMID:7251145

  5. The role of wall calcium in the extension of cell walls of soybean hypocotyls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Virk, S. S.; Cleland, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    Calcium crosslinks are load-bearing bonds in soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) hypocotyl cell walls, but they are not the same load-bearing bonds that are broken during acid-mediated cell elongation. This conclusion is reached by studying the relationship between wall calcium, pH and the facilitated creep of frozen-thawed soybean hypocotyl sections. Supporting data include the following observations: 1) 2-[(2-bis-[carboxymethyl]amino-5-methylphenoxy)methyl]-6-methoxy-8-bis[car boxymethyl]aminoquinoline (Quin 2) and ethylene glycol-bis(2-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) caused only limited facilitated creep as compared with acid, despite removal of comparable or larger amounts of wall calcium; 2) the pH-response curves for calcium removal and acid-facilitated creep were different; 3) reversible acid-extension occurred even after removal of almost all wall calcium with Quin 2; and 4) growth of abraded sections did not involve a proportional loss of wall calcium. Removal of wall calcium, however, increased the capacity of the walls to undergo acid-facilitated creep. These data indicate that breakage of calcium crosslinks is not a major mechanism of cell-wall loosening in soybean hypocotyl tissues.

  6. Collenchyma: a versatile mechanical tissue with dynamic cell walls

    PubMed Central

    Leroux, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Background Collenchyma has remained in the shadow of commercially exploited mechanical tissues such as wood and fibres, and therefore has received little attention since it was first described. However, collenchyma is highly dynamic, especially compared with sclerenchyma. It is the main supporting tissue of growing organs with walls thickening during and after elongation. In older organs, collenchyma may become more rigid due to changes in cell wall composition or may undergo sclerification through lignification of newly deposited cell wall material. While much is known about the systematic and organographic distribution of collenchyma, there is rather less information regarding the molecular architecture and properties of its cell walls. Scope and conclusions This review summarizes several aspects that have not previously been extensively discussed including the origin of the term ‘collenchyma’ and the history of its typology. As the cell walls of collenchyma largely determine the dynamic characteristics of this tissue, I summarize the current state of knowledge regarding their structure and molecular composition. Unfortunately, to date, detailed studies specifically focusing on collenchyma cell walls have not been undertaken. However, generating a more detailed understanding of the structural and compositional modifications associated with the transition from plastic to elastic collenchyma cell wall properties is likely to provide significant insights into how specific configurations of cell wall polymers result in specific functional properties. This approach, focusing on architecture and functional properties, is likely to provide improved clarity on the controversial definition of collenchyma. PMID:22933416

  7. The Interplay between Cell Wall Mechanical Properties and the Cell Cycle in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Richard G.; Turner, Robert D.; Mullin, Nic; Clarke, Nigel; Foster, Simon J.; Hobbs, Jamie K.

    2014-01-01

    The nanoscale mechanical properties of live Staphylococcus aureus cells during different phases of growth were studied by atomic force microscopy. Indentation to different depths provided access to both local cell wall mechanical properties and whole-cell properties, including a component related to cell turgor pressure. Local cell wall properties were found to change in a characteristic manner throughout the division cycle. Splitting of the cell into two daughter cells followed a local softening of the cell wall along the division circumference, with the cell wall on either side of the division circumference becoming stiffer. Once exposed, the newly formed septum was found to be stiffer than the surrounding, older cell wall. Deeper indentations, which were affected by cell turgor pressure, did not show a change in stiffness throughout the division cycle, implying that enzymatic cell wall remodeling and local variations in wall properties are responsible for the evolution of cell shape through division. PMID:25468333

  8. Characterisation of Eubacterium cell wall: peptidoglycan structure determines arthritogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, X; Rimpilainen, M; Toivanen, P

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To elucidate factors involved in the arthritogenicity of bacterial cell walls.
METHODS—For characterisation of an arthritogenic Eubacterium aerofaciens cell wall, peptidoglycan-polysaccharide (PG-PS) polymers were isolated by removing cell wall associated proteins (CWPs), PG and PS moieties were separated, and an attempt was made to de-O-acetylate PG-PS. The cell wall of E limosum was used as a non-arthritogenic control. The chemical composition of these cell wall preparations was analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Also, their ability to resist lysozyme degradation and to sustain experimental chronic arthritis was tested.
RESULTS—The observations made with the cell wall of E aerofaciens, an anaerobic habitant of the human intestine, were compared with those reported from a pathogenic Streptococcus, showing that in both strains a complex consisting of PG-PS is required for the induction of chronic arthritis. The PS moiety most probably protects PG from enzyme degradation, allowing prolonged tissue persistence and leading to the chronic synovial inflammation. CWPs attached to PG-PS are not necessary for this function. O-Acetylation of PG, which is required for arthritogenicity of the streptococcal cell wall, seems not to be present in the arthritogenic E aerofaciens PG or only occurs to a small degree; attempts to de-O-acylate the E aerofaciens cell wall did not affect its arthritogenicity or lysozyme resistance.
CONCLUSION—The results obtained indicate that the source of bacterial cell wall plays no part in the chemical or structural requirements for PG to induce chronic cell wall arthritis in the rats; the chemical structure of the PG moiety is decisive.

 PMID:11171690

  9. Glucuronoarabinoxylan structure in the walls of Aechmea leaf chlorenchyma cells is related to wall strength.

    PubMed

    Ceusters, Johan; Londers, Elsje; Brijs, Kristof; Delcour, Jan A; De Proft, Maurice P

    2008-09-01

    In CAM-plants rising levels of malic acid in the early morning cause elevated turgor pressures in leaf chlorenchyma cells. Under specific conditions this process is lethal for sensitive plants resulting in chlorenchyma cell burst while other species can cope with these high pressures and do not show cell burst under comparable conditions. The non-cellulosic polysaccharide composition of chlorenchyma cell walls was investigated and compared in three cultivars of Aechmea with high sensitivity for chlorenchyma cell burst and three cultivars with low sensitivity. Chlorenchyma layers were cut from the leaf and the non-cellulosic carbohydrate fraction of the cell wall fraction was analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography. Glucuronoarabinoxylans (GAXs) were the major non-cellulosic polysaccharides in Aechmea. The fine structure of these GAXs was strongly related to chlorenchyma wall strength. Chlorenchyma cell walls from cultivars with low sensitivity to cell burst were characterized by an A/X ratio of ca. 0.13 while those from cultivars with high sensitivity showed an A/X ratio of ca. 0.23. Xylose chains from cultivars with high cell burst sensitivity were ca. 40% more substituted with arabinose compared to cultivars with low sensitivity for cell burst. The results indicate a relationship in vivo between glucuronoarabinoxylan fine structure and chlorenchyma cell wall strength in Aechmea. The evidence obtained supports the hypothesis that GAXs with low degrees of substitution cross-link cellulose microfibrils, while GAXs with high degrees of substitution do not. A lower degree of arabinose substitution on the xylose backbone implies stronger cell walls and the possibility of withstanding higher internal turgor pressures without cell bursting. PMID:18632122

  10. Structure of plant cell walls: XIX. Isolation and characterization of wall polysaccharides from suspension-cultured Douglas fir cells

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.R.; McNeil, M.; Darvill, A.G.; Albersheim, P.

    1987-03-01

    The partial purification and characterization of cell wall polysaccharides isolated from suspension-cultured Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) cells are described. Extraction of isolated cell walls from 1.0 M LiCl solubilized pectic polysaccharides with glycosyl-linkage compositions similar to those of rhamnogalacturonans I and II, pectic polysaccharides isolated from walls of suspension-cultured sycamore cells. Treatment of LiCl-extracted Douglas fir walls with an endo-..cap alpha..-1,4-polygalacturonase released only small, additional amounts of pectic polysaccharide, which had a glycosyl-linkage composition similar to that of rhamnogalacturonan I. Xyloglucan oligosaccharides were released from the endo-..cap alpha..-1,4-polygalacturonase-treated walls by treatment with an endo-..beta..-1,4-glucanase. These oligosaccharides included hepta- and nonasaccharides similar or identical to those released from sycamore cell walls by the same enzyme, and structurally related octa- and decasaccharides similar to those isolated from various angiosperms. Finally, additional xyloglucan and small amounts of xylan were extracted from the endo-..beta..-1,4-glucanase-treated walls by 0.5 N NaOH. The xylan resembled that extracted by NaOH from dicot cell walls in that it contained 2,4- but not 3,4-linked xylosyl residues. In this study, a total of 15% of the cell wall was isolated as pectic material, 10% as xyloglucan, and less than 1% as xylan. The noncellulosic polysaccharides accounted for 25% of the cell walls, cellulose for 23%, protein for 34%, and ash for 5%, for a total of 88% of the cell wall.

  11. Architecture and Biosynthesis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cell Wall

    PubMed Central

    Orlean, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The wall gives a Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell its osmotic integrity; defines cell shape during budding growth, mating, sporulation, and pseudohypha formation; and presents adhesive glycoproteins to other yeast cells. The wall consists of β1,3- and β1,6-glucans, a small amount of chitin, and many different proteins that may bear N- and O-linked glycans and a glycolipid anchor. These components become cross-linked in various ways to form higher-order complexes. Wall composition and degree of cross-linking vary during growth and development and change in response to cell wall stress. This article reviews wall biogenesis in vegetative cells, covering the structure of wall components and how they are cross-linked; the biosynthesis of N- and O-linked glycans, glycosylphosphatidylinositol membrane anchors, β1,3- and β1,6-linked glucans, and chitin; the reactions that cross-link wall components; and the possible functions of enzymatic and nonenzymatic cell wall proteins. PMID:23135325

  12. Immunochemistry of the streptococcal group R cell wall polysaccharide antigen.

    PubMed

    Soprey, P; Slade, H D

    1972-01-01

    The group R streptococcal group antigen has been shown to be a polysaccharide located at the surface of the cell wall of the organism. The antigen was extracted from cell walls in 0.05 n HCl or 5% trichloracetic acid at 100 C, from whole cells at room temperature in 0.85% NaCl or 0.1 m acetate (pH 5.0), and by sonic oscillation. The antigen is largely destroyed when extracted from whole cells in 0.05 n HCl at 100 C. Acetate is recommended for routine extraction. The antigen extracted by sonic treatment was separated into six immunologically active fractions on diethylaminoethyl-Sephadex. The fractions were found to possess a common antigen which exhibited similar properties on immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoresis. The purified antigen did not react with any other streptococcal group antisera. Adsorption of group R serum with the antigen removed all antibodies against whole cell antigen extracts of R cells. Chemical and enzymatic analysis of three fractions showed that the antigen was composed of d-glucose, d-galactose, rhamnose, and glucosamine. No significant quantities of phosphorus, glycerol, ribitol, or muramic acid were present. Significant inhibition of the quantitative precipitin determination by d-galactose and stachyose indicated that galactose in terminal alpha linkage was the immunodominant hexose in the antigen. d-Glucose and d-glucosamine possessed a partial inhibitory activity. N-acetyl-d-glucosamine and l-rhamnose did not produce significant inhibition. The results indicate that the R antigen is an immunologically specific structure which serves as a reliable means of identification of these streptococci as a serological group. PMID:4632470

  13. Chromatin and Cell Wall Staining of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Iain M

    2016-01-01

    Fission yeasts grow by tip extension, maintaining a constant width until they reach a critical size threshold and divide. Division by medial fission-which gives these yeast their name-generates a new end that arises from the site of cytokinesis. The old end, which was produced during the previous cell cycle, initiates progression of the new cell cycle, and in G2, the new end is activated in a process termed new-end takeoff (NETO). In this protocol, the fluorescent stains calcofluor and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) are used to give a rapid and informative assessment of morphogenesis and cell-cycle progression in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe Calcofluor reveals the timing of NETO because it stains the birth scars that are generated at new ends by cytokinesis less efficiently than the rest of the cell wall. Intense calcofluor staining of the septum and measurement of cell length are also widely used to identify dividing cells and to gauge the timing of mitotic commitment. Staining nuclei with DAPI identifies mono- and binucleated cells and complements the calcofluor staining procedure to evaluate the stages of the cell cycle and identify mitotic errors. Equally simple DAPI staining procedures reveal chromatin structure in higher resolution, facilitating more accurate staging of mitotic progression and characterization of mitotic errors. PMID:27250942

  14. How cell wall complexity influences saccharification efficiency in Miscanthus sinensis.

    PubMed

    De Souza, Amanda P; Alvim Kamei, Claire L; Torres, Andres F; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Hahn, Michael G; Trindade, Luisa M; Buckeridge, Marcos S

    2015-07-01

    The production of bioenergy from grasses has been developing quickly during the last decade, with Miscanthus being among the most important choices for production of bioethanol. However, one of the key barriers to producing bioethanol is the lack of information about cell wall structure. Cell walls are thought to display compositional differences that lead to emergence of a very high level of complexity, resulting in great diversity in cell wall architectures. In this work, a set of different techniques was used to access the complexity of cell walls of different genotypes of Miscanthus sinensis in order to understand how they interfere with saccharification efficiency. Three genotypes of M. sinensis displaying different patterns of correlation between lignin content and saccharification efficiency were subjected to cell wall analysis by quantitative/qualitative analytical techniques such as monosaccharide composition, oligosaccharide profiling, and glycome profiling. When saccharification efficiency was correlated negatively with lignin, the structural features of arabinoxylan and xyloglucan were found to contribute positively to hydrolysis. In the absence of such correlation, different types of pectins, and some mannans contributed to saccharification efficiency. Different genotypes of M. sinensis were shown to display distinct interactions among their cell wall components, which seem to influence cell wall hydrolysis. PMID:25908240

  15. How cell wall complexity influences saccharification efficiency in Miscanthus sinensis

    PubMed Central

    De Souza, Amanda P.; Kamei, Claire L. Alvim; Torres, Andres F.; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Hahn, Michael G.; Trindade, Luisa M.; Buckeridge, Marcos S.

    2015-01-01

    The production of bioenergy from grasses has been developing quickly during the last decade, with Miscanthus being among the most important choices for production of bioethanol. However, one of the key barriers to producing bioethanol is the lack of information about cell wall structure. Cell walls are thought to display compositional differences that lead to emergence of a very high level of complexity, resulting in great diversity in cell wall architectures. In this work, a set of different techniques was used to access the complexity of cell walls of different genotypes of Miscanthus sinensis in order to understand how they interfere with saccharification efficiency. Three genotypes of M. sinensis displaying different patterns of correlation between lignin content and saccharification efficiency were subjected to cell wall analysis by quantitative/qualitative analytical techniques such as monosaccharide composition, oligosaccharide profiling, and glycome profiling. When saccharification efficiency was correlated negatively with lignin, the structural features of arabinoxylan and xyloglucan were found to contribute positively to hydrolysis. In the absence of such correlation, different types of pectins, and some mannans contributed to saccharification efficiency. Different genotypes of M. sinensis were shown to display distinct interactions among their cell wall components, which seem to influence cell wall hydrolysis. PMID:25908240

  16. A radioimmunoassay for lignin in plant cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Dawley, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    Lignin detection and determination in herbaceous tissue requires selective, specific assays which are not currently available. A radioimmunoassay (RIA) was developed to study lignin metabolism in these tissues. A {beta}-aryl ether lignin model compound was synthesized, linked to keyhole limpet hemocyanin using a water-soluble carbodiimide, and injected into rabbits. The highest titer of the antiserum obtained was 34 {eta}g/mL of model derivatized BSA. An in vitro system was developed to characterize the RIA. The model compound was linked to amino activated polyacrylamide beads to mimic lignin in the cell walls. {sup 125}I Radiolabelled protein A was used to detect IgG antibody binding. The RIA was shown in the in vitro system to exhibit saturable binding. The amount of antibody bound decreased when the serum was diluted. Immunoelectrophoresis and competitive binding experiments confirmed that both aromatic rings of the lignin model compound had been antigenic. Chlorogenic acid, a phenolic known to be present in plant cells, did not compete for antibody binding. The RIA was used to measure lignin in milled plant samples and barley seedlings. Antiserum binding to wheat cell walls and stressed barley segments was higher than preimmune serum binding. Antibody binding to stressed barley tissue decreased following NaClO{sub 2} delignification. The RIA was found to be less sensitive than expected, so several avenues for improving the method are discussed.

  17. Lignification in poplar tension wood lignified cell wall layers.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Arata; Kusumoto, Hiroshi; Laurans, Françoise; Pilate, Gilles; Takabe, Keiji

    2012-09-01

    The lignification process in poplar tension wood lignified cell wall layers, specifically the S(1) and S(2) layers and the compound middle lamella (CML), was analysed using ultraviolet (UV) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Variations in the thickness of the gelatinous layer (G-layer) were also measured to clarify whether the lignified cell wall layers had completed their lignification before the deposition of G-layers, or, on the contrary, if lignification of these layers was still active during G-layer formation. Observations using UV microscopy and TEM indicated that both UV absorbance and the degree of potassium permanganate staining increased in the CML and S(1) and S(2) layers during G-layer formation, suggesting that the lignification of these lignified layers is still in progress during G-layer formation. In the context of the cell-autonomous monolignol synthesis hypothesis, our observations suggest that monolignols must go through the developing G-layer during the lignification of CML and the S(1) and S(2) layers. The alternative hypothesis of external synthesis (in the rays) does not require that monolignols go through the G-layer before being deposited in the CML, or the S(1) and S(2) layers. Interestingly, the previous observation of lignin in the poplar G-layer was not confirmed with the microscopy techniques used in the present study. PMID:22933655

  18. Cell wall remodeling in mycorrhizal symbiosis: a way towards biotrophism

    PubMed Central

    Balestrini, Raffaella; Bonfante, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Cell walls are deeply involved in the molecular talk between partners during plant and microbe interactions, and their role in mycorrhizae, i.e., the widespread symbiotic associations established between plant roots and soil fungi, has been investigated extensively. All mycorrhizal interactions achieve full symbiotic functionality through the development of an extensive contact surface between the plant and fungal cells, where signals and nutrients are exchanged. The exchange of molecules between the fungal and the plant cytoplasm takes place both through their plasma membranes and their cell walls; a functional compartment, known as the symbiotic interface, is thus defined. Among all the symbiotic interfaces, the complex intracellular interface of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis has received a great deal of attention since its first description. Here, in fact, the host plasma membrane invaginates and proliferates around all the developing intracellular fungal structures, and cell wall material is laid down between this membrane and the fungal cell surface. By contrast, in ectomycorrhizae (ECM), where the fungus grows outside and between the root cells, plant and fungal cell walls are always in direct contact and form the interface between the two partners. The organization and composition of cell walls within the interface compartment is a topic that has attracted widespread attention, both in ecto- and endomycorrhizae. The aim of this review is to provide a general overview of the current knowledge on this topic by integrating morphological observations, which have illustrated cell wall features during mycorrhizal interactions, with the current data produced by genomic and transcriptomic approaches. PMID:24926297

  19. A proteomic and genetic analysis of the Neurospora crassa conidia cell wall proteins identifies two glycosyl hydrolases involved in cell wall remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ao, Jie; Aldabbous, Mash'el; Notaro, Marysa J; Lojacono, Mark; Free, Stephen J

    2016-09-01

    A proteomic analysis of the conidial cell wall identified 35 cell wall proteins. A comparison with the proteome of the vegetative hyphae showed that 16 cell wall proteins were shared, and that these shared cell wall proteins were cell wall biosynthetic proteins or cell wall structural proteins. Deletion mutants for 34 of the genes were analyzed for phenotypes indicative of conidial cell wall defects. Mutants for two cell wall glycosyl hydrolases, the CGL-1 β-1,3-glucanase (NCU07523) and the NAG-1 exochitinase (NCU10852), were found to have a conidial separation phenotype. These two enzymes function in remodeling the cell wall between adjacent conidia to facilitate conidia formation and dissemination. Using promoter::RFP and promoter::GFP constructs, we demonstrated that the promoters for 15 of the conidia-specific cell wall genes, including cgl-1 and nag-1, provided for conidia-specific gene expression or for a significant increase in their expression during conidiation. PMID:27381444

  20. Initiation of phospholipomannan β-1,2 mannosylation involves Bmts with redundant activity, influences its cell wall location and regulates β-glucans homeostasis but is dispensable for Candida albicans systemic infection.

    PubMed

    Courjol, F; Mille, C; Hall, R A; Masset, A; Aijjou, R; Gow, N A R; Poulain, D; Jouault, T; Fradin, C

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic and non-pathogenic fungi synthesize glycosphingolipids, which have a crucial role in growth and viability. Glycosphingolipids also contribute to fungal-associated pathogenesis. The opportunistic yeast pathogen Candida albicans synthesizes phospholipomannan (PLM), which is a glycosphingolipid of the mannosylinositol phosphorylceramide family. Through its lipid and glycan moieties, PLM contributes to the initial recognition of the yeast, causing immune system disorder and persistent fungal disease through activation of host signaling pathways. The lipid moiety of PLM activates the deregulation signaling pathway involved in yeast phagocytosis whereas its glycan moiety, composed of β-1,2 mannosides (β-Mans), participates to inflammatory processes through a mechanism involving Galectin-3. Biosynthesis of PLM β-Mans involves two β-1,2 mannosyltransferases (Bmts) that initiate (Bmt5) and elongate (Bmt6) the glycan chains. After generation of double bmtsΔ mutants, we show that Bmt5 has redundant activity with Bmt2, which can replace Bmt5 in bmt5Δ mutant. We also report that PLM is located in the inner layer of the yeast cell wall. PLM seems to be not essential for systemic infection of the yeast. However, defect of PLM β-mannosylation increases resistance of C. albicans to inhibitors of β-glucans and chitin synthesis, highlighting a role of PLM in cell wall homeostasis. PMID:26427558

  1. Isolation of Lactococcus lactis Mutants Simultaneously Resistant to the Cell Wall-Active Bacteriocin Lcn972, Lysozyme, Nisin, and Bacteriophage c2

    PubMed Central

    Roces, Clara; Courtin, Pascal; Kulakauskas, Saulius; Rodríguez, Ana; Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Lactococcin 972 (Lcn972) is a nonlantibiotic bacteriocin that inhibits cell wall biosynthesis by binding to lipid II. In this work, two mutants resistant to Lcn972, Lactococcus lactis D1 and D1-20, with high (>320 arbitrary units [AU]/ml) and low (80 AU/ml) susceptibilities, respectively, have been isolated. Resistance to Lcn972 did not impose a burden to growth under laboratory conditions, nor did it substantially alter the physicochemical properties of the cell surface. However, the peptidoglycan of the mutants featured a higher content of muropeptides with tripeptide side chains than the wild-type strain, linking for the first time peptidoglycan remodelling to bacteriocin resistance. Moreover, L. lactis lacking a functional d,d-carboxypeptidase DacA (i.e., with a high content of pentapeptide side chain muropeptides) was shown to be more susceptible to Lcn972. Cross-resistance to lysozyme and nisin and enhanced susceptibility to penicillin G and bacitracin was also observed. Intriguingly, the Lcn972-resistant mutants were not infected by the lytic phage c2 and less efficiently infected by phage sk1. Lack of c2 infectivity was linked to a 22.6-kbp chromosomal deletion encompassing the phage receptor protein gene pip. The deletion also included maltose metabolic genes and the two-component system (TCS) F. However, a clear correlation between these genes and resistance to Lcn972 could not be clearly established, pointing to the presence of as-yet-unidentified mutations that account for Lcn972 resistance. PMID:22504807

  2. Measurement of pectin methylation in plant cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    McFeeters, R.F.; Armstrong, S.A.

    1984-01-01

    A procedure was developed to measure the degree of pectin methylation in small samples of isolated cell walls from nonlignified plant tissues or pectin solutions. Galacturonic acid was determined colorimetrically with the 3,5-dimethylphenol reagent. Methylation was measured by base hydrolysis of galacturonic acid methyl esters, followed by gas chromatographic determination of released methanol. Estimates of the precision of analysis of pectin and cell wall samples were made. The coefficient of variation for estimates of the pectin esterification in cell walls isolated from 10-g samples of cucumber tissue ranged from 7.7 to 13.2%.

  3. On the growth of walled cells: From shells to vesicles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudaoud, Arezki

    2003-03-01

    The growth of isolated walled cells is investigated. Examples of such cells range from bacteria to giant algae, and include cochlear hair, plant root hair, fungi and yeast cells. They are modeled as elastic shells inflated by a liquid. Cell growth is driven by fluid pressure and is similar to a plastic deformation of the wall. The requirement of mechanical equilibrium leads to two new scaling laws for cell size that are in quantitative agreement with the compiled biological data. Given these results, possible shapes for growing cells are computed by analogy with those of vesicle membranes.

  4. Growth of Walled Cells: From Shells to Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudaoud, Arezki

    2003-07-01

    The growth of isolated walled cells is investigated. Examples of such cells range from bacteria to giant algae, and include cochlear hair, plant root hair, fungi, and yeast cells. They are modeled as elastic shells containing a liquid. Cell growth is driven by fluid pressure and is is similar to a plastic deformation of the wall. The requirement of mechanical equilibrium leads to two new scaling laws for cell size that are in quantitative agreement with the compiled biological data. Given these results, possible shapes for growing cells are computed by analogy with those of vesicle membranes.

  5. 'Strengthening the fungal cell wall through chitin-glucan cross-links: effects on morphogenesis and cell integrity'.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Javier; Farkaš, Vladimír; Sanz, Ana Belén; Cabib, Enrico

    2016-09-01

    The cross-linking of polysaccharides to assemble new cell wall in fungi requires transglycosylation mechanisms by which preexisting glycosidic linkages are broken and new linkages are created between the polysaccharides. The molecular mechanisms for these processes, which are essential for fungal cell biology, are only now beginning to be elucidated. Recent development of in vivo and in vitro biochemical approaches has allowed characterization of important aspects about the formation of chitin-glucan covalent cell wall cross-links by cell wall transglycosylases of the CRH family and their biological function. Covalent linkages between chitin and glucan mediated by Crh proteins control morphogenesis and also play important roles in the remodeling of the fungal cell wall as part of the compensatory responses necessary to counterbalance cell wall stress. These enzymes are encoded by multigene families of redundant proteins very well conserved in fungal genomes but absent in mammalian cells. Understanding the molecular basis of fungal adaptation to cell wall stress through these and other cell wall remodeling enzymatic activities offers an opportunity to explore novel antifungal treatments and to identify potential fungal virulence factors. PMID:27185288

  6. An Arabidopsis Gene Regulatory Network for Secondary Cell Wall Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Taylor-Teeples, M; Lin, L; de Lucas, M; Turco, G; Toal, TW; Gaudinier, A; Young, NF; Trabucco, GM; Veling, MT; Lamothe, R; Handakumbura, PP; Xiong, G; Wang, C; Corwin, J; Tsoukalas, A; Zhang, L; Ware, D; Pauly, M; Kliebenstein, DJ; Dehesh, K; Tagkopoulos, I; Breton, G; Pruneda-Paz, JL; Ahnert, SE; Kay, SA; Hazen, SP; Brady, SM

    2014-01-01

    Summary The plant cell wall is an important factor for determining cell shape, function and response to the environment. Secondary cell walls, such as those found in xylem, are composed of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin and account for the bulk of plant biomass. The coordination between transcriptional regulation of synthesis for each polymer is complex and vital to cell function. A regulatory hierarchy of developmental switches has been proposed, although the full complement of regulators remains unknown. Here, we present a protein-DNA network between Arabidopsis transcription factors and secondary cell wall metabolic genes with gene expression regulated by a series of feed-forward loops. This model allowed us to develop and validate new hypotheses about secondary wall gene regulation under abiotic stress. Distinct stresses are able to perturb targeted genes to potentially promote functional adaptation. These interactions will serve as a foundation for understanding the regulation of a complex, integral plant component. PMID:25533953

  7. Regulation of Meristem Morphogenesis by Cell Wall Synthases in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weibing; Schuster, Christoph; Beahan, Cherie T; Charoensawan, Varodom; Peaucelle, Alexis; Bacic, Antony; Doblin, Monika S; Wightman, Raymond; Meyerowitz, Elliot M

    2016-06-01

    The cell walls of the shoot apical meristem (SAM), containing the stem cell niche that gives rise to the above-ground tissues, are crucially involved in regulating differentiation. It is currently unknown how these walls are built and refined or their role, if any, in influencing meristem developmental dynamics. We have combined polysaccharide linkage analysis, immuno-labeling, and transcriptome profiling of the SAM to provide a spatiotemporal plan of the walls of this dynamic structure. We find that meristematic cells express only a core subset of 152 genes encoding cell wall glycosyltransferases (GTs). Systemic localization of all these GT mRNAs by in situ hybridization reveals members with either enrichment in or specificity to apical subdomains such as emerging flower primordia, and a large class with high expression in dividing cells. The highly localized and coordinated expression of GTs in the SAM suggests distinct wall properties of meristematic cells and specific differences between newly forming walls and their mature descendants. Functional analysis demonstrates that a subset of CSLD genes is essential for proper meristem maintenance, confirming the key role of walls in developmental pathways. PMID:27212401

  8. Cell Wall Metabolism in Response to Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Gall, Hyacinthe Le; Philippe, Florian; Domon, Jean-Marc; Gillet, Françoise; Pelloux, Jérôme; Rayon, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on the responses of the plant cell wall to several abiotic stresses including drought, flooding, heat, cold, salt, heavy metals, light, and air pollutants. The effects of stress on cell wall metabolism are discussed at the physiological (morphogenic), transcriptomic, proteomic and biochemical levels. The analysis of a large set of data shows that the plant response is highly complex. The overall effects of most abiotic stress are often dependent on the plant species, the genotype, the age of the plant, the timing of the stress application, and the intensity of this stress. This shows the difficulty of identifying a common pattern of stress response in cell wall architecture that could enable adaptation and/or resistance to abiotic stress. However, in most cases, two main mechanisms can be highlighted: (i) an increased level in xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase (XTH) and expansin proteins, associated with an increase in the degree of rhamnogalacturonan I branching that maintains cell wall plasticity and (ii) an increased cell wall thickening by reinforcement of the secondary wall with hemicellulose and lignin deposition. Taken together, these results show the need to undertake large-scale analyses, using multidisciplinary approaches, to unravel the consequences of stress on the cell wall. This will help identify the key components that could be targeted to improve biomass production under stress conditions. PMID:27135320

  9. Cell Wall Metabolism in Response to Abiotic Stress.

    PubMed

    Le Gall, Hyacinthe; Philippe, Florian; Domon, Jean-Marc; Gillet, Françoise; Pelloux, Jérôme; Rayon, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on the responses of the plant cell wall to several abiotic stresses including drought, flooding, heat, cold, salt, heavy metals, light, and air pollutants. The effects of stress on cell wall metabolism are discussed at the physiological (morphogenic), transcriptomic, proteomic and biochemical levels. The analysis of a large set of data shows that the plant response is highly complex. The overall effects of most abiotic stress are often dependent on the plant species, the genotype, the age of the plant, the timing of the stress application, and the intensity of this stress. This shows the difficulty of identifying a common pattern of stress response in cell wall architecture that could enable adaptation and/or resistance to abiotic stress. However, in most cases, two main mechanisms can be highlighted: (i) an increased level in xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase (XTH) and expansin proteins, associated with an increase in the degree of rhamnogalacturonan I branching that maintains cell wall plasticity and (ii) an increased cell wall thickening by reinforcement of the secondary wall with hemicellulose and lignin deposition. Taken together, these results show the need to undertake large-scale analyses, using multidisciplinary approaches, to unravel the consequences of stress on the cell wall. This will help identify the key components that could be targeted to improve biomass production under stress conditions. PMID:27135320

  10. Identification of polysaccharide hydrolases involved in autolytic degradation of Zea cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Nock, L.P.; Smith, C.J. )

    1987-08-01

    Cell walls of Zea mays (cv L.G.11) seedlings labeled with {sup 14}C were treated with {alpha}-amylase from Bacillus subtilis to remove starch and mixed linkage glucans. These walls released arabinose, xylose, galactose, and galacturonic acid in addition to glucose when they were allowed to autolyze. Methylation analysis was performed on samples of wall which had been incubated autolytically and the results indicated that degradation of the major polymer of the wall, the glucoarabinoxylan, had occurred. A number of glycanases could be dissociated from the wall by use of 3 M LiCL. The proteins which were released were found to contain a number of exoglycosidase activities in addition to being effective in degrading the polysaccharide substrates, araban, xylan, galactan, laminarin, mannan, and polygalacturonic acid. The effects of these enzymes on the wall during autolysis appear to result from endo-activity in addition to exo-activity. The structural changes that occurred in the cell walls during autolysis were found to be related to the changes previously found to occur in cell walls during auxin induced extension.

  11. Cell Wall Composition, Biosynthesis and Remodeling during Pollen Tube Growth

    PubMed Central

    Mollet, Jean-Claude; Leroux, Christelle; Dardelle, Flavien; Lehner, Arnaud

    2013-01-01

    The pollen tube is a fast tip-growing cell carrying the two sperm cells to the ovule allowing the double fertilization process and seed setting. To succeed in this process, the spatial and temporal controls of pollen tube growth within the female organ are critical. It requires a massive cell wall deposition to promote fast pollen tube elongation and a tight control of the cell wall remodeling to modify the mechanical properties. In addition, during its journey, the pollen tube interacts with the pistil, which plays key roles in pollen tube nutrition, guidance and in the rejection of the self-incompatible pollen. This review focuses on our current knowledge in the biochemistry and localization of the main cell wall polymers including pectin, hemicellulose, cellulose and callose from several pollen tube species. Moreover, based on transcriptomic data and functional genomic studies, the possible enzymes involved in the cell wall remodeling during pollen tube growth and their impact on the cell wall mechanics are also described. Finally, mutant analyses have permitted to gain insight in the function of several genes involved in the pollen tube cell wall biosynthesis and their roles in pollen tube growth are further discussed. PMID:27137369

  12. A formin-nucleated actin aster concentrates cell wall hydrolases for cell fusion in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Dudin, Omaya; Bendezú, Felipe O.; Groux, Raphael; Laroche, Thierry; Seitz, Arne

    2015-01-01

    Cell–cell fusion is essential for fertilization. For fusion of walled cells, the cell wall must be degraded at a precise location but maintained in surrounding regions to protect against lysis. In fission yeast cells, the formin Fus1, which nucleates linear actin filaments, is essential for this process. In this paper, we show that this formin organizes a specific actin structure—the actin fusion focus. Structured illumination microscopy and live-cell imaging of Fus1, actin, and type V myosins revealed an aster of actin filaments whose barbed ends are focalized near the plasma membrane. Focalization requires Fus1 and type V myosins and happens asynchronously always in the M cell first. Type V myosins are essential for fusion and concentrate cell wall hydrolases, but not cell wall synthases, at the fusion focus. Thus, the fusion focus focalizes cell wall dissolution within a broader cell wall synthesis zone to shift from cell growth to cell fusion. PMID:25825517

  13. Electrical Potentials of Plant Cell Walls in Response to the Ionic Environment1

    PubMed Central

    Shomer, Ilan; Novacky, Anton J.; Pike, Sharon M.; Yermiyahu, Uri; Kinraide, Thomas B.

    2003-01-01

    Electrical potentials in cell wallsWall) and at plasma membrane surfaces (ψPM) are determinants of ion activities in these phases. The ψPM plays a demonstrated role in ion uptake and intoxication, but a comprehensive electrostatic theory of plant-ion interactions will require further understanding of ψWall. ψWall from potato (Solanum tuberosum) tubers and wheat (Triticum aestivum) roots was monitored in response to ionic changes by placing glass microelectrodes against cell surfaces. Cations reduced the negativity of ψWall with effectiveness in the order Al3+ > La3+ > H+ > Cu2+ > Ni2+ > Ca2+ > Co2+ > Cd2+ > Mg2+ > Zn2+ > hexamethonium2+ > Rb+ > K+ > Cs+ > Na+. This order resembles substantially the order of plant-root intoxicating effectiveness and indicates a role for both ion charge and size. Our measurements were combined with the few published measurements of ψWall, and all were considered in terms of a model composed of Donnan theory and ion binding. Measured and model-computed values for ψWall were in close agreement, usually, and we consider ψWall to be at least proportional to the actual Donnan potentials. ψWall and ψPM display similar trends in their responses to ionic solutes, but ions appear to bind more strongly to plasma membrane sites than to readily accessible cell wall sites. ψWall is involved in swelling and extension capabilities of the cell wall lattice and thus may play a role in pectin bonding, texture, and intercellular adhesion. PMID:12970506

  14. Electrical potentials of plant cell walls in response to the ionic environment.

    PubMed

    Shomer, Ilan; Novacky, Anton J; Pike, Sharon M; Yermiyahu, Uri; Kinraide, Thomas B

    2003-09-01

    Electrical potentials in cell walls (psi(Wall)) and at plasma membrane surfaces (psi(PM)) are determinants of ion activities in these phases. The psi(PM) plays a demonstrated role in ion uptake and intoxication, but a comprehensive electrostatic theory of plant-ion interactions will require further understanding of psi(Wall). psi(Wall) from potato (Solanum tuberosum) tubers and wheat (Triticum aestivum) roots was monitored in response to ionic changes by placing glass microelectrodes against cell surfaces. Cations reduced the negativity of psi(Wall) with effectiveness in the order Al(3+) > La(3+) > H(+) > Cu(2+) > Ni(2+) > Ca(2+) > Co(2+) > Cd(2+) > Mg(2+) > Zn(2+) > hexamethonium(2+) > Rb(+) > K(+) > Cs(+) > Na(+). This order resembles substantially the order of plant-root intoxicating effectiveness and indicates a role for both ion charge and size. Our measurements were combined with the few published measurements of psi(Wall), and all were considered in terms of a model composed of Donnan theory and ion binding. Measured and model-computed values for psi(Wall) were in close agreement, usually, and we consider psi(Wall) to be at least proportional to the actual Donnan potentials. psi(Wall) and psi(PM) display similar trends in their responses to ionic solutes, but ions appear to bind more strongly to plasma membrane sites than to readily accessible cell wall sites. psi(Wall) is involved in swelling and extension capabilities of the cell wall lattice and thus may play a role in pectin bonding, texture, and intercellular adhesion. PMID:12970506

  15. Ethanolic rhizome extract from Kaempferia parviflora Wall. ex. Baker induces apoptosis in HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Banjerdpongchai, Ratana; Suwannachot, Kittiphan; Rattanapanone, Viboon; Sripanidkulchai, Bungorn

    2008-01-01

    Kaempferia parviflora Wall. ex. Baker is a Thai herb containing many flavonoids that have anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic and antioxidant activities. The objective of this study was to demonstrate apoptotic effects of Kaempferia parviflora Wall. ex. Baker rhizome ethanolic extract on HL-60 cells in vitro. The extract suppressed HL-60 cell growth and decreased cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Apoptotic cell death was demonstrated by changes in cell morphology, externalization of phosphatidylserine on the cell surface, loss in mitochondrial transmembrane potential and activation of caspase 3. Apoptosis induced by K. parviflora Wall. ex. Baker rhizome ethanolic extract was enhanced by treatment with paclitaxel or doxorubicin, and inhibitors of Akt, PI3-K and MEK. PMID:19256745

  16. Plant cell wall characterization using scanning probe microscopy techniques

    PubMed Central

    Yarbrough, John M; Himmel, Michael E; Ding, Shi-You

    2009-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is today considered a promising renewable resource for bioenergy production. A combined chemical and biological process is currently under consideration for the conversion of polysaccharides from plant cell wall materials, mainly cellulose and hemicelluloses, to simple sugars that can be fermented to biofuels. Native plant cellulose forms nanometer-scale microfibrils that are embedded in a polymeric network of hemicelluloses, pectins, and lignins; this explains, in part, the recalcitrance of biomass to deconstruction. The chemical and structural characteristics of these plant cell wall constituents remain largely unknown today. Scanning probe microscopy techniques, particularly atomic force microscopy and its application in characterizing plant cell wall structure, are reviewed here. We also further discuss future developments based on scanning probe microscopy techniques that combine linear and nonlinear optical techniques to characterize plant cell wall nanometer-scale structures, specifically apertureless near-field scanning optical microscopy and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy. PMID:19703302

  17. Modification of cell wall polysaccharides during retting of cassava roots.

    PubMed

    Ngolong Ngea, Guillaume Legrand; Guillon, Fabienne; Essia Ngang, Jean Justin; Bonnin, Estelle; Bouchet, Brigitte; Saulnier, Luc

    2016-12-15

    Retting is an important step in traditional cassava processing that involves tissue softening of the roots to transform the cassava into flour and various food products. The tissue softening that occurs during retting was attributed to the degradation of cell wall pectins through the action of pectin-methylesterase and pectate-lyase that possibly originated from a microbial source or the cassava plant itself. Changes in cell wall composition were investigated during retting using chemical analysis, specific glycanase degradation and immuno-labelling of cell wall polysaccharides. Pectic 1,4-β-d-galactan was the main cell wall polysaccharide affected during the retting of cassava roots. This result suggested that better control of pectic galactan degradation and a better understanding of the degradation mechanism by endogenous endo-galactanase and/or exogenous microbial enzymes might contribute to improve the texture properties of cassava products. PMID:27451197

  18. The Cell Wall Protein Ecm33 of Candida albicans is Involved in Chronological Life Span, Morphogenesis, Cell Wall Regeneration, Stress Tolerance, and Host-Cell Interaction.

