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Sample records for active chlorine species

  1. Bacterial responses to reactive chlorine species.

    PubMed

    Gray, Michael J; Wholey, Wei-Yun; Jakob, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), the active ingredient of household bleach, is the most common disinfectant in medical, industrial, and domestic use and plays an important role in microbial killing in the innate immune system. Given the critical importance of the antimicrobial properties of chlorine to public health, it is surprising how little is known about the ways in which bacteria sense and respond to reactive chlorine species (RCS). Although the literature on bacterial responses to reactive oxygen species (ROS) is enormous, work addressing bacterial responses to RCS has begun only recently. Transcriptomic and proteomic studies now provide new insights into how bacteria mount defenses against this important class of antimicrobial compounds. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge, emphasizing the overlaps between RCS stress responses and other more well-characterized bacterial defense systems, and identify outstanding questions that represent productive avenues for future research. PMID:23768204

  2. Kinetic model for predicting the concentrations of active halogens species in chlorinated saline cooling waters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Haag, W.R.; Lietzke, M.H.

    1981-08-01

    A kinetic model has been developed for describing the speciation of chlorine-produced oxidants in seawater as a function of time. The model is applicable under a broad variety of conditions, including all pH range, salinities, temperatures, ammonia concentrations, organic amine concentrations, and chlorine doses likely to be encountered during power plant cooling water chlorination. However, the effects of sunlight are not considered. The model can also be applied to freshwater and recirculating water systems with cooling towers. The results of the model agree with expectation, however, complete verification is not feasible at the present because analytical methods for some of the predicted species are lacking.

  3. REACTION OF ACTIVATED CARBON WITH AQUEOUS CHLORINE AND CHLORINE DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this research was to determine whether aqueous chlorine and chlorine dioxide react with activated carbon, or with compounds adsorbed on activated carbon, to produce compounds that would not form in the absence of activated carbon. The experimental conditions were...

  4. Impact of January 2005 Solar Proton Events on Chlorine Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damiani, A.; Funke, B.; Marsh, D. R.; Lopez-Puertas, M.; Santee, M. L.; Froidevaux, L.; Wang, S.; Jackman, C. H.; vonClarmann, T.; Gardini, A.; Cordero, R. R.; Storini, M.

    2012-01-01

    Sudden changes in stratospheric chlorine species in the polar northern atmosphere, caused by the Solar Proton Events (SPEs) of 17 and 20 January 2005, have been investigated and compared with version 4 of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM4). We used Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) measurements to monitor the variability of ClO, HCl, HOCl and Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounder (MIPAS) on ENVISAT to retrieve ClONO2. SPE-induced chlorine activation has been identified. HCl decrease occurred at nearly all the investigated altitudes (i.e., 10-0.5 hPa) with the strongest decrease (of about 0.25 ppbv) on 21 January. HOCl was found to be the main active chlorine species under nighttime conditions (with increases of more than 0.2 ppbv) whereas both HOCl and ClO enhancements (about 0.1 ppbv) have been observed at the polar night terminator. Further, small ClO decreases (of less than 0.1 ppbv) and ClONO2 enhancements (about 0.2 ppbv) have been observed at higher latitudes (i.e., at nighttime) roughly above 2 hPa. While WACCM4 reproduces most of the SPE-induced variability in the chlorine species fairly well, in some particular regions discrepancies between the modeled and measured temporal evolution of the abundances of chlorine species were found. HOCl changes are modelled very well with respect to both magnitude and geographic distribution. ClO decreases are reproduced at high latitudes, whereas ClO enhancements in the terminator region are underestimated and attributed to background variations. WACCM4 also reproduces the HCl depletion in the mesosphere but it does not show the observed decrease below about 2 hPa. Finally, WACCM4 simulations indicate that the observed ClONO2 increase is dominated by background variability, although SPE-induced production might contribute by 0.1 ppbv.

  5. Impact of January 2005 Solar Proton Events on Chlorine Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damiani, A.; Funke, B.; Marsh, D. R.; Lopez-Puertas, M.; Santee, M. L.; Froidevaux, L.; Wang, S.; Jackman, C. H.; von Clarmann, T.; Gardini, A.; Cordero, R. R.; Storini, M.

    2011-01-01

    Sudden changes in stratospheric chlorine species in the polar northern atmosphere, caused by the Solar Proton Events (SPEs) of 17 and 20 January 2005, have been investigated and compared with version 4 of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM4). We used Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) measurements to monitor the variability of ClO, HCl, HOCl and Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounder (MIPAS) on ENVISAT to retrieve ClONO2. SPE-induced chlorine activation has been identified. HCl decrease occurred at nearly all the investigated altitudes with the lowest values (of less than 0.25 ppbv) on 21 January. HOCl was found to be the main active chlorine species under nighttime conditions (with increases of more than 0.2 ppbv) whereas both HOCL and CLO enhancements (about 0.1 ppbv) have been observed at the polar night terminator. Further, small ClO decreases (of less than 0.1 ppbv) and ClONO2 enhancements (0.2 ppbv) have been observed at higher latitudes (i.e., at nighttime) roughly above 2hPa. While WACCM4 reproduces most of the SPE-induced variability in the chlorine species fairly well, in some particular regions discrepancies between the modeled and measured temporal evolution of the abundances of chlorine species were found. HOCl changes are modelled very well with respect to both magnitude and geographic distribution. ClO decreases are reproduced at high latitudes, whereas ClO enhancements in the terminator region are underestimated and attributed to background variations. WACCM4 also reproduces the HCl depletion in the mesosphere but it does not show the observed decrease below about 2 hPa. Finally, WACCM4 simulations indicate that the observed ClONO2 increase is dominated by background variability, although SPE-induced production might contribute by 0.1 ppbv.

  6. Impact of January 2005 solar proton events on chlorine species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damiani, A.; Funke, B.; Marsh, D. R.; López-Puertas, M.; Santee, M. L.; Froidevaux, L.; Wang, S.; Jackman, C. H.; von Clarmann, T.; Gardini, A.; Cordero, R. R.; Storini, M.

    2012-01-01

    Sudden changes in stratospheric chlorine species in the polar northern atmosphere, caused by the Solar Proton Events (SPEs) of 17 and 20 January 2005, have been investigated and compared with version 4 of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM4). We used Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) measurements to monitor the variability of ClO, HCl, HOCl and Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounder (MIPAS) on ENVISAT to retrieve ClONO2. SPE-induced chlorine activation has been identified. HCl decrease occurred at nearly all the investigated altitudes with the lowest values (of less than 0.25 ppbv) on 21 January. HOCl was found to be the main active chlorine species under nighttime conditions (with increases of more than 0.2 ppbv) whereas both HOCl and ClO enhancements (about 0.1 ppbv) have been observed at the polar night terminator. Further, small ClO decreases (of less than 0.1 ppbv) and ClONO2 enhancements (about 0.2 ppbv) have been observed at higher latitudes (i.e., at nighttime) roughly above 2 hPa. While WACCM4 reproduces most of the SPE-induced variability in the chlorine species fairly well, in some particular regions discrepancies between the modeled and measured temporal evolution of the abundances of chlorine species were found. HOCl changes are modelled very well with respect to both magnitude and geographic distribution. ClO decreases are reproduced at high latitudes, whereas ClO enhancements in the terminator region are underestimated and attributed to background variations. WACCM4 also reproduces the HCl depletion in the mesosphere but it does not show the observed decrease below about 2 hPa. Finally, WACCM4 simulations indicate that the observed ClONO2 increase is dominated by background variability, although SPE-induced production might contribute by 0.1 ppbv.

  7. Impact of January 2005 solar proton events on chlorine species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damiani, A.; Funke, B.; Marsh, D. R.; López-Puertas, M.; Santee, M. L.; Froidevaux, L.; Wang, S.; Jackman, C. H.; von Clarmann, T.; Gardini, A.; Cordero, R. R.; Storini, M.

    2012-05-01

    Sudden changes in stratospheric chlorine species in the polar northern atmosphere, caused by the Solar Proton Events (SPEs) of 17 and 20 January 2005, have been investigated and compared with version 4 of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM4). We used Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) measurements to monitor the variability of ClO, HCl, HOCl and Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounder (MIPAS) on ENVISAT to retrieve ClONO2. SPE-induced chlorine activation has been identified. HCl decrease occurred at nearly all the investigated altitudes (i.e., 10-0.5 hPa) with the strongest decrease (of about 0.25 ppbv) on 21 January. HOCl was found to be the main active chlorine species under nighttime conditions (with increases of more than 0.2 ppbv) whereas both HOCl and ClO enhancements (about 0.1 ppbv) have been observed at the polar night terminator. Further, small ClO decreases (of less than 0.1 ppbv) and ClONO2 enhancements (about 0.2 ppbv) have been observed at higher latitudes (i.e., at nighttime) roughly above 2 hPa. While WACCM4 reproduces most of the SPE-induced variability in the chlorine species fairly well, in some particular regions discrepancies between the modeled and measured temporal evolution of the abundances of chlorine species were found. HOCl changes are modelled very well with respect to both magnitude and geographic distribution. ClO decreases are reproduced at high latitudes, whereas ClO enhancements in the terminator region are underestimated and attributed to background variations. WACCM4 also reproduces the HCl depletion in the mesosphere but it does not show the observed decrease below about 2 hPa. Finally, WACCM4 simulations indicate that the observed ClONO2 increase is dominated by background variability, although SPE-induced production might contribute by 0.1 ppbv.

  8. Tolerance of five species of tropical marine mussels to continuous chlorination.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, S; Venugopalan, V P; Van der Velde, G; Jenner, H A

    2003-05-01

    The paper examines the relative lethal and sublethal response of five important tropical marine mussels (Perna viridis, Perna perna, Brachidontes striatulus, Brachidontes variabilis and Modiolus philippinarum) to different chlorine concentrations varying from 0.25 to 15 mg l(-1). The mussels were observed to co-exist in the cooling water circuits of a coastal power station that adopted intermittent chlorination as a fouling control technique. The five mussel species showed, in response to chlorination, 100% mortality at significantly different exposure times, indicating significant species-specific variability in chlorine tolerance. For example, at 1 mg l(-1) residual chlorine, B. variabilis and P. viridis took 288 and 816 h, respectively, to achieve 100% mortality. The time taken for 100% mortality decreased with increasing chlorine residual concentration. The effect of mussel size (= mussel age) of P. viridis, P. perna, B. striatulus and M. philippinarum on mortality was significant between 1 and 5 mg l(-1) residual chlorine, with larger mussels showing greater resistance than smaller ones. All mussel species showed progressive reduction in physiological activities when chlorine residuals were increased from 0 to 1 mg l(-1). However, species-specific differences in the relative rate of physiological activities were observed. Accordingly, relative reduction in physiological activities in response to chlorination was the lowest in P. viridis and the highest in B. variabilis. The data clearly indicate significant differences in the lethal and sublethal responses of the five mussel species to chlorination. The results, therefore, suggest that for effective fouling control, chlorine treatment against mussels has to be employed judiciously, depending on the mussel species involved. PMID:12517421

  9. Transformation of two chlorinated fumigants by hydrogen sulfide species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chlorinated fumigants chloropicrin and 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) are extensively used to control soilborne pests. Transformation of these two pesticides by hydrogen sulfide species (H2S and HS-) was examined in well-defined anoxic aqueous solutions. Chloropicrin underwent an extremely rapid re...

  10. Antarctic stratospheric chemistry of chlorine nitrate, hydrogen chloride, and ice - Release of active chlorine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, Mario J.; Tso, Tai-Ly; Molina, Luisa T.; Wang, Frank C.-Y.

    1987-01-01

    The reaction rate between atmospheric hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine nitrate (ClONO2) is greatly enhanced in the presence of ice particles; HCl dissolves readily into ice, and the collisional reaction probability for ClONO2 on the surface of ice with HCl in the mole fraction range from about 0.003 to 0.010 is in the range from about 0.05 to 0.1 for temperatures near 200 K. Chlorine is released into the gas phase on a time scale of at most a few milliseconds, whereas nitric acid (HNO3), the other product, remains in the condensed phase. This reaction could play an important role in explaining the observed depletion of ozone over Antarctica; it releases photolytically active chlorine from its most abundant reservoir species, and it promotes the formation of HNO3 and thus removes nitrogen dioxide from the gas phase. Hence it establishes the necessary conditions for the efficient catalytic destruction of ozone by halogenated free radicals.

  11. Antarctic Stratospheric Chemistry of Chlorine Nitrate, Hydrogen Chloride, and Ice: Release of Active Chlorine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, Mario J.; Tso, Tai-Ly; Molina, Luisa T.; Wang, Frank C.-Y.

    1987-11-01

    The reaction rate between atmospheric hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine nitrate (ClONO2) is greatly enhanced in the presence of ice particles; HCl dissolves readily into ice, and the collisional reaction probability for ClONO2 on the surface of ice with HCl in the mole fraction range from ~ 0.003 to 0.010 is in the range from ~ 0.05 to 0.1 for temperatures near 200 K. Chlorine (Cl2) is released into the gas phase on a time scale of at most a few milliseconds, whereas nitric acid (HNO3), the other product, remains in the condensed phase. This reaction could play an important role in explaining the observed depletion of ozone over Antarctica; it releases photolytically active chlorine from its most abundant reservoir species, and it promotes the formation of HNO3 and thus removes nitrogen dioxide (NO2) from the gas phase. Hence it establishes the necessary conditions for the efficient catalytic destruction of ozone by halogenated free radicals. In the absence of HCl, ClONO2 also reacts irreversibly with ice with a collision efficiency of ~ 0.02 at 200 K; the product hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is released to the gas phase on a time scale of minutes.

  12. Impacts of the January 2005 solar particle events on middle atmospheric chlorine species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Holger; Sinnhuber, Miriam; Notholt, Justus; Maik Wissing, Jan; Kallenrode, May-Britt; Santee, Michelle

    It is well established that solar particle events (SPEs) are sources of significant chemical dis-turbances in the Earth's polar atmosphere. The observed SPE effects on nitrogen, hydrogen and oxygen compounds have been investigated in some detail in recent years, and they can be reproduced by atmospheric models using basic parametrizations for NOx and HOx produc-tion as a funtion of the particle impact ionisation. However, there are considerable differences between model predictions and measurements concerning several other trace gases including chlorine species. Two major SPEs occurred on January 17, and January 20, 2005. The latter had an exceptionally hard energy spectrum which caused maximum particle impact ionization at stratospheric altitudes. The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instrument on-board the Aura satellite has measured a short-term decrease of HCl in the northern polar region corresponding to January 2005 SPEs. The peak HCl depletion is ˜300 ppt at 35-40 km. This is comparable to the depletion of messopheric HCl observed by the HALOE instrument during the July 2000 SPE. We will present simulation results of the University of Bremen Ion Chemistry (UBIC) model for the SPEs in January 2005 focusing on chlorine species. The simulations indicate that the observed short-term decrease of middle atmospheric HCl is due to a conversion into active chlorine species such as Cl, ClO and HOCl. The magnitude of the observed HCl loss can only be reproduced if reactions of negative chlorine species and the production of O(1 D) from the reaction N(2 D) + O2 are taken into account. The model results will be compared to MLS/Aura data of HCl, HOCl and ClO. Additionally, the impacts of the observed chlorine activation, e.g. on ozone, will be assessed.

  13. Synergistic effect between UV and chlorine (UV/chlorine) on the degradation of carbamazepine: Influence factors and radical species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Long; Wu, Qian-Yuan; Huang, Nan; Wang, Ting; Hu, Hong-Ying

    2016-07-01

    For successful wastewater reclamation, advanced oxidation processes have attracted attention for elimination of emerging contaminants. In this study, the synergistic treatment with UV irradiation and chlorine (UV/chlorine) was used to degrade carbamazepine (CBZ). Neither UV irradiation alone nor chlorination alone could efficiently degraded CBZ. UV/chlorine oxidation showed a significant synergistic effect on CBZ degradation through generation of radical species (OH and Cl), and this process could be well depicted by pseudo first order kinetic. The degradation rate constants (kobs,CBZ) of CBZ increased linearly with increasing UV irradiance and chlorine dosage. The degradation of CBZ by UV/chlorine in acidic solutions was more efficient than that in basic solutions mainly due to the effect of pH on the dissociation of HOCl and OCl(-) and then on the quantum yields and radical species quenching of UV/chlorine. When pH was increased from 5.5 to 9.5, the rate constants of degradation of CBZ by OH decreased from 0.65 to 0.14 min(-1) and that by Cl decreased from 0.40 to 0.11 min(-1). The rate constant for the reaction between Cl and CBZ was 5.6 ± 1.6 × 10(10) M(-1) s(-1). Anions of HCO3(-) (1-50 mM) showed moderate inhibition of CBZ degradation by UV/chlorine, while Cl(-) did not. UV/chlorine could efficiently degrade CBZ in wastewater treatment plant effluent, although the degradation was inhibited by about 30% compared with that in ultrapure water with chlorine dosage of 0.14-0.56 mM. Nine main oxidation products of the CBZ degradation by UV/chlorine were identified using the HPLC-QToF MS/MS. Initial oxidation products arose from hydroxylation, carboxylation and hydrogen atom abstraction of CBZ by OH and Cl, and were then further oxidized to generate acylamino cleavage and decarboxylation products of acridine and acridione. PMID:27105033

  14. Chlorinated aromatics from combustion: influence of chlorine, combustion conditions, and catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Oberg, T; Ohrström, T

    2003-09-01

    Research on the formation of chlorinated aromatics in combustion processes has mainly taken place in the laboratory. Previous attempts to correlate observation data from commercial plants have been inconclusive. This study reports on the outcome of an industrial experiment in a full-scale afterburner. The influence of chlorine input, combustion temperature, and catalytic activity was investigated in a factorial design with two blocks. Polychlorinated benzenes, dibenzo-p-dioxins, and dibenzofurans were formed both at combustion temperatures and below 400 degrees C. The results show that all three experimental factors have statistically significant impact on the formation and release of these toxic byproducts. The quantitative dependence between chlorine input and the occurrence of chlorinated aromatics is of particular interest due to previous controversy. The purpose with this study was to ensure that the installation of a boiler for energy recovery would not cause elevated emissions of chlorinated aromatics. The experiment demonstrated that this risk is probably low, since the presence of catalytic material or an increase in chlorine input is required for this to happen. A general conclusion was that industrial experimentation employing the principles of statistical design could improve the validity in recommendations regarding commercial plant operation. PMID:12967125

  15. Chlorine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical laboratory information profile (CLIP) of the chemical chlorine, produced in small quantities in the laboratory, is presented. The profile summarizes physical and harmful properties, exposure limits, reactivity risks, and symptoms of major exposure for the benefit of teachers and students using the chemical in the laboratory.

  16. Chlorine

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Chlorine ; CASRN 7782 - 50 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects

  17. Chlorine

    SciTech Connect

    Talmage, Sylvia Smith

    2009-01-01

    Following a brief description of the use of chlorine as a chemical warfare agent in World War I, this chapter summarizes physical and chemical data and recent clinical and controlled laboratory studies on the irritant and lethal effects of chlorine. The mechanism of toxicity for both irritation and lethal effects is described. The mathematical relationship between concentration and exposure duration for a set endpoint is given for both an irritancy response and mortality. This information can be used to assist in time-scaling for the set endpoint to other exposure durations. Risk assessment addresses the potential for greater effects in sensitive populations such as asthmatics. A concentration of 0.5 ppm for up to 8 hours is a no-adverse-effect concentration in most sensitive subjects; whereas, a concentration of 1.0 ppm induces some sensory irritation and transient changes in respiratory tract airflow parameters. Treatment and intervention of exposed individuals is dependent upon symptoms

  18. Adsorption of chlorine dioxide gas on activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Wood, Joseph P; Ryan, Shawn P; Snyder, Emily Gibb; Serre, Shannon D; Touati, Abderrahmane; Clayton, Matthew J

    2010-08-01

    Research and field experience with chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas to decontaminate structures contaminated with Bacillus anthracis spores and other microorganisms have demonstrated the effectiveness of this sterilant technology. However, because of its hazardous properties, the unreacted ClO2, gas must be contained and captured during fumigation events. Although activated carbon has been used during some decontamination events to capture the ClO2 gas, no data are available to quantify the performance of the activated carbon in terms of adsorption capacity and other sorbent property operational features. Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine and compare the ClO2 adsorption capacities of five different types of activated carbon as a function of the challenge ClO2 concentration. Tests were also conducted to investigate other sorbent properties, including screening tests to determine gaseous species desorbed from the saturated sorbent upon warming (to provide an indication of how immobile the ClO2 gas and related compounds are once captured on the sorbent). In the adsorption tests, ClO2 gas was measured continuously using a photometric-based instrument, and these measurements were verified with a noncontinuous method utilizing wet chemistry analysis. The results show that the simple activated carbons (not impregnated or containing other activated sorbent materials) were the most effective, with maximum adsorption capacities of approximately 110 mg/g. In the desorption tests, there was minimal release of ClO(2) from all sorbents tested, but desorption levels of chlorine (Cl2) gas (detected as chloride) varied, with a maximum release of nearly 15% of the mass of ClO2 adsorbed. PMID:20842929

  19. Three dimensional modelling of chlorine activation in the Arctic stratosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Kettleborough, J.A.; Carver, G.D.; Lary, D.J.; Pyle, J.A. ); Scott, P.A. )

    1994-06-22

    This paper presents the results of using the UK Universities Global Atmospheric Modelling Program (UGAMP) general circulation model to study the atmospheric chemistry of chlorine compounds in the arctic stratosphere during EASOE. Here the authors discuss the results of a model run started in early January 1992, which show that the low temperatures favored the production of polar stratospheric clouds which can process active chlorine compounds to densities in the ppbv range. The model also shows that lack of sunlight means that this reactive chlorine is not able to contribute to chemical destruction of ozone. As the temperatures rise, the active chlorine is seen to cycle back into the compound ClONO[sub 2].

  20. Observation of Chlorine Activation near the Midlatitude Tropopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, B.; Toohey, D.; Wilson, J. C.; Kelly, K. K.; Thompson, T. L.; Proffitt, M. H.; May, R. D.

    2004-12-01

    It has been proposed that heterogeneous chlorine activation on cirrus cloud particles near the tropopause could provide a chemical explanation for ozone trends in the midlatitude tropopause region. During the 1998 WAM (WB-57 Aerosol Mission) campaign, an in situ ClO instrument was deployed on the NASA WB-57 aircraft in the midlatitudes. On the 11 April 1998 flight, clear examples of enhancements to reactive chlorine in sunlit, wet, particle laden air near the tropopause were observed over eastern Wyoming (approximately 42\\deg N, 105\\deg E) at 11-12 km. The air being sampled appeared to contain evaporating cirrus, and the observed chlorine enhancements (up to 20% activation) were strongly correlated with both particle surface area and total water. Ozone values in this enhanced ClO region ranged from 80-300 ppbv, consistent with both tropospheric and lowermost stratospheric air. These observations suggest that near tropopause reactive chlorine enhancements likely occur in regions of recent stratospheric-tropospheric exchange providing water and increased particle surface area to otherwise relatively dry stratospheric air. Due to greater insolation, ozone loss rates in this region may be higher than those previously reported for similar active chlorine abundances at similar altitudes in the Arctic.

  1. A 3D transport model study of chlorine activation during EASOE

    SciTech Connect

    Chipperfield, M.P.; Cariolle, D.; Simon, P. )

    1994-06-22

    The authors present the results of a chemical transport model which was applied to the problem of atmospheric chemistry of trace species in the stratosphere during EASOE. The model uses a comprehensive set of gas phase reactions, as well as modeling reactions occuring on nuclei in polar stratospheric clouds. This model has been used to study the development of chlorine compounds during the winter of 1991-92. Meteorological data is used as a boundary condition for the model. Significant increases in reactive chlorine are shown to occur in the lower stratosphere through mid January, when warming reduced the occurrence of polar stratospheric clouds. Even with the enhanced active chlorine presence, the lack of sunlight inhibited substantial chemical destruction of ozone.

  2. THE ROLE OF CHLORINE IN DIOXIN FORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is poor correlation between total chlorine in waste streams and formation of polychlorinated dibenzodioxin and polychlorinated dibenzofuran (PCDD/F) during waste combustion. This is because the active chlorine (Cl) species are strongly dependent upon combustion conditions. ...

  3. The roles of reactive species in micropollutant degradation in the UV/free chlorine system.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jingyun; Fu, Yun; Shang, Chii

    2014-01-01

    The UV/free chlorine process forms reactive species such as hydroxyl radicals (HO(•)), chlorine atoms (Cl(•)), Cl2(•-), and O(•-). The specific roles of these reactive species in aqueous micropollutant degradation in the UV/chlorine process under different conditions were investigated using a steady-state kinetic model. Benzoic acid (BA) was chosen as the model micropollutant. The steady-state kinetic model developed fitted the experimental data well. The results showed that HO(•) and Cl(•) contributed substantially to BA degradation, while the roles of the other reactive species such as Cl2(•-) and O(•-) were negligible. The overall degradation rate of BA decreased as the pH increased from 6 to 9. In particular, the relative contributions of HO(•) and Cl(•) to the degradation changed from 34.7% and 65.3% respectively at pH 6 to 37.9% and 62% respectively at pH 9 under the conditions evaluated. Their relative contributions also changed slightly with variations in chlorine dosage, BA concentration and chloride concentration. The scavenging effect of natural organic matter (NOM) on Cl(•) was relatively small compared to that on HO(•), while bicarbonate preferentially reduced the contribution of Cl(•). This study is the first to demonstrate the contributions of different reactive species to the micropollutant degradation in the UV/chlorine system under environmentally relevant conditions. PMID:24400681

  4. Vortex-wide chlorine activation by a mesoscale PSC event in the Arctic winter of 2009/10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, Tobias; Pitts, Michael C.; Poole, Lamont R.; Tritscher, Ines; Grooß, Jens-Uwe; Nakajima, Hideaki

    2016-04-01

    In the Arctic polar vortex of the 2009/10 winter temperatures were low enough to allow widespread formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). These clouds occurred during the initial chlorine activation phase which provided the opportunity to investigate the impact of PSCs on chlorine activation. Satellite observations of gas-phase species and PSCs are used in combination with trajectory modeling to assess this initial activation. The initial activation occurred in association with the formation of PSCs over the east coast of Greenland at the beginning of January 2010. Although this area of PSCs covered only a small portion of the vortex, it was responsible for almost the entire initial activation of chlorine vortex wide. Observations show HCl (hydrochloric acid) mixing ratios decreased rapidly in and downstream of this region. Trajectory calculations and simplified heterogeneous chemistry modeling confirmed that the initial chlorine activation continued until ClONO2 (chlorine nitrate) was completely depleted and the activated air masses were advected throughout the polar vortex. For the calculation of heterogeneous reaction rates, surface area density is estimated from backscatter observations. Modeled heterogeneous reaction rates along trajectories intersecting with the PSCs indicate that the initial phase of chlorine activation occurred in just a few hours. These calculations also indicate that chlorine activation on the binary background aerosol is significantly slower than on the PSC particles and the observed chlorine activation can only be explained by an increase in surface area density due to PSC formation. Furthermore, there is a strong correlation between the magnitude of the observed HCl depletion and PSC surface area density.

  5. BREAKPOINT CHLORINATION/ACTIVATED CARBON TREATMENT: EFFECT ON VOLATILE HALOGENATED ORGANICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The production and removal of six volatile halogenated organic compounds during treatment of tertiary clarified and filtered wastewater by breakpoint chlorination and activated carbon was examined in a continuous flow pilot plant. Short contact time breakpoint chlorination of fil...

  6. Microfluidic Chip for the Photocatalytic Production of Active Chlorine.

    PubMed

    Elmas, Sait; Ambroz, Filip; Chugh, Dipankar; Nann, Thomas

    2016-05-17

    Active chlorine is the most powerful microbicidal reagent in swimming pools, potable water, hospitals, and medical surgeries. Its production mainly relies on reactive inorganic intermediates and electrochemical methods that involve undesired waste products and high energy as well as material costs. In this study, we fabricated a low-cost chip based on sputter-coated thin films of silver (Ag) that acted as recyclable and effective photoelectrode for the photocatalytic production of active chlorine (HOCl) from aqueous media and artificial sunlight. The photoelectrode was electrochemically activated to AgCl at low overpotentials between 0.2 and 0.4 V vs Ag|AgCl (3 M KCl) and photocatalytically reduced to Ag(0) for 15 consecutive cycles, showing the electrode still being active. However, because of poor adhesion properties on the selected substrates, degradation effects were observed over time. Furthermore, the Ag@AgCl photoelectrode was integrated into a microfluidic chip, and we showed for the first time a light-driven microfluidic chip generating a constant stream of active chlorine. PMID:27115714

  7. Chlorine Isotopes: As a Possible Tracer of Fluid/Bio-Activities on Mars and a Progress Report on Chlorine Isotope Analysis by TIMs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, N.; Nyquist, L.E.; Reese, Y.; Shih, C-Y.; Numata, M.; Fujitani, T.; Okano, O.

    2009-01-01

    Significantly large mass fractionations between chlorine isotopes (Cl-35, Cl-37) have been reported for terrestrial materials including both geological samples and laboratory materials. Also, the chlorine isotopic composition can be used as a tracer for early solar system processes. Moreover, chlorine is ubiquitous on the Martian surface. Typical chlorine abundances in Gusev soils are approx.0.5 %. The global surface average chlorine abundance also is approx.0.5 %. Striking variations among outcrop rocks at Meridiani were reported with some chlorine abundances as high as approx.2%. Characterizing conditions under which chlorine isotopic fractionation may occur is clearly of interest to planetary science. Thus, we have initiated development of a chlorine isotopic analysis technique using TIMS at NASA-JSC. We present here a progress report on the current status of development at JSC and discuss the possible application of chlorine isotopic analysis to Martian meteorites in a search for fluid- and possibly biological activity on Mars.

  8. EFFECTS OF ACTIVATED CARBON ON THE REACTIONS OF FREE CHLORINE WITH PHENOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of prechlorination in drinking water treatment results in contact of free chlorine with activated carbon which has been added to remove organic compounds from water. The chlorine then reacts with the carbon and adsorbed compounds. Free chlorine reacts readily with a group...

  9. Activation of stratospheric chlorine by reactions in liquid sulphuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, R.A.; MacKenzie, A.R. ); Mueller, R.H.; Peter, Th.; Crutzen, P.J. )

    1994-06-22

    The authors discuss activation mechanisms for chlorine compounds in the stratosphere, based on laboratory measurements for the solubility and reaction rates of HOCl and HCl in H[sub 2]SO[sub 4] solutions, as found on aerosols in the stratosphere. Their interest is in the impact of the large increase in aerosol loading in the stratosphere in the winter on 1991-92 due to the Mt. Pinatubo eruption. While laboratory data is not available for the temperature range close to 190 K, they argue that should the solubility and hydrolysis rates be high enough, this excess aerosol density could have contributed a significant additional amount of reactive chlorine to the stratosphere.

  10. Partitioning and budget of inorganic and organic chlorine species observed by MIPAS-B and TELIS in the Arctic in March 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzel, G.; Oelhaf, H.; Birk, M.; de Lange, A.; Engel, A.; Friedl-Vallon, F.; Kirner, O.; Kleinert, A.; Maucher, G.; Nordmeyer, H.; Orphal, J.; Ruhnke, R.; Sinnhuber, B.-M.; Vogt, P.

    2015-07-01

    The Arctic winter 2010/2011 was characterized by a persistent vortex with extremely low temperatures in the lower stratosphere above northern Scandinavia leading to a strong activation of chlorine compounds (ClOx) like Cl, Cl2, ClO, ClOOCl, OClO, and HOCl, which rapidly destroyed ozone when sunlight returned after winter solstice. The MIPAS-B (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding) and TELIS (TErahertz and submillimeter LImb Sounder) balloon measurements obtained in northern Sweden on 31 March 2011 inside the polar vortex have provided vertical profiles of inorganic and organic chlorine species as well as diurnal variations of ClO around sunrise over the whole altitude range in which chlorine has been undergoing activation and deactivation. This flight was performed at the end of the winter during the last phase of ClOx deactivation. The complete inorganic and organic chlorine partitioning and budget for 31 March 2011, assumed to be representative for the late-winter Arctic stratosphere, has been derived by combining MIPAS-B and TELIS simultaneously observed molecules. A total chlorine amount of 3.41 ± 0.30 parts per billion by volume is inferred from the measurements (above 24 km). This value is in line with previous stratospheric observations carried out outside the tropics confirming the slightly decreasing chlorine amount in the stratosphere. Observations are compared and discussed with the output of a multi-year simulation performed with the chemistry climate model EMAC (ECHAM5/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry). The simulated stratospheric total chlorine amount is in accordance with the MIPAS-B/TELIS observations, taking into account the fact that some chlorine source gases and very short-lived species are not included in the model.

  11. Partitioning and budget of inorganic and organic chlorine species observed by MIPAS-B and TELIS in the Arctic in March 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzel, G.; Oelhaf, H.; Birk, M.; de Lange, A.; Engel, A.; Friedl-Vallon, F.; Kirner, O.; Kleinert, A.; Maucher, G.; Nordmeyer, H.; Orphal, J.; Ruhnke, R.; Sinnhuber, B.-M.; Vogt, P.

    2015-02-01

    The Arctic winter 2010/11 was characterized by a persisting vortex with extremely cold temperatures in the lower stratosphere above northern Scandinavia leading to a strong activation of chlorine compounds (ClOx) like Cl, Cl2, ClO, ClOOCl, OClO, and HOCl which rapidly destroyed ozone when sunlight returned after winter solstice. MIPAS (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding) and TELIS (Terahertz and submillimeter Limb Sounder) balloon measurements obtained in northern Sweden on 31 March 2011 inside the polar vortex have provided vertical profiles of inorganic and organic chlorine species as well as diurnal variations of ClO around sunrise over the whole altitude range in which chlorine is undergoing activation and deactivation. This flight was performed at the end of the winter during the last phase of ClOx deactivation. The complete inorganic and organic chlorine partitioning and budget in the stratosphere has been derived by combining MIPAS-B and TELIS simultaneously observed molecules. A total chlorine amount of 3.41 ± 0.30 ppbv is inferred from the measurements. This value is in line with previously carried out stratospheric observations confirming the slightly decreasing chlorine trend in the stratosphere. Observations are compared and discussed with the output of a multi-year simulation performed with the Chemistry Climate Model EMAC (ECHAM5/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry). The simulated stratospheric total chlorine amount is in accordance with the MIPAS-B/TELIS observation taking into account the fact that some chlorine source gases and very short lived species are not included in the model.

  12. Effect of chlorine pollution on three fruit tree species at Ranoli near Baroda, India.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, R; Bedi, S J

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the effect of chlorine pollution from an alkalies and chemical plant at Ranoli, near Baroda, on three tropical fruit tree species-Mangifera indica L. (mango) Manilkara hexandra Dubard. (rayan) and Syzygium cumini Skeels (Jamun). As compared to controls growing in a less polluted area, trees growing close to the plant showed reduced mean leaf area, a higher percentage of leaf area damaged, a reduction in fruit yield, chlorophyll pigments, protein and carbohydrate content, and higher accumulation of chloride in the foliar tissues. The accumulation of pollutaant, chloride, in the foliar tissues was very high in mango and jamun. Based on the degree of damage to the plants, the species studied were arranged in decreasing order of their sensitivity to chlorine pollution-mango, jamun and rayan. PMID:15092455

  13. Urea degradation by electrochemically generated reactive chlorine species: products and reaction pathways.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kangwoo; Hoffmann, Michael R

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated the transformation of urea by electrochemically generated reactive chlorine species (RCS). Solutions of urea with chloride ions were electrolyzed using a bismuth doped TiO2 (BiOx/TiO2) anode coupled with a stainless steel cathode at applied anodic potentials (Ea) of either +2.2 V or +3.0 V versus the normal hydrogen electrode. In NaCl solution, the current efficiency of RCS generation was near 30% at both potentials. In divided cell experiments, the pseudo-first-order rate of total nitrogen decay was an order of magnitude higher at Ea of +3.0 V than at +2.2 V, presumably because dichlorine radical (Cl2(-)·) ions facilitate the urea transformation primary driven by free chlorine. Quadrupole mass spectrometer analysis of the reactor headspace revealed that N2 and CO2 are the primary gaseous products of the oxidation of urea, whose urea-N was completely transformed into N2 (91%) and NO3(-) (9%). The higher reaction selectivity with respect to N2 production can be ascribed to a low operational ratio of free available chlorine to N. The mass-balance analysis recovered urea-C as CO2 at 77%, while CO generation most likely accounts for the residual carbon. In light of these results, we propose a reaction mechanism involving chloramines and chloramides as reaction intermediates, where the initial chlorination is the rate-determining step in the overall sequence of reactions. PMID:25219459

  14. Mutagenic activity associated with by-products of drinking water disinfection by chlorine, chlorine dioxide, ozone and UV-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zoeteman, B C; Hrubec, J; de Greef, E; Kool, H J

    1982-12-01

    A retrospective epidemiological study in The Netherlands showed a statistical association between chlorination by-products in drinking water and cancer of the esophagus and stomach for males. A pilot-plant study with alternative disinfectants was carried out with stored water of the Rivers Rhine and Meuse. It was demonstrated that the increase of direct acting mutagens after treatment with chlorine dioxide is similar to the effect of chlorination. Ozonation of Rhine water reduced the mutagenic activity for Salmonella typhimurium TA 98 both with and without metabolic activation. UV alone hardly affects the mutagenicity of the stored river water for S. typh. TA 98. In all studies, practically no mutagenic activity for S. typh. TA 100 was found. Although remarkable changes in the concentration of individual organic compounds are reported, the identity of the mutagens detected is yet unclear. Compounds of possible interest due to their removal by ozonation are 1,3,3-trimethyloxindole, dicyclopentadiene and several alkylquinolines. Compounds which might be responsible for the increased mutagenicity after chlorination are two brominated acetonitriles and tri(2-chlorethyl) phosphate. Furthermore, the concentration procedure with adsorption on XAD resin and the subsequent elution step may have affected the results. It is proposed to focus further research more on the less volatile by-products of disinfection than on the trihalomethanes. PMID:7151762

  15. Experimental evidence of large changes in terrestrial chlorine cycling following altered tree species composition.

    PubMed

    Montelius, Malin; Thiry, Yves; Marang, Laura; Ranger, Jacques; Cornelis, Jean-Thomas; Svensson, Teresia; Bastviken, David

    2015-04-21

    Organochlorine molecules (Clorg) are surprisingly abundant in soils and frequently exceed chloride (Cl(-)) levels. Despite the widespread abundance of Clorg and the common ability of microorganisms to produce Clorg, we lack fundamental knowledge about how overall chlorine cycling is regulated in forested ecosystems. Here we present data from a long-term reforestation experiment where native forest was cleared and replaced with five different tree species. Our results show that the abundance and residence times of Cl(-) and Clorg after 30 years were highly dependent on which tree species were planted on the nearby plots. Average Cl(-) and Clorg content in soil humus were higher, at experimental plots with coniferous trees than in those with deciduous trees. Plots with Norway spruce had the highest net accumulation of Cl(-) and Clorg over the experiment period, and showed a 10 and 4 times higher Cl(-) and Clorg storage (kg ha(-1)) in the biomass, respectively, and 7 and 9 times higher storage of Cl(-) and Clorg in the soil humus layer, compared to plots with oak. The results can explain why local soil chlorine levels are frequently independent of atmospheric deposition, and provide opportunities for improved modeling of chlorine distribution and cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. PMID:25811074

  16. Diamagnetic Raman Optical Activity of Chlorine, Bromine, and Iodine Gases.

    PubMed

    Šebestík, Jaroslav; Kapitán, Josef; Pačes, Ondřej; Bouř, Petr

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic Raman optical activity of gases provides unique information about their electric and magnetic properties. Magnetic Raman optical activity has recently been observed in a paramagnetic gas (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2012, 51, 11058; Angew. Chem. 2012, 124, 11220). In diamagnetic molecules, it has been considered too weak to be measurable. However, in chlorine, bromine and iodine vapors, we could detect a significant signal as well. Zeeman splitting of electronic ground-state energy levels cannot rationalize the observed circular intensity difference (CID) values of about 10(-4) . These are explicable by participation of paramagnetic excited electronic states. Then a simple model including one electronic excited state provides reasonable spectral intensities. The results suggest that this kind of scattering by diamagnetic molecules is a general event observable under resonance conditions. The phenomenon sheds new light on the role of excited states in the Raman scattering, and may be used to probe molecular geometry and electronic structure. PMID:26845382

  17. Bulk chlorine uptake by polyamide active layers of thin-film composite membranes upon exposure to free chlorine-kinetics, mechanisms, and modeling.

    PubMed

    Powell, Joshua; Luh, Jeanne; Coronell, Orlando

    2014-01-01

    We studied the volume-averaged chlorine (Cl) uptake into the bulk region of the aromatic polyamide active layer of a reverse osmosis membrane upon exposure to free chlorine. Volume-averaged measurements were obtained using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry with samples prepared at a range of free chlorine concentrations, exposure times, and mixing, rinsing, and pH conditions. Our volume-averaged measurements complement previous studies that have quantified Cl uptake at the active layer surface (top ≈ 7 nm) and advance the mechanistic understanding of Cl uptake by aromatic polyamide active layers. Our results show that surface Cl uptake is representative of and underestimates volume-averaged Cl uptake under acidic conditions and alkaline conditions, respectively. Our results also support that (i) under acidic conditions, N-chlorination followed by Orton rearrangement is the dominant Cl uptake mechanism with N-chlorination as the rate-limiting step; (ii) under alkaline conditions, N-chlorination and dechlorination of N-chlorinated amide links by hydroxyl ion are the two dominant processes; and (iii) under neutral pH conditions, the rates of N-chlorination and Orton rearrangement are comparable. We propose a kinetic model that satisfactorily describes Cl uptake under acidic and alkaline conditions, with the largest discrepancies between model and experiment occurring under alkaline conditions at relatively high chlorine exposures. PMID:24506252

  18. Chemistry and transport in a three-dimensional stratospheric model: Chlorine species during a simulated stratospheric warming

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, J.A.; Rood, R.B. )

    1989-01-20

    Calculations of coupled chemistry and transport for the stratosphere are carried out for a 6-day period during the February 1979 stratospheric major warming, using winds derived from a spectral forecast model. All major families of stratospheric chemistry (odd oxygen, odd nitrogen, odd hydrogen, and odd chlorine), as well as longitudinally varying reaction rate coefficients and photolysis rates, are included in the model. Eight constituents and/or families are transported in the model; additional ones are held fixed or inferred by photochemical equilibrium approximations. Results presented include zonal mean fields, latitude-longitude distributions (and their changes with time), vertical profiles, and time series of the mixing ratios of transported constituents and families as well as of their total stratospheric column amounts. The results obtained show the relative importance of chemistry and transport for the chlorine-containing species ClO, ClONO{sub 2}, HCl, and HOCl. Dynamical effects dominate the variability of HCl, while diurnal ones dominate that of ClONO{sub 2} and ClO. Diurnal chemistry and dynamical variability are of similar magnitude for HOCl. The effects of strong planetary wave activity may be seen as large longitudinal variability of the total HCl and ClONO{sub 2} columns in the stratosphere; in middle and high northern latitudes it is sufficiently large that it exceeds the diurnal variability of the column.

  19. Trajectory Hunting: Analysis of UARS Measurements Showing Rapid Chlorine Activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, M. Y.; Santee, M. L.; Rodriquez, J. M.; Ko, M. K. W.; Mergenthaler, J. M.; Kumer, J. B.; Tabazadeh, A.

    1998-01-01

    Trajectory hunting (i.e., a technique to find air parcels sampled at least twice over the course of a few days) is applied to analyze Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) measurements in conjunction with the AER photochemical box model. In this study, we investigate rapid chlorine activation in the Arctic lower stratosphere on 29 Dec. 1992 associated with a polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) event. Six air parcels that have been sampled twice were followed along 5-day trajectories at the 465 K (approx. 46 mb) and 585 K (approxi. 22 mb) levels. A detailed sensitivity study with the AER photochemical box model along these trajectories leads to the following conclusions for the episode considered: 1) model results are in better agreement with UARS measurements at these levels if the U.K. Meteorological Office (UKMO) temperature is decreased by at least 1-2 K; 2) the NAT (nitric acid trihydrate) PSC formation scheme produces results in better agreement with observations than the STS (supercooled ternary solution) scheme; 3) the model can explain the UARS measurements at 585 K, but under-estimates the ClO abundance at 465 K, suggesting some inconsistency between the UARS measurements at this level.

  20. Trajectory Hunting: Analysis of UARS Measurements showing Rapid Chlorine Activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, M.Y.; Santee, M. L.; Rodriquez, J. M.; Ko, M. K. W.; Mergenthaler, J. M.; Kumer, J. B.; Tabazadeh, A.

    1998-01-01

    Trajectory hunting (i.e., a technique to find air parcels sampled at least twice over the course of a few days) is applied to analyze Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) measurements in conjunction with the AER photochemical box model. In this study, we investigate rapid chlorine activation in the Arctic lower stratosphere on 29 Dec 1992 associated with a polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) event. Six air parcels that have been sampled twice were followed along 5-day trajectories at the 465 K (approximately 46 mb) and 585 K (approximately 22 mb) levels. A detailed sensitivity study with the AER. photochemical box model along these trajectories leads to the following conclusions for the episode considered: (1) model results are in better agreement with UARS measurements at these levels if the UKMO temperature is decreased by at least 1-2 K; (2) the NAT (nitric acid trihydrate) PSC formation scheme produces results in better agreement with observations than the STS (supercooled ternary solution) scheme; (3) the model can explain the UARS measurements at 585 K, but under-estimates the ClO abundance at 465 K, suggesting some inconsistency between the UARS measurements at this level.

  1. Using the nuclear activation AMS method for determining chlorine in solids at ppb-levels and below

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Stephan R.; Eigl, Rosmarie; Forstner, Oliver; Martschini, Martin; Steier, Peter; Sterba, Johannes H.; Golser, Robin

    2015-10-01

    Neutron activation analysis using decay counting of the activated element is a well-established method in elemental analysis. However, for chlorine there is a better alternative to measuring decay of the short-lived activation product chlorine-38 (t1/2 = 37.24 min) - accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) of 36Cl: the relatively high neutron capture cross section of chlorine-35 for thermal neutrons (43.7 b) and combined the AMS technique for chlorine-36 (t1/2 = 301 ka) allow for determination of chlorine down to ppb-levels using practical sample sizes and common exposure durations. The combination of neutron activation and AMS can be employed for a few other elements (nitrogen, thorium, and uranium) as well. For bulk solid samples an advantage of the method is that lab contamination can be rendered irrelevant. The chlorine-35 in the sample is activated to chlorine-36, and surface chlorine can be removed after the irradiation. Subsequent laboratory contamination, however, will not carry a prominent chlorine-36 signature. After sample dissolution and addition of sufficient amounts of stable chlorine carrier the produced chlorine-36 and thus the original chlorine-35 of the sample can be determined using AMS. We have developed and applied the method for analysis of chlorine in steel samples. The chlorine content of steel is of interest to nuclear industry, precisely because of above mentioned high neutron capture cross section for chlorine-35, which leads to accumulation of chlorine-36 as long-term nuclear waste. The samples were irradiated at the TRIGA Mark II reactor of the Atominstitut in Vienna and the 36Cl-AMS setup at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA) was used for 36Cl/Cl analysis.

  2. METABOLISM OF DIBENZO-P-DIOXIN AND CHLORINATED DIBENZO-P-DIOXINS BY A BEIJERINCKIA SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Whole cells of the parent strain of Beijerinckia, grown with succinate and biphenyl, oxidized dibenzo-p-dioxin and several chlorinated dioxins. The rate of oxidation of the chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxons decreased with an increasing degree of chlorine substitution. A mutant strain...

  3. Temperature thresholds for chlorine activation and ozone loss in the polar stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drdla, K.; Müller, R.

    2012-07-01

    Low stratospheric temperatures are known to be responsible for heterogeneous chlorine activation that leads to polar ozone depletion. Here, we discuss the temperature threshold below which substantial chlorine activation occurs. We suggest that the onset of chlorine activation is dominated by reactions on cold binary aerosol particles, without the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), i.e. without any significant uptake of HNO3 from the gas phase. Using reaction rates on cold binary aerosol in a model of stratospheric chemistry, a chlorine activation threshold temperature, TACL, is derived. At typical stratospheric conditions, TACL is similar in value to TNAT (within 1-2 K), the highest temperature at which nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) can exist. TNAT is still in use to parameterise the threshold temperature for the onset of chlorine activation. However, perturbations can cause TACL to differ from TNAT: TACL is dependent upon H2O and potential temperature, but unlike TNAT is not dependent upon HNO3. Furthermore, in contrast to TNAT, TACL is dependent upon the stratospheric sulfate aerosol loading and thus provides a means to estimate the impact on polar ozone of strong volcanic eruptions and some geo-engineering options, which are discussed. A parameterisation of TACL is provided here, allowing it to be calculated for low solar elevation (or high solar zenith angle) over a comprehensive range of stratospheric conditions. Considering TACL as a proxy for chlorine activation cannot replace a detailed model calculation, and polar ozone loss is influenced by other factors apart from the initial chlorine activation. However, TACL provides a more accurate description of the temperature conditions necessary for chlorine activation and ozone loss in the polar stratosphere than TNAT.

  4. Photodynamic activity of the boronated chlorin e6 amide in artificial and cellular membranes.

    PubMed

    Antonenko, Yuri N; Kotova, Elena A; Omarova, Elena O; Rokitskaya, Tatyana I; Ol'shevskaya, Valentina A; Kalinin, Valery N; Nikitina, Roza G; Osipchuk, Julia S; Kaplan, Mikhail A; Ramonova, Alla A; Moisenovich, Mikhail M; Agapov, Igor I; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P

    2014-03-01

    Photodynamic tumor-destroying activity of the boronated chlorin e6 derivative BACE (chlorin e6 13(1)-N-{2-[N-(1-carba-closo-dodecaboran-1-yl)methyl]aminoethyl}amide-15(2), 17(3)-dimethyl ester), previously described in Moisenovich et al. (2010) PLoS ONE 5(9) e12717, was shown here to be enormously higher than that of unsubstituted chlorin e6, being supported by the data on much higher photocytotoxicity of BACE in M-1 sarcoma cell culture. To validate membrane damaging effect as the basis of the enhanced tumoricidal activity, BACE was compared with unsubstituted chlorin e6 in the potency to photosensitize dye leakage from liposomes, transbilayer lipid flip-flop, inactivation of gramicidin A ionic channels in planar lipid membranes and erythrocyte hemolysis. In all the models comprising artificial and cellular membranes, the photodynamic effect of BACE exceeded that of chlorin e6. BACE substantially differed from chlorin e6 in the affinity to liposomes and erythrocytes, as monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy, flow cytometry and centrifugation. The results support the key role of membrane binding in the photodynamic effect of the boronated chlorin e6 amide. PMID:24287152

  5. Enhanced photo-activated luminescence for screening polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) and other related chlorinated compounds

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1994-06-07

    The presence of polychlorinated biphenyls and other chlorinated compounds in a sample is determined by treating the sample with a photo-activator and then exposing the treated sample to a UV light source. The UV light produces a photo-product complex, which is subsequently excited with UV light to cause luminescence of the complex. The luminescence is detected and characteristics of the luminescence spectra are used to determine the presence of chlorinated compounds and also the quantity of the chlorine in the compounds. 14 figs.

  6. Enhanced photo-activated luminescence for screening polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) and other related chlorinated compounds

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1994-01-01

    The presence of polychlorinated biphenyls and other chlorinated compounds in a sample is determined by treating the sample with a photo-activator and then exposing the treated sample to a UV light source. The UV light produces a photo-product complex, which is subsequently excited with UV light to cause luminescence of the complex. The luminescence is detected and characteristics of the luminescence spectra are used to determine the presence of chlorinated compounds and also the quantity of the chlorine in the compounds

  7. Enhanced photo-activated luminescence for screening polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) and other related chlorinated compounds

    DOEpatents

    Tuan Vodinh.

    1993-12-21

    The presence of polychlorinated biphenyls and other chlorinated compounds in a sample is determined by treating the sample with a photo-activator and then exposing the treated sample to a UV light source. The UV light produces a photo-product complex, which is subsequently excited with UV light to cause luminescence of the complex. The luminescence is detected and characteristics of the luminescence spectra are used to determine the presence of chlorinated compounds and also the quantity of the chlorine in the compounds. 14 figures.

  8. Enhanced photo-activated luminescence for screening polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) and other related chlorinated compounds

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1993-01-01

    The presence of polychlorinated biphenyls and other chlorinated compounds in a sample is determined by treating the sample with a photo-activator and then exposing the treated sample to a UV light source. The UV light produces a photo-product complex, which is subsequently excited with UV light to cause luminescence of the complex. The luminescence is detected and characteristics of the luminescence spectra are used to determine the presence of chlorinated compounds and also the quantity of the chlorine in the compounds.

  9. Photochemical Activation of Chlorine by Iron and Iron Oxide Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmer, J.; Zetzsch, C.

    2015-12-01

    The photochemical activation of chlorine by dissolved iron in sea-salt aerosol droplets and by highly dispersed Fe2O3 aerosol particles (mainly hematite, specific surface > 100 m2/g), exposed to gaseous HCl, was investigated in humidified air in a Teflon simulation chamber. Employing the radical-clock technique, we quantified the production of gaseous atomic Cl. When the artificial sea salt aerosols contained suspended Fe2O3 alone at pH 6, no significant Cl production could be observed, even if the dissolution of iron was forced by "weathering" (repeatedly freezing and thawing for five times). Adjusting the pH in the stock suspension to 2.6, 2.2, and 1.9 and equilibrating for one week resulted in a quantifiable amount of dissolved iron (0.03, 0.2, and 0.6 mmol/L, respectively) and in gaseous Cl production rates of ~1.6, 6, and 8 × 1021 atoms cm-2 h-1, respectively. Exposing the pure Fe2O3 aerosol in the absence of salt to various gaseous HCl concentrations resulted in rates ranging from 8 × 1020 Cl atoms cm-2 h-1 (at ~4 ppb HCl) to 5 × 1022 Cl atoms cm-2 h-1 (at ~350 ppb HCl) and confirmed the uptake and conversion of HCl to atomic Cl (at HCl to Cl conversion yields of 2-5 % mol/mol, depending on the relative humidity). The relevance for environmental processes in the atmosphere will be discussed.

  10. Estrogenic activity of alkylphenols, bisphenol S, and their chlorinated derivatives using a GFP expression system.

    PubMed

    Kuruto-Niwa, Ryoko; Nozawa, Ryushi; Miyakoshi, Takashi; Shiozawa, Tatsushi; Terao, Yoshiyasu

    2005-01-01

    Alkylphenol ethoxylates, widely used non-ionic surfactants, are biodegraded into alkylphenols such as nonylphenol (NP) and t-octylphenol (OP), short-chain ethoxylates such as NP-monoethoxylate (NP1EO) and NP-diethoxylate (NP2EO), and alkylphenoxy carboxylic acids such as 4-t-octylphenoxyacetic acid (OP1EC). Bisphenol S (BPS) is more heat-stable and photo-resistant than bisphenol A (BPA), and therefore replaces BPA. These chemicals could be chlorinated during wastewater treatment. We synthesized these compounds and their chlorinated derivatives to estimate their estrogenic activities using a GFP expression system. The EC(50) ranking of NP-related compounds was NP > ClNP > diClNP > NP1EO > ClNP1EO > NP2EO. The estrogenic activity of OP1EC was 10 times less potent than parent OP. Furthermore, BPS showed comparable estrogenic activity with BPA. The EC(50) ranking of BPS-related compounds was BPA ≥ BPS > triClBPS > diClBPS > ClBPS. Other tested BPS derivatives had no estrogenic activity. Chlorination of the tested chemicals did not enhance their estrogenic activity, in contrast to certain chlorinated BPAs. Thus, our results demonstrated that chlorinated derivatives of NP, OP, and BPS, even if artificially produced during wastewater processing, were less estrogenic than their parent chemicals, known as endocrine disruptors. PMID:21783468

  11. CHLORINE 'DISINFECTION' CHEMISTRY OF AROMATIC COMPOUNDS. POLYNUCLEAR AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS: RATES, PRODUCTS, AND MECHANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of chlorine for water renovation and disinfection has been questioned because of the reaction of active chlorine species with organic compounds present in water to form products that may be biologically harmful. Among the organic species known to be present during chlorin...

  12. Oxidation of chlorinated ethenes by heat-activated persulfate: kinetics and products.

    PubMed

    Waldemer, Rachel H; Tratnyek, Paul G; Johnson, Richard L; Nurmi, James T

    2007-02-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) and in situ thermal remediation (ISTR) are applicable to treatment of groundwater contaminated with chlorinated ethenes. ISCO with persulfate (S2O8(2-)) requires activation, and this can be achieved with the heat from ISTR, so there may be advantages to combining these technologies. To explore this possibility, we determined the kinetics and products of chlorinated ethene oxidation with heat-activated persulfate and compared them to the temperature dependence of other degradation pathways. The kinetics of chlorinated ethene disappearance were pseudo-first-order for 1-2 half-lives, and the resulting rate constants-measured from 30 to 70 degrees C--fit the Arrhenius equation, yielding apparent activation energies of 101 +/- 4 kJ mol(-1) for tetrachloroethene (PCE), 108 +/- 3 kJ mol(-1) for trichloroethene (TCE), 144 +/- 5 kJ mol(-1) for cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE), and 141 +/- 2 kJ mol(-1) for trans-1,2-dichloroethene (trans-DCE). Chlorinated byproducts were observed, but most of the parent material was completely dechlorinated. Arrhenius parameters for hydrolysis and oxidation by persulfate or permanganate were used to calculate rates of chlorinated ethene degradation by these processes over the range of temperatures relevant to ISTR and the range of oxidant concentrations and pH relevant to ISCO. PMID:17328217

  13. Chronic Low Dose Chlorine Exposure Aggravates Allergic Inflammation and Airway Hyperresponsiveness and Activates Inflammasome Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sae-Hoon; Park, Da-Eun; Lee, Hyun-Seung; Kang, Hye-Ryun; Cho, Sang-Heon

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidemiologic clinical studies suggested that chronic exposure to chlorine products is associated with development of asthma and aggravation of asthmatic symptoms. However, its underlying mechanism was not clearly understood. Studies were undertaken to define the effects and mechanisms of chronic low-dose chlorine exposure in the pathogenesis of airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Methods Six week-old female BALB/c mice were sensitized and challenged with OVA in the presence and absence of chronic low dose chlorine exposure of naturally vaporized gas of 5% sodium hypochlorite solution. Airway inflammation and AHR were evaluated by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell recovery and non-invasive phlethysmography, respectively. Real-time qPCR, Western blot assay, and ELISA were used to evaluate the mRNA and protein expressions of cytokines and other inflammatory mediators. Human A549 and murine epithelial (A549 and MLE12) and macrophage (AMJ2-C11) cells were used to define the responses to low dose chlorine exposure in vitro. Results Chronic low dose chlorine exposure significantly augmented airway inflammation and AHR in OVA-sensitized and challenged mice. The expression of Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-5 and proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β and IL-33 were significantly increased in OVA/Cl group compared with OVA group. The chlorine exposure also activates the major molecules associated with inflammasome pathway in the macrophages with increased expression of epithelial alarmins IL-33 and TSLP in vitro. Conclusion Chronic low dose exposure of chlorine aggravates allergic Th2 inflammation and AHR potentially through activation of inflammasome danger signaling pathways. PMID:25202911

  14. Ab Initio Studies of Chlorine Oxide and Nitrogen Oxide Species of Interest in Stratospheric Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The ability of modern state-of-the art ab initio quantum chemical techniques to characterize reliably the gas-phase molecular structure, vibrational spectrum, electronic spectrum, and thermal stability of chlorine oxide and nitrogen oxide species will be demonstrated by presentation of some example studies. In particular the geometrical structures, vibrational spectra, and heats of formation Of ClNO2, CisClONO, and trans-ClONO are shown to be in excellent agreement with the available experimental data, and where the experimental data are either not known or are inconclusive, the ab initio results are shown to fill in the gaps and to resolve the experimental controversy. In addition, ab initio studies in which the electronic spectra and the characterization of excited electronic states of ClONO2, HONO2, ClOOC17 ClOOH, and HOOH will also be presented. Again where available, the ab initio results are compared to experimental observations, and are used to aid in the interpretation of the experimental studies.

  15. IN-FLIGHT CAPTURE OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY BY A CHLORINE-IMPREGNATED ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the in-flight capture of elemental mercury (Hgo) by a chlorine (C1)-impregnated activated carbon. Efforts to develop sorbents for the control of Hg emissions have demonstrated that C1-impregnation of virgin activated carbons using dilute solutions of hydrogen ...

  16. MERCURY REACTIONS IN THE PRESENCE OF CHLORINE SPECIES: HOMOGENOUS GAS PHASE AND HETEROGENOUS GAS-SOLID PHASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The kinetics of mercury chlorination (with HC1) were studied using a flow reactor system with an on-line Hg analyzer and spciation sampling using a set of impingers. Kinetic parameters, such as reaction order (a), activation energy (Eu) and the overall rate constant (k') were es...

  17. Arctic chlorine activation and ozone depletion: Comparison of chemistry transport models with satellite observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grooß, J.-U.; Wegner, T.; Müller, R.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Feng, W.; Santee, M. L.

    2009-04-01

    The accurate simulation of Arctic stratospheric ozone depletion has been an issue for two decades. However, there are still notable quantitative discrepancies between the models and observations. We show results from the SLIMCAT and CLaMS 3D chemistry-transport models that differ in some aspects of simulated chlorine activation and descent in the polar vortex. Consequently, the estimates of accumulated ozone depletion in the polar vortex for these two models in cold Arctic winters still largely disagree. As shown recently by Santee et al. (JGR, 2008) using MLS and ACE data, the extent of chlorine activation for the cold Arctic winter of 2004/2005 within the basic SLIMCAT model is overestimated with the likely consequence of too much simulated ozone depletion. In contrast, the CLaMS simulation for the same winter shows too little chlorine activation compared to observations, and therefore likely too little loss. For SLIMCAT the version used by Santee et al. has been updated to replace the equilibrium treatment of NAT PSCs with a Lagrangian microphysical scheme. This leads to smaller regions of NAT particles and less denitrification, in better agreement with observations. The impact of this on the modeled extent of chlorine activation will be discussed. For CLaMS we have changed the parameterization of heterogeneous reactions on liquid aerosols from Carslaw et al. to that of Shi et al. (2001), with which chlorine activation on liquid aerosol becomes more efficient. In turn, the simulated chlorine activation agrees better with the observations. The impact of these model changes on chlorine activation and ozone loss will be assessed and remaining model-observation discrepancies will be discussed in terms of different model formulations. We will also show the impact of recent lab measurements of Cl2O2 absorption cross sections by von Hobe et al. (2009) on the simulated ozone depletion. References: von Hobe, M., F. Stroh, H. Beckers, T. Benter, and H. Willner, The UV

  18. Photochemical chlorine and bromine activation from artificial saline snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wren, S. N.; Donaldson, D. J.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2013-05-01

    The activation of reactive halogen species - particularly Cl2 - from sea ice and snow surfaces is not well understood. In this study, we used a photochemical snow reactor coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometer to investigate the production of Br2, BrCl and Cl2 from NaCl/NaBr-doped artificial snow samples. At temperatures above the NaCl-water eutectic, illumination of samples (λ > 310 nm) in the presence of gas phase O3 led to the accelerated release of Br2, BrCl and the release of Cl2 in a process that was significantly enhanced by acidity, high surface area and additional gas phase Br2. Cl2 production was only observed when both light and ozone were present. The total halogen release depended on [O3] and pre-freezing [NaCl]. Our observations support a "halogen explosion" mechanism occurring within the snowpack which is initiated by heterogeneous oxidation, and propagated by Br2 or BrCl photolysis and by recycling of HOBr and HOCl into the snowpack. Our study implicates an important role for active chemistry occurring within the interstitial air of aged (i.e., acidic) snow for halogen activation at polar sunrise.

  19. Photochemical chlorine and bromine activation from artificial saline snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wren, S. N.; Donaldson, D. J.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2013-10-01

    The activation of reactive halogen species - particularly Cl2 - from sea ice and snow surfaces is not well understood. In this study, we used a photochemical snow reactor coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometer to investigate the production of Br2, BrCl and Cl2 from NaCl/NaBr-doped artificial snow samples. At temperatures above the NaCl-water eutectic, illumination of samples (λ > 310 nm) in the presence of gas phase O3 led to the accelerated release of Br2, BrCl and the release of Cl2 in a process that was significantly enhanced by acidity, high surface area and additional gas phase Br2. Cl2 production was only observed when both light and ozone were present. The total halogen release depended on [ozone] and pre-freezing [NaCl]. Our observations support a "halogen explosion" mechanism occurring within the snowpack, which is initiated by heterogeneous oxidation and propagated by Br2 or BrCl photolysis and by recycling of HOBr and HOCl into the snowpack. Our study implicates this important role of active chemistry occurring within the interstitial air of aged (i.e. acidic) snow for halogen activation at polar sunrise.

  20. Removal of iodide from water by chlorination and subsequent adsorption on powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Ikari, Mariya; Matsui, Yoshihiko; Suzuki, Yuta; Matsushita, Taku; Shirasaki, Nobutaka

    2015-01-01

    Chlorine oxidation followed by treatment with activated carbon was studied as a possible method for removing radioactive iodine from water. Chlorination time, chlorine dose, the presence of natural organic matter (NOM), the presence of bromide ion (Br⁻), and carbon particle size strongly affected iodine removal. Treatment with superfine powdered activated carbon (SPAC) after 10-min oxidation with chlorine (1 mg-Cl₂/L) removed 90% of the iodine in NOM-containing water (dissolved organic carbon concentration, 1.5 mg-C/L). Iodine removal in NOM-containing water increased with increasing chlorine dose up to 0.1 mg-Cl₂/L but decreased at chlorine doses of >1.0 mg-Cl₂/L. At a low chlorine dose, nonadsorbable iodide ion (I⁻) was oxidized to adsorbable hypoiodous acid (HOI). When the chlorine dose was increased, some of the HOI reacted with NOM to form adsorbable organic iodine (organic-I). Increasing the chlorine dose further did not enhance iodine removal, owing to the formation of nonadsorbable iodate ion (IO₃⁻). Co-existing Br⁻ depressed iodine removal, particularly in NOM-free water, because hypobromous acid (HOBr) formed and catalyzed the oxidation of HOI to IO₃⁻. However, the effect of Br⁻ was small in the NOM-containing water because organic-I formed instead of IO₃⁻. SPAC (median particle diameter, 0.62 μm) had a higher equilibrium adsorption capacity for organic-I than did conventional PAC (median diameter, 18.9 μm), but the capacities of PAC and SPAC for HOI were similar. The reason for the higher equilibrium adsorption capacity for organic-I was that organic-I was adsorbed principally on the exterior of the PAC particles and not inside the PAC particles, as indicated by direct visualization of the solid-phase iodine concentration profiles in PAC particles by field emission electron probe microanalysis. In contrast, HOI was adsorbed evenly throughout the entire PAC particle. PMID:25462731

  1. Comparative Antimicrobial Activities of Aerosolized Sodium Hypochlorite, Chlorine Dioxide, and Electrochemically Activated Solutions Evaluated Using a Novel Standardized Assay

    PubMed Central

    Thorn, R. M. S.; Robinson, G. M.

