Science.gov

Sample records for active chlorine species

  1. Bacterial Responses to Reactive Chlorine Species

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Michael J.; Wholey, Wei-Yun; Jakob, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), the active ingredient of household bleach, is the most common disinfectant in medical, industrial, and domestic use and plays an important role in microbial killing in the innate immune system. Given the critical importance of the antimicrobial properties of chlorine to public health, it is surprising how little is known about the ways in which bacteria sense and respond to reactive chlorine species (RCS). Although the literature on bacterial responses to reactive oxygen species (ROS) is enormous, work addressing bacterial responses to RCS has begun only recently. Transcriptomic and proteomic studies now provide new insights into how bacteria mount defenses against this important class of antimicrobial compounds. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge, emphasizing the overlaps between RCS stress responses and other more well-characterized bacterial defense systems, and identify outstanding questions that represent productive avenues for future research. PMID:23768204

  2. Bacterial responses to reactive chlorine species.

    PubMed

    Gray, Michael J; Wholey, Wei-Yun; Jakob, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), the active ingredient of household bleach, is the most common disinfectant in medical, industrial, and domestic use and plays an important role in microbial killing in the innate immune system. Given the critical importance of the antimicrobial properties of chlorine to public health, it is surprising how little is known about the ways in which bacteria sense and respond to reactive chlorine species (RCS). Although the literature on bacterial responses to reactive oxygen species (ROS) is enormous, work addressing bacterial responses to RCS has begun only recently. Transcriptomic and proteomic studies now provide new insights into how bacteria mount defenses against this important class of antimicrobial compounds. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge, emphasizing the overlaps between RCS stress responses and other more well-characterized bacterial defense systems, and identify outstanding questions that represent productive avenues for future research.

  3. Kinetic model for predicting the concentrations of active halogens species in chlorinated saline cooling waters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Haag, W.R.; Lietzke, M.H.

    1981-08-01

    A kinetic model has been developed for describing the speciation of chlorine-produced oxidants in seawater as a function of time. The model is applicable under a broad variety of conditions, including all pH range, salinities, temperatures, ammonia concentrations, organic amine concentrations, and chlorine doses likely to be encountered during power plant cooling water chlorination. However, the effects of sunlight are not considered. The model can also be applied to freshwater and recirculating water systems with cooling towers. The results of the model agree with expectation, however, complete verification is not feasible at the present because analytical methods for some of the predicted species are lacking.

  4. Gamma-irradiation produces active chlorine species (ACS) in physiological solutions: Secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG) scavenges ACS - A novel mechanism of DNA radioprotection

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Om P.; Popov, Anatoliy V.; Pietrofesa, Ralph A.; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo

    2017-01-01

    Background Secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG), the main lignan in whole grain flaxseed, is a potent antioxidant and free radical scavenger with known radioprotective properties. However, the exact mechanism of SDG radioprotection is not well understood. The current study identified a novel mechanism of DNA radioprotection by SDG in physiological solutions by scavenging active chlorine species (ACS) and reducing chlorinated nucleobases. Methods The ACS scavenging activity of SDG was determined using two highly specific fluoroprobes: hypochlorite-specific 3′-(p-aminophenyl) fluorescein (APF) and hydroxyl radical-sensitive 3′-(p-hydroxyphenyl) fluorescein (HPF). Dopamine, an SDG structural analog, was used for proton 1H NMR studies to trap primary ACS radicals. Taurine N-chlorination was determined to demonstrate radiation-induced generation of hypochlorite, a secondary ACS. DNA protection was assessed by determining the extent of DNA fragmentation and plasmid DNA relaxation following exposure to ClO− and radiation. Purine base chlorination by ClO− and γ-radiation was determined by using 2-aminopurine (2-AP), a fluorescent analog of 6-aminopurine. Results: Chloride anions (Cl−) consumed >90% of hydroxyl radicals in physiological solutions produced by γ-radiation resulting in ACS formation, which was detected by 1H NMR. Importantly, SDG scavenged hypochlorite- and γ-radiation-induced ACS. In addition, SDG blunted ACS-induced fragmentation of calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA relaxation. SDG treatment before or after ACS exposure decreased the ClO− or γ-radiation-induced chlorination of 2-AP. Exposure to γ-radiation resulted in increased taurine chlorination, indicative of ClO− generation. NMR studies revealed formation of primary ACS radicals (chlorine atoms (Cl•) and dichloro radical anions (Cl2−•)), which were trapped by SDG and its structural analog dopamine. Conclusion We demonstrate that γ-radiation induces the generation of ACS in

  5. Impact of January 2005 Solar Proton Events on Chlorine Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damiani, A.; Funke, B.; Marsh, D. R.; Lopez-Puertas, M.; Santee, M. L.; Froidevaux, L.; Wang, S.; Jackman, C. H.; von Clarmann, T.; Gardini, A.; Cordero, R. R.; Storini, M.

    2011-01-01

    Sudden changes in stratospheric chlorine species in the polar northern atmosphere, caused by the Solar Proton Events (SPEs) of 17 and 20 January 2005, have been investigated and compared with version 4 of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM4). We used Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) measurements to monitor the variability of ClO, HCl, HOCl and Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounder (MIPAS) on ENVISAT to retrieve ClONO2. SPE-induced chlorine activation has been identified. HCl decrease occurred at nearly all the investigated altitudes with the lowest values (of less than 0.25 ppbv) on 21 January. HOCl was found to be the main active chlorine species under nighttime conditions (with increases of more than 0.2 ppbv) whereas both HOCL and CLO enhancements (about 0.1 ppbv) have been observed at the polar night terminator. Further, small ClO decreases (of less than 0.1 ppbv) and ClONO2 enhancements (0.2 ppbv) have been observed at higher latitudes (i.e., at nighttime) roughly above 2hPa. While WACCM4 reproduces most of the SPE-induced variability in the chlorine species fairly well, in some particular regions discrepancies between the modeled and measured temporal evolution of the abundances of chlorine species were found. HOCl changes are modelled very well with respect to both magnitude and geographic distribution. ClO decreases are reproduced at high latitudes, whereas ClO enhancements in the terminator region are underestimated and attributed to background variations. WACCM4 also reproduces the HCl depletion in the mesosphere but it does not show the observed decrease below about 2 hPa. Finally, WACCM4 simulations indicate that the observed ClONO2 increase is dominated by background variability, although SPE-induced production might contribute by 0.1 ppbv.

  6. Impact of January 2005 Solar Proton Events on Chlorine Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damiani, A.; Funke, B.; Marsh, D. R.; Lopez-Puertas, M.; Santee, M. L.; Froidevaux, L.; Wang, S.; Jackman, C. H.; vonClarmann, T.; Gardini, A.; Cordero, R. R.; Storini, M.

    2012-01-01

    Sudden changes in stratospheric chlorine species in the polar northern atmosphere, caused by the Solar Proton Events (SPEs) of 17 and 20 January 2005, have been investigated and compared with version 4 of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM4). We used Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) measurements to monitor the variability of ClO, HCl, HOCl and Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounder (MIPAS) on ENVISAT to retrieve ClONO2. SPE-induced chlorine activation has been identified. HCl decrease occurred at nearly all the investigated altitudes (i.e., 10-0.5 hPa) with the strongest decrease (of about 0.25 ppbv) on 21 January. HOCl was found to be the main active chlorine species under nighttime conditions (with increases of more than 0.2 ppbv) whereas both HOCl and ClO enhancements (about 0.1 ppbv) have been observed at the polar night terminator. Further, small ClO decreases (of less than 0.1 ppbv) and ClONO2 enhancements (about 0.2 ppbv) have been observed at higher latitudes (i.e., at nighttime) roughly above 2 hPa. While WACCM4 reproduces most of the SPE-induced variability in the chlorine species fairly well, in some particular regions discrepancies between the modeled and measured temporal evolution of the abundances of chlorine species were found. HOCl changes are modelled very well with respect to both magnitude and geographic distribution. ClO decreases are reproduced at high latitudes, whereas ClO enhancements in the terminator region are underestimated and attributed to background variations. WACCM4 also reproduces the HCl depletion in the mesosphere but it does not show the observed decrease below about 2 hPa. Finally, WACCM4 simulations indicate that the observed ClONO2 increase is dominated by background variability, although SPE-induced production might contribute by 0.1 ppbv.

  7. Antarctic stratospheric chemistry of chlorine nitrate, hydrogen chloride, and ice - Release of active chlorine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, Mario J.; Tso, Tai-Ly; Molina, Luisa T.; Wang, Frank C.-Y.

    1987-01-01

    The reaction rate between atmospheric hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine nitrate (ClONO2) is greatly enhanced in the presence of ice particles; HCl dissolves readily into ice, and the collisional reaction probability for ClONO2 on the surface of ice with HCl in the mole fraction range from about 0.003 to 0.010 is in the range from about 0.05 to 0.1 for temperatures near 200 K. Chlorine is released into the gas phase on a time scale of at most a few milliseconds, whereas nitric acid (HNO3), the other product, remains in the condensed phase. This reaction could play an important role in explaining the observed depletion of ozone over Antarctica; it releases photolytically active chlorine from its most abundant reservoir species, and it promotes the formation of HNO3 and thus removes nitrogen dioxide from the gas phase. Hence it establishes the necessary conditions for the efficient catalytic destruction of ozone by halogenated free radicals.

  8. Roles of reactive chlorine species in trimethoprim degradation in the UV/chlorine process: Kinetics and transformation pathways.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zihao; Fang, Jingyun; Xiang, Yingying; Shang, Chii; Li, Xuchun; Meng, Fangang; Yang, Xin

    2016-11-01

    The UV/chlorine process, which forms several reactive species including hydroxyl radicals (HO) and reactive chlorine species (RCS) to degrade contaminants, is being considered to be an advanced oxidation process. This study investigated the kinetics and mechanism of the degradation of trimethoprim (TMP) by the UV/chlorine process. The degradation of TMP was much faster by UV/chlorine compared to UV/H2O2. The degradation followed pseudo first-order kinetics, and the rate constant (k') increased linearly as the chlorine dosage increased from 20 μM to 200 μM and decreased as pH rose from 6.1 to 8.8. k' was not affected by chloride and bicarbonate but decreased by 50% in the presence of 1-mg/L NOM. The contribution of RCS, including Cl, Cl2(-) and ClO, to the degradation removal rate was much higher than that of HO and increased from 67% to 87% with increasing pH from 6.1 to 8.8 under the experimental condition. The increasing contribution of RCS to the degradation with increasing pH was attributable to the increase in the ClO concentration. Kinetic modeling and radical scavenging tests verified that ClO mainly attacked the trimethoxybenzyl moiety of TMP. RCS reacted with TMP much faster than HOCl/OCl(-) to form chlorinated products (i.e., m/z 325) and chlorinated disinfection byproducts such as chloroform, chloral hydrate, dichloroacetonitrile and trichloronitromethane. The hydroxylation and demethylation of m/z 325 driven by HO generated m/z 327 and m/z 341. Meanwhile, reactions of m/z 325 with HO and RCS/HOCl/OCl(-) generated dichlorinated and hydroxylated products (i.e., m/z 377). All the chlorinated products could be further depleted to produce products with less degree of halogenation in the UV/chlorine process, compared to dark chlorination. The acute toxicity to Vibrio fischeri by UV/chlorine was lower than chlorination at the same removal rate of TMP. This study demonstrated the importance of RCS, in particular, ClO, in the degradation of micropollutants

  9. Synergistic effect between UV and chlorine (UV/chlorine) on the degradation of carbamazepine: Influence factors and radical species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Long; Wu, Qian-Yuan; Huang, Nan; Wang, Ting; Hu, Hong-Ying

    2016-07-01

    For successful wastewater reclamation, advanced oxidation processes have attracted attention for elimination of emerging contaminants. In this study, the synergistic treatment with UV irradiation and chlorine (UV/chlorine) was used to degrade carbamazepine (CBZ). Neither UV irradiation alone nor chlorination alone could efficiently degraded CBZ. UV/chlorine oxidation showed a significant synergistic effect on CBZ degradation through generation of radical species (OH and Cl), and this process could be well depicted by pseudo first order kinetic. The degradation rate constants (kobs,CBZ) of CBZ increased linearly with increasing UV irradiance and chlorine dosage. The degradation of CBZ by UV/chlorine in acidic solutions was more efficient than that in basic solutions mainly due to the effect of pH on the dissociation of HOCl and OCl(-) and then on the quantum yields and radical species quenching of UV/chlorine. When pH was increased from 5.5 to 9.5, the rate constants of degradation of CBZ by OH decreased from 0.65 to 0.14 min(-1) and that by Cl decreased from 0.40 to 0.11 min(-1). The rate constant for the reaction between Cl and CBZ was 5.6 ± 1.6 × 10(10) M(-1) s(-1). Anions of HCO3(-) (1-50 mM) showed moderate inhibition of CBZ degradation by UV/chlorine, while Cl(-) did not. UV/chlorine could efficiently degrade CBZ in wastewater treatment plant effluent, although the degradation was inhibited by about 30% compared with that in ultrapure water with chlorine dosage of 0.14-0.56 mM. Nine main oxidation products of the CBZ degradation by UV/chlorine were identified using the HPLC-QToF MS/MS. Initial oxidation products arose from hydroxylation, carboxylation and hydrogen atom abstraction of CBZ by OH and Cl, and were then further oxidized to generate acylamino cleavage and decarboxylation products of acridine and acridione.

  10. Chlorine

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Chlorine ; CASRN 7782 - 50 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects

  11. Chlorine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical laboratory information profile (CLIP) of the chemical chlorine, produced in small quantities in the laboratory, is presented. The profile summarizes physical and harmful properties, exposure limits, reactivity risks, and symptoms of major exposure for the benefit of teachers and students using the chemical in the laboratory.

  12. Chlorine

    SciTech Connect

    Talmage, Sylvia Smith

    2009-01-01

    Following a brief description of the use of chlorine as a chemical warfare agent in World War I, this chapter summarizes physical and chemical data and recent clinical and controlled laboratory studies on the irritant and lethal effects of chlorine. The mechanism of toxicity for both irritation and lethal effects is described. The mathematical relationship between concentration and exposure duration for a set endpoint is given for both an irritancy response and mortality. This information can be used to assist in time-scaling for the set endpoint to other exposure durations. Risk assessment addresses the potential for greater effects in sensitive populations such as asthmatics. A concentration of 0.5 ppm for up to 8 hours is a no-adverse-effect concentration in most sensitive subjects; whereas, a concentration of 1.0 ppm induces some sensory irritation and transient changes in respiratory tract airflow parameters. Treatment and intervention of exposed individuals is dependent upon symptoms

  13. Multi-species biofilms defined from drinking water microorganisms provide increased protection against chlorine disinfection.

    PubMed

    Schwering, Monika; Song, Joanna; Louie, Marie; Turner, Raymond J; Ceri, Howard

    2013-09-01

    A model biofilm, formed of multiple species from environmental drinking water, including opportunistic pathogens, was created to explore the tolerance of multi-species biofilms to chlorine levels typical of water-distribution systems. All species, when grown planktonically, were killed by concentrations of chlorine within the World Health Organization guidelines (0.2-5.0 mg l(-1)). Higher concentrations (1.6-40-fold) of chlorine were required to eradicate biofilm populations of these strains, ~70% of biofilms tested were not eradicated by 5.0 mg l(-1) chlorine. Pathogenic bacteria within the model multi-species biofilms had an even more substantial increase in chlorine tolerance; on average ~700-1100 mg l(-1) chlorine was required to eliminate pathogens from the biofilm, 50-300-fold higher than for biofilms comprising single species. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of biofilms showed distinct 3D structures and multiple cell morphologies and arrangements. Overall, this study showed a substantial increase in the chlorine tolerance of individual species with co-colonization in a multi-species biofilm that was far beyond that expected as a result of biofilm growth on its own.

  14. Chlorine

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC.gov . Specific Hazards Bioterrorism A-Z Anthrax (Bacillus anthracis) Arenaviruses Treatment & Infection Control Specimen Submission & Lab Testing Education & Training Related Bioterrorism Resources Bacillus anthracis (Anthrax) Botulism (Clostridium botulinum toxin) Brucella species ( ...

  15. THE ROLE OF CHLORINE IN DIOXIN FORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is poor correlation between total chlorine in waste streams and formation of polychlorinated dibenzodioxin and polychlorinated dibenzofuran (PCDD/F) during waste combustion. This is because the active chlorine (Cl) species are strongly dependent upon combustion conditions. ...

  16. Chlorine Isotopes: As a Possible Tracer of Fluid/Bio-Activities on Mars and a Progress Report on Chlorine Isotope Analysis by TIMs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, N.; Nyquist, L.E.; Reese, Y.; Shih, C-Y.; Numata, M.; Fujitani, T.; Okano, O.

    2009-01-01

    Significantly large mass fractionations between chlorine isotopes (Cl-35, Cl-37) have been reported for terrestrial materials including both geological samples and laboratory materials. Also, the chlorine isotopic composition can be used as a tracer for early solar system processes. Moreover, chlorine is ubiquitous on the Martian surface. Typical chlorine abundances in Gusev soils are approx.0.5 %. The global surface average chlorine abundance also is approx.0.5 %. Striking variations among outcrop rocks at Meridiani were reported with some chlorine abundances as high as approx.2%. Characterizing conditions under which chlorine isotopic fractionation may occur is clearly of interest to planetary science. Thus, we have initiated development of a chlorine isotopic analysis technique using TIMS at NASA-JSC. We present here a progress report on the current status of development at JSC and discuss the possible application of chlorine isotopic analysis to Martian meteorites in a search for fluid- and possibly biological activity on Mars.

  17. Activation of stratospheric chlorine by reactions in liquid sulphuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, R.A.; MacKenzie, A.R. ); Mueller, R.H.; Peter, Th.; Crutzen, P.J. )

    1994-06-22

    The authors discuss activation mechanisms for chlorine compounds in the stratosphere, based on laboratory measurements for the solubility and reaction rates of HOCl and HCl in H[sub 2]SO[sub 4] solutions, as found on aerosols in the stratosphere. Their interest is in the impact of the large increase in aerosol loading in the stratosphere in the winter on 1991-92 due to the Mt. Pinatubo eruption. While laboratory data is not available for the temperature range close to 190 K, they argue that should the solubility and hydrolysis rates be high enough, this excess aerosol density could have contributed a significant additional amount of reactive chlorine to the stratosphere.

  18. Chlorine dioxide disinfection of single and dual species biofilms, detached biofilm and planktonic cells.

    PubMed

    Behnke, Sabrina; Camper, Anne K

    2012-01-01

    Disinfection efficacy testing is usually done with planktonic cells or more recently, biofilms. While disinfectants are much less effective against biofilms compared to planktonic cells, questions regarding the disinfection tolerance of detached biofilm clusters remain largely unanswered. Burkholderia cepacia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were grown in chemostats and biofilm tubing reactors, with the tubing reactor serving as a source of detached biofilm clusters. Chlorine dioxide susceptibility was assessed for B. cepacia and P. aeruginosa in these three sample types as monocultures and binary cultures. Similar doses of chlorine dioxide inactivated samples of chemostat and tubing reactor effluent and no statistically significant difference between the log(10) reductions was found. This contrasts with chlorine, shown previously to be generally less effective against detached biofilm particles. Biofilms were more tolerant and required chlorine dioxide doses ten times higher than chemostat and tubing reactor effluent samples. A second species was advantageous in all sample types and resulted in lower log(10) reductions when compared to the single species cultures, suggesting a beneficial interaction of the species.

  19. Effect of chlorine pollution on three fruit tree species at Ranoli near Baroda, India.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, R; Bedi, S J

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the effect of chlorine pollution from an alkalies and chemical plant at Ranoli, near Baroda, on three tropical fruit tree species-Mangifera indica L. (mango) Manilkara hexandra Dubard. (rayan) and Syzygium cumini Skeels (Jamun). As compared to controls growing in a less polluted area, trees growing close to the plant showed reduced mean leaf area, a higher percentage of leaf area damaged, a reduction in fruit yield, chlorophyll pigments, protein and carbohydrate content, and higher accumulation of chloride in the foliar tissues. The accumulation of pollutaant, chloride, in the foliar tissues was very high in mango and jamun. Based on the degree of damage to the plants, the species studied were arranged in decreasing order of their sensitivity to chlorine pollution-mango, jamun and rayan.

  20. Mutagenic activity associated with by-products of drinking water disinfection by chlorine, chlorine dioxide, ozone and UV-irradiation.

    PubMed Central

    Zoeteman, B C; Hrubec, J; de Greef, E; Kool, H J

    1982-01-01

    A retrospective epidemiological study in The Netherlands showed a statistical association between chlorination by-products in drinking water and cancer of the esophagus and stomach for males. A pilot-plant study with alternative disinfectants was carried out with stored water of the Rivers Rhine and Meuse. It was demonstrated that the increase of direct acting mutagens after treatment with chlorine dioxide is similar to the effect of chlorination. Ozonation of Rhine water reduced the mutagenic activity for Salmonella typhimurium TA 98 both with and without metabolic activation. UV alone hardly affects the mutagenicity of the stored river water for S. typh. TA 98. In all studies, practically no mutagenic activity for S. typh. TA 100 was found. Although remarkable changes in the concentration of individual organic compounds are reported, the identity of the mutagens detected is yet unclear. Compounds of possible interest due to their removal by ozonation are 1,3,3-trimethyloxindole, dicyclopentadiene and several alkylquinolines. Compounds which might be responsible for the increased mutagenicity after chlorination are two brominated acetonitriles and tri(2-chlorethyl) phosphate. Furthermore, the concentration procedure with adsorption on XAD resin and the subsequent elution step may have affected the results. It is proposed to focus further research more on the less volatile by-products of disinfection than on the trihalomethanes. PMID:7151762

  1. Diamagnetic Raman Optical Activity of Chlorine, Bromine, and Iodine Gases.

    PubMed

    Šebestík, Jaroslav; Kapitán, Josef; Pačes, Ondřej; Bouř, Petr

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic Raman optical activity of gases provides unique information about their electric and magnetic properties. Magnetic Raman optical activity has recently been observed in a paramagnetic gas (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2012, 51, 11058; Angew. Chem. 2012, 124, 11220). In diamagnetic molecules, it has been considered too weak to be measurable. However, in chlorine, bromine and iodine vapors, we could detect a significant signal as well. Zeeman splitting of electronic ground-state energy levels cannot rationalize the observed circular intensity difference (CID) values of about 10(-4). These are explicable by participation of paramagnetic excited electronic states. Then a simple model including one electronic excited state provides reasonable spectral intensities. The results suggest that this kind of scattering by diamagnetic molecules is a general event observable under resonance conditions. The phenomenon sheds new light on the role of excited states in the Raman scattering, and may be used to probe molecular geometry and electronic structure.

  2. Experimental evidence of large changes in terrestrial chlorine cycling following altered tree species composition.

    PubMed

    Montelius, Malin; Thiry, Yves; Marang, Laura; Ranger, Jacques; Cornelis, Jean-Thomas; Svensson, Teresia; Bastviken, David

    2015-04-21

    Organochlorine molecules (Clorg) are surprisingly abundant in soils and frequently exceed chloride (Cl(-)) levels. Despite the widespread abundance of Clorg and the common ability of microorganisms to produce Clorg, we lack fundamental knowledge about how overall chlorine cycling is regulated in forested ecosystems. Here we present data from a long-term reforestation experiment where native forest was cleared and replaced with five different tree species. Our results show that the abundance and residence times of Cl(-) and Clorg after 30 years were highly dependent on which tree species were planted on the nearby plots. Average Cl(-) and Clorg content in soil humus were higher, at experimental plots with coniferous trees than in those with deciduous trees. Plots with Norway spruce had the highest net accumulation of Cl(-) and Clorg over the experiment period, and showed a 10 and 4 times higher Cl(-) and Clorg storage (kg ha(-1)) in the biomass, respectively, and 7 and 9 times higher storage of Cl(-) and Clorg in the soil humus layer, compared to plots with oak. The results can explain why local soil chlorine levels are frequently independent of atmospheric deposition, and provide opportunities for improved modeling of chlorine distribution and cycling in terrestrial ecosystems.

  3. The effects of active chlorine on photooxidation of 2-methyl-2-butene.

    PubMed

    Im, Yunseok; Jang, Myoseon; Delcomyn, Carrie A; Henley, Michael V; Hearn, John D

    2011-06-01

    Active chlorine comprising hypochlorite (OCl⁻), hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and chlorine (Cl₂) is the active constituent in bleach formulations for a variety of industrial and consumer applications. However, the strong oxidative reactivity of active chlorine can cause adverse effects on both human health and the environment. In this study, aerosolized Oxone® [2KHSO₅, KHSO₄, K₂SO₄] with saline solution has been utilized to produce active chlorine (HOCl and Cl₂). To investigate the impact of active chlorine on volatile organic compound (VOC) oxidation, 2-methyl-2-butene (MB) was photoirradiated in the presence of active chlorine using a 2-m³ Teflon film indoor chamber. The resulting carbonyl products produced from photooxidation of MB were derivatized with O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl) hydroxyamine hydrochloride (PFBHA) and analyzed using gas chromatograph-ion trap mass spectrometer (GC/ITMS). The photooxidation of MB in the presence of active chlorine was simulated with an explicit kinetic model using a chemical solver (Morpho) which included both Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM) and Cl radical reactions. The reaction rate constants of a Cl radical with MB and its oxidized products were estimated using a Structure-Reactivity Relationship method. Under dark conditions no effect of active chlorine on MB oxidation was apparent, whereas under simulated daylight conditions (UV irradiation) rapid MB oxidation was observed due to photo-dissociation of active chlorine. The model simulation agrees with chamber data showing rapid production of oxygenated products that are characterized using GC/ITMS. Ozone formation was enhanced when MB was oxidized in the presence of irradiated active chlorine and NO(x).

  4. Bulk chlorine uptake by polyamide active layers of thin-film composite membranes upon exposure to free chlorine-kinetics, mechanisms, and modeling.

    PubMed

    Powell, Joshua; Luh, Jeanne; Coronell, Orlando

    2014-01-01

    We studied the volume-averaged chlorine (Cl) uptake into the bulk region of the aromatic polyamide active layer of a reverse osmosis membrane upon exposure to free chlorine. Volume-averaged measurements were obtained using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry with samples prepared at a range of free chlorine concentrations, exposure times, and mixing, rinsing, and pH conditions. Our volume-averaged measurements complement previous studies that have quantified Cl uptake at the active layer surface (top ≈ 7 nm) and advance the mechanistic understanding of Cl uptake by aromatic polyamide active layers. Our results show that surface Cl uptake is representative of and underestimates volume-averaged Cl uptake under acidic conditions and alkaline conditions, respectively. Our results also support that (i) under acidic conditions, N-chlorination followed by Orton rearrangement is the dominant Cl uptake mechanism with N-chlorination as the rate-limiting step; (ii) under alkaline conditions, N-chlorination and dechlorination of N-chlorinated amide links by hydroxyl ion are the two dominant processes; and (iii) under neutral pH conditions, the rates of N-chlorination and Orton rearrangement are comparable. We propose a kinetic model that satisfactorily describes Cl uptake under acidic and alkaline conditions, with the largest discrepancies between model and experiment occurring under alkaline conditions at relatively high chlorine exposures.

  5. ASCORBIC ACID REDUCTION ON RESIDUAL ACTIVE CHLORINE IN POTABLE WATER PRIOR TO HALOCARBOXYLATE DETERMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In studies on the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs), it is necessary to scavenge residual active (odxidizing) chlorine in order to fix the chlorination byproducts (such as haloethanoates) at a point in time . Such research projects often have distinct needs from requi...

  6. ASCORBIC ACID REDUCTION OF RESIDUAL ACTIVE CHLORINE IN POTABLE WATER PRIOR TO HALOCARBOXYLATE DETERMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In studies on the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs), it is necessary to scavenge residual active (oxidizing) chlorine in order to fix the chlorination byproducts (such as haloethanoates) at a point in time. Thus, methods designed for compliance monitoring are not alway...

  7. Free chlorine and monochloramine application to nitrifying biofilm: comparison of biofilm penetration, activity, and viability.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woo Hyoung; Wahman, David G; Bishop, Paul L; Pressman, Jonathan G

    2011-02-15

    Biofilm in drinking water systems is undesirable. Free chlorine and monochloramine are commonly used as secondary drinking water disinfectants, but monochloramine is perceived to penetrate biofilm better than free chlorine. However, this hypothesis remains unconfirmed by direct biofilm monochloramine measurement. This study compared free chlorine and monochloramine biofilm penetration into an undefined mixed-culture nitrifying biofilm by use of microelectrodes and assessed the subsequent effect on biofilm activity and viability by use of dissolved oxygen (DO) microelectrodes and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) with LIVE/DEAD BacLight. For equivalent chlorine concentrations, monochloramine initially penetrated biofilm 170 times faster than free chlorine, and even after subsequent application to a monochloramine penetrated biofilm, free chlorine penetration was limited. DO profiles paralleled monochloramine profiles, providing evidence that either the biofilm was inactivated with monochloramine's penetration or its persistence reduced available substrate (free ammonia). While this research clearly demonstrated monochloramine's greater penetration, this penetration did not necessarily translate to immediate viability loss. Even though free chlorine's penetration was limited compared to that of monochloramine, it more effectively (on a cell membrane integrity basis) inactivated microorganisms near the biofilm surface. Limited free chlorine penetration has implications when converting to free chlorine in full-scale chloraminated systems in response to nitrification episodes.

  8. Application of activated carbons from coal and coconut shell for removing free residual chlorine.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Fumihiko; Tominaga, Hisato; Ueda, Ayaka; Tanaka, Yuko; Iwata, Yuka; Kawasaki, Naohito

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the removal of free residual chlorine by activated carbon (AC). ACs were prepared from coal (AC1) and coconut shell (AC2). The specific surface area of AC1 was larger than that of AC2. The removal of free residual chlorine increased with elapsed time and amount of adsorbent. The removal mechanism of free residual chlorine was the dechlorination reaction between hypochlorous acid or hypochlorite ion and AC. Moreover, AC1 was useful in the removal of free residual chlorine in tap water. The optimum condition for the removal of free residual chlorine using a column is space velocity 306 1/h; liner velocity 6.1 m/h.

  9. Trajectory Hunting: Analysis of UARS Measurements showing Rapid Chlorine Activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, M.Y.; Santee, M. L.; Rodriquez, J. M.; Ko, M. K. W.; Mergenthaler, J. M.; Kumer, J. B.; Tabazadeh, A.

    1998-01-01

    Trajectory hunting (i.e., a technique to find air parcels sampled at least twice over the course of a few days) is applied to analyze Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) measurements in conjunction with the AER photochemical box model. In this study, we investigate rapid chlorine activation in the Arctic lower stratosphere on 29 Dec 1992 associated with a polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) event. Six air parcels that have been sampled twice were followed along 5-day trajectories at the 465 K (approximately 46 mb) and 585 K (approximately 22 mb) levels. A detailed sensitivity study with the AER. photochemical box model along these trajectories leads to the following conclusions for the episode considered: (1) model results are in better agreement with UARS measurements at these levels if the UKMO temperature is decreased by at least 1-2 K; (2) the NAT (nitric acid trihydrate) PSC formation scheme produces results in better agreement with observations than the STS (supercooled ternary solution) scheme; (3) the model can explain the UARS measurements at 585 K, but under-estimates the ClO abundance at 465 K, suggesting some inconsistency between the UARS measurements at this level.

  10. Trajectory Hunting: Analysis of UARS Measurements Showing Rapid Chlorine Activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, M. Y.; Santee, M. L.; Rodriquez, J. M.; Ko, M. K. W.; Mergenthaler, J. M.; Kumer, J. B.; Tabazadeh, A.

    1998-01-01

    Trajectory hunting (i.e., a technique to find air parcels sampled at least twice over the course of a few days) is applied to analyze Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) measurements in conjunction with the AER photochemical box model. In this study, we investigate rapid chlorine activation in the Arctic lower stratosphere on 29 Dec. 1992 associated with a polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) event. Six air parcels that have been sampled twice were followed along 5-day trajectories at the 465 K (approx. 46 mb) and 585 K (approxi. 22 mb) levels. A detailed sensitivity study with the AER photochemical box model along these trajectories leads to the following conclusions for the episode considered: 1) model results are in better agreement with UARS measurements at these levels if the U.K. Meteorological Office (UKMO) temperature is decreased by at least 1-2 K; 2) the NAT (nitric acid trihydrate) PSC formation scheme produces results in better agreement with observations than the STS (supercooled ternary solution) scheme; 3) the model can explain the UARS measurements at 585 K, but under-estimates the ClO abundance at 465 K, suggesting some inconsistency between the UARS measurements at this level.

  11. Low-Chlorinated Non-Dioxin-like Polychlorinated Biphenyls Present in Blood and Breast Milk Induce Higher Levels of Reactive Oxygen Species in Neutrophil Granulocytes than High-Chlorinated Congeners.

    PubMed

    Berntsen, Hanne Friis; Fonnum, Frode; Walaas, Sven Ivar; Bogen, Inger Lise

    2016-12-01

    Despite their ban several decades ago, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) still pose a health threat to human beings due to their persistent and accumulative nature and continued presence in the environment. Non-dioxin-like (NDL)-PCBs have earlier been found to have effects on the immune system, including human neutrophil granulocytes. The aim of this study was to investigate the differences between ortho-chlorinated NDL-PCBs with a low or high degree of chlorination in their capability to induce the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human neutrophil granulocytes in vitro. We used some of the congeners occurring at the highest levels in blood, breast milk and food: PCB 52 representing the low-chlorinated congeners and PCB 180 the high-chlorinated congeners. In addition, the extensively studied PCB 153 was included as a reference compound. ROS production was assessed with the luminol-amplified chemiluminescence and DCF fluorescence assays. The involvement of intracellular signalling mechanisms was investigated using different pharmacological substances. At high concentrations (10-20 μM), PCB 52 induced more ROS than PCB 153 and PCB 180. The role of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and/or ERK 5 signalling in PCB-induced ROS production was implicated through the reduction in ROS in the presence of the specific inhibitor U0126, whereas reduced ROS production after the use of SB203580 and SP600125 indicated the involvement of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) pathways, respectively. In addition, the calcineurin inhibitor FK-506, the intracellular calcium chelator BAPTA-AM and the antioxidant vitamin E reduced the levels of ROS. The intracellular signalling mechanisms involved in ROS production in human neutrophil granulocytes appeared to be similar for PCB 52, PCB 153 and PCB 180. Based on the results from the present and previous studies, we conclude that for abundant ortho-chlorinated PCBs

  12. [Combined use of active chlorine and coagulants for drinking water purification and disinfection].

    PubMed

    Rakhmanin, Iu A; Zholdakova, Z I; Poliakova, E E; Kir'ianova, L F; Miasnikov, I N; Tul'skaia, E A; Artemova, T Z; Ivanova, L V; Dmitrieva, R A; Doskina, T V

    2004-01-01

    The authors made an experimental study of the efficiency of water purification procedures based on the combined use of active chlorine and coagulants and hygienically evaluated the procedures. The study included the evaluation of water disinfection with various coagulants and active chlorine; the investigation of the processes of production of deleterious organic chlorine compounds; the assessment of the quality of water after its treatment. The coagulants representing aluminum polyoxychloride: RAX-10 (AQUA-AURATE 10) and RAX-18 (AQUA-AURATE 18), and aluminum sulfate, technically pure grade were tested. The treatment of river water with the coagulants RAX-10 and RAX-18, followed by precipitation, filtration, and chlorination under laboratory conditions, was shown to result in water disinfection to the levels complying with the requirements described in SanPiN 2.1.4.1074-01. RAX-18 showed the best disinfecting activity against total and heat-tolerant coliform bacteria, but also to the highly chlorine-resistant microrganisms--the spores of sulfite-reducing Clostridia, phages, and viruses. Since the coagulants have an increased sorptive capacity relative to humus and other organic substances, substitution of primary chlorination for coagulant treatment may induce a reduction in the risk of formation of oncogenically and mutagenically hazardous chlorinated hydrocarbons.

  13. Using the nuclear activation AMS method for determining chlorine in solids at ppb-levels and below

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Stephan R.; Eigl, Rosmarie; Forstner, Oliver; Martschini, Martin; Steier, Peter; Sterba, Johannes H.; Golser, Robin

    2015-10-01

    Neutron activation analysis using decay counting of the activated element is a well-established method in elemental analysis. However, for chlorine there is a better alternative to measuring decay of the short-lived activation product chlorine-38 (t1/2 = 37.24 min) - accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) of 36Cl: the relatively high neutron capture cross section of chlorine-35 for thermal neutrons (43.7 b) and combined the AMS technique for chlorine-36 (t1/2 = 301 ka) allow for determination of chlorine down to ppb-levels using practical sample sizes and common exposure durations. The combination of neutron activation and AMS can be employed for a few other elements (nitrogen, thorium, and uranium) as well. For bulk solid samples an advantage of the method is that lab contamination can be rendered irrelevant. The chlorine-35 in the sample is activated to chlorine-36, and surface chlorine can be removed after the irradiation. Subsequent laboratory contamination, however, will not carry a prominent chlorine-36 signature. After sample dissolution and addition of sufficient amounts of stable chlorine carrier the produced chlorine-36 and thus the original chlorine-35 of the sample can be determined using AMS. We have developed and applied the method for analysis of chlorine in steel samples. The chlorine content of steel is of interest to nuclear industry, precisely because of above mentioned high neutron capture cross section for chlorine-35, which leads to accumulation of chlorine-36 as long-term nuclear waste. The samples were irradiated at the TRIGA Mark II reactor of the Atominstitut in Vienna and the 36Cl-AMS setup at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA) was used for 36Cl/Cl analysis.

  14. Alkyl Nitrates and Oxidized Volatile Organic Compounds during NACHTT: Influence on Reactive Chlorine Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swarthout, R.; Sive, B. C.; Russo, R. S.; Zhou, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies have suggested that reactive chlorine species can contribute substantially to the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere and also influence tropospheric ozone chemistry in areas far from dominant marine sources. The photochemical processing of polluted air masses containing can potentially affect the formation of chlorine radical (Cl) through various processes involving hydrocarbons and NOx (NO + NO2). Organic peroxy radicals can react with nitric oxide (NO) to form alkyl nitrates or to produce nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs), including alcohols, aldehydes and ketones. Aldehydes can further react with NO2 to form peroxyacyl nitrates (PAN). Alkyl nitrates and PAN can serve as reservoirs for long range transport of NOx and can influence Cl production in remote areas. In order to further elucidate the influence of OVOCs and alkyl nitrates on chlorine activation processes, whole air samples were collected hourly during the Nitrogen, Aerosol Composition and Halogens on a Tall Tower (NACHTT) campaign at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory in Erie, Colorado from February 18 through March 11, 2011. Profile samples up to 250 m were also collected throughout the campaign. Samples were analyzed for a comprehensive suite of volatile organic compounds, including OVOCs and C1 to C5 alkyl nitrates, using a five channel gas chromatographic analytical system. Alkyl nitrates and OVOCs were abundant throughout the campaign. Total alkyl nitrate mixing ratios ranged from 13 to 227 pptv with 2-butyl nitrate and 2-propyl nitrate accounting for over half of this total. Ethanol was the most abundant OVOC followed by methanol with median mixing ratios of 8.5 ppbv and 5.6 ppbv, respectively. This presentation will focus on the influence the observed alkyl nitrate and OVOC mixing ratios and air mass photochemical processing on Cl cycling.

  15. First-principles thermochemistry for gas phase species in an industrial rutile chlorinator.

    PubMed

    Shirley, Raphael; Phadungsukanan, Weerapong; Kraft, Markus; Downing, Jim; Day, Nick E; Murray-Rust, Peter

    2010-11-04

    This work presents thermochemical data for possible gas phase intermediate species in an industrial rutile chlorinator. An algorithm developed for previous work is employed to ensure that all possible species are considered, reducing the number of important species neglected. Thermochemical data and enthalpies of formation are calculated for 22 new species using density functional theory, post Hartree-Fock coupled cluster calculations, and statistical mechanics. Equilibrium calculations are performed to identify whether any Ti/C intermediates are likely to be important to the high temperature industrial process. These new species are not present at high concentration in the exit stream. It is therefore likely that the two chemical processes do not interact. Rather, the Cl₂ rapidly reacts with the solid TiO₂ to form TiCl₄ and O₂. The latter then reacts with the solid C to form CO and CO₂ and provide the heat. Data for all the new species is provided as Supporting Information. Finally, a new methodology for data collaboration is investigated in which the data is made openly accessible using the resource description framework. Example scripts are provided to demonstrate how to query and retrieve the data automatically.

  16. Photodynamic activity of the boronated chlorin e6 amide in artificial and cellular membranes.

    PubMed

    Antonenko, Yuri N; Kotova, Elena A; Omarova, Elena O; Rokitskaya, Tatyana I; Ol'shevskaya, Valentina A; Kalinin, Valery N; Nikitina, Roza G; Osipchuk, Julia S; Kaplan, Mikhail A; Ramonova, Alla A; Moisenovich, Mikhail M; Agapov, Igor I; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P

    2014-03-01

    Photodynamic tumor-destroying activity of the boronated chlorin e6 derivative BACE (chlorin e6 13(1)-N-{2-[N-(1-carba-closo-dodecaboran-1-yl)methyl]aminoethyl}amide-15(2), 17(3)-dimethyl ester), previously described in Moisenovich et al. (2010) PLoS ONE 5(9) e12717, was shown here to be enormously higher than that of unsubstituted chlorin e6, being supported by the data on much higher photocytotoxicity of BACE in M-1 sarcoma cell culture. To validate membrane damaging effect as the basis of the enhanced tumoricidal activity, BACE was compared with unsubstituted chlorin e6 in the potency to photosensitize dye leakage from liposomes, transbilayer lipid flip-flop, inactivation of gramicidin A ionic channels in planar lipid membranes and erythrocyte hemolysis. In all the models comprising artificial and cellular membranes, the photodynamic effect of BACE exceeded that of chlorin e6. BACE substantially differed from chlorin e6 in the affinity to liposomes and erythrocytes, as monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy, flow cytometry and centrifugation. The results support the key role of membrane binding in the photodynamic effect of the boronated chlorin e6 amide.

  17. Enhanced photo-activated luminescence for screening polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) and other related chlorinated compounds

    DOEpatents

    Tuan Vodinh.

    1993-12-21

    The presence of polychlorinated biphenyls and other chlorinated compounds in a sample is determined by treating the sample with a photo-activator and then exposing the treated sample to a UV light source. The UV light produces a photo-product complex, which is subsequently excited with UV light to cause luminescence of the complex. The luminescence is detected and characteristics of the luminescence spectra are used to determine the presence of chlorinated compounds and also the quantity of the chlorine in the compounds. 14 figures.

  18. Enhanced photo-activated luminescence for screening polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) and other related chlorinated compounds

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1993-01-01

    The presence of polychlorinated biphenyls and other chlorinated compounds in a sample is determined by treating the sample with a photo-activator and then exposing the treated sample to a UV light source. The UV light produces a photo-product complex, which is subsequently excited with UV light to cause luminescence of the complex. The luminescence is detected and characteristics of the luminescence spectra are used to determine the presence of chlorinated compounds and also the quantity of the chlorine in the compounds.

  19. Enhanced photo-activated luminescence for screening polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) and other related chlorinated compounds

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1994-06-07

    The presence of polychlorinated biphenyls and other chlorinated compounds in a sample is determined by treating the sample with a photo-activator and then exposing the treated sample to a UV light source. The UV light produces a photo-product complex, which is subsequently excited with UV light to cause luminescence of the complex. The luminescence is detected and characteristics of the luminescence spectra are used to determine the presence of chlorinated compounds and also the quantity of the chlorine in the compounds. 14 figs.

  20. Enhanced photo-activated luminescence for screening polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) and other related chlorinated compounds

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1994-01-01

    The presence of polychlorinated biphenyls and other chlorinated compounds in a sample is determined by treating the sample with a photo-activator and then exposing the treated sample to a UV light source. The UV light produces a photo-product complex, which is subsequently excited with UV light to cause luminescence of the complex. The luminescence is detected and characteristics of the luminescence spectra are used to determine the presence of chlorinated compounds and also the quantity of the chlorine in the compounds

  1. Alterations of phytoplankton assemblages treated with chlorinated hydrocarbons: effects of dominant species sensitivity and initial diversity.

    PubMed

    Bácsi, István; Gonda, Sándor; B-Béres, Viktória; Novák, Zoltán; Nagy, Sándor Alex; Vasas, Gábor

    2015-05-01

    Changes in composition of phytoplankton assemblages due to short-chained chlorinated hydrocarbons (tetrachloroethane, tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene) were studied in microcosm experiments with different initial diversities. Diversity decreased further during treatments in the less diverse 2011 summer assemblages, dominated by the euglenid Trachelomonas volvocinopsis (its relative abundance was nearly 70 %). Diversity did not change significantly during treatments in the more diverse 2012 summer assemblages, dominated by cryptomonads (their relative abundance was 40 %). The dominant Trachelomonas volvocinopsis in 2011, due to its insensitivity to the treatment and presumably high competition skills, filled released habitats occurring when sensitive species were not detectable any more. In contrast, cryptomonads were extremely sensitive to the treatments, their abundance decreased under detection limit in the treated assemblages, regardless of diversity conditions. Our results showed that population dynamics of dominant species determine the response to the contamination of the entire community, if these species display high resistance or resilience. If the dominant species was highly sensitive and recovered slowly, compensatory growth of rare species maintained high levels of ecosystem performance.

  2. Optimizing the Activation of Chlorin e6 Utilizing Upconversion Energy Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avalos, Julio C.; Pedraza, Francisco J.; Sardar, Dhiraj K.

    2015-03-01

    Current cancer therapy techniques, such as chemotherapy and radiation therapy, possess several drawbacks including lack of selectivity resulting in harmful side effects. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is one of the fastest emerging techniques due to its many advantages, including the use of nonionizing radiation, targeted delivery, and controlled doses. In PDT, photosensitizers (PSs) are activated inside targeted cells to produce irreversible damage inducing cell death. Since most PSs operate in the visible range, it is difficult to activate them due to the high attenuation of soft tissue. Upconverting nanoparticles (UCNP) are able to absorb in the NIR region, where light is less attenuated, and emit in the visible range, resulting in deeper tissue penetration. UCNPs are able to assist with the activation of the PS by energy transfer when the PS is conjugated onto the UCNP. Chlorin e6 (Ce6) is a commonly used PSs due to its ability to release reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is one of the main processes utilized in PDT. The UCNP studied contain a combination of rare earth doped ions including Erbium, Thulium, and Holmium precisely doped into the host nanocrystal to improve upconversion emission and energy transfer. The work presented will focus on exploring the factors that affect the activation of Ce6. The results will include the enhancement of Ce6 activation and ROS release when conjugated onto a rare earth-doped UCNP. This research was funded by NSF-PREM Grant No. DMR -0934218 and RISE Grant No. GM 060655.

  3. [In vitro study of the antifungal activity of two chlorine derivatives to be used in antisepsis].

    PubMed

    Bianchi, P; Repetto, A; Bulletti, S; Mattiacci, P; Rossi, J; Pagiotti, R; Ribaldi, M; Schiaffella, F

    1989-01-01

    chlorine contents of the two compounds was evaluated by iodometry simultaneously with the pH of the different solutions. Useful data were obtained from the comparison of the two systems of activity assessment of the fluid and agarized substrate. It was thus found that the two compounds were equally active against the species tested. Some of these (A. fumigatus, M. gypseum, A. niger, C. albicans, C. neoformans) were less sensitive to the compounds examined (doses for cell inactivation 0.62-2.5% for product A, and O.15-1.25% for product B) where at any rate product B was more active.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  4. Catalytic destruction of chloramine to nitrogen using chlorination and activated carbon--case study.

    PubMed

    Kochany, J; Lipczynska-Kochany, E

    2008-04-01

    The paper presents the results of laboratory and pilot studies on the removal of chloramine from potable water using chlorination with a less-than-breakpoint dosage of chlorine, followed by treatment with catalytic activated carbon. The effect of the chlorine-to-nitrogen ratio, temperature, and carbon contact time were investigated to optimize conditions for chloramines removal and minimize the production of ammonia. Results demonstrated that prechlorination of water, followed by treatment with catalytic activated carbon, can degrade monochloramine to nitrogen gas as a main product. For all chlorine-to-ammonia ratios studied, the observed rates of monochloramine removal were higher at a temperature of 20 degrees C than they were at 5 degrees C. Generation of ammonia was slightly higher at the lower temperature. However, at both temperatures, practically all monochloramine was destroyed, and only insignificant amounts of ammonia were formed when a chlorine-to-ammonia ratio of 7:1 was applied. The described method is simple and cost-effective, because it eliminates the requirement of removal of ammonia, typically formed during the treatment of chloramines with activated carbon.

  5. IN-FLIGHT CAPTURE OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY BY A CHLORINE-IMPREGNATED ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the in-flight capture of elemental mercury (Hgo) by a chlorine (C1)-impregnated activated carbon. Efforts to develop sorbents for the control of Hg emissions have demonstrated that C1-impregnation of virgin activated carbons using dilute solutions of hydrogen ...

  6. Ab Initio Studies of Chlorine Oxide and Nitrogen Oxide Species of Interest in Stratospheric Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The ability of modern state-of-the art ab initio quantum chemical techniques to characterize reliably the gas-phase molecular structure, vibrational spectrum, electronic spectrum, and thermal stability of chlorine oxide and nitrogen oxide species will be demonstrated by presentation of some example studies. In particular the geometrical structures, vibrational spectra, and heats of formation Of ClNO2, CisClONO, and trans-ClONO are shown to be in excellent agreement with the available experimental data, and where the experimental data are either not known or are inconclusive, the ab initio results are shown to fill in the gaps and to resolve the experimental controversy. In addition, ab initio studies in which the electronic spectra and the characterization of excited electronic states of ClONO2, HONO2, ClOOC17 ClOOH, and HOOH will also be presented. Again where available, the ab initio results are compared to experimental observations, and are used to aid in the interpretation of the experimental studies.

  7. MERCURY REACTIONS IN THE PRESENCE OF CHLORINE SPECIES: HOMOGENOUS GAS PHASE AND HETEROGENOUS GAS-SOLID PHASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The kinetics of mercury chlorination (with HC1) were studied using a flow reactor system with an on-line Hg analyzer and spciation sampling using a set of impingers. Kinetic parameters, such as reaction order (a), activation energy (Eu) and the overall rate constant (k') were es...

  8. Comparative antimicrobial activities of aerosolized sodium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide, and electrochemically activated solutions evaluated using a novel standardized assay.

    PubMed

    Thorn, R M S; Robinson, G M; Reynolds, D M

    2013-05-01

    The main aim of this study was to develop a standardized experimental assay to enable differential antimicrobial comparisons of test biocidal aerosols. This study represents the first chlorine-matched comparative assessment of the antimicrobial activities of aerosolized sodium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide, and electrochemically activated solution (ECAS) to determine their relative abilities to decontaminate various surface-associated health care-relevant microbial challenges. Standard microbiological challenges were developed by surface-associating typed Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis spores, or a clinical methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain on stainless steel, polypropylene, or fabric. All test coupons were subjected to 20-min biocidal aerosols of chlorine-matched (100 ppm) sodium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide, or ECAS within a standard aerosolization chamber using a commercial humidifier under defined conditions. Biocidal treatment type and material surface had a significant effect on the number of microorganisms recovered from various material surfaces following treatment exposure. Under the conditions of the assay, the order of antimicrobial efficacy of biocidal aerosol treatment was as follows: ECAS > chlorine dioxide > sodium hypochlorite. For all biocides, greater antimicrobial reductions were seen when treating stainless steel and fabric than when treating plastic-associated microorganisms. The experimental fogging system and assay protocol designed within this study were shown capable of differentiating the comparative efficacies of multiple chlorine-matched biocidal aerosols against a spectrum of target organisms on a range of test surface materials and would be appropriate for testing other biocidal aerosol treatments or material surfaces.

