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Sample records for active chemical compounds

  1. Chemical transformations that yield compounds with distinct activity profiles.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ye; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2011-07-14

    We have systematically searched for chemical changes that generate compounds with distinct biological activity profiles. For this purpose, activity profiles were generated for ∼42000 compounds active against human targets. Unique activity profiles involving multiple target proteins were determined, and all possible matched molecular pairs (MMPs) were identified for compounds representing these profiles. An MMP is defined as a pair of compounds that are distinguished from each other only at a single site such as an R group or ring system. For example, in an MMP, a hydroxyl group might be replaced by a halogen atom or a benzene ring by an amide group. From ∼37500 MMPs, more than 300 nonredundant chemical transformations were isolated that yielded compounds with distinct activity profiles. None of these transformations was found in pairs of compounds with overlapping activity profiles. These transformations were ranked according to the number of MMPs, the number of activity profiles, and the total number of targets that they covered. In many instances, prioritized transformations involved ring systems of varying complexity. All transformations that were found to switch activity profiles are provided to enable further analysis and aid in compound design efforts.

  2. Propolis volatile compounds: chemical diversity and biological activity: a review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Propolis is a sticky material collected by bees from plants, and used in the hive as building material and defensive substance. It has been popular as a remedy in Europe since ancient times. Nowadays, propolis use in over-the-counter preparations, “bio”-cosmetics and functional foods, etc., increases. Volatile compounds are found in low concentrations in propolis, but their aroma and significant biological activity make them important for propolis characterisation. Propolis is a plant-derived product: its chemical composition depends on the local flora at the site of collection, thus it offers a significant chemical diversity. The role of propolis volatiles in identification of its plant origin is discussed. The available data about chemical composition of propolis volatiles from different geographic regions are reviewed, demonstrating significant chemical variability. The contribution of volatiles and their constituents to the biological activities of propolis is considered. Future perspectives in research on propolis volatiles are outlined, especially in studying activities other than antimicrobial. PMID:24812573

  3. Prediction of compounds in different local structure-activity relationship environments using emerging chemical patterns.

    PubMed

    Namasivayam, Vigneshwaran; Gupta-Ostermann, Disha; Balfer, Jenny; Heikamp, Kathrin; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2014-05-27

    Active compounds can participate in different local structure-activity relationship (SAR) environments and introduce different degrees of local SAR discontinuity, depending on their structural and potency relationships in data sets. Such SAR features have thus far mostly been analyzed using descriptive approaches, in particular, on the basis of activity landscape modeling. However, compounds in different local SAR environments have not yet been predicted. Herein, we adapt the emerging chemical patterns (ECP) method, a machine learning approach for compound classification, to systematically predict compounds with different local SAR characteristics. ECP analysis is shown to accurately assign many compounds to different local SAR environments across a variety of activity classes covering the entire range of observed local SARs. Control calculations using random forests and multiclass support vector machines were carried out and a variety of statistical performance measures were applied. In all instances, ECP calculations yielded comparable or better performance than controls. The approach presented herein can be applied to predict compounds that complement local SARs or prioritize compounds with different SAR characteristics.

  4. Chemical reactivity and biological activity of chalcones and other α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds.

    PubMed

    Maydt, Daniela; De Spirt, Silke; Muschelknautz, Christian; Stahl, Wilhelm; Müller, Thomas J J

    2013-08-01

    Abstract 1. Chalcones are structural analogues of benzalacetophenone (BAP). Several derivatives have been identified in plants and anticarcinogenic and anti-inflammatory properties were attributed to the compounds, probably related to their direct antioxidant activity or stimulatory effects on the expression of endogenous defence enzymes like hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1). HO-1 expression is triggered by the Nrf2-Keap1 signalling pathway, initiated by the addition of chalcones to thiol groups of Keap1 via Michael-type reaction. 2. The present study used a model system estimating the reactivity of different synthetic chalcones and other α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds with thiols and compared the chemical reactivity with the biological activity, measured by HO-1 expression in human dermal fibroblasts. 3. Chemical reactivity with the thiol group of N-acetylcysteine was determined with 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) and followed chemical principles of structure-reactivity relationship. Most reactive were sulforaphane, dimethylfumarate, chalcone 3 ((2E)-1-phenyl-3-pyrimidin-2-ylprop-2-en-1-one) and chalcone 7 (1,3-diphenylprop-2-yn-1-one). This result demonstrates that α,β-unsaturated carbonyl derivatives react with thiols differently. All compounds were also biologically active; however, expression of HO-1 was not only related to the chemical reactivity but also to the lipophilicity of the molecules which likely affected transmembrane uptake. Most efficient inducers of HO-1 expression were BAP, 4-hydroxynonenal and chalcone 1 (4-[(1E)-3-oxo-3-phenylprop-1-en-1-yl]benzonitrile), chalcone 5 ((2E)-1-phenyl-3-[4-(trifluoromethyl)-phenyl]prop-2-en-1-one) and chalcone 7.

  5. Making Models of Chemical Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoehn, Robert G.

    1992-01-01

    Describes the benefits and techniques of having students create models of chemical compounds. This hands-on approach uses colored paper and other inexpensive materials to construct the models. A step-by-step approach provides objectives, materials, an explanation on how to calculate chemical ratios, procedures, follow-up activities, and a resource…

  6. Extended Functional Groups (EFG): An Efficient Set for Chemical Characterization and Structure-Activity Relationship Studies of Chemical Compounds.

    PubMed

    Salmina, Elena S; Haider, Norbert; Tetko, Igor V

    2015-12-23

    The article describes a classification system termed "extended functional groups" (EFG), which are an extension of a set previously used by the CheckMol software, that covers in addition heterocyclic compound classes and periodic table groups. The functional groups are defined as SMARTS patterns and are available as part of the ToxAlerts tool (http://ochem.eu/alerts) of the On-line CHEmical database and Modeling (OCHEM) environment platform. The article describes the motivation and the main ideas behind this extension and demonstrates that EFG can be efficiently used to develop and interpret structure-activity relationship models.

  7. Biological and chemical properties of alkanediazotates as active species of N-nitroso compounds.

    PubMed

    Ukawa, S; Mochizuki, M

    1991-01-01

    The mutagenicity and chemical reactivity of (E)- and (Z)-potassium alkanediazotates, as precursors of corresponding alkanediazohydroxides, were investigated. In three microbial strains, Salmonella typhimurium TA1535 and Escherichia coli WP2 and WP2hcr-, the effect of changing the alkyl group on mutagenic potency was similar for (E)- and (Z)-diazotates, N-alkyl-N-nitrosoureas and alpha-hydroxynitrosamines. The capacity to alkylate nicotinamide, measured in an aqueous phosphate buffer, decreased with increasing alkyl chain length. Specific mutagenicity in S. typhimurium TA1535 was linearly related to alkylating activity. These results confirm that alkanediazohydroxides are the active alkylating species of N-nitroso compounds, and that their mutagenicity is determined by their alkylating activity.

  8. Revealing of Biological Activity in Crude Extracts, Seperated Fractions, Groups of Chemical Substance and Individual Compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crude extracts, separated fractions, groups of chemical substances, and individual compounds from natural sources are all evaluated stepwise while performing purifications in in-house bioassays. In a stepwise fashion proceeding from crude extracts to fractions and on to pure compounds, decisions ar...

  9. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of volatile compounds of Tamarix boveana (Tamaricaceae).

    PubMed

    Saïdana, D; Mahjoub, M A; Boussaada, O; Chriaa, J; Chéraif, I; Daami, M; Mighri, Z; Helal, A N

    2008-01-01

    The chemical composition of the Tamarix boveana volatile oils obtained from the whole aerial part, flowers, leaves and stems by steam distillation was analysed using gas chromatograph (GC)-flame ionization detectors (FID) and GC-MS. Sixty-two components were identified. Hexadecanoic acid (18.14%), docosane (13.34%), germacrene D (7.68%), fenchyl acetate (7.34%), Benzyl benzoate (4.11%) were found to be the major components in the whole aerial parts. This composition differed according to the tested part: 2.4 Nonadienal was the main compound in the flowers (12.13%) while germacrene D was the major component in leaves (31.43%) and hexadecanoic acid in the stems (13.94%). To evaluate in vitro antimicrobial activity, all volatile oils were tested against six Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and four fungi. The T. boveana volatile oils exhibited an interesting antibacterial activity against all strains tested except Pseudomonas aeruginosa but no antifungal activity was detected.

  10. Reconstitution of anti-allergic activities of PG102 derived from Actinidia arguta by combining synthetic chemical compounds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donghyun; Choi, Jinyong; Kim, Mi-Jeong; Kim, Seon Hee; Cho, Sang Heon; Kim, Sunyoung

    2013-06-01

    PG102, a water-soluble extract from an edible fruit, Actinidia arguta, has previously been shown to control various factors involved in allergy pathogenesis. It was investigated whether the original activities of PG102 could be reconstituted by mixing chemical compounds present in PG102. Six compounds present in PG102 were, individually or in the form of mixtures, tested for their effects on the expression of various Th2 cytokines and inflammatory mediators in the cell-based assay. Each chemical inhibited IL-4 expression to varying degrees. The chemical compounds were combined at a ratio present in PG102, resulting in two formulations, CQMIIH and CQM, consisting of all or the first three of the following chemicals, citric, quinic, and malic acids, myo-inositol, isoquercitrin, and 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde. The mixtures reconstituted original activities of PG102 to a significant level. In the murine asthma model, CQM ameliorated asthmatic symptoms and significantly decreased the level of IgE and IL-5. The decreased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 was observed in cells and mice treated with PG102 and the mixtures. Our data indicated that the substantial portion of PG102's anti-allergic activities could be reconstituted, in vitro and in vivo, by mixing six chemical compounds, suggesting the possibility of developing a new type of anti-allergic agent. This approach may be useful for developing chemically defined functional products from complex botanical extracts.

  11. A Quantum Chemical and Statistical Study of Cytotoxic Activity of Compounds Isolated from Curcuma zedoaria

    PubMed Central

    Hamdi, Omer Abdalla Ahmed; Anouar, El Hassane; Shilpi, Jamil A.; Trabolsy, Zuhra Bashir Khalifa Al; Zain, Sharifuddin Bin Md; Zakaria, Nur Shahidatul Shida; Zulkefeli, Mohd; Weber, Jean-Frédéric F.; Malek, Sri Nurestri A.; Rahman, Syarifah Nur Syed Abdul; Awang, Khalijah

    2015-01-01

    A series of 21 compounds isolated from Curcuma zedoaria was subjected to cytotoxicity test against MCF7; Ca Ski; PC3 and HT-29 cancer cell lines; and a normal HUVEC cell line. To rationalize the structure–activity relationships of the isolated compounds; a set of electronic; steric and hydrophobic descriptors were calculated using density functional theory (DFT) method. Statistical analyses were carried out using simple and multiple linear regressions (SLR; MLR); principal component analysis (PCA); and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA). SLR analyses showed that the cytotoxicity of the isolated compounds against a given cell line depend on certain descriptors; and the corresponding correlation coefficients (R2) vary from 0%–55%. MLR results revealed that the best models can be achieved with a limited number of specific descriptors applicable for compounds having a similar basic skeleton. Based on PCA; HCA and MLR analyses; active compounds were classified into subgroups; which was in agreement with the cell based cytotoxicity assay. PMID:25923077

  12. Extraction, chemical characterization and biological activity determination of broccoli health promoting compounds.

    PubMed

    Ares, Ana M; Nozal, María J; Bernal, José

    2013-10-25

    Broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. Italica) contains substantial amount of health-promoting compounds such as vitamins, glucosinolates, phenolic compounds, and dietary essential minerals; thus, it benefits health beyond providing just basic nutrition, and consumption of broccoli has been increasing over the years. This review gives an overview on the extraction and separation techniques, as well as the biological activity of some of the above mentioned compounds which have been published in the period January 2008 to January 2013. The work has been distributed according to the different families of health promoting compounds discussing the extraction procedures and the analytical techniques employed for their characterization. Finally, information about the different biological activities of these compounds has been also provided.

  13. Devices for collecting chemical compounds

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R; Groenewold, Gary S

    2013-12-24

    A device for sampling chemical compounds from fixed surfaces and related methods are disclosed. The device may include a vacuum source, a chamber and a sorbent material. The device may utilize vacuum extraction to volatilize the chemical compounds from a fixed surface so that they may be sorbed by the sorbent material. The sorbent material may then be analyzed using conventional thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) instrumentation to determine presence of the chemical compounds. The methods may include detecting release and presence of one or more chemical compounds and determining the efficacy of decontamination. The device may be useful in collection and analysis of a variety of chemical compounds, such as residual chemical warfare agents, chemical attribution signatures and toxic industrial chemicals.

  14. Pupicidal and repellent activities of Pogostemon cablin essential oil chemical compounds against medically important human vector mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Gokulakrishnan, J; Kuppusamy, Elumalai; Shanmugam, Dhanasekaran; Appavu, Anandan; Kaliyamoorthi, Krishnappa

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the repellent and pupicidal activities of Pogostemon cablin (P. cablin) chemical compositions were assayed for their toxicity against selected important vector mosquitoes, viz., Aedes aegypti (Ae. aegypti), Anopheles stephensi (An. stephensi) and Culex quinquefasciatus (Cx. quinquefasciatus) (Diptera: Culicidae). Methods The plants dry aerial parts were subjected to hydrodistillation using a modified Clevenger-type apparatus. The composition of the essential oil was analyzed by Gas Chromatography (GC) and GC mass spectrophotometry. Evaluation was carried out in a net cage (45 cm×30 cm×45 cm) containing 100 blood starved female mosquitoes and were assayed in the laboratory condition by using the protocol of WHO 2010. The repellent activity of P. cablin chemical compositions at concentration of 2mg/cm2were applied on skin of fore arm in man and exposed against adult female mosquitoes. The pupicidal activity was determined against selected important vector mosquitoes to concentration of 100 mg/L and mortality of each pupa was recorded after 24 h of exposure to the compounds. Results Chemical constituents of 15 compounds were identified in the oil of P.cablin compounds representing to 98.96%. The major components in essential oil were â-patchoulene, á-guaiene, ã-patchoulene, á-bulnesene and patchouli alcohol. The repellent activity of patchouli alcohol compound was found to be most effective for repellent activity and 2 mg/cm2 concentration provided 100% protection up to 280 min against Ae. aegypti, An. stephensi and Cx. quinquefasciatus, respectively. Similarly, pupae exposed to 100 mg/L concentrations of P. cablin chemical compositions. Among five compounds tested patchouli alcoholwas found to be most effective for pupicidal activity provided 28.44, 26.28 and 25.36 against Ae.aegypti, An.stephensi and Cx. quinquefasciatus, respectively. The percent adult emergence was inversely proportional to the concentration of compounds and directly

  15. A model explaining and predicting lamb flavour from the aroma-active chemical compounds released upon grilling light lamb loins.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Mónica; Campo, M Mar; Cacho, Juan; Ferreira, Vicente; Escudero, Ana

    2014-12-01

    The objective of the work is to understand the role of the different aroma compounds in the perception of the local "lamb flavour" concept. For this, a set of 70 loins (Longissimus dorsi) from approximately seventy day-old Rasa Aragonesa male lambs were grilled and the aroma-active chemicals released during the grilling process were trapped and analyzed. Carbonyl compounds were derivatizated and determined by GC-NCI-MS, whereas other aromatic compounds were directly analyzed by GC-GC-MS. Odour activity values (OAVs) were calculated using their odour threshold values in air. Lamb flavour could be satisfactory explained by a partial least-squares model (74% explained variance in cross-validation) built by the OAVs of 32 aroma-active chemical compounds. The model demonstrates that the lamb flavour concept is the result of a complex balance. Its intensity critically and positively depends to the levels of volatile fatty acids and several dimethylpyrazines while is negatively influenced by the different alkenals and alkadienals. (E,E)-2,4-decadienal and (E)-2-nonenal showed top OAVs.

  16. Screening of novel chemical compounds as possible inhibitors of carbonic anhydrase and photosynthetic activity of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Karacan, Mehmet Sayım; Zharmukhamedov, Sergei K; Mamaş, Serhat; Kupriyanova, Elena V; Shitov, Alexandr V; Klimov, Vyacheslav V; Özbek, Neslihan; Özmen, Ümmühan; Gündüzalp, Ayla; Schmitt, Franz-Josef; Karacan, Nurcan; Friedrich, Thomas; Los, Dmitry A; Carpentier, Robert; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2014-08-01

    Thirty novel chemical compounds were designed and synthesized expecting that they would be possible inhibitors. From this number eleven were organic bases, twenty-four were their organic derivatives and fourteen were metal complexes. Screening of these chemicals by their action on photosynthetic electron transfer (PET) and carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity (CAA) of photosystem II (PSII), α-CA, as well as β-CA was done. Several groups were revealed among them. Some of them are capable to suppress either one, two, three, or even all of the measured activities. As example, one of the Cu(II)-phenyl sulfonylhydrazone complexes (compound 25) suppresses CAA of α-CA by 88%, CAA of β-CA by 100% inhibition; CAA of PSII by 100% and the PSII photosynthetic activity by 66.2%. The Schiff base compounds (12, 15) and Cu(II)-phenyl sulfonylhydrazone complexes (25, 26) inhibited the CAA and PET of PSII significantly. The obtained data indicate that the PSII donor side is a target of the inhibitory action of these agents. Some physico- or electrochemical properties such as diffusion coefficient, number of transferred electrons, peak potential and heterogeneous standard rate constants of the compounds were determined in nonaqueous media. pKa values were also determined in nonaqueous and aqueous media. Availability in the studied group of novel chemical agents possessing different inhibitory activity allow in future to isolate the "active part" in the structure of the inhibitors responsible for different inhibitory mechanisms, as well as to determine the influence of side substituters on its inhibitory efficiency.

  17. Chemical Diversity and Antimicrobial Activity of Volatile Compounds from Zanthoxylum zanthoxyloides Lam. according to Compound Classes, Plant Organs and Senegalese Sample Locations.

    PubMed

    Tine, Yoro; Diop, Abdoulaye; Diatta, William; Desjobert, Jean-Marie; Boye, Cheikh Saad Bouh; Costa, Jean; Wélé, Alassane; Paolini, Julien

    2017-01-01

    The chemical diversity of Zanthoxylum zanthoxyloides growing wild in Senegal was studied according to volatile compound classes, plant organs and sample locations. The composition of fruit essential oil was investigated using an original targeted approach based on the combination of gas chromatography (GC) and liquid chromatography (LC) both coupled with mass spectrometry (MS). The volatile composition of Z. zanthoxyloides fruits exhibited relative high amounts of hydrocarbon monoterpenes (24.3 - 55.8%) and non-terpenic oxygenated compounds (34.5 - 63.1%). The main components were (E)-β-ocimene (12.1 - 39%), octyl acetate (11.6 - 21.8%) and decanol (9.7 - 15.4%). The GC and GC/MS profiling of fruit essential oils showed a chemical variability according to geographical locations of plant material. The LC/MS/MS analysis of fruit oils allowed the detection of seven coumarins in trace content. The chemical composition of fruit essential oils was compared with volatile fractions of leaves and barks (root and trunk) from the same plant station. Hexadecanoic acid, germacrene D and decanal were identified as the major constituents of leaves whereas the barks (root and trunk) were dominated by pellitorine (85.8% and 57%, respectively), an atypic linear compound with amide group. The fruit essential oil exhibited interesting antimicrobial activities against Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans, particularly the alcohol fraction of the oil.

  18. Identification of Three Classes of Heteroaromatic Compounds with Activity against Intracellular Trypanosoma cruzi by Chemical Library Screening

    PubMed Central

    Bettiol, Esther; Samanovic, Marie; Murkin, Andrew S.; Raper, Jayne; Buckner, Frederick; Rodriguez, Ana

    2009-01-01

    The development of new drugs against Chagas disease is a priority since the currently available medicines have toxic effects, partial efficacy and are targeted against the acute phase of disease. At present, there is no drug to treat the chronic stage. In this study, we have optimized a whole cell-based assay for high throughput screening of compounds that inhibit infection of mammalian cells by Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes. A 2000-compound chemical library was screened using a recombinant T. cruzi (Tulahuen strain) expressing β-galactosidase. Three hits were selected for their high activity against T. cruzi and low toxicity to host cells in vitro: PCH1, NT1 and CX1 (IC50: 54, 190 and 23 nM, respectively). Each of these three compounds presents a different mechanism of action on intracellular proliferation of T. cruzi amastigotes. CX1 shows strong trypanocidal activity, an essential characteristic for the development of drugs against the chronic stage of Chagas disease where parasites are found intracellular in a quiescent stage. NT1 has a trypanostatic effect, while PCH1 affects parasite division. The three compounds also show high activity against intracellular T. cruzi from the Y strain and against the related kinetoplastid species Leishmania major and L. amazonensis. Characterization of the anti–T. cruzi activity of molecules chemically related to the three library hits allowed the selection of two compounds with IC50 values of 2 nM (PCH6 and CX2). These values are approximately 100 times lower than those of the medicines used in patients against T. cruzi. These results provide new candidate molecules for the development of treatments against Chagas disease and leishmaniasis. PMID:19238193

  19. Public chemical compound databases.

    PubMed

    Williams, Anthony J

    2008-05-01

    The internet has rapidly become the first port of call for all information searches. The increasing array of chemistry-related resources that are now available provides chemists with a direct path to the information that was previously accessed via library services and was limited by commercial and costly resources. The diversity of the information that can be accessed online is expanding at a dramatic rate, and the support for publicly available resources offers significant opportunities in terms of the benefits to science and society. While the data online do not generally meet the quality standards of manually curated sources, there are efforts underway to gather scientists together and 'crowdsource' an improvement in the quality of the available data. This review discusses the types of public compound databases that are available online and provides a series of examples. Focus is also given to the benefits and disruptions associated with the increased availability of such data and the integration of technologies to data mine this information.

  20. Pluto's Nonvolatile Chemical Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundy, William M.; Binzel, Richard; Cook, Jason C.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Dalle Ore, Cristina M.; Earle, Alissa M.; Ennico, Kimberly; Jennings, Donald; Howett, Carly; Kaiser, Ralf-Ingo; Linscott, Ivan; Lunsford, A. W.; Olkin, Catherine B.; Parker, Alex Harrison; Parker, Joel Wm.; Philippe, Sylvain; Protopapa, Silvia; Quirico, Eric; Reuter, D. C.; Schmitt, Bernard; Singer, Kelsi N.; Spencer, John R.; Stansberry, John A.; Stern, S. Alan; Tsang, Constantine; Verbiscer, Anne J.; Weaver, Harold A.; Weigle, G. E.; Young, Leslie

    2016-10-01

    Despite the migration of Pluto's volatile ices (N2, CO, and CH4) around the surface on seasonal timescales, the planet's non-volatile materials are not completely hidden from view. They occur in a variety of provinces formed over a wide range of timescales, including rugged mountains and chasms, the floors of mid-latitude craters, and an equatorial belt of especially dark and reddish material typified by the informally named Cthulhu Regio. NASA's New Horizons probe observed several of these regions at spatial resolutions as fine as 3 km/pixel with its LEISA imaging spectrometer, covering wavelengths from 1.25 to 2.5 microns. Various compounds that are much lighter than the tholin-like macromolecules responsible for the reddish coloration, but that are not volatile at Pluto surface temperatures such as methanol (CH3OH) and ethane (C2H6) have characteristic absorption bands within LEISA's wavelength range. This presentation will describe their geographic distributions and attempt to constrain their origins. Possibilities include an inheritance from Pluto's primordial composition (the likely source of H2O ice seen on Pluto's surface) or ongoing production from volatile precursors through photochemistry in Pluto's atmosphere or through radiolysis on Pluto's surface. New laboratory data inform the analysis.This work was supported by NASA's New Horizons project.

  1. Phenolic compounds in olive oil: antioxidant, health and organoleptic activities according to their chemical structure.

    PubMed

    Servili, M; Esposto, S; Fabiani, R; Urbani, S; Taticchi, A; Mariucci, F; Selvaggini, R; Montedoro, G F

    2009-04-01

    Hydrophilic phenols are the most abundant natural antioxidants of virgin olive oil (VOO), in which, however, tocopherols and carotenes are also present. The prevalent classes of hydrophilic phenols found in VOO are phenolic alcohols and acids, flavonoids, lignans and secoiridoids. Among these substances the last two classes include the most concentrate phenols of VOO. Secoiridoids, like aglycone derivatives of oleuropein, demethyloleuropein and ligstroside, are present in olive fruit as most abundant VOO phenolic antioxidants. Several important biological properties (antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, chemopreventive and anti-cancer) and the characteristic pungent and bitter tasty properties have been attributed to VOO phenols. Relationships between polyphenols activities and their chemical structures are discussed in this paper.

  2. Correlations between chemical reactivity and mutagenic activity against S. typhimurium TA100 for alpha-dicarbonyl compounds as a proof of the mutagenic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Mellado, J M; Ruiz Montoya, M

    1994-01-16

    The mutagenic activities in the Ames test against S. typhimurium TA100 for a series of alpha-dicarbonyl compounds are examined together with the formation constants of the adducts formed between such compounds and guanine and guanosine. Correlations between the equilibrium constants, the apparent reaction enthalpies, and the mutagenic activity are presented. These correlations imply that the mutagenic activity is related to the chemical reactivity of the dicarbonyl compounds with the puric bases.

  3. Structural characteristics of compounds that can be activated to chemically reactive metabolites: use for a prediction of a carcinogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Lutz, W K

    1984-01-01

    Many mutagens and carcinogens act via covalent interaction of metabolic intermediates with DNA in the target cell. This report groups those structural elements which are often found to form the basis for a metabolism to such chemically reactive metabolites. Compounds which are chemically reactive per se and which do not require metabolic activation form group 1. Group 2 comprises of olefins and aromatic hydrocarbons where the oxidation via an epoxide can be responsible for the generation of reactive species. Aromatic amines, hydrazines, and nitrosamines form group 3 requiring an oxidation of a nitrogen atom or of a carbon atom in alpha position to a nitrosated amine. Group 4 compounds are halogenated hydrocarbons which can either give rise to radicals or can form an olefin (group 2) upon dehydrohalogenation. Group 5 compounds depend upon some preceding enzymatic activity either not available in the target cell or acting on positions in the molecule which are not directly involved in the subsequent formation of electrophilic atoms. Examples for each group are taken from the "List of Chemicals and Industrial Processes Associated with Cancer in Humans" as compiled by the International Agency for the Research on Cancer, and it is shown that 91% of the organic carcinogens would have been detected on the basis of structural elements characteristic for group 1-5. As opposed to this very high sensitivity, the specificity (the true negative fraction) of using this approach as a short-term test for carcinogenicity is shown to be bad because detoxification pathways have so far not been taken into account. These competing processes are so complex, however, that either only very extensive knowledge about pharmacokinetics, stability, and reactivity will be required or that in vivo systems have to be used to predict, on a quantitative basis, the damage expected on the DNA. DNA-binding experiments in vivo are presented with benzene and toluene to demonstrate one possible way for

  4. Physico-Chemical Characterization, Bioactive Compounds and Antioxidant Activity of Malay Apple [Syzygium malaccense (L.) Merr. & L.M. Perry

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Polyana Campos; Aquino, Jailane de Souza; Rockenbach, Ismael Ivan; Stamford, Tânia Lúcia Montenegro

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the physico-chemical characteristics, bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity of Malay apple fruit (Syzygium malaccense) grown in Brazil with regard to the geographical origin and its peel fractions and edible portion analyzed independently. Fruit diameter, weight, yield, and centesimal composition, ascorbic acid, reductive sugars, total soluble solids, pH and fiber content were determined. Total phenolics (1293 mg gallic acid equivalent/100 g) and total anthocyanins (1045 mg/100 g) contents were higher in the peel, with the major anthocyanin identified using HPLC-DAD-MS/MS as cyanidin 3-glucoside. Higher values for DPPH antiradical scavenging activity (47.52 μMol trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity/g) and Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Potential (FRAP, 0.19 mM ferreous sulfate/g) were also observed in the peel fraction. All extracts tested showed the ability to inhibit oxidation in the β-carotene/linoleic acid system. This study highlights the potential of Malay apple fruit as a good source of antioxidant compounds with potential benefits to human health. PMID:27352306

  5. Chemical composition and biological activity of four salvia essential oils and individual compounds against two species of mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Ali, Abbas; Tabanca, Nurhayat; Demirci, Betul; Blythe, Eugene K; Ali, Zulfiqar; Baser, K Husnu Can; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2015-01-21

    The chemical compositions of essential oils obtained from four species of genus Salvia were analyzed by gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector (GC-FID) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The main compounds identified from Salvia species essential oils were as follows: 1,8-cineole (71.7%), α-pinene (5.1%), camphor (4.4%), and β-pinene (3.8%) in Salvia apiana; borneol (17.4%), β-eudesmol (10.4%), bornyl acetate (5%), and guaiol (4.8%) in Salvia elegans; bornyl acetate (11.4%), β-caryophyllene (6.5%), caryophyllene oxide (13.5%), and spathulenol (7.0%) in Salvia leucantha; α-thujene (25.8%), viridiflorol (20.4%), β-thujene (5.7%), and camphor (6.4%) in Salvia officinalis. In biting-deterrent bioassays, essential oils of S. leucantha and S. elegans at 10 μg/cm(2) showed activity similar to that of DEET (97%, N, N-diethyl-m-toluamide) in two species of mosquitoes, whereas the activities of S. officinalis and S. apiana essential oils were lower than those of the other oils or DEET. Pure compounds β-eudesmol and guaiol showed biting-deterrent activity similar to DEET at 25 nmol/cm(2), whereas the activity of 13-epi-manool, caryophyllene oxide, borneol, bornyl acetate, and β-caryophyllene was significantly lower than that of β-eudesmol, guaiol, or DEET. All essential oils showed larvicidal activity except that of S. apiana, which was inactive at the highest dose of 125 ppm against both mosquito species. On the basis of 95% CIs, all of the essential oils showed higher toxicity in Anopheles quadrimaculatus than in Aedes aegypti. The essential oil of S. leucantha with an LC50 value of 6.2 ppm showed highest toxicity in An. quadrimaculatus.

  6. Activation of Human Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Nuclear Receptors (PPARγ1) by Semi-Volatile Compounds (SVOCs) and Chemical Mixtures in Indoor Dust.

    PubMed

    Fang, Mingliang; Webster, Thomas F; Stapleton, Heather M

    2015-08-18

    Recently, we reported that several semi-volatile compounds (SVOCs) were competitive ligands for human peroxisome proliferator-activated nuclear receptor gamma (PPARγ1). We also observed significant binding from chemicals extracted from house dust at a concentration of 3 mg dust/mL in the dosing medium. To follow up on this study, a commercially available reporter gene assay (GeneBLAzer PPARγ1 non-DA Assay, Invitrogen) was used to investigate the PPARγ1 activation by 30 common SVOCs (e.g., brominated flame retardants, organophosphates, and phthalates) and in house dust extracts. Twenty-eight SVOCs or their metabolites were either confirmed or for the first time were found to be weak or moderate PPARγ1 agonists. We also observed activation in 15 of 25 dust extracts examined. In some cases, activation was as high as 50% of the activation of the positive control (rosiglitazone). Furthermore, there was a significant and positive correlation (r = 0.7, p < 0.003) between data collected from this reporter assay and our previous ligand binding assay tested on the same dust extracts. Our results suggest that many SVOCs ubiquitous in house dust, or their metabolites, are possible PPARγ1 agonists. Also, chemical mixtures present in house dust at environmentally relevant levels can activate human PPARγ1 in a transfected cell culture system, and further research is needed to identify the primary chemical(s) driving this activity.

  7. Characterization of Chemical Compounds with Antioxidant and Cytotoxic Activities in Bougainvillea x buttiana Holttum and Standl, (var. Rose) Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Abarca-Vargas, Rodolfo; Peña Malacara, Carlos F.; Petricevich, Vera L.

    2016-01-01

    Bougainvillea is widely used in traditional Mexican medicine to treat several diseases. This study was designed to characterize the chemical constituents of B. x buttiana extracts with antioxidant and cytotoxic activities using different solvents. The extraction solvents used were as follows: distilled water (dH2O), methanol (MeOH), acetone (DMK), ethanol (EtOH), ethyl acetate (EtOAc), dichloromethane (DCM), and hexane (Hex) (100%) at an extraction temperature of 26 °C. Analysis of bioactive compounds present in the B. x buttiana extracts included the application of common phytochemical screening assays, GC-MS analysis, and cytotoxicity and antioxidant assays. The results show that the highest extraction yield was observed with water and methanol. The maximum total phenolic content amount and highest antioxidant potential were obtained when extraction with methanol was used. With the exceptions of water and ethanol extractions, all other extracts showed cytotoxicity ranging between 31% and 50%. The prevailing compounds in water, methanol, ethanol, and acetone solvents were as follows: 4H-pyran-4-one, 2,3-dihydro-3, 5-dihydroxy-6-methyl (2), 2-propenoic acid, 3-(2-hydrophenyl)-(E)- (3), and 3-O-methyl-d-glucose (6). By contrast, the major components in the experiments using solvents such as EtOH, DMK, EtOAc, DCM, and Hex were n-hexadecanoic acid (8), 9,12-octadecadienoic acid (Z,Z) (12); 9-octadecenoic acid (E)- (13), and stigmasta-5,22-dien-3-ol (28). PMID:27918436

  8. Pharmaceutically active compounds and endocrine disrupting chemicals in water, sediments and mollusks in mangrove ecosystems from Singapore.

    PubMed

    Bayen, Stéphane; Estrada, Elvagris Segovia; Juhel, Guillaume; Kit, Lee Wei; Kelly, Barry C

    2016-08-30

    This study investigated the occurrence of bisphenol A (BPA), atrazine and selected pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) in mangrove habitats in Singapore in 2012-2013, using multiple tools (sediment sampling, POCIS and filter feeder molluscs). Using POCIS, the same suite of contaminants (atrazine, BPA and eleven PhACs) was detected in mangrove waters in 28-days deployments in both 2012 and 2013. POCIS concentrations ranged from pg/L to μg/L. Caffeine, BPA, carbamazepine, E1, triclosan, sulfamerazine, sulfamethazine, and lincomycin were also detected in mangrove sediments from the low pg/g dw (e.g. carbamazepine) to ng/g dw (e.g. BPA). The detection of caffeine, carbamazepine, BPA, sulfamethoxazole or lincomycin in bivalve tissues also showed that these chemicals are bioavailable in the mangrove habitat. Since there are some indications that some pharmaceutically active substances may be biologically active in the low ppb range in marine species, further assessment should be completed based on ecotoxicological data specific to mangrove species.

  9. Selection of quantum chemical descriptors by chemometric methods in the study of antioxidant activity of flavonoid compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, K. C.; Honório, K. M.; da Silva, S. L.; Mercadante, R.; da Silva, A. B. F.

    In the present study, the aim was to select electronic properties responsible for free radical scavenging ability of a set of 25 flavonoid compounds employing chemometric methods. Electronic parameters were calculated using the AM1 semiempirical method, and chemometric methods (principal component analysis, hierarchical cluster analysis, and k-nearest neighbor) were used with the aim to build models able to find relationships between electronic features and the antioxidant activity presented by the compounds studied. According to these models, four electronic variables can be considered important to discriminate more and less antioxidant flavonoid compounds: polarizability (α), charge at carbon 3 (QC3), total charge at substituent 5 (QS5), and total charge at substituent 3' (QS3'). The features found as being responsible for the antioxidant activity of the flavonoid compounds studied are consistent with previous results found in the literature. The results obtained can also bring improvements in the search for better antioxidant flavonoid compounds.

  10. Cytotoxic Activity and Chemical Composition of the Root Extract from the Mexican Species Linum scabrellum: Mechanism of Action of the Active Compound 6-Methoxypodophyllotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Alejandre-García, Ivonne; Álvarez, Laura; Cardoso-Taketa, Alexandre; González-Maya, Leticia; Antúnez, Mayra; Salas-Vidal, Enrique; Díaz, J. Fernando; Marquina-Bahena, Silvia; Villarreal, María Luisa

    2015-01-01

    The cytotoxic activity and the chemical composition of the dichloromethane/methanol root extract of Linum scabrellum Planchon (Linaceae) were analyzed. Using NMR spectra and mass spectrometry analyses of the extract we identified eight main constituents: oleic acid (1), octadecenoic acid (2), stigmasterol (3), α-amyrin (4), pinoresinol (5), 6 methoxypodophyllotoxin (6), coniferin (7), and 6-methoxypodophyllotoxin-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (8). By using the sulforhodamine B assay, an important cytotoxic activity against four human cancer cell lines, HF6 colon (IC50 = 0.57 μg/mL), MCF7 breast (IC50 = 0.56 μg/mL), PC3 prostate (IC50 = 1.60 μg/mL), and SiHa cervical (IC50 = 1.54 μg/mL), as well as toward the normal fibroblasts line HFS-30 IC50 = 1.02 μg/mL was demonstrated. Compound 6 (6-methoxypodophyllotoxin) was responsible for the cytotoxic activity exhibiting an IC50 value range of 0.0632 to 2.7433 µg/mL against the tested cell lines. Cell cycle studies with compound 6 exhibited a cell arrest in G2/M of the prostate PC3 cancer cell line. Microtubule disruption studies demonstrated that compound 6 inhibited the polymerization of tubulin through its binding to the colchicine site (binding constant Kb = 7.6 × 106 M−1). A dose-response apoptotic effect was also observed. This work constitutes the first investigation reporting the chemical composition of L. scabrellum and the first study determining the mechanism of action of compound 6. PMID:26246833

  11. Anti-prion activity of a panel of aromatic chemical compounds: in vitro and in silico approaches.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Natalia C; Marques, Icaro A; Conceição, Wesley A; Macedo, Bruno; Machado, Clarice S; Mascarello, Alessandra; Chiaradia-Delatorre, Louise Domeneghini; Yunes, Rosendo Augusto; Nunes, Ricardo José; Hughson, Andrew G; Raymond, Lynne D; Pascutti, Pedro G; Caughey, Byron; Cordeiro, Yraima

    2014-01-01

    The prion protein (PrP) is implicated in the Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs), which comprise a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases affecting humans and other mammals. Conversion of cellular PrP (PrP(C)) into the scrapie form (PrP(Sc)) is the hallmark of TSEs. Once formed, PrP(Sc) aggregates and catalyzes PrP(C) misfolding into new PrP(Sc) molecules. Although many compounds have been shown to inhibit the conversion process, so far there is no effective therapy for TSEs. Besides, most of the previously evaluated compounds failed in vivo due to poor pharmacokinetic profiles. In this work we propose a combined in vitro/in silico approach to screen for active anti-prion compounds presenting acceptable drugability and pharmacokinetic parameters. A diverse panel of aromatic compounds was screened in neuroblastoma cells persistently infected with PrP(Sc) (ScN2a) for their ability to inhibit PK-resistant PrP (PrP(Res)) accumulation. From ∼200 compounds, 47 were effective in decreasing the accumulation of PrP(Res) in ScN2a cells. Pharmacokinetic and physicochemical properties were predicted in silico, allowing us to obtain estimates of relative blood brain barrier permeation and mutagenicity. MTT reduction assays showed that most of the active compounds were non cytotoxic. Compounds that cleared PrP(Res) from ScN2a cells, were non-toxic in the MTT assay, and presented a good pharmacokinetic profile were investigated for their ability to inhibit aggregation of an amyloidogenic PrP peptide fragment (PrP(109-149)). Molecular docking results provided structural models and binding affinities for the interaction between PrP and the most promising compounds. In summary, using this combined in vitro/in silico approach we have identified new small organic anti-scrapie compounds that decrease the accumulation of PrP(Res) in ScN2a cells, inhibit the aggregation of a PrP peptide, and possess pharmacokinetic characteristics that support their drugability. These

  12. Anti-Prion Activity of a Panel of Aromatic Chemical Compounds: In Vitro and In Silico Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Natalia C.; Marques, Icaro A.; Conceição, Wesley A.; Macedo, Bruno; Machado, Clarice S.; Mascarello, Alessandra; Chiaradia-Delatorre, Louise Domeneghini; Yunes, Rosendo Augusto; Nunes, Ricardo José; Hughson, Andrew G.; Raymond, Lynne D.; Pascutti, Pedro G.; Caughey, Byron; Cordeiro, Yraima

    2014-01-01

    The prion protein (PrP) is implicated in the Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs), which comprise a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases affecting humans and other mammals. Conversion of cellular PrP (PrPC) into the scrapie form (PrPSc) is the hallmark of TSEs. Once formed, PrPSc aggregates and catalyzes PrPC misfolding into new PrPSc molecules. Although many compounds have been shown to inhibit the conversion process, so far there is no effective therapy for TSEs. Besides, most of the previously evaluated compounds failed in vivo due to poor pharmacokinetic profiles. In this work we propose a combined in vitro/in silico approach to screen for active anti-prion compounds presenting acceptable drugability and pharmacokinetic parameters. A diverse panel of aromatic compounds was screened in neuroblastoma cells persistently infected with PrPSc (ScN2a) for their ability to inhibit PK-resistant PrP (PrPRes) accumulation. From ∼200 compounds, 47 were effective in decreasing the accumulation of PrPRes in ScN2a cells. Pharmacokinetic and physicochemical properties were predicted in silico, allowing us to obtain estimates of relative blood brain barrier permeation and mutagenicity. MTT reduction assays showed that most of the active compounds were non cytotoxic. Compounds that cleared PrPRes from ScN2a cells, were non-toxic in the MTT assay, and presented a good pharmacokinetic profile were investigated for their ability to inhibit aggregation of an amyloidogenic PrP peptide fragment (PrP109–149). Molecular docking results provided structural models and binding affinities for the interaction between PrP and the most promising compounds. In summary, using this combined in vitro/in silico approach we have identified new small organic anti-scrapie compounds that decrease the accumulation of PrPRes in ScN2a cells, inhibit the aggregation of a PrP peptide, and possess pharmacokinetic characteristics that support their drugability. These compounds are

  13. Isolation and Chemical Structural Characterisation of a Compound with Antioxidant Activity from the Roots of Senna italica

    PubMed Central

    Mokgotho, Matlou Phineas; Gololo, Stanley Sechene; Masoko, Peter; Shai, Leshwene Jeremiah; Bagla, Victor Patrick; Eloff, Jacobus Nicolaas

    2013-01-01

    Senna italica, a member of the Fabaceae family (subfamily Caesalpiniaceae), is widely used in South African traditional medicine to treat a number of disease conditions. Aqueous extracts of the plant are mainly used to treat sexually transmitted infections and intestinal complications. The roots of S. italica were ground to a fine powder and sequentially extracted with n-hexane, dichloromethane, acetone, and methanol using serial exhaustive extraction (SEE) method. Thin layer chromatography was used to analyse the phytochemical composition of the extracts and DPPH radical scavenging method to detect the presence of antioxidant compounds. The bioassay guided fractionation of the acetone fraction afforded an antioxidant compound with free radical scavenging activity. The isolated compound was subsequently identified as 3,4′,5-trihydroxystilbene (resveratrol). This study represents the first report of the stilbene resveratrol in S. italica. PMID:23843877

  14. Variability in Human Bitter Taste Sensitivity to Chemically Diverse Compounds Can Be Accounted for by Differential TAS2R Activation.

    PubMed

    Roura, Eugeni; Aldayyani, Asya; Thavaraj, Pridhuvi; Prakash, Sangeeta; Greenway, Delma; Thomas, Walter G; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Roudnitzky, Natacha; Foster, Simon R

    2015-07-01

    The human population displays high variation in taste perception. Differences in individual taste sensitivity may also impact on nutrient intake and overall appetite. A well-characterized example is the variable perception of bitter compounds such as 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP) and phenylthiocarbamide (PTC), which can be accounted for at the molecular level by polymorphic variants in the specific type 2 taste receptor (TAS2R38). This phenotypic variation has been associated with influencing dietary preference and other behaviors, although the generalization of PROP/PTC taster status as a predictor of sensitivity to other tastes is controversial. Here, we proposed that the taste sensitivities of different bitter compounds would be correlated only when they activate the same bitter taste receptor. Thirty-four volunteers were exposed to 8 bitter compounds that were selected based on their potential to activate overlapping and distinct repertoires of TAS2Rs. Taste intensity ratings were evaluated using the general Labeled Magnitude Scale. Our data demonstrate a strong interaction between the intensity for bitter substances when they activate common TAS2Rs. Consequently, PROP/PTC sensitivity was not a reliable predictor of general bitter sensitivity. In addition, our findings provide a novel framework to predict taste sensitivity based on their specific T2R activation profile.

  15. Virtual screening of chemical compounds active against breast cancer cell lines based on cell cycle modelling, prediction of cytotoxicity and interaction with targets.

    PubMed

    Konova, V; Lagunin, A; Pogodin, P; Kolotova, E; Shtil, A; Poroikov, V

    2015-01-01

    Bio- and chemoinformatics methods are widely used for the detection of mechanisms of cancer, to search for potential drug targets and their ligands. Regulatory network analysis based on signalling pathways, and cell cycle regulation provides better understanding of diseases with multiple mechanisms of pathogenesis. We developed an approach for in silico prediction of the cytotoxic effect of chemical compounds in non-transformed and breast cancer cell lines. This approach combines the prediction of the interaction between chemical compounds and human proteins, cytotoxicity and regulatory network modelling taking into account gene expression. Application of our approach to virtual screening of libraries of commercially available compounds allowed selection of dozens of promising hits. These molecules are predicted to interact with the identified targets and exhibit cytotoxicity against breast cancer cell lines but not non-tumour human cell lines. Experimental testing of 49 selected compounds against MDA-MB-231 and MCF7 breast cancer cell lines confirmed the activity of eight compounds with IC50 values ranged from 0.8 to 50 μM. Thus, the developed approach may be applied for virtual screening for cytotoxic compounds against tumour cell lines.

  16. Chemical effect on diffusion in intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Ting

    With the trend of big data and the Internet of things, we live in a world full of personal electronic devices and small electronic devices. In order to make the devices more powerful, advanced electronic packaging such as wafer level packaging or 3D IC packaging play an important role. Furthermore, ?-bumps, which connect silicon dies together with dimension less than 10 ?m, are crucial parts in advanced packaging. Owing to the dimension of ?-bumps, they transform into intermetallic compound from tin based solder after the liquid state bonding process. Moreover, many new reliability issues will occur in electronic packaging when the bonding materials change; in this case, we no longer have tin based solder joint, instead, we have intermetallic compound ?-bumps. Most of the potential reliability issues in intermetallic compounds are caused by the chemical reactions driven by atomic diffusion in the material; thus, to know the diffusivities of atoms inside a material is significant and can help us to further analyze the reliability issues. However, we are lacking these kinds of data in intermetallic compound because there are some problems if used traditional Darken's analysis. Therefore, we considered Wagner diffusivity in our system to solve the problems and applied the concept of chemical effect on diffusion by taking the advantage that large amount of energy will release when compounds formed. Moreover, by inventing the holes markers made by Focus ion beam (FIB), we can conduct the diffusion experiment and obtain the tracer diffusivities of atoms inside the intermetallic compound. We applied the technique on Ni3Sn4 and Cu3Sn, which are two of the most common materials in electronic packaging, and the tracer diffusivities are measured under several different temperatures; moreover, microstructure of the intermetallic compounds are investigated to ensure the diffusion environment. Additionally, the detail diffusion mechanism was also discussed in aspect of diffusion

  17. Diazo Compounds: Versatile Tools for Chemical Biology.

    PubMed

    Mix, Kalie A; Aronoff, Matthew R; Raines, Ronald T

    2016-12-16

    Diazo groups have broad and tunable reactivity. That and other attributes endow diazo compounds with the potential to be valuable reagents for chemical biologists. The presence of diazo groups in natural products underscores their metabolic stability and anticipates their utility in a biological context. The chemoselectivity of diazo groups, even in the presence of azido groups, presents many opportunities. Already, diazo compounds have served as chemical probes and elicited novel modifications of proteins and nucleic acids. Here, we review advances that have facilitated the chemical synthesis of diazo compounds, and we highlight applications of diazo compounds in the detection and modification of biomolecules.

  18. Isolation, identification, and antibacterial activity of chemical compounds from ethanolic extract of suji leaf (Pleomele angusifolia NE Brown)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faridah; Natalia; Lina, Maria; W, Hendig

    2014-03-01

    Suji (Pleomele angustifolia NE Brown) is one of the medicinal plants of the tribe of Liliaceae, empirically useful to treat coughs and respiratory diseases such as tuberculosis (TB) and pneumonia. In this study, ethanolic extract of suji leaves was tested its activity against bacteria that attacks the respiratory organs, namely Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Streptococcus pneumoniae, using a paper disc diffusion and dilution agar method. These extracts have activity in inhibiting the growth of M. tuberculosis at a concentration of 8 mg and against S. pneumoniae at a concentration of 4 mg. The fractions were tested their antibacterial activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae using paper disc diffusion method. The most active fraction was chosen based on the inhibition diameter. The fractions contained flavonoids, steroids, and essential oils. The precipitate isolated from the extraction process shows needle-shaped, white, cold and tasteless crystals. Moreover, the HPLC analysis of isolate revealed a single peak with a retention time of 7.183 minutes. The exact compounds in the isolate could not be determined but it was known the compounds contained the functional groups of alkene, alkane, C=O, -OH. Test results obtained from UV-Vis spectrophotometer provides maximum absorption at a wavelength of 203.0 nm.

  19. Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Activity Determination of One Hundred Kinds of Pure Chemical Compounds Using Offline and Online Screening HPLC Assay.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Jin; Oh, You Chang; Cho, Won Kyung; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the antioxidant activity of one hundred kinds of pure chemical compounds found within a number of natural substances and oriental medicinal herbs (OMH). Three different methods were used to evaluate the antioxidant activity of DPPH radical-scavenging activity, ABTS radical-scavenging activity, and online screening HPLC-ABTS assays. The results indicated that 17 compounds exhibited better inhibitory activity against ABTS radical than DPPH radical. The IC50 rate of a more practical substance is determined, and the ABTS assay IC50 values of gallic acid hydrate, (+)-catechin hydrate, caffeic acid, rutin hydrate, hyperoside, quercetin, and kaempferol compounds were 1.03 ± 0.25, 3.12 ± 0.51, 1.59 ± 0.06, 4.68 ± 1.24, 3.54 ± 0.39, 1.89 ± 0.33, and 3.70 ± 0.15 μg/mL, respectively. The ABTS assay is more sensitive to identifying the antioxidant activity since it has faster reaction kinetics and a heightened response to antioxidants. In addition, there was a very small margin of error between the results of the offline-ABTS assay and those of the online screening HPLC-ABTS assay. We also evaluated the effects of 17 compounds on the NO secretion in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells and also investigated the cytotoxicity of 17 compounds using a cell counting kit (CCK) in order to determine the optimal concentration that would provide an effective anti-inflammatory action with minimum toxicity. These results will be compiled into a database, and this method can be a powerful preselection tool for compounds intended to be studied for their potential bioactivity and antioxidant activity related to their radical-scavenging capacity.

  20. Design of chemical space networks incorporating compound distance relationships

    PubMed Central

    de la Vega de León, Antonio; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Networks, in which nodes represent compounds and edges pairwise similarity relationships, are used as coordinate-free representations of chemical space. So-called chemical space networks (CSNs) provide intuitive access to structural relationships within compound data sets and can be annotated with activity information. However, in such similarity-based networks, distances between compounds are typically determined for layout purposes and clarity and have no chemical meaning. By contrast, inter-compound distances as a measure of dissimilarity can be directly obtained from coordinate-based representations of chemical space. Herein, we introduce a CSN variant that incorporates compound distance relationships and thus further increases the information content of compound networks. The design was facilitated by adapting the Kamada-Kawai algorithm. Kamada-Kawai networks are the first CSNs that are based on numerical similarity measures, but do not depend on chosen similarity threshold values. PMID:28184279

  1. Design of chemical space networks incorporating compound distance relationships.

    PubMed

    de la Vega de León, Antonio; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Networks, in which nodes represent compounds and edges pairwise similarity relationships, are used as coordinate-free representations of chemical space. So-called chemical space networks (CSNs) provide intuitive access to structural relationships within compound data sets and can be annotated with activity information. However, in such similarity-based networks, distances between compounds are typically determined for layout purposes and clarity and have no chemical meaning. By contrast, inter-compound distances as a measure of dissimilarity can be directly obtained from coordinate-based representations of chemical space. Herein, we introduce a CSN variant that incorporates compound distance relationships and thus further increases the information content of compound networks. The design was facilitated by adapting the Kamada-Kawai algorithm. Kamada-Kawai networks are the first CSNs that are based on numerical similarity measures, but do not depend on chosen similarity threshold values.

  2. Direct quantification of chemical warfare agents and related compounds at low ppt levels: comparing active capillary dielectric barrier discharge plasma ionization and secondary electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Jan-Christoph; Schaer, Martin; Siegenthaler, Peter; Zenobi, Renato

    2015-01-06

    A novel active capillary dielectric barrier discharge plasma ionization (DBDI) technique for mass spectrometry is applied to the direct detection of 13 chemical warfare related compounds, including sarin, and compared to secondary electrospray ionization (SESI) in terms of selectivity and sensitivity. The investigated compounds include an intact chemical warfare agent and structurally related molecules, hydrolysis products and/or precursors of highly toxic nerve agents (G-series, V-series, and "new" nerve agents), and blistering and incapacitating warfare agents. Well-defined analyte gas phase concentrations were generated by a pressure-assisted nanospray with consecutive thermal evaporation and dilution. Identification was achieved by selected reaction monitoring (SRM). The most abundant fragment ion intensity of each compound was used for quantification. For DBDI and SESI, absolute gas phase detection limits in the low ppt range (in MS/MS mode) were achieved for all compounds investigated. Although the sensitivity of both methods was comparable, the active capillary DBDI sensitivity was found to be dependent on the applied AC voltage, thus enabling direct tuning of the sensitivity and the in-source fragmentation, which may become a key feature in terms of field applicability. Our findings underline the applicability of DBDI and SESI for the direct, sensitive detection and quantification of several CWA types and their degradation products. Furthermore, they suggest the use of DBDI in combination with hand-held instruments for CWAs on-site monitoring.

  3. Quantum chemical studies of estrogenic compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantum chemical methods are potent tools to provide information on the chemical structure and electronic properties of organic molecules. Modern computational chemistry methods have provided a great deal of insight into the binding of estrogenic compounds to estrogenic receptors (ER), an important ...

  4. [Chemical characterization and quantification of fructooligosaccharides, phenolic compounds and antiradical activity of Andean roots and tubers grown in Northwest of Argentina].

    PubMed

    Jiménez, María Eugenia; Sammán, Norma

    2014-06-01

    There is great interest in consuming foods that can provide the nutrients for a good nutrition and other health beneficial compounds. The aim of this work was to determine the chemical composition of native foods of the Andean region and to quantify some functional com-ponents. Proximal composition, vitamin C, total phenolic compounds, antiradical activity (DPPH) in peel and pulp, dietary fiber soluble and insoluble, fructooligosaccharides (FOS), total and resistant starch (in tubers and raw roots, boiled and boiled and stored) of 6 varieties of Oca (Oxalis tuberosa), 4 clones of manioc (Manihot esculenta Crantz) and yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius were determined. The results showed greater amount of bioactive compounds and antiradical activity in the skin of these products. The highest content was found in the oca peel. In all cases, the content of insoluble fiber was greater than the soluble. The manioc had higher total starch than Andean roots and tubers. The boiling process decreased the resistant starch content of ocas and maniocs, but when these are stored for 48 h at 5 ° C, the resistant starch content increased. The FOS content of the ocas was similar for all varieties (7%). The main component of yacon carbohydrates were FOS (8.89%). The maniocs did not contain FOS. It can be concluded that the roots and tubers studied, in addition to provide nutrients, contain functional compounds that confer additional helpful value for preventing no communicable diseases.

  5. Organometallic compounds: an opportunity for chemical biology?

    PubMed

    Patra, Malay; Gasser, Gilles

    2012-06-18

    Organometallic compounds are renowned for their remarkable applications in the field of catalysis, but much less is known about their potential in chemical biology. Indeed, such compounds have long been considered to be either unstable under physiological conditions or cytotoxic. As a consequence, little attention has been paid to their possible utilisation for biological purposes. Because of their outstanding physicochemical properties, which include chemical stability, structural diversity and unique photo- and electrochemical properties, however, organometallic compounds have the ability to play a leading role in the field of chemical biology. Indeed, remarkable examples of the use of such compounds-notably as enzyme inhibitors and as luminescent agents-have recently been reported. Here we summarise recent advances in the use of organometallic compounds for chemical biology purposes, an area that we define as "organometallic chemical biology". We also demonstrate that these recent discoveries are only a beginning and that many other organometallic complexes are likely to be found useful in this field of research in the near future.

  6. Validation of chemical compound library screening for transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif inhibitors using GFP-fused transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Shunta; Maruyama, Junichi; Kawano, Shodai; Iwasa, Hiroaki; Nakagawa, Kentaro; Ishigami-Yuasa, Mari; Kagechika, Hiroyuki; Nishina, Hiroshi; Hata, Yutaka

    2016-06-01

    Transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) plays versatile roles in cell proliferation and differentiation. It is phosphorylated by large tumor suppressor kinases, the core kinases of the tumor-suppressive Hippo pathway. Phosphorylation induces the cytoplasmic accumulation of TAZ and its degradation. In human cancers, the deregulation of the Hippo pathway and gene amplification enhance TAZ activity. TAZ interacts with TEA domain family members (TEAD), and upregulates genes implicated in epithelial-mesenchymal transition. It also confers stemness to cancer cells. Thus, TAZ activation provides cancer cells with malignant properties and worsens the clinical prognosis. Therefore, TAZ attracts attention as a therapeutic target in cancer therapy. We applied 18 606 small chemical compounds to human osteosarcoma U2OS cells expressing GFP-fused TAZ (GFP-TAZ), monitored the subcellular localization of GFP-TAZ, and selected 33 compounds that shifted GFP-TAZ to the cytoplasm. Unexpectedly, only a limited number of compounds suppressed TAZ-mediated enhancement of TEAD-responsive reporter activity. Moreover, the compounds that weakened TEAD reporter activity did not necessarily decrease the unphosphorylated TAZ. In this study, we focused on three compounds that decreased both TEAD reporter activity and unphosphorylated TAZ, and treated several human cancer cells with these compounds. One compound did not show a remarkable effect, whereas the other two compounds compromised the cell viability in certain cancer cells. In conclusion, the GFP-TAZ-based assay can be used as the first screening for compounds that inhibit TAZ and show anticancer properties. To develop anticancer drugs, we need additional assays to select the compounds.

  7. Systematic chemical-genetic and chemical-chemical interaction datasets for prediction of compound synergism

    PubMed Central

    Wildenhain, Jan; Spitzer, Michaela; Dolma, Sonam; Jarvik, Nick; White, Rachel; Roy, Marcia; Griffiths, Emma; Bellows, David S.; Wright, Gerard D.; Tyers, Mike

    2016-01-01

    The network structure of biological systems suggests that effective therapeutic intervention may require combinations of agents that act synergistically. However, a dearth of systematic chemical combination datasets have limited the development of predictive algorithms for chemical synergism. Here, we report two large datasets of linked chemical-genetic and chemical-chemical interactions in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We screened 5,518 unique compounds against 242 diverse yeast gene deletion strains to generate an extended chemical-genetic matrix (CGM) of 492,126 chemical-gene interaction measurements. This CGM dataset contained 1,434 genotype-specific inhibitors, termed cryptagens. We selected 128 structurally diverse cryptagens and tested all pairwise combinations to generate a benchmark dataset of 8,128 pairwise chemical-chemical interaction tests for synergy prediction, termed the cryptagen matrix (CM). An accompanying database resource called ChemGRID was developed to enable analysis, visualisation and downloads of all data. The CGM and CM datasets will facilitate the benchmarking of computational approaches for synergy prediction, as well as chemical structure-activity relationship models for anti-fungal drug discovery. PMID:27874849

  8. Systematic chemical-genetic and chemical-chemical interaction datasets for prediction of compound synergism.

    PubMed

    Wildenhain, Jan; Spitzer, Michaela; Dolma, Sonam; Jarvik, Nick; White, Rachel; Roy, Marcia; Griffiths, Emma; Bellows, David S; Wright, Gerard D; Tyers, Mike

    2016-11-22

    The network structure of biological systems suggests that effective therapeutic intervention may require combinations of agents that act synergistically. However, a dearth of systematic chemical combination datasets have limited the development of predictive algorithms for chemical synergism. Here, we report two large datasets of linked chemical-genetic and chemical-chemical interactions in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We screened 5,518 unique compounds against 242 diverse yeast gene deletion strains to generate an extended chemical-genetic matrix (CGM) of 492,126 chemical-gene interaction measurements. This CGM dataset contained 1,434 genotype-specific inhibitors, termed cryptagens. We selected 128 structurally diverse cryptagens and tested all pairwise combinations to generate a benchmark dataset of 8,128 pairwise chemical-chemical interaction tests for synergy prediction, termed the cryptagen matrix (CM). An accompanying database resource called ChemGRID was developed to enable analysis, visualisation and downloads of all data. The CGM and CM datasets will facilitate the benchmarking of computational approaches for synergy prediction, as well as chemical structure-activity relationship models for anti-fungal drug discovery.

  9. Lifetime of a Chemically Bound Helium Compound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaban, Galina M.; Lundell, Jan; Gerber, R. Benny; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The rare-gas atoms are chemically inert, to an extent unique among all elements. This is due to the stable electronic structure of the atoms. Stable molecules with chemically bound rare-gas atoms are, however, known. A first such compound, XePtF6, W2S prepared in 1962 and since then a range of molecules containing radon, xenon and krypton have been obtained. Most recently, a first stable chemically bound compound of argon was prepared, leaving neon and helium as the only elements for which stable chemically bound molecules are not yet known. Electronic structure calculations predict that a metastable species HHeF exists, but significance of the result depends on the unknown lifetime. Here we report quantum dynamics calculations of the lifetime of HHeF, using accurate interactions computed from electronic structure theory. HHeF is shown to disintegrate by tunneling through energy barriers into He + HF and H + He + F the first channel greatly dominating. The lifetime of HHeF is more than 120 picoseconds, that of DHeF is 14 nanoseconds. The relatively long lifetimes are encouraging for the preparation prospects of this first chemically bound helium compound.

  10. Occurrence and distribution of pharmaceutically active and endocrine disrupting compounds in Singapore's marine environment: influence of hydrodynamics and physical-chemical properties.

    PubMed

    Bayen, Stéphane; Zhang, Hui; Desai, Malan Manish; Ooi, Seng Keat; Kelly, Barry C

    2013-11-01

    The fate and exposure risks of pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) and endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in marine environments are not well-understood. In this study we developed a multi-residue analytical method for quantifying concentrations of forty target compounds in seawater from Singapore. Analyses of samples (n = 24) from eight sites showed the occurrence of several compounds, including gemfibrozil (<0.09-19.8 ng/L), triclosan (<0.55-10.5 ng/L), carbamazepine (<0.28-10.9 ng/L) and ibuprofen (<2.2-9.1 ng/L). A 3D hydrodynamic model for Singapore was used to predict residence time (tR). Principal Components Analysis revealed a strong relationship between tR and contaminant concentrations. While source emissions are undoubtedly important, proximate distance to a wastewater treatment plant had little influence on concentrations. The site with the greatest tR, which exhibited the highest concentrations, is adjacent to Singapore's largest protected wetland reserve. The results highlight an important linkage between hydrodynamic behavior and contaminant exposure risks in complex coastal marine ecosystems.

  11. Chemical images of marine bio-active compounds by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy and transposed orthogonal partial least squares (T-OPLS).

    PubMed

    Abbas, Aamer; Josefson, Mats; Nylund, Göran M; Pavia, Henrik; Abrahamsson, Katarina

    2012-08-06

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy combined with transposed Orthogonal Partial Least Squares (T-OPLS) was shown to produce chemical images of the natural antibacterial surface-active compound 1,1,3,3-tetrabromo-2-heptanone (TBH) on Bonnemaisonia hamifera. The use of gold colloids functionalised with the internal standard 4-mercapto-benzonitrile (MBN) made it possible to create images of the relative concentration of TBH over the surfaces. A gradient of TBH could be mapped over and in the close vicinity of the B. hamifera algal vesicles at the attomol/pixel level. T-OPLS produced a measure of the spectral correlation for each pixel of the hyperspectral images whilst not including spectral variation that was linearly independent of the target spectrum. In this paper we show the possibility to retrieve specific spectral information with a low magnitude in a complex matrix.

  12. Chemical characterization of volatile compounds of Lantana camara L. and L. radula Sw. and their antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Passos, Juliana Lanna; Barbosa, Luiz Claudio Almeida; Demuner, Antonio Jacinto; Alvarenga, Elson Santiago; da Silva, Cleiton Moreira; Barreto, Robert Weingart

    2012-09-27

    A comparative study of the chemical composition of essential oils of two very similar species of the Verbenaceae family (Lantana camara and L. radula) revealed that the main components of essential oil of L. camara were germacrene-D (19.8%) and E-caryophyllene (19.7%), while those of L. radula were E-caryophyllene (25.3%), phytol (29.2%) and E-nerolidol (19.0%). We have hypothesized that the observed differences could contribute to the differentiated reaction of the two species of Lantana to the attack of the phytopathogenic fungi Corynespora cassiicola. An experiment, involving C. cassiicola cultivation in culture media containing volatile oils of the two species demonstrated that the oils of L. radula were more fungistatic than the oils of L. camara, in accordance with the in vivo observations. It is likely that E-nerolidol and phytol, only found in the oil of L. radula, play a significant role in the effects of L. radula on C. cassiicola.

  13. QSAR modeling and chemical space analysis of antimalarial compounds.

    PubMed

    Sidorov, Pavel; Viira, Birgit; Davioud-Charvet, Elisabeth; Maran, Uko; Marcou, Gilles; Horvath, Dragos; Varnek, Alexandre

    2017-04-03

    Generative topographic mapping (GTM) has been used to visualize and analyze the chemical space of antimalarial compounds as well as to build predictive models linking structure of molecules with their antimalarial activity. For this, a database, including ~3000 molecules tested in one or several of 17 anti-Plasmodium activity assessment protocols, has been compiled by assembling experimental data from in-house and ChEMBL databases. GTM classification models built on subsets corresponding to individual bioassays perform similarly to the earlier reported SVM models. Zones preferentially populated by active and inactive molecules, respectively, clearly emerge in the class landscapes supported by the GTM model. Their analysis resulted in identification of privileged structural motifs of potential antimalarial compounds. Projection of marketed antimalarial drugs on this map allowed us to delineate several areas in the chemical space corresponding to different mechanisms of antimalarial activity. This helped us to make a suggestion about the mode of action of the molecules populating these zones.

  14. Sensory effects of capsaicin congeners. Part II: Importance of chemical structure and pungency in desensitizing activity of capsaicin-type compounds.

    PubMed

    Szolcsányi, J; Jancsó-Gábor, A

    1976-01-01

    The characteristic insensitivity of sensory nerve endings to chemically induced pain brought about by capsaicin could be reproduced on the rat's eye by pungent vanillylamides, homovanilloyl-alkylamides and piperine, while homovanilloyl-cycloalkylamides, -azacycloalkylamides, - alkylesters, -alkyl-homovanillylamides, undecenoyl-3-aminopropranololand zingerone were practically ineffective in this respect. Desensitizing potency was not parallel with the stimulating effect of the compounds, e.g. the strongly pungent homovanilloyl-octylester failed to desensitize the receptors, while the less pungent homovanilloyl-dodecylamide proved to be a more potent desensitizing agent than capsaicin itself. It is concluded that the inverse position of the acylamide linkage does not modify, while its replacement by an esteric group completely abolishes the desensitizing activity. In contrast to the stimulating effect, in desensitizing action the presence of an alkyl chain is essential and its optimal length corresponds to 10-12 C atoms. On the basis of these results the possible molecular interactions at the site of action are discussed.

  15. Determination of biodegradability of phenolic compounds, characteristic to wastewater of the oil-shale chemical industry, on activated sludge by oxygen uptake measurement.

    PubMed

    Lepik, Riina; Tenno, Toomas

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the biodegradation of phenol, o-cresol and p-cresol individually and as bi-substrate mixtures at low initial substrate concentrations. Activated sludge was taken from the Kohtla-Järve wastewater treatment plant, Estonia, which is also treating phenolic wastewater from the oil-shale chemical industry and is considered to be acclimated to the phenolic compounds. Respirometric data have been used for evaluation of the kinetic parameters describing the bio-oxidation of substrates. Activated sludge was able to degrade phenol and p-cresol faster than o-cresol, showing better affinity to p-cresol. However, at higher concentrations, phenol and p-cresol exhibited also an inhibitory effect to the microorganisms. The highest values for maximum rate of oxygen uptake (V(O2,max)) were obtained for the bi-substrate system of phenol--p-cresol among the mixtures containing both substrates at equal concentrations from 0.005 mM to 0.050 mM. Concerning the systems containing one substrate at 0.1 mM and the other substrate varied in the abovementioned range, the highest V(O2,max) values were found for phenol--o-cresol(0.1 mM). The interaction parameters indicated that phenol had a stronger inhibition effect on the biodegradation of p-cresol than p-cresol had on the biodegradation of phenol. However, the obtained interaction parameters for systems of phenol--o-cresol indicated that o-cresol had a stronger inhibition effect on the biodegradation of phenol, which in turn had a mild inhibition or even enhancing effect on the biodegradation of o-cresol. In the case of a 1:1 mixture, phenol and o-cresol had a similar mild inhibition effect on each other's biodegradation.

  16. Device for collecting chemical compounds and related methods

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R.; Groenewold, Gary S.; Rae, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    A device for sampling chemical compounds from fixed surfaces and related methods are disclosed. The device may include a vacuum source, a chamber and a sorbent material. The device may utilize vacuum extraction to volatilize the chemical compounds from the fixed surfaces so that they may be sorbed by the sorbent material. The sorbent material may then be analyzed using conventional thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) instrumentation to determine presence of the chemical compounds. The methods may include detecting release and presence of one or more chemical compounds and determining the efficacy of decontamination. The device may be useful in collection and analysis of a variety of chemical compounds, such as residual chemical warfare agents, chemical attribution signatures and toxic industrial chemicals.

  17. Characteristic Chemical Components and Aroma-active Compounds of the Essential Oils from Ranunculus nipponicus var. submersus Used in Japanese Traditional Food.

    PubMed

    Nakaya, Satoshi; Usami, Atsushi; Yorimoto, Tomohito; Miyazawa, Mitsuo

    2015-01-01

    Ranunculus nipponicus var. submersus is an aquatic macrophyte; it is known as a wild edible plant in Japan for a long time. In this study, the essential oils from the fresh and dried aerial parts of R. nipponicus var. submersus were extracted by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Moreover, important aroma-active compounds were also detected in the oil using GC-olfactometry (GC-O) and aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA). Thus, 98 compounds (accounting for 93.86%) of the oil were identified. The major compounds in fresh plant oil were phytol (41.94%), heptadecane (5.92%), and geranyl propionate (5.76%), while those of. Dried plant oil were β-ionone (23.54%), 2-hexenal (8.75%), and dihydrobovolide (4.81%). The fresh and dried oils had the green-floral and citrus-floral odor, respectively. The GC-O and AEDA results show that phenylacetaldehyde (green, floral odor, FD-factor = 8) and β-ionone (violet-floral odor, FD-factor = 8) were the most characteristic odor compounds of the fresh oils. β-Cyclocitral (citrus odor, FD-factor = 64) and β-ionone (violet-floral odor, FD-factor = 64) were the most characteristic odor compounds of the dried oil. These compounds are thought to contribute to the flavor of R. nipponicus var. submersus.