    PubMed

    Gil-Bona, Ana; Reales-Calderon, Jose A; Parra-Giraldo, Claudia M; Martinez-Lopez, Raquel; Monteoliva, Lucia; Gil, Concha

    2016-01-01

    Ecm33 is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein in the human pathogen Candida albicans. This protein is known to be involved in fungal cell wall integrity (CWI) and is also critical for normal virulence in the mouse model of hematogenously disseminated candidiasis, but its function remains unknown. In this work, several phenotypic analyses of the C. albicans ecm33/ecm33 mutant (RML2U) were performed. We observed that RML2U displays the inability of protoplast to regenerate the cell wall, activation of the CWI pathway, hypersensitivity to temperature, osmotic and oxidative stresses and a shortened chronological lifespan. During the exponential and stationary culture phases, nuclear and actin staining revealed the possible arrest of the cell cycle in RML2U cells. Interestingly, a "veil growth," never previously described in C. albicans, was serendipitously observed under static stationary cells. The cells that formed this structure were also observed in cornmeal liquid cultures. These cells are giant, round cells, without DNA, and contain large vacuoles, similar to autophagic cells observed in other fungi. Furthermore, RML2U was phagocytozed more than the wild-type strain by macrophages at earlier time points, but the damage caused to the mouse cells was less than with the wild-type strain. Additionally, the percentage of RML2U apoptotic cells after interaction with macrophages was fewer than in the wild-type strain. PMID:26870022

  19. The Cell Wall Protein Ecm33 of Candida albicans is Involved in Chronological Life Span, Morphogenesis, Cell Wall Regeneration, Stress Tolerance, and Host–Cell Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Bona, Ana; Reales-Calderon, Jose A.; Parra-Giraldo, Claudia M.; Martinez-Lopez, Raquel; Monteoliva, Lucia; Gil, Concha

    2016-01-01

    Ecm33 is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein in the human pathogen Candida albicans. This protein is known to be involved in fungal cell wall integrity (CWI) and is also critical for normal virulence in the mouse model of hematogenously disseminated candidiasis, but its function remains unknown. In this work, several phenotypic analyses of the C. albicans ecm33/ecm33 mutant (RML2U) were performed. We observed that RML2U displays the inability of protoplast to regenerate the cell wall, activation of the CWI pathway, hypersensitivity to temperature, osmotic and oxidative stresses and a shortened chronological lifespan. During the exponential and stationary culture phases, nuclear and actin staining revealed the possible arrest of the cell cycle in RML2U cells. Interestingly, a “veil growth,” never previously described in C. albicans, was serendipitously observed under static stationary cells. The cells that formed this structure were also observed in cornmeal liquid cultures. These cells are giant, round cells, without DNA, and contain large vacuoles, similar to autophagic cells observed in other fungi. Furthermore, RML2U was phagocytozed more than the wild-type strain by macrophages at earlier time points, but the damage caused to the mouse cells was less than with the wild-type strain. Additionally, the percentage of RML2U apoptotic cells after interaction with macrophages was fewer than in the wild-type strain. PMID:26870022

  20. Evolution and development of cell walls in cereal grains

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Rachel A.; Fincher, Geoffrey B.

    2014-01-01

    The composition of cell walls in cereal grains and other grass species differs markedly from walls in seeds of other plants. In the maternal tissues that surround the embryo and endosperm of the grain, walls contain higher levels of cellulose and in many cases are heavily lignified. This may be contrasted with walls of the endosperm, where the amount of cellulose is relatively low, and the walls are generally not lignified. The low cellulose and lignin contents are possible because the walls of the endosperm perform no load-bearing function in the mature grain and indeed the low levels of these relatively intractable wall components are necessary because they allow rapid degradation of the walls following germination of the grain. The major non-cellulosic components of endosperm walls are usually heteroxylans and (1,3;1,4)-β-glucans, with lower levels of xyloglucans, glucomannans, and pectic polysaccharides. Pectic polysaccharides and xyloglucans are the major non-cellulosic wall constituents in most dicot species, in which (1,3;1,4)-β-glucans are usually absent and heteroxylans are found at relatively low levels. Thus, the “core” non-cellulosic wall polysaccharides in grain of the cereals and other grasses are the heteroxylans and, more specifically, arabinoxylans. The (1,3;1,4)-β-glucans appear in the endosperm of some grass species but are essentially absent from others; they may constitute from zero to more than 45% of the cell walls of the endosperm, depending on the species. It is clear that in some cases these (1,3;1,4)-β-glucans function as a major store of metabolizable glucose in the grain. Cereal grains and their constituent cell wall polysaccharides are centrally important as a source of dietary fiber in human societies and breeders have started to select for high levels of non-cellulosic wall polysaccharides in grain. To meet end-user requirements, it is important that we understand cell wall biology in the grain both during development and

  1. An improved protocol to study the plant cell wall proteome

    PubMed Central

    Printz, Bruno; Dos Santos Morais, Raphaël; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Sergeant, Kjell; Lutts, Stanley; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Renaut, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Cell wall proteins were extracted from alfalfa stems according to a three-steps extraction procedure using sequentially CaCl2, EGTA, and LiCl-complemented buffers. The efficiency of this protocol for extracting cell wall proteins was compared with the two previously published methods optimized for alfalfa stem cell wall protein analysis. Following LC-MS/MS analysis the three-steps extraction procedure resulted in the identification of the highest number of cell wall proteins (242 NCBInr identifiers) and gave the lowest percentage of non-cell wall proteins (about 30%). However, the three protocols are rather complementary than substitutive since 43% of the identified proteins were specific to one protocol. This three-step protocol was therefore selected for a more detailed proteomic characterization using 2D-gel electrophoresis. With this technique, 75% of the identified proteins were shown to be fraction-specific and 72.7% were predicted as belonging to the cell wall compartment. Although, being less sensitive than LC-MS/MS approaches in detecting and identifying low-abundant proteins, gel-based approaches are valuable tools for the differentiation and relative quantification of protein isoforms and/or modified proteins. In particular isoforms, having variations in their amino-acid sequence and/or carrying different N-linked glycan chains were detected and characterized. This study highlights how the extracting protocols as well as the analytical techniques devoted to the study of the plant cell wall proteome are complementary and how they may be combined to elucidate the dynamism of the plant cell wall proteome in biological studies. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001927. PMID:25914713

  2. Construction, molecular modeling, and simulation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell walls.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xuan; Hopfinger, A J

    2004-01-01

    The mycobacterial cell wall is extraordinarily thick and tight consisting mainly of (1). long chain fatty acids, the mycolic acids, and (2). a unique polysaccharide, arabinogalactan (AG). These two chemical constituents are covalently linked through ester bonds. Minnikin (The Biology of the Mycobacteria; Academic: London, 1982) proposed that the mycobacterial cell wall is composed of an asymmetric lipid bilayer. The inner leaflet of the cell wall contains mycolic acids covalently linked to AG. This inner leaflet is believed to have the lowest permeability to organic compounds of the overall cell wall. Conformational search and molecular dynamics simulation were used to explore the conformational profile of AG and the conformations and structural organization of the mycolic acid-AG complex, and overall, an inner leaflet molecular model of the cell wall was constructed. The terminal arabinose residues of AG that serve as linkers between AG and mycolic acids were found to exist in four major chemical configurations. The mycolate hydrocarbon chains were determined to be tightly packed and perpendicular to the "plane" formed by the oxygen atoms of the 5-hydroxyl groups of the terminal arabinose residues. For Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the average packing distance between mycolic acids is estimated to be approximately 7.3 A. Thus, Minnikin's model is supported by this computational study. Overall, this modeling and simulation approach provides a way to probe the mechanism of low permeability of the cell wall and the intrinsic drug resistance of M. tuberculosis. In addition, monolayer models were built for both dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine, two common phospholipids in bacterial and animal membranes, respectively. Structural comparisons of these cell wall phospholipid membrane models were made to the M. tuberculosis cell wall model. PMID:15132700

  3. Cell wall studies of Histoplasma capsulatum and Blastomyces dermatitidis using autologous and heterologous enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, T E; Domer, J E; Li, Y T

    1977-01-01

    Enzymes capable of hydrolyzing cell walls of Blastomyces dermatitidis and chemotypes I and II of Histoplasma capsulatum were prepared in the laboratory or obtained from commercial sources. They included chitinases, beta-1,3-glucanases, beta-1,6-glucanase, and Pronase. Monosaccharides and disaccharides of glucose released from the cell walls by the enzymes were determined qualitatively by paper and gas-liquid chromatography, and monosaccharides were quantitated by the latter technique as well. An enzyme system isolated from Streptomyces sp. containing both chitinase and glucanase released maximum amounts of glucose and N-acetylglucosamine from the cell walls of H. capsulatum chemotype I. A chitinase preparation, free of glucanase, from Serratia marcescens released only chitobiose and N-acetylglucosamine from chemotype I cell walls, but the total quantity of N-acetylglucosamine released was about 60% less than that released by the Streptomyces system. A beta-1,3-glucanase from Bacillus circulans hydrolyzed the cell walls of H. capsulatum chemotype I, but a beta-1,6-glucanase failed to release glucose from the same walls. Autolytic enzymes, viz., beta-1,3-glucanases and several glycosidases were detected as constitutive enzymes in both yeast and mycelial phases of B. dermatitidis and H. capsulatum chemotypes I and II. No difference in the amount of activity was found between cell sap and culture filtrate preparations. The beta-glucanases prepared from the Histoplasma and Blastomyces strains were active on the cell walls of the yeast phases of H. capsulatum chemotypes I and II, releasing laminaribiose and glucose, but were essentially inactive on the cell walls of B. dermatitidis. Chitinase, beta-1,6-glucanase, alpha-glucanase, and alpha-glucosidase activities were absent from these fungal enzyme preparations. Images PMID:870437

  4. Cell wall polysaccharides from fern leaves: evidence for a mannan-rich Type III cell wall in Adiantum raddianum.

    PubMed

    Silva, Giovanna B; Ionashiro, Mari; Carrara, Thalita B; Crivellari, Augusto C; Tiné, Marco A S; Prado, Jefferson; Carpita, Nicholas C; Buckeridge, Marcos S

    2011-12-01

    Primary cell walls from plants are composites of cellulose tethered by cross-linking glycans and embedded in a matrix of pectins. Cell wall composition varies between plant species, reflecting in some instances the evolutionary distance between them. In this work the monosaccharide compositions of isolated primary cell walls of nine fern species and one lycophyte were characterized and compared with those from Equisetum and an angiosperm dicot. The relatively high abundance of mannose in these plants suggests that mannans may constitute the major cross-linking glycan in the primary walls of pteridophytes and lycophytes. Pectin-related polysaccharides contained mostly rhamnose and uronic acids, indicating the presence of rhamnogalacturonan I highly substituted with galactose and arabinose. Structural and fine-structural analyses of the hemicellulose fraction of leaves of Adiantum raddianum confirmed this hypothesis. Linkage analysis showed that the mannan contains mostly 4-Man with very little 4,6-Man, indicating a low percentage of branching with galactose. Treatment of the mannan-rich fractions with endo-β-mannanase produced characteristic mannan oligosaccharides. Minor amounts of xyloglucan and xylans were also detected. These data and those of others suggest that all vascular plants contain xyloglucans, arabinoxylans, and (gluco)mannans, but in different proportions that define cell wall types. Whereas xyloglucan and pectin-rich walls define Type I walls of dicots and many monocots, arabinoxylans and lower proportion of pectin define the Type II walls of commelinoid monocots. The mannan-rich primary walls with low pectins of many ferns and a lycopod indicate a fundamentally different wall type among land plants, the Type III wall. PMID:21955619

  5. Characterization and Localization of Insoluble Organic Matrices Associated with Diatom Cell Walls: Insight into Their Roles during Cell Wall Formation

    PubMed Central

    Tesson, Benoit; Hildebrand, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Organic components associated with diatom cell wall silica are important for the formation, integrity, and function of the cell wall. Polysaccharides are associated with the silica, however their localization, structure, and function remain poorly understood. We used imaging and biochemical approaches to describe in detail characteristics of insoluble organic components associated with the cell wall in 5 different diatom species. Results show that an insoluble organic matrix enriched in mannose, likely the diatotepum, is localized on the proximal surface of the silica cell wall. We did not identify any organic matrix embedded within the silica. We also identified a distinct material consisting of glucose polymer with variable localization depending on the species. In some species this component was directly involved in the morphogenesis of silica structure while in others it appeared to be only a structural component of the cell wall. A novel glucose-rich structure located between daughter cells during division was also identified. This work for the first time correlates the structure, composition, and localization of insoluble organic matrices associated with diatom cell walls. Additionally we identified a novel glucose polymer and characterized its role during silica structure formation. PMID:23626714

  6. Live cell imaging of the cytoskeleton and cell wall enzymes in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Sampathkumar, Arun; Wightman, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    The use of live imaging techniques to visualize the dynamic changes and interactions within plant cells has given us detailed information on the function and organization of the cytoskeleton and cell wall associated proteins. This information has grown with the constant improvement in imaging hardware and molecular tools. In this chapter, we describe the procedure for the preparation and live visualization of fluorescent protein fusions associated with the cytoskeleton and the cell wall in Arabidopsis. PMID:25408450

  7. Characterizing visible and invisible cell wall mutant phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Carpita, Nicholas C; McCann, Maureen C

    2015-07-01

    About 10% of a plant's genome is devoted to generating the protein machinery to synthesize, remodel, and deconstruct the cell wall. High-throughput genome sequencing technologies have enabled a reasonably complete inventory of wall-related genes that can be assembled into families of common evolutionary origin. Assigning function to each gene family member has been aided immensely by identification of mutants with visible phenotypes or by chemical and spectroscopic analysis of mutants with 'invisible' phenotypes of modified cell wall composition and architecture that do not otherwise affect plant growth or development. This review connects the inference of gene function on the basis of deviation from the wild type in genetic functional analyses to insights provided by modern analytical techniques that have brought us ever closer to elucidating the sequence structures of the major polysaccharide components of the plant cell wall. PMID:25873661

  8. Ultrastructure and Composition of the Nannochloropsis gaditana Cell Wall

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Matthew J.; Weiss, Taylor L.; Jinkerson, Robert E.; Jing, Jia; Roth, Robyn; Goodenough, Ursula; Posewitz, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    Marine algae of the genus Nannochloropsis are promising producers of biofuel precursors and nutraceuticals and are also harvested commercially for aquaculture feed. We have used quick-freeze, deep-etch electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and carbohydrate analyses to characterize the architecture of the Nannochloropsis gaditana (strain CCMP 526) cell wall, whose recalcitrance presents a significant barrier to biocommodity extraction. The data indicate a bilayer structure consisting of a cellulosic inner wall (∼75% of the mass balance) protected by an outer hydrophobic algaenan layer. Cellulase treatment of walls purified after cell lysis generates highly enriched algaenan preparations without using the harsh chemical treatments typically used in algaenan isolation and characterization. Nannochloropsis algaenan was determined to comprise long, straight-chain, saturated aliphatics with ether cross-links, which closely resembles the cutan of vascular plants. Chemical identification of >85% of the isolated cell wall mass is detailed, and genome analysis is used to identify candidate biosynthetic enzymes. PMID:25239976

  9. A Model for Cell Wall Dissolution in Mating Yeast Cells: Polarized Secretion and Restricted Diffusion of Cell Wall Remodeling Enzymes Induces Local Dissolution

    PubMed Central

    Huberman, Lori B.; Murray, Andrew W.

    2014-01-01

    Mating of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, occurs when two haploid cells of opposite mating types signal using reciprocal pheromones and receptors, grow towards each other, and fuse to form a single diploid cell. To fuse, both cells dissolve their cell walls at the point of contact. This event must be carefully controlled because the osmotic pressure differential between the cytoplasm and extracellular environment causes cells with unprotected plasma membranes to lyse. If the cell wall-degrading enzymes diffuse through the cell wall, their concentration would rise when two cells touched each other, such as when two pheromone-stimulated cells adhere to each other via mating agglutinins. At the surfaces that touch, the enzymes must diffuse laterally through the wall before they can escape into the medium, increasing the time the enzymes spend in the cell wall, and thus raising their concentration at the point of attachment and restricting cell wall dissolution to points where cells touch each other. We tested this hypothesis by studying pheromone treated cells confined between two solid, impermeable surfaces. This confinement increases the frequency of pheromone-induced cell death, and this effect is diminished by reducing the osmotic pressure difference across the cell wall or by deleting putative cell wall glucanases and other genes necessary for efficient cell wall fusion. Our results support the model that pheromone-induced cell death is the result of a contact-driven increase in the local concentration of cell wall remodeling enzymes and suggest that this process plays an important role in regulating cell wall dissolution and fusion in mating cells. PMID:25329559

  10. A model for cell wall dissolution in mating yeast cells: polarized secretion and restricted diffusion of cell wall remodeling enzymes induces local dissolution.

    PubMed

    Huberman, Lori B; Murray, Andrew W

    2014-01-01

    Mating of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, occurs when two haploid cells of opposite mating types signal using reciprocal pheromones and receptors, grow towards each other, and fuse to form a single diploid cell. To fuse, both cells dissolve their cell walls at the point of contact. This event must be carefully controlled because the osmotic pressure differential between the cytoplasm and extracellular environment causes cells with unprotected plasma membranes to lyse. If the cell wall-degrading enzymes diffuse through the cell wall, their concentration would rise when two cells touched each other, such as when two pheromone-stimulated cells adhere to each other via mating agglutinins. At the surfaces that touch, the enzymes must diffuse laterally through the wall before they can escape into the medium, increasing the time the enzymes spend in the cell wall, and thus raising their concentration at the point of attachment and restricting cell wall dissolution to points where cells touch each other. We tested this hypothesis by studying pheromone treated cells confined between two solid, impermeable surfaces. This confinement increases the frequency of pheromone-induced cell death, and this effect is diminished by reducing the osmotic pressure difference across the cell wall or by deleting putative cell wall glucanases and other genes necessary for efficient cell wall fusion. Our results support the model that pheromone-induced cell death is the result of a contact-driven increase in the local concentration of cell wall remodeling enzymes and suggest that this process plays an important role in regulating cell wall dissolution and fusion in mating cells. PMID:25329559

  11. Bending forces plastically deform growing bacterial cell walls.

    PubMed

    Amir, Ariel; Babaeipour, Farinaz; McIntosh, Dustin B; Nelson, David R; Jun, Suckjoon

    2014-04-22

    Cell walls define a cell's shape in bacteria. The walls are rigid to resist large internal pressures, but remarkably plastic to adapt to a wide range of external forces and geometric constraints. Currently, it is unknown how bacteria maintain their shape. In this paper, we develop experimental and theoretical approaches and show that mechanical stresses regulate bacterial cell wall growth. By applying a precisely controllable hydrodynamic force to growing rod-shaped Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis cells, we demonstrate that the cells can exhibit two fundamentally different modes of deformation. The cells behave like elastic rods when subjected to transient forces, but deform plastically when significant cell wall synthesis occurs while the force is applied. The deformed cells always recover their shape. The experimental results are in quantitative agreement with the predictions of the theory of dislocation-mediated growth. In particular, we find that a single dimensionless parameter, which depends on a combination of independently measured physical properties of the cell, can describe the cell's responses under various experimental conditions. These findings provide insight into how living cells robustly maintain their shape under varying physical environments. PMID:24711421

  12. Production Model Press for the Preparation of Bacterial Cell Walls

    PubMed Central

    Perrine, T. D.; Ribi, E.; Maki, W.; Miller, B.; Oertli, E.

    1962-01-01

    A modification of the apparatus previously described permits the preparation of cell walls in quantity. This consists of a heavy duty, double-acting hydraulic press with motor-driven pump, and a superstrength alloy steel pressure cell which is corrosion resistant. Liquid cooling of the jet is substituted for the previously used gas cooling to minimize aerosol formation and to facilitate subsequent treatment of the products. The device produces cell walls of excellent quality in good yield. The pressure cell has been used satisfactorily up to about 60,000 psi. Design details are given. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 6 PMID:14485524

  13. Motion of red blood cells near microvessel walls: effects of a porous wall layer

    PubMed Central

    HARIPRASAD, DANIEL S.; SECOMB, TIMOTHY W.

    2013-01-01

    A two-dimensional model is used to simulate the motion and deformation of a single mammalian red blood cell (RBC) flowing close to the wall of a microvessel, taking into account the effects of a porous endothelial surface layer (ESL) lining the vessel wall. Migration of RBCs away from the wall leads to the formation of a cell-depleted layer near the wall, which has a large effect on the resistance to blood flow in microvessels. The objective is to examine the mechanical factors causing this migration, including the effects of the ESL. The vessel is represented as a straight parallel-sided channel. The RBC is represented as a set of interconnected viscoelastic elements, suspended in plasma, a Newtonian fluid. The ESL is represented as a porous medium, and plasma flow in the layer is computed using the Brinkman approximation. It is shown that an initially circular cell positioned close to the ESL in a shear flow is deformed into an asymmetric shape. This breaking of symmetry leads to migration away from the wall. With increasing hydraulic resistivity of the layer, the rate of lateral migration increases. It is concluded that mechanical interactions of RBCs flowing in microvessels with a porous wall layer may reduce the rate of lateral migration and hence reduce the width of the cell-depleted zone external to the ESL, relative to the cell-depleted zone that would be formed if the interface between the ESL and free-flowing plasma were replaced by an impermeable boundary. PMID:23493820

  14. Suppression of Hydroxycinnamate Network Formation in Cell Walls of Rice Shoots Grown under Microgravity Conditions in Space.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Soga, Kouichi; Hoson, Takayuki; Kotake, Toshihisa; Yamazaki, Takashi; Higashibata, Akira; Ishioka, Noriaki; Shimazu, Toru; Fukui, Keiji; Osada, Ikuko; Kasahara, Haruo; Kamada, Motoshi

    2015-01-01

    Network structures created by hydroxycinnamate cross-links within the cell wall architecture of gramineous plants make the cell wall resistant to the gravitational force of the earth. In this study, the effects of microgravity on the formation of cell wall-bound hydroxycinnamates were examined using etiolated rice shoots simultaneously grown under artificial 1 g and microgravity conditions in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility on the International Space Station. Measurement of the mechanical properties of cell walls showed that shoot cell walls became stiff during the growth period and that microgravity suppressed this stiffening. Amounts of cell wall polysaccharides, cell wall-bound phenolic acids, and lignin in rice shoots increased as the shoot grew. Microgravity did not influence changes in the amounts of cell wall polysaccharides or phenolic acid monomers such as ferulic acid (FA) and p-coumaric acid, but it suppressed increases in diferulic acid (DFA) isomers and lignin. Activities of the enzymes phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and cell wall-bound peroxidase (CW-PRX) in shoots also increased as the shoot grew. PAL activity in microgravity-grown shoots was almost comparable to that in artificial 1 g-grown shoots, while CW-PRX activity increased less in microgravity-grown shoots than in artificial 1 g-grown shoots. Furthermore, the increases in expression levels of some class III peroxidase genes were reduced under microgravity conditions. These results suggest that a microgravity environment modifies the expression levels of certain class III peroxidase genes in rice shoots, that the resultant reduction of CW-PRX activity may be involved in suppressing DFA formation and lignin polymerization, and that this suppression may cause a decrease in cross-linkages within the cell wall architecture. The reduction in intra-network structures may contribute to keeping the cell wall loose under microgravity conditions. PMID:26378793

  15. Suppression of Hydroxycinnamate Network Formation in Cell Walls of Rice Shoots Grown under Microgravity Conditions in Space

    PubMed Central

    Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Soga, Kouichi; Hoson, Takayuki; Kotake, Toshihisa; Yamazaki, Takashi; Higashibata, Akira; Ishioka, Noriaki; Shimazu, Toru; Fukui, Keiji; Osada, Ikuko; Kasahara, Haruo; Kamada, Motoshi

    2015-01-01

    Network structures created by hydroxycinnamate cross-links within the cell wall architecture of gramineous plants make the cell wall resistant to the gravitational force of the earth. In this study, the effects of microgravity on the formation of cell wall-bound hydroxycinnamates were examined using etiolated rice shoots simultaneously grown under artificial 1 g and microgravity conditions in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility on the International Space Station. Measurement of the mechanical properties of cell walls showed that shoot cell walls became stiff during the growth period and that microgravity suppressed this stiffening. Amounts of cell wall polysaccharides, cell wall-bound phenolic acids, and lignin in rice shoots increased as the shoot grew. Microgravity did not influence changes in the amounts of cell wall polysaccharides or phenolic acid monomers such as ferulic acid (FA) and p-coumaric acid, but it suppressed increases in diferulic acid (DFA) isomers and lignin. Activities of the enzymes phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and cell wall-bound peroxidase (CW-PRX) in shoots also increased as the shoot grew. PAL activity in microgravity-grown shoots was almost comparable to that in artificial 1 g-grown shoots, while CW-PRX activity increased less in microgravity-grown shoots than in artificial 1 g-grown shoots. Furthermore, the increases in expression levels of some class III peroxidase genes were reduced under microgravity conditions. These results suggest that a microgravity environment modifies the expression levels of certain class III peroxidase genes in rice shoots, that the resultant reduction of CW-PRX activity may be involved in suppressing DFA formation and lignin polymerization, and that this suppression may cause a decrease in cross-linkages within the cell wall architecture. The reduction in intra-network structures may contribute to keeping the cell wall loose under microgravity conditions. PMID:26378793

  16. Interaction of Cryptococcus neoformans Extracellular Vesicles with the Cell Wall

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Julie M.; Espadas-Moreno, Javier; Luque-Garcia, Jose L.

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans produces extracellular vesicles containing a variety of cargo, including virulence factors. To become extracellular, these vesicles not only must be released from the plasma membrane but also must pass through the dense matrix of the cell wall. The greatest unknown in the area of fungal vesicles is the mechanism by which these vesicles are released to the extracellular space given the presence of the fungal cell wall. Here we used electron microscopy techniques to image the interactions of vesicles with the cell wall. Our goal was to define the ultrastructural morphology of the process to gain insights into the mechanisms involved. We describe single and multiple vesicle-leaving events, which we hypothesized were due to plasma membrane and multivesicular body vesicle origins, respectively. We further utilized melanized cells to “trap” vesicles and visualize those passing through the cell wall. Vesicle size differed depending on whether vesicles left the cytoplasm in single versus multiple release events. Furthermore, we analyzed different vesicle populations for vesicle dimensions and protein composition. Proteomic analysis tripled the number of proteins known to be associated with vesicles. Despite separation of vesicles into batches differing in size, we did not identify major differences in protein composition. In summary, our results indicate that vesicles are generated by more than one mechanism, that vesicles exit the cell by traversing the cell wall, and that vesicle populations exist as a continuum with regard to size and protein composition. PMID:24906412

  17. Another Brick in the Cell Wall: Biosynthesis Dependent Growth Model

    PubMed Central

    Barbacci, Adelin; Lahaye, Marc; Magnenet, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Expansive growth of plant cell is conditioned by the cell wall ability to extend irreversibly. This process is possible if (i) a tensile stress is developed in the cell wall due to the coupling effect between turgor pressure and the modulation of its mechanical properties through enzymatic and physicochemical reactions and if (ii) new cell wall elements can be synthesized and assembled to the existing wall. In other words, expansive growth is the result of coupling effects between mechanical, thermal and chemical energy. To have a better understanding of this process, models must describe the interplay between physical or mechanical variable with biological events. In this paper we propose a general unified and theoretical framework to model growth in function of energy forms and their coupling. This framework is based on irreversible thermodynamics. It is then applied to model growth of the internodal cell of Chara corallina modulated by changes in pressure and temperature. The results describe accurately cell growth in term of length increment but also in term of cell pectate biosynthesis and incorporation to the expanding wall. Moreover, the classical growth model based on Lockhart's equation such as the one proposed by Ortega, appears as a particular and restrictive case of the more general growth equation developed in this paper. PMID:24066142

  18. Another brick in the cell wall: biosynthesis dependent growth model.

    PubMed

    Barbacci, Adelin; Lahaye, Marc; Magnenet, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Expansive growth of plant cell is conditioned by the cell wall ability to extend irreversibly. This process is possible if (i) a tensile stress is developed in the cell wall due to the coupling effect between turgor pressure and the modulation of its mechanical properties through enzymatic and physicochemical reactions and if (ii) new cell wall elements can be synthesized and assembled to the existing wall. In other words, expansive growth is the result of coupling effects between mechanical, thermal and chemical energy. To have a better understanding of this process, models must describe the interplay between physical or mechanical variable with biological events. In this paper we propose a general unified and theoretical framework to model growth in function of energy forms and their coupling. This framework is based on irreversible thermodynamics. It is then applied to model growth of the internodal cell of Chara corallina modulated by changes in pressure and temperature. The results describe accurately cell growth in term of length increment but also in term of cell pectate biosynthesis and incorporation to the expanding wall. Moreover, the classical growth model based on Lockhart's equation such as the one proposed by Ortega, appears as a particular and restrictive case of the more general growth equation developed in this paper. PMID:24066142

  19. Enzymatic cell wall degradation of Chlorella vulgaris and other microalgae for biofuels production.

    PubMed

    Gerken, Henri G; Donohoe, Bryon; Knoshaug, Eric P

    2013-01-01

    Cell walls of microalgae consist of a polysaccharide and glycoprotein matrix providing the cells with a formidable defense against its environment. We characterized enzymes that can digest the cell wall and weaken this defense for the purpose of protoplasting or lipid extraction. A growth inhibition screen demonstrated that chitinase, lysozyme, pectinase, sulfatase, β-glucuronidase, and laminarinase had the broadest effect across the various Chlorella strains tested and also inhibited Nannochloropsis and Nannochloris strains. Chlorella is typically most sensitive to chitinases and lysozymes, both enzymes that degrade polymers containing N-acetylglucosamine. Using a fluorescent DNA stain, we developed rapid methodology to quantify changes in permeability in response to enzyme digestion and found that treatment with lysozyme in conjunction with other enzymes has a drastic effect on cell permeability. Transmission electron microscopy of enzymatically treated Chlorella vulgaris indicates that lysozyme degrades the outer surface of the cell wall and removes hair-like fibers protruding from the surface, which differs from the activity of chitinase. This action on the outer surface of the cell causes visible protuberances on the cell surface and presumably leads to the increased settling rate when cells are treated with lysozyme. We demonstrate radical ultrastructural changes to the cell wall in response to treatment with various enzyme combinations which, in some cases, causes a greater than twofold increase in the thickness of the cell wall. The enzymes characterized in this study should prove useful in the engineering and extraction of oils from microalgae. PMID:23011569

  20. Production of Cell Wall Hydrolyzing Enzymes by Barley Aleurone Layers in Response to Gibberellic Acid 1

    PubMed Central

    Taiz, Lincoln; Honigman, William A.

    1976-01-01

    The cell walls of barley (Hordeum vulgare var. Himalaya) aleurone layers undergo extensive degradation during the tissue's response to gibberellic acid. Previous work had shown that these cell walls consist almost entirely of arabinoxylan. In this study we show that gibberellic acid stimulates endo-β-1,4-xylanase activity in isolated aleurone layers. In addition, gibberellic acid enhances the activity of two glycosidases: β-xylopyranosidase and α-arabinofuranosidase. No gibberellic acid-stimulated cellulase activity was detected. Germination studies showed a similar pattern of enzyme development in intact seeds. Images PMID:16659683

  1. Glycan Profiling of Plant Cell Wall Polymers using Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Moller, Isabel E.; Pettolino, Filomena A.; Hart, Charlie; Lampugnani, Edwin R.; Willats, William G.T.; Bacic, Antony

    2012-01-01

    Plant cell walls are complex matrixes of heterogeneous glycans which play an important role in the physiology and development of plants and provide the raw materials for human societies (e.g. wood, paper, textile and biofuel industries)1,2. However, understanding the biosynthesis and function of these components remains challenging. Cell wall glycans are chemically and conformationally diverse due to the complexity of their building blocks, the glycosyl residues. These form linkages at multiple positions and differ in ring structure, isomeric or anomeric configuration, and in addition, are substituted with an array of non-sugar residues. Glycan composition varies in different cell and/or tissue types or even sub-domains of a single cell wall3. Furthermore, their composition is also modified during development1, or in response to environmental cues4. In excess of 2,000 genes have Plant cell walls are complex matrixes of heterogeneous glycans been predicted to be involved in cell wall glycan biosynthesis and modification in Arabidopsis5. However, relatively few of the biosynthetic genes have been functionally characterized 4,5. Reverse genetics approaches are difficult because the genes are often differentially expressed, often at low levels, between cell types6. Also, mutant studies are often hindered by gene redundancy or compensatory mechanisms to ensure appropriate cell wall function is maintained7. Thus novel approaches are needed to rapidly characterise the diverse range of glycan structures and to facilitate functional genomics approaches to understanding cell wall biosynthesis and modification. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs)8,9 have emerged as an important tool for determining glycan structure and distribution in plants. These recognise distinct epitopes present within major classes of plant cell wall glycans, including pectins, xyloglucans, xylans, mannans, glucans and arabinogalactans. Recently their use has been extended to large-scale screening experiments

  2. Cell wall proteomics of the green alga Haematococcus pluvialis (Chlorophyceae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng-Bing; Hu, Qiang; Sommerfeld, Milton; Chen, Feng

    2004-03-01

    The green microalga Haematococcus pluvialis can synthesize and accumulate large amounts of the ketocarotenoid astaxanthin, and undergo profound changes in cell wall composition and architecture during the cell cycle and in response to environmental stresses. In this study, cell wall proteins (CWPs) of H. pluvialis were systematically analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) coupled with peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) and sequence-database analysis. In total, 163 protein bands were analyzed, which resulted in positive identification of 81 protein orthologues. The highly complex and dynamic composition of CWPs is manifested by the fact that the majority of identified CWPs are differentially expressed at specific stages of the cell cycle along with a number of common wall-associated 'housekeeping' proteins. The detection of cellulose synthase orthologue in the vegetative cells suggested that the biosynthesis of cellulose occurred during primary wall formation, in contrast to earlier observations that cellulose was exclusively present in the secondary wall of the organism. A transient accumulation of a putative cytokinin oxidase at the early stage of encystment pointed to a possible role in cytokinin degradation while facilitating secondary wall formation and/or assisting in cell expansion. This work represents the first attempt to use a proteomic approach to investigate CWPs of microalgae. The reference protein map constructed and the specific protein markers obtained from this study provide a framework for future characterization of the expression and physiological functions of the proteins involved in the biogenesis and modifications in the cell wall of Haematococcus and related organisms. PMID:14997492

  3. The composition of the cell wall of Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, I. R.

    1965-01-01

    1. The cell-wall composition of Aspergillus niger has been investigated. Analysis shows the presence of six sugars, glucose, galactose, mannose, arabinose, glucosamine and galactosamine, all in the d-configuration, except that a small amount of l-galactose may be present. Sixteen common amino acids are also present. 2. The wall consists chiefly of neutral carbohydrate (73–83%) and hexosamine (9–13%), with smaller amounts of lipid (2–7%), protein (0·5–2·5%) and phosphorus (less than 0·1%). The acetyl content (3·0–3·4%) corresponds to 1·0mole/mole of hexosamine nitrogen. 3. A fractionation of the cell-wall complex was achieved, with or without a preliminary phenol extraction, by using n-sodium hydroxide. Though this caused some degradation, 30–60% of the wall could be solubilized (depending on the preparation). Analyses on several fractions suggest that fractionation procedures bring about some separation of components although not in a clear-cut fashion. 4. Cell-wall preparations were shown to yield a fraction having [α]D approx. +240° (in n-sodium hydroxide) and consisting largely of glucose. This was separated into two subfractions, one of which had [α]D+281° (in n-sodium hydroxide) and had properties resembling the polysaccharide nigeran; the other had [α]D +231° (in n-sodium hydroxide). It is suggested that nigeran is a cell-wall component. PMID:5862404

  4. Bending forces plastically deform growing bacterial cell walls

    PubMed Central

    Amir, Ariel; Babaeipour, Farinaz; McIntosh, Dustin B.; Nelson, David R.; Jun, Suckjoon

    2014-01-01

    Cell walls define a cell’s shape in bacteria. The walls are rigid to resist large internal pressures, but remarkably plastic to adapt to a wide range of external forces and geometric constraints. Currently, it is unknown how bacteria maintain their shape. In this paper, we develop experimental and theoretical approaches and show that mechanical stresses regulate bacterial cell wall growth. By applying a precisely controllable hydrodynamic force to growing rod-shaped Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis cells, we demonstrate that the cells can exhibit two fundamentally different modes of deformation. The cells behave like elastic rods when subjected to transient forces, but deform plastically when significant cell wall synthesis occurs while the force is applied. The deformed cells always recover their shape. The experimental results are in quantitative agreement with the predictions of the theory of dislocation-mediated growth. In particular, we find that a single dimensionless parameter, which depends on a combination of independently measured physical properties of the cell, can describe the cell’s responses under various experimental conditions. These findings provide insight into how living cells robustly maintain their shape under varying physical environments. PMID:24711421

  5. Microfabricated alkali vapor cell with anti-relaxation wall coating

    SciTech Connect

    Straessle, R.; Pétremand, Y.; Briand, D.; Rooij, N. F. de; Pellaton, M.; Affolderbach, C.; Mileti, G.

    2014-07-28

    We present a microfabricated alkali vapor cell equipped with an anti-relaxation wall coating. The anti-relaxation coating used is octadecyltrichlorosilane and the cell was sealed by thin-film indium-bonding at a low temperature of 140 °C. The cell body is made of silicon and Pyrex and features a double-chamber design. Depolarizing properties due to liquid Rb droplets are avoided by confining the Rb droplets to one chamber only. Optical and microwave spectroscopy performed on this wall-coated cell are used to evaluate the cell's relaxation properties and a potential gas contamination. Double-resonance signals obtained from the cell show an intrinsic linewidth that is significantly lower than the linewidth that would be expected in case the cell had no wall coating but only contained a buffer-gas contamination on the level measured by optical spectroscopy. Combined with further experimental evidence this proves the presence of a working anti-relaxation wall coating in the cell. Such cells are of interest for applications in miniature atomic clocks, magnetometers, and other quantum sensors.

  6. Wall stretch and thromboxane A2 activate NO synthase (eNOS) in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells via H2O2 and Akt-dependent phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hae Jin; Yoo, Hae Young; Jang, Ji Hyun; Lin, Hai Yue; Seo, Eun Yeong; Zhang, Yin Hua; Kim, Sung Joon

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary arteries (PAs) have high compliance, buffering the wide ranges of blood flow. Here, we addressed a hypothesis that PA smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) express nitric oxide synthases (NOS) that might be activated by mechanical stress and vasoactive agonists. In the myograph study of endothelium-denuded rat PAs, NOS inhibition (L-NAME) induced strong contraction (96 % of 80 mM KCl-induced contraction (80K)) in the presence of 5 nM U46619 (thromboxane A2 (TXA2) analogue) with relatively high basal stretch (2.94 mN, S(+)). With lower basal stretch (0.98 mN, S(-)), however, L-NAME application following U46619 (TXA2/L-NAME) induced weak contraction (27 % of 80K). Inhibitors of nNOS and iNOS had no such effect in S(+) PAs. In endothelium-denuded S(+) mesenteric and renal arteries, TXA2/L-NAME-induced contraction was only 18 and 21 % of 80K, respectively. Expression of endothelial-type NOS (eNOS) in rat PASMCs was confirmed by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Even in S(-) PAs, pretreatment with H2O2 (0.1-10 μM) effectively increased the sensitivity to TXA2/L-NAME (105 % of 80K). Vice versa, NADPH oxidase inhibitors, reactive oxygen species scavengers, or an Akt inhibitor (SC-66) suppressed TXA2/L-NAME-induced contraction in S(+) PAs. In a human PASMC line, immunoblot analysis showed the following: (1) eNOS expression, (2) Ser(1177) phosphorylation by U46619 and H2O2, and (3) Akt activation (Ser(473) phosphorylation) by U46619. In the cell-attached patch clamp study, H2O2 facilitated membrane stretch-activated cation channels in rat PASMCs. Taken together, the muscular eNOS in PAs can be activated by TXA2 and mechanical stress via H2O2 and Akt-mediated signaling, which may counterbalance the contractile signals from TXA2 and mechanical stimuli. PMID:26729266

  7. Structural studies of complex carbohydrates of plant cell walls. Progress report, June 15, 1992--June 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Darvill, A.G.

    1994-10-01

    This report contains the abstracts of fourteen papers published, in press, or in preparation reporting on research activities to investigate the structure, as well as the function of cell walls in plants. This document also contains research on methods to determine the structure of complex carbohydrates of the cell walls.

  8. Cell wall composition and digestibility alterations in Brachypodium distachyon acheived through reduced expression of the UDP-arabinopyranose mutase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant cell-wall polysaccharide biosynthesis requires nucleotide-activated sugars. The prominent grass cell wall sugars, glucose (Glc), xylose (Xyl), and arabinose (Ara), are biosynthetically related via the UDP-sugar interconversion pathway. RNA-seq analysis of Brachypodium distachyon UDP-sugar inte...

  9. Cell wall composition and digestibility alterations in Brachypodium distachyon achieved through reduced expression of the UDP-arabinopyranose mutase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nucleotide-activated sugars are essential substrates for plant cell wall carbohydrate-polymer biosynthetic glycosyltransferase enzymes. The most prevalent sugars in grass cell walls include glucose (Glc), xylose (Xyl), and arabinose (Ara). These sugars are biosynthetically related via the uridine di...