  9. Comparative Antimicrobial Activities of Aerosolized Sodium Hypochlorite, Chlorine Dioxide, and Electrochemically Activated Solutions Evaluated Using a Novel Standardized Assay

    PubMed Central

    Thorn, R. M. S.; Robinson, G. M.

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to develop a standardized experimental assay to enable differential antimicrobial comparisons of test biocidal aerosols. This study represents the first chlorine-matched comparative assessment of the antimicrobial activities of aerosolized sodium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide, and electrochemically activated solution (ECAS) to determine their relative abilities to decontaminate various surface-associated health care-relevant microbial challenges. Standard microbiological challenges were developed by surface-associating typed Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis spores, or a clinical methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain on stainless steel, polypropylene, or fabric. All test coupons were subjected to 20-min biocidal aerosols of chlorine-matched (100 ppm) sodium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide, or ECAS within a standard aerosolization chamber using a commercial humidifier under defined conditions. Biocidal treatment type and material surface had a significant effect on the number of microorganisms recovered from various material surfaces following treatment exposure. Under the conditions of the assay, the order of antimicrobial efficacy of biocidal aerosol treatment was as follows: ECAS > chlorine dioxide > sodium hypochlorite. For all biocides, greater antimicrobial reductions were seen when treating stainless steel and fabric than when treating plastic-associated microorganisms. The experimental fogging system and assay protocol designed within this study were shown capable of differentiating the comparative efficacies of multiple chlorine-matched biocidal aerosols against a spectrum of target organisms on a range of test surface materials and would be appropriate for testing other biocidal aerosol treatments or material surfaces. PMID:23459480

  10. Synthesis of chlorinated flavonoids with anti-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic activities in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Marisa; Ribeiro, Daniela; Tomé, Sara M; Silva, Artur M S; Fernandes, Eduarda

    2014-10-30

    Neutrophils are considered the central cells of acute inflammation. Flavonoids have been suggested as therapeutic agents to avoid damages induced by inflammatory processes. It is well known the reactivity of flavonoids with hypochlorous acid produced by neutrophils, to form stable mono and dichlorinated products. In this study, we synthesized novel chlorinated flavonoids and investigated their effect in neutrophils' oxidative burst and in its lifespan, in comparison with the parent non-chlorinated flavonoids. The obtained results demonstrate that chlorinated flavonoids were more efficient than their parent compounds in modulating neutrophils' oxidative burst in phorbol myristate acetate-activated neutrophils. Some of the tested flavonoids drive neutrophil apoptosis in a caspase 3-dependent fashion. The present data showed that 8-chloro-3',4',5,7-tetrahydroxyflavone (4a) constitute an alternative anti-inflammatory therapy, due to the proven ability to suppress mechanisms engaged at the onset and progression of inflammation.

  11. Sulfonate activation of the electrophilic reactivity of chlorine and alkyl hypochlorides by the insertion of sulfur trioxide at the C1-C1 and O-C1 bonds. Addition of chlorine chloro- and ethoxysulfate to olefins

    SciTech Connect

    Zefirov, N.S.; Koz'min, A.S.; Sorokin, V.D.; Zhdankin, V.V.

    1986-10-10

    At low temperatures (-40 to -80/sup 0/C) sulfur trioxide enters the chlorine molecule (with the formation of chlorine chlorosulfate) and the ethyl hypochlorite molecule (giving chlorine ethoxysulfate). Both new compounds are highly reactive electrophilic chlorinating reagents and add to ethylene, activated alkenes (1-hexene and cyclohexene), and deactivated olefins (methyl methacrylate, tri- and tetrachloroethylene) in methylene chloride solution at low temperatures. The addition of chlorine chlorosulfate leads to the formation of ..beta..-chloroalkyl chlorosulfates with yields of 24-85%, and the addition of chlorine ethoxysulfate leads to ..beta..-chloroalkyl ethylsulfates with yields of 65-85%. The reactions with unsymmetrical olefins lead to mixtures of the regioisomers with a preference for the products from addition according to the Markovnikov rule; the addition to cyclohexene is trans-stereospecific. The investigated processes represent a new simple approach to the production of sulfate-activated chlorinating reagents and extend the possibilities for functional substitution of olefins.

  12. Oxidation of diclofenac with chlorine dioxide in aquatic environments: influences of different nitrogenous species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingling; Liu, Haijin; Liu, Guoguang; Xie, Youhai; Ni, Tianjun

    2015-06-01

    The oxidation of diclofenac (DCF), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug and emerging water pollutant, with chlorine dioxide was investigated under simulated water disinfection conditions. The reaction kinetics as functions of the initial concentrations of DCF, different nitrogenous species, and different pE values were experimentally determined. The results demonstrated that DCF reacted rapidly with ClO2, where more than 75 % of DCF (≤3.00 μM) was removed by 18.94 μM ClO2 within 60 s. All of the reactions followed pseudo first-order kinetics with respect to DCF, and the rate constant, k obs, exhibited a significant decrease from 4.21 × 10(-2) to 8.09 × 10(-3) s(-1), as the initial DCF concentration was increased from 1.00 to 5.00 μM. Furthermore, the degradation kinetics of DCF was clearly dependent on nitrogen-containing ion concentrations in the reaction solution. Ammonium and nitrite ions inhibited the DCF degradation by ClO2, whereas nitrate ion clearly initiated its promotion. In contrast, the inhibitory effect of NO2 (-) was more robust than that of NH4 (+). When the values of pE were gradually increased, the transformation of NH4 (+) to NO2 (-), and subsequently to NO3 (-), would occur, the rate constants were initially decreased, and then increased. When NH4 (+) and NO2 (-) coexisted, the inhibitory effect on the DCF degradation was less than the sum of the partial inhibitory effect. However, when NO2 (-) and NO3 (-) coexisted, the actual inhibition rate was greater than the theoretical estimate. These results indicated that the interaction of NH4 (+) and NO2 (-) was antagonistic, while the coexistence of NO2 (-) and NO3 (-) was observed to have a synergistic effect in aqueous environments.

  13. The removal of estrogenic activity with UV/chlorine technology and identification of novel estrogenic disinfection by-products.

    PubMed

    Li, Man; Xu, Bi; Liungai, Zhiqi; Hu, Hong-Ying; Chen, Chao; Qiao, Juan; Lu, Yun

    2016-04-15

    As a recently developed disinfection technology, ultraviolet (UV)/chlorine treatment has received much attention. Many studies have evaluated its effects on pathogen inactivation, contaminant removal, and formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs), but its potential for environmental estrogen removal and estrogenic DBP generation, which can also be a risk to both ecosystem and human health, have not been evaluated. In this study, UV/chlorine treatment resulted in a greater removal of estrogenic activity in synthetic effluent samples containing 17β-estradiol (E2) than did UV or chlorine treatment alone regardless of the water quality. For both the UV/chlorine and chlorine treatments, there was significant interference from NH3-N, although the UV/chlorine treatment was less affected. Estrogen receptor based affinity chromatography was used to isolate the specific estrogenic DBPs, and a novel product, with high estrogenic activity compared to E2, Δ9(11)-dehydro-estradiol, was identified. It was generated by all three treatments, and might be previously mistakenly recognized as estrone (E1). This study demonstrated that UV/chlorine is a better treatment for the removal of 17β-estradiol than chlorine and UV alone. The new identified estrogenic DBP, Δ9(11)-dehydro-estradiol, which can be isolated by affinity chromatography, could be an emerging concern in the future.

  14. A DFT study of the interaction between large PAHs and atomic chlorine or hydrogen chloride molecule: Toward a modelling of the influence of chlorinated species on the trapping of water by soot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Fernandez, C.; Radola, B.; Martin-Gondre, L.; Picaud, S.; Rayez, M. T.; Rayez, J. C.; Ouf, F. X.; Rubayo-Soneira, J.

    2017-02-01

    First-principle calculations have been performed to characterize the interaction of chlorinated species (HCl and Cl) with large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules and radicals. Whereas the characterization of the interaction process on the face of the PAH molecules requires taking into account long-range dispersion interactions in the calculations, trapping at the edge of PAH radicals involves stronger interactions that lead to the dissociation of the HCl molecule. Then, the first steps of water adsorption on the corresponding chlorinated species has been characterized, showing that chlorine may act as an efficient nucleation center for water molecules on such aromatic systems mimicking part of the carbonaceous surfaces that are likely present in soot. These results represent a first but necessary step for a better understanding of soot behavior in industrial or domestic fire situations.

  15. ASCORBIC ACID REDUCTION OF ACTIVE CHLORINE PRIOR TO DETERMINING AMES MUTAGENICITY OF CHLORINATED NATURAL ORGANIC MATTER (NOM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many potable water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) that result from the reaction of natural organic matter (NOM) with oxidizing chlorine are known or suspected to be carcinogenic and mutagenic. The Ames assay is routinely used to assess an overall level of mutagenicity for all com...

  16. Semi-empirical models for chlorine activation and ozone depletion in the Antarctic stratosphere: proof of concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, P. E.; Bodeker, G. E.; Kremser, S.; McDonald, A. J.; Rex, M.; Struthers, H.

    2013-03-01

    Two semi-empirical models were developed for the Antarctic stratosphere to relate the shift of species within total chlorine (Cly = HCl + ClONO2 + HOCl + 2 × Cl2 + 2×Cl2O2 + ClO + Cl) into the active forms (here: ClOx = 2×Cl2O2 + ClO), and to relate the rate of ozone destruction to ClOx. These two models provide a fast and computationally inexpensive way to describe the inter- and intra-annual evolution of ClOx and ozone mass deficit (OMD) in the Antarctic spring. The models are based on the underlying physics/chemistry of the system and capture the key chemical and physical processes in the Antarctic stratosphere that determine the interaction between climate change and Antarctic ozone depletion. They were developed considering bulk effects of chemical mechanisms for the duration of the Antarctic vortex period and quantities averaged over the vortex area. The model equations were regressed against observations of daytime ClO and OMD providing a set of empirical fit coefficients. Both semi-empirical models are able to explain much of the intra- and inter-annual variability observed in daily ClOx and OMD time series. This proof-of-concept paper outlines the semi-empirical approach to describing the evolution of Antarctic chlorine activation and ozone depletion.

  17. Polar stratospheric cloud evolution and chlorine activation measured by CALIPSO and MLS, and modeled by ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Hideaki; Wohltmann, Ingo; Wegner, Tobias; Takeda, Masanori; Pitts, Michael C.; Poole, Lamont R.; Lehmann, Ralph; Santee, Michelle L.; Rex, Markus

    2016-03-01

    We examined observations of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) by CALIPSO, and of HCl and ClO by MLS along air mass trajectories, to investigate the dependence of the inferred PSC composition on the temperature history of the air parcels and the dependence of the level of chlorine activation on PSC composition. Several case studies based on individual trajectories from the Arctic winter 2009/2010 were conducted, with the trajectories chosen such that the first processing of the air mass by PSCs in this winter occurred on the trajectory. Transitions of PSC composition classes were observed to be highly dependent on the temperature history. In cases of a gradual temperature decrease, nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and super-cooled ternary solution (STS) mixture clouds were observed. In cases of rapid temperature decrease, STS clouds were first observed, followed by NAT/STS mixture clouds. When temperatures dropped below the frost point, ice clouds formed and then transformed into NAT/STS mixture clouds when temperature increased above the frost point. The threshold temperature for rapid chlorine activation on PSCs is approximately 4 K below the NAT existence temperature, TNAT. Furthermore, simulations of the ATLAS chemistry and transport box model along the trajectories were used to corroborate the measurements and show good agreement with the observations. Rapid chlorine activation was observed when an air mass encountered PSCs. Usually, chlorine activation was limited by the amount of available ClONO2. Where ClONO2 was not the limiting factor, a large dependence on temperature was evident.

  18. ESTIMATION OF MICROBIAL REDUCTIVE TRANSFORMATION RATES FOR CHLORINATED BENZENES AND PHENOLS USING A QUANTITATIVE STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIP APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    A set of literature data was used to derive several quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) to predict the rate constants for the microbial reductive dehalogenation of chlorinated aromatics. Dechlorination rate constants for 25 chloroaromatics were corrected for th...

  19. Contribution of chlorination to the mutagenic activity of drinking water extracts in Salmonella and Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, G.R.; Nestmann, E.R.; Lebel, G.

    1986-11-01

    The production of chlorinated by-products through chlorine disinfection of drinking water has been well documented. Natural organic precursors for these chemicals include fulvic and humic acids, the chlorination of which leads to the production of mutagenic compounds. Comparisons of extracts of raw versus treated waters have confirmed that clorination during water treatment produces mutagenic activity in the Salmonella (Ames) test. Present work on XAD-2 extracts of raw and chlorinated water from six municipalities in the Great Lakes region of Canada has involved a battery of mutagenicity assays for various genetic endpoints: the Salmonella test, the sister-chromatid exchange (SCE) and the micronucleus (MN) induction in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. All extracts of treated (chlorinated), but none of untreated, water were mutagenic in the Salmonella assay. On the other hand, extracts of both treated and untreated water samples showed activity in the SCE and MN assays, but no consistent pattern of response with regard to treatment (chlorination) was evident. These data show that chlorination contributes mutagens to drinking water and suggest that mammalian in vitro assays may be more sensitive for detecting mutagenicity in water samples than the Salmonella test.

  20. Observation of Chlorine and other RHS Species in the Marine Boundary Layer at Cape Verde Atmospheric Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöhler, Denis; Tschritter, Jens; Lampel, Johannes; Frieß, Udo; Platt, Ulrich

    2014-05-01

    Reactive halogen species (RHS) have a significant influence on the marine atmosphere as they react with ozone, change the oxidation capacity and may form particles. However, their release processes, the emissions and concentrations of different RHS species are mostly uncertain. Only a few measurements exist and results are sometimes very different. Most studies focused on iodine and bromine species. Chlorine was mostly not investigated as it is typically more difficult to measure and it was expected that it has a smaller impact on the marine atmosphere and thus less significant. Recent model studies show that this assumption is probably not correct and more information of chlorine is needed to understand the processes in the marine atmosphere. We present results from measurements at the Cape Verde atmospheric research station (CVAO) during the HALOCAVE campaign in 2010 (June to October) using the LP-DOAS technique. Simultaneous measurements of a series of trace gases ranging from RHS like BrO, IO, ClO, OClO and other species like NO2, O3, CHOCHO, HCHO, SO2, HONO, NO3 have been performed along different measurement paths. In contrast to previous observations we could not observe IO above the detection limit of 0.5ppt. Also simultaneous CE-DOAS measurements could not observe IO above the detection limit of 1.0ppt. Profile retrievals of IO MAX-DOAS measurements show a concentration between 0.2 to 0.5ppt and thus in agreement with our LP-DOAS observations but not with previous findings. For BrO we found with the LP-DOAS concentrations up to 5ppt, a characteristic daily cycle with high variability from day to day indicating various metrological parameters to be significant for the bromine emission. ClO could not be observed above the relative high detection limit of approx. 25ppt. However, we found significant OClO concentrations in the night of up to 8ppt, which is most likely formed from ClO. This indicates significant chlorine concentrations in the marine atmosphere

  1. Reducing the chlorine dioxide demand in final disinfection of drinking water treatment plants using activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Sorlini, Sabrina; Biasibetti, Michela; Collivignarelli, Maria Cristina; Crotti, Barbara Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide is one of the most widely employed chemicals in the disinfection process of a drinking water treatment plant (DWTP). The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of the adsorption process with granular activated carbon (GAC) on the chlorine dioxide consumption in final oxidation/disinfection. A first series of tests was performed at the laboratory scale employing water samples collected at the outlet of the DWTP sand filter of Cremona (Italy). The adsorption process in batch conditions with seven different types of GAC was studied. A second series of tests was performed on water samples collected at the outlet of four GAC columns installed at the outlet of the DWTP sand filter. The results showed that the best chlorine dioxide demand (ClO2-D) reduction yields are equal to 60-80% and are achieved in the first 30 min after ClO2 addition, during the first 16 days of the column operation using a mineral, coal-based, mesoporous GAC. Therefore, this carbon removes organic compounds that are more rapidly reactive with ClO2. Moreover, a good correlation was found between the ClO2-D and UV absorbance at wavelength 254 nm using mineral carbons; therefore, the use of a mineral mesoporous GAC is an effective solution to control the high ClO2-D in the disinfection stage of a DWTP.

  2. Adsorption equilibria of chlorinated organic solvents onto activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, J.H.; Choi, D.K.; Kim, S.H.

    1998-04-01

    Adsorption equilibria of dichloromethane, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and trichloroethylene on activated carbon were obtained by a static volumetric technique. Isotherms were measured for the pure vapors in the temperature range from 283 to 363 K and pressures up to 60 kPa for dichloromethane, 16 kPa for 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and 7 kPa for trichloroethylene, respectively. The Toth and Dubinin-Radushkevich equations were used to correlate experimental isotherms. Thermodynamic properties such as the isosteric heat of adsorption and the henry`s constant were calculated. It was found that the values of isosteric heat of adsorption were varied with surface loading. Also, the Henry`s constant showed that the order of adsorption affinity is 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, and dichloromethane. By employing the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation, the limiting volume of the adsorbed space, which equals micropore volume, was determined, and its value was found to be approximately independent of adsorbates.

  3. Monsoon circulations and tropical heterogeneous chlorine chemistry in the stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Susan; Kinnison, Doug; Garcia, Rolando R.; Bandoro, Justin; Mills, Michael; Wilka, Catherine; Neely, Ryan R.; Schmidt, Anja; Barnes, John E.; Vernier, Jean-Paul; Höpfner, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Model simulations presented in this paper suggest that transport processes associated with the summer monsoons bring increased abundances of hydrochloric acid into contact with liquid sulfate aerosols in the cold tropical lowermost stratosphere, leading to heterogeneous chemical activation of chlorine species. The calculations indicate that the spatial and seasonal distributions of chlorine monoxide and chlorine nitrate near the monsoon regions of the northern hemisphere tropical and subtropical lowermost stratosphere could provide indicators of heterogeneous chlorine processing. In the model, these processes impact the local ozone budget and decrease ozone abundances, implying a chemical contribution to longer-term northern tropical ozone profile changes at 16-19 km.

  4. Free Chlorine and Monochloramine Application to Nitrifying Biofilm: Comparison of Biofilm Penetration, Activity, and Viability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biofilm in drinking water systems is undesirable and effective biofilm control maintains public health. Free chlorine and monochloramine are commonly used as secondary drinking water disinfectants, but monochloramine is perceived to penetrate biofilm better than free chlorine. ...

  5. Synthesis, characterization, and antifungal activity of novel inulin derivatives with chlorinated benzene.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhanyong; Li, Qing; Wang, Gang; Dong, Fang; Zhou, Haoyuan; Zhang, Jing

    2014-01-01

    A group of novel inulin derivatives containing benzene or chlorinated benzene were synthesized by reaction of chloracetyl inulin (CAIL) with the Schiff bases of 4-amino-pyridine, including (2-pyridyl)acetyl inulin chloride (PAIL), 2-[4-(2-chlorobenzylideneamino)-pyridyl]acetyl inulin chloride (2CPAIL), 2-[4-(4-chlorobenzylideneamino)-pyridyl]acetyl inulin chloride (4CPAIL), and 2-[4-(2,4-dichlorobenzylideneamino)-pyridyl]acetyl inulin chloride (2,4DCPAIL). Their antifungal activity against three kinds of phytopathogens was estimated by hypha measurement in vitro. Of all the synthesized chitosan derivatives, 2,4DCPAIL inhibited the growth of the tested phytopathogens with inhibitory indices of 67%, 47%, and 43% against Colletotrichum lagenarium (Pass) Ell.et halst, Phomopsis asparagi (Sacc.) Bubak and Fusarium oxysporum (schl.) F.sp. niveum (F. oxysporum) respectively at 1.0 mg/mL. The results indicate that all the inulin derivatives have better antifungal activity than inulin, and the inhibitory index is affected by the chlorine atom grafted to the inulin derivatives.

  6. Short-chain chlorinated paraffins in terrestrial bird species inhabiting an e-waste recycling site in South China.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiao-Jun; Sun, Yu-Xin; Wu, Jiang-Ping; Chen, She-Jun; Mai, Bi-Xian

    2015-03-01

    Short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) are under review by the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants. Currently, limited data are available about SCCPs in terrestrial organisms. In the present study, SCCP concentration in the muscles of seven terrestrial bird species (n = 38) inhabiting an e-waste recycling area in South China was determined. This concentration varied from 620 to 17,000 ng/g lipid. Resident birds accumulated significantly higher SCCP concentrations than migratory birds (p < 0.01). Trophic magnification was observed for migratory bird species but not for resident, which was attributed to high heterogeneity of SCCP in e-waste area. Two different homologue group patterns were observed in avian samples. The first pattern was found in five bird species dominated by C10 and C11 congeners, while the second was found in the remains, which show rather equal abundance of homologue groups. This may be caused by two sources of SCCPs (local and e-waste) in the study area.

  7. Chlorine dioxide as a treatment for ballast water to control invasive species: shipboard testing.

    PubMed

    Maranda, Lucie; Cox, Annie M; Campbell, Robert G; Smith, David C

    2013-10-15

    The efficacy of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) in eliminating organisms present in estuarine ballast water of a containership was determined under actual operating conditions by comparing the survival of planktonic communities present in waters of treated and control ballast tanks. Sampling was via ballast-tank hatches. The treatment (5 mg L(-1)ClO2 without pre-filtration) delivered by a prototype ClO2-generating system was generally effective against planktonic assemblages, although bacterial communities rebounded after a few days. Regardless of temperature, ClO2 was very effective against phytoplankton; the effect was immediate, without resurgence. Some zooplankters in the ≥ 50-μm fraction may survive the biocide, especially those able to find refuge within a protective coating (e.g., cysts, resting eggs, and shells) or in sediment. In order to boost efficacy, a pre-filtration step is recommended (now installed as standard equipment) to lower the intake of the ≥ 50-μm fraction and lessen the challenge posed by this size class.

  8. Freeze-induced formation of bromine/chlorine interhalogen species from aqueous halide ion solutions.

    PubMed

    O'Concubhair, Ruairí; Sodeau, John R

    2012-10-02

    Both gaseous bromine and bromine chloride have been monitored in polar environments and implicated in the destruction of tropospheric ozone. The formation mechanisms operating for these halogen compounds have been suggested previously. However, few laboratory studies have been performed using environmentally relevant concentrations of bromide and chloride ions in polar ice mimics. In aqueous solutions held at room temperature, previous studies have shown that the major product is the Cl(2)Br¯ trihalide ion when solutions of bromate, hydrochloric acid, and bromide ions are left to equilibrate. In contrast, the results of the cryochemical experiments presented here suggest that the dibromochloride ion (BrBrCl¯) is the major product when solutions of bromate, sulfuric acid, bromide, and chloride ions are frozen. Such a species would preferentially release bromine to the gas phase. Hence, similar halide starting materials form structurally different trihalide ions when frozen, which are capable of releasing differing active halogens, BrCl and Br(2), to the gas-phase. This is a potentially important finding because Br(2) is photolyzed more readily and to longer wavelengths than BrCl and therefore the efficiency in forming products that can lead to ozone destruction in the atmosphere would be increased. Evidence is provided for the mechanism to occur by means of both the freeze-concentration effect and the incorporation of ions into the growing ice phase.

  9. Chlorine activation indoors and outdoors via surface-mediated reactions of nitrogen oxides with hydrogen chloride.

    PubMed

    Raff, Jonathan D; Njegic, Bosiljka; Chang, Wayne L; Gordon, Mark S; Dabdub, Donald; Gerber, R Benny; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2009-08-18

    Gaseous HCl generated from a variety of sources is ubiquitous in both outdoor and indoor air. Oxides of nitrogen (NO(y)) are also globally distributed, because NO formed in combustion processes is oxidized to NO(2), HNO(3), N(2)O(5) and a variety of other nitrogen oxides during transport. Deposition of HCl and NO(y) onto surfaces is commonly regarded as providing permanent removal mechanisms. However, we show here a new surface-mediated coupling of nitrogen oxide and halogen activation cycles in which uptake of gaseous NO(2) or N(2)O(5) on solid substrates generates adsorbed intermediates that react with HCl to generate gaseous nitrosyl chloride (ClNO) and nitryl chloride (ClNO(2)), respectively. These are potentially harmful gases that photolyze to form highly reactive chlorine atoms. The reactions are shown both experimentally and theoretically to be enhanced by water, a surprising result given the availability of competing hydrolysis reaction pathways. Airshed modeling incorporating HCl generated from sea salt shows that in coastal urban regions, this heterogeneous chemistry increases surface-level ozone, a criteria air pollutant, greenhouse gas and source of atmospheric oxidants. In addition, it may contribute to recently measured high levels of ClNO(2) in the polluted coastal marine boundary layer. This work also suggests the potential for chlorine atom chemistry to occur indoors where significant concentrations of oxides of nitrogen and HCl coexist.

  10. Active chlorine and nitric oxide formation from chemical rocket plume afterburning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leone, D. M.; Turns, S. R.

    1994-01-01

    Chlorine and oxides of nitrogen (NO(x)) released into the atmosphere contribute to acid rain (ground level or low-altitude sources) and ozone depletion from the stratosphere (high-altitude sources). Rocket engines have the potential for forming or activating these pollutants in the rocket plume. For instance, H2/O2 rockets can produce thermal NO(x) in their plumes. Emphasis, in the past, has been placed on determining the impact of chlorine release on the stratosphere. To date, very little, if any, information is available to understand what contribution NO(x) emissions from ground-based engine testing and actual rocket launches have on the atmosphere. The goal of this work is to estimate the afterburning emissions from chemical rocket plumes and determine their local stratospheric impact. Our study focuses on the space shuttle rocket motors, which include both the solid rocket boosters (SRB's) and the liquid propellant main engines (SSME's). Rocket plume afterburning is modeled employing a one-dimensional model incorporating two chemical kinetic systems: chemical and thermal equilibria with overlayed nitric oxide chemical kinetics (semi equilibrium) and full finite-rate chemical kinetics. Additionally, the local atmospheric impact immediately following a launch is modeled as the emissions diffuse and chemically react in the stratosphere.

  11. Semi-synthesis and PDT activities of a new amphiphilic chlorin derivative.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Milene N O; Gonçalves, Joyce L S; Linares, Irwin A P; Perussi, Janice R; de Oliveira, Kleber T

    2016-10-18

    An amphiphilic chlorin derivative (CHL-T) was prepared from methylpheophorbide a (CHL) and 2-Amino-2-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-propanediol (TRISMA(®)). The new chlorin was compared to other dyes (CHL and Hypericin) in relation to photophysical and photobiological activities in tumor and non-tumor cell lines. Cytotoxicity and cell death target were determined to evaluate the CHL-T efficiency, comparing to the precursor CHL and to the well-known dye hypericin (HY). All of the studied compounds exhibited absorption bands in the therapeutic window and presented a small fluorescence quantum yield compared to the reference dye (rhodamine B). CHL-T was about three times more efficient on singlet oxygen generation than the others photosensitizers. The lipophilicity order of the photosensitizers was CHL>HY>CHL-T. The tumoral HeLa cells presented improved accumulation for CHL and CHL-T compared to HY. The phototoxicity presented by the CHL-T was about ten times higher than by CHL, as demonstrated by the MTT assay. CHL-T showed more cytotoxicity to tumoral cell, comparing to non-tumoral cell in short incubation time. The cell death rises proportionally with increasing PSs concentrations, mainly by necrosis. These findings suggest that CHL-T is a potential new photosensitizer for PDT.

  12. Reaction products of chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, A A

    1982-01-01

    Inspection of the available literature reveals that a detailed investigation of the aqueous organic chemistry of chlorine dioxide and systematic identification of products formed during water disinfection has not been considered. This must be done before an informed assessment can be made of the relative safety of using chlorine dioxide as a disinfectant alternative to chlorine. Although trihalomethanes are generally not formed by the action of chlorine dioxide, the products of chlorine dioxide treatment of organic materials are oxidized species, some of which also contain chlorine. The relative amounts of species types may depend on the amount of chlorine dioxide residual maintained and the concentration and nature of the organic material present in the source water. The trend toward lower concentrations of chlorinated by-products with increasing ClO2 concentration, which was observed with phenols, has not been observed with natural humic materials as measured by the organic halogen parameter. Organic halogen concentrations have been shown to increase with increasing chlorine dioxide dose, but are much lower than those observed when chlorine is applied. Aldehydes have been detected as apparent by-products of chlorine dioxide oxidation reactions in a surface water that is a drinking water source. Some other nonchlorinated products of chlorine dioxide treatment may be quinones and epoxides. The extent of formation of these moieties within the macromolecular humic structure is also still unknown. PMID:7151750

  13. Trajectory Hunting: A Case Study of Rapid Chlorine Activation in December 1992 as Seen by UARS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, M. Y.; Santee, M. L.; Rodriguez, J. M.; Ko, M. K. W.; Mergenthaler, J. M.; Kumer, J. B.; Tabazadeh, A.; Livesey, N. J.

    2000-01-01

    Trajectory hunting (i.e., a technique to find air parcels sampled at least twice over the course of a few days) is applied to analyze Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) measurements in conjunction with the Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) photochemical box model. As a case study, we investigate rapid chlorine activation in the Arctic lower stratosphere on December 29, 1992 associated with a polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) event. Eleven air parcels that have been sampled several times along five-day trajectories at the 465 K (approx. 46 hPa), 520 K (approx. 31 hPa), and 585 K (approx. 22 hPa) levels were investigated. For the first time, the latest versions of the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES, version 9) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS, version 5) data sets are analyzed, and their consistency is assessed. A detailed sensitivity study with the AER photochemical box model along these trajectories leads to the conclusion that for the December 24-29, 1992 episode: (1) the individual CLAES ClONO2 and MLS ClO measurements are self-consistent within their uncertainties; and (2) most of the time, UARS measurements of ClO, ClONO2, HNO3, and aerosol extinction at 780 cm(exp -1) agree within the range of their uncertainties with the model calculations. It appears that the HNO3 and aerosol extinction measurements for four parcels at 520 K look more supportive for the nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) scheme, However, the uncertainties in the individual UARS measurements and UK Meteorological Office temperature do not allow a definite discrimination between the NAT and supercooled ternary solution (STS) PSC schemes for this chlorine activation episode in December 1992.

  14. Trajectory Hunting: A Case Study of Rapid Chlorine Activation in December 1992 as Seen by UARS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, M. Y.; Santee, M. L.; Rodriquez, J. M.; Ko, M. K. W.; Mergenthaler, J. M.; Kumer, J. B.; Tabazadeh, A.; Livesey

    2000-01-01

    Trajectory hunting (i.e., a technique to find air parcels sampled at least twice over the course of a few days) is applied to analyze Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) measurements in conjunction with the Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) photochemical box model. As a case study, we investigate rapid chlorine activation in the Arctic lower stratosphere on December 29, 1992 associated with a polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) event. Eleven air parcels that have been sampled several times along 5-day trajectories at the 465 K (approx. 46 hPa), 520 K (approx. 31 hPa), and 585 K (approx. 22 hPa) levels were investigated. For the first time, the latest versions of the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES, version 9) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS, version 5) data sets are analyzed, and their consistency is assessed. A detailed sensitivity study with the AER photochemical box model along these trajectories leads to the conclusion that for the December 24-29, 1992 episode (1) the individual CLAES version 9 ClONO2 and MLS version 5 ClO measurements are self-consistent within their uncertainties; and (2) most of the time, UARS measurements of ClO, ClONO2, HNO3, and aerosol extinction at 780 cm (exp -1) agree within the range of their uncertainties with the model calculations. It appears that the HNO3 and aerosol extinction measurements for four parcels at 520 K look more supportive for the nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) scheme. However, the uncertainties in the individual UARS measurements and U.K. Meteorological Office temperature do not allow a definite discrimination between the NAT and supercooled ternary solution (STS) PSC schemes for this chlorine activation episode in December 1992.

  15. Effects of starvation on physiological activity and chlorine disinfection resistance in Escherichia coli O157:H7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisle, J. T.; Broadaway, S. C.; Prescott, A. M.; Pyle, B. H.; Fricker, C.; McFeters, G. A.

    1998-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 can persist for days to weeks in microcosms simulating natural conditions. In this study, we used a suite of fluorescent, in situ stains and probes to assess the influence of starvation on physiological activity based on membrane potential (rhodamine 123 assay), membrane integrity (LIVE/DEAD BacLight kit), respiratory activity (5-cyano-2,3-di-4-tolyl-tetrazolium chloride assay), intracellular esterase activity (ScanRDI assay), and 16S rRNA content. Growth-dependent assays were also used to assess substrate responsiveness (direct viable count [DVC] assay), ATP activity (MicroStar assay), and culturability (R2A agar assay). In addition, resistance to chlorine disinfection was assessed. After 14 days of starvation, the DVC values decreased, while the values in all other assays remained relatively constant and equivalent to each other. Chlorine resistance progressively increased through the starvation period. After 29 days of starvation, there was no significant difference in chlorine resistance between control cultures that had not been exposed to the disinfectant and cultures that had been exposed. This study demonstrates that E. coli O157:H7 adapts to starvation conditions by developing a chlorine resistance phenotype.

  16. Analysis of the sporicidal activity of chlorine dioxide disinfectant against Bacillus anthracis (Sterne strain)

    PubMed Central

    Chatuev, B.A.; Peterson, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Routine surface decontamination is an essential hospital and laboratory procedure, but the list of effective, noncorrosive disinfectants that kill spores is limited. We investigated the sporicidal potential of an aqueous chlorine dioxide solution and encountered some unanticipated problems. Quantitative bacteriological culture methods were used to determine the log10 reduction of Bacillus anthracis (Sterne strain) spores following 3 min exposure to various concentrations of aqueous chlorine dioxide solutions at room temperature in sealed tubes, as well as spraying onto plastic and stainless steel surfaces in a biological safety cabinet. Serial 10-fold dilutions of the treated spores were then plated on 5% sheep blood agar plates, and the survivor colonies were enumerated. Disinfection of spore suspensions with aqueous chlorine dioxide solution in sealed microfuge tubes was highly effective, reducing the viable spore counts by 8 log10 in only 3 min. By contrast, the process of spraying or spreading the disinfectant onto surfaces resulted in only a 1 log10 kill because the chlorine dioxide gas was rapidly vaporised from the solutions. Full potency of the sprayed aqueous chlorine dioxide solution was restored by preparing the chlorine dioxide solution in 5% bleach (0.3% sodium hypochlorite). The volatility of chlorine dioxide can cause treatment failures that constitute a serious hazard for unsuspecting users. Supplementation of the chlorine dioxide solution with 5% bleach (0.3% sodium hypochlorite) restored full potency and increased stability for one week. PMID:20061062

  17. Analysis of the sporicidal activity of chlorine dioxide disinfectant against Bacillus anthracis (Sterne strain).

    PubMed

    Chatuev, B M; Peterson, J W

    2010-02-01

    Routine surface decontamination is an essential hospital and laboratory procedure, but the list of effective, noncorrosive disinfectants that kill spores is limited. We investigated the sporicidal potential of an aqueous chlorine dioxide solution and encountered some unanticipated problems. Quantitative bacteriological culture methods were used to determine the log(10) reduction of Bacillus anthracis (Sterne strain) spores following 3min exposure to various concentrations of aqueous chlorine dioxide solutions at room temperature in sealed tubes, as well as spraying onto plastic and stainless steel surfaces in a biological safety cabinet. Serial 10-fold dilutions of the treated spores were then plated on 5% sheep blood agar plates, and the survivor colonies were enumerated. Disinfection of spore suspensions with aqueous chlorine dioxide solution in sealed microfuge tubes was highly effective, reducing the viable spore counts by 8log(10) in only 3min. By contrast, the process of spraying or spreading the disinfectant onto surfaces resulted in only a 1log(10) kill because the chlorine dioxide gas was rapidly vaporised from the solutions. Full potency of the sprayed aqueous chlorine dioxide solution was restored by preparing the chlorine dioxide solution in 5% bleach (0.3% sodium hypochlorite). The volatility of chlorine dioxide can cause treatment failures that constitute a serious hazard for unsuspecting users. Supplementation of the chlorine dioxide solution with 5% bleach (0.3% sodium hypochlorite) restored full potency and increased stability for one week.

  18. Chlorine chemistry and the potential for ozone depletion in the Arctic stratosphere in the winter of 1991/92

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, R.; Peter, Th.; Crutzen, P.J. ); Oelhaf, H.; Adrian, G.P.; Clarmann, Th.V.; Wegner, A. ); Schmidt, U. ); Lary, D. )

    1994-06-22

    The authors use a chemical box model to study the interaction of atmospheric chemistry processes in the arctic stratosphere, as related to chlorine chemistry. Their objective is to apply this model to study the implications of chlorine chemistry for possible chemical destruction of ozone during the 1991-92 winter. Two major observations from the model were an almost complete conversion of available chlorine to activated forms during the winter, and finally a return of this chlorine to ClONO[sub 2], and after about another month to HCl, as the major reservoir molecular species for chlorine.

  19. Evaluation of Chlorinated Solvent Removal Efficiency Among Three Wetland Plant Species: A Mesocom Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    per gram of dry soil (Bouwer, 1992). ATP extraction also indicates that around 10% of the cells in the subsurface are metabolically active (Bouwer...phytodegradation, phytostabilization and phytovolatilization (Lunney, 2004). Phytoextraction is the process in which plants extract pollutants and degraded...nitroreductase, peroxidase, lactase , and nitrilase (Schnoor, 1995). Plants could also directly uptake pollutants. But direct uptake is

  20. Movement and fate of chlorinated solvents in ground water: Research activities at Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey

    SciTech Connect

    Fusillo, T.V.; Ehlke, T.A.; Martin, M.

    1987-01-01

    The USGS, through its Toxic Waste - Groundwater Contamination Program, is undertaking an interdisciplinary research study of contaminants. The purpose of the study is to gain a better understanding of the chemical, physical, and biological processes that affect the movement and fate of these contaminants in groundwater. The study is being conducted at Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey, where metal plating and metal etching wastes have contaminated part of the glacial stratified drift aquifers. Major areas of research at the site are described, including: distribution and movement of chlorinated solvents in groundwater, behavior of chlorinated solvents in the unsaturated zone, geochemistry of the contaminated groundwater, and microbial transformations of chlorinated solvents. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Amide Link Scission in the Polyamide Active Layers of Thin-Film Composite Membranes upon Exposure to Free Chlorine: Kinetics and Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Powell, Joshua; Luh, Jeanne; Coronell, Orlando

    2015-10-20

    The volume-averaged amide link scission in the aromatic polyamide active layer of a reverse osmosis membrane upon exposure to free chlorine was quantified at a variety of free chlorine exposure times, concentrations, and pH and rinsing conditions. The results showed that (i) hydroxyl ions are needed for scission to occur, (ii) hydroxide-induced amide link scission is a strong function of exposure to hypochlorous acid, (iii) the ratio between amide links broken and chlorine atoms taken up increased with the chlorination pH and reached a maximum of ∼25%, (iv) polyamide disintegration occurs when high free chlorine concentrations, alkaline conditions, and high exposure times are combined, (v) amide link scission promotes further chlorine uptake, and (vi) scission at the membrane surface is unrepresentative of volume-averaged scission in the active layer. Our observations are consistent with previously proposed mechanisms describing amide link scission as a result of the hydrolysis of the N-chlorinated amidic N-C bond due to nucleophilic attack by hydroxyl ions. This study increases the understanding of the physicochemical changes that could occur for membranes in treatment plants using chlorine as an upstream disinfectant and the extent and rate at which those changes would occur.

  2. Carbon isotope fractionation of chlorinated ethenes during oxidation by Fe2+ activated persulfate.

    PubMed

    Marchesi, Massimo; Aravena, Ramon; Sra, Kanwartej S; Thomson, Neil R; Otero, Neus; Soler, Albert; Mancini, Silvia

    2012-09-01

    The increased use of persulfate (S(2)O(8)(2-)) for in situ chemical oxidation to treat groundwater and soils contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbon compounds (CHCs) requires unbiased methods to assess treatment performance. Stable carbon isotope analysis offers a potential tool for assessing the in situ treatment performance of persulfate at sites contaminated with CHCs. This study investigated the extent of C isotope fractionation during oxidation of tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE) and cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) by persulfate activated by ferrous ion (Fe(2+)). An average carbon isotope enrichment factor ε(bulk) of -4.9‰ for PCE, -3.6‰ for TCE and -7.6‰ for cis-DCE were obtained in batch experiments. Variations in the initial S(2)O(8)(2-)/Fe(2+)/CHC molar ratios did not result in any significant differences in carbon isotope fractionation. The occurrence of carbon isotope fractionation during oxidation and the lack of dependence of enrichment factors upon the S(2)O(8)(2-)/Fe(2+)/CHC molar ratio demonstrate that carbon isotope analysis can potentially be used at contaminated sites as an additional technique to estimate treatment efficacy during oxidation of CHCs by Fe(2+) activated persulfate.

  3. Comparing the chlorine disinfection of detached biofilm clusters with those of sessile biofilms and planktonic cells in single- and dual-species cultures.

    PubMed

    Behnke, Sabrina; Parker, Albert E; Woodall, Dawn; Camper, Anne K

    2011-10-01

    Although the detachment of cells from biofilms is of fundamental importance to the dissemination of organisms in both public health and clinical settings, the disinfection efficacies of commonly used biocides on detached biofilm particles have not been investigated. Therefore, the question arises whether cells in detached aggregates can be killed with disinfectant concentrations sufficient to inactivate planktonic cells. Burkholderia cepacia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were grown in standardized laboratory reactors as single species and in coculture. Cluster size distributions in chemostats and biofilm reactor effluent were measured. Chlorine susceptibility was assessed for planktonic cultures, attached biofilm, and particles and cells detached from the biofilm. Disinfection tolerance generally increased with a higher percentage of larger cell clusters in the chemostat and detached biofilm. Samples with a lower percentage of large clusters were more easily disinfected. Thus, disinfection tolerance depended on the cluster size distribution rather than sample type for chemostat and detached biofilm. Intact biofilms were more tolerant to chlorine independent of species. Homogenization of samples led to significantly increased susceptibility in all biofilm samples as well as detached clusters for single-species B. cepacia, B. cepacia in coculture, and P. aeruginosa in coculture. The disinfection efficacy was also dependent on species composition; coculture was advantageous to the survival of both species when grown as a biofilm or as clusters detached from biofilm but, surprisingly, resulted in a lower disinfection tolerance when they were grown as a mixed planktonic culture.

  4. Microphysical Modelling of the 1999-2000 Arctic Winter. 2; Chlorine Activation and Ozone Depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drdla, K.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The effect of a range of assumptions about polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) on ozone depletion has been assessed using at couple microphysical/photochemical model. The composition of the PSCs was varied (ternary solutions, nitric acid trihydrate, nitric acid dehydrate, or ice), as were parameters that affected the levels of denitrification and dehydration. Ozone depletion was affected by assumptions about PSC freezing because of the variability in resultant nitrification chlorine activation in all scenarios was similar despite the range of assumed PSC compositions. Vortex-average ozone loss exceeded 40% in the lower stratosphere for simulations without nitrification an additional ozone loss of 15-20% was possible in scenarios where vortex-average nitrification reached 60%. Ozone loss intensifies non-linearly with enhanced nitrification in air parcels with 90% nitrification 40% ozone loss in mid-April can be attributed to nitrification alone. However, these effects are sensitive to the stability of the vortex in springtime: nitrification only began to influence ozone depletion in mid-March.

  5. Process for Photochemical Chlorination of Hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Beanblossom, W S

    1951-08-28

    A process for chlorination of a major portion of the hydrogen atoms of paraffinic hydrocarbons of five or more carbon atoms may be replaced by subjecting the hydrocarbon to the action of chlorine under active light. The initial chlorination is begun at 25 to 30 deg C with the chlorine diluted with HCl. The later stages may be carried out with undiluted chlorine and the temperature gradually raised to about 129 deg C.

  6. Photoelectrocatalytic production of active chlorine on nanocrystalline titanium dioxide thin-film electrodes.

    PubMed

    Zanoni, Maria Valnice B; Sene, Jeosadaque J; Selcuk, Huseyin; Anderson, Marc A

    2004-06-01

    The production of chlorine and hypochlorite is of great economical and technological interest due to their large-scale use in many kinds of commercial applications. Yet, the current processes are not without problems such as inevitable side reactions and the high cost of production. This work reports the photoelectrocatalytic oxidation of chloride ions to free chlorine as it has been investigated by using titanium dioxide (TiO2) and several metal-doped titanium dioxide (M-TiO2) material electrodes. An average concentration of 800 mg L(-1) of free chlorine was obtained in an open-air reactor using a TiO2 thin-film electrode biased at +1.0 V (SCE) and illuminated by UV light. The M-doped electrodes have performed poorly compared with the pure TiO2 counterpart. Test solutions containing 0.05 mol L(-1) NaCl pH 2.0-4.0 were found to be the best conditions for fast production of free chlorine. A complete investigation of all parameters that influence the global process of chlorine production by the photo electrocatalytic method such as applied potential, concentration of NaCl, pH solution, and time is presented in detail. In addition, photocurrent vs potential curves and the reaction order are also discussed.

  7. Differences in antimicrobial activity of chlorine against twelve most prevalent poultry-associated Salmonella serotypes.

    PubMed

    Paul, Narayan C; Sullivan, Tarah S; Shah, Devendra H

    2017-06-01

    Chlorine is the most widely used carcass sanitizer in poultry processing in the USA. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of varying concentrations of organic matter on the susceptibility of twelve most prevalent poultry-associated Salmonella serotypes (MPPSTs) to chlorine. To mimic the microenvironment of the water used for immersion chilling, we manipulated organic matter contamination levels in pre-chilled (pH∼6, T∼4 °C) chlorinated (50 ppm) water using varying concentrations (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5%) of chicken-meat-extract (CME) produced from frozen chicken carcasses. This CME-based in vitro model was challenged with ∼1 × 10(5) CFUs of each MPPST isolate and the bacterial survival was tested at 5, 30, 60 and 90 min post-challenge. In this model, the decimal reduction time (D90-values) of each MPPST was linearly correlated with the concentration of CME. Significant inter-serotype differences in the D90-values were observed. The results show that the pH, concentration of total- and free-chlorine were also linearly correlated with the presence of CME in a concentration-dependent manner. The findings of this study indicate that the serotype and the levels of organic matter contamination significantly influence Salmonella survival and that both variables should be included in models that predict effectiveness of chlorine treatment in immersion chilling.

  8. Ecology of mixed biofilms subjected daily to a chlorinated alkaline solution: spatial distribution of bacterial species suggests a protective effect of one species to another.

    PubMed

    Leriche, V; Briandet, R; Carpentier, B

    2003-01-01

    Three bacterial strains (Kocuria sp. C714.1, Brevibacterium linens B337.1 and Staphylococcus sciuri CCL101) were grown together on stainless steel and were subjected daily to a commercial alkaline chlorine solution (22 mg l-1 of free chlorine, pH 11) over a period of 4 weeks. After the daily chemical shock, culture madia [1:20 dilution of tryptic soy broth (TSB-YE/20) or diluted whey] was deposited on the biofilms. The chemical shocks led first to a drop in the culturable population, followed by an increase and finally stabilization at around 106-107 CFU cm-2 by day 11 of the experiment. These changes in the microbial population can be attributed to a decreasing susceptibility to the antimicrobial agent with biofilm age, and to the consumption of free chlorine by biofilm exoproteins. The microbial composition appeared to be linked to the free chlorine concentration that depended on exoprotein production. At the end of the experiment, exoprotein production was greater for biofilms grown in TSBYE/20 than in whey. As a consequence, biofilms grown in whey did not neutralize the chlorine and the dominant strain was the one having the highest resistance to chlorine: K. varians. When biofilm were grown in TSBYE/20, chlorine was neutralized and the dominant strain was the one having the highest growth rate: S. sciuri. The presence of chlorine may also explain the distribution of S. sciuri cells as a ring around Kocuria sp. microcolonies. When chlorine was totally consumed by the biofilm during the chemical shock, S. sciuri was no longer grouped around Kocuria sp. microcolonies but was evenly scattered over the substratum as single cells or in small clusters, as it was before any chemical treatment. These findings strongly suggest protection of S. sciuri by Kocuria sp. microcolonies against the chlorinated solution. This phenomenon, added to the low susceptibility phenotype of the biofilm cells, could at least partly explain the survival of microbial cells in an adverse

  9. Myeloperoxidase-Related Chlorination Activity Is Positively Associated with Circulating Ceruloplasmin in Chronic Heart Failure Patients: Relationship with Neurohormonal, Inflammatory, and Nutritional Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Cabassi, Aderville; Binno, Simone Maurizio; Tedeschi, Stefano; Graiani, Gallia; Galizia, Cinzia; Bianconcini, Michele; Coghi, Pietro; Fellini, Federica; Ruffini, Livia; Govoni, Paolo; Piepoli, Massimo; Perlini, Stefano; Regolisti, Giuseppe; Fiaccadori, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Rationale. Heart failure (HF) is accompanied by the development of an imbalance between oxygen- and nitric oxide-derived free radical production leading to protein nitration. Both chlorinating and peroxidase cycle of Myeloperoxidase (MPO) contribute to oxidative and nitrosative stress and are involved in tyrosine nitration of protein. Ceruloplasmin (Cp) has antioxidant function through its ferroxidase I (FeOxI) activity and has recently been proposed as a physiological defense mechanism against MPO inappropriate actions. Objective. We investigated the relationship between plasma MPO-related chlorinating activity, Cp and FeOxI, and nitrosative stress, inflammatory, neurohormonal, and nutritional biomarkers in HF patients. Methods and Results. In chronic HF patients (n = 81, 76 ± 9 years, NYHA Class II (26); Class III (29); Class IV (26)) and age-matched controls (n = 17, 75 ± 11 years, CTR), plasma MPO chlorinating activity, Cp, FeOxI, nitrated protein, free Malondialdehyde, BNP, norepinephrine, hsCRP, albumin, and prealbumin were measured. Plasma MPO chlorinating activity, Cp, BNP, norepinephrine, and hsCRP were increased in HF versus CTR. FeOxI, albumin, and prealbumin were decreased in HF. MPO-related chlorinating activity was positively related to Cp (r = 0.363, P < 0.001), nitrated protein, hsCRP, and BNP and inversely to albumin. Conclusions. Plasma MPO chlorinated activity is increased in elderly chronic HF patients and positively associated with Cp, inflammatory, neurohormonal, and nitrosative parameters suggesting a role in HF progression. PMID:26539521

  10. Dechlorination of chlorinated compounds by Trametes versicolor ATCC 200801 crude laccase and quantitative structure-activity relationship of toxicity.

    PubMed

    Çabuk, Ahmet; Sidir, Yadigar G; Aytar, Pinar; Gedikli, Serap; Sidir, İsa

    2012-01-01

    Chlorinated compounds constitute an important class of xenobiotics. Crude laccase was produced using Trametes versicolor ATCC (200801) in potato dextrose broth, with wheat bran as an inducing medium, and its ability to dechlorinate eight compounds was determined. The compounds were 2-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2,6-dichlorophenol, 2,4,5-trichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, heptachlor and pentachlorophenol. A range of parameters for the dechlorination of some compounds was tested, including incubation period, pH, initial substrate concentration, temperature, and enzyme quantity. The oxygen consumption was determined during each dechlorination process, under pre-determined optimum conditions. The changes in chemical structure of the compounds were also determined, by using FTIR analysis, following dechlorination of test chlorophenolics. Strong interactions were found to lead to the reactivity of hydroxyl groups in some cases and chlorine atoms were released from the benzene ring. The changes in compound toxicity were monitored before and after enzymatic treatment, using Microtox. Quantitative structure-activity relationships for the toxicity of the chlorinated compounds were developed. Consequently, the toxic activity of the test compounds was controlled by electrophilic index and electronic properties.