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to develop a standardized experimental assay to enable differential antimicrobial comparisons of test biocidal aerosols. This study represents the first chlorine-matched comparative assessment of the antimicrobial activities of aerosolized sodium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide, and electrochemically activated solution (ECAS) to determine their relative abilities to decontaminate various surface-associated health care-relevant microbial challenges. Standard microbiological challenges were developed by surface-associating typed Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis spores, or a clinical methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain on stainless steel, polypropylene, or fabric. All test coupons were subjected to 20-min biocidal aerosols of chlorine-matched (100 ppm) sodium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide, or ECAS within a standard aerosolization chamber using a commercial humidifier under defined conditions. Biocidal treatment type and material surface had a significant effect on the number of microorganisms recovered from various material surfaces following treatment exposure. Under the conditions of the assay, the order of antimicrobial efficacy of biocidal aerosol treatment was as follows: ECAS > chlorine dioxide > sodium hypochlorite. For all biocides, greater antimicrobial reductions were seen when treating stainless steel and fabric than when treating plastic-associated microorganisms. The experimental fogging system and assay protocol designed within this study were shown capable of differentiating the comparative efficacies of multiple chlorine-matched biocidal aerosols against a spectrum of target organisms on a range of test surface materials and would be appropriate for testing other biocidal aerosol treatments or material surfaces. PMID:23459480

  2. Influence of organophosphorus pesticides on peroxidase and chlorination activity of human myeloperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Lazarević-Pašti, Tamara; Momić, Tatjana; Radojević, Miloš M; Vasić, Vesna

    2013-09-01

    Inhibitory effects of five organophosphorus pesticides (diazinon, malathion, chlorpyrifos, azinphos-methyl and phorate) and their oxo-analogs on human myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were investigated. While inspecting separately peroxidase and chlorination activity, it was observed that investigated OPs affect peroxidase activity, but not chlorination activity. Among investigated pesticides, malathion and malaoxon have showed the highest power to inhibit MPO peroxidase activity with IC50 values of the order of 3×10(-7) and 5×10(-9) M, respectively. It was proposed that inhibition trend is rendered by molecular structure which invokes steric hindrance for OPs interaction with MPO active center responsible for peroxidase activity. In addition, it was concluded that physiological function of MPO is not affected by any of the investigated OPs. PMID:25149236

  3. Oxidation of diclofenac with chlorine dioxide in aquatic environments: influences of different nitrogenous species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingling; Liu, Haijin; Liu, Guoguang; Xie, Youhai; Ni, Tianjun

    2015-06-01

    The oxidation of diclofenac (DCF), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug and emerging water pollutant, with chlorine dioxide was investigated under simulated water disinfection conditions. The reaction kinetics as functions of the initial concentrations of DCF, different nitrogenous species, and different pE values were experimentally determined. The results demonstrated that DCF reacted rapidly with ClO2, where more than 75 % of DCF (≤3.00 μM) was removed by 18.94 μM ClO2 within 60 s. All of the reactions followed pseudo first-order kinetics with respect to DCF, and the rate constant, k obs, exhibited a significant decrease from 4.21 × 10(-2) to 8.09 × 10(-3) s(-1), as the initial DCF concentration was increased from 1.00 to 5.00 μM. Furthermore, the degradation kinetics of DCF was clearly dependent on nitrogen-containing ion concentrations in the reaction solution. Ammonium and nitrite ions inhibited the DCF degradation by ClO2, whereas nitrate ion clearly initiated its promotion. In contrast, the inhibitory effect of NO2 (-) was more robust than that of NH4 (+). When the values of pE were gradually increased, the transformation of NH4 (+) to NO2 (-), and subsequently to NO3 (-), would occur, the rate constants were initially decreased, and then increased. When NH4 (+) and NO2 (-) coexisted, the inhibitory effect on the DCF degradation was less than the sum of the partial inhibitory effect. However, when NO2 (-) and NO3 (-) coexisted, the actual inhibition rate was greater than the theoretical estimate. These results indicated that the interaction of NH4 (+) and NO2 (-) was antagonistic, while the coexistence of NO2 (-) and NO3 (-) was observed to have a synergistic effect in aqueous environments. PMID:25604564

  4. Effect of chlorination on the protein phosphatase inhibition activity for several microcystins.

    PubMed

    Mash, H; Wittkorn, A

    2016-05-15

    Microcystins are of particular concern due to their toxicity to both humans and animals and may be the most prominent cyanotoxin observed in freshwater. Although a number of studies have investigated the fate of microcystins and other algal toxins through drinking water treatment facilities, measurement of their potential for toxic activity after chlorination, a popular form of treatment in the United States, has not been investigated. In this study, six microcystin variants are subjected to chlorine oxidation. The degradation of each microcystin variant is measured by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry simultaneously with protein phosphatase inhibition (PPI) response over reaction time with chlorine. Results show that inhibition is dependent on the incorporated amino acid residues, their placement within the microcystin structure, as well as pH. This pH dependence may have practical implications to such activities such as drinking water treatment when the pH is usually adjusted to around 8. Namely, at this pH, even with chlorine addition for disinfection, PPI activity may not be totally eliminated even when the initial MYCs are eliminated. PMID:26999255

  5. Polar Stratospheric Cloud evolution and chlorine activation measured by CALIPSO and MLS, and modelled by ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, H.; Wohltmann, I.; Wegner, T.; Takeda, M.; Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.; Lehmann, R.; Santee, M. L.; Rex, M.

    2015-08-01

    We examined observations of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) by CALIPSO and of HCl, ClO and HNO3 by MLS along air mass trajectories to investigate the dependence of the inferred PSC composition on the temperature history of the air parcels, and the dependence of the level of chlorine activation on PSC composition. Several case studies based on individual trajectories from the Arctic winter 2009/10 were conducted, with the trajectories chosen such that the first processing of the air mass by PSCs in this winter occurred on the trajectory. Transitions of PSC composition classes were observed to be highly dependent on the temperature history. In cases of a gradual temperature decrease, nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and super-cooled ternary solution (STS) mixture clouds were observed. In cases of rapid temperature decrease, STS clouds were first observed, followed by NAT/STS mixture clouds. When temperatures dropped below the frost point, ice clouds formed, and then transformed into NAT/STS mixture clouds when temperature increased above the frost point. The threshold temperature for rapid chlorine activation on PSCs is approximately 4 K below the NAT existence temperature, TNAT. Furthermore, simulations of the ATLAS chemistry and transport box model along the trajectories were used to corroborate the measurements and show good agreement with the observations. Rapid chlorine activation was observed when an airmass encountered PSCs. The observed and modelled dependence of the rate of chlorine activation on the PSC composition class was small. Usually, chlorine activation was limited by the amount of available ClONO2. Where ClONO2 was not the limiting factor, a large dependence on temperature was evident.

  6. INDUCTION OF PROPHAGE LAMBDA BY CHLORINATED ORGANICS: DETECTION OF SOME SINGLE-SPECIES/SINGLE-SITE CARCINOGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Twenty-eight chlorinated organic compounds were evaluated for their ability to induce DNA damage using the Microscreen prophage-induction assay in Escherichia coli. omparison of the performance characteristics of the prophage-induction and Salmonella assays to rodent carcinogenic...

  7. The removal of estrogenic activity with UV/chlorine technology and identification of novel estrogenic disinfection by-products.

    PubMed

    Li, Man; Xu, Bi; Liungai, Zhiqi; Hu, Hong-Ying; Chen, Chao; Qiao, Juan; Lu, Yun

    2016-04-15

    As a recently developed disinfection technology, ultraviolet (UV)/chlorine treatment has received much attention. Many studies have evaluated its effects on pathogen inactivation, contaminant removal, and formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs), but its potential for environmental estrogen removal and estrogenic DBP generation, which can also be a risk to both ecosystem and human health, have not been evaluated. In this study, UV/chlorine treatment resulted in a greater removal of estrogenic activity in synthetic effluent samples containing 17β-estradiol (E2) than did UV or chlorine treatment alone regardless of the water quality. For both the UV/chlorine and chlorine treatments, there was significant interference from NH3-N, although the UV/chlorine treatment was less affected. Estrogen receptor based affinity chromatography was used to isolate the specific estrogenic DBPs, and a novel product, with high estrogenic activity compared to E2, Δ9(11)-dehydro-estradiol, was identified. It was generated by all three treatments, and might be previously mistakenly recognized as estrone (E1). This study demonstrated that UV/chlorine is a better treatment for the removal of 17β-estradiol than chlorine and UV alone. The new identified estrogenic DBP, Δ9(11)-dehydro-estradiol, which can be isolated by affinity chromatography, could be an emerging concern in the future. PMID:26780699

  8. Effects of initial active chlorine concentrations on the Antarctic ozone spring depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, G.S.; Evans, W.F.J. ); McConnell, J.C. )

    1990-02-20

    Several one-dimensional model experiments have been conducted in order to simulate the observed downward trend of total ozone and the shape of ozone profiles in the Antarctic during the austral spring. The results underline the fact that the O{sub 3} depletion is quadratically sensitive to the amount of active chlorine, which the authors have expressed as the fraction (F) of CL{sub x} that is in active form by polar sunrise. For F = 1, this result is largely independent of the occurrence of heterogeneous chemistry after polar sunrise since all of the processing has already occurred. The main O{sub 3} loss is due to formation and photolysis of Cl{sub 2}O{sub 2}. By comparison, using Br{sub x} levels similar to currently measured values, it was found that the BrO + ClO reaction plays a less important role in O{sub 3} depletion. The depth of the O{sub 3} minimum in spring appears to be related to the vertical extent of the region chemically processed by polar stratospheric clouds as well as the absolute levels of active Cl{sub 2}; more extensive vertical regions result in larger bite outs of the O{sub 3} profile. This may account for the difference in O{sub 3} minimum between 1986 and 1987. Simulations involving downward vertical transports are unable to reproduce observed decreases in total O{sub 3}. The authors speculate that low trace gas mixing ratios of species such as N{sub 2}O may be remnants of the previous summer and fall conditions, rather than signatures of downward transport during the springtime ozone depletion.

  9. ASCORBIC ACID REDUCTION OF ACTIVE CHLORINE PRIOR TO DETERMINING AMES MUTAGENICITY OF CHLORINATED NATURAL ORGANIC MATTER (NOM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many potable water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) that result from the reaction of natural organic matter (NOM) with oxidizing chlorine are known or suspected to be carcinogenic and mutagenic. The Ames assay is routinely used to assess an overall level of mutagenicity for all com...

  10. Semi-empirical models for chlorine activation and ozone depletion in the Antarctic stratosphere: proof of concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, P. E.; Bodeker, G. E.; Kremser, S.; McDonald, A. J.; Rex, M.; Struthers, H.

    2013-03-01

    Two semi-empirical models were developed for the Antarctic stratosphere to relate the shift of species within total chlorine (Cly = HCl + ClONO2 + HOCl + 2 × Cl2 + 2×Cl2O2 + ClO + Cl) into the active forms (here: ClOx = 2×Cl2O2 + ClO), and to relate the rate of ozone destruction to ClOx. These two models provide a fast and computationally inexpensive way to describe the inter- and intra-annual evolution of ClOx and ozone mass deficit (OMD) in the Antarctic spring. The models are based on the underlying physics/chemistry of the system and capture the key chemical and physical processes in the Antarctic stratosphere that determine the interaction between climate change and Antarctic ozone depletion. They were developed considering bulk effects of chemical mechanisms for the duration of the Antarctic vortex period and quantities averaged over the vortex area. The model equations were regressed against observations of daytime ClO and OMD providing a set of empirical fit coefficients. Both semi-empirical models are able to explain much of the intra- and inter-annual variability observed in daily ClOx and OMD time series. This proof-of-concept paper outlines the semi-empirical approach to describing the evolution of Antarctic chlorine activation and ozone depletion.

  11. Semi-empirical models for chlorine activation and ozone depletion in the Antarctic stratosphere: proof of concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, P. E.; Bodeker, G. E.; Kremser, S.; McDonald, A. J.; Rex, M.; Struthers, H.

    2012-10-01

    Two semi-empirical models were developed for the Antarctic stratosphere to relate the shift of species within total chlorine (Cly = HCl + ClONO2 + HOCl + 2 × Cl2 + 2 × Cl2O2 + ClO + Cl) into the active forms (here: ClOx = 2 × Cl2O2 + ClO), and to relate the rate of ozone destruction to ClOx. These two models provide a fast and computationally inexpensive way to describe the inter- and intra-annual evolution of ClOx and ozone mass deficit (OMD) in the Antarctic spring. The models are based on the underlying physics/chemistry of the system and capture the key chemical and physical processes in the Antarctic stratosphere that determine the interaction between climate change and Antarctic ozone depletion. They were developed considering bulk effects of chemical mechanisms for the duration of the Antarctic vortex period and quantities averaged over the vortex area. The model equations were regressed against observations of daytime ClO and OMD providing a set of empirical fit coefficients. Both semi-empirical models are able to explain much of the intra- and inter-annual variability observed in daily ClOx and OMD time series. This proof-of-concept paper outlines the semi-empirical approach to describing the evolution of Antarctic chlorine activation and ozone depletion.

  12. Formation of Chlorination Byproducts and Their Emission Pathways in Chlorine Mediated Electro-Oxidation of Urine on Active and Nonactive Type Anodes.

    PubMed

    Zöllig, Hanspeter; Remmele, Annette; Fritzsche, Cristina; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Udert, Kai M

    2015-09-15

    Chlorination byproducts (CBPs) are harmful to human health and the environment. Their formation in chlorine mediated electro-oxidation is a concern for electrochemical urine treatment. We investigated the formation of chlorate, perchlorate, and organic chlorination byproducts (OCBPs) during galvanostatic (10, 15, 20 mA · cm(-2)) electro-oxidation of urine on boron-doped diamond (BDD) and thermally decomposed iridium oxide film (TDIROF) anodes. In the beginning of the batch experiments, the production of perchlorate was prevented by competing active chlorine and chlorate formation as well as by direct oxidation of organic substances. Perchlorate was only formed at higher specific charges (>17 Ah · L(-1) on BDD and >29 Ah · L(-1) on TDIROF) resulting in chlorate and perchlorate being the dominant CBPs (>90% of initial chloride). BDD produced mainly short chained OCBPs (dichloromethane, trichloromethane, and tetrachloromethane), whereas longer chained OCBPs (1,2-dichloropropane and 1,2-dichloroethane) were more frequently found on TDIROF. The OCBPs were primarily eliminated by electrochemical stripping: On BDD, this pathway accounted for 40% (dichloromethane) to 100% (tetrachloromethane) and on TDIROF for 90% (1,2-dichloroethane) to 100% (trichloromethane) of what was produced. A post-treatment of the liquid as well as the gas phase should be foreseen if CBP formation cannot be prevented by eliminating chloride or organic substances in a pretreatment. PMID:26214011

  13. Polar stratospheric cloud evolution and chlorine activation measured by CALIPSO and MLS, and modeled by ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Hideaki; Wohltmann, Ingo; Wegner, Tobias; Takeda, Masanori; Pitts, Michael C.; Poole, Lamont R.; Lehmann, Ralph; Santee, Michelle L.; Rex, Markus

    2016-03-01

    We examined observations of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) by CALIPSO, and of HCl and ClO by MLS along air mass trajectories, to investigate the dependence of the inferred PSC composition on the temperature history of the air parcels and the dependence of the level of chlorine activation on PSC composition. Several case studies based on individual trajectories from the Arctic winter 2009/2010 were conducted, with the trajectories chosen such that the first processing of the air mass by PSCs in this winter occurred on the trajectory. Transitions of PSC composition classes were observed to be highly dependent on the temperature history. In cases of a gradual temperature decrease, nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and super-cooled ternary solution (STS) mixture clouds were observed. In cases of rapid temperature decrease, STS clouds were first observed, followed by NAT/STS mixture clouds. When temperatures dropped below the frost point, ice clouds formed and then transformed into NAT/STS mixture clouds when temperature increased above the frost point. The threshold temperature for rapid chlorine activation on PSCs is approximately 4 K below the NAT existence temperature, TNAT. Furthermore, simulations of the ATLAS chemistry and transport box model along the trajectories were used to corroborate the measurements and show good agreement with the observations. Rapid chlorine activation was observed when an air mass encountered PSCs. Usually, chlorine activation was limited by the amount of available ClONO2. Where ClONO2 was not the limiting factor, a large dependence on temperature was evident.

  14. Metabolism of Dibenzo-p-Dioxin and Chlorinated Dibenzo-p- Dioxins by a Beijerinckia Species

    PubMed Central

    Klečka, Gary M.; Gibson, David T.

    1980-01-01

    Whole cells of the parent strain of Beijerinckia, grown with succinate and biphenyl, oxidized dibenzo-p-dioxin and several chlorinated dioxins. The rate of oxidation of the chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins decreased with an increasing degree of chlorine substitution. A mutant strain (B8/36) of Beijerinckia oxidized dibenzo-p-dioxin to cis-1,2-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydrodibenzo-p-dioxin. The mutant organism also oxidized two monochlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins to cis-dihydrodiols. No metabolites were detected from two dichlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins. Growth of the parent strain of Beijerinckia on succinate was inhibited after 4 h when 0.05% dibenzo-p-dioxin was present in the culture medium. Resting cell suspensions of the parent organism, previously grown with succinate and biphenyl, oxidized dibenzo-p-dioxin to a compound identified as 1,2-dihydroxydibenzo-p-dioxin. Further degradation of this metabolite was not detected, as the compound was found to be a potent mixed-type inhibitor of two ring-fission oxygenases present in this organism. PMID:16345500

  15. ESTIMATION OF MICROBIAL REDUCTIVE TRANSFORMATION RATES FOR CHLORINATED BENZENES AND PHENOLS USING A QUANTITATIVE STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIP APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    A set of literature data was used to derive several quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) to predict the rate constants for the microbial reductive dehalogenation of chlorinated aromatics. Dechlorination rate constants for 25 chloroaromatics were corrected for th...

  16. Activation of RidA chaperone function by N-chlorination

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Alexandra; Langklotz, Sina; Lupilova, Nataliya; Kuhlmann, Katja; Bandow, Julia Elisabeth; Leichert, Lars Ingo Ole

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli RidA is a member of a structurally conserved, yet functionally highly diverse protein family involved in translation inhibition (human), Hsp90-like chaperone activity (fruit fly) and enamine/imine deamination (Salmonella enterica). Here, we show that E. coli RidA modified with HOCl acts as a highly effective chaperone. Although activation of RidA is reversed by treatment with DTT, ascorbic acid, the thioredoxin system and glutathione, it is independent of cysteine modification. Instead, treatment with HOCl or chloramines decreases the amino group content of RidA by reversibly N-chlorinating positively charged residues. N-chlorination increases hydrophobicity of RidA and promotes binding to a wide spectrum of unfolded cytosolic proteins. Deletion of ridA results in an HOCl-sensitive phenotype. HOCl-mediated N-chlorination thus is a cysteine-independent post-translational modification that reversibly turns RidA into an effective chaperone holdase, which plays a crucial role in the protection of cytosolic proteins during oxidative stress. PMID:25517874

  17. Contribution of chlorination to the mutagenic activity of drinking water extracts in Salmonella and Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, G.R.; Nestmann, E.R.; Lebel, G.

    1986-11-01

    The production of chlorinated by-products through chlorine disinfection of drinking water has been well documented. Natural organic precursors for these chemicals include fulvic and humic acids, the chlorination of which leads to the production of mutagenic compounds. Comparisons of extracts of raw versus treated waters have confirmed that clorination during water treatment produces mutagenic activity in the Salmonella (Ames) test. Present work on XAD-2 extracts of raw and chlorinated water from six municipalities in the Great Lakes region of Canada has involved a battery of mutagenicity assays for various genetic endpoints: the Salmonella test, the sister-chromatid exchange (SCE) and the micronucleus (MN) induction in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. All extracts of treated (chlorinated), but none of untreated, water were mutagenic in the Salmonella assay. On the other hand, extracts of both treated and untreated water samples showed activity in the SCE and MN assays, but no consistent pattern of response with regard to treatment (chlorination) was evident. These data show that chlorination contributes mutagens to drinking water and suggest that mammalian in vitro assays may be more sensitive for detecting mutagenicity in water samples than the Salmonella test.

  18. Novel chlorinated dibenzofurans isolated from the cellular slime mold, Polysphondylium filamentosum, and their biological activities.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Haruhisa; Kubohara, Yuzuru; Nguyen, Van Hai; Katou, Yasuhiro; Oshima, Yoshiteru

    2013-08-01

    Cellular slime molds are expected to have the huge potential for producing secondary metabolites including polyketides, and we have studied the diversity of secondary metabolites of cellular slime molds for their potential utilization as new biological resources for natural product chemistry. From the methanol extract of fruiting bodies of Polysphondylium filamentosum, we obtained new chlorinated benzofurans Pf-1 (4) and Pf-2 (5) which display multiple biological activities; these include stalk cell differentiation-inducing activity in the well-studied cellular slime mold, Dictyostelium discoideum, and inhibitory activities on cell proliferation in mammalian cells and gene expression in Drosophila melanogaster. PMID:23746784

  19. Adsorption equilibria of chlorinated organic solvents onto activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, J.H.; Choi, D.K.; Kim, S.H.

    1998-04-01

    Adsorption equilibria of dichloromethane, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and trichloroethylene on activated carbon were obtained by a static volumetric technique. Isotherms were measured for the pure vapors in the temperature range from 283 to 363 K and pressures up to 60 kPa for dichloromethane, 16 kPa for 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and 7 kPa for trichloroethylene, respectively. The Toth and Dubinin-Radushkevich equations were used to correlate experimental isotherms. Thermodynamic properties such as the isosteric heat of adsorption and the henry`s constant were calculated. It was found that the values of isosteric heat of adsorption were varied with surface loading. Also, the Henry`s constant showed that the order of adsorption affinity is 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, and dichloromethane. By employing the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation, the limiting volume of the adsorbed space, which equals micropore volume, was determined, and its value was found to be approximately independent of adsorbates.

  20. Reducing the chlorine dioxide demand in final disinfection of drinking water treatment plants using activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Sorlini, Sabrina; Biasibetti, Michela; Collivignarelli, Maria Cristina; Crotti, Barbara Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide is one of the most widely employed chemicals in the disinfection process of a drinking water treatment plant (DWTP). The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of the adsorption process with granular activated carbon (GAC) on the chlorine dioxide consumption in final oxidation/disinfection. A first series of tests was performed at the laboratory scale employing water samples collected at the outlet of the DWTP sand filter of Cremona (Italy). The adsorption process in batch conditions with seven different types of GAC was studied. A second series of tests was performed on water samples collected at the outlet of four GAC columns installed at the outlet of the DWTP sand filter. The results showed that the best chlorine dioxide demand (ClO2-D) reduction yields are equal to 60-80% and are achieved in the first 30 min after ClO2 addition, during the first 16 days of the column operation using a mineral, coal-based, mesoporous GAC. Therefore, this carbon removes organic compounds that are more rapidly reactive with ClO2. Moreover, a good correlation was found between the ClO2-D and UV absorbance at wavelength 254 nm using mineral carbons; therefore, the use of a mineral mesoporous GAC is an effective solution to control the high ClO2-D in the disinfection stage of a DWTP. PMID:25465650

  1. Measurements of Active Chlorine in the Antarctic Ozone Hole: 1986 to 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, P.; Barrett, J.; Connor, B.; Mooney, T.; Parrish, A.

    2005-12-01

    We will present and compare ground-based microwave measurements of stratospheric chlorine monoxide, ClO, from 1986, 1987 and 1996 through 2005 obtained from McMurdo and Scott Base, Antarctica (78° S). These measurements demonstrate the evolution of the ClO altitude profile (from 15 to 40 km) as the ozone hole progresses from the onset of sunlight in early August until the beginning of the breakup of the vortex in early October. The measurements from 1986 and 1987 were part of the National Ozone Expedition and the 1996 to 2005 measurements are carried out as part of the Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change, NDSC. The 1986 measurements were the first detection of a huge excess of chlorine monoxide during the Antarctic ozone hole period and the 1987 measurements produced the first full altitude profile of ClO over Antarctica. The last 10 years of measurements were carried out with an instrument very similar to the one used in the 1980's, but automated for continuous operation. The ClO altitude profile from the older measurements will be compared to the more recent measurements and variations in the time sequence of active chlorine from year to year will be discussed. We will also report on changes and/or trends in the peak mixing ratios from year to year both within the 10 year sequence (1996 to 2005) and between the recent measurements and the data from the 1980's. The measurements will also be compared to models to test the current understanding of chlorine chemistry.

  2. Free Chlorine and Monochloramine Application to Nitrifying Biofilm: Comparison of Biofilm Penetration, Activity, and Viability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biofilm in drinking water systems is undesirable and effective biofilm control maintains public health. Free chlorine and monochloramine are commonly used as secondary drinking water disinfectants, but monochloramine is perceived to penetrate biofilm better than free chlorine. ...

  3. Involvement of mitochondrial and reactive oxygen species in the sonodynamic toxicity of chlorin e6 in human leukemia K562 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yixiang; Wang, Pan; Wang, Xiaobing; Su, Xiaomin; Liu, Quanhong

    2014-05-01

    It is well accepted that sonodynamic therapy (SDT) exerts cytotoxicity and anti-tumor activity in many human tumors through the induction of cell apoptosis. The aim of the work described here was to study the effect of chlorin e6 (Ce6)-mediated SDT on human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells. Our results indicate that Ce6-mediated SDT can suppress the viability of K562 cells. SDT caused apoptosis as analyzed by annexin V-phycoerythrin/7-amino-actinomycin D staining as well as cleavage of caspase 3 and the polypeptide poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. After SDT exposure, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, translocation of Bax from cytoplasm to mitochondria and activation of caspase 9 indicated that the mitochondrial-related apoptotic pathway might be activated. This process was accompanied by rapid generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Scavenging of ROS significantly blocked caspase-3 expression and the killing effect of SDT on K562 cells. Stress-activated protein kinases c-jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase were activated after SDT treatment. Together, these findings indicate that Ce6-mediated SDT triggers mitochondria- and caspase-dependent apoptosis; oxidative injury may play a vital role in apoptotic signaling cascades. PMID:24462156

  4. Chlorine dioxide as a treatment for ballast water to control invasive species: shipboard testing.

    PubMed

    Maranda, Lucie; Cox, Annie M; Campbell, Robert G; Smith, David C

    2013-10-15

    The efficacy of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) in eliminating organisms present in estuarine ballast water of a containership was determined under actual operating conditions by comparing the survival of planktonic communities present in waters of treated and control ballast tanks. Sampling was via ballast-tank hatches. The treatment (5 mg L(-1)ClO2 without pre-filtration) delivered by a prototype ClO2-generating system was generally effective against planktonic assemblages, although bacterial communities rebounded after a few days. Regardless of temperature, ClO2 was very effective against phytoplankton; the effect was immediate, without resurgence. Some zooplankters in the ≥ 50-μm fraction may survive the biocide, especially those able to find refuge within a protective coating (e.g., cysts, resting eggs, and shells) or in sediment. In order to boost efficacy, a pre-filtration step is recommended (now installed as standard equipment) to lower the intake of the ≥ 50-μm fraction and lessen the challenge posed by this size class. PMID:23987094

  5. Contribution of liquid, NAT and ice particles to chlorine activation and ozone depletion in Antarctic winter and spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirner, O.; Müller, R.; Ruhnke, R.; Fischer, H.

    2015-02-01

    Heterogeneous reactions in the Antarctic stratosphere are the cause of chlorine activation and ozone depletion, but the relative roles of different types of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in chlorine activation is an open question. We use multi-year simulations of the chemistry-climate model ECHAM5/MESSy for Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) to investigate the impact that the various types of PSCs have on Antarctic chlorine activation and ozone loss. One standard and three sensitivity EMAC simulations have been performed. In all simulations a Newtonian relaxation technique using the ERA-Interim reanalysis was applied to simulate realistic synoptic conditions. In the three sensitivity simulations, we only changed the heterogeneous chemistry on PSC particles by switching the chemistry on liquid, nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and ice particles on and off. The results of these simulations show that the significance of heterogeneous reactions on NAT and ice particles for chlorine activation and ozone depletion in Antarctic winter and spring is small in comparison to the significance of heterogeneous reactions on liquid particles. Liquid particles alone are sufficient to activate almost all of the available chlorine, with the exception of the upper PSC regions between 10 and 30 hPa, where temporarily ice particles show a relevant contribution. Shortly after the first PSC occurrence, NAT particles contribute a small fraction to chlorine activation. Heterogeneous chemistry on liquid particles is responsible for more than 90% of the ozone depletion in Antarctic spring in the model simulations. In high southern latitudes, heterogeneous chemistry on ice particles causes only up to 5 DU of additional ozone depletion in the column and heterogeneous chemistry on NAT particles less than 0.5 DU. The simulated HNO3, ClO and O3 results agree closely with observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) onboard NASA's Aura satellite.

  6. Active chlorine and nitric oxide formation from chemical rocket plume afterburning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leone, D. M.; Turns, S. R.

    1994-01-01

    Chlorine and oxides of nitrogen (NO(x)) released into the atmosphere contribute to acid rain (ground level or low-altitude sources) and ozone depletion from the stratosphere (high-altitude sources). Rocket engines have the potential for forming or activating these pollutants in the rocket plume. For instance, H2/O2 rockets can produce thermal NO(x) in their plumes. Emphasis, in the past, has been placed on determining the impact of chlorine release on the stratosphere. To date, very little, if any, information is available to understand what contribution NO(x) emissions from ground-based engine testing and actual rocket launches have on the atmosphere. The goal of this work is to estimate the afterburning emissions from chemical rocket plumes and determine their local stratospheric impact. Our study focuses on the space shuttle rocket motors, which include both the solid rocket boosters (SRB's) and the liquid propellant main engines (SSME's). Rocket plume afterburning is modeled employing a one-dimensional model incorporating two chemical kinetic systems: chemical and thermal equilibria with overlayed nitric oxide chemical kinetics (semi equilibrium) and full finite-rate chemical kinetics. Additionally, the local atmospheric impact immediately following a launch is modeled as the emissions diffuse and chemically react in the stratosphere.

  7. Chlorine activation indoors and outdoors via surface-mediated reactions of nitrogen oxides with hydrogen chloride

    PubMed Central

    Raff, Jonathan D.; Njegic, Bosiljka; Chang, Wayne L.; Gordon, Mark S.; Dabdub, Donald; Gerber, R. Benny; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2009-01-01

    Gaseous HCl generated from a variety of sources is ubiquitous in both outdoor and indoor air. Oxides of nitrogen (NOy) are also globally distributed, because NO formed in combustion processes is oxidized to NO2, HNO3, N2O5 and a variety of other nitrogen oxides during transport. Deposition of HCl and NOy onto surfaces is commonly regarded as providing permanent removal mechanisms. However, we show here a new surface-mediated coupling of nitrogen oxide and halogen activation cycles in which uptake of gaseous NO2 or N2O5 on solid substrates generates adsorbed intermediates that react with HCl to generate gaseous nitrosyl chloride (ClNO) and nitryl chloride (ClNO2), respectively. These are potentially harmful gases that photolyze to form highly reactive chlorine atoms. The reactions are shown both experimentally and theoretically to be enhanced by water, a surprising result given the availability of competing hydrolysis reaction pathways. Airshed modeling incorporating HCl generated from sea salt shows that in coastal urban regions, this heterogeneous chemistry increases surface-level ozone, a criteria air pollutant, greenhouse gas and source of atmospheric oxidants. In addition, it may contribute to recently measured high levels of ClNO2 in the polluted coastal marine boundary layer. This work also suggests the potential for chlorine atom chemistry to occur indoors where significant concentrations of oxides of nitrogen and HCl coexist. PMID:19620710

  8. Active chlorine and nitric oxide formation from chemical rocket plume afterburning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, D. M.; Turns, S. R.

    Chlorine and oxides of nitrogen (NO(x)) released into the atmosphere contribute to acid rain (ground level or low-altitude sources) and ozone depletion from the stratosphere (high-altitude sources). Rocket engines have the potential for forming or activating these pollutants in the rocket plume. For instance, H2/O2 rockets can produce thermal NO(x) in their plumes. Emphasis, in the past, has been placed on determining the impact of chlorine release on the stratosphere. To date, very little, if any, information is available to understand what contribution NO(x) emissions from ground-based engine testing and actual rocket launches have on the atmosphere. The goal of this work is to estimate the afterburning emissions from chemical rocket plumes and determine their local stratospheric impact. Our study focuses on the space shuttle rocket motors, which include both the solid rocket boosters (SRB's) and the liquid propellant main engines (SSME's). Rocket plume afterburning is modeled employing a one-dimensional model incorporating two chemical kinetic systems: chemical and thermal equilibria with overlayed nitric oxide chemical kinetics (semi equilibrium) and full finite-rate chemical kinetics. Additionally, the local atmospheric impact immediately following a launch is modeled as the emissions diffuse and chemically react in the stratosphere.

  9. Reaction products of chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, A A

    1982-01-01

    Inspection of the available literature reveals that a detailed investigation of the aqueous organic chemistry of chlorine dioxide and systematic identification of products formed during water disinfection has not been considered. This must be done before an informed assessment can be made of the relative safety of using chlorine dioxide as a disinfectant alternative to chlorine. Although trihalomethanes are generally not formed by the action of chlorine dioxide, the products of chlorine dioxide treatment of organic materials are oxidized species, some of which also contain chlorine. The relative amounts of species types may depend on the amount of chlorine dioxide residual maintained and the concentration and nature of the organic material present in the source water. The trend toward lower concentrations of chlorinated by-products with increasing ClO2 concentration, which was observed with phenols, has not been observed with natural humic materials as measured by the organic halogen parameter. Organic halogen concentrations have been shown to increase with increasing chlorine dioxide dose, but are much lower than those observed when chlorine is applied. Aldehydes have been detected as apparent by-products of chlorine dioxide oxidation reactions in a surface water that is a drinking water source. Some other nonchlorinated products of chlorine dioxide treatment may be quinones and epoxides. The extent of formation of these moieties within the macromolecular humic structure is also still unknown. PMID:7151750

  10. Color and chlorinated organics removal from pulp mills wastewater using activated petroleum coke.

    PubMed

    Shawwa, A R; Smith, D W; Sego, D C

    2001-03-01

    Delayed petroleum coke, a waste by-product from the oil sand industry, was utilized in the production of activated carbon. The activated carbon was then evaluated for color and chlorinated organics reduction from pulp mill wastewater. The activation of the petroleum coke was evaluated using a fixed bed reactor involving carbonization and activation steps at temperature of 850 degrees C and using steam as the activation medium. The activation results showed that the maximum surface area of the activated coke was achieved at an activation period of 4 h. The maximum surface area occurred at burnoff and water efficiency of 48.5 and 54.3%, respectively. Increasing the activation period to 6 h resulted in a decrease in the surface area. Methylene blue adsorption results indicated that the activation process was successful. Methylene blue adsorbed per 100 g of applied activated coke was 10 times higher than that adsorbed by raw petroleum coke. Adsorption equilibrium results of the bleached wastewater and the activated coke showed that significant color, COD, DOC and AOX removal (> 90%) was achieved when the activated coke dose exceeded 15,000 mg/L. Adsorption isotherms, in terms of COD, DOC, UV and color were developed based on the batch equilibrium data. Based on these isotherms, the amount of activated coke required to achieve certain removal of color and AOX can be predicted. The utilization of the petroleum coke for the production of activated carbon can provide an excellent disposal option for the oil sand industry at the same time would provide a cheap and valuable activated carbon. PMID:11228973

  11. Trajectory Hunting: A Case Study of Rapid Chlorine Activation in December 1992 as Seen by UARS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, M. Y.; Santee, M. L.; Rodriguez, J. M.; Ko, M. K. W.; Mergenthaler, J. M.; Kumer, J. B.; Tabazadeh, A.; Livesey, N. J.

    2000-01-01

    Trajectory hunting (i.e., a technique to find air parcels sampled at least twice over the course of a few days) is applied to analyze Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) measurements in conjunction with the Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) photochemical box model. As a case study, we investigate rapid chlorine activation in the Arctic lower stratosphere on December 29, 1992 associated with a polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) event. Eleven air parcels that have been sampled several times along five-day trajectories at the 465 K (approx. 46 hPa), 520 K (approx. 31 hPa), and 585 K (approx. 22 hPa) levels were investigated. For the first time, the latest versions of the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES, version 9) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS, version 5) data sets are analyzed, and their consistency is assessed. A detailed sensitivity study with the AER photochemical box model along these trajectories leads to the conclusion that for the December 24-29, 1992 episode: (1) the individual CLAES ClONO2 and MLS ClO measurements are self-consistent within their uncertainties; and (2) most of the time, UARS measurements of ClO, ClONO2, HNO3, and aerosol extinction at 780 cm(exp -1) agree within the range of their uncertainties with the model calculations. It appears that the HNO3 and aerosol extinction measurements for four parcels at 520 K look more supportive for the nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) scheme, However, the uncertainties in the individual UARS measurements and UK Meteorological Office temperature do not allow a definite discrimination between the NAT and supercooled ternary solution (STS) PSC schemes for this chlorine activation episode in December 1992.

  12. Trajectory Hunting: A Case Study of Rapid Chlorine Activation in December 1992 as Seen by UARS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, M. Y.; Santee, M. L.; Rodriquez, J. M.; Ko, M. K. W.; Mergenthaler, J. M.; Kumer, J. B.; Tabazadeh, A.; Livesey

    2000-01-01

    Trajectory hunting (i.e., a technique to find air parcels sampled at least twice over the course of a few days) is applied to analyze Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) measurements in conjunction with the Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) photochemical box model. As a case study, we investigate rapid chlorine activation in the Arctic lower stratosphere on December 29, 1992 associated with a polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) event. Eleven air parcels that have been sampled several times along 5-day trajectories at the 465 K (approx. 46 hPa), 520 K (approx. 31 hPa), and 585 K (approx. 22 hPa) levels were investigated. For the first time, the latest versions of the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES, version 9) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS, version 5) data sets are analyzed, and their consistency is assessed. A detailed sensitivity study with the AER photochemical box model along these trajectories leads to the conclusion that for the December 24-29, 1992 episode (1) the individual CLAES version 9 ClONO2 and MLS version 5 ClO measurements are self-consistent within their uncertainties; and (2) most of the time, UARS measurements of ClO, ClONO2, HNO3, and aerosol extinction at 780 cm (exp -1) agree within the range of their uncertainties with the model calculations. It appears that the HNO3 and aerosol extinction measurements for four parcels at 520 K look more supportive for the nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) scheme. However, the uncertainties in the individual UARS measurements and U.K. Meteorological Office temperature do not allow a definite discrimination between the NAT and supercooled ternary solution (STS) PSC schemes for this chlorine activation episode in December 1992.

  13. Effects of starvation on physiological activity and chlorine disinfection resistance in Escherichia coli O157:H7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisle, J. T.; Broadaway, S. C.; Prescott, A. M.; Pyle, B. H.; Fricker, C.; McFeters, G. A.

    1998-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 can persist for days to weeks in microcosms simulating natural conditions. In this study, we used a suite of fluorescent, in situ stains and probes to assess the influence of starvation on physiological activity based on membrane potential (rhodamine 123 assay), membrane integrity (LIVE/DEAD BacLight kit), respiratory activity (5-cyano-2,3-di-4-tolyl-tetrazolium chloride assay), intracellular esterase activity (ScanRDI assay), and 16S rRNA content. Growth-dependent assays were also used to assess substrate responsiveness (direct viable count [DVC] assay), ATP activity (MicroStar assay), and culturability (R2A agar assay). In addition, resistance to chlorine disinfection was assessed. After 14 days of starvation, the DVC values decreased, while the values in all other assays remained relatively constant and equivalent to each other. Chlorine resistance progressively increased through the starvation period. After 29 days of starvation, there was no significant difference in chlorine resistance between control cultures that had not been exposed to the disinfectant and cultures that had been exposed. This study demonstrates that E. coli O157:H7 adapts to starvation conditions by developing a chlorine resistance phenotype.

  14. Antifungal activity of some Cuban Zanthoxylum species.

    PubMed

    Diéguez-Hurtado, R; Garrido-Garrido, G; Prieto-González, S; Iznaga, Y; González, L; Molina-Torres, J; Curini, M; Epifano, F; Marcotullio, M C

    2003-06-01

    Ethanolic extracts of the trunk bark of Zanthoxylum fagara, Z. elephantiasis and Z. martinicense showed activity against different species of fungi. No antibacterial activity was detected. PMID:12781811

  15. Amide Link Scission in the Polyamide Active Layers of Thin-Film Composite Membranes upon Exposure to Free Chlorine: Kinetics and Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Powell, Joshua; Luh, Jeanne; Coronell, Orlando

    2015-10-20

    The volume-averaged amide link scission in the aromatic polyamide active layer of a reverse osmosis membrane upon exposure to free chlorine was quantified at a variety of free chlorine exposure times, concentrations, and pH and rinsing conditions. The results showed that (i) hydroxyl ions are needed for scission to occur, (ii) hydroxide-induced amide link scission is a strong function of exposure to hypochlorous acid, (iii) the ratio between amide links broken and chlorine atoms taken up increased with the chlorination pH and reached a maximum of ∼25%, (iv) polyamide disintegration occurs when high free chlorine concentrations, alkaline conditions, and high exposure times are combined, (v) amide link scission promotes further chlorine uptake, and (vi) scission at the membrane surface is unrepresentative of volume-averaged scission in the active layer. Our observations are consistent with previously proposed mechanisms describing amide link scission as a result of the hydrolysis of the N-chlorinated amidic N-C bond due to nucleophilic attack by hydroxyl ions. This study increases the understanding of the physicochemical changes that could occur for membranes in treatment plants using chlorine as an upstream disinfectant and the extent and rate at which those changes would occur. PMID:26394532

  16. Evaluation of disinfection by-product formation potential (DBPFP) during chlorination of two algae species--Blue-green Microcystis aeruginosa and diatom Cyclotella meneghiniana.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xiaobin; Liu, Jinjin; Yang, Mingli; Ma, Hongfang; Yuan, Baoling; Huang, Ching-Hua

    2015-11-01

    Microcystis aeruginosa (blue-green alga) commonly blooms in summer and Cyclotella meneghiniana (diatom) outbreaks in fall in the reservoirs that serve as drinking water sources in Southeast China. Herein, an evaluation of disinfection by-product formation potential (DBPFP) from them during chlorination should be conducted. Five DBPs including trichloromethane (TCM), trichloronitromethane (TCNM), dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN), 1,1-dichloropropanone (1,1-DCP) and 1,1,1-trichloropropanone (1,1,1-TCP) were monitored. The formation potential of TCM and TCNM was enhanced with the increase of reaction time and chlorine dosage, whereas that of DCAN, 1,1-DCP and 1,1,1-TCP increased first and then fell with continuing reaction time. M. aeruginosa showed higher DBPFP than C. meneghiniana, the yield of DBPs varied with components of algal cells. The DBPFP order from components of M. aeruginosa was cell suspension (CS) ≈ intracellular organic matter (IOM) > extracellular organic matter (EOM) > cell debris (CD), which indicated that IOM was the main DBP precursors for M. aeruginosa. The yields of DBPs from components of C. meneghiniana were in the order of CS>IOM≈ CD ≈ EOM, suggesting that three components made similar contributions to the total DBP formation. The amount of IOM with higher DBPFP leaked from both algae species increased with the chlorine dosage, indicating that chlorine dosage should be considered carefully in the treatment of eutrophic water for less destroying of the cell integrity. Though fluorescence substances contained in both algae species varied significantly, the soluble microbial products (SMPs) and aromatic protein-like substances were the main cellular components that contributed to DBP formation for both algae. PMID:26100733

  17. Microphysical Modelling of the 1999-2000 Arctic Winter. 2; Chlorine Activation and Ozone Depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drdla, K.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The effect of a range of assumptions about polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) on ozone depletion has been assessed using at couple microphysical/photochemical model. The composition of the PSCs was varied (ternary solutions, nitric acid trihydrate, nitric acid dehydrate, or ice), as were parameters that affected the levels of denitrification and dehydration. Ozone depletion was affected by assumptions about PSC freezing because of the variability in resultant nitrification chlorine activation in all scenarios was similar despite the range of assumed PSC compositions. Vortex-average ozone loss exceeded 40% in the lower stratosphere for simulations without nitrification an additional ozone loss of 15-20% was possible in scenarios where vortex-average nitrification reached 60%. Ozone loss intensifies non-linearly with enhanced nitrification in air parcels with 90% nitrification 40% ozone loss in mid-April can be attributed to nitrification alone. However, these effects are sensitive to the stability of the vortex in springtime: nitrification only began to influence ozone depletion in mid-March.

  18. Ecology of mixed biofilms subjected daily to a chlorinated alkaline solution: spatial distribution of bacterial species suggests a protective effect of one species to another.

    PubMed

    Leriche, V; Briandet, R; Carpentier, B

    2003-01-01

    Three bacterial strains (Kocuria sp. C714.1, Brevibacterium linens B337.1 and Staphylococcus sciuri CCL101) were grown together on stainless steel and were subjected daily to a commercial alkaline chlorine solution (22 mg l-1 of free chlorine, pH 11) over a period of 4 weeks. After the daily chemical shock, culture madia [1:20 dilution of tryptic soy broth (TSB-YE/20) or diluted whey] was deposited on the biofilms. The chemical shocks led first to a drop in the culturable population, followed by an increase and finally stabilization at around 106-107 CFU cm-2 by day 11 of the experiment. These changes in the microbial population can be attributed to a decreasing susceptibility to the antimicrobial agent with biofilm age, and to the consumption of free chlorine by biofilm exoproteins. The microbial composition appeared to be linked to the free chlorine concentration that depended on exoprotein production. At the end of the experiment, exoprotein production was greater for biofilms grown in TSBYE/20 than in whey. As a consequence, biofilms grown in whey did not neutralize the chlorine and the dominant strain was the one having the highest resistance to chlorine: K. varians. When biofilm were grown in TSBYE/20, chlorine was neutralized and the dominant strain was the one having the highest growth rate: S. sciuri. The presence of chlorine may also explain the distribution of S. sciuri cells as a ring around Kocuria sp. microcolonies. When chlorine was totally consumed by the biofilm during the chemical shock, S. sciuri was no longer grouped around Kocuria sp. microcolonies but was evenly scattered over the substratum as single cells or in small clusters, as it was before any chemical treatment. These findings strongly suggest protection of S. sciuri by Kocuria sp. microcolonies against the chlorinated solution. This phenomenon, added to the low susceptibility phenotype of the biofilm cells, could at least partly explain the survival of microbial cells in an adverse

  19. Process for Photochemical Chlorination of Hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Beanblossom, W S

    1951-08-28

    A process for chlorination of a major portion of the hydrogen atoms of paraffinic hydrocarbons of five or more carbon atoms may be replaced by subjecting the hydrocarbon to the action of chlorine under active light. The initial chlorination is begun at 25 to 30 deg C with the chlorine diluted with HCl. The later stages may be carried out with undiluted chlorine and the temperature gradually raised to about 129 deg C.

  20. Movement and fate of chlorinated solvents in ground water; research activities at Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fusillo, T.V.; Ehlke, T.A.; Martin, Mary

    1987-01-01

    The USGS, through its Toxic Waste--Ground-Water Contamination Program, is undertaking an interdisciplinary research study of contaminants. The purpose of the study is to gain a better understanding of the chemical, physical, and biological processes that affect the movement and fate of these contaminants in groundwater. The study is being conducted at Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey, where metal plating and metal etching wastes have contaminated part of the glacial stratified drift aquifers. Major areas of research at the site are described, including: (1) distribution and movement of chlorinated solvents in groundwater, (2) behavior of chlorinated solvents in the unsaturated zone, (3) geochemistry of the contaminated groundwater, and (4) microbial transformations of chlorinated solvents. (Author 's abstract)

  1. Optimum conditions for the formation of Al13 polymer and active chlorine in electrolysis process with Ti/RuO2-TiO2 anodes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chengzhi; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2012-01-01

    A polyaluminum containing a high concentration of Al13 polymer and active chlorine (PACC) was successfully synthesized by a new electrochemical reactor using Ti/RuO2-TiO2 anodes. PACC can potentially be used as a dual-function chemical reagent for water treatment. The obtained results indicated that the formation of Al13 polymer and active chlorine, were the most active components in PACC responsible for coagulation and disinfection respectively. These components were significantly influenced by electrolyte temperature, current density, and stirring rate. It was observed that high electrolyte temperature favored the formation of Al13. Increasing current density and stirring rate resulted in high current efficiency of chlorine evolution, thus favoring the generation of Al13 and active chlorine in PACC. When the PACC (Al(T) = 0.5 mol/L, basicity = 2.3) was prepared at the optimum conditions by electrolysis process, the Al13 polymer and active chlorine in product reached above 70% of Al(T) and 4000 mg/L, respectively. In the pilot scale experiment with raw polyaluminum chloride used as an electrolyte, PACC was successfully prepared and produced a high content of Al13 and active chlorine products. The pilot scale experiment demonstrated a potential industrial approach of PACC preparation. PMID:22655391

  2. Impacts of solar particle events on middle atmospheric chlorine compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Holger; Sinnhuber, Miriam; Wissing, Jan-Maik; Kallenrode, May-Britt; Stiller, Gabrielle; von Clarmann, Thomas; Funke, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    Solar particle events (SPEs) are well known sources of chemical perturbations in the middle atmosphere. A well-understood effect is the release of reactive NOx and HOx, and the subsequent destruction of ozone. Satellite measurements (HALOE, MIPAS, AURA-MLS) have shown that there is also chlorine activation in the stratosphere and mesosphere, and an increase of chlorine nitrate in the lower and middle stratosphere during SPEs. This cannot be explained by the NOx and HOx increase alone. Atmospheric models with standard parametrizations of NOx and HOx production due to SPEs fail to reproduce the magnitude of the observed chlorine disturbances. Numerical simulations using the University of Bremen ion chemistry (UBIC) model show a much better agreement with measurements if full negative ion chemistry is considered additionally to the NOx and HOx production. The UBIC results in combination with atmospheric models indicate that reactions of negative cluster ions can have a significant impact on the middle atmosphere's chlorine chemistry during SPEs. There is a transformation of HCl into active chlorine via anion cluster chemistry. Additionally, the release of O(1D) through N(2D) + O2 - NO + O(1D) has a considerable impact on chlorine species. Results of UBIC simulations for different SPEs (July 2000, October 2003, January 2005) are presented. They are compared with the observed changes of chlorine compounds - HCl, HOCl, ClO and ClONO2 - from the satellite instruments HALOE, MIPAS and AURA-MLS.

  3. Texas Endangered Species Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Kathleen Marie; Campbell, Linda

    This publication is the result of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Division's (TPWD's) commitment to education and the fertile partnerships formed between TPWD biologists and educators. This activity book brings together the expertise and practical knowledge of a classroom teacher with the technical knowledge and skills of a TPWD biologist and artist.…

  4. Antimicrobial activity of controlled-release chlorine dioxide gas on fresh blueberries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) on the safety and quality of blueberries was studied. In vitro studies revealed that both ClO2 gas fumigation and ClO2 water direct contact killed food pathogen bacterium, Escherichia coli and fruit decay pathogen fungus, Colletotrichum acutatum. In vivo studies...

  5. Chlorine isotopes of thermal springs in arc volcanoes for tracing shallow magmatic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long; Bonifacie, Magali; Aubaud, Cyril; Crispi, Olivier; Dessert, Céline; Agrinier, Pierre

    2015-03-01

    The evaluation of the status of shallow magma body (i.e., from the final intrusion stage, to quiescence, and back to activity), one of the key parameters that trigger and sustain volcanic eruptions, has been challenging in modern volcanology. Among volatile tracers, chlorine (Cl) uniquely exsolves at shallow depths and is highly hydrophilic. Consequently, Cl enrichment in volcanic gases and thermal springs has been proposed as a sign for shallow magmatic activities. However, such enrichment could also result from numerous other processes (e.g., water evaporation, dissolution of old chloride mineral deposits, seawater contamination) that are unrelated to magmatic activity. Here, based on stable isotope compositions of chloride and dissolved inorganic carbon, as well as previous published 3He/4He data obtained in thermal springs from two recently erupted volcanoes (La Soufrière in Guadeloupe and Montagne Pelée in Martinique) in the Lesser Antilles Arc, we show that the magmatic Cl efficiently trapped in thermal springs displays negative δ37Cl values (≤ - 0.65 ‰), consistent with a slab-derived origin but distinct from the isotope compositions of chloride in surface reservoirs (e.g. seawater, local meteoric waters, rivers and cold springs) displaying common δ37Cl values of around 0‰. Using this δ37Cl difference as an index of magmatic Cl, we further examined thermal spring samples including a 30-year archive from two thermal springs in Guadeloupe covering samples from its last eruption in 1976-1977 to 2008 and an island-wide sampling event in Martinique in 2008 to trace the evolution of magmatic Cl in the volcanic hydrothermal systems over time. The results show that magmatic Cl can be rapidly flushed out of the hydrothermal systems within <30 to 80 years after the eruption, much quicker than other volatile tracers such as CO2 and noble gases, which can exsolve at greater depths and constantly migrate to the surface. Because arc volcanoes often have well

  6. Tropospheric budget of reactive chlorine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graedel, T. E.; Keene, W. C.

    1995-03-01

    Reactive chlorine in the lower atmosphere (as distinguished from chlorofluorocarbon-derived chlorine in the stratosphere) is important to considerations of precipitation acidity, corrosion, foliar damage, and chemistry of the marine boundary layer. Many of the chlorine-containing gases are difficult to measure, and natural sources appear to dominate anthropogenic sources for some chemical species. As a consequence, no satisfactory budget for reactive chlorine in the lower atmosphere is available. We have reviewed information on sources; source strengths; measurements in gas, aqueous, and aerosol phases; and chemical processes and from those data derive global budgets for nine reactive chlorine species and for reactive chlorine as a whole. The typical background abundance of reactive chlorine in the lower tropospheric is about 1.5 ppbv. The nine species, CH3 Cl, CH3 CCl3, HCl, CHClF2, Cl2* (thought to be HOCl and/or Cl2), CCl2 = CCl2, CH2 Cl2 , COCl2 , and CHCl3, each contribute at least a few percent to that total. The tropospheric reactive chlorine burden of approximately 8.3 Tg Cl is dominated by CH3 Cl (≈45 %) and CH3 CCl3 (≈25 %) and appears to be increasing by several percent per year. By far the most vigorous chlorine cycling appears to occur among seasalt aerosol, HCl, and Cl2*. The principal sources of reactive chlorine are volatilization from seasalt (enhanced by anthropogenically generated reactants), marine algae, volcanoes, and coal combustion (natural sources being thus quite important to the budget). It is anticipated that the concentrations of tropospheric reactive chlorine will continue to increase in the next several decades, particularly near urban areas in the rapidly developing countries.

  7. Effect of chlorine activation treatment on electron beam induced current signal distribution of cadmium telluride thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zywitzki, Olaf; Modes, Thomas; Morgner, Henry; Metzner, Christoph; Siepchen, Bastian; Späth, Bettina; Drost, Christian; Krishnakumar, Velappan; Frauenstein, Sven

    2013-10-01

    We have investigated CdTe thin film solar cells without activation treatment and with CdCl2 activation treatment at temperatures between 370 and 430 °C using a constant activation time of 25 min. For this purpose, CdS/CdTe layers were deposited by closed-space-sublimation on FTO coated float glass. The solar cells were characterized by measurements of the JV characteristics and quantum efficiencies. In addition, ion polished cross sections of the solar cells were prepared for high-resolution FE-SEM imaging of the microstructure and the simultaneous registration of electron beam induced current (EBIC) signal distribution. By measurement of the EBIC signal distribution, it can be shown that without activation treatment the CdTe grain boundaries itself and grain boundary near regions exhibit no EBIC signal, whereas centres of some singular grains already show a distinct EBIC signal. In contrast, after the chlorine activation treatment, the grain boundary near regions exhibit a significant higher EBIC signal than the centre of the grains. The results can be discussed as a direct evidence for defect passivation of grain boundary near regions by the chlorine activation treatment. At activation temperature of 430 °C, additionally, a significant grain growth and agglomeration of the CdS layer can be recognized, which is linked with the formation of voids within the CdS layer and a deterioration of pn junction properties.

  8. Chemistry and transport in a three-dimensional stratospheric model - Chlorine species during a simulated stratospheric warming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaye, Jack A.; Rood, Richard B.

    1989-01-01

    The distributions in the stratosphere of a variety of chemical species were calculated for a 6-day period during the February 1979 stratospheric major warming, using winds derived from a spectral forecast model which included O(x), NO(x), HO(x), and ClO(x) chemistries as well as longitudinally varying reaction rate coefficients and photolysis rates for these molecules. The results obtained indicate a particular importance of chemistry and transport for the Cl-containing species ClO, ClONO2, HCl, and HOCl. Dynamical effects dominate the variability of HCl, while diurnal effects dominate that of ClONO2 and ClO. The effects of strong planetary wave activity may be seen in terms of large longitudinal variability of the total HCl and ClONO columns in the stratosphere; in the middle and high northern latitudes, it is sufficiently large to exceed the diurnal variability of the column.

  9. Removal efficiencies for 136 tetra- through octa-chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofuran congeners with activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xu-Jian; Li, Xiao-Dong; Ni, Ming-Jiang; Cen, Ke-Fa

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the removal efficiency of 136 tetra- to octa-chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (CDD)/furan (F) congeners from a nitrogen + oxygen carrier gas was studied using a laboratory-scale, fixed bed adsorption system. Two kinds of activated carbon with dissimilar pore structures were used as adsorbents. The total concentration of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans (PCDD/Fs) in the source gas was 541 ng/Nm(3) and that of the 17 toxic 2,3,7,8-substituted PCDD/Fs 96.35 ng/Nm(3), accounting for 17.8% of the total original weight amount. Their toxic equivalent quantity (TEQ) was 8.31 ng I-TEQ/Nm(3). For both activated carbons, the removal efficiencies of the ten PCDD/F homologue groups rise with chlorine substitution number. The removal efficiencies vary approximately as a power function of vapor pressure (correlation coefficients r(2) = 0.93 and 0.81, respectively). Competitive adsorption and desorption occur as adsorption time went on, causing elution of the lower chlorinated homologues, i.e. tetra-CDD/F and Penta-CDD/F congeners. In addition, there are significantly different concentration distributions for isomers in the same homologue groups. However, their removal efficiencies have weak correlation with their initial concentrations. The correlation coefficients are from -0.47 to 0.32 and from -0.57 to 0.46 respectively for the two kinds of activated carbons. PMID:26154037

  10. Bactericidal activity of chlorine dioxide against Escherichia coli in water and on hard surfaces.

    PubMed

    Foschino, R; Nervegna, I; Motta, A; Galli, A

    1998-06-01

    The efficacy of chlorine dioxide as a disinfectant was evaluated against cells of Escherichia coli ATCC 11229 in aqueous suspension and adhering to the surfaces of stainless steel AISI 304 and PVC. The concentrations tested ranged from 0.7 to 14 mg/liter; the exposure times investigated were 30 s and 1, 2, 4, and 8 min. When the bacteria were suspended in water with 1.4 mg/liter of chlorine dioxide, a 10(5)-fold reduction of the initial viable count occurred within 30 s; when cells were attached to the steel surface, the same rate of inactivation took place only after 6 min with 7 mg/liter or 4 min with 14 mg/liter of chlorine dioxide. A 5-log reduction was not obtained when organisms were adhered to polyvinyl chloride (PVC). Scanning electron microscope micrographs of contaminated surfaces revealed that the PVC was very rough with pores much larger in diameter than the cells. Time values determining a 90% reduction of the E. coli population (90% killing time) were calculated for each concentration of disinfectant tested in suspension and on the steel surface. If the same experimental conditions were strictly adopted, linear functions of the log of bacterial inactivation could be plotted (log 90% killing time versus log concentration of disinfectant). This work showed that results obtained with suspension tests could not be used to estimate disinfection of hard surfaces. PMID:9709246

  11. Chlorine adsorption on Au(111): chlorine overlayer or surface chloride?

    PubMed

    Gao, Weiwei; Baker, Thomas A; Zhou, Ling; Pinnaduwage, Dilini S; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Friend, Cynthia M

    2008-03-19

    We report the first scanning tunneling microscope (STM) investigation, combined with density functional theory calculations, to resolve controversy regarding the bonding and structure of chlorine adsorbed on Au(111). STM experiments are carried out at 120 K to overcome instability caused by mobile species upon chlorine adsorption at room temperature. Chlorine adsorption initially lifts the herringbone reconstruction. At low coverages (<0.33 ML), chlorine binds to the top of Au(111)-(1 x 1) surface and leads to formation of an overlayer with (square root(3) x square root(3))R30 degree structure at 0.33 ML. At higher coverages, packing chlorine into an overlayer structure is no longer favored. Gold atoms incorporate into a complex superlattice of a Au-Cl surface compound. PMID:18290645

  12. The use of multiple indices of physiological activity to access viability in chlorine disinfected Escherichia coli O157:H7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisle, J. T.; Pyle, B. H.; McFeters, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    A suite of fluorescent intracellular stains and probes was used, in conjunction with viable plate counts, to assess the effect of chlorine disinfection on membrane potential (rhodamine 123; Rh123 and bis-(1,3-dibutylbarbituric acid) trimethine oxonol; DiBAC4(3)), membrane integrity (LIVE/DEAD BacLight kit), respiratory activity (5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride; CTC) and substrate responsiveness (direct viable counts; DVC) in the commensal pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7. After a 5 min exposure to the disinfectant, physiological indices were affected in the following order: viable plate counts > substrate responsiveness > membrane potential > respiratory activity > membrane integrity. In situ assessment of physiological activity by examining multiple targets, as demonstrated in this study, permits a more comprehensive determination of the site and extent of injury in bacterial cells following sublethal disinfection with chlorine. This approach to assessing altered bacterial physiology has application in various fields where detection of stressed bacteria is of interest.

  13. Hierarchical chlorine-doped rutile TiO{sub 2} spherical clusters of nanorods: Large-scale synthesis and high photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Hua; Zheng Zhi; Zhang Lizhi Zhang Hailu; Deng Feng

    2008-09-15

    In this study, we report the synthesis of hierarchical chlorine-doped rutile TiO{sub 2} spherical clusters of nanorods photocatalyst on a large scale via a soft interface approach. This catalyst showed much higher photocatalytic activity than the famous commercial titania (Degussa P25) under visible light ({lambda}>420 nm). The resulting sample was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM (HRTEM), nitrogen adsorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, {sup 1}H solid magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) and photoluminescence spectroscopy. On the basis of characterization results, we found that the doping of chlorine resulted in red shift of absorption and higher surface acidity as well as crystal defects in the photocatalyst, which were the reasons for high photocatalytic activity of chlorine-doped TiO{sub 2} under visible light ({lambda}>420 nm). These hierarchical chlorine-doped rutile TiO{sub 2} spherical clusters of nanorods are very attractive in the fields of environmental pollutants removal and solar cell because of their easy separation and high activity. - Graphical abstract: Hierarchical chlorine-doped rutile TiO{sub 2} spherical clusters of nanorods photocatalyst were synthesized on a large scale via a soft interface approach. This catalyst showed much higher photocatalytic activity than the famous commercial titania (Degussa P25) under visible light ({lambda}>420 nm)

  14. Global emissions of hydrogen chloride and chloromethane from coal combustion, incineration and industrial activities: Reactive Chlorine Emissions Inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCulloch, Archie; Aucott, Michael L.; Benkovitz, Carmen M.; Graedel, Thomas E.; Kleiman, Gary; Midgley, Pauline M.; Li, Yi-Fan

    1999-04-01

    Much if not all of the chlorine present in fossil fuels is released into the atmosphere as hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chloromethane (CH3Cl, methyl chloride). The chlorine content of oil-based fuels is so low that these sources can be neglected, but coal combustion provides significant releases. On the basis of national statistics for the quantity and quality of coal burned during 1990 in power and heat generation, industrial conversion and residential and commercial heating, coupled with information on the chlorine contents of coals, a global inventory of national HCl emissions from this source has been constructed. This was combined with an estimate of the national emissions of HCl from waste combustion (both large-scale incineration and trash burning) which was based on an estimate of the global quantity released from this source expressed per head of population. Account was taken of reduced emissions where flue gases were processed, for example to remove sulphur dioxide. The HCl emitted in 1990, comprising 4.6 ± 4.3 Tg Cl from fossil fuel and 2 ± 1.9 Tg Cl from waste burning, was spatially distributed using available information on point sources such as power generation utilities and population density by default. Also associated with these combustion sources are chloromethane emissions, calculated to be 0.075 ± 0.07 Tg as Cl (equivalent) from fossil fuels and 0.032 ± 0.023 Tg Cl (equivalent) from waste combustion. These were distributed spatially exactly as the HCl emissions, and a further 0.007 Tg Cl in chloromethane from industrial process activity was distributed by point sources.

  15. Peroxone activated persulfate treatment of 1,4-dioxane in the presence of chlorinated solvent co-contaminants.

    PubMed

    Eberle, Dylan; Ball, Raymond; Boving, Thomas B

    2016-02-01

    1,4-dioxane is often found as a co-contaminant with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at solvent release sites such as landfills, solvent recycling facilities, or fire training areas. Historically, soil and groundwater samples were not routinely analyzed for 1,4-dioxane and therefore the number of known 1,4-dioxane sites is still increasing. Due to its co-occurrence with chlorinated compounds, remediation strategies are needed that simultaneously treat both 1,4-dioxane as well as chlorinated VOC co-contaminants. In this proof of concept laboratory study, the fate of 1,4-dioxane was examined during the targeted destruction of aqueous phase VOC, using a peroxone activated persulfate (PAP) chemical oxidation method. Bench-scale experiments were carried out to evaluate the treatability of 1,4-dioxane as both a single-contaminant and in the presence of trichloroethene (TCE), and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-TCA). Possible dependencies on oxidant concentration and reaction kinetics were studied. The oxidative destruction of 1,4-dioxane, TCE and 1,1,1-TCA in single-contaminant batch systems followed pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics and even at the most dilute oxidant concentration lasted for at least 13 days. The rate of oxidation for each contaminant increased linearly with increasing persulfate concentration over the range of oxidant concentrations tested. The rate of oxidative destruction, from most easily degraded to least, was: TCE > 1,4-dioxane > 1,1,1-TCA. Oxidation rates were up to 87% slower in a mixture of these three compounds. Although additional tests are necessary, our data suggest that PAP oxidation of 1,4-dioxane might aid in the cleanup of VOC contaminated sites. PMID:26408980

  16. Relative roles of different types of PSC to Antarctic ozone depletion in polar spring caused by chlorine activation and denitrification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirner, Ole; Müller, Rolf; Khosrawi, Farah; Ruhnke, Roland

    2015-04-01

    It is well known that heterogeneous reactions on the surfaces of PSC particles and denitrification of the stratosphere are the cause for Antarctic ozone depletion in polar spring, but the relative roles of different types of PSCs is an open question. We use multi-year simulations from 2005 to 2014 of the chemistry-climate model ECHAM5/MESSy Atmospheric chemistry (EMAC) to investigate the impact that various types of PSCs have on Antarctic ozone loss. One standard and three sensitivity EMAC simulations (nudged with ERA-Interim) have been performed to evaluate the contribution of liquid, NAT and ice particles to ozone depletion in Antarctic winter and spring due to chlorine activation by heterogeneous chemistry on their surfaces. In the three sensitivity simulations, we changed the heterogeneous chemistry on PSC particles by switching on and off the chemistry on liquid, NAT and ice particles. Further sensitivity simulations are performed to evaluate the contribution of NAT to Antarctic ozone depletion through denitrification of the stratosphere. With the help of these different EMAC simulations we will show the significance of liquid, NAT and ice particles to Antarctic ozone depletion caused by chlorine activation and denitrification.

  17. Reaction of chlorine nitrate with hydrogen chloride and water at Antarctic stratospheric temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolbert, Margaret A.; Rossi, Michel J.; Malhotra, Ripudaman; Golden, David M.

    1987-01-01

    Laboratory studies of heterogeneous reactions important for ozone depletion over Antarctica are reported. The reaction of chlorine nitrate (ClONO2) with H2O and HCl on surfacers that simulate polar stratospheric clouds are studied at temperatures relevant to the Antarctic stratosphere. The gaseous products of the resulting reactions, HOCl, Cl2O, and Cl2, could readily photolyze in the Antarctic spring to produce active chlorine for ozone depletion. Furthermore, the additional formation of condensed-phase HNO3 could serve as a sink for odd nitrogen species that would otherwise scavenge the active chlorine.

  18. Analytical strategy for the determination of various arsenic species in landfill leachate containing high concentrations of chlorine and organic carbon by HPLC-ICPMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, J.; An, J.; Kim, J.; Jung, H.; Kim, K.; Yoon, C.; Yoon, H.

    2012-12-01

    As a variety of wastes containing arsenic are disposed of in landfills, such facilities can play a prominent role in disseminating arsenic sources to the environment. Since it is widely recognized that arsenic toxicity is highly dependent on its species, accurate determination of various arsenic species should be considered as one of the essential goals to properly account for the potential health risk of arsenic in human and the environment. The inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry linked to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-ICPMS) is acknowledged as one of the most important tools for the trace analysis of metallic speciation because of its superior separation capability and detectability. However, the complexity of matrices can cause severe interferences in the analysis results, which is the problem often encountered with HPLC-ICPMS system. High concentration of organic carbon in a sample solution causes carbon build-up on the skimmer and sampling cone, which reduces analytical sensitivity and requires a high maintenance level for its cleaning. In addition, argon from the plasma and chlorine from the sample matrix may combine to form 40Ar35Cl, which has the same nominal mass to charge (m/z) ratio as arsenic. In this respect, analytical strategy for the determination of various arsenic species (e.g., inorganic arsenite and arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid, dimethylarsinic acid, dimethyldithioarsinic acid, and arsenobetaine) in landfill leachate containing high concentrations of chlorine and organic carbon was developed in the present study. Solid phase extraction disk (i.e., C18 disk), which does not significantly adsorb any target arsenic species, was used to remove organic carbon in sample solutions. In addition, helium (He) gas was injected into the collision reaction cell equipped in ICPMS to collapse 40Ar35Cl into individual 40Ar and 35Cl. Although He gas also decreased arsenic intensity by blocking 75As, its signal to noise ratio

  19. Transformation of organophosphorus pesticides in the presence of aqueous chlorine: kinetics, pathways, and structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Duirk, Stephen E; Desetto, Lisa M; Davis, Gary M

    2009-04-01

    The fate of organophosphorus (OP) pesticides in the presence of aqueous chlorine was investigated under simulated drinking water treatment conditions. Intrinsic rate coefficients were found for the reaction of hypochlorous acid (k(HOCl,OP)) and hypochlorite ion (k(OCl,OP) for several OP pesticides. The reaction of hypochlorous acid (HOCl) with each OP pesticide was relatively rapid near neutral pH, k(HOCl,OP) = 0.86 - 3.56 x 10(6) M(-1)h(-1). HOCI reacts at the thiophosphate (P = S) moiety of the OP pesticide resulting in the formation of the corresponding oxon (P=0), which is more toxic than the parent pesticide. Hypochlorite ion (OCl-) was found not to oxidize OP pesticides but act like a nucleophile accelerating hydrolysis, k(OCl,OP) = 37.3-15910 M(-1)h(-1). Both the k(HOCl,OP) and the k(OCl,OP) were found to correlate well with molecular descriptors within each subgroup of the OP pesticide class. A model was developed to predict the transformation of OP pesticides in the presence of aqueous chlorine. With hydrolysis rate coefficients, the transformation of OP pesticides under drinking water treatment conditions was found to be adequately predicted. The structure-activity relationships and model developed here could be used by risk assessors to determine exposure to OP pesticides and their transformation products in potable water. PMID:19452883

  20. Chlorine dioxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Chlorine dioxide ; CASRN 10049 - 04 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  1. Chlorine cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Chlorine cyanide ; CASRN 506 - 77 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  2. Determination of bromine, chlorine and iodine in environmental aqueous samples by epithermal neutron activation analysis and Compton suppression

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landsberger, S.; O'Kelly, D. J.; Braisted, J.; Panno, S.