  10. Atkinesin-13A Modulates Cell-Wall Synthesis and Cell Expansion in Arabidopsis thaliana via the THESEUS1 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fujikura, Ushio; Elsaesser, Lore; Breuninger, Holger; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Clara; Ivakov, Alexander; Laux, Thomas; Findlay, Kim; Persson, Staffan; Lenhard, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Growth of plant organs relies on cell proliferation and expansion. While an increasingly detailed picture about the control of cell proliferation is emerging, our knowledge about the control of cell expansion remains more limited. We demonstrate here that the internal-motor kinesin AtKINESIN-13A (AtKIN13A) limits cell expansion and cell size in Arabidopsis thaliana, with loss-of-function atkin13a mutants forming larger petals with larger cells. The homolog, AtKINESIN-13B, also affects cell expansion and double mutants display growth, gametophytic and early embryonic defects, indicating a redundant role of the two genes. AtKIN13A is known to depolymerize microtubules and influence Golgi motility and distribution. Consistent with this function, AtKIN13A interacts genetically with ANGUSTIFOLIA, encoding a regulator of Golgi dynamics. Reduced AtKIN13A activity alters cell wall structure as assessed by Fourier-transformed infrared-spectroscopy and triggers signalling via the THESEUS1-dependent cell-wall integrity pathway, which in turn promotes the excess cell expansion in the atkin13a mutant. Thus, our results indicate that the intracellular activity of AtKIN13A regulates cell expansion and wall architecture via THESEUS1, providing a compelling case of interplay between cell wall integrity sensing and expansion. PMID:25232944

  11. Characterization of rhamnogalacturonan I from cotton suspension culture cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Progress has been made on the project of determining the structure of pectins. From recent progress, a covalent crosslink between rhamnogalacturonan I (RGI) and xyloglucan was hypothesized and a structure for RGI was proposed. The development of a method to determine the distribution of methyl esterification with pectins also progressed. The degree of methyl esterification of cotton cotyledon cell walls was compared to that of cotton suspension cultures. Cotyledon wall were found to have {approximately}55% of the galacturonic acid esterified whereas suspension culture wall were only about 14% methyl esterified. 10 refs. (SM)

  12. Simulated microgravity inhibits cell wall regeneration of Penicillium decumbens protoplasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, C.; Sun, Y.; Yi, Z. C.; Rong, L.; Zhuang, F. Y.; Fan, Y. B.

    2010-09-01

    This work compares cell wall regeneration from protoplasts of the fungus Penicillium decumbens under rotary culture (simulated microgravity) and stationary cultures. Using an optimized lytic enzyme mixture, protoplasts were successfully released with a yield of 5.3 × 10 5 cells/mL. Under simulated microgravity conditions, the protoplast regeneration efficiency was 33.8%, lower than 44.9% under stationary conditions. Laser scanning confocal microscopy gave direct evidence for reduced formation of polysaccharides under simulated conditions. Scanning electron microscopy showed the delayed process of cell wall regeneration by simulated microgravity. The delayed regeneration of P. decumbens cell wall under simulated microgravity was likely caused by the inhibition of polysaccharide synthesis. This research contributes to the understanding of how gravitational loads affect morphological and physiological processes of fungi.

  13. Modification of glass cell walls by rubidium vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, J.; Kishinevski, A.; Jau, Y.-Y.; Reuter, C.; Happer, W.

    2009-04-01

    It has long been known that the inner walls of freshly manufactured glass cells filled with a few droplets of alkali metal undergo a “curing” process, where the properties of the cell wall change over a period of days to weeks. We report quantitative studies of “curing” in Pyrex cells filled with rubidium metal. Our experiment shows that at 94°C , the surface of Pyrex glass adsorbs about 3×1015 rubidium atoms per cm2 , which is equivalent to 6-7 monolayers of liquid rubidium.

  14. Chromosome and cell wall segregation in Streptococcus faecium ATCC 9790

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, M.L.; Glaser, D.; Dicker, D.T.; Zito, E.T.

    1989-01-01

    Segregation was studied by measuring the positions of autoradiographic grain clusters in chains formed from single cells containing on average less than one radiolabeled chromosome strand. The degree to which chromosomal and cell wall material cosegregated was quantified by using the methods of S. Cooper and M. Weinberger, dividing the number of chains labeled at the middle. This analysis indicated that in contrast to chromosomal segregation in Escherichia coli and, in some studies, to that in gram-positive rods, chromosomal segregation in Streptococcus faecium was slightly nonrandom and did not vary with growth rate. Results were not significantly affected by strand exchange. In contrast, labeled cell wall segregated predominantly nonrandomly.

  15. Molecular Rigidity in Dry and Hydrated Onion Cell Walls.

    PubMed Central

    Ha, M. A.; Apperley, D. C.; Jarvis, M. C.

    1997-01-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation experiments can provide information on the rigidity of individual molecules within a complex structure such as a cell wall, and thus show how each polymer can potentially contribute to the rigidity of the whole structure. We measured the proton magnetic relaxation parameters T2 (spin-spin) and T1p (spin-lattice) through the 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of dry and hydrated cell walls from onion (Allium cepa L.) bulbs. Dry cell walls behaved as rigid solids. The form of their T2 decay curves varied on a continuum between Gaussian, as in crystalline solids, and exponential, as in more mobile materials. The degree of molecular mobility that could be inferred from the T2 and T1p decay patterns was consistent with a crystalline state for cellulose and a glassy state for dry pectins. The theory of composite materials may be applied to explain the rigidity of dry onion cell walls in terms of their components. Hydration made little difference to the rigidity of cellulose and most of the xyloglucan shared this rigidity, but the pectic fraction became much more mobile. Therefore, the cellulose/xyloglucan microfibrils behaved as solid rods, and the most significant physical distinction within the hydrated cell wall was between the microfibrils and the predominantly pectic matrix. A minor xyloglucan fraction was much more mobile than the microfibrils and probably corresponded to cross-links between them. Away from the microfibrils, pectins expanded upon hydration into a nonhomogeneous, but much softer, almost-liquid gel. These data are consistent with a model for the stress-bearing hydrated cell wall in which pectins provide limited stiffness across the thickness of the wall, whereas the cross-linked microfibril network provides much greater rigidity in other directions. PMID:12223827

  16. Molecular Rigidity in Dry and Hydrated Onion Cell Walls.

    PubMed

    Ha, M. A.; Apperley, D. C.; Jarvis, M. C.

    1997-10-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation experiments can provide information on the rigidity of individual molecules within a complex structure such as a cell wall, and thus show how each polymer can potentially contribute to the rigidity of the whole structure. We measured the proton magnetic relaxation parameters T2 (spin-spin) and T1p (spin-lattice) through the 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of dry and hydrated cell walls from onion (Allium cepa L.) bulbs. Dry cell walls behaved as rigid solids. The form of their T2 decay curves varied on a continuum between Gaussian, as in crystalline solids, and exponential, as in more mobile materials. The degree of molecular mobility that could be inferred from the T2 and T1p decay patterns was consistent with a crystalline state for cellulose and a glassy state for dry pectins. The theory of composite materials may be applied to explain the rigidity of dry onion cell walls in terms of their components. Hydration made little difference to the rigidity of cellulose and most of the xyloglucan shared this rigidity, but the pectic fraction became much more mobile. Therefore, the cellulose/xyloglucan microfibrils behaved as solid rods, and the most significant physical distinction within the hydrated cell wall was between the microfibrils and the predominantly pectic matrix. A minor xyloglucan fraction was much more mobile than the microfibrils and probably corresponded to cross-links between them. Away from the microfibrils, pectins expanded upon hydration into a nonhomogeneous, but much softer, almost-liquid gel. These data are consistent with a model for the stress-bearing hydrated cell wall in which pectins provide limited stiffness across the thickness of the wall, whereas the cross-linked microfibril network provides much greater rigidity in other directions. PMID:12223827

  17. Neutrophil Attack Triggers Extracellular Trap-Dependent Candida Cell Wall Remodeling and Altered Immune Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Hopke, Alex; Nicke, Nadine; Hidu, Erica E.; Degani, Genny; Popolo, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens hide immunogenic epitopes from the host to evade immunity, persist and cause infection. The opportunistic human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, which can cause fatal disease in immunocompromised patient populations, offers a good example as it masks the inflammatory epitope β-glucan in its cell wall from host recognition. It has been demonstrated previously that β-glucan becomes exposed during infection in vivo but the mechanism behind this exposure was unknown. Here, we show that this unmasking involves neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) mediated attack, which triggers changes in fungal cell wall architecture that enhance immune recognition by the Dectin-1 β-glucan receptor in vitro. Furthermore, using a mouse model of disseminated candidiasis, we demonstrate the requirement for neutrophils in triggering these fungal cell wall changes in vivo. Importantly, we found that fungal epitope unmasking requires an active fungal response in addition to the stimulus provided by neutrophil attack. NET-mediated damage initiates fungal MAP kinase-driven responses, particularly by Hog1, that dynamically relocalize cell wall remodeling machinery including Chs3, Phr1 and Sur7. Neutrophil-initiated cell wall disruptions augment some macrophage cytokine responses to attacked fungi. This work provides insight into host-pathogen interactions during disseminated candidiasis, including valuable information about how the C. albicans cell wall responds to the biotic stress of immune attack. Our results highlight the important but underappreciated concept that pattern recognition during infection is dynamic and depends on the host-pathogen dialog. PMID:27223610

  18. Neutrophil Attack Triggers Extracellular Trap-Dependent Candida Cell Wall Remodeling and Altered Immune Recognition.

    PubMed

    Hopke, Alex; Nicke, Nadine; Hidu, Erica E; Degani, Genny; Popolo, Laura; Wheeler, Robert T

    2016-05-01

    Pathogens hide immunogenic epitopes from the host to evade immunity, persist and cause infection. The opportunistic human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, which can cause fatal disease in immunocompromised patient populations, offers a good example as it masks the inflammatory epitope β-glucan in its cell wall from host recognition. It has been demonstrated previously that β-glucan becomes exposed during infection in vivo but the mechanism behind this exposure was unknown. Here, we show that this unmasking involves neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) mediated attack, which triggers changes in fungal cell wall architecture that enhance immune recognition by the Dectin-1 β-glucan receptor in vitro. Furthermore, using a mouse model of disseminated candidiasis, we demonstrate the requirement for neutrophils in triggering these fungal cell wall changes in vivo. Importantly, we found that fungal epitope unmasking requires an active fungal response in addition to the stimulus provided by neutrophil attack. NET-mediated damage initiates fungal MAP kinase-driven responses, particularly by Hog1, that dynamically relocalize cell wall remodeling machinery including Chs3, Phr1 and Sur7. Neutrophil-initiated cell wall disruptions augment some macrophage cytokine responses to attacked fungi. This work provides insight into host-pathogen interactions during disseminated candidiasis, including valuable information about how the C. albicans cell wall responds to the biotic stress of immune attack. Our results highlight the important but underappreciated concept that pattern recognition during infection is dynamic and depends on the host-pathogen dialog. PMID:27223610

  19. Cell wall and enzyme changes during the graviresponse of the leaf-sheath pulvinus of oat (Avena sativa)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibeaut, David M.; Karuppiah, Nadarajah; Chang, S.-R.; Brock, Thomas G.; Vadlamudi, Babu; Kim, Donghern; Ghosheh, Najati S.; Rayle, David L.; Carpita, Nicholas C.; Kaufman, Peter B.

    1990-01-01

    The graviresponse of the leaf-sheath pulvinus of oat (Avena sativa) involves an asymmetric growth response and asymmetric processes involving degradation of starch and cell wall synthesis. Cellular and biochemical events were studied by investigation of the activities of related enzymes and changes in cell walls and their constituents. It is suggested that an osmotic potential gradient acts as the driving factor for growth, while wall extensibility is a limiting factor in pulvinus growth.

  20. 15. View of interior, north wall of hot cell featuring ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. View of interior, north wall of hot cell featuring radioactive materials containment box, facing east - Nevada Test Site, Reactor Maintenance & Disassembly Complex, Junior Hot Cell, Jackass Flats, Area 25, South of intersection of Roads F & G, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  1. 47. ARAI. Interior view of operating wall of hot cell ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. ARA-I. Interior view of operating wall of hot cell in ARA-626. Note stands for operators at viewing windows. Manipulators with hand grips extend cables and other controls into hot cell through ducts above windows. Ineel photo no. 81-27. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  2. Alterations in auxin homeostasis suppress defects in cell wall function.

    PubMed

    Steinwand, Blaire J; Xu, Shouling; Polko, Joanna K; Doctor, Stephanie M; Westafer, Mike; Kieber, Joseph J

    2014-01-01

    The plant cell wall is a highly dynamic structure that changes in response to both environmental and developmental cues. It plays important roles throughout plant growth and development in determining the orientation and extent of cell expansion, providing structural support and acting as a barrier to pathogens. Despite the importance of the cell wall, the signaling pathways regulating its function are not well understood. Two partially redundant leucine-rich-repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR-RLKs), FEI1 and FEI2, regulate cell wall function in Arabidopsis thaliana roots; disruption of the FEIs results in short, swollen roots as a result of decreased cellulose synthesis. We screened for suppressors of this swollen root phenotype and identified two mutations in the putative mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase E1α homolog, IAA-Alanine Resistant 4 (IAR4). Mutations in IAR4 were shown previously to disrupt auxin homeostasis and lead to reduced auxin function. We show that mutations in IAR4 suppress a subset of the fei1 fei2 phenotypes. Consistent with the hypothesis that the suppression of fei1 fei2 by iar4 is the result of reduced auxin function, disruption of the WEI8 and TAR2 genes, which decreases auxin biosynthesis, also suppresses fei1 fei2. In addition, iar4 suppresses the root swelling and accumulation of ectopic lignin phenotypes of other cell wall mutants, including procuste and cobra. Further, iar4 mutants display decreased sensitivity to the cellulose biosynthesis inhibitor isoxaben. These results establish a role for IAR4 in the regulation of cell wall function and provide evidence of crosstalk between the cell wall and auxin during cell expansion in the root. PMID:24859261

  3. Effects of spaceflight on polysaccharides of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Zhi; Wang, Qiang; Liu, Xiao-Yong; Tan, Sze-Sze

    2008-12-01

    Freeze-dried samples of four Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, namely, FL01, FL03, 2.0016, and 2.1424, were subjected to spaceflight. After the satellite's landing on Earth, the samples were recovered and changes in yeast cell wall were analyzed. Spaceflight strains of all S. cerevisiae strains showed significant changes in cell wall thickness (P < 0.05). One mutant of S. cerevisiae 2.0016 with increased biomass, cell wall thickness, and cell wall glucan was isolated (P < 0.05). The spaceflight mutant of S. cerevisiae 2.0016 showed 46.7%, 62.6%, and 146.0% increment in biomass, cell wall thickness and beta-glucan content, respectively, when compared to the ground strain. Moreover, growth curve analysis showed spaceflight S. cerevisiae 2.0016 had a faster growth rate, shorter lag phase periods, higher final biomass, and higher content of beta-glucan. Genetic stability analysis showed that prolonged subculturing of spaceflight strain S. cerevisiae 2.0016 did not lead to the appearance of variants, indicating that the genetic stability of S. cerevisiae 2.0016 mutant could be sufficient for its exploitation of beta-glucan production. PMID:18797865

  4. Purification and characterization of a soybean cell wall protein

    SciTech Connect

    San Francisco, S.; Tierney, M.L. )

    1989-04-01

    Plant cell wall composition is thought to reflect cellular responses to developmental and environmental signals. We have purified a 33 kDa protein from cell wall extracts of soybean seedlings which is most abundant in extracts from the hook region of the hypocotyl and is rich in proline and hydroxypyroline. In vivo {sup 3}H-proline labelling of hypocotyl tissues indicates that the hook tissue is the predominant site for synthesis of this protein. In unwounded hook, label is incorporated into a 33 kDa protein, while in wounded hook this and additional proteins rich in proline are synthesized. Similarly treated cell wall extracts analyzed by Western blot analysis, using a polyclonal antibody raised against this 33kD protein, showed that the 33 kDa protein is most abundant in cell wall extracts from the hook region of unwounded seedlings and does not increase upon wounding. An immunologically related 35kD protein is also apparent in extracts from wounded hooks and appears to co-migrate with one of the labelled proteins extractable from this tissue. These data indicate that there are two related, proline-rich cell wall proteins in the hook region of soybean seedlings, one of which (33 kDa) is prominent during seedling development and another (35 kDa) which is wound inducible.

  5. Shared catalysis in virus entry and bacterial cell wall depolymerization.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Daniel N; Sham, Yuk Y; Haugstad, Greg D; Xiang, Ye; Rossmann, Michael G; Anderson, Dwight L; Popham, David L

    2009-04-01

    Bacterial virus entry and cell wall depolymerization require the breakdown of peptidoglycan (PG), the peptide-cross-linked polysaccharide matrix that surrounds bacterial cells. Structural studies of lysostaphin, a PG lytic enzyme (autolysin), have suggested that residues in the active site facilitate hydrolysis, but a clear mechanism for this reaction has remained unsolved. The active-site residues and a structural pattern of beta-sheets are conserved among lysostaphin homologs (such as LytM of Staphylococcus aureus) and the C-terminal domain of gene product 13 (gp13), a protein at the tail tip of the Bacillus subtilis bacteriophage varphi29. gp13 activity on PG and muropeptides was assayed using high-performance liquid chromatography, and gp13 was found to be a d,d-endopeptidase that cleaved the peptide cross-link. Computational modeling of the B. subtilis cross-linked peptide into the gp13 active site suggested that Asp195 may facilitate scissile-bond activation and that His247 is oriented to mediate nucleophile generation. To our knowledge, this is the first model of a Zn(2)(+) metallopeptidase and its substrate. Residue Asp195 of gp13 was found to be critical for Zn(2)(+) binding and catalysis by substitution mutagenesis with Ala or Cys. Circular dichroism and particle-induced X-ray emission spectroscopy showed that the general protein folding and Zn(2)(+) binding were maintained in the Cys mutant but reduced in the Ala mutant. These findings together support a model in which the Asp195 and His247 in gp13 and homologous residues in the LytM and lysostaphin active sites facilitate hydrolysis of the peptide substrate that cross-links PG. Thus, these autolysins and phage-entry enzymes have a shared chemical mechanism of action. PMID:19361422

  6. Structure, function, and biosynthesis of plant cell walls: proceedings of the seventh annual symposium in botany

    SciTech Connect

    Dugger, W.M.; Bartnicki-Garcia, S.

    1984-01-01

    Papers in the following areas were included in these symposium proceedings: (1) cell wall chemistry and biosynthesis; (2) cell wall hydrolysis and associated physiology; (3) cellular events associated with cell wall biosynthesis; and (4) interactions of plant cell walls with pathogens and related responses. Papers have been individually abstracted for the data base. (ACR)

  7. Spatially and temporally restricted expression of PtrMYB021 regulates secondary cell wall formation in Arabidopsis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Wei; Li, Eryang; Porth, Ilga; Chen, Jin-Gui; Mansfield, Shawn D.; Douglas, Carl J.; Wang, Shucai

    2016-02-02

    Among the R2R3 MYB transcription factors that involve in the regulation of secondary cell wall formation in Arabidopsis, MYB46 alone is sufficient to induce the entire secondary cell wall biosynthesis program. PtrMYB021, the poplar homolog of MYB46, has been reported to regulate secondary cell wall formation when expressed in Arabidopsis. We report here that spatially and temporally restricted expression of PtrMYB021 is critical for its function in regulating secondary cell wall formation. By using quantitative RT-PCR, we found that PtrMYB021 was expressed primarily in xylem tissues. When expressed in Arabidopsis under the control of PtrCesA8, but not the 35S promoter,more » PtrMYB021 increased secondary cell wall thickness, which is likely caused by increased lignification as well as changes in cell wall carbohydrate composition. Consistent with this, elevated expression of lignin and cellulose biosynthetic genes were observed in the transgenic plants. Finally, when expressed in Arabidopsis protoplasts as fusion proteins to the Gal4 DNA binding domain, PtrMYB021 activated the reporter gene Gal4-GUS. In summary, our results suggest that PtrMYB021 is a transcriptional activator, and spatially and temporally restricted expression of PtrMYB021 in Arabidopsis regulates secondary cell wall formation by activating a subset of secondary cell wall biosynthesis genes.« less

  8. Induction of cell wall thickening by the antifungal compound dihydromaltophilin disrupts fungal growth and is mediated by sphingolipid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaojie; Calvo, Ana M; Yuen, Gary Y; Du, Liangcheng; Harris, Steven D

    2009-01-01

    Dihydromaltophilin (heat-stable antifungal factor [HSAF]) is an antifungal metabolite produced in Lysobacter enzymogenes biocontrol strain C3. This compound induces cell wall thickening in Aspergillus nidulans. Here we show that the cell wall thickening is a general response to HSAF in diverse fungal species. In the A. nidulans model, the thickened cell wall negatively affects hyphal growth. Growth of HSAF-pre-treated hyphae failed to resume at hyphal tips with thick cell wall and the actin cable could not re-polarize at the thickened region of the cell wall, even after the treated hyphae were transferred to drug-free medium. Moreover, HSAF-induced cell wall thickening is mediated by sphingolipid synthesis: HSAF failed to induce cell wall thickening in the absence of ceramide synthase BarA and the sphingolipid synthesis inhibitor myriocin was able to suppress HSAF-induced cell wall thickening. The thickened cell wall could be digested by chitinase suggesting that chitin contributes to the HSAF-induced thickening. Furthermore, HSAF treatment activated the transcription of two chitin synthase encoding genes chsB and chsC. PMID:21462551

  9. Ultrastructure of organic cell walls in Proterozoic microalgae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moczydlowska-Vidal, M.

    2009-04-01

    The antiquity of life has been well appreciated since the discoveries of microfossils and confirmation of their authenticity, as well as the recognition of geochemical signs of biogenicity in the Archean successions. Resolving the biological affinities of early biota is essential for the unravelling the changes that led to modern biodiversity, but also for the detection of possible biogenic records outside of the terrestrial biosphere. Advanced techniques in microscopy, tomography and spectroscopy applied to examine individual microfossils at the highest attainable spatial resolution have provided unprecedented insights into micro- and nano-scale structure and composition of organic matter. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy studies of the wall ultrastructure of sphaeromorphic and ornamented acritarchs have revealed complex, single to multilayered walls, having a unique texture in sub-layers and an occasionally preserved trilaminar sheath structure (TLS) of the cell wall. A variety of optical characteristics, the electron density and texture of fabrics of discrete layers, and the properties of biopolymers may indicate the polyphyletic affiliations of such microfossils and/or the preservation of various stages (vegetative, resting) in their life cycle. I evaluate the morphological features of organic-walled unicellular microfossils in conjunction with their cell wall ultrastructure to infer their life cycle and to recognize various developmental stages represented among microfossils attributed to a single form-taxon. Several cases of fine wall ultrastructure in microfossils have been documented and have had a conclusive influence on understanding their affinities. Some Proterozoic and Cambrian leiosphaerids are of algal affinities. Certain specimens represent chlorophyceaens, having the multilayered composite wall with TLS structure known from vegetative and resting cells in modern genera of the Chlorococcales and Volvocales. The wall ultrastructure of

  10. A phosphorylated pseudokinase complex controls cell wall synthesis in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Gee, Christine L; Papavinasasundaram, Kadamba G; Blair, Sloane R; Baer, Christina E; Falick, Arnold M; King, David S; Griffin, Jennifer E; Venghatakrishnan, Harene; Zukauskas, Andrew; Wei, Jun-Rong; Dhiman, Rakesh K; Crick, Dean C; Rubin, Eric J; Sassetti, Christopher M; Alber, Tom

    2012-01-24

    Prokaryotic cell wall biosynthesis is coordinated with cell growth and division, but the mechanisms regulating this dynamic process remain obscure. Here, we describe a phosphorylation-dependent regulatory complex that controls peptidoglycan (PG) biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We found that PknB, a PG-responsive Ser-Thr protein kinase (STPK), initiates complex assembly by phosphorylating a kinase-like domain in the essential PG biosynthetic protein, MviN. This domain was structurally diverged from active kinases and did not mediate phosphotransfer. Threonine phosphorylation of the pseudokinase domain recruited the FhaA protein through its forkhead-associated (FHA) domain. The crystal structure of this phosphorylated pseudokinase-FHA domain complex revealed the basis of FHA domain recognition, which included unexpected contacts distal to the phosphorylated threonine. Conditional degradation of these proteins in mycobacteria demonstrated that MviN was essential for growth and PG biosynthesis and that FhaA regulated these processes at the cell poles and septum. Controlling this spatially localized PG regulatory complex is only one of several cellular roles ascribed to PknB, suggesting that the capacity to coordinate signaling across multiple processes is an important feature conserved between eukaryotic and prokaryotic STPK networks. PMID:22275220

  11. A Phosphorylated Pseudokinase Complex Controls Cell Wall Synthesis in Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Gee, Christine L.; Papavinasasundaram, Kadamba G.; Blair, Sloane R.; Baer, Christina E.; Falick, Arnold M.; King, David S.; Griffin, Jennifer E.; Venghatakrishnan, Harene; Zukauskas, Andrew; Wei, Jun-Rong; Dhiman, Rakesh K.; Crick, Dean C.; Rubin, Eric J.; Sassetti, Christopher M.; Alber, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Prokaryotic cell wall biosynthesis is coordinated with cell growth and division, but the mechanisms regulating this dynamic process remain obscure. Here, we describe a phosphorylation-dependent regulatory complex that controls peptidoglycan (PG) biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We found that PknB, a PG-responsive Ser-Thr protein kinase (STPK), initiates complex assembly by phosphorylating a kinase-like domain in the essential PG biosynthetic protein, MviN. This domain was structurally diverged from active kinases and did not mediate phosphotransfer. Threonine phosphorylation of the pseudokinase domain recruited the FhaA protein through its forkhead-associated (FHA) domain. The crystal structure of this phosphorylated pseudokinase–FHA domain complex revealed the basis of FHA domain recognition, which included unexpected contacts distal to the phosphorylated threonine. Conditional degradation of these proteins in mycobacteria demonstrated that MviN was essential for growth and PG biosynthesis and that FhaA regulated these processes at the cell poles and septum. Controlling this spatially localized PG regulatory complex is only one of several cellular roles ascribed to PknB, suggesting that the capacity to coordinate signaling across multiple processes is an important feature conserved between eukaryotic and prokaryotic STPK networks. PMID:22275220

  12. Cellulose synthesis in two secondary cell wall processes in a single cell type

    PubMed Central

    Mendu, Venugopal; Stork, Jozsef; Harris, Darby; DeBolt, Seth

    2011-01-01

    Plant cells have a rigid cell wall that constrains internal turgor pressure yet extends in a regulated and organized manner to allow the cell to acquire shape. The primary load-bearing macromolecule of a plant cell wall is cellulose, which forms crystalline microfibrils that are organized with respect to a cell's function and shape requirements. A primary cell wall is deposited during expansion whereas secondary cell wall is synthesized post expansion during differentiation. A complex form of asymmetrical cellular differentiation occurs in Arabidopsis seed coat epidermal cells, where we have recently shown that two secondary cell wall processes occur that utilize different cellulose synthase (CESA) proteins. One process is to produce pectinaceous mucilage that expands upon hydration and the other is a radial wall thickening that reinforced the epidermal cell structure. Our data illustrate polarized specialization of CESA5 in facilitating mucilage attachment to the parent seed and CESA2, CESA5 and CESA9 in radial cell wall thickening and formation of the columella. Herein, we present a model for the complexity of cellulose biosynthesis in this highly differentiated cell type with further evidence supporting each cellulosic secondary cell wall process. PMID:22057330

  13. Cotton fiber: a powerful single-cell model for cell wall and cellulose research

    PubMed Central

    Haigler, Candace H.; Betancur, Lissete; Stiff, Michael R.; Tuttle, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Cotton fibers are single-celled extensions of the seed epidermis. They can be isolated in pure form as they undergo staged differentiation including primary cell wall synthesis during elongation and nearly pure cellulose synthesis during secondary wall thickening. This combination of features supports clear interpretation of data about cell walls and cellulose synthesis in the context of high throughput modern experimental technologies. Prior contributions of cotton fiber to building fundamental knowledge about cell walls will be summarized and the dynamic changes in cell wall polymers throughout cotton fiber differentiation will be described. Recent successes in using stable cotton transformation to alter cotton fiber cell wall properties as well as cotton fiber quality will be discussed. Futurec prospects to perform experiments more rapidly through altering cotton fiberwall properties via virus-induced gene silencing will be evaluated. PMID:22661979

  14. Fluorescent probes for exploring plant cell wall deconstruction: a review.

    PubMed

    Paës, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Plant biomass is a potential resource of chemicals, new materials and biofuels that could reduce our dependency on fossil carbon, thus decreasing the greenhouse effect. However, due to its chemical and structural complexity, plant biomass is recalcitrant to green biological transformation by enzymes, preventing the establishment of integrated bio-refineries. In order to gain more knowledge in the architecture of plant cell wall to facilitate their deconstruction, many fluorescent probes bearing various fluorophores have been devised and used successfully to reveal the changes in structural motifs during plant biomass deconstruction, and the molecular interactions between enzymes and plant cell wall polymers. Fluorescent probes are thus relevant tools to explore plant cell wall deconstruction. PMID:24995923

  15. A new method for extraction of pectin from cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Maness, N.O.; Mort, A.J. )

    1991-05-01

    Pectin is often extracted from plant tissues using the Ca{sup ++} chelators ethylenediamine tetraacetate (EDTA) or cyclohexane-trans-1,2 diamine tetraacetate (CDTA). While these chelators are effective in solubilizing pectin, even after extensive dialysis against distilled water, EDTA or CDTA remains associated with the pectin. The authors have found that if 500 mM imidazole buffer, pH 7.0 is substituted for 50 mM CDTA, pH 6.5, and for equivalent extraction periods, an equivalent amount of pectin with the same sugar composition is extracted. But, the imidazole buffer can be dialyzed away completely into distilled water. Their alternative procedure for extraction of pectin from cell walls will be presented. Utilization of the procedure for extraction of whole cell walls or cell walls pretreated with liquid hydrogen fluoride is discussed.

  16. Surface enhanced Raman scattering analyses of individual silver nanoaggregates on living single yeast cell wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sujith, Athiyanathil; Itoh, Tamitake; Abe, Hiroko; Anas, Abdul Aziz; Yoshida, Kenichi; Biju, Vasudevanpillai; Ishikawa, Mitsuru

    2008-03-01

    We labeled the living yeast cell surface (Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain W303-1A) by silver nanoparticles which can form nanoaggregates and found to show surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity. Blinking of SERS and its polarization dependence reveal that SERS signals are from amplified electromagnetic field at nanometric Ag nanoparticles gaps with single or a few molecules sensitivity. We tentatively assigned SERS spectra from a yeast cell wall to mannoproteins. Nanoaggregate-by-nanoaggregate variations and temporal fluctuations of SERS spectra are discussed in terms of inhomogeneous mannoprotein distribution on a cell wall and possible ways of Ag nanoaggregate adsorption, respectively.

  17. Merkel cell carcinoma of the abdominal wall

    PubMed Central

    Gaopande, Vandana L.; Joshi, Avinash R.; Khandeparkar, Siddhi G. S.; Deshmukh, Sanjay D.

    2015-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma also known as neuroendocrine carcinoma of the skin is a very rare skin tumor. It commonly presents in the old age and the common sites are head, neck and extremities. The diagnosis requires histopathological examination with immunohistochemical correlation. We report a case of Merkel cell carcinoma stage IIIB with bilateral inguinal lymphadenopathy that on FNAB showed metastatic deposits of the tumor. PMID:26225333

  18. A zoom into the nanoscale texture of secondary cell walls

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Besides classical utilization of wood and paper, lignocellulosic biomass has become increasingly important with regard to biorefinery, biofuel production and novel biomaterials. For these new applications the macromolecular assembly of cell walls is of utmost importance and therefore further insights into the arrangement of the molecules on the nanolevel have to be gained. Cell wall recalcitrance against enzymatic degradation is one of the key issues, since an efficient degradation of lignocellulosic plant material is probably the most crucial step in plant conversion to energy. A limiting factor for in-depth analysis is that high resolution characterization techniques provide structural but hardly chemical information (e.g. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)), while chemical characterization leads to a disassembly of the cell wall components or does not reach the required nanoscale resolution (Fourier Tranform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), Raman Spectroscopy). Results Here we use for the first time Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscopy (SNOM in reflection mode) on secondary plant cell walls and reveal a segmented circumferential nanostructure. This pattern in the 100 nm range was found in the secondary cell walls of a softwood (spruce), a hardwood (beech) and a grass (bamboo) and is thus concluded to be consistent among various plant species. As the nanostructural pattern is not visible in classical AFM height and phase images it is proven that the contrast is not due to changes in surfaces topography, but due to differences in the molecular structure. Conclusions Comparative analysis of model substances of casted cellulose nanocrystals and spin coated lignin indicate, that the SNOM signal is clearly influenced by changes in lignin distribution or composition. Therefore and based on the known interaction of lignin and visible light (e.g. fluorescence and resonance effects), we assume the elucidated nanoscale

  19. Climbing the Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Wall - Safely

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuentes, Jose; Greene, Stacie

    2010-01-01

    The success of the EVA team, that includes the EVA project office, Crew Office, Mission Operations, Engineering and Safety, is assured by the full integration of all necessary disciplines. Safety participation in all activities from hardware development concepts, certification and crew training, provides for a strong partnership within the team. Early involvement of Safety on the EVA team has mitigated risk and produced a high degree of mission success.

  20. Distribution of cell wall components in Sphagnum hyaline cells and in liverwort and hornwort elaters.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Celeste; Pettolino, Filomena; Bacic, Antony; Drinnan, Andrew

    2004-10-01

    Spiral secondary walls are found in hyaline cells of Sphagnum, in the elaters of most liverworts, and in elaters of the hornwort Megaceros. Recent studies on these cells suggest that cytoskeletal and ultrastructural processes involved in cell differentiation and secondary wall formation are similar in bryophytes and vascular plant tracheary elements. To examine differences in wall structure, primary and secondary wall constituents of the hyaline cells of Sphagnum novo-zelandicum and elaters of the liverwort Radula buccinifera and the hornwort Megaceros gracilis were analyzed by immunohistochemical and chemical methods. Anti-arabinogalactan-protein antibodies, JIM8 and JIM13, labeled the central fibrillar secondary wall layer of Megaceros elaters and the walls of Sphagnum leaf cells, but did not label the walls of Radula elaters. The CCRC-M7 antibody, which detects an arabinosylated (1-->6)-linked beta-galactan epitope, exclusively labeled hyaline cells in Sphagnum leaves and the secondary walls of Radula elaters. Anti-pectin antibodies, LM5 and JIM5, labeled the primary wall in Megaceros elaters. LM5 also labeled the central layer of the secondary wall but only during formation. In Radula elaters, JIM5 and another anti-pectin antibody, JIM7, labeled the primary wall. The distribution of arabinogalactan-proteins and pectic polysaccharides restricted to specific wall types and stages of development provides evidence for the developmental and functional regulation of cell wall composition in bryophytes. Monosaccharide-linkage analysis of Sphagnum leaf cell walls suggests they contain polysaccharides similar to those of higher plants. The most abundant linkage was 4-Glc, typical of cellulose, but there was also evidence for xyloglucans, 4-linked mannans, 4-linked xylans and rhamnogalacturonan-type polysaccharides. PMID:15290291

  1. Particle Trajectories in Rotating Wall Cell Culture Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran N.; Downey, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    Cell cultures are extremely important to the medical community since such cultures provide an opportunity to perform research on human tissue without the concerns inherent in experiments on individual humans. Development of cells in cultures has been found to be greatly influenced by the conditions of the culture. Much work has focused on the effect of the motions of cells in the culture relative to the solution. Recently rotating wall vessels have been used with success in achieving improved cellular cultures. Speculation and limited research have focused on the low shear environment and the ability of rotating vessels to keep cells suspended in solution rather than floating or sedimenting as the primary reasons for the improved cellular cultures using these devices. It is widely believed that the cultures obtained using a rotating wall vessel simulates to some degree the effect of microgravity on cultures. It has also been speculated that the microgravity environment may provide the ideal acceleration environment for culturing of cellular tissues due to the nearly negligible levels of sedimentation and shear possible. This work predicts particle trajectories of cells in rotating wall vessels of cylindrical and annular design consistent with the estimated properties of typical cellular cultures. Estimates of the shear encountered by cells in solution and the interactions with walls are studied. Comparisons of potential experiments in ground and microgravity environments are performed.

  2. Interactions of Condensed Tannins with Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yeast Cells and Cell Walls: Tannin Location by Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mekoue Nguela, Julie; Vernhet, Aude; Sieczkowski, Nathalie; Brillouet, Jean-Marc

    2015-09-01

    Interactions between grape tannins/red wine polyphenols and yeast cells/cell walls was previously studied within the framework of red wine aging and the use of yeast-derived products as an alternative to aging on lees. Results evidenced a quite different behavior between whole cells (biomass grown to elaborate yeast-derived products, inactivated yeast, and yeast inactivated after autolysis) and yeast cell walls (obtained from mechanical disruption of the biomass). Briefly, whole cells exhibited a high capacity to irreversibly adsorb grape and wine tannins, whereas only weak interactions were observed for cell walls. This last point was quite unexpected considering the literature and called into question the real role of cell walls in yeasts' ability to fix tannins. In the present work, tannin location after interactions between grape and wine tannins and yeast cells and cell walls was studied by means of transmission electron microscopy, light epifluorescence, and confocal microscopy. Microscopy observations evidenced that if tannins interact with cell walls, and especially cell wall mannoproteins, they also diffuse freely through the walls of dead cells to interact with their plasma membrane and cytoplasmic components. PMID:26223789

  3. Chalcone Synthase (CHS) Gene Suppression in Flax Leads to Changes in Wall Synthesis and Sensing Genes, Cell Wall Chemistry and Stem Morphology Parameters.

    PubMed

    Zuk, Magdalena; Działo, Magdalena; Richter, Dorota; Dymińska, Lucyna; Matuła, Jan; Kotecki, Andrzej; Hanuza, Jerzy; Szopa, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The chalcone synthase (CHS) gene controls the first step in the flavonoid biosynthesis. In flax, CHS down-regulation resulted in tannin accumulation and reduction in lignin synthesis, but plant growth was not affected. This suggests that lignin content and thus cell wall characteristics might be modulated through CHS activity. This study investigated the possibility that CHS affects cell wall sensing as well as polymer content and arrangement. CHS-suppressed and thus lignin-reduced plants showed significant changes in expression of genes involved in both synthesis of components and cell wall sensing. This was accompanied by increased levels of cellulose and hemicellulose. CHS-reduced flax also showed significant changes in morphology and arrangement of the cell wall. The stem tissue layers were enlarged averagely twofold compared to the control, and the number of fiber cells more than doubled. The stem morphology changes were accompanied by reduction of the crystallinity index of the cell wall. CHS silencing induces a signal transduction cascade that leads to modification of plant metabolism in a wide range and thus cell wall structure. PMID:27446124

  4. Chalcone Synthase (CHS) Gene Suppression in Flax Leads to Changes in Wall Synthesis and Sensing Genes, Cell Wall Chemistry and Stem Morphology Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Zuk, Magdalena; Działo, Magdalena; Richter, Dorota; Dymińska, Lucyna; Matuła, Jan; Kotecki, Andrzej; Hanuza, Jerzy; Szopa, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The chalcone synthase (CHS) gene controls the first step in the flavonoid biosynthesis. In flax, CHS down-regulation resulted in tannin accumulation and reduction in lignin synthesis, but plant growth was not affected. This suggests that lignin content and thus cell wall characteristics might be modulated through CHS activity. This study investigated the possibility that CHS affects cell wall sensing as well as polymer content and arrangement. CHS-suppressed and thus lignin-reduced plants showed significant changes in expression of genes involved in both synthesis of components and cell wall sensing. This was accompanied by increased levels of cellulose and hemicellulose. CHS-reduced flax also showed significant changes in morphology and arrangement of the cell wall. The stem tissue layers were enlarged averagely twofold compared to the control, and the number of fiber cells more than doubled. The stem morphology changes were accompanied by reduction of the crystallinity index of the cell wall. CHS silencing induces a signal transduction cascade that leads to modification of plant metabolism in a wide range and thus cell wall structure. PMID:27446124

  5. Temperature modulates the cell wall mechanical properties of rice coleoptiles by altering the molecular mass of hemicellulosic polysaccharides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Yukiko; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Hoson, Takayuki

    2003-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the mechanism inducing the difference in the cell wall extensibility of rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Koshihikari) coleoptiles grown under various temperature (10-50 degrees C) conditions. The growth rate and the cell wall extensibility of rice coleoptiles exhibited the maximum value at 30-40 degrees C, and became smaller as the growth temperature rose or dropped from this temperature range. The amounts of cell wall polysaccharides per unit length of coleoptile increased in coleoptiles grown at 40 degrees C, but not at other temperature conditions. On the other hand, the molecular size of hemicellulosic polysaccharides was small at temperatures where the cell wall extensibility was high (30-40 degrees C). The autolytic activities of cell walls obtained from coleoptiles grown at 30 and 40 degrees C were substantially higher than those grown at 10, 20 and 50 degrees C. Furthermore, the activities of (1-->3),(1-->4)-beta-glucanases extracted from coleoptile cell walls showed a similar tendency. When oat (1-->3),(1-->4)-beta-glucans with high molecular mass were incubated with the cell wall enzyme preparations from coleoptiles grown at various temperature conditions, the extensive molecular mass downshifts were brought about only by the cell wall enzymes obtained from coleoptiles grown at 30-40 degrees C. There were close correlations between the cell wall extensibility and the molecular mass of hemicellulosic polysaccharides or the activity of beta -glucanases. These results suggest that the environmental temperature regulates the cell wall extensibility of rice coleoptiles by modifying mainly the molecular mass of hemicellulosic polysaccharides. Modulation of the activity of beta-glucanases under various temperature conditions may be involved in the alteration of the molecular size of hemicellulosic polysaccharides.

