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Sample records for active chitinases chitotriosidase

  1. Chitotriosidase activity in the blood serum and organs of mice of various strains under the influence of chitin.

    PubMed

    Monoszon, A A; Cherkanova, M S; Duzhak, A B; Korolenko, T A

    2012-11-01

    Mouse chitotriosidase cleaving chitin belongs to the family of mammalian chitinases, whose biological functions are poorly understood. Chitotriosidase activity in mouse serum was shown to be much higher than in humans. The following interstrain differences were revealed in mouse chitotriosidase activity: GR>C57Bl/6>BALB/c>A/Sn>CBA. Chitotriosidase activity in CBA mice was lowest and practically did not differ from that in C3H/He and ICR mice. No sex-related differences were found in enzyme activity. Hybrids of opposite strains CBA and C57Bl/6 were characterized by dominant inheritance of this sign (elevated activity of chitotriosidase in the serum). Intragastric administration of chitin in a single dose of 100 mg/kg was followed by a decrease in chitotriosidase activity in the lungs, but not in the blood serum and homogenate of gastric cells from CBA mice. These data indicate that intragastric administration of chitin does not induce chitotriosidase in mice.

  2. The relationship between chitotriosidase activity and tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, M; Deng, J; Li, W; Su, C; Xia, Y; Wang, M; Li, X; Abuaku, B K; Tan, H; Wen, S W

    2015-11-01

    Chitotriosidase, secreted by activated macrophages, is a biomarker of activated macrophages. In this study, we explored whether chitotriosidase could be adopted as a biomarker to evaluate the curative effect on tuberculosis (TB). Five counties were randomly selected out of 122 counties/cities/districts in Hunan Province, China. Our cases were all TB patients who were newly diagnosed or had been receiving treatment at the Centers for Disease Control (CDCs) of these five counties between April and August in 2009. Healthy controls were selected from a community health facility in the Kaifu district of Changsha City after frequency-matching of gender and age with the cases. Chitotriosidase activity was evaluated by a fluorometric assay. Categorical variables were analysed with the χ 2 test. Measurement data in multiple groups were tested with analysis of variance and least significant difference (LSD). Correlation between chitotriosidase activity and the degree of radiological extent (DRE) was examined by Spearman's rank correlation test. The average chitotriosidase activity levels of new TB cases, TB cases with different periods of treatment (6 months) and the control group were 54·47, 34·77, 21·54, 12·73 and 10·53 nmol/h.ml, respectively. Chitotriosidase activity in TB patients declined along with the continuity of treatment. The chitotriosidase activity of both smear-positive and the smear-negative pulmonary TB patients decreased after 6 months' treatment to normal levels (P < 0·05). Moreover, chitotriosidase activity was positively correlated with DRE (r = 0·607, P < 0·001). Our results indicate that chitotriosidase might be a marker of TB treatment effects. However, further follow-up study of TB patients is needed in the future. PMID:26418349

  3. Chitotriosidase activity in goat blood and colostrum.

    PubMed

    Argüello, A; Castro, N; Batista, M; Moreno-Indias, I; Morales-delaNuez, A; Sanchez-Macias, D; Quesada, E; Capote, J

    2008-05-01

    Chitotriosidase (ChT) activity has not been investigated in ruminants, and therefore, we studied this activity in blood and colostrum of 25 pregnant goats and 60 goat kids. Blood samples were taken from pregnant goats at 3, 2, and 1 d prepartum; at partum; and at 1, 2, 3, and 4 d postpartum. Colostrum samples were obtained by machine-milking at partum and 1, 2, 3, and 4 d postpartum. Goat kid blood was collected at birth and every 7 d thereafter until goats kids were 56 d old. The ChT activity ranged from 2,368 to 3,350 nmol/ mL per hour in goat blood serum, and no statistical differences were detected through time. However, activity tended to decrease from 3 d prepartum to 2 d post-partum. Colostrum ChT activity was 3,912 nmol/mL per hour and 465 nmol/mL per hour on the day of delivery and 4 d postpartum, respectively. Colostrum ChT activity was significantly higher at partum than at any other time. The ChT activity in colostrum was significantly greater at 1 d postpartum than at 2, 3, and 4 d postpartum. Chitotriosidase activity did not differ in colostrum collected on d 2, 3, and 4 postpartum. Chitotriosidase activity in goat kid blood serum ranged from 2,664 to 9,231 nmol/mL per hour at birth and 49 d of life, respectively. Chitotriosidase activity in the blood serum increased with age: at birth, activity was significantly less than at 28, 35, 42, 49, and 56 d postpartum. The maximum ChT activity in blood serum was observed at 49 d postpartum. Activity in 49-d-old kids was significantly greater than that observed in kids at 0, 7, and 14 d postpartum.

  4. Immunomodulatory Effects of Chitotriosidase Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Elmonem, Mohamed A.; van den Heuvel, Lambertus P.; Levtchenko, Elena N.

    2016-01-01

    Chitotriosidase enzyme (EC: 3.2.1.14) is the major active chitinase in the human body. It is produced mainly by activated macrophages, in which its expression is regulated by multiple intrinsic and extrinsic signals. Chitotriosidase was confirmed as essential element in the innate immunity against chitin containing organisms such as fungi and protozoa; however, its immunomodulatory effects extend far beyond innate immunity. In the current review, we will try to explore the expanding spectrum of immunological roles played by chitotriosidase enzyme in human health and disease and will discuss its up-to-date clinical value. PMID:26881065

  5. The human chitotriosidase gene. Nature of inherited enzyme deficiency.

    PubMed

    Boot, R G; Renkema, G H; Verhoek, M; Strijland, A; Bliek, J; de Meulemeester, T M; Mannens, M M; Aerts, J M

    1998-10-01

    The human chitinase, named chitotriosidase, is a member of family 18 of glycosylhydrolases. Following the cloning of the chitotriosidase cDNA (Boot, R. G., Renkema, G. H., Strijland, A., van Zonneveld, A. J., and Aerts, J. M. F. G. (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 26252-26256), the gene and mRNA have been investigated. The chitotriosidase gene is assigned to chromosome 1q31-q32. The gene consists of 12 exons and spans about 20 kilobases. The nature of the common deficiency in chitotriosidase activity is reported. A 24-base pair duplication in exon 10 results in activation of a cryptic 3' splice site, generating a mRNA with an in-frame deletion of 87 nucleotides. All chitotriosidase-deficient individuals tested were homozygous for the duplication. The observed carrier frequency of about 35% indicates that the duplication is the predominant cause of chitotriosidase deficiency. The presence of the duplication in individuals from various ethnic groups suggests that this mutation is relatively old.

  6. Toxoplasma gondii Chitinase Induces Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Fausto; Sardinha-Silva, Aline; da Silva, Thiago Aparecido; Pessoni, André Moreira; Pinzan, Camila Figueiredo; Alegre-Maller, Ana Claudia Paiva; Cecílio, Nerry Tatiana; Moretti, Nilmar Silvio; Damásio, André Ricardo Lima; Pedersoli, Wellington Ramos; Mineo, José Roberto; Silva, Roberto Nascimento; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite found worldwide that is able to chronically infect almost all vertebrate species, especially birds and mammalians. Chitinases are essential to various biological processes, and some pathogens rely on chitinases for successful parasitization. Here, we purified and characterized a chitinase from T. gondii. The enzyme, provisionally named Tg_chitinase, has a molecular mass of 13.7 kDa and exhibits a Km of 0.34 mM and a Vmax of 2.64. The optimal environmental conditions for enzymatic function were at pH 4.0 and 50°C. Tg_chitinase was immunolocalized in the cytoplasm of highly virulent T. gondii RH strain tachyzoites, mainly at the apical extremity. Tg_chitinase induced macrophage activation as manifested by the production of high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, a pathogenic hallmark of T. gondii infection. In conclusion, to our knowledge, we describe for the first time a chitinase of T. gondii tachyzoites and provide evidence that this enzyme might influence the pathogenesis of T. gondii infection. PMID:26659253

  7. Role of changes in serum chitotriosidase activity in mice under conditions of hyperlipidemia and lipid-lowering effect of carboxymethylated (1-3)-β-D-glycan.

    PubMed

    Pisareva, E E; Goncharova, I A; Tuzikov, F V; Goncharova, N V; Makhova, E; Korolenko, T A

    2014-09-01

    Enhanced expression and activity of chitotriosidase in humans is regarded as a marker of atherosclerosis. However, it remains unclear, whether this increase is related to lipemia or enhanced secretion of the enzyme by activated macrophages in the atherosclerotic plaques. It was shown that acute lipemia in mice caused by single administration of poloxamer 407 (P-407) in a dose of 300 mg/kg is accompanied by an increase in serum chitotriosidase activity (24 h) that correlated with elevated content of total cholesterol and triglycerides. Preliminary administration of (1-3)-β-D-glycan prevented the P-407-induced increase in chitotriosidase activity, probably due to the hypolipidemic action of (1-3)-β-D-glycan. The relationship between changes in chitotriosidase activity with atherogenic fractions and subfractions of serum lipoproteins during lipemia is discussed.

  8. GENETIC ASSOCIATION BETWEEN HUMAN CHITINASES AND LUNG FUNCTION IN COPD

    PubMed Central

    Aminuddin, F.; Akhabir, L.; Stefanowicz, D.; Paré, P.D.; Connett, J.E.; Anthonisen, N.R.; Fahy, J.V.; Seibold, M.A.; Burchard, E.G.; Eng, C.; Gulsvik, A.; Bakke, P.; Cho, M. H.; Litonjua, A.; Lomas, D.A.; Anderson, W. H.; Beaty, T.H.; Crapo, J.D.; Silverman, E.K.; Sandford, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Two primary chitinases have been identified in humans – acid mammalian chitinase (AMCase) and chitotriosidase (CHIT1). Mammalian chitinases have been observed to affect the host’s immune response. The aim of this study was to test for association between genetic variation in the chitinases and phenotypes related to Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Polymorphisms in the chitinase genes were selected based on previous associations with respiratory diseases. Polymorphisms that were associated with lung function level or rate of decline in the Lung Health Study (LHS) cohort were analyzed for association with COPD affection status in four other COPD case-control populations. Chitinase activity and protein levels were also related to genotypes. In the Caucasian LHS population, the baseline forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) was significantly different between the AA and GG genotypic groups of the AMCase rs3818822 polymorphism. Subjects with the GG genotype had higher AMCase protein and chitinase activity compared with AA homozygotes. For CHIT1 rs2494303, a significant association was observed between rate of decline in FEV1 and the different genotypes. In the African American LHS population, CHIT1 rs2494303 and AMCase G339T genotypes were associated with rate of decline in FEV1. Although a significant effect of chitinase gene alleles was found on lung function level and decline in the LHS, we were unable to replicate the associations with COPD affection status in the other COPD study groups. PMID:22200767

  9. Transmission-blocking activity of a chitinase inhibitor and activation of malarial parasite chitinase by mosquito protease.

    PubMed Central

    Shahabuddin, M; Toyoshima, T; Aikawa, M; Kaslow, D C

    1993-01-01

    During development in the mosquito midgut, malarial parasites must traverse a chitin-containing peritrophic matrix (PM) that forms around the food bolus. Previously Huber et al. [Huber, M., Cabib, E. & Miller, L. H. (1991) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 88, 2807-2810] reported that the parasite secretes a protein with chitinase activity, and they suggested that parasite chitinase (EC 3.2.1.14) plays an important role in the parasite's egress from the blood meal. We found that allosamidin, a specific inhibitor of chitinase, completely blocked oocyst development in vivo and thus blocked malaria parasite transmission. Addition of exogenous chitinase to the blood meal prevented the PM from forming and reversed the transmission-blocking activity of allosamidin. Using exogenous chitinase, we also found that the PM does not limit the number of parasites that develop into oocysts, suggesting that the parasite produces sufficient quantities of chitinase to penetrate this potential barrier. In addition, we found that treatment of parasite chitinase with a diisopropyl fluorophosphate-sensitive trypsinlike protease from the mosquito midgut or endoproteinase Lys-C increased its enzymatic activity. These results suggest that malaria parasite has evolved an intricate mechanism to adapt to the PM and the protease-rich environment of the mosquito midgut. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8483942

  10. Chitotriosidase as a biomarker of cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) is an X-linked peroxisomal disorder characterized by the abnormal beta-oxidation of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA). In 35-40% of children with ALD, an acute inflammatory process occurs in the central nervous system (CNS) leading to demyelination that is rapidly progressive, debilitating and ultimately fatal. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) can halt disease progression in cerebral ALD (C-ALD) if performed early. In contrast, for advanced patients the risk of morbidity and mortality is increased with transplantation. To date there is no means of quantitating neuroinflammation in C-ALD, nor is there an accepted measure to determine prognosis for more advanced patients. Methods As cellular infiltration has been observed in C-ALD, including activation of monocytes and macrophages, we evaluated the activity of chitotriosidase in the plasma and spinal fluid of boys with active C-ALD. Due to genotypic variations in the chitotriosidase gene, these were also evaluated. Results We document elevations in chitotriosidase activity in the plasma of patients with C-ALD (n = 38; median activity 1,576 ng/mL/hr) vs. controls (n = 16, median 765 ng/mL/hr, p = 0.0004), and in the CSF of C-ALD patients (n = 38; median activity 4,330 ng/mL/hr) vs. controls (n = 16, median 0 ng/mL/hr, p < 0.0001). In addition, activity levels of plasma and CSF chitotriosidase prior to transplant correlated with progression as determined by the Moser/Raymond functional score 1 year following transplantation (p = 0.002 and < 0.0001, respectively). Conclusions These findings confirm elevation of chitotriosidase activity in patients with active C-ALD, and suggest that these levels predict prognosis of patients with C-ALD undergoing transplantation. PMID:22014002

  11. A complete chitinolytic system in the atherinopsid pike silverside Chirostoma estor: gene expression and activities.

    PubMed

    Pohls, P; González-Dávalos, L; Mora, O; Shimada, A; Varela-Echavarria, A; Toledo-Cuevas, E M; Martínez-Palacios, C A

    2016-06-01

    The expression and digestive activity of pike silverside Chirostoma estor endogenous chitinases were analysed in samples from four life stages: whole eggs; larvae; juvenile intestine and hepatopancreas and adult intestine and hepatopancreas. A chitinase cDNA was cloned and partially sequenced (GenBank accession number: FJ785521). It was highly homologous to non-acidic chitinase sequences from other fish species, suggesting that it is a chitotriosidase. Quantitative PCR showed that this chitinase was expressed throughout the life span of C. estor, with maximum expression in the hepatopancreas of juveniles. Chitotriosidase and chitobiosidase activities were found at all life stages, along with a very high level of N-acetyl glucosaminidase (NAGase). The chitotriosidase activity could be encoded by the cloned complementary (c)DNA, although additional chitinase genes may be present. The chitotriosidase activity appeared to be transcriptionally regulated only at the juvenile stage. The expression and activity of chitinases tended to increase from the early to juvenile stages, suggesting that these variables are stimulated by chitin-rich live food. Nevertheless, the feeding of juvenile and adult fish with both live food and a balanced commercial diet seemed to provoke significant reductions in pancreatic NAGase secretion and/or synthesis in the gut. Moreover, all chitinase activities were lower in adults, probably reflecting a higher intake and use of the balanced diet. The observation of chitotriosidase and chitobiosidase activities together with a very high NAGase activity suggest the presence of a complete and compensatory chitinolytic chitinase system that enables this stomachless short-gut fish species to use chitin as an energy substrate. These novel findings suggest that dietary inclusions of chitin-rich ingredients or by-products might reduce the farming costs of C. estor without impairing performance. PMID:27161769

  12. Identification and characterization of a novel chitinase with antifungal activity from 'Baozhu' pear (Pyrus ussuriensis Maxim.).

    PubMed

    Han, Peng; Yang, Chengcheng; Liang, Xiaobo; Li, Lirong

    2016-04-01

    A novel chitinase from the 'Baozhu' pear was found, purified, and characterized in this report. This chitinase was a monomer with a molecular mass of 28.9 kDa. Results of the internal peptide sequence analyses classify this chitinase as a class III chitinase. In the enzymatic hydrolytic assay, this chitinase could hydrolyze chitin derivatives into di-N-acetylchitobiose (GlcNAc2) as a major product in the initial phase, as well as hydrolyze GlcNAc2 into N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), which represents both chitobiosidase and β-N-acetylglucosaminase activity. Biological analyses showed that this chitinase exhibits strong antifungal activity toward agricultural pathogenic fungi. In total, chitinase from 'Baozhu' pear is a novel bifunctional chitinase that could be a potential fungicide in the biological control of plant diseases.

  13. Identification and characterization of a novel chitinase with antifungal activity from 'Baozhu' pear (Pyrus ussuriensis Maxim.).

    PubMed

    Han, Peng; Yang, Chengcheng; Liang, Xiaobo; Li, Lirong

    2016-04-01

    A novel chitinase from the 'Baozhu' pear was found, purified, and characterized in this report. This chitinase was a monomer with a molecular mass of 28.9 kDa. Results of the internal peptide sequence analyses classify this chitinase as a class III chitinase. In the enzymatic hydrolytic assay, this chitinase could hydrolyze chitin derivatives into di-N-acetylchitobiose (GlcNAc2) as a major product in the initial phase, as well as hydrolyze GlcNAc2 into N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), which represents both chitobiosidase and β-N-acetylglucosaminase activity. Biological analyses showed that this chitinase exhibits strong antifungal activity toward agricultural pathogenic fungi. In total, chitinase from 'Baozhu' pear is a novel bifunctional chitinase that could be a potential fungicide in the biological control of plant diseases. PMID:26593558

  14. Reduced Chitinase Activities in Ant Plants of the Genus Macaranga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heil, Martin; Fiala, Brigitte; Linsenmair, K. Eduard; Boller, Thomas

    Many plant species have evolved mutualistic associations with ants, protecting their host against detrimental influences such as herbivorous insects. Letourneau (1998) reported in the case of Piper that ants defend their plants principally against stem-boring insects and also reduce fungal infections on inflorescences. Macaranga plants that were experimentally deprived of their symbiotic Crematogaster ants suffered heavily from shoot borers and pathogenic fungi (Heil 1998). Here we report that ants seem to reduce fungal infections actively in the obligate myrmecophyte Macarangatriloba (Euphorbiaceae), while ant-free plants can be easily infected. We also found extremely low chitinase activity in Macaranga plants. The plants' own biochemical defense seems to be reduced, and low chitinase activity perhaps may represent a predisposition for the evolution of myrmecophytism. These plants are therefore highly dependent on their ants, which obviously function not only as an antiherbivore defense but also as an effective agent against fungal pathogens.

  15. Designing a new chitinase with more chitin binding and antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Matroodi, Soheila; Motallebi, Mostafa; Zamani, Mohammadreza; Moradyar, Mehdi

    2013-08-01

    Chitinases have the ability of chitin digestion that constitutes a main compound of the cell wall in many of the phytopathogens such as fungi. Chitinase Chit42 from Trichoderma atroviride PTCC5220 is considered to play an important role in the biocontrol activity of this fungus against plant pathogens. Chit42 lacks a chitin binding domain (ChBD). We have produced a chimeric chitinase with stronger chitin-binding capacity by fusing to Chit42 a ChBD from Serratia marcescens Chitinase B. The fusion of ChBD improved the affinity to crystalline and colloidal chitin and also the enzyme activity of the chimeric chitinase when compared with the native Chit42. The chimeric chitinase showed higher antifungal activity toward phytopathogenic fungi.

  16. Chitotriosidase in the Pathogenesis of Inflammation, Interstitial Lung Diseases and COPD.

    PubMed

    Cho, Soo Jung; Weiden, Michael D; Lee, Chun Geun

    2015-01-01

    As a member of 18 glycosyl hydrolase (GH) family, chitotriosidase (Chitinase 1, CHIT1) is a true chitinase mainly expressed in the differentiated and polarized macrophages. CHIT1 is an innate immune mediator that digests the cell walls of chitin-containing eukaryotic pathogens, such as fungi. However, CHIT1 is dysregulated in granulomatous and fibrotic interstitial lung diseases characterized by inflammation and tissue remodeling. These include tuberclosis, sarcoidosis, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, scleroderma-associated interstitial lung diseases (SSc-ILD), and chronic obstructive lung diseases (COPD). CHIT1 serum concentration correlates with the progression or the severity of these diseases, suggesting a potential use of CHIT1 as a biomarker or a therapeutic target. Recent studies with genetically modified mice demonstrate that CHIT1 enhances TGF-β1 receptor expression and signaling, suggesting a role in initiating or amplifying the response to organ injury and repair. This additional CHIT1 activity is independent of its enzymatic activity. These studies suggest that CHIT1 serves a bridging function; it is both an innate immune mediator and a regulator of tissue remodeling. This review will focus on recent data linking CHIT1 to the pathogenesis of inflammation, interstitial lung disease, and COPD. PMID:25553258

  17. Chitotriosidase in the Pathogenesis of Inflammation, Interstitial Lung Diseases and COPD.

    PubMed

    Cho, Soo Jung; Weiden, Michael D; Lee, Chun Geun

    2015-01-01

    As a member of 18 glycosyl hydrolase (GH) family, chitotriosidase (Chitinase 1, CHIT1) is a true chitinase mainly expressed in the differentiated and polarized macrophages. CHIT1 is an innate immune mediator that digests the cell walls of chitin-containing eukaryotic pathogens, such as fungi. However, CHIT1 is dysregulated in granulomatous and fibrotic interstitial lung diseases characterized by inflammation and tissue remodeling. These include tuberclosis, sarcoidosis, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, scleroderma-associated interstitial lung diseases (SSc-ILD), and chronic obstructive lung diseases (COPD). CHIT1 serum concentration correlates with the progression or the severity of these diseases, suggesting a potential use of CHIT1 as a biomarker or a therapeutic target. Recent studies with genetically modified mice demonstrate that CHIT1 enhances TGF-β1 receptor expression and signaling, suggesting a role in initiating or amplifying the response to organ injury and repair. This additional CHIT1 activity is independent of its enzymatic activity. These studies suggest that CHIT1 serves a bridging function; it is both an innate immune mediator and a regulator of tissue remodeling. This review will focus on recent data linking CHIT1 to the pathogenesis of inflammation, interstitial lung disease, and COPD.

  18. Chitotriosidase in the Pathogenesis of Inflammation, Interstitial Lung Diseases and COPD

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Soo Jung; Weiden, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    As a member of 18 glycosyl hydrolase (GH) family, chitotriosidase (Chitinase 1, CHIT1) is a true chitinase mainly expressed in the differentiated and polarized macrophages. CHIT1 is an innate immune mediator that digests the cell walls of chitin-containing eukaryotic pathogens, such as fungi. However, CHIT1 is dysregulated in granulomatous and fibrotic interstitial lung diseases characterized by inflammation and tissue remodeling. These include tuberclosis, sarcoidosis, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, scleroderma-associated interstitial lung diseases (SSc-ILD), and chronic obstructive lung diseases (COPD). CHIT1 serum concentration correlates with the progression or the severity of these diseases, suggesting a potential use of CHIT1 as a biomarker or a therapeutic target. Recent studies with genetically modified mice demonstrate that CHIT1 enhances TGF-β1 receptor expression and signaling, suggesting a role in initiating or amplifying the response to organ injury and repair. This additional CHIT1 activity is independent of its enzymatic activity. These studies suggest that CHIT1 serves a bridging function; it is both an innate immune mediator and a regulator of tissue remodeling. This review will focus on recent data linking CHIT1 to the pathogenesis of inflammation, interstitial lung disease, and COPD. PMID:25553258

  19. Identification of glutamic acid 204 and aspartic acid 200 in chitinase A1 of Bacillus circulans WL-12 as essential residues for chitinase activity.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Kobori, K; Miyashita, K; Fujii, T; Sakai, H; Uchida, M; Tanaka, H

    1993-09-01

    Prokaryotic chitinases, class III plant chitinases, yeast chitinases, and endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidases share weak amino acid sequence similarities at the certain region of each enzyme. These regions have been assumed to be important for catalytic activities of the enzymes. To verify this assumption, three amino acid residues (Ser-160, Asp-200, Glu-204) in chitinase A1 of Bacillus circulans WL-12 were chosen, based on the amino acid sequence alignment of the regions sharing sequence similarity, and were replaced by site-directed mutagenesis. Kinetic parameters for 4-methylumbelliferyl-N,N',N"-triacetylchitotriose hydrolysis were determined with wild-type and seven mutant chitinases. Chitinases with Glu-204-->Gln mutation and Glu-204-->Asp mutation were essentially inactive and kcat values of these chitinases were approximately 1/5,000 and 1/17,000 of that of wild-type chitinase, respectively. Asp-200-->Asn mutation decreased the kcat value to approximately 1/350 of that of the wild-type enzyme, while the Km value decreased only slightly. On the other hand, neither the kcat value nor the Km value was affected by Asp-200-->Glu mutation. Thus, it appeared that Glu-204 and Asp-200 are directly involved in the catalytic events of chitinase A1. The role of the carboxyl group of Asp-200 can be fully substituted by that of Glu residue. The Ser-160-->Ala mutant retained 10% activity of the wild-type chitinase indicating that the hydroxyl group of Ser-160 is not absolutely required for the catalytic activity. These results indicate a lysozyme-type catalytic mechanism of the chitinase.

  20. Neutrophils as a Source of Chitinases and Chitinase-Like Proteins in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Żurawska-Płaksej, Ewa; Ługowska, Agnieszka; Hetmańczyk, Katarzyna; Knapik-Kordecka, Maria; Piwowar, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The pathophysiological role of human chitinases and chitinase-like proteins (CLPs) is not fully understood. We aimed to determine the levels of neutrophil-derived chitotriosidase (CHIT1), acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase) and chitinase 3-like protein 1 (YKL-40) in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and verify their association with metabolic and clinical conditions of these patients. Methods Neutrophils were obtained from the whole blood by gradient density centrifugation from 94 T2D patients and 40 control subjects. The activities of CHIT1 and AMCase as well as leukocyte elastase (LE) were measured fluorometrically and concentration of YKL-40 immunoenzymatically. Also, routine laboratory parameters in serum/plasma were determined by standard methods. Results The levels of all three examined proteins were about 2-times higher in diabetic patients in comparison to control subjects. They were significantly correlated with the activity of LE and increased progressively across tertiles of LE activity. Moreover, the activities of CHIT1 and AMCase were significantly correlated with each other. Metabolic compensation of diabetes did not influence the levels of these proteins. In the subgroup of patients with inflammatory evidence only YKL-40 concentration was significantly higher compared to those without inflammation. The highest levels of all three proteins were observed in patients with macroangiopathies. Insulin therapy was associated with lower levels of examined proteins. Conclusions We revealed that neutrophils may be an important source of the increased levels of chitinases and CLPs in T2D, and these proteins may participate in inflammatory mechanisms in the course of the disease and consequent development of diabetic angiopathies. PMID:26517273

  1. X-Ray Crystal Structure of the Full Length Human Chitotriosidase (CHIT1) Reveals Features of Its Chitin Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Fadel, Firas; Zhao, Yuguang; Cousido-Siah, Alexandra; Ruiz, Francesc X.; Mitschler, André; Podjarny, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Chitinases are enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of chitin. Human chitotriosidase (CHIT1) is one of the two active human chitinases, involved in the innate immune response and highly expressed in a variety of diseases. CHIT1 is composed of a catalytic domain linked by a hinge to its chitin binding domain (ChBD). This latter domain belongs to the carbohydrate-binding module family 14 (CBM14 family) and facilitates binding to chitin. So far, the available crystal structures of the human chitinase CHIT1 and the Acidic Mammalian Chitinase (AMCase) comprise only their catalytic domain. Here, we report a crystallization strategy combining cross-seeding and micro-seeding cycles which allowed us to obtain the first crystal structure of the full length CHIT1 (CHIT1-FL) at 1.95 Å resolution. The CHIT1 chitin binding domain (ChBDCHIT1) structure shows a distorted β-sandwich 3D fold, typical of CBM14 family members. Accordingly, ChBDCHIT1 presents six conserved cysteine residues forming three disulfide bridges and several exposed aromatic residues that probably are involved in chitin binding, including the highly conserved Trp465 in a surface- exposed conformation. Furthermore, ChBDCHIT1 presents a positively charged surface which may be involved in electrostatic interactions. Our data highlight the strong structural conservation of CBM14 family members and uncover the structural similarity between the human ChBDCHIT1, tachycitin and house mite dust allergens. Overall, our new CHIT1-FL structure, determined with an adapted crystallization approach, is one of the few complete bi-modular chitinase structures available and reveals the structural features of a human CBM14 domain. PMID:27111557

  2. X-Ray Crystal Structure of the Full Length Human Chitotriosidase (CHIT1) Reveals Features of Its Chitin Binding Domain.

    PubMed

    Fadel, Firas; Zhao, Yuguang; Cousido-Siah, Alexandra; Ruiz, Francesc X; Mitschler, André; Podjarny, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Chitinases are enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of chitin. Human chitotriosidase (CHIT1) is one of the two active human chitinases, involved in the innate immune response and highly expressed in a variety of diseases. CHIT1 is composed of a catalytic domain linked by a hinge to its chitin binding domain (ChBD). This latter domain belongs to the carbohydrate-binding module family 14 (CBM14 family) and facilitates binding to chitin. So far, the available crystal structures of the human chitinase CHIT1 and the Acidic Mammalian Chitinase (AMCase) comprise only their catalytic domain. Here, we report a crystallization strategy combining cross-seeding and micro-seeding cycles which allowed us to obtain the first crystal structure of the full length CHIT1 (CHIT1-FL) at 1.95 Å resolution. The CHIT1 chitin binding domain (ChBDCHIT1) structure shows a distorted β-sandwich 3D fold, typical of CBM14 family members. Accordingly, ChBDCHIT1 presents six conserved cysteine residues forming three disulfide bridges and several exposed aromatic residues that probably are involved in chitin binding, including the highly conserved Trp465 in a surface- exposed conformation. Furthermore, ChBDCHIT1 presents a positively charged surface which may be involved in electrostatic interactions. Our data highlight the strong structural conservation of CBM14 family members and uncover the structural similarity between the human ChBDCHIT1, tachycitin and house mite dust allergens. Overall, our new CHIT1-FL structure, determined with an adapted crystallization approach, is one of the few complete bi-modular chitinase structures available and reveals the structural features of a human CBM14 domain. PMID:27111557

  3. Measuring Chitinase and Protease Activity in Cultures of Fungal Entomopathogens.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Peter; Glare, Travis R; Rostás, Michael; Haines, Stephen R

    2016-01-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi produce a variety of destructive enzymes and metabolites to overcome the unique defense mechanisms of insects. In a first step, fungal chitinases and proteinases need to break down the insect's cuticle. Both enzyme classes support the infection process by weakening the chitin barrier and by producing nutritional cleavage products for the fungus. In a second step, the pathogen can now mechanically penetrate the weakened cuticle and reach the insect's hemolymph where it starts proliferating. The critical enzymes chitinase and proteinase are also excreted into the supernatants of fungal cultures and can be used as indicators of virulence. Chromogenic assays adapted for 96-well microtiter plates that measure these enzymes provide a sensitive, fast, and easy screening method for evaluating the potential biocontrol activity of fungal isolates and may be considered as an alternative to laborious and time-consuming bioassays. Furthermore, monitoring fungal enzyme production in dependence of time, nutrient sources, or other factors can facilitate in establishing optimal growth and harvesting conditions for selected isolates with the aim of achieving maximum biocontrol activity. PMID:27565500

  4. Low chitinase activity in Acacia myrmecophytes: a potential trade-off between biotic and chemical defences?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heil, M.; Staehelin, Christian; McKey, D.

    We determined chitinase activity in leaves of four myrmecophytic and four non-myrmecophytic leguminous species at the plants' natural growing sites in Mexico. Myrmecophytic plants (or 'ant plants') have obligate mutualisms with ants protecting them against herbivores and pathogenic fungi. Plant chitinases can be considered a reliable measure of plant resistance to pathogenic fungi. The myrmecophytic Acacia species, which were colonised by mutualistic ants, exhibited at least six-fold lower levels of chitinase activity compared with the non-myrmecophytic Acacia farnesiana and three other non-myrmecophytes. Though belonging to different phylogenetic groups, the myrmecophytic Acacia species formed one distinct group in the data set, which was clearly separated from the non-myrmecophytic species. These findings allowed for comparison between two recent hypotheses that attempt to explain low chitinase activity in ant plants. Most probably, chitinases are reduced in myrmecophytic plant species because these are effectively defended indirectly due to their symbiosis with mutualistic ants.

  5. Effects of induced parturition in goats on immunoglobulin G and chitotriosidase activity in colostrum and plasma and on plasma concentrations of prolactin.

    PubMed

    Castro, N; Capote, J; Batista, M; Bruckmaier, R M; Argüello, A

    2011-05-01

    The effect of induction of parturition with a PGF(2)α analog on plasma concentration of prolactin (PRL) and its effects on colostrum concentration of IgG and chitotriosidase (ChT) activity were studied in 16 pregnant Majorera goats. Treated goats, those in which parturition was induced, had greater concentrations of PRL than control goats 24 h before parturition (P < 0.05) and 48 h after parturition (P < 0.05). Control goats had greater concentrations of PRL than treated goats 96 h after parturition (P < 0.05). Plasma concentration of IgG did not differ between groups during the experimental period, but colostrum concentrations of IgG were greater in control goats than in treated goats at parturition (P < 0.05). Plasma ChT activity decreased during the period 72 h before parturition to 24 h after parturition in control and treated goats. Time evolution after partum affected the colostrum ChT activity, being greater at parturition than after parturition in both groups (P < 0.05). In summary, concentration of IgG in colostrum is slightly diminished if parturition is induced. Induction of parturition causes an early increase in PRL, which is most likely responsible for preterm suppression of IgG transport into mammary secretions.

  6. Activity of Lipase and Chitinase Immobilized on Superparamagnetic Particles in a Rotational Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Mizuki, Toru; Sawai, Miyuki; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Morimoto, Hisao; Maekawa, Toru

    2013-01-01

    We immobilize hydrolases such as lipase and chitinase on superparamagnetic particles, which are subjected to a rotational magnetic field, and measure the activities of the enzymes. We find that the activities of lipase and chitinase increase in the rotational magnetic field compared to those in the absence of a magnetic field and reach maximum at certain frequencies. The present methodology may well be utilized for the design and development of efficient micro reactors and micro total analysis systems (μ-TASs). PMID:23799111

  7. Purification and characterisation of a novel chitinase from persimmon (Diospyros kaki) with antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianzhi; Kopparapu, Narasimha Kumar; Yan, Qiaojuan; Yang, Shaoqing; Jiang, Zhengqiang

    2013-06-01

    A novel chitinase from the persimmon fruit was isolated, purified and characterised in this report. The Diospyros kaki chitinase (DKC) was found to be a monomer with a molecular mass of 29 kDa. It exhibited optimal activity at pH 4.5 with broad pH stability from pH 4.0-9.0. It has an optimal temperature of 60°C and thermostable up to 60°C when incubated for 30 min. The internal peptide sequences of DKC showed similarity with other reported plant chitinases. It has the ability to hydrolyse colloidal chitin into chito-oligomers such as chitotriose, chitobiose and into its monomer N-acetylglucosamine. It can be used to degrade chitin waste into useful products such as chito-oligosacchaarides. DKC exhibited antifungal activity towards pathogenic fungus Trichoderma viride. Chitinases with antifungal property can be used as biocontrol agents replacing chemical fungicides. PMID:23411236

  8. Purification and characterisation of a novel chitinase from persimmon (Diospyros kaki) with antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianzhi; Kopparapu, Narasimha Kumar; Yan, Qiaojuan; Yang, Shaoqing; Jiang, Zhengqiang

    2013-06-01

    A novel chitinase from the persimmon fruit was isolated, purified and characterised in this report. The Diospyros kaki chitinase (DKC) was found to be a monomer with a molecular mass of 29 kDa. It exhibited optimal activity at pH 4.5 with broad pH stability from pH 4.0-9.0. It has an optimal temperature of 60°C and thermostable up to 60°C when incubated for 30 min. The internal peptide sequences of DKC showed similarity with other reported plant chitinases. It has the ability to hydrolyse colloidal chitin into chito-oligomers such as chitotriose, chitobiose and into its monomer N-acetylglucosamine. It can be used to degrade chitin waste into useful products such as chito-oligosacchaarides. DKC exhibited antifungal activity towards pathogenic fungus Trichoderma viride. Chitinases with antifungal property can be used as biocontrol agents replacing chemical fungicides.

  9. Chitinase producing bacteria with direct algicidal activity on marine diatoms.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Lei, Xueqian; Zhu, Hong; Zhang, Huajun; Guan, Chengwei; Chen, Zhangran; Zheng, Wei; Fu, Lijun; Zheng, Tianling

    2016-01-01

    Chitinase producing bacteria can involve extensively in nutrient cycling and energy flow in the aquatic environment through degradation and utilization of chitin. It is well known that diatoms cells are encased by box-like frustules composed of chitin. Thus the chitin containing of diatoms shall be a natural target of chitinase producing bacteria, however, the interaction between these two organismic groups has not been studied thus far. Therefore, in this study, the algicidal mechanism of one chitinase producing bacterium (strain LY03) on Thalassiosira pseudonana was investigated. The algicidal range and algicidal mode of strain LY03 were first studied, and then bacterial viability, chemotactic ability and direct interaction characteristic between bacteria and diatom were also confirmed. Finally, the characteristic of the intracellular algicidal substance was identified and the algicidal mechanism was determined whereby algicidal bacterial cells showed chemotaxis to algal cells, fastened themselves on algal cells with their flagella, and then produced chitinase to degrade algal cell walls, and eventually caused algal lysis and death. It is the first time to investigate the interaction between chitinase producing bacteria and diatoms, and this novel special interaction mode was confirmed in this study, which will be helpful in protection and utilization of diatoms resources. PMID:26902175

  10. Chitinase producing bacteria with direct algicidal activity on marine diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Lei, Xueqian; Zhu, Hong; Zhang, Huajun; Guan, Chengwei; Chen, Zhangran; Zheng, Wei; Fu, Lijun; Zheng, Tianling

    2016-01-01

    Chitinase producing bacteria can involve extensively in nutrient cycling and energy flow in the aquatic environment through degradation and utilization of chitin. It is well known that diatoms cells are encased by box-like frustules composed of chitin. Thus the chitin containing of diatoms shall be a natural target of chitinase producing bacteria, however, the interaction between these two organismic groups has not been studied thus far. Therefore, in this study, the algicidal mechanism of one chitinase producing bacterium (strain LY03) on Thalassiosira pseudonana was investigated. The algicidal range and algicidal mode of strain LY03 were first studied, and then bacterial viability, chemotactic ability and direct interaction characteristic between bacteria and diatom were also confirmed. Finally, the characteristic of the intracellular algicidal substance was identified and the algicidal mechanism was determined whereby algicidal bacterial cells showed chemotaxis to algal cells, fastened themselves on algal cells with their flagella, and then produced chitinase to degrade algal cell walls, and eventually caused algal lysis and death. It is the first time to investigate the interaction between chitinase producing bacteria and diatoms, and this novel special interaction mode was confirmed in this study, which will be helpful in protection and utilization of diatoms resources. PMID:26902175

  11. Characterization of a chitinase with antifungal activity from a native Serratia marcescens B4A.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Mandana; Aminzadeh, Saeed; Zolgharnein, Hossein; Safahieh, Alireza; Daliri, Morteza; Noghabi, Kambiz Akbari; Ghoroghi, Ahmad; Motallebi, Abbasali

    2011-07-01

    Chitinases have the ability of chitin digestion that constitutes a main compound of the cell wall in many of the phytopathogens such as fungi. In the following investigation, a novel chitinase with antifungal activity was characterized from a native Serratia marcescens B4A. Partially purified enzyme had an apparent molecular mass of 54 kDa. It indicated an optimum activity in pH 5 at 45°C. Enzyme was stable in 55°C for 20 min and at a pH range of 3-9 for 90 min at 25°C. When the temperature was raised to 60°C, it might affect the structure of enzymes lead to reduction of chitinase activity. Moreover, the Km and Vmax values for chitin were 8.3 mg/ml and 2.4 mmol/min, respectively. Additionally, the effect of some cations and chemical compounds were found to stimulate the chitinase activity. In addition, Iodoacetamide and Idoacetic acid did not inhibit enzyme activity, indicating that cysteine residues are not part of the catalytic site of chitinase. Finally, chitinase activity was further monitored by scanning electronic microscopy data in which progressive changes in chitin porosity appeared upon treatment with chitinase. This enzyme exhibited antifungal activity against Rhizoctonia solani, Bipolaris sp, Alternaria raphani, Alternaria brassicicola, revealing a potential application for the industry with potentially exploitable significance. Fungal chitin shows some special features, in particular with respect to chemical structure. Difference in chitinolytic ability must result from the subsite structure in the enzyme binding cleft. This implies that why the enzyme didn't have significant antifungal activity against other Fungi.

  12. Purification, characterization, and antifungal activity of chitinase from Fusarium chlamydosporum, a mycoparasite to groundnut rust, Puccinia arachidis.

    PubMed

    Mathivanan, N; Kabilan, V; Murugesan, K

    1998-07-01

    Chitinase (EC 3.2.1.14) was isolated from the culture filtrate of Fusarium chlamydosporum and purified by ion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration. The molecular mass of purified chitinase was 40 kDa as estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Chitinase was optimally active at a pH of 5 and stable from pH 4 to 6 and up to 40 degrees C. Among the metals and inhibitors tested, mercuric chloride completely inhibited the enzyme activity. The activity of chitinase was high on colloidal and pure chitin. The purified chitinase inhibited the germination of uredospores of Puccinia arachidis and also lysed the walls of uredospores and germ tubes. The results from these experiments indicated that chitinase of F. chlamydosporum plays an important role in the biocontrol of groundnut rust.

  13. Chitinase activity on amorphous chitin thin films: a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring and atomic force microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Kittle, Joshua D; Qian, Chen; Roman, Maren; Esker, Alan R

    2013-08-12

    Chitinases are widely distributed in nature and have wide-ranging pharmaceutical and biotechnological applications. This work highlights a real-time and label-free method to assay Chitinase activity via a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The chitin substrate was prepared by spincoating a trimethylsilyl chitin solution onto a silica substrate, followed by regeneration to amorphous chitin (RChi). The QCM-D and AFM results clearly showed that the hydrolysis rate of RChi films increased as Chitinase (from Streptomyces griseus) concentrations increased, and the optimal temperature and pH for Chitinase activity were around 37 °C and 6-8, respectively. The Chitinase showed greater activity on chitin substrates, having a high degree of acetylation, than on chitosan substrates, having a low degree of acetylation.

  14. Purification, characterization, and antifungal activity of chitinases from pineapple (Ananas comosus) leaf.

    PubMed

    Taira, Toki; Toma, Noriko; Ishihara, Masanobu

    2005-01-01

    Three chitinases, designated pineapple leaf chitinase (PL Chi)-A, -B, and -C were purified from the leaves of pineapple (Ananas comosus) using chitin affinity column chromatography followed by several column chromatographies. PL Chi-A is a class III chitinase having a molecular mass of 25 kDa and an isoelectric point of 4.4. PL Chi-B and -C are class I chitinases having molecular masses of 33 kDa and 39 kDa and isoelectric points of 7.9 and 4.6 respectively. PL Chi-C is a glycoprotein and the others are simple proteins. The optimum pHs of PL Chi-A, -B, and -C toward glycolchitin are pH 3, 4, and 9 respectively. The chitin-binding ability of PL Chi-C is higher than that of PL Chi-B, and PL Chi-A has lower chitin-binding ability than the others. At low ionic strength, PL Chi-B exhibits strong antifungal activity toward Trichoderma viride but the others do not. At high ionic strength, PL Chi-B and -C exhibit strong and weak antifungal activity respectively. PL Chi-A does not have antifungal activity.

  15. Chitinase inhibitors: extraction of the active framework from natural argifin and use of in situ click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Tomoyasu; Sunazuka, Toshiaki; Sugawara, Akihiro; Endo, Ayako; Iguchi, Kanami; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Ui, Hideaki; Shiomi, Kazuro; Watanabe, Takeshi; Sharpless, K Barry; Omura, Satoshi

    2009-05-01

    In situ click chemistry is a target-guided synthesis technique for discovering potent protein ligands by assembling azides and alkynes into triazoles inside the affinity site of a target protein. We report the rapid discovery of a new and potent inhibitor of bacterial chitinases by the use of in situ click chemistry. We observed a target-templated formation of a potent triazole inhibitor of the chitinase-catalyzed chitin hydrolysis, through in situ click chemistry between a biologically active azide-containing scaffold and structurally unrelated alkyne fragments. Chitinase inhibitors have chemotherapeutic potential as fungicides, pesticides and antiasthmatics. Argifin, which has been isolated and characterized as a cyclopentapeptide natural product by our research group, shows strong inhibitory activity against chitinases. As a result of our efforts at developing a chitinase inhibitor from an azide-bearing argifin fragment and the application of the chitinase template and a library of alkynes, we rapidly obtained a very potent and new 1,5-disubstituted triazole inhibitor against Serratia marcescens chitinase (SmChi) B. The new inhibitor expressed 300-fold increase in the inhibitory activity against SmChiB compared with that of argifin. To the best of our knowledge, our finding of an enzyme-made 1,5-disubstituted triazole, using in situ click chemistry is the second example reported in the literature.

  16. Antifungal activity of chitinase obtained from Paenibacillus ehimensis MA2012 against conidial of Collectotrichum gloeosporioides in vitro.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dong-Jun; Lee, Yong-Sung; Kim, Kil-Yong; Jung, Woo-Jin

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the expression patterns of chitinase on SDS-PAGE gel, Paenibacillus ehimensis MA2012 was incubated in gelatin-chitin medium (GCM) at 30 °C for 7 days. Six major bands (Ch3, Ch4, Ch5, Ch6, Ch7, and Ch8) of chitinase isozymes in GC medium appeared on SDS-PAGE gel during the incubation period. Chitinase activity staining of P. ehimensis MA2012 was detected on 2-DE with different pI values (4-11). After DEAE-Sephadex chromatography, eight bands (Ch1 to Ch8) of chitinase isozymes were stained strongly with Calcofluor white M2R at fraction 45. After Sephadex G-75 gel filtration, six bands (Ch3 to Ch8) of chitinase isozymes were stained with Calcofluor white M2R at fractions of 11-12. The specific activity of the purified chitinase was 3.8 units mg(-1) protein with a purification factor of 0.27. Inhibition rate of the conidial germination of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides was 87% in partial purified chitinase treatment compared with control. PMID:27133265

  17. Chitotriosidase is a Biomarker for the Resistance to World Trade Center Lung Injury in New York City Firefighters

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Soo Jung; Nolan, Anna; Echevarria, Ghislaine C.; Kwon, Sophia; Naveed, Bushra; Schenck, Edward; Tsukiji, Jun; Prezant, David J.; Rom, William N.; Weiden, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose World Trade Center (WTC) exposure caused airflow obstruction years after exposure. Chitinases and IgE are innate and humoral mediators of obstructive airway disease. We investigated if serum expression of chitinases and IgE early after WTC exposure predicts subsequent obstruction. Methods With a nested case-control design, 251 FDNY personnel had chitotriosidase, YKL-40 and IgE measured in serum drawn within months of 9/11/2001. The main outcome was subsequent Forced Expiratory Volume after one second/Forced Vital Capacity (FEV1/FVC) less than the lower limit of normal (LLN). Cases (N=125) had abnormal FEV1/FVC whereas controls had normal FEV1/FVC (N=126). In a secondary analysis, resistant cases (N=66) had FEV1 (≥107%) one standard deviation above the mean. Logistic regression adjusted for age, BMI, exposure intensity and post-exposure FEV1/FVC modeled the association between early biomarkers and later lung function. Results Cases and Controls initially lost lung function. Controls recovered to pre-9/11 FEV1 and FVC while cases continue to decline. Cases expressed lower serum chitotriosidase and higher IgE levels. Increase in IgE increased the odds of airflow obstruction and decreased the odds of above average FEV1. Alternately, increasing chitotriosidase decreased the odds of abnormal FEV1/FVC and increased the odds of FEV1≥107%. Serum YKL-40 was not associated with FEV1/FVC or FEV1 in this cohort. Conclusions Increased serum chitotriosidase reduces the odds of developing obstruction after WTC-particulate matter exposure and is associated with recovery of lung function. Alternately, elevated IgE is a risk factor for airflow obstruction and progressive lung function decline. PMID:23744081

  18. Cloning of the 52-kDa chitinase gene from Serratia marcescens KCTC2172 and its proteolytic cleavage into an active 35-kDa enzyme.

    PubMed

    Gal, S W; Choi, J Y; Kim, C Y; Cheong, Y H; Choi, Y J; Lee, S Y; Bahk, J D; Cho, M J

    1998-03-01

    A chitinase gene (pCHI52) encoding the 52-kDa chitinase was isolated from a Serratia marcescens KCTC2172 cosmid library. This chitinase gene consists of 2526 bp with an open reading frame that encodes 485 amino acids. Escherichia coli harboring the pCHI52 gene secreted not only a 52-kDa but also a 35-kDa chitinase into the culture supernatant. We purified both 52-kDa and 35-kDa chitinases using a chitin affinity column and Sephacryl-S-300 gel filtration chromatography. We determined that the 17 N-terminal amino acid sequences of the 52-kDa and the 35-kDa chitinase are identical. Furthermore, a protease obtained from S. marcescens KCTC2172 cleaved the 52-kDa chitinase into the 35-kDa protein with chitinase activity. These results suggest that the 35-kDa chitinase derives from the 52-kDa chitinase by post-translational proteolytic modification. The optimal reaction temperature of 45 degrees C and the optimal pH of 5.5 were identical for both enzymes. The specific activities of the 52-kDa and 35-kDa chitinases on natural swollen chitin were 67 mumol min-1 mg-1 and 60 mumol min-1 mg-1, respectively.

  19. A Diverse Range of Bacterial and Eukaryotic Chitinases Hydrolyzes the LacNAc (Galβ1–4GlcNAc) and LacdiNAc (GalNAcβ1–4GlcNAc) Motifs Found on Vertebrate and Insect Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Frederiksen, Rikki F.; Yoshimura, Yayoi; Storgaard, Birgit G.; Paspaliari, Dafni K.; Petersen, Bent O.; Chen, Kowa; Larsen, Tanja; Duus, Jens Ø.; Ingmer, Hanne; Bovin, Nicolai V.; Westerlind, Ulrika; Blixt, Ola; Palcic, Monica M.; Leisner, Jørgen J.

    2015-01-01

    There is emerging evidence that chitinases have additional functions beyond degrading environmental chitin, such as involvement in innate and acquired immune responses, tissue remodeling, fibrosis, and serving as virulence factors of bacterial pathogens. We have recently shown that both the human chitotriosidase and a chitinase from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium hydrolyze LacNAc from Galβ1–4GlcNAcβ-tetramethylrhodamine (LacNAc-TMR (Galβ1–4GlcNAcβ(CH2)8CONH(CH2)2NHCO-TMR)), a fluorescently labeled model substrate for glycans found in mammals. In this study we have examined the binding affinities of the Salmonella chitinase by carbohydrate microarray screening and found that it binds to a range of compounds, including five that contain LacNAc structures. We have further examined the hydrolytic specificity of this enzyme and chitinases from Sodalis glossinidius and Polysphondylium pallidum, which are phylogenetically related to the Salmonella chitinase, as well as unrelated chitinases from Listeria monocytogenes using the fluorescently labeled substrate analogs LacdiNAc-TMR (GalNAcβ1–4GlcNAcβ-TMR), LacNAc-TMR, and LacNAcβ1–6LacNAcβ-TMR. We found that all chitinases examined hydrolyzed LacdiNAc from the TMR aglycone to various degrees, whereas they were less active toward LacNAc-TMR conjugates. LacdiNAc is found in the mammalian glycome and is a common motif in invertebrate glycans. This substrate specificity was evident for chitinases of different phylogenetic origins. Three of the chitinases also hydrolyzed the β1–6 bond in LacNAcβ1–6LacNAcβ-TMR, an activity that is of potential importance in relation to mammalian glycans. The enzymatic affinities for these mammalian-like structures suggest additional functional roles of chitinases beyond chitin hydrolysis. PMID:25561735

  20. Serum cystatin C and chitotriosidase in acute P-407 induced dyslipidemia: Can they serve as potential early biomarkers for atherosclerosis?

    PubMed

    Korolenko, T A; Pisareva, E E; Filyushina, E E; Johnston, T P; Machova, E

    2015-09-01

    In an attempt to better understand potential biomarkers for, and the role of macrophages in, the development of atherosclerosis, the toxicologic, and any therapeutic pharmacologic effects of carboxymethylated β-glucan, gadolinium chloride, and poloxamer 407 were studied in mice for their capacity to perturb serum lipids, cystatin C, and chitotriosidase-1. Gadolinium and carboxymethylated β-glucan dosed separately to control mice had no effect on serum lipids, whereas carboxymethylated β-glucan, but not gadolinium, exerted a significant (p<0.01) and unexpected hypolipidemic effect in poloxamer 407-induced hyperlipidemic mice. An acute hyperlipidemic state (∼4 days), induced with poloxamer 407 administration alone, resulted in a significant (p<0.01) time-dependent decrease and increase in serum cystatin C and chitotriosidase, respectively. Carboxymethylated β-glucan administration to hyperlipidemic mice significantly (p<0.05) increased the serum concentration of cystatin C, but significantly (p<0.01) decreased chitotriosidase activity, when each was compared to mice treated with poloxamer 407 only. Gadolinium administration caused a significant decrease in serum chitotriosidase activity in both controls (p<0.01) and poloxamer 407-induced hyperlipidemic (p<0.001) mice, but had no effect on the concentration of cystatin C in either controls or poloxamer 407-induced hyperlipidemic mice. Gadolinium administration resulted in both morphological and functional changes to liver macrophages, which included incorporation of excess lipids, especially when simultaneously administered with poloxamer 407. It is suggested that serum cystatin C and chitotriosidase may represent potential early biomarkers for eventual atherosclerosis in the poloxamer 407-induced mouse model of atherogenesis, and that two compounds known to either increase (carboxymethylated β-glucan) or decrease (gadolinium chloride) the number of macrophages in vivo were able to modulate serum

  1. Chitinase activities, scab resistance, mycorrhization rates and biomass of own-rooted and grafted transgenic apple

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Tina; Hanke, Magda-Viola; Flachowsky, Henryk; König, Stephan; Peil, Andreas; Kaldorf, Michael; Polle, Andrea; Buscot, François

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of constitutively expressed Trichoderma atroviride genes encoding exochitinase nag70 or endochitinase ech42 in transgenic lines of the apple cultivar Pinova on the symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). We compared the exo- and endochitinase activities of leaves and roots from non-transgenic Pinova and the transgenic lines T386 and T389. Local and systemic effects were examined using own-rooted trees and trees grafted onto rootstock M9. Scab susceptibility was also assessed in own-rooted and grafted trees. AMF root colonization was assessed microscopically in the roots of apple trees cultivated in pots with artificial substrate and inoculated with the AMF Glomus intraradices and Glomus mosseae. Own-rooted transgenic lines had significantly higher chitinase activities in their leaves and roots compared to non-transgenic Pinova. Both of the own-rooted transgenic lines showed significantly fewer symptoms of scab infection as well as significantly lower root colonization by AMF. Biomass production was significantly reduced in both own-rooted transgenic lines. Rootstock M9 influenced chitinase activities in the leaves of grafted scions. When grafted onto M9, the leaf chitinase activities of non-transgenic Pinova (M9/Pinova) and transgenic lines (M9/T386 and M9/T389) were not as different as when grown on their own roots. M9/T386 and M9/T389 were only temporarily less infected by scab than M9/Pinova. M9/T386 and M9/T389 did not differ significantly from M9/Pinova in their root chitinase activities, AMF root colonization and biomass. PMID:22888297

  2. Tobacco-expressed Brassica juncea chitinase BjCHI1 shows antifungal activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fung, King-Leung; Zhao, Kai-Jun; He, Zhu-Mei; Chye, Mee-Len

    2002-09-01

    We have previously isolated a Brassica juncea cDNA encoding BjCHI1, a novel chitinase with two chitin-binding domains, and have shown that its mRNA is induced by wounding and methyl jasmonate treatment (K.-J. Zhao and M.-L. Chye, Plant Mol. Biol. 40 (1999) 1009-1018). By the presence of two chitin-binding domains, BjCHI1 resembles the precursor of UDA (Urtica dioica agglutinin) but, unlike UDA, BjCHI1 retains its chitinase catalytic domain after post-translational processing. Here, we indicate the role of BjCHI1 in plant defense by demonstrating its mRNA induction upon Aspergillus niger infection or caterpillar Pieris rapae (L.) feeding. To further investigate the biological properties of BjCHI1, we transformed tobacco with a construct expressing the BjCHI1 cDNA from the CaMV 35S promoter. Subsequently, we purified BjCHI1 from the resultant transgenic Ro plants using a regenerated chitin column followed by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC). Also, the significance of the second chitin-binding domain in BjCHI1 was investigated by raising transgenic tobacco plants expressing BjCHI2, a deletion derivative of BjCHI1 lacking one chitin-binding domain. Colorimetric chitinase assays at 25 degrees C, pH 5, showed no significant differences between the activities of BjCHI1 and BjCHI2, suggesting that chitinase activity, due to the catalytic domain, is not enhanced by the presence of a second chitin-binding domain. Both BjCHI1 and BjCHI2 show in vitro anti-fungal activity toward Trichoderma viride, causing reductions in hyphal diameter, hyphal branching and conidia size. PMID:12175020

  3. Bacterial community composition and chitinase gene diversity of vermicompost with antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Yasir, Muhammad; Aslam, Zubair; Kim, Seon Won; Lee, Seon-Woo; Jeon, Che Ok; Chung, Young Ryun

    2009-10-01

    Bacterial communities and chitinase gene diversity of vermicompost (VC) were investigated to clarify the influence of earthworms on the inhibition of plant pathogenic fungi in VC. The spore germination of Fusarium moniliforme was reduced in VC aqueous extracts prepared from paper sludge and dairy sludge (fresh sludge, FS). The bacterial communities were examined by culture-dependent and -independent analyses. Unique clones selected from 16S rRNA libraries of FS and VC on the basis of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) fell into the major lineages of the domain bacteria Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Verrucomicrobia, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes. Among culture isolates, Actinobacteria dominated in VC, while almost equal numbers of Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria were present in FS. Analysis of chitinolytic isolates and chitinase gene diversity revealed that chitinolytic bacterial communities were enriched in VC. Populations of bacteria that inhibited plant fungal pathogens were higher in VC than in FS and particularly chitinolytic isolates were most active against the target fungi.

  4. Role of prodigiosin and chitinases in antagonistic activity of the bacterium Serratia marcescens against the fungus Didymella applanata.

    PubMed

    Duzhak, A B; Panfilova, Z I; Duzhak, T G; Vasyunina, E A; Shternshis, M V

    2012-08-01

    The molecular features of antagonism of the bacterium Serratia marcescens against the plant pathogenic fungus Didymella applanata have been studied. The chitinases and the red pigment prodigiosin (PG) of S. marcescens were isolated and characterized. Specific antifungal activity of the purified PG and chitinases against D. applanata was tested in vitro. The antagonistic properties of several S. marcescens strains exhibiting different levels of PG and chitinase production were analyzed in vitro with regard to D. applanata. It was found that the ability of S. marcescens to suppress the vital functions of D. applanata depends mainly on the level of PG production, whereas chitinase production does not provide the bacterium with any competitive advantage over the fungus.

  5. Bacterial expression of an active class Ib chitinase from Castanea sativa cotyledons.

    PubMed

    Allona, I; Collada, C; Casado, R; Paz-Ares, J; Aragoncillo, C

    1996-12-01

    Ch3, an endochitinase of 32 kDa present in Castanea sativa cotyledons, showed in vitro antifungal properties when assayed against Trichoderma viride. The characterization of a cDNA clone corresponding to this protein indicated that Ch3 is a class Ib endochitinase that is synthesized as a preprotein with a signal sequence preceding the mature polypeptide. Bacterial expression of mature Ch3 fused to the leader peptide of the periplasmic protein ompT resulted in active Ch3 enzyme. A plate assay was adapted for semi-quantitative determination of chitinase activity secreted from cultured bacteria, which should facilitate the identification of mutants with altered capacity to hydrolyse chitin.

  6. Lysozyme- and chitinase activity in latex bearing plants of genus Euphorbia--A contribution to plant defense mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sytwala, Sonja; Günther, Florian; Melzig, Matthias F

    2015-10-01

    Occurrence of latices in plants is widespread, there are 40 families of plants characterized to establish lactiferous structures. Latices exhibit a constitutive part of plant defense due to the stickiness. The appearance of proteins incorporated in latices is well characterized, and hydrolytic active proteins are considerable. A lot of plants constitute so-called pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins, to overcome stressful conditions. In our investigation we are focused on latex bearing plants of Euphorbiaceae Juss., and investigated the appearance of chitinase- and lysozyme activity in particular. The present outcomes represent a comprehensive study, relating to the occurrence of lysozyme and chitinase activity of genus Euphorbia at the first time. 110 different species of genus Euphorbia L. were tested, and the appearance of chitinase and lysozyme were determined in different quantities. The appearance itself, and the physicochemical properties of latices indicate an efficient interaction for plant defense against pathogen attack.

  7. The N-terminal cysteine-rich domain of tobacco class I chitinase is essential for chitin binding but not for catalytic or antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Iseli, B; Boller, T; Neuhaus, J M

    1993-09-01

    The vacuolar chitinases of class I possess an N-terminal cysteine-rich domain homologous to hevein and chitin-binding lectins such as wheat germ agglutinin and Urtica dioica lectin. To investigate the significance of this domain for the biochemical and functional characteristics of chitinase, chimeric genes encoding the basic chitinase A of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) with and without this domain were constructed and constitutively expressed in transgenic Nicotiana sylvestris. The chitinases were subsequently isolated and purified to homogeneity from the transgenic plants. Chromatography on colloidal chitin revealed that only the form with the N-terminal domain, and not the one without it, had chitin-binding properties, demonstrating directly that the domain is a chitin-binding domain (CBD). Under standard assay conditions with radioactive colloidal chitin, both forms of chitinase had approximately the same catalytic activity. However, kinetic analysis demonstrated that the enzyme without CBD had a considerably lower apparent affinity for its substrate. The pH and temperature optima of the two chitinases were similar, but the form with the CBD had an approximately 3-fold higher activation energy and retained a higher activity at low pH values. Both chitinases were capable of inhibiting growth of Trichoderma viride, although the form with the CBD was about three times more effective than the one without it. Thus, the CBD is not necessary for catalytic or antifungal activity of chitinase. PMID:8208848

  8. Purification of Chitinase enzymes from Bacillus subtilis bacteria TV-125, investigation of kinetic properties and antifungal activity against Fusarium culmorum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chitin is the main structural component of cell walls of fungi, exoskeletons of insects and other arthropods and shells of crustaceans. Chitinase enzyme is capable of degrading chitin, and this enzyme can be used as a biological fungicide against phytopathogenic fungi, as well as an insecticide against insect pests. Methods In this study, 158 isolates, which were derived from bacteria cultures isolated from leaves and root rhizospheres of certain plants in Turkey, were selected after confirming that they are not phytopathogenic based on the hypersensitivity test performed on tobacco; and antifungal activity test was performed against Fusarium culmorum, which is a pathogenic fungi that cause decomposition of roots of vegetables. Accordingly, chitinase enzyme activity assay was performed on 31 isolates that have an antifungal activity, and among them the isolate of Bacillus subtilis TV-125 was selected, which has demonstrated the highest activity. Results Chitinase enzyme was purified by using ammonium sulphate and DEAE-sephadex ion exchange chromatography. Ammonium sulphate precipitation of chitinase enzyme from Bacillus subtilis TV-125 isolate was performed at maximum range of 0-20%, and 28.4-fold purification was obtained with a 13.4% of yield. Optimum activity of the purified enzyme was observed at pH 4.0 and at 50°C of temperature. In addition, it was identified that Bacillus subtilis TV-125A isolate retains 42% of its activity at 80°C temperature. Conclusion In the last phase of the study, chitinase enzyme purified from Bacillus subtilis TV-125A was tested on four fungal agents, although all the results were positive, it was particularly effective on F. culmorum according to the findings. PMID:25112904

  9. Oat (Avena sativa) seed extract as an antifungal food preservative through the catalytic activity of a highly abundant class I chitinase.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Hans Peter; Madsen, Lone Søvad; Petersen, Jørgen; Andersen, Jesper Tapdrup; Hansen, Anne Maria; Beck, Hans Christian

    2010-03-01

    Extracts from different higher plants were screened for the ability to inhibit the growth of Penicillium roqueforti, a major contaminating species in industrial food processing. Oat (Avena sativa) seed extracts exhibited a high degree of antifungal activity and could be used directly on rye bread to prevent the formation of P. roqueforti colonies. Proteins in the oat seed extracts were fractionated by column chromatography and proteins in fractions containing antifungal activity were identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and database searches. Identified antifungal candidates included thaumatin-like proteins, 1,3-beta-glucanase, permatin precursor, pathogenesis-related protein type 1, and chitinases of class I and II. Class I chitinase could be specifically removed from the extracts and was found to be indispensable for 50% of the P. roqueforti inhibiting activity. The purified class I chitinase has a molecular weight of approximately 34 kDa, optimal chitinase activity at pH 7, and exists as at least two basic isoforms (pI values of 7.6 and 8.0). Partial sequencing of the class I chitinase isoforms by LC-MS/MS revealed a primary structure with high similarity to class I chitinases of wheat (Triticum aestivum), barley (Hordeum vulgare), and rye (Secale cereale). Oat, wheat, barley, and rye seed extracts were compared with respect to the abundance of the class I chitinase and decrease in antifungal activity when class I chitinase is removed. We found that the oat seed class I chitinase is at least ten times more abundant than the wheat, barley, and rye homologs and that oat seed extracts are highly active toward P. roqueforti as opposed to extracts of other cereal seeds.

  10. Mutational analysis of amino acid residues involved in catalytic activity of a family 18 chitinase from tulip bulbs.

    PubMed

    Suzukawa, Keisuke; Yamagami, Takeshi; Ohnuma, Takayuki; Hirakawa, Hideki; Kuhara, Satoru; Aso, Yoichi; Ishiguro, Masatsune

    2003-02-01

    We expressed chitinase-1 (TBC-1) from tulip bulbs (Tulipa bakeri) in E. coli cells and used site-directed mutagenesis to identify amino acid residues essential for catalytic activity. Mutations at Glu-125 and Trp-251 completely abolished enzyme activity, and activity decreased with mutations at Asp-123 and Trp-172 when glycolchitin was the substrate. Activity changed with the mutations of Trp-251 to one of several amino acids with side-chains of little hydrophobicity, suggesting that hydrophobic interaction of Trp-251 is important for the activity. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation analysis with hevamine as the model compound showed that the distance between Asp-123 and Glu-125 was extended by mutation of Trp-251. Kinetic studies of Trp-251-mutated chitinases confirmed these various phenomena. The results suggested that Glu-125 and Trp-251 are essential for enzyme activity and that Trp-251 had a direct role in ligand binding.

  11. Activity, stability and folding analysis of the chitinase from Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Patricia L A; Minchaca, Alexis Z; Mares, Rosa E; Ramos, Marco A

    2016-02-01

    Human amebiasis, caused by the parasitic protozoan Entamoeba histolytica, remains as a significant public health issue in developing countries. The life cycle of the parasite compromises two main stages, trophozoite and cyst, linked by two major events: encystation and excystation. Interestingly, the cyst stage has a chitin wall that helps the parasite to withstand harsh environmental conditions. Since the amebic chitinase, EhCHT1, has been recognized as a key player in both encystation and excystation, it is plausible to consider that specific inhibition could arrest the life cycle of the parasite and, thus, stop the infection. However, to selectively target EhCHT1 it is important to recognize its unique biochemical features to have the ability to control its cellular function. Hence, to gain further insights into the structure-function relationship, we conducted an experimental approach to examine the effects of pH, temperature, and denaturant concentration on the enzymatic activity and protein stability. Additionally, dependence on in vivo oxidative folding was further studied using a bacterial model. Our results attest the potential of EhCHT1 as a target for the design and development of new or improved anti-amebic therapeutics. Likewise, the potential of the oxidoreductase EhPDI, involved in oxidative folding of amebic proteins, was also confirmed.

  12. Activity, stability and folding analysis of the chitinase from Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Patricia L A; Minchaca, Alexis Z; Mares, Rosa E; Ramos, Marco A

    2016-02-01

    Human amebiasis, caused by the parasitic protozoan Entamoeba histolytica, remains as a significant public health issue in developing countries. The life cycle of the parasite compromises two main stages, trophozoite and cyst, linked by two major events: encystation and excystation. Interestingly, the cyst stage has a chitin wall that helps the parasite to withstand harsh environmental conditions. Since the amebic chitinase, EhCHT1, has been recognized as a key player in both encystation and excystation, it is plausible to consider that specific inhibition could arrest the life cycle of the parasite and, thus, stop the infection. However, to selectively target EhCHT1 it is important to recognize its unique biochemical features to have the ability to control its cellular function. Hence, to gain further insights into the structure-function relationship, we conducted an experimental approach to examine the effects of pH, temperature, and denaturant concentration on the enzymatic activity and protein stability. Additionally, dependence on in vivo oxidative folding was further studied using a bacterial model. Our results attest the potential of EhCHT1 as a target for the design and development of new or improved anti-amebic therapeutics. Likewise, the potential of the oxidoreductase EhPDI, involved in oxidative folding of amebic proteins, was also confirmed. PMID:26526675

  13. Antifungal properties of lectin and new chitinases from potato tubers.

    PubMed

    Gozia, O; Ciopraga, J; Bentia, T; Lungu, M; Zamfirescu, I; Tudor, R; Roseanu, A; Nitu, F

    1993-08-01

    We have purified from potato tubers, the lectin STA devoid of chitinase activity and two chitinases devoid of lectin activity. Both enzymes are 16 kDa glycoproteins, and probably belong to a new family of plant chitinases. The respective antifungal properties of lectin and chitinases were studied by following their effects against early developmental stages of Fusarium oxysporum, a fungal potato pathogen. Here we demonstrate that: (1) lectin does not inhibit mycelial growth but irreversibly inhibits conidia germination and alters the germ tubes; and (2) chitinases block mycelial growth as well as conidia germination and lyse germ tubes.

  14. Molecular docking and site-directed mutagenesis of a Bacillus thuringiensis chitinase to improve chitinolytic, synergistic lepidopteran-larvicidal and nematicidal activities.

    PubMed

    Ni, Hong; Zeng, Siquan; Qin, Xu; Sun, Xiaowen; Zhang, Shan; Zhao, Xiuyun; Yu, Ziniu; Li, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial chitinases are useful in the biocontrol of agriculturally important pests and fungal pathogens. However, the utility of naturally occurring bacterial chitinases is often limited by their low enzyme activity. In this study, we constructed mutants of a Bacillus thuringiensis chitinase with enhanced activity based on homology modeling, molecular docking, and the site-directed mutagenesis of target residues to modify spatial positions, steric hindrances, or hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity. We first identified a gene from B. thuringiensis YBT-9602 that encodes a chitinase (Chi9602) belonging to glycosyl hydrolase family 18 with conserved substrate-binding and substrate-catalytic motifs. We constructed a structural model of a truncated version of Chi9602 (Chi9602(35-459)) containing the substrate-binding domain using the homologous 1ITX protein of Bacillus circulans as the template. We performed molecular docking analysis of Chi9602(35-459) using di-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine as the ligand. We then selected 10 residues of interest from the docking area for the site-directed mutagenesis experiments and expression in Escherichia coli. Assays of the chitinolytic activity of the purified chitinases revealed that the three mutants exhibited increased chitinolytic activity. The ChiW50A mutant exhibited a greater than 60 % increase in chitinolytic activity, with similar pH, temperature and metal ion requirements, compared to wild-type Chi9602. Furthermore, ChiW50A exhibited pest-controlling activity and antifungal activity. Remarkable synergistic effects of this mutant with B. thuringiensis spore-crystal preparations against Helicoverpa armigera and Caenorhabditis elegans larvae and obvious activity against several plant-pathogenic fungi were observed.

  15. Molecular Docking and Site-directed Mutagenesis of a Bacillus thuringiensis Chitinase to Improve Chitinolytic, Synergistic Lepidopteran-larvicidal and Nematicidal Activities

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Hong; Zeng, Siquan; Qin, Xu; Sun, Xiaowen; Zhang, Shan; Zhao, Xiuyun; Yu, Ziniu; Li, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial chitinases are useful in the biocontrol of agriculturally important pests and fungal pathogens. However, the utility of naturally occurring bacterial chitinases is often limited by their low enzyme activity. In this study, we constructed mutants of a Bacillus thuringiensis chitinase with enhanced activity based on homology modeling, molecular docking, and the site-directed mutagenesis of target residues to modify spatial positions, steric hindrances, or hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity. We first identified a gene from B. thuringiensis YBT-9602 that encodes a chitinase (Chi9602) belonging to glycosyl hydrolase family 18 with conserved substrate-binding and substrate-catalytic motifs. We constructed a structural model of a truncated version of Chi9602 (Chi960235-459) containing the substrate-binding domain using the homologous 1ITX protein of Bacillus circulans as the template. We performed molecular docking analysis of Chi960235-459 using di-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine as the ligand. We then selected 10 residues of interest from the docking area for the site-directed mutagenesis experiments and expression in Escherichia coli. Assays of the chitinolytic activity of the purified chitinases revealed that the three mutants exhibited increased chitinolytic activity. The ChiW50A mutant exhibited a greater than 60 % increase in chitinolytic activity, with similar pH, temperature and metal ion requirements, compared to wild-type Chi9602. Furthermore, ChiW50A exhibited pest-controlling activity and antifungal activity. Remarkable synergistic effects of this mutant with B. thuringiensis spore-crystal preparations against Helicoverpa armigera and Caenorhabditis elegans larvae and obvious activity against several plant-pathogenic fungi were observed. PMID:25678849

  16. Chitinases: An update

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Rifat; Khan, Minhaj A.; Ahmad, Mahboob; Ahmad, Malik Mobeen; Abdin, Malik Zainul; Musarrat, Javed; Javed, Saleem

    2013-01-01

    Chitin, the second most abundant polysaccharide in nature after cellulose, is found in the exoskeleton of insects, fungi, yeast, and algae, and in the internal structures of other vertebrates. Chitinases are enzymes that degrade chitin. Chitinases contribute to the generation of carbon and nitrogen in the ecosystem. Chitin and chitinolytic enzymes are gaining importance for their biotechnological applications, especially the chitinases exploited in agriculture fields to control pathogens. Chitinases have a use in human health care, especially in human diseases like asthma. Chitinases have wide-ranging applications including the preparation of pharmaceutically important chitooligosaccharides and N-acetyl D glucosamine, preparation of single-cell protein, isolation of protoplasts from fungi and yeast, control of pathogenic fungi, treatment of chitinous waste, mosquito control and morphogenesis, etc. In this review, the various types of chitinases and the chitinases found in different organisms such as bacteria, plants, fungi, and mammals are discussed. PMID:23559820

  17. A single amino acid substitution in a chitinase of the legume Medicago truncatula is sufficient to gain Nod-factor hydrolase activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lan-Yue; Cai, Jie; Li, Ru-Jie; Liu, Wei; Wagner, Christian; Wong, Kam-Bo; Xie, Zhi-Ping; Staehelin, Christian

    2016-07-01

    The symbiotic interaction between nitrogen-fixing rhizobia and legumes depends on lipo-chitooligosaccharidic Nod-factors (NFs). The NF hydrolase MtNFH1 of Medicago truncatula is a symbiotic enzyme that hydrolytically inactivates NFs with a C16 : 2 acyl chain produced by the microsymbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021. MtNFH1 is related to class V chitinases (glycoside hydrolase family 18) but lacks chitinase activity. Here, we investigated the substrate specificity of MtNFH1-related proteins. MtCHIT5a and MtCHIT5b of M. truncatula as well as LjCHIT5 of Lotus japonicus showed chitinase activity, suggesting a role in plant defence. The enzymes failed to hydrolyse NFs from S. meliloti. NFs from Rhizobium leguminosarum with a C18 : 4 acyl moiety were neither hydrolysed by these chitinases nor by MtNFH1. Construction of chimeric proteins and further amino acid replacements in MtCHIT5b were performed to identify chitinase variants that gained the ability to hydrolyse NFs. A single serine-to-proline substitution was sufficient to convert MtCHIT5b into an NF-cleaving enzyme. MtNFH1 with the corresponding proline-to-serine substitution failed to hydrolyse NFs. These results are in agreement with a substrate-enzyme model that predicts NF cleavage when the C16 : 2 moiety is placed into a distinct fatty acid-binding cleft. Our findings support the view that MtNFH1 evolved from the ancestral MtCHIT5b by gene duplication and subsequent symbiosis-related neofunctionalization. PMID:27383628

  18. A single amino acid substitution in a chitinase of the legume Medicago truncatula is sufficient to gain Nod-factor hydrolase activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lan-Yue; Cai, Jie; Li, Ru-Jie; Liu, Wei; Wagner, Christian; Wong, Kam-Bo; Xie, Zhi-Ping; Staehelin, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The symbiotic interaction between nitrogen-fixing rhizobia and legumes depends on lipo-chitooligosaccharidic Nod-factors (NFs). The NF hydrolase MtNFH1 of Medicago truncatula is a symbiotic enzyme that hydrolytically inactivates NFs with a C16 : 2 acyl chain produced by the microsymbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021. MtNFH1 is related to class V chitinases (glycoside hydrolase family 18) but lacks chitinase activity. Here, we investigated the substrate specificity of MtNFH1-related proteins. MtCHIT5a and MtCHIT5b of M. truncatula as well as LjCHIT5 of Lotus japonicus showed chitinase activity, suggesting a role in plant defence. The enzymes failed to hydrolyse NFs from S. meliloti. NFs from Rhizobium leguminosarum with a C18 : 4 acyl moiety were neither hydrolysed by these chitinases nor by MtNFH1. Construction of chimeric proteins and further amino acid replacements in MtCHIT5b were performed to identify chitinase variants that gained the ability to hydrolyse NFs. A single serine-to-proline substitution was sufficient to convert MtCHIT5b into an NF-cleaving enzyme. MtNFH1 with the corresponding proline-to-serine substitution failed to hydrolyse NFs. These results are in agreement with a substrate-enzyme model that predicts NF cleavage when the C16 : 2 moiety is placed into a distinct fatty acid-binding cleft. Our findings support the view that MtNFH1 evolved from the ancestral MtCHIT5b by gene duplication and subsequent symbiosis-related neofunctionalization. PMID:27383628

  19. The characteristics of chitinase expression in Aeromonas schubertii.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jeen-Kuan; Shen, Chia-Rui; Liu, Chao-Lin

    2014-04-01

    In this study, chitinase activity in an incubation broth of Aeromonas schubertii was measured using colloidal chitin azure as the substrate. More specifically, the induction of chitinases due to amendment with various carbon sources was examined. The highest chitinase activity was found following amendment with 0.5-1.0 % chitin powder, whereas the activity increased negligibly due to amendment with other carbon sources, such as glucose, GlcNAc, GlcN, sorbitol, sucrose, cellulose, or starch. The chitinase activity induced by the chitin powder was suppressed when the glucose, GlcNAc, GlcN, or starch was added simultaneously to the medium but was not suppressed by the addition of sorbitol, sucrose, or cellulose. The activity of chitinase in the crude extract was also not directly inhibited by glucose. Taken together, these findings suggest that the induction of chitinase activity depends on the acquisition of suitable carbon sources from the environment and that induction occurs at a regulatory level.

  20. Acaconin, a chitinase-like antifungal protein with cytotoxic and anti-HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activities from Acacia confusa seeds.

    PubMed

    Lam, Sze Kwan; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2010-01-01

    From the seeds of Acacia confusa, a chitinase-like antifungal protein designated as acaconin that demonstrated antifungal activity toward Rhizoctonia solani with an IC₅₀ of 30±4 µM was isolated. Acaconin demonstrated an N-terminal sequence with pronounced similarity to chitinases and a molecular mass of 32 kDa. It was isolated by chromatography on Q-Sepharose, SP-Sepharose and Superdex 75 and was not bound by either ion exchanger. Acaconin was devoid of chitinase activity. The antifungal activity against Rhizoctonia solani was completely preserved from pH 4 to 10 and from 0°C to 70°C. Congo Red staining at the tips of R. solani hyphae indicated inhibition of fungal growth. However, there was no antifungal activity toward Mycosphaerella arachidicola, Fusarium oxysporum, Helminthosporium maydis, and Valsa mali. Acaconin inhibited proliferation of breast cancer MCF-7 cells with an IC₅₀ of 128±9 µM but did not affect hepatoma HepG2 cells. Its IC₅₀ value toward HIV-1 reverse transcriptase was 10±2.3 µM. The unique features of acaconin include relatively high stability when exposed to changes in ambient pH and temperature, specific antifungal and antitumor actions, potent HIV-reverse transcriptase inhibitory activity, and lack of binding by strongly cationic and anionic exchangers. PMID:20725649

  1. Fungal Exposure Modulates the Effect of Polymorphisms of Chitinases on Emergency Department Visits and Hospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ann Chen; Lasky-Su, Jessica; Rogers, Christine A.; Klanderman, Barbara J.; Litonjua, Augusto A.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Chitinases are enzymes that cleave chitin, which is present in fungal cells. Two types of human chitinases, chitotriosidase and acidic mammalian chitinase, and the chitinase-like protein, YKL-40, seem to play an important role in asthma. We hypothesized that exposure to environmental fungi may modulate the effect of chitinases in individuals with asthma. Objectives: To explore whether interactions between high fungal exposure and common genetic variants in the two chitinases in humans, CHIT1 and CHIA, and the chitinase 3-like 1 gene, CHI3L1, are associated with severe asthma exacerbations and other asthma-related outcomes. Methods: Forty-eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CHIT1, CHIA, and CHI3L1 and one CHIT1 duplication were genotyped in 395 subjects and their parents as part of the Childhood Asthma Management Program. Household levels of mold (an index of fungal exposure) were determined on house dust samples. We conducted family-based association tests with gene–environment interactions. Our outcome was severe exacerbation, defined as emergency department visits and hospitalizations from asthma over a 4-year period, and our secondary outcomes included indices of lung function and allergy-related phenotypes. Measurements and Main Results: Of the 395 subjects who had mold levels at randomization, 24% (95 subjects) had levels that were greater than 25,000 units per gram of house dust (high mold exposure). High mold exposure significantly modified the relation between three SNPs in CHIT1 (rs2486953, rs4950936, and rs1417149) and severe exacerbations (P for interaction 0.0010 for rs2486953, 0.0008 for rs4950936, and 0.0005 for rs1417149). High mold exposure did not significantly modify the relationship between any of the other variants and outcomes. Conclusions: Environmental exposure to fungi, modifies the effect of CHIT1 SNPs on severe asthma exacerbations. PMID:20538957

  2. Aromatic residues in the catalytic center of chitinase A from Serratia marcescens affect processivity, enzyme activity, and biomass converting efficiency.