    2006-01-01

    Halides, particularly Br- and Cl-, have been used as indicators of potential sources of Na+ and Cl- in surface water and groundwater with limited success. Contamination of groundwater and surface water by Na+ and Cl- is a common occurrence in growing urban areas and adversely affects municipal and private water supplies in Illinois and other states, as well as vegetation in environmentally sensitive areas. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) can be effectively used to determine these halogens, but often the elevated concentrations of sodium and chlorine in water samples can give rise to very high detection limits for bromine and iodine due to elevated backgrounds from the activation process. We present a detailed analytical scheme to determine Cl, Br and I in aqueous samples with widely varying Na and Cl concentrations using epithermal NAA in conjunction with Compton suppression. ?? 2006 Akade??miai Kiado??.

  3. Stabilization of a Chlorinated (#4348)C66:C2v Cage by Encapsulating Monometal Species: Coordination between Metal and Double Hexagon-Condensed Pentalenes.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiao-Zhi; Zheng, Jia-Jia; He, Ling; Nagase, Shigeru; Zhao, Xiang

    2016-08-01

    Carbon cages in endohedral and exohedral fullerene derivatives are usually different. A recent report suggested that chlorofullerene C66Cl10:Cs and endohedral metallofullerene (EMF) Sc2@C66 shared the same cage (#4348)C66:C2v, while it was denied by the definitive characterization of Sc2@C66, which actually possesses the (#4059)C66:C2v isomer. Here, we show that a (#4348)C66:C2v cage with a double hexagon-condensed pentalene (DHCP) moiety, which was captured by exohedral chlorination, is also capable of being stabilized by encapsulating tri- or divalent monometal (M) species. On the basis of density functional theory calculations combined with statistical mechanics analyses, (#4348)C66:C2v-based mono-EMFs M@C2v(4348)-C66 (M = Tb, La, Y, and Yb) were demonstrated to be the most stable and predominant isomers at the fullerene formation temperature region, while another chlorinated cage (#4169)C66:Cs, featured with triple sequentially fused pentagon (TSFP) moiety, is less favorable to be obtained in the form of EMFs, although these two cages can be interconverted by a simple Stone-Wales transformation. The superiority of M@C2v(4348)-C66 over M@Cs(4169)-C66 comes from the stronger interaction of M-DHCP over that of M-TSFP in both ionic and covalent bonding aspects. In addition, size-selective complexation of host [n]cycloparaphenylene ([n]CPP) and Tb@C2v(4348)-C66 was simulated, showing that [10]CPP exhibits the best affinity toward Tb@C66, which provides a new opportunity for isolation and characterization of C66-based mono-EMFs. PMID:27429293

  4. Factors affecting trihalomethane formation and speciation during chlorination of reclaimed water.

    PubMed

    Ma, Defang; Gao, Baoyu; Wang, Yan; Yue, Qinyan; Li, Qian

    2015-01-01

    A hybrid process with membrane bioreactor (MBR) and powdered activated carbon (PAC), PAC/MBR, was used for real municipal wastewater treatment and reuse. The roles of chlorine dose, contact time, pH and bromide in trihalomethane (THM) formation and speciation during chlorination of the reclaimed water were investigated. Total trihalomethane (TTHM) yield exponentially increased to maximum with increasing chlorine dose (correlation coefficient R2=0.98). Prolonging substrate chlorine contact time significantly promoted TTHM formation. Less than 40% of THMs formed in the first 24 h, indicating that the PAC/MBR effluent organic matters were mostly composed of slow-reacting precursors. Increasing pH and bromide concentration facilitated THM formation. Higher chlorine dose and contact time enhanced chloro-THM formation. The bromo-THM formation was favored at near neutral condition. Despite the variation of chlorine dose, contact time and pH, the yield of THM species in order was usually CHCl3>CHBrCl2>CHBr2Cl>CHBr3. However, THM speciation shifted from chlorinated species to brominated species with increasing bromide concentration. PMID:26247761

  5. Antifungal activity of five species of Polygala

    PubMed Central

    Johann, Susana; Mendes, Beatriz G.; Missau, Fabiana C.; de Resende, Maria A.; Pizzolatti, Moacir G.

    2011-01-01

    Crude extracts and fractions of five species of Polygala – P. campestris, P. cyparissias, P. paniculata, P. pulchella and P. sabulosa – were investigated for their in vitro antifungal activity against opportunistic Candida species, Cryptococcus gattii and Sporothrix schenckii with bioautographic and microdilution assays. In the bioautographic assays, the major extracts were active against the fungi tested. In the minimal concentration inhibitory (MIC) assay, the hexane extract of P. paniculata and EtOAc fraction of P. sabulosa showed the best antifungal activity, with MIC values of 60 and 30 μg/mL, respectively, against C. tropicalis, C. gattii and S. schenckii. The compounds isolated from P. sabulosa prenyloxycoumarin and 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexanehexol displayed antifungal activity against S. schenckii (with MICs of 125 μg/mL and 250 μg/mL, respectively) and C. gattii (both with MICs of 250 μg/mL). Rutin and aurapten isolated from P. paniculata showed antifungal activity against C. gattii with MIC values of 60 and 250 μg/mL, respectively. In the antifungal screening, few of the isolated compounds showed good antifungal inhibition. The compound α-spinasterol showed broad activity against the species tested, while rutin had the best activity with the lowest MIC values for the microorganisms tested. These two compounds may be chemically modified by the introduction of a substitute group that would alter several physico-chemical properties of the molecule, such as hydrophobicity, electronic density and steric strain. PMID:24031724

  6. Neutron-activation analysis using thermochromatography. I. Investigation of factors affecting processes of sample chlorination and thermochromatographic separation of chlorides of the elements

    SciTech Connect

    Sattarov, G.; Davydov, A.B.; Khatamov, S.; Kist, A.A.

    1985-07-01

    With the goal of evaluating the feasibility of gas thermochromatography in radioactive analysis, the authors consider the basic factors affecting the processes of sample chlorination, volatilization and thermochromatographic separation of chlorides for a number of elements, the determination of which is carried out by the neutron activation analysis method. They study the behavior of chlorides of /sup 124/Sb, /sup 76/As, /sup 198/Au, /sup 203/Hg as a function of the starting temperature, the chlorination period, the reagent gas delivery rate, the sorbent grain size, the magnitude of the temperature gradient, and other factors.

  7. Antibacterial activity of some Artemisia species extract.

    PubMed

    Poiată, Antonia; Tuchiluş, Cristina; Ivănescu, Bianca; Ionescu, A; Lazăr, M I

    2009-01-01

    The antimicrobial activities of ethanol, methanol and hexane extracts from Artemisia absinthium, Artemisia annua and Artemisia vulgaris were studied. Plant extracts were tested against five Gram-positive bacteria, two Gram-negative bacteria and one fungal strain. The results indicated that Artemisia annua alcoholic extracts are more effective against tested microorganisms. However, all plants extracts have moderate or no activity against Gram-negative bacteria. The obtained results confirm the justification of extracts of Artemisia species use in traditional medicine as treatment for microbial infections. PMID:20191854

  8. Chlorine Clues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This plot shows that levels of the element chlorine rise dramatically in the deeper rocks lining the walls of the crater dubbed 'Endurance.' The data shown here were taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer at Endurance and 'Eagle Crater,' the site where Opportunity first landed at Meridiani Planum.

    Opportunity has been inching down the walls of Endurance Crater, investigating distinct layers of rock as it goes for clues to Mars' buried past. The various Endurance layers have been informally labeled 'A' through 'F.' Targets within these layers are listed on the graph along with previous targets from Eagle Crater. All the rocks listed here were observed after they had been drilled by the rover's rock abrasion tool.

    The observations indicate that the elements making up the shallow rock layers of Endurance Crater resemble those of Eagle, while the deeper layers of Endurance possess increasingly higher concentrations of the element chlorine.

    Opportunity will continue to roll deeper into Endurance to see if this puzzling trend continues. Scientists hope the new data will help them figure out how the presence of chlorine fits into the history of water at Endurance Crater.

  9. In vivo neutron activation analysis of sodium and chlorine in tumor tissue after fast neutron therapy.

    PubMed

    Auberger, T; Koester, L; Knopf, K; Weissfloch, L

    1996-01-01

    In 12 patients with recurrences and metastases of different primaries (head and neck cancer, breast cancer, malignant melanoma, and osteosarcoma) who were treated with reactor fission neutrons the photon emission of irradiated tissue was measured after each radiotherapy fraction. Spectral analyses of the decay rates resulted in data for the exchange of sodium (Na) and chlorine (Cl) between the irradiated tissue and the body. About 60% of Na and Cl exchanged rapidly with a turnover half-life of 13 +/- 2 min. New defined mass exchange rates for Na and Cl amount to an average of 0.8 mval/min/kg of soft tissue. At the beginning of radiotherapy the turnover of the electrolytes in tissues with large tumor volumes was about twice that in tissues with small tumor volumes. Depending on the dose, neutron therapy led in all cases to variation in the metabolism. A maximum of Cl exchange and a minimum of Na exchange occurred after 10 Gy of neutrons (group of six previously untreated patients) or after 85 Gy (photon equivalent dose) of combined photon-neutron therapy. A significant increase in non-exchangeable fraction of Na from about 40 to 80% was observed in three tumors after a neutron dose of 10 Gy administered in five fractions correlated with a rapid reduction of tissue within 4 weeks after end of therapy. These results demonstrate for the first time the local response of the electrolyte metabolism to radiotherapy. PMID:8949749

  10. Interspecific differences in concentrations and congener profiles of chlorinated and brominated organic pollutants in three insectivorous bird species.

    PubMed

    Dauwe, Tom; Van den Steen, Evi; Jaspers, Veerle L B; Maes, Koen; Covaci, Adrian; Eens, Marcel

    2009-02-01

    We investigated the accumulation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in eggs of three insectivorous bird species, the great tit (Parus major), the Northern lapwing (Vanellus vanellus) and the Mediterranean gull (Larus melanocephalus), near the harbour of Antwerp (Belgium). Our results show that lapwing eggs had the highest median concentrations of PCBs (4358 ng/g lw) and PBDEs (109 ng/g lw). Mediterranean gulls feed during breeding on ground-dwelling invertebrates on agricultural fields, which is reflected in higher OCP concentrations in eggs (1235 ng/g lw). Apart from differences in accumulation, also interspecific differences in contaminant profiles were investigated. Significant differences among species were found in the profile of PCBs, PBDEs and OCPs. These differences could be attributed to differences in diet, behaviour and metabolic capacity. Interestingly, the OCP profile in lapwing eggs deviated extremely from the two other species. In both great tit and Mediterranean gull eggs p,p'-DDE was by far the most important compound, whereas in lapwing eggs hexachlorobenzene, oxychlordane, trans-nonachlor and even p,p'-DDT were relatively more abundant than p,p'-DDE. The high p,p'-DDT/p,p'-DDE ratio has previously been described in lapwings, which suggests that low p,p'-DDE accumulation in eggs might be inherent for this species. PMID:18947874

  11. Antimicrobial activity of controlled-release chlorine dioxide gas on fresh blueberries.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiuxiu; Bai, Jinhe; Ference, Christopher; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Yifan; Narciso, Jan; Zhou, Kequan

    2014-07-01

    The effect of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas on the safety and quality of blueberries was studied. In vitro studies revealed that both ClO2 gas fumigation and ClO2 direct contact in water killed food pathogen bacterium Escherichia coli and fruit decay pathogen fungus Colletotrichum acutatum. In vivo studies were conducted using noninoculated berries and berries inoculated with postharvest decay and foodborne pathogens. Berries were inoculated with either E. coli (5.2 log CFU/g) or C. acutatum (3.9 log CFU/g). Inoculated fruit were dried for 2 h at room temperature in a climate-controlled laboratory and packed in perforated commercial clamshells, with or without ClO2 pads, and stored at 10°C for up to 9 days. The effects of ClO2 on microbial populations and fruit firmness were monitored during storage. In the inoculation experiment, treatment with ClO2 reduced populations of E. coli and C. acutatum by 2.2 to 3.3 and 1.3 to 2.0 log CFU/g, respectively. For the noninoculated blueberries, the initial total aerobic bacteria count and the yeast and mold count were 4.2 and 4.1 log CFU/g, respectively. ClO2 treatment reduced total aerobic bacteria count and yeast and mold count by 1.5 to 1.8 and 1.3 to 1.7 log CFU/g, respectively. The firmness of both inoculated and noninoculated blueberries was maintained by ClO2 treatment. Thus, controlled-release ClO2 gas fumigation technology shows promise as an effective and practical antimicrobial agent in commercial clamshell packaging of blueberry and other fruits. PMID:24988018

  12. The influence of plant species on the plant/air partitioning coefficients of PCBs and chlorinated benzenes

    SciTech Connect

    Koemp, P.; McLachlan, M.S.

    1995-12-31

    The plant/air partitioning coefficients (K{sub PA}) of pentachlorobenzene, hexachlorobenzene and 16 PCB congeners were determined in five different grass and herb species common to Central Europe (Lolium multiflorum, Trifolium repens, Plantago lanceolata, Crepis biennis, Achillea millefolium). The measurements were conducted between 5 C and 35 C using a solid phase fugacity meter. Octanol/air partition coefficients (K{sub OA}) were also measured over a similar temperature range. In all cases an excellent linear relationship between log K{sub PA} and log K{sub OA} was observed (r{sup 2} between 0.80 and 0.99). However, while the slope of this relationship was 1 for Lolium multiflorum (ryegrass), in agreement with previous work, the slopes of the log K{sub PA} vs. log K{sub OA} plot were less than 1 for the other 4 species, lying as low as 0.49 for Achillea millefolium (yarrow). Large differences in the enthalpy of phase change (plant/air) were also observed between the different species, but these differences were not related to the differences in the partition coefficients. These observations demonstrate that the contaminant storage properties of plants are variable, and that the lipophilic compartment in some plants is considerably more polar than octanol. This places constraints on the applicability of current models of plant uptake, almost all of which assume that the lipophilic compartment behaves like octanol, and reinforces the need for more research into the contaminant storage properties of plants.

  13. Phytochemistry and biological activities of Phlomis species.

    PubMed

    Limem-Ben Amor, Ilef; Boubaker, Jihed; Ben Sgaier, Mohamed; Skandrani, Ines; Bhouri, Wissem; Neffati, Aicha; Kilani, Soumaya; Bouhlel, Ines; Ghedira, Kamel; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2009-09-01

    The genus Phlomis L. belongs to the Lamiaceae family and encompasses 100 species native to Turkey, North Africa, Europe and Asia. It is a popular herbal tea enjoyed for its taste and aroma. Phlomis species are used to treat various conditions such as diabetes, gastric ulcer, hemorrhoids, inflammation, and wounds. This review aims to summarize recent research on the phytochemistry and pharmacological properties of the genus Phlomis, with particular emphasis on its ethnobotanical uses. The essential oil of Phomis is composed of four chemotypes dominated by monoterpenes (alpha-pinene, limonene and linalool), sesquiterpenes (germacrene D and beta-caryophyllene), aliphalic compounds (9,12,15-octadecatrienoic acid methyl ester), fatty acids (hexadecanoic acid) and other components (trans-phytol, 9,12,15-octadecatrien-1-ol). Flavonoids, iridoids and phenylethyl alcohol constitute the main compounds isolated from Phlomis extracts. The pharmacological activities of some Phlomis species have been investigated. They are described according to antidiabetic, antinociceptive, antiulcerogenic, protection of the vascular system, anti-inflammatory, antiallergic, anticancer, antimicrobial and antioxidant properties. PMID:19563875

  14. Gaseous, chlorine-free chlorine dioxide for drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, G.; Rosenblatt, A.

    1996-11-01

    The benefits of applying chlorine dioxide (ClO{sub 2}) for the oxidative treatment of drinking water are well established. Chlorine dioxide treated finished water typically has substantially lower trihalomethane (THM) levels because ClO{sub 2} will not form chlorinated organic species as a by-product of disinfection. The THMs that are formed are probably due to chlorine from the generator or chlorine used to maintain a post-disinfection residual. An emerging regulatory issue concerning the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) is causing the water industry to set standards for the generation and delivery of ClO{sub 2}. The Federal Register (11 February 1994) contains language developed to limit the production of the unwanted inorganic by-products chlorite (ClO{sub 2}{sup -}), chlorate (ClO{sub 3}{sup -}), and bromate (BrO{sub 3}{sup -}) ions by requiring utilities to maintain high (95%) generation efficiencies and by limiting the amount of excess Cl{sub 2} that can be used during the generation process. The efficiency and excess Cl{sub 2} regulations may be problematic for utilities that over-chlorinate to attain chlorine dioxide high yields. Many utilities will have to decide either to reduce the amount of Cl{sub 2} used to react with sodium chlorite (NaClO{sub 2}), thereby increasing the ClO{sub 2}{sup -} residual in finished water, or over-chlorinate to increase yields and surpass the excess Cl{sub 2} limits.

  15. Antimicrobial activities of some Euphorbia species.

    PubMed

    Kirbag, Sevda; Erecevit, Pınar; Zengin, Fikriye; Guvenc, Ayşe Nilay

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the antimicrobial activities of methanolic extracts and latex of some Euphorbia species used for medical purposes in Turkey were investigated. The extracts of Euphorbia aleppica L., Euphorbia szovitsii Fisch.&Mey. var. harputensis Aznav. ex M. S. Khan, Euphorbia falcata L. sub. falcata var. falcata, Euphorbia denticulata Lam., Euphorbia macroclada Boiss., Euphorbia cheiradenia Boiss.&Hohen, Euphorbia virgata Waldst.&Kit., Euphorbia petiolata Banks&Sol. were prepared with methanol. The antimicrobial activities of these extracts were examined on test microorganisms as follows: Staphylococcus aureus COWAN 1, Bacillus megaterium DSM 32, Proteus vulgaris FMC 1, Klebsiella pneumonia FMC 5, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Pseudomonas aeruginosa DSM 50071, Candida albicans FMC 17, Candida glabrata ATCC 66032, Epidermophyton sp. and Trichophyton sp. by the disc diffusion methods and well agar method. The MIC values of extracts were determined according to the broth microdulitions method. Results indicated that extracts of Euphorbia species inhibited the growth of tested microorganisms in the different ratio. Also, the MIC values of extracts were determined as 31,2-1000 µg. PMID:24311840

  16. The brown mussel Perna perna (L., 1758) as a sentinel species for chlorinated pesticide and dioxin-like compounds.

    PubMed

    Galvao, Petrus; Henkelmann, Bernhard; Longo, Renan; Torres, João Paulo Machado; Malm, Olaf; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    2015-09-01

    To contribute to the use of the tropical brown mussel Perna perna as a sentinel species for organochlorine pesticides (OCP) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), the present study reports data on the toxicokinetics of these compounds in P. perna. Specifically, the authors present data on OCP and PCB bioaccumulation for eight sampling months from three bays (SE Brazil) and two transplant experiments (each 1 month long). Although seasonality is observed in the total lipid content of the whole soft tissue, with summer samples showing higher values, no such seasonality is observed in the OCP and PCB concentrations bioaccumulated by the mussel P. perna. Because no seasonal effect is observed in the annual OCP and PCB concentrations bioaccumulated by P. perna, the use of this species as a sentinel organism to monitor organochlorinated compounds is encouraged. One month of transplantation is not enough to allow the transplanted specimens to reach the concentrations observed in animals reared at the destination site. Nevertheless, P. perna showed a clear tendency to depurate the DDT metabolites p,p'-DDD and p,p'-DDE after 1 month of transplantation. PMID:25943516

  17. DETERMINING ACTIVE OXIDANT SPECIES REACTING WITH ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDES IN CHLORINATED DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorpyrifos (CP) is an organophosphate (OP) pesticide that was used as a model compound to investigate the transformation of OP pesticides at low pH and in the presence of bromide and natural organic matter (NOM) under drinking water treatment conditions. Raman spectroscopy was...

  18. Transformation of iopamidol during chlorination.

    PubMed

    Wendel, Friedrich M; Lütke Eversloh, Christian; Machek, Edward J; Duirk, Stephen E; Plewa, Michael J; Richardson, Susan D; Ternes, Thomas A

    2014-11-01

    The transformation of the iodinated X-ray contrast media (ICM) iopamidol, iopromide, iohexol, iomeprol, and diatrizoate was examined in purified water over the pH range from 6.5 to 8.5 in the presence of sodium hypochlorite, monochloramine, and chlorine dioxide. In the presence of aqueous chlorine, only iopamidol was transformed. All other ICM did not show significant reactivity, regardless of the oxidant used. Chlorination of iopamidol followed a second order reaction, with an observed rate constant of up to 0.87 M(-1) s(-1) (±0.021 M(-1) s(-1)) at pH 8.5. The hypochlorite anion was identified to be the reactive chlorine species. Iodine was released during the transformation of iopamidol, and was mainly oxidized to iodate. Only a small percentage (less than 2% after 24 h) was transformed to known organic iodinated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) of low molecular weight. Some of the iodine was still present in high-molecular weight DBPs. The chemical structures of these DBPs were elucidated via MSn fragmentation and NMR. Side chain cleavage was observed as well as the exchange of iodine by chlorine. An overall transformation pathway was proposed for the degradation of iopamidol. CHO cell chronic cytotoxicity tests indicate that chlorination of iopamidol generates a toxic mixture of high molecular weight DBPs (LC50 332 ng/μL). PMID:25325766

  19. Observations of interstellar chlorine and phosphorus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.; York, D. G.

    1978-01-01

    Copernicus observations of interstellar Cl I, Cl II, and P II UV lines toward 10 stars are reported. Column densities are estimated for each species, and upper limits are computed for HCl column densities. Derivation of the gas-phase abundances of chlorine and phosphorus indicates that the averages of both the chlorine and the phosphorus logarithmic abundances relative to hydrogen are between 5.0 and 5.1. It is suggested that interstellar chlorine may be depleted by about a factor of 3 relative to the solar abundance and that interstellar phosphorus is depleted by a factor of 2 to 3. The results are shown to support the prediction that chlorine is ionized in regions containing primarily atomic oxygen and is neutral in regions where there is a significant amount of molecular hydrogen. The photoionization rate of neutral chlorine toward 15 Mon is estimated, and it is concluded that most chlorine is contained within the gas phase.

  20. Chlorination of tramadol: Reaction kinetics, mechanism and genotoxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hanyang; Song, Dean; Chang, Yangyang; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-12-01

    Tramadol (TRA) is one of the most detected analgesics in environmental matrices, and it is of high significance to study the reactivity of TRA during chlorination considering its potential toxicity to the environment. The chlorine/TRA reaction is first order with respect to the TRA concentration, and a combination of first-order and second-order with respect to chlorine concentration. The pH dependence of the observed rate constants (kobs) showed that the TRA oxidation reactivity increased with increasing pH. kobs can be quantitatively described by considering all active species including Cl2, Cl2O and HOCl, and the individual rate constants of HOCl/TRA(0), HOCl/TRAH(+), Cl2/TRA and Cl2O/TRA reactions were calculated to be (2.61±0.29)×10(3)M(-1)s(-1), 14.73±4.17M(-1)s(-1), (3.93±0.34)×10(5)M(-1)s(-1) and (5.66±1.83)×10(6)M(-1)s(-1), respectively. Eleven degradation products were detected with UPLC-Q-TOF-MS, and the corresponding structures of eight products found under various pH conditions were proposed. The amine group was proposed to be the initial attack site under alkaline pH conditions, where reaction of the deprotonated amine group with HOCl is favorable. Under acidic and neutral pH conditions, however, two possible reaction pathways were proposed. One is an electrophilic substitution on the aromatic ring, and another is an electrophilic substitution on the nitrogen, leading to an N-chlorinated intermediate, which can be further oxidized. Finally, the SOS/umu test showed that the genotoxicity of TRA chlorination products increased with increasing dosage of chlorine, which was mostly attributed to the formation of some chlorine substitution products. PMID:26291914

  1. Activated Persulfate Treatment of 1,4-Dioxane in the Presence of Chlorinated Solvent Co-contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boving, T. T.; Eberle, D. E. H.; Ball, R.

    2014-12-01

    1,4-dioxane is an emerging groundwater contaminant and a likely human carcinogen. Due to its history as a stabilizer in chlorinated solvents, 1,4-dioxane is often found as a co-contaminant at solvent releases sites such as landfills, solvent recycling facilities, vapor decreasing operations, and fire-training areas. Historically, 1,4-dioxane was not routinely analyzed for at solvent release sites. The lack of analyses and the limitations of the analyses that were performed (i.e. high reporting limits) means that the scale of 1,4-dioxane subsurface contamination is still emerging. With the number of known 1,4-dioxane sites increasing, the need for cost effective 1,4-dioxane remediation technologies is rising as well. Remediation strategies that are capable of treating both 1,4-dioxane as well as chlorinated co-contaminants are of particular importance, especially when treating mixed-waste source zones. In the present study, we examined the fate of 1,4-dioxane during the targeted remediation of aqueous phase volatile organic compounds (VOC) using an activated persulfate based ISCO method (OxyZone®). Bench scale laboratory experiments are used to evaluate the treatability of 1,4-dioxane both as a single compound and in the presence of trichloroethene (TCE) and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-TCA). Possible dependencies on oxidant concentration and reaction kinetics were studied. Preliminary results are promising and show that OxyZone® is persistent and long lived, with oxidation of 1,4-dioxane continuing more than 12 days after initial dosage, even at dilute oxidant concentrations. The oxidative destruction of 1,4-dioxane, TCE and 1,1,1-TCA in single compound batch systems followed pseudo first order reaction kinetics. The rate of oxidation for each contaminant increased linearly with increasing persulfate concentration over the range of oxidant concentrations tested. The rate of oxidative destruction, from most easily degraded to least was: TCE > 1,4-Dioxane > 1

  2. Highly efficient active optical interconnect incorporating a partially chlorinated ribbon POF in conjunction with a visible VCSEL.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hak-Soon; Lee, Sang-Shin; Kim, Bong-Seok; Son, Yung-Sung

    2014-05-19

    A low-loss 4-ch active optical interconnect (AOI) enabling passive alignment was proposed and built resorting to a transmitter (Tx) incorporating a red 680-nm VCSEL, which is linked to a receiver (Rx) module via a partially chlorinated ribbon POF. The POF was observed to exhibit an extremely low loss of ~0.24 dB/m at λ = 680 nm, in comparison to ~1.29 dB/m at λ = 850 nm, and a large numerical aperture of ~0.42. Both the Tx and Rx, which taps into a beam router based on collimated beam optics involving a pair of spherical lenses, were meant to be substantially alignment tolerant and compact. The achieved tolerance for the constructed modules was beyond 40 μm in terms of the positioning of VCSEL and photodetector. The proposed AOI was completed by linking the Tx with the Rx via a 3-m long ribbon POF, incurring a transmission loss of as small as 3.2 dB. The AOI was practically assessed in terms of a high-speed data transmission over a wide range of temperatures and then exploited to convey full HD video signals. PMID:24921299

  3. In Vitro Transformation of Chlorinated Parabens by the Liver S9 Fraction: Kinetics, Metabolite Identification, and Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Agonist Activity.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, Masanori; Wada, Takeshi; Nagashima, Satoshi; Makino, Masakazu; Yasukawa, Hiro

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the kinetics of in vitro transformation of a dichlorinated propyl paraben (2-propyl 3,5-dichloro-4-hydroxybenzoate; Cl2PP) by the rat liver S9 fraction and assessed the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonist activity of the metabolite products identified in HPLC and GC/MS analysis and by metabolite syntheses. The results indicated that the chlorination of Cl2PP reduced its degradation rate by approximately 40-fold. Two hydroxylated metabolite products showed AhR agonist activity of up to 39% of that of the parent Cl2PP when assessed in a yeast (YCM3) reporter gene assay. The determination of the metabolic properties of paraben bioaccumulation presented here provides further information on the value of risk assessments of chlorinated parabens as a means to ensure human health and environmental safety. PMID:27250800

  4. Transformation of humic acid and halogenated byproduct formation in UV-chlorine processes.

    PubMed

    Li, Tong; Jiang, Yan; An, Xiaoqiang; Liu, Huijuan; Hu, Chun; Qu, Jiuhui

    2016-10-01

    The synergistic effect of ultraviolet light (UV) and chlorine on the structural transformation of Humic Acid (HA) and formation of chloro-disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in water were investigated, with chlorination as a reference. The transformation and mineralization of HA were enhanced upon co-exposure to UV and chlorine. Electron spin resonance (ESR) studies revealed that hydroxyl radical (OH) and chlorine radical (Cl) were predominant active species in a pH range from 4 to 7, while Cl dominated at pH 2 and pH higher than 7. The impact of different radicals on the transformation of HA was investigated by UV254, fluorescence and TOC measurements. OH were found to be responsible for the removal of chromophoric groups and mineralization of HA, while Cl mainly reacted with HA and intermediates from HA degradation. Due to the competitive and synergistic reaction of OH and Cl with HA, higher removal of HA and lower formation of chloro-DBPs appeared in UV-chlorine than chlorination, thus the combined UV-chlorine processes should be a promising method for water purification. PMID:27393967

  5. Mutagenic activity of halogenated propanes and propenes: effect of bromine and chlorine positioning.

    PubMed

    Låg, M; Omichinski, J G; Dybing, E; Nelson, S D; Søderlund, E J

    1994-10-01

    A series of halogenated propanes and propenes were studied for mutagenic effects in Salmonella typhimurium TA100 in the absence or presence of NADPH plus liver microsomes from phenobarbital-induced rats as an exogenous metabolism system. The cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of the halogenated propane 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP) has previously been studied in our laboratories. These studies showed that metabolic activation of DBCP was required to exert its detrimental effects. All of the trihalogenated propane analogues were mutagenic when the microsomal activation system was included. The highest mutagenic activity was obtained with 1,2,3-tribromopropane, with approximately 50-fold higher activity than the least mutagenic trihalogenated propane, 1,2,3-trichloropropane. The order of mutagenicity was as follows: 1,2,3-tribromopropane > or = 1,2-dibromo- 3-chloropropane > 1,3-dibromo-2-chloropropane > or = 1,3-dichloro-2-bromopropane > 1-bromo-2,3-dichloropropane > 1,2,3-trichloropropane. Compared to DBCP, the dihalogenated propanes were substantially less mutagenic. Only 1,2-dibromopropane was mutagenic and its mutagenic potential was approximately 1/30 of that of DBCP. In contrast to DBCP, 1,2-dibromopropane showed similar mutagenic activity with and without the addition of an activation system. The halogenated propenes 2,3-dibromopropene and 2-bromo-3-chloropropene were mutagenic to the bacteria both in the absence and presence of the activation system, whereas 2,3-dichloropropene did not show any mutagenic effect. The large differences in mutagenic potential between the various halogenated propanes and propenes are proposed to be due to the formation of different possible proximate and ultimate mutagenic metabolites resulting from the microsomal metabolism of the various halogenated propanes and propenes, and to differences in the rate of formation of the metabolites. Pathways are proposed for the formation of genotoxic metabolites of di- and trihalogenated

  6. The Economics of Saving Endangered Species: A Teaching Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schug, Mark C.; Shaw, Jane S.

    1997-01-01

    Argues that well-intentioned government policies, such as the Endangered Species Act, can actually cause harm to endangered species by creating disincentives to preserving the habitat for endangered species. Maintains that the use of incentives can lead to voluntary species protection. Includes instructions for an in-class teaching activity. (MJP)

  7. Salinity and lithology determination from the sodium and chlorine activation lines

    SciTech Connect

    Schweitzer, J.S.; Tapphorn, R.M.

    1983-09-13

    In the illustrative embodiments of the invention disclosed, the lithology and salinity of an earth formation traversed by a well bore are investigated by irradiating the formation with a neutron source and generating an energy spectrum of the activation gamma rays resulting therefrom. From the spectrum thus obtained, the level of the activation gamma radiation emitted by /sup 24/Na and that emitted by /sup 38/Cl are determined. The two intensity measurements are then combined, e.g., by forming a cross-plot or ratio thereof, to provide an indication of the lithology and salinity of the earth formation.

  8. What role do type I polar stratospheric cloud and aerosol parameterizations play in modelled lower stratospheric chlorine activation and ozone loss?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sessler, J.; Good, P.; MacKenzie, A. R.; Pyle, J. A.

    1996-12-01

    The chlorine activation and subsequent ozone loss of the northern winter lower stratosphere have been modelled using different schemes for type I polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) and sulphate aerosols. Type I PSCs were assumed to consist of either nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) at equilibrium, supercooled ternary solutions (STS) at equilibrium, or to follow a hysteresis cycle between frozen and liquid particles depending on the temperature history. The sulphate aerosol was assumed to be present as either liquid binary H2SO4/H2O aerosol (LBA) or as solid sulphuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT). Our box model integrations show that NAT and STS, representing the upper and lower limits of lower stratospheric chlorine activation, respectively, appear to destroy ozone equally efficiently after a cold PSC event (Tmin ≤ 190K at 50 mbar). For higher minimum temperatures, up to the equilibrium NAT point, there is significantly more ozone loss in the NAT scheme than in the STS scheme. On NAT, chlorine is activated directly by ClONO2 + HCl → 2Cl + HNO3, whereas on STS, indirect activation by ClONO2 + H2O → HOCl + HNO3 followed by HOCl + HCl → 2Cl + H2O, dominates. During the processing period, the indirect activation on STS will produce a temporary peak in HOCl. Box model integrations also show that direct chlorine activation is faster on SAT than on LBA, yielding significantly more ozone loss in air parcels which remain below the SAT melting point (215-220 K). Our single-layer chemical transport model simulations (θ = 465K) of the lower stratospheric chlorine activation during Arctic winter 1994/1995 show that chlorine is activated more quickly on NAT than on STS. However, in mid December 1994, when temperatures are low enough for substantial STS particle growth, maximum active chlorine becomes similar in both schemes and remains similar until the end of January 1995. A model integration which includes SAT produces up to 200 parts per trillion by volume more ClOx, inside

  9. Geomembranes containing powdered activated carbon have the potential to improve containment of chlorinated aromatic contaminants.

    PubMed

    Surdo, Erin M; Cussler, Edward L; Novak, Paige J; Arnold, William A

    2009-12-01

    Breakthrough across high-density polyethylene (HDPE) was measured for 2,3',4',5-tetrachlorobiphenyl and a higher-solubility surrogate, 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene. Addition of powdered activated carbon (0.14 g carbon/cm(3) membrane) reduced pseudo-steady-state flux through thin HDPE membranes by approximately 60%. Breakthrough curves for activated carbon-containing membranes were best described by a model in which sorption to the carbon was limited by the rate of diffusion from the bulk membrane to the carbon particle surfaces. Field-scale estimates based on this model show a substantial (over 10 orders of magnitude) reduction in flux for the activated carbon-containing HDPE compared with pure HDPE. The flux of 2,3',4',5-tetrachlorobiphenyl through a composite membrane with thin layers of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) with 0.05 g carbon/cm(3) and pure HDPE was 69% lower than expected for a similar layered membrane without the sorptive scavenger. This flux reduction was achieved with less than a third of the carbon used in the HDPE case, an improvement that is likely the result of better solute uptake in the hydrophilic PVA layer. PMID:19943666

  10. Surface-catalyzed chlorine and nitrogen activation: mechanisms for the heterogeneous formation of ClNO, NO, NO2, HONO, and N2O from HNO3 and HCl on aluminum oxide particle surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rubasinghege, Gayan; Grassian, Vicki H

    2012-05-31

    It is well-known that chlorine active species (e.g., Cl(2), ClONO(2), ClONO) can form from heterogeneous reactions between nitrogen oxides and hydrogen chloride on aerosol particle surfaces in the stratosphere. However, less is known about these reactions in the troposphere. In this study, a potential new heterogeneous pathway involving reaction of gaseous HCl and HNO(3) on aluminum oxide particle surfaces, a proxy for mineral dust in the troposphere, is proposed. We combine transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to investigate changes in the composition of both gas-phase and surface-bound species during the reaction under different environmental conditions of relative humidity and simulated solar radiation. Exposure of surface nitrate-coated aluminum oxide particles, from prereaction with nitric acid, to gaseous HCl yields several gas-phase products, including ClNO, NO(2), and HNO(3), under dry (RH < 1%) conditions. Under humid more conditions (RH > 20%), NO and N(2)O are the only gas products observed. The experimental data suggest that, in the presence of adsorbed water, ClNO is hydrolyzed on the particle surface to yield NO and NO(2), potentially via a HONO intermediate. NO(2) undergoes further hydrolysis via a surface-mediated process, resulting in N(2)O as an additional nitrogen-containing product. In the presence of broad-band irradiation (λ > 300 nm) gas-phase products can undergo photochemistry, e.g., ClNO photodissociates to NO and chlorine atoms. The gas-phase product distribution also depends on particle mineralogy (Al(2)O(3) vs CaCO(3)) and the presence of other coadsorbed gases (e.g., NH(3)). These newly identified reaction pathways discussed here involve continuous production of active ozone-depleting chlorine and nitrogen species from stable sinks such as gas-phase HCl and HNO(3) as a result of heterogeneous surface reactions. Given that aluminosilicates represent a major fraction of mineral dust

  11. 2,4,6-Trichlorophenol mediated increases in extracellular peroxidase activity in three species of Lemnaceae.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Dilip K; Scannell, Gillian; Akhmetov, Nurlan; Fitzpatrick, Dara; Jansen, Marcel A K

    2010-11-01

    Chlorinated phenols, or chlorophenols, are persistent priority pollutants that are widespread in the environment. Class III peroxidases are well-characterised plant enzymes that can catalyse the oxidative dechlorination of chlorophenols. Expression of these enzymes by plants is commonly associated with plant stress, therefore limiting scope for phytoremediation. In this study, we have quantitatively compared peroxidase activity and phytotoxicity as a function of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP) concentration in three species of Lemnaceae; Lemna minor, Lemna gibba and Landoltia punctata. Effects of TCP on the growth rates of the three species differed considerably with L. punctata being the most tolerant species. TCP also affected photosynthetic parameters, causing a decrease in open photosystem II reaction centres (qP) and, in L. punctata only, a decrease in non-photochemical quenching (qN). In parallel, TCP exposure resulted in increased peroxidase activity in all three species. Peroxidase activity in L. minor and L. gibba displayed an inverse relationship with biomass accumulation, i.e. the more growth reduction the more peroxidase activity. In contrast, induction of peroxidase activity in L. punctata was bi-phasic, with a TCP-induced activity peak at concentrations that had no major effect on growth, and further induction under phytotoxic concentrations. The mechanism by which L. punctata recognises and responds to low concentrations of an anthropogenic compound, in the absence of wide-ranging stress, remains enigmatic. However, we conclude that this "window" of peroxidase production in the absence of major growth inhibition offers potential for the development of sustainable, peroxidise-mediated phytoremediation systems. PMID:20810175

  12. Oxidative DNA adducts after Cu(2+)-mediated activation of dihydroxy PCBs: role of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Wendy A; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Robertson, Larry W; Gupta, Ramesh C

    2009-05-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are toxic industrial chemicals, complete carcinogens, and efficacious tumor promoters. However, the mechanism(s) of PCB-mediated carcinogenicity remains largely undefined. One likely pathway by which these agents may play a role in carcinogenesis is the generation of oxidative DNA damage by redox cycling of dihydroxylated PCB metabolites. We have now employed a new (32)P-postlabeling system to examine novel oxidative DNA lesions induced by Cu(2+)-mediated activation of PCB metabolites. (32)P postlabeling of DNA incubated with various PCB metabolites resulted in over a dozen novel polar oxidative DNA adducts that were chromatographically similar for all active agents. The most potent metabolites tested were the hydroquinones (hydroxyl groups arranged para to each other), yielding polar oxidative adduct levels ranging from 55 to 142 adducts/10(6) nucleotides. PCB catechols, or ortho-dihydroxy metabolites, were up to 40% less active than their corresponding hydroquinone congeners, whereas monohydroxylated and quinone metabolites did not produce detectable oxidative damage over that of vehicle. With the exception of 2,4,5-Cl-2',5'-dihydroxybiphenyl, this oxidative DNA damage seemed to be inversely related to chlorine content: no chlorine approximately mono->di->trichlorinated metabolites. Importantly, copper, but not iron, was essential for activation of the PCB metabolites to these polar oxidative DNA adducts, because in its absence or in the presence of the Cu(+)-specific scavenger bathocuproine, no adducts were detected. Intervention studies with known reactive oxygen species (ROS) modifiers suggested that H(2)O(2), singlet oxygen, hydroxyl radical, and superoxide may also be involved in this PCB-mediated oxidative DNA damage. These data indicate a mechanistic role for several ROS, in addition to copper, in PCB-induced DNA damage and provide further support for oxidative DNA damage in PCB-mediated carcinogenesis. PMID:19233261

  13. OClO and BrO observations in the volcanic plume of Mt. Etna - implications on the chemistry of chlorine and bromine species in volcanic plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gliß, J.; Bobrowski, N.; Vogel, L.; Platt, U.

    2014-10-01

    Spatial and temporal profiles of chlorine dioxide (OClO), bromine monoxide (BrO) and sulphur dioxide (SO2) were measured in the plume of Mt. Etna, Italy, in September 2012 using Multi-Axis-Differential-Optical-Absorption-Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS). OClO (BrO) was detected in 119 (452) individual measurements covering plume ages up to 6 (23) minutes. The retrieved slant column densities (SCDs) reached values up to 2.0 × 1014 molecules cm-2 (OClO) and 1.1 × 1015 molecules cm-2 (BrO). In addition, the spectra were analysed for signatures of IO, OIO and OBrO, none of these species could be detected. The corresponding detection limits for IO / SO2, OIO / SO2 and OBrO / SO2 were 1.8 × 10-6, 2.0 × 10-5 and 1.1 × 10-5 respectively. The measurements were performed at plume ages (τ) from zero to 23 min downwind the emission source. The chemical variability of BrO and OClO in the plume was studied analysing the OClO / SO2 and BrO / SO2-ratio. A marked increase of both ratios was observed in the young plume (τ < 3 min) and a levelling off at larger plume ages (τ > 3 min) with mean abundances of 3.17 × 10-5 (OClO / SO2), 1.55 × 10-4 (BrO / SO2) and 0.16 (OClO / BrO). Furthermore, enhanced BrO/SO2-ratios were found at the plume edges (by ~30-37%) and a strong indication of enhanced OClO / SO2-ratios as well (~10-250%). A measurement performed in the early morning (05:20-06:20 UTC, sunrise: 04:40 UTC) showed an BrO / SO2-ratio increasing with time until 05:35 UTC and a constant ratio afterwards. Observing this increase was only possible due to a correction for stratospheric BrO signals in the plume spectra. The corresponding OClO / SO2-ratio showed a similar trend stabilising around 06:13 UTC, approximately 40 min later than BrO. This is another strong indication for the photochemical nature of the reactions involved in the formation of oxidised halogens in volcanic plumes. In particular, these findings support the current understanding of the underlying chemistry, namely

  14. OClO and BrO observations in the volcanic plume of Mt. Etna - implications on the chemistry of chlorine and bromine species in volcanic plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gliss, J.; Bobrowski, N.; Vogel, L.; Pohler, D.; Platt, U.

    2015-05-01

    OClO formation in the young plume, were used to infer the prevailing Cl-atom concentrations in the plume. Relatively small values ranging from [Cl] = 2.5 × 106 cm-3 (assuming 80 ppb background O3) to [Cl] = 2.0 × 108 cm-3 (at 1 ppb O3) were calculated at plume ages of about 2 min. Based on these Cl abundances, a potential - chlorine-induced - depletion of tropospheric methane (CH4) in the plume was investigated. CH4 lifetimes between 14 h (at 1 ppb O3) and 47 days (at 80 ppb O3) were derived. While these lifetimes are considerably shorter than the atmospheric lifetime of CH4, the impact of gaseous chlorine on the CH4 budget in the plume environment should nevertheless be relatively small due to plume dispersion (decreasing Cl concentrations) and ongoing mixing of the plume with the surrounding atmosphere (replenishing O3 and CH4). In addition, all spectra were analysed for signatures of IO, OIO and BrO. None of these species could be detected. Upper limits for IO/SO2, OIO/SO2 and OBrO/SO2 are 1.8 × 10-6, 2.0 × 10-5 and 1.1 × 10-5 respectively.

  15. Transformation of Organophosphorus Pesticides in the Presence of Aqueous Chlorine: Kinetics, Pathways, and Structure-Activity Relationships

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fate of organophosphorus (OP) pesticides in the presence of aqueous chlorine was investigated under simulated drinking water treatment conditions. Intrinsic rate coefficients were found for the reaction of hypochlorous acid (kHOCl,OP) and hypochlorite ion (kOCl,OP) for eight...

  16. Influence of sorption to dissolved humic substances on transformation reactions of hydrophobic organic compounds in water. I. Chlorination of PAHs.

    PubMed

    Georgi, Anett; Reichl, Annett; Trommler, Ulf; Kopinke, Frank-Dieter

    2007-10-15

    The effect of sorption to dissolved humic acids (HAs) on the chlorination of PAHs in aqueous solution was studied. The addition of HA accelerated the chlorination of fluoranthene and naphthalene in hypochlorite solutions at pH 5, the stronger effect being observed for fluoranthene that is sorbed to a higher extent than naphthalene. Sorption coefficients (K(DOC)) of the analytes were determined by solid-phase microextraction (SPME). The observed rate constant for fluoranthene chlorination is, for example, larger by a factor of 5 in the presence of 10 mg L(-1) of an aquatic HA as compared to HA-free solution (k' = 0.02 h(-1) at 60 mg L(-1) active chlorine, pH 5, without HA). While Cl2 is the dominant reactive species in pure aqueous solution for both PAHs, the reaction of fluoranthene seems to involve an additional pathway of chlorination by HOCl in the presence of HA. It was found that not only did HA not protect PAHs from the electrophilic attack of the chlorinating species, but the sorption of PAHs on the hydrophobic domains of the HA favored instead the extent of the chlorination reaction. PMID:17993140

  17. Antifungal activity of heartwood extracts from three Juniperus species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heartwood samples from three species of Juniperus (i.e., J. virginianna, J. occidentalis, and J. ashei) were extracted with hexane, ethanol and methanol and the hexane and ethanol extracts were tested for antifungal activity against four species of wood-rot fungi. These three species represent the ...

  18. The Chlorination Quandary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josephson, Julian

    1978-01-01

    Current use of chlorination technology to disinfect water supplies can cause the production of undesirable products, among them chloroform and chlorobenzene. Alternatives to this methodology include the use of ozone, chlorine dioxide, and bromine chloride in place of chlorine. Presently, the methods are feasible in developed countries only. (MA)

  19. REVIEW OF CHLORINATED PHENOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chlorinated phenols are a group of 19 isomers composed of phenol with substituted chlorines. These chemicals are readily soluble in organic solvents but only slightly soluble in water, except for the chlorophenate salts. Chlorophenols with less than 3 chlorines are not used e...

  20. Decay kinetics of free chlorine in fresh produce wash system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorinated water wash is a critical step employed in the production of fresh-cut produce. The efficacy of chlorinated water was affected largely by the concentration of active chlorine ingredients, which degrades due to the presence of microorganisms, as well as inorganic and organic matters. It is...

  1. Effects of chlorine on freshwater fish under various time and chemical conditions: toxicity of chlorine to freshwater fish. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, A.S.; Bartos, J.M.; Danos, P.T.

    1982-07-01

    Laboratory bioassays to determine the acute toxicity of monochloramine, dichloramine, hypochlorous acid, and hypochlorite ion to emerald shiners, channel catfish, and rainbow trout were conducted. Four exposure regimes typical of chlorination schedules at operating steam electric power plants were used. Fish were exposed to single 15-minute, 30-minute, 120-minute, and quadruple 30-minute periods. No mortality or LC50 values were determined for each species of fish and chemical species of chlorine. Hypochlorous acid was the most toxic form of chlorine studied, followed closely by dichloramine. Monochloramine and hypochlorite ion were three to four times less toxic than hypochlorous acid and dichloramine. On the average, emerald shiners were 1.8 times more sensitive to chlorine than channel catfish and 3.3 times more sensitive than rainbow trout to the four forms of chlorine. The fish were more tolerant of chlorine during short duration exposures and most sensitive during the continuous 120-minute exposures. The significant differences in toxicity noted among the various chlorine species suggest that careful attention should be paid not only to total residual chlorine but to both the chlorine and fish species present and the duration of exposure expected in establishing chlorination regimes.

  2. Oxidative DNA Adducts Following Cu2+-Mediated Activation of Dihydroxy PCBs: Role of Reactive Oxygen Species1

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Wendy A.; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Robertson, Larry W.; Gupta, Ramesh C.

    2009-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are toxic industrial chemicals, complete carcinogens and efficacious tumor promoters. However, the mechanism(s) of PCB-mediated carcinogenicity remains largely undefined. One likely pathway by which these agents may play a role in carcinogenesis is the generation of oxidative DNA damage by redox cycling of dihydroxylated PCB metabolites. We have now employed a new 32P-postlabeling system to examine novel oxidative DNA lesions induced by Cu2+-mediated activation of PCB metabolites. 32P-Postlabeling of DNA incubated with various PCB metabolites resulted in over a dozen novel polar oxidative DNA adducts that were chromatographically similar for all active agents. The most potent metabolites tested were the hydroquinones (hydroxyl groups arranged para to each other) yielding polar oxidative adduct levels ranging from 55 to 142 adducts/106 nucleotides. PCB catechols, or ortho-dihydroxy metabolites, were up to 40% less active than their corresponding hydroquinone congeners while mono hydroxylated and quinone metabolites did not produce detectable oxidative damage over that of vehicle. With the exception of 2,4,5-Cl-2′,5′-dihydroxybiphenyl, this oxidative DNA damage appeared to be inversely related to chlorine content: no chlorine ≈ mono- > di- > tri-chlorinated metabolites. Importantly, copper, but not iron, was essential for activation of the PCB metabolites to these polar oxidative DNA adducts since in its absence or in the presence of the Cu+-specific scavenger, bathocuproine, no adducts were detected. Intervention studies with known reactive oxygen species (ROS) modifiers suggested that H2O2, singlet oxygen, hydroxyl radical and superoxide may also be involved in this PCB-mediated oxidative DNA damage. These data indicate a mechanistic role of several ROS, in addition to copper, in PCB-induced DNA damage and provide further support for oxidative DNA damage in PCB-mediated carcinogenesis. PMID:19233261

  3. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Varnell, Jason A.; Tse, Edmund C. M.; Schulz, Charles E.; Fister, Tim T.; Haasch, Richard T.; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Gewirth, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites. PMID:27538720

  4. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts.

    PubMed

    Varnell, Jason A; Tse, Edmund C M; Schulz, Charles E; Fister, Tim T; Haasch, Richard T; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Gewirth, Andrew A

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites. PMID:27538720

  5. Microbial based chlorinated ethene destruction

    DOEpatents

    Bagwell, Christopher E.; Freedman, David L.; Brigmon, Robin L.; Bratt, William B.; Wood, Elizabeth A.

    2009-11-10

    A mixed culture of Dehalococcoides species is provided that has an ability to catalyze the complete dechlorination of polychlorinated ethenes such as PCE, TCE, cDCE, 1,1-DCE and vinyl chloride as well as halogenated ethanes such as 1,2-DCA and EDB. The mixed culture demonstrates the ability to achieve dechlorination even in the presence of high source concentrations of chlorinated ethenes.

  6. Chlorine poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... released when mixing bleach with some of the powdered cleansing products and ammonia (chloramine gas) Gas released ... treated as appropriate. The person may receive: Activated charcoal Breathing support, including a tube through the mouth ...

  7. Ixodes ticks: serum species sensitivity of anticomplement activity.

    PubMed

    Lawrie, C H; Randolph, S E; Nuttall, P A

    1999-12-01

    Ixodid ticks feed for extended periods of up to 2 weeks or more. To complete engorgement, they must overcome their host's innate immune mechanisms of which the complement system is a major component. Using in vitro assays, salivary gland extracts of the ixodid ticks, Ixodes ricinus, I. hexagonus, and I. uriae, were shown to inhibit activity of the alternative pathway of complement. The ability of the different Ixodes species to inhibit complement activity varied with the animal species used as a complement serum source. Serum species sensitivity correlates to the reported host range of the tick species tested. PMID:10600446

  8. STABLE ISOTOPIC INVESTIGATIONS OF IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF CHLORINATED ORGANIC SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We propose to develop innovative methods for investigating the mechanism and extent of in situ bioremediation of chlorinated organic solvents. These methods will use precise isotopic ratio measurements of chlorine and carbon in reactant and product species in laboratory experimen...

  9. Electrochemically active species and multielectron processes in ionic melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapoval, Viktor I.; Solov'ev, Veniamin V.; Malyshev, Viktor V.

    2001-02-01

    The model concepts for the mechanisms of formation of electrochemically active species and multielectron processes in ionic nitrate-, carbonate-, boron- and titanium-containing fluoride melts are generalised. The fundamental importance of the acid-base properties of a melt in the mechanism of formation of electrochemically active species is shown for nitrate- and carbonate-containing melts. This fact is confirmed by electrochemical measurements and by calculations of force constants for oxyanions. The optimum form of electrochemically active species has been established; their reduction abilities depend on the cationic composition of a melt, the adsorption properties of the electrode surface and the electric field strength. The bibliography includes 218 references.

  10. Cytochrome P4501A induction by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and two chlorinated dibenzofurans in primary hepatocyte cultures of three avian species.

    PubMed

    Hervé, Jessica C; Crump, Doug; Jones, Stephanie P; Mundy, Lukas J; Giesy, John P; Zwiernik, Matthew J; Bursian, Steven J; Jones, Paul D; Wiseman, Steve B; Wan, Yi; Kennedy, Sean W

    2010-02-01

    Relative potencies of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran (PeCDF), and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran (TCDF) were determined in vitro in primary hepatocyte cultures of chicken (Gallus gallus), ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus), and Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) embryos. Concentration-dependent effects on ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity and expression of cytochrome P4501A4 and cytochrome P4501A5 (CYP1A4 and CYP1A5) messenger RNA (mRNA) were determined in hepatocytes exposed to serial dilutions of TCDD, PeCDF, or TCDF for 24 h. In chicken hepatocytes, the three compounds were equipotent inducers of EROD activity and CYP1A4/CYP1A5 mRNA expression. However, in ring-necked pheasant and Japanese quail hepatocytes, PeCDF was more potent than TCDD (3- to 5-fold in ring-necked pheasant and 13- to 30-fold in Japanese quail). Among species, the rank order of sensitivity (most to least) to EROD and CYP1A4/CYP1A5 mRNA induction for TCDD and TCDF was chicken > ring-necked pheasant > Japanese quail. In contrast, the three species were approximately equisensitive to EROD and CYP1A4/CYP1A5 mRNA induction by PeCDF. It has generally been assumed that TCDD is the most potent "dioxin-like compound" (DLC) and that the chicken is the most sensitive avian species to CYP1A induction by all DLCs. This study indicates that PeCDF is more potent than TCDD in ring-necked pheasant and Japanese quail hepatocytes and that ring-necked pheasant, Japanese quail, and chicken hepatocytes are equally sensitive to CYP1A induction by PeCDF. PMID:19884122

  11. Estimating The Thermodynamics And Kinetics Of Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Bylaska, Eric J.

    2006-08-01

    Many different degradation reactions of chlorinated hydrocarbons are possible in natural ground waters. In order to identify which degradation reactions are important, a large number of possible reaction pathways must be sorted out. Recent advances in ab initio electronic structure methods have the potential to help identify relevant environmental degradation reactions by characterizing the thermodynamic properties of all relevant contaminant species and intermediates for which experimental data is usually not available, as well as provide activation energies for relevant pathways. In this paper, strategies based on ab initio electronic structure methods for estimating thermochemical and kinetic properties of reactions with chlorinated hydrocarbons are presented. Particular emphasis is placed on strategies that are computationally fast and can be used for large organochlorine compounds such as 4,4?-DDT.

  12. In vitro and in vivo antitumor activity of a novel chlorin derivative for photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C Y; Zhang, L J; Li, J W; Li, J H; Wu, Z M; Zhang, L X; Chen, N; Yan, Y J; Chen, Z L

    2016-01-01

    In presented paper, a new chlorin derivative 5,10,15,20-tetrakis[(5-N-morpholino)pentyl] chlorin (TMC) was investigated as a photosensitizer in photodynamic therapy (PDT). Cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, intracellular location, biodistribution and antitumor effects were studied using human esophageal cancer cells (Eca-109) and human cervical cancer cells (Hela) in vitro and an esophageal cancer model in BALB/c nude mice. Cellular uptake and biodistribution of TMC were measured by fluorescence spectrophotometer. Cytotoxicity of TMC against Eca-109 and Hela cells was determined by MTT assay. The intracellular location of TMC was detected with a confocal microscopy. It was showed that TMC could rapidly accumulate in tumor cells and localize in cytoplasm. TMC was found to be low-toxic in dark but extensively photosensitive in vitro. A fast clearance rate of TMC was observed in Eca-109-bearing mice. In particular, TMC could significantly inhibit the tumor growth and exhibit a notable antitumor efficacy for PDT in vivo. PMID:26639232

  13. Identification of the haemolytic activity of Malassezia species.

    PubMed

    Juntachai, Weerapong; Kummasook, Aksarakorn; Mekaprateep, Malee; Kajiwara, Susumu

    2014-03-01

    Malassezia species are part of the normal skin flora and are associated with a number of human and animal skin diseases. However, the mechanisms that mediate infection and host-fungal interactions are poorly understood. The haemolytic activity of several microorganisms is considered a factor that contributes to pathogenicity of the organism to humans and animals. This virulence factor was previously identified in several pathogenic fungi that cause systemic mycoses, such as Aspergillus and Candida. In this study, the haemolytic activity of six major Malassezia species, including M. furfur, M. globosa, M. pachydermatis, M. restricta, M. slooffiae and M. sympodialis, was investigated. The haemolytic activity of these species was tested on tryptone soya agar with 5% sheep blood. All the examined Malassezia species produced a halo zone of complete haemolysis. A quantitative analysis of the haemolytic activity was performed by incubating sheep erythrocytes with the extraction from culture of each Malassezia species. Interestingly, M. globosa and M. restricta showed significantly high haemolytic activity compared with the other Malassezia species. In addition, M. globosa also exhibited stable haemolytic activity after treatment at 100 °C and in the presence of some proteases, indicating that this haemolytic factor is different from those of other fungi. PMID:24028702

  14. Volatile species in halide-activated-diffusion coating packs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bianco, Robert; Rapp, Robert A.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1992-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure sampling mass spectrometer was used to identify the vapor species generated in a halide-activated cementation pack. Pack powder mixtures containing a Cr-Al binary masteralloy powder, an NH4Cl activator salt, and either ZrO2 or Y2O3 (or neither) were analyzed at 1000 C. Both the equilibrium calculations for the pack and mass spectrometer results indicated that volatile AlCl(x) and CrCl(y) species were generated by the pack powder mixture; in packs containing the reactive element oxide, volatile ZrCl(z) and YCl(w) species were formed by the conversion of their oxide sources.

  15. The occurrence of chlorine in serpentine minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miura, Y.; Rucklidge, J.; Nord, G.L., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Partially serpentinized dunites containing small amounts of Chlorine (< 0.5%) from Dumont, Quebec, and Horoman, Hokkaido, Japan, and one containing less than 0.05% Chlorine from Higashi-Akaishi-Yama, Ehime, Japan have been examined using the electron probe microanalyzer and scanning transmission electron microscope with X-ray analytical capabilities. Chlorine was found together with Si, Mg, Ca and Fe in the serpentine minerals of the Dumont and Hokkaido dunites but not in the Ehime dunite. Chlorine is found associated only with the most finely crystalline facies of the serpentine (grain size less than 10 nm). The Ehime dunite contained no such fine grained serpentine, and was thus effectively chlorine-free, as are the coarser grained serpentines of the other samples. The finegrained chlorine-bearing serpentine also has a much higher concentration of Fe, and can contain smaller amounts of Ca, Ni and Mn than the coarse-grained variety as well as minute awaruite (FeNi3) grains. This fine-grained serpentine probably represents an early stage in the transformation of olivine to serpentine, with chlorine from hydrothermal solutions assisting the necessary chemical changes. The Cl increases the reaction rate by lowering the activation barrier to reaction by the introduction of reaction steps. ?? 1981 Springer-Verlag.

  16. Legionella pneumophila transcriptional response to chlorine treatment.

    PubMed

    Bodet, Charles; Sahr, Tobias; Dupuy, Mathieu; Buchrieser, Carmen; Héchard, Yann

    2012-03-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a ubiquitous environmental microorganism found in freshwater that can cause an acute form of pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease. Despite widespread use of chlorine to ensure drinking water quality and awareness that L. pneumophila may escape these treatments, little is known about its effects on L. pneumophila. The aim of this study was to investigate the L. pneumophila transcriptional response induced by chlorine treatment. Transcriptome analysis, using DNA arrays, showed that a sublethal dose of chlorine induces a differential expression of 391 genes involved in stress response, virulence, general metabolism, information pathways and transport. Many of the stress response genes were significantly upregulated, whereas a significant number of virulence genes were repressed. In particular, exposure of L. pneumophila to chlorine induced the expression of cellular antioxidant proteins, stress proteins and transcriptional regulators. In addition, glutathione S-transferase specific activity was enhanced following chlorine treatment. Our results clearly indicate that chlorine induces expression of proteins involved in cellular defence mechanisms against oxidative stress that might be involved in adaptation or resistance to chlorine treatment. PMID:22192759

  17. Active transposable elements recover species boundaries and geographic structure in Madagascan coffee species.

    PubMed

    Roncal, Julissa; Guyot, Romain; Hamon, Perla; Crouzillat, Dominique; Rigoreau, Michel; Konan, Olivier N'Guessan; Rakotomalala, Jean-Jacques; Nowak, Michael D; Davis, Aaron P; de Kochko, Alexandre

    2016-02-01

    The completion of the genome assembly for the economically important coffee plant Coffea canephora (Rubiaceae) has allowed the use of bioinformatic tools to identify and characterize a diverse array of transposable elements (TEs), which can be used in evolutionary studies of the genus. An overview of the copy number and location within the C. canephora genome of four TEs is presented. These are tested for their use as molecular markers to unravel the evolutionary history of the Millotii Complex, a group of six wild coffee (Coffea) species native to Madagascar. Two TEs from the Gypsy superfamily successfully recovered some species boundaries and geographic structure among samples, whereas a TE from the Copia superfamily did not. Notably, species occurring in evergreen moist forests of eastern and southeastern Madagascar were divergent with respect to species in other habitats and regions. Our results suggest that the peak of transpositional activity of the Gypsy and Copia TEs occurred, respectively, before and after the speciation events of the tested Madagascan species. We conclude that the utilization of active TEs has considerable potential to unravel the evolutionary history and delimitation of closely related Coffea species. However, the selection of TE needs to be experimentally tested, since each element has its own evolutionary history. Different TEs with similar copy number in a given species can render different dendrograms; thus copy number is not a good selection criterion to attain phylogenetic resolution. PMID:26231981

  18. Water Treatment Technology - Chlorination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross-Harrington, Melinda; Kincaid, G. David

    One of twelve water treatment technology units, this student manual on chlorination provides instructional materials for nine competencies. (The twelve units are designed for a continuing education training course for public water supply operators.) The competencies focus on the following areas: purpose and process of chlorination, chlorine…

  19. Inhalation of chlorine gas.

    PubMed

    Williams, J G

    1997-11-01

    The clinical features of acute chlorine gas inhalation, and its management are reviewed. Current medical views on the chronic effects of an acute overwhelming exposure on lung function (reactive airways dysfunction syndrome), and the more controversial field of lung disease secondary to repeated inhalations of lower concentrations of chlorine gas are discussed. PMID:9519180

  20. Aqueous chlorination of resorcinol

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heasley, V.L.; Burns, M.D.; Kemalyan, N.A.; Mckee, T.C.; Schroeter, H.; Teegarden, B.R.; Whitney, S.E.; Wershaw, R. L.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation of the aqueous chlorination (NaOCl) of resorcinol is reported. The following intermediates were detected in moderate to high yield at different pH values and varying percentages of chlorination: 2-chloro-, 4-chloro-, 2,4-dichloro-, 4,6-dichloro- and 2,4,6-trichlororesorcinol. Only trace amounts of the intermediates were detected when the chlorination was conducted in the presence of phosphate buffer. This result has significant implications since resorcinol in phosphate buffer has been used as a model compound in several recent studies on the formation of chlorinated hydrocarbons during chlorination of drinking water. Relative rates of chlorination were determined for resorcinol and several of the chlorinated resorcinols. Resorcinol was found to chlorinate only three times faster than 2,4,6-trichlororesorcinol. The structure 2,4,6-trichlororesorcinol was established as a monohydrate even after sublimation. A tetrachloro or pentachloro intermediate was not detected, suggesting that the ring-opening step of such an intermediate must be rapid. ?? 1989.

  1. [Nocturnal flight activities of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) species in Konya].

    PubMed

    Dik, Bilal; Ergül, Recep

    2006-01-01

    This study was carried out in order to determine the nocturnal flight activities of Culicoides species during July, 1997 in Konya. Light traps were used for the collection of Culicoides specimens. They were placed in or nearby pens of poultry, sheep and cattle between the hours 20:00-22:00, 22:00-24:00, 24:00-02:00, 02:00-04:00, 04:00-06:00, and 06:00-08:00. A total of 4084 specimens were caught. Twelve species (C. puncticollis, C. maritimus, C. circumscriptus, C. punctatus, C. newsteadi, C. flavipulicaris, C. obsoletus, C. pulicaris, C. simulator, C. gejgelensis, C. salinarius, and C. vexans) were identified. C. puncticollis, C. maritimus, C. circumscriptus and C. punctatus were the most abundant species. It was found that the Culicoides species fly at night and their numbers decrease in the morning. The different species were observed to have different flight activities. A maximum number of C. puncticollis was captured in between the hours 20:00-22:00. A relatively high number of C. maritimus were caught between the hours of 20.00-22.00. Flight activity of this species peaked between the hours 22:00-24:00. The maximum number of C. circumscriptus was captured between the hours of 22:00-24:00 and 24:00-02:00. Flight activity of C. punctatus increased regularly from the hours of 20:00-22:00 until 02:00-04:00. PMID:17160855

  2. ATRAZOME CHLORINATION TRANSFORMATION PRODUCTS UNDER DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorination is a commonly-used disinfectant step in drinking water treatment. Should free chlorine be added to water used as a drinking water source, it is widely understood that many biological species in the water, along with dissolved organic and inorganic chemicals, will rea...

  3. CHARACTERIZATION OF CHLORINATION TRANSFORMATION PRODUCTS OF SELECTED PESTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorination is a commonly-used disinfectant step in drinking water treatment. Should free chlorine be added to water used as a drinking water source, it is widely understood that many biological species in the water along with dissolved organic and inorganic chemicals will react...

  4. Chemistry of saline-water chlorination

    SciTech Connect

    Haag, W.R.

    1981-06-01

    Vast quantities of natural waters are used by power plants for cooling purposes. This water is chlorinated to prevent slime build-up inside the cooling pipes, is circulated through the cooling system, and eventually discharged back into the water body. In order to assess the environmental impact of water chlorination, it is necessary to know what chemical compounds are produced and discharged into the receiving waters. To attack this problem, a review of the present state of knowledge of natural water chlorination chemistry was performed, and some experimental work explained the results of previous workers by showing that chlorine losses at very high doses in seawater are simply the result of chlorate and bromate formation which, however, is negligible at normal doses. The most important chlorine-produced oxidants, along with the relevant chemical reactions, were chosen as a basis for a kinetic model of saline water chlorination chemistry. Kinetic data were compiled in a computer program which simultaneously solves 24 differential equations, one for each species modelled. Estimates were made for the unknown rate constants. A purely predictive model was not possible due to the great variability in the organic demand; however, the model is applicable under a broad variety of conditions (except sunlight), and it provides a reasonably good description of a halamine chemistry under environmental conditions.

  5. Partitioning and budget of inorganic and organic chlorine observed by MIPAS-B and TELIS in the Arctic in January 2010 and March 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzel, Gerald; Birk, Manfred; de Lange, Arno; Oelhaf, Hermann; Friedl-Vallon, Felix; Kirner, Oliver; Kleinert, Anne; Maucher, Guido; Nordmeyer, Hans; Orphal, Johannes; Ruhnke, Roland; Sinnhuber, Björn-Martin

    2014-05-01

    Arctic winters 2009/2010 and 2010/2011 were characterized by strong vortices with extremely cold temperatures in the lower stratosphere above northern Scandinavia. Hence, the occurrence of widespread polar stratospheric clouds enabled a strong activation of chlorine compounds (ClOx) which rapidly destroyed ozone when sunlight returned after winter solstice. MIPAS (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding) balloon measurements obtained in northern Sweden on 24 January 2010 and 31 March 2011 inside the polar vortices have provided vertical profiles of inorganic and organic chlorine species as well as diurnal variations of ClO around sunrise over the whole altitude range in which chlorine is undergoing activation and deactivation. The first flight was carried out in very cold chlorine-activated air with widespread polar stratospheric clouds. The second one was performed at the end of the winter during the last phase of ClOx deactivation. The Terahertz and submillimeter Limb Sounder TELIS was mounted on the MIPAS balloon gondola. TELIS is able to detect the chlorine species ClO and HCl. The complete inorganic and organic chlorine partitioning and budget in the stratosphere has been derived by combining MIPAS-B and TELIS simultaneously observed molecules. Observations are compared and discussed with calculations performed with the 3-dimensional Chemistry Climate Model EMAC (ECHAM5/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry).