  6. The structure of secondary cell wall polymers: how Gram-positive bacteria stick their cell walls together.

    PubMed

    Schäffer, Christina; Messner, Paul

    2005-03-01

    The cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria has been a subject of detailed chemical study over the past five decades. Outside the cytoplasmic membrane of these organisms the fundamental polymer is peptidoglycan (PG), which is responsible for the maintenance of cell shape and osmotic stability. In addition, typical essential cell wall polymers such as teichoic or teichuronic acids are linked to some of the peptidoglycan chains. In this review these compounds are considered as 'classical' cell wall polymers. In the course of recent investigations of bacterial cell surface layers (S-layers) a different class of 'non-classical' secondary cell wall polymers (SCWPs) has been identified, which is involved in anchoring of S-layers to the bacterial cell surface. Comparative analyses have shown considerable differences in chemical composition, overall structure and charge behaviour of these SCWPs. This review discusses the progress that has been made in understanding the structural principles of SCWPs, which may have useful applications in S-layer-based 'supramolecular construction kits' in nanobiotechnology. PMID:15758211

  7. Anammox Planctomycetes have a peptidoglycan cell wall

    PubMed Central

    van Teeseling, Muriel C.F.; Mesman, Rob J.; Kuru, Erkin; Espaillat, Akbar; Cava, Felipe; Brun, Yves V.; VanNieuwenhze, Michael S.; Kartal, Boran; van Niftrik, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Planctomycetes are intriguing microorganisms that apparently lack peptidoglycan, a structure that controls the shape and integrity of almost all bacterial cells. Therefore, the planctomycetal cell envelope is considered exceptional and their cell plan uniquely compartmentalized. Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) Planctomycetes play a key role in the global nitrogen cycle by releasing fixed nitrogen back to the atmosphere as N2. Here using a complementary array of state-of-the-art techniques including continuous culturing, cryo-transmission electron microscopy, peptidoglycan-specific probes and muropeptide analysis, we show that the anammox bacterium Kuenenia stuttgartiensis contains peptidoglycan. On the basis of the thickness, composition and location of peptidoglycan in K. stuttgartiensis, we propose to redefine Planctomycetes as Gram-negative bacteria. Our results demonstrate that Planctomycetes are not an exception to the universal presence of peptidoglycan in bacteria. PMID:25962786

  8. Cell Wall Nonlinear Elasticity and Growth Dynamics: How Do Bacterial Cells Regulate Pressure and Growth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yi

    In my thesis, I study intact and bulging Escherichia coli cells using atomic force microscopy to separate the contributions of the cell wall and turgor pressure to the overall cell stiffness. I find strong evidence of power--law stress--stiffening in the E. coli cell wall, with an exponent of 1.22±0.12, such that the wall is significantly stiffer in intact cells (E = 23±8 MPa and 49±20 MPa in the axial and circumferential directions) than in unpressurized sacculi. These measurements also indicate that the turgor pressure in living cells E. coli is 29±3 kPa. The nonlinearity in cell elasticity serves as a plausible mechanism to balance the mechanical protection and tension measurement sensitivity of the cell envelope. I also study the growth dynamics of the Bacillus subtilis cell wall to help understand the mechanism of the spatiotemporal order of inserting new cell wall material. High density fluorescent markers are used to label the entire cell surface to capture the morphological changes of the cell surface at sub-cellular to diffraction-limited spatial resolution and sub-minute temporal resolution. This approach reveals that rod-shaped chaining B. subtilis cells grow and twist in a highly heterogeneous fashion both spatially and temporally. Regions of high growth and twisting activity have a typical length scale of 5 μm, and last for 10-40 minutes. Motivated by the quantification of the cell wall growth dynamics, two microscopy and image analysis techniques are developed and applied to broader applications beyond resolving bacterial growth. To resolve densely distributed quantum dots, we present a fast and efficient image analysis algorithm, namely Spatial Covariance Reconstruction (SCORE) microscopy that takes into account the blinking statistics of the fluorescence emitters. We achieve sub-diffraction lateral resolution of 100 nm from 5 to 7 seconds of imaging, which is at least an order of magnitude faster than single-particle localization based methods

  9. The Cellulose System in the Cell Wall of Micrasterias

    PubMed

    Kim; Herth; Vuong; Chanzy

    1996-11-01

    The cellulose system of the cell wall of Micrasterias denticulata and Micrasterias rotata was analyzed by diffraction contrast transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, and X-ray analysis. The studies, achieved on disencrusted cell ghosts, confirmed that the cellulose microfibrils occurred in crisscrossed bands consisting of a number of parallel ribbon-like microfibrils. The individual microfibrils had thicknesses of 5 nm for a width of around 20 nm, but in some instances, two or three microfibrils merged into one another to yield larger monocrystalline domains reaching up to 60 nm in lateral size. The orientation of the cellulose of Micrasterias is very unusual, as it was found that in the cell wall, the equatorial crystallographic planes of cellulose having a d-spacing of 0.60 nm [(11;0) in the Ibeta cellulose unit cell defined by Sugiyama et al., 1991, Macromolecules 24, 4168-4175] were oriented perpendicular to the cell wall surface. Up to now, such orientation has been found only in Spirogyra, another member of the Zygnemataceae group. The unusual structure of the secondary wall cellulose of Micrasterias may be tentatively correlated with the unique organization of the terminal complexes, which in this alga occur as hexagonal arrays of rosettes. PMID:8986649

  10. A model of cell wall expansion based on thermodynamics of polymer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veytsman, B. A.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    A theory of cell wall extension is proposed. It is shown that macroscopic properties of cell walls can be explained through the microscopic properties of interpenetrating networks of cellulose and hemicellulose. The qualitative conclusions of the theory agree with the existing experimental data. The dependence of the cell wall yield threshold on the secretion of the wall components is discussed.

  11. The yin and yang of cell wall integrity control: brassinosteroid and FERONIA signaling.

    PubMed

    Höfte, Herman

    2015-02-01

    Understanding how developmental and environmental signals control plant cell expansion requires an intimate knowledge of the architecture of the primary cell wall and the chemo-rheological processes that underlie cell wall relaxation. In this review I discuss recent findings that reveal a more prominent role than previously suspected for covalent bonds and pectin cross-links in primary cell wall architecture. In addition, genetic studies have uncovered a role for receptor kinases in the control of cell wall homeostasis in growing cells. The emerging view is that, upon cell wall disruption, compensatory changes are induced in the cell wall through the interplay between the brassinosteroid signaling module, which positively regulates wall extensibility and receptor kinases of the CrRLKL1 family, which may act as negative regulators of cell wall stiffness. These findings lift the tip of the veil of a complex signaling network allowing normal homeostasis in walls of growing cells but also crisis management under stress conditions. PMID:25481004

  12. Influence of the Cell Wall on Intracellular Delivery to Algal Cells by Electroporation and Sonication

    PubMed Central

    Azencott, Harold R.; Peter, Gary F.; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2007-01-01

    To assess the cell wall’s role as a barrier to intracellular delivery, wild-type Chlamydomonas reinhardtii algal cells and mutant cells lacking a cell wall were exposed to electroporation or sonication. Flow cytometry determined intracellular uptake of calcein and bovine serum albumin (BSA) and loss of cell viability as functions of electroporation transmembrane potential and acoustic energy. Electroporation of wild-type cells increased calcein uptake with increasing transmembrane potential, but delivered much less BSA. Electroporation of wall-deficient cells had similar effects on calcein uptake, but increased BSA uptake as much as 7.5-fold relative to wild-type cells, which indicated that the cell wall was a significant barrier to BSA delivery during electroporation. Sonication of wild-type cells caused calcein and BSA uptake at similar levels. This suggests that the cell wall barrier to BSA delivery can be overcome by sonication. Increased electroporation transmembrane potential or acoustic energy also caused increased loss of cell viability, where wall-deficient cells were especially susceptible to lysis. Overall, we believe this is the first study to compare the effects of electroporation and sonication in a direct fashion in any cell type. Specifically, these findings suggest that electroporation primarily transports molecules across the plasma membrane, because its mechanism is specific to lipid bilayer disruption, whereas sonication transports molecules across both the plasma membrane and cell wall, because it non-specifically disrupts cell-surface barriers. PMID:17602827

  13. Cell wall structure and function in lactic acid bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria is a complex assemblage of glycopolymers and proteins. It consists of a thick peptidoglycan sacculus that surrounds the cytoplasmic membrane and that is decorated with teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and proteins. It plays a major role in bacterial physiology since it maintains cell shape and integrity during growth and division; in addition, it acts as the interface between the bacterium and its environment. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are traditionally and widely used to ferment food, and they are also the subject of more and more research because of their potential health-related benefits. It is now recognized that understanding the composition, structure, and properties of LAB cell walls is a crucial part of developing technological and health applications using these bacteria. In this review, we examine the different components of the Gram-positive cell wall: peptidoglycan, teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and proteins. We present recent findings regarding the structure and function of these complex compounds, results that have emerged thanks to the tandem development of structural analysis and whole genome sequencing. Although general structures and biosynthesis pathways are conserved among Gram-positive bacteria, studies have revealed that LAB cell walls demonstrate unique properties; these studies have yielded some notable, fundamental, and novel findings. Given the potential of this research to contribute to future applied strategies, in our discussion of the role played by cell wall components in LAB physiology, we pay special attention to the mechanisms controlling bacterial autolysis, bacterial sensitivity to bacteriophages and the mechanisms underlying interactions between probiotic bacteria and their hosts. PMID:25186919

  14. Cell wall structure and function in lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre; Kulakauskas, Saulius

    2014-08-29

    The cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria is a complex assemblage of glycopolymers and proteins. It consists of a thick peptidoglycan sacculus that surrounds the cytoplasmic membrane and that is decorated with teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and proteins. It plays a major role in bacterial physiology since it maintains cell shape and integrity during growth and division; in addition, it acts as the interface between the bacterium and its environment. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are traditionally and widely used to ferment food, and they are also the subject of more and more research because of their potential health-related benefits. It is now recognized that understanding the composition, structure, and properties of LAB cell walls is a crucial part of developing technological and health applications using these bacteria. In this review, we examine the different components of the Gram-positive cell wall: peptidoglycan, teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and proteins. We present recent findings regarding the structure and function of these complex compounds, results that have emerged thanks to the tandem development of structural analysis and whole genome sequencing. Although general structures and biosynthesis pathways are conserved among Gram-positive bacteria, studies have revealed that LAB cell walls demonstrate unique properties; these studies have yielded some notable, fundamental, and novel findings. Given the potential of this research to contribute to future applied strategies, in our discussion of the role played by cell wall components in LAB physiology, we pay special attention to the mechanisms controlling bacterial autolysis, bacterial sensitivity to bacteriophages and the mechanisms underlying interactions between probiotic bacteria and their hosts. PMID:25186919

  15. Overexpression of PhEXPA1 increases cell size, modifies cell wall polymer composition and affects the timing of axillary meristem development in Petunia hybrida.

    PubMed

    Zenoni, Sara; Fasoli, Marianna; Tornielli, Giovanni Battista; Dal Santo, Silvia; Sanson, Andrea; de Groot, Peter; Sordo, Sara; Citterio, Sandra; Monti, Francesca; Pezzotti, Mario

    2011-08-01

    • Expansins are cell wall proteins required for cell enlargement and cell wall loosening during many developmental processes. The involvement of the Petunia hybrida expansin A1 (PhEXPA1) gene in cell expansion, the control of organ size and cell wall polysaccharide composition was investigated by overexpressing PhEXPA1 in petunia plants. • PhEXPA1 promoter activity was evaluated using a promoter-GUS assay and the protein's subcellular localization was established by expressing a PhEXPA1-GFP fusion protein. PhEXPA1 was overexpressed in transgenic plants using the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and chemical analysis were used for the quantitative analysis of cell wall polymers. • The GUS and GFP assays demonstrated that PhEXPA1 is present in the cell walls of expanding tissues. The constitutive overexpression of PhEXPA1 significantly affected expansin activity and organ size, leading to changes in the architecture of petunia plants by initiating premature axillary meristem outgrowth. Moreover, a significant change in cell wall polymer composition in the petal limbs of transgenic plants was observed. • These results support a role for expansins in the determination of organ shape, in lateral branching, and in the variation of cell wall polymer composition, probably reflecting a complex role in cell wall metabolism. PMID:21534969

  16. The Conversion of Exterior Wall Facings for Climbing Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    March, Bill; Toft, Murray

    1979-01-01

    The conversion of existing exterior walls to provide facilities for outdoor rock climbing activities is described with particular emphasis on design to provide practice in basic movement skills such as correct use of holds, balance, controlled change of position, traversing, and moving up and down. (JMF)

  17. Active sound attenuation across a double wall structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Shepherd, Kevin P.

    1991-01-01

    The possibility of achieving significant local and global sound attenuation across a flat double wall is demonstrated. It is also shown that sound can be prevented from entering the interior of a cabinlike environment. The approach used is unlike established active noise control techniques.

  18. Environmental stability of stem cell wall traits in alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The concentration of stem cell wall constituents in alfalfa, Medicago sativa L., herbage can affect dry matter intake and energy availability in dairy and beef production systems and impact energy conversion efficiency when alfalfa is used to produce biofuels. Stem Klason lignin, glucose, xylose, an...

  19. Cell wall proteome of Clostridium thermocellum and detection of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tingting; Xu, Xinping; Peng, Yanfeng; Luo, Yuanming; Yang, Keqian

    2012-06-20

    Clostridium thermocellum, a thermophilic anaerobe, has the unusual capacity to convert cellulosic biomass into ethanol and hydrogen. In this work, the cell wall proteome of C. thermocellum was investigated. The proteins in the cell wall fraction of C. thermocellum prepared by the boiling SDS method were released by mutanolysin digestion and resolved on two-dimensional (2D) gel. One hundred and thirty-two proteins were identified by mass spectrometry, among which the extracellular solute-binding protein (CbpB/cthe_1020), enolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and translation elongation factor EF-Tu were detected as highly abundant proteins. Besides the known surface localized proteins, including FtsZ, MinD, GroEL, DnaK, many enzymes involved in bioenergetics, such as alcohol dehydrogenases and hydrogenases were also detected. By glycan stain and MS analysis of glycopeptides, we identified CbpB as a glycoprotein, which is the second glycoprotein from C. thermocellum characterized. The fact that CbpB was highly abundant in the cell wall region and glycosylated, reflects its importance in substrate assimilation. Our results indicate cell wall proteins constitute a significant portion of cellular proteins and may play important physiological roles (i.e. bioenergetics) in this bacterium. The insights described are relevant for the development of C. thermocellum as a biofuel producer. PMID:22494898

  20. Titration of Isolated Cell Walls of Lemna minor L 1

    PubMed Central

    Morvan, Claudine; Demarty, Maurice; Thellier, Michel

    1979-01-01

    A theoretical model has been built to bypass the equation of titration of the cell wall. This equation, which is an extension of the Henderson-Hasselbach equation, underlines the importance of the exchange constant, the ionic strength as well as the rate of neutralization. The model is restricted to the case when the ionization degree is equal to the neutralization degree. The shape of the titration curve is shown to be strongly dependent on the valency of the base used. Experimental results have shown that isolated cell walls bear at least two kinds of sites. The first sites which are titrated after a short time of equilibration are attributed to polyuronic acids (capacity: 0.3 milliequivalents per gram fresh cell walls). The second sites, are obtained after a long time of equilibration (capacity: 1.2 to 1.3 milliequivalents per gram, fresh cell walls). Titrations have been performed with different bases [KOH, NaOH, and Ca(OH)2] and under different ionic strengths. The results obtained with NaOH and KOH do not exhibit any difference of selectivity. Conversely, the sites have a much bigger affinity for the Ca2+ ions than for the monovalent ones. The apparent pKa of the uronic acids was estimated to lie between 3.0 and 3.4; this is consistent with the values obtained with polyuronic acid solutions. PMID:16660868

  1. Hetero-oligomeric cell wall channels (porins) of Nocardia farcinica.

    PubMed

    Kläckta, Christian; Knörzer, Philipp; Riess, Franziska; Benz, Roland

    2011-06-01

    The cell wall of Nocardia farcinica contains a cation-selective cell wall channel, which may be responsible for the limited permeability of the cell wall of N. farcinica for negatively charged antibiotics. Based on partial sequencing of the protein responsible for channel formation derived from N. farcinica ATTC 3318 we were able to identify the corresponding genes (nfa15890 and nfa15900) within the known genome of N. farcinica IFM 10152. The corresponding genes of N. farcinica ATTC 3318 were separately expressed in the Escherichia coli BL21DE3Omp8 strain and the N-terminal His10-tagged proteins were purified to homogeneity using immobilized metal affinity chromatography. The pure proteins were designated NfpANHis and NfpBNHis, for N. farcinica porin A and N. farcinica porin B. The two proteins were checked separately for channel formation in lipid bilayers. Our results clearly indicate that the proteins NfpANHis and NfpBNHis expressed in E. coli could only together form a channel in lipid bilayer membranes. This means that the cell wall channel of N. farcinica is formed by a heterooligomer. NfpA and NfpB form together a channel that may structurally be related to MspA of Mycobacterium smegmatis based on amino acid comparison and renaturation procedure. PMID:21092733

  2. Medicago truncatula as a Model for Dicot Cell Wall Development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Strong interest in renewable energy has promoted an upsurge of research on plant cell wall traits that influence the availability of lignocellulosic-derived sugars for fermentation in production of biofuels. We have initiated a genome-wide transcript profiling study using the model legume Medicago t...

  3. Determination of carbohydrate profile in sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris) cell walls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugarbeet germplasms USH20, C869, EL55, EL54 were used, and different tissues at different developmental stages were sampled, including dry seeds, germinating seedlings, developing leaves, mature leaves, petioles, hypocotyls, mature roots, flowering stems and inflorescences. Cell Wall Composition An...

  4. Significant quantities of the glycolytic enzyme phosphoglycerate mutase are present in the cell wall of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Motshwene, Precious; Brandt, Wolf; Lindsey, George

    2003-01-01

    NaOH was used to extract proteins from the cell walls of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This treatment was shown not to disrupt yeast cells, as NaOH-extracted cells displayed a normal morphology upon electron microscopy. Moreover, extracted and untreated cells had qualitatively similar protein contents upon disruption. When yeast was grown in the presence of 1 M mannitol, two proteins were found to be present at an elevated concentration in the cell wall. These were found to be the late-embryogenic-abundant-like protein heat-shock protein 12 and the glycolytic enzyme phosphoglycerate mutase. The presence of phosphoglycerate mutase in the cell wall was confirmed by immunocytochemical analysis. Not only was the phosphoglycerate mutase in the yeast cell wall found to be active, but whole yeast cells were also able to convert 3-phosphoglycerate in the medium into ethanol, provided that the necessary cofactors were present. PMID:12238949

  5. Undressing the fungal cell wall/cell membrane--the antifungal drug targets.

    PubMed

    Tada, Rui; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Aimanianda, Vishukumar

    2013-01-01

    Being external, the fungal cell wall plays a crucial role in the fungal life. By covering the underneath cell, it offers mechanical strength and acts as a barrier, thus protecting the fungus from the hostile environment. Chemically, this cell wall is composed of different polysaccharides. Because of their specific composition, the fungal cell wall and its underlying plasma membrane are unique targets for the development of drugs against pathogenic fungal species. The objective of this review is to consolidate the current knowledge on the antifungal drugs targeting the cell wall and plasma membrane, mainly of Aspergillus and Candida species - the most prevalent fungal pathogens, and also to present challenges and questions conditioning the development of new antifungal drugs targeting the cell wall. PMID:23278542

  6. Partial Chemical Characterization of Corn Root Cell Walls 1

    PubMed Central

    Dever, John E.; Bandurski, Robert S.; Kivilaan, A.

    1968-01-01

    The present study reports on chemical changes which occur in the cell wall of Zea mays during early phases of growth. Roots of seedling corn plants were divided into a meristematic zone, the zone of elongation, and the maturation zone, and the cell wall isolated from each of these zones. The wall preparations were then extracted sequentially to obtain pectin, hemicellulose, cellulose, and lignin fractions. Each of these, except for the lignin fraction, was hydrolyzed and the resultant sugars isolated, identified, and estimated quantitatively. Quantitative analysis of the products of hydrolysis of these fractions demonstrated that the classical scheme of fractionation is a valuable indicator of the changes in solubility properties which the various polysaccharide components for the wall undergo. It does not however yield definite chemical entities. For example, the “pectin” fraction contains only about 3% galacturonic acid; the bulk of it being composed of glucose, xylose, and galactose. By summation of analysis of these various fractions, it was found that substances yielding glucose and xylose upon hydrolysis increase with advancing age of the tissue. Galactose- and arabinose-yielding compounds decrease and mannose appears during maturation. Anhydrouronic acids first decrease, then increase. Most interestingly, of the total dry weight of the cell wall, only 24, 45, and 50% of the meristematic, elongation, and maturation zones respectively are accounted for as simple sugars in the acid hydrolysates. Oligosaccharides were not encountered in large amounts so that the 50 to 75% of the wall weight unaccounted for would consist of polysaccharides or oligosaccharides not precipitated by ethanol from the extracting solutions employed and by polysaccharides in the hemicellulose fraction which are resistant to acid hydrolysis. PMID:16656735

  7. Cell-Wall Polysaccharides of Developing Flax Plants.

    PubMed Central

    Gorshkova, T. A.; Wyatt, S. E.; Salnikov, V. V.; Gibeaut, D. M.; Ibragimov, M. R.; Lozovaya, V. V.; Carpita, N. C.

    1996-01-01

    Flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) fibers originate from procambial cells of the protophloem and develop in cortical bundles that encircle the vascular cylinder. We determined the polysaccharide composition of the cell walls from various organs of the developing flax plant, from fiber-rich strips peeled from the stem, and from the xylem. Ammonium oxalate-soluble polysaccharides from all tissues contained 5-linked arabinans with low degrees of branching, rhamnogalacturonans, and polygalacturonic acid. The fiber-rich peels contained, in addition, substantial amounts of a buffer-soluble, 4-linked galactan branched at the 0-2 and 0-3 positions with nonreducing terminal-galactosyl units. The cross-linking glycans from all tissues were (fucogalacto)xyloglucan, typical of type-I cell walls, xylans containing (1->)-[beta]-D-xylosyl units branched exclusively at the xylosyl O-2 with t-(4-O-methyl)-glucosyluronic acid units, and (galacto)glucomannans. Tissues containing predominantly primary cell wall contained a larger proportion of xyloglucan. The xylem cells were composed of about 60% 4-xylans, 32% cellulose, and small amounts of pectin and the other cross-linking polysaccharides. The noncellulosic polysaccharides of flax exhibit an uncommonly low degree of branching compared to similar polysaccharides from other flowering plants. Although the relative abundance of the various noncellulosic polysaccharides varies widely among the different cell types, the linkage structure and degree of branching of several of the noncellulosic polysaccharides are invariant. PMID:12226214

  8. Detection of Cell Wall Chemical Variation in Zea Mays Mutants Using Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Buyck, N.; Thomas, S.

    2001-01-01

    Corn stover is regarded as the prime candidate feedstock material for commercial biomass conversion in the United States. Variations in chemical composition of Zea mays cell walls can affect biomass conversion process yields and economics. Mutant lines were constructed by activating a Mu transposon system. The cell wall chemical composition of 48 mutant families was characterized using near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. NIR data were analyzed using a multivariate statistical analysis technique called Principal Component Analysis (PCA). PCA of the NIR data from 349 maize leaf samples reveals 57 individuals as outliers on one or more of six Principal Components (PCs) at the 95% confidence interval. Of these, 19 individuals from 16 families are outliers on either PC3 (9% of the variation) or PC6 (1% of the variation), the two PCs that contain information about cell wall polymers. Those individuals for which altered cell wall chemistry is confirmed with wet chemical analysis will then be subjected to fermentation analysis to determine whether or not biomass conversion process kinetics, yields and/or economics are significantly affected. Those mutants that provide indications for a decrease in process cost will be pursued further to identify the gene(s) responsible for the observed changes in cell wall composition and associated changes in process economics. These genes will eventually be incorporated into maize breeding programs directed at the development of a truly dual use crop.

  9. Major changes in the cell wall during silique development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Louvet, Romain; Rayon, Catherine; Domon, Jean-Marc; Rusterucci, Christine; Fournet, Françoise; Leaustic, Antoine; Crépeau, Marie-Jeanne; Ralet, Marie-Christine; Rihouey, Christophe; Bardor, Muriel; Lerouge, Patrice; Gillet, Françoise; Pelloux, Jérôme

    2011-01-01

    Fruit development is a highly complex process, which involves major changes in plant metabolism leading to cell growth and differentiation. Changes in cell wall composition and structure play a major role in modulating cell growth. We investigated the changes in cell wall composition and the activities of associated enzymes during the dry fruit development of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Silique development is characterized by several specific phases leading to fruit dehiscence and seed dispersal. We showed that early phases of silique growth were characterized by specific changes in non-cellulosic sugar content (rhamnose, arabinose, xylose, galactose and galacturonic acid). Xyloglucan oligosaccharide mass profiling further showed a strong increase in O-acetylated xyloglucans over the course of silique development, which could suggest a decreased capacity of xyloglucans to be associated with each other or to cellulose. The degree of methylesterification, mediated by the activity of pectin methylesterases (PMEs), decreased over the course of silique growth and dehiscence. The major changes in cell wall composition revealed by our analysis suggest that it could be major determinants in modulating cell wall rheology leading to growth or growth arrest. PMID:21051061

  10. Crushing Strength of Aluminum Honeycomb with Thinning Cell Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogasawara, Nagahisa; Chiba, Norimasa; Kobayashi, Eiji; Kikuchi, Yuji

    To evaluate the crash safety of automobiles, various collision tests are performed by the auto industry. In the offset frontal collision test and the side collision test, the target is an aluminum honeycomb material which has thinning cell walls. In this study, based on the analyses of the shock absorption mechanism, a new crushing strength formula is proposed. First, load-displacement curves obtained from compression tests in quasi-static condition showed an almost linear relation between a thinning rate of cell walls and a crushing strength. Second, based on Wierzbicki's theory, a new formula was proposed, which can estimate a crushing strength of a honeycomb material with thinning wall. In addition, a correcting equation which considered an elastic deformation was also proposed. Third, parametric analyses were carried out with a FE model which can simulate a delamination between cell walls. The results obtained from the theory and FEM almost corresponded to each other for a wide range of the thinning rate. Fourth, impact tests were carried out, in which the weight was dropped freely at the speed used for the automobile tests. Those results almost agreed well with the sum of the theoretical crush strength and the inside air pressure.

  11. Nucleated assembly of Chlamydomonas and Volvox cell walls.

    PubMed

    Adair, W S; Steinmetz, S A; Mattson, D M; Goodenough, U W; Heuser, J E

    1987-11-01

    The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cell wall is made up of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins, arranged in five distinct layers. The W6 (crystalline) layer contains three major glycoproteins (GP1, GP2, GP3), selectively extractable with chaotropic agents, that self-assemble into crystals in vitro. A system to study W6 assembly in a quantitative fashion was developed that employs perchlorate-extracted Chlamydomonas cells as nucleating agents. Wall reconstitution by biotinylated W6 monomers was monitored by FITC-streptavidin fluorescence and quick-freeze/deep-etch electron microscopy. Optimal reconstitution was obtained at monomer concentrations (0.2-0.3 mg/ml) well below those required for nonnucleated assembly. Assembly occurred from multiple nucleation sites, and faithfully reflected the structure of the intact W6 layer. Specificity of nucleated assembly was demonstrated using two cell-wall mutants (cw-2 and cw-15); neither served as a substrate for assembly of wild-type monomers. In addition, W6 sublayers were assembled from purified components: GP2 and GP3 coassembled to form the inner (W6A) sublayer; this then served as a substrate for self-assembly of GP1 into the outer (W6B) sublayer. Finally, evolutionary relationships between C. reinhardtii and two additional members of the Volvocales (Chlamydomonas eugametos and Volvox carteri) were explored by performing interspecific reconstitutions. Hybrid walls were obtained between C. reinhardtii and Volvox but not with C. eugametos, confirming taxonomic assignments based on structural criteria. PMID:3680387

  12. Cell wall staining with Trypan blue enables quantitative analysis of morphological changes in yeast cells

    PubMed Central

    Liesche, Johannes; Marek, Magdalena; Günther-Pomorski, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Yeast cells are protected by a cell wall that plays an important role in the exchange of substances with the environment. The cell wall structure is dynamic and can adapt to different physiological states or environmental conditions. For the investigation of morphological changes, selective staining with fluorescent dyes is a valuable tool. Furthermore, cell wall staining is used to facilitate sub-cellular localization experiments with fluorescently-labeled proteins and the detection of yeast cells in non-fungal host tissues. Here, we report staining of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall with Trypan Blue, which emits strong red fluorescence upon binding to chitin and yeast glucan; thereby, it facilitates cell wall analysis by confocal and super-resolution microscopy. The staining pattern of Trypan Blue was similar to that of the widely used UV-excitable, blue fluorescent cell wall stain Calcofluor White. Trypan Blue staining facilitated quantification of cell size and cell wall volume when utilizing the optical sectioning capacity of a confocal microscope. This enabled the quantification of morphological changes during growth under anaerobic conditions and in the presence of chemicals, demonstrating the potential of this approach for morphological investigations or screening assays. PMID:25717323

  13. Altered excitability of cultured chromaffin cells following exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Gavello, Daniela; Vandael, David H F; Cesa, Roberta; Premoselli, Federica; Marcantoni, Andrea; Cesano, Federico; Scarano, Domenica; Fubini, Bice; Carbone, Emilio; Fenoglio, Ivana; Carabelli, Valentina

    2012-02-01

    We studied the effects of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on the electrophysiological properties of cultured mouse chromaffin cells, a model of spontaneously firing cells. The exposure of chromaffin cells to MWCNTs at increasing concentrations (30-263 μg/ml) for 24 h reduced, in a dose-dependent way, both the cell membrane input resistance and the number of spontaneously active cells (from 80-52%). Active cells that survived from the toxic effects of MWCNTs exhibited more positive resting potentials, higher firing frequencies and unaltered voltage-gated Ca(2+), Na(+) and K+ current amplitudes. MWCNTs slowed down the inactivation kinetics of Ca(2+)-dependent BK channels. These electrophysiological effects were accompanied by MWCNTs internalization, as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, indicating that most of the toxic effects derive from a dose-dependent MWCNTs-cell interaction that damages the spontaneous cell activity. PMID:21322767

  14. Resistance to antibiotics targeted to the bacterial cell wall

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaidis, I; Favini-Stabile, S; Dessen, A

    2014-01-01

    Peptidoglycan is the main component of the bacterial cell wall. It is a complex, three-dimensional mesh that surrounds the entire cell and is composed of strands of alternating glycan units crosslinked by short peptides. Its biosynthetic machinery has been, for the past five decades, a preferred target for the discovery of antibacterials. Synthesis of the peptidoglycan occurs sequentially within three cellular compartments (cytoplasm, membrane, and periplasm), and inhibitors of proteins that catalyze each stage have been identified, although not all are applicable for clinical use. A number of these antimicrobials, however, have been rendered inactive by resistance mechanisms. The employment of structural biology techniques has been instrumental in the understanding of such processes, as well as the development of strategies to overcome them. This review provides an overview of resistance mechanisms developed toward antibiotics that target bacterial cell wall precursors and its biosynthetic machinery. Strategies toward the development of novel inhibitors that could overcome resistance are also discussed. PMID:24375653

  15. Messenger Functions of the Bacterial Cell Wall-derived Muropeptides

    PubMed Central

    Boudreau, Marc A.; Fisher, Jed. F.; Mobashery, Shahriar

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial muropeptides are soluble peptidoglycan structures central to recycling of the bacterial cell wall, and messengers in diverse cell-signaling events. Bacteria sense muropeptides as signals that antibiotics targeting cell-wall biosynthesis are present, and eukaryotes detect muropeptides during the innate immune response to bacterial infection. This review summarizes the roles of bacterial muropeptides as messengers, with a special emphasis on bacterial muropeptide structures and the relationship of structure to the biochemical events that the muropeptides elicit. Muropeptide sensing and recycling in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria is discussed, followed by muropeptide sensing by eukaryotes as a crucial event to the innate immune response of insects (via peptidoglycan-recognition proteins) and mammals (through Nod-like receptors) to bacterial invasion. PMID:22409164

  16. Overexpression of the carbohydrate binding module of strawberry expansin2 in Arabidopsis thaliana modifies plant growth and cell wall metabolism.

    PubMed

    Nardi, Cristina F; Villarreal, Natalia M; Rossi, Franco R; Martínez, Santiago; Martínez, Gustavo A; Civello, Pedro M

    2015-05-01

    Several cell wall enzymes are carbohydrate active enzymes that contain a putative Carbohydrate Binding Module (CBM) in their structures. The main function of these non-catalitic modules is to facilitate the interaction between the enzyme and its substrate. Expansins are non-hydrolytic proteins present in the cell wall, and their structure includes a CBM in the C-terminal that bind to cell wall polymers such as cellulose, hemicelluloses and pectins. We studied the ability of the Expansin2 CBM (CBMFaEXP2) from strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa, Duch) to modify the cell wall of Arabidopsis thaliana. Plants overexpressing CBMFaEXP2 were characterized phenotypically and biochemically. Transgenic plants were taller than wild type, possibly owing to a faster growth of the main stem. Cell walls of CBMFaEXP2-expressing plants were thicker and contained higher amount of pectins. Lower activity of a set of enzymes involved in cell wall degradation (PG, β-Gal, β-Xyl) was found, and the expression of the corresponding genes (AtPG, Atβ-Gal, Atβ-Xyl5) was reduced also. In addition, a decrease in the expression of two A. thaliana Expansin genes (AtEXP5 and AtEXP8) was observed. Transgenic plants were more resistant to Botrytis cinerea infection than wild type, possibly as a consequence of higher cell wall integrity. Our results support the hypothesis that the overexpression of a putative CBM is able to modify plant cell wall structure leading to modulation of wall loosening and plant growth. These findings might offer a tool to controlling physiological processes where cell wall disassembly is relevant, such as fruit softening. PMID:25837738

  17. Ectopic lignification in primary cellulose-deficient cell walls of maize cell suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Mélida, Hugo; Largo-Gosens, Asier; Novo-Uzal, Esther; Santiago, Rogelio; Pomar, Federico; García, Pedro; García-Angulo, Penélope; Acebes, José Luis; Álvarez, Jesús; Encina, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) suspension-cultured cells with up to 70% less cellulose were obtained by stepwise habituation to dichlobenil (DCB), a cellulose biosynthesis inhibitor. Cellulose deficiency was accompanied by marked changes in cell wall matrix polysaccharides and phenolics as revealed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Cell wall compositional analysis indicated that the cellulose-deficient cell walls showed an enhancement of highly branched and cross-linked arabinoxylans, as well as an increased content in ferulic acid, diferulates and p-coumaric acid, and the presence of a polymer that stained positive for phloroglucinol. In accordance with this, cellulose-deficient cell walls showed a fivefold increase in Klason-type lignin. Thioacidolysis/GC-MS analysis of cellulose-deficient cell walls indicated the presence of a lignin-like polymer with a Syringyl/Guaiacyl ratio of 1.45, which differed from the sensu stricto stress-related lignin that arose in response to short-term DCB-treatments. Gene expression analysis of these cells indicated an overexpression of genes specific for the biosynthesis of monolignol units of lignin. A study of stress signaling pathways revealed an overexpression of some of the jasmonate signaling pathway genes, which might trigger ectopic lignification in response to cell wall integrity disruptions. In summary, the structural plasticity of primary cell walls is proven, since a lignification process is possible in response to cellulose impoverishment. PMID:25735403

  18. Cell wall composition profiling of parasitic giant dodder (Cuscuta reflexa) and its hosts: a priori differences and induced changes.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Hanne R; Striberny, Bernd; Olsen, Stian; Vidal-Melgosa, Silvia; Fangel, Jonatan U; Willats, William G T; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Krause, Kirsten

    2015-08-01

    Host plant penetration is the gateway to survival for holoparasitic Cuscuta and requires host cell wall degradation. Compositional differences of cell walls may explain why some hosts are amenable to such degradation while others can resist infection. Antibody-based techniques for comprehensive profiling of cell wall epitopes and cell wall-modifying enzymes were applied to several susceptible hosts and a resistant host of Cuscuta reflexa and to the parasite itself. Infected tissue of Pelargonium zonale contained high concentrations of de-esterified homogalacturonans in the cell walls, particularly adjacent to the parasite's haustoria. High pectinolytic activity in haustorial extracts and high expression levels of pectate lyase genes suggest that the parasite contributes directly to wall remodeling. Mannan and xylan concentrations were low in P. zonale and in five susceptible tomato introgression lines, but high in the resistant Solanum lycopersicum cv M82, and in C. reflexa itself. Knowledge of the composition of resistant host cell walls and the parasite's own cell walls is useful in developing strategies to prevent infection by parasitic plants. PMID:25808919

  19. (Rapid regulatory control of plant cell expansion and wall relaxation)

    SciTech Connect

    Cosgrove, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    This section presents a brief overview of accomplishments related to this project in the past 3-year period. Our work has focused on the basic mechanisms of plant cell expansion, particularly on the interrelations of water and solute transport with cell wall relaxation and expansion. To study these processes, we have developed new methods and used these methods to analyze the dynamic behavior of growth processes and to examine how various agents (GA, drought, light, genetic lesions) alter the growth machinery of the cell.

  20. The Late S-Phase Transcription Factor Hcm1 Is Regulated through Phosphorylation by the Cell Wall Integrity Checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Negishi, Takahiro; Veis, Jiri; Hollenstein, David; Sekiya, Mizuho; Ammerer, Gustav

    2016-01-01

    The cell wall integrity (CWI) checkpoint in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae coordinates cell wall construction and cell cycle progression. In this study, we showed that the regulation of Hcm1, a late-S-phase transcription factor, arrests the cell cycle via the cell wall integrity checkpoint. Although the HCM1 mRNA level remained unaffected when the cell wall integrity checkpoint was induced, the protein level decreased. The overproduction of Hcm1 resulted in the failure of the cell wall integrity checkpoint. We identified 39 Hcm1 phosphorylation sites, including 26 novel sites, by tandem mass spectrometry analysis. A mutational analysis revealed that phosphorylation of Hcm1 at S61, S65, and S66 is required for the proper onset of the cell wall integrity checkpoint by regulating the timely decrease in its protein level. Hyperactivation of the CWI mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway significantly reduced the Hcm1 protein level, and the deletion of CWI MAPK Slt2 resulted in a failure to decrease Hcm1 protein levels in response to stress, suggesting that phosphorylation is regulated by CWI MAPK. In conclusion, we suggest that Hcm1 is regulated negatively by the cell wall integrity checkpoint through timely phosphorylation and degradation under stress to properly control budding yeast proliferation. PMID:26729465

  1. Studies on bacterial cell wall inhibitors. VI. Screening method for the specific inhibitors of peptidoglycan synthesis.

    PubMed

    Omura, S; Tanaka, H; Oiwa, R; Nagai, T; Koyama, Y; Takahashi, Y

    1979-10-01

    A screening method was established for selecting new specific inhibitors of bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan synthesis. In the primary test, culture broths of soil isolates were selected based on relative microbial activity. A culture, to be retained, must be active against Bacillus subtilis and lack activities against Acholeplasma laidawii. In the secondary test, inhibitors of bacterial cell wall synthesis were identified by their ability to prevent the incorporation of meso-[3H]diaminopimelic acid but not to prevent the incorporation of L-[4C]leucine into the acid-insoluble macromolecular fraction of growing cells of Bacillus sp. ATCC 21206 (Dpm-). As the tertiary test, inhibitors with molecular weights under 1,000 were selected by passage through a Diaflo UM-2 membrane. By this screening procedure, six known antibiotics and one new one were picked out from ten thousand soil isolates. PMID:528376

  2. Mutations in PMR5 result in powdery mildew resistance and altered cell wall composition.

    PubMed

    Vogel, John P; Raab, Theodore K; Somerville, Chris R; Somerville, Shauna C

    2004-12-01

    Powdery mildews and other obligate biotrophic pathogens are highly adapted to their hosts and often show limited host ranges. One facet of such host specialization is likely to be penetration of the host cell wall, a major barrier to infection. A mutation in the pmr5 gene rendered Arabidopsis resistant to the powdery mildew species Erysiphe cichoracearum and Erysiphe orontii, but not to the unrelated pathogens Pseudomonas syringae or Peronospora parasitica. PMR5 belongs to a large family of plant-specific genes of unknown function. pmr5-mediated resistance did not require signaling through either the salicylic acid or jasmonic acid/ethylene defense pathways, suggesting resistance in this mutant may be due either to the loss of a susceptibility factor or to the activation of a novel form of defense. Based on Fourier transform infrared analysis, the pmr5 cell walls were enriched in pectin and exhibited a reduced degree of pectin modification relative to wild-type cell walls. In addition, the mutant had smaller cells, suggesting a defect in cell expansion. A double mutant with pmr6 (defective in a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored pectate lyase-like gene) exhibited a strong increase in total uronic acid content and a more severe reduction in size, relative to the single mutants, suggesting that the two genes affect pectin composition, either directly or indirectly, via different mechanisms. These two mutants highlight the importance of the host cell wall in plant-microbe interactions. PMID:15584961

  3. Nanoscopic cell-wall architecture of an immunogenic ligand in Candida albicans during antifungal drug treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jia; Wester, Michael J.; Graus, Matthew S.; Lidke, Keith A.; Neumann, Aaron K.