    PubMed

    Zakariassen, Henrik; Aam, Berit Bjugan; Horn, Svein J; Vårum, Kjell M; Sørlie, Morten; Eijsink, Vincent G H

    2009-04-17

    The processive Serratia marcescens chitinases A (ChiA) and B (ChiB) are thought to degrade chitin in the opposite directions. A recent study of ChiB suggested that processivity is governed by aromatic residues in the +1 and +2 (aglycon) subsites close to the catalytic center. To further investigate the roles of aromatic residues in processivity and to gain insight into the structural basis of directionality, we have mutated Trp(167), Trp(275), and Phe(396) in the -3, +1, and +2 subsites of ChiA, respectively, and characterized the hydrolytic activities of the mutants toward beta-chitin and the soluble chitin-derivative chitosan. Although the W275A and F396A mutants showed only modest reductions in processivity, it was almost abolished by the W167A mutation. Thus, although aglycon subsites seem to steer processivity in ChiB, a glycon (-3) subsite seems to be adapted to do so in ChiA, in line with the notion that the two enzymes have different directionalities. Remarkably, whereas all three single mutants and the W167A/W275A double mutant showed reduced efficiency toward chitin, they showed up to 20-fold higher activities toward chitosan. These results show that the processive mechanism is essential for an efficient conversion of crystalline substrates but comes at a large cost in terms of intrinsic enzyme speed. This needs to be taken into account when devising enzymatic strategies for biomass turnover.

  3. Computational analysis of difenoconazole interaction with soil chitinases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlǎdoiu, D. L.; Filimon, M. N.; Ostafe, V.; Isvoran, A.

    2015-01-01

    This study focusses on the investigation of the potential binding of the fungicide difenoconazole to soil chitinases using a computational approach. Computational characterization of the substrate binding sites of Serratia marcescens and Bacillus cereus chitinases using Fpocket tool reflects the role of hydrophobic residues for the substrate binding and the high local hydrophobic density of both sites. Molecular docking study reveals that difenoconazole is able to bind to Serratia marcescens and Bacillus cereus chitinases active sites, the binding energies being comparable.

  4. Chitinases: in agriculture and human healthcare.

    PubMed

    Nagpure, Anand; Choudhary, Bharti; Gupta, Rajinder K

    2014-09-01

    Biological control of phytopathogenic fungi and insects continues to inspire the research and development of environmentally friendly bioactive alternatives. Potentially lytic enzymes, chitinases can act as a biocontrol agent against agriculturally important fungi and insects. The cell wall in fungi and protective covers, i.e. cuticle in insects shares a key structural polymer, chitin, a β-1,4-linked N-acetylglucosamine polymer. Therefore, it is advantageous to develop a common biocontrol agent against both of these groups. As chitin is absent in plants and mammals, targeting its metabolism will signify an eco-friendly strategy for the control of agriculturally important fungi and insects but is innocuous to mammals, plants, beneficial insects and other organisms. In addition, development of chitinase transgenic plant varieties probably holds the most promising method for augmenting agricultural crop protection and productivity, when properly integrated into traditional systems. Recently, human proteins with chitinase activity and chitinase-like proteins were identified and established as biomarkers for human diseases. This review covers the recent advances of chitinases as a biocontrol agent and its various applications including preparation of medically important chitooligosaccharides, bioconversion of chitin as well as in implementing chitinases as diagnostic and prognostic markers for numerous diseases and the prospect of their future utilization.

  5. Cloning and expression of pathogenesis-related protein 4 from jelly fig (Ficus awkeotsang Makino) achenes associated with ribonuclease, chitinase and anti-fungal activities.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hsi-Chi; Lin, Jia-Hui; Chua, Anna C N; Chung, Tse-Yu; Tsai, I-Chun; Tzen, Jason T C; Chou, Wing-Ming

    2012-07-01

    A cDNA fragment (FaPR4) encoding a class I pathogenesis-related protein 4 (PR-4) from Ficus awkeotsang was obtained by PCR cloning. Plant PR-4s were grouped into class I and II, differing by the presence of ChtBD and hinge. The predicted mature FaPR4 comprises N-terminal chitin-binding domain (ChtBD), hinge, Barwin domain and C-terminal extension. FaPR4-C, an N-terminal truncated form of FaPR4, was designed to mimic the structural feature of class II PR-4s. FaPR4 and FaPR4-C were over-expressed in yeast Pichia pastoris, and both recombinants exhibited RNase and anti-fungal activities. To our knowledge, it is the first report that FaPR4, a member of class I PR-4s has RNase activity as class II. FaPR4 possesses better anti-fungal activities toward Fusarium oxysporum and Sclerotium rolfsii than FaPR4-C. Heat-treated FaPR4 remained RNase and anti-fungal activities; while heat-treated FaPR4-C lost those activities. Therefore, ChtBD of FaPR4 may not only contribute to its anti-fungal but also improve the thermal stability of protein. It also implied the correlation of RNase activity with anti-fungal activity of FaPR4-C. Furthermore, FaPR4 was detected to have weak but significant chitinase activity, and its chitinase activity was reduced after heat treatment. The chitinase activity by FaPR4-C was much lower than FaPR4. PMID:22579939

  6. The Latex of Hevea brasiliensis Contains High Levels of Both Chitinases and Chitinases/Lysozymes 1

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Melinda N.

    1991-01-01

    The latex of the commercial rubber tree, Hevea brasiliensis, was fractionated by ultracentrifugation as described by G. F. J. Moir ([1959] Nature 184: 1626-1628) into a top layer of rubber particles, a cleared cytoplasm, and a pellet that contains primarily specialized vacuoles known as lutoids. The proteins in each fraction were resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Both the pellet fraction and cleared cytoplasm contained large amounts of relatively few proteins, suggesting that laticifers serve a very specialized function in the plant. More than 75% of the total soluble protein in latex was found in the pellet fraction. Twenty-five percent of the protein in the pellet was identified as chitinases/lysozymes, which are capable of degrading the chitin component of fungal cell walls and the peptidoglycan component of bacterial cell walls. Both the chitinase and lysozyme activities were localized exclusively in the pellet or lutoid fraction. The chitinases/lysozymes were resolved into acidic and basic classes of proteins and further purified. An acidic protein (molecular mass 25.5 kD) represented 20% of the chitinase activity in latex; this protein lacked the low level of lysozyme activity that is associated with many plant chitinases. Six basic proteins, having both chitinase and lysozyme activities in various ratios and molecular mass of 27.5 or 26 kD, were resolved. Two of the basic proteins had very high lysozyme specific activities which were comparable to the specific activities reported for animal lysozymes. Like animal lysozymes, but unlike previously characterized plant chitinases/lysozymes, these basic chitinases/lysozymes were also capable of completely lysing or clearing suspensions of bacterial cell walls. These results suggest that laticifers may serve a defensive role in the plant. Images Figure 2 Figure 5 PMID:16668007

  7. Potentiation of the synergistic activities of chitinases ChiA, ChiB and ChiC from Serratia marcescens CFFSUR-B2 by chitobiase (Chb) and chitin binding protein (CBP).

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Román, Martha Ingrid; Dunn, Michael F; Tinoco-Valencia, Raunel; Holguín-Meléndez, Francisco; Huerta-Palacios, Graciela; Guillén-Navarro, Karina

    2014-01-01

    With the goal of understanding the chitinolytic mechanism of the potential biological control strain Serratia marcescens CFFSUR-B2, genes encoding chitinases ChiA, ChiB and ChiC, chitobiase (Chb) and chitin binding protein (CBP) were cloned, the protein products overexpressed in Escherichia coli as 6His-Sumo fusion proteins and purified by affinity chromatography. Following affinity tag removal, the chitinolytic activity of the recombinant proteins was evaluated individually and in combination using colloidal chitin as substrate. ChiB and ChiC were highly active while ChiA was inactive. Reactions containing both ChiB and ChiC showed significantly increased N-acetylglucosamine trimer and dimer formation, but decreased monomer formation, compared to reactions with either enzyme alone. This suggests that while both ChiB and ChiC have a general affinity for the same substrate, they attack different sites and together degrade chitin more efficiently than either enzyme separately. Chb and CBP in combination with ChiB and ChiC (individually or together) increased their chitinase activity. We report for the first time the potentiating effect of Chb on the activity of the chitinases and the synergistic activity of a mixture of all five proteins (the three chitinases, Chb and CBP). These results contribute to our understanding of the mechanism of action of the chitinases produced by strain CFFSUR-B2 and provide a molecular basis for its high potential as a biocontrol agent against fungal pathogens.

  8. Aeromonas chitinase degrades chironomid egg masses.

    PubMed

    Laviad, Sivan; Golan, Amnon; Shaked, Tamar; Vaizel-Ohayon, Dalit; Halpern, Malka; Pick, Elah

    2016-02-01

    Chironomids are freshwater insects that undergo a complete metamorphosis of four life stages. Chironomid egg masses can be degraded by Vibrio cholerae and some Aeromonas species. Egg mass degradation by V. cholerae requires haemagglutinin protease activity. Our aim was to identify the egg mass degrading (EMD) factor secreted by Aeromonas dhkanesis 3K1C15. Following the hypothesis that the EMD factor of A. dhkanesis is also a protease, secreted proteases were screened, but none of them proved to have the same properties as the EMD factor. Using conventional protein purification methods, we found that the active fraction included chitinases. We further confirmed chitin as a building block of the egg masses. Interestingly, by supplementing bacterial growth media with chitin, we observed unexpected EMD factor activity in Aeromonas isolates that initially were not able to degrade egg masses. Accordingly, we concluded that although strain 3K1C15 secretes chitinases constitutively, most Aeromonas strains secrete chitinases inductively. Induction of chitinases in nature presumably occurs when bacteria are attached to the egg mass habitat, in which chitin is abundant. Considering that chitinases are highly conserved across bacteria phyla, we assume that the role of this enzyme in the bacteria-insect interplay could be wider than is currently thought. PMID:26472256

  9. Study of biomaterial-induced macrophage activation, cell-mediated immune response and molecular oxidative damage in patients with dermal bioimplants.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Olga; Rodríguez-Sureda, Víctor; Domínguez, Carmen; Fernández-Figueras, Teresa; Vilches, Angel; Llurba, Elisa; Alijotas-Reig, Jaume

    2012-01-01

    Several soft-tissue dermal fillers have been reported to provoke immunogenicity and may cause adverse reactions despite claims regarding their safety. This study aimed to assess biomaterial-induced macrophage activation, cell-mediated immune response and oxidative stress in 169 patients with dermal bioimplants. To this end, we analysed plasma concentrations of myeloperoxidase (MPO), the chitinase-like proteins chitotriosidase and YKL-40 and molecular oxidative damage. The present study shows, for the first time, that the components of innate immunity: chitotriosidase and YKL-40, are significantly higher in patients with certain bioimplants and these markers of monocyte/macrophage activation rose progressively as adverse reactions (AR) evolved. Plasma MPO levels increased 4-fold in filler users with AR and 3-fold in those without. Analysis by filler type showed subjects injected with calcium hydroxylapatite, methacrylate, acrylamides and silicone to have values significantly above those of non-filler subjects for at least two plasma biomarkers, probably because the afore-mentioned biomaterials are permanent and prone to trigger AR in the long term. By contrast, hyaluronic acid alone elicited little immune response. Plasma concentrations of markers of oxidative damage to lipids and proteins were found to be significantly higher in users of four of the nine dermal fillers studied. These diffusible products of molecular peroxidation would stem from the reaction catalysed by MPO that generates potent oxidants, leading to cell oxidative damage which, in turn, may exert deleterious effects on the organism. Overall, the results of this study on the effects of a range of dermal fillers point to chronic activation of the immune response mediated by macrophages and PMNs. The increases in plasma of MPO, chitotriosidase and YKL-40 proteins and products of macromolecular peroxidation suggests that these molecules could serve as blood-based biochemical markers and alert to the

  10. Plant Chitinases and Their Roles in Resistance to Fungal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Punja, Zamir K.; Zhang, Ye-Yan

    1993-01-01

    Chitinases are enzymes that hydrolyze the N-acetylglucosamine polymer chitin, and they occur in diverse plant tissues over a broad range of crop and noncrop species. The enzymes may be expressed constitutively at low levels but are dramatically enhanced by numerous abiotic agents (ethylene, salicylic acid, salt solutions, ozone, UV light) and by biotic factors (fungi, bacteria, viruses, viroids, fungal cell wall components, and oligosaccharides). Different classes of plant chitinases are distinguishable by molecular, biochemical, and physicochemical criteria. Thus, plant chitinases may differ in substrate-binding characteristics, localization within the cell, and specific activities. Because chitin is a structural component of the cell wall of many phytopathogenic fungi, extensive research has been conducted to determine whether plant chitinases have a role in defense against fungal diseases. Plant chitinases have different degrees of antifungal activity to several fungi in vitro. In vivo, although rapid accumulation and high levels of chitinases (together with numerous other pathogenesis-related proteins) occur in resistant tissues expressing a hypersensitive reaction, high levels also can occur in susceptible tissues. Expression of cloned chitinase genes in transgenic plants has provided further evidence for their role in plant defense. The level of protection observed in these plants is variable and may be influenced by the specific activity of the enzyme, its localization and concentration within the cell, the characteristics of the fungal pathogen, and the nature of the host-pathogen interaction. The expression of chitinase in combination with one or several different antifungal proteins should have a greater effect on reducing disease development, given the complexities of fungal-plant cell interactions and resistance responses in plants. The effects of plant chitinases on nematode development in vitro and in vivo are worthy of investigation. PMID:19279806

  11. Cloning, Expression and 3D Structure Prediction of Chitinase from Chitinolyticbacter meiyuanensis SYBC-H1

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Zhikui; Wu, Hangui; Yang, Meiling; Chen, Jianjun; Xi, Limin; Zhao, Weijie; Yu, Jialin; Liu, Jiayang; Liao, Xiangru; Huang, Qingguo

    2016-01-01

    Two CHI genes from Chitinolyticbacter meiyuanensis SYBC-H1 encoding chitinases were identified and their protein 3D structures were predicted. According to the amino acid sequence alignment, CHI1 gene encoding 166 aa had a structural domain similar to the GH18 type II chitinase, and CHI2 gene encoding 383 aa had the same catalytic domain as the glycoside hydrolase family 19 chitinase. In this study, CHI2 chitinase were expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 cells, and this protein was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation, DEAE-cellulose, and Sephadex G-100 chromatography. Optimal activity of CHI2 chitinase occurred at a temperature of 40 °C and a pH of 6.5. The presence of metal ions Fe3+, Fe2+, and Zn2+ inhibited CHI2 chitinase activity, while Na+ and K+ promoted its activity. Furthermore, the presence of EGTA, EDTA, and β-mercaptoethanol significantly increased the stability of CHI2 chitinase. The CHI2 chitinase was active with p-NP-GlcNAc, with the Km and Vm values of 23.0 µmol/L and 9.1 mM/min at a temperature of 37 °C, respectively. Additionally, the CHI2 chitinase was characterized as an N-acetyl glucosaminidase based on the hydrolysate from chitin. Overall, our results demonstrated CHI2 chitinase with remarkable biochemical properties is suitable for bioconversion of chitin waste. PMID:27240345

  12. Srchi24, A Chitinase Homolog Lacking an Essential Glutamic Acid Residue for Hydrolytic Activity, Is Induced during Nodule Development on Sesbania rostrata1

    PubMed Central

    Goormachtig, Sofie; Van de Velde, Willem; Lievens, Sam; Verplancke, Christa; Herman, Sylvia; De Keyser, Annick; Holsters, Marcelle

    2001-01-01

    The interaction between the tropical legume Sesbania rostrata and the bacterium Azorhizobium caulinodans results in the formation of nodules on both stem and roots. Stem nodulation was used as a model system to isolate early markers by differential display. One of them, Srchi24 is a novel early nodulin whose transcript level increased already 4 h after inoculation. This enhancement depended on Nod factor-producing bacteria. Srchi24 transcript levels were induced also by exogenous cytokinins. In situ hybridization and immunolocalization experiments showed that Srchi24 transcripts and proteins were present in the outermost cortical cell layers of the developing nodules. Sequence analyses revealed that Srchi24 is similar to class III chitinases, but lacks an important catalytic glutamate residue. A fusion between a maltose-binding protein and Srchi24 had no detectable hydrolytic activity. A function in nodulation is proposed for the Srchi24 protein. PMID:11553736

  13. High prevalence of chitotriosidase deficiency in Peruvian Amerindians exposed to chitin-bearing food and enteroparasites

    PubMed Central

    Manno, N.; Sherratt, S.; Boaretto, F.; Coico, F. Mejìa; Camus, C. Espinoza; Campos, C. Jara; Musumeci, S.; Battisti, A.; Quinnell, R.J.; León, J. Mostacero; Vazza, G.; Mostacciuolo, M.L.; Paoletti, M.G.; Falcone, F.H.

    2014-01-01

    The human genome encodes a gene for an enzymatically active chitinase (CHIT1) located in a single copy on Chromosome 1, which is highly expressed by activated macrophages and in other cells of the innate immune response. Several dysfunctional mutations are known in CHIT1, including a 24-bp duplication in Exon 10 causing catalytic deficiency. This duplication is a common variant conserved in many human populations, except in West and South Africans. Thus it has been proposed that human migration out of Africa and the consequent reduction of exposure to chitin from environmental factors may have enabled the conservation of dysfunctional mutations in human chitinases. Our data obtained from 85 indigenous Amerindians from Peru, representative of populations characterized by high prevalence of chitin-bearing enteroparasites and intense entomophagy, reveal a very high frequency of the 24-bp duplication (47.06%), and of other single nucleotide polymorphisms which are known to partially affect enzymatic activity (G102S: 42.7% and A442G/V: 25.5%). Our finding is in line with a founder effect, but appears to confute our previous hypothesis of a protective role against parasite infection and sustains the discussion on the redundancy of chitinolytic function. PMID:25256524

  14. Cloning and characterization of chitinases from interior spruce and lodgepole pine.

    PubMed

    Kolosova, N; Breuil, C; Bohlmann, J

    2014-05-01

    Chitinases have been implicated in the defence of conifers against insects and pathogens. cDNA for six chitinases were cloned from interior spruce (Picea glauca x engelmannii) and four from lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta). The cloned interior spruce chitinases were annotated class I PgeChia1-1 and PgeChia1-2, class II PgeChia2-1, class IV PgeChia4-1, and class VII PgeChia7-1 and PgeChia7-2; lodgepole pine chitinases were annotated class I PcChia1-1, class IV PcChia4-1, and class VII PcChia7-1 and PcChia7-2. Chitinases were expressed in Escherichia coli with maltose-binding-protein tags and soluble proteins purified. Functional characterization demonstrated chitinolytic activity for the three class I chitinases PgeChia1-1, PgeChia1-2 and PcChia1-1. Transcript analysis established strong induction of most of the tested chitinases, including all three class I chitinases, in interior spruce and lodgepole pine in response to inoculation with bark beetle associated fungi (Leptographium abietinum and Grosmannia clavigera) and in interior spruce in response to weevil (Pissodes strobi) feeding. Evidence of chitinolytic activity and inducibility by fungal and insect attack support the involvement of these chitinases in conifer defense. PMID:24564978

  15. Cloning and characterization of chitinases from interior spruce and lodgepole pine.

    PubMed

    Kolosova, N; Breuil, C; Bohlmann, J

    2014-05-01

    Chitinases have been implicated in the defence of conifers against insects and pathogens. cDNA for six chitinases were cloned from interior spruce (Picea glauca x engelmannii) and four from lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta). The cloned interior spruce chitinases were annotated class I PgeChia1-1 and PgeChia1-2, class II PgeChia2-1, class IV PgeChia4-1, and class VII PgeChia7-1 and PgeChia7-2; lodgepole pine chitinases were annotated class I PcChia1-1, class IV PcChia4-1, and class VII PcChia7-1 and PcChia7-2. Chitinases were expressed in Escherichia coli with maltose-binding-protein tags and soluble proteins purified. Functional characterization demonstrated chitinolytic activity for the three class I chitinases PgeChia1-1, PgeChia1-2 and PcChia1-1. Transcript analysis established strong induction of most of the tested chitinases, including all three class I chitinases, in interior spruce and lodgepole pine in response to inoculation with bark beetle associated fungi (Leptographium abietinum and Grosmannia clavigera) and in interior spruce in response to weevil (Pissodes strobi) feeding. Evidence of chitinolytic activity and inducibility by fungal and insect attack support the involvement of these chitinases in conifer defense.

  16. Chitinase-resistant hydrophilic symbiotic factors secreted by Frankia activate both Ca(2+) spiking and NIN gene expression in the actinorhizal plant Casuarina glauca.

    PubMed

    Chabaud, Mireille; Gherbi, Hassen; Pirolles, Elodie; Vaissayre, Virginie; Fournier, Joëlle; Moukouanga, Daniel; Franche, Claudine; Bogusz, Didier; Tisa, Louis S; Barker, David G; Svistoonoff, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Although it is now well-established that decorated lipo-chitooligosaccharide Nod factors are the key rhizobial signals which initiate infection/nodulation in host legume species, the identity of the equivalent microbial signaling molecules in the Frankia/actinorhizal association remains elusive. With the objective of identifying Frankia symbiotic factors we present a novel approach based on both molecular and cellular pre-infection reporters expressed in the model actinorhizal species Casuarina glauca. By introducing the nuclear-localized cameleon Nup-YC2.1 into Casuarina glauca we show that cell-free culture supernatants of the compatible Frankia CcI3 strain are able to elicit sustained high frequency Ca(2+) spiking in host root hairs. Furthermore, an excellent correlation exists between the triggering of nuclear Ca(2+) spiking and the transcriptional activation of the ProCgNIN:GFP reporter as a function of the Frankia strain tested. These two pre-infection symbiotic responses have been used in combination to show that the signal molecules present in the Frankia CcI3 supernatant are hydrophilic, of low molecular weight and resistant to chitinase degradation. In conclusion, the biologically active symbiotic signals secreted by Frankia appear to be chemically distinct from the currently known chitin-based rhizobial/arbuscular mycorrhizal signaling molecules. Convenient bioassays in Casuarina glauca are now available for their full characterization. PMID:26484850

  17. Functional Properties of Mouse Chitotriosidase Expressed in the Periplasmic Space of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sekine, Kazutaka; Yoshikawa, Satoshi; Sato, Akira; Okawa, Kazuaki; Kashimura, Akinori; Sakaguchi, Masayoshi; Sugahara, Yasusato; Yamanaka, Daisuke; Ohno, Naohito; Bauer, Peter O

    2016-01-01

    Chitotriosidase (Chit1) is an enzyme associated with various diseases, including Gaucher disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, Alzheimer disease and cystic fibrosis. In this study, we first expressed mouse mature Chit1 fused with V5 and (His)6 tags at the C-terminus (Chit1-V5-His) in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli and found that most of the expressed protein was insoluble. In contrast, Chit1 tagged with Protein A at the N-terminus and V5-His at the C-terminus, was expressed in the periplasmic space of E. coli as a soluble protein and successfully purified. We evaluated the chitinolytic properties of the recombinant enzyme using 4-nitrophenyl N,N’-diacetyl-β-D-chitobioside [4NP-chitobioside, 4NP-(GlcNAc)2] and found that its activity was comparable to CHO cells-expressed Chit1-V5-His. Optimal conditions for the E. coli-produced Chit1 were pH ~5.0 at 50°C. Chit1 was stable after 1 h incubation at pH 5.0~11.0 on ice and its chitinolytic activity was lost at pH 2.0, although the affinity to chitin remained unchanged. Chit1 efficiently cleaved crystalline and colloidal chitin substrates as well as oligomers of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) releasing primarily (GlcNAc)2 fragments at pH 5.0. On the other hand, (GlcNAc)3 was relatively resistant to digestion by Chit1. The degradation of 4NP-(GlcNAc)2 and (GlcNAc)3 was less evident at pH 7.0~8.0, while (GlcNAc)2 production from colloidal chitin and (GlcNAc)6 at these pH conditions remained strong at the neutral conditions. Our results indicate that Chit1 degrades chitin substrates under physiological conditions and suggest its important pathophysiological roles in vivo. PMID:27716783

  18. Arabidopsis Chitinases: a Genomic Survey

    PubMed Central

    Passarinho, Paul A.; de Vries, Sacco C.

    2002-01-01

    Plant chitinases (EC 3.2.1.14) belong to relatively large gene families subdivided in classes that suggest class-specific functions. They are commonly induced upon the attack of pathogens and by various sources of stress, which led to associating them with plant defense in general. However, it is becoming apparent that most of them display several functions during the plant life cycle, including taking part in developmental processes such as pollination and embryo development. The number of chitinases combined with their multiple functions has been an obstacle to a better understanding of their role in plants. It is therefore important to identify and inventory all chitinase genes of a plant species to be able to dissect their function and understand the relations between the different classes. Complete sequencing of the Arabidopsis genome has made this task feasible and we present here a survey of all putative chitinase-encoding genes accompanied by a detailed analysis of their sequence. Based on their characteristics and on studies on other plant chitinases, we propose an overview of their possible functions as well as modified annotations for some of them. PMID:22303199

  19. Chitinases from the Plant Disease Biocontrol Agent, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia C3.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Yuen, G Y; Sarath, G; Penheiter, A R

    2001-02-01

    ABSTRACT Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strain C3, a biocontrol agent of Bipolaris sorokiniana in turfgrass, produced chitinases in broth media containing chitin. Chitinases were partially purified from culture fluid by ammonium sulfate precipitation and chitin affinity chromatography. The chromatography fraction with the highest specific chitinase activity was inhibitory to conidial germination and germ-tube elongation of B. sorokiniana, but it was less inhibitory than the protein fraction or the raw culture filtrate. The fraction exhibited strong exochitinase and weak endo-chitinase activity. Optimum temperature and pH for chitinase activity were 45 to 50 degrees C and 4.5 to 5.0, respectively. Chitinase activity was inhibited by Hg(2+) and Fe(3+), but not by other metal ions or enzyme inhibitors. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of the chromatography fraction revealed the presence of five protein bands of 25, 32, 48, 65, and 75 kDa. Partial amino acid sequences of the 32-, 65-, and 75-kDa proteins indicated that they are homologous to known bacterial chitinases. There was no homology found in the partial amino acid sequences of the 25- and 48-kDa proteins to any known chitinases. Five chitinase-active proteins were detected in the protein and chromatography fractions by activity gels, but when each protein was extracted and re-electrophoresed separately under denaturing conditions, only 32- or 48-kDa proteins were revealed. It was concluded that strain C3 produces at least two chitinases that are antifungal.

  20. Functional characterization of chitinase-3 reveals involvement of chitinases in early embryo immunity in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Teng, Zinan; Sun, Chen; Liu, Shousheng; Wang, Hongmiao; Zhang, Shicui

    2014-10-01

    The function and mechanism of chitinases in early embryonic development remain largely unknown. We show here that recombinant chitinase-3 (rChi3) is able to hydrolyze the artificial chitin substrate, 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-D-N,N',N″-triacetylchitotrioside, and to bind to and inhibit the growth of the fungus Candida albicans, implicating that Chi3 plays a dual function in innate immunity and chitin-bearing food digestion in zebrafish. This is further corroborated by the expression profile of Chi3 in the liver and gut, which are both immune- and digestion-relevant organs. Compared with rChi3, rChi3-CD lacking CBD still retains partial capacity to bind to C. albicans, but its enzymatic and antifungal activities are significantly reduced. By contrast, rChi3-E140N with the putative catalytic residue E140 mutated shows little affinity to chitin, and its enzymatic and antifungal activities are nearly completely lost. These suggest that both enzymatic and antifungal activities of Chi3 are dependent on the presence of CBD and E140. We also clearly demonstrate that in zebrafish, both the embryo extract and the developing embryo display antifungal activity against C. albicans, and all the findings point to chitinase-3 (Chi3) being a newly-identified factor involved in the antifungal activity. Taken together, a dual function in both innate immunity and food digestion in embryo is proposed for zebrafish Chi3. It also provides a new angle to understand the immune role of chitinases in early embryonic development of animals.

  1. Characterization of a yam class IV chitinase produced by recombinant Pichia pastoris X-33.

    PubMed

    Akond, Muhammad Ali; Matsuda, Yusuke; Ishimaru, Takayuki; Iwai, Ken; Saito, Akira; Kato, Akio; Tanaka, Shuhei; Kobayashi, Jun; Koga, Daizo

    2014-01-01

    A yam (Dioscorea opposita Thunb) class IV chitinase, whose genomic DNA was cloned by Mitsunaga et al. (2004), was produced by the recombinant Pichia pastoris X-33 in high yields such as 66 mg/L of culture medium. The chitinase was purified by column chromatography after Endoglycosidase H treatment and then characterized. It showed properties similar to the original chitinase E purified from the yam tuber reported by Arakane et al. (2000). This Pichia-produced chitinase also showed strong lytic activity against Fusarium oxysporum and Phytophthora nicotianae, wide pH and thermal stability, optimum activity at higher temperature such as 70 °C, and high substrate affinity, indicating that one can use this Pichia-produced yam chitinase as a bio-control agent.

  2. Molecular characterization of chitinase genes from a local isolate of Serratia marcescens and their contribution to the insecticidal activity of Bacillus thuringiensis strains.

    PubMed

    Ozgen, Arzu; Sezen, Kazim; Demir, Ismail; Demirbag, Zihni; Nalcacioglu, Remziye

    2013-10-01

    The chitinase B (chiB) and C (chiC) genes and flanking regions from a local isolate of Serratia marcescens were cloned individually and sequenced. Results showed that these chiB and chiC genes have a 96 % maximum similarity with chiB and chiC from different S. marcescens species (GenBank numbers Z36295.1 and AJ630582.1, respectively). The amplified chiB fragment, including some upstream and downstream regions, is 1,689-bp long with an open reading frame of 1,500 bp. The amplified fragment of chiC is 1,844 bp with an open reading frame of 1,443 bp. These sequences were submitted to the GenBank with accession numbers JX847796 (chiB) and JX847797 (chiC). Putative promoter regions and Shine-Dalgarno sequences were identified in both genes. The genes were cloned into a shuttle vector and the constructs were designated as pHYSB and pHYSC, respectively. Both plasmids were introduced separately into kurstaki and israelensis strains of Bacillus thuringiensis and the insecticidal activities of the engineered B. thuringiensis strains were assayed in larvae of Galleria mellonella and adult of Drosophila melanogaster. Engineered B. thuringiensis strains showed higher insecticidal activity than parental strain and the parental S. marcescens. In addition, pHYSB and pHYSC were stable over 16 daily passages under non-selective conditions in transformed B. t. israelensis 5724 strain.

  3. BjMYB1, a transcription factor implicated in plant defence through activating BjCHI1 chitinase expression by binding to a W-box-like element

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ying; Jia, Shuangwei; Wang, Chunlian; Wang, Fujun; Wang, Fajun; Zhao, Kaijun

    2016-01-01

    We previously identified the W-box-like-4 (Wbl-4) element (GTAGTGACTCAT), one of six Wbl elements in the BjC-P promoter of the unusual chitinase gene BjCHI1 from Brassica juncea, as the core element responsive to fungal infection. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of the cognate transcription factor interacting with the Wbl-4 element. Using Wbl-4 as a target, we performed yeast one-hybrid screening of a B. juncea cDNA library and isolated an R2R3-MYB transcription factor designated as BjMYB1. BjMYB1 was localized in the nucleus of plant cells. EMSA assays confirmed that BjMYB1 binds to the Wbl-4 element. Transiently expressed BjMYB1 up-regulated the activity of the BjC-P promoter through its binding to the Wbl-4 element in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) leaves. In B. juncea, BjMYB1 displayed a similar induced expression pattern as that of BjCHI1 upon infection by the fungus Botrytis cinerea. Moreover, heterogeneous overexpression of BjMYB1 significantly elevated the resistance of transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana to the fungus B. cinerea. These results suggest that BjMYB1 is potentially involved in host defence against fungal attack through activating the expression of BjCHI1 by binding to the Wbl-4 element in the BjC-P promoter. This finding demonstrates a novel DNA target of plant MYB transcription factors. PMID:27353280

  4. Characterization of a chitinase from the cellulolytic actinomycete Thermobifida fusca.

    PubMed

    Gaber, Yasser; Mekasha, Sophanit; Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Fraaije, Marco W

    2016-09-01

    Thermobifida fusca is a well-known cellulose-degrading actinomycete, which produces various glycoside hydrolases for this purpose. However, despite the presence of putative chitinase genes in its genome, T. fusca has not been reported to grow on chitin as sole carbon source. In this study, a gene encoding a putative membrane-anchored GH18 chitinase (Tfu0868) from T. fusca has been cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The protein was produced as SUMO fusion protein and, upon removal of the SUMO domain, soluble pure TfChi18A was obtained with yields typically amounting to 150mg per litre of culture. The enzyme was found to be relatively thermostable (apparent Tm=57.5°C) but not particularly thermoactive, the optimum temperature being 40-45°C. TfChi18A bound to α- and β-chitin and degraded both these substrates. Interestingly, activity towards colloidal chitin was minimal and in this case, substrate inhibition was observed. TfChi18A also cleaved soluble chito-oligosaccharides and showed a clear preference for substrates having five sugars or more. While these results show that TfChi18A is a catalytically competent GH18 chitinase, the observed catalytic rates were low compared to those of well-studied GH18 chitinases. This suggests that TfChi18A is not a true chitinase and not likely to endow T. fusca with the ability to grow on chitin. PMID:27108953

  5. Chitinase genes revealed and compared in bacterial isolates, DNA extracts and a metagenomic library from a phytopathogen suppressive soil

    SciTech Connect

    Hjort, K.; Bergstrom, M.; Adesina, M.F.; Jansson, J.K.; Smalla, K.; Sjoling, S.

    2009-09-01

    Soil that is suppressive to disease caused by fungal pathogens is an interesting source to target for novel chitinases that might be contributing towards disease suppression. In this study we screened for chitinase genes, in a phytopathogen-suppressive soil in three ways: (1) from a metagenomic library constructed from microbial cells extracted from soil, (2) from directly extracted DNA and (3) from bacterial isolates with antifungal and chitinase activities. Terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) of chitinase genes revealed differences in amplified chitinase genes from the metagenomic library and the directly extracted DNA, but approximately 40% of the identified chitinase terminal-restriction fragments (TRFs) were found in both sources. All of the chitinase TRFs from the isolates were matched to TRFs in the directly extracted DNA and the metagenomic library. The most abundant chitinase TRF in the soil DNA and the metagenomic library corresponded to the TRF{sup 103} of the isolate, Streptomyces mutomycini and/or Streptomyces clavifer. There were good matches between T-RFLP profiles of chitinase gene fragments obtained from different sources of DNA. However, there were also differences in both the chitinase and the 16S rRNA gene T-RFLP patterns depending on the source of DNA, emphasizing the lack of complete coverage of the gene diversity by any of the approaches used.

  6. Enhanced expression of chitinase during the autolysis of mushroom in Coprinellus congregatus.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyangsoon; Choi, Hyoung T

    2009-04-01

    Fungal cell walls consist of various glucans and chitin. An inky cap, Coprinellus congregates, produced mushrooms at 25 degrees C in a regime of 15 h light/9 h dark, and then the mushroom was autolyzed rapidly to generate black liquid droplets where no cell wall was detected by microscopy. A chitinase cDNA from the matured mushroom cells of C. congregates that consisted of 1,541 nucleotides was successfully cloned using the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE)-PCR technique. Its deduced 441 amino acid sequence had the conserved catalytic domain as in other fungal chitinase family 18. Chitinase activity was higher at the matured mushroom stage than primordial and young mushroom stage. When the expression of the cloned chitinase was examined by real-time PCR using the chitinase-specific primers, it was increased more than twice to 20 times during the autolytic process of mushroom than young mushroom or primordial stages, respectively.

  7. Macrophage Chitinase 1 Stratifies Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Agapov, Eugene; Battaile, John T.; Tidwell, Rose; Hachem, Ramsey; Patterson, G. Alexander; Pierce, Richard A.; Atkinson, Jeffrey J.; Holtzman, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Diagnosis and therapy of chronic inflammatory lung disease is limited by the need for individualized biomarkers that provide insight into pathogenesis. Herein we show that mouse models of chronic obstructive lung disease exhibit an increase in lung chitinase production but cannot predict which chitinase family member may be equivalently increased in humans with corresponding lung disease. Moreover, we demonstrate that lung macrophage production of chitinase 1 is selectively increased in a subset of subjects with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and this increase is reflected in plasma levels. The findings provide a means to noninvasively track alternatively activated macrophages in chronic lung disease and thereby better differentiate molecular phenotypes in heterogeneous patient populations. PMID:19491341

  8. Secreted major Venus flytrap chitinase enables digestion of Arthropod prey.

    PubMed

    Paszota, Paulina; Escalante-Perez, Maria; Thomsen, Line R; Risør, Michael W; Dembski, Alicja; Sanglas, Laura; Nielsen, Tania A; Karring, Henrik; Thøgersen, Ida B; Hedrich, Rainer; Enghild, Jan J; Kreuzer, Ines; Sanggaard, Kristian W

    2014-02-01

    Predation plays a major role in energy and nutrient flow in the biological food chain. Plant carnivory has attracted much interest since Darwin's time, but many fundamental properties of the carnivorous lifestyle are largely unexplored. In particular, the chain of events leading from prey perception to its digestive utilization remains to be elucidated. One of the first steps after the capture of animal prey, i.e. the enzymatic breakup of the insects' chitin-based shell, is reflected by considerable chitinase activity in the secreted digestive fluid in the carnivorous plant Venus flytrap. This study addresses the molecular nature, function, and regulation of the underlying enzyme, VF chitinase-I. Using mass spectrometry based de novo sequencing, VF chitinase-I was identified in the secreted fluid. As anticipated for one of the most prominent proteins in the flytrap's "green stomach" during prey digestion, transcription of VF chitinase-I is restricted to glands and enhanced by secretion-inducing stimuli. In their natural habitat, Venus flytrap is exposed to high temperatures. We expressed and purified recombinant VF chitinase-I and show that the enzyme exhibits the hallmark properties expected from an enzyme active in the hot and acidic digestive fluid of Dionaea muscipula. Structural modeling revealed a relative compact globular form of VF chitinase-I, which might contribute to its overall stability and resistance to proteolysis. These peculiar characteristics could well serve industrial purposes, especially because of the ability to hydrolyze both soluble and crystalline chitin substrates including the commercially important cleavage of α-chitin. PMID:24275507

  9. Secreted major Venus flytrap chitinase enables digestion of Arthropod prey.

    PubMed

    Paszota, Paulina; Escalante-Perez, Maria; Thomsen, Line R; Risør, Michael W; Dembski, Alicja; Sanglas, Laura; Nielsen, Tania A; Karring, Henrik; Thøgersen, Ida B; Hedrich, Rainer; Enghild, Jan J; Kreuzer, Ines; Sanggaard, Kristian W

    2014-02-01

    Predation plays a major role in energy and nutrient flow in the biological food chain. Plant carnivory has attracted much interest since Darwin's time, but many fundamental properties of the carnivorous lifestyle are largely unexplored. In particular, the chain of events leading from prey perception to its digestive utilization remains to be elucidated. One of the first steps after the capture of animal prey, i.e. the enzymatic breakup of the insects' chitin-based shell, is reflected by considerable chitinase activity in the secreted digestive fluid in the carnivorous plant Venus flytrap. This study addresses the molecular nature, function, and regulation of the underlying enzyme, VF chitinase-I. Using mass spectrometry based de novo sequencing, VF chitinase-I was identified in the secreted fluid. As anticipated for one of the most prominent proteins in the flytrap's "green stomach" during prey digestion, transcription of VF chitinase-I is restricted to glands and enhanced by secretion-inducing stimuli. In their natural habitat, Venus flytrap is exposed to high temperatures. We expressed and purified recombinant VF chitinase-I and show that the enzyme exhibits the hallmark properties expected from an enzyme active in the hot and acidic digestive fluid of Dionaea muscipula. Structural modeling revealed a relative compact globular form of VF chitinase-I, which might contribute to its overall stability and resistance to proteolysis. These peculiar characteristics could well serve industrial purposes, especially because of the ability to hydrolyze both soluble and crystalline chitin substrates including the commercially important cleavage of α-chitin.

  10. Characterization of the chitinase gene in Bacillus thuringiensis Mexican isolates.

    PubMed

    Rosas-García, Ninfa M; Fortuna-González, Juan M; Barboza-Corona, J Eleazar

    2013-11-01

    The chitinase gene was molecularly characterized in five Bacillus thuringiensis Mexican isolates, MR10, MR11, MR21, MR33, and RN52. The proteins derived from these genes were tested for their chitinase activity using fluorogenic chitin derivatives. In order to verify if chitinase genes were functional, they were cloned, and enzymatic activity of recombinant chitinases was also tested. Results indicated that enzymes exhibited endochitinase activity. The highest hydrolytic activity shown against the chitin tetrameric derivative occurred at pH value of 6.5, and the optimum activity temperature was around 60 °C. The recombinant endochitinases showed a molecular mass of ∼77 kDa with isoelectric points from 6.5 to 7.0. Analysis of the nucleotide sequences showed highly conserved sequences among all isolates (97-99 %). Gene sequence analysis revealed a putative promoter (-35 TTGAGA and -10 TTAATA) and a Shine-Dalgarno sequence (5´-AGGAGA-3´) upstream from the open reading frame. The deduced amino acid sequence revealed that the proteins are modular enzymes composed by a family 18 glycosyl hydrolase domain located between amino acids 134 and 549, a fibronectin-binding domain (580 through 656), and a chitin-binding domain (664 through 771). The deduced amino acid sequences of our isolates showed a similarity close to 100 % respect to the sequences reported in the GenBank database.

  11. Chitinases Are Essential for Cell Separation in Ustilago maydis

    PubMed Central

    Langner, Thorsten; Öztürk, Merve; Hartmann, Sarah; Cord-Landwehr, Stefan; Moerschbacher, Bruno; Walton, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Chitin is an essential component of the fungal cell wall, providing rigidity and stability. Its degradation is mediated by chitinases and supposedly ensures the dynamic plasticity of the cell wall during growth and morphogenesis. Hence, chitinases should be particularly important for fungi with dramatic morphological changes, such as Ustilago maydis. This smut fungus switches from yeast to filamentous growth for plant infection, proliferates as a mycelium in planta, and forms teliospores for spreading. Here, we investigate the contribution of its four chitinolytic enzymes to the different morphological changes during the complete life cycle in a comprehensive study of deletion strains combined with biochemical and cell biological approaches. Interestingly, two chitinases act redundantly in cell separation during yeast growth. They mediate the degradation of remnant chitin in the fragmentation zone between mother and daughter cell. In contrast, even the complete lack of chitinolytic activity does not affect formation of the infectious filament, infection, biotrophic growth, or teliospore germination. Thus, unexpectedly we can exclude a major role for chitinolytic enzymes in morphogenesis or pathogenicity of U. maydis. Nevertheless, redundant activity of even two chitinases is essential for cell separation during saprophytic growth, possibly to improve nutrient access or spreading of yeast cells by wind or rain. PMID:25934689

  12. Chitinases Are Essential for Cell Separation in Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Langner, Thorsten; Öztürk, Merve; Hartmann, Sarah; Cord-Landwehr, Stefan; Moerschbacher, Bruno; Walton, Jonathan D; Göhre, Vera

    2015-09-01

    Chitin is an essential component of the fungal cell wall, providing rigidity and stability. Its degradation is mediated by chitinases and supposedly ensures the dynamic plasticity of the cell wall during growth and morphogenesis. Hence, chitinases should be particularly important for fungi with dramatic morphological changes, such as Ustilago maydis. This smut fungus switches from yeast to filamentous growth for plant infection, proliferates as a mycelium in planta, and forms teliospores for spreading. Here, we investigate the contribution of its four chitinolytic enzymes to the different morphological changes during the complete life cycle in a comprehensive study of deletion strains combined with biochemical and cell biological approaches. Interestingly, two chitinases act redundantly in cell separation during yeast growth. They mediate the degradation of remnant chitin in the fragmentation zone between mother and daughter cell. In contrast, even the complete lack of chitinolytic activity does not affect formation of the infectious filament, infection, biotrophic growth, or teliospore germination. Thus, unexpectedly we can exclude a major role for chitinolytic enzymes in morphogenesis or pathogenicity of U. maydis. Nevertheless, redundant activity of even two chitinases is essential for cell separation during saprophytic growth, possibly to improve nutrient access or spreading of yeast cells by wind or rain. PMID:25934689

  13. Chitinases Are Essential for Cell Separation in Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Langner, Thorsten; Öztürk, Merve; Hartmann, Sarah; Cord-Landwehr, Stefan; Moerschbacher, Bruno; Walton, Jonathan D; Göhre, Vera

    2015-09-01

    Chitin is an essential component of the fungal cell wall, providing rigidity and stability. Its degradation is mediated by chitinases and supposedly ensures the dynamic plasticity of the cell wall during growth and morphogenesis. Hence, chitinases should be particularly important for fungi with dramatic morphological changes, such as Ustilago maydis. This smut fungus switches from yeast to filamentous growth for plant infection, proliferates as a mycelium in planta, and forms teliospores for spreading. Here, we investigate the contribution of its four chitinolytic enzymes to the different morphological changes during the complete life cycle in a comprehensive study of deletion strains combined with biochemical and cell biological approaches. Interestingly, two chitinases act redundantly in cell separation during yeast growth. They mediate the degradation of remnant chitin in the fragmentation zone between mother and daughter cell. In contrast, even the complete lack of chitinolytic activity does not affect formation of the infectious filament, infection, biotrophic growth, or teliospore germination. Thus, unexpectedly we can exclude a major role for chitinolytic enzymes in morphogenesis or pathogenicity of U. maydis. Nevertheless, redundant activity of even two chitinases is essential for cell separation during saprophytic growth, possibly to improve nutrient access or spreading of yeast cells by wind or rain.

  14. Purification and characterization of chitinase from Paenibacillus sp. D1.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anil Kumar; Chhatpar, Hari S

    2011-05-01

    A 56.56-kDa extracellular chitinase from Paenibacillus sp. D1 was purified to 52.3-fold by ion exchange chromatography using SP Sepharose. Maximum enzyme activity was recorded at pH 5.0 and 50 °C. MALDI-LC-MS/MS analysis identified the purified enzyme as chitinase with 60% similarity to chitinase Chi55 of Paenibacillus ehimensis. The activation energy (E (a)) for chitin hydrolysis and temperature quotient (Q (10)) at optimum temperature was found to be 19.14 kJ/mol and 1.25, respectively. Determination of kinetic constants k (m), V (max), k (cat), and k (cat)/k (m) and thermodynamic parameters ΔH*, ΔS*, ΔG*, ΔG*(E-S), and ΔG*(E-T) revealed high affinity of the enzyme for chitin. The enzyme exhibited higher stability in presence of commonly used protectant fungicides Captan, Carbendazim, and Mancozeb compared to control as reflected from the t (1/2) values suggesting its applicability in integrated pest management for control of soil-borne fungal phytopathogens. The order of stability of chitinase in presence of fungicides at 80 °C as revealed from t (1/2) values and thermodynamic parameters E (a(d)) (activation energy for irreversible deactivation), ΔH*, ΔG*, and ΔS* was: Captan > Carbendazim > Mancozeb > control. The present study is the first report on thermodynamic and kinetic characterization of chitinase from Paenibacillus sp. D1.

  15. Chitinases from Bacteria to Human: Properties, Applications, and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Rathore, Abhishek Singh; Gupta, Rinkoo D.

    2015-01-01

    Chitin is the second most plenteous polysaccharide in nature after cellulose, present in cell walls of several fungi, exoskeletons of insects, and crustacean shells. Chitin does not accumulate in the environment due to presence of bacterial chitinases, despite its abundance. These enzymes are able to degrade chitin present in the cell walls of fungi as well as the exoskeletons of insect. They have shown being the potential agents for biological control of the plant diseases caused by various pathogenic fungi and insect pests and thus can be used as an alternative to chemical pesticides. There has been steady increase in demand of chitin derivatives, obtained by action of chitinases on chitin polymer for various industrial, clinical, and pharmaceutical purposes. Hence, this review focuses on properties and applications of chitinases starting from bacteria, followed by fungi, insects, plants, and vertebrates. Designing of chitinase by applying directed laboratory evolution and rational approaches for improved catalytic activity for cost-effective field applications has also been explored. PMID:26664744

  16. Identification of a chitinase modifying protein from Fusarium verticillioides: truncation of a host resistance protein by a fungalysin metalloprotease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chitinase modifying proteins (cmps) are proteases, secreted by fungal pathogens, which truncate the plant class IV chitinases ChitA and ChitB during maize ear rot. Cmp activity has been characterized for Bipolaris zeicola and Stenocarpella maydis, but the identities of the proteases are not known. H...

  17. Degradation of chitin and chitosan by a recombinant chitinase derived from a virulent Aeromonas hydrophila isolated from diseased channel catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A chitinase was identified in extracellular products of a virulent Aeromonas hydrophila isolated from diseased channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). Bioactive recombinant chitinase (rChi-Ah) was produced in Escherichia coli. Purified rChi-Ah had optimal activity at temperature of 42°C and pH 6.5. T...

  18. Characterization of antifungal chitinase from marine Streptomyces sp. DA11 associated with South China Sea sponge Craniella australiensis.

    PubMed

    Han, Yue; Yang, Bingjie; Zhang, Fengli; Miao, Xiaoling; Li, Zhiyong

    2009-01-01

    The gene cloning, purification, properties, kinetics, and antifungal activity of chitinase from marine Streptomyces sp. DA11 associated with South China sponge Craniella australiensis were investigated. Alignment analysis of the amino acid sequence deduced from the cloned conserved 451 bp DNA sequence shows the chitinase belongs to ChiC type with 80% similarity to chitinase C precursor from Streptomyces peucetius. Through purification by 80% ammonium sulfate, affinity binding to chitin and diethylaminoethyl-cellulose anion-exchange chromatography, 6.15-fold total purification with a specific activity of 2.95 Umg(-1) was achieved. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed a molecular weight of approximately 34 kDa and antifungal activities were observed against Aspergillus niger and Candida albicans. The optimal pH, temperature, and salinity for chitinase activity were 8.0, 50 degrees C, and 45 g per thousand psu, respectively, which may contribute to special application of this marine microbe-derived chitinase compared with terrestrial chitinases. The chitinase activity was increased by Mn(2+), Cu(2+), and Mg(2+), while strongly inhibited by Fe(2+) and Ba(2+). Meanwhile, SDS, ethyleneglycoltetraacetic acid, urea, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid were found to have significantly inhibitory effect on chitinase activity. With colloidal chitin as substrates instead of powder chitin, higher V (max) (0.82 mg product/min.mg protein) and lower K (m) (0.019 mg/ml) values were achieved. The sponge's microbial symbiont with chitinase activity may contribute to chitin degradation and antifungal defense. To our knowledge, it was the first time to study sponge-associated microbial chitinase.

  19. Recent development of two chitinase inhibitors, Argifin and Argadin, produced by soil microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, Tomoyasu; Sunazuka, Toshiaki; Ōmura, Satoshi

    2010-01-01

    Chitin, the second most abundant polysaccharide in nature, occurs in fungi, some algae and many invertebrates, including insects. Thus, chitin synthesis and degradation could represent specific targets for fungicides and insecticides. Chitinases hydrolyze chitin into oligomers of N-acetyl-d-glucosamine at key points in the life cycles of organisms, consequently, chitinase inhibitors have become subject of increasing interest. This review covers the development of two chitinase inhibitors of natural origin, Argifin and Argadin, isolated from the cultured broth of microorganisms in our laboratory. In particular, the practical total synthesis of these natural products, the synthesis of lead compounds via computer-aided rational molecular design, and discovery methods that generate only highly-active compounds using a kinetic target(chitinase)-guided synthesis approach (termed in situ click chemistry) are described. PMID:20154467

  20. Chitinase production by Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus licheniformis: their potential in antifungal biocontrol.

    PubMed

    Gomaa, Eman Zakaria

    2012-02-01

    Thirty bacterial strains were isolated from the rhizosphere of plants collected from Egypt and screened for production of chitinase enzymes. Bacillus thuringiensis NM101-19 and Bacillus licheniformis NM120-17 had the highest chitinolytic activities amongst those investigated. The production of chitinase by B. thuringiensis and B. licheniformis was optimized using colloidal chitin medium amended with 1.5% colloidal chitin, with casein as a nitrogen source, at 30°C after five days of incubation. An enhancement of chitinase production by the two species was observed by addition of sugar substances and dried fungal mats to the colloidal chitin media. The optimal conditions for chitinase activity by B. thuringiensis and B. licheniformis were at 40°C, pH 7.0 and pH 8.0, respectively. Na(+), Mg(2+), Cu(2+), and Ca(2+) caused enhancement of enzyme activities whereas they were markedly inhibited by Zn(2+), Hg(2+), and Ag(+). In vitro, B. thuringiensis and B. licheniformis chitinases had potential for cell wall lysis of many phytopathogenic fungi tested. The addition of B. thuringiensis chitinase was more effective than that of B. licheniformis in increasing the germination of soybean seeds infected with various phytopathogenic fungi.

  1. Cloning and expression analysis of the chitinase gene Ifu-chit2 from Isaria fumosorosea

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Huimin; Wang, Zhangxun; Meng, Xiangyun; Xie, Ling; Huang, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi can produce a series of chitinases, some of which function synergistically with proteases and other hydrolytic enzymes to degrade the insect cuticle. In the present study, the chitinase gene Ifu-chit2 from Isaria fumosorosea was investigated. The Ifu-chit2 gene is 1,435-bp long, interrupted by three short introns, and encodes a predicted protein of 423 amino acids with a 22 residue signal peptide. The predicted Ifu-Chit2 protein is highly homologous to Beauveria bassiana chitinase Bbchit2 and belongs to the glycohydrolase family 18. Ifu-Chit2 was expressed in Escherichia coli to verify chitinase activity, and the recombinant enzyme exhibited activity with a colloidal chitin substrate. Furthermore, the expression profiles of Ifu-chit2 were analyzed at different induction times under in vivo conditions. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that Ifu-chit2 expression peaked at two days post-induction. The expression of chitinase Ifu-chit2 in vivo suggests that the chitinase may play a role in the early stage of pathogenesis. PMID:26500443

  2. Structural and functional evolution of chitinase-like proteins from plants.

    PubMed

    Kesari, Pooja; Patil, Dipak Narhari; Kumar, Pramod; Tomar, Shailly; Sharma, Ashwani Kumar; Kumar, Pravindra

    2015-05-01

    The plant genome contains a large number of sequences that encode catalytically inactive chitinases referred to as chitinase-like proteins (CLPs). Although CLPs share high sequence and structural homology with chitinases of glycosyl hydrolase 18 (TIM barrel domain) and 19 families, they may lack the binding/catalytic activity. Molecular genetic analysis revealed that gene duplication events followed by mutation in the existing chitinase gene have resulted in the loss of activity. The evidences show that adaptive functional diversification of the CLPs has been achieved through alterations in the flexible regions than in the rigid structural elements. The CLPs plays an important role in the defense response against pathogenic attack, biotic and abiotic stress. They are also involved in the growth and developmental processes of plants. Since the physiological roles of CLPs are similar to chitinase, such mutations have led to plurifunctional enzymes. The biochemical and structural characterization of the CLPs is essential for understanding their roles and to develop potential utility in biotechnological industries. This review sheds light on the structure-function evolution of CLPs from chitinases.

  3. Multiple chitinases of an endophytic Serratia proteamaculans 568 generate chitin oligomers.

    PubMed

    Purushotham, Pallinti; Sarma, P V S R N; Podile, Appa Rao

    2012-05-01

    Serratia proteamaculans 568 genome revealed the presence of four family 18 chitinases (Sp ChiA, Sp ChiB, Sp ChiC, and Sp ChiD). Heterologous expression and characterization of Sp ChiA, Sp ChiB, and Sp ChiC showed that these enzymes were optimally active at pH 6.0-7.0, and 40°C. The three Sp chitinases displayed highest activity/binding to β-chitin and showed broad range of substrate specificities, and released dimer as major end product from oligomeric and polymeric substrates. Longer incubation was required for hydrolysis of trimer for the three Sp chitinases. The three Sp chitinases released up to tetramers from colloidal chitin substrate. Sp ChiA and Sp ChiB were processive chitinases, while Sp ChiC was a non-processive chitinase. Based on the known structures of ChiA and ChiB from S. marcescens, 3D models of Sp ChiA and Sp ChiB were generated.

  4. Complete amino acid sequence of chitinase-A from leaves of pokeweed (Phytolacca americana).

    PubMed

    Yamagami, T; Tanigawa, M; Ishiguro, M; Funatsu, G

    1998-04-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of pokeweed leaf chitinase-A was determined. First all 11 tryptic peptides from the reduced and S-carboxymethylated form of the enzyme were sequenced. Then the same form of the enzyme was cleaved with cyanogen bromide, giving three fragments. The fragments were digested with chymotrypsin or Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease. Last, the 11 tryptic peptides were put in order. Of seven cysteine residues, six were linked by disulfide bonds (between Cys25 and Cys74, Cys89 and Cys98, and Cys195 and Cys208); Cys176 was free. The enzyme consisted of 208 amino acid residues and had a molecular weight of 22,391. It consisted of only one polypeptide chain without a chitin-binding domain. The length of the chain was almost the same as that of the catalytic domains of class IL chitinases. These findings suggested that this enzyme is a new kind of class IIL chitinase, although its sequence resembles that of catalytic domains of class IL chitinases more than that of the class IIL chitinases reported so far. Discussion on the involvement of specific tryptophan residue in the active site of PLC-A is also given based on the sequence similarity with rye seed chitinase-c.

  5. The Role of Chitinase Production by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Strain C3 in Biological Control of Bipolaris sorokiniana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Yuen, G Y

    2000-04-01

    ABSTRACT The role of chitinase production by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strain C3 in biological control of leaf spot on tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea), caused by Bipolaris sorokiniana, was investigated in vitro and in vivo. The filtrate of a broth culture of C3, with chitin as the carbon source, was separated into fractions. A high molecular-weight fraction (>8 kDa) was chitinolytic and more inhibitory than a low-molecular-weight, nonchitinolytic fraction to conidial germination and hyphal growth by B. sorokiniana and to leaf spot development. A protein fraction derived by ammonium sulfate precipitation and a chitinase fraction purified by chitin affinity chromatography also were chitinolytic and highly antifungal. The chitinolytic fractions caused swelling and vacuolation of conidia and discoloration, malformation, and degradation of germ tubes. When boiled, the chitinolytic fractions lost chitinase activity along with most of the antifungal properties. Two chitinase-deficient and two chitinase-reduced mutants of C3 were compared with the wild-type strain for inhibition of germination of B. sorokiniana conidia on tall fescue leaves and for suppression of leaf spot development in vivo. The mutants exhibited reduced antifungal activity and biocontrol efficacy, but did not lose all biocontrol activity. An aqueous extract of leaves colonized by wild-type C3 had higher chitinase activity than that of noncolonized leaves and was inhibitory to conidial germination. The addition of chitin to leaves along with the wild-type strain increased both chitinase and antifungal activity. The chitinase activity level of extracts from leaves colonized by a chitinase-deficient mutant of C3, with and without added chitin, was no higher than the background, and the extracts lacked antifungal activity. Chitinolysis appears to be one mechanism of biological control by strain C3, and it functions in concert with other mechanisms.

  6. Does 24bp Duplication of Human CHIT1 Gene (Chitotriosidase1) Predispose to Filarial Chyluria? A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Pant, Shriya; Agarwal, Jyotsna; Gangwar, Pravin K; Waseem, Mohammad; Gupta, Prashant; Sankhwar, Satya N; Purkait, Bimalesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chyluria which is endemic in many parts of the world is mainly caused by Wuchereria bancrofti. CHIT1 (chitotriosidase) is produced by macrophages and plays an important role in the defense against chitin containing pathogen such as filarial parasite. Variation in the coding region with 24 bp duplication allele results in reduced CHIT1 activity that enhance the survival of parasite which may play a role in the occurrence of disease. Aim To examine the role of 24bp duplication of CHIT1 gene in patients of filarial chyluria (FC). Materials and Methods A case-control study was carried out where 155 confirmed FC patients and equal number of age-, sex- and residence-matched controls without any symptoms or signs of lymphatic filariasis, confirmed by negative immunochromatographic card test (ICT) and IgG/IgM combo rapid antibody test, from a hospital-based population were enrolled. Filarial aetiology was confirmed on the basis of DEC-provocative test (Giemsa staining), ICT and IgG/IgM- antifiarial antibody test. The patients positive by either of these tests were enrolled as FC cases. 24bp duplication in CHIT1 gene in FC was detected by the product size 99bp of amplified gene using polymerase chain reaction. Results The mean ages of patients and controls were 38.25±12.09 and 35.45±12.53 years, respectively while male: female ratio was 2.4:1. The mean duration of illness in chyluria patients was 62.81±60.83 months and mean number of episodes was 2.54±1.11. Homozygous wild type, heterozygous and homozygous mutant frequencies were 10.3%, 81.3% and 8.4% in FC patients and 18.7%, 75.5%, and 5.8% in controls, respectively. The 24bp duplication in CHIT1 gene showed a significant association in Heterozygous (HT) genotype with Odd Ratio (OR) of 1.95, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) (1.01-3.77); p=0.04. However, the homozygous mutant genotype (TT) was found to be non-significant with OR of 2.61, 95% CI (0.91-7.45); p=0.07. The combination of both HT+TT was also found

  7. Antifungal Hydrolases in Pea Tissue : II. Inhibition of Fungal Growth by Combinations of Chitinase and beta-1,3-Glucanase.

    PubMed

    Mauch, F; Mauch-Mani, B; Boller, T

    1988-11-01

    Chitinase and beta-1,3-glucanase purified from pea pods acted synergistically in the degradation of fungal cell walls. The antifungal potential of the two enzymes was studied directly by adding protein preparations to paper discs placed on agar plates containing germinated fungal spores. Protein extracts from pea pods infected with Fusarium solani f.sp. phaseoli, which contained high activities of chitinase and beta-1,3-glucanase, inhibited growth of 15 out of 18 fungi tested. Protein extracts from uninfected pea pods, which contained low activities of chitinase and beta-1,3-glucanase, did not inhibit fungal growth. Purified chitinase and beta-1,3-glucanase, tested individually, did not inhibit growth of most of the test fungi. Only Trichoderma viride was inhibited by chitinase alone, and only Fusarium solani f.sp. pisi was inhibited by beta-1,3-glucanase alone. However, combinations of purified chitinase and beta-1,3-glucanase inhibited all fungi tested as effectively as crude protein extracts containing the same enzyme activities. The pea pathogen, Fusarium solani f.sp. pisi, and the nonpathogen of peas, Fusarium solani f.sp. phaseoli, were similarly strongly inhibited by chitinase and beta-1,3-glucanase, indicating that the differential pathogenicity of the two fungi is not due to differential sensitivity to the pea enzymes. Inhibition of fungal growth was caused by the lysis of the hyphal tips.

  8. Purification, characterization and molecular cloning of the major chitinase from Tenebrio molitor larval midgut.

    PubMed

    Genta, Fernando A; Blanes, Lucas; Cristofoletti, Plínio T; do Lago, Claudimir L; Terra, Walter R; Ferreira, Clélia

    2006-10-01

    Insect chitinases are involved in degradation of chitin from the exoskeleton cuticle or from midgut peritrophic membrane during molts. cDNAs coding for insect cuticular and gut chitinases were cloned, but only chitinases from moulting fluid were purified and characterized. In this study the major digestive chitinase from T. molitor midgut (TmChi) was purified to homogeneity, characterized and sequenced after cDNA cloning. TmChi is secreted by midgut epithelial cells, has a molecular weight of 44 kDa and is unstable in the presence of midgut proteinases. TmChi shows strong substrate inhibition when acting on umbelliferyl-derivatives of chitobio- and chitotriosaccharides, but has normal Michaelis kinetics with the N-acetylglucosamine derivative as substrate. TmChi has very low activity against colloidal chitin, but effectively converts oligosaccharides to shorter fragments. The best substrate for TmChi is chitopentaose, with highest k(cat)/K(M) value. Sequence analysis and chemical modification experiments showed that the TmChi active site contains carboxylic groups and a tryptophane, which are known to be important for catalysis in family 18 chitinases. Modification with p-hidroximercuribenzoate of a cysteine residue, which is exposed after substrate binding, leads to complete inactivation of the enzyme. TmChi mRNA encodes a signal peptide plus a protein with 37 kDa and high similarity with other insect chitinases from family 18. Surprisingly, this gene does not encode the C-terminal Ser-Thr-rich connector and chitin-binding domain normally present in chitinases. The special features of TmChi probably result from its adaptation to digest chitin-rich food without damaging the peritrophic membrane.

  9. Methyl jasmonate induces expression of a novel Brassica juncea chitinase with two chitin-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Zhao, K J; Chye, M L

    1999-08-01

    We have cloned a 1.3 kb Brassica juncea cDNA encoding BjCHI1, a novel acidic chitinase with two chitin-binding domains that shows 62% identity to Nicotiana tabacum Chia1 chitinase. BjCHI1 is structurally unlike Chia1 that has one chitin-binding domain, but resembles Chia5 chitinase UDA1, the precursor of Urtica dioica agglutinin: however there is only 36.9% identity between them. We propose that BjCHI1 should be classified under a new class, Chia7. The spacer and the hinge region of BjCHI1 are proline-rich, like that of Beta vulgaris Ch1, a Chia6 chitinase with half a chitin-binding domain. Northern blot analysis showed that the 1.3 kb BjCHI1 mRNA is induced by wounding and methyljasmonate (MeJA) treatment but is unaffected by ethylene, salicylic acid (SA) or abscisic acid (ABA). This is the first report on MeJA induction of chitinase gene expression and further suggests that wound-related JA-mediated signal transduction is independent of that involving SA. Western blot analysis using polyclonal antibodies against BjCHI1 showed a cross-reacting band with an apparent molecular mass of 37 kDa in wounded tissues of B. juncea, revealing that, unlike UDA1, BjCHI1 is not cleaved post-translationally at the hinge. Expression of recombinant BjCHI1 in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) inhibited its growth while crude extracts from E. coli JM109 expressing recombinant BjCHI1 showed chitinase activity. Results from polymerase chain reaction (PCR) suggest that genes encoding chitinases with single or double chitin-binding domains exist in B. juncea. PMID:10527425

  10. Insights into the role of the (alpha+beta) insertion in the TIM-barrel catalytic domain, regarding the stability and the enzymatic activity of chitinase A from Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Zees, Athanassios C; Pyrpassopoulos, Serapion; Vorgias, Constantinos E

    2009-01-01

    Chitinase A (ChiA) from Serratia marcescens is a mesophilic enzyme with high catalytic activity and high stability. The crystal structure of ChiA has revealed a TIM-barrel fold of the catalytic domain, an (alpha+beta) insertion between the B7 beta-strand and A7 alpha-helix of the TIM-barrel, an FnIII domain at the N-terminus of the molecule and a hinge region that connects the latter to the catalytic domain. In this study, the role of the (alpha+beta) domain on the stability, catalytic activity and specificity of the enzyme was investigated by deleting this domain and studying the enzymatic and structural properties of the resulting truncated enzyme. The obtained data clearly show that by removing the (alpha+beta) domain, the thermal stability of the enzyme is substantially reduced, with an apparent T(m) of 42.0+/-1.0 degrees C, compared to the apparent T(m) of 58.1+/-1.0 degrees C of ChiA at pH 9.0. The specific activity of ChiADelta(alpha+beta) was substantially decreased, the pH optimum was shifted from 6.5 to 5.0 and the substrate and product specificities were altered.

  11. Purification and characterization of an antifungal chitinase from Citrobacter freundii str. nov. haritD11.

    PubMed

    Meruvu, Haritha; Donthireddy, Sri Rami Reddy

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to study the purification and partial characterization of antifungal alkaline chitinase from a newly isolated Citrobacter freundii haritD11. The enzyme was purified in a three-step procedure involving ammonium sulfate precipitation, dialysis, and Sephadex G-100 gel filtration chromatography. The enzyme was shown to have a relative high molecular weight of 64 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and was purified 7.3-fold with a yield of 18.8 %. It was most active at 35 °C, pH 8.0, with colloid chitin as substrate and was very stable at alkaline pH contradicting the characteristic that most of the bacterial chitinases are active at acidic pH. Further, the purified chitinase exhibited remarkable antifungal activity against pathogenic fungi Aspergillus flavus MTCC 2798 and Aspergillus niger MTCC 9652 showing diametric inhibition zones of 27 mm and 21 mm, respectively.

  12. First report of a bifunctional chitinase/lysozyme produced by Bacillus pumilus SG2.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Seyedhadi; Ahmadian, Gholamreza; Sadeghi, Mehdi; Zeigler, Daniel R; Rahimian, Heshmatollah; Ghandili, Soheila; Naghibzadeh, Neda; Dehestani, Ali

    2011-03-01

    Bacillus pumilus SG2 isolated from high salinity ecosystem in Iran produces two chitinases (ChiS and ChiL) and secretes them into the medium. In this study, chiS and chiL genes were cloned in pQE-30 expression vector and were expressed in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli strain M15. The recombinant proteins were purified using Ni-NTA column. The optimum pH and optimum temperature for enzyme activity of ChiS were pH 6, 50°C; those of ChiL were pH 6.5, 40°C. The purified chitinases showed antifungal activity against Fusarium graminearum, Rhizoctonia solani, Magnaporthe grisea, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Trichoderma reesei, Botrytis cinerea and Bipolaris sp. Moreover, purified ChiS was identified as chitinase/lysozyme, which are capable of degrading the chitin component of fungal cell walls and the peptidoglycan component of cell walls with many kinds of bacteria (Xanthomonas translucens pv. hordei, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri, Bacillus licheniformis, E. coli C600, E. coli TOP10, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida). Strong homology was found between the three-dimensional structures of ChiS and a chitinase/lysozyme from Bacillus circulans WL-12. This is the first report of a bifunctional chitinase/lysozyme from B. pumilus. PMID:22112904

  13. Enzymatic properties of chitinase-producing antagonistic bacterium Paenibacillus chitinolyticus with various substrates.

    PubMed

    Song, Yong-Su; Seo, Dong-Jun; Ju, Wan-Taek; Lee, Yong-Seong; Jung, Woo-Jin

    2015-12-01

    Various chitin substrates were used to investigate the properties of enzymes produced from the chitinase-producing bacterium Paenibacillus chitinolyticus MP-306 against phytopathogens. The MP-306 bacterium was incubated in nine culture media [crab shell powder chitin (CRS), chitin-protein complex powder (CPC), carboxymethyl-chitin powder (CMC), yeast extract only (YE), LB (Trypton, NaCl, and yeast extract), GT (Trypton, NaCl, and glucose), crab shell colloidal chitin (CSC), squid pen powder chitin (SPC), and cicada slough powder chitin (CSP)] at 30 °C for 3 days. Chitinase isozymes in CPC medium were expressed strongly as CN1, CN2, CN3, CN4, CN5, and CN6 bands on native-PAGE gels. Chitinase isozymes in CPC and CMC medium were expressed as 13 bands (CS1-CS13) on SDS-PAGE gels. Chitinase isozymes were expressed strongly on SDS-PAGE gels as two bands (CS6 and CS8) on YE and LB medium and 13 bands (CS1-CS13) on SPC medium. In crude enzyme, chitinase isozymes at pH 7 and pH 9 in chitin media appeared strongly on SDS-PAGE gels. Partial purified enzyme indicated high stability of enzyme activity at various temperatures and pHs in chitin medium, while these enzymes indicated low activity staining of enzyme on electrophoresis gels at various temperatures and pHs condition of chitin medium.

  14. Tissue distribution, synthesis stage, and ethylene induction of pineapple (Ananas comosus) chitinases.

    PubMed

    Taira, Toki; Toma, Noriko; Ichi, Marika; Takeuchi, Makoto; Ishihara, Masanobu

    2005-04-01

    We examined the tissue distribution, synthesis stage, and ethylene induction of three types of pineapple chitinase using chitinase activity gel and immunoblot analysis. Type A (acidic class III) exists in all tissues, while type B (weakly basic class I, which has strong antifungal activity) and type C (acidic class I) are localized mainly in the leaf and stem. In a pericarp, type A exists at all stages during fruit development, while type B and type C exist only at the early stage. Synthesis of type A is induced by ethylene, while that of types B and C is not affected by it. These results suggest that the physiological roles of these three types of chitinase in pineapple are different.

  15. Co-transformation of canola by chimeric chitinase and tlp genes towards improving resistance to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    PubMed

    Aghazadeh, Rustam; Zamani, Mohammadreza; Motallebi, Mostafa; Moradyar, Mehdi; Moghadassi Jahromi, Zahra

    2016-09-01

    Canola (Brassica napus) plants were co-transformed with two pathogenesis-related protein genes expressing a Trichoderma atroviride chitinase with a chitin-binding domain (chimeric chitinase) and a thaumatin-like protein (tlp) from Oryza sativa conferring resistance to phytopatogenic fungi by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The putative transgenic plants were confirmed by PCR. After measuring the specific activity of the chimeric chitinase and glucanase activity for tlp genes, transgenic plants with high specific activity were selected for southern blot analysis to confirm the copy number of the genes. In vitro assays, the antifungal activity of crude extracted protein against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum showed that the inhibition percentage in double transgenic plants was between 55 and 62, whereas the inhibition percentage in single-gene transformants (chimeric chitinase) ranged from 35 to 45 percent. Importantly, in greenhouse conditions, the double transgenic plants showed significant resistance than the single-gene transformant and wild type plants. The results in T2 generation using the intact leaf inoculation method showed that the average lesion diameters were 10, 14.7 and 29 mm for the double transformant, single-gene transformant and non-transgenic plants, respectively. Combined expression of chimeric chitinase and tlp in transgenic plants showed significantly enhanced resistance against S. sclerotiorum than the one that express single-gene transformant plants. These results suggest that the co-expression of chimeric chitinase and tlp can confer enhanced disease resistance in canola plant. PMID:27430511

  16. Co-transformation of canola by chimeric chitinase and tlp genes towards improving resistance to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    PubMed

    Aghazadeh, Rustam; Zamani, Mohammadreza; Motallebi, Mostafa; Moradyar, Mehdi; Moghadassi Jahromi, Zahra

    2016-09-01

    Canola (Brassica napus) plants were co-transformed with two pathogenesis-related protein genes expressing a Trichoderma atroviride chitinase with a chitin-binding domain (chimeric chitinase) and a thaumatin-like protein (tlp) from Oryza sativa conferring resistance to phytopatogenic fungi by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The putative transgenic plants were confirmed by PCR. After measuring the specific activity of the chimeric chitinase and glucanase activity for tlp genes, transgenic plants with high specific activity were selected for southern blot analysis to confirm the copy number of the genes. In vitro assays, the antifungal activity of crude extracted protein against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum showed that the inhibition percentage in double transgenic plants was between 55 and 62, whereas the inhibition percentage in single-gene transformants (chimeric chitinase) ranged from 35 to 45 percent. Importantly, in greenhouse conditions, the double transgenic plants showed significant resistance than the single-gene transformant and wild type plants. The results in T2 generation using the intact leaf inoculation method showed that the average lesion diameters were 10, 14.7 and 29 mm for the double transformant, single-gene transformant and non-transgenic plants, respectively. Combined expression of chimeric chitinase and tlp in transgenic plants showed significantly enhanced resistance against S. sclerotiorum than the one that express single-gene transformant plants. These results suggest that the co-expression of chimeric chitinase and tlp can confer enhanced disease resistance in canola plant.

  17. Characterization of two Listeria innocua chitinases of different sizes that were expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Honda, Shotaro; Wakita, Satoshi; Sugahara, Yasusato; Kawakita, Masao; Oyama, Fumitaka; Sakaguchi, Masayoshi

    2016-09-01

    Two putative chitinase genes, lin0153 and lin1996, from the nonpathogenic bacterium Listeria innocua were expressed in Escherichia coli, and the gene products were characterized. The genes were close homologs of chitinases from the pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, in which chitinases and chitin-binding proteins play important roles in pathogenesis in mice-infection models. The purified recombinant enzymes that are different in size, LinChi78 (lin0153 product) and LinChi35 (lin1996 product)-with molecular masses of 82 and 38 kDa, including vector-derived additional sequences, respectively-exhibited optimum catalytic activity under neutral and acidic conditions at 50 °C, respectively, and were stable over broad pH (4-11) and temperature (4-40 °C) ranges. LinChi35 displayed higher k cat and K M values for 4-nitrophenyl N,N-diacetyl-β-D-chitobioside [4NP-(GlcNAc)2] than LinChi78. Both enzymes produced primarily dimers from colloidal chitin as a substrate. However, LinChi78 and LinChi35 could hydrolyze oligomeric substrates in a processive exo- and nonprocessive endo-manner, respectively, and showed different reactivity toward oligomeric substrates. Both enzymes could bind chitin beads but were different in their binding ability toward crystalline α-chitin and cellulose. The structure-function relationships of these chitinases are discussed in reference to other bacterial chitinases. PMID:27138200

  18. Crystal structures and inhibitor binding properties of plant class V chitinases: the cycad enzyme exhibits unique structural and functional features.

    PubMed

    Umemoto, Naoyuki; Kanda, Yuka; Ohnuma, Takayuki; Osawa, Takuo; Numata, Tomoyuki; Sakuda, Shohei; Taira, Toki; Fukamizo, Tamo

    2015-04-01

    A class V (glycoside hydrolase family 18) chitinase from the cycad Cycas revoluta (CrChiA) is a plant chitinase that has been reported to possess efficient transglycosylation (TG) activity. We solved the crystal structure of CrChiA, and compared it with those of class V chitinases from Nicotiana tabacum (NtChiV) and Arabidopsis thaliana (AtChiC), which do not efficiently catalyze the TG reaction. All three chitinases had a similar (α/β)8 barrel fold with an (α + β) insertion domain. In the acceptor binding site (+1, +2 and +3) of CrChiA, the Trp168 side chain was found to stack face-to-face with the +3 sugar. However, this interaction was not found in the identical regions of NtChiV and AtChiC. In the DxDxE motif, which is essential for catalysis, the carboxyl group of the middle Asp (Asp117) was always oriented toward the catalytic acid Glu119 in CrChiA, whereas the corresponding Asp in NtChiV and AtChiC was oriented toward the first Asp. These structural features of CrChiA appear to be responsible for the efficient TG activity. When binding of the inhibitor allosamidin was evaluated using isothermal titration calorimetry, the changes in binding free energy of the three chitinases were found to be similar to each other, i.e. between -9.5 and -9.8 kcal mol(-1) . However, solvation and conformational entropy changes in CrChiA were markedly different from those in NtChiV and AtChiC, but similar to those of chitinase A from Serratia marcescens (SmChiA), which also exhibits significant TG activity. These results provide insight into the molecular mechanism underlying the TG reaction and the molecular evolution from bacterial chitinases to plant class V chitinases.

  19. Chitinase but N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase production correlates to the biomass decline in Penicillium and Aspergillus species.

    PubMed

    Pusztahelyi, Tünde; Pócsi, István

    2014-06-01

    Hydrolytic enzyme production is typical of the autolysis in filamentous fungi; however, less attention has been given to the physiological role of the enzymes. Here, the aim was to investigate the possible relation of the chitinolytic enzymes to the changes in the biomass in some filamentous fungi of high importance for pharmaceutical or food industry. In Penicillium and Aspergillus filamentous fungi, which showed different characteristics in submerged cultures, the growth and biomass decline rates were calculated and correlated to the chitinase and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase enzyme productions. Correlation was found between the biomass decrease rate and the chitinase level at the stationary growth phase; while chitinase production covariates negatively with N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase activities. The chitinase production and the intensive autolysis hindered the production of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase and, therefore, could hinder the cell death in the cultures.