  6. Comparison of Cas9 activators in multiple species.

    PubMed

    Chavez, Alejandro; Tuttle, Marcelle; Pruitt, Benjamin W; Ewen-Campen, Ben; Chari, Raj; Ter-Ovanesyan, Dmitry; Haque, Sabina J; Cecchi, Ryan J; Kowal, Emma J K; Buchthal, Joanna; Housden, Benjamin E; Perrimon, Norbert; Collins, James J; Church, George

    2016-07-01

    Several programmable transcription factors exist based on the versatile Cas9 protein, yet their relative potency and effectiveness across various cell types and species remain unexplored. Here, we compare Cas9 activator systems and examine their ability to induce robust gene expression in several human, mouse, and fly cell lines. We also explore the potential for improved activation through the combination of the most potent activator systems, and we assess the role of cooperativity in maximizing gene expression. PMID:27214048

  7. Behavior of sulfur and chlorine in coal during combustion and boiler corrosion. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1992--May 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, C.L.; Hackley, K.C.; Donnals, G.L.; Cao, J.; Ruch, R.R.; Pan, W.P.; Shao, D.

    1992-10-01

    Four replicate experiments of pyrolysis with quadrupole gas analyzer and ion selective electrode were conducted to monitor the release of chlorine and sulfur from a high-chlorine Illinois coal IBC-109 (0.42% chlorine on dry basis). The chlorine in coal is released solely as HCl, and the HCl release profile shows a broad peak between 250{degree}C and 600{degree}C with a maximum at 445{degree}C. In contrast, the sulfur release profile shows three peaks; the sulfur released around 370{degree}C may be derived from a labile (possibly aliphatic) component of organic sulfur, the main peak at 475{degree}C corresponds to the release of the main component (thiophenic) of organic sulfur, and the third peak at 600{degree} results from the decomposition of pyrite. Sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) is the major sulfur species under an oxidizing condition in the combustion gas; additional gaseous sulfur species (COS and H{sub 2}S) are observed when the atmosphere is changed to a reducing condition. Sodium and chlorine contents in char residues determined by neutron activation analysis showed that 98% of chlorine in coal was volatilized during pyrolysis to 800{degree}C, and all the sodium is retained in the chars. The thermogravimetry-Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy experiments were carried out to characterize gaseous species during pyrolysis of four Illinois coals (IBC-103, -105, -106, and -109). Gas evolution profiles of sulfur (H{sub 2}S, S0{sub 2}, and COS), chlorine (HCl), and nitrogen (NH{sub 3} and HCN) species were determined. Similar release profiles of HCl and NH{sub 3} supported an interpretation that chlorine and nitrogen are closely associated in coal. COS may be formed by reaction of CO with H{sub 2}S in the gas phase.

  8. Accumulation of chlorinated benzenes in earthworms

    SciTech Connect

    Beyer, W.N.

    1996-12-31

    Chlorinated benzenes are widespread in the environment. Hexachlorobenzene, pentachlorobenzene and all isomers of dichlorobenzenes, trichlorobenzenes, and tetrachlorobenzenes, have been detected in fish, water, and sediments from the Great Lakes. They probably entered the water as leachates from chemical waste dumps and as effluents from manufacturing. Hexachlorobenzene and pentachlorobenzene are commonly present in Herring gull (Larus argentatus) eggs from the Great Lakes, and some of the isomers of trichlorobenzene and tetrachlorobenzene are occasionally detected at low concentrations. Hexachlorobenzene, which was formerly used as a fungicide, has been the most thoroughly studied chlorinated benzene, and has been detected in many species. Its use as a fungicide in the United States was canceled in 1984. Since about 1975 hexachlorobenzene has been formed mainly in the production of chlorinated solvents. It is highly persistent in the environment and some species are poisoned by hexachlorobenzene at very low chronic dietary exposures. As little as 1 ppm in the diet of mink (Mustela vison) reduced the birth weights of young, and 5 ppm in the diet of Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) caused slight liver damage. This paper describes a long-term (26 wk) experiment relating the concentrations of chlorinated benzenes in earthworms to length of exposure and three 8 wk experiments relating concentration to the concentration in soil the soil organic matter content, and the degree of chlorination. 20 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Heterogeneous Chemistry of HONO on Liquid Sulfuric Acid: A New Mechanism of Chlorine Activation on Stratospheric Sulfate Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Renyi; Leu, Ming-Taun; Keyser, Leon F.

    1996-01-01

    Heterogeneous chemistry of nitrous acid (HONO) on liquid sulfuric acid (H2SO4) Was investigated at conditions that prevail in the stratosphere. The measured uptake coefficient (gamma) of HONO on H2SO4 increased with increasing acid content, ranging from 0.03 for 65 wt % to about 0.1 for 74 wt %. In the aqueous phase, HONO underwent irreversible reaction with H2SO4 to form nitrosylsulfuric acid (NO(+)HSO4(-). At temperatures below 230 K, NO(+)HSO4(-) was observed to be stable and accumulated in concentrated solutions (less than 70 wt % H2SO4) but was unstable and quickly regenerated HONO in dilute solutions (less than 70 wt %). HCl reacted with HONO dissolved in sulfuric acid, releasing gaseous nitrosyl chloride (ClNO). The reaction probability between HCl and HONO varied from 0.01 to 0.02 for 60-72 wt % H2SO4. In the stratosphere, ClNO photodissociates rapidly to yield atomic chlorine, which catalytically destroys ozone. Analysis of the laboratory data reveals that the reaction of HCl with HONO on sulfate aerosols can affect stratospheric ozone balance during elevated sulfuric acid loadings after volcanic eruptions or due to emissions from the projected high-speed civil transport (HSCT). The present results may have important implications on the assessment of environmental acceptability of HSCT.

  10. Chlorine activation within urban or power plant plumes: Vertically resolved ClNO2 and Cl2 measurements from a tall tower in a polluted continental setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, Theran P.; Wagner, Nicholas L.; Dubé, William P.; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Young, Cora J.; Öztürk, Fatma; Bahreini, Roya; Vandenboer, Trevor C.; Wolfe, Daniel E.; Williams, Eric J.; Roberts, James M.; Brown, Steven S.; Thornton, Joel A.

    2013-08-01

    chloride (ClNO2) is a chlorine atom source and reactive nitrogen reservoir formed during the night by heterogeneous reactions of dinitrogen pentoxide on chloride-containing aerosol particles. The main factors that influence ClNO2 production include nitrogen oxides, ozone, aerosol surface area, soluble chloride, and ambient relative humidity. Regions with strong anthropogenic activity therefore have large ClNO2 formation potential even inland of coastal regions due to transport or local emissions of soluble chloride. As part of the Nitrogen, Aerosol Composition, and Halogens on a Tall Tower field study, we report wintertime vertically resolved ClNO2 and molecular chlorine (Cl2) measurements taken on a 300 m tall tower located at NOAA's Boulder Atmospheric Observatory in Weld County, CO, during February and March of 2011. Gas and particle phase measurements aboard the tower carriage allowed for a detailed description of the chemical state of the nocturnal atmosphere as a function of height. These observations show significant vertical structure in ClNO2 and Cl2 mixing ratios that undergo dynamic changes over the course of a night. Using these measurements, we focus on two distinct combustion plume events where ClNO2 mixing ratios reached 600 and 1300 parts per trillion by volume, respectively, aloft of the nocturnal surface layer. We infer ClNO2 yields from N2O5-aerosol reactions using both observational constraints and box modeling. The derived yields in these plumes suggest efficient ClNO2 production compared to the campaign average, where in-plume yields range from 0.3 to 1; the campaign average yield in the boundary layer is 0.05 ± 0.15, with substantial night-to-night and within night variability similar to previous measurements in this region.

  11. Inactivation of Naegleria gruberi cysts by chlorinated cyanurates.

    PubMed Central

    Engel, J P; Rubin, A J; Sproul, O J

    1983-01-01

    The resistance of Naegleria gruberi cysts to chlorine in the presence of cyanuric acid was compared at pH 5 and 7. An amperometric membrane electrode was used to measure HOCl concentrations independently of the chlorinated cyanurate species, thus permitting an analysis of the role of free chlorine versus chlorinated cyanurates in cyst inactivation. In the presence of cyanuric acid, the products of the HOCl residual and the contact time required for 99% cyst inactivation were 8.5 mg . min/liter and 13.9 mg . min/liter at pH 5 and 7, respectively. The Watson's Law coefficients of dilution (n) were 1.3 and 1.6 at pH 5 and 7, respectively. The results strongly suggest that HOCl is the predominant cysticide with no measurable cysticidal effect of the chlorinated cyanurate species. PMID:6316851

  12. Diversity and Activity of Lysobacter Species from Disease Suppressive Soils

    PubMed Central

    Gómez Expósito, Ruth; Postma, Joeke; Raaijmakers, Jos M.; De Bruijn, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The genus Lysobacter includes several species that produce a range of extracellular enzymes and other metabolites with activity against bacteria, fungi, oomycetes, and nematodes. Lysobacter species were found to be more abundant in soil suppressive against the fungal root pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, but their actual role in disease suppression is still unclear. Here, the antifungal and plant growth-promoting activities of 18 Lysobacter strains, including 11 strains from Rhizoctonia-suppressive soils, were studied both in vitro and in vivo. Based on 16S rRNA sequencing, the Lysobacter strains from the Rhizoctonia-suppressive soil belonged to the four species Lysobacter antibioticus, Lysobacter capsici, Lysobacter enzymogenes, and Lysobacter gummosus. Most strains showed strong in vitro activity against R. solani and several other pathogens, including Pythium ultimum, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporum, and Xanthomonas campestris. When the Lysobacter strains were introduced into soil, however, no significant and consistent suppression of R. solani damping-off disease of sugar beet and cauliflower was observed. Subsequent bioassays further revealed that none of the Lysobacter strains was able to promote growth of sugar beet, cauliflower, onion, and Arabidopsis thaliana, either directly or via volatile compounds. The lack of in vivo activity is most likely attributed to poor colonization of the rhizosphere by the introduced Lysobacter strains. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that Lysobacter species have strong antagonistic activities against a range of pathogens, making them an important source for putative new enzymes and antimicrobial compounds. However, their potential role in R. solani disease suppressive soil could not be confirmed. In-depth omics'–based analyses will be needed to shed more light on the potential contribution of Lysobacter species to the collective activities of microbial consortia in disease suppressive soils. PMID:26635735

  13. Diversity and Activity of Lysobacter Species from Disease Suppressive Soils.

    PubMed

    Gómez Expósito, Ruth; Postma, Joeke; Raaijmakers, Jos M; De Bruijn, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The genus Lysobacter includes several species that produce a range of extracellular enzymes and other metabolites with activity against bacteria, fungi, oomycetes, and nematodes. Lysobacter species were found to be more abundant in soil suppressive against the fungal root pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, but their actual role in disease suppression is still unclear. Here, the antifungal and plant growth-promoting activities of 18 Lysobacter strains, including 11 strains from Rhizoctonia-suppressive soils, were studied both in vitro and in vivo. Based on 16S rRNA sequencing, the Lysobacter strains from the Rhizoctonia-suppressive soil belonged to the four species Lysobacter antibioticus, Lysobacter capsici, Lysobacter enzymogenes, and Lysobacter gummosus. Most strains showed strong in vitro activity against R. solani and several other pathogens, including Pythium ultimum, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporum, and Xanthomonas campestris. When the Lysobacter strains were introduced into soil, however, no significant and consistent suppression of R. solani damping-off disease of sugar beet and cauliflower was observed. Subsequent bioassays further revealed that none of the Lysobacter strains was able to promote growth of sugar beet, cauliflower, onion, and Arabidopsis thaliana, either directly or via volatile compounds. The lack of in vivo activity is most likely attributed to poor colonization of the rhizosphere by the introduced Lysobacter strains. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that Lysobacter species have strong antagonistic activities against a range of pathogens, making them an important source for putative new enzymes and antimicrobial compounds. However, their potential role in R. solani disease suppressive soil could not be confirmed. In-depth omics'-based analyses will be needed to shed more light on the potential contribution of Lysobacter species to the collective activities of microbial consortia in disease suppressive soils. PMID:26635735

  14. Immunoquantitation and microsomal monooxygenase activities of hepatic cytochromes P4501A and P4502B and chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminant levels in polar bear (Ursus maritimus).

    PubMed

    Letcher, R J; Norstrom, R J; Lin, S; Ramsay, M A; Bandiera, S M

    1996-04-01

    Contamination of the Arctic ecosystem by anthropogenic compounds has resulted in exposure of polar bear (Ursus maritimus) to lipophilic chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminants (CHCs) accumulated through the marine food web. Liver samples were collected from 16 adult male polar bears in the Canadian arctic and subjected to chemical analysis for CHCs and metabolites, determination of alkoxyresorufin O-dealkylase activities, and immunoquantitation of cytochrome P450 (CYP) protein levels. We report on the relationships between the hepatic microsomal levels of immunoreactive CYP1A and CYP2B isozymes, catalytic activities, and hepatic CHC and metabolite concentrations in polar bear. We specifically explored the influence of several CHCs on the induction of hepatic CYP in polar bear and the potential use of immunoassay quantitation as a bioindicator of CHC exposure. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) classed as CYP1A and mixed CYP1A/CYP2B inducers accounted for about 25% of the total PCB residues present (18,680 +/- 5053 ng/g lipid). CYP1A protein content correlated strongly with hepatic levels of PCBs, PCDDs (0.032 +/- 0.018 ng/g lipid, and PCDFs (0.011 +/- 0.007 ng/g lipid) and their corresponding toxic equivalents (TEQ, 0.377 +/- 0.182 ng/g lipid). Mono-ortho-CB-156, CB-157, and CB-105 were the predominant TEQ contributors. Correlations between CYP2B protein content and CHC residue levels in polar bear liver suggested that ortho-chlorine-substituted PCBs and chlordanes were the major contributors to CYP2B induction. CYP1A and CYP2B contents were therefore good indicators of CHC exposure in polar bear liver. Ethoxyresorufin, pentoxyresorufin, and benzyloxyresorufin O-dealkylase activities increased with increasing CYP1A protein content up to protein levels of approximately 5 pmol/mg, suggesting that all three activities were primarily CYP1A-mediated. These results were substantiated by antibody inhibition experiments. In summary, immunoquantitated CYP1A and CYP2B isozymes are

  15. Antioxidant, Antimicrobial and Antiproliferative Activities of Five Lichen Species

    PubMed Central

    Mitrović, Tatjana; Stamenković, Slaviša; Cvetković, Vladimir; Tošić, Svetlana; Stanković, Milan; Radojević, Ivana; Stefanović, Olgica; Čomić, Ljiljana; Đačić, Dragana; Ćurčić, Milena; Marković, Snežana

    2011-01-01

    The antioxidative, antimicrobial and antiproliferative potentials of the methanol extracts of the lichen species Parmelia sulcata, Flavoparmelia caperata, Evernia prunastri, Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea were evaluated. The total phenolic content of the tested extracts varied from 78.12 to 141.59 mg of gallic acid equivalent (GA)/g of extract and the total flavonoid content from 20.14 to 44.43 mg of rutin equivalent (Ru)/g of extract. The antioxidant capacities of the lichen extracts were determined by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals scavenging. Hypogymnia physodes with the highest phenolic content showed the strongest DPPH radical scavenging effect. Further, the antimicrobial potential of the lichen extracts was determined by a microdilution method on 29 microorganisms, including 15 strains of bacteria, 10 species of filamentous fungi and 4 yeast species. A high antimicrobial activity of all the tested extracts was observed with more potent inhibitory effects on the growth of Gram (+) bacteria. The highest antimicrobial activity among lichens was demonstrated by Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea. Finally, the antiproliferative activity of the lichen extracts was explored on the colon cancer adenocarcinoma cell line HCT-116 by MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) viability assay and acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining. The methanol extracts of Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea showed a better cytotoxic activity than the other extracts. All lichen species showed the ability to induce apoptosis of HCT-116 cells. PMID:21954369

  16. Metabolomic profiling and antioxidant activity of some Acacia species

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Farid, I.B.; Sheded, M.G.; Mohamed, E.A.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomic profiling of different parts (leaves, flowers and pods) of Acacia species (Acacia nilotica, Acacia seyal and Acacia laeta) was evaluated. The multivariate data analyses such as principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were used to differentiate the distribution of plant metabolites among different species or different organs of the same species. A.nilotica was characterized with a high content of saponins and A.seyal was characterized with high contents of proteins, phenolics, flavonoids and anthocyanins. A.laeta had a higher content of carbohydrates than A. nilotica and A. seyal. On the basis of these results, total antioxidant capacity, DPPH free radical scavenging activity and reducing power of the methanolic extracts of studied parts were evaluated. A.nilotica and A.seyal extracts showed less inhibitory concentration 50 (IC50) compared to A.laeta extracts which means that these two species have the strongest radical scavenging activity whereas A. laeta extracts have the lowest radical scavenging activity. A positive correlation between saponins and flavonoids with total antioxidant capacity and DPPH radical scavenging activity was observed. Based on these results, the potentiality of these plants as antioxidants was discussed. PMID:25313274

  17. CHLORINATED SOLVENT PLUME CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This lecture will cover recent success in controlling and assessing the treatment of shallow ground water plumes of chlorinated solvents, other halogenated organic compounds, and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE).

  18. Breathing with chlorinated solvents

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, P.L.

    1997-06-06

    Chlorinated solvents are effective cleaners and in the past dirted solvents were dumped into landfills, stored in tanks that often leaked, or spilled. As a result the most common contaminants of organic groundwater at hazardous waste sites are the two major chlorinated solvents - tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE). Both are suspected carcinogens and both are highly resistant to biodegradation. Now however, there is a report of a bacterium that can remove all of the chlorine atoms from both by halorespiration to form ethene, an innocuous end product. This article goes on to discuss the background of biodegradation of chlorinated compounds, why it is so difficult, and what the future is in this area. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Bugs digest chlorinated organics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    This article describes a new bioreactor that uses a consortium of aerobic bacteria to biodegrade chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons. Methanotrophic bacteria are cultivated for their MMO enzyme. After the MMO enzyme breaks down the chlorinated organics by oxidation, non-methanotrophic bacteria consume the byproducts. Pilot-scale testing has demonstrated successful treatment of groundwater containing coal-tar constituents, toluene, trichloroethylene, vinyl chlorides, chlorobenzene, and methyl methacrylate from three Superfund sites.

  20. Lipid oxidation by hypochlorous acid: chlorinated lipids in atherosclerosis and myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Ford, David A

    2010-12-01

    Leukocytes, containing myeloperoxidase (MPO), produce the reactive chlorinating species, HOCl, and they have important roles in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease. Leukocyte-derived HOCl can target primary amines, alkenes and vinyl ethers of lipids, resulting in chlorinated products. Plasmalogens are vinyl ether-containing phospholipids that are abundant in tissues of the cardiovascular system. The HOCl oxidation products derived from plasmalogens are α-chlorofatty aldehyde and unsaturated molecular species of lysophosphatidylcholine. α-chlorofatty aldehyde is the precursor of both α-chlorofatty alcohol and α-chlorofatty acid. Both α-chlorofatty aldehyde and α-chlorofatty acid accumulate in activated neutrophils and have disparate chemotactic properties. In addition, α-chlorofatty aldehyde increases in activated monocytes, human atherosclerotic lesions and rat infarcted myocardium. This article addresses the pathways for the synthesis of these lipids and their biological targets. PMID:21339854

  1. SENSITIVITY OF THREE ENCEPHALITOZOON SPECIES TO CHLORINE AND CHLORAMINE TREATMENT AS DETECTED BY AN IN-VITRO MICROWELL PLATE ASSAY (POSTER PRESENTATION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microsporidia are obligate intracellular parasites that form environmentally resistant, infectious spores. These parasites are ubiquitous in the environment, infecting members of almost every class of verebrates and invertebrates. At least 14 microsporidian species that infect th...

  2. Distinguishing Candida Species by β-N-Acetylhexosaminidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Niimi, Kyoko; Shepherd, Maxwell G.; Cannon, Richard D.

    2001-01-01

    A variety of fungi produce the hydrolytic enzyme β-N-acetylhexosaminidase (HexNAcase), which can be readily detected in assays by using p-nitrophenyl-N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminide as a substrate. In the present study we developed a microtiter plate-based HexNAcase assay for distinguishing Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis strains from other yeast species. HexNAcase activity was detected in 89 of 92 (97%) C. albicans strains and 4 of 4 C. dubliniensis strains but not in 28 strains of eight other Candida species, 4 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, or 2 Cryptococcus neoformans strains. The HexNAcase activity in C. albicans and C. dubliniensis was strain specific. All except three clinical C. albicans isolates among the C. albicans strains tested produced enzyme activity within 24 h. These strains did produce enzyme activity, however, after a prolonged incubation period. For two of these atypical strains, genomic DNA at the C. albicans HEX1 gene locus, which encodes HexNAcase, showed nucleotide differences from the sequence of control strains. Among the other Candida species tested, only C. dubliniensis had a DNA sequence that hybridized with the HEX1 probe under low-stringency conditions. The microtiter plate-based assay used in the present study for the detection of HexNAcase activity is a simple, relatively inexpensive method useful for the presumptive identification of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis. PMID:11376040

  3. Chlorination of bisphenol A: kinetics and by-products formation.

    PubMed

    Gallard, Hervé; Leclercq, Amélie; Croué, Jean-Philippe

    2004-08-01

    The kinetics of initial chlorination of bisphenol A (BPA) was studied between pH 2 and 11 at room temperature (20 +/- 2 degrees C). pH Profile of the apparent second-order rate constant of the reaction of BPA with chlorine were modeled considering the elementary reactions of HOCl with BPA species and an acid-catalyzed reaction. The predominant reactions at near neutral pH were the reactions of HOCl with the two phenolate species of BPA (k = 3.10 x 10(4) M(-1)s(-1) for BPA- and 6.62 x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) for BPA(2-)). At near neutral pH, half-life times of BPA were calculated to be less than 1.5 h for chlorine residual higher than 0.2 mg l(-1). Chlorination of synthetic treated waters spiked with BPA showed that BPA disappeared within 4 h and that chlorinated bisphenol A congeners were rapidly formed and remained in solution for up to 10-20 h when low chlorine dosages are applied (0.5-1 mg l(-1)). To limit their presence in drinking water networks, it is then necessary to maintain high chlorine residuals that rapidly produce and decompose chlorinated bisphenol A congeners. PMID:15212912

  4. GENOTOXIC PROPERTIES OF HALOACETONITRILES: DRINKING WATER BY-PRODUCTS OF CHLORINE DISINFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorinated and brominated haloacetonitriles (HAN), known drinking water contaminants which form during chlorine disinfection, were investigated for genotoxic activity. The HAN produced DNA strand breaks in cultured human lymphoblastic (CCRF-CEM) cells, bound to the nucleophilic ...

  5. Quality assessment and antiplasmodial activity of West African Cochlospermum species.

    PubMed

    Lamien-Meda, Aline; Kiendrebeogo, Martin; Compaoré, Moussa; Meda, Roland N T; Bacher, Markus; Koenig, Karin; Pacher, Thomas; Fuehrer, Hans-Peter; Noedl, Harald; Willcox, Merlin; Novak, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    The present study focuses on development of phytochemical methods for quality assessment of two West-African Cochlospermum species (Cochlospermum planchonii and Cochlospermum tinctorium) traditionally used for malaria treatment in Burkina Faso. Antimalarial activity of preparations from dried rhizomes (decoction) was tested against the chloroquine-sensitive Plasmodium strain 3D7 using the histidine-rich protein II (HRP2) drug susceptibility assay and compared with extract preparations using organic solvents of different polarity. Two main apocarotenoids were isolated from rhizomes of C. planchonii and unambiguously identified as dihydrocochloxanthine and cochloxanthine by spectroscopic methods. Comparative HPLC analyses of thirty-nine (39) samples from markets and from collections in natural habitats of both species showed a high variability in the accumulation of cochloxanthines and related carotenoids which were proven to be characteristic for rhizomes of both species and generally absent in leaves. Furthermore, content of total phenolics and antioxidant activities (DPPH and FRAP) as well as haemolytic activity of various extracts was tested. The HPLC method presented here was validated and provides a good separation of both compounds including 10 minor carotenoids. Extracts from both species and pure cochloxanthine offered pronounced antioxidant activities and weak haemolytic activity while, in contrast, dihydrocochloxanthine had a strong haemolytic effect at the highest concentration analysed. However, cochloxanthine as well as dihydrocochloxanthine showed erythroprotective effects against the haemolytic activity of the reference saponin. Moderate antiplasmodial activity between 16 and 63 μg/ml were observed with all tested extracts, and lower IC50 values were obtained with pure dihydrocochloxanthine (IC50=6.9 μg/ml), cochloxanthine (IC50=6.8 μg/ml), the DCM fraction (IC50=2.4 μg/ml) and the ethyl acetate fraction (IC50=11.5μg/ml) derived from a methanolic

  6. Cleaning without chlorinated solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.M.; Simandl, R.F.

    1994-12-31

    Because of health and environmental concerns, many regulations have been passed in recent years regarding the use of chlorinated solvents. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has had an active program to find alternatives for these solvents used in cleaning applications for the past 7 years. During this time frame, the quantity of solvents purchased has been reduced by 92%. The program has been a twofold effort. Vapor degreasers used in batch cleaning-operations have been replaced by ultrasonic cleaning with aqueous detergent, and other organic solvents have been identified for use in hand-wiping or specialty operations. In order to qualify these alternatives for use, experimentation was conducted on cleaning ability as well as effects on subsequent operations such as welding, painting and bonding. Cleaning ability was determined using techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) which are capable of examining monolayer levels of contamination on a surface. Solvents have been identified for removal of rust preventative oils, lapping oils, machining coolants, lubricants, greases, and mold releases. Solvents have also been evaluated for cleaning urethane foam spray guns, swelling of urethanes and swelling of epoxies.

  7. Cleaning without chlorinated solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, L. M.; Simandl, R. F.

    1995-01-01

    Because of health and environmental concerns, many regulations have been passed in recent years regarding the use of chlorinated solvents. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has had an active program to find alternatives for these solvents used in cleaning applications for the past 7 years. During this time frame, the quantity of solvents purchased has been reduced by 92 percent. The program has been a twofold effort. Vapor degreasers used in batch cleaning operations have been replaced by ultrasonic cleaning with aqueous detergent, and other organic solvents have been identified for use in hand-wiping or specialty operations. In order to qualify these alternatives for use, experimentation was conducted on cleaning ability as well as effects on subsequent operations such as welding, painting, and bonding. Cleaning ability was determined using techniques such as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) which are capable of examining monolayer levels of contamination on a surface. Solvents have been identified for removal of rust preventative oils, lapping oils, machining coolants, lubricants, greases, and mold releases. Solvents have also been evaluated for cleaning urethane foam spray guns, swelling of urethanes, and swelling of epoxies.

  8. Chlorination of organophosphorus pesticides in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Acero, Juan L; Benítez, F Javier; Real, Francisco J; González, Manuel

    2008-05-01

    Unknown second-order rate constants for the reactions of three organophosphorus pesticides (chlorpyrifos, chlorfenvinfos and diazinon) with chlorine were determined in the present study, and the influence of pH and temperature was established. It was found that an increase in the pH provides a negative effect on the pesticides degradation rates. Apparent second-order rate constants at 20 degrees C and pH 7 were determined to be 110.9, 0.004 and 191.6 M(-1) s(-1) for chlorpyrifos, chlorfenvinfos and diazinon, respectively. A higher reactivity of chlorine with the phosphorothioate group (chlorpyrifos and diazinon) than with the phosphate moiety (chlorfenvinfos) could explain these results. Intrinsic rate constant for the elementary reactions of chlorine species with chlorpyrifos and diazinon were also calculated, leading to the conclusion that the reaction between hypochlorous acid and the pesticide is predominant at neutral pH. The elimination of these pesticides in surface waters was also investigated. A chlorine dose of 2.5 mg L(-1) was enough to oxidize chlorpyrifos and diazinon almost completely, with a formation of trihalomethanes below the EU standard for drinking water. However, the removal of chlorfenvinfos was not appreciable. Therefore, chlorination is a feasible option for the removal of organophosphorus pesticides with phosphorothioate group during oxidation and disinfection processes, but not for the elimination of pesticides with phosphate moiety. PMID:17904287

  9. Plant species richness increases phosphatase activities in an experimental grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, Nina; Wilcke, Wolfgang; Oelmann, Yvonne

    2014-05-01

    Plant species richness has been shown to increase aboveground nutrient uptake requiring the mobilization of soil nutrient pools. For phosphorus (P) the underlying mechanisms for increased P release in soil under highly diverse grassland mixtures remain obscure because aboveground P storage and concentrations of inorganic and organic P in soil solution and differently reactive soil P pools are unrelated (Oelmann et al. 2011). The need of plants and soil microorganisms for P can increase the exudation of enzymes hydrolyzing organically bound P (phosphatases) which might represent an important release mechanism of inorganic P in a competitive environment such as highly diverse grassland mixtures. Our objectives were to test the effects of i) plant functional groups (legumes, grasses, non-leguminous tall and small herbs), and of (ii) plant species richness on microbial P (Pmic) and phosphatase activities in soil. In autumn 2013, we measured Pmic and alkaline phosphomonoesterase and phosphodiesterase activities in soil of 80 grassland mixtures comprising different community compositions and species richness (1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 60) in the Jena Experiment. In general, Pmic and enzyme activities were correlated (r = 0.59 and 0.46 for phosphomonoesterase and phosphodiesterase activities, respectively; p

  10. Identification of Active Radical Species in Alkaline Persulfate Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chenju; Lei, Jung-Hsuan

    2015-07-01

    A proposed mechanism for alkaline activation of persulfate involves generation of sulfate (SO(4)(-)), hydroxyl (HO·), and superoxide radicals (O(2)(-)). The present study investigated the feasibility of chloroform (CF) degradation using alkaline activated persulfate and identified the active radical species using a radical inhibition technique. 2-propanol (PrOH) (preferentially reacted with HO·), phenol (preferentially reacted with both HO· and SO(4)(-)), and carbon tetrachloride (CT) (preferentially reacted with O(2)(-)) were used to inhibit the degradation of CF, and the extent of inhibited degradation was used to indicate the predominant radical species. Additions of PrOH and phenol appeared to significantly scavenge SO(4)(-) and HO· and resulted in inhibited CF degradation. Here, the authors demonstrated that SO(4)(-) and HO· were predominant radicals in the alkaline activated persulfate system. The presence of O(2)(-) scavengers (i.e., CT) resulted in a partial inhibition of CF degradation and, hence, one can speculate that O(2)(-) is a minor radical species. PMID:26163502

  11. Hemolytic activity of dermatophytes species isolated from clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Aktas, E; Yıgıt, N

    2015-03-01

    Hemolytic activity was recently reported for several pathogenic fungal species, such as Aspergillus, Candida, Trichophyton, Penicillium and Fusarium. Based on a number of mechanistic and characterization studies, several fungal hemolysins have been proposed as virulence factors. Hemolysins lyse red blood cells resulting in the release of iron, an important growth factor for microbes especially during infection. The requirement of iron in fungal growth is necessary for metabolic processes and as a catalyst for various biochemical processes. Expression of a hemolytic protein with capabilities to lyse red blood cells has also been suggested to provide a survival strategy for fungi during opportunistic infections. The aims of this study were to investigate the hemolytic activities of dermatophytes species isolated from patients with dermatophytosis. Hair, skin and nail samples of patients were examined with direct microscopy using potassium hydroxide and cultivated on Mycobiotic agar and Sabouraud's dextrose agar. To determine hemolytic activities of dermatophytes species, they were subcultured on Columbia Agar with 5% sheep blood and incubated for 7-14 days at 25°C in aerobic conditions. Media which displayed hemolysis were further incubated for 1-5 days at 37°C to increase hemolytic activity. In this study, 66 dermatophytes strains were isolated from clinical specimens and were identified by six different species: 43 (65.1%) Trichophyton rubrum, 7 (10.7%) Trichophyton mentagrophytes, 5 (7.6%) Microsporum canis, 5 (7.6%) Trichophyton tonsurans, 4 (6.0%) Epidermophyton floccosum and 2 (3.0%) Trichophyton violaceum. Twenty-one T. rubrum strains showed incomplete (alpha) hemolysis and nine T. rubrum strains showed complete (beta) hemolysis, whereas hemolysis was absent in 13 T. rubrum strains. Four T. mentagrophytes strains showed complete hemolysis and three T. tonsurans strains showed incomplete hemolysis. However, M. canis, E. floccosum and T. violaceum species had

  12. Review of chlorinated phenols

    SciTech Connect

    Exon, J.H.

    1984-12-01

    The chlorinated phenols are a group of 19 isomers composed of phenol with substituted chlorines. These chemicals are readily soluble in organic solvents but only slightly soluble in water, except for the chlorophenate salts. Chlorophenols with less than 3 chlorines are not used extensively except in the production of higher chlorophenols and chlorophenyloxyacetic acid herbicides. Pentachlorophenol and some tetrachlorophenols are used worldwide, primarily as wood preservatives or fungicides. Residues of chlorophenols have been found worldwide in soil, water and air samples, in food products, and in human and animal tissues and body fluids. Environmental contamination with these chemicals occurs from industrial effluents, agricultural runoff, breakdown of chlorophenyloxyacetic acid herbicides and hexachlorobenzene, and from spontaneous formation following chlorination of water for disinfection and deodorization. The acute toxicity of these chemicals is relatively low and little is known concerning their chronic effects. Chlorophenols have not been shown conclusively to be mutagens, teratogens or carcinogens. However, these compounds may act as promotors or cocarcinogens and the immune system is particularly sensitive to their toxic effects. Transplacental exposure to chlorophenols may result in embryotoxicity and abortion. The major mode of toxic action is as uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation. The toxicity of chlorophenols decreases with decreasing chlorination. These chemicals are mild hepatotoxins and are stored mainly in hepatic and renal tissues.

  13. Chlorine gas exposure and the lung: a review.

    PubMed

    Das, R; Blanc, P D

    1993-01-01

    We conducted a review of the literature detailing the respiratory effects of chlorine, an extremely important but toxic halogen. Historically, the heaviest mass inhalational exposures to chlorine resulted from World War I gassing. Currently potential human exposure to chlorine inhalation occurs in a variety of settings in the workplace, as a result of inadvertent environmental releases, and even in the home due to household cleaning mishaps. Chlorine species are highly reactive; tissue injury results from exposure to chlorine, hydrochloric acid, hypochlorous acid, or chloramines. Acute, high level exposure to chlorine gas in occupational or environmental settings results in a variety of dose-related lung effects ranging from respiratory mucus membrane irritation to pulmonary edema. Pulmonary function testing can reveal either obstructive or restrictive deficits immediately following exposure, with resolution over time in the majority of cases. However, some of those exposed may demonstrate long-term persistent obstructive or restrictive pulmonary deficits or increased nonspecific airway reactivity after high level exposure to chlorine gas. Symptoms and signs following inhalation of mixtures of chlorine-containing cleaners in the home are similar to those after occupational exposures and environmental releases. Although generally less severe, these events may be extremely common. Controlled human exposure data suggest that some subjects may be more responsive to the effects of chlorine gas; epidemiologic data also indicate that certain subpopulations (e.g., smokers) may be at greater risk of adverse outcome after chlorine inhalation. Although these findings are intriguing, additional study is needed to better delineate the risk factors that predispose toward the development of long-term pulmonary sequelae following chlorine gas exposure. PMID:8367885

  14. In-situ measurements of chlorine activation, nitric acid redistribution and ozone depletion in the Antarctic lower vortex aboard the German research aircraft HALO during TACTS/ESMVal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurkat, Tina; Voigt, Christiane; Kaufmann, Stefan; Schlage, Romy; Gottschaldt, Klaus-Dirk; Ziereis, Helmut; Hoor, Peter; Bozem, Heiko; Müller, Stefan; Zahn, Andreas; Schlager, Hans; Oelhaf, Hermann; Sinnhuber, Björn-Martin; Dörnbrack, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    In-situ measurements of stratospheric chlorine compounds are rare and exhibit the potential to gain insight into small scale mixing processes where stratospheric air masses of different origin and history interact. In addition, the relationship with chemically stable trace gases helps to identify regions that have been modified by chemical processing on polar stratospheric clouds. To this end, in-situ measurements of ClONO2, HCl, HNO3, NOy, N2O and O3 have been performed in the Antarctic Polar Vortex in September 2012 aboard the German research aircraft HALO (High Altitude and Long Rang research aircraft) during the TACTS/ESMVal (Transport and Composition in the UTLS/Earth System Model Validation) mission. With take-off and landing in Capetown, HALO sampled vortex air with latitudes down to 65°S, at altitudes between 8 and 14.3 km and potential temperatures between 340 and 390 K. Before intering the vortex at 350 K potential temperature, HALO additionally sampled mid-latitude stratospheric air. The trace gas distributions at the edge of the Antarctic polar vortex show distinct signatures of processed upper stratospheric vortex air and chemically different lower stratospheric / upper tropospheric air. Diabatic descend of the vortex transports processed air into the lower stratosphere. Here small scale filaments of only a few kilometers extension form at the lower vortex boundary due to shear stress, ultimately leading to transport and irreversible mixing. Comparison of trace gas relationships with those at the beginning of the polar winter reveals substantial chlorine activation, ozone depletion de- and renitrification with high resolution. Furthermore, the measurements are compared to the chemistry climate models EMAC and supported by ECMWF analysis. Finally, we compare the Antarctic measurements with new measurements of ClONO2, HCl and HNO3 aboard HALO obtained during the Arctic mission POLSTRACC (POLar STratosphere in a Changing Climate) based in Kiruna (Sveden

  15. Reaction of Chlorine Nitrate with Hydrogen Chloride and Water at Antarctic Stratospheric Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolbert, Margaret A.; Rossi, Michel J.; Malhotra, Ripudaman; Golden, David M.

    1987-11-01

    Laboratory studies of heterogeneous reactions important for ozone depletion over Antarctica are reported. The reaction of chlorine nitrate (ClONO2) with H2O and hydrogen chloride (HCl) on surfaces that simulate polar stratospheric clouds [ice and nitric acid (HNO3)--ice and sulfuric acid] are studied at temperatures relevant to the Antarctic stratosphere. The reaction of ClONO2 on ice and certain mixtures of HNO3 and ice proceeded readily. The sticking coefficient of ClONO2 on ice of 0.009 ± 0.002 was observed. A reaction produced gas-phase hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and condensed-phase HNO3; HOCl underwent a secondary reaction on ice producing dichlorine monoxide (Cl2O). In addition to the reaction with H2O, ClONO2 reacted with HCl on ice to form gas-phase chlorine (Cl2) and condensed-phase HNO3. Essentially all of the HCl in the bulk of the ice can react with ClONO2 on the ice surface. The gaseous products of the above reactions, HOCl, Cl2O, and Cl2, could readily photolyze in the Antarctic spring to produce active chlorine for ozone depletion. Furthermore, the formation of condensed-phase HNO3 could serve as a sink for odd nitrogen species that would otherwise scavenge the active chlorine.

  16. Bromine-Chlorine Coupling in the Antarctic Ozone Hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, Michael Y.; Sze, Nien-Dak; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Rodriquez, Jose M.; Prather, Michael J.

    1996-01-01

    The contribution from the chlorine and bromine species in the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole is evaluated. Since chlorine and bromine compounds are of different industrial origin, it is desirable, from a policy point of view, to be able to attribute chlorine-catalyzed loss of ozone with those reactions directly involving chlorine species, and likewise for bromine-catalyzed loss. In the stratosphere, however, most of the chemical families are highly coupled, and, for example, changes in the chlorine abundance will alter the partitioninig in other families and thus the rate of ozone loss. This modeling study examines formation of the Antarctic ozone hole for a wide range of bromine concentrations (5 - 25 pptv) and for chlorine concentrations typical of the last two decades (1.5, 2.5 and 3.5 ppbv). We follow the photochemical evolution of a single parcel of air, typical of the inner Antarctic vortex (50 mbar, 70 deg. S, NO(sub y) = 2 ppbv, with Polar Stratospheric Clouds(PSC)) from August 1 to November 1. For all of these ranges of chlorine and bromine loading, we would predict a substantial ozone hole (local depletion greater than 90%) within the de-nitrified, PSC- perturbed vortex. The contributions of the different catalytic cycles responsible for ozone loss are tabulated. The deep minimum in ozone is driven primarily by the chlorine abundance. As bromine levels decrease, the magnitude of the chlorine-catalyzed ozone loss increases to take up the slack. This is because bromine suppresses ClO by accelerating the conversion of ClO an Cl2O2 back to HCI. For this range of conditions, the local relative efficiency of ozone destruction per bromine atom to that per chlorine atom (alpha-factor) ranges from 33 to 55, decreasing with increase of bromine.

  17. Transfer of polychlorinated biphenyls and chlorinated pesticides from mother to pup in relation to cytochrome P450 enzyme activities in harp seals (Phoca groenlandica) from the gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada.

    PubMed

    Wolkers, Hans; Burkow, Ivan C; Hammill, Mike O; Lydersen, Christian; Witkamp, Renger F

    2002-01-01

    Congener-specific transfer of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and chlorinated pesticides from female to pup was studied in harp seals from eastern Canada. Possible effects on hepatic cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP450) due to contaminant mobilization from blubber lipids in females and ingestion of contaminated milk in pups were studied. Contaminant transfer from blubber to milk in females favored the more polar compounds (lower chlorinated PCBs, toxaphenes, hexachlorocyclohexanes, and hexachlorobenzene) relative to more lipophilic compounds (higher chlorinated PCBs, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane [DDT], chlordane). In spite of substantial contaminant mobilization from blubber in females and ingestion of contaminated milk by pups, CYP450 activities were low in all animals. Possibly, increased plasma estradiol concentrations, involved in breeding after lactation, suppressed CYP450 directly. Although the pups were exposed to contaminants in milk, CYP450 activities were low, resulting in low contaminant metabolism. This was confirmed by similar contaminant patterns in milk and pups. A strong positive relation between CYP1A-like activities and body weight in the pups suggested not yet fully developed CYP1A enzymes. A negative association between CYP3A and pesticides in females and pups was hypothesized to be a result of metabolic inactivation of CYP450. The CYP450 enzyme activities were considered unsuitable indicators for contaminant mobilization and transfer in harp seals. PMID:11804067

  18. Search for Trace Species in Europa's Exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, M. A.; Sparks, W. B.; Spencer, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the present surface composition of Europa provides critical information about its potential habitability. From Earth we currently have very few tools at our disposal to measure Europa's composition. Two notable exceptions are Keck NIR spectroscopy (cf Brown and Hand 2013) and Hubble Space Telescope UV spectroscopy (cf Cunningham et al. 2015). In March 2015 we obtained 5 orbits of deep UV spectroscopy of Europa using the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph covering wavelength range 1170-1760 Å. The purpose of the observations was to detect trace species in Europa's exosphere, which is generated by charged particle sputtering of Europa's water ice surface. The composition of the exosphere therefore provides an indirect measurement of surface composition. Furthermore, if active plumes are present, the composition of the exosphere may also reflect the composition of Europa's subsurface water reservoir. Of particular interest in the observed wavelength range are multiplets of atomic chlorine, because chlorine is predicted to be a major constituent of Europa's ocean (Kargel et al. 2000), and Na and K chlorides are expected to be major constituents of the icy shell (Zolotov and Shock 2001; Zolotov and Kargel 2009). The present situation at Europa is analogous to that at Io in the late 1990s, when chlorine ions were first detected in the plasma near Io (Kuppers and Schneider 2000), motivating searches for atomic chlorine and chlorine-bearing species that were subsequently detected in Io's atmosphere (Lellouch et al. 2003, Feaga et al. 2004). Galileo plasma measurements have detected chlorine ions near Europa (Volwerk et al. 2001), which has motivated the present search for chlorine in Europa's exosphere. We will present the new COS spectra of Europa and discuss the implications of the trace species that have been detected in these data.

  19. Search for Trace Species at Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, Melissa; Sparks, William; Spencer, John

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the present surface composition of Europa provides critical information about its potential habitability. From Earth we currently have very few tools at our disposal to measure Europa’s composition. Two notable exceptions are Keck NIR spectroscopy (cf Brown and Hand 2013) and Hubble Space Telescope UV spectroscopy (cf Cunningham et al. 2015). In March 2015 we obtained 5 orbits of deep UV spectroscopy of Europa using the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph covering wavelength range 1170-1760 Å. The purpose of the observations was to detect trace species in Europa’s exosphere, which is generated by charged particle sputtering of Europa’s water ice surface. The composition of the exosphere therefore provides an indirect measurement of surface composition. Furthermore, if active plumes are present, the composition of the exosphere may also reflect the composition of Europa’s subsurface water reservoir. Of particular interest in the observed wavelength range are multiplets of atomic chlorine, because chlorine is predicted to be a major constituent of Europa’s ocean (Kargel et al. 2000), and Na and K chlorides are expected to be major constituents of the icy shell (Zolotov and Shock 2001; Zolotov and Kargel 2009). The present situation at Europa is analogous to that at Io in the late 1990s, when chlorine ions were first detected in the plasma near Io (Kuppers and Schneider 2000), motivating searches for atomic chlorine and chlorine-bearing species that were subsequently detected in Io’s atmosphere (Lellouch et al. 2003, Feaga et al. 2004). Galileo plasma measurements have detected chlorine ions near Europa (Volwerk et al. 2001), which has motivated the present search for chlorine in Europa’s exosphere. We will present the new COS spectra of Europa and discuss the implications of the trace species that have been detected in these data.

  20. A comparison of iodinated trihalomethane formation from chlorine, chlorine dioxide and potassium permanganate oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian-Yang; Xu, Bin; Hu, Chen-Yan; Lin, Yi-Li; Lin, Lin; Ye, Tao; Tian, Fu-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the formation of iodinated trihalomethanes (I-THMs) from iodide-containing raw waters oxidized by chlorine, chlorine dioxide (ClO₂) and potassium permanganate (KMnO₄) at different oxidant concentrations, reaction times, pHs, initial iodide concentrations and bromide to iodide mass ratios. Among the six investigated I-THMs, iodoform was the major species formed during the oxidation using chlorine, ClO₂ and KMnO₄. When oxidant concentration increased from 0.1 to 3.0 mg/L, the formation of I-THMs increased and then decreased for chlorine and ClO₂, but kept increasing for KMnO₄. As the reaction time went by, I-THM concentration increased to a plateau within 10 h (ClO₂ within only 1 h, especially) for all the three oxidants. I-THM formation gradually increased from pH 3.0 to 9.0 and remained stable at pH values higher than 7.5 for chlorine; however, for ClO₂ and KMnO₄ the highest I-THM formation showed at pH 7.0 and 7.5, respectively. As initial iodide concentration increased from 20 to 800 μg/L, the total amount and species of I-THMs increased for the three oxidants. Iodide contributed to I-THM formation much more significantly than bromide. PMID:25462746

  1. Chlorine: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Evans, Richard B

    2005-01-01

    Chlorine is a widely used industrial chemical. Individuals can be exposed to chlorine through transportation accidents, industrial exposures or misuse of domestic cleaners. While most exposed individuals recover normal pulmonary function, chlorine can cause a variety of lung injuries including pulmonary edema, restrictive lung disease, and obstructive disease, including Reactive Airways Dysfunction Syndrome. Residual effects of chlorine exposure are a function of intensity of exposure, minute ventilation during exposure, and host characteristics such as cigarette smoking and atopy. This monograph will summarize uses of chlorine, the potential for accidents, the mechanism of chlorine toxicity in the lung, and review acute and chronic effects of chlorine exposure on the lung, as well as systemic effects of massive chlorine exposure. PMID:16078037

  2. Atomic scale insights on chlorinated gamma-alumina surfaces.

    PubMed

    Digne, Mathieu; Raybaud, Pascal; Sautet, Philippe; Guillaume, Denis; Toulhoat, Hervé

    2008-08-20

    The thermochemistry of chlorinated gamma-alumina surfaces is explored by means of density functional calculations as a function of relevant reaction conditions used in experiments and in high-octane fuel production in the refining industry such as hydrocarbon isomerization and reforming. The role of chlorine as a dope of the Brønsted acidity of gamma-alumina surfaces is investigated at an atomic scale. Combining infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations, the most favorable location of chlorine atoms on the (110), (100) and (111) surfaces of gamma-alumina is found to result either from direct adsorption or from the exchange of basic hydroxyl groups. Moreover, the modification of the hydrogen bond network upon chlorine adsorption is put forward as a key parameter for changing the Brønsted acidity. In a second step, we use a thermodynamic approach based on DFT total energy calculations corrected by the chemical potentials of HCl and H2O to determine the adsorption isotherms of chlorine and the relative surface concentration of hydroxyl groups and chlorine species on the gamma-alumina surfaces. The determination of chlorine content as a function of temperature and partial pressures of H2O and HCl offers new quantitative data required for optimizing the state of the support surface in industrial conditions. The mechanisms of chlorination are also discussed as a function of reaction conditions. PMID:18646849

  3. Whole Blood Cholinesterase Activity in 20 Species of Wild Birds.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Igal H; Yanco, Esty G; Landau, Shmulik; Nadler-Valency, Rona; Anglister, Nili; Bueller-Rosenzweig, Ariela; Apelbom-Halbersberg, Tal; Cuneah, Olga; Hanji, Vera; Bellaiche, Michel

    2016-06-01

    Clinical signs of organophosphate and carbamate intoxication in wild birds can be mistaken for those of other diseases, thus potentially delaying diagnosis and implementation of life-saving treatment. The objective of this study was to determine the reference interval for blood cholinesterase activity in 20 different wild avian species from 7 different orders, thereby compiling a reference database for wildlife veterinarians. Blood was collected from birds not suspected of having organophosphate or carbamate toxicosis, and the modified Michel method, which determines the change in blood pH that directly correlates with cholinesterase activity, was used to measure blood cholinesterase levels. Results of change in blood pH values ranged from 0.11 for the white-tailed eagle ( Haliaeetus albicilla ) to 0.90 for the honey buzzard ( Pernis apivorus ). The results showed that even within the same family, interspecies differences in normal cholinesterase blood activity were not uncommon. The findings emphasized the importance of determining reference intervals for avian blood cholinesterase activity at the species level. PMID:27315378

  4. Hydrodesulfurization of chlorinized coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalvinskas, J. J.; Rohatgi, N. K. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A method of desulfurization is described in which high sulfur coals are desulfurized by low temperature chlorinolysis of coal in liquid media, preferably water, followed by hydrodesulfurization at a temperature above 500 C. The coals are desulfurized to an extent of up to 90% by weight and simultaneously dechlorinated to a chlorine content below 0.1% by weight. The product coals have lower volatiles loss, lower oxygen and nitrogen content and higher fixed carbon than raw coals treated with hydrogen under the same conditions. Heating the chlorinated coal to a temperature above 500 C. in inert gas such as nitrogen results in significantly less desulfurization.

  5. Phytochemical profiles, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of three Potentilla species

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Extracts from Potentilla species have been applied in traditional medicine and exhibit antioxidant, hypoglycemic, anti-inflammatory, antitumor and anti-ulcerogenic properties, but little has been known about the diversity of phytochemistry and pharmacology on this genus. This study investigated and compared the phytochemical profiles, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of leaf extracts from three Potentilla species (Potentilla fruticosa, Potentilla glabra and Potentilla parvifolia) in order to discover new resources for lead structures and pharmaceutical products. Methods Chemical composition and content of six phenolic compounds were evaluated and determined by RP-HPLC; Total phenolic and total flavonoid content were determined using Folin-Ciocalteau colourimetric method and sodium borohydride/chloranil-based method (SBC); Antioxidant activities were determined using DPPH, ABTS and FRAP assays; Antimicrobial properties were investigated by agar dilution and mycelial growth rate method. Results The results showed hyperoside was the predominant phenolic compound in three Potentilla species by RP-HPLC assay, with the content of 8.86 (P. fruticosa), 2.56 (P. glabra) and 2.68 mg/g (P. parvifolia), respectively. The highest content of total identified phenolic compounds (hyperoside, (+)-catechin, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, rutin and ellagic acid) was observed in P. parvifolia (14.17 mg/g), follow by P. fruticosa (10.01 mg/g) and P. glabra (7.01 mg/g). P. fruticosa possessed the highest content of total phenolic (84.93 ± 0.50 mmol gallic acid equivalent/100 g) and total flavonoid (84.14 ± 0.03 mmol quercetin equivalent/100 g), which were in good correlation with its significant DPPHIC50 (16.87 μg/mL), ABTS (2763.48 μmol Trolox equivalent/g) and FRAP (1398.70 μmol Trolox equivalent/g) capacities. Furthermore, the effective methodology to distinguish the different species of Potentilla was also established by chromatographic fingerprint analysis for

  6. Influence of humic substances on the formation of chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons during chlorination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon polluted water

    SciTech Connect

    Johnsen, S.; Gribbestad, I.S.

    1988-08-01

    Chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are present at nanogram per liter levels in lake water. Some of these compounds are known to be mutagenic in the Ames Salmonella test. The PAH compounds fluorene, anthracene, fluoranthene, and benzo(a)pyrene were dissolved in lake water with low humus content and in humus water with 9.17 mg of total organic carbon/L, followed by sodium hypochlorite chlorination at different concentrations. Reaction of PAH and formation of chlorinated PAH were measured by cyclohexane extraction of the samples 3 days after chlorination and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analyses of the extracts. The PAH-chlorine reaction was found to be dependent upon the concentration of free active chlorine in the water, and the presence of humic substances was found to affect the formation of chlorinated PAH. Chlorinated PAH were formed in the lake water samples of fluoranthene and benzo(a)pyrene, but no chlorinated PAH were detected in the presence of humic substances.

  7. Bioreductively Activated Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Generators as MRSA Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Khodade, Vinayak S; Sharath Chandra, Mallojjala; Banerjee, Ankita; Lahiri, Surobhi; Pulipeta, Mallikarjuna; Rangarajan, Radha; Chakrapani, Harinath

    2014-07-10

    The number of cases of drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections is on the rise globally and new strategies to identify drug candidates with novel mechanisms of action are in urgent need. Here, we report the synthesis and evaluation of a series of benzo[b]phenanthridine-5,7,12(6H)-triones, which were designed based on redox-active natural products. We find that the in vitro inhibitory activity of 6-(prop-2-ynyl)benzo[b]phenanthridine-5,7,12(6H)-trione (1f) against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), including a panel of patient-derived strains, is comparable or better than vancomycin. We show that the lead compound generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cell, contributing to its antibacterial activity. PMID:25050164

  8. Oxidation of manganese(II) during chlorination: role of bromide.

    PubMed

    Allard, S; Fouche, L; Dick, J; Heitz, A; von Gunten, U

    2013-08-01

    The oxidation of dissolved manganese(II) (Mn(II)) during chlorination is a relatively slow process which may lead to residual Mn(II) in treated drinking waters. Chemical Mn(II) oxidation is autocatalytic and consists of a homogeneous and a heterogeneous process; the oxidation of Mn(II) is mainly driven by the latter process. This study demonstrates that Mn(II) oxidation during chlorination is enhanced in bromide-containing waters by the formation of reactive bromine species (e.g., HOBr, BrCl, Br2O) from the oxidation of bromide by chlorine. During oxidation of Mn(II) by chlorine in bromide-containing waters, bromide is recycled and acts as a catalyst. For a chlorine dose of 1 mg/L and a bromide level as low as 10 μg/L, the oxidation of Mn(II) by reactive bromine species becomes the main pathway. It was demonstrated that the kinetics of the reaction are dominated by the adsorbed Mn(OH)2 species for both chlorine and bromine at circumneutral pH. Reactive bromine species such as Br2O and BrCl significantly influence the rate of manganese oxidation and may even outweigh the reactivity of HOBr. Reaction orders in [HOBr]tot were found to be 1.33 (±0.15) at pH 7.8 and increased to 1.97 (±0.17) at pH 8.2 consistent with an important contribution of Br2O which is second order in [HOBr]tot. These findings highlight the need to take bromide, and the subsequent reactive bromine species formed upon chlorination, into account to assess Mn(II) removal during water treatment with chlorine. PMID:23859083

  9. Chlorination strategies for direct groundwater recharge of tertiary effluent

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, P.; Wang, L.; Johnson, P.C.; Houston, S.; Houston, W.N.; Brown, P.

    1998-07-01

    Chlorination for the control of biological activity during direct recharge of tertiary effluent was studied in bench-scale simulated aquifers. Both free chlorine and chloramine were studied at darcy velocities of 360 cm/d to 720 cm/d. A free chlorine residual of 5 mg/L or above inhibited biological activity in the 1.2 m of soil that was studied. A free chlorine residual concentration of 2 mg/L prevented biological activity in the first 0.9 m of exposed soil and significant biological clogging was observed in soil greater than 0.9 m from the injection point. A 2 mg/L residual concentration of chloramine resulted in biological clogging over the 0.9 m of soil adjacent to the injection point. No chlorine addition resulted in clogging adjacent to the injection point indicating that the chloramine inhibited biological activity and allowed biological activity to occur over a greater distance from the injection point. Dissolved oxygen levels decreased to zero in aquifers where significant biological activity was observed and trihalomethane concentrations decreased in these aquifers. Free chlorine appears to effectively control biological clogging adjacent to the injection point while permitting biological activity to develop after the chlorine has decayed.

  10. Formation and speciation characteristics of brominated trihalomethanes in seawater chlorination.

    PubMed

    Padhi, R K; Sowmya, M; Mohanty, A K; Bramha, S N; Satpathy, K K

    2012-11-01

    Formation character of brominated-trihalomethanes (Br-THMs) in chlorinated seawater and its dependence on applied chlorine dose, reaction time, and temperature were investigated in the laboratory. Seawater was collected from the east coast of India and a chlorine dose of 1, 3, 5, and 10 ppm was each applied at a temperature of 20, 30, and 40 degrees C to investigate the yield and kinetics of Br-THMs formation. Qualitative and quantitative estimation of THM formation at various intervals of time ranging from 5 min to 168 h was determined by a gas chromatograph equipped with an electron capture detector (GC-ECD). Chlorine dose, chlorine contact time, and reaction temperature positively affected the load of THMs. The ratio of chlorine dose to halogen incorporation decreased from 12% to 5% with increasing applied chlorine dose from 1 to 10 ppm. Significant levels of THMs were found to be formed within 0.5 h of reaction, followed by a very slow rate of formation. Elevated temperature favored both increased rate of formation and overall THM yield. The formation order of different trihalomethane species at all studied temperatures was observed to be bromodichloromethane (CHCl2Br) < dibromochloromethane (CHClBr2) < bromoform (CHBr3). Formation of chloroform was not observed, and bromoform was the dominant (96% to 98%) among the three THM species formed. PMID:23356015

  11. Chlorinated phenols control the expression of the multi-drug resistance efflux pump MexAB-OprM in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by activating NalC

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sudeshna; Cremers, Claudia M.; Jakob, Ursula; Love, Nancy G.

    2011-01-01

    Summary NalC is a TetR type regulator that represses the multidrug efflux pump MexAB-OprM in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here we explain the mechanism of NalC mediated regulation of MexAB-OprM. We show that NalC non-covalently binds chlorinated phenols and chemicals containing chlorophenol sidechains such as triclosan. NalC-chlorinated phenol binding results in its dissociation from promoter DNA and up-regulation of NalC’s downstream targets, including the MexR antirepressor ArmR. ArmR up-regulation and MexR-ArmR complex formation have previously been shown to upregulate MexAB-OprM. In vivo mexB and armR expression analyses were used to corroborate in vitro NalC chlorinated phenol binding. We also show that the interaction between chlorinated phenols and NalC is reversible, such that removal of these chemicals restored NalC promoter DNA binding. Thus, the NalC-chlorinated phenol interaction is likely a pertinent physiological mechanism that P. aeruginosa uses to control expression of the MexAB-OprM efflux pump. PMID:21231970

  12. Large roads reduce bat activity across multiple species.

    PubMed

    Kitzes, Justin; Merenlender, Adina

    2014-01-01

    Although the negative impacts of roads on many terrestrial vertebrate and bird populations are well documented, there have been few studies of the road ecology of bats. To examine the effects of large roads on bat populations, we used acoustic recorders to survey bat activity along ten 300 m transects bordering three large highways in northern California, applying a newly developed statistical classifier to identify recorded calls to the species level. Nightly counts of bat passes were analyzed with generalized linear mixed models to determine the relationship between bat activity and distance from a road. Total bat activity recorded at points adjacent to roads was found to be approximately one-half the level observed at 300 m. Statistically significant road effects were also found for the Brazilian free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis), big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus), hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus), and silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans). The road effect was found to be temperature dependent, with hot days both increasing total activity at night and reducing the difference between activity levels near and far from roads. These results suggest that the environmental impacts of road construction may include degradation of bat habitat and that mitigation activities for this habitat loss may be necessary to protect bat populations. PMID:24823689

  13. Large Roads Reduce Bat Activity across Multiple Species

    PubMed Central

    Kitzes, Justin; Merenlender, Adina

    2014-01-01

    Although the negative impacts of roads on many terrestrial vertebrate and bird populations are well documented, there have been few studies of the road ecology of bats. To examine the effects of large roads on bat populations, we used acoustic recorders to survey bat activity along ten 300 m transects bordering three large highways in northern California, applying a newly developed statistical classifier to identify recorded calls to the species level. Nightly counts of bat passes were analyzed with generalized linear mixed models to determine the relationship between bat activity and distance from a road. Total bat activity recorded at points adjacent to roads was found to be approximately one-half the level observed at 300 m. Statistically significant road effects were also found for the Brazilian free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis), big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus), hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus), and silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans). The road effect was found to be temperature dependent, with hot days both increasing total activity at night and reducing the difference between activity levels near and far from roads. These results suggest that the environmental impacts of road construction may include degradation of bat habitat and that mitigation activities for this habitat loss may be necessary to protect bat populations. PMID:24823689

  14. Chlorine Dioxide (Gas)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas is registered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a sterilant for use in manufacturing, laboratory equipment, medical devices, environmental surfaces, tools and clean rooms. Aqueous ClO2 is registered by the EPA as a surface disinfectant and sanitizer fo...

  15. Chlorination of lanthanum oxide.

    PubMed

    Gaviría, Juan P; Navarro, Lucas G; Bohé, Ana E

    2012-03-01

    The reactive system La(2)O(3)(s)-Cl(2)(g) was studied in the temperature range 260-950 °C. The reaction course was followed by thermogravimetry, and the solids involved were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results showed that the reaction leads to the formation of solid LaOCl, and for temperatures above 850 °C, the lanthanum oxychloride is chlorinated, producing LaCl(3)(l). The formation of the oxychloride progresses through a nucleation and growth mechanism, and the kinetic analysis showed that at temperatures below 325 °C the system is under chemical control. The influence of diffusive processes on the kinetics of production of LaOCl was evaluated by studying the effect of the reactive gas flow rate, the mass of the sample, and the chlorine diffusion through the boundary layer surrounding the solid sample. The conversion curves were analyzed and fitted according to the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami description, and the reaction order with respect to the chlorine partial pressure was obtained by varying this partial pressure between 10 and 70 kPa. The rate equation was obtained, which includes the influence of the temperature, chlorine partial pressure, and reaction degree. PMID:22280490

  16. Chlorine dioxide and hemodialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.P. . Dept. of Pharmacology and Toxicology)

    1989-05-01

    Because it has little or no tendency to generate carcinogenic trihalomethanes such as chloroform, chlorine dioxide is an attractive alternative to chlorine for drinking water disinfection. There are, however, concerns about its acute toxicity, and the toxic effects of its by-products, chlorite and chlorate. The human experience with chlorine dioxide in both controlled, prospective studies and in actual use situations in community water supplies have as yet failed to reveal adverse health effects. The EPA has recommended standards of 0.06 mg/L for chlorine dioxide and standards of 0.007 mg/L for chlorite and chlorate in drinking water. Among groups who may be at special risk from oxychlorines in drinking water are patients who must undergro chronic extracorporeal hemodialysis. Although even units for home hemodialysis are supposed to be equipped with devices which effectively remove oxychlorines, there is a always a possibility of operator error or equipment failure. When the equipment is adequately maintained, it is likely that dialysis patients will have more intensive exposures from drinking water than from dialysis fluids despite the much larger volumes of water that are involved in dialysis. This paper discusses a hemodialysis and the standards and effects of oxychlorines. 90 refs., 2 tabs.

  17. Production of chlorine from chloride salts

    DOEpatents

    Rohrmann, Charles A.

    1981-01-01

    A process for converting chloride salts and sulfuric acid to sulfate salts and elemental chlorine is disclosed. A chloride salt and sulfuric acid are combined in a furnace where they react to produce a sulfate salt and hydrogen chloride. Hydrogen chloride from the furnace contacts a molten salt mixture containing an oxygen compound of vanadium, an alkali metal sulfate and an alkali metal pyrosulfate to recover elemental chlorine. In the absence of an oxygen-bearing gas during the contacting, the vanadium is reduced, but is regenerated to its active higher valence state by separately contacting the molten salt mixture with an oxygen-bearing gas.

  18. Lectin activity in mycelial extracts of Fusarium species.

    PubMed

    Bhari, Ranjeeta; Kaur, Bhawanpreet; Singh, Ram S

    2016-01-01

    Lectins are non-immunogenic carbohydrate-recognizing proteins that bind to glycoproteins, glycolipids, or polysaccharides with high affinity and exhibit remarkable ability to agglutinate erythrocytes and other cells. In the present study, ten Fusarium species previously not explored for lectins were screened for the presence of lectin activity. Mycelial extracts of F. fujikuroi, F. beomiformii, F. begoniae, F. nisikadoi, F. anthophilum, F. incarnatum, and F. tabacinum manifested agglutination of rabbit erythrocytes. Neuraminidase treatment of rabbit erythrocytes increased lectin titers of F. nisikadoi and F. tabacinum extracts, whereas the protease treatment resulted in a significant decline in agglutination by most of the lectins. Results of hapten inhibition studies demonstrated unique carbohydrate specificity of Fusarium lectins toward O-acetyl sialic acids. Activity of the majority of Fusarium lectins exhibited binding affinity to d-ribose, l-fucose, d-glucose, l-arabinose, d-mannitol, d-galactosamine hydrochloride, d-galacturonic acid, N-acetyl-d-galactosamine, N-acetyl-neuraminic acid, 2-deoxy-d-ribose, fetuin, asialofetuin, and bovine submaxillary mucin. Melibiose and N-glycolyl neuraminic acid did not inhibit the activity of any of the Fusarium lectins. Mycelial extracts of F. begoniae, F. nisikadoi, F. anthophilum, and F. incarnatum interacted with most of the carbohydrates tested. F. fujikuroi and F. anthophilum extracts displayed strong interaction with starch. The expression of lectin activity as a function of culture age was investigated. Most species displayed lectin activity on the 7th day of cultivation, and it varied with progressing of culture age. PMID:27237111

  19. Activated Carbons from Flax Shive and Cotton Gin Waste as Environmental Adsorbents for the Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Trichloroethylene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural by-products represent a considerable quantity of harvested commodity crops. The use of by-products as a starting material for the production of widely used adsorbents, such as activated carbons, may impart a value-added component of the overall biomass harvested. Our objective in this...

  20. Catalytic Role Of Palladium And Relative Reactivity Of Substituted Chlorines During Adsorption And Treatment Of PCBs On Reactive Activated Carbon

    EPA Science Inventory

    The adsorption-mediated dechlorination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is a unique feature of reactive activated cabon (RAC). Here, we address the RAC system, containing a tunable amount of Fe as a primary electron donor coupled with Pd as an electrochemical catalyst to pote...

  1. Altered UV absorbance and cytotoxicity of chlorinated sunscreen agents.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Vaughn F; Kennedy, Steven; Zhang, Hualin; Purser, Gordon H; Sheaff, Robert J

    2012-12-01

    Sunscreens are widely utilized due to the adverse effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation on human health. The safety of their active ingredients as well as that of any modified versions generated during use is thus of concern. Chlorine is used as a chemical disinfectant in swimming pools. Its reactivity suggests sunscreen components might be chlorinated, altering their absorptive and/or cytotoxic properties. To test this hypothesis, the UV-filters oxybenzone, dioxybenzone, and sulisobenzone were reacted with chlorinating agents and their UV spectra analyzed. In all cases, a decrease in UV absorbance was observed. Given that chlorinated compounds can be cytotoxic, the effect of modified UV-filters on cell viability was examined. Chlorinated oxybenzone and dioxybenzone caused significantly more cell death than unchlorinated controls. In contrast, chlorination of sulisobenzone actually reduced cytotoxicity of the parent compound. Exposing a commercially available sunscreen product to chlorine also resulted in decreased UV absorbance, loss of UV protection, and enhanced cytotoxicity. These observations show chlorination of sunscreen active ingredients can dramatically decrease UV absorption and generate derivatives with altered biological properties. PMID:22257218

  2. 46 CFR 151.50-31 - Chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... desired rate of discharge, provided the air or gas is oil-free and thoroughly dried by passing it over activated aluminum oxide, silica gel, or other acceptable drying agent, and provided the supply pressure is...-resistant to chlorine in either the gas or liquid phase. Cast or malleable iron shall not be used....

  3. Reactive oxygen species-activated nanomaterials as theranostic agents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kye S; Lee, Dongwon; Song, Chul Gyu; Kang, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated from the endogenous oxidative metabolism or from exogenous pro-oxidant exposure. Oxidative stress occurs when there is excessive production of ROS, outweighing the antioxidant defense mechanisms which may lead to disease states. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is one of the most abundant and stable forms of ROS, implicated in inflammation, cellular dysfunction and apoptosis, which ultimately lead to tissue and organ damage. This review is an overview of the role of ROS in different diseases. We will also examine ROS-activated nanomaterials with emphasis on hydrogen peroxide, and their potential medical implications. Further development of the biocompatible, stimuli-activated agent responding to disease causing oxidative stress, may lead to a promising clinical use. PMID:26328770

  4. Reactive oxygen species-activated nanomaterials as theranostic agents

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kye S; Lee, Dongwon; Song, Chul Gyu; Kang, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated from the endogenous oxidative metabolism or from exogenous pro-oxidant exposure. Oxidative stress occurs when there is excessive production of ROS, outweighing the antioxidant defense mechanisms which may lead to disease states. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is one of the most abundant and stable forms of ROS, implicated in inflammation, cellular dysfunction and apoptosis, which ultimately lead to tissue and organ damage. This review is an overview of the role of ROS in different diseases. We will also examine ROS-activated nanomaterials with emphasis on hydrogen peroxide, and their potential medical implications. Further development of the biocompatible, stimuli-activated agent responding to disease causing oxidative stress, may lead to a promising clinical use. PMID:26328770

  5. Bromoform production in tropical open-ocean waters: OTEC chlorination

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwig, E.O.; Valentine, R.