  18. GPU accelerated chemical similarity calculation for compound library comparison.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chao; Wang, Lirong; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2011-07-25

    Chemical similarity calculation plays an important role in compound library design, virtual screening, and "lead" optimization. In this manuscript, we present a novel GPU-accelerated algorithm for all-vs-all Tanimoto matrix calculation and nearest neighbor search. By taking advantage of multicore GPU architecture and CUDA parallel programming technology, the algorithm is up to 39 times superior to the existing commercial software that runs on CPUs. Because of the utilization of intrinsic GPU instructions, this approach is nearly 10 times faster than existing GPU-accelerated sparse vector algorithm, when Unity fingerprints are used for Tanimoto calculation. The GPU program that implements this new method takes about 20 min to complete the calculation of Tanimoto coefficients between 32 M PubChem compounds and 10K Active Probes compounds, i.e., 324G Tanimoto coefficients, on a 128-CUDA-core GPU.

  19. How can Databases assist with the Prediction of Chemical Compounds?

    PubMed Central

    Schön, J Christian

    2014-01-01

    An overview is given on the ways databases can be employed to aid in the prediction of chemical compounds, in particular inorganic crystalline compounds. Methods currently employed and possible future approaches are discussed. PMID:26213422

  20. BASIC CHEMICAL RESEARCH PROGRAM. ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    BENZENE, *CYANIDES, *HYDROXIDES, *ORGANIC COMPOUNDS, ACETYLENES, ALKYL RADICALS, AMIDES, ANILINES , BENZALDEHYDES, CHEMICAL REACTIONS , CONDENSATION... REACTIONS , ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY, MATERIALS, MEASUREMENT, MONOCYCLIC COMPOUNDS, PHENOLS, PHENYL RADICALS, QUINONES, SOLID STATE PHYSICS, SYNTHESIS.

  1. Exploring the chemical space of P-glycoprotein interacting compounds.

    PubMed

    Prachayasittikul, Veda; Mandi, Prasit; Prachayasittikul, Supaluk; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Nantasenamat, Chanin

    2016-01-21

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) is well known for its clinical importance in the pharmacokinetics of drugs and its role in multidrug resistance. The promiscuity of Pgp that arises from its ability to extrude a wide range of lipophilic and structurally unrelated compounds from cells, render the classification and understanding of its interacting compounds a great challenge. In this study, a data set of Pgp-interacting compounds including 1463 inhibitors, 1085 non-inhibitors, 308 substrates and 126 non-substrates was retrieved and subjected to a combination of analyses, including exploration of chemical space, statistical analysis of descriptor values and molecular fragment analysis, to obtain insight into distinct physicochemical properties and important chemical substructures which may govern the biological activity of investigated compounds toward Pgp. Statistical analysis of descriptor values and molecular fragment analysis indicated that particular size, shape, functional groups and molecular fragments may govern the classification of Pgp-interacting compounds by influencing their physicochemical properties and their interaction with Pgp. Overall, the interacting compounds (i.e., substrates and inhibitors) are larger in size, more flexible, more lipophilic, and less charged than non-interacting compounds (i.e., non-substrates and non-inhibitors). The fragment analysis suggested that methyl and amino groups may be involved in Pgp inhibition and/or transport. The 2-methoxyphenol fragment was noted to be a potential substructure for designing Pgp inhibitors, whereas the 2-sulfanylidene-1-[3,4,5-trihydroxy-6-(hydroxymethyl)oxan-2-yl]-1,2-dihydropyridine-3-carbonitrile substructure was implied for avoiding transport by Pgp. Hence, this study could provide a comprehensive understanding of this drug transporter, which could benefit an early ADMET screening as well as drug design and development.

  2. Natural compounds with anti-ageing activity.

    PubMed

    Argyropoulou, Aikaterini; Aligiannis, Nektarios; Trougakos, Ioannis P; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros

    2013-10-11

    Ageing is a complex molecular process driven by diverse molecular pathways and biochemical events that are promoted by both environmental and genetic factors. Specifically, ageing is defined as a time-dependent decline of functional capacity and stress resistance, associated with increased chance of morbidity and mortality. These effects relate to age-related gradual accumulation of stressors that result in increasingly damaged biomolecules which eventually compromise cellular homeostasis. Nevertheless, the findings that genetic or diet interventions can increase lifespan in evolutionarily diverse organisms indicate that mortality can be postponed. Natural compounds represent an extraordinary inventory of high diversity structural scaffolds that can offer promising candidate chemical entities in the major healthcare challenge of increasing health span and/or delaying ageing. Herein, those natural compounds (either pure forms or extracts) that have been found to delay cellular senescence or in vivo ageing will be critically reviewed and summarized according to affected cellular signalling pathways. Moreover, the chemical structures of the identified natural compounds along with the profile of extracts related to their bioactive components will be presented and discussed. Finally, novel potential molecular targets for screening natural compounds for anti-ageing activity, as well as the idea that anti-ageing interventions represent a systemic approach that is also effective against age-related diseases will be discussed.

  3. Optimization of activated carbon fiber preparation from Kenaf using K2HPO4 as chemical activator for adsorption of phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Aber, Soheil; Khataee, Alireza; Sheydaei, Mohsen

    2009-12-01

    The present work reports the preparation of activated carbon fiber (ACF) from Kenaf natural fibers. Taguchi experimental design method was used to optimize the preparation of ACF using K(2)HPO(4). Optimized conditions were: carbonization at 300 degrees C, impregnation with 30%w/v K(2)HPO(4) solution and activation at 700 degrees C for 2h with the rate of achieving the activation temperature equal to 2 degrees C min(-1). The surface characteristics of the ACF prepared at optimized conditions were also studied using pore structure analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Pore structure analysis shows that micropores constitute the most of the porosity of the prepared ACF. The ability of the ACF prepared at optimized conditions to adsorb phenol and p-nitrophenol from aqueous solution was also investigated. The equilibrium data of phenol and p-nitrophenol adsorption on the prepared ACF were well fitted to the Langmuir isotherm. The maximum adsorption capacities of phenol and p-nitrophenol on the prepared ACF are 140.84 and 136.99 mg g(-1), respectively. The adsorption process follows the pseudo-first-order kinetic model.

  4. STUDIES ON THE SENSITIZATION OF ANIMALS WITH SIMPLE CHEMICAL COMPOUNDS

    PubMed Central

    Chase, Merrill W.

    1947-01-01

    Evidence is presented to show that guinea pigs actively sensitized to simple chemical compounds form serum antibodies capable of sensitizing the skin of normal guinea pigs. Skin sites prepared as for the Prausnitz-Küstner test develop immediate-type ("evanescent") reactions with erythema and edema, upon subsequent injection of the corresponding simple compounds or protein conjugates thereof, and give effects resembling transferred reaginic reactions as seen in human beings. The antibodies were obtainable after sensitization by acyl chlorides, acid anhydrides, and also substances of lesser reactivity, picryl chloride and 2:4 dinitrochlorobenzene, which are human allergens. Observations are reported on the specificity of the antibodies and on various details of the reaction. Like effects result when antiprotein immune sera and their corresponding antigens are employed for the test, making it highly probable that the antibodies secured after sensitization to drugs result from immunization by conjugates formed in vivo. The sera obtained after sensitization with simple chemical compounds readily confer passive anaphylaxis, and their capacity for sensitizing the skin declines gradually with progressive heating. It was observed that following a reaction of substantial degree in guinea pig skin the area involved does not fully recover for some days its capacity to react, the effect being a manifestation, it would seem, of what has been termed "non-specific antianaphylaxis." PMID:19871693

  5. LigandBox: A database for 3D structures of chemical compounds.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Takeshi; Sugihara, Yusuke; Fukunishi, Yoshifumi; Nakamura, Haruki

    2013-01-01

    A database for the 3D structures of available compounds is essential for the virtual screening by molecular docking. We have developed the LigandBox database (http://ligandbox.protein.osaka-u.ac.jp/ligandbox/) containing four million available compounds, collected from the catalogues of 37 commercial suppliers, and approved drugs and biochemical compounds taken from KEGG_DRUG, KEGG_COMPOUND and PDB databases. Each chemical compound in the database has several 3D conformers with hydrogen atoms and atomic charges, which are ready to be docked into receptors using docking programs. The 3D conformations were generated using our molecular simulation program package, myPresto. Various physical properties, such as aqueous solubility (LogS) and carcinogenicity have also been calculated to characterize the ADME-Tox properties of the compounds. The Web database provides two services for compound searches: a property/chemical ID search and a chemical structure search. The chemical structure search is performed by a descriptor search and a maximum common substructure (MCS) search combination, using our program kcombu. By specifying a query chemical structure, users can find similar compounds among the millions of compounds in the database within a few minutes. Our database is expected to assist a wide range of researchers, in the fields of medical science, chemical biology, and biochemistry, who are seeking to discover active chemical compounds by the virtual screening.

  6. The chemical activity of metal compound nanoparticles: Importance of electronic and steric effects in M8C12 (M=Ti, V, Mo) metcars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ping; Rodriguez, José A.; Muckerman, James T.

    2004-12-01

    Density functional theory was employed to investigate the chemical activity of metal carbide nanoparticles. The present calculations indicate that M8C12 (M=Ti, V, Mo) nanoparticles exhibit a unique behavior compared to metal [M(001)] and metal carbide surfaces [M2C(001) and MC(001)]. It is found that the nanoparticles behave very reactive in spite of the high carbon concentration in some reactions, while surprisingly inert in other cases. Our study reveals that the unexpected activity is the result of the interplay of shifts in the metal d-bands and distortions in the geometry of the metal carbide nanoparticles.

  7. Process for preparing a chemical compound enriched in isotope content

    DOEpatents

    Michaels, Edward D.

    1982-01-01

    A process to prepare a chemical enriched in isotope content which includes: (a) A chemical exchange reaction between a first and second compound which yields an isotopically enriched first compound and an isotopically depleted second compound; (b) the removal of a portion of the first compound as product and the removal of a portion of the second compound as spent material; (c) the conversion of the remainder of the first compound to the second compound for reflux at the product end of the chemical exchange reaction region; (d) the conversion of the remainder of the second compound to the first compound for reflux at the spent material end of the chemical exchange region; and the cycling of the additional chemicals produced by one conversion reaction to the other conversion reaction, for consumption therein. One of the conversion reactions is an oxidation reaction, and the energy that it yields is used to drive the other conversion reaction, a reduction. The reduction reaction is carried out in a solid polymer electrolyte electrolytic reactor. The overall process is energy efficient and yields no waste by-products.

  8. Chemical compound navigator: a web-based chem-BLAST, chemical taxonomy-based search engine for browsing compounds.

    PubMed

    Prasanna, M D; Vondrasek, Jiri; Wlodawer, Alexander; Rodriguez, H; Bhat, T N

    2006-06-01

    A novel technique to annotate, query, and analyze chemical compounds has been developed and is illustrated by using the inhibitor data on HIV protease-inhibitor complexes. In this method, all chemical compounds are annotated in terms of standard chemical structural fragments. These standard fragments are defined by using criteria, such as chemical classification; structural, chemical, or functional groups; and commercial, scientific or common names or synonyms. These fragments are then organized into a data tree based on their chemical substructures. Search engines have been developed to use this data tree to enable query on inhibitors of HIV protease (http://xpdb.nist.gov/hivsdb/hivsdb.html). These search engines use a new novel technique, Chemical Block Layered Alignment of Substructure Technique (Chem-BLAST) to search on the fragments of an inhibitor to look for its chemical structural neighbors. This novel technique to annotate and query compounds lays the foundation for the use of the Semantic Web concept on chemical compounds to allow end users to group, sort, and search structural neighbors accurately and efficiently. During annotation, it enables the attachment of "meaning" (i.e., semantics) to data in a manner that far exceeds the current practice of associating "metadata" with data by creating a knowledge base (or ontology) associated with compounds. Intended users of the technique are the research community and pharmaceutical industry, for which it will provide a new tool to better identify novel chemical structural neighbors to aid drug discovery.

  9. Chemical Preparation Laboratory for IND Candidate Compounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-08

    CLASSIFICATION lb. RESTRICTIVE MARKINGS Unclassified 2a. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION AUTHORITY 3 . DISTRIBUTION /AVAILABILITY OF REPORT 2b. DECLASSIFICATION... 3 III. Cumulative list of Compounds Delivered to U.S. Army Medical Research and Development (USAMRIID) from January 17, 1989 to...AVS 52) ............................................ 7 2. Selenazole (AVS 253) ............................................... 9 3 . Methyl-l,2,4

  10. Helping Students Distinguish between Mixtures and Chemical Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papageorgiou, George

    2002-01-01

    Describes a model demonstrating the difference between mixtures and chemical compounds in which two different colors of clay are used to represent two different elements. Makes connections to real world situations. (YDS)

  11. Malaria Parasite Metabolic Pathways (MPMP) Upgraded with Targeted Chemical Compounds.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, Hagai; Abdel-Haleem, Alyaa M

    2016-01-01

    Malaria Parasite Metabolic Pathways (MPMP) is the website for the functional genomics of intraerythrocytic Plasmodium falciparum. All the published information about targeted chemical compounds has now been added. Users can find the drug target and publication details linked to a drug database for further information about the medicinal properties of each compound.

  12. Unusual chemical compounds in flue gas desulfurization systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dille, E.R.

    1996-08-01

    Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems continue to have deposits formed on internal surfaces of the materials of which the FGD systems are fabricated. These compounds contribute to crevice corrosion of the alloys of which some of the FGD systems are made. In the process of performing the failure analysis of the FGD fabrication materials, new compounds were discovered. This paper discusses two corrosion failure analysis case histories and the new compounds that were discovered and the chemical environment in which they were discovered.

  13. LOSS OF ORGANIC CHEMICALS IN SOIL: PURE COMPOUND TREATABILITY STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comprehensive screening data on the treatability of 32 organic chemicals in soil were developed. Of the evaluated chemicals, 22 were phenolic compounds. Aerobic batch laboratory microcosm experiments were conducted using two soils: an acidic clay soil with <1% organic matter and ...

  14. Extraction and Characterization of Chemical Compounds in Coelaenomenodera elaeidis (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To elucidate the characterization of probable pheromone chemical compounds in Coelaenomenodera elaeidis Mlk., volatile samples were collected and subjected to gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analyses. These compounds were contained in active fractions: Butylated hydroxytoluene (C15H24O); 4, 4...

  15. Chemical Preparation Laboratory for IND Candidate Compounds.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-30

    carboxamide; 4H-r,lH-trans,2H-cis,lObH-trans,l-(2’-tetrahydro- pyranyloxy)-2-hydroxy-8,9- methylenedioxy -1,2,4a,l0b-tetrahydro6(5H)phenan. thridone...4aH-r,lH-trans,2H-cis,lObH-trans-1,2-Dihydroxy-8,9- methylenedioxy - 1,2 ,4a, lOb-tetrahydro-6(5H)phenanthridone. Three compounds remain under...28 K. 4H-r,lH-trans,2H-cis,lObH-trans,l-(2’-Tetrahydro- pyranyloxy)-2-hydroxy-8 9- methylenedioxy -1,2,4a,10b

  16. Chemical Preparation Laboratory for IND Candidate Compounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-10

    Dihydroxy-8 ,9 - methylenedioxy -1 ,2- 4a,l0b-tetrahydro-6(5H)phenanthridone 2.5 g 1986, p.3 1 5 SYN. REFERENCE* I.D. NO. COMPOUND AMOUNT (ANN. CONT. RPT...AVS 360 HP 4H-r,lH-trans,2H-cis,lObH-trans-1- (2’ ,Tetrahydropyranyloxy) -2-hydroxy- 8, 9- methylenedioxy -l, 2,4a, l0b-tetra- hydro-6(5H...Trihydroxy-2 acetoxy-8 ,9- methylenedioxy -I ,3,4, 4a, lOb-hexahydro-6(5H)phenanthridone 1.23 g 1988, p. 16 AVS 360 OH 4aH-r,1H-trans,2H-cis,3H--trans

  17. Biological activities of lignin hydrolysate-related compounds.

    PubMed

    Lee, Siseon; Monnappa, Ajay Kalanjana; Mitchell, Robert J

    2012-05-01

    Lignin hydrolysates contain many different chemical species, including ferulic acid, coumaric acid, vanillic acid, vanillin, syringaldehyde and furfural. From the perspective of biofuels, these compounds are problematic and can cause downstream loss of product if not removed prior to beginning the fermentative process. In contrast, a search for these compounds within the literature turns up many papers where the same compounds have beneficial properties pertaining to human health, including as antioxidants and in cancer prevention, or are involved in bacterial cell-to-cell signaling. Consequently, this article reviews the dual nature of these and other compounds found in lignin hydrolysates, highlighting both their detrimental and beneficial activities.

  18. Development of Chemical Compound Libraries for In Silico Drug Screening.

    PubMed

    Fukunishi, Yoshifumi; Lintuluoto, Masami

    2010-01-01

    Chemical compound libraries are the basic database for virtual (in silico) drug screening, and the number of entries has reached 20 million. Many drug-like compound libraries for virtual drug screening have been developed and released. In this review, the process of constructing a database for virtual screening is reviewed, and several popular databases are introduced. Several kinds of focused libraries have been developed. The author has developed databases for metalloproteases, and the details of the libraries are described. The library for metalloproteases was developed by improving the generation of the dominant-ion forms. For instance, the SH group is treated as S- in this library while all SH groups are protonated in the conventional libraries. In addition, metal complexes were examined as new candidates of drug-like compounds. Finally, a method for generating chemical space is introduced, and the diversity of compound libraries is discussed.

  19. Study of Compounds for Activity against Leishmania

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-27

    Comparative Antileishmanial Activity of Selected Compounds Against Leishmania Leishmania donovani and Leishmania Viannia braziliensis 7 IV. Zn vitro...Studies of Oligonucleotides Against Leishmania Leishmania donovani ............................................................ 9 Discussion...for several years in studies to identify new compounds for antileishmanial activity against both visceral (Lelshmania Leishmania donovani ) and

  20. [Organisms producing hypolipidemic compounds with antioxidant activity].

    PubMed

    Puzhevskaia, T O; Grammatikova, N E; Bibikova, M V; Katlinskiĭ, A V

    2009-01-01

    Complex compounds produced by fungal cultures of Lecanicilium and Beauveria with both high hypolipidemic and antioxydant activities were screened. Two fractions of the hypolipipidemic compounds with antioxidant activity of 95 and 75% in a dose of 25 mcg/ml were isolated.

  1. STUDIES ON THE SENSITIZATION OF ANIMALS WITH SIMPLE CHEMICAL COMPOUNDS

    PubMed Central

    Landsteiner, K.; Di Somma, A. A.

    1938-01-01

    With the view of making new types of chemicals accessible for investigations on drug hypersensitiveness, methods have been devised for sensitizing animals with diazomethane and mustard oil, two non-aromatic compounds. Guinea pigs have been sensitized to diazomethane, a substance of high reactivity and known to cause severe allergic effects in man. With the second substance, allylisothiocyanate, likewise capable of forming conjugates with substances in the animal body, sensitization effects have been obtained in man and in hogs. Sensitization in human beings was successful with one out of six individuals treated. The observations indicate species and individual differences as regards the ability to become sensitized to various chemical compounds. PMID:19870801

  2. Chemical reactions of organic compounds on clay surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Soma, Y; Soma, M

    1989-01-01

    Chemical reactions of organic compounds including pesticides at the interlayer and exterior surfaces of clay minerals and with soil organic matter are reviewed. Representative reactions under moderate conditions possibly occurring in natural soils are described. Attempts have been made to clarify the importance of the chemical nature of molecules, their structures and their functional groups, and the Brönsted or Lewis acidity of clay minerals. PMID:2533556

  3. Inhibition of the compound action potentials of frog sciatic nerves by aroma oil compounds having various chemical structures.

    PubMed

    Ohtsubo, Sena; Fujita, Tsugumi; Matsushita, Akitomo; Kumamoto, Eiichi

    2015-03-01

    Plant-derived chemicals including aroma oil compounds have an ability to inhibit nerve conduction and modulate transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Although applying aroma oils to the skin produces a local anesthetic effect, this has not been yet examined throughly. The aim of the present study was to know how nerve conduction inhibitions by aroma oil compounds are related to their chemical structures and whether these activities are mediated by TRP activation. Compound action potentials (CAPs) were recorded from the frog sciatic nerve by using the air-gap method. Citral (aldehyde), which activates various types of TRP channels, attenuated the peak amplitude of CAP with the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 0.46 mmol/L. Another aldehyde (citronellal), alcohol (citronellol, geraniol, (±)-linalool, (-)-linalool, (+)-borneol, (-)-borneol, α-terpineol), ester (geranyl acetate, linalyl acetate, bornyl acetate), and oxide (rose oxide) compounds also reduced CAP peak amplitudes (IC50: 0.50, 0.35, 0.53, 1.7, 2.0, 1.5, 2.3, 2.7, 0.51, 0.71, 0.44, and 2.6 mmol/L, respectively). On the other hand, the amplitudes were reduced by a small extent by hydrocarbons (myrcene and p-cymene) and ketone (camphor) at high concentrations (2-5 mmol/L). The activities of citral and other TRP agonists ((+)-borneol and camphor) were resistant to TRP antagonist ruthenium red. An efficacy sequence for the CAP inhibitions was generally aldehydes ≥ esters ≥ alcohols > oxides > hydrocarbons. The CAP inhibition by the aroma oil compound was not related to its octanol-water partition coefficient. It is suggested that aroma oil compounds inhibit nerve conduction in a manner specific to their chemical structures without TRP activation.

  4. Prediction of the rodent carcinogenicity of organic compounds from their chemical structures using the FALS method.

    PubMed Central

    Moriguchi, I; Hirano, H; Hirono, S

    1996-01-01

    Fuzzy adaptive least-squares (FALS), a pattern recognition method recently developed in our laboratory for correlating structure with activity rating, was used to generate quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models on the carcinogenicity of organic compounds of several chemical classes. Using the predictive models obtained from the chemical class-based FALS QSAR approach, the rodent carcinogenicity or noncarcinogenicity of a group of organic chemicals currently being tested by the U.S. National Toxicology Program was estimated from their chemical structures. PMID:8933054

  5. PEROXISOME-PROLIFERATOR ACTIVATED RECEPTORS AS A MACROMOLECULAR TARGET FOR CHEMICAL TOXICITY: MODELS OF THE INTERACTIONS OF PPARS WITH PERFLUORINATED ORGANIC COMPOUNDS-S

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many toxicological processes may be studied using the same paradigms as used in this study. As a result, methods applied here may have a far reaching effect for evaluating the risk of this and other classes of chemicals and other macromolecular targets.

  6. Modeling the Biodegradability of Chemical Compounds Using the Online CHEmical Modeling Environment (OCHEM)

    PubMed Central

    Vorberg, Susann

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Biodegradability describes the capacity of substances to be mineralized by free‐living bacteria. It is a crucial property in estimating a compound’s long‐term impact on the environment. The ability to reliably predict biodegradability would reduce the need for laborious experimental testing. However, this endpoint is difficult to model due to unavailability or inconsistency of experimental data. Our approach makes use of the Online Chemical Modeling Environment (OCHEM) and its rich supply of machine learning methods and descriptor sets to build classification models for ready biodegradability. These models were analyzed to determine the relationship between characteristic structural properties and biodegradation activity. The distinguishing feature of the developed models is their ability to estimate the accuracy of prediction for each individual compound. The models developed using seven individual descriptor sets were combined in a consensus model, which provided the highest accuracy. The identified overrepresented structural fragments can be used by chemists to improve the biodegradability of new chemical compounds. The consensus model, the datasets used, and the calculated structural fragments are publicly available at http://ochem.eu/article/31660. PMID:27485201

  7. Exposure Levels for Chemical Threat Compounds; Information to Facilitate Chemical Incident Response

    SciTech Connect

    Hauschild, Veronique; Watson, Annetta Paule

    2013-01-01

    Exposure Standards, Limits and Guidelines for Chemical Threat Compunds ABSTRACT Exposure criteria for chemical warfare (CW) agents and certain toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) used as CW agents (such as chlorine fill in an improvised explosive device) have been developed for protection of the civilian general public, civilian employees in chemical agent processing facilities and deployed military populations. In addition, compound-specific concentrations have been developed to serve as how clean is clean enough clearance criteria guiding facility recovery following chemical terrorist or other hazardous release events. Such criteria are also useful to verify compound absence, identify containment boundaries and expedite facility recovery following chemical threat release. There is no single right value or concentration appropriate for all chemical hazard control applications. It is acknowledged that locating and comparing the many sources of CW agent and TIC exposure criteria has not been previously well-defined. This paper summarizes many of these estimates and assembles critical documentation regarding their derivation and use.

  8. Chemicals from coal. Utilization of coal-derived phenolic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Song, C.; Schobert, H.H.

    1999-07-01

    This article provides an overview for possible utilization of coal-derived phenolic compounds. Phenolic compounds are abundant in coal-derived liquids. Coal-derived phenolic compounds include phenol, cresol, catechol, methylcatechol, naphthol, and their derivatives. Liquids from coal liquefaction, pyrolysis, gasification, and carbonization are potential sources of phenolic chemicals, although certain processing and separation are needed. There are opportunities for coal-based phenolic chemicals, because there are existing industrial applications and potential new applications. Currently the petrochemical industry produces phenol in multi-step processes, and new research and development has resulted in a one-step process. Selective methylation of phenol can produce a precursor for aromatic engineering plastics. Catalytic oxidation of phenol has been commercialized recently for catechol production. There are potential new uses of phenol that could replace large-volume multi-step chemical processes that are based on benzene as the starting material. New chemical research on coal and coal-derived liquids can pave the way for their non-fuel uses for making chemicals and materials.

  9. Synthesis and Assay of SIRT1-Activating Compounds.

    PubMed

    Dai, H; Ellis, J L; Sinclair, D A; Hubbard, B P

    2016-01-01

    The NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase SIRT1 plays key roles in numerous cellular processes including DNA repair, gene transcription, cell differentiation, and metabolism. Overexpression of SIRT1 protects against a number of age-related diseases including diabetes, cancer, and Alzheimer's disease. Moreover, overexpression of SIRT1 in the murine brain extends lifespan. A number of small-molecule sirtuin-activating compounds (STACs) that increase SIRT1 activity in vitro and in cells have been developed. While the mechanism for how these compounds act on SIRT1 was once controversial, it is becoming increasingly clear that they directly interact with SIRT1 and enhance its activity through an allosteric mechanism. Here, we present detailed chemical syntheses for four STACs, each from a distinct structural class. Also, we provide a general protocol for purifying active SIRT1 enzyme and outline two complementary enzymatic assays for characterizing the effects of STACs and similar compounds on SIRT1 activity.

  10. Synthesis and Assay of SIRT1-Activating Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Dai, H.; Ellis, J.L.; Sinclair, D.A.; Hubbard, B.P.

    2016-01-01

    The NAD+-dependent deacetylase SIRT1 plays key roles in numerous cellular processes including DNA repair, gene transcription, cell differentiation, and metabolism. Over-expression of SIRT1 protects against a number of age-related diseases including diabetes, cancer, and Alzheimer's disease. Moreover, overexpression of SIRT1 in the murine brain extends lifespan. A number of small-molecule sirtuin-activating compounds (STACs) that increase SIRT1 activity in vitro and in cells have been developed. While the mechanism for how these compounds act on SIRT1 was once controversial, it is becoming increasingly clear that they directly interact with SIRT1 and enhance its activity through an allosteric mechanism. Here, we present detailed chemical syntheses for four STACs, each from a distinct structural class. Also, we provide a general protocol for purifying active SIRT1 enzyme and outline two complementary enzymatic assays for characterizing the effects of STACs and similar compounds on SIRT1 activity. PMID:27423864

  11. Metabolism of fluoroorganic compounds in microorganisms: impacts for the environment and the production of fine chemicals.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Cormac D; Clark, Benjamin R; Amadio, Jessica

    2009-09-01

    Incorporation of fluorine into an organic compound can favourably alter its physicochemical properties with respect to biological activity, stability and lipophilicity. Accordingly, this element is found in many pharmaceutical and industrial chemicals. Organofluorine compounds are accepted as substrates by many enzymes, and the interactions of microorganisms with these compounds are of relevance to the environment and the fine chemicals industry. On the one hand, the microbial transformation of organofluorines can lead to the generation of toxic compounds that are of environmental concern, yet similar biotransformations can yield difficult-to-synthesise products and intermediates, in particular derivatives of biologically active secondary metabolites. In this paper, we review the historical and recent developments of organofluorine biotransformation in microorganisms and highlight the possibility of using microbes as models of fluorinated drug metabolism in mammals.

  12. Study of Compounds for Activity against Leishmania

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-27

    Mrs. Barbara Harris, Miss Laura A. Lamb, and Miss Shannon Waits. tORZWORD Opinions, interpretations, conclusions and recommendations are those of the...antileishmanial activity against both visceral (Leishmania donovani) and cutaneous (Lebs-Qnia, braziliensis panamensis) leishmaniasis . Among the most promising...active compounds found against visceral leishmaniasis durinq these studies is the 8-aminoquinoline, WR06026. This compound is now undergoing clinical

  13. Experimental studies of the Universal Chemical Key (UCK) algorithm on the NCI database of chemical compounds.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Robert; Kasturi, Pavan; Hamelberg, Donald; Liu, Bing

    2003-01-01

    We have developed an algorithm called the Universal Chemical Key (UCK) algorithm that constructs a unique key for a molecular structure. The molecular structures are represented as undirected labeled graphs with the atoms representing the vertices of the graph and the bonds representing the edges. The algorithm was tested on 236,917 compounds obtained from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) database of chemical compounds. In this paper we present the algorithm,some examples and the experimental results on the NCI database. On the NCI database, the UCK algorithm provided distinct unique keys for chemicals with different molecular structures.

  14. PEROXISOME-PROLIFERATOR ACTIVATED RECEPTORS AS A MACROMOLECULAR TARGET FOR CHEMICAL TOXICITY: MODELS OF THE INTERACTIONS OF PPARS WITH PERFLUORINATED ORGANIC COMPOUNDS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptors (PPARs), a class of nuclear receptors that modulate both transcription and metabolic processes, are implicated in a variety of metabolic disorders linked to lipidogenesis, adipose tissue accumulation, fatty-acid oxidation pathways, ...

  15. MEASUREMENT OF INFRARED SPECTRA AND CHEMICAL BONDING OF INORGANIC COMPOUNDS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CHROMATES, SELENIUM COMPOUNDS, PERMANGANATES, FLUOBORATES , LITHIUM FLUORIDES, BELGIUM...CRYSTAL STRUCTURE, SODIUM CHLORIDE, LITHIUM COMPOUNDS, BARIUM COMPOUNDS, ALKALINE EARTH COMPOUNDS, ALKALI METAL COMPOUNDS, SULFATES, PERCHLORATES

  16. Chemical impurity produces extra compound eyes and heads in crickets

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, B.T.

    1981-04-03

    A chemical impurity isolated from commercially purchased acridine causes cricket embryos to develop extra compound eyes, branched antennae, extra antennae, and extra heads. Purified acridine does not produce similar duplications of cricket heads or head structures nor do the substituted acridines proflavine, acriflavine, or acridine orange. A dose-response relation exists such that the number and severity of abnormalities increase with increasing concentration of the teratogen.

  17. Quantum Chemical Study of the Thermochemical Properties of Organophosphorous Compounds.

    PubMed

    Khalfa, A; Ferrari, M; Fournet, R; Sirjean, B; Verdier, L; Glaude, P A

    2015-10-22

    Organophosphorous compounds are involved in many toxic compounds such as fungicides, pesticides, or chemical warfare nerve agents. The understanding of the decomposition chemistry of these compounds in the environment is largely limited by the scarcity of thermochemical data. Because of the high toxicity of many of these molecules, experimental determination of their thermochemical properties is very difficult. In this work, standard gas-phase thermodynamic data, i.e., enthalpies of formation (ΔfH298°), standard entropies (S298°), and heat capacities (Cp°(T)), were determined using quantum chemical calculations and more specifically the CBS-QB3 composite method, which was found to be the best compromise between precision and calculation time among high accuracy composite methods. A large number of molecules was theoretically investigated, involving trivalent and pentavalent phosphorus atoms, and C, H, O, N, S, and F atoms. These data were used to propose 83 original groups, used in the semiempirical group contribution method proposed by Benson. Thanks to these latter group values, thermochemical properties of several nerve agents, common pesticides and herbicides have been evaluated. Bond dissociations energies (BDE), useful for the analysis the thermal stability of the compounds, were also determined in several molecules of interest.

  18. The control of polyphenol oxidase activity in fruits and vegetables. A study of the interactions between the chemical compounds used and heat treatment.

    PubMed

    Almeida, M E; Nogueira, J N

    1995-04-01

    Objective of this research was to find alternative methods for the control of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity in fruits and vegetables with the purpose of reducing or eliminating the use of SO2 for this purpose. Interactions between the use of ascorbic acid, citric acid, EDTA, sodium metabisulphite and heat treatment (70 degrees C for 2 min) in the control of PPO activity were studied in avocado (var. Fortuna), banana (var. Nanica), apple (var. Ana, Fuji, Gala & Golden), pear (var. D'Agua), peach (var. Réal), potato (var. Bintje), eggplant (var. Super F100), mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) and hearts-of-palm (Euterpe edulis Mart). The results demonstrated that PPO of avocado and eggplant was most resistant to inhibition by the methods used. The least efficient method tested for the control of PPO was the addition of ascorbic acid and EDTA, while the most efficient methods investigated included the use of ascorbic acid, citric acid, sodium metabisulphite and heat treatment. The results indicated that, with the exception of PPO from avocado, the most adequate alternative method to substitute for the use of SO2 in the control of PPO was a combination of ascorbic acid, citric acid and heat treatment.

  19. Chemical stability of extemporaneously compounded omeprazole formulations: a comparison of two methods of compounding.

    PubMed

    Garg, Sanjay; Svirskis, Darren; Al-Kabban, Majid; Farhan, Samer; Komeshi, Mohammed; Lee, Jacky; Liu, Quincy; Naidoo, Sacha; Kairuz, Therese

    2009-01-01

    Liquid preparations of omeprazole are compounded extemporaneously for patients who cannot tolerate or have difficulty with tablets or capsules, such as those with a nasogastric tube or jejunal or feeding tube, those with a swallowing disorder, and young children and the elderly. Recommendations for preparation of a liquid from the enteric-coated pellets of omeprazole capsules are available in the literature. The pellets are dissolved in a sodium bicarbonate solution; shaking is recommended to aid dissolution. Apparently some pharmacists crush the pellets to speed up the compounding process. The aim of this study was to investigate the chemical stability of omeprazole in extemporaneously compounded liquids prepared by the grinding and shaking methods. A high-performance liquid chromatographic method was developed for evaluation of chemical stability. Samples were stored at 2 deg C (refrigerated conditions) or 25 deg C/60% relative humidity and assayed for drug concentration at 0, 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks. The method of preparation affected the chemical stability of omeprazole when stored at 25 deg C/60% relative humidity; it was stable for 4 weeks if prepared by the shaking method, but for only 1 week if prepared by the grinding method. For both methods, the suspension was stable for 8 weks if stored under refrigerated conditions. It is recommended that the shaking method be employed for extemporaneously compounded omeprazole suspensions, and that the prepared suspension be stored in the refrigerator.

  20. Endophytic fungi with antitumor activities: Their occurrence and anticancer compounds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling; Zhang, Qiao-Yan; Jia, Min; Ming, Qian-Liang; Yue, Wei; Rahman, Khalid; Qin, Lu-Ping; Han, Ting

    2016-05-01

    Plant endophytic fungi have been recognized as an important and novel resource of natural bioactive products, especially in anticancer application. This review mainly deals with the research progress on the production of anticancer compounds by endophytic fungi between 1990 and 2013. Anticancer activity is generally associated with the cytotoxicity of the compounds present in the endophytic fungi. All strains of endophytes producing antitumor chemicals were classified taxonomically and the genera of Pestalotiopsis and Aspergillus as well as the taxol producing endophytes were focused on. Classification of endophytic fungi producing antitumor compounds has received more attention from mycologists, and it can also lead to the discovery of novel compounds with antitumor activity due to phylogenetic relationships. In this review, the structures of the anticancer compounds isolated from the newly reported endophytes between 2010 and 2013 are discussed including strategies for the efficient production of the desired compounds. The purpose of this review is to provide new directions in endophytic fungi research including integrated information relating to its anticancer compounds.

  1. Identification of anti-cancer chemical compounds using Xenopus embryos.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masamitsu; Kuriyama, Sei; Itoh, Go; Kohyama, Aki; Iwabuchi, Yoshiharu; Shibata, Hiroyuki; Yashiro, Masakazu; Aiba, Namiko

    2016-06-01

    Cancer tissues have biological characteristics similar to those observed in embryos during development. Many types of cancer cells acquire pro-invasive ability through epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Similar processes (gastrulation and migration of cranial neural crest cells [CNCC]) are observed in the early stages of embryonic development in Xenopus during which cells that originate from epithelial sheets through EMT migrate to their final destinations. The present study examined Xenopus embryonic tissues to identify anti-cancer compounds that prevent cancer invasion. From the initial test of known anti-cancer drugs, AMD3100 (an inhibitor of CXCR4) and paclitaxel (a cytoskeletal drug targeting microtubules) effectively prevented migration during gastrulation or CNCC development. Blind-screening of 100 synthesized chemical compounds was performed, and nine candidates that inhibited migration of these embryonic tissues without embryonic lethality were selected. Of these, C-157 (an analog of podophyllotoxin) and D-572 (which is an indole alkaroid) prevented cancer cell invasion through disruption of interphase microtubules. In addition, these compounds affected progression of mitotic phase and induced apoptosis of SAS oral cancer cells. SAS tumors were reduced in size after intratumoral injection of C-157, and peritoneal dissemination of melanoma cells and intracranial invasion of glioma cells were inhibited by C-157 and D-572. When the other analogues of these chemicals were compared, those with subtle effect on embryos were not tumor suppressive. These results suggest that a novel chemical-screening approach based on Xenopus embryos is an effective method for isolating anti-cancer drugs and, in particular, targeting cancer cell invasion and proliferation.

  2. Relationships between chemical structure and rat repellency. II. Compounds screened between 1950 and 1960

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowles, W.A.; Adomaitis, V.A.; DeWitt, J.B.; Pratt, J.J.

    1974-01-01

    Over 4,600 compounds, chiefly organic types, were evaluated using both a food acceptance test (Part A) and a barrier penetration bioassay (Part B), to correlate relationships between chemical structure and rodent repellency.These chemicals are indexed and classified according to the functional groups present and to the degree of substitution within their molecular structures. The results of reduction in foot consumption for each compound appraised are calculated and their K values listed in Table I.The repellent activities of the functional groups represented, alone or in combinations, are expressed in Table II by a Functional Group Repellency Index. A ranking of these indices suggests that acyclic and heteroyclic compounds containing tri- or pentavalent nitrogen would be a parent compound of choice for synthesizing novel repellents. Other molecular arrangements, spatial configurations and combinations of functional groups are compared.There were 123 active, interesting or promising compounds included in the 699 having K values of 85 or greater, which were selected for the barrier appraisal study. These chemicals were formulated in selective solvents at several concentrations and applied to burlap. Small foot bags were fashioned using the fabric impregnated with the candidate formulation, and exposed to rodent attack following storage periods of varying intervals. The results of these tests are listed in Table III. Again, those compounds containing nitrogen in the functional groupings indicated a high order of effectiveness. Several commercial patents covering rodent repellents were issued using the data from the food acceptance and barrier studies.Organizations and cooperators which supplied samples for the program are listed in Appendix I. The Wiswesser cipher for compounds in Table I is used in Appendix II to facilitate location of chemicals by sample code number as they appear under the index headings, and for computer storage and analysis.

  3. Relationships between chemical structure and rat repellency: II. compounds screened between 1950 and 1960

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowles, Walter A.; Adomaitis, V.A.; DeWitt, J.B.; Pratt, J.J.

    1974-01-01

    Over 4,600 compounds, chiefly organic types, were evaluated using both a food acceptance test (Part A) and a barrier penetration bioassay (Part B), to correlate relationships between chemical structure and rodent repellency. These chemicals are indexed and classified according to the functional groups present and to the degree of substitution within their molecular structures. The results of reduction in food consumption for each compound appraised are calculated and their K values listed in Table 1. The repellent activities of the functional groups represented, alone or in combinations, are expressed in Table II by a Functional Group Repellency Index.. A ranking of these indices suggests that acyclic and heteroyclic compounds containing tri- or pentavalent nitrogen would be a parent compound of choice for synthesizing novel repellents. Other molecular arrangements, spatial configurations and combinations of functional groups are compared. There were 123 active, interesting or promising compounds included in the 699 having K values of 85 or greater, which were selected for the barrier appraisal study. These chemicals were formulated in selective solvents at several concentrations and applied to burlap. Small food bags were fashioned using the fabric impregnated with the candidate formulation, and exposed to rodent attack following storage periods of varying intervals. The results of these tests are listed in Table III. Again, those compounds containing nitrogen in the functional groupings indicated a high order of effectiveness. Several commercial patents covering rodent repellents were issued using the data from the food acceptance and barrier studies. Organizations and cooperators which supplied samples for the program are listed in Appendix I. The Wiswesser cipher for compounds in Table I is used in Appendix II to facilitate location of chemicals by sample code number as they appear under the index headings, and for computer storage and analysis.

  4. Byrsonima fagifolia Niedenzu Apolar Compounds with Antitubercular Activity

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, C. T.; Sannomiya, M.; Pavan, F. R.; Leite, S. R. A.; Sato, D. N.; Franzblau, S. G.; Sacramento, L. V. S.; Vilegas, W.; Leite, C. Q. F.

    2011-01-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of the chloroform extract of Byrsonima fagifolia leaves led to the isolation of active antitubercular compounds alkane dotriacontane (Minimal Inhibitory Concentration—MIC, 62.5 μg mL−1), triterpenoids as bassic acid (MIC = 2.5 μg mL−1), α-amyrin acetate (MIC = 62.5 μg mL−1), a mixture of lupeol, α- and β-amyrin (MIC = 31.5 μg mL−1) and a mixture of lupeol, and acetates of α- and β-amyrin (MIC = 31.5 μg mL−1). The antimycobacterial activity was determined by the Microplate Alamar Blue Assay (MABA) and the structures of promising compounds were determined by spectroscopic analysis. This investigation constitutes the first report of a chemical and antitubercular study of apolar compounds from B. fagifolia Niedenzu (IK). PMID:19091782

  5. Electrolytic photodissociation of chemical compounds by iron oxide electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Somorjai, G.A.; Leygraf, C.H.

    1984-07-17

    Chemical compounds can be dissociated by contacting the same with a p/n type semi-conductor diode having visible light as its sole source of energy. The diode consists of low cost, readily available materials, specifically polycrystalline iron oxide doped with silicon in the case of the n-type semi-conductor electrode, and polycrystalline iron oxide doped with magnesium in the case of the p-type electrode. So long as the light source has an energy greater than 2.2 electron volts, no added energy source is needed to achieve dissociation.

  6. Electrolytic photodissociation of chemical compounds by iron oxide photochemical diodes

    DOEpatents

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Leygraf, Christofer H.

    1985-01-01

    Chemical compounds can be dissociated by contacting the same with a p/n type semi-conductor photochemical diode having visible light as its sole source of energy. The photochemical diode consists of low cost, readily available materials, specifically polycrystalline iron oxide doped with silicon in the case of the n-type semi-conductor electrode, and polycrystalline iron oxide doped with magnesium in the case of the p-type electrode. So long as the light source has an energy greater than 2.2 electron volts, no added energy source is needed to achieve dissociation.

  7. Electrolytic photodissociation of chemical compounds by iron oxide electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Leygraf, Christofer H.

    1984-01-01

    Chemical compounds can be dissociated by contacting the same with a p/n type semi-conductor diode having visible light as its sole source of energy. The diode consists of low cost, readily available materials, specifically polycrystalline iron oxide doped with silicon in the case of the n-type semi-conductor electrode, and polycrystalline iron oxide doped with magnesium in the case of the p-type electrode. So long as the light source has an energy greater than 2.2 electron volts, no added energy source is needed to achieve dissociation.

  8. NMR Chemical Shifts in Hard Carbon Nitride Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Y.; Yoon, Y.; Pfrommer, B.G.; Pfrommer, B.G.; Louie, S.G.; Louie, S.G.; Mauri, F.

    1998-04-01

    We show that NMR chemical shift spectroscopy could help to identify the crystalline phases of hard carbon nitride compounds. To this purpose we compute the NMR chemical shifts of defect zinc-blende, cubic, {alpha}{minus} , {beta}{minus} , and graphitic C{sub 3}N{sub 4} with a newly developed {ital ab initio} method. The C shifts can be used to identify the CN bonds and to characterize C hybridization. The N shifts distinguish the {alpha}-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} from the {beta}-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} phases, and indicate the presence of the graphitic phase. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. Antimicrobial activity of extractable conifer heartwood compounds toward Phytophthora ramorum.

    PubMed

    Manter, Daniel K; Kelsey, Rick G; Karchesy, Joseph J

    2007-11-01

    Ethyl acetate extracts from heartwood of seven western conifer trees and individual volatile compounds in the extracts were tested for antimicrobial activity against Phytophthora ramorum. Extracts from incense and western redcedar exhibited the strongest activity, followed by yellow-cedar, western juniper, and Port-Orford-cedar with moderate activity, and no activity for Douglas-fir and redwood extracts. Chemical composition of the extracts varied both qualitatively and quantitatively among the species with a total of 37 compounds identified by mass spectrometry. Of the 13 individual heartwood compounds bioassayed, three showed strong activity with a Log(10) EC(50) less than or equal to 1.0 ppm (hinokitiol, thymoquinone, and nootkatin), three expressed moderate activity ranging from 1.0-2.0 ppm (nootkatol, carvacrol, and valencene-11,12-diol), four compounds had weak activity at 2.0-3.0 ppm [alpha-terpineol, valencene-13-ol, (+)-beta-cedrene, (-)-thujopsene], and three had no activity [(+)-cedrol, delta-cadinene, and methyl carvacrol]. All of the most active compounds contained a free hydroxyl group, except thymoquinone. The importance of a free hydroxyl was demonstrated by the tremendous difference in activity between carvacrol (Log(10) EC(50) 1.81 +/- 0.08 ppm) and methyl carvacrol (Log(10) EC(50) >3.0 ppm). A field trial in California, showed that heartwood chips from redcedar placed on the forest floor for 4 months under Umbellularia californica (California bay laurel) with symptoms of P. ramorum leaf blight significantly limited the accumulation of P. ramorum DNA in the litter layer, compared with heartwood chips from redwood.

  10. Chemical analysis of uranium compounds. [For Fe, Ni, fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Jarabek, R.J.

    1987-10-01

    Research and development studies relating to gaseous diffusion plants require expertise in the analysis of uranium and its compounds. Synthesis of these compounds along with subsequent use necessitates a means of identification in addition to X-ray diffraction patterns normally obtained. Analyses for fluoride, nickel, and iron have been developed to supplement the analysis for U/sup +4/ and U total previously developed. The fluoride is determined by pyrolysis, with subsequent acid-base titration. Nickel is analyzed by precipitation with dimethylglyoxime following complexation of the uranium with citric acid. Iron is analyzed iodometrically following an ammonium hydroxide-ammonium carbonate separation process from the uranium. High precision and accuracy can be obtained on these procedures using low-cost, wet chemical methods. Expensive computerized equipment is not needed. Uranium compounds analyzed include UF/sub 5/, UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/, U/sub 3/O/sub 8/, and U/sub 2/F/sub 9/.

  11. Chemically activated manganese dioxide for dry batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askar, M.; Abbas, H.

    1994-10-01

    The present investigation has enabled us to convert inactive beta-manganese dioxide to high electrochemically active types by chemical processes. Natural and chemically prepared beta-manganese dioxides were roasted at 1050 C to form Mn3O4. This compound was subjected to activation treatment using hydrochloric and sulfuric acid under various reaction conditions. The manganese dioxide so obtained was examined by x-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric, differential thermal, and chemical analyses. The structure of the dioxide obtained was found to be greatly dependent on the origin of MnO2 and type of acid used. Treatment with hydrochloric acid yielded the so-called gamma-variety while sulfuric acid tended to produce gamma- or alpha-MnO2. In addition, waste manganese sulfate obtained as by-product from sulfuric acid digestion treatment was recycled and electrolytically oxidized to gamma-MnO2. The discharge performance of the above-mentioned MnO2 samples as battery cathodic active material was evaluated and compared with the ordinary battery grade.

  12. Biological and chemical investigation of Allium cepa L. response to selenium inorganic compounds.

    PubMed

    Michalska-Kacymirow, M; Kurek, E; Smolis, A; Wierzbicka, M; Bulska, E

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the biological and chemical response of Allium cepa L. exposed to inorganic selenium compounds. Besides the investigation of the total content of selenium as well as its chemical speciation, the Allium test was used to evaluate the growth of onion roots and mitotic activity in the roots' meristem. The total content of selenium was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP MS). High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), coupled to ICP MS, was used for the selenium chemical speciation. Results indicated that A. cepa plants are able to biotransform inorganic selenium compounds into their organic derivatives, e.g., Se-methylselenocysteine from the Se(IV) inorganic precursor. Although the differences in the biotransformation of selenium are due mainly to the oxidation state of selenium, the experiment has also shown a fine effect of counter ions (H(+), Na(+), NH4 (+)) on the response of plants and on the specific metabolism of selenium.

  13. Real-time monitoring of volatile organic compounds using chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Mowry, Curtis Dale; Thornberg, Steven Michael

    1999-01-01

    A system for on-line quantitative monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) includes pressure reduction means for carrying a gaseous sample from a first location to a measuring input location maintained at a low pressure, the system utilizing active feedback to keep both the vapor flow and pressure to a chemical ionization mode mass spectrometer constant. A multiple input manifold for VOC and gas distribution permits a combination of calibration gases or samples to be applied to the spectrometer.

  14. [Physical, chemical and bioactive compounds of tree tomato (Cyphomandra betacea)].

    PubMed

    Torres, Alexia

    2012-12-01

    Tree tomato (Cyphomandra betacea) is appreciated for its excellent nutritional qualities, being considered a good source of antioxidants compounds, calcium, phosphorus, potassium and iron, sugars, organic acids, pectins and flavonoids. In this study, were evaluated physical parameters (weight, size, compression strength and humidity) and chemical (degrees Brix, titratable acidity, pH, protein, dietary fiber, ash, minerals and their bioaccesibility, pectin, antioxidants compounds) of the fruit from the Aragua State, Venezuela, as a contribution to stimulate and diversify the consumption of the tree tomato. The characterization showed that the fruits were at the ripening stage for consumption (degrees Brix 10.51, pH 3.5, acidity 0.02 g/100ml and 4.32 Kgf/cm2 compression strength) gave a yield of 74% pulp. The analytical results of the ripped pulp showed a content of 30 Kcal/100 g, dietary fiber (4.10 g/100 g), and minerals such as phosphorous, calcium, magnesium, potassium and iron (331.32, 21.25, 21.18, 17.03 and 7.44 mg/100 g, respectively). Bioaccesibility values of 6.71 and 1.86% were reported for calcium and iron. The extracted pectin (1.00 g/100 g) was classified as high methoxyl with high degree of esterification. The antioxidant capacity of the ripped pulp (EC50 of 165.00 g/g DPPH and reducing power of 0.07 mmol Fe +2/100 g), could be attributed to the presence of ascorbic acid (23.32 mg/100 g), lycopene (1.22 mg/100 g), and phenolic compounds (1.39 mg GAE/g), anthocyanins (0.29 mg cyanidin/g) and tannins (0.40 mg catechin/100 g).The results obtained encourage the nutritional benefits and suggest applications as a functional ingredient in food product development.

  15. Current Chemical Risk Reduction Activities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's existing chemicals programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and/or characterization, and risk management for chemicals substances in commercial use.

  16. Biological activity of acetylated phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Fragopoulou, Elizabeth; Nomikos, Tzortzis; Karantonis, Haralabos C; Apostolakis, Constantinos; Pliakis, Emmanuel; Samiotaki, Martina; Panayotou, George; Antonopoulou, Smaragdi

    2007-01-10

    In recent years an effort has been made to isolate and identify biologically active compounds that are included in the Mediterranean diet. The existence of naturally occurring acetylated phenolics, as well as studies with synthetic ones, provide evidence that acetyl groups could be correlated with their biological activity. Platelet activating factor (PAF) is implicated in atherosclerosis, whereas its inhibitors seem to play a protective role against cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to examine the biological activity of resveratrol and tyrosol and their acetylated derivatives as inhibitors of PAF-induced washed rabbit platelet aggregation. Acetylation of resveratrol and tyrosol was performed, and separation was achieved by HPLC. Acetylated derivatives were identified by negative mass spectrometry. The data showed that tyrosol and its monoacetylated derivatives act as PAF inhibitors, whereas diacetylated derivatives induce platelet aggregation. Resveratrol and its mono- and triacetylated derivatives exert similar inhibitory activity, whereas the diacetylated ones are more potent inhibitors. In conclusion, acetylated phenolics exert the same or even higher antithrombotic activity compared to the biological activity of the initial one.

  17. Method for halogenating or radiohalogenating a chemical compound

    DOEpatents

    Kabalka, George W.

    2006-05-09

    A method for obtaining a halogenated organic compound, whereby an organotrifluoroborate compound is reacted with a halide ion in the presence of an oxidizing agent to produce the corresponding halogenated organic compound. The method may be used for producing radiohalogenated organic compounds.

  18. Chemical biology of histone acetyltransferase natural compounds modulators.

    PubMed

    Piaz, Fabrizio Dal; Vassallo, Antonio; Rubio, Osmany Cuesta; Castellano, Sabrina; Sbardella, Gianluca; De Tommasi, Nunziatina

    2011-05-01

    Histone acetyltransferases (HATs) are a class of epigenetic enzymes crucial for chromatin restructuring and transcriptional regulation in eukaryotic cells, thus being a promising target for therapeutic development. Nonetheless, differently from histone deacetylases (HDACs) inhibitors, there is still paucity of small-molecule modulators of HAT activity. After a decline during past decade, natural products and their derivatives could be once again a valuable tool in the lead discovery process and meet such need of Novel Chemical Entities (NCEs). In this review, we will provide a comprehensive summary on the discovery of small-molecule HAT modulators from naturally occurring molecular scaffolds.

  19. Chemical Modification of the Multi-Target Neuroprotective Compound Fisetin

    PubMed Central

    Chiruta, Chandramouli; Schubert, David; Dargusch, Richard; Maher, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    Many factors are implicated in age-related CNS disorders making it unlikely that modulating only a single factor will provide effective treatment. Perhaps a better approach is to identify small molecules that have multiple biological activities relevant to the maintenance of brain function. Recently, we identified an orally active, neuroprotective and cognition-enhancing molecule, the flavonoid fisetin, that is effective in several animal models of CNS disorders. Fisetin has direct antioxidant activity and can also increase the intracellular levels of glutathione (GSH), the major endogenous antioxidant. In addition, fisetin has both neurotrophic and anti-inflammatory activity. However, its relatively high EC50 in cell based assays, low lipophilicity, high tPSA and poor bioavailability suggest that there is room for medicinal chemical improvement. Here we describe a multi-tiered approach to screening that has allowed us to identify fisetin derivatives with significantly enhanced activity in an in vitro neuroprotection model while at the same time maintaining other key activities. PMID:22192055

  20. Identification and testing of oviposition attractant chemical compounds for Musca domestica

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Rui; Zhang, Feng; Kone, N’Golopé; Chen, Jing-Hua; Zhu, Fen; Han, Ri-Chou; Lei, Chao-Liang; Kenis, Marc; Huang, Ling-Qiao; Wang, Chen-Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Oviposition attractants for the house fly Musca domestica have been investigated using electrophysiological tests, behavioural assays and field tests. Volatiles were collected via head space absorption method from fermented wheat bran, fresh wheat bran, rearing substrate residue and house fly maggots. A Y-tube olfactometer assay showed that the odor of fermented wheat bran was a significant attractant for female house flies. Bioactive compounds from fermented wheat bran for house fly females were identified by electrophysiology and mass spectrophotometry and confirmed with standard chemicals. Four electrophysiologically active compounds including ethyl palmitate, ethyl linoleate, methyl linoleate, and linoleic acid were found at a proportion of 10:24:6:0.2. Functional imaging in the female antennal lobes revealed an overlapped active pattern for all chemicals. Further multiple-choice behavioural bioassays showed that these chemicals, as well as a mixture that mimicked the naturally occurring combination, increased the attractiveness of non-preferred rearing substrates of cotton and maize powder. Finally, a field demonstration test revealed that, by adding this mimic blend into a rearing substrate used to attract and breed house flies in West Africa, egg numbers laid by females were increased. These chemicals could be utilized to improve house fly production systems or considered for lure traps. PMID:27667397

  1. Identification and testing of oviposition attractant chemical compounds for Musca domestica.

    PubMed

    Tang, Rui; Zhang, Feng; Kone, N'Golopé; Chen, Jing-Hua; Zhu, Fen; Han, Ri-Chou; Lei, Chao-Liang; Kenis, Marc; Huang, Ling-Qiao; Wang, Chen-Zhu

    2016-09-26

    Oviposition attractants for the house fly Musca domestica have been investigated using electrophysiological tests, behavioural assays and field tests. Volatiles were collected via head space absorption method from fermented wheat bran, fresh wheat bran, rearing substrate residue and house fly maggots. A Y-tube olfactometer assay showed that the odor of fermented wheat bran was a significant attractant for female house flies. Bioactive compounds from fermented wheat bran for house fly females were identified by electrophysiology and mass spectrophotometry and confirmed with standard chemicals. Four electrophysiologically active compounds including ethyl palmitate, ethyl linoleate, methyl linoleate, and linoleic acid were found at a proportion of 10:24:6:0.2. Functional imaging in the female antennal lobes revealed an overlapped active pattern for all chemicals. Further multiple-choice behavioural bioassays showed that these chemicals, as well as a mixture that mimicked the naturally occurring combination, increased the attractiveness of non-preferred rearing substrates of cotton and maize powder. Finally, a field demonstration test revealed that, by adding this mimic blend into a rearing substrate used to attract and breed house flies in West Africa, egg numbers laid by females were increased. These chemicals could be utilized to improve house fly production systems or considered for lure traps.

  2. Occurrence and chemical speciation analysis of organotin compounds in the environment: a review.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho Oliveira, Regina; Santelli, Ricardo Erthal

    2010-06-30

    Environmental concerns regarding organotin compounds have increased remarkably in the past 20 years, due in large part to the use of these compounds as active components in antifouling paints [mainly tributyltin (TBT)] and pesticide formulations [mainly triphenyltin (TPhT)]. Their direct introduction into the environment, their bio-accumulation and the high toxicity of these compounds towards "non-target" organisms (for example: oysters and mussels) causes environmental and economic damage around the world. As a consequence, the presence and absence of organotin compounds is currently monitored in a range of environmental matrices (e.g., water, sediment and shellfish) to examine the utility of controls meant to regulate the level of contamination as required in some EC Directives and the Water Framework Directive 2000/60/EC. To evaluate the environmental distribution and fate of these compounds and to determine the effectives of legal provisions adopted by a number of countries, a variety of analytical methods have been developed for organotin determination in the environment. Most of these methods include different steps such as extraction, derivatisation and clean up. The aim of the present review is to evaluate the environmental distribution, fate and chemical speciation of organotin compounds in the environment.

  3. Machine learning of molecular electronic properties in chemical compound space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montavon, Grégoire; Rupp, Matthias; Gobre, Vivekanand; Vazquez-Mayagoitia, Alvaro; Hansen, Katja; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Anatole von Lilienfeld, O.

    2013-09-01

    The combination of modern scientific computing with electronic structure theory can lead to an unprecedented amount of data amenable to intelligent data analysis for the identification of meaningful, novel and predictive structure-property relationships. Such relationships enable high-throughput screening for relevant properties in an exponentially growing pool of virtual compounds that are synthetically accessible. Here, we present a machine learning model, trained on a database of ab initio calculation results for thousands of organic molecules, that simultaneously predicts multiple electronic ground- and excited-state properties. The properties include atomization energy, polarizability, frontier orbital eigenvalues, ionization potential, electron affinity and excitation energies. The machine learning model is based on a deep multi-task artificial neural network, exploiting the underlying correlations between various molecular properties. The input is identical to ab initio methods, i.e. nuclear charges and Cartesian coordinates of all atoms. For small organic molecules, the accuracy of such a ‘quantum machine’ is similar, and sometimes superior, to modern quantum-chemical methods—at negligible computational cost.

  4. Chemical and biological characterisation of nutraceutical compounds of broccoli.

    PubMed

    Moreno, D A; Carvajal, M; López-Berenguer, C; García-Viguera, C

    2006-08-28

    People's diet offers a greater and more diverse group of plant bioactives than do drugs, and they often do not realise that many drugs are derived from the compounds originally discovered in plant foods. Numerous epidemiological studies indicate that Brassica vegetables in general, and broccoli in particular, protect humans against cancer since they are rich sources of glucosinolates as well as possessing a high content of flavonoids, vitamins and mineral nutrients. One unusual phytotherapeutic role of broccoli is for skin diseases--the juice of the leaves is used to treat warts. However, the main use of broccoli stems from its health-promoting properties. Some criteria have been proposed to evaluate the possibilities of developing new "functional foods" to reduce the risk of specific cancers; largely in broccoli, which is associated with cancer protection. Processing conditions, transport, domestic cooking, etc., affect the health-promoting properties of broccoli and these have been widely studied. This review makes an in-depth study of the chemical and biological characterization of the phytochemicals of broccoli and the effects on the bioactive composition of broccoli.

  5. Vanadium compounds as therapeutic agents: some chemical and biochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Faneca, H; Figueiredo, V A; Tomaz, Isabel; Gonçalves, Gisela; Avecilla, Fernando; Pedroso de Lima, M C; Geraldes, Carlos F G C; Pessoa, João Costa; Castro, M Margarida C A

    2009-04-01

    The behaviour of three vanadium(V) systems, namely the pyridinone (V(V)-dmpp), the salicylaldehyde (V(V)-salDPA) and the pyrimidinone (V(V)-MHCPE) complexes, is studied in aqueous solutions, under aerobic and physiological conditions using (51)V NMR, EPR and UV-Visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopies. The speciations for the V(V)-dmpp and V(V)-salDPA have been previously reported. In this work, the system V(V)-MHCPE is studied by pH-potentiometry and (51)V NMR. The results indicate that, at pH ca. 7, the main species present are (V(V)O(2))L(2) and (V(V)O(2))LH(-1) (L=MHCPE(-)) and hydrolysis products, similar to those observed in aqueous solutions of V(V)-dmpp. The latter species is protonated as the pH decreases, originating (V(V)O(2))L and (V(V)O(2))LH. All the V(V)-species studied are stable in aqueous media with different compositions and at physiological pH, including the cell culture medium. The compounds were screened for their potential cytotoxic activity in two different cell lines. The toxic effects were found to be incubation time and concentration dependent and specific for each compound and type of cells. The HeLa tumor cells seem to be more sensitive to drug effects than the 3T3-L1 fibroblasts. According to the IC(50) values and the results on reversibility to drug effects, the V(V)-species resulting from the V(V)-MHCPE system show higher toxicity in the tumor cells than in non-tumor cells, which may indicate potential antitumor activity.

  6. Predicting the Absorption Potential of Chemical Compounds through a Deep Learning Approach.

    PubMed

    Shin, Moonshik; Jang, Dongjin; Nam, Hojung; Lee, Kwang Hyung; Lee, Doheon

    2016-02-26

    The human colorectal carcinoma cell line (Caco-2) is a commonly used in-vitro test that predicts the absorption potential of orally administered drugs. In-silico prediction methods, based on the Caco-2 assay data, may increase the effectiveness of the high-throughput screening of new drug candidates. However, previously developed in-silico models that predict the Caco-2 cellular permeability of chemical compounds use handcrafted features that may be dataset-specific and induce over-fitting problems. Deep Neural Network (DNN) generates high-level features based on non-linear transformations for raw features, which provides high discriminant power and, therefore, creates a good generalized model. We present a DNNbased binary Caco-2 permeability classifier. Our model was constructed based on 663 chemical compounds with in-vitro Caco-2 apparent permeability data. 209 molecular descriptors are used for generating the high-level features during DNN model generation. Dropout regularization is applied to solve the over-fitting problem and the non-linear activation. The Rectified Linear Unit (ReLU) is adopted to reduce the vanishing gradient problem. The results demonstrate that the high-level features generated by the DNN are more robust than handcrafted features for predicting the cellular permeability of structurally diverse chemical compounds in Caco-2 cell lines.

  7. Inorganic chemically active adsorbents (ICAAs)

    SciTech Connect

    Ally, M.R.; Tavlarides, L.

    1997-10-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researchers are developing a technology that combines metal chelation extraction technology and synthesis chemistry. They begin with a ceramic substrate such as alumina, titanium oxide or silica gel because they provide high surface area, high mechanical strength, and radiolytic stability. One preparation method involves silylation to hydrophobize the surface, followed by chemisorption of a suitable chelation agent using vapor deposition. Another route attaches newly designed chelating agents through covalent bonding by the use of coupling agents. These approaches provide stable and selective, inorganic chemically active adsorbents (ICAAs) tailored for removal of metals. The technology has the following advantages over ion exchange: (1) higher mechanical strength, (2) higher resistance to radiation fields, (3) higher selectivity for the desired metal ion, (4) no cation exchange, (5) reduced or no interference from accompanying anions, (6) faster kinetics, and (7) easy and selective regeneration. Target waste streams include metal-containing groundwater/process wastewater at ORNL`s Y-12 Plant (multiple metals), Savannah River Site (SRS), Rocky Flats (multiple metals), and Hanford; aqueous mixed wastes at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL); and scrubber water generated at SRS and INEL. Focus Areas that will benefit from this research include Mixed Waste, and Subsurface Contaminants.

  8. Novel Antiproliferative Chimeric Compounds with Marked Histone Deacetylase Inhibitory Activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Given our interest in finding potential antitumor agents and in view of the multifactorial mechanistic nature of cancer, in the present work, taking advantage of the multifunctional ligands approach, new chimeric molecules were designed and synthesized by combining in single chemical entities structural features of SAHA, targeting histone deacetylases (HDACs), with substituted stilbene or terphenyl derivatives previously obtained by us and endowed with antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic activity. The new chimeric derivatives were characterized with respect to their cytotoxic activity and their effects on cell cycle progression on different tumor cell lines, as well as their HDACs inhibition. Among the other, trans-6 showed the most interesting biological profile, as it exhibited a strong pro-apoptotic activity in tumor cell lines in comparison with both of its parent compounds and a marked HDAC inhibition. PMID:25221651

  9. Bioactive Compounds, Chemical Composition, and Medicinal Value of the Giant Puffball, Calvatia gigantea (Higher Basidiomycetes), from Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kivrak, Ibrahim; Kivrak, Seyda; Harmandar, Mansur

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the compositions of Calvatia gigantea were first analyzed in order to elucidate its chemical basis for development as a health-enhancing food or medicine. This study investigates the chemical composition (nutritional value; phenolic, sugar and fatty acid content; aroma compounds) and antioxidant properties (radical scavenging activity, reducing power, and inhibition of lipid peroxidation) of C. gigantea. The results showed that C. gigantea contains phenolic compounds and sugars and is rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (67.93%), proteins (34.37%), and carbohydrates (51.97%). The most abundant compounds were gentisic acid (23.26 µg/g; as a phenolic compound), trehalose (9.78 g/100g; as a sugar), and hexanal (34.71%; as an aroma compound). These findings suggest that C. gigantea might be a promising source of medicine and has the potential to be a health food and food supplementary product.

  10. Environmental Fate of Organophosphorus Compounds Related to Chemical Weapons

    SciTech Connect

    Davisson, M L; Love, A H; Vance, A; Reynolds, J G

    2005-02-08

    Man-made organophosphorus compounds have been widely distributed throughout our environment as pesticides since their development during and after WWII. Many important studies have documented their relative persistence and toxicity. Development and use of some organophosphorus compounds as nerve agents gave rise to a separate but parallel effort to understand environmental persistence. In this latter case, the experiments have focused mainly on evaporation rates and first-order reaction kinetics. However, because organophosphorus compounds are easily polarized, the ionic content of a surrounding media directly factors into these reaction rates, but limited work in this regard has been done under environmentally relevant conditions. Furthermore, limited experiments investigating persistence of these agents on soil has resulted in widely varying degradation rates. Not surprisingly, no studies have investigated affinities of organophosphorus nerve agents to mineral or organic matter typically found in soil. As a result, we initiated laboratory experiments on dilute concentrations of nerve agent O-ethyl S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) methylphosphonothiolate (VX) to quantify persistence in simulated environmental aqueous conditions. A quantitative analytical method was developed for VX and its degradation products using High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS). VX hydrolysis rate is known to have a pH-dependency, however, the type of buffer and the relative proportion of different nucleophiles in solution significantly affect the overall rate and mechanism of degradation. For example, dissolved carbonate, a weak nucleophile dominating natural water, yielded pseudo-first order rate constants of {approx} 8 x 10{sup -3}/hr at pH 5 and 2 x 10{sup -2}/hr at pH 11. This small pH-dependent variation departs significantly from widely accepted rates at this pH range (4 x 10{sup -4}/hr to 8 x 10{sup -2}/hr) that were based on

  11. Cyanobacteria and microalgae: a renewable source of bioactive compounds and other chemicals.

    PubMed

    Encarnação, Telma; Pais, Alberto A C C; Campos, Maria G; Burrows, Hugh D

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae and cyanobacteria are rich sources of many valuable compounds, including important bioactive and biotechnologically relevant chemicals. Their enormous biodiversity, and the consequent variability in the respective biochemical composition, make microalgae cultivations a promising resource for many novel chemically and biologically active molecules and compounds of high commercial value such as lipids and dyes. The nature of the chemicals produced can be manipulated by changing the cultivation media and conditions. Algae are extremely versatile because they can be adapted to a variety of cell culture conditions. They do not require arable land, can be cultivated on saline water and wastewaters, and require much less water than plants. They possess an extremely high growth rate making these microorganisms very attractive for use in biofuel production--some species of algae can achieve around 100 times more oil than oil seeds. In addition, microalgae and cyanobacteria can accumulate various biotoxins and can contribute to mitigate greenhouse gases since they produce biomass through carbon dioxide fixation. In this review, we provide an overview of the application of microalgae in the production of bioactive and other chemicals.