  11. Movement and fate of chlorinated solvents in ground water; research activities at Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fusillo, T.V.; Ehlke, T.A.; Martin, Mary

    1987-01-01

    The USGS, through its Toxic Waste--Ground-Water Contamination Program, is undertaking an interdisciplinary research study of contaminants. The purpose of the study is to gain a better understanding of the chemical, physical, and biological processes that affect the movement and fate of these contaminants in groundwater. The study is being conducted at Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey, where metal plating and metal etching wastes have contaminated part of the glacial stratified drift aquifers. Major areas of research at the site are described, including: (1) distribution and movement of chlorinated solvents in groundwater, (2) behavior of chlorinated solvents in the unsaturated zone, (3) geochemistry of the contaminated groundwater, and (4) microbial transformations of chlorinated solvents. (Author 's abstract)

  12. Effect of chlorine substituent on cytotoxic activities: Design and synthesis of systematically modified 2,4-diphenyl-5H-indeno[1,2-b]pyridines.

    PubMed

    Kadayat, Tara Man; Park, Seojeong; Jun, Kyu-Yeon; Magar, Til Bahadur Thapa; Bist, Ganesh; Shrestha, Aarajana; Na, Younghwa; Kwon, Youngjoo; Lee, Eung-Seok

    2016-04-01

    In continuation of our previous work, six hydroxylated 2,4-diphenyl-5H-indeno[1,2-b]pyridine analogs were modified by introducing one chlorine functionality at ortho, meta or para position of the 2- or 4-phenyl ring. Eighteen new chlorinated compounds were thus prepared and assessed for topoisomerase inhibitory activity and cytotoxicity against HCT15, T47D, and HeLa cancer cell lines. All of the chlorinated compounds displayed significant cytotoxic effect, revealing potent anticancer activity against T47D breast cancer cells. This functional group modification allowed us to explore the importance of chlorine group substitution for the cytotoxic properties. The information reported here provides valuable insight for further study to develop new anticancer agents using related scaffolds.

  13. Evaluation of estrogenic activity of parabens and their chlorinated derivatives by using the yeast two-hybrid assay and the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, Masanori; Kamata, Ryo; Shiraishi, Fujio; Makino, Masakazu

    2009-01-01

    We assessed the estrogen agonist activities of 21 parabens and their chlorinated derivatives by using yeast two-hybrid assays incorporating either the human or medaka (Oryzias latipes) estrogen receptor alpha (hERalpha and medERalpha, respectively), and by using hERalpha competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ER-ELISA). In the two-hybrid assay with hERalpha, five parabens and three chlorinated derivatives exhibited estrogenic activity, and their relative activity (17beta-estradiol [E2] = 1) ranged from 2.0 x 10(-5) to 2.0 x 10(-4), with the highest activity observed in i-butylparaben. In the medERalpha assay, six parabens and six chlorinated derivatives exhibited estrogenic activity and their relative activity ranged from 2.7 x 10(-5) to 3.5 x 10(-3), with the highest activity observed in benzylparaben, its monochlorinated derivative, i-butylparaben, and n-butylparaben. Although medERalpha demonstrated an activity to E2 that was three times lower than that demonstrated by hERalpha, medERalpha has a higher sensitivity to parabens than hERa (1.3-8.9 times). Five parabens and two chlorinated derivatives exhibited a binding affinity to ERa in the ER-ELISA; of the parabens, i-butylparaben exhibited the strongest binding affinity. The yeast two-hybrid assay and the ER-ELISA also revealed that many of the assayed chlorinated parabens were much weaker than the parent compound. In addition, the results mainly showed that parabens with a bulk substituent (e.g., i-butyl and benzyl groups) had a higher activity than those with a sterically small substituent. It is considered that derivatization masks the apparent estrogenic activity of parabens, but the resulting chlorinated compounds may represent a potential hazard and therefore other toxicity tests should be performed to determine the toxicity of the chlorinated derivatives.

  14. Antimicrobial activity of controlled-release chlorine dioxide gas on fresh blueberries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) on the safety and quality of blueberries was studied. In vitro studies revealed that both ClO2 gas fumigation and ClO2 water direct contact killed food pathogen bacterium, Escherichia coli and fruit decay pathogen fungus, Colletotrichum acutatum. In vivo studies...

  15. Ligand Exchange-Mediated Activation and Stabilization of a Re-Based Olefin Metathesis Catalyst by Chlorinated Alumina.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Alessandro; Fong, Anthony; Szeto, Kai C; Rieb, Julia; Delevoye, Laurent; Gauvin, Régis M; Taoufik, Mostafa; Peters, Baron; Scott, Susannah L

    2016-10-05

    Extensive chlorination of γ-Al2O3 results in the formation of highly Lewis acidic surface domains depleted in surface hydroxyl groups. Adsorption of methyltrioxorhenium (MTO) onto these chlorinated domains serves to activate it as a low temperature, heterogeneous olefin metathesis catalyst and confers both high activity and high stability. Characterization of the catalyst reveals that the immobilized MTO undergoes partial ligand exchange with the surface, whereby some Re sites acquire a chloride ligand from the modified alumina while donating an oxo ligand to the support. More specifically, Re LIII-edge EXAFS and DFT calculations support facile ligand exchange between MTO and Cl-Al2O3 to generate [CH3ReO2Cl(+)] fragments that interact with a bridging oxygen of the support via a Lewis acid-base interaction. According to IR and solid-state NMR, the methyl group remains intact, and does not evolve spontaneously to a stable methylene tautomer. Nevertheless, the chloride-promoted metathesis catalyst is far more active and productive than MTO/γ-Al2O3, easily achieving a TON of 100 000 for propene metathesis in a flow reactor at 10 °C (compared to TON < 5000 for the nonchlorinated catalyst). Increased activity is a consequence of both a larger fraction of active sites and a higher intrinsic activity for the new sites. Increased stability is tentatively attributed to a stronger interaction between MTO and chlorinated surface regions, as well as extensive depletion of the Brønsted acidic surface hydroxyl population. The reformulated catalyst represents a major advance for Re-based metathesis catalysts, whose widespread use has thus far been severely hampered by their instability.

  16. Chlorine isotopes of thermal springs in arc volcanoes for tracing shallow magmatic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long; Bonifacie, Magali; Aubaud, Cyril; Crispi, Olivier; Dessert, Céline; Agrinier, Pierre

    2015-03-01

    The evaluation of the status of shallow magma body (i.e., from the final intrusion stage, to quiescence, and back to activity), one of the key parameters that trigger and sustain volcanic eruptions, has been challenging in modern volcanology. Among volatile tracers, chlorine (Cl) uniquely exsolves at shallow depths and is highly hydrophilic. Consequently, Cl enrichment in volcanic gases and thermal springs has been proposed as a sign for shallow magmatic activities. However, such enrichment could also result from numerous other processes (e.g., water evaporation, dissolution of old chloride mineral deposits, seawater contamination) that are unrelated to magmatic activity. Here, based on stable isotope compositions of chloride and dissolved inorganic carbon, as well as previous published 3He/4He data obtained in thermal springs from two recently erupted volcanoes (La Soufrière in Guadeloupe and Montagne Pelée in Martinique) in the Lesser Antilles Arc, we show that the magmatic Cl efficiently trapped in thermal springs displays negative δ37Cl values (≤ - 0.65 ‰), consistent with a slab-derived origin but distinct from the isotope compositions of chloride in surface reservoirs (e.g. seawater, local meteoric waters, rivers and cold springs) displaying common δ37Cl values of around 0‰. Using this δ37Cl difference as an index of magmatic Cl, we further examined thermal spring samples including a 30-year archive from two thermal springs in Guadeloupe covering samples from its last eruption in 1976-1977 to 2008 and an island-wide sampling event in Martinique in 2008 to trace the evolution of magmatic Cl in the volcanic hydrothermal systems over time. The results show that magmatic Cl can be rapidly flushed out of the hydrothermal systems within <30 to 80 years after the eruption, much quicker than other volatile tracers such as CO2 and noble gases, which can exsolve at greater depths and constantly migrate to the surface. Because arc volcanoes often have well

  17. Hepatic microsomal cytochrome p450s and chlorinated hydrocarbons in largha and ribbon seals from Hokkaido, Japan: differential response of seal species to Ah receptor agonist exposure.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Issei; Sakakibara, Akihito; Iwata, T Hisato; Ishizuka, Mayumi; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Akahori, Fumiaki; Kazusaka, Akio; Fujita, Shoichi

    2002-04-01

    From 16 largha seals (Phoca largha) and 15 ribbon seals (Phoca fasciata) in the coastal waters of Hokkaido, Japan, blubber chlorinated hydrocarbon (CHC) levels and hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP) catalytic activities and their immunochemically detected protein content levels were measured. Concentrations of DDTs (2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethylene,p,p'-DDE; 2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethane, p,p'-DDD; dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, p,p'-DDT), polychlorinated biphenyl congeners (PCBs), and chlordane compounds (oxychlordane, chlordanes, and nonachlors) in both species were in the range of 290 to 5,300, 420 to 4,000, and 130 to 1,500 ng/g lipid weight, respectively. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists, non-ortho (IUPAC 77 and 126) and mono-ortho (IUPAC 105, 118, and 156) coplanar PCB congeners, were also detected, and the 2,3,7,8-tetrachlordibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) toxic equivalents (TEQs) were 4.9 to 120 pg TEQ/g lipid weight. Cross-reactive proteins with polyclonal antibodies against rat CYP1A1 and CYP3A2 were notably detected in seal liver microsomes. Interestingly, a polyclonal antibody against rat CYP2B1 recognized proteins only at trace levels. In largha seals, both levels of alkoxyresorufin- (methoxy-, ethoxy-, pentoxy-, and benzyloxyresorufin) O-dealkylase (AROD) activities and proteins detected by polyclonal antibodies against rat CYP1A1 were significantly correlated with the concentrations of individual coplanar PCB congeners, total TEQs, and total PCBs. Threshold concentrations for TEQs in blubber of the largha seal to induce hepatic CYP1A protein and EROD activity were estimated to be 8.5 and 19 pg TEQ/g fat weight, respectively. In ribbon seals, similar correlations were not detected, although the TEQ levels were not significantly lower than those in largha seals. These results suggest that AROD activity and CYP1A1 protein in the liver of the largha seal could be a biomarker for the exposure to AhR agonists such as coplanar PCB

  18. Correlation of Conformational Changes and Protein Degradation with Loss of Lysozyme Activity Due to Chlorine Dioxide Treatment.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Beng Guat; Branning, Sharon Alyssa

    2016-12-13

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is a potent oxidizing agent used for the treatment of drinking water and decontamination of facilities and equipment. The purpose of this research is to elucidate the manner in which ClO2 destroys proteins by studying the effects of ClO2 on lysozyme. The degree of enzyme activity lost can be correlated to the treatment time and levels of the ClO2 used. Lysozyme activity was drastically reduced to 45.3% of original enzyme activity when exposed to 4.3 mM ClO2 in the sample after 3 h. Almost all activities were lost in 3 h after exposure to higher ClO2 concentrations of up to 16.8 and 21.9 mM. Changes in protein conformation and amount as a result of ClO2 treatment were determined using the Raman spectroscopy and gel electrophoresis. Raman shifts and the alteration of spectral features observed in the ClO2-treated lysozyme samples are associated with loss of the α-helix secondary structure, tertiary structure, and disulfide bond. Progressive degradation of the denatured lysozyme by increasing levels of chlorine dioxide was also observed in gel electrophoresis. Hence, ClO2 can effectively cause protein denaturation and degradation resulting in loss of enzyme activity.

  19. Texas Endangered Species Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Kathleen Marie; Campbell, Linda

    This publication is the result of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Division's (TPWD's) commitment to education and the fertile partnerships formed between TPWD biologists and educators. This activity book brings together the expertise and practical knowledge of a classroom teacher with the technical knowledge and skills of a TPWD biologist and artist.…

  20. Enhancement of toxicity and enzyme-repressing activity of p-dioxane by chlorination: stereoselective effects.

    PubMed

    Woo, Y T; Neuburger, B J; Arcos, J C; Argus, M F; Nishiyama, K; Griffin, G W

    1980-01-01

    The acute toxicity of p-dioxane may be enhanced up to 1000-fold by chlorination of the compound. The effect was stereoselective. Of the stereoisomers tested, tetrachloro-p-dioxane, isomer I (2r, 3t, 5t, 6c) was over 80 times more toxic than isomer II (2r, 3c, 5t, 6t). The latter compound was also a potent repressor of hepatic dimethylnitrosamine-demethylase I (DMN-d) and aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH).

  1. The use of multiple indices of physiological activity to access viability in chlorine disinfected Escherichia coli O157:H7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisle, J. T.; Pyle, B. H.; McFeters, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    A suite of fluorescent intracellular stains and probes was used, in conjunction with viable plate counts, to assess the effect of chlorine disinfection on membrane potential (rhodamine 123; Rh123 and bis-(1,3-dibutylbarbituric acid) trimethine oxonol; DiBAC4(3)), membrane integrity (LIVE/DEAD BacLight kit), respiratory activity (5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride; CTC) and substrate responsiveness (direct viable counts; DVC) in the commensal pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7. After a 5 min exposure to the disinfectant, physiological indices were affected in the following order: viable plate counts > substrate responsiveness > membrane potential > respiratory activity > membrane integrity. In situ assessment of physiological activity by examining multiple targets, as demonstrated in this study, permits a more comprehensive determination of the site and extent of injury in bacterial cells following sublethal disinfection with chlorine. This approach to assessing altered bacterial physiology has application in various fields where detection of stressed bacteria is of interest.

  2. Hierarchical chlorine-doped rutile TiO{sub 2} spherical clusters of nanorods: Large-scale synthesis and high photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Hua; Zheng Zhi; Zhang Lizhi Zhang Hailu; Deng Feng

    2008-09-15

    In this study, we report the synthesis of hierarchical chlorine-doped rutile TiO{sub 2} spherical clusters of nanorods photocatalyst on a large scale via a soft interface approach. This catalyst showed much higher photocatalytic activity than the famous commercial titania (Degussa P25) under visible light ({lambda}>420 nm). The resulting sample was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM (HRTEM), nitrogen adsorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, {sup 1}H solid magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) and photoluminescence spectroscopy. On the basis of characterization results, we found that the doping of chlorine resulted in red shift of absorption and higher surface acidity as well as crystal defects in the photocatalyst, which were the reasons for high photocatalytic activity of chlorine-doped TiO{sub 2} under visible light ({lambda}>420 nm). These hierarchical chlorine-doped rutile TiO{sub 2} spherical clusters of nanorods are very attractive in the fields of environmental pollutants removal and solar cell because of their easy separation and high activity. - Graphical abstract: Hierarchical chlorine-doped rutile TiO{sub 2} spherical clusters of nanorods photocatalyst were synthesized on a large scale via a soft interface approach. This catalyst showed much higher photocatalytic activity than the famous commercial titania (Degussa P25) under visible light ({lambda}>420 nm)

  3. Reaction of chlorine nitrate with hydrogen chloride and water at Antarctic stratospheric temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolbert, Margaret A.; Rossi, Michel J.; Malhotra, Ripudaman; Golden, David M.

    1987-01-01

    Laboratory studies of heterogeneous reactions important for ozone depletion over Antarctica are reported. The reaction of chlorine nitrate (ClONO2) with H2O and HCl on surfacers that simulate polar stratospheric clouds are studied at temperatures relevant to the Antarctic stratosphere. The gaseous products of the resulting reactions, HOCl, Cl2O, and Cl2, could readily photolyze in the Antarctic spring to produce active chlorine for ozone depletion. Furthermore, the additional formation of condensed-phase HNO3 could serve as a sink for odd nitrogen species that would otherwise scavenge the active chlorine.

  4. Decomposition of free chlorine with tertiary ammonium.

    PubMed

    Katano, Hajime; Uematsu, Kohei; Tatsumi, Hirosuke; Tsukatani, Toshihide

    2010-01-01

    The reaction of free chlorine with tertiary ammonium or amine compounds in aqueous solution was studied by the amperometry at a rotating Pt-disk electrode. The amperometric method can be applied to follow the concentration of free chlorine (c(Cl)) even in the presence of chloramine species. By addition of mono- and dibutylammonium to the solution containing free chlorine, the step-like decrease in c(Cl) was observed, indicating the rapid formation of the stable chloramine species. By addition of tributylammonium, the c(Cl) was decreased exponentially to nearly zero even if the free chlorine was present initially in excess. The c(Cl)-t curves can be explained by tributylammonium-species-catalyzed decomposition of free chlorine to chloride ion. The catalytic decomposition was observed also with the tertiary-ammonium-based anion-exchange resins. Furthermore, the anion-exchange resins exhibited the decomposition of not only free chlorine but also chloramines in water.

  5. Chlorine dioxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 00 / 007 TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE AND CHLORITE ( CAS Nos . 10049 - 04 - 4 and 7758 - 19 - 2 ) In Support of Summary Information on the ( IRIS ) Integrated Risk Information System September 2000 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC DISCLAIMER This docu

  6. Chlorine cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Chlorine cyanide ; CASRN 506 - 77 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  7. Determination of bromine, chlorine and iodine in environmental aqueous samples by epithermal neutron activation analysis and Compton suppression

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landsberger, S.; O'Kelly, D. J.; Braisted, J.; Panno, S.

    2006-01-01

    Halides, particularly Br- and Cl-, have been used as indicators of potential sources of Na+ and Cl- in surface water and groundwater with limited success. Contamination of groundwater and surface water by Na+ and Cl- is a common occurrence in growing urban areas and adversely affects municipal and private water supplies in Illinois and other states, as well as vegetation in environmentally sensitive areas. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) can be effectively used to determine these halogens, but often the elevated concentrations of sodium and chlorine in water samples can give rise to very high detection limits for bromine and iodine due to elevated backgrounds from the activation process. We present a detailed analytical scheme to determine Cl, Br and I in aqueous samples with widely varying Na and Cl concentrations using epithermal NAA in conjunction with Compton suppression. ?? 2006 Akade??miai Kiado??.

  8. Analytical strategy for the determination of various arsenic species in landfill leachate containing high concentrations of chlorine and organic carbon by HPLC-ICPMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, J.; An, J.; Kim, J.; Jung, H.; Kim, K.; Yoon, C.; Yoon, H.

    2012-12-01

    As a variety of wastes containing arsenic are disposed of in landfills, such facilities can play a prominent role in disseminating arsenic sources to the environment. Since it is widely recognized that arsenic toxicity is highly dependent on its species, accurate determination of various arsenic species should be considered as one of the essential goals to properly account for the potential health risk of arsenic in human and the environment. The inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry linked to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-ICPMS) is acknowledged as one of the most important tools for the trace analysis of metallic speciation because of its superior separation capability and detectability. However, the complexity of matrices can cause severe interferences in the analysis results, which is the problem often encountered with HPLC-ICPMS system. High concentration of organic carbon in a sample solution causes carbon build-up on the skimmer and sampling cone, which reduces analytical sensitivity and requires a high maintenance level for its cleaning. In addition, argon from the plasma and chlorine from the sample matrix may combine to form 40Ar35Cl, which has the same nominal mass to charge (m/z) ratio as arsenic. In this respect, analytical strategy for the determination of various arsenic species (e.g., inorganic arsenite and arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid, dimethylarsinic acid, dimethyldithioarsinic acid, and arsenobetaine) in landfill leachate containing high concentrations of chlorine and organic carbon was developed in the present study. Solid phase extraction disk (i.e., C18 disk), which does not significantly adsorb any target arsenic species, was used to remove organic carbon in sample solutions. In addition, helium (He) gas was injected into the collision reaction cell equipped in ICPMS to collapse 40Ar35Cl into individual 40Ar and 35Cl. Although He gas also decreased arsenic intensity by blocking 75As, its signal to noise ratio

  9. Removal of Intermediate Aromatic Halogenated DBPs by Activated Carbon Adsorption: A New Approach to Controlling Halogenated DBPs in Chlorinated Drinking Water.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jingyi; Zhang, Xiangru; Zhu, Xiaohu; Li, Yu

    2017-03-21

    During chlorine disinfection of drinking water, chlorine may react with natural organic matter (NOM) and bromide ion in raw water to generate halogenated disinfection byproducts (DBPs). To mitigate adverse effects from DBP exposure, granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption has been considered as one of the best available technologies for removing NOM (DBP precursor) in drinking water treatment. Recently, we have found that many aromatic halogenated DBPs form in chlorination, and they act as intermediate DBPs to decompose and form commonly known DBPs including trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids. In this work, we proposed a new approach to controlling drinking water halogenated DBPs by GAC adsorption of intermediate aromatic halogenated DBPs during chlorination, rather than by GAC adsorption of NOM prior to chlorination (i.e., traditional approach). Rapid small-scale column tests were used to simulate GAC adsorption in the new and traditional approaches. Significant reductions of aromatic halogenated DBPs were observed in the effluents with the new approach; the removals of total organic halogen, trihalomethanes, and haloacetic acids by the new approach always exceeded those by the traditional approach; and the effluents with the new approach were considerably less developmentally toxic than those with the traditional approach. Our findings indicate that the new approach is substantially more effective in controlling halogenated DBPs than the traditional approach.

  10. The effect of pH and chloride concentration on the stability and antimicrobial activity of chlorine-based sanitizers.

    PubMed

    Waters, Brian W; Hung, Yen-Con

    2014-04-01

    Chlorinated water and electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water solutions were made to compare the free chlorine stability and microbicidal efficacy of chlorine-containing solutions with different properties. Reduction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 was greatest in fresh samples (approximately 9.0 log CFU/mL reduction). Chlorine loss in "aged" samples (samples left in open bottles) was greatest (approximately 40 mg/L free chlorine loss in 24 h) in low pH (approximately 2.5) and high chloride (Cl(-) ) concentrations (greater than 150 mg/L). Reduction of E. coli O157:H7 was also negatively impacted (<1.0 log CFU/mL reduction) in aged samples with a low pH and high Cl(-) . Higher pH values (approximately 6.0) did not appear to have a significant effect on free chlorine loss or numbers of surviving microbial cells when fresh and aged samples were compared. This study found chloride levels in the chlorinated and EO water solutions had a reduced effect on both free chlorine stability and its microbicidal efficacy in the low pH solutions. Greater concentrations of chloride in pH 2.5 samples resulted in decreased free chlorine stability and lower microbicidal efficacy.

  11. Total residual chlorine as a regulatory tool

    SciTech Connect

    Mattice, J.S.; Tsai, S.C.

    1981-01-01

    Inherent in the choice of total residual chlorine (TRC) as a basis for establishing water quality criteria or effluent guidelines for chlorine are assumptions that components of TRC are roughly equivalent in toxicity to aquatic species and that the toxicities of these components are additive. Most of the studies of this assumption involved comparisons of mixtures of residual chlorine components and thus led to conflicting conclusions. In addition, studies designed to avoid the mixture problem omitted one or more of the most likely products of chlorination from the comparison(s). On the other hand, the assumption of additive toxicity of residual chlorine species has largely been ignored. In view of the continuing controversy that focused on the levels of residual chlorine which can be discharged without deleterious impact on receiving waters, it is important that these assumptions be evaluated comprehensively. New data on the toxicities to the mosquitofish, Gambusia affinis, of inorganic monochloramine, inorganic dichloramine, a mixture of these two compounds, and two mixtures with free chlorine are reported. These and other data on the toxicity of residual chlorine species to mosquitofish are then used to examine the questions of toxicity equivalence and additivity of species of residual chlorine. (ERB)

  12. Chlorine Clues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This plot shows that levels of the element chlorine rise dramatically in the deeper rocks lining the walls of the crater dubbed 'Endurance.' The data shown here were taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer at Endurance and 'Eagle Crater,' the site where Opportunity first landed at Meridiani Planum.

    Opportunity has been inching down the walls of Endurance Crater, investigating distinct layers of rock as it goes for clues to Mars' buried past. The various Endurance layers have been informally labeled 'A' through 'F.' Targets within these layers are listed on the graph along with previous targets from Eagle Crater. All the rocks listed here were observed after they had been drilled by the rover's rock abrasion tool.

    The observations indicate that the elements making up the shallow rock layers of Endurance Crater resemble those of Eagle, while the deeper layers of Endurance possess increasingly higher concentrations of the element chlorine.

    Opportunity will continue to roll deeper into Endurance to see if this puzzling trend continues. Scientists hope the new data will help them figure out how the presence of chlorine fits into the history of water at Endurance Crater.

  13. Collagen degrading activity associated with Mycobacterium species

    PubMed Central

    Masso, F; Paez, A; Varela, E; d Diaz; Zenteno, E; Montano, L

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The mechanism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis penetration into tissues is poorly understood but it is reasonable to assume that there is a contribution from proteases capable of disrupting the extracellular matrix of the pulmonary epithelium and the blood vessels. A study was undertaken to identify and characterise collagen degrading activity of M tuberculosis.
METHODS—Culture filtrate protein extract (CFPE) was obtained from reference mycobacterial strains and mycobacteria isolated from patients with tuberculosis. The collagen degrading activity of CFPE was determined according to the method of Johnson-Wint using 3H-type I collagen. The enzyme was identified by the Birkedal-Hansen and Taylor method and its molecular mass determined by SDS-PAGE and Sephacryl S-300 gel filtration chromatography using an electroelution purified enzyme.
RESULTS—CFPE from Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Rv showed collagenolytic activity that was four times higher than that of the avirulent strain H37Ra. The 75 kDa enzyme responsible was divalent cation dependent. Other mycobacterial species and those isolated from patients with tuberculosis also had collagen degrading activity.
CONCLUSIONS—Mycobacterium species possess a metalloprotease with collagen degrading activity. The highest enzymatic activity was found in the virulent reference strain H37Rv.

 PMID:10212111

  14. Antimicrobial activity of controlled-release chlorine dioxide gas on fresh blueberries.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiuxiu; Bai, Jinhe; Ference, Christopher; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Yifan; Narciso, Jan; Zhou, Kequan

    2014-07-01

    The effect of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas on the safety and quality of blueberries was studied. In vitro studies revealed that both ClO2 gas fumigation and ClO2 direct contact in water killed food pathogen bacterium Escherichia coli and fruit decay pathogen fungus Colletotrichum acutatum. In vivo studies were conducted using noninoculated berries and berries inoculated with postharvest decay and foodborne pathogens. Berries were inoculated with either E. coli (5.2 log CFU/g) or C. acutatum (3.9 log CFU/g). Inoculated fruit were dried for 2 h at room temperature in a climate-controlled laboratory and packed in perforated commercial clamshells, with or without ClO2 pads, and stored at 10°C for up to 9 days. The effects of ClO2 on microbial populations and fruit firmness were monitored during storage. In the inoculation experiment, treatment with ClO2 reduced populations of E. coli and C. acutatum by 2.2 to 3.3 and 1.3 to 2.0 log CFU/g, respectively. For the noninoculated blueberries, the initial total aerobic bacteria count and the yeast and mold count were 4.2 and 4.1 log CFU/g, respectively. ClO2 treatment reduced total aerobic bacteria count and yeast and mold count by 1.5 to 1.8 and 1.3 to 1.7 log CFU/g, respectively. The firmness of both inoculated and noninoculated blueberries was maintained by ClO2 treatment. Thus, controlled-release ClO2 gas fumigation technology shows promise as an effective and practical antimicrobial agent in commercial clamshell packaging of blueberry and other fruits.

  15. Gaseous, chlorine-free chlorine dioxide for drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, G.; Rosenblatt, A.

    1996-11-01

    The benefits of applying chlorine dioxide (ClO{sub 2}) for the oxidative treatment of drinking water are well established. Chlorine dioxide treated finished water typically has substantially lower trihalomethane (THM) levels because ClO{sub 2} will not form chlorinated organic species as a by-product of disinfection. The THMs that are formed are probably due to chlorine from the generator or chlorine used to maintain a post-disinfection residual. An emerging regulatory issue concerning the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) is causing the water industry to set standards for the generation and delivery of ClO{sub 2}. The Federal Register (11 February 1994) contains language developed to limit the production of the unwanted inorganic by-products chlorite (ClO{sub 2}{sup -}), chlorate (ClO{sub 3}{sup -}), and bromate (BrO{sub 3}{sup -}) ions by requiring utilities to maintain high (95%) generation efficiencies and by limiting the amount of excess Cl{sub 2} that can be used during the generation process. The efficiency and excess Cl{sub 2} regulations may be problematic for utilities that over-chlorinate to attain chlorine dioxide high yields. Many utilities will have to decide either to reduce the amount of Cl{sub 2} used to react with sodium chlorite (NaClO{sub 2}), thereby increasing the ClO{sub 2}{sup -} residual in finished water, or over-chlorinate to increase yields and surpass the excess Cl{sub 2} limits.

  16. Risk assessment of short-chain chlorinated paraffins in Japan based on the first market basket study and species sensitivity distributions.

    PubMed

    Iino, Fukuya; Takasuga, Takumi; Senthilkumar, Kurunthachalam; Nakamura, Naoki; Nakanishi, Junko

    2005-02-01

    The chemical risks of short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) to human health and ecological species in Japan were assessed in this study. SCCPs are used as extreme pressure additives in metal-working fluids and flame retardant agents in plastic materials. The first market basket study with a high resolution gas chromatography and mass spectrometry with electron capture negative ionization is reported. Total daily food intakes for Japanese residents of different ages were estimated using Latin Hypercube simulations, and the highest 95th percentile intake is 6.8 x 10(2) ng/kg/day for a 1-year-old child. Based on the reported no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) and the estimated exposure mainly from food, it was concluded thatSCCPs are not posing risks to humans in Japan. Ecological risks to aquatic and sediment organisms were estimated using species sensitivity distributions. The 95th percentiles of the distributions obtained by fitting several environmental SCCP concentration data of river water and sediment were 41.8 ng/L and 558 ng/g wet weight as the possible highest concentrations, respectively. No-observed-effect-concentrations (NOEC) were determined by calculating the fifth percentiles of a species sensitivity distribution, which were 2.2 microg/L for aquatic organisms and 1.7 to 13.5 mg/ kg wet weight for sediment organisms. While it is likely that there is no imminent environmental chemical risk for aquatic organisms at a regional level in Japan, this study concluded that a more detailed risk assessment is necessary for sediment organisms.

  17. Observations of interstellar chlorine and phosphorus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.; York, D. G.

    1978-01-01

    Copernicus observations of interstellar Cl I, Cl II, and P II UV lines toward 10 stars are reported. Column densities are estimated for each species, and upper limits are computed for HCl column densities. Derivation of the gas-phase abundances of chlorine and phosphorus indicates that the averages of both the chlorine and the phosphorus logarithmic abundances relative to hydrogen are between 5.0 and 5.1. It is suggested that interstellar chlorine may be depleted by about a factor of 3 relative to the solar abundance and that interstellar phosphorus is depleted by a factor of 2 to 3. The results are shown to support the prediction that chlorine is ionized in regions containing primarily atomic oxygen and is neutral in regions where there is a significant amount of molecular hydrogen. The photoionization rate of neutral chlorine toward 15 Mon is estimated, and it is concluded that most chlorine is contained within the gas phase.

  18. Chlorination of tramadol: Reaction kinetics, mechanism and genotoxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hanyang; Song, Dean; Chang, Yangyang; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-12-01

    Tramadol (TRA) is one of the most detected analgesics in environmental matrices, and it is of high significance to study the reactivity of TRA during chlorination considering its potential toxicity to the environment. The chlorine/TRA reaction is first order with respect to the TRA concentration, and a combination of first-order and second-order with respect to chlorine concentration. The pH dependence of the observed rate constants (kobs) showed that the TRA oxidation reactivity increased with increasing pH. kobs can be quantitatively described by considering all active species including Cl2, Cl2O and HOCl, and the individual rate constants of HOCl/TRA(0), HOCl/TRAH(+), Cl2/TRA and Cl2O/TRA reactions were calculated to be (2.61±0.29)×10(3)M(-1)s(-1), 14.73±4.17M(-1)s(-1), (3.93±0.34)×10(5)M(-1)s(-1) and (5.66±1.83)×10(6)M(-1)s(-1), respectively. Eleven degradation products were detected with UPLC-Q-TOF-MS, and the corresponding structures of eight products found under various pH conditions were proposed. The amine group was proposed to be the initial attack site under alkaline pH conditions, where reaction of the deprotonated amine group with HOCl is favorable. Under acidic and neutral pH conditions, however, two possible reaction pathways were proposed. One is an electrophilic substitution on the aromatic ring, and another is an electrophilic substitution on the nitrogen, leading to an N-chlorinated intermediate, which can be further oxidized. Finally, the SOS/umu test showed that the genotoxicity of TRA chlorination products increased with increasing dosage of chlorine, which was mostly attributed to the formation of some chlorine substitution products.

  19. The influence of plant species on the plant/air partitioning coefficients of PCBs and chlorinated benzenes

    SciTech Connect

    Koemp, P.; McLachlan, M.S.

    1995-12-31

    The plant/air partitioning coefficients (K{sub PA}) of pentachlorobenzene, hexachlorobenzene and 16 PCB congeners were determined in five different grass and herb species common to Central Europe (Lolium multiflorum, Trifolium repens, Plantago lanceolata, Crepis biennis, Achillea millefolium). The measurements were conducted between 5 C and 35 C using a solid phase fugacity meter. Octanol/air partition coefficients (K{sub OA}) were also measured over a similar temperature range. In all cases an excellent linear relationship between log K{sub PA} and log K{sub OA} was observed (r{sup 2} between 0.80 and 0.99). However, while the slope of this relationship was 1 for Lolium multiflorum (ryegrass), in agreement with previous work, the slopes of the log K{sub PA} vs. log K{sub OA} plot were less than 1 for the other 4 species, lying as low as 0.49 for Achillea millefolium (yarrow). Large differences in the enthalpy of phase change (plant/air) were also observed between the different species, but these differences were not related to the differences in the partition coefficients. These observations demonstrate that the contaminant storage properties of plants are variable, and that the lipophilic compartment in some plants is considerably more polar than octanol. This places constraints on the applicability of current models of plant uptake, almost all of which assume that the lipophilic compartment behaves like octanol, and reinforces the need for more research into the contaminant storage properties of plants.

  20. DETERMINING ACTIVE OXIDANT SPECIES REACTING WITH ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDES IN CHLORINATED DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorpyrifos (CP) is an organophosphate (OP) pesticide that was used as a model compound to investigate the transformation of OP pesticides at low pH and in the presence of bromide and natural organic matter (NOM) under drinking water treatment conditions. Raman spectroscopy was...

  1. Isotope analysis of sulfur, bromine, and chlorine in individual anionic species by ion chromatography/multicollector-ICPMS.

    PubMed

    Zakon, Yevgeni; Halicz, Ludwik; Gelman, Faina

    2014-07-01

    We developed an analytical method for precise and accurate analysis of δ(34)S, δ(81)Br, and δ(37)Cl in individual anionic species by coupled ion chromatography (IC) and multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS). The method is based on the online separation and purification of ions by IC prior to their isotope analysis by MC-ICPMS. The developed technique significantly simplifies δ(34)S, δ(81)Br, and δ(37)Cl analysis in environmental samples. In cases when several anionic species of the same element are present in the sample, they might be analyzed in a single analytical run. Major isobaric interferences for the analyzed elements were reduced by using "dry" plasma conditions and applying sufficient mass resolution power. The sample-standard bracketing technique was used for instrumental drift correction. In the case of δ(34)S analysis, precisions up to 0.15‰ (1sd) have been achieved for analytes containing down to 5 nmol of S; for δ(81)Br, the attained precision was 0.1‰ (1sd) for analytes containing down to 0.6 nmol of Br. Precisions of 0.2‰ have been obtained for δ(37)Cl with analytes containing 0.7 μmol of Cl. Robustness of the developed analytical method, as well as high precisions and accuracies, has been demonstrated for the laboratory standard solutions and for environmental samples.

  2. Phytochemistry and biological activities of Phlomis species.

    PubMed

    Limem-Ben Amor, Ilef; Boubaker, Jihed; Ben Sgaier, Mohamed; Skandrani, Ines; Bhouri, Wissem; Neffati, Aicha; Kilani, Soumaya; Bouhlel, Ines; Ghedira, Kamel; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2009-09-07

    The genus Phlomis L. belongs to the Lamiaceae family and encompasses 100 species native to Turkey, North Africa, Europe and Asia. It is a popular herbal tea enjoyed for its taste and aroma. Phlomis species are used to treat various conditions such as diabetes, gastric ulcer, hemorrhoids, inflammation, and wounds. This review aims to summarize recent research on the phytochemistry and pharmacological properties of the genus Phlomis, with particular emphasis on its ethnobotanical uses. The essential oil of Phomis is composed of four chemotypes dominated by monoterpenes (alpha-pinene, limonene and linalool), sesquiterpenes (germacrene D and beta-caryophyllene), aliphalic compounds (9,12,15-octadecatrienoic acid methyl ester), fatty acids (hexadecanoic acid) and other components (trans-phytol, 9,12,15-octadecatrien-1-ol). Flavonoids, iridoids and phenylethyl alcohol constitute the main compounds isolated from Phlomis extracts. The pharmacological activities of some Phlomis species have been investigated. They are described according to antidiabetic, antinociceptive, antiulcerogenic, protection of the vascular system, anti-inflammatory, antiallergic, anticancer, antimicrobial and antioxidant properties.

  3. Evaluation of chlorinated benz[a]anthracene on hepatic toxicity in rats and mutagenic activity in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Kido, T; Sakakibara, H; Ohura, T; Guruge, K S; Kojima, M; Hasegawa, J; Iwamura, T; Yamanaka, N; Masuda, S; Sakaguchi, M; Amagai, T; Shimoi, K

    2013-01-01

    Chlorinated benz[a]anthracenes (Cl-BaA) are halogenated aromatic compounds (typified by dioxins) found in the environment at relatively high concentrations. Fischer 344 rats were intragastrically administered 0, 1, or 10 mg of Cl-BaA or its parent compound benz[a]anthracene (BaA) per kg of body weight for 14 consecutive days. Both chemicals at 10 mg/kg/day inhibited the gain in body weight, and consequent increase in relative liver weight. Hepatic gene expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1, 1A2, and 1B1 was significantly stimulated by administration of BaA (10 mg/kg/day) compared with the control. After administration of Cl-BaA, only the CYP1A2 gene was significantly induced, even at the lower dosage; CYP1A1 and 1B1 mRNA levels remained unchanged in Cl-BaA-treated rats compared with controls. To elucidate the role of such Cl-BaA exposure and induced CYPs at toxicity onset, we investigated the mutagenicity of BaA and Cl-BaA using Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100. BaA and Cl-BaA at 10 μg/plate produced positive results in both strains in the presence of rat S-9. Incubation of Cl-BaA with recombinant rat CYP1A2 produced a significantly higher number of revertant colonies in TA98 and TA100 than in controls, but no such change was observed for BaA. In conclusion, BaA changes its own physiological and toxicological actions by its chlorination; (1) daily exposure to Cl-BaA selectively induces hepatic CYP1A2 in rats and (2) Cl-BaA induces frameshift mutations in the presence of CYP1A2, although BaA does not exert mutagenicity. This indicates that CYP1A2 may metabolize Cl-BaA to active forms.

  4. Activated Persulfate Treatment of 1,4-Dioxane in the Presence of Chlorinated Solvent Co-contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boving, T. T.; Eberle, D. E. H.; Ball, R.

    2014-12-01

    1,4-dioxane is an emerging groundwater contaminant and a likely human carcinogen. Due to its history as a stabilizer in chlorinated solvents, 1,4-dioxane is often found as a co-contaminant at solvent releases sites such as landfills, solvent recycling facilities, vapor decreasing operations, and fire-training areas. Historically, 1,4-dioxane was not routinely analyzed for at solvent release sites. The lack of analyses and the limitations of the analyses that were performed (i.e. high reporting limits) means that the scale of 1,4-dioxane subsurface contamination is still emerging. With the number of known 1,4-dioxane sites increasing, the need for cost effective 1,4-dioxane remediation technologies is rising as well. Remediation strategies that are capable of treating both 1,4-dioxane as well as chlorinated co-contaminants are of particular importance, especially when treating mixed-waste source zones. In the present study, we examined the fate of 1,4-dioxane during the targeted remediation of aqueous phase volatile organic compounds (VOC) using an activated persulfate based ISCO method (OxyZone®). Bench scale laboratory experiments are used to evaluate the treatability of 1,4-dioxane both as a single compound and in the presence of trichloroethene (TCE) and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-TCA). Possible dependencies on oxidant concentration and reaction kinetics were studied. Preliminary results are promising and show that OxyZone® is persistent and long lived, with oxidation of 1,4-dioxane continuing more than 12 days after initial dosage, even at dilute oxidant concentrations. The oxidative destruction of 1,4-dioxane, TCE and 1,1,1-TCA in single compound batch systems followed pseudo first order reaction kinetics. The rate of oxidation for each contaminant increased linearly with increasing persulfate concentration over the range of oxidant concentrations tested. The rate of oxidative destruction, from most easily degraded to least was: TCE > 1,4-Dioxane > 1

  5. In Vitro Transformation of Chlorinated Parabens by the Liver S9 Fraction: Kinetics, Metabolite Identification, and Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Agonist Activity.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, Masanori; Wada, Takeshi; Nagashima, Satoshi; Makino, Masakazu; Yasukawa, Hiro

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the kinetics of in vitro transformation of a dichlorinated propyl paraben (2-propyl 3,5-dichloro-4-hydroxybenzoate; Cl2PP) by the rat liver S9 fraction and assessed the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonist activity of the metabolite products identified in HPLC and GC/MS analysis and by metabolite syntheses. The results indicated that the chlorination of Cl2PP reduced its degradation rate by approximately 40-fold. Two hydroxylated metabolite products showed AhR agonist activity of up to 39% of that of the parent Cl2PP when assessed in a yeast (YCM3) reporter gene assay. The determination of the metabolic properties of paraben bioaccumulation presented here provides further information on the value of risk assessments of chlorinated parabens as a means to ensure human health and environmental safety.

  6. The Biocide Chlorine Dioxide Stimulates Biofilm Formation in Bacillus subtilis by Activation of the Histidine Kinase KinC▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Shemesh, Moshe; Kolter, Roberto; Losick, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis forms biofilms in response to signals that remain poorly defined. We report that biofilm formation is stimulated by sublethal doses of chlorine dioxide (ClO2), an extremely effective and fast-acting biocide. ClO2 accelerated biofilm formation in B. subtilis as well as in other bacteria, suggesting that biofilm formation is a widely conserved response to sublethal doses of the agent. Biofilm formation depends on the synthesis of an extracellular matrix that holds the constituent cells together. We show that the transcription of the major operons responsible for the matrix production in B. subtilis, epsA-epsO and yqxM-sipW-tasA, was enhanced by ClO2, in a manner that depended on the membrane-bound kinase KinC. Activation of KinC appeared to be due to the ability of ClO2 to collapse the membrane potential. Importantly, strains unable to make a matrix were hypersensitive to ClO2, indicating that biofilm formation is a defensive response that helps protect cells from the toxic effects of the biocide. PMID:20971918

  7. Highly efficient active optical interconnect incorporating a partially chlorinated ribbon POF in conjunction with a visible VCSEL.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hak-Soon; Lee, Sang-Shin; Kim, Bong-Seok; Son, Yung-Sung

    2014-05-19

    A low-loss 4-ch active optical interconnect (AOI) enabling passive alignment was proposed and built resorting to a transmitter (Tx) incorporating a red 680-nm VCSEL, which is linked to a receiver (Rx) module via a partially chlorinated ribbon POF. The POF was observed to exhibit an extremely low loss of ~0.24 dB/m at λ = 680 nm, in comparison to ~1.29 dB/m at λ = 850 nm, and a large numerical aperture of ~0.42. Both the Tx and Rx, which taps into a beam router based on collimated beam optics involving a pair of spherical lenses, were meant to be substantially alignment tolerant and compact. The achieved tolerance for the constructed modules was beyond 40 μm in terms of the positioning of VCSEL and photodetector. The proposed AOI was completed by linking the Tx with the Rx via a 3-m long ribbon POF, incurring a transmission loss of as small as 3.2 dB. The AOI was practically assessed in terms of a high-speed data transmission over a wide range of temperatures and then exploited to convey full HD video signals.

  8. Use of lysis and recycle to control excess sludge production in activated sludge treatment: bench scale study and effect of chlorinated organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Nolasco, M A; Campos, A L O; Springer, A M; Pires, E C

    2002-01-01

    The most widely used treatment system in the pulp and paper industry--the activated sludge--produces high quantities of sludge which need proper disposal. In this paper a modified activated sludge process is presented. A synthetic wastewater, prepared to simulate the effluent of bleached and unbleached pulp and paper plant wastewater, was submitted to treatment in a bench scale aerobic reactor. The excess sludge was lysed in a mechanical mill--Kaddy mill--and totally recycled to the aeration tank. In the first phase the synthetic wastewater, without the chlorinated compounds, was fed to the reactor. In the second phase increasing dosages of the chlorinated compounds were used. Total recycle of excess sludge after disintegration did not produce adverse effects. During the first phase average COD removal efficiency was 65% for the control unit, which operated in a conventional way, and 63% for the treatment unit, which operated with total recycle. During the second phase the COD removal efficiency increased to 77% in the control unit and 75% in the treatment unit. Chlorinated organics removal was 85% in the treatment unit and 86% for the control unit. These differences are not significant.

  9. Atmospheric Release of Organic Chlorinated Compounds from the Activated-Sludge Wastewater Treatment Process.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    the uncertainties of --y were considerably less. Ii 24 2.0 EXPERIMENTAL METHODS The study was comprised of two aspects: field surveys of an activated...Tables 29 and 31. Neither survey generated detectable levels for Hex-BCH, Hex-VCL or chlordene with the charcoal tubes. With the Chromosorb 102 tube...two wastewater samples. N/D refers to None Detected Table 18 Air Sample Results of Aeration Basin Survey (IV) (March 24, 1979 9AM-1PM) Concentration

  10. Degradation of DEET and Caffeine under UV/Chlorine and Simulated Sunlight/Chlorine Conditions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peizhe; Lee, Wan-Ning; Zhang, Ruochun; Huang, Ching-Hua

    2016-12-20

    Photoactivation of aqueous chlorine could promote degradation of chlorine-resistant and photochemically stable chemicals accumulated in swimming pools. This study investigated the degradation of two such chemicals, N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET) and caffeine, by low pressure ultraviolet (UV) light and simulated sunlight (SS) activated free chlorine (FC) in different water matrices. Both DEET and caffeine were rapidly degraded by UV/FC and SS/FC but exhibited different kinetic behaviors. The degradation of DEET followed pseudo-first-order kinetics, whereas the degradation of caffeine accelerated with reaction. Mechanistic study revealed that, under UV/FC, ·OH and Cl· were responsible for degradation of DEET, whereas ClO· related reactive species (ClOrrs), generated by the reaction between FC and ·OH/Cl·, played a major role in addition to ·OH and Cl· in degrading caffeine. Reaction rate constants of DEET and caffeine with the respective radical species were estimated. The imidazole moiety of caffeine was critical for the special reactivity with ClOrrs. Water matrix such as pH had a stronger impact on the UV/FC process than the SS/FC process. In saltwater matrix under UV/FC and SS/FC, the degradation of DEET was significantly inhibited, but the degradation of caffeine was much faster than that in nonsalty solutions. The interaction between Br(-) and Cl(-) may play an important role in the degradation of caffeine by UV/FC in saltwater. Reaction product analysis showed similar product patterns by UV/FC and SS/FC and minimal formation of chlorinated intermediates and disinfection byproducts.

  11. WACCM-D—Improved modeling of nitric acid and active chlorine during energetic particle precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, M. E.; Verronen, P. T.; Marsh, D. R.; Päivärinta, S.-M.; Plane, J. M. C.

    2016-09-01

    Observations have shown that a number of neutral minor species are affected by energetic particle precipitation (EPP) and ion chemistry (IC) in the polar regions. However, to date the complexity of the ion chemistry below the mesopause (i.e., in the D region ionosphere) has restricted global models to simplified EEP/IC parameterizations which are unable to reproduce some important effects, e.g., the increase of mesospheric nitric acid (HNO3). Here we use WACCM-D, a variant of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model which includes a selected set of D region ion chemistry designed to produce the observed effects of EPP/IC. We evaluate the performance of EPP/IC modeling by comparing WACCM-D results for the January 2005 solar proton event (SPE) to those from the standard WACCM and Aura/Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and SCISAT/Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) observations. The results indicate that WACCM-D improves the modeling of HNO3, HCl, ClO, OH, and NOx during the SPE. Northern Hemispheric HNO3 from WACCM-D shows an increase by 2 orders of magnitude at 40-70 km compared to WACCM, reaching 2.6 ppbv, in agreement with the observations. For HCl and ClO, the improvement is most pronounced in the Southern Hemisphere at 40-50 km where WACCM-D predicts a decrease of HCl and increase of ClO by 1.6% and 10%, respectively, similar to MLS data. Compared to WACCM, WACCM-D produces 25-50% less OH and 30-130% more NOx at 70-85 km which leads to better agreement with the observations. Although not addressed here, longer-term NOx impact of ion chemistry could be important for polar stratospheric ozone and middle atmospheric dynamics.

  12. Transformation of Organophosphorus Pesticides in the Presence of Aqueous Chlorine: Kinetics, Pathways, and Structure-Activity Relationships

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fate of organophosphorus (OP) pesticides in the presence of aqueous chlorine was investigated under simulated drinking water treatment conditions. Intrinsic rate coefficients were found for the reaction of hypochlorous acid (kHOCl,OP) and hypochlorite ion (kOCl,OP) for eight...

  13. OClO and BrO observations in the volcanic plume of Mt. Etna - implications on the chemistry of chlorine and bromine species in volcanic plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gliß, J.; Bobrowski, N.; Vogel, L.; Platt, U.

    2014-10-01

    Spatial and temporal profiles of chlorine dioxide (OClO), bromine monoxide (BrO) and sulphur dioxide (SO2) were measured in the plume of Mt. Etna, Italy, in September 2012 using Multi-Axis-Differential-Optical-Absorption-Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS). OClO (BrO) was detected in 119 (452) individual measurements covering plume ages up to 6 (23) minutes. The retrieved slant column densities (SCDs) reached values up to 2.0 × 1014 molecules cm-2 (OClO) and 1.1 × 1015 molecules cm-2 (BrO). In addition, the spectra were analysed for signatures of IO, OIO and OBrO, none of these species could be detected. The corresponding detection limits for IO / SO2, OIO / SO2 and OBrO / SO2 were 1.8 × 10-6, 2.0 × 10-5 and 1.1 × 10-5 respectively. The measurements were performed at plume ages (τ) from zero to 23 min downwind the emission source. The chemical variability of BrO and OClO in the plume was studied analysing the OClO / SO2 and BrO / SO2-ratio. A marked increase of both ratios was observed in the young plume (τ < 3 min) and a levelling off at larger plume ages (τ > 3 min) with mean abundances of 3.17 × 10-5 (OClO / SO2), 1.55 × 10-4 (BrO / SO2) and 0.16 (OClO / BrO). Furthermore, enhanced BrO/SO2-ratios were found at the plume edges (by ~30-37%) and a strong indication of enhanced OClO / SO2-ratios as well (~10-250%). A measurement performed in the early morning (05:20-06:20 UTC, sunrise: 04:40 UTC) showed an BrO / SO2-ratio increasing with time until 05:35 UTC and a constant ratio afterwards. Observing this increase was only possible due to a correction for stratospheric BrO signals in the plume spectra. The corresponding OClO / SO2-ratio showed a similar trend stabilising around 06:13 UTC, approximately 40 min later than BrO. This is another strong indication for the photochemical nature of the reactions involved in the formation of oxidised halogens in volcanic plumes. In particular, these findings support the current understanding of the underlying chemistry, namely

  14. The Economics of Saving Endangered Species: A Teaching Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schug, Mark C.; Shaw, Jane S.