    1981-09-01

    The bromoform, and other volatile organics produced while chlorinating both the evaporator and condenser seawater during operation of the one megawatt (1 MW) OTEC-1 test facility are reported. Although many halogenated compounds might be produced as a result of chlorination, the quantitative analyses in this study focused on volatile EPA priority pollutants. Bromoform is the compound specifically recognized as a potential pollutant. Its concentration may be indicative of other halogenated species.

  6. Antimicrobial activity of Amazonian oils against Paenibacillus species.

    PubMed

    Santos, Roberto Christ Vianna; dos Santos Alves, Camilla Filippi; Schneider, Taiane; Lopes, Leonardo Quintana Soares; Aurich, Carlos; Giongo, Janice Luehring; Brandelli, Adriano; de Almeida Vaucher, Rodrigo

    2012-03-01

    The Gram-positive, spore-forming bacterium Paenibacillus larvae is the primary bacterial pathogen of honeybee brood and the causative agent of American foulbrood disease (AFB). One of the feasible alternative treatments being used for their control of this disease is essential oils. In this study in vitro antimicrobial activity of Andiroba and Copaíba essential oils against Paenibacillus species, including P. larvae was evaluated. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) in Mueller-Hinton broth by the microdilution method was assessed. Andiroba registered MIC values of 1.56-25%, while the MICs values obtained for Copaíba oil were of 1.56-12.5%. In order to determine the time-response effect of essential oils on P. larvae, this microorganism was exposed to the oils for up to 48 h. After 24 h treatment with Andiroba oil and after 48 h treatment with Copaíba oil no viable cells of P. larvae ATCC 9545 were observed. The possible toxic effect of essential oils were assessed by the spraying application method of the same concentrations of MICs. Bee mortality was evident only in treatment with Andiroba oil and the Copaíba oil shows no toxic effects after 10 days of observation. Taking together ours results showed for the first time that these oils presented a high activity against Paenibacillus species showing that Copaíba oil may be a candidate for the treatment or prevention of AFB. PMID:22200645

  7. Disappearance of chloramines in the presence of bromide and nitrite. [Ammoniacal monochloramine, diethylchloramine, and chloramines produced by chlorinating a real and synthetic secondary (activated sludge) municipal waste effluent

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    Batch experiments were used to study the reduction of chloramines in the presence of bromide and nitrite. Chloramines studies were ammoniacal monochloramine, diethylchloramine (DECA), and those produced by chlorinating a real and synthetic secondary (activated sludge) municipal waste effluent. Oxidant concentrations were measured using the DPD-FAS (N,N-diethyl-p-phenylenediamine, Ferrous Ammonium Sulfate) titrimetric procedure and/or spectrophotometrically. The degradation of NH/sub 2/Cl in the presence of bromide was found to occur via a mechanism consistent with a rate limiting step involving monochlorammonium ion (NH/sub 3/Cl/sup +/) and bromide ion. Experimental evidence suggests that the mixed haloamine, NHBrCl, was produced as an unstable intermediate. The oxidation of bromide by DECA did not occur by a mechanism similar to that describing the oxidation of bromide by NH/sub 2/Cl. The rate was not affected by added ammonia and was slower than that observed for comparable NH/sub 2/Cl-Br/sup -/ reactions. Chloramine loss in organic rich effluents was greatly accelerated by bromide addition. The reaction is not dependent on excess ammonia and is slower than that observed for a pure NH/sub 2/Cl-Br/sup -/ solution. Monochloramine can rapidly disappear in the presence of nitrite. The rates are too fast to be due solely to the hydrolysis of monochloramine. The presence of relatively small concentrations of nitrite can greatly accelerate the loss of NH/sub 2/Cl in the presence of bromide. Nitrite is not significantly consumed. Nitrite appears to increase the rate of bromide oxidation in a parallel acid catalyzed reaction mechanism which involves a rate limiting step described by a first order dependence on nitrite but no dependence on bromide. Empirical rate expressions and rate constants were determined for each reaction. 54 figures, 17 tables.

  8. On the formation and destruction of chlorine negative ions in the D region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, R. P.

    1977-01-01

    We have investigated the possible reactions of chlorine atoms, chlorine monoxide, and hydrogen chloride with D region negative ions. The mesospheric concentrations of the neutral chlorine gases have been predicted with a diurnally varying one-dimensional model of the upper atmosphere. Despite the low abundances of chlorine compounds in air their high reactivity leads to the formation of substantial quantities of clorine negative ions at high altitudes. The concentration of chlorine ions is limited in daylight by rapid reactions with oxygen and hydrogen atoms and at night by the competitive production of other stable ions. The presence of chlorine negative ions in the upper atmosphere is consistent with in situ mass spectrometer observations of charged species. The abundance of chlorinated ions in the D region may be correlated with mesospheric nitric oxide and water vapor concentrations.

  9. Anticholinesterase and Antityrosinase Activities of Ten Piper Species from Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Salleh, Wan Mohd Nuzul Hakimi Wan; Hashim, Nur Athirah; Ahmad, Farediah; Heng Yen, Khong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and antityrosinase activities of extracts from ten Piper species namely; P. caninum, P. lanatum, P. abbreviatum, P. aborescens, P. porphyrophyllum, P. erecticaule, P. ribesioides, P. miniatum, P. stylosum, and P. majusculum. Methods: Anticholinesterase and antityrosinase activities were evaluated against in vitro Ellman spectroscopy method and mushroom tyrosinase, respectively. Results: The EtOAc extract of P. erecticaule showed the highest AChE and BChE inhibitory with 22.9% and 70.9% inhibition, respectively. In antityrosinase activity, all extracts of P. porphyrophyllum showed the highest inhibitory effects against mushroom tyrosinase, compared to standard, kojic acid. Conclusion: This study showed that P. erecticaule and P. porphyrophyllum have potential AChE/BChE and tyrosinase inhibition activities. The respective extracts can be explored further for the development of novel lead as AChE/BChE and tyrosinase inhibitors in therapeutic management of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:25671185

  10. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of degrading short chain chlorinated paraffins over reduced graphene oxide/CoFe2O4/Ag nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Zhao, Qidong; Li, Xinyong; Wang, Dong

    2016-10-01

    Short chain chlorinated paraffins have recently attracted great attention because of their environmental persistence and biological toxicity as an important organic pollutant. In this work, reduced graphene oxide/CoFe2O4/Ag (RGO/CoFe2O4/Ag) nanocomposite was prepared and employed for photocatalytic degradation of short chain chlorinated paraffins. The process of photocatalytic degradation of short chain chlorinated paraffins over RGO/CoFe2O4/Ag under visible light (λ>400nm) was investigated by in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and the related mechanisms were proposed. An apparent degradation ratio of 91.9% over RGO/CoFe2O4/Ag could be obtained under visible light illumination of 12h, while only about 21.7% was obtained with commercial P25 TiO2 under the same experimental conditions, which demonstrates that the RGO/CoFe2O4/Ag nanocomposite is a potential candidate for effective photocatalytic removal of short chain chlorinated paraffins. PMID:27376973

  11. Formation of 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (MX) and mutagenic activity by chlorination of phenolic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Långvik, Vivi-Ann; Hormi, Osmo; Kronberg, Leif; Tikkanen, Leena; Holmbom, Bjarne

    Homovanillic acid, vanillin, protocatechualdehyde, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (LDOPA) and caffeic acid were chlorinated at pH 2 in aqueous solutions with various chlorine doses. The occurance of Ames-mutagenicity was tested, and the formation of 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (MX) and its isomer (E)-2-3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (MX) and its isomer (E)-2-ch'oro-3-(dichloromethyl)-4-oxo-butenoic acid (EMX), was determined by combined gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. Chlorination of the studied phenols resulted in Ames-mutagenicity and the formation of the mutagens MX and EMX. The molar ratios of MX to EMX varied from about 30-50 for caffeic acid and L-DOPA and from about 0.5 to 2 for homovanillic acid, vanillin and protocatechualdehyde. The results of our work show that MX and EMX in chlorinated drinking water may originate from phenolic subunits of the humic macromolecules.

  12. Alkaloid profiling and anticholinesterase activity of South American Lycopodiaceae species.

    PubMed

    Konrath, Eduardo Luis; Ortega, María Gabriela; de Loreto Bordignon, Sérgio; Apel, Miriam Anders; Henriques, Amélia Teresinha; Cabrera, José Luis

    2013-02-01

    The alkaloid extracts of four Huperzia and one Lycopodiella species, from Brazilian habitats, were tested for their in vitro anticholinesterase activities. IC(50) values showed a potent acetylcholinesterase inhibition for H. reflexa (0.11 ± 0.05 μg/mL), followed by H. quadrifariata (2.0 ± 0.3 μg/mL), H. acerosa (5.5 ± 0.9 μg/mL), H. heterocarpon (25.6 ± 2.7 μg/mL) and L. cernua (42.6 ± 1.5 μg/mL). A lower inhibition of butyrylcholinesterase was observed for all species with the exception of H. heterocarpon (8.3 ± 0.9 μg/mL), whose alkaloid extract presented a selectivity for pseudocholinesterase. Moreover, the chemical study of the bioactive extracts performed by GC-MS, revealed the presence of a number of Lycopodium alkaloids belonging to the lycopodane, flabellidane and cernuane groups. Surprisingly, the potent acetylcholinesterase inhibitors huperzines A and B were not detected in the extracts, suggesting that other alkaloids may be responsible for such an effect. PMID:22117191

  13. Organ- and species-specific biological activity of rosmarinic acid.

    PubMed

    Iswandana, R; Pham, B T; van Haaften, W T; Luangmonkong, T; Oosterhuis, D; Mutsaers, H A M; Olinga, P

    2016-04-01

    Rosmarinic acid (RA), a compound found in several plant species, has beneficial properties, including anti-inflammatory and antibacterial effects. We investigated the toxicity, anti-inflammatory, and antifibrotic effects of RA using precision-cut liver slices (PCLS) and precision-cut intestinal slices (PCIS) prepared from human, mouse, and rat tissue. PCLS and PCIS were cultured up to 48h in the absence or presence of RA. Gene expression of the inflammatory markers: IL-6, IL-8/CXCL1/KC, and IL-1β, as well as the fibrosis markers: pro-collagen 1a1, heat shock protein 47, α-smooth muscle actin, fibronectin (Fn2) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) were evaluated by qPCR. RA was only toxic in murine PCIS. RA failed to mitigate the inflammatory response in most models, while it clearly reduced IL-6 and CXCL1/KC gene expression in murine PCIS at non-toxic concentrations. With regard to fibrosis, RA decreased the gene levels of Fn2 and PAI-1 in murine PCLS, and Fn2 in murine PCIS. Yet, no effect was observed on the gene expression of fibrosis markers in human and rat PCIS. In conclusion, we observed clear organ- and species-specific effects of RA. RA had little influence on inflammation. However, our study further establishes RA as a potential candidate for the treatment of liver fibrosis. PMID:26804033

  14. Effect of chlorination on the development of marine biofilms dominated by diatoms.

    PubMed

    Patil, Jagadish S; Jagadeesan, V

    2011-03-01

    This study addressed the antifouling efficiency of commercially available chlorine at different concentrations (0.5%, 1%, and 2%) and exposure times (0.5 min, 1 min, 5 min, and 15 min). The rapid and non-destructive FIRe (fluorescence induction and relaxation) technique was used to evaluate the effects of the biocide on diatom dominated biofilms. The efficiency of chlorine in removing diatoms from the developed biofilms increased with an increase in concentration and exposure time. The fluorescence measurements revealed low F(v)/F(m) and high σ(PSII) values for chlorine-treated Navicula and Amphora biofilms indicating that chlorination was efficient in damaging the photosystem-II reaction centers. Chlorination also caused mortality of diatom cells by damaging the cell body. In natural biofilms, the biocidal effect of chlorine was species specific; species of Amphiphrora, Navicula, Cylindrotheca, and Coscinodiscus showed an increase in the density of the population, but species of Pleurosigma, Amphora, and Thalassionema did not increase in density after chlorine treatment. It was also demonstrated that diatoms can colonize, grow and photosynthesize on chlorine-treated surfaces. Under pulse chlorination (treatment every 6 h), irrespective of chlorine concentration, the development of biofouling decreased with an increase in exposure time. Differences between exposure times of 1 to 15 min were not significant. Additionally, transmission levels of the control (non-chlorine-treated) fouled coupons reduced significantly (∼20%) compared to the chlorine-treated fouled coupons (<2%). These results suggest that chlorine can be used as a biocide to control the development of diatom biofilms. PMID:21337191

  15. EFFECTS OF OZONE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORINE, AND MONOCHLORAMINE ON CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYST VIABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purified Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. xcystation and mouse infectivity were comparatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. zone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlorine an...

  16. Transfer of chlorine from the environment to agricultural foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Kashparov, V; Colle, C; Levchuk, S; Yoschenko, V; Svydynuk, N

    2007-01-01

    The factors governing chlorine transfer from Phaeozem and Greyzem soils to various important crop species (foodstuff and forage) were determined in natural conditions in the Kiev region of Ukraine. The stable chlorine concentration ratio (CR) values were the lowest in apple (0.5+/-0.3) and strawberry (2+/-1), higher in vegetables (5+/-3), seeds (15+/-7) and reached a maximum in straw (187+/-90). The average CR values of 36Cl were estimated for the most important crops using all experimental data on 36Cl and stable chlorine transfer into plants from various soils. It was experimentally shown that boiling potatoes in water leads to an equilibrium between 36Cl specific content in the water and moisture in the cooked potato. The 36Cl processing factor (PF) for boiling various foodstuffs is equal to the ratio of water mass in the cooked foodstuff to the total water mass (in the food and the decoction). 36Cl PF for cereal flour can be estimated as 1. The 36Cl processing factor for dairy products is equal to the ratio of residual water mass in the product to initial water mass in milk. At a 36Cl specific activity in soil of 1 Bq kg-1, the estimated annual dietary 36Cl intake into human organism (adult man) is about 10 kBq. Sixty to seventy percent of the above amount will be taken in via milk and dairy products, 7-16% via meat, 14-16% via bread and bakery items and 8-12% via vegetables. The highest annual 36Cl intake, 10.7 kBq, is predicted for 1-year-old children. The expected effective doses from annual 36Cl intake are higher for younger age groups, increasing from 0.008 mSv in adults to 0.12 mSv in 1-year-old children. PMID:17289228

  17. Chlorine isotope variability in subglacial glasses from Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halldorsson, S. A.; Barnes, J.; Stefansson, A.; Hilton, D. R.; Hauri, E. H.

    2014-12-01

    Chlorine concentrations tend to be significantly enriched in surface reservoirs relative to that of the mantle. This large contrast in chlorine contents makes primary asthenospheric melts, highly susceptible to contamination by surficial chlorine in shallow-level crustal environments. Indeed, on the basis of both chlorine abundance systematics [e.g., 1], and chlorine isotopes [2], previous researchers have argued for a surficial chlorine component in controlling the chlorine systematics of MORB. In contrast, other studies suggest recycling of ancient chlorine via a subducted, altered oceanic lithospheric component as a means of controlling the chlorine isotope composition of the mantle [3]. So far, very few high precision chlorine isotope data are available from key oceanic islands, which potentially provide access to deeper parts of the mantle and thus allow for testing of the relative role of these ideas. We report new chlorine isotope (reported as δ37Cl; n=22) and abundance data (SIMS) derived from fresh subglacial glasses from Iceland. The glasses, which cover all the currently active volcanic zones of Iceland, span a wide range in their major element composition with MgO contents between 2.1 and 10.0 wt% and chlorine contents, that vary by almost two orders of magnitude, of 17 to 1270 ppm. Chlorine contents show significant correlations (R2 > 0.9) with incompatible elements such as potassium, consistent with earlier observations from Iceland and the adjacent Reykjanes Ridge [4, 5]. δ37Cl values range from -0.6‰ to +1.4‰. Significantly, δ37Cl values strongly correlate with Cl and MgO contents, with low δ37Cl values in samples with low Cl and high MgO concentrations. The data are consistent with mixing between two different reservoirs: a upper mantle reservoir with low Cl concentration and a slightly negative δ37Cl value and a crustal reservoir with a high Cl concentration and enriched in 37Cl. To further investigate the origin of these chlorine isotope

  18. Sarcoendoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase. A critical target in chlorine inhalation-induced cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shama; Ahmad, Aftab; Hendry-Hofer, Tara B; Loader, Joan E; Claycomb, William C; Mozziconacci, Olivier; Schöneich, Christian; Reisdorph, Nichole; Powell, Roger L; Chandler, Joshua D; Day, Brian J; Veress, Livia A; White, Carl W

    2015-04-01

    Autopsy specimens from human victims or experimental animals that die due to acute chlorine gas exposure present features of cardiovascular pathology. We demonstrate acute chlorine inhalation-induced reduction in heart rate and oxygen saturation in rats. Chlorine inhalation elevated chlorine reactants, such as chlorotyrosine and chloramine, in blood plasma. Using heart tissue and primary cardiomyocytes, we demonstrated that acute high-concentration chlorine exposure in vivo (500 ppm for 30 min) caused decreased total ATP content and loss of sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) activity. Loss of SERCA activity was attributed to chlorination of tyrosine residues and oxidation of an important cysteine residue, cysteine-674, in SERCA, as demonstrated by immunoblots and mass spectrometry. Using cardiomyocytes, we found that chlorine-induced cell death and damage to SERCA could be decreased by thiocyanate, an important biological antioxidant, and by genetic SERCA2 overexpression. We also investigated a U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved drug, ranolazine, used in treatment of cardiac diseases, and previously shown to stabilize SERCA in animal models of ischemia-reperfusion. Pretreatment with ranolazine or istaroxime, another SERCA activator, prevented chlorine-induced cardiomyocyte death. Further investigation of responsible mechanisms showed that ranolazine- and istaroxime-treated cells preserved mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP after chlorine exposure. Thus, these studies demonstrate a novel critical target for chlorine in the heart and identify potentially useful therapies to mitigate toxicity of acute chlorine exposure. PMID:25188881

  19. Sarcoendoplasmic Reticulum Ca2+ ATPase. A Critical Target in Chlorine Inhalation–Induced Cardiotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Aftab; Hendry-Hofer, Tara B.; Loader, Joan E.; Claycomb, William C.; Mozziconacci, Olivier; Schöneich, Christian; Reisdorph, Nichole; Powell, Roger L.; Chandler, Joshua D.; Day, Brian J.; Veress, Livia A.; White, Carl W.

    2015-01-01

    Autopsy specimens from human victims or experimental animals that die due to acute chlorine gas exposure present features of cardiovascular pathology. We demonstrate acute chlorine inhalation–induced reduction in heart rate and oxygen saturation in rats. Chlorine inhalation elevated chlorine reactants, such as chlorotyrosine and chloramine, in blood plasma. Using heart tissue and primary cardiomyocytes, we demonstrated that acute high-concentration chlorine exposure in vivo (500 ppm for 30 min) caused decreased total ATP content and loss of sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) activity. Loss of SERCA activity was attributed to chlorination of tyrosine residues and oxidation of an important cysteine residue, cysteine-674, in SERCA, as demonstrated by immunoblots and mass spectrometry. Using cardiomyocytes, we found that chlorine-induced cell death and damage to SERCA could be decreased by thiocyanate, an important biological antioxidant, and by genetic SERCA2 overexpression. We also investigated a U.S. Food and Drug Administration–approved drug, ranolazine, used in treatment of cardiac diseases, and previously shown to stabilize SERCA in animal models of ischemia–reperfusion. Pretreatment with ranolazine or istaroxime, another SERCA activator, prevented chlorine-induced cardiomyocyte death. Further investigation of responsible mechanisms showed that ranolazine- and istaroxime-treated cells preserved mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP after chlorine exposure. Thus, these studies demonstrate a novel critical target for chlorine in the heart and identify potentially useful therapies to mitigate toxicity of acute chlorine exposure. PMID:25188881

  20. Evidence That Chlorinated Auxin Is Restricted to the Fabaceae But Not to the Fabeae1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    McAdam, Scott A.M.; McAdam, Erin L.

    2015-01-01

    Auxin is a pivotal plant hormone, usually occurring in the form of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). However, in maturing pea (Pisum sativum) seeds, the level of the chlorinated auxin, 4-chloroindole-3-acetic acid (4-Cl-IAA), greatly exceeds that of IAA. A key issue is how plants produce halogenated compounds such as 4-Cl-IAA. To better understand this topic, we investigated the distribution of the chlorinated auxin. We show for the first time, to our knowledge, that 4-Cl-IAA is found in the seeds of Medicago truncatula, Melilotus indicus, and three species of Trifolium. Furthermore, we found no evidence that Pinus spp. synthesize 4-Cl-IAA in seeds, contrary to a previous report. The evidence indicates a single evolutionary origin of 4-Cl-IAA synthesis in the Fabaceae, which may provide an ideal model system to further investigate the action and activity of halogenating enzymes in plants. PMID:25971549

  1. Evidence That Chlorinated Auxin Is Restricted to the Fabaceae But Not to the Fabeae.

    PubMed

    Lam, Hong Kiat; McAdam, Scott A M; McAdam, Erin L; Ross, John J

    2015-07-01

    Auxin is a pivotal plant hormone, usually occurring in the form of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). However, in maturing pea (Pisum sativum) seeds, the level of the chlorinated auxin, 4-chloroindole-3-acetic acid (4-Cl-IAA), greatly exceeds that of IAA. A key issue is how plants produce halogenated compounds such as 4-Cl-IAA. To better understand this topic, we investigated the distribution of the chlorinated auxin. We show for the first time, to our knowledge, that 4-Cl-IAA is found in the seeds of Medicago truncatula, Melilotus indicus, and three species of Trifolium. Furthermore, we found no evidence that Pinus spp. synthesize 4-Cl-IAA in seeds, contrary to a previous report. The evidence indicates a single evolutionary origin of 4-Cl-IAA synthesis in the Fabaceae, which may provide an ideal model system to further investigate the action and activity of halogenating enzymes in plants. PMID:25971549

  2. Impact of water quality on chlorine demand of corroding copper.

    PubMed

    Lytle, Darren A; Liggett, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    Copper is widely used in drinking water premise plumbing system materials. In buildings such as hospitals, large and complicated plumbing networks make it difficult to maintain good water quality. Sustaining safe disinfectant residuals throughout a building to protect against waterborne pathogens such as Legionella is particularly challenging since copper and other reactive distribution system materials can exert considerable demands. The objective of this work was to evaluate the impact of pH and orthophosphate on the consumption of free chlorine associated with corroding copper pipes over time. A copper test-loop pilot system was used to control test conditions and systematically meet the study objectives. Chlorine consumption trends attributed to abiotic reactions with copper over time were different for each pH condition tested, and the total amount of chlorine consumed over the test runs increased with increasing pH. Orthophosphate eliminated chlorine consumption trends with elapsed time (i.e., chlorine demand was consistent across entire test runs). Orthophosphate also greatly reduced the total amount of chlorine consumed over the test runs. Interestingly, the total amount of chlorine consumed and the consumption rate were not pH dependent when orthophosphate was present. The findings reflect the complex and competing reactions at the copper pipe wall including corrosion, oxidation of Cu(I) minerals and ions, and possible oxidation of Cu(II) minerals, and the change in chlorine species all as a function of pH. The work has practical applications for maintaining chlorine residuals in premise plumbing drinking water systems including large buildings such as hospitals. PMID:26826646

  3. Discovering Engangered Species. A Learning and Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Nancy; Machlis, Sally

    Up to 33 million species share the earth; no one knows the exact number for sure. All over the world, many species are becoming extinct. This workbook is designed to help children become more aware of the concept of extinction, and to develop personal strategies for helping with the problem of endangered species. Included are 31 activities…

  4. Analytical and biological characterization of halogenated gemfibrozil produced through chlorination of wastewater.

    PubMed

    Bulloch, Daryl N; Lavado, Ramon; Forsgren, Kristy L; Beni, Szabolcs; Schlenk, Daniel; Larive, Cynthia K

    2012-05-15

    The cholesterol-lowering pharmaceutical gemfibrozil is a relevant environmental contaminant because of its frequency of detection in U.S. wastewaters at concentrations which have been shown to disrupt endocrine function in aquatic species. The treatment of gemfibrozil solutions with sodium hypochlorite yielded a 4'-chlorinated gemfibrozil analog (chlorogemfibrozil). In the presence of bromide ion, as is often encountered in municipal wastewater, hypobromous acid generated through a halogen exchange reaction produced an additional 4'-brominated gemfibrozil product (bromogemfibrozil). Standards of chloro- and bromogemfibrozil were synthesized, isolated and characterized using mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. Mass spectrometry was used to follow the in situ halogenation reaction of gemfibrozil in deionized water and wastewater matrices, and to measure levels of gemfibrozil (254 ± 20 ng/L), chlorogemfibrozil (166 ± 121 ng/L), and bromogemfibrozil (50 ± 11 ng/L) in advanced primary wastewater treatment effluent treated by chlorination. Chlorogemfibrozil demonstrated a significant (p < 0.05) reduction in the levels of 11-ketotestosterone at 55.1 μg/L and bromogemfibrozil demonstrated a significant (p < 0.05) reduction in the levels of testosterone at 58.8 μg/L in vivo in Japanese medaka in a 21 day exposure. These results indicated that aqueous exposure to halogenated degradates of gemfibrozil enhanced the antiandrogenicity of the parent compound in a model fish species, demonstrating that chlorination may increase the toxicity of pharmaceutically active compounds in surface water. PMID:22494162

  5. Species Turnover and Diel Flight Activity of Species of Dung Beetles, Onthophagus, in the Tropical Lowland Forest of Peninsular Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Boonrotpong, Singtoe; Sotthibandhu, Sunthorn; Satasook, Chutamas

    2012-01-01

    Species turnover and temporal variation of forest insects were used to explain the ecological succession and ecological segregation between efficiently competing species. In this study, species richness, abundance, and beta-diversity of the genus Onthophagus (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) assemblages between 2003 and 2007 were described and the diel—flight activity was examined in the disturbed forest and the interior forest of the lowland tropical rain forest at Ton Nga Chang Wildlife Sanctuary in peninsular Thailand. A total of 2,260 individuals of 22 species in 2003 and 2,382 individuals of 24 species in 2007 were collected. Although species richness and abundance did not differ significantly between the two years, all similarity indices were significantly different. The community structure of Onthophagus assemblage in 2003 demonstrated a heterogeneous pattern, whereas there was a tendency for the pattern to shift toward a more homogeneous structure in 2007. The temporal variation showed two distinct diel—flight activities; diurnal and crepuscular patterns. Six species were crepuscular (O. deflexicollis Lansberge, O. orientalis Harold, O. rudis Sharp, O. sp 1, O. sp 2, and O. sp 4), whereas most of Onthophagus species demonstrated diurnal pattern. Remarkably, five species (O. taurinus White, O. pilularius Lansberge, O. punneeae Masumoto, O. laevis Harold, and O. sp 3.) could not be classified as either diurnal or crepuscular species. It was suggested that the species turnover was probably influenced by the recovery of the forest structure and the decrease of anthropogenic disturbance. Resource partitioning was suggested to be a key factor for crepuscular adaptation in Onthophagus species. PMID:23418986

  6. Efficient photosensitization by a chlorin-polyoxometalate supramolecular complex.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Il; Kim, Jung Hwa; Li, Jia Zhu; Lee, Woo Kyoung; Shim, Young Key

    2014-01-01

    The 4:1 supramolecular complexed ionic salt between pyridinium chlorin and polyanionic [α-SiMo12O40](4-) exhibits significantly enhanced photodynamic activity against A549 cell lines because of increased singlet oxygen photogeneration through high cellular penetration and localization of the chlorin molecules on the ionic salt into the cancer cell. Confocal laser scanning microscopy images clearly represent a higher uptake and photodynamic effect of this supramolecular complex corresponding to the lower IC50 value compared to the free chlorin. PMID:24320629

  7. 40 CFR 704.45 - Chlorinated terphenyl.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... means the percent by weight of chlorine for each isomer (ortho, meta, and para). (3) Isomeric ratio... chlorinated terphenyl. (4) A description of the isomeric ratio and extent of chlorination of the...

  8. A comparison of chlorinated organic material produced by chlorine and chlorine dioxide bleaching

    SciTech Connect

    McKaque, A.B.; Reeve, D.W.

    1995-12-31

    Chlorine and chlorine dioxide react differently with pulp during bleaching and produce different types of organic by-products. The main differences are the large reduction in the amount of AOX (adsorbable organic halogen) in the effluent and EOX (extractable organic halogen) in the pulp. This talk reviews the differences in the amounts and types of chlorinated organic by-products produced by the two different bleaching agents.

  9. "Invented Invaders": An Engaging Activity to Teach Characteristics Control of Invasive Species

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lampert, Evan

    2015-01-01

    Invasive species, defined as exotic species that reach pest status, are major threats to global biodiversity. Although invasive species can belong to any taxonomic group, general characteristics such as rapid growth and reproduction are shared by many invasive species. "Invented Invaders" is a collaborative activity in which students…

  10. Observation of halogen species in the Amundsen Gulf, Arctic, by active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pöhler, Denis; Vogel, Leif; Friess, Udo; Platt, Ulrich

    2010-04-13

    In the polar tropospheric boundary layer, reactive halogen species (RHS) are responsible for ozone depletion as well as the oxidation of elemental mercury and dimethyl sulphide. After polar sunrise, air masses enriched in reactive bromine cover areas of several million square kilometers. Still, the source and release mechanisms of halogens are not completely understood. We report measurements of halogen oxides performed in the Amundsen Gulf, Arctic, during spring 2008. Active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) measurements were set up offshore, several kilometers from the coast, directly on the sea ice, which was never done before. High bromine oxide concentrations were detected frequently during sunlight hours with a characteristic daily cycle showing morning and evening maxima and a minimum at noon. The, so far, highest observed average mixing ratio in the polar boundary layer of 41 pmol/mol (equal to pptv) was detected. Only short sea ice contact is required to release high amounts of bromine. An observed linear decrease of maximum bromine oxide levels with ambient temperature during sunlight, between -24 degrees C and -15 degrees C, provides indications on the conditions required for the emission of RHS. In addition, the data indicate the presence of reactive chlorine in the Arctic boundary layer. In contrast to Antarctica, iodine oxide was not detected above a detection limit of 0.3 pmol/mol. PMID:20160121

  11. Observation of halogen species in the Amundsen Gulf, Arctic, by active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pöhler, Denis; Vogel, Leif; Frieß, Udo; Platt, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    In the polar tropospheric boundary layer, reactive halogen species (RHS) are responsible for ozone depletion as well as the oxidation of elemental mercury and dimethyl sulphide. After polar sunrise, air masses enriched in reactive bromine cover areas of several million square kilometers. Still, the source and release mechanisms of halogens are not completely understood. We report measurements of halogen oxides performed in the Amundsen Gulf, Arctic, during spring 2008. Active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) measurements were set up offshore, several kilometers from the coast, directly on the sea ice, which was never done before. High bromine oxide concentrations were detected frequently during sunlight hours with a characteristic daily cycle showing morning and evening maxima and a minimum at noon. The, so far, highest observed average mixing ratio in the polar boundary layer of 41 pmol/mol (equal to pptv) was detected. Only short sea ice contact is required to release high amounts of bromine. An observed linear decrease of maximum bromine oxide levels with ambient temperature during sunlight, between -24 °C and -15 °C, provides indications on the conditions required for the emission of RHS. In addition, the data indicate the presence of reactive chlorine in the Arctic boundary layer. In contrast to Antarctica, iodine oxide was not detected above a detection limit of 0.3 pmol/mol. PMID:20160121

  12. Pharmacologically active compounds in the Anoectochilus and Goodyera species.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiao-Ming; Irino, Nobuto; Furusho, Norihiro; Hayashi, Jun; Shoyama, Yukihiro

    2008-04-01

    The extract of Anoectochilus formosanus showed significant activity in decreasing the levels of the cytosolic enzymes LDH, GOT, and GPT, and the result demonstrated that A. formosanus possessed prominent hepatoprotective activity against CCl(4)-induced hepatotoxicity. Moreover, in the results of the test using aurothioglucose-induced obese mice, the extract showed a significant antihyperliposis effect. A. formosanus grown in the wild and propagated by tissue culture contain ten compounds, including a major known component, (3R)-3-(beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy)butanolide (kinsenoside; 1), and two new components, (3R)-3-(beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-4-hydroxybutanoic acid (2) and 2-[(beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy)methyl]-5-hydroxymethylfuran (3), along with the known compounds, isopropyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside (4), (R)-3,4-dihydroxybutanoic acid gamma-lactone (5), 4-(beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy) benzyl alcohol (6), (6R,9S)-9-(beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy)megastigma-4,7-dien-3-one (7), and (3R)-3-(beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-4-hydroxybutanolide (8). Since a higher concentration of kinsenoside (1) was detected in the crude drugs A. formosanus and A. koshunensis by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis, we proved a simple purification system for kinsenoside (1), giving 180 mg of kinsenoside (1) from 1 g of dried samples for further pharmacological experiments. In an anti-hyperliposis assay using high-fat-diet rats, 1 significantly reduced the weights of the body and the liver, and also decreased the triglyceride level in the liver compared to those of control rats. On the other hand, the epimer of 1, (3S)-3-(beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy)butanolide, goodyeroside A (9), which was isolated from the Goodyera species, had no effect for anti-hyperliposis. In aurothioglucose-induced obese mice, 1 suppressed the body and liver weight increase, significantly ameliorated the triglyceride level in the liver, and also reduced the deposition of uterine fat pads. The anti

  13. Germicidal activities of representatives of five different teat dip classes against three bovine mycoplasma species using a modified excised teat model.

    PubMed

    Boddie, R L; Owens, W E; Ray, C H; Nickerson, S C; Boddie, N T

    2002-08-01

    Six representative teat dips from five different teat dip classes were tested for germicidal activity against challenge exposure to Mycoplasma bovis, Mycoplasma californicum, and Mycoplasma bovigenitalium using a modified excised teat model. All teat dip formulations tested were efficacious against all of the Mycoplasma species, providing bacterial logarithmic reductions above 4. The germicides performed best against M. bovigenitalium with an average log reduction (LR) of 6.29. Average LR were 5.41 and 5.70 against M. bovis and M. californicum, respectively. The iodine and chlorhexidine products performed best against M. bovis and M. californicum, respectively, with complete kill of all organisms. The chlorhexidine and the barrier chlorine product also had complete kill of M. bovigenitalium organisms. PMID:12214982

  14. [Advances in studies on chemical constituents and biological activities of Desmodium species].

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Qian-Jun; Kang, Wen-Yi; Zhang, Long; Zhou, Qing-Di

    2013-12-01

    The chemical constituents isolated from Desmodium species (Leguminosae) included terpenoids, flavonoids, steroids, alkaloids compounds. Modem pharmacological studies have showed that the Desmodium species have antioxidant, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective, diuretic, antipyretic, analgesic and choleretic activity. This article mainly has reviewed the research advances of chemical constituents and biological activities of Desmodium species since 2003. PMID:24791478

  15. Spatial and temporal variability of inorganic chlorine in Northwestern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommariva, R.; Hollis, L. D. J.; Baker, A. R.; Ball, S. M.; Bell, T. G.; Cordell, R. L.; Fleming, Z.; Gaget, M.; Yang, M. X.; Monks, P. S.

    2015-12-01

    Chlorine is well known to be a strong oxidant in the atmosphere;chlorine reactivity impacts the formation of tropospheric ozone, theoxidation of methane and non-methane hydrocarbons, and the cycling ofnitrogen, sulphur and mercury. An accurate assessment of the roleplayed by chlorine in tropospheric chemical processes is complicatedby the scarce knowledge of its sources, sinks and distribution.We report observations of inorganic chlorine species (Cl2, ClNO2,particulate chloride) taken over the period 2014-2015 at threedifferent locations in Britain: an urban site a hundred kilometersfrom the ocean (Leicester), a coastal site mostly affected by shiptraffic (Penlee Point, Cornwall) and a coastal site experiencingeither clean air from the North Sea or polluted air from inland(Weybourne, Norfolk).This dataset provides a first look into the geographical distributionand seasonal variability of chlorine in Northwestern Europe: theresults suggest that, during the night, ClNO2 is ubiquitous withconcentrations in the range of hundreds to thousands of pptV at alllocations, whereas Cl2 can be observed only at coastal sites, withconcentrations of a few tens of pptV. The implications of thewidespread presence of these forms of inorganic chlorine for ozoneproduction and, in general, for the oxidative processes in the loweratmosphere are discussed with the help of a wide range of supportingmeasurements.

  16. Shock-tube pyrolysis of chlorinated hydrocarbons - Formation of soot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenklach, M.; Hsu, J. P.; Miller, D. L.; Matula, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Soot formation in pyrolysis of chlorinated methanes, their mixtures with methane, and chlorinated ethylenes were studied behind reflected shock waves by monitoring the attenuation of an He-Ne laser beam. An additional single-pulse shock-tube study was conducted for the pyrolysis of methane, methyl chloride, and dichloromethane. The experiments were performed at temperatures 1300-3000 K, pressures of 0.4-3.6 bar, and total carbon atom concentrations of 1-5 x 10 to the 17th atoms cu cm. The amounts of soot produced in the pyrolysis of chlorinated hydrocarbons are larger than that of their nonchlorinated counterparts. The sooting behavior and product distribution can be generally explained in terms of chlorine-catalyzed chemical reaction mechanisms. The pathway to soot from chlorinated methanes and ethylenes with high H:Cl ratio proceeds via the formation of C2H, C2H2, and C2H3 species. For chlorinated hydrocarbons with low H:Cl ratio, the formation of C2 and its contribution to soot formation at high temperatures becomes significant. There is evidence for the importance of CHCl radical and its reactions in the pyrolysis of dichloromethane.

  17. Reactive chlorine chemistry in the boundary layer of coastal Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielcke, Johannes; Poehler, Denis; Friess, Udo; Hay, Tim; Eger, Philipp; Kreher, Karin; Platt, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    A unique feature of the polar troposphere is the strong impact of halogen photochemistry, in which reactive halogen species are responsible for ozone depletion as well as the oxidation of elemental mercury and dimethyl sulphide. The source, however, as well as release and recycling mechanisms of these halogen species - for some species even abundances - are far from being completely known, especially of chlorine and iodine compounds. Here we present active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) measurements conducted during austral spring 2012 at Ross Island, Antarctica, observing several species (BrO, O3, NO2, IO, ClO, OBrO, OClO, OIO, I2, CHOCHO, HCHO, HONO). For the first time, ClO was detected and quantified in the marine boundary layer of coastal Antarctica, with typical mixing ratios around 20 pptv and maxima around 50 pptv. Meteorological controls on the mixing ratio of ClO as well as the interplay with other halogen compounds will be discussed, such as the lack of observed OClO (< 1 pptv). The results seem to reflect previously in chamber studies observed dependences on ozone levels and solar irradiance.

  18. Approaches for the analysis of chlorinated lipids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Yi; Albert, Carolyn J; Ford, David A

    2013-12-15

    Leukocytes are key cellular mediators of human diseases through their role in inflammation. Identifying unique molecules produced by leukocytes may provide new biomarkers and mechanistic insights into the role of leukocytes in disease. Chlorinated lipids are generated as a result of myeloperoxidase-containing leukocyte-derived hypochlorous acid targeting the vinyl ether bond of plasmalogens. The initial product of this reaction is α-chlorofatty aldehyde. α-Chlorofatty aldehyde is both oxidized to α-chlorofatty acid and reduced to α-chlorofatty alcohol by cellular metabolism. This review focuses on the separation techniques and quantitative analysis for these chlorinated lipids. For α-chlorofatty acid, the negative charge of carboxylic acids is exploited to detect the chlorinated lipid species of these acids by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in the negative ion mode. In contrast, α-chlorofatty aldehyde and α-chlorofatty alcohol are converted to pentafluorobenzyl oxime and pentafluorobenzoyl ester derivatives, which are detected by negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry. These two detection methods coupled with the use of stable isotope internal standards and either liquid chromatography or gas chromatography provide highly sensitive analytical approaches to measure these novel lipids. PMID:24056259

  19. Various Molecular Species of Diacylglycerol Hydroperoxide Activate Human Neutrophils via PKC Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kambayashi, Yasuhiro; Takekoshi, Susumu; Tanino, Yutaka; Watanabe, Keiichi; Nakano, Minoru; Hitomi, Yoshiaki; Takigawa, Tomoko; Ogino, Keiki; Yamamoto, Yorihiro

    2007-01-01

    We have proposed that diacylglycerol hydroperoxide-induced unregulated signal transduction causes oxidative stress-related diseases. In this study, we investigated which molecular species of diacylglycerol hydroperoxide activated human peripheral neutrophils. All diacylglycerol hydroperoxides, diacylglycerol hydroxides, and diacyglycerols tested in the present study induced superoxide production by neutrophils. The ability to activate neutrophils among molecular species containing the same fatty acid composition was as follows; diacylglycerol hydroperoxide>diacylglycerol hydroxide≥diacylglycerol. The diacylglycerol hydroperoxide composed of linoleate was a stronger activator for neutrophils than that composed of arachidonate. 1-Palmitoyl-2-linoleoylglycerol hydroperoxide (PLG-OOH) was the strongest stimulator for neutrophils. We reconfirmed that PLG-OOH activated protein kinase C (PKC) in neutrophils. PLG-OOH induced the phosphorylation of p47phox, a substrate of PKC and a cytosolic component of NADPH oxidase, in neutrophils, as did N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine or 4β-phorbol-12β-myristate-13α-acetate. Moreover, the time course of p47phox phosphorylation was comparable to that of superoxide production. These results suggest that PLG-OOH activated intracellular protein kinase C. PLG-OOH, produced via an uncontrolled process, can act as a biological second messenger to cause inflammatory disease from oxidative stress. PMID:18392102

  20. Tick species (Acari: Ixodida) in Antalya City, Turkey: species diversity and seasonal activity.

    PubMed

    Koc, Samed; Aydın, Levent; Cetin, Huseyin

    2015-07-01

    Ticks (Acari: Ixodida) are an important group of ectoparasites of vertebrates. Most species are known vectors of diseases including Lyme disease, Q fever, and Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever. A 3-year research was conducted in Antalya, Turkey, to determine tick species composition, seasonal abundance, and spatial distribution. The study was carried out in five districts (Aksu, Dosemealtı, Kepez, Konyaaltı, and Muratpasa) of Antalya Metropolitan Municipality area in Turkey, between May 2010 and May 2013, where 1393 tick specimens were collected from domestic and wild animals (cattle, goats, sheep, hedgehogs, tortoises, dogs, cats, chickens) and from the environment. The collected ticks were preserved in 70 % alcohol and then were identified. Five genus and eight hard and soft tick species were identified, including Argas persicus, Rhipicephalus annulatus, R. sanguineus, R. turanicus, Hyalomma aegyptium, H. marginatum, Haemaphysalis parva, and Dermacentor niveus. Rhipicephalus sanguineus, R. turanicus, and H. aegyptium were the most common tick species in Antalya city. Rhipicephalus turanicus and R. sanguineus were the most abundant tick species infesting dogs in the city. The hosts of H. aegyptium are primarily tortoises in Antalya. The results of this research will contribute to establishing appropriate measures to control tick infestations on animals and humans and their environment in the city of Antalya. PMID:25869959

  1. Development of compound-specific isotope analysis of stable chlorine in sub-µmol quantities of chlorinated organic substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmstrand, H.; Andersson, P.; Gustafsson, O.

    2003-04-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons is a common class of substances known to be of high ecotoxicity largely due to their persistence and strongly lipophilic properties. This group of chemicals include the semivolatile compounds dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), which, together with solvents like trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE), are globally present at detectable levels in all natural environments. Recent reports on the possibility of enzymatic synthesis of chlorinated dioxins and furans, illustrate the need for means to distinguish the naturally produced contribution from anthropogenic input to the environment. Shifts in the chlorine isotope composition due to degradation, or synthesis, of a compound are in the order of a few per mil of the initial isotope ratio. The cause of the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) arises from differences in preferential phase distribution of isotopic species. Compound specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of stable chlorine should accordingly provide knowledge relevant to degradation rates, distribution patterns and reaction pathways for organochlorines. Isotope analysis of chlorine, derived from chlorinated hydrocarbons, can be performed using thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS) with positive ions. This lowers the limit of determination from about 30 μmol Cl for conventional electron ionisation mass spectrometry (EIMS), to less than 0.3 μmol Cl with a precision of 0.25 ppm (1s) for TIMS. Such a decrease by a factor 100 in the requirements of sample size will enable CSIA of sediment samples collected away from the immediate vicinity of strongly contaminated areas. The aim of this study is to develop a functioning sequence for i) sealed tube combustion with CuO of solid phase chlorinated hydrocarbons equivalent to <0.7 μmol Cl, ii) conversion of formed chloride to CsCl by ion exchange chromatography and iii) analysis of chlorine isotopes in TIMS. The described method can open new

  2. Theoretical and experimental formation of low chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans in the Fenton oxidation of chlorophenol solutions.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Castro, Pablo; San Román, M Fresnedo; Ortiz, Inmaculada

    2016-10-01

    The formation of chlorinated and non-chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) has been experimentally investigated after the Fenton oxidation of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP, 15.56 mM) aqueous solutions by assessing the influence of iron concentration (0.09-2.88 mM), hydrogen peroxide dose (40.44-202.20 mM), temperature (20-70 °C) and chloride concentration (0-56.35 mM). The presence of chloride in the medium together with room temperature and substoichiometric Fenton conditions (40.44 mM H2O2) led to an increase in total PCDD/Fs concentration from less than 1 ng L(-1) to 2 μg L(-1). Results showed a dominance of the dichlorinated species (DCDD/Fs) in the homologue profile of total PCDD/Fs reaching values up to 1.5 μg L(-1). Furthermore, the products distribution exhibited a gradual decrease in the homologue concentration as the chlorination degree increased from di-to octachloro-substituted positions. Considering the characteristics of the reaction medium, the experimental results, and the information gathered in bibliography with regard to the generation of active radicals from 2-chlorophenol, a mechanism describing the formation of low chlorinated PCDD/Fs in a Fenton oxidizing aqueous system has been proposed. PMID:27424055

  3. Antioxidant, hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of Senecio species used in traditional medicine of northwestern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Lizarraga, Emilio; Castro, Felipe; Fernández, Francisco; de Lampasona, Marina P; Catalán, César A N

    2012-05-01

    Senecio nutans Sch. Bip., S. viridis var. viridis Phill. and S. spegazzinii Cabrera are native species used in traditional medicine of northwestern Argentina. The total phenolics, flavonoids and caffeoylquinic acids contents, as well as radical scavenging, antioxidant, hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of aqueous extracts (infusion and decoction) of all three species were determined. S. nutans was the most active. The extracts did not show antibacterial activity. Alkaloids were not detected in any of the aqueous extracts of the three studied species. PMID:22799087

  4. Chlorinated hydrocarbons in peat

    SciTech Connect

    Rapaport, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Concentrations (ng/g), accumulation rates (ug/m/sup 2/=yr) and burdens were determined for DDT (1,1,1-trichlorophenyl2-2'bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane), polychlorinated biphenyls. Toxaphene, hexachlorobenzene (HCB) and a,b,g-hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) in peat cores taken across the mid-latitudes of North America. Because peat bogs are ombrotrophic, thereby receiving all contaminant inputs from the atmosphere and because peat cores were dated, atmospheric input functions were constructed for all of the compounds listed above excepting the HCHs. Compound inventories (burdens) in peat cores of PCBs, HCB, HCHs, Toxaphene, DDT, Pb and Zn were compared, indicating a strong influence from areas proximate to industrial sources and the atmospheric transport from source regions. Untransformed parent DDT (p,p' and o,p'-DDT) in surface peat and in precipitation provides evidence for the long range transport of DDT from neighboring countries where use has increased over the past 10-15 years. Present accumulation rates of DDT in peat are about 10-20% of maximum levels associated with peak use in the US around 1960. The DDT input function that was developed can be used to date peat cores. Transformations of DDT and PCBs were also examined in peat cores. First order transformation rates of DDT (p,p' and o,p') to DDD in anaerobic peat core environments ranged from 0.03 to 0.09 yr/sup -1/ with differences related to temperature. Aerobic transformation of PCB congeners in peat cores and microcosms was rapid for 2,3 and several 4 chlorinated congeners (T/sub 1/2 less than or equal to 0.2 to 3 years) and declined with increasing chlorine number.

  5. Diurnal variations of reactive chlorine and nitrogen oxides observed by MIPAS-B in the Arctic in January 2010 and March 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzel, G.; Oelhaf, H.; Friedl-Vallon, F.; Kirner, O.; Kleinert, A.; Maucher, G.; Nordmeyer, H.; Orphal, J.; Ruhnke, R.

    2012-04-01

    Arctic winters 2009/2010 and 2010/2011 were characterized by strong vortices with extremely cold temperatures in the lower stratosphere above northern Scandinavia. Hence, the occurrence of widespread polar stratospheric clouds enabled a strong activation of chlorine compounds (ClOx) which rapidly destroyed ozone when sunlight returned after winter solstice. MIPAS (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding) balloon measurements obtained in northern Sweden on 24 January 2010 and 31 March 2011 inside the polar vortices have provided the first time diurnal variations of chlorine species over the whole altitude range in which chlorine is undergoing activation and deactivation. The first flight was carried out in very cold chlorine-activated air with widespread polar stratospheric clouds. The second one was performed at the end of the winter during the last phase of ClOx deactivation. Around sunrise, several fast sequences of spectra (in time steps of about 10 min.) were measured to allow the retrieval of chlorine- and nitrogen-containing species which change quickly their concentration around the terminator between night and day. For this purpose the line of sight of the instrument was aligned perpendicular to the azimuth direction of the sun to allow for a symmetric illumination of the sounded air mass before and beyond the tangent point. Mixing ratios of species like ClO, NO2, and N2O5 show significant changes under twilight conditions. Observations are compared and discussed with calculations performed with the 3-dimensional Chemistry Climate Model EMAC (ECHAM5/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry).

  6. Comparative Toxicity of Chlorinated Saline and Freshwater Wastewater Effluents to Marine Organisms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mengting; Liu, Jiaqi; Zhang, Xiangru; Richardson, Susan D

    2015-12-15

    Toilet flushing with seawater results in saline wastewater, which may contain approximately 33-50% seawater. Halogenated disinfection byproducts (DBPs), especially brominated and iodinated DBPs, have recently been found in chlorinated saline wastewater effluents. With the occurrence of brominated and iodinated DBPs, the adverse effects of chlorinated saline wastewater effluents to marine ecology have been uncertain. By evaluating the developmental effects in the marine polychaete Platynereis dumerilii directly exposed to chlorinated saline/freshwater wastewater effluents, we found surprisingly that chlorinated saline wastewater effluents were less toxic than a chlorinated freshwater wastewater effluent. This was also witnessed by the marine alga Tetraselmis marina. The toxicity of a chlorinated wastewater effluent to the marine species was dominated by its relatively low salinity compared to the salinity in seawater. The organic matter content in a chlorinated wastewater effluent might be partially responsible for the toxicity. The adverse effects of halogenated DBPs on the marine species were observed pronouncedly only in the "concentrated" chlorinated wastewater effluents. pH and ammonia content in a wastewater effluent caused no adverse effects on the marine species. The results suggest that using seawater to replace freshwater for toilet flushing might mitigate the "direct" acute detrimental effect of wastewater to the marine organisms. PMID:26505276

  7. Chlorine induced corrosion of steels in fossil fuel power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegel, M.; Grabke, H.J.

    1998-12-31

    The corrosion of steels in power plants (coal combustion, waste incineration) is mainly due to condensed chlorides in the ash deposited on the boiler tubes. These chlorides are stabilized by HCl in the combustion gas. In the case of coal as a fuel, chlorine is present as chloride minerals in the raw material which is converted to HCl during the combustion process. Corrosion of steels in chlorine containing environments occurs by the active oxidation mechanism, which is a self-sustaining accelerated oxidation process, catalyzed by chlorine. This study shows that solid chlorides react with the oxide scale of the steels to form chlorine, which initiates active oxidation. In order to prevent chlorine induced corrosion, the deposition of chlorides on the tubes within the coal ash must be avoided. This is possible by the presence of SO{sub 2}, which is present in the combustion gas, converting the chlorides to sulfates in the gas phase. The paper presents an example of a failure case in a coal fired plant in Germany. In this plant, chlorine induced corrosion was observed after effective removal of SO{sub 2} by additions of CaO. From thermodynamic calculations it can be shown that a certain amount of SO{sub 2} is necessary in order to avoid deposition of chlorides and to prevent corrosion.

  8. Germicidal activity of a chlorous acid-chlorine dioxide teat dip and a sodium chlorite teat dip during experimental challenge with Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Boddie, R L; Nickerson, S C; Adkinson, R W

    1998-08-01

    Three postmilking teat dips were tested for efficacy against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae in two separate studies using experimental challenge procedures that were recommended by the National Mastitis Council. The first study evaluated a barrier teat dip product containing chlorous acid-chlorine dioxide as the germicidal agent, and the second study evaluated a sodium chlorite product with a barrier component as well as a sodium chlorite product without a barrier component. The chlorous acid-chlorine dioxide teat dip reduced new intramammary infections (IMI) caused by Staph. aureus by 91.5% and reduced new IMI caused by Strep. agalactiae by 71.7%. The barrier dip containing sodium chlorite reduced new IMI caused by Staph. aureus and Strep. agalactiae by 41.0 and 0%, respectively. The nonbarrier dip containing sodium chlorite reduced new IMI caused by Staph. aureus by 65.6% and reduced new IMI caused by Strep. agalactiae by 39.1%. Teat skin and teat end conditions were evaluated before and after the second study; no deleterious effects among dipped quarters compared with control quarters were noted for the two sodium chlorite products. PMID:9749396

  9. 46 CFR 151.50-31 - Chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chlorine. 151.50-31 Section 151.50-31 Shipping COAST... LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-31 Chlorine. (a) Chlorine barges. Subparts 98.03 and 98.20 of Part 98 of this chapter have been revoked. However, chlorine barges that...

  10. 46 CFR 151.50-31 - Chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Chlorine. 151.50-31 Section 151.50-31 Shipping COAST... LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-31 Chlorine. (a) Chlorine barges. Subparts 98.03 and 98.20 of Part 98 of this chapter have been revoked. However, chlorine barges that...

  11. 46 CFR 151.50-31 - Chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Chlorine. 151.50-31 Section 151.50-31 Shipping COAST... LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-31 Chlorine. (a) Chlorine barges. Subparts 98.03 and 98.20 of Part 98 of this chapter have been revoked. However, chlorine barges that...

  12. 46 CFR 151.50-31 - Chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Chlorine. 151.50-31 Section 151.50-31 Shipping COAST... LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-31 Chlorine. (a) Chlorine barges. Subparts 98.03 and 98.20 of Part 98 of this chapter have been revoked. However, chlorine barges that...

  13. Zebra mussel mortality with chlorine

    SciTech Connect

    Van Benschoten, J.E.; Jensen, J.N.; Harrington, D.; DeGirolamo, D.J.

    1995-05-01

    The rate of mortality of the zebra mussel in response to chlorine is described by a kinetic model that combines a statistical characterization of mussel mortality with a disinfection-type modeling approach. Parameter estimates were made with nine sets of data from experiments conducted in Niagara River water. From the kinetic model, an operational diagram was constructed that describes the time to 95% mortality as a function of chlorine concentration and temperature. Either the model or the diagram can be used to assist utilities in planning chlorination treatments for controlling zebra mussels.

  14. The synergistic effect of Escherichia coli inactivation by sequential disinfection with low level chlorine dioxide followed by free chlorine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wu; Yang, Dong; Zhu, Sui-Yi; Chen, Bo-Yan; Huo, Ming-Xin; Li, Jun-Wen

    2012-12-01

    To the best of our knowledge, there was little information available on pathogen removal using low level disinfectant followed by free chlorine in sequential disinfection (SD). This study investigated Escherichia coli inactivation by four types of disinfection: single step disinfection (SSD), SD, traditional sequential disinfection (TSD) and mixed disinfectant disinfection (MDD). Results indicated that SD had higher ability to inactivate E. coli than the others, indicating there was a positive synergistic effect on chlorine disinfection by prior dosing with a low level of chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)). The ONPG assay suggested that the permeability of cell wall rather than the viability of E. coli were changed under 0.02 mg/l ClO(2) treatment. The coexistence of residual ClO(2) and free chlorine also plays an active synergistic effect. Additionally, temperature had a positive effect on E. coli inactivation in SD, while inactivation was reduced in alkaline compared to neutral and acidic conditions. PMID:23165713

  15. Leaching of oxidic zinc materials with chlorine and chlorine hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, B. K.; Fray, D. J.

    1981-06-01

    Low grade zinc ores and residues were leached in chlorine water and chlorine hydrate water mixtures. It was found that the rate of leaching Adrar ore and Electric Arc Furnace dust obeyed a shrinking core diffusion model, whereas, the rate of leaching of Turkish ore appeared to be controlled by a surface reaction. In all cases, lead leached with the zinc but the iron oxides remained virtually undissolved.

  16. Ground water chlorinated ethenes in tree trunks: Case studies, influence of recharge, and potential degradation mechanism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, D.A.; Clinton, B.D.; Vose, J.M.; Casey, C.C.; Harvey, G.J.; Bradley, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    Trichloroethene (TCE) was detected in cores of trees growing above TCE-contaminated ground at three sites: the Carswell Golf Course in Texas, Air Force Plant PJKS in Colorado, and Naval Weapons Station Charleston in South Carolina. This was true even when the depth to water was 7.9 m or when the contaminated aquifer was confined beneath ???3 m of clay. Additional ground water contaminants detected in the tree cores were cis-1,2-dichloroethene at two sites and tetrachloroethene at one site. Thus, tree coring can be a rapid and effective means of locating shallow subsurface chlorinated ethenes and possibly identifying zones of active TCE dechlorination. Tree cores collected over time were useful in identifying the onset of ground water contamination. Several factors affecting chlorinated ethene concentrations in tree cores were identified in this investigation. The factors include ground water chlorinated ethene concentrations and depth to ground water contamination. In addition, differing TCE concentrations around the trunk of some trees appear to be related to the roots deriving water from differing areas. Opportunistic uptake of infiltrating rainfall can dilute prerain TCE concentrations in the trunk. TCE concentrations in core headspace may differ among some tree species. In some trees, infestation of bacteria in decaying heartwood may provide a TCE dechlorination mechanism within the trunk.

  17. Combustion of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using bimetallic chromium-copper supported on modified H-ZSM-5 catalyst.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Ahmad Zuhairi; Bakar, Mohamad Zailani Abu; Bhatia, Subhash

    2006-02-28

    The paper reports on the performance of chromium or/and copper supported on H-ZSM-5(Si/Al = 240) modified with silicon tetrachloride (Cr1.5/SiCl4-Z, Cu1.5/SiCl4-Z and Cr1.0Cu0.5/SiCl4-Z) as catalysts in the combustion of chlorinated VOCs (Cl-VOCs). A reactor operated at a gas hourly space velocity (GHSV) of 32,000 h(-1), a temperature between 100 and 500 degrees C with 2500 ppm of dichloromethane (DCM), trichloromethane (TCM) and trichloroethylene (TCE) is used for activity studies. The deactivation study is conducted at a GHSV of 3800 h(-1), at 400 degrees C for up to 12 h with a feed concentration of 35,000 ppm. Treatment with silicon tetrachloride improves the chemical resistance of H-ZSM-5 against hydrogen chloride. TCM is more reactive compared to DCM but it produces more by-products due to its high chlorine content. The stabilization of TCE is attributed to resonance effects. Water vapor increases the carbon dioxide yield through its role as hydrolysis agent forming reactive carbocations and acting as hydrogen-supplying agent to suppress chlorine-transfer reactions. The deactivation of Cr1.0Cu0.5/SiCl4-Z is mainly due to the chlorination of its metal species, especially with higher Cl/H feed. Coking is limited, particularly with DCM and TCM. In accordance with the Mars-van Krevelen model, the weakening of overall metal reducibility due to chlorination leads to a loss of catalytic activity. PMID:16310938

  18. CHLORINE INACTIVATION OF BACILLUS ENDOSPORES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The possibility of a bioterrorism event resulting in the release of Bacillus anthracis endospores into a drinking water distribution system necessitates research into means by which these endospores can be inactivated. This study was designed to determine the chlorine resistance...

  19. CHLORINATION OF AQUATIC HUMIC SUBSTANCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research program was initiated with the overall objective of increasing our understanding of the chemical structures of aquatic humic material and their behavior during chemical oxidation in particular with chlorine. Experimental methods were devised for the isolation of hum...

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa for the Evaluation of Swimming Pool Chlorination and Algicides

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, G. P.; DerVartanian, M. E.

    1969-01-01

    Concentrations of ammonia and the chlorine stabilizer, cyanuric acid, which could be expected in swimming pools decreased the rate of kill by chlorine of the potential pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The effect of cyanuric acid increased as the concentration of chlorine decreased, a fact of significance from a public health view. Quaternary ammonium algcides had little effect on the kill rate of chlorine, but an organic mercury algicide had a synergistic effect with chlorine when the chlorine activity was stressed by the addition of ammonia or the use of 100 times the normal concentration of bacteria. The effect of natural waters, rain, beaches, and swimming pools on the kill rate by 0.5 mg of chlorine per liter indicated that a treatment time of 1 hr or more was required to kill 99.9% of 106 Pseudomonas cells per ml. The synergism of chlorine and the organic mercury algicide was also demonstrated with these waters and with sewage treatment plant effluents. The necessity of developing and using laboratory tests which simulate conditions in swimming pools with heavy loads of swimmers, as opposed to tests in chlorine demand-free conditions, is discussed. Samples taken from well-supervised swimming pools when the swimmer load had been especially high required treatment times of 1 to 3 hr to obtain 99.9% kills of the potential pathogen, P. aeruginosa, with 0.5 mg of chlorine per liter. PMID:4976325

  1. Carboranyl-Chlorin e6 as a Potent Antimicrobial Photosensitizer

    PubMed Central

    Omarova, Elena O.; Nazarov, Pavel A.; Firsov, Alexander M.; Strakhovskaya, Marina G.; Arkhipova, Anastasia Yu.; Moisenovich, Mikhail M.; Agapov, Igor I.; Ol’shevskaya, Valentina A.; Zaitsev, Andrey V.; Kalinin, Valery N.; Kotova, Elena A.; Antonenko, Yuri N.

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation is currently being widely considered as alternative to antibiotic chemotherapy of infective diseases, attracting much attention to design of novel effective photosensitizers. Carboranyl-chlorin-e6 (the conjugate of chlorin e6 with carborane), applied here for the first time for antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation, appeared to be much stronger than chlorin e6 against Gram-positive bacteria, such as Bacillus subtilis, Staphyllococcus aureus and Mycobacterium sp. Confocal fluorescence spectroscopy and membrane leakage experiments indicated that bacteria cell death upon photodynamic treatment with carboranyl-chlorin-e6 is caused by loss of cell membrane integrity. The enhanced photobactericidal activity was attributed to the increased accumulation of the conjugate by bacterial cells, as evaluated both by centrifugation and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Gram-negative bacteria were rather resistant to antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation mediated by carboranyl-chlorin-e6. Unlike chlorin e6, the conjugate showed higher (compared to the wild-type strain) dark toxicity with Escherichia coli ΔtolC mutant, deficient in TolC-requiring multidrug efflux transporters. PMID:26535905

  2. Chlorination of Betacyanins in Several Hypochlorous Acid Systems.

    PubMed

    Wybraniec, Sławomir; Starzak, Karolina; Pietrzkowski, Zbigniew

    2016-04-13

    This study presents a comparative evaluation of chlorination of betanin, betanidin, and neobetanin exposed to sodium hypochlorite and myeloperoxidase (MPO)/H2O2/Cl(-) systems. For betanin/betanidin, the chlorination takes place at the aglycone unit, but for neobetanin, no chlorinated products in the reaction mixtures can be detected. In the RP-HPLC system, monochloro-betanin/-betanidin were eluted earlier than their corresponding nonchlorinated substrates. An influence of Cl(-) concentration on betanin/betanidin chlorination efficiency in sodium hypochlorite and MPO systems was investigated. At pH 3-5, the yields of formed monochloro-betanin/-betanidin decrease dramatically at higher Cl(-) concentrations, indicating that generated Cl2 is not the chlorinating agent in the presence of sodium hypochlorite. The intriguing low activity of Cl2 in betanin/betanidin chlorination compared to HOCl and/or Cl2O can be explained by a special position of the attack by molecules of HOCl and/or Cl2O. In the MPO/H2O2/Cl(-) system, the highest efficiency of monochloro-betanin/-betanidin generation is observed at pH 5. PMID:26947920

  3. Carboranyl-Chlorin e6 as a Potent Antimicrobial Photosensitizer.

    PubMed

    Omarova, Elena O; Nazarov, Pavel A; Firsov, Alexander M; Strakhovskaya, Marina G; Arkhipova, Anastasia Yu; Moisenovich, Mikhail M; Agapov, Igor I; Ol'shevskaya, Valentina A; Zaitsev, Andrey V; Kalinin, Valery N; Kotova, Elena A; Antonenko, Yuri N

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation is currently being widely considered as alternative to antibiotic chemotherapy of infective diseases, attracting much attention to design of novel effective photosensitizers. Carboranyl-chlorin-e6 (the conjugate of chlorin e6 with carborane), applied here for the first time for antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation, appeared to be much stronger than chlorin e6 against Gram-positive bacteria, such as Bacillus subtilis, Staphyllococcus aureus and Mycobacterium sp. Confocal fluorescence spectroscopy and membrane leakage experiments indicated that bacteria cell death upon photodynamic treatment with carboranyl-chlorin-e6 is caused by loss of cell membrane integrity. The enhanced photobactericidal activity was attributed to the increased accumulation of the conjugate by bacterial cells, as evaluated both by centrifugation and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Gram-negative bacteria were rather resistant to antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation mediated by carboranyl-chlorin-e6. Unlike chlorin e6, the conjugate showed higher (compared to the wild-type strain) dark toxicity with Escherichia coli ΔtolC mutant, deficient in TolC-requiring multidrug efflux transporters. PMID:26535905

  4. IDENTIFICATION OF NEW DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FROM OZONE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORAMINE, AND CHLORINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern over the potential adverse health effects of trihalomethanes (THMs) and other chlorinated by-products in chlorinated drinking water, alternative disinfection methods are being explored. Ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine are currently popular alternatives to ...

  5. EFFECTS OF OZONE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORINE, AND MONOCHLORAMINE ON CRYTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYST VIABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purified Cryptosporiodium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. Excystation and mouse infectivity were compareatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. Ozone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlor...

  6. Determination of PCBs and chlorinated hydrocarbons in marine mammal tissues.

    PubMed

    Schantz, M M; Koster, B J; Wise, S A; Becker, P R

    1993-11-01

    Selected tissues (blubber, liver, kidney and muscle) from marine mammals, which were collected as part of the Alaska Marine Mammal Tissue Archival Project (AMMTAP), were analyzed for polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners and chlorinated pesticides. Concentrations of these compounds in the different tissues were compared and blubber was selected as the primary tissue for organic contaminant analyses for the AMMTAP based on higher levels (1-2 orders of magnitude) in this tissue compared to liver, kidney and muscle. Concentrations for 15 PCB congeners and 12 chlorinated pesticides are reported for 10 different animals of three species (northern fur seal, ringed seal and belukha whale) from five different sites. PMID:8272838

  7. A Hands-On Activity to Introduce the Effects of Transmission by an Invasive Species

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Barbara Jean

    2013-01-01

    This activity engages students to better understand the impact of transmission by invasive species. Using dice, poker chips, and paper plates, an entire class mimics the spread of an invasive species within a geographic region. The activity can be modified and conducted at the K-16 levels.