  12. REVIEW OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND SOURCE APPORTIONMENT BY CHEMICAL MASS BALANCE. (R826237)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chemical mass balance (CMB) receptor model has apportioned volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in more than 20 urban areas, mostly in the United States. These applications differ in terms of the total fraction apportioned, the calculation method, the chemical compounds used ...

  13. Chemical Components and Cardiovascular Activities of Valeriana spp.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Heng-Wen; Wei, Ben-Jun; He, Xuan-Hui; Liu, Yan; Wang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Valeriana spp. is a flowering plant that is well known for its essential oils, iridoid compounds such as monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, flavonoids, alkaloids, amino acids, and lignanoids. Valeriana spp. exhibits a wide range of biological activities such as lowering blood pressure and heart rate, antimyocardial ischemia reperfusion injury, antiarrhythmia, and regulation of blood lipid levels. This review focuses on the chemical constituents and cardiovascular activities of Valeriana spp. PMID:26788113

  14. Gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds

    DOEpatents

    Grindstaff, Quirinus G.

    1992-01-01

    Described is a new gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system and method for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds. All components of such a GC/MS system external to the oven of the gas chromatograph are programmably temperature controlled to operate at a volatilization temperature specific to the compound(s) sought to be separated and measured.

  15. Organometallic Chemical Vapor Deposition Growth of Antimony Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Peng-Kuen

    This research is motivated by the desire to synthesize Sb III-V materials, including GaAs(,1-x)Sb(,x), InSb, and InAs(,1-x)Sb(,x). Ga-As-Sb system is known to have a significant solid phase miscibility gap from x = 0.2 to x = 0.8 at 600(DEGREES)C using a liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) growth technique. In this work, organometallic chemical vapor deposition (OM-CVD) has been shown to be a suitable growth technique for growing GaAs(,1-x)Sb(,x) alloys lying in the region of solid immiscibility. Conditions for growth of GaAs(,1-x)Sb(,x) layers with x as high as 0.7 on GaAs substrates are described for temperatures between 580 and 650(DEGREES)C. Effects of substrate orientation on growth characteristics are noted, and comparisons of growth on (511) and (100) GaAs faces are made. The experimental results indicate that growth is being controlled by surface reaction kinetics. A simple model based on kinetic control is presented. InSb is one of the most extensively examined semiconductors because of the small energy bandgap which is suitable for 3-5 (mu)m wavelength detection, and it also has highest mobility of any III-V compounds. OM-CVD has been used to epitaxially grow high quality InSb for the first time in this work. InSb with excellent morphology was achieved on both (100) and (111)B InSb substrates. The measured electron mobility at 300(DEGREES)K of undoped InSb grown on (100) GaAs semi-insulating substrates was 40,000 cm('2)/V -sec at a carrier concentration of N(,D)-N(,A) = 1.2 x 10('15)cm(' -3) has been measured at 77(DEGREES)K.Experimental data suggests that a dislocation scattering mechanism represents a significant mobility limiting process. InAs(,1-x)Sb(,x), with x (TURN) 0.6, has the lowest bandgap (=0.1 eV at 300(DEGREES)K) of any of the III-V ternary compounds. This bandgap is suitable for detectors in the 8-12 (mu)m wavelength region where an atmosphere window exists. So far, InAs(,1-x)Sb(,x) with 0.55 < x < 0.75 has not been achieved by LPE and molecular

  16. Quantitative genetic activity graphical profiles for use in chemical evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, M.D.; Stack, H.F.; Garrett, N.E.; Jackson, M.A.

    1990-12-31

    A graphic approach, terms a Genetic Activity Profile (GAP), was developed to display a matrix of data on the genetic and related effects of selected chemical agents. The profiles provide a visual overview of the quantitative (doses) and qualitative (test results) data for each chemical. Either the lowest effective dose or highest ineffective dose is recorded for each agent and bioassay. Up to 200 different test systems are represented across the GAP. Bioassay systems are organized according to the phylogeny of the test organisms and the end points of genetic activity. The methodology for producing and evaluating genetic activity profile was developed in collaboration with the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Data on individual chemicals were compiles by IARC and by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Data are available on 343 compounds selected from volumes 1-53 of the IARC Monographs and on 115 compounds identified as Superfund Priority Substances. Software to display the GAPs on an IBM-compatible personal computer is available from the authors. Structurally similar compounds frequently display qualitatively and quantitatively similar profiles of genetic activity. Through examination of the patterns of GAPs of pairs and groups of chemicals, it is possible to make more informed decisions regarding the selection of test batteries to be used in evaluation of chemical analogs. GAPs provided useful data for development of weight-of-evidence hazard ranking schemes. Also, some knowledge of the potential genetic activity of complex environmental mixtures may be gained from an assessment of the genetic activity profiles of component chemicals. The fundamental techniques and computer programs devised for the GAP database may be used to develop similar databases in other disciplines. 36 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Cocktail of chemical compounds robustly promoting cell reprogramming protects liver against acute injury.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yuewen; Cheng, Lin

    2017-02-11

    Tissue damage induces cells into reprogramming-like cellular state, which contributes to tissue regeneration. However, whether factors promoting the cell reprogramming favor tissue regeneration remains elusive. Here we identified combination of small chemical compounds including drug cocktails robustly promoting in vitro cell reprogramming. We then administrated the drug cocktails to mice with acute liver injuries induced by partial hepatectomy or toxic treatment. Our results demonstrated that the drug cocktails which promoted cell reprogramming in vitro improved liver regeneration and hepatic function in vivo after acute injuries. The underlying mechanism could be that expression of pluripotent genes activated after injury is further upregulated by drug cocktails. Thus our study offers proof-of-concept evidence that cocktail of clinical compounds improving cell reprogramming favors tissue recovery after acute damages, which is an attractive strategy for regenerative purpose.

  18. Large-scale chemical similarity networks for target profiling of compounds identified in cell-based chemical screens.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yu-Chen; Senese, Silvia; Li, Chien-Ming; Hu, Qiyang; Huang, Yong; Damoiseaux, Robert; Torres, Jorge Z

    2015-03-01

    Target identification is one of the most critical steps following cell-based phenotypic chemical screens aimed at identifying compounds with potential uses in cell biology and for developing novel disease therapies. Current in silico target identification methods, including chemical similarity database searches, are limited to single or sequential ligand analysis that have limited capabilities for accurate deconvolution of a large number of compounds with diverse chemical structures. Here, we present CSNAP (Chemical Similarity Network Analysis Pulldown), a new computational target identification method that utilizes chemical similarity networks for large-scale chemotype (consensus chemical pattern) recognition and drug target profiling. Our benchmark study showed that CSNAP can achieve an overall higher accuracy (>80%) of target prediction with respect to representative chemotypes in large (>200) compound sets, in comparison to the SEA approach (60-70%). Additionally, CSNAP is capable of integrating with biological knowledge-based databases (Uniprot, GO) and high-throughput biology platforms (proteomic, genetic, etc) for system-wise drug target validation. To demonstrate the utility of the CSNAP approach, we combined CSNAP's target prediction with experimental ligand evaluation to identify the major mitotic targets of hit compounds from a cell-based chemical screen and we highlight novel compounds targeting microtubules, an important cancer therapeutic target. The CSNAP method is freely available and can be accessed from the CSNAP web server (http://services.mbi.ucla.edu/CSNAP/).

  19. A prodrug approach to improve the physico-chemical properties and decrease the genotoxicity of nitro compounds.

    PubMed

    Chung, Man Chin; Bosquesi, Priscila Longhin; dos Santos, Jean Leandro

    2011-01-01

    In therapeutics research, the nitro compounds are part of an important group of drugs with multiple pharmacological activities. However, in drug design, the inclusion of a nitro group in a molecule changes the physico-chemical and electronic properties and is associated with increased mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. In addition, several studies have related the relationship between the antimicrobial and/or anti-protozoal activity and the mutagenic effect to reduction of the nitro group. This work reviews the toxicity of nitro compounds and shows how the use of prodrugs can increase the biological activity and decrease the genotoxicity of nitro compounds, without any modification in nitro reduction behavior, but rather by physico-chemical improvement. Examples are given of metronidazole and nitrofurazone prodrugs.

  20. Crystal chemical characterization of mullite-type aluminum borate compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, K.; Hooper, T. J. N.; Zhao, H.; Kolb, U.; Murshed, M. M.; Fischer, M.; Lührs, H.; Nénert, G.; Kudějová, P.; Senyshyn, A.; Schneider, H.; Hanna, J. V.; Gesing, Th. M.; Fischer, R. X.

    2017-03-01

    Al-rich aluminum borates were prepared by different synthesis routes using various Al/B ratios, characterized by diffraction methods, spectroscopy and prompt gamma activation analysis. The 11B NMR data show a small amount of BO4 species in all samples. The chemical analysis indicates a trend in the Al/B ratio instead of a fixed composition. Both methods indicate a solid solution Al5-xB1+xO9 where Al is substituted by B in the range of 1-3%. The structure of B-rich Al4B2O9 (C2/m, a=1488 pm, b=553 pm, c=1502 pm, ß=90.6°), was re-investigated by electron diffraction methods, showing that structural details vary within a crystallite. In most of the domains the atoms are orderly distributed, showing no signal for the postulated channel oxygen atom O5. The absence of O5 is supported by density functional theory calculations. Other domains show a probable disordered configuration of O5 and O10, indicated by diffuse scattering along the b direction.

  1. Deciphering potential chemical compounds of gaseous oxidized mercury in Florida, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jiaoyan; Miller, Matthieu B.; Edgerton, Eric; Sexauer Gustin, Mae

    2017-02-01

    The highest mercury (Hg) wet deposition in the United States of America (USA) occurs along the Gulf of Mexico, and in the southern and central Mississippi River Valley. Gaseous oxidized Hg (GOM) is thought to be a major contributor due to high water solubility and reactivity. Therefore, it is critical to understand concentrations, potential for wet and dry deposition, and GOM compounds present in the air. Concentrations and dry-deposition fluxes of GOM were measured and calculated for Naval Air Station Pensacola Outlying Landing Field (OLF) in Florida using data collected by a Tekran® 2537/1130/1135, the University of Nevada Reno Reactive Mercury Active System (UNRRMAS) with cation exchange and nylon membranes, and the Aerohead samplers that use cation-exchange membranes to determine dry deposition. Relationships with Tekran®-derived data must be interpreted with caution, since the GOM concentrations measured are biased low depending on the chemical compounds in air and interferences with water vapor and ozone.Criteria air pollutants were concurrently measured. This allowed for comparison and better understanding of GOM.In addition to other methods previously applied at OLF, use of the UNRRMAS provided a platform for determination of the chemical compounds of GOM in the air. Results from nylon membranes with thermal desorption analyses indicated seven GOM compounds in this area, including HgBr2, HgCl2, HgO, Hg-nitrogen and sulfur compounds, and two unknown compounds. This indicates that the site is influenced by different gaseous phase reactions and sources. Using back-trajectory analysis during a high-GOM event related to high CO, but average SO2, indicated air parcels moved from the free troposphere and across Arkansas, Mississippi, and Alabama at low elevation (< 300 m). This event was initially characterized by HgBr2, followed by a mixture of GOM compounds. Overall, GOM chemistry indicates oxidation reactions with local mobile source pollutants and long

  2. Microwave spectra of some sulfur and nitrogen compounds. [for chemical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. F.

    1974-01-01

    A computer-controlled microwave spectrometer was used to catalog reference spectra for chemical analysis. The apparatus, software, and experimental procedures are described. Tables of absorption frequencies, peak absorption coefficients, and integrated intensities are included for 13 sulfur compounds, 14 nitrogen compounds, and 1 compound containing both sulfur and nitrogen. The frequency range covered was 26,500 to 40,000 MHz for most compounds and 18,000 to 40,000 MHz for some.

  3. Portable Sensor for Chemical Nerve Agents and Organophosphorus Compounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-18

    as pesticides in crop, livestock, and poultry products and as chemical and biological warfare agents. As a result of the high toxicity and the...agents have been exploited for use as pesticides in crop, livestock, and poultry products and as chemical and biological warfare agents. As a result of

  4. Chemical properties and methods of analysis of refractory compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samsonov, G. V. (Editor); Frantsevich, I. N. (Editor); Yeremenko, V. N. (Editor); Nazarchuk, T. N. (Editor); Popova, O. I. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    Reactions involving refractory metals and the alloys based on them are discussed. Chemical, electrochemical, photometric, spectrophotometric, and X-ray analysis are among the methods described for analyzing the results of the reactions and for determining the chemical properties of these materials.

  5. Evidence for Different Reactive Hg Sources and Chemical Compounds at Adjacent Valley and High Elevation Locations.

    PubMed

    Sexauer Gustin, Mae; Pierce, Ashley M; Huang, Jiaoyan; Miller, Matthieu B; Holmes, Heather A; Loria-Salazar, S Marcela

    2016-11-15

    The spatial distribution of chemical compounds and concentration of reactive mercury (RM), defined as the sum of gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) and <3 μm particulate bound mercury (PBM), are poorly characterized. The objective of this study was to understand the chemistry, concentration, and spatial and temporal distribution of GOM at adjacent locations (12 km apart) with a difference in elevation of ∼1000 m. Atmospheric GOM measurements were made with passive and active samplers using membranes, and at one location, a Tekran mercury measurement system was used. The chemistry of GOM varied across time and location. On the basis of data collected, chemistry at the low elevation site adjacent to a highway was primarily influenced by pollutants generated by mobile sources (GOM = nitrogen and sulfur-based compounds), and the high elevation site (GOM = halogen-based compounds) was affected by long-range transport in the free troposphere over the marine boundary layer into Nevada. Data collected at these two locations demonstrate that different GOM compounds exist depending on the oxidants present in the air. Measurements of GOM made by the KCl denuder in the Tekran instrument located at the low elevation site were lower than that measured using membranes by 1.7-13 times. Accurate measurements of atmospheric concentrations and chemistry of RM are necessary for proper assessment of environmental impacts, and field measurements are essential for atmospheric models, which in turn influence policy decisions.

  6. [Estrogenic activity of ultraviolet absorbers and the related compounds].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hisashi; Adachi, Shinichi; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2005-08-01

    The estrogenic activities of ultraviolet absorbers and their related compounds were investigated using MCF-7 cell proliferation assay. Nine of 33 chemicals (benzophenone, 2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone, 2,2',4,4'-tetrahydroxybenzophenone, 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone, 2,2'-dihydroxy-4,4'-dimethoxybenzophenone, 4-hydroxybenzophenone, 3-(4-methylbenzylidene) camphor, ethyl 2-cyano-3,3-diphenylacrylate (etocrylene) and 2-ethylhexyl-2-cyano-3,3-diphenylacrylate (octocrylene)) were positive compared with the vehicle control. Benzhydrol, ethyl cinnamate and 2,2'-dihydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone were weakly active. When each xenoestrogen was added to the cells along with ICI 182780, an estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist, the cell growth was reduced according to its doses. Therefore, the cell proliferation was suggested to generate through ER. Most of these chemicals were also positive using CHOOSER assay, a new method of testing estrogenic activity of xenoestrogen. Each xenoestrogen was also confirmed to bind to ERalpha and ERbeta using a human ER competitive binding assay against 17beta-estradiol. The concentration order of the strength of its inhibitory effect using both ERalpha and ERbeta was similar to that of MCF-7 cell proliferation assay, except for benzyl 4-hydroxybenzoate (B4HB). B4HB showed a stronger activity on CHOOSER assay and the competitive binding assay using both ERalpha and ERbeta, although there was no activity observed on MCF-7 cell proliferation assay. Our findings were to detect the estrogenic activity of etocrylene and octocrylene in vitro, in addition to confirming the activities of some ultraviolet absorbers as previously reported.

  7. Catalytic activities of zeolite compounds for decomposing aqueous ozone.

    PubMed

    Kusuda, Ai; Kitayama, Mikito; Ohta, Yoshio

    2013-12-01

    The advanced oxidation process (AOP), chemical oxidation using aqueous ozone in the presence of appropriate catalysts to generate highly reactive oxygen species, offers an attractive option for removing poorly biodegradable pollutants. Using the commercial zeolite powders with various Si/Al ratios and crystal structures, their catalytic activities for decomposing aqueous ozone were evaluated by continuously flowing ozone to water containing the zeolite powders. The hydrophilic zeolites (low Si/Al ratio) with alkali cations in the crystal structures were found to possess high catalytic activity for decomposing aqueous ozone. The hydrophobic zeolite compounds (high Si/Al ratio) were found to absorb ozone very well, but to have no catalytic activity for decomposing aqueous ozone. Their catalytic activities were also evaluated by using the fixed bed column method. When alkali cations were removed by acid rinsing or substituted by alkali-earth cations, the catalytic activities was significantly deteriorated. These results suggest that the metal cations on the crystal surface of the hydrophilic zeolite would play a key role for catalytic activity for decomposing aqueous ozone.

  8. Process for preparing a chemical compound enriched in isotope content. [nitrogen 15-enriched nitric acid

    DOEpatents

    Michaels, E.D.

    1981-02-25

    A process to prepare a chemical enriched in isotope content includes: a chemical exchange reaction between a first and second compound which yields an isotopically enriched first compound and an isotopically depleted second compound; the removal of a portion of the first compound as product and the removal of a portion of the second compound as spent material; the conversion of the remainder of the first compound to the second compound for reflux at the product end of the chemical exchange reaction region; the conversion of the remainder of the second compound to the first compound for reflux at the spent material end of the chemical exchange region; and the cycling of the additional chemicals produced by one conversion reaction to the other conversion reaction, for consumption therein. One of the conversion reactions is an oxidation reaction, and the energy that it yields is used to drive the other conversion reaction, a reduction. The reduction reaction is carried out in a solid polymer electrolyte electrolytic reactor. The overall process is energy efficient and yields no waste by-products. A particular embodiment of the process in the production of nitrogen-15-enriched nitric acid.

  9. Science Activities in Energy: Chemical Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Presented is a science activities in energy package which includes 15 activities relating to chemical energy. Activities are simple, concrete experiments for fourth, fifth and sixth grades which illustrate principles and problems relating to energy. Each activity is outlined on a single card which is introduced by a question. A teacher's…

  10. Ionic surface active compounds in atmospheric aerosols.

    PubMed

    Sukhapan, Jariya; Brimblecombe, Peter

    2002-04-27

    Surfactants in the atmosphere have several potential roles in atmospheric chemistry. They can form films on aqueous surfaces, which lowers the surface tension and possibly delays water evaporation and gaseous transportation across the aqueous interface. They can also increase the solubility of organic compounds in the aqueous phase. Recently, the decrease of surface tension in cloud growing droplets has been suggested as relevant to increases in the number of droplets of smaller size, potentially enhancing cloud albedo. Natural surfactants in the lung aid gas transfer and influence the dissolution rate of aerosol particles, so surfactants in atmospheric aerosols, once inhaled, may interact with pulmonary surfactants. Ambient aerosols were collected from the edge of Norwich, a small city in a largely agricultural region of England, and analysed for surfactants. Methylene blue, a conventional dye for detecting anionic surfactants, has been used as a colorimetric agent. The concentration of surfactants expressed as methylene blue active substances (MBAS) is in the range of 6-170 pmol m(-3)(air). A negative correlation with chloride aerosol indicates that these surfactants are probably not the well-known surfactants derived from marine spray. A more positive correlation with aerosol nitrate and gaseous NOx supports an association with more polluted inland air masses. The surfactants found in aerosols seem to be relatively strong acids, compared with weaker acids such as the long-chain carboxylic acids previously proposed as atmospheric surfactants. Surfactants from the oxidation of organic materials (perhaps vegetation- or soil-derived) seem a likely source of these substances in the atmosphere.

  11. Irreversible adsorption of phenolic compounds by activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, T.M.; King, C.J.

    1988-12-01

    Studies were undertaken to determine the reasons why phenolic sorbates can be difficult to remove and recover from activated carbons. The chemical properties of the sorbate and the adsorbent surface, and the influences of changes in the adsorption and desorption conditions were investigated. Comparison of isotherms established after different contact times or at different temperatures indicated that phenolic compounds react on carbon surfaces. The reaction rate is a strong function of temperature. Regeneration of carbons by leaching with acetone recovered at least as much phenol as did regeneration with other solvents or with displacers. The physiochemical properties of adsorbents influences irreversible uptakes. Sorbates differed markedly in their tendencies to undergo irreversible adsorption. 64 refs., 47 figs., 32 tabs.

  12. Investigation of chemical compounds, antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of teucrium arduini L. (lamiaceae).

    PubMed

    Kremer, Dario; Kosir, Iztok Joze; Kosalec, Ivan; Koncic, Marijana Zovko; Potocnik, Tanja; Cerenak, Andreja; Bezic, Nada; Srecec, Sinisa; Dunkic, Valerija

    2013-08-01

    In this paper chemical composition of the essential oil (analysed by GC and GC-MS), the content of phenolic compounds (analysed by HPLC), quantity of total phenols and total flavonoids (analysed by UV/Vis spectrophotometer), antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of ethanolic extracts were investigated in endemic Teucrium arduini L. in population of Mt Biokovo (Croatia). The oil was characterized by a high concentration of sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (70.4%) of which β-caryophyllene (35.2%) and germacrene D (18.7%) being the major compounds. Three phenolic compounds (quercetin, ferulic acid and rosmarinic acid) were identified and quantified in ethanolic extract of T. arduini using HPLC. The results also showed that T. arduini is a source of polyphenolic and other antioxidants with radical-scavenging and chelating properties. The ethanol extracts prepared from the leaf of T. arduini showed broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity on Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans and Aspergillus brasiliensis, which are susceptible on concentration below or equal to 4.00 mg/mL, whilst Microsporum gypseum was resistant at investigated concentrations.

  13. Quantum chemical calculations for polymers and organic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, J.; Yang, C.

    1982-01-01

    The relativistic effects of the orbiting electrons on a model compound were calculated. The computational method used was based on 'Modified Neglect of Differential Overlap' (MNDO). The compound tetracyanoplatinate was used since empirical measurement and calculations along "classical" lines had yielded many known properties. The purpose was to show that for large molecules relativity effects could not be ignored and that these effects could be calculated and yield data in closer agreement to empirical measurements. Both the energy band structure and molecular orbitals are depicted.

  14. STUDIES ON THE SENSITIZATION OF ANIMALS WITH SIMPLE CHEMICAL COMPOUNDS

    PubMed Central

    Landsteiner, K.; Di Somma, A. A.

    1940-01-01

    Sensitization of guinea pigs to picric acid was obtained by application of oil solutions to the skin, preferably on inflamed sites or by treatment with a compound of picric acid with n-butyl-p-aminobenzoate. The lesions obtained in sensitive animals on superficial administration bore resemblance to human eczema. It seems probable that picric acid sensitization is an instance where a substance does not sensitize directly but after conversion into a more reactive compound, a principle which should be of wider application to instances where the original substance does not readily form conjugates. PMID:19871030

  15. Identification and Characterization of a Chemical Compound that Inhibits Methionyl-tRNA Synthetase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Robles, Sara; Hu, Yanmei; Resto, Tahyra; Dean, Frank; Bullard, James M

    2017-03-30

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen problematic in causing nosocomial infections and is highly susceptible to development of resistance to multiple antibiotics. The gene encoding methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MetRS) from P. aeruginosa was cloned and the resulting protein characterized. MetRS was kinetically evaluated and the KM for its three substrates, methionine, ATP and tRNAMet were determined to be 35, 515, and 29 μM, respectively. P. aeruginosa MetRS was used to screen two chemical compound libraries (1690) and a natural product compound was identified that inhibited the aminoacylation function. The compound inhibited P. aeruginosa MetRS with an IC50 of 70 μM. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the compound was determined against nine clinically relevant bacterial strains, including efflux pump mutants and hypersensitive strains of P. aeruginosa and E. coli. The compound displayed broad spectrum anti-bacterial activity. The MIC against the hypersensitive strain of P. aeruginosa was 16 μg/ml. However, the compound was not effective against the wild-type and efflux pump mutant strains, indicating that efflux may not be responsible for the lack of activity against the wild-type strains. When tested in human cell cultures, the cytotoxicity concentration (CC50) was observed to be 30 μg/ml. The compound did not compete with methionine or ATP for binding MetRS, indicating that the mechanism of action of the compound likely occurs outside the active site of aminoacylation.

  16. Chemical Potentials and Activities: An Electrochemical Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetzel, T. L.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment which explores the effects of adding inert salts to electrolytic cells and demonstrates the difference between concentration and chemical activity. Examines chemical potentials as the driving force of reactions. Provides five examples of cell potential and concentration change. (JM)

  17. Endocrine-active chemicals in mammary cancer causation and prevention.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Sarah; Betancourt, Angela M; Wang, Jun; Lamartiniere, Coral A

    2012-04-01

    Endocrine-active chemicals alter or mimic physiological hormones. These compounds are reported to originate from a wide variety of sources, and recent studies have shown widespread human exposure to several of these compounds. Given the role of the sex steroid hormone, estradiol, in human breast cancer causation, endocrine-active chemicals which interfere with estrogen signaling constitute one potential factor contributing to the high incidence of breast cancer. Thus, the aim of this review is to examine several common endocrine-active chemicals and their respective roles in breast cancer causation or prevention. The plastic component, bisphenol A (BPA), the synthetic estrogen, diethylstilbestrol (DES), the by-product of organic combustion, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), the soy component, genistein, and the red grape phytoalexin, resveratrol, have some degree of structural similarities to each other and estradiol. However, despite these structural similarities, the in vitro and in vivo properties of each of these chemicals vary greatly in terms of breast cancer causation and prevention. Early life exposure to BPA and DES increases rodent susceptibility to chemically induced mammary carcinogenesis, presumably through retardation of normal mammary gland maturation and/or disrupting the ratio of cell proliferation and apoptosis in the mammary gland. On the other hand, early exposures to genistein and resveratrol protect rodents against chemically induced and spontaneous mammary cancers. This is reported to occur through the ability of genistein and resveratrol to accelerate mammary gland maturation. Interestingly, TCDD, which is the most structurally dissimilar to the above chemicals and functions as an anti-estrogen, also increases chemically induced mammary carcinogenesis through retardation of mammary gland maturation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Endocrine disruptors'.

  18. GPM: A Graph Pattern Matching Kernel with Diffusion for Chemical Compound Classification.

    PubMed

    Smalter, Aaron; Huan, Jun; Lushington, Gerald

    2008-12-08

    Classifying chemical compounds is an active topic in drug design and other cheminformatics applications. Graphs are general tools for organizing information from heterogenous sources and have been applied in modelling many kinds of biological data. With the fast accumulation of chemical structure data, building highly accurate predictive models for chemical graphs emerges as a new challenge.In this paper, we demonstrate a novel technique called Graph Pattern Matching kernel (GPM). Our idea is to leverage existing frequent pattern discovery methods and explore their application to kernel classifiers (e.g. support vector machine) for graph classification. In our method, we first identify all frequent patterns from a graph database. We then map subgraphs to graphs in the database and use a diffusion process to label nodes in the graphs. Finally the kernel is computed using a set matching algorithm. We performed experiments on 16 chemical structure data sets and have compared our methods to other major graph kernels. The experimental results demonstrate excellent performance of our method.

  19. Glucosidase inhibitory activity and antioxidant activity of flavonoid compound and triterpenoid compound from Agrimonia Pilosa Ledeb

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In Chinese traditional medicine, Agrimonia pilosa Ledeb (APL) exhibits great effect on treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), however its mechanism is still unknown. Considering that T2DM are correlated with postprandial hyperglycemia and oxidative stress, we investigated the α-glucosidase inhibitory activity and the antioxidant activity of flavonoid compound (FC) and triterpenoid compound (TC) from APL. Methods Entire plants of APL were extracted using 95% ethanol and 50% ethanol successively. The resulting extracts were partitioned and isolated by applying liquid chromatography using silica gel column and Sephadex LH 20 column to give FC and TC. The content of total flavonoids in FC and the content of total triterpenoids in TC were determined by using UV spectrophotometry. HPLC analysis was used to identify and quantify the monomeric compound in FC and TC. The α-glucosidase inhibitory activities were determined using the chromogenic method with p-nitrophenyl-α-D-glucopyranoside as substrate. Antioxidant activities were assessed through three kinds of radical scavenging assays (DPPH radical, ABTS radical and hydroxyl radical) & β-carotene-linoleic acid assay. Results The results indicate FC is abundant of quercitrin, and hyperoside, and TC is abundant of 1β, 2β, 3β, 19α-tetrahydroxy-12-en-28-oic acid (265.2 mg/g) and corosolic acid (100.9 mg/g). The FC & the TC have strong α-glucosidase inhibitory activities with IC50 of 8.72 μg/mL and 3.67 μg/mL, respectively. We find that FC show competitive inhibition against α-glucosidase, while the TC exhibits noncompetitive inhibition. Furthermore, The FC exhibits significant radical scavenging activity with the EC50 values of 7.73 μg/mL, 3.64 μg/mL and 5.90 μg/mL on DPPH radical, hydroxyl radical and ABTS radical, respectively. The FC also shows moderate anti-lipid peroxidation activity with the IC50 values of 41.77 μg/mL on inhibiting β-carotene bleaching. Conclusion These results

  20. Chemical evolution and the preservation of organic compounds on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, Anastassia; Mancinelli, Rocco L.

    1989-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that the environment on early Mars and early Earth were very similar. Since life is abundant on Earth, it seems likely that conditions on early Earth were conducive to chemical evolution and the origin of life. The similarity between early Mars and early Earth encourages the hypothesis that chemical evolution might have also occurred on Mars, but that decreasing temperatures and the loss of its atmosphere brought the evolution to a halt. The possibility of finding on Mars remnants of organic material dating back to this early clement period is addressed.

  1. Chemical genetics reveals an RGS/G-protein role in the action of a compound.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kevin; Tertyshnikova, Svetlana; Moore, Lisa; Bjerke, Lynn; Burley, Ben; Cao, Jian; Carroll, Pamela; Choy, Robert; Doberstein, Steve; Dubaquie, Yves; Franke, Yvonne; Kopczynski, Jenny; Korswagen, Hendrik; Krystek, Stanley R; Lodge, Nicholas J; Plasterk, Ronald; Starrett, John; Stouch, Terry; Thalody, George; Wayne, Honey; van der Linden, Alexander; Zhang, Yongmei; Walker, Stephen G; Cockett, Mark; Wardwell-Swanson, Judi; Ross-Macdonald, Petra; Kindt, Rachel M

    2006-04-01

    We report here on a chemical genetic screen designed to address the mechanism of action of a small molecule. Small molecules that were active in models of urinary incontinence were tested on the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and the resulting phenotypes were used as readouts in a genetic screen to identify possible molecular targets. The mutations giving resistance to compound were found to affect members of the RGS protein/G-protein complex. Studies in mammalian systems confirmed that the small molecules inhibit muscarinic G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling involving G-alphaq (G-protein alpha subunit). Our studies suggest that the small molecules act at the level of the RGS/G-alphaq signaling complex, and define new mutations in both RGS and G-alphaq, including a unique hypo-adapation allele of G-alphaq. These findings suggest that therapeutics targeted to downstream components of GPCR signaling may be effective for treatment of diseases involving inappropriate receptor activation.

  2. Three new resin glycosides compounds from Argyreia acuta and their α-glucosidase inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Yan, You-Shao; Cui, Hong-Hua; Yin, Yong-Qin; Pan, Jie-Tao; Yu, Bang-Wei

    2017-03-01

    Three new phenolic compounds, acutacoside C (1), acutacoside D (2) and acutacoside E (3) were isolated from the aerial part of Argyreia acuta. The oligosaccharide chain was composed of two glucoses and three rhamnoses, and the aglycone was (11S)-hydroxyhexadecanoic acid (jalapinolic acid). The core of the three compounds was operculinic acid B, which was rare in resin glycosides. Their structures were established by a combination of spectroscopic and chemical methods. Compounds 1-3 have been evaluated for inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase, which all showed weak inhibitory activities.

  3. EVALUATION USING AN ORGANOPHILIC CLAY TO CHEMICALLY STABILIZE WASTE CONTAINING ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A modified clay (organophilic) was utilized to evaluate the potential for chemically stabilizing a waste containing organic compounds. hemical bonding between the binder and the contaminants was indicated. eachate testing also indicated strong binding. Copy available at NTIS as ...

  4. Cyanobacterium sp. host cell and vector for production of chemical compounds in cyanobacterial cultures

    DOEpatents

    Piven, Irina; Friedrich, Alexandra; Duhring, Ulf; Uliczka, Frank; Baier, Kerstin; Inaba, Masami; Shi, Tuo; Wang, Kui; Enke, Heike; Kramer, Dan

    2014-09-30

    A cyanobacterial host cell, Cyanobacterium sp., that harbors at least one recombinant gene for the production of a chemical compounds is provided, as well as vectors derived from an endogenous plasmid isolated from the cell.

  5. Cyanobacterium sp. host cell and vector for production of chemical compounds in Cyanobacterial cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Piven, Irina; Friedrich, Alexandra; Duhring, Ulf; Uliczka, Frank; Baier, Kerstin; Inaba, Masami; Shi, Tuo; Wang, Kui; Enke, Heike; Kramer, Dan

    2016-04-19

    A cyanobacterial host cell, Cyanobacterium sp., that harbors at least one recombinant gene for the production of a chemical compounds is provided, as well as vectors derived from an endogenous plasmid isolated from the cell.

  6. ESTIMATION OF PHYSICAL PROPERTIES AND CHEMICAL REACTIVITY PARAMETERS OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The computer program SPARC (Sparc Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry)has been under development for several years to estimate physical properties and chemical reactivity parameters of organic compounds strictly from molecular structure. SPARC uses computational algorithms ...

  7. PREDICTION OF CHEMICAL REACTIVITY PARAMETERS AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM MOLECULAR STRUCTURE USING SPARC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The computer program SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) has been under development for several years to estimate physical properties and chemical reactivity parameters of organic compounds strictly from molecular structure. SPARC uses computational algorithms...

  8. Grape Seed Oil Compounds: Biological and Chemical Actions for Health

    PubMed Central

    Garavaglia, Juliano; Markoski, Melissa M.; Oliveira, Aline; Marcadenti, Aline

    2016-01-01

    Grape seed oil is rich in phenolic compounds, fatty acids, and vitamins, with economic importance to pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and food industry. Its use as an edible oil has also been suggested, especially due to its pleasant sensory characteristics. Grape seed oil has beneficial properties for health that are mainly detected by in vitro studies, such as anti-inflammatory, cardioprotective, antimicrobial, and anticancer properties, and may interact with cellular and molecular pathways. These effects have been related to grape seed oil constituents, mainly tocopherol, linolenic acid, resveratrol, quercetin, procyanidins, carotenoids, and phytosterols. The aim of this article was to briefly review the composition and nutritional aspects of grape seed oil, the interactions of its compounds with molecular and cellular pathways, and its possible beneficial effects on health. PMID:27559299

  9. Radiation induced chemical changes of phenolic compounds in strawberries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitfellner, F.; Solar, S.; Sontag, G.

    2003-06-01

    In unirradiated strawberries four phenolic acids (gallic acid, p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid), the flavonoids (+)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin and glycosides from kaempferol and quercetin were determined by reversed phase chromatography with diode array detection. Characteristic linear dose/concentration relationships were found for 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and two unidentified compounds. One of them may be usable as marker to prove an irradiation treatment.

  10. Self-diffusiophoresis of chemically active colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Mihail N.; Uspal, William E.; Dietrich, Siegfried

    2016-11-01

    Chemically active colloids locally change the chemical composition of their solvent via catalytic reactions which occur on parts of their surface. They achieve motility by converting the released chemical free energy into mechanical work through various mechanisms, such as phoresis. Here we discuss the theoretical aspects of self-diffusiophoresis, which - despite being one of the simplest motility mechanisms - captures many of the general features characterizing self-phoresis, such as self-generated and maintained hydrodynamic flows "driven" by surface activity induced inhomogeneities in solution. By studying simple examples, which provide physical insight, we highlight the complex phenomenology which can emerge from self-diffusiophoresis.

  11. [Source profile and chemical reactivity of volatile organic compounds from vehicle exhaust].

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yue-Zhen; Wang, Hong-Li; Huang, Cheng; Chen, Chang-Hong; Su, Lei-Yan; Zhou, Min; Xu, Hua; Zhang, Gang-Feng; Chen, Yi-Ran; Li, Li; Chen, Ming-Hua; Huang, Hai-Ying

    2012-04-01

    Light-duty gasoline taxis (LDGT) and passenger cars (LDGV), heavy-duty diesel buses (HDDB) and trucks (HDDT), gasoline motorcycles (MC) and LPG scooters (LPGS), were selected for tailpipe volatile organic compounds (VOCs) samplings by using transient dynamometer and on road test combined with SUMMA canisters technology. The samples were tested by GC-MS to analyze the concentration and species composition of VOCs. The results indicate that light-duty gasoline automobiles have higher fractions of aromatic hydrocarbons, which account for 43.38%-44.45% of the total VOCs, the main aromatic hydrocarbons are toluene and xylenes. Heavy-duty diesel vehicles have higher fractions of alkanes, which constitute 46.86%-48.57% of the total VOCs, the main alkanes are propane, n-dodecane and n-undecane. In addition, oxy-organics account for 13.28%-15.01% of the VOCs, the main oxy-organics is acetone. The major compound from MC and LPGS exhaust is acetylene, it accounts for 39.75% and 76.67% of the total VOCs, respectively. VOCs exhaust from gasoline motorcycles and light-duty gasoline automobiles has a significantly higher chemical reactivity than those from heavy-duty diesel vehicles, which contribute 55% and 44% to the atmospheric chemical reactivity in Shanghai. The gasoline motorcycles and light-duty gasoline automobiles are the key pollution sources affecting city and region ambient oxidation, and the key active species of toluene, xylenes, propylene, and styrene make the greatest contribution.

  12. [Coordination compounds of Pd(II) with potential antitumor activity].

    PubMed

    González Vílchez, F; García Basallote, M; Benítez Ordóñez, J; Vilaplana Serrano, R

    1982-01-01

    The first results about the anti-neoplastic activity of Pd(II) ion coordinative compounds with complexones of the ethylenediamine-tetraacetic acid type are described. The assays employing Ehrlich ascites cancer of the mouse show that the presence of substitutes in the ethylenediamine skeleton originates important changes of the activity of such compounds.

  13. Biological Activities of Phenolic Compounds of Extra Virgin Olive Oil.

    PubMed

    Servili, Maurizio; Sordini, Beatrice; Esposto, Sonia; Urbani, Stefania; Veneziani, Gianluca; Di Maio, Ilona; Selvaggini, Roberto; Taticchi, Agnese

    2013-12-20

    Over the last few decades, multiple biological properties, providing antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, chemopreventive and anti-cancer benefits, as well as the characteristic pungent and bitter taste, have been attributed to Extra Virgin Olive Oil (EVOO) phenols. In particular, growing efforts have been devoted to the study of the antioxidants of EVOO, due to their importance from health, biological and sensory points of view. Hydrophilic and lipophilic phenols represent the main antioxidants of EVOO, and they include a large variety of compounds. Among them, the most concentrated phenols are lignans and secoiridoids, with the latter found exclusively in the Oleaceae family, of which the drupe is the only edible fruit. In recent years, therefore, we have tackled the study of the main properties of phenols, including the relationships between their biological activity and the related chemical structure. This review, in fact, focuses on the phenolic compounds of EVOO, and, in particular, on their biological properties, sensory aspects and antioxidant capacity, with a particular emphasis on the extension of the product shelf-life.

  14. Biological Activities of Phenolic Compounds of Extra Virgin Olive Oil

    PubMed Central

    Servili, Maurizio; Sordini, Beatrice; Esposto, Sonia; Urbani, Stefania; Veneziani, Gianluca; Maio, Ilona Di; Selvaggini, Roberto; Taticchi, Agnese

    2013-01-01

    Over the last few decades, multiple biological properties, providing antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, chemopreventive and anti-cancer benefits, as well as the characteristic pungent and bitter taste, have been attributed to Extra Virgin Olive Oil (EVOO) phenols. In particular, growing efforts have been devoted to the study of the antioxidants of EVOO, due to their importance from health, biological and sensory points of view. Hydrophilic and lipophilic phenols represent the main antioxidants of EVOO, and they include a large variety of compounds. Among them, the most concentrated phenols are lignans and secoiridoids, with the latter found exclusively in the Oleaceae family, of which the drupe is the only edible fruit. In recent years, therefore, we have tackled the study of the main properties of phenols, including the relationships between their biological activity and the related chemical structure. This review, in fact, focuses on the phenolic compounds of EVOO, and, in particular, on their biological properties, sensory aspects and antioxidant capacity, with a particular emphasis on the extension of the product shelf-life. PMID:26784660

  15. Metabolic activation and inactivation of chemical carcinogens

    SciTech Connect

    Pelkonen, O.; Vaehaekangas, K.

    1980-09-01

    Chemical carcinogens are metabolized by numerous pathways catalyzed by enzymes in endoplasmic reticulum and other parts of the cell. Reactions in which functional groups are created are especially important in the activation of polycyclic hydrocarbon carcinogens to ultimate carcinogenic forms, although other enzymes may also participate in the activation of other chemical carcinogens. The reasons why carcinogens act on specific target tissues are incompletely understood, although differences in enzyme profiles between tissues certainly contribute to the target tissue variability. The concept of metabolic activation of carcinogens by body's own enzymes has led to the development of short-term assay systems, which essentially measure the production of biologically active metabolites from potential carcinogens.

  16. Catalytic Conversion of Carbon-Containing Compounds into Valuable Chemicals and Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhuo

    Conversion of carbon-containing compounds, especially C1 compounds such as carbon dioxide and methane, to valuable chemicals and fuels will hopefully address concerns over decreasing supplies of fossil fuels and mitigate the eects of greenhouse gas emissions on global climate change. Many challenges, however, remain to be addressed before these technologies may be adopted on an industrial scale. Chiefly, catalysts must be developed to activate carbon-containing compounds from their thermodynamically stable ground states, using hydrogen, electrons, or heat as energy sources. We chose as model catalytic systems: 1) Metathesis of ethene and 2-butene; 2) Methane dehydrogenation and carbon dioxide hydrogenation. We developed three computational methodologies to study these processes across a range of length and time scales. First, we investigated how electronic structure affects the properties and reactivity of these catalyst systems; by computing the partial electronic density of states, electronic localization function, and excess spin density, we showed how redox supports, such as ceria, promote electron transfer reactions. We applied this to the studies of methane activation and carbon dioxide activation. Second, we developed a non-equilibrium thermodynamics approach to calculate energies of activation at nite temperatures, based on the Bronsted-Evans-Polanyi principle and the Nudged Elastic Band method. Third, we developed an approach to numerically compute heat capacities and other thermodynamic properties on extended catalytic systems that are comparable in accuracy and precision to methods that have been well-developed for gas-phase molecules. We applied these to the studies of metathesis propagation and carbon dioxide hydrogenation. We gained mechanistic, thermodynamic, and kinetic insight into the elementary steps that comprise larger reaction networks of interest to the broader catalysis community. Ultimately, these theoretical and computational predictions

  17. Lead selection and characterization of antitubercular compounds using the Nested Chemical Library.

    PubMed

    Sipos, Anna; Pató, János; Székely, Rita; Hartkoorn, Ruben C; Kékesi, László; Őrfi, László; Szántai-Kis, Csaba; Mikušová, Katarína; Svetlíková, Zuzana; Korduláková, Jana; Nagaraja, Valakunja; Godbole, Adwait Anand; Bush, Natassja; Collin, Frédéric; Maxwell, Anthony; Cole, Stewart T; Kéri, György

    2015-06-01

    Discovering new drugs to treat tuberculosis more efficiently and to overcome multidrug resistance is a world health priority. To find novel antitubercular agents several approaches have been used in various institutions worldwide, including target-based approaches against several validated mycobacterial enzymes and phenotypic screens. We screened more than 17,000 compounds from Vichem's Nested Chemical Library™ using an integrated strategy involving whole cell-based assays with Corynebacterium glutamicum and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and target-based assays with protein kinases PknA, PknB and PknG as well as other targets such as PimA and bacterial topoisomerases simultaneously. With the help of the target-based approach we have found very potent hits inhibiting the selected target enzymes, but good minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) against M. tuberculosis were not achieved. Focussing on the whole cell-based approach several potent hits were found which displayed minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) against M. tuberculosis below 10 μM and were non-mutagenic, non-cytotoxic and the targets of some of the hits were also identified. The most active hits represented various scaffolds. Medicinal chemistry-based lead optimization was performed applying various strategies and, as a consequence, a series of novel potent compounds were synthesized. These efforts resulted in some effective potential antitubercular lead compounds which were confirmed in phenotypic assays.

  18. The Chemical Composition of the Active Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazunova, L. V.

    The comparison of the results of the studies of the active stars' chemical composition obtained by different authors has been performed. It was concluded that the difference between the abundances of some elements in active and inactive stars becomes significant (> 3σ) only for the active stars with high chromospheric activity (lgR'HK > -4). This is the case primarily for the light elements, namely Li, Na and Al, as well as heavy elements with Z > 30.

  19. A quantum chemical based toxicity study of estimated reduction potential and hydrophobicity in series of nitroaromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Gooch, A; Sizochenko, N; Sviatenko, L; Gorb, L; Leszczynski, J

    2017-02-01

    Nitroaromatic compounds and the products of their degradation are toxic to bacteria, cells and animals. Various studies have been carried out to better understand the mechanism of toxicity of aromatic nitrocompounds and their relationship to humans and the environment. Recent data relate cytotoxicity of nitroaromatic compounds to their single- or two-electron enzymatic reduction. However, mechanisms of animal toxicity could be more complex. This work investigates the estimated reduction and oxidation potentials of 34 nitroaromatic compounds using quantum chemical approaches. All geometries were optimized with density functional theory (DFT) using the solvation model based on density (SMD) and polarizable continuum model (PCM) solvent model protocols. Quantitative structure-activity/property (QSAR/QSPR) models were developed using descriptors obtained from quantum chemical optimizations as well as the DRAGON software program. The QSAR/QSPR equations developed consist of two to four descriptors. Correlations have been identified between electron affinity (ELUMO) and hydrophobicity (log P).

  20. Sulfonamides identified as plant immune-priming compounds in high-throughput chemical screening increase disease resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Noutoshi, Yoshiteru; Ikeda, Mika; Saito, Tamio; Osada, Hiroyuki; Shirasu, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Plant activators are agrochemicals that protect crops from diseases by activating the plant immune system. To isolate lead compounds for use as practical plant activators, we screened two different chemical libraries composed of various bioactive substances by using an established screening procedure that can selectively identify immune-priming compounds. We identified and characterized a group of sulfonamide compounds – sulfameter, sulfamethoxypyridazine, sulfabenzamide, and sulfachloropyridazine – among the various isolated candidate molecules. These sulfonamide compounds enhanced the avirulent Pseudomonas-induced cell death of Arabidopsis suspension cell cultures and increased disease resistance in Arabidopsis plants against both avirulent and virulent strains of the bacterium. These compounds did not prevent the growth of pathogenic bacteria in minimal liquid media at 200 μM. They also did not induce the expression of defense-related genes in Arabidopsis seedlings, at least not at 24 and 48 h after treatment, suggesting that they do not act as salicylic acid analogs. In addition, although sulfonamides are known to be folate biosynthesis inhibitors, the application of folate did not restore the potentiation effects of the sulfonamides on pathogen-induced cell death. Our data suggest that sulfonamides potentiate Arabidopsis disease resistance by their novel chemical properties. PMID:23118736

  1. In silico approaches and chemical space of anti-P-type ATPase compounds for discovering new antituberculous drugs.

    PubMed

    Santos, Paola; López-Vallejo, Fabian; Soto, Carlos-Y

    2017-01-22

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most important public health problems around the world. The emergence of multi-drug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains has driven the finding of alternative anti-TB targets. In this context, P-type ATPases are interesting therapeutic targets due to their key role in ion homeostasis across the plasma membrane and the mycobacterial survival inside macrophages. In this review, in silico and experimental strategies used for the rational design of new anti-TB drugs are presented; in addition, the chemical space distribution based on the structure and molecular properties of compounds with anti-TB and anti-P-type ATPase activity is discussed. The chemical space distribution compared to public compound libraries demonstrates that natural product libraries are a source of novel chemical scaffolds with potential anti-P-type ATPase activity. Furthermore, compounds that experimentally display anti-P-type ATPase activity belong to a chemical space of molecular properties comparable to that occupied by those approved for oral use, suggesting that these kinds of molecules have a good pharmacokinetic profile (drug-like) for evaluation as potential anti-TB drugs.

  2. Thermodynamic analysis of chemical compatibility of several compounds with Fe-Cr-Al alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical compatibility between Fe-19.8Cr-4.8Al (weight percent), which is the base composition for the commercial superalloy MA956, and several carbides, borides, nitrides, oxides, and silicides was analyzed from thermodynamic considerations. The effect of addition of minor alloying elements, such as Ti, Y, and Y2O3, to the Fe-Cr-Al alloy on chemical compatibility between the alloy and various compounds was also analyzed. Several chemically compatible compounds that can be potential reinforcement materials and/or interface coating materials for Fe-Cr-Al based composites were identified.

  3. How to acquire new biological activities in old compounds by computer prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poroikov, V. V.; Filimonov, D. A.

    2002-11-01

    Due to the directed way of testing chemical compounds' in drug research and development many projects fail because serious adverse effects and toxicity are discovered too late, and many existing prospective activities remain unstudied. Evaluation of the general biological potential of molecules is possible using a computer program PASS that predicts more than 780 pharmacological effects, mechanisms of action, mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, etc. on the basis of structural formulae of compounds, with average accuracy ˜85%. PASS applications to both databases of available samples included hundreds of thousands compounds, and small collections of compounds synthesized by separate medicinal chemists are described. It is shown that 880 compounds from Prestwick chemical library represent a very diverse pharmacological space. New activities can be found in existing compounds by prediction. Therefore, on this basis, the selection of compounds with required and without unwanted properties is possible. Even when PASS cannot predict very new activities, it may recognize some unwanted actions at the early stage of R&D, providing the medicinal chemist with the means to increase the efficiency of projects.

  4. Mining Chemical Activity Status from High-Throughput Screening Assays.

    PubMed

    Soufan, Othman; Ba-alawi, Wail; Afeef, Moataz; Essack, Magbubah; Rodionov, Valentin; Kalnis, Panos; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) experiments provide a valuable resource that reports biological activity of numerous chemical compounds relative to their molecular targets. Building computational models that accurately predict such activity status (active vs. inactive) in specific assays is a challenging task given the large volume of data and frequently small proportion of active compounds relative to the inactive ones. We developed a method, DRAMOTE, to predict activity status of chemical compounds in HTP activity assays. For a class of HTP assays, our method achieves considerably better results than the current state-of-the-art-solutions. We achieved this by modification of a minority oversampling technique. To demonstrate that DRAMOTE is performing better than the other methods, we performed a comprehensive comparison analysis with several other methods and evaluated them on data from 11 PubChem assays through 1,350 experiments that involved approximately 500,000 interactions between chemicals and their target proteins. As an example of potential use, we applied DRAMOTE to develop robust models for predicting FDA approved drugs that have high probability to interact with the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) in humans. Our findings are further partially and indirectly supported by 3D docking results and literature information. The results based on approximately 500,000 interactions suggest that DRAMOTE has performed the best and that it can be used for developing robust virtual screening models. The datasets and implementation of all solutions are available as a MATLAB toolbox online at www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/dramote and can be found on Figshare.

  5. Mining Chemical Activity Status from High-Throughput Screening Assays

    PubMed Central

    Soufan, Othman; Ba-alawi, Wail; Afeef, Moataz; Essack, Magbubah; Rodionov, Valentin; Kalnis, Panos; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) experiments provide a valuable resource that reports biological activity of numerous chemical compounds relative to their molecular targets. Building computational models that accurately predict such activity status (active vs. inactive) in specific assays is a challenging task given the large volume of data and frequently small proportion of active compounds relative to the inactive ones. We developed a method, DRAMOTE, to predict activity status of chemical compounds in HTP activity assays. For a class of HTP assays, our method achieves considerably better results than the current state-of-the-art-solutions. We achieved this by modification of a minority oversampling technique. To demonstrate that DRAMOTE is performing better than the other methods, we performed a comprehensive comparison analysis with several other methods and evaluated them on data from 11 PubChem assays through 1,350 experiments that involved approximately 500,000 interactions between chemicals and their target proteins. As an example of potential use, we applied DRAMOTE to develop robust models for predicting FDA approved drugs that have high probability to interact with the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) in humans. Our findings are further partially and indirectly supported by 3D docking results and literature information. The results based on approximately 500,000 interactions suggest that DRAMOTE has performed the best and that it can be used for developing robust virtual screening models. The datasets and implementation of all solutions are available as a MATLAB toolbox online at www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/dramote and can be found on Figshare. PMID:26658480

  6. Isolation and characterization of an utero-active compound from Agave americana.

    PubMed

    Basilio, C M; Seyler, L; Bernstein, J; Castro de la Mata, R

    1989-12-01

    Crude extracts of Agave americana contain two utero-active compounds. One of these, tentatively named "Fraction B", has been purified to chromatographic homogeneity. Its pharmacological actions are similar to those of acetylcholine. However its chromatographic and electrophoretic mobilities are different. Some chemical properties of fraction B are compatible with the structure of an acyl derivative of choline different from acetylcholine.

  7. Emergy Evaluations of the Global Biogeochemical Cycles of Six Biologically Active Elements and Two Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimates of the emergy carried by the flows of biologically active elements (BAE) and compounds are needed to accurately evaluate the near and far field effects of anthropogenic wastes. The transformities and specific emergies of these elements and of their different chemical sp...

  8. Phenolic compounds with IL-6 inhibitory activity from Aster yomena.

    PubMed

    Kim, A Ryun; Jin, Qinglong; Jin, Hong-Guang; Ko, Hae Ju; Woo, Eun-Rhan

    2014-07-01

    A new biflavonoid, named asteryomenin (1), as well as six known phenolic compounds, esculetin (2), 4-O-β-D-glucopyranoside-3-hydroxy methyl benzoate (3), caffeic acid (4), isoquercitrin (5), isorhamnetin-3-O-glucoside (6), and apigenin (7) were isolated from the aerial parts of Aster yomena. The structures of compounds (1-7) were identified based on 1D and 2D NMR, including (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC and NOESY spectroscopic analyses. Compounds 2-7 were isolated from this plant for the first time. For these isolates, the inhibitory activity of IL-6 production in the TNF-α stimulated MG-63 cell was examined. Among these isolates, compounds 4 and 7 appeared to have potent inhibitory activity of IL-6 production in the TNF-α stimulated MG-63 cell, while compounds 1-3 and 5-6 showed moderate activity.

  9. Anti-tumoral activity of native compound morelloflavone in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xianfeng; Ai, Hongyan; Sun, Deke; Wu, Tao; He, Jian; Xu, Zhai; Ding, Li; Wang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the anti-tumoral activity of morelloflavone substances with different structures. We also studied the possible link between morelloflavone structure and its function. Various types of chromatographic techniques were used to isolate and screen morelloflavone substances from the extracts of gambogic tree trunk and the morelloflavone structures were identified by analytical techniques such as high resolution mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetism. Anti-tumoral activities of different compounds were investigated and the link between the antitumor activity and the structure of compound was exaimed. Our results showed that the isolated morelloflavone substances demonstrated a certain level of antitumor activity. The compound no. 1 had the strongest effect to inhibit glioma U87 and C6 cells followed by compound no. 2 while compound no. 5 was the weakest among them. We conducted a preliminary analysis on the structure-function relationship through the structure comparison and we concluded that the antitumor effects of morelloflavone substances with different structures were significantly different from each other. Thus, the glucose chain in C4 position of biflavone structure can enhance the antitumor activity of the compound in glioma cells. Additionally, the formation of intramolecular hydrogen bonds in biflavone compounds may also play a role in enhancing the antitumor activity and inhibition rate. PMID:27900007

  10. Feasibility of Active Machine Learning for Multiclass Compound Classification.

    PubMed

    Lang, Tobias; Flachsenberg, Florian; von Luxburg, Ulrike; Rarey, Matthias

    2016-01-25

    A common task in the hit-to-lead process is classifying sets of compounds into multiple, usually structural classes, which build the groundwork for subsequent SAR studies. Machine learning techniques can be used to automate this process by learning classification models from training compounds of each class. Gathering class information for compounds can be cost-intensive as the required data needs to be provided by human experts or experiments. This paper studies whether active machine learning can be used to reduce the required number of training compounds. Active learning is a machine learning method which processes class label data in an iterative fashion. It has gained much attention in a broad range of application areas. In this paper, an active learning method for multiclass compound classification is proposed. This method selects informative training compounds so as to optimally support the learning progress. The combination with human feedback leads to a semiautomated interactive multiclass classification procedure. This method was investigated empirically on 15 compound classification tasks containing 86-2870 compounds in 3-38 classes. The empirical results show that active learning can solve these classification tasks using 10-80% of the data which would be necessary for standard learning techniques.

  11. Activating secondary metabolism with stress and chemicals.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Vanessa; Nodwell, Justin R

    2014-02-01

    The available literature on the secondary or nonessential metabolites of the streptomycetes bacteria suggests that there may be poorly expressed or "cryptic" compounds that have yet to be identified and that may have significant medical utility. In addition, it is clear that there is a large and complex regulatory network that controls the production of these molecules in the laboratory and in nature. Two approaches that have been taken to manipulating the yields of secondary metabolites are the use of various stress responses and, more recently, the use of precision chemical probes. Here, we review the status of this work and outline the challenges and opportunities afforded by each of them.

  12. TRIFLUOROMETHYL COMPOUNDS OF GERMANIUM

    DTIC Science & Technology

    FLUORIDES, *GERMANIUM COMPOUNDS, *HALIDES, *ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS, ALKYL RADICALS, ARSENIC COMPOUNDS, CHEMICAL BONDS, CHEMICAL REACTIONS ...CHLORIDES, CHLORINE COMPOUNDS, HYDROLYSIS, IODIDES, METHYL RADICALS, POTASSIUM COMPOUNDS, PYROLYSIS, STABILITY, SYNTHESIS, TIN COMPOUNDS.

  13. ToxAlerts: A Web Server of Structural Alerts for Toxic Chemicals and Compounds with Potential Adverse Reactions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The article presents a Web-based platform for collecting and storing toxicological structural alerts from literature and for virtual screening of chemical libraries to flag potentially toxic chemicals and compounds that can cause adverse side effects. An alert is uniquely identified by a SMARTS template, a toxicological endpoint, and a publication where the alert was described. Additionally, the system allows storing complementary information such as name, comments, and mechanism of action, as well as other data. Most importantly, the platform can be easily used for fast virtual screening of large chemical datasets, focused libraries, or newly designed compounds against the toxicological alerts, providing a detailed profile of the chemicals grouped by structural alerts and endpoints. Such a facility can be used for decision making regarding whether a compound should be tested experimentally, validated with available QSAR models, or eliminated from consideration altogether. The alert-based screening can also be helpful for an easier interpretation of more complex QSAR models. The system is publicly accessible and tightly integrated with the Online Chemical Modeling Environment (OCHEM, http://ochem.eu). The system is open and expandable: any registered OCHEM user can introduce new alerts, browse, edit alerts introduced by other users, and virtually screen his/her data sets against all or selected alerts. The user sets being passed through the structural alerts can be used at OCHEM for other typical tasks: exporting in a wide variety of formats, development of QSAR models, additional filtering by other criteria, etc. The database already contains almost 600 structural alerts for such endpoints as mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, skin sensitization, compounds that undergo metabolic activation, and compounds that form reactive metabolites and, thus, can cause adverse reactions. The ToxAlerts platform is accessible on the Web at http://ochem.eu/alerts, and it is constantly

  14. Simultaneous Activation of Iron- and Thiol-Based Sensor-Regulator Systems by Redox-Active Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kang-Lok; Yoo, Ji-Sun; Oh, Gyeong-Seok; Singh, Atul K.; Roe, Jung-Hye

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria in natural habitats are exposed to myriad redox-active compounds (RACs), which include producers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive electrophile species (RES) that alkylate or oxidize thiols. RACs can induce oxidative stress in cells and activate response pathways by modulating the activity of sensitive regulators. However, the effect of a certain compound on the cell has been investigated primarily with respect to a specific regulatory pathway. Since a single compound can exert multiple chemical effects in the cell, its effect can be better understood by time-course monitoring of multiple sensitive regulatory pathways that the compound induces. We investigated the effect of representative RACs by monitoring the activity of three sensor-regulators in the model actinobacterium Streptomyces coelicolor; SoxR that senses reactive compounds directly through oxidation of its [2Fe–2S] cluster, CatR/PerR that senses peroxides through bound iron, and an anti-sigma factor RsrA that senses RES via disulfide formation. The time course and magnitude of induction of their target transcripts were monitored to predict the chemical activities of each compound in S. coelicolor. Phenazine methosulfate (PMS) was found to be an effective RAC that directly activated SoxR and an effective ROS-producer that induced CatR/PerR with little thiol-perturbing activity. p-Benzoquinone was an effective RAC that directly activated SoxR, with slower ROS-producing activity, and an effective RES that induced the RsrA-SigR system. Plumbagin was an effective RAC that activated SoxR, an effective ROS-producer, and a less agile but effective RES. Diamide was an RES that effectively formed disulfides and a weak RAC that activated SoxR. Monobromobimane was a moderately effective RES and a slow producer of ROS. Interestingly, benzoquinone induced the SigR system by forming adducts on cysteine thiols in RsrA, revealing a new pathway to modulate RsrA activity. Overall, this study showed

  15. [Allergenic characteristics of chemical compounds migrating from polymeric building materials].

    PubMed

    Trubitskaia, G P; Bokov, A N; Poliak, A I; Komareva, R F

    1977-02-01

    The authors worked out the technique of determining the allergenic activity of the volatiles migrating into the air medium from polymer building materials (PBM). The methods of allergodiagnosis in vitro (the passive hemagglutination test, specific leukocytic agglomeration test, intensification of leukocyte pyroninophilia test) were used to detect sensitization in experiments on guinea pigs. It appeared that PBM could cause atopic allergie reaction under certain dwelling conditions.

  16. Chemical activation of carbon mesophase pitches.

    PubMed

    Mora, E; Blanco, C; Pajares, J A; Santamaría, R; Menéndez, R

    2006-06-01

    This paper studies the chemical activation of mesophase pitches of different origins in order to obtain activated carbons suitable for use as electrodes in supercapacitors. The effect that the activating agent (NaOH, LiOH, and KOH), the alkaline hydroxide/pitch ratio, and the activation temperature had on the characteristics of the resultant activated carbons was studied. LiOH was found to be a noneffective activating agent, while activation with NaOH and KOH yielded activated carbons with high apparent surface areas and pore volumes. The increase of the KOH/pitch ratio caused an increase of the chemical attack on the carbon, producing higher burnoffs and development of porosity. Extremely high apparent surface areas were obtained when the petroleum pitch was activated with 5:1 KOH/carbon ratio. The increase of the activation temperature caused an increase of the burnoff, although the differences were not as significant as those derived from the use of different proportions of activating agent.

  17. Activated coconut shell charcoal carbon using chemical-physical activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budi, Esmar; Umiatin, Nasbey, Hadi; Bintoro, Ridho Akbar; Wulandari, Futri; Erlina

    2016-02-01

    The use of activated carbon from natural material such as coconut shell charcoal as metal absorbance of the wastewater is a new trend. The activation of coconut shell charcoal carbon by using chemical-physical activation has been investigated. Coconut shell was pyrolized in kiln at temperature about 75 - 150 °C for about 6 hours in producing charcoal. The charcoal as the sample was shieved into milimeter sized granule particle and chemically activated by immersing in various concentration of HCl, H3PO4, KOH and NaOH solutions. The samples then was physically activated using horizontal furnace at 400°C for 1 hours in argon gas environment with flow rate of 200 kg/m3. The surface morphology and carbon content of activated carbon were characterized by using SEM/EDS. The result shows that the pores of activated carbon are openned wider as the chemical activator concentration is increased due to an excessive chemical attack. However, the pores tend to be closed as further increasing in chemical activator concentration due to carbon collapsing.

  18. [Antibacterial activity of natural compounds - essential oils].

    PubMed

    Hassan, Sherif T S; Majerová, Michaela; Šudomová, Miroslava; Berchová, Kateřina

    2015-12-01

    Since the problem of bacterial resistance has become a serious problem worldwide, it was necessary to search for new active substances that can overcome the problem and enhance the treatment efficacy of bacterial infections. Numerous plant-derived essential oils exhibited significant antibacterial activities. This review aimed to summarize the most promising essential oils that exhibited remarkable antibacterial activities against various bacterial infections, including staphylococcal infections, Helicobacter pylori infections, skin infections, tuberculosis infection and dental bacterial infection. The synergy effect of essential oils in combination with antibiotics, as well as their role in the treatment of bacterial infections have been discussed. Essential oils can be used as models for further studies in vivo and clinical trials.

  19. Compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzumura, Akitoshi; Watanabe, Masaki; Nagasako, Naoyuki; Asahi, Ryoji

    2014-06-01

    Recently, Cu-based chalcogenides such as Cu3SbSe4, Cu2Se, and Cu2SnSe3 have attracted much attention because of their high thermoelectric performance and their common feature of very low thermal conductivity. However, for practical use, materials without toxic elements such as selenium are preferable. In this paper, we report Se-free Cu3SbS4 thermoelectric material and improvement of its figure of merit ( ZT) by chemical substitutions. Substitutions of 3 at.% Ag for Cu and 2 at.% Ge for Sb lead to significant reductions in the thermal conductivity by 37% and 22%, respectively. These substitutions do not sacrifice the power factor, thus resulting in enhancement of the ZT value. The sensitivity of the thermal conductivity to chemical substitutions in these compounds is discussed in terms of the calculated phonon dispersion and previously proposed models for Cu-based chalcogenides. To improve the power factor, we optimize the hole carrier concentration by substitution of Ge for Sb, achieving a power factor of 16 μW/cm K2 at 573 K, which is better than the best reported for Se-based Cu3SbSe4 compounds.

  20. Salinity effect on nutritional value, chemical composition and bioactive compounds content of Cichorium spinosum L.

    PubMed

    Petropoulos, Spyridon A; Levizou, Efi; Ntatsi, Georgia; Fernandes, Ângela; Petrotos, Konstantinos; Akoumianakis, Konstantinos; Barros, Lillian; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2017-01-01

    Soil salinization is an increasing problem for many areas throughout the world that renders prohibitive vegetables and crop production in general. In the present study, Cichorium spinosum L. plants were grown under saline conditions in order to evaluate chemical composition and bioactive compounds content of their leaves. Salinity increase resulted in significant changes of macro and micro-nutrients content (nutritional value, sugars, fatty acids, minerals, ascorbic acid and tocopherols), whereas the concentration of phenolic compounds was not significantly affected. Chicoric and 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid were the most abundant phenolic acids. In contrast, antioxidant activity and mineral composition were beneficially affected by mid-to-high and high salinity levels. In conclusion, C. spinosum can be cultivated under saline conditions without compromising the quality of the final product, especially in semi-arid areas where irrigation water is scarce and/or of low quality due to high content of NaCl (coastal areas or areas where underground water is saline).

  1. Title III section 313 release reporting guidance: Estimating chemical releases from rubber production and compounding

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-01

    Facilities engaged in rubber production and compounding may be required to report annually any releases to the environment of certain chemicals regulated under Section 313, Title III, of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. The document has been developed to assist those who produce rubber in the completion of Part III (Chemical Specific Information) of the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Reporting Form. Included herein is general information on toxic chemicals used and process wastes generated, along with several examples to demonstrate the types of data needed and various methodologies available for estimating releases.

  2. Antioxidant and Anti-Osteoporotic Activities of Aromatic Compounds and Sterols from Hericium erinaceum.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Lee, Sang Hyun; Jang, Hae Dong; Ma, Jin Yeul; Kim, Young Ho

    2017-01-11

    Hericium erinaceum, commonly called lion's mane mushroom, is a traditional edible mushroom widely used in culinary applications and herbal medicines in East Asian countries. In this study, a new sterol, cerevisterol 6-cinnamate (6), was isolated from the fruiting bodies of H. erinaceum together with five aromatic compounds 1-5 and five sterols 7-11. The chemical structures of these compounds were elucidated using chemical and physical methods and comparison of HRESIMS, ¹D-NMR (¹H, (13)C, and DEPT) and 2D-NMR (COSY, HMQC, HMBC, and NOESY) spectra with previously reported data. The antioxidant and anti-osteoporotic activities of extracts and the isolated compounds 1-11 were investigated. All compounds exhibited peroxyl radical-scavenging capacity but only compounds 1, 3, and 4 showed potent reducing capacity. Moreover, compounds 1, 2, 4, and 5 showed moderate effects on cellular antioxidant activity and inhibited the receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastic differentiation. These results suggested that H. erinaceum could be utilized in the development of natural antioxidant and anti-osteoporotic nutraceuticals and functional foods.

  3. Nanoparticles made of π-conjugated compounds targeted for chemical and biological applications.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xinjun; Liu, Ronghua; Li, Lidong

    2015-12-07

    Semiconducting organic nanoparticles have recently attracted increasing attention in the chemical and biomedical fields. Such nanoparticles are mainly composed of π-conjugated compounds. They possess the properties of easy synthesis, facile tuning, less toxicity and more biocompatibility relative to the existing inorganic nanoparticles. In addition, they show advantages such as brighter fluorescence, higher photostability and higher biocompatibility, compared with classical fluorescent organic dyes. In this review, we summarize the latest advances in the development of organic nanoparticles made of π-conjugated compounds, including preparation methods, material design, nanoparticle fabrication and surface functionalization for chemical and biological applications. Especially, we focus on the applications of semiconducting organic nanoparticles in chemical and biological sensing by monitoring the fluorescence signal, as nanocarriers for drug/gene delivery, in photothermal and photodynamic therapy, and in photoacoustic imaging. Finally, the challenges and perspectives for the future development of organic nanoparticles based on π-conjugated compounds are also discussed.

  4. Systematic mining of generally recognized as safe (GRAS) flavor chemicals for bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Mayorga, Karina; Peppard, Terry L; López-Vallejo, Fabian; Yongye, Austin B; Medina-Franco, José L

    2013-08-07

    Bioactive food compounds can be both therapeutically and nutritionally relevant. Screening strategies are widely employed to identify bioactive compounds from edible plants. Flavor additives contained in the so-called FEMA GRAS (generally recognized as safe) list of approved flavoring ingredients is an additional source of potentially bioactive compounds. This work used the principles of molecular similarity to identify compounds with potential mood-modulating properties. The ability of certain GRAS molecules to inhibit histone deacetylase-1 (HDAC1), proposed as an important player in mood modulation, was assayed. Two GRAS chemicals were identified as HDAC1 inhibitors in the micromolar range, results similar to what was observed for the structurally related mood prescription drug valproic acid. Additional studies on bioavailability, toxicity at higher concentrations, and off-target effects are warranted. The methodology described in this work could be employed to identify potentially bioactive flavor chemicals present in the FEMA GRAS list.