    2016-01-01

    The cell wall of Candida albicans is composed largely of polysaccharides. Here we focus on β-glucan, an immunogenic cell-wall polysaccharide whose surface exposure is often restricted, or “masked,” from immune recognition by Dectin-1 on dendritic cells (DCs) and other innate immune cells. Previous research suggested that the physical presentation geometry of β-glucan might determine whether it can be recognized by Dectin-1. We used direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy to explore the fine structure of β-glucan exposed on C. albicans cell walls before and after treatment with the antimycotic drug caspofungin, which alters glucan exposure. Most surface-accessible glucan on C. albicans yeast and hyphae is limited to isolated Dectin-1–binding sites. Caspofungin-induced unmasking caused approximately fourfold to sevenfold increase in total glucan exposure, accompanied by increased phagocytosis efficiency of DCs for unmasked yeasts. Nanoscopic imaging of caspofungin-unmasked C. albicans cell walls revealed that the increase in glucan exposure is due to increased density of glucan exposures and increased multiglucan exposure sizes. These findings reveal that glucan exhibits significant nanostructure, which is a previously unknown physical component of the host–Candida interaction that might change during antifungal chemotherapy and affect innate immune activation. PMID:26792838

  4. Lipid-linked cell wall precursors regulate membrane association of bacterial actin MreB

    PubMed Central

    Schirner, Kathrin; Eun, Ye-Jin; Dion, Mike; Luo, Yun; Helmann, John D.; Garner, Ethan C.; Walker, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Summary The bacterial actin homolog MreB, which is critical for rod shape determination, forms filaments that rotate around the cell width on the inner surface of the cytoplasmic membrane. What determines filament association with the membranes or with other cell wall elongation proteins is not known. Using specific chemical and genetic perturbations while following MreB filament motion, we find that MreB membrane association is an actively regulated process that depends on the presence of lipid-linked peptidoglycan precursors. When precursors are depleted, MreB filaments disassemble into the cytoplasm and peptidoglycan synthesis becomes disorganized. In cells that lack wall teichoic acids, but continue to make peptidoglycan, dynamic MreB filaments are observed, although their presence is not sufficient to establish a rod shape. We propose that the cell regulates MreB filament association with the membrane, allowing rapid and reversible inactivation of cell wall enzyme complexes in response to the inhibition of cell wall synthesis. PMID:25402772

  5. Vascular defense responses in rice: peroxidase accumulation in xylem parenchyma cells and xylem wall thickening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilaire, E.; Young, S. A.; Willard, L. H.; McGee, J. D.; Sweat, T.; Chittoor, J. M.; Guikema, J. A.; Leach, J. E.

    2001-01-01

    The rice bacterial blight pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae is a vascular pathogen that elicits a defensive response through interaction with metabolically active rice cells. In leaves of 12-day-old rice seedlings, the exposed pit membrane separating the xylem lumen from the associated parenchyma cells allows contact with bacterial cells. During resistant responses, the xylem secondary walls thicken within 48 h and the pit diameter decreases, effectively reducing the area of pit membrane exposed for access by bacteria. In susceptible interactions and mock-inoculated controls, the xylem walls do not thicken within 48 h. Xylem secondary wall thickening is developmental and, in untreated 65-day-old rice plants, the size of the pit also is reduced. Activity and accumulation of a secreted cationic peroxidase, PO-C1, were previously shown to increase in xylem vessel walls and lumen. Peptide-specific antibodies and immunogold-labeling were used to demonstrate that PO-C1 is produced in the xylem parenchyma and secreted to the xylem lumen and walls. The timing of the accumulation is consistent with vessel secondary wall thickening. The PO-C1 gene is distinct but shares a high level of similarity with previously cloned pathogen-induced peroxidases in rice. PO-C1 gene expression was induced as early as 12 h during resistant interactions and peaked between 18 and 24 h after inoculation. Expression during susceptible interactions was lower than that observed in resistant interactions and was undetectable after infiltration with water, after mechanical wounding, or in mature leaves. These data are consistent with a role for vessel secondary wall thickening and peroxidase PO-C1 accumulation in the defense response in rice to X. oryzae pv. oryzae.

  6. Dynamics of cell wall elasticity pattern shapes the cell during yeast mating morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Goldenbogen, Björn; Giese, Wolfgang; Hemmen, Marie; Uhlendorf, Jannis; Herrmann, Andreas; Klipp, Edda

    2016-09-01

    The cell wall defines cell shape and maintains integrity of fungi and plants. When exposed to mating pheromone, Saccharomyces cerevisiae grows a mating projection and alters in morphology from spherical to shmoo form. Although structural and compositional alterations of the cell wall accompany shape transitions, their impact on cell wall elasticity is unknown. In a combined theoretical and experimental approach using finite-element modelling and atomic force microscopy (AFM), we investigated the influence of spatially and temporally varying material properties on mating morphogenesis. Time-resolved elasticity maps of shmooing yeast acquired with AFM in vivo revealed distinct patterns, with soft material at the emerging mating projection and stiff material at the tip. The observed cell wall softening in the protrusion region is necessary for the formation of the characteristic shmoo shape, and results in wider and longer mating projections. The approach is generally applicable to tip-growing fungi and plants cells. PMID:27605377

  7. Effect of Yeast Cell Morphology, Cell Wall Physical Structure and Chemical Composition on Patulin Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ying; Wang, Jianguo; Liu, Bin; Wang, Zhouli; Yuan, Yahong; Yue, Tianli

    2015-01-01

    The capability of yeast to adsorb patulin in fruit juice can aid in substantially reducing the patulin toxic effect on human health. This study aimed to investigate the capability of yeast cell morphology and cell wall internal structure and composition to adsorb patulin. To compare different yeast cell morphologies, cell wall internal structure and composition, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and ion chromatography were used. The results indicated that patulin adsorption capability of yeast was influenced by cell surface areas, volume, and cell wall thickness, as well as 1,3-β-glucan content. Among these factors, cell wall thickness and 1,3-β-glucan content serve significant functions. The investigation revealed that patulin adsorption capability was mainly affected by the three-dimensional network structure of the cell wall composed of 1,3-β-glucan. Finally, patulin adsorption in commercial kiwi fruit juice was investigated, and the results indicated that yeast cells could adsorb patulin from commercial kiwi fruit juice efficiently. This study can potentially simulate in vitro cell walls to enhance patulin adsorption capability and successfully apply to fruit juice industry. PMID:26295574

  8. Cell wall bound anionic peroxidases from asparagus byproducts.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo-Carmona, Sara; López, Sergio; Vazquez-Castilla, Sara; Jimenez-Araujo, Ana; Rodriguez-Arcos, Rocio; Guillen-Bejarano, Rafael

    2014-10-01

    Asparagus byproducts are a good source of cationic soluble peroxidases (CAP) useful for the bioremediation of phenol-contaminated wastewaters. In this study, cell wall bound peroxidases (POD) from the same byproducts have been purified and characterized. The covalent forms of POD represent >90% of the total cell wall bound POD. Isoelectric focusing showed that whereas the covalent fraction is constituted primarily by anionic isoenzymes, the ionic fraction is a mixture of anionic, neutral, and cationic isoenzymes. Covalently bound peroxidases were purified by means of ion exchange chromatography and affinity chromatography. In vitro detoxification studies showed that although CAP are more effective for the removal of 4-CP and 2,4-DCP, anionic asparagus peroxidase (AAP) is a better option for the removal of hydroxytyrosol (HT), the main phenol present in olive mill wastewaters. PMID:25195693

  9. A derivative of Lactococcus lactis strain H61 with less interleukin-12 induction has a different cell wall.

    PubMed

    Kimoto-Nira, H; Suzuki, C; Aoki, R; Kobayashi, M; Mizumachi, K

    2012-06-01

    Lactococcus lactis H61 can increase the cellular immune responses of aged (14-mo-old) senescence-accelerated mice. The aim of this study was to investigate the factors contributing to IL-12 induction by strain H61 by analyzing strains derived from it. Strain H61 derivative no. 13 was obtained by growing the parent strain at 37°C. This derivative induced significantly lower production of IL-12 from J774.1 macrophage cells than did the parent strain H61. The 2 strains differed in the resistance of their whole cells or cell walls to lysozyme, a cell wall-degrading enzyme. Sodium hydroxide treatment to de-O-acetylate muramic acid in the cell walls of the 2 strains reduced the lysozyme resistance, compared with untreated cell walls: at 3h after adding lysozyme, the lysozyme resistance of untreated and NaOH treated cell wall from strain H61 was 55.4% and 11.7%, respectively. The values of untreated and NaOH-treated cell walls from strain no.13 were 73.7 and 42.8%, respectively. The reduction was higher in strain H61, indicating that the cell walls of strain H61 were highly O-acetylated. Trichloroacetic acid treatment to remove wall-associated polymers such as teichoic acids made the lysozyme resistance of the cell walls of both strains similar. The sugar content of cell walls prepared from strain H61 was significantly higher than that of strain no. 13 cell wall. A derivative with less activity for inducing IL-12 by macrophage cells had less O-acetylation and had lower sugar content in the cell wall than did strain H61. Modifying the cell wall of strain H61 may be a useful way to regulate its ability to induce IL-12. Strain H61 has been used as a starter bacterium in the dairy industry. This study could lead to enhancing the value of dairy products made by strain H61 by characterizing the key factor(s) responsible for its stimulation of immunity. PMID:22612923

  10. Enzyme Amplified Detection of Microbial Cell Wall Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wainwright, Norman R.

    2004-01-01

    This proposal is MBL's portion of NASA's Johnson Space Center's Astrobiology Center led by Principal Investigator, Dr. David McKay, entitled: 'Institute for the Study of Biomarkers in Astromaterials.' Dr. Norman Wainwright is the principal investigator at MBL and is responsible for developing methods to detect trace quantities of microbial cell wall chemicals using the enzyme amplification system of Limulus polyphemus and other related methods.

  11. Inhibition of cell wall turnover and autolysis by vancomycin in a highly vancomycin-resistant mutant of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Sieradzki, K; Tomasz, A

    1997-01-01

    A highly vancomycin-resistant mutant (MIC = 100 microg/ml) of Staphylococcus aureus, mutant VM, which was isolated in the laboratory by a step-pressure procedure, continued to grow and synthesize peptidoglycan in the presence of vancomycin (50 microg/ml) in the medium, but the antibiotic completely inhibited cell wall turnover and autolysis, resulting in the accumulation of cell wall material at the cell surface and inhibition of daughter cell separation. Cultures of mutant VM removed vancomycin from the growth medium through binding the antibiotic to the cell walls, from which the antibiotic could be quantitatively recovered in biologically active form. Vancomycin blocked the in vitro hydrolysis of cell walls by autolytic enzyme extracts, lysostaphin and mutanolysin. Analysis of UDP-linked peptidoglycan precursors showed no evidence for the presence of D-lactate-terminating muropeptides. While there was no significant difference in the composition of muropeptide units of mutant and parental cell walls, the peptidoglycan of VM had a significantly lower degree of cross-linkage. These observations and the results of vancomycin-binding studies suggest alterations in the structural organization of the mutant cell walls such that access of the vancomycin molecules to the sites of wall biosynthesis is blocked. PMID:9098053

  12. Inhibition of cell wall turnover and autolysis by vancomycin in a highly vancomycin-resistant mutant of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Sieradzki, K; Tomasz, A

    1997-04-01

    A highly vancomycin-resistant mutant (MIC = 100 microg/ml) of Staphylococcus aureus, mutant VM, which was isolated in the laboratory by a step-pressure procedure, continued to grow and synthesize peptidoglycan in the presence of vancomycin (50 microg/ml) in the medium, but the antibiotic completely inhibited cell wall turnover and autolysis, resulting in the accumulation of cell wall material at the cell surface and inhibition of daughter cell separation. Cultures of mutant VM removed vancomycin from the growth medium through binding the antibiotic to the cell walls, from which the antibiotic could be quantitatively recovered in biologically active form. Vancomycin blocked the in vitro hydrolysis of cell walls by autolytic enzyme extracts, lysostaphin and mutanolysin. Analysis of UDP-linked peptidoglycan precursors showed no evidence for the presence of D-lactate-terminating muropeptides. While there was no significant difference in the composition of muropeptide units of mutant and parental cell walls, the peptidoglycan of VM had a significantly lower degree of cross-linkage. These observations and the results of vancomycin-binding studies suggest alterations in the structural organization of the mutant cell walls such that access of the vancomycin molecules to the sites of wall biosynthesis is blocked. PMID:9098053

  13. Adult Vascular Wall Resident Multipotent Vascular Stem Cells, Matrix Metalloproteinases, and Arterial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Amato, Bruno; Compagna, Rita; Amato, Maurizio; Grande, Raffaele; Butrico, Lucia; Rossi, Alessio; Naso, Agostino; Ruggiero, Michele; de Franciscis, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Evidences have shown the presence of multipotent stem cells (SCs) at sites of arterial aneurysms: they can differentiate into smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and are activated after residing in a quiescent state in the vascular wall. Recent studies have implicated the role of matrix metalloproteinases in the pathogenesis of arterial aneurysms: in fact the increased synthesis of MMPs by arterial SMCs is thought to be a pivotal mechanism in aneurysm formation. The factors and signaling pathways involved in regulating wall resident SC recruitment, survival, proliferation, growth factor production, and differentiation may be also related to selective expression of different MMPs. This review explores the relationship between adult vascular wall resident multipotent vascular SCs, MMPs, and arterial aneurysms. PMID:25866513

  14. Proteomic Analysis to Identify Tightly-Bound Cell Wall Protein in Rice Calli.

    PubMed

    Cho, Won Kyong; Hyun, Tae Kyung; Kumar, Dhinesh; Rim, Yeonggil; Chen, Xiong Yan; Jo, Yeonhwa; Kim, Suwha; Lee, Keun Woo; Park, Zee-Yong; Lucas, William J; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2015-08-01

    Rice is a model plant widely used for basic and applied research programs. Plant cell wall proteins play key roles in a broad range of biological processes. However, presently, knowledge on the rice cell wall proteome is rudimentary in nature. In the present study, the tightly-bound cell wall proteome of rice callus cultured cells using sequential extraction protocols was developed using mass spectrometry and bioinformatics methods, leading to the identification of 1568 candidate proteins. Based on bioinformatics analyses, 389 classical rice cell wall proteins, possessing a signal peptide, and 334 putative non-classical cell wall proteins, lacking a signal peptide, were identified. By combining previously established rice cell wall protein databases with current data for the classical rice cell wall proteins, a comprehensive rice cell wall proteome, comprised of 496 proteins, was constructed. A comparative analysis of the rice and Arabidopsis cell wall proteomes revealed a high level of homology, suggesting a predominant conservation between monocot and eudicot cell wall proteins. This study importantly increased information on cell wall proteins, which serves for future functional analyses of these identified rice cell wall proteins. PMID:26194822

  15. Proteomic Analysis to Identify Tightly-Bound Cell Wall Protein in Rice Calli

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Won Kyong; Hyun, Tae Kyung; Kumar, Dhinesh; Rim, Yeonggil; Chen, Xiong Yan; Jo, Yeonhwa; Kim, Suwha; Lee, Keun Woo; Park, Zee-Yong; Lucas, William J.; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2015-01-01

    Rice is a model plant widely used for basic and applied research programs. Plant cell wall proteins play key roles in a broad range of biological processes. However, presently, knowledge on the rice cell wall proteome is rudimentary in nature. In the present study, the tightly-bound cell wall proteome of rice callus cultured cells using sequential extraction protocols was developed using mass spectrometry and bioinformatics methods, leading to the identification of 1568 candidate proteins. Based on bioinformatics analyses, 389 classical rice cell wall proteins, possessing a signal peptide, and 334 putative non-classical cell wall proteins, lacking a signal peptide, were identified. By combining previously established rice cell wall protein databases with current data for the classical rice cell wall proteins, a comprehensive rice cell wall proteome, comprised of 496 proteins, was constructed. A comparative analysis of the rice and Arabidopsis cell wall proteomes revealed a high level of homology, suggesting a predominant conservation between monocot and eudicot cell wall proteins. This study importantly increased information on cell wall proteins, which serves for future functional analyses of these identified rice cell wall proteins. PMID:26194822

  16. Aspergillus Enzymes Involved in Degradation of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Ronald P.; Visser, Jaap

    2001-01-01

    Degradation of plant cell wall polysaccharides is of major importance in the food and feed, beverage, textile, and paper and pulp industries, as well as in several other industrial production processes. Enzymatic degradation of these polymers has received attention for many years and is becoming a more and more attractive alternative to chemical and mechanical processes. Over the past 15 years, much progress has been made in elucidating the structural characteristics of these polysaccharides and in characterizing the enzymes involved in their degradation and the genes of biotechnologically relevant microorganisms encoding these enzymes. The members of the fungal genus Aspergillus are commonly used for the production of polysaccharide-degrading enzymes. This genus produces a wide spectrum of cell wall-degrading enzymes, allowing not only complete degradation of the polysaccharides but also tailored modifications by using specific enzymes purified from these fungi. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the cell wall polysaccharide-degrading enzymes from aspergilli and the genes by which they are encoded. PMID:11729262

  17. Phosphate-containing cell wall polymers of bacilli.

    PubMed

    Potekhina, N V; Streshinskaya, G M; Tul'skaya, E M; Kozlova, Yu I; Senchenkova, S N; Shashkov, A S

    2011-07-01

    Anionic phosphate-containing cell wall polymers of bacilli are represented by teichoic acids and poly(glycosyl 1-phosphates). Different locations of phosphodiester bonds in the main chain of teichoic acids as well as the nature and combination of the constituent structural elements underlie their structural diversity. Currently, the structures of teichoic acids of bacilli can be classified into three types, viz. poly(polyol phosphates) with glycerol or ribitol as the polyol; poly(glycosylpolyol phosphates), mainly glycerol-containing polymers; and poly(acylglycosylglycerol phosphate), in which the components are covalently linked through glycosidic, phosphodiester, and amide bonds. In addition to teichoic acids, poly(glycosyl 1-phosphates) with mono- and disaccharide residues in the repeating units have been detected in cell walls of several Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus pumilus strains. The known structures of teichoic acids and poly(glycosyl 1-phosphates) of B. subtilis, B. atrophaeus, B. licheniformis, B. pumilus, B. stearothermophilus, B. coagulans, B. cereus as well as oligomers that link the polymers to peptidoglycan are surveyed. The reported data on the structures of phosphate-containing polymers of different strains of B. subtilis suggest heterogeneity of the species and may be of interest for the taxonomy of bacilli to allow differentiation of closely related organisms according to the "structures and composition of cell wall polymers" criterion. PMID:21999535

  18. Resistive wall mode active control physics design for KSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y. S. Sabbagh, S. A.; Bialek, J. M.; Berkery, J. W.; Bak, J. G.; Lee, S. G.; Oh, Y. K.

    2014-01-15

    As KSTAR H-mode operation approaches the region where the resistive wall mode (RWM) can be unstable, an important issue for future long pulse, high beta plasma operation is to evaluate RWM active feedback control performance using a planned active/passive RWM stabilization system on the device. In particular, an optimal design of feedback sensors allows mode stabilization up to the highest achievable β{sub N} close to the ideal with-wall limit, β{sub N}{sup wall}, with reduced control power requirements. The computed ideal n = 1 mode structure from the DCON code has been input to the VALEN-3D code to calculate the projected performance of an active RWM control system in the KSTAR three-dimensional conducting structure device geometry. Control performance with the midplane locked mode detection sensors, off-midplane saddle loops, and magnetic pickup coils is examined. The midplane sensors measuring the radial component of the mode perturbation is found to be strongly affected by the wall eddy current. The off-axis saddle loops with proper compensation of the prompt applied field are computed to provide stabilization at β{sub N} up to 86% of β{sub N}{sup wall} but the low RWM amplitude computed in the off-axis regions near the sensors can produce a low signal-to-noise ratio. The required control power and bandwidth are also estimated with varied noise levels in the feedback sensors. Further improvements have been explored by examining a new RWM sensor design motivated by the off-midplane poloidal magnetic field sensors in NSTX. The new sensors mounted off of the copper passive stabilizer plates near the device midplane show a clear advantage in control performance corresponding to achieving 99% of β{sub N}{sup wall} without the need of compensation of the prompt field. The result shows a significant improvement of RWM feedback stabilization using the new sensor set which motivates a future feedback sensor upgrade.

  19. Modeling of thin, back-wall silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baraona, C. R.

    1979-01-01

    The performance of silicon solar cells with p-n junctions on the nonilluminated surface (i.e., upside-down or back-wall cells) was calculated. These structures consisted of a uniformly shaped p-type substrate layer, a p(+)-type field layer on the front (illuminated) surface, and a shallow, n-type junction on the back (nonilluminated) surface. A four-layer solar cell model was used to calculate efficiency, open-circuit voltage, and short-circuit current. The effect on performance of p-layer thickness and resistivity was determined. The diffusion length was varied to simulate the effect of radiation damage. The results show that peak initial efficiencies greater than 15 percent are possible for cell thicknesses or 100 micrometers or less. After 10 years of radiation damage in geosynchronous orbit, thin (25 to 50 micrometers thick) cells made from 10 to 100 ohm cm material show the smallest decrease (approximately 10 percent) in performance.

  20. Cell differentiation, secondary cell-wall formation and transformation of callus tissue of Pinus radiata D. Don.

    PubMed

    Möller, Ralf; McDonald, Armando G; Walter, Christian; Harris, Philip J

    2003-09-01

    Tracheid and sclereid differentiation was induced in callus cultures of Pinus radiata D. Don by culturing on a basal medium containing activated charcoal but no phytohormones; sclereids differentiated in callus derived from xylem strips, but not in callus derived from hypocotyl segments. The tracheids differentiated in hypocotyl-derived callus had helical, scalariform, reticulated or pitted secondary cell-wall patterns, but those differentiated in xylem-derived callus had a reticulate or pitted pattern. The thickened tracheid and sclereid walls contained lignin as indicated by the red colour reaction given with phloroglucinol-HCl. The presence of lignin in the cell walls of differentiated callus was confirmed using pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry by the detection of phenylpropanoid components derived from lignin. Lignin was also detected using solid-state (13)C cross-polarisation/magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and quantified as thioglycolic acid lignin. Monosaccharide analyses of the cell walls isolated from differentiated and undifferentiated calli showed that the cell walls of the differentiated calli contained higher proportions of glucose and mannose, consistent with the presence of greater proportions of gluco- and/or galactogluco-mannans in the secondary cell walls of the differentiated cells. A protocol for the stable transformation of undifferentiated, xylem-derived cultures was successfully developed. Transgenic cell lines were established following Biolistic particle bombardment with a plasmid containing the coding region of the nptII gene and the coding region of the cad gene from P. radiata. Expression of the nptII gene in transgenic lines was confirmed by an NPTII-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The overexpression of cad in the transgenic lines resulted in a down-regulation of cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.195) expression. PMID:12811558

  1. Chemical Structure of the Cell Walls of Dwarf Maize and Changes Mediated by Gibberellin 1

    PubMed Central

    Carpita, Nicholas C.; Kanabus, Jan

    1988-01-01

    Dwarf maize (Zea mays L.), a mutant deficient in gibberellin synthesis, provides an excellent model to study the influence of gibberellin on biochemical processes related to plant development. Alterations in the chemical structure of the cell wall mediated by gibberellin were examined in seedlings of this mutant. The composition of the walls of roots, mesocotyl, coleoptile, and primary leaves of dwarf maize was similar to that of normal maize and other cereal grasses. Glucuronoarabinoxylans constituted the principal hemicelluloses, but walls also contained substantial amounts of xyloglucan and mixed-linkage β-d-glucan. Root growth in dwarf maize was essentially normal, but growth of mesocotyl and primary leaves was severely retarded. Injection of the gibberellin into the cavity of the coleoptile resulted in a marked increase in elongation of the primary leaves. This elongation was accompanied by increases in total wall mass, but the proportion of β-d-glucan decreased from 20% to 15% of the hemicellulosic polysaccharide. During leaf expansion, the proportion decreased further to only 10%. Through 4 days incubation, the proportion of β-d-glucan in leaves of control seedlings without gibberellin was nearly constant. Extraction of exo- and endo-β-d-glucan hydrolases from purified cell walls and assay against a purified oat bran β-d-glucan demonstrated that gibberellin increased the activity of the endo-β-d-glucan hydrolase. These and other data support the hypothesis that β-d-glucan metabolism is central to control of cell expansion in cereal grasses. PMID:16666367

  2. Evaluating fundamental position-dependent differences in wood cell wall adhesion using nanoindentation

    PubMed Central

    Obersriebnig, Michael; Konnerth, Johannes; Gindl-Altmutter, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Spruce wood specimens were bonded with one-component polyurethane (PUR) and urea-formaldehyde (UF) adhesive, respectively. The adhesion of the adhesives to the wood cell wall was evaluated at two different locations by means of a new micromechanical assay based on nanoindentation. One location tested corresponded to the interface between the adhesive and the natural inner cell wall surface of the secondary cell wall layer 3 (S3), whereas the second location corresponded to the interface between the adhesive and the freshly cut secondary cell wall layer 2 (S2). Overall, a trend towards reduced cell wall adhesion was found for PUR compared to UF. Position-resolved examination revealed excellent adhesion of UF to freshly cut cell walls (S2) but significantly diminished adhesion to the inner cell wall surface (S3). In contrast, PUR showed better adhesion to the inner cell wall surface and less adhesion to freshly cut cell walls. Atomic force microscopy revealed a less polar character for the inner cell wall surface (S3) compared to freshly cut cell walls (S2). It is proposed that differences in the polarity of the used adhesives and the surface chemistry of the two cell wall surfaces examined account for the observed trends.

  3. Proteomic analysis of cell walls of two developmental stages of alfalfa stems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cell walls are important for the growth and development of all plants. They are also valuable resources for feed and fiber, and more recently as a potential feedstock for bioenergy production. Cell wall proteins comprise only a fraction of the cell wall, but play important roles in establishing the ...

  4. Peptidoglycan at its peaks: how chromatographic analyses can reveal bacterial cell-wall structure and assembly

    PubMed Central

    Desmarais, Samantha M.; De Pedro, Miguel A.; Cava, Felipe; Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2013-01-01

    The peptidoglycan (PG) cell wall is a unique macromolecule responsible for both shape determination and cellular integrity under osmotic stress in virtually all bacteria. A quantitative understanding of the relationships between PG architecture, morphogenesis, immune system activation, and pathogenesis can provide molecular-scale insights into the function of proteins involved in cell-wall synthesis and cell growth. High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) has played an important role in our understanding of the structural and chemical complexity of the cell wall by providing an analytical method to quantify differences in chemical composition. Here, we present a primer on the basic chemical features of wall structure that can be revealed through HPLC, along with a description of the applications of HPLC PG analyses for interpreting the effects of genetic and chemical perturbations to a variety of bacterial species in different environments. We describe the physical consequences of different PG compositions on cell shape, and review complementary experimental and computational methodologies for PG analysis. Finally, we present a partial list of future targets of development for HPLC and related techniques. PMID:23679048

  5. Characterization of long-term extension of isolated cell walls from growing cucumber hypocotyls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    Walls from frozen-thawed cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) hypocotyls extend for many hours when placed in tension under acidic conditions. This study examined whether such "creep" is a purely physical process dependent on wall viscoelasticity alone or whether enzymatic activities are needed to maintain wall extension. Chemical denaturants inhibited wall creep, some acting reversibly and others irreversibly. Brief (15 s) boiling in water irreversibly inhibited creep, as did pre-incubation with proteases. Creep exhibited a high Q10 (3.8) between 20 degrees and 30 degrees C, with slow inactivation at higher temperatures, whereas the viscous flow of pectin solutions exhibited a much lower Q10 (1.35). On the basis of its temperature sensitivity, involvement of pectic gel-sol transitions was judged to be of little importance in creep. Pre-incubation of walls in neutral pH irreversibly inactivated their ability to creep, with a half-time of about 40 min. At 1 mM, Cu2+, Hg2+ and Al3+ were strongly inhibitory whereas most other cations, including Ca2+, had little effect. Sulfhydryl-reducing agents strongly stimulated creep, apparently by stabilizing wall enzyme(s). The physical effects of these treatments on polymer interactions were examined by Instron and stress-relaxation analyses. Some treatments, such as pH and Cu2+, had significant effects on wall viscoelasticity, but others had little or no apparent effect, thus implicating an enzymatic creep mechanism. The results indicate that creep depends on relatively rugged enzymes that are firmly attached to or entangled in the wall. The sensitivity of creep to SH-reducing agents indicates that thiol reduction of wall enzymes might provide a control mechanism for endogenous cell growth.

  6. Understanding How the Complex Molecular Architecture of Mannan-degrading Hydrolases Contributes to Plant Cell Wall Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoyang; Rogowski, Artur; Zhao, Lei; Hahn, Michael G.; Avci, Utku; Knox, J. Paul; Gilbert, Harry J.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial degradation of plant cell walls is a central component of the carbon cycle and is of increasing importance in environmentally significant industries. Plant cell wall-degrading enzymes have a complex molecular architecture consisting of catalytic modules and, frequently, multiple non-catalytic carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs). It is currently unclear whether the specificities of the CBMs or the topology of the catalytic modules are the primary drivers for the specificity of these enzymes against plant cell walls. Here, we have evaluated the relationship between CBM specificity and their capacity to enhance the activity of GH5 and GH26 mannanases and CE2 esterases against intact plant cell walls. The data show that cellulose and mannan binding CBMs have the greatest impact on the removal of mannan from tobacco and Physcomitrella cell walls, respectively. Although the action of the GH5 mannanase was independent of the context of mannan in tobacco cell walls, a significant proportion of the polysaccharide was inaccessible to the GH26 enzyme. The recalcitrant mannan, however, was fully accessible to the GH26 mannanase appended to a cellulose binding CBM. Although CE2 esterases display similar specificities against acetylated substrates in vitro, only CjCE2C was active against acetylated mannan in Physcomitrella. Appending a mannan binding CBM27 to CjCE2C potentiated its activity against Physcomitrella walls, whereas a xylan binding CBM reduced the capacity of esterases to deacetylate xylan in tobacco walls. This work provides insight into the biological significance for the complex array of hydrolytic enzymes expressed by plant cell wall-degrading microorganisms. PMID:24297170

  7. Insights into Substrate Specificity of NlpC/P60 Cell Wall Hydrolases Containing Bacterial SH3 Domains

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingping; Liu, Xueqian W.; Patin, Delphine; Farr, Carol L.; Grant, Joanna C.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Knuth, Mark W.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial SH3 (SH3b) domains are commonly fused with papain-like Nlp/P60 cell wall hydrolase domains. To understand how the modular architecture of SH3b and NlpC/P60 affects the activity of the catalytic domain, three putative NlpC/P60 cell wall hydrolases were biochemically and structurally characterized. These enzymes all have γ-d-Glu-A2pm (A2pm is diaminopimelic acid) cysteine amidase (or dl-endopeptidase) activities but with different substrate specificities. One enzyme is a cell wall lysin that cleaves peptidoglycan (PG), while the other two are cell wall recycling enzymes that only cleave stem peptides with an N-terminal l-Ala. Their crystal structures revealed a highly conserved structure consisting of two SH3b domains and a C-terminal NlpC/P60 catalytic domain, despite very low sequence identity. Interestingly, loops from the first SH3b domain dock into the ends of the active site groove of the catalytic domain, remodel the substrate binding site, and modulate substrate specificity. Two amino acid differences at the domain interface alter the substrate binding specificity in favor of stem peptides in recycling enzymes, whereas the SH3b domain may extend the peptidoglycan binding surface in the cell wall lysins. Remarkably, the cell wall lysin can be converted into a recycling enzyme with a single mutation. PMID:26374125

  8. Lower cell wall pectin solubilisation and galactose loss during early fruit development in apple (Malus x domestica) cultivar 'Scifresh' are associated with slower softening rate.

    PubMed

    Ng, Jovyn K T; Schröder, Roswitha; Brummell, David A; Sutherland, Paul W; Hallett, Ian C; Smith, Bronwen G; Melton, Laurence D; Johnston, Jason W

    2015-03-15

    Substantial differences in softening behaviour can exist between fruit even within the same species. Apple cultivars 'Royal Gala' and 'Scifresh' soften at different rates despite having a similar genetic background and producing similar amounts of ethylene during ripening. An examination of cell wall metabolism from the fruitlet to the ripe stages showed that in both cultivars pectin solubilisation increased during cell expansion, declined at the mature stage and then increased again during ripening. This process was much less pronounced in the slower softening 'Scifresh' than in 'Royal Gala' at every developmental stage examined, consistent with less cell separation and softening in this cultivar. Both cultivars also exhibited a progressive loss of pectic galactan and arabinan side chains during development. The cell wall content of arabinose residues was similar in both cultivars, but the galactose residue content in 'Scifresh' remained higher than that of 'Royal Gala' at every developmental stage. The higher content of cell wall galactose residue in 'Scifresh' cell walls correlated with a lower β-galactosidase activity and more intense immunolabelling of RG-I galactan side chains in both microscopy sections and glycan microarrays. A high cell wall galactan content has been associated with reduced cell wall porosity, which may restrict access of cell wall-modifying enzymes and thus maintain better structural integrity later in development. The data suggest that the composition and structure of the cell wall at very early development stages may influence subsequent cell wall loosening, and may even predispose the wall's ensuing properties. PMID:25602611

  9. Impact of processing on the noncovalent interactions between procyanidin and apple cell wall.

    PubMed

    Le Bourvellec, Carine; Watrelot, Aude A; Ginies, Christian; Imberty, Anne; Renard, Catherine M G C

    2012-09-19

    Procyanidins can bind cell wall material in raw product, and it could be supposed that the same mechanism of retention of procyanidins by apple cell walls takes place in cooked products. To evaluate the influence of cell wall composition and disassembly during cooking on the cell walls' capacity to interact with procyanidins, four cell wall materials differing in their protein contents and physical characteristics were prepared: cell wall with proteins, cell wall devoid of protein, and two processed cell walls differing by their drying method. Protein contents varied from 23 to 99 mg/g and surface areas from 1.26 to 3.16 m(2)/g. Apple procyanidins with an average polymerization degree of 8.7 were used. The adsorption of apple procyanidins on solid cell wall material was quantified using the Langmuir isotherm formulation. The protein contents in cell wall material had no effect on procyanidin/cell wall interactions, whereas modification of the cell wall material by boiling, which reduces pectin content, and drying decreased the apparent affinity and increased the apparent saturation levels when constants were expressed relative to cell wall weight. However, boiling and drying increased apparent saturation levels and had no effect on apparent affinity when the same data were expressed per surface units. Isothermal titration calorimetry indicated strong affinity (K(a) = 1.4 × 10(4) M(-1)) between pectins solubilized by boiling and procyanidins. This study higllights the impact of highly methylated pectins and drying, that is, composition and structure of cell wall in the cell wall/procyanidin interactions. PMID:22861056

  10. Interrelationship among testicular cells in wall lizard Hemidactylus flaviviridis (Rüppell): an ultrastructural seasonal and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Khan, U W; Rai, Umesh

    2004-04-01

    The present study was aimed at investigating ultrastructure of different testicular cells and their interactions through various junctional specializations during different phases of reproductive cycle in wall lizard H. flaviviridis to develop an integrated approach of cell-cell interaction in control of testicular functions. Specialized steroid synthesizing cell organelles such as smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) and long slender mitochondria with tubulo-vesicular cristae were predominantly seen in Leydig as well as Sertoli cells during spermatogenically active phase, suggesting their active involvement in steroid biosynthesis. Peritubular cells also exhibited marked seasonal variations. Multi-layered fibroblast-like peritubular cells during regressed phase became single layered myoid-like during spermatogenically active phase. The presence of various types of junctions, including gap and tight junctions (occluding junctions) and adhering junctions such as desmosomes, septate-like junction, ectoplasmic specializations and tubulo-bulbar complexes, were demonstrated among testicular cells in wall lizard H. flaviviridis. However, the nature and degree of junctional (environmental) interaction varied with the reproductive state of the wall lizard. Further, administration of dihydrotestosterone in wall lizards during regressed phase resulted in increase of lipid droplets in Leydig cells and accumulation of germ cell debris in seminiferous tubules. Some of the Sertoli cells were seen darker in response to testosterone treatment probably due to its inhibitory effect on lipid metabolism. These results suggest that testosterone either directly or via inhibiting pituitary basal gonadotropin secretion has suppressive effect on testicular cells. PMID:15088688

  11. Cell wall pH and auxin transport velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenstein, K. H.; Rayle, D.

    1984-01-01

    According to the chemiosmotic polar diffusion hypothesis, auxin pulse velocity and basal secretion should increase with decreasing cell wall pH. Experiments were designed to test this prediction. Avena coleoptile sections were preincubated in either fusicoccin (FC), cycloheximide, pH 4.0, or pH 8.0 buffer and subsequently their polar transport capacities were determined. Relative to controls, FC enhanced auxin (IAA) uptake while CHI and pH 8.0 buffer reduced IAA uptake. Nevertheless, FC reduced IAA pulse velocity while cycloheximide increased velocity. Additional experiments showed that delivery of auxin to receivers is enhanced by increased receiver pH. This phenomenon was overcome by a pretreatment of the tissue with IAA. Our data suggest that while acidic wall pH values facilitate cellular IAA uptake, they do not enhance pulse velocity or basal secretion. These findings are inconsistent with the chemiosmotic hypothesis for auxin transport.

  12. Cell wall pH and auxin transport velocity.

    PubMed Central

    Hasenstein, K H; Rayle, D

    1984-01-01

    According to the chemiosmotic polar diffusion hypothesis, auxin pulse velocity and basal secretion should increase with decreasing cell wall pH. Experiments were designed to test this prediction. Avena coleoptile sections were preincubated in either fusicoccin (FC), cycloheximide, pH 4.0, or pH 8.0 buffer and subsequently their polar transport capacities were determined. Relative to controls, FC enhanced auxin (IAA) uptake while CHI and pH 8.0 buffer reduced IAA uptake. Nevertheless, FC reduced IAA pulse velocity while cycloheximide increased velocity. Additional experiments showed that delivery of auxin to receivers is enhanced by increased receiver pH. This phenomenon was overcome by a pretreatment of the tissue with IAA. Our data suggest that while acidic wall pH values facilitate cellular IAA uptake, they do not enhance pulse velocity or basal secretion. These findings are inconsistent with the chemiosmotic hypothesis for auxin transport. PMID:11540807

  13. Scattering properties of microalgae: the effect of cell size and cell wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensen, Øyvind; Frette, Øyvind; Rune Erga, Svein

    2007-08-01

    The main objective of this work was to investigate how the cell size and the presence of a cell wall influence the scattering properties of the green microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The growth cycle of two strains, one with a cell wall and one without, was synchronized to be in the same growth phase. Measurements were conducted at two different phases of the growth cycle on both strains of the algae. It was found that the shape of the scattering phase function was very similar for both strains at both growth phases, but the regular strain with a cell wall scatters more strongly than the wall-less mutant. It was also found that the mutant strain has a stronger increase in scattering than the regular strain, as the algae grow, and that the scattering from the regular strain is more wavelength dependent than from the mutant strain.