    1997-01-01

    Argues that well-intentioned government policies, such as the Endangered Species Act, can actually cause harm to endangered species by creating disincentives to preserving the habitat for endangered species. Maintains that the use of incentives can lead to voluntary species protection. Includes instructions for an in-class teaching activity. (MJP)

  15. Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation in Plants: Mechanisms and Enhancement of Phytoremediation of Groundwater Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Strand, Stuart E.

    2003-06-01

    Our research objectives are as follows: (1) Transform poplar and other tree species to extend and optimize chlorinated hydrocarbon (CHC) oxidative activities. (2) Determine the mechanisms of CHC oxidation in plants. (3) Isolate the genes responsible for CHC oxidation in plants.

  16. Biodegration of chlorinated ethenes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Paul M.; Chapelle, Francis H.

    2010-01-01

    Biodegradation of chlorinated ethenes by naturally occurring or artificially enhanced processes is an important component of current site remediation strategies. At this writing, several microbial mechanisms for chlorinated ethene transformation and degradation have been identified. The purpose of this chapter is to briefly summarize the current understanding of those processes that lead to the biodegradation of chlorinated ethenes.

  17. The Chlorination Quandary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josephson, Julian

    1978-01-01

    Current use of chlorination technology to disinfect water supplies can cause the production of undesirable products, among them chloroform and chlorobenzene. Alternatives to this methodology include the use of ozone, chlorine dioxide, and bromine chloride in place of chlorine. Presently, the methods are feasible in developed countries only. (MA)

  18. Effects of chlorine on freshwater fish under various time and chemical conditions: toxicity of chlorine to freshwater fish. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, A.S.; Bartos, J.M.; Danos, P.T.

    1982-07-01

    Laboratory bioassays to determine the acute toxicity of monochloramine, dichloramine, hypochlorous acid, and hypochlorite ion to emerald shiners, channel catfish, and rainbow trout were conducted. Four exposure regimes typical of chlorination schedules at operating steam electric power plants were used. Fish were exposed to single 15-minute, 30-minute, 120-minute, and quadruple 30-minute periods. No mortality or LC50 values were determined for each species of fish and chemical species of chlorine. Hypochlorous acid was the most toxic form of chlorine studied, followed closely by dichloramine. Monochloramine and hypochlorite ion were three to four times less toxic than hypochlorous acid and dichloramine. On the average, emerald shiners were 1.8 times more sensitive to chlorine than channel catfish and 3.3 times more sensitive than rainbow trout to the four forms of chlorine. The fish were more tolerant of chlorine during short duration exposures and most sensitive during the continuous 120-minute exposures. The significant differences in toxicity noted among the various chlorine species suggest that careful attention should be paid not only to total residual chlorine but to both the chlorine and fish species present and the duration of exposure expected in establishing chlorination regimes.

  19. Fungicidal activities of commonly used disinfectants and antifungal pharmaceutical spray preparations against clinical strains of Aspergillus and Candida species.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A K; Ahmad, I; Summerbell, R C

    2002-04-01

    The antifungal efficacy of commercial chemical disinfectants and pharmaceutical antifungal agents against medically important moulds and yeast species was investigated. Chlorine, phenol, sodium dodecyl sulfate and quaternary ammonium salts were the chemical disinfectants, and bifonazole and terbinafine were the antifungal pharmaceutical products tested against clinical isolates of Aspergillus and Candida species. Fungal inocula were obtained from conidial preparations of two A. ochraceus strains and yeast cells of C. albicans, C. krusei and C. parapsilosis. The antifungal activities were evaluated either by determining the kill rate in a cell suspension media at different contact periods, or by examining the viability and growth on plates sprayed with the active ingredient. Chlorine (1%) was the only disinfectant with the ability to cause a rapid inactivation of all five strains. Phenol (5%) was equally effective against Candida species; however, a number of A. ochraceus conidia were able to survive this treatment for up to 1 h. Benzalkonium chloride (0.5%) and cetrimide (0.5%) were also able to disinfect the three Candida species rapidly; however, these two quaternary ammonium compounds were relatively ineffective against A. ochraceus. In spray experiments, quaternary ammonium compounds had a fungicidal activity against Candida species and were fungistatic against A. ochraceus conidia. All five fungal strains were able to resist 0.5% sodium dodecyl sulfate, present either in the suspension solution or on the sprayed plate. Of the two pharmaceutical antifungal products tested, bifonazole (1%) were essentially ineffective against all five strains. Terbinafine (1%) had a fungicidal activity against A. ochraceus and C. parapsilosis. In suspension experiments, an exposure to 0.01% terbinafine required a contact period of 1 h for a complete inactivation of A. ochraceus conidia and an onset of fungicidal effect on C. parapsilosis yeast cells. Terbinafine was only

  20. Microbial based chlorinated ethene destruction

    DOEpatents

    Bagwell, Christopher E.; Freedman, David L.; Brigmon, Robin L.; Bratt, William B.; Wood, Elizabeth A.

    2009-11-10

    A mixed culture of Dehalococcoides species is provided that has an ability to catalyze the complete dechlorination of polychlorinated ethenes such as PCE, TCE, cDCE, 1,1-DCE and vinyl chloride as well as halogenated ethanes such as 1,2-DCA and EDB. The mixed culture demonstrates the ability to achieve dechlorination even in the presence of high source concentrations of chlorinated ethenes.

  1. Influence of chlorine on the decomposition of ethylene over iron and cobalt particles

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, A,; Baker, R.T.K.

    1997-02-27

    The interaction of cobalt and iron powders with ethylene and ethylene/hydrogen mixtures containing trace concentrations of chlorine has been studied using a combination of flow reactor and transmission electron microscopy techniques. Detailed analysis of both the gaseous products and the amount of solid carbon (a filamentous form) deposited on the metal surfaces has permitted us to gain an insight into some of the factors surrounding the promotional effect of low concentrations of chlorine on the catalytic action of both cobalt and iron. The optimum carbon deposition activity was achieved when either of these metals was treated at 400{degree}C in an ethylene/hydrogen environment containing 75-100 ppm chlorine. If the halogen was removed from the reactant, then the high activity for carbon filament growth could not be sustained. Reintroduction of chlorine after a suitable period of time resulted in restoration of the carbon deposition activity to its original level, demonstrating the reversible nature of the `activation-deactivation` processes. The results of this study are rationalized according to the notion that the presence of adsorbed chlorine species is responsible for causing reconstruction of the metal surface; however, the possibility that the halogen is capable of inducing a perturbation in the electronic properties of the particles is also considered. 40 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Non-heme manganese catalysts for on-demand production of chlorine dioxide in water and under mild conditions.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Scott D; Kim, Doyeon; Xiong, Silei; Medvedev, Grigori A; Caruthers, James; Hong, Seungwoo; Nam, Wonwoo; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M

    2014-03-05

    Two non-heme manganese complexes are used in the catalytic formation of chlorine dioxide from chlorite under ambient temperature at pH 5.00. The catalysts afford up to 1000 turnovers per hour and remain highly active in subsequent additions of chlorite. Kinetic and spectroscopic studies revealed a Mn(III)(OH) species as the dominant form under catalytic conditions. A Mn(III)(μ-O)Mn(IV) dinuclear species was observed by EPR spectroscopy, supporting the involvement of a putative Mn(IV)(O) species. First-order kinetic dependence on the manganese catalyst precludes the dinuclear species as the active form of the catalyst. Quantitative kinetic modeling enabled the deduction of a mechanism that accounts for all experimental observations. The chlorine dioxide producing cycle involves formation of a putative Mn(IV)(O), which undergoes PCET (proton coupled electron-transfer) reaction with chlorite to afford chlorine dioxide. The ClO2 product can be efficiently removed from the aqueous reaction mixture via purging with an inert gas, allowing for the preparation of pure chlorine dioxide for on-site use and further production of chlorine dioxide.

  3. Antifungal activity of heartwood extracts from three Juniperus species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heartwood samples from three species of Juniperus (i.e., J. virginianna, J. occidentalis, and J. ashei) were extracted with hexane, ethanol and methanol and the hexane and ethanol extracts were tested for antifungal activity against four species of wood-rot fungi. These three species represent the ...

  4. Chlorine isn't Just for Swimming Pools Anymore... Chlorination of Organic Compounds in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, A.; Raab, T. K.

    2013-12-01

    The cycling of chlorine between its organic and inorganic forms is known to occur in forest soils, but little is known about the generality of this mechanism, which soil components chlorine attaches to, and at what rate chlorination occurs. The study uses peat-rich tundra soils from Barrow, Alaska varying in age since formation of 50 yrs - 5500 yrs BP, and seeks to measure the rate at which organic molecules are chlorinated and to understand what changes those molecules undergo once chlorinated. Soil abundance of chlorine and bromine was estimated in soils of varying age using X-ray fluorescence, and org-Cl levels were measured using pyro-hydrolysis [Table 1]. We considered activity of the enzyme Chloroperoxidase, and data was gathered using absorbance scans of the organic molecule monochlorodimedone to determine whether it had been chlorinated and if so, at what rate. Additional information was gathered from the chlorination of small organic components of the macromolecule lignin, whose constituent molecules make up a large portion of humic materials critical to soil health, through emission scans and fluorescence scans. The results showed that the enzyme chloroperoxidase, which is found in nature and is associated with fungi or bacteria, attaches a chlorine atom to monochlorodimedone and that similar enzymes found in Arctic soils act on it, as well as the lignin model subunits cinnamaldehyde ((2E)-3-phenylprop-2-enal) and naringenin-7-rhamnoglucoside. The results may provide more information on chlorination rates in the Arctic and may contribute to an understanding of how and at what rate chlorine changes form in nature, and answer questions about ozone deterioration or anthropogenic chlorine impact(s) on the environment.Average Halogen Abundance in Arctic Soils xrf=Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescencepyro= TOX Pyro-Hydrolysis

  5. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Varnell, Jason A.; Tse, Edmund C. M.; Schulz, Charles E.; Fister, Tim T.; Haasch, Richard T.; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Gewirth, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites. PMID:27538720

  6. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts.

    PubMed

    Varnell, Jason A; Tse, Edmund C M; Schulz, Charles E; Fister, Tim T; Haasch, Richard T; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Gewirth, Andrew A

    2016-08-19

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites.

  7. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varnell, Jason A.; Tse, Edmund C. M.; Schulz, Charles E.; Fister, Tim T.; Haasch, Richard T.; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Gewirth, Andrew A.

    2016-08-01

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites.

  8. Liquid-phase chlorination of perchloroethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Levanova, S.V.; Evstigneev, O.V.; Rodova, R.M.; Berlin, E.R.; Ul'yanov, A.A.

    1988-06-01

    The relationships in the liquid-phase chlorination of perchloroethylene to hexachlorethane in a thermal process and in the presence of an initiator have been studied. The rate constants and the activation parameters of the process have been determined.

  9. Halogenase‐Inspired Oxidative Chlorination Using Flavin Photocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Hering, Thea; Mühldorf, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Chlorine gas or electropositive chlorine reagents are used to prepare chlorinated aromatic compounds, which are found in pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and polymers, and serve as synthetic precursors for metal‐catalyzed cross‐couplings. Nature chlorinates with chloride anions, FAD‐dependent halogenases, and O2 as the oxidant. A photocatalytic oxidative chlorination is described based on the organic dye riboflavin tetraacetate mimicking the enzymatic process. The chemical process allows within the suitable arene redox potential window a broader substrate scope compared to the specific activation in the enzymatic binding pocket. PMID:26991557

  10. Effect of UV irradiation on the proportion of organic chloramines in total chlorine in subsequent chlorination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian-Yang; Lin, Yi-Li; Xu, Bin; Xia, Sheng-Ji; Tian, Fu-Xiang; Gao, Nai-Yun

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the changes of chlorine species and proportion of organic chloramines during the chlorination process after UV irradiation pretreatment in drinking water. It was found that the UV pretreatment could enhance the percentage of organic chloramines by increasing free chlorine consumption in the chlorination of raw waters. The percentage of organic chloramines in total chlorine increased with UV intensity and irradiation time in raw waters. However, for the humic acid synthesized water, the percentage of organic chloramines increased first and then decreased with the increase of UV irradiation time. The value of SUVA declined in both raw and humic acid synthesized waters over the UV irradiation time, which indicated that the decomposition of aromatic organic matter by UV could be a contributor to the increase of free chlorine consumption and organic chloramine proportion. The percentage of organic chloramines during chlorination of raw waters after 30-min UV irradiation pretreatment varied from 20.2% to 41.8%. Total chlorine decreased obviously with the increase of nitrate concentration, but the percentage of organic chloramines increased and was linearly correlated to nitrate concentration.

  11. Chlorine inactivation of bacterial bioterrorism agents.

    PubMed

    Rose, Laura J; Rice, Eugene W; Jensen, Bette; Murga, Ricardo; Peterson, Alicia; Donlan, Rodney M; Arduino, Matthew J

    2005-01-01

    Seven species of bacterial select agents were tested for susceptibility to free available chlorine (FAC). Under test conditions, the FAC routinely maintained in potable water would be sufficient to reduce six species by 2 orders of magnitude within 10 min. Water contaminated with spores of Bacillus anthracis spores would require further treatment.

  12. Estimating The Thermodynamics And Kinetics Of Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Bylaska, Eric J.

    2006-08-01

    Many different degradation reactions of chlorinated hydrocarbons are possible in natural ground waters. In order to identify which degradation reactions are important, a large number of possible reaction pathways must be sorted out. Recent advances in ab initio electronic structure methods have the potential to help identify relevant environmental degradation reactions by characterizing the thermodynamic properties of all relevant contaminant species and intermediates for which experimental data is usually not available, as well as provide activation energies for relevant pathways. In this paper, strategies based on ab initio electronic structure methods for estimating thermochemical and kinetic properties of reactions with chlorinated hydrocarbons are presented. Particular emphasis is placed on strategies that are computationally fast and can be used for large organochlorine compounds such as 4,4?-DDT.

  13. Terminating pre-ozonation prior to biological activated carbon filtration results in increased formation of nitrogenous disinfection by-products upon subsequent chlorination.

    PubMed

    Chu, Wenhai; Li, Changjun; Gao, Naiyun; Templeton, Michael R; Zhang, Yanshen

    2015-02-01

    Previous research demonstrated that ozone dosed before biological activated carbon (BAC) filtration reduces the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) upon subsequent chlorination. The current work aimed to evaluate the impact of terminating this pre-ozonation on the ability of the BAC to remove the precursors of N-DBPs. More N-DBP precursors passed into the post-BAC water when the pre-ozonation was terminated, resulting in greater formation of N-DBPs when the water was subsequently chlorinated, compared to a parallel BAC filter when the pre-ozonation was run continuously. Moreover, the N-DBP formation potential was significantly increased in the effluent of the BAC filter after terminating pre-ozonation, compared with the influent of the BAC filter (i.e. the effluent from the sand filter). Therefore, while selectively switching pre-ozonation on/off may have cost and other operational benefits for water suppliers, these should be weighed against the increased formation of N-DBPs and potential associated health risks.

  14. The occurrence of chlorine in serpentine minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miura, Y.; Rucklidge, J.; Nord, G.L.

    1981-01-01

    Partially serpentinized dunites containing small amounts of Chlorine (< 0.5%) from Dumont, Quebec, and Horoman, Hokkaido, Japan, and one containing less than 0.05% Chlorine from Higashi-Akaishi-Yama, Ehime, Japan have been examined using the electron probe microanalyzer and scanning transmission electron microscope with X-ray analytical capabilities. Chlorine was found together with Si, Mg, Ca and Fe in the serpentine minerals of the Dumont and Hokkaido dunites but not in the Ehime dunite. Chlorine is found associated only with the most finely crystalline facies of the serpentine (grain size less than 10 nm). The Ehime dunite contained no such fine grained serpentine, and was thus effectively chlorine-free, as are the coarser grained serpentines of the other samples. The finegrained chlorine-bearing serpentine also has a much higher concentration of Fe, and can contain smaller amounts of Ca, Ni and Mn than the coarse-grained variety as well as minute awaruite (FeNi3) grains. This fine-grained serpentine probably represents an early stage in the transformation of olivine to serpentine, with chlorine from hydrothermal solutions assisting the necessary chemical changes. The Cl increases the reaction rate by lowering the activation barrier to reaction by the introduction of reaction steps. ?? 1981 Springer-Verlag.

  15. Does diet influence salivary enzyme activities in elephant species?

    PubMed

    Boehlke, Carolin; Pötschke, Sandra; Behringer, Verena; Hannig, Christian; Zierau, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) and African elephants (Loxodonta africana) are herbivore generalists; however, Asian elephants might ingest a higher proportion of grasses than Africans. Although some studies have investigated nutrition-specific morphological adaptations of the two species, broader studies on salivary enzymes in both elephant species are lacking. This study focuses on the comparison of salivary enzymes activity profiles in the two elephant species; these enzymes are relevant for protective and digestive functions in humans. We aimed to determine whether salivary amylase (sAA), lysozyme (sLYS), and peroxidase (sPOD) activities have changed in a species-specific pattern during evolutionary separation of the elephant genera. Saliva samples of 14 Asian and eight African elephants were collected in three German zoos. Results show that sAA and sLYS are salivary components of both elephant species in an active conformation. In contrast, little to no sPOD activity was determined in any elephant sample. Furthermore, sAA activity was significantly higher in Asian compared with African elephants. sLYS and sPOD showed no species-specific differences. The time of food provision until sample collection affected only sAA activity. In summary, the results suggest several possible factors modulating the activity of the mammal-typical enzymes, such as sAA, sLYS, and sPOD, e.g., nutrition and sampling procedure, which have to be considered when analyzing differences in saliva composition of animal species.

  16. Water Treatment Technology - Chlorination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross-Harrington, Melinda; Kincaid, G. David

    One of twelve water treatment technology units, this student manual on chlorination provides instructional materials for nine competencies. (The twelve units are designed for a continuing education training course for public water supply operators.) The competencies focus on the following areas: purpose and process of chlorination, chlorine…

  17. Aqueous chlorination of resorcinol

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heasley, V.L.; Burns, M.D.; Kemalyan, N.A.; Mckee, T.C.; Schroeter, H.; Teegarden, B.R.; Whitney, S.E.; Wershaw, R. L.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation of the aqueous chlorination (NaOCl) of resorcinol is reported. The following intermediates were detected in moderate to high yield at different pH values and varying percentages of chlorination: 2-chloro-, 4-chloro-, 2,4-dichloro-, 4,6-dichloro- and 2,4,6-trichlororesorcinol. Only trace amounts of the intermediates were detected when the chlorination was conducted in the presence of phosphate buffer. This result has significant implications since resorcinol in phosphate buffer has been used as a model compound in several recent studies on the formation of chlorinated hydrocarbons during chlorination of drinking water. Relative rates of chlorination were determined for resorcinol and several of the chlorinated resorcinols. Resorcinol was found to chlorinate only three times faster than 2,4,6-trichlororesorcinol. The structure 2,4,6-trichlororesorcinol was established as a monohydrate even after sublimation. A tetrachloro or pentachloro intermediate was not detected, suggesting that the ring-opening step of such an intermediate must be rapid. ?? 1989.

  18. CHARACTERIZATION OF CHLORINATION TRANSFORMATION PRODUCTS OF SELECTED PESTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorination is a commonly-used disinfectant step in drinking water treatment. Should free chlorine be added to water used as a drinking water source, it is widely understood that many biological species in the water along with dissolved organic and inorganic chemicals will react...

  19. ATRAZOME CHLORINATION TRANSFORMATION PRODUCTS UNDER DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorination is a commonly-used disinfectant step in drinking water treatment. Should free chlorine be added to water used as a drinking water source, it is widely understood that many biological species in the water, along with dissolved organic and inorganic chemicals, will rea...

  20. Chemistry of saline-water chlorination

    SciTech Connect

    Haag, W.R.

    1981-06-01

    Vast quantities of natural waters are used by power plants for cooling purposes. This water is chlorinated to prevent slime build-up inside the cooling pipes, is circulated through the cooling system, and eventually discharged back into the water body. In order to assess the environmental impact of water chlorination, it is necessary to know what chemical compounds are produced and discharged into the receiving waters. To attack this problem, a review of the present state of knowledge of natural water chlorination chemistry was performed, and some experimental work explained the results of previous workers by showing that chlorine losses at very high doses in seawater are simply the result of chlorate and bromate formation which, however, is negligible at normal doses. The most important chlorine-produced oxidants, along with the relevant chemical reactions, were chosen as a basis for a kinetic model of saline water chlorination chemistry. Kinetic data were compiled in a computer program which simultaneously solves 24 differential equations, one for each species modelled. Estimates were made for the unknown rate constants. A purely predictive model was not possible due to the great variability in the organic demand; however, the model is applicable under a broad variety of conditions (except sunlight), and it provides a reasonably good description of a halamine chemistry under environmental conditions.

  1. A sensitive search for organics (CH4, CH3OH, H2CO, C2H6, C2H2, C2H4), hydroperoxyl (HO2), nitrogen compounds (N2O, NH3, HCN) and chlorine species (HCl, CH3Cl) on Mars using ground-based high-resolution infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, G. L.; Mumma, M. J.; Novak, R. E.; Radeva, Y. L.; Käufl, H. U.; Smette, A.; Tokunaga, A.; Khayat, A.; Encrenaz, T.; Hartogh, P.

    2013-03-01

    Is Mars actively releasing organic and other minor gases into the atmosphere? We present a comprehensive search for trace species on Mars, targeting multiple volatile organic species (CH4, CH3OH, H2CO, C2H6, C2H2, C2H4), hydroperoxyl (HO2), several nitrogen compounds (N2O, NH3, HCN), and two chlorine species (HCl, CH3Cl) through their rovibrational spectra in the 2.8-3.7 μm spectral region. The data were acquired over a period of 4 years (2006-2010) using powerful infrared high-resolution spectrometers (CRIRES, NIRSPEC, CSHELL) at high-altitude observatories (VLT, Keck-2, NASA-IRTF), and span a broad range of seasons, Doppler shifts and spatial coverage. Here, we present results from a selection of high-quality spectra obtained on four separate dates, representing a fraction of our search space. For most of these species we derived the most stringent upper limits ever obtained, and because the targeted gases have substantially different resident lifetimes in the Martian atmosphere (from hours to centuries), our measurements not only test for current release but also provide stringent limits on the quiescent levels. In particular, we sampled the same regions where plumes of methane have been recently observed (e.g., Syrtis Major and Valles Marineris), allowing us to test for seasonal and temporal variability.

  2. Identification of the haemolytic activity of Malassezia species.

    PubMed

    Juntachai, Weerapong; Kummasook, Aksarakorn; Mekaprateep, Malee; Kajiwara, Susumu

    2014-03-01

    Malassezia species are part of the normal skin flora and are associated with a number of human and animal skin diseases. However, the mechanisms that mediate infection and host-fungal interactions are poorly understood. The haemolytic activity of several microorganisms is considered a factor that contributes to pathogenicity of the organism to humans and animals. This virulence factor was previously identified in several pathogenic fungi that cause systemic mycoses, such as Aspergillus and Candida. In this study, the haemolytic activity of six major Malassezia species, including M. furfur, M. globosa, M. pachydermatis, M. restricta, M. slooffiae and M. sympodialis, was investigated. The haemolytic activity of these species was tested on tryptone soya agar with 5% sheep blood. All the examined Malassezia species produced a halo zone of complete haemolysis. A quantitative analysis of the haemolytic activity was performed by incubating sheep erythrocytes with the extraction from culture of each Malassezia species. Interestingly, M. globosa and M. restricta showed significantly high haemolytic activity compared with the other Malassezia species. In addition, M. globosa also exhibited stable haemolytic activity after treatment at 100 °C and in the presence of some proteases, indicating that this haemolytic factor is different from those of other fungi.

  3. Behavior of sulfur and chlorine in coal during combustion and boiler corrosion. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1992--May 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, C.L.; Hackley, K.C.; Donnals, G.L.; Cao, J.; Ruch, R.R.; Pan, W.P.; Shao, D.

    1992-10-01

    Four replicate experiments of pyrolysis with quadrupole gas analyzer and ion selective electrode were conducted to monitor the release of chlorine and sulfur from a high-chlorine Illinois coal IBC-109 (0.42% chlorine on dry basis). The chlorine in coal is released solely as HCl, and the HCl release profile shows a broad peak between 250{degree}C and 600{degree}C with a maximum at 445{degree}C. In contrast, the sulfur release profile shows three peaks; the sulfur released around 370{degree}C may be derived from a labile (possibly aliphatic) component of organic sulfur, the main peak at 475{degree}C corresponds to the release of the main component (thiophenic) of organic sulfur, and the third peak at 600{degree} results from the decomposition of pyrite. Sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) is the major sulfur species under an oxidizing condition in the combustion gas; additional gaseous sulfur species (COS and H{sub 2}S) are observed when the atmosphere is changed to a reducing condition. Sodium and chlorine contents in char residues determined by neutron activation analysis showed that 98% of chlorine in coal was volatilized during pyrolysis to 800{degree}C, and all the sodium is retained in the chars. The thermogravimetry-Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy experiments were carried out to characterize gaseous species during pyrolysis of four Illinois coals (IBC-103, -105, -106, and -109). Gas evolution profiles of sulfur (H{sub 2}S, S0{sub 2}, and COS), chlorine (HCl), and nitrogen (NH{sub 3} and HCN) species were determined. Similar release profiles of HCl and NH{sub 3} supported an interpretation that chlorine and nitrogen are closely associated in coal. COS may be formed by reaction of CO with H{sub 2}S in the gas phase.

  4. Volatile species in halide-activated-diffusion coating packs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bianco, Robert; Rapp, Robert A.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1992-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure sampling mass spectrometer was used to identify the vapor species generated in a halide-activated cementation pack. Pack powder mixtures containing a Cr-Al binary masteralloy powder, an NH4Cl activator salt, and either ZrO2 or Y2O3 (or neither) were analyzed at 1000 C. Both the equilibrium calculations for the pack and mass spectrometer results indicated that volatile AlCl(x) and CrCl(y) species were generated by the pack powder mixture; in packs containing the reactive element oxide, volatile ZrCl(z) and YCl(w) species were formed by the conversion of their oxide sources.

  5. Heterogeneous Chemistry of HONO on Liquid Sulfuric Acid: A New Mechanism of Chlorine Activation on Stratospheric Sulfate Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Renyi; Leu, Ming-Taun; Keyser, Leon F.

    1996-01-01

    Heterogeneous chemistry of nitrous acid (HONO) on liquid sulfuric acid (H2SO4) Was investigated at conditions that prevail in the stratosphere. The measured uptake coefficient (gamma) of HONO on H2SO4 increased with increasing acid content, ranging from 0.03 for 65 wt % to about 0.1 for 74 wt %. In the aqueous phase, HONO underwent irreversible reaction with H2SO4 to form nitrosylsulfuric acid (NO(+)HSO4(-). At temperatures below 230 K, NO(+)HSO4(-) was observed to be stable and accumulated in concentrated solutions (less than 70 wt % H2SO4) but was unstable and quickly regenerated HONO in dilute solutions (less than 70 wt %). HCl reacted with HONO dissolved in sulfuric acid, releasing gaseous nitrosyl chloride (ClNO). The reaction probability between HCl and HONO varied from 0.01 to 0.02 for 60-72 wt % H2SO4. In the stratosphere, ClNO photodissociates rapidly to yield atomic chlorine, which catalytically destroys ozone. Analysis of the laboratory data reveals that the reaction of HCl with HONO on sulfate aerosols can affect stratospheric ozone balance during elevated sulfuric acid loadings after volcanic eruptions or due to emissions from the projected high-speed civil transport (HSCT). The present results may have important implications on the assessment of environmental acceptability of HSCT.

  6. Evaluation of the antiviral activity of chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite against feline calicivirus, human influenza virus, measles virus, canine distemper virus, human herpesvirus, human adenovirus, canine adenovirus and canine parvovirus.

    PubMed

    Sanekata, Takeshi; Fukuda, Toshiaki; Miura, Takanori; Morino, Hirofumi; Lee, Cheolsung; Maeda, Ken; Araki, Kazuko; Otake, Toru; Kawahata, Takuya; Shibata, Takashi

    2010-06-01

    We evaluated the antiviral activity of a chlorine dioxide gas solution (CD) and sodium hypochlorite (SH) against feline calicivirus, human influenza virus, measles virus, canine distemper virus, human herpesvirus, human adenovirus, canine adenovirus and canine parvovirus. CD at concentrations ranging from 1 to 100 ppm produced potent antiviral activity, inactivating >or= 99.9% of the viruses with a 15 sec treatment for sensitization. The antiviral activity of CD was approximately 10 times higher than that of SH.

  7. Comparison of cytotoxic activities of extracts from Selaginella species

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Lei, Xiang; Chen, Ke-li

    2014-01-01

    Background: Selaginella species are resurrection plants, which are known, possess various molecular bioactivities depending on species, but only a few species have been detailed observe in the advanced research. Objective: The objective of the following study is to compare the chemical profiles of different species of Selaginella and to investigate cytotoxicity and induction of apoptosis activities of some species of Selaginella. Materials and Methods: The high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was developed for chemical analysis. Ethyl acetate, ethanol and water-soluble extracts from seven Selaginella species were submitted to 3-(4,5-dimenthyl thizol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay, flow cytometry, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) laddering analysis and caspase-3 expression using Bel-7402, HT-29 and HeLa cells. Results: The HPLC analysis revealed two major common peaks, which were identified as amentoflavone and robustaflavone and another three main peaks in their chromatograms. The results showed that S. labordei, Selaginella tamariscina and Selaginella uncinata had relatively stronger activities on Bel-7402 and HeLa cells and Selaginella moellendorfii had moderate antiproliferation activities, but Selaginella remotifolia and Selaginella pulvinata had almost no inhibitory activities. The main active components were in the ethyl acetate extracts which had abundant biflavonoids. The effects of these extracts on cell proliferation and apoptosis in different cells were not the same, they were more apparent on HeLa cells than on HT-29 cells. The assay of DNA laddering analysis and caspase-3 expression further confirmed that inducing cell apoptosis was one of antitumor mechanisms and antitumor activities of Selaginella species were related to apoptosis induced by caspase family. Conclusion: S. labordei, S. tamariscina and S. uncinata would be potential antitumor agents. PMID:25422557

  8. CHLORINATED SOLVENT PLUME CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This lecture will cover recent success in controlling and assessing the treatment of shallow ground water plumes of chlorinated solvents, other halogenated organic compounds, and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE).

  9. Bugs digest chlorinated organics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    This article describes a new bioreactor that uses a consortium of aerobic bacteria to biodegrade chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons. Methanotrophic bacteria are cultivated for their MMO enzyme. After the MMO enzyme breaks down the chlorinated organics by oxidation, non-methanotrophic bacteria consume the byproducts. Pilot-scale testing has demonstrated successful treatment of groundwater containing coal-tar constituents, toluene, trichloroethylene, vinyl chlorides, chlorobenzene, and methyl methacrylate from three Superfund sites.

  10. N-chlorinated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) microgels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zuohe; Lam, Wing Yan; Pelton, Robert

    2013-10-22

    The treatment of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) microgels with aqueous bleach (NaClO) at pH 10.5 resulted in the partial conversion of the amide hydrogen to the corresponding chloramide. N-Chlorinated microgels poly(NIPAM-co-NIPAMCl) are more hydrophobic than the parent PNIPAM microgels. Thus, the volume phase transition temperature decreases with increasing chlorination. During chlorination, the microgels coagulate once they undergo a volume phase transition. The chlorination reaction stops once the microgels dehydrate and coagulate, presumably as a result of the decreased diffusion rate of the ClO(-) anion into the microgels. The microgels are reversibly dechlorinated by glutathione (GSH), first giving PNIPAM shell + poly(NIPAM-co-NIPAMCl) core microgels. Because GSH is an important redox actor in biological cells, this work suggests that chlorinated microgels may be employed to deliver active chlorine to targeted cells.

  11. Chlorinated and nitrogenous disinfection by-product formation from ozonation and post-chlorination of natural organic matter surrogates.

    PubMed

    Bond, Tom; Templeton, Michael R; Rifai, Omar; Ali, Hussain; Graham, Nigel J D

    2014-09-01

    Ozonation before chlorination is associated with enhanced formation of chloropicrin, a halonitromethane disinfection by-product (DBP), during drinking water treatment. In order to elucidate reasons for this, five natural organic matter (NOM) surrogates were treated using both chlorination and ozonation-chlorination under controlled laboratory conditions. Selected surrogates comprised two phenolic compounds, two free amino acids and one dipeptide; these were resorcinol, 3-aminophenol, L-aspartic acid, β-alanine and ala-ala, respectively. Quantified DBPs included chloropicrin, chloroform, dichloroacetonitrile and trichloroacetonitrile. Relative to chlorination alone, increases in the formation of chloropicrin from ozonation-chlorination varied from 138% for 3-aminophenol to 3740% for ala-ala for the four amine surrogates. This indicates that ozone is more effective than chlorine in mediating a rate-limiting oxidation step in chloropicrin formation, most plausibly involving conversion of an amine group to a nitro group. While both hydrophilic and hydrophobic surrogates acted as chloropicrin precursors, ala-ala was the most reactive precursor following ozonation-chlorination. Since peptides are far commoner in drinking water sources than free amino acids, further research into chemical oxidation of these species by ozone and chlorine is recommended. In contrast, oxidation with ozone prior to chlorination reduced chloroform formation moderately for the two phenolic compounds.

  12. Separation of chlorinated diastereomers of decarboxy-betacyanins in myeloperoxidase catalyzed chlorinated Beta vulgaris L. extract.

    PubMed

    Wybraniec, Sławomir; Starzak, Karolina; Szneler, Edward; Pietrzkowski, Zbigniew

    2016-11-15

    A comparative chromatographic evaluation of chlorinated decarboxylated betanins and betanidins generated under activity of hypochlorous acid exerted upon these highly antioxidative potent decarboxylated pigments derived from natural sources was performed by LC-DAD-ESI-MS/MS. Comparison of the chromatographic profiles of the chlorinated pigments revealed two different directions of retention changes in relation to the corresponding substrates. Chlorination of all betacyanins that are decarboxylated at carbon C-17 results in an increase of their retention times. In contrast, all other pigments (the non-decarboxylated betacyanins as well as 2-decarboxy- and 15-decarboxy-derivatives) exhibit lower retention after chlorination. During further chromatographic experiments based upon chemical transformation of the related pigments (decarboxylation and deglucosylation), the compounds' structures were confirmed. The elaborated method for determination of chlorinated pigments enabled analysis of a chlorinated red beet root extract that was submitted to the MPO/H2O2/Cl(-) system acting under inflammation-like conditions (pH 5). This indicates a promising possibility for measurement of these chlorinated pigments as indicators of specific inflammatory states wherein betacyanins and decarboxylated betacyanins act as hypochlorite scavengers.

  13. Effects of chlorobrominated and chlorinated cooling waters on estuarine organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Liden, L.H.; Burton, D.T.; Bongers, L.H.; Holland, A.F.

    1980-01-01

    Research report:Continuous-flow bioassays were conducted during August 1976 to compare the effects of chlorobrominated and chlorinated condenser cooling effluents on several selected estuarine food-chain organisms. Two fish species, two bivalve species, a copepod, and naturally occurring phytoplankton communities were studied. Toxic effects of chlorobrominated and chlorinated power plant cooling waters on estuarine organisms appear to be similar with respect to the lethal and sublethal response indicators used in the study. However, more comparative tests must be conducted to define any differences in toxicities of bromine chloride or chlorine residual oxidants. (50 references, 5 tables)

  14. Breakpoint chlorination curves of greywater.

    PubMed

    March, J G; Gual, M

    2007-08-01

    A study on chlorination of raw greywater with hypochlorite is reported in this paper. Samples were chlorinated in a variety of conditions, and residual chlorine (Cl2) was measured spectrophotometrically. For each sample, the chlorination curve (chlorine residuals versus chlorine dose) was obtained. Curves showed the typical hump-and-dip profile attributable to the formation and destruction of chloramines. It was observed that, after reactions with strong reductants and chloramines-forming compounds, the remaining organic matter exerted a certain demand of chlorine. The evolution of chlorination curves with addition of ammonia and dodecylbencene sulfonate sodium salt and with dilution of the greywater sample were studied. In addition, chlorination curves at several contact times have been obtained, resulting in slower chlorine decay in the hump zone than in the dip zone. In addition, the decay of coliforms in chlorinated samples was also investigated. It was found that, for a chlorination dosage corresponding to the maximum of the hump zone (average 8.9 mg Cl2/ L), samples were negative in coliforms after 10 to 30 minutes of contact time. After-growth was not observed within 3 days after chlorination. Implications in chlorination treatments of raw greywater can be derived from these results.

  15. Chlorination of organophosphorus pesticides in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Acero, Juan L; Benítez, F Javier; Real, Francisco J; González, Manuel

    2008-05-01

    Unknown second-order rate constants for the reactions of three organophosphorus pesticides (chlorpyrifos, chlorfenvinfos and diazinon) with chlorine were determined in the present study, and the influence of pH and temperature was established. It was found that an increase in the pH provides a negative effect on the pesticides degradation rates. Apparent second-order rate constants at 20 degrees C and pH 7 were determined to be 110.9, 0.004 and 191.6 M(-1) s(-1) for chlorpyrifos, chlorfenvinfos and diazinon, respectively. A higher reactivity of chlorine with the phosphorothioate group (chlorpyrifos and diazinon) than with the phosphate moiety (chlorfenvinfos) could explain these results. Intrinsic rate constant for the elementary reactions of chlorine species with chlorpyrifos and diazinon were also calculated, leading to the conclusion that the reaction between hypochlorous acid and the pesticide is predominant at neutral pH. The elimination of these pesticides in surface waters was also investigated. A chlorine dose of 2.5 mg L(-1) was enough to oxidize chlorpyrifos and diazinon almost completely, with a formation of trihalomethanes below the EU standard for drinking water. However, the removal of chlorfenvinfos was not appreciable. Therefore, chlorination is a feasible option for the removal of organophosphorus pesticides with phosphorothioate group during oxidation and disinfection processes, but not for the elimination of pesticides with phosphate moiety.

  16. Cleaning without chlorinated solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.M.; Simandl, R.F.

    1994-12-31

    Because of health and environmental concerns, many regulations have been passed in recent years regarding the use of chlorinated solvents. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has had an active program to find alternatives for these solvents used in cleaning applications for the past 7 years. During this time frame, the quantity of solvents purchased has been reduced by 92%. The program has been a twofold effort. Vapor degreasers used in batch cleaning-operations have been replaced by ultrasonic cleaning with aqueous detergent, and other organic solvents have been identified for use in hand-wiping or specialty operations. In order to qualify these alternatives for use, experimentation was conducted on cleaning ability as well as effects on subsequent operations such as welding, painting and bonding. Cleaning ability was determined using techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) which are capable of examining monolayer levels of contamination on a surface. Solvents have been identified for removal of rust preventative oils, lapping oils, machining coolants, lubricants, greases, and mold releases. Solvents have also been evaluated for cleaning urethane foam spray guns, swelling of urethanes and swelling of epoxies.

  17. Cleaning without chlorinated solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, L. M.; Simandl, R. F.

    1995-01-01

    Because of health and environmental concerns, many regulations have been passed in recent years regarding the use of chlorinated solvents. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has had an active program to find alternatives for these solvents used in cleaning applications for the past 7 years. During this time frame, the quantity of solvents purchased has been reduced by 92 percent. The program has been a twofold effort. Vapor degreasers used in batch cleaning operations have been replaced by ultrasonic cleaning with aqueous detergent, and other organic solvents have been identified for use in hand-wiping or specialty operations. In order to qualify these alternatives for use, experimentation was conducted on cleaning ability as well as effects on subsequent operations such as welding, painting, and bonding. Cleaning ability was determined using techniques such as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) which are capable of examining monolayer levels of contamination on a surface. Solvents have been identified for removal of rust preventative oils, lapping oils, machining coolants, lubricants, greases, and mold releases. Solvents have also been evaluated for cleaning urethane foam spray guns, swelling of urethanes, and swelling of epoxies.

  18. Hemolytic Activities of the Candida Species in Liquid Medium

    PubMed Central

    Malcok, Hilal Kuzucu; Aktas, Esin; Ayyildiz, Ahmet; Yigit, Nimet; Yazgi, Halil

    2009-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro hemolytic activities of 107 Candida strains isolated from different clinical samples in liquid medium, and to examine the impact of glucose on this activity. Materials and Methods A total of 107 Candida isolates representing seven species (C. albicans, n=28; C. glabrata, n=23; C. tropicalis, n=17; C. parapsilosis, n=16; C. kefyr, n=14; C. krusei, n=5; C. guilliermondii, n=4) were included in the study. The hemolytic activities of the strains were tested on two different Sabouraud dextrose liquid media (SDB) containing 7% defibrinated human blood, one of which is supplemented with 3% glucose and the other without glucose. Cultures were evaluated at the end of a 48-hour incubation. The hemolysis in the media was detected spectrophotometrically by measuring the amount of released hemoglobin and compared with a standard hemolysate which was prepared prior to testing. The degree of hemolysis (percentage value) by an individual strain was calculated according to the following formula below: (Absorbance of supernatant media at 540 nm / Absorbance of standard hemolysate at 540 nm X 100). Results In the liquid medium without glucose, strains generally produced hemolysis at low levels. The degree of hemolysis produced by all species increased noticeably in the liquid medium with glucose. Strains of C. albicans and C.kefyr had demonstrated significant hemolytic activity, whereas others had lower activity. C. parapsilosis exerted very little hemolytic activity in the medium with glucose and showed no activity in the medium without glucose. Conclusion The hemolytic activities of most Candida species was found to be higher in the human blood-enriched SDB medium containing 3% additive glucose than in the one free from additives. This result indicates that increased blood glucose concentration may contribute to increased hemolytic activity in Candida species, and it suggests a parallel with possible pathogenesis of

  19. Reactions of tetracycline antibiotics with chlorine dioxide and free chlorine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei; He, Yi-Liang; Huang, Ching-Hua

    2011-02-01

    Tetracyclines (TCs) are a group of widely used antibiotics that have been frequently found in the aquatic environment. The potential reactions of TCs with common water disinfection oxidants such as chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) and free available chlorine (FAC) have not been studied in depth and are the focus of this study. The oxidation kinetics of tetracycline, oxytetracycline, chlorotetracycline and iso-chlorotetracycline by ClO(2) and FAC are very rapid (with large apparent second-order rate constants k(app) = 2.24 × 10(5)-1.26 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1) with ClO(2) and k(app) = 1.12 × 10(4)-1.78 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1) with FAC at pH 7.0) and highly dependent on pH. Species-specific rate constants are obtained by kinetic modeling that incorporates pH-speciation of TCs and the oxidants (for FAC), and reveal that TCs primarily react with ClO(2) and FAC by their unprotonated dimethylamino group and deprotonated phenolic-diketone group. The modest difference in reactivity among the four TCs toward the oxidants is consistent with expectation and can be explained by structural influences on the two reactive moieties. Product evaluation shows that oxidation of TCs by ClO(2) leads to (hydr)oxylation and breakage of TC molecules, while oxidation of TCs by FAC leads to chlorinated and (hydr)oxylated products without any substantial ring breakage. Results of this study indicate that rapid transformation of TCs by oxidants such as ClO(2) and FAC under water and wastewater treatment conditions can be expected.

  20. SENSITIVITY OF THREE ENCEPHALITOZOON SPECIES TO CHLORINE AND CHLORAMINE TREATMENT AS DETECTED BY AN IN-VITRO MICROWELL PLATE ASSAY (POSTER PRESENTATION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microsporidia are obligate intracellular parasites that form environmentally resistant, infectious spores. These parasites are ubiquitous in the environment, infecting members of almost every class of verebrates and invertebrates. At least 14 microsporidian species that infect th...

  1. Diversity and Activity of Lysobacter Species from Disease Suppressive Soils

    PubMed Central

    Gómez Expósito, Ruth; Postma, Joeke; Raaijmakers, Jos M.; De Bruijn, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The genus Lysobacter includes several species that produce a range of extracellular enzymes and other metabolites with activity against bacteria, fungi, oomycetes, and nematodes. Lysobacter species were found to be more abundant in soil suppressive against the fungal root pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, but their actual role in disease suppression is still unclear. Here, the antifungal and plant growth-promoting activities of 18 Lysobacter strains, including 11 strains from Rhizoctonia-suppressive soils, were studied both in vitro and in vivo. Based on 16S rRNA sequencing, the Lysobacter strains from the Rhizoctonia-suppressive soil belonged to the four species Lysobacter antibioticus, Lysobacter capsici, Lysobacter enzymogenes, and Lysobacter gummosus. Most strains showed strong in vitro activity against R. solani and several other pathogens, including Pythium ultimum, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporum, and Xanthomonas campestris. When the Lysobacter strains were introduced into soil, however, no significant and consistent suppression of R. solani damping-off disease of sugar beet and cauliflower was observed. Subsequent bioassays further revealed that none of the Lysobacter strains was able to promote growth of sugar beet, cauliflower, onion, and Arabidopsis thaliana, either directly or via volatile compounds. The lack of in vivo activity is most likely attributed to poor colonization of the rhizosphere by the introduced Lysobacter strains. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that Lysobacter species have strong antagonistic activities against a range of pathogens, making them an important source for putative new enzymes and antimicrobial compounds. However, their potential role in R. solani disease suppressive soil could not be confirmed. In-depth omics'–based analyses will be needed to shed more light on the potential contribution of Lysobacter species to the collective activities of microbial consortia in disease suppressive soils. PMID:26635735

  2. Impacts of heterogeneous uptake of dinitrogen pentoxide and chlorine activation on ozone and reactive nitrogen partitioning: improvement and application of the WRF-Chem model in southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qinyi; Zhang, Li; Wang, Tao; Tham, Yee Jun; Ahmadov, Ravan; Xue, Likun; Zhang, Qiang; Zheng, Junyu

    2016-12-01

    The uptake of dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) on aerosol surfaces and the subsequent production of nitryl chloride (ClNO2) can have a significant impact on the oxidising capability and thus on secondary pollutants such as ozone. The range of such an impact, however, has not been well quantified in different geographical regions. In this study, we applied the Weather Research and Forecasting coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) model to investigate the impact of the N2O5 uptake processes in the Hong Kong-Pearl River Delta (HK-PRD) region, where the highest ever reported N2O5 and ClNO2 concentrations were observed in our recent field study. We first incorporated into the WRF-Chem an aerosol thermodynamics model (ISORROPIA II), recent parameterisations for N2O5 heterogeneous uptake and ClNO2 production and gas-phase chlorine chemistry. The revised model was then used to simulate the spatiotemporal distribution of N2O5 and ClNO2 over the HK-PRD region and the impact of N2O5 uptake and Cl activation on ozone and reactive nitrogen in the planetary boundary layer (PBL). The updated model can generally capture the temporal variation of N2O5 and ClNO2 observed at a mountaintop site in Hong Kong, but it overestimates N2O5 uptake and ClNO2 production. The model results suggest that under average conditions, elevated levels of ClNO2 (> 0.25 ppb within the PBL) are present in the south-western PRD, with the highest values (> 1.00 ppb) predicted near the ground surface (0-200 m above ground level; a.g.l.). In contrast, during the night when very high levels of ClNO2 and N2O5 were measured in well-processed plumes from the PRD, ClNO2 is mostly concentrated within the residual layer ( ˜ 300 m a.g.l.). The addition of N2O5 heterogeneous uptake and Cl activation reduces the NO and NO2 levels by as much as 1.93 ppb ( ˜ 7.4 %) and 4.73 ppb ( ˜ 16.2 %), respectively, and it increases the total nitrate and ozone concentrations by up to 13.45 µg m-3 ( ˜ 57.4 %) and 7.23 ppb ( ˜ 16

  3. Antioxidant, antimicrobial and antiproliferative activities of five lichen species.

    PubMed

    Mitrović, Tatjana; Stamenković, Slaviša; Cvetković, Vladimir; Tošić, Svetlana; Stanković, Milan; Radojević, Ivana; Stefanović, Olgica; Comić, Ljiljana; Dačić, Dragana; Curčić, Milena; Marković, Snežana

    2011-01-01

    The antioxidative, antimicrobial and antiproliferative potentials of the methanol extracts of the lichen species Parmelia sulcata, Flavoparmelia caperata, Evernia prunastri, Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea were evaluated. The total phenolic content of the tested extracts varied from 78.12 to 141.59 mg of gallic acid equivalent (GA)/g of extract and the total flavonoid content from 20.14 to 44.43 mg of rutin equivalent (Ru)/g of extract. The antioxidant capacities of the lichen extracts were determined by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals scavenging. Hypogymnia physodes with the highest phenolic content showed the strongest DPPH radical scavenging effect. Further, the antimicrobial potential of the lichen extracts was determined by a microdilution method on 29 microorganisms, including 15 strains of bacteria, 10 species of filamentous fungi and 4 yeast species. A high antimicrobial activity of all the tested extracts was observed with more potent inhibitory effects on the growth of Gram (+) bacteria. The highest antimicrobial activity among lichens was demonstrated by Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea. Finally, the antiproliferative activity of the lichen extracts was explored on the colon cancer adenocarcinoma cell line HCT-116 by MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) viability assay and acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining. The methanol extracts of Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea showed a better cytotoxic activity than the other extracts. All lichen species showed the ability to induce apoptosis of HCT-116 cells.

  4. [L-lysine-alpha-oxidase activity of some Trichoderma species].

    PubMed

    Smirnova, I P; Khaduev, S Kh

    1984-01-01

    Trichoderma cultures were tested for their ability to produce L-lysine-alpha-oxidase. The highest enzyme activity was manifested by T. harzianum (MGU), T. longibrachiatum Rifai VKM F-2025 and T. aureoviride Rifai VKM F-2026. The biosynthesis of the enzyme did not depend on the growth of the cultures and did not vary among the species.