  5. CKB - the compound knowledge base: a text based chemical search system.

    PubMed

    Walker, Matthew J; Hull, Richard D; Singh, Suresh B

    2002-01-01

    The Compound Knowledge Base (CKB) was developed as a means of locating structures and additional relevant information from a given known structural identifier. Any of Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number, company code (code number the producing company refers to the chemical entity internally), generic name (trivial or class name), or trade name (name under which the compound is marketed) can be provided as a query. CKB will provide the remaining available information as well as the corresponding structure for any matching compound in the database. The interface to the Compound Knowledge Base is Internet/World Wide Web-based, using Netscape Navigator and the ChemDraw Pro Plugin, which allows Merck scientists quick and easy access to the database from their desktop. The design and implementation of the database and the search interface are herein detailed.

  6. Hemagglutinating activity in phytopathogenic bacteria surface compounds.

    PubMed

    Serra, M T; Castresana, M C; Tejerina, G

    1987-01-01

    Extracellular components of plant pathogenic bacteria were obtained from their culture medium as well as from the whole cells by using NaCl 1 M, pH 6.0; 20% sucrose dissolved in 0.03 M Tris buffer, pH 8.0; or 0.05 M Na2EDTA. All the extracts from Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora, Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola, Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli, Pseudomonas solanacearum, and Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica, were assayed for hemagglutinating activity on sheep, rabbit and chicken red blood cells (RBCs). The only active extracts were those obtained by NaCl treatment. They agglutinated sheep and rabbit erythrocytes. Extracts from E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica gave rise to the high agglutination titer on rabbit RBCs. These extracts had the lowest polysaccharide/protein ratio. E. carotovora subsp. carotovora extracts showed only a low titer (18.5 units). The agglutinating activity present in NaCl extracts of the bacteria tested was inhibited by different carbohydrates to various extent. Extracts from E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica appeared to be the most sensitive ones while those of E. carotovora subsp. carotovora least sensitive to the presence of sugar. It is suggested that hemagglutinins observed in plant pathogenic bacteria and those in plant host are similar and that both may, in some way, be involved in the plant-parasite relationship.

  7. Antioxidant Activity of Marine Algal Polyphenolic Compounds: A Mechanistic Approach.

    PubMed

    Fernando, I P Shanura; Kim, Misook; Son, Kwang-Tae; Jeong, Yoonhwa; Jeon, You-Jin

    2016-07-01

    Polyphenolic compounds isolated from marine algae exhibit a broad spectrum of beneficial biological properties, including antioxidant, anticancer, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antidiabetic activities, along with several other bioactivities centered on their antioxidant properties. Consequently, polyphenolic compounds are increasingly being investigated for their potential use in food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical applications. The antioxidant activities of these compounds have been explored widely through experimental studies. Nonetheless, a theoretical understanding of the structural and electronic properties could broaden research perspectives, leading to the identification and synthesis of efficient structural analogs with prophylactic uses. This review briefly summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding antioxidant polyphenolic compounds in marine algae with an attempt to describe the structure-activity relationship.

  8. [Antioxidant and antibacterial activities of dimeric phenol compounds].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Masahiro

    2008-08-01

    We studied the antioxidant and antibacterial activities of monomeric and dimeric phenol compounds. Dimeric compounds had higher antioxidant activities than monomeric compounds. Electron spin resonance spin-trapping experiments showed that phenol compounds with an allyl substituent on their aromatic rings directly scavenged superoxide, and that only eugenol trapped hydroxyl radicals. We developed a generation system of the hydroxyl radical without using any metals by adding L-DOPA and DMPO to PBS or MiliQ water in vitro. We found that eugenol trapped hydroxyl radicals directly and is metabolized to a dimer. On the other hand, dipropofol, a dimer of propofol, has strong antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria. However, it lacks solubility in water and this property is assumed to limit its efficacy. We tried to improve the solubility and found a new solubilization method of dipropofol in water with the addition of a monosaccharide or ascorbic acid.

  9. Physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of compounds used in hydraulic fracturing.

    PubMed

    Stringfellow, William T; Domen, Jeremy K; Camarillo, Mary Kay; Sandelin, Whitney L; Borglin, Sharon

    2014-06-30

    Hydraulic fracturing (HF), a method to enhance oil and gas production, has become increasingly common throughout the U.S. As such, it is important to characterize the chemicals found in HF fluids to evaluate potential environmental fate, including fate in treatment systems, and human health impacts. Eighty-one common HF chemical additives were identified and categorized according to their functions. Physical and chemical characteristics of these additives were determined using publicly available chemical information databases. Fifty-five of the compounds are organic and twenty-seven of these are considered readily or inherently biodegradable. Seventeen chemicals have high theoretical chemical oxygen demand and are used in concentrations that present potential treatment challenges. Most of the HF chemicals evaluated are non-toxic or of low toxicity and only three are classified as Category 2 oral toxins according to standards in the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals; however, toxicity information was not located for thirty of the HF chemicals evaluated. Volatilization is not expected to be a significant exposure pathway for most HF chemicals. Gaps in toxicity and other chemical properties suggest deficiencies in the current state of knowledge, highlighting the need for further assessment to understand potential issues associated with HF chemicals in the environment.

  10. Profiling of the Tox21 Chemical Collection for Mitochondrial Function to Identify Compounds that Acutely Decrease Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    PubMed Central

    Attene-Ramos, Matias S.; Huang, Ruili; Michael, Sam; Witt, Kristine L.; Richard, Ann; Tice, Raymond R.; Simeonov, Anton; Austin, Christopher P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of disorders including cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. Understanding whether different environmental chemicals and druglike molecules impact mitochondrial function represents an initial step in predicting exposure-related toxicity and defining a possible role for such compounds in the onset of various diseases. Objectives: We sought to identify individual chemicals and general structural features associated with changes in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Methods: We used a multiplexed [two end points in one screen; MMP and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content] quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) approach combined with informatics tools to screen the Tox21 library of 10,000 compounds (~ 8,300 unique chemicals) at 15 concentrations each in triplicate to identify chemicals and structural features that are associated with changes in MMP in HepG2 cells. Results: Approximately 11% of the compounds (913 unique compounds) decreased MMP after 1 hr of treatment without affecting cell viability (ATP content). In addition, 309 compounds decreased MMP over a concentration range that also produced measurable cytotoxicity [half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) in MMP assay/IC50 in viability assay ≤ 3; p < 0.05]. More than 11% of the structural clusters that constitute the Tox21 library (76 of 651 clusters) were significantly enriched for compounds that decreased the MMP. Conclusions: Our multiplexed qHTS approach allowed us to generate a robust and reliable data set to evaluate the ability of thousands of drugs and environmental compounds to decrease MMP. The use of structure-based clustering analysis allowed us to identify molecular features that are likely responsible for the observed activity. Citation: Attene-Ramos MS, Huang R, Michael S, Witt KL, Richard A, Tice RR, Simeonov A, Austin CP, Xia M. 2015. Profiling of the Tox

  11. Relationship between electronic properties and drug activity of seven quinoxaline compounds: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behzadi, Hadi; Roonasi, Payman; Assle taghipour, Khatoon; van der Spoel, David; Manzetti, Sergio

    2015-07-01

    The quantum chemical calculations at the DFT/B3LYP level of theory were carried out on seven quinoxaline compounds, which have been synthesized as anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis agents. Three conformers were optimized for each compound and the lowest energy structure was found and used in further calculations. The electronic properties including EHOMO, ELUMO and related parameters as well as electron density around oxygen and nitrogen atoms were calculated for each compound. The relationship between the calculated electronic parameters and biological activity of the studied compounds were investigated. Six similar quinoxaline derivatives with possible more drug activity were suggested based on the calculated electronic descriptors. A mechanism was proposed and discussed based on the calculated electronic parameters and bond dissociation energies.

  12. Antimicrobial activity of chemically modified dextran derivatives.

    PubMed

    Tuchilus, Cristina G; Nichifor, Marieta; Mocanu, Georgeta; Stanciu, Magdalena C

    2017-04-01

    Cationic amphiphilic dextran derivatives with a long alkyl group attached to the reductive end of the polysaccharide chain and quaternary ammonium groups attached as pendent groups to the main dextran backbone were synthesized and tested for their antimicrobial properties against several bacteria and fungi strains. Dependence of antimicrobial activity on both polymer chemical composition (dextran molar mass, length of end alkyl group and chemical structure of ammonium groups) and type of microbes was highlighted by disc-diffusion method (diameter of inhibition zone) and broth microdilution method (minimum inhibitory concentrations). Polymers had antimicrobial activity for all strains studied, except for Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853. The best activity against Staphylococcus aureus (Minimun Inhibitory Concentration 60μg/mL) was provided by polymers obtained from dextran with lower molecular mass (Mn=4500), C12H25 or C18H37 end groups, and N,N-dimethyl-N-benzylammonium pendent groups.

  13. Identification and quantitative analysis of chemical compounds based on multiscale linear fitting of terahertz spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Lingbo; Wang, Yingxin; Zhao, Ziran; Chen, Zhiqiang

    2014-07-01

    Terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy is considered as an attractive tool for the analysis of chemical composition. The traditional methods for identification and quantitative analysis of chemical compounds by THz spectroscopy are all based on full-spectrum data. However, intrinsic features of the THz spectrum only lie in absorption peaks due to existence of disturbances, such as unexpected components, scattering effects, and barrier materials. We propose a strategy that utilizes Lorentzian parameters of THz absorption peaks, extracted by a multiscale linear fitting method, for both identification of pure chemicals and quantitative analysis of mixtures. The multiscale linear fitting method can automatically remove background content and accurately determine Lorentzian parameters of the absorption peaks. The high recognition rate for 16 pure chemical compounds and the accurate predicted concentrations for theophylline-lactose mixtures demonstrate the practicability of our approach.

  14. Insight into hydroxides-activated coals: chemical or physical activation?

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaniz-Monge, J.; Illan-Gomez, M.J.

    2008-02-15

    The objective of this paper is to get an insight into the chemical activation mechanism using KOH and NaOH as activated agents. Three coals have been selected as carbon precursors. It was found that KOH and NaOH develop a similar narrow microporosity, independently of the coal rank, whereas only KOH generates supermicroporosity. Temperature-programmed desorption experiments, carried out with impregnated anthracite, show differences on the gas evolved during the activated carbon preparation using the two activating agents. Thus, whereas hydrogen profiles are quite similar for both activated agents, the CO and H{sub 2}O profiles are different. It is remarkable the high amount of H{sub 2}O evolved at the maximum treatment temperature for both activating agents. The results obtained to allow conclusion that the chemical activation is due to a combination of different process driving the development of material porosity.

  15. Density functional theory study of (13)C NMR chemical shift of chlorinated compounds.

    PubMed

    Li, Songqing; Zhou, Wenfeng; Gao, Haixiang; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2012-02-01

    The use of the standard density functional theory (DFT) leads to an overestimation of the paramagnetic contribution and underestimation of the shielding constants, especially for chlorinated carbon nuclei. For that reason, the predictions of chlorinated compounds often yield too high chemical shift values. In this study, the WC04 functional is shown to be capable of reducing the overestimation of the chemical shift of Cl-bonded carbons in standard DFT functionals and to show a good performance in the prediction of (13)C NMR chemical shifts of chlorinated organic compounds. The capability is attributed to the minimization of the contributions that intensively increase the chemical shift in the WC04. Extensive computations and analyses were performed to search for the optimal procedure for WC04. The B3LYP and mPW1PW91 standard functionals were also used to evaluate the performance. Through detailed comparisons between the basis set effects and the solvent effects on the results, the gas-phase GIAO/WC04/6-311+G(2d,p)//B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) was found to be specifically suitable for the prediction of (13)C NMR chemical shifts of chlorides in both chlorinated and non-chlorinated carbons. Further tests with eight molecules in the probe set sufficiently confirmed that WC04 was undoubtedly effective for accurately predicting (13) C NMR chemical shifts of chlorinated organic compounds.

  16. Different phenolic compounds activate distinct human bitter taste receptors.

    PubMed

    Soares, Susana; Kohl, Susann; Thalmann, Sophie; Mateus, Nuno; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; De Freitas, Victor

    2013-02-20

    Bitterness is a major sensory attribute of several common foods and beverages rich in polyphenol compounds. These compounds are reported as very important for health as chemopreventive compounds, but they are also known to taste bitter. In this work, the activation of the human bitter taste receptors, TAS2Rs, by six polyphenol compounds was analyzed. The compounds chosen are present in a wide range of plant-derived foods and beverages, namely, red wine, beer, tea, and chocolate. Pentagalloylglucose (PGG) is a hydrolyzable tannin, (-)-epicatechin is a precursor of condensed tannins, procyanidin dimer B3 and trimer C2 belong to the condensed tannins, and malvidin-3-glucoside and cyanidin-3-glucoside are anthocyanins. The results show that the different compounds activate different combinations of the ~25 TAS2Rs. (-)-Epicatechin activated three receptors, TAS2R4, TAS2R5, and TAS2R39, whereas only two receptors, TAS2R5 and TAS2R39, responded to PGG. In contrast, malvidin-3-glucoside and procyanidin trimer stimulated only one receptor, TAS2R7 and TAS2R5, respectively. Notably, tannins are the first natural agonists found for TAS2R5 that display high potency only toward this receptor. The catechol and/or galloyl groups appear to be important structural determinants that mediate the interaction of these polyphenolic compounds with TAS2R5. Overall, the EC(50) values obtained for the different compounds vary 100-fold, with the lowest values for PGG and malvidin-3-glucoside compounds, suggesting that they could be significant polyphenols responsible for the bitterness of fruits, vegetables, and derived products even if they are present in very low concentrations.

  17. Isolation and anticomplement activity of compounds from Dendropanax morbifera.

    PubMed

    Park, Bo-Young; Min, Byung-Sun; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Kim, Jung-Hee; Kim, Tae-Jin; Kim, Dong-Hee; Bae, Ki-Hwan; Lee, Hyeong-Kyu

    2004-02-01

    Dendropanax morbifera Leveille (Araliaceae) is used in Korea for a variety of disease, such as migraine headache and dysmenorrhea. A new polyacetylene (1) and six known compounds (2-7) were isolated from the leaves of this plant by conventional chromatographic techniques. The structure of the new polyacetylene (1) was determined as (9Z,16S)-16-hydroxy-9,17-octadecadiene-12,14-diynoic acid by spectroscopic means including 2D NMR, which comprised the determination of a chiral by modified Mosher's ester method. Compounds 1-7 were investigated in vitro for their anticomplement activity against the classical pathway of the complement system. Of these, compound 1 showed significant anticomplement activity with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 56.98 microM, whereas compounds 2-7 were inactive.

  18. Chemical and sensory profiles of makgeolli, Korean commercial rice wine, from descriptive, chemical, and volatile compound analyses.

    PubMed

    Jung, Heeyong; Lee, Seung-Joo; Lim, Jeong Ho; Kim, Bum Keun; Park, Kee Jai

    2014-01-01

    The chemical and sensory profiles of 12 commercial samples of makgeolli, a Korean rice wine, were determined using descriptive sensory, chemical, and volatile components analyses. The sample wines were analysed for their titratable acidity, ethanol content, pH, Hunter colour value and total reducing sugars. The chemical compositions of the makgeolli samples were found to be significantly different. The volatile compounds were extracted with solid-phase microextraction and analysed by gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry. In all, 45 major volatile compounds, consisting of 33 esters, 8 alcohols, 1 aldehyde, 1 acid, 1 phenol and 1 terpene, were identified; each makgeolli sample included 28-35 volatile compounds. Based on principal component analysis of the sensory data, samples RW1, RW2, RW5, RW8 and RW12 were associated with roasted cereal, mouldy, bubbles, sweet and sour attributes; the other samples were associated with sensory attributes of yellowness, yeast, full body, turbidity, continuation, swallow, alcohol, fruit aroma and whiteness.

  19. Antioxidant Activity of Phenolic Compounds from Fava Bean Sprouts.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Koharu; Hosoya, Takahiro; Kawarazaki, Kai; Izawa, Norihiko; Kumazawa, Shigenori

    2016-06-01

    Fava beans are eaten all over the world and recently, marketing for their sprouts began in Japan. Fava bean sprouts contain more polyphenols and l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA) than the bean itself. Our antioxidant screening program has shown that fava bean sprouts also possess a higher antioxidant activity than other commercially available sprouts and mature beans. However, the individual constituents of fava bean sprouts are not entirely known. In the present study, we investigated the phenolic compounds of fava bean sprouts and their antioxidant activity. Air-dried fava bean sprouts were treated with 80% methanol and the extract was partitioned in water with chloroform and ethyl acetate. HPLC analysis had shown that the ethyl acetate-soluble parts contained phenolic compounds, separated by preparative HPLC to yield 5 compounds (1-5). Structural analysis using NMR and MS revealed that the compounds isolated were kaempferol glycosides. All isolated compounds had an α-rhamnose at the C-7 position with different sugars attached at the C-3 position. Compounds 1-5 had β-galactose, β-glucose, α-rhamnose, 6-acetyl-β-galactose and 6-acetyl-β-glucose, respectively, at the C-3 position. The amount of l-DOPA in fava bean sprouts was determined by the quantitative (1) H NMR technique. The l-DOPA content was 550.45 mg ± 11.34 /100 g of the raw sprouts. The antioxidant activities of compounds 2-5 and l-DOPA were evaluated using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl scavenging assay. l-DOPA showed high antioxidant activity, but the isolated kaempferol glycosides showed weak activity. Therefore, it can be suggested that l-DOPA contributed to the antioxidant activity of fava bean sprouts.

  20. Identification of Chemical Compounds That Inhibit Protein Synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Stephanie O; Hu, Yanmei; Keniry, Megan; Bullard, James M

    2016-11-21

    Four inhibitory compounds were identified using a poly-uridylic acid (polyU) mRNA-directed aminoacylation/translation (A/T) protein synthesis system composed of phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetases (PheRS), ribosomes, and ribosomal factors from Pseudomonas aeruginosa in an in vitro screen of a synthetic compound library. The compounds were specific for inhibition of bacterial protein synthesis. In enzymatic assays, the compounds inhibited protein synthesis with IC50 values ranging from 20 to 60 μM. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined in cultures for a panel of pathogenic organisms, including Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Haemophilus influenzae, P. aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumoniae All the compounds were observed to have broad-spectrum activity and inhibited an efflux pump mutant strain of P. aeruginosa with MICs of 0.5-16 μg/mL. The molecular target of two compounds was determined to be PheRS. These two compounds were bacteriostatic against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens. In competition assays, they were not observed to compete with the natural substrates ATP or phenylalanine for active site binding. The other two compounds directly inhibited the ribosome and were bactericidal against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens. In cytotoxicity MTT testing in human cell lines, the compounds were shown to be from 2500- to 30,000-fold less active than the control staurosporine.

  1. Evaluation of leishmanicidal and trypanocidal activities of phenolic compounds from Calea uniflora Less.

    PubMed

    Lima, Tamires C; Souza, Rafaela J; Santos, Alan D C; Moraes, Milene H; Biondo, Nicole E; Barison, Andersson; Steindel, Mário; Biavatti, Maique W

    2016-01-01

    The phytochemical study of Calea uniflora led to the isolation of nine phenolic compounds identified as noreugenin (1), ethyl caffeate (2), a mixture of butein (3) + orobol (4), α-hydroxy-butein (5), caffeic acid (6), butein 4'-O-glucopyranosyl (7), quercetin 3-O-glucopyranosyl (8) and 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid (9). The chemical identity of the isolates was established on the basis of NMR and physical data. The chemical shifts of 5 and 7 have been reassigned and all the isolates were tested against Leishmania amazonensis and Trypanosoma cruzi amastigotes. None of the metabolites showed promising leishmanicidal activity. However, 2 and the mixture of 3 and 4 demonstrated interesting trypanocidal effect with IC50 values of 18.27 and 26.53 μM, respectively. Besides, these compounds did not present cytotoxic effect towards THP-1 cells, and compound 2 was 3.5-fold more selective than the mixture of 3+4.

  2. Electrocatalytic processing of renewable biomass-derived compounds for production of chemicals, fuels and electricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Le

    The dual problems of sustaining the fast growth of human society and preserving the environment for future generations urge us to shift our focus from exploiting fossil oils to researching and developing more affordable, reliable and clean energy sources. Human beings had a long history that depended on meeting our energy demands with plant biomass, and the modern biorefinery technologies realize the effective conversion of biomass to production of transportation fuels, bulk and fine chemicals so to alleviate our reliance on fossil fuel resources of declining supply. With the aim of replacing as much non-renewable carbon from fossil oils with renewable carbon from biomass as possible, innovative R&D activities must strive to enhance the current biorefinery process and secure our energy future. Much of my Ph.D. research effort is centered on the study of electrocatalytic conversion of biomass-derived compounds to produce value-added chemicals, biofuels and electrical energy on model electrocatalysts in AEM/PEM-based continuous flow electrolysis cell and fuel cell reactors. High electricity generation performance was obtained when glycerol or crude glycerol was employed as fuels in AEMFCs. The study on selective electrocatalytic oxidation of glycerol shows an electrode potential-regulated product distribution where tartronate and mesoxalate can be selectively produced with electrode potential switch. This finding then led to the development of AEMFCs with selective production of valuable tartronate or mesoxalate with high selectivity and yield and cogeneration of electricity. Reaction mechanisms of electrocatalytic oxidation of ethylene glycol and 1,2-propanediol were further elucidated by means of an on-line sample collection technique and DFT modeling. Besides electro-oxidation of biorenewable alcohols to chemicals and electricity, electrocatalytic reduction of keto acids (e.g. levulinic acid) was also studied for upgrading biomass-based feedstock to biofuels while

  3. Collective surfing of chemically active particles.

    PubMed

    Masoud, Hassan; Shelley, Michael J

    2014-03-28

    We study theoretically the collective dynamics of immotile particles bound to a 2D surface atop a 3D fluid layer. These particles are chemically active and produce a chemical concentration field that creates surface-tension gradients along the surface. The resultant Marangoni stresses create flows that carry the particles, possibly concentrating them. For a 3D diffusion-dominated concentration field and Stokesian fluid we show that the surface dynamics of active particle density can be determined using nonlocal 2D surface operators. Remarkably, we also show that for both deep or shallow fluid layers this surface dynamics reduces to the 2D Keller-Segel model for the collective chemotactic aggregation of slime mold colonies. Mathematical analysis has established that the Keller-Segel model can yield finite-time, finite-mass concentration singularities. We show that such singular behavior occurs in our finite-depth system, and study the associated 3D flow structures.

  4. Heterogeneous tempo and mode of evolutionary diversification of compounds in lizard chemical signals.

    PubMed

    García-Roa, Roberto; Jara, Manuel; López, Pilar; Martín, José; Pincheira-Donoso, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Important part of the multivariate selection shaping social and interspecific interactions among and within animal species emerges from communication. Therefore, understanding the diversification of signals for animal communication is a central endeavor in evolutionary biology. Over the last decade, the rapid development of phylogenetic approaches has promoted a stream of studies investigating evolution of communication signals. However, comparative research has primarily focused on visual and acoustic signals, while the evolution of chemical signals remains largely unstudied. An increasing interest in understanding the evolution of chemical communication has been inspired by the realization that chemical signals underlie some of the major interaction channels in a wide range of organisms. In lizards, in particular, chemosignals play paramount roles in female choice and male-male competition, and during community assembly and speciation. Here, using phylogenetic macro-evolutionary modeling, we show for the very first time that multiple compounds of scents for communication in lizards have diversified following highly different evolutionary speeds and trajectories. Our results suggest that cholesterol, α-tocopherol, and cholesta-5,7-dien-3-ol have been subject to stabilizing selection (Ornstein-Uhlenbeck model), whereas the remaining compounds are better described by Brownian motion modes of evolution. Additionally, the diversification of the individual compounds has accumulated substantial relative disparity over time. Thus, our study reveals that the chemical components of lizard chemosignals have proliferated across different species following compound-specific directions.

  5. Chemical mutagenesis testing in Drosophila. VII. Results of 22 coded compounds tested in larval feeding experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmering, S.; Mason, J.M.; Valencia, R. )

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-two chemicals were tested for mutagenicity in the sex-linked recessive lethal (SLRL) mutation assay after being fed to Drosophila melanogaster larvae. One compound, maleic hydrazide, was found to be mutagenic. It was tested for the ability to produce reciprocal translocations (RTs) and was positive in that assay as well.

  6. Montmorillonite Functionalized with Pralidoxime as a Material for Chemical Protection against Organophosphorous Compounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-25

    implied is via iondipole forces.5,6 It is well-known that clays such as montmorillonite and kaolinite accelerate the degradation of insecticides such...REPORT Montmorillonite Functionalized with Pralidoxime As a Material for Chemical Protection against Organophosphorous Compounds 14. ABSTRACT 16...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Montmorillonite K-10 functionalized with ?-nucleophilic 2-pralidoxime (PAM) and its zwitterionic oximate form (PAMNa) is

  7. Dimethoxymethane in Diesel Fuel: Chemical Characterization of Toxicologically Relevart Compounds From Diesel Emissions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-04-01

    then compounds relevant to the use of this chemical would need to be measured including, but not limited to urea, ammonia, biuret , and cyanic acid. 3.0...Combustion heat release analysis reveals reactions that occur BTDC, with long in-cylinder residence time of the pilot injected fuel. Differences in

  8. A Photoacoustic Study of Chemically Active Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    unless so designated by other documentation IS. KEY WORDS (Continue w reverse aide If neceeairy wd Identify by block nmber) Photoacoustic, Spectroscopy ...CwcAhnm i, pwo If w M Idntitty by block nin1b9) -,xThe method of gas-microphone photoacoustic spectroscopy and the related photothermal deflection... spectroscopy have been developed for application to chemically active systems. Fourier Transform Infrared Photoacoustic Spectros- copy has been used to study

  9. Nematicidal Activity of Cassia and Cinnamon Oil Compounds and Related Compounds toward Bursaphelenchus xylophilus (Nematoda: Parasitaphelenchidae)

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Jeong-Ok; Lee, Sang-Myung; Moon, Yil-Seong; Lee, Sang-Gil; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2007-01-01

    The nematicidal activity of two cassia, Cinnamomum cassia, oils (Especial and true), four cinnamon, Cinnamomum zey-lanicum, oils (technical, #500, bark and green leaf), and their compounds (e.g., trans-cinnamaldehyde and trans-cinnamic acid) toward adult Bursaphelenchus xylophilus was examined by a direct contact bioassay. Results were compared with those of 34 related compounds. As judged by 24-hour LC50 values, two cassia oils (0.084–0.085 mg/ml) and four cinnamon oils (0.064–0.113 mg/ml) were toxic toward adult B. xylophilus. Of 45 test compounds, trans-cinnamaldehyde (0.061 mg/ml) was the most active nematicide, followed by ethyl cinnamate, α-methyl-trans-cinnamaldehyde, methyl cinnamate and allyl cinnamate (0.114–0.195 mg/ml). Potent nematicidal activity was also observed with 4-methoxycinnamonitrile, trans-4-methoxycinnamaldehyde, trans-2-methoxy-cinnamaldehyde, ethyl α-cyanocinnamate, cinnamonitrile and cinnamyl bromide (0.224–0.502 mg/ml). Structure-activity relationships indicate that structural characteristics, such as types of functional groups, saturation and carbon skeleton, appear to play a role in determining the toxicities to adult B. xylophilus. Cassia and cinnamon oils and test compounds described merit further study as potential nematicides or leads for the control of pine wilt disease caused by B. xylophilus. PMID:19259472

  10. Stimulation of Ideas through Compound-Based Bibliometrics: Counting and Mapping Chemical Compounds for Analyzing Research Topics in Chemistry, Physics, and Materials Science.

    PubMed

    Barth, Andreas; Marx, Werner

    2012-12-01

    Counting compounds (rather than papers or citations) offers a new perspective for quantitative analyses of research activities. First of all, we can precisely define (compound-related) research topics and access the corresponding publications (scientific papers as well as patents) as a measure of research activity. We can also establish the time evolution of the publications dealing with specific compounds or compound classes. Moreover, the mapping of compounds by establishing compound-based landscapes has some potential to visualize the compound basis of research topics for further research activities. We have analyzed the rare earth compounds to give an example of a broad compound class. We present the number of the currently existing compounds and of the corresponding publications as well as the time evolution of the papers and patents. Furthermore, we have analyzed the rare earth cuprates (copper oxides) as an example of a narrower compound class to demonstrate the potential of mapping compounds by compound-based landscapes. We have quantified the various element combinations of the existing compounds and revealed all element combinations not yet realized in the synthesis within this compound class. Finally, we have analyzed the quasicrystal compound category as an example of a compound class that is not defined by a specific element combination or a molecular structure.

  11. Terpenoid bioactive compound from Streptomyces rochei (M32): taxonomy, fermentation and biological activities.

    PubMed

    Pazhanimurugan, Raasaiyah; Radhakrishnan, Manikkam; Shanmugasundaram, Thangavel; Gopikrishnan, Venugopal; Balagurunathan, Ramasamy

    2016-10-01

    The present study emphasized the production of biologically active terpenoid compound from Streptomyces rochei M32, which was isolated from Western Ghats ecosystem, South India. The presence of resistant genes like mecA, vanA of Staphylococcus aureus and bla SHV, bla TEM of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was confirmed by molecular studies. The isolated compound from Streptomyces rochei M32 inhibited wide range of standard and clinical drug resistant pathogens and enteric pathogens. The rice bran supplemented basal medium influenced the active compound production on 8th day of fermentation and yielded 1875 mg of crude extract from 10 g of rice bran substrate. Purification and characterization of crude ethyl acetate extract was achieved by preparative thin layer chromatography. The active fraction was identified as terpenoid class compound by chemical screening. Based on the results of spectral studies (NMR, LC-MS, FTIR, etc.), the active compound was tentatively identified as 1, 19-bis (3-hydroxyazetidin-1-yl) nonadeca-5, 14-diene-1, 8, 12, 19-tetraone with molecular weight 462.41 g/mol. Minimum inhibitory concentration value ranges between 7.6 and 31.2 µg/mL against test organisms was observed. The cytotoxicity results on cervical cancer (HeLa) cell line showed IC50 value of 2.034 µg/mL. The corresponding compound is not previously reported from any microbial resources.

  12. Phenolic Melatonin-Related Compounds: Their Role as Chemical Protectors against Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Galano, Annia; Castañeda-Arriaga, Romina; Pérez-González, Adriana; Tan, Dun-Xian; Reiter, Russel J

    2016-10-29

    There is currently no doubt about the serious threat that oxidative stress (OS) poses to human health. Therefore, a crucial strategy to maintain a good health status is to identify molecules capable of offering protection against OS through chemical routes. Based on the known efficiency of the phenolic and melatonin (MLT) families of compounds as antioxidants, it is logical to assume that phenolic MLT-related compounds should be (at least) equally efficient. Unfortunately, they have been less investigated than phenols, MLT and its non-phenolic metabolites in this context. The evidence reviewed here strongly suggests that MLT phenolic derivatives can act as both primary and secondary antioxidants, exerting their protection through diverse chemical routes. They all seem to be better free radical scavengers than MLT and Trolox, while some of them also surpass ascorbic acid and resveratrol. However, there are still many aspects that deserve further investigations for this kind of compounds.

  13. Chemical Compounds Toxic to Invertebrates Isolated from Marine Cyanobacteria of Potential Relevance to the Agricultural Industry

    PubMed Central

    Essack, Magbubah; Alzubaidy, Hanin S.; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Archer, John A. C.

    2014-01-01

    In spite of advances in invertebrate pest management, the agricultural industry is suffering from impeded pest control exacerbated by global climate changes that have altered rain patterns to favour opportunistic breeding. Thus, novel naturally derived chemical compounds toxic to both terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates are of interest, as potential pesticides. In this regard, marine cyanobacterium-derived metabolites that are toxic to both terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates continue to be a promising, but neglected, source of potential pesticides. A PubMed query combined with hand-curation of the information from retrieved articles allowed for the identification of 36 cyanobacteria-derived chemical compounds experimentally confirmed as being toxic to invertebrates. These compounds are discussed in this review. PMID:25356733

  14. Chemical compounds toxic to invertebrates isolated from marine cyanobacteria of potential relevance to the agricultural industry.

    PubMed

    Essack, Magbubah; Alzubaidy, Hanin S; Bajic, Vladimir B; Archer, John A C

    2014-10-29

    In spite of advances in invertebrate pest management, the agricultural industry is suffering from impeded pest control exacerbated by global climate changes that have altered rain patterns to favour opportunistic breeding. Thus, novel naturally derived chemical compounds toxic to both terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates are of interest, as potential pesticides. In this regard, marine cyanobacterium-derived metabolites that are toxic to both terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates continue to be a promising, but neglected, source of potential pesticides. A PubMed query combined with hand-curation of the information from retrieved articles allowed for the identification of 36 cyanobacteria-derived chemical compounds experimentally confirmed as being toxic to invertebrates. These compounds are discussed in this review.

  15. Chemical applications of anthocyanins and related compounds. A source of bioinspiration.

    PubMed

    Pina, Fernando

    2014-07-23

    Independently of the natural or synthetic origin, flavylium derivatives follow the same network of chemical reactions. Actually, the flavylium cation is stable only at low pH values. Increasing the pH gives rise to the formation of several species: quinoidal bases, hemiketal, cis- and trans-chalcones, and their deprotonated forms. A deep knowledge of the thermodynamics and kinetics of these species is an essential tool to practical applications of these compounds, in particular, in the domain of food chemistry. In this work the network of chemical reactions involving flavylium derivatives is presented, and the respective thermodynamics and kinetics are discussed in detail, including the mathematical expressions and a step-by-step procedure to calculate all of the rate and equilibrium constants of the system. Examples of systems possessing a high or low cis-trans isomerization barrier are shown. Recent practical applications of anthocyanins and related compounds illustrate the potentialities of the flavylium-based family of compounds.

  16. Lignans, bacteriocides and organochlorine compounds activate the human pregnane X receptor (PXR)

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Miriam N. . E-mail: miriam.jacobs@jrc.it; Nolan, Gail T.; Hood, Steven R.

    2005-12-01

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR) mediates the induction of enzymes involved in steroid metabolism and xenobiotic detoxification. The receptor is expressed in liver and intestinal tissues and is activated by a wide range of compounds. The ability of a diverse range of dietary compounds to activate PXR-mediated transcription was assayed in HuH7 cells following transient transfection with human PXR (hPXR). The compounds investigated included phytochemicals such as lignans and phytoestrogens, organochlorine dietary contaminants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and triclosan and selected steroid, drug and herbal compounds. The hPXR activation at the top concentrations tested (10 {mu}M) relative to the positive control 10 {mu}M rifampicin ranged from 1.3% (trans-resveratrol) to 152% (ICI 182780). Hydroxylated compounds were marginally more potent than the parent compounds (tamoxifen activation was 74.6% whereas 4 hydroxytamoxifen activation was 84.2%) or significantly greater (vitamin D{sub 3} activation was 1.6%, while hydroxylated vitamin D{sub 3} activation was 55.6%). Enterolactone, the metabolite of common dietary lignans, was a medium activator of PXR (35.6%), compared to the lower activation of a parent lignan, secoisolariciresinol (20%). Two non-hydroxylated PCB congeners (PCB 118 and 153), which present a larger fraction of the PCB contamination of fatty foods, activated hPXR by 26.6% and 17%, respectively. The pesticide trans-nonachlor activation was 53.8%, while the widely used bacteriocide triclosan was a medium activator of hPXR at 46.2%. The responsiveness of PXR to activation by lignan metabolites suggests that dietary intake of these compounds may affect the metabolism of drugs that are CYP3A substrates. Additionally, the evidence that organochlorine chemicals, particularly the ubiquitous triclosan, activate hPXR suggests that these environmental chemicals may, in part, exhibit their endocrine disruptor activities by altering PXR-regulated steroid

  17. Pulmonary metabolism of foreign compounds: Its role in metabolic activation

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, G.M. )

    1990-04-01

    The lung has the potential of metabolizing many foreign chemicals to a vast array of metabolites with different pharmacological and toxicological properties. Because many chemicals require metabolic activation in order to exert their toxicity, the cellular distribution of the drug-metabolizing enzymes in a heterogeneous tissue, such as the lung, and the balance of metabolic activation and deactivation pathways in any particular cell are key factors in determining the cellular specificity of many pulmonary toxins. Environmental factors such as air pollution, cigarette smoking, and diet markedly affect the pulmonary metabolism of some chemicals and, thereby, possibly affect their toxicity.

  18. Chemical fate and biological effects of several endocrine disrupters compounds in two echinoderm species.

    PubMed

    Sugni, Michela; Tremolada, Paolo; Porte, Cinta; Barbaglio, Alice; Bonasoro, Francesco; Carnevali, M Daniela Candia

    2010-03-01

    Two echinoderm species, the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus and the feather star Antedon mediterranea, were exposed for 28 days to several EDCs: three putative androgenic compounds, triphenyltin (TPT), fenarimol (FEN), methyltestosterone (MET), and two putative antiandrogenic compounds, p,p'-DDE (DDE) and cyproterone acetate (CPA). The exposure nominal concentrations were from 10 to 3000 ng L(-1), depending on the compound. This paper is an attempt to join three different aspects coming from our ecotoxicological tests: (1) the chemical behaviour inside the experimental system; (2) the measured toxicological endpoints; (3) the biochemical responses, to which the measured endpoints may depend. The chemical fate of the different compounds was enquired by a modelling approach throughout the application of the 'Aquarium model'. An estimation of the day-to-day concentration levels in water and biota were obtained together with the amount assumed each day by each animal (uptake in microg animal(-1) d(-1) or ng g-wet weight(-1) d(-1)). The toxicological endpoints investigated deal with the reproductive potential (gonad maturation stage, gonad index and oocyte diameter) and with the regenerative potential (growth and histology). Almost all the compounds exerted some kind of effect at the tested concentrations, however TPT was the most effective in altering both reproductive and regenerative parameters (also at the concentration of few ng L(-1)). The biochemical analyses of testosterone (T) and 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) also showed the ability of the selected compounds to significantly alter endogenous steroid concentrations.

  19. Chemical inhibition of nitrification in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Kelly, R T; Henriques, I D S; Love, N G

    2004-03-20

    Conventional aerobic nitrification was adversely affected by single pulse inputs of six different classes of industrially relevant chemical toxins: an electrophilic solvent (1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, CDNB), a heavy metal (cadmium), a hydrophobic chemical (1-octanol), an uncoupling agent (2,4-dinitrophenol, DNP), alkaline pH, and cyanide in its weak metal complexed form. The concentrations of each chemical source that caused 1 5, 25, and 50% respiratory inhibition of a nitrifying mixed liquor during a short-term assay were used to shock sequencing batch reactors containing nitrifying conventional activated sludge. The reactors were monitored for recovery over a period of 30 days or less. All shock conditions inhibited nitrification, but to different degrees. The nitrate generation rate (NGR) of the shocked reactors recovered overtime to control reactor levels and showed that it was a more sensitive indicator of nitrification inhibition than both initial respirometric tests conducted on unexposed biomass and effluent nitrogen species analyses. CDNB had the most severe impact on nitrification, followed by alkaline pH 11, cadmium, cyanide, octanol, and DNP. Based on effluent data, cadmium and octanol primarily inhibited ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) while CDNB, pH 11,and cyanide inhibited both AOB and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB). DNP initially inhibited nitrification but quickly increased the NGR relative to the control and stimulated nitrification after several days in a manner reflective of oxidative uncoupling. The shocked mixed liquor showed trends toward recovery from inhibition for all chemicals tested, but in some cases this reversion was slow. These results contribute to our broader effort to identify relationships between chemical sources and the process effects they induce in activated sludge treatment systems.

  20. Improving solubility and chemical stability of natural compounds for medicinal use by incorporation into liposomes.

    PubMed

    Coimbra, Maria; Isacchi, Benedetta; van Bloois, Louis; Torano, Javier Sastre; Ket, Aldo; Wu, Xiaojie; Broere, Femke; Metselaar, Josbert M; Rijcken, Cristianne J F; Storm, Gert; Bilia, Rita; Schiffelers, Raymond M

    2011-09-20

    Natural bioactive compounds have been studied for a long time for their chemopreventive and therapeutic potential in several chronic inflammatory diseases, including cancer. However, their physicochemical properties generally result in poor chemical stability and lack of in vivo bioavailability. Very few human clinical trials have addressed absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of these compounds in relation to efficacy. This limits the use of these valuable natural compounds in the clinic. In this study, we examined caffeic acid (derivatives), carvacrol (derivatives), thymol, pterostilbene (derivatives), and N-(3-oxo-dodecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone. These are natural compounds with strong anti-inflammatory properties derived from plants and bacteria. However, these compounds have poor water solubility or are chemically unstable. To overcome these limitations we have prepared liposomal formulations. Our results show that lipophilic 3-oxo-C(12)-homoserine lactone and stilbene derivatives can be loaded into liposomal lipid bilayer with efficiencies of 50-70%. Thereby, the liposomes solubilize these compounds, allowing intravenous administration without use of solvents. When compounds could not be loaded into the lipid bilayer (carvacrol and thymol) or are rapidly extracted from the liposomes in the presence of serum albumin (3-oxo-C(12)-homoserine lactone and pterostilbene derivatives), derivatization of the compound into a water-soluble prodrug was shown to improve loading efficiency and encapsulation stability. The phosphate forms of carvacrol and pterostilbene were loaded into the aqueous interior of the liposomes and encapsulation was unaffected by the presence of serum albumin. Chemical instability of resveratrol was improved by liposome-encapsulation, preventing inactivating cis-trans isomerization. For caffeic acid, liposomal encapsulation did not prevent oxidation into a variety of products. Still, by derivatization into a phenyl ester, the

  1. Genetic and environmental factors affecting host response to drugs and other chemical compounds in our environment.

    PubMed Central

    Vesell, E S; Passananti, G T

    1977-01-01

    Compared to laboratory animals, humans are extremely heterogenous with respect to the many factors that can influence the distribution and biological effects of toxic chemicals. This heterogeneity can prevent an accurate assessment of the impact of a particular toxic compound on the health of an individual subject. Some of the factors that can significantly modify the host response to certain drugs, which serve in this review as a model for environmental chemicals, are enumerated and discussed. Although the mechanisms by which many of these factors modify the biological effects of certain environmental chemicals and drugs have been determined in some cases, better definition of the nature of interactions between these factors and environmental chemicals in a particular individual is required at a biochemical and molecular level. Recommendations are offered for the further development of our knowledge concerning interactions between environmental chemicals and such factors in a particular individual. PMID:598349

  2. Biological activities of phenolic compounds present in virgin olive oil.

    PubMed

    Cicerale, Sara; Lucas, Lisa; Keast, Russell

    2010-02-02

    The Mediterranean diet is associated with a lower incidence of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative diseases and certain types of cancer. The apparent health benefits have been partially ascribed to the dietary consumption of virgin olive oil by Mediterranean populations. Much research has focused on the biologically active phenolic compounds naturally present in virgin olive oils to aid in explaining reduced mortality and morbidity experienced by people consuming a traditional Mediterranean diet. Studies (human, animal, in vivo and in vitro) have demonstrated that olive oil phenolic compounds have positive effects on certain physiological parameters, such as plasma lipoproteins, oxidative damage, inflammatory markers, platelet and cellular function, antimicrobial activity and bone health. This paper summarizes current knowledge on the bioavailability and biological activities of olive oil phenolic compounds.

  3. Bactericidal activity of glutaraldehyde-like compounds from olive products.

    PubMed

    Medina, Eduardo; Brenes, Manuel; García, Aranzazu; Romero, Concepción; de Castro, Antonio

    2009-12-01

    The bactericidal effects of several olive compounds (nonenal, oleuropein, tyrosol, the dialdehydic form of decarboxymethyl elenolic acid either free [EDA] or linked to tyrosol [TyEDA] or to hydroxytyrosol [HyEDA]), other food phenolic compounds (catechin, epicatechin, eugenol, thymol, carvacrol, and carnosic acid), and commercial disinfectants (glutaraldehyde [GTA] and ortho-phthalaldehyde [OPA]), were tested against strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, and Escherichia coli. It was found that the bactericidal activities of olive GTA-like compounds (EDA, HyEDA, and TyEDA) were greater than those exerted by several food phenolic substances. Surprisingly, these olive antimicrobials were as active as the synthetic biocides GTA and OPA against the four bacteria studied. Thus, it has been proposed that the bactericidal activity of the main olive antimicrobials is primarily due to their dialdehydic structure, which is similar to that of the commercial biocides GTA and OPA. Our results clearly reveal that olive GTA-like compounds possess a strong bactericidal activity even greater than that of other food phenolic compounds or synthetic biocides.

  4. Aspartate and glutamate mimetic structures in biologically active compounds.

    PubMed

    Stefanic, Peter; Dolenc, Marija Sollner

    2004-04-01

    Glutamate and aspartate are frequently recognized as key structural elements for the biological activity of natural peptides and synthetic compounds. The acidic side-chain functionality of both the amino acids provides the basis for the ionic interaction and subsequent molecular recognition by specific receptor sites that results in the regulation of physiological or pathophysiological processes in the organism. In the development of new biologically active compounds that possess the ability to modulate these processes, compounds offering the same type of interactions are being designed. Thus, using a peptidomimetic design approach, glutamate and aspartate mimetics are incorporated into the structure of final biologically active compounds. This review covers different bioisosteric replacements of carboxylic acid alone, as well as mimetics of the whole amino acid structure. Amino acid analogs presented include those with different distances between anionic moieties, and analogs with additional functional groups that result in conformational restriction or alternative interaction sites. The article also provides an overview of different cyclic structures, including various cycloalkane, bicyclic and heterocyclic analogs, that lead to conformational restriction. Higher di- and tripeptide mimetics in which carboxylic acid functionality is incorporated into larger molecules are also reviewed. In addition to the mimetic structures presented, emphasis in this article is placed on their steric and electronic properties. These mimetics constitute a useful pool of fragments in the design of new biologically active compounds, particularly in the field of RGD mimetics and excitatory amino acid agonists and antagonists.

  5. Cryptic antifungal compounds active by synergism with polyene antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Yoshioka, Mariko; Ihara, Fumio; Nihira, Takuya

    2016-04-01

    The majority of antifungal compounds reported so far target the cell wall or cell membrane of fungi, suggesting that other types of antibiotics cannot exert their activity because they cannot penetrate into the cells. Therefore, if the permeability of the cell membrane could be enhanced, many antibiotics might be found to have antifungal activity. We here used the polyene antibiotic nystatin, which binds to ergosterol and forms pores at the cell membrane, to enhance the cellular permeability. In the presence of nystatin, many culture extracts from entomopathogenic fungi displayed antifungal activity. Among all the active extracts, two active components were purified and identified as helvolic acid and terramide A. Because the minimum inhibitory concentration of either compound was reduced four-fold in the presence of nystatin, it can be concluded that this screening method is useful for detecting novel antifungal activity.

  6. Relationship between chemical structure and the occupational asthma hazard of low molecular weight organic compounds

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, J; Seed, M; Elton, R; Sawyer, L; Agius, R

    2005-01-01

    Aims: To investigate quantitatively, relationships between chemical structure and reported occupational asthma hazard for low molecular weight (LMW) organic compounds; to develop and validate a model linking asthma hazard with chemical substructure; and to generate mechanistic hypotheses that might explain the relationships. Methods: A learning dataset used 78 LMW chemical asthmagens reported in the literature before 1995, and 301 control compounds with recognised occupational exposures and hazards other than respiratory sensitisation. The chemical structures of the asthmagens and control compounds were characterised by the presence of chemical substructure fragments. Odds ratios were calculated for these fragments to determine which were associated with a likelihood of being reported as an occupational asthmagen. Logistic regression modelling was used to identify the independent contribution of these substructures. A post-1995 set of 21 asthmagens and 77 controls were selected to externally validate the model. Results: Nitrogen or oxygen containing functional groups such as isocyanate, amine, acid anhydride, and carbonyl were associated with an occupational asthma hazard, particularly when the functional group was present twice or more in the same molecule. A logistic regression model using only statistically significant independent variables for occupational asthma hazard correctly assigned 90% of the model development set. The external validation showed a sensitivity of 86% and specificity of 99%. Conclusions: Although a wide variety of chemical structures are associated with occupational asthma, bifunctional reactivity is strongly associated with occupational asthma hazard across a range of chemical substructures. This suggests that chemical cross-linking is an important molecular mechanism leading to the development of occupational asthma. The logistic regression model is freely available on the internet and may offer a useful but inexpensive adjunct to the

  7. Applications of swept-frequency acoustic interferometer for nonintrusive detection and identification of chemical warfare compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, D.N.; Springer, K.; Han, W.; Lizon, D.; Kogan, S.

    1997-12-01

    Swept-Frequency Acoustic Interferometry (SFAI) is a nonintrusive liquid characterization technique developed specifically for detecting and identifying chemical warfare (CW) compounds inside sealed munitions. The SFAI technique can rapidly (less than 20 seconds) and accurately determine sound speed and sound attenuation of a liquid inside a container over a wide frequency range (1 kHz-15 MHz). From the frequency-dependent sound attenuation measurement, liquid density is determined. These three physical properties are used to uniquely identify the CW compounds. In addition, various chemical relaxation processes in liquids and particle size distribution in emulsions can also be determined from the frequency-dependent attenuation measurement. The SFAI instrument is battery-operated and highly portable (< 6 lb.). The instrument has many potential application in industry ranging from sensitive detection (ppm level) of contamination to process control. The theory of the technique will be described and examples of several chemical industry applications will be presented.

  8. Highly efficient direct conversion of human fibroblasts to neuronal cells by chemical compounds.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ping; Harada, Yoshinori; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2015-05-01

    Direct conversion of mammalian fibroblasts into induced neuronal (iN) cells has been attained by forced expression of pro-neural transcriptional factors, or by combining defined factors with either microRNAs or small molecules. Here, we show that neuronal cells can be converted from postnatal human fibroblasts into cell populations with neuronal purities of up to >80% using a combination of six chemical compounds. The chemical compound-induced neuronal cells (CiNCs) express neuron-specific proteins and functional neuron markers. The efficiency of CiNCs is unaffected by either the donor's age or cellular senescence (passage number). We propose this chemical direct converting strategy as a potential approach for highly efficient generation of neuronal cells from human fibroblasts for such uses as in neural disease modeling and regenerative medicine.

  9. Compound prioritization methods increase rates of chemical probe discovery in model organisms

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Iain M; Urbanus, Malene L; Luciani, Genna M; Burns, Andrew R; Han, Mitchell KL; Wang, Hao; Arora, Kriti; Heisler, Lawrence E; Proctor, Michael; St. Onge, Robert P; Roemer, Terry; Roy, Peter J; Cummins, Carolyn L; Bader, Gary D; Nislow, Corey; Giaever, Guri

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Pre-selection of compounds that are more likely to induce a phenotype can increase the efficiency and reduce the costs for model organism screening. To identify such molecules, we screened ~81,000 compounds in S. cerevisiae and identified ~7,500 that inhibit cell growth. Screening these growth-inhibitory molecules across a diverse panel of model organisms resulted in an increased phenotypic hit-rate. This data was used to build a model to predict compounds that inhibit yeast growth. Empirical and in silico application of the model enriched the discovery of bioactive compounds in diverse model organisms. To demonstrate the potential of these molecules as lead chemical probes we used chemogenomic profiling in yeast and identified specific inhibitors of lanosterol synthase and of stearoyl-CoA 9-desaturase. As community resources, the ~7,500 growth-inhibitory molecules has been made commercially available and the computational model and filter used are provided. PMID:22035796

  10. Effects of various poisoning compounds on the activity and stereospecificity of heterogeneous Ziegler–Natta catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Tangjituabun, Kitti; Yull Kim, Sang; Hiraoka, Yuichi; Taniike, Toshiaki; Terano, Minoru; Jongsomjit, Bunjerd; Praserthdam, Piyasan

    2008-01-01

    A TiCl4/ethylbenzoate/MgCl2 Ziegler–Natta catalyst was pretreated with chemically different poisoning compounds to investigate their effects on the catalyst activity and stereospecificity for propylene polymerization. The poisoning power on the activity was in the order of methanol > acetone > ethyl acetate. A kinetic analysis using the stopped-flow method revealed that addition of the poisoning materials decreased the activity through the reduction of the number of active sites, whereas the catalyst isospecificity was hardly affected by these materials. PMID:27877969

  11. Chemical activation through super energy transfer collisions.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jonathan M; Nikow, Matthew; Ma, Jianqiang; Wilhelm, Michael J; Han, Yong-Chang; Sharma, Amit R; Bowman, Joel M; Dai, Hai-Lung

    2014-02-05

    Can a molecule be efficiently activated with a large amount of energy in a single collision with a fast atom? If so, this type of collision will greatly affect molecular reactivity and equilibrium in systems where abundant hot atoms exist. Conventional expectation of molecular energy transfer (ET) is that the probability decreases exponentially with the amount of energy transferred, hence the probability of what we label "super energy transfer" is negligible. We show, however, that in collisions between an atom and a molecule for which chemical reactions may occur, such as those between a translationally hot H atom and an ambient acetylene (HCCH) or sulfur dioxide, ET of chemically significant amounts of energy commences with surprisingly high efficiency through chemical complex formation. Time-resolved infrared emission observations are supported by quasi-classical trajectory calculations on a global ab initio potential energy surface. Results show that ∼10% of collisions between H atoms moving with ∼60 kcal/mol energy and HCCH result in transfer of up to 70% of this energy to activate internal degrees of freedom.

  12. Pollen source effects on growth of kernel structures and embryo chemical compounds in maize

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, W.; Mantese, A. I.; Maddonni, G. A.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Previous studies have reported effects of pollen source on the oil concentration of maize (Zea mays) kernels through modifications to both the embryo/kernel ratio and embryo oil concentration. The present study expands upon previous analyses by addressing pollen source effects on the growth of kernel structures (i.e. pericarp, endosperm and embryo), allocation of embryo chemical constituents (i.e. oil, protein, starch and soluble sugars), and the anatomy and histology of the embryos. Methods Maize kernels with different oil concentration were obtained from pollinations with two parental genotypes of contrasting oil concentration. The dynamics of the growth of kernel structures and allocation of embryo chemical constituents were analysed during the post-flowering period. Mature kernels were dissected to study the anatomy (embryonic axis and scutellum) and histology [cell number and cell size of the scutellums, presence of sub-cellular structures in scutellum tissue (starch granules, oil and protein bodies)] of the embryos. Key Results Plants of all crosses exhibited a similar kernel number and kernel weight. Pollen source modified neither the growth period of kernel structures, nor pericarp growth rate. By contrast, pollen source determined a trade-off between embryo and endosperm growth rates, which impacted on the embryo/kernel ratio of mature kernels. Modifications to the embryo size were mediated by scutellum cell number. Pollen source also affected (P < 0·01) allocation of embryo chemical compounds. Negative correlations among embryo oil concentration and those of starch (r = 0·98, P < 0·01) and soluble sugars (r = 0·95, P < 0·05) were found. Coincidently, embryos with low oil concentration had an increased (P < 0·05–0·10) scutellum cell area occupied by starch granules and fewer oil bodies. Conclusions The effects of pollen source on both embryo/kernel ratio and allocation of embryo chemicals seems to be related to the early

  13. Chemical constituents of peppers (Piper spp.) and application to food preservation: naturally occurring antioxidative compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Nakatani, N; Inatani, R; Ohta, H; Nishioka, A

    1986-01-01

    In a structure analysis of the compounds of the genus Piper (Family Piperaceae), we identified five phenolic amides from Piper nigrum, seven compounds from P. retrofractum, and two compounds from P. baccatum. All the phenolic amides possess significant antioxidant activities that are more effective than the naturally occurring antioxidant, alpha-tocopherol. One amide, feruperine, has antioxidant activity as high as the synthetic antioxidants, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT). Naturally occurring antioxidants, therefore, may surpass BHA and BHT in their ability to inactivate mutagens in food. PMID:3757949

  14. Crystal chemical and quantum chemical studies of Ba(Sr)-Nb oxide compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubkov, V. G.; Turzhevsky, S. A.; Pereliaev, V. A.; Liechtenstein, A. I.; Gubanov, V. A.

    1990-01-01

    The information available on the BaO(SrO)-NbO-NbO2 system with the niobium atom in the lower oxidation degree is very limited. Very few compounds have been found previously in this system. They are BaNbO3, SrxNbO3(0,7=x=1), Ba2Nb2O9, SrNb8O14; and some suggestions on the BaNb8O14 existence have been made also. At the same time Nb-based oxide compounds could be quite interesting in the search of new noncopper high T(sub c) superconductors Researchers studied Ba(Sr) NbxO2x-2 and Ba2(Sr2)-NbxO2x-1 compositions in the phase diagram of BaO(SrO)-NbO-NbO2 system. The synthesis of the materials was carried out in vacuum at the temperatures of 1000 to 1500 C. Barium carbonate and niobium pentoxide were used as initial components. X-ray analysis was carried out.

  15. Natural hydrazine-containing compounds: Biosynthesis, isolation, biological activities and synthesis.

    PubMed

    Le Goff, Géraldine; Ouazzani, Jamal

    2014-12-01

    Hydrazine, hydrazone and hydrazide derivatives are nitrogen-nitrogen bond containing compounds. Such molecules are relatively scarce in nature and have been isolated from plants, marine organisms and microorganisms. These compounds exhibit remarkable structural diversity and relevant biological activities. The enzymes involved in the formation of the N-N bond are still unknown, but many lines of evidence support the involvement of N-nitrosation and N-hydroxylation activating steps. Beside the challenging N-N bond, N-acylases catalyzing the C-N bond formation contribute to the chemical diversity of N-N-containing natural products (N2NP). This review examines the state of knowledge regarding the biosynthesis of N2NP, for which only two biosynthetic gene clusters have been investigated. Biological properties and chemical synthesis of hydrazines, hydrazones and hydrazides are also reported.

  16. Effect of vanadium compounds on acid phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Vescina, C M; Sálice, V C; Cortizo, A M; Etcheverry, S B

    1996-01-01

    The direct effect of different vanadium compounds on acid phosphatase (ACP) activity was investigated. Vanadate and vanadyl but not pervanadate inhibited the wheat germ ACP activity. These vanadium derivatives did not alter the fibroblast Swiss 3T3 soluble fraction ACP activity. Using inhibitors of tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases), the wheat germ ACP was partially characterized as a PTPase. This study suggests that the inhibitory ability of different vanadium derivatives to modulate ACP activity seems to depend on the geometry around the vanadium atom more than on the oxidation state. Our results indicate a correlation between the PTPase activity and the sensitivity to vanadate and vanadyl cation.

  17. Efficacy of potential chemical control compounds for removing invasive American bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana).

    PubMed

    Witmer, Gary W; Snow, Nathan P; Moulton, Rachael S

    2015-01-01

    Invasive American bullfrogs [Rana catesbeiana (Lithobates catesbeianus)] are outcompeting and predating on native biota and contributing to reductions in biodiversity worldwide. Current methods for controlling American bullfrogs are incapable of stopping their expansion, thus more cost-effective and broadly applicable methods are needed. Although chemical control compounds have been identified as effective for removing other invasive amphibians, none have been tested for American bullfrogs. Our objective was to expand on previous research and test the efficacy of 10 potential chemical control compounds for removing invasive American bullfrogs. After a dermal spray-application of 4 ml, we found 3 compounds (i.e., chloroxylenol, rotenone with permethrin, and caffeine) at 5-10 % concentrations in water were 100 % lethal for adult American bullfrogs. Chloroxylenol and rotenone with permethrin were fast acting with time-to-death <2 h. This research presents a first-step toward incorporating chemical control as part of integrated pest management strategy for controlling invasive American bullfrogs. Follow-up studies on delivery systems and reducing non-target hazards should ensue with these compounds to confirm their effectiveness and safety for removing invasive American bullfrogs.

  18. [Biological activity of selenorganic compounds at heavy metal salts intoxication].

    PubMed

    Rusetskaya, N Y; Borodulin, V B

    2015-01-01

    Possible mechanisms of the antitoxic action of organoselenium compounds in heavy metal poisoning have been considered. Heavy metal toxicity associated with intensification of free radical oxidation, suppression of the antioxidant system, damage to macromolecules, mitochondria and the genetic material can cause apoptotic cell death or the development of carcinogenesis. Organic selenium compounds are effective antioxidants during heavy metal poisoning; they exhibit higher bioavailability in mammals than inorganic ones and they are able to activate antioxidant defense, bind heavy metal ions and reactive oxygen species formed during metal-induced oxidative stress. One of promising organoselenium compounds is diacetophenonyl selenide (DAPS-25), which is characterized by antioxidant and antitoxic activity, under conditions including heavy metal intoxication.

  19. Compounds active against cell walls of medically important fungi.

    PubMed Central

    Hector, R F

    1993-01-01

    A number of substances that directly or indirectly affect the cell walls of fungi have been identified. Those that actively interfere with the synthesis or degradation of polysaccharide components share the property of being produced by soil microbes as secondary metabolites. Compounds specifically interfering with chitin or beta-glucan synthesis have proven effective in studies of preclinical models of mycoses, though they appear to have a restricted spectrum of coverage. Semisynthetic derivatives of some of the natural products have offered improvements in activity, toxicology, or pharmacokinetic behavior. Compounds which act on the cell wall indirectly or by a secondary mechanism of action, such as the azoles, act against diverse fungi but are usually fungistatic in nature. Overall, these compounds are attractive candidates for further development. PMID:8457977

  20. Toward Relatively General and Accurate Quantum Chemical Predictions of Solid-State (17)O NMR Chemical Shifts in Various Biologically Relevant Oxygen-Containing Compounds.

    PubMed

    Rorick, Amber; Michael, Matthew A; Yang, Liu; Zhang, Yong

    2015-09-03

    Oxygen is an important element in most biologically significant molecules, and experimental solid-state (17)O NMR studies have provided numerous useful structural probes to study these systems. However, computational predictions of solid-state (17)O NMR chemical shift tensor properties are still challenging in many cases, and in particular, each of the prior computational works is basically limited to one type of oxygen-containing system. This work provides the first systematic study of the effects of geometry refinement, method, and basis sets for metal and nonmetal elements in both geometry optimization and NMR property calculations of some biologically relevant oxygen-containing compounds with a good variety of XO bonding groups (X = H, C, N, P, and metal). The experimental range studied is of 1455 ppm, a major part of the reported (17)O NMR chemical shifts in organic and organometallic compounds. A number of computational factors toward relatively general and accurate predictions of (17)O NMR chemical shifts were studied to provide helpful and detailed suggestions for future work. For the studied kinds of oxygen-containing compounds, the best computational approach results in a theory-versus-experiment correlation coefficient (R(2)) value of 0.9880 and a mean absolute deviation of 13 ppm (1.9% of the experimental range) for isotropic NMR shifts and an R(2) value of 0.9926 for all shift-tensor properties. These results shall facilitate future computational studies of (17)O NMR chemical shifts in many biologically relevant systems, and the high accuracy may also help the refinement and determination of active-site structures of some oxygen-containing substrate-bound proteins.

  1. Solving practical problems in environmental sampling for chemical agents and their degradation compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.E.; Sheely, M.V.

    1995-06-01

    The analyses of environmental samples for chemical agent degradation products were conducted using analytical test methods designed for evaluation of solid waste samples. All methods are found in the 3rd Edition of EPA`s compendium of analytical methods (SW-846) dated July 1992. These EPA methods are recommended for compliance testing required by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and are routinely used for the analysis of environmental samples. In the past several years, these same methods were used to support the survey of areas suspected of having chemical agent or chemical agent degradation compound contamination. An overview is presented of the U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine`s (previously the U.S. Army Environmental Hygiene Agency) involvement with the analysis of samples for chemical agents and their degradation compounds collected from sites such as Tooele Army Depot, Rocky Mt. Arsenal, Newport Army Depot, Johnston Island, and Spring Valley, (a residential site near American University in Washington D.C.) Discussed are practical problems encountered during a quick response of a non-surety laboratory to analyze environmental samples for agents and their degradation compounds.

  2. Chemical characterisation of bioactive compounds in Medicago sativa growing in the desert of Oman.

    PubMed

    Hanif, Muhammad Asif; Al-Maskari, Ahmed Yahya; Al-Sabahi, Jamal Nasser; Al-Hdhrami, Ibtisam; Khan, Muhammad Mumtaz; Al-Azkawi, Ahlam; Hussain, Abdullah Ijaz

    2015-01-01

    Medicago sativa Linn growing in Omani desert were chemically characterised using flame photometry, inductively coupled plasma, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) analysis. HPLC analyses were performed to determine the phenolics and flavonoids present in M. sativa. The major compounds detected in M. sativa leaves were protchaechenic acid (3.22%), hydroxyl benzoic acid (1.05%), β-Phenyl caffate (0.97%) and kaempherol (0.89%). Pterostilbene, a cholesterol-lowering compound, was detected in M. sativa.

  3. Anti-Salmonella Activity of Volatile Compounds of Vietnam Coriander.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Ken-Ichi; Chavasiri, Warinthorn; Kubo, Isao

    2015-07-01

    Essential oil derived from the fresh leaves of Polygonum odoratum Lour was tested for their effects on a foodborne bacterium Salmonella choleraesuis subsp. choleraesuis ATCC 35640 using a broth dilution method. This essential oil showed a significant antibacterial activity against S. choleraesuis at the concentration of 200 µg/mL. Twenty-five volatile compounds were characterized from this essential oil by GC-MS, and aldehyde compounds were found abundant and accounted for more than three-fourths of the essential oil. Among the compounds characterized, dodecanal (C12 ) was the most abundant (55.5%), followed by decanal (C10 ) (11.6%). Both alkanals were effective against S. choleraesuis with the minimum growth inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values of 100 µg/mL. The most potent antibacterial activity against this bacterium was found with two minor compounds, dodecanol (lauryl alcohol) and 2E-dodecenal, both with each MBC of 6.25 µg/mL. Their primary antibacterial action against S. choleraesuis provably comes from their ability to function as nonionic surface-active agents (surfactants), disrupting the native function of integral membrane proteins nonspecifically. Thus, the antibacterial activity is mediated by biophysical processes. In the case of 2E-alkenals, a biochemical mechanism is also somewhat involved, depending on their alkyl chain length.

  4. Antibacterial activity of phenolic compounds against the phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa.

    PubMed

    Maddox, Christina E; Laur, Lisa M; Tian, Li

    2010-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a pathogenic bacterium that causes diseases in many crop species, which leads to considerable economic loss. Phenolic compounds (a group of secondary metabolites) are widely distributed in plants and have shown to possess antimicrobial properties. The anti-Xylella activity of 12 phenolic compounds, representing phenolic acid, coumarin, stilbene and flavonoid, was evaluated using an in vitro agar dilution assay. Overall, these phenolic compounds were effective in inhibiting X. fastidiosa growth, as indicated by low minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). In addition, phenolic compounds with different structural features exhibited different anti-Xylella capacities. Particularly, catechol, caffeic acid and resveratrol showed strong anti-Xylella activities. Differential response to phenolic compounds was observed among X. fastidiosa strains isolated from grape and almond. Elucidation of secondary metabolite-based host resistance to X. fastidiosa will have broad implication in combating X. fastidiosa-caused plant diseases. It will facilitate future production of plants with improved disease resistance properties through genetic engineering or traditional breeding approaches and will significantly improve crop yield.

  5. Development of a Fundamental Understanding of Chemical Bonding and Electronic Structure in Spinel Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Sickafus, K.E.; Wills, J.M.; Chen, S.-P.; Terry, J.H., Jr.; Hartmann, T.; Sheldon, R.I.

    1999-05-14

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos national Laboratory (LANL). Hundreds of ceramic compounds possess the spinel crystal structure and exhibit a remarkable variety of properties, ranging from compounds that are electrical insulators to compounds that are superconducting, or from compounds with ferri- and antiferromagnetic behavior to materials with colossal magnetoresistive characteristics. The unique crystal structure of spinel compounds is in many ways responsible for the widely varying physical properties of spinels. The objective of this project is to investigate the nature of chemical bonding, point defects, and electronic structure in compounds with the spinel crystal structure. Our goal is to understand and predict the stability of the spinel structure as a function of chemical composition, stoichiometry, and cation disorder. The consequences of cation disorder in spinel materials can be profound . The ferromagnetic characteristics of magnesioferrite, for instance, are entirely attributable to disorder on the cation sublattices. Our studies provide insight into the mechanisms of point defect formation and cation disorder and their effects on the electronic band structure and crystal structure of spinel-structure materials. our ultimate objective is to develop a more substantive knowledge of the spinel crystal structure and to promote new and novel uses for spinel compounds. The technical approach to achieve our goals is to combine first-principles calculations with experimental measurements. The structural and electronic properties of spinel samples were experimentally determined primarily with X-ray and neutron scattering, optical and X-ray absorption, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. Total energy electronic structure calculations were performed to determine structural stability, band structure, density of states, and electron distribution. We also used shell

  6. Development of a Fundamental Understanding of Chemical Bonding and Electronic Structure in Spinel Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Sickafus, K.E.; Wills, J.M.; Chen, S.-P.; Terry, J.H., Jr.; Hartmann, T.; Sheldon, R.I.