  8. Using Chemical Release Surveillance Data to Evaluate the Public Health Impacts of Chlorine and Its Alternatives

    PubMed Central

    Ruckart, Perri Zeitz; Anderson, Ayana; Welles, Wanda Lizak

    2015-01-01

    Background More than 80 million Americans may be at risk of a chemical exposure because they live near one of the 101 most hazardous chemical facilities or near routes used to transport hazardous chemicals. One approach to hazard reduction is to use less toxic alternatives. Chlorine, one of the chemicals posing the greatest public health danger, has several alternatives depending on the application. Methods We analyzed data collected during 1993–2008 by 17 state health departments participating in the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry’s (ATSDR) active chemical incident surveillance program. We conducted descriptive analyses to evaluate whether five chlorine alternatives (calcium hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide, sodium chlorate, sodium hydrosulfite, and sodium hypochlorite) resulted in less severe incidents. We used chi square and z-score analyses to test significance, where appropriate. Results During 1993–2008, 2040 incidents involved chlorine, and 1246 incidents involved chlorine alternatives. Nearly 30% of chlorine releases resulted in injured persons, as compared to 13% of chlorine alternatives that resulted in injury. Although similar proportions of persons injured in chlorine or chlorine alternative releases were treated on scene (18% and 14%, respectively) and at a hospital (58% and 60%, respectively), there was a greater proportion of hospital admissions following chlorine releases than there was following releases of chlorine alternatives (10 % vs. 4%) (p < 0.01). There were significantly fewer victims per release for hydrogen peroxide (0.2) than there were for chlorine (1.3) in paper manufacturing (p < 0.01). Conclusion Exposures to these five potential chlorine alternatives resulted in a lower proportion of exposed persons requiring hospital admission. To reduce acute public health injuries associated with chemical exposures, users should consider a chlorine alternative when such a substitution is reasonable. PMID:26290770

  9. Preparation of active HDS catalysts by controlling the dispersion of active species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamura, Kazuhiro; Uchikawa, Kei; Matsuda, Satoshi; Akai, Yoshio

    1997-11-01

    It is demonstrated that the structural control of the metal ion precursors in the impregnating solution by adding the chelating agents is effective to prepare the higher active CoMo supported on alumina catalysts ( Co-Mo/Al 2O 3) for hydrodesulfurization (HDS). Coordination structures of the Co and Mo complexes in the CoMo impregnating solution and distributions of the Co and Mo complexes were evaluated by spectroscopic characterization techniques and by using a computational calculation, respectively. An addition of a chelating agent, such as NTA (nitrilotriacetic acid) and Glu (L-glutamic acid), in the CoMo solution results in the selective formation of the Co complexes, while the amount of the Mo complex is negligibly small at the practical pH of 9.2. The addition of the chelating agent increases the thiophene HDS activity of the sulfided catalysts typically by 50%, compared with that prepared without the chelating agent. Dispersion results of Co and Mo species on both oxidic and sulfided catalysts indicate that the higher HDS activity is explained by the higher degree of surface exposure of Co sites (namely the dispersion of Co) rather than that of Mo sites. The selective formation of the Co-chelate complexes keeps Co ions stable in solution up to high concentration. Furthermore, the Co complexes are estimated to be stable on the support even in the initial step of calcination, which would depress the formation of crystalline Co compounds, such as CoAl 2O 4 and CoMoO 4. These effects result in the higher dispersion of the active Co surface species.

  10. Degradation of carbamazepine by UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process and formation of disinfection by-products.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shiqing; Xia, Ying; Li, Ting; Yao, Tian; Shi, Zhou; Zhu, Shumin; Gao, Naiyun

    2016-08-01

    Pharmaceuticals in water are commonly found and are not efficiently removed by current treatment processes. Degradation of antiepileptic drug carbamazepine (CBZ) by UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process was systematically investigated in this study. The results showed that the UV/chlorine process was more effective at degrading CBZ than either UV or chlorination alone. The CBZ degradation followed pseudo-first order reaction kinetics, and the degradation rate constants (kobs) were affected by the chlorine dose, solution pH, and natural organic matter concentration to different degrees. Degradation of CBZ greatly increased with increasing chlorine dose and decreasing solution pH during the UV/chlorine process. Additionally, the presence of natural organic matter in the solution inhibited the degradation of CBZ. UV photolysis, chlorination, and reactive species (hydroxyl radical •OH and chlorine atoms •Cl) were identified as responsible for CBZ degradation in the UV/chlorine process. Finally, a degradation pathway for CBZ in the UV/chlorine process was proposed and the formation potentials of carbonaceous and nitrogenous disinfection by-products were evaluated. Enhanced formation of trichloroacetic acid, dichloroacetonitrile, and trichloronitromethane precursors should be considered when applying UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process to drinking water. PMID:27164884

  11. Evaluation of multi-activities of 14 edible species from Zingiberaceae.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chuan-Li; Zhao, Hai-Yan; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2013-02-01

    Fourteen Zingiberaceae species, widely used in China for both food and medicine, were selected to evaluate and compare their antioxidant, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities. Results indicated that seven species displayed high antioxidant activity, while eight species exhibited different degrees of antimicrobial activities (minimum inhibitory concentrations were 2.00-40.00 μg/ml), and six species exhibited cytotoxicity on the SMMC-7721 cells. Alpinia officinarum and Alpinia oxyphylla showed a broader antimicrobial spectrum, while Curcuma phaeocaulis and Zingiber officinale displayed specific inhibition on Escherichia coli. Amomum villosum showed strong radical scavenging capacity. Amomum kravanh and Curcuma longa exhibited significant cytotoxicity. Overall, the antioxidant, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities of the 14 species showed obvious diversities. It is hoped that, from the results, the biological activity of ginger plants can be used more rationally and effectively in future. PMID:22716965

  12. Electrochemical chlorine evolution at rutile oxide (110) surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Heine A; Man, Isabela C; Studt, Felix; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Bligaard, Thomas; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations we study the electrochemical chlorine evolution reaction on rutile (110) oxide surfaces. First we construct the Pourbaix surface diagram for IrO(2) and RuO(2), and from this we find the chlorine evolution reaction intermediates and identify the lowest overpotential at which all elementary reaction steps in the chlorine evolution reaction are downhill in free energy. This condition is then used as a measure for catalytic activity. Linear scaling relations between the binding energies of the intermediates and the oxygen binding energies at cus-sites are established for MO(2) (M being Ir, Ru, Pt, Ti). The linear relations form the basis for constructing a generalized surface phase diagram where two parameters, the potential and the binding energy of oxygen, are needed to determine the surface composition. We calculate the catalytic activity as function of the oxygen binding energy, giving rise to a Sabatier volcano. By combining the surface phase diagram and the volcano describing the catalytic activity, we find that the reaction mechanism differs depending on catalyst material. The flexibility in reaction path means that the chlorine evolution activity is high for a wide range of oxygen binding energies. We find that the required overpotential for chlorine evolution is lower than the overpotential necessary for oxygen evolution. PMID:20024470

  13. Phytochemical profiling of five medicinally active constituents across 14 Eutrema species.

    PubMed

    Hao, Guoqian; Wang, Qian; Liu, Bingbing; Liu, Jianquan

    2016-04-01

    Wasabi or Japanese horseradish (Eutrema japonicum) is both a traditional condiment and a medicinally important plant with diverse uses. Its medicinally active constituents appear to include five isothiocyanates, but their spatial variations in naturally occurring congeners are unknown. Thus, in this study we measured concentrations of these five active constituents in 20 populations of 14 species of Eutrema and one related species, Yinshania sinuata. Three to five of these constituents were detected in each of the examined species, at concentrations that varied greatly between sampled species and populations of the same species. However, two species, Eutrema tenue and Eutrema deltoideum, had higher total concentrations of the five isothiocyanates and substantially higher concentrations of one or two, than the widely cultivated E. japonicum. Thus, both of these species could be important wild resources for artificial cultivation, in addition to the currently widely cultivated E. japonicum. PMID:26946379

  14. Reservoirs of atmospheric chlorine - Prospects for HOCl revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, S. S.; Jaffe, R. L.; Whitten, R. C.; Turco, R. P.

    1978-01-01

    Possible effects of HOCl aeronomy in the terrestrial stratosphere are reexamined. Chemical kinetics data for HOCl are analyzed which are required in aeronomical studies, and the possible role of HOCl as a reservoir of atmospheric chlorine is evaluated. Chemical production and loss of HOCl in the stratosphere is considered, along with photolysis of HOCl and prospects for HOCl as an inert chlorine reservoir. It is shown that a recent theoretical calculation of the HOCl photodissociation cross section suggests this species as a possible significant reservoir of atmospheric chlorine, but that the theoretical calculations are in sharp disagreement with some experimental measurements. Laboratory and atmospheric experiments to clarify the uncertainties of HOCl aeronomy are proposed.

  15. Animal Related Activities as Determinants of Species Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randler, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Previous work has established a relationship between knowledge and environmental concern. Different factors may contribute to this knowledge and animal-related leisure activities may also contribute to this knowledge. 390 participants in Leipzig, Germany were interviewed to assess their animal-related leisure activities, their demographic status…

  16. Antifungal activity of local anesthetics against Candida species.

    PubMed Central

    Pina-Vaz, C; Rodrigues, A G; Sansonetty, F; Martinez-De-Oliveira, J; Fonseca, A F; Mårdh, P A

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the activity of benzydamine, lidocaine, and bupivacaine, three drugs with local anesthetic activity, against Candida albicans and non-albicans strains and to clarify their mechanism of activity. METHODS: The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined for 20 Candida strains (18 clinical isolates and two American Type Culture Collection strains). The fungistatic activity was studied with the fluorescent probe FUN-1 and observation under epifluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. The fungicidal activity of the three drugs was assayed by viability counts. Membrane alterations induced in the yeast cells were evaluated by staining with propidium iodide, by quantitation of intracellular K+ leakage and by transmission electron microscopy of intact yeast cells and prepared spheroplasts. RESULTS: The MIC ranged from 12.5-50.0 microg/mL, 5.0-40.0 mg/mL, and 2.5-10.0 mg/mL for benzydamine, lidocaine, and bupivacaine, respectively. The inhibitory activity of these concentrations could be detected with the fluorescent probe FUN-1 after incubation for 60 minutes. A very fast fungicidal activity was shown by 0.2, 50, and 30 mg/mL of benzydamine, lidocaine, and bupivacaine, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: At lower concentrations, the tested drugs have a fungistatic activity, due to yeast metabolic impairment, while at higher concentrations they are fungicidal, due to direct damage to the cytoplasmic membrane. PMID:10968594

  17. The formation and degradation of active species during methanol conversion over protonated zeotype catalysts.

    PubMed

    Olsbye, U; Svelle, S; Lillerud, K P; Wei, Z H; Chen, Y Y; Li, J F; Wang, J G; Fan, W B

    2015-10-21

    The methanol to hydrocarbon (MTH) process provides an efficient route for the conversion of carbon-based feedstocks into olefins, aromatics and gasoline. Still, there is room for improvements in product selectivity and catalytic stability. This task calls for a fundamental understanding of the formation, catalytic mechanism and degradation of active sites. The autocatalytic feature of the MTH process implies that hydrocarbons are active species on the one hand and deactivating species on the other hand. The steady-state performance of such species has been thoroughly studied and reviewed. However, the mechanism of formation of the initial hydrocarbon species (i.e.; the first C-C bond) and the evolution of active species into deactivating coke species have received less attention. Therefore, this review focuses on the significant progress recently achieved in these two stages by a combination of theoretical calculations, model studies, operando spectroscopy and catalytic tests. PMID:26185806

  18. Comparison of compounds of three Rubus species and their antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Caidan, Rezeng; Cairang, Limao; Pengcuo, Jiumei; Tong, Li

    2015-12-01

    Rubus amabilis, Rubus niveus Thunb., and Rubus sachalinensis are three Rubus species that are alternatively found in Manubzhithang, a Tibetan medicine, in different areas of China. The current study analyzed HPLC/UV chromatograms and it compared compounds of these three Rubus species in contrast to reference substances such as 2,6-dimethoxy-4-hydroxyphenol-1-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, procyanidin B4, and isovitexin-7-O-glucoside. The three Rubus species produced similar peaks in chromatograms. The antioxidant activity of the three Rubus species was determined using an assay for DPPH free radical scavenging activity. Results indicated that the three Rubus species extracts had almost the same level of free radical scavenging activity. Thus, findings indicated the rationality of substituting these species for one another as an ingredient in Manubzhithang. PMID:26781923

  19. Antimicrobial activities of three species of family mimosaceae.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Adeel; Mahmood, Aqeel; Qureshi, Rizwana Aleem

    2012-01-01

    The antimicrobial activities of crude methanolic extract of leaves of Acacia nilotica L., Albizia lebbeck L. and Mimosa himalayana Gamble belonging to family mimosaceae were investigated in this research work. Antibacterial activity was studied by agar well diffusion method against one gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and three gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumonia. Crude extract of all plants showed best activity against gram-negative bacterial strains while minor inhibition zones were found against gram positive bacterial strains. Antifungal activity of crude plant extract was screened by agar tube dilution method against Aspergillus nigar and Aspergillus flavus. These results showed that these plants extracts have potential against bacterias, while against fungi their activity is not much effective. PMID:22186331

  20. [Comparative evaluation of health hazards associated with industrial chemicals and their derivates forming during water chlorination].

    PubMed

    Zholdakova, Z I; Poliakova, E E; Lebedev, A T

    2006-01-01

    Many industrial chemicals found in waste waters are able to form organochlorine by-products during water disinfection. The transformation of seven model compounds, cyclohexene, n-butanol, diphenylmethane, acetophenone, aniline, 1-methylnaphthalene, and phenylxylylethane during a reaction with active chlorine was studied. Aqueous chlorine and sodium hypochlorite were used as chlorinating agents. The products of the reaction were analyzed by means of chromatomass-spectrometry. A schematic model of diphenylmethane transformation was proposed. Comparative evaluation of hazards associated with the model chemicals and their derivates confirmed that chlorination products can be more toxic and dangerous than the initial compounds, and may possess mutagenic and cancerigenic properties. PMID:16889350

  1. Active Site Structure and Peroxidase Activity of Oxidatively Modified Cytochrome c Species in Complexes with Cardiolipin.

    PubMed

    Capdevila, Daiana A; Oviedo Rouco, Santiago; Tomasina, Florencia; Tortora, Verónica; Demicheli, Verónica; Radi, Rafael; Murgida, Daniel H

    2015-12-29

    We report a resonance Raman and UV-vis characterization of the active site structure of oxidatively modified forms of cytochrome c (Cyt-c) free in solution and in complexes with cardiolipin (CL). The studied post-translational modifications of Cyt-c include methionine sulfoxidation and tyrosine nitration, which lead to altered heme axial ligation and increased peroxidase activity with respect to those of the wild-type protein. In spite of the structural and activity differences between the protein variants free in solution, binding to CL liposomes induces in all cases the formation of a spectroscopically identical bis-His axial coordination conformer that more efficiently promotes lipid peroxidation. The spectroscopic results indicate that the bis-His form is in equilibrium with small amounts of high-spin species, thus suggesting a labile distal His ligand as the basis for the CL-induced increase in enzymatic activity observed for all protein variants. For Cyt-c nitrated at Tyr74 and sulfoxidized at Met80, the measured apparent binding affinities for CL are ∼4 times larger than for wild-type Cyt-c. On the basis of these results, we propose that these post-translational modifications may amplify the pro-apoptotic signal of Cyt-c under oxidative stress conditions at CL concentrations lower than for the unmodified protein. PMID:26620444

  2. Ametryn degradation by aqueous chlorine: kinetics and reaction influences.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Gao, Nai-yun; Cheng, Hefa; Hu, Chen-yan; Xia, Sheng-ji; Sun, Xiao-feng; Wang, Xuejiao; Yang, Shaogui

    2009-09-30

    The chemical oxidation of the herbicide ametryn was investigated by aqueous chlorination between pH 4 and 10 at a temperature of 25 degrees C. Ametryn was found to react very rapidly with aqueous chlorine. The reaction kinetics can be well described by a second-order kinetic model. The apparent second-order rate constants are greater than 5 x 10(2)M(-1)s(-1) under acidic and neutral conditions. The reaction proceeds much more slowly under alkaline conditions. The predominant reactions were found to be the reactions of HOCl with neutral ametryn and the charged ametryn, with rate constants equal to 7.22 x 10(2) and 1.58 x 10(3)M(-1)s(-1), respectively. The ametryn degradation rate increases with addition of bromide and decreases with addition of ammonia during the chlorination process. Based on elementary chemical reactions, a kinetic model of ametryn degradation by chlorination in the presence of bromide or ammonia ion was also developed. By employing this model, we estimate that the rate constants for the reactions of HOBr with neutral ametryn and charged ametryn were 9.07 x 10(3) and 3.54 x 10(6)M(-1)s(-1), respectively. These values are 10- to 10(3)-fold higher than those of HOCl, suggesting that the presence of bromine species during chlorination could significantly accelerate ametryn degradation. PMID:19423216

  3. Accurate determination of chlorine, bromine, and iodine in sedimentary rock reference samples by radiochemical neutron activation analysis and a detailed comparison with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry literature data.

    PubMed

    Sekimoto, Shun; Ebihara, Mitsuru

    2013-07-01

    Trace amounts of three halogens (chlorine, bromine, and iodine) were determined using radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) for nine sedimentary rocks and three rhyolite samples. To obtain high-quality analytical data, the radiochemical procedure of RNAA was improved by lowering the background in gamma-ray spectrometry and completing the chemical procedure more rapidly than in conventional procedures. A comparison of the RNAA data of Br and I with corresponding inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) literature data revealed that the values obtained by ICPMS coupled with pyrohydrolysis preconcentration were systematically lower than the RNAA data for some reference samples, suggesting that the quantitative collection of Br and I cannot always be achieved by the pyrohydrolysis for some solid samples. The RNAA data of three halogens can classify sedimentary rock reference samples into two groups (the samples from inland water and those from seawater), implying the geochemical significance of halogen data. PMID:23710630

  4. Anaerobic biotransformation of chlorinated alkenes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, P.

    1994-01-01

    Chlorinated alkenes are widely found in contaminated subsurface soil and groundwater. The highly chlorinated alkene (i.e., PCE) is not subject to aerobic biotransformation. The aim of this research was to explore the potential of using anaerobic processes (i.e., denitrification, sulfate-reduction and methanogenesis) for chlorinated alkenes biotransformation. Contaminated soil samples were used throughout this study. Soil microcosms simulating field anoxic conditions with various nutrients amendment, liquid microcosms as well as enrichment liquid cultures were developed to delineate the dechlorination process. The effect of biomass, chlorinated alkenes concentration and site specific conditions (e.g., temperature and pH) on the dechlorination and the primary metabolic process was investigated. The role of sorption and nutritional needs (i.e., electron donor) were also studied. A preliminary study revealed that denitrification was the least affected by low temperatures as compared to sulfate-reduction and methanogenesis. Although dechlorination took place under sequential denitrifying and methanogenic conditions and under sulfate-reducing conditions, further studies concluded that fermentative and methanogenic bacteria were responsible for the observed dechlorination. In most cases, dechlorination of PCE or TCE resulted in the accumulation of cDCE. However, a VC-producing culture was developed from the PCE-contaminated soil. In general, the dechlorination process could be enhanced by increasing electron donor and biomass concentration. At relatively low concentrations, the dechlorination rate was also increased with increasing chlorinated alkene concentration. Dechlorination even proceeded at high chlorinated alkene concentrations when methane production was inhibited. However, as the concentration of the chlorinated alkenes increased, severe toxicity eventually halted the dechlorination process.

  5. Chemistry of combined residual chlorination

    SciTech Connect

    Leao, S.F.; Selleck, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    The decay of the combined chlorine residual was investigated in this work. Recent concerns about the formation of undesirable compounds such as chloroform with free residual chlorination have focused attention on the alternative use of combined residual chlorination. This work investigates the applicability of reactions proposed to describe the transformations and decay of the combined residual with time. Sodium hypochlorite was added to buffered solutions of ammonia with the chlorine residual being monitored over periods extending up to 10 days. The reaction was studied at four initial concentrations of hypochlorite of 100, 50, 25 and 10 mg/L as Cl/sub 2/ with molar application ratios of chlorine to ammonia, defined herein as M ratios, of 0.90, 0.50, 0.25 and 0.05 at each hypochlorite dose. Sixty-eight experiments were conducted at the pH of 6.6 and 7.2. The conclusions are: (1) in the absence of free chlorine, the concentration of NH/sub 3/ does not seem to affect the rate of disappearance of the residual other than through the formation of NHCl/sub 2/ by NH/sub 2/Cl hydrolysis; (2) the reaction between NHCl/sub 2/ and NH/sub 4//sup +/ to form NH/sub 2/Cl is either much slower than reported by Gray et. al. or the mechanism is different with a rate limiting step not involving NH/sub 3/ or NH/sub 4//sup +/; (3) a redox reaction in addition to the first-order decomposition of NHCl/sub 2/ appears necessary. Model simulation results indicated that a reaction of the type NH/sub 2/Cl + NHCl/sub 2/ ..-->.. P added to the first-order NHCl/sub 2/ decomposition can explain the results observed except at the higher chlorine doses.

  6. In vivo activity of aryl ozonides against Schistosoma species.

    PubMed

    Keiser, Jennifer; Ingram, Katrin; Vargas, Mireille; Chollet, Jacques; Wang, Xiaofang; Dong, Yuxiang; Vennerstrom, Jonathan L

    2012-02-01

    We evaluated the in vivo antischistosomal activities of 11 structurally diverse synthetic peroxides. Of all compounds tested, ozonide (1,2,4-trioxolane) OZ418 had the highest activity against adult Schistosoma mansoni, with total and female worm burden reductions of 80 and 90% (P < 0.05), respectively. Furthermore, treatment of S. haematobium-infected mice with OZ418 reduced the total worm burden by 86%. In conclusion, OZ418 is a promising antischistosomal lead compound. PMID:22106214

  7. Antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of three Mentha species essential oils.

    PubMed

    Mimica-Dukić, Neda; Bozin, Biljana; Soković, Marina; Mihajlović, Biserka; Matavulj, Milan

    2003-05-01

    The present study describes the antimicrobial activity and free radical scavenging capacity (RSC) of essential oils from Mentha aquatica L., Mentha longifolia L., and Mentha piperita L. The chemical profile of each essential oil was determined by GC-MS and TLC. All essential oils exhibited very strong antibacterial activity, in particularly against Esherichia coli strains. The most powerful was M. piperita essential oil, especially towards multiresistant strain of Shigella sonei and Micrococcus flavus ATTC 10,240. All tested oils showed significant fungistatic and fungicidal activity [expressed as minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal fungicidal concentration (MFC) values, respectively], that were considerably higher than those of the commercial fungicide bifonazole. The essential oils of M. piperita and M. longifolia were found to be more active than the essential oil of M. aquatica. Especially low MIC (4 microL/mL) and MFC (4 microL/mL) were found with M. piperita oil against Trichophyton tonsurans and Candida albicans (both 8 microL/mL). The RSC was evaluated by measuring the scavenging activity of the essential oils on the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and OH radicals. All examined essential oils were able to reduce DPPH radicals into the neutral DPPH-H form, and this activity was dose-dependent. However, only the M. piperita oil reduced DPPH to 50 % (IC50 = 2.53 microg/mL). The M. piperita essential oil also exhibited the highest OH radical scavenging activity, reducing OH radical generation in the Fenton reaction by 24 % (pure oil). According to GC-MS and TLC (dot-blot techniques), the most powerful scavenging compounds were monoterpene ketones (menthone and isomenthone) in the essential oils of M. longifolia and M. piperita and 1,8-cineole in the oil of M. aquatica. PMID:12802721

  8. Do laboratory species protect endangered species? Interspecies variation in responses to 17β-estradiol, a model endocrine active compound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jorgenson, Zachary G.; Buhl, Kevin J.; Bartell, Stephen E.; Schoenfuss, Heiko L.

    2015-01-01

    Although the effects of estrogens on model laboratory species are well documented, their utility as surrogates for other species, including those listed as endangered, are less clear. Traditionally, conservation policies are evaluated based on model organism responses but are intended to protect all species in an environment. We tested the hypothesis that the endangered Rio Grande silvery minnow (Hybognathus amarus) is more vulnerable to endocrine disruption—as assessed through its larval predator-escape performance, survival, juvenile sex ratios, and whole-body vitellogenin concentration—than the commonly used toxicological model species fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and the bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus). Fish were exposed concurrently for 21 days to the model endocrine active compound (EAC) 17ß-estradiol (E2) at 10 ng E2/L and 30 ng E2/L in a flow-through system using reconstituted water that simulated the physicochemical conditions of the Middle Rio Grande in New Mexico, USA. No significant differences were observed between the fathead and silvery minnow in larval predator-escape response or juvenile sex ratio. Rio Grande silvery minnow survival decreased significantly at day 14 compared with the other two species; by day 21, both cyprinid species (silvery minnow and fathead minnow) exhibited a significant decrease in survival compared with bluegill sunfish, a member of the family Centrarchidae. Male Rio Grande silvery minnow showed a significant increase in whole-body vitellogenin concentration in the 10 ng/L treatment, whereas fathead minnow and bluegill sunfish showed no significant increases in vitellogenin concentrations across treatments. Our study showed response differences to estrogen exposures between the two cyprinid species and further divergence in responses between the families Cyprinidae and Centrarchidae. These results suggest that commonly used laboratory model organisms may be less sensitive to EACs than the endangered

  9. Do laboratory species protect endangered species? Interspecies variation in responses to 17β-estradiol, a model endocrine active compound.

    PubMed

    Jorgenson, Z G; Buhl, K; Bartell, S E; Schoenfuss, H L

    2015-01-01

    Although the effects of estrogens on model laboratory species are well documented, their utility as surrogates for other species, including those listed as endangered, are less clear. Traditionally, conservation policies are evaluated based on model organism responses but are intended to protect all species in an environment. We tested the hypothesis that the endangered Rio Grande silvery minnow (Hybognathus amarus) is more vulnerable to endocrine disruption-as assessed through its larval predator-escape performance, survival, juvenile sex ratios, and whole-body vitellogenin concentration-than the commonly used toxicological model species fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and the bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus). Fish were exposed concurrently for 21 days to the model endocrine active compound (EAC) 17ß-estradiol (E2) at 10 ng E2/L and 30 ng E2/L in a flow-through system using reconstituted water that simulated the physicochemical conditions of the Middle Rio Grande in New Mexico, USA. No significant differences were observed between the fathead and silvery minnow in larval predator-escape response or juvenile sex ratio. Rio Grande silvery minnow survival decreased significantly at day 14 compared with the other two species; by day 21, both cyprinid species (silvery minnow and fathead minnow) exhibited a significant decrease in survival compared with bluegill sunfish, a member of the family Centrarchidae. Male Rio Grande silvery minnow showed a significant increase in whole-body vitellogenin concentration in the 10 ng/L treatment, whereas fathead minnow and bluegill sunfish showed no significant increases in vitellogenin concentrations across treatments. Our study showed response differences to estrogen exposures between the two cyprinid species and further divergence in responses between the families Cyprinidae and Centrarchidae. These results suggest that commonly used laboratory model organisms may be less sensitive to EACs than the endangered Rio

  10. Ubiquitin Activates Patatin-Like Phospholipases from Multiple Bacterial Species

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, David M.; Sato, Hiromi; Dirck, Aaron T.; Feix, Jimmy B.

    2014-01-01

    Phospholipase A2 enzymes are ubiquitously distributed throughout the prokaryotic and eukaryotic kingdoms and are utilized in a wide array of cellular processes and physiological and immunological responses. Several patatin-like phospholipase homologs of ExoU from Pseudomonas aeruginosa were selected on the premise that ubiquitin activation of this class of bacterial enzymes was a conserved process. We found that ubiquitin activated all phospholipases tested in both in vitro and in vivo assays via a conserved serine-aspartate catalytic dyad. Ubiquitin chains versus monomeric ubiquitin were superior in inducing catalysis, and ubiquitin-like proteins failed to activate phospholipase activity. Toxicity studies in a prokaryotic dual-expression system grouped the enzymes into high- and low-toxicity classes. Toxicity measured in eukaryotic cells also suggested a two-tiered classification but was not predictive of the severity of cellular damage, suggesting that each enzyme may correspond to unique properties perhaps based on its specific biological function. Additional studies on lipid binding preference suggest that some enzymes in this family may be differentially sensitive to phosphatidyl-4,5-bisphosphate in terms of catalytic activation enhancement and binding affinity. Further analysis of the function and amino acid sequences of this enzyme family may lead to a useful approach to formulating a unifying model of how these phospholipases behave after delivery into the cytoplasmic compartment. PMID:25404699

  11. Use of nutrient response techniques to assess the effectiveness of chlorination of rapid sand filter gravel.

    PubMed Central

    Lytle, M S; Adams, J C; Dickman, D G; Bressler, W R

    1989-01-01

    A direct viable counting method was used to rapidly assess the effectiveness of chlorination of biofilms on rapid sand filter gravel. A total of 50% of the cells were nutrient responsive after exposure to 0.5 mg of chlorine per liter, while this value was 25% after exposure to 25 mg of chlorine per liter. A large variation was seen in the numbers of nutrient-responsive cells on different rocks. More cells attached to the sandblasted side of marbles than to the smooth side, but there was no difference in eight of nine cases in the proportion of survival to chlorination between the two different sides. The effectiveness of chlorination appeared to be influenced by the species of bacterium in the biofilm. PMID:2705772

  12. Influence of chlorine on methane oxidation.

    PubMed

    Chi, Yong; Wang, Bo; Yan, Jianhua; Ni, Mingjiang

    2009-01-01

    Experiments on CH4/Cl2/O2/N2 oxidation were conducted in an atmospheric pressure flow reactor to understand the influence of chlorine on hydrocarbon oxidation in hazardous waste incineration. The reaction temperature varied from 973 to 1273 K and the chlorine to hydrogen mole ratio (Cl/H) of the inlet mixture varied from 0 to 0.44. The species produced in the reaction were measured online with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). It was found that the destruction and removal efficiency of CH4 increased with Cl/H mole ratio. Increasing Cl/H favored COCl2 and CO formation and inhibited the CO oxidation process. As Cl/H approached 0.44, the concentrations of CH2Cl2 and CH3Cl first increased, and then declined. Reaction temperature greatly affected the reaction system. Increasing temperatures raised the destruction removal efficiency of CH4 and decreased the concentrations of CH3Cl and CH2Cl2. With a certain ratio of Cl/H, the concentrations of CO and COCl2 first increased and then declined. The CO and COCl2 concentration peak was observed around 1100 K and 1023 K, respectively. When the reaction temperature exceeded 1273 K, carbon in CH4 was mostly converted to CO2. It could be concluded that the presence of chlorine enhanced the destruction of CH4, but resulted in the more toxic incomplete combustion products emission such as COCl2 when the reaction temperature was not high enough. PMID:19999983

  13. Enzyme activities in plasma, kidney, liver, and muscle of five avian species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J.C.; Murray, H.C.; Bunck, C.

    1985-01-01

    Activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), creatine phosphokinase (CPK), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were determined in plasma, kidney, liver, and muscle from five species of captive birds. Few differences occurred in plasma activities between sexes but considerable differences occurred between species. All five enzymes were detected in each of the tissues sampled. Relative enzyme activities in liver, kidney, and muscle were similar for each species. CPK activity was much higher in muscle than in liver or kidney and, of the five enzymes studied, may be the best indicator of muscle damage. Most of the other enzymes were more evenly distributed among the three tissues, and no organ-specific enzyme could be identified for liver or kidney. Because of interspecific variations in plasma enzyme activities, it is important to establish baseline values for each species to ensure accurate interpretation of results.

  14. Characterization of serum phospholipase a(2) activity in three diverse species of west african crocodiles.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Mark; Juneau, Kate; Gemillion, Jared; Falconi, Rodolfo; Doucet, Aaron; Shirley, Matthew H

    2011-01-01

    Secretory phospholipase A(2), an enzyme that exhibits substantial immunological activity, was measured in the serum of three species of diverse West African crocodiles. Incubation of different volumes of crocodile serum with bacteria labeled with a fluorescent fatty acid in the sn-2 position of membrane lipids resulted in a volume-dependent liberation of fluorescent probe. Serum from the Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) exhibited slightly higher activity than that of the slender-snouted crocodile (Mecistops cataphractus) and the African dwarf crocodile (Osteolaemus tetraspis). Product formation was inhibited by BPB, a specific PLA(2) inhibitor, confirming that the activity was a direct result of the presence of serum PLA(2). Kinetic analysis showed that C. niloticus serum produced product more rapidly than M. cataphractus or O. tetraspis. Serum from all three species exhibited temperature-dependent PLA(2) activities but with slightly different thermal profiles. All three crocodilian species showed high levels of activity against eight different species of bacteria. PMID:22110960

  15. Growth enhancement and gene expression of Arabidopsis thaliana irradiated with active oxygen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Ono, Reoto; Hayashi, Nobuya; Shiratani, Masaharu; Tashiro, Kosuke; Kuhara, Satoru; Inoue, Asami; Yasuda, Kaori; Hagiwara, Hiroko

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of plant growth enhancement effect and the mechanism of the enhancement induced by plasma irradiation are investigated using various active species in plasma. Active oxygen species in oxygen plasma are effective for growth enhancement of plants. DNA microarray analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana indicates that the genes coding proteins that counter oxidative stresses by eliminating active oxygen species are expressed at significantly high levels. The size of plant cells increases owing to oxygen plasma irradiation. The increases in gene expression levels and cell size suggest that the increase in the expression level of the expansin protein is essential for plant growth enhancement phenomena.

  16. Chill water additive controls transfer of Salmonella and Campylobacter by improved chlorine efficacy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In earlier work, we showed that a proprietary additive (T-128) maintains chlorine activity in the presence of organic material such as broiler parts. T-128 improves the efficacy of chlorine to control transfer of Campylobacter and Salmonella from inoculated wings to un-inoculated wings during immer...

  17. No Effect of Host Species on Phenoloxidase Activity in a Mycophagous Beetle

    PubMed Central

    Formica, Vincent; Chan, Amanda Kar-Men

    2015-01-01

    Ecological immunology is an interdisciplinary field that helps elucidate interactions between the environment and immune response. The host species individuals experience have profound effects on immune response in many species of insects. However, this conclusion comes from studies of herbivorous insects even though species of mycophagous insects also inhabit many different host species. The goal of this study was to determine if fungal host species as well as individual, sex, body size, and host patch predict one aspect of immune function, phenoloxidase activity (PO). We sampled a metapopulation of Bolitotherus cornutus, a mycophagous beetle in southwestern Virginia. B. cornutus live on three species of fungus that differ in nutritional quality, social environment, and density. A filter paper phenoloxidase assay was used to quantify phenoloxidase activity. Overall, PO activity was significantly repeatable among individuals (0.57) in adult B. cornutus. While there was significant variance among individuals in PO activity, there were surprisingly no significant differences in PO activity among subpopulations, beetles living on different host species, or between the sexes; there was also no effect of body size. Our results suggest that other factors such as age, genotype, disease prevalence, or natal environment may be generating variance among individuals in PO activity. PMID:26513243

  18. Potential pancreatic lipase inhibitory activity of an endophytic Penicillium species.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mahiti; Saxena, Sanjai; Goyal, Dinesh

    2015-02-01

    Pancreatic lipase (PL) is considered as one of the safest target for diet-induced anti-obesity drug development. Orlistat is the only PL inhibitor approved for anti-obesity treatment till date. In the process of exploration of new PL inhibitors, we have screened culture filtrates of 70 endophytic fungi of medicinal plants using qualitative as well as quantitative in-vitro PL assays. The qualitative assays indicated potential PL inhibition in only three isolates, namely #57 TBBALM, #33 TBBALM and #1 CSSTOT. Only ethyl acetate extracts of the culture filtrates of these isolates exhibited the PL inhibition. #57 TBBLAM ethyl acetate extract of culture filtrate exhibited potential PL inhibition with an IC50 of 3.69 µg/ml which was comparable to the positive control, i.e. Orlistat exhibiting IC50 value of 2.73 µg/ml. Further molecular phylogenetic tools and morphological studies were used to identify the isolate #57 TBBALM as Penicillium species. PMID:24417211

  19. Surface-Active Agents from Two Bacillus Species

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, David G.; Goldenberg, Beena G.

    1987-01-01

    Two Bacillus species were studied which produced bioemulsifiers; however, they were distinctly different compounds. Bacillus sp. strain IAF 343 produced unusually high yields of extracellular biosurfactant when grown on a medium containing only water-soluble substrates. The yield of 1 g/liter was appreciably better than those of most of the biosurfactants reported previously. This neutral lipid product, unlike most lipid biosurfactants, had significant emulsifying properties. It did not appreciably lower the surface tension of water. On the same medium, Bacillus cereus IAF 346 produced a more conventional polysaccharide bioemulsifier, but it also produced a monoglyceride biosurfactant. The bioemulsifier contained substantial amounts of glucosamine and originated as part of the capsule layer. The monoglyceride lowered the surface tension of water to 28 mN/m. It formed a strong association with the polysaccharide, and it was necessary to use ultrafiltration to effect complete separation. The removal of the monoglyceride caused the polysaccharide to precipitate. It is suggested that earlier reports of biopolymers which both stabilized emulsions and lowered surface tension were actually similar aggregates of lipid and bioemulsifier. PMID:16347271

  20. Chlorination of humic materials: Byproduct formation and chemical interpretations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reckhow, D.A.; Singer, P.C.; Malcolm, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    Ten aquatic humic and fulvic acids were isolated and studied with respect to their reaction with chlorine. Yields of TOX, chloroform, trichloroacetic acid, dichloroacetic acid, dichloroacetonitrile, and 1,1,1-trichloropropanone were measured at pH 7 and 12. Humic acids produced higher concentrations than their corresponding fulvic acids of all byproducts except 1,1,1-trichloropropanone. Chlorine consumption and byproduct formation were related to fundamental chemical characteristics of the humic materials. A statistical model was proposed for activated aromatic content based on 13C NMR and base titration data. The values estimated from this model were found to be well correlated with chlorine consumption. Specific byproduct formation was related to UV absorbance, nitrogen content, or the activated aromatic content. ?? 1990 American Chemical Society.

  1. Malassezia globosa tends to grow actively in summer conditions more than other cutaneous Malassezia species.

    PubMed

    Akaza, Narifumi; Akamatsu, Hirohiko; Takeoka, Shiori; Sasaki, Yasuyuki; Mizutani, Hiroshi; Nakata, Satoru; Matsunaga, Kayoko

    2012-07-01

    Malassezia globosa is a major pathogen of Malassezia folliculitis (MF) and the predominant species on human skin. The aim of this study was to clarify the differences between M. globosa and other cutaneous Malassezia species, M. restricta, M. dermatis, M. sympodialis and M. furfur. The optimum growth temperature, effects of compounds of sweat and free fatty acids on growth, and lipase activities of five cutaneous Malassezia species were determined. The growth of M. globosa was promoted strongly by the compounds of sweat and high temperature unlike that of other cutaneous Malassezia species. This result clarified that M. globosa tended to grow actively in summer conditions more than other cutaneous Malassezia species. Furthermore, M. globosa showed high lipase activity. We consider these characteristics of M. globosa to relate to the pathogenesis of MF. PMID:22229642

  2. [Extraction of pharmacologically active alkaloids from Vinca species].

    PubMed

    Gagua, N D; Bakuridze, A D; Vachnadze, N S; Berashvili, D T; Vachnadze, V Iu

    2011-06-01

    From the Genius Vinca the drugs have been received, arbitrally named: Vingerbin- with anthyarithmic activity, Vincabral-for improvement of brain blood circulation and leicobetin-as stimulator of leicopoesis. The investigations has been performed for creation of rational, resource saving, rentable phyto technologies. As a result, the liquid extraction general schema is provided for receipt of indolic alkaloids from plants V. herbaceae and V.minor. Analyses have shown that extraction with diluent gaz gives the possibility to receive the sums rich with alkaloids:Vingerbin and Vincabral. The advantage of extraction with diluent gaz is exclusion of high volumes of organic and non organic chemicals on the stage of extraction from raw material and liquid extraction, and remain and lipofil fraction converse to new phytosubtances for receipt of biologically active flavonoids, amino acids etc. PMID:21778554

  3. Antiphytoviral activity of essential oil from endemic species Teucrium arduini.

    PubMed

    Dunkić, Valerija; Bezić, Nada; Vuko, Elma

    2011-09-01

    The essential oil of Teucrium arduini L. was characterized by a high concentration of sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (43.8%) of which beta-caryophyllene (19.9%) being the major compound, followed by oxygenated sesquiterpenes (19.6%) of which caryophyllene-oxide (14.6%) was dominant. When applied to plants of Chenopodium amaranticolor and Ch. quinoa for two successive days prior inoculation, the oil was effective in reducing lesion numbers on plants infected with Tobacco mosaic virus (25.7%) and Cucumber mosaic virus (21.9%). The main components of oil, beta-caryophyllene and caryophyllene oxide showed potent antiviral activity against CMV, but weak activity against TMV infection. PMID:21941920

  4. Detection of chlorinated aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1996-02-06

    A method for making a composition for measuring the concentration of chlorinated aromatic compounds in aqueous fluids, and an optical probe for use with the method are disclosed. The composition comprises a hydrophobic polymer matrix, preferably polyamide, with a fluorescent indicator uniformly dispersed therein. The indicator fluoresces in the presence of the chlorinated aromatic compounds with an intensity dependent on the concentration of these compounds in the fluid of interest, such as 8-amino-2-naphthalene sulfonate. The probe includes a hollow cylindrical housing that contains the composition in its distal end. The probe admits an aqueous fluid to the probe interior for exposure to the composition. An optical fiber transmits excitation light from a remote source to the composition while the indicator reacts with chlorinated aromatic compounds present in the fluid. The resulting fluorescence light signal is reflected to a second optical fiber that transmits the light to a spectrophotometer for analysis. 5 figs.

  5. Investigation of cytotoxic activity in four stachys species from iran.

    PubMed

    Khanavi, Mahnaz; Manayi, Azadeh; Lotfi, Mahnaz; Abbasi, Rofeyde; Majdzadeh, Maryam; Ostad, Seyed Nasser

    2012-01-01

    The aerial parts of Stachys laxa Boiss. and Buhse. from Siah-bishe in Mazandaran province, Stachys trinervis Aitch. and Hemsl. from Karaj in Alborz province, Stachys subaphylla Rech. F. and Stachys turcomanica Trautv. from Golestan province have been collected in May 2008. Total extracts were obtained through MeOH/H2O (80/20) and then partitioned between CHCl3, EtOAc and MeOH. These fractions and total extracts have been investigated for in-vitro cytotoxic activity against the colon carcinoma (HT-29), colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2), breast ductal carcinoma (T47D) and Swiss mouse embryo fibroblast (NIH 3T3) cell lines using MTT assay (3-(4,5-di methyl thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-di phenyltetrazolium bromide). At each cell line, doses of 3.125, 6.25, 12.5, 25, 100, 200, 400 and 800 µg/mL in 1% (v/v) DMSO of all samples were tested. Ethyl acetate and chloroform fractions of Stachys laxa against proliferation of T47D and HT-29 cell lines and chloroform fraction of Stachys subaphylla and Stachys subaphylla ethyl acetate fraction toward T47D cell line exhibited highest cytotoxic activity (IC50 < 50 µg/mL). Ethyl acetate and chloroform fractions of Stachys turcomanica against HT-29 cell line, except methanol fraction of Stachys subaphylla, the other extrcts on T47D cell line, represented moderate cytotoxic activity (IC50 < 70 µg/mL). All fractions of S. trinervis demonstrated no effective cytotoxic activity. IC50 values confirmed that the growth and proliferation of HT-29 and T47D cells were most affected by chloroform and ethyl acetate fractions of Stachys laxa and Stachys turcomanica due to their nonpolar compounds. PMID:24250483

  6. Active colonization dynamics and diversity patterns are influenced by dendritic network connectivity and species interactions

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Mathew; Altermatt, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Habitat network connectivity influences colonization dynamics, species invasions, and biodiversity patterns. Recent theoretical work suggests dendritic networks, such as those found in rivers, alter expectations regarding colonization and dispersal dynamics compared with other network types. As many native and non-native species are spreading along river networks, this may have important ecological implications. However, experimental studies testing the effects of network structure on colonization and diversity patterns are scarce. Up to now, experimental studies have only considered networks where sites are connected with small corridors, or dispersal was experimentally controlled, which eliminates possible effects of species interactions on colonization dynamics. Here, we tested the effect of network connectivity and species interactions on colonization dynamics using continuous linear and dendritic (i.e., river-like) networks, which allow for active dispersal. We used a set of six protist species and one rotifer species in linear and dendritic microcosm networks. At the start of the experiment, we introduced species, either singularly or as a community within the networks. Species subsequently actively colonized the networks. We periodically measured densities of species throughout the networks over 2 weeks to track community dynamics, colonization, and diversity patterns. We found that colonization of dendritic networks was faster compared with colonization of linear networks, which resulted in higher local mean species richness in dendritic networks. Initially, community similarity was also greater in dendritic networks compared with linear networks, but this effect vanished over time. The presence of species interactions increased community evenness over time, compared with extrapolations from single-species setups. Our experimental findings confirm previous theoretical work and show that network connectivity, species-specific dispersal ability, and species

  7. The chlorinated AHR ligand 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126) promotes reactive oxygen species (ROS) production during embryonic development in the killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arzuaga, Xabier; Wassenberg, Deena; Giulio, Richard D.; Elskus, Adria

    2006-01-01

    Exposure to dioxin-like chemicals that activate the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) can result in increased cellular and tissue production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Little is known of these effects during early fish development. We used the fish model, Fundulus heteroclitus, to determine if the AHR ligand and pro-oxidant 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126) can increase ROS production during killifish development, and to test a novel method for measuring ROS non-invasively in a living organism. The superoxide-sensitive fluorescent dye, dihydroethidium (DHE), was used to detect in ovo ROS production microscopically in developing killifish exposed to PCB126 or vehicle. Both in ovo CYP1A activity (ethoxyresorufin-o-deethylase, EROD) and in ovo ROS were induced by PCB126. In ovo CYP1A activity was inducible by PCB126 concentrations as low as 0.003 nM, with maximal induction occurring at 0.3 nM PCB126. These PCB126 concentrations also significantly increased in ovo ROS production in embryonic liver, ROS being detectable as early as 5 days post-fertilization. These data demonstrate that the pro-oxidant and CYP1A inducer, PCB126, increases both CYP1A activity and ROS production in developing killifish embryos. The superoxide detection assay (SoDA) described in this paper provides a semi-quantitative, easily measured, early indicator of altered ROS production that can be used in conjunction with simultaneous in ovo measurements of CYP1A activity and embryo development to explore functional relationships among biochemical, physiological and developmental responses to AHR ligands.

  8. 40 CFR 704.43 - Chlorinated naphthalenes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the chlorine atom(s) on the naphthalene. (4) Polychlorinated biphenyl means any chemical substance that is limited to the biphenyl molecule and that has been chlorinated to varying degrees. (5)...

  9. Inactivation of Helicobacter pylori by chlorination.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, C H; Rice, E W; Reasoner, D J

    1997-01-01

    Three strains of Helicobacter pylori were studied to determine their resistance to chlorination. The organisms were readily inactivated by free chlorine and should therefore be controlled by disinfection practices normally employed in the treatment of drinking water. PMID:9406419

  10. 40 CFR 704.43 - Chlorinated naphthalenes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the chlorine atom(s) on the naphthalene. (4) Polychlorinated biphenyl means any chemical substance that is limited to the biphenyl molecule and that has been chlorinated to varying degrees. (5)...

  11. 40 CFR 704.43 - Chlorinated naphthalenes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the chlorine atom(s) on the naphthalene. (4) Polychlorinated biphenyl means any chemical substance that is limited to the biphenyl molecule and that has been chlorinated to varying degrees. (5)...

  12. 40 CFR 704.43 - Chlorinated naphthalenes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the chlorine atom(s) on the naphthalene. (4) Polychlorinated biphenyl means any chemical substance that is limited to the biphenyl molecule and that has been chlorinated to varying degrees. (5)...

  13. 40 CFR 704.43 - Chlorinated naphthalenes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the chlorine atom(s) on the naphthalene. (4) Polychlorinated biphenyl means any chemical substance that is limited to the biphenyl molecule and that has been chlorinated to varying degrees. (5)...

  14. Reactions of aqueous chlorine and chlorine dioxide with model food compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Fukayama, M Y; Tan, H; Wheeler, W B; Wei, C I

    1986-01-01

    Chlorine and chlorine dioxide (ClO2), common disinfecting and bleaching chemicals used in the food industry, are potent oxidizing and chlorinating agents. Unfortunately, little is known about the nature of the reactions of chlorine with organic food constituents. This presentation reviews published information concerning the reactions of chlorine gas (Cl2[g]), aqueous chlorine, and ClO2 with model food compounds, the fate of chlorine during the chlorination of specific food products, and the potential toxicity of the reaction products. Fatty acids and their methyl esters react with chlorine with the degree of incorporation corresponding to their degree of unsaturation. Aqueous chlorine oxidizes and chlorinates lipids and amino acids much more readily than ClO2. Several amino acids are highly susceptible to oxidation and chlorination by chlorine compounds. Reactions of chlorine and ClO2 with several food products, including flour and shrimp, have also been characterized. In one model system, 99% of Cl2(g) either reacted with components of flour or was consumed by oxidation/chlorination reactions. The lipids extracted from the chlorinated flour contained significant amounts of chlorine. Exposure of shrimp to hypochlorous acid (HOCl) solution resulted in significant incorporation of chlorine into the edible portion. Although significant quantities of chlorine can be incorporated into specific model compounds and food products, the health risks associated with exposure to chlorinated organic products are unknown. Preliminary studies using the Ames Salmonella/microsome mutagenicity assay indicate that the reaction products from mixtures of aqueous chlorine and various lipids or tryptophan are nonmutagenic. Nevertheless, additional studies are warranted, so that the toxicological significance of these reaction products can be understood more fully. PMID:3545804

  15. Radiolytic dechlorination of chlorinated organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghipour, Fariborz; Evans, Greg J.

    1997-02-01

    The radiolytic dechlorination of 12 low molecular weight chlorinated organic compounds present in pulp mill effluent was investigated. For most of these chloro-organic compounds more than 90% dechlorination was obtained for gamma doses up to 20 kGy. Parameters such as the number of chlorine atoms and aqueous solution concentration were found to affect the dechlorination rate. A reaction set was also created to model the behavior of irradiated 0.49-49 mol m -3 chloroform solutions, giving good agreement with experimental results.

  16. Colorectal cancers and chlorinated water

    PubMed Central

    El-Tawil, Ahmed Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Published reports have revealed increased risk of colorectal cancers in people exposed to chlorinated drinking water or chemical derivatives of chlorination. Oestrogen plays a dual positive functions for diminishing the possibilities of such risk by reducing the entrance, and increasing the excretion, of these chemicals. In addition, there are supplementary measures that could be employed in order to reduce this risk further, such as boiling the drinking water, revising the standard concentrations of calcium, magnesium and iron in the public drinking water and prescribing oestrogen in susceptible individuals. Hypo-methylation of genomic DNA could be used as a biological marker for screening for the potential development of colorectal cancers. PMID:27096035

  17. In Vitro Activities of Ketoconazole, Econazole, Miconazole, and Melaleuca alternifolia (Tea Tree) Oil against Malassezia Species

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, K. A.; Carson, C. F.; Riley, T. V.

    2000-01-01

    The in vitro activities of ketoconazole, econazole, miconazole, and tea tree oil against 54 Malassezia isolates were determined by agar and broth dilution methods. Ketoconazole was more active than both econazole and miconazole, which showed very similar activities. M. furfur was the least susceptible species. M. sympodialis, M. slooffiae, M. globosa, and M. obtusa showed similar susceptibilities to the four agents. PMID:10639388

  18. Diuretic and natriuretic activity of two mistletoe species in rats

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, Namita; Patil, C. R.; Chaudhari, K. B.; Wagh, J. P.; Surana, S. J.; Jadhav, R. B.

    2010-01-01

    In different cultural groups, the hemiparasitic plants of the families Loranthaceae and Viscaceae (mistletoes) are frequently used in the treatment of hypertension and/or as diuretic agents. However, it remains unclear as to what commonality makes them diuretic agents or a remedy for hypertension. In this article, the diuretic activity of methanol extracts of Viscum articulatum (VA) Burm. f. and Helicanthus elastica (HE) (Ders.) Dans. in rats is reported. The extracts were administered orally at doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg to rats that had been fasted and deprived of water for 18 hours. Investigations were carried out for diuretic, saluretic and natriuretic effects. The polyphenolic and triterpenoid contents were determined quantitatively using chemical assays and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis, respectively. The extracts of VA and HE demonstrated significant and dose-dependent diuretic activity in rats. It was found that while VA mimics the furosemide pattern, HE demonstrated a dose-dependent increase in diuresis, along with an increase in potassium-sparing effects. Phytochemical analysis revealed that polyphenolics and triterpenoids, such as oleanolic acid and lupeol, are the major phytochemicals involved. It was also found that in different combinations, these phytochemicals differed in the way they influenced the electrolyte excretion. A higher content of polyphenolics in association with lower triterpenoid content was found to favor potassium-sparing effects. PMID:21808540

  19. THE IMPORTANCE OF CHLORINE SPECIATION ON DE NOVO FORMATION OF POLYCHLORINATED DIBENZO-P-DIOXINS AND POLYCHLORINATED DIBENZOFURANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The role of chlorine speciation on de novo formation of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDDs/Fs) has been thoroughly studied in an entrained flow reactor during simulated waste combustion. Namely, the affects of gas-phase chlorine species suc...

  20. Biological assessment for rare and endangered plant species: Related to CERCLA characterization activities

    SciTech Connect

    Sackschewsky, M.R.

    1992-04-01

    Environmental characterization in support of hazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste cleanup (in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980) can involve a large number of both nonintrusive and intrusive activities. Many of these activities could have a detrimental impact on listed plant species. These impacts can be minimized by following simple conservation policies while conducting the various field activities. For instance, frequent off-road vehicular traffic and have a severe impact on native habitats and, therefore, should be kept to a minimum. Personnel performing the field activities should be trained to preserve, respect, and minimize their impact on native habitat while performing work in the field. In addition, areas where sampling is planned should be surveyed for the presence of listed plant species before the initiation of the field activities. Extremely distributed areas could be exempted from this requirement provided adequate habitat assessments have been performed by qualified personnel. Twelve special status plant species are known to survive on or very near the Hanford Site. None of these species currently are listed as Federal Threatened or Endangered Species. However, four local species currently are candidates for federal protection. These species are the Northern Wormwood (Artemisia campestris ssp. borealis var. wormskioldii), Persistantsepal Yellowcress (Rorippa columbiae), Hoover's Desert Parsley (Lomatium tuberosum), and Columbia Milkvetch (Astragalus columbianus).

  1. Biological assessment for rare and endangered plant species: Related to CERCLA characterization activities

    SciTech Connect

    Sackschewsky, M.R.

    1992-04-01

    Environmental characterization in support of hazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste cleanup (in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980) can involve a large number of both nonintrusive and intrusive activities. Many of these activities could have a detrimental impact on listed plant species. These impacts can be minimized by following simple conservation policies while conducting the various field activities. For instance, frequent off-road vehicular traffic and have a severe impact on native habitats and, therefore, should be kept to a minimum. Personnel performing the field activities should be trained to preserve, respect, and minimize their impact on native habitat while performing work in the field. In addition, areas where sampling is planned should be surveyed for the presence of listed plant species before the initiation of the field activities. Extremely distributed areas could be exempted from this requirement provided adequate habitat assessments have been performed by qualified personnel. Twelve special status plant species are known to survive on or very near the Hanford Site. None of these species currently are listed as Federal Threatened or Endangered Species. However, four local species currently are candidates for federal protection. These species are the Northern Wormwood (Artemisia campestris ssp. borealis var. wormskioldii), Persistantsepal Yellowcress (Rorippa columbiae), Hoover`s Desert Parsley (Lomatium tuberosum), and Columbia Milkvetch (Astragalus columbianus).

  2. STABLE CHLORINE ISOTOPE ANALYSIS OF CHLORINATED ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The biogeochemical cycling of chlorinated organic contaminants in the environment is often difficult to understand because of the complex distributions of these compounds and variability of sources. To address these issues from an isotopic perspective, we have measured the, 37Cl...

  3. Structure and the catalysis mechanism of oxidative chlorination in nanostructural layers of a surface of alumina

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of X-ray diffraction and mass spectrometric analysis of carrier γ-Al2O3 and catalysts CuCl2/CuCl on its surface, the chemical structure of the active centers of two types oxidative chlorination catalysts applied and permeated type of industrial brands “Harshow” and “MEDС-B” was investigated. On the basis of quantum-mechanical theory of the crystal, field complexes were detected by the presence of CuCl2 cation stoichiometry and structure of the proposed model crystal quasichemical industrial catalyst permeated type MEDС-B for oxidative chlorination of ethylene. On the basis of quantum-mechanical calculations, we propose a new mechanism of catalysis crystal quasichemical oxidative chlorination of ethylene reaction for the catalysts of this type (MEDС-B) and confirmed the possibility of such a mechanism after the analysis of mass spectrometric studies of the active phase (H2 [CuCl4]) catalyst oxidative chlorination of ethylene. The possibility of the formation of atomic and molecular chlorine on the oxidative chlorination of ethylene catalyst surface during Deacon reaction was displaying, which may react with ethylene to produce 1,2-dichloroethane. For the active phase (H [CuCl2]), catalyst offered another model of the metal complex catalyst oxidative chlorination of ethylene deposited type (firm ‘Harshow,’ USA) and the mechanism of catalysis of oxidative chlorination of ethylene with this catalyst. PMID:25258594

  4. Minnows can acclimate to total residual chlorine

    SciTech Connect

    Lotts, J.W. Jr.; Stewart, A.J.

    1995-08-01

    Observations in a chlorine-contaminated stream in eastern Tennessee revealed several species of fish in areas where total residual chlorine (TRC) concentrations were often great enough to be lethal, based on the results of other studies. The authors used in situ and laboratory experiments to test the hypothesis that minnows could acclimate to TRC. Acclimation was assessed by time-to-death for fish exposed to a single lethal regime of TRC. In in situ experiments, striped shiner and central stoneroller minnows collected from East Fork Poplar Creek at a TRC-contaminated site and a site farther downstream, where TRC was below detection, were caged at sites in the stream where TRC concentrations were either nil or great enough to be lethal. At the cage with high TRC, minnows collected from the ``TRC-free`` site survived two to four times longer (15.8 h vs. 6.1 h) than the same species from the ``TRC-free`` site. In laboratory experiments, golden shiner minnows were exposed to TRC in a stepwise increasing concentration regime (0.04 mg/L during week 1, 0.08 mg/L during week 2, and 0.12 mg/L during week 3) before being challenged-tested with a lethal concentration of TRC. Minnows that had been previously exposed to TRC survived longer than controls in each test, and the magnitude of the mean time to death increased as the TRC concentration and duration of exposure increased (1.2-, 2.5-, and 3.9-fold increases for weeks 1, 2, and 3, respectively). Another experiment with golden shiner minnows showed that a 21-d exposure to TRC at a low concentration (0.04 mg/L) only slightly increased their tolerance to TRC. Thus, several minnow species apparently can acclimate, fairly rapidly, to TRC. This study may help explain why fish kills are less common than expected in TRC-contaminated streams.

  5. Antiparasitic activity of prenylated benzoic acid derivatives from Piper species.

    PubMed

    Flores, Ninoska; Jiménez, Ignacio A; Giménez, Alberto; Ruiz, Grace; Gutiérrez, David; Bourdy, Genevieve; Bazzocchi, Isabel L

    2009-03-01

    Fractionation of dichloromethane extracts from the leaves of Piper heterophyllum and P. aduncum afforded three prenylated hydroxybenzoic acids, 3-[(2E,6E,10E)-11-carboxy-3,7,15-trimethyl-2,6,10,14-hexadecatetraenyl)-4,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 3-[(2E,6E,10E)-11-carboxy-13-hydroxy-3,7,15-trimethyl-2,6,10,14-hexadecatetraenyl]-4,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid and 3-[(2E,6E,10E)-11-carboxy-14-hydroxy-3,7,15-trimethyl-2,6,10,15-hexadecatetraenyl]-4,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, along with the known compounds, 4,5-dihydroxy-3-(E,E,E-11-formyl-3,7,15-trimethyl-hexadeca-2,6,10,14-tetraenyl)benzoic acid (arieianal), 3,4-dihydroxy-5-(E,E,E-3,7,11,15-tetramethyl-hexadeca-2,6,10,14-tetraenyl)benzoic acid, 4-hydroxy-3-(E,E,E-3,7,11,15-tetramethyl-hexadeca-2,6,10,14-tetraenyl)benzoic acid, 3-(3,7-dimethyl-2,6-octadienyl)-4-methoxy-benzoic acid, 4-hydroxy-3-(3,7-dimethyl-2,6-octadienyl)benzoic acid and 4-hydroxy-3-(3-methyl-1-oxo-2-butenyl)-5-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)benzoic acid. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data, including homo- and heteronuclear correlation NMR experiments (COSY, HSQC and HMBC) and comparison with data reported in the literature. Riguera ester reactions and optical rotation measurements established the compounds as racemates. The antiparasitic activity of the compounds were tested against three strains of Leishmania spp., Trypanosoma cruzi and Plasmodium falciparum. The results showed that 3-(3,7-dimethyl-2,6-octadienyl)-4-methoxy-benzoic acid exhibited potent and selective activity against L. braziliensis (IC(50) 6.5 microg/ml), higher that pentamidine used as control. Moreover, 3-[(2E,6E,10E)-11-carboxy-3,7,15-trimethyl- 2,6,10,14-hexadecatetraenyl)-4,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid and 4-hydroxy-3-(3-methyl-1-oxo-2-butenyl)-5-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)benzoic acid showed moderate antiplasmodial (IC(50) 3.2 microg/ml) and trypanocidal (16.5 microg/ml) activities, respectively. PMID:19361822

  6. Chlorinated Biphenyl Quinones and Phenyl-2,5-benzoquinone Differentially Modify the Catalytic Activity of Human Hydroxysteroid Sulfotransferase hSULT2A1

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xiaoyan; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Teesch, Lynn M.; Robertson, Larry W.; Duffel, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    Human hydroxysteroid sulfotransferase (hSULT2A1) catalyzes the sulfation of a broad range of environmental chemicals, drugs, and other xenobiotics in addition to endogenous compounds that include hydroxysteroids and bile acids. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent environmental contaminants, and oxidized metabolites of PCBs may play significant roles in the etiology of their adverse health effects. Quinones derived from oxidative metabolism of PCBs (PCB-quinones) react with nucleophilic sites in proteins and also undergo redox cycling to generate reactive oxygen species. This, along with the sensitivity of hSULT2A1 to oxidative modification at cysteine residues led us to hypothesize that electrophilic PCB-quinones react with hSULT2A1 to alter its catalytic function. Thus, we examined the effects of four phenylbenzoquinones on the ability of hSULT2A1 to catalyze the sulfation of the endogenous substrate, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). The quinones studied were 2′-chlorophenyl-2,5-benzoquinone (2′-Cl-BQ), 4′-chlorophenyl-2,5-benzoquinone (4′-Cl-BQ), 4′-chlorophenyl-3,6-dichloro-2,5-benzoquinone (3,6,4′-triCl-BQ), and phenyl-2,5-benzoquinone (PBQ). At all concentrations examined, pretreatment of hSULT2A1 with the PCB-quinones decreased catalytic activity of hSULT2A1. Pretreatment with low concentrations of PBQ, however, increased the catalytic activity of the enzyme, while higher concentrations inhibited catalysis. A decrease in substrate inhibition with DHEA was seen following preincubation of hSULT2A1 with all of the quinones. Proteolytic digestion of the enzyme followed by LC/MS analysis indicated PCB-quinone- and PBQ-adducts at Cys55 and Cys199, as well as oxidation products at methionines in the protein. Equilibrium binding experiments and molecular modeling suggested that changes due to these modifications may affect the nucleotide binding site and the entrance to the sulfuryl acceptor binding site of hSULT2A1. PMID:24059442

  7. Toxic effects of residual chlorine on larvae of Hydropsyche pellucidula (Trichoptera, Hydropsychidae): A proposal of biological indicator

    SciTech Connect

    Camargo, J.A. )

    1991-08-01

    Elemental chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) and other chlorine compounds, such as chloramines and hypochlorites, have been used as important bactericides in disinfection of drinking waters for many years. Residual chlorine concentrations in municipal water supplies are normally between 0.5 and 2 mg/L. In water at pH values above 5, elemental chlorine and hypochlorite compounds react rapidly, resulting in the formation of hypochlorous acid (HOCl) in equilibrium with hypochlorite ions (OCL-). Very little is known about the toxicity of residual chlorine on aquatic insects that comprise the macroinvertebrate communities of freshwater ecosystems. This study examines the toxic effects of municipal chlorinated waters on larvae of Hydropsyche pellucidula (Curtis), a common insect species in macrobenthic communities of rivers and streams in the Iberian Peninsula and other European countries, evaluating implications on their life cycles. Field and laboratory studies were performed in order to reach these goals.

  8. 49 CFR 179.102-2 - Chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Chlorine. 179.102-2 Section 179.102-2... Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.102-2 Chlorine. (a) Each tank car used to transport chlorine must comply with all of the following: (1) Tanks must be fabricated from carbon...

  9. 49 CFR 179.102-2 - Chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chlorine. 179.102-2 Section 179.102-2... Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.102-2 Chlorine. (a) Each tank car used to transport chlorine must comply with all of the following: (1) Tanks must...

  10. 49 CFR 179.102-2 - Chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Chlorine. 179.102-2 Section 179.102-2... Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.102-2 Chlorine. (a) Each tank car used to transport chlorine must comply with all of the following: (1) Tanks must be fabricated from carbon...

  11. 49 CFR 179.102-2 - Chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chlorine. 179.102-2 Section 179.102-2... Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.102-2 Chlorine. (a) Each tank car used to transport chlorine must comply with all of the following: (1) Tanks must be fabricated from carbon...

  12. 49 CFR 179.102-2 - Chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Chlorine. 179.102-2 Section 179.102-2... Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.102-2 Chlorine. (a) Each tank car used to transport chlorine must comply with all of the following: (1) Tanks must be fabricated from carbon...

  13. BOOSTER CHLORINATION FOR MANAGING DISINFECTANT RESIDUALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Booster chlorination is an approach to residual maintenance in which chlorine is applied at strategic locations within the distribution system. Situations in which booster chlorination may be most effective for maintaining a residual are explained informally in the context of a ...

  14. An Easy Way To Make Chlorine Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, L. H., Jr.

    1997-11-01

    Chlorine water can be made easily by mixing hypochlorite and hydrochloric acid. The equilibrium lies toward Cl2 in the reaction HOCl + HCl -> Cl2 + H2O and this can be used to make chlorine water from sodium hypochlorite and hydrochloric acid if the presence of NaCl in the chlorine water does not interfere with its use.

  15. CHLORINE DIOXIDE FOR DRINKING WATER RESEARCH DIVISION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to comply with the trihalomethane regulation, many drinking water utilities have had to alter their treatment methods. ne option available to these utilities is to use a disinfectant other than chlorine such as chlorine dioxide. ith chlorine dioxide disinfection, trihalo...

  16. Chapter 21. chlorine dioxide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Submerging terminal leafy cuttings of Rhododendron L. 'Gumpo White' ('Gumpo White' azalea) in 50 °C water for 21 min was previously shown to eliminate binucleate Rhizoctonia species, the cause of azalea web blight, from plant tissues. Prior to considering commercial use of this practice, a better un...

  17. Chlorine Release from Hypalon Cable Insulation During Severe Nuclear Reactor Accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Auvinen, Ari; Zilliacus, Riitta; Jokiniemi, Jorma

    2005-02-15

    Pyrolytic dehydrochlorination of the electrical cable insulation Hypalon was studied as a function of time and temperature. The chlorine evolution was determined separately by means of on-line activity measurements and by neutron activation analysis in the temperature range 200 deg. C to 300 deg. C, with one test conducted at 500 deg. C. The object of the research was to determine the chlorine release and the chlorine release fraction as a function of temperature. The data obtained were needed to formulate conclusions regarding the release mechanisms of chlorine. Estimates of the amount of hydrochloric acid released to the containment building in a severe reactor accident were also calculated. It can be concluded that the amount of chlorine release from the Hypalon cable is significant and will have an effect on iodine behavior in a severe accident.

  18. MUTAGENS IN CHLORINATED WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past twelve years, numerous reports have appeared in the literature documenting the presence of genotoxic activity in organic concentrates of drinking water. enotoxic activity has been observed using in vitro test systems, including microbial, mammalian and lower eukaryo...

  19. Disinfectants: Chlorine and chlorine dioxide. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the antimicrobial properties of chlorine and chlorine dioxide. The use of chlorine for the inactivation of viruses, bacteria, and fungi in wastewater treatment plants is discussed, including the mode of action and factors influencing inactivation. The use of chlorine dioxide as an alternative to chlorine disinfection in swimming pools and water supplies, and possible adverse effects are also discussed. (Contains a minimum of 157 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  20. Synthesis, structural investigations on organotin(IV) chlorin-e6 complexes, their effect on sea urchin embryonic development and induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Pellerito, Claudia; D'Agati, Paolo; Fiore, Tiziana; Mansueto, Caterina; Mansueto, Valentina; Stocco, Giancarlo; Nagy, László; Pellerito, Lorenzo

    2005-06-01

    Four new organotin(IV) chlorin derivatives, [chlorin=chlorin-e(6)=21H,23H-porphine-2-propanoic acid, 18-carboxy-20-(carboxymethyl)-8-ethenyl-13-ethyl-2,3-di-hydro-3,7,12,17-tetramethyl-(2S-trans)-], with formula (R(2)Sn)(3)(chlorin)(2).2H(2)O (R=Me, n-Bu) and (R(3)Sn)(3)chlorin.2H(2)O (R=Me, Ph) have been synthesized. The solid state and solution phase structures have been investigated by FT-IR, (119)Sn Mössbauer, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. In the solid state, (R(2)Sn)(3)(chlorin)(2).2H(2)O complexes contain six coordinated Sn(IV), in a skew trapezoidal environment by forming trans-R(2)SnO(4) polymeric units. As far as (R(3)Sn)(3)chlorin.2H(2)O complexes are concerned, Sn(IV) is five coordinated in a polymeric (oligomeric) trigonal bipyramidal environment and eq-R(3)SnO(2) units, in the solid state. In saturated solutions, a polymeric structure comparable to the solid phase, with carboxylate groups of the ligand behaving in monoanionic bidentate fashion bridging Sn(IV) atoms, was detected for the (Me(3)Sn)(3)chlorin.2H(2)O complex, while in more diluted ones a tetrahedral configuration for the trimethyltin(IV) moieties was observed. Cytotoxic activity of the novel organotin(IV) chlorin was investigated in order to assay the effect on sea urchin embryonic development. The results obtained demonstrated that (n-Bu(2)Sn)(3)(chlorin)(2).2H(2)O and (Ph(3)Sn)(3)chlorin.2H(2)O exerted the antimitotic effect on the early stages of sea urchin development. In addition, the cytotoxic effect exerted by (n-Bu(2)Sn)(3)(chlorin)(2).2H(2)O appeared with necrosis of the blastomeres, which were clearly destroyed. After treatment with (Ph(3)Sn)(3)chlorin.2H(2)O, a programmed cell death was triggered, as shown by light microscope observations through morphological assays. The apoptotic events in 2-cell stage embryos revealed: (i) DNA fragmentation, with the TUNEL reaction (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling); (ii) phosphatidylserine

  1. Recovery of cholinesterase activity in five avian species exposed to dicrotophos, an organophosphorus pesticide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, W.J.; Grue, C.E.