  20. Comparative studies of chitinases A and B from Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Brurberg, M B; Nes, I F; Eijsink, V G

    1996-07-01

    Serratia marcescens produces several chitinolytic enzymes, including chitinase A (ChiA) and chitinase B (ChiB). In this study, ChiB was purified to homogeneity using a newly developed protocol based on hydrophobic interaction chromatography. Subsequently, characteristics of ChiB and of the hitherto only partly characterized ChiA were determined and compared. Pure ChiA and ChiB shared several characteristics such as a broad pH optimum around pH 5.0-6.0, and a temperature optimum between 50 and 60 degrees C. Both enzymes were fairly stable, with half-lives of more than 10 d at 37 degrees C, pH 6.1. Analyses of the degradation of various N-acetylglucosamine oligomers, fluorogenic substrates and colloidal chitin showed that both enzymes cleave chitobiose [(GlcNAc)2] from (GlcNAc)n and thus possess an exo-N,N'-diacetylchitobiohydrolase activity. Both enzymes were also capable of producing monomers from longer (GlcNAc)n substrates, indicating that they also have an endochitinase (ChiA) or exo-N,N',N"-triacetylchitotriohydrolase (ChiB) activity. Kinetic analyses with 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-N,N'-diacetylchitobioside, an analogue of (GlcNAc)3, showed cooperative kinetics for ChiA, whereas for ChiB normal hyperbolic kinetics were observed. ChiA had a higher specific activity towards chitin than ChiB and synergistic effects on the chitin degradation rate were observed upon combining the two enzymes. These results, together with the results of sequence comparisons and previous studies of the cellular localization of the two chitinases in S. marcescens indicate possible roles for ChiA and ChiB in chitin breakdown.

  1. Production of Chitinase and its Optimization from a Novel Isolate Serratia marcescens XJ-01.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jin-Lan; Xiong, Jing; Zhang, Rui-Yong; Liu, Ke-Ke; Huang, Bin; Nie, Zhen-Yuan

    2011-07-01

    Production of chitinase from bacteria has distinct advantages over fungi, due to the formation of mycelia of fungi in the later phase of fermentation. A novel chitinase-producing bacterial strain XJ-01 was isolated from the Yulu fishing field of Changsha, Hunan province, China, by enrichment and spread-plate technique, sequentially. Physicochemical characterization and 16S rRNA sequencing revealed that strain XJ-01 belongs to Serratia marcescens. By optimizing the fermentation condition based on L(9)(3(4)) orthogonal experimental design, a maximal chitinase activity up to 15.36 U/ml was attained by that stain under the condition: 0.5% (NH(4))(2)SO(4) as the nitrogen source, 0.75% colloidal chitin as the carbon source, temperature of 32°C, time of 32 h and pH 8.0.

  2. Isolation, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of chitinase from tamarind (Tamarindus indica) seeds.

    PubMed

    Patil, Dipak N; Datta, Manali; Chaudhary, Anshul; Tomar, Shailly; Sharma, Ashwani Kumar; Kumar, Pravindra

    2009-04-01

    A protein with chitinase activity has been isolated and purified from tamarind (Tamarindus indica) seeds. N-terminal amino-acid sequence analysis of this protein confirmed it to be an approximately 34 kDa endochitinase which belongs to the acidic class III chitinase family. The protein was crystallized by the vapour-diffusion method using PEG 4000. The crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P4(1), with two molecules per asymmetric unit. Diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.6 A.

  3. Molecular Cloning and Functional Expression of Chitinase-Encoding cDNA from the Cabbage Moth, Mamestra brassicae

    PubMed Central

    Paek, Aron; Park, Hee Yun; Jeong, Seong Eun

    2012-01-01

    Chitinase is a rate-limiting and endo-splitting enzyme involved in the bio-degradation of chitin, an important component of the cuticular exoskeleton and peritrophic matrix in insects. We isolated a cDNA-encoding chitinase from the last larval integument of the cabbage moth, Mamestra brassicae (Lepidoptera; Noctuidae), cloned the ORF cDNA into E. coli to confirm its functionality, and analyzed the deduced amino acid sequence in comparison with previously described lepidopteran chitinases. M. brassicae chitinase expressed in the transformed E. coli cells with the chitinase-encoding cDNA enhanced cell proliferation to about 1.6 times of the untransformed wild type strain in a colloidal chitin-including medium with only a very limited amount of other nutrients. Compared with the wild type strain, the intracellular levels of chitin degradation derivatives, glucosamine and N-acetylglucosamine were about 7.2 and 2.3 times higher, respectively, while the extracellular chitinase activity was about 2.2 times higher in the transformed strain. The ORF of M. brassicae chitinase-encoding cDNA consisted of 1686 nucleotides (562 amino acid residues) except for the stop codon, and its deduced amino acid composition revealed a calculated molecular weight of 62.7 and theoretical pI of 5.3. The ORF was composed of N-terminal leading signal peptide (AA 1-20), catalytic domain (AA 21–392), linker region (AA 393–498), and C-terminal chitin-binding domain (AA 499–562) showing its characteristic structure as a molting fluid chitinase. In phylogenetic analysis, the enzymes from 6 noctuid species were grouped together, separately from a group of 3 bombycid and 1 tortricid enzymes, corresponding to their taxonomic relationships at both the family and genus levels. PMID:22124732

  4. Unexpected effects of chitinases on the peach-potato aphid (Myzus persicae Sulzer) when delivered via transgenic potato plants (Solanum tuberosum Linné) and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Saguez, Julien; Hainez, Romaric; Cherqui, Anas; Van Wuytswinkel, Olivier; Jeanpierre, Haude; Lebon, Gaël; Noiraud, Nathalie; Beaujean, Antony; Jouanin, Lise; Laberche, Jean-Claude; Vincent, Charles; Giordanengo, Philippe

    2005-02-01

    With the aim of producing insect-resistant potato plants, internode explants of Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Désirée were transformed with an Agrobacterium strain C58pMP90 containing an insect (Phaedon cochleariae: Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae) chitinase gene and the neomycin phosphotransferase (nptII) gene as selectable marker, both under the control of the viral CaMV 35S promoter. Three transformed potato lines (CH3, CH5 and CH25) exhibiting the highest chitinolytic activities were selected for feeding experiments with the peach-potato aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer), under controlled photoperiod and temperature conditions. Aphids fed on transgenic potato plants showed a reduced pre-reproductive period and an enhanced daily fecundity. Transgenic potato lines did not affect nymphal mortality, but improved several biological parameters related to aphid population's growth. Artificial diets were used to provide active (1, 10, 100 and 500 microg ml(-1)) and inactive (500 microg ml(-1)) bacterial (Serratia marcescens) chitinase to M. persicae. These compounds increased nymph survival at all active chitinase doses when compared to the control diet, while inactive chitinase did not. Although the pre-reproductive period was slightly shortened and the daily fecundity slightly higher, active and inactive chitinase provided as food led a reduction from 1 to 1.5 day population's doubling time. Therefore chitinase activity was responsible for the probiotic effects on aphids. Our results question the relevance of a chitinase-based strategy in the context of potato culture protection.

  5. [The study of mycolytic properties of aerobic spore-forming bacteria producing extracellular chitinases].

    PubMed

    Aktuganov, G E; Melent'ev, A I; Galimzianova, N F; Shirokov, A V

    2008-01-01

    The mycolytic activity of 27 strains of antagonistic bacilli belonging to two taxonomic groups (18 strains of Bacillus subtilis and 9 strains of Paenibacillus ehimensis) capable of induced synthesis of chitinolytic enzymes was studied. Most of the B. subtilis strains neither displayed visible mycolytic effects on the phytopathogenic fungus Bipolaris sorokiniana in vitro, nor produced chitinases in the presence of an auto-claved mycelium. On the contrary, P. ehimensis strains grown under conditions favorable for induction of chitinases and other hydrolases exhibited a pronounced lytic effect on B. sorokiniana and actively grew by utilizing mycelium as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen. Comparison of the mycolytic activities of extracellular hydrolases in the studied strains demonstrated low correlation between chitinase production and the ability of the strains to degrade the cell walls of B. sorokiniana. Characterization of enzyme profiles in the studied strains revealed that beta-1,3-glucanase was a more significant factor than chitinase for determining the mycolytic potential of bacteria and their ability to utilize the mycelium of phytopathogenic fungi as a growth substrate.

  6. Thermodynamic Relationships with Processivity in Serratia marcescens Family 18 Chitinases.

    PubMed

    Hamre, Anne Grethe; Jana, Suvamay; Holen, Matilde Mengkrog; Mathiesen, Geir; Väljamäe, Priit; Payne, Christina M; Sørlie, Morten

    2015-07-30

    The enzymatic degradation of recalcitrant polysaccharides is accomplished by synergistic enzyme cocktails of glycoside hydrolases (GHs) and accessory enzymes. Many GHs are processive which means that they remain attached to the substrate in between subsequent hydrolytic reactions. Chitinases are GHs that catalyze the hydrolysis of chitin (β-1,4-linked N-acetylglucosamine). Previously, a relationship between active site topology and processivity has been suggested while recent computational efforts have suggested a link between the degree of processivity and ligand binding free energy. We have investigated these relationships by employing computational (molecular dynamics (MD)) and experimental (isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC)) approaches to gain insight into the thermodynamics of substrate binding to Serratia marcescens chitinases ChiA, ChiB, and ChiC. We show that increased processive ability indeed corresponds to more favorable binding free energy and that this likely is a general feature of GHs. Moreover, ligand binding in ChiB is entropically driven; in ChiC it is enthalpically driven, and the enthalpic and entropic contributions to ligand binding in ChiA are equal. Furthermore, water is shown to be especially important in ChiA-binding. This work provides new insight into oligosaccharide binding, getting us one step closer to understand how GHs efficiently degrade recalcitrant polysaccharides.

  7. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of chitinase A from Vibrio carchariae

    SciTech Connect

    Songsiriritthigul, Chomphunuch; Yuvaniyama, Jirundon; Robinson, Robert C.; Vongsuwan, Archara; Prinz, Heino; Suginta, Wipa

    2005-10-01

    This article describes the high-level expression, purification and crystallization as well as preliminary X-ray diffraction study of a family 18 chitinase, chitinase A from V. carchariae. Chitinase A of Vibrio carchariae was expressed in Escherichia coli M15 host cells as a 575-amino-acid fragment with full enzymatic activity using the pQE60 expression vector. The yield of the highly purified recombinant protein was approximately 70 mg per litre of bacterial culture. The molecular mass of the expressed protein was determined by HPLC/ESI–MS to be 63 770, including the hexahistidine tag. Crystals of recombinant chitinase A were grown to a suitable size for X-ray structure analysis in a precipitant containing 10%(v/v) PEG 400, 0.1 M sodium acetate pH 4.6 and 0.125 M CaCl{sub 2}. The crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P422, with two molecules per asymmetric unit and unit-cell parameters a = b = 127.64, c = 171.42 Å. A complete diffraction data set was collected to 2.14 Å resolution using a Rigaku/MSC R-AXIS IV{sup ++} detector system mounted on an RU-H3R rotating-anode X-ray generator.

  8. The role of enzyme distortion in the single displacement mechanism of family 19 chitinases

    PubMed Central

    Brameld, Ken A.; Goddard, William A.

    1998-01-01

    By using molecular dynamics simulations, we have examined the binding of a hexaNAG substrate and two potential hydrolysis intermediates (an oxazoline ion and an oxocarbenium ion) to a family 19 barley chitinase. We find the hexaNAG substrate binds with all sugars in a chair conformation, unlike the family 18 chitinase which causes substrate distortion. Glu 67 is in a position to protonate the anomeric oxygen linking sugar residues D and E whereas Asn 199 serves to hydrogen bond with the C2′ N-acetyl group of sugar D, thus preventing the formation of an oxazoline ion intermediate. In addition, Glu 89 is part of a flexible loop region allowing a conformational change to occur within the active site to bring the oxocarbenium ion intermediate and Glu 89 closer by 4–5 Å. A hydrolysis product with inversion of the anomeric configuration occurs because of nucleophilic attack by a water molecule that is coordinated by Glu 89 and Ser 120. Issues important for the design of inhibitors specific to family 19 chitinases over family 18 chitinases also are discussed. PMID:9539727

  9. Studies on Exo-Chitinase Production from Trichoderma asperellum UTP-16 and Its Characterization.

    PubMed

    Kumar, D Praveen; Singh, Rajesh Kumar; Anupama, P D; Solanki, Manoj Kumar; Kumar, Sudheer; Srivastava, Alok K; Singhal, Pradeep K; Arora, Dilip K

    2012-09-01

    The growth conditions for chitinase production by Trichoderma asperellum UTP-16 in solid state fermentation was optimized using response surface methodology based on central composite design. The chitinase production was optimized, using one-factor at a time approach, with six independent variables (temperature, pH, NaCl, incubation period, nitrogen and carbon sources) and 3.31 Units per gram dry substrate (U gds(-1)) exo-chitinase yield was obtained. A 21.15% increase was recorded in chitinase activity (4.01 U gds(-1)) through surface response methodology, indicates that it is a powerful and rapid tool for optimization of physical and nutritional variables. Further, efficiency of crude enzyme was evaluated against phytopathogenic Fusarium spp. and a mycelial growth inhibition up to 3.5-6.5 mm was achieved in well diffusion assay. These results could be supplemented as basic information for the development of enzyme based formulation of T. asperellum UTP-16 and its use as a biocontrol agent. PMID:23997329

  10. Stimulatory effects of chitinase on growth and immune defense of orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanhong; Feng, Shaozhen; Chen, Jun; Qin, Chaobin; Lin, Haoran; Li, Wensheng

    2012-05-01

    Chitinase, belonging to either family 18 or family 19 of the glycosylhydrolases, hydrolyze chitin into oligosaccharides. In the present study, the cDNA fragment encoding orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) chitinase1 was subcloned into pPIC3.5K vector and expressed in Pichia pastoris GS115. The results showed that a band with the size of about 53 kDa could be detected by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. The recombinant protein of grouper chitinase1 (rgChi1) was added into the fish diet containing shrimp shell chitin for feeding experiment lasting 8 weeks. The weight of orange-spotted grouper, fed with diets containing rgChi1 at 0, 5, 10 and 20 μg/g was calculated on the 2nd, 4th, 6th and 8th weeks, and difference in growth rates was first observed in the 6th week of the feeding period and it kept until the end of the feeding experiment. At the end of 8 weeks feeding trial, the percent weight gain (PWG), growth rate (GR) and specific growth rate (SGR) of fish fed with 10 and 20 μg rgChi1/g feed were significantly higher compared to the control group. The neuropeptide Y (NPY), growth-hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), growth-hormone (GH), interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), superoxide dismutase (SOD) (Cu/Zn) and SOD (Mn) mRNA expression of fish fed with diet containing 10 μg/g or/and 20 μg/g rgChi1 were obviously higher than the control group. The lysozyme (LZM) and total SOD activity of fish fed with diet containing rgChi1 at 10 and 20 μg/g were significantly higher than that of the control. The aspartate aminotransferase (AST)/glutamic oxalacetic transaminases (GOT) activity in 20 μg/g group decreased compared to the control group. These results indicated that the grouper chitinase1 was successfully produced using the P. pastoris expression system and the recombinant protein had obvious effects on growth and immune defense. The mRNA expression and protein secretion of grouper chitinase1 and chitinase2 were significantly stimulated in

  11. Stimulatory effects of chitinase on growth and immune defense of orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanhong; Feng, Shaozhen; Chen, Jun; Qin, Chaobin; Lin, Haoran; Li, Wensheng

    2012-05-01

    Chitinase, belonging to either family 18 or family 19 of the glycosylhydrolases, hydrolyze chitin into oligosaccharides. In the present study, the cDNA fragment encoding orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) chitinase1 was subcloned into pPIC3.5K vector and expressed in Pichia pastoris GS115. The results showed that a band with the size of about 53 kDa could be detected by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. The recombinant protein of grouper chitinase1 (rgChi1) was added into the fish diet containing shrimp shell chitin for feeding experiment lasting 8 weeks. The weight of orange-spotted grouper, fed with diets containing rgChi1 at 0, 5, 10 and 20 μg/g was calculated on the 2nd, 4th, 6th and 8th weeks, and difference in growth rates was first observed in the 6th week of the feeding period and it kept until the end of the feeding experiment. At the end of 8 weeks feeding trial, the percent weight gain (PWG), growth rate (GR) and specific growth rate (SGR) of fish fed with 10 and 20 μg rgChi1/g feed were significantly higher compared to the control group. The neuropeptide Y (NPY), growth-hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), growth-hormone (GH), interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), superoxide dismutase (SOD) (Cu/Zn) and SOD (Mn) mRNA expression of fish fed with diet containing 10 μg/g or/and 20 μg/g rgChi1 were obviously higher than the control group. The lysozyme (LZM) and total SOD activity of fish fed with diet containing rgChi1 at 10 and 20 μg/g were significantly higher than that of the control. The aspartate aminotransferase (AST)/glutamic oxalacetic transaminases (GOT) activity in 20 μg/g group decreased compared to the control group. These results indicated that the grouper chitinase1 was successfully produced using the P. pastoris expression system and the recombinant protein had obvious effects on growth and immune defense. The mRNA expression and protein secretion of grouper chitinase1 and chitinase2 were significantly stimulated in

  12. Structural characteristics of an insect group I chitinase, an enzyme indispensable to moulting.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Liu, Tian; Zhou, Yong; Chen, Qi; Shen, Xu; Yang, Qing

    2014-04-01

    Insects possess a greater number of chitinases than any other organisms. This work is the first report of unliganded and oligosaccharide-complexed crystal structures of the insect chitinase OfChtI from Ostrinia furnacalis, which is essential to moulting. The obtained crystal structures were solved at resolutions between 1.7 and 2.2 Å. A structural comparison with other chitinases revealed that OfChtI contains a long substrate-binding cleft similar to the bacterial chitinase SmChiB from Serratia marcescens. However, unlike the exo-acting SmChiB, which has a blocked and tunnel-like cleft, OfChtI possesses an open and groove-like cleft. The complexed structure of the catalytic domain of OfChtI (OfChtI-CAD) with (GlcNAc)2/3 indicates that the reducing sugar at subsite -1 is in an energetically unfavoured `boat' conformation, a state that possibly exists just before the completion of catalysis. Because OfChtI is known to act from nonreducing ends, (GlcNAc)3 would be a hydrolysis product of (GlcNAc)6, suggesting that OfChtI possesses an endo enzymatic activity. Furthermore, a hydrophobic plane composed of four surface-exposed aromatic residues is adjacent to the entrance to the substrate-binding cleft. Mutations of these residues greatly impair the chitin-binding activity, indicating that this hydrophobic plane endows OfChtI-CAD with the ability to anchor chitin. This work reveals the unique structural characteristics of an insect chitinase.

  13. The gene for stinging nettle lectin (Urtica dioica agglutinin) encodes both a lectin and a chitinase.

    PubMed

    Lerner, D R; Raikhel, N V

    1992-06-01

    Chitin-binding proteins are present in a wide range of plant species, including both monocots and dicots, even though these plants contain no chitin. To investigate the relationship between in vitro antifungal and insecticidal activities of chitin-binding proteins and their unknown endogenous functions, the stinging nettle lectin (Urtica dioica agglutinin, UDA) cDNA was cloned using a synthetic gene as the probe. The nettle lectin cDNA clone contained an open reading frame encoding 374 amino acids. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence revealed a 21-amino acid putative signal sequence and the 86 amino acids encoding the two chitin-binding domains of nettle lectin. These domains were fused to a 19-amino acid "spacer" domain and a 244-amino acid carboxyl extension with partial identity to a chitinase catalytic domain. The authenticity of the cDNA clone was confirmed by deduced amino acid sequence identity with sequence data obtained from tryptic digests, RNA gel blot, and polymerase chain reaction analyses. RNA gel blot analysis also showed the nettle lectin message was present primarily in rhizomes and inflorescence (with immature seeds) but not in leaves or stems. Chitinase enzymatic activity was found when the chitinase-like domain alone or the chitinase-like domain with the chitin-binding domains were expressed in Escherichia coli. This is the first example of a chitin-binding protein with both a duplication of the 43-amino acid chitin-binding domain and a fusion of the chitin-binding domains to a structurally unrelated domain, the chitinase domain. PMID:1375935

  14. Conversion of α-chitin substrates with varying particle size and crystallinity reveals substrate preferences of the chitinases and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase of Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yuko S; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Totani, Kazuhide; Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav

    2013-11-20

    Industrial depolymerization of chitinous biomass generally requires numerous steps and the use of deleterious substances. Enzymatic methods provide an alternative, but fundamental knowledge that could direct potential development of industrial enzyme cocktails is scarce. We have studied the contribution of monocomponent chitinases (ChiA, -B, and -C) and the lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase (LPMO) from Serratia marcescens on depolymerization of α-chitin substrates with varying particle size and crystallinity that were generated using a converge mill. For all chitinases activity was positively correlated to a decline in particle size and crystallinity. Especially ChiC, the only nonprocessive endochitinase from the S. marcescens chitinolytic machinery, benefited from mechanical pretreatment. Combining the chitinases revealed clear synergies for all substrates tested. CBP21, the chitin-active LPMO from S. marcescens, increased solubilization of substrates with high degrees of crystallinity when combined with each of the three chitinases, but this synergy was reduced upon decline in crystallinity.

  15. Dual protonophore-chitinase inhibitors dramatically affect O. volvulus molting.

    PubMed

    Gooyit, Major; Tricoche, Nancy; Lustigman, Sara; Janda, Kim D

    2014-07-10

    The L3-stage-specific chitinase OvCHT1 has been implicated in the development of Onchocerca volvulus, the causative agent of onchocerciasis. Closantel, a known anthelmintic drug, was previously discovered as a potent and specific OvCHT1 inhibitor. As closantel is also a known protonophore, we performed a simple scaffold modulation to map out the structural features that are relevant for its individual or dual biochemical roles. Furthermore, we present that either OvCHT1 inhibition or protonophoric activity was capable of affecting O. volvulus L3 molting and that the presence of both activities in a single molecule yielded more potent inhibition of the nematode's developmental process. PMID:24918716

  16. Structural investigation of a novel N-acetyl glucosamine binding chi-lectin which reveals evolutionary relationship with class III chitinases.

    PubMed

    Patil, Dipak N; Datta, Manali; Dev, Aditya; Dhindwal, Sonali; Singh, Nirpendra; Dasauni, Pushpanjali; Kundu, Suman; Sharma, Ashwani K; Tomar, Shailly; Kumar, Pravindra

    2013-01-01

    The glycosyl hydrolase 18 (GH18) family consists of active chitinases as well as chitinase like lectins/proteins (CLPs). The CLPs share significant sequence and structural similarities with active chitinases, however, do not display chitinase activity. Some of these proteins are reported to have specific functions and carbohydrate binding property. In the present study, we report a novel chitinase like lectin (TCLL) from Tamarindus indica. The crystal structures of native TCLL and its complex with N-acetyl glucosamine were determined. Similar to the other CLPs of the GH18 members, TCLL lacks chitinase activity due to mutations of key active site residues. Comparison of TCLL with chitinases and other chitin binding CLPs shows that TCLL has substitution of some chitin binding site residues and more open binding cleft due to major differences in the loop region. Interestingly, the biochemical studies suggest that TCLL is an N-acetyl glucosamine specific chi-lectin, which is further confirmed by the complex structure of TCLL with N-acetyl glucosamine complex. TCLL has two distinct N-acetyl glucosamine binding sites S1 and S2 that contain similar polar residues, although interaction pattern with N-acetyl glucosamine varies extensively among them. Moreover, TCLL structure depicts that how plants utilize existing structural scaffolds ingenuously to attain new functions. To date, this is the first structural investigation of a chi-lectin from plants that explore novel carbohydrate binding sites other than chitin binding groove observed in GH18 family members. Consequently, TCLL structure confers evidence for evolutionary link of lectins with chitinases.

  17. Family GH19 plant class IV chitinase from Zea mays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize ChitA chitinase is composed of a small, hevein-like domain attached to a carboxy-terminal chitinase domain. During fungal ear rot, the hevein-like domain is cleaved by secreted fungal proteases to produce truncated forms of ChitA. Here we report a structural and biochemical characterization of...

  18. Modification of recombinant maize ChitA chitinase by fungal chitinase-modifying proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In commercial maize, there are at least two different alleles of the chiA gene that encode alloforms of ChitA chitinase, a protein that is abundant in developing seed. Both known alloforms are modified by Bz-cmp, a protein secreted by the fungal pathogen Bipolaris zeicola. One alloform (ChitA-B73) i...

  19. Postharvest application of a novel chitinase cloned from Metschnikowia fructicola and overexpressed in Pichia pastoris to control brown rot of peaches.

    PubMed

    Banani, Houda; Spadaro, Davide; Zhang, Dianpeng; Matic, Slavica; Garibaldi, Angelo; Gullino, Maria Lodovica

    2015-04-16

    Metschnikowia fructicola strain AP47 is a yeast antagonist against postharvest pathogens of fruits. The yeast was able to produce chitinase enzymes in the presence of pathogen cell wall. A novel chitinase gene MfChi (GenBank accession number HQ113461) was amplified from the genomic DNA of Metschnikowia fructicola AP47. Sequence analysis showed lack of introns, an open reading frame (ORF) of 1098 bp encoding a 365 amino acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 40.9 kDa and a predicted pI of 5.27. MfChi was highly induced in Metschnikowia fructicola after interaction with Monilinia fructicola cell wall, suggesting a primary role of MfChi chitinase in the antagonistic activity of the yeast. The MfChi gene overexpressed in the heterologous expression system of Pichia pastoris KM71 and the recombinant chitinase showed high endochitinase activity towards 4-Nitrophenyl β-d-N,N',N″-triacetylchitotriose substrate. The antifungal activity of the recombinant chitinase was investigated against Monilinia fructicola and Monilinia laxa in vitro and on peaches. The chitinase significantly controlled the spore germination and the germ tube length of the tested pathogens in PDB medium and the mycelium diameter in PDA. The enzyme, when applied on peaches cv. Redhaven, successfully reduced brown rot severity. This work shows that the chitinase MfChi could be developed as a postharvest treatment with antimicrobial activity for fruit undergoing a short shelf life, and confirms that P. pastoris KM71 is a suitable microorganism for cost-effective large-scale production of recombinant chitinases. PMID:25632799

  20. CHITINASES IN SALIVARY GLANDS AND CIRCULATION IN SJÖGREN’S SYNDROME - MACROPHAGE HARBINGERS OF DISEASE SEVERITY

    PubMed Central

    Greenwell-Wild, Teresa; Moutsopoulos, Niki M.; Gliozzi, Maria; Kapsogeorgou, Efstathia; Rangel, Zoila; Munson, Peter J.; Moutsopoulos, Haralampos M.; Wahl, Sharon M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Sjögren’s syndrome(SS) represents a chronic autoimmune disease of unknown etiology that targets salivary and lacrimal glands and may be accompanied by multi-organ systemic manifestations. To further an understanding of immunopathology associated with SS and uncover therapeutic targets, we compared gene expression profiles of salivary glands with severe inflammation to those with mild or no disease. Methods Using microarray profiling of salivary gland tissues from SS patients and controls, we identified target genes that were further characterized in tissues, serum and in cultured cell populations by real time PCR and protein analyses. Results Among the most highly expressed SS genes were genes associated with myeloid cells, including members of the mammalian chitinase family, not previously associated with exocrinopathies. Both chitinase-3-like-1(CHI3L1/YKL-40) and chitinase 1(CHIT1), highly conserved chitinase-like glycoproteins, one with and one lacking enzymatic activity, were evident at the transcriptome level, and detected within inflamed tissues. Chitinases are expressed during monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation, and augmented by cytokines, including IFNα. Conclusions Since elevated expression of these and other macrophage-derived molecules corresponded with more severe SS, these observations suggest potential immunopathologic macrophage involvement and furthermore, that the tissue macrophage transcriptional profile reflects multiple genes induced by IFNα. PMID:21618203

  1. The role of an extracellular chitinase from Trichoderma virens Gv29-8 in the biocontrol of Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Baek, J M; Howell, C R; Kenerley, C M

    1999-02-01

    The role of extracellular chitinase in the biocontrol activity of Trichoderma virens was examined using genetically manipulated strains of this fungus. The T. virens strains in which the chitinase gene (cht42) was disrupted (KO) or constitutively over-expressed (COE) were constructed through genetic transformation. The resulting transformants were stable and showed patterns similar to the wild-type (WT) strain with respect to growth rate, sporulation, antibiotic production, colonization efficiency on cotton roots and growth/survival in soil. Biocontrol activity of the KO and COE strains were significantly decreased and enhanced, respectively against cotton seedling disease incited by Rhizoctonia solani when compared with the WT strain.

  2. Partial purification, characterization, and kinetic studies of a low-molecular-weight, alkali-tolerant chitinase enzyme from Bacillus subtilis JN032305, A potential biocontrol strain.

    PubMed

    Shivakumar, Srividya; Karmali, Anika Nayak; Ruhimbana, Charles

    2014-01-01

    A new alkalophilic low-molecular-mass chitinase of 14 kD from the potent biocontrol agent Bacillus subtilis JN032305 was partially purified and enzymology of the chitinase was studied. The enzyme showed optimal pH of 9.0 and temperature of 50°C. The enzyme was found stable during the 60-min incubation at 50 °C. The chitinase was inhibited by group specific agents like IAA, DAN, TLCK, and SDS and metal ions Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Fe(2+), Mn(2+), Ba(2+), and Hg(2+), whereas Zn(2+) did not show significant inhibitory effect against the chitinase. PMSF partially inhibited the enzyme. Substrates specificity tests indicated that the enzyme showed 75% of relative activity on glycol chitin, 58% on carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), 33% on chitin flakes, and 166% laminarin compared to that on colloidal chitin. The enzyme also hydrolyzed 4-methylumbelliferyl-N-acetyl-D-glucosaminide, indicating its chitobiase activity. The chitinase of this study has broad specificity, which could hydrolyze not only the glycosidic bond in GlcNAc-GlcNAc but also that of related carbohydrates with glycosidic linkages. The partially purified chitinase not only showed antifungal activity against Rhizoctonia solani and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, two potent phytopathogens of chilli, but also increased the germination of chilli seeds when infected with the two potent phytopathogenic fungi. PMID:24499366

  3. Characterization of a novel chitinase, DkChi, from Dendrolimus kikuchii nucleopolyhedrovirus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qinghua; Qu, Liangjian; Zhang, Zhilin; Wang, Yuzhu; Zhang, Yongan

    2013-12-01

    Dendrolimus kikuchii Matsumura nucleopolyhedrovirus (DkNPV) is a novel nucleopolyhedrovirus strain that has exhibited high potential as biological control agent against D. kikuchii. In this work, a 1755-bp DkChi gene with sequence homology to a chitinase gene was cloned from the genomic DNA of DkNPV using a DNA fragment library. The DkChi gene, encoding 558 residues protein with a predicted mass of 61.6 kDa, was expressed at high levels in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography. We confirmed that the prepared protein was the DkChi protein by mass spectrometry analysis. Enzyme activity analysis showed that DkChi had both endo- and exo-chitinase activities. Interestingly, the DkChi protein displayed a strong insecticidal activity against Spodoptera exigua, Hyphantria cunea, Helicoverpa armigera and Lymantria dispar. The results suggest that DkChi is a good candidate protein for significantly contributing to pest control.

  4. Characterization of Thermotolerant Chitinases Encoded by a Brevibacillus laterosporus Strain Isolated from a Suburban Wetland

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pulin; Cheng, Deyong; Miao, Lihong

    2015-01-01

    To isolate and characterize chitinases that can be applied with practical advantages, 57 isolates of chitin-degrading bacteria were isolated from the soil of a suburban wetland. 16S rRNA gene analysis revealed that the majority of these strains belonged to two genera, Paenibacillus and Brevibacillus. Taking thermostability into account, the chitinases (ChiA and ChiC) of a B. laterosporus strain were studied further. Ni-NTA affinity-purified ChiA and ChiC were optimally active at pH 7.0 and 6.0, respectively, and showed high temperature stability up to 55 °C. Kinetic analysis revealed that ChiC has a lower affinity and stronger catalytic activity toward colloidal chitin than ChiA. With their stability in a broad temperature range, ChiA and ChiC can be utilized for the industrial bioconversion of chitin wastes into biologically active products. PMID:26690223

  5. Transfer of a plant chitinase gene into a nitrogen-fixing Azospirillum and study of its expression.

    PubMed

    Jayaraj, Jayaraman; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam; Liang, George H

    2004-07-01

    Azospirillum is used extensively in rice and other cereal crops as a biofertilizer. There is a substantial opportunity to improve the efficiency of this bacterium through the transfer of genes of agricultural importance from other organisms. Chitinases are antifungal proteins, and expression of chitinase genes in Azospirillum would help to develop strains with potential antifungal activities. So far there are no reports about transfer of plant genes into Azospirillum and their expression. The present study was aimed at expressing an antifungal gene (a rice chitinase) of plant origin in Azospirillum brasilense. A rice chitinase cDNA (RC 7) that codes for a 35 kDa protein was subcloned into a broad host range plasmid pDSK519 under the control of LacZ promoter. The plasmid was mobilized into the nitrogen-fixing bacterium, Azospirillum brasilense strain SP51eFL1, through biparental mating. The conjugation frequency was in the range of 35-40 x 10(-6). The transconjugants grew in nitrogen-free media and fixed gaseous nitrogen in vitro. However, their growth and nitrogen-fixing ability were slightly less than those of the wild-type. Expression of the protein was demonstrated through western blotting of the total cell protein, which detected a 35 kDa band that was immuno-reactive to a barley chitinase antibody. The cell lysates also hydrolyzed various chitin substrates, which resulted in release of free sugars demonstrating the chitinase activity of transconjugants. The expressed protein also had antifungal activity as demonstrated by inhibition of growth of the plant pathogenic fungus, Rhizoctonia solani.

  6. Production of a Thermostable and Alkaline Chitinase by Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki Strain HBK-51

    PubMed Central

    Kuzu, Secil Berna; Güvenmez, Hatice Korkmaz; Denizci, Aziz Akin

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the isolation and identification of chitinase-producing Bacillus from chitin-containing wastes, production of a thermostable and alkaline chitinasese, and enzyme characterization. Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki HBK-51 was isolated from soil and was identified. Chitinase was obtained from supernatant of B. thuringiensis HBK-51 strain and showed its optimum activity at 110°C and at pH 9.0. Following 3 hours of incubation period, the enzyme showed a high level of activity at 110°C (96% remaining activity) and between pH 9.0 and 12.0 (98% remaining activity). Considering these characteristics, the enzyme was described as hyperthermophile-thermostable and highly alkaline. Two bands of the enzyme weighing 50 and 125 kDa were obtained following 12% SDS-PAGE analyses. Among the metal ions and chemicals used, Ni2+ (32%), K+ (44%), and Cu2+ (56%) increased the enzyme activity while EDTA (7%), SDS (7%), Hg2+ (11%), and ethyl-acetimidate (20%) decreased the activity of the enzyme. Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki HBK-51 is an important strain which can be used in several biotechnological applications as a chitinase producer. PMID:23304523

  7. Stomach Chitinase from Japanese Sardine Sardinops melanostictus: Purification, Characterization, and Molecular Cloning of Chitinase Isozymes with a Long Linker

    PubMed Central

    Kawashima, Satoshi; Ikehata, Hiroki; Tada, Chihiro; Ogino, Tomohiro; Kakizaki, Hiromi; Ikeda, Mana; Fukushima, Hideto; Matsumiya, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Fish express two different chitinases, acidic fish chitinase-1 (AFCase-1) and acidic fish chitinase-2 (AFCase-2), in the stomach. AFCase-1 and AFCase-2 have different degradation patterns, as fish efficiently degrade chitin ingested as food. For a comparison with the enzymatic properties and the primary structures of chitinase isozymes obtained previously from the stomach of demersal fish, in this study, we purified chitinase isozymes from the stomach of Japanese sardine Sardinops melanostictus, a surface fish that feeds on plankton, characterized the properties of these isozymes, and cloned the cDNAs encoding chitinases. We also predicted 3D structure models using the primary structures of S. melanostictus stomach chitinases. Two chitinase isozymes, SmeChiA (45 kDa) and SmeChiB (56 kDa), were purified from the stomach of S. melanostictus. Moreover, two cDNAs, SmeChi-1 encoding SmeChiA, and SmeChi-2 encoding SmeChiB were cloned. The linker regions of the deduced amino acid sequences of SmeChi-1 and SmeChi-2 (SmeChi-1 and SmeChi-2) are the longest among the fish stomach chitinases. In the cleavage pattern groups toward short substrates and the phylogenetic tree analysis, SmeChi-1 and SmeChi-2 were classified into AFCase-1 and AFCase-2, respectively. SmeChi-1 and SmeChi-2 had catalytic domains that consisted of a TIM-barrel (β/α)8–fold structure and a deep substrate-binding cleft. This is the first study showing the 3D structure models of fish stomach chitinases. PMID:26805857

  8. Stomach Chitinase from Japanese Sardine Sardinops melanostictus: Purification, Characterization, and Molecular Cloning of Chitinase Isozymes with a Long Linker.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Satoshi; Ikehata, Hiroki; Tada, Chihiro; Ogino, Tomohiro; Kakizaki, Hiromi; Ikeda, Mana; Fukushima, Hideto; Matsumiya, Masahiro

    2016-01-20

    Fish express two different chitinases, acidic fish chitinase-1 (AFCase-1) and acidic fish chitinase-2 (AFCase-2), in the stomach. AFCase-1 and AFCase-2 have different degradation patterns, as fish efficiently degrade chitin ingested as food. For a comparison with the enzymatic properties and the primary structures of chitinase isozymes obtained previously from the stomach of demersal fish, in this study, we purified chitinase isozymes from the stomach of Japanese sardine Sardinops melanostictus, a surface fish that feeds on plankton, characterized the properties of these isozymes, and cloned the cDNAs encoding chitinases. We also predicted 3D structure models using the primary structures of S. melanostictus stomach chitinases. Two chitinase isozymes, SmeChiA (45 kDa) and SmeChiB (56 kDa), were purified from the stomach of S. melanostictus. Moreover, two cDNAs, SmeChi-1 encoding SmeChiA, and SmeChi-2 encoding SmeChiB were cloned. The linker regions of the deduced amino acid sequences of SmeChi-1 and SmeChi-2 (SmeChi-1 and SmeChi-2) are the longest among the fish stomach chitinases. In the cleavage pattern groups toward short substrates and the phylogenetic tree analysis, SmeChi-1 and SmeChi-2 were classified into AFCase-1 and AFCase-2, respectively. SmeChi-1 and SmeChi-2 had catalytic domains that consisted of a TIM-barrel (β/α)₈-fold structure and a deep substrate-binding cleft. This is the first study showing the 3D structure models of fish stomach chitinases.

  9. Aromatic-Mediated Carbohydrate Recognition in Processive Serratia marcescens Chitinases.

    PubMed

    Jana, Suvamay; Hamre, Anne Grethe; Wildberger, Patricia; Holen, Matilde Mengkrog; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Beckham, Gregg T; Sørlie, Morten; Payne, Christina M

    2016-02-25

    Microorganisms use a host of enzymes, including processive glycoside hydrolases, to deconstruct recalcitrant polysaccharides to sugars. Processive glycoside hydrolases closely associate with polymer chains and repeatedly cleave glycosidic linkages without dissociating from the crystalline surface after each hydrolytic step; they are typically the most abundant enzymes in both natural secretomes and industrial cocktails by virtue of their significant hydrolytic potential. The ubiquity of aromatic residues lining the enzyme catalytic tunnels and clefts is a notable feature of processive glycoside hydrolases. We hypothesized that these aromatic residues have uniquely defined roles, such as substrate chain acquisition and binding in the catalytic tunnel, that are defined by their local environment and position relative to the substrate and the catalytic center. Here, we investigated this hypothesis with variants of Serratia marcescens family 18 processive chitinases ChiA and ChiB. We applied molecular simulation and free energy calculations to assess active site dynamics and ligand binding free energies. Isothermal titration calorimetry provided further insight into enthalpic and entropic contributions to ligand binding free energy. Thus, the roles of six aromatic residues, Trp-167, Trp-275, and Phe-396 in ChiA, and Trp-97, Trp-220, and Phe-190 in ChiB, have been examined. We observed that point mutation of the tryptophan residues to alanine results in unfavorable changes in the free energy of binding relative to wild-type. The most drastic effects were observed for residues positioned at the "entrances" of the deep substrate-binding clefts and known to be important for processivity. Interestingly, phenylalanine mutations in ChiA and ChiB had little to no effect on chito-oligomer binding, in accordance with the limited effects of their removal on chitinase functionality.

  10. Enhanced nematicidal potential of the chitinase pachi from Pseudomonas aeruginosa in association with Cry21Aa.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Jiang, Huang; Cheng, Qipeng; Chen, Junpeng; Wu, Gaobing; Kumar, Ashok; Sun, Ming; Liu, Ziduo

    2015-01-01

    Nematodes are known to be harmful to various crops, vegetables, plants and insects. The present study reports that, chitin upregulates the activity of chitinase (20%) and nematicidal potential (15%) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The chitinase gene (pachi) from P. aeruginosa was cloned, and its nematicidal activity of pachi protein against Caenorhabditis elegans was studied. The mortality rate induced by pachi increased by 6.3-fold when in association with Cry21Aa from Bacillus thuringiensis. Pachi efficiently killed C. elegans in its native state (LC50 = 387.3 ± 31.7 μg/ml), as well as in association with Cry21Aa (LC50 = 30.9 ± 4.1 μg/ml), by degrading the cuticle, egg shell and intestine in a relatively short time period of 24 h. To explore the nematidal potential of chitinase, six fusion proteins were constructed using gene engineering techniques. The CHACry showed higher activity against C. elegans than others owing to its high solubility. Notably, the CHACry showed a synergistic factor of 4.1 versus 3.5 a mixture [1:1] of pachi and Cry21Aa. The present study has identified eco-friendly biological routes (e.g., mixed proteins, fusion proteins) with potent nematicidal activity, which not only can help to prevent major crop losses but also strengthen the agro-economy and increase gross crop yield. PMID:26400097

  11. Enhanced nematicidal potential of the chitinase pachi from Pseudomonas aeruginosa in association with Cry21Aa

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Jiang, Huang; Cheng, Qipeng; Chen, Junpeng; Wu, Gaobing; Kumar, Ashok; Sun, Ming; Liu, Ziduo

    2015-01-01

    Nematodes are known to be harmful to various crops, vegetables, plants and insects. The present study reports that, chitin upregulates the activity of chitinase (20%) and nematicidal potential (15%) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The chitinase gene (pachi) from P. aeruginosa was cloned, and its nematicidal activity of pachi protein against Caenorhabditis elegans was studied. The mortality rate induced by pachi increased by 6.3-fold when in association with Cry21Aa from Bacillus thuringiensis. Pachi efficiently killed C. elegans in its native state (LC50 = 387.3 ± 31.7 μg/ml), as well as in association with Cry21Aa (LC50 = 30.9 ± 4.1 μg/ml), by degrading the cuticle, egg shell and intestine in a relatively short time period of 24 h. To explore the nematidal potential of chitinase, six fusion proteins were constructed using gene engineering techniques. The CHACry showed higher activity against C. elegans than others owing to its high solubility. Notably, the CHACry showed a synergistic factor of 4.1 versus 3.5 a mixture [1:1] of pachi and Cry21Aa. The present study has identified eco-friendly biological routes (e.g., mixed proteins, fusion proteins) with potent nematicidal activity, which not only can help to prevent major crop losses but also strengthen the agro-economy and increase gross crop yield. PMID:26400097

  12. Chitinase from a Novel Strain of Serratia marcescens JPP1 for Biocontrol of Aflatoxin: Molecular Characterization and Production Optimization Using Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Yan, Pei-sheng; Cao, Li-xin

    2014-01-01

    Chitinase is one of the most important mycolytic enzymes with industrial significance, and produced by a number of organisms. A chitinase producing isolate Serratia marcescens JPP1 was obtained from peanut hulls in Jiangsu Province, China, and exhibited antagonistic activity against aflatoxins. In this study, we describe the optimization of medium composition with increased production of chitinase for the selected bacteria using statistical methods: Plackett-Burman design was applied to find the key ingredients, and central composite design of response surface methodology was used to optimize the levels of key ingredients for the best yield of chitinase. Maximum chitinase production was predicted to be 23.09 U/mL for a 2.1-fold increase in medium containing 12.70 g/L colloidal chitin, 7.34 g/L glucose, 5.00 g/L peptone, 1.32 g/L (NH4)2SO4, 0.7 g/L K2HPO4, and 0.5 g/L MgSO4·7H2O. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the JPP1 chitinase gene was performed and obtained a 1,789 bp nucleotide sequence; its open reading frame encoded a protein of 499 amino acids named as ChiBjp. PMID:24812619

  13. Utilization of Chitinaceous Wastes for the Production of Chitinase.

    PubMed

    Das, S; Roy, D; Sen, R

    2016-01-01

    Marine environment is the most abundant source of chitin. Several marine organisms possess chitin in their structural components. Hence, a huge amount of chitin wastes is deposited in marine environment when such organisms shed their outer skeleton and also after their demise. Waste chitins are potential nutrient source of certain microbes. These microbes produce chitinases that hydrolyze waste chitins. These organisms thus play an important role to remove the chitin wastes from marine environment. In connection with this, chitinases are found to be most important biocatalyst for the utilization of chitin wastes. Therefore, use of chitin for chitinase production is one of the useful tools for different types of bioprocesses. PMID:27452164

  14. Expression of a chitinase gene from Metarhizium anisopliae in tobacco plants confers resistance against Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Kern, Marcelo Fernando; Maraschin, Simone de Faria; Vom Endt, Débora; Schrank, Augusto; Vainstein, Marilene Henning; Pasquali, Giancarlo

    2010-04-01

    The chit1 gene from the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae, encoding the endochitinase CHIT42, was placed under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter, and the resulting construct was transferred to tobacco. Seventeen kanamycin-resistant transgenic lines were recovered, and the presence of the transgene was confirmed by polymerase chain reactions and Southern blot hybridization. The number of chit1 copies was determined to be varying from one to four. Copy number had observable effects neither on plant growth nor development. Substantial heterogeneity concerning production of the recombinant chitinase, and both general and specific chitinolytic activities were detected in leaf extracts from primary transformants. The highest chitinase activities were found in plants harboring two copies of chit1 inserts at different loci. Progeny derived from self-pollination of the primary transgenics revealed a stable inheritance pattern, with transgene segregation following a mendelian dihybrid ratio. Two selected plants expressing high levels of CHIT42 were consistently resistant to the soilborne pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, suggesting a direct relationship between enzyme activity and reduction of foliar area affected by fungal lesions. To date, this is the first report of resistance to fungal attack in plants mediated by a recombinant chitinase from an entomopathogenic and acaricide fungus.

  15. Molecular cloning of chitinase 33 (chit33) gene from Trichoderma atroviride

    PubMed Central

    Matroudi, S.; Zamani, M.R.; Motallebi, M.

    2008-01-01

    In this study Trichoderma atroviride was selected as over producer of chitinase enzyme among 30 different isolates of Trichoderma sp. on the basis of chitinase specific activity. From this isolate the genomic and cDNA clones encoding chit33 have been isolated and sequenced. Comparison of genomic and cDNA sequences for defining gene structure indicates that this gene contains three short introns and also an open reading frame coding for a protein of 321 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence includes a 19 aa putative signal peptide. Homology between this sequence and other reported Trichoderma Chit33 proteins are discussed. The coding sequence of chit33 gene was cloned in pEt26b(+) expression vector and expressed in E. coli. PMID:24031242

  16. Isolation and characterization of a chitinase gene from entomopathogenic fungus Verticillium lecanii

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yanping; Pan, Jieru; Qiu, Junzhi; Guan, Xiong

    2008-01-01

    Entomopathogenic fungus Verticillium lecanii is a promising whitefly and aphid control agent. Chitinases secreted by this insect pathogen have considerable importance in the biological control of some insect pests. An endochitinase gene Vlchit1 from the fungus was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The Vlchit1 gene not only contains an open reading frame (ORF) which encodes a protein of 423 amino acids (aa), but also is interrupted by three short introns. Vlchit1 protein showed that the chitinase Vlchit1 has a (a/b)8 TIM barrel structure. Overexpression test and Enzymatic activity assay indicated that the Vlchit1 is a functional enzyme that can hydrolyze the chitin substrate, so the Vlchit1 gene can service as a useful gene source for genetic manipulation leading to strain improvement of entomopathogenic fungi or constructing new transgenic plants with resistance to various fungal and insects pests. PMID:24031223

  17. Polyglycine hydrolases: fungal b-lactamase-like endoproteases that cleave polyglycine regions within plant class IV chitinases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyglycine hydrolases are secreted fungal proteases that cleave glycine-glycine peptide bonds in the inter-domain linker region of specific plant defense chitinases. Previously, we reported the catalytic activity of polyglycine hydrolases from the phytopathogens Epicoccum sorghi (Es-cmp) and Cochli...

  18. Two cold-induced family 19 glycosyl hydrolases from cherimoya (Annona cherimola) fruit: an antifungal chitinase and a cold-adapted chitinase.

    PubMed

    Goñi, Oscar; Sanchez-Ballesta, María T; Merodio, Carmen; Escribano, María I

    2013-11-01

    Two cold-induced chitinases were isolated and purified from the mesocarp cherimoyas (Annona cherimola Mill.) and they were characterised as acidic endochitinases with a Mr of 24.79 and 47.77kDa (AChi24 and AChi48, respectively), both family 19 glycosyl hydrolases. These purified chitinases differed significantly in their biochemical and biophysical properties. While both enzymes had similar optimal acidic pH values, AChi24 was enzymatically active and stable at alkaline pH values, as well as displaying an optimal temperature of 45°C and moderate thermostability. Kinetic studies revealed a great catalytic efficiency of AChi24 for oligomeric and polymeric substrates. Conversely, AChi48 hydrolysis showed positive co-operativity that was associated to a mixture of different functional oligomeric states through weak transient protein interactions. The rise in the AChi48 kcat at increasing enzyme concentrations provided evidence of its oligomerisation. AChi48 chitinase was active and stable in a broad acidic pH range, and while it was relatively labile as temperatures increased, with an optimal temperature of 35°C, it retained about 50% of its maximal activity from 5 to 50°C. Thermodynamic characterisation reflected the high kcat of AChi48 and the remarkably lower ΔH(‡), ΔS(‡) and ΔG(‡) values at 5°C compared to AChi24, indicating that the hydrolytic activity of AChi48 was less thermodependent. In vitro functional studies revealed that AChi24 had a strong antifungal defence potential against Botrytis cinerea, whereas they displayed no cryoprotective or antifreeze activity. Hence, based on biochemical, thermodynamic and functional data, this study demonstrates that two acidic endochitinases are induced at low temperatures in a subtropical fruit, and that one of them acts in an oligomeric cold-adapted manner. PMID:23890591

  19. Two cold-induced family 19 glycosyl hydrolases from cherimoya (Annona cherimola) fruit: an antifungal chitinase and a cold-adapted chitinase.

    PubMed

    Goñi, Oscar; Sanchez-Ballesta, María T; Merodio, Carmen; Escribano, María I

    2013-11-01

    Two cold-induced chitinases were isolated and purified from the mesocarp cherimoyas (Annona cherimola Mill.) and they were characterised as acidic endochitinases with a Mr of 24.79 and 47.77kDa (AChi24 and AChi48, respectively), both family 19 glycosyl hydrolases. These purified chitinases differed significantly in their biochemical and biophysical properties. While both enzymes had similar optimal acidic pH values, AChi24 was enzymatically active and stable at alkaline pH values, as well as displaying an optimal temperature of 45°C and moderate thermostability. Kinetic studies revealed a great catalytic efficiency of AChi24 for oligomeric and polymeric substrates. Conversely, AChi48 hydrolysis showed positive co-operativity that was associated to a mixture of different functional oligomeric states through weak transient protein interactions. The rise in the AChi48 kcat at increasing enzyme concentrations provided evidence of its oligomerisation. AChi48 chitinase was active and stable in a broad acidic pH range, and while it was relatively labile as temperatures increased, with an optimal temperature of 35°C, it retained about 50% of its maximal activity from 5 to 50°C. Thermodynamic characterisation reflected the high kcat of AChi48 and the remarkably lower ΔH(‡), ΔS(‡) and ΔG(‡) values at 5°C compared to AChi24, indicating that the hydrolytic activity of AChi48 was less thermodependent. In vitro functional studies revealed that AChi24 had a strong antifungal defence potential against Botrytis cinerea, whereas they displayed no cryoprotective or antifreeze activity. Hence, based on biochemical, thermodynamic and functional data, this study demonstrates that two acidic endochitinases are induced at low temperatures in a subtropical fruit, and that one of them acts in an oligomeric cold-adapted manner.

  20. Identification, phylogeny, and transcript of chitinase family genes in sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Su, Yachun; Xu, Liping; Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Zhuqing; Yang, Yuting; Chen, Yun; Que, Youxiong

    2015-01-01

    Chitinases are pathogensis-related proteins, which play an important role in plant defense mechanisms. The role of the sugarcane chitinase family genes remains unclear due to the highly heterozygous and aneuploidy chromosome genetic background of sugarcane. Ten differentially expressed chitinase genes (belonging to class I~VII) were obtained from RNA-seq analysis of both incompatible and compatible sugarcane genotypes during Sporisorium scitamineum challenge. Their structural properties and expression patterns were analyzed. Seven chitinases (ScChiI1, ScChiI2, ScChiI3, ScChiIII1, ScChiIII2, ScChiIV1 and ScChiVI1) showed more positive with early response and maintained increased transcripts in the incompatible interaction than those in the compatible one. Three (ScChiII1, ScChiV1 and ScChiVII1) seemed to have no significant difference in expression patterns between incompatible and compatible interactions. The ten chitinases were expressed differentially in response to hormone treatment as well as having distinct tissue specificity. ScChiI1, ScChiIV1 and ScChiVII1 were induced by various abiotic stresses (NaCl, CuCl2, PEG and 4 °C) and their involvement in plant immunity was demonstrated by over-expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. The results suggest that sugarcane chitinase family exhibit differential responses to biotic and abiotic stress, providing new insights into their function.

  1. Identification, Phylogeny, and Transcript of Chitinase Family Genes in Sugarcane

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yachun; Xu, Liping; Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Zhuqing; Yang, Yuting; Chen, Yun; Que, Youxiong

    2015-01-01

    Chitinases are pathogensis-related proteins, which play an important role in plant defense mechanisms. The role of the sugarcane chitinase family genes remains unclear due to the highly heterozygous and aneuploidy chromosome genetic background of sugarcane. Ten differentially expressed chitinase genes (belonging to class I~VII) were obtained from RNA-seq analysis of both incompatible and compatible sugarcane genotypes during Sporisorium scitamineum challenge. Their structural properties and expression patterns were analyzed. Seven chitinases (ScChiI1, ScChiI2, ScChiI3, ScChiIII1, ScChiIII2, ScChiIV1 and ScChiVI1) showed more positive with early response and maintained increased transcripts in the incompatible interaction than those in the compatible one. Three (ScChiII1, ScChiV1 and ScChiVII1) seemed to have no significant difference in expression patterns between incompatible and compatible interactions. The ten chitinases were expressed differentially in response to hormone treatment as well as having distinct tissue specificity. ScChiI1, ScChiIV1 and ScChiVII1 were induced by various abiotic stresses (NaCl, CuCl2, PEG and 4 °C) and their involvement in plant immunity was demonstrated by over-expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. The results suggest that sugarcane chitinase family exhibit differential responses to biotic and abiotic stress, providing new insights into their function. PMID:26035173

  2. Expression and efficient secretion of a functional chitinase from Chromobacterium violaceum in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chromobacterium violaceum is a free-living β-proteobacterium found in tropical and subtropical regions. The genomic sequencing of C. violaceum ATCC 12472 has revealed many genes that underpin its adaptability to diverse ecosystems. Moreover, C. violaceum genes with potential applications in industry, medicine and agriculture have also been identified, such as those encoding chitinases. However, none of the chitinase genes of the ATCC 12472 strain have been subjected to experimental validation. Chitinases (EC 3.2.1.14) hydrolyze the β-(1,4) linkages in chitin, an abundant biopolymer found in arthropods, mollusks and fungi. These enzymes are of great biotechnological interest as potential biocontrol agents against pests and pathogens. This work aimed to experimentally validate one of the chitinases from C. violaceum. Results The open reading frame (ORF) CV2935 of C. violaceum ATCC 12472 encodes a protein (439 residues) that is composed of a signal peptide, a chitin-binding domain, a linker region, and a C-terminal catalytic domain belonging to family 18 of the glycoside hydrolases. The ORF was amplified by PCR and cloned into the expression vector pET303/CT-His. High levels of chitinolytic activity were detected in the cell-free culture supernatant of E. coli BL21(DE3) cells harboring the recombinant plasmid and induced with IPTG. The secreted recombinant protein was purified by affinity chromatography on a chitin matrix and showed an apparent molecular mass of 43.8 kDa, as estimated by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. N-terminal sequencing confirmed the proper removal of the native signal peptide during the secretion of the recombinant product. The enzyme was able to hydrolyze colloidal chitin and the synthetic substrates p-nitrophenyl-β-D-N,N’-diacetylchitobiose and p-nitrophenyl-β-D-N,N’,N”-triacetylchitotriose. The optimum pH for its activity was 5.0, and the enzyme retained ~32% of its activity when heated to 60°C for 30

  3. Chitinase production by Bacillus subtilis ATCC 11774 and its effect on biocontrol of Rhizoctonia diseases of potato.

    PubMed

    Saber, Wesam I A; Ghoneem, Khalid M; Al-Askar, Abdulaziz A; Rashad, Younes M; Ali, Abeer A; Rashad, Ehsan M

    2015-12-01

    Stem canker and black scurf of potato, caused by Rhizoctonia solani, can be serious diseases causing an economically significant damage. Biocontrol activity of Bacillus subtilis ATCC 11774 against the Rhizoctonia diseases of potato was investigated in this study. Chitinase enzyme was optimally produced by B. subtilis under batch fermentation conditions similar to those of the potato-growing soil. The maximum chitinase was obtained at initial pH 8 and 30 °C. In vitro, the lytic action of the B. subtilis chitinase was detected releasing 355 μg GlcNAc ml⁻¹ from the cell wall extract of R. solani and suggesting the presence of various chitinase enzymes in the bacterial filtrate. In dual culture test, the antagonistic behavior of B. subtilis resulted in the inhibition of the radial growth of R. solani by 48.1% after 4 days. Moreover, the extracted B. subtilis chitinase reduced the growth of R. solani by 42.3% when incorporated with the PDA plates. Under greenhouse conditions, application of a bacterial suspension of B. subtilis at 109 cell mL⁻¹ significantly reduced the disease incidence of stem canker and black scurf to 22.3 and 30%, respectively. In addition, it significantly improved some biochemical parameters, growth and tubers yield. Our findings indicate two points; firstly, B. subtilis possesses a good biocontrol activity against Rhizoctonia diseases of potato, secondly, the harmonization and suitability of the soil conditions to the growth and activity of B. subtilis guaranteed a high controlling capacity against the target pathogen. PMID:26616375

  4. Characterization of a chitinase (Chit62) from Serratia marcescens B4A and its efficacy as a bioshield against plant fungal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Babashpour, S; Aminzadeh, S; Farrokhi, N; Karkhane, A; Haghbeen, K

    2012-10-01

    Chitinases have been suggested to be involved in pathogen-antagonist interaction during biological control progress of plant pathogenic fungi. Here, a recombinant bacterial chitinase originally from Serratia marcescens B4A was produced, purified, and assayed biochemically to ascertain the activity and determine the kinetics parameters. Active enzyme was used to determine its biocontrol features against fungal phytopathogens. The results demonstrated that the optimum pH and temperature for the enzyme activity were 6.0 and 55 °C, respectively. The K(m) and V(max) values were 3.30 mg ml(-1) and 0.92 units, respectively. The recombinant chitinase was demonstrated to be highly active in controlling fungal pathogens.

  5. Direct Regulation of Extracellular Chitinase Production by the Transcription Factor LeClp in Lysobacter enzymogenes OH11.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huiyong; Chen, Hongfu; Shen, Yuemao; Du, Liangcheng; Chou, Shan-Ho; Liu, Hongxia; Qian, Guoliang; Liu, Fengquan

    2016-09-01

    Lysobacter enzymogenes is a gram-negative bacterial biological control agent that produces abundant extracellular enzymes capable of degrading the cell walls of fungal pathogens. In strain OH11, an isolate from China, the global regulator LeClp controls the production of extracellular chitinase by regulating the transcription of the chitinase-encoding gene chiA. Using a combination of bioinformatic, genetic, and biochemical methods, we show that LeClp regulates chiA transcription by directly binding to the chiA promoter region. Although LeClp appears to be important in this role, it is not the sole regulator of chiA transcription. Furthermore, the sequence analysis of putative LeClp binding sites indicated that the LeClp homolog could be involved in the regulation of extracellular chitinase production in diverse Lysobacter spp. by a mechanism similar to that in L. enzymogenes. Our findings present new insights into the molecular mechanism of LeClp in controlling extracellular chitinase activity, providing a fundamental road to elucidate how LeClp regulates the production of other extracellular lytic enzymes in L. enzymogenes. PMID:27385597

  6. Structural analysis of Chi1 Chitinase from Yen-Tc: the multisubunit insecticidal ABC toxin complex of Yersinia entomophaga.

    PubMed

    Busby, Jason N; Landsberg, Michael J; Simpson, Robert M; Jones, Sandra A; Hankamer, Ben; Hurst, Mark R H; Lott, J Shaun

    2012-01-13

    Yersinia entomophaga MH96 is a native New Zealand soil bacterium that secretes a large ABC-type protein toxin complex, Yen-Tc, similar to those produced by nematode-associated bacteria such as Photorhabdus luminescens. Y. entomophaga displays an exceptionally virulent pathogenic phenotype in sensitive insect species, causing death within 72 h of infection. Because of this phenotype, there is intrinsic interest in the mechanism of action of Yen-Tc, and it also has the potential to function as a novel class of biopesticide. We have identified genes that encode chitinases as part of the toxin complex loci in Y. entomophaga MH96, P. luminescens, Photorhabdus asymbiotica and Xenorhabdus nematophila. Furthermore, we have shown that the secreted toxin complex from Y. entomophaga MH96 includes two chitinases as an integral part of the complex, a feature not described previously in other ABC toxins and possibly related to the severe disease caused by this bacterium. We present here the structure of the Y. entomophaga MH96 Chi1 chitinase, determined by X-ray crystallography to 1.74 Å resolution, and show that a ring of five symmetrically arranged lobes on the surface of the Yen-Tc toxin complex structure, as determined by single-particle electron microscopy, provides a good fit to the Chi1 monomer. We also confirm that the isolated chitinases display endochitinase activity, as does the complete toxin complex. PMID:22108167

  7. Co-evolution of chitinases from maize and other cereals with secreted proteases from Pleosporineae fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant class IV chitinases are composed of a carboxy-terminal chitinase domain that is attached, through a linker sequence, to a small amino-terminal domain that can be thought of as a structured peptide. While both the peptide-like domain and the chitinase domain share sequence homology throughout m...

  8. Molecular cloning and characterization of chitinase genes from Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    McCreath, K J; Specht, C A; Robbins, P W

    1995-01-01

    Chitinase (EC 3.2.1.14) is an important enzyme for the remodeling of chitin in the cell wall of fungi. We have cloned three chitinase genes (CHT1, CHT2, and CHT3) from the dimorphic human pathogen Candida albicans. CHT2 and CHT3 have been sequenced in full and their primary structures have been analyzed: CHT2 encodes a protein of 583 aa with a predicted size of 60.8 kDa; CHT3 encodes a protein of 567 aa with a predicted size of 60 kDa. All three genes show striking similarity to other chitinase genes in the literature, especially in the proposed catalytic domain. Transcription of CHT2 and CHT3 was greater when C. albicans was grown in a yeast phase as compared to a mycelial phase. A transcript of CHT1 could not be detected in either growth condition. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 5 PMID:7708682

  9. Acidic Chitinase Limits Allergic Inflammation and Promotes Intestinal Nematode Expulsion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase) is stereotypically induced during mammalian immune responses to helminths and allergens—yet, its precise role in immunity and inflammation is unclear. Here we show that in the lung, genetic ablation of AMCase failed to diminish type 2 inflammation against helmint...

  10. Characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa chitinase, a gradually secreted protein.

    PubMed

    Folders, J; Algra, J; Roelofs, M S; van Loon, L C; Tommassen, J; Bitter, W

    2001-12-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes many proteins into its extracellular environment via the type I, II, and III secretion systems. In this study, a gene, chiC, coding for an extracellular chitinolytic enzyme, was identified. The chiC gene encodes a polypeptide of 483 amino acid residues, without a typical N-terminal signal sequence. Nevertheless, an N-terminal segment of 11 residues was found to be cleaved off in the secreted protein. The protein shows sequence similarity to the secreted chitinases ChiC of Serratia marcescens, ChiA of Vibrio harveyi, and ChiD of Bacillus circulans and consists of an activity domain and a chitin-binding domain, which are separated by a fibronectin type III domain. ChiC was able to bind and degrade colloidal chitin and was active on the artificial substrates carboxymethyl-chitin-Remazol Brilliant Violet and p-nitrophenyl-beta-D-N,N',N"-triacetylchitotriose, but not on p-nitrophenyl-beta-D-N-acetylglucosamine, indicating that it is an endochitinase. Expression of the chiC gene appears to be regulated by the quorum-sensing system of P. aeruginosa, since this gene was not expressed in a lasIR vsmI mutant. After overnight growth, the majority of the ChiC produced was found intracellularly, whereas only small amounts were detected in the culture medium. However, after several days, the cellular pool of ChiC was largely depleted, and the protein was found in the culture medium. This release could not be ascribed to cell lysis. Since ChiC did not appear to be secreted via any of the known secretion systems, a novel secretion pathway seems to be involved.

  11. Production of prodigiosin and chitinases by tropical Serratia marcescens strains with potential to control plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Román, Martha Ingrid; Holguín-Meléndez, Francisco; Bello-Mendoza, Ricardo; Guillén-Navarro, Karina; Dunn, Michael F; Huerta-Palacios, Graciela

    2012-01-01

    The potential of three Serratia marcescens strains (CFFSUR-B2, CFFSUR-B3 and CFFSUR-B4) isolated from tropical regions in Mexico to inhibit the mycelial growth and conidial germination of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, causal agent of fruit anthracnose, was evaluated. The ability of these strains to produce prodigiosin and chitinases when cultivated in oil seed-based media (peanut, sesame, soybean and castor bean) and in Luria-Bertani medium was determined. All of the strains exhibited similar fungal antagonistic activities and inhibited myceliar growth by more than 40% while inhibiting conidial germination by 81-89% (P = 0.01). The highest level of prodigiosin (40 μg/ml) was produced in the peanut-based medium while growth in soybean-based medium allowed the highest production of chitinases (56 units/ml), independent of the strain used. Strain CFFSUR-B2 grown in peanut medium was used to evaluate the effect of inoculum density and initial pH on metabolite production. The amount of prodigiosin produced increased with greater inoculum densities, with an initial density of 1 × 10(12) resulting in the highest production (60 μg/ml). Prodigiosin production was not affected by pH. The strains studied have the advantage of being adapted to tropical climates and are able to produce chitinases in the absence of chitin induction in vitro. These characteristics suggest their potential as biocontrol agents for fungal pathogens in tropical regions of the world.

  12. Cooperative Degradation of Chitin by Extracellular and Cell Surface-Expressed Chitinases from Paenibacillus sp. Strain FPU-7

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Takafumi; Hibi, Takao; Fujii, Yutaka; Sugimoto, Ikumi; Fujiwara, Akihiro; Suzuki, Fumiko; Iwasaki, Yukimoto; Kim, Jin-Kyung; Taketo, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Chitin, a major component of fungal cell walls and invertebrate cuticles, is an exceedingly abundant polysaccharide, ranking next to cellulose. Industrial demand for chitin and its degradation products as raw materials for fine chemical products is increasing. A bacterium with high chitin-decomposing activity, Paenibacillus sp. strain FPU-7, was isolated from soil by using a screening medium containing α-chitin powder. Although FPU-7 secreted several extracellular chitinases and thoroughly digested the powder, the extracellular fluid alone broke them down incompletely. Based on expression cloning and phylogenetic analysis, at least seven family 18 chitinase genes were found in the FPU-7 genome. Interestingly, the product of only one gene (chiW) was identified as possessing three S-layer homology (SLH) domains and two glycosyl hydrolase family 18 catalytic domains. Since SLH domains are known to function as anchors to the Gram-positive bacterial cell surface, ChiW was suggested to be a novel multimodular surface-expressed enzyme and to play an important role in the complete degradation of chitin. Indeed, the ChiW protein was localized on the cell surface. Each of the seven chitinase genes (chiA to chiF and chiW) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli cells for biochemical characterization of their products. In particular, ChiE and ChiW showed high activity for insoluble chitin. The high chitinolytic activity of strain FPU-7 and the chitinases may be useful for environmentally friendly processing of chitin in the manufacture of food and/or medicine. PMID:24077704

  13. Colloidal chitin stained with Remazol Brilliant Blue R, a useful substrate to select chitinolytic microorganisms and to evaluate chitinases.

    PubMed

    Gómez Ramírez, M; Rojas Avelizapa, L I; Rojas Avelizapa, N G; Cruz Camarillo, R

    2004-02-01

    A simple and sensitive method based on the use of colloidal chitin stained with Remazol Brilliant Blue R (RBB) is proposed to evaluate chitinase activity. If this colloidal-stained substrate is included as a carbon source in a liquid medium, this technique allows the selection or the comparison of chitinolytic microorganisms. The colloidal substrate is proportionally solubilized and the dye released is spectrophotometrically quantified at 595 nm. The procedures used for the staining and fixing of RBB in the colloidal chitin, and a comparison with the commercial substrate chitin-azure, are presented. The influence of several physicochemical and enzymatic parameters on the release of dyes is also shown. Both stained substrates were used for studying the effect of pH, substrate concentration, temperature and time on the chitinase reaction of Bacillus thuringiensis Bt-107.

  14. Specificity and affinity of natural product cyclopentapeptide inhibitors against A. fumigatus, human, and bacterial chitinases.

    PubMed

    Rao, Francesco V; Houston, Douglas R; Boot, Rolf G; Aerts, Johannes M F G; Hodkinson, Michael; Adams, David J; Shiomi, Kazuro; Omura, Satoshi; van Aalten, Daan M F

    2005-01-01

    Family 18 chitinases play key roles in organisms ranging from bacteria to man. There is a need for specific, potent inhibitors to probe the function of these chitinases in different organisms. Such molecules could also provide leads for the development of chemotherapeuticals with fungicidal, insecticidal, or anti-inflammatory potential. Recently, two natural product peptides, argifin and argadin, have been characterized, which structurally mimic chitinase-chitooligosaccharide interactions and inhibit a bacterial chitinase in the nM-mM range. Here, we show that these inhibitors also act on human and Aspergillus fumigatus chitinases. The structures of these enzymes in complex with argifin and argadin, together with mutagenesis, fluorescence, and enzymology, reveal that subtle changes in the binding site dramatically affect affinity and selectivity. The data show that it may be possible to develop specific chitinase inhibitors based on the argifin/argadin scaffolds.

  15. Proteomic analysis reveals suppression of bark chitinases and proteinase inhibitors in citrus plants affected by the citrus sudden death disease.

    PubMed

    Cantú, M D; Mariano, A G; Palma, M S; Carrilho, E; Wulff, N A

    2008-10-01

    Citrus sudden death (CSD) is a disease of unknown etiology that greatly affects sweet oranges grafted on Rangpur lime rootstock, the most important rootstock in Brazilian citriculture. We performed a proteomic analysis to generate information related to this plant pathogen interaction. Protein profiles from healthy, CSD-affected and CSD-tolerant stem barks, were generated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The protein spots were well distributed over a pI range of 3.26 to 9.97 and a molecular weight (MW) range from 7.1 to 120 kDa. The patterns of expressed proteins on 2-DE gels made it possible to distinguish healthy barks from CSD-affected barks. Protein spots with MW around 30 kDa and pI values ranging from 4.5 to 5.2 were down-regulated in the CSD-affected root-stock bark. This set of protein spots was identified as chitinases. Another set of proteins, ranging in pI from 6.1 to 9.6 with an MW of about 20 kDa, were also suppressed in CSD-affected rootstock bark; these were identified as miraculin-like proteins, potential trypsin inhibitors. Down-regulation of chitinases and proteinase inhibitors in CSD-affected plants is relevant since chitinases are well-known pathogenesis-related protein, and their activity against plant pathogens is largely accepted. PMID:18943454

  16. Molecular and functional evolution of class I chitinases for plant carnivory in the caryophyllales.

    PubMed

    Renner, Tanya; Specht, Chelsea D

    2012-10-01

    Proteins produced by the large and diverse chitinase gene family are involved in the hydrolyzation of glycosidic bonds in chitin, a polymer of N-acetylglucosamines. In flowering plants, class I chitinases are important pathogenesis-related proteins, functioning in the determent of herbivory and pathogen attack by acting on insect exoskeletons and fungal cell walls. Within the carnivorous plants, two subclasses of class I chitinases have been identified to play a role in the digestion of prey. Members of these two subclasses, depending on the presence or absence of a C-terminal extension, can be secreted from specialized digestive glands found within the morphologically diverse traps that develop from carnivorous plant leaves. The degree of homology among carnivorous plant class I chitinases and the method by which these enzymes have been adapted for the carnivorous habit has yet to be elucidated. This study focuses on understanding the evolution of carnivory and chitinase genes in one of the major groups of plants that has evolved the carnivorous habit: the Caryophyllales. We recover novel class I chitinase homologs from species of genera Ancistrocladus, Dionaea, Drosera, Nepenthes, and Triphyophyllum, while also confirming the presence of two subclasses of class I chitinases based upon sequence homology and phylogenetic affinity to class I chitinases available from sequenced angiosperm genomes. We further detect residues under positive selection and reveal substitutions specific to carnivorous plant class I chitinases. These substitutions may confer functional differences as indicated by protein structure homology modeling.

  17. Molecular and functional evolution of class I chitinases for plant carnivory in the caryophyllales.

    PubMed

    Renner, Tanya; Specht, Chelsea D

    2012-10-01

    Proteins produced by the large and diverse chitinase gene family are involved in the hydrolyzation of glycosidic bonds in chitin, a polymer of N-acetylglucosamines. In flowering plants, class I chitinases are important pathogenesis-related proteins, functioning in the determent of herbivory and pathogen attack by acting on insect exoskeletons and fungal cell walls. Within the carnivorous plants, two subclasses of class I chitinases have been identified to play a role in the digestion of prey. Members of these two subclasses, depending on the presence or absence of a C-terminal extension, can be secreted from specialized digestive glands found within the morphologically diverse traps that develop from carnivorous plant leaves. The degree of homology among carnivorous plant class I chitinases and the method by which these enzymes have been adapted for the carnivorous habit has yet to be elucidated. This study focuses on understanding the evolution of carnivory and chitinase genes in one of the major groups of plants that has evolved the carnivorous habit: the Caryophyllales. We recover novel class I chitinase homologs from species of genera Ancistrocladus, Dionaea, Drosera, Nepenthes, and Triphyophyllum, while also confirming the presence of two subclasses of class I chitinases based upon sequence homology and phylogenetic affinity to class I chitinases available from sequenced angiosperm genomes. We further detect residues under positive selection and reveal substitutions specific to carnivorous plant class I chitinases. These substitutions may confer functional differences as indicated by protein structure homology modeling. PMID:22490823

  18. Purification and characterization of chitinase from Streptomyces violascens NRRL B2700.

    PubMed

    Gangwar, Mamta; Singh, Vineeta; Pandey, Asheesh Kumar; Tripathi, C K M; Mishra, B N

    2016-01-01

    Chitinase is one of the important enzymes as it is directly linked to Chitin that has wide applications in industrial, medical and commercial fields for its biocompatibility and biodegradability. Here, we report extracellular chitinase production by Streptomyces violascens NRRL B2700 under submerged fermentation condition. Chitinase production started after 10 h of incubation and reached to maximum level at 72 h of cultivation. Studies on the influence of additional carbon and nitrogen sources on chitinase production revealed that maltose, xylose, fructose, lactose, soybean meal and ammonium nitrate served as good carbon and nitrogen sources to enhance chitinase yield by 1.6 to 6 fold. Medium supplemented with 1% colloidal chitin produced high chitinase concentration (0.1714 U/mg). The enzyme chitinase was purified from the culture broth by 75% ammonium sulphate precipitation, DEAE-cellulose ion-exchange and sephadex G-100 gel filtration. The molecular mass of the purified chitinase was 65 kDa as estimated by SDS-PAGE. The apparent Michaelis constant (K(m)) and the maximum rate (V(max)) of the enzyme for colloidal chitin were 1.556 mg/mL and 2.680 μM/min/mg, respectively suggested high affinity towards-chitin. Possibly, it is the first report on production of chitinase from S. violascens NRRL B2700. The findings were encouraging, especially for cost effective production, and further warrants media and purification optimization studies for enhanced yield. PMID:26891554

  19. Isolation and identification of two novel SDS-resistant secreted chitinases from Aeromonas schubertii

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao-Lin; Shen, Chia-Rui; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Chen, Jeen-Kuan; Wu, Pei-Tzu; Guo, Shang-Hsin; Lee, Wen-Chien; Yu, Feng-Wei; Mackey, Zachary B.; Turk, John; Gross, Michael L.

    2008-01-01

    Two SDS-resistant endochitinases, designated as ASCHI53 and ASCHI61, were isolated from Aeromonas schubertii in a soil sample from southern Taiwan. MALDI-TOF mass measurement indicates the molecular weights of 53,527 for ASCHI53 and 61,202 for ASCHI61. N-terminal and internal amino acid sequences were obtained, and BLAST analysis of the sequences and MS/MS peptide sequencing showed that they were novel proteins. Degradation of chitin by these two endochitinases gave rise to hexameric chitin oligosaccharide, a compound known to have several potent biomedical functions. ASCHI53 and ASCHI61 retained, respectively, 65% and 75%, of their chitinase activity in the presence of 5% SDS and 100% of their activity in the presence of 10% β-mercaptoethanol. These results demonstrate that they are SDS-resistant endochitinases and probably have a rigid structure. PMID:19197977

  20. Structural and functional analysis of chitinase gene family in wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    PubMed

    Mishra, A K; Pandey, Bharati; Tyagi, Chetna; Chakraborty, Ohika; Kumar, Amrender; Jain, A K

    2015-04-01

    Chitinases are the hydrolytic enzymes which protect plants against pathogen attack. However, the precise role of chitinases in disease resistance has not been explored in wheat. In the present study, in silico approach, including secondary structure analysis, detailed signature pattern study, cis-acting regulatory elements survey, evolutionary trends and three-dimensional molecular modeling was used for different chitinase classes of wheat (Triticum aestivum). Homology modeling of class I, II, IV and 3 chitinase proteins was performed using the template crystal structure. The model structures were further refined by molecular mechanics methods using different tools, such as Procheck, ProSA and Verify3D. Secondary structure studies revealed greater percentage of residues forming a helix conformation with specific signature pattern, similar to casein kinase II phosphorylation site, amidation site, N-myristoylation (N-MYR) site and protein kinase C phoshorylation site. The expression profile suggested that wheat chitinase gene was highly expressed in cell culture and callus. We found that wheat chitinases showed more functional similarity with rice and barley. The results provide insight into the evolution of the chitinase family, constituting a diverse array of pathogenesis-related proteins. The study also provides insight into the possible binding sites of chitinase proteins and may further enhance our knowledge of fungal resistance mechanism in plants.

  1. Polyglycine hydrolases secreted by Pleosporineae fungi that target the linker region of plant class IV chitinases*

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chitinase modifying proteins (cmps) are fungal proteases that truncate plant class IV chitinases by cleaving near their amino termini. We previously described Fv-cmp, a fungalysin protease that cleaves a conserved glycine-cysteine bond within the hevein domain. Here we describe a new type of cmp—pol...

  2. Antimicrobial peptide inhibition of fungalysin proteases that target plant type 19 Family IV defense chitinases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cereal crops and other plants produce secreted seed chitinases that reduce pathogenic infection, most likely by targeting the fungal chitinous cell wall. We have shown that corn (Zea mays) produces three GH family 19, plant class IV chitinases, that help in protecting the plant against Fusarium and ...

  3. Protein A-mouse acidic mammalian chitinase-V5-His expressed in periplasmic space of Escherichia coli possesses chitinase functions comparable to CHO-expressed protein.

    PubMed

    Kashimura, Akinori; Okawa, Kazuaki; Ishikawa, Kotarou; Kida, Yuta; Iwabuchi, Kokoro; Matsushima, Yudai; Sakaguchi, Masayoshi; Sugahara, Yasusato; Oyama, Fumitaka

    2013-01-01

    Acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase) has been shown to be associated with asthma in mouse models, allergic inflammation and food processing. Here, we describe an E. coli-expression system that allows for the periplasmic production of active AMCase fused to Protein A at the N-terminus and V5 epitope and (His)6 tag (V5-His) at the C-terminus (Protein A-AMCase-V5-His) in E. coli. The mouse AMCase cDNA was cloned into the vector pEZZ18, which is an expression vector containing the Staphylococcus Protein A promoter, with the signal sequence and truncated form of Protein A for extracellular expression in E. coli. Most of the Protein A-AMCase-V5-His was present in the periplasmic space with chitinolytic activity, which was measured using a chromogenic substrate, 4-nitrophenyl N,N'-diacetyl-β-D-chitobioside. The Protein A-AMCase-V5-His was purified from periplasmic fractions using an IgG Sepharose column followed by a Ni Sepharose chromatography. The recombinant protein showed a robust peak of activity with a maximum observed activity at pH 2.0, where an optimal temperature was 54°C. When this protein was preincubated between pH 1.0 and pH 11.0 on ice for 1 h, full chitinolytic activity was retained. This protein was also heat-stable till 54°C, both at pH 2.0 and 7.0. The chitinolytic activity of the recombinant AMCase against 4-nitrophenyl N,N'-diacetyl-β-D-chitobioside was comparable to the CHO-expressed AMCase. Furthermore, the recombinant AMCase bound to chitin beads, cleaved colloidal chitin and released mainly N,N'-diacetylchitobiose fragments. Thus, the E. coli-expressed Protein A-mouse AMCase-V5-His fusion protein possesses chitinase functions comparable to the CHO-expressed AMCase. This recombinant protein can be used to elucidate detailed biomedical functions of the mouse AMCase.