    1999-06-03

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Hundreds of ceramic compounds possess the spinel crystal structure and exhibit a remarkable variety of properties, ranging from compounds that are electrical insulators to compounds that are superconducting, or from compounds with ferri- and antiferromagnetic behavior to materials with colossal magnetoresistive characteristics. The unique crystal structure of spinel compounds is in many ways responsible for the widely varying physical properties of spinels. The objective of this project is to investigate the nature of chemical bonding, point defects, and electronic structure in compounds with the spinel crystal structure. Our goal is to understand and predict the stability of the spinel structure as a function of chemical composition, stoichiometry, and cation disorder. The consequences of cation disorder in spinel materials can be profound . The ferromagnetic characteristics of magnesioferrite, for instance, are entirely attributable to disorder on the cation sublattices. Our studies provide insight into the mechanisms of point defect formation and cation disorder and their effects on the electronic band structure and crystal structure of spinel-structure materials. Our ultimate objective is to develop a more substantive knowledge of the spinel crystal structure and to promote new and novel uses for spinel compounds. The technical approach to achieve our goals is to combine first-principles calculations with experimental measurements. The structural and electronic properties of spinel samples were experimentally determined primarily with X-ray and neutron scattering, optical and X-ray absorption, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. Total energy electronic structure calculations were performed to determine structural stability, band structure, density of states, and electron distribution. We also used shell

  7. Wound Healing Activity and Chemical Standardization of Eugenia pruniformis Cambess

    PubMed Central

    de Albuquerque, Ricardo Diego Duarte Galhardo; Perini, Jamila Alessandra; Machado, Daniel Escorsim; Angeli-Gamba, Thaís; Esteves, Ricardo dos Santos; Santos, Marcelo Guerra; Oliveira, Adriana Passos; Rocha, Leandro

    2016-01-01

    Background: Eugenia pruniformis is an endemic species from Brazil. Eugenia genus has flavonoids as one of the remarkable chemical classes which are related to the improvement of the healing process. Aims: To evaluate of wound healing activity of E. pruniformis leaves and to identify and quantify its main flavonoids compounds. Materials And Methods: Wound excision model in rats was used to verify the hydroethanolic and ethyl acetate extracts potential. The animals were divided in four groups of six and the samples were evaluated until the 15° day of treatment. Hydroxyproline dosage and histological staining with hematoxilin-eosin and Sirius Red were used to observe the tissue organization and quantify the collagen deposition, respectively. Chemical compounds of the ethyl acetate extract were identified by chromatographic techniques and mass spectrometry analysis and total flavonoids content was determined by spectrophotometric method. The antioxidant activity was determined by oxygen radical absorbing capacity (ORAC) and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazylhydrate radical photometric (DPPH) assays. Results: The treated group with the ethyl acetate extract showed collagen deposition increase, higher levels of hidroxyproline, better tissue reorganization and complete remodeling of epidermis. Quercetin, kaempferol and hyperoside were identified as main compounds and flavonoids content value was 43% (w/w). The ORAC value of the ethyl acetate extract was 0.81± 0.05 mmol TE/g whereas the concentration to produce 50% reduction of the DPPH was 7.05± 0.09 μg/mL. Conclusion: The data indicate a wound healing and antioxidant activities of E. pruniformis. This study is the first report of flavonoids and wound healing activity of E. pruniformis. KEY MESSAGES Eugenia pruniformis extract accelerates wound healing in skin rat model, probably due to its involvement with the collagen deposition increase, higher levels of hidroxyproline, dermal remodelling and potent antioxidant activity

  8. Chemical composition and biological activity of Salvia verbenaca essential oil.

    PubMed

    Canzoneri, Marisa; Bruno, Maurizio; Rosselli, Sergio; Russo, Alessandra; Cardile, Venera; Formisano, Carmen; Rigano, Daniela; Senatore, Felice

    2011-07-01

    Salvia verbenaca L. (syn. S. minore) is a perennial herb known in the traditional medicine of Sicily as "spaccapetri" and is used to resolve cases of kidney stones, chewing the fresh leaves or in decoction. The chemical composition of the essential oil obtained from aerial parts of S. verbenaca collected in Piano Battaglia (Sicily) on July 2009, was analyzed by GC and GC-MS. The oil was strongly characterized by fatty acids (39.5%) and carbonylic compounds (21.2%), with hexadecanoic acid (23.1%), (Z)-9-octadecenoic acid (11.1%) and benzaldehyde (7.3%) as the main constituents. The in vitro activity of the essential oil against some microorganisms in comparison with chloramphenicol by the broth dilution method was determined. The oil exhibited a good activity as inhibitor of growth of Gram + bacteria.

  9. Micro- and Nanostructured Metal Oxide Chemical Sensors for Volatile Organic Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alim, M. A.; Penn, B. G.; Currie, J. R., Jr.; Batra, A. K.; Aggarwal, M. D.

    2008-01-01

    Aeronautic and space applications warrant the development of chemical sensors which operate in a variety of environments. This technical memorandum incorporates various kinds of chemical sensors and ways to improve their performance. The results of exploratory investigation of the binary composite polycrystalline thick-films such as SnO2-WO3, SnO2-In2O3, SnO2-ZnO for the detection of volatile organic compound (isopropanol) are reported. A short review of the present status of the new types of nanostructured sensors such as nanobelts, nanorods, nanotube, etc. based on metal oxides is presented.

  10. Experimental Observation of the Nature of Weak Chemical Bonds in Labile Compounds.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Daisuke

    2017-02-15

    Accurate single-crystal X-ray diffraction data afford a total electron density distribution for crystalline materials by employing an aspherical atomic model with comparable accuracy to that of theoretical calculations. Chemical bonds and intermolecular interactions in the crystalline state are characterized based on the electron density distribution of valence electrons, as well as structural parameters. Herein, the bonding nature of weak chemical bonds in labile compounds, such as hypervalent bonds and delocalized π-bonds, is explored on the basis of electronic structures derived from experimental electron density distribution analyses. In addition, the visualization of a radicalic orbital distribution on an sp(2) -hydridized carbon atom is demonstrated.

  11. FAF-Drugs3: a web server for compound property calculation and chemical library design.

    PubMed

    Lagorce, David; Sperandio, Olivier; Baell, Jonathan B; Miteva, Maria A; Villoutreix, Bruno O

    2015-07-01

    Drug attrition late in preclinical or clinical development is a serious economic problem in the field of drug discovery. These problems can be linked, in part, to the quality of the compound collections used during the hit generation stage and to the selection of compounds undergoing optimization. Here, we present FAF-Drugs3, a web server that can be used for drug discovery and chemical biology projects to help in preparing compound libraries and to assist decision-making during the hit selection/lead optimization phase. Since it was first described in 2006, FAF-Drugs has been significantly modified. The tool now applies an enhanced structure curation procedure, can filter or analyze molecules with user-defined or eight predefined physicochemical filters as well as with several simple ADMET (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity) rules. In addition, compounds can be filtered using an updated list of 154 hand-curated structural alerts while Pan Assay Interference compounds (PAINS) and other, generally unwanted groups are also investigated. FAF-Drugs3 offers access to user-friendly html result pages and the possibility to download all computed data. The server requires as input an SDF file of the compounds; it is open to all users and can be accessed without registration at http://fafdrugs3.mti.univ-paris-diderot.fr.

  12. FAF-Drugs3: a web server for compound property calculation and chemical library design

    PubMed Central

    Lagorce, David; Sperandio, Olivier; Baell, Jonathan B.; Miteva, Maria A.; Villoutreix, Bruno O.

    2015-01-01

    Drug attrition late in preclinical or clinical development is a serious economic problem in the field of drug discovery. These problems can be linked, in part, to the quality of the compound collections used during the hit generation stage and to the selection of compounds undergoing optimization. Here, we present FAF-Drugs3, a web server that can be used for drug discovery and chemical biology projects to help in preparing compound libraries and to assist decision-making during the hit selection/lead optimization phase. Since it was first described in 2006, FAF-Drugs has been significantly modified. The tool now applies an enhanced structure curation procedure, can filter or analyze molecules with user-defined or eight predefined physicochemical filters as well as with several simple ADMET (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity) rules. In addition, compounds can be filtered using an updated list of 154 hand-curated structural alerts while Pan Assay Interference compounds (PAINS) and other, generally unwanted groups are also investigated. FAF-Drugs3 offers access to user-friendly html result pages and the possibility to download all computed data. The server requires as input an SDF file of the compounds; it is open to all users and can be accessed without registration at http://fafdrugs3.mti.univ-paris-diderot.fr. PMID:25883137

  13. Natural compounds with aromatase inhibitory activity: an update.

    PubMed

    Balunas, Marcy J; Kinghorn, A Douglas

    2010-08-01

    Several synthetic aromatase inhibitors are currently in clinical use for the treatment of postmenopausal women with hormone-receptor positive breast cancer. However, these treatments may lead to untoward side effects and so the search for new aromatase inhibitors continues, especially those for which the activity is promoter-specific, targeting the breast-specific promoters I.3 and II. Recently, numerous natural compounds have been found to inhibit aromatase in noncellular, cellular, and IN VIVO studies. These investigations, covering the last two years, as well as additional studies that have focused on the evaluation of natural compounds as promoter-specific aromatase inhibitors or as aromatase inducers, are described in this review.

  14. Sample preparation of organic liquid for off-site analysis of chemical weapons convention related compounds.

    PubMed

    Pardasani, Deepak; Palit, Meehir; Gupta, A K; Shakya, Purushottam; Sekhar, K; Dubey, D K

    2005-02-15

    Off-site analysis of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and related compounds plays a key role in the verification program of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC). The analysis results, aiming toward unambiguous identication of compounds, depend on the type of sample preparation method. Development of milder sample preparation methods, which offer good recoveries and do not alter the structure of analytes, is highly desirable. Organic liquid with high hydrocarbon background is a frequently encountered challenge in off-site analysis and in official proficiency tests conducted by OPCW. Sample cleanup procedures, namely, solvent exchange followed by cooling and liquid-liquid extraction were studied to eliminate the hydrocarbons from organic liquid. Acetonitrile, a polar aprotic solvent, was effectively used to remove the background in both methods, and recoveries of spiked CWAs by the two techniques were between 69 and 99%.

  15. Chemical compounds and toxicological assessments of drinking water stored in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles: A source of controversy reviewed.

    PubMed

    Bach, Cristina; Dauchy, Xavier; Chagnon, Marie-Christine; Etienne, Serge

    2012-03-01

    A declaration of conformity according to European regulation No. 10/2011 is required to ensure the safety of plastic materials in contact with foodstuffs. This regulation established a positive list of substances that are authorized for use in plastic materials. Some compounds are subject to restrictions and/or specifications according to their toxicological data. Despite this, the analysis of PET reveals some non-intentionally added substances (NIAS) produced by authorized initial reactants and additives. Genotoxic and estrogenic activities in PET-bottled water have been reported. Chemical mixtures in bottled water have been suggested as the source of these toxicological effects. Furthermore, sample preparation techniques, such as solid-phase extraction (SPE), to extract estrogen-like compounds in bottled water are controversial. It has been suggested that inappropriate extraction methods and sample treatment may result in false-negative or positive responses when testing water extracts in bioassays. There is therefore a need to combine chemical analysis with bioassays to carry out hazard assessments. Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and antimony are clearly related to migration from PET into water. However, several studies have shown other theoretically unexpected substances in bottled water. The origin of these compounds has not been clearly established (PET container, cap-sealing resins, background contamination, water processing steps, NIAS, recycled PET, etc.). Here, we surveyed toxicological studies on PET-bottled water and chemical compounds that may be present therein. Our literature review shows that contradictory results for PET-bottled water have been reported, and differences can be explained by the wide variety of analytical methods, bioassays and exposure conditions employed.

  16. [Chemical Loss of Volatile Organic Compounds and Its Impact on the Formation of Ozone in Shanghai].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-li

    2015-09-01

    The spatial characterization of ozone (O3) and its precursors was studied based on the field measurements in urban and rural areas of Shanghai during the summer of 2014. The chemical loss of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was estimated by the parameterization method. The mixing ratio of VOCs was 20 x 10(-9) in urban area and 17 x 10(-9) in the west rural area during the measurements. The average values of the maximum incremental reactivity were comparable in urban and rural areas, namely 5. 0 mol.mol-1 (O3/VOCs). By contrast, the chemical loss of VOCs was 8. 3 x 10(-9) in west rural area, which was two times as that in urban area. The more chemical loss of VOCs was probably one of the important reasons leading to the higher O3 concentration in west rural area. The regional transport might be important reason of the variation of O3 in the eastern coastal rural area. The chemical loss of VOCs showed good agreement with the local formation of O3 in both urban and rural areas, suggesting a similar efficiency of O3 formation from the chemical loss of VOCs. Among the chemical loss, aromatics and alkenes are the dominant VOC species of the atmospheric chemistry which accounts for more than 90% . The diurnal profile of VOC chemical loss matched well with the production of O3 with one-hour postponement.

  17. Scalarane and homoscalarane compounds from the nudibranchs Glossodoris sedna and Glossodoris dalli: chemical and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Fontana, A; Mollo, E; Ortea, J; Gavagnin, M; Cimino, G

    2000-04-01

    A series of homoscalarane and scalarane compounds (2-7) have been isolated from two distinct species of Pacific Glossodoris nudibranchs. The structure and elucidation of the relative stereochemistry of the new metabolites 2 and 3 were obtained by spectroscopic methods. Compound 2 was ichthyotoxic at 0.1 ppm against Gambusia affinis and showed moderate activity (IC(50) 18 microM) to inhibit mammalian phospholipase A(2).

  18. Thymus mastichina: chemical constituents and their anti-cancer activity.

    PubMed

    Gordo, Joana; Máximo, Patrícia; Cabrita, Eurico; Lourenço, Ana; Oliva, Abel; Almeida, Joana; Filipe, Mariana; Cruz, Pedro; Barcia, Rita; Santos, Miguel; Cruz, Helder

    2012-11-01

    The cytotoxicity-guided study of the dichloromethane and ethanol extracts of Thymus mastichina L. using the HCT colon cancer cell line allowed the identification of nine compounds, sakuranetin (1), sterubin (2), oleanolic acid (3), ursolic acid (4), lutein (5), beta-sitosterol (6), rosmarinic acid (7), 6-hydroxyluteolin-7-O-beta-glucopyranoside (8), and 6-hydroxyapigenin-7-O-beta-glucopyranoside (9). All compounds were tested for their cytotoxicity against the HCT colon cancer cell line. Compound 4 showed cytotoxicity with GI50 value of 6.8 microg/mL. A fraction composed of a mixture (1:1) of triterpenoid acids 3 and 4 displayed improved cytotoxicity with a GI50 of 2.8 microg/mL suggesting a synergistic behavior. This is the first report on the chemical constituents of Thymus mastichina L. based on structural assignments by spectroscopic analysis. The presence of these constituents identified by colon cancer cytotoxicity-guided activity indicates that extracts of T. mastichina L. may have a protective effect against colon cancers.

  19. The quantum-chemical determination of group contributions to the thermodynamic properties of organophosphorus compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorofeeva, O. V.; Ryzhova, O. N.; Moiseeva, N. F.

    2008-06-01

    The enthalpies of formation, entropies, and heat capacities of 95 organophosphorus derivatives calculated by nonempirical quantum-chemical methods were used to develop the additive method for estimating the thermodynamic properties of these compounds. 86 group contribution values were obtained for estimating the thermodynamic properties of diverse organic derivatives of phosphorus in the oxidation states 3 and 5 (three-and four-coordinate phosphorus atoms).

  20. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of 111-v compounds on silicon

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, Stanley M.

    1986-01-01

    Expitaxial composite comprising thin films of a Group III-V compound semiconductor such as gallium arsenide (GaAs) or gallium aluminum arsenide (GaAlAs) on single crystal silicon substrates are disclosed. Also disclosed is a process for manufacturing, by chemical deposition from the vapor phase, epitaxial composites as above described, and to semiconductor devices based on such epitaxial composites. The composites have particular utility for use in making light sensitive solid state solar cells.

  1. Active Chemical Thermodynamics promoted by activity of cortical actin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Bhaswati; Chaudhuri, Abhishek; Gowrishankar, Kripa; Rao, Madan

    2011-03-01

    The spatial distribution and dynamics of formation and breakup of the nanoclusters of cell surface proteins is controlled by the active remodeling dynamics of the underlying cortical actin. To explain these observations, we have proposed a novel mechanism of nanoclustering, involving the transient binding to and advection along constitutively occuring ``asters'' of cortical actin. We study the consequences of such active actin-based clustering, in the context of chemical reactions involving conformational changes of cell surface proteins. We find that the active remodeling of cortical actin, can give rise to a dramatic increase in efficiency and extent of conformational spread, even at low levels of expression at the cell surface. We define a activity temperature (τa) arising due to actin activities which can be used to describe chemical thermodynamics of the system. We plot TTT (time-temparature-transformation) curves and compute the Arrhenius factors which depend on τa . With this, the active asters can be treated as enzymes whose enzymatic reaction rate can be related to the activity.

  2. Synthesis and antitumor activity of natural compound aloe emodin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Thimmegowda, Naraganahalli R; Park, Chanmi; Shwetha, Bettaswamigowda; Sakchaisri, Krisada; Liu, Kangdong; Hwang, Joonsung; Lee, Sangku; Jeong, Sook J; Soung, Nak K; Jang, Jae H; Ryoo, In-Ja; Ahn, Jong S; Erikson, Raymond L; Kim, Bo Y

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we have synthesized novel water soluble derivatives of natural compound aloe emodin 4(a-j) by coupling with various amino acid esters and substituted aromatic amines, in an attempt to improve the anticancer activity and to explore the structure-activity relationships. The structures of the compounds were determined by (1) H NMR and mass spectroscopy. Cell growth inhibition assays revealed that the aloe emodin derivatives 4d, 4f, and 4i effectively decreased the growth of HepG2 (human liver cancer cells) and NCI-H460 (human lung cancer cells) and some of the derivatives exhibited comparable antitumor activity against HeLa (Human epithelial carcinoma cells) and PC3 (prostate cancer cells) cell lines compared to that of the parent aloe emodin at low micromolar concentrations.

  3. Estimation of Physical Properties and Chemical Reactivity Parameters of Organic Compounds for Environmental Modeling by SPARC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mathematical models for predicting the transport and fate of pollutants in the environment require reactivity parameter values that is value of the physical and chemical constants that govern reactivity. Although empirical structure activity relationships have been developed th...

  4. In Vivo Rapid Assessment of Compound Exposure (RACE) for Profiling the Pharmacokinetics of Novel Chemical Probes

    PubMed Central

    McAnally, Danielle; Vicchiarelli, Michael; Siddiquee, Khandaker

    2013-01-01

    The RACE assay is an easy and efficient method for estimating the exposure of novel chemical probe compounds in mice. RACE is a truncated and compressed version of a traditional comprehensive in vivo pharmacokinetics study. The method uses a single standard formulation, dose, route of administration, and a small cohort of mice (n=4). Standardized protocols and an abbreviated sample collection scheme reduce the labor needed to perform both the in life and bioanalytical phases of the study. The procedure reduces the complexity of data analysis by eliminating all but one calculated pharmacokinetic parameter; estimated exposure (eAUC20-120), a parameter that is sufficient to rank order compounds based on exposure, but is also easily determined by most software using the simple trapezoidal rule. The RACE assay protocol is readily applicable to early/exploratory studies of most compounds, and is intended to be employed by laboratories with limited expertise in pharmacology and pharmacokinetics. PMID:23788556

  5. Antioxidant activity of compounds from the medicinal herb Aster tataricus.

    PubMed

    Ng, T B; Liu, Fang; Lu, Yanhua; Cheng, C H K; Wang, Zhengtao

    2003-10-01

    A number of compounds were isolated from the medicinal plant Aster tataricus including shionone, epifriedelinol, quercetin, kaempferol, scopoletin, emodin, aurantiamide acetate and 1,7-dihydroxy-6-methyl-anthraquinone. The compounds were compared with regard to their ability in inhibiting hemolysis of rat erythrocytes induced by 2'-2' azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride, lipid peroxidation using the FeSO(4)-ascorbic acid system, and generation of superoxide radicals using a phenazine methosulfate-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide system. The effects on the Fe-bleomycin-induced DNA damage reflected pro-oxidant activity. Quercetin and kaempferol were most potent in inhibiting hemolysis, lipid peroxidation and superoxide radical generation. Scopoletin and emodin were similar to quercetin and kaempferol in inhibiting superoxide radical generation and second to them in inhibiting lipid peroxidation. Aurantiamide acetate exhibited some inhibitory activity toward superoxide radical generation. 1,7-dihydroxy-6-methyl-anthraquinone exerted an inhibitory activity only on superoxide radical generation. Shionone and epifriedelinol did not display any antioxidant activity. Quercetin and kaempferol, but not the remaining compounds, exhibited some pro-oxidant activity.

  6. Aqua mediated synthesis of bio-active compounds.

    PubMed

    Panda, Siva S

    2013-05-01

    Recently the aqueous medium has attracted the interest of organic chemists, and many. Moreover, in the past 20 years, the drug-discovery process has undergone extraordinary changes, and high-throughput biological screening of potential drug candidates has led to an ever-increasing demand for novel drug-like compounds. Noteworthy advantages were observed during the course of study on aqua mediated synthesis of compounds of medicinal importance. The established advantages of water as a solvent for reactions are, water is the most abundant and available resource on the planet and many biochemical processes occur in aqueous medium. This review will focus on describing new developments in the application of water in medicinal chemistry for the synthesis of bio-active compounds possessing various biological properties.

  7. Hybrid energy storage systems utilizing redox active organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Xu, Wu; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2015-09-08

    Redox flow batteries (RFB) have attracted considerable interest due to their ability to store large amounts of power and energy. Non-aqueous energy storage systems that utilize at least some aspects of RFB systems are attractive because they can offer an expansion of the operating potential window, which can improve on the system energy and power densities. One example of such systems has a separator separating first and second electrodes. The first electrode includes a first current collector and volume containing a first active material. The second electrode includes a second current collector and volume containing a second active material. During operation, the first source provides a flow of first active material to the first volume. The first active material includes a redox active organic compound dissolved in a non-aqueous, liquid electrolyte and the second active material includes a redox active metal.

  8. Solvent Extraction of Chemical Attribution Signature Compounds from Painted Wall Board: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, Jon H.; Colburn, Heather A.

    2009-10-29

    This report summarizes work that developed a robust solvent extraction procedure for recovery of chemical attribution signature (CAS) compound dimethyl methyl phosphonate (DMMP) (as well as diethyl methyl phosphonate (DEMP), diethyl methyl phosphonothioate (DEMPT), and diisopropyl methyl phosphonate (DIMP)) from painted wall board (PWB), which was selected previously as the exposed media by the chemical attribution scientific working group (CASWG). An accelerated solvent extraction approach was examined to determine the most effective method of extraction from PWB. Three different solvent systems were examined, which varied in solvent strength and polarity (i.e., 1:1 dichloromethane : acetone,100% methanol, and 1% isopropanol in pentane) with a 1:1 methylene chloride : acetone mixture having the most robust and consistent extraction for four original target organophosphorus compounds. The optimum extraction solvent was determined based on the extraction efficiency of the target analytes from spiked painted wallboard as determined by gas chromatography x gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCxGC-MS) analysis of the extract. An average extraction efficiency of approximately 60% was obtained for these four compounds. The extraction approach was further demonstrated by extracting and detecting the chemical impurities present in neat DMMP that was vapor-deposited onto painted wallboard tickets.

  9. Miniaturized sequential injection analyzer for the monitoring and quantitation of chemical weapons degradation compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancaster, Herbert L., III; Postlethwaite, Timothy A.; Zhang, Peng; Sorrells, Richard

    2002-06-01

    The ability to monitor and detect chemical warfare agents and their degradation compounds continues to be of utmost importance. Remote on-site field analysis of these compounds is also extremely important as it relates to treaty verification for the Chemical Weapons Convention, as well as the minimization and elimination of human exposure. A portable instrument has been developed and miniaturized that allows for the detection of these compounds in the field with better quantitative results and higher reproducibility than traditional field test kits. All sample and reagent manipulations are conducted in a completely automated fashion. Quantitative results may be determined colorimetrically using the molybdenum blue reaction for the final degradation product of phosphonic acid based chemical warfare agents with a detection limit of 0.05 ppm. The instrument is based on the flow analysis technique of sequential injection analysis (SIA). The benefits of this approach are that the method provides rapid response, high reproducibility of results, high sensitivity and minimal waste production.

  10. Characterizing the Smell of Marijuana by Odor Impact of Volatile Compounds: An Application of Simultaneous Chemical and Sensory Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Recent US legislation permitting recreational use of marijuana in certain states brings the use of marijuana odor as probable cause for search and seizure to the forefront of forensic science, once again. This study showed the use of solid-phase microextraction with multidimensional gas chromatography—mass spectrometry and simultaneous human olfaction to characterize the total aroma of marijuana. The application of odor activity analysis offers an explanation as to why high volatile chemical concentration does not equate to most potent odor impact of a certain compound. This suggests that more attention should be focused on highly odorous compounds typically present in low concentrations, such as nonanal, decanol, o-cymene, benzaldehyde, which have more potent odor impact than previously reported marijuana headspace volatiles. PMID:26657499

  11. Spectral Response and Diagnostics of Biological Activity of Hydroxyl-Containing Aromatic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Mayer, G. V.; Bel'kov, M. V.; Shadyro, O. I.

    2016-08-01

    Using IR Fourier spectra and employing quantum-chemical calculations of electronic structure, spectra, and proton-acceptor properties, synthetic derivatives of aminophenol exhibiting biological activity in the suppression of herpes, influenza, and HIV viruses have been investigated from a new perspective, with the aim of establishing the spectral response of biological activity of the molecules. It has been experimentally established that the participation of the aminophenol hydroxyl group in intramolecular hydrogen bonds is characteristic of structures with antiviral properties. A quantum-chemical calculation of the proton-acceptor ability of the investigated aminophenol derivatives has shown that biologically active structures are characterized by a high proton-acceptor ability of oxygen of the hydroxyl group. A correlation that has been obtained among the formation of an intramolecular hydrogen bond, high proton-acceptor ability, and antiviral activity of substituted aminophenols enables us to predict the pharmacological properties of new medical preparations of the given class of compounds.

  12. Toxicity challenges in environmental chemicals: Prediction of human plasma protein binding through quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study explores the merit of utilizing available pharmaceutical data to construct a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) for prediction of the fraction of a chemical unbound to plasma protein (Fub) in environmentally relevant compounds. Independent model...

  13. Genotoxic activity of organic chemicals in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Meier, J R

    1988-11-01

    The information summarized in this review provides substantial evidence for the widespread presence of genotoxins in drinking water. In many, if not most cases, the genotoxic activity can be directly attributed to the chlorination stage of drinking water treatment. The genotoxic activity appears to originate primarily from reactions of chlorine with humic substances in the source waters. Genotoxic activity in drinking water concentrates has been most frequently demonstrated using bacterial mutagenicity tests but results with mammalian cell assay systems are generally consistent with the findings from the bacterial assays. There is currently no evidence for genotoxic damage following in vivo exposures to animals. In some locations genotoxic contaminants of probable industrial and/or agricultural origin occur in the source waters and contribute substantially to the genotoxic activity of finished drinking waters. The method used for sample concentration can have an important bearing on study results. In particular, organic acids account for most of the mutagenicity of chlorinated drinking water, and their recovery from water requires a sample acidification step prior to extraction or XAD resin adsorption. Considerable work has been done to determine the identity of the compounds responsible for the mutagenicity of organic concentrates of drinking water. Recently, one class of acidic compounds, the chlorinated hydroxyfuranones, has been shown to be responsible for a major part of the mutagenic activity. Strategies for drinking water treatment that have been evaluated with respect to reduction of genotoxins in drinking water include granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration, chemical destruction, and the use of alternative means of treatment (i.e., ozone, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine). GAC treatment has been found to be effective for removal of mutagens from drinking water even after the GAC is beyond its normal use for organic carbon removal. All disinfectant

  14. Flavonoids, Antioxidant Activity and Aroma Compounds Analysis from Different Kinds of Tartary Buckwheat Tea

    PubMed Central

    Peng, L. X.; Zou, L.; Wang, J. B.; Zhao, J. L.; Xiang, D. B.; Zhao, G.

    2015-01-01

    The rutin, quercetin concentrations, antioxidant activity, and aroma compounds in different commercial tartary buckwheat tea were analyzed in our study. Results revealed that the materials and the processing protocol affected the chemical composition and activity of tartary buckwheat tea. Rutin and quercetin concentrations, antioxidant activity were significantly different in various kinds of tartary buckwheat tea, where the whole bran tea and the whole plant tea had the lower rutin, but higher quercetin concentrations and higher antioxidant activity. The whole embryo tea had the converse results. There was strong correlation between quercetin concentration and antioxidant activity (r>0.98, P<0.05). Meanwhile, Twenty eight different aroma compounds in tartary buckwheat tea were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Those compounds were mainly composed of pyrazine, aldehydes, fatty acids and ketones. The main type of aroma compounds in different tartary buckwheat tea were similar, but their relative contents were different. The implications to the quality control of buckwheat tea were extensively discussed. PMID:26997692

  15. Antifungal compounds from turmeric and nutmeg with activity against plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Radwan, Mohamed M; Tabanca, Nurhayat; Wedge, David E; Tarawneh, Amer H; Cutler, Stephen J

    2014-12-01

    The antifungal activity of twenty-two common spices was evaluated against plant pathogens using direct-bioautography coupled Colletotrichum bioassays. Turmeric, nutmeg, ginger, clove, oregano, cinnamon, anise, fennel, basil, black cumin, and black pepper showed antifungal activity against the plant pathogens Colletotrichum acutatum, Colletotrichum fragariae, and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. Among the active extracts, turmeric and nutmeg were the most active and were chosen for further investigation. The bioassay-guided fractionation led to the isolation of three compounds from turmeric (1-3) and three compounds from nutmeg (4-6). Their chemical structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analysis including HR-MS, 1D, and 2D NMR as curcumin (1), demethoxycurcumin (2) and bisdemethoxy-curcumin (3), erythro-(7R,8R)-Δ(8')-4,7-dihydroxy-3,3',5'-trimethoxy-8-O-4'-neolignan (4), erythro-(7R,8R)-Δ8'-7-acetoxy-3,4,3',5'-tetra-methoxy-8-O-4'-neolignan (5), and 5-hydroxy-eugenol (6). The isolated compounds were subsequently evaluated using a 96-well microbioassay against plant pathogens. At 30 μM, compounds 2 and 3 possessed the most antifungal activity against Phomopsis obscurans and Phomopsis viticola, respectively.

  16. Influence of redox-active compounds and PXR-activators on human MRP1 and MRP2 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kauffmann, Hans Martin; Pfannschmidt, Sylvia; Zöller, Heike; Benz, Anke; Vorderstemann, Birgit; Webster, Jeanette I; Schrenk, Dieter

    2002-02-28

    In the present study, we investigated the inducibility of the drug conjugate transporter genes MRP1 and MRP2 by redox-active compounds such as tertiary butylated hydroquinone (tBHQ) and quercetin and by chemicals known to activate the pregnane X receptor (PXR) such as rifampicin and clotrimazol and by the metalloid compound arsenite. The human MRP2 gene was found to be inducible in HepG2 cells by rifampicin, clotrimazol, arsenite and tBHQ. As MRP1 expression is extremely low in HepG2 cells, its inducibility was studied in MCF-7 cells. However, only tBHQ and quercetin acted as inducers, but not the other compounds investigated. Reporter gene assays demonstrated that proximal promoter regions of the genes contribute to the induction by tBHQ, quercetin (MRP1) and clotrimazol (MRP2). However, the deletion of binding sites supposed to mediate the induction process (a PXR-binding element-like sequence for the clotrimazol effect and an ARE (antioxidative response element) for the tBHQ/quercetin effect) did not result in a significant decrease in the induction factor indicating that other parts of the promoter are probably involved in the induction process. In summary, expression of both genes can be up-regulated by redox-active compounds, while the other compounds tested induced only MRP2 but not MRP1 expression.

  17. Anti-allergic inflammatory activities of compounds of amomi fructus.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyun Gyu; Je, In-Gyu; Kim, Geum Jin; Choi, Hyukjae; Kim, Sang Hyun; Kim, Jeong Ah; Lee, Kim Seung Ho

    2015-04-01

    Activity-guided isolation of compounds from the fruits of Amomum xanthioides resulted in the purification of fourteen phenolic compounds, 4-hydroxy-benzaldehyde (1), 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (2), 3,5-dimethoxy-4-methylbenzaldehyde (3), syringic aldehyde (4), benzoic acid (5), 3,4-dihydroxy benzoic acid (6), vanillic acid (7), 3-hydroxy-2-methoxybenzoic acid (8), o-vanillic acid (9), phenylacetic acid (10), tyrosol (11), pyrocatechol (12), 1,2,4,5-tetramethoxybenzene (13), and 3,3',5,5'-tetramethoxybiphenyl-4,4'-diol (14). To evaluate the anti-allergic inflammatory activities of these compounds, we examined the inhibitory effects of the isolates (1-14) on histamine release and on the expressions of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-ca and interleukin (IL)-6 genes by using human mast cells. Of the tested compounds, 9, 11, and 13 suppressed histamine release from mast cells, and all isolates attenuated the expressions of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α and IL-6 genes in human mast cells.

  18. Natural products as a resource for biologically active compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Hanke, F.J.

    1986-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate various sources of biologically active natural products in an effort to identify the active pesticidal compounds involved. The study is divided into several parts. Chapter 1 contains a discussion of several new compounds from plant and animal sources. Chapter 2 introduces a new NMR technique. In section 2.1 a new technique for better utilizing the lanthanide relaxation agent Gd(fod)/sub 3/ is presented which allows the predictable removal of resonances without line broadening. Section 2.2 discusses a variation of this technique for use in an aqueous solvent by applying this technique towards identifying the binding sites of metals of biological interest. Section 2.3 presents an unambiguous /sup 13/C NMR assignment of melibiose. Chapter 3 deals with work relating to the molting hormone of most arthropods, 20-hydroxyecdysone. Section 3.1 discusses the use of two-dimensional NMR (2D NMR) to assign the /sup 1/H NMR spectrum of this biologically important compound. Section 3.2 presents a new application for Droplet countercurrent chromatography (DCCC). Chapter 4 presents a basic improvement to the commercial DCCC instrument that is currently being applied to future commercial instruments. Chapter 5 discusses a curious observation of the effects that two previously known compounds, nagilactone C and (-)-epicatechin, have on lettuce and rice and suggest a possible new role for the ubiquitous flavanol (-)-epicatechin in plants.

  19. Antimicrobial active herbal compounds against Acinetobacter baumannii and other pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Vishvanath; Roy, Ranita; Tiwari, Monalisa

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens cause a number of lethal diseases. Opportunistic bacterial pathogens grouped into ESKAPE pathogens that are linked to the high degree of morbidity, mortality and increased costs as described by Infectious Disease Society of America. Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the ESKAPE pathogens which cause respiratory infection, pneumonia and urinary tract infections. The prevalence of this pathogen increases gradually in the clinical setup where it can grow on artificial surfaces, utilize ethanol as a carbon source and resists desiccation. Carbapenems, a β-lactam, are the most commonly prescribed drugs against A. baumannii. The high level of acquired and intrinsic carbapenem resistance mechanisms acquired by these bacteria makes their eradication difficult. The pharmaceutical industry has no solution to this problem. Hence, it is an urgent requirement to find a suitable alternative to carbapenem, a commonly prescribed drug for Acinetobacter infection. In order to do this, here we have made an effort to review the active compounds of plants that have potent antibacterial activity against many bacteria including carbapenem resistant strain of A. baumannii. We have also briefly highlighted the separation and identification methods used for these active compounds. This review will help researchers involved in the screening of herbal active compounds that might act as a replacement for carbapenem. PMID:26150810

  20. Quantitative global studies of reactomes and metabolomes using a vectorial representation of reactions and chemical compounds

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Global studies of the protein repertories of organisms are providing important information on the characteristics of the protein space. Many of these studies entail classification of the protein repertory on the basis of structure and/or sequence similarities. The situation is different for metabolism. Because there is no good way of measuring similarities between chemical reactions, there is a barrier to the development of global classifications of "metabolic space" and subsequent studies comparable to those done for protein sequences and structures. Results In this work, we propose a vectorial representation of chemical reactions, which allows them to be compared and classified. In this representation, chemical compounds, reactions and pathways may be represented in the same vectorial space. We show that the representation of chemical compounds reflects their physicochemical properties and can be used for predictive purposes. We use the vectorial representations of reactions to perform a global classification of the reactome of the model organism E. coli. Conclusions We show that this unsupervised clustering results in groups of enzymes more coherent in biological terms than equivalent groupings obtained from the EC hierarchy. This hierarchical clustering produces an optimal set of 21 groups which we analyzed for their biological meaning. PMID:20406431

  1. Difference in the sensitivity to chemical compounds between female and male neonates of Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Ikuno, Erika; Matsumoto, Takeru; Okubo, Tomohiro; Itoi, Shiro; Sugita, Haruo

    2008-10-01

    Daphnia magna usually produce female offspring by parthenogenesis, and thus only female neonates are used to evaluate the environmental toxicity to chemicals. Additionally, it is known that male daphnids are induced by exposure to a juvenile hormone, methyl farnesoate, during late ovarian development. In this study, we investigated the concentration of methyl farnesoate in a 24-h exposure producing 100% males, and the difference in sensitivity to chemical compounds, potassium dichromate, pentachlorophenol, and paraquat, between females and males, referring to OECD Test Guideline 202. The results show that the minimum concentration for 100%-male induction of methyl farnesoate in adult females was 50 microg/L. In addition, acute toxicity tests (immobility test) with the other chemicals showed that male neonates have higher tolerance to potassium dichromate and pentachlorophenol than females for at least 24 h after birth, while no sex difference was observed in the sensitivity to paraquat. The differences in the median effective concentrations in these compounds between female and male neonates suggest two different overall modes of action. Using female daphnids for environmentally toxicity testing seems reasonable, since the females are more sensitive to chemicals than males. Furthermore, the method of male induction established in this study could be used for screening of endocrine disruptors.

  2. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanisms for Incineration of Organophosphorus and Fluoro-Organophosphorus Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Glaude, P A; Melius, C; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2001-12-13

    A detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism is developed to describe incineration of the chemical warfare nerve agent sarin (GB), based on commonly used principles of bond additivity and hierarchical reaction mechanisms. The mechanism is based on previous kinetic models of organophosphorus compounds such as TMP, DMMP and DIMP that are often used as surrogates to predict incineration of GB. Kinetic models of the three surrogates and GB are then used to predict their consumption in a perfectly stirred reactor fueled by natural gas to simulate incineration of these chemicals. Computed results indicate that DIMP is the only one of these surrogates that adequately describes combustion of GB under comparable conditions. The kinetic pathways responsible for these differences in reactivity are identified and discussed. The most important reaction in GB and DIMP that makes them more reactive than TMP or DMMP is found to be a six-center molecular elimination reaction producing propene.

  3. Chemical characterisation of semi-volatile and aerosol compounds from the photooxidation of toluene and NOx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Stephen J.; Jamie, Ian M.; Angove, Dennys E.

    2014-02-01

    The chemical composition of a gas phase and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mixture from toluene photooxidation in NOx was determined. Aerosol from toluene photooxidation was generated in a smog chamber and was collected onto glass fibre filters along with those gas phase compounds which adhered to the filter. The filter bound organic material was extracted, derivatised with O-2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl hydroxylamine (PFBHA) and N,O-bistrimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA), then analysed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Compound identification was aided by the use of isotopically-labelled toluene. The effect of humidity on product formation was investigated by raising water vapour concentration in one experiment. Sixty compounds were identified, of which twenty had not been identified from toluene photooxidation previously. Small carboxylic acids and dicarbonyls provided the highest proportion of identifiable compounds by relative response. The use of water to extract the filter samples resulted in much higher relative responses for oxocarboxylic acids, such as glyoxylic acid and pyruvic acid, than has been observed in previous studies. The formation of levulinic acid was determined to be due to the reaction of water with aromatic photooxidation products in the gas phase or particle phase of the chamber experiment. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was used to determine the functional groups of water-extracted organic material, which indicated that the water-soluble components were comprised of compounds which contain similar functional groups, primarily alcohols and carboxylic acids.

  4. Modulation of alternative splicing with chemical compounds in new therapeutics for human diseases.

    PubMed

    Ohe, Kenji; Hagiwara, Masatoshi

    2015-04-17

    Alternative splicing is a critical step where a limited number of human genes generate a complex and diverse proteome. Various diseases, including inherited diseases with abnormalities in the "genome code," have been found to result in an aberrant mis-spliced "transcript code" with correlation to the resulting phenotype. Chemical compound-based and nucleic acid-based strategies are trying to target this mis-spliced "transcript code". We will briefly mention about how to obtain splicing-modifying-compounds by high-throughput screening and overview of what is known about compounds that modify splicing pathways. The main focus will be on RNA-binding protein kinase inhibitors. In the main text, we will refer to diseases where splicing-modifying-compounds have been intensively investigated, with comparison to nucleic acid-based strategies. The information on their involvement in mis-splicing as well as nonsplicing events will be helpful in finding better compounds with less off-target effects for future implications in mis-splicing therapy.

  5. Source and plume investigation of chlorinated compounds in groundwater at a chemical plant

    SciTech Connect

    Trahan, D.B.

    1995-10-01

    A site assessment was conducted to determine the distribution of chlorinated compounds in soil and groundwater at a chemical plant in Geismar, Louisiana. The assessment first included an investigation of the source(S) of the contaminants using aerial photos, interviews and plant records. Next, the stratigraphic framework of the site was defined with a hydrogeological investigation using historic borin logs and cone penetrometer testing (CPT). Finally, a plume investigation was performed to determine the horizontal and vertical extent of the contamination using direct-push methods for sampling of soil and groundwater. It was determined that chlorinated compounds originated from leaking drums and cleaning operations prior to 1975. Downward migration of these compounds may have been promoted by the installation of uncased 50-foot wooden pillings. The contamination is limited both vertical and horizontally, to three hydrogeologic zones: (1) the first water-bearing silt zone; (2) an intermediate zone consisting of interlayered silt and clay; and (3) the second water-bearing silt zone. The concentration of chlorinated compounds are greatest in the intermediate zone. There is some evidence of natural degradation of the chlorinated compounds, particularly in the first water-bearing zone.

  6. Organogold(III) compounds as experimental anticancer agents: chemical and biological profiles.

    PubMed

    Massai, Lara; Cirri, Damiano; Michelucci, Elena; Bartoli, Gianluca; Guerri, Annalisa; Cinellu, Maria A; Cocco, Fabio; Gabbiani, Chiara; Messori, Luigi

    2016-10-01

    In the last few years gold(III) complexes have attracted growing attention in the medicinal chemistry community as candidate anticancer agents. In particular some organogold(III) compounds manifested quite attractive pharmacological behaviors in preclinical studies. Here we compare the chemical and biological properties of the novel organogold(III) complex [Au(bipy(dmb)-H)(NH(CO)CH3)][PF6] (Aubipy(aa)) with those of its parent compounds [Au(bipy(dmb)-H)(OH)][PF6] (Aubipy(c)) and [Au2(bipy(dmb)-H)2)(μ-O)][PF6]2 (Au2bipy(c)), previously synthesized and characterized. The three study compounds were comparatively assessed for their antiproliferative actions against HCT-116 cancer cells, revealing moderate cytotoxic effects. Proapoptotic and cell cycle effects were also monitored. Afterward, to gain additional mechanistic insight, the three gold compounds were challenged against the model proteins HEWL, RNase A and cytochrome c and reactions investigated through UV-Vis and ESI-MS analysis. A peculiar and roughly invariant protein metalation profile emerges in the three cases consisting of protein binding of {Au(bipy(dmb)-H)} moieties. The implications of these results are discussed in the frame of current knowledge on anticancer gold compounds.

  7. Two new compounds from the roots of Ilex pubescens and their cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Huan; Zhao, Fang; Bi, Jiayi; Zhang, Yang; Zhao, Guiyun; Chen, Xue; Li, Yuncong; Yan, Rui; Zhao, Qiang; Qiao, Hua; Zhang, Guogang

    2016-07-01

    A new phenylethanoid, 1-O-β-D-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-ethyl-6-O-vanilloyl-glucopyranoside (1), and a new furofuran lignan, (7R,7'R,7''S,8S,8'S,8''R)-4', 4''-dihydroxy-3,3',3'',5-tetramethoxy-7,9':7'9-diepoxy-4,8''-oxy-8,8'-sesquineolignan-7'',9''-diol (2), along with five known compounds (3-7) were isolated from the roots of Ilex pubescens. Their chemical structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis, including UV, IR, MS, and NMR experiments. In addition, compounds 2-7 were evaluated in vitro for their cytotoxic effects on human HeLa cells; among them, compounds 2, 3, 6, and 7 showed cytotoxic activity against HeLa cells in the test.

  8. Antileishmanial Activity of Compounds Isolated from Sassafras albidum.

    PubMed

    Pulivarthi, Divya; Steinberg, Kelly Marie; Monzote, Lianet; Piñón, Abel; Setzer, William N

    2015-07-01

    Leishmaniasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by Leishmania parasitic protozoa, which currently lacks efficient treatment. Natural products have shown promise as a potential source for antiprotozoal drugs. This work focuses on the antileishmanial potential of Sassafras albidum (Lauraceae) bark extract. The crude bark extract of S. albidum showed excellent antileishmanial activity with an IC50 value less than 12.5 μg/mL against promastigotes of L. amazonensis. The chloroform stem bark extract of S. albidum was subjected to preparative column chromatography. Five compounds were isolated, purified by recrystallization, and identified as sesamin, spinescin, β-sitosterol, hexatriacontanal, and 1-triacontanol. Antileishmanial and cytotoxic screening were performed on these compounds. Sesamin exhibited the best activity against L. amazonensis with an IC50 of 15.8 μg/mL and was not cytotoxic to mouse macrophage cells (CC50 > 100 μg/mL).

  9. Antimicrobial activity of novel 4H-4-oxoquinolizine compounds against extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strains.

    PubMed

    Na, Seok Hyeon; Jeon, Hyejin; Kim, Yoo Jeong; Kwon, Hyo Il; Selasi, Gati Noble; Nicholas, Asiimwe; Yun, Chang-Soo; Lee, Sang Ho; Lee, Je Chul

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to screen lead compounds exhibiting potent in vitro antimicrobial activity against multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii strains from a library of chemical compounds. In a high-throughput screening analysis of 7520 compounds representative of 340,000 small molecules, two 4H-4-oxoquinolizine compounds were the most active against A. baumannii ATCC 17978. Subsequent selection and analysis of 70 4H-4-oxoquinolizine compounds revealed that the top 7 compounds were extremely active against extensively drug-resistant (XDR) A. baumannii isolates. These compounds commonly carried a 1-cyclopropyl-7-fluoro-4-oxo-4H-quinolizine-3-carboxylic acid core structure but had different C-8 and/or C-9 moieties. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the seven compounds against fluoroquinolone-resistant A. baumannii isolates were found to be in the range of 0.02-1.70 µg/mL regardless of the mutation types in the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) of GyrA and ParC. Cytotoxicity of the seven compounds was observed in HeLa and U937 cells at a concentration of 50 µg/mL, which was >32.5- to 119-fold higher than the MIC90 for A. baumannii isolates. In conclusion, novel 4H-4-oxoquinolizine compounds represent a promising scaffold on which to develop antimicrobial agents against drug-resistant A. baumannii strains.

  10. Target Prediction for an Open Access Set of Compounds Active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Jiménez, Francisco; Papadatos, George; Yang, Lun; Wallace, Iain M.; Kumar, Vinod; Pieper, Ursula; Sali, Andrej; Brown, James R.; Overington, John P.; Marti-Renom, Marc A.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), infects an estimated two billion people worldwide and is the leading cause of mortality due to infectious disease. The development of new anti-TB therapeutics is required, because of the emergence of multi-drug resistance strains as well as co-infection with other pathogens, especially HIV. Recently, the pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline published the results of a high-throughput screen (HTS) of their two million compound library for anti-mycobacterial phenotypes. The screen revealed 776 compounds with significant activity against the M. tuberculosis H37Rv strain, including a subset of 177 prioritized compounds with high potency and low in vitro cytotoxicity. The next major challenge is the identification of the target proteins. Here, we use a computational approach that integrates historical bioassay data, chemical properties and structural comparisons of selected compounds to propose their potential targets in M. tuberculosis. We predicted 139 target - compound links, providing a necessary basis for further studies to characterize the mode of action of these compounds. The results from our analysis, including the predicted structural models, are available to the wider scientific community in the open source mode, to encourage further development of novel TB therapeutics. PMID:24098102

  11. Follow-up: Prospective compound design using the 'SAR Matrix' method and matrix-derived conditional probabilities of activity.

    PubMed

    Gupta-Ostermann, Disha; Hirose, Yoichiro; Odagami, Takenao; Kouji, Hiroyuki; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    In a previous Method Article, we have presented the 'Structure-Activity Relationship (SAR) Matrix' (SARM) approach. The SARM methodology is designed to systematically extract structurally related compound series from screening or chemical optimization data and organize these series and associated SAR information in matrices reminiscent of R-group tables. SARM calculations also yield many virtual candidate compounds that form a "chemical space envelope" around related series. To further extend the SARM approach, different methods are developed to predict the activity of virtual compounds. In this follow-up contribution, we describe an activity prediction method that derives conditional probabilities of activity from SARMs and report representative results of first prospective applications of this approach.

  12. Cooked garlic and antioxidant activity: Correlation with organosulfur compound composition.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, D A; Nazareno, M A; Fusari, C M; Camargo, A B

    2017-04-01

    The antioxidant properties and the main beneficial organosulphur compounds of home-cooked garlic samples were studied in order to establish relationships between them. Antioxidant activity was tested by free radical scavenging against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) and 2,2'-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzo-thiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS(+)), Fe(III) reducing ability (FRAP) and linoleic acid co-oxidation initiated by soybean lipoxygenase in a micelle system. DPPH, ABTS and FRAP assays showed the highest activity for raw garlic samples, while β-carotene bleaching assay yielded the highest activity for stir-fried garlic. Pure organosulphur compounds tested by DPPH, FRAP and β-carotene bleaching assays showed that allicin had an antiradical action mechanism, as well as iron reducing capacity; while antioxidant activity was the main mechanism for ajoenes and 2-VD. To our knowledge, this study is the first demonstration that home-cooked garlic retains its antioxidant activity, and, at the same time, elucidates the mechanisms involved in this activity.

  13. Therapeutic Uses and Pharmacological Properties of Garlic, Shallot, and Their Biologically Active Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Mikaili, Peyman; Maadirad, Surush; Moloudizargari, Milad; Aghajanshakeri, Shahin; Sarahroodi, Shadi

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Garlic (Allium sativum L. family Liliaceae) is well known in Iran and its leaves, flowers, and cloves have been used in traditional medicine for a long time. Research in recent decades has shown widespread pharmacological effects of A. sativum and its organosulfur compounds especially Allicin. Studies carried out on the chemical composition of the plant show that the most important constituents of this plant are organosulfur compounds such as allicin, diallyl disulphide, S-allylcysteine, and diallyl trisulfide. Allicin represents one of the most studied among these naturally occurring compounds. In addition to A. sativum, these compounds are also present in A. hirtifolium (shallot) and have been used to treat various diseases. This article reviews the pharmacological effects and traditional uses of A. sativum, A. hirtifolium, and their active constituents to show whether or not they can be further used as potential natural sources for the development of novel drugs. Materials and Methods: For this purpose, the authors went through a vast number of sources and articles and all needed data was gathered. The findings were reviewed and classified on the basis of relevance to the topic and a summary of all effects were reported as tables. Conclusion: Garlic and shallots are safe and rich sources of biologically active compounds with low toxicity. Further studies are needed to confirm the safety and quality of the plants to be used by clinicians as therapeutic agents. PMID:24379960

  14. The screening of chemicals for juvenoid-related endocrine activity using the water flea Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Wang, Helen Ying; Olmstead, Allen W; Li, Hong; Leblanc, Gerald A

    2005-09-10

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is charged with developing a screening and testing paradigm for detecting endocrine toxicity of chemicals that are subject to regulation under the Food Quality Protection and the Safe Drinking Water Acts. In this study, we developed and evaluated a screening assay that could be employed to detect juvenoid-related endocrine-modulating activity in an invertebrate species. Juvenoid activity, anti-juvenoid activity, and juvenoid potentiator activity of chemicals was assessed using the water flea Daphnia magna. Male sex determination is under the regulatory control of juvenoid hormone, presumably methyl farnesoate, and this endpoint was used to detect juvenoid modulating activity of chemicals. Eighteen chemicals were evaluated for juvenoid agonist activity. Positive responses were detected with the juvenoid hormones methyl farnesoate and juvenile hormone III along with the insect growth regulating insecticides pyriproxyfen, fenoxycarb, and methoprene. Weak juvenoid activity also was detected with the cyclodiene insecticide dieldrin. Assays performed repetitively with compounds that gave either strong positive, weak positive, or negative response were 100% consistent indicating that the assay is not prone to false positive or negative responses. Five candidate chemicals were evaluated for anti-juvenoid activity and none registered positive. Four chemicals (all trans-retinoic acid, methoprene, kinoprene, bisphenol A) also were evaluated for their ability to potentiate the activity of methyl farnesoate. All registered positive. Results demonstrate that an in vivo assay with a crustacean species customarily employed in toxicity testing can be used to effectively screen chemicals for juvenoid-modulating activity.

  15. Design and characterization of chemical space networks for different compound data sets.

    PubMed

    Zwierzyna, Magdalena; Vogt, Martin; Maggiora, Gerald M; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    Chemical Space Networks (CSNs) are generated for different compound data sets on the basis of pairwise similarity relationships. Such networks are thought to complement and further extend traditional coordinate-based views of chemical space. Our proof-of-concept study focuses on CSNs based upon fingerprint similarity relationships calculated using the conventional Tanimoto similarity metric. The resulting CSNs are characterized with statistical measures from network science and compared in different ways. We show that the homophily principle, which is widely considered in the context of social networks, is a major determinant of the topology of CSNs of bioactive compounds, designed as threshold networks, typically giving rise to community structures. Many properties of CSNs are influenced by numerical features of the conventional Tanimoto similarity metric and largely dominated by the edge density of the networks, which depends on chosen similarity threshold values. However, properties of different CSNs with constant edge density can be directly compared, revealing systematic differences between CSNs generated from randomly collected or bioactive compounds.

  16. Characterization of volatile compounds, physico-chemical and sensory characteristics of smoked dry-cured ham.

    PubMed

    Marušić Radovčić, Nives; Vidaček, Sanja; Janči, Tibor; Medić, Helga

    2016-11-01

    Volatile compounds from smoked dry-cured ham were isolated by using headspace-solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Samples of biceps femoris were also evaluated for sensory physical and chemical characteristics. Eighty seven volatile aroma compounds of smoked dry-cured ham were identified. Chemical groups identified were aldehydes (35.6%), phenols (34.3%), alcohols (13.8%), terpenes (6.4%), aromatic hydrocarbons (2.6%), alkanes (2.2%), ketones (2.2%), esters (1.7%) and acids (0.7%). Except volatile compounds derived from lipolysis and proteolysis the second most abundant constituents were phenols that originate from smoking phase of the production process. The most abundant phenols were: 4-methylphenol, 3-methylphenol, 2-metoxy-4-methylphenol, 2-methylphenol, 2,6-dimethoxyphenol and 4-ethyl-2 methoxyphenol. Principal components analysis showed that NaCl and ash content positively correlated with the salty taste while fat content was correlated to marbling. Water content and aw value were negatively correlated with hardness of dry-cured ham while phenols were positively corelated with smoky aroma. Due to the different volatile composition and pronounced smoky aroma, smoked dry-cured ham can be distinguished from other types of dry-cured hams.

  17. Quinolone Amides as Antitrypanosomal Lead Compounds with In Vivo Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hiltensperger, Georg; Hecht, Nina; Kaiser, Marcel; Rybak, Jens-Christoph; Hoerst, Alexander; Dannenbauer, Nicole; Müller-Buschbaum, Klaus; Bruhn, Heike; Esch, Harald; Lehmann, Leane; Meinel, Lorenz

    2016-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is a major tropical disease for which few drugs for treatment are available, driving the need for novel active compounds. Recently, morpholino-substituted benzyl amides of the fluoroquinolone-type antibiotics were identified to be compounds highly active against Trypanosoma brucei brucei. Since the lead compound GHQ168 was challenged by poor water solubility in previous trials, the aim of this study was to introduce structural variations to GHQ168 as well as to formulate GHQ168 with the ultimate goal to increase its aqueous solubility while maintaining its in vitro antitrypanosomal activity. The pharmacokinetic parameters of spray-dried GHQ168 and the newly synthesized compounds GHQ242 and GHQ243 in mice were characterized by elimination half-lives ranging from 1.5 to 3.5 h after intraperitoneal administration (4 mice/compound), moderate to strong human serum albumin binding for GHQ168 (80%) and GHQ243 (45%), and very high human serum albumin binding (>99%) for GHQ242. For the lead compound, GHQ168, the apparent clearance was 112 ml/h and the apparent volume of distribution was 14 liters/kg of body weight (BW). Mice infected with T. b. rhodesiense (STIB900) were treated in a stringent study scheme (2 daily applications between days 3 and 6 postinfection). Exposure to spray-dried GHQ168 in contrast to the control treatment resulted in mean survival durations of 17 versus 9 days, respectively, a difference that was statistically significant. Results that were statistically insignificantly different were obtained between the control and the GHQ242 and GHQ243 treatments. Therefore, GHQ168 was further profiled in an early-treatment scheme (2 daily applications at days 1 to 4 postinfection), and the results were compared with those obtained with a control treatment. The result was statistically significant mean survival times exceeding 32 days (end of the observation period) versus 7 days for the GHQ168 and control treatments

  18. A novel aphrodisiac compound from an orchid that activates nitric oxide synthases.

    PubMed

    Subramoniam, A; Gangaprasad, A; Sureshkumar, P K; Radhika, J; Arun, K B; Arun, B K

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is known to have roles in several crucial biological functions including vasodilation and penile erection. There are neuronal, endothelial and inducible NO synthases that influence the levels of NO in tissues and blood. NO activates guanylate cyclase and thereby increases the levels of cyclic GMP (cGMP). Viagra (sildenafil), a top selling drug in the world for erectile dysfunction, inhibits phosphodiesterase-5, which hydrolyses cGMP to GMP. Thus, it fosters an NO-mediated increase in the levels of cGMP, which mediates erectile function. Here, we show the aphrodisiac activity of a novel chemical isolate from the flowers of an epiphytic orchid, Vanda tessellata (Roxb.) ex Don, which activates neuronal and endothelial, but not inducible, NO synthases. The aphrodisiac activity is caused by an increase in the level of NO in corpus cavernosum. The drug increases blood levels of NO as early as 30 min after oral administration. The active compound was isolated by column chromatography. Based on the spectral data, the active compound is found to be a new compound, 2,7,7-tri methyl bicyclo [2.2.1] heptane. We anticipate that our findings could lead to the development of a commercially viable and valuable drug for erectile dysfunction.

  19. In situ Analysis of Organic Compounds on Mars using Chemical Derivatization and Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Buch, A.; Cabane, M.; Coll, P.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2005-01-01

    One of the core science objectives of NASA's 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission is to determine the past or present habitability of Mars. The search for key organic compounds relevant to terrestrial life will be an important part of that assessment. We have developed a protocol for the analysis of amino acids and carboxylic acids in Mars analogue materials using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS). As shown, a variety of carboxylic acids were readily identified in soil collected from the Atacama Desert in Chile at part-per-billion levels by GCMS after extraction and chemical derivatization using the reagent N,N-tert.-butyl (dimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA). Several derivatized amino acids including glycine and alanine were also detected by GCMS in the Atacama soil at lower concentrations (chromatogram not shown). Lacking derivatization capability, the Viking pyrolysis GCMS instruments could not have detected amino acids and carboxylic acids, since these non-volatile compounds require chemical transformation into volatile species that are stable in a GC column. We are currently optimizing the chemical extraction and derivatization technique for in situ GCMS analysis on Mars. Laboratory results of analyses of Atacama Desert samples and other Mars analogue materials using this protocol will be presented.

  20. Synergistic activation of human pregnane X receptor by binary cocktails of pharmaceutical and environmental compounds

    PubMed Central

    Delfosse, Vanessa; Dendele, Béatrice; Huet, Tiphaine; Grimaldi, Marina; Boulahtouf, Abdelhay; Gerbal-Chaloin, Sabine; Beucher, Bertrand; Roecklin, Dominique; Muller, Christina; Rahmani, Roger; Cavaillès, Vincent; Daujat-Chavanieu, Martine; Vivat, Valérie; Pascussi, Jean-Marc; Balaguer, Patrick; Bourguet, William

    2015-01-01

    Humans are chronically exposed to multiple exogenous substances, including environmental pollutants, drugs and dietary components. Many of these compounds are suspected to impact human health, and their combination in complex mixtures could exacerbate their harmful effects. Here we demonstrate that a pharmaceutical oestrogen and a persistent organochlorine pesticide, both exhibiting low efficacy when studied separately, cooperatively bind to the pregnane X receptor, leading to synergistic activation. Biophysical analysis shows that each ligand enhances the binding affinity of the other, so the binary mixture induces a substantial biological response at doses at which each chemical individually is inactive. High-resolution crystal structures reveal the structural basis for the observed cooperativity. Our results suggest that the formation of ‘supramolecular ligands' within the ligand-binding pocket of nuclear receptors contributes to the synergistic toxic effect of chemical mixtures, which may have broad implications for the fields of endocrine disruption, toxicology and chemical risk assessment. PMID:26333997

  1. Single, competitive, and dynamic adsorption on activated carbon of compounds used as plasticizers and herbicides.

    PubMed

    Abdel daiem, Mahmoud M; Rivera-Utrilla, José; Sánchez-Polo, Manuel; Ocampo-Pérez, Raúl

    2015-12-15

    The main aim of this study was to investigate the single, competitive, and dynamic adsorption of phthalic acid (PA), bisphenol A (BPA), diphenolic acid (DPA), 2,4-dichlorophenoxy-acetic acid (2,4-D), and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) on two activated carbons with different chemical natures and similar textural characteristics. The adsorption mechanism was also elucidated by analyzing the influence of solution pH and ionic strength. The activated carbons demonstrated high adsorption capacity to remove all micropollutants due to the presence of active sites on their surfaces, which increase dispersive interactions between the activated carbon graphene layers and the aromatic ring of pollutants. The adsorption capacity of the activated carbons increased in the order: DPAchemical structure of pollutants, and iii) chemical properties of adsorbents. In most cases, the adsorption of contaminants is favored at acid pH (pH<5) due to the establishment of attractive electrostatic interactions. In dynamic regime, the amount of pollutant adsorbed was much higher for PA, followed by DPA, and was approximately similar for BPA, 2,4-D, and MCPA. Finally, the amount of BPA and DPA adsorbed on activated carbon decreased by around 50% and 70% in the presence of DPA and BPA, respectively, indicating that both compounds are adsorbed on the same adsorption sites of the activated carbon.

  2. Imidazolium compounds are active against all stages of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Faral-Tello, Paula; Liang, Mary; Mahler, Graciela; Wipf, Peter; Robello, Carlos

    2014-03-01

    Imidazolium salts are best known for their applications in organic synthesis as room-temperature ionic liquids, or as precursors of stable carbenes, but they also show important biological properties such as anti-oxidative effects, induction of mitochondrial membrane permeabilisation and inhibition of the infection cycle of Plasmodium falciparum. For these reasons, and since chemotherapy for Chagas disease is inefficient, the aim of this study was to test the use of imidazolium compounds against the kinetoplastid haemoflagellate aetiological agent for this disease, namely Trypanosoma cruzi. The results show that five of the tested compounds are more effective than the reference drug benznidazole against the epimastigote and trypomastigote forms of T. cruzi. Moreover, intracellular amastigotes were also affected by the compounds, which showed lower toxicity in host cells. Transmission electron microscopy analysis demonstrated that the tested agents induced alterations of the kinetoplast and particularly of the mitochondria, leading to extraordinary swelling of the organelle. These results further demonstrate that the test agents with the best profile are those bearing symmetrical bulky substituents at N(1) and N(3), displaying promising activity against all forms of T. cruzi, interesting selectivity indexes and exceptional activity at low doses. Accordingly, these agents represent promising candidates for the treatment of Chagas disease.

  3. Factors affecting antibacterial activity of hop compounds and their derivatives.

    PubMed

    Simpson, W J; Smith, A R

    1992-04-01

    The antibacterial effect of weak acids derived from the hop plant (Humulus lupulus L.) increased with decreasing pH. Analysis of the minimum inhibitory concentration of such compounds against Lactobacillus brevis IFO 3960 over pH 4-7 suggests that undissociated molecules were mainly responsible for inhibition of bacterial growth. The antibacterial activity of trans-isohumulone was ca 20 times greater than that of humulone, 11 times greater than that of colupulone and nine times greater than that of trans-humulinic acid when the degree of ionization was taken into account. Monovalent cations (K+, Na+, NH4+, Rb+, Li+) stimulated antibacterial activity of trans-isohumulone but the effect was smaller than that observed with H+. The response to divalent cations varied: Ca2+ had little effect on antibacterial activity, whereas Mg2+ reduced activity. Lipid materials and beta-cyclodextrin also antagonized the antibacterial action of trans-isohumulone.

  4. Tetrapleura tetraptera: molluscicidal activity and chemical constituents.

    PubMed

    Aladesanmi, Adetunji J

    2006-08-28

    Tetrapleura tetraptera (Schumach. And Thonn) Taub, Mimosaceae, commonly known as Aridan (fruit), A single stemmed, robust, perennial tree of about 30 m. It has a grey/brown, smooth/rough bark with glabrous yound branchlets. The flower is yellow/pink and racemes white the fruit has dark brown, four winged pods 12-25 x 3.5-6.5 cm. It is generally found in the lowland forest of tropical Africa. The fruit consists of a fleshy pulp with small, brownish-black seeds. The fruit possesses a fragrant, characteristically pungent aromatic odour, which is attributed to its insect repellent property. It is used as spices and aroma (exotic tropical scents) and fish poisoning. It is one of the molluscicidal medicinal plants of Nigeria, also useful in the management of convulsions, leprosy, inflammation and/or rheumatoid pains. The documented biological and-or pharmacological activities are found to be molluscicidal, cardio-vascular, neuromuscular, hypotensive, anti-convulsant, trypanocidal, hirudinicidal, schistosomiasis control, anti-ulcerative, ectoxicity, anti-inflammatory, hypoglycaemic, anti-microbial, emulsifying property, birth control, food value and the control of intestinal parasites. Activity-guided fractionation of the methanol extract of the fruits of T. tetraptera led to the isolation of a saponin glycoside with an oleanolic acid aglycone, a monodesmosidic diglycoside of the rare sapogenin 27-hydroxyolean-12 (13)-en-28-oic acid; echinocystic acid-3-0-sodium sulfate from the stembark, umbelliferone and ferulic acid from the leaves and branches respectively. Also isolated from the fruits were aridanin and three of its olean-12-en-28-oic acid derivatives. All the compounds isolated either from the fruits or other parts were found to exhibit strong molluscicidal properties against the schistosomiasis-transmitting snails Biomphalaria glabrata.

  5. Platelet anti-aggregation activities of compounds from Cinnamomum cassia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Young; Koo, Yean Kyoung; Koo, Ja Yong; Ngoc, Tran Minh; Kang, Sam Sik; Bae, KiHwan; Kim, Yeong Sik; Yun-Choi, Hye Sook

    2010-10-01

    Cinnamomum cassia is a well-known traditional medicine for improvement of blood circulation. An extract of this plant showed both platelet anti-aggregation and blood anti-coagulation effects in preliminary testing. Among the 13 compounds obtained from this plant, eugenol (2), amygdalactone (4), cinnamic alcohol (5), 2-hydroxycinnamaldehyde (7), 2-methoxycinnamaldehyde (8), and coniferaldehyde (9) showed 1.5-73-fold greater inhibitory effects than acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) on arachidonic acid (AA)-induced aggregation (50% inhibitory concentration [IC₅₀] = 3.8, 5.16, 31.2, 40.0, 16.9, and 0.82 μM, respectively, vs. 60.3 μM) and 6.3-730-fold stronger effect than ASA on U46619 (a thromboxane A₂ mimic)-induced aggregation (IC₅₀ = 3.51, 33.9, 31.0, 51.3, 14.6, and 0.44 μM, respectively, vs. 321 μM). The other compounds, coumarin (3), cinnamaldehyde (6), cinnamic acid (10), icariside DC (11), and dihydrocinnacasside (12), also inhibited (2.5 to four times greater than ASA) U46619-induced aggregation. In addition, compounds 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 were 1.3-87 times more effective than ASA against epinephrine-induced aggregation (IC₅₀ = 1.86, 1.10, 37.7, 25.0, 16.8, 15.3, and 0.57 μM, respectively, vs. 50.0 μM). However, the 13 compounds were only very mildly effective against blood coagulation, if at all. In conclusion, compounds 2, 4, 8, and 9 showed stronger inhibitory potencies than others on AA-, U46619-, and epinephrine-induced platelet aggregation. Eugenol (2) and coniferaldehyde (9) were the two of the most active anti-platelet constituents of C. cassia.

  6. Comprehensive Emerging Chemical Discovery: Novel Polyfluorinated Compounds in Lake Michigan Trout.

    PubMed

    Fakouri Baygi, Sadjad; Crimmins, Bernard S; Hopke, Philip K; Holsen, Thomas M

    2016-09-06

    A versatile screening algorithm capable of efficiently searching liquid chromatographic/mass spectrometric data for unknown compounds has been developed using a combination of open source and generic computing software packages. The script was used to search for select novel polyfluorinated contaminants in Great Lakes fish. However, the framework is applicable whenever full-scan, high-resolution mass spectral and chromatographic data are collected. Target compound classes are defined and a matrix of candidates is generated that includes mass spectral profiles and likely fragmentation pathways. The initial calibration was performed using a standard solution of known linear perfluoroalkyl acids. Once validated, Lake Michigan trout data files were analyzed for polyfluoroalkyl acids using the algorithm referencing 3570 possible compounds including C4-C10 perfluoro- and polyfluoroalkyl, polyfluorochloroalkyl acids and sulfonates, and potential ether forms. The results suggest the presence of 30 polyfluorinated chemical formulas which have not been previously reported in the literature. The identified candidates included mono- to hexafluoroalkyl carboxylic acids, mono- and trifluoroalkyl carboxylic acid ethers, and novel polyfluoroalkyl sulfonates. Candidate species identified in lake trout were qualified using theoretical isotopic profile matching, characteristic fragmentation patterns based on known linear perfluoroalkyl acid (PFAA) fragmentation, and retention time reproducibility among replicate extractions and injections. In addition, the relative retention times of multiple species within a compound class were compared based on theoretical octanol-water partition coefficients.

  7. [Emission characteristics and hazard assessment analysis of volatile organic compounds from chemical synthesis pharmaceutical industry].

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Wang, Zhe-Ming; Song, Shuang; Xu, Zhi-Rong; Xu, Ming-Zhu; Xu, Wei-Li

    2014-10-01

    In this study, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released from chemical synthesis pharmaceutical industry in Taizhou, Zhejiang province were analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively. The total volatile organic compounds (TVOCs) was in the range of 14.9-308.6 mg · m(-3). Evaluation models of ozone formation potentials (OFP) and health risk assessment were adopted to preliminarily assess the environmental impact and health risk of VOCs. The results showed that the values of OFP of VOCs were in the range of 3.1-315.1 mg · m(-3), based on the maximum incremental reactivity, the main principal contribution was toluene, tetrahydrofuran (THF), acetic ether etc. The non-carcinogenic risk and the carcinogen risk fell in the ranges of 9.48 x 10(-7)-4.98 x 10(-4) a(-1) and 3.17 x 10(-5)- 6.33 x 10(-3). The principal contribution of VOCs was benzene, formaldehyde and methylene chloride.