  14. Role of bifunctional ammonia-lyase in grass cell wall biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Barros, Jaime; Serrani-Yarce, Juan C; Chen, Fang; Baxter, David; Venables, Barney J; Dixon, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    L-Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) is the first enzyme in the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoid-derived plant compounds such as flavonoids, coumarins and the cell wall polymer lignin. The cell walls of grasses possess higher proportions of syringyl (S)-rich lignins and high levels of esterified coumaric acid compared with those of dicotyledonous plants, and PAL from grasses can also possess tyrosine ammonia-lyase (TAL) activity, the reason for which has remained unclear. Using phylogenetic, transcriptomic and in vitro biochemical analyses, we identified a single homotetrameric bifunctional ammonia-lyase (PTAL) among eight BdPAL enzymes in the model grass species Brachypodium distachyon. (13)C isotope labelling experiments along with BdPTAL1-downregulation in transgenic plants showed that the TAL activity of BdPTAL1 can provide nearly half of the total lignin deposited in Brachypodium, with a preference for S-lignin and wall-bound coumarate biosynthesis, indicating that PTAL function is linked to the characteristic features of grass cell walls. Furthermore, isotope dilution experiments suggest that the pathways to lignin from L-phenylalanine and L-tyrosine are distinct beyond the formation of 4-coumarate, supporting the organization of lignin synthesis enzymes in one or more metabolons. PMID:27255834

  15. Effects of wall shear stress and its gradient on tumor cell adhesion in curved microvessels

    PubMed Central

    Yan, W. W.; Cai, B.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cell adhesion to vessel walls in the microcirculation is one critical step in cancer metastasis. In this paper, the hypothesis that tumor cells prefer to adhere at the microvessels with localized shear stresses and their gradients, such as in the curved microvessels, was examined both experimentally and computationally. Our in vivo experiments were performed on the microvessels (post-capillary venules, 30–50 μm diameter) of rat mesentery. A straight or curved microvessel was cannulated and perfused with tumor cells by a glass micropipette at a velocity of ~1mm/s. At less than 10 min after perfusion, there was a significant difference in cell adhesion to the straight and curved vessel walls. In 60 min, the averaged adhesion rate in the curved vessels (n = 14) was ~1.5-fold of that in the straight vessels (n = 19). In 51 curved segments, 45% of cell adhesion was initiated at the inner side, 25% at outer side, and 30% at both sides of the curved vessels. To investigate the mechanical mechanism by which tumor cells prefer adhering at curved sites, we performed a computational study, in which the fluid dynamics was carried out by the lattice Boltzmann method, and the tumor cell dynamics was governed by the Newton’s law of translation and rotation. A modified adhesive dynamics model that included the influence of wall shear stress/gradient on the association/dissociation rates of tumor celladhesion was proposed, in which the positive wall shear stress/gradient jump would enhance tumor cell adhesion while the negative wall shear stress/gradient jump would weaken tumor cell adhesion. It was found that the wall shear stress/gradient, over a threshold, had significant contribution to tumor cell adhesion by activating or inactivating cell adhesion molecules. Our results elucidated why the tumor cell adhesion prefers to occur at the positive curvature of curved microvessels with very low Reynolds number (in the order of 10−2) laminar flow. PMID:21818636

  16. Measuring the Mechanical Properties of Plant Cell Walls.

    PubMed

    Vogler, Hannes; Felekis, Dimitrios; Nelson, Bradley J; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2015-01-01

    The size, shape and stability of a plant depend on the flexibility and integrity of its cell walls, which, at the same time, need to allow cell expansion for growth, while maintaining mechanical stability. Biomechanical studies largely vanished from the focus of plant science with the rapid progress of genetics and molecular biology since the mid-twentieth century. However, the development of more sensitive measurement tools renewed the interest in plant biomechanics in recent years, not only to understand the fundamental concepts of growth and morphogenesis, but also with regard to economically important areas in agriculture, forestry and the paper industry. Recent advances have clearly demonstrated that mechanical forces play a crucial role in cell and organ morphogenesis, which ultimately define plant morphology. In this article, we will briefly review the available methods to determine the mechanical properties of cell walls, such as atomic force microscopy (AFM) and microindentation assays, and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. But we will focus on a novel methodological approach, called cellular force microscopy (CFM), and its automated successor, real-time CFM (RT-CFM). PMID:27135321

  17. Measuring the Mechanical Properties of Plant Cell Walls

    PubMed Central

    Vogler, Hannes; Felekis, Dimitrios; Nelson, Bradley J.; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2015-01-01

    The size, shape and stability of a plant depend on the flexibility and integrity of its cell walls, which, at the same time, need to allow cell expansion for growth, while maintaining mechanical stability. Biomechanical studies largely vanished from the focus of plant science with the rapid progress of genetics and molecular biology since the mid-twentieth century. However, the development of more sensitive measurement tools renewed the interest in plant biomechanics in recent years, not only to understand the fundamental concepts of growth and morphogenesis, but also with regard to economically important areas in agriculture, forestry and the paper industry. Recent advances have clearly demonstrated that mechanical forces play a crucial role in cell and organ morphogenesis, which ultimately define plant morphology. In this article, we will briefly review the available methods to determine the mechanical properties of cell walls, such as atomic force microscopy (AFM) and microindentation assays, and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. But we will focus on a novel methodological approach, called cellular force microscopy (CFM), and its automated successor, real-time CFM (RT-CFM). PMID:27135321

  18. Cell wall protection by the Candida albicans class I chitin synthases

    PubMed Central

    Preechasuth, Kanya; Anderson, Jeffrey C.; Peck, Scott C.; Brown, Alistair J.P.; Gow, Neil A.R.; Lenardon, Megan D.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans has four chitin synthases from three different enzyme classes which deposit chitin in the cell wall, including at the polarized tips of growing buds and hyphae, and sites of septation. The two class I enzymes, Chs2 and Chs8, are responsible for most of the measurable chitin synthase activity in vitro, but their precise biological functions in vivo remain obscure. In this work, detailed phenotypic analyses of a chs2Δchs8Δ mutant have shown that C. albicans class I chitin synthases promote cell integrity during early polarized growth in yeast and hyphal cells. This was supported by live cell imaging of YFP-tagged versions of the class I chitin synthases which revealed that Chs2-YFP was localized at sites of polarized growth. Furthermore, a unique and dynamic pattern of localization of the class I enzymes at septa of yeast and hyphae was revealed. Phosphorylation of Chs2 on the serine at position 222 was shown to regulate the amount of Chs2 that is localized to sites of polarized growth and septation. Independently from this post-translational modification, specific cell wall stresses were also shown to regulate the amount of Chs2 that localizes to specific sites in cells, and this was linked to the ability of the class I enzymes to reinforce cell wall integrity during early polarized growth in the presence of these stresses. PMID:26257018

  19. [Hydroxyproline: Rich glycoproteins of the plant and cell wall

    SciTech Connect

    Varner, J.E.

    1993-01-01

    Since xylem tissue includes the main cell types which are lignified, we are interested in gene expression of glycine-rich proteins and proline-rich proteins, and other proteins which are involved in secondary cell wall thickening during xylogenesis. Since the main feature of xylogenesis is the deposition of additional wall components, study of the mechanism of xylogenesis will greatly advance our knowledge of the synthesis and assembly of wall macromolecules. We are using the in vitro xylogenesis system from isolated Zinnia mesophyll cells to isolate genes which are specifically expressed during xylogenesis. We have used subtractive hybridization methods to isolate a number of cDNA clones for differentially regulated genes from the cells after hormonal induction. So far, we have partially characterized 18 different cDNA clones from 239 positive clones. These differentially regulated genes can be divided into three sets according to the characteristics of gene expression in the induction medium and the control medium. The first set is induced in both the induction medium and the control medium without hormones. The second set is induced mainly in the induction medium and in the control medium with the addition of NAA alone. Two of thesegenes are exclusively induced by auxin. The third set of genes is induced mainly in the induction medium. Since these genes are not induced by either auxin or cytokinin alone, they may be directly involved in the process of xylogenesis. Our experiments on the localization of H[sub 2]O[sub 2] production reinforce the earlier ideas of others that H[sub 2]O[sub 2] is involved in normal lignification.

  20. Differences in osmotolerant and cell-wall properties of two Zygosaccharomyces rouxii strains.

    PubMed

    Pribylová, L; Farkas, V; Slaninová, I; de Montigny, J; Sychrová, H

    2007-01-01

    The osmotolerant and cell wall properties of the two most studied wild-type Zygosaccharomyces rouxii strains (CBS 732 and ATCC 42981) were examined. Differences in their (1) tolerance to high salt content in the medium, (2) resistance to the lysing enzymes Lyticase and Zymolyase, (3) cell-wall polymer content and (4) cell wall micromorphology suggested that the less osmotolerant CBS 732 strain possesses a more rigid cell wall than the more osmotolerant ATCC 42981, whose cell wall seems to be more flexible and elastic. PMID:17702462

  1. Comparative structure and biomechanics of plant primary and secondary cell walls

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Daniel J.; Jarvis, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    Recent insights into the physical biology of plant cell walls are reviewed, summarizing the essential differences between primary and secondary cell walls and identifying crucial gaps in our knowledge of their structure and biomechanics. Unexpected parallels are identified between the mechanism of expansion of primary cell walls during growth and the mechanisms by which hydrated wood deforms under external tension. There is a particular need to revise current “cartoons” of plant cell walls to be more consistent with data from diverse approaches and to go beyond summarizing limited aspects of cell walls, serving instead as guides for future experiments and for the application of new techniques. PMID:22936943

  2. Protecting cell walls from binding aluminum by organic acids contributes to aluminum resistance.

    PubMed

    Li, Ya-Ying; Zhang, Yue-Jiao; Zhou, Yuan; Yang, Jian-Li; Zheng, Shao-Jian

    2009-06-01

    Aluminum-induced secretion of organic acids from the root apex has been demonstrated to be one major Al resistance mechanism in plants. However, whether the organic acid concentration is high enough to detoxify Al in the growth medium is frequently questioned. The genotypes of Al-resistant wheat, Cassia tora L. and buckwheat secrete malate, citrate and oxalate, respectively. In the present study we found that at a 35% inhibition of root elongation, the Al activities in the solution were 10, 20, and 50 muM with the corresponding malate, citrate, and oxalate exudation at the rates of 15, 20 and 21 nmol/cm(2) per 12 h, respectively, for the above three plant species. When exogenous organic acids were added to ameliorate Al toxicity, twofold and eightfold higher oxalate and malate concentrations were required to produce the equal effect by citrate. After the root apical cell walls were isolated and preincubated in 1 mM malate, oxalate or citrate solution overnight, the total amount of Al adsorbed to the cell walls all decreased significantly to a similar level, implying that these organic acids own an equal ability to protect the cell walls from binding Al. These findings suggest that protection of cell walls from binding Al by organic acids may contribute significantly to Al resistance. PMID:19522816

  3. Dissecting the polysaccharide-rich grape cell wall matrix using recombinant pectinases during winemaking.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu; Fangel, Jonatan U; Willats, William G T; Vivier, Melané A; Moore, John P

    2016-11-01

    The effectiveness of enzyme-mediated-maceration in red winemaking relies on the use of an optimum combination of specific enzymes. A lack of information on the relevant enzyme activities and the corresponding polysaccharide-rich berry cell wall structure is a major limitation. This study used different combinations of purified recombinant pectinases with cell wall profiling tools to follow the deconstruction process during winemaking. Multivariate data analysis of the glycan microarray (CoMPP) and gas chromatography (GC) results revealed that pectin lyase performed almost as effectively in de-pectination as certain commercial enzyme mixtures. Surprisingly the combination of endo-polygalacturonase and pectin-methyl-esterase only unraveled the cell walls without de-pectination. Datasets from the various combinations used confirmed pectin-rich and xyloglucan-rich layers within the grape pomace. These data support a proposed grape cell wall model which can serve as a foundation to evaluate testable hypotheses in future studies aimed at developing tailor-made enzymes for winemaking scenarios. PMID:27516299

  4. Technological Implications of Modifying the Extent of Cell Wall-Proanthocyanidin Interactions Using Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Bautista-Ortín, Ana Belén; Ben Abdallah, Rim; Castro-López, Liliana Del Rocío; Jiménez-Martínez, María Dolores; Gómez-Plaza, Encarna

    2016-01-01

    The transference and reactivity of proanthocyanidins is an important issue that affects the technological processing of some fruits, such as grapes and apples. These processes are affected by proanthocyanidins bound to cell wall polysaccharides, which are present in high concentrations during the processing of the fruits. Therefore, the effective extraction of proanthocyanidins from fruits to their juices or derived products will depend on the ability to manage these associations, and, in this respect, enzymes that degrade these polysaccharides could play an important role. The main objective of this work was to test the role of pure hydrolytic enzymes (polygalacturonase and cellulose) and a commercial enzyme containing these two activities on the extent of proanthocyanidin-cell wall interactions. The results showed that the modification promoted by enzymes reduced the amount of proanthocyanidins adsorbed to cell walls since they contributed to the degradation and release of the cell wall polysaccharides, which diffused into the model solution. Some of these released polysaccharides also presented some reactivity towards the proanthocyanidins present in a model solution. PMID:26797601

  5. Technological Implications of Modifying the Extent of Cell Wall-Proanthocyanidin Interactions Using Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Bautista-Ortín, Ana Belén; Ben Abdallah, Rim; Castro-López, Liliana del Rocío; Jiménez-Martínez, María Dolores; Gómez-Plaza, Encarna

    2016-01-01

    The transference and reactivity of proanthocyanidins is an important issue that affects the technological processing of some fruits, such as grapes and apples. These processes are affected by proanthocyanidins bound to cell wall polysaccharides, which are present in high concentrations during the processing of the fruits. Therefore, the effective extraction of proanthocyanidins from fruits to their juices or derived products will depend on the ability to manage these associations, and, in this respect, enzymes that degrade these polysaccharides could play an important role. The main objective of this work was to test the role of pure hydrolytic enzymes (polygalacturonase and cellulose) and a commercial enzyme containing these two activities on the extent of proanthocyanidin-cell wall interactions. The results showed that the modification promoted by enzymes reduced the amount of proanthocyanidins adsorbed to cell walls since they contributed to the degradation and release of the cell wall polysaccharides, which diffused into the model solution. Some of these released polysaccharides also presented some reactivity towards the proanthocyanidins present in a model solution. PMID:26797601

  6. Cotton GhMYB7 is predominantly expressed in developing fibers and regulates secondary cell wall biosynthesis in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Junfeng; Chen, Feng; Wu, Siyu; Li, Juan; Xu, Wenliang

    2016-02-01

    The secondary cell wall in mature cotton fibers contains over 90% cellulose with low quantities of xylan and lignin. However, little is known regarding the regulation of secondary cell wall biosynthesis in cotton fibers. In this study, we characterized an R2R3-MYB transcription factor, GhMYB7, in cotton. GhMYB7 is expressed at a high level in developing fibers and encodes a MYB protein that is targeted to the cell nucleus and has transcriptional activation activity. Ectopic expression of GhMYB7 in Arabidopsis resulted in small, curled, dark green leaves and also led to shorter inflorescence stems. A cross-sectional assay of basal stems revealed that cell wall thickness of vessels and interfascicular fibers was higher in transgenic lines overexpressing GhMYB7 than in the wild type. Constitutive expression of GhMYB7 in Arabidopsis activated the expression of a suite of secondary cell wall biosynthesis-related genes (including some secondary cell wall-associated transcription factors), leading to the ectopic deposition of cellulose and lignin. The ectopic deposition of secondary cell walls may have been initiated before the cessation of cell expansion. Moreover, GhMYB7 was capable of binding to the promoter regions of AtSND1 and AtCesA4, suggesting that GhMYB7 may function upstream of NAC transcription factors. Collectively, these findings suggest that GhMYB7 is a potential transcriptional activator, which may participate in regulating secondary cell wall biosynthesis of cotton fibers. PMID:26803299

  7. Cell Wall Invertase Promotes Fruit Set under Heat Stress by Suppressing ROS-Independent Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-Hua; Offler, Christina E; Ruan, Yong-Ling

    2016-09-01

    Reduced cell wall invertase (CWIN) activity has been shown to be associated with poor seed and fruit set under abiotic stress. Here, we examined whether genetically increasing native CWIN activity would sustain fruit set under long-term moderate heat stress (LMHS), an important factor limiting crop production, by using transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) with its CWIN inhibitor gene silenced and focusing on ovaries and fruits at 2 d before and after pollination, respectively. We found that the increase of CWIN activity suppressed LMHS-induced programmed cell death in fruits. Surprisingly, measurement of the contents of H2O2 and malondialdehyde and the activities of a cohort of antioxidant enzymes revealed that the CWIN-mediated inhibition on programmed cell death is exerted in a reactive oxygen species-independent manner. Elevation of CWIN activity sustained Suc import into fruits and increased activities of hexokinase and fructokinase in the ovaries in response to LMHS Compared to the wild type, the CWIN-elevated transgenic plants exhibited higher transcript levels of heat shock protein genes Hsp90 and Hsp100 in ovaries and HspII17.6 in fruits under LMHS, which corresponded to a lower transcript level of a negative auxin responsive factor IAA9 but a higher expression of the auxin biosynthesis gene ToFZY6 in fruits at 2 d after pollination. Collectively, the data indicate that CWIN enhances fruit set under LMHS through suppression of programmed cell death in a reactive oxygen species-independent manner that could involve enhanced Suc import and catabolism, HSP expression, and auxin response and biosynthesis. PMID:27462084

  8. Analysis of Stress Responsive Genes Induced by Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in BJ Foreskin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Shubhashish; Sharma, Chidananda; Yog, Rajeshwari; Periakaruppan, Adaikkappan; Jejelowo, Olufisayo; Thomas, Renard; Barrera, Enrique V.; Rice-Ficht, Allison C.; Wilson, Bobby L.; Ramesh, Govindarajan T.

    2009-01-01

    Nanotechnology is finding its use as a potential technology in consumer products, defense, electronics, and medical applications by exploiting the properties of nanomaterials. Single-walled carbon nanotubes are novel forms of these nanomaterials with potential for large applications. However, the toxicity studies on this material are not explored in detail and therefore limiting its use. It has been earlier reported that single-walled carbon nanotubes induces oxidative stress and also dictates activation of specific signaling pathway in keratinocytes. The present study explores the effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes on stress genes in human BJ Foreskin cells. The results show induction of oxidative stress in BJ Foreskin cells by single-walled carbon nanotubes and increase in stress responsive genes. The genes included inducible genes like HMOX1, HMOX2, and Cyp1B1. In addition we validated increase for four genes by SWCNT, namely ATM, CCNC, DNAJB4, and GADD45A by RT-PCR. Moreover results of the altered stress related genes have been discussed and that partially explains some of the toxic responses induced by single-walled carbon nanotubes. PMID:17450800

  9. Architecture-based multiscale computational modeling of plant cell wall mechanics to examine the hydrogen-bonding hypothesis of cell wall network structure model

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Hojae; Puri, Virendra M.

    2012-11-01

    A primary plant cell wall network was computationally modeled using the finite element approach to study the hypothesis of hemicellulose (HC) tethering with the cellulose microfibrils (CMFs) as one of the major load-bearing mechanisms of the growing cell wall. A computational primary cell wall network fragment (10 × 10 μm) comprising typical compositions and properties of CMFs and HC was modeled with well-aligned CMFs. The tethering of HC to CMFs is modeled in accordance with the strength of the hydrogen bonding by implementing a specific load-bearing connection (i.e. the joint element). The introduction of the CMF-HC interaction to the computational cell wall network model is a key to the quantitative examination of the mechanical consequences of cell wall structure models, including the tethering HC model. When the cell wall network models with and without joint elements were compared, the hydrogen bond exhibited a significant contribution to the overall stiffness of the cell wall network fragment. When the cell wall network model was stretched 1% in the transverse direction, the tethering of CMF-HC via hydrogen bonds was not strong enough to maintain its integrity. When the cell wall network model was stretched 1% in the longitudinal direction, the tethering provided comparable strength to maintain its integrity. This substantial anisotropy suggests that the HC tethering with hydrogen bonds alone does not manifest sufficient energy to maintain the integrity of the cell wall during its growth (i.e. other mechanisms are present to ensure the cell wall shape).

  10. Sequential cell wall transformations in response to the induction of a pedicel abscission event in Euphorbia pulcherrima (poinsettia).

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeonkyeong; Derbyshire, Paul; Knox, J Paul; Hvoslef-Eide, Anne Kathrine

    2008-06-01

    Alterations in the detection of cell wall polysaccharides during an induced abscission event in the pedicel of Euphorbia pulcherrima (poinsettia) have been determined using monoclonal antibodies and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy. Concurrent with the appearance of a morphologically distinct abscission zone (AZ) on day 5 after induction, a reduction in the detection of the LM5 (1-->4)-beta-D-galactan and LM6 (1-->5)-alpha-L-arabinan epitopes in AZ cell walls was observed. Prior to AZ activation, a loss of the (1-->4)-beta-D-galactan and (1-->5)-alpha-L-arabinan epitopes was detected in cell walls distal to the AZ, i.e. in the to-be-shed organ. The earliest detected change, on day 2 after induction, was a specific loss of the LM5 (1-->4)-beta-D-galactan epitope from epidermal cells distal to the region where the AZ would form. Such alteration in the cell walls was an early, pre-AZ activation event. An AZ-associated de-esterification of homogalacturonan (HG) was detected in the AZ and distal area on day 7 after induction. The FT-IR analysis indicated that lignin and xylan were abundant in the AZ and that lower levels of cellulose, arabinose and pectin were present. Xylan and xyloglucan epitopes were detected in the cell walls of both the AZ and also the primary cell walls of the distal region at a late stage of the abscission process, on day 7 after induction. These observations indicate that the induction of an abscission event results in a temporal sequence of cell wall modifications involving the spatially regulated loss, appearance and/or remodelling of distinct sets of cell wall polymers. PMID:18298669

  11. Changes in the chemical properties and swelling coefficient of alfalfa root cell walls in the presence of toluene as a toxic agent.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, M; Khoshgoftarmanesh, A H; Hadadzadeh, H

    2016-04-01

    The influence of toluene pollution on the chemical properties and swelling coefficient of root cell walls in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) was investigated. Two sets of alfalfa seedlings were selected and one set was treated with 450 mg L(-1) toluene in the nutrient solution under hydroponic culture. Thirty days after treatment with toluene, alfalfa plants were harvested and the root cell walls were isolated. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was carried out for the characterization of the root cell walls composition. The cation exchange capacity (CEC) and the swelling coefficient of the root cell walls (Kcw) were estimated at various pH values. The toluene contamination significantly reduced the mass of the cell wall material in the alfalfa roots. According to the FTIR spectra, the toluene pollution can change the alfalfa root cell wall properties by reducing the cell wall functional groups. These functional groups are probably related to the proteins and polysaccharides in the cell wall. Also, toluene pollution strongly reduced CEC and Kcw of the root cell walls. The results show that the decrease in the active sites of adsorption on the root cell walls as a response to toluene pollution can affect the water flow rate and the mineral nutrients uptake by roots. PMID:26728292

  12. Proteomic Analysis of Cell Walls of Two Developmental Stages of Alfalfa Stems

    PubMed Central

    Verdonk, Julian C.; Hatfield, Ronald D.; Sullivan, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Cell walls are important for the growth and development of all plants. They are also valuable resources for feed and fiber, and more recently as a potential feedstock for bioenergy production. Cell wall proteins comprise only a fraction of the cell wall, but play important roles in establishing the walls and in the chemical interactions (e.g., crosslinking) of cell wall components. This crosslinking provides structure, but restricts digestibility of cell wall complex carbohydrates, limiting available energy in animal and bioenergy production systems. Manipulation of cell wall proteins could be a strategy to improve digestibility. An analysis of the cell wall proteome of apical alfalfa stems (less mature, more digestible) and basal alfalfa stems (more mature, less digestible) was conducted using a recently developed low-salt/density gradient method for the isolation of cell walls. Walls were subsequently subjected to a modified extraction utilizing EGTA to remove pectins, followed by a LiCl extraction to isolate more tightly bound proteins. Recovered proteins were identified using shotgun proteomics. We identified 272 proteins in the alfalfa stem cell wall proteome, 153 of which had not previously been identified in cell wall proteomic analyses. Nearly 70% of the identified proteins were predicted to be secreted, as would be expected for most cell wall proteins, an improvement over previously published studies using traditional cell wall isolation methods. A comparison of our and several other cell wall proteomic studies indicates little overlap in identified proteins among them, which may be largely due to differences in the tissues used as well as differences in experimental approach. PMID:23248635

  13. Bacterial cell wall-induced arthritis: chemical composition and tissue distribution of four Lactobacillus strains.

    PubMed

    Simelyte, E; Rimpiläinen, M; Lehtonen, L; Zhang, X; Toivanen, P

    2000-06-01

    To study what determines the arthritogenicity of bacterial cell walls, cell wall-induced arthritis in the rat was applied, using four strains of Lactobacillus. Three of the strains used proved to induce chronic arthritis in the rat; all were Lactobacillus casei. The cell wall of Lactobacillus fermentum did not induce chronic arthritis. All arthritogenic bacterial cell walls had the same peptidoglycan structure, whereas that of L. fermentum was different. Likewise, all arthritogenic cell walls were resistant to lysozyme degradation, whereas the L. fermentum cell wall was lysozyme sensitive. Muramic acid was observed in the liver, spleen, and lymph nodes in considerably larger amounts after injection of an arthritogenic L. casei cell wall than following injection of a nonarthritogenic L. fermentum cell wall. The L. casei cell wall also persisted in the tissues longer than the L. fermentum cell wall. The present results, taken together with those published previously, underline the possibility that the chemical structure of peptidoglycan is important in determining the arthritogenicity of the bacterial cell wall. PMID:10816508

  14. Active control of the resistive wall mode with power saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Li Li; Liu Yue; Liu Yueqiang

    2012-01-15

    An analytic model of non-linear feedback stabilization of the resistive wall mode is presented. The non-linearity comes from either the current or the voltage saturation of the control coil power supply. For the so-called flux-to-current control, the current saturation of active coils always results in the loss of control. On the contrary, the flux-to-voltage control scheme tolerates certain degree of the voltage saturation. The minimal voltage limit is calculated, below which the control will be lost.

  15. In planta expression of A. cellulolyticus Cel5A endocellulase reduces cell wall recalcitrance in tobacco and maize

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The glycoside hydrolase family 5 endocellulase, E1 (Cel5A), from Acidothermus cellulolyticus was transformed into both Nicotiana tabacum and Zea mays with expression targeted to the cell wall under a constitutive promoter. Here we explore the possibility that in planta expression of endocellulases will allow these enzymes to access their substrates during cell wall construction, rendering cellulose more amenable to pretreatment and enzyme digestion. Tobacco and maize plants were healthy and developed normally compared with the wild type (WT). After thermochemical pretreatment and enzyme digestion, transformed plants were clearly more digestible than WT, requiring lower pretreatment severity to achieve comparable conversion levels. Furthermore, the decreased recalcitrance was not due to post-pretreatment residual E1 activity and could not be reproduced by the addition of exogenous E1 to the biomass prior to pretreatment, indicating that the expression of E1 during cell wall construction altered the inherent recalcitrance of the cell wall. PMID:21269444

  16. Structure and Cell Wall Cleavage by Modular Lytic Transglycosylase MltC of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The lytic transglycosylases are essential bacterial enzymes that catalyze the nonhydrolytic cleavage of the glycan strands of the bacterial cell wall. We describe here the structural and catalytic properties of MltC, one of the seven lytic transglycosylases found in the genome of the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli. The 2.3 Å resolution X-ray structure of a soluble construct of MltC shows a unique, compared to known lytic transglycosylase structures, two-domain structure characterized by an expansive active site of 53 Å length extending through an interface between the domains. The structures of three complexes of MltC with cell wall analogues suggest the positioning of the peptidoglycan in the active site both as a substrate and as a product. One complex is suggested to correspond to an intermediate in the course of sequential and exolytic cleavage of the peptidoglycan. Moreover, MltC partitioned its reactive oxocarbenium-like intermediate between trapping by the C6-hydroxyl of the muramyl moiety (lytic transglycosylase activity, the major path) and by water (muramidase activity). Genomic analysis identifies the presence of an MltC homologue in no less than 791 bacterial genomes. While the role of MltC in cell wall assembly and maturation remains uncertain, we propose a functional role for this enzyme as befits the uniqueness of its two-domain structure. PMID:24988330

  17. Structure and cell wall cleavage by modular lytic transglycosylase MltC of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Artola-Recolons, Cecilia; Lee, Mijoon; Bernardo-García, Noelia; Blázquez, Blas; Hesek, Dusan; Bartual, Sergio G; Mahasenan, Kiran V; Lastochkin, Elena; Pi, Hualiang; Boggess, Bill; Meindl, Kathrin; Usón, Isabel; Fisher, Jed F; Mobashery, Shahriar; Hermoso, Juan A

    2014-09-19

    The lytic transglycosylases are essential bacterial enzymes that catalyze the nonhydrolytic cleavage of the glycan strands of the bacterial cell wall. We describe here the structural and catalytic properties of MltC, one of the seven lytic transglycosylases found in the genome of the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli. The 2.3 Å resolution X-ray structure of a soluble construct of MltC shows a unique, compared to known lytic transglycosylase structures, two-domain structure characterized by an expansive active site of 53 Å length extending through an interface between the domains. The structures of three complexes of MltC with cell wall analogues suggest the positioning of the peptidoglycan in the active site both as a substrate and as a product. One complex is suggested to correspond to an intermediate in the course of sequential and exolytic cleavage of the peptidoglycan. Moreover, MltC partitioned its reactive oxocarbenium-like intermediate between trapping by the C6-hydroxyl of the muramyl moiety (lytic transglycosylase activity, the major path) and by water (muramidase activity). Genomic analysis identifies the presence of an MltC homologue in no less than 791 bacterial genomes. While the role of MltC in cell wall assembly and maturation remains uncertain, we propose a functional role for this enzyme as befits the uniqueness of its two-domain structure. PMID:24988330

  18. Structure, cell wall elasticity and polysaccharide properties of living yeast cells, as probed by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsteens, David; Dupres, Vincent; McEvoy, Kevin; Wildling, Linda; Gruber, Hermann J.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2008-09-01

    Although the chemical composition of yeast cell walls is known, the organization, assembly, and interactions of the various macromolecules remain poorly understood. Here, we used in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) in three different modes to probe the ultrastructure, cell wall elasticity and polymer properties of two brewing yeast strains, i.e. Saccharomyces carlsbergensis and S. cerevisiae. Topographic images of the two strains revealed smooth and homogeneous cell surfaces, and the presence of circular bud scars on dividing cells. Nanomechanical measurements demonstrated that the cell wall elasticity of S. carlsbergensis is homogeneous. By contrast, the bud scar of S. cerevisiae was found to be stiffer than the cell wall, presumably due to the accumulation of chitin. Notably, single molecule force spectroscopy with lectin-modified tips revealed major differences in polysaccharide properties of the two strains. Polysaccharides were clearly more extended on S. cerevisiae, suggesting that not only oligosaccharides, but also polypeptide chains of the mannoproteins were stretched. Consistent with earlier cell surface analyses, these findings may explain the very different aggregation properties of the two organisms. This study demonstrates the power of using multiple complementary AFM modalities for probing the organization and interactions of the various macromolecules of microbial cell walls.

  19. Cellulose-hemicellulose interaction in wood secondary cell-wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ning; Li, Shi; Xiong, Liming; Hong, Yu; Chen, Youping

    2015-12-01

    The wood cell wall features a tough and relatively rigid fiber reinforced composite structure. It acts as a pressure vessel, offering protection against mechanical stress. Cellulose microfibrils, hemicellulose and amorphous lignin are the three major components of wood. The structure of secondary cell wall could be imagined as the same as reinforced concrete, in which cellulose microfibrils acts as reinforcing steel bar and hemicellulose-lignin matrices act as the concrete. Therefore, the interface between cellulose and hemicellulose/lignin plays a significant role in determine the mechanical behavior of wood secondary cell wall. To this end, we present a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation study attempting to quantify the strength of the interface between cellulose microfibrils and hemicellulose. Since hemicellulose binds with adjacent cellulose microfibrils in various patterns, the atomistic models of hemicellulose-cellulose composites with three typical binding modes, i.e. bridge, loop and random binding modes are constructed. The effect of the shape of hemicellulose chain on the strength of hemicellulose-cellulose composites under shear loadings is investigated. The contact area as well as hydrogen bonds between cellulose and hemicellulose, together with the covalent bonds in backbone of hemicellulose chain are found to be the controlling parameters which determine the strength of the interfaces in the composite system. For the bridge binding model, the effect of shear loading direction on the strength of the cellulose material is also studied. The obtained results suggest that the shear strength of wood-inspired engineering composites can be optimized through maximizing the formations of the contributing hydrogen bonds between cellulose and hemicellulose.

  20. Effect of wall material on the antioxidant activity and physicochemical properties of Rubus fruticosus juice microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Dafne I; Beristain, Cesar I; Azuara, Ebner; Luna, Guadalupe; Jimenez, Maribel

    2015-01-01

    Blackberry (Rubus fruticosus) juice possesses compounds with antioxidant activity, which can be protected by different biopolymers used in the microencapsulation. Therefore, the effects of cell wall material including maltodextrin (MD), Arabic gum (GA) and whey protein concentrate (WPC) were evaluated on the physicochemical and antioxidant properties of encapsulated blackberries using a spray-drying technique. Anthocyanin concentration, polymeric colour, total polyphenols, radical scavenging activity of the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrilhydrazil radical, reducing power and the stability at different storage conditions were evaluated. GA and MD conferred a similar protection to the antioxidant compounds when the microcapsules were stored at low water activities (aw < 0.515) in contrast to at a high moisture content (aw > 0.902), whereas WPC presented a high protection. Therefore, the selection of the best wall material for blackberry juice encapsulation depends of the conditions of storage of the powder. PMID:26006741

  1. Substitution of L-fucose by L-galactose in cell walls of arabidopsis mur1

    SciTech Connect

    Zablackis, E.; York, W.S.; Pauly, M.

    1996-06-21

    An Arabidopsis thaliana mutant (mur1) has less than 2 percent of the normal amounts of L-fucose in the primary cell walls of aerial portions of the plant. The survival of mur1 plants challenged the hypothesis that fucose is a required component of biologically active oligosaccharides derived from cell wall xyloglucan. However, the replacement of L-fucose (that is, 6-deoxyl-L-galactose) by L-galactose does not detectably alter the biological activity of the oligosaccharides derived from xyloglucan. Thus, essential structural and conformational features of xyloglucan and xyloglucan-derived oligosaccharides are retained when L-galactose replaces L-fucose. 29 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Forage digestibility: the intersection of cell wall lignification and plant tissue anatomy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cellulose and the other polysaccharides present in forage cell walls can be completely degraded by the rumen microflora but only when these polysaccharides have been isolated from the wall and all matrix structures eliminated. Understanding how cell wall component interactions limit microbial degrad...

  3. The Mechanisms of Plant Cell Wall Deconstruction during Enzymatic Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Thygesen, Lisbeth G.; Thybring, Emil E.; Johansen, Katja S.; Felby, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical agitation during enzymatic hydrolysis of insoluble plant biomass at high dry matter contents is indispensable for the initial liquefaction step in biorefining. It is known that particle size reduction is an important part of liquefaction, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Here we put forward a simple model based on mechanical principles capable of capturing the result of the interaction between mechanical forces and cell wall weakening via hydrolysis of glucosidic bonds. This study illustrates that basic material science insights are relevant also within biochemistry, particularly when it comes to up-scaling of processes based on insoluble feed stocks. PMID:25232741

  4. Theoretical investigation on breaking plant cell wall by laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liang-cai; Wang, Jin-ji; Ma, Peng; Zuo, Du-luo; Wang, Xin-bing; Cheng, Zu-hai

    2012-03-01

    The experiment collected some spinach leaves which were irradiated by pulsed CO2 laser with energy 5.6J, 8.0J and 9.5J respectively. Each of them was soaked in three kinds of solvents (water, ethanol, the mixture of ethanol and petroleum ether) respectively. The experiment shows that the ethanol solution which contains the irradiated leaves turn dark green than the ethanol solution which contains the intact leaves and the color of solution with the leaves irradiated by CO2 laser with 9.5J changes the most significantly. Further, selective excitation on the molecular level of the cell wall were used to explain the phenomenon.

  5. Theoretical investigation on breaking plant cell wall by laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liang-cai; Wang, Jin-ji; Ma, Peng; Zuo, Du-luo; Wang, Xin-bing; Cheng, Zu-hai

    2011-11-01

    The experiment collected some spinach leaves which were irradiated by pulsed CO2 laser with energy 5.6J, 8.0J and 9.5J respectively. Each of them was soaked in three kinds of solvents (water, ethanol, the mixture of ethanol and petroleum ether) respectively. The experiment shows that the ethanol solution which contains the irradiated leaves turn dark green than the ethanol solution which contains the intact leaves and the color of solution with the leaves irradiated by CO2 laser with 9.5J changes the most significantly. Further, selective excitation on the molecular level of the cell wall were used to explain the phenomenon.

  6. The Metabolic Enzyme ManA Reveals a Link between Cell Wall Integrity and Chromosome Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Elbaz, Maya; Ben-Yehuda, Sigal

    2010-01-01

    Synchronizing cell growth, division and DNA replication is an essential property of all living cells. Accurate coordination of these cellular events is especially crucial for bacteria, which can grow rapidly and undergo multifork replication. Here we show that the metabolic protein ManA, which is a component of mannose phosphotransferase system, participates in cell wall construction of the rod shaped bacterium Bacillus subtilis. When growing rapidly, cells lacking ManA exhibit aberrant cell wall architecture, polyploidy and abnormal chromosome morphologies. We demonstrate that these cellular defects are derived from the role played by ManA in cell wall formation. Furthermore, we show that ManA is required for maintaining the proper carbohydrate composition of the cell wall, particularly of teichoic acid constituents. This perturbed cell wall synthesis causes asynchrony between cell wall elongation, division and nucleoid segregation. PMID:20862359

  7. Phosphodiesterase MoPdeH targets MoMck1 of the conserved mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signalling pathway to regulate cell wall integrity in rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ziyi; Tang, Wei; Wang, Jingzhen; Liu, Xinyu; Yang, Lina; Gao, Chuyun; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Haifeng; Zheng, Xiaobo; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Zhengguang

    2016-06-01

    In the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae, the high-affinity cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) phosphodiesterase MoPdeH is important not only for cAMP signalling and pathogenicity, but also for cell wall integrity (CWI) maintenance through an unknown mechanism. By utilizing affinity purification, we found that MoPdeH interacts with MoMck1, one of the components of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade that regulates CWI. Overexpression of MoMCK1 suppressed defects in autolysis and pathogenicity of the ΔMopdeH mutant, although partially, suggesting that MoPdeH plays a critical role in CWI maintenance mediated by the MAP kinase pathway. We found that MoMck1 and two other MAP kinase cascade components, MoMkk1 and MoMps1, modulate intracellular cAMP levels by regulating the expression of MoPDEH through a feedback loop. In addition, disruption of MoMKK1 resulted in less aerial hyphal formation, defective asexual development and attenuated pathogenicity. Moreover, MoMkk1 plays a role in the response to osmotic stress via regulation of MoOsm1 phosphorylation levels, whereas endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress enhances MoMps1 phosphorylation and loss of the MAP kinase cascade component affects the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that MoPdeH functions upstream of the MoMck1-MoMkk1-MoMps1 MAP kinase pathway to regulate CWI, and that MoPdeH also mediates crosstalk between the cAMP signalling pathway, the osmotic sensing high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway and the dithiothreitol (DTT)-induced UPR pathway in M. oryzae. PMID:27193947

  8. The cell wall amidase AmiB is essential for Pseudomonas aeruginosa cell division, drug resistance, and viability

    PubMed Central

    Yakhnina, Anastasiya A.; McManus, Heather R.; Bernhardt, Thomas G.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The physiological function of cell wall amidases has been investigated in several proteobacterial species. In all cases, they have been implicated in the cleavage of cell wall material synthesized by the cytokinetic ring. Although typically non-essential, this activity is critical for daughter cell separation and outer membrane invagination during division. In Escherichia coli, proteins with LytM domains also participate in cell separation by stimulating amidase activity. Here, we investigated the function of amidases and LytM proteins in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In agreement with studies in other organisms, PaAmiB and three LytM proteins were found to play crucial roles in P. aeruginosa cell separation, envelope integrity, and antibiotic resistance. Importantly, the phenotype of amidase-defective P. aeruginosa cells also differed in informative ways from the E. coli paradigm; PaAmiB was found to be essential for viability and the successful completion of cell constriction. Our results thus reveal a key role for amidase activity in cytokinetic ring contraction. Furthermore, we show that the essential function of PaAmiB can be bypassed in mutants activated for a Cpx-like envelope stress response, suggesting that this signaling system may elicit the repair of division machinery defects in addition to general envelope damage. PMID:26032134

  9. Comparison of Post-Germination Mobilization of Cell Wall Polysaccharides and Non-Cell Wall Carbohydrates in Soybean (Glycine max L.) Cotyledons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cell wall polysaccharides (CWP) and non-cell wall carbohydrates (NCWC) (sucrose, raffinose, stachyose, starch) were measured in cotyledons of germinating soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr. cv. Lambert] seedlings grown for 14 d in darkness or under a 16-h photoperiod. Ungerminated seeds contained equiva...

  10. Factors Influencing Protection Against Experimental Tuberculosis in Mice by Heat-Stable Cell Wall Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ribi, E.; Anacker, R. L.; Brehmer, W.; Goode, G.; Larson, C. L.; List, R. H.; Milner, K. C.; Wicht, W. C.