  4. Protein A-Mouse Acidic Mammalian Chitinase-V5-His Expressed in Periplasmic Space of Escherichia coli Possesses Chitinase Functions Comparable to CHO-Expressed Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kida, Yuta; Iwabuchi, Kokoro; Matsushima, Yudai; Sakaguchi, Masayoshi; Sugahara, Yasusato; Oyama, Fumitaka

    2013-01-01

    Acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase) has been shown to be associated with asthma in mouse models, allergic inflammation and food processing. Here, we describe an E. coli-expression system that allows for the periplasmic production of active AMCase fused to Protein A at the N-terminus and V5 epitope and (His)6 tag (V5-His) at the C-terminus (Protein A-AMCase-V5-His) in E. coli. The mouse AMCase cDNA was cloned into the vector pEZZ18, which is an expression vector containing the Staphylococcus Protein A promoter, with the signal sequence and truncated form of Protein A for extracellular expression in E. coli. Most of the Protein A-AMCase-V5-His was present in the periplasmic space with chitinolytic activity, which was measured using a chromogenic substrate, 4-nitrophenyl N,N′-diacetyl-β-D-chitobioside. The Protein A-AMCase-V5-His was purified from periplasmic fractions using an IgG Sepharose column followed by a Ni Sepharose chromatography. The recombinant protein showed a robust peak of activity with a maximum observed activity at pH 2.0, where an optimal temperature was 54°C. When this protein was preincubated between pH 1.0 and pH 11.0 on ice for 1 h, full chitinolytic activity was retained. This protein was also heat-stable till 54°C, both at pH 2.0 and 7.0. The chitinolytic activity of the recombinant AMCase against 4-nitrophenyl N,N′-diacetyl-β-D-chitobioside was comparable to the CHO-expressed AMCase. Furthermore, the recombinant AMCase bound to chitin beads, cleaved colloidal chitin and released mainly N,N′-diacetylchitobiose fragments. Thus, the E. coli-expressed Protein A-mouse AMCase-V5-His fusion protein possesses chitinase functions comparable to the CHO-expressed AMCase. This recombinant protein can be used to elucidate detailed biomedical functions of the mouse AMCase. PMID:24244337

  5. Srchi13, a novel early nodulin from Sesbania rostrata, is related to acidic class III chitinases.

    PubMed Central

    Goormachtig, S; Lievens, S; Van de Velde, W; Van Montagu, M; Holsters, M

    1998-01-01

    On the tropical legume Sesbania rostrata, stem-borne nodules develop after inoculation of adventitious root primordia with the microsymbiont Azorhizobium caulinodans. A cDNA clone, Srchi13, with homology to acidic class III chitinase genes, corresponds to an early nodulin gene with transiently induced expression during nodule ontogeny. Srchi13 transcripts accumulated strongly 2 days after inoculation, decreased from day 7 onward, and disappeared in mature nodules. Induction was dependent on Nod factor-producing bacteria. Srchi13 was expressed around infection pockets, in infection centra, around the developing nodule and its vascular bundles, and in uninfected cells of the central tissue. The specific and transient transcript accumulation together with the lipochitooligosaccharide degradation activity of the recombinant protein hint at a role of Srchi13 in normal nodule ontogeny by limiting the action of Nod factors. PMID:9634579

  6. Endo/exo mechanism and processivity of family 18 chitinases produced by Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Horn, Svein J; Sørbotten, Audun; Synstad, Bjørnar; Sikorski, Pawel; Sørlie, Morten; Vårum, Kjell M; Eijsink, Vincent G H

    2006-02-01

    We present a comparative study of ChiA, ChiB, and ChiC, the three family 18 chitinases produced by Serratia marcescens. All three enzymes eventually converted chitin to N-acetylglucosamine dimers (GlcNAc2) and a minor fraction of monomers. ChiC differed from ChiA and ChiB in that it initially produced longer oligosaccharides from chitin and had lower activity towards an oligomeric substrate, GlcNAc6. ChiA and ChiB could convert GlcNAc6 directly to three dimers, whereas ChiC produced equal amounts of tetramers and dimers, suggesting that the former two enzymes can act processively. Further insight was obtained by studying degradation of the soluble, partly deacetylated chitin-derivative chitosan. Because there exist nonproductive binding modes for this substrate, it was possible to discriminate between independent binding events and processive binding events. In reactions with ChiA and ChiB the polymer disappeared very slowly, while the initially produced oligomers almost exclusively had even-numbered chain lengths in the 2-12 range. This demonstrates a processive mode of action in which the substrate chain moves by two sugar units at a time, regardless of whether complexes formed along the way are productive. In contrast, reactions with ChiC showed rapid disappearance of the polymer and production of a continuum of odd- and even-numbered oligomers. These results are discussed in the light of recent literature data on directionality and synergistic effects of ChiA, ChiB and ChiC, leading to the conclusion that ChiA and ChiB are processive chitinases that degrade chitin chains in opposite directions, while ChiC is a nonprocessive endochitinase.

  7. Purification, characterization, and molecular cloning of an extracellular chitinase from Bacillus licheniformis stain LHH100 isolated from wastewater samples in Algeria.

    PubMed

    Laribi-Habchi, Hassiba; Bouanane-Darenfed, Amel; Drouiche, Nadjib; Pauss, André; Mameri, Nabil

    2015-01-01

    An extracellular chitinase (ChiA-65) was produced and purified from a newly isolated Bacillus licheniformis LHH100. Pure protein was obtained after heat treatment and ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by Sephacryl S-200 chromatography. Based on matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) analysis, the purified enzyme is a monomer with a molecular mass of 65,195.13 Da. The sequence of the 27 N-terminal residues of the mature ChiA-65 showed high homology with family-18 chitinases. Optimal activity was achieved at pH 4 and 75 °C. Among the inhibitors and metals tested, p-chloromercuribenzoic acid, N-ethylmaleimide, Hg(2+), and Hg(+) completely inhibited enzyme activity. Chitinase activity was high on colloidal chitin, glycol chitin, glycol chitosane, chitotriose, and chitooligosaccharide. Chitinase activity towards synthetic substrates in the order of p-NP-(GlcNAc)n (n = 2-4) was p-NP-(GlcNAc)2 > p-NP-(GlcNAc)4 > p-NP-(GlcNAc)3. Our results suggest that ChiA-65 preferentially hydrolyzed the second glycosidic link from the non-reducing end of (GlcNAc)n. ChiA-65 obeyed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, the Km and kcat values being 0.385 mg, colloidal chitin/ml and 5000 s(-1), respectively. The chiA-65 gene encoding ChiA-65 was cloned in Escherichia coli and its sequence was determined. Above all, ChiA-65 exhibited remarkable biochemical properties suggesting that this enzyme is suitable for bioconversion of chitin waste. PMID:25450539

  8. Functional Characterization of Novel Chitinase Genes Present in the Sheath Blight Resistance QTL: qSBR11-1 in Rice Line Tetep.

    PubMed

    Richa, Kamboj; Tiwari, Ila M; Kumari, Mandeep; Devanna, B N; Sonah, Humira; Kumari, Archana; Nagar, Ramawatar; Sharma, Vinay; Botella, Jose R; Sharma, Tilak R

    2016-01-01

    Rice sheath blight disease caused by Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most devastating diseases in rice leading to heavy yield losses. Due to the polygenic nature of resistance, no major resistance gene with complete host resistance against R. solani has been reported. In this study, we have performed molecular and functional analysis of the genes associated with the major R. solani-resistance QTL qSBR11-1 in the indica rice line Tetep. Sequence analysis revealed the presence of a set of 11 tandem repeats containing genes with a high degree of homology to class III chitinase defense response genes. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis showed that all the genes are strongly induced 36 h after R. solani infection. Comparison between the resistant Tetep and the susceptible HP2216 lines shows that the induction of the chitinase genes is much higher in the Tetep line. Recombinant protein produced in vitro for six of the eleven genes showed chitinolytic activity in gel assays but we did not detect any xylanase inhibitory activity. All the six in vitro expressed proteins show antifungal activity with a clear inhibitory effect on the growth of the R. solani mycelium. The characterized chitinase genes can provide an important resource for the genetic improvement of R. solani susceptible rice lines for sheath blight resistance breeding.

  9. Functional Characterization of Novel Chitinase Genes Present in the Sheath Blight Resistance QTL: qSBR11-1 in Rice Line Tetep

    PubMed Central

    Richa, Kamboj; Tiwari, Ila M.; Kumari, Mandeep; Devanna, B. N.; Sonah, Humira; Kumari, Archana; Nagar, Ramawatar; Sharma, Vinay; Botella, Jose R.; Sharma, Tilak R.

    2016-01-01

    Rice sheath blight disease caused by Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most devastating diseases in rice leading to heavy yield losses. Due to the polygenic nature of resistance, no major resistance gene with complete host resistance against R. solani has been reported. In this study, we have performed molecular and functional analysis of the genes associated with the major R. solani-resistance QTL qSBR11-1 in the indica rice line Tetep. Sequence analysis revealed the presence of a set of 11 tandem repeats containing genes with a high degree of homology to class III chitinase defense response genes. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis showed that all the genes are strongly induced 36 h after R. solani infection. Comparison between the resistant Tetep and the susceptible HP2216 lines shows that the induction of the chitinase genes is much higher in the Tetep line. Recombinant protein produced in vitro for six of the eleven genes showed chitinolytic activity in gel assays but we did not detect any xylanase inhibitory activity. All the six in vitro expressed proteins show antifungal activity with a clear inhibitory effect on the growth of the R. solani mycelium. The characterized chitinase genes can provide an important resource for the genetic improvement of R. solani susceptible rice lines for sheath blight resistance breeding. PMID:26973685

  10. Substrate specificity of chitinases from two species of fish, greenling, Hexagrammos otakii, and common mackerel, Scomber japonicus, and the insect, tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Matsumiya, Masahiro; Arakane, Yasuyuki; Haga, Atsunobu; Muthukrishnan, Subaratnam; Kramer, Karl J

    2006-04-01

    Three chitinase isozymes, HoChiA, HoChiB, and HoChiC, were purified from the stomach of the greenling, Hexagrammos otakii, by ammonium sulfate fractionation, followed by column chromatography on Chitopearl Basic BL-03 and CM-Toyopearl 650S. The molecular masses and pIs of HoChiA, HoChiB, and HoChiC are 62 kDa and pH 5.7, 51 kDa and pH 7.6, and 47 kDa and pH 8.8, respectively. Substrate specificities of these chitinases were compared with those of another fish stomach chitinase from the common mackerel, Scomber japonicus (SjChi), as well as two from the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta (MsChi535 and MsChi386). The efficiency parameters, kcat/Km, toward glycolchitin for HoChiA and SjChi were larger than those for HoChiB and HoChiC. The relative activities of HoChiA and SjChi toward various forms of chitin were as follows: shrimp shell or crab shell alpha-chitin > beta-chitin > silkworm cuticle alpha-chitin. On the other hand, the relative activities of HoChiB and HoChiC were beta-chitin > silkworm alpha-chitin > shrimp and crab alpha-chitin. MsChi535 preferred silkworm alpha-chitin to shrimp and crab alpha-chitins, and no activity was observed toward beta-chitin. MsChi386, which lacked the C-terminal linker region and the chitin-binding domain, did not hydrolyze silkworm alpha-chitin. These results demonstrate that fish and insect chitinases possess unique substrate specificities that are correlated with their physiological roles in the digestion of food or cuticle.

  11. Heterogonous expression and characterization of a plant class IV chitinase from the pitcher of the carnivorous plant Nepenthes alata.

    PubMed

    Ishisaki, Kana; Honda, Yuji; Taniguchi, Hajime; Hatano, Naoya; Hamada, Tatsuro

    2012-03-01

    A class IV chitinase belonging to the glycoside hydrolase 19 family from Nepenthes alata (NaCHIT1) was expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme exhibited weak activity toward polymeric substrates and significant activity toward (GlcNAc)(n) [β-1,4-linked oligosaccharide of GlcNAc with a polymerization degree of n (n = 4-6)]. The enzyme hydrolyzed the third and fourth glycosidic linkages from the non-reducing end of (GlcNAc)(6). The pH optimum of the enzymatic reaction was 5.5 at 37°C. The optimal temperature for activity was 60°C in 50 mM sodium acetate buffer (pH 5.5). The anomeric form of the products indicated that it was an inverting enzyme. The k(cat)/K(m) of the (GlcNAc)(n) hydrolysis increased with an increase in the degree of polymerization. Amino acid sequence alignment analysis between NaCHIT1 and a class IV chitinase from a Picea abies (Norway spruce) suggested that the deletion of four loops likely led the enzyme to optimize the (GlcNAc)(n) hydrolytic reaction rather than the hydrolysis of polymeric substrates.

  12. Chitinase gene transformation through Agrobacteriumand its explanation in soybean in order to induce resistance to root rot caused by Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Salehi, A; Mohammadi, M; Okhovvat, S M; Omidi, M

    2005-01-01

    Chitinase gene (chi) of bean which has been cloned in recombinant binary plasmid vector, pBI121 with 35s promoter of Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV), were used for transformation of soybean using strain LBA4404 of Agrobacterium. The plasmid contained nptII gene that is a resistant gene to kanomycin as selector marker and Gus gene as reporter. Cotyledon explants of Williams and Clark cultivars were inoculated by Agrobacterium suspension with pBI121 and were cultured in regeneration medium. After complete regeneration of explants to seedling in B5 medium amended with kanomycin, polymerase chain reaction analysis were conducted to ensure conjugation of nptII, Gus, CHN genes in transformants seedling of soybean. Results showed that some lines of soybean contained Gus and CHN genes. More ever, chitinase activity in leaf extract of transformed soybean lines was significantly more than untransformed soybean, exception one sample. Bioassay of chitinase activity of transgenic lines on in vitro condition prevented mycelial growth of Rhizoctonia solani in comparison with untransformed control leaf extract.

  13. Wide-range antifungal antagonism of Paenibacillus ehimensis IB-X-b and its dependence on chitinase and beta-1,3-glucanase production.

    PubMed

    Aktuganov, G; Melentjev, A; Galimzianova, N; Khalikova, E; Korpela, T; Susi, P

    2008-07-01

    Previously, we isolated a strain of Bacillus that had antifungal activity and produced lytic enzymes with fungicidal potential. In the present study, we identified the bacterium as Paenibacillus ehimensis and further explored its antifungal properties. In liquid co-cultivation assays, P. ehimensis IB-X-b decreased biomass production of several pathogenic fungi by 45%-75%. The inhibition was accompanied by degradation of fungal cell walls and alterations in hyphal morphology. Residual medium from cultures of P. ehimensis IB-X-b inhibited fungal growth, indicating the inhibitors were secreted into the medium. Of the 2 major lytic enzymes, chitinases were only induced by chitin-containing substrates, whereas beta-1,3-glucanase showed steady levels in all carbon sources. Both purified chitinase and beta-1,3-glucanase degraded cell walls of macerated fungal mycelia, whereas only the latter also degraded cell walls of intact mycelia. The results indicate synergism between the antifungal action mechanisms of these enzymes in which beta-1,3-glucanase is the initiator of the cell wall hydrolysis, whereas the degradation process is reinforced by chitinases. Paenibacillus ehimensis IB-X-b has pronounced antifungal activity with a wide range of fungi and has potential as a biological control agent against plant pathogenic fungi.

  14. Abundant class III acidic chitinase homologue in tamarind (Tamarindus indica) seed serves as the major storage protein.

    PubMed

    Rao, Devavratha H; Gowda, Lalitha R

    2008-03-26

    The phyla Leguminosae contains protease inhibitors, lectins, chitinases, and glycohydrolases as major defense proteins in their seeds. Electrophoretic analysis of the seed proteins of tamarind ( Tamarindus indica L.), an agri-waste material, indicated the unusual presence of two major proteins comparable to overexpression of recombinant proteins. These proteins were identified by amino-terminal analysis to be (1) Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor and (2) class III endochitinase (34000 Da). These two proteins were purified to apparent homogeneity by a single-step chitin bead affinity chromatography and characterized. The Kunitz inhibitor was specific toward inhibiting trypsin with a stoichiometry of 1:1. The 33000 +/- 1000 Da protein, accounting for >50% of the total seed protein, is an acidic glycoprotein exhibiting a very low endotype hydrolytic activity toward chitin derivatives. SDS-PAGE followed by densitometry of tamarind seed germination indicates the disappearance of the chitinase with the concomitant appearance of a cysteine endopeptidase. On the basis of its abundance, accumulation without any pathogenesis-related stimulus, temporal regulation, amino acid composition, and very low enzyme activity, this 34000 Da protein designated "tamarinin" physiologically serves as the major storage protein.

  15. Production of N-Acetyl-d-glucosamine from Mycelial Waste by a Combination of Bacterial Chitinases and an Insect N-Acetyl-d-glucosaminidase.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Weixing; Wang, Di; Liu, Tian; Yang, Qing

    2016-09-01

    N-Acetyl-d-glucosamine (GlcNAc) has great potential to be used as a food additive and medicine. The enzymatic degradation of chitin-containing biomass for producing GlcNAc is an eco-friendly approach but suffers from a high cost. The economical efficiency can be improved by both optimizing the member and ratio of the chitinolytic enzymes and using new inexpensive substrates. To address this, a novel combination of bacterial and insect chitinolytic enzymes was developed in this study to efficiently produce GlcNAc from the mycelia of Asperillus niger, a fermentation waste. This enzyme combination contained three bacterial chitinases (chitinase A from Serratia marcescens (SmChiA), SmChiB, SmChiC) and one insect N-acetyl-d-glucosaminidase from Ostrinia furnacalis (OfHex1) in a ratio of 39.1% of SmChiA, 26.7% of SmChiB, 32.9% of SmChiC, and 1.3% of OfHex1. A yield of 6.3 mM (1.4 mg/mL) GlcNAc with a purity of 95% can be obtained from 10 mg/mL mycelial powder in 24 h. The enzyme combination reported here exhibited 5.8-fold higher hydrolytic activity over the commercial chitinase preparation derived from Streptomyces griseus. PMID:27546481

  16. [Cloning and functional analysis of chitinase gene GbCHI from sea-island cotton (Gossypium barbadense)].

    PubMed

    Ma, Yin-Ping; Wang, Fu-Xin; Yang, Chun-Lin; Shen, Fa-Fu; Xia, Gui-Xian

    2012-02-01

    Chitinase is one of the important pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins in plants. By comparative proteomics study, a novel pathogen-responsive chitinase (known as GbCHI) has been identified from sea-island cotton (Gossypium barbadense). The GbCHI cDNA was cloned from wilt-resistant sea-island cotton and the anti-fungal activity of the gene product was investigated. qRT-PCR analysis indicated that GbCHI was expressed constitutively in root, stem, leaf, flower, and ovule of cotton plant, and the expression could be induced by Verticillium dahliae and plant hormone SA, ACC, and JA. Subcellular localization analysis using GFP-tagged proteins showed that GbCHI-GFP fusion proteins were targeted mainly to the plasma membrane. Anti-fungal assay demonstrated that GbCHI could inhibit spore germination and hyphae growth of V. dahliae significantly. These results provide important information for understanding the cellular function of GbCHI and for exploring the application potential of this gene in molecular breeding of wilt-tolerant cotton plants.

  17. Enhancing plant disease suppression by Burkholderia vietnamiensis through chromosomal integration of Bacillus subtilis chitinase gene chi113.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinjian; Huang, Yujie; Harvey, Paul R; Ren, Yan; Zhang, Guangzhi; Zhou, Hongzi; Yang, Hetong

    2012-02-01

    Burkholderia vietnamiensis P418 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria. A chitinase gene from Bacillus subtilis was cloned and stably integrated into the chromosome of using the transposon delivery vector, pUTkm1. Chitinase activity was detected in recombinant P418-37 but not in wild type P418. Recombinant P418-37 retained the in vitro growth rate, N(2)-fixation and phosphate and potassium-solubilizing characteristics of the wild type. P418-37 significantly (P < 0.05) increased in vitro inhibition of the plant pathogenic fungi Rhizoctonia solani, Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. vasinfectum, Rhizoctonia cerealis, Bipolaris sorokiniana, Verticillium dahliae and Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici compared with P418. In planta disease suppression assays indicated that P418-37 significantly (P < 0.05) enhanced suppression of wheat sheath blight (R. cerealis), cotton Fusarium wilt (F. oxysporium f.sp. vasinfectum) and tomato gray mould (Botrytis cinerea), relative to the wild type.

  18. A glycosynthase derived from an inverting chitinase with an extended binding cleft.

    PubMed

    Ohnuma, Takayuki; Dozen, Satoshi; Honda, Yuji; Kitaoka, Motomitsu; Fukamizo, Tamo

    2016-08-01

    We created a glycosynthase from a GH19 chitinase from rye seeds (RSC-c), that has a long-extended binding cleft consisting of eight subsites; -4, -3, -2, -1, +1, +2, +3 and +4. When wild-type RSC-c was incubated with α-(GlcNAc)3-F [α-(GlcNAc)3 fluoride], (GlcNAc)3 and hydrogen fluoride were produced through the Hehre resynthesis-hydrolysis mechanism. Glu89, which acts as a catalytic base, and Ser120, which fixes a nucleophilic water molecule, were mutated to produce two single mutants, E89G and S120A, and a double mutant, E89G/S120A. E89G only produced a small amount of (GlcNAc)7 from α-(GlcNAc)3-F in the presence of (GlcNAc)4 S120A, with the highest F(-)-releasing activity, produced a larger amount of (GlcNAc)7, a fraction of which was decomposed by its own residual hydrolytic activity. However, the double mutant E89G/S120A, of which the hydrolytic activity was completely abolished while its F(-)-releasing activity was only moderately affected, produced the largest amount of (GlcNAc)7 from α-(GlcNAc)3-F and (GlcNAc)4 without decomposition. We concluded that E89G/S120A was an efficient glycosynthase, that enabled the addition of a three-sugar unit. PMID:26908157

  19. Purification of two chitinases from Rhizopus oligosporus and isolation and sequencing of the encoding genes.

    PubMed Central

    Yanai, K; Takaya, N; Kojima, N; Horiuchi, H; Ohta, A; Takagi, M

    1992-01-01

    Two chitinases were purified from Rhizopus oligosporus, a filamentous fungus belonging to the class Zygomycetes, and designated chitinase I and chitinase II. Their N-terminal amino acid sequences were determined, and two synthetic oligonucleotide probes corresponding to these amino acid sequences were synthesized. Southern blot analyses of the total genomic DNA from R. oligosporus with these oligonucleotides as probes indicated that one of the two genes encoding these two chitinases was contained in a 2.9-kb EcoRI fragment and in a 3.6-kb HindIII fragment and that the other one was contained in a 2.9-kb EcoRI fragment and in a 11.5-kb HindIII fragment. Two DNA fragments were isolated from the phage bank of R. oligosporus genomic DNA with the synthetic oligonucleotides as probes. The restriction enzyme analyses of these fragments coincided with the Southern blot analyses described above and the amino acid sequences deduced from their nucleotide sequences contained those identical to the determined N-terminal amino acid sequences of the purified chitinases, indicating that each of these fragments contained a gene encoding chitinase (designated chi 1 and chi 2, encoding chitinase I and II, respectively). The deduced amino acid sequences of these two genes had domain structures similar to that of the published sequence of chitinase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, except that they had an additional C-terminal domain. Furthermore, there were significant differences between the molecular weights experimentally determined with the two purified enzymes and those deduced from the nucleotide sequences for both genes. Analysis of the N- and C-terminal amino acid sequences of both chitinases and comparison of them with the amino acid sequences deduced from the nucleotide sequences revealed posttranslational processing not only at the N-terminal signal sequences but also at the C-terminal domains. It is concluded that these chitinases are synthesized with pre- and prosequences in

  20. Use Of Chitinase Gene As Biomarker To Reflect Penguin Population Change In History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, X.; Yin, X.; Lin, J.; Sun, L.; You, Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, F.

    2005-12-01

    Penguins are studied as bio-model to understand how climate change has influenced the Antarctic marine ecosystem. This certainly needs to exclude anthropogenic influences from natural variables. Ancient penguin excreta was found ideal material to study historically the impacts of climate change on penguin population excluding the influences of human beings and other secondary factors. In this study, a sediment core, spanning approximately 1600 yrs, collected from a lake on Ardley Island, Antarctica, was studied by a combination of geochemical and molecular microbiological methods. The sediment core had been greatly influenced by penguin guano. Chitinase gene was chosen and tested as a new bio-molecular marker to reflect possible penguin population change in history. Using quantitative competitive-polymerase chain reaction (QC-PCR), chitinase gene copies in each 1cm section of the whole sediment column were quantified. It was found that the chitinase gene copies coincide with the temperature history record: a low chitinase gene number in the column occurred around 600yrs B.P., the little ice age; high chitinase gene copies occurred around 1,400yrs B.P., the Medieval warm time period. Along the column, significant correlation was found between chitinase gene copies, P2O5 and TOC concentrations which were served as the geochemical monitor of penguin droppings, demonstrating that the variation of the bacterial chitinase gene number is another reliable proxy to reconstruct Antarctic penguin population change in history. Most of the chitinase genes cloned from the historic sediment core were novel. Analyzing the chitinase gene diversity in selected sediment layers and in the fresh penguin deposits indicated frequent shifts in the chitinolytic bacterial community over time, which suggested the penguin species change in the population and/or their diet change in history. Our results for the first time indicated that the chitinase gene probe is a suitable bio

  1. Involvement of the MAPK and PI3K pathways in chitinase 3-like 1-regulated hyperoxia-induced airway epithelial cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Mi Na; Lee, Kyung Eun; Hong, Jung Yeon; Heo, Won Il; Kim, Kyung Won; Kim, Kyu Earn; Sohn, Myung Hyun

    2012-05-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hyperoxia induces apoptosis and chitinase 3-like 1 expression in human airway epithelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of chitinase 3-like 1 affects airway epithelial cell death after hyperoxic exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silencing chitinase 3-like 1 manipulate the phosphorylation of ERK, p38 and Akt. -- Abstract: Background: Exposure to 100% oxygen causes hyperoxic acute lung injury characterized by cell death and injury of alveolar epithelial cells. Recently, the role of chitinase 3-like 1 (CHI3L1), a member of the glycosyl hydrolase 18 family that lacks chitinase activity, in oxidative stress was demonstrated in murine models. High levels of serum CHI3L1 have been associated with various diseases of the lung, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cancer. However, the role of CHI3L1 in human airway epithelial cells undergoing oxidative stress remains unknown. In addition, the signaling pathways associated with CHI3L1 in this process are poorly understood. Purpose: In this study, we demonstrate the role of CHI3L1, along with the MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways, in hyperoxia-exposed airway epithelial cells. Method: The human airway epithelial cell line, BEAS-2B, was exposed to >95% oxygen (hyperoxia) for up to 72 h. Hyperoxia-induced cell death was determined by assessing cell viability, Annexin-V FITC staining, caspase-3 and -7 expression, and electron microscopy. CHI3L1 knockdown and overexpression studies were conducted in BEAS-2B cells to examine the role of CHI3L1 in hyperoxia-induced apoptosis. Activation of the MAPK and PI3K pathways was also investigated to determine the role of these signaling cascades in this process. Results: Hyperoxia exposure increased CHI3L1 expression and apoptosis in a time-dependent manner. CHI3L1 knockdown protected cells from hyperoxia-induced apoptosis. In contrast, CHI3L1 overexpression promoted cell death after hyperoxia exposure. Finally

  2. Chitinase 3-like 1: prognostic biomarker in clinically isolated syndromes.

    PubMed

    Cantó, Ester; Tintoré, Mar; Villar, Luisa M; Costa, Carme; Nurtdinov, Ramil; Álvarez-Cermeño, José C; Arrambide, Georgina; Reverter, Ferran; Deisenhammer, Florian; Hegen, Harald; Khademi, Mohsen; Olsson, Tomas; Tumani, Hayrettin; Rodríguez-Martín, Eulalia; Piehl, Fredrik; Bartos, Ales; Zimova, Denisa; Kotoucova, Jolana; Kuhle, Jens; Kappos, Ludwig; García-Merino, Juan Antonio; Sánchez, Antonio José; Saiz, Albert; Blanco, Yolanda; Hintzen, Rogier; Jafari, Naghmeh; Brassat, David; Lauda, Florian; Roesler, Romy; Rejdak, Konrad; Papuc, Ewa; de Andrés, Clara; Rauch, Stefan; Khalil, Michael; Enzinger, Christian; Galimberti, Daniela; Scarpini, Elio; Teunissen, Charlotte; Sánchez, Alex; Rovira, Alex; Montalban, Xavier; Comabella, Manuel

    2015-04-01

    Chitinase 3-like 1 (CHI3L1) has been proposed as a biomarker associated with the conversion to clinically definite multiple sclerosis in patients with clinically isolated syndromes, based on the finding of increased cerebrospinal fluid CHI3L1 levels in clinically isolated syndrome patients who later converted to multiple sclerosis compared to those who remained as clinically isolated syndrome. Here, we aimed to validate CHI3L1 as a prognostic biomarker in a large cohort of patients with clinically isolated syndrome. This is a longitudinal cohort study of clinically isolated syndrome patients with clinical, magnetic resonance imaging, and cerebrospinal fluid data prospectively acquired. A total of 813 cerebrospinal fluid samples from patients with clinically isolated syndrome were recruited from 15 European multiple sclerosis centres. Cerebrospinal fluid CHI3L1 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to investigate the association between cerebrospinal fluid CHI3L1 levels and time to conversion to multiple sclerosis and time to reach Expanded Disability Status Scale 3.0. CHI3L1 levels were higher in patients who converted to clinically definite multiple sclerosis compared to patients who continued as clinically isolated syndrome (P = 8.1 × 10(-11)). In the Cox regression analysis, CHI3L1 levels were a risk factor for conversion to multiple sclerosis (hazard ratio = 1.7; P = 1.1 × 10(-5) using Poser criteria; hazard ratio = 1.6; P = 3.7 × 10(-6) for McDonald criteria) independent of other covariates such as brain magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities and presence of cerebrospinal fluid oligoclonal bands, and were the only significant independent risk factor associated with the development of disability (hazard ratio = 3.8; P = 2.5 × 10(-8)). High CHI3L1 levels were associated with shorter time to multiple sclerosis (P = 3.2 × 10(-9) using Poser criteria; P = 5.6 × 10(-11) for McDonald criteria

  3. Chitinase and beta-1,3-glucanase in the lutoid-body fraction of Hevea latex.

    PubMed

    Subroto, T; van Koningsveld, G A; Schreuder, H A; Soedjanaatmadja, U M; Beintema, J J

    1996-09-01

    The lutoid-body (bottom) fraction of latex from the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) contains a limited number of major proteins. These are, besides the chitin-binding protein hevein, its precursor and the C-terminal fragment of this precursor, proteins with enzymic activities: three hevamine components, which are basic, vacuolar, chitinases with lysozyme activity, and a beta-1,3-glucanase. Lutoid-body fractions from three rubber-tree clones differed in their contents of these enzyme proteins. The hevamine components and glucanase were isolated and several enzymic and structural properties were investigated. These enzymes are basic proteins and cause coagulation of the negatively charged rubber particles. The coagulation occurs in a rather narrow range of ratios of added protein to rubber particles, which indicates that charg neutralization is the determining factor. Differences in coagulation of rubber particles by lutoid-body fractions from various rubber clones can be explained by their content of hevamine and glucanase. Glucanase from the lutoid-body fraction may dissolve callus tissue and this may explain the observation that rubber-tree clones with a high glucanase content in this fraction produce more latex than clones with little glucanase. Sequence studies of two CNBr peptides of the glucanase indicate that this protein is homologous with glucanases from other plants, and that a C-terminal peptide, possibly involved in vacuolar targeting, may have been cleaved off. PMID:8987504

  4. Different structure and mRNA expression of Entamoeba invadens chitinases in the encystation and excystation.

    PubMed

    Makioka, Asao; Kumagai, Masahiro; Hiranuka, Kazushi; Kobayashi, Seiki; Takeuchi, Tsutomu

    2011-08-01

    Entamoeba histolytica forms chitin-walled cysts during encystation process, where formation of the cyst wall needs not only chitin synthase but also chitinase. During excystation, quadruplet amoebae emerge from the chitin-walled cysts by dissolving the wall, so that chitinase may be necessary for excystation process as well. There is, however, no report on chitinase expression during excystation. In this study, we used Entamoeba invadens, a reptilian amoeba, as a model for encystation and excystation of E. histolytica, and studied chitinase mRNA expression in those processes. Although expression of three E. invadens chitinases designated EiChit1, EiChit2, and EiChit3 during encystation has been reported, we identified another enzyme named as EiChit4 in the E. invadens genome database. Therefore, we investigated the primary structure and mRNA expression of these four chitinases of Ei in the excystation as well as the encystation by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Like EiChit1, EiChit4 had an 8 × Cys chitin-binding domain (CBD) and a hydrophilic spacer between the CBD and catalytic domain, and was also closer to EiChit1 than EiChit2 and EiChit3 in the phylogenetic tree. During encystation, the expression of all four chitinases increased in the early phase; the increase in EiChit1 and EiChit4 was much higher than in EiChit2 and EiChit3. Then, the expression of all four chitinases sharply decreased in the later phase. In cysts, EiChit1 was most abundantly expressed and EiChit4 was at a lower level, while the expressions of EiChit2 and EiChit3 were virtually absent. Following the induction of excystation, mRNA levels of EiChit1 and EiChit4 in cysts 5 h after induction were significantly lower than those in cysts before induction, while those of EiChit2 and EiChit3 were remarkably higher than before induction. The mRNAs of only EiChit2 and EiChit3 remarkably increased when the excystation was induced in the presence of cytochalasin D

  5. Acidic chitinase primes the protective immune response to gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Vannella, Kevin M; Ramalingam, Thirumalai R; Hart, Kevin M; de Queiroz Prado, Rafael; Sciurba, Joshua; Barron, Luke; Borthwick, Lee A; Smith, Allen D; Mentink-Kane, Margaret; White, Sandra; Thompson, Robert W; Cheever, Allen W; Bock, Kevin; Moore, Ian; Fitz, Lori J; Urban, Joseph F; Wynn, Thomas A

    2016-05-01

    Acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase) is known to be induced by allergens and helminths, yet its role in immunity is unclear. Using AMCase-deficient mice, we show that AMCase deficiency reduced the number of group 2 innate lymphoid cells during allergen challenge but was not required for establishment of type 2 inflammation in the lung in response to allergens or helminths. In contrast, AMCase-deficient mice showed a profound defect in type 2 immunity following infection with the chitin-containing gastrointestinal nematodes Nippostrongylus brasiliensis and Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri. The impaired immunity was associated with reduced mucus production and decreased intestinal expression of the signature type 2 response genes Il13, Chil3, Retnlb, and Clca1. CD103(+) dendritic cells, which regulate T cell homing, were also reduced in mesenteric lymph nodes of infected AMCase-deficient mice. Thus, AMCase functions as a critical initiator of protective type 2 responses to intestinal nematodes but is largely dispensable for allergic responses in the lung. PMID:27043413

  6. Purification and characterization of chitinase from Bacillus circulans No.4.1.

    PubMed

    Wiwat, C; Siwayaprahm, P; Bhumiratana, A

    1999-09-01

    Bacillus circulans No.4.1 produced a high level of chitinase when cells were grown in tryptic soy broth supplemented with 0.3% colloidal chitin at 35 degrees C for 5 days. Purification was carried out by protein precipitation with 80% saturation ammonium sulfate, anion-exchange chromatography with DEAE-Sephacel, and gel filtration with Sephadex G-100, sequentially. The purified enzyme could be demonstrated as a single band on SDS-PAGE, estimated to be 45 kDa. This enzyme could hydrolyze colloidal chitin, purified chitin, glycol chitin, carboxymethyl-chitin (CM-chitin), and 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-N,N'-diacetylchitobioside [4-MU-(GlcNAc)(2)]. The optimal conditions for this chitinase were pH 8.0 and 40 degrees C. The isoelectric point of the chitinase was 5.1. The amino acid composition of the purified chitinase was determined. The initial 20 amino acid residues of the N-terminal were found to be alanine (A), proline (P), tryptophan (W), asparagine (N), serine (S), lysine (K), glycine (G), asparagine (N), tyrosine (Y), alanine (A), leucine (L), proline (P), tyrosine (Y), tyrosine (Y), arginine (R), glycine (G), alanine (A), tryptophan (W), alanine (A), and valine (V). Knowledge of these properties of chitinase from B. circulans No. 4.1 should be useful in the development of genetically engineered Bacillus sp. as biopesticides. PMID:10441726

  7. Molecular characterization of stress resistance-related chitinase genes of Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nasar Uddin; Park, Jong-In; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Kang, Kwon-Kyoo; Hur, Yoonkang; Lim, Yong-Pyo; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2012-09-01

    Brassica is an important vegetable group worldwide that is impacted by biotic and abiotic stresses. Molecular biology techniques offer the most efficient approach to address these concerns. Inducible plant defense responses include the production of pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins, and chitinases are very important PR proteins. We collected 30 chitinase like genes, three from our full-length cDNA library of Brassica rapa cv. Osome and 27 from Brassica databases. Sequence analysis and comparison study confirmed that they were all class I-V and VII chitinase genes. These genes also showed a high degree of homology with other biotic stress resistance-related plant chitinases. An organ-specific expression of these genes was observed and among these, seven genes showed significant responses after infection with Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. conglutinans in cabbage and sixteen genes showed responsive expression after abiotic stress treatments in Chinese cabbage. BrCLP1, 8, 10, 17 and 18 responded commonly after biotic and abiotic stress treatments indicating their higher potentials. Taken together, the results presented herein suggest that these chitinase genes may be useful resources in the development of stress resistant Brassica.

  8. Transgenic wheat expressing a barley class II chitinase gene has enhanced resistance against Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sanghyun; Mackintosh, Caroline A.; Lewis, Janet; Heinen, Shane J.; Radmer, Lorien; Dill-Macky, Ruth; Baldridge, Gerald D.; Zeyen, Richard J.; Muehlbauer, Gary J.

    2008-01-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB; scab), primarily caused by Fusarium graminearum, is a devastating disease of wheat worldwide. FHB causes yield reductions and contamination of grains with trichothecene mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON). The genetic variation in existing wheat germplasm pools for FHB resistance is low and may not provide sufficient resistance to develop cultivars through traditional breeding approaches. Thus, genetic engineering provides an additional approach to enhance FHB resistance. The objectives of this study were to develop transgenic wheat expressing a barley class II chitinase and to test the transgenic lines against F. graminearum infection under greenhouse and field conditions. A barley class II chitinase gene was introduced into the spring wheat cultivar, Bobwhite, by biolistic bombardment. Seven transgenic lines were identified that expressed the chitinase transgene and exhibited enhanced Type II resistance in the greenhouse evaluations. These seven transgenic lines were tested under field conditions for percentage FHB severity, percentage visually scabby kernels (VSK), and DON accumulation. Two lines (C8 and C17) that exhibited high chitinase protein levels also showed reduced FHB severity and VSK compared to Bobwhite. One of the lines (C8) also exhibited reduced DON concentration compared with Bobwhite. These results showed that transgenic wheat expressing a barley class II chitinase exhibited enhanced resistance against F. graminearum in greenhouse and field conditions. PMID:18467324

  9. Crystal structure of class III chitinase from pomegranate provides the insight into its metal storage capacity.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Taro; Zhao, Guanghua; Mikami, Bunzo

    2015-01-01

    Chitinase hydrolyzes the β-1,4-glycosidic bond in chitin. In higher plants, this enzyme has been regarded as a pathogenesis-related protein. Recently, we identified a class III chitinase, which functions as a calcium storage protein in pomegranate (Punica granatum) seed (PSC, pomegranate seed chitinase). Here, we solved a crystal structure of PSC at 1.6 Å resolution. Although its overall structure, including the structure of catalytic site and non-proline cis-peptides, was closely similar to those of other class III chitinases, PSC had some unique structural characteristics. First, there were some metal-binding sites with coordinated water molecules on the surface of PSC. Second, many unconserved aspartate residues were present in the PSC sequence which rendered the surface of PSC negatively charged. This acidic electrostatic property is in contrast to that of hevamine, well-characterized plant class III chitinase, which has rather a positively charged surface. Thus, the crystal structure provides a clue for metal association property of PSC.

  10. Functional analyses of the chitin-binding domains and the catalytic domain of Brassica juncea chitinase BjCHI1.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ce Mun; Chye, Mee-Len; Ramalingam, Sathishkumar; Ouyang, Shi-Wen; Zhao, Kai-Jun; Ubhayasekera, Wimal; Mowbray, Sherry L

    2004-09-01

    We previously isolated a Brassica juncea cDNA encoding BjCHI1, a novel chitinase with two chitin-binding domains. Synthesis of its mRNA is induced by wounding, methyl jasmonate treatment, Aspergillus niger infection and caterpillar (Pieris rapae) feeding, suggesting that the protein has a role in defense. In that it possesses two chitin-binding domains, BjCHI1 resembles the precursor of Urtica dioica agglutinin but unlike that protein, BjCHI1 retains its chitinase catalytic domain after post-translational processing. To explore the properties of multi-domain BjCHI1, we have expressed recombinant BjCHI1 and two derivatives, which lack one (BjCHI2) or both (BjCHI3) chitin-binding domains, as secreted proteins in Pichia pastoris. Recombinant BjCHI1 and BjCHI2, showed apparent molecular masses on SDS-PAGE larger than calculated, and could be deglycosylated using alpha-mannosidase. Recombinant BjCHI3, without the proline/threonine-rich linker region containing predicted O-glycosylation sites, did not appear to be processed by alpha-mannosidase. BjCHI1's ability to agglutinate rabbit erythrocytes is unique among known chitinases. Both chitin-binding domains are essential for agglutination; this property is absent in recombinant BjCHI2 and BjCHI3. To identify potential catalytic residues, we generated site-directed mutations in recombinant BjCHI3. Mutation E212A showed the largest effect, exhibiting 0% of wild-type specific activity. H211N and R361A resulted in considerable (>91%) activity loss, implying these charged residues are also important in catalysis. E234A showed 36% retention of activity and substitution Y269D, 50%. The least affected mutants were E349A and D360A, with 73% and 68% retention, respectively. Like Y269, E349 and D360 are possibly involved in substrate binding rather than catalysis. PMID:15604744

  11. Abundance of truncated and full-length ChitA and ChitB chitinases in healthy and diseased maize tissues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chitinase modifying proteins, cmps, are secreted fungal proteases that combat plant defenses by truncating plant class IV chitinases. We initially discovered that ChitA and ChitB, two plant class IV chitinases that are abundant in developing and mature kernels of corn, are truncated by cmps during e...

  12. Creation of Customized Bioactivity within a 14-Membered Macrolide Scaffold: Design, Synthesis, and Biological Evaluation Using a Family-18 Chitinase.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Akihiro; Maita, Nobuo; Gouda, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Hirose, Tomoyasu; Kimura, Saori; Saito, Yoshifumi; Nakano, Hayato; Kasai, Takako; Nakano, Hirofumi; Shiomi, Kazuro; Hirono, Shuichi; Watanabe, Takeshi; Taniguchi, Hisaaki; Omura, Satoshi; Sunazuka, Toshiaki

    2015-06-25

    Argifin, a 17-membered pentapeptide, inhibits chitinase. As argifin has properties that render it unsuitable as a drug development candidate, we devised a mechanism to create the structural component of argifin that bestows the chitinase inhibition and introduce it into a 14-membered macrolide scaffold. Here we describe (1) the designed macrolide, which exhibits ∼200-fold more potent chitinase inhibition than argifin, (2) the binding modes of the macrolide with Serratia marcescens chitinase B, and (3) the computed analysis explaining the reason for derivatives displaying increased inhibition compared to argifin, the macrolide aglycone displaying inhibition in a nanomolar range. This promises a class of chitinase inhibitors with novel skeletons, providing innovative insight for drug design and the use of macrolides as adaptable, flexible templates for use in drug discovery research and development.

  13. The complete amino acid sequence of chitinase-B from the leaves of pokeweed (Phytolacca americana).

    PubMed

    Tanigawa, M; Yamagami, T; Funatsu, G

    1995-05-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of pokeweed leaf chitinase-B (PLC-B) has been determined by first sequencing all 19 tryptic peptides derived from the reduced and S-carboxymethylated (RCm-) PLC-B and then connecting them by analyzing the chymotryptic peptides from three fragments produced by cyanogen bromide cleavage of RCm-PLC-B. PLC-B consists of 274 amino acid residues and has a molecular mass of 29,473 Da. Six cysteine residues are linked by disulfide bonds between Cys20 and Cys67, Cys50 and Cys57, and Cys159 and Cys188. From 58-68% sequence homology of PLC-B with five class III chitinases, it was concluded that PLC-B is a basic class III chitinase.

  14. Screening-based discovery of Aspergillus fumigatus plant-type chitinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lockhart, Deborah E.A.; Schuettelkopf, Alexander; Blair, David E.; van Aalten, Daan M.F.

    2014-01-01

    A limited therapeutic arsenal against increasing clinical disease due to Aspergillus spp. necessitates urgent characterisation of new antifungal targets. Here we describe the discovery of novel, low micromolar chemical inhibitors of Aspergillus fumigatus family 18 plant-type chitinase A1 (AfChiA1) by high-throughput screening (HTS). Analysis of the binding mode by X-ray crystallography confirmed competitive inhibition and kinetic studies revealed two compounds with selectivity towards fungal plant-type chitinases. These inhibitors provide new chemical tools to probe the effects of chitinase inhibition on A. fumigatus growth and virulence, presenting attractive starting points for the development of further potent drug-like molecules. PMID:25063338

  15. Production, purification and application of extracellular chitinase from Cellulosimicrobium cellulans 191

    PubMed Central

    Fleuri, Luciana F.; Kawaguti, Haroldo Y.; Sato, Hélia H.

    2009-01-01

    This study concerned the production, purification and application of extracellular chitinase from Cellulosimicrobium cellulans strain 191. In shaken flasks the maximum yield of chitinase was 6.9 U/mL after 72 h of cultivation at 25°C and 200 rpm. In a 5 L fermenter with 1.5 vvm aeration, the highest yield obtained was 4.19 U/mL after 168 h of fermentation at 25°C and 200 rpm, and using 3 vvm, it was 4.38 U/mL after 144 h of fermentation. The chitinase (61 KDa) was purified about 6.65 times by Sepharose CL 4B 200 gel filtration with a yield of 46.61%. The purified enzyme was able to lyse the cell walls of some fungi and to form protoplasts. PMID:24031407

  16. The chitinase-like protein YKL-40 increases mucin5AC production in human bronchial epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chunyi; Li, Qi; Zhou, Xiangdong; Kolosov, Victor P.; Perelman, Juliy M.

    2013-11-01

    Mucus overproduction is an important feature in patients with chronic inflammatory airway diseases. However, the regulatory mechanisms that mediate excessive mucin production remain elusive. Recently, the level of YKL-40, a chitinase-like protein, has been found to be significantly increased in chronic inflammatory airway diseases and has been shown to be associated with the severity of these diseases. In this study, we sought to explore the effect of YKL-40 on mucin5AC (MUC5AC) production in chronic inflammatory airway diseases and the potential signaling pathways involved in this process. We found that elevated YKL-40 levels increased the mRNA and protein expression of MUC5AC in a dose- and time-dependent manner, in association with the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), reflecting their activation. These responses were significantly suppressed by the knockdown of protease-activating receptor 2 (PAR2) with specific small interfering RNA or the inhibitors of ERK and NF-κB. YKL-40-induced MUC5AC overproduction was also effectively attenuated by the inhibitor of focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Taken together, these results imply that YKL-40 can stimulate excessive MUC5AC production through PAR2- and FAK-mediated mechanisms. - Highlights: • MUC5AC is the major secreted mucin in chronic inflammatory airway diseases. • YKL-40 is a prototype of the chitinase-like protein in mammals. • YKL-40 is an active player in chronic inflammatory airway diseases. • YKL-40 can increase MUC5AC production via PAR2-mediated pathway. • FAK is another candidate to mediate YKL-40-induced MUC5AC overexpression.

  17. Identification and expression analysis of chitinase genes related to biotic stress resistance in Brassica.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nasar Uddin; Park, Jong-In; Seo, Mi-Suk; Kumar, Thamilarasan Senthil; Lee, In-Ho; Park, Beom-Seok; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2012-04-01

    Brassica is a very important vegetable group because of its contribution to human nutrition and consequent economic benefits. However, biotic stress is a major concern for these crops and molecular biology techniques offer the most efficient of approaches to address this concern. Chitinase is an important biotic stress resistance-related gene. We identified three genes designated as Brassica chitinase like protein (BrCLP1), BrCLP2 and BrCLP3 from a full-length cDNA library of Brassica rapa cv. Osome. Sequence analysis of these genes confirmed that BrCLP1 was a class IV chitinase, and BrCLP2 and BrCLP3 were class VII chitinases. Also, these genes showed a high degree of homology with other biotic stress resistance-related plant chitinases. In expression analysis, organ-specific expression of all three genes was high except BrCLP1 in all the organs tested and BrCLP2 showed the highest expression compared to the other genes in flower buds. All these genes also showed expression during all developmental growth stages of Chinese cabbage. In addition, BrCLP1 was up-regulated with certain time of infection by Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum in Chinese cabbage plants during microarray expression analysis. On the other hand, expression of BrCLP2 and BrCLP3 were increased after 6 h post inoculation (hpi) but decreased from 12 hpi. All these data suggest that these three chitinase genes may be involved in plant resistance against biotic stresses.

  18. Regulation of amylase, cellulase and chitinase secretion in the digestive tract of the two-spotted field cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Weidlich, Sandy; Müller, Sonja; Hoffmann, Klaus H; Woodring, Joseph

    2013-06-01

    The secretion of amylase and cellulase in Gryllus bimaculatus is determined by increased food intake, whereby shortly after molting food consumption increases. About half of the standing amylase concentration (activity) in the endothelial cells can be secreted within 30 min. The peak of amylase and cellulase secretion that occurs in the photophase is related to the feeding peak in the previous scotophase. The secretion of chitinase on the other hand is primarily controlled by the molting cycle. Only amylase secretion was affected by calcium in the incubation medium, suggesting an apocrine release mechanism. Refeeding experiments (after 5 days without food) suggest that the release of amylase in response to a nutrient in the lumen (glucose) is not due to simple stimulation of exocytosis, but rather a stimulation of synthesis. PMID:23585293

  19. Industrially Important Carbohydrate Degrading Enzymes from Yeasts: Pectinases, Chitinases, and β-1,3-Glucanases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gummadi, Sathyanarayana N.; Kumar, D. Sunil; Dash, Swati S.; Sahu, Santosh Kumar

    Polysaccharide degrading enzymes are hydrolytic enzymes, which have a lot of industrial potential and also play a crucial role in carbon recycling. Pectinases, chitinases and glucanases are the three major polysaccharide degrading enzymes found abundantly in nature and these enzymes are mainly produced by fungal strains. Production of these enzymes by yeasts is advantageous over fungi, because the former are easily amenable to genetic manipulations and time required for growth and production is less than that of the latter. Several yeasts belonging to Saccharomyces, Pichia, Rhodotorula and Cryptococcus produce extracellular pectinases, glucanases and chitinases. This chapter emphasizes on the biological significance of these enzymes, their production and their industrial applications.

  20. Heterologous expression and characterization of two chitinase 5 enzymes from the migratory locust Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying-Long; Song, Hui-Fang; Zhang, Xue-Yao; Li, Da-Qi; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Ma, En-Bo; Zhang, Jian-Zhen

    2016-06-01

    Insect chitinases are involved in degradation of chitin from the exoskeleton or peritrophic metrix of midgut. In Locusta migratoria, two duplicated Cht5s (LmCht5-1 and LmCht5-2) have been shown to have distinct molecular characteristics and biological roles. To explore the protein properties of the two LmCht5s, we heterologously expressed both enzymes using baculovirus expression system in SF9 cells, and characterized kinetic and carbohydrate-binding properties of purified enzymes. LmCht5-1 and LmCht5-2 exhibited similar pH and temperature optimums. LmCht5-1 has lower Km value for the oligomeric substrate (4MU-(GlcNAc)3 ), and higher Km value for the longer substrate (CM-Chitin-RBV) compared with LmCht5-2. A comparison of amino acids and homology modeling of catalytic domain presented similar TIM barrel structures and differentiated amino acids between two proteins. LmCht5-1 has a chitin-binding domain (CBD) tightly bound to colloidal chitin, but LmCht5-2 does not have a CBD for binding to colloidal chitin. Our results suggested both LmCht5-1 and LmCht5-2, which have the critical glutamate residue in region II of catalytic domain, exhibited chitinolytic activity cleaving both polymeric and oligomeric substrates. LmCht5-1 had relatively higher activity against the oligomeric substrate, 4MU-(GlcNAc)3 , whereas LmCht5-2 exhibited higher activity toward the longer substrate, CM-Chitin-RBV. These findings are helpful for further research to clarify their different roles in insect growth and development. PMID:26792119

  1. Role of breast regression protein 39 (BRP-39)/chitinase 3-like-1 in Th2 and IL-13-induced tissue responses and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chun Geun; Hartl, Dominik; Lee, Gap Ryol; Koller, Barbara; Matsuura, Hiroshi; Da Silva, Carla A; Sohn, Myung Hyun; Cohn, Lauren; Homer, Robert J; Kozhich, Alexander A; Humbles, Alison; Kearley, Jennifer; Coyle, Anthony; Chupp, Geoffrey; Reed, Jennifer; Flavell, Richard A; Elias, Jack A

    2009-05-11

    Mouse breast regression protein 39 (BRP-39; Chi3l1) and its human homologue YKL-40 are chitinase-like proteins that lack chitinase activity. Although YKL-40 is expressed in exaggerated quantities and correlates with disease activity in asthma and many other disorders, the biological properties of BRP-39/YKL-40 have only been rudimentarily defined. We describe the generation and characterization of BRP-39(-/-) mice, YKL-40 transgenic mice, and mice that lack BRP-39 and produce YKL-40 only in their pulmonary epithelium. Studies of these mice demonstrated that BRP-39(-/-) animals have markedly diminished antigen-induced Th2 responses and that epithelial YKL-40 rescues the Th2 responses in these animals. The ability of interleukin13 to induce tissue inflammation and fibrosis was also markedly diminished in the absence of BRP-39. Mechanistic investigations demonstrated that BRP-39 and YKL-40 play an essential role in antigen sensitization and immunoglobulin E induction, stimulate dendritic cell accumulation and activation, and induce alternative macrophage activation. These proteins also inhibit inflammatory cell apoptosis/cell death while inhibiting Fas expression, activating protein kinase B/AKT, and inducing Faim 3. These studies establish novel regulatory roles for BRP-39/YKL-40 in the initiation and effector phases of Th2 inflammation and remodeling and suggest that these proteins are therapeutic targets in Th2- and macrophage-mediated disorders.

  2. Oral caffeine administration ameliorates acute colitis by suppressing chitinase 3-like 1 expression in intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, In-Ah; Low, Daren; Kamba, Alan; Llado, Victoria; Mizoguchi, Emiko

    2013-01-01

    Background The initial trigger of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) can be partly attributed towards the interaction and invasion of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and submucosal compartments. Identifying safe and economical methods to block these interactions may help prevent the onset of early colitis. Chitinase 3-like 1 is an inducible host protein that facilitates bacterial attachment and invasion on/into IECs. Therefore, we test the hypothesis of inhibiting CHI3L1 using the pan-chitinase inhibitor caffeine to reduce the likelihood of early colitis onset. Methods IEC lines were treated with caffeine (2.5 mM or 5 mM) and analyzed for CHI3L1 expression and the impact on bacterial invasion. In vivo, mice were treated with 2.5 mM caffeine and induced with 3.5% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-mediated colitis and subsequently analyzed colitis development. Results In vitro, caffeine treatment in IEC lines down-regulated CHI3L1 mRNA expression, which resulted in the reduction of bacterial invasion in a caffeine dose-dependent manner. In vivo, mice treated with caffeine displayed delayed response towards DSS-induced colitis, characterized by lower body weight loss, clinical and histological scores. Bacterial translocation into other organs and pro-inflammatory cytokines production were also reduced in the caffeine-treated mice with DSS-induced colitis. Caffeine treatment also resulted in the loss of CHI3L1-associated AKT signaling pathway activation both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion Development of acute colitis is reduced upon caffeine treatment. The mechanism involves the down-regulation of CHI3L1 expression and its associated bacterial interaction effect. Therefore caffeine is proposed as a safe and economical candidate for successful IBD management. PMID:23925589

  3. Characterization of the Maize Chitinase Genes and Their Effect on Aspergillus flavus and Aflatoxin Accumulation Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Leigh K.; Mylroie, J. Erik; Oliveira, Dafne A.; Smith, J. Spencer; Ozkan, Seval; Windham, Gary L.; Williams, W. Paul; Warburton, Marilyn L.

    2015-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is a crop of global importance, but prone to contamination by aflatoxins produced by fungi in the genus Aspergillus. The development of resistant germplasm and the identification of genes contributing to resistance would aid in the reduction of the problem with a minimal need for intervention by farmers. Chitinolytic enzymes respond to attack by potential pathogens and have been demonstrated to increase insect and fungal resistance in plants. Here, all chitinase genes in the maize genome were characterized via sequence diversity and expression patterns. Recent evolution within this gene family was noted. Markers from within each gene were developed and used to map the phenotypic effect on resistance of each gene in up to four QTL mapping populations and one association panel. Seven chitinase genes were identified that had alleles associated with increased resistance to aflatoxin accumulation and A. flavus infection in field grown maize. The chitinase in bin 1.05 identified a new and highly significant QTL, while chitinase genes in bins 2.04 and 5.03 fell directly beneath the peaks of previously published QTL. The expression patterns of these genes corroborate possible grain resistance mechanisms. Markers from within the gene sequences or very closely linked to them are presented to aid in the use of marker assisted selection to improve this trait. PMID:26090679

  4. A novel putative insect chitinase with multiple catalytic domains: hormonal regulation during metamorphosis.

    PubMed Central

    Royer, Véronique; Fraichard, Stéphane; Bouhin, Hervé

    2002-01-01

    We have used differential display to identify genes that are regulated by juvenile hormone in the epidermis of the beetle Tenebrio molitor. One of the genes encodes T. molitor chitinase 5 (TmChit5), a chitinase possessing an unusual structure. Sequence analysis of TmChit5 identified five 'chitinase units' of approx. 480 amino acids with similarity to chitinase family 18. These units are separated by less conserved regions containing putative PEST (rich in proline, glutamic acid, serine and threonine) sequences, putative chitin-binding domains and mucin domains. Northern-blot analysis identified a single transcript of approx. 9 kb, whose abundance correlated with that of 20-hydroxyecdysone during metamorphosis. Injection of pupae with 20-hydroxyecdysone alone, or in combination with cycloheximide, indicated that TmChit5 expression is directly induced by the hormone. Further experiments indicated that methoprene (a juvenile hormone analogue) indirectly induced TmChit5 mRNA expression. On the basis of the present results and previous studies, we propose a molecular mechanism for cuticle digestion during the moulting process. PMID:12059786

  5. Maize Seed Chitinase is Modified by a Protein Secreted by Bipolaris zeicola

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants contain defense mechanisms that prevent infection by most fungi. Some specialized fungi have the ability to overcome plant defenses. The Zea mays (maize) seed chitinase ChitA has been previously reported as an antifungal protein. Here we report that ChitA is converted to a modified form by...

  6. Characterization of the Maize Chitinase Genes and Their Effect on Aspergillus flavus and Aflatoxin Accumulation Resistance.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Leigh K; Mylroie, J Erik; Oliveira, Dafne A; Smith, J Spencer; Ozkan, Seval; Windham, Gary L; Williams, W Paul; Warburton, Marilyn L

    2015-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is a crop of global importance, but prone to contamination by aflatoxins produced by fungi in the genus Aspergillus. The development of resistant germplasm and the identification of genes contributing to resistance would aid in the reduction of the problem with a minimal need for intervention by farmers. Chitinolytic enzymes respond to attack by potential pathogens and have been demonstrated to increase insect and fungal resistance in plants. Here, all chitinase genes in the maize genome were characterized via sequence diversity and expression patterns. Recent evolution within this gene family was noted. Markers from within each gene were developed and used to map the phenotypic effect on resistance of each gene in up to four QTL mapping populations and one association panel. Seven chitinase genes were identified that had alleles associated with increased resistance to aflatoxin accumulation and A. flavus infection in field grown maize. The chitinase in bin 1.05 identified a new and highly significant QTL, while chitinase genes in bins 2.04 and 5.03 fell directly beneath the peaks of previously published QTL. The expression patterns of these genes corroborate possible grain resistance mechanisms. Markers from within the gene sequences or very closely linked to them are presented to aid in the use of marker assisted selection to improve this trait. PMID:26090679

  7. Effect of Bombyx mori chitinase against Japanese pine sawyer (Monochamus alternatus) adults as a biopesticide.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Khondkar Ehteshamul; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Tado, Hiroyuki; Endo, Katsuhiko; Yamanaka, Akira; Tanaka, Shuhei; Koga, Daizo

    2006-01-01

    Bombyx mori chitinase (Bm-CHI), with a molecular mass of 75 kDa, was investigated on the possibility that it can serve as a biocontrol agent against the adult Japanese pine sawyer (JPS), Monochamus alternatus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). Oral ingestion of purified chitinase at concentrations of 3 microM (11.25 microg/50 microl) and 0.3 micoM (1.125 microg/50 microl) caused high mortality in JPS, a significant decrease in bark consumption, and, only in high concentration, a slight reduction of body weight. Fluorescence assays indicated that peritrophic membrane (PM) chitin is degraded by the action of orally ingested Bm-CHI at 3 microM concentration only. Scanning electron micrographs clearly indicated that the beetles that ingested Bm-CHI of the same high concentration had their PM perforated and disrupted, but ultrastructural studies showed that the ingested chitinase did not affect the midgut epithelium. These findings open up the possibility of using insect chitinase as a biopesticidal enzyme. It should have agronomic potential for insect control. PMID:16428840

  8. A novel putative insect chitinase with multiple catalytic domains: hormonal regulation during metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Royer, Véronique; Fraichard, Stéphane; Bouhin, Hervé

    2002-09-15

    We have used differential display to identify genes that are regulated by juvenile hormone in the epidermis of the beetle Tenebrio molitor. One of the genes encodes T. molitor chitinase 5 (TmChit5), a chitinase possessing an unusual structure. Sequence analysis of TmChit5 identified five 'chitinase units' of approx. 480 amino acids with similarity to chitinase family 18. These units are separated by less conserved regions containing putative PEST (rich in proline, glutamic acid, serine and threonine) sequences, putative chitin-binding domains and mucin domains. Northern-blot analysis identified a single transcript of approx. 9 kb, whose abundance correlated with that of 20-hydroxyecdysone during metamorphosis. Injection of pupae with 20-hydroxyecdysone alone, or in combination with cycloheximide, indicated that TmChit5 expression is directly induced by the hormone. Further experiments indicated that methoprene (a juvenile hormone analogue) indirectly induced TmChit5 mRNA expression. On the basis of the present results and previous studies, we propose a molecular mechanism for cuticle digestion during the moulting process.

  9. ScChi, Encoding an Acidic Class III Chitinase of Sugarcane, Confers Positive Responses to Biotic and Abiotic Stresses in Sugarcane

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yachun; Xu, Liping; Fu, Zhiwei; Yang, Yuting; Guo, Jinlong; Wang, Shanshan; Que, Youxiong

    2014-01-01

    Chitinases (EC 3.2.2.14), expressed during the plant-pathogen interaction, are associated with plant defense against pathogens. In the present study, a positive correlation between chitinase activity and sugarcane smut resistance was found. ScChi (GenBank accession no. KF664180), a Class III chitinase gene, encoded a 31.37 kDa polypeptide, was cloned and identified. Subcellular localization revealed ScChi targeting to the nucleus, cytoplasm and the plasma membrane. Real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) results showed that ScChi was highly expressed in leaf and stem epidermal tissues. The ScChi transcript was both higher and maintained longer in the resistance cultivar during challenge with Sporisorium scitamineum. The ScChi also showed an obvious induction of transcription after treatment with SA (salicylic acid), H2O2, MeJA (methyl jasmonate), ABA (abscisic acid), NaCl, CuCl2, PEG (polyethylene glycol) and low temperature (4 °C). The expression levels of ScChi and six immunity associated marker genes were upregulated by the transient overexpression of ScChi. Besides, histochemical assay of Nicotiana benthamiana leaves overexpressing pCAMBIA 1301-ScChi exhibited deep DAB (3,3′-diaminobenzidinesolution) staining color and high conductivity, indicating the high level of H2O2 accumulation. These results suggest a close relationship between the expression of ScChi and plant immunity. In conclusion, the positive responses of ScChi to the biotic and abiotic stimuli reveal that this gene is a stress-related gene of sugarcane. PMID:24552874

  10. Isoform patterns of chitinase and beta-1,3-glucanase in maturing corn kernels (Zea mays L.) associated with Aspergillus flavus milk stage infection.

    PubMed

    Ji, C; Norton, R A; Wicklow, D T; Dowd, P F

    2000-02-01

    Isoform patterns of chitinase and beta-1,3-glucanase of maturing kernels of yellow dent corn (Pioneer 3394) infected with Aspergillus flavus at the milk stage were investigated through polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Proteins on the sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) gel with an apparent molecular mass range of 23-46 kDa were differentially present in the kernels infected with both aflatoxin-producing and non-aflatoxin-producing strains of A. flavus. From in-gel (native PAGE) enzyme activity assays, three bands corresponding to chitinase isoforms and two bands corresponding to beta-1,3-glucanase isoforms were detected in the infected kernels. One chitinase isoform of 29 kDa was present only in the infected kernels, and another one of 28 kDa was present in both infected and noninfected kernels. They were judged to be acidic on the basis of their migration on an acrylamide isoelectric focusing (IEF) gel. For the beta-1,3-glucanase, one isoform of 35 kDa was present in both infected and noninfected kernels, but another one, a 33 kDa isoform, was present only in the infected kernels. Both acidic and basic beta-1,3-glucanase isoforms were detected in the IEF gel. The results of this study are the first to demonstrate patterns of enhanced or inducible proteins in maturing corn kernels in response to A. flavus infection at the milk stage. The results also indicate that only particular isoforms of the two hydrolytic enzymes are involved in the maturing corn kernels infected at the milk stage with A. flavus.

  11. Functional expression and characterization of a chitinase from the marine archaeon Halobacterium salinarum CECT 395 in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    García-Fraga, Belén; da Silva, Abigaíl F; López-Seijas, Jacobo; Sieiro, Carmen

    2014-03-01

    The HschiA1 gene of the archaeon Halobacterium salinarum CECT 395 was cloned and overexpressed as an active protein of 66.5 kDa in Escherichia coli. The protein called HsChiA1p has a modular structure consisting of a glycosyl hydrolase family 18 catalytic region, as well as a N-terminal family 5 carbohydrate-binding module and a polycystic kidney domain. The purified recombinant chitinase displayed optimum catalytic activity at pH 7.3 and 40 °C and showed high stability over broad pH (6-8.5) and temperature (25-45 °C) ranges. Protein activity was stimulated by the metal ions Mg(+2), K(+), and Ca(+2) and strongly inhibited by Mn(+2). HsChiA1p is salt-dependent with its highest activity in the presence of 1.5 M of NaCl, but retains 20% of its activity in the absence of salt. The recombinant enzyme hydrolysed p-NP-(GlcNAc)3, p-NP-(GlcNAc), crystalline chitin, and colloidal chitin. From its sequence features and biochemical properties, it can be identified as an exo-acting enzyme with potential interest regarding the biodegradation of chitin waste or its bioconversion into biologically active products.

  12. Human YKL39 (chitinase 3-like protein 2), an osteoarthritis-associated gene, enhances proliferation and type II collagen expression in ATDC5 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miyatake, Kazumasa; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Yamaga, Mika; Yamada, Jun; Matsukura, Yu; Abula, Kahaer; Sekiya, Ichiro; Muneta, Takeshi

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► hYKL-39 expression is increased in osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes. ► To examine the molecular functions of hYKL-39 in chondrocytes, we overexpressed hYKL-39 in chondrocytic ATDC5 cells. ► hYKL-39 enhanced proliferation and colony formation in ATDC5 cells. ► hYKL-39 increased type II collagen expression in ATDC5 cells treated with chondrogenic medium. -- Abstract: Human YKL39 (chitinase 3-like protein 2/CHI3L2) is a secreted 39 kDa protein produced by articular chondrocytes and synoviocytes. Recent studies showed that hYKL-39 expression is increased in osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes suggesting the involvement of hYKL-39 in the progression of osteoarthritis (OA). However little is known regarding the molecular function of hYKL-39 in joint homeostasis. Sequence analyses indicated that hYKL-39 has significant identity with the human chitotorisidase family molecules, although it is considered that hYKL-39 has no enzymatic activity since it lacks putative chitinase catalytic motif. In this study, to examine the molecular function of hYKL-39 in chondrocytes, we overexpressed hYKL-39 in ATDC5 cells. Here we report that hYKL-39 enhances colony forming activity, cell proliferation, and type II collagen expression in these cells. These data suggest that hYKL-39 is a novel growth and differentiation factor involved in cartilage homeostasis.

  13. Co-expression of a modified maize ribosome-inactivating protein and a rice basic chitinase gene in transgenic rice plants confers enhanced resistance to sheath blight.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ju-Kon; Jang, In-Cheol; Wu, Ray; Zuo, Wei-Neng; Boston, Rebecca S; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Ahn, Il-Pyung; Nahm, Baek Hie

    2003-08-01

    Chitinases, beta-1,3-glucanases, and ribosome-inactivating proteins are reported to have antifungal activity in plants. With the aim of producing fungus-resistant transgenic plants, we co-expressed a modified maize ribosome-inactivating protein gene, MOD1, and a rice basic chitinase gene, RCH10, in transgenic rice plants. A construct containing MOD1 and RCH10 under the control of the rice rbcS and Act1 promoters, respectively, was co-transformed with a plasmid containing the herbicide-resistance gene bar as a selection marker into rice by particle bombardment. Several transformants analyzed by genomic Southern-blot hybridization demonstrated integration of multiple copies of the foreign gene into rice chromosomes. Immunoblot experiments showed that MOD1 formed approximately 0.5% of the total soluble protein in transgenic leaves. RCH10 expression was examined using the native polyacrylamide-overlay gel method, and high RCH10 activity was observed in leaf tissues where endogenous RCH10 is not expressed. R1 plants were analyzed in a similar way, and the Southern-blot patterns and levels of transgene expression remained the same as in the parental line. Analysis of the response of R2 plants to three fungal pathogens of rice, Rhizoctonia solani, Bipolaris oryzae, and Magnaporthe grisea, indicated statistically significant symptom reduction only in the case of R. solani (sheath blight). The increased resistance co-segregated with herbicide tolerance, reflecting a correlation between the resistance phenotype and transgene expression.

  14. Soluble antigen derived from IV larva of Angiostrongylus cantonensis promotes chitinase-like protein 3 (Chil3) expression induced by interleukin-13.

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng; Wei, Jie; Liu, Zhen; Zeng, Xin; Yu, Zilong; Lv, Zhiyue; Sun, Xi; Wu, Zhongdao

    2016-10-01

    Angiostrongyliasis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis (A. cantonensis) is an emerging food-borne parasitic disease, which refers basically to eosinophilic meningitis. Chitinase-like protein 3 (Chil3), a member of chitinase-like protein family which has chemotactic activity for eosinophils, is reported to be highly upregulated in brain of mouse infected with A. cantonensis. The mechanisms of high expression of Chil3 and the association between A. cantonensis and Chil3 are rarely reported. In order to understand the mechanism of high expression of Chil3 in A. cantonensis-infected mouse, we measured the level of Chil3 in RAW 264.7 and BV2 cell lines stimulated with soluble antigen of A. cantonensis by qPCR and ELISA. To explore the role of Chil3 in inflammation caused by A. cantonensis, we extracted and cultured brain mononuclear cells (BMNCs) and detected the eosinophil chemotactic activity of Chil3 using transwell assay and flow cytometer. Furthermore, we treated the infected mice by injection with rmChil3 and then counted the number of larvae in brains of infected mice and treated mice to examine the association between the worm and Chil3. Our results showed the soluble antigen from A. cantonensis could promote the Chil3 expression in macrophage and microglial cell lines induced by interleukin-13. In conclusion, we supposed that high expression of Chil3 enhanced by soluble antigens from A. cantonensis might be the reason of serious eosinophil infiltration in mouse brain after A. cantonensis infection.

  15. Molecular characterization of plantain class i chitinase gene and its expression in response to infection by Gloeosporium musarum Cke and Massee and other abiotic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jianming; Wang, Hongbin; Feng, Dongru; Liu, Bin; Liu, Haiyan; Wang, Jinfa

    2007-11-01

    We have cloned a chitinase cDNA (MpChi-1) from plantain (Musa paradisiacal L) using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) according to a sequence fragment which we had cloned using the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) technique. The MpChi-1 encodes a protein of 326 amino acids and belongs to acidic chitinase class Ib subfamily. MpChi-1 shares high identity with rice endochitinase (XP_468714) and different each other only at three residues. Homology modelling indicated these three substitutions would not change the configuration of the activity site of the enzyme. We have expressed recombinant MpChi-1 and purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation and preparative reversed phase HPLC. The recombinant protein could hydrolyse chitin and inhibit the growth of the Gloeosporium musarum Cke and Massee in vitro. Northern blot revealed that the MpChi-1 transcripts rapidly after inoculation with G. musarum and maximum mRNA accumulation reached at 48 h. Jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) could induce MpChi-1 expression, while mechanical wounding, silver nitrate and osmotic stress stimulated only a slight accumulation of MpChi-1 transcripts. Abscisic acid (ABA) could induce MpChi-1 transcript. These results suggest the MpChi-1 plays important role in the events of the hypersensitive reaction (HR). PMID:18006520

  16. Enhanced resistance to blister blight in transgenic tea (Camellia sinensis [L.] O. Kuntze) by overexpression of class I chitinase gene from potato (Solanum tuberosum).

    PubMed

    Singh, H Ranjit; Deka, Manab; Das, Sudripta

    2015-07-01

    Tea is the second most consumed beverage in the world. A crop loss of up to 43 % has been reported due to blister blight disease of tea caused by a fungus, Exobasidium vexans. Thus, it directly affects the tea industry qualitatively and quantitatively. Solanum tuberosum class I chitinase gene (AF153195) is a plant pathogenesis-related gene. It was introduced into tea genome via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation with hygromycin phosphotransferase (hpt) gene conferring hygromycin resistance as plant selectable marker. A total of 41 hygromycin resistant plantlets were obtained, and PCR analysis established 12 plantlets confirming about the stable integration of transgene in the plant genome. Real-time PCR detected transgene expression in four transgenic plantlets (T28, C57, C9, and T31). Resistance to biotrophic fungal pathogen, E. vexans, was tested by detached leaf infection assay of greenhouse acclimated plantlets. An inhibitory activity against the fungal pathogen was evident from the detached leaves from the transformants compared with the control. Fungal lesion formed on control plantlet whereas the transgenic plantlets showed resistance to inoculated fungal pathogen by the formation of hypersensitivity reaction area. This result suggests that constitutive expression of the potato class I chitinase gene can be exploited to improve resistance to fungal pathogen, E. vexans, in economical perennial plantation crop like tea. PMID:25772466

  17. Molecular characterization of plantain class i chitinase gene and its expression in response to infection by Gloeosporium musarum Cke and Massee and other abiotic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jianming; Wang, Hongbin; Feng, Dongru; Liu, Bin; Liu, Haiyan; Wang, Jinfa

    2007-11-01

    We have cloned a chitinase cDNA (MpChi-1) from plantain (Musa paradisiacal L) using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) according to a sequence fragment which we had cloned using the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) technique. The MpChi-1 encodes a protein of 326 amino acids and belongs to acidic chitinase class Ib subfamily. MpChi-1 shares high identity with rice endochitinase (XP_468714) and different each other only at three residues. Homology modelling indicated these three substitutions would not change the configuration of the activity site of the enzyme. We have expressed recombinant MpChi-1 and purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation and preparative reversed phase HPLC. The recombinant protein could hydrolyse chitin and inhibit the growth of the Gloeosporium musarum Cke and Massee in vitro. Northern blot revealed that the MpChi-1 transcripts rapidly after inoculation with G. musarum and maximum mRNA accumulation reached at 48 h. Jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) could induce MpChi-1 expression, while mechanical wounding, silver nitrate and osmotic stress stimulated only a slight accumulation of MpChi-1 transcripts. Abscisic acid (ABA) could induce MpChi-1 transcript. These results suggest the MpChi-1 plays important role in the events of the hypersensitive reaction (HR).

  18. Enhanced resistance to blister blight in transgenic tea (Camellia sinensis [L.] O. Kuntze) by overexpression of class I chitinase gene from potato (Solanum tuberosum).

    PubMed

    Singh, H Ranjit; Deka, Manab; Das, Sudripta

    2015-07-01

    Tea is the second most consumed beverage in the world. A crop loss of up to 43 % has been reported due to blister blight disease of tea caused by a fungus, Exobasidium vexans. Thus, it directly affects the tea industry qualitatively and quantitatively. Solanum tuberosum class I chitinase gene (AF153195) is a plant pathogenesis-related gene. It was introduced into tea genome via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation with hygromycin phosphotransferase (hpt) gene conferring hygromycin resistance as plant selectable marker. A total of 41 hygromycin resistant plantlets were obtained, and PCR analysis established 12 plantlets confirming about the stable integration of transgene in the plant genome. Real-time PCR detected transgene expression in four transgenic plantlets (T28, C57, C9, and T31). Resistance to biotrophic fungal pathogen, E. vexans, was tested by detached leaf infection assay of greenhouse acclimated plantlets. An inhibitory activity against the fungal pathogen was evident from the detached leaves from the transformants compared with the control. Fungal lesion formed on control plantlet whereas the transgenic plantlets showed resistance to inoculated fungal pathogen by the formation of hypersensitivity reaction area. This result suggests that constitutive expression of the potato class I chitinase gene can be exploited to improve resistance to fungal pathogen, E. vexans, in economical perennial plantation crop like tea.

  19. Trp122 and Trp134 on the surface of the catalytic domain are essential for crystalline chitin hydrolysis by Bacillus circulans chitinase A1.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Ishibashi, A; Ariga, Y; Hashimoto, M; Nikaidou, N; Sugiyama, J; Matsumoto, T; Nonaka, T

    2001-04-01

    From the 3D-structural analysis of the catalytic domain of chitinase A1, two exposed tryptophan residues (W122 and W134) are proposed to play an important role in guiding a chitin chain into the catalytic cleft during the crystalline chitin hydrolysis. Mutation of either W122 or W134 to alanine significantly reduced the hydrolyzing activity against highly crystalline beta-chitin microfibrils. Double mutation almost completely abolished the hydrolyzing activity. On the other hand, the hydrolyzing activity against either soluble or amorphous substrate was not reduced. These mutations slightly impaired the binding activity of this enzyme. These results clearly demonstrated that the two exposed aromatic residues play a critical role in hydrolyzing the chitin chain in crystalline chitin.

  20. Biotechnological approaches to develop bacterial chitinases as a bioshield against fungal diseases of plants.

    PubMed

    Neeraja, Chilukoti; Anil, Kondreddy; Purushotham, Pallinti; Suma, Katta; Sarma, Pvsrn; Moerschbacher, Bruno M; Podile, Appa Rao

    2010-09-01

    Fungal diseases of plants continue to contribute to heavy crop losses in spite of the best control efforts of plant pathologists. Breeding for disease-resistant varieties and the application of synthetic chemical fungicides are the most widely accepted approaches in plant disease management. An alternative approach to avoid the undesired effects of chemical control could be biological control using antifungal bacteria that exhibit a direct action against fungal pathogens. Several biocontrol agents, with specific fungal targets, have been registered and released in the commercial market with different fungal pathogens as targets. However, these have not yet achieved their full commercial potential due to the inherent limitations in the use of living organisms, such as relatively short shelf life of the products and inconsistent performance in the field. Different mechanisms of action have been identified in microbial biocontrol of fungal plant diseases including competition for space or nutrients, production of antifungal metabolites, and secretion of hydrolytic enzymes such as chitinases and glucanases. This review focuses on the bacterial chitinases that hydrolyze the chitinous fungal cell wall, which is the most important targeted structural component of fungal pathogens. The application of the hydrolytic enzyme preparations, devoid of live bacteria, could be more efficacious in fungal control strategies. This approach, however, is still in its infancy, due to prohibitive production costs. Here, we critically examine available sources of bacterial chitinases and the approaches to improve enzymatic properties using biotechnological tools. We project that the combination of microbial and recombinant DNA technologies will yield more effective environment-friendly products of bacterial chitinases to control fungal diseases of crops.

  1. Cladosporium fulvum Avr4 protects fungal cell walls against hydrolysis by plant chitinases accumulating during infection.

    PubMed

    van den Burg, Harrold A; Harrison, Stuart J; Joosten, Matthieu H A J; Vervoort, Jacques; de Wit, Pierre J G M

    2006-12-01

    Resistance against the leaf mold fungus Cladosporium fulvum is mediated by the tomato Cf proteins which belong to the class of receptor-like proteins and indirectly recognize extracellular avirulence proteins (Avrs) of the fungus. Apart from triggering disease resistance, Avrs are believed to play a role in pathogenicity or virulence of C. fulvum. Here, we report on the avirulence protein Avr4, which is a chitin-binding lectin containing an invertebrate chitin-binding domain (CBM14). This domain is found in many eukaryotes, but has not yet been described in fungal or plant genomes. We found that interaction of Avr4 with chitin is specific, because it does not interact with other cell wall polysaccharides. Avr4 binds to chitin oligomers with a minimal length of three N-acetyl glucosamine residues. In vitro, Avr4 protects chitin against hydrolysis by plant chitinases. Avr4 also binds to chitin in cell walls of the fungi Trichoderma viride and Fusarium solani f. sp. phaseoli and protects these fungi against normally deleterious concentrations of plant chitinases. In situ fluorescence studies showed that Avr4 also binds to cell walls of C. fulvum during infection of tomato, where it most likely protects the fungus against tomato chitinases, suggesting that Avr4 is a counter-defensive virulence factor.