    1981-01-01

    The responses of brain and plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activities were examined in mallard ducks, bobwhite quail, barn owls, starlings, and common grackles given oral doses of dicrotophos, an organophosphorus insecticide. Up to an eightfold difference in response of brain ChE activity to dicrotophos was found among these species. Brain ChE activity recovered to within 2 SD of normal within 26 days after being depressed 55 to 64%. Recovery of brain ChE activity was similar among species and followed the model Y = a + b (log10X).

  2. Benzoic acid derivatives from Piper species and their antiparasitic activity.

    PubMed

    Flores, Ninoska; Jiménez, Ignacio A; Giménez, Alberto; Ruiz, Grace; Gutiérrez, David; Bourdy, Genevieve; Bazzocchi, Isabel L

    2008-09-01

    Piper glabratum and P. acutifolium were analyzed for their content of main secondary constituents, affording nine new benzoic acid derivatives (1, 2, 4, 5, 7, and 10-13), in addition to four known compounds (3, 6, 8, and 9). Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data. Riguera ester reactions and optical rotation measurements established the new compounds as racemates. In the search for antiparasitic agents, the compounds were evaluated in vitro against the promastigote forms of Leishmania spp., Trypanosoma cruzi, and Plasmodium falciparum. Among the evaluated compounds, methyl 3,4-dihydroxy-5-(3'-methyl-2'-butenyl)benzoate (7) exhibited leishmanicidal effect (IC50 13.8-18.5 microg/mL) against the three Leishmania strains used, and methyl 3,4-dihydroxy-5-(2-hydroxy-3-methylbutenyl)benzoate (1), methyl 4-hydroxy-3-(2-hydroxy-3-methyl-3-butenyl)benzoate (3), and methyl 3,4-dihydroxy-5-(3-methyl-2-butenyl) benzoate (7) showed significant trypanocidal activity, with IC50 values of 16.4, 15.6, and 18.5 microg/mL, respectively. PMID:18712933

  3. Mechanistic aspects of ingested chlorine dioxide on thyroid function: impact of oxidants on iodide metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Bercz, J.P.; Jones, L.L.; Harrington, R.M.; Bawa, R.; Condie, L.

    1986-11-01

    Toxicological studies dealing with recent findings of health effects of drinking water disinfectants are reviewed. Experiments with monkeys and rodents indicate that the biological activity of ingested disinfectants is expressed via their chemical interaction with the mucosal epithelia, secretory products, and nutritional contents of the alimentary tract. Evidence exists that a principal partner of this redox interaction is the iodide of nutritional origin that is ubiquitous in the gastrointestinal tract. Thus the observation that subchronic exposure to chlorine dioxide (ClO/sub 2/) in drinking water decreases serum thyroxine levels in mammalian species can be best explained with changes produced in the chemical form of the bioavailable iodide. Ongoing and previously reported mechanistic studies indicate that oxidizing agents such as chlorine-based disinfectants oxidize the basal iodide content of the gastrointestinal tract. The resulting reactive iodine species readily attaches to organic matter by covalent bonding. Evidence suggests that the extent to which such iodinated organics are formed is proportional to the magnitude of the electromotive force and stoichiometry of the redox couple between iodide and the disinfectant. Because the extent of thyroid uptake of the bioavailable iodide does not decrease during ClO/sub 2/ ingestion, it seems that ClO/sub 2/ does not cause iodide deficiency of sufficient magnitude to account for the decease in hormonogenesis. Absorption of one or more of iodinated molecules, e.g., nutrient, hormones, or cellular constituents of the alimentary tract having thyromimetic or thyroid inhibitory properties, is a better hypothesis for the effects seen.

  4. NATURAL ATTENUATION OF CHLORINATED SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The protocol will simply describe in detail, with references and illustrations, the approach currently used by staff of the SPRD to evaluate natural attenuation of chlorinated solvents in ground water. Staff of SPRD, and staff of the Air Force Center for environmental excellence...

  5. VOLTAMMETRIC MEMBRANE CHLORINE DIOXIDE ELECTRODE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A voltammetric membrane electrode system has been modified and applied to the in situ measurement of chlorine dioxide. The electrode system consisted of a gold cathode, a silver/silver chloride reference electrode, and a gold counter electrode. Different membrane materials were t...

  6. Chlorine Abundances in Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D.D.; Garrison, D.H.; Park, J.

    2009-01-01

    Chlorine measurements made in martian surface rocks by robotic spacecraft typically give Chlorine (Cl) abundances of approximately 0.1-0.8%. In contrast, Cl abundances in martian meteorites appear lower, although data is limited, and martian nakhlites were also subjected to Cl contamination by Mars surface brines. Chlorine abundances reported by one lab for whole rock (WR) samples of Shergotty, ALH77005, and EET79001 range 108-14 ppm, whereas Cl in nakhlites range 73-1900 ppm. Measurements of Cl in various martian weathering phases of nakhlites varied 0.04-4.7% and reveal significant concentration of Cl by martian brines Martian meteorites contain much lower Chlorine than those measured in martian surface rocks and give further confirmation that Cl in these surface rocks was introduced by brines and weathering. It has been argued that Cl is twice as effective as water in lowering the melting point and promoting melting at shallower martian depths, and that significant Cl in the shergottite source region would negate any need for significant water. However, this conclusion was based on experiments that utilized Cl concentrations more analogous to martian surface rocks than to shergottite meteorites, and may not be applicable to shergottites.

  7. [Determination of chlorine levels in Presept, a modern disinfectant].

    PubMed

    Janácek, K; Lodin, Z

    1999-04-01

    Presept (containing sodium dichloroisocyanurate as active component) was shown to be an excellent analytical reagent superior to classical Chloramine T and Chloramine B. Potentiometric titration of potassium ferrocyanide was found to be most suitable for estimation of chlorine content in Presept solutions. The presence of serum albumin can block or reverse the oxidation of ferrocyanide completely, whereas that of a detergent is of little importance. The content of available chlorine in various Presept tablets was found to be as a rule slightly higher than that guaranteed by the dilution rules of Johnson & Johnson. Presept solutions are remarkably stable, paradoxically the concentration of available chlorine in open vessels remains higher than in perfectly closed vessels. PMID:10349781

  8. Influence of drinking water treatments on chlorine dioxide consumption and chlorite/chlorate formation.

    PubMed

    Sorlini, Sabrina; Gialdini, Francesca; Biasibetti, Michela; Collivignarelli, Carlo

    2014-05-01

    Disinfection is the last treatment stage of a Drinking Water Treatment Plant (DWTP) and is carried out to maintain a residual concentration of disinfectant in the water distribution system. Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is a widely used chemical employed for this purpose. The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of several treatments on chlorine dioxide consumption and on chlorite and chlorate formation in the final oxidation/disinfection stage. A number of tests was performed at laboratory scale employing water samples collected from the DWTP of Cremona (Italy). The following processes were studied: oxidation with potassium permanganate, chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite, coagulation/flocculation with ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate, filtration and adsorption onto activated carbon. The results showed that the chlorine dioxide demand is high if sodium hypochlorite or potassium permanganate are employed in pre-oxidation. On the other hand, chlorine dioxide leads to the highest production of chlorite and chlorate. The coagulation/flocculation process after pre-oxidation shows that chlorine dioxide demand decreases if potassium permanganate is employed as an oxidant, both with ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate. Therefore, the combination of these processes leads to a lower production of chlorite and chlorate. Aluminum sulfate is preferable in terms of the chlorine dioxide demand reduction and minimization of the chlorite and chlorate formation. Activated carbon is the most effective solution as it reduced the chlorine dioxide consumption by about 50% and the DBP formation by about 20-40%. PMID:24534637

  9. Antioxidant activity and phenolic content of leaf infusions of Myrtaceae species from Cerrado (Brazilian Savanna).

    PubMed

    Takao, L K; Imatomi, M; Gualtieri, S C J

    2015-11-01

    There is considerable interest in identifying new antioxidants from plant materials. Several studies have emphasized the antioxidant activity of species belonging to the Myrtaceae family. However, there are few reports on these species from the Cerrado (Brazilian savanna). In this study, the antioxidant activity and phenolic content of 12 native Myrtaceae species from the Cerrado were evaluated (Blepharocalyx salicifolius, Eugenia bimarginata, Eugenia dysenterica, Eugenia klotzschiana, Hexachlamys edulis, Myrcia bella, Myrcia lingua, Myrcia splendens, Myrcia tomentosa, Psidium australe, Psidium cinereum, and Psidium laruotteanum). Antioxidant potential was assessed using the antioxidant activity index (AAI) by the DPPH method and total phenolic content (TPC) by the Folin-Ciocalteu assay. There was a high correlation between TPC and AAI values. Psidium laruotteanum showed the highest TPC (576.56 mg GAE/g extract) and was the most potent antioxidant (AAI = 7.97, IC50 = 3.86 µg·mL-1), with activity close to that of pure quercetin (IC50 = 2.99 µg·mL-1). The extracts of nine species showed IC50 of 6.24-8.75 µg·mL-1. Most species showed TPC and AAI values similar to or higher than those for Camellia sinensis, a commonly consumed tea with strong antioxidant properties. The results reveal that the analyzed Myrtaceae species from the Cerrado possess high phenolic contents and antioxidant activities. Thus, they are a potential source of new natural antioxidants. PMID:26675912

  10. Catalase activity of different Candida species after exposition to specific antiserum

    PubMed Central

    Miyasaka, Natália R.S.; Unterkircher, Carmelinda S.; Shimizu, Mario T.

    2008-01-01

    Antisera were developed in rabbits after challenge with intracellular antigens of Candida albicans, C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis. Microorganism catalase has been correlated with virulence, resistance to drugs and immunogenicity. The intracellular catalase is consistently present in strains of Candida and in this paper, the enzyme activity was analysed by PAGE after exposition to antisera. The catalases of C. albicans, C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis were immunogenic and differed in their binding to specific antibodies raised in rabbits. Tests of cross-reactivity between different Candida species showed that when antiserum from C. albicans immunized rabbit was incubated with intracellular extracts of these three Candida species, the catalases activities were abolished. However, the antisera from C. parapsilosis or C. tropicalis immunized rabbits did not affect the catalase activity of C. albicans; the enzyme of C. albicans was inactivated only by the antiserum to the catalase of own C. albicans. The antiserum to the catalase of C. tropicalis was species-specific and did not cross-react with catalases of C. albicans and C. parapsilosis. The activities of Aspergillus niger and bovine catalases were not affected by the antiserum from any Candida immunized rabbits. This report is a preliminary study of specific antisera that react against intracellular catalase of Candida sp. and neutralize the enzymatic activity. Further study is necessary to develop species-specific antibody once differences in the susceptibility of the Candida species to commonly used antifungal drugs make identification to the species level important. PMID:24031174

  11. Scenarios Evaluation Tool for Chlorinated Solvent MNA

    SciTech Connect

    Vangelas, Karen; Michael J. Truex; Charles J. Newell; Brian Looney

    2007-02-28

    Over the past three decades, much progress has been made in the remediation of chlorinated solvents from the subsurface. Yet these pervasive contaminants continue to present a significant challenge to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), other federal agencies, and other public and private organizations. The physical and chemical properties of chlorinated solvents make it difficult to rapidly reach the low concentrations typically set as regulatory limits. These technical challenges often result in high costs and long remediation time frames. In 2003, the DOE through the Office of Environmental Management funded a science-based technical project that uses the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's technical protocol (EPA, 1998) and directives (EPA, 1999) on Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) as the foundation on which to introduce supporting concepts and new scientific developments that will support remediation of chlorinated solvents based on natural attenuation processes. This project supports the direction in which many site owners want to move to complete the remediation of their site(s), that being to complete the active treatment portion of the remedial effort and transition into MNA. The overarching objective of the effort was to examine environmental remedies that are based on natural processes--remedies such as Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) or Enhanced Attenuation (EA). The research program did identify several specific opportunities for advances based on: (1) mass balance as the central framework for attenuation based remedies, (2) scientific advancements and achievements during the past ten years, (3) regulatory and policy development and real-world experience using MNA, and (4) exploration of various ideas for integrating attenuation remedies into a systematic set of ''combined remedies'' for contaminated sites. These opportunities are summarized herein and are addressed in more detail in referenced project documents and journal articles, as well

  12. EFFECTS OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE ON THE DEVELOPING RAT BRAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Male and female Long-Evans rat pups, exposed to an oral dose of 14 mg chlorine dioxide C102)/kg/d (postnatal d 10), were examined for effects on brain development and for changes in thyroid activity. ody weight reductions were observed on postnatal (pn) d 11, 21, and 35. orebrain...

  13. Kinetics and pathways of ibuprofen degradation by the UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yingying; Fang, Jingyun; Shang, Chii

    2016-03-01

    The UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process (AOP), which forms reactive species such as hydroxyl radicals (HO) and reactive chlorine species (RCS) such as chlorine atoms (Cl) and Cl2(-), is being considered as an alternative to the UV/H2O2 AOP for the degradation of emerging contaminants. This study investigated the kinetics and pathways of the degradation of a recalcitrant pharmaceutical and personal care product (PPCP)-ibuprofen (IBP)-by the UV/chlorine AOP. The degradation of IBP followed the pseudo first-order kinetics. The first-order rate constant was 3.3 times higher in the UV/chlorine AOP than in the UV/H2O2 AOP for a given chemical molar dosage at pH 6. The first-order rate constant decreased from 3.1 × 10(-3) s(-1) to 5.5 × 10(-4) s(-1) with increasing pH from 6 to 9. Both HO and RCS contributed to the degradation, and the contribution of RCS increased from 22% to 30% with increasing pH from 6 to 9. The degradation was initiated by HO-induced hydroxylation and Cl-induced chlorine substitution, and sustained through decarboxylation, demethylation, chlorination and ring cleavage to form more stable products. Significant amounts of chlorinated intermediates/byproducts were formed from the UV/chlorine AOP, and four chlorinated products were newly identified. The yield of total organic chlorine (TOCl) was 31.6 μM after 90% degradation of 50 μM IBP under the experimental conditions. The known disinfection by-products (DBPs) comprised 17.4% of the TOCl. The effects of water matrix in filtered drinking water on the degradation were not significant, demonstrating the practicality of the UV/chlorine AOP for the control of some refractory PPCPs. However, the toxicity of the chlorinated products should be further assessed. PMID:26748208

  14. Estimates of total organic and inorganic chlorine in the lower stratosphere from in situ and flask measurements during AASE 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodbridge, E. L.; Elkins, J. W.; Fahey, D. W.; Heidt, L. E.; Solomon, S.; Baring, T. J.; Gilpin, T. M.; Pollack, W. H.; Schauffler, S. M.; Atlas, E. L.

    1995-01-01

    Aircraft sampling has provided extensive in situ and flask measurements of organic chlorine species in the lower stratosphere. The recent Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition 2 (AASE 2) included two independent measurements of organic chlorine species using whole air sample and real-time techniques. From the whole air sample measurements we derive directly the burden of total organic chlorine (CCl(y)) in the lower stratosphere. From the more limited real-time measurements we estimate the CCl(y) burden using mixing ratios and growth rates of the principal CCl(y) species in the troposphere in conjunction with results from a two-dimensional photochemical model. Since stratospheric chlorine is tropospheric in origin and tropospheric mixing ratios are increasing, it is necessary to establish the average age of a stratospheric air parcel to assess its total chlorine (Cl(sub Total)) abundance. Total inorganic chlorine (Cl(y)) in the parcel is then estimated by the simple difference, Cl(y) = Cl(sub Total) - CCl(y). The consistency of the results from these two quite different techniques suggests that we can determine the CCl(y) and Cl(y) in the lower stratosphere with confidence. Such estimates of organic and inorganic chlorine are crucial in evaluating the photochemistry controlling chlorine partitioning and hence ozone loss processes in the lower stratosphere.

  15. Estimates of total organic and inorganic chlorine in the lower stratosphere from in situ and flask measurements during AASE 2

    SciTech Connect

    Woodbridge, E.L.; Elkins, J.W.; Fahey, D.W.; Heidt, L.E.; Solomon, S.; Baring, T.J.; Gilpin, T.M.; Pollack, W.H.; Schauffler, S.M.; Atlas, E.L. ||

    1995-02-01

    Aircraft sampling has provided extensive in situ and flask measurements of organic chlorine species in the lower stratosphere. The recent Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition 2 (AASE 2) included two independent measurements of organic chlorine species using whole air sample and real-time techniques. From the whole air sample measurements we derive directly the burden of total organic chlorine (CCl(y)) in the lower stratosphere. From the more limited real-time measurements we estimate the CCl(y) burden using mixing ratios and growth rates of the principal CCl(y) species in the troposphere in conjunction with results from a two-dimensional photochemical model. Since stratospheric chlorine is tropospheric in origin and tropospheric mixing ratios are increasing, it is necessary to establish the average age of a stratospheric air parcel to assess its total chlorine (Cl(sub Total)) abundance. Total inorganic chlorine (Cl(y)) in the parcel is then estimated by the simple difference, Cl(y) = Cl(sub Total) - CCl(y). The consistency of the results from these two quite different techniques suggests that we can determine the CCl(y) and Cl(y) in the lower stratosphere with confidence. Such estimates of organic and inorganic chlorine are crucial in evaluating the photochemistry controlling chlorine partitioning and hence ozone loss processes in the lower stratosphere.

  16. Environmental factors regulating soil organic matter chlorination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, Teresia; Montelius, Malin; Reyier, Henrik; Rietz, Karolina; Karlsson, Susanne; Lindberg, Cecilia; Andersson, Malin; Danielsson, Åsa; Bastviken, David

    2016-04-01

    Natural chlorination of organic matter is common in soils. Despite the widespread abundance of soil chlorinated soil organic matter (SOM), frequently exceeding soil chloride abundance in surface soils, and a common ability of microorganisms to produce chlorinated SOM, we lack fundamental knowledge about dominating processes and organisms responsible for the chlorination. To take one step towards resolving the terrestrial chlorine (Cl) puzzle, this study aims to analyse how environmental factors influence chlorination of SOM. Four factors were chosen for this study: soil moisture (W), nitrogen (N), chloride (Cl) and organic matter quality (C). These factors are all known to be important for soil processes. Laboratory incubations with 36Cl as a Cl tracer were performed in a two soil incubation experiments. It was found that addition of chloride and nitrogen seem to hamper the chlorination. For the C treatment, on the other hand, the results show that chlorination is enhanced by increased availability of labile organic matter (glucose and maltose). Even higher chlorination was observed when nitrogen and water were added in combination with labile organic matter. The effect that more labile organic matter strongly stimulated the chlorination rates was confirmed by the second separate experiment. These results indicate that chlorination was not primarily a way to cut refractory organic matter into digestible molecules, representing one previous hypothesis, but is related with microbial metabolism in other ways that will be further discussed in our presentation.

  17. Ultrafast measurements of chlorine dioxide photochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Ludowise, P.D.

    1997-08-01

    Time-resolved mass spectrometry and time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy are used to study the ultrafast photodissociation dynamics of chlorine dioxide, an important constituent in stratospheric ozone depletion. Chapter 1 introduces these pump/probe techniques, in which a femtosecond pump pulse excites a molecule to a dissociative state. At a later time, a second femtosecond probe pulse ionizes the molecule. The resulting mass and photoelectron spectra are acquired as a function of the delay between the pump and probe pulses, which follows the evolution of the molecule on the excited state. A comparison to other techniques used to study reaction dynamics is discussed. Chapter 2 includes a detailed description of the design and construction of the experimental apparatus, which consists of a femtosecond laser system, a molecular beam time-of-flight spectrometer, and a data acquisition system. The time-of-flight spectrometer is specifically designed to have a short flight distance to maximize the photoelectron collection efficiency without degrading the resolution, which is limited by the bandwidth of the femtosecond laser system. Typical performance of the apparatus is demonstrated in a study of the time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of nitric oxide. The results of the time-resolved mass spectrometry experiments of chlorine dioxide are presented in Chapter 3. Upon excitation to the A {sup 2}A{sub 2} state near 3.2 eV, the molecule dissociates through an indirect two-step mechanism. The direct dissociation channel has been predicted to be open, but is not observed. A quantum beat is observed in the OClO{sup +} species, which is described as a vibrational coherence of the optically prepared A {sup 2}A{sub 2} state. Chapter 4 presents the results of the time-resolved photoelectron experiments of chlorine dioxide. At short delay time, the quantum beat of the OClO{sup +} species is observed in the X {sup 1}A{sub 1} state of the ion. At infinite delay, the signal

  18. Activation of molecular oxygen and the nature of the active oxygen species for CO oxidation on oxide supported Au catalysts.

    PubMed

    Widmann, D; Behm, R J

    2014-03-18

    Although highly dispersed Au catalysts with Au nanoparticles (NPs) of a few nanometers in diameter are well-known for their high catalytic activity for several oxidation and reduction reactions already at rather low temperatures for almost 30 years, central aspects of the reaction mechanism are still unresolved. While most studies focused on the active site, the active Au species, and the effect of the support material, the most crucial step during oxidation reactions, the activation of molecular oxygen and the nature of the resulting active oxygen species (Oact), received more attention just recently. This is topic of this Account, which focuses on the formation, location, and nature of the Oact species present on metal oxide supported Au catalysts under typical reaction conditions, at room temperature and above. It is mainly based on quantitative temporal analysis of products (TAP) reactor measurements, which different from most spectroscopic techniques are able to detect and quantify these species even at the extremely low concentrations present under realistic reaction conditions. Different types of pulse experiments were performed, during which the highly dispersed, realistic powder catalysts are exposed to very low amounts of reactants, CO and/or O2, in order to form and reactively remove Oact species and gain information on their formation, nature, and the active site for Oact formation. Our investigations have shown that the active oxygen species for CO oxidation on Au/TiO2 for reaction at 80 °C and higher is a highly stable atomic species, which at 80 °C is formed only at the perimeter of the Au-oxide interface and whose reactive removal by CO is activated, but not its formation. From these findings, it is concluded that surface lattice oxygen represents the Oact species for the CO oxidation. Accordingly, the CO oxidation proceeds via a Au-assisted Mars-van Krevelen mechanism, during which surface lattice oxygen close to the Au NPs is removed by reaction

  19. A species of human alpha interferon that lacks the ability to boost human natural killer activity.

    PubMed Central

    Ortaldo, J R; Herberman, R B; Harvey, C; Osheroff, P; Pan, Y C; Kelder, B; Pestka, S

    1984-01-01

    Most species of recombinant leukocyte interferons (IFN-alpha A, -alpha B, -alpha C, -alpha D, -alpha F, -alpha I, and -alpha K) were capable of boosting human natural killer (NK) activity after a 2-hr treatment of cells at a concentration of 1-80 units/ml. In contrast, recombinant human IFN-alpha J was found to be incapable of augmenting NK activity after exposure of cells for 2 hr to concentrations as high as 10,000 units/ml. This inability of IFN-alpha J to boost NK activity was not complete because, after exposure of cells to a high concentration of IFN-alpha J (10,000 units/ml) for 18 hr, boosting of cytolysis was observed. IFN-alpha J appeared to interact with receptors for IFN on NK cells since it was found to interfere with the boosting of NK activity by other species of IFN-alpha. In contrast to its deficient ability to augment NK activity, IFN-alpha J has potent antiviral and antiproliferative activities. Such extensive dissociation of these biological activities has not been observed previously with any other natural or recombinant IFN species. Thus, this IFN species may be useful for evaluating the relative importance of various biological activities on the therapeutic effects of IFN, for understanding structure-function relationships, and for determining the biochemical pathways related to the various biological effects of IFN. PMID:6589637

  20. Biological Chlorine Cycling in Arctic Peat Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlamal, J. E.; Raab, T. K.; Lipson, D.

    2014-12-01

    Soils of the Arctic tundra near Barrow, Alaska are waterlogged and anoxic throughout most of the profile due to underlying permafrost. Microbial communities in these soils are adapted for the dominant anaerobic conditions and are capable of a surprising diversity of metabolic pathways. Anaerobic respiration in this environment warrants further study, particularly in the realm of electron cycling involving chlorine, which preliminary data suggest may play an important role in arctic anaerobic soil respiration. For decades, Cl was rarely studied outside of the context of solvent-contaminated sites due to the widely held belief that it is an inert element. However, Cl has increasingly become recognized as a metabolic player in microbial communities and soil cycling processes. Organic chlorinated compounds (Clorg) can be made by various organisms and used metabolically by others, such as serving as electron acceptors for microbes performing organohalide respiration. Sequencing our arctic soil samples has uncovered multiple genera of microorganisms capable of participating in many Cl-cycling processes including organohalide respiration, chlorinated hydrocarbon degradation, and perchlorate reduction. Metagenomic analysis of these soils has revealed genes for key enzymes of Cl-related metabolic processes such as dehalogenases and haloperoxidases, and close matches to genomes of known organohalide respiring microorganisms from the Dehalococcoides, Dechloromonas, Carboxydothermus, and Anaeromyxobacter genera. A TOX-100 Chlorine Analyzer was used to quantify total Cl in arctic soils, and these data were examined further to separate levels of inorganic Cl compounds and Clorg. Levels of Clorg increased with soil organic matter content, although total Cl levels lack this trend. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) was used to provide information on the structure of Clorg in arctic soils, showing great diversity with Cl bound to both aromatic and alkyl groups

  1. Disinfection byproduct relationships and speciation in chlorinated nanofiltered waters.

    PubMed

    Chellam, S; Krasner, S W

    2001-10-01

    The formation and speciation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) resulting from chlorination of nanofilter permeates obtained from various source water locations and membrane types are examined. Specific ultraviolet absorbance and bromide utilization are shown to decrease following nanofiltration. Both dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration and ultraviolet absorbance at 254 nm were found to correlate strongly with trihalomethane (THM), haloacetic acid (HAA), and total organic halide (TOX) concentrations in chlorinated nanofilter permeates, suggesting that they can be employed as surrogates for DBPs in nanofiltered waters. Because smooth curves were obtained for individual THM and HAA species as well as bromine and chlorine incorporation into THMs and HAAs as a function of Br-/DOC molar ratio, it is likely that mole fractions of these DBPs are more strongly influenced by chlorination conditions, Br-, and DOC concentrations than NOM source and membrane type. Mole fractions of mono-, di-, and trihalogenated HAAs were found to be independent of Br-/DOC. Even at a very low Br-/DOC of 2.9microM/mM, the mixed bromochloro- and tribromoacetic acids constituted 20% of total HAAs on a molar basis. This increased to approximately 50% as Br-/DOC increased to approximately 25microM/mM or more, proving that a large fraction of HAAs may not be covered under existing federal regulations. Total THM and HAA9 concentrations decreased in permeate waters with increasing Br-/DOC suggesting that nanofilter permeates are limited with respect to DBP precursors. PMID:11642467

  2. The Chlorine Isotopic Composition Of Lunar UrKREEP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, J. J.; Tartese, R.; Anand, M.; McCubbin, F. M.; Neal, C. R.; Franchi, I. A.

    2016-01-01

    Since the long standing paradigm of an anhydrous Moon was challenged there has been a renewed focus on investigating volatiles in a variety of lunar samples. However, the current models for the Moon’s formation have yet to fully account for its thermal evolution in the presence of H2O and other volatiles. When compared to chondritic meteorites and terrestrial rocks, lunar samples have exotic chlorine isotope compositions, which are difficult to explain in light of the abundance and isotopic composition of other volatile species, especially H, and the current estimates for chlorine and H2O in the bulk silicate Moon. In order to better understand the processes involved in giving rise to the heavy chlorine isotope compositions of lunar samples, we have performed a comprehensive in situ high precision study of chlorine isotopes, using NanoSIMS (Nanoscale Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry) of lunar apatite from a suite of Apollo samples covering a range of geochemical characteristics and petrologic types.

  3. Diurnal variations of reactive chlorine and nitrogen oxides observed by MIPAS-B inside the January 2010 Arctic vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzel, G.; Oelhaf, H.; Kirner, O.; Friedl-Vallon, F.; Ruhnke, R.; Ebersoldt, A.; Kleinert, A.; Maucher, G.; Nordmeyer, H.; Orphal, J.

    2012-07-01

    The winter 2009/2010 was characterized by a strong Arctic vortex with extremely cold mid-winter temperatures in the lower stratosphere associated with an intense activation of reactive chlorine compounds (ClOx) from reservoir species. Stratospheric limb emission spectra were recorded during a flight of the balloon version of the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS-B) from Kiruna (Sweden) on 24 January 2010 inside the Arctic vortex. Several fast limb sequences of spectra (in time steps of about 10 min) were measured from nighttime photochemical equilibrium to local noon allowing the retrieval of chlorine- and nitrogen-containing species which change rapidly their concentration around the terminator between night and day. Mixing ratios of species like ClO, NO2, and N2O5 show significant changes around sunrise, which are temporally delayed due to polar stratospheric clouds reducing the direct radiative flux from the sun. ClO variations were derived for the first time from MIPAS-B spectra. Daytime ClO values of up to 1.6 ppbv are visible in a broad chlorine activated layer below 26 km correlated with low values (below 0.1 ppbv) of the chlorine reservoir species ClONO2. Observations are compared and discussed with calculations performed with the 3-dimensional Chemistry Climate Model EMAC (ECHAM5/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry). Mixing ratios of the species ClO, NO2, and N2O5 are well reproduced by the model during night and noon. However, the onset of ClO production and NO2 loss around the terminator in the model is not consistent with the measurements. The MIPAS-B observations along with Tropospheric Ultraviolet-Visible (TUV) radiation model calculations suggest that polar stratospheric clouds lead to a delayed start followed by a faster increase of the photodissoziation of ClOOCl and NO2 near the morning terminator since stratospheric clouds alter the direct and the diffuse flux of solar radiation. These effects are not considered in the EMAC

  4. In vitro activity of Rutaceae species against the trypomastigote form of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Mafezoli, J; Vieira, P C; Fernandes, J B; da Silva, M F; de Albuquerque, S

    2000-11-01

    The activity of crude plant extracts of nine species of Rutaceae against the trypomastigote form of Trypanosoma cruzi was evaluated at 4 mg/ml. Thirty-two crude extracts were tested and eight of them showed significant activity (>80%). The most active extract was obtained from the stems of Pilocarpus spicatus (97.3%). Fractionation of the active crude extracts provided 25 fractions which were tested against the trypomastigote form of T. cruzi at 2 mg/ml. Of these six showed significant activity (>80%). The most active fractions (100%) were obtained from the leaves of Almeidea coerulea (butanol fraction) and Conchocarpus inopinatus (dichloromethane fraction). PMID:11025175

  5. Survival of selected bacterial species in sterilized activated carbon filters and biological activated carbon filters.

    PubMed Central

    Rollinger, Y; Dott, W

    1987-01-01

    The survival of selected hygienically relevant bacterial species in activated carbon (AC) filters on a bench scale was investigated. The results revealed that after inoculation of the test strains the previously sterilized AC absorbed all bacteria (10(6) to 10(7)). After a period of 6 to 13 days without countable bacteria in the effluent, the numbers of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Pseudomonas putida increased up to 10(4) to 10(5) CFU/ml of effluent and 10(6) to 10(7) CFU/g of AC. When Klebsiella pneumoniae and Streptococcus faecalis were used, no growth in filters could be observed. The numbers of E. coli, P. aeruginosa, and P. putida, however, decreased immediately and showed no regrowth in nonsterile AC from a filter which had been continuously connected to running tap water for 2 months. Under these conditions an autochthonous microflora developed on the carbon surface which could be demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy and culturing methods (heterotrophic plate count). These bacteria reduced E. coli, P. aeruginosa, and P. putida densities in the effluent by a factor of more than 10(5) within 1 to 5 days. The hypothesis that antagonistic substances of the autochthonous microflora were responsible for the elimination of the artificial contamination could not be confirmed because less than 1% of the isolates of the autochthonous microflora were able to produce such substances as indicated by in vitro tests. Competition for limiting nutrients was thought to be the reason for the observed effects. PMID:3579281

  6. Mutagenic by-products from chlorination of humic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, J.R.; Ringhand, H.P.; Coleman, W.E.; Schenck, K.M.; Munch, J.W.; Streicher, R.P.; Kaylor, W.H.; Kopfler, F.C.

    1986-11-01

    Chlorination of humic and fulvic acid results in the formation of direct-acting mutagenicity, detectable in the Salmonella/microsome assay (Ames test). This mutagenicity is being characterized as part of an overall effort aimed at evaluating potential health risks associated with the presence of mutagenic chemicals in drinking water. A number of chlorinated organic compounds, including several known mutagens, have been identified and quantified in diethyl either extracts of chlorinated humic acid solutions. However, the total mutagenicity of these compounds accounts for only about 7% of the original mutagenicity. Synergistic or antagonistic interactions among the identified components have been ruled out as possible explanations for the failure to account for a higher percentage of the activity. Recent progress has been made to separate the activity into neutral and strong acid fractions. Further isolation of the strong acids by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) has resulted in the purification of the mutagenicity into a major peak of activity with a specific mutagenicity of about 20,000 TA100 revertants per milligram. Several trichlorohydroxyfuranone isomers have been tentatively identified in this fraction. The contribution of these types of compounds to the mutagenicity of chlorinated humic acid is under investigation.

  7. Chlorine/UV Process for Decomposition and Detoxification of Microcystin-LR.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinran; Li, Jing; Yang, Jer-Yen; Wood, Karl V; Rothwell, Arlene P; Li, Weiguang; Blatchley Iii, Ernest R

    2016-07-19

    Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) is a potent hepatotoxin that is often associated with blooms of cyanobacteria. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficiency of the chlorine/UV process for MC-LR decomposition and detoxification. Chlorinated MC-LR was observed to be more photoactive than MC-LR. LC/MS analyses confirmed that the arginine moiety represented an important reaction site within the MC-LR molecule for conditions of chlorination below the chlorine demand of the molecule. Prechlorination activated MC-LR toward UV254 exposure by increasing the product of the molar absorption coefficient and the quantum yield of chloro-MC-LR, relative to the unchlorinated molecule. This mechanism of decay is fundamentally different than the conventional view of chlorine/UV as an advanced oxidation process. A toxicity assay based on human liver cells indicated MC-LR degradation byproducts in the chlorine/UV process possessed less cytotoxicity than those that resulted from chlorination or UV254 irradiation applied separately. MC-LR decomposition and detoxification in this combined process were more effective at pH 8.5 than at pH 7.5 or 6.5. These results suggest that the chlorine/UV process could represent an effective strategy for control of microcystins and their associated toxicity in drinking water supplies. PMID:27338715

  8. Chlorination and dechlorination rates in a forest soil - A combined modelling and experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Montelius, Malin; Svensson, Teresia; Lourino-Cabana, Beatriz; Thiry, Yves; Bastviken, David

    2016-06-01

    Much of the total pool of chlorine (Cl) in soil consists of naturally produced organic chlorine (Clorg). The chlorination of bulk organic matter at substantial rates has been experimentally confirmed in various soil types. The subsequent fates of Clorg are important for ecosystem Cl cycling and residence times. As most previous research into dechlorination in soils has examined either single substances or specific groups of compounds, we lack information about overall bulk dechlorination rates. Here we assessed bulk organic matter chlorination and dechlorination rates in coniferous forest soil based on a radiotracer experiment conducted under various environmental conditions (additional water, labile organic matter, and ammonium nitrate). Experiment results were used to develop a model to estimate specific chlorination (i.e., fraction of Cl(-) transformed to Clorg per time unit) and specific dechlorination (i.e., fraction of Clorg transformed to Cl(-) per time unit) rates. The results indicate that chlorination and dechlorination occurred simultaneously under all tested environmental conditions. Specific chlorination rates ranged from 0.0005 to 0.01 d(-1) and were hampered by nitrogen fertilization but were otherwise similar among the treatments. Specific dechlorination rates were 0.01-0.03d(-1) and were similar among all treatments. This study finds that soil Clorg levels result from a dynamic equilibrium between the chlorination and rapid dechlorination of some Clorg compounds, while another Clorg pool is dechlorinated more slowly. Altogether, this study demonstrates a highly active Cl cycling in soils. PMID:26950634

  9. NADPH Oxidase- and Mitochondria-derived Reactive Oxygen Species in Proinflammatory Microglial Activation: A Bipartisan Affair?

    PubMed Central

    Bordt, Evan A.; Polster, Brian M.

    2014-01-01

    Microglia are the resident immune cells of the brain and play major roles in central nervous system development, maintenance, and disease. Brain insults cause microglia to proliferate, migrate, and transform into one or more activated states. Classical M1 activation triggers the production of proinflammatory factors such as tumor necrosis factor- α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), nitric oxide (NO), and reactive oxygen species which, in excess, can exacerbate brain injury. The mechanisms underlying microglial activation are not fully understood, yet reactive oxygen species are increasingly implicated as mediators of microglial activation. In this review, we highlight studies linking reactive oxygen species, in particular hydrogen peroxide derived from NADPH oxidase-generated superoxide, to the classical activation of microglia. In addition, we critically evaluate controversial evidence suggesting a specific role for mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, a multiprotein complex that mediates the production of IL-1β and IL-18. Finally, the limitations of common techniques used to implicate mitochondrial ROS in microglial and inflammasome activation, such as the use of the mitochondrially-targeted ROS indicator MitoSOX and the mitochondrially-targeted antioxidant MitoTEMPO, are also discussed. PMID:25091898

  10. The Importance of Landscape Elements for Bat Activity and Species Richness in Agricultural Areas.

    PubMed

    Heim, Olga; Treitler, Julia T; Tschapka, Marco; Knörnschild, Mirjam; Jung, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Landscape heterogeneity is regarded as a key factor for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function in production landscapes. We investigated whether grassland sites at close vicinity to forested areas are more frequently used by bats. Considering that bats are important consumers of herbivorous insects, including agricultural pest, this is important for sustainable land management. Bat activity and species richness were assessed using repeated monitoring from May to September in 2010 with acoustic monitoring surveys on 50 grassland sites in the Biosphere Reserve Schorfheide-Chorin (North-East Germany). Using spatial analysis (GIS), we measured the closest distance of each grassland site to potentially connecting landscape elements (e.g., trees, linear vegetation, groves, running and standing water). In addition, we assessed the distance to and the percent land cover of forest remnants and urban areas in a 200 m buffer around the recording sites to address differences in the local landscape setting. Species richness and bat activity increased significantly with higher forest land cover in the 200 m buffer and at smaller distance to forested areas. Moreover, species richness increased in proximity to tree groves. Larger amount of forest land cover and smaller distance to forest also resulted in a higher activity of bats on grassland sites in the beginning of the year during May, June and July. Landscape elements near grassland sites also influenced species composition of bats and species richness of functional groups (open, edge and narrow space foragers). Our results highlight the importance of forested areas, and suggest that agricultural grasslands that are closer to forest remnants might be better buffered against outbreaks of agricultural pest insects due to higher species richness and higher bat activity. Furthermore, our data reveals that even for highly mobile species such as bats, a very dense network of connecting elements within the landscape is

  11. The Importance of Landscape Elements for Bat Activity and Species Richness in Agricultural Areas

    PubMed Central

    Heim, Olga; Treitler, Julia T.; Tschapka, Marco; Knörnschild, Mirjam; Jung, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Landscape heterogeneity is regarded as a key factor for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function in production landscapes. We investigated whether grassland sites at close vicinity to forested areas are more frequently used by bats. Considering that bats are important consumers of herbivorous insects, including agricultural pest, this is important for sustainable land management. Bat activity and species richness were assessed using repeated monitoring from May to September in 2010 with acoustic monitoring surveys on 50 grassland sites in the Biosphere Reserve Schorfheide-Chorin (North-East Germany). Using spatial analysis (GIS), we measured the closest distance of each grassland site to potentially connecting landscape elements (e.g., trees, linear vegetation, groves, running and standing water). In addition, we assessed the distance to and the percent land cover of forest remnants and urban areas in a 200 m buffer around the recording sites to address differences in the local landscape setting. Species richness and bat activity increased significantly with higher forest land cover in the 200 m buffer and at smaller distance to forested areas. Moreover, species richness increased in proximity to tree groves. Larger amount of forest land cover and smaller distance to forest also resulted in a higher activity of bats on grassland sites in the beginning of the year during May, June and July. Landscape elements near grassland sites also influenced species composition of bats and species richness of functional groups (open, edge and narrow space foragers). Our results highlight the importance of forested areas, and suggest that agricultural grasslands that are closer to forest remnants might be better buffered against outbreaks of agricultural pest insects due to higher species richness and higher bat activity. Furthermore, our data reveals that even for highly mobile species such as bats, a very dense network of connecting elements within the landscape is

  12. Effect of chlorine demand on the ammonia breakpoint curve: model development, validation with nitrite, and application to municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Chen, W L; Jensen, J N

    2001-01-01

    Chlorine added during wastewater disinfection may be consumed through reactions with chlorine-demanding chemical species. In this study, a mechanistically based kinetic model for chlorine demand in the presence of ammonia was developed and validated with laboratory studies on ammonia-nitrite systems, and then applied to breakpoint curves obtained with wastewater samples. The model is a modification of kinetic models for chlorine-ammonia systems to include hypochlorous acid-demand and monochloramine-demand reactions. The model accurately describes both laboratory-generated breakpoint curves with added nitrite and literature data. In a plant thought to be undergoing partial nitrification, breakpoint curves were consistent with high chlorine demand (i.e., small initial slopes and large doses to achieve the total chlorine maximum and breakpoint). A simplified kinetic model was also developed. Chlorine demand calculated from the simplified model was similar to chlorine demand from plant data. The simplified model was used to generate operating guidelines to calculate chlorine doses needed to overcome demand from nitrite or other sources. PMID:11833766

  13. Integrative approach to delineate natural attenuation of chlorinated benzenes in anoxic aquifers.

    PubMed

    Stelzer, Nicole; Imfeld, Gwenaël; Thullner, Martin; Lehmann, Jürgen; Poser, Alexander; Richnow, Hans-H; Nijenhuis, Ivonne

    2009-06-01

    Biodegradation of chlorobenzenes was assessed at an anoxic aquifer by combining hydrogeochemistry and stable isotope analyses. In situ microcosm analysis evidenced microbial assimilation of chlorobenzene (MCB) derived carbon and laboratory investigations asserted mineralization of MCB at low rates. Sequential dehalogenation of chlorinated benzenes may affect the isotope signature of single chlorobenzene species due to simultaneous depletion and enrichment of (13)C, which complicates the evaluation of degradation. Therefore, the compound-specific isotope analysis was interpreted based on an isotope balance. The enrichment of the cumulative isotope composition of all chlorobenzenes indicated in situ biodegradation. Additionally, the relationship between hydrogeochemistry and degradation activity was investigated by principal component analysis underlining variable hydrogeochemical conditions associated with degradation activity at the plume scale. Although the complexity of the field site did not allow straightforward assessment of natural attenuation processes, the application of an integrative approach appeared relevant to characterize the in situ biodegradation potential. PMID:19250727

  14. Ordered chlorinated monolayer silicene structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenbin; Sheng, Shaoxiang; Chen, Jian; Cheng, Peng; Chen, Lan; Wu, Kehui

    2016-04-01

    We report on a systematic experimental study on the chlorination of monatomic silicene layer on Ag(111) by scanning tunneling microscopy. Monolayer silicene on Ag(111) can form 4×4, (√13×√13)R ± 13.9°, and (2√3×2√3)R30° reconstructions due to their different buckling configurations. We found that at low dosage, Cl atoms attach to the upper buckled Si atoms without changing the buckling configuration of the silicene monolayer. However, at high coverage, the global buckling configuration will be significantly changed, resulting in new ordered structures. Interestingly, all monolayer silicene structures, regardless of their initial reconstructions, tend to form a local silicene 1×1 structure at the saturation coverage. The mechanism for chlorination of monolayer silicene is explained.

  15. Chlorine signal attenuation in concrete.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, A A; Maslehuddin, M; ur-Rehman, Khateeb; Al-Amoudi, O S B

    2015-11-01

    The intensity of prompt gamma-ray was measured at various depths from chlorine-contaminated silica fume (SF) concrete slab concrete specimens using portable neutron generator-based prompt gamma-ray setup. The intensity of 6.11MeV chloride gamma-rays was measured from the chloride contaminated slab at distance of 15.25, 20.25, 25.25, 30.25 and 35.25cm from neutron target in a SF cement concrete slab specimens. Due to attenuation of thermal neutron flux and emitted gamma-ray intensity in SF cement concrete at various depths, the measured intensity of chlorine gamma-rays decreases non-linearly with increasing depth in concrete. A good agreement was noted between the experimental results and the results of Monte Carlo simulation. This study has provided useful experimental data for evaluating the chloride contamination in the SF concrete utilizing gamma-ray attenuation method. PMID:26218450

  16. Detection of chlorinated aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Ekechukwu, Amy A.

    1996-01-01

    A method for making a composition for measuring the concentration of chloated aromatic compounds in aqueous fluids, and an optical probe for use with the method. The composition comprises a hydrophobic polymer matrix, preferably polyamide, with a fluorescent indicator uniformly dispersed therein. The indicator fluoresces in the presence of the chlorinated aromatic compounds with an intensity dependent on the concentration of these compounds in the fluid of interest, such as 8-amino-2-naphthalene sulfonate. The probe includes a hollow cylindrical housing that contains the composition in its distal end. The probe admits an aqueous fluid to the probe interior for exposure to the composition. An optical fiber transmits excitation light from a remote source to the composition while the indicator reacts with chlorinated aromatic compounds present in the fluid. The resulting fluorescence light signal is reflected to a second optical fiber that transmits the light to a spectrophotometer for analysis.

  17. Effect of chlorination on antibiotic resistance profiles of sewage-related bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, G E; Tobin, R S; Junkins, B; Kushner, D J

    1984-01-01

    A total of 1,900 lactose-fermenting bacteria were isolated from raw sewage influent and chlorinated sewage effluent from a sewage treatment plant, as well as from chlorinated and neutralized dilute sewage, before and after a 24-h regrowth period in the laboratory. Of these isolates, 84% were resistant to one or more antibiotics. Chlorination of influent resulted in an increase in the proportion of bacteria resistant to ampicillin and cephalothin, the increase being most marked after regrowth occurred following chlorination. Of the other nine antibiotics tested, chlorination resulted in an increased proportion of bacteria resistant to some, but a decrease in the proportion resistant to the remainder. Multiple resistance was found for up to nine antibiotics, especially in regrowth populations. Identification of about 5% of the isolates showed that the highest proportion of Escherichia coli fell in untreated sewage. Some rare and potentially pathogenic species were isolated from chlorinated and regrowth samples, including Yersinia enterocolitica, Yersinia pestis, Pasteurella multocida, and Hafnia alvei. Our results indicate that chlorination, while initially lowering the total number of bacteria in sewage, may substantially increase the proportions of antibiotic-resistant, potentially pathogenic organisms. PMID:6476832

  18. Oxidative Dissolution of Silver Nanoparticles by Chlorine: Implications to Silver Nanoparticle Fate and Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Garg, Shikha; Rong, Hongyan; Miller, Christopher J; Waite, T David

    2016-04-01

    The kinetics of oxidative dissolution of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) by chlorine is investigated in this work, with results showing that AgNPs are oxidized in the presence of chlorine at a much faster rate than observed in the presence of dioxygen and/or hydrogen peroxide. The oxidation of AgNPs by chlorine occurs in air-saturated solution in stoichiometric amounts with 2 mol of AgNPs oxidized for each mole of chlorine added. Dioxygen plays an important role in OCl(-)-mediated AgNP oxidation, especially at lower OCl(-) concentrations, with the mechanism shifting from stoichiometric oxidation of AgNPs by OCl(-) in the presence of dioxygen to catalytic removal of OCl(-) by AgNPs in the absence of dioxygen. These results suggest that the presence of chlorine will mitigate AgNP toxicity by forming less-reactive AgCl(s) following AgNP oxidation, although the disinfection efficiency of OCl(-) may not be significantly impacted by the presence of AgNPs because a chlorine-containing species is formed on OCl(-) decay that has significant oxidizing capacity. Our results further suggest that the antibacterial efficacy of nanosilver particles embedded on fabrics may be negated when treated with detergents containing strong oxidants, such as chlorine. PMID:26986484

  19. Evaluation of chlorinated by-products in drinking waters of Central Friuli (Italy).

    PubMed

    Goi, Daniele; Tubaro, Franco; Barbone, Fabio; Dolcetti, Giuliano; Bontempelli, Gino

    2005-01-01

    Drinkable water supplied by aqueducts undergoes preliminar potabilization which, in Italy, is mainly accomplished by chlorine addition. The bactericidal action involved in this process is always accompanied by chlorination and oxidation of organic species (mainly humic and fulvic acids) naturally present in treated waters, so that many disinfection by-products (DBPs) are formed, such as trihalomethanes (THMs) and halo-acetic acids (HAA), which can represent a chemical risk for public health. The aim of this study was the monitoring of DBPs in drinking water disinfected by chlorination, supplied by four different aqueducts of Central Friuli (Italy). DBP evaluations were performed in water samples consisting of both input and output of disinfection plants. The results of analytical determinations were worked out to provide the THM and HAA parameters for disinfected waters, while in feeding waters the following different conventional parameters were adopted: (i) trihalomethanes formation potential (THMFP), (ii) halo-acetic acids formation potential (HAAFP) and (iii) UV absorbance at 254 nm (UV254). The quite moderate content of chlorinated products found in all samples considered highlighted the excellent quality of potabilized waters available in Central Friuli. Moreover, our results confirmed that the majority of DBPs formed when chlorine is used for water disinfection consists of THMs, while chlorites and chlorates prevailed when potabilization is accomplished by using chlorine dioxide. Finally, simple UV254 monitoring turned out to be a profitable approach for the determination of chlorinated by-products only when THMs prevail among DBPs. PMID:16342734

  20. Effects of helium gas mixing on the production of active species in nitrogen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naveed, M. A.; Qayyum, A.; Ali, Shujaat; Zakaullah, M.

    2006-12-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy is used to investigate the effects of helium gas mixing on the electron temperature and the production of active species in nitrogen plasma generated by 50 Hz pulsed-DC power source. The electron temperature is determined from He I line intensities, using Boltzmann's plot method. The relative changes in the concentration of active species N2(C Πu3) and N+2(B Σu+2) are monitored by measuring the emission intensities of nitrogen (0 0) bands of the second positive and the first negative systems. It is found that the electron temperature can be raised considerably by mixing helium in nitrogen plasma, which in return plays a significant role in enhancing the concentration of active species through Penning effect of metastable states of the helium.

  1. Coal desulfurization by aqueous chlorination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalvinskas, J. J.; Vasilakos, N.; Corcoran, W. H.; Grohmann, K.; Rohatgi, N. K. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A method of desulfurizing coal is described in which chlorine gas is bubbled through an aqueous slurry of coal at low temperature below 130 degrees C., and at ambient pressure. Chlorinolysis converts both inorganic and organic sulfur components of coal into water soluble compounds which enter the aqueous suspending media. The media is separated after chlorinolysis and the coal dechlorinated at a temperature of from 300 C to 500 C to form a non-caking, low-sulfur coal product.

  2. Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) detection of active oxygen species and organic phases in Martian soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Fun-Dow; Kim, Soon Sam; Liang, Ranty H.

    1989-01-01

    The presence of active oxygen species (O(-), O2(-), O3(-)) and other strong oxidants (Fe2O3 and Fe3O4) was invoked in interpretations of the Viking biological experiments and a model was also suggested for Martian surface chemistry. The non-biological interpretations of the biological results gain futher support as no organic compounds were detected in the Viking pyrolysis-gas chromatography mass spectrometer (GCSM) experiments at concentrations as low as 10 ppb. Electron spin resonance (ESR) measures the absorption of microwaves by a paramagnetic and/or ferromagnetic center in the presence of an external field. In many instances, ESR has the advantage of detailed submicroscopic identification of the transient species and/or unstable reaction intermediates in their environments. Since the higly active oxygen species (O(-), O2(-), O3(-), and R-O-O(-)) are all paramagnetic in nature, they can be readily detected in native form by the ESR method. Active oxygen species likely to occur in the Martian surface samples were detected by ESR in UV-irradiated samples containing MgO. A miniaturized ESR spectrometer system can be developed for the Mars Rover Sample Return Mission. The instrument can perform the following in situ Martian samples analyses: detection of active oxygen species; characterization of Martian surface chemistry and photooxidation processes; and searching for organic compounds in the form of free radicals preserved in subsoils, and detection of microfossils with Martian carbonate sediments.

  3. Salinity effects on viability, metabolic activity and proliferation of three Perkinsus species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    La, Peyre M.; Casas, S.; La, Peyre J.

    2006-01-01

    Little is known regarding the range of conditions in which many Perkinsus species may proliferate, making it difficult to predict conditions favorable for their expansion, to identify conditions inducing mortality, or to identify instances of potential cross-infectivity among sympatric host species. In this study, the effects of salinity on viability, metabolic activity and proliferation of P. marinus, P. olseni and P. chesapeaki were determined. Specifically, this research examined the effects of 5 salinities (7, 11, 15, 25, 35???), (1) without acclimation, on the viability and metabolic activity of 2 isolates of each Perkinsus species, and (2) with acclimation, on the viability, metabolic activity, size and number of 1 isolate of each species. P. chesapeaki showed the widest range of salinity tolerance of the 3 species, with high viability and cell proliferation at all salinities tested. Although P. chesapeaki originated from low salinity areas (i.e. <15???), several measures (i.e. cell number and metabolic activity) indicated that higher salinities (15, 25???) were more favorable for its growth. P. olseni, originating from high salinity areas, had better viability and proliferation at the higher salinities (15, 25, 35???). Distinct differences in acute salinity response of the 2 P. olseni isolates at lower salinities (7, 11???), however, suggest the need for a more expansive comparison of isolates to better define the lower salinity tolerance. Lastly, P. marinus was more tolerant of the lower salinities (7 and 11???) than P. olseni, but exhibited reduced viability at 7???, even after acclimation. ?? Inter-Research 2006.

  4. In vitro antifungal activity of topical and systemic antifungal drugs against Malassezia species.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Muñoz, Alfonso Javier; Rojas, Florencia; Tur-Tur, Cristina; de Los Ángeles Sosa, María; Diez, Gustavo Ortiz; Espada, Carmen Martín; Payá, María Jesús; Giusiano, Gustavo

    2013-09-01

    The strict nutritional requirements of Malassezia species make it difficult to test the antifungal susceptibility. Treatments of the chronic and recurrent infections associated with Malassezia spp. are usually ineffective. The objective of this study was to obtain in vitro susceptibility profile of 76 clinical isolates of Malassezia species against 16 antifungal drugs used for topical or systemic treatment. Isolates were identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were obtained by a modified microdilution method based on the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute reference document M27-A3. The modifications allowed a good growth of all tested species. High in vitro antifungal activity of most tested drugs was observed, especially triazole derivatives, except for fluconazole which presented the highest MICs and widest range of concentrations. Ketoconazole and itraconazole demonstrated a great activity. Higher MICs values were obtained with Malassezia furfur indicating a low susceptibility to most of the antifungal agents tested. Malassezia sympodialis and Malassezia pachydermatis were found to be more-susceptible species than M. furfur, Malassezia globosa, Malassezia slooffiae and Malassezia restricta. Topical substances were also active but provide higher MICs than the compounds for systemic use. The differences observed in the antifungals activity and interspecies variability demonstrated the importance to studying the susceptibility profile of each species to obtain reliable information for defining an effective treatment regimen. PMID:23496653

  5. Dynamic response of chlorine atoms on a RuO(2)(110) model catalyst surface.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Jan Philipp; Zweidinger, Stefan; Seitsonen, Ari Paavo; Farkas, Attila; Knapp, Marcus; Balmes, Olivier; Lundgren, Edvin; Andersen, Jesper N; Over, Herbert

    2010-12-21

    The dynamic behavior of surface accommodated chlorine atoms on RuO(2)(110) was studied by a variety of experimental methods including high resolution core level shift, thermal desorption-, and in situ infrared spectroscopy as well as in situ surface X-ray diffraction in combination with state-of-the-art density functional theory calculations. On the chlorinated RuO(2)(110) surface the undercoordinated oxygen atoms have been selectively replaced by chlorine. These strongly bound surface chlorine atoms shift from bridging to on-top sites when the sample is annealed in oxygen, while the reverse shift of Cl from on-top into bridge positions is observed during CO exposure; the vacant bridge position is then occupied by either chlorine or CO. For the CO oxidation reaction over chlorinated RuO(2)(110), the reactant induced site switching of chlorine causes a site-blocking of the catalytically active one-fold coordinatively unsaturated (1f-cus) Ru sites. This site blocking reduces the number of active sites and, even more important, on-top Cl blocks the free migration of the adsorbed reactants along the one-dimensional 1f-cus Ru rows, thus leading to a loss of catalytic activity. PMID:20967353

  6. The effect of chlorine and combined chlorine/UV treatment on coliphages in drinking water disinfection.

    PubMed

    Zyara, Alyaa M; Torvinen, Eila; Veijalainen, Anna-Maria; Heinonen-Tanski, Helvi

    2016-08-01

    Chlorine disinfection is a globally used method to ensure the safety of drinking water. However, it has not always been successful against viruses and, therefore, it is important to find new methods to disinfect water. Seventeen different coliphages were isolated from the treated municipal wastewater. These coliphages and MS2 were treated with different dosages of chlorine in drinking water, and a combined chlorine/ultraviolet irradiation treatment for the chlorine-resistant coliphages. Chlorine disinfection with 0.3-0.5 mg/L total chlorine (free Cl-dosage 0.12-0.21 mg/L) for 10 min achieved 2.5-5.7 Log10-reductions for 11 sensitive coliphages. The six most resistant coliphages showed no reduction with these chlorine concentrations. MS2 was intermediate in chlorine resistance, and thus it is not a good indicator for viruses in chlorine disinfection. In the combined treatment total chlorine of 0.05-0.25 mg/L (free Cl-dosage 0.02-0.08 mg/L) and ultraviolet irradiation (14-22 mWs/cm(2)) were more effective than chlorine alone, and 3-5 Log10-reductions were achieved for the chlorine-resistant strains. The chlorination efficiency could be increased by higher dosages and longer contact times, but this could increase the formation of disinfection by-products. Therefore, the combination treatment is a recommended disinfection method. PMID:27441859

  7. UV/chlorine process for ammonia removal and disinfection by-product reduction: comparison with chlorination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinran; Li, Weiguang; Blatchley, Ernest R; Wang, Xiaoju; Ren, Pengfei

    2015-01-01

    The combined application of UV irradiation at 254 nm and chlorination (UV/chlorine process) was investigated for ammonia removal in water treatment. The UV/chlorine process led to higher ammonia removal with less chlorine demand, as compared to breakpoint chlorination. Chlorination of NH₃ led to NH₂Cl formation in the first step. The photolysis of NH₂Cl and radical- mediated oxidation of ammonia appeared to represent the main pathways for ammonia removal. The trivalent nitrogen of ammonia was oxidized, presumably by reactions with aminyl radicals and chlorine radicals. Measured products included NO₃⁻and NO₂⁻; it is likely that N₂ and N₂O were also generated. In addition, UV irradiation appeared to have altered the reactivity of NOM toward free chlorine. The UV/chlorine process had lower chlorine demand, less C-DBPs (THMs and HAAs), but more HANs than chlorination. These results indicate that the UV/chlorine process could represent an alternative to conventional breakpoint chlorination for ammonia-containing water, with several advantages in terms of simplicity, short reaction time, and reduced chemical dosage. PMID:25466638

  8. Reactions of aqueous chlorine and chlorine dioxide with model food compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Fukayama, M.Y.; Tan, H.; Wheeler, W.B.; Wei, C.

    1986-11-01

    This presentation reviews published information concerning the reactions of chlorine gas (CL/sub 2/(g)), aqueous chlorine, and ClO/sub 2/ with model food compounds, the fate of chlorine during the chlorination of specific food products, and the potential toxicity of the reaction products. Fatty acids and their methyl esters react with chlorine with the degree of incorporation corresponding to their degree of unsaturation. Aqueous chlorine oxidizes and chlorinates lipids and amino acids much more readily than ClO/sub 2/. Several amino acids are highly susceptible to oxidation and chlorination by chlorine compounds. Reactions of chlorine and ClO/sub 2/ with several food products, including flour and shrimp, have also been characterized. Although significant quantities of chlorine can be incorporated into specific model compounds and food products, the health risks associated with exposure to chlorinated organic products are unknown. Preliminary studies using the Ames Salmonella/microsome mutagenicity assay indicate that the reaction products from mixtures of aqueous chlorine and various lipids or tryptophan are nonmutagenic. Nevertheless, additional studies are warranted, so that the toxicological significance of these reaction products can be understood more fully.

  9. Inhibition of lipopolysaccharide induced acute inflammation in lung by chlorination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinshan; Xue, Jinling; Xu, Bi; Xie, Jiani; Qiao, Juan; Lu, Yun

    2016-02-13

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, also called endotoxin) is a pro-inflammatory constituent of gram negative bacteria and cyanobacteria, which causes a potential health risk in the process of routine urban application of reclaimed water, such as car wash, irrigation, scenic water refilling, etc. Previous studies indicated that the common disinfection treatment, chlorination, has little effect on endotoxin activity removal measured by Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) assay. However, in this study, significant decrease of acute inflammatory effects was observed in mouse lung, while LAL assay still presented a moderate increase of endotoxin activity. To explore the possible mechanisms, the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) results showed the chlorination happened in alkyl chain of LPS molecules, which could affect the interaction between LPS and LPS-binding protein. Also the size of LPS aggregates was found to drop significantly after treatment, which could be another results of chlorination caused polarity change. In conclusion, our observation demonstrated that chlorination is effective to reduce the LPS induced inflammation in lung, and it is recommended to use health effect-based methods to assess risk removal of water treatment technologies. PMID:26530889

  10. The formation of halogen-specific TOX from chlorination and chloramination of natural organic matter isolates.

    PubMed

    Kristiana, Ina; Gallard, Hervé; Joll, Cynthia; Croué, Jean-Philippe

    2009-09-01

    The formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) is a public health concern. An important way to evaluate the presence of DBPs is in terms of the total organic halogen (TOX), which can be further specified into total organic chlorine (TOCl), bromine (TOBr), and iodine (TOI). The formation and distribution of halogen-specific TOX during chlorination and chloramination of natural organic matter (NOM) isolates in the presence of bromide and iodide ions were studied. As expected, chloramination produced significantly less TOX than chlorination. TOCl was the dominant species formed in both chlorination and chloramination. TOI was always produced in chloramination, but not in chlorination when high chlorine dose was used, due to the limited presence of HOI in chlorination as a result of the oxidation of iodide to iodate in the presence of excess chlorine. The formation of TOI during chloramination increased as the initial iodide ion concentration increased, with a maximum of approximately 60% of the initial iodide ion becoming incorporated into NOM. Iodine incorporation in NOM was consistently higher than bromine incorporation, demonstrating that the competitive reactions between bromine and iodine species in chloramination favoured the formation of HOI and thus TOI, rather than TOBr. Correlations between the aromatic character of the NOM isolates (SUVA(254) and % aromatic C) and the concentrations of overall TOX and halogen-specific TOX in chloramination were observed. This indicates that the aromatic moieties in NOM, as indicated by SUVA(254) and % aromatic C, play an important role in the formation of overall TOX and halogen-specific TOX in chloramination. THMs comprised only a fraction of TOX, up to 7% in chloramination and up to 47% in chlorination. Although chloramine produces less TOX than chlorine, it formed proportionally more non-THM DBPs than chlorine. These non-THM DBPs are mostly unknown, corresponding to unknown health risks. Considering the higher

  11. Using trees to remediate groundwaters contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Strand, S.E.; Gordon, M.P.

    1998-06-01

    'Industrial practices in the past have resulted in contamination of groundwater with chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs) at many DOE sites, such as Hanford and Savannah River. Such contamination is a major problem because existing groundwater remediation technologies are expensive and difficult. An inexpensive method for groundwater remediation is greatly needed. Trees could be used to remediate CHC polluted groundwater at minimal cost (phytoremediation). Before phytoremediation can be extensively applied, the authors must determine the range of compounds that are attacked, the effects of metabolic products on the plants and the environment, and the effect of transpiration and concentration of CHC on uptake and metabolism. They will test the ability of hybrid poplar to take up and transform the chlorinated methanes, ethanes and ethylenes. The rate of uptake and transformation by poplar of TCE as a function of concentration in the soil, transpiration rate and illumination level will be determined. Methods will be developed to permit rapid testing of plants from contaminated sites for species able to oxidize and sequester chlorinated compounds. They will identify the nature of the bound residues of TCE metabolism in poplar. They will identify the mechanisms involved in CHC oxidation in poplar and use genetic manipulations to enhance that activity. They will introduce the genes for mammalian cytochrome P-450-IIE1, known to oxidize light CHCs such as TCE to attempt to increase the CHC metabolism capacity of poplar. The results of this research will place phytoremediation of CHCs on a firm scientific footing, allowing a rational assessment of its application to groundwater contamination. This report summarizes the results of the first 1.5 years of work on a three-year project.'

  12. Determination of the antibiofilm, antiadhesive, and anti-MRSA activities of seven Salvia species

    PubMed Central

    Al-Bakri, Amal G.; Othman, Ghadeer; Afifi, Fatma U.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Several Salvia species are indigenous to Jordan and are widely used as beverages and spices and for their medicinal properties. The objective of the study was to establish the antimicrobial activities, including the antiadhesive and antibiofilm effects of seven different Salvia species. Materials and Methods: Methods used for planktonic culture included agar diffusion, broth microdilution, and minimal biocidal concentration determination while viable count was used for the determination of the antibiofilm and antiadhesion activities. Overnight cultures of reference strains of Candida albicans, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus and clinical strains of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) were used as test microorganisms. Results: An antimicrobial activity toward planktonic cultures demonstrated a significant bacteriocidal activity (≥4 log cycle reduction) for the S. triloba extract against S. aureus including MRSA. Its volatile oil exhibited an antimicrobial activity covering all tested microorganisms with the exception of P. aeruginosa. S. triloba extract and volatile oil were successful in preventing and controlling the biofilm, demonstrating antiadhesion and antibiofilm activities, respectively. Conclusion: These reported activities for S. triloba extract and volatile oil allows their listing as potential antibiofilm and anti-MRSA natural agents. This might suggest their use as an antiseptic in the prophylaxis and treatment of S. aureus-associated skin infections. The antimicrobial activity of the other tested Salvia species was negligible. PMID:21120026

  13. The Chlorine Isotopic Composition Of Lunar UrKREEP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, J. J.; Tartese, R.; Anand, M.; McCubbin, F. M.; Neal, C. R.; Franchi, I. A.

    2016-01-01

    Since the long standing paradigm of an anhydrous Moon was challenged there has been a renewed focus on investigating volatiles in a variety of lunar samples. Numerous studies have examined the abundances and isotopic compositions of volatiles in lunar apatite, Ca5(PO4)3(F,Cl,OH). In particular, apatite has been used as a tool for assessing the sources of H2O in the lunar interior. However, current models for the Moon's formation have yet to fully account for its thermal evolution in the presence of H2O and other volatiles. For ex-ample, in the context of the lunar magma ocean (LMO) model, it is anticipated that chlorine (and other volatiles) should have been concentrated in the late-stage LMO residual melts (i.e., the dregs enriched in incompatible elements such as K, REEs (Rare Earth Elements), and P, collectively called KREEP, and in its primitive form - urKREEP, given its incompatibility in mafic minerals like olivine and pyroxene, which were the dominant phases that crystallized early in the cumulate pile of the LMO. When compared to chondritic meteorites and terrestrial rocks, lunar samples have exotic chlorine isotope compositions, which are difficult to explain in light of the abundance and isotopic composition of other volatile species, especially H, and the current estimates for chlorine and H2O in the bulk silicate Moon (BSM). In order to better understand the processes involved in giving rise to the heavy chlorine isotope compositions of lunar samples, we have performed a comprehensive in situ high precision study of chlorine isotopes in lunar apatite from a suite of Apollo samples covering a range of geochemical characteristics and petrologic types.

  14. Reactive oxygen species in signalling the transcriptional activation of WIPK expression in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Xu, Juan; Yang, Kwang-Yeol; Yoo, Seung Jin; Liu, Yidong; Ren, Dongtao; Zhang, Shuqun

    2014-07-01

    Plant mitogen-activated protein kinases represented by tobacco WIPK (wounding-induced protein kinase) and its orthologs in other species are unique in their regulation at transcriptional level in response to stress and pathogen infection. We previously demonstrated that transcriptional activation of WIPK is essential for induced WIPK activity, and activation of salicylic acid-induced protein kinase (SIPK) by the constitutively active NtMEK2(DD) is sufficient to induce WIPK gene expression. Here, we report that the effect of SIPK on WIPK gene expression is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Using a combination of pharmacological and gain-of-function transgenic approaches, we studied the relationship among SIPK activation, WIPK gene activation in response to fungal cryptogein, light-dependent ROS generation in chloroplasts, and ROS generated via NADPH oxidase. In the conditional gain-of-function GVG-NtMEK2(DD) transgenic tobacco, induction of WIPK expression is dependent on the ROS generation in chloroplasts. Consistently, methyl viologen, an inducer of ROS generation in chloroplasts, highly activated WIPK expression. In addition to chloroplast-originated ROS, H(2)O(2) generated from the cell-surface NADPH oxidase could also activate WIPK gene expression, and inhibition of cryptogein-induced ROS generation also abolished WIPK gene activation. Our data demonstrate that WIPK gene activation is mediated by ROS, which provides a mechanism by which ROS influence cellular signalling processes in plant stress/defence response. PMID:24392654

  15. Bioremediation of chlorinated organics

    SciTech Connect

    Strong-Gunderson, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    The use of lux bioreporters to measure enhanced bioavailability due to surfactants is briefly described in this paper. The bioreporters are engineered microorganisms that produce light during contaminant degradation, providing a real-time measure of microbial activity. The results of two experiments using bioreporters are summarized. The first experiment showed that the surfactant concentration that best enhanced the overall rate of toluene degradation was below the critical micelle concentration (CMC). A second experiment showed that surfactants at the CMC interfered with or inhibited the biodegradation of trichloroethylene.