  8. Natural Product Compounds with Aromatase Inhibitory Activity: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Balunas, Marcy J.; Kinghorn, A. Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Several synthetic aromatase inhibitors are currently in clinical use for the treatment of postmenopausal women with hormone-receptor positive breast cancer. However, these treatments may lead to untoward side effects and so a search for new aromatase inhibitors continues, especially those for which the activity is promoter-specific, targeting the breast-specific promoters I.3 and II. Recently, numerous natural product compounds have been found to inhibit aromatase in non-cellular, cellular, and in vivo studies. These investigations, covering the last two years, as well as additional studies that have focused on the evaluation of natural product compounds as promoter-specific aromatase inhibitors or as aromatase inducers, are described in this review. PMID:20635310

  9. Pharmacologically active compounds in the environment and their chirality.

    PubMed

    Kasprzyk-Hordern, Barbara

    2010-11-01

    Pharmacologically active compounds including both legally used pharmaceuticals and illicit drugs are potent environmental contaminants. Extensive research has been undertaken over the recent years to understand their environmental fate and toxicity. The one very important phenomenon that has been overlooked by environmental researchers studying the fate of pharmacologically active compounds in the environment is their chirality. Chiral drugs can exist in the form of enantiomers, which have similar physicochemical properties but differ in their biological properties such as distribution, metabolism and excretion, as these processes (due to stereospecific interactions of enantiomers with biological systems) usually favour one enantiomer over the other. Additionally, due to different pharmacological activity, enantiomers of chiral drugs can differ in toxicity. Furthermore, degradation of chiral drugs during wastewater treatment and in the environment can be stereoselective and can lead to chiral products of varied toxicity. The distribution of different enantiomers of the same chiral drug in the aquatic environment and biota can also be stereoselective. Biological processes can lead to stereoselective enrichment or depletion of the enantiomeric composition of chiral drugs. As a result the very same drug might reveal different activity and toxicity and this will depend on its origin and exposure to several factors governing its fate in the environment. In this critical review a discussion of the importance of chirality of pharmacologically active compounds in the environmental context is undertaken and suggestions for directions in further research are made. Several groups of chiral drugs of major environmental relevance are discussed and their pharmacological action and disposition in the body is also outlined as it is a key factor in developing a full understanding of their environmental occurrence, fate and toxicity. This review will be of interest to environmental

  10. Chemical constituents and cytotoxic effect of the main compounds of Lythrum salicaria L.

    PubMed

    Manayi, Azadeh; Saeidnia, Soodabeh; Ostad, Seyed Nasser; Hadjiakhoondi, Abbas; Ardekani, Mohammad Reza Shams; Vazirian, Mahdi; Akhtar, Yasmin; Khanavi, Mahnaz

    2013-01-01

    Lythrum salicaria L. (Lythraceae), a herbaceous plant growing widely in Iran, has been well known for many centuries for its astringent and styptic properties. A phytochemical investigation of this plant, based on spectroscopic analysis, identified fourteen compounds: 5-hydroxypyrrolidin-2-one (1), umbelliferone-6-carboxylic acid (2), 3,3',4'-tri-O-methylellagic acid-4-O-beta-D-(2"-acetyl)-glucopyranoside (3), 3,3',4'-tri-O-methylellagic acid-4-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (4), daucosterol (5), phytol (6), dodecanoic acid (7), oleanolic acid (8), 3,3',4'-tri-O-methylellagic acid (9), corosolic acid (10), beta-sitosterol (11), peucedanin (12), buntansin (13), and erythrodiol (14). All compounds, except for 8 and 11, have been isolated from L. salicaria for the first time. Cytotoxic activities of the compounds were examined against three cancerous cell lines, colon carcinoma (HT-29), leukemia (K-562), and breast ductal carcinoma (T47D), and Swiss mouse embryo fibroblast (NIH-3T3) cells using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and methotrexate as positive control. Compounds 5, 10, 11, and 14 were the most active against the HT-29 cell line with IC50 values of 192.7, 36.8, 38.2, and 12.8 microg/mL, respectively. Compounds 14, 11, 5, and 10 were 6.4, 2.8, 2.6, and 1.4 times, respectively, more selective than methotrexate. Compound 5 was the most active against the K-562 cell line (IC50 = 50.2 microg/mL), with a selectivity exceeding that of methotrexate 13.3 times. The results of the cytotoxic assay confirmed that growth and proliferation of the cancer cell lines are predominantly influenced by triterpene derivatives and sterols of this plant.

  11. Screening for antiviral activities of isolated compounds from essential oils.

    PubMed

    Astani, Akram; Reichling, Jürgen; Schnitzler, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Essential oil of star anise as well as phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes, for example, trans-anethole, eugenol, β-eudesmol, farnesol, β-caryophyllene and β-caryophyllene oxide, which are present in many essential oils, were examined for their antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in vitro. Antiviral activity was analyzed by plaque reduction assays and mode of antiviral action was determined by addition of the drugs to uninfected cells, to the virus prior to infection or to herpesvirus-infected cells. Star anise oil reduced viral infectivity by >99%, phenylpropanoids inhibited HSV infectivity by about 60-80% and sesquiterpenes suppressed herpes virus infection by 40-98%. Both, star anise essential oil and all isolated compounds exhibited anti-HSV-1 activity by direct inactivation of free virus particles in viral suspension assays. All tested drugs interacted in a dose-dependent manner with herpesvirus particles, thereby inactivating viral infectivity. Star anise oil, rich in trans-anethole, revealed a high selectivity index of 160 against HSV, whereas among the isolated compounds only β-caryophyllene displayed a high selectivity index of 140. The presence of β-caryophyllene in many essential oils might contribute strongly to their antiviral ability. These results indicate that phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes present in essential oils contribute to their antiviral activity against HSV.

  12. Psychoactive plants described in a Brazilian literary work and their chemical compounds.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Rafaela Denise; Lago, João Henrique Ghilardi; Rossi, Lucia; Galduróz, José Carlos Fernandes; Rodrigues, Eliana

    2010-09-01

    Ethnopharmacological research investigates the plants and other medicinal and toxic substances utilized by different traditional populations. One approach in this field is a literature search of the available publications on medicinal plants. The purpose of the current study was to select plants with psychoactive effects described in a Brazilian literary work written by Pio Correa in 1926. Those mentioned plants were classified in accordance with their indications for use as stimulants and depressors of the central nervous system. For the phytochemical study herein, we researched these species via a database search, and all the obtained information was compiled into a new database to analyze possible correlations between the chemical compounds and the psychoactive categories. Of the 813 plants searched in the literary work, 104 presented chemical data in the scientific periodicals consulted. Seventy-five of them belong to the stimulant category, while 31 are depressors and two of them belong to both categories. Phenols and flavonoids were the main compounds observed in plants of both categories, though at different frequencies. Monoterpenes (29.9%) and sesquiterpenes (28.6%) were also observed in plants from the stimulant category, while 25.8% of plants from the depressor category were comprised of carotenoids and 22.6% of steroids. The main specific compounds were identified as ferulic acid, α-pinene, limonene, α-humulene and kaempferol among the stimulant plants. Otherwise, in depressor plants were characterized caffeic acid, kaempferol, quercetin, β-carotene, physalins and withanolides as specific compounds. The association between ethnopharmacological and chemotaxonomic data, as presented in this study, could support plant selection in further investigations by research groups whose studies focus on psychoactive plants as potential therapeutics.

  13. [Simultaneous determination of chlorhexidine acetate and benzalkonium chloride in compound chemical disinfectants by capillary electrophoresis].

    PubMed

    Song, Baohua; Ding, Xiaojing; Li, Jia; Wang, Zhi

    2012-09-01

    Benzalkonium chloride (BAC) is a mixture of alkyl substituted benzyl dimethylammonium chloride homologs (C12-BAC, C14-BAC and C16-BAC). Chlorhexidine acetate is a widely used effective component in compound chemical disinfectants. A method for the simultaneous determination of chlorhexidine acetate and benzalkonium chloride in compound chemical disinfectants by capillary electrophoresis (CE) was established. The CE analysis was carried out using an uncoated capillary with 50 microm i. d. and 37 cm total length. The running buffer was 150 mmol/L NaH2PO4-62.5 mmol/L H3PO4 (pH 2.5) containing 40% (v/v) acetonitrile. The sample medium was 50 mmol/L acetic acid-acetonitrile (1:1, v/v). The detection wavelength was 214 nm. The factors such as the buffer concentration and pH, the content of acetonitrile, which influenced the separation and accurate assay of compound chemical disinfectants were investigated in detail. The intra-day and inter-day precisions of the method were below 3. 0% and 3.7%, respectively. The limits of detection (LOD, signal to noise ratio (S/N) = 3) for chlorhexidine acetate, C12-BAC, Cl4-BAC and C16-BAC were 0. 3, 0.5, 0.5 and 0.5 mg/L, respectively. The limits of quantification (LOQ, S/N = 10) were 1.0, 1.5, 1.5, and 1.5 mg/L, respectively. The corrected peak area and the mass concentration of the four components mentioned above showed good linear relationships within the ranges of 1.0 - 400 mg/L, 1. 5 - 200 mg/L, 1.5 - 200 mg/L and 1.5 - 200 mg/L, with linear correlation coefficients (r) of 0.9995, 0.9998, 0.999 7 and 0.9998, respectively. The established method was used for the determination of the four disinfectants in the compound chemical disinfectants. The results were in good agreement with those obtained by the high performance liquid chromatographic method.

  14. Efficacy of some oils and chemical compounds on Insignorthezia insignis (Browne) (Hemiptera: Ortheziidae) infesting Lantana camara in Alexandria, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Moursi, S Khadiga; Abo-Shanab, A S H; Mesbah, H A; Abdel-Razak, S I; Mourad, A K; Zaghloul, O A; Abdel-Fatah, R S

    2010-01-01

    Field and laboratory experiments were conducted in March, 2008 in El-Nouzha garden, Alexandria governorate. Pre-and post treatment inspections of the insects were examined and recorded before and after (2,4,8, and 12 weeks). Spraying was applied to evaluate the efficiency of the tested compounds, [Mineral oils (KZ oil and Star oil); IGRs (Chlorfluazuron, lufenuron and pyriproxyfen); Neem oil; emamectin benzoate and thiamethoxam]. Percentages of reduction were calculated. The ensign scale insects Insignorthezia insignis (Browne) were collected from treated Lantana camara shrubs to investigate the effect of the tested chemicals on Aspartate transferase (AST), Alanine transferase (ALT) and Alkaline-phosphatase (ALPK) of the insect enzymes activities. From the obtained results, it could be concluded that the tested materials gave good results for controlling both adult and immature stages of the ensign scale insect Insignorthezia insignis (Browne) that infested Lantana camara shrubs, through affecting enzymes activities of the assigned insect pest.

  15. Molecular descriptor data explain market prices of a large commercial chemical compound library

    PubMed Central

    Polanski, Jaroslaw; Kucia, Urszula; Duszkiewicz, Roksana; Kurczyk, Agata; Magdziarz, Tomasz; Gasteiger, Johann

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between the structure and a property of a chemical compound is an essential concept in chemistry guiding, for example, drug design. Actually, however, we need economic considerations to fully understand the fate of drugs on the market. We are performing here for the first time the exploration of quantitative structure-economy relationships (QSER) for a large dataset of a commercial building block library of over 2.2 million chemicals. This investigation provided molecular statistics that shows that on average what we are paying for is the quantity of matter. On the other side, the influence of synthetic availability scores is also revealed. Finally, we are buying substances by looking at the molecular graphs or molecular formulas. Thus, those molecules that have a higher number of atoms look more attractive and are, on average, also more expensive. Our study shows how data binning could be used as an informative method when analyzing big data in chemistry. PMID:27334348

  16. Molecular descriptor data explain market prices of a large commercial chemical compound library.

    PubMed

    Polanski, Jaroslaw; Kucia, Urszula; Duszkiewicz, Roksana; Kurczyk, Agata; Magdziarz, Tomasz; Gasteiger, Johann

    2016-06-23

    The relationship between the structure and a property of a chemical compound is an essential concept in chemistry guiding, for example, drug design. Actually, however, we need economic considerations to fully understand the fate of drugs on the market. We are performing here for the first time the exploration of quantitative structure-economy relationships (QSER) for a large dataset of a commercial building block library of over 2.2 million chemicals. This investigation provided molecular statistics that shows that on average what we are paying for is the quantity of matter. On the other side, the influence of synthetic availability scores is also revealed. Finally, we are buying substances by looking at the molecular graphs or molecular formulas. Thus, those molecules that have a higher number of atoms look more attractive and are, on average, also more expensive. Our study shows how data binning could be used as an informative method when analyzing big data in chemistry.

  17. Molecular descriptor data explain market prices of a large commercial chemical compound library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polanski, Jaroslaw; Kucia, Urszula; Duszkiewicz, Roksana; Kurczyk, Agata; Magdziarz, Tomasz; Gasteiger, Johann

    2016-06-01

    The relationship between the structure and a property of a chemical compound is an essential concept in chemistry guiding, for example, drug design. Actually, however, we need economic considerations to fully understand the fate of drugs on the market. We are performing here for the first time the exploration of quantitative structure-economy relationships (QSER) for a large dataset of a commercial building block library of over 2.2 million chemicals. This investigation provided molecular statistics that shows that on average what we are paying for is the quantity of matter. On the other side, the influence of synthetic availability scores is also revealed. Finally, we are buying substances by looking at the molecular graphs or molecular formulas. Thus, those molecules that have a higher number of atoms look more attractive and are, on average, also more expensive. Our study shows how data binning could be used as an informative method when analyzing big data in chemistry.

  18. A general mathematical model for chemical-enhanced flushing of soil contaminated by organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei; Brusseau, Mark L.

    The use of chemical agents to enhance the in situ removal of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) from porous media is an emerging remediation technology. Whereas surfactants and cosolvents are the primary agents examined to date, others, such as natural organic matter and complexing agents, have also been examined for their ability to enhance the solubilization of HOCs. While the mode of action of each type of enhanced-solubilization agent may be different, they all induce similar responses. In this paper, a general mathematical model is developed to simulate the enhanced-solubilization process for various chemical agents, including cosolvents, surfactants, natural organic matter, and complexing agents. This model is developed using a master-equation approach that incorporates the solubilization mechanisms associated with each type of agent. A limited evaluation of the model is conducted by comparing simulations to the results of two laboratory experiments. A sensitivity analysis is performed to illustrate the influence of various factors on contaminant removal.

  19. Elevated levels of diesel range organic compounds in groundwater near Marcellus gas operations are derived from surface activities.

    PubMed

    Drollette, Brian D; Hoelzer, Kathrin; Warner, Nathaniel R; Darrah, Thomas H; Karatum, Osman; O'Connor, Megan P; Nelson, Robert K; Fernandez, Loretta A; Reddy, Christopher M; Vengosh, Avner; Jackson, Robert B; Elsner, Martin; Plata, Desiree L

    2015-10-27

    Hundreds of organic chemicals are used during natural gas extraction via high-volume hydraulic fracturing (HVHF). However, it is unclear whether these chemicals, injected into deep shale horizons, reach shallow groundwater aquifers and affect local water quality, either from those deep HVHF injection sites or from the surface or shallow subsurface. Here, we report detectable levels of organic compounds in shallow groundwater samples from private residential wells overlying the Marcellus Shale in northeastern Pennsylvania. Analyses of purgeable and extractable organic compounds from 64 groundwater samples revealed trace levels of volatile organic compounds, well below the Environmental Protection Agency's maximum contaminant levels, and low levels of both gasoline range (0-8 ppb) and diesel range organic compounds (DRO; 0-157 ppb). A compound-specific analysis revealed the presence of bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, which is a disclosed HVHF additive, that was notably absent in a representative geogenic water sample and field blanks. Pairing these analyses with (i) inorganic chemical fingerprinting of deep saline groundwater, (ii) characteristic noble gas isotopes, and (iii) spatial relationships between active shale gas extraction wells and wells with disclosed environmental health and safety violations, we differentiate between a chemical signature associated with naturally occurring saline groundwater and one associated with alternative anthropogenic routes from the surface (e.g., accidental spills or leaks). The data support a transport mechanism of DRO to groundwater via accidental release of fracturing fluid chemicals derived from the surface rather than subsurface flow of these fluids from the underlying shale formation.

  20. Modeling the Detection of Organic and Inorganic Compounds Using Iodide-Based Chemical Ionization.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Siddharth; Lopez-Hilfiker, Felipe; Lee, Ben H; Thornton, Joel A; Kurtén, Theo

    2016-02-04

    Iodide-based chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) has been used to detect and measure concentrations of several atmospherically relevant organic and inorganic compounds. The significant electronegativity of iodide and the strong acidity of hydroiodic acid makes electron transfer and proton abstraction essentially negligible, and the soft nature of the adduct formation ionization technique reduces the chances of sample fragmentation. In addition, iodide has a large negative mass defect, which, when combined with the high resolving power of a high resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS), provides good selectivity. In this work, we use quantum chemical methods to calculate the binding energies, enthalpies and free energies for clusters of an iodide ion with a number of atmospherically relevant organic and inorganic compounds. Systematic configurational sampling of the free molecules and clusters was carried out at the B3LYP/6-31G* level, followed by subsequent calculations at the PBE/SDD and DLPNO-CCSD(T)/def2-QZVPP//PBE/aug-cc-pVTZ-PP levels. The binding energies, enthalpies, and free energies thus obtained were then compared to the iodide-based University of Washington HR-ToF-CIMS (UW-CIMS) instrument sensitivities for these molecules. We observed a reasonably linear relationship between the cluster binding enthalpies and logarithmic instrument sensitivities already at the PBE/SDD level, which indicates that relatively simple quantum chemical methods can predict the sensitivity of an iodide-based CIMS instrument toward most molecules. However, higher level calculations were needed to treat some outlier molecules, most notably oxalic acid and methylerythritol. Our calculations also corroborated the recent experimental findings that the molecules that the UW-CIMS detects at maximum sensitivity usually have binding enthalpies to iodide which are higher than about 26 kcal/mol, depending slightly on the level of theory.

  1. Country-specific chemical signatures of persistent environmental compounds in breast milk.

    PubMed

    Krysiak-Baltyn, K; Toppari, J; Skakkebaek, N E; Jensen, T S; Virtanen, H E; Schramm, K-W; Shen, H; Vartiainen, T; Kiviranta, H; Taboureau, O; Brunak, S; Main, K M

    2010-04-01

    Recent reports have confirmed a worldwide increasing trend of testicular cancer incidence, and a conspicuously high prevalence of this disease and other male reproductive disorders, including cryptorchidism and hypospadias, in Denmark. In contrast, Finland, a similarly industrialized Nordic country, exhibits much lower incidences of these disorders. The reasons behind the observed trends are unexplained, but environmental endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) that affect foetal testis development are probably involved. Levels of persistent chemicals in breast milk can be considered a proxy for exposure of the foetus to such agents. Therefore, we undertook a comprehensive ecological study of 121 EDCs, including the persistent compounds dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), pesticides and flame retardants, and non-persistent phthalates, in 68 breast milk samples from Denmark and Finland to compare exposure of mothers to this environmental mixture of EDCs. Using sophisticated, bioinformatic tools in our analysis, we reveal, for the first time, distinct country-specific chemical signatures of EDCs with Danes having generally higher exposure than Finns to persistent bioaccumulative chemicals, whereas there was no country-specific pattern with regard to the non-persistent phthalates. Importantly, EDC levels, including some dioxins, PCBs and some pesticides (hexachlorobenzene and dieldrin) were significantly higher in Denmark than in Finland. As these classes of EDCs have been implicated in testicular cancer or in adversely affecting development of the foetal testis in humans and animals, our findings reinforce the view that environmental exposure to EDCs may explain some of the temporal and between-country differences in incidence of male reproductive disorders.

  2. Chemical characterization of dissolved organic compounds from coastal sea surface microlayers (Baltic Sea, Germany).

    PubMed

    van Pinxteren, Manuela; Müller, Conny; Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Stolle, Christian; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2012-10-02

    The physicochemical properties of the sea surface microlayer (SML), i.e. the boundary layer between the air and the sea, and its impact on air-sea exchange processes have been investigated for decades. However, a detailed description about these processes remains incomplete. In order to obtain a better chemical characterization of the SML, in a case study three pairs of SML and corresponding bulk water samples were taken in the southern Baltic Sea. The samples were analyzed for dissolved organic carbon and dissolved total nitrogen, as well as for several organic nitrogen containing compounds and carbohydrates, namely aliphatic amines, dissolved free amino acids, dissolved free monosaccharides, sugar alcohols, and monosaccharide anhydrates. Therefore, reasonable analytical procedures with respect to desalting and enrichment were established. All aliphatic amines and the majority of the investigated amino acids (11 out of 18) were found in the samples with average concentrations between 53 ng L(-1) and 1574 ng L(-1). The concentrations of carbohydrates were slightly higher, averaging 2900 ng L(-1). Calculation of the enrichment factor (EF) between the sea surface microlayer and the bulk water showed that dissolved total nitrogen was more enriched (EF: 1.1 and 1.2) in the SML than dissolved organic carbon (EF: 1.0 and 1.1). The nitrogen containing organic compounds were generally found to be enriched in the SML (EF: 1.9-9.2), whereas dissolved carbohydrates were not enriched or even depleted (EF: 0.7-1.2). Although the investigated compounds contributed on average only 0.3% to the dissolved organic carbon and 0.4% to the total dissolved nitrogen fraction, these results underline the importance of single compound analysis to determine SML structure, function, and its potential for a transfer of compounds into the atmosphere.

  3. Endophytic fungal compounds active against Cryptococcus neoformans and C. gattii.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Cristiane B; de Oliveira, Djalma M; Hughes, Alice Fs; Kohlhoff, Markus; LA Vieira, Mariana; Martins Vaz, Aline B; Ferreira, Mariana C; Carvalho, Camila R; Rosa, Luiz H; Rosa, Carlos A; Alves, Tânia Ma; Zani, Carlos L; Johann, Susana; Cota, Betania B

    2015-07-01

    Infections with Cryptococcus are invasive mycoses associated with significant morbidity and mortality, mainly in immunosuppressed patients. Several drugs have been introduced to combat these opportunistic infections. However, resistance of this organism to antifungal drugs has increased, causing difficulties in the treatment. The goal of this work was to evaluate the antifungal activity of ethanol extracts from endophytic fungi isolated from plants collected from different Brazilian ecosystems and to perform the fractionation of the most promising extract. Four-hundred fungal extracts were investigated by microdilution broth assays against Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii at a concentration of 500 μg ml(-1). Among them, the extract of Mycosphaerella sp. UFMGCB 2032, an endophytic fungus isolated from the plant Eugenia bimarginata DC. (Myrtaceae) exhibited outstanding antifungal activity against C. neoformans and C. gattii, with MIC values of 31.2 μg ml(-1) and 7.8 μg ml(-1), respectively. The fractionation of this extract using liquid-liquid partitioning and semi-preparative HPLC afforded two eicosanoic acids with antifungal activity, compound 1, (2S,3R,4R)-(E)-2-amino-3,4-dihydroxy-2-(hydroxymethyl)-14-oxoeicos-6,12-dienoic acid with MIC values ranging from 1.3-2.50 μg ml(-1), and compound 2, known as myriocin, with MIC values of 0.5 μg ml(-1) against C. neoformans and C. gattii. These compounds are reported for the first time in the Mycosphaerella genus.

  4. Method for Systematic Assessment of Chemical Changes in Molecular Scaffolds with Conserved Topology and Application to the Analysis of Scaffold-Activity Relationships.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ye; Zhang, Bijun; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2015-08-01

    Sets of scaffolds with conserved molecular topology are abundant among drugs and bioactive compounds. Core structure topology is one of the determinants of biological activity. Heteroatom replacements and/or bond order variation render topologically equivalent scaffolds chemically distinct and also contribute to differences in the biological activity of compounds containing these scaffolds. Relationships between core structure topology, chemical modifications, and observed activity profiles are difficult to analyze. A computational method is introduced to consistently assess chemical transformations that distinguish scaffolds with conserved topology. The methodology is applied to quantify chemical differences in conserved topological environments and systematically relate chemical changes in topologically equivalent scaffolds to associated activity profiles.

  5. Extremely Randomized Machine Learning Methods for Compound Activity Prediction.

    PubMed

    Czarnecki, Wojciech M; Podlewska, Sabina; Bojarski, Andrzej J

    2015-11-09

    Speed, a relatively low requirement for computational resources and high effectiveness of the evaluation of the bioactivity of compounds have caused a rapid growth of interest in the application of machine learning methods to virtual screening tasks. However, due to the growth of the amount of data also in cheminformatics and related fields, the aim of research has shifted not only towards the development of algorithms of high predictive power but also towards the simplification of previously existing methods to obtain results more quickly. In the study, we tested two approaches belonging to the group of so-called 'extremely randomized methods'-Extreme Entropy Machine and Extremely Randomized Trees-for their ability to properly identify compounds that have activity towards particular protein targets. These methods were compared with their 'non-extreme' competitors, i.e., Support Vector Machine and Random Forest. The extreme approaches were not only found out to improve the efficiency of the classification of bioactive compounds, but they were also proved to be less computationally complex, requiring fewer steps to perform an optimization procedure.

  6. Leaf Surface Lipophilic Compounds as One of the Factors of Silver Birch Chemical Defense against Larvae of Gypsy Moth

    PubMed Central

    Martemyanov, Vyacheslav V.; Pavlushin, Sergey V.; Dubovskiy, Ivan M.; Belousova, Irina A.; Yushkova, Yuliya V.; Morosov, Sergey V.; Chernyak, Elena I.; Glupov, Victor V.

    2015-01-01

    Plant chemical defense against herbivores is a complex process which involves a number of secondary compounds. It is known that the concentration of leaf surface lipophilic compounds (SLCs), particularly those of flavonoid aglycones are increased with the defoliation treatment of silver birch Betula pendula. In this study we investigated how the alteration of SLCs concentration in the food affects the fitness and innate immunity of the gypsy moth Lymantria dispar. We found that a low SLCs concentrations in consumed leaves led to a rapid larval development and increased females’ pupae weight (= fecundity) compared to larvae fed with leaves with high SLCs content. Inversely, increasing the compounds concentration in an artificial diet produced the reverse effects: decreases in both larval weight and larval survival. Low SLCs concentrations in tree leaves differently affected larval innate immunity parameters. For both sexes, total hemocytes count in the hemolymph increased, while the activity of plasma phenoloxidase decreased when larvae consume leaves with reduced content of SLCs. Our results clearly demonstrate that the concentration of SLCs in silver birch leaves affects not only gypsy moth fitness but also their innate immune status which might alter the potential resistance of insects against infections and/or parasitoids. PMID:25816371

  7. Biological activities and chemical composition of lichens from Serbia

    PubMed Central

    Kosanic, Marijana; Rankovic, Branislav; Stanojkovic, Tatjana; Vasiljevic, Perica; Manojlovic, Nedeljko

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate chemical composition of acetone extracts of the lichens Parmelia arseneana and Acarospora fuscata and in vitro antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer activities of these extracts and gyrophoric acid isolated from A. fuscata. The HPLC-UV method was used for the identification of secondary metabolites. Stictic acid, norstictic acid, gyrophoric acid, usnic acid, atranorin and chloroatranorin were identified in the A. fuscata. In P. arseneana, we detected stictic acid, norstictic acid, usnic acid and atranorin, while gyrophoric acid was not identified. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by measuring the scavenging capacity of tested samples on DPPH and superoxide anion radicals, reducing the power of samples and determination of total phenolic compounds in extracts. As a result of the study, gyrophoric acid was found to have the largest DPPH radical scavenging activity with an IC50 value of 105.75 µg/ml. Moreover, the tested samples had an effective superoxide anion radical scavenging and reducing power. The total content of phenol in extracts was determined as pyrocatechol equivalent. The antimicrobial activity was estimated by determination of the minimal inhibitory concentration by the broth microdilution method. The most active was also gyrophoric acid, with minimum inhibitory concentration values ranging from 0.019 to 1.25 mg/ml. Anticancer activity was tested against LS174 (human colon carcinoma cell line), A549 (human lung carcinoma cell line), Fem-x (malignant melanoma cell line), and a chronic myelogeneous leukaemia K562 cell line using the MTT method. Extract of P. arseneana expressed the strongest anticancer activity against all cell lines with IC50 values ranging from 11.61 to 47.06 µg/ml. PMID:26417336

  8. Stereoregularity of poly (lactic acid) and their model compounds as studied by NMR and quantum chemical calculations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to understand the origin of the tacticity splitting in the NMR spectrum of poly(lactic acid), monomer model compound and dimer model compounds (both isotactic and syndiotactic) were synthesized and their 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts observed. Two energetically stable conformations were o...

  9. Eucalyptus (gracilis, oleosa, salubris, and salmonophloia) essential oils: their chemical composition and antioxidant and antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Ben Marzoug, Hajer Naceur; Bouajila, Jalloul; Ennajar, Monia; Lebrihi, Ahmed; Mathieu, Florence; Couderc, François; Abderraba, Manef; Romdhane, Mehrez

    2010-08-01

    Essential oils of four different Eucalyptus species (Eucalyptus salubris, Eucalyptus salmonophloia, Eucalyptus oleosa, and Eucalyptus gracilis) grown in southern Tunisia were screened for their antioxidant and antimicrobial properties as well as their chemical compositions. According to gas chromatography-flame ionization detection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis, chemical compositions of the Eucalyptus species E. salubris (27 compounds; 99.2%), E. salmonophloia (31 compounds; 99.2%), E. oleosa (32 compounds; 97.6%), and E. gracilis (18 compounds; 97.7%) were identified. In the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl assay, the antioxidant activity was in the range of 12.0-52.8 mg/mL, whereas in the 2,2'-azinobis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate assay, E. oleosa (176.5 +/- 3.1 mg/L) gave the best inhibition result. To evaluate antimicrobial activity, all essential oils were tested against bacteria (two Gram-positive and two Gram-negative), two yeast, and two fungi. Essential oils exhibited an interesting antibacterial activity against all microorganisms tested (activity was better against Gram-positive bacteria) except for Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Correlations between chemical composition and biological and antioxidant activities were studied.

  10. Laccase Catalyzed Synthesis of Iodinated Phenolic Compounds with Antifungal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ihssen, Julian; Schubert, Mark; Thöny-Meyer, Linda; Richter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Iodine is a well known antimicrobial compound. Laccase, an oxidoreductase which couples the one electron oxidation of diverse phenolic and non-phenolic substrates to the reduction of oxygen to water, is capable of oxidizing unreactive iodide to reactive iodine. We have shown previously that laccase-iodide treatment of spruce wood results in a wash-out resistant antimicrobial surface. In this study, we investigated whether phenolic compounds such as vanillin, which resembles sub-structures of softwood lignin, can be directly iodinated by reacting with laccase and iodide, resulting in compounds with antifungal activity. HPLC-MS analysis showed that vanillin was converted to iodovanillin by laccase catalysis at an excess of potassium iodide. No conversion of vanillin occurred in the absence of enzyme. The addition of redox mediators in catalytic concentrations increased the rate of iodide oxidation ten-fold and the yield of iodovanillin by 50%. Iodinated phenolic products were also detected when o-vanillin, ethyl vanillin, acetovanillone and methyl vanillate were incubated with laccase and iodide. At an increased educt concentration of 0.1 M an almost one to one molar ratio of iodide to vanillin could be used without compromising conversion rate, and the insoluble iodovanillin product could be recovered by simple centrifugation. The novel enzymatic synthesis procedure fulfills key criteria of green chemistry. Biocatalytically produced iodovanillin and iodo-ethyl vanillin had significant growth inhibitory effects on several wood degrading fungal species. For Trametes versicolor, a species causing white rot of wood, almost complete growth inhibition and a partial biocidal effect was observed on agar plates. Enzymatic tests indicated that the iodinated compounds acted as enzyme responsive, antimicrobial materials. PMID:24594755

  11. Computational Method for the Systematic Identification of Analog Series and Key Compounds Representing Series and Their Biological Activity Profiles.

    PubMed

    Stumpfe, Dagmar; Dimova, Dilyana; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2016-08-25

    A computational methodology is introduced for detecting all unique series of analogs in large compound data sets, regardless of chemical relationships between analogs. No prior knowledge of core structures or R-groups is required, which are automatically determined. The approach is based upon the generation of retrosynthetic matched molecular pairs and analog networks from which distinct series are isolated. The methodology was applied to systematically extract more than 17 000 distinct series from the ChEMBL database. For comparison, analog series were also isolated from screening compounds and drugs. Known biological activities were mapped to series from ChEMBL, and in more than 13 000 of these series, key compounds were identified that represented substitution sites of all analogs within a series and its complete activity profile. The analog series, key compounds, and activity profiles are made freely available as a resource for medicinal chemistry applications.

  12. New clues on carcinogenicity-related substructures derived from mining two large datasets of chemical compounds.

    PubMed

    Golbamaki, Azadi; Benfenati, Emilio; Golbamaki, Nazanin; Manganaro, Alberto; Merdivan, Erinc; Roncaglioni, Alessandra; Gini, Giuseppina

    2016-04-02

    In this study, new molecular fragments associated with genotoxic and nongenotoxic carcinogens are introduced to estimate the carcinogenic potential of compounds. Two rule-based carcinogenesis models were developed with the aid of SARpy: model R (from rodents' experimental data) and model E (from human carcinogenicity data). Structural alert extraction method of SARpy uses a completely automated and unbiased manner with statistical significance. The carcinogenicity models developed in this study are collections of carcinogenic potential fragments that were extracted from two carcinogenicity databases: the ANTARES carcinogenicity dataset with information from bioassay on rats and the combination of ISSCAN and CGX datasets, which take into accounts human-based assessment. The performance of these two models was evaluated in terms of cross-validation and external validation using a 258 compound case study dataset. Combining R and H predictions and scoring a positive or negative result when both models are concordant on a prediction, increased accuracy to 72% and specificity to 79% on the external test set. The carcinogenic fragments present in the two models were compared and analyzed from the point of view of chemical class. The results of this study show that the developed rule sets will be a useful tool to identify some new structural alerts of carcinogenicity and provide effective information on the molecular structures of carcinogenic chemicals.

  13. Effects-driven chemical fractionation of heavy fuel oil to isolate compounds toxic to trout embryos.

    PubMed

    Bornstein, Jason M; Adams, Julie; Hollebone, Bruce; King, Thomas; Hodson, Peter V; Brown, R Stephen

    2014-04-01

    Heavy fuel oil (HFO) spills account for approximately 60% of ship-source oil spills and are up to 50 times more toxic than medium and light crude oils. Heavy fuel oils contain elevated concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and alkyl-PAHs, known to be toxic to fish; however, little direct characterization of HFO toxicity has been reported. An effects-driven chemical fractionation was conducted on HFO 7102 to separate compounds with similar chemical and physical properties, including toxicity, to isolate the groups of compounds most toxic to trout embryos. After each separation, toxicity tests directed the next phase of fractionation, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis correlated composition with toxicity, with a focus on PAHs. Low-temperature vacuum distillation permitted the separation of HFO into 3 fractions based on boiling point ranges. The most toxic of these fractions underwent wax precipitation to remove long-chain n-alkanes. The remaining PAH-rich extract was further separated using open column chromatography, which provided distinct fractions that were grouped according to increasing aromatic ring count. The most toxic of these fractions was richest in PAHs and alkyl-PAHs. The results of the present study were consistent with previous crude oil studies that identified PAH-rich fractions as the most toxic.

  14. Synthesis of Hydroxide-TiO2 Compounds with Photocatalytic Activity for Degradation of Phenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras-Ruiz, J. C.; Martínez-Gallegos, S.; Ordoñez, E.; González-Juárez, J. C.; García-Rivas, J. L.

    2017-01-01

    Photocatalytic degradation of phenol using titanium dioxide (TiO2), either alone or in combination with other materials, has been tested. Mg/Al hydrotalcites prepared by two methods using inorganic (HC) or organic (HS) chemical reagents, along with mixed oxides produced by calcination of these products (HCC and HSC), were mixed with titanium isopropoxide to obtain hydroxide-TiO2 compounds (HCC-TiO2 and HSC-TiO2) and their photocatalytic activity tested in solutions of 10 mg/L phenol at 120 min under illumination at λ UV = 254 nm with power of 4 W or 8 W. The obtained materials were characterized by various techniques, revealing that TiO2 was incorporated into the mixed oxides of the calcined hydrotalcite to form the above-mentioned compounds. The photocatalytic test results indicate that the activity of HCC-TiO2 can be attributed to increased phenol adsorption by hydrotalcite for transfer to the active photocatalytic phase of the impregnated TiO2 particles, while the better results obtained for HSC-TiO2 are due to greater catalyst impregnation on the surface of the calcined hydrotalcite, reducing the screening phenomenon and achieving HSC-TiO2 degradation of up to 21.0% at 8 W. Reuse of both compounds indicated tight combination of HCC or HSC with TiO2, since in four successive separation cycles there was little reduction of activity, being associated primarily with material loss during recovery.

  15. Synthesis of Hydroxide-TiO2 Compounds with Photocatalytic Activity for Degradation of Phenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras-Ruiz, J. C.; Martínez-Gallegos, S.; Ordoñez, E.; González-Juárez, J. C.; García-Rivas, J. L.

    2017-03-01

    Photocatalytic degradation of phenol using titanium dioxide (TiO2), either alone or in combination with other materials, has been tested. Mg/Al hydrotalcites prepared by two methods using inorganic (HC) or organic (HS) chemical reagents, along with mixed oxides produced by calcination of these products (HCC and HSC), were mixed with titanium isopropoxide to obtain hydroxide-TiO2 compounds (HCC-TiO2 and HSC-TiO2) and their photocatalytic activity tested in solutions of 10 mg/L phenol at 120 min under illumination at λ UV = 254 nm with power of 4 W or 8 W. The obtained materials were characterized by various techniques, revealing that TiO2 was incorporated into the mixed oxides of the calcined hydrotalcite to form the above-mentioned compounds. The photocatalytic test results indicate that the activity of HCC-TiO2 can be attributed to increased phenol adsorption by hydrotalcite for transfer to the active photocatalytic phase of the impregnated TiO2 particles, while the better results obtained for HSC-TiO2 are due to greater catalyst impregnation on the surface of the calcined hydrotalcite, reducing the screening phenomenon and achieving HSC-TiO2 degradation of up to 21.0% at 8 W. Reuse of both compounds indicated tight combination of HCC or HSC with TiO2, since in four successive separation cycles there was little reduction of activity, being associated primarily with material loss during recovery.

  16. Design, in vitro stability, and ocular hypotensive activity of t-butalone chemical delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Reddy, I K; Vaithiyalingam, S R; Khan, M A; Bodor, N S

    2001-08-01

    The objective of this work was to synthesize two bioreversible diacyl derivatives of t-butalone (chemical delivery systems), determine their chemical and in vitro stability, and investigate their potential use as topical antiglaucoma agents. The stability of these compounds was determined in isotonic phosphate buffers (pH range 5-8) and in selected biological media, including human whole blood, rabbit and rat blood, and the anterior segment tissues of rabbit. The ocular hypotensive activity of these compounds in unrestrained, normotensive albino rabbits was determined with a pneumatonometer. The two compounds were stable at lower pH. The stability decreased as the pH increased, suggesting their lability to base-catalyzed hydrolysis. These compounds exhibited significant differences in the hydrolytic rates in the whole blood among species examined (rat > rabbit > human). The observed rates of disappearance in different ocular tissues were indicative of relative enzyme activity in these media (iris-ciliary body > cornea > aqueous humor). The two compounds exhibited a significant ocular hypotensive activity (P < 0.01) at 2% dose level. The peak activity was found between 2 and 4 h, and the activity was maintained for 4.5 to 7 h. The dipivalyl derivative of t-butalone exhibited more pronounced decrease in intraocular pressure than that of diisovaleryl derivative. The present study suggests the possible use of diacyl derivatives of t-butalone as ocular hypotensive agents.

  17. Large-scale assessment of activity landscape feature probabilities of bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Kayastha, Shilva; Dimova, Dilyana; Iyer, Preeti; Vogt, Martin; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2014-02-24

    Activity landscape representations integrate pairwise compound similarity and potency relationships and provide direct access to characteristic structure-activity relationship features in compound data sets. Because pairwise compound comparisons provide the foundation of activity landscape design, the assessment of specific landscape features such as activity cliffs has generally been confined to the level of compound pairs. A conditional probability-based approach has been applied herein to assign most probable activity landscape features to individual compounds. For example, for a given data set compound, it was determined if it would preferentially engage in the formation of activity cliffs or other landscape features. In a large-scale effort, we have determined conditional activity landscape feature probabilities for more than 160,000 compounds with well-defined activity annotations contained in 427 different target-based data sets. These landscape feature probabilities provide a detailed view of how different activity landscape features are distributed over currently available bioactive compounds.

  18. Chemical hydrogenation of La(Fe,Si) family of intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wlodarczyk, P.; Polak, M.; Hawelek, L.; Kowalczyk, M.; Hreczka, M.; Kolano-Burian, A.

    2016-11-01

    In the present work, the chemical hydrogenation process of La(Fe,Si)13 compounds has been shown. It was found, that the La(Fe,Si) compound can be easily saturated with hydrogen by performing reaction with 0.6 M hydrochloric acid (HCl) for 2 h. After reaction, the heat treatment process is necessary to make hydrogenated powder homogenous. For the LaFe11.8Si1.2 micronized (<50 μm) and hydrogenated powder, the strength of the magnetocaloric effect was estimated by means of magnetocalorimetric measurements on plates consolidated with PVDF thermoplastic polymer. Magnetic entropy change was calculated by use of magnetization data acquired at magnetic fields with induction up to 2T. The adiabatic temperature change is equal to 3 K in magnetic field change 0-1.7T at 335 K, while magnetic entropy change is equal 13 J/kg*K at 2T. The structural homogeneity of initial and hydrogenated powders was validated by powder X-ray diffraction method. The amount of hydrogen in the hydrogenated compounds was evaluated using thermogravimetry method (4 H atoms per formula unit LaFe11.8Si1.2).

  19. Chemical kinetic study of the oxidation of toluene and related cyclic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Mehl, M; Frassoldati, A; Fietzek, R; Faravelli, T; Pitz, W; Ranzi, E

    2009-10-01

    Chemical kinetic models of hydrocarbons found in transportation fuels are needed to simulate combustion in engines and to improve engine performance. The study of the combustion of practical fuels, however, has to deal with their complex compositions, which generally involve hundreds of compounds. To provide a simplified approach for practical fuels, surrogate fuels including few relevant components are used instead of including all components. Among those components, toluene, the simplest of the alkyl benzenes, is one of the most prevalent aromatic compounds in gasoline in the U.S. (up to 30%) and is a promising candidate for formulating gasoline surrogates. Unfortunately, even though the combustion of aromatics been studied for a long time, the oxidation processes relevant to this class of compounds are still matter of discussion. In this work, the combustion of toluene is systematically approached through the analysis of the kinetics of some important intermediates contained in its kinetic submechanism. After discussing the combustion chemistry of cyclopentadiene, benzene, phenol and, finally, of toluene, the model is validated against literature experimental data over a wide range of operating conditions.

  20. Passive Sampling in Regulatory Chemical Monitoring of Nonpolar Organic Compounds in the Aquatic Environment.

    PubMed

    Booij, Kees; Robinson, Craig D; Burgess, Robert M; Mayer, Philipp; Roberts, Cindy A; Ahrens, Lutz; Allan, Ian J; Brant, Jan; Jones, Lisa; Kraus, Uta R; Larsen, Martin M; Lepom, Peter; Petersen, Jördis; Pröfrock, Daniel; Roose, Patrick; Schäfer, Sabine; Smedes, Foppe; Tixier, Céline; Vorkamp, Katrin; Whitehouse, Paul

    2016-01-05

    We reviewed compliance monitoring requirements in the European Union, the United States, and the Oslo-Paris Convention for the protection of the marine environment of the North-East Atlantic, and evaluated if these are met by passive sampling methods for nonpolar compounds. The strengths and shortcomings of passive sampling are assessed for water, sediments, and biota. Passive water sampling is a suitable technique for measuring concentrations of freely dissolved compounds. This method yields results that are incompatible with the EU's quality standard definition in terms of total concentrations in water, but this definition has little scientific basis. Insufficient quality control is a present weakness of passive sampling in water. Laboratory performance studies and the development of standardized methods are needed to improve data quality and to encourage the use of passive sampling by commercial laboratories and monitoring agencies. Successful prediction of bioaccumulation based on passive sampling is well documented for organisms at the lower trophic levels, but requires more research for higher levels. Despite the existence of several knowledge gaps, passive sampling presently is the best available technology for chemical monitoring of nonpolar organic compounds. Key issues to be addressed by scientists and environmental managers are outlined.

  1. Element and chemical compounds transfer in bio-crude from hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaohan; Zhang, Chao; Li, Zeyu; Yang, Xiaoyi

    2016-02-01

    In this study, hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) experiments of Nannochloropsis and Spirulina were carried out at different temperatures (220-300 °C) to explore the effects of temperature on bio-crude yield and properties. The optimal temperature for bio-crude yield was around 260-280 °C. Transfers of element and chemical compounds in bio-crude were discussed in detail to deduce the reaction mechanism. The hydrogen and carbon recoveries were consistent with the results of bio-crude yields at every temperature point. The relative percentage of fatty acid in bio-crude decreased and the amine and amide increased for both microalgae with temperature rising. The N-heterocyclic compounds in bio-crude increased with temperature rising for Nannochloropsis, while decreased when temperature increased from 220 °C to 280 °C for Spirulina. Bio-crude gained at higher temperature or from microalgae with high protein content may contain high heteroatom compounds.

  2. Determination of total N-nitroso compounds by chemical denitrosation using CuCl.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia; Chan, W Geoffrey; Haut, Stephen A; Krauss, Marc R; Izac, Richard R; Hempfling, Walter P

    2005-06-15

    A method for the determination of total N-nitroso compounds (NOC) by chemical denitrosation and subsequent chemiluminescence detection of evolved NO is described. Denitrosation was accomplished with CuCl in HCl at 70 degrees C. The detection limit for N-nitrosoproline (NPRO) was 1 pmol. NO formation from NPRO was linear (R(2) = 0.999) from 4 pmol to 2 nmol. Among the possible interfering compounds tested, only S-nitroso compounds contribute any significant interference. This method had several advantages over other similar methods: (1) A commercially available one-piece reaction vessel and a NO analyzer with software were used. (2) NO release occurred rapidly and was easily measured and quantified. (3) Compared to HBr or HI, CuCl was more convenient to work with and safe. (4) CuCl was suitable for samples in aqueous and most organic solvents. The application of this method to food, personal care products, and human body fluids demonstrates its utility.

  3. Chemical features of Ganoderma polysaccharides with antioxidant, antitumor and antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Isabel C F R; Heleno, Sandrina A; Reis, Filipa S; Stojkovic, Dejan; Queiroz, Maria João R P; Vasconcelos, M Helena; Sokovic, Marina

    2015-06-01

    Ganoderma genus comprises one of the most commonly studied species worldwide, Ganoderma lucidum. However, other Ganoderma species have been also reported as important sources of bioactive compounds. Polysaccharides are important contributors to the medicinal properties reported for Ganoderma species, as demonstrated by the numerous publications, including reviews, on this matter. Yet, what are the chemical features of Ganoderma polysaccharides that have bioactivity? In the present manuscript, the chemical features of Ganoderma polysaccharides with reported antioxidant, antitumor and antimicrobial activities (the most studied worldwide) are analyzed in detail. The composition of sugars (homo- versus hetero-glucans and other polysaccharides), type of glycosidic linkages, branching patterns, and linkage to proteins are discussed. Methods for extraction, isolation and identification are evaluated and, finally, the bioactivity of polysaccharidic extracts and purified compounds are discussed. The integration of data allows deduction of structure-activity relationships and gives clues to the chemical aspects involved in Ganoderma bioactivity.

  4. Bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity of wolfberry infusion

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yujing; Rukeya, Japaer; Tao, Wenyang; Sun, Peilong; Ye, Xingqian

    2017-01-01

    An infusion of the wolfberry (Lycium barbarum L.) is a traditional Asian herbal tea. This is the most commonly consumed form of dried wolfberry worldwide, yet little scientific information on wolfberry infusions is available. We investigated the effects of making infusions with hot water on the color, the content of bioactive compounds (polysaccharides, polyphenols, flavonoids and carotenoids) and the antioxidant ability of wolfberry infusions. The contents of bioactive compounds and the antioxidant activity of a wolfberry infusion increased with increased infusion temperature and time. Total polysaccharides content (TPOC), total polyphenols (TPC), total flavonoids (TFC) and total carotenoids contents (TCC) were important for determining the antioxidant capacity of wolfberry infusions with the contribution to antioxidant activity in the order TPC > TFC > TCC > TPOC. Hierarchical cluster analysis indicated preparation conditions of 100 °C for 1~3 h, 90 °C for 2~3 h and 80 °C for 2.5~3 h were equivalent as regards the value of TPC, TPOC, TFC, TCC, FRAP, DPPH and ABTS. The results of this study suggest the length of time of making a wolfberry infusion in actual real life practice is too short and different dietary habits associated with the intake of wolfberry infusion might provide the same bioactive nutrients. PMID:28102295

  5. Bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity of wolfberry infusion.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yujing; Rukeya, Japaer; Tao, Wenyang; Sun, Peilong; Ye, Xingqian

    2017-01-19

    An infusion of the wolfberry (Lycium barbarum L.) is a traditional Asian herbal tea. This is the most commonly consumed form of dried wolfberry worldwide, yet little scientific information on wolfberry infusions is available. We investigated the effects of making infusions with hot water on the color, the content of bioactive compounds (polysaccharides, polyphenols, flavonoids and carotenoids) and the antioxidant ability of wolfberry infusions. The contents of bioactive compounds and the antioxidant activity of a wolfberry infusion increased with increased infusion temperature and time. Total polysaccharides content (TPOC), total polyphenols (TPC), total flavonoids (TFC) and total carotenoids contents (TCC) were important for determining the antioxidant capacity of wolfberry infusions with the contribution to antioxidant activity in the order TPC > TFC > TCC > TPOC. Hierarchical cluster analysis indicated preparation conditions of 100 °C for 1~3 h, 90 °C for 2~3 h and 80 °C for 2.5~3 h were equivalent as regards the value of TPC, TPOC, TFC, TCC, FRAP, DPPH and ABTS. The results of this study suggest the length of time of making a wolfberry infusion in actual real life practice is too short and different dietary habits associated with the intake of wolfberry infusion might provide the same bioactive nutrients.

  6. Influence of plasma-activated compounds on melanogenesis and tyrosinase activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Anser; Ashraf, Zaman; Kumar, Naresh; Rafiq, Muhammad; Jabeen, Farukh; Park, Ji Hoon; Choi, Ki Hong; Lee, Seunghyun; Seo, Sung-Yum; Choi, Eun Ha; Attri, Pankaj

    2016-03-01

    Many organic chemists around the world synthesize medicinal compounds or extract multiple compounds from plants in order to increase the activity and quality of medicines. In this work, we synthesized new eugenol derivatives (ED) and then treated them with an N2 feeding gas atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) to increase their utility. We studied the tyrosinase-inhibition activity (activity test) and structural changes (circular dichroism) of tyrosinase with ED and plasma activated eugenol derivatives (PAED) in a cell-free environment. Later, we used docking studies to determine the possible interaction sites of ED and PAED compounds with tyrosinase enzyme. Moreover, we studied the possible effect of ED and PAED on melanin synthesis and its mechanism in melanoma (B16F10) cells. Additionally, we investigated the structural changes that occurred in activated ED after plasma treatment using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Hence, this study provides a new perspective on PAED for the field of plasma medicine.

  7. Influence of plasma-activated compounds on melanogenesis and tyrosinase activity.

    PubMed

    Ali, Anser; Ashraf, Zaman; Kumar, Naresh; Rafiq, Muhammad; Jabeen, Farukh; Park, Ji Hoon; Choi, Ki Hong; Lee, SeungHyun; Seo, Sung-Yum; Choi, Eun Ha; Attri, Pankaj

    2016-03-02

    Many organic chemists around the world synthesize medicinal compounds or extract multiple compounds from plants in order to increase the activity and quality of medicines. In this work, we synthesized new eugenol derivatives (ED) and then treated them with an N2 feeding gas atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) to increase their utility. We studied the tyrosinase-inhibition activity (activity test) and structural changes (circular dichroism) of tyrosinase with ED and plasma activated eugenol derivatives (PAED) in a cell-free environment. Later, we used docking studies to determine the possible interaction sites of ED and PAED compounds with tyrosinase enzyme. Moreover, we studied the possible effect of ED and PAED on melanin synthesis and its mechanism in melanoma (B16F10) cells. Additionally, we investigated the structural changes that occurred in activated ED after plasma treatment using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Hence, this study provides a new perspective on PAED for the field of plasma medicine.

  8. Influence of plasma-activated compounds on melanogenesis and tyrosinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Anser; Ashraf, Zaman; Kumar, Naresh; Rafiq, Muhammad; Jabeen, Farukh; Park, Ji Hoon; Choi, Ki Hong; Lee, SeungHyun; Seo, Sung-Yum; Choi, Eun Ha; Attri, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Many organic chemists around the world synthesize medicinal compounds or extract multiple compounds from plants in order to increase the activity and quality of medicines. In this work, we synthesized new eugenol derivatives (ED) and then treated them with an N2 feeding gas atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) to increase their utility. We studied the tyrosinase-inhibition activity (activity test) and structural changes (circular dichroism) of tyrosinase with ED and plasma activated eugenol derivatives (PAED) in a cell-free environment. Later, we used docking studies to determine the possible interaction sites of ED and PAED compounds with tyrosinase enzyme. Moreover, we studied the possible effect of ED and PAED on melanin synthesis and its mechanism in melanoma (B16F10) cells. Additionally, we investigated the structural changes that occurred in activated ED after plasma treatment using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Hence, this study provides a new perspective on PAED for the field of plasma medicine. PMID:26931617

  9. Creating an Adaptive Technology Using a Cheminformatics System to Read Aloud Chemical Compound Names for People with Visual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamijo, Haruo; Morii, Shingo; Yamaguchi, Wataru; Toyooka, Naoki; Tada-Umezaki, Masahito; Hirobayashi, Shigeki

    2016-01-01

    Various tactile methods, such as Braille, have been employed to enhance the recognition ability of chemical structures by individuals with visual disabilities. However, it is unknown whether reading aloud the names of chemical compounds would be effective in this regard. There are no systems currently available using an audio component to assist…

  10. Identification of phenolic compounds by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in seventeen species of wild mushrooms in Central Mexico and determination of their antioxidant activity and bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Yahia, Elhadi M; Gutiérrez-Orozco, Fabiola; Moreno-Pérez, Marco A

    2017-07-01

    Wild mushrooms are important for the diet of some communities in Mexico. However, limited information exists on their chemical composition, contribution to the diet, and health effects. We characterized seventeen wild mushroom species growing in the state of Queretaro in Central Mexico. Most species analyzed were edible, but also included nonedible, medicinal, poisonous and toxic specimens. Whole mushrooms (caps and stipes) were characterized for water content, color, and total content of phenolic compounds, flavonoids and anthocyanins. In vitro antioxidant capacity was measured by FRAP and DPPH assays. Phenolic compounds were identified and quantified by HPLC-mass spectrometry. All species analyzed were found to possess antioxidant activity in vitro and a wide range of phenolic and organic compounds were identified. Our results add to the limited information available on the composition and potential nutritional and health value of wild mushrooms. Further analyses of their bioactivities are warranted.

  11. A novel dicyclodextrinyl ditelluride compound with antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Ren, X; Xue, Y; Zhang, K; Liu, J; Luo, G; Zheng, J; Mu, Y; Shen, J

    2001-11-02

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) primarily arise from products of normal metabolic activities and are thought to be the etiology of many diseases. A novel dicyclodextrinyl ditelluride (2-TeCD) compound was designed to be a functional mimic of the glutathione peroxidase that normally removes ROS. 2-TeCD exhibited highly catalytic efficiency and good water solubility. Antioxidant activity was studied by using ferrous sulfate/ascorbate-induced mitochondria damage model system. 2-TeCD protected the mitochondria against oxidative damage in a dose-dependent manner and exhibited also great antioxidant ability in comparison with 2-phenyl-1,2-benziososelenazol-3(2H)-one. The mimic may result in better clinical therapies for the treatment of ROS-mediated diseases.

  12. Carbon 13 chemical shift tensors in aromatic compounds. 3. Phenanthrene and triphenylene

    SciTech Connect

    Soderquist, A.; Hughes, C.D.; Horton, W.J.; Facelli, J.C.; Grant, D.M.

    1992-04-08

    Measurements of the principal values of the {sup 13}C chemical shift tensor are presented for the three carbons in triphenylene and for three different {alpha} carbons in phenanthrene. The measurements in triphenylene were made in natural abundance samples at room temperature, while the phenanthrene tensors were obtained from selectively labeled compounds (99% {sup 13}C) at low temperatures ({approx} 25 K). The principal values of the shift tensors were oriented in the molecular frame using ab initio LORG calculations. The steric compression at C{sub 4} in phenanthrene and in corresponding positions in triphenylene is manifested in sizable upfield shift in the {sigma} 33 component relative to the corresponding {sigma} 33 values at C{sub 1} and C{sub 9} in phenanthrene. The upfield shift in {sigma} 33 is mainly responsible for the well-known upfield shift of the isotropic chemical shifts of such sterically perturbed carbons. In phenanthrene c{sub 9} exhibits a unique {sigma} 22 value reflecting the greater localization of {pi}-electrons in the c{sub 9}-C{sub 10} bond. This localization of the {pi}-electrons at the C{sub 9}-C{sub 10} bond in the central ring of phenanthrene also corresponds with the most likely ordering of electrons described by the various Kekule structures in phenanthrene. The analysis of the {sup 13}C chemical shieldings of the bridgehead carbons in the triphenylene provides significant experimental information on bonding between rings in polycyclic aromatic compounds. 39 refs., 8 fig., 3 tab.

  13. Quinones and Aromatic Chemical Compounds in Particulate Matter Induce Mitochondrial Dysfunction: Implications for Ultrafine Particle Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Tian; Korge, Paavo; Weiss, James N.; Li, Ning; Venkatesen, M. Indira; Sioutas, Constantinos; Nel, Andre

    2004-01-01

    Particulate pollutants cause adverse health effects through the generation of oxidative stress. A key question is whether these effects are mediated by the particles or their chemical compounds. In this article we show that aliphatic, aromatic, and polar organic compounds, fractionated from diesel exhaust particles (DEPs), exert differential toxic effects in RAW 264.7 cells. Cellular analyses showed that the quinone-enriched polar fraction was more potent than the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)–enriched aromatic fraction in O2•− generation, decrease of membrane potential (ΔΨm), loss of mitochondrial membrane mass, and induction of apoptosis. A major effect of the polar fraction was to promote cyclosporin A (CsA)–sensitive permeability transition pore (PTP) opening in isolated liver mitochondria. This opening effect is dependent on a direct effect on the PTP at low doses as well as on an effect on ΔΨm at high doses in calcium (Ca2+)-loaded mitochondria. The direct PTP effect was mimicked by redox-cycling DEP quinones. Although the aliphatic fraction failed to perturb mitochondrial function, the aromatic fraction increased the Ca2+ retention capacity at low doses and induced mitochondrial swelling and a decrease in ΔΨm at high doses. This swelling effect was mostly CsA insensitive and could be reproduced by a mixture of PAHs present in DEPs. These chemical effects on isolated mitochondria could be reproduced by intact DEPs as well as ambient ultrafine particles (UFPs). In contrast, commercial polystyrene nanoparticles failed to exert mitochondrial effects. These results suggest that DEP and UFP effects on the PTP and ΔΨm are mediated by adsorbed chemicals rather than the particles themselves. PMID:15471724

  14. Revisiting benzene cluster cations for the chemical ionization of dimethyl sulfide and select volatile organic compounds

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Michelle J.; Zoerb, Matthew C.; Campbell, Nicole R.; ...

    2016-01-01

    Benzene cluster cations were revisited as a sensitive and selective reagent ion for the chemical ionization of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and a select group of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Laboratory characterization was performed using both a new set of compounds (i.e., DMS, β-caryophyllene) as well as previously studied VOCs (i.e., isoprene, α-pinene). Using a field deployable chemical-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (CI-ToFMS), benzene cluster cations demonstrated high sensitivity (> 1 ncps ppt−1) to DMS, isoprene, and α-pinene standards. Parallel measurements conducted using a chemical-ionization quadrupole mass spectrometer, with a much weaker electric field, demonstrated that ion–molecule reactions likely proceed through a combination of ligand-switching and directmore » charge transfer mechanisms. Laboratory tests suggest that benzene cluster cations may be suitable for the selective ionization of sesquiterpenes, where minimal fragmentation (< 25 %) was observed for the detection of β-caryophyllene, a bicyclic sesquiterpene. The in-field stability of benzene cluster cations using CI-ToFMS was examined in the marine boundary layer during the High Wind Gas Exchange Study (HiWinGS). The use of benzene cluster cation chemistry for the selective detection of DMS was validated against an atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer, where measurements from the two instruments were highly correlated (R2 > 0.95, 10 s averages) over a wide range of sampling conditions.« less

  15. Chemical and thermal modulation of molecular motor activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Weili

    Molecular motors of kinesin and dynein families are responsible for various intracellular activities, from long distance movement of organelles, vesicles, protein complexes, and mRNAs to powering mitotic processes. They can take nanometer steps using chemical energy from the hydrolysis of ATP (adenosine triphosphate), and their dysfunction is involved in many neurodegenerative diseases that require long distance transport of cargos. Here I report on the study of the properties of molecular motors at a single-molecule level using optical trappings. I first studied the inhibition properties of kinesin motors by marine natural compound adociasulfates. I showed that adociasulfates compete with microtubules for binding to kinesins and thus inhibit kinesins' activity. Although adociasulfates are a strong inhibitor for all kinesin members, they show a much higher inhibition effect for conventional kinesins than for mitotic kinesins. Thus adociasulfates can be used to specifically inhibit conventional kinesins. By comparing the inhibition of kinesins by two structurally similar adociasulfates, one can see that the negatively charged sulfate residue of adociasulfates can be replaced by other negative residues and thus make it possible for adociasulfate-derived compounds to be more cell permeable. Kinesins and dyneins move cargos towards opposite directions along a microtubule. Cargos with both kinesins and dyneins attached often move bidirectionally due to undergoing a tug-of-war between the oppositely moving kinesin and dynein motors. Here I studied the effect of temperature on microtubule-based kinesin and dynein motor transport. While kinesins' and dyneins' velocities are closely matched above 15 °C, below this temperature the dyneins' velocity decreases much faster than the kinesins'. The kinesins' and dyneins' forces do not measurably change with temperature. The results suggest that temperature has significant effects on bidirectional transport and can be used to

  16. Cytochrome P450-mediated activation of the fragrance compound geraniol forms potent contact allergens

    SciTech Connect

    Hagvall, Lina; Baron, Jens Malte; Boerje, Anna; Weidolf, Lars; Merk, Hans; Karlberg, Ann-Therese

    2008-12-01

    Contact sensitization is caused by low molecular weight compounds which penetrate the skin and bind to protein. In many cases, these compounds are activated to reactive species, either by autoxidation on exposure to air or by metabolic activation in the skin. Geraniol, a widely used fragrance chemical, is considered to be a weak allergen, although its chemical structure does not indicate it to be a contact sensitizer. We have shown that geraniol autoxidizes and forms allergenic oxidation products. In the literature, it is suggested but not shown that geraniol could be metabolically activated to geranial. Previously, a skin-like CYP cocktail consisting of cutaneous CYP isoenzymes, was developed as a model system to study cutaneous metabolism. In the present study, we used this system to investigate CYP-mediated activation of geraniol. In incubations with the skin-like CYP cocktail, geranial, neral, 2,3-epoxygeraniol, 6,7-epoxygeraniol and 6,7-epoxygeranial were identified. Geranial was the main metabolite formed followed by 6,7-epoxygeraniol. The allergenic activities of the identified metabolites were determined in the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA). Geranial, neral and 6,7-epoxygeraniol were shown to be moderate sensitizers, and 6,7-epoxygeranial a strong sensitizer. Of the isoenzymes studied, CYP2B6, CYP1A1 and CYP3A5 showed high activities. It is likely that CYP1A1 and CYP3A5 are mainly responsible for the metabolic activation of geraniol in the skin, as they are expressed constitutively at significantly higher levels than CYP2B6. Thus, geraniol is activated through both autoxidation and metabolism. The allergens geranial and neral are formed via both oxidation mechanisms, thereby playing a large role in the sensitization to geraniol.

  17. Portable sequential injection analyzer for onsite screening for chemical weapons degradation compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postlethwaite, Timothy A.; Zhang, Peng; Lancaster, Herbert L., III; Bacon, Christina P.; Mensch, David

    2002-02-01

    In many circumstances, the ability to perform on-site, point-of-collection analysis can play a pivotal role in the goals or requirements of the inquiry. Toward this end, the use of commercial or customized kits, which require the analyst to manually perform the metering and mixing of reagents with the sample and the subsequent visual, spectrophotometric or other interpretation of the results, has become widespread. Often, these methods can suffer from poor reproducibility and sensitivity in addition to being tedious and time consuming. Flow analysis methods, such as traditional flow injection analysis (FIA) and the more recent sequential injection analysis (SIA), have found widespread use in the automation of sample and reagent handling and subsequent analysis for many important analytes. These methods can be completely automated and offer excellent reproducibility, minimized analysis time, and in certain configurations, very high sensitivity. We have developed a miniaturized, fully portable SIA-based instrument for on-site screening for chemical weapons degradation products during challenge inspections under the Chemical Weapons Convention, as well as for the sensitive analysis of other important environmental analytes. In this paper, we will discuss our portable SIA design, the analytical approaches utilized, and results obtained for the analysis of representative chemical weapons degradation compounds.

  18. Chemical constituents from the rhizome of Polygonum paleaceum and their antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi-Xi; An, Mao-Mao; Jin, Yong-Sheng; Chen, Hai-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    A new compounds neopaleaceolactoside (1), along with nine known compounds phyllocoumarin (2), quercetin (3), quercitrin (4), quercetin-3-methyl ether (5), vincetoxicoside B (6), isoquercitrin (7), kaempferol (8), (-)-epicatechin (9), and chlorogenic acid (10), was isolated from Polygonum paleaceum Wall. Their chemical structures were established based on one-dimensional and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance techniques, mass spectrometry and by comparison with spectroscopic data reported. Some selected compounds were screened for their antifungal activity. Quercetin (3), vincetoxicoside B (6), kaempferol (8), and (-)-epicatechin (9) showed synergistic antifungal activities with the FICI values <0.5. A preliminary structure-activity relationship could be observed that free 3-OH in the structure of flavonoids was important for synergistic antifungal activity.

  19. Variations in essential oil, phenolic compounds, and antioxidant activity of tunisian cultivated Salvia officinalis L.

    PubMed

    Ben Farhat, Mouna; Jordán, María J; Chaouech-Hamada, Rym; Landoulsi, Ahmed; Sotomayor, Jose A

    2009-11-11

    The variation in the chemical composition of the essential oil of Salvia officinalis , growing in different habitats, was studied. GC-MS analysis revealed 57 compounds representing 94.68-96.80% of total oils. The major components were alpha-thujone (11.55-19.23%), viridiflorol (9.94-19.46%), 1,8-cineole (8.85-15.60%), camphor (5.08-15.06%), manool (5.52-13.06%), beta-caryophyllene (2.63-9.24%), alpha-humulene (1.93-8.94%), and beta-thujone (5.45-6.17%), showing significant differences between different collection sites. Analysis of some representative polyphenolic compounds and antioxidant activity was performed using postdistilled dry samples. Rosmarinic acid, carnosol, and carnosic acid were the prevalent compounds of S. officinalis methanolic extracts. The results revealed differences in the polyphenolic composition and also exhibited antioxidant and radical-scavenging activities at different magnitudes of potency. However, within the used methods, only the DPPH(*) assay showed significant differences (p < 0.05) in free radical scavenging activity among samples collected in different regions. Plants collected in the coastal regions Soliman and Kelibia accumulate more polyphenolic compounds, known to be responsible for the main antioxidant activity of sage (rosmarinic acid, carnosol, and carnosic acid), than those growing inland at Bou Arada and Sers. Moreover, the former presented a higher radical-scavenging activity. The methanolic extracts of postdistilled S. officinalis might be valuable antioxidant natural sources and seemed to be applicable in both the health medicine and food industries.

  20. Chemical Variability and Biological Activities of Eucalyptus spp. Essential Oils.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Luiz Claudio Almeida; Filomeno, Claudinei Andrade; Teixeira, Robson Ricardo

    2016-12-07

    Many plant species produce mixtures of odorous and volatile compounds known as essential oils (EOs). These mixtures play important roles in Nature and have been utilized by mankind for different purposes, such as pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, aromatherapy, and food flavorants. There are more than 3000 EOs reported in the literature, with approximately 300 in commercial use, including the EOs from Eucalyptus species. Most EOs from Eucalyptus species are rich in monoterpenes and many have found applications in pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, food flavorants, and perfumes. Such applications are related to their diverse biological and organoleptic properties. In this study, we review the latest information concerning the chemical composition and biological activities of EOs from different species of Eucalyptus. Among the 900 species and subspecies of the Eucalyptus genus, we examined 68 species. The studies associated with these species were conducted in 27 countries. We have focused on the antimicrobial, acaricidal, insecticidal and herbicidal activities, hoping that such information will contribute to the development of research in this field. It is also intended that the information described in this study can be useful in the rationalization of the use of Eucalyptus EOs as components for pharmaceutical and agrochemical applications as well as food preservatives and flavorants.

  1. Adsorption of volatile organic compounds by pecan shell- and almond shell-based granular activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Bansode, R R; Losso, J N; Marshall, W E; Rao, R M; Portier, R J

    2003-11-01

    The objective of this research was to determine the effectiveness of using pecan and almond shell-based granular activated carbons (GACs) in the adsorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of health concern and known toxic compounds (such as bromo-dichloromethane, benzene, carbon tetrachloride, 1,1,1-trichloromethane, chloroform, and 1,1-dichloromethane) compared to the adsorption efficiency of commercially used carbons (such as Filtrasorb 200, Calgon GRC-20, and Waterlinks 206C AW) in simulated test medium. The pecan shell-based GACs were activated using steam, carbon dioxide or phosphoric acid. An almond shell-based GAC was activated with phosphoric acid. Our results indicated that steam- or carbon dioxide-activated pecan shell carbons were superior in total VOC adsorption to phosphoric acid-activated pecan shell or almond shell carbons, inferring that the method of activation selected for the preparation of activated carbons affected the adsorption of VOCs and hence are factors to be considered in any adsorption process. The steam-activated, pecan shell carbon adsorbed more total VOCs than the other experimental carbons and had an adsorption profile similar to the two coconut shell-based commercial carbons, but had greater adsorption than the coal-based commercial carbon. All the carbons studied adsorbed benzene more effectively than the other organics. Pecan shell, steam-activated and acid-activated GACs showed higher adsorption of 1,1,1-trichloroethane than the other carbons studied. Multivariate analysis was conducted to group experimental carbons and commercial carbons based on their physical, chemical, and adsorptive properties. The results of the analysis conclude that steam-activated and acid-activated pecan shell carbons clustered together with coal-based and coconut shell-based commercial carbons, thus inferring that these experimental carbons could potentially be used as alternative sources for VOC adsorption in an aqueous environment.