  5. Antioxidant, Antimicrobial and Antiproliferative Activities of Five Lichen Species

    PubMed Central

    Mitrović, Tatjana; Stamenković, Slaviša; Cvetković, Vladimir; Tošić, Svetlana; Stanković, Milan; Radojević, Ivana; Stefanović, Olgica; Čomić, Ljiljana; Đačić, Dragana; Ćurčić, Milena; Marković, Snežana

    2011-01-01

    The antioxidative, antimicrobial and antiproliferative potentials of the methanol extracts of the lichen species Parmelia sulcata, Flavoparmelia caperata, Evernia prunastri, Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea were evaluated. The total phenolic content of the tested extracts varied from 78.12 to 141.59 mg of gallic acid equivalent (GA)/g of extract and the total flavonoid content from 20.14 to 44.43 mg of rutin equivalent (Ru)/g of extract. The antioxidant capacities of the lichen extracts were determined by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals scavenging. Hypogymnia physodes with the highest phenolic content showed the strongest DPPH radical scavenging effect. Further, the antimicrobial potential of the lichen extracts was determined by a microdilution method on 29 microorganisms, including 15 strains of bacteria, 10 species of filamentous fungi and 4 yeast species. A high antimicrobial activity of all the tested extracts was observed with more potent inhibitory effects on the growth of Gram (+) bacteria. The highest antimicrobial activity among lichens was demonstrated by Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea. Finally, the antiproliferative activity of the lichen extracts was explored on the colon cancer adenocarcinoma cell line HCT-116 by MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) viability assay and acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining. The methanol extracts of Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea showed a better cytotoxic activity than the other extracts. All lichen species showed the ability to induce apoptosis of HCT-116 cells. PMID:21954369

  6. Metabolomic profiling and antioxidant activity of some Acacia species

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Farid, I.B.; Sheded, M.G.; Mohamed, E.A.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomic profiling of different parts (leaves, flowers and pods) of Acacia species (Acacia nilotica, Acacia seyal and Acacia laeta) was evaluated. The multivariate data analyses such as principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were used to differentiate the distribution of plant metabolites among different species or different organs of the same species. A.nilotica was characterized with a high content of saponins and A.seyal was characterized with high contents of proteins, phenolics, flavonoids and anthocyanins. A.laeta had a higher content of carbohydrates than A. nilotica and A. seyal. On the basis of these results, total antioxidant capacity, DPPH free radical scavenging activity and reducing power of the methanolic extracts of studied parts were evaluated. A.nilotica and A.seyal extracts showed less inhibitory concentration 50 (IC50) compared to A.laeta extracts which means that these two species have the strongest radical scavenging activity whereas A. laeta extracts have the lowest radical scavenging activity. A positive correlation between saponins and flavonoids with total antioxidant capacity and DPPH radical scavenging activity was observed. Based on these results, the potentiality of these plants as antioxidants was discussed. PMID:25313274

  7. Chlorine gas exposure and the lung: a review.

    PubMed

    Das, R; Blanc, P D

    1993-01-01

    We conducted a review of the literature detailing the respiratory effects of chlorine, an extremely important but toxic halogen. Historically, the heaviest mass inhalational exposures to chlorine resulted from World War I gassing. Currently potential human exposure to chlorine inhalation occurs in a variety of settings in the workplace, as a result of inadvertent environmental releases, and even in the home due to household cleaning mishaps. Chlorine species are highly reactive; tissue injury results from exposure to chlorine, hydrochloric acid, hypochlorous acid, or chloramines. Acute, high level exposure to chlorine gas in occupational or environmental settings results in a variety of dose-related lung effects ranging from respiratory mucus membrane irritation to pulmonary edema. Pulmonary function testing can reveal either obstructive or restrictive deficits immediately following exposure, with resolution over time in the majority of cases. However, some of those exposed may demonstrate long-term persistent obstructive or restrictive pulmonary deficits or increased nonspecific airway reactivity after high level exposure to chlorine gas. Symptoms and signs following inhalation of mixtures of chlorine-containing cleaners in the home are similar to those after occupational exposures and environmental releases. Although generally less severe, these events may be extremely common. Controlled human exposure data suggest that some subjects may be more responsive to the effects of chlorine gas; epidemiologic data also indicate that certain subpopulations (e.g., smokers) may be at greater risk of adverse outcome after chlorine inhalation. Although these findings are intriguing, additional study is needed to better delineate the risk factors that predispose toward the development of long-term pulmonary sequelae following chlorine gas exposure.

  8. Activated carbons from flax shive and cotton gin waste as environmental adsorbents for the chlorinated hydrocarbon trichloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Klasson, K Thomas; Wartelle, Lynda H; Lima, Isabel M; Marshall, Wayne E; Akin, Danny E

    2009-11-01

    Agricultural by-products represent a considerable quantity of harvested commodity crops. The use of by-products as precursors for the production of widely used adsorbents, such as activated carbons, may impart a value-added component of the overall biomass harvested. Our objective in this paper is to show that flax shive and cotton gin waste can serve as a precursor for activated carbon that can be used for adsorption of trichloroethylene (TCE) from both the liquid and gas phases. Testing was conducted on carbon activated with phosphoric acid or steam. The results show that activated carbon made from flax shive performed better than select commercial activated carbons, especially at higher TCE concentrations. The activation method employed had little effect on TCE adsorption in gas or vapor phase studies but liquid phase studies suggested that steam activation is slightly better than phosphoric acid activation. As expected, the capacity for the activated carbons depended on the fluid phase equilibrium concentration. At a fluid concentration of 2 mg of TCE/L of fluid, the capacity of the steam activated carbon made from flax shive was similar at 64 and 80 mg TCE/g of carbon for the vapor and liquid phases, respectively. Preliminary cost estimates suggest that the production costs of such carbons are $1.50 to $8.90 per kg, depending on activation method and precursor material; steam activation was significantly less expensive than phosphoric acid activation.

  9. Bromine-Chlorine Coupling in the Antarctic Ozone Hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, Michael Y.; Sze, Nien-Dak; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Rodriquez, Jose M.; Prather, Michael J.

    1996-01-01

    The contribution from the chlorine and bromine species in the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole is evaluated. Since chlorine and bromine compounds are of different industrial origin, it is desirable, from a policy point of view, to be able to attribute chlorine-catalyzed loss of ozone with those reactions directly involving chlorine species, and likewise for bromine-catalyzed loss. In the stratosphere, however, most of the chemical families are highly coupled, and, for example, changes in the chlorine abundance will alter the partitioninig in other families and thus the rate of ozone loss. This modeling study examines formation of the Antarctic ozone hole for a wide range of bromine concentrations (5 - 25 pptv) and for chlorine concentrations typical of the last two decades (1.5, 2.5 and 3.5 ppbv). We follow the photochemical evolution of a single parcel of air, typical of the inner Antarctic vortex (50 mbar, 70 deg. S, NO(sub y) = 2 ppbv, with Polar Stratospheric Clouds(PSC)) from August 1 to November 1. For all of these ranges of chlorine and bromine loading, we would predict a substantial ozone hole (local depletion greater than 90%) within the de-nitrified, PSC- perturbed vortex. The contributions of the different catalytic cycles responsible for ozone loss are tabulated. The deep minimum in ozone is driven primarily by the chlorine abundance. As bromine levels decrease, the magnitude of the chlorine-catalyzed ozone loss increases to take up the slack. This is because bromine suppresses ClO by accelerating the conversion of ClO an Cl2O2 back to HCI. For this range of conditions, the local relative efficiency of ozone destruction per bromine atom to that per chlorine atom (alpha-factor) ranges from 33 to 55, decreasing with increase of bromine.

  10. Spectroscopic and structural characterization of chlorine loading effects on Mo/Si:Ti catalysts in oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Ozkan, Umit S

    2005-02-17

    The structural changes induced in a silica-titania mixed-oxide support (1:1 molar ratio) by chlorine addition at different loading levels, their relation to the structural characteristics of supported MoOx species over the support, and their correlation with ethane oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) activity have been examined. The molybdenum and chlorine precursors are incorporated into the Si/Ti support network as it forms during gelation by using a "one-pot" modified sol-gel/coprecipitation technique. In situ X-ray diffraction during calcination shows the Si/Ti 1:1 mixed-oxide support is in a state of nanodispersed anatase titania over amorphous silica. With the addition of molybdenum and chlorine modifier, this anatase feature becomes more pronounced, indicating a decreased dispersion of titania. The effective titania surface area on the chlorine-doped Si:Ti support obtained from 2-propanol temperature-programmed reaction supports this observation. Raman spectra of dehydrated samples point to an enhanced interaction of MoOx species with silica at the expense of titania. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic results show that, without forming a molybdenum chloride, the presence of chlorine significantly alters the relative surface concentration of Si vs Ti, the electronic structure of the surface MoOx species, and the oxygen environment around supported MoOx species in the Si/Ti network. Secondary ion mass spectrometry detected the existence of SiCl fragments from the mass spectra, which provides molecular insight into the location of chlorine in Mo/Si:Ti catalysts. The observed increase in ethane ODH selectivity with chlorine modification may be ascribed to the MoOx species sharing more complex ligands with silica and titania with the indirect participation of chlorine. Steady-state isotopic transient kinetic analysis (SSITKA) is used to to examine the oxygen insertion and exchange mechanisms. The catalysts show very little oxygen exchange with the gas phase in the

  11. In-situ measurements of chlorine activation, nitric acid redistribution and ozone depletion in the Antarctic lower vortex aboard the German research aircraft HALO during TACTS/ESMVal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurkat, Tina; Voigt, Christiane; Kaufmann, Stefan; Schlage, Romy; Gottschaldt, Klaus-Dirk; Ziereis, Helmut; Hoor, Peter; Bozem, Heiko; Müller, Stefan; Zahn, Andreas; Schlager, Hans; Oelhaf, Hermann; Sinnhuber, Björn-Martin; Dörnbrack, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    In-situ measurements of stratospheric chlorine compounds are rare and exhibit the potential to gain insight into small scale mixing processes where stratospheric air masses of different origin and history interact. In addition, the relationship with chemically stable trace gases helps to identify regions that have been modified by chemical processing on polar stratospheric clouds. To this end, in-situ measurements of ClONO2, HCl, HNO3, NOy, N2O and O3 have been performed in the Antarctic Polar Vortex in September 2012 aboard the German research aircraft HALO (High Altitude and Long Rang research aircraft) during the TACTS/ESMVal (Transport and Composition in the UTLS/Earth System Model Validation) mission. With take-off and landing in Capetown, HALO sampled vortex air with latitudes down to 65°S, at altitudes between 8 and 14.3 km and potential temperatures between 340 and 390 K. Before intering the vortex at 350 K potential temperature, HALO additionally sampled mid-latitude stratospheric air. The trace gas distributions at the edge of the Antarctic polar vortex show distinct signatures of processed upper stratospheric vortex air and chemically different lower stratospheric / upper tropospheric air. Diabatic descend of the vortex transports processed air into the lower stratosphere. Here small scale filaments of only a few kilometers extension form at the lower vortex boundary due to shear stress, ultimately leading to transport and irreversible mixing. Comparison of trace gas relationships with those at the beginning of the polar winter reveals substantial chlorine activation, ozone depletion de- and renitrification with high resolution. Furthermore, the measurements are compared to the chemistry climate models EMAC and supported by ECMWF analysis. Finally, we compare the Antarctic measurements with new measurements of ClONO2, HCl and HNO3 aboard HALO obtained during the Arctic mission POLSTRACC (POLar STratosphere in a Changing Climate) based in Kiruna (Sveden

  12. Activation mechanism of Gi and Go by reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Motohiro; Schey, Kevin L; Takagahara, Shuichi; Kontani, Kenji; Katada, Toshiaki; Urano, Yasuteru; Nagano, Tetsuo; Nagao, Taku; Kurose, Hitoshi

    2002-03-15

    Reactive oxygen species are proposed to work as intracellular mediators. One of their target proteins is the alpha subunit of heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins (Galpha(i) and Galpha(o)), leading to activation. H(2)O(2) is one of the reactive oxygen species and activates purified Galpha(i2). However, the activation requires the presence of Fe(2+), suggesting that H(2)O(2) is converted to more reactive species such as c*OH. The analysis with mass spectrometry shows that seven cysteine residues (Cys(66), Cys(112), Cys(140), Cys(255), Cys(287), Cys(326), and Cys(352)) of Galpha(i2) are modified by the treatment with *OH. Among these cysteine residues, Cys(66), Cys(112), Cys(140), Cys(255), and Cys(352) are not involved in *OH-induced activation of Galpha(i2). Although the modification of Cys(287) but not Cys(326) is required for subunit dissociation, the modification of both Cys(287) and Cys(326) is necessary for the activation of Galpha(i2) as determined by pertussis toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation, conformation-dependent change of trypsin digestion pattern or guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate binding. Wild type Galpha(i2) but not Cys(287)- or Cys(326)-substituted mutants are activated by UV light, singlet oxygen, superoxide anion, and nitric oxide, indicating that these oxidative stresses activate Galpha(i2) by the mechanism similar to *OH-induced activation. Because Cys(287) exists only in G(i) family, this study explains the selective activation of G(i)/G(o) by oxidative stresses.

  13. In vitro antioxidant and antiproliferative activities of nine Salvia species.

    PubMed

    Loizzo, Monica Rosa; Abouali, Morteza; Salehi, Peyman; Sonboli, Ali; Kanani, Mohammad; Menichini, Francesco; Tundis, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Supported by a growing increase of scientific research attesting the health properties of salvia species, we have decided to investigate nine Salvia namely Salvia sclarea, Salvia atropatana, Salvia sahendica, Salvia hydrangea, Salvia xanthocheila, Salvia macrosiphon, Salvia glutinosa, Salvia chloroleuca and Salvia ceratophylla species for their antioxidant and antiproliferative activities. In order to correlate the bioactivity with their phytochemical content, the total phenol and total flavonoid contents were also determined. S. ceratophylla exhibited the strongest activity against C32 cells with an IC50 value of 20.8 μg mL(- 1), while S. glutinosa exhibited an IC50 value of 29.5 μg mL(- 1) against ACHN cell line. Interestingly, S. glutinosa displayed also the highest DPPH radical-scavenging activity with an IC50 of 3.2 μg mL(- 1). These species are characterised by the highest total phenol and flavonoid contents. The obtained results suggest that Salvia species are healthy plant foods.

  14. A comparison of iodinated trihalomethane formation from chlorine, chlorine dioxide and potassium permanganate oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian-Yang; Xu, Bin; Hu, Chen-Yan; Lin, Yi-Li; Lin, Lin; Ye, Tao; Tian, Fu-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the formation of iodinated trihalomethanes (I-THMs) from iodide-containing raw waters oxidized by chlorine, chlorine dioxide (ClO₂) and potassium permanganate (KMnO₄) at different oxidant concentrations, reaction times, pHs, initial iodide concentrations and bromide to iodide mass ratios. Among the six investigated I-THMs, iodoform was the major species formed during the oxidation using chlorine, ClO₂ and KMnO₄. When oxidant concentration increased from 0.1 to 3.0 mg/L, the formation of I-THMs increased and then decreased for chlorine and ClO₂, but kept increasing for KMnO₄. As the reaction time went by, I-THM concentration increased to a plateau within 10 h (ClO₂ within only 1 h, especially) for all the three oxidants. I-THM formation gradually increased from pH 3.0 to 9.0 and remained stable at pH values higher than 7.5 for chlorine; however, for ClO₂ and KMnO₄ the highest I-THM formation showed at pH 7.0 and 7.5, respectively. As initial iodide concentration increased from 20 to 800 μg/L, the total amount and species of I-THMs increased for the three oxidants. Iodide contributed to I-THM formation much more significantly than bromide.

  15. Radical scavenging, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of halophytic species.

    PubMed

    Meot-Duros, Laetitia; Le Floch, Gaëtan; Magné, Christian

    2008-03-05

    For the first time, both antioxidant and antimicrobial activities are simultaneously reported in halophytic plants, particularly on polar fractions. Chloroformic and methanolic extracts of the halophytes Eryngium maritimum L., Crithmum maritimum L. and Cakile maritima Scop. were tested for their antimicrobial activities against 12 bacterial and yeast strains. In addition, radical scavenging and antioxidant activities were assessed, as well as total phenol contents. Only one bacterial strain (Listeria monocytogenes) was not inhibited by plants extracts, and apolar (chloroformic) fractions were generally more active than polar (methanolic) ones. Eryngium maritimum presented the weakest radical scavenging activity (ABTS IC(50)=0.28 mg ml(-1)), as well as the lowest total phenol content (16.4 mg GAE g(-1) DW). However, the three halophytic species had relatively strong total antioxidant activities (from 32.7 to 48.6 mg ascorbate equivalents g (-1) DW). Consequences on the potential use of these plants in food or cosmetic industry are discussed.

  16. Hydrodesulfurization of chlorinized coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalvinskas, J. J.; Rohatgi, N. K. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A method of desulfurization is described in which high sulfur coals are desulfurized by low temperature chlorinolysis of coal in liquid media, preferably water, followed by hydrodesulfurization at a temperature above 500 C. The coals are desulfurized to an extent of up to 90% by weight and simultaneously dechlorinated to a chlorine content below 0.1% by weight. The product coals have lower volatiles loss, lower oxygen and nitrogen content and higher fixed carbon than raw coals treated with hydrogen under the same conditions. Heating the chlorinated coal to a temperature above 500 C. in inert gas such as nitrogen results in significantly less desulfurization.

  17. Chlorination strategies for direct groundwater recharge of tertiary effluent

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, P.; Wang, L.; Johnson, P.C.; Houston, S.; Houston, W.N.; Brown, P.

    1998-07-01

    Chlorination for the control of biological activity during direct recharge of tertiary effluent was studied in bench-scale simulated aquifers. Both free chlorine and chloramine were studied at darcy velocities of 360 cm/d to 720 cm/d. A free chlorine residual of 5 mg/L or above inhibited biological activity in the 1.2 m of soil that was studied. A free chlorine residual concentration of 2 mg/L prevented biological activity in the first 0.9 m of exposed soil and significant biological clogging was observed in soil greater than 0.9 m from the injection point. A 2 mg/L residual concentration of chloramine resulted in biological clogging over the 0.9 m of soil adjacent to the injection point. No chlorine addition resulted in clogging adjacent to the injection point indicating that the chloramine inhibited biological activity and allowed biological activity to occur over a greater distance from the injection point. Dissolved oxygen levels decreased to zero in aquifers where significant biological activity was observed and trihalomethane concentrations decreased in these aquifers. Free chlorine appears to effectively control biological clogging adjacent to the injection point while permitting biological activity to develop after the chlorine has decayed.

  18. Plant species richness increases phosphatase activities in an experimental grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, Nina; Wilcke, Wolfgang; Oelmann, Yvonne

    2014-05-01

    Plant species richness has been shown to increase aboveground nutrient uptake requiring the mobilization of soil nutrient pools. For phosphorus (P) the underlying mechanisms for increased P release in soil under highly diverse grassland mixtures remain obscure because aboveground P storage and concentrations of inorganic and organic P in soil solution and differently reactive soil P pools are unrelated (Oelmann et al. 2011). The need of plants and soil microorganisms for P can increase the exudation of enzymes hydrolyzing organically bound P (phosphatases) which might represent an important release mechanism of inorganic P in a competitive environment such as highly diverse grassland mixtures. Our objectives were to test the effects of i) plant functional groups (legumes, grasses, non-leguminous tall and small herbs), and of (ii) plant species richness on microbial P (Pmic) and phosphatase activities in soil. In autumn 2013, we measured Pmic and alkaline phosphomonoesterase and phosphodiesterase activities in soil of 80 grassland mixtures comprising different community compositions and species richness (1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 60) in the Jena Experiment. In general, Pmic and enzyme activities were correlated (r = 0.59 and 0.46 for phosphomonoesterase and phosphodiesterase activities, respectively; p

  19. Estrogenic and androgenic activity of PCBs, their chlorinated metabolites and other endocrine disruptors estimated with two in vitro yeast assays.

    PubMed

    Svobodová, K; Placková, M; Novotná, V; Cajthaml, T

    2009-11-01

    Investigations of environmental pollution by endocrine-disrupting chemicals are now in progress. Up to now, several in vitro bioassays have been developed for evaluation of the endocrine disruptive activity; however, there is still a lack of comparative studies of their sensitivity. In this work comparison of the estrogen screening assay based on beta-galactosidase expression and a bioluminescent estrogen screen revealed differences in the sensitivity and specificity of the two tests. With the beta-galactosidase screen a slight estrogen-like activity of Delor 103, a commercial mixture of PCB congeners, and a fungicide triclosan was measured whereas no activity was detected using the bioluminescent assay. A bioluminescent androgen test negated previously suggested androgenic potential of triclosan. Further, this work demonstrates the androgenic activity of Delor 103, with an EC(50) value of 2.29 x 10(-2)mg/L. On the other hand, chlorobenzoic acids (CBAs), representing potential PCB degradation metabolites, exhibited no androgenic activity but were slightly estrogenic. Their estrogenicity varied with their chemical structure, with 2,3-CBA, 2,3,6-CBA, 2,4,6-CBA and monochlorinated compounds exhibiting the highest activity. Thus the results indicated possible transitions of the hormonal activity of PCBs during bacterial degradation.

  20. Altered UV absorbance and cytotoxicity of chlorinated sunscreen agents.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Vaughn F; Kennedy, Steven; Zhang, Hualin; Purser, Gordon H; Sheaff, Robert J

    2012-12-01

    Sunscreens are widely utilized due to the adverse effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation on human health. The safety of their active ingredients as well as that of any modified versions generated during use is thus of concern. Chlorine is used as a chemical disinfectant in swimming pools. Its reactivity suggests sunscreen components might be chlorinated, altering their absorptive and/or cytotoxic properties. To test this hypothesis, the UV-filters oxybenzone, dioxybenzone, and sulisobenzone were reacted with chlorinating agents and their UV spectra analyzed. In all cases, a decrease in UV absorbance was observed. Given that chlorinated compounds can be cytotoxic, the effect of modified UV-filters on cell viability was examined. Chlorinated oxybenzone and dioxybenzone caused significantly more cell death than unchlorinated controls. In contrast, chlorination of sulisobenzone actually reduced cytotoxicity of the parent compound. Exposing a commercially available sunscreen product to chlorine also resulted in decreased UV absorbance, loss of UV protection, and enhanced cytotoxicity. These observations show chlorination of sunscreen active ingredients can dramatically decrease UV absorption and generate derivatives with altered biological properties.

  1. Production of chlorine from chloride salts

    DOEpatents

    Rohrmann, Charles A.

    1981-01-01

    A process for converting chloride salts and sulfuric acid to sulfate salts and elemental chlorine is disclosed. A chloride salt and sulfuric acid are combined in a furnace where they react to produce a sulfate salt and hydrogen chloride. Hydrogen chloride from the furnace contacts a molten salt mixture containing an oxygen compound of vanadium, an alkali metal sulfate and an alkali metal pyrosulfate to recover elemental chlorine. In the absence of an oxygen-bearing gas during the contacting, the vanadium is reduced, but is regenerated to its active higher valence state by separately contacting the molten salt mixture with an oxygen-bearing gas.

  2. Chlorinated phenols control the expression of the multi-drug resistance efflux pump MexAB-OprM in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by activating NalC

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sudeshna; Cremers, Claudia M.; Jakob, Ursula; Love, Nancy G.

    2011-01-01

    Summary NalC is a TetR type regulator that represses the multidrug efflux pump MexAB-OprM in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here we explain the mechanism of NalC mediated regulation of MexAB-OprM. We show that NalC non-covalently binds chlorinated phenols and chemicals containing chlorophenol sidechains such as triclosan. NalC-chlorinated phenol binding results in its dissociation from promoter DNA and up-regulation of NalC’s downstream targets, including the MexR antirepressor ArmR. ArmR up-regulation and MexR-ArmR complex formation have previously been shown to upregulate MexAB-OprM. In vivo mexB and armR expression analyses were used to corroborate in vitro NalC chlorinated phenol binding. We also show that the interaction between chlorinated phenols and NalC is reversible, such that removal of these chemicals restored NalC promoter DNA binding. Thus, the NalC-chlorinated phenol interaction is likely a pertinent physiological mechanism that P. aeruginosa uses to control expression of the MexAB-OprM efflux pump. PMID:21231970

  3. Disinfection efficacy of chlorine and peracetic acid alone or in combination against Aspergillus spp. and Candida albicans in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Sisti, Maurizio; Brandi, Giorgio; De Santi, Mauro; Rinaldi, Laura; Schiavano, Giuditta F

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the fungicidal activity of chlorine and peracetic acid in drinking water against various pathogenic Aspergillus spp. and Candida albicans strains. A. nidulans exhibited the greatest resistance, requiring 10 ppm of chlorine for 30 min contact time for a complete inactivation. Under the same experimental conditions, peracetic acid was even less fungicidal. In this case, A. niger proved to be the most resistant species (50 ppm for 60 min for complete inactivation). All Aspergillus spp. were insensitive to 10 ppm even with extended exposure (>5 h). The combination of chlorine and peracetic acid against Aspergillus spp. did not show synergistic effects except in the case of A. flavus. Complete growth inhibition of C. albicans was observed after about 3 h contact time with 0.2 ppm. C. albicans was less sensitive to peracetic acid. Hence the concentrations of chlorine that are usually present in drinking water distribution systems are ineffective against several Aspergillus spp. and peracetic acid cannot be considered an alternative to chlorine for disinfecting drinking water. The combination of the two biocides is not very effective in eliminating filamentous fungi at the concentrations permitted for drinking water disinfection.

  4. Measurement of Metabolic Activity in Dormant Spores of Bacillus Species

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-14

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Spores of Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus subtilis were harvested shortly after release from sporangia, incubated under...Dec-2014 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Measurement of Metabolic Activity in Dormant Spores of Bacillus Species...Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 spores, Bacillus , spore dormancy, 3-phosphoglycerate REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11

  5. Chlorine Dioxide (Gas)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas is registered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a sterilant for use in manufacturing, laboratory equipment, medical devices, environmental surfaces, tools and clean rooms. Aqueous ClO2 is registered by the EPA as a surface disinfectant and sanitizer fo...

  6. Chlorination of lanthanum oxide.

    PubMed

    Gaviría, Juan P; Navarro, Lucas G; Bohé, Ana E

    2012-03-08

    The reactive system La(2)O(3)(s)-Cl(2)(g) was studied in the temperature range 260-950 °C. The reaction course was followed by thermogravimetry, and the solids involved were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results showed that the reaction leads to the formation of solid LaOCl, and for temperatures above 850 °C, the lanthanum oxychloride is chlorinated, producing LaCl(3)(l). The formation of the oxychloride progresses through a nucleation and growth mechanism, and the kinetic analysis showed that at temperatures below 325 °C the system is under chemical control. The influence of diffusive processes on the kinetics of production of LaOCl was evaluated by studying the effect of the reactive gas flow rate, the mass of the sample, and the chlorine diffusion through the boundary layer surrounding the solid sample. The conversion curves were analyzed and fitted according to the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami description, and the reaction order with respect to the chlorine partial pressure was obtained by varying this partial pressure between 10 and 70 kPa. The rate equation was obtained, which includes the influence of the temperature, chlorine partial pressure, and reaction degree.

  7. Impacts of Water Chlorination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Science and Technology, 1976

    1976-01-01

    To learn the consequences of one aspect of technology on man and his surroundings, scientists meeting at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory discussed what is known about the impacts of water chlorination. The conference produced state-of-the-art information about the technology and attempted to summarize all the information on the subject. (BT)

  8. Chlorine dioxide and hemodialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.P. . Dept. of Pharmacology and Toxicology)

    1989-05-01

    Because it has little or no tendency to generate carcinogenic trihalomethanes such as chloroform, chlorine dioxide is an attractive alternative to chlorine for drinking water disinfection. There are, however, concerns about its acute toxicity, and the toxic effects of its by-products, chlorite and chlorate. The human experience with chlorine dioxide in both controlled, prospective studies and in actual use situations in community water supplies have as yet failed to reveal adverse health effects. The EPA has recommended standards of 0.06 mg/L for chlorine dioxide and standards of 0.007 mg/L for chlorite and chlorate in drinking water. Among groups who may be at special risk from oxychlorines in drinking water are patients who must undergro chronic extracorporeal hemodialysis. Although even units for home hemodialysis are supposed to be equipped with devices which effectively remove oxychlorines, there is a always a possibility of operator error or equipment failure. When the equipment is adequately maintained, it is likely that dialysis patients will have more intensive exposures from drinking water than from dialysis fluids despite the much larger volumes of water that are involved in dialysis. This paper discusses a hemodialysis and the standards and effects of oxychlorines. 90 refs., 2 tabs.

  9. Formation and speciation of haloacetamides and haloacetonitriles for chlorination, chloramination, and chlorination followed by chloramination.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huang; Chen, Bo-Yi; Zhu, Zi-Ru

    2017-01-01

    The formation of haloacetamides (HAcAms) and haloacetonitriles (HANs) from a solution containing natural organic matter and a secondary effluent sample was evaluated for disinfection by chlorination, chloramination, and chlorination followed by chloramination (Cl2NH2Cl process). The use of preformed monochloramine (NH2Cl) produced higher concentrations of HAcAms and lower concentrations of HANs than chlorination, while the Cl2NH2Cl process produced the highest concentrations of HAcAms and HANs. These results indicate that the Cl2NH2Cl process, which inhibited the formation of regulated trihalomethanes compared with chlorination, enhanced the formation of HAcAms and HANs. For disinfection in the presence of bromide, brominated dihaloacetamides and dihaloacetonitriles were formed, and the trends were similar to those observed for chlorinated species in the absence of bromide. The degrees of bromine substitution of dihaloacetamides and dihaloacetonitriles were highest for chlorination, followed by the Cl2NH2Cl process and then by the NH2Cl process. For the Cl2NH2Cl process, HAN formation kept gradually increasing with prechlorination time increasing from 0 to 120 min, while HAcAm formation increased only until it reached a maximum at around 10-30 min. These results suggest that the prechlorination time could be reduced to control the formation of HAcAms and HANs. During chloramination, the formation of HAcAms and HANs was lower when using preformed NH2Cl than when chloramines were formed in situ, with higher formation of HAcAms and HANs when chlorine was added before ammonia than vice versa for the secondary effluent; this finding suggests that preformed NH2Cl could be used to inhibit the formation of HAcAms and HANs during chloramination.

  10. Chlorine in Lunar Basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, J. J.; Anand, M.; Franchi, I. A.

    2017-01-01

    In the context of the lunar magma ocean (LMO) model, it is anticipated that chlorine (and other volatiles) should have been concentrated in the late-stage LMO residual melts (i.e., the dregs enriched in incompatible elements such as K, REEs, and P, collectively called KREEP, and in its primitive form - urKREEP, [1]), given its incompatibility in mafic minerals like olivine and pyroxene, which were the dominant phases that crystallized early in the cumulate pile of the LMO (e.g., [2]). When compared to chondritic meteorites and terrestrial rocks (e.g., [3-4]), lunar samples often display heavy chlorine isotope compositions [5-9]. Boyce et al. [8] found a correlation between delta Cl-37 (sub Ap) and bulk-rock incompatible trace elements (ITEs) in lunar basalts, and used this to propose that early degassing of Cl (likely as metal chlorides) from the LMO led to progressive enrichment in remaining LMO melt in Cl-37over Cl-35- the early degassing model. Barnes et al. [9] suggested that relatively late degassing of chlorine from urKREEP (to yield delta Cl-37 (sub urKREEP greater than +25 per mille) followed by variable mixing between KREEPy melts and mantle cumulates (characterized by delta Cl-370 per mille) could explain the majority of Cl isotope data from igneous lunar samples. In order to better understand the processes involved in giving rise to the heavy chlorine isotope compositions of lunar samples, we have performed an in situ study of chlorine isotopes and abundances of volatiles in lunar apatite from a diverse suite of lunar basalts spanning a range of geochemical types.

  11. Evaluation of acrodontiolamide, a chlorinated compound produced by Acrodontium salmoneum de Hoog for cytotoxicity and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Steiman, R; Benoit-Guyod, J L; Guiraud, P; Seigle-Murandi, F

    1995-10-01

    A new antifungal compound has been isolated from the culture medium of Acrodontium salmoneum de Hoog. Its structure was previously elucidated and was named acrodontiolamide. However, this compound is not characteristically produced by the genus Acrodontium, it is rather a feature of one isolate of A. Salmoneum coming from the soil of the grotto of La Pierre Saint Martin (France). Production, purification, cytotoxicity and antimicrobial activities of acrodontiolamide are described. Concerning microorganisms, inhibitory activity seems to be specifically restricted to phytopathogenic and entomapathogenic fungi. Acrodontiolamide is not cytotoxic to either normal human cultured cells or tumor cells.

  12. Bromoform production in tropical open-ocean waters: OTEC chlorination

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwig, E.O.; Valentine, R.

    1981-09-01

    The bromoform, and other volatile organics produced while chlorinating both the evaporator and condenser seawater during operation of the one megawatt (1 MW) OTEC-1 test facility are reported. Although many halogenated compounds might be produced as a result of chlorination, the quantitative analyses in this study focused on volatile EPA priority pollutants. Bromoform is the compound specifically recognized as a potential pollutant. Its concentration may be indicative of other halogenated species.

  13. Silver-Catalyzed C(sp(3))-H Chlorination.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Jun; Kanai, Motomu

    2017-03-17

    A silver-catalyzed chlorination of benzylic, tertiary, and secondary C(sp(3))-H bonds was developed. The reaction proceeded with as low as 0.2 mol % catalyst loading at room temperature under air atmosphere with synthetically useful functional group compatibility. The regioselectivity and reactivity tendencies suggest that the chlorination proceeded through a radical pathway, but an intermediate alkylsilver species cannot be ruled out.

  14. Activated Carbons from Flax Shive and Cotton Gin Waste as Environmental Adsorbents for the Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Trichloroethylene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural by-products represent a considerable quantity of harvested commodity crops. The use of by-products as a starting material for the production of widely used adsorbents, such as activated carbons, may impart a value-added component of the overall biomass harvested. Our objective in this...

  15. Catalytic Role Of Palladium And Relative Reactivity Of Substituted Chlorines During Adsorption And Treatment Of PCBs On Reactive Activated Carbon

    EPA Science Inventory

    The adsorption-mediated dechlorination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is a unique feature of reactive activated cabon (RAC). Here, we address the RAC system, containing a tunable amount of Fe as a primary electron donor coupled with Pd as an electrochemical catalyst to pote...

  16. Magnetically active biosorbent for chromium species removal from aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M; Mahmoud, Mohamed E; Osmam, Maher M; Ahmed, Somia B

    2014-01-01

    A magnetically active composite as adsorbent was synthesized via a facile in situ one-pot impregnation of magnetic nano-iron oxide (Fe₃O₄) on the surface of activated carbon (AC) for the formation of AC-Fe₃O₄. Baker(')s yeast was physically loaded on the resultant adsorbent AC-Fe₃O₄ to form a novel yeast coated magnetic composite AC-Fe₃O₄-Yst as biosorbent. The two synthesized adsorbents were characterized by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and assessed using Langmuir, the Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm models. The validity and applicability of these two sorbents in adsorptive removal of chromium species, Cr(VI) and Cr(III), from aqueous solutions under the effect of a magnetic field were studied and evaluated in the presence of various controlling parameters in order to identify the optimal pH, contact time, mass dose and chromium concentrations for such adsorption process. Also, single and multi-stage micro-column techniques were used to study the potential applications of AC-Fe₃O₄ as magnetically active adsorbents and AC-Fe₃O₄-Yst as magnetically active biosorbents, for the removal of chromium species from various real water samples.

  17. Whole Blood Cholinesterase Activity in 20 Species of Wild Birds.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Igal H; Yanco, Esty G; Landau, Shmulik; Nadler-Valency, Rona; Anglister, Nili; Bueller-Rosenzweig, Ariela; Apelbom-Halbersberg, Tal; Cuneah, Olga; Hanji, Vera; Bellaiche, Michel

    2016-06-01

    Clinical signs of organophosphate and carbamate intoxication in wild birds can be mistaken for those of other diseases, thus potentially delaying diagnosis and implementation of life-saving treatment. The objective of this study was to determine the reference interval for blood cholinesterase activity in 20 different wild avian species from 7 different orders, thereby compiling a reference database for wildlife veterinarians. Blood was collected from birds not suspected of having organophosphate or carbamate toxicosis, and the modified Michel method, which determines the change in blood pH that directly correlates with cholinesterase activity, was used to measure blood cholinesterase levels. Results of change in blood pH values ranged from 0.11 for the white-tailed eagle ( Haliaeetus albicilla ) to 0.90 for the honey buzzard ( Pernis apivorus ). The results showed that even within the same family, interspecies differences in normal cholinesterase blood activity were not uncommon. The findings emphasized the importance of determining reference intervals for avian blood cholinesterase activity at the species level.

  18. Chemical constituents and biological activities of two Iranian Cystoseira species.

    PubMed

    Yegdaneh, Afsaneh; Ghannadi, Alireza; Dayani, Ladan

    2016-07-01

    The marine environment represents approximately half of the global biodiversity and could provide unlimited biological resources for the production of therapeutic drugs. Marine seaweeds comprise few thousands of species representing a considerable part of the littoral biomass. Extracts of the Cystoseira indica and Cystoseira merica were subjected to phytochemical and cytotoxicity evaluation. The amount of total phenol was determined with Folin-Ciocalteu reagent. Cytotoxicity was characterized by IC50 of human cancer cell lines including MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma), HeLa (cervical carcinoma), and HT-29 (human colon adenocarcinoma) using Sulforhodamin assay. Antioxidant activities were evaluated using 2,2-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method. The analysis revealed that tannins, saponins, sterols and triterpenes were the most abundant constituents in these Cystoseira species while cyanogenic and cardiac glycosides were the least ones. C. indica had the higher content of total phenolics and also showed higher antioxidant activity. Cytotoxic results showed that both species inhibited cell growth effectively, especially against MCF-7 cell line. The present findings suggest potential pharmacological applications of selected seaweeds but require further investigation and identification of their bioactive principles.

  19. Chemical constituents and biological activities of two Iranian Cystoseira species

    PubMed Central

    Yegdaneh, Afsaneh; Ghannadi, Alireza; Dayani, Ladan

    2016-01-01

    The marine environment represents approximately half of the global biodiversity and could provide unlimited biological resources for the production of therapeutic drugs. Marine seaweeds comprise few thousands of species representing a considerable part of the littoral biomass. Extracts of the Cystoseira indica and Cystoseira merica were subjected to phytochemical and cytotoxicity evaluation. The amount of total phenol was determined with Folin-Ciocalteu reagent. Cytotoxicity was characterized by IC50 of human cancer cell lines including MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma), HeLa (cervical carcinoma), and HT-29 (human colon adenocarcinoma) using Sulforhodamin assay. Antioxidant activities were evaluated using 2,2-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method. The analysis revealed that tannins, saponins, sterols and triterpenes were the most abundant constituents in these Cystoseira species while cyanogenic and cardiac glycosides were the least ones. C. indica had the higher content of total phenolics and also showed higher antioxidant activity. Cytotoxic results showed that both species inhibited cell growth effectively, especially against MCF-7 cell line. The present findings suggest potential pharmacological applications of selected seaweeds but require further investigation and identification of their bioactive principles. PMID:27651811

  20. Phytochemical profiles, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of three Potentilla species

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Extracts from Potentilla species have been applied in traditional medicine and exhibit antioxidant, hypoglycemic, anti-inflammatory, antitumor and anti-ulcerogenic properties, but little has been known about the diversity of phytochemistry and pharmacology on this genus. This study investigated and compared the phytochemical profiles, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of leaf extracts from three Potentilla species (Potentilla fruticosa, Potentilla glabra and Potentilla parvifolia) in order to discover new resources for lead structures and pharmaceutical products. Methods Chemical composition and content of six phenolic compounds were evaluated and determined by RP-HPLC; Total phenolic and total flavonoid content were determined using Folin-Ciocalteau colourimetric method and sodium borohydride/chloranil-based method (SBC); Antioxidant activities were determined using DPPH, ABTS and FRAP assays; Antimicrobial properties were investigated by agar dilution and mycelial growth rate method. Results The results showed hyperoside was the predominant phenolic compound in three Potentilla species by RP-HPLC assay, with the content of 8.86 (P. fruticosa), 2.56 (P. glabra) and 2.68 mg/g (P. parvifolia), respectively. The highest content of total identified phenolic compounds (hyperoside, (+)-catechin, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, rutin and ellagic acid) was observed in P. parvifolia (14.17 mg/g), follow by P. fruticosa (10.01 mg/g) and P. glabra (7.01 mg/g). P. fruticosa possessed the highest content of total phenolic (84.93 ± 0.50 mmol gallic acid equivalent/100 g) and total flavonoid (84.14 ± 0.03 mmol quercetin equivalent/100 g), which were in good correlation with its significant DPPHIC50 (16.87 μg/mL), ABTS (2763.48 μmol Trolox equivalent/g) and FRAP (1398.70 μmol Trolox equivalent/g) capacities. Furthermore, the effective methodology to distinguish the different species of Potentilla was also established by chromatographic fingerprint analysis for

  1. Antimicrobial activity of some Clerodendrum species from Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abouzid, Sameh F; Wahba, Haytham M; Elshamy, Ali; Cos, Paul; Maes, Louis; Apers, Sandra; Pieters, Luc; Shahat, Abdelaaty A

    2013-01-01

    Chloroformic and methanolic extracts of four Clerodendrum species cultivated in Egypt were screened for antimicrobial activities. Chloroformic extracts of the flowers of Clerodendrum chinense and Clerodendrum splendens were active against Plasmodium falciparum (IC50 < 10 µg mL(-1)). Chloroformic extracts of the stem and flowers of C. chinense were active against Trypanosoma cruzi (IC50 = 1.21 and 1.12 µg mL(-1), respectively) with marginal cytotoxicity. Chloroformic extracts of the leaves of C. chinense and C. splendens showed promising activities against T. cruzi (IC50 = 3.39 and 1.98 µg mL(-1), respectively) without cytotoxic effect on a human cell line. None of the selected plants showed significant activity against Gram-negative or Gram-positive bacteria or Candida albicans. Verbascoside, a phenyl propanoid glycoside isolated from the leaves of C. chinense, showed marginal activity against T. cruzi. Rengyolone, a cyclohexyl ethanoid isolated from the leaves of C. chinense, showed a broad but not specific activity against the tested organisms.

  2. Disappearance of chloramines in the presence of bromide and nitrite. [Ammoniacal monochloramine, diethylchloramine, and chloramines produced by chlorinating a real and synthetic secondary (activated sludge) municipal waste effluent

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    Batch experiments were used to study the reduction of chloramines in the presence of bromide and nitrite. Chloramines studies were ammoniacal monochloramine, diethylchloramine (DECA), and those produced by chlorinating a real and synthetic secondary (activated sludge) municipal waste effluent. Oxidant concentrations were measured using the DPD-FAS (N,N-diethyl-p-phenylenediamine, Ferrous Ammonium Sulfate) titrimetric procedure and/or spectrophotometrically. The degradation of NH/sub 2/Cl in the presence of bromide was found to occur via a mechanism consistent with a rate limiting step involving monochlorammonium ion (NH/sub 3/Cl/sup +/) and bromide ion. Experimental evidence suggests that the mixed haloamine, NHBrCl, was produced as an unstable intermediate. The oxidation of bromide by DECA did not occur by a mechanism similar to that describing the oxidation of bromide by NH/sub 2/Cl. The rate was not affected by added ammonia and was slower than that observed for comparable NH/sub 2/Cl-Br/sup -/ reactions. Chloramine loss in organic rich effluents was greatly accelerated by bromide addition. The reaction is not dependent on excess ammonia and is slower than that observed for a pure NH/sub 2/Cl-Br/sup -/ solution. Monochloramine can rapidly disappear in the presence of nitrite. The rates are too fast to be due solely to the hydrolysis of monochloramine. The presence of relatively small concentrations of nitrite can greatly accelerate the loss of NH/sub 2/Cl in the presence of bromide. Nitrite is not significantly consumed. Nitrite appears to increase the rate of bromide oxidation in a parallel acid catalyzed reaction mechanism which involves a rate limiting step described by a first order dependence on nitrite but no dependence on bromide. Empirical rate expressions and rate constants were determined for each reaction. 54 figures, 17 tables.

  3. Chlorine inactivation of Tubifex tubifex in drinking water and the synergistic effect of sequential inactivation with UV irradiation and chlorine.

    PubMed

    Nie, Xiao-Bao; Li, Zhi-Hong; Long, Yuan-Nan; He, Pan-Pan; Xu, Chao

    2017-06-01

    The inactivation of Tubifex tubifex is important to prevent contamination of drinking water. Chlorine is a widely-used disinfectant and the key factor in the inactivation of T. tubifex. This study investigated the inactivation kinetics of chlorine on T. tubifex and the synergistic effect of the sequential use of chlorine and UV irradiation. The experimental results indicated that the Ct (concentration × timereaction) concept could be used to evaluate the inactivation kinetics of T. tubifex with chlorine, thus allowing for the use of a simpler Ct approach for the assessment of T. tubifex chlorine inactivation requirements. The inactivation kinetics of T. tubifex by chlorine was found to be well-fitted to a delayed pseudo first-order Chick-Watson expression. Sequential experiments revealed that UV irradiation and chlorine worked synergistically to effectively inactivate T. tubifex as a result of the decreased activation energy, Ea, induced by primary UV irradiation. Furthermore, the inactivation effectiveness of T. tubifex by chlorine was found to be affected by several drinking water quality parameters including pH, turbidity, and chemical oxygen demand with potassium permanganate (CODMn) concentration. High pH exhibited pronounced inactivation effectiveness and the decrease in turbidity and CODMn concentrations contributed to the inactivation of T. tubifex.

  4. Formation of N-nitrosamines from chlorination and chloramination of molecular weight fractions of natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Kristiana, Ina; Tan, Jace; Joll, Cynthia A; Heitz, Anna; von Gunten, Urs; Charrois, Jeffrey W A

    2013-02-01

    N-Nitrosamines are a class of disinfection by-products (DBPs) that have been reported to be more toxic than the most commonly detected and regulated DBPs. Only a few studies investigating the formation of N-nitrosamines from disinfection of natural waters have been reported, and little is known about the role of natural organic matter (NOM) and the effects of its nature and reactivity on the formation of N-nitrosamines. This study investigated the influence of the molecular weight (MW) characteristics of NOM on the formation of eight species of N-nitrosamines from chlorination and chloramination, and is the first to report on the formation of eight N-nitrosamines from chlorination and chloramination of MW fractions of NOM. Isolated NOM from three different source waters in Western Australia was fractionated into several apparent MW (AMW) fractions using preparative-scale high performance size exclusion chromatography. These AMW fractions of NOM were then treated with chlorine or chloramine, and analysed for eight species of N-nitrosamines. Among these N-nitrosamines, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) was the most frequently detected. All AMW fractions of NOM produced N-nitrosamines upon chlorination and chloramination. Regardless of AMW characteristics, chloramination demonstrated a higher potential to form N-nitrosamines than chlorination, and a higher frequency of detection of the N-nitrosamines species was also observed in chloramination. The results showed that inorganic nitrogen may play an important role in the formation of N-nitrosamines, while organic nitrogen is not necessarily a good indicator for their formation. Since chlorination has less potential to form N-nitrosamines, chloramination in pre-chlorination mode was recommended to minimise the formation of N-nitrosamines. There was no clear trend in the formation of N-nitrosamines from chlorination of AMW fractions of NOM. However, during chloramination, NOM fractions with AMW <2.5 kDa were found to produce

  5. Preparation of gold- and chlorine-impregnated bead-type activated carbon for a mercury sorbent trap.

    PubMed

    Song, Young Cheol; Lee, Tai Gyu

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to develop a mercury (Hg) adsorption trap, which can be used to measure the concentration of elemental Hg in emissions from a Hg discharge facility, and evaluate its adsorption efficiency. The Hg spiking efficiency was compared by impregnating metallic and halogen materials that have high affinity for Hg into activated carbon (AC) to determine an accurate spiking method for Hg on AC. The Hg spiking efficiency was compared according to the type and content of the impregnated substances. AC impregnated with Cl and Au had a 15-20% higher Hg spiking efficiency compared to virgin AC. For Au impregnation at weight ratios of 0-20 wt% of adsorbent, spiking efficiencies of over 97% were observed under certain conditions. The Hg adsorption properties of the above adsorbent were determined experimentally, and the results were used to test the adsorption performance of Hg adsorption traps.

  6. α-Halogenoacetanilides as hydrogen-bonding organocatalysts that activate carbonyl bonds: fluorine versus chlorine and bromine.

    PubMed

    Koeller, Sylvain; Thomas, Coralie; Peruch, Fréderic; Deffieux, Alain; Massip, Stéphane; Léger, Jean-Michel; Desvergne, Jean-Pierre; Milet, Anne; Bibal, Brigitte

    2014-03-03

    α-Halogenoacetanilides (X=F, Cl, Br) were examined as H-bonding organocatalysts designed for the double activation of CO bonds through NH and CH donor groups. Depending on the halide substituents, the double H-bond involved a nonconventional CH⋅⋅⋅O interaction with either a HCXn (n=1-2, X=Cl, Br) or a HCAr bond (X=F), as shown in the solid-state crystal structures and by molecular modeling. In addition, the catalytic properties of α-halogenoacetanilides were evaluated in the ring-opening polymerization of lactide, in the presence of a tertiary amine as cocatalyst. The α-dichloro- and α-dibromoacetanilides containing electron-deficient aromatic groups afforded the most attractive double H-bonding properties towards CO bonds, with a NH⋅⋅⋅O⋅⋅⋅HCX2 interaction.

  7. Antiinflammatory activities of Hungarian Stachys species and their iridoids.

    PubMed

    Háznagy-Radnai, Erzsébet; Balogh, Ágnes; Czigle, Szilvia; Máthé, Imre; Hohmann, Judit; Blazsó, Gábor

    2012-04-01

    The antiinflammatory activities of aqueous extracts prepared from the aerial parts of ten Hungarian Stachys species were investigated in vivo in the carrageenan-induced paw oedema test after intraperitoneal and oral administration to rats. Some of the extracts were found to display significant antiphlogistic effects when administered intraperitoneally and orally; in particular, the extracts of S. alpina, S. germanica, S. officinalis and S. recta demonstrated high activity following intraperitoneal administration. At the same dose of 5.0 mg/kg, these extracts exhibited similar or greater potency than that of the positive control diclofenac-Na. The main iridoids present in the investigated extracts, ajugoside, aucubin, acetylharpagide, harpagide and harpagoside, were also assayed in the same test, and high dose-dependent antiphlogistic effects were recorded for aucubin and harpagoside. These results led to the conclusion that most probably iridoids are responsible for the antiinflammatory effect of Stachys species, but other active constituents or their synergism must also be implicated in the antiinflammatory effect.

  8. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of degrading short chain chlorinated paraffins over reduced graphene oxide/CoFe2O4/Ag nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Zhao, Qidong; Li, Xinyong; Wang, Dong

    2016-10-01

    Short chain chlorinated paraffins have recently attracted great attention because of their environmental persistence and biological toxicity as an important organic pollutant. In this work, reduced graphene oxide/CoFe2O4/Ag (RGO/CoFe2O4/Ag) nanocomposite was prepared and employed for photocatalytic degradation of short chain chlorinated paraffins. The process of photocatalytic degradation of short chain chlorinated paraffins over RGO/CoFe2O4/Ag under visible light (λ>400nm) was investigated by in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and the related mechanisms were proposed. An apparent degradation ratio of 91.9% over RGO/CoFe2O4/Ag could be obtained under visible light illumination of 12h, while only about 21.7% was obtained with commercial P25 TiO2 under the same experimental conditions, which demonstrates that the RGO/CoFe2O4/Ag nanocomposite is a potential candidate for effective photocatalytic removal of short chain chlorinated paraffins.

  9. [Comparison of the quality and toxicity of wastewater after chlorine and chlorine dioxide disinfections].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-sha; Zhang, Tong; Hu, Hong-ying

    2005-11-01

    The effects of chlorine and chlorine dioxide disinfections on quality and toxicity of wastewater were compared. The experiment results showed that chlorine disinfection had no obvious effect on wastewater color, while chlorine dioxide disinfection decreased wastewater color observably. The DOC of wastewater did not change much after chlorine and chlorine dioxide disinfections. Chlorine disinfection significantly increased UV230 of wastewater and chlorine dioxide disinfection slightly decreased UV230 of wastewater. When the disinfectants dosage was 30 mg/L, UV230 increased about 0.7 cm(-1) after chlorine disinfection and decreased about 0.05 cm(-1) after chlorine dioxide disinfection. The acute toxicity of wastewater increased with increasing disinfectants dosage for both chlorine and chlorine dioxide disinfections and the acute toxicity after chlorine disinfection is much stronger than that after chlorine dioxide disinfection. The genotoxicity of wastewater increased slightly after chlorine disinfection and decreased slightly after chlorine dioxide disinfection.