  2. Biochemical characterization of a recombinant plant class III chitinase from the pitcher of the carnivorous plant Nepenthes alata.

    PubMed

    Ishisaki, Kana; Arai, Sachiko; Hamada, Tatsuro; Honda, Yuji

    2012-11-01

    A class III chitinase belonging to the GH18 family from Nepenthes alata (NaCHIT3) was expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme exhibited hydrolytic activity toward colloidal chitin, ethylene glycol chitin, and (GlcNAc)(n) (n=5 and 6). The enzyme hydrolyzed the fourth glycosidic linkage from the non-reducing end of (GlcNAc)(6). The anomeric form of the products indicated it was a retaining enzyme. The colloidal chitin hydrolytic reaction displayed high activity between pH 3.9 and 6.9, but the pH optimum of the (GlcNAc)(6) hydrolytic reaction was 3.9 at 37 °C. The optimal temperature for activity was 65 °C in 50 mM sodium acetate buffer (pH 3.9). The pH optima of NaCHIT3 and NaCHIT1 might be related to their roles in chitin degradation in the pitcher fluid.

  3. Molecular, Structural and Immunological Characterization of Der p 18, a Chitinase-Like House Dust Mite Allergen

    PubMed Central

    Resch, Yvonne; Blatt, Katharina; Malkus, Ursula; Fercher, Christian; Swoboda, Ines; Focke-Tejkl, Margit; Chen, Kuan-Wei; Seiberler, Susanne; Mittermann, Irene; Lupinek, Christian; Rodriguez-Dominguez, Azahara; Zieglmayer, Petra; Zieglmayer, René; Keller, Walter; Krzyzanek, Vladislav; Valent, Peter; Valenta, Rudolf; Vrtala, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Background The house dust mite (HDM) allergen Der p 18 belongs to the glycoside hydrolase family 18 chitinases. The relevance of Der p 18 for house dust mite allergic patients has only been partly investigated. Objective To perform a detailed characterization of Der p 18 on a molecular, structural and immunological level. Methods Der p 18 was expressed in E. coli, purified to homogeneity, tested for chitin-binding activity and its secondary structure was analyzed by circular dichroism. Der p 18-specific IgG antibodies were produced in rabbits to localize the allergen in mites using immunogold electron microscopy and to search for cross-reactive allergens in other allergen sources (i.e. mites, crustacea, mollusca and insects). IgE reactivity of rDer p 18 was tested with sera from clinically well characterized HDM-allergic patients (n = 98) and its allergenic activity was analyzed in basophil activation experiments. Results Recombinant Der p 18 was expressed and purified as a folded, biologically active protein. It shows weak chitin-binding activity and partial cross-reactivity with Der f 18 from D. farinae but not with proteins from the other tested allergen sources. The allergen was mainly localized in the peritrophic matrix of the HDM gut and to a lower extent in fecal pellets. Der p 18 reacted with IgE from 10% of mite allergic patients from Austria and showed allergenic activity when tested for basophil activation in Der p 18-sensitized patients. Conclusion Der p 18 is a rather genus-specific minor allergen with weak chitin-binding activity but exhibits allergenic activity and therefore should be included in diagnostic test panels for HDM allergy. PMID:27548813

  4. Development of insect resistant maize plants expressing a chitinase gene from the cotton leaf worm, Spodoptera littoralis

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Gamal H.; Assem, Shireen K.; Alreedy, Rasha M.; El-Ghareeb, Doaa K.; Basry, Mahmoud A.; Rastogi, Anshu; Kalaji, Hazem M.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the importance of chitinolytic enzymes for insect, nematode and fungal growth, they are receiving attention concerning their development as biopesticides or chemical defense proteins in transgenic plants and as microbial biocontrol agents. Targeting chitin associated with the extracellular matrices or cell wall by insect chitinases may be an effective approach for controlling pest insects and pathogenic fungi. The ability of chitinases to attack and digest chitin in the peritrophic matrix or exoskeleton raises the possibility to use them as insect control method. In this study, an insect chitinase cDNA from cotton leaf worm (Spodoptera littoralis) has been synthesized. Transgenic maize plant system was used to improve its tolerance against insects. Insect chitinase transcripts and proteins were expressed in transgenic maize plants. The functional integrity and expression of chitinase in progenies of the transgenic plants were confirmed by insect bioassays. The bioassays using transgenic corn plants against corn borer (Sesamia cretica) revealed that ~50% of the insects reared on transgenic corn plants died, suggesting that transgenic maize plants have enhanced resistance against S. cretica. PMID:26658494

  5. Development of insect resistant maize plants expressing a chitinase gene from the cotton leaf worm, Spodoptera littoralis.

    PubMed

    Osman, Gamal H; Assem, Shireen K; Alreedy, Rasha M; El-Ghareeb, Doaa K; Basry, Mahmoud A; Rastogi, Anshu; Kalaji, Hazem M

    2015-01-01

    Due to the importance of chitinolytic enzymes for insect, nematode and fungal growth, they are receiving attention concerning their development as biopesticides or chemical defense proteins in transgenic plants and as microbial biocontrol agents. Targeting chitin associated with the extracellular matrices or cell wall by insect chitinases may be an effective approach for controlling pest insects and pathogenic fungi. The ability of chitinases to attack and digest chitin in the peritrophic matrix or exoskeleton raises the possibility to use them as insect control method. In this study, an insect chitinase cDNA from cotton leaf worm (Spodoptera littoralis) has been synthesized. Transgenic maize plant system was used to improve its tolerance against insects. Insect chitinase transcripts and proteins were expressed in transgenic maize plants. The functional integrity and expression of chitinase in progenies of the transgenic plants were confirmed by insect bioassays. The bioassays using transgenic corn plants against corn borer (Sesamia cretica) revealed that ~50% of the insects reared on transgenic corn plants died, suggesting that transgenic maize plants have enhanced resistance against S. cretica. PMID:26658494

  6. Chitinase is stored and secreted from the inner body of microfilariae and has a role in exsheathment in the parasitic nematode Brugia malayi

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yang; Preston, Gillian; Bianco, Albert E.

    2008-01-01

    Chitinase expression in microfilariae of the parasitic nematode Brugia malayi (B. malayi, Bm) is coincidental with the onset of their infectivity to mosquitoes. An antibody raised to Onchocerca volvulus (O. volvulus, Ov) infective-stage larval chitinase (Ov-CHI-1) was specifically reactive against B. malayi microfilarial chitinase and was used to study the localization of chitinase in B. malayi during microfilarial development and transmission to the insect vector. Immuno-electron microscopy (IEM) was used to demonstrate that the chitinase was confined to the inner body of the microfilariae and furthermore that chitinase was only present in sheathed microfilarial species, although the inner body is present in all species. Observation using the IEM implicates two distinct routes of chitinase secretion from the inner body, via either the pharyngeal thread, or during transmission of the microfilariae to the vector, contained in vesicle-like structures. Many morphological studies have described the structure of the inner body, but no function has been assigned to it as of yet. Although it has been commented that the cells surrounding the inner body and pharyngeal thread are those destined to become the intestine and pharynx and that the inner body represents a store of material. Our studies suggest that chitinase is one such product stored in the inner body and that it is secreted during the exsheathment of the microfilaria in the mosquito. PMID:18611418

  7. Cloning and identification of Fv-cmp, a protease from Fusarium verticillioides that truncates Zea mays and Arabidopsis thaliana class IV chitinases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chitinase modifying proteins (cmps) are proteases, secreted by fungal pathogens, that were originally identified as proteins that truncate class IV chitinases of maize during ear rot. Cmps from Bipolaris zeicola and Stenocarpella maydis have been characterized, but the identities of the proteases h...

  8. Suppression of leaf feeding and oviposition of phytophagous ladybird beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) by chitinase gene-transformed phylloplane bacteria and their specific bacteriophages entrapped in alginate gel beads.

    PubMed

    Otsu, Yasunari; Mori, Hirofumi; Komuta, Kenji; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Nogawa, Souta; Matsuda, Yoshinori; Nonomura, Teruo; Sakuratani, Yasuyuki; Tosa, Yukio; Mayama, Shigeyuki; Toyoda, Hideyoshi

    2003-06-01

    The chitinase gene-transformed strain KPM-007E/chi of Enterobacter cloacae was vitally entrapped in sodium alginate gel beads with its specific virulent bacteriophage EcP-01 to provide a new method for microbially digesting chitinous peritrophic membranes of phytophagous ladybird beetles Epilachna vigintioctopunctata. First, chitinase SH1 from a gram-positive bacterium Kurthia zopfii was overproduced by Escherichia coli cells and purified by affinity column chromatography. The purified enzyme effectively digested peritrophic membranes dissected from the ladybird beetles to expose epithelial tissues beneath the peritrophic membrane, and the beetles that had ingested chitinase after submergence in chitinase solution had considerably reduced their feeding on tomato leaves. KPM-007E/chi, entrapped in the alginate beads, released the chitinase. More chitinase was released when KPM-007E/chi was present with their specific virulent bacteriophage EcP-01 in the beads because of lysis of bacterial cells infected with the bacteriophages. This chitinase release from the microbial beads (containing KPM-007E/chi and EcP-01) was sufficient to digest the peritrophic membrane as well as to suppress feeding of bead-sprayed tomato leaves by the ladybird beetles. A daily supply of tomato leaves treated with the microbial beads considerably suppressed leaf feeding and oviposition by the ladybird beetles, suggesting a possible application of chitinase-secreting bacteria for suppressing herbivorous insect pests.

  9. IL-13Rα2 uses TMEM219 in chitinase 3-like-1-induced signalling and effector responses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Min; He, Chuan Hua; Nour, Adel M.; Zhou, Yang; Ma, Bing; Park, Jin Wook; Kim, Kyung Hee; Cruz, Charles Dela; Sharma, Lokesh; Nasr, Mahmoud L.; Modis, Yorgo; Lee, Chun Geun; Elias, Jack A.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that chitinase 3-like-1 (Chi3l1) binds to and signals via IL-13Rα2. However, the mechanism that IL-13Rα2 uses to mediate the effects of Chi3l1 has not been defined. Here, we demonstrate that the membrane protein, TMEM219, is a binding partner of IL-13Rα2 using yeast two-hybrid, co-immunoprecipitation, co-localization and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays. Furthermore, fluorescence anisotropy nanodisc assays revealed a direct physical interaction between TMEM219 and IL-13Rα2-Chi3l1 complexes. Null mutations or siRNA silencing of TMEM219 or IL-13Rα2 similarly decreased Chi3l1-stimulated epithelial cell HB-EGF production and macrophage MAPK/Erk and PKB/Akt activation. Null mutations of TMEM219 or IL-13Rα2 also phenocopied one another as regards the ability of Chi3l1 to inhibit oxidant-induced apoptosis and lung injury, promote melanoma metastasis and stimulate TGF-β1. TMEM219 also contributed to the decoy function of IL-13Rα2. These studies demonstrate that TMEM219 plays a critical role in Chi3l1-induced IL-13Rα2 mediated signalling and tissue responses. PMID:27629921

  10. IL-13Rα2 uses TMEM219 in chitinase 3-like-1-induced signalling and effector responses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Min; He, Chuan Hua; Nour, Adel M; Zhou, Yang; Ma, Bing; Park, Jin Wook; Kim, Kyung Hee; Cruz, Charles Dela; Sharma, Lokesh; Nasr, Mahmoud L; Modis, Yorgo; Lee, Chun Geun; Elias, Jack A

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that chitinase 3-like-1 (Chi3l1) binds to and signals via IL-13Rα2. However, the mechanism that IL-13Rα2 uses to mediate the effects of Chi3l1 has not been defined. Here, we demonstrate that the membrane protein, TMEM219, is a binding partner of IL-13Rα2 using yeast two-hybrid, co-immunoprecipitation, co-localization and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays. Furthermore, fluorescence anisotropy nanodisc assays revealed a direct physical interaction between TMEM219 and IL-13Rα2-Chi3l1 complexes. Null mutations or siRNA silencing of TMEM219 or IL-13Rα2 similarly decreased Chi3l1-stimulated epithelial cell HB-EGF production and macrophage MAPK/Erk and PKB/Akt activation. Null mutations of TMEM219 or IL-13Rα2 also phenocopied one another as regards the ability of Chi3l1 to inhibit oxidant-induced apoptosis and lung injury, promote melanoma metastasis and stimulate TGF-β1. TMEM219 also contributed to the decoy function of IL-13Rα2. These studies demonstrate that TMEM219 plays a critical role in Chi3l1-induced IL-13Rα2 mediated signalling and tissue responses. PMID:27629921

  11. Effect of Urtica dioica agglutinin and Arabidopsis thaliana Chia4 chitinase on the protozoan Phytomonas françai.

    PubMed

    Gomes Rocha, Graça Celeste; Nicolich, Rebecca; Romeiro, Alexandre; Margis-Pinheiro, Márcia; Attias, Márcia; Alves-Ferreira, Márcio

    2003-09-12

    The genus Phytomonas is responsible for many diseases in different crop plant species. The finding that chitin is an exposed cell surface polysaccharide in Phytomonas françai and the observation that chitinases can inhibit fungal growth raises expectations about the potential effect of plant chitinases on the P. françai cell membrane surface. The plant chitinases Urtica dioica agglutinin (UDA) and Arabidopsis thaliana Chia4 (ATCHIT4) proteins were over-expressed in bacteria and the interaction between these proteins and P. françai surface was analyzed by immunocytochemistry. We showed that UDA and ATCHIT4 proteins can interact with surface-exposed chitin from P. françai.

  12. Polyglycine hydrolases: Fungal β-lactamase-like endoproteases that cleave polyglycine regions within plant class IV chitinases

    PubMed Central

    Naumann, Todd A; Naldrett, Michael J; Ward, Todd J; Price, Neil P J

    2015-01-01

    Polyglycine hydrolases are secreted fungal proteases that cleave glycine–glycine peptide bonds in the inter-domain linker region of specific plant defense chitinases. Previously, we reported the catalytic activity of polyglycine hydrolases from the phytopathogens Epicoccum sorghi (Es-cmp) and Cochliobolus carbonum (Bz-cmp). Here we report the identity of their encoding genes and the primary amino acid sequences of the proteins responsible for these activities. Peptides from a tryptic digest of Es-cmp were analyzed by LC-MS/MS and the spectra obtained were matched to a draft genome sequence of E. sorghi. From this analysis, a 642 amino acid protein containing a predicted β-lactamase catalytic region of 280 amino acids was identified. Heterologous strains of the yeast Pichia pastoris were created to express this protein and its homolog from C. carbonum from their cDNAs. Both strains produced recombinant proteins with polyglycine hydrolase activity as shown by SDS-PAGE and MALDI-MS based assays. Site directed mutagenesis was used to mutate the predicted catalytic serine of Es-cmp to glycine, resulting in loss of catalytic activity. BLAST searching of publicly available fungal genomes identified full-length homologous proteins in 11 other fungi of the class Dothideomycetes, and in three fungi of the related class Sordariomycetes while significant BLAST hits extended into the phylum Basidiomycota. Multiple sequence alignment led to the identification of a network of seven conserved tryptophans that surround the β-lactamase-like region. This is the first report of a predicted β-lactamase that is an endoprotease. PMID:25966977

  13. Soluble antigen derived from IV larva of Angiostrongylus cantonensis promotes chitinase-like protein 3 (Chil3) expression induced by interleukin-13.

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng; Wei, Jie; Liu, Zhen; Zeng, Xin; Yu, Zilong; Lv, Zhiyue; Sun, Xi; Wu, Zhongdao

    2016-10-01

    Angiostrongyliasis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis (A. cantonensis) is an emerging food-borne parasitic disease, which refers basically to eosinophilic meningitis. Chitinase-like protein 3 (Chil3), a member of chitinase-like protein family which has chemotactic activity for eosinophils, is reported to be highly upregulated in brain of mouse infected with A. cantonensis. The mechanisms of high expression of Chil3 and the association between A. cantonensis and Chil3 are rarely reported. In order to understand the mechanism of high expression of Chil3 in A. cantonensis-infected mouse, we measured the level of Chil3 in RAW 264.7 and BV2 cell lines stimulated with soluble antigen of A. cantonensis by qPCR and ELISA. To explore the role of Chil3 in inflammation caused by A. cantonensis, we extracted and cultured brain mononuclear cells (BMNCs) and detected the eosinophil chemotactic activity of Chil3 using transwell assay and flow cytometer. Furthermore, we treated the infected mice by injection with rmChil3 and then counted the number of larvae in brains of infected mice and treated mice to examine the association between the worm and Chil3. Our results showed the soluble antigen from A. cantonensis could promote the Chil3 expression in macrophage and microglial cell lines induced by interleukin-13. In conclusion, we supposed that high expression of Chil3 enhanced by soluble antigens from A. cantonensis might be the reason of serious eosinophil infiltration in mouse brain after A. cantonensis infection. PMID:27256220

  14. Regulation of a Chitinase Gene Promoter by Ethylene and Elicitors in Bean Protoplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Roby, Dominique; Broglie, Karen; Gaynor, John; Broglie, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Chitinase gene expression has been shown to be transcriptionally regulated by a number of inducers, including ethylene, elicitors, and pathogen attack. To investigate the mechanism(s) responsible for induction of chitinase gene expression in response to various stimuli, we have developed a transient gene expression system in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) protoplasts that is responsive to ethylene and elicitor treatment. This system was used to study the expression of a chimeric gene composed of the 5′ flanking sequences of a bean endochitinase gene fused to the reporter gene β-glucuronidase linked to a 3′ fragment from nopaline synthase. Addition of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid, the direct precursor of ethylene, or elicitors such as chitin oligosaccharides or cell wall fragments derived from Colletotrichum lagenarium, to transformed protoplasts resulted in a rapid and marked increase in the expression of the chimeric gene. The kinetics and dose response for these treatments were similar to those observed for the native gene in vivo. Analyses of 5′ deletion mutants in the protoplast system indicated that DNA sequences located between −305 and −236 are important for both ethylene and elicitor induction of the reporter gene. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:16668405

  15. Purification and characterization of two chitinases from the leaves of pokeweed (Phytolacca americana).

    PubMed

    Ohta, M; Yamagami, T; Funatsu, G

    1995-04-01

    Two chitinases, designated PLC-A and PLC-B, were purified from the leaves of pokeweed (Phytolacca americana) using DEAE-cellulose column chromatography followed by gel filtration on Sephadex G-75, hydrophobic column chromatography, and ion-exchange FPLC. PLC-A and PLC-B are acidic and basic proteins having molecular masses of 25 and 29 kDa, and isoelectric points of 3.7 and 9.5, respectively. On the basis of their partial amino acid sequences, it was seen that PLC-A and PLC-B belong to class II and class III chitinases, respectively. The optimal pH of PLC-A toward glycolchitin is pH 4.5 and hydrolyzed (GlcNAc)4 into 2(GlcNAc)2, and (GlcNAc)5-6 into (GlcNAc)2 and (GlcNAc)3. on the other hand, PLC-B has two optimal pHs at 3 and 7 toward glycolchitin and hydrolyzed (GlcNAc)5 into GlcNAc and (GlcNAc)4, and (GlcNAc)6 into GlcNAc, (GlcNAc)2, and (GlcNAc)4.

  16. High-yield production of a chitinase from Aeromonas veronii B565 as a potential feed supplement for warm-water aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuting; Zhou, Zhigang; Liu, Yuchun; Cao, Yanan; He, Suxu; Huo, Fengmin; Qin, Chubin; Yao, Bin; Ringø, Einar

    2014-02-01

    Chitin, present in crustacean shells, insects, and fungi, is the second most plentiful natural organic fiber after wood. To effectively use chitin in a cost-saving and environmentally friendly way in aquaculture, crustacean shells (e.g., shrimp-shell meal) are supplemented into aquafeed after degradation by chemical methods. Herein, we describe a chitinase from Aeromonas veronii B565, designated ChiB565, which potently degrades shrimp-shell chitin and resists proteolysis. We isolated recombinant ChiB565 of the expected molecular mass in large yield from Pichia pastoris. ChiB565 is optimally active at pH 5.0 and 50 °C and stable between pH 4.5 and 9.0 at 50 °C and below. Compared with the commercial chitinase C-6137, which cannot degrade shrimp-shell chitin, ChiB565 hydrolyzes shrimp-shell chitin in addition to colloidal chitin, powdered chitin, and β-1,3-1,4-glucan. The optimal enzyme concentration and reaction time for in vitro degradation of 0.1 g of powdered shrimp shell are 30 U of ChiB565 and 3 h, respectively. A synergistic protein-release effect occurred when ChiB565 and trypsin were incubated in vitro with shrimp shells. Tilapia were fed an experimental diet containing 5% (w/w) shrimp bran and 16.2 U/kg ChiB565, which significantly improved growth and feed conversion compared with a control diet lacking ChiB565. Dietary ChiB565 enhanced nitrogen digestibility and downregulated intestinal IL-1β expression. The immunologically relevant protective effects of dietary ChiB565 were also observed for 2 to 3 days following exposure to pathogenic Aeromonas hydrophila.

  17. Expression and characterization of endochitinase C from Serratia marcescens BJL200 and its purification by a one-step general chitinase purification method.

    PubMed

    Synstad, Bjørnar; Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav; Cederkvist, F Henning; Saua, Silje F; Horn, Svein J; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Sørlie, Morten

    2008-03-01

    In this study we cloned, expressed, purified, and charaterized chitinase C1 from Serratia marcescens strain BJL200. As expected, the BJL200-ChiC1 amino acid sequence of this strain was highly similar to sequences of ChiC1 identified in two other strains of S. marcescens. BJL200-ChiC1 was overproduced in E. coli by the T7 expression system, and purified by a one-step hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) with phenyl-sepharose. BJL200-ChiA and BJL200-ChiB had an approximately 30-fold higher k(cat) and 15 fold-lower K(m) than BJL200-ChiC1 for the oligomeric substrate 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-N-N'-N''-triacetylchitotrioside, while BJL200-ChiC1 was 10-15 times faster than BJL200-ChiB and BJL200-ChiA in degrading the polymeric substrate CM-chitin-RBV. BJL200-ChiC1 degradation of beta-chitin resulted in a range of different chito-oligosaccharides (GlcNAc)(2) (main product), GlcNAc, (GlcNAc)(3), (GlcNAc)(4), and (GlcNAc)(5), indicating endo activity. The purification method used for BJL200-ChiC1 in this study is generally applicable to family 18 chitinases and their mutants, including inactive mutants, some of which tend to bind almost irreversibly to chitin columns. The high specificity of the interaction with the (non-chitinous) column material is mediated by aromatic residues that occur in the substrate-binding clefts and surfaces of the enzymes.

  18. Role of Chitinase 3-Like-1 in Interleukin-18-Induced Pulmonary Type 1, Type 2, and Type 17 Inflammation; Alveolar Destruction; and Airway Fibrosis in the Murine Lung.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Jong; Yoon, Chang Min; Nam, Milang; Kim, Do-Hyun; Choi, Je-Min; Lee, Chun Geun; Elias, Jack A

    2015-12-01

    Chitinase 3-like 1 (Chi3l1), which is also called YKL-40 in humans and BRP-39 in mice, is the prototypic chitinase-like protein. Recent studies have highlighted its impressive ability to regulate the nature of tissue inflammation and the magnitude of tissue injury and fibroproliferative repair. This can be appreciated in studies that highlight its induction after cigarette smoke exposure, during which it inhibits alveolar destruction and the genesis of pulmonary emphysema. IL-18 is also known to be induced and activated by cigarette smoke, and, in murine models, the IL-18 pathway has been shown to be necessary and sufficient to generate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease-like inflammation, fibrosis, and tissue destruction. However, the relationship between Chi3l1 and IL-18 has not been defined. To address this issue we characterized the expression of Chi3l1/BRP-39 in control and lung-targeted IL-18 transgenic mice. We also characterized the effects of transgenic IL-18 in mice with wild-type and null Chi3l1 loci. The former studies demonstrated that IL-18 is a potent stimulator of Chi3l1/BRP-39 and that this stimulation is mediated via IFN-γ-, IL-13-, and IL-17A-dependent mechanisms. The latter studies demonstrated that, in the absence of Chi3l1/BRP-39, IL-18 induced type 2 and type 17 inflammation and fibrotic airway remodeling were significantly ameliorated, whereas type 1 inflammation, emphysematous alveolar destruction, and the expression of cytotoxic T lymphocyte perforin, granzyme, and retinoic acid early transcript 1 expression were enhanced. These studies demonstrate that IL-18 is a potent stimulator of Chi3l1 and that Chi3l1 is an important mediator of IL-18-induced inflammatory, fibrotic, alveolar remodeling, and cytotoxic responses.

  19. Genome-wide analysis and differential expression of chitinases in banana against root lesion nematode (Pratylenchus coffeae) and eumusa leaf spot (Mycosphaerella eumusae) pathogens.

    PubMed

    Backiyarani, S; Uma, S; Nithya, S; Chandrasekar, A; Saraswathi, M S; Thangavelu, R; Mayilvaganan, M; Sundararaju, P; Singh, N K

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge on structure and conserved domain of Musa chitinase isoforms and their responses to various biotic stresses will give a lead to select the suitable chitinase isoform for developing biotic stress-resistant genotypes. Hence, in this study, chitinase sequences available in the Musa genome hub were analyzed for their gene structure, conserved domain, as well as intron and exon regions. To identify the Musa chitinase isoforms involved in Pratylenchus coffeae (root lesion nematode) and Mycosphaerella eumusae (eumusa leaf spot) resistant mechanisms, differential gene expression analysis was carried out in P. coffeae- and M. eumusae-challenged resistant and susceptible banana genotypes. This study revealed that more number of chitinase isoforms (CIs) were responses upon eumusa leaf spot stress than nematode stress. The nematode challenge studies revealed that class II chitinase (GSMUA_Achr9G16770_001) was significantly overexpressed with 6.75-fold (with high fragments per kilobase of exon per million fragments mapped (FPKM)) in resistant genotype (Karthobiumtham-ABB) than susceptible (Nendran-AAB) genotype, whereas when M. eumusae was challenge inoculated, two class III CIs (GSMUA_Achr9G25580_001 and GSMUA_Achr8G27880_001) were overexpressed in resistant genotype (Manoranjitham-AAA) than the susceptible genotype (Grand Naine-AAA). However, none of the CIs were found to be commonly overexpressed under both stress conditions. This study reiterated that the chitinase genes are responding differently to different biotic stresses in their respective resistant genotypes.

  20. Turnabout Is Fair Play: Herbivory-Induced Plant Chitinases Excreted in Fall Armyworm Frass Suppress Herbivore Defenses in Maize.

    PubMed

    Ray, Swayamjit; Alves, Patrick C M S; Ahmad, Imtiaz; Gaffoor, Iffa; Acevedo, Flor E; Peiffer, Michelle; Jin, Shan; Han, Yang; Shakeel, Samina; Felton, Gary W; Luthe, Dawn S

    2016-05-01

    The perception of herbivory by plants is known to be triggered by the deposition of insect-derived factors such as saliva and oral secretions, oviposition materials, and even feces. Such insect-derived materials harbor chemical cues that may elicit herbivore and/or pathogen-induced defenses in plants. Several insect-derived molecules that trigger herbivore-induced defenses in plants are known; however, insect-derived molecules suppressing them are largely unknown. In this study, we identified two plant chitinases from fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) larval frass that suppress herbivore defenses while simultaneously inducing pathogen defenses in maize (Zea mays). Fall armyworm larvae feed in enclosed whorls of maize plants, where frass accumulates over extended periods of time in close proximity to damaged leaf tissue. Our study shows that maize chitinases, Pr4 and Endochitinase A, are induced during herbivory and subsequently deposited on the host with the feces. These plant chitinases mediate the suppression of herbivore-induced defenses, thereby increasing the performance of the insect on the host. Pr4 and Endochitinase A also trigger the antagonistic pathogen defense pathway in maize and suppress fungal pathogen growth on maize leaves. Frass-induced suppression of herbivore defenses by deposition of the plant-derived chitinases Pr4 and Endochitinase A is a unique way an insect can co-opt the plant's defense proteins for its own benefit. It is also a phenomenon unlike the induction of herbivore defenses by insect oral secretions in most host-herbivore systems.

  1. Glucanases and chitinases as causal agents in the protection of Acacia extrafloral nectar from infestation by phytopathogens.

    PubMed

    González-Teuber, Marcia; Pozo, María J; Muck, Alexander; Svatos, Ales; Adame-Alvarez, Rosa M; Heil, Martin

    2010-03-01

    Nectars are rich in primary metabolites and attract mutualistic animals, which serve as pollinators or as an indirect defense against herbivores. Their chemical composition makes nectars prone to microbial infestation. As protective strategy, floral nectar of ornamental tobacco (Nicotiana langsdorffii x Nicotiana sanderae) contains "nectarins," proteins producing reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide. By contrast, pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins were detected in Acacia extrafloral nectar (EFN), which is secreted in the context of defensive ant-plant mutualisms. We investigated whether these PR proteins protect EFN from phytopathogens. Five sympatric species (Acacia cornigera, A. hindsii, A. collinsii, A. farnesiana, and Prosopis juliflora) were compared that differ in their ant-plant mutualism. EFN of myrmecophytes, which are obligate ant-plants that secrete EFN constitutively to nourish specialized ant inhabitants, significantly inhibited the growth of four out of six tested phytopathogenic microorganisms. By contrast, EFN of nonmyrmecophytes, which is secreted only transiently in response to herbivory, did not exhibit a detectable inhibitory activity. Combining two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with nanoflow liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis confirmed that PR proteins represented over 90% of all proteins in myrmecophyte EFN. The inhibition of microbial growth was exerted by the protein fraction, but not the small metabolites of this EFN, and disappeared when nectar was heated. In-gel assays demonstrated the activity of acidic and basic chitinases in all EFNs, whereas glucanases were detected only in EFN of myrmecophytes. Our results demonstrate that PR proteins causally underlie the protection of Acacia EFN from microorganisms and that acidic and basic glucanases likely represent the most important prerequisite in this defensive function. PMID:20023149

  2. Dissecting the Role of CHITINASE-LIKE1 in Nitrate-Dependent Changes in Root Architecture1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Hermans, Christian; Porco, Silvana; Vandenbussche, Filip; Gille, Sascha; De Pessemier, Jérôme; Van Der Straeten, Dominique; Verbruggen, Nathalie; Bush, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    The root phenotype of an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutant of CHITINASE-LIKE1 (CTL1), called arm (for anion-related root morphology), was previously shown to be conditional on growth on high nitrate, chloride, or sucrose. Mutants grown under restrictive conditions displayed inhibition of primary root growth, radial swelling, proliferation of lateral roots, and increased root hair density. We found here that the spatial pattern of CTL1 expression was mainly in the root and root tips during seedling development and that the protein localized to the cell wall. Fourier-transform infrared microspectroscopy of mutant root tissues indicated differences in spectra assigned to linkages in cellulose and pectin. Indeed, root cell wall polymer composition analysis revealed that the arm mutant contained less crystalline cellulose and reduced methylesterification of pectins. We also explored the implication of growth regulators on the phenotype of the mutant response to the nitrate supply. Exogenous abscisic acid application inhibited more drastically primary root growth in the arm mutant but failed to repress lateral branching compared with the wild type. Cytokinin levels were higher in the arm root, but there were no changes in mitotic activity, suggesting that cytokinin is not directly involved in the mutant phenotype. Ethylene production was higher in arm but inversely proportional to the nitrate concentration in the medium. Interestingly, eto2 and eto3 ethylene overproduction mutants mimicked some of the conditional root characteristics of the arm mutant on high nitrate. Our data suggest that ethylene may be involved in the arm mutant phenotype, albeit indirectly, rather than functioning as a primary signal. PMID:21949212

  3. Action myoclonus-renal failure syndrome: diagnostic applications of activity-based probes and lipid analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, Paulo; Kallemeijn, Wouter W.; Strijland, Anneke; Scheij, Saskia; Van Eijk, Marco; Aten, Jan; Overkleeft, Herman S.; Balreira, Andrea; Zunke, Friederike; Schwake, Michael; Sá Miranda, Clara; Aerts, Johannes M. F. G.

    2014-01-01

    Lysosomal integral membrane protein-2 (LIMP2) mediates trafficking of glucocerebrosidase (GBA) to lysosomes. Deficiency of LIMP2 causes action myoclonus-renal failure syndrome (AMRF). LIMP2-deficient fibroblasts virtually lack GBA like the cells of patients with Gaucher disease (GD), a lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the GBA gene. While GD is characterized by the presence of glucosylceramide-laden macrophages, AMRF patients do not show these. We studied the fate of GBA in relation to LIMP2 deficiency by employing recently designed activity-based probes labeling active GBA molecules. We demonstrate that GBA is almost absent in lysosomes of AMRF fibroblasts. However, white blood cells contain considerable amounts of residual enzyme. Consequently, AMRF patients do not acquire lipid-laden macrophages and do not show increased plasma levels of macrophage markers, such as chitotriosidase, in contrast to GD patients. We next investigated the consequences of LIMP2 deficiency with respect to plasma glycosphingolipid levels. Plasma glucosylceramide concentration was normal in the AMRF patients investigated as well as in LIMP2-deficient mice. However, a marked increase in the sphingoid base, glucosylsphingosine, was observed in AMRF patients and LIMP2-deficient mice. Our results suggest that combined measurements of chitotriosidase and glucosylsphingosine can be used for convenient differential laboratory diagnosis of GD and AMRF. PMID:24212238

  4. Effects of Listeria monocytogenes EGD-e and Salmonella enterica ser. Typhimurium LT2 chitinases on intracellular survival in Dictyostelium discoideum and mammalian cell lines.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, Rikki F; Leisner, Jørgen J

    2015-05-01

    Some bacterial pathogens produce chitinases as virulence factors during host infection. The molecular target of such enzymes in non-chitinous hosts remains uncertain. We studied the importance of Listeria monocytogenes EGD-e and Salmonella enterica ser. Typhimurium LT2 chitinases for intracellular survival in Dictyostelium discoideum, and for Salmonella, also infection of mammalian cell lines, and a mouse model. The Salmonella chitinase did not contribute significantly to infection of D. discoideum, mammalian cell lines or mice. However, survival in D. discoideum was clearly reduced for Listeria mutants deficient of ChiB (8-fold) or deficient of both ChiA and ChiB (22-fold). Our findings suggest that chitinases from the two species play different roles in virulence.

  5. Direct detection of underivatized chitooligosaccharides produced through chitinase action using capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Blanes, Lucas; Saito, Renata M; Genta, Fernando A; Donegá, Juliana; Terra, Walter R; Ferreira, Clélia; do Lago, Claudimir Lucio

    2008-02-01

    Capillary electrophoresis with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection was successfully used to quantify N-acetylglucosamine and five N-acetyl-chitooligosaccharides (C2-C6) produced after reaction with a purified chitinase (TmChi) from Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera). No derivatization process was necessary. The separation was developed using 10 mM NaOH with 10% (v/v) acetonitrile as background electrolyte and homemade equipment with a system that avoids the harmful effect of electrolysis. The limit of detection for all oligosaccharides was ca. 3microM, and the results indicated that the larger the oligosaccharide, the higher the sensitivity. Analysis of the chitooligosaccharides produced revealed that TmChi has an endolytic cleavage pattern with C5 as the best substrate (higher catalytic efficiency kcat/KM) releasing C2 and C3.

  6. The Listeria monocytogenes ChiA Chitinase Enhances Virulence through Suppression of Host Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Swarnava; Gantner, Benjamin N.; Ye, Richard D.; Cianciotto, Nicholas P.; Freitag, Nancy E.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Environmental pathogens survive and replicate within the outside environment while maintaining the capacity to infect mammalian hosts. For some microorganisms, mammalian infection may be a relatively rare event. Understanding how environmental pathogens retain their ability to cause disease may provide insight into environmental reservoirs of disease and emerging infections. Listeria monocytogenes survives as a saprophyte in soil but is capable of causing serious invasive disease in susceptible individuals. The bacterium secretes virulence factors that promote cell invasion, bacterial replication, and cell-to-cell spread. Recently, an L. monocytogenes chitinase (ChiA) was shown to enhance bacterial infection in mice. Given that mammals do not synthesize chitin, the function of ChiA within infected animals was not clear. Here we have demonstrated that ChiA enhances L. monocytogenes survival in vivo through the suppression of host innate immunity. L. monocytogenes ΔchiA mutants were fully capable of establishing bacterial replication within target organs during the first 48 h of infection. By 72 to 96 h postinfection, however, numbers of ΔchiA bacteria diminished, indicative of an effective immune response to contain infection. The ΔchiA-associated virulence defect could be complemented in trans by wild-type L. monocytogenes, suggesting that secreted ChiA altered a target that resulted in a more permissive host environment for bacterial replication. ChiA secretion resulted in a dramatic decrease in inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, and ΔchiA mutant virulence was restored in NOS2−/− mice lacking iNOS. This work is the first to demonstrate modulation of a specific host innate immune response by a bacterial chitinase. PMID:23512964

  7. Chitinase 3-like-1 and its receptors in Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome-associated lung disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; He, Chuan Hua; Herzog, Erica L; Peng, Xueyan; Lee, Chang-Min; Nguyen, Tung H; Gulati, Mridu; Gochuico, Bernadette R; Gahl, William A; Slade, Martin L; Lee, Chun Geun; Elias, Jack A

    2015-08-01

    Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) comprises a group of inherited disorders caused by mutations that alter the function of lysosome-related organelles. Pulmonary fibrosis is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with subtypes HPS-1 and HPS-4, which both result from defects in biogenesis of lysosome-related organelle complex 3 (BLOC-3). The prototypic chitinase-like protein chitinase 3-like-1 (CHI3L1) plays a protective role in the lung by ameliorating cell death and stimulating fibroproliferative repair. Here, we demonstrated that circulating CHI3L1 levels are higher in HPS patients with pulmonary fibrosis compared with those who remain fibrosis free, and that these levels associate with disease severity. Using murine HPS models, we also determined that these animals have a defect in the ability of CHI3L1 to inhibit epithelial apoptosis but exhibit exaggerated CHI3L1-driven fibroproliferation, which together promote HPS fibrosis. These divergent responses resulted from differences in the trafficking and effector functions of two CHI3L1 receptors. Specifically, the enhanced sensitivity to apoptosis was due to abnormal localization of IL-13Rα2 as a consequence of dysfunctional BLOC-3-dependent membrane trafficking. In contrast, the fibrosis was due to interactions between CHI3L1 and the receptor CRTH2, which trafficked normally in BLOC-3 mutant HPS. These data demonstrate that CHI3L1-dependent pathways exacerbate pulmonary fibrosis and suggest CHI3L1 as a potential biomarker for pulmonary fibrosis progression and severity in HPS. PMID:26121745

  8. Complete subsite mapping of a "loopful" GH19 chitinase from rye seeds based on its crystal structure.

    PubMed

    Ohnuma, Takayuki; Umemoto, Naoyuki; Kondo, Kaori; Numata, Tomoyuki; Fukamizo, Tamo

    2013-08-19

    Crystallographic analysis of a mutated form of "loopful" GH19 chitinase from rye seeds a double mutant RSC-c, in which Glu67 and Trp72 are mutated to glutamine and alanine, respectively, (RSC-c-E67Q/W72A) in complex with chitin tetrasaccharide (GlcNAc)₄ revealed that the entire substrate-binding cleft was completely occupied with the sugar residues of two (GlcNAc)₄ molecules. One (GlcNAc)₄ molecule bound to subsites -4 to -1, while the other bound to subsites +1 to +4. Comparisons of the main chain conformation between liganded RSC-c-E67Q/W72A and unliganded wild type RSC-c suggested domain motion essential for catalysis. This is the first report on the complete subsite mapping of GH19 chitinase.

  9. Complete genome sequence of the fish pathogen Aeromonas veronii TH0426 with potential application in biosynthesis of pullulanase and chitinase.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yuanhuan; Pan, Xiaoyi; Xu, Yang; Siddiqui, Shahrood A; Wang, Chunfeng; Shan, Xiaofeng; Qian, Aidong

    2016-06-10

    Aeromonas veronii TH0426 is a pathogen of the farmed yellow catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco but shows high-level expression of pullulanase and chitinase. Here, we present its genome sequence, which is the first reported complete genome of fish pathogen in A. veronii to date. Strain TH0426 harbors a single circular 4,923,009bp chromosome with a GC content of 58.25%. There are 4525 genes identified on its genome, including 4244 protein-coding genes, 32 rRNA genes, 120 tRNA genes, a noncoding RNA and 128 pseudo genes. We believe that the genomic information of A. veronii TH0426 would facilitate to reveal its pathogenic mechanism associated with yellow catfish, develop vaccine to decrease economic losses for fish farming, meanwhile explore the potential application in producing pullulanase and chitinase. PMID:27080448

  10. ECDYSTEROID AND CHITINASE FLUCTUATIONS IN THE WESTERN TARNISHED PLANT BUG (Lygus hesperus) PRIOR TO MOLT INDICATE ROLES IN DEVELOPMENT.

    PubMed

    Brent, Colin S; Wang, Meixian; Miao, Yun-Gen; Hull, J Joe

    2016-06-01

    Vital physiological processes that drive the insect molt represent areas of interest for the development of alternative control strategies. The western tarnished plant bug (Lygus hesperus Knight) is a pest of numerous agronomic and horticultural crops but the development of novel control approaches is impeded by limited knowledge of the mechanisms regulating its molt. To address this deficiency, we examined the fundamental relationship underlying the hormonal and molecular components of ecdysis. At 27°C L. hesperus exhibits a temporally controlled nymph-adult molt that occurs about 4 days after the final nymph-nymph molt with ecdysteroid levels peaking 2 days prior to the final molt. Application of exogenous ecdysteroids when endogenous levels had decreased disrupted the nymphal-adult molt, with treated animals exhibiting an inability to escape the old exoskeleton and resulting in mortality compared to controls. Using accessible transcriptomic data, we identified 10 chitinase-like sequences (LhCht), eight of which had protein motifs consistent with chitinases. Phylogenetic analyses revealed orthologous relationships to chitinases critical to molting in other insects. RT-PCR based transcript profiling revealed that expression changes to four of the LhChts was coordinated with the molt period and ecdysteroid levels. Collectively, our results support a role for ecdysteroid regulation of the L. hesperus molt and suggest that cuticle clearance is mediated by LhCht orthologs of chitinases that are essential to the molt process. These results provide the initial hormonal and molecular basis for future studies to investigate the specific roles of these components in molting. PMID:27192063

  11. Expression of Rice Chitinase Gene in Genetically Engineered Tomato Confers Enhanced Resistance to Fusarium Wilt and Early Blight.

    PubMed

    Jabeen, Nyla; Chaudhary, Zubeda; Gulfraz, Muhammad; Rashid, Hamid; Mirza, Bushra

    2015-09-01

    This is the first study reporting the evaluation of transgenic lines of tomato harboring rice chitinase (RCG3) gene for resistance to two important fungal pathogens Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) causing fusarium wilt and Alternaria solani causing early blight (EB). In this study, three transgenic lines TL1, TL2 and TL3 of tomato Solanum lycopersicum Mill. cv. Riogrande genetically engineered with rice chitinase (RCG 3) gene and their R1 progeny was tested for resistance to Fol by root dip method and A. solani by detached leaf assay. All the R0 transgenic lines were highly resistant to these fungal pathogens compared to non-transgenic control plants. The pattern of segregation of three independent transformant for Fol and A. solani was also studied. Mendelian segregation was observed in transgenic lines 2 and 3 while it was not observed in transgenic line 1. It was concluded that introduction of chitinase gene in susceptible cultivar of tomato not only enhanced the resistance but was stably inherited in transgenic lines 2 and 3. PMID:26361473

  12. Expression of Rice Chitinase Gene in Genetically Engineered Tomato Confers Enhanced Resistance to Fusarium Wilt and Early Blight

    PubMed Central

    Jabeen, Nyla; Chaudhary, Zubeda; Gulfraz, Muhammad; Rashid, Hamid; Mirza, Bushra

    2015-01-01

    This is the first study reporting the evaluation of transgenic lines of tomato harboring rice chitinase (RCG3) gene for resistance to two important fungal pathogens Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) causing fusarium wilt and Alternaria solani causing early blight (EB). In this study, three transgenic lines TL1, TL2 and TL3 of tomato Solanum lycopersicum Mill. cv. Riogrande genetically engineered with rice chitinase (RCG 3) gene and their R1 progeny was tested for resistance to Fol by root dip method and A. solani by detached leaf assay. All the R0 transgenic lines were highly resistant to these fungal pathogens compared to non-transgenic control plants. The pattern of segregation of three independent transformant for Fol and A. solani was also studied. Mendelian segregation was observed in transgenic lines 2 and 3 while it was not observed in transgenic line 1. It was concluded that introduction of chitinase gene in susceptible cultivar of tomato not only enhanced the resistance but was stably inherited in transgenic lines 2 and 3. PMID:26361473

  13. Five hepatopancreatic and one epidermal chitinases from a pandalid shrimp (Pandalopsis japonica): cloning and effects of eyestalk ablation on gene expression.

    PubMed

    Salma, Umme; Uddowla, Md Hasan; Kim, Meesun; Kim, Jong Min; Kim, Bo Kwang; Baek, Hae-Ja; Park, Hyun; Mykles, Donald L; Kim, Hyun-Woo

    2012-03-01

    Six cDNAs encoding chitinase proteins in Pandalopsis japonica were isolated by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) cloning methods and bioinformatic analysis of expressed sequence tags (ESTs). The cDNAs, designated Pj-Cht1, 2, 3A, 3B, 3C, and 4, encoded proteins ranging from 388 to 607 amino acid residues in length (43.61-67.62kDa) and displayed a common structural organization: an N-terminal catalytic domain, a Thr/Pro-rich linker region, and either 0 (Pj-Cht2, 3A), 1 (Pj-Cht1, 3B, and 3C), or 2 (Pj-Cht4) C-terminal chitin-binding domain(s) (CBD). Pj-Cht1 and 2 lacked the 5' end of the open reading frame (ORF); the other Pj-Chts contained the complete ORF. All known decapod crustacean chitinases were segregated into at least four groups based on phylogenetic analysis and domain organization. Group 1 chitinases, represented by Pj-Cht1, were most closely related to insect group I chitinases and may function in the digestion of the peritrophic membrane. Group 2 chitinases including Pj-Cht2 show different domain organizations and pI value from other chitinases and appear to function in degradation of the old exoskeleton during the premolt period. Group 3 chitinases, represented by Pj-Cht3A, 3B, and 3C, may function in digestion of chitin-containing food and defense against pathogens. Group 4 chitinases, represented by Pj-Cht4, have two CBDs and their functions are unknown. Five Pj-Chts (Pj-Cht1, 3A, 3B, 3C, and 4) are expressed in the hepatopancreas and intestine, whereas Pj-Cht2 is expressed in epidermis and SG/XO complex suggesting crustacean chitinases can be classified into two groups (hepatopancreatic and epidermal) based on the expression profile. Eyestalk ablation (ESA) down-regulated the hepatopancreatic chitinase expression (Pj-Cht1, 3A, and 3C); Pj-Cht3B expression was not significantly affected by ESA. By contrast, mRNA levels of Pj-Cht2 were significantly upregulated in 7days post-ESA. Pj-Cht4 mRNA levels were too low for measurement with quantitative

  14. Molecular cloning of class III chitinase gene from Avicennia marina and its expression analysis in response to cadmium and lead stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Ying; Wang, You-Shao; Zhang, Jing-Ping; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2015-10-01

    Mangrove species have high tolerance to heavy metal pollution. Chitinases have been widely reported as defense proteins in response to heavy metal stress in terrestrial plants. In this study, a full-length cDNA sequence encoding an acidic and basic class III chitinase (AmCHI III) was cloned by using RT-PCR and RACE methods in Avicennia marina. AmCHI III mRNA expression in leaf of A. marina were investigated under Cd, Pb stresses on using real-time quantitative PCR. The deduced AmCHI III protein consists of 302 amino acids, including a signal putative peptide region, and a catalytic domain. Homology modeling of the catalytic domain revealed a typical molecular structure of class III plant chitinases. Results further demonstrated that the regulation of AmCHI III mRNA expression in leaves was strongly dependent on Cd, Pb stresses. AmCHI III mRNA expressions were significantly increased in response to Cd, Pb, and peaked at 7 days Cd-exposure, 7 days Pb-exposure, respectively. AmCHI III mRNA expression exhibited more sensitive to Pb stress than Cd stress. This work was the first time cloing chitinase from A. marina, and it brought evidence on chitinase gene involving in heavy metals (Cd(2+) and Pb(2+)) resistance or detoxification in plants. Further studies including the promoter and upstream regulation, gene over-expression and the response of mangrove chitinases to other stresses will shed more light on the role of chitinase in mangrove plants.

  15. Molecular cloning of class III chitinase gene from Avicennia marina and its expression analysis in response to cadmium and lead stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Ying; Wang, You-Shao; Zhang, Jing-Ping; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2015-10-01

    Mangrove species have high tolerance to heavy metal pollution. Chitinases have been widely reported as defense proteins in response to heavy metal stress in terrestrial plants. In this study, a full-length cDNA sequence encoding an acidic and basic class III chitinase (AmCHI III) was cloned by using RT-PCR and RACE methods in Avicennia marina. AmCHI III mRNA expression in leaf of A. marina were investigated under Cd, Pb stresses on using real-time quantitative PCR. The deduced AmCHI III protein consists of 302 amino acids, including a signal putative peptide region, and a catalytic domain. Homology modeling of the catalytic domain revealed a typical molecular structure of class III plant chitinases. Results further demonstrated that the regulation of AmCHI III mRNA expression in leaves was strongly dependent on Cd, Pb stresses. AmCHI III mRNA expressions were significantly increased in response to Cd, Pb, and peaked at 7 days Cd-exposure, 7 days Pb-exposure, respectively. AmCHI III mRNA expression exhibited more sensitive to Pb stress than Cd stress. This work was the first time cloing chitinase from A. marina, and it brought evidence on chitinase gene involving in heavy metals (Cd(2+) and Pb(2+)) resistance or detoxification in plants. Further studies including the promoter and upstream regulation, gene over-expression and the response of mangrove chitinases to other stresses will shed more light on the role of chitinase in mangrove plants. PMID:26044930

  16. Genome-wide analysis of chitinase genes and their varied functions in larval moult, pupation and eclosion in the rice striped stem borer, Chilo suppressalis.

    PubMed

    Su, C; Tu, G; Huang, S; Yang, Q; Shahzad, M F; Li, F

    2016-08-01

    Some insect chitinases are required to degrade chitin and ensure successful metamorphosis. Although chitinase genes have been well characterized in several model insects, no reports exist for the rice striped stem borer, Chilo suppressalis, a highly destructive pest that causes huge yield losses in rice production. Here, we conducted a genome-level analysis of chitinase genes in C. suppressalis. After amplification of full-length transcripts with rapid amplification of cDNA ends, we identified 12 chitinase genes in C. suppressalis. All these genes had the conserved domains and motifs of glycoside hydrolase family 18 and grouped phylogenetically into five subgroups. C. suppressalis chitinase 1 (CsCht1) was highly expressed in late pupae, whereas CsCht3 was abundant in early pupae. Both CsCht2 and CsCht4 were highly expressed in larvae. CsCht2 was abundant specifically in the third-instar larvae and CsCht4 showed periodic high expression in 2- to 5-day-old larvae in each instar. Tissue specific expression analysis indicated that CsCht1 and CsCht3 were highly expressed in epidermis whereas CsCht2 and CsCht4 were specifically abundant in the midgut. Knockdown of CsCht1 resulted in adults with curled wings, indicating that CsCht1 might have an important role in wing expansion. Silencing of CsCht2 or CsCht4 arrested moulting, suggesting essential roles in larval development. When the expression of CsCht3 was interfered, defects in pupation occurred. Overall, we provide here the first catalogue of chitinase genes in the rice striped stem borer and have elucidated the functions of four chitinases in metamorphosis. PMID:27080989

  17. The roles of three Serratia marcescens chitinases in chitin conversion are reflected in different thermodynamic signatures of allosamidin binding.

    PubMed

    Baban, Jamil; Fjeld, Salima; Sakuda, Shohei; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Sørlie, Morten

    2010-05-13

    Binding of allosamidin to the three family 18 chitinases of Serratia marcescens has been studied using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Interestingly, the thermodynamic signatures of allosamidin binding were different for all three chitinases. At pH 6.0, chitinase A (ChiA) binds allosamidin with a K(d) value of 0.17 +/- 0.06 microM where the main part of the driving force is due to enthalpic change (DeltaH(r) degrees = -6.2 +/- 0.2 kcal/mol) and less to entropic change (-TDeltaS(r) degrees = -3.2 kcal/mol). A large part of DeltaH is due to allosamidin stacking with Trp(167) in the -3 subsite. Binding of allosamidin to both chitinase B (ChiB) (K(d) = 0.16 +/- 0.04 microM) and chitinase C (ChiC) (K(d) = 2.0 +/- 0.2 microM) is driven by entropy (DeltaH(r) degrees = 3.8 +/- 0.2 kcal/mol and -TDeltaS(r) degrees = -13.2 kcal/mol for ChiB and DeltaH(r) degrees = -0.6 +/- 0.1 and -TDeltaS(r) degrees = -7.3 kcal/mol for ChiC). For ChiC, the entropic term is dominated by changes in solvation entropy (DeltaS(conf) = 1 cal/K.mol and DeltaS(solv) = 31 cal/K.mol), while, for ChiB, changes in conformational entropy dominate (DeltaS(conf) = 37 cal/K x mol and DeltaS(solv) = 15 cal/K x mol). Corresponding values for ChiA are DeltaS(conf) = 4 cal/K x mol and DeltaS(solv) = 15 cal/K x mol. These remarkable differences in binding parameters reflect the different architectures of the catalytic centers in these enzymes that are adapted to different types of actions: ChiA and ChiB are processive enzymes that move in opposite directions, meaning that allosamidin binds in to "product" subsites in ChiB, while it binds to polymer-binding subsites in ChiA. The values for ChiC are compatible with this enzyme being a nonprocessive endochitinase with a much more open and solvated substrate-binding-site cleft.

  18. The Modes of Action of ChiIII, a Chitinase from Mushroom Coprinopsis cinerea, Shift with Changes in the Length of GlcNAc Oligomers.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xin; Liu, Cui-Cui; Xiong, Yuan-Jing; Yang, Ming-Mei; Ma, Fei; Liu, Zhong-Hua; Yuan, Sheng

    2016-09-21

    A putative class III endochitinase (ChiIII) was reported previously to be expressed dominantly in fruiting bodies of Coprinopsis cinerea, and its expression levels increased with the maturation of the fruiting bodies. This paper further reports that ChiIII is a novel chitinase with exo- and endoactivities. When the substrate was (GlcNAc)3-5, ChiIII exhibited exoactivity, releasing GlcNAc processively from the reducing end of (GlcNAc)3-5; when the substrate was (GlcNAc)6-7, the activity of ChiIII shifted to an endoacting enzyme, randomly splitting chitin oligosaccharides to various shorter oligosaccharides. This shift in the mode of action of ChiIII may be related to its stronger hydrolytic capacity to degrade chitin in fungal cell walls. The predicted structure of ChiIII shows that it lacks the α+β domain insertion; however, its substrate binding cleft seems to be deeper than that of common endochitinases but shallower and more open than that of common exochitinases, which may be related to its exo- and endohydrolytic activities. PMID:27573573

  19. Inhibition of acidic mammalian chitinase by RNA interference suppresses ovalbumin-sensitized allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ching-Jen; Liu, Yu-Kuo; Liu, Chao-Lin; Shen, Chia-Ning; Kuo, Ming-Ling; Su, Chien-Chang; Tseng, Ching-Ping; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Shen, Chia-Rui

    2009-12-01

    Asthma, a chronic helper T cell type 2-mediated inflammatory disease, is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation. Growing evidence suggests that increased expression of acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase) may play a role in the pathogenesis of asthma. In the present study, we sought to develop an RNA interference approach to suppress allergic asthma in mice through silencing of AMCase expression. Mice sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) were intratracheally administered a recombinant adeno-associated virus expressing short hairpin RNA (rAAV-shRNA) against AMCase. In OVA-sensitized mice, the development of allergic symptoms was significantly associated with elevated AMCase expression. After administration of rAAV-shRNA, there was a significant reduction of AMCase expression in the lung and in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cells of sensitized mice. Sensitized mice receiving rAAV-shRNA showed a significant improvement in allergic symptoms, including airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), eosinophil infiltration, eotaxin, interleukin-13 secretion in BALF, and serum OVA-specific IgE level. Our data suggest the hyperexpression of AMCase in asthma can be suppressed by rAAV-mediated shRNA. Silencing AMCase expression by shRNA may be a promising therapeutic strategy in asthma.

  20. Chitinases and Imaginal disc growth factors organize the extracellular matrix formation at barrier tissues in insects

    PubMed Central

    Pesch, Yanina-Yasmin; Riedel, Dietmar; Patil, Kapil R; Loch, Gerrit; Behr, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The cuticle forms an apical extracellular-matrix (ECM) that covers exposed organs, such as epidermis, trachea and gut, for organizing morphogenesis and protection of insects. Recently, we reported that cuticle proteins and chitin are involved in ECM formation. However, molecular mechanisms that control assembly, maturation and replacement of the ECM and its components are not well known. Here we investigated the poorly described glyco-18-domain hydrolase family in Drosophila and identified the Chitinases (Chts) and imaginal-disc-growth-factors (Idgfs) that are essential for larval and adult molting. We demonstrate that Cht and idgf depletion results in deformed cuticles, larval and adult molting defects, and insufficient protection against wounding and bacterial infection, which altogether leads to early lethality. We show that Cht2/Cht5/Cht7/Cht9/Cht12 and idgf1/idgf3/idgf4/idgf5/idgf6 are needed for organizing proteins and chitin-matrix at the apical cell surface. Our data indicate that normal ECM formation requires Chts, which potentially hydrolyze chitin-polymers. We further suggest that the non-enzymatic idgfs act as structural proteins to maintain the ECM scaffold against chitinolytic degradation. Conservation of Chts and Idgfs proposes analogous roles in ECM dynamics across the insect taxa, indicating that Chts/Idgfs are new targets for species specific pest control. PMID:26838602

  1. Comparative evolutionary histories of chitinase genes in the Genus zea and Family poaceae.

    PubMed Central

    Tiffin, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Patterns of DNA sequence diversity vary widely among genes encoding proteins that protect plants against pathogens and herbivores. Comparative studies may help determine whether these differences are due to the strength of selection acting on different types of defense, in different evolutionary lineages, or both. I analyzed sequence diversity at three chitinases, a well-studied component of defense, in two species of Zea and several Poaceae taxa. Although the Zea species are closely related and these genes code for proteins with similar biochemical function, patterns of diversity vary widely within and among species. Intraspecific diversity at chiB, chiI, and Z. mays ssp. parviglumis chiA are consistent with a neutral-equilibrium model whereas chiA had no segregating sites within Z. diploperennis--consistent with a recent and strong selective sweep. Codons identified as having diverged among Poaceae taxa in response to positive selection were significantly overrepresented among targets of selection in Arabis, suggesting common responses to selection in distantly related plant taxa. Divergence of the recent duplicates chiA and chiB is consistent with positive selection but relaxed constraint cannot be rejected. Weak evidence for adaptive divergence of these duplicated downstream components of defense contrasts with strong evidence for adaptive divergence of genes involved in pathogen recognition. PMID:15280246

  2. Two-way traffic of glycoside hydrolase family 18 processive chitinases on crystalline chitin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Uchiyama, Taku; Sugimoto, Hayuki; Wada, Masahisa; Suzuki, Kazushi; Sakuda, Shohei; Ando, Toshio; Watanabe, Takeshi; Samejima, Masahiro

    2014-06-01

    Processivity refers to the ability of synthesizing, modifying and degrading enzymes to catalyse multiple successive cycles of reaction with polymeric substrates without disengaging from the substrates. Since biomass polysaccharides, such as chitin and cellulose, often form recalcitrant crystalline regions, their degradation is highly dependent on the processivity of degrading enzymes. Here we employ high-speed atomic force microscopy to directly visualize the movement of two processive glycoside hydrolase family 18 chitinases (ChiA and ChiB) from the chitinolytic bacterium Serratia marcescens on crystalline β-chitin. The half-life of processive movement and the velocity of ChiA are larger than those of ChiB, suggesting that asymmetric subsite architecture determines both the direction and the magnitude of processive degradation of crystalline polysaccharides. The directions of processive movements of ChiA and ChiB are observed to be opposite. The molecular mechanism of the two-way traffic is discussed, including a comparison with the processive cellobiohydrolases of the cellulolytic system.

  3. Chitinase 3-like 1 expression by human (MG63) osteoblasts in response to lysophosphatidic acid and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3.

    PubMed

    Mansell, J P; Cooke, M; Read, M; Rudd, H; Shiel, A I; Wilkins, K; Manso, M

    2016-01-01

    Chitinase 3-like 1, otherwise known as YKL-40, is a secreted glycoprotein purported to have a role in extracellular matrix metabolism. The first mammalian cell type found to express YKL-40 was the human osteosarcoma-derived osteoblast, MG63. In that first study the active vitamin D3 metabolite, 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25D), stimulated YKL-40 expression, thereby indicating that a vital factor for skeletal health promoted YKL-40 synthesis by bone forming cells. However, when these MG63 cells were exposed to 1,25D they were also exposed to serum, a rich source of the pleiotropic lipid mediator, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). Given that 1,25D is now known to co-operate with selected growth factors, including LPA, to influence human osteoblast differentiation we hypothesised that 1,25D and LPA may work together to stimulate osteoblast YKL-40 expression. Herein we report that 1,25D and LPA synergistically promote YKL-40 expression by MG63 cells. Inhibitors targeting AP1, MEK, Sp1 and STAT3 blunted the expression of both alkaline phosphatase and YKL-40 by MG63 cells in response to co-stimulation with 1,25D and LPA. Other ligands of the vitamin D receptor also co-operated with LPA in driving YKL-40 mobilisation. Collectively our findings highlight another important role of 1,25D and LPA in the regulation of human osteoblast function. PMID:27575987

  4. Characterization of chitinase-like proteins (Cg-Clp1 and Cg-Clp2) involved in immune defence of the mollusc Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Badariotti, Fabien; Lelong, Christophe; Dubos, Marie-Pierre; Favrel, Pascal

    2007-07-01

    Chitinase-like proteins have been identified in insects and mammals as nonenzymatic members of the glycoside hydrolase family 18. Recently, the first molluscan chitinase-like protein, named Crassostrea gigas (Cg)-Clp1, was shown to control the proliferation and synthesis of extracellular matrix components of mammalian chondrocytes. However, the precise physiological roles of Cg-Clp1 in oysters remain unknown. Here, we report the cloning and the characterization of a new chitinase-like protein (Cg-Clp2) from the oyster Crassostrea gigas. Gene expression profiles monitored by quantitative RT-PCR in adult tissues and through development support its involvement in tissue growth and remodelling. Both Cg-Clp1- and Cg-Clp2-encoding genes were transcriptionally stimulated in haemocytes in response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide challenge, strongly suggesting that these two close paralogous genes play a role in oyster immunity. PMID:17608806

  5. Biodegradation of shrimp processing bio-waste and concomitant production of chitinase enzyme and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine by marine bacteria: production and process optimization.

    PubMed

    Suresh, P V

    2012-10-01

    A total of 250 chitinolytic bacteria from 68 different marine samples were screened employing enrichment method that utilized native chitin as the sole carbon source. After thorough screening, five bacteria were selected as potential cultures and identified as; Stenotrophomonas sp. (CFR221 M), Vibrio sp. (CFR173 M), Phyllobacteriaceae sp. (CFR16 M), Bacillus badius (CFR198 M) and Bacillus sp. (CFR188 M). All five strains produced extracellular chitinase and GlcNAc in SSF using shrimp bio-waste. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed the ability of these marine bacteria to adsorb onto solid shrimp bio-waste and to degrade chitin microfibers. HPLC analysis of the SSF extract also confirmed presence of 36-65 % GlcNAc as a product of the degradation. The concomitant production of chitinase and GlcNAc by all five strains under SSF using shrimp bio-waste as the solid substrate was optimized by 'one factor at a time' approach. Among the strains, Vibrio sp. CFR173 M produced significantly higher yields of chitinase (4.8 U/g initial dry substrate) and GlcNAc (4.7 μmol/g initial dry substrate) as compared to other cultures tested. A statistically designed experiment was applied to evaluate the interaction of variables in the biodegradation of shrimp bio-waste and concomitant production of chitinase and GlcNAc by Vibrio sp. CFR173 M. Statistical optimization resulted in a twofold increase of chitinase, and a 9.1 fold increase of GlcNAc production. These results indicated the potential of chitinolytic marine bacteria for the reclamation of shrimp bio-waste, as well as the potential for economic production of chitinase and GlcNAc employing SSF using shrimp bio-waste as an ideal substrate.

  6. Dual silencing of long and short Amblyomma americanum acidic chitinase forms weakens the tick cement cone stability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae K.; Curran, Janet; Mulenga, Albert

    2014-01-01

    This study demonstrates that Amblyomma americanum (Aam) constitutively and ubiquitously expresses the long (L) and short (S) putative acidic chitinases (Ach) that are distinguished by a 210 base pair (bp) deletion in AamAch-S. Full-length AamAch-L and AamAch-S cDNA are 1959 and 1718 bp long, containing 1332 and 1104 bp open reading frames that code for 443 and 367 amino acid residues proteins with the former predicted to be extracellular and the latter intracellular. Both AamAch-L and AamAch-S mRNA are expressed in multiple organs as revealed by qualitative RT-PCR analysis. Furthermore, quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that AamAch-L mRNA was downregulated in the mid-gut, but was unchanged in the salivary gland and in other organs in response to feeding. Of significant interest, AamAch-L and/or AamAch-S functions are probably associated with formation and/or maintenance of stability of A. americanum tick cement cone. Dual RNA interference silencing of AamAch-L and/or AamAch-S mRNA caused ticks to loosely attach onto host skin as suggested by bleeding around tick mouthparts and ticks detaching off host skin with a light touch. AamAch-L may apparently encode an inactive chitinase as indicated by Pichia pastoris-expressed recombinant AamAch-L failing to hydrolyse chitinase substrates. Unpublished related work in our laboratory, and published work by others that found AamAch-L in tick saliva, suggest that native AamAch-L is a non-specific immunoglobulin binding tick saliva protein in that rAamAch-L non-specifically bound rabbit, bovine and chicken non-immune sera. We discuss findings in this study with reference to advancing knowledge on tick feeding physiology. PMID:25189365

  7. Molecular Analysis of Atypical Family 18 Chitinase from Fujian Oyster Crassostrea angulata and Its Physiological Role in the Digestive System.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bingye; Zhang, Mingming; Li, Lingling; Pu, Fei; You, Weiwei; Ke, Caihuan

    2015-01-01

    Chitinolytic enzymes have an important physiological significance in immune and digestive systems in plants and animals, but chitinase has not been identified as having a role in the digestive system in molluscan. In our study, a novel chitinase homologue, named Ca-Chit, has been cloned and characterized as the oyster Crassostrea angulate. The 3998bp full-length cDNA of Ca-Chit consisted of 23bp 5-UTR, 3288 ORF and 688bp 3-UTR. The deduced amino acids sequence shares homologue with the chitinase of family 18. The molecular weight of the protein was predicted to be 119.389 kDa, with a pI of 6.74. The Ca-Chit protein was a modular enzyme composed of a glycosyl hydrolase family 18 domain, threonine-rich region profile and a putative membrane anchor domain. Gene expression profiles monitored by quantitative RT-PCR in different adult tissues showed that the mRNA of Ca-Chit expressed markedly higher visceral mass than any other tissues. The results of the whole mount in-situ hybridization displayed that Ca-Chit starts to express the visceral mass of D-veliger larvae and then the digestive gland forms a crystalline structure during larval development. Furthermore, the adult oysters challenged by starvation indicated that the Ca-Chit expression would be regulated by feed. All the observations made suggest that Ca-Chit plays an important role in the digestive system of the oyster, Crassostrea angulate. PMID:26046992

  8. Transcriptional Regulation of a Chitinase Gene by 20-Hydroxyecdysone and Starvation in the Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wen-Jia; Xu, Kang-Kang; Zhang, Rui-Ying; Dou, Wei; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Insect chitinases are hydrolytic enzymes that are required for the degradation of glycosidic bonds of chitin. In this study, we identified and characterized a full-length cDNA of the chitinase gene (BdCht2) in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis. The cDNA contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 1449 bp that encodes 483 amino acid residues and 126- and 296-bp non-coding regions at the 5′- and 3′-ends, respectively. The BdCht2 genome has four exons and three introns. The predicted molecular mass of the deduced BdCht2 is approximately 54.3 kDa, with an isoelectric point of 5.97. The 977 bp 5′ flanking region was identified and the transcription factor binding sites were predicted. Bioinformatic analyses showed that the deduced amino acid sequence of BdCht2 had 34%–66% identity to that of chitinases identified in other insect species. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analyses indicated that BdCht2 was mainly expressed during the larval-pupal and pupal-adult transitions. The tissue-specific expression showed that the highest expression was in the integument, followed by the fat body and other tissues. Moreover, the expression of BdCht2 was upregulated significantly upon 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) at different dose injections after 8 h compared to that of the control. Starvation also increased the expression of BdCht2 in the third-instar larvae and was suppressed again by re-feeding the insects. These results suggest that BdCht2 plays an important role in the molting process of B. dorsalis larvae and can be regulated by 20E. PMID:24113584

  9. Effects of C-terminal domain truncation on enzyme properties of Serratia marcescens chitinase C.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fu-Pang; Wu, Chun-Yi; Chen, Hung-Nien; Lin, Hui-Ju

    2015-04-01

    A chitinase gene (SmChiC) and its two C-terminal truncated mutants, SmChiCG426 and SmChiCG330 of Serratia marcescens, were constructed and cloned by employing specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques. SmChiCG426 is derived from SmChiC molecule without its C-terminal chitin-binding domain (ChBD) while SmChiCG330 is truncated from SmChiC by its C-terminal deletion of both ChBD and fibronectin type III domain (FnIII). To study the role of the C-terminal domains of SmChiC on the enzyme properties, SmChiC, SmChiCG426, and SmChiCG330 were expressed in Escherichia coli by using the pET-20b(+) expression system. The His-tag affinity-purified SmChiC, SmChiCG426, and SmChiCG330 enzymes had a calculated molecular mass of 51, 46, and 36 kDa, respectively. Certain biochemical characterizations indicated that the enzymes had similar physicochemical properties, such as the optimum pH (5), temperature (37 °C), thermostability (50 °C), and identical hydrolyzing product (chitobiose) from both the soluble and insoluble chitin substrates. The overall catalytic efficiency k cat /K M was higher for both truncated enzymes toward the insoluble α-chitin, whereas the binding abilities toward the insoluble α-chitin substrate were reduced moderately. The fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy data suggested that both mutants retained a similar folding conformation as that of the full-length SmChiC enzyme. However, a CD-monitored melting study showed that the SmChiCG330 had no obvious transition temperature, unlike the SmChiC and SmChiCG426.

  10. Aromatic residues within the substrate-binding cleft of Bacillus circulans chitinase A1 are essential for hydrolysis of crystalline chitin.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Takeshi; Ariga, Yumiko; Sato, Urara; Toratani, Tadayuki; Hashimoto, Masayuki; Nikaidou, Naoki; Kezuka, Yuichiro; Nonaka, Takamasa; Sugiyama, Junji

    2003-01-01

    Bacillus circulans chitinase A1 (ChiA1) has a deep substrate-binding cleft on top of its (beta/alpha)8-barrel catalytic domain and an interaction between the aromatic residues in this cleft and bound oligosaccharide has been suggested. To study the roles of these aromatic residues, especially in crystalline-chitin hydrolysis, site-directed mutagenesis of these residues was carried out. Y56A and W53A mutations at subsites -5 and -3, respectively, selectively decreased the hydrolysing activity against highly crystalline beta-chitin. W164A and W285A mutations at subsites +1 and +2, respectively, decreased the hydrolysing activity against crystalline beta-chitin and colloidal chitin, but enhanced the activities against soluble substrates. These mutations increased the K(m)-value when reduced (GlcNAc)5 (where GlcNAc is N -acetylglucosamine) was used as the substrate, but decreased substrate inhibition observed with wild-type ChiA1 at higher concentrations of this substrate. In contrast with the selective effect of the other mutations, mutations of W433 and Y279 at subsite -1 decreased the hydrolysing activity drastically against all substrates and reduced the kcat-value, measured with 4-methylumbelliferyl chitotrioside to 0.022% and 0.59% respectively. From these observations, it was concluded that residues Y56 and W53 are only essential for crystalline-chitin hydrolysis. W164 and W285 are very important for crystalline-chitin hydrolysis and also participate in hydrolysis of other substrates. W433 and Y279 are both essential for catalytic reaction as predicted from the structure. PMID:12930197

  11. The chitinase 3-like protein human cartilage glycoprotein 39 inhibits cellular responses to the inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Hua; Recklies, Anneliese D

    2004-01-01

    Expression of the chitinase 3-like protein HC-gp39 (human cartilage glycoprotein 39) is associated with conditions of increased matrix turnover and tissue remodelling. High levels of this protein have been found in sera and synovial fluids of patients with inflammatory and degenerative arthritis. In order to assess the role of HC-gp39 in matrix degradation induced by inflammatory cytokines, we have examined its effect on the responses of connective tissue cells to TNF-alpha (tumour necrosis factor-alpha) and IL-1 (interleukin-1) with respect to activation of signalling pathways and production of MMPs (matrix metalloproteases) and chemokines. Stimulation of human skin fibroblasts or articular chondrocytes with IL-1 or TNF-alpha in the presence of HC-gp39 resulted in a marked reduction of both p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and stress-activated protein kinase/Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation, whereas nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappaB proceeded unimpeded. HC-gp39 suppressed the cytokine-induced secretion of MMP1, MMP3 and MMP13, as well as secretion of the chemokine IL-8. The suppressive effects of HC-gp39 were dependent on phosphoinositide 3-kinase activity, and treatment of cells with HC-gp39 resulted in AKT-mediated serine/threonine phosphorylation of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1. This process could therefore be responsible for the down-regulation of cytokine signalling by HC-gp39. These results suggest a physiological role for HC-gp39 in limiting the catabolic effects of inflammatory cytokines. PMID:15015934

  12. Targeting chitinase gene of Helicoverpa armigera by host-induced RNA interference confers insect resistance in tobacco and tomato.

    PubMed

    Mamta; Reddy, K R K; Rajam, M V

    2016-02-01

    Helicoverpa armigera Hübner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) is a devastating agricultural insect pest with broad spectrum of host range, causing million dollars crop loss annually. Limitations in the present conventional and transgenic approaches have made it crucial to develop sustainable and environmental friendly methods for crop improvement. In the present study, host-induced RNA interference (HI-RNAi) approach was used to develop H. armigera resistant tobacco and tomato plants. Chitinase (HaCHI) gene, critically required for insect molting and metamorphosis was selected as a potential target. Hair-pin RNAi construct was prepared from the conserved off-target free partial HaCHI gene sequence and was used to generate several HaCHI-RNAi tobacco and tomato plants. Northern hybridization confirmed the production of HaCHI gene-specific siRNAs in HaCHI-RNAi tobacco and tomato lines. Continuous feeding on leaves of RNAi lines drastically reduced the target gene transcripts and consequently, affected the overall growth and survival of H. armigera. Various developmental deformities were also manifested in H. armigera larvae after feeding on the leaves of RNAi lines. These results demonstrated the role of chitinase in insect development and potential of HI-RNAi for effective management of H. armigera. PMID:26659592

  13. Transcriptome signatures in Helicobacter pylori-infected mucosa identifies acidic mammalian chitinase loss as a corpus atrophy marker

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The majority of gastric cancer cases are believed to be caused by chronic infection with the bacterium Helicobacter pylori, and atrophic corpus gastritis is a predisposing condition to gastric cancer development. We aimed to increase understanding of the molecular details of atrophy by performing a global transcriptome analysis of stomach tissue. Methods Biopsies from patients with different stages of H. pylori infection were taken from both the antrum and corpus mucosa and analyzed on microarrays. The stages included patients without current H. pylori infection, H. pylori-infected without corpus atrophy and patients with current or past H. pylori-infection with corpus-predominant atrophic gastritis. Results Using clustering and integrated analysis, we found firm evidence for antralization of the corpus mucosa of atrophy patients. This antralization harbored gain of gastrin expression, as well as loss of expression of corpus-related genes, such as genes associated with acid production, energy metabolism and blood clotting. The analyses provided detailed molecular evidence for simultaneous intestinal metaplasia (IM) and spasmolytic polypeptide expressing metaplasia (SPEM) in atrophic corpus tissue. Finally, acidic mammalian chitinase, a chitin-degrading enzyme produced by chief cells, was shown to be strongly down-regulated in corpus atrophy. Conclusions Transcriptome analysis revealed several gene groups which are related to development of corpus atrophy, some of which were increased also in H. pylori-infected non-atrophic patients. Furthermore, loss of acidic chitinase expression is a promising marker for corpus atrophy. PMID:24119614

  14. Discovery and identification of candidate genes from the chitinase gene family for Verticillium dahliae resistance in cotton

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun; Xu, Xiaoyang; Tian, Liangliang; Wang, Guilin; Zhang, Xueying; Wang, Xinyu; Guo, Wangzhen

    2016-01-01

    Verticillium dahliae, a destructive and soil-borne fungal pathogen, causes massive losses in cotton yields. However, the resistance mechanism to V. dahilae in cotton is still poorly understood. Accumulating evidence indicates that chitinases are crucial hydrolytic enzymes, which attack fungal pathogens by catalyzing the fungal cell wall degradation. As a large gene family, to date, the chitinase genes (Chis) have not been systematically analyzed and effectively utilized in cotton. Here, we identified 47, 49, 92, and 116 Chis from four sequenced cotton species, diploid Gossypium raimondii (D5), G. arboreum (A2), tetraploid G. hirsutum acc. TM-1 (AD1), and G. barbadense acc. 3–79 (AD2), respectively. The orthologous genes were not one-to-one correspondence in the diploid and tetraploid cotton species, implying changes in the number of Chis in different cotton species during the evolution of Gossypium. Phylogenetic classification indicated that these Chis could be classified into six groups, with distinguishable structural characteristics. The expression patterns of Chis indicated their various expressions in different organs and tissues, and in the V. dahliae response. Silencing of Chi23, Chi32, or Chi47 in cotton significantly impaired the resistance to V. dahliae, suggesting these genes might act as positive regulators in disease resistance to V. dahliae. PMID:27354165

  15. Discovery and identification of candidate genes from the chitinase gene family for Verticillium dahliae resistance in cotton.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Xu, Xiaoyang; Tian, Liangliang; Wang, Guilin; Zhang, Xueying; Wang, Xinyu; Guo, Wangzhen

    2016-06-29

    Verticillium dahliae, a destructive and soil-borne fungal pathogen, causes massive losses in cotton yields. However, the resistance mechanism to V. dahilae in cotton is still poorly understood. Accumulating evidence indicates that chitinases are crucial hydrolytic enzymes, which attack fungal pathogens by catalyzing the fungal cell wall degradation. As a large gene family, to date, the chitinase genes (Chis) have not been systematically analyzed and effectively utilized in cotton. Here, we identified 47, 49, 92, and 116 Chis from four sequenced cotton species, diploid Gossypium raimondii (D5), G. arboreum (A2), tetraploid G. hirsutum acc. TM-1 (AD1), and G. barbadense acc. 3-79 (AD2), respectively. The orthologous genes were not one-to-one correspondence in the diploid and tetraploid cotton species, implying changes in the number of Chis in different cotton species during the evolution of Gossypium. Phylogenetic classification indicated that these Chis could be classified into six groups, with distinguishable structural characteristics. The expression patterns of Chis indicated their various expressions in different organs and tissues, and in the V. dahliae response. Silencing of Chi23, Chi32, or Chi47 in cotton significantly impaired the resistance to V. dahliae, suggesting these genes might act as positive regulators in disease resistance to V. dahliae.