    1966-01-01

    Ribi, E. (Rocky Mountain Laboratory, Hamilton, Mont.), R. L. Anacker, W. Brehmer, G. Goode, C. L. Larson, R. H. List, K. C. Milner, and W. C. Wicht. Factors influencing protection against experimental tuberculosis in mice by heat-stable cell wall vaccines. J. Bacteriol. 92:869–879. 1966.—Studies of nonviable, heat-stable vaccines for active protection against experimental tuberculosis have been continued with a test involving aerosol challenge of intravenously vaccinated mice. The previously reported activating effect of light mineral oil on disrupted cells of the BCG strain was found to be shared by certain other mineral oils and a synthetic, 24-carbon hydrocarbon, but not by kerosene or any of several vegetable oils. Dry cell walls coated with a small amount of oil and dispersed in saline with aid of an emulsifier were suitable for intravenous administration and were effective in promoting resistance to challenge. Oil used in this manner, in contrast to water-in-oil emulsions of the Freund type which could not be administered intravenously, did not potentiate the tuberculin-sensitizing activity of the cell walls. Although the amount of oil required for full effect was small (< 0.5 ml/100 mg of dry antigen), there was a critical level below which optimal enhancement was not achieved. More stable suspensions than could be obtained with the other oils were readily prepared from cell walls treated with the synthetic hydrocarbon, 7-n-hexyloctadecane. Extended experience has shown that in this test system both the viable BCG standard vaccine and heated, oil-treated experimental vaccines gave highly reproducible results showing graded responses to graded doses. PMID:5332873

  11. 2-Fluoro-L-Fucose Is a Metabolically Incorporated Inhibitor of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharide Fucosylation.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Jose A; Yi, Bo R; Wallace, Ian S

    2015-01-01

    The monosaccharide L-fucose (L-Fuc) is a common component of plant cell wall polysaccharides and other plant glycans, including the hemicellulose xyloglucan, pectic rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I) and rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II), arabinogalactan proteins, and N-linked glycans. Mutations compromising the biosynthesis of many plant cell wall polysaccharides are lethal, and as a result, small molecule inhibitors of plant cell wall polysaccharide biosynthesis have been developed because these molecules can be applied at defined concentrations and developmental stages. In this study, we characterize novel small molecule inhibitors of plant fucosylation. 2-fluoro-L-fucose (2F-Fuc) analogs caused severe growth phenotypes when applied to Arabidopsis seedlings, including reduced root growth and altered root morphology. These phenotypic defects were dependent upon the L-Fuc salvage pathway enzyme L-Fucose Kinase/ GDP-L-Fucose Pyrophosphorylase (FKGP), suggesting that 2F-Fuc is metabolically converted to the sugar nucleotide GDP-2F-Fuc, which serves as the active inhibitory molecule. The L-Fuc content of cell wall matrix polysaccharides was reduced in plants treated with 2F-Fuc, suggesting that this molecule inhibits the incorporation of L-Fuc into these polysaccharides. Additionally, phenotypic defects induced by 2F-Fuc treatment could be partially relieved by the exogenous application of boric acid, suggesting that 2F-Fuc inhibits RG-II biosynthesis. Overall, the results presented here suggest that 2F-Fuc is a metabolically incorporated inhibitor of plant cellular fucosylation events, and potentially suggest that other 2-fluorinated monosaccharides could serve as useful chemical probes for the inhibition of cell wall polysaccharide biosynthesis. PMID:26414071

  12. 2-Fluoro-L-Fucose Is a Metabolically Incorporated Inhibitor of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharide Fucosylation

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Ian S.

    2015-01-01

    The monosaccharide L-fucose (L-Fuc) is a common component of plant cell wall polysaccharides and other plant glycans, including the hemicellulose xyloglucan, pectic rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I) and rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II), arabinogalactan proteins, and N-linked glycans. Mutations compromising the biosynthesis of many plant cell wall polysaccharides are lethal, and as a result, small molecule inhibitors of plant cell wall polysaccharide biosynthesis have been developed because these molecules can be applied at defined concentrations and developmental stages. In this study, we characterize novel small molecule inhibitors of plant fucosylation. 2-fluoro-L-fucose (2F-Fuc) analogs caused severe growth phenotypes when applied to Arabidopsis seedlings, including reduced root growth and altered root morphology. These phenotypic defects were dependent upon the L-Fuc salvage pathway enzyme L-Fucose Kinase/ GDP-L-Fucose Pyrophosphorylase (FKGP), suggesting that 2F-Fuc is metabolically converted to the sugar nucleotide GDP-2F-Fuc, which serves as the active inhibitory molecule. The L-Fuc content of cell wall matrix polysaccharides was reduced in plants treated with 2F-Fuc, suggesting that this molecule inhibits the incorporation of L-Fuc into these polysaccharides. Additionally, phenotypic defects induced by 2F-Fuc treatment could be partially relieved by the exogenous application of boric acid, suggesting that 2F-Fuc inhibits RG-II biosynthesis. Overall, the results presented here suggest that 2F-Fuc is a metabolically incorporated inhibitor of plant cellular fucosylation events, and potentially suggest that other 2-fluorinated monosaccharides could serve as useful chemical probes for the inhibition of cell wall polysaccharide biosynthesis. PMID:26414071

  13. Cell wall degradation is required for normal starch mobilisation in barley endosperm.

    PubMed

    Andriotis, Vasilios M E; Rejzek, Martin; Barclay, Elaine; Rugen, Michael D; Field, Robert A; Smith, Alison M

    2016-01-01

    Starch degradation in barley endosperm provides carbon for early seedling growth, but the control of this process is poorly understood. We investigated whether endosperm cell wall degradation is an important determinant of the rate of starch degradation. We identified iminosugar inhibitors of enzymes that degrade the cell wall component arabinoxylan. The iminosugar 1,4-dideoxy-1, 4-imino-l-arabinitol (LAB) inhibits arabinoxylan arabinofuranohydrolase (AXAH) but does not inhibit the main starch-degrading enzymes α- and β-amylase and limit dextrinase. AXAH activity in the endosperm appears soon after the onset of germination and resides in dimers putatively containing two isoforms, AXAH1 and AXAH2. Upon grain imbibition, mobilisation of arabinoxylan and starch spreads across the endosperm from the aleurone towards the crease. The front of arabinoxylan degradation precedes that of starch degradation. Incubation of grains with LAB decreases the rate of loss of both arabinoxylan and starch, and retards the spread of both degradation processes across the endosperm. We propose that starch degradation in the endosperm is dependent on cell wall degradation, which permeabilises the walls and thus permits rapid diffusion of amylolytic enzymes. AXAH may be of particular importance in this respect. These results provide new insights into the mobilization of endosperm reserves to support early seedling growth. PMID:27622597

  14. Characteristics of cadmium tolerance in 'Hermes' flax seedlings: contribution of cell walls.

    PubMed

    Douchiche, Olfa; Soret-Morvan, Odile; Chaïbi, Wided; Morvan, Claudine; Paynel, Florence

    2010-12-01

    Most flax (Linum usitatissimum) varieties are described as tolerant to high concentrations of Cd. The aim of the present paper was to better characterize this tolerance, by studying the responses of flax plantlets, cv Hermes, to 18d growth on 0.5mM Cd. In Cd-treated seedlings, the majority of Cd was compartmentalized in the roots. Analysis of other elements showed that only Fe concentration was reduced, while Mn increased. Growth parameters of Cd treated flax were only moderately altered, with similar mass tolerance-indices for roots and shoots. Tissue anatomy was unaffected by treatment. The effect on lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation and antioxidative activities appeared low but slightly higher in roots. The most important impacts of Cd were, in all organs, cell expansion, cell-wall thickening, pectin cross-linking and increase of cell-wall enzymatic activities (pectin methylesterase and peroxidase). Thus, the role of the cell wall in Cd tolerance might be important at two levels: (i) in the reinforcement of the tissue cohesion and (ii) in the sequestration of Cd. PMID:20884040

  15. Conditioning of Parsley (Petroselinum crispum L.) Suspension Cells Increases Elicitor-Induced Incorporation of Cell Wall Phenolics.

    PubMed Central

    Kauss, H.; Franke, R.; Krause, K.; Conrath, U.; Jeblick, W.; Grimmig, B.; Matern, U.

    1993-01-01

    The elicitor-induced incorporation of phenylpropanoid derivatives into the cell wall and the secretion of soluble coumarin derivatives (phytoalexins) by parsley (Petroselinum crispum L.) suspension cultures can be potentiated by pretreatment of the cultures with 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid or derivatives of salicylic acid. To investigate this phenomenon further, the cell walls and an extracellular soluble polymer were isolated from control cells or cells treated with an elicitor from Phytophthora megasperma f. sp. glycinea. After alkaline hydrolysis, both fractions from elicited cells showed a greatly increased content of 4-coumaric, ferulic, and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, as well as 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde and vanillin. Two minor peaks were identified as tyrosol and methoxytyrosol. The pretreatment effect is most pronounced at a low elicitor concentration. Its specificity was elaborated for coumarin secretion. When the parsley suspension cultures were preincubated for 1 d with 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic, 4- or 5-chlorosalicylic, or 3,5- dichlorosalicylic acid, the cells exhibited a greatly increased elicitor response. Pretreatment with isonicotinic, salicylic, acetylsalicylic, or 2,6-dihydroxybenzoic acid was less efficient in enhancing the response, and some other isomers were inactive. This increase in elicitor response was also observed for the above-mentioned monomeric phenolics, which were liberated from cell walls upon alkaline hydrolysis and for "lignin-like" cell wall polymers determined by the thioglycolic acid method. It was shown for 5-chlorosalicylic acid that conditioning most likely improves the signal transduction leading to the activation of genes encoding phenylalanine ammonia lyase and 4-coumarate: coenzyme A ligase. The conditioning thus sensitizes the parsley suspension cells to respond to lower elicitor concentrations. If a similar mechanism were to apply to whole plants treated with 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid, a known inducer of systemic

  16. Yeast and fungal cell-wall polysaccharides can self-assemble in vitro into an ultrastructure resembling in vivo yeast cell walls.

    PubMed

    Kopecká, Marie

    2013-06-01

    Polysaccharides account for more than 90% of the content of fungal cell walls, but the mechanism underlying the formation of the architecture of the cell walls, which consist of microfibrils embedded in an amorphous wall matrix, remains unknown. We used electron microscopy to investigate ten different fungal cell-wall polysaccharides to determine whether they could self-assemble into the fibrillar or amorphous component of fungal cell walls in a test tube without enzymes. The ultrastructures formed by precipitating β-1,3-glucan and β-1,6-glucan are different depending on the existence of branching in the molecule. Linear β-1,3-glucan and linear β-1,6-glucan precipitate into a fibrillar ultrastructure. Branched β-1,6-glucan, mannan and glycogen precipitates are amorphous. Branched β-1,3-glucan forms a fibrillar plus amorphous ultrastructure. Self-assembly among combinations of different linear and branched cell-wall polysaccharides results in an ultrastructure that resembles that of a yeast cell wall, which suggests that self-assembly of polysaccharides may participate in the development of the three-dimensional architecture of the yeast cell wall. PMID:23160360

  17. The cell-wall glycoproteins of the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus. The predominant cell-wall polypeptide of Scenedesmus obliquus is related to the cell-wall glycoprotein gp3 of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Jürgen; Stolarczyk, Adam; Zych, Maria; Malec, Przemysław; Burczyk, Jan

    2014-02-01

    The green alga Scenedesmus obliquus contains a multilayered cell wall, ultrastructurally similar to that of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, although its proportion of hydroxyproline is considerably lower. Therefore, we have investigated the polypeptide composition of the insoluble and the chaotrope-soluble wall fractions of S. obliquus. The polypeptide pattern of the chaotrope-soluble wall fraction was strongly modified by chemical deglycosylation with anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (HF) in pyridine indicating that most of these polypeptides are glycosylated. Polypeptide constituents of the chaotrope-soluble cell-wall fraction with apparent molecular masses of 240, 270, 265, and 135 kDa cross-reacted with a polyclonal antibody raised against the 100 kDa deglycosylation product of the C. reinhardtii cell-wall glycoprotein GP3B. Chemical deglycosylation of the chaotrope-soluble wall fraction resulted in a 135 kDa major polypeptide and a 106 kDa minor component reacting with the same antibody. This antibody recognized specific peptide epitopes of GP3B. When the insoluble wall fraction of S. obliquus was treated with anhydrous HF/pyridine, three polypeptides with apparent molecular masses of 144, 135, and 65 kDa were solubilized, which also occured in the deglycosylated chaotrope-soluble wall fraction. These findings indicate that theses glycoproteins are cross-linked to the insoluble wall fraction via HF-sensitive bonds. PMID:24388513

  18. Solar cell activation system

    SciTech Connect

    Apelian, L.

    1983-07-05

    A system for activating solar cells involves the use of phosphorescent paint, the light from which is amplified by a thin magnifying lens and used to activate solar cells. In a typical system, a member painted with phosphorescent paint is mounted adjacent a thin magnifying lens which focuses the light on a predetermined array of sensitive cells such as selenium, cadmium or silicon, mounted on a plastic board. A one-sided mirror is mounted adjacent the cells to reflect the light back onto said cells for purposes of further intensification. The cells may be coupled to rechargeable batteries or used to directly power a small radio or watch.

  19. Biosynthesis of the Plant Cell Wall Matrix Polysaccharide Xyloglucan.

    PubMed

    Pauly, Markus; Keegstra, Kenneth

    2016-04-29

    Xyloglucan (XyG) is a matrix polysaccharide that is present in the cell walls of all land plants. It consists of a β-1,4-linked glucan backbone that is further substituted with xylosyl residues. These xylosyl residues can be further substituted with other glycosyl and nonglycosyl substituents that vary depending on the plant family and specific tissue. Advances in plant mutant isolation and characterization, functional genomics, and DNA sequencing have led to the identification of nearly all transferases and synthases necessary to synthesize XyG. Thus, in terms of the molecular mechanisms of plant cell wall polysaccharide biosynthesis, XyG is the most well understood. However, much remains to be learned about the molecular mechanisms of polysaccharide assembly and the regulation of these processes. Knowledge of the XyG biosynthetic machinery allows the XyG structure to be tailored in planta to ascertain the functions of this polysaccharide and its substituents in plant growth and interactions with the environment. PMID:26927904

  20. Chemical Profiling of the Plant Cell Wall through Raman Microspectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Ju; Singh, Seema; Sun, Lan; Simmons, Blake; Auer, Manfred; Parvin, Bahram

    2010-03-02

    This paper presents a computational framework for chemical pro.ling of the plant cell wall through the Raman spectroscopy. The system enables query of known spectral signatures and clustering of spectral data based on intrinsic properties. As a result, presence and relative concentration of speci.c chemical bonds can be quanti.ed. The primary contribution of this paper is in representation of raman pro.le in terms of .uorescence background and multiscale peak detection at each grid point (voxel). Such a representation allows ef.cient spatial segmentation based on the coupling between high-level salient properties and low-level symbolic representation at each voxel. The high-level salient properties refer to preferred peaks and their attributes for the entire image. The low-level symbolic representations are based on .uorescence background, spectral peak locations, and their attributes. We present results on a corn stover tissue section that is imaged through Raman microscopy, and the results are consistent with the literature. In addition, automatic clustering indicates several distinct layers of the cell walls with different spectral signatures.

  1. The toughness of secondary cell wall and woody tissue

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, P. W.; Tan, H. T. W.; Cheng, P. Y.

    1997-01-01

    The 'across grain' toughness of 51 woods has been determined on thin wet sections using scissors. The moisture content of sections and the varying sharpness of the scissor blades had little effect on the results. In thin sections (less than 0.6mm), toughness rose linearly with section thickness. The intercept toughness at zero thickness, estimated from regression analysis, was proportional to relative density, consistent with values reported for non-woody plant tissues. Extrapolation of the intercept toughness of these woods and other plant tissues/materials to a relative density of 1.0 predicted a toughness of 3.45kJ m-2 , which we identify with the intrinsic toughness of the cell wall. This quantity appears to predict published results from KIC tests on woods and is related to the propensity for crack deflection. The slope of the relationship between section thickness and toughness, describing the work of plastic buckling of cells, was not proportional to relative density, the lightest (balsa) and heaviest (lignum vitae) woods fracturing with less plastic work than predicted. The size of the plastic zone around the crack tip was estimated to be 0.5mm in size. From this, the hypothetical overall toughness of a thick (greater than 1 mm) block of solid cell wall material was calculated as 39.35 kJ m-2, due to both cell wall resistance (10 per cent) and the plastic buckling of cells (90 per cent). This value successfully predicts the toughness of most commercial woods (of relative densities between 0.2 and 0.8) from 'work area' tests in tension and bending. Though density was the most important factor, both fibre width/fibre length (in hardwoods) and lignin/cellulose ratios were negatively correlated with the work of plastic buckling, after correcting for density. At low densities the work of plastic buckling in the longitudinal radial (LR) direction exceeded that in longitudinal tangential (LT), but the reverse was true for relative densities above 0.25. This could

  2. Molecular Mechanisms for Vascular Development and Secondary Cell Wall Formation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jung Hyun; Wang, Huanzhong

    2016-01-01

    Vascular tissues are important for transporting water and nutrients throughout the plant and as physical support of upright growth. The primary constituents of vascular tissues, xylem, and phloem, are derived from the meristematic vascular procambium and cambium. Xylem cells develop secondary cell walls (SCWs) that form the largest part of plant lignocellulosic biomass that serve as a renewable feedstock for biofuel production. For the last decade, research on vascular development and SCW biosynthesis has seen rapid progress due to the importance of these processes to plant biology and to the biofuel industry. Plant hormones, transcriptional regulators and peptide signaling regulate procambium/cambium proliferation, vascular patterning, and xylem differentiation. Transcriptional regulatory pathways play a pivot role in SCW biosynthesis. Although most of these discoveries are derived from research in Arabidopsis, many genes have shown conserved functions in biofuel feedstock species. Here, we review the recent advances in our understanding of vascular development and SCW formation and discuss potential biotechnological uses. PMID:27047525

  3. Cell wall proteins of Sporothrix schenckii as immunoprotective agents.

    PubMed

    Alba-Fierro, Carlos A; Pérez-Torres, Armando; López-Romero, Everardo; Cuéllar-Cruz, Mayra; Ruiz-Baca, Estela

    2014-01-01

    Sporothrix schenckii is the etiological agent of sporotrichosis, an endemic subcutaneous mycosis in Latin America. Cell wall (CW) proteins located on the cell surface are inducers of cellular and humoral immune responses, potential candidates for diagnosis purposes and to generate vaccines to prevent fungal infections. This mini-review emphasizes the potential use of S. schenckii CW proteins as protective and therapeutic immune response inducers against sporotrichosis. A number of pathogenic fungi display CW components that have been characterized as inducers of protective cellular and humoral immune responses against the whole pathogen from which they were originally purified. The isolation and characterization of immunodominant protein components of the CW of S. schenckii have become relevant because of their potential in the development of protective and therapeutic immune responses against sporotrichosis. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012). PMID:24257472

  4. Rapid regulatory control of plant cell expansion and wall relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Cosgrove, D.J.

    1991-08-14

    The aim of this project is to elucidate the biophysical and cellular mechanisms that control plant cell expansion. At present we are attempting to characterize the kinetics of the system(s) responsible for regulatory and compensatory behavior of growing cells and tissues. This work is significantly because it indicates that biochemical loosening and biophysical stress relaxation of the wall are part of a feedback loop controlling growth. This report briefly summarizes the efforts and results of the past 12 months. In large part, we have been trying to analyze the nature of growth rate noise,'' i.e. spontaneous and often erratic variations in growth rate. We are obtaining evidence that such noise'' is not random, but rather reveals an underlying growth mechanism with complex dynamics.

  5. Molecular Mechanisms for Vascular Development and Secondary Cell Wall Formation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jung Hyun; Wang, Huanzhong

    2016-01-01

    Vascular tissues are important for transporting water and nutrients throughout the plant and as physical support of upright growth. The primary constituents of vascular tissues, xylem, and phloem, are derived from the meristematic vascular procambium and cambium. Xylem cells develop secondary cell walls (SCWs) that form the largest part of plant lignocellulosic biomass that serve as a renewable feedstock for biofuel production. For the last decade, research on vascular development and SCW biosynthesis has seen rapid progress due to the importance of these processes to plant biology and to the biofuel industry. Plant hormones, transcriptional regulators and peptide signaling regulate procambium/cambium proliferation, vascular patterning, and xylem differentiation. Transcriptional regulatory pathways play a pivot role in SCW biosynthesis. Although most of these discoveries are derived from research in Arabidopsis, many genes have shown conserved functions in biofuel feedstock species. Here, we review the recent advances in our understanding of vascular development and SCW formation and discuss potential biotechnological uses. PMID:27047525

  6. Immunochemistry of a Formamide-extracted Antigen from Clostridium perfringens Cell Walls

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Howard M.; Brenner, Kristen; Hall, Herbert E.

    1969-01-01

    The type-specific antigen of a strain of Clostridium perfringens involved in food poisoning was isolated from the cell wall by the use of hot formamide. The antigen appears to consist of polysaccharide or mucopeptide. The formamide extract was shown to be heterogeneous by gel filtration on Sephadex G-200. The serologically active fraction contained about 25% of the amount of protein present in the original formamide extract. Hexosamine, acetyl groups, and carbohydrate also were detected. The formamide extract showed a high degree of serological activity. The serological activity was increased twofold on Sephadex gel filtration. Images PMID:4310078

  7. Effect of calcium on cell-wall degrading enzymes of Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Sasanuma, Izumi; Suzuki, Takuya

    2016-09-01

    Effective anti-Botrytis strategies leading to reduce pesticides on strawberries are examined to provide the protection that is harmless to humans, higher animals and plants. Calcium treatments significantly inhibited the spore germination and mycelial growth of B. cinerea. The intracellular polygalacturonase and CMCase showed low activities in B. cinerea cultivated by medium containing calcium. On the other hand, calcium-stimulated β-glucosidases production occurred. Our findings suggest that the calcium treatments keep CMCase activity low and cause low activities of cell-wall degrading enzymes of B. cinerea in the late stage of growth. PMID:26998660

  8. Polarized and persistent Ca²⁺ plumes define loci for formation of wall ingrowth papillae in transfer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui-Ming; Imtiaz, Mohammad S; Laver, Derek R; McCurdy, David W; Offler, Christina E; van Helden, Dirk F; Patrick, John W

    2015-03-01

    Transfer cell morphology is characterized by a polarized ingrowth wall comprising a uniform wall upon which wall ingrowth papillae develop at right angles into the cytoplasm. The hypothesis that positional information directing construction of wall ingrowth papillae is mediated by Ca(2+) signals generated by spatiotemporal alterations in cytosolic Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]cyt) of cells trans-differentiating to a transfer cell morphology was tested. This hypothesis was examined using Vicia faba cotyledons. On transferring cotyledons to culture, their adaxial epidermal cells synchronously trans-differentiate to epidermal transfer cells. A polarized and persistent Ca(2+) signal, generated during epidermal cell trans-differentiation, was found to co-localize with the site of ingrowth wall formation. Dampening Ca(2+) signal intensity, by withdrawing extracellular Ca(2+) or blocking Ca(2+) channel activity, inhibited formation of wall ingrowth papillae. Maintenance of Ca(2+) signal polarity and persistence depended upon a rapid turnover (minutes) of cytosolic Ca(2+) by co-operative functioning of plasma membrane Ca(2+)-permeable channels and Ca(2+)-ATPases. Viewed paradermally, and proximal to the cytosol-plasma membrane interface, the Ca(2+) signal was organized into discrete patches that aligned spatially with clusters of Ca(2+)-permeable channels. Mathematical modelling demonstrated that these patches of cytosolic Ca(2+) were consistent with inward-directed plumes of elevated [Ca(2+)]cyt. Plume formation depended upon an alternating distribution of Ca(2+)-permeable channels and Ca(2+)-ATPase clusters. On further inward diffusion, the Ca(2+) plumes coalesced into a uniform Ca(2+) signal. Blocking or dispersing the Ca(2+) plumes inhibited deposition of wall ingrowth papillae, while uniform wall formation remained unaltered. A working model envisages that cytosolic Ca(2+) plumes define the loci at which wall ingrowth papillae are deposited. PMID:25504137

  9. Polarized and persistent Ca2+ plumes define loci for formation of wall ingrowth papillae in transfer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui-Ming; Imtiaz, Mohammad S.; Laver, Derek R.; McCurdy, David W.; Offler, Christina E.; van Helden, Dirk F.; Patrick, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Transfer cell morphology is characterized by a polarized ingrowth wall comprising a uniform wall upon which wall ingrowth papillae develop at right angles into the cytoplasm. The hypothesis that positional information directing construction of wall ingrowth papillae is mediated by Ca2+ signals generated by spatiotemporal alterations in cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]cyt) of cells trans-differentiating to a transfer cell morphology was tested. This hypothesis was examined using Vicia faba cotyledons. On transferring cotyledons to culture, their adaxial epidermal cells synchronously trans-differentiate to epidermal transfer cells. A polarized and persistent Ca2+ signal, generated during epidermal cell trans-differentiation, was found to co-localize with the site of ingrowth wall formation. Dampening Ca2+ signal intensity, by withdrawing extracellular Ca2+ or blocking Ca2+ channel activity, inhibited formation of wall ingrowth papillae. Maintenance of Ca2+ signal polarity and persistence depended upon a rapid turnover (minutes) of cytosolic Ca2+ by co-operative functioning of plasma membrane Ca2+-permeable channels and Ca2+-ATPases. Viewed paradermally, and proximal to the cytosol–plasma membrane interface, the Ca2+ signal was organized into discrete patches that aligned spatially with clusters of Ca2+-permeable channels. Mathematical modelling demonstrated that these patches of cytosolic Ca2+ were consistent with inward-directed plumes of elevated [Ca2+]cyt. Plume formation depended upon an alternating distribution of Ca2+-permeable channels and Ca2+-ATPase clusters. On further inward diffusion, the Ca2+ plumes coalesced into a uniform Ca2+ signal. Blocking or dispersing the Ca2+ plumes inhibited deposition of wall ingrowth papillae, while uniform wall formation remained unaltered. A working model envisages that cytosolic Ca2+ plumes define the loci at which wall ingrowth papillae are deposited. PMID:25504137

  10. The connection of cytoskeletal network with plasma membrane and the cell wall

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zengyu; Persson, Staffan; Zhang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    The cell wall provides external support of the plant cells, while the cytoskeletons including the microtubules and the actin filaments constitute an internal framework. The cytoskeletons contribute to the cell wall biosynthesis by spatially and temporarily regulating the transportation and deposition of cell wall components. This tight control is achieved by the dynamic behavior of the cytoskeletons, but also through the tethering of these structures to the plasma membrane. This tethering may also extend beyond the plasma membrane and impact on the cell wall, possibly in the form of a feedback loop. In this review, we discuss the linking components between the cytoskeletons and the plasma membrane, and/or the cell wall. We also discuss the prospective roles of these components in cell wall biosynthesis and modifications, and aim to provide a platform for further studies in this field. PMID:25693826

  11. Through-the-wall detection of human activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Tommy; Rahm, Jonas; Gustavsson, Jan; Nilsson, Stefan; Sume, Ain; Örbom, Anders

    2011-06-01

    An approach toward real-time for radar through-the-wall (TTW) sensing is presented. The aim is to detect and classify human motions behind walls. In the future a system could support an operator with information on the activity in a closed room, e.g., in a hostage situation. To meet this objective, radar TTW measurements have been performed on moving person(s) inside a closed room and an MTI-based signal processing algorithm, using coherent subtraction between different frequency sweeps, has been developed. The radar was equipped with ridge horn antennas which were directed toward an outer door. For each measurement the radar frequency was swept between 5 and 10 GHz 1893 times, with a sweep sampling rate of ~94 Hz. A crucial algorithm parameter is the time distance between two subtracting sweeps, or the sweep difference. Fast and slow motions are captured by using separate sweep differences. Applying the algorithm to the TTW data, we find that human motions behind a door can be detected with the background well suppressed. Even a person who is standing still without breathing is fairly easy to detect. The results are promising with low false alarm rates and fast signal processing rates, enabling real-time operation capability.

  12. Wall-induced self-diffusiophoresis of active isotropic colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yariv, Ehud

    2016-07-01

    While chemically active homogeneous spherical particles do not undergo self-diffusiophoresis in free solution, they may do so when suspended in the vicinity of a solid boundary. We explore this possibility using a first-order kinetic model of solute absorption, where the relative magnitude of reaction to diffusion is characterized by the Damköhler number Da . When the particle is remote from the wall, it is repelled from it with a velocity that scales inversely with the square of distance. The opposite extreme, when the ratio δ of separation distance to particle size is small, results in the anomalous scaling δ√{1/+2 Da }-1 2 of the solute concentration in the narrow gap separating the particle and wall. This irrational power may only be obtained by asymptotic matching with solute transport outside the gap. For Da <4 the self-propulsion speed possesses the same scaling, being set by the large pressures forming in the gap through a lubrication-type mechanism. For Da >4 the particle velocity is O (δ ) , set by the flow in the region outside the gap. Solute advection is subdominant to diffusion in both the remote and near-contact limits and accordingly affects neither the above scaling nor the resulting approximations.

  13. ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS OF YEAST CELL WALLS. I. ISOLATION OF WALL-DECOMPOSING ORGANISMS AND SEPARATION AND PURIFICATION OF LYTIC ENZYMES.

    PubMed

    TANAKA, H; PHAFF, H J

    1965-06-01

    Tanaka, Hirosato (University of California, Davis), and Herman J. Phaff. Enzymatic hydrolysis of yeast cell walls. I. Isolation of wall-decomposing organisms and separation and purification of lytic enzymes. J. Bacteriol. 89:1570-1580. 1965.-A number of microorganisms, able to decompose and grow on yeast cell walls, were isolated from soil. These isolates demonstrated various types of attack on yeast walls. A bacterium, identified as Bacillus circulans, and a species of Streptomyces produced clear, lysed zones when grown on an agar medium containing baker's yeast cell walls. The streptomycete formed glucanase, mannanase, and protease, but B. circulans produced only glucanases. Purified mannan could be prepared from the culture fluid of B. circulans grown on baker's yeast cell walls. In a liquid, mineral medium, extracellular lytic enzyme production by B. circulans was optimal after 3 days of aerobic growth at 30 C with 0.5% baker's yeast cell walls as the carbon source. Twelve other carbon sources were ineffective as inducers. Among a number of polysaccharides tested, the crude enzymes of B. circulans hydrolyzed only beta-1-->3 glucan (laminarin) and beta-1-->6 glucan (pustulan), both by a random mechanism, to a mixture of dimer and glucose. The beta-1-->3 and beta-1-->6 glucanases were separated from each other by diethylaminoethyl cellulose column chromatography. Water-soluble oat glucan, which contains in the linear chain both beta-1-->3 and beta-1-->4 bonds, was also hydrolyzed by the bacterial beta-1-->3 glucanase. The products of this reaction indicated that this enzyme hydrolyzes beta-1-->3 or beta-1-->4 glucosidic linkages, provided the beta-glucopyranosyl units composing these bonds are substituted in the 3 position by another glucose unit. PMID:14291597

  14. Identification of cell-wall stress as a hexose-dependent and osmosensitive regulator of plant responses.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Thorsten; Bennett, Mark; Mansfield, John; Somerville, Christopher

    2009-03-01

    Development, abiotic and biotic stress each affect the physical architecture and chemical composition of the plant cell wall, making maintenance of cell-wall integrity an important component of many plant processes. Cellulose biosynthesis inhibition (CBI) was employed to impair the functional integrity of the cell wall, and the plant's response to this specific stress was characterized in an Arabidopsis seedling model system. CBI caused changes in the expression of genes involved in mechanoperception, the response to microbial challenge, and lignin and cell-wall polysaccharide biosynthesis. Following CBI, activation of a UDP-D-xylose 4-epimerase gene correlated with increases in arabinose and uronic acid content in seedling cell walls. Activation of pathogen response genes, lignin deposition and lesion formation were dependent on externally supplied sugars and were suppressed by osmotic support. Lignin deposition in the root elongation zone caused by CBI was reduced in atrbohd (NADPH oxidase) mutant seedlings but increased in jasmonic acid resistant1 (jar1-1) mutant seedlings. Phytohormone measurements showed that CBI-induced increases in jasmonic (JA) and salicylic acids were dependent on sugar availability and prevented by osmotic support. We show that CBI activates responses commonly attributed to both abiotic and microbial challenges. Glucose/sucrose and turgor pressure are critical components in maintenance of cell-wall integrity and the regulation of induced responses, including JA biosynthesis. Lignin deposition induced by CBI is regulated by JAR1-1 and NADPH oxidase-dependent signalling processes. Our results identify components of the mechanism that mediates the response to impairment of cell-wall integrity in Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:19036034

  15. Bacterial cell wall recycling provides cytosolic muropeptides as effectors for beta-lactamase induction.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, C; Huang, L J; Bartowsky, E; Normark, S; Park, J T

    1994-01-01

    A mechanism for bacteria to monitor the status of their vital cell wall peptidoglycan is suggested by the convergence of two phenomena: peptidoglycan recycling and beta-lactamase induction. ampG and ampD, genes essential for beta-lactamase regulation, are here shown to be required for recycling as well. Cells lacking either AmpG or AmpD lose up to 40% of their peptidoglycan per generation, whereas Escherichia coli normally suffers minimal losses and instead recycles 40 or 50% of the tripeptide, L-alanyl-D-glutamyl-meso-diaminopimelic acid, from its peptidoglycan each generation. The ampG mutant releases peptidoglycan-derived material into the medium. In contrast, the ampD mutant accumulates a novel cell wall muropeptide, 1,6-anhydro N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-glutamyl-meso-diaminopimelic acid (anhMurNAc-tripeptide), in its cytoplasm. This work suggests that AmpG is the permease for a large muropeptide and AmpD is a novel cytosolic N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanine amidase that cleaves anhMurNAc-tripeptide to release tripeptide, which is then recycled. These results also suggest that the phenomenon of beta-lactamase induction is regulated by the level of muropeptide(s) in the cytoplasm, since an ampD mutation that results in beta-lactamase expression even in the absence of a beta-lactamase inducer coincides with accumulation of anhMurNAc-tripeptide. The transcriptional regulator AmpR is presumably converted into an activator for beta-lactamase production by sensing the higher level of muropeptide(s). This may be an example of a general mechanism for signaling the progress of external events such as cell wall maturation, cell division or cell wall damage. PMID:7925310

  16. Apoptosis-inducing effect of akebia saponin D from the roots of Dipsacus asper Wall in U937 cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seung-Il; Zhou, Beng; Bae, Jin-Beom; Kim, Nam-Seok; Kim, Sun-Geun; Kwon, Jin; Kim, Dae-Keun; Shin, Tae-Yong; Jeon, Hoon; Lim, Jong-Phil; Kim, Hongjun; Kim, Ho Kyoung; Oh, Chan-Ho

    2008-11-01

    Methanol extracts of the root of Dipsacus asper Wall (Dipsacaceae) were found to exhibit apoptosis-inducing activities in U937 (human monocyte-like histiocytic) cells. Investigation of the active n-BuOH fraction led to the isolation of akebia saponin D (ASD). Structure was established by spectroscopic methods. Treatment of U937 cells with ASD induced apoptosis in a dose dependent manner. ASD exerted strong cytotoxicity against human and murine leukemia cells. It is significantly increased the subG1 cell population and expression of p53 and Bax gene. And also ASD enhanced NO production from RAW264.7 macrophage cells. Taken together, these results strongly indicate that ASD may exert apoptosis-inducing activity via induction of apoptosis through activation chiefly via the nitric oxide and apoptosis-related p53 and Bax gene expression. These data provide scientific evidence that Dipsacus asper Wall can be useful as a chemopreventive agent. PMID:19023535

  17. The plant cell wall in the feeding sites of cyst nematodes.

    PubMed

    Bohlmann, Holger; Sobczak, Miroslaw

    2014-01-01

    Plant parasitic cyst nematodes (genera Heterodera and Globodera) are serious pests for many crops. They enter the host roots as migratory second stage juveniles (J2) and migrate intracellularly toward the vascular cylinder using their stylet and a set of cell wall degrading enzymes produced in the pharyngeal glands. They select an initial syncytial cell (ISC) within the vascular cylinder or inner cortex layers to induce the formation of a multicellular feeding site called a syncytium, which is the only source of nutrients for the parasite during its entire life. A syncytium can consist of more than hundred cells whose protoplasts are fused together through local cell wall dissolutions. While the nematode produces a cocktail of cell wall degrading and modifying enzymes during migration through the root, the cell wall degradations occurring during syncytium development are due to the plants own cell wall modifying and degrading proteins. The outer syncytial cell wall thickens to withstand the increasing osmotic pressure inside the syncytium. Furthermore, pronounced cell wall ingrowths can be formed on the outer syncytial wall at the interface with xylem vessels. They increase the surface of the symplast-apoplast interface, thus enhancing nutrient uptake into the syncytium. Processes of cell wall degradation, synthesis and modification in the syncytium are facilitated by a variety of plant proteins and enzymes including expansins, glucanases, pectate lyases and cellulose synthases, which are produced inside the syncytium or in cells surrounding the syncytium. PMID:24678316

  18. The plant cell wall in the feeding sites of cyst nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Bohlmann, Holger; Sobczak, Miroslaw

    2014-01-01

    Plant parasitic cyst nematodes (genera Heterodera and Globodera) are serious pests for many crops. They enter the host roots as migratory second stage juveniles (J2) and migrate intracellularly toward the vascular cylinder using their stylet and a set of cell wall degrading enzymes produced in the pharyngeal glands. They select an initial syncytial cell (ISC) within the vascular cylinder or inner cortex layers to induce the formation of a multicellular feeding site called a syncytium, which is the only source of nutrients for the parasite during its entire life. A syncytium can consist of more than hundred cells whose protoplasts are fused together through local cell wall dissolutions. While the nematode produces a cocktail of cell wall degrading and modifying enzymes during migration through the root, the cell wall degradations occurring during syncytium development are due to the plants own cell wall modifying and degrading proteins. The outer syncytial cell wall thickens to withstand the increasing osmotic pressure inside the syncytium. Furthermore, pronounced cell wall ingrowths can be formed on the outer syncytial wall at the interface with xylem vessels. They increase the surface of the symplast-apoplast interface, thus enhancing nutrient uptake into the syncytium. Processes of cell wall degradation, synthesis and modification in the syncytium are facilitated by a variety of plant proteins and enzymes including expansins, glucanases, pectate lyases and cellulose synthases, which are produced inside the syncytium or in cells surrounding the syncytium. PMID:24678316

  19. Nanoindentation techniques for the cell walls of wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakes, Joseph Eugene

    There is a recognized need in forest products research to better understand how the mechanical properties of wood derive from the basic polymer components that make up the wood. For development of new engineered wood products there is the need to understand how chemical additives and adhesives interact with wood polymers and influence properties at the cellular level. To meet these needs I have developed nanoindentation techniques for probing the mechanical properties of the cell walls in wood. There are two, key results of this research. The first is a newly invented structural compliance method for isolating the properties of local regions within materials and excluding artifacts brought about by neighboring edges including free edges and interfaces between dissimilar cell wall layers. The second consists of methods to obtain viscoplastic and viscoelastic data over as wide a range of deformation rate as possible. The broadband nanoindentation creep (BNC) technique assesses the viscoplastic properties over 5 orders of magnitude in deformation rate (-10-4 to 10 s-1). Viscoelastic measurements can be made with unloading times ranging from 0.01 to 100 s, resulting in viscoelastic data that span four orders of magnitude in frequency or inverse time (˜10-3 to 10 s-1). To demonstrate the efficacy of these techniques, experiments are performed on a range of materials including fused silica, silicon, molybdenum, siliconon-insulator layered specimen, poly (methylmetacrylate), polycarbonate, polystyrene, wood cells in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda ), and a polypropylene-wood composite. Finally, the structural compliance method and BNC are combined to explore polymeric methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (pMDI)-wood interactions. The data suggest that pMDI polymerizes in situ to create an interpenetrating polymer network.

  20. On the active control of wall-bounded turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moin, P.; Kim, J.; Choi, H.

    1989-01-01

    The direct numerical simulation technique is used to explore concepts for manipulation of turbulent boundary layers. Significant drag reduction was achieved when at each instant the normal component of velocity at the wall was prescribed to be 180 deg out of phase with the normal velocity slightly above the wall. The drag reduction is accompanied with significant reduction in the intensity of the wall-layer structures and reductions in the magnitude of Reynolds stresses throughout the flow. Suitability of wall pressure and shear stress fluctuations for detection of flow structures above the wall are examined.

  1. Cell-wall deficient L. monocytogenes L-forms feature abrogated pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Barbara; Staubli, Titu; Harris, Nicola L.; Rogler, Gerhard; Kopf, Manfred; Loessner, Martin J.; Schuppler, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Stable L-forms are cell wall-deficient bacteria which are able to multiply and propagate indefinitely, despite the absence of a rigid peptidoglycan cell wall. We investigated whether L-forms of the intracellular pathogen L. monocytogenes possibly retain pathogenicity, and if they could trigger an innate immune response. While phagocytosis of L. monocytogenes L-forms by non-activated macrophages sometimes resulted in an unexpected persistence of the bacteria in the phagocytes, they were effectively eliminated by IFN-γ preactivated or bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM). These findings were in line with the observed down-regulation of virulence factors in the cell-wall deficient L. monocytogenes. Absence of Interferon-β (IFN-β) triggering indicated inability of L-forms to escape from the phagosome into the cytosol. Moreover, abrogated cytokine response in MyD88-deficient dendritic cells (DC) challenged with L. monocytogenes L-forms suggested an exclusive TLR-dependent host response. Taken together, our data demonstrate a strong attenuation of Listeria monocytogenes L-form pathogenicity, due to diminished expression of virulence factors and innate immunity recognition, eventually resulting in elimination of L-form bacteria from phagocytes. PMID:24904838

  2. Characterization of a virulence-associated and cell-wall-located DNase of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Tadao; Minami, Masaaki; Okamoto, Akira; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Isaka, Masanori; Ohta, Michio

    2010-01-01

    We investigated culture supernatant proteins from the M1 serotype of Streptococcus pyogenes by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and peptide mass mapping analysis, and characterized the single protein spots. Among them, we analysed the Spy0747 protein. This protein is homologous to the SsnA protein, a cell-wall-located DNase expressed in Streptococcus suis serotype 2. We designated the Spy0747 protein as SpnA. SpnA protein was also detected in the insoluble fraction of whole-cell lysates using shotgun proteomic analysis, suggesting that SpnA is also located in the cell wall. SpnA was expressed as a glutathione S-transferase-fusion protein in Escherichia coli. We confirmed that the recombinant protein had DNase activity that was dependent on Ca(2+) and Mg(2+), like SsnA. Blood bactericidal assays and mouse infection model experiments showed that the spnA knockout strain was less virulent than the parental strain, thus suggesting that SpnA could play an important role in virulence. Using PCR, we found that the spnA gene was present in all clinical S. pyogenes strains we examined. Our results, together with a previous report identifying Spy0747 as a surface-associated protein, suggest that SpnA is an important cell-wall-located DNase that is generally produced in S. pyogenes and is involved in virulence. PMID:19850619

  3. Role of calcium in the mechanical strength of soybean hypocotyl cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Virk, S.S.; Cleland, R.E.