  10. Large Roads Reduce Bat Activity across Multiple Species

    PubMed Central

    Kitzes, Justin; Merenlender, Adina

    2014-01-01

    Although the negative impacts of roads on many terrestrial vertebrate and bird populations are well documented, there have been few studies of the road ecology of bats. To examine the effects of large roads on bat populations, we used acoustic recorders to survey bat activity along ten 300 m transects bordering three large highways in northern California, applying a newly developed statistical classifier to identify recorded calls to the species level. Nightly counts of bat passes were analyzed with generalized linear mixed models to determine the relationship between bat activity and distance from a road. Total bat activity recorded at points adjacent to roads was found to be approximately one-half the level observed at 300 m. Statistically significant road effects were also found for the Brazilian free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis), big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus), hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus), and silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans). The road effect was found to be temperature dependent, with hot days both increasing total activity at night and reducing the difference between activity levels near and far from roads. These results suggest that the environmental impacts of road construction may include degradation of bat habitat and that mitigation activities for this habitat loss may be necessary to protect bat populations. PMID:24823689

  11. Large roads reduce bat activity across multiple species.

    PubMed

    Kitzes, Justin; Merenlender, Adina

    2014-01-01

    Although the negative impacts of roads on many terrestrial vertebrate and bird populations are well documented, there have been few studies of the road ecology of bats. To examine the effects of large roads on bat populations, we used acoustic recorders to survey bat activity along ten 300 m transects bordering three large highways in northern California, applying a newly developed statistical classifier to identify recorded calls to the species level. Nightly counts of bat passes were analyzed with generalized linear mixed models to determine the relationship between bat activity and distance from a road. Total bat activity recorded at points adjacent to roads was found to be approximately one-half the level observed at 300 m. Statistically significant road effects were also found for the Brazilian free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis), big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus), hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus), and silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans). The road effect was found to be temperature dependent, with hot days both increasing total activity at night and reducing the difference between activity levels near and far from roads. These results suggest that the environmental impacts of road construction may include degradation of bat habitat and that mitigation activities for this habitat loss may be necessary to protect bat populations.

  12. Chlorine isotope variability in subglacial glasses from Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halldorsson, S. A.; Barnes, J.; Stefansson, A.; Hilton, D. R.; Hauri, E. H.

    2014-12-01

    Chlorine concentrations tend to be significantly enriched in surface reservoirs relative to that of the mantle. This large contrast in chlorine contents makes primary asthenospheric melts, highly susceptible to contamination by surficial chlorine in shallow-level crustal environments. Indeed, on the basis of both chlorine abundance systematics [e.g., 1], and chlorine isotopes [2], previous researchers have argued for a surficial chlorine component in controlling the chlorine systematics of MORB. In contrast, other studies suggest recycling of ancient chlorine via a subducted, altered oceanic lithospheric component as a means of controlling the chlorine isotope composition of the mantle [3]. So far, very few high precision chlorine isotope data are available from key oceanic islands, which potentially provide access to deeper parts of the mantle and thus allow for testing of the relative role of these ideas. We report new chlorine isotope (reported as δ37Cl; n=22) and abundance data (SIMS) derived from fresh subglacial glasses from Iceland. The glasses, which cover all the currently active volcanic zones of Iceland, span a wide range in their major element composition with MgO contents between 2.1 and 10.0 wt% and chlorine contents, that vary by almost two orders of magnitude, of 17 to 1270 ppm. Chlorine contents show significant correlations (R2 > 0.9) with incompatible elements such as potassium, consistent with earlier observations from Iceland and the adjacent Reykjanes Ridge [4, 5]. δ37Cl values range from -0.6‰ to +1.4‰. Significantly, δ37Cl values strongly correlate with Cl and MgO contents, with low δ37Cl values in samples with low Cl and high MgO concentrations. The data are consistent with mixing between two different reservoirs: a upper mantle reservoir with low Cl concentration and a slightly negative δ37Cl value and a crustal reservoir with a high Cl concentration and enriched in 37Cl. To further investigate the origin of these chlorine isotope

  13. Sarcoendoplasmic Reticulum Ca2+ ATPase. A Critical Target in Chlorine Inhalation–Induced Cardiotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Aftab; Hendry-Hofer, Tara B.; Loader, Joan E.; Claycomb, William C.; Mozziconacci, Olivier; Schöneich, Christian; Reisdorph, Nichole; Powell, Roger L.; Chandler, Joshua D.; Day, Brian J.; Veress, Livia A.; White, Carl W.

    2015-01-01

    Autopsy specimens from human victims or experimental animals that die due to acute chlorine gas exposure present features of cardiovascular pathology. We demonstrate acute chlorine inhalation–induced reduction in heart rate and oxygen saturation in rats. Chlorine inhalation elevated chlorine reactants, such as chlorotyrosine and chloramine, in blood plasma. Using heart tissue and primary cardiomyocytes, we demonstrated that acute high-concentration chlorine exposure in vivo (500 ppm for 30 min) caused decreased total ATP content and loss of sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) activity. Loss of SERCA activity was attributed to chlorination of tyrosine residues and oxidation of an important cysteine residue, cysteine-674, in SERCA, as demonstrated by immunoblots and mass spectrometry. Using cardiomyocytes, we found that chlorine-induced cell death and damage to SERCA could be decreased by thiocyanate, an important biological antioxidant, and by genetic SERCA2 overexpression. We also investigated a U.S. Food and Drug Administration–approved drug, ranolazine, used in treatment of cardiac diseases, and previously shown to stabilize SERCA in animal models of ischemia–reperfusion. Pretreatment with ranolazine or istaroxime, another SERCA activator, prevented chlorine-induced cardiomyocyte death. Further investigation of responsible mechanisms showed that ranolazine- and istaroxime-treated cells preserved mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP after chlorine exposure. Thus, these studies demonstrate a novel critical target for chlorine in the heart and identify potentially useful therapies to mitigate toxicity of acute chlorine exposure. PMID:25188881

  14. Sarcoendoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase. A critical target in chlorine inhalation-induced cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shama; Ahmad, Aftab; Hendry-Hofer, Tara B; Loader, Joan E; Claycomb, William C; Mozziconacci, Olivier; Schöneich, Christian; Reisdorph, Nichole; Powell, Roger L; Chandler, Joshua D; Day, Brian J; Veress, Livia A; White, Carl W

    2015-04-01

    Autopsy specimens from human victims or experimental animals that die due to acute chlorine gas exposure present features of cardiovascular pathology. We demonstrate acute chlorine inhalation-induced reduction in heart rate and oxygen saturation in rats. Chlorine inhalation elevated chlorine reactants, such as chlorotyrosine and chloramine, in blood plasma. Using heart tissue and primary cardiomyocytes, we demonstrated that acute high-concentration chlorine exposure in vivo (500 ppm for 30 min) caused decreased total ATP content and loss of sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) activity. Loss of SERCA activity was attributed to chlorination of tyrosine residues and oxidation of an important cysteine residue, cysteine-674, in SERCA, as demonstrated by immunoblots and mass spectrometry. Using cardiomyocytes, we found that chlorine-induced cell death and damage to SERCA could be decreased by thiocyanate, an important biological antioxidant, and by genetic SERCA2 overexpression. We also investigated a U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved drug, ranolazine, used in treatment of cardiac diseases, and previously shown to stabilize SERCA in animal models of ischemia-reperfusion. Pretreatment with ranolazine or istaroxime, another SERCA activator, prevented chlorine-induced cardiomyocyte death. Further investigation of responsible mechanisms showed that ranolazine- and istaroxime-treated cells preserved mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP after chlorine exposure. Thus, these studies demonstrate a novel critical target for chlorine in the heart and identify potentially useful therapies to mitigate toxicity of acute chlorine exposure.

  15. Lectin activity in mycelial extracts of Fusarium species.

    PubMed

    Bhari, Ranjeeta; Kaur, Bhawanpreet; Singh, Ram S

    2016-01-01

    Lectins are non-immunogenic carbohydrate-recognizing proteins that bind to glycoproteins, glycolipids, or polysaccharides with high affinity and exhibit remarkable ability to agglutinate erythrocytes and other cells. In the present study, ten Fusarium species previously not explored for lectins were screened for the presence of lectin activity. Mycelial extracts of F. fujikuroi, F. beomiformii, F. begoniae, F. nisikadoi, F. anthophilum, F. incarnatum, and F. tabacinum manifested agglutination of rabbit erythrocytes. Neuraminidase treatment of rabbit erythrocytes increased lectin titers of F. nisikadoi and F. tabacinum extracts, whereas the protease treatment resulted in a significant decline in agglutination by most of the lectins. Results of hapten inhibition studies demonstrated unique carbohydrate specificity of Fusarium lectins toward O-acetyl sialic acids. Activity of the majority of Fusarium lectins exhibited binding affinity to d-ribose, l-fucose, d-glucose, l-arabinose, d-mannitol, d-galactosamine hydrochloride, d-galacturonic acid, N-acetyl-d-galactosamine, N-acetyl-neuraminic acid, 2-deoxy-d-ribose, fetuin, asialofetuin, and bovine submaxillary mucin. Melibiose and N-glycolyl neuraminic acid did not inhibit the activity of any of the Fusarium lectins. Mycelial extracts of F. begoniae, F. nisikadoi, F. anthophilum, and F. incarnatum interacted with most of the carbohydrates tested. F. fujikuroi and F. anthophilum extracts displayed strong interaction with starch. The expression of lectin activity as a function of culture age was investigated. Most species displayed lectin activity on the 7th day of cultivation, and it varied with progressing of culture age.

  16. Improved ex vivo method for microbiocidal activity across vertebrate species

    PubMed Central

    French, Susannah S.; Neuman-Lee, Lorin A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The field of ecoimmunology is currently undergoing rapid expansion, whereby biologists from a wide range of ecological disciplines are increasingly interested in assessing immunocompetence in their study organisms. One of the key challenges to researchers is determining what eco-immune measures to use in a given experiment. Moreover, there are limitations depending on study species, requirements for specific antibodies, and relevance of the methodology to the study organism. Here we introduce an improved ex vivo method for microbiocidal activity across vertebrate species. The utility of this assay is that it determines the ability of an organism to remove a pathogen that could be encountered in the wild, lending ecological relevancy to the technique. The applications of this microbiocidal assay are broad, as it is readily adaptable to different types of microbes as well as a wide variety of study species. We describe a method of microbiocidal analysis that will enable researchers across disciplines to effectively employ this method to accurately quantify microbial killing ability, using readily available microplate absorbance readers. PMID:23213440

  17. Anticancer activities of selected species of North American lichen extracts.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Gajendra; El-Naggar, Atif M; St Clair, Larry L; O'Neill, Kim L

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of human deaths in the USA. Despite continuous efforts to treat cancer over the past 50 years, human mortality rates have not decreased significantly. Natural products, such as lichens, have been good sources of anticancer drugs. This study reports the cytotoxic activity of crude extracts of 17 lichen species against Burkitt's lymphoma (Raji) cells. Out of the 17 lichen species, extracts from 14 species showed cytotoxicity against Raji cells. On the basis of IC50 values, we selected Xanthoparmelia chlorochroa and Tuckermannopsis ciliaris to study the mechanism of cell death. Viability of normal lymphocytes was not affected by the extracts of X. chlorochroa and T. ciliaris. We found that extracts from both lichens decreased proliferation, accumulated cells at the G0 /G1 stage, and caused apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Both lichen extracts also caused upregulation of p53. The T. ciliaris extract upregulated the expression of TK1 but X. chlorochroa did not. We also found that usnic, salazinic, constictic, and norstictic acids were present in the extract of X. chlorochroa, whereas protolichesterinic acid in T. ciliaris extracts. Our data demonstrate that lichen extracts merit further research as a potential source of anticancer drugs.

  18. Reactive oxygen species-activated nanomaterials as theranostic agents

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kye S; Lee, Dongwon; Song, Chul Gyu; Kang, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated from the endogenous oxidative metabolism or from exogenous pro-oxidant exposure. Oxidative stress occurs when there is excessive production of ROS, outweighing the antioxidant defense mechanisms which may lead to disease states. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is one of the most abundant and stable forms of ROS, implicated in inflammation, cellular dysfunction and apoptosis, which ultimately lead to tissue and organ damage. This review is an overview of the role of ROS in different diseases. We will also examine ROS-activated nanomaterials with emphasis on hydrogen peroxide, and their potential medical implications. Further development of the biocompatible, stimuli-activated agent responding to disease causing oxidative stress, may lead to a promising clinical use. PMID:26328770

  19. Characterization and chillproofing activity of two enzymes from Streptomyces species.

    PubMed

    Etok, C A; Eka, O U

    1996-01-01

    Two enzymes, amylase and protease of Streptomyces species were purified by a combination of ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration and characterized. The amylase had an exoaction on starch yielding maltose as a major end product and was identified as beta-amylase. The purified amylase had a molecular weight of 48,000 and was maximally active at 35 degrees C and at pH 6.0. On the other hand, protease had a molecular weight of 21,000 and was most active at pH 10.0 and at a temperature of 30 degrees C. The Km or MICHAELIS constant of amylase for maize starch was 0.333 mg/ml while that of protease for casein was 2.5 mg/ml. The feasibility of using the purified protease for various industrial application especially in the chillproofing of beer is discussed.

  20. ALDH2 Mediates 5-Nitrofuran Activity in Multiple Species

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Linna; Ishizaki, Hironori; Spitzer, Michaela; Taylor, Kerrie L.; Temperley, Nicholas D.; Johnson, Stephen L.; Brear, Paul; Gautier, Philippe; Zeng, Zhiqiang; Mitchell, Amy; Narayan, Vikram; McNeil, Ewan M.; Melton, David W.; Smith, Terry K.; Tyers, Mike; Westwood, Nicholas J.; Patton, E. Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Summary Understanding how drugs work in vivo is critical for drug design and for maximizing the potential of currently available drugs. 5-nitrofurans are a class of prodrugs widely used to treat bacterial and trypanosome infections, but despite relative specificity, 5-nitrofurans often cause serious toxic side effects in people. Here, we use yeast and zebrafish, as well as human in vitro systems, to assess the biological activity of 5-nitrofurans, and we identify a conserved interaction between aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) 2 and 5-nitrofurans across these species. In addition, we show that the activity of nifurtimox, a 5-nitrofuran anti-trypanosome prodrug, is dependent on zebrafish Aldh2 and is a substrate for human ALDH2. This study reveals a conserved and biologically relevant ALDH2-5-nitrofuran interaction that may have important implications for managing the toxicity of 5-nitrofuran treatment. PMID:22840776

  1. Impact of water quality on chlorine demand of corroding copper.

    PubMed

    Lytle, Darren A; Liggett, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    Copper is widely used in drinking water premise plumbing system materials. In buildings such as hospitals, large and complicated plumbing networks make it difficult to maintain good water quality. Sustaining safe disinfectant residuals throughout a building to protect against waterborne pathogens such as Legionella is particularly challenging since copper and other reactive distribution system materials can exert considerable demands. The objective of this work was to evaluate the impact of pH and orthophosphate on the consumption of free chlorine associated with corroding copper pipes over time. A copper test-loop pilot system was used to control test conditions and systematically meet the study objectives. Chlorine consumption trends attributed to abiotic reactions with copper over time were different for each pH condition tested, and the total amount of chlorine consumed over the test runs increased with increasing pH. Orthophosphate eliminated chlorine consumption trends with elapsed time (i.e., chlorine demand was consistent across entire test runs). Orthophosphate also greatly reduced the total amount of chlorine consumed over the test runs. Interestingly, the total amount of chlorine consumed and the consumption rate were not pH dependent when orthophosphate was present. The findings reflect the complex and competing reactions at the copper pipe wall including corrosion, oxidation of Cu(I) minerals and ions, and possible oxidation of Cu(II) minerals, and the change in chlorine species all as a function of pH. The work has practical applications for maintaining chlorine residuals in premise plumbing drinking water systems including large buildings such as hospitals.

  2. Evidence That Chlorinated Auxin Is Restricted to the Fabaceae But Not to the Fabeae1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    McAdam, Scott A.M.; McAdam, Erin L.

    2015-01-01

    Auxin is a pivotal plant hormone, usually occurring in the form of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). However, in maturing pea (Pisum sativum) seeds, the level of the chlorinated auxin, 4-chloroindole-3-acetic acid (4-Cl-IAA), greatly exceeds that of IAA. A key issue is how plants produce halogenated compounds such as 4-Cl-IAA. To better understand this topic, we investigated the distribution of the chlorinated auxin. We show for the first time, to our knowledge, that 4-Cl-IAA is found in the seeds of Medicago truncatula, Melilotus indicus, and three species of Trifolium. Furthermore, we found no evidence that Pinus spp. synthesize 4-Cl-IAA in seeds, contrary to a previous report. The evidence indicates a single evolutionary origin of 4-Cl-IAA synthesis in the Fabaceae, which may provide an ideal model system to further investigate the action and activity of halogenating enzymes in plants. PMID:25971549

  3. Anticholinesterase and Antityrosinase Activities of Ten Piper Species from Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Salleh, Wan Mohd Nuzul Hakimi Wan; Hashim, Nur Athirah; Ahmad, Farediah; Heng Yen, Khong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and antityrosinase activities of extracts from ten Piper species namely; P. caninum, P. lanatum, P. abbreviatum, P. aborescens, P. porphyrophyllum, P. erecticaule, P. ribesioides, P. miniatum, P. stylosum, and P. majusculum. Methods: Anticholinesterase and antityrosinase activities were evaluated against in vitro Ellman spectroscopy method and mushroom tyrosinase, respectively. Results: The EtOAc extract of P. erecticaule showed the highest AChE and BChE inhibitory with 22.9% and 70.9% inhibition, respectively. In antityrosinase activity, all extracts of P. porphyrophyllum showed the highest inhibitory effects against mushroom tyrosinase, compared to standard, kojic acid. Conclusion: This study showed that P. erecticaule and P. porphyrophyllum have potential AChE/BChE and tyrosinase inhibition activities. The respective extracts can be explored further for the development of novel lead as AChE/BChE and tyrosinase inhibitors in therapeutic management of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:25671185

  4. 21 CFR 177.1610 - Polyethylene, chlorinated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... chlorinated polyethylene contains a maximum of 60 percent by weight of total chlorine, as determined by ASTM 1method D1303-55 (Reapproved 1979), “Standard Test Method for Total Chlorine in Vinyl Chloride...

  5. A comparison of chlorinated organic material produced by chlorine and chlorine dioxide bleaching

    SciTech Connect

    McKaque, A.B.; Reeve, D.W.

    1995-12-31

    Chlorine and chlorine dioxide react differently with pulp during bleaching and produce different types of organic by-products. The main differences are the large reduction in the amount of AOX (adsorbable organic halogen) in the effluent and EOX (extractable organic halogen) in the pulp. This talk reviews the differences in the amounts and types of chlorinated organic by-products produced by the two different bleaching agents.

  6. Chlorine, Chloramine, Chlorine Dioxide, and Ozone Susceptibility of Mycobacterium avium

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Robert H.; Falkinham, Joseph O.; Norton, Cheryl D.; LeChevallier, Mark W.

    2000-01-01

    Environmental and patient isolates of Mycobacterium avium were resistant to chlorine, monochloramine, chlorine dioxide, and ozone. For chlorine, the product of the disinfectant concentration (in parts per million) and the time (in minutes) to 99.9% inactivation for five M. avium strains ranged from 51 to 204. Chlorine susceptibility of cells was the same in washed cultures containing aggregates and in reduced aggregate fractions lacking aggregates. Cells of the more slowly growing strains were more resistant to chlorine than were cells of the more rapidly growing strains. Water-grown cells were 10-fold more resistant than medium-grown cells. Disinfectant resistance may be one factor promoting the persistence of M. avium in drinking water. PMID:10742264

  7. Chlorine transfer hose failure.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Giby

    2004-11-11

    On the morning of 14 August 2002, a 1 in. transfer hose used in a rail tank car unloading operation at DPC Enterprises, near Festus, Missouri, catastrophically ruptured and initiated a sequence of events that led to the release of 48,000 pounds of chlorine--a toxic gas--into neighboring areas. The facility repackages bulk dry liquid chlorine into 1 ton containers and 150 pound cylinders for commercial, industrial, and municipal use in the St. Louis metropolitan area. Fortunately, the wind direction on the day of the release limited the effects of the chlorine plume on the surrounding community. However, 63 people sought hospital treatment due to exposure, and hundreds of others were affected by the release (the community was advised to shelter-in-place for 4 h, and traffic was halted on Interstate 55 for 1.5 h). The US Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board (CSB) investigated this incident for the following reasons: This paper presents the lesson-learned from this incident to help prevent similar occurrences. This paper is based on US Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board Report Number 2002-04-I-MO, which was approved by the Board on 1 May 2003. This paper has not been independently approved by the Board and is published for general informational purposes only. Every effort has been made to accurately present the contents of the Board-approved report in this paper. Any material in the paper that did not originate in the Board-approved report is solely the responsibility of the author and does not represent an official finding, conclusion, or position of the Board. A complete copy of the Board investigation report upon which this paper is based is available on the CSB website at "Completed Investigations."

  8. Spatial and temporal variability of inorganic chlorine in Northwestern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommariva, R.; Hollis, L. D. J.; Baker, A. R.; Ball, S. M.; Bell, T. G.; Cordell, R. L.; Fleming, Z.; Gaget, M.; Yang, M. X.; Monks, P. S.

    2015-12-01

    Chlorine is well known to be a strong oxidant in the atmosphere;chlorine reactivity impacts the formation of tropospheric ozone, theoxidation of methane and non-methane hydrocarbons, and the cycling ofnitrogen, sulphur and mercury. An accurate assessment of the roleplayed by chlorine in tropospheric chemical processes is complicatedby the scarce knowledge of its sources, sinks and distribution.We report observations of inorganic chlorine species (Cl2, ClNO2,particulate chloride) taken over the period 2014-2015 at threedifferent locations in Britain: an urban site a hundred kilometersfrom the ocean (Leicester), a coastal site mostly affected by shiptraffic (Penlee Point, Cornwall) and a coastal site experiencingeither clean air from the North Sea or polluted air from inland(Weybourne, Norfolk).This dataset provides a first look into the geographical distributionand seasonal variability of chlorine in Northwestern Europe: theresults suggest that, during the night, ClNO2 is ubiquitous withconcentrations in the range of hundreds to thousands of pptV at alllocations, whereas Cl2 can be observed only at coastal sites, withconcentrations of a few tens of pptV. The implications of thewidespread presence of these forms of inorganic chlorine for ozoneproduction and, in general, for the oxidative processes in the loweratmosphere are discussed with the help of a wide range of supportingmeasurements.

  9. Anthelmintic activity of the latex of Ficus species.

    PubMed

    de Amorin, A; Borba, H R; Carauta, J P; Lopes, D; Kaplan, M A

    1999-03-01

    The latex of some species of Ficus (Moraceae) has been traditionally used as vermifuge in Central and South America. It has been accepted that anthelmintic activity is due to a proteolytic fraction called ficin. In the present study, the anthelmintic activity of the latex of Ficus insipida Willd. and Ficus carica L. has been investigated in NIH mice naturally infected with Syphacia obvelata, Aspiculuris tetraptera and Vampirolepis nana. The latex of F. insipida, administered by intragastric route in doses of 4 ml/kg/day during three consecutive days, were effective in the removal of 38.6% of the total number of S. obvelata, being inexpressive in the removal of A. tetraptera (8.4%) and segments of V. nana (6.3%). The latex of F. carica, administered in doses of 3 ml/kg/day, during three consecutive days, was effective in the removal of S. obvelata (41.7%) and it did not produce significant elimination of A. tetraptera (2.6%) and V. nana (8.3%). The observed high acute toxicity with hemorrhagic enteritis, in addition to a weak anthelmintic efficacy, do not recommend the use of these lattices in traditional medicine.

  10. Generation and remote delivery of plasma activated species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maguire, Paul; Mahony, Charles; Kelsey, Colin; Rutherford, David; Mariotti, Davide; Macias-Montero, Manuel; Perez-Martin, Fatima; Diver, Declan

    2016-09-01

    Plasma interactions with microdroplets offer new opportunities to deliver active chemical agents and nanoparticles to remote substrates downstream with many potential applications from cancer theranostics and wound healing in biomedicine, gentle food decontamination and seed germination in plasma agriculture to catalyst production and photonic structures fabrication, among others. We demonstrate plasma-liquid based pristine nanomaterials synthesis in flight and subsequent delivery up to 120mm from the atmospheric pressure plasma source. Monosized and non-aggregating metal nanoparticles are formed in the rf plasma in less than 100us, representing an increase in precursor reduction rate that is many (>4) orders of magnitude faster than that observed with standard colloidal chemistry or via high energy radiolytic techniques. Also the collection and purification limitations of the latter are avoided. Plasma activated liquid including OH radicals and H2O2 are transported over 120mm and have demonstrated high efficacy bacterial decontamination. These results will be compared with charge species and radical transport from the rf plasma without microdroplets. Reaction models based on high solvated surface electron concentrations will be presented. Funding from EPSRC acknowledged (Grants EP/K006088/1 and EP/K006142/1).

  11. Effects of pH on the chlorination process of phenols in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Ge, Fei; Zhu, Lizhong; Chen, Hairong

    2006-05-20

    Toxic organic compounds detected generally in source water could combine with chlorine and contribute significantly to chlorination disinfection by-products (CDBPs). The effects of pH on species distribution of CDBPs and the kinetics of chlorination were investigated using phenol as a model of ionizable toxic organic compounds in the pH range of 6.0-9.0. It was found that five chlorination products including 2-monochlorophenol (2-MCP), 4-monochlorophenol (4-MCP), 2,6-dichlorophenol (2,6-DCP), 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP) were produced by successive chlorination substitution. MCP (2-MCP and 4-MCP) were the dominant products and phenol partly remained in acid media, while TCP and DCP (2,6-DCP and 2,4-DCP) were the main components in neutral and alkaline media. A steady equilibrium of phenol and its chlorination products was reached in 20-30 min in acid-, neutral- and slightly alkaline media, and was delayed to 60-180 min in alkaline media. The difference in properties between phenols and phenolates, and those between HOCl and ClO(-) should be considered simultaneously in explaining the effects of pH on the chlorination process with the theory of electrophilic substitution. These results show that pH plays an important regulating role in the species distribution of CDBPs and the kinetics of chlorination for ionizable toxic organic compounds in chlorination.

  12. Observation of halogen species in the Amundsen Gulf, Arctic, by active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pöhler, Denis; Vogel, Leif; Frieß, Udo; Platt, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    In the polar tropospheric boundary layer, reactive halogen species (RHS) are responsible for ozone depletion as well as the oxidation of elemental mercury and dimethyl sulphide. After polar sunrise, air masses enriched in reactive bromine cover areas of several million square kilometers. Still, the source and release mechanisms of halogens are not completely understood. We report measurements of halogen oxides performed in the Amundsen Gulf, Arctic, during spring 2008. Active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) measurements were set up offshore, several kilometers from the coast, directly on the sea ice, which was never done before. High bromine oxide concentrations were detected frequently during sunlight hours with a characteristic daily cycle showing morning and evening maxima and a minimum at noon. The, so far, highest observed average mixing ratio in the polar boundary layer of 41 pmol/mol (equal to pptv) was detected. Only short sea ice contact is required to release high amounts of bromine. An observed linear decrease of maximum bromine oxide levels with ambient temperature during sunlight, between -24 °C and -15 °C, provides indications on the conditions required for the emission of RHS. In addition, the data indicate the presence of reactive chlorine in the Arctic boundary layer. In contrast to Antarctica, iodine oxide was not detected above a detection limit of 0.3 pmol/mol. PMID:20160121

  13. Discovering Engangered Species. A Learning and Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Nancy; Machlis, Sally

    Up to 33 million species share the earth; no one knows the exact number for sure. All over the world, many species are becoming extinct. This workbook is designed to help children become more aware of the concept of extinction, and to develop personal strategies for helping with the problem of endangered species. Included are 31 activities…

  14. Disinfection kinetics of murine norovirus using chlorine and chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Lim, Mi Young; Kim, Ju-Mi; Ko, Gwangpyo

    2010-05-01

    We determined the disinfection efficiency of chlorine and chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) using murine norovirus (MNV) and coliphage MS2 as surrogates for human norovirus. Experiments were performed in oxidant demand-free buffer (pH 7.2) at 5 degrees C and 20 degrees C. The extent of virus inactivation by a disinfectant was quantified using three different analytical methods: plaque, short template real-time TaqMan reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and long template RT-PCR assays. Rapid inactivation of MNV by both chlorine and chlorine dioxide was observed by the plaque assay. According to the efficiency factor Hom model, Ct values of 0.314mg/Lmin and 0.247mg/Lmin were required for a 4-log reduction of MNV at 5 degrees C by chlorine and chlorine dioxide, respectively. Lower Ct values were required at 20 degrees C. Both long template and short template RT-PCR assays significantly underestimated the virus inactivation compared to the plaque assay. Our study demonstrates that adequate treatment of water with either chlorine or ClO(2) is likely to effectively control the waterborne transmission of human norovirus.

  15. Reactive chlorine chemistry in the boundary layer of coastal Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielcke, Johannes; Poehler, Denis; Friess, Udo; Hay, Tim; Eger, Philipp; Kreher, Karin; Platt, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    A unique feature of the polar troposphere is the strong impact of halogen photochemistry, in which reactive halogen species are responsible for ozone depletion as well as the oxidation of elemental mercury and dimethyl sulphide. The source, however, as well as release and recycling mechanisms of these halogen species - for some species even abundances - are far from being completely known, especially of chlorine and iodine compounds. Here we present active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) measurements conducted during austral spring 2012 at Ross Island, Antarctica, observing several species (BrO, O3, NO2, IO, ClO, OBrO, OClO, OIO, I2, CHOCHO, HCHO, HONO). For the first time, ClO was detected and quantified in the marine boundary layer of coastal Antarctica, with typical mixing ratios around 20 pptv and maxima around 50 pptv. Meteorological controls on the mixing ratio of ClO as well as the interplay with other halogen compounds will be discussed, such as the lack of observed OClO (< 1 pptv). The results seem to reflect previously in chamber studies observed dependences on ozone levels and solar irradiance.

  16. Development of compound-specific isotope analysis of stable chlorine in sub-µmol quantities of chlorinated organic substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmstrand, H.; Andersson, P.; Gustafsson, O.

    2003-04-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons is a common class of substances known to be of high ecotoxicity largely due to their persistence and strongly lipophilic properties. This group of chemicals include the semivolatile compounds dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), which, together with solvents like trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE), are globally present at detectable levels in all natural environments. Recent reports on the possibility of enzymatic synthesis of chlorinated dioxins and furans, illustrate the need for means to distinguish the naturally produced contribution from anthropogenic input to the environment. Shifts in the chlorine isotope composition due to degradation, or synthesis, of a compound are in the order of a few per mil of the initial isotope ratio. The cause of the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) arises from differences in preferential phase distribution of isotopic species. Compound specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of stable chlorine should accordingly provide knowledge relevant to degradation rates, distribution patterns and reaction pathways for organochlorines. Isotope analysis of chlorine, derived from chlorinated hydrocarbons, can be performed using thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS) with positive ions. This lowers the limit of determination from about 30 μmol Cl for conventional electron ionisation mass spectrometry (EIMS), to less than 0.3 μmol Cl with a precision of 0.25 ppm (1s) for TIMS. Such a decrease by a factor 100 in the requirements of sample size will enable CSIA of sediment samples collected away from the immediate vicinity of strongly contaminated areas. The aim of this study is to develop a functioning sequence for i) sealed tube combustion with CuO of solid phase chlorinated hydrocarbons equivalent to <0.7 μmol Cl, ii) conversion of formed chloride to CsCl by ion exchange chromatography and iii) analysis of chlorine isotopes in TIMS. The described method can open new

  17. "Invented Invaders": An Engaging Activity to Teach Characteristics Control of Invasive Species

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lampert, Evan

    2015-01-01

    Invasive species, defined as exotic species that reach pest status, are major threats to global biodiversity. Although invasive species can belong to any taxonomic group, general characteristics such as rapid growth and reproduction are shared by many invasive species. "Invented Invaders" is a collaborative activity in which students…

  18. Comparative Toxicity of Chlorinated Saline and Freshwater Wastewater Effluents to Marine Organisms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mengting; Liu, Jiaqi; Zhang, Xiangru; Richardson, Susan D

    2015-12-15

    Toilet flushing with seawater results in saline wastewater, which may contain approximately 33-50% seawater. Halogenated disinfection byproducts (DBPs), especially brominated and iodinated DBPs, have recently been found in chlorinated saline wastewater effluents. With the occurrence of brominated and iodinated DBPs, the adverse effects of chlorinated saline wastewater effluents to marine ecology have been uncertain. By evaluating the developmental effects in the marine polychaete Platynereis dumerilii directly exposed to chlorinated saline/freshwater wastewater effluents, we found surprisingly that chlorinated saline wastewater effluents were less toxic than a chlorinated freshwater wastewater effluent. This was also witnessed by the marine alga Tetraselmis marina. The toxicity of a chlorinated wastewater effluent to the marine species was dominated by its relatively low salinity compared to the salinity in seawater. The organic matter content in a chlorinated wastewater effluent might be partially responsible for the toxicity. The adverse effects of halogenated DBPs on the marine species were observed pronouncedly only in the "concentrated" chlorinated wastewater effluents. pH and ammonia content in a wastewater effluent caused no adverse effects on the marine species. The results suggest that using seawater to replace freshwater for toilet flushing might mitigate the "direct" acute detrimental effect of wastewater to the marine organisms.

  19. Antifungal activities of azole agents against the Malassezia species.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Karla Carvalho; de Araujo, Crystiane Rodrigues; Costa, Carolina Rodrigues; Passos, Xisto Sena; de Fátima Lisboa Fernandes, Orionalda; do Rosário Rodrigues Silva, Maria

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, we identified 95 Malassezia isolates by morphological and biochemical criteria and assessed the in vitro activity of fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole and voriconazole by broth microdilution against these species using slightly modified Leeming-Notman medium. The Malassezia isolates were identified as M. furfur (74), M. sympodialis (11), M. obtusa (8) and M. globosa (2). The modified Leeming-Notman medium used for susceptibility testing allowed good growth of Malassezia spp. Visual reading of the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was readily achieved until Day 5 of incubation at 32 degrees C. Although high MIC values of 16 microg/mL for fluconazole were observed in 9.5% of Malassezia isolates, in general these microorganisms were susceptible to all drugs studied. Interestingly, one M. globosa isolate showed high MIC values for voriconazole, itraconazole and fluconazole. For the 95 strains, the MIC ranges were <0.03-4 microg/mL for ketoconazole, <0.03 to >16 microg/mL for voriconazole, <0.125 to >64 microg/mL for fluconazole and <0.03-16 microg/mL for itraconazole. In summary, the good reproducibility and visual readings obtained using modified Leeming-Notman medium suggest that this medium should be proposed for antifungal testing of drugs against Malassezia spp.

  20. The synergistic effect of Escherichia coli inactivation by sequential disinfection with low level chlorine dioxide followed by free chlorine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wu; Yang, Dong; Zhu, Sui-Yi; Chen, Bo-Yan; Huo, Ming-Xin; Li, Jun-Wen

    2012-12-01

    To the best of our knowledge, there was little information available on pathogen removal using low level disinfectant followed by free chlorine in sequential disinfection (SD). This study investigated Escherichia coli inactivation by four types of disinfection: single step disinfection (SSD), SD, traditional sequential disinfection (TSD) and mixed disinfectant disinfection (MDD). Results indicated that SD had higher ability to inactivate E. coli than the others, indicating there was a positive synergistic effect on chlorine disinfection by prior dosing with a low level of chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)). The ONPG assay suggested that the permeability of cell wall rather than the viability of E. coli were changed under 0.02 mg/l ClO(2) treatment. The coexistence of residual ClO(2) and free chlorine also plays an active synergistic effect. Additionally, temperature had a positive effect on E. coli inactivation in SD, while inactivation was reduced in alkaline compared to neutral and acidic conditions.

  1. 46 CFR 151.50-31 - Chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Chlorine. 151.50-31 Section 151.50-31 Shipping COAST... LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-31 Chlorine. (a) Chlorine barges. Subparts 98.03 and 98.20 of Part 98 of this chapter have been revoked. However, chlorine barges that...

  2. 46 CFR 151.50-31 - Chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chlorine. 151.50-31 Section 151.50-31 Shipping COAST... LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-31 Chlorine. (a) Chlorine barges. Subparts 98.03 and 98.20 of Part 98 of this chapter have been revoked. However, chlorine barges that...

  3. 46 CFR 151.50-31 - Chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Chlorine. 151.50-31 Section 151.50-31 Shipping COAST... LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-31 Chlorine. (a) Chlorine barges. Subparts 98.03 and 98.20 of Part 98 of this chapter have been revoked. However, chlorine barges that...

  4. 21 CFR 173.300 - Chlorine dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chlorine dioxide. 173.300 Section 173.300 Food and... Additives § 173.300 Chlorine dioxide. Chlorine dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 10049-04-4) may be safely used in food... the following methods: (i) Treating an aqueous solution of sodium chlorite with either chlorine gas...

  5. 21 CFR 173.300 - Chlorine dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chlorine dioxide. 173.300 Section 173.300 Food and... Additives § 173.300 Chlorine dioxide. Chlorine dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 10049-04-4) may be safely used in food... the following methods: (i) Treating an aqueous solution of sodium chlorite with either chlorine gas...

  6. 46 CFR 151.50-31 - Chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Chlorine. 151.50-31 Section 151.50-31 Shipping COAST... LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-31 Chlorine. (a) Chlorine barges. Subparts 98.03 and 98.20 of Part 98 of this chapter have been revoked. However, chlorine barges that...

  7. 46 CFR 151.50-31 - Chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chlorine. 151.50-31 Section 151.50-31 Shipping COAST... LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-31 Chlorine. (a) Chlorine barges. Subparts 98.03 and 98.20 of Part 98 of this chapter have been revoked. However, chlorine barges that...

  8. 21 CFR 173.300 - Chlorine dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Chlorine dioxide. 173.300 Section 173.300 Food and... Additives § 173.300 Chlorine dioxide. Chlorine dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 10049-04-4) may be safely used in food... the following methods: (i) Treating an aqueous solution of sodium chlorite with either chlorine gas...

  9. 21 CFR 173.300 - Chlorine dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chlorine dioxide. 173.300 Section 173.300 Food and... Additives § 173.300 Chlorine dioxide. Chlorine dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 10049-04-4) may be safely used in food... the following methods: (i) Treating an aqueous solution of sodium chlorite with either chlorine gas...

  10. Immunogenic cell death due to a new photodynamic therapy (PDT) with glycoconjugated chlorin (G-chlorin)

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Mamoru; Kataoka, Hiromi; Yano, Shigenobu; Sawada, Takuya; Akashi, Haruo; Inoue, Masahiro; Suzuki, Shugo; Inagaki, Yusuke; Hayashi, Noriyuki; Nishie, Hirotada; Shimura, Takaya; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Mori, Yoshinori; Kubota, Eiji; Tanida, Satoshi; Takahashi, Satoru; Joh, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Both the pre-apoptotic exposure to calreticulin (CRT) and the post-apoptotic release of high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) are required for immunogenic cell death. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses non-toxic photosensitizers and visible light at a specific wavelength in combination with oxygen to produce cytotoxic reactive oxygen species that kill malignant cells by apoptosis and/or necrosis, shut down the tumor microvasculature, and stimulate the host immune system. We have previously shown that glycoconjugated chlorin (G-chlorin) has superior cancer cell selectivity and effectively suppresses the growth of xenograft tumors. In the present study, we evaluated the immunogenicity of PDT with G-chlorin treatment in colon cancer cells. PDT with G-chlorin suppressed CT26 (mouse colon cancer cells) tumor growth considerably more efficiently in immunocompetent mice (wild-type mice, allograft model) than in immune-deficient mice (nude mice, xenograft model), although control treatments were not different between the two. This treatment also induced CRT translocation and HMGB1 release in cells, as shown by western blot and immunofluorescence staining. To evaluate the use of PDT-treated cells as a tumor vaccine, we employed a syngeneic mouse tumor model (allograft model). Mice inoculated with PDT-treated CT26 cells were significantly protected against a subsequent challenge with live CT26 cells, and this protection was inhibited by siRNA for CRT or HMGB1. In conclusion, PDT with G-chlorin treatment induced immunogenic cell death in a mouse model, where the immunogenicity of this treatment was directed by CRT expression and HMGB1 release. PMID:27363018

  11. Chlorinated hydrocarbons in peat

    SciTech Connect

    Rapaport, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Concentrations (ng/g), accumulation rates (ug/m/sup 2/=yr) and burdens were determined for DDT (1,1,1-trichlorophenyl2-2'bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane), polychlorinated biphenyls. Toxaphene, hexachlorobenzene (HCB) and a,b,g-hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) in peat cores taken across the mid-latitudes of North America. Because peat bogs are ombrotrophic, thereby receiving all contaminant inputs from the atmosphere and because peat cores were dated, atmospheric input functions were constructed for all of the compounds listed above excepting the HCHs. Compound inventories (burdens) in peat cores of PCBs, HCB, HCHs, Toxaphene, DDT, Pb and Zn were compared, indicating a strong influence from areas proximate to industrial sources and the atmospheric transport from source regions. Untransformed parent DDT (p,p' and o,p'-DDT) in surface peat and in precipitation provides evidence for the long range transport of DDT from neighboring countries where use has increased over the past 10-15 years. Present accumulation rates of DDT in peat are about 10-20% of maximum levels associated with peak use in the US around 1960. The DDT input function that was developed can be used to date peat cores. Transformations of DDT and PCBs were also examined in peat cores. First order transformation rates of DDT (p,p' and o,p') to DDD in anaerobic peat core environments ranged from 0.03 to 0.09 yr/sup -1/ with differences related to temperature. Aerobic transformation of PCB congeners in peat cores and microcosms was rapid for 2,3 and several 4 chlorinated congeners (T/sub 1/2 less than or equal to 0.2 to 3 years) and declined with increasing chlorine number.

  12. Zebra mussel mortality with chlorine

    SciTech Connect

    Van Benschoten, J.E.; Jensen, J.N.; Harrington, D.; DeGirolamo, D.J.

    1995-05-01

    The rate of mortality of the zebra mussel in response to chlorine is described by a kinetic model that combines a statistical characterization of mussel mortality with a disinfection-type modeling approach. Parameter estimates were made with nine sets of data from experiments conducted in Niagara River water. From the kinetic model, an operational diagram was constructed that describes the time to 95% mortality as a function of chlorine concentration and temperature. Either the model or the diagram can be used to assist utilities in planning chlorination treatments for controlling zebra mussels.

  13. Highly enantioselective alpha-chlorination of cyclic beta-ketoesters catalyzed by N,N'-dioxide using NCS as the chlorine source.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yunfei; Wang, Wentao; Shen, Ke; Wang, Jun; Hu, Xiaolei; Lin, Lili; Liu, Xiaohua; Feng, Xiaoming

    2010-02-28

    A simple and highly efficient N,N'-dioxide organocatalyst system was developed for the asymmetric alpha-chlorination of cyclic beta-ketoesters using easily available NCS as the chlorine source to provide a series of optically active alpha-chloro-beta-ketoesters in excellent yields with 90-98% ee.

  14. The toxicity and enzyme activity of a chlorine and sulfate containing aeruginosin isolated from a non-microcystin-producing Planktothrix strain

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, Esther; Grundler, Verena; Häussinger, Daniel; Kurmayer, Rainer; Gademann, Karl; Pernthaler, Jakob; Blom, Judith F.

    2017-01-01

    The toxicity of six different Planktothrix strains was examined in acute toxicity assays with the crustacean Thamnocephalus platyurus. The presence of toxicity in two strains could be explained by the occurrence of microcystins. The other four Planktothrix strains were not able to produce microcystins due to different mutations in the microcystin synthetase (mcy) gene cluster. In these strains, toxicity was attributed to the presence of chlorine and sulfate containing compounds. The main representative, called aeruginosin 828A, of such a compound in the Planktothrix strain 91/1 was isolated, and structure elucidation by 2D-NMR and MS methods revealed the presence of phenyllactic acid (Pla), chloroleucine (Cleu), 2-carboxy-6-(4’-sulfo-xylosyl)-octahydroindole (Choi), and 3-aminoethyl-1-N-amidino-Δ-3-pyrroline (Aeap) residues. Aeruginosin 828A was found to be toxic for Thamnocephalus platyurus with a LC50 value of 22.4 µM, which is only slightly higher than the toxicity found for microcystins. Additionally, very potent inhibition values for thrombin (IC50 = 21.8 nM) and for trypsin (IC50 = 112 nM) have been determined for aeruginosin 828A. These data support the hypothesis that aeruginosins containing chlorine and sulfate groups, which were found in microcystin-deficient Planktothrix strains, can be considered as another class of toxins. PMID:28100989

  15. Ground water chlorinated ethenes in tree trunks: Case studies, influence of recharge, and potential degradation mechanism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, D.A.; Clinton, B.D.; Vose, J.M.; Casey, C.C.; Harvey, G.J.; Bradley, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    Trichloroethene (TCE) was detected in cores of trees growing above TCE-contaminated ground at three sites: the Carswell Golf Course in Texas, Air Force Plant PJKS in Colorado, and Naval Weapons Station Charleston in South Carolina. This was true even when the depth to water was 7.9 m or when the contaminated aquifer was confined beneath ???3 m of clay. Additional ground water contaminants detected in the tree cores were cis-1,2-dichloroethene at two sites and tetrachloroethene at one site. Thus, tree coring can be a rapid and effective means of locating shallow subsurface chlorinated ethenes and possibly identifying zones of active TCE dechlorination. Tree cores collected over time were useful in identifying the onset of ground water contamination. Several factors affecting chlorinated ethene concentrations in tree cores were identified in this investigation. The factors include ground water chlorinated ethene concentrations and depth to ground water contamination. In addition, differing TCE concentrations around the trunk of some trees appear to be related to the roots deriving water from differing areas. Opportunistic uptake of infiltrating rainfall can dilute prerain TCE concentrations in the trunk. TCE concentrations in core headspace may differ among some tree species. In some trees, infestation of bacteria in decaying heartwood may provide a TCE dechlorination mechanism within the trunk.

  16. Chlorinated didemnins from the tunicate Trididemnum solidum.

    PubMed

    Ankisetty, Sridevi; Khan, Shabana I; Avula, Bharathi; Gochfeld, Deborah; Khan, Ikhlas A; Slattery, Marc

    2013-11-11

    Chemical investigation of the tunicate Trididemnum solidum resulted in the isolation of two new chlorinated compounds belonging to the didemnin class, along with two known compounds didemnin A and didemnin B. The structural determination of the compounds was based on extensive NMR and mass spectroscopic analysis. The isolated compounds 1-4 were tested for their anti-inflammatory activity using in vitro assays for inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activity. The anti-cell proliferative activity of the above compounds was also evaluated against four solid tumor cell lines.

  17. Prompt gamma analysis of chlorine in concrete for corrosion study.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, A A; Nagadi, M M; Al-Amoudi, O S B

    2006-02-01

    Measurement of chlorine in concrete is very important for studying of corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete. Corrosion of reinforcing steel is primarily ascribed to the penetration of chloride ions to the steel surface. Preventive measures for avoiding concrete structure reinforcement corrosion requires monitoring the chloride ion concentration in concrete so that its concentration does not exceed a threshold limit to initiate reinforcement concrete corrosion. An accelerator based prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) setup has been developed for non-destructive analysis of elemental composition of concrete samples. The setup has been used to measure chlorine concentration in concrete samples over a 1-3 wt% concentration range. Although a strong interference has been observed between the chlorine gamma-rays and calcium gamma-rays from concrete, the chlorine concentration in concrete samples has been successfully measured using the 1.164 and 7.643 MeV chlorine gamma-rays. The experimental data were compared with the results of the Monte Carlo simulations. An excellent agreement has been achieved between the experimental data and results of Monte Carlo simulations. The study has demonstrated the successful use of the accelerator-based PGNAA setup in non-destructive analysis of chlorine in concrete samples.

  18. Disinfection of swine wastewater using chlorine, ultraviolet light and ozone.

    PubMed

    Macauley, John J; Qiang, Zhimin; Adams, Craig D; Surampalli, Rao; Mormile, Melanie R

    2006-06-01

    Veterinary antibiotics are widely used at concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) to prevent disease and promote growth of livestock. However, the majority of antibiotics are excreted from animals in urine, feces, and manure. Consequently, the lagoons used to store these wastes can act as reservoirs of antibiotics and antibiotic-resistant bacteria. There is currently no regulation or control of these systems to prevent the spread of these bacteria and their genes for antibiotic resistance into other environments. This study was conducted to determine the disinfection potential of chlorine, ultraviolet light and ozone against swine lagoon bacteria. Results indicate that a chlorine dose of 30 mg/L could achieve a 2.2-3.4 log bacteria reduction in lagoon samples. However, increasing the dose of chlorine did not significantly enhance the disinfection activity due to the presence of chlorine-resistant bacteria. The chlorine resistant bacteria were identified to be closely related to Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus licheniformis. A significant percentage of lagoon bacteria were not susceptible to the four selected antibiotics: chlortetracycline, lincomycin, sulfamethazine and tetracycline (TET). However, the presence of both chlorine and TET could inactivate all bacteria in one lagoon sample. The disinfection potential of UV irradiation and ozone was also examined. Ultraviolet light was an effective bacterial disinfectant, but was unlikely to be economically viable due to its high energy requirements. At an ozone dose of 100 mg/L, the bacteria inactivation efficiency could reach 3.3-3.9 log.

  19. Chlorination of Betacyanins in Several Hypochlorous Acid Systems.

    PubMed

    Wybraniec, Sławomir; Starzak, Karolina; Pietrzkowski, Zbigniew

    2016-04-13

    This study presents a comparative evaluation of chlorination of betanin, betanidin, and neobetanin exposed to sodium hypochlorite and myeloperoxidase (MPO)/H2O2/Cl(-) systems. For betanin/betanidin, the chlorination takes place at the aglycone unit, but for neobetanin, no chlorinated products in the reaction mixtures can be detected. In the RP-HPLC system, monochloro-betanin/-betanidin were eluted earlier than their corresponding nonchlorinated substrates. An influence of Cl(-) concentration on betanin/betanidin chlorination efficiency in sodium hypochlorite and MPO systems was investigated. At pH 3-5, the yields of formed monochloro-betanin/-betanidin decrease dramatically at higher Cl(-) concentrations, indicating that generated Cl2 is not the chlorinating agent in the presence of sodium hypochlorite. The intriguing low activity of Cl2 in betanin/betanidin chlorination compared to HOCl and/or Cl2O can be explained by a special position of the attack by molecules of HOCl and/or Cl2O. In the MPO/H2O2/Cl(-) system, the highest efficiency of monochloro-betanin/-betanidin generation is observed at pH 5.

  20. Performance of chlorination process during nanofiltration of sulfonamide antibiotic.

    PubMed

    Ramli, Mohd Redzuan; Sulaiman, Nik Meriam Nik; Mohd, Mustafa Ali; Rabuni, Mohamad Fairus

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of combined nanofiltration and disinfection processes was studied by comparing the pre-disinfection and post-disinfection when in combination with nanofiltration. Four types of sulfonamide (sulfanilamide, sulfadiazine, sulfamethoxazole, and sulfadimethoxine) were chosen as substrates, with sodium hypochlorite as a disinfectant. A laboratory-scale nanofiltration system was used to conduct the following sets of experiment: (1) a pre-chlorination system, where the free active chlorine (FAC) was added to the membrane influent; and (2), a post-chlorination system, where the FAC was added to the membrane effluent. Overall, the pre-disinfection nanofiltration system showed higher sulfonamide removal efficiency compared to the post-chlorination nanofiltration system (>99.5% versus >89.5%). In the case of limited FAC ([FAC]0: [sulfonamide]0≤1), the removal efficiency for the post-chlorination nanofiltration system was higher, due to the prior nanofiltration process that could remove 12.5% to 80% of sulfonamide. The flux of the treated feed system was considerably higher than in the untreated feed system; however, the membrane was observed to be slightly damaged due to residual chlorine attack.