  16. SnTox1, a Parastagonospora nodorum necrotrophic effector, is a dual-function protein that facilitates infection while protecting from wheat-produced chitinases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhaohui; Gao, Yuanyuan; Kim, Yong Min; Faris, Justin D; Shelver, Weilin L; de Wit, Pierre J G M; Xu, Steven S; Friesen, Timothy L

    2016-08-01

    SnTox1 induces programmed cell death and the up-regulation of pathogenesis-related genes including chitinases. Additionally, SnTox1 has structural homology to several plant chitin-binding proteins. Therefore, we evaluated SnTox1 for chitin binding and localization. We transformed an avirulent strain of Parastagonospora nodorum as well as three nonpathogens of wheat (Triticum aestivum), including a necrotrophic pathogen of barley, a hemibiotrophic pathogen of sugar beet and a saprotroph, to evaluate the role of SnTox1 in infection and in protection from wheat chitinases. SnTox1 bound chitin and an SnTox1-green fluorescent fusion protein localized to the mycelial cell wall. Purified SnTox1 induced necrosis in the absence of the pathogen when sprayed on the leaf surface and appeared to remain on the leaf surface while inducing both epidermal and mesophyll cell death. SnTox1 protected the different fungi from chitinase degradation. SnTox1 was sufficient to change the host range of a necrotrophic pathogen but not a hemibiotroph or saprotroph. Collectively, this work shows that SnTox1 probably interacts with a receptor on the outside of the cell to induce cell death to acquire nutrients, but SnTox1 accomplishes a second role in that it protects against one aspect of the defense response, namely the effects of wheat chitinases. PMID:27041151

  17. SnTox1, a Parastagonospora nodorum necrotrophic effector, is a dual-function protein that facilitates infection while protecting from wheat-produced chitinases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhaohui; Gao, Yuanyuan; Kim, Yong Min; Faris, Justin D; Shelver, Weilin L; de Wit, Pierre J G M; Xu, Steven S; Friesen, Timothy L

    2016-08-01

    SnTox1 induces programmed cell death and the up-regulation of pathogenesis-related genes including chitinases. Additionally, SnTox1 has structural homology to several plant chitin-binding proteins. Therefore, we evaluated SnTox1 for chitin binding and localization. We transformed an avirulent strain of Parastagonospora nodorum as well as three nonpathogens of wheat (Triticum aestivum), including a necrotrophic pathogen of barley, a hemibiotrophic pathogen of sugar beet and a saprotroph, to evaluate the role of SnTox1 in infection and in protection from wheat chitinases. SnTox1 bound chitin and an SnTox1-green fluorescent fusion protein localized to the mycelial cell wall. Purified SnTox1 induced necrosis in the absence of the pathogen when sprayed on the leaf surface and appeared to remain on the leaf surface while inducing both epidermal and mesophyll cell death. SnTox1 protected the different fungi from chitinase degradation. SnTox1 was sufficient to change the host range of a necrotrophic pathogen but not a hemibiotroph or saprotroph. Collectively, this work shows that SnTox1 probably interacts with a receptor on the outside of the cell to induce cell death to acquire nutrients, but SnTox1 accomplishes a second role in that it protects against one aspect of the defense response, namely the effects of wheat chitinases.

  18. Glucanases and Chitinases as Causal Agents in the Protection of Acacia Extrafloral Nectar from Infestation by Phytopathogens1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    González-Teuber, Marcia; Pozo, María J.; Muck, Alexander; Svatos, Ales; Adame-Álvarez, Rosa M.; Heil, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Nectars are rich in primary metabolites and attract mutualistic animals, which serve as pollinators or as an indirect defense against herbivores. Their chemical composition makes nectars prone to microbial infestation. As protective strategy, floral nectar of ornamental tobacco (Nicotiana langsdorffii × Nicotiana sanderae) contains “nectarins,” proteins producing reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide. By contrast, pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins were detected in Acacia extrafloral nectar (EFN), which is secreted in the context of defensive ant-plant mutualisms. We investigated whether these PR proteins protect EFN from phytopathogens. Five sympatric species (Acacia cornigera, A. hindsii, A. collinsii, A. farnesiana, and Prosopis juliflora) were compared that differ in their ant-plant mutualism. EFN of myrmecophytes, which are obligate ant-plants that secrete EFN constitutively to nourish specialized ant inhabitants, significantly inhibited the growth of four out of six tested phytopathogenic microorganisms. By contrast, EFN of nonmyrmecophytes, which is secreted only transiently in response to herbivory, did not exhibit a detectable inhibitory activity. Combining two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with nanoflow liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis confirmed that PR proteins represented over 90% of all proteins in myrmecophyte EFN. The inhibition of microbial growth was exerted by the protein fraction, but not the small metabolites of this EFN, and disappeared when nectar was heated. In-gel assays demonstrated the activity of acidic and basic chitinases in all EFNs, whereas glucanases were detected only in EFN of myrmecophytes. Our results demonstrate that PR proteins causally underlie the protection of Acacia EFN from microorganisms and that acidic and basic glucanases likely represent the most important prerequisite in this defensive function. PMID:20023149

  19. Alternative splicing of basic chitinase gene PR3b in the low-nicotine mutants of Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Burley 21

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Haoran; Wang, Feng; Wang, Wenjing; Yin, Guoying; Zhang, Dingyu; Ding, Yongqiang; Timko, Michael P.; Zhang, Hongbo

    2016-01-01

    Two unlinked semi-dominant loci, A (NIC1) and B (NIC2), control nicotine and related alkaloid biosynthesis in Burley tobaccos. Mutations in either or both loci (nic1 and nic2) lead to low nicotine phenotypes with altered environmental stress responses. Here we show that the transcripts derived from the pathogenesis-related (PR) protein gene PR3b are alternatively spliced to a greater extent in the nic1 and nic2 mutants of Burley 21 tobacco and the nic1nic2 double mutant. The alternative splicing results in a deletion of 65 nucleotides and introduces a premature stop codon into the coding region of PR3b that leads to a significant reduction of PR3b specific chitinase activity. Assays of PR3b splicing in F2 individuals derived from crosses between nic1 and nic2 mutants and wild-type plants showed that the splicing phenotype is controlled by the NIC1 and NIC2 loci, even though NIC1 and NIC2 are unlinked loci. Moreover, the transcriptional analyses showed that the splicing patterns of PR3b in the low-nicotine mutants were differentially regulated by jasmonate (JA) and ethylene (ET). These data suggest that the NIC1 and NIC2 loci display differential roles in regulating the alternative splicing of PR3b in Burley 21. The findings in this study have provided valuable information for extending our understanding of the broader effects of the low-nicotine mutants of Burley 21 and the mechanism by which JA and ET signalling pathways post-transcriptionally regulate the activity of PR3b protein. PMID:27664270

  20. A computational analysis of the binding mode of closantel as inhibitor of the Onchocerca volvulus chitinase: insights on macrofilaricidal drug design.

    PubMed

    Segura-Cabrera, Aldo; Bocanegra-García, Virgilio; Lizarazo-Ortega, Cristian; Guo, Xianwu; Correa-Basurto, José; Rodríguez-Pérez, Mario A

    2011-12-01

    Onchocerciasis is a leading cause of blindness with at least 37 million people infected and more than 120 million people at risk of contracting the disease; most (99%) of this population, threatened by infection, live in Africa. The drug of choice for mass treatment is the microfilaricidal Mectizan(®) (ivermectin); it does not kill the adult stages of the parasite at the standard dose which is a single annual dose aimed at disease control. However, multiple treatments a year with ivermectin have effects on adult worms. The discovery of new therapeutic targets and drugs directed towards the killing of the adult parasites are thus urgently needed. The chitinase of filarial nematodes is a new drug target due to its essential function in the metabolism and molting of the parasite. Closantel is a potent and specific inhibitor of chitinase of Onchocerca volvulus (OvCHT1) and other filarial chitinases. However, the binding mode and specificity of closantel towards OvCHT1 remain unknown. In the absence of a crystallographic structure of OvCHT1, we developed a homology model of OvCHT1 using the currently available X-ray structures of human chitinases as templates. Energy minimization and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the model led to a high quality of 3D structure of OvCHIT1. A flexible docking study using closantel as the ligand on the binding site of OvCHIT1 and human chitinases was performed and demonstrated the differences in the closantel binding mode between OvCHIT1 and human chitinase. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations and free-energy calculation were employed to determine and compare the detailed binding mode of closantel with OvCHT1 and the structure of human chitinase. This comparative study allowed identification of structural features and properties responsible for differences in the computationally predicted closantel binding modes. The homology model and the closantel binding mode reported herein might help guide the rational development of

  1. Changes in host chitinase isoforms in relation to wounding and colonization by Heterobasidion annosum: early and strong defense response in 33-year-old resistant Norway spruce clone.

    PubMed

    Fossdal, Carl Gunnar; Hietala, Ari M; Kvaalen, Harald; Solheim, Halvor

    2006-02-01

    We studied the defense reactions of 33-year-old susceptible and resistant clones of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) to the major root-rot fungus Heterobasidion annosum (Fr.) Bref. and determined if tissue cultures can be used as a model system for studying defense responses of mature trees at the molecular level. Quantitative PCR analysis of genomic DNA obtained from samples taken at different times along the lesion length in living bark indicated that the fungus was present in higher amounts and extended further into the host tissue in the susceptible clone than in the resistant clone. In protein extracts from the same lesion samples, there were differences in temporal and spatial changes in host chitinase isoform profiles between the resistant and susceptible clones. Host chitinase isoforms with pI values approximately 4.8, 4.4 and 3.7 increased more during the first 7 days after wounding and inoculation and extended further along the lesion length in the resistant clone than in the susceptible clone. These results suggest that the time from wounding and infection to induction of defense-related expression is shorter in the resistant clone indicating a more efficient host defense response than in the susceptible clone. Tissue cultures from the same clones were not resistant to H. annosum and showed no difference in the timing of the increase in chitinase isoforms in response to the pathogen. However, tissue cultures from both clones showed an increase in chitinase isoforms within 6 to 24 h past inoculation, indicating that increased chitinase expression in response to the pathogen is part of a general defense response common to both mature clones and tissue cultures.

  2. Slow Off-rates and Strong Product Binding Are Required for Processivity and Efficient Degradation of Recalcitrant Chitin by Family 18 Chitinases.

    PubMed

    Kurašin, Mihhail; Kuusk, Silja; Kuusk, Piret; Sørlie, Morten; Väljamäe, Priit

    2015-11-27

    Processive glycoside hydrolases are the key components of enzymatic machineries that decompose recalcitrant polysaccharides, such as chitin and cellulose. The intrinsic processivity (P(Intr)) of cellulases has been shown to be governed by the rate constant of dissociation from polymer chain (koff). However, the reported koff values of cellulases are strongly dependent on the method used for their measurement. Here, we developed a new method for determining koff, based on measuring the exchange rate of the enzyme between a non-labeled and a (14)C-labeled polymeric substrate. The method was applied to the study of the processive chitinase ChiA from Serratia marcescens. In parallel, ChiA variants with weaker binding of the N-acetylglucosamine unit either in substrate-binding site -3 (ChiA-W167A) or the product-binding site +1 (ChiA-W275A) were studied. Both ChiA variants showed increased off-rates and lower apparent processivity on α-chitin. The rate of the production of insoluble reducing groups on the reduced α-chitin was an order of magnitude higher than koff, suggesting that the enzyme can initiate several processive runs without leaving the substrate. On crystalline chitin, the general activity of the wild type enzyme was higher, and the difference was magnifying with hydrolysis time. On amorphous chitin, the variants clearly outperformed the wild type. A model is proposed whereby strong interactions with polymer in the substrate-binding sites (low off-rates) and strong binding of the product in the product-binding sites (high pushing potential) are required for the removal of obstacles, like disintegration of chitin microfibrils.

  3. Slow Off-rates and Strong Product Binding Are Required for Processivity and Efficient Degradation of Recalcitrant Chitin by Family 18 Chitinases.

    PubMed

    Kurašin, Mihhail; Kuusk, Silja; Kuusk, Piret; Sørlie, Morten; Väljamäe, Priit

    2015-11-27

    Processive glycoside hydrolases are the key components of enzymatic machineries that decompose recalcitrant polysaccharides, such as chitin and cellulose. The intrinsic processivity (P(Intr)) of cellulases has been shown to be governed by the rate constant of dissociation from polymer chain (koff). However, the reported koff values of cellulases are strongly dependent on the method used for their measurement. Here, we developed a new method for determining koff, based on measuring the exchange rate of the enzyme between a non-labeled and a (14)C-labeled polymeric substrate. The method was applied to the study of the processive chitinase ChiA from Serratia marcescens. In parallel, ChiA variants with weaker binding of the N-acetylglucosamine unit either in substrate-binding site -3 (ChiA-W167A) or the product-binding site +1 (ChiA-W275A) were studied. Both ChiA variants showed increased off-rates and lower apparent processivity on α-chitin. The rate of the production of insoluble reducing groups on the reduced α-chitin was an order of magnitude higher than koff, suggesting that the enzyme can initiate several processive runs without leaving the substrate. On crystalline chitin, the general activity of the wild type enzyme was higher, and the difference was magnifying with hydrolysis time. On amorphous chitin, the variants clearly outperformed the wild type. A model is proposed whereby strong interactions with polymer in the substrate-binding sites (low off-rates) and strong binding of the product in the product-binding sites (high pushing potential) are required for the removal of obstacles, like disintegration of chitin microfibrils. PMID:26468285

  4. Sequence/structural analysis of xylem proteome emphasizes pathogenesis-related proteins, chitinases and β-1, 3-glucanases as key players in grapevine defense against Xylella fastidiosa

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Sandeep; Nascimento, Rafael; Zaini, Paulo A.; Gouran, Hossein; Rao, Basuthkar J.; Goulart, Luiz R.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Xylella fastidiosa, the causative agent of various plant diseases including Pierce’s disease in the US, and Citrus Variegated Chlorosis in Brazil, remains a continual source of concern and economic losses, especially since almost all commercial varieties are sensitive to this Gammaproteobacteria. Differential expression of proteins in infected tissue is an established methodology to identify key elements involved in plant defense pathways. Methods. In the current work, we developed a methodology named CHURNER that emphasizes relevant protein functions from proteomic data, based on identification of proteins with similar structures that do not necessarily have sequence homology. Such clustering emphasizes protein functions which have multiple copies that are up/down-regulated, and highlights similar proteins which are differentially regulated. As a working example we present proteomic data enumerating differentially expressed proteins in xylem sap from grapevines that were infected with X. fastidiosa. Results. Analysis of this data by CHURNER highlighted pathogenesis related PR-1 proteins, reinforcing this as the foremost protein function in xylem sap involved in the grapevine defense response to X. fastidiosa. β-1, 3-glucanase, which has both anti-microbial and anti-fungal activities, is also up-regulated. Simultaneously, chitinases are found to be both up and down-regulated by CHURNER, and thus the net gain of this protein function loses its significance in the defense response. Discussion. We demonstrate how structural data can be incorporated in the pipeline of proteomic data analysis prior to making inferences on the importance of individual proteins to plant defense mechanisms. We expect CHURNER to be applicable to any proteomic data set. PMID:27257535

  5. Sequence/structural analysis of xylem proteome emphasizes pathogenesis-related proteins, chitinases and β-1, 3-glucanases as key players in grapevine defense against Xylella fastidiosa.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sandeep; Nascimento, Rafael; Zaini, Paulo A; Gouran, Hossein; Rao, Basuthkar J; Goulart, Luiz R; Dandekar, Abhaya M

    2016-01-01

    Background. Xylella fastidiosa, the causative agent of various plant diseases including Pierce's disease in the US, and Citrus Variegated Chlorosis in Brazil, remains a continual source of concern and economic losses, especially since almost all commercial varieties are sensitive to this Gammaproteobacteria. Differential expression of proteins in infected tissue is an established methodology to identify key elements involved in plant defense pathways. Methods. In the current work, we developed a methodology named CHURNER that emphasizes relevant protein functions from proteomic data, based on identification of proteins with similar structures that do not necessarily have sequence homology. Such clustering emphasizes protein functions which have multiple copies that are up/down-regulated, and highlights similar proteins which are differentially regulated. As a working example we present proteomic data enumerating differentially expressed proteins in xylem sap from grapevines that were infected with X. fastidiosa. Results. Analysis of this data by CHURNER highlighted pathogenesis related PR-1 proteins, reinforcing this as the foremost protein function in xylem sap involved in the grapevine defense response to X. fastidiosa. β-1, 3-glucanase, which has both anti-microbial and anti-fungal activities, is also up-regulated. Simultaneously, chitinases are found to be both up and down-regulated by CHURNER, and thus the net gain of this protein function loses its significance in the defense response. Discussion. We demonstrate how structural data can be incorporated in the pipeline of proteomic data analysis prior to making inferences on the importance of individual proteins to plant defense mechanisms. We expect CHURNER to be applicable to any proteomic data set.

  6. Sequence/structural analysis of xylem proteome emphasizes pathogenesis-related proteins, chitinases and β-1, 3-glucanases as key players in grapevine defense against Xylella fastidiosa.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sandeep; Nascimento, Rafael; Zaini, Paulo A; Gouran, Hossein; Rao, Basuthkar J; Goulart, Luiz R; Dandekar, Abhaya M

    2016-01-01

    Background. Xylella fastidiosa, the causative agent of various plant diseases including Pierce's disease in the US, and Citrus Variegated Chlorosis in Brazil, remains a continual source of concern and economic losses, especially since almost all commercial varieties are sensitive to this Gammaproteobacteria. Differential expression of proteins in infected tissue is an established methodology to identify key elements involved in plant defense pathways. Methods. In the current work, we developed a methodology named CHURNER that emphasizes relevant protein functions from proteomic data, based on identification of proteins with similar structures that do not necessarily have sequence homology. Such clustering emphasizes protein functions which have multiple copies that are up/down-regulated, and highlights similar proteins which are differentially regulated. As a working example we present proteomic data enumerating differentially expressed proteins in xylem sap from grapevines that were infected with X. fastidiosa. Results. Analysis of this data by CHURNER highlighted pathogenesis related PR-1 proteins, reinforcing this as the foremost protein function in xylem sap involved in the grapevine defense response to X. fastidiosa. β-1, 3-glucanase, which has both anti-microbial and anti-fungal activities, is also up-regulated. Simultaneously, chitinases are found to be both up and down-regulated by CHURNER, and thus the net gain of this protein function loses its significance in the defense response. Discussion. We demonstrate how structural data can be incorporated in the pipeline of proteomic data analysis prior to making inferences on the importance of individual proteins to plant defense mechanisms. We expect CHURNER to be applicable to any proteomic data set. PMID:27257535

  7. The Vibrio cholerae Extracellular Chitinase ChiA2 Is Important for Survival and Pathogenesis in the Host Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Moumita; Nag, Dhrubajyoti; Koley, Hemanta; Saha, Dhira Rani; Chatterjee, Nabendu Sekhar

    2014-01-01

    In aquatic environments, Vibrio cholerae colonizes mainly on the chitinous surface of copepods and utilizes chitin as the sole carbon and nitrogen source. Of the two extracellular chitinases essential for chitin utilization, the expression of chiA2 is maximally up-regulated in host intestine. Recent studies indicate that several bacterial chitinases may be involved in host pathogenesis. However, the role of V. cholerae chitinases in host infection is not yet known. In this study, we provide evidence to show that ChiA2 is important for V. cholerae survival in intestine as well as in pathogenesis. We demonstrate that ChiA2 de-glycosylates mucin and releases reducing sugars like GlcNAc and its oligomers. Deglycosylation of mucin corroborated with reduced uptake of alcian blue stain by ChiA2 treated mucin. Next, we show that V. cholerae could utilize mucin as a nutrient source. In comparison to the wild type strain, ΔchiA2 mutant was 60-fold less efficient in growth in mucin supplemented minimal media and was also ∼6-fold less competent to survive when grown in the presence of mucin-secreting human intestinal HT29 epithelial cells. Similar results were also obtained when the strains were infected in mice intestine. Infection with the ΔchiA2 mutant caused ∼50-fold less fluid accumulation in infant mice as well as in rabbit ileal loop compared to the wild type strain. To see if the difference in survival of the ΔchiA2 mutant and wild type V. cholerae was due to reduced adhesion of the mutant, we monitored binding of the strains on HT29 cells. The initial binding of the wild type and mutant strain was similar. Collectively these data suggest that ChiA2 secreted by V. cholerae in the intestine hydrolyzed intestinal mucin to release GlcNAc, and the released sugar is successfully utilized by V. cholerae for growth and survival in the host intestine. PMID:25244128

  8. The Vibrio cholerae extracellular chitinase ChiA2 is important for survival and pathogenesis in the host intestine.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Moumita; Nag, Dhrubajyoti; Koley, Hemanta; Saha, Dhira Rani; Chatterjee, Nabendu Sekhar

    2014-01-01

    In aquatic environments, Vibrio cholerae colonizes mainly on the chitinous surface of copepods and utilizes chitin as the sole carbon and nitrogen source. Of the two extracellular chitinases essential for chitin utilization, the expression of chiA2 is maximally up-regulated in host intestine. Recent studies indicate that several bacterial chitinases may be involved in host pathogenesis. However, the role of V. cholerae chitinases in host infection is not yet known. In this study, we provide evidence to show that ChiA2 is important for V. cholerae survival in intestine as well as in pathogenesis. We demonstrate that ChiA2 de-glycosylates mucin and releases reducing sugars like GlcNAc and its oligomers. Deglycosylation of mucin corroborated with reduced uptake of alcian blue stain by ChiA2 treated mucin. Next, we show that V. cholerae could utilize mucin as a nutrient source. In comparison to the wild type strain, ΔchiA2 mutant was 60-fold less efficient in growth in mucin supplemented minimal media and was also ∼6-fold less competent to survive when grown in the presence of mucin-secreting human intestinal HT29 epithelial cells. Similar results were also obtained when the strains were infected in mice intestine. Infection with the ΔchiA2 mutant caused ∼50-fold less fluid accumulation in infant mice as well as in rabbit ileal loop compared to the wild type strain. To see if the difference in survival of the ΔchiA2 mutant and wild type V. cholerae was due to reduced adhesion of the mutant, we monitored binding of the strains on HT29 cells. The initial binding of the wild type and mutant strain was similar. Collectively these data suggest that ChiA2 secreted by V. cholerae in the intestine hydrolyzed intestinal mucin to release GlcNAc, and the released sugar is successfully utilized by V. cholerae for growth and survival in the host intestine.

  9. Directional degradation of beta-chitin by chitinase A1 revealed by a novel reducing end labelling technique.

    PubMed

    Imai, Tomoya; Watanabe, Takeshi; Yui, Toshifumi; Sugiyama, Junji

    2002-01-16

    A novel procedure for labelling the molecular ends of beta-chitin crystals has been established. By introducing a hydrazide derivative of biotin at the reducing end of a chitin chain, followed by a specific interaction between biotin and streptavidin coupled with a colloidal gold particle, the chain directionality of beta-chitin microcrystals could be directly visualized by transmission electron microscopy. This method allowed to certify the parallelism of the chitin chains in the beta-chitin microcrystals, and also to label the reducing tips of beta-chitin microcrystals degraded by Bacillus circulans chitinase A1. With these substrates, the labelling occurred only at their tapered tip, which indicates that the digestion of these crystals proceeded from their reducing end. The generalization of this new labelling method to other polysaccharide crystals is discussed.

  10. Allozyme-specific modification of a maize seed chitinase by a protein secreted by the fungal pathogen Stenocarpella maydis.

    PubMed

    Naumann, Todd A; Wicklow, Donald T

    2010-07-01

    Stenocarpella maydis causes both dry-ear rot and stalk rot of maize. Maize inbred lines have varying levels of resistance to ear rot caused by S. maydis. The genetic basis of resistance appears to rely on multiple genetic factors, none of which are known. The commonly used stiff-stalk inbred line B73 has been shown to be strongly susceptible to ear rot caused by S. maydis. Here, we report that the ChitA protein alloform from B73, ChitA-F, encoded by a known allele of the chiA gene, is susceptible to modification by a protein (Stm-cmp) secreted by S. maydis. We also identify a new allele of chiA (from inbred line LH82) which encodes ChitA-S, an alloform of ChitA that is resistant to Stm-cmp modification. Chitinase zymogram analysis of seed from a commercial field showed the presence of both ChitA alloforms in healthy ears, and showed that ChitA-F but not ChitA-S was modified in ears rotted by S. maydis. The ChitA-F protein was purified from inbred line B73 and ChitA-S from LH82. ChitA-F was modified more efficiently than ChitA-S by S. maydis protein extracts in vitro. The chiA gene from LH82 was cloned and sequenced. It is a novel allele that encodes six polymorphisms relative to the known allele from B73. This is the first demonstration that the susceptibility to modification of a fungal targeted plant chitinase differs among inbred lines. These findings suggest that the LH82 chiA allele may be a specific genetic determinant that contributes to resistance to ear rot caused by S. maydis whereas the B73 allele may contribute to susceptibility.

  11. Chitinase 3–like–1 and its receptors in Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome–associated lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yang; He, Chuan Hua; Herzog, Erica L.; Peng, Xueyan; Lee, Chang-Min; Nguyen, Tung H.; Gulati, Mridu; Gochuico, Bernadette R.; Gahl, William A.; Slade, Martin L.; Lee, Chun Geun; Elias, Jack A.

    2015-01-01

    Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) comprises a group of inherited disorders caused by mutations that alter the function of lysosome-related organelles. Pulmonary fibrosis is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with subtypes HPS-1 and HPS-4, which both result from defects in biogenesis of lysosome-related organelle complex 3 (BLOC-3). The prototypic chitinase-like protein chitinase 3–like–1 (CHI3L1) plays a protective role in the lung by ameliorating cell death and stimulating fibroproliferative repair. Here, we demonstrated that circulating CHI3L1 levels are higher in HPS patients with pulmonary fibrosis compared with those who remain fibrosis free, and that these levels associate with disease severity. Using murine HPS models, we also determined that these animals have a defect in the ability of CHI3L1 to inhibit epithelial apoptosis but exhibit exaggerated CHI3L1-driven fibroproliferation, which together promote HPS fibrosis. These divergent responses resulted from differences in the trafficking and effector functions of two CHI3L1 receptors. Specifically, the enhanced sensitivity to apoptosis was due to abnormal localization of IL-13Rα2 as a consequence of dysfunctional BLOC-3–dependent membrane trafficking. In contrast, the fibrosis was due to interactions between CHI3L1 and the receptor CRTH2, which trafficked normally in BLOC-3 mutant HPS. These data demonstrate that CHI3L1-dependent pathways exacerbate pulmonary fibrosis and suggest CHI3L1 as a potential biomarker for pulmonary fibrosis progression and severity in HPS. PMID:26121745

  12. Feces Derived Allergens of Tyrophagus putrescentiae Reared on Dried Dog Food and Evidence of the Strong Nutritional Interaction between the Mite and Bacillus cereus Producing Protease Bacillolysins and Exo-chitinases.

    PubMed

    Erban, Tomas; Rybanska, Dagmar; Harant, Karel; Hortova, Bronislava; Hubert, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Schrank, 1781) is an emerging source of allergens in stored products and homes. Feces proteases are the major allergens of astigmatid mites (Acari: Acaridida). In addition, the mites are carriers of microorganisms and microbial adjuvant compounds that stimulate innate signaling pathways. We sought to analyze the mite feces proteome, proteolytic activities, and mite-bacterial interaction in dry dog food (DDF). Proteomic methods comprising enzymatic and zymographic analysis of proteases and 2D-E-MS/MS were performed. The highest protease activity was assigned to trypsin-like proteases; lower activity was assigned to chymotrypsin-like proteases, and the cysteine protease cathepsin B-like had very low activity. The 2D-E-MS/MS proteomic analysis identified mite trypsin allergen Tyr p3, fatty acid-binding protein Tyr p13 and putative mite allergens ferritin (Grp 30) and (poly)ubiquitins. Tyr p3 was detected at different positions of the 2D-E. It indicates presence of zymogen at basic pI, and mature-enzyme form and enzyme fragment at acidic pI. Bacillolysins (neutral and alkaline proteases) of Bacillus cereus symbiont can contribute to the protease activity of the mite extract. The bacterial exo-chitinases likely contribute to degradation of mite exuviae, mite bodies or food boluses consisting of chitin, including the peritrophic membrane. Thus, the chitinases disrupt the feces and facilitate release of the allergens. B. cereus was isolated and identified based on amplification and sequencing of 16S rRNA and motB genes. B. cereus was added into high-fat, high-protein (DDF) and low-fat, low-protein (flour) diets to 1 and 5% (w/w), and the diets palatability was evaluated in 21-day population growth test. The supplementation of diet with B. cereus significantly suppressed population growth and the suppressive effect was higher in the high-fat, high-protein diet than in the low-fat, low-protein food. Thus, B. cereus has to coexist with the mite in

  13. Feces Derived Allergens of Tyrophagus putrescentiae Reared on Dried Dog Food and Evidence of the Strong Nutritional Interaction between the Mite and Bacillus cereus Producing Protease Bacillolysins and Exo-chitinases.

    PubMed

    Erban, Tomas; Rybanska, Dagmar; Harant, Karel; Hortova, Bronislava; Hubert, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Schrank, 1781) is an emerging source of allergens in stored products and homes. Feces proteases are the major allergens of astigmatid mites (Acari: Acaridida). In addition, the mites are carriers of microorganisms and microbial adjuvant compounds that stimulate innate signaling pathways. We sought to analyze the mite feces proteome, proteolytic activities, and mite-bacterial interaction in dry dog food (DDF). Proteomic methods comprising enzymatic and zymographic analysis of proteases and 2D-E-MS/MS were performed. The highest protease activity was assigned to trypsin-like proteases; lower activity was assigned to chymotrypsin-like proteases, and the cysteine protease cathepsin B-like had very low activity. The 2D-E-MS/MS proteomic analysis identified mite trypsin allergen Tyr p3, fatty acid-binding protein Tyr p13 and putative mite allergens ferritin (Grp 30) and (poly)ubiquitins. Tyr p3 was detected at different positions of the 2D-E. It indicates presence of zymogen at basic pI, and mature-enzyme form and enzyme fragment at acidic pI. Bacillolysins (neutral and alkaline proteases) of Bacillus cereus symbiont can contribute to the protease activity of the mite extract. The bacterial exo-chitinases likely contribute to degradation of mite exuviae, mite bodies or food boluses consisting of chitin, including the peritrophic membrane. Thus, the chitinases disrupt the feces and facilitate release of the allergens. B. cereus was isolated and identified based on amplification and sequencing of 16S rRNA and motB genes. B. cereus was added into high-fat, high-protein (DDF) and low-fat, low-protein (flour) diets to 1 and 5% (w/w), and the diets palatability was evaluated in 21-day population growth test. The supplementation of diet with B. cereus significantly suppressed population growth and the suppressive effect was higher in the high-fat, high-protein diet than in the low-fat, low-protein food. Thus, B. cereus has to coexist with the mite in

  14. Feces Derived Allergens of Tyrophagus putrescentiae Reared on Dried Dog Food and Evidence of the Strong Nutritional Interaction between the Mite and Bacillus cereus Producing Protease Bacillolysins and Exo-chitinases

    PubMed Central

    Erban, Tomas; Rybanska, Dagmar; Harant, Karel; Hortova, Bronislava; Hubert, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Schrank, 1781) is an emerging source of allergens in stored products and homes. Feces proteases are the major allergens of astigmatid mites (Acari: Acaridida). In addition, the mites are carriers of microorganisms and microbial adjuvant compounds that stimulate innate signaling pathways. We sought to analyze the mite feces proteome, proteolytic activities, and mite-bacterial interaction in dry dog food (DDF). Proteomic methods comprising enzymatic and zymographic analysis of proteases and 2D-E-MS/MS were performed. The highest protease activity was assigned to trypsin-like proteases; lower activity was assigned to chymotrypsin-like proteases, and the cysteine protease cathepsin B-like had very low activity. The 2D-E-MS/MS proteomic analysis identified mite trypsin allergen Tyr p3, fatty acid-binding protein Tyr p13 and putative mite allergens ferritin (Grp 30) and (poly)ubiquitins. Tyr p3 was detected at different positions of the 2D-E. It indicates presence of zymogen at basic pI, and mature-enzyme form and enzyme fragment at acidic pI. Bacillolysins (neutral and alkaline proteases) of Bacillus cereus symbiont can contribute to the protease activity of the mite extract. The bacterial exo-chitinases likely contribute to degradation of mite exuviae, mite bodies or food boluses consisting of chitin, including the peritrophic membrane. Thus, the chitinases disrupt the feces and facilitate release of the allergens. B. cereus was isolated and identified based on amplification and sequencing of 16S rRNA and motB genes. B. cereus was added into high-fat, high-protein (DDF) and low-fat, low-protein (flour) diets to 1 and 5% (w/w), and the diets palatability was evaluated in 21-day population growth test. The supplementation of diet with B. cereus significantly suppressed population growth and the suppressive effect was higher in the high-fat, high-protein diet than in the low-fat, low-protein food. Thus, B. cereus has to coexist with the mite in

  15. Penicillium ochrochloron MTCC 517 chitinase: An effective tool in commercial enzyme cocktail for production and regeneration of protoplasts from various fungi.

    PubMed

    Patil, Nilambari S; Jadhav, Jyoti P

    2015-03-01

    Penicillium ochrochloron MTCC 517 is a potent producer of chitinolytic enzymes. Novozyme 234, traditional enzyme cocktail for protoplast generation is not available in the market. So, new enzyme cocktail is prepared for protoplast formation from various filamentous fungi which consists of 5 mg ml(-1) lysing enzymes from Trichoderma harzianum, 0.06 mg ml(-1) β-glucuronidase from Helix pomatia and 1 mg ml(-1) P. ochrochloron chitinase. The greatest number of protoplasts could be produced from most of the fungi in 0.8 M sorbitol and by incubation for about 2 h at 37 °C, but the number was decreased by incubation for more than 3 h. About twice as many protoplasts were produced from different species of fungi by involvement of P. ochrochloron chitinase than with combined commercial enzymes. PMID:25737658

  16. The Role of CHI3L1 (Chitinase-3-Like-1) in the Pathogenesis of Infections in Burns in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Bohr, Stefan; Patel, Suraj J; Vasko, Radovan; Shen, Keyue; Golberg, Alexander; Berthiaume, Francois; Yarmush, Martin L

    2015-01-01

    In severe burn injury the unique setting of a depleted, dysfunctional immune system along with a loss of barrier function commonly results in opportunistic infections that eventually proof fatal. Unfortunately, the dynamic sequence of bacterial contamination, colonization and eventually septic invasion with bacteria such as Pseudomonas species is still poorly understood although a limiting factor in clinical decision making. Increasing evidence supports the notion that inhibition of bacterial translocation into the wound site may be an effective alternative to prevent infection. In this context we investigated the role of the mammalian Chitinase-3-Like-1 (CHI3L1) non-enyzmatic protein predominately expressed on epithelial as well as innate immune cells as a potential bacterial-translocation-mediating factor. We show a strong trend that a modulation of chitinase expression is likely to be effective in reducing mortality rates in a mouse model of burn injury with superinfection with the opportunistic PA14 Pseudomonas strain, thus demonstrating possible clinical leverage.

  17. Cloning, Sequences, and Characterization of Two Chitinase Genes from the Antarctic Arthrobacter sp. Strain TAD20: Isolation and Partial Characterization of the Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Lonhienne, Thierry; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Vorgias, Constantin E.; Buchon, Laurent; Gerday, Charles; Bouriotis, Vassilis

    2001-01-01

    Arthrobacter sp. strain TAD20, a chitinolytic gram-positive organism, was isolated from the sea bottom along the Antarctic ice shell. Arthrobacter sp. strain TAD20 secretes two major chitinases, ChiA and ChiB (ArChiA and ArChiB), in response to chitin induction. A single chromosomal DNA fragment containing the genes coding for both chitinases was cloned in Escherichia coli. DNA sequencing analysis of this fragment revealed two contiguous open reading frames coding for the precursors of ArChiA (881 amino acids [aa]) and ArChiB (578 aa). ArChiA and ArChiB are modular enzymes consisting of a glycosyl-hydrolase family 18 catalytic domain as well as two and one chitin-binding domains, respectively. The catalytic domain of ArChiA exhibits 55% identity with a chitodextrinase from Vibrio furnissii. The ArChiB catalytic domain exhibits 33% identity with chitinase A of Bacillus circulans. The ArChiA chitin-binding domains are homologous to the chitin-binding domain of ArChiB. ArChiA and ArChiB were purified to homogeneity from the native Arthrobacter strain and partially characterized. Thermal unfolding of ArChiA, ArChiB, and chitinase A of Serratia marcescens was studied using differential scanning calorimetry. ArChiA and ArChiB, compared to their mesophilic counterpart, exhibited increased heat lability, similar to other cold-adapted enzymes. PMID:11160110

  18. Turnabout Is Fair Play: Herbivory-Induced Plant Chitinases Excreted in Fall Armyworm Frass Suppress Herbivore Defenses in Maize1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Patrick C.M.S.; Gaffoor, Iffa; Acevedo, Flor E.; Peiffer, Michelle; Jin, Shan; Han, Yang; Shakeel, Samina; Felton, Gary W.

    2016-01-01

    The perception of herbivory by plants is known to be triggered by the deposition of insect-derived factors such as saliva and oral secretions, oviposition materials, and even feces. Such insect-derived materials harbor chemical cues that may elicit herbivore and/or pathogen-induced defenses in plants. Several insect-derived molecules that trigger herbivore-induced defenses in plants are known; however, insect-derived molecules suppressing them are largely unknown. In this study, we identified two plant chitinases from fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) larval frass that suppress herbivore defenses while simultaneously inducing pathogen defenses in maize (Zea mays). Fall armyworm larvae feed in enclosed whorls of maize plants, where frass accumulates over extended periods of time in close proximity to damaged leaf tissue. Our study shows that maize chitinases, Pr4 and Endochitinase A, are induced during herbivory and subsequently deposited on the host with the feces. These plant chitinases mediate the suppression of herbivore-induced defenses, thereby increasing the performance of the insect on the host. Pr4 and Endochitinase A also trigger the antagonistic pathogen defense pathway in maize and suppress fungal pathogen growth on maize leaves. Frass-induced suppression of herbivore defenses by deposition of the plant-derived chitinases Pr4 and Endochitinase A is a unique way an insect can co-opt the plant’s defense proteins for its own benefit. It is also a phenomenon unlike the induction of herbivore defenses by insect oral secretions in most host-herbivore systems. PMID:26979328

  19. Chitinase-like (CTL) and cellulose synthase (CESA) gene expression in gelatinous-type cellulosic walls of flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) bast fibers.

    PubMed

    Mokshina, Natalia; Gorshkova, Tatyana; Deyholos, Michael K

    2014-01-01

    Plant chitinases (EC 3.2.1.14) and chitinase-like (CTL) proteins have diverse functions including cell wall biosynthesis and disease resistance. We analyzed the expression of 34 chitinase and chitinase-like genes of flax (collectively referred to as LusCTLs), belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 19 (GH19). Analysis of the transcript expression patterns of LusCTLs in the stem and other tissues identified three transcripts (LusCTL19, LusCTL20, LusCTL21) that were highly enriched in developing bast fibers, which form cellulose-rich gelatinous-type cell walls. The same three genes had low relative expression in tissues with primary cell walls and in xylem, which forms a xylan type of secondary cell wall. Phylogenetic analysis of the LusCTLs identified a flax-specific sub-group that was not represented in any of other genomes queried. To provide further context for the gene expression analysis, we also conducted phylogenetic and expression analysis of the cellulose synthase (CESA) family genes of flax, and found that expression of secondary wall-type LusCESAs (LusCESA4, LusCESA7 and LusCESA8) was correlated with the expression of two LusCTLs (LusCTL1, LusCTL2) that were the most highly enriched in xylem. The expression of LusCTL19, LusCTL20, and LusCTL21 was not correlated with that of any CESA subgroup. These results defined a distinct type of CTLs that may have novel functions specific to the development of the gelatinous (G-type) cellulosic walls.

  20. Chitinase 3-Like 1 Promotes Candida albicans Killing and Preserves Corneal Structure and Function by Controlling Host Antifungal Responses

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Chitinase 3-like 1 (CHI3L1) has been shown to play a role in promoting antibacterial responses, decreasing tissue injury, and enhancing pulmonary repair. This study sought to elucidate the role of CHI3L1 in augmenting the corneal innate immune response to Candida albicans infection in an animal model of fungal keratitis. Flagellin applied topically 24 h prior to C. albicans inoculation significantly protected the corneal from C. albicans and induced CHI3L1 expression in C57BL/6 mouse corneas. CHI3L1, however, played a detectable but minor role in flagellin-induced protection. While C. albicans keratitis was more severe in the corneas treated with Chi3l1 small interfering RNA (siRNA), corneas treated with recombinant CHI3L1 before C. albicans inoculation had markedly ameliorated keratitis, reduced fungal load, and decreased polymorphonucleocyte (PMN) infiltration in an interleukin 13 receptor α2 (IL-13Rα2)-dependent manner. CHI3L1 treatment resulted in the induction of the antimicrobial peptides β-defensin 3, CRAMP, and chemokine CXCL10 and its receptor CXCR3 in corneal epithelial cells. Importantly, CHI3L1 administered after C. albicans inoculation also had strong protection against fungal keratitis, suggesting a therapeutic window. This is the first report demonstrating that CHI3L1 is induced during fungal infection, where it acts as an immunomodulator to promote fungal clearance and to regulate antifungal innate immune responses in the cornea. PMID:26238714

  1. CytR Is a Global Positive Regulator of Competence, Type VI Secretion, and Chitinases in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Watve, Samit S; Thomas, Jacob; Hammer, Brian K

    2015-01-01

    The facultative pathogen Vibrio cholerae transitions between its human host and aquatic reservoirs where it colonizes chitinous surfaces. Growth on chitin induces expression of chitin utilization genes, genes involved in DNA uptake by natural transformation, and a type VI secretion system that allows contact-dependent killing of neighboring bacteria. We have previously shown that the transcription factor CytR, thought to primarily regulate the pyrimidine nucleoside scavenging response, is required for natural competence in V. cholerae. Through high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), we show that CytR positively regulates the majority of competence genes, the three type VI secretion operons, and the four known or predicted chitinases. We used transcriptional reporters and phenotypic analysis to determine the individual contributions of quorum sensing, which is controlled by the transcription factors HapR and QstR; chitin utilization that is mediated by TfoX; and pyrimidine starvation that is orchestrated by CytR, toward each of these processes. We find that in V. cholerae, CytR is a global regulator of multiple behaviors affecting fitness and adaptability in the environment.

  2. CytR Is a Global Positive Regulator of Competence, Type VI Secretion, and Chitinases in Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    The facultative pathogen Vibrio cholerae transitions between its human host and aquatic reservoirs where it colonizes chitinous surfaces. Growth on chitin induces expression of chitin utilization genes, genes involved in DNA uptake by natural transformation, and a type VI secretion system that allows contact-dependent killing of neighboring bacteria. We have previously shown that the transcription factor CytR, thought to primarily regulate the pyrimidine nucleoside scavenging response, is required for natural competence in V. cholerae. Through high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), we show that CytR positively regulates the majority of competence genes, the three type VI secretion operons, and the four known or predicted chitinases. We used transcriptional reporters and phenotypic analysis to determine the individual contributions of quorum sensing, which is controlled by the transcription factors HapR and QstR; chitin utilization that is mediated by TfoX; and pyrimidine starvation that is orchestrated by CytR, toward each of these processes. We find that in V. cholerae, CytR is a global regulator of multiple behaviors affecting fitness and adaptability in the environment. PMID:26401962

  3. The impact of acute aerobic exercise on chitinase 3-like protein 1 and intelectin-1 expression in obesity

    PubMed Central

    Slusher, Aaron L; Whitehurst, Michael; Wells, Marie; Maharaj, Arun; Shibata, Yoshimi

    2015-01-01

    Chitinase 3-like 1 (CHI3L1) and intelectin 1 (ITLN-1) recognize microbial N-acetylglucosamine polymer and galactofuranosyl carbohydrates, respectively. Both lectins are highly abundant in plasma and seem to play pro- and anti-inflammatory roles, respectively, in obesity and inflammatory-related illnesses. The aim of this study was to examine whether plasma levels of these lectins in obese subjects are useful for monitoring inflammatory conditions immediately influenced by acute aerobic exercise. Plasma interleukin-6, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, was also examined. Twenty-two (11 obese and 11 normal-weight) healthy subjects, ages 18–30 years, were recruited to perform a 30 min bout of acute aerobic exercise at 75% VO2max. We confirmed higher baseline levels of plasma CHI3L1, but lower ITLN-1, in obese subjects than in normal-weight subjects. The baseline levels of CHI3L1 were negatively correlated with cardiorespiratory fitness (relative VO2max). However, when controlled for BMI, the relationship between baseline level of CHI3L1 and relative VO2max was no longer observed. While acute aerobic exercise elicited an elevation in these parameters, we found a lower ITLN-1 response in obese subjects compared to normal-weight subjects. Our study clearly indicates that acute aerobic exercise elicits a pro-inflammatory response (e.g. CHI3L1) with a lower anti-inflammatory effect (e.g. ITLN-1) in obese individuals. Furthermore, these lectins could be predictors of outcome of exercise interventions in obesity-associated inflammation. PMID:26316585

  4. The impact of acute aerobic exercise on chitinase 3-like protein 1 and intelectin-1 expression in obesity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Jung; Slusher, Aaron L; Whitehurst, Michael; Wells, Marie; Maharaj, Arun; Shibata, Yoshimi

    2016-01-01

    Chitinase 3-like 1 (CHI3L1) and intelectin 1 (ITLN-1) recognize microbial N-acetylglucosamine polymer and galactofuranosyl carbohydrates, respectively. Both lectins are highly abundant in plasma and seem to play pro- and anti-inflammatory roles, respectively, in obesity and inflammatory-related illnesses. The aim of this study was to examine whether plasma levels of these lectins in obese subjects are useful for monitoring inflammatory conditions immediately influenced by acute aerobic exercise. Plasma interleukin-6, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, was also examined. Twenty-two (11 obese and 11 normal-weight) healthy subjects, ages 18-30 years, were recruited to perform a 30 min bout of acute aerobic exercise at 75% VO2max. We confirmed higher baseline levels of plasma CHI3L1, but lower ITLN-1, in obese subjects than in normal-weight subjects. The baseline levels of CHI3L1 were negatively correlated with cardiorespiratory fitness (relative VO2max). However, when controlled for BMI, the relationship between baseline level of CHI3L1 and relative VO2max was no longer observed. While acute aerobic exercise elicited an elevation in these parameters, we found a lower ITLN-1 response in obese subjects compared to normal-weight subjects. Our study clearly indicates that acute aerobic exercise elicits a pro-inflammatory response (e.g. CHI3L1) with a lower anti-inflammatory effect (e.g. ITLN-1) in obese individuals. Furthermore, these lectins could be predictors of outcome of exercise interventions in obesity-associated inflammation.

  5. The impact of acute aerobic exercise on chitinase 3-like protein 1 and intelectin-1 expression in obesity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Jung; Slusher, Aaron L; Whitehurst, Michael; Wells, Marie; Maharaj, Arun; Shibata, Yoshimi

    2016-01-01

    Chitinase 3-like 1 (CHI3L1) and intelectin 1 (ITLN-1) recognize microbial N-acetylglucosamine polymer and galactofuranosyl carbohydrates, respectively. Both lectins are highly abundant in plasma and seem to play pro- and anti-inflammatory roles, respectively, in obesity and inflammatory-related illnesses. The aim of this study was to examine whether plasma levels of these lectins in obese subjects are useful for monitoring inflammatory conditions immediately influenced by acute aerobic exercise. Plasma interleukin-6, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, was also examined. Twenty-two (11 obese and 11 normal-weight) healthy subjects, ages 18-30 years, were recruited to perform a 30 min bout of acute aerobic exercise at 75% VO2max. We confirmed higher baseline levels of plasma CHI3L1, but lower ITLN-1, in obese subjects than in normal-weight subjects. The baseline levels of CHI3L1 were negatively correlated with cardiorespiratory fitness (relative VO2max). However, when controlled for BMI, the relationship between baseline level of CHI3L1 and relative VO2max was no longer observed. While acute aerobic exercise elicited an elevation in these parameters, we found a lower ITLN-1 response in obese subjects compared to normal-weight subjects. Our study clearly indicates that acute aerobic exercise elicits a pro-inflammatory response (e.g. CHI3L1) with a lower anti-inflammatory effect (e.g. ITLN-1) in obese individuals. Furthermore, these lectins could be predictors of outcome of exercise interventions in obesity-associated inflammation. PMID:26316585

  6. Plasma chitinase 3-like 1 is persistently elevated during first month after minimally invasive colorectal cancer resection

    PubMed Central

    Shantha Kumara, H M C; Gaita, David; Miyagaki, Hiromichi; Yan, Xiaohong; Hearth, Sonali AC; Njoh, Linda; Cekic, Vesna; Whelan, Richard L

    2016-01-01

    AIM To assess blood chitinase 3-like 1 (CHi3L1) levels for 2 mo after minimally invasive colorectal resection (MICR) for colorectal cancer (CRC). METHODS CRC patients in an Institutional Review Board approved data/plasma bank who underwent elective MICR for whom preoperative (PreOp), early postoperative (PostOp), and 1 or more late PostOp samples [postoperative day (POD) 7-27] available were included. Plasma CHi3L1 levels (ng/mL) were determined in duplicate by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS PreOp and PostOp plasma sample were available for 80 MICR cancer patients for the study. The median PreOp CHi3L1 level was 56.8 CI: 41.9-78.6 ng/mL (n = 80). Significantly elevated (P < 0.001) median plasma levels (ng/mL) over PreOp levels were detected on POD1 (667.7 CI: 495.7, 771.7; n = 79), POD 3 (132.6 CI: 95.5, 173.7; n = 76), POD7-13 (96.4 CI: 67.7, 136.9; n = 62), POD14-20 (101.4 CI: 80.7, 287.4; n = 22), and POD 21-27 (98.1 CI: 66.8, 137.4; n = 20, P = 0.001). No significant difference in plasma levels were noted on POD27-41. CONCLUSION Plasma CHi3L1 levels were significantly elevated for one month after MICR. Persistently elevated plasma CHi3L1 may support the growth of residual tumor and metastasis. PMID:27574553

  7. The Role of CHI3L1 (Chitinase-3-Like-1) in the Pathogenesis of Infections in Burns in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Bohr, Stefan; Patel, Suraj J.; Vasko, Radovan; Shen, Keyue; Golberg, Alexander; Berthiaume, Francois; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2015-01-01

    In severe burn injury the unique setting of a depleted, dysfunctional immune system along with a loss of barrier function commonly results in opportunistic infections that eventually proof fatal. Unfortunately, the dynamic sequence of bacterial contamination, colonization and eventually septic invasion with bacteria such as Pseudomonas species is still poorly understood although a limiting factor in clinical decision making. Increasing evidence supports the notion that inhibition of bacterial translocation into the wound site may be an effective alternative to prevent infection. In this context we investigated the role of the mammalian Chitinase-3-Like-1 (CHI3L1) non-enyzmatic protein predominately expressed on epithelial as well as innate immune cells as a potential bacterial-translocation-mediating factor. We show a strong trend that a modulation of chitinase expression is likely to be effective in reducing mortality rates in a mouse model of burn injury with superinfection with the opportunistic PA14 Pseudomonas strain, thus demonstrating possible clinical leverage. PMID:26528713

  8. Cloning of the Aegiceras corniculatum class I chitinase gene (AcCHI I) and the response of AcCHI I mRNA expression to cadmium stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Ying; Wang, You-Shao; Cheng, Hao; Zhang, Jing-Ping; Yeok, Foong Swee

    2015-10-01

    Chitinases in terrestrial plants have been reported these are involved in heavy metal tolerance/detoxification. This is the first attempt to reveal chitinase gene (AcCHI I) and its function on metal detoxification in mangroves Aegiceras corniculatum. RT-PCR and RACE techniques were used to clone AcCHI I, while real-time quantitative PCR was employed to assess AcCHI I mRNA expressions in response to Cadmium (Cd). The deduced AcCHI I protein consists of 316 amino acids, including a signal peptide region, a chitin-binding domain (CBD) and a catalytic domain. Protein homology modeling was performed to identify potential features in AcCHI I. The CBD structure of AcCHI I might be critical for metal tolerance/homeostasis of the plant. Clear tissue-specific differences in AcCHI I expression were detected, with higher transcript levels detected in leaves. Results demonstrated that a short duration of Cd exposure (e.g., 3 days) promoted AcCHI I expression in roots. Upregulated expression was also detected in leaves under 10 mg/kg Cd concentration stress. The present study demonstrates that AcCHI I may play an important role in Cd tolerance/homeostasis in the plant. Further studies of the AcCHI I protein, gene overexpression, the promoter and upstream regulation will be necessary for clarifying the functions of AcCHI I. PMID:26044931

  9. Cloning of the Aegiceras corniculatum class I chitinase gene (AcCHI I) and the response of AcCHI I mRNA expression to cadmium stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Ying; Wang, You-Shao; Cheng, Hao; Zhang, Jing-Ping; Yeok, Foong Swee

    2015-10-01

    Chitinases in terrestrial plants have been reported these are involved in heavy metal tolerance/detoxification. This is the first attempt to reveal chitinase gene (AcCHI I) and its function on metal detoxification in mangroves Aegiceras corniculatum. RT-PCR and RACE techniques were used to clone AcCHI I, while real-time quantitative PCR was employed to assess AcCHI I mRNA expressions in response to Cadmium (Cd). The deduced AcCHI I protein consists of 316 amino acids, including a signal peptide region, a chitin-binding domain (CBD) and a catalytic domain. Protein homology modeling was performed to identify potential features in AcCHI I. The CBD structure of AcCHI I might be critical for metal tolerance/homeostasis of the plant. Clear tissue-specific differences in AcCHI I expression were detected, with higher transcript levels detected in leaves. Results demonstrated that a short duration of Cd exposure (e.g., 3 days) promoted AcCHI I expression in roots. Upregulated expression was also detected in leaves under 10 mg/kg Cd concentration stress. The present study demonstrates that AcCHI I may play an important role in Cd tolerance/homeostasis in the plant. Further studies of the AcCHI I protein, gene overexpression, the promoter and upstream regulation will be necessary for clarifying the functions of AcCHI I.

  10. Human serum contains a chitinase: identification of an enzyme, formerly described as 4-methylumbelliferyl-tetra-N-acetylchitotetraoside hydrolase (MU-TACT hydrolase).

    PubMed

    Overdijk, B; Van Steijn, G J

    1994-12-01

    Since 1988 an endoglucosaminidase, provisionally named MU-TACT hydrolase, has been known that hydrolyses the artificial substrate 4-methylumbelliferyl-tetra-N-acetyl-chitotetraoside (MU-[GlcNAc]4, where GlcNAc is N-acetylglucosamine). The biological function of the enzyme was unknown. In this paper evidence is presented showing that this endoglucosaminidase from human serum is in fact a chitinase that is different from lysozyme. The facts sustaining this finding are: (i) the identification of the products formed from MU-[GlcNAc]3 and [GlcNAc]2;and [GlcNAc]3; (ii) chitin and ethylene glycolchitin can be degraded by the enzyme; (iii) the chitinase inhibitor allosamidin also inhibits the action of MU-TACT hydrolase from human serum; (iv) no hydrolysis of the lysozyme substrate Micrococcus lysodeikticus. The enzyme also occurs in rat liver. It was demonstrated that upon Percoll density gradient centrifugation the enzyme from this tissue distributed parallel to the lysosomal marker enzymes beta-N-acetylhexosaminidase and beta-galactosidase, indicating a lysosomal localization for this enzyme. It is proposed that the enzyme functions in the hydrolysis of chitin, to which mammals are frequently exposed during infection by pathogens. PMID:7734843

  11. Transformation of blackgram (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper) by barley chitinase and ribosome-inactivating protein genes towards improving resistance to Corynespora leaf spot fungal disease.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Rajan; Saini, Raman

    2014-12-01

    Blackgram (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper), an important grain legume crop, is sensitive to many fungal pathogens including Corynespora cassiicola, the causal agent of corynespora leaf spot disease. In the present study, plasmid pGJ42 harboring neomycin phosphotransferase (nptII) a selectable marker gene, the barley antifungal genes chitinase (AAA56786) and ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP; AAA32951) were used for the transformation, to develop fungal resistance for the first time in blackgram. The presence and integration of transgene into the blackgram genome was confirmed by PCR and Southern analysis with an overall transformation frequency of 10.2 %. Kanamycin selection and PCR analysis of T0 progeny revealed the inheritance of transgene in Mendelian fashion (3:1). Transgenic plants (T1), evaluated for fungal resistance by in vitro antifungal assay, arrested the growth of C. cassiicola up to 25-40 % over the wild-type plants. In fungal bio-assay screening, the transgenic plants (T1) sprayed with C. cassiicola spores showed a delay in onset of disease along with their lesser extent in terms of average number of diseased leaves and reduced number and size of lesions. The percent disease protection among different transformed lines varies in the range of 27-47 % compare to control (untransformed) plants. These results demonstrate potentiality of chitinase and RIP from a heterologous source in developing fungal disease protection in blackgram and can be helpful in increasing the production of blackgram.

  12. RIG-like Helicase Regulation of Chitinase 3-like 1 Axis and Pulmonary Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Bing; Herzog, Erica L.; Moore, Meagan; Lee, Chang-Min; Na, Sung Hun; Lee, Chun Geun; Elias, Jack A.

    2016-01-01

    Chi3l1 is induced by a variety of cancers where it portends a poor prognosis and plays a key role in the generation of metastasis. However, the mechanisms that Chi3l1 uses to mediate these responses and the pathways that control Chi3l1-induced tumor responses are poorly understood. We characterized the mechanisms that Chi3l1 uses to foster tumor progression and the ability of the RIG-like helicase (RLH) innate immune response to control Chi3l1 elaboration and pulmonary metastasis. Here we demonstrate that RLH activation inhibits tumor induction of Chi3l1 and the expression of receptor IL-13Rα2 and pulmonary metastasis while restoring NK cell accumulation and activation, augmenting the expression of IFN-α/β, chemerin and its receptor ChemR23, p-cofilin, LIMK2 and PTEN and inhibiting BRAF and NLRX1 in a MAVS-dependent manner. These studies demonstrate that Chi3l1 is a multifaceted immune stimulator of tumor progression and metastasis whose elaboration and tissue effects are abrogated by RLH innate immune responses. PMID:27198666

  13. Substrate positioning in chitinase A, a processive chito-biohydrolase from Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Norberg, Anne Line; Dybvik, Anette I; Zakariassen, Henrik; Mormann, Michael; Peter-Katalinić, Jasna; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Sørlie, Morten

    2011-07-21

    The contributions of the -3 subsite and a putative +3 subsite to substrate positioning in ChiA from Serratia marcescens have been investigated by comparing how ChiA and its -3 subsite mutant W167A interact with soluble substrates. The data show that Trp - GlcNAc stacking in the -3 subsite rigidifies the protein backbone supporting the formation of the intermolecular interaction network that is necessary for the recognition and positioning of the N-acetyl groups before the -1 subsite. The +3 subsite exhibits considerable substrate affinity that may promote endo-activity in ChiA and/or assist in expelling dimeric products from the +1 and +2 subsites during processive hydrolysis.

  14. Stability of transgene integration and expression in subsequent generations of doubled haploid oilseed rape transformed with chitinase and beta-1,3-glucanase genes in a double-gene construct.

    PubMed

    Melander, Margareta; Kamnert, Iréne; Happstadius, Ingrid; Liljeroth, Erland; Bryngelsson, Tomas

    2006-09-01

    A double-gene construct with one chitinase and one beta-1,3-glucanase gene from barley, both driven by enhanced 35S promoters, was transformed into oilseed rape. From six primary transformants expressing both transgenes 10 doubled haploid lines were produced and studied for five generations. The number of inserted copies for both the genes was determined by Southern blotting and real-time PCR with full agreement between the two methods. When copy numbers were analysed in different generations, discrepancies were found, indicating that at least part of the inserted sequences were lost in one of the alleles of some doubled haploids. Chitinase and beta-1,3-glucanase expression was analysed by Western blotting in all five doubled haploid generations. Despite that both the genes were present on the same T-DNA and directed by the same promoter their expression pattern between generations was different. The beta-1,3-glucanase was expressed at high and stable levels in all generations, while the chitinase displayed lower expression that varied between generations. The transgenic plants did not show any major impact on fungal resistance when assayed in greenhouse, although purified beta-1,3-glucanase and chitinase caused retardment of fungal growth in vitro.

  15. Genetic ontogeny of pancreatic enzymes in Labrus bergylta larvae and the effect of feed type on enzyme activities and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Truls Wergeland; Folkvord, Arild; Grøtan, Espen; Sæle, Øystein

    2013-03-01

    A newly cultivated wrasse species, Labrus bergylta, have shown great potential for use in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) farms in the battle against sea lice (Lepeoptheirus salmonis) infections. Hatchery reared L. bergylta were studied from 2 to 55 DPH to examine the molecular basis of digestive ontogeny related to the pancreas. An isolated feeding trial was performed on 27-34 DPH larvae to compare the effect of diet on enzyme activity and the possible exogenous contribution by live feed. The following genes coding for key pancreatic enzymes were analyzed by qPCR: trypsin, Cyp7 A1, BAL, sPLA(2) 1B, amylase and pancreatic chitinase. Enzyme activity was measured on trypsin, neutral lipase, sPLA(2), amylase and chitinase in fed and unfed larvae. We did not observe any effects of the formulated diet v.s. rotifers on enzyme activities of neutral lipase, chitinase and sPLA(2). However, a probable feed-dependency was observed at a transcriptional level, where rotifers seem to stimulate upregulation. The regulation of BAL was the only exception, where an upregulation was observed after weaning both in the ontogeny series and the experimental part. Our data on pancreatic chitinase and amylase mRNA levels suggest the importance of carbohydrates in the diet of early larval and juvenile L. bergylta.

  16. Extracellular enzyme activity at the air-water interface of an estuarine lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudryk, Z. J.; Skórczewski, P.

    2004-01-01

    Variations in hydrolytic activity of eight extracellular enzymes in surface and subsurface waters in estuarine Lake Gardno were measured. The ranking of potential activity rates of the assayed enzymes was the same in both surface and subsurface water, i.e. esterase > lipase > aminopeptidase > phosphatase > β-glucosidase > α-glucosidase > chitinase > β-lactosidase. The vertical activity profiles show that esterase, aminopeptidase, α-glucosidase, β-glucosidase and β-lactosidase reached the highest values in surface layer, whereas lipase, phosphatase and chitinase showed maximum activity in subsurface water. Significant differences in enzyme activity between different parts of the studied lake were demonstrated, with higher values in the seawater zone, and lower values in the freshwater zone.

  17. Anthelmintic activity of Leucaena leucocephala protein extracts on Haemonchus contortus.

    PubMed

    Soares, Alexandra Martins dos Santos; de Araújo, Sandra Alves; Lopes, Suzana Gomes; Costa Junior, Livio Martins

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of protein extracts obtained from the plant Leucaena leucocephala on the nematode parasite Haemonchus contortus. The seeds, shell and cotyledon of L. leucocephala were separated and their proteins extracted using a sodium phosphate buffer, and named as TE (total seed extract), SE (shell extract) and CE (cotyledon extract). Soluble protein content, protease, protease inhibitory and chitinase activity assays were performed. Exsheathment inhibition of H. contortus larvae were performed at concentrations of 0.6 mg mL-1, and egg hatch assays were conducted at protein concentrations of 0.8, 0.4, 0.2, 0.1 and 0.05 mg mL-1. The effective concentration for 50% hatching inhibition (EC50) was estimated by probit. Different proportions of soluble proteins, protease and chitinase were found in TE and CE. Protease inhibitory activity was detected in all extracts. The EC50 of the CE and TE extracts were 0.48 and 0.33 mg mL-1, respectively. No ovicidal effects on H. contortus were detected in SE extracts, and none of the protein extracts demonstrated larvicidal effects on H. contortus. We therefore conclude that protein extracts of L. leucocephala had a detrimental effect on nematode eggs, which can be correlated with the high protease and chitinase activity of these extracts. PMID:26689178

  18. The Chitinolytic Activity of Listeria monocytogenes EGD Is Regulated by Carbohydrates but Also by the Virulence Regulator PrfA ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, M. H.; Leisner, J. J.; Ingmer, H.

    2010-01-01

    Chitin, an insoluble polymer of N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (GlcNAc), is one of the most abundant carbohydrate polymers in marine and terrestrial environments. Chitin hydrolysis by Listeria monocytogenes depends on two chitinase-encoding genes, chiA and chiB, and the aim of this study was to investigate their regulation. Chitin induces the expression of both chitinases in late exponential growth phase, and chiA but not chiB is furthermore induced by the monomer GlcNAc. Furthermore, their expression is subjected to catabolite control. Chitinases expressed by bacterial pathogens have proven to be important not only for nutrient acquisition and environmental survival but also for infecting animals and humans. Interestingly, the central L. monocytogenes virulence gene regulator, PrfA, is required for the chitinolytic phenotype, as chitinase activity was significantly reduced in prfA mutant cells compared to its level in wild-type cells. In agreement with this, Northern blot analysis showed that the amounts of chiA and chiB transcripts upon induction by chitin were significantly lower in the prfA mutant than in the wild type. The chitinolytic activity and chiA and chiB expression were reduced in the absence of the sigB gene, indicating that σB is also important for the production of chitinases. The chiA, chiB, and chiA chiB mutants were not impaired for in vitro adhesion and invasion in epithelial cell lines, but the chiA chiB double mutant showed less survival ability in a chitin-enriched medium. The regulation of chitinolytic activity in L. monocytogenes is complex, and taken together, the results indicate that the biological role of this activity may not be limited to the external environment. PMID:20675445

  19. miR-71 and miR-263 Jointly Regulate Target Genes Chitin synthase and Chitinase to Control Locust Molting

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Feng; Song, Tianqi; Wang, Huimin; Liu, Qing; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Jianzhen; Kang, Le

    2016-01-01

    Chitin synthase and chitinase play crucial roles in chitin biosynthesis and degradation during insect molting. Silencing of Dicer-1 results in reduced levels of mature miRNAs and severely blocks molting in the migratory locust. However, the regulatory mechanism of miRNAs in the molting process of locusts has remained elusive. In this study, we found that in chitin metabolism, two crucial enzymes, chitin synthase (CHS) and chitinase (CHT) were regulated by miR-71 and miR-263 during nymph molting. The coding sequence of CHS1 and the 3’-untranslated region of CHT10 contain functional binding sites for miR-71 and miR-263, respectively. miR-71/miR-263 displayed cellular co-localization with their target genes in epidermal cells and directly interacted with CHS1 and CHT10 in the locust integument, respectively. Injections of miR-71 and miR-263 agomirs suppressed the expression of CHS1 and CHT10, which consequently altered chitin production of new and old cuticles and resulted in a molting-defective phenotype in locusts. Unexpectedly, reduced expression of miR-71 and miR-263 increased CHS1 and CHT10 mRNA expression and led to molting defects similar to those induced by miRNA delivery. This study reveals a novel function and balancing modulation pattern of two miRNAs in chitin biosynthesis and degradation, and it provides insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms of the molting process in locusts. PMID:27532544

  20. miR-71 and miR-263 Jointly Regulate Target Genes Chitin synthase and Chitinase to Control Locust Molting.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meiling; Wang, Yanli; Jiang, Feng; Song, Tianqi; Wang, Huimin; Liu, Qing; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Jianzhen; Kang, Le

    2016-08-01

    Chitin synthase and chitinase play crucial roles in chitin biosynthesis and degradation during insect molting. Silencing of Dicer-1 results in reduced levels of mature miRNAs and severely blocks molting in the migratory locust. However, the regulatory mechanism of miRNAs in the molting process of locusts has remained elusive. In this study, we found that in chitin metabolism, two crucial enzymes, chitin synthase (CHS) and chitinase (CHT) were regulated by miR-71 and miR-263 during nymph molting. The coding sequence of CHS1 and the 3'-untranslated region of CHT10 contain functional binding sites for miR-71 and miR-263, respectively. miR-71/miR-263 displayed cellular co-localization with their target genes in epidermal cells and directly interacted with CHS1 and CHT10 in the locust integument, respectively. Injections of miR-71 and miR-263 agomirs suppressed the expression of CHS1 and CHT10, which consequently altered chitin production of new and old cuticles and resulted in a molting-defective phenotype in locusts. Unexpectedly, reduced expression of miR-71 and miR-263 increased CHS1 and CHT10 mRNA expression and led to molting defects similar to those induced by miRNA delivery. This study reveals a novel function and balancing modulation pattern of two miRNAs in chitin biosynthesis and degradation, and it provides insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms of the molting process in locusts. PMID:27532544

  1. Latex-allergic patients sensitized to the major allergen hevein and hevein-like domains of class I chitinases show no increased frequency of latex-associated plant food allergy

    PubMed Central

    Radauer, Christian; Adhami, Farzaneh; Fürtler, Irene; Wagner, Stefan; Allwardt, Dorothee; Scala, Enrico; Ebner, Christof; Hafner, Christine; Hemmer, Wolfgang; Mari, Adriano; Breiteneder, Heimo

    2011-01-01

    Allergies to certain fruits such as banana, avocado, chestnut and kiwi are described in 30–70% of latex-allergic patients. This association is attributed to the cross-reactivity between the major latex allergen hevein and hevein-like domains (HLDs) from fruit class I chitinases. We aimed to assess the extent of cross-reactivity between hevein and HLDs using sera from latex-allergic patients with and without plant food allergy. Hevein and HLDs of latex, banana, and avocado chitinases were expressed in Escherichia coli as fusion proteins with the maltose-binding protein and purified by affinity chromatography. IgE binding to these proteins was studied in sera from 59 latex-allergic patients and 20 banana-allergic patients without latex allergy by ELISA and ELISA inhibition. Additionally, 16,408 allergic patients’ sera were tested for IgE binding to hevein, latex chitinase, and wheat germ agglutinin using an allergen microarray. Hevein-specific IgE was detected in 34/59 (58%) latex-allergic patients’ sera. HLDs of latex, banana, and avocado chitinases were recognized by 21 (36%), 20 (34%), and 9 (15%) sera, respectively. In contrast, only one of 20 banana-allergic patients without latex allergy was sensitized to chitinase HLDs. In most tested latex-allergic patients’ sera, IgE binding to hevein was only partially reduced by preincubation with HLDs. Among hevein-sensitized, latex-allergic patients, the percentage of plant food allergy (15/34 = 44%) was equal to latex-allergic patients without hevein sensitization (11/25 = 44%). In the general allergic population, 230 of 16,408 sera (1.4%) reacted to hevein and/or a hevein-like allergen. Of these, 128 sera showed an isolated sensitization to hevein, whereas only 17 bound to latex chitinase or wheat germ agglutinin without hevein sensitization. In conclusion, the IgE response to HLDs is elicited by hevein as sensitizing allergen in most cases. Despite considerable cross-reactivity between these allergens, no

  2. Isolation and Characterization of Trichoderma spp. for Antagonistic Activity Against Root Rot and Foliar Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Krishna; Amaresan, N; Bhagat, S; Madhuri, K; Srivastava, R C

    2012-06-01

    Trichoderma, soil-borne filamentous fungi, are capable of parasitising several plant pathogenic fungi. Twelve isolates of Trichoderma spp. isolated from different locations of South Andaman were characterized for their cultural, morphological and antagonistic activity against soil borne and foliar borne pathogens. The sequencing of these isolates showed seven different species. The isolates revealed differential reaction patterns against the test pathogens viz., Sclerotium rolfsii, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and C. capsici. However, the isolates, TND1, TWN1, TWC1, TGD1 and TSD1 were most effective in percentage inhibition of mycelial growth of test pathogens. Significant chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase activities of all Trichoderma isolates has been recorded in growth medium. T. viride was found with highest chitinase whereas T. harzianum was recorded with highest β-1,3-glucanase activities. PMID:23729873

  3. Identification of two GH18 chitinase family genes and their use as targets for detection of the crayfish-plague oomycete Aphanomyces astaci

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The oomycete Aphanomyces astaci is regarded as the causative agent of crayfish plague and represents an evident hazard for European crayfish species. Native crayfish populations infected with this pathogen suffer up to 100% mortality. The existence of multiple transmission paths necessitates the development of a reliable, robust and efficient test to detect the pathogen. Currently, A. astaci is diagnosed by a PCR-based assay that suffers from cross-reactivity to other species. We developed an alternative closed-tube assay for A. astaci, which achieves robustness through simultaneous amplification of multiple functionally constrained genes. Results Two novel constitutively expressed members of the glycosyl hydrolase (GH18) gene family of chitinases were isolated from the A. astaci strain Gb04. The primary amino acid sequence of these chitinase genes, termed CHI2 and CHI3, is composed of an N-terminal signal peptide directing the post-translational transport of the protein into the extracellular space, the catalytic GH18 domain, a proline-, serine-, and threonine-rich domain and a C-terminal cysteine-rich putative chitin-binding site. The A. astaci mycelium grown in a pepton-glucose medium showed significant temporal changes in steady-state CHI2 and CHI3 mRNA amounts indicating functional constraint. Their different temporal occurrence with maxima at 48 and 24 hours of incubation for CHI2 and CHI3, respectively, is in accordance with the multifunctionality of GH18 family members. To identify A. astaci-specific primer target sites in these novel genes, we determined the partial sequence homologs in the related oomycetes A. frigidophilus, A. invadans, A. helicoides, A. laevis, A. repetans, Achlya racemosa, Leptolegnia caudata, and Saprolegnia parasitica, as well as in the relevant fungi Fusarium solani and Trichosporon cutaneum. An A. astaci-specific primer pair targeting the novel genes CHI2 and CHI3 as well as CHI1 - a third GH18 family member - was

  4. Activation of mononuclear cells by interleukin-12: an in vivo study in chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Lauw, F N; te Velde, A A; Dekkers, P E; Speelman, P; Aerts, J M; Hack, C E; van Deventer, S J; van der Poll, T

    1999-07-01

    Interleukin (IL)-12 is considered a central regulator of host resistance against a variety of pathogens. Therefore, IL-12 has been advocated as a potential therapeutic agent in infections. To determine the in vivo effects of IL-12 on mononuclear cells involved in the host immune response, four chimpanzees received an intravenous injection of recombinant IL-12 (1 microgram/kg). IL-12 induced a sustained decrease in lymphocyte counts, with decreases in CD3+/CD4+ and CD3+/CD8+ cells, while monocyte counts showed a transient increase. IL-12 injection resulted in a shift toward a Th1-mediated immune response as indicated by increased interferon-gamma production during whole-blood stimulation, while not influencing IL-4 production. IL-12-induced activation of NK cells and phagocytes, as indicated by increased NK cell cytotoxicity and increased plasma levels of granzymes A and B and of chitotriosidase activity. These data support the hypothesis that IL-12 may serve as a useful therapeutic agent in infections where a cell-mediated response is protective.

  5. Visualization of enzyme activities inside earthworm pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Duyen; Razavi, Bahar S.

    2015-04-01

    In extremely dynamic microhabitats as bio-pores made by earthworm, the in situ enzyme activities are assumed as a footprint of complex biotic interactions. Our study focused on the effect of earthworm on the enzyme activities inside bio-pores and visualizing the differences between bio-pores and earthworm-free soil by zymography technique (Spohn and Kuzyakov, 2013). For the first time, we aimed at quantitative imaging of enzyme activities in bio-pores. Lumbricus terrestris L. was placed into transparent box (15×20×15cm). After two weeks when bio-pore systems were formed by earthworms, we visualized in situ enzyme activities of five hydrolytic enzymes (β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, chitinase, xylanase, leucine-aminopeptidase, and phosphatase. Zymography showed higher activity of β-glucosidase, chitinase, xylanase and phosphatase in biopores comparing to bulk soil. However, the differences in activity of cellobiohydrolase and leucine aminopeptidase between bio-pore and bulk soil were less pronounced. This demonstrated an applicability of zymography approach to monitor and to distinguish the in situ activity of hydrolytic enzymes in soil biopores.

  6. Evaluation of Mosquito Repellent Activity of Isolated Oleic Acid, Eicosyl Ester from Thalictrum javanicum

    PubMed Central

    Gurunathan, Abinaya; Senguttuvan, Jamuna; Paulsamy, S.

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the traditional use, the mosquito repellent property of Thalictrum javanicum and to confirm the predicted larvicidal activity of the isolated compound, oleic acid, eicosyl ester from its aerial parts by PASS software, the present study was carried out using 4th instar stage larvae of the mosquitoes, Aedes aegypti (dengue vector) and Culex quinquefasciatus (filarial vector). Insecticidal susceptibility tests were conducted and the mortality rate was observed after 24 h exposure. The chitinase activity of isolated compound was assessed by using purified β-N-acetyl glucosaminidase (chitinase). Ecdysone 20-monooxygenase assay (radioimmuno assay) was made using the same larval stage of A. aegyptiand C. quinquefasciatus. The results were compared with the crude methanol extract of the whole plant. The isolated compound, oleic acid, eicosyl ester was found to be the most effective larvicide against A. aegypti (LC50/24 h -8.51 ppm) and C. quinquefasciatus (LC50/24 h - 12.5 ppm) than the crude methanol extract (LC50/24 h - 257.03 ppm and LC50/24 h - 281.83 ppm, respectively). The impact of oleic acid, eicosyl ester on reducing the activity of chitinase and ecdysone 20-monooxygenase was most prominent in both the target species, A. aegyptiand C. quinquefasciatus than the control. The results therefore suggest that the compound, oleic acid, eicosyl ester from Thalictrum javanicum may be considered as a potent source of mosquito larvicidal property. PMID:27168688

  7. Evaluation of Mosquito Repellent Activity of Isolated Oleic Acid, Eicosyl Ester from Thalictrum javanicum.

    PubMed

    Gurunathan, Abinaya; Senguttuvan, Jamuna; Paulsamy, S

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the traditional use, the mosquito repellent property of Thalictrum javanicum and to confirm the predicted larvicidal activity of the isolated compound, oleic acid, eicosyl ester from its aerial parts by PASS software, the present study was carried out using 4th instar stage larvae of the mosquitoes, Aedes aegypti (dengue vector) and Culex quinquefasciatus (filarial vector). Insecticidal susceptibility tests were conducted and the mortality rate was observed after 24 h exposure. The chitinase activity of isolated compound was assessed by using purified β-N-acetyl glucosaminidase (chitinase). Ecdysone 20-monooxygenase assay (radioimmuno assay) was made using the same larval stage of A. aegyptiand C. quinquefasciatus. The results were compared with the crude methanol extract of the whole plant. The isolated compound, oleic acid, eicosyl ester was found to be the most effective larvicide against A. aegypti (LC50/24 h -8.51 ppm) and C. quinquefasciatus (LC50/24 h - 12.5 ppm) than the crude methanol extract (LC50/24 h - 257.03 ppm and LC50/24 h - 281.83 ppm, respectively). The impact of oleic acid, eicosyl ester on reducing the activity of chitinase and ecdysone 20-monooxygenase was most prominent in both the target species, A. aegyptiand C. quinquefasciatus than the control. The results therefore suggest that the compound, oleic acid, eicosyl ester from Thalictrum javanicum may be considered as a potent source of mosquito larvicidal property.

  8. Evaluation of Mosquito Repellent Activity of Isolated Oleic Acid, Eicosyl Ester from Thalictrum javanicum.

    PubMed

    Gurunathan, Abinaya; Senguttuvan, Jamuna; Paulsamy, S

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the traditional use, the mosquito repellent property of Thalictrum javanicum and to confirm the predicted larvicidal activity of the isolated compound, oleic acid, eicosyl ester from its aerial parts by PASS software, the present study was carried out using 4th instar stage larvae of the mosquitoes, Aedes aegypti (dengue vector) and Culex quinquefasciatus (filarial vector). Insecticidal susceptibility tests were conducted and the mortality rate was observed after 24 h exposure. The chitinase activity of isolated compound was assessed by using purified β-N-acetyl glucosaminidase (chitinase). Ecdysone 20-monooxygenase assay (radioimmuno assay) was made using the same larval stage of A. aegyptiand C. quinquefasciatus. The results were compared with the crude methanol extract of the whole plant. The isolated compound, oleic acid, eicosyl ester was found to be the most effective larvicide against A. aegypti (LC50/24 h -8.51 ppm) and C. quinquefasciatus (LC50/24 h - 12.5 ppm) than the crude methanol extract (LC50/24 h - 257.03 ppm and LC50/24 h - 281.83 ppm, respectively). The impact of oleic acid, eicosyl ester on reducing the activity of chitinase and ecdysone 20-monooxygenase was most prominent in both the target species, A. aegyptiand C. quinquefasciatus than the control. The results therefore suggest that the compound, oleic acid, eicosyl ester from Thalictrum javanicum may be considered as a potent source of mosquito larvicidal property. PMID:27168688

  9. C-reactive protein and chitinase 3-like protein 1 as biomarkers of spatial redistribution of retinal blood vessels on digital retinal photography in patients with diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cekić, Sonja; Cvetković, Tatjana; Jovanović, Ivan; Jovanović, Predrag; Pešić, Milica; Babić, Gordana Stanković; Milenković, Svetislav; Risimić, Dijana

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the correlation between the levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and chitinase 3-like protein 1 (YKL-40) in blood samples with morpohometric parameters of retinal blood vessels in patients with diabetic retinopathy. Blood laboratory examination of 90 patients included the measurement of glycemia, HbA1C, total cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C, triglycerides and CRP. Levels of YKL-40 were detected and measured in serum by ELISA (Micro VueYKL-40 EIA Kit, Quidel Corporation, San Diego, USA). YKL-40 correlated positively with diameter and negatively with number of retinal blood vessels. The average number of the blood vessels per retinal zone was significantly higher in the group of patients with mild non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy than in the group with severe form in the optic disc and all five retinal zones. The average outer diameter of the evaluated retinal zones and optic disc vessels was significantly higher in the group with severe compared to the group with mild diabetic retinopathy. Morphological analysis of the retinal vessels on digital fundus photography and correlation with YKL-40 may be valuable for the follow-up of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:25172979

  10. Pyramiding taro cystatin and fungal chitinase genes driven by a synthetic promoter enhances resistance in tomato to root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yuan-Li; He, Yong; Hsiao, Tsen-Tsz; Wang, Chii-Jeng; Tian, Zhihong; Yeh, Kai-Wun

    2015-02-01

    Meloidogyne incognita, one of the major root-knot nematode (RKN) species in agriculture, attacks many plant species, causing severe economic losses. Genetic engineering of plants with defense-responsive genes has been demonstrated to control RKN. These studies, however, focused on controlling RKN at certain growth stages. In the present study, a dual gene overexpression system, utilizing a plant cysteine proteinase inhibitor (CeCPI) and a fungal chitinase (PjCHI-1), was used to transform tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) in order to provide protection from all growth stages of RKN. A synthetic promoter, pMSPOA, containing NOS-like and SP8a elements, was employed to drive the expression of introduced genes. Gall formation and the proportion of female nematodes in the population, as well as effects on the reproduction of RKN, were monitored in both transgenic and control plants. RKN eggs collected from transgenic plants displayed reduced chitin content and retardation in embryogenesis. The results demonstrated that transgenic plants had inhibitory effects on RKN that were superior to plants transformed with a single gene. The pyramiding expression system produced synergistic effects by the two defense-responsive genes, leading to a detrimental effect on all growth stages of RKN. PMID:25575993

  11. Comparative proteomics of primary and secondary lutoids reveals that chitinase and glucanase play a crucial combined role in rubber particle aggregation in Hevea brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuchu; Shi, Minjing; Wang, Dan; Chen, Yueyi; Cai, Fuge; Zhang, Shixin; Wang, Limin; Tong, Zheng; Tian, Wei-Min

    2013-11-01

    Lutoids are specific vacuole-based organelles within the latex-producing laticifers in rubber tree Hevea brasiliensis. Primary and secondary lutoids are found in the primary and secondary laticifers, respectively. Although both lutoid types perform similar roles in rubber particle aggregation (RPA) and latex coagulation, they vary greatly at the morphological and proteomic levels. To compare the differential proteins and determine the shared proteins of the two lutoid types, a proteomic analysis of lutoid membranes and inclusions was performed, revealing 169 proteins that were functionally classified into 14 families. Biological function analysis revealed that most of the proteins are involved in pathogen defense, chitin catabolism, and proton transport. Comparison of the gene and protein changed patterns and determination of the specific roles of several main lutoid proteins, such as glucanase, hevamine, and hevein, demonstrated that Chitinase and glucanase appeared to play crucial synergistic roles in RPA. Integrative analysis revealed a protein-based metabolic network mediating pH and ion homeostasis, defense response, and RPA in lutoids. From these findings, we developed a modified regulation model for lutoid-mediated RPA that will deepen our understanding of potential mechanisms involved in lutoid-mediated RPA and consequent latex coagulation. PMID:23991906

  12. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) with a rice chitinase gene for improved tolerance to a fungal pathogen Sclerotium rolfsii.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoling; Miyasaka, Susan C; Fitch, Maureen M M; Moore, Paul H; Zhu, Yun J

    2008-05-01

    Taro (Colocasia esculenta) is one of the most important crops in the Pacific Islands, however, taro yields have been declining in Hawaii over the past 30 years partly due to diseases caused by oomycete and fungal pathogens. In this study, an efficient Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation method for taro is first reported. In total, approximately 200 pieces (8 g) of embryogenic calluses were infected with the super-virulent A. tumefaciens strain EHA105 harboring the plant transformation plasmid pBI121/ricchi11 that contains the rice chitinase gene ricchi11. The presence and expression of the transgene ricchi11 in six independent transgenic lines was confirmed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). Southern blot analysis of the six independent lines indicated that three out of six (50%) had integrated a single copy of the transgene, and the other three lines had two or three copies of the transgene. Compared to the particle bombardment transformation of taro method, which was used in the previous studies, the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method obtained 43-fold higher transformation efficiency. In addition, these six transgenic lines via Agrobacterium may be more effective for transgene expression as a result of single-copy or low-copy insertion of the transgene than the single line with multiple copies of the transgene via particle bombardment. In a laboratory bioassay, all six transgenic lines exhibited increased tolerance to the fungal pathogen Sclerotium rolfsii, ranging from 42 to 63% reduction in lesion expansion.