  16. IDENTIFICATION OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FROM OZONE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORAMINE, AND CHLORINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many drinking water treatment plants are currently using alternative disinfectants to treat drinking water, with ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine being the most popular. However, compared to chlorine, which has been much more widely studied, there is little information abo...

  17. EVALUATION OF MUTAGENIC AND CARCINOGENIC PROPERTIES OF BROMINATED AND CHLORINATED ACETONITRILES: BY-PRODUCTS OF CHLORINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study was undertaken to determine if chlorinated and brominated acetonitriles formed during the chlorination of drinking water possess mutagenic and/or carcinogenic properties. Chloroacetonitrile (CAN), dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN), trichloroacetonitrile (TCAN), bromoc...

  18. PRODUCTION OF CHLORINE ATOMS FROM THE REACTION OF OH WITH CHLORINATED HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements from previous studies have shown that when hydroxyl radicals react with various chlorinated hydrocarbons under atmospheric conditions, free chlorine atoms can be produced. hetechnique described in this study involves scavenging Cl atoms produced by the reaction (usin...

  19. Behavior of sulfur and chlorine in coal during combustion and boiler corrosion. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, C.L.; Hackley, K.C.; Cao, J.; Donnals, G.L.; Ruch, R.R.; Pan, W.P.; Shao, D.

    1992-12-31

    Using the pyrolysis-QGA system, samples of coal were heated from ambient temperature to 800{degrees}C at a rate of 20{degrees}C/min in the pyrolysis chamber under a nitrogen atmosphere. The volatile products were carried with the nitrogen flow to the combustion chamber which was maintained at 850{degrees}C under a constant flow of oxygen. For Illinois coals (IBC-101, 103, and -109), HCl was the only chlorine species identified by the QGA. The HCl release profiles for the coals showed a broad peak between 250{degrees}C and 600{degrees}C with a maximum at 445{degrees}C. Neutron activation analysis of pyrolysis residues showed that 98 percent of the chlorine in raw coal was volatilized. Thus, it may be inferred that the chlorine in Illinois coals is released rapidly as HCl, not as sodium chloride (NaCl), during combustion in a utility/industrial boiler. In contrast to chlorine, the sulfur release profile for IBC-109 showed three peaks: the first sulfur peak at about 350{degrees}C was probably derived from elemental sulfur, the main peak at 475{degrees}C corresponded to the release of organic sulfur, and the third peak at 600{degrees}C resulted from the decomposition of pyrite. The low-temperature peak was absent for fresh samples. Sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) was the major sulfur species in combustion gases under an oxidizing condition; additional gaseous sulfur species (COS and H{sub 2}S) were observed when the atmosphere was changed to a reducing condition.

  20. An Examination of the Inorganic Chlorine Budget in the Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonne, G. P.; Stimpfle, R. M.; Cohen, R. C.; Voss, P. B.; Perkins, K. K.; Anderson, J. G.; Salawitch, R. J.; Elkins, J. W.; Dutton, G. S.; Jucks, K. W.

    2000-01-01

    We use the first simultaneous in situ measurements of ClONO2, ClO, and HCl acquired using the NASA ER-2 aircraft during the Photochemistry of Ozone Loss in the Arctic Region in Summer (POLARIS) mission to test whether these three compounds quantitatively account for total inorganic chlorine (Cly) in the lower stratosphere in 1997. We find (ClO + ClONO2 + HCl)/Cly = 0.92 +/- 0.10, where Cly is inferred from in situ measurements of organic chlorine source gases. These observations are consistent with our current understanding of the budget and partitioning of Cly in the lower stratosphere. We find no evidence in support of missing inorganic chlorine species that compose a significant fraction of Cly. We apply the analysis to earlier ER-2 observations dating from 1991 to investigate possible causes of previously observed discrepancies in the inorganic chlorine budget. Using space shuttle, satellite, balloon, and aircraft measurements in combination with ER-2 data, we find that the discrepancy is unlikely to have been caused by missing chlorine species or an error in the photolysis rate of chlorine nitrate. We also find that HCl/Cly is not significantly controlled by aerosol surface area density in the lower stratosphere.

  1. Induction of toluene oxidation activity in pseudomonas mendocina KR1 and pseudomonas sp. strain ENVPC5 by chlorinated solvents and alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    McClay, K.; Streger, S.H.; Steffan, R.J.

    1995-09-01

    Toluene oxidation activity in Pseudomonas mendocina KR1 and Pseudomonas sp. strain ENVPC5 was induced by trichloroethylene (TCE), and induction was followed by the degradation of TCE. Higher levels of toluene oxidation activity were achieved in the presence of a supplemental growth substrate such as glutamate, with levels of activity of up to 86% of that observed with toluene-induced cells. Activity in P. mendocina KR1 was also induced by cis-1,2-dichloroethylene, perchloroethylene, chloroethane, hexane, pentane, and octane, but not by trans-1,2-dichloroethylene. Toluene oxidation was not induced by TCE in Burkholderia (Pseudomonas) cepacia G4, P. putida F1, Pseudomonas sp. strain ENV110, or Pseudomonas sp. strain ENV113. 22 refs., 4 tabs.

  2. Impact of chlorine on the cell integrity and toxin release and degradation of colonial Microcystis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jiajia; Rao, La; Chiu, Yi-Ting; Lin, Tsair-Fuh

    2016-10-01

    The occurrence of toxic cyanobacteria in drinking water sources is problematic for water authorities as they can impair drinking water quality. Chlorine as a commonly used oxidant in water treatment plants has shown the potential to lyse cyanobacterial cells, resulting in the release of secondary metabolites which are hard to be removed during conventional water treatment processes. The majority of cyanobacterial species such as Microcystis, often occur in colonial forms under natural conditions. However, previous studies have mainly focused on the influence of chlorination on individual cyanobacterial cells due to technique limitations. A syringe dispersion method combined with a fluorescence technique (SYTOX Green stain with flow cytometry), was successfully developed for the evaluation of cell integrity of colonial Microcystis. Chlorination of Microcystis-laden water was conducted at different chlorine dosages for different colonial sizes (<37, 37-270 and 270-550 μm). The results indicated that colonial Microcystis cells were more resistant to chlorine oxidation than individual cells, which may be attributed to protection from the cell-bound mucilage. There was a lag phase before cell rupture occurred and a Delayed Chick Watson Model describes the experimental data very well for the kinetics of cyanobacterial cell rupture. The growing colonial size caused increases in the lag phases but decreases in the cell lysis rates. Chlorination also induced the release of microcystins (MCs) from colonial Microcystis cells. In particular, increased levels of dissolved MCs were observed in Cheng Kung Lake (CKL) water. In summary, the reaction of chlorine with colonial cyanobacteria is more complicated than with individual cells. The efficiency of chlorine oxidation could be reduced by the cell-bound mucilage and natural water matrix. These observations may provide insights for water authorities to assess the risk to drinking water quality posed by chlorination under

  3. Mechanism of Growth Enhancement of Plants Induced by Active Species in Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Ono, Reoto; Hayashi, Nobuya

    2015-09-01

    Plant growth enhances when seeds are irradiated by plasma. However the mechanism of the growth enhancement by plasma has not been clarified. In this study, growth enhancement of plants using various active species and variation of plant cells are investigated. RF plasma is generated under conditions where pressure is 60 Pa and input electrical power is 60 W. Irradiation period varies from 0 (control) to 75 min. Air plasma shows maximum growth of plants with irradiation period of 60 min on the other hand, oxygen plasma shows the maximum growth with irradiation period of 15 min. From change of gaseous species and pressure dependence, growth enhancing factor is expected to be active oxygen species produced in plasma. According to gene expression analysis of Arabidopsis, there are two speculated mechanism of plant growth enhancement. The first is acceleration of cell cycle by gene expressions of photosynthesis and glycolytic pathway, and the second is increase of cell size via plant hormone production.

  4. Activity Profile In Vitro of Micafungin against Spanish Clinical Isolates of Common and Emerging Species of Yeasts and Molds▿

    PubMed Central

    Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Gomez-Lopez, Alicia; Mellado, Emilia; Monzon, Araceli; Buitrago, Maria J.; Rodriguez-Tudela, Juan L.

    2009-01-01

    A collection of 2,278 isolates belonging to 86 different fungal species was tested with micafungin and eight other drugs using the EUCAST procedures. Micafungin was active against species of Candida and Aspergillus (even azole-resistant species) as well as Penicillium spp., Scedosporium apiospermum, and Acremonium spp. It was inactive for species of Basidiomycota and Mucorales and for multiresistant species such as those of Fusarium. PMID:19223630

  5. Cytotoxic activities of ethyl acetate extract and a metabolite from a Monocillium species.

    PubMed

    Khondkar, Proma; Rahman, M Mukhlesur; Islam, Anwarul

    2005-09-01

    The ethyl acetate soluble fraction of a cultural broth of a Monocillium species afforded the isolation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural. Both the extract and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural showed significant cytotoxic activities in a brine shrimp bioassay and the LC(50) values were found to be 14.96 microg/mL and 23.71 microg/mL, respectively. PMID:16220580

  6. Rare & Endangered Species: Understanding Our Disappearing Plants and Animals. Activities Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Gas Association, Arlington, VA. Educational Services.

    About 464 plants and animals found in the United States and its territories are listed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as threatened or endangered. Another 3900 are candidates for protection. The activities in this guide are designed to help teachers and students understand the issue of endangered species. It includes ideas for several…

  7. Abiotic stresses activate a MAPkinase in the model grass species Lolium temulentum L.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forage and turf grasses are utilized in diverse environments which exposes them to a variety of abiotic stresses, however very little is known concerning the perception or molecular responses to these various stresses. In the model grass species Lolium temulentum (Lt), a 46 kDa mitogen-activated pro...

  8. Screening of halophilic bacteria and Alteromonas species for organophosphorus hydrolyzing enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    DeFrank, J J; Beaudry, W T; Cheng, T C; Harvey, S P; Stroup, A N; Szafraniec, L L

    1993-06-01

    Previously, a G-type nerve agent degrading enzyme activity was found in a halophilic bacterial isolate designated JD6.5. This organism was tentatively identified as an unknown species of the genus Alteromonas. In order to determine whether this type of enzyme activity was common in other species of Alteromonas, a screening program was initiated. A number of Alteromonas species and five halophilic bacterial isolates were cultured and their crude cell extracts screened for hydrolytic activity against several organophosphorus chemical agents and other related compounds. The samples were also screened for cross-reactivity with a monoclonal antibody raised against the purified enzyme from JD6.5 and for hybridization with a DNA probe based on its N-terminal amino acid sequence A wide spectrum of activities and reactivities were seen, suggesting a significant heterogeneity between the functionally similar enzymes that are present in these bacterial species. Enzymes of the type described here have considerable potential for the decontamination and demilitarization of chemical warfare agents. PMID:8393735

  9. Characterization Activities to Evaluate Chlorinated Solvent Discharges to Tims Branch from the A/M Area of the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, D.G.

    2001-02-23

    The objective of this investigation was to identify those regions of plume outcrop along Tims Branch southeast of A/M Area and to establish fixed monitoring points along the seepline to evaluate proposed remediation needs and to support long-term monitoring activities in the vicinity of the seepline. The characterization approach employed in completing these tasks was dynamic and graded. Three stages of characterization were used to evaluate the outcrop region, with the results from each of the previous activities used to direct subsequent characterization.

  10. Enhancement of the Microbial Dehalogenation of a Model Chlorinated Compound

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Stuart N.; Alexander, Martin

    1981-01-01

    A number of chlorinated aromatic and aliphatic compounds were dehalogenated when incubated with sewage. Preincubating the sewage with nonchlorinated organic substrates enhanced the subsequent dehalogenation of the chlorinated chemicals. Dehalogenation of 4-chloro-3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid (CDBA) in lake water occurred as a result of microbial growth both in the light in the absence of added nutrients and in the dark in the presence of acetate. No organism able to use CDBA as a carbon source was isolated. Axenic bacterial cultures and a nonaxenic Chlamydomonas culture released chloride from CDBA. The metabolism of CDBA by the latter culture, a process that was inhibited by 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea, yielded a product that was identified as α-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde. This product of an apparent cometabolic transformation was mineralized by a strain of Streptomyces, thus suggesting that certain cometabolic products may not accumulate because they are carbon sources for other species. PMID:16345899

  11. Toxicity of chlorinated benzenes to marine algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yan-Jun; Wang, Xiu-Lin; Yu, Wei-Jun; Zhang, Li-Jun; Sun, Han-Zhang

    1997-12-01

    Growth of Chlorella marine, Nannochloropsis oculata, Pyramidomonas sp., Platymonas subcordiformis and Phaeodactylum tricornutum exposed to monochlorobenzene (MCB), 1,2-dichlorobenzene (1,2-DCB), 1, 2, 3, 4-tetrachlorobenzene (1, 2, 3, 4-TeCB) and pentachlorobenzene (PeCB) was tested. Tests of 72 h- EC 50 values showed that the toxicity ranged in the order: MCB<1,2-DCB<1,2,3,4-TeCBchlorinated benzene (CB) alone to marine algae was almost in the order: Pyramidomonas sp. < Platymonas subcordiformis < Nannochloropsis oculata < Chlorella marine < Phaeodactylum tricomutum. Study of the QSAR (Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship) between K OW and toxicity of CBs to marine algae showed good relationships between -log EC 50 and log K OW.

  12. Natural chlorine and fluorine in the atmosphere, water and precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friend, James P.

    1990-01-01

    The geochemical cycles of chlorine and fluorine are surveyed and summarized as framework for the understanding of the global natural abundances of these species in the atmosphere, water, and precipitation. In the cycles the fluxes into and out of the atmosphere can be balanced within the limits of our knowledge of the natural sources and sinks. Sea salt from the ocean surfaces represent the predominant portion of the source of chlorine. It is also an important source of atmospheric fluorine, but volcanoes are likely to be more important fluorine sources. Dry deposition of sea salt returns about 85 percent of the salt released there. Precipitation removes the remainder. Most of the sea salt materials are considered to be cyclic, moving through sea spray over the oceans and either directly back to the oceans or deposited dry and in precipitation on land, whence it runs off into rivers and streams and returns to the oceans. Most of the natural chlorine in the atmosphere is in the form of particulate chloride ion with lesser amounts as gaseous inorganic chloride and methyl chloride vapor. Fluorine is emitted from volcanoes primarily as HF. It is possible that HF may be released directly form the ocean surface but this has not been confirmed by observation. HCl and most likely HF gases are released into the atmosphere by sea salt aerosols. The mechanism for the release is likely to be the provision of protons from the so-called excess sulfate and HNO3. Sea salt aerosol contains fluorine as F(-), MgF(+), CaF(+), and NaF. The concentrations of the various species of chlorine and fluorine that characterize primarily natural, unpolluted atmospheres are summarized in tables and are discussed in relation to their fluxes through the geochemical cycle.

  13. Antibiofilm activity of carboxymethyl chitosan on the biofilms of non-Candida albicans Candida species.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yulong; Leonhard, Matthias; Moser, Doris; Schneider-Stickler, Berit

    2016-09-20

    Although most cases of candidiasis have been attributed to Candida albicans, non-C. albicans Candida species have been isolated in increasing numbers in patients. In this study, we determined the inhibition of carboxymethyl chitosan (CM-chitosan) on single and mixed species biofilm of non-albicans Candida species, including Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, Candida krusei and Candida glabrata. Biofilm by all tested species in microtiter plates were inhibited nearly 70%. CM-chitosan inhibited mixed species biofilm in microtiter plates and also on medical materials surfaces. To investigate the mechanism, the effect of CM-chitosan on cell viability and biofilm growth was employed. CM-chitosan inhibited Candida planktonic growth as well as adhesion. Further biofilm formation was inhibited with CM-chitosan added at 90min, 12h or 24h after biofilm initiation. CM-chitosan was not only able to inhibit the metabolic activity of Candida cells, but was also active upon the establishment and the development of biofilms. PMID:27261732

  14. Screening of radical scavenging activity and polyphenol content of Bulgarian plant species

    PubMed Central

    Nikolova, Milena

    2011-01-01

    Background: Discovery of new plant species with antioxidant properties is a priority of many research teams. Most of the species included in this study are unstudied for antioxidant properties, but they are taxonomically related to reference plants with well-documented antioxidant activity. Materials and Methods: Free radical scavenging activity of plant extracts was evaluated using a 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. An aluminum chloride colorimetric method was used for flavonoid determination. The amount of phenolic compounds in the extracts was estimated by using the Folin–Ciocalteu reagent. Results: As a result of screening, it was found that the significant antioxidant properties possess several unstudied until now plant species (Veronica bellidioides L., V. kellereri Deg. et Urm, V. vindobonensis (M. Fisher) M. Fisher, V. beccabunga L., V. rhodopaea L., V. austriaca (Velen.) Degen., Clinopodium vulgare L., Stachysrecta L., Clematis vitalba L., and Xeranthemum annum L.). The antioxidant potential of the new species is comparable to that of reference medicinal plants. Conclusions: The existing data presented here provide new information for antioxidant potential of plant species that have not been traditionally used as medicinal plants. PMID:22224049

  15. In vitro antimalarial activity of six Aspidosperma species from the state of Minas Gerais (Brazil).

    PubMed

    Dolabela, Maria Fâni; Oliveira, Salma G; Peres, José M; Nascimento, José M S; Póvoa, Marinete M; Oliveira, Alaide B

    2012-12-01

    Ethnomedicinal informations point to some Aspidosperma species (Apocynaceae) as antimalarial plants in Brazil and have motivated the evaluation of six species which were collected in the state of Minas Gerais: A. cylindrocarpon Müll. Arg., A. parvifolium A. DC., A. olivaceum Müll. Arg., A. ramiflorum Müll. Arg., A. spruceanum Benth. ex Müll. Arg. and A. tomentosum Mart.. A total of 23 extracts of different plant parts in different solvents were assayed in vitro against chloroquine-resistant (W2) and chloroquine-sensitive (3D7) strains of Plasmodium falciparum. All the extracts were shown to be active with IC50 values in the range of 5.0 ± 0 2.8 µg/mL to 65.0 ± 4.2 µg/mL. TLC profile of the extracts revealed the presence of alkaloids in the six species assayed. These results seem to confirm the popular use of Aspidosperma species to treat human malaria in Brazil and seem point to alkaloids as the putative active compounds of the assayed species. PMID:23207699

  16. Formation of chlorinated lipids post-chlorine gas exposure.

    PubMed

    Ford, David A; Honavar, Jaideep; Albert, Carolyn J; Duerr, Mark A; Oh, Joo Yeun; Doran, Stephen; Matalon, Sadis; Patel, Rakesh P

    2016-08-01

    Exposure to chlorine (Cl2) gas can occur during accidents and intentional release scenarios. However, biomarkers that specifically indicate Cl2 exposure and Cl2-derived products that mediate postexposure toxicity remain unclear. We hypothesized that chlorinated lipids (Cl-lipids) formed by direct reactions between Cl2 gas and plasmalogens serve as both biomarkers and mediators of post-Cl2 gas exposure toxicities. The 2-chloropalmitaldehyde (2-Cl-Pald), 2-chlorostearaldehyde (2-Cl-Sald), and their oxidized products, free- and esterified 2-chloropalmitic acid (2-Cl-PA) and 2-chlorostearic acid were detected in the lungs and plasma of mouse and rat models of Cl2 gas exposure. Levels of Cl-lipids were highest immediately post-Cl2 gas exposure, and then declined over 72 h with levels remaining 20- to 30-fold higher at 24 h compared with baseline. Glutathione adducts of 2-Cl-Pald and 2-Cl-Sald also increased with levels peaking at 4 h in plasma. Notably, 3-chlorotyrosine also increased after Cl2 gas exposure, but returned to baseline within 24 h. Intranasal administration of 2-Cl-PA or 2-Cl-Pald at doses similar to those formed in the lung after Cl2 gas exposure led to increased distal lung permeability and inflammation and systemic endothelial dysfunction characterized by loss of eNOS-dependent vasodilation. These data suggest that Cl-lipids could serve as biomarkers and mediators for Cl2 gas exposure and toxicity. PMID:27324796

  17. Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation in Plants: Mechanisms and Enhancement of Phytoremediation of Groundwater Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Strand, Stuart E.

    2002-06-01

    Several varieties of transgenic poplar containing cytochrome P-450 2E1 have been constructed and are undergoing tests. Strategies for improving public acceptance and safety of transgenic poplar for chlorinated hydrocarbon phytoremediation are being developed. We have discovered a unique rhizobium species that lives within the stems of poplar and we are investigating whether this bacterium contributes nitrogen fixed from the air to the plant and whether this endophyte could be used to introduce genes into poplar. Studies of the production of chloride ion from TCE have shown that our present P-450 constructs did not produce chloride more rapidly than wild type plants. Follow-up studies will determine if there are other rate limiting downstream steps in TCE metabolism in plants. Studies of the metabolism of carbon tetrachloride in poplar cells have provided evidence that the native plant metabolism is due to the activity of oxidative enzymes similar to the mammalian cytochrome P-450 2E1.

  18. Biological activities and chemical constituents of some mangrove species from Sundarban estuary: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Simlai, Aritra; Roy, Amit

    2013-01-01

    This review represents the studies performed on some beneficial mangrove plants such as Ceriops decandra, Xylocarpus granatum, Xylocarpus moluccensis, Excoecaria agallocha, Sarcolobus globosus, Sonneratia caseolaris and Acanthus ilicifolius from the Sundarban estuary spanning India and Bangladesh with regard to their biological activities and chemical investigations till date. Sundarban is the largest single chunk of mangrove forest in the world. The forest is a source of livelihood to numerous people of the region. Several of its plant species have very large applications in the traditional folk medicine; various parts of these plants are used by the local people as cure for various ailments. Despite such enormous potential, remarkably few reports are available on these species regarding their biological activities and the active principles responsible for such activities. Though some chemical studies have been made on the mangrove plants of this estuary, reports pertaining to their activity-structure relationship are few in number. An attempt has been made in this review to increase the awareness for the medicinal significance as well as conservation and utilization of these mangrove species as natural rich sources of novel bioactive agents. PMID:24347925

  19. Antioxidant activity and total phenolic content of 24 Lamiaceae species growing in Iran.

    PubMed

    Firuzi, Omidreza; Javidnia, Katayoun; Gholami, Maryam; Soltani, Mohammad; Miri, Ramin

    2010-02-01

    The antioxidant activities of the methanolic extracts of 9 Salvia species and 15 other Lamiaceae plants growing in Iran were evaluated using ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging assays. FRAP values ranged form 8.5 to 79.0 microM quercetin equivalents/g dry weight, and IC50 values in the DPPH assay from 115.7 to 1350.2 microg dry weight/mL. Salvia species showed the highest antioxidant activities. S. santolinifolia, S. eremophila and S. palestina, which have not been studied before, were the most active plants. These were more active than the previously studied species from this family, such as S. multicaulis and Marrubium vulgare. S. hydrangea and Gontscharovia popovii also showed high antioxidant activities. FRAP and DPPH assay results showed good correlations with the total phenolic contents of the plants, measured by the Folin-Ciocalteau assay (r2 = 0.925 and 0.799, respectively, p < 0.0001). In conclusion, our study shows that some Lamiaceae plants growing in Iran represent good potential sources of natural antioxidants useful for either prevention or treatment of oxidative stress-related diseases. PMID:20334140

  20. Biological activities and chemical constituents of some mangrove species from Sundarban estuary: An overview.

    PubMed

    Simlai, Aritra; Roy, Amit

    2013-07-01

    This review represents the studies performed on some beneficial mangrove plants such as Ceriops decandra, Xylocarpus granatum, Xylocarpus moluccensis, Excoecaria agallocha, Sarcolobus globosus, Sonneratia caseolaris and Acanthus ilicifolius from the Sundarban estuary spanning India and Bangladesh with regard to their biological activities and chemical investigations till date. Sundarban is the largest single chunk of mangrove forest in the world. The forest is a source of livelihood to numerous people of the region. Several of its plant species have very large applications in the traditional folk medicine; various parts of these plants are used by the local people as cure for various ailments. Despite such enormous potential, remarkably few reports are available on these species regarding their biological activities and the active principles responsible for such activities. Though some chemical studies have been made on the mangrove plants of this estuary, reports pertaining to their activity-structure relationship are few in number. An attempt has been made in this review to increase the awareness for the medicinal significance as well as conservation and utilization of these mangrove species as natural rich sources of novel bioactive agents. PMID:24347925

  1. In vitro antiplasmodial activity of benzophenones and xanthones from edible fruits of Garcinia species.

    PubMed

    Lyles, James T; Negrin, Adam; Khan, Shabana I; He, Kan; Kennelly, Edward J

    2014-06-01

    Species of Garcinia have been used to combat malaria in traditional African and Asian medicines, including Ayurveda. In the current study, we have identified antiplasmodial benzophenone and xanthone compounds from edible Garcinia species by testing for in vitro inhibitory activity against Plasmodium falciparum. Whole fruits of Garcinia xanthochymus, G. mangostana, G. spicata, and G. livingstonei were extracted and tested for antiplasmodial activity. Garcinia xanthochymus was subjected to bioactivity-guided fractionation to identify active partitions. Purified benzophenones (1-9) and xanthones (10-18) were then screened in the plasmodial lactate dehydrogenase assay and tested for cytotoxicity against mammalian (Vero) cells. The benzophenones guttiferone E (4), isoxanthochymol (5), and guttiferone H (6), isolated from G. xanthochymus, and the xanthones α-mangostin (15), β-mangostin (16), and 3-isomangostin (17), known from G. mangostana, showed antiplasmodial activity with IC50 values in the range of 4.71-11.40 µM. Artemisinin and chloroquine were used as positive controls and exhibited IC50 values in the range of 0.01-0.24 µM. The identification of antiplasmodial benzophenone and xanthone compounds from G. xanthochymus and G. mangostana provides evidence for the antiplasmodial activity of Garcinia species and warrants further investigation of these fruits as dietary sources of chemopreventive compounds. PMID:24963617

  2. The relationship between total cholinesterase activity and mortality in four butterfly species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bargar, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between total cholinesterase activity (TChE) and mortality in four butterfly species (great southern white [Ascia monuste], common buckeye [Junonia coenia], painted lady [Vanessa cardui], and julia butterflies [Dryas julia]) was investigated. Acute contact toxicity studies were conducted to evaluate the response (median lethal dose [LD50] and TChE) of the four species following exposure to the organophosphate insecticide naled. The LD50 for these butterflies ranged from 2.3 to 7.6 μg/g. The average level of TChE inhibition associated with significant mortality ranged from 26 to 67%, depending on the species. The lower bounds of normal TChE activity (2 standard deviations less than the average TChE for reference butterflies) ranged from 8.4 to 12.3 μM/min/g. As a percentage of the average reference TChE activity for the respective species, the lower bounds were similar to the inhibition levels associated with significant mortality, indicating there was little difference between the dose resulting in significant TChE inhibition and that resulting in mortality.

  3. Chemical Constituents Analysis and Antidiabetic Activity Validation of Four Fern Species from Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen-Yu; Chiu, Fu-Yu; Lin, Yenshou; Huang, Wei-Jan; Hsieh, Po-Shiuan; Hsu, Feng-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Pterosins are abundant in ferns, and pterosin A was considered a novel activator of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, which is crucial for regulating blood glucose homeostasis. However, the distribution of pterosins in different species of ferns from various places in Taiwan is currently unclear. To address this question, the distribution of pterosins, glucose-uptake efficiency, and protective effects of pterosin A on β-cells were examined. Our results showed that three novel compounds, 13-chloro-spelosin 3-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (1), (3R)-Pterosin D 3-O-β-d-(3'-p-coumaroyl)-glucopyranoside (2), and (2R,3R)-Pterosin L 3-O-β-d-(3'-p-coumaroyl)-glucopyranoside (3), were isolated for the first time from four fern species (Ceratopteris thalictroides, Hypolepis punctata, Nephrolepis multiflora, and Pteridium revolutum) along with 27 known compounds. We also examined the distribution of these pterosin compounds in the mentioned fern species (except N. multiflora). Although all pterosin analogs exhibited the same effects in glucose uptake assays, pterosin A prevented cell death and reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. This paper is the first report to provide new insights into the distribution of pterosins in ferns from Taiwan. The potential anti-diabetic activity of these novel phytocompounds warrants further functional studies. PMID:25622260

  4. The relationship between total cholinesterase activity and mortality in four butterfly species.

    PubMed

    Bargar, Timothy A

    2012-09-01

    The relationship between total cholinesterase activity (TChE) and mortality in four butterfly species (great southern white [Ascia monuste], common buckeye [Junonia coenia], painted lady [Vanessa cardui], and julia butterflies [Dryas julia]) was investigated. Acute contact toxicity studies were conducted to evaluate the response (median lethal dose [LD50] and TChE) of the four species following exposure to the organophosphate insecticide naled. The LD50 for these butterflies ranged from 2.3 to 7.6 µg/g. The average level of TChE inhibition associated with significant mortality ranged from 26 to 67%, depending on the species. The lower bounds of normal TChE activity (2 standard deviations less than the average TChE for reference butterflies) ranged from 8.4 to 12.3 µM/min/g. As a percentage of the average reference TChE activity for the respective species, the lower bounds were similar to the inhibition levels associated with significant mortality, indicating there was little difference between the dose resulting in significant TChE inhibition and that resulting in mortality. PMID:22740147

  5. Endogenous superoxide-like species and antioxidant activity in ocular tissues detected by luminol luminescence.

    PubMed

    Trevithick, J R; Dzialoszynski, T

    1997-04-01

    A new luminescent method was used to detect the reactive oxygen species in aqueous and vitreous humors and in homogenates of the lens and retina of laboratory rats. Superoxide-like activity per microgram protein increased in all tissues with weight of the rat, a good indicator of animal age. Superoxide dismutase, centrophenoxine, soluble vitamin E (D-alpha-Locopherol (polyethlyene glycol 1000) succinate, and N'-diphenyl-p-phenylenediamine (DPPD) reduced the luminescence. Catalase had no effect. These results are consistent with the detected species being superoxide-like. PMID:9111931

  6. Diversity of Secondary Metabolites from Marine Bacillus Species: Chemistry and Biological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mondol, Muhammad Abdul Mojid; Shin, Hee Jae; Islam, Mohammad Tofazzal

    2013-01-01

    Marine Bacillus species produce versatile secondary metabolites including lipopeptides, polypeptides, macrolactones, fatty acids, polyketides, and isocoumarins. These structurally diverse compounds exhibit a wide range of biological activities, such as antimicrobial, anticancer, and antialgal activities. Some marine Bacillus strains can detoxify heavy metals through reduction processes and have the ability to produce carotenoids. The present article reviews the chemistry and biological activities of secondary metabolites from marine isolates. Side by side, the potential for application of these novel natural products from marine Bacillus strains as drugs, pesticides, carotenoids, and tools for the bioremediation of heavy metal toxicity are also discussed. PMID:23941823

  7. Diversity of secondary metabolites from marine Bacillus species: chemistry and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Mondol, Muhammad Abdul Mojid; Shin, Hee Jae; Islam, Mohammad Tofazzal

    2013-08-01

    Marine Bacillus species produce versatile secondary metabolites including lipopeptides, polypeptides, macrolactones, fatty acids, polyketides, and isocoumarins. These structurally diverse compounds exhibit a wide range of biological activities, such as antimicrobial, anticancer, and antialgal activities. Some marine Bacillus strains can detoxify heavy metals through reduction processes and have the ability to produce carotenoids. The present article reviews the chemistry and biological activities of secondary metabolites from marine isolates. Side by side, the potential for application of these novel natural products from marine Bacillus strains as drugs, pesticides, carotenoids, and tools for the bioremediation of heavy metal toxicity are also discussed. PMID:23941823

  8. Transportation and Accumulation of Redox Active Species at the Buried Interfaces of Plasticized Membrane Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Sohail, Manzar; De Marco, Roland; Jarolímová, Zdeňka; Pawlak, Marcin; Bakker, Eric; He, Ning; Latonen, Rose-Marie; Lindfors, Tom; Bobacka, Johan

    2015-09-29

    The transportation and accumulation of redox active species at the buried interface between glassy carbon electrodes and plasticized polymeric membranes have been studied using synchrotron radiation X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (SR-XPS), near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS), in situ electrochemical Fourier transform infrared-attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry (CA), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Ferrocene tagged poly(vinyl chloride) [FcPVC], ferrocene (Fc), and its derivatives together with tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) doped plasticized polymeric membrane electrodes have been investigated, so as to extend the study of the mechanism of this reaction chemistry to different time scales (both small and large molecules with variable diffusion coefficients) using a range of complementary electrochemical and surface analysis techniques. This study also provides direct spectroscopic evidence for the transportation and electrochemical reactivity of redox active species, regardless of the size of the electrochemically reactive molecule, at the buried interface of the substrate electrode. With all redox dopants, when CA electrolysis was performed, redox active species were undetectable (<1 wt % of signature elements or below the detection limit of SR-XPS and NEXAFS) in the outermost surface layers of the membrane, while a high concentration of redox species was located at the electrode substrate as a consequence of the deposition of the reaction product (Fc(+)-anion complex) at the buried interface between the electrode and the membrane. This reaction chemistry for redox active species within plasticized polymeric membranes may be useful in the fashioning of multilayered polymeric devices (e.g., chemical sensors, organic electronic devices, protective laminates, etc.) based on an electrochemical tunable deposition of redox molecules at the buried substrate electrode beneath

  9. Salinity effects on viability, metabolic activity and proliferation of three Perkinsus species.

    PubMed

    La Peyre, Megan; Casas, Sandra; La Peyre, Jerome

    2006-07-11

    Little is known regarding the range of conditions in which many Perkinsus species may proliferate, making it difficult to predict conditions favorable for their expansion, to identify conditions inducing mortality, or to identify instances of potential cross-infectivity among sympatric host species. In this study, the effects of salinity on viability, metabolic activity and proliferation of P. marinus, P. olseni and P. chesapeaki were determined. Specifically, this research examined the effects of 5 salinities (7, 11, 15, 25, 35 per thousand), (1) without acclimation, on the viability and metabolic activity of 2 isolates of each Perkinsus species, and (2) with acclimation, on the viability, metabolic activity, size and number of 1 isolate of each species. P. chesapeaki showed the widest range of salinity tolerance of the 3 species, with high viability and cell proliferation at all salinities tested. Although P. chesapeaki originated from low salinity areas (i.e. <15 per thousand), several measures (i.e. cell number and metabolic activity) indicated that higher salinities (15, 25 per thousand) were more favorable for its growth. P. olseni, originating from high salinity areas, had better viability and proliferation at the higher salinities (15, 25, 35 per thousand). Distinct differences in acute salinity response of the 2 P. olseni isolates at lower salinities (7, 11 per thousand), however, suggest the need for a more expansive comparison of isolates to better define the lower salinity tolerance. Lastly, P. marinus was more tolerant of the lower salinities (7 and 11 per thousand) than P. olseni, but exhibited reduced viability at 7 per thousand, even after acclimation. PMID:16922001

  10. Precise determination of stable chlorine isotopic ratios in low-concentration natural samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magenheim, A. J.; Spivack, A. J.; Volpe, C.; Ransom, B.

    1994-07-01

    Investigation of stable chlorine isotopes in geological materials has been hindered by large sample requirements and/or lack of analytical precision. Here we describe precise methods for the extraction, isolation, and isotopic analysis of low levels of chlorine in both silicate and aerosol samples. Our standard procedure uses 2 μg of Cl for each isotopic analysis. External reproducibility (1 σ) is 0.25%. for the 37Cl /35Cl measurements. Chlorine is extracted from silicate samples (typically containing at least 20 μg of Cl) via pyrohydrolysis using induction heating and water vapor as the carrier, and the volatilized chlorine is condensed in aqueous solution. Atmospheric aerosols collected on filters are simply dissolved in water. Prior to isotopic measurement, removal of high levels of SO 42-, F -, and organic compounds is necessary for the production of stable ion beams. Sulfate is removed by BaSCO 4 precipitation, F - by CaF 2 precipitation, and organic compounds are extracted with activated carbon. Chlorine is converted to stoichiometric CsCl by cation exchange, and isotopic ratios are determined by thermal ionization mass spectrometry of Cs 2Cl +. We demonstrate that the sensitivity and precision of this method allow resolution of natural variations in chlorine isotopic composition, and thereby provide insight to some fundamental aspects of chlorine geochemistry.

  11. Stability of microcystins from cyanobacteria--IV. Effect of chlorination on decomposition.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, K; Watanuki, T; Kondo, F; Watanabe, M F; Nakazawa, H; Suzuki, M; Uchida, H; Harada, K

    1997-07-01

    Microcystins, the cyclic heptapeptide toxins produced by cyanobacteria such as Microcystis, show tumor-promoting activity through inhibition of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A. They potentially threaten human health, and are increasing the world-wide interest in the health risk associated with cyanobacterial toxins. In this study, the effect of chlorination on the decomposition of microcystins-LR and -RR was examined. The toxins were easily decomposed by chlorination with sodium hypochlorite, and the decomposition depended on the free chlorine dose. In this operation, many reaction products were formed, one of which was determined to be dihydroxymicrocystin formed through the chloronium ion at the conjugated diene of Adda [3-amino-9-methoxy-10-phenyl-2,6,8-trimethyl-deca-4(E), 6(E)-dienoic acid], followed by hydrolysis. Other products may be its stereoisomers and/or regioismers. No noxious products were detected from the chlorination process of microcystin-LR. Although these results suggested that chlorination at an adequate chlorine dose is very effective for the removal of microcystin in raw water, preoxidation of the cell itself with chlorine must be avoided, because it frequently causes toxin release from algae and produce trihalomethanes during water treatment. PMID:9248002

  12. Electro-active sensor, method for constructing the same; apparatus and circuitry for detection of electro-active species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An electro-active sensor includes a nonconductive platform with a first electrode set attached with a first side of a nonconductive platform. The first electrode set serves as an electrochemical cell that may be utilized to detect electro-active species in solution. A plurality of electrode sets and a variety of additional electrochemical cells and sensors may be attached with the nonconductive platform. The present invention also includes a method for constructing the aforementioned electro-active sensor. Additionally, an apparatus for detection and observation is disclosed, where the apparatus includes a sealable chamber for insertion of a portion of an electro-active sensor. The apparatus allows for monitoring and detection activities. Allowing for control of attached cells and sensors, a dual-mode circuitry is also disclosed. The dual-mode circuitry includes a switch, allowing the circuitry to be switched from a potentiostat to a galvanostat mode.

  13. Chlorine hazard evaluation for the zinc-chlorine electric vehicle battery. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Zalosh, R.G.; Bajpai, S.N.; Short, T.P.; Tsui, R.K.

    1980-04-01

    An evaluation of the hazards associated with conceivable accidental chlorine releases from zinc-chlorine electric vehicle batteries is presented. Since commercial batteries are not yet available, this hazard assessment is based both on theoretical chlorine dispersion models and small-scale and large-scale spill tests with chlorine hydrate. Six spill tests involving chlorine hydrate indicate that the danger zone in which chlorine vapor concentrations intermittently exceed 100 ppM extends at least 23 m directly downwind of a spill onto a warm road surface. Chlorine concentration data from the hydrate spill tests compare favorably with calculations based on a quasi-steady area source dispersion model and empirical estimates of the hydrate decomposition rate. The theoretical dispersion model has been combined with assumed hydrate spill probabilities and current motor vehicle accident statistics in order to project expected chlorine-induced fatality rates. These calculations indicate that expected chlorine fatality rates are several times higher in a city with a warm and calm climate than in a colder and windier city. Calculated chlorine-induced fatality rate projections for various climates are presented as a function of hydrate spill probability in order to illustrate the degree of vehicle/battery crashworthiness required to maintain chlorine-induced fatality rates below current vehicle fatility rates due to fires and asphyxiations.

  14. Comprehensive Model for Enhanced Biodegradation of Chlorinated Solvents in Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouznetsova, I.; Gerhard, J. I.; Mao, X.; Robinson, C.; Barry, A. D.; Harkness, M.; Mack, E. E.; Dworatzek, S.

    2007-12-01

    SABRE (Source Area BioREmediation) is a public/private consortium whose charter is to de-termine if enhanced anaerobic bioremediation can result in effective treatment of chlorinated solvent DNAPL source areas. The focus of this 4-year, $5.7 million research and development project is a field site in the United Kingdom containing TCE DNAPL. A comprehensive numerical model for simulating dehalogenation of chlorinated ethenes has been developed. The model considers the kinetic dissolution of DNAPL and nonaqueous organic amendments, bacterial growth and decay, and the interaction of biological and geochemical reactions that might influence biological activity. The model accounts for inhibitory effects of high chlorin-ated solvent concentrations as well as the link between fermentation and dehalogenation due to dynamic hydrogen concentration (the direct electron donor). In addition to the standard biodegradation pathways, sulphate reduction, mineral dissolution and precipitation kinetics are incorporated. These latter processes influence the soil buffering capacity and thus the net acidity generated. One-dimensional simulations were carried out to reproduce the data from columns packed with site soil and groundwater exhibiting both intermediate (250 mg/L) and near solubility (1100 mg/L) TCE concentrations. The modelling aims were to evaluate the key processes underpinning bioremediation success and provide a tool for investigating field sys-tem sensitivity to site data and design variables. This paper will present the model basis and validation and examine sensitivity to key processes including chlorinated ethene partitioning into soybean oil, sulphate reduction, and geochemical influences such as pH and the role of buffering in highly dechlorinating systems.

  15. Platinum nanoparticle during electrochemical hydrogen evolution: Adsorbate distribution, active reaction species, and size effect

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Teck L.; Wang, Lin -Lin; Zhang, Jia; Johnson, Duane D.; Bai, Kewu

    2015-03-02

    For small Pt nanoparticles (NPs), catalytic activity is, as observed, adversely affected by size in the 1–3 nm range. We elucidate, via first-principles-based thermodynamics, the operation H* distribution and cyclic voltammetry (CV) during the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) across the electrochemical potential, including the underpotential region (U ≤ 0) that is difficult to assess in experiment. We consider multiple adsorption sites on a 1 nm Pt NP model and show that the characteristic CV peaks from different H* species correspond well to experiment. We next quantify the activity contribution from each H* species to explain the adverse effect of size. From the resolved CV peaks at the standard hydrogen electrode potential (U = 0), we first deduce that the active species for the HER are the partially covered (100)-facet bridge sites and the (111)-facet hollow sites. Upon evaluation of the reaction barriers at operation H* distribution and microkinetic modeling of the exchange current, we find that the nearest-neighbor (100)-facet bridge site pairs have the lowest activation energy and contribute to ~75% of the NP activity. Edge bridge sites (fully covered by H*) per se are not active; however, they react with neighboring (100)-facet H* to account for ~18% of the activity, whereas (111)-facet hollow sites contribute little. As a result, extrapolating the relative contributions to larger NPs in which the ratio of facet-to-edge sites increases, we show that the adverse size effect of Pt NP HER activity kicks in for sizes below 2 nm.

  16. Platinum nanoparticle during electrochemical hydrogen evolution: Adsorbate distribution, active reaction species, and size effect

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tan, Teck L.; Wang, Lin -Lin; Zhang, Jia; Johnson, Duane D.; Bai, Kewu

    2015-03-02

    For small Pt nanoparticles (NPs), catalytic activity is, as observed, adversely affected by size in the 1–3 nm range. We elucidate, via first-principles-based thermodynamics, the operation H* distribution and cyclic voltammetry (CV) during the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) across the electrochemical potential, including the underpotential region (U ≤ 0) that is difficult to assess in experiment. We consider multiple adsorption sites on a 1 nm Pt NP model and show that the characteristic CV peaks from different H* species correspond well to experiment. We next quantify the activity contribution from each H* species to explain the adverse effect of size.more » From the resolved CV peaks at the standard hydrogen electrode potential (U = 0), we first deduce that the active species for the HER are the partially covered (100)-facet bridge sites and the (111)-facet hollow sites. Upon evaluation of the reaction barriers at operation H* distribution and microkinetic modeling of the exchange current, we find that the nearest-neighbor (100)-facet bridge site pairs have the lowest activation energy and contribute to ~75% of the NP activity. Edge bridge sites (fully covered by H*) per se are not active; however, they react with neighboring (100)-facet H* to account for ~18% of the activity, whereas (111)-facet hollow sites contribute little. As a result, extrapolating the relative contributions to larger NPs in which the ratio of facet-to-edge sites increases, we show that the adverse size effect of Pt NP HER activity kicks in for sizes below 2 nm.« less

  17. REACTION PRODUCTS FROM THE CHLORINATION OF SEAWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical treatment of natural waters, in particular the use of chlorine as a biocide, modifies the chemistry of these waters in ways that are not fully understood. The research described in this report examined both inorganic and organic reaction products from the chlorination of...

  18. Chlorination products: emerging links with allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Bernard, A

    2007-01-01

    Exposure of the human population to chlorination products has considerably increased during the 20(th) century especially after the 1960s with the development of public and leisure pools. The present article summarizes current knowledge regarding the human exposure to chlorination products and reviews studies suggesting that these chemicals might be involved in the development or exacerbation of allergic diseases. Populations regularly in contact with chlorination products such as swimmers, lifeguards or workers using chlorine as cleaning or bleaching agent show increased risks of allergic diseases or of respiratory disorders frequently associated with allergy. Experimental evidence suggests that chlorination products promote allergic sensitization by compromising the permeability or the immunoregulatory function of epithelial barriers. These findings led to the chlorine hypothesis proposing that the rise of allergic diseases could result less from the declining exposure to microbial agents (the hygiene hypothesis) than from the increasing and largely uncontrolled exposure to products of chlorination, the most widely used method to achieve hygiene in the developed world. Giving the increasing popularity of water recreational areas, there is an obvious need to assess the effects of chlorine-based oxidants on human health and their possible implication in the epidemic of allergic diseases. PMID:17627515

  19. FATE OF CHROMIUM (III) IN CHLORINATED WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The oxidation of trivalent chromium, Cr(III), to the more toxic Cr(VI) in chlorinated water is thermodynamically feasible and was the subject of the study. The study found that free available chlorine (FAC) readily converts Cr(III) to Cr(VI) at a rate that is highly dependent upo...

  20. Chemotaxis of Pseudomonas putida toward chlorinated benzoates

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood, C.S.; Parales, R.E.; Dispensa, M. )

    1990-05-01

    The chlorinated aromatic acids 3-chlorobenzoate and 4-chlorobenzoate are chemoattractants for Pseudomonas putida PRS2000. These compounds are detected by a chromosomally encoded chemotactic response to benzoate which is inducible by {beta}-ketoadipate, and intermediate of benzoate catabolism. Plasmid pAC27, encoding enzymes for 3-chlorobenzoate degradation, does not appear to carry genes for chemotaxis toward chlorinated compounds.

  1. Effects of ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine on Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst viability.

    PubMed Central

    Korich, D G; Mead, J R; Madore, M S; Sinclair, N A; Sterling, C R

    1990-01-01

    Purified Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. Excystation and mouse infectivity were comparatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. Ozone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlorine and monochloramine did. Greater than 90% inactivation as measured by infectivity was achieved by treating oocysts with 1 ppm of ozone (1 mg/liter) for 5 min. Exposure to 1.3 ppm of chlorine dioxide yielded 90% inactivation after 1 h, while 80 ppm of chlorine and 80 ppm of monochloramine required approximately 90 min for 90% inactivation. The data indicate that C. parvum oocysts are 30 times more resistant to ozone and 14 times more resistant to chlorine dioxide than Giardia cysts exposed to these disinfectants under the same conditions. With the possible exception of ozone, the use of disinfectants alone should not be expected to inactivate C. parvum oocysts in drinking water. PMID:2339894

  2. Effects of ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine on Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst viability

    SciTech Connect

    Korich, D.G.; Mead, J.R.; Madore, M.S.; Sinclair, N.A.; Sterling, C.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Purified Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. Excystation and mouse infectivity were comparatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. Ozone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlorine and monochloramine did. Greater than 90% inactivation as measured by infectivity was achieved by treating oocysts with 1 ppm of ozone (1 mg/liter) for 5 min. Exposure to 1.3 ppm of chlorine dioxide yielded 90% inactivation after 1 h, while 80 ppm of chlorine and 80 ppm of monochloramine required approximately 90 min for 90% inactivation. The data indicate that C. parvum oocysts are 30 times more resistant to ozone and 14 times more resistant to chlorine dioxide than Giardia cysts exposed to these disinfectants under the same conditions. With the possible exception of ozone, the use of disinfectants alone should not be expected to inactivate C. parvum oocysts in drinking water.

  3. Antioxidant activities and phytochemical study of leaf extracts from 18 indigenous tree species in taiwan.

    PubMed

    Ho, Shang-Tse; Tung, Yu-Tang; Chen, Yong-Long; Zhao, Ying-Ying; Chung, Min-Jay; Wu, Jyh-Horng

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess antioxidant activities of methanolic extracts from the leaves of 18 indigenous tree species in Taiwan. Results revealed that, among 18 species, Acer oliverianum exhibited the best free radical scavenging activities. The IC(50) values were 5.8 and 11.8 μg/mL on DPPH radical and superoxide radical scavenging activities, respectively. In addition, A. oliverianum also exhibited the strongest ferrous ion chelating activity. Based on a bioactivity-guided isolation principle, the resulting methanolic crude extracts of A. oliverianum leaves were fractionated to yield soluble fractions of hexane, EtOAc, BuOH, and water. Of these, the EtOAc fraction had the best antioxidant activity. Furthermore, 8 specific phytochemicals were isolated and identified from the EtOAc fraction. Among them, 1,2,3,4,6-O-penta-galloyl-β-D-glucopyranose had the best free radical scavenging activity. These results demonstrate that methanolic extracts and their derived phytochemicals of A. oliverianum leaves have excellent antioxidant activities and thus they have great potential as sources for natural health products. PMID:22454657

  4. Cytochromes P450 and species differences in xenobiotic metabolism and activation of carcinogen.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, D F; Ioannides, C; Parke, D V

    1998-01-01

    The importance of cytochrome P450 isoforms to species differences in the metabolism of foreign compounds and activation of procarcinogens has been identified. The possible range of P450 isozymes in significant variations in toxicity exhibited by experimental rodent species may have a relevance to chemical risk assessment, especially as human P450s are likely to show changes in the way they metabolize xenobiotics. Consequently, in the safety evaluation of chemicals, we should be cautious in extrapolating results from experimental animal models to humans. This paper focuses on examples in which species differences in P450s lead to significant alterations in carcinogenic response, and includes a discussion of the current procedures for toxicity screening, with an emphasis on short-term tests. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9755138

  5. ModuleBlast: identifying activated sub-networks within and across species

    PubMed Central

    Zinman, Guy E.; Naiman, Shoshana; O'Dee, Dawn M.; Kumar, Nishant; Nau, Gerard J.; Cohen, Haim Y.; Bar-Joseph, Ziv

    2015-01-01

    Identifying conserved and divergent response patterns in gene networks is becoming increasingly important. A common approach is integrating expression information with gene association networks in order to find groups of connected genes that are activated or repressed. In many cases, researchers are also interested in comparisons across species (or conditions). Finding an active sub-network is a hard problem and applying it across species requires further considerations (e.g. orthology information, expression data and networks from different sources). To address these challenges we devised ModuleBlast, which uses both expression and network topology to search for highly relevant sub-networks. We have applied ModuleBlast to expression and interaction data from mouse, macaque and human to study immune response and aging. The immune response analysis identified several relevant modules, consistent with recent findings on apoptosis and NFκB activation following infection. Temporal analysis of these data revealed cascades of modules that are dynamically activated within and across species. We have experimentally validated some of the novel hypotheses resulting from the analysis of the ModuleBlast results leading to new insights into the mechanisms used by a key mammalian aging protein. PMID:25428368

  6. ModuleBlast: identifying activated sub-networks within and across species.

    PubMed

    Zinman, Guy E; Naiman, Shoshana; O'Dee, Dawn M; Kumar, Nishant; Nau, Gerard J; Cohen, Haim Y; Bar-Joseph, Ziv

    2015-02-18

    Identifying conserved and divergent response patterns in gene networks is becoming increasingly important. A common approach is integrating expression information with gene association networks in order to find groups of connected genes that are activated or repressed. In many cases, researchers are also interested in comparisons across species (or conditions). Finding an active sub-network is a hard problem and applying it across species requires further considerations (e.g. orthology information, expression data and networks from different sources). To address these challenges we devised ModuleBlast, which uses both expression and network topology to search for highly relevant sub-networks. We have applied ModuleBlast to expression and interaction data from mouse, macaque and human to study immune response and aging. The immune response analysis identified several relevant modules, consistent with recent findings on apoptosis and NFκB activation following infection. Temporal analysis of these data revealed cascades of modules that are dynamically activated within and across species. We have experimentally validated some of the novel hypotheses resulting from the analysis of the ModuleBlast results leading to new insights into the mechanisms used by a key mammalian aging protein. PMID:25428368

  7. Threatened and endangered wildlife species of the Hanford Site related to CERCLA characterization activities

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzner, R.E.; Weiss, S.G.; Stegen, J.A.

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site has been placed on the National Priorities List, which requires that it be remediated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) or Superfund. Potentially contaminated areas of the Hanford Site were grouped into operable units, and detailed characterization and investigation plans were formulated. The DOE Richland Operations Office requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to conduct a biological assessment of the potential impact of these characterization activities on the threatened, endangered, and sensitive wildlife species of the Hanford Site. Additional direction for WHC compliances with wildlife protection can be found in the Environmental Compliance Manual. This document is intended to meet these requirements, in part, for the CERCLA characterization activities, as well as for other work comparable in scope. This report documents the biological assessment and describes the pertinent components of the Hanford Site as well as the planned characterization activities. Also provided are accounts of endangered, threatened, and federal candidate wildlife species on the Hanford Site and information as to how human disturbances can affect these species. Potential effects of the characterization activities are described with recommendations for mitigation measures.

  8. Early Activity of Cometary Species from ROSINA/DFMS at 67P/ Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hässig, Myrtha; Fuselier, Stephen A.; Altwegg, Kathrin; Balsiger, Hans; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Bieler, André; Calmonte, Ursina; Dhooghe, Frederik; Fiethe, Björn; Gasc, Sébastien; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Jäckel, Annette; Korth, Axel; Le Roy, Léna; Rème, Henri; Rubin, Martin; Tzou, Chia-Yu; Wurz, Peter

    2014-11-01

    The European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft arrived after a journey of more than 10 years at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. ROSINA is an instrument package on board Rosetta. It consists of two mass spectrometers and a COmetary Pressure Sensor (COPS). The two mass spectrometers, the Double Focusing Mass Spectrometer (DFMS) and the Reflectron Time of Flight (RTOF) complement each other with high mass resolution (e.g to resolve 13C from CH), high dynamic range (to detect low abundant isotopes and species), high mass range (to detect organics), and high time resolution. ROSINA is designed to measure the neutral gas and plasma composition in the coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in addition to the physical properties of the neutral component of the coma. For the first time, a comet can be observed in situ from its early activity towards and after perihelion. Little is known about what drives initial cometary activity very far from the Sun. Remote sensing observations to date are highly constrained to a limited number of a few bright comets (e.g. Hale-Bopp) and a limited number of species. Rosetta provides the first measurements of the early activity of a comet in situ and detected the first cometary molecules early August. We will focus on early activity of cometary species from the high resolution mass spectrometer ROSINA/DFMS.

  9. Subalpine Species Response to Past Climate Change and Fire Activity: Are We Underestimating the Biotic Resilience?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlock, C. L.; Iglesias, V.; Krause, T.

    2014-12-01

    Climate-change impacts on species distributions will be especially complex in mountain systems with steep environmental gradients and heterogeneous landscapes. In the western US, projected climate conditions include rising temperatures, decreased snowpack, and increased moisture deficits, all of which will impact species distributions at high elevations. Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis; WBP) is a keystone species in subalpine environments and one that is highly vulnerable to projected climate trends. In the past two decades, WBP populations dramatically declined as a result of bark beetle infestation, blister rust, high-severity fires, and drought. Species-niche modeling used to map future WPB distributions is based on the relation between present-day occurrence and bioclimatic parameters. While these models capture the realized niche, the full niche space inferred from paleo-observations appears to be much larger. To assess a broad range of bioclimatic conditions for WPB, we examined its response to past changes in climate, fire activity, and species competition. General additive modeling of pollen/charcoal data from the Greater Yellowstone area indicate that WBP reached maximum population size and distribution ~12,000 -7500 years ago and declined thereafter. Population dynamics tracked variations in summer insolation, such that WBP was most abundant when summer temperatures and fire frequency were higher than at present. Competition from lodgepole pine after ~10,000 years ago limited WBP at middle elevations. Paleoecological data indicate that the fundamental WBP niche is considerably larger than assumed, and simulations that project the demise of WBP in the next 50 years are probably too dramatic given WPB's ability to thrive under warm conditions and high fire activity in the past. Management strategies that reduce biotic competition and nonnative pathogens should help increase the future resilience of WBP and other subalpine species.

  10. Chlorine

    MedlinePlus

    ... gas are inhaled. Fluid in the lungs (pulmonary edema) that may be delayed for a few hours ... problems such as fluid in the lungs (pulmonary edema) following the initial exposure. How people can protect ...

  11. Eriosema (Fabaceae) Species Represent a Rich Source of Flavonoids with Interesting Pharmacological Activities.

    PubMed

    Awouafack, Maurice Ducret; Tane, Pierre; Spiteller, Michael; Eloff, Jacobus Nicolaas

    2015-07-01

    Many flavonoids have so far been isolated as main secondary metabolites in plant species of the genus Eriosema (Fabaceae), which contains approximately 160 species. A total of 52 flavonoids including isoflavones, dihydroflavonols, flavonols, flavanones, dihydrochalcones, isoflavanone and their pyrano or glucoside derivatives were isolated and characterized from the five species of this genus investigated to date. Total synthesis and semi-synthesis (acetylation, methylation, hydrogenation, and cyclization) of some isolated flavonoids were reported. Due to several significant pharmacological properties (antimicrobial, cytotoxicity, anti-mycobacterial, antioxidant, antiviral, erectile-dysfunction, vasodilatory and hypoglycemic) of the isolated flavonoids and derivatives, more scientists should be interested in investigating Eriosema species. The present review is the first to document all flavonoids that have been reported from the genus Eriosema to date together with their synthetic and semi-synthetic derivatives, and their pharmacological properties. Dihydrochalcones, which are precursors of other classes of flavonoids, are very rare in natural sources and their isolation from Eriosema species may explain the large number of flavonoids found in this genus. It appears that isoflavone could be a marker for species in this genus. The 83 flavonoids (1-83) documented include 52 isolates, 31 semi-synthetic and 3 totally synthetic derivatives. Data were obtained from Google scholar, Pubmed, Scifinder, Sciencedirect, and Scopus. With 52 different flavonoids isolated from only 5 of the approximately 160 species it shows the remarkable chemical diversity of this genus. This compilation of the biological activities and chemical composition may renew the interest of pharmacologists and phytochemists in this genus. PMID:26411043

  12. Active hydrogen species on TiO2 for photocatalytic H2 production.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zongfang; Zhang, Wenhua; Xiong, Feng; Yuan, Qing; Jin, Yuekang; Yang, Jinlong; Huang, Weixin

    2014-04-21

    Photocatalytic H2 production over TiO2 has attracted tremendous attention and achieved great progress, but the active hydrogen species is still unknown. Employing a rutile TiO2(110) surface as a model catalyst we report here for the first time the direct observation of photocatalytic H2 production under ultrahigh vacuum conditions during UV-light irradiation at 115 K and the identification of negatively-charged hydride-type H-Ti species as the corresponding photoactive surface species by means of thermal desorption spectroscopy, photon-stimulated desorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and DFT calculations. The formation and stability of H-Ti species are closely related to available surplus electrons on the rutile TiO2(110) surface that can be created by the formation of surface BBO vacancies or by the formation of surface hydroxyls via the adsorption of atomic H or molecular H2 on O sites. The photocatalytic H2 production from H-Ti species is hole-mediated and co-existing water exerts a negative effect on this process. PMID:24614827

  13. Biological Activities of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species: Oxidative Stress versus Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Weidinger, Adelheid; Kozlov, Andrey V.

    2015-01-01

    In the past, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) were shown to cause oxidative damage to biomolecules, contributing to the development of a variety of diseases. However, recent evidence has suggested that intracellular RONS are an important component of intracellular signaling cascades. The aim of this review was to consolidate old and new ideas on the chemical, physiological and pathological role of RONS for a better understanding of their properties and specific activities. Critical consideration of the literature reveals that deleterious effects do not appear if only one primary species (superoxide radical, nitric oxide) is present in a biological system, even at high concentrations. The prerequisite of deleterious effects is the formation of highly reactive secondary species (hydroxyl radical, peroxynitrite), emerging exclusively upon reaction with another primary species or a transition metal. The secondary species are toxic, not well controlled, causing irreversible damage to all classes of biomolecules. In contrast, primary RONS are well controlled (superoxide dismutase, catalase), and their reactions with biomolecules are reversible, making them ideal for physiological/pathophysiological intracellular signaling. We assume that whether RONS have a signal transducing or damaging effect is primarily defined by their quality, being primary or secondary RONS, and only secondly by their quantity. PMID:25884116

  14. Comparative analysis of immunoglobulin A1 protease activity among bacteria representing different genera, species, and strains.

    PubMed Central

    Reinholdt, J; Kilian, M

    1997-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) proteases cleaving human IgA1 in the hinge region are produced constitutively by a number of pathogens, including Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae, as well as by some members of the resident oropharyngeal flora. Whereas IgA1 proteases have been shown to interfere with the functions of IgA antibodies in vitro, the exact role of these enzymes in the relationship of bacteria to a human host capable of responding with enzyme-neutralizing antibodies is not clear. Conceivably, the role of IgA1 proteases may depend on the quantity of IgA1 protease generated as well as on the balance between secreted and cell-associated forms of the enzyme. Therefore, we have compared levels of IgA1 protease activity in cultures of 38 bacterial strains representing different genera and species as well as strains of different pathogenic potential. Wide variation in activity generation rate was found overall and within some species. High activity was not an exclusive property of bacteria with documented pathogenicity. Almost all activity of H. influenzae, N. meningitidis, and N. gonorrhoeae strains was present in the supernatant. In contrast, large proportions of the activity in Streptococcus, Prevotella, and Capnocytophaga species was cell associated at early stationary phase, suggesting that the enzyme may play the role of a surface antigen. Partial release of cell-associated activity occurred during stationary phase. Within some taxa, the degree of activity variation correlated with degree of antigenic diversity of the enzyme as determined previously. This finding may indicate that the variation observed is of biological significance. PMID:9353019

  15. Trace substances present as chlorination by-products in drinking and process waters

    SciTech Connect

    Jolley, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Chlorination is a process commonly used for disinfection of potable water supplies, for the treatment of a variety of process waters such as wastewater and cooling waters, and for many industrial processes such as paper pulp bleaching. Such use is based on the reactive and oxidative properties of aqueous chlorine species in which the chlorine is present at a valence state of plus one (i.e., C1/sup /plus// in HOCl or Cl/sub 2/). Both HOCl and Cl/sub 2/ are powerful oxidants and appear to be the principal agents responsible for the chlorine substitution reactions. During the last 15 years, increasing attention has been focused on the formation of chloro-organic by-products during the chlorination process, especially in drinking water because of public health concern regarding the toxicological properties of halogenated organics. This paper briefly reviews the chemistry of chlorine germane to the formation of chloro-organics and summarizes some of the more recent developments. 20 refs; 1 fig; 2 tabs.

  16. Trace substances present as chlorination by-products in drinking and process waters

    SciTech Connect

    Jolley, R.L. )

    1988-01-01

    Chlorination is a process commonly used for disinfection of potable water supplies, for the treatment of a variety of process waters such as wastewater and cooling waters, and for many industrial processes such as paper pulp bleaching. Such use is based on the reactive and oxidative properties of aqueous chlorine species in which the chlorine is present at a valence state of plus one (i.e., Cl{sup +} in HOCl or Cl{sub 2}). Both HOCl and Cl{sub 2} are powerful oxidants and appear to be the principal agents responsible for the chlorine substitution reactions. During the last 15 years, increasing attention has been focused on the formation of chloro-organic by-products during the chlorination process, especially in drinking water because of public health concern regarding the toxicological properties of halogenated organics. This paper briefly reviews the chemistry of chlorine germane to the formation of chloro-organics and summarizes some of the more recent developments.

  17. Effects of Al(III) and nano-Al13 species on malate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaodi; Cai, Ling; Peng, Yu; Li, Huihui; Chen, Rong Fu; Shen, Ren Fang

    2011-01-01

    The effects of different aluminum species on malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity were investigated by monitoring amperometric i-t curves for the oxidation of NADH at low overpotential using a functionalized multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) modified glass carbon electrode (GCE). The results showed that Al(III) and Al(13) can activate the enzymatic activity of MDH, and the activation reaches maximum levels as the Al(III) and Al(13) concentration increase. Our study also found that the effects of Al(III) and Al(13) on the activity of MDH depended on the pH value and aluminum speciation. Electrochemical and circular dichroism spectra methods were applied to study the effects of nano-sized aluminum compounds on biomolecules. PMID:22163924

  18. Evidence that reactive oxygen species do not mediate NF-κB activation

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Makio; Miyashita, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Isao; Kitagawa, Masatoshi; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Yasuda, Hideyo; Karin, Michael; Kikugawa, Kiyomi

    2003-01-01

    It has been postulated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) may act as second messengers leading to nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation. This hypothesis is mainly based on the findings that N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), compounds recognized as potential antioxidants, can inhibit NF-κB activation in a wide variety of cell types. Here we reveal that both NAC and PDTC inhibit NF-κB activation independently of antioxidative function. NAC selectively blocks tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced signaling by lowering the affinity of receptor to TNF. PDTC inhibits the IκB–ubiquitin ligase activity in the cell-free system where extracellular stimuli-regulated ROS production does not occur. Furthermore, we present evidence that endogenous ROS produced through Rac/NADPH oxidase do not mediate NF-κB signaling, but instead lower the magnitude of its activation. PMID:12839997

  19. The effect of five Taraxacum species on in vitro and in vivo antioxidant and antiproliferative activity.

    PubMed

    Mingarro, D Muñoz; Plaza, A; Galán, A; Vicente, J A; Martínez, M P; Acero, N

    2015-08-01

    Plants belonging to the genus Taraxacum are considered a nutritious food, being consumed raw or cooked. Additionally, these plants have long been used in folk medicine due to their choleretic, diuretic, antitumor, antioxidant, antiinflammatory, and hepatoprotective properties. This genus, with its complex taxonomy, includes several species that are difficult to distinguish. Its traditional use must be related not only to T. officinale F.H. Wigg., the most studied species, but also to others. The aim of this work is to compare five different common South European species of Taraxacum (T. obovatum (Willd.) DC., T. marginellum H. Lindb., T. hispanicum H. Lindb., T. lambinonii Soest and T. lacistrum Sahlin), in order to find differences between antioxidant and cytotoxic activities among them. Dissimilarities between species in LC/MS patterns, in in vitro and intracellular antioxidant activity and also in the cytotoxicity assay were found. T. marginellum was the most efficient extract reducing intracellular ROS levels although in in vitro assays, T. obovatum was the best free radical scavenger. A relevant cytotoxic effect was found in T. lacistrum extract over HeLa and HepG2 cell lines. PMID:26158347

  20. Valuing the Endangered Species Antirrhinum lopesianum: Neuroprotective Activities and Strategies for in vitro Plant Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Andreia; Fortalezas, Sofia; Pimpão, Rui; Figueira, Inês; Maroco, João; Aguiar, Carlos; Ferreira, Ricardo B.; Miguel, Célia; Santos, Cláudia N.

    2013-01-01

    Plant phytochemicals are described as possessing considerable neuroprotective properties, due to radical scavenging capacity and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity, important bioactivities in neurodegeneration. Antirrhinum lopesianum is a rare endemism from the Iberian Peninsula, occurring at the northeastern border between Portugal and Spain. It is classified as Endangered, due to its highly fragmented geographical occupation, facing a high risk of extinction in the Portuguese territory, within 20 years. Here, we describe for the first time the chemical characterization of extracts of the species concerning total phenol content, flavonoid content and antioxidant properties. The profile of high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detector (HPLC-DAD) of the polyphenol-enriched fraction of plant extracts was also performed, showing the great potential of the species as a source of bioactive phytochemical compounds. A. lopesianum’s potential for neuroprotection was revealed by a significant acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity and also by a neuroprotective effect on a human cell model of neurodegeneration. Moreover, this is the first report describing a successful procedure for the in vitro propagation of this endangered species. The comparison of phenolic content and the HPLC-DAD profile of wild and in vitro propagated plants revealed that in vitro plants maintain the ability to produce secondary metabolites, but the profiles are differentially affected by the growth regulators. The results presented here greatly contribute to the value for this species regarding its potential as a source of phytochemicals with prospective neuroprotective health benefits. PMID:26784465