    1986-04-01

    Calcium ions inhibit auxin-induced growth in both dicot stems and coleoptiles. In coleoptiles calcium does not directly stiffen cell walls. The authors have tested here whether calcium might alter the mechanical strength of a dicot cell wall, the soybean hypocotyl. Sections were longitudinally bisected, boiled or frozen-thawed, incubated in solutions and then the mechanical strength was determined with an Instron. The calcium content was also measured. Removal of calcium by EGTA or by acidic buffers such as K-Pi-citrate resulted in a proportional increase in wall extensibility. Addition of calcium, on the other hand, stiffened the walls. These changes were reversible. It was concluded that calcium crosslinks make a significant contribution to the strength of dicot stem cell walls, and that in vivo, removal of calcium from the wall by uptake into the cell could result in wall loosening and thus enhanced growth.

  4. The cell wall of the Arabidopsis pollen tube--spatial distribution, recycling, and network formation of polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Chebli, Youssef; Kaneda, Minako; Zerzour, Rabah; Geitmann, Anja

    2012-12-01

    The pollen tube is a cellular protuberance formed by the pollen grain, or male gametophyte, in flowering plants. Its principal metabolic activity is the synthesis and assembly of cell wall material, which must be precisely coordinated to sustain the characteristic rapid growth rate and to ensure geometrically correct and efficient cellular morphogenesis. Unlike other model species, the cell wall of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) pollen tube has not been described in detail. We used immunohistochemistry and quantitative image analysis to provide a detailed profile of the spatial distribution of the major cell wall polymers composing the Arabidopsis pollen tube cell wall. Comparison with predictions made by a mechanical model for pollen tube growth revealed the importance of pectin deesterification in determining the cell diameter. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that cellulose microfibrils are oriented in near longitudinal orientation in the Arabidopsis pollen tube cell wall, consistent with a linear arrangement of cellulose synthase CESA6 in the plasma membrane. The cellulose label was also found inside cytoplasmic vesicles and might originate from an early activation of cellulose synthases prior to their insertion into the plasma membrane or from recycling of short cellulose polymers by endocytosis. A series of strategic enzymatic treatments also suggests that pectins, cellulose, and callose are highly cross linked to each other. PMID:23037507

  5. Relating the mechanics of the primary plant cell wall to morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bidhendi, Amir J; Geitmann, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of the mechanical properties of the cell wall is a key parameter used by plants to control the growth behavior of individual cells and tissues. Modulation of the mechanical properties occurs through the control of the biochemical composition and the degree and nature of interlinking between cell wall polysaccharides. Preferentially oriented cellulose microfibrils restrict cellular expansive growth, but recent evidence suggests that this may not be the trigger for anisotropic growth. Instead, non-uniform softening through the modulation of pectin chemistry may be an initial step that precedes stress-induced stiffening of the wall through cellulose. Here we briefly review the major cell wall polysaccharides and their implication for plant cell wall mechanics that need to be considered in order to study the growth behavior of the primary plant cell wall. PMID:26689854

  6. Approaches to understanding the functional architecture of the plant cell wall.

    PubMed

    McCann, M C; Bush, M; Milioni, D; Sado, P; Stacey, N J; Catchpole, G; Defernez, M; Carpita, N C; Hofte, H; Ulvskov, P; Wilson, R H; Roberts, K

    2001-07-01

    Cell wall polysaccharides are some of the most complex biopolymers known, and yet their functions remain largely mysterious. Advances in imaging methods permit direct visualisation of the molecular architecture of cell walls and the modifications that occur to polymers during growth and development. To address the structural and functional relationships of individual cell wall components, we need to better characterise a broad range of structural and architectural alterations in cell walls, appearing as a consequence of developmental regulation, environmental adaptation or genetic modification. We have developed a rapid method to screen large numbers of plants for a broad range of cell wall phenotypes using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy and Principal Component Analysis. We are using model systems to uncover the genes that encode some of the cell-wall-related biosynthetic and hydrolytic enzymes, and structural proteins. PMID:11423133

  7. Plant biomass recalcitrance: effect of hemicellulose composition on nanoscale forces that control cell wall strength.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Rodrigo L; Stoyanov, Stanislav R; Gusarov, Sergey; Skaf, Munir S; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2013-12-26

    Efficient conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to second-generation biofuels and valuable chemicals requires decomposition of resilient plant cell wall structure. Cell wall recalcitrance varies among plant species and even phenotypes, depending on the chemical composition of the noncellulosic matrix. Changing the amount and composition of branches attached to the hemicellulose backbone can significantly alter the cell wall strength and microstructure. We address the effect of hemicellulose composition on primary cell wall assembly forces by using the 3D-RISM-KH molecular theory of solvation, which provides statistical-mechanical sampling and molecular picture of hemicellulose arrangement around cellulose. We show that hemicellulose branches of arabinose, glucuronic acid, and especially glucuronate strengthen the primary cell wall by strongly coordinating to hydrogen bond donor sites on the cellulose surface. We reveal molecular forces maintaining the cell wall structure and provide directions for genetic modulation of plants and pretreatment design to render biomass more amenable to processing. PMID:24274712

  8. Polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein is a structural component of plant cell wall.

    PubMed

    Protsenko, M A; Buza, N L; Krinitsyna, A A; Bulantseva, E A; Korableva, N P

    2008-10-01

    It is generally believed that plants "evolved a strategy of defending themselves from a phytopathogen attack" during evolution. This metaphor is used frequently, but it does not facilitate understanding of the mechanisms providing plant resistance to the invasion of foreign organisms and to other unfavorable external factors, as well as the role of these mechanisms in plant growth and development. Information on processes involving one of the plant resistance factors--polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein (PGIP)--is considered in this review. The data presented here indicate that PGIP, being an extracellular leucine-rich repeat-containing protein, performs important functions in the structure of plant cell wall. Amino acid residues participating in PGIP binding to homogalacturonan in the cell wall have been determined. The degree of methylation and the mode of distribution of homogalacturonan methyl groups are responsible for the formation of a complex structure, which perhaps determines the specificity of PGIP binding to pectin. PGIP is apparently one of the components of plant cell wall determining some of its mechanical properties; it is involved in biochemical processes related to growth, expansion, and maceration, and it influences plant morphology. Polygalacturonase (PG) is present within practically all plant tissues, but the manifestation of its activity varies significantly depending on physiological conditions in the tissue. Apparently, the regulation of PG functioning in apoplast significantly affects the development of processes associated with the modification of the structure of plant cell wall. PGIP can regulate PG activity through binding to homogalacturonan. The genetically determined structure of PGIP in plants determines the mode of its interaction with an invader and perhaps is one of the factors responsible for the set of pathogens causing diseases in a given plant species. PMID:18991551

  9. Expression of a fungal ferulic acid esterase in alfalfa modifies cell wall digestibility

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) is an important forage crop in North America owing to its high biomass production, perennial nature and ability to fix nitrogen. Feruloyl esterase (EC 3.1.1.73) hydrolyzes ester linkages in plant cell walls and has the potential to further improve alfalfa as biomass for biofuel production. Results In this study, faeB [GenBank:AJ309807] was synthesized at GenScript and sub-cloned into a novel pEACH vector containing different signaling peptides to target type B ferulic acid esterase (FAEB) proteins to the apoplast, chloroplast, endoplasmic reticulum and vacuole. Four constructs harboring faeB were transiently expressed in Nicotiana leaves, with FAEB accumulating at high levels in all target sites, except chloroplast. Stable transformed lines of alfalfa were subsequently obtained using Agrobacterium tumefaciens (LBA4404). Out of 136 transgenic plants regenerated, 18 independent lines exhibited FAEB activity. Subsequent in vitro digestibility and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of FAEB-expressing lines showed that they possessed modified cell wall morphology and composition with a reduction in ester linkages and elevated lignin content. Consequently, they were more recalcitrant to digestion by mixed ruminal microorganisms. Interestingly, delignification by alkaline peroxide treatment followed by exposure to a commercial cellulase mixture resulted in higher glucose release from transgenic lines as compared to the control line. Conclusion Modifying cell wall crosslinking has the potential to lower recalcitrance of holocellulose, but also exhibited unintended consequences on alfalfa cell wall digestibility due to elevated lignin content. The combination of efficient delignification treatment (alkaline peroxide) and transgenic esterase activity complement each other towards efficient and effective digestion of transgenic lines. PMID:24650274

  10. Area Expansivity Moduli of Regenerating Plant Protoplast Cell Walls Exposed to Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimura, Yuu; Iino, Masaaki; Watanabe, Ugai

    2005-05-01

    To control the elasticity of the plant cell wall, protoplasts isolated from cultured Catharanthus roseus cells were regenerated in shear flows of 115 s-1 (high shear) and 19.2 s-1 (low shear, as a control). The surface area expansivity modulus and the surface breaking strength of these regenerating protoplasts were measured by a micropipette aspiration technique. Cell wall synthesis was also measured using a cell wall-specific fluorescent dye. High shear exposure for 3 h doubled both the surface area modulus and breaking strength observed under low shear, significantly decreased cell wall synthesis, and roughly quadrupled the moduli of the cell wall. Based on the cell wall synthesis data, we estimated the three-dimensional modulus of the cell wall to be 4.1± 1.2 GPa for the high shear, and 0.35± 0.2 GPa for the low shear condition, using the surface area expansivity modulus divided by the cell wall thickness, which is identical with the Young’s modulus divided by 2(1-σ), where σ is Poisson's ratio. We concluded that high shear exposure considerably strengthens the newly synthesized cell wall.

  11. Starting to gel: how Arabidopsis seed coat epidermal cells produce specialized secondary cell walls.

    PubMed

    Voiniciuc, Cătălin; Yang, Bo; Schmidt, Maximilian Heinrich-Wilhelm; Günl, Markus; Usadel, Björn

    2015-01-01

    For more than a decade, the Arabidopsis seed coat epidermis (SCE) has been used as a model system to study the synthesis, secretion and modification of cell wall polysaccharides, particularly pectin. Our detailed re-evaluation of available biochemical data highlights that Arabidopsis seed mucilage is more than just pectin. Typical secondary wall polymers such as xylans and heteromannans are also present in mucilage. Despite their low abundance, these components appear to play essential roles in controlling mucilage properties, and should be further investigated. We also provide a comprehensive community resource by re-assessing the mucilage phenotypes of almost 20 mutants using the same conditions. We conduct an in-depth functional evaluation of all the SCE genes described in the literature and propose a revised model for mucilage production. Further investigation of SCE cells will improve our understanding of plant cell walls. PMID:25658798

  12. Starting to Gel: How Arabidopsis Seed Coat Epidermal Cells Produce Specialized Secondary Cell Walls

    PubMed Central

    Voiniciuc, Cătălin; Yang, Bo; Schmidt, Maximilian Heinrich-Wilhelm; Günl, Markus; Usadel, Björn

    2015-01-01

    For more than a decade, the Arabidopsis seed coat epidermis (SCE) has been used as a model system to study the synthesis, secretion and modification of cell wall polysaccharides, particularly pectin. Our detailed re-evaluation of available biochemical data highlights that Arabidopsis seed mucilage is more than just pectin. Typical secondary wall polymers such as xylans and heteromannans are also present in mucilage. Despite their low abundance, these components appear to play essential roles in controlling mucilage properties, and should be further investigated. We also provide a comprehensive community resource by re-assessing the mucilage phenotypes of almost 20 mutants using the same conditions. We conduct an in-depth functional evaluation of all the SCE genes described in the literature and propose a revised model for mucilage production. Further investigation of SCE cells will improve our understanding of plant cell walls. PMID:25658798

  13. Laser microsurgery of higher plant cell walls permits patch-clamp access

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, G. H.; Taylor, A. R.; Brownlee, C.; Assmann, S. M.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Plasma membranes of guard cells in epidermal peels of Vicia faba and Commelina communis can be made accessible to a patch-clamp pipet by removing a small portion (1-3 micrometers in diameter) of the guard cell wall using a microbeam of ultraviolet light generated by a nitrogen laser. Using this laser microsurgical technique, we have measured channel activity across plasma membranes of V. faba guard cells in both cell-attached and isolated patch configurations. Measurements made in the inside-out patch configuration revealed two distinct K(+)-selective channels. Major advantages of the laser microsurgical technique include the avoidance of enzymatic protoplast isolation, the ability to study cell types that have been difficult to isolate as protoplasts or for which enzymatic isolation protocols result in protoplasts not amenable to patch-clamp studies, the maintenance of positional information in single-channel measurements, reduced disruption of cell-wall-mediated signaling pathways, and the ability to investigate intercellular signaling through studies of cells remaining situated within tissue.

  14. Two cationic peroxidases from cell walls of Araucaria araucana seeds.

    PubMed

    Riquelme, A; Cardemil, L

    1995-05-01

    We have previously reported the purification and partial characterization of two cationic peroxidases from the cell walls of seeds and seedlings of the South American conifer, Araucaria araucana. In this work, we have studied the amino acid composition and NH2-terminal sequences of both enzymes. We also compare the data obtained from these analyses with those reported for other plant peroxidases. The two peroxidases are similar in their amino acid compositions. Both are particularly rich in glycine, which comprises more than 30% of the amino acid residues. The content of serine is also high, ca 17%. The two enzymes are different in their content of arginine, alanine, valine, phenylalanine and threonine. Both peroxidases have identical NH2-terminal sequences, indicating that the two proteins are genetically related and probably are isoforms of the same kind of peroxidase. The amino acid composition and NH2-terminal sequence analyses showed marked differences from the cationic peroxidases from turnip and horseradish. PMID:7786490

  15. Single Wall Carbon Nanotube-polymer Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Castro, Stephanie L.; Landi, Brian J.; Gennett, Thomas; Raffaelle, Ryne P.

    2005-01-01

    Investigation of single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer solar cells has been conducted towards developing alternative lightweight, flexible devices for space power applications. Photovoltaic devices were constructed with regioregular poly(3-octylthiophene)-(P3OT) and purified, >95% w/w, laser-generated SWNTs. The P3OT composites were deposited on ITO-coated polyethylene terapthalate (PET) and I-V characterization was performed under simulated AM0 illumination. Fabricated devices for the 1.0% w/w SWNT-P3OT composites showed a photoresponse with an open-circuit voltage (V(sub oc)) of 0.98 V and a short-circuit current density (I(sub sc)) of 0.12 mA/sq cm. Optimization of carrier transport within these novel photovoltaic systems is proposed, specifically development of nanostructure-SWNT complexes to enhance exciton dissociation.

  16. Pectinous cell wall thickenings formation - A common defense strategy of plants to cope with Pb.

    PubMed

    Krzesłowska, Magdalena; Rabęda, Irena; Basińska, Aneta; Lewandowski, Michał; Mellerowicz, Ewa J; Napieralska, Anna; Samardakiewicz, Sławomir; Woźny, Adam

    2016-07-01

    Lead, one of the most abundant and hazardous trace metals affecting living organisms, has been commonly detected in plant cell walls including some tolerant plants, mining ecotypes and hyperaccumulators. We have previously shown that in tip growing Funaria sp. protonemata cell wall is remodeled in response to lead by formation of thickenings rich in low-methylesterified pectins (pectin epitope JIM5 - JIM5-P) able to bind metal ions, which accumulate large amounts of Pb. Hence, it leads to the increase of cell wall capacity for Pb compartmentalization. Here we show that diverse plant species belonging to different phyla (Arabidopsis, hybrid aspen, star duckweed), form similar cell wall thickenings in response to Pb. These thickenings are formed in tip growing cells such as the root hairs, and in diffuse growing cells such as meristematic and root cap columella cells of root apices in hybrid aspen and Arabidopsis and in mesophyll cells in star duckweed fronds. Notably, all analyzed cell wall thickenings were abundant in JIM5-P and accumulated high amounts of Pb. In addition, the co-localization of JIM5-P and Pb commonly occurred in these cells. Hence, cell wall thickenings formed the extra compartment for Pb accumulation. In this way plant cells increased cell wall capacity for compartmentalization of this toxic metal, protecting protoplast from its toxicity. As cell wall thickenings occurred in diverse plant species and cell types differing in the type of growth we may conclude that pectinous cell wall thickenings formation is a widespread defense strategy of plants to cope with Pb. Moreover, detection of natural defense strategy, increasing plant cell walls capacity for metal accumulation, reveals a promising direction for enhancing plant efficiency in phytoremediation. PMID:27107260

  17. In-vitro fermentability of cell walls as influenced by lignin composition and cross-linking.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We assessed how diverse modifications in lignin composition and reductions in ferulate-lignin cross-linking influence the degradability of cell walls. Cell walls from nonlignified maize cell suspensions were artificially lignified with varying ratios of normal monolignols (coniferyl and sinapyl alco...

  18. Composition and architecture of the cell walls of grasses and the mechanisms of synthesis of cell wall polysaccharides. Final report for period September 1, 1988 - April 30, 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Carpita, Nicholas C.

    2001-10-18

    This program was devoted toward complete understanding of the polysaccharide structure and architecture of the primary cell walls grasses and cereals, and the biosynthesis of the mixed-linkage beta-glucane, a cellulose interacting polymer that is synthesized uniquely by grass species and close relatives. With these studies as focal point, the support from DOE was instrumental in the development of new analytical means that enabled us to characterize carbohydrate structure, to reveal new features of cell wall dynamics during cell growth, and to apply these techniques in other model organisms. The support by DOE in these basic studies was acknowledged on numerous occasions in review articles covering current knowledge of cell wall structure, architecture, dynamics, biosynthesis, and in all genes related to cell wall biogenesis.

  19. Lead sulfide nanoparticles increase cell wall chitin content and induce apoptosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sun, Meiqing; Yu, Qilin; Hu, Mengyuan; Hao, Zhenwei; Zhang, Chengdong; Li, Mingchun

    2014-05-30

    Although there have been numerous studies on bacterial toxicity, the cytotoxicity of nanoparticles toward fungi remains poorly understood. We investigated the toxicity of various sizes of lead sulfide particles against the important model fungus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The smallest particle exerted the highest toxicity, inhibiting cell growth and decreasing cell viability, likely reflecting reduced sedimentation and persistent cell wall attack. In response to cell wall stress, S. cerevisiae showed an increase in the cell wall chitin content and the overexpression of FKS2 and PRM5, two genes of the cell wall integrity signaling pathway. Cell wall stress increased the concentration of intracellular reactive oxygen species, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and cell apoptosis. The contribution of dissolved lead ions to the overall toxicity was negligible. These findings provide the first demonstration of the physiological protective response of a fungus toward nanoparticles, thereby contributing useful information to the assessment of the environmental impact of metal nanoparticles. PMID:24704549

  20. Demethylesterification of Cell Wall Pectins in Arabidopsis Plays a Role in Seed Germination1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Kerstin; Levesque-Tremblay, Gabriel; Bartels, Sebastian; Weitbrecht, Karin; Wormit, Alexandra; Usadel, Bjoern; Haughn, George; Kermode, Allison R.

    2013-01-01

    The methylesterification status of cell wall homogalacturonans, mediated through the action of pectin methylesterases (PMEs), influences the biophysical properties of plant cell walls such as elasticity and porosity, important parameters for cell elongation and water uptake. The completion of seed germination requires cell wall extensibility changes in both the radicle itself and in the micropylar tissues surrounding the radicle. In wild-type seeds of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), PME activities peaked around the time of testa rupture but declined just before the completion of germination (endosperm weakening and rupture). We overexpressed an Arabidopsis PME inhibitor to investigate PME involvement in seed germination. Seeds of the resultant lines showed a denser methylesterification status of their cell wall homogalacturonans, but there were no changes in the neutral sugar and uronic acid composition of the cell walls. As compared with wild-type seeds, the PME activities of the overexpressing lines were greatly reduced throughout germination, and the low steady-state levels neither increased nor decreased. The most striking phenotype was a significantly faster rate of germination, which was not connected to altered testa rupture morphology but to alterations of the micropylar endosperm cells, evident by environmental scanning electron microscopy. The transgenic seeds also exhibited an apparent reduced sensitivity to abscisic acid with respect to its inhibitory effects on germination. We speculate that PME activity contributes to the temporal regulation of radicle emergence in endospermic seeds by altering the mechanical properties of the cell walls and thereby the balance between the two opposing forces of radicle elongation and mechanical resistance of the endosperm. PMID:23129203

  1. A laser microsurgical method of cell wall removal allows detection of large-conductance ion channels in the guard cell plasma membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miedema, H.; Henriksen, G. H.; Assmann, S. M.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Application of patch clamp techniques to higher-plant cells has been subject to the limitation that the requisite contact of the patch electrode with the cell membrane necessitates prior enzymatic removal of the plant cell wall. Because the wall is an integral component of plant cells, and because cell-wall-degrading enzymes can disrupt membrane properties, such enzymatic treatments may alter ion channel behavior. We compared ion channel activity in enzymatically isolated protoplasts of Vicia faba guard cells with that found in membranes exposed by a laser microsurgical technique in which only a tiny portion of the cell wall is removed while the rest of the cell remains intact within its tissue environment. "Laser-assisted" patch clamping reveals a new category of high-conductance (130 to 361 pS) ion channels not previously reported in patch clamp studies on plant plasma membranes. These data indicate that ion channels are present in plant membranes that are not detected by conventional patch clamp techniques involving the production of individual plant protoplasts isolated from their tissue environment by enzymatic digestion of the cell wall. Given the large conductances of the channels revealed by laser-assisted patch clamping, we hypothesize that these channels play a significant role in the regulation of ion content and electrical signalling in guard cells.

  2. Binding of nascent glucuronoxylan to the cell walls of pea seedlings.

    PubMed

    Brett, C T; Healy, S A; McDonald, M S; Macgregor, C; Baydoun, E A

    1997-08-01

    Glucuronoxylan synthesised in vitro by membrane-bound enzymes from etiolated pea epicotyls was found to bind to isolated cell walls from the same tissue in a pH-dependant manner. The binding was maximum at pH 3.5-4.0, and decreased to zero at pH 6. The bound glucuronoxylan could be dissociated from the cell walls by washing at pH 6, and the binding appeared to be non-covalent. Extraction experiments indicated that the glucuronoxylan was binding to hemicellulose in the cell-wall. The observed binding may be significant in the process of cell-wall assembly in vivo. PMID:9283032

  3. Detecting Cellulase Penetration Into Corn Stover Cell Walls by Immuno-Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Donohoe, B. S.; Selig, M. J.; Viamajala, S.; Vinzant, T. B.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.

    2009-06-15

    In general, pretreatments are designed to enhance the accessibility of cellulose to enzymes, allowing for more efficient conversion. In this study, we have detected the penetration of major cellulases present in a commercial enzyme preparation (Spezyme CP) into corn stem cell walls following mild-, moderate- and high-severity dilute sulfuric acid pretreatments. The Trichoderma reesei enzymes, Cel7A (CBH I) and Cel7B (EG I), as well as the cell wall matrix components xylan and lignin were visualized within digested corn stover cell walls by immuno transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using enzyme- and polymer-specific antibodies. Low severity dilute-acid pretreatment (20 min at 100 C) enabled <1% of the thickness of secondary cell walls to be penetrated by enzyme, moderate severity pretreatment at (20 min at 120 C) allowed the enzymes to penetrate {approx}20% of the cell wall, and the high severity (20 min pretreatment at 150 C) allowed 100% penetration of even the thickest cell walls. These data allow direct visualization of the dramatic effect dilute-acid pretreatment has on altering the condensed ultrastructure of biomass cell walls. Loosening of plant cell wall structure due to pretreatment and the subsequently improved access by cellulases has been hypothesized by the biomass conversion community for over two decades, and for the first time, this study provides direct visual evidence to verify this hypothesis. Further, the high-resolution enzyme penetration studies presented here provide insight into the mechanisms of cell wall deconstruction by cellulolytic enzymes.

  4. Plant cell walls throughout evolution: towards a molecular understanding of their design principles

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Purbasha; Bosneaga, Elena; Auer, Manfred

    2009-02-16

    Throughout their life, plants typically remain in one location utilizing sunlight for the synthesis of carbohydrates, which serve as their sole source of energy as well as building blocks of a protective extracellular matrix, called the cell wall. During the course of evolution, plants have repeatedly adapted to their respective niche,which is reflected in the changes of their body plan and the specific design of cell walls. Cell walls not only changed throughout evolution but also are constantly remodelled and reconstructed during the development of an individual plant, and in response to environmental stress or pathogen attacks. Carbohydrate-rich cell walls display complex designs, which together with the presence of phenolic polymers constitutes a barrier for microbes, fungi, and animals. Throughout evolution microbes have co-evolved strategies for efficient breakdown of cell walls. Our current understanding of cell walls and their evolutionary changes are limited as our knowledge is mainly derived from biochemical and genetic studies, complemented by a few targeted yet very informative imaging studies. Comprehensive plant cell wall models will aid in the re-design of plant cell walls for the purpose of commercially viable lignocellulosic biofuel production as well as for the timber, textile, and paper industries. Such knowledge will also be of great interest in the context of agriculture and to plant biologists in general. It is expected that detailed plant cell wall models will require integrated correlative multimodal, multiscale imaging and modelling approaches, which are currently underway.

  5. The cell-wall phosphatase of cotton (Gossypium) is inhibited by kelthane.

    PubMed Central

    Daley, L S; Carroll, P; Mussell, H

    1979-01-01

    Kelthane [4,4'-dichloro-alpha-(trichloromethyl)benzhydrol] was previously shown to decrease the limited tolerance of susceptible varieties of cotton (Gossypium) to Verticillium wilt. Kelthane was shown in the present study to inhibit the cell-wall p-nitrophenyl phosphatase of cotton. In view of information already establishing the cell wall as a primary site of action of Verticillium wilt, the data are interpreted as suggesting an as yet undefined interaction between Kelthane, cell-wall phosphatase and verticillium-resistance mechanisms of the cell wall. PMID:224864

  6. Mycobacterial cell walls. I. Methods of preparation and treatment with various chemicals.

    PubMed

    TAKEYA, K; HISATSUNE, K

    1963-01-01

    Takeya, Kenji (Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan) and Kazuhito Hisatsune. Mycobacterial cell walls. I. Methods of preparation and treatment with various chemicals. J. Bacteriol. 85:16-23. 1963.-Several methods of preparation of mycobacterial cell walls were examined, and the grinding method with glass powder, using Dry Ice, was found to give fairly good cell-wall preparations. "Paired fibrous structures" were clearly seen on the purified cell wall. The appearance of the cell wall as revealed by the electron microscope was not altered by digestion with trypsin, pronase, or pronase in 5% alcoholic solution, nor by treatment with 95% alcohol, acetone-alcohol mixture, or ether-alcohol mixture. By treatment with alcoholic KOH solution, the fibrous structure was removed. The remaining thin layer of the cell wall was tentatively designated the "basal layer" of the mycobacterial cell wall. The fibers appeared also to be removed by chloroform treatment. Nagarse digestion seemed to solubilize some constituents of the cell wall. The cell wall lost its shape and rigidity after lysozyme digestion. PMID:13984703

  7. Strong alkalinization of Chara cell surface in the area of cell wall incision as an early event in mechanoperception.

    PubMed

    Bulychev, Alexander A; Alova, Anna V; Bibikova, Tatiana N

    2013-11-01

    Mechanical wounding of cell walls occurring in plants under the impact of pathogens or herbivores can be mimicked by cell wall incision with a glass micropipette. Measurements of pH at the surface of Chara corallina internodes following microperforation of cell wall revealed a rapid (10-30s) localized alkalinization of the apoplast after a lag period of 10-20s. The pH increase induced by incision could be as large as 3 pH units and relaxed slowly, with a halftime up to 20min. The axial pH profile around the incision zone was bell-shaped and localized to a small area, extending over a distance of about 100μm. The pH response was suppressed by lowering cell turgor upon the replacement of artificial pond water (APW) with APW containing 50mM sorbitol. Stretching of the plasma membrane during its impression into the cell wall defect is likely to activate the Ca(2+) channels, as evidenced from sensitivity of the incision-induced alkalinization to the external calcium concentration and to the addition of Ca(2+)-channel blockers, such as La(3+), Gd(3+), and Zn(2+). The maximal pH values attained at the incision site (~10.0) were close to pH in light-dependent alkaline zones of Chara cells. The involvement of cytoskeleton in the origin of alkaline patch was documented by observations that the incision-induced pH transients were suppressed by the inhibitors of microtubules (oryzalin and taxol) and, to a lesser extent, by the actin inhibitor (cytochalasin B). The results indicate that the localized increase in apoplastic pH is an early event in mechanoperception and depends on light, cytoskeleton, and intracellular calcium. PMID:23850637

  8. Wall extensibility: its nature, measurement and relationship to plant cell growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Expansive growth of plant cells is controlled principally by processes that loosen the wall and enable it to expand irreversibly. The central role of wall relaxation for cell expansion is reviewed. The most common methods for assessing the extension properties of plant cell walls ( wall extensibility') are described, categorized and assessed critically. What emerges are three fundamentally different approaches which test growing cells for their ability (a) to enlarge at different values of turgor, (b) to induce wall relaxation, and (c) to deform elastically or plastically in response to an applied tensile force. Analogous methods with isolated walls are similarly reviewed. The results of these different assays are related to the nature of plant cell growth and pertinent biophysical theory. I argue that the extensibilities' measured by these assays are fundamentally different from one another and that some are more pertinent to growth than others.

  9. DBIO Best Thesis Award: Mechanics, Dynamics, and Organization of the Bacterial Cytoskeleton and Cell Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Siyuan

    2012-02-01

    Bacteria come in a variety of shapes. While the peptidoglycan (PG) cell wall serves as an exoskeleton that defines the static cell shape, the internal bacterial cytoskeleton mediates cell shape by recruiting PG synthesis machinery and thus defining the pattern of cell-wall synthesis. While much is known about the chemistry and biology of the cytoskeleton and cell wall, much of their biophysics, including essential aspects of the functionality, dynamics, and organization, remain unknown. This dissertation aims to elucidate the detailed biophysical mechanisms of cytoskeleton guided wall synthesis. First, I find that the bacterial cytoskeleton MreB contributes nearly as much to the rigidity of an Escherichia coli cell as the cell wall. This conclusion implies that the cytoskeletal polymer MreB applies meaningful force to the cell wall, an idea favored by theoretical modeling of wall growth, and suggests an evolutionary origin of cytoskeleton-governed cell rigidity. Second, I observe that MreB rotates around the long axis of E. coli, and the motion depends on wall synthesis. This is the first discovery of a cell-wall assembly driven molecular motor in bacteria. Third, I prove that both cell-wall synthesis and the PG network have chiral ordering, which is established by the spatial pattern of MreB. This work links the molecular structure of the cytoskeleton and of the cell wall with organismal-scale behavior. Finally, I develop a mathematical model of cytoskeleton-cell membrane interactions, which explains the preferential orientation of different cytoskeleton components in bacteria.

  10. Nuclear Rocket Test Facility Decommissioning Including Controlled Explosive Demolition of a Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Kruzic

    2007-09-01

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site, the Test Cell A Facility was used in the 1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program. The facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) in 2005 using the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Utilities and process piping were verified void of contents, hazardous materials were removed, concrete with removable contamination decontaminated, large sections mechanically demolished, and the remaining five-foot, five-inch thick radiologically-activated reinforced concrete shield wall demolished using open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). CED of the shield wall was closely monitored and resulted in no radiological exposure or atmospheric release.

  11. The cortical cytoskeletal network and cell-wall dynamics in the unicellular charophycean green alga Penium margaritaceum

    PubMed Central

    Ochs, Julie; LaRue, Therese; Tinaz, Berke; Yongue, Camille; Domozych, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Penium margaritaceum is a unicellular charophycean green alga with a unique bi-directional polar expansion mechanism that occurs at the central isthmus zone prior to cell division. This entails the focused deposition of cell-wall polymers coordinated by the activities of components of the endomembrane system and cytoskeletal networks. The goal of this study was to elucidate the structural organization of the cortical cytoskeletal network during the cell cycle and identify its specific functional roles during key cell-wall developmental events: pre-division expansion and cell division. Methods Microtubules and actin filaments were labelled during various cell cycle phases with an anti-tubulin antibody and rhodamine phalloidin, respectively. Chemically induced disruption of the cytoskeleton was used to elucidate specific functional roles of microtubules and actin during cell expansion and division. Correlation of cytoskeletal dynamics with cell-wall development included live cell labelling with wall polymer-specific antibodies and electron microscopy. Key Results The cortical cytoplasm of Penium is highlighted by a band of microtubules found at the cell isthmus, i.e. the site of pre-division wall expansion. This band, along with an associated, transient band of actin filaments, probably acts to direct the deposition of new wall material and to mark the plane of the future cell division. Two additional bands of microtubules, which we identify as satellite bands, arise from the isthmus microtubular band at the onset of expansion and displace toward the poles during expansion, ultimately marking the isthmus of future daughter cells. Treatment with microtubule and actin perturbation agents reversibly stops cell division. Conclusions The cortical cytoplasm of Penium contains distinct bands of microtubules and actin filaments that persist through the cell cycle. One of these bands, termed the isthmus microtubule band, or IMB, marks the site of both pre

  12. Protein diffusion in plant cell plasma membranes: the cell-wall corral

    PubMed Central

    Martinière, Alexandre; Runions, John

    2013-01-01

    Studying protein diffusion informs us about how proteins interact with their environment. Work on protein diffusion over the last several decades has illustrated the complex nature of biological lipid bilayers. The plasma membrane contains an array of membrane-spanning proteins or proteins with peripheral membrane associations. Maintenance of plasma membrane microstructure can be via physical features that provide intrinsic ordering such as lipid microdomains, or from membrane-associated structures such as the cytoskeleton. Recent evidence indicates, that in the case of plant cells, the cell wall seems to be a major player in maintaining plasma membrane microstructure. This interconnection / interaction between cell-wall and plasma membrane proteins most likely plays an important role in signal transduction, cell growth, and cell physiological responses to the environment. PMID:24381579

  13. Cell Wall Modifications in Maize Pulvini in Response to Gravitational Stress1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qisen; Pettolino, Filomena A.; Dhugga, Kanwarpal S.; Rafalski, J. Antoni; Tingey, Scott; Taylor, Jillian; Shirley, Neil J.; Hayes, Kevin; Beatty, Mary; Abrams, Suzanne R.; Zaharia, L. Irina; Burton, Rachel A.; Bacic, Antony; Fincher, Geoffrey B.

    2011-01-01

    Changes in cell wall polysaccharides, transcript abundance, metabolite profiles, and hormone concentrations were monitored in the upper and lower regions of maize (Zea mays) pulvini in response to gravistimulation, during which maize plants placed in a horizontal position returned to the vertical orientation. Heteroxylan levels increased in the lower regions of the pulvini, together with lignin, but xyloglucans and heteromannan contents decreased. The degree of substitution of heteroxylan with arabinofuranosyl residues decreased in the lower pulvini, which exhibited increased mechanical strength as the plants returned to the vertical position. Few or no changes in noncellulosic wall polysaccharides could be detected on the upper side of the pulvinus, and crystalline cellulose content remained essentially constant in both the upper and lower pulvinus. Microarray analyses showed that spatial and temporal changes in transcript profiles were consistent with the changes in wall composition that were observed in the lower regions of the pulvinus. In addition, the microarray analyses indicated that metabolic pathways leading to the biosynthesis of phytohormones were differentially activated in the upper and lower regions of the pulvinus in response to gravistimulation. Metabolite profiles and measured hormone concentrations were consistent with the microarray data, insofar as auxin, physiologically active gibberellic acid, and metabolites potentially involved in lignin biosynthesis increased in the elongating cells of the lower pulvinus. PMID:21697508

  14. Destructuring plant biomass: focus on fungal and extremophilic cell wall hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Guerriero, Gea; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Strauss, Joseph; Ertan, Haluk; Siddiqui, Khawar Sohail

    2015-05-01

    The use of plant biomass as feedstock for biomaterial and biofuel production is relevant in the current bio-based economy scenario of valorizing renewable resources. Fungi, which degrade complex and recalcitrant plant polymers, secrete different enzymes that hydrolyze plant cell wall polysaccharides. The present review discusses the current research trends on fungal, as well as extremophilic cell wall hydrolases that can withstand extreme physico-chemical conditions required in efficient industrial processes. Secretomes of fungi from the phyla Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Zygomycota and Neocallimastigomycota are presented along with metabolic cues (nutrient sensing, coordination of carbon and nitrogen metabolism) affecting their composition. We conclude the review by suggesting further research avenues focused on the one hand on a comprehensive analysis of the physiology and epigenetics underlying cell wall degrading enzyme production in fungi and on the other hand on the analysis of proteins with unknown function and metagenomics of extremophilic consortia. The current advances in consolidated bioprocessing, altered secretory pathways and creation of designer plants are also examined. Furthermore, recent developments in enhancing the activity, stability and reusability of enzymes based on synergistic, proximity and entropic effects, fusion enzymes, structure-guided recombination between homologous enzymes and magnetic enzymes are considered with a view to improving saccharification. PMID:25804821

  15. β-glucan: Crucial component of the fungal cell wall and elusive MAMP in plants.

    PubMed

    Fesel, Philipp H; Zuccaro, Alga

    2016-05-01

    Plant innate immunity relies in first place on the detection of invading microbes. Thus, plants evolved receptors to sense unique molecules of the microbe, the so called microbe-associated molecular patterns or MAMPs. The best studied fungal MAMP is chitin, an important structural building block of the fungal cell wall. Over the past years several plant receptors for chitin have been characterized as well as different strategies adopted by fungi to evade chitin recognition. Despite its strong activity as an elicitor of plant defense chitin represents only a small percentage of the cell wall of most fungi compared to other complex sugars. β-glucan, the most abundant fungal cell wall polysaccharide, also serves as a MAMP, but the mechanisms of β-glucan perception and signaling in plants are largely unknown. In contrast to that the β-glucan recognition and signaling machineries are well characterized in mammals. The C-type lectin receptor Dectin-1 is a key component of these machineries. In this review we describe valuable knowledge about the existence of at least one β-glucan receptor in plants and about the hindrances in β-glucan research. Additionally we discuss possible future perspectives of glucan research and the possibility to transfer the gathered knowledge from mammalian systems to plants. PMID:26688467

  16. Destructuring plant biomass: Focus on fungal and extremophilic cell wall hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Gea; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Strauss, Joseph; Ertan, Haluk; Siddiqui, Khawar Sohail

    2016-01-01

    The use of plant biomass as feedstock for biomaterial and biofuel production is relevant in the current bio-based economy scenario of valorizing renewable resources. Fungi, which degrade complex and recalcitrant plant polymers, secrete different enzymes that hydrolyze plant cell wall polysaccharides. The present review discusses the current research trends on fungal, as well as extremophilic cell wall hydrolases that can withstand extreme physico-chemical conditions required in efficient industrial processes. Secretomes of fungi from the phyla Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Zygomycota and Neocalli-mastigomycota are presented along with metabolic cues (nutrient sensing, coordination of carbon and nitrogen metabolism) affecting their composition. We conclude the review by suggesting further research avenues focused on the one hand on a comprehensive analysis of the physiology and epigenetics underlying cell wall degrading enzyme production in fungi and on the other hand on the analysis of proteins with unknown function and metagenomics of extremophilic consortia. The current advances in consolidated bioprocessing, altered secretory pathways and creation of designer plants are also examined. Furthermore, recent developments in enhancing the activity, stability and reusability of enzymes based on synergistic, proximity and entropic effects, fusion enzymes, structure-guided recombination between homologous enzymes and magnetic enzymes are considered with a view to improving saccharification. PMID:25804821

  17. Members of the Hsp70 family of proteins in the cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    López-Ribot, J L; Chaffin, W L

    1996-01-01

    Western blot (immunoblot) analysis of cell wall and cytosolic extracts obtained from parental and ssa1 and ssa2 single- and double-mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed that the heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) products of these genes, previously thought to be restricted to the cell interior, are also present in the cell wall. A cell wall location was further confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence with intact cells and biotinylation of extracellular Hsp70. Hsp70s have been implicated in translocation across the membrane and as molecular chaperones, and changes in the profile of cell wall proteins suggested that these proteins may have a similar role in the cell wall. PMID:8755907

  18. Heteromannan and Heteroxylan Cell Wall Polysaccharides Display Different Dynamics During the Elongation and Secondary Cell Wall Deposition Phases of Cotton Fiber Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Gomez, Mercedes C.; Runavot, Jean-Luc; Guo, Xiaoyuan; Bourot, Stéphane; Benians, Thomas A.S.; Willats, William G.T.; Meulewaeter, Frank; Knox, J. Paul

    2015-01-01

    The roles of non-cellulosic polysaccharides in cotton fiber development are poorly understood. Combining glycan microarrays and in situ analyses with monoclonal antibodies, polysaccharide linkage analyses and transcript profiling, the occurrence of heteromannan and heteroxylan polysaccharides and related genes in developing and mature cotton (Gossypium spp.) fibers has been determined. Comparative analyses on cotton fibers at selected days post-anthesis indicate different temporal and spatial regulation of heteromannan and heteroxylan during fiber development. The LM21 heteromannan epitope was more abundant during the fiber elongation phase and localized mainly in the primary cell wall. In contrast, the AX1 heteroxylan epitope occurred at the