  2. Phthalides: Distribution in Nature, Chemical Reactivity, Synthesis, and Biological Activity.

    PubMed

    León, Alejandra; Del-Ángel, Mayela; Ávila, José Luis; Delgado, Guillermo

    2017-01-01

    oxidation, reduction, addition, elimination, and cycloaddition reactions, and treatments with Lewis acids of (Z)-ligustilide have afforded linear dimers. Some intramolecular condensations and differentiated cyclizations of the dimeric phthalides have been carried out, providing evidences for the particular chemical reactivity of these compounds.Several structural modifications of phthalides have been carried out subjecting them to microbial transformations by different species of bacteria, fungi and algae, and these included resolutions of racemic mixtures and oxidations, among others.The [π4s + π2s] and [π2s + π2s] cycloadditions of (Z)-ligustilide for the synthesis of dimeric phthalides have been reported, and different approaches involving cyclizations, Alder-Rickert reactions, Sharpless asymmetric hydroxylations, or Grignard additions have been used for the synthesis of monomeric phthalides. The use of phthalides as building blocks for divergent oriented synthesis has been proven.Many of the naturally occurring phthalides display different biological activities including antibacterial, antifungal, insecticidal, cytotoxic, and anti-inflammatory effects, among many others, with a considerable recent research on the topic. In the case of compounds isolated from the Apiaceae, the bioactivities correlate with the traditional medicinal uses of the natural sources. Some monomeric phthalides have shown their ability to attenuate certain neurological diseases, including stroke, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.The present contribution covers the distribution of phthalides in nature and the findings in the structural diversity, chemical reactivity, biotransformations, syntheses, and bioactivity of natural and semisynthetic phthalides.

  3. Phenotype-driven chemical screening in zebrafish for compounds that inhibit collective cell migration identifies multiple pathways potentially involved in metastatic invasion.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, Viviana E; Varshney, Gaurav K; Lee, Minnkyong; Bupp, Sujata; Xu, Lisha; Shinn, Paul; Crawford, Nigel P; Inglese, James; Burgess, Shawn M

    2015-06-01

    In the last decade, high-throughput chemical screening has become the dominant approach for discovering novel compounds with therapeutic properties. Automated screening using in vitro or cultured cell assays have yielded thousands of candidate drugs for a variety of biological targets, but these approaches have not resulted in an increase in drug discovery despite major increases in expenditures. In contrast, phenotype-driven screens have shown a much stronger success rate, which is why we developed an in vivo assay using transgenic zebrafish with a GFP-marked migrating posterior lateral line primordium (PLLp) to identify compounds that influence collective cell migration. We then conducted a high-throughput screen using a compound library of 2160 annotated bioactive synthetic compounds and 800 natural products to identify molecules that block normal PLLp migration. We identified 165 compounds that interfere with primordium migration without overt toxicity in vivo. Selected compounds were confirmed in their migration-blocking activity by using additional assays for cell migration. We then proved the screen to be successful in identifying anti-metastatic compounds active in vivo by performing orthotopic tumor implantation assays in mice. We demonstrated that the Src inhibitor SU6656, identified in our screen, can be used to suppress the metastatic capacity of a highly aggressive mammary tumor cell line. Finally, we used CRISPR/Cas9-targeted mutagenesis in zebrafish to genetically validate predicted targets of compounds. This approach demonstrates that the migrating PLLp in zebrafish can be used for large-scale, high-throughput screening for compounds that inhibit collective cell migration and, potentially, anti-metastatic compounds.

  4. Synergistic activation of estrogen receptor with combinations of environmental chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, S.F.; Klotz, D.M.; Collins, B.M.

    1996-06-07

    Certain chemicals in the environment are estrogenic. The low potencies of the compounds, when studied singly, suggest that they may have little effect on biological systems. The estrogenic potencies of combinations of such chemicals were screened in a simple yeast estrogen potencies of combination of such chemicals were screened in a simple yeast estrogen systems (YES) containing human estrogen receptor (hER). Combinations of two weak environmental estrogens, such as dieldrin, endosulfan, or toxaphene, were 100 times as potent in hER-mediated transactivation as any chemical alone. Hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls shown previously to synergistically alter sexual development in turtles also synergized in the YES. The synergistic interaction of chemical mixtures with the estrogen receptor may have profound environmental implications. These results may represent a previously uncharacterized level of regulation of estrogen-associated responses. 32 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Anti-arthritic active fraction of Capparis spinosa L. fruits and its chemical constituents.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaolu; Lu, Jincai; Xin, Hailiang; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Yuliang; Tang, Kexuan

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain the anti-arthritic active fraction of Capparis spinosa L. (Capparidaceae) fruits and its chemical constituents. The adjuvant arthritic rat model was developed to evaluate the anti-arthritic effects of different fractions of ethanol extraction from C. spinosa L. The fraction eluted by ethanol-water (50:50, v/v) had the most significant anti-arthritic activity. The chemical constituents of this fraction were therefore studied; seven known compounds were isolated and identified as: P-hydroxy benzoic acid; 5-(hydroxymethyl) furfural; bis(5-formylfurfuryl) ether; daucosterol; α-D-fructofuranosides methyl; uracil; and stachydrine.

  6. Dechlorination of chlorinated compounds by Trametes versicolor ATCC 200801 crude laccase and quantitative structure-activity relationship of toxicity.

    PubMed

    Çabuk, Ahmet; Sidir, Yadigar G; Aytar, Pinar; Gedikli, Serap; Sidir, İsa

    2012-01-01

    Chlorinated compounds constitute an important class of xenobiotics. Crude laccase was produced using Trametes versicolor ATCC (200801) in potato dextrose broth, with wheat bran as an inducing medium, and its ability to dechlorinate eight compounds was determined. The compounds were 2-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2,6-dichlorophenol, 2,4,5-trichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, heptachlor and pentachlorophenol. A range of parameters for the dechlorination of some compounds was tested, including incubation period, pH, initial substrate concentration, temperature, and enzyme quantity. The oxygen consumption was determined during each dechlorination process, under pre-determined optimum conditions. The changes in chemical structure of the compounds were also determined, by using FTIR analysis, following dechlorination of test chlorophenolics. Strong interactions were found to lead to the reactivity of hydroxyl groups in some cases and chlorine atoms were released from the benzene ring. The changes in compound toxicity were monitored before and after enzymatic treatment, using Microtox. Quantitative structure-activity relationships for the toxicity of the chlorinated compounds were developed. Consequently, the toxic activity of the test compounds was controlled by electrophilic index and electronic properties.

  7. Antidepressant-like and anxiolytic-like effects of cannabidiol: a chemical compound of Cannabis sativa.

    PubMed

    de Mello Schier, Alexandre R; de Oliveira Ribeiro, Natalia P; Coutinho, Danielle S; Machado, Sergio; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Crippa, Jose A; Zuardi, Antonio W; Nardi, Antonio E; Silva, Adriana C

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety and depression are pathologies that affect human beings in many aspects of life, including social life, productivity and health. Cannabidiol (CBD) is a constituent non-psychotomimetic of Cannabis sativa with great psychiatric potential, including uses as an antidepressant-like and anxiolytic-like compound. The aim of this study is to review studies of animal models using CBD as an anxiolytic-like and antidepressant-like compound. Studies involving animal models, performing a variety of experiments on the above-mentioned disorders, such as the forced swimming test (FST), elevated plus maze (EPM) and Vogel conflict test (VCT), suggest that CBD exhibited an anti-anxiety and antidepressant effects in animal models discussed. Experiments with CBD demonstrated non-activation of neuroreceptors CB1 and CB2. Most of the studies demonstrated a good interaction between CBD and the 5-HT1A neuro-receptor.

  8. Can Coffee Chemical Compounds and Insecticidal Plants Be Harnessed for Control of Major Coffee Pests?

    PubMed

    Green, Paul W C; Davis, Aaron P; Cossé, Allard A; Vega, Fernando E

    2015-11-04

    Pests and pathogens threaten coffee production worldwide and are difficult to control using conventional methods, such as insecticides. We review the literature on the chemistry of coffee, concentrating on compounds most commonly reported from Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora. Differences in chemistry can distinguish coffee species and varieties, and plants grown under different biogeographic conditions exhibit different chemotypes. A number of chemical groups, such as alkaloids and caffeoylquinic acids, are known to be insecticidal, but most studies have investigated their effects on coffee quality and flavor. More research is required to bridge this gap in knowledge, so that coffee can be bred to be more resistant to pests. Furthermore, we report on some pesticidal plants that have been used for control of coffee pests. Locally sourced pesticidal plants have been underutilized and offer a sustainable alternative to conventional insecticides and could be used to augment breeding for resilience of coffee plants.

  9. Inferring Alcoholism SNPs and Regulatory Chemical Compounds Based on Ensemble Bayesian Network.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huan; Sun, Jiatong; Jiang, Hong; Wang, Xianyue; Wu, Lingxiang; Wu, Wei; Wang, Qh

    2016-12-20

    The disturbance of consciousness is one of the most common symptoms of those have alcoholism and may cause disability and mortality. Previous studies indicated that several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) increase the susceptibility of alcoholism. In this study, we utilized the Ensemble Bayesian Network (EBN) method to identify causal SNPs of alcoholism based on the verified GAW14 data. Thirteen out of eighteen SNPs directly connected with alcoholism were found concordance with potential risk regions of alcoholism in OMIM database. As a number of SNPs were found contributing to alteration on gene expression, known as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs), we further sought to identify chemical compounds acting as regulators of alcoholism genes captured by causal SNPs. Chloroprene and valproic acid were identified as the expression regulators for genes C11orf66 and SALL3 which were captured by alcoholism SNPs, respectively.

  10. Antibacterial Activity of Alanine-Derived Gemini Quaternary Ammonium Compounds.

    PubMed

    Piecuch, Agata; Obłąk, Ewa; Guz-Regner, Katarzyna

    The antibacterial activity of alanine-derived gemini quaternary ammonium salts (chlorides and bromides) with various spacer and alkyl chain lengths was investigated. The studied compounds exhibited a strong bactericidal effect, especially bromides with 10 and 12 carbon alkyl chains and 3 carbon spacer groups (TMPAL-10 Br and TMPAL-12 Br), with a short contact time. Both salts dislodged biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus epidermidis, and were lethal to adherent cells of S. epidermidis. Bromide with 2 carbon spacer groups and 12 carbon alkyl chains (TMEAL-12 Br) effectively reduced microbial adhesion by coating polystyrene and silicone surfaces. The results obtained suggest that, after further studies, gemini QAS might be considered as antimicrobial agents in medicine or industry.

  11. [The release of biologically active compounds from peat peloids].

    PubMed

    Babaskin, D V

    2011-01-01

    This work had the objective to study kinetics of the release of flavonoides from peat peloid compositions containing extracts of medicinal herbs in model systems.The key parameters of the process are defined. The rate of liberation of flavonoides is shown to depend on their initial concentration in the compositions being used. The influence of the flavonoide composition of the tested extracts and dimethylsulfoxide on the release of biologically active compounds contained in the starting material in the model environment is estimated. The possibility of the layer-by-layer deposition of the compositions and peat peloids in order to increase the efficacy of flavonoide release from the starting composition and to ensure more rational utilization of the extracts of medicinal plants is demonstrated.

  12. Refractory Organic Compounds in Enceladus' Ice Grains and Hydrothermal Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postberg, F.; Khawaja, N.; Hsu, H. W.; Sekine, Y.; Shibuya, T.

    2015-12-01

    Cassini's Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) generates time-of-flight mass spectra of individual grains impinging on the instruments target-plate. Following the analysis of salt rich ice grains emitted by Enceladus that indicated a salt-water ocean in contact with the moon's rocky core [1,2] a recent CDA analysis of nano-phase silica particles pointed at hydrothermal activity at the moon's rock/water interface [3]. The results imply temperatures above 80 - 90°C and alkaline pH values around 10 reminiscent of alkaline hydrothermal vents on Earth like the Lost City Hydrothermal Field. In this context the compositional analysis of organic components in CDA mass spectra of the ejected ice grains is of particular relevance. A multitude of volatile organic species has already been identified in the gas component of the plume [4]. As expected, we find more complex organic molecules in ice grains than in the gas indicating aromatic species, amines, and carbonyl group species. The composition of organic-bearing ice grains displays a great diversity indicating a variety of different organic species in varying concentrations. Recent spatially resolved CDA in situ measurements inside Enceladus' plume indicate that these organic compounds are especially frequent in 'young' ice grains that have just been ejected by high velocity jets. We investigate the implications of our findings with respect to ice grain formation at the water surface and inside the icy vents. We constrain the generation of organic compounds at the rock/water interface in the light of hydrothermal activity and the potential for the formation of life precursor molecules in Enceladus' ocean. Ref:[1] Postberg et al., Nature 459, 1098-1101 (2009). [2] Postberg et al., Nature 474, 620-622 (2011). [3]. Hsu, Postberg, Sekine et al., Nature, 519, 207-210 (2015). [4] Waite et al., Nature 460, 487-490 (2009).

  13. SOME CHEMICAL PROPERTIES UNDERLYING ARSENIC'S BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    In this paper some of the chemical properties of arsenicals (atomic
    and molecular orbitals, electronegativity, valence state, changes between
    valence state, nucleophilicity, the hard/soft acid/base principle) that may
    account for some of the b...

  14. Dose Response Data for Hormonally Active Chemicals ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The shape of the dose response curve in the low dose region has been debated since the late 1940s. The debate originally focused on linear no threshold (LNT) vs threshold responses in the low dose range for cancer and noncancer related effects. For noncancer effects the default assumption is that noncancer effects generally display threshold rather than LNT responses. More recently, claims have arisen that the chemicals, like endocrine disrupters (EDS), which act via high affinity, low capacity nuclear receptors, may display LNT or nonmonotonic low dose responses: responses that could be missed in multigenerational guideline toxicity testing. This presentation will discuss LNT, threshold and nonmonotonic dose response relationships from case studies of chemicals that disrupt reproductive development and function via the ER, AR and AhR pathways and will include in vitro and in vivo multigenerational data. The in vivo studies in this discussion include only robust, well designed, comprehensive studies that administered the chemical via a relevant route(s) of exposure over a broad dose response range, including low dose(s) in the microgram/kg/d range. The chemicals include ethinyl estradiol, estradiol, genistein, bisphenol a, trenbolone, finasteride, flutamide, phthalate esters and 2,3,7,8 TCDD. The objective is to critically evaluate the data from well done studies in this field to address concerns that current multigenerational reproductive test gui

  15. Toxicological and chemical assessment of ordnance compounds in marine sediments and porewaters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nipper, M.; Carr, R.S.; Biedenbach, J.M.; Hooten, R.L.; Miller, K.

    2002-01-01

    Toxicological and chemical studies were performed with a silty and a sandy marine sediment spiked with 2,6-dinitrotoluene (2,6-DNT), 2,4,6-trinitrophenylmethylnitramine (tetryl), or 2,4,6-trinitrophenol (picric acid). Whole sediment toxicity was analyzed by the 10-day survival test with the amphipod Ampelisca abdita, and porewater toxicity tests assessed macro-algae (Ulva fasciata) zoospore germination and germling growth, sea urchin (Arbacia punctulata) embryological development, and polychaete (Dinophilus gyrociliatus) survival and reproduction. Whole sediments spiked with 2,6-DNT were not toxic to amphipods. The fine-grained sediment spiked with tetryl was also not acutely toxic. The tetryl and picric acid LC50 values in the sandy sediment were 3.24 and 144 mg/kg dry weight, respectively. The fine-grained sediment spiked with picric acid generated a U-shaped concentration-response curve in the amphipod test, with increased survival both in the lowest and highest concentration. Grain-size distribution and organic carbon content strongly influenced the behavior of ordnance compounds in spiked sediments. Very low concentrations were measured in some of the treatments and irreversible binding and biodegradation are suggested as the processes responsible for the low measurements. Porewater toxicity varied with its sedimentary origin and with ordnance compound. The sea urchin embryological development test tended to be the least sensitive. Tetryl was the most toxic chemical in all porewater tests, and picric acid the least toxic. Samples spiked with 2,6-DNT contained a degradation product identified as 2-methyl-3-nitroaniline (also known as 2-amino-6-nitrotoluene), and unidentified peaks, possibly degradation products, were also seen in some of the picric acid- and tetryl-spiked samples. Degradation products may have played a role in observed toxicity. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Relations between the structure of storage and the transport of chemical compounds in karstic aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaute, L.; Drogue, C.; Garrelly, L.; Ghelfenstein, M.

    1997-12-01

    Study of the movement of chemical compounds naturally present in the water, or which result from pollution, are examined according to the reservoir structure in karstic aquifers. Structure is represented by a simple geometrical model; slow flow takes place in blocks with a network of low-permeability cracks. The blocks are separated by highly permeable karstic conduits that allow rapid flow, and these form the aquifer drainage system. The karst studied covers 110 km 2. It is fed by an interrupted stream draining a 35 km 2 non-karstic basin, contaminated at the entry to the karst by effluents from a sewage treatment station. The underground water reappears as a resurgence with an annual average flow of approximately 1 m 3 s -1, after an apparent underground course of 8 km in the karst. Several local sources of pollution (effluent from septic tanks) contaminate the underground water during its course. Sixteen measurement operations were performed at 12 water points, between the interrupted stream and the spring. Some sampling points were at drains, and others were in the low-permeability fissured blocks. Comparison at each point of the concentrations of 14 chemical compounds gave the following results: when pollutant discharge occurs in a permeable zone, movement is rapid in the drainage network formed by the karstic conduits, and does not reach the less permeable fissured blocks which are thus protected; however, if discharge is in a low-permeability zone, the flow does not allow rapid movement of the polluted water, and this increases the pollutant concentration at the discharge. This simple pattern can be upset by a reversal of the apparent piezometric gradient between a block and a conduit during floods or pumping; this may reverse flow directions and hence modify the movement of contaminants. The study made it possible to site five boreholes whose positions in the karstic structure were unknown, showing the interest of such an approach for the forecasting of the

  17. Direct determination of chemical oxygen demand by anodic decomposition of organic compounds at a diamond electrode.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Takeshi; Tamura, Yusuke; Hoshino, Masaki; Watanabe, Takeshi; Aikawa, Tatsuo; Yuasa, Makoto; Einaga, Yasuaki

    2014-08-19

    Chemical oxygen demand (COD) was measured directly with a simple electrochemical method using a boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode. By applying a highly positive potential (+2.5 V vs Ag/AgCl) to an aqueous electrolyte containing potassium hydrogen phthalate, glucose, and lactic acid or sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate using a BDD electrode, an anodic current corresponding to the electrolytic decomposition of these organic compounds was observed. No such current was seen on glassy carbon or platinum electrodes due to a significant background current caused by the oxygen evolution reaction. The electric charge for the anodic current observed at the BDD electrode was found to be consistent with the theoretical charge required for the electrolytic decomposition of the organic compounds to CO2 and was used to calculate COD. This analysis was performed by a simple I-t measurement at constant potential using a BDD electrode, and no calibration was needed. This new simple indicator, "ECOD" (electrochemical oxygen demand), will be useful for continuous monitoring of industrial wastewater with low protein concentrations and on-site instant analysis of natural water with a BDD electrode-based portable ECOD meter.

  18. Environmental impact of ionic liquids: Automated evaluation of chemical oxygen demand of photochemical degraded compounds.

    PubMed

    Saraiva, M Lúcia Mfs; Costa, Susana; Passos, Marieta

    2017-02-19

    A novel automated fluorimetric technique was developed for the assessment of ionic liquids (ILs) chemical oxygen demand (COD). It was combined a photodegradation step with the perspective of promote ILs degradation. The method was implemented on a sequential injection analysis (SIA) system and based on the reduction of cerium (IV) in the presence of irradiated ILs. The obtained results demonstrated higher COD values for compounds incorporating the chloride anion. Bmim [Cl], bmpyr [Cl] and hmim [Cl] also exhibiting considerable photodegradability ratio. Cholinium cation and methanesulfonate and tetrafluoroborate anions seem to confer resistance to photolysis. The developed methodology proved to be a simple, affordable and robust method. Additionally, it showed a good repeatability under the tested conditions (rsd < 3.5%, n = 10). Therefore, it is expected that the developed approach can be used as screening method for preliminary evaluation of compounds potential impact in the aquatic field. Additionally, the photolysis seems to be an attractive option to promote ILs degradation before their release to wastewater.

  19. Breadth-first search approach to enumeration of tree-like chemical compounds.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yang; Hayashida, Morihiro; Jindalertudomdee, Jira; Nagamochi, Hiroshi; Akutsu, Tatsuya

    2013-12-01

    Molecular enumeration plays a basic role in the design of drugs, which has been studied by mathematicians, computer scientists, and chemists for quite a long time. Although many researchers are involved in developing enumeration algorithms specific to drug design systems, molecular enumeration is still a hard problem to date due to its exponentially increasing large search space with larger number of atoms. To alleviate this defect, we propose efficient algorithms, BfsSimEnum and BfsMulEnum to enumerate tree-like molecules without and with multiple bonds, respectively, where chemical compounds are represented as molecular graphs. In order to reduce the large search space, we adjust some important concepts such as left-heavy, center-rooted, and normal form to molecular tree graphs. Different from many existing approaches, BfsSimEnum and BfsMulEnum firstly enumerate tree-like compounds by breadth-first search order. Computational experiments are performed to compare with several existing methods. The results suggest that our proposed methods are exact and more efficient.

  20. Cloud Condensation Nuclei Activity Associated with Chemical Composition and Precipitation Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrigan, C.; Roberts, G. C.; Zauscher, M.; Suski, K.; Noblitts, S.; Sullivan, A. P.; Collett, J. L.

    2010-12-01

    Measurements of ambient cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations can be improved by simultaneously collecting information on the activation size of the CCN along with chemical composition of the ambient aerosol. A size scanning CCN instrument developed at Scripps Institution of Oceanography was deployed as part of the Calwater project in the Sierra Nevada foothills of California during February and March of 2010. The instrument was capable of determining the critical diameter of activation for the ambient aerosol during a 20 minute scan. During the study period, the CCN activation size increased after each rain event and the activity slowly returned over the next few days. The critical diameter of the overall aerosol was largest (least active) immediately following precipitation events. The average critical diameter would typically decrease by 20% in the time between major precipitation events. This regeneration of the CCN activity can be partially attributed to the transport of sulfate and nitrate pollution to replace the particles that were washed out by the rain, but it may also be due to chemical changes via aging and oxidation mechanisms. Since CCN activity is determined by the particles size and chemical composition, the changes in critical diameter indicate a change in the chemical composition of the available CCN particles. By comparing the critical diameters with aerosol chemical data from a semi-real time aerosol ion chromatograph, the CCN activity was generally correlated with the mass loading of sulfate and nitrate. Deviations from the expected activity of sulfate and nitrate indicate the existence of other compounds that contribute to activity through additional dissolution and by reducing the surface tension. The contribution to CCN activity from additional compounds, including organic surfactants, can be estimated by observing the deviation of the measured critical diameters from values calculated using only the measured nitrate+sulfate mass

  1. Missing links in our understanding of estrogenic compounds; chemical quantitation vs. biological assessment – where do we go from here?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The literature has become replete with reports quantifying estrogenic chemicals in the environment ranging from natural hormones to plasticizers. Laboratories have developed in vitro assays to assess estrogenic activity of both environmental samples and pure chemicals. Information pertaining to th...

  2. Formation and emission of volatile polonium compound by microbial activity and polonium methylation with methylcobalamin.

    PubMed

    Momoshima, N; Song, L X; Osaki, S; Maeda, Y

    2001-07-15

    We observed biologically mediated emission of Po from culture solution inoculated sea sediment extract and incubated under natural light/dark cycle condition or dark condition the emitted Po compound would be lipophilic because of effective collection in organic solvent. Sterilization of the culture medium with antibiotics or CuSO4 completely suppressed growth of microorganisms and resulted in no emission of Po, indicating biological activity of microorganisms is responsible for formation and emission of volatile Po compound. Po emission also occurred when seawater was used as a culture medium. Our finding indicates a possibility of biotic source for atmospheric Po in the environment, which has been believed to be originated from abiotic sources. We compared emission behavior of Po and S in the culture experiments, the elements belong to XVI group in the Periodical Table, and consider that their emission mechanisms involved would be different though the emission of both elements is supported by biological activity of microorganisms. One of the chemical forms of S emitted was confirmed to be dimethyl sulfide (DMS) but that of Po is not known. Methylation experiments of Po with methylcobalamin demonstrated a formation and emission of volatile Po compound. The methylation of Po with methylcobalamin might be related to the observed Po emission in the culture experiments.

  3. Ligand substitutions between ruthenium–cymene compounds can control protein versus DNA targeting and anticancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Adhireksan, Zenita; Davey, Gabriela E.; Campomanes, Pablo; Groessl, Michael; Clavel, Catherine M.; Yu, Haojie; Nazarov, Alexey A.; Yeo, Charmian Hui Fang; Ang, Wee Han; Dröge, Peter; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Dyson, Paul J.; Davey, Curt A.

    2014-01-01

    Ruthenium compounds have become promising alternatives to platinum drugs by displaying specific activities against different cancers and favourable toxicity and clearance properties. Nonetheless, their molecular targeting and mechanism of action are poorly understood. Here we study two prototypical ruthenium-arene agents—the cytotoxic antiprimary tumour compound [(η6-p-cymene)Ru(ethylene-diamine)Cl]PF6 and the relatively non-cytotoxic antimetastasis compound [(η6-p-cymene)Ru(1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane)Cl2]—and discover that the former targets the DNA of chromatin, while the latter preferentially forms adducts on the histone proteins. Using a novel ‘atom-to-cell’ approach, we establish the basis for the surprisingly site-selective adduct formation behaviour and distinct cellular impact of these two chemically similar anticancer agents, which suggests that the cytotoxic effects arise largely from DNA lesions, whereas the protein adducts may be linked to the other therapeutic activities. Our study shows promise for developing new ruthenium drugs, via ligand-based modulation of DNA versus protein binding and thus cytotoxic potential, to target distinguishing epigenetic features of cancer cells. PMID:24637564

  4. Discovery of New Compounds Active against Plasmodium falciparum by High Throughput Screening of Microbial Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Moreno, Guiomar; Cantizani, Juan; Sánchez-Carrasco, Paula; Ruiz-Pérez, Luis Miguel; Martín, Jesús; El Aouad, Noureddine; Pérez-Victoria, Ignacio; Tormo, José Rubén; González-Menendez, Víctor; González, Ignacio; de Pedro, Nuria; Reyes, Fernando; Genilloud, Olga; Vicente, Francisca; González-Pacanowska, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Due to the low structural diversity within the set of antimalarial drugs currently available in the clinic and the increasing number of cases of resistance, there is an urgent need to find new compounds with novel modes of action to treat the disease. Microbial natural products are characterized by their large diversity provided in terms of the chemical complexity of the compounds and the novelty of structures. Microbial natural products extracts have been underexplored in the search for new antiparasitic drugs and even more so in the discovery of new antimalarials. Our objective was to find new druggable natural products with antimalarial properties from the MEDINA natural products collection, one of the largest natural product libraries harboring more than 130,000 microbial extracts. In this work, we describe the optimization process and the results of a phenotypic high throughput screen (HTS) based on measurements of Plasmodium lactate dehydrogenase. A subset of more than 20,000 extracts from the MEDINA microbial products collection has been explored, leading to the discovery of 3 new compounds with antimalarial activity. In addition, we report on the novel antiplasmodial activity of 4 previously described natural products.

  5. Detection of estrogenic activity in sediment-associated compounds using in vitro reporter gene assays.

    PubMed

    Legler, Juliette; Dennekamp, Martine; Vethaak, A Dick; Brouwer, Abraham; Koeman, Jan H; van der Burg, Bart; Murk, Albertinka J

    2002-07-03

    Sediments may be the ultimate sink for persistent (xeno-)estrogenic compounds released into the aquatic environment. Sediment-associated estrogenic potency was measured with an estrogen receptor-mediated luciferase reporter gene (ER-CALUX) assay and compared with a recombinant yeast screen. The ER-CALUX assay was more sensitive to 17beta-estradiol (E2) than the recombinant yeast screen, with an EC50 of 6 pM E2 compared to 100 pM in the yeast screen. Yeast cells were unable to distinguish the anti-estrogens ICI 182,780 and (4-hydroxy)tamoxifen, which were agonistic in the yeast. Acetone-soluble fractions of hexane/acetone extracts of sediments showed higher estrogenic potency than hexane-soluble extracts in the ER-CALUX assay. Sediments obtained from industrialized areas such as the Port of Rotterdam showed the highest estrogenic potency of the 12 marine sediments tested (up to 40 pmol estradiol equivalents per gram sediment). The estrogenic activity of individual chemicals that can be found in sediments including: alkylphenol ethoxylates and carboxylates; phthalates; and pesticides, was tested. Increasing sidechain length of various nonylphenol ethoxylates resulted in decreased estrogenic activity. Of the phthalates tested, butylbenzylphthalate was the most estrogenic, though with a potency approximately 100,000 times less than E2. The organochlorine herbicides atrazine and simazine failed to induce reporter gene activity. As metabolic activation may be required to induce estrogenic activity, a metabolic transformation step was added to the ER-CALUX assay using incubation of compounds with liver microsomes obtained from PCB-treated rats. Results indicate that metabolites of E2, NP and bisphenol A were less active than the parent compounds, while metabolites of methoxychlor were more estrogenic following microsomal incubations.

  6. Analysis and occurrence of endocrine-disrupting compounds and estrogenic activity in the surface waters of Central Spain.

    PubMed

    Esteban, S; Gorga, M; Petrovic, M; González-Alonso, S; Barceló, D; Valcárcel, Y

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) are chemical compounds with the ability to alter the hormonal systems of organisms. Such compounds are used in several industrial and domestic activities and reach the aquatic environment via wastewater discharge. The aim of this study is to assess the occurrence of 30 EDCs and related compounds in the surface waters of central Spain and to determine the overall estrogenic activity of environmental samples. This study analyzed a large number of EDCs and other emergent or suspected compounds with endocrine-disrupting activity. The results have shown the presence of 19 EDCs at concentrations ranging from 2 to 5928 ng L(-1). Organophosphorus-based flame retardants, alkylphenolic compounds and anticorrosives were found at the highest concentrations. Furthermore, although insufficient data are available to calculate an average over time, these preliminary results show the need to monitor the waters in both rivers studied. Alkylphenolic compounds, particularly nonylphenol, were the main contributors to overall estrogenicity. A higher concentration of the compounds studied was detected in the river Jarama, although the estrogenicity expressed as estradiol equivalents (EEQs) was higher in the river Manzanares due to a higher concentration of nonylphenol. However, the total estrogenicity did not exceed 1 ng L(-1) (EEQ), which is the level that may cause estrogenic effects in aquatic organisms, in any of the samples. In conclusion, the potential estrogenic risk in both rivers is low, although organophosphorus-based flame retardants may increase this risk as they were found at high levels in all samples. Unfortunately, these compounds could not be taken into account when calculating the estrogenic activity due to the lack of activity data for them. For future investigations, it will be important to assess the estrogenicity provided by these flame retardants. Due to the significant concentrations of EDCs detected in both rivers, further

  7. Development of a Wireless and Passive SAW-Based Chemical Sensor for Organophosphorous Compound Detection

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fang-Qian; Wang, Wen; Xue, Xu-Feng; Hu, Hao-Liang; Liu, Xin-Lu; Pan, Yong

    2015-01-01

    A new wireless and passive surface acoustic wave (SAW)-based chemical sensor for organophosphorous compound (OC) detection is presented. A 434 MHz reflective delay line configuration composed by single phase unidirectional transducers (SPUDTs) and three shorted reflectors was fabricated on YZ LiNbO3 piezoelectric substrate as the sensor element. A thin fluoroalcoholpolysiloxane (SXFA) film acted as the sensitive interface deposited onto the SAW propagation path between the second and last reflectors of the SAW device. The first reflector was used for the temperature compensation utilizing the difference method. The adsorption between the SXFA and OC molecules modulates the SAW propagation, especially for the time delay of the SAW, hence, the phase shifts of the reflection peaks from the corresponding reflectors can be used to characterize the target OC. Prior to the sensor fabrication, the coupling of modes (COM) and perturbation theory were utilized to predict the SAW device performance and the gas adsorption. Referring to a frequency-modulated continuous wave (FMCW)-based reader unit, the developed SAW chemical sensor was wirelessly characterized in gas exposure experiments for dimethylmethylphosphonate (DMMP) detection. Sensor performance parameters such as phase sensitivity, repeatability, linearity, and temperature compensation were evaluated experimentally. PMID:26633419

  8. Gene expression profiling in Ishikawa cells: A fingerprint for estrogen active compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Boehme, Kathleen; Simon, Stephanie

    2009-04-01

    Several anthropogenous and naturally occurring substances, referred to as estrogen active compounds (EACs), are able to interfere with hormone and in particular estrogen receptor signaling. EACs can either cause adverse health effects in humans and wildlife populations or have beneficial effects on estrogen-dependent diseases. The aim of this study was to examine global gene expression profiles in estrogen receptor (ER)-proficient Ishikawa plus and ER-deficient Ishikawa minus endometrial cancer cells treated with selected well-known EACs (Diethylstilbestrol, Genistein, Zearalenone, Resveratrol, Bisphenol A and o,p'-DDT). We also investigated the effect of the pure antiestrogen ICI 182,780 (ICI) on the expression patterns caused by these compounds. Transcript levels were quantified 24 h after compound treatment using Illumina BeadChip Arrays. We identified 87 genes with similar expression changes in response to all EAC treatments in Ishikawa plus. ICI lowered the magnitude or reversed the expression of these genes, indicating ER dependent regulation. Apart from estrogenic gene regulation, Bisphenol A, o,p'-DDT, Zearalenone, Genistein and Resveratrol displayed similarities to ICI in their expression patterns, suggesting mixed estrogenic/antiestrogenic properties. In particular, the predominant antiestrogenic expression response of Resveratrol could be clearly distinguished from the other test compounds, indicating a distinct mechanism of action. Divergent gene expression patterns of the phytoestrogens, as well as weaker estrogenic gene expression regulation determined for the anthropogenous chemicals Bisphenol A and o,p'-DDT, warrants a careful assessment of potential detrimental and/or beneficial effects of EACs. The characteristic expression fingerprints and the identified subset of putative marker genes can be used for screening chemicals with an unknown mode of action and for predicting their potential to exert endocrine disrupting effects.

  9. Antioxidative activities and active compounds of extracts from Catalpa plant leaves.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongyu; Hu, Gege; Dong, Juane; Wei, Qin; Shao, Hongbo; Lei, Ming

    2014-01-01

    In order to screen the Catalpa plant with high antioxidant activity and confirm the corresponding active fractions from Catalpa ovata G. Don, C. fargesii Bur., and C. bungei C. A. Mey., total flavonoid contents and antioxidant activities of the extracts/fractions of Catalpa plant leaves were determined. The determined total flavonoid content and antioxidant activity were used as assessment criteria. Those compounds with antioxidant activity were isolated with silica gel column chromatography and ODS column chromatography. Our results showed that the total flavonoid content in C. bungei C. A. Mey. (30.07 mg/g · DW) was the highest, followed by those in C. fargesii Bur. (25.55 mg/g · DW) and C. ovata G. Don (24.96 mg/g · DW). According to the determination results of total flavonoid content and antioxidant activity in 3 clones of leaves of C. bungei C. A. Mey., the total flavonoid content and antioxidant activity in crude extracts from C. bungei C. A. Mey. 6 (CA6) leaves were the highest. Moreover, the results showed that the total flavonoid content and antioxidant activities of ethyl acetate (EA) fraction in ethanol crude extracts in CA6 leaves were the highest, followed by n-butanol, petroleum ether (PE), and water fractions. Two flavonoid compounds with antioxidant activity were firstly isolated based on EA fraction. The two compounds were luteolin (1) and apigenin (2), respectively.

  10. Antioxidative Activities and Active Compounds of Extracts from Catalpa Plant Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hongyu; Hu, Gege; Dong, Juane; Wei, Qin; Shao, Hongbo; Lei, Ming

    2014-01-01

    In order to screen the Catalpa plant with high antioxidant activity and confirm the corresponding active fractions from Catalpa ovata G. Don, C. fargesii Bur., and C. bungei C. A. Mey., total flavonoid contents and antioxidant activities of the extracts/fractions of Catalpa plant leaves were determined. The determined total flavonoid content and antioxidant activity were used as assessment criteria. Those compounds with antioxidant activity were isolated with silica gel column chromatography and ODS column chromatography. Our results showed that the total flavonoid content in C. bungei C. A. Mey. (30.07 mg/g·DW) was the highest, followed by those in C. fargesii Bur. (25.55 mg/g·DW) and C. ovata G. Don (24.96 mg/g·DW). According to the determination results of total flavonoid content and antioxidant activity in 3 clones of leaves of C. bungei C. A. Mey., the total flavonoid content and antioxidant activity in crude extracts from C. bungei C. A. Mey. 6 (CA6) leaves were the highest. Moreover, the results showed that the total flavonoid content and antioxidant activities of ethyl acetate (EA) fraction in ethanol crude extracts in CA6 leaves were the highest, followed by n-butanol, petroleum ether (PE), and water fractions. Two flavonoid compounds with antioxidant activity were firstly isolated based on EA fraction. The two compounds were luteolin (1) and apigenin (2), respectively. PMID:25431795

  11. Comparison of antioxidant activity of compounds isolated from guava leaves and a stability study of the most active compound.

    PubMed

    Nantitanon, W; Okonogi, S

    2012-02-01

    In the present study, quercetin (QT), morin (MR), and quercetin-3-O-glucopyranoside (QG) isolated from guava leaves were comparatively tested for antioxidant activity using DPPH, ABTS, and FRAP methods. QT was the most active among them. The free radical scavenging activity of QT was approximately four times higher than MR and two times higher than QG. The reducing power of QT was eight times higher than MR and two times higher than QG. A mixture of QT with MR or QG showed interesting combination effect. The synergistic antioxidant activity was obtained when QT was mixed with MR whereas the antagonistic effect was found when mixed with QG. The stability study of QT in liquid preparations indicated that the decomposition reaction rate of QT could be explained by a kinetic model assuming a first-order chemical reaction. The aqueous solution of QT was rapidly decomposed with t1/2 of approximately five days whereas QT entrapped in chitosan nanoparticles was five times longer. It was concluded that QT was the most active antioxidant from guava leaves. Entrapment of QT in chitosan nanoparticles could significantly enhance its stability.

  12. Structural Characterization and Evaluation of the Antioxidant Activity of Phenolic Compounds from Astragalus taipaishanensis and Their Structure-Activity Relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Wenjun; Wang, Dongmei; Zhou, Dan

    2015-09-01

    Eight phenolic compounds were isolated using bio-guided isolation and purified from the roots of Astragalus taipaishanensis Y. C. Ho et S. B. Ho (A. taipaishanensis) for the first time. Their structures were elucidated by ESI-MS, HR-ESI-MS, 1D-NMR and 2D-NMR as 7,2‧-dihydroxy-3‧,4‧-dimethoxy isoflavan (1), formononetin (2), isoliquiritigenin (3), quercetin (4), kaempferol (5), ononin (6), p-hydroxybenzoic acid (7) and vanillic acid (8). Six flavonoids (compounds 1-6) exhibited stronger antioxidant activities (determined by DPPH, ABTS, FRAP and lipid peroxidation inhibition assays) than those of BHA and TBHQ and also demonstrated noticeable protective effects (particularly quercetin and kaempferol) on Escherichia coli under oxidative stress. Additionally, the chemical constituents compared with those of Astragalus membranaceus and the structure-activity relationship of the isolated compounds were both analyzed. The results clearly demonstrated that A. taipaishanensis has the potential to be selected as an alternative medicinal and food plant that can be utilized in health food products, functional tea and pharmaceutical products.

  13. An In Silico Approach for Identification of Potential Anti-Mycobacterial Targets of Vasicine and Related Chemical Compounds.

    PubMed

    Chaliha, Amrita Kashyap; Gogoi, Dhrubajyoti; Chetia, Pankaj; Sarma, Diganta; Buragohain, Alak Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is known to mankind as one of the most pervasive and persistent of diseases since the early days of civilization. The growing resistance of the causative pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis to the standard drug regimen for TB poses further difficulty in its treatment and control. Screening of novel plant-derived compounds with promising anti-tubercular activity has been cited as a prospective route for new anti-tubercular drug discovery and design. Justicia adhatoda L. is a perennial evergreen shrub which is widely mentioned in scientific literature on account of its potent anti-mycobacterial properties. In the present study, we have employed a series of computational methodologies to reveal the probable molecular interactions of vasicine, the principal alkaloid of Justicia adhatoda L., and two of its close natural derivatives- vasicinone and deoxyvasicine, with certain biological targets in M. tuberculosis. Targets were identified from literature and through a reverse Pharmacophore-based approach. Subsequent comparative molecular docking to identify the best ligand-target interactions revealed Antigen 85C of M. tuberculosis as the most potent biological target of vasicine on the basis of optimum molecular docking values. A chemogenomics approach was also employed to validate the molecular interactions between the same class of chemical compounds as vasicine and Antigen 85C. Further, a library of structural analogs of vasicine was created by bioiosterism-based drug design to identify structural analogs with better inhibitory potential against Antigen 85C.

  14. Data-Driven Derivation of an "Informer Compound Set" for Improved Selection of Active Compounds in High-Throughput Screening.

    PubMed

    Paricharak, Shardul; IJzerman, Adriaan P; Jenkins, Jeremy L; Bender, Andreas; Nigsch, Florian

    2016-09-26

    Despite the usefulness of high-throughput screening (HTS) in drug discovery, for some systems, low assay throughput or high screening cost can prohibit the screening of large numbers of compounds. In such cases, iterative cycles of screening involving active learning (AL) are employed, creating the need for smaller "informer sets" that can be routinely screened to build predictive models for selecting compounds from the screening collection for follow-up screens. Here, we present a data-driven derivation of an informer compound set with improved predictivity of active compounds in HTS, and we validate its benefit over randomly selected training sets on 46 PubChem assays comprising at least 300,000 compounds and covering a wide range of assay biology. The informer compound set showed improvement in BEDROC(α = 100), PRAUC, and ROCAUC values averaged over all assays of 0.024, 0.014, and 0.016, respectively, compared to randomly selected training sets, all with paired t-test p-values <10(-15). A per-assay assessment showed that the BEDROC(α = 100), which is of particular relevance for early retrieval of actives, improved for 38 out of 46 assays, increasing the success rate of smaller follow-up screens. Overall, we showed that an informer set derived from historical HTS activity data can be employed for routine small-scale exploratory screening in an assay-agnostic fashion. This approach led to a consistent improvement in hit rates in follow-up screens without compromising scaffold retrieval. The informer set is adjustable in size depending on the number of compounds one intends to screen, as performance gains are realized for sets with more than 3,000 compounds, and this set is therefore applicable to a variety of situations. Finally, our results indicate that random sampling may not adequately cover descriptor space, drawing attention to the importance of the composition of the training set for predicting actives.

  15. Preparation of activated carbons from raw and biotreated agricultural residues for removal of volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Hsi, Hsing-Cheng; Horng, Richard S; Pan, Tai-An; Lee, Shin-Ku

    2011-05-01

    Activated carbons with diverse physical and chemical properties were produced from four agriculture residues, including raw barley husk, biotreated barley husk, rice husk, and pistachio shell. Results showed that with adequate steam activation (30-90 min, 50% H2O(g),/50% N2), activated carbons with surface areas between 360 and 950 m2 g(-1) were developed. Further increases in the activation time destroyed the pore structure of activated carbons, which resulted in a decrease in the surface area and pore volume. Biotreated agricultural residues were found to be suitable precursors for producing mesoporous activated carbons. The oxygen content of activated carbons increased with increasing activation time. Results from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy examination further suggested that H2O molecules react with the carbon surface, enhancing the deconvoluted peak area of carbonyl and carboxyl groups. Equilibrium adsorption of toluene indicated that the adsorption capacities increased with an increase in the inlet toluene concentration and a decrease in temperature. The adsorption isotherms were successfully fitted with Freundlich, Langmuir, and Dubinin-Radushkevich equations. Activated carbons derived from agricultural residues appear to be more applicable to adsorb volatile organic compounds at a low concentration and high-temperature environment.

  16. Chemical evolution of volatile organic compounds in the outflow of the Mexico City Metropolitan area

    SciTech Connect

    Apel, E.; Springston, S.; Karl, T.; Emmons, L.; Flocke, F.; Hills, A. J.; Madronich, S.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Fried, A.; Weibring, P.; Walega, J.; Richter, D., Tie, X.; Mauldin, L.; Campos, T.; Sive, B.; Kleinman, L.; Springston, S., Zaveri, R.; deGouw, J.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, R.; Rudolph, J.; Junkermann, W.; Riemer, D. D.

    2009-11-01

    The volatile organic compound (VOC) distribution in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) and its evolution as it is uplifted and transported out of the MCMA basin was studied during the 2006 MILAGRO/MIRAGE-Mex field campaign. The results show that in the morning hours in the city center, the VOC distribution is dominated by non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) but with a substantial contribution from oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs), predominantly from primary emissions. Alkanes account for a large part of the NMHC distribution in terms of mixing ratios. In terms of reactivity, NMHCs also dominate overall, especially in the morning hours. However, in the afternoon, as the boundary layer lifts and air is mixed and aged within the basin, the distribution changes as secondary products are formed. The WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry) model and MOZART (Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers) were able to reproduce the general features of the daytime cycle of the VOC OH reactivity distribution showing that NMHCs dominate the distribution except in the afternoon hours and that the VOC OH reactivity peaks in the early morning due to high morning emissions from the city into a shallow boundary layer. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models showed higher reactivity than the experimental data during the nighttime cycle, perhaps indicating problems with the modeled nighttime boundary layer height. In addition, a plume was studied in which air was advected out of the MCMA and intercepted downwind with the DOE G1 on 18 March and the NCAR C130 one day later on 19 March. A number of identical species measured aboard each aircraft gave insight into the chemical evolution of the plume as it aged and was transported as far as 1000 km downwind. Ozone and many OVOCs were photochemically produced in the plume. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models were used to examine the spatial and temporal extent of the 19 March plume and to help interpret the OH

  17. Chemical evolution of volatile organic compounds in the outflow of the Mexico City Metropolitan area

    SciTech Connect

    Apel, Eric; Emmons, L.; Karl, Thomas G.; Flocke, Frank M.; Hills, A. J.; Madronich, Sasha; Lee-Taylor, J.; Fried, Alan; Weibring, P.; Walega, J.; Richter, Dirk; Tie, X.; Mauldin, L.; Campos, Teresa; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Knapp, David; Sive, B.; Kleinman, Lawrence I.; Springston, S.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Ortega, John V.; Voss, Paul B.; Blake, D. R.; Baker, Angela K.; Warneke, Carsten; Welsh-Bon, Daniel; de Gouw, Joost A.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, Renyi; Rudolph, Jochen; Junkermann, W.; Riemer, D.

    2010-01-01

    The volatile organic compound (VOC) distribution in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) and its evolution as it is uplifted and transported out of the MCMA basin was studied during the 2006 MILAGRO/MIRAGE-Mex field campaign. The results show that in the morning hours in the city center, the VOC distribution is dominated by non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) but with a substantial contribution from oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs), predominantly from primary emissions. Alkanes account for a large part of the NMHC distribution in terms of mixing ratios. In terms of reactivity, NMHCs also dominate overall, especially in the morning hours. However, in the afternoon, as the boundary layer lifts and air is mixed and aged within the basin, the distribution changes as secondary products are formed. The WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry) model and MOZART (Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers) were able to reproduce the general features of the daytime cycle of the VOC OH reactivity distribution showing that NMHCs dominate the distribution except in the afternoon hours and that the VOC OH reactivity peaks in the early morning due to high morning emissions from the city into a shallow boundary layer. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models showed higher reactivity than the experimental data during the nighttime cycle, perhaps indicating problems with the modeled nighttime boundary layer height. In addition, a plume was studied in which air was advected out of the MCMA and intercepted downwind with the DOE G1 on March 18 and the NCAR C130 one day later on March 19. A number of identical species measured aboard each aircraft gave insight into the chemical evolution of the plume as it aged and was transported as far as 1000 km downwind. Ozone and many OVOCs were photochemically produced in the plume. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models were used to examine the spatial and temporal extent of the March 19 plume and to help interpret the OH

  18. Clinical breath analysis: Discriminating between human endogenous compounds and exogenous (environmental) chemical confounders

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath originate from current or previous environmental exposures (exogenous compounds) and internal metabolic anabolic and catabolic) production (endogenous compounds). The origins of certain VOCs in breath presumed to be endogenous ...

  19. Investigating the antiplasmodial activity of primary sulfonamide compounds identified in open source malaria data.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Gillian M; Bua, Silvia; Del Prete, Sonia; Arnold, Megan S J; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T; Andrews, Katherine T; Poulsen, Sally-Ann

    2017-04-01

    In the past decade there has been a significant reduction in deaths due to malaria, in part due to the success of the gold standard antimalarial treatment - artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs). However the potential threat of ACT failure and the lack of a broadly effective malaria vaccine are driving efforts to discover new chemical entities (NCEs) to target this disease. The primary sulfonamide (PS) moiety is a component of several clinical drugs, including those for treatment of kidney disease, glaucoma and epilepsy, however this chemotype has not yet been exploited for malaria. In this study 31 PS compounds sourced from the GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) Tres Cantos antimalarial set (TCAMS) were investigated for their ability to selectively inhibit the in vitro growth of Plasmodium falciparum asexual stage malaria parasites. Of these, 14 compounds were found to have submicromolar activity (IC50 0.16-0.89 μM) and a modest selectivity index (SI) for the parasite versus human cells (SI > 12 to >43). As the PS moiety is known to inhibit carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzymes from many organisms, the PS compounds were assessed for recombinant P. falciparum CA (PfCA) mediated inhibition of CO2 hydration. The PfCA inhibition activity did not correlate with antiplasmodial potency. Furthermore, no significant difference in IC50 was observed for P. falciparum versus P. knowlesi (P > 0.05), a Plasmodium species that is not known to contain an annotated PfCA gene. Together these data suggest that the asexual intraerythrocytic stage antiplasmodial activity of the PS compounds examined in this study is likely unrelated to PfCA inhibition.

  20. ILO activities in the area of chemical safety.

    PubMed

    Obadia, Isaac

    2003-08-21

    The ILO has been active in the area of safety in the use of chemicals at work since the year of its creation in 1919, including the development of international treaties and other technical instruments, the provision of technical assistance to its member States, and the development of chemical safety information systems. The two key ILO standards in this area are the Conventions on safety in the use of chemicals at work (No. 170, 1990), and the Prevention of Major Industrial Accidents (No. 174, 1993). The ILO Programme on occupational safety, health and environment (Safe Work) is currently responsible for ILO chemical safety activities. In the past two decades, most of ILO work in this area has been carried out within the context of inter-agency collaboration frameworks linking the ILO, WHO, UNEP, FAO, UNIDO, UNITAR, and the OECD, including the International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), the Inter-Organisation Programme for the Sound Management of Chemicals (IOMC), and the Intergovernmental Forum on Chemical Safety (IFCS). Apart from the regular development, updating and dissemination of chemical safety information data bases such as the IPCS International Chemical Cards, the elaboration of a Globally harmonized system for the classification and labelling of Chemicals (GHS) has been the most outstanding achievement of this international collaboration on chemical safety.

  1. Chemical Composition and Antioxidant Activities of Broussonetia papyrifera Fruits

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jie; Liu, Shao-fang; Zhang, Chu-shu; Yu, Li-na; Bi, Jie; Zhu, Feng; Yang, Qing-li

    2012-01-01

    Fruits of Broussonetia papyrifera from South China were analyzed for their total chemical composition, and antioxidant activities in ethanol and aqueous extracts. In the fruit of this plant, the crude protein, crude fat and carbohydrates was 7.08%, 3.72% and 64.73% of dry weight, respectively. The crude protein, crude fat and carbohydrates were 15.71%, 20.51% and 36.09% of dry weight, respectively. Fatty acid and amino acid composition of the fruit were analyzed. Unsaturated fatty acid concentration was 70.6% of the total fatty acids. The percentage of the essential amino acids (EAAs) was 40.60% of the total amino acids. Furthermore, B. papyrifera fruit are rich in many mineral elements and vitamins. Total phenolic content was assessed using the Folin-Ciocalteau assay, whereas antioxidant activities were assessed by measuring the ability of the two extracts to scavenge DPPH radicals, inhibit peroxidation, and chelate ferric ions. Their reducing power was also assessed. Results indicated that the aqueous extract of B. papyrifera was a more potent reducing agent and radical-scavenger than the ethanol extract. GC–MS analysis of the ethanol extract showed the presence of some acid-containing compounds. The changes in total phenolic content and antioxidant capacity in B. papyrifera from four different regions grown under normal conditions were assessed. The antioxidant activity of different extracts was positively associated with their total phenolic content. These results suggest that the fruit of B. papyrifera could be used in dietary supplement preparations, or as a food additive, for nutritional gain, or to prevent oxidation in food products. PMID:22389678

  2. Phenolic compounds and biological activity of Kitaibelia vitifolia.

    PubMed

    Mašković, Pavle; Solujić, Slavica; Mihailović, Vladimir; Mladenović, Milan; Cvijović, Milica; Mladenović, Jelena; Aćamović-Đoković, Gordana; Kurćubić, Vladimir

    2011-12-01

    This study was aimed at evaluating the antioxidant activity and efficacy of the ethanolic extract of the endemic plant species Kitaibelia vitifolia in inhibiting the growth of selected fungi and bacteria. Antimicrobial activity was tested using the broth dilution procedure for determination of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). MICs were determined for eight selected indicator strains. The highest susceptibility to K. vitifolia ethanolic extract among the bacteria tested was exhibited by Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, and Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 13883 (MIC=15.62 μg/mL), followed by Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Proteus mirabilis ATCC 14153 (MIC=31.25 μg/mL), and Proteus vulgaris ATCC 13315 (MIC=62.50 μg/mL). Of the fungi, Candida albicans ATCC 10231 (MIC=15.62 μg/mL) showed the highest susceptibility, and Aspergillus niger ATCC 16404 (MIC=31.25 μg/mL) had the lowest. Results showed that K. vitifolia extract possesses antioxidant activity, with total antioxidant capacity of 75.45±0.68 μg of ascorbic acid/g and 50% inhibition concentration values of 47.45±0.55 μg/mL for 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical scavenging activity, 35.35±0.68 μg/mL for inhibitory activity against lipid peroxidation, 95.25±0.52 μg/mL for hydroxyl radical scavenging activity, and 31.50±0.35 μg/mL for metal chelating activity. Total phenolics, flavonoids, condensed tannins, and gallotannins were 85.25±0.69 mg of gallic acid (GA)/g, 45.32±0.55 mg of rutin/g, 54.25±0.75 mg of GA/g, and 41.74±0.55 mg of GA/g, respectively. The phenolic composition of K. vitifolia extract was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Rosmarinic acid was found to be the dominant phenolic compound of the extract.

  3. Phenolic Compounds and Antioxidant Activity of Phalaenopsis Orchid Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Minh, Truong Ngoc; Khang, Do Tan; Tuyen, Phung Thi; Minh, Luong The; Anh, La Hoang; Quan, Nguyen Van; Ha, Pham Thi Thu; Quan, Nguyen Thanh; Toan, Nguyen Phu; Elzaawely, Abdelnaser Abdelghany; Xuan, Tran Dang

    2016-01-01

    Phalaenopsis spp. is the most commercially and economically important orchid, but their plant parts are often left unused, which has caused environmental problems. To date, reports on phytochemical analyses were most available on endangered and medicinal orchids. The present study was conducted to determine the total phenolics, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity of ethanol extracts prepared from leaves and roots of six commercial hybrid Phalaenopsis spp. Leaf extracts of “Chian Xen Queen” contained the highest total phenolics with a value of 11.52 ± 0.43 mg gallic acid equivalent per g dry weight and the highest total flavonoids (4.98 ± 0.27 mg rutin equivalent per g dry weight). The antioxidant activity of root extracts evaluated by DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) free radical scavenging assay and β-carotene bleaching method was higher than those of the leaf extracts. Eleven phenolic compounds were identified, namely, protocatechuic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, caffeic acid, syringic acid, vanillin, ferulic acid, sinapic acid, p-coumaric acid, benzoic acid, and ellagic acid. Ferulic, p-coumaric and sinapic acids were concentrated largely in the roots. The results suggested that the root extracts from hybrid Phalaenopsis spp. could be a potential source of natural antioxidants. This study also helps to reduce the amount of this orchid waste in industrial production, as its roots can be exploited for pharmaceutical purposes. PMID:27649250

  4. Platinum (II) Compounds With Antitumor Activity Studied by Molecular Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Georgieva, Ivelina; Nikolov, George St.

    1998-01-01

    A series of Pt(ll) complexes with antitumor properties: [1,2-bis(2,6-dichloro-4-hydroxyphenyl)ethylenediamine]PtL2 (meso-1-PtL2) and [erythro-1-(2,6-dichloro-4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-(2-halo-4-hydroxyphenyl)ethylenediamine]PtL2, [2L=2Cl−,2I−,SO42−; halo = F (erythro-8-PtL2),halo = Cl (erythro-9-PtL2)] has been modelled by molecular mechanics (MM). The MM calculations were carried out for different isomers and ligand conformations meso-δ, meso-λ, d,l-δ, d,I-λ. The compounds with the lowest MM energies have the same geometries as those obtained by X-ray analysis. The calculated MMX energy orders: meso-1-PtL2 < erythro-9-PtL2 < erythro-8-PtL2 for L=I−, Cl− and SO42− are reverse to the known antitumor activity order - the lowest energy complex (the most stable one)is the one with the highest estrogen activity (meso-1-PtL2). The type of the leaving group (L) does not alter the energy order, which is in agreement with the biological experiments that show a slight dependence of the estrogen properties on the leaving group type. PMID:18475828

  5. Platinum (II) Compounds With Antitumor Activity Studied by Molecular Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Trendafilova, N; Georgieva, I; Nikolov, G S

    1998-01-01

    A SERIES OF PT(LL) COMPLEXES WITH ANTITUMOR PROPERTIES: [1,2-bis(2,6-dichloro-4-hydroxyphenyl)ethylenediamine]PtL(2) (meso-1-PtL(2)) and [erythro-1-(2,6-dichloro-4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-(2-halo-4-hydroxyphenyl)ethylenediamine]PtL(2), [2L=2Cl-,2I-,SO(4) (2)-; halo = F (erythro-8-PtL(2)),halo = Cl (erythro-9-PtL(2))] has been modelled by molecular mechanics (MM). The MM calculations were carried out for different isomers and ligand conformations meso-delta, meso-lambda, d,l-delta, d,I-lambda. The compounds with the lowest MM energies have the same geometries as those obtained by X-ray analysis. The calculated MMX energy orders: meso-1-PtL(2) < erythro-9-PtL(2) < erythro-8-PtL(2) for L=I-, Cl- and SO(4) (2-) are reverse to the known antitumor activity order - the lowest energy complex (the most stable one)is the one with the highest estrogen activity (meso-1-PtL(2)). The type of the leaving group (L) does not alter the energy order, which is in agreement with the biological experiments that show a slight dependence of the estrogen properties on the leaving group type.

  6. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Nitric Acid, Nitrates, and Nitro Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bretherick, Leslie

    1989-01-01

    Discussed are the potential hazards associated with nitric acid, inorganic and organic nitrate salts, alkyl nitrates, acyl nitrates, aliphatic nitro compounds, aromatic nitro compounds, and nitration reactions. (CW)

  7. Automated Structure-Activity Relationship Mining: Connecting Chemical Structure to Biological Profiles.

    PubMed

    Wawer, Mathias J; Jaramillo, David E; Dančík, Vlado; Fass, Daniel M; Haggarty, Stephen J; Shamji, Alykhan F; Wagner, Bridget K; Schreiber, Stuart L; Clemons, Paul A

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the structure-activity relationships (SARs) of small molecules is important for developing probes and novel therapeutic agents in chemical biology and drug discovery. Increasingly, multiplexed small-molecule profiling assays allow simultaneous measurement of many biological response parameters for the same compound (e.g., expression levels for many genes or binding constants against many proteins). Although such methods promise to capture SARs with high granularity, few computational methods are available to support SAR analyses of high-dimensional compound activity profiles. Many of these methods are not generally applicable or reduce the activity space to scalar summary statistics before establishing SARs. In this article, we present a versatile computational method that automatically extracts interpretable SAR rules from high-dimensional profiling data. The rules connect chemical structural features of compounds to patterns in their biological activity profiles. We applied our method to data from novel cell-based gene-expression and imaging assays collected on more than 30,000 small molecules. Based on the rules identified for this data set, we prioritized groups of compounds for further study, including a novel set of putative histone deacetylase inhibitors.

  8. Identification of Tetraazacyclic Compounds as Novel Potent Inhibitors Antagonizing RORγt Activity and Suppressing Th17 Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Qingfeng; Zhao, Mei; Yu, Bolan; Bai, Chuan; Huang, Zhaofeng

    2015-01-01

    CD4+ T-helper cells that produce interleukin-17 (Th17 cells) are characterized as pathological T-helper cells in autoimmune diseases. Differentiation of human and mouse Th17 cells requires a key transcription regulator, retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor γt (RORγt), which is a potential therapeutic target for autoimmune diseases. To develop a therapeutic agent for Th17-mediated autoimmune diseases, we have established a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay for candidate screening, in which the luciferase activity in RORγt-LBD positive and negative Jurkat cells were analyzed to evaluate induction of RORγt activity by compounds. This technique was applied to screen a commercially-available drug-like chemical compound library (Enamine) which contains 20155 compounds. The screening identified 17 compounds that can inhibit RORγt function in the HTS screen system. Of these, three tetraazacyclic compounds can potently inhibit RORγt activity, and suppress Th17 differentiation and IL-17 production. These three candidate compounds could significantly attenuate the expression of the Il17a by 65%- 90%, and inhibit IL-17A secretion by 47%, 63%, and 74%, respectively. These compounds also exhibited a potent anti-RORγt activity, with EC50 values of 0.25 μM, 0.67 μM and 2.6 μM, respectively. Our data demonstrated the feasibility of targeting the RORγt to inhibit Th17 cell differentiation and function with these tetraazacyclic compounds, and the potential to improve the structure of these compounds for autoimmune diseases therapeutics. PMID:26368822

  9. Influence of process parameters on the surface and chemical properties of activated carbon obtained from biochar by chemical activation.

    PubMed

    Angın, Dilek; Altintig, Esra; Köse, Tijen Ennil

    2013-11-01

    Activated carbons were produced from biochar obtained through pyrolysis of safflower seed press cake by chemical activation with zinc chloride. The influences of process variables such as the activation temperature and the impregnation ratio on textural and chemical-surface properties of the activated carbons were investigated. Also, the adsorptive properties of activated carbons were tested using methylene blue dye as the targeted adsorbate. The experimental data indicated that the adsorption isotherms are well described by the Langmuir equilibrium isotherm equation. The optimum conditions resulted in activated carbon with a monolayer adsorption capacity of 128.21 mg g(-1) and carbon content 76.29%, while the BET surface area and total pore volume corresponded to 801.5m(2)g(-1) and 0.393 cm(3)g(-1), respectively. This study demonstrated that high surface area activated carbons can be prepared from the chemical activation of biochar with zinc chloride as activating agents.

  10. Identification of new compounds with high activity against stationary phase Borrelia burgdorferi from the NCI compound collection

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jie; Shi, Wanliang; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease is the leading tick-borne disease in the USA. Whereas the majority of Lyme disease patients with early disease can be cured with standard treatment, some patients suffer from chronic fatigue and joint and muscular pain despite treatment, a syndrome called posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome. Although the cause is unclear, ineffective killing of Borrelia burgdorferi persisters by current Lyme disease antibiotics is one possible explanation. We took advantage of our recently developed high-throughput viability assay and screened the National Cancer Institute compound library collection consisting of 2526 compounds against stationary phase B. burgdorferi. We identified the top 30 new active hits, including the top six anthracycline antibiotics daunomycin 3-oxime, dimethyldaunomycin, daunomycin, NSC299187, NSC363998 and nogalamycin, along with other compounds, including prodigiosin, mitomycin, nanaomycin and dactinomycin, as having excellent activity against B. burgdorferi stationary phase culture. The anthracycline or anthraquinone compounds, which are known to have both anti-cancer and antibacterial activities, also had high activity against growing B. burgdorferi with low minimum inhibitory concentration. Future studies on the structure–activity relationship and mechanisms of action of anthracyclines/anthraquinones are warranted. In addition, drug combination studies with the anthracycline class of compounds and the current Lyme antibiotics to eradicate B. burgdorferi persisters in vitro and in animal models are needed to determine if they improve the treatment of Lyme disease. PMID:26954881

  11. Identification of new compounds with high activity against stationary phase Borrelia burgdorferi from the NCI compound collection.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jie; Shi, Wanliang; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, Ying

    2015-06-03

    Lyme disease is the leading tick-borne disease in the USA. Whereas the majority of Lyme disease patients with early disease can be cured with standard treatment, some patients suffer from chronic fatigue and joint and muscular pain despite treatment, a syndrome called posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome. Although the cause is unclear, ineffective killing of Borrelia burgdorferi persisters by current Lyme disease antibiotics is one possible explanation. We took advantage of our recently developed high-throughput viability assay and screened the National Cancer Institute compound library collection consisting of 2526 compounds against stationary phase B. burgdorferi. We identified the top 30 new active hits, including the top six anthracycline antibiotics daunomycin 3-oxime, dimethyldaunomycin, daunomycin, NSC299187, NSC363998 and nogalamycin, along with other compounds, including prodigiosin, mitomycin, nanaomycin and dactinomycin, as having excellent activity against B. burgdorferi stationary phase culture. The anthracycline or anthraquinone compounds, which are known to have both anti-cancer and antibacterial activities, also had high activity against growing B. burgdorferi with low minimum inhibitory concentration. Future studies on the structure-activity relationship and mechanisms of action of anthracyclines/anthraquinones are warranted. In addition, drug combination studies with the anthracycline class of compounds and the current Lyme antibiotics to eradicate B. burgdorferi persisters in vitro and in animal models are needed to determine if they improve the treatment of Lyme disease.

  12. Chemical Constituents from Andrographis echioides and Their Anti-Inflammatory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Shen, De-Yang; Juang, Shin-Hun; Kuo, Ping-Chung; Huang, Guan-Jhong; Chan, Yu-Yi; Damu, Amooru G.; Wu, Tian-Shung

    2013-01-01

    Phytochemical investigation of the whole plants of Andrographis echioides afforded two new 2′-oxygenated flavonoids (1) and (2), two new phenyl glycosides (3) and (4), along with 37 known structures. The structures of new compounds were elucidated by spectral analysis and chemical transformation studies. Among the isolated compounds, (1–2) and (6–19) were subjected into the examination for their iNOS inhibitory bioactivity. The structure-activity relationships of the flavonoids for their inhibition of NO production were also discussed. PMID:23271366

  13. Active machine learning-driven experimentation to determine compound effects on protein patterns.

    PubMed

    Naik, Armaghan W; Kangas, Joshua D; Sullivan, Devin P; Murphy, Robert F

    2016-02-03

    High throughput screening determines the effects of many conditions on a given biological target. Currently, to estimate the effects of those conditions on other targets requires either strong modeling assumptions (e.g. similarities among targets) or separate screens. Ideally, data-driven experimentation could be used to learn accurate models for many conditions and targets without doing all possible experiments. We have previously described an active machine learning algorithm that can iteratively choose small sets of experiments to learn models of multiple effects. We now show that, with no prior knowledge and with liquid handling robotics and automated microscopy under its control, this learner accurately learned the effects of 48 chemical compounds on the subcellular localization of 48 proteins while performing only 29% of all possible experiments. The results represent the first practical demonstration of the utility of active learning-driven biological experimentation in which the set of possible phenotypes is unknown in advance.

  14. Volatile Compounds in Honey: A Review on Their Involvement in Aroma, Botanical Origin Determination and Potential Biomedical Activities

    PubMed Central

    Manyi-Loh, Christy E.; Ndip, Roland N.; Clarke, Anna M.

    2011-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in honey are obtained from diverse biosynthetic pathways and extracted by using various methods associated with varying degrees of selectivity and effectiveness. These compounds are grouped into chemical categories such as aldehyde, ketone, acid, alcohol, hydrocarbon, norisoprenoids, terpenes and benzene compounds and their derivatives, furan and pyran derivatives. They represent a fingerprint of a specific honey and therefore could be used to differentiate between monofloral honeys from different floral sources, thus providing valuable information concerning the honey’s botanical and geographical origin. However, only plant derived compounds and their metabolites (terpenes, norisoprenoids and benzene compounds and their derivatives) must be employed to discriminate among floral origins of honey. Notwithstanding, many authors have reported different floral markers for honey of the same floral origin, consequently sensory analysis, in conjunction with analysis of VOCs could help to clear this ambiguity. Furthermore, VOCs influence honey’s aroma described as sweet, citrus, floral, almond, rancid, etc. Clearly, the contribution of a volatile compound to honey aroma is determined by its odor activity value. Elucidation of the aroma compounds along with floral origins of a particular honey can help to standardize its quality and avoid fraudulent labeling of the product. Although only present in low concentrations, VOCS could contribute to biomedical activities of honey, especially the antioxidant effect due to their natural radical scavenging potential. PMID:22272147

  15. QSAR classification models for the screening of the endocrine-disrupting activity of perfluorinated compounds.

    PubMed

    Kovarich, S; Papa, E; Li, J; Gramatica, P

    2012-01-01

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) are a class of emerging pollutants still widely used in different materials as non-adhesives, waterproof fabrics, fire-fighting foams, etc. Their toxic effects include potential for endocrine-disrupting activity, but the amount of experimental data available for these pollutants is limited. The use of predictive strategies such as quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) is recommended under the REACH regulation, to fill data gaps and to screen and prioritize chemicals for further experimentation, with a consequent reduction of costs and number of tested animals. In this study, local classification models for PFCs were developed to predict their T4-TTR (thyroxin-transthyretin) competing potency. The best models were selected by maximizing the sensitivity and external predictive ability. These models, characterized by robustness, good predictive power and a defined applicability domain, were applied to predict the activity of 33 other PFCs of environmental concern. Finally, classification models recently published by our research group for T4-TTR binding of brominated flame retardants and for estrogenic and anti-androgenic activity were applied to the studied perfluorinated chemicals to compare results and to further evaluate the potential for these PFCs to cause endocrine disruption.

  16. Development of a surface acoustic wave gas sensor for organophosphorus nerve agents employing lanthanide compounds as the chemical interface.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuizen, M S; Harteveld, J L

    1994-03-01

    The results of a study dealing with surface acoustic wave gas sensors for organophosphorus compounds such as nerve agents are described. Several lanthanum coordination compounds were applied as the chemical interface. The various sensors prepared were challenged with both the nerve agent sarin and the simulant dimethyl methylphosphonate. Many aspects were studied, such as sensitivity, selectivity, reversibility and response rate as well as the effect of temperature and structural features. Detection limits down to 0.1 ppm were found. Response rates require further improvement. Degradation phenomena were observed which in some cases yielded irreversible responses. The selectivity for organophosphorus compounds was found to be promising.

  17. TSCA Chemical Data Reporting Fact Sheet: Reporting Manufactured Chemical Substances from Metal Mining and Related Activities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This fact sheet provides guidance on the Chemical Data Reporting (CDR) rule requirements related to the reporting of mined metals, intermediates, and byproducts manufactured during metal mining and related activities.