  1. Dechloriation mechanisms of chlorinated olefins.

    PubMed Central

    Van Dyke, R A

    1977-01-01

    The dechlorination of chlorinated hydrocarbons has been examined in detail. The reaction is catalyzed by cytochrome P-450 and occurs optimally in the presence of oxygen although some dechlorination may occur under anaerobic conditions. Halothane has been shown to undergo an oxidative dechlorination and a reductive defluorination. Enzymatic attack of chlorinated olefins and hydrocarbons is not on the carbon--halogen bond. Oxidative dechlorination of hydrocarbons is apparently initiated by an attack on the carbon atom and the halogen is then released from the oxidized carbon. The chlorinated olefins, on the other hand, are not easily dechlorinated enzymatically. The chlorines migrate readily across the double bond, therefore, cyclic chloronium ions must occur as intermediates. It is not clear at this time if epoxides are also intermediates in this conversion. PMID:612436

  2. CHLORINE INACTIVATION OF BACILLUS ENDOSPORES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The possibility of a bioterrorism event resulting in the release of Bacillus anthracis endospores into a drinking water distribution system necessitates research into means by which these endospores can be inactivated. This study was designed to determine the chlorine resistance...

  3. EFFECTS OF OZONE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORINE, AND MONOCHLORAMINE ON CRYTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYST VIABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purified Cryptosporiodium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. Excystation and mouse infectivity were compareatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. Ozone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlor...

  4. IDENTIFICATION OF NEW DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FROM OZONE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORAMINE, AND CHLORINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern over the potential adverse health effects of trihalomethanes (THMs) and other chlorinated by-products in chlorinated drinking water, alternative disinfection methods are being explored. Ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine are currently popular alternatives to ...

  5. Degradation of carbamazepine by UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process and formation of disinfection by-products.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shiqing; Xia, Ying; Li, Ting; Yao, Tian; Shi, Zhou; Zhu, Shumin; Gao, Naiyun

    2016-08-01

    Pharmaceuticals in water are commonly found and are not efficiently removed by current treatment processes. Degradation of antiepileptic drug carbamazepine (CBZ) by UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process was systematically investigated in this study. The results showed that the UV/chlorine process was more effective at degrading CBZ than either UV or chlorination alone. The CBZ degradation followed pseudo-first order reaction kinetics, and the degradation rate constants (kobs) were affected by the chlorine dose, solution pH, and natural organic matter concentration to different degrees. Degradation of CBZ greatly increased with increasing chlorine dose and decreasing solution pH during the UV/chlorine process. Additionally, the presence of natural organic matter in the solution inhibited the degradation of CBZ. UV photolysis, chlorination, and reactive species (hydroxyl radical •OH and chlorine atoms •Cl) were identified as responsible for CBZ degradation in the UV/chlorine process. Finally, a degradation pathway for CBZ in the UV/chlorine process was proposed and the formation potentials of carbonaceous and nitrogenous disinfection by-products were evaluated. Enhanced formation of trichloroacetic acid, dichloroacetonitrile, and trichloronitromethane precursors should be considered when applying UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process to drinking water.

  6. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity in mononuclear leukocytes of 13 mammalian species correlates with species-specific life span.

    PubMed Central

    Grube, K; Bürkle, A

    1992-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a eukaryotic posttranslational modification of proteins that is strongly induced by the presence of DNA strand breaks and plays a role in DNA repair and the recovery of cells from DNA damage. We compared poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP; EC 2.4.2.30) activities in Percoll gradient-purified, permeabilized mononuclear leukocytes from mammalian species of different maximal life span. Saturating concentrations of a double-stranded octameric oligonucleotide were applied to provide a direct and maximal stimulation of PARP. Our results on 132 individuals from 13 different species yield a strong positive correlation between PARP activity and life span (r = 0.84; P << 0.001), with human cells displaying approximately 5 times the activity of rat cells. Intraspecies comparisons with both rat and human cells from donors of all age groups revealed some decline of PARP activity with advancing age, but it was only weakly correlated. No significant polymer degradation was detectable under our assay conditions, ruling out any interference by poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase activity. By Western blot analysis of mononuclear leukocytes from 11 species, using a crossreactive antiserum directed against the extremely well-conserved NAD-binding domain, no correlation between the amount of PARP protein and the species' life spans was found, suggesting a greater specific enzyme activity in longer-lived species. We propose that a higher poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation capacity in cells from long-lived species might contribute to the efficient maintenance of genome integrity and stability over their longer life span. Images PMID:1465394

  7. Molecular size distribution of dissolved organic matter in water of the Pearl River and trihalomethane formation characteristics with chlorine and chlorine dioxide treatments.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhen-Ye; Gu, Ji-Dong; Fan, Xiao-Jun; Li, Hai-Bo

    2006-06-30

    River water sample was collected from Guangzhou section of the Pearl River to investigate soluble organic fractions and formation of trihalomethane (THMs) after chlorine and chlorine dioxide treatments. The water sample was passed through Amicon YC-05, YM-1, YM-3, YM-10, YM-30, YM-100 and ZM-500 series membranes after a pre-treatment. The molecular weight distribution and the specific ultra-violet absorbance (SUVA(254)) of each fraction obtained from membrane were analyzed, and these fractions were further disinfected with chlorine and chlorine dioxide. The results showed that reverse osmosis (RO) fraction contained mainly dissolved organic matter (DOM) from the water sample, suggesting that the water has been highly contaminated by anthropogenic activities. Meanwhile, the THMs concentration and SUVA(254) increased gradually as the molecular weight of the obtained fractions reduced, indicating that the low molecular weight DOM was the major THMs precursor in the disinfection process with chlorine and chlorine dioxide. The results suggest that THMs in source water of Pearl River could be effectively reduced when pollution of human activity is greatly controlled. Between the two disinfection processes tested, chlorine dioxide produced less THMs than chlorine in this study.

  8. Mosquito larvicidal activity of active constituent derived from Chamaecyparis obtusa leaves against 3 mosquito species.

    PubMed

    Jang, Young-Su; Jeon, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Hoi-Seon

    2005-12-01

    Mosqutio larvicidal activity of Chamaecyparis obtusa leaf-derived materials against the 4th-stage larvae of Aedes aegypti (L.), Ochlerotatus togoi (Theobald), and Culex pipiens pallens (Coquillett) was examined in the laboratory. A crude methanol extract of C. obtusa leaves was found to be active (percent mortality rough) against the 3 species larvae; the hexane fraction of the methanol extract showed a strong larvicidal activity (100% mortality) at 100 ppm. The bioactive component in the C. obtusa leaf extract was characterized as beta-thujaplicin by spectroscopic analyses. The LC50 value of beta-thujaplicin was 2.91, 2.60, and 1.33 ppm against Ae. aegypti, Oc. togoi, and Cx. pipiens pallens larvae. This naturally occurring C. obtusa leaves-derived compound merits further study as a potential mosquito larval control agent or lead compound.

  9. Killer activity of yeasts isolated from natural environments against some medically important Candida species.

    PubMed

    Vadkertiová, Renata; Sláviková, Elena

    2007-01-01

    Twenty-five yeast cultures, mainly of human origin, belonging to four pathogenic yeast species--Candida albicans, Candida krusei, Candida parapsilosis, and Candida tropicalis were tested for their sensitivity to ten basidiomycetous and eleven ascomycetous yeast species isolated from the water and soil environments and from tree leaves. The best killer activity among basidiomycetous species was exhibited by Rhodotorula glutinis, and R. mucilaginosa. The other carotenoid producing species Cystofilobasidium capitatum, Sporobolomyces salmonicolor, and S. roseus were active only against about 40% of the tested strains and exhibited weak activity. The broadest killer activity among ascomycetous yeasts was shown by the strains Pichia anomala and Metschnikowia pulcherrima. The species Debaryomyces castellii, Debaryomyces hansenii, Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Pichia membranifaciens, and Williopsis californica did not show any killer activity. The best killer activity exhibited the strains isolated from leafy material. The lowest activity pattern was found among strains originating from soil environment.

  10. Application of spinel-type cobalt chromite as a novel catalyst for combustion of chlorinated organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Kim, D C; Ihm, S K

    2001-01-01

    Various chromium-containing catalysts were tested for the total oxidation of trichloroethylene (TCE) as a model reaction for the catalytic combustion of chlorinated organic pollutants. A spinel-type cobalt chromite (CoCr2O4) among others was proven to be a very promising catalyst showing higher activity and higher CO2 selectivity than traditional alumina supported chromia. Even if both Cr3+ and Cr6+ species were observed on the surface of CoCr2O4, the Cr6+ species was stable under reducing environment. The presence of Cr3+-Cr6+ pair sites and the effect of redox treatments on the activity were investigated to explain the nature of possible active sites for TCE decomposition. Higher selectivity to CO2 of CoCr2O4 was ascribed to the abundance of its Cr3+ species, together with its activity for water gas shift reaction.

  11. Chemistry of combined residual chlorination

    SciTech Connect

    Leao, S.F.; Selleck, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    The decay of the combined chlorine residual was investigated in this work. Recent concerns about the formation of undesirable compounds such as chloroform with free residual chlorination have focused attention on the alternative use of combined residual chlorination. This work investigates the applicability of reactions proposed to describe the transformations and decay of the combined residual with time. Sodium hypochlorite was added to buffered solutions of ammonia with the chlorine residual being monitored over periods extending up to 10 days. The reaction was studied at four initial concentrations of hypochlorite of 100, 50, 25 and 10 mg/L as Cl/sub 2/ with molar application ratios of chlorine to ammonia, defined herein as M ratios, of 0.90, 0.50, 0.25 and 0.05 at each hypochlorite dose. Sixty-eight experiments were conducted at the pH of 6.6 and 7.2. The conclusions are: (1) in the absence of free chlorine, the concentration of NH/sub 3/ does not seem to affect the rate of disappearance of the residual other than through the formation of NHCl/sub 2/ by NH/sub 2/Cl hydrolysis; (2) the reaction between NHCl/sub 2/ and NH/sub 4//sup +/ to form NH/sub 2/Cl is either much slower than reported by Gray et. al. or the mechanism is different with a rate limiting step not involving NH/sub 3/ or NH/sub 4//sup +/; (3) a redox reaction in addition to the first-order decomposition of NHCl/sub 2/ appears necessary. Model simulation results indicated that a reaction of the type NH/sub 2/Cl + NHCl/sub 2/ ..-->.. P added to the first-order NHCl/sub 2/ decomposition can explain the results observed except at the higher chlorine doses.

  12. Accurate determination of chlorine, bromine, and iodine in sedimentary rock reference samples by radiochemical neutron activation analysis and a detailed comparison with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry literature data.

    PubMed

    Sekimoto, Shun; Ebihara, Mitsuru

    2013-07-02

    Trace amounts of three halogens (chlorine, bromine, and iodine) were determined using radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) for nine sedimentary rocks and three rhyolite samples. To obtain high-quality analytical data, the radiochemical procedure of RNAA was improved by lowering the background in gamma-ray spectrometry and completing the chemical procedure more rapidly than in conventional procedures. A comparison of the RNAA data of Br and I with corresponding inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) literature data revealed that the values obtained by ICPMS coupled with pyrohydrolysis preconcentration were systematically lower than the RNAA data for some reference samples, suggesting that the quantitative collection of Br and I cannot always be achieved by the pyrohydrolysis for some solid samples. The RNAA data of three halogens can classify sedimentary rock reference samples into two groups (the samples from inland water and those from seawater), implying the geochemical significance of halogen data.

  13. Antitrypanosomal activity of some pregnane glycosides isolated from Caralluma species.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Sattar, Essam; Shehab, Naglaa G; Ichino, Chikara; Kiyohara, Hiroaki; Ishiyama, Aki; Otoguro, Kazuhiko; Omura, Satoshi; Yamada, Haruki

    2009-06-01

    Pregnane glycosides previously isolated from genus Caralluma (C. Penicillata, C. tuberculata and C. russelliana) were tested for their antitrypanosomal activity. Penicilloside E showed the highest antitrypanosomal activity (IC(50) 1.01 microg/ml) followed by caratuberside C (IC(50) 1.85 microg/ml), which exhibited the highest selectivity index (SI 12.04). It was noticed that acylation is required for the antitrypanosomal activity while glycosylation at C-20 has no significant effect on the activity.

  14. Alkaline pretreatment for chlorine removal from high-chlorine rhodochrosite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xing-ran; Liu, Zuo-hua; Li, Wen-sheng; Cheng, Ya-ya; Du, Jun; Tao, Chang-yuan

    2016-11-01

    Chloride in manganese ore adversely affects mineral extraction. The mechanisms and the factors that influence an alkali pretreatment to removal chlorine from manganese ore were explored to eliminate hazards posed by chlorine during the electrolysis of manganese. The results showed that sodium carbonate, when used as an alkaline additive, promoted the dissolution of insoluble chloride, enhanced the migration of chloride ions, and effectively stabilized Mn2+. The optimal conditions were a sodium carbonate concentration of 0.45 mol·L-1, a liquid-solid ratio of 5:1 mL·g-1, a reaction time of 1 h, and a temperature of 25°C. The chlorine removal efficiency was greater than 95%, and the ore grade (Mn) was increased by 2.7%.

  15. Chill water additive controls transfer of Salmonella and Campylobacter by improved chlorine efficacy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In earlier work, we showed that a proprietary additive (T-128) maintains chlorine activity in the presence of organic material such as broiler parts. T-128 improves the efficacy of chlorine to control transfer of Campylobacter and Salmonella from inoculated wings to un-inoculated wings during immer...

  16. Diversity and enzyme activity of Penicillium species associated with macroalgae in Jeju Island.

    PubMed

    Park, Myung Soo; Lee, Seobihn; Oh, Seung-Yoon; Cho, Ga Youn; Lim, Young Woon

    2016-10-01

    A total of 28 strains of 19 Penicillium species were isolated in a survey of extracellular enzyme-producing fungi from macroalgae along the coast of Jeju Island of Korea. Penicillium species were identified based on morphological and β-tubulin sequence analyses. In addition, the halo-tolerance and enzyme activity of all strains were evaluated. The diversity of Penicillium strains isolated from brown algae was higher than the diversity of strains isolated from green and red algae. The commonly isolated species were Penicillium antarcticum, P. bialowiezense, P. brevicompactum, P. crustosum, P. oxalicum, P. rubens, P. sumatrense, and P. terrigenum. While many strains showed endoglucanase, β-glucosidase, and protease activity, no alginase activity was detected. There was a positive correlation between halo-tolerance and endoglucanase activity within Penicillium species. Among 19 Penicillium species, three species-P. kongii, P. olsonii, and P. viticola-have not been previously recorded in Korea.

  17. Chlorination of humic materials: Byproduct formation and chemical interpretations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reckhow, D.A.; Singer, P.C.; Malcolm, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    Ten aquatic humic and fulvic acids were isolated and studied with respect to their reaction with chlorine. Yields of TOX, chloroform, trichloroacetic acid, dichloroacetic acid, dichloroacetonitrile, and 1,1,1-trichloropropanone were measured at pH 7 and 12. Humic acids produced higher concentrations than their corresponding fulvic acids of all byproducts except 1,1,1-trichloropropanone. Chlorine consumption and byproduct formation were related to fundamental chemical characteristics of the humic materials. A statistical model was proposed for activated aromatic content based on 13C NMR and base titration data. The values estimated from this model were found to be well correlated with chlorine consumption. Specific byproduct formation was related to UV absorbance, nitrogen content, or the activated aromatic content. ?? 1990 American Chemical Society.

  18. A Hands-On Activity to Introduce the Effects of Transmission by an Invasive Species

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Barbara Jean

    2013-01-01

    This activity engages students to better understand the impact of transmission by invasive species. Using dice, poker chips, and paper plates, an entire class mimics the spread of an invasive species within a geographic region. The activity can be modified and conducted at the K-16 levels.

  19. Protective activity of propofol, Diprivan and intralipid against active oxygen species.

    PubMed Central

    Mathy-Hartert, M; Deby-Dupont, G; Hans, P; Deby, C; Lamy, M

    1998-01-01

    We separately studied the antioxidant properties of propofol (PPF), Diprivan (the commercial form of PPF) and intralipid (IL) (the vehicle solution of PPF in Diprivan) on active oxygen species produced by phorbol myristate acetate (10(-6) M)-stimulated human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN: 5 x 10(5) cells/assay), human endothelial cells (5 x 10(5) cells/assay) or cell-free systems (NaOCl or H2O2/peroxidase systems), using luminol (10(-4) M)-enhanced chemiluminescence (CL). We also studied the protective effects of Diprivan on endothelial cells submitted to an oxidant stress induced by H2O2/MPO system: cytotoxicity was assessed by the release of preincorporated 51Cr. Propofol inhibited the CL produced by stimulated PMN in a dose dependent manner (until 5 x 10(-5) M, a clinically relevant concentration), while Diprivan and IL were not dose-dependent inhibitors. The CL produced by endothelial cells was dose-dependently inhibited by Diprivan and PPF, and weakly by IL (not dose-dependent). In cell free systems, dose-dependent inhibitions were obtained for the three products with a lower effect for IL. Diprivan efficaciously protected endothelial cells submitted to an oxidant stress, while IL was ineffective. By HPLC, we demonstrated that PPF was not incorporated into the cells. The drug thus acted by scavenging the active oxygen species released in the extracellular medium. IL acted in the same manner, but was a less powerful antioxidant. PMID:9883967

  20. Detection of chlorinated aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1996-02-06

    A method for making a composition for measuring the concentration of chlorinated aromatic compounds in aqueous fluids, and an optical probe for use with the method are disclosed. The composition comprises a hydrophobic polymer matrix, preferably polyamide, with a fluorescent indicator uniformly dispersed therein. The indicator fluoresces in the presence of the chlorinated aromatic compounds with an intensity dependent on the concentration of these compounds in the fluid of interest, such as 8-amino-2-naphthalene sulfonate. The probe includes a hollow cylindrical housing that contains the composition in its distal end. The probe admits an aqueous fluid to the probe interior for exposure to the composition. An optical fiber transmits excitation light from a remote source to the composition while the indicator reacts with chlorinated aromatic compounds present in the fluid. The resulting fluorescence light signal is reflected to a second optical fiber that transmits the light to a spectrophotometer for analysis. 5 figs.

  1. Reactions of aqueous chlorine and chlorine dioxide with model food compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Fukayama, M Y; Tan, H; Wheeler, W B; Wei, C I

    1986-01-01

    Chlorine and chlorine dioxide (ClO2), common disinfecting and bleaching chemicals used in the food industry, are potent oxidizing and chlorinating agents. Unfortunately, little is known about the nature of the reactions of chlorine with organic food constituents. This presentation reviews published information concerning the reactions of chlorine gas (Cl2[g]), aqueous chlorine, and ClO2 with model food compounds, the fate of chlorine during the chlorination of specific food products, and the potential toxicity of the reaction products. Fatty acids and their methyl esters react with chlorine with the degree of incorporation corresponding to their degree of unsaturation. Aqueous chlorine oxidizes and chlorinates lipids and amino acids much more readily than ClO2. Several amino acids are highly susceptible to oxidation and chlorination by chlorine compounds. Reactions of chlorine and ClO2 with several food products, including flour and shrimp, have also been characterized. In one model system, 99% of Cl2(g) either reacted with components of flour or was consumed by oxidation/chlorination reactions. The lipids extracted from the chlorinated flour contained significant amounts of chlorine. Exposure of shrimp to hypochlorous acid (HOCl) solution resulted in significant incorporation of chlorine into the edible portion. Although significant quantities of chlorine can be incorporated into specific model compounds and food products, the health risks associated with exposure to chlorinated organic products are unknown. Preliminary studies using the Ames Salmonella/microsome mutagenicity assay indicate that the reaction products from mixtures of aqueous chlorine and various lipids or tryptophan are nonmutagenic. Nevertheless, additional studies are warranted, so that the toxicological significance of these reaction products can be understood more fully. PMID:3545804

  2. 40 CFR 704.43 - Chlorinated naphthalenes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... weight of chlorine. (2) Import means to import in bulk form or as part of a mixture. (3) Isomeric ratio... the chlorine atom(s) on the naphthalene. (4) Polychlorinated biphenyl means any chemical...

  3. Chlorinous flavor perception in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Piriou, P; Mackey, E D; Suffet, I H; Bruchet, A

    2004-01-01

    Chlorinous flavors at the tap are the leading cause of customers' complaints and dissatisfaction with drinking water. To characterize consumer perception and acceptance to chlorinous tastes, extensive taste testing was performed with both trained panelists and average consumers. Taste testing with trained panelists showed that chlorine perception is underestimated by disinfectant flavor thresholds reported in the literature. However, trained panelists significantly overestimate the average consumer's ability to perceive chlorine. In addition, consumer perception seems to be influenced by the chlorination practices of the country they live in. Among water quality characteristics that may influence chlorine perception, temperature was not found to induce any significant change. The influence of total dissolved solids (TDS) on chlorine perception remains unclear and, as reported elsewhere, background tastes such as musty, may significantly impact chlorine threshold.

  4. Structure and the catalysis mechanism of oxidative chlorination in nanostructural layers of a surface of alumina

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of X-ray diffraction and mass spectrometric analysis of carrier γ-Al2O3 and catalysts CuCl2/CuCl on its surface, the chemical structure of the active centers of two types oxidative chlorination catalysts applied and permeated type of industrial brands “Harshow” and “MEDС-B” was investigated. On the basis of quantum-mechanical theory of the crystal, field complexes were detected by the presence of CuCl2 cation stoichiometry and structure of the proposed model crystal quasichemical industrial catalyst permeated type MEDС-B for oxidative chlorination of ethylene. On the basis of quantum-mechanical calculations, we propose a new mechanism of catalysis crystal quasichemical oxidative chlorination of ethylene reaction for the catalysts of this type (MEDС-B) and confirmed the possibility of such a mechanism after the analysis of mass spectrometric studies of the active phase (H2 [CuCl4]) catalyst oxidative chlorination of ethylene. The possibility of the formation of atomic and molecular chlorine on the oxidative chlorination of ethylene catalyst surface during Deacon reaction was displaying, which may react with ethylene to produce 1,2-dichloroethane. For the active phase (H [CuCl2]), catalyst offered another model of the metal complex catalyst oxidative chlorination of ethylene deposited type (firm ‘Harshow,’ USA) and the mechanism of catalysis of oxidative chlorination of ethylene with this catalyst. PMID:25258594

  5. Animal Related Activities as Determinants of Species Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randler, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Previous work has established a relationship between knowledge and environmental concern. Different factors may contribute to this knowledge and animal-related leisure activities may also contribute to this knowledge. 390 participants in Leipzig, Germany were interviewed to assess their animal-related leisure activities, their demographic status…

  6. Antimicrobial activity of some Salvia species essential oils from Iran.

    PubMed

    Yousefzadi, Morteza; Sonboli, Ali; Karimic, Farah; Ebrahimi, Samad Nejad; Asghari, Behvar; Zeinalia, Amineh

    2007-01-01

    The aerial parts of Salvia multicaulis, S. sclarea and S. verticillata were collected at full flowering stage. The essential oils were isolated by hydrodistillation and analyzed by combination of capillary GC and GC-MS. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of the essential oils were studied against eight Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus pumulis, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae) and three fungi (Candida albicans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus niger). The results of antibacterial activity tests of the essential oils according to the disc diffusion method and MIC values indicated that all the samples have moderate to high inhibitory activity against the tested bacteria except for P. aeruginosa which was totally resistant. In contrast to antibacterial activity, the oils exhibited no or slight antifungal property, in which only the oil of S. multicaulis showed weak activity against two tested yeasts, C. albicans and S. cerevisiae.

  7. Radiolytic dechlorination of chlorinated organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghipour, Fariborz; Evans, Greg J.

    1997-02-01

    The radiolytic dechlorination of 12 low molecular weight chlorinated organic compounds present in pulp mill effluent was investigated. For most of these chloro-organic compounds more than 90% dechlorination was obtained for gamma doses up to 20 kGy. Parameters such as the number of chlorine atoms and aqueous solution concentration were found to affect the dechlorination rate. A reaction set was also created to model the behavior of irradiated 0.49-49 mol m -3 chloroform solutions, giving good agreement with experimental results.

  8. Colorectal cancers and chlorinated water.

    PubMed

    El-Tawil, Ahmed Mahmoud

    2016-04-15

    Published reports have revealed increased risk of colorectal cancers in people exposed to chlorinated drinking water or chemical derivatives of chlorination. Oestrogen plays a dual positive functions for diminishing the possibilities of such risk by reducing the entrance, and increasing the excretion, of these chemicals. In addition, there are supplementary measures that could be employed in order to reduce this risk further, such as boiling the drinking water, revising the standard concentrations of calcium, magnesium and iron in the public drinking water and prescribing oestrogen in susceptible individuals. Hypo-methylation of genomic DNA could be used as a biological marker for screening for the potential development of colorectal cancers.

  9. Colorectal cancers and chlorinated water

    PubMed Central

    El-Tawil, Ahmed Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Published reports have revealed increased risk of colorectal cancers in people exposed to chlorinated drinking water or chemical derivatives of chlorination. Oestrogen plays a dual positive functions for diminishing the possibilities of such risk by reducing the entrance, and increasing the excretion, of these chemicals. In addition, there are supplementary measures that could be employed in order to reduce this risk further, such as boiling the drinking water, revising the standard concentrations of calcium, magnesium and iron in the public drinking water and prescribing oestrogen in susceptible individuals. Hypo-methylation of genomic DNA could be used as a biological marker for screening for the potential development of colorectal cancers. PMID:27096035

  10. Toxic effects of residual chlorine on larvae of Hydropsyche pellucidula (Trichoptera, Hydropsychidae): A proposal of biological indicator

    SciTech Connect

    Camargo, J.A. )

    1991-08-01

    Elemental chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) and other chlorine compounds, such as chloramines and hypochlorites, have been used as important bactericides in disinfection of drinking waters for many years. Residual chlorine concentrations in municipal water supplies are normally between 0.5 and 2 mg/L. In water at pH values above 5, elemental chlorine and hypochlorite compounds react rapidly, resulting in the formation of hypochlorous acid (HOCl) in equilibrium with hypochlorite ions (OCL-). Very little is known about the toxicity of residual chlorine on aquatic insects that comprise the macroinvertebrate communities of freshwater ecosystems. This study examines the toxic effects of municipal chlorinated waters on larvae of Hydropsyche pellucidula (Curtis), a common insect species in macrobenthic communities of rivers and streams in the Iberian Peninsula and other European countries, evaluating implications on their life cycles. Field and laboratory studies were performed in order to reach these goals.

  11. Comparison of compounds of three Rubus species and their antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Caidan, Rezeng; Cairang, Limao; Pengcuo, Jiumei; Tong, Li

    2015-12-01

    Rubus amabilis, Rubus niveus Thunb., and Rubus sachalinensis are three Rubus species that are alternatively found in Manubzhithang, a Tibetan medicine, in different areas of China. The current study analyzed HPLC/UV chromatograms and it compared compounds of these three Rubus species in contrast to reference substances such as 2,6-dimethoxy-4-hydroxyphenol-1-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, procyanidin B4, and isovitexin-7-O-glucoside. The three Rubus species produced similar peaks in chromatograms. The antioxidant activity of the three Rubus species was determined using an assay for DPPH free radical scavenging activity. Results indicated that the three Rubus species extracts had almost the same level of free radical scavenging activity. Thus, findings indicated the rationality of substituting these species for one another as an ingredient in Manubzhithang.

  12. STABLE CHLORINE ISOTOPE ANALYSIS OF CHLORINATED ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The biogeochemical cycling of chlorinated organic contaminants in the environment is often difficult to understand because of the complex distributions of these compounds and variability of sources. To address these issues from an isotopic perspective, we have measured the, 37Cl...

  13. In vitro photodynamic therapy with chlorin e6 leads to apoptosis of human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wawrzyńska, Magdalena; Kałas, Wojciech; Biały, Dariusz; Zioło, Ewa; Arkowski, Jacek; Mazurek, Walentyna; Strzadała, Leon

    2010-02-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention has become the most common and widely implemented method of heart revascularization. However, the development of restenosis remains the major limitation of this method. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) recently emerged as a new and promising method for the prevention of arterial restenosis. Here the efficacy of chlorin e6 in PDT was investigated in vitro using human vascular smooth muscle cells (TG/HA-VSMCs) as one of the cell types crucial in the development of restenosis. PDT-induced cell death was studied on many levels,including annexin V staining, measurement of the generation reactive oxygen species (ROS) and caspase-3 activity,and assessment of changes in mitochondrial membrane potential and fragmentation of DNA. Photosensitization of TG/HA-VSMCs with a 170 lM of chlorin e6 and subsequent illumination with the light of a 672-nm diode laser(2 J/cm2) resulted in the generation of ROS, a decrease in cell membrane polarization, caspase-3 activation, as well as DNA fragmentation. Interestingly, the latter two apoptotic events could not be observed in photosensitized and illuminated NIH3T3 fibroblasts, suggesting different outcomes of the model of PDT in various types of cells. The results obtained with human VSMCs show that chlorin e6 may be useful in the PDT of aerial restenosis, but its efficacy still needs to be established in an animal model.

  14. 21 CFR 177.1610 - Polyethylene, chlorinated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyethylene, chlorinated. 177.1610 Section 177... Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1610 Polyethylene, chlorinated. Chlorinated polyethylene identified in this section may be safely used as articles or components of articles that...

  15. 21 CFR 177.1610 - Polyethylene, chlorinated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Polyethylene, chlorinated. 177.1610 Section 177... Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1610 Polyethylene, chlorinated. Chlorinated polyethylene identified in this section may be safely used as articles or components of articles that...

  16. 21 CFR 177.1610 - Polyethylene, chlorinated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Polyethylene, chlorinated. 177.1610 Section 177... Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1610 Polyethylene, chlorinated. Chlorinated polyethylene identified in this section may be safely used as articles or components of articles that...

  17. 21 CFR 177.1610 - Polyethylene, chlorinated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polyethylene, chlorinated. 177.1610 Section 177... Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1610 Polyethylene, chlorinated. Chlorinated polyethylene identified in this section may be safely used as articles or components of articles that...

  18. Chlorine demand of Savannah River water

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, E.W.

    1989-01-01

    Savannah River water used for cooling SRS reactors was tested for chlorine demand and the rate of decay for both free and total residual chlorine on seven quarterly dates between 1986 and 1988. Test conditions included chlorine dosages of 1, 3, and 5 mg/l and a variety of contact times ranging from less than 1 minute to one day. Statistically significant differences were detected in the chlorine demand for the seven dates; however, there was no discernible seasonality to the variation. The chlorine demand, amount of combined residual chlorine formed and the persistence of total residual chlorine following a dose of 5 mg/l was significantly greater on one of the seven sampling dates (February, 1988) compared to all of the other dates. These differences could not be attributed to water temperature, pH, ammonia nitrogen concentration, or the amount of rainfall prior to or during the collection of the cooling water. Except as noted above, dissipation of chlorine was similar among the sampling dates. Most reactions of available chlorine with other constituents in the cooking water occurred in the first minute of contact, although measurable total chlorine residuals generally persisted for 24 hours after the dose had been administered. The results of this study indicate that, with occasional exceptions, a chlorine dose of between 3 and 5 mg/l will provide a free chlorine residual of 1 mg/l in Savannah River water. 14 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. BOOSTER CHLORINATION FOR MANAGING DISINFECTANT RESIDUALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Booster chlorination is an approach to residual maintenance in which chlorine is applied at strategic locations within the distribution system. Situations in which booster chlorination may be most effective for maintaining a residual are explained informally in the context of a ...

  20. 49 CFR 179.102-2 - Chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Chlorine. 179.102-2 Section 179.102-2... Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.102-2 Chlorine. (a) Each tank car used to transport chlorine must comply with all of the following: (1) Tanks must be fabricated from carbon...

  1. 49 CFR 179.102-2 - Chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chlorine. 179.102-2 Section 179.102-2... Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.102-2 Chlorine. (a) Each tank car used to transport chlorine must comply with all of the following: (1) Tanks must...

  2. 21 CFR 173.300 - Chlorine dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chlorine dioxide. 173.300 Section 173.300 Food and... FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Specific Usage Additives § 173.300 Chlorine dioxide. Chlorine dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 10049-04-4) may be safely used in food in accordance with...

  3. 49 CFR 179.102-2 - Chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Chlorine. 179.102-2 Section 179.102-2... Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.102-2 Chlorine. (a) Each tank car used to transport chlorine must comply with all of the following: (1) Tanks must be fabricated from carbon...

  4. 49 CFR 179.102-2 - Chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chlorine. 179.102-2 Section 179.102-2... Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.102-2 Chlorine. (a) Each tank car used to transport chlorine must comply with all of the following: (1) Tanks must be fabricated from carbon...

  5. 49 CFR 179.102-2 - Chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Chlorine. 179.102-2 Section 179.102-2... Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.102-2 Chlorine. (a) Each tank car used to transport chlorine must comply with all of the following: (1) Tanks must be fabricated from carbon...

  6. 40 CFR 704.45 - Chlorinated terphenyl.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... No. 61788-33-6, comprised of chlorinated ortho-, meta-, and paraterphenyl. (2) Extent of chlorination means the percent by weight of chlorine for each isomer (ortho, meta, and para). (3) Isomeric ratio means the ratios of ortho-, meta-, and parachlorinated terphenyls. (4) Polychlorinated biphenyl...

  7. An Easy Way To Make Chlorine Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, L. H., Jr.

    1997-11-01

    Chlorine water can be made easily by mixing hypochlorite and hydrochloric acid. The equilibrium lies toward Cl2 in the reaction HOCl + HCl -> Cl2 + H2O and this can be used to make chlorine water from sodium hypochlorite and hydrochloric acid if the presence of NaCl in the chlorine water does not interfere with its use.

  8. Disinfectants: Chlorine and chlorine dioxide. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the antimicrobial properties of chlorine and chlorine dioxide. The use of chlorine for the inactivation of viruses, bacteria, and fungi in wastewater treatment plants is discussed, including the mode of action and factors influencing inactivation. The use of chlorine dioxide as an alternative to chlorine disinfection in swimming pools and water supplies, and possible adverse effects are also discussed. (Contains a minimum of 157 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  9. Studies on the chlorination of zircon: Part I. Static bed investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidaye, A. C.; Gupta, C. K.; Venkatachalam, S.

    1999-04-01

    Carbochlorination is an important unit operation in the processing of zirconium resources. In the article, the use of different reducing agents in zircon chlorination, to produce zirconium tetrachloride, has been examined on thermodynamic and other considerations. While numerous workers have investigated zircon chlorination, a literature survey shows that there is a wide variation in the reported effect of various process parameters on the chlorination rate and a wide scatter in the values for kinetic parameters such as order of reaction, activation energy, rate constant as also the rate law expression. This work is an extensive study on zircon chlorination and the article discusses the effect of process parameters such as charge particle size, gas and solid composition, gas flow rate, temperature, reaction duration, etc. on the chlorination rate, over a much wider range of the parameter values. During investigations in the static bed chlorinator, it was noticed that the initial rate and the total extent of chlorination are proportional to the exposed surface of the solid zircon-coke charge but independent of the depth or amount of the charge. Further, the stalled chlorination could be reactivated by remixing the solid charge. Also, while the reaction rate in general increased as the charge became finer, the effect of zircon particle size was much more predominant. The activation energy value for the chlorination showed a wide variation with other operating conditions. Likewise, the order of reaction with respect to chlorine decreased from two to zero as the chlorine concentration in the gaseous atmosphere increased. Interestingly, the chlorination rate initially increased with gas flow rate, then decreased, before finally becoming independent of the gas flow rate. Results also indicated that there is an optimum charge composition that yields the maximum chlorination rate and the article discusses the effect of the zircon to coke particle number ratio in the

  10. Antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer activity of 3 Umbilicaria species.

    PubMed

    Kosanić, Marijana; Ranković, Branislav; Stanojković, Tatjana

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate in vitro antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer activity of the acetone extracts of the lichens Umbilicaria crustulosa, U. cylindrica, and U. polyphylla. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by 5 separate methods: free radical scavenging, superoxide anion radical scavenging, reducing power, determination of total phenolic compounds, and determination of total flavonoid content. Of the lichens tested, U. polyphylla had largest free radical scavenging activity (72.79% inhibition at a concentration of 1 mg/mL), which was similar as standard antioxidants in the same concentration. Moreover, the tested extracts had effective reducing power and superoxide anion radical scavenging. Total content of phenol and flavonoid in extracts was determined as pyrocatechol equivalent, and as rutin equivalent, respectively. The strong relationships between total phenolic and flavonoid contents and the antioxidant effect of tested extracts were observed. The antimicrobial activity was estimated by determination of the minimal inhibitory concentration by the broth microdilution method. The most active was extract of U. polyphylla with minimum inhibitory concentration values ranging from 1.56 to 12.5 mg/mL. Anticancer activity was tested against FemX (human melanoma) and LS174 (human colon carcinoma) cell lines using MTT method. All extracts were found to be strong anticancer activity toward both cell lines with IC₅₀ values ranging from 28.45 to 97.82 μg/mL. The present study shows that tested lichen extracts demonstrated a strong antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer effects. That suggests that lichens may be used as possible natural antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer agents.

  11. Biodegradable Plastic-degrading Activity of Various Species of Paraphoma.

    PubMed

    Koitabashi, Motoo; Sameshima-Yamashita, Yuka; Koike, Hideaki; Sato, Toyozo; Moriwaki, Jouji; Morita, Tomotake; Watanabe, Takashi; Yoshida, Shigenobu; Kitamoto, Hiroko

    2016-07-01

    The fungal strain B47-9, isolated from barley, was previously selected as an effective degrader of various biodegradable plastic (BP) films such as poly(butylene succinate-co-adipate) (PBSA) and poly(butylene succinate) (PBS). The strain has not been identified based on mycological methods because it does not form fruiting bodies, which are the key to morphological identification. Here, we performed molecular phylogenetic analyses of the nuclear ribosomal RNA gene regions and their internal transcribed spacer region of B47-9 and related fungi. The results suggest that B47-9 is closely related to the genus Paraphoma. Investigation of the abilities of six strains belonging to the genus Paraphoma to degrade BPs indicated that all strains could degrade PBSA and PBS films to varying degrees. Based on our approach, we conclude that strain B47-9 is a species belonging to the genus Paraphoma.

  12. Influence of drinking water treatments on chlorine dioxide consumption and chlorite/chlorate formation.

    PubMed

    Sorlini, Sabrina; Gialdini, Francesca; Biasibetti, Michela; Collivignarelli, Carlo

    2014-05-01

    Disinfection is the last treatment stage of a Drinking Water Treatment Plant (DWTP) and is carried out to maintain a residual concentration of disinfectant in the water distribution system. Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is a widely used chemical employed for this purpose. The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of several treatments on chlorine dioxide consumption and on chlorite and chlorate formation in the final oxidation/disinfection stage. A number of tests was performed at laboratory scale employing water samples collected from the DWTP of Cremona (Italy). The following processes were studied: oxidation with potassium permanganate, chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite, coagulation/flocculation with ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate, filtration and adsorption onto activated carbon. The results showed that the chlorine dioxide demand is high if sodium hypochlorite or potassium permanganate are employed in pre-oxidation. On the other hand, chlorine dioxide leads to the highest production of chlorite and chlorate. The coagulation/flocculation process after pre-oxidation shows that chlorine dioxide demand decreases if potassium permanganate is employed as an oxidant, both with ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate. Therefore, the combination of these processes leads to a lower production of chlorite and chlorate. Aluminum sulfate is preferable in terms of the chlorine dioxide demand reduction and minimization of the chlorite and chlorate formation. Activated carbon is the most effective solution as it reduced the chlorine dioxide consumption by about 50% and the DBP formation by about 20-40%.

  13. Kinetics and Mechanism of Bacterial Disinfection by Chlorine Dioxide1

    PubMed Central

    Benarde, Melvin A.; Snow, W. Brewster; Olivieri, Vincent P.; Davidson, Burton

    1967-01-01

    Survival data are presented for a fecal strain of Escherichia coli exposed to three concentrations of chlorine dioxide at four temperatures. Chick's first-order reaction equation is generalized to a pseudo nth-order model. Nonlinear least squares curve-fitting of the survival data to the nth order model was performed on an analogue computer. The data were observed to follow fractional order kinetics with respect to survival concentration, with an apparent activation energy of 12,000 cal/mole. Initial experiments support the thesis that the mechanism of chlorine dioxide kill occurs via disruption of protein synthesis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:5339839

  14. The chlorinated AHR ligand 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126) promotes reactive oxygen species (ROS) production during embryonic development in the killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arzuaga, Xabier; Wassenberg, Deena; Giulio, Richard D.; Elskus, Adria

    2006-01-01

    Exposure to dioxin-like chemicals that activate the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) can result in increased cellular and tissue production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Little is known of these effects during early fish development. We used the fish model, Fundulus heteroclitus, to determine if the AHR ligand and pro-oxidant 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126) can increase ROS production during killifish development, and to test a novel method for measuring ROS non-invasively in a living organism. The superoxide-sensitive fluorescent dye, dihydroethidium (DHE), was used to detect in ovo ROS production microscopically in developing killifish exposed to PCB126 or vehicle. Both in ovo CYP1A activity (ethoxyresorufin-o-deethylase, EROD) and in ovo ROS were induced by PCB126. In ovo CYP1A activity was inducible by PCB126 concentrations as low as 0.003 nM, with maximal induction occurring at 0.3 nM PCB126. These PCB126 concentrations also significantly increased in ovo ROS production in embryonic liver, ROS being detectable as early as 5 days post-fertilization. These data demonstrate that the pro-oxidant and CYP1A inducer, PCB126, increases both CYP1A activity and ROS production in developing killifish embryos. The superoxide detection assay (SoDA) described in this paper provides a semi-quantitative, easily measured, early indicator of altered ROS production that can be used in conjunction with simultaneous in ovo measurements of CYP1A activity and embryo development to explore functional relationships among biochemical, physiological and developmental responses to AHR ligands.

  15. Anti-inflammatory activity of four Bolivian Baccharis species (Compositae).

    PubMed

    Abad, M J; Bessa, A L; Ballarin, B; Aragón, O; Gonzales, E; Bermejo, P

    2006-02-20

    Hexanic, dichloromethanic, ethanolic and aqueous extracts from Baccharis obtusifolia HBK, Baccharis latifolia (R. et P.) Pers., Baccharis pentlandii D.C. and Baccharis subulata Wedd., plants used in the traditional medicine of South America have been studied for their in vitro anti-inflammatory activity in cellular systems. Calcium ionophore A23187-stimulated mouse peritoneal macrophages were validated as a source of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) (prostaglandin E2, PGE2) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) (leukotriene C4, LTC4), and mouse peritoneal macrophages stimulated with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were used for testing cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) (PGE2), nitric oxide (NO) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) activity. Most of the extracts tested were active in all assays.

  16. Antifungal Activity of Eugenol against Penicillium, Aspergillus, and Fusarium Species.

    PubMed

    Campaniello, Daniela; Corbo, Maria Rosaria; Sinigaglia, Milena

    2010-06-01

    The antifungal activity of eugenol in a model system against aspergilli (Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus terreus, and Emericella nidulans), penicilli (Penicillium expansum, Penicillium glabrum, and Penicillium italicum), and fusaria (Fusarium oxysporum and Fusarium avenaceum) was investigated. Minimum detection time (time to attain a colony diameter of 1 cm) and the kinetic parameters were evaluated. The effectiveness of the active compound seemed to be strain or genus dependent; 100 mg/liter represented a critical value for P. expansum, P. glabrum, P. italicum, A. niger, and E. nidulans because a further increase of eugenol resulted in fungistatic activity. The radial growth of A. terreus and F. avenaceum was inhibited at 140 mg/liter, and growth of F. oxysporum was completely inhibited at 150 mg/liter.

  17. Chapter 21. chlorine dioxide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Submerging terminal leafy cuttings of Rhododendron L. 'Gumpo White' ('Gumpo White' azalea) in 50 °C water for 21 min was previously shown to eliminate binucleate Rhizoctonia species, the cause of azalea web blight, from plant tissues. Prior to considering commercial use of this practice, a better un...

  18. Chlorinated Biphenyl Quinones and Phenyl-2,5-benzoquinone Differentially Modify the Catalytic Activity of Human Hydroxysteroid Sulfotransferase hSULT2A1

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xiaoyan; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Teesch, Lynn M.; Robertson, Larry W.; Duffel, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    Human hydroxysteroid sulfotransferase (hSULT2A1) catalyzes the sulfation of a broad range of environmental chemicals, drugs, and other xenobiotics in addition to endogenous compounds that include hydroxysteroids and bile acids. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent environmental contaminants, and oxidized metabolites of PCBs may play significant roles in the etiology of their adverse health effects. Quinones derived from oxidative metabolism of PCBs (PCB-quinones) react with nucleophilic sites in proteins and also undergo redox cycling to generate reactive oxygen species. This, along with the sensitivity of hSULT2A1 to oxidative modification at cysteine residues led us to hypothesize that electrophilic PCB-quinones react with hSULT2A1 to alter its catalytic function. Thus, we examined the effects of four phenylbenzoquinones on the ability of hSULT2A1 to catalyze the sulfation of the endogenous substrate, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). The quinones studied were 2′-chlorophenyl-2,5-benzoquinone (2′-Cl-BQ), 4′-chlorophenyl-2,5-benzoquinone (4′-Cl-BQ), 4′-chlorophenyl-3,6-dichloro-2,5-benzoquinone (3,6,4′-triCl-BQ), and phenyl-2,5-benzoquinone (PBQ). At all concentrations examined, pretreatment of hSULT2A1 with the PCB-quinones decreased catalytic activity of hSULT2A1. Pretreatment with low concentrations of PBQ, however, increased the catalytic activity of the enzyme, while higher concentrations inhibited catalysis. A decrease in substrate inhibition with DHEA was seen following preincubation of hSULT2A1 with all of the quinones. Proteolytic digestion of the enzyme followed by LC/MS analysis indicated PCB-quinone- and PBQ-adducts at Cys55 and Cys199, as well as oxidation products at methionines in the protein. Equilibrium binding experiments and molecular modeling suggested that changes due to these modifications may affect the nucleotide binding site and the entrance to the sulfuryl acceptor binding site of hSULT2A1. PMID:24059442

  19. Do laboratory species protect endangered species? Interspecies variation in responses to 17β-estradiol, a model endocrine active compound.

    PubMed

    Jorgenson, Z G; Buhl, K; Bartell, S E; Schoenfuss, H L

    2015-01-01

    Although the effects of estrogens on model laboratory species are well documented, their utility as surrogates for other species, including those listed as endangered, are less clear. Traditionally, conservation policies are evaluated based on model organism responses but are intended to protect all species in an environment. We tested the hypothesis that the endangered Rio Grande silvery minnow (Hybognathus amarus) is more vulnerable to endocrine disruption-as assessed through its larval predator-escape performance, survival, juvenile sex ratios, and whole-body vitellogenin concentration-than the commonly used toxicological model species fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and the bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus). Fish were exposed concurrently for 21 days to the model endocrine active compound (EAC) 17ß-estradiol (E2) at 10 ng E2/L and 30 ng E2/L in a flow-through system using reconstituted water that simulated the physicochemical conditions of the Middle Rio Grande in New Mexico, USA. No significant differences were observed between the fathead and silvery minnow in larval predator-escape response or juvenile sex ratio. Rio Grande silvery minnow survival decreased significantly at day 14 compared with the other two species; by day 21, both cyprinid species (silvery minnow and fathead minnow) exhibited a significant decrease in survival compared with bluegill sunfish, a member of the family Centrarchidae. Male Rio Grande silvery minnow showed a significant increase in whole-body vitellogenin concentration in the 10 ng/L treatment, whereas fathead minnow and bluegill sunfish showed no significant increases in vitellogenin concentrations across treatments. Our study showed response differences to estrogen exposures between the two cyprinid species and further divergence in responses between the families Cyprinidae and Centrarchidae. These results suggest that commonly used laboratory model organisms may be less sensitive to EACs than the endangered Rio

  20. Do laboratory species protect endangered species? Interspecies variation in responses to 17β-estradiol, a model endocrine active compound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jorgenson, Zachary G.; Buhl, Kevin J.; Bartell, Stephen E.; Schoenfuss, Heiko L.

    2015-01-01

    Although the effects of estrogens on model laboratory species are well documented, their utility as surrogates for other species, including those listed as endangered, are less clear. Traditionally, conservation policies are evaluated based on model organism responses but are intended to protect all species in an environment. We tested the hypothesis that the endangered Rio Grande silvery minnow (Hybognathus amarus) is more vulnerable to endocrine disruption—as assessed through its larval predator-escape performance, survival, juvenile sex ratios, and whole-body vitellogenin concentration—than the commonly used toxicological model species fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and the bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus). Fish were exposed concurrently for 21 days to the model endocrine active compound (EAC) 17ß-estradiol (E2) at 10 ng E2/L and 30 ng E2/L in a flow-through system using reconstituted water that simulated the physicochemical conditions of the Middle Rio Grande in New Mexico, USA. No significant differences were observed between the fathead and silvery minnow in larval predator-escape response or juvenile sex ratio. Rio Grande silvery minnow survival decreased significantly at day 14 compared with the other two species; by day 21, both cyprinid species (silvery minnow and fathead minnow) exhibited a significant decrease in survival compared with bluegill sunfish, a member of the family Centrarchidae. Male Rio Grande silvery minnow showed a significant increase in whole-body vitellogenin concentration in the 10 ng/L treatment, whereas fathead minnow and bluegill sunfish showed no significant increases in vitellogenin concentrations across treatments. Our study showed response differences to estrogen exposures between the two cyprinid species and further divergence in responses between the families Cyprinidae and Centrarchidae. These results suggest that commonly used laboratory model organisms may be less sensitive to EACs than the endangered

  1. Chlorine Abundances in Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D.D.; Garrison, D.H.; Park, J.

    2009-01-01

    Chlorine measurements made in martian surface rocks by robotic spacecraft typically give Chlorine (Cl) abundances of approximately 0.1-0.8%. In contrast, Cl abundances in martian meteorites appear lower, although data is limited, and martian nakhlites were also subjected to Cl contamination by Mars surface brines. Chlorine abundances reported by one lab for whole rock (WR) samples of Shergotty, ALH77005, and EET79001 range 108-14 ppm, whereas Cl in nakhlites range 73-1900 ppm. Measurements of Cl in various martian weathering phases of nakhlites varied 0.04-4.7% and reveal significant concentration of Cl by martian brines Martian meteorites contain much lower Chlorine than those measured in martian surface rocks and give further confirmation that Cl in these surface rocks was introduced by brines and weathering. It has been argued that Cl is twice as effective as water in lowering the melting point and promoting melting at shallower martian depths, and that significant Cl in the shergottite source region would negate any need for significant water. However, this conclusion was based on experiments that utilized Cl concentrations more analogous to martian surface rocks than to shergottite meteorites, and may not be applicable to shergottites.