  13. Co-bombardment, integration and expression of rice chitinase and thaumatin-like protein genes in barley (Hordeum vulgare cv. Conlon).

    PubMed

    Tobias, Dennis J; Manoharan, Muthusamy; Pritsch, Clara; Dahleen, Lynn S

    2007-05-01

    Pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins associated with degradation of structural components of pathogenic filamentous fungi were overexpressed in the two-rowed malting barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cultivar Conlon. Transgenes were introduced by co-bombardment with two plasmids, one carrying a rice (Oryza sativa L.) chitinase gene (chi11) and another carrying a rice thaumatin-like protein gene (tlp). Each gene was under the control of the maize ubiquitin (Ubi1) promoter. Fifty-eight primary transformants from three independent transformation events were regenerated. T(1) plants with high rice chi11 and tlp protein expression levels were advanced to identify T(2) homozygotes by herbicide spray and subjected to further molecular analyses. T(3) progeny from one event (E2) had stable integration and expression of the rice chi11 and tlp while those from the other events (E1 and E3) showed stable integration only of tlp. The successful production of these lines overexpressing the antifungal chi and tlp proteins provides materials to test the effects of these genes on a variety of fungal diseases that attack barley and to serve as potential additional sources of disease resistance.

  14. Chitinase-like1/pom-pom1 and its homolog CTL2 are glucan-interacting proteins important for cellulose biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Rodríguez, Clara; Bauer, Stefan; Hématy, Kian; Saxe, Friederike; Ibáñez, Ana Belén; Vodermaier, Vera; Konlechner, Cornelia; Sampathkumar, Arun; Rüggeberg, Markus; Aichinger, Ernst; Neumetzler, Lutz; Burgert, Ingo; Somerville, Chris; Hauser, Marie-Theres; Persson, Staffan

    2012-02-01

    Plant cells are encased by a cellulose-containing wall that is essential for plant morphogenesis. Cellulose consists of β-1,4-linked glucan chains assembled into paracrystalline microfibrils that are synthesized by plasma membrane-located cellulose synthase (CESA) complexes. Associations with hemicelluloses are important for microfibril spacing and for maintaining cell wall tensile strength. Several components associated with cellulose synthesis have been identified; however, the biological functions for many of them remain elusive. We show that the chitinase-like (CTL) proteins, CTL1/POM1 and CTL2, are functionally equivalent, affect cellulose biosynthesis, and are likely to play a key role in establishing interactions between cellulose microfibrils and hemicelluloses. CTL1/POM1 coincided with CESAs in the endomembrane system and was secreted to the apoplast. The movement of CESAs was compromised in ctl1/pom1 mutant seedlings, and the cellulose content and xyloglucan structures were altered. X-ray analysis revealed reduced crystalline cellulose content in ctl1 ctl2 double mutants, suggesting that the CTLs cooperatively affect assembly of the glucan chains, which may affect interactions between hemicelluloses and cellulose. Consistent with this hypothesis, both CTLs bound glucan-based polymers in vitro. We propose that the apoplastic CTLs regulate cellulose assembly and interaction with hemicelluloses via binding to emerging cellulose microfibrils. PMID:22327741

  15. CHITINASE-LIKE1/POM-POM1 and Its Homolog CTL2 Are Glucan-Interacting Proteins Important for Cellulose Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Rodríguez, Clara; Bauer, Stefan; Hématy, Kian; Saxe, Friederike; Ibáñez, Ana Belén; Vodermaier, Vera; Konlechner, Cornelia; Sampathkumar, Arun; Rüggeberg, Markus; Aichinger, Ernst; Neumetzler, Lutz; Burgert, Ingo; Somerville, Chris; Hauser, Marie-Theres; Persson, Staffan

    2012-01-01

    Plant cells are encased by a cellulose-containing wall that is essential for plant morphogenesis. Cellulose consists of β-1,4-linked glucan chains assembled into paracrystalline microfibrils that are synthesized by plasma membrane–located cellulose synthase (CESA) complexes. Associations with hemicelluloses are important for microfibril spacing and for maintaining cell wall tensile strength. Several components associated with cellulose synthesis have been identified; however, the biological functions for many of them remain elusive. We show that the chitinase-like (CTL) proteins, CTL1/POM1 and CTL2, are functionally equivalent, affect cellulose biosynthesis, and are likely to play a key role in establishing interactions between cellulose microfibrils and hemicelluloses. CTL1/POM1 coincided with CESAs in the endomembrane system and was secreted to the apoplast. The movement of CESAs was compromised in ctl1/pom1 mutant seedlings, and the cellulose content and xyloglucan structures were altered. X-ray analysis revealed reduced crystalline cellulose content in ctl1 ctl2 double mutants, suggesting that the CTLs cooperatively affect assembly of the glucan chains, which may affect interactions between hemicelluloses and cellulose. Consistent with this hypothesis, both CTLs bound glucan-based polymers in vitro. We propose that the apoplastic CTLs regulate cellulose assembly and interaction with hemicelluloses via binding to emerging cellulose microfibrils. PMID:22327741

  16. Pyramiding taro cystatin and fungal chitinase genes driven by a synthetic promoter enhances resistance in tomato to root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yuan-Li; He, Yong; Hsiao, Tsen-Tsz; Wang, Chii-Jeng; Tian, Zhihong; Yeh, Kai-Wun

    2015-02-01

    Meloidogyne incognita, one of the major root-knot nematode (RKN) species in agriculture, attacks many plant species, causing severe economic losses. Genetic engineering of plants with defense-responsive genes has been demonstrated to control RKN. These studies, however, focused on controlling RKN at certain growth stages. In the present study, a dual gene overexpression system, utilizing a plant cysteine proteinase inhibitor (CeCPI) and a fungal chitinase (PjCHI-1), was used to transform tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) in order to provide protection from all growth stages of RKN. A synthetic promoter, pMSPOA, containing NOS-like and SP8a elements, was employed to drive the expression of introduced genes. Gall formation and the proportion of female nematodes in the population, as well as effects on the reproduction of RKN, were monitored in both transgenic and control plants. RKN eggs collected from transgenic plants displayed reduced chitin content and retardation in embryogenesis. The results demonstrated that transgenic plants had inhibitory effects on RKN that were superior to plants transformed with a single gene. The pyramiding expression system produced synergistic effects by the two defense-responsive genes, leading to a detrimental effect on all growth stages of RKN.

  17. C-reactive protein and chitinase 3-like protein 1 as biomarkers of spatial redistribution of retinal blood vessels on digital retinal photography in patients with diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Cekić, Sonja; Cvetković, Tatjana; Jovanović, Ivan; Jovanović, Predrag; Pesić, Milica; Stanković Babić, Gordana; Milenković, Svetislav; Risimić, Dijana

    2014-08-20

    The aim of the study was to investigate the correlation between the levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and chitinase 3-like protein 1 (YKL-40) in blood samples with morpohometric parameters of retinal blood vessels in patients with diabetic retinopathy. Blood laboratory examination of 90 patients included the measurement of glycemia, HbA1C, total cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C, triglycerides and CRP. Levels of YKL-40 were detected and measured in serum by ELISA (Micro VueYKL-40 EIA Kit, Quidel Corporation, San Diego, USA). YKL-40 correlated positively with diameter and negatively with number of retinal blood vessels. The average number of the blood vessels per retinal zone was significantly higher in the group of patients with mild non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy than in the group with severe form in the optic disc and all five retinal zones. The average outer diameter of the evaluated retinal zones and optic disc vessels was significantly higher in the group with severe compared to the group with mild diabetic retinopathy. Morphological analysis of the retinal vessels on digital fundus photography and correlation with YKL-40 may be valuable for the follow-up of diabetic retinopathy.

  18. Expression of CHI3L1 and CHIT1 in Osteoarthritic Rat Cartilage Model. A Morphological Study

    PubMed Central

    Di Rosa, M.; Szychlinska, M.A.; Tibullo, D.; Malaguarnera, L.

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative joint disease, which affects millions of people around the world. It occurs when the protective cartilage at the end of bones wears over time, leading to loss of flexibility of the joint, pain and stiffness. The cause of osteoarthritis is unknown, but its development is associated with different factors, such as metabolic, genetic, mechanical and inflammatory ones. In recent years the biological role of chitinases has been studied in relation to different inflammatory diseases and more in particular the elevated levels of human cartilage glycoprotein 39 (CHI3L1) and chitotriosidase (CHIT1) have been reported in a variety of diseases including chronic inflammation and degenerative disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate, by immunohistochemistry, the distribution of CHI3L1 and CHIT1 in osteoarthritic and normal rat articular cartilage, to discover their potential role in the development of this disease. The hypothesis was that the expression of chitinases could increase in OA disease. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that CHI3L1 and CHIT1 staining was very strong in osteoarthritic cartilage, especially in the superficial areas of the cartilage most exposed to mechanical load, while it was weak or absent in normal cartilage. These findings suggest that these two chitinases could be functionally associated with the development of osteoarthritis and could be used as markers, so in the future they could have a role in the daily clinical practice to stage the severity of the disease. However, the longer-term in vivoand in vitro studies are needed to understand the exact mechanism of these molecules, their receptors and activities on cartilage tissue. PMID:25308850

  19. Enzyme activities along a latitudinal transect in Western Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnecker, Jörg; Wild, Birgit; Eloy Alves, Ricardo J.; Gentsch, Norman; Gittel, Antje; Knoltsch, Anna; Lashchinskiy, Nikolay; Mikutta, Robert; Takriti, Mounir; Richter, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) and thus carbon and nutrient cycling in soils is mediated by the activity of extracellular enzymes. The specific activities of these enzymes and their ratios to each other represent the link between the composition of soil organic matter and the nutrient demand of the microbial community. Depending on the difference between microbial nutrient demand and substrate availability, extracellular enzymes can enhance or slow down different nutrient cycles in the soil. We investigated activities of six extracellular enzymes (cellobiohydrolase, leucine-amino-peptidase, N-acetylglucosaminidase, chitotriosidase, phosphatase and phenoloxidase) in the topsoil organic horizon, topsoil mineral horizon and subsoil horizon in seven ecosystems along a 1,500 km-long North-South transect in Western Siberia. The transect included sites in the southern tundra, northern taiga, middle taiga, southern taiga, forest-steppe (in forested patches as well as in adjacent meadows) and Steppe. We found that enzyme patterns varied stronger with soil depth than between ecosystems. Differences between horizons were mainly based on the increasing ratio of oxidative enzymes to hydrolytic enzymes. Differences between sites were more pronounced in topsoil than in subsoil mineral horizons, but did not reflect the north-south transect and the related gradients in temperature and precipitation. The observed differences between sites in topsoil horizons might therefore result from differences in vegetation rather than climatic factors. The decreasing variability in the enzyme pattern with depth might also indicate that the composition of soil organic matter becomes more similar with soil depth, most likely by an increasing proportion of microbial remains compared to plant derived constituents of SOM. This also indicates, that SOM becomes less divers the more it is processed by soil microorganisms. Our findings highlight the importance of soil depth on enzyme

  20. Activity of extracellular enzymes on the marine beach differing in the level of antropopressure.

    PubMed

    Perliński, P; Mudryk, Z J

    2016-03-01

    The level of activity of extracellular enzymes was determined on two transects characterised by different anthropic pressure on a sandy beach in Ustka, the southern coast of the Baltic Sea. Generally, the level of activity of the studied enzymes was higher on the transect characterised by high anthropic pressure. The ranking order of the mean enzyme activity rates in the sand was as follows: lipase > phosphatase > aminopeptidase > β-glucosidase > α-glucosidase > chitinase. Each enzyme had its characteristic horizontal profile of activity. The levels of activity of the studied enzymes were slightly higher in the surface than subsurface sand layer. Extracellular enzymatic activities were strongly influenced by the season. PMID:26911592

  1. Enhanced biocontrol activity of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa cultured in media containing chitosan against postharvest diseases in strawberries: possible mechanisms underlying the effect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongyin; Ge, Lingling; Chen, Keping; Zhao, Lina; Zhang, Xiaoyun

    2014-05-01

    The effect of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa cultured in media containing chitosan on its antogonistic activity against postharvest diseases of strawberries and the possible mechanisms involved are discussed. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis were applied in the analysis of the proteins of R. mucilaginosa in response to chitosan. Compared with the application of R. mucilaginosa alone, the biocontrol efficacy of the yeast combined with 0.5% chitosan was enhanced greatly, with significant increase in chitinase activity of antagonistic yeast, polyphenoloxidase, peroxidase, phenylalanine ammonia lyase, chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase activity, and with an inhibition of lipid peroxidation of strawberries. The population of R. mucilaginosa harvested from NYDB amended with chitosan at 0.5% increased rapidly in strawberry wounds compared with those harvested from NYDB without chitosan. In the cellular proteome, several differentially expressed proteins were identified, most of which were related to basic metabolism. PMID:24724730

  2. [Glycolytic activity of enzyme preparation from the red king crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus) hepatopancreas].

    PubMed

    Rysakova, K S; Novikov, V Iu; Mukhin, V A; Serafimchik, E M

    2008-01-01

    Enzyme preparation exhibiting glycolytic activity yielding chitooligosaccharides along with N-acetyl-D-glucosamine was obtained from the red king crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus) hepatopancreas. The results of the analysis confirmed the presence of endo- and exochitinase activities in the preparation. HPLC showed that the hydrolysis products of chitin and chitosan did not contain D(+)-glucosamine, which is indicative of the absence of deacetylase and, apparently, exochitosanase activities. A comparison of the dependence of the enzyme preparation activity on temperature and pH of the incubation medium suggests that chitinase and protease activities are exhibited by different enzymes.

  3. Investigations on hydrolytic activities from Stachybotrys microspora and their use as an alternative in yeast DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Abdeljalil, Salma; Ben Hmad, Ines; Saibi, Walid; Amouri, Bahia; Maalej, Wiem; Kaaniche, Marwa; Koubaa, Aida; Gargouri, Ali

    2014-02-01

    Stachybotrys microspora is a filamentous fungus characterized by the secretion of multiple hydrolytic activities (cellulolytic and non-cellulolytic enzymes). The production of these biocatalysts was studied under submerged culture using glucose, cellulose, and wheat bran as carbon sources. Endoglucanases, pectinases, xylanases, β-glucanases, chitinases, and proteases were induced on cellulose-based medium and repressed on glucose in both strains with higher amounts produced by the mutant. β-glucosidases were roughly equally produced by both strains under glucose and cellulose conditions. The yield of chitinases, β-glucanases, and proteases produced by Stachybotrys strains was as much higher than the commercialized lysing enzyme called "zymolyase," currently used in yeast DNA extraction. In this context, we showed that S. microspora hydrolases can be successfully applied in the extraction of yeast DNA.

  4. Increased Obesity-Associated Circulating Levels of the Extracellular Matrix Proteins Osteopontin, Chitinase-3 Like-1 and Tenascin C Are Associated with Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Catalán, Victoria; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Rodríguez, Amaia; Ramírez, Beatriz; Izaguirre, Maitane; Hernández-Lizoain, José Luis; Baixauli, Jorge; Martí, Pablo; Valentí, Víctor; Moncada, Rafael; Silva, Camilo; Salvador, Javier; Frühbeck, Gema

    2016-01-01

    Background Excess adipose tissue represents a major risk factor for the development of colon cancer with inflammation and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling being proposed as plausible mechanisms. The aim of this study was to investigate whether obesity can influence circulating levels of inflammation-related extracellular matrix proteins in patients with colon cancer (CC), promoting a microenvironment favorable for tumor growth. Methods Serum samples obtained from 79 subjects [26 lean (LN) and 53 obese (OB)] were used in the study. Enrolled subjects were further subclassified according to the established diagnostic protocol for CC (44 without CC and 35 with CC). Anthropometric measurements as well as circulating metabolites and hormones were determined. Circulating concentrations of the ECM proteins osteopontin (OPN), chitinase-3-like protein 1 (YKL-40), tenascin C (TNC) and lipocalin-2 (LCN-2) were determined by ELISA. Results Significant differences in circulating OPN, YKL-40 and TNC concentrations between the experimental groups were observed, being significantly increased due to obesity (P<0.01) and colon cancer (P<0.05). LCN-2 levels were affected by obesity (P<0.05), but no differences were detected regarding the presence or not of CC. A positive association (P<0.05) with different inflammatory markers was also detected. Conclusions To our knowledge, we herein show for the first time that obese patients with CC exhibit increased circulating levels of OPN, YKL-40 and TNC providing further evidence for the influence of obesity on CC development via ECM proteins, representing promising diagnostic biomarkers or target molecules for therapeutics. PMID:27612200

  5. Class I chitinase and beta-1,3-glucanase are differentially regulated by wounding, methyl jasmonate, ethylene, and gibberellin in tomato seeds and leaves.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chun-Ta; Bradford, Kent J

    2003-09-01

    Class I chitinase (Chi9) and beta-1,3-glucanase (GluB) genes are expressed in the micropylar endosperm cap of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) seeds just before radicle emergence through this tissue to complete germination. In gibberellin (GA)-deficient mutant (gib-1) seeds, expression of Chi9 and GluB mRNA and protein is dependent upon GA. However, as expression occurs relatively late in the germination process, we investigated whether the genes are induced indirectly in response to tissue wounding associated with endosperm cap weakening and radicle protrusion. Wounding and methyl jasmonate (MeJA) induced Chi9 expression, whereas ethylene, abscisic acid, sodium salicylate, fusicoccin, or beta-aminobutyric acid were without effect. Chi9 expression occurred only in the micropylar tissues when seeds were exposed to MeJA or were wounded at the chalazal end of the seed. Expression of Chi9, but not GluB, mRNA was reduced in germinating seeds of the jasmonate-deficient defenseless1 tomato mutant and could be restored by MeJA treatment. Chi9 expression during germination may be associated with "wounding" from cell wall hydrolysis and weakening in the endosperm cap leading to radicle protrusion, and jasmonate is involved in the signaling pathway for this response. Among these treatments and chemicals (other than GA), only MeJA and wounding induced a low level of GluB expression in gib-1 seeds. However, MeJA, wounding, and particularly ethylene induced both genes in leaves, whereas GA induced only Chi9 in leaves. Although normally expressed simultaneously during tomato seed germination, Chi9 and GluB genes are regulated distinctly and tissue specifically by hormones and wounding.

  6. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) with a rice chitinase gene for improved tolerance to a fungal pathogen Sclerotium rolfsii.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoling; Miyasaka, Susan C; Fitch, Maureen M M; Moore, Paul H; Zhu, Yun J

    2008-05-01

    Taro (Colocasia esculenta) is one of the most important crops in the Pacific Islands, however, taro yields have been declining in Hawaii over the past 30 years partly due to diseases caused by oomycete and fungal pathogens. In this study, an efficient Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation method for taro is first reported. In total, approximately 200 pieces (8 g) of embryogenic calluses were infected with the super-virulent A. tumefaciens strain EHA105 harboring the plant transformation plasmid pBI121/ricchi11 that contains the rice chitinase gene ricchi11. The presence and expression of the transgene ricchi11 in six independent transgenic lines was confirmed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). Southern blot analysis of the six independent lines indicated that three out of six (50%) had integrated a single copy of the transgene, and the other three lines had two or three copies of the transgene. Compared to the particle bombardment transformation of taro method, which was used in the previous studies, the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method obtained 43-fold higher transformation efficiency. In addition, these six transgenic lines via Agrobacterium may be more effective for transgene expression as a result of single-copy or low-copy insertion of the transgene than the single line with multiple copies of the transgene via particle bombardment. In a laboratory bioassay, all six transgenic lines exhibited increased tolerance to the fungal pathogen Sclerotium rolfsii, ranging from 42 to 63% reduction in lesion expansion. PMID:18301900

  7. Rhizoxin analogs, orfamide A and chitinase production contribute to the toxicity of Pseudomonas protegens strain Pf-5 to Drosophila melanogaster

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas protegens strain Pf-5 is a soil bacterium that was first described for its activity in biological control of plant diseases and has since been shown to be lethal to certain insects. Among these is the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, a well-established model organism for studies evalu...

  8. Microbial dynamics and enzyme activities in tropical Andosols depending on land use and nutrient inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mganga, Kevin; Razavi, Bahar; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    Microbial decomposition of soil organic matter is mediated by enzymes and is a key source of terrestrial CO2 emissions. Microbial and enzyme activities are necessary to understand soil biochemical functioning and identify changes in soil quality. However, little is known about land use and nutrients availability effects on enzyme activities and microbial processes, especially in tropical soils of Africa. This study was conducted to examine how microbial and enzyme activities differ between different land uses and nutrient availability. As Andosols of Mt. Kilimanjaro are limited by nutrient concentrations, we hypothesize that N and P additions will stimulate enzyme activity. N and P were added to soil samples (0-20 cm) representing common land use types in East Africa: (1) savannah, (2) maize fields, (3) lower montane forest, (4) coffee plantation, (5) grasslands and (6) traditional Chagga homegardens. Total CO2 efflux from soil, microbial biomass and activities of β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, chitinase and phosphatase involved in C, N and P cycling, respectively was monitored for 60 days. Total CO2 production, microbial biomass and enzyme activities varied in the order forest soils > grassland soils > arable soils. Increased β-glucosidase and cellobiohydrolase activities after N addition of grassland soils suggest that microorganisms increased N uptake and utilization to produce C-acquiring enzymes. Low N concentration in all soils inhibited chitinase activity. Depending on land use, N and P addition had an inhibitory or neutral effect on phosphatase activity. We attribute this to the high P retention of Andosols and low impact of N and P on the labile P fractions. Enhanced CO2 production after P addition suggests that increased P availability could stimulate soil organic matter biodegradation in Andosols. In conclusion, land use and nutrients influenced soil enzyme activities and microbial dynamics and demonstrated the decline in soil quality after landuse

  9. QM/MM free-energy simulations of reaction in Serratia marcescens Chitinase B reveal the protonation state of Asp142 and the critical role of Tyr214.

    PubMed

    Jitonnom, Jitrayut; Limb, Michael A L; Mulholland, Adrian J

    2014-05-01

    Serratia marcescens Chitinase B (ChiB), belonging to the glycosidase family 18 (GH18), catalyzes the hydrolysis of β-1,4-glycosidic bond, with retention of configuration, via an unusual substrate-assisted mechanism, in which the substrate itself acts as an intramolecular nucleophile. Here, both elementary steps (glycosylation and deglycosylation) of the ChiB-catalyzed reaction are investigated by means of combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) umbrella sampling molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at the SCC-DFTB/CHARMM22 level of theory. We examine the influence of the Asp142 protonation state on the reaction and the role that this residue performs in the reaction. Our simulations show that reaction with a neutral Asp142 is preferred and demonstrate that this residue provides electrostatic stabilization of the oxazolinium ion intermediate formed in the reaction. Insight into the conformational itinerary ((1,4)B↔(4)H5↔(4)C1) adopted by the substrate (bound in subsite -1) along the preferred reaction pathway is also provided by the simulations. The relative energies of the stationary points found along the reaction pathway calculated with SCC-DFTB and B3LYP were compared. The results suggest that SCC-DFTB is an accurate method for estimating the relative barriers for both steps of the reaction; however, it was found to overestimate the relative energy of an intermediate formed in the reaction when compared with the higher level of theory. Glycosylation is suggested to be a rate-determining step in the reaction with calculated overall reaction free-energy barrier of 20.5 kcal/mol, in a reasonable agreement with the 16.1 kcal/mol barrier derived from the experiment. The role of Tyr214 in catalysis was also investigated with the results, indicating that the residue plays a critical role in the deglycosylation step of the reaction. Simulations of the enzyme-product complex were also performed with an unbinding event suggested to have been observed

  10. Isolation of vulgin, a new antifungal polypeptide with mitogenic activity from the pinto bean.

    PubMed

    Ye, X Y; Ng, T B

    2003-02-01

    An antifungal polypeptide bearing an N-termnial sequence with some homology to chitinases was purified from an extract of pinto beans. The polypeptide, designated vulgin, exerted antifungal activity toward Mycosphaerella arachidicola, Coprinus cornatus, Fusarium oxysporum and Botrytis cinerea. Vulgin inhibited translation in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate system with an IC50 of 4.3 microM and HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activity with an IC50 of 58 microM. Vulgin stimulated in vitro incorporation of methyl [3H] thymidine into mouse splenocytes. PMID:12630696

  11. Stochastic and nonstochastic post-transcriptional silencing of chitinase and beta-1,3-glucanase genes involves increased RNA turnover-possible role for ribosome-independent RNA degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Holtorf, H; Schöb, H; Kunz, C; Waldvogel, R; Meins, F

    1999-01-01

    Stochastic and nonstochastic post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) in Nicotiana sylvestris plants carrying tobacco class I chitinase (CHN) and beta-1,3-glucanase transgenes differs in incidence, stability, and pattern of expression. Measurements with inhibitors of RNA synthesis (cordycepin, actinomycin D, and alpha-amanitin) showed that both forms of PTGS are associated with increased sequence-specific degradation of transcripts, suggesting that increased RNA turnover may be a general feature of PTGS. The protein synthesis inhibitors cycloheximide and verrucarin A did not inhibit degradation of CHN RNA targeted for PTGS, confirming that PTGS-related RNA degradation does not depend on ongoing protein synthesis. Because verrucarin A, unlike cycloheximide, dissociates mRNA from ribosomes, our results also suggest that ribosome-associated RNA degradation pathways may not be involved in CHN PTGS. PMID:10072405

  12. One-pot synthesis and antifungal activity against plant pathogens of quinazolinone derivatives containing an amide moiety.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Liu, Jia; Ma, Yangmin; Ren, Decheng; Cheng, Pei; Zhao, Jiawen; Zhang, Fan; Yao, Yuan

    2016-05-01

    An efficient one-pot, three-component synthesis of quinazolinone derivatives containing 3-acrylamino motif was carried out using CeO2 nanoparticles as catalyst. Thirty-nine synthesized compounds were obtained with satisfied yield and elucidated by spectroscopic analysis. Four phytopathogenic fungi were chosen to test the antifungal activities by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) method. Compounds 4ag, 4bb, 4bc showed broad antifungal activities against at least three fungi, and dramatic effects of substituents on the activities were observed. Docking studies were established to explore the potential antifungal mechanism of quinazolinone derivatives as the chitinase inhibitors, and also verified the importance of the amide moiety.

  13. The influence of repeated administration of poloxamer 407 on serum lipoproteins and protease activity in mouse liver and heart.

    PubMed

    Korolenko, Tatyana A; Tuzikov, Fedor V; Johnston, Thomas P; Tuzikova, Natalia A; Kisarova, Yana A; Zhanaeva, Svetlana Ya; Alexeenko, Tatyana V; Zhukova, Natalia A; Brak, Ivan V; Spiridonov, Victor K; Filjushina, Elena E; Cherkanova, Marina S; Monoszon, Anna A

    2012-11-01

    The effects of repeated administration of poloxamer 407 (P-407) on lipoprotein-cholesterol (LP-C) and lipoprotein-triglyceride (LP-TG) fractions and subfractions, as well as the effect on liver and heart proteases, were studied. Repeated administration of P-407 to male CBA mice resulted in a model of atherosclerosis with increased diastolic blood pressure; there was a drastic increase in total serum cholesterol and especially TG. A novel small-angle X-ray scattering method for the determination of the fractional and subfractional composition of LP-C and LP-TG was used. In chronically P-407-treated mice, P-407 significantly increased atherogenic low-density lipoprotein C (LDL-C) fractions, as well as intermediate-density lipoprotein C (IDL-C), and LDL₁₋₃-C subfractions, and very-low-density lipoprotein-C (VLDL-C) fractions, as well as VLDL₁₋₂-C and VLDL₃₋₅-C subfractions), to a lesser extent, the total anti-atherogenic high-density lipoprotein C (HDL-C) fraction, as well as HDL₂-C and HDL₃-C subfractions. Additionally, we demonstrated an increase in the serum chitotriosidase activity, without significant changes in serum matrix metalloprotease (MMP) activity. Morphological changes observed in P-407-treated mice included atherosclerosis in the heart and storage syndrome in the liver macrophages. P-407 significantly increased the activity of cysteine, aspartate proteases, and MMPs in the heart, and only the activity of cathepsin B and MMPs in the liver of mice. Thus, repeated administration of P-407 to mice induced atherosclerosis secondary to sustained dyslipidemia and formation of foamy macrophages in liver, and also modulated the activity of heart and liver proteases.

  14. Soil zymography - A novel technique for mapping enzyme activity in the rhizosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spohn, Marie

    2014-05-01

    The effect plant roots on microbial activity in soil at the millimeter scale is poorly understood. One reason for this is that spatially explicit methods for the study of microbial activity in soil are limited. Here we present a quantitative in situ technique for mapping the distribution of exoenzymes in soil along with some results about the effects of roots on exoenzyme activity in soil. In the first study we showed that both acid and alkaline phosphatase activity were up to 5.4-times larger in the rhizosphere of Lupinus albus than in the bulk soil. While acid phosphatase activity (produced by roots and microorganisms) was closely associated with roots, alkaline phosphatase activity (produced only by microorganisms) was more widely distributed, leading to a 2.5-times larger area of activity of alkaline than of acid phosphatase. These results indicate a spatial differentiation of different ecophysiological groups of organic phosphorus mineralizing organisms in the rhizosphere which might alleviate a potential competition for phosphorus between them. In a second study cellulase, chitinase and phosphatase activities were analyzed in the presence of living Lupinus polyphyllus roots and dead/dying roots (in the same soils 10, 20 and 30 days after cutting the L. polyphyllus shoots). The activity of all three enzymes was 9.0 to 13.9-times higher at the living roots compared to the bulk soil. Microhotspots of cellulase, chitinase and phosphatase activity in the soil were found up to 60 mm away from the living roots. 10 days after shoot cutting, the areas of high activities of cellulase and phosphatase activity were extend up to 55 mm away from the next root, while the extension of the area of chitinase activity did not change significantly. At the root, cellulase and chitinase activity increased first at the root tips after shoot cutting and showed maximal activity 20 days after shoot cutting. The number and activity of microhotspots of chitinase activity was maximal 10

  15. Influence of protoplast fusion between two Trichoderma spp. on extracellular enzymes production and antagonistic activity

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Mohamed M.

    2014-01-01

    Biological control plays a crucial role in grapevine pathogens disease management. The cell-wall degrading enzymes chitinase, cellulase and β-glucanase have been suggested to be essential for the mycoparasitism activity of Trichoderma species against grapevine fungal pathogens. In order to develop a useful strain as a single source of these vital enzymes, it was intended to incorporate the characteristics of two parental fungicides tolerant mutants of Trichoderma belonging to the high chitinase producing species T. harzianum and the high cellulase producing species T. viride, by fusing their protoplasts. The phylogeny of the parental strains was carried out using a sequence of the 5.8S-ITS region. The BLAST of the obtained sequence identified these isolates as T. harzianum and T. viride. Protoplasts were isolated using lysing enzymes and were fused using polyethylene glycol. The fused protoplasts have been regenerated on protoplast regeneration minimal medium supplemented with two selective fungicides. Among the 40 fast growing fusants, 17 fusants were selected based on their enhanced growth on selective media for further studies. The fusant strains were growing 60%–70% faster than the parents up to third generation. All the 17 selected fusants exhibited morphological variations. Some fusant strains displayed threefold increased chitinase enzyme activity and twofold increase in β-glucanase enzyme activity compared to the parent strains. Most fusants showed powerful antagonistic activity against Macrophomin aphaseolina, Pythium ultimum and Sclerotium rolfsii pathogens. Fusant number 15 showed the highest inhibition percentage (92.8%) against M. phaseolina and P. ultimum, while fusant number 9 showed the highest inhibition percentage (98.2%) against the growth of S. rolfsii. A hyphal intertwining and degradation phenomenon was observed by scanning electron microscope. The Trichoderma antagonistic effect against pathogenic fungal mycelia was due to the

  16. Chitins and chitosans as immunoadjuvants and non-allergenic drug carriers.

    PubMed

    Muzzarelli, Riccardo A A

    2010-02-21

    amplified during many infections and diseases, the common feature of chitinase-like proteins and chitinase activity in all organisms appears to be the biochemical defense of the host. Unfortunately, conceptual and methodological errors are present in certain recent articles dealing with chitin and allergy, i.e., (1) omitted consideration of mammalian chitinase and/or chitotriosidase secretion, accompanied by inactive chitinase-like proteins, as an ancestral defensive means against invasion, capable to prevent the insurgence of allergy; (2) omitted consideration of the fact that the mammalian organism recognizes more promptly the secreted water soluble chitinase produced by a pathogen, rather than the insoluble and well protected chitin within the pathogen itself; (3) superficial and incomplete reports and investigations on chitin as an allergen, without mentioning the potent allergen from crustacean flesh, tropomyosine; (4) limited perception of the importance of the chemical/biochemical characteristics of the isolated chitin or chitosan for the replication of experiments and optimization of results; and (5) lack of interdisciplinarity. There is quite a large body of knowledge today on the use of chitosans as biomaterials, and more specifically as drug carriers for a variety of applications: the delivery routes being the same as those adopted for the immunological studies. Said articles, that devote attention to the safety and biocompatibility aspects, never reported intolerance or allergy in individuals and animals, even when the quantities of chitosan used in single experiments were quite large. Therefore, it is concluded that crab, shrimp, prawn and lobster chitins, as well as chitosans of all grades, once purified, should not be considered as "crustacean derivatives", because the isolation procedures have removed proteins, fats and other contaminants to such an extent as to allow them to be classified as chemicals regardless of their origin.

  17. Soil Microbial Activity Provides Insight to Carbon Cycling in Shrub Ecotones of Sub-Arctic Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marek, E.; Kashi, N. N.; Chen, J.; Hobbie, E. A.; Schwan, M. R.; Varner, R. K.

    2015-12-01

    Shrubs are expanding in Arctic and sub-Arctic regions due to rising atmospheric temperatures. Microbial activity increases as growing temperatures cause permafrost warming and subsequent thaw, leading to a greater resource of soil nutrients enabling shrub growth. Increased carbon inputs from shrubs is predicted to result in faster carbon turnover by microbial decomposition. Further understanding of microbial activity underneath shrubs could uncover how microbes and soil processes interact to promote shrub expansion and carbon cycling. To address how higher soil carbon input from shrubs influences decomposition, soil samples were taken across a heath, shrub, and forest ecotone gradient at two sites near Abikso, Sweden. Samples were analyzed for soluble carbon and nitrogen, microbial abundance, and microbial activity of chitinase, glucosidase, and phosphatase to reflect organic matter decomposition and availability of nitrogen, carbon, and phosphate respectively. Chitinase activity positively correlated with shrub cover, suggesting microbial demands for nitrogen increase with higher shrub cover. Glucosidase activity negatively correlated with shrub cover and soluble carbon, suggesting decreased microbial demand for carbon as shrub cover and carbon stores increase. Lower glucosidase activity in areas with high carbon input from shrubs implies that microbes are decomposing carbon less readily than carbon is being put into the soil. Increasing soil carbon stores in shrub covered areas can lead to shrubs becoming a net carbon sink and a negative feedback to changing climate.

  18. Active invasion of bacteria into living fungal cells

    PubMed Central

    Moebius, Nadine; Üzüm, Zerrin; Dijksterhuis, Jan; Lackner, Gerald; Hertweck, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The rice seedling blight fungus Rhizopus microsporus and its endosymbiont Burkholderia rhizoxinica form an unusual, highly specific alliance to produce the highly potent antimitotic phytotoxin rhizoxin. Yet, it has remained a riddle how bacteria invade the fungal cells. Genome mining for potential symbiosis factors and functional analyses revealed that a type 2 secretion system (T2SS) of the bacterial endosymbiont is required for the formation of the endosymbiosis. Comparative proteome analyses show that the T2SS releases chitinolytic enzymes (chitinase, chitosanase) and chitin-binding proteins. The genes responsible for chitinolytic proteins and T2SS components are highly expressed during infection. Through targeted gene knock-outs, sporulation assays and microscopic investigations we found that chitinase is essential for bacteria to enter hyphae. Unprecedented snapshots of the traceless bacterial intrusion were obtained using cryo-electron microscopy. Beyond unveiling the pivotal role of chitinolytic enzymes in the active invasion of a fungus by bacteria, these findings grant unprecedented insight into the fungal cell wall penetration and symbiosis formation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03007.001 PMID:25182414

  19. Synthesis and antifungal activity of novel sulfoxide derivatives containing trimethoxyphenyl substituted 1,3,4-thiadiazole and 1,3,4-oxadiazole moiety.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Luo, Xiao-Qiong; Song, Bao-An; Bhadury, Pinaki S; Yang, Song; Jin, Lin-Hong; Xue, Wei; Hu, De-Yu

    2008-04-01

    Selective oxidation of sulfides 7 or 8 to sulfoxides 9 or 10 is achieved by mCPBA. The structures of the compounds 9 or 10 are confirmed by elemental analysis, IR, and (1)H NMR. The bioassay results showed that title compound 10a possess high antifungal activities with EC(50) values ranging from 19.91 to 63.97 microg/mL. The mechanism of action of 10a against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum was studied. After treating with compound 10a at 100 microg/mL for 12 h, the mycelial reducing sugar, D-GlcNAc, soluble protein and pyruvate content, chitinase activity showed declining tendency.

  20. Snow-mold-induced apoplastic proteins in winter rye leaves lack antifreeze activity

    PubMed

    Hiilovaara-Teijo; Hannukkala; Griffith; Yu; Pihakaski-Maunsbach

    1999-10-01

    During cold acclimation, winter rye (Secale cereale L.) plants secrete antifreeze proteins that are similar to pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins. In this experiment, the secretion of PR proteins was induced at warm temperatures by infection with pink snow mold (Microdochium nivale), a pathogen of overwintering cereals. A comparison of cold-induced and pathogen-induced proteins showed that PR proteins accumulated in the leaf apoplast to a greater level in response to cold. The PR proteins induced by cold and by snow mold were similar when separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and examined by immunoblotting. Both groups of PR proteins contained glucanase-like, chitinase-like, and thaumatin-like proteins, and both groups exhibited similar levels of glucanase and chitinase activities. However, only the PR proteins induced by cold exhibited antifreeze activity. Our findings suggest that the cold-induced PR proteins may be isoforms that function as antifreeze proteins to modify the growth of ice during freezing while also providing resistance to the growth of low-temperature pathogens in advance of infection. Both functions of the cold-induced PR proteins may improve the survival of overwintering cereals.

  1. The herbicide flumioxazin stimulates pathogenesis-related gene expression and enzyme activities in Vitis vinifera.

    PubMed

    Castro, Antonio Jesús; Saladin, Gäelle; Bézier, Annie; Mazeyrat-Gourbeyre, Florence; Baillieul, Fabienne; Clément, Christophe

    2008-11-01

    In this work, the capacity of the soil-applied herbicide flumioxazin (fmx) to trigger defence mechanisms was assessed using 6-week-old in vitro grown Vitis vinifera L. plantlets. Time-course studies demonstrated that the herbicide induced the expression of basic beta-1,3-glucanase (Vvglu), basic chitinase (Vvchit1b) and PR10 (VvPR10.3) genes encoding three pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins involved in grapevine defence against pathogens. Thus, all transcripts accumulated in grapevine tissues to reach maximum values after 24-72 h of herbicide exposure, except for VvPR10.3 gene expression, which was induced in roots and stems but not in leaves. Induction of PR genes was observed to a greater extent in roots and leaves, and its intensity diminished in the stems although still remained noteworthy. The activities of beta-1,3-glucanase and chitinase enzymes significantly increased in the whole plant after herbicide exposure and were still stimulated 21 days after the beginning of treatments. Similarly, the most remarkable effect occurred in roots. However, all enzyme activities tested were stimulated in the upper aerial tissues as well, indicating that fmx or a derived product acts systemically, likely via root uptake.

  2. Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kincaid, Charlene; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students collect and organize data from a real-world simulation of the scientific concept of half life. Students collect data using a marble sifter, analyze the data using a graphing calculator, and determine an appropriate mathematical model. Includes reproducible worksheets. (MDH)

  3. Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathematics Teacher, 1982

    1982-01-01

    The material presented is designed to help students explore geometric patterns involving Fibonnaci numbers and the golden ratio, and to aid in review of basic geometry skills. Worksheet masters intended for duplication are provided. Suggestions are made of possible classroom extensions to the initial activities. (MP)

  4. Visualization of enzyme activities inside earthworm biopores by in situ soil zymography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thu Duyen Hoang, Thi; Razavi, Bahar. S.; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    Earthworms can strongly activate microorganisms, increase microbial and enzyme activities and consequently the turnover of native soil organic matter. In extremely dynamic microhabitats and hotspots as biopores made by earthworms, the in situ enzyme activities are a footprint of complex biotic interactions. The effect of earthworms on the alteration of enzyme activities inside biopores and the difference between bio-pores and earthworm-free soil was visualized by in situ soil zymography (Spohn and Kuzyakov, 2014). For the first time, we prepared quantitative imaging of enzyme activities in biopores. Furthermore, we developed the zymography technique by direct application of a substrate saturated membrane to the soil to obtain better spatial resolution. Lumbricus terrestris L. was placed into transparent box (15×20×15cm). Simultaneously, maize seed was sown in the soil. Control soil box with maize and without earthworm was prepared in the same way. After two weeks when bio-pore systems were formed by earthworm, we visualized in situ enzyme activities of five hydrolytic enzymes (β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, chitinase, xylanase, leucine aminopeptidase) and phosphatase. Followed by non-destructive zymography, biopore samples and control soil were destructively collected to assay enzyme kinetics by fluorogenically labeled substrates method. Zymography showed higher activity of β-glucosidase, chitinase, xylanase and phosphatase in biopores comparing to bulk soil. These differences were further confirmed by fluorimetric microplate enzyme assay detected significant difference of Vmax in four above mentioned enzymes. Vmax of β-glucosidase, chitinase, xylanase and phosphatase in biopores is 68%, 108%, 50% and 49% higher than that of control soil. However, no difference in cellobiohydrolase and leucine aminopeptidase kinetics between biopores and control soil were detected. This indicated little effect of earthworms on protein and cellulose transformation in soil

  5. The Capsicum annuum class IV chitinase ChitIV interacts with receptor-like cytoplasmic protein kinase PIK1 to accelerate PIK1-triggered cell death and defence responses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Sung; Kim, Nak Hyun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-01-01

    The pepper receptor-like cytoplasmic protein kinase, CaPIK1, which mediates signalling of plant cell death and defence responses was previously identified. Here, the identification of a class IV chitinase, CaChitIV, from pepper plants (Capsicum annuum), which interacts with CaPIK1 and promotes CaPIK1-triggered cell death and defence responses, is reported. CaChitIV contains a signal peptide, chitin-binding domain, and glycol hydrolase domain. CaChitIV expression was up-regulated by Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) infection. Notably, avirulent Xcv infection rapidly induced CaChitIV expression in pepper leaves. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and co-immunoprecipitation revealed that CaPIK1 interacts with CaChitIV in planta, and that the CaPIK1–CaChitIV complex is localized mainly in the cytoplasm and plasma membrane. CaChitIV is also localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Transient co-expression of CaChitIV with CaPIK1 enhanced CaPIK1-triggered cell death response and reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) bursts. Co-silencing of both CaChitIV and CaPIK1 in pepper plants conferred enhanced susceptibility to Xcv infection, which was accompanied by a reduced induction of cell death response, ROS and NO bursts, and defence response genes. Ectopic expression of CaPIK1 in Arabidopsis enhanced basal resistance to Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis infection. Together, the results suggest that CaChitIV positively regulates CaPIK1-triggered cell death and defence responses through its interaction with CaPIK1. PMID:25694549

  6. Kinetic studies on the hydrolysis of N-acetylated and N-deacetylated derivatives of 4-methylumbelliferyl chitobioside by the family 18 chitinases ChiA and ChiB from Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Honda, Yuji; Kitaoka, Motomitsu; Tokuyasu, Ken; Sasaki, Chiye; Fukamizo, Tamo; Hayashi, Kiyoshi

    2003-02-01

    Kinetic analyses of the hydrolysis reactions of N-acetylated and N-deacetylated derivatives of 4-methylumbelliferyl chitobioside [(GlcNAc)(2)-UMB (1), GlcN-GlcNAc-UMB (2), GlcNAc-GlcN-UMB (3), and (GlcN)(2)-UMB (4)] by ChiA and ChiB from Serratia marcescens were performed. Both enzymes released UMB from all compounds apart from 4. The S-v curves of the hydrolyses of 1 by ChiA and ChiB both exhibited atypical kinetic patterns, and the shapes of the two S-v curves were different from one another. However, both curve shapes were explained by assuming some of the enzyme present formed complexes with multiple molecules of the substrate. Conversely, the S-v curves generated in the cleavage of 2 and 3 by ChiA exhibited typical Michaelis-Menten profiles. Both enzymes hydrolysed 2 with an approximately 14-fold higher K(m) value relative to 1, indicating that the N-acetyl group was recognised at the -2 subsite. The k(cat) value obtained with ChiA was identical to the k(cat) value observed for 1. However, the k(cat) value for ChiB was one-fourth that of 1, suggesting that the removal of the N-acetyl group caused an increase in the formation of a non-productive ES-complex. ChiA and ChiB hydrolysed 3 with 5- and 20-fold greater K(m) values relative to 1, respectively, and 60- and 30-fold smaller k(cat) values relative to 1, respectively. The reaction mechanism of family 18 chitinases is discussed based upon the results obtained from the hydrolysis of these compounds.

  7. Isolation of a New Mexican Strain of Bacillus subtilis with Antifungal and Antibacterial Activities

    PubMed Central

    Basurto-Cadena, M. G. L.; Vázquez-Arista, M.; García-Jiménez, J.; Salcedo-Hernández, R.; Bideshi, D. K.; Barboza-Corona, J. E.

    2012-01-01

    Although several strains of B. subtilis with antifungal activity have been isolated worldwide, to date there are no published reports regarding the isolation of a native B. subtilis strain from strawberry plants in Mexico. A native bacterium (Bacillus subtilis 21) demonstrated in vitro antagonistic activity against different plant pathogenic fungi. Under greenhouse conditions, it was shown that plants infected with Rhizoctonia solani and Fusarium verticillioides and treated with B. subtilis 21 produced augment in the number of leaves per plant and an increment in the length of healthy leaves in comparison with untreated plants. In addition, B. subtilis 21 showed activity against pathogenic bacteria. Secreted proteins by B. subtilis 21 were studied, detecting the presence of proteases and bacteriocin-like inhibitor substances that could be implicated in its antagonistic activity. Chitinases and zwittermicin production could not be detected. Then, B. subtilis 21 could potentially be used to control phytopathogenic fungi that infect strawberry plants. PMID:22593682

  8. Isolation of a new Mexican strain of Bacillus subtilis with antifungal and antibacterial activities.

    PubMed

    Basurto-Cadena, M G L; Vázquez-Arista, M; García-Jiménez, J; Salcedo-Hernández, R; Bideshi, D K; Barboza-Corona, J E

    2012-01-01

    Although several strains of B. subtilis with antifungal activity have been isolated worldwide, to date there are no published reports regarding the isolation of a native B. subtilis strain from strawberry plants in Mexico. A native bacterium (Bacillus subtilis 21) demonstrated in vitro antagonistic activity against different plant pathogenic fungi. Under greenhouse conditions, it was shown that plants infected with Rhizoctonia solani and Fusarium verticillioides and treated with B. subtilis 21 produced augment in the number of leaves per plant and an increment in the length of healthy leaves in comparison with untreated plants. In addition, B. subtilis 21 showed activity against pathogenic bacteria. Secreted proteins by B. subtilis 21 were studied, detecting the presence of proteases and bacteriocin-like inhibitor substances that could be implicated in its antagonistic activity. Chitinases and zwittermicin production could not be detected. Then, B. subtilis 21 could potentially be used to control phytopathogenic fungi that infect strawberry plants. PMID:22593682

  9. Effect of antagonistic yeast XL-1 on resistance-associated enzyme activities in postharvest cantaloupe.

    PubMed

    Shan, C-H; Chen, W; Zhang, H; Tang, F-X; Tong, J-M

    2014-08-15

    The effect of the antagonistic yeast XL-1 on resistance-associated enzyme activities in postharvest cantaloupe was studied by inoculating the antagonistic yeast XL-1. Cantaloupes were sterilized, dried in air, and soaked in antagonistic yeast treatment liquid for 30 s. After drying in air, the cantaloupe was stored at room temperature (2°-5°C). The activities of resistance-associated enzymes in cantaloupe like polyphenol oxidase, β-1,3-glucanase, peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase were measured every 7 days. Our results indicated that the antagonistic yeast XL-1 significantly improved the activity of β-1,3-glucanase and chitinase to promote the disease resistance of postharvest cantaloupe.

  10. The platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase gene derived from Trichoderma harzianum induces maize resistance to Curvularia lunata through the jasmonic acid signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chuanjin; Fan, Lili; Gao, Jinxin; Wang, Meng; Wu, Qiong; Tang, Jun; Li, Yaqian; Chen, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) derived from Trichoderma harzianum was upregulated by the interaction of T. harzianum with maize roots or the foliar pathogen Curvularia lunata. PAF-AH was associated with chitinase and cellulase expressions, but especially with chitinase, because its activity in the KO40 transformant (PAF-AH disruption transformant) was lower, compared with the wild-type strain T28. The result demonstrated that the colonization of maize roots by T. harzianum induced systemic protection of leaves inoculated with C. lunata. Such protection was associated with the expression of inducible jasmonic acid pathway-related genes. Moreover, the data from liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry confirmed that the concentration of jasmonic acid in maize leaves was associated with the expression level of defense-related genes, suggesting that PAF-AH induced resistance to the foliar pathogen. Our findings showed that PAF-AH had an important function in inducing systemic resistance to maize leaf spot pathogen. PMID:26273755

  11. The platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase gene derived from Trichoderma harzianum induces maize resistance to Curvularia lunata through the jasmonic acid signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chuanjin; Fan, Lili; Gao, Jinxin; Wang, Meng; Wu, Qiong; Tang, Jun; Li, Yaqian; Chen, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) derived from Trichoderma harzianum was upregulated by the interaction of T. harzianum with maize roots or the foliar pathogen Curvularia lunata. PAF-AH was associated with chitinase and cellulase expressions, but especially with chitinase, because its activity in the KO40 transformant (PAF-AH disruption transformant) was lower, compared with the wild-type strain T28. The result demonstrated that the colonization of maize roots by T. harzianum induced systemic protection of leaves inoculated with C. lunata. Such protection was associated with the expression of inducible jasmonic acid pathway-related genes. Moreover, the data from liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry confirmed that the concentration of jasmonic acid in maize leaves was associated with the expression level of defense-related genes, suggesting that PAF-AH induced resistance to the foliar pathogen. Our findings showed that PAF-AH had an important function in inducing systemic resistance to maize leaf spot pathogen.

  12. Isolation of a homodimeric lectin with antifungal and antiviral activities from red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) seeds.

    PubMed

    Ye, X Y; Ng, T B; Tsang, P W; Wang, J

    2001-07-01

    A homodimeric lectin adsorbed on Affi-gel blue gel and CM-Sepharose and possessing a molecular weight of 67 kDa was isolated from red kidney beans. The hemagglutinating activity of this lectin was inhibited by glycoproteins but not by simple sugars. The lectin manifested inhibitory activity on human immunodeficiency virus-1 reverse transcriptase and alpha-glucosidase. The N-terminal sequence of the lectin exhibited some differences from previously reported lectins from Phaseolus vulgaris but showed some similarity to chitinases. It exerted a suppressive effect on growth of the fungal species Fusarium oxysporum, Coprinus comatus, and Rhizoctonia solani. The lectin had low ribonuclease and negligible translation-inhibitory activities. PMID:11732688

  13. In Vitro and In Vivo Plant Growth Promoting Activities and DNA Fingerprinting of Antagonistic Endophytic Actinomycetes Associates with Medicinal Plants.

    PubMed

    Passari, Ajit Kumar; Mishra, Vineet Kumar; Gupta, Vijai Kumar; Yadav, Mukesh Kumar; Saikia, Ratul; Singh, Bhim Pratap

    2015-01-01

    Endophytic actinomycetes have shown unique plant growth promoting as well as antagonistic activity against fungal phytopathogens. In the present study forty-two endophytic actinomycetes recovered from medicinal plants were evaluated for their antagonistic potential and plant growth-promoting abilities. Twenty-two isolates which showed the inhibitory activity against at least one pathogen were subsequently tested for their plant-growth promoting activities and were compared genotypically using DNA based fingerprinting, including enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) and BOX repetitive elements. Genetic relatedness based on both ERIC and BOX-PCR generates specific patterns corresponding to particular genotypes. Exponentially grown antagonistic isolates were used to evaluate phosphate solubilization, siderophores, HCN, ammonia, chitinase, indole-3-acetic acid production, as well as antifungal activities. Out of 22 isolates, the amount of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) ranging between 10-32 μg/ml was produced by 20 isolates and all isolates were positive for ammonia production ranging between 5.2 to 54 mg/ml. Among 22 isolates tested, the amount of hydroxamate-type siderophores were produced by 16 isolates ranging between 5.2 to 36.4 μg/ml, while catechols-type siderophores produced by 5 isolates ranging from 3.2 to 5.4 μg/ml. Fourteen isolates showed the solubilisation of inorganic phosphorous ranging from 3.2 to 32.6 mg/100ml. Chitinase and HCN production was shown by 19 and 15 different isolates, respectively. In addition, genes of indole acetic acid (iaaM) and chitinase (chiC) were successively amplified from 20 and 19 isolates respectively. The two potential strains Streptomyces sp. (BPSAC34) and Leifsonia xyli (BPSAC24) were tested in vivo and improved a range of growth parameters in chilli (Capsicum annuum L.) under greenhouse conditions. This study is the first published report that actinomycetes can be isolated as endophytes from within these

  14. In Vitro and In Vivo Plant Growth Promoting Activities and DNA Fingerprinting of Antagonistic Endophytic Actinomycetes Associates with Medicinal Plants

    PubMed Central

    Passari, Ajit Kumar; Mishra, Vineet Kumar; Gupta, Vijai Kumar; Yadav, Mukesh Kumar; Saikia, Ratul; Singh, Bhim Pratap

    2015-01-01

    Endophytic actinomycetes have shown unique plant growth promoting as well as antagonistic activity against fungal phytopathogens. In the present study forty-two endophytic actinomycetes recovered from medicinal plants were evaluated for their antagonistic potential and plant growth-promoting abilities. Twenty-two isolates which showed the inhibitory activity against at least one pathogen were subsequently tested for their plant-growth promoting activities and were compared genotypically using DNA based fingerprinting, including enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) and BOX repetitive elements. Genetic relatedness based on both ERIC and BOX-PCR generates specific patterns corresponding to particular genotypes. Exponentially grown antagonistic isolates were used to evaluate phosphate solubilization, siderophores, HCN, ammonia, chitinase, indole-3-acetic acid production, as well as antifungal activities. Out of 22 isolates, the amount of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) ranging between 10–32 μg/ml was produced by 20 isolates and all isolates were positive for ammonia production ranging between 5.2 to 54 mg/ml. Among 22 isolates tested, the amount of hydroxamate-type siderophores were produced by 16 isolates ranging between 5.2 to 36.4 μg/ml, while catechols-type siderophores produced by 5 isolates ranging from 3.2 to 5.4 μg/ml. Fourteen isolates showed the solubilisation of inorganic phosphorous ranging from 3.2 to 32.6 mg/100ml. Chitinase and HCN production was shown by 19 and 15 different isolates, respectively. In addition, genes of indole acetic acid (iaaM) and chitinase (chiC) were successively amplified from 20 and 19 isolates respectively. The two potential strains Streptomyces sp. (BPSAC34) and Leifsonia xyli (BPSAC24) were tested in vivo and improved a range of growth parameters in chilli (Capsicum annuum L.) under greenhouse conditions. This study is the first published report that actinomycetes can be isolated as endophytes from within these

  15. Calmodulin-binding transcription activator (CAMTA) 3 mediates biotic defense responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Galon, Yael; Nave, Roy; Boyce, Joy M; Nachmias, Dikla; Knight, Marc R; Fromm, Hillel

    2008-03-19

    Calmodulin-binding transcription activator (CAMTA) 3 (also called SR1) is a calmodulin-binding transcription factor in Arabidopsis. Two homozygous T-DNA insertion mutants (camta3-1, camta3-2) showed enhanced spontaneous lesions. Transcriptome analysis of both mutants revealed 6 genes with attenuated expression and 99 genes with elevated expression. Of the latter, 32 genes are related to defense against pathogens (e.g. WRKY33, PR1 and chitinase). Propagation of a virulent strain of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae and the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea were attenuated in both mutants. Moreover, both mutants accumulated high levels of H2O2. We suggest that CAMTA3 regulates the expression of a set of genes involved in biotic defense responses.

  16. Burdock fructooligosaccharide induces fungal resistance in postharvest Kyoho grapes by activating the salicylic acid-dependent pathway and inhibiting browning.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fei; Zhang, Pengying; Guo, Moran; Yu, Wenqian; Chen, Kaoshan

    2013-05-01

    Burdock fructooligosaccharide (BFO) is a natural elicitor from Arcitum lappa. The effects of BFO in controlling postharvest disease in grape, apple, banana, kiwi, citrus, strawberry, and pear were investigated. The disease index, decay percentage, and area under the disease progress curve indicated that BFO has general control effects on postharvest disease of fruits. Kyoho grapes were studied to elucidate the mechanism of BFO in boosting the resistance of grapes to Botrytis cinerea infection. BFO treatment induced upregulation of the npr1, pr1, pal, and sts genes, and inhibited the total phenol content decrease, which activated chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase. These results indicated that the salicylic acid-dependent signalling pathway was induced. The delayed colour change and peroxidase and polyphenoloxidase activity suggested that BFO delayed grape browning. The reduced respiration rate, weight loss, and titratable acidity prolonged the shelf life of postharvest grapes. BFO is a promising elicitor in postharvest disease control. PMID:23265522

  17. Burdock fructooligosaccharide induces fungal resistance in postharvest Kyoho grapes by activating the salicylic acid-dependent pathway and inhibiting browning.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fei; Zhang, Pengying; Guo, Moran; Yu, Wenqian; Chen, Kaoshan

    2013-05-01

    Burdock fructooligosaccharide (BFO) is a natural elicitor from Arcitum lappa. The effects of BFO in controlling postharvest disease in grape, apple, banana, kiwi, citrus, strawberry, and pear were investigated. The disease index, decay percentage, and area under the disease progress curve indicated that BFO has general control effects on postharvest disease of fruits. Kyoho grapes were studied to elucidate the mechanism of BFO in boosting the resistance of grapes to Botrytis cinerea infection. BFO treatment induced upregulation of the npr1, pr1, pal, and sts genes, and inhibited the total phenol content decrease, which activated chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase. These results indicated that the salicylic acid-dependent signalling pathway was induced. The delayed colour change and peroxidase and polyphenoloxidase activity suggested that BFO delayed grape browning. The reduced respiration rate, weight loss, and titratable acidity prolonged the shelf life of postharvest grapes. BFO is a promising elicitor in postharvest disease control.

  18. [Activity of protective proteins in wheat plants treated with chitooligosaccharides with different degrees of acetylation and infection with Bipolaris sorokiniana].

    PubMed

    Iarullina, L G; Kasimova, R I; Akhatova, A R

    2014-01-01

    The influence of chitooligosaccharides (COS) with different degrees of acetylation (DA) on the production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and changes in the level of gene expression of pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins (oxalate oxidase AJ556991.1, peroxidase TC 151917, chitinase AV029935L, proteinase inhibitor EU293132.1) in the roots of the wheat Triticum aestivum L. inoculated with root rot pathogen Bipolaris sorokiniana (Sacc.) Shoenaker was investigated. Differences were detected in plant responses to infection. These differences were due to the pretreatment of COS seeds with differing DA. Our results demonstrated that COS with a DA over 65% more effectively induced accumulation of H2O2 and increased the transcriptional activity of genes of PR-proteins as compared to COS with a DA of 30%. These data suggest an important role for DA in the manifestation of eliciting properties of COS, also in the presence of H2O2.

  19. Mechanism of phosphate solubilization and antifungal activity of Streptomyces spp. isolated from wheat roots and rhizosphere and their application in improving plant growth.

    PubMed

    Jog, Rahul; Pandya, Maharshi; Nareshkumar, G; Rajkumar, Shalini

    2014-04-01

    The application of plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) at field scale has been hindered by an inadequate understanding of the mechanisms that enhance plant growth, rhizosphere incompetence and the inability of bacterial strains to thrive in different soil types and environmental conditions. Actinobacteria with their sporulation, nutrient cycling, root colonization, bio-control and other plant-growth-promoting activities could be potential field bio-inoculants. We report the isolation of five rhizospheric and two root endophytic actinobacteria from Triticum aestivum (wheat) plants. The cultures exhibited plant-growth-promoting activities, namely phosphate solubilization (1916 mg l(-1)), phytase (0.68 U ml(-1)), chitinase (6.2 U ml(-1)), indole-3-acetic acid (136.5 mg l(-1)) and siderophore (47.4 mg l(-1)) production, as well as utilizing all the rhizospheric sugars under test. Malate (50-55 mmol l(-1)) was estimated in the culture supernatant of the highest phosphate solublizer, Streptomyces mhcr0816. The mechanism of malate overproduction was studied by gene expression and assays of key glyoxalate cycle enzymes - isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH), isocitrate lyase (ICL) and malate synthase (MS). The significant increase in gene expression (ICL fourfold, MS sixfold) and enzyme activity (ICL fourfold, MS tenfold) of ICL and MS during stationary phase resulted in malate production as indicated by lowered pH (2.9) and HPLC analysis (retention time 13.1 min). Similarly, the secondary metabolites for chitinase-independent biocontrol activity of Streptomyces mhcr0817, as identified by GC-MS and (1)H-NMR spectra, were isoforms of pyrrole derivatives. The inoculation of actinobacterial isolate mhce0811 in T. aestivum (wheat) significantly improved plant growth, biomass (33%) and mineral (Fe, Mn, P) content in non-axenic conditions. Thus the actinobacterial isolates reported here were efficient PGPR possessing significant antifungal activity and may have potential field

  20. Biological activity of phenylpropionic acid isolated from a terrestrial Streptomycetes.

    PubMed

    Narayana, Kolla J P; Prabhakar, Peddikotla; Vijayalakshmi, Muvva; Venkateswarlu, Yenamandra; Krishna, Palakodety S J

    2007-01-01

    The strain ANU 6277 was isolated from laterite soil and identified as Streptomyces sp. closely related to Streptomyces albidoflavus cluster by 16S rRNA analysis. The cultural, morphological and physiological characters of the strain were recorded. The strain exhibited resistance to chloramphenicol, penicillin and streptomycin. It had the ability to produce enzymes such as amylase and chitinase. A bioactive compound was isolated from the strain at stationary phase of culture and identified as 3-phenylpropionic acid (3-PPA) by FT-IR, EI-MS, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectral studies. It exhibited antimicrobial activity against different bacteria like Bacillus cereus, B. subtilis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. flourescens, Staphylococcus aureus and some fungi including Aspergillus flavus, A. niger, Candida albicans, Fusarium oxysporum, F. udum and Penicillium citrinum. The antifungal activity of 3-PPA of the strain was evaluated in in vivo and in vitro conditions against Fusarium udum causing wilt disease in pigeon pea. The compound 3-PPA is an effective antifungal agent when compared to tricyclozole (fungicide) to control wilt caused by F. udum, but it exhibited less antifungal activity than carbendazim. PMID:18062653

  1. Biological activity of phenylpropionic acid isolated from a terrestrial Streptomycetes.

    PubMed

    Narayana, Kolla J P; Prabhakar, Peddikotla; Vijayalakshmi, Muvva; Venkateswarlu, Yenamandra; Krishna, Palakodety S J

    2007-01-01

    The strain ANU 6277 was isolated from laterite soil and identified as Streptomyces sp. closely related to Streptomyces albidoflavus cluster by 16S rRNA analysis. The cultural, morphological and physiological characters of the strain were recorded. The strain exhibited resistance to chloramphenicol, penicillin and streptomycin. It had the ability to produce enzymes such as amylase and chitinase. A bioactive compound was isolated from the strain at stationary phase of culture and identified as 3-phenylpropionic acid (3-PPA) by FT-IR, EI-MS, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectral studies. It exhibited antimicrobial activity against different bacteria like Bacillus cereus, B. subtilis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. flourescens, Staphylococcus aureus and some fungi including Aspergillus flavus, A. niger, Candida albicans, Fusarium oxysporum, F. udum and Penicillium citrinum. The antifungal activity of 3-PPA of the strain was evaluated in in vivo and in vitro conditions against Fusarium udum causing wilt disease in pigeon pea. The compound 3-PPA is an effective antifungal agent when compared to tricyclozole (fungicide) to control wilt caused by F. udum, but it exhibited less antifungal activity than carbendazim.

  2. Ascalin, a new anti-fungal peptide with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase-inhibiting activity from shallot bulbs.

    PubMed

    Wang, H X; Ng, T B

    2002-06-01

    An isolation procedure comprising ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, ion exchange chromatography on SP-Sepharose and gel filtration on Superdex 75 was used to isolate an anti-fungal peptide from the bulbs of the shallot Allium ascalonicum. The peptide demonstrated a molecular weight of 9.5kDa, and possessed an N-terminal sequence YQCGQGG somewhat similar to chitinases from other Allium species which are however much larger in molecular weight. The peptide designated ascalin manifested a unique specific anti-fungal activity. It inhibited mycelial growth in the fungus Botrytis cinerea but not in the fungi Mycosphaerella arachidicola and Fusarium oxysporum. Ascalin inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with an IC(50) of 10 microM, much more potently than Allium tuberosum anti-fungal protein and other anti-fungal proteins.

  3. Determination of lytic enzyme activities of indigenous Trichoderma isolates from Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Asad, Saeed Ahmad; Tabassum, Ayesha; Hameed, Abdul; Hassan, Fayyaz Ul; Afzal, Aftab; Khan, Sabaz Ali; Ahmed, Rafiq; Shahzad, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated lytic enzyme activities in three indigenous Trichoderma strains namely, Trichoderma asperellum, Trichoderma harzianum and Trichoderma sp. Native Trichoderma strains and a virulent strain of Rhizoctonia solani isolated from infected bean plants were also included in the study. Enzyme activities were determined by measuring sugar reduction by dinitrosalicylic acid (DNS) method using suitable substrates. The antagonists were cultured in minimal salt medium with the following modifications: medium A (1 g of glucose), medium B (0.5 g of glucose + 0.5 g of deactivated R. solani mycelia), medium C (1.0 g of deactivated respective antagonist mycelium) and medium D (1 g of deactivated R. solani mycelia). T asperellum showed presence of higher amounts of chitinases, β-1, 3-glucanases and xylanases in extracellular protein extracts from medium D as compared to medium A. While, the higher activities of glucosidases and endoglucanses were shown in medium D extracts by T. harzianum. β-glucosidase activities were lower compared with other enzymes; however, activities of the extracts of medium D were significantly different. T. asperellum exhibited maximum inhibition (97.7%). On the other hand, Trichoderma sp. did not show any effect on mycelia growth of R. solani on crude extract. PMID:26691463

  4. Effect of chitin on the antagonistic activity of Cryptococcus laurentii against Penicillium expansum in pear fruit.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ting; Wang, Lianping; Yin, Yun; Wang, Yixi; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2008-02-29

    This study was designed to evaluate the impact of chitin on the antagonistic activity of Cryptococcus laurentii against the postharvest blue mold rot caused by Penicillium expansum in pear fruit. The results showed that the antagonistic activity of C. laurentii obtained from the culture media of nutrient yeast dextrose broth (NYDB) amended with chitin at 0.5-1.0% was improved greatly compared with the case that without chitin. The addition of chitin to NYDB did not influence the growth of C. laurentii, however, its population was found to increase rapidly thereafter in pear fruit wounds compared to that harvested from NYDB without chitin. Moreover, the cell-free filtrate of the chitin-supplement culture media in which the yeast was incubated for 24 h emerged a direct antifungal activity against P. expansum in pear fruit wounds, with the associated high level of chitinase activity. These results suggested that the use of chitin may be an effective method to induce the antagonistic activity of C. laurentii. To our knowledge, this is the first report regarding the chitin could enhance the efficacy of postharvest biocontrol yeasts.

  5. Determination of lytic enzyme activities of indigenous Trichoderma isolates from Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Asad, Saeed Ahmad; Tabassum, Ayesha; Hameed, Abdul; Hassan, Fayyaz ul; Afzal, Aftab; Khan, Sabaz Ali; Ahmed, Rafiq; Shahzad, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study investigated lytic enzyme activities in three indigenous Trichoderma strains namely, Trichoderma asperellum, Trichoderma harzianum and Trichoderma sp. Native Trichoderma strains and a virulent strain of Rhizoctonia solani isolated from infected bean plants were also included in the study. Enzyme activities were determined by measuring sugar reduction by dinitrosalicylic acid (DNS) method using suitable substrates. The antagonists were cultured in minimal salt medium with the following modifications: medium A (1 g of glucose), medium B (0.5 g of glucose + 0.5 g of deactivated R. solani mycelia), medium C (1.0 g of deactivated respective antagonist mycelium) and medium D (1 g of deactivated R. solani mycelia). T asperellum showed presence of higher amounts of chitinases, β-1, 3-glucanases and xylanases in extracellular protein extracts from medium D as compared to medium A. While, the higher activities of glucosidases and endoglucanses were shown in medium D extracts by T. harzianum. β-glucosidase activities were lower compared with other enzymes; however, activities of the extracts of medium D were significantly different. T. asperellum exhibited maximum inhibition (97.7%). On the other hand, Trichoderma sp. did not show any effect on mycelia growth of R. solani on crude extract. PMID:26691463

  6. Determination of lytic enzyme activities of indigenous Trichoderma isolates from Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Asad, Saeed Ahmad; Tabassum, Ayesha; Hameed, Abdul; Hassan, Fayyaz Ul; Afzal, Aftab; Khan, Sabaz Ali; Ahmed, Rafiq; Shahzad, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated lytic enzyme activities in three indigenous Trichoderma strains namely, Trichoderma asperellum, Trichoderma harzianum and Trichoderma sp. Native Trichoderma strains and a virulent strain of Rhizoctonia solani isolated from infected bean plants were also included in the study. Enzyme activities were determined by measuring sugar reduction by dinitrosalicylic acid (DNS) method using suitable substrates. The antagonists were cultured in minimal salt medium with the following modifications: medium A (1 g of glucose), medium B (0.5 g of glucose + 0.5 g of deactivated R. solani mycelia), medium C (1.0 g of deactivated respective antagonist mycelium) and medium D (1 g of deactivated R. solani mycelia). T asperellum showed presence of higher amounts of chitinases, β-1, 3-glucanases and xylanases in extracellular protein extracts from medium D as compared to medium A. While, the higher activities of glucosidases and endoglucanses were shown in medium D extracts by T. harzianum. β-glucosidase activities were lower compared with other enzymes; however, activities of the extracts of medium D were significantly different. T. asperellum exhibited maximum inhibition (97.7%). On the other hand, Trichoderma sp. did not show any effect on mycelia growth of R. solani on crude extract.

  7. The pathogenesis-related protein PR-4b from Theobroma cacao presents RNase activity, Ca2+ and Mg2+ dependent-DNase activity and antifungal action on Moniliophthora perniciosa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The production and accumulation of pathogenesis-related proteins (PR proteins) in plants in response to biotic or abiotic stresses is well known and is considered as a crucial mechanism for plant defense. A pathogenesis-related protein 4 cDNA was identified from a cacao-Moniliophthora perniciosa interaction cDNA library and named TcPR-4b. Results TcPR-4b presents a Barwin domain with six conserved cysteine residues, but lacks the chitin-binding site. Molecular modeling of TcPR-4b confirmed the importance of the cysteine residues to maintain the protein structure, and of several conserved amino acids for the catalytic activity. In the cacao genome, TcPR-4b belonged to a small multigene family organized mainly on chromosome 5. TcPR-4b RT-qPCR analysis in resistant and susceptible cacao plants infected by M. perniciosa showed an increase of expression at 48 hours after infection (hai) in both cacao genotypes. After the initial stage (24-72 hai), the TcPR-4b expression was observed at all times in the resistant genotypes, while in the susceptible one the expression was concentrated at the final stages of infection (45-90 days after infection). The recombinant TcPR-4b protein showed RNase, and bivalent ions dependent-DNase activity, but no chitinase activity. Moreover, TcPR-4b presented antifungal action against M. perniciosa, and the reduction of M. perniciosa survival was related to ROS production in fungal hyphae. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report of a PR-4 showing simultaneously RNase, DNase and antifungal properties, but no chitinase activity. Moreover, we showed that the antifungal activity of TcPR-4b is directly related to RNase function. In cacao, TcPR-4b nuclease activities may be related to the establishment and maintenance of resistance, and to the PCD mechanism, in resistant and susceptible cacao genotypes, respectively. PMID:24920373

  8. Different Effects of Metarhizium anisopliae Strains IMI330189 and IBC200614 on Enzymes Activities and Hemocytes of Locusta migratoria L.

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Guangchun; Jia, Miao; Zhao, Xia; Wang, Lei; Tu, Xiongbing; Wang, Guangjun; Nong, Xiangqun; Zhang, Zehua

    2016-01-01

    Background Metarhizium is an important class of entomopathogenic fungi in the biocontrol of insects, but its virulence is affected by insect immunity. To clarify the mechanism in virulence of Metarhizium, we compared the immunological differences in Locusta migratoria L. when exposed to two strains of Metarhizium anisopliae (Ma). Results The virulence of Ma IMI330189 was significantly higher than that of Ma IBC200614 to locust, and IMI330189 overcame the hemocytes and began destroying the hemocytes of locust at 72 h after spray, while locust is immune to IBC200614. IMI330189 could overcome the humoral immunity of locust by inhibiting the activities of phenol oxidase (PO), esterases, multi-function oxidases (MFOs) and acetylcholinesterases in locust while increasing the activities of glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs), catalase and aryl-acylamidase (AA). However IBC200614 inhibit the activities of GSTs and AA in locust and increase the activities of MFOs, PO, superoxide dismutase, peroxidase and chitinase in locust. The changes of enzymes activities in period of infection showed that the time period between the 2nd and the 5th day after spray is critical in the pathogenic process. Conclusion These results found the phenomenon that Ma initiatively broke host hemocytes, revealed the correlation between the virulence of Ma and the changes of enzymes activities in host induced by Ma, and clarified the critical period in the infection of Ma. So, these results should provide guidance for the construction of efficient biocontrol Ma strains. PMID:27227835

  9. Cold active hydrolytic enzymes production by psychrotrophic Bacilli isolated from three sub-glacial lakes of NW Indian Himalayas.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Ajar Nath; Sachan, Shashwati Ghosh; Verma, Priyanka; Kaushik, Rajeev; Saxena, Anil Kumar

    2016-03-01

    The diversity of culturable, cold-active enzymes producing Bacilli was investigated from three sub-glacial lakes of north western Indian Himalayas. Amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) using three restriction enzymes Alu I, Msp I, and Hae III led to the clustering of 136 Bacilli into 26, 23, and 22 clusters at 75% similarity index from Chandratal Lake, Dashair Lake, and Pangong Lake, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing led to the identification of 35 Bacilli that could be grouped in seven families viz.: Bacillaceae (48%), Staphylococcaceae (14%), Bacillales incertae sedis (13%), Planococcaceae (12%), Paenibacillaceae (9%), Sporolactobacillaceae (3%), and Carnobacteriaceae (1%), which included twelve different genera Bacillus, Desemzia, Exiguobacterium, Jeotgalicoccus, Lysinibacillus, Paenibacillus, Planococcus, Pontibacillus, Sinobaca, Sporosarcina, Staphylococcus, and Virgibacillus. Based on their optimal temperature for growth, 35 Bacilli were grouped as psychrophilic (11 strains), psychrotrophic (17 strains), or psychrotolerant (7 strains), respectively. The representative isolates from each cluster were screened for cold-active enzyme activities. Amylase, β-glucosidase, pectinase, and protease activities at 4 °C were detected in more than 80% of the strains while approximately 40, 31, 23, 14, 11, and 9% of strains possessed cellulase, xylanase, β-galactosidase, laccase, chitinase, and lipase activity, respectively. Among 35 Bacilli, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, Bacillus marisflavi, Exiguobacterium indicum, Paenibacillus terrae, Pontibacillus sp., Sporosarcina globispora, and Sporosarcina psychrophila were efficient producers of different cold-active enzymes. These cold-adapted Bacilli could play an important role in industrial and agricultural processes. PMID:26933936

  10. [Effects of forest type on soil organic matter, microbial biomass, and enzyme activities].