  18. Chemically-related Groups of Active Ingredients

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Many pesticide active ingredients affect pests in similar ways, and we re-evaluate them together as a group. Groups include carbamate insecticides, neonicotinoids, organochlorines, organophosphates, pyrethrins, and pyrethroids.

  19. Chemical Characterization of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formed from Atmospheric Aqueous-phase Reactions of Phenolic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L.; Smith, J.; Anastasio, C.; Zhang, Q.

    2012-12-01

    Phenolic compounds, which are released in significant amounts from biomass burning, may undergo fast aqueous-phase reactions to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere. Understanding the aqueous-phase reaction mechanisms of these compounds and the composition of their reaction products is thus important for constraining SOA sources and predicting organic aerosol properties in models. In this study, we investigate the aqueous-phase reactions of three phenols (phenol, guaiacol and syringol) with two oxidants - excited triplet states (3C*) of non-phenolic aromatic carbonyls and hydroxyl radical (OH). By employing four analytical methods including high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry, total organic carbon analysis, ion chromatography, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we thoroughly characterize the chemical compositions of the low volatility reaction products of phenols and propose formation mechanisms based on this information. Our results indicate that phenolic SOA is highly oxygenated, with O/C ratios in the range of 0.83-1.03, and that the SOA of phenol is usually more oxidized than those of guaiacol and syringol. Among the three precursors, syringol generates the largest fraction of higher molecular weight (MW) products. For the same precursor, the SOA formed via reaction with 3C* is less oxidized than that formed via reaction with OH. In addition, oxidation by 3C* enhances the formation of higher MW species, including phenolic dimers, higher oligomers and hydroxylated products, compared to reactions initiated by OH, which appear to favor the formation of organic acids. However, our results indicate that the yields of small organic acids (e.g., formate, acetate, oxalate, and malate) are low for both reaction pathways, together accounting for less than 5% of total SOA mass.

  20. Theoretical Study of Indium Compounds of Interest for Organometallic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, B. H.; Moore, C. E.; Cardelino, C. A.; Frazier, D. O.; Backmann, K. J.

    2000-01-01

    The structural. electronic and therinochemical properties of indium compounds which are of interest in halide transport and organometallic chemical vapor deposition processes have been studied by ab initio and statistical mechanics methods. The compounds reported include: indium halides and hydrides (InF, InCl, InCl3, InH, InH2, InH3); indium clusters (In2, In3); methylindium, dimethylindium, and their hydrogen derivatives [In(CH3), In(CH3)H, In(CH3)H2, In(CH3)2, In(CH3)2H]; dimethyl-indium dimer [In2(CH3)4], trimethyl-indium [In(CH3)3]; dehydrogenated methyl, dimethyl and trimethylindium [In(CH3)2CH2, In(CH3)CH2, In(CH2)], trimethylindium adducts with ammonia, trimethylamine and hydrazine [(CH3)3In:NH3, (CH3)3In:N(CH3)3, (CH3)3In:N(H2)N(H2)]; dimethylamino-indium and methylimino-indium [In(CH3)2(NH2), In(CH3)(NH)]; indium nitride and indium nitride dimer (InN, In2N2), indium phosphide, arsenide and antimonide ([InP, InAs, InSb). The predicted electronic properties are based on density functional theory calculations; the calculated thermodynamic properties are reported following the format of the JANAF (Joint Army, Navy, NASA, Air Force) Tables. Equilibrium compositions at two temperatures (298 and 1000 K) have been analyzed for groups of competing simultaneous reactions.

  1. Acute toxicity of Daphnia pulex to six classes of chemical compounds potentially hazardous to Great Lakes aquatic biota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Stephen B.; Savino, Jacqueline F.; Blouin, Marc A.

    1988-01-01

    Of the six classes of chemicals potentially hazardous to Great Lakes aquatic biota, derivatives of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were the most acutely toxic (48-h EC 50) to Daphnia pulex. The other classes, listed in order of decreasing toxicity were alkyl halides, nitrogen-containing compounds, cyclic alkanes, heterocyclic nitrogen compounds, silicon-containing compounds. O f the 41 compounds representing the six chemical classes, 6 were extremely toxic (> 0.01 - 0.1 mg/L), 11 highly toxic (> 01. - 1.0 mg/L), 20 moderately toxic (> 1.0 - 10.0 mg/L), and 4 slightly toxic (>10 - 100 mg/L). The reference compound, p, p'DDT, was super toxic (< 0.01 mg/L). Based on toxicity and relative abundance (hazard ranking) of the 21 compounds that were detected in tissue of Great Lakes fishes, the classes of compounds that present the greatest threat to Great Lakes aquatic biota are PAH derivatives, alkyl halides, and cyclic aklanes.

  2. Low cost whole-organism screening of compounds for anthelmintic activity.

    PubMed

    Preston, Sarah; Jabbar, Abdul; Nowell, Cameron; Joachim, Anja; Ruttkowski, Bärbel; Baell, Jonathan; Cardno, Tony; Korhonen, Pasi K; Piedrafita, David; Ansell, Brendan R E; Jex, Aaron R; Hofmann, Andreas; Gasser, Robin B

    2015-04-01

    Due to major problems with drug resistance in parasitic nematodes of animals, there is a substantial need and excellent opportunities to develop new anthelmintics via genomic-guided and/or repurposing approaches. In the present study, we established a practical and cost-effective whole-organism assay for the in vitro-screening of compounds for activity against parasitic stages of the nematode Haemonchus contortus (barber's pole worm). The assay is based on the use of exsheathed L3 (xL3) and L4 stages of H. contortus of small ruminants (sheep and goats). Using this assay, we screened a panel of 522 well-curated kinase inhibitors (GlaxoSmithKline, USA; code: PKIS2) for activity against H. contortus by measuring the inhibition of larval motility using an automated image analysis system. We identified two chemicals within the compound classes biphenyl amides and pyrazolo[1,5-α]pyridines, which reproducibly inhibit both xL3 and L4 motility and development, with IC50s of 14-47 μM. Given that these inhibitors were designed as anti-inflammatory drugs for use in humans and fit the Lipinski rule-of-five (including bioavailability), they show promise for hit-to-lead optimisation and repurposing for use against parasitic nematodes. The screening assay established here has significant advantages over conventional methods, particularly in terms of ease of use, throughput, time and cost. Although not yet fully automated, the current assay is readily suited to the screening of hundreds to thousands of compounds for subsequent hit-to-lead optimisation. The current assay is highly adaptable to many parasites of socioeconomic importance, including those causing neglected tropical diseases. This aspect is of major relevance, given the urgent need to deliver the goals of the London Declaration (http://unitingtocombatntds.org/resource/london-declaration) through the rapid and efficient repurposing of compounds in public-private partnerships.

  3. QSAR study for the soybean 15-lipoxygenase inhibitory activity of organosulfur compounds derived from the essential oil of garlic.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Alejandra B; Marchevsky, Eduardo; Luco, Juan M

    2007-04-18

    In this study, multiple linear regression (MLR) and partial least-squares (PLS) techniques were used for modeling the soybean 15-lipoxygenase inhibitory activity of a varied group of mono-, di-, and trisulfides derived from the essential oil of garlic. The structures of the compounds under study were characterized by means of calculated physicochemical parameters and several nonempirical descriptors, such as topological, geometrical, and quantum chemical indices. The results obtained indicate that the inhibitory activity is strongly dependent on the ability of the compounds to participate in dispersive interactions with the enzyme, as expressed by the solvent-accessible surface area (SASA) and the average distance/distance degree descriptor (ADDD) index. On the other hand, the high contribution of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbit term (LUMO) in the PLS models derived for the di- and trisulfides suggests that the solute's electron-acceptor capacity plays a fundamental role in the inhibitory activity exhibited for these compounds. Finally, the geometric features as expressed by the shape parameters included in the models indicate a low but not negligible positive contribution of molecular linearity in the enzyme-inhibitor binding. In summary, the developed quantitative structure-activity relationship approach successfully accounts for the potencies of organosulfur compounds acting on soybean 15-lipoxygenase and thereby offers both a guide for the synthesis of new compounds and a hypothesis for the molecular basis of their activity.

  4. Quantitative high-throughput screening: A titration-based approach that efficiently identifies biological activities in large chemical libraries

    PubMed Central

    Inglese, James; Auld, Douglas S.; Jadhav, Ajit; Johnson, Ronald L.; Simeonov, Anton; Yasgar, Adam; Zheng, Wei; Austin, Christopher P.

    2006-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) of chemical compounds to identify modulators of molecular targets is a mainstay of pharmaceutical development. Increasingly, HTS is being used to identify chemical probes of gene, pathway, and cell functions, with the ultimate goal of comprehensively delineating relationships between chemical structures and biological activities. Achieving this goal will require methodologies that efficiently generate pharmacological data from the primary screen and reliably profile the range of biological activities associated with large chemical libraries. Traditional HTS, which tests compounds at a single concentration, is not suited to this task, because HTS is burdened by frequent false positives and false negatives and requires extensive follow-up testing. We have developed a paradigm, quantitative HTS (qHTS), tested with the enzyme pyruvate kinase, to generate concentration–response curves for >60,000 compounds in a single experiment. We show that this method is precise, refractory to variations in sample preparation, and identifies compounds with a wide range of activities. Concentration–response curves were classified to rapidly identify pyruvate kinase activators and inhibitors with a variety of potencies and efficacies and elucidate structure–activity relationships directly from the primary screen. Comparison of qHTS with traditional single-concentration HTS revealed a high prevalence of false negatives in the single-point screen. This study demonstrates the feasibility of qHTS for accurately profiling every compound in large chemical libraries (>105 compounds). qHTS produces rich data sets that can be immediately mined for reliable biological activities, thereby providing a platform for chemical genomics and accelerating the identification of leads for drug discovery. PMID:16864780

  5. Screening Active Compounds from Garcinia Species Native to China Reveals Novel Compounds Targeting the STAT/JAK Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Linfeng; Lao, Yuanzhi; Zhao, Yanhui; Qin, Jian; Fu, Wenwei; Zhang, Yingjia; Xu, Hongxi

    2015-01-01

    Natural compounds from medicinal plants are important resources for drug development. In a panel of human tumor cells, we screened a library of the natural products from Garcinia species which have anticancer potential to identify new potential therapeutic leads and discovered that caged xanthones were highly effective at suppressing multiple cancer cell lines. Their anticancer activities mainly depended on apoptosis pathways. For compounds in sensitive cancer line, their mechanisms of mode of action were evaluated. 33-Hydroxyepigambogic acid and 35-hydroxyepigambogic acid exhibited about 1 μM IC50 values against JAK2/JAK3 kinases and less than 1 μM IC50 values against NCI-H1650 cell which autocrined IL-6. Thus these two compounds provided a new antitumor molecular scaffold. Our report describes 33-hydroxyepigambogic acid and 35-hydroxyepigambogic acid that inhibited NCI-H1650 cell growth by suppressing constitutive STAT3 activation via direct inhibition of JAK kinase activity.

  6. Biocidal Compounds from Mentha sp. Essential Oils and Their Structure-Activity Relationships.

    PubMed

    Kimbaris, Athanasios C; González-Coloma, Azucena; Andrés, Maria Fe; Vidali, Veroniki P; Polissiou, Moschos G; Santana-Méridas, Omar

    2017-03-01

    Essential oils from Greek Mentha species showed different chemical compositions for two populations of M. pulegium, characterized by piperitone and pulegone. Mentha spicata essential oil was characterized by endocyclic piperitenone epoxide, piperitone epoxide, and carvone. The bioactivities of these essential oils and their components have been tested against insect pests (Leptinotarsa decemlineata, Spodoptera littoralis and Myzus persicae), root-knot nematodes (Meloydogine javanica) and plants (Lactuca sativa, Lolium perenne, Solanum lycopersicum). The structure-activity relationships of these compounds have been studied including semi-synthetic endocyclic trans-carvone epoxide, exocyclic carvone epoxide, a new exocyclic piperitenone epoxide and trans-pulegone epoxide. Leptinotarsa decemlineata feeding was affected by piperitenone and piperitone epoxide. Spodoptera littoralis was affected by piperitone epoxide and pulegone. The strongest nematicidal agent was piperitenone epoxide, followed by piperitone epoxide, piperitenone and carvone. Germination of S. lycopersicum and L. perenne was significantly affected by piperitenone epoxide. This compound and carvone epoxide inhibited L. perenne root and leaf growth. Piperitenone epoxide also inhibited the root growth of S. lycopersicum. The presence of a C(1) epoxide resulted in strong antifeedant, nematicidal and phytotoxic compounds regardless of the C(4) substituent. New natural crop protectants could be developed through appropriate structural modifications in the p-menthane skeleton.

  7. [Ajoene the main active compound of garlic (Allium sativum): a new antifungal agent].

    PubMed

    Ledezma, Eliades; Apitz-Castro, Rafael

    2006-06-01

    The curative properties of garlic in medicine have been known for a long time. But, it was only in the last three decades when garlic properties were seriously investigated confirming its potential as therapeutic agent. Allicin, ajoene, thiosulfinates and a wide range of other organosulphurate compounds, are known to be the constituents linked to the garlic properties. Regarding the biochemical properties of these compounds, ajoene [(E,Z)-4,5,9 Trithiadodeca 1,6,11 Triene 9-oxide] is stable in water, and it can be obtained by chemical synthesis. There is evidence that some of the garlic constituents exert a wide variety of effects on different biological systems. However, ajoene is the garlic compound related to more biological activities, as showed in in vitro and in vivo systems. Those studies found that ajoene has antithrombotic, anti-tumoral,antifungal, and antiparasitic effects. This study deals with a recently described antifungal property of ajoene, and its potential use in clinical trails to treat several fungal infections.

  8. Persistence of biologically active compounds in aquatic systems: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boelter, A.M.; Fernandez, J.D.; Meyer, J.S.; Sanchez, D.A.; Bergman, H.L.

    1986-11-01

    Waters collected from two study sites were tested for persistence of biologically active compounds as the waters percolated through experimental media. At the first site, the Paraho Lysimeter in Anvil Points, Colorado, two leachate samples (early and late flow in Spring 1983) were collected from each of four piles of processed oil shale overlain by different thicknesses of soil. Although water quality differed among samples, six of eight lysimeter leachates tested were acutely toxic to an aquatic invertebrate, Daphnia magna, and five were acutely toxic to fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Water collected from a modified in situ (MIS) retort was percolated through columns containing three different types of soil. Raw leachate from the MIS spent shale was acutely toxic to an aquatic invertebrate, Ceriodaphnia dubia. The toxicity of samples from nine pore volumes of retort water percolating through a column containing a sandy soil increased with successive pore volumes, but leachate toxicity never equaled the toxicity of the retort water. In contrast, the first pore volumes of retort water or reconstituted water leached through a sandy loam soil were more toxic than the retort water; however, the second pore volumes of leachates were not toxic. First pore volume leachates of retort water percolating through a sandy clay loam soil were much less toxic than the retort water; second pore volume leachates were not toxic.

  9. Identification and quantification of individual chemical compounds in biogenic secondary organic aerosols using GCxGC-VUV/EI-HRTOFMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, M.; Worton, D. R.; Isaacman, G. A.; Chan, A. W.; Ruehl, C.; Zhao, Y.; Wilson, K. R.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have adverse effects on human health and air quality and affect radiative forcing and thus climate. While the organic fraction of aerosols is substantial, the sources and chemistry leading to the formation of secondary organic aerosols are very poorly understood. Characterizing individual compounds present in organic aerosol provides insights into the sources, formation mechanisms and oxidative transformations that have taken place. Fifteen aerosol samples collected over a 5 day period at the Blodgett Forest Research Station in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, part of the Biosphere Effects on Aerosols and Photochemistry Experiment (BEARPEX) in July 2009, were analyzed using comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatography with high resolution time of flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-HRTOFMS). Approximately 600 compounds were observed in each sample as significant peaks in the chromatogram. Of these, around a third were identified by matching the unique electron ionization (EI) mass spectrum of each compound to the NIST library of characteristic fragmentation patterns. One filter sample was also analyzed using vacuum ultraviolet ionization (VUV) instead of EI. This 'soft' ionization technique results in much less fragmentation yielding the molecular ion of each compound, from which the exact mass was determined. If the formula of the EI library matched compound equaled the high mass resolution VUV molecular weight within a certain tolerance (< 30 ppm), then the library match was considered confirmed; 226 compounds were identified in this way. Using the VUV technique 234 additional compounds that were not in the EI mass spectral database were assigned chemical formulas based on the observed molecular weights. The chemical formulas in conjunction with the location of the compound in the GCxGC chromatogram were used to provide further classification of these compounds based on their likely functionalization. The broad array of observed oxygenated

  10. Chemical constituents of Phragmanthera austroarabica A. G. Mill and J. A. Nyberg with potent antioxidant activity

    PubMed Central

    Badr, Jihan M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Phragmanthera austroarabica A.G. Mill. and J. A. Nyberg is a semi parasitic plant belonging to family Loranthaceae. It was collected from Saudi Arabia. It is widely used in folk medicine among the kingdom in treatment of various diseases including diabetes mellitus. Objective: The total alcoholic extract of P. austroarabica collected from Saudi Arabia was investigated for the chemical structure and prominent biological activity of the main constituents. Materials and Methods: Isolation of the active constituents was performed using different chromatographic techniques including column chromatography packed with silica or sephadex and preparative thin layer chromatography. The structures of the isolated compounds were established based on different spectroscopic data as mass spectrum, one-dimensional and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (correlation spectroscopy, heteronuclear single quantum coherence, and heteronuclear multiple-bond correlation). Results: Phytochemical investigation of the plant resulted in isolation of 12 compounds. The isolated compounds were identified as chrysophanic acid, emodin, chrysophanic acid-8-O-glucoside, emodin-8-O-glucoside, pectolinarigenin, quercetin, dillenetin-3-O-glucoside, catechin, catechin-4’-O-gallate, methyl gallate, lupeol and ursolic acid. All the isolated phenolic compounds revealed significant free radical scavenging activities when tested using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl reagent. Conclusion: The antioxidant activities of the isolated compounds can justify the use of P. austroarabica in traditional medicine for treatment of diabetes and verify its possible application as an antihyperglycemic drug. PMID:26692747

  11. Evaluation of mycobactericidal activity of selected chemical disinfectants and antiseptics according to European standards

    PubMed Central

    Bocian, Ewa; Grzybowska, Wanda; Tyski, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background The history of the investigation of standardized mycobactericidal activity of disinfectants and antiseptics is not very long. There is growing interest among the manufacturers of disinfectants in carrying out research on the antimicrobial activities in accordance with European standards (EN). This research could facilitate the introduction of high-quality disinfectants to the market. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mycobactericidal activity of selected chemical disinfectants and antiseptics used in the medical and veterinary fields. Material/Methods This study included 19 products submitted to the National Medicines Institute in Poland for evaluation of mycobactericidal activity. These products contain in their composition active substances belonging to different chemical groups, including aldehydes, alcohols, amines, quaternary ammonium compounds, phenols, guanidine, and oxidizing compounds. This study, conducted according to the manufacturers’ description of the preparations, was carried out in accordance with European standards, which also met the Polish standards: PN-EN 14204: 2013, PN-EN 14348: 2006, and PN-EN 14563: 2012. Results Tested products for disinfection and antiseptics containing active substances from different chemical groups showed high mycobactericidal activity and met the requirements of the appropriate European standards in most cases. In the case of products containing guanidine and amine compounds, the concentration of active ingredients used in the test and the test conditions specified by the manufacturer did not provide the mycobactericidal activity required by the standards. Conclusions Prior to the launch of a new product on the market, it is important to establish the appropriate usage and testing conditions of the preparation, such as its practical concentration, contact time, and environment condition (clean or dirty). PMID:24755666

  12. Study of the volatile compounds and odor-active compounds of dry-cured Iberian ham extracted by SPME.

    PubMed

    del Pulgar, José Sánchez; García, Carmen; Reina, Raquel; Carrapiso, Ana I

    2013-06-01

    The volatile compounds and the most odor-active compounds of dry-cured Iberian ham were investigated by extracting them using a solid phase microextraction technique with a 2 cm Carboxen/PDMS/DVB fiber. The detection frequency method was applied to estimate the potential contribution of each compound to the odor of hams. Twenty-one volatile compounds were tentatively identified for the first time in dry-cured ham by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and eight in dry-cured Iberian ham. Gas chromatography-olfactometry allowed the identification for the first time of six compounds not previously reported as odorants of Iberian ham, and also two odorants were newly identified in dry-cured ham. According to the detection frequency method, the most odor active compounds found were 3-methylbutanoic acid (dirty sock-like smelling), hexanal (cut grass-like odor), 3-methylbutanal (sweaty and bitter almond-like odor), 2-methyl-3-furanthiol (toasted nuts-like odor) and 1-octen-3-one (mushroom-like odor).

  13. Bioactive Compounds and Antioxidant Activity in Different Types of Berries

    PubMed Central

    Skrovankova, Sona; Sumczynski, Daniela; Mlcek, Jiri; Jurikova, Tunde; Sochor, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Berries, especially members of several families, such as Rosaceae (strawberry, raspberry, blackberry), and Ericaceae (blueberry, cranberry), belong to the best dietary sources of bioactive compounds (BAC). They have delicious taste and flavor, have economic importance, and because of the antioxidant properties of BAC, they are of great interest also for nutritionists and food technologists due to the opportunity to use BAC as functional foods ingredients. The bioactive compounds in berries contain mainly phenolic compounds (phenolic acids, flavonoids, such as anthocyanins and flavonols, and tannins) and ascorbic acid. These compounds, either individually or combined, are responsible for various health benefits of berries, such as prevention of inflammation disorders, cardiovascular diseases, or protective effects to lower the risk of various cancers. In this review bioactive compounds of commonly consumed berries are described, as well as the factors influencing their antioxidant capacity and their health benefits. PMID:26501271

  14. Bioactive Compounds and Antioxidant Activity in Different Types of Berries.

    PubMed

    Skrovankova, Sona; Sumczynski, Daniela; Mlcek, Jiri; Jurikova, Tunde; Sochor, Jiri

    2015-10-16

    Berries, especially members of several families, such as Rosaceae (strawberry, raspberry, blackberry), and Ericaceae (blueberry, cranberry), belong to the best dietary sources of bioactive compounds (BAC). They have delicious taste and flavor, have economic importance, and because of the antioxidant properties of BAC, they are of great interest also for nutritionists and food technologists due to the opportunity to use BAC as functional foods ingredients. The bioactive compounds in berries contain mainly phenolic compounds (phenolic acids, flavonoids, such as anthocyanins and flavonols, and tannins) and ascorbic acid. These compounds, either individually or combined, are responsible for various health benefits of berries, such as prevention of inflammation disorders, cardiovascular diseases, or protective effects to lower the risk of various cancers. In this review bioactive compounds of commonly consumed berries are described, as well as the factors influencing their antioxidant capacity and their health benefits.

  15. Chemical Classification of Nearby Active Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aladro, R.; Martín, S.; Kramer, C.

    2015-12-01

    We present an unbiased λ=3 mm survey done with the IRAM 30 telescope towards the central parts of eight galaxies considered as archetypes of nearby starbursts, galaxies with an active galactic nucleus (AGN) and ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs). The spatial resolution range from ˜200 pc to ˜1.6 kpc, depending on the galaxy. We compare the abundances of thirty-seven species among the sample, and highlight the molecules that characterise the gas in each of them. These results can be very useful to prepare future interferometric observations of active galaxies.

  16. Analysis of essential oils from Voacanga africana seeds at different hydrodistillation extraction stages: chemical composition, antioxidant activity and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiong; Yang, Dongliang; Liu, Jiajia; Ren, Na

    2015-01-01

    In this study, essential oils from Voacanga africana seeds at different extraction stages were investigated. In the chemical composition analysis, 27 compounds representing 86.69-95.03% of the total essential oils were identified and quantified. The main constituents in essential oils were terpenoids, alcohols and fatty acids accounting for 15.03-24.36%, 21.57-34.43% and 33.06-57.37%, respectively. Moreover, the analysis also revealed that essential oils from different extraction stages possessed different chemical compositions. In the antioxidant evaluation, all analysed oils showed similar antioxidant behaviours, and the concentrations of essential oils providing 50% inhibition of DPPH-scavenging activity (IC50) were about 25 mg/mL. In the antimicrobial experiments, essential oils from different extraction stages exhibited different antimicrobial activities. The antimicrobial activity of oils was affected by extraction stages. By controlling extraction stages, it is promising to obtain essential oils with desired antimicrobial activities.

  17. Treatment with activated carbon and other adsorbents as an effective method for the removal of volatile compounds in agricultural distillates.

    PubMed

    Balcerek, Maria; Pielech-Przybylska, Katarzyna; Patelski, Piotr; Dziekońska-Kubczak, Urszula; Jusel, Tomaš

    2017-02-08

    This study investigates the effect of treatment with activated carbon and other adsorbents on the chemical composition and organoleptics of a barley malt-based agricultural distillate. Contact with activated carbon is one of the methods by which the quality of raw distillates and spirit beverages can be improved. Samples placed in contact with 1 g activated carbon (SpiritFerm) per 100 ml distillate with ethanol content of 50% v/v for 1 h showed the largest reductions in the concentrations of most volatile compounds (aldehydes, alcohols, esters). Increasing the dose of adsorbent to over 1 g 100 ml(-1) did not improve the purity of the agricultural distillate significantly. Of the tested compounds, acetaldehyde and methanol showed the lowest adsorption on activated carbon. The lowest concentrations of these congeners (expressed in mg l(-1) alcohol 100% v/v) were measured in solutions with ethanol contents of 70-80% v/v, while solutions with an alcoholic strength by volume of 40% did not show statistically significant decreases in these compounds in relation the control sample. The reductions in volatile compounds were compared with those for other adsorbents based on silica or activated carbon and silica. An interesting alternative to activated carbon was found to be an adsorbent prepared from activated carbon and silica (Spiricol). Treatment with this adsorbent produced distillate with the lowest concentrations of acetaldehyde and isovaleraldehyde, and led to the greatest improvement in its organoleptics.

  18. Exploring new 129Xe chemical shift ranges in HXeY compounds: hydrogen more relativistic than xenon.

    PubMed

    Lantto, Perttu; Standara, Stanislav; Riedel, Sebastian; Vaara, Juha; Straka, Michal

    2012-08-21

    Among rare gases, xenon features an unusually broad nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift range in its compounds and as a non-bonded Xe atom introduced into different environments. In this work we show that (129)Xe NMR chemical shifts in the recently prepared, matrix-isolated xenon compounds appear in new, so far unexplored (129)Xe chemical shift ranges. State-of-the-art theoretical predictions of NMR chemical shifts in compounds of general formula HXeY (Y = H, F, Cl, Br, I, -CN, -NC, -CCH, -CCCCH, -CCCN, -CCXeH, -OXeH, -OH, -SH) as well as in the recently prepared ClXeCN and ClXeNC species are reported. The bonding situation of Xe in the studied compounds is rather different from the previously characterized cases as Xe appears in the electronic state corresponding to a situation with a low formal oxidation state, between I and II in these compounds. Accordingly, the predicted (129)Xe chemical shifts occur in new NMR ranges for this nucleus: ca. 500-1000 ppm (wrt Xe gas) for HXeY species and ca. 1100-1600 ppm for ClXeCN and ClXeNC. These new ranges fall between those corresponding to the weakly-bonded Xe(0) atom in guest-host systems (δ < 300 ppm) and in the hitherto characterized Xe molecules (δ > 2000 ppm). The importance of relativistic effects is discussed. Relativistic effects only slightly modulate the (129)Xe chemical shift that is obtained already at the nonrelativistic CCSD(T) level. In contrast, spin-orbit-induced shielding effects on the (1)H chemical shifts of the H1 atom directly bonded to the Xe center largely overwhelm the nonrelativistic deshielding effects. This leads to an overall negative (1)H chemical shift in the range between -5 and -25 ppm (wrt CH(4)). Thus, the relativistic effects induced by the heavy Xe atom appear considerably more important for the chemical shift of the neighbouring, light hydrogen atom than that of the Xe nucleus itself. The predicted NMR parameters facilitate an unambiguous experimental identification of

  19. Elevated levels of diesel range organic compounds in groundwater near Marcellus gas operations are derived from surface activities

    PubMed Central

    Drollette, Brian D.; Hoelzer, Kathrin; Warner, Nathaniel R.; Darrah, Thomas H.; Karatum, Osman; O’Connor, Megan P.; Nelson, Robert K.; Fernandez, Loretta A.; Reddy, Christopher M.; Vengosh, Avner; Jackson, Robert B.; Elsner, Martin; Plata, Desiree L.

    2015-01-01

    Hundreds of organic chemicals are used during natural gas extraction via high-volume hydraulic fracturing (HVHF). However, it is unclear whether these chemicals, injected into deep shale horizons, reach shallow groundwater aquifers and affect local water quality, either from those deep HVHF injection sites or from the surface or shallow subsurface. Here, we report detectable levels of organic compounds in shallow groundwater samples from private residential wells overlying the Marcellus Shale in northeastern Pennsylvania. Analyses of purgeable and extractable organic compounds from 64 groundwater samples revealed trace levels of volatile organic compounds, well below the Environmental Protection Agency’s maximum contaminant levels, and low levels of both gasoline range (0–8 ppb) and diesel range organic compounds (DRO; 0–157 ppb). A compound-specific analysis revealed the presence of bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, which is a disclosed HVHF additive, that was notably absent in a representative geogenic water sample and field blanks. Pairing these analyses with (i) inorganic chemical fingerprinting of deep saline groundwater, (ii) characteristic noble gas isotopes, and (iii) spatial relationships between active shale gas extraction wells and wells with disclosed environmental health and safety violations, we differentiate between a chemical signature associated with naturally occurring saline groundwater and one associated with alternative anthropogenic routes from the surface (e.g., accidental spills or leaks). The data support a transport mechanism of DRO to groundwater via accidental release of fracturing fluid chemicals derived from the surface rather than subsurface flow of these fluids from the underlying shale formation. PMID:26460018

  20. Identification of chemical modulators of the constitutive activated receptor (CAR) in a gene expression compendium

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Keiyu; Vasani, Naresh; Jones, Carlton; Moore, Tanya; Hester, Susan; Nesnow, Stephen; Auerbach, Scott; Geter, David R.; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Thomas, Russell S.; Applegate, Dawn; Klaassen, Curtis D.; Corton, J. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear receptor family member constitutive activated receptor (CAR) is activated by structurally diverse drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals leading to transcriptional regulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism and transport. Chronic activation of CAR increases liver cancer incidence in rodents, whereas suppression of CAR can lead to steatosis and insulin insensitivity. Here, analytical methods were developed to screen for chemical treatments in a gene expression compendium that lead to alteration of CAR activity. A gene expression biomarker signature of 83 CAR-dependent genes was identified using microarray profiles from the livers of wild-type and CAR-null mice after exposure to three structurally-diverse CAR activators (CITCO, phenobarbital, TCPOBOP). A rank-based algorithm (Running Fisher’s algorithm (p-value ≤ 10-4)) was used to evaluate the similarity between the CAR biomarker signature and a test set of 28 and 32 comparisons positive or negative, respectively, for CAR activation; the test resulted in a balanced accuracy of 97%. The biomarker signature was used to identify chemicals that activate or suppress CAR in an annotated mouse liver/primary hepatocyte gene expression database of ~1850 comparisons. CAR was activated by 1) activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in wild-type but not AhR-null mice, 2) pregnane X receptor (PXR) activators in wild-type and to lesser extents in PXR-null mice, and 3) activators of PPARα in wild-type and PPARα-null mice. CAR was consistently activated by five conazole fungicides and four perfluorinated compounds. Comparison of effects in wild-type and CAR-null mice showed that the fungicide propiconazole increased liver weight and hepatocyte proliferation in a CAR-dependent manner, whereas the perfluorinated compound perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) increased these endpoints in a CAR-independent manner. A number of compounds suppressed CAR coincident with increases in markers of

  1. Identification of chemical modulators of the constitutive activated receptor (CAR) in a gene expression compendium.

    PubMed

    Oshida, Keiyu; Vasani, Naresh; Jones, Carlton; Moore, Tanya; Hester, Susan; Nesnow, Stephen; Auerbach, Scott; Geter, David R; Aleksunes, Lauren M; Thomas, Russell S; Applegate, Dawn; Klaassen, Curtis D; Corton, J Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear receptor family member constitutive activated receptor (CAR) is activated by structurally diverse drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals leading to transcriptional regulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism and transport. Chronic activation of CAR increases liver cancer incidence in rodents, whereas suppression of CAR can lead to steatosis and insulin insensitivity. Here, analytical methods were developed to screen for chemical treatments in a gene expression compendium that lead to alteration of CAR activity. A gene expression biomarker signature of 83 CAR-dependent genes was identified using microarray profiles from the livers of wild-type and CAR-null mice after exposure to three structurally-diverse CAR activators (CITCO, phenobarbital, TCPOBOP). A rank-based algorithm (Running Fisher's algorithm (p-value ≤ 10(-4))) was used to evaluate the similarity between the CAR biomarker signature and a test set of 28 and 32 comparisons positive or negative, respectively, for CAR activation; the test resulted in a balanced accuracy of 97%. The biomarker signature was used to identify chemicals that activate or suppress CAR in an annotated mouse liver/primary hepatocyte gene expression database of ~1850 comparisons. CAR was activated by 1) activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in wild-type but not AhR-null mice, 2) pregnane X receptor (PXR) activators in wild-type and to lesser extents in PXR-null mice, and 3) activators of PPARα in wild-type and PPARα-null mice. CAR was consistently activated by five conazole fungicides and four perfluorinated compounds. Comparison of effects in wild-type and CAR-null mice showed that the fungicide propiconazole increased liver weight and hepatocyte proliferation in a CAR-dependent manner, whereas the perfluorinated compound perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) increased these endpoints in a CAR-independent manner. A number of compounds suppressed CAR coincident with increases in markers of

  2. Soft antimicrobial agents: synthesis and activity of labile environmentally friendly long chain quaternary ammonium compounds.

    PubMed

    Thorsteinsson, Thorsteinn; Másson, Már; Kristinsson, Karl G; Hjálmarsdóttir, Martha A; Hilmarsson, Hilmar; Loftsson, Thorsteinn

    2003-09-11

    A series of soft quaternary ammonium antimicrobial agents, which are analogues to currently used quaternary ammonium preservatives such as cetyl pyridinium chloride and benzalkonium chloride, were synthesized. These soft analogues consist of long alkyl chain connected to a polar headgroup via chemically labile spacer group. They are characterized by facile nonenzymatic and enzymatic degradation to form their original nontoxic building blocks. However, their chemical stability has to be adequate in order for them to have antimicrobial effects. Stability studies and antibacterial and antiviral activity measurements revealed relationship between activity, lipophilicity, and stability. Their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was as low as 1 microg/mL, and their viral reduction was in some cases greater than 6.7 log. The structure-activity studies demonstrate that the bioactive compounds (i.e., MIC for Gram-positive bacteria of <10 microg/mL) have an alkyl chain length between 12 and 18 carbon atoms, with a polar headgroup preferably of a small quaternary ammonium group, and their acquired inactivation half-life must be greater than 3 h at 60 degrees C.

  3. Survey of compounds which have been tested for carcinogenic activity. Cumulative indexes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The volume includes a Cumulative Chemical Name Index containing all chemical names, both common names and CAS preferred names, used in all volumes of the PHS-149 series in alphabetical order. The chemical accession numbers for the PHS-149 volumes in which each chemical appears accompanying each chemical name. In addition to the Cumulative Chemical Name Index, the volume includes a Cumulative CAS Registry Number Index. The index includes all available CAS Registry Numbers listed sequentially with the chemical accession number for each PHS-149 volume in which the chemical is found. Thus, the user can use both chemical name and/or CAS Registry Number to search the PHS-149 volumes for information on a compound.

  4. Hydrazine bisalane is a potential compound for chemical hydrogen storage. A theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Vinh Son; Swinnen, Saartje; Leszczynski, Jerzy; Nguyen, Minh Tho

    2011-09-14

    Electronic structure calculations suggest that hydrazine bisalane (AlH(3)NH(2)NH(2)AlH(3), alhyzal) is a promising compound for chemical hydrogen storage (CHS). Calculations are carried out using the coupled-cluster theory CCSD(T) with the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set. Potential energy surfaces are constructed to probe the formation of, and hydrogen release from, hydrazine bisalane which is initially formed from the reaction of hydrazine with dialane. Molecular and electronic characteristics of both gauche and trans alhyzal are determined for the first time. The gauche hydrazine bisalane is formed from starting reactants hydrazine + dialane following a movement of an AlH(3) group from AlH(3)AlH(3)NH(2)NH(2) rather than by a direct attachment of a separate AlH(3) group, generated by predissociation of dialane, to AlH(3)NH(2)NH(2). The energy barriers for dehydrogenation processes from gauche and transalhyzal are in the range of 21-28 kcal mol(-1), which are substantially smaller than those of ca. 40 kcal mol(-1) previously determined for the isovalent hydrazine bisborane (bhyzb) system. H(2) release from hydrazine bisalane is thus more favored over that from hydrazine bisborane, making the Al derivative an alternative candidate for CHS.

  5. Tuning the ferromagnetic phase in the CDW compound SmNiC2 via chemical alloying.

    PubMed

    Prathiba, G; Kim, I; Shin, S; Strychalska, J; Klimczuk, T; Park, T

    2016-05-25

    We report a study on tuning the charge density wave (CDW) ferromagnet SmNiC2 to a weakly coupled superconductor by substituting La for Sm. X-ray diffraction measurements show that the doped compounds obey Vegard's law, where La (Lu) alloying expands (shrinks) the lattice due to its larger (smaller) atomic size than Sm. In the series Sm1-xLaxNiC2, CDW transition (TCDW = 148 K) for SmNiC2 is gradually suppressed, while the ferromagnetic (FM) ordering temperature (TC) at 17 K slightly increases up to x = 0.3. For x > 0.3, TC starts to decrease and there is no signature that could be related with the CDW phase. Electrical resistivity, magnetic susceptibility and specific heat measurements point toward the possible presence of a FM quantum critical point (QCP) near x = 0.92, where the TC is extrapolated to zero temperature. Superconductivity in LaNiC2 (Tsc = 2.9 K) is completely suppressed with small amount of Sm inclusion near the proposed FM critical point, indicating a competition between the two ordered phases. The tunable lattice parameters via chemical substitution (La,Lu) and the ensuing change among the ordered phases of ferromagnetism, CDW and superconductivity underscores that SmNiC2 provides a rich avenue to study the rare example of a FM QCP, where the broken symmetries are intricately correlated.

  6. Two-dimensional carbon compounds derived from graphyne with chemical properties superior to those of graphene.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jia-Jia; Zhao, Xiang; Zhao, Yuliang; Gao, Xingfa

    2013-01-01

    Computational studies considering both thermodynamic and kinetic aspects revealed that graphyne, a carbon material that has recently been of increasing interest, favours unprecedented homogeneous "in-plane" addition reactions. The addition of dichlorocarbene to the C(sp)-C(sp) bond, a site with outstanding regioselectivity in graphyne, proceeds via a stepwise mechanism. Due to their homogeneous nature, additions occurring at C(sp)-C(sp) bonds yield structurally ordered two-dimensional carbon compounds (2DCCs). 2DCCs have electronic band structures near the Fermi level that are similar to those of graphene and are either electrically semi-conductive or metallic depending on whether the reactions break the hexagonal symmetry. Notably, 2DCCs can be further functionalised through substitution reactions with little damage to the extended π-electron conjugation system. These results suggest that 2DCCs derived from graphyne have physical properties comparable to those of graphene and chemical properties superior to those of graphene. Therefore, 2DCCs are expected to be better suited to practical applications.

  7. Immunological mechanisms of adaptation to the low-weight chemical compounds in ontogenesis.

    PubMed

    Glushkov, A N

    2003-09-01

    It is postulated that adaptation to the low-weight chemical compounds includes six consistent ontogenetic periods: the reciprocal selection of the marriage partners; the maturation of the gametes; the formation of the zygote; the development of the fetus; the birth and nursing of the child; and the sexual maturation of a human being. The main immunological parts of adaptation are: the antibodies to the low-weight xeno- and endobiotics; the reciprocal immune-like recognition of the maternal and paternal gametes; and the maternal immune reaction on the paternal histocompatibility antigens of the fetus. The main immunological mechanisms of adaptation are: the promotion of the selectivity in the smell recognition of the marriage partners by the antibodies to the xeno- and endobiotics expanding the individual spectrum of their metabolites; the inhibition of the xenobiotic genotoxic action on the gametes, fetus and child by the antibodies; the prevention of the development of gene-damaged gametes and fetus by antibodies to the sexual hormones; and the immune preservation (elimination) of the heterozygote (homozygote) fetus.

  8. Detection of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Activation by Some Chemicals in Food Using a Reporter Gene Assay

    PubMed Central

    Amakura, Yoshiaki; Tsutsumi, Tomoaki; Yoshimura, Morio; Nakamura, Masafumi; Handa, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Rieko; Teshima, Reiko; Watanabe, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether a simple bioassay used for the detection of dioxins (DXNs) could be applied to detect trace amounts of harmful DXN-like substances in food products. To identify substances with possible DXN-like activity, we assessed the ability of various compounds in the environment to bind the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) that binds specifically to DXNs. The compounds tested included 19 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), 20 PAH derivatives (nitrated, halogenated, and aminated derivatives), 23 pesticides, six amino acids, and eight amino acid metabolites. The AhR binding activities (AhR activity) of these compounds were measured using the chemical activated luciferase gene expression (CALUX) reporter gene assay system. The majority of the PAHs exhibited marked AhR activity that increased in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, there was a positive link between AhR activity and the number of aromatic rings in the PAH derivatives. Conversely, there appeared to be a negative correlation between AhR activity and the number of chlorine residues present on halogenated PAH derivatives. However, there was no correlation between AhR activity and the number and position of substituents among nitrated and aminated derivatives. Among the pesticides tested, the indole-type compounds carbendazim and thiabendazole showed high levels of activity. Similarly, the indole compound tryptamine was the only amino acid metabolite to induce AhR activity. The results are useful in understanding the identification and characterization of AhR ligands in the CALUX assay. PMID:28231110

  9. Coordination compounds of tetravalent silicon, germanium and tin: the structure, chemical bonding and intermolecular interactions in them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korlyukov, A. A.

    2015-04-01

    The review is devoted to analysis and generalization of the results of (i) quantum chemical studies on the structure, chemical bonding and intermolecular interactions in coordination compounds of tetravalent silicon, germanium and tin in crystals, in solutions and in the gas phase and (ii) experimental investigations of the electron density distribution in these systems. The bibliography includes 147 references. In memoriam of Corresponding Member of the Russian Academy of Sciences M Yu Antipin (1951 - 2013), Academician of the Russian Academy of Sciences M G Voronkov (1921 - 2014) and Dr. S P Knyazev, Lomonosov Moscow University of Fine Chemical Technology (1949 - 2012).

  10. USE OF BIOASSAY-DIRECTED CHEMICAL ANALYSIS FOR IDENTIFYING MUTAGENIC COMPOUNDS IN URBAN AIR AND COMBUSTION EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioassay-directed chemical analysis fractionation has been used for 30 years to identify mutagenic classes of compounds in complex mixtures. Most studies have used the Salmonella (Ames) mutagenicity assay, and we have recently applied this methodology to two standard reference sa...

  11. Gas and Chemical Activation of Charcoal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1945-06-29

    supplemented ’ by runs in the laboratory has shown that zinc chloride is by far the most suitable activating agent. 1. In the dehydration mixing of...istics with time of dehydration . 3. The physical appearance of the mixture during the impregnation pperation provides sufficient significant information...to enable the operator to predict .mechanical characteristics of the briquet. CONFIDENTIAL " • ’< i£: • CONFIDENTIAL -4- 4* In the dehydration

  12. A review on antifungal activity of mushroom (basidiomycetes) extracts and isolated compounds.

    PubMed

    Alves, Maria José; Ferreira, Isabel C F R; Dias, Joana; Teixeira, Vânia; Martins, Anabela; Pintado, Manuela

    2013-01-01

    The present review reports the antifungal activity of mushroom extracts and isolated compounds including high (e.g. peptides and proteins) and low (e.g. sesquiterpenes and other terpenes, steroids, organic acids, acylcyclopentenediones and quinolines) molecular weight compounds. Most of the studies available on literature focused on screening of antifungal activity of mushroom extracts, rather than of isolated compounds. Data indicate that mushroom extracts are mainly tested against different Candida species, while mushroom compounds are mostly tested upon other fungi. Therefore, the potential of these compounds might be more useful in food industry than in clinics. Oudemansiella canarii and Agaricus bisporus methanolic extracts proved to be the most active mushroom extracts against Candida spp. Grifolin, isolated from Albatrellus dispansus, seemed to be the most active compound against phytopathogenic fungi. Further studies should be performed in order to better understand the mechanism of action of this and other antifungal compounds as well as safety issues.

  13. Inhibitors of VIM-2 by screening pharmacologically active and click-chemistry compound libraries.

    PubMed

    Minond, Dmitriy; Saldanha, S Adrian; Subramaniam, Prem; Spaargaren, Michael; Spicer, Timothy; Fotsing, Joseph R; Weide, Timo; Fokin, Valery V; Sharpless, K Barry; Galleni, Moreno; Bebrone, Carine; Lassaux, Patricia; Hodder, Peter

    2009-07-15

    VIM-2 is an Ambler class B metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL) capable of hydrolyzing a broad-spectrum of beta-lactam antibiotics. Although the discovery and development of MBL inhibitors continue to be an area of active research, an array of potent, small molecule inhibitors is yet to be fully characterized for VIM-2. In the presented research, a compound library screening approach was used to identify and characterize VIM-2 inhibitors from a library of pharmacologically active compounds as well as a focused 'click' chemistry library. The four most potent VIM-2 inhibitors resulting from a VIM-2 screen were characterized by kinetic studies in order to determine K(i) and mechanism of enzyme inhibition. As a result, two previously described pharmacologic agents, mitoxantrone (1,4-dihydroxy-5,8-bis([2-([2-hydroxyethyl]amino)ethyl]amino)-9,10-anthracenedione) and 4-chloromercuribenzoic acid (pCMB) were found to be active, the former as a non-competitive inhibitor (K(i)=K(i)(')=1.5+/-0.2microM) and the latter as a slowly reversible or irreversible inhibitor. Additionally, two novel sulfonyl-triazole analogs from the click library were identified as potent, competitive VIM-2 inhibitors: N-((4-((but-3-ynyloxy)methyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-5-yl)methyl)-4-iodobenzenesulfonamide (1, K(i)=0.41+/-0.03microM) and 4-iodo-N-((4-(methoxymethyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-5-yl)methyl)benzenesulfonamide (2, K(i)=1.4+/-0.10microM). Mitoxantrone and pCMB were also found to potentiate imipenem efficacy in MIC and synergy assays employing Escherichia coli. Taken together, all four compounds represent useful chemical probes to further investigate mechanisms of VIM-2 inhibition in biochemical and microbiology-based assays.

  14. Characteristics, chemical compositions and biological activities of propolis from Al-Bahah, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Elnakady, Yasser A.; Rushdi, Ahmed I.; Franke, Raimo; Abutaha, Nael; Ebaid, Hossam; Baabbad, Mohannad; Omar, Mohamed O. M.; Al Ghamdi, Ahmad A.

    2017-01-01

    Propolis has been used to treat several diseases since ancient times, and is an important source of bioactive natural compounds and drug derivatives. These properties have kept the interest of investigators around the world, leading to the investigation of the chemical and biological properties and application of propolis. In this report, the chemical constituents that are responsible for the anticancer activities of propolis were analyzed. The propolis was sourced from Al-Baha in the southern part of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Standard protocols for chemical fractionation and bioactivity-guided chemical analysis were used to identify the bio-active ethyl acetate fraction. The extraction was performed in methanol and then analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The major compounds are triterpenoids, with a relative concentration of 74.0%; steroids, with a relative concentration of 9.8%; and diterpenoids, with a relative concentration of 7.9%. The biological activity was characterized using different approaches and cell-based assays. Propolis was found to inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manner through apoptosis. Immunofluorescence staining with anti-α-tubulin antibodies and cell cycle analysis indicated that tubulin and/or microtubules are the cellular targets of the L-acetate fraction. This study demonstrates the importance of Saudi propolis as anti-cancer drug candidates. PMID:28165013

  15. Characteristics, chemical compositions and biological activities of propolis from Al-Bahah, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elnakady, Yasser A.; Rushdi, Ahmed I.; Franke, Raimo; Abutaha, Nael; Ebaid, Hossam; Baabbad, Mohannad; Omar, Mohamed O. M.; Al Ghamdi, Ahmad A.

    2017-02-01

    Propolis has been used to treat several diseases since ancient times, and is an important source of bioactive natural compounds and drug derivatives. These properties have kept the interest of investigators around the world, leading to the investigation of the chemical and biological properties and application of propolis. In this report, the chemical constituents that are responsible for the anticancer activities of propolis were analyzed. The propolis was sourced from Al-Baha in the southern part of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Standard protocols for chemical fractionation and bioactivity-guided chemical analysis were used to identify the bio-active ethyl acetate fraction. The extraction was performed in methanol and then analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The major compounds are triterpenoids, with a relative concentration of 74.0%; steroids, with a relative concentration of 9.8%; and diterpenoids, with a relative concentration of 7.9%. The biological activity was characterized using different approaches and cell-based assays. Propolis was found to inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manner through apoptosis. Immunofluorescence staining with anti-α-tubulin antibodies and cell cycle analysis indicated that tubulin and/or microtubules are the cellular targets of the L-acetate fraction. This study demonstrates the importance of Saudi propolis as anti-cancer drug candidates.

  16. 75 FR 69630 - Impact of Implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention on Commercial Activities Involving...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ...-0543-02] Impact of Implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention on Commercial Activities Involving... Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC), through the Chemical Weapons Convention Implementation Act (CWCIA) and the Chemical Weapons Convention Regulations (CWCR), has had on commercial activities...

  17. Drug-like annotation and duplicate analysis of a 23-supplier chemical database totalling 2.7 million compounds.

    PubMed

    Baurin, N; Baker, R; Richardson, C; Chen, I; Foloppe, N; Potter, A; Jordan, A; Roughley, S; Parratt, M; Greaney, P; Morley, D; Hubbard, R E

    2004-01-01

    We have implemented five drug-like filters, based on 1D and 2D molecular descriptors, and applied them to characterize the drug-like properties of commercially available chemical compounds. In addition to previously published filters (Lipinski and Veber), we implemented a filter for medicinal chemistry tractability based on lists of chemical features drawn up by a panel of medicinal chemists. A filter based on the modeling of aqueous solubility (>1 microM) was derived in-house, as well as another based on the modeling of Caco-2 passive membrane permeability (>10 nm/s). A library of 2.7 million compounds was collated from the 23 compound suppliers and analyzed with these filters, highlighting a tendency toward highly lipophilic compounds. The library contains 1.6 M unique structures, of which 37% (607,223) passed all five drug-like filters. None of the 23 suppliers provides all the members of the drug-like subset, emphasizing the benefit of considering compounds from various compound suppliers as a source of diversity for drug discovery.

  18. Essential Oil Composition of Phagnalon sordidum (L.) from Corsica, Chemical Variability and Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Brunel, Marion; Vitrac, Caroline; Costa, Jean; Mzali, Fatima; Vitrac, Xavier; Muselli, Alain

    2016-03-01

    The chemical composition of Phagnalon sordidum (L.) essential oil was investigated for the first time using gas chromatography and chromatography/mass spectrometry. Seventy-six compounds, which accounted for 87.9% of the total amount, were identified in a collective essential oil of P. sordidum from Corsica. The main essential oil components were (E)-β-caryophyllene (14.4%), β-pinene (11.0%), thymol (9.0%), and hexadecanoic acid (5.3%). The chemical compositions of essential oils from 19 Corsican locations were investigated. The study of the chemical variability using statistical analysis allowed identifying direct correlation between the three populations of P. sordidum widespread in Corsica and the essential oil compositions they produce. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of P. sordidum essential oil was evaluated and it exhibited a notable activity on a large panel of clinically significant microorganisms.

  19. Computer-assisted mechanistic structure-activity studies: application to diverse classes of chemical carcinogens.

    PubMed Central

    Loew, G H; Poulsen, M; Kirkjian, E; Ferrell, J; Sudhindra, B S; Rebagliati, M

    1985-01-01

    In the first part of this paper we have indicated how the techniques and capabilities of theoretical chemistry, together with experimental results, can be used in a mechanistic approach to structure-activity studies of toxicity. In the second part, we have illustrated how this computer-assisted approach has been used to identify and calculate causally related molecular indicators of relative carcinogenic activity in five classes of chemical carcinogens: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and their methyl derivatives, aromatic amines, chloroethanes, chloroalkenes and dialkyl nitrosamines. In each class of chemicals studied, candidate molecular indicators have been identified that could be useful in predictive screening of unknown compounds. In addition, further insights into some mechanistic aspects of chemical carcinogenesis have been obtained. Finally, experiments have been suggested to both verify the usefulness of the indicators and test their mechanistic implications. PMID:3905382

  20. C15078. Essential oil composition of Phagnalon sordidum (L.) from Corsica, chemical variability and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Brunel, Marion; Vitrac, Caroline; Costa, Jean; Mzali, Fatima; Vitrac, Xavier; Muselli, Alain

    2016-02-10

    The chemical composition of Phagnalon sordidum (L.) essential oil was investigated for the first time using gas chromatography and chromatography-mass spectrometry. Seventy-six compounds, which accounted for 87.9% of the total amount, were identified in a collective essential oil of P. sordidum from Corsica. The main essential oil components were (E)-β-caryophyllene (14.4%), β-pinene (11.0%), thymol (9.0%), and hexadecanoic acid (5.3%). The chemical compositions of essential oils from 19 Corsican locations were investigated. The study of the chemical variability using statistical analysis allowed identifying direct correlation between the three populations of P. sordidum widespread in Corsica and the essential oil compositions they produce. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of P. sordidum essential oil was evaluated and exhibited a notable activity on a large panel of clinically significant microorganisms. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Human Health Relevance of Pharmaceutically Active Compounds in Drinking Water.

    PubMed

    Khan, Usman; Nicell, Jim

    2015-05-01

    In Canada, as many as 20 pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) have been detected in samples of treated drinking water. The presence of these PhACs in drinking water raises important questions as to the human health risk posed by their potential appearance in drinking water supplies and the extent to which they indicate that other PhACs are present but have not been detected using current analytical methods. Therefore, the goal of the current investigation was to conduct a screening-level assessment of the human health risks posed by the aquatic release of an evaluation set of 335 selected PhACs. Predicted and measured concentrations were used to estimate the exposure of Canadians to each PhAC in the evaluation set. Risk evaluations based on measurements could only be performed for 17 PhACs and, of these, all were found to pose a negligible risk to human health when considered individually. The same approach to risk evaluation, but based on predicted rather than measured environmental concentrations, suggested that 322 PhACs of the evaluation set, when considered individually, are expected to pose a negligible risk to human health due to their potential presence in drinking waters. However, the following 14 PhACs should be prioritized for further study: triiodothyronine, thyroxine, ramipril and its metabolite ramiprilat, candesartan, lisinopril, atorvastatin, lorazepam, fentanyl, atenolol, metformin, enalaprilat, morphine, and irbesartan. Finally, the currently available monitoring data for PhACs in Canadian surface and drinking waters was found to be lacking, irrespective of whether their suitability was assessed based on risk posed, predicted exposure concentrations, or potency.

  2. Estimating Air Chemical Emissions from Research Activities Using Stack Measurement Data

    SciTech Connect

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Duchsherer, Cheryl J.; Woodruff, Rodger K.; Larson, Timothy V.

    2013-02-15

    Current methods of estimating air emissions from research and development (R&D) activities use a wide range of release fractions or emission factors with bases ranging from empirical to semi-empirical. Although considered conservative, the uncertainties and confidence levels of the existing methods have not been reported. Chemical emissions were estimated from sampling data taken from four research facilities over ten years. The approach was to use a Monte Carlo technique to create distributions of annual emission estimates for target compounds detected in source test samples. Distributions were created for each year and building sampled for compounds with sufficient detection frequency to qualify for the analysis. The results using the Monte Carlo technique without applying a filter to remove negative emission values showed almost all distributions spanning zero, and forty percent of the distributions having a negative mean. This indicates that emissions are so low as to be indistinguishable from building background. Application of a filter to allow only positive values in the distribution provided a more realistic value for emissions and increased the distribution mean by an average of sixteen percent. Release fractions were calculated by dividing the emission estimates by a building chemical inventory quantity. Two variations were used for this quantity: chemical usage, and chemical usage plus one-half standing inventory. Filters were applied so that only release fraction values from zero to one were included in the resulting distributions. Release fractions had a wide range among chemicals and among data sets for different buildings and/or years for a given chemical. Regressions of release fractions to molecular weight and vapor pressure showed weak correlations. Similarly, regressions of mean emissions to chemical usage, chemical inventory, molecular weight and vapor pressure also gave weak correlations. These results highlight the difficulties in estimating

  3. SYNTHESIZING ORGANIC COMPOUNDS USING LIGHT-ACTIVATED TIO2

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-value organic compounds have been synthesized successfully from linear and cyclic hydrocarbons, by photocatalytic oxidation using a semiconductor material, titanium dioxide (TiO2). Various hydrocarbons were partially oxgenated in both liquid and gaseous phase reactors usi...

  4. Acquisition of Compound Words in Chinese-English Bilingual Children: Decomposition and Cross-Language Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Chenxi; Wang, Min; Perfetti, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated compound processing and cross-language activation in a group of Chinese-English bilingual children, and they were divided into four groups based on the language proficiency levels in their two languages. A lexical decision task was designed using compound words in both languages. The compound words in one language contained…

  5. SARANEA: a freely available program to mine structure-activity and structure-selectivity relationship information in compound data sets.

    PubMed

    Lounkine, Eugen; Wawer, Mathias; Wassermann, Anne Mai; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    We introduce SARANEA, an open-source Java application for interactive exploration of structure-activity relationship (SAR) and structure-selectivity relationship (SSR) information in compound sets of any source. SARANEA integrates various SAR and SSR analysis functions and utilizes a network-like similarity graph data structure for visualization. The program enables the systematic detection of activity and selectivity cliffs and corresponding key compounds across multiple targets. Advanced SAR analysis functions implemented in SARANEA include, among others, layered chemical neighborhood graphs, cliff indices, selectivity trees, editing functions for molecular networks and pathways, bioactivity summaries of key compounds, and markers for bioactive compounds having potential side effects. We report the application of SARANEA to identify SAR and SSR determinants in different sets of serine protease inhibitors. It is found that key compounds can influence SARs and SSRs in rather different ways. Such compounds and their SAR/SSR characteristics can be systematically identified and explored using SARANEA. The program and source code are made freely available under the GNU General Public License.

  6. Medicinal plants and their isolated compounds showing anti-Trichomonas vaginalis- activity.

    PubMed

    Mehriardestani, Mozhgan; Aliahmadi, Atousa; Toliat, Tayebeh; Rahimi, Roja

    2017-04-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a major of non-viral sexually-transmitted infection and an important cause of serious obstetrical and gynecological complications. Treatment options for trichomoniasis are limited to nitroimidazole compounds. The increasing resistance and allergic reactions to nitroimidazole and recurrent trichomoniasis make it essential to identify and develop new drugs against trichomoniasis. Medicinal plants are an important source for discovery of new medications. This review discusses the anti-trichomonas effects of medicinal plants and their chemical constituents to find better options against this pathogenic protozoon. Electronic databases were searched to collect all data from the year 2000 through September 2015 for in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies on the effect of medicinal plants on T. vaginalis. A total of 95 in vitro and clinical studies were identified. Only four human studies were found in this review. The Asteracea, Lamiaceae and Myrtaceae families contained the greatest number of plants with anti-trichomonas activity. Persea americana, Ocimum basilicum and Verbascum thapsus were the most efficacious against T. vaginalis. Plant metabolites containing alkaloids, isoflavonoid glucosides, essential oils, lipids, saponins and sesquiterpene lactones were found to possess anti-trichomonas properties. Assessing the structure-activity of highly-potent anti-trichomonas phytochemicals is suggested for finding natural, semisynthetic and synthetic anti-trichomonas compounds. Further clinical studies are necessary for confirmation of natural anti-trichomonas substances and completion of their safety profiles.

  7. Computational reverse chemical ecology: Virtual screening and predicting behaviorally active semiochemicals for Bactrocera dorsalis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Semiochemical is a generic term used for a chemical substance that influences the behaviour of an organism. It is a common term used in the field of chemical ecology to encompass pheromones, allomones, kairomones, attractants and repellents. Insects have mastered the art of using semiochemicals as communication signals and rely on them to find mates, host or habitat. This dependency of insects on semiochemicals has allowed chemical ecologists to develop environment friendly pest management strategies. However, discovering semiochemicals is a laborious process that involves a plethora of behavioural and analytical techniques, making it expansively time consuming. Recently, reverse chemical ecology approach using odorant binding proteins (OBPs) as target for elucidating behaviourally active compounds is gaining eminence. In this scenario, we describe a “computational reverse chemical ecology” approach for rapid screening of potential semiochemicals. Results We illustrate the high prediction accuracy of our computational method. We screened 25 semiochemicals for their binding potential to a GOBP of B. dorsalis using molecular docking (in silico) and molecular dynamics. Parallely, compounds were subjected to fluorescent quenching assays (Experimental). The correlation between in silico and experimental data were significant (r2 = 0.9408; P < 0.0001). Further, predicted compounds were subjected to behavioral bioassays and were found to be highly attractive to insects. Conclusions The present study provides a unique methodology for rapid screening and predicting behaviorally active semiochemicals. This methodology may be developed as a viable approach for prospecting active semiochemicals for pest control, which otherwise is a laborious process. PMID:24640964

  8. Valuable chemicals by the enzymatic modification of molecules of natural origin: terpenoids, steroids, phenolics and related compounds.

    PubMed

    Groussin, Anne-Laure; Antoniotti, Sylvain

    2012-07-01

    A renewed interest for using natural organic molecules for the production of valuable chemicals is observed in current organic processes. Natural compounds provide the access to natural grade chemicals when submitted to physical treatments or biotechnological processes. Dealing with structurally complex molecules, they can provide complex core structures for hemisynthesis purposes, and in many instances they offer the advantage of providing sustainable processes when using renewable resources. These assets could be synergistic with the assets of biocatalytic processes, to end-up with efficient and sustainable processes in the organic synthesis of valuable products. In this review, we have gathered a selection of examples on the use of enzymes for the modification of molecules of natural origin being either purified compounds (terpenoids, steroids, phenolics) or mixtures (essential oils, natural extracts) to access fine chemicals or organic polymers.

  9. Chemical Profiles and Identification of Key Compound Caffeine in Marine-Derived Traditional Chinese Medicine Ostreae concha

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue; Zhou, Shi-Lu; Ma, Ai-Cui; Xu, Hai-Tao; Guan, Hua-Shi; Liu, Hong-Bing

    2012-01-01

    To compare the chemical differences between the medicinal and cultured oyster shells, their chemical profiles were investigated. Using the ultra performance liquid chromatography-electron spraying ionization-mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-MS), combined with principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal projection to latent structures discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA), the discrimination of the chemical characteristics among the medicinal and cultured oyster shells was established. Moreover, the chemometric analysis revealed some potential key compounds. After a large-scale extraction and isolation, one target key compound was unambiguously identified as caffeine (1) based on extensive spectroscopic data analysis (1D and 2D NMR, MS, and UV) and comparison with literature data. PMID:22822365

  10. Imperanene, a novel phenolic compound with platelet aggregation inhibitory activity from Imperata cylindrica.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, K; Shibuya, M; Ohizumi, Y

    1995-01-01

    Imperanene, a novel phenolic compound [1] has been isolated from Imperata cylindrica. Its structure was elucidated by spectroscopic evidence. Imperanene showed platelet aggregation inhibitory activity.

  11. Compositions comprising a polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and a bicycle compound and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Feng; Sweeney, Matthew; Quinlan, Jason

    2015-06-16

    The present invention relates to compositions comprising: a polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and a bicyclic compound. The present invention also relates to methods of using the compositions.

  12. Compositions comprising a polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and a bicyclic compound and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Quinlan, Jason; Xu, Feng; Sweeney, Matthew

    2016-10-04

    The present invention relates to compositions comprising: a polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and a bicyclic compound. The present invention also relates to methods of using the compositions.

  13. Compositions comprising a polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and a quinone compound and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Quinlan, Jason; Xu, Feng; Sweeney, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    The present invention relates to compositions comprising: a polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and a quinone compound. The present invention also relates to methods of using the compositions.

  14. Compositions comprising a polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and a heterocyclic compound and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Feng; Sweeney, Matthew; Quinlan, Jason

    2016-08-02

    The present invention relates to compositions comprising: a polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and a heterocyclic compound. The present invention also relates to methods of using the compositions.

  15. Compositions comprising a polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and a dioxy compound and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sweeney, Matthew; Xu, Feng; Quinlan, Jason

    2016-07-19

    The present invention relates to compositions comprising: a polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and a dioxy compound. The present invention also relates to methods of using the compositions.

  16. Elucidating the modes of action for bioactive compounds in a cell-specific manner by large-scale chemically-induced transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Michio; Sawada, Ryusuke; Iwata, Hiroaki; Kotera, Masaaki; Yamanishi, Yoshihiro

    2017-01-01

    The identification of the modes of action of bioactive compounds is a major challenge in chemical systems biology of diseases. Genome-wide expression profiling of transcriptional responses to compound treatment for human cell lines is a promising unbiased approach for the mode-of-action analysis. Here we developed a novel approach to elucidate the modes of action of bioactive compounds in a cell-specific manner using large-scale chemically-induced transcriptome data acquired from the Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS), and analyzed 16,268 compounds and 68 human cell lines. First, we performed pathway enrichment analyses of regulated genes to reveal active pathways among 163 biological pathways. Next, we explored potential target proteins (including primary targets and off-targets) with cell-specific transcriptional similarity using chemical–protein interactome. Finally, we predicted new therapeutic indications for 461 diseases based on the target proteins. We showed the usefulness of the proposed approach in terms of prediction coverage, interpretation, and large-scale applicability, and validated the new prediction results experimentally by an in vitro cellular assay. The approach has a high potential for advancing drug discovery and repositioning. PMID:28071740

  17. Identification of structure-activity relationships from screening a structurally compact DNA-encoded chemical library.

    PubMed

    Franzini, Raphael M; Ekblad, Torun; Zhong, Nan; Wichert, Moreno; Decurtins, Willy; Nauer, Angela; Zimmermann, Mauro; Samain, Florent; Scheuermann, Jörg; Brown, Peter J; Hall, Jonathan; Gräslund, Susanne; Schüler, Herwig; Neri, Dario

    2015-03-23

    Methods for the rapid and inexpensive discovery of hit compounds are essential for pharmaceutical research and DNA-encoded chemical libraries represent promising tools for this purpose. We here report on the design and synthesis of DAL-100K, a DNA-encoded chemical library containing 103 200 structurally compact compounds. Affinity screening experiments and DNA-sequencing analysis provided ligands with nanomolar affinities to several proteins, including prostate-specific membrane antigen and tankyrase 1. Correlations of sequence counts with binding affinities and potencies of enzyme inhibition were observed and enabled the identification of structural features critical for activity. These results indicate that libraries of this type represent a useful source of small-molecule binders for target proteins of pharmaceutical interest and information on structural features important for binding.

  18. Optimization and prevalidation of the in vitro ERalpha CALUX method to test estrogenic and antiestrogenic activity of compounds.

    PubMed

    van der Burg, Bart; Winter, Roos; Weimer, Marc; Berckmans, Pascale; Suzuki, Go; Gijsbers, Linda; Jonas, Arjen; van der Linden, Sander; Witters, Hilda; Aarts, Jac; Legler, Juliette; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Bremer, Susanne

    2010-08-01

    Estrogenicity of chemicals has received significant attention and is linked to endocrine-disrupting activities. However, there is a paucity of validated methods to assess estrogenicity in vitro. We have established a robust method to test estrogenic and antiestrogenic activity of compounds in vitro, as an alternative to using animal models such as the uterotrophic assay. To this end we optimized protocols to be used in combination with CALUX reporter gene assays and carried out an in house prevalidation, followed by two rounds of tests to establish transferability. Problems in the initial test with transferability were solved by isolation of a novel cell clone of the ERalpha CALUX line with greatly improved stability and luciferase levels. This cell line proved to be a very suitable and reliable predictor of estrogenicity of chemicals and was able to readily rank a range of chemicals on the basis of their EC50 values.

  19. Activated chemical defenses suppress herbivory on freshwater red algae.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Keri M; Hay, Mark E

    2013-04-01

    The rapid life cycles of freshwater algae are hypothesized to suppress selection for chemical defenses against herbivores, but this notion remains untested. Investigations of chemical defenses are rare for freshwater macrophytes and absent for freshwater red algae. We used crayfish to assess the palatability of five freshwater red algae relative to a palatable green alga and a chemically defended aquatic moss. We then assessed the roles of structural, nutritional, and chemical traits in reducing palatability. Both native and non-native crayfish preferred the green alga Cladophora glomerata to four of the five red algae. Batrachospermum helminthosum, Kumanoa holtonii, and Tuomeya americana employed activated chemical defenses that suppressed feeding by 30-60 % following damage to algal tissues. Paralemanea annulata was defended by its cartilaginous structure, while Boldia erythrosiphon was palatable. Activated defenses are thought to reduce ecological costs by expressing potent defenses only when actually needed; thus, activation might be favored in freshwater red algae whose short-lived gametophytes must grow and reproduce rapidly over a brief growing season. The frequency of activated chemical defenses found here (three of five species) is 3-20× higher than for surveys of marine algae or aquatic vascular plants. If typical for freshwater red algae, this suggests that (1) their chemical defenses may go undetected if chemical activation is not considered and (2) herbivory has been an important selective force in the evolution of freshwater Rhodophyta. Investigations of defenses in freshwater rhodophytes contribute to among-system comparisons and provide insights into the generality of plant-herbivore interactions and their evolution.

  20. Spontaneous and specific activation of chemical bonds in macromolecular fluids.

    PubMed

    Park, Insun; Shirvanyants, David; Nese, Alper; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Rubinstein, Michael; Sheiko, Sergei S

    2010-09-08

    Mechanical activation of chemical bonds typically involves the application of external forces, which implies a broad distribution of bond tensions. We demonstrate that controlling the flow profile of a macromolecular fluid generates and delineates mechanical force concentration, enabling a hierarchical activation of chemical bonds on different length scales from the macroscopic to the molecular. Bond tension is spontaneously generated within brushlike macromolecules as they spread on a solid substrate. The molecular architecture creates an uneven distribution of tension in the covalent bonds, leading to spatially controlled bond scission. By controlling the flow rate and the gradient of the film pressure, one can sever the flowing macromolecules with high precision. Specific chemical bonds are activated within distinct macromolecules located in a defined area of a thin film. Furthermore, the flow-controlled loading rate enables quantitative analysis of the bond activation parameters.