    PubMed

    Lu, Shun-bao; Zhou, Xiao-qi; Rui, Yi-chao; Chen, Cheng-rong; Xu, Zhi-hong; Guo, Xiao-min

    2011-10-01

    Taking the typical forest types Pinus elliottii var. elliotttii, Araucaria cunninghamii, and Agathis australis in southern Queensland of Australia as test objects, an investigation was made on the soil soluble organic carbon (SOC) and nitrogen (SON), microbial biomass C (MBC) and N (MBN), and enzyme activities, aimed to understand the effects of forest type on soil quality. In the three forests, soil SOC content was 552-1154 mg kg(-1), soil SON content was 20.11-57.32 mg kg(-1), soil MBC was 42-149 mg kg(-1), soil MBN was 7-35 mg kg(-1), soil chitinase (CAS) activity was 2.96-7.63 microg g(-1) h(-1), soil leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) activity was 0.18-0.46 microg g(-1) d(-1), soil acid phosphatase (ACP) activity was 16.5-29.6 microg g(-1) h(-1), soil alkaline phosphatase (AKP) activity was 0.79-3.42 microg g(-1) h(-1), and soil beta-glucosidase (BG) activity was 3.71-9.93 microg g(-1) h(-1). There was a significant correlation between soil MBC and MBN. Soil SOC content and soil CAS and LAP activities decreased in the order of P. elliottii > A. cunninghamii > A. australis, soil SON content decreased in the order of A. cunninghamii > A. australis > P. elliottii and was significantly higher in A. cunninghamii than in P. elliottii forest (P < 0.05), soil MBC and MBN and AKP activity decreased in the order of A. australis > P. elliottii > A. cunninghamii, and soil ACP and BG activities decreased in the order of P. elliottii > A. australis > A. cunninghamii. Among the test soil biochemical factors, soil MBC, MBN, SON, and LAP had greater effects on the soil quality under the test forest types. PMID:22263459

  11. Depth profiles of bacterioplankton assemblages and their activities in the Ross Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celussi, Mauro; Cataletto, Bruno; Fonda Umani, Serena; Del Negro, Paola

    2009-12-01

    The identification of bacterial community structure has led, since the beginning of the 1990s, to the idea that bacterioplankton populations are stratified in the water column and that diverse lineages with mostly unknown phenotypes dominate marine microbial communities. The diversity of depth-related assemblages is also reflected in their patterns of activities, as bacteria affiliated to different groups can express different activities in a given ecosystem. We analysed bacterial assemblages (DGGE fingerprinting) and their activities (prokaryotic carbon production, protease, phosphatase, chitinase, beta-glucosidase and lipase activities) in two areas in the Ross Sea, differing mainly in their productivity regime: two stations are located in the Terra Nova Bay polynya area (highly productive during summer) and two close to Cape Adare (low phytoplankton biomass and activity). At every station a pronounced stratification of bacterial assemblages was identified, highlighting epipelagic communities differing substantially from the mesopelagic and the bathypelagic communities. Multivariate analysis suggested that pressure and indirectly light-affected variables (i.e. oxygen and fluorescence) had a great effect on the bacterial communities outcompeting the possible influences of temperature and dissolved organic carbon concentration. Generally activities decreased with depth even though a signal of the Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) at one of the northern stations corresponded to an increase in some of the degradative activities, generating some 'hot spots' in the profile. We also found that similar assemblages express similar metabolic requirements reflected in analogous patterns of activity (similar degradative potential and leucine uptake rate). Furthermore, the presence of eukaryotic chloroplasts' 16S rDNA in deep samples highlighted how in some cases the dense surface-water formation (in this case High Salinity Shelf Water—HSSW) and downwelling can affect, at least

  12. Classically and alternatively activated macrophages contribute to tissue remodelling after myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Troidl, C; Möllmann, H; Nef, H; Masseli, F; Voss, S; Szardien, S; Willmer, M; Rolf, A; Rixe, J; Troidl, K; Kostin, S; Hamm, C; Elsässer, A

    2009-01-01

    An important goal in cardiology is to minimize myocardial necrosis and to support a discrete but resilient scar formation after myocardial infarction (MI). Macrophages are a type of cells that influence cardiac remodelling during MI. Therefore, the goal of the present study was to investigate their transcriptional profile and to identify the type of activation during scar tissue formation. Ligature of the left anterior descending coronary artery was performed in mice. Macrophages were isolated from infarcted tissue using magnetic cell sorting after 5 days. The total RNA of macrophages was subjected to microarray analysis and compared with RNA from MI and LV-control. mRNA abundance of relevant targets was validated by quantitative real-time PCR 2, 5 and 10 days after MI (qRT-PCR). Immunohistochemistry was performed to localize activation type-specific proteins. The genome scan revealed 68 targets predominantly expressed by macrophages after MI. Among these targets, an increased mRNA abundance of genes, involved in both the classically (tumour necrosis factor α, interleukin 6, interleukin 1β) and the alternatively (arginase 1 and 2, mannose receptor C type 1, chitinase 3-like 3) activated phenotype of macrophages, was found 5 days after MI. This observation was confirmed by qRT-PCR. Using immunohistochemistry, we confirmed that tumour necrosis factor α, representing the classical activation, is strongly transcribed early after ligature (2 days). It was decreased after 5 and 10 days. Five days after MI, we found a fundamental change towards alternative activation of macrophages with up-regulation of arginase 1. Our results demonstrate that macrophages are differentially activated during different phases of scar tissue formation after MI. During the early inflammatory phase, macrophages are predominantly classically activated, whereas their phenotype changes during the important transition from inflammation to scar tissue formation into an alternatively activated

  13. The Glycolytic Enzymes Activity in the Midgut of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) adult and their Seasonal Changes

    PubMed Central

    Guzik, Joanna; Nakonieczny, Mirosław; Tarnawska, Monika; Bereś, Paweł K.; Drzewiecki, Sławomir; Migula, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    The western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) is an important pest of maize. The diet of the D. virgifera imago is rich in starch and other polysaccharides present in cereals such as maize. Therefore, knowledge about enzymes involved in digestion of such specific food of this pest seems to be important. The paper shows, for the first time, the activities of main glycolytic enzymes in the midgut of D. virgifera imago: endoglycosidases (α-amylase, cellulase, chitinase, licheninase, laminarinase); exoglycosidases (α- and β-glucosidases, α- and β-galactosidases) and disaccharidases (maltase, isomaltase, sucrase, trehalase, lactase, and cellobiase). Activities of α-amylase, α-glucosidase, and maltase were the highest among assayed endoglycosidases, exoglycosidases, and disaccharidases, respectively. This indicates that in the midgut of D. virgifera imago α-amylase, α-glucosidase and maltase are important enzymes in starch hydrolysis and products of its digestion. These results lead to conclusion that inhibition of most active glycolytic enzymes of D. virgifera imago may be another promising method for chemical control of this pest of maize.

  14. Response of microbial extracellular enzyme activities and r- vs. K- selected microorganisms to elevated atmospheric CO2 depends on soil aggregate size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorodnikov, Maxim; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Blagodatskiy, Sergey; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-05-01

    Increased belowground carbon (C) transfer by plant roots under elevated atmospheric CO2 and the contrasting environment in soil macro- and microaggregates could affect properties of the microbial community in the rhizosphere. We evaluated the effect of 5 years of elevated CO2 (550 ppm) on four extracellular enzymes: ß-glucosidase, chitinase, phosphatase, and sulfatase along with the contribution of fast- (r-strategists) and slow-growing microorganisms (K-strategists) in soil aggregates. We fractionated the bulk soil from the ambient and elevated CO2 treatments of FACE-Hohenheim (Stuttgart) into large macro- (>2 mm), small macro- (0.25-2.00 mm), and microaggregates (<0.25 mm) using a modified dry sieving. Microbial biomass (C-mic by SIR), the maximal specific growth rate (µ), growing microbial biomass (GMB) and lag-period (t-lag) were estimated by the kinetics of CO2 emission from bulk soil and aggregates amended with glucose and nutrients. In the bulk soil and isolated aggregates before and after activation with glucose, the actual and the potential enzyme activities were measured. Although C-org and C-mic as well as the activities of ß-glucosidase, phosphatase, and sulfatase were unaffected in bulk soil and in aggregate-size classes by elevated CO2, significant changes were observed in potential enzyme production after substrate amendment. After adding glucose, enzyme activities under elevated CO2 were 1.2-1.9-fold higher than under ambient CO2. In addition, µ values were significantly higher under elevated than ambient CO2 for bulk soil, small macroaggregates, and microaggregates. Based on changes in µ, GMB, and lag-period, we conclude that elevated atmospheric CO2 stimulated the r-selected microorganisms, especially in soil microaggregates. In contrast, significantly higher chitinase activity in bulk soil and in large macroaggregates under elevated CO2 revealed an increased contribution of fungi to turnover processes. We conclude that quantitative and

  15. Comparison of the White-Nose Syndrome Agent Pseudogymnoascus destructans to Cave-Dwelling Relatives Suggests Reduced Saprotrophic Enzyme Activity

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Hannah T.; Barton, Hazel A.

    2014-01-01

    White-nose Syndrome (WNS) is an emerging infectious mycosis that has impacted multiple species of North American bats since its initial discovery in 2006, yet the physiology of the causal agent, the psychrophilic fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans ( = Geomyces destructans), is not well understood. We investigated the ability of P. destructans to secrete enzymes that could permit environmental growth or affect pathogenesis and compared enzyme activity across several Pseudogymnoascus species isolated from both hibernating bats and cave sediments. We found that P. destructans produced enzymes that could be beneficial in either a pathogenic or saprotrophic context, such as lipases, hemolysins, and urease, as well as chitinase and cellulases, which could aid in saprotrophic growth. The WNS pathogen showed significantly lower activity for urease and endoglucanase compared to con-generic species (Pseudogymnoascus), which may indicate a shift in selective pressure to the detriment of P. destructans’ saprotrophic ability. Based on the positive function of multiple saprotrophic enzymes, the causal agent of White-nose Syndrome shows potential for environmental growth on a variety of substrates found in caves, albeit at a reduced level compared to environmental strains. Our data suggest that if P. destructans emerged as an opportunistic infection from an environmental source, co-evolution with its host may have led to a reduced capacity for saprotrophic growth. PMID:24466096

  16. Comparison of the white-nose syndrome agent Pseudogymnoascus destructans to cave-dwelling relatives suggests reduced saprotrophic enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Hannah T; Barton, Hazel A

    2014-01-01

    White-nose Syndrome (WNS) is an emerging infectious mycosis that has impacted multiple species of North American bats since its initial discovery in 2006, yet the physiology of the causal agent, the psychrophilic fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans ( = Geomyces destructans), is not well understood. We investigated the ability of P. destructans to secrete enzymes that could permit environmental growth or affect pathogenesis and compared enzyme activity across several Pseudogymnoascus species isolated from both hibernating bats and cave sediments. We found that P. destructans produced enzymes that could be beneficial in either a pathogenic or saprotrophic context, such as lipases, hemolysins, and urease, as well as chitinase and cellulases, which could aid in saprotrophic growth. The WNS pathogen showed significantly lower activity for urease and endoglucanase compared to con-generic species (Pseudogymnoascus), which may indicate a shift in selective pressure to the detriment of P. destructans' saprotrophic ability. Based on the positive function of multiple saprotrophic enzymes, the causal agent of White-nose Syndrome shows potential for environmental growth on a variety of substrates found in caves, albeit at a reduced level compared to environmental strains. Our data suggest that if P. destructans emerged as an opportunistic infection from an environmental source, co-evolution with its host may have led to a reduced capacity for saprotrophic growth. PMID:24466096

  17. Evaluating the Biodeterioration Enzymatic Activities of Fungal Contamination Isolated from Some Ancient Yemeni Mummies Preserved in the National Museum

    PubMed Central

    Naji, Khalid Mohammed; Abdullah, Qais Yusuf M.; AL-Zaqri, Aida Qaseem M.; Alghalibi, Saeed M.

    2014-01-01

    Sophisticated mummification using chemical preservation was prevalent in ancient Yemeni civilization as noted in the 4th century B.C. mummies of the National Museum of Yemen, Sana'a, used in this study. Five of these mummies were used to evaluate hydrolytic enzymes produced as a result of fungal contamination. Forty-seven fungal species were isolated, thereby reflecting a high degree of contamination which may have resulted from the poor ventilation and preservation system. Aspergillus was the most common genus isolated (48.9%). Fifteen isolates exhibited ability to produce cellulase (EC; 3.2.1.4), Aspergillus candidus being the highest cellulose-producer. Pectin lyase (PL, EC; 4.2.2.2) and pectin methyl esterase (PME, EC; 3.1.1.11) were produced by Trichoderma hamatum, whereas chitinase (EC; 3.2.1.14) was produced by Aspergillus niger. Protease activity was noted by only Cladosporium herbarum. The higher activities of these fungal hydrolytic enzymes represent the major threats of biodeterioration including deteriorating linen bandages as well as the mummy bodies. Therefore, it is recommended to improve the preservation system of the mummies at the National Museum to minimize the contamination up to the lowest level and protect the mummies from biodeterioration. PMID:25478228

  18. Characterization of a pathogenesis-related protein 4 (PR-4) induced in Capsicum chinense L3 plants with dual RNase and DNase activities.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Morato, Maria Angeles; de Lacoba, Mario García; García-Luque, Isabel; Serra, Maria Teresa

    2010-07-01

    Resistance conferred by the L(3) gene is active against most of the tobamoviruses, including the Spanish strain (PMMoV-S), a P(1),(2) pathotype, but not against certain strains of pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV), termed as P(1),(2),(3) pathotype, such as the Italian strain (PMMoV-I). PMMoV-S induces a hypersensitive reaction (HR) in C. chinense PI159236 plant leaves with the formation of necrotic local lesions and restriction of the virus at the primary infection sites. In this paper, a C. chinense PR-4 protein induced during both the compatible and the incompatible interactions has been identified. It was strongly associated with HR induction and to a lesser extent with the compatible interaction, but only in the later stages of infection. Moreover, it was found to accumulate during the necrogenic reaction induced by Potato virus X. The C. chinense PR-4 protein belongs to the PR-4 protein subgroup II, based on the absence of a hevein domain. Furthermore, it is shown that the purified protein does not have chitinase activity, as previously proposed for PR-4 proteins. Instead, it has both RNase and DNase activity, although its contribution to the bulk activity of nucleases in infected plants is very low.

  19. Characterization of a pathogenesis-related protein 4 (PR-4) induced in Capsicum chinense L3 plants with dual RNase and DNase activities

    PubMed Central

    Guevara-Morato, Maria Ángeles; de Lacoba, Mario García; García-Luque, Isabel; Serra, Maria Teresa

    2010-01-01

    Resistance conferred by the L3 gene is active against most of the tobamoviruses, including the Spanish strain (PMMoV-S), a P1,2 pathotype, but not against certain strains of pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV), termed as P1,2,3 pathotype, such as the Italian strain (PMMoV-I). PMMoV-S induces a hypersensitive reaction (HR) in C. chinense PI159236 plant leaves with the formation of necrotic local lesions and restriction of the virus at the primary infection sites. In this paper, a C. chinense PR-4 protein induced during both the compatible and the incompatible interactions has been identified. It was strongly associated with HR induction and to a lesser extent with the compatible interaction, but only in the later stages of infection. Moreover, it was found to accumulate during the necrogenic reaction induced by Potato virus X. The C. chinense PR-4 protein belongs to the PR-4 protein subgroup II, based on the absence of a hevein domain. Furthermore, it is shown that the purified protein does not have chitinase activity, as previously proposed for PR-4 proteins. Instead, it has both RNase and DNase activity, although its contribution to the bulk activity of nucleases in infected plants is very low. PMID:20511278

  20. Effects of stoichiometry and temperature perturbations on beech litter decomposition, enzyme activities and protein expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiblinger, K. M.; Schneider, T.; Roschitzki, B.; Schmid, E.; Eberl, L.; Hämmerle, I.; Leitner, S.; Richter, A.; Wanek, W.; Riedel, K.; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, S.

    2011-12-01

    Microbes are major players in leaf litter decomposition and therefore advances in the understanding of their control on element cycling are of paramount importance. Our aim was to investigate the influence of leaf litter stoichiometry in terms of carbon (C) : nitrogen (N) : phosphorus (P) on the decomposition process, and to follow changes in microbial community structure and function in response to temperature-stress treatments. To elucidate how the stoichiometry of beech litter (Fagus sylvatica L.) and stress treatments interactively affect the decomposition processes, a terrestrial microcosm experiment was conducted. Beech litter from different Austrian sites covering C:N ratios from 39 to 61 and C:P ratios from 666 to 1729 were incubated at 15 °C and 60% moisture for six months. Part of the microcosms were then subjected to severe changes in temperature (+30 °C and -15 °C) to monitor the influence of temperature stress. Extracellular enzyme activities were assayed and respiratory activities measured. A semi-quantitative metaproteomics approach (1D-SDS PAGE combined with liquid chromatography and tandem mass-spectrometry; unique spectral counting) was employed to investigate the impact of the applied stress treatments in dependency of litter stoichiometry on structure and function of the decomposing community. In litter with narrow C:nutrient ratios microbial decomposers were most abundant. Cellulase, chitinase, phosphatase and protease activity decreased after heat and frost treatments. Decomposer communities and specific functions varied with site i.e. stoichiometry. The applied stress evoked strong changes of enzyme activities, dissolved organic nitrogen and litter pH. Freeze treatments resulted in a decline in residual plant litter material, and increased fungal abundance indicating slightly accelerated decomposition. Overall, we could detect a strong effect of litter stoichiometry on microbial community structure as well as function. Temperature

  1. Mutation of the protein-O-mannosyltransferase enhances secretion of the human urokinase-type plasminogen activator in Hansenula polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Agaphonov, Michael O; Sokolov, Sviatoslav S; Romanova, Nina V; Sohn, Jung-Hoon; Kim, So-Young; Kalebina, Tatyana S; Choi, Eui-Sung; Ter-Avanesyan, Michael D

    2005-10-15

    Human urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is poorly secreted and aggregates in the endoplasmic reticulum of yeast cells due to inefficient folding. A screen for Hansenula polymorpha mutants with improved uPA secretion revealed a gene encoding a homologue of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein-O-mannosyltransferase Pmt1p. Expression of the H. polymorpha PMT1 gene (HpPMT1) abolished temperature sensitivity of the S. cerevisiae pmt1 pmt2 double mutant. As in S. cerevisiae, inactivation of the HpPMT1 gene affected electrophoretic mobility of the O-glycosylated protein, extracellular chitinase. In contrast to S. cerevisiae, disruption of HpPMT1 alone caused temperature sensitivity. Inactivation of the HpPMT1 gene decreased intracellular aggregation of uPA, suggesting that enhanced secretion of uPA was due to improvement of its folding in the endoplasmic reticulum. Unlike most of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane proteins, HpPmt1p possesses the C-terminal KDEL retention signal. PMID:16200504

  2. Hydrolytic ectoenzyme activity associated with suspended and sinking organic particles within the anoxic Cariaco Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Gordon T.; Thunell, Robert; Varela, Ramon; Benitez-Nelson, Claudia; Scranton, Mary I.

    2009-08-01

    Ectohydrolase activities of suspended microbiota were compared to those associated with sinking particles (sed-POM) retrieved from sediment traps deployed in the permanently anoxic Cariaco Basin. In shore-based assays, activities of aminopeptidase, β-glucosidase, chitinase and alkaline phosphatase were measured in samples obtained from oxic and anoxic depths using MUF- and MCA-labeled fluorogenic substrate analogs. Hydrolysis potentials for these enzymes in the seston varied widely over the nine cruises sampled (8 Nov 1996-3 May 2000) and among depths (15-1265 m); from <10 to over 1600 nM d -1 hydrolysate released, generally co-varying with one another and with suspended particulate organic carbon (POC) and particulate nitrogen (PN). Hydrolytic potentials, prokaryotic abundances and POC/PN concentrations in sinking debris were 400-1.3×10 7 times higher than in comparable volumes of seawater. However when normalized to PN, hydrolytic potentials in sediment trap samples were not demonstrably higher than in Niskin bottle samples. We estimate that PN pools in sediment trap samples were turned over 2-1400 times (medians=7-26 x) slower by hydrolysis than were suspended PN pools. Median prokaryotic growth rates (divisions d -1) in sinking debris were also ˜150 times slower than for bacterioplankton. Hydrolytic potentials in surface oxic waters were generally faster than in underlying anoxic waters on a volumetric basis (nM hydrolysate d -1), but were not significantly ( p>0.05) different when normalized to PN or prokaryote abundances. Alkaline phosphatase was consistently the most active ectohydrolase in both sample types, suggesting that Cariaco Basin assemblages were adapted to decomposing phosphate esters in organic polymers. However, phosphorus limitation was not evident from nutrient inventories in the water column. Results support the hypothesis that efficiencies of polymer hydrolysis in anoxic waters are not inherently lower than in oxic waters.

  3. Prokaryotic Metabolic Activity and Community Structure in Antarctic Continental Shelf Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, J. P.; McCammon, S. A.; Gibson, J. A. E.; Robertson, L.; Nichols, P. D.

    2003-01-01

    The prokaryote community activity and structural characteristics within marine sediment sampled across a continental shelf area located off eastern Antarctica (66°S, 143°E; depth range, 709 to 964 m) were studied. Correlations were found between microbial biomass and aminopeptidase and chitinase rates, which were used as proxies for microbial activity. Biomass and activity were maximal within the 0- to 3-cm depth range and declined rapidly with sediment depths below 5 cm. Most-probable-number counting using a dilute carbohydrate-containing medium recovered 1.7 to 3.8% of the sediment total bacterial count, with mostly facultatively anaerobic psychrophiles cultured. The median optimal growth temperature for the sediment isolates was 15°C. Many of the isolates identified belonged to genera characteristic of deep-sea habitats, although most appear to be novel species. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) and isoprenoid glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether analyses indicated that the samples contained lipid components typical of marine sediments, with profiles varying little between samples at the same depth; however, significant differences in PLFA profiles were found between depths of 0 to 1 cm and 13 to 15 cm, reflecting the presence of a different microbial community. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of amplified bacterial 16S rRNA genes revealed that between samples and across sediment core depths of 1 to 4 cm, the community structure appeared homogenous; however, principal-component analysis of DGGE patterns revealed that at greater sediment depths, successional shifts in community structure were evident. Sequencing of DGGE bands and rRNA probe hybridization analysis revealed that the major community members belonged to delta proteobacteria, putative sulfide oxidizers of the gamma proteobacteria, Flavobacteria, Planctomycetales, and Archaea. rRNA hybridization analyses also indicated that these groups were present at similar levels in the top

  4. Construction of transgenic Trichoderma koningi with chit42 of Metarhizium anisopliae and analysis of its activity against the Asian corn borer.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying Y; Tang, Jun; Fu, Ke H; Gao, Shi G; Wu, Qiong; Chen, Jie

    2012-01-01

    The chit42 gene was cloned from Metarhizium anisopliae CY1 and was inserted into Trichoderma koningii T30 genome by protoplast transformation. Sixteen transgenic isolates were identified by polymerase chain reaction analysis. The chit42 gene was 1275 bp in length and its coded protein was approximately 42 kDa in size. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis and the measurement of the chitinase activity under induced conditions were conducted. Mortality of the Asian corn borer (Ostrinia furnacalis) was used for assessing efficacy of culture filtrates and conidial suspensions of transgenic Trichoderma strains against the insect. The results indicated that the transgenic Trichoderma strain harboring chit42 gene from Metarhizium anisopliae CY1 showed significant lethal effect on the Asian corn borer larvae. Study on growth inhibition of silkworm (Bombyx mori) larvae was carried out. The transgenic Trichoderma could better hinder the growth and development of the silkworm larvae than the wild-type Trichoderma did. The inhibition to the expression of three genes associated with development and anti-stress response in the mid-gut of the Asian corn borer larvae was more significant in the transcriptional level after larvae were fed with transgenic biomass than with the wild type. Evaluation of inhibition on the growth of maize ear rot pathogens was carried out in vitro test and the transgenic strains kept antagonistic activity against Fusarium verticilloides.

  5. Active-R filter

    DOEpatents

    Soderstrand, Michael A.

    1976-01-01

    An operational amplifier-type active filter in which the only capacitor in the circuit is the compensating capacitance of the operational amplifiers, the various feedback and coupling elements being essentially solely resistive.

  6. Early Macrophage Recruitment and Alternative Activation Are Critical for the Later Development of Hypoxia-induced Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Vergadi, Eleni; Chang, Mun Seog; Lee, Changjin; Liang, Olin; Liu, Xianlan; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Angeles; Mitsialis, S. Alex; Kourembanas, Stella

    2011-01-01

    Background Lung inflammation precedes the development of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (HPH); however its role in the pathogenesis of HPH is poorly understood. We sought to characterize the hypoxic inflammatory response and elucidate its role in the development of HPH. We also aimed to investigate the mechanisms by which heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an anti-inflammatory enzyme, is protective in HPH. Methods and Results We generated bitransgenic mice that overexpress human HO-1 under doxycycline (dox) control in an inducible, lung-specific manner. Hypoxic exposure of mice in the absence of dox resulted in early transient accumulation of monocytes/macrophages in the bronchoalveolar lavage. Alveolar macrophages acquired an alternatively activated phenotype (M2) in response to hypoxia, characterized by the expression of Found in Inflammatory Zone-1, Arginase-1 and Chitinase-3-like-3. A brief, two-day pulse of dox delayed but did not prevent the peak of hypoxic inflammation, and could not protect from HPH. In contrast, a seven-day dox treatment sustained high HO-1 levels during the entire period of hypoxic inflammation, inhibited macrophage accumulation and activation, induced macrophage IL-10 expression, and prevented the development of HPH. Supernatants from hypoxic M2 macrophages promoted proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells while treatment with carbon monoxide, a HO-1 enzymatic product, abrogated this effect. Conclusions Early recruitment and alternative activation of macrophages in hypoxic lungs is critical for the later development of HPH. HO-1 may confer protection from HPH by effectively modifing macrophage activation state in hypoxia. PMID:21518986

  7. Effects of polyacrylamide, biopolymer, and biochar on decomposition of soil organic matter and 14C-labeled plant residues as determined by enzyme activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud Awad, Yasser; Ok, Young Sik; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-05-01

    Application of polymers for the improvement of aggregate structure and reduction of soil erosion may alter the availability and decomposition of plant residues. In this study, we assessed the effects of anionic polyacrylamide (PAM), synthesized biopolymer (BP), and biochar (BC) on the decomposition of 14C-labeled maize residue in sandy and sandy loam soils. Specifically, PAM and BP with or without 14C-labeled plant residue were applied at 400 kg ha-1, whereas BC was applied at 5000 kg ha-1, after which the soils were incubated for 80 days at 22 oC. Initially, plant residue decomposition was much higher in untreated sandy loam soil than in sandy soil. Nevertheless, the stimulating effects of BP and BC on the decomposition of plant residue were more pronounced in sandy soil, where it accounted for 13.4% and 23.4% of 14C input, respectively, whereas in sandy loam soil, the acceleration of plant residue decomposition by BP and BC did not exceed 2.6% and 14.1%, respectively, compared to untreated soil with plant residue. The stimulating effects of BP and BC on the decomposition of plant residue were confirmed based on activities of β-cellobiohydrolase, β-glucosidase, and chitinase in both soils. In contrast to BC and BP, PAM did not increase the decomposition of native or added C in both soils.

  8. Isolation, Characterization, Kinetics, and Enzymatic and Nonenzymatic Microbicidal Activities of a Novel c-Type Lysozyme from Plasma of Schistocerca gregaria (Orthoptera: Acrididae)

    PubMed Central

    Elmogy, Mohamed; Bassal, Taha T. M.; Yousef, Hesham A.; Dorrah, Moataza A.; Mohamed, Amr A.; Duvic, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    A protein, designated as Sgl, showing a muramidase lytic activity to the cell wall of the Gram-positive bacterium Micrococcus lysodeikticus was isolated for the first time from plasma of Escherichia coli-immunized fifth instar Schistocerca gregaria. The isolated Sgl was detected as a single protein band, on both native- and SDS-PAGE, has a molecular weight of ∼15.7 kDa and an isoelectric point (pI) of ca 9.3 and its antiserum has specifically recognized its isolated form. Fifty-nine percentage of Sgl lytic activity was recovered in the isolated fractions and yielded ca 126-fold increase in specific activity than that of the crude. The partial N-terminal amino acid sequence of the Sgl has 55 and 40% maximum identity with Bombyx mori and Gallus gallus c-type lysozymes, respectively. The antibacterial activity against the Gram-positive and the Gram-negative bacteria were comparatively stronger than that of the hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL). The detected Sgl poration to the inner membrane that reach a maximum ability after 3 h was suggested to operate as a nonenzymatic mechanism for Gram-negative bacterial cell lysis, as tested in a permease-deficient E. coli, ML-35 strain. Sgl showed a maximal muramidase activity at pH 6.2, 30–50°C, and 0.05 M Ca2+ or Mg2+; and has a Km of 0.5 μg/ml and a Vmax of 0.518 with M. lysodeikticus as a substrate. The Sgl displayed a chitinase activity against chitin with a Km of 0.93 mg/ml and a Vmax of 1.63. PMID:25972507

  9. In Vitro Evaluation of Enzymatic and Antifungal Activities of Soil-Actinomycetes Isolates and Their Molecular Identification by PCR

    PubMed Central

    Keikha, Nasser; Ayatollahi Mousavi, Seyyed Amin; Nakhaei, Ali Reza; Yadegari, Mohammad Hossein; Shahidi Bonjar, Gholam Hossein; Amiri, Somayyeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Human cutaneous infection caused by a homogeneous group of keratinophilic fungi called dermatophytes. These fungi are the most common infectious agents in humans that are free of any population and geographic area. Microsporum canis is a cause of dermatophytosis (Tinea) in recent years in Iran and atypical strain has been isolated in Iran. Its cases occur sporadically due to M. canis transmission from puppies and cats to humans. Since this pathogenic dermatophyte is eukaryotes, chemical treatment with antifungal drugs may also affect host tissue cells. Objectives: The aim of the current study was to find a new antifungal agent of soil-Actinomycetes from Kerman province against M. canis and Actinomycete isolates were identified by PCR. Materials and Methods: A number of hundred Actinomycete isolated strains were evaluated from soil of Kerman province, for their antagonistic activity against the M. canis. M. canis of the Persian Type Culture Collection (PTCC) was obtained from the Iranian Research Organization for Science and Technology (IROST). Electron microscope studies of these isolates were performed based on the physiological properties of these antagonists including lipase, amylase, protease and chitinase activities according to the relevant protocols and were identified using gene 16SrDNA. Results: In this study the most antagonist of Actinomycete isolates with antifungal activity against M. canis isolates of L1, D5, Ks1m, Km2, Kn1, Ks8 and Ks1 were shown in vitro. Electron microscopic studies showed that some fungal strains form spores, mycelia and spore chain. Nucleotide analysis showed that Ks8 had maximum homology (98%) to Streptomyces zaomyceticus strain xsd08149 and L1 displayed 100% homology to Streptomyces sp. HVG6 using 16SrDNA studies. Conclusions: Our findings showed that Streptomyces has antifungal effects against M. canis. PMID:26060560

  10. Differences in the Activities of Eight Enzymes from Ten Soil Fungi and Their Possible Influences on the Surface Structure, Functional Groups, and Element Composition of Soil Colloids

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenjie; Li, Yanhong; Wang, Huimei; Zu, Yuangang

    2014-01-01

    How soil fungi function in soil carbon and nutrient cycling is not well understood by using fungal enzymatic differences and their interactions with soil colloids. Eight extracellular enzymes, EEAs (chitinase, carboxymethyl cellulase, β-glucosidase, protease, acid phosphatase, polyphenol oxidase, laccase, and guaiacol oxidase) secreted by ten fungi were compared, and then the fungi that showed low and high enzymatic activity were co-cultured with soil colloids for the purpose of finding fungi-soil interactions. Some fungi (Gomphidius rutilus, Russula integra, Pholiota adiposa, and Geastrum mammosum) secreted 3–4 enzymes with weak activities, while others (Cyathus striatus, Suillus granulate, Phallus impudicus, Collybia dryophila, Agaricus sylvicola, and Lactarius deliciosus) could secret over 5 enzymes with high activities. The differences in these fungi contributed to the alterations of functional groups (stretching bands of O-H, N-H, C-H, C = O, COO- decreased by 11–60%, while P = O, C-O stretching, O-H bending and Si-O-Si stretching increased 9–22%), surface appearance (disappearance of adhesive organic materials), and elemental compositions (11–49% decreases in C1s) in soil colloids. Moreover, more evident changes were generally in high enzymatic fungi (C. striatus) compared with low enzymatic fungi (G. rutilus). Our findings indicate that inter-fungi differences in EEA types and activities might be responsible for physical and chemical changes in soil colloids (the most active component of soil matrix), highlighting the important roles of soil fungi in soil nutrient cycling and functional maintenance. PMID:25398013

  11. Differences in the activities of eight enzymes from ten soil fungi and their possible influences on the surface structure, functional groups, and element composition of soil colloids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenjie; Li, Yanhong; Wang, Huimei; Zu, Yuangang

    2014-01-01

    How soil fungi function in soil carbon and nutrient cycling is not well understood by using fungal enzymatic differences and their interactions with soil colloids. Eight extracellular enzymes, EEAs (chitinase, carboxymethyl cellulase, β-glucosidase, protease, acid phosphatase, polyphenol oxidase, laccase, and guaiacol oxidase) secreted by ten fungi were compared, and then the fungi that showed low and high enzymatic activity were co-cultured with soil colloids for the purpose of finding fungi-soil interactions. Some fungi (Gomphidius rutilus, Russula integra, Pholiota adiposa, and Geastrum mammosum) secreted 3-4 enzymes with weak activities, while others (Cyathus striatus, Suillus granulate, Phallus impudicus, Collybia dryophila, Agaricus sylvicola, and Lactarius deliciosus) could secret over 5 enzymes with high activities. The differences in these fungi contributed to the alterations of functional groups (stretching bands of O-H, N-H, C-H, C = O, COO- decreased by 11-60%, while P = O, C-O stretching, O-H bending and Si-O-Si stretching increased 9-22%), surface appearance (disappearance of adhesive organic materials), and elemental compositions (11-49% decreases in C1s) in soil colloids. Moreover, more evident changes were generally in high enzymatic fungi (C. striatus) compared with low enzymatic fungi (G. rutilus). Our findings indicate that inter-fungi differences in EEA types and activities might be responsible for physical and chemical changes in soil colloids (the most active component of soil matrix), highlighting the important roles of soil fungi in soil nutrient cycling and functional maintenance.

  12. Differences in the activities of eight enzymes from ten soil fungi and their possible influences on the surface structure, functional groups, and element composition of soil colloids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenjie; Li, Yanhong; Wang, Huimei; Zu, Yuangang

    2014-01-01

    How soil fungi function in soil carbon and nutrient cycling is not well understood by using fungal enzymatic differences and their interactions with soil colloids. Eight extracellular enzymes, EEAs (chitinase, carboxymethyl cellulase, β-glucosidase, protease, acid phosphatase, polyphenol oxidase, laccase, and guaiacol oxidase) secreted by ten fungi were compared, and then the fungi that showed low and high enzymatic activity were co-cultured with soil colloids for the purpose of finding fungi-soil interactions. Some fungi (Gomphidius rutilus, Russula integra, Pholiota adiposa, and Geastrum mammosum) secreted 3-4 enzymes with weak activities, while others (Cyathus striatus, Suillus granulate, Phallus impudicus, Collybia dryophila, Agaricus sylvicola, and Lactarius deliciosus) could secret over 5 enzymes with high activities. The differences in these fungi contributed to the alterations of functional groups (stretching bands of O-H, N-H, C-H, C = O, COO- decreased by 11-60%, while P = O, C-O stretching, O-H bending and Si-O-Si stretching increased 9-22%), surface appearance (disappearance of adhesive organic materials), and elemental compositions (11-49% decreases in C1s) in soil colloids. Moreover, more evident changes were generally in high enzymatic fungi (C. striatus) compared with low enzymatic fungi (G. rutilus). Our findings indicate that inter-fungi differences in EEA types and activities might be responsible for physical and chemical changes in soil colloids (the most active component of soil matrix), highlighting the important roles of soil fungi in soil nutrient cycling and functional maintenance. PMID:25398013

  13. Did the temporary shortage in supply of imiglucerase have clinical consequences? Retrospective observational study on 34 italian Gaucher type I patients.

    PubMed

    Deroma, Laura; Sechi, Annalisa; Dardis, Andrea; Macor, Daniela; Liva, Giulia; Ciana, Giovanni; Bembi, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Background. Enzyme Replacement Therapy (ERT) is the standard of care in Gaucher disease. The effects of withdrawal or reduced doses are debated, thus a retrospective cohort study was conducted to investigate clinical and laboratory differences in 34 Gaucher type 1 patients experiencing an ERT dosage reduction after the forced temporary imiglucerase shortage in 2009. Methods. Haemoglobin concentration, leukocytes and platelets counts, and chitotriosidase activity were assessed at baseline and after 6 and 12 months (t0, t6, t12), while bone pain, energy, work or school performance, concentration, memory and social life every 3 months. Results. The cohort was made up of 18 males and 16 females (medians: age 41.8 years, therapy duration 14.1 years, dosage reduction 35.5%). Haemoglobin, leukocytes and platelets remained substantially stable, while chitotriosidase activity showed an increase, especially after t6. Age, splenectomy or genotype were not associated with laboratory parameters changes, except for a significant median increase of chitotriosidase activity in non-splenectomised patients after 12 months (p = 0.01). At 3, 6, 9 and 12 months, more than 50% patients reported at least one problem in subjective well-being (56%, 65%, 70%, 58%, respectively), while bone pain occurred or worsened in 13/33, 13/32, 7/28 and 5/26 patients, respectively. No bone crises were reported. Conclusions. Drug reduction did not induce substantial modification in the laboratory values but seems to have influenced the well-being perception of some Gaucher patients. Thus, bone pain, general health and quality of life should be carefully monitored during ERT reductions. PMID:23430505

  14. Isolation and characterization of multifunctional Streptomyces species with antimicrobial, nematicidal and phytohormone activities from marine environments in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Rashad, Ferial M; Fathy, Hayam M; El-Zayat, Ayatollah S; Elghonaimy, Ahlam M

    2015-06-01

    Different strategies have been employed for selective isolation of Streptomycetes from 20 marine samples varied in their biological nature. The recovery of Streptomycetes isolates (112) was influenced preferentially by different strategies; sediment samples were the best source of potential candidate Streptomycetes. All isolates exhibited antimicrobial activities with variable spectrum; the most promising isolates (31) were phenotypically characterized and identified as Streptomyces sp.; these isolates exhibited variable capacity for secretion of numerous hydrolytic enzymes such as catalase, protease, amylase, lipase, lecithinase, asparaginase, chitinase and pectinase. All the strains resisted both penicillin and streptomycin, 29 were sensitive to neomycin; the majority of strains (25) showed multiple antibiotic resistance index greater than 0.2; 23, 22 and 13 degraded the shrimp shell, chicken feather and corn cob, respectively, producing bioactive substance(s) which indicates their diversity and their ecological role in the marine ecosystem. At least 28 strains exhibited nematicidal activity in vitro and in vivo against root-knot nematode and supported plant growth. In vitro, the assessed Streptomyces species exhibited the ability to produce gibberellic acid, indole acetic acid, abscisic acid, kinetin and benzyladenine. Except for indole acetic acid, this is the first report concerning the ability of marine Streptomyces to produce such phytohormones and the use of shrimp shell waste as a mono component medium for production of phytohormones. The study is efficacious in selecting effective biodiverse strains of marine Streptomyces that may work under diverse agro-ecological conditions as a useful element in plant nutrition and as biocontrol agents involved in integrated management programs. PMID:25805507

  15. Complete genome sequences of the Serratia plymuthica strains 3Rp8 and 3Re4-18, two rhizosphere bacteria with antagonistic activity towards fungal phytopathogens and plant growth promoting abilities.

    PubMed

    Adam, Eveline; Müller, Henry; Erlacher, Armin; Berg, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    The Serratia plymuthica strains 3Rp8 and 3Re4-18 are motile, Gram-negative, non-sporulating bacteria. Strain 3Rp8 was isolated from the rhizosphere of Brassica napus L. and strain 3Re4-18 from the endorhiza of Solanum tuberosum L. Studies have shown in vitro activity against the soil-borne fungi Verticillium dahliae Kleb., Rhizoctonia solani Kühn, and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Here, we announce and describe the complete genome sequence of S. plymuthica 3Rp8 consisting of a single circular chromosome of 5.5 Mb that encodes 4954 protein-coding and 108 RNA-only encoding genes and of S. plymuthica 3Re4-18 consisting of a single circular chromosome of 5.4 Mb that encodes 4845 protein-coding and 109 RNA-only encoding genes. The whole genome sequences and annotations are available in NCBI under the locus numbers CP012096 and CP012097, respectively. The genome analyses revealed genes putatively responsible for the promising plant growth promoting and biocontrol properties including predicting factors such as secretion systems, iron scavenging siderophores, chitinases, secreted proteases, glucanases and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases, as well as unique genomic islands. PMID:27602183

  16. Impact of imiglucerase supply shortage on clinical and laboratory parameters in Norrbottnian patients with Gaucher disease type 3.

    PubMed

    Machaczka, Maciej; Kämpe Björkvall, Cecilia; Wieremiejczyk, Joanna; Paucar Arce, Martin; Myhr-Eriksson, Kristina; Klimkowska, Monika; Hägglund, Hans; Svenningsson, Per

    2015-02-01

    A viral contamination of the production plant producing imiglucerase (Cerezyme™) resulted in an unpredicted worldwide shortage of global supplies during 2009-2010. The aim of the study was to describe the effects of dose reduction of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) in adults with Norrbottnian form of Gaucher disease type 3 (N-GD3). There were ten adults with N-GD3 treated with imiglucerase in the county of Norrbotten in June 2009. Analyzed variables included plasma chitotriosidase activity and concentration of CCL18/PARC, whole blood hemoglobin concentration (Hb) and platelet count (PLT), as well as patients' body weight, subjective complaints and health status measured by the EuroQoL-5D questionnaire. The median duration of ERT shortage lasted for 14 months (10-20 months). The median percentage reduction of imiglucerase dose was 36 % (26-59 %). Hb decreased in four patients, PLT decreased in three patients, chitotriosidase increased in three patients (max. +22 % of baseline), and CCL18/PARC increased in six patients (+14 % to +57 %). The body weight was moderately decreased in one patient. No new bone events were noted. Self-assessment of individual patient's health status was stable in all but one patient. Our results suggest that moderate reduction of ERT dosage lasting for relatively short period of time can lead to worsening in biomarkers of adults with N-GD3. However, this worsening is infrequently translated to clinical worsening of patients. It is possible that CCL18/PARC has a higher sensitivity than chitotriosidase in monitoring of ERT dosing in GD3. PMID:25205209

  17. Active turbulence in active nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thampi, S. P.; Yeomans, J. M.

    2016-07-01

    Dense, active systems show active turbulence, a state characterised by flow fields that are chaotic, with continually changing velocity jets and swirls. Here we review our current understanding of active turbulence. The development is primarily based on the theory and simulations of active liquid crystals, but with accompanying summaries of related literature.

  18. Effects of stoichiometry and temperature perturbations on beech leaf litter decomposition, enzyme activities and protein expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiblinger, K. M.; Schneider, T.; Roschitzki, B.; Schmid, E.; Eberl, L.; Hämmerle, I.; Leitner, S.; Richter, A.; Wanek, W.; Riedel, K.; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, S.

    2012-11-01

    Microbes are major players in leaf litter decomposition and therefore advances in the understanding of their control on element cycling are of paramount importance. Our aim was to investigate the influence of leaf litter stoichiometry in terms of carbon (C) : nitrogen (N) : phosphorus (P) ratios on the decomposition processes and to track changes in microbial community structures and functions in response to temperature stress treatments. To elucidate how the stoichiometry of beech leaf litter (Fagus sylvatica L.) and stress treatments interactively affect the microbial decomposition processes, a terrestrial microcosm experiment was conducted. Beech litter from different Austrian sites covering C:N ratios from 39 to 61 and C:P ratios from 666 to 1729 were incubated at 15 °C and 60% moisture for six months. Part of the microcosms were then subjected to severe changes in temperature (+30 °C and -15 °C) to monitor the influence of temperature stress. Extracellular enzyme activities were assayed and respiratory activities measured. A semi-quantitative metaproteomics approach (1D-SDS PAGE combined with liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry; unique spectral counting) was employed to investigate the impact of the applied stress treatments in dependency of litter stoichiometry on structure and function of the decomposing community. In litter with narrow C:nutrient (C:N, C:P) ratios, microbial decomposers were most abundant. Cellulase, chitinase, phosphatase and protease activity decreased after heat and freezing treatments. Decomposer communities and specific functions varied with site, i.e. stoichiometry. The applied stress combined with the respective time of sampling evoked changes of enzyme activities and litter pH. Freezing treatments resulted in a decline in residual plant litter material and increased fungal abundance, indicating slightly accelerated decomposition. Overall, a strong effect of litter stoichiometry on microbial community structures and

  19. Antimicrobial activity of engineered shrimp ovarian peritrophin fragments from Fenneropenaeus merguiensis.

    PubMed

    Anuchan, Sujunya; Deachamag, Panchalika; Siammai, Nareerat; Phongpaichit, Souwalak; Chotigeat, Wilaiwan

    2015-01-01

    Shrimp ovarian peritrophin (SOP), a major protein in jelly layer and cortical rods, plays a role in egg protection after spawning. Previous study, sequence of SOP gene from Fenneropenaeus merguiensis (Fm-SOP) was composed of domain A and domain B. The SOP domain A contains amino acid sequences between 1-80 of Fm-SOP. The domain A had six conserved cysteines which have been found in many antimicrobial peptides. The molecular weight of purified rSOP-A protein was about 9 kDa. The SOP domain B contains amino acid sequences 81-329 of Fm-SOP while SOP-B1 was amino acid sequence 182-275 of Fm-SOP. The molecular weight of purified rHis-SOP-B and rHis-SOP-B1 protein were about 38.5 and 18.0 kDa, respectively. Antimicrobial activities of rSOP-A, rHis-SOP-B and rHis-SOP-B1 protein were investigated by liquid growth inhibition assay. Minimal Inhibition Concentration (MIC) of rSOP-A against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Vibrio harveyi, Candida albicans and Fusarium oxysporum were 35, 280, 280, 570 and 15 µg/mL, respectively. The MIC of rHis-SOP-B against S. aureus, V. harveyi and F. oxysporum were 30, 270 and 500 µg/mL, respectively. And the MIC of rHis-SOP-B1 against S. aureus, V. harveyi and F. oxysporum were 20, 470 and 250 µg/mL, respectively. The rHis-SOP-B and rHis-SOP-B1 (1000 µg/mL) did not show antimicrobial activity against E. coli and C. albicans. Three purified proteins were able to agglutinate V. harveyi in vitro, displayed a chitinase activity and proteinase inhibition. In addition the stability of the proteins was tested and found decrease antimicrobial activity after incubation at 50 °C for 5 h.

  20. Activity Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerpelman, Larry C.; Weiner, Michael J.

    This twenty-four item scale assesses students' actual and desired political-social activism in terms of physical participation, communication activities, and information-gathering activities. About ten minutes are required to complete the instrument. The scale is divided into two subscales. The first twelve items (ACT-A) question respondents on…

  1. Proteasome Activators

    PubMed Central

    Stadtmueller, Beth M.; Hill, Christopher P.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Proteasomes degrade a multitude of protein substrates in the cytosol and nucleus, and thereby are essential for many aspects of cellular function. Because the proteolytic sites are sequestered in a closed barrel-shaped structure, activators are required to facilitate substrate access. Structural and biochemical studies of two activator families, 11S and Blm10, have provided insights to proteasome activation mechanisms, although the biological functions of these factors remain obscure. Recent advances have improved our understanding of the third activator family, including the 19S activator, which targets polyubiquitylated proteins for degradation. PMID:21211719

  2. Biocontrol activity of an alkaline serine protease from Aureobasidium pullulans expressed in Pichia pastoris against four postharvest pathogens on apple.

    PubMed

    Banani, Houda; Spadaro, Davide; Zhang, Dianpeng; Matic, Slavica; Garibaldi, Angelo; Gullino, Maria Lodovica

    2014-07-16

    The yeast-like fungus Aureobasidium pullulans PL5 is a microbial antagonist against postharvest pathogens of fruits. The strain is able to produce hydrolases, including glucanases, chitinases and proteases. The alkaline serine protease gene ALP5 from A. pullulans was cloned, inserted into the vector pPIC9 to construct pPIC9/ALP5, and then expressed in Pichia pastoris strain KM71. ALP5 had a molecular mass of 42.9kDa after 5days growth with 1% methanol induction at 28°C. The recombinant protease expressed in P. pastoris showed its highest activity under alkaline conditions (at pH10) and a temperature of 50°C. The antifungal activity of the recombinant protease was investigated against Penicillium expansum, Botrytis cinerea, Monilinia fructicola and Alternaria alternata in vitro and on apple. The recombinant protease reduced significantly the spore germination and the germ tube length of the tested pathogens in PDB medium. The highest level of protease efficacy was observed against M. fructicola and B. cinerea, whereas a lower efficacy was observed against P. expansum and A. alternata indicating a possible effect of the pathogen cell wall composition on the proteolytic activity of the recombinant protease. The presence of protease was able to cause the swelling of the hyphae of B. cinerea, under an optical microscope. The recombinant protease expressed in P. pastoris was more active against the pathogens in vitro than the same enzyme expressed in E. coli in previous studies. The efficacy of ALP5 was also evaluated against the pathogens in vivo on cv Golden Delicious apples. The protease was more efficient in controlling M. fructicola, B. cinerea and P. expansum than A. alternata. However, the extent of the activity was dependent on the enzyme concentration and the length of fruit storage. This study demonstrated the capacity of the alkaline serine protease to keep its enzymatic activity for some days in the unfavorable environment of the fruit wounds. The alkaline

  3. Exposure of Daphnia magna to trichloroethylene (TCE) and vinyl chloride (VC): evaluation of gene transcription, cellular activity, and life-history parameters.

    PubMed

    Houde, Magali; Douville, Mélanie; Gagnon, Pierre; Sproull, Jim; Cloutier, François

    2015-06-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a ubiquitous contaminant classified as a human carcinogen. Vinyl chloride (VC) is primarily used to manufacture polyvinyl chloride and can also be a degradation product of TCE. Very few data exist on the toxicity of TCE and VC in aquatic organisms particularly at environmentally relevant concentrations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sub-lethal effects (10 day exposure; 0.1; 1; 10 µg/L) of TCE and VC in Daphnia magna at the gene, cellular, and life-history levels. Results indicated impacts of VC on the regulation of genes related to glutathione-S-transferase (GST), juvenile hormone esterase (JHE), and the vitelline outer layer membrane protein (VMO1). On the cellular level, exposure to 0.1, 1, and 10 µg/L of VC significantly increased the activity of JHE in D. magna and TCE increased the activity of chitinase (at 1 and 10 µg/L). Results for life-history parameters indicated a possible tendency of TCE to affect the number of molts at the individual level in D. magna (p=0.051). Measurement of VG-like proteins using the alkali-labile phosphates (ALP) assay did not show differences between TCE treated organisms and controls. However, semi-quantitative measurement using gradient gel electrophoresis (213-218 kDa) indicated significant decrease in VG-like protein levels following exposure to TCE at all three concentrations. Overall, results indicate effects of TCE and VC on genes and proteins related to metabolism, reproduction, and growth in D. magna.

  4. Natural competence in Vibrio cholerae is controlled by a nucleoside scavenging response that requires CytR-dependent anti-activation.

    PubMed

    Antonova, Elena S; Bernardy, Eryn E; Hammer, Brian K

    2012-12-01

    Competence for genetic transformation in Vibrio cholerae is triggered by chitin-induced transcription factor TfoX and quorum sensing (QS) regulator HapR. Transformation requires expression of ComEA, described as a DNA receptor in other competent bacteria. A screen for mutants that poorly expressed a comEA-luciferase fusion identified cytR, encoding the nucleoside scavenging cytidine repressor, previously shown in V. cholerae to be a biofilm repressor and positively regulated by TfoX, but not linked to transformation. A ΔcytR mutant was non-transformable and defective in expression of comEA and additional TfoX-induced genes, including pilA (transformation pseudopilus) and chiA-1 (chitinase). In Escherichia coli, 'anti-activation' of nucleoside metabolism genes, via protein-protein interactions between critical residues in CytR and CRP (cAMP receptor protein), is disrupted by exogenous cytidine. Amino acid substitutions of the corresponding V. cholerae CytR residues impaired expression of comEA, pilA and chiA-1, and halted DNA uptake; while exogenous cytidine hampered comEA expression levels and prevented transformation. Our results support a speculative model that when V. cholerae reaches high density on chitin, CytR-CRP interactions 'anti-activate' multiple genes, including a possible factor that negatively controls DNA uptake. Thus, a nucleoside scavenging mechanism couples nutrient stress and cell-cell signalling to natural transformation in V. cholerae as described in other bacterial pathogens.

  5. Biocontrol and plant growth promoting activities of a Streptomyces corchorusii strain UCR3-16 and preparation of powder formulation for application as biofertilizer agents for rice plant.

    PubMed

    Tamreihao, K; Ningthoujam, Debananda S; Nimaichand, Salam; Singh, Elangbam Shanta; Reena, Pascal; Singh, Salam Herojeet; Nongthomba, Upendra

    2016-11-01

    Streptomyces corchorusii strain UCR3-16, obtained from rice rhizospheric soils showed antifungal activities against 6 major rice fungal pathogens by diffusible and volatile compounds production. The strain was found positive for production of fungal cell wall degrading enzymes such as chitinase, β-1,3-glucanase, β-1,4-glucanase, lipase and protease. The strain was also positive for plant growth promoting traits. It produced up to 30.5μg/ml of IAA and solubilized a significant amount of inorganic phosphate (up to 102μg/ml). It also produced 69% siderophore units. The strain also produced ammonia and gave positive result for ACC deaminase activity. Highest vigor index of inoculated seedlings was observed when rice seeds were treated with cell suspension of UCR3-16 corresponding to 4.5×10(8)cfu/ml. Bioinoculant-treated seeds also showed similar results under pathogen challenged conditions. In pot trial experiments, UCR3-16-treated rice plants showed significantly increased growth and grain yield production. Powder formulation of the strain was developed using talcum and corn starch as carriers and the shelf-lives were monitored. Talcum formulation showed higher cell-count than corn starch even after 6 months of storage, and optimum condition for storage of the powder formulation were found to be at 4°C. Pot trial experiments using talcum powder formulation also showed significant positive effects on growth of rice plants. Field trial using talcum powder formulation also exhibited significant enhancement in shoot length and weight of shoot and root, and total grain yield and weight of grains in rice plants. Talcum formulation also significantly reduced the sheath blight disease in rice leaves. PMID:27664745

  6. Active ratchets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelani, L.; Costanzo, A.; Di Leonardo, R.

    2011-12-01

    We analyze self-propelling organisms, or active particles, in a periodic asymmetric potential. Unlike standard ratchet effect for Brownian particles requiring external forcing, in the case of active particles asymmetric potential alone produces a net drift speed (active ratchet effect). By using theoretical models and numerical simulations we demonstrate the emergence of the rectification process in the presence of an asymmetric piecewise periodic potential. The broken spatial symmetry (external potential) and time symmetry (active particles) are sufficient ingredients to sustain unidirectional transport. Our findings open the way to new mechanisms to move in directional manner motile organisms by using external periodic static fields.

  7. Astronomy Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstone, Sid

    This document consists of activities and references for teaching astronomy. The activities (which include objectives, list of materials needed, and procedures) focus on: observing the Big Dipper and locating the North Star; examining the Big Dipper's stars; making and using an astrolabe; examining retograde motion of Mars; measuring the Sun's…

  8. Faculty Activism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academe, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Blending scholarship and activism, whether domestic or international, takes some real work. Two scholar-activists reflect on why and how activism can be more than academic labor in this feature of the "Academe" journal. This feature includes the following brief reflections on political work, both local and global that demonstrates how on campus…

  9. Catalyst activator

    DOEpatents

    McAdon, Mark H.; Nickias, Peter N.; Marks, Tobin J.; Schwartz, David J.

    2001-01-01

    A catalyst activator particularly adapted for use in the activation of metal complexes of metals of Group 3-10 for polymerization of ethylenically unsaturated polymerizable monomers, especially olefins, comprising two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms and a ligand structure including at least one bridging group connecting ligands on the two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms.

  10. Outdoor Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minneapolis Independent School District 275, Minn.

    Twenty-four activities suitable for outdoor use by elementary school children are outlined. Activities designed to make children aware of their environment include soil painting, burr collecting, insect and pond water collecting, studies of insect galls and field mice, succession studies, and a model of natural selection using dyed toothpicks. A…

  11. Effects of switching from a reduced dose imiglucerase to velaglucerase in type 1 Gaucher disease: clinical and biochemical outcomes.

    PubMed

    van Dussen, Laura; Cox, Timothy M; Hendriks, Erik J; Morris, Elizabeth; Akkerman, Erik M; Maas, Mario; Groener, Johanna E M; Aerts, Johannes M F G; Deegan, Patrick B; Hollak, Carla E M

    2012-12-01

    This paper describes the effects of a switch to velaglucerase alfa in a group of adult patients with type 1 Gaucher disease, all of whom had previously had their dose reduced as a consequence of the worldwide imiglucerase shortage. Thirty-two patients from two large European Gaucher centers switched to treatment with velaglucerase alfa after 1-8.5 months of dose reduction. The course of important Gaucher disease parameters was studied at four time points: one year before the shortage, just before the shortage, before a switch to velaglucerase and after up to one year of treatment with velaglucerase. These parameters included hemoglobin concentration, platelet count, plasma chitotriosidase activity in all patients, and spleen and liver volumes (as well as bone marrow fat fraction images) in 10 patients. Decreases in platelet counts as a result of reduced treatment with imiglucerase were quickly restored on treatment with velaglucerase alfa. Chitotriosidase activity declined overall after switching. Five out of 10 patients had an increase in liver volume of at least 10% after six months of velaglucerase treatment, which was reversible in 3. Most patients received infusions at home and no important side effects were observed. Velaglucerase alfa appears to be a safe and effective alternative for imiglucerase. PMID:22773601

  12. Activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Alfassi, Z.B. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    This volume contains 16 chapters on the application of activation analysis in the fields of life sciences, biological materials, coal and its effluents, environmental samples, archaeology, material science, and forensics. Each chapter is processed separately for the data base.

  13. CSF markers of Alzheimer’s pathology and microglial activation are associated with altered white matter microstructure in asymptomatic adults at risk for Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Melah, Kelsey E; Lu, Sharon Yuan-Fu; Hoscheidt, Siobhan M; Alexander, Andrew L; Adluru, Nagesh; Destiche, Daniel J; Carlsson, Cynthia M; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Okonkwo, Ozioma C; Gleason, Carey E; Dowling, N Maritza; Bratzke, Lisa C; Rowley, Howard A; Sager, Mark A; Asthana, Sanjay; Johnson, Sterling C; Bendlin, Barbara B

    2015-01-01

    Background The immune response in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) involves activation of microglia which may remove β-amyloid. However, overproduction of inflammatory compounds may exacerbate neural damage in Alzheimer’s disease. AD pathology accumulates years before diagnosis, yet the extent to which neuroinflammation is involved in the earliest disease stages is unknown. Objective To determine whether neuroinflammation exacerbates neural damage in preclinical AD. Methods We utilized cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and magnetic resonance imaging collected in 192 asymptomatic late-middle-aged adults (mean age=60.98 years). Neuroinflammatory markers chitinase-3-like protein 1 (YKL-40) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in CSF were utilized as markers of neuroinflammation. Neural cell damage was assessed using CSF neurofilament light chain protein (NFL), CSF total tau (T-Tau), and neural microstructure assessed with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). With regard to AD pathology, CSF Aβ42 and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (P-Tau181) were used as markers of amyloid and tau pathology, respectively. We hypothesized that higher YKL-40 and MCP-1 in the presence of AD pathology would be associated with higher NFL, T-Tau, and altered microstructure on DTI. Results Neuroinflammation was associated with markers of neural damage. Higher CSF YKL-40 was associated with both higher CSF NFL and T-Tau. Inflammation interacted with AD pathology, such that greater MCP-1 and lower Aβ42 was associated with altered microstructure in bilateral frontal and right temporal lobe and that greater MCP-1 and greater P-Tau181 was associated with altered microstructure in precuneus. Conclusion Inflammation may play a role in neural damage in preclinical AD. PMID:26836182

  14. Pathogenic and enzyme activities of the entomopathogenic fungus Tolypocladium cylindrosporum (Ascomycota: Hypocreales) from Tierra del Fuego, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Scorsetti, Ana C; Elíades, Lorena A; Stenglein, Sebastián A; Cabello, Marta N; Pelizza, Sebastián A; Saparrat, Mario C N

    2012-06-01

    Tolypocladium cylindrosporum is an entomopathogenic fungi that has been studied as a biological control agent against insects of several orders. The fungus has been isolated from the soil as well as from insects of the orders Coleoptera, Lepidoptera, Diptera and Hymenoptera. In this study, we analyzed the ability of a strain of T cylindrosporum, isolated from soil samples taken in Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, to produce hydrolytic enzymes, and to study the relationship of those activities to the fungus pathogenicity against pest aphids. We have made the traditional and molecular characterization of this strain of T cylindrosporum. The expression of hydrolase activity in the fungal strain was estimated at three incubation temperatures (4 degreeC, 12 degreeC and 24 degreeC), on different agar media supplemented with the following specific substrates: chitin azure, Tween 20, casein, and urea for chitinase, lipase, protease, and urease activity, respectively. The hydrolytic-enzyme activity was estimated qualitatively according to the presence of a halo of clarification through hydrolase action, besides was expressed semi-quantitatively as the ratio between the hydrolytic-halo and colony diameters. The pathogenicity of the fungus was tested on adults of the aphid Rhopalosiphum padi at three temperatures of incubation (4 degree C, 12 degree C and 24 degree C). The suspension was adjusted to a concentration of 1x10(7) conidia/ml. In pathogenicity assays at seven days post-inoculation, the fungus caused the mortality of adults of Ropalosiphum padi at different temperatures also showed a broad ability to grow on several agar-culture media, supplemented with different carbon sources at the three incubation temperatures tested. Although, the growth was greater with higher incubation temperatures (with maximum levels at 24 degreeC), the fungus reached similar colony diameters after 15 days of incubation on the medium supplemented with Tween 20 at the lower two incubation

  15. Integrin activation

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Integrin-mediated cell adhesion is important for development, immune responses, hemostasis and wound healing. Integrins also function as signal transducing receptors that can control intracellular pathways that regulate cell survival, proliferation, and cell fate. Conversely, cells can modulate the affinity of integrins for their ligands a process operationally defined as integrin activation. Analysis of activation of integrins has now provided a detailed molecular understanding of this unique form of “inside-out” signal transduction and revealed new paradigms of how transmembrane domains (TMD) can transmit long range allosteric changes in transmembrane proteins. Here, we will review how talin and mediates integrin activation and how the integrin TMD can transmit these inside out signals. [BMB Reports 2014; 47(12): 655-659] PMID:25388208

  16. Cerebrospinal Fluid Inflammatory Biomarkers Reflect Clinical Severity in Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Lauren M.; McColgan, Peter; Robertson, Nicola; Tabrizi, Sarah J.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Wild, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Immune system activation is involved in Huntington’s disease (HD) pathogenesis and biomarkers for this process could be relevant to study the disease and characterise the therapeutic response to specific interventions. We aimed to study inflammatory cytokines and microglial markers in the CSF of HD patients. Methods CSF TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, YKL-40, chitotriosidase, total tau and neurofilament light chain (NFL) from 23 mutation carriers and 14 healthy controls were assayed. Results CSF TNF-α and IL-1β were below the limit of detection. Mutation carriers had higher YKL-40 (p = 0.003), chitotriosidase (p = 0.015) and IL-6 (p = 0.041) than controls. YKL-40 significantly correlated with disease stage (p = 0.007), UHDRS total functional capacity score (r = -0.46, p = 0.016), and UHDRS total motor score (r = 0.59, p = 4.5*10−4) after adjustment for age. Conclusion YKL-40 levels in CSF may, after further study, come to have a role as biomarkers for some aspects of HD. Further investigation is needed to support our exploratory findings. PMID:27657730

  17. Active Cytokinins

    PubMed Central

    Mornet, René; Theiler, Jane B.; Leonard, Nelson J.; Schmitz, Ruth Y.; Moore, F. Hardy; Skoog, Folke

    1979-01-01

    Four series of azidopurines have been synthesized and tested for cytokinin activity in the tobacco callus bioassay: 2- and 8-azido-N6-benzyladenines, -N6-(Δ2-isopentenyl)adenines, and -zeatins, and N6-(2- and 4-azidobenzyl)adenines. The compounds having 2-azido substitution on the adenine ring are as active as the corresponding parent compounds, while those with 8-azido substitution are about 10 or more times as active. The 8-azidozeatin, which is the most active cytokinin observed, exhibited higher than minimal detectable activity at 1.2 × 10−5 micromolar, the lowest concentration tested. The shape of the growth curve indicates that even a concentration as low as 5 × 10−6 micromolar would probably be effective. By comparison, the lowest active concentration ever reported for zeatin has been 5 × 10−5 micromolar, representing a sensitivity rarely attained. All of the azido compounds have been submitted to photolysis in aqueous ethanol, and the photoproducts have been detected and identified by low and high resolution mass spectrometry. They are rationalized as products of abstraction and insertion reactions of the intermediate nitrenes. The potential of the major released products as cytokinins was also assessed by bioassay. 2-Azido-N6-(Δ2-isopentenyl)adenine competed with [14C]kinetin for the cytokinin-binding protein isolated from wheat germ. When the azido compound was photolysed in the presence of this protein, its attachment effectively blocked the binding of [14C]kinetin. PMID:16661017

  18. Active microwaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D.; Vidal-Madjar, D.

    1994-01-01

    Research on the use of active microwaves in remote sensing, presented during plenary and poster sessions, is summarized. The main highlights are: calibration techniques are well understood; innovative modeling approaches have been developed which increase active microwave applications (segmentation prior to model inversion, use of ERS-1 scatterometer, simulations); polarization angle and frequency diversity improves characterization of ice sheets, vegetation, and determination of soil moisture (X band sensor study); SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) interferometry potential is emerging; use of multiple sensors/extended spectral signatures is important (increase emphasis).

  19. Activity report

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S W

    2008-08-11

    This report is aimed to show the author's activities to support the LDRD. The title is 'Investigation of the Double-C Behavior in the Pu-Ga Time-Temperature-Transformation Diagram' The sections are: (1) Sample Holder Test; (2) Calculation of x-ray diffraction patterns; (3) Literature search and preparing publications; (4) Tasks Required for APS Experiments; and (5) Communications.

  20. Classroom Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Frances R.

    This pamphlet suggests activities that may be used in the elementary school classroom. Chapter I lists various short plays that children can easily perform which encourage their imagination. Chapter II details a few quiet classroom games such as "I Saw,""Corral the Wild Horse,""Who Has Gone from the Room," and "Six-Man-Football Checkers." A number…

  1. Learning Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tipton, Tom, Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Presents a flow chart for naming inorganic compounds. Although it is not necessary for students to memorize rules, preliminary skills needed before using the chart are outlined. Also presents an activity in which the mass of an imaginary atom is determined using lead shot, Petri dishes, and a platform balance. (JN)

  2. Leaf Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mingie, Walter

    Leaf activities can provide a means of using basic concepts of outdoor education to learn in elementary level subject areas. Equipment needed includes leaves, a clipboard with paper, and a pencil. A bag of leaves may be brought into the classroom if weather conditions or time do not permit going outdoors. Each student should pick a leaf, examine…

  3. Get Active

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lifting small weights – you can even use bottled water or cans of food as weights Watch these videos for muscle strengthening exercises to do at home or at the gym. If you do muscle-strengthening activities with weights, check out the do’s and don’ ...

  4. Activated Sludge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, F. Michael

    1978-01-01

    Presents the 1978 literature review of wastewater treatment. This review covers: (1) activated sludge process; (2) process control; (3) oxygen uptake and transfer; (4) phosphorus removal; (5) nitrification; (6) industrial wastewater; and (7) aerobic digestion. A list of 136 references is also presented. (HM)

  5. Organic matter recycling in a shallow coastal zone (NW Mediterranean): The influence of local and global climatic forcing and organic matter lability on hydrolytic enzyme activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misic, Cristina; Harriague, Anabella Covazzi

    2008-12-01

    Seawater and sediment were collected on a monthly basis from a shallow (10.5 m depth) coastal site in the Ligurian Sea (NW Mediterranean) from November 1993 to December 1994 to determine the main environmental forces that influenced the biogeochemical processes and to study the relationships between the availability and lability of the organic matter (OM) and hydrolytic enzymatic activity. The current direction throughout the sampling year was influenced by the climatic conditions, which showed significant correlations with north atlantic oscillation (NAO) index values. The current generally flowed northwards in spring. This could cause significantly lower transparency values than in the summer, when an eastward current probably reduced the allochthonous input of material from the main local watercourse and contributed to turning the conditions from mesotrophic to oligotrophic. Spring and summer were separated by transitional periods more than by the canonical autumn and winter seasons. These transitions were characterised by a reduction in salinity values and by resuspension caused by water column mixing and a current flowing towards the southwest. The significant inverse correlations of the chlorophyll- a and protein concentrations, bacterial abundance and proteolysis of the bottom seawater and transparency showed the direct influence of resuspension on the organic matter dynamics. Moreover, OM trophic quality influenced the bacterial parameters and the enzymatic activities. The glycolytic β glucosidase and chitinase activities and their bacterial cell-specific hydrolytic rates were higher when substrates such as hydrolysable proteins were available, while they decreased when refractory compounds were abundant. The low leucine aminopeptidase: β glucosidase ratio values observed in the water column were presumably related to the potential ease with which microbes obtained protein-derived materials and energy, the protein hydrolysable fraction being estimated at

  6. Glucokinase activators.

    PubMed

    Filipski, Kevin J; Futatsugi, Kentaro; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A; Stevens, Benjamin D

    2012-07-01

    In this review we highlight recently disclosed progress in the field of small-molecule activators of the human glucokinase enzyme. Several of the reported chemotypes possess structural features that diverge from known leads; some of these modifications appear to be specifically designed to modulate tissue selectivity or discrete parameters of enzyme function (e.g., S0.5 v Vmax). This review will inform the reader of the extent of continued effort being directed toward discovery of a first-in-class drug for Type II diabetes mellitus that functions through this target. Patents were selected from those published in December 2009 up to November 2011; foreign filings were translated where possible to understand the claims and biological techniques utilized to characterize the reported glucokinase activators. Overall, there appears to be a recent trend leading to reduced patent filings for small-molecule glucokinase activators. There are many possible explanations for this trend; however, it is likely that the field has reached maturity and that the downturn of new disclosures represents the transition of many of these programs to the clinic.

  7. Molecular size and net charge of pathogenesis-related enzymes from barley (Hordeum vulgare L., v. Karat) infected with Drechslera teres f. teres (Sacch.) Shoem.

    PubMed

    Rothe, G M; Welschbillig, N; Reiss, E

    1998-05-01

    Molecular size and net charge of isoforms of pathogenesis-related (PR) chitinase, beta-1,3-glucanase and peroxidase were studied in uninfected barley (Hordeum vulgare L., v. Karat) leaves and in barley leaves infected with the pathogenic fungus Drechslera teres f. teres (Sacch.) Shoem. Molecular characteristics were determined by time-dependent polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis under native conditions and by applying an extended version of the computer program MOL-MASS (Rothe, G. M., Weidmann, H., Electrophoresis 1991, 12, 703-709). Uninfected barley leaves contained predominantly one peroxidase isozyme but also three very weak peroxidases. Activities of all of these three peroxidases increased considerably after infection with Drechslera teres. The molecular masses of peroxidases 1 and 3 were estimated to be 38 +/- 5 and 42 +/- 7 kDa and their apparent valences at pH 8.4 were Z = 3.13 and 3.20, respectively. Amongst the chitinase isoforms, chitinase 1 and chitinase 2 appeared after infection, while chitinase 3 was also observed in uninfected leaves of barley. The molecular mass of chitinase 3 (31 +/- 6 kDa; f/fo = 1.20) was larger than that of chitinase 1 (20 +/- 2 kDa; f/fo = 1.04) and chitinase 2 (23 +/- 3 kDa; f/fo = 1.06). The valence of constitutive chitinase 3 (Z = 1.44 +/- 0.81) at pH 8.4 was lower than that of adaptive chitinase 1 (Z = 3.27 +/- 1.02) and chitinase 2 (Z = 2.96 +/- 1.38). Infection of barley leaves with Drechslera teres also induced the hydrolytic enzyme beta-1,3-glucanase 1; beta-1,3-glucanase 2 appeared in uninfected and in infected leaves. Constitutive beta-1,3-glucanase 2 was smaller (molecular mass 19 +/- kDa; f/fo = 1.05) than adaptive beta-1,3-glucanase 1 (molecular mass 26 +/- 4 kDa; f/fo = 1.07). The valence of adaptive beta-1,3-glucanase 1 (Z = 9.58 +/- 4.17) was approximately threefold that of beta-1,3-glucanase 2 (Z = 2.80 +/- 0.93).

  8. Mineral vs. Organic Amendments: Microbial Community Structure, Activity and Abundance of Agriculturally Relevant Microbes Are Driven by Long-Term Fertilization Strategies.

    PubMed

    Francioli, Davide; Schulz, Elke; Lentendu, Guillaume; Wubet, Tesfaye; Buscot, François; Reitz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Soil management is fundamental to all agricultural systems and fertilization practices have contributed substantially to the impressive increases in food production. Despite the pivotal role of soil microorganisms in agro-ecosystems, we still have a limited understanding of the complex response of the soil microbiota to organic and mineral fertilization in the very long-term. Here, we report the effects of different fertilization regimes (mineral, organic and combined mineral and organic fertilization), carried out for more than a century, on the structure and activity of the soil microbiome. Organic matter content, nutrient concentrations, and microbial biomass carbon were significantly increased by mineral, and even more strongly by organic fertilization. Pyrosequencing revealed significant differences between the structures of bacterial and fungal soil communities associated to each fertilization regime. Organic fertilization increased bacterial diversity, and stimulated microbial groups (Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Zygomycota) that are known to prefer nutrient-rich environments, and that are involved in the degradation of complex organic compounds. In contrast, soils not receiving manure harbored distinct microbial communities enriched in oligotrophic organisms adapted to nutrient-limited environments, as Acidobacteria. The fertilization regime also affected the relative abundances of plant beneficial and detrimental microbial taxa, which may influence productivity and stability of the agroecosystem. As expected, the activity of microbial exoenzymes involved in carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorous mineralization were enhanced by both types of fertilization. However, in contrast to comparable studies, the highest chitinase and phosphatase activities were observed in the solely mineral fertilized soil. Interestingly, these two enzymes showed also a particular high biomass-specific activities and a strong negative relation with soil pH. As many soil parameters

  9. Mineral vs. Organic Amendments: Microbial Community Structure, Activity and Abundance of Agriculturally Relevant Microbes Are Driven by Long-Term Fertilization Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Francioli, Davide; Schulz, Elke; Lentendu, Guillaume; Wubet, Tesfaye; Buscot, François; Reitz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Soil management is fundamental to all agricultural systems and fertilization practices have contributed substantially to the impressive increases in food production. Despite the pivotal role of soil microorganisms in agro-ecosystems, we still have a limited understanding of the complex response of the soil microbiota to organic and mineral fertilization in the very long-term. Here, we report the effects of different fertilization regimes (mineral, organic and combined mineral and organic fertilization), carried out for more than a century, on the structure and activity of the soil microbiome. Organic matter content, nutrient concentrations, and microbial biomass carbon were significantly increased by mineral, and even more strongly by organic fertilization. Pyrosequencing revealed significant differences between the structures of bacterial and fungal soil communities associated to each fertilization regime. Organic fertilization increased bacterial diversity, and stimulated microbial groups (Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Zygomycota) that are known to prefer nutrient-rich environments, and that are involved in the degradation of complex organic compounds. In contrast, soils not receiving manure harbored distinct microbial communities enriched in oligotrophic organisms adapted to nutrient-limited environments, as Acidobacteria. The fertilization regime also affected the relative abundances of plant beneficial and detrimental microbial taxa, which may influence productivity and stability of the agroecosystem. As expected, the activity of microbial exoenzymes involved in carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorous mineralization were enhanced by both types of fertilization. However, in contrast to comparable studies, the highest chitinase and phosphatase activities were observed in the solely mineral fertilized soil. Interestingly, these two enzymes showed also a particular high biomass-specific activities and a strong negative relation with soil pH. As many soil parameters

  10. Mineral vs. Organic Amendments: Microbial Community Structure, Activity and Abundance of Agriculturally Relevant Microbes Are Driven by Long-Term Fertilization Strategies.

    PubMed

    Francioli, Davide; Schulz, Elke; Lentendu, Guillaume; Wubet, Tesfaye; Buscot, François; Reitz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Soil management is fundamental to all agricultural systems and fertilization practices have contributed substantially to the impressive increases in food production. Despite the pivotal role of soil microorganisms in agro-ecosystems, we still have a limited understanding of the complex response of the soil microbiota to organic and mineral fertilization in the very long-term. Here, we report the effects of different fertilization regimes (mineral, organic and combined mineral and organic fertilization), carried out for more than a century, on the structure and activity of the soil microbiome. Organic matter content, nutrient concentrations, and microbial biomass carbon were significantly increased by mineral, and even more strongly by organic fertilization. Pyrosequencing revealed significant differences between the structures of bacterial and fungal soil communities associated to each fertilization regime. Organic fertilization increased bacterial diversity, and stimulated microbial groups (Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Zygomycota) that are known to prefer nutrient-rich environments, and that are involved in the degradation of complex organic compounds. In contrast, soils not receiving manure harbored distinct microbial communities enriched in oligotrophic organisms adapted to nutrient-limited environments, as Acidobacteria. The fertilization regime also affected the relative abundances of plant beneficial and detrimental microbial taxa, which may influence productivity and stability of the agroecosystem. As expected, the activity of microbial exoenzymes involved in carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorous mineralization were enhanced by both types of fertilization. However, in contrast to comparable studies, the highest chitinase and phosphatase activities were observed in the solely mineral fertilized soil. Interestingly, these two enzymes showed also a particular high biomass-specific activities and a strong negative relation with soil pH. As many soil parameters

  11. Mineral vs. Organic Amendments: Microbial Community Structure, Activity and Abundance of Agriculturally Relevant Microbes Are Driven by Long-Term Fertilization Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Francioli, Davide; Schulz, Elke; Lentendu, Guillaume; Wubet, Tesfaye; Buscot, François; Reitz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Soil management is fundamental to all agricultural systems and fertilization practices have contributed substantially to the impressive increases in food production. Despite the pivotal role of soil microorganisms in agro-ecosystems, we still have a limited understanding of the complex response of the soil microbiota to organic and mineral fertilization in the very long-term. Here, we report the effects of different fertilization regimes (mineral, organic and combined mineral and organic fertilization), carried out for more than a century, on the structure and activity of the soil microbiome. Organic matter content, nutrient concentrations, and microbial biomass carbon were significantly increased by mineral, and even more strongly by organic fertilization. Pyrosequencing revealed significant differences between the structures of bacterial and fungal soil communities associated to each fertilization regime. Organic fertilization increased bacterial diversity, and stimulated microbial groups (Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Zygomycota) that are known to prefer nutrient-rich environments, and that are involved in the degradation of complex organic compounds. In contrast, soils not receiving manure harbored distinct microbial communities enriched in oligotrophic organisms adapted to nutrient-limited environments, as Acidobacteria. The fertilization regime also affected the relative abundances of plant beneficial and detrimental microbial taxa, which may influence productivity and stability of the agroecosystem. As expected, the activity of microbial exoenzymes involved in carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorous mineralization were enhanced by both types of fertilization. However, in contrast to comparable studies, the highest chitinase and phosphatase activities were observed in the solely mineral fertilized soil. Interestingly, these two enzymes showed also a particular high biomass-specific activities and a strong negative relation with soil pH. As many soil parameters

  12. Active packaging with antifungal activities.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Van Long, N; Joly, Catherine; Dantigny, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    There have been many reviews concerned with antimicrobial food packaging, and with the use of antifungal compounds, but none provided an exhaustive picture of the applications of active packaging to control fungal spoilage. Very recently, many studies have been done in these fields, therefore it is timely to review this topic. This article examines the effects of essential oils, preservatives, natural products, chemical fungicides, nanoparticles coated to different films, and chitosan in vitro on the growth of moulds, but also in vivo on the mould free shelf-life of bread, cheese, and fresh fruits and vegetables. A short section is also dedicated to yeasts. All the applications are described from a microbiological point of view, and these were sorted depending on the name of the species. Methods and results obtained are discussed. Essential oils and preservatives were ranked by increased efficacy on mould growth. For all the tested molecules, Penicillium species were shown more sensitive than Aspergillus species. However, comparison between the results was difficult because it appeared that the efficiency of active packaging depended greatly on the environmental factors of food such as water activity, pH, temperature, NaCl concentration, the nature, the size, and the mode of application of the films, in addition to the fact that the amount of released antifungal compounds was not constant with time.

  13. Active packaging with antifungal activities.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Van Long, N; Joly, Catherine; Dantigny, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    There have been many reviews concerned with antimicrobial food packaging, and with the use of antifungal compounds, but none provided an exhaustive picture of the applications of active packaging to control fungal spoilage. Very recently, many studies have been done in these fields, therefore it is timely to review this topic. This article examines the effects of essential oils, preservatives, natural products, chemical fungicides, nanoparticles coated to different films, and chitosan in vitro on the growth of moulds, but also in vivo on the mould free shelf-life of bread, cheese, and fresh fruits and vegetables. A short section is also dedicated to yeasts. All the applications are described from a microbiological point of view, and these were sorted depending on the name of the species. Methods and results obtained are discussed. Essential oils and preservatives were ranked by increased efficacy on mould growth. For all the tested molecules, Penicillium species were shown more sensitive than Aspergillus species. However, comparison between the results was difficult because it appeared that the efficiency of active packaging depended greatly on the environmental factors of food such as water activity, pH, temperature, NaCl concentration, the nature, the size, and the mode of application of the films, in addition to the fact that the amount of released antifungal compounds was not constant with time. PMID:26803804

  14. Active tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This study is part of a series of Studies in Geophysics that have been undertaken for the Geophysics Research Forum by the Geophysics Study Committee. One purpose of each study is to provide assessments from the scientific community to aid policymakers in decisions on societal problems that involve geophysics. An important part of such assessments is an evaluation of the adequacy of current geophysical knowledge and the appropriateness of current research programs as a source of information required for those decisions. The study addresses our current scientific understanding of active tectonics --- particularly the patterns and rates of ongoing tectonic processes. Many of these processes cannot be described reasonably using the limited instrumental or historical records; however, most can be described adequately for practical purposes using the geologic record of the past 500,000 years. A program of fundamental research focusing especially on Quaternary tectonic geology and geomorphology, paleoseismology, neotectonics, and geodesy is recommended to better understand ongoing, active tectonic processes. This volume contains 16 papers. Individual papers are indexed separately on the Energy Database.

  15. Cultural conditions on the production of extracellular enzymes by Trichoderma isolates from tobacco rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Mallikharjuna Rao, K L N; Siva Raju, K; Ravisankar, H

    2016-01-01

    Twelve isolates of Trichoderma spp. isolated from tobacco rhizosphere were evaluated for their ability to produce chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase extracellular hydrolytic enzymes. Isolates ThJt1 and TvHt2, out of 12 isolates, produced maximum activities of <