  2. Combustion of chlorinated VOC on nanostructured chromia aerogel as catalyst and catalyst support.

    PubMed

    Rotter, H; Landau, M V; Herskowitz, M

    2005-09-01

    The chromia-based catalysts have been reported to combine the high activity and resistance to deactivation in oxidative removal of chlorinated VOC. However, their activity is limited by the low amount of chromia that can be deposited on supports maintaining the optimal state of surface species and high surface area. The pure nanostructured chromia was used as a catalytically active support for noble metals and transition-metal oxide oxidation catalysts. High efficiency of Pt-promoted CrOOH aerogel with surface area of 500 m2*g(-1) was demonstrated in full combustion of 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE) and chlorobenzene (CB). At gas hour space velocity (GHSV) of 46 000 h(-1), the total conversion to CO2/H2O/HCl was achieved at 330 degrees C (DCE) and 380 degrees C (CB). The combustion rate constants measured at standard conditions with 0.5% Pt/CrOOH catalyst were 1 or 2 orders of magnitude higher than measured with 15%Cr2O3/Al2O3 or 0.5%Pt/Al2O3, respectively. The effects of Pt, Au, Mn, and Ce additives on the performance of CrOOH aerogel in combustion of chlorinated VOC were analyzed related to the materials structure.

  3. Effect of silica fume addition on the PGNAA measurement of chlorine in concrete.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, A A; Maslehuddin, M; Garwan, M A; Nagadi, M M; Al-Amoudi, O S B; Raashid, M; Khateeb-ur-Rehman

    2010-03-01

    Pozzolanic materials, such as fly ash (FA), silica fume (SF), and blast furnace slag (BFS) are added to Portland cement in concrete to prevent reinforcement steel corrosion in concrete. Further preventive measure against reinforcement steel corrosion require monitoring of chloride salts concentration in concrete using non-destructive techniques, such as the prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) technique. Due to interferences between gamma-rays from chlorine and calcium in PGNAA technique, detection limit of chlorine in concrete strongly depends upon calcium concentration in concrete. SF mainly contains silica and its addition to cement concrete reduces overall concentration of calcium in concrete. This may result in an improvement in detection limit of chlorine in SF-based concrete in PGNAA studies. Particularly for chlorine detection using 6.11 and 6.62 MeV prompt gamma-rays that strongly interfere with 6.42 MeV prompt gamma-rays from calcium. In this study, SF was added to Portland cement to prevent concrete reinforcement steel from corrosion. The chlorine concentration in SF cement concrete specimens containing 0.2-3.0 wt% chlorine was measured through yield of 1.16, 1.95, 6.11, 6.62, 7.41, 7.79, and 8.58 MeV chlorine gamma-rays using PGNAA technique. An excellent agreement was noted between the experimental yield of the prompt gamma-rays and the gamma-ray yield calculated through the Monte Carlo simulations. Further the minimum detectable concentration (MDC) of chlorine in SF cement concrete was calculated and compared with the MDC values of chlorine in plain concrete and concrete mixed with fly ash cement. The MDC of chlorine in SF-based concrete through 6.11 MeV, and 6.62 MeV chlorine gamma-rays was found to be improved as compared to those in plain concrete and concrete mixed with fly ash cement.

  4. Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Insecticides: Recent Animal Data of Potential Significance for Man

    PubMed Central

    Ecobichon, D. J.

    1970-01-01

    The environmental persistence of chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides is posing a serious threat to the survival of several wildlife species. Sublethal effects, completely unrelated to the insecticidal properties of these chemicals, have contributed markedly to impaired reproduction in many species and to toxicity in neonatal animals. Considering the insecticide levels found in man, are these chemicals potentially dangerous to human infants and adults? Of special concern are the potential long-term, subtle effects of low concentrations of insecticides to which many persons are ordinarily exposed. These agents affect both the peripheral and central nervous systems. They markedly elevate hepatic enzyme levels, enhancing the biotransformation of many pharmacological agents as well as interfering with endogenous steroid biosynthesis and degradation. The DDT-like insecticides are potent estrogenic agents and some have shown teratogenic and carcinogenic activity. These aspects are discussed in relation to present levels found in humans and to possible adverse effects on perinatal and adult individuals. PMID:4096932

  5. Enzyme activities in plasma, kidney, liver, and muscle of five avian species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J.C.; Murray, H.C.; Bunck, C.

    1985-01-01

    Activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), creatine phosphokinase (CPK), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were determined in plasma, kidney, liver, and muscle from five species of captive birds. Few differences occurred in plasma activities between sexes but considerable differences occurred between species. All five enzymes were detected in each of the tissues sampled. Relative enzyme activities in liver, kidney, and muscle were similar for each species. CPK activity was much higher in muscle than in liver or kidney and, of the five enzymes studied, may be the best indicator of muscle damage. Most of the other enzymes were more evenly distributed among the three tissues, and no organ-specific enzyme could be identified for liver or kidney. Because of interspecific variations in plasma enzyme activities, it is important to establish baseline values for each species to ensure accurate interpretation of results.

  6. Characterization of Serum Phospholipase A2 Activity in Three Diverse Species of West African Crocodiles

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Mark; Juneau, Kate; Gemillion, Jared; Falconi, Rodolfo; Doucet, Aaron; Shirley, Matthew H.

    2011-01-01

    Secretory phospholipase A2, an enzyme that exhibits substantial immunological activity, was measured in the serum of three species of diverse West African crocodiles. Incubation of different volumes of crocodile serum with bacteria labeled with a fluorescent fatty acid in the sn-2 position of membrane lipids resulted in a volume-dependent liberation of fluorescent probe. Serum from the Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) exhibited slightly higher activity than that of the slender-snouted crocodile (Mecistops cataphractus) and the African dwarf crocodile (Osteolaemus tetraspis). Product formation was inhibited by BPB, a specific PLA2 inhibitor, confirming that the activity was a direct result of the presence of serum PLA2. Kinetic analysis showed that C. niloticus serum produced product more rapidly than M. cataphractus or O. tetraspis. Serum from all three species exhibited temperature-dependent PLA2 activities but with slightly different thermal profiles. All three crocodilian species showed high levels of activity against eight different species of bacteria. PMID:22110960

  7. Scenarios Evaluation Tool for Chlorinated Solvent MNA

    SciTech Connect

    Vangelas, Karen; Michael J. Truex; Charles J. Newell; Brian Looney

    2007-02-28

    Over the past three decades, much progress has been made in the remediation of chlorinated solvents from the subsurface. Yet these pervasive contaminants continue to present a significant challenge to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), other federal agencies, and other public and private organizations. The physical and chemical properties of chlorinated solvents make it difficult to rapidly reach the low concentrations typically set as regulatory limits. These technical challenges often result in high costs and long remediation time frames. In 2003, the DOE through the Office of Environmental Management funded a science-based technical project that uses the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's technical protocol (EPA, 1998) and directives (EPA, 1999) on Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) as the foundation on which to introduce supporting concepts and new scientific developments that will support remediation of chlorinated solvents based on natural attenuation processes. This project supports the direction in which many site owners want to move to complete the remediation of their site(s), that being to complete the active treatment portion of the remedial effort and transition into MNA. The overarching objective of the effort was to examine environmental remedies that are based on natural processes--remedies such as Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) or Enhanced Attenuation (EA). The research program did identify several specific opportunities for advances based on: (1) mass balance as the central framework for attenuation based remedies, (2) scientific advancements and achievements during the past ten years, (3) regulatory and policy development and real-world experience using MNA, and (4) exploration of various ideas for integrating attenuation remedies into a systematic set of ''combined remedies'' for contaminated sites. These opportunities are summarized herein and are addressed in more detail in referenced project documents and journal articles, as well

  8. Growth enhancement and gene expression of Arabidopsis thaliana irradiated with active oxygen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Ono, Reoto; Hayashi, Nobuya; Shiratani, Masaharu; Tashiro, Kosuke; Kuhara, Satoru; Inoue, Asami; Yasuda, Kaori; Hagiwara, Hiroko

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of plant growth enhancement effect and the mechanism of the enhancement induced by plasma irradiation are investigated using various active species in plasma. Active oxygen species in oxygen plasma are effective for growth enhancement of plants. DNA microarray analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana indicates that the genes coding proteins that counter oxidative stresses by eliminating active oxygen species are expressed at significantly high levels. The size of plant cells increases owing to oxygen plasma irradiation. The increases in gene expression levels and cell size suggest that the increase in the expression level of the expansin protein is essential for plant growth enhancement phenomena.

  9. Kinetics and pathways of ibuprofen degradation by the UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yingying; Fang, Jingyun; Shang, Chii

    2016-03-01

    The UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process (AOP), which forms reactive species such as hydroxyl radicals (HO) and reactive chlorine species (RCS) such as chlorine atoms (Cl) and Cl2(-), is being considered as an alternative to the UV/H2O2 AOP for the degradation of emerging contaminants. This study investigated the kinetics and pathways of the degradation of a recalcitrant pharmaceutical and personal care product (PPCP)-ibuprofen (IBP)-by the UV/chlorine AOP. The degradation of IBP followed the pseudo first-order kinetics. The first-order rate constant was 3.3 times higher in the UV/chlorine AOP than in the UV/H2O2 AOP for a given chemical molar dosage at pH 6. The first-order rate constant decreased from 3.1 × 10(-3) s(-1) to 5.5 × 10(-4) s(-1) with increasing pH from 6 to 9. Both HO and RCS contributed to the degradation, and the contribution of RCS increased from 22% to 30% with increasing pH from 6 to 9. The degradation was initiated by HO-induced hydroxylation and Cl-induced chlorine substitution, and sustained through decarboxylation, demethylation, chlorination and ring cleavage to form more stable products. Significant amounts of chlorinated intermediates/byproducts were formed from the UV/chlorine AOP, and four chlorinated products were newly identified. The yield of total organic chlorine (TOCl) was 31.6 μM after 90% degradation of 50 μM IBP under the experimental conditions. The known disinfection by-products (DBPs) comprised 17.4% of the TOCl. The effects of water matrix in filtered drinking water on the degradation were not significant, demonstrating the practicality of the UV/chlorine AOP for the control of some refractory PPCPs. However, the toxicity of the chlorinated products should be further assessed.

  10. Modeling and kinetic characterization of wastewater disinfection using chlorine and UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Mounaouer, Brahmi; Abdennaceur, Hassen

    2016-10-01

    Sewage disinfection has the primary objective of inactivating pathogenic organisms to prevent the dissemination of waterborne diseases. This study analyzed individual disinfection, with chlorine alone, ultraviolet radiation alone, and a combined disinfection process (chlorine-UV radiation). Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 15442, Escherichia coli ATCC 11229, Salmonella typhi ATCC 14028, and Clostridium perfringens were selected to evaluate the efficiency of different disinfection processes. The aim of the present study was to characterize the kinetics of chlorine (as NaHOCl) consumption, to evaluate responses of these bacterial species to the chlorination, the ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and the chlorine/UV disinfection processes in secondary wastewater using a batch laboratory reactor. Another target of this work was to study the modeling of the kinetic of water disinfection by chlorination and/or UV irradiation. Two kinetic models (Chick-Watson and Hom) were tested as to ability to scale disinfection of these bacterial species by different ultraviolet and/or chlorine doses. The results of the kinetics of chlorine consumption showed that monochloramines and trichloramines were the most important forms of residual chlorine as compared to free chlorine and dichloramines. The kinetics of inactivation of all examined bacterial strains showed that the application of the model of Hom in its original form was not representative of this kinetics of inactivation. Modification of this model, considering an initial decline of bacteria during the contact of water with chlorine, improved the results of the model. By the same, results revealed that the involved processes of UV irradiation were too complex to be approached by a simplified formulation, even in the case of specific strains of microorganisms and the use of nearly constant UV radiation intensity. In fact, the results have pointed out that the application of the Chick-Watson law is known to be inadequate to describe

  11. Hydrazide derivatives produce active oxygen species as hydrazine.

    PubMed

    Timperio, Anna Maria; Rinalducci, Sara; Zolla, Lello

    2005-12-01

    It is well documented that some hydrazines are quite sensitive to oxidation and may serve as the electron donor for the reduction of oxygen, whereas hydrazides are not believed to react directly with oxygen. Data presented in this paper show that both hydrazides and hydrazines share an N-N moiety, which is assumed to react with atmospheric oxygen and produce oxygen radicals, at various degrees of efficiency. Since spectrometric measurements of hydrazide just after solubilization showed that the molecular mass remains constant in the absence of oxygen, we can conclude that hydrazides do not react with the oxygen through a slow spontaneous hydrolytic release of hydrazine. However, hydrazine is more reactive than hydrazide, which requires hours rather than minutes to produce measurable quantities of radical species. Differences were also apparent for various substituted derivatives. The reaction was significantly enhanced by the presence of metal ions. Data reported here demonstrate that hydrazides cause irreversible damage to the prosthetic group of proteins as well as causing degradation of the polypeptide chain into small fragments.

  12. Estimates of total organic and inorganic chlorine in the lower stratosphere from in situ and flask measurements during AASE 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodbridge, E. L.; Elkins, J. W.; Fahey, D. W.; Heidt, L. E.; Solomon, S.; Baring, T. J.; Gilpin, T. M.; Pollack, W. H.; Schauffler, S. M.; Atlas, E. L.

    1995-01-01

    Aircraft sampling has provided extensive in situ and flask measurements of organic chlorine species in the lower stratosphere. The recent Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition 2 (AASE 2) included two independent measurements of organic chlorine species using whole air sample and real-time techniques. From the whole air sample measurements we derive directly the burden of total organic chlorine (CCl(y)) in the lower stratosphere. From the more limited real-time measurements we estimate the CCl(y) burden using mixing ratios and growth rates of the principal CCl(y) species in the troposphere in conjunction with results from a two-dimensional photochemical model. Since stratospheric chlorine is tropospheric in origin and tropospheric mixing ratios are increasing, it is necessary to establish the average age of a stratospheric air parcel to assess its total chlorine (Cl(sub Total)) abundance. Total inorganic chlorine (Cl(y)) in the parcel is then estimated by the simple difference, Cl(y) = Cl(sub Total) - CCl(y). The consistency of the results from these two quite different techniques suggests that we can determine the CCl(y) and Cl(y) in the lower stratosphere with confidence. Such estimates of organic and inorganic chlorine are crucial in evaluating the photochemistry controlling chlorine partitioning and hence ozone loss processes in the lower stratosphere.

  13. Estimates of total organic and inorganic chlorine in the lower stratosphere from in situ and flask measurements during AASE 2

    SciTech Connect

    Woodbridge, E.L.; Elkins, J.W.; Fahey, D.W.; Heidt, L.E.; Solomon, S.; Baring, T.J.; Gilpin, T.M.; Pollack, W.H.; Schauffler, S.M.; Atlas, E.L. ||

    1995-02-01

    Aircraft sampling has provided extensive in situ and flask measurements of organic chlorine species in the lower stratosphere. The recent Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition 2 (AASE 2) included two independent measurements of organic chlorine species using whole air sample and real-time techniques. From the whole air sample measurements we derive directly the burden of total organic chlorine (CCl(y)) in the lower stratosphere. From the more limited real-time measurements we estimate the CCl(y) burden using mixing ratios and growth rates of the principal CCl(y) species in the troposphere in conjunction with results from a two-dimensional photochemical model. Since stratospheric chlorine is tropospheric in origin and tropospheric mixing ratios are increasing, it is necessary to establish the average age of a stratospheric air parcel to assess its total chlorine (Cl(sub Total)) abundance. Total inorganic chlorine (Cl(y)) in the parcel is then estimated by the simple difference, Cl(y) = Cl(sub Total) - CCl(y). The consistency of the results from these two quite different techniques suggests that we can determine the CCl(y) and Cl(y) in the lower stratosphere with confidence. Such estimates of organic and inorganic chlorine are crucial in evaluating the photochemistry controlling chlorine partitioning and hence ozone loss processes in the lower stratosphere.

  14. No Effect of Host Species on Phenoloxidase Activity in a Mycophagous Beetle

    PubMed Central

    Formica, Vincent; Chan, Amanda Kar-Men

    2015-01-01

    Ecological immunology is an interdisciplinary field that helps elucidate interactions between the environment and immune response. The host species individuals experience have profound effects on immune response in many species of insects. However, this conclusion comes from studies of herbivorous insects even though species of mycophagous insects also inhabit many different host species. The goal of this study was to determine if fungal host species as well as individual, sex, body size, and host patch predict one aspect of immune function, phenoloxidase activity (PO). We sampled a metapopulation of Bolitotherus cornutus, a mycophagous beetle in southwestern Virginia. B. cornutus live on three species of fungus that differ in nutritional quality, social environment, and density. A filter paper phenoloxidase assay was used to quantify phenoloxidase activity. Overall, PO activity was significantly repeatable among individuals (0.57) in adult B. cornutus. While there was significant variance among individuals in PO activity, there were surprisingly no significant differences in PO activity among subpopulations, beetles living on different host species, or between the sexes; there was also no effect of body size. Our results suggest that other factors such as age, genotype, disease prevalence, or natal environment may be generating variance among individuals in PO activity. PMID:26513243

  15. Environmental factors regulating soil organic matter chlorination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, Teresia; Montelius, Malin; Reyier, Henrik; Rietz, Karolina; Karlsson, Susanne; Lindberg, Cecilia; Andersson, Malin; Danielsson, Åsa; Bastviken, David

    2016-04-01

    Natural chlorination of organic matter is common in soils. Despite the widespread abundance of soil chlorinated soil organic matter (SOM), frequently exceeding soil chloride abundance in surface soils, and a common ability of microorganisms to produce chlorinated SOM, we lack fundamental knowledge about dominating processes and organisms responsible for the chlorination. To take one step towards resolving the terrestrial chlorine (Cl) puzzle, this study aims to analyse how environmental factors influence chlorination of SOM. Four factors were chosen for this study: soil moisture (W), nitrogen (N), chloride (Cl) and organic matter quality (C). These factors are all known to be important for soil processes. Laboratory incubations with 36Cl as a Cl tracer were performed in a two soil incubation experiments. It was found that addition of chloride and nitrogen seem to hamper the chlorination. For the C treatment, on the other hand, the results show that chlorination is enhanced by increased availability of labile organic matter (glucose and maltose). Even higher chlorination was observed when nitrogen and water were added in combination with labile organic matter. The effect that more labile organic matter strongly stimulated the chlorination rates was confirmed by the second separate experiment. These results indicate that chlorination was not primarily a way to cut refractory organic matter into digestible molecules, representing one previous hypothesis, but is related with microbial metabolism in other ways that will be further discussed in our presentation.

  16. Malassezia globosa tends to grow actively in summer conditions more than other cutaneous Malassezia species.

    PubMed

    Akaza, Narifumi; Akamatsu, Hirohiko; Takeoka, Shiori; Sasaki, Yasuyuki; Mizutani, Hiroshi; Nakata, Satoru; Matsunaga, Kayoko

    2012-07-01

    Malassezia globosa is a major pathogen of Malassezia folliculitis (MF) and the predominant species on human skin. The aim of this study was to clarify the differences between M. globosa and other cutaneous Malassezia species, M. restricta, M. dermatis, M. sympodialis and M. furfur. The optimum growth temperature, effects of compounds of sweat and free fatty acids on growth, and lipase activities of five cutaneous Malassezia species were determined. The growth of M. globosa was promoted strongly by the compounds of sweat and high temperature unlike that of other cutaneous Malassezia species. This result clarified that M. globosa tended to grow actively in summer conditions more than other cutaneous Malassezia species. Furthermore, M. globosa showed high lipase activity. We consider these characteristics of M. globosa to relate to the pathogenesis of MF.

  17. Identification of endangered or threatened Costa Rican tree species by wood anatomy and fluorescence activity.

    PubMed

    Moya, Róger; Wiemann, Michael C; Olivares, Carlos

    2013-09-01

    A total of 45 native Costa Rican tree species are threatened or in danger of extinction, but the Convention on International Trade Endangered Species (CITES) includes only eight of these in its Appendices. However, the identification of other species based on their wood anatomy is limited. The present study objective was to describe and to compare wood anatomy and fluorescence activity in some endangered or threatened species of Costa Rica. A total of 45 (22 endangered and 23 threatened with extinction) wood samples of these species, from the xylaria of the Instituto Tecnológico de Costa Rica and the Forest Products Laboratory in Madison, Wisconsin, were examined. Surface fluorescence was positive in eight species, water extract fluorescence was positive in six species and ethanol extract fluorescence was positive in 24 species. Almost all species were diffuse porous except for occasional (Cedrela odorata, C. fissilis, Cordia gerascanthus) or regular (C. salvadorensis and C. tonduzii) semi-ring porosity. A dendritic vessel arrangement was found in Sideroxylon capari, and pores were solitary in Guaiacum sanctum and Vantanea barbourii. Vessel element length was shortest in Guaiacum sanctum and longest in Humiriastrum guianensis, Minquartia guianensis and Vantanea barbourii. Finally, anatomical information and fluorescence activity were utilized to construct an identification key of species, in which fluorescence is a feature used in identification.

  18. Ultrafast measurements of chlorine dioxide photochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Ludowise, P.D.

    1997-08-01

    Time-resolved mass spectrometry and time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy are used to study the ultrafast photodissociation dynamics of chlorine dioxide, an important constituent in stratospheric ozone depletion. Chapter 1 introduces these pump/probe techniques, in which a femtosecond pump pulse excites a molecule to a dissociative state. At a later time, a second femtosecond probe pulse ionizes the molecule. The resulting mass and photoelectron spectra are acquired as a function of the delay between the pump and probe pulses, which follows the evolution of the molecule on the excited state. A comparison to other techniques used to study reaction dynamics is discussed. Chapter 2 includes a detailed description of the design and construction of the experimental apparatus, which consists of a femtosecond laser system, a molecular beam time-of-flight spectrometer, and a data acquisition system. The time-of-flight spectrometer is specifically designed to have a short flight distance to maximize the photoelectron collection efficiency without degrading the resolution, which is limited by the bandwidth of the femtosecond laser system. Typical performance of the apparatus is demonstrated in a study of the time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of nitric oxide. The results of the time-resolved mass spectrometry experiments of chlorine dioxide are presented in Chapter 3. Upon excitation to the A {sup 2}A{sub 2} state near 3.2 eV, the molecule dissociates through an indirect two-step mechanism. The direct dissociation channel has been predicted to be open, but is not observed. A quantum beat is observed in the OClO{sup +} species, which is described as a vibrational coherence of the optically prepared A {sup 2}A{sub 2} state. Chapter 4 presents the results of the time-resolved photoelectron experiments of chlorine dioxide. At short delay time, the quantum beat of the OClO{sup +} species is observed in the X {sup 1}A{sub 1} state of the ion. At infinite delay, the signal

  19. Diuretic and natriuretic activity of two mistletoe species in rats

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, Namita; Patil, C. R.; Chaudhari, K. B.; Wagh, J. P.; Surana, S. J.; Jadhav, R. B.

    2010-01-01

    In different cultural groups, the hemiparasitic plants of the families Loranthaceae and Viscaceae (mistletoes) are frequently used in the treatment of hypertension and/or as diuretic agents. However, it remains unclear as to what commonality makes them diuretic agents or a remedy for hypertension. In this article, the diuretic activity of methanol extracts of Viscum articulatum (VA) Burm. f. and Helicanthus elastica (HE) (Ders.) Dans. in rats is reported. The extracts were administered orally at doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg to rats that had been fasted and deprived of water for 18 hours. Investigations were carried out for diuretic, saluretic and natriuretic effects. The polyphenolic and triterpenoid contents were determined quantitatively using chemical assays and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis, respectively. The extracts of VA and HE demonstrated significant and dose-dependent diuretic activity in rats. It was found that while VA mimics the furosemide pattern, HE demonstrated a dose-dependent increase in diuresis, along with an increase in potassium-sparing effects. Phytochemical analysis revealed that polyphenolics and triterpenoids, such as oleanolic acid and lupeol, are the major phytochemicals involved. It was also found that in different combinations, these phytochemicals differed in the way they influenced the electrolyte excretion. A higher content of polyphenolics in association with lower triterpenoid content was found to favor potassium-sparing effects. PMID:21808540

  20. A model to predict threshold concentrations for toxic effects of chlorinated benzenes in sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchsman, P.C.; Duda, D.J.; Barber, T.R.

    1999-09-01

    A probabilistic model was developed to predict effects threshold concentrations for chlorinated benzenes in sediment. Based on published quantitative structure-activity relationships relating the toxicity of chlorinated benzenes to the degree of chlorination, congeners with the same number of chlorine substitutions were considered toxicologically equivalent. Hexachlorobenzene was excluded from the assessment based on a lack of aquatic toxicity at the water solubility limit. The equilibrium partitioning approach was applied in a probabilistic analysis to derive predicted effects thresholds (PETs) for each chlorinated benzene group, with model input distributions defined by published log K{sub ow} values and aquatic toxicity data extracted from the published literature. The probabilistic distributions of PETs generally increased with chlorination, with 20th percentile values ranging from 3.2 mg/kg{sub 1{degree}OC} for chlorobenzene to 67 mg/kg{sub 1%OC} for tetrachlorobenzene congeners. The toxicity of total chlorinated benzenes in sediment can be assessed by applying the PETs in a toxic index model, based on the assumption that multiple chlorinated benzene congeners will show approximately additive toxicity, as characteristic of nonpolar narcotic toxicants. The 20th percentile PET values are one to two orders of magnitude higher than published screening-level guidelines, suggesting that the screening-level guidelines will provide overly conservative assessments in most cases. Relevant spiked sediment toxicity data are very limited but seem consistent with the probabilistic model; additional testing could be conducted to confirm the model's predictions.

  1. Chlorine/UV Process for Decomposition and Detoxification of Microcystin-LR.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinran; Li, Jing; Yang, Jer-Yen; Wood, Karl V; Rothwell, Arlene P; Li, Weiguang; Blatchley Iii, Ernest R

    2016-07-19

    Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) is a potent hepatotoxin that is often associated with blooms of cyanobacteria. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficiency of the chlorine/UV process for MC-LR decomposition and detoxification. Chlorinated MC-LR was observed to be more photoactive than MC-LR. LC/MS analyses confirmed that the arginine moiety represented an important reaction site within the MC-LR molecule for conditions of chlorination below the chlorine demand of the molecule. Prechlorination activated MC-LR toward UV254 exposure by increasing the product of the molar absorption coefficient and the quantum yield of chloro-MC-LR, relative to the unchlorinated molecule. This mechanism of decay is fundamentally different than the conventional view of chlorine/UV as an advanced oxidation process. A toxicity assay based on human liver cells indicated MC-LR degradation byproducts in the chlorine/UV process possessed less cytotoxicity than those that resulted from chlorination or UV254 irradiation applied separately. MC-LR decomposition and detoxification in this combined process were more effective at pH 8.5 than at pH 7.5 or 6.5. These results suggest that the chlorine/UV process could represent an effective strategy for control of microcystins and their associated toxicity in drinking water supplies.

  2. Daily activity and light exposure levels for five species of lemurs at the Duke Lemur Center.

    PubMed

    Rea, Mark S; Figueiro, Mariana G; Jones, Geoffrey E; Glander, Kenneth E

    2014-01-01

    Light is the primary synchronizer of all biological rhythms, yet little is known about the role of the 24-hour luminous environment on nonhuman primate circadian patterns, making it difficult to understand the photic niche of the ancestral primate. Here we present the first data on proximate light-dark exposure and activity-rest patterns in free-ranging nonhuman primates. Four individuals each of five species of lemurs at the Duke Lemur Center (Eulemur mongoz, Lemur catta, Propithecus coquereli, Varecia rubra, and Varecia variegata variegata) were fitted with a Daysimeter-D pendant that contained light and accelerometer sensors. Our results reveal common as well as species-specific light exposure and behavior patterns. As expected, all five species were more active between sunrise and sunset. All five species demonstrated an anticipatory increase in their pre-sunrise activity that peaked at sunrise with all but V. rubra showing a reduction within an hour. All five species reduced activity during mid-day. Four of the five stayed active after sunset, but P. coquereli began reducing their activity about 2 hours before sunset. Other subtle differences in the recorded light exposure and activity patterns suggest species-specific photic niches and behaviors. The eventual application of the Daysimeter-D in the wild may help to better understand the adaptive evolution of ancestral primates.

  3. Disinfection byproduct relationships and speciation in chlorinated nanofiltered waters.

    PubMed

    Chellam, S; Krasner, S W

    2001-10-01

    The formation and speciation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) resulting from chlorination of nanofilter permeates obtained from various source water locations and membrane types are examined. Specific ultraviolet absorbance and bromide utilization are shown to decrease following nanofiltration. Both dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration and ultraviolet absorbance at 254 nm were found to correlate strongly with trihalomethane (THM), haloacetic acid (HAA), and total organic halide (TOX) concentrations in chlorinated nanofilter permeates, suggesting that they can be employed as surrogates for DBPs in nanofiltered waters. Because smooth curves were obtained for individual THM and HAA species as well as bromine and chlorine incorporation into THMs and HAAs as a function of Br-/DOC molar ratio, it is likely that mole fractions of these DBPs are more strongly influenced by chlorination conditions, Br-, and DOC concentrations than NOM source and membrane type. Mole fractions of mono-, di-, and trihalogenated HAAs were found to be independent of Br-/DOC. Even at a very low Br-/DOC of 2.9microM/mM, the mixed bromochloro- and tribromoacetic acids constituted 20% of total HAAs on a molar basis. This increased to approximately 50% as Br-/DOC increased to approximately 25microM/mM or more, proving that a large fraction of HAAs may not be covered under existing federal regulations. Total THM and HAA9 concentrations decreased in permeate waters with increasing Br-/DOC suggesting that nanofilter permeates are limited with respect to DBP precursors.

  4. The Chlorine Isotopic Composition Of Lunar UrKREEP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, J. J.; Tartese, R.; Anand, M.; McCubbin, F. M.; Neal, C. R.; Franchi, I. A.

    2016-01-01

    Since the long standing paradigm of an anhydrous Moon was challenged there has been a renewed focus on investigating volatiles in a variety of lunar samples. However, the current models for the Moon’s formation have yet to fully account for its thermal evolution in the presence of H2O and other volatiles. When compared to chondritic meteorites and terrestrial rocks, lunar samples have exotic chlorine isotope compositions, which are difficult to explain in light of the abundance and isotopic composition of other volatile species, especially H, and the current estimates for chlorine and H2O in the bulk silicate Moon. In order to better understand the processes involved in giving rise to the heavy chlorine isotope compositions of lunar samples, we have performed a comprehensive in situ high precision study of chlorine isotopes, using NanoSIMS (Nanoscale Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry) of lunar apatite from a suite of Apollo samples covering a range of geochemical characteristics and petrologic types.

  5. Population and hierarchy of active species in gold iron oxide catalysts for carbon monoxide oxidation

    PubMed Central

    He, Qian; Freakley, Simon J.; Edwards, Jennifer K.; Carley, Albert F.; Borisevich, Albina Y.; Mineo, Yuki; Haruta, Masatake; Hutchings, Graham J.; Kiely, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    The identity of active species in supported gold catalysts for low temperature carbon monoxide oxidation remains an unsettled debate. With large amounts of experimental evidence supporting theories of either gold nanoparticles or sub-nm gold species being active, it was recently proposed that a size-dependent activity hierarchy should exist. Here we study the diverging catalytic behaviours after heat treatment of Au/FeOx materials prepared via co-precipitation and deposition precipitation methods. After ruling out any support effects, the gold particle size distributions in different catalysts are quantitatively studied using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). A counting protocol is developed to reveal the true particle size distribution from HAADF-STEM images, which reliably includes all the gold species present. Correlation of the populations of the various gold species present with catalysis results demonstrate that a size-dependent activity hierarchy must exist in the Au/FeOx catalyst. PMID:27671143

  6. Biological assessment for rare and endangered plant species: Related to CERCLA characterization activities

    SciTech Connect

    Sackschewsky, M.R.

    1992-04-01

    Environmental characterization in support of hazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste cleanup (in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980) can involve a large number of both nonintrusive and intrusive activities. Many of these activities could have a detrimental impact on listed plant species. These impacts can be minimized by following simple conservation policies while conducting the various field activities. For instance, frequent off-road vehicular traffic and have a severe impact on native habitats and, therefore, should be kept to a minimum. Personnel performing the field activities should be trained to preserve, respect, and minimize their impact on native habitat while performing work in the field. In addition, areas where sampling is planned should be surveyed for the presence of listed plant species before the initiation of the field activities. Extremely distributed areas could be exempted from this requirement provided adequate habitat assessments have been performed by qualified personnel. Twelve special status plant species are known to survive on or very near the Hanford Site. None of these species currently are listed as Federal Threatened or Endangered Species. However, four local species currently are candidates for federal protection. These species are the Northern Wormwood (Artemisia campestris ssp. borealis var. wormskioldii), Persistantsepal Yellowcress (Rorippa columbiae), Hoover`s Desert Parsley (Lomatium tuberosum), and Columbia Milkvetch (Astragalus columbianus).

  7. Biological assessment for rare and endangered plant species: Related to CERCLA characterization activities

    SciTech Connect

    Sackschewsky, M.R.

    1992-04-01

    Environmental characterization in support of hazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste cleanup (in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980) can involve a large number of both nonintrusive and intrusive activities. Many of these activities could have a detrimental impact on listed plant species. These impacts can be minimized by following simple conservation policies while conducting the various field activities. For instance, frequent off-road vehicular traffic and have a severe impact on native habitats and, therefore, should be kept to a minimum. Personnel performing the field activities should be trained to preserve, respect, and minimize their impact on native habitat while performing work in the field. In addition, areas where sampling is planned should be surveyed for the presence of listed plant species before the initiation of the field activities. Extremely distributed areas could be exempted from this requirement provided adequate habitat assessments have been performed by qualified personnel. Twelve special status plant species are known to survive on or very near the Hanford Site. None of these species currently are listed as Federal Threatened or Endangered Species. However, four local species currently are candidates for federal protection. These species are the Northern Wormwood (Artemisia campestris ssp. borealis var. wormskioldii), Persistantsepal Yellowcress (Rorippa columbiae), Hoover's Desert Parsley (Lomatium tuberosum), and Columbia Milkvetch (Astragalus columbianus).

  8. Species-Specific Differences and Structure-Activity Relationships in the Debromination of PBDE Congeners in Three Fish Species

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Simon C.; Noyes, Pamela D.; Gallagher, Evan P.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that there may be species-specific differences in the metabolism of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) among different fish species. In this study, we investigated the in vitro hepatic metabolism of eleven individual PBDE congeners (tri- through decaBDEs) in three different fish species: rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), common carp (Cyprinus carpio), and Chinook salmon (O. tschwatcha). In addition, we evaluated the influence of PBDE structural characteristics (i.e., bromine substitution patterns) on metabolism. Six of the eleven congeners we evaluated, BDEs 99, 153, 183, 203, 208, and 209, were metabolically debrominated to lower brominated congeners. All of the congeners that were metabolized contained at least one meta-substituted bromine. Metabolites were not detected for congeners without one meta-substituted bromine (e.g., BDEs 28, 47, and 100). Metabolite formation rates were generally 10–100 times faster in carp than in trout and salmon. BDEs 47, 49, 101, 154, and 183 were the major metabolites observed in all three species with the exception of BDE 47, which was only detected in carp. Carp demonstrated a preference towards meta-debromination, while trout and salmon debrominated meta- and para- bromine atoms to an equal extent. We compared glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and deiodinase (DI) activity among all three species as these enzyme systems have been hypothesized to play a role in PBDE debromination among teleosts. Carp exhibited a preference for meta-deiodination of the thyroid hormone thyroxine, which was consistent with the preference for meta-debromination of PBDEs observed in carp. PMID:21291240

  9. Considerations concerning the murine hepatocarcinogenicity of selected chlorinated hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Maronpot, R R; Anna, C H; Devereux, T R; Lucier, G W; Butterworth, B E; Anderson, M W

    1995-01-01

    Of the chlorinated hydrocarbons discussed above, all six are associated with induction of hepatocellular neoplasia in mice. None of the six is considered to be potent mutagen and most are without any significant genotoxic activity as assessed by conventional in vitro testing schemes. Although some of the agents have biological effects in common (see Figure 4), there is no single biological response (mode of action) that they all share to provide a mechanistic basis for the observed murine hepatocarcinogenicity. Based upon the information currently available for each of the chlorinated hydrocarbons discussed above, it is probable that some modes of action may be more contributory to the rodent carcinogenic response than others; however, no mode of action, pathway, or mechanism should be considered to be mutually exclusive. The murine hepatocarcinogenic effect of TriCE is most probably contingent upon its species-specific metabolism to trichloroacetic acid and DCA. There is fairly consistent evidence that cytotoxicity and reparative hyperplasia are associated with doses of TriCE that cause induction of liver neoplasms. The possibility that peroxisome proliferation is playing a role in the induction of mouse hepatocellular neoplasia remains a tempting explanation, since higher intracellular steady states of H2O2 production would be consistent with observed enhanced cellular proliferation as well as the possibility of in vivo DNA damage. The mouse hepatocarcinogenicity associated with TetCE most probably is associated with species-specific metabolic production of trichloroacetic acid. As with TriCE, cytotoxicity and reparative hyperplasia may represent a potential mode of action for the observed hepatocarcinogenicity. Once again, the potential for enhanced peroxisome proliferation is consistent with enhanced cell proliferation and oxygen radical damage would help explain the random point mutations in ras proto-oncogenes documented in DNA from TetCE-induced mouse liver

  10. In vitro antiplasmodial and phytochemical study of five Artemisia species from Iran and in vivo activity of two species.

    PubMed

    Ramazani, Ali; Sardari, Soroush; Zakeri, Sedigheh; Vaziri, Behrouz

    2010-08-01

    The extract from Artemisia annua, containing artemisinin, has been proven active against multidrug resistant Plasmodium falciparum in previous studies. The purpose of this paper was to study five Artemisia species from Iran for their in vitro and in vivo antimalarial property and detection of artemisinin in the active species by chromatographic and spectroscopic methods including nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Dried plants were extracted by 80% ethanol, and total extracts were investigated for antiplasmodial property and artemisinin content by TLC, HPLC, and (1)H-NMR techniques. Two plants (A. annua L. and Artemisia absinthium L.) showed good antiplasmodial activity against multidrug resistant and sensitive strain of P. falciparum. A. absinthium and A. annua at concentrations of 200 mg/kg for 4 days reduced parasitemia in BALB/C mice infected with Plasmodium bergei by 94.28% and 83.28%, respectively, but we could not detect artemisinin in all plants studied in this research. The antiplasmodial property of these two herbs is possibly related to essential oils that present in high amounts in their extracts.

  11. Two new iridoids from selected Penstemon species--antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Zajdel, Sybilla M; Graikou, Konstantia; Sotiroudis, Georgios; Głowniak, Kazimierz; Chinou, Ioanna

    2013-01-01

    Eighteen secondary metabolites, belonging to three different chemical groups, were isolated from the methanolic extracts of the aerial parts of selected penstemon plants [Penstemon fruticosus (Pursh) Greene var. fruticosus, Penstemon palmeri Gray and Penstemon venustus Doug. ex Lindl.], and their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectral evidence. Six iridoid glucosides (1-6), three phenylpropanoid glucosides (13-15) and two acetophenone derivatives (16,17), obtained from P. fruticosus, five iridoids (2, 7-10), one phenylpropanoid glucoside (15) and two acetophenones (16, 18), isolated from P. palmeri while three iridoids (2, 11, 12) and three phenylpropanoids (13-15) were identified in P. venustus. Two of the iridoid glucosides (4, 5) from P. fruticosus are new natural products named accordingly as cis- and trans- forms of 10-O-p-methoxycinnamoylaucubin. All isolated compounds, as well as crude methanolic extracts, were evaluated for their antimicrobial activities against six Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and three human pathogenic fungi.

  12. Inactivation, reactivation and regrowth of indigenous bacteria in reclaimed water after chlorine disinfection of a municipal wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Zeng, Siyu; Gu, April Z; He, Miao; Shi, Hanchang

    2013-07-01

    Disinfection of reclaimed water prior to reuse is important to prevent the transmission of pathogens. Chlorine is a widely utilized disinfectant and as such is a leading contender for disinfection of reclaimed water. To understand the risks of chlorination resulting from the potential selection of pathogenic bacteria, the inactivation, reactivation and regrowth rates of indigenous bacteria were investigated in reclaimed water after chlorine disinfection. Inactivation of total coliforms, Enterococcus and Salmonella showed linear correlations, with constants of 0.1384, 0.1624 and 0.057 L/(mg.min) and R2 of 0.7617, 0.8316 and 0.845, respectively. However, inactivation of total viable cells by measurement of metabolic activity typically showed a linear correlation at lower chlorine dose (0-22 (mg-min)/L), and a trailing region with chlorine dose increasing from 22 to 69 (mg.min)/L. Reactivation and regrowth of bacteria were most likely to occur after exposure to lower chlorine doses, and extents of reactivation decreased gradually with increasing chlorine dose. In contrast to total coliforms and Enterococcus, Salmonella had a high level of regrowth and reactivation, and still had 2% regrowth even after chlorination of 69 (mg.min)/L and 24 hr storage. The bacterial compositions were also significantly altered by chlorination and storage of reclaimed water, and the ratio of Salmonella was significantly increased from 0.001% to 0.045% after chlorination of 69 (mg.min)/L and 24 hr storage. These trends indicated that chlorination contributes to the selection of chlorine-resistant pathogenic bacteria, and regrowth of pathogenic bacteria after chlorination in reclaimed water with a long retention time could threaten public health security during wastewater reuse.

  13. Recovery of cholinesterase activity in five avian species exposed to dicrotophos, an organophosphorus pesticide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, W.J.; Grue, C.E.

    1981-01-01

    The responses of brain and plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activities were examined in mallard ducks, bobwhite quail, barn owls, starlings, and common grackles given oral doses of dicrotophos, an organophosphorus insecticide. Up to an eightfold difference in response of brain ChE activity to dicrotophos was found among these species. Brain ChE activity recovered to within 2 SD of normal within 26 days after being depressed 55 to 64%. Recovery of brain ChE activity was similar among species and followed the model Y = a + b (log10X).

  14. Examination of the kinetics of degradation of the antineoplastic drug 5-fluorouracil by chlorine and bromine.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Tanumihardja, Jessica; Masuyama, Takaaki; Korshin, Gregory

    2015-01-23

    This study examined the degradation of the widely used antineoplastic drug 5-fluorouracil (5FU) by chlorine and bromine. 5FU was determined to interact readily with free chlorine and bromine but was stable in the presence of chloramine. The removal of 5FU followed a second-order kinetic pattern. Apparent rates (kapp) of 5FU removal by chlorine and bromine were strongly pH dependent and had maximum 14.8M(-1)s(-1) and 1.9×10(3)M(-1)s(-1)kapp values, respectively at pH 7. Modeling of the dependence of the kapp values vs. pH indicated the presence of a relatively acidic (pK 6.4 vs. 8.5 of 5FU per se) 5FU intermediate generated in the presence of halogen species. Spectrophotometric measurements confirmed the increased acidity of 5FU chlorination products and allowed proposing a degradation pathway of 5FU by chlorine. This pathway suggests that 5FU chlorination proceeds via chlorine incorporation at the 6th carbon in the heterocyclic ring of 5FU.

  15. Oxidative Dissolution of Silver Nanoparticles by Chlorine: Implications to Silver Nanoparticle Fate and Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Garg, Shikha; Rong, Hongyan; Miller, Christopher J; Waite, T David

    2016-04-05

    The kinetics of oxidative dissolution of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) by chlorine is investigated in this work, with results showing that AgNPs are oxidized in the presence of chlorine at a much faster rate than observed in the presence of dioxygen and/or hydrogen peroxide. The oxidation of AgNPs by chlorine occurs in air-saturated solution in stoichiometric amounts with 2 mol of AgNPs oxidized for each mole of chlorine added. Dioxygen plays an important role in OCl(-)-mediated AgNP oxidation, especially at lower OCl(-) concentrations, with the mechanism shifting from stoichiometric oxidation of AgNPs by OCl(-) in the presence of dioxygen to catalytic removal of OCl(-) by AgNPs in the absence of dioxygen. These results suggest that the presence of chlorine will mitigate AgNP toxicity by forming less-reactive AgCl(s) following AgNP oxidation, although the disinfection efficiency of OCl(-) may not be significantly impacted by the presence of AgNPs because a chlorine-containing species is formed on OCl(-) decay that has significant oxidizing capacity. Our results further suggest that the antibacterial efficacy of nanosilver particles embedded on fabrics may be negated when treated with detergents containing strong oxidants, such as chlorine.

  16. Evaluation of chlorinated by-products in drinking waters of Central Friuli (Italy).

    PubMed

    Goi, Daniele; Tubaro, Franco; Barbone, Fabio; Dolcetti, Giuliano; Bontempelli, Gino

    2005-01-01

    Drinkable water supplied by aqueducts undergoes preliminar potabilization which, in Italy, is mainly accomplished by chlorine addition. The bactericidal action involved in this process is always accompanied by chlorination and oxidation of organic species (mainly humic and fulvic acids) naturally present in treated waters, so that many disinfection by-products (DBPs) are formed, such as trihalomethanes (THMs) and halo-acetic acids (HAA), which can represent a chemical risk for public health. The aim of this study was the monitoring of DBPs in drinking water disinfected by chlorination, supplied by four different aqueducts of Central Friuli (Italy). DBP evaluations were performed in water samples consisting of both input and output of disinfection plants. The results of analytical determinations were worked out to provide the THM and HAA parameters for disinfected waters, while in feeding waters the following different conventional parameters were adopted: (i) trihalomethanes formation potential (THMFP), (ii) halo-acetic acids formation potential (HAAFP) and (iii) UV absorbance at 254 nm (UV254). The quite moderate content of chlorinated products found in all samples considered highlighted the excellent quality of potabilized waters available in Central Friuli. Moreover, our results confirmed that the majority of DBPs formed when chlorine is used for water disinfection consists of THMs, while chlorites and chlorates prevailed when potabilization is accomplished by using chlorine dioxide. Finally, simple UV254 monitoring turned out to be a profitable approach for the determination of chlorinated by-products only when THMs prevail among DBPs.

  17. Chlorine, is there a better alternative?

    PubMed

    Robeck, G G

    1981-04-01

    In brief, the current status of our present knowledge regarding alternatives to free chlorine is as follows: 1. Biocidal Capabilities - Ozone is the most potent biocide of those under consideration. Chlorine dioxide is about on a par with hypochlorous acid, the most efficient form of free residual chlorine. Chlorine dioxide, in contrast to free residual chlorine, increases in efficiency as pH increases above 6. Chloramine is a much weaker biocide than hypochlorite ion, the least inefficient form of free residual chlorine. 2. Health effects - All of the potential alternatives may cause some adverse health effects. Chlorite and chlorate, two of the reaction products of chlorine dioxide, have been shown to cause a subclinical apparently compensated hemolytic anemia in rats. On the other hand, according to very preliminary studies, chlorine and all of the alternatives except chlorine dioxide have been shown to produce reaction products from substances in water that can initiate tumors in mice. Actually, all disinfectants are reactive molecules capable of altering the chemical nature of organic substances present in the water. Thus, the alternative disinfectants question relates to other aspects of water treatment particularly the use of processes for organic precursor removal prior to disinfection. 3. Technology and Economics - The simplest and most economical conversion for many utilities, would be to the use of chloramines and the most difficult and expensive would be to the use of ozone. Conversion to chlorine dioxide would be intermediate in cost.

  18. Detection of chlorinated aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Ekechukwu, Amy A.

    1996-01-01

    A method for making a composition for measuring the concentration of chloated aromatic compounds in aqueous fluids, and an optical probe for use with the method. The composition comprises a hydrophobic polymer matrix, preferably polyamide, with a fluorescent indicator uniformly dispersed therein. The indicator fluoresces in the presence of the chlorinated aromatic compounds with an intensity dependent on the concentration of these compounds in the fluid of interest, such as 8-amino-2-naphthalene sulfonate. The probe includes a hollow cylindrical housing that contains the composition in its distal end. The probe admits an aqueous fluid to the probe interior for exposure to the composition. An optical fiber transmits excitation light from a remote source to the composition while the indicator reacts with chlorinated aromatic compounds present in the fluid. The resulting fluorescence light signal is reflected to a second optical fiber that transmits the light to a spectrophotometer for analysis.

  19. Chlorine signal attenuation in concrete.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, A A; Maslehuddin, M; ur-Rehman, Khateeb; Al-Amoudi, O S B

    2015-11-01

    The intensity of prompt gamma-ray was measured at various depths from chlorine-contaminated silica fume (SF) concrete slab concrete specimens using portable neutron generator-based prompt gamma-ray setup. The intensity of 6.11MeV chloride gamma-rays was measured from the chloride contaminated slab at distance of 15.25, 20.25, 25.25, 30.25 and 35.25cm from neutron target in a SF cement concrete slab specimens. Due to attenuation of thermal neutron flux and emitted gamma-ray intensity in SF cement concrete at various depths, the measured intensity of chlorine gamma-rays decreases non-linearly with increasing depth in concrete. A good agreement was noted between the experimental results and the results of Monte Carlo simulation. This study has provided useful experimental data for evaluating the chloride contamination in the SF concrete utilizing gamma-ray attenuation method.

  20. Assessing the Fate and Transformation By-Product Potential of Trenbolone during Chlorination

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorine disinfection is an effective means for managing microbiological activity during drinking water treatment and can eliminate a number of known organic contaminants. Trenbolone is an androgenic steroidal hormone used primarily as a growth stimulant in the animal feedstock ...

  1. Spectra of Low-Temperature Chlorine Salt Hydrates and Implications for Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanley, J.; Dalton, J. B., III; Chevrier, V. F.; Jamieson, C. S.

    2014-02-01

    Low-temperature spectra of chloride and (per)chlorate salts exhibit diagnostic features that should allow for their detection, if present. Chlorine salts lower the activity of water, limiting potential life.

  2. Contrasting activity patterns of two related octopus species, Octopus macropus and Octopus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Meisel, Daniela V; Byrne, Ruth A; Kuba, Michael; Mather, Jennifer; Ploberger, Werner; Reschenhofer, Erhard

    2006-08-01

    Octopus macropus and Octopus vulgaris have overlapping habitats and are exposed to similar temporal changes. Whereas the former species is described as nocturnal in the field, there are conflicting reports about the activity time of the latter one. To compare activity patterns, the authors tested both species in the laboratory. Octopuses were exposed to a light-dark cycle and held under constant dim light for 7 days each. O. macropus showed nocturnal and light-cued activity. According to casual observations, O. vulgaris started out nocturnal but had switched to mostly diurnal when the experiment began. Individual variation of its activity was found. The different activity patterns of O. macropus and O. vulgaris might reflect their lifestyles, the latter species being more generalist.

  3. UV/chlorine process for ammonia removal and disinfection by-product reduction: comparison with chlorination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinran; Li, Weiguang; Blatchley, Ernest R; Wang, Xiaoju; Ren, Pengfei

    2015-01-01

    The combined application of UV irradiation at 254 nm and chlorination (UV/chlorine process) was investigated for ammonia removal in water treatment. The UV/chlorine process led to higher ammonia removal with less chlorine demand, as compared to breakpoint chlorination. Chlorination of NH₃ led to NH₂Cl formation in the first step. The photolysis of NH₂Cl and radical- mediated oxidation of ammonia appeared to represent the main pathways for ammonia removal. The trivalent nitrogen of ammonia was oxidized, presumably by reactions with aminyl radicals and chlorine radicals. Measured products included NO₃⁻and NO₂⁻; it is likely that N₂ and N₂O were also generated. In addition, UV irradiation appeared to have altered the reactivity of NOM toward free chlorine. The UV/chlorine process had lower chlorine demand, less C-DBPs (THMs and HAAs), but more HANs than chlorination. These results indicate that the UV/chlorine process could represent an alternative to conventional breakpoint chlorination for ammonia-containing water, with several advantages in terms of simplicity, short reaction time, and reduced chemical dosage.

  4. The effect of chlorine and combined chlorine/UV treatment on coliphages in drinking water disinfection.

    PubMed

    Zyara, Alyaa M; Torvinen, Eila; Veijalainen, Anna-Maria; Heinonen-Tanski, Helvi

    2016-08-01

    Chlorine disinfection is a globally used method to ensure the safety of drinking water. However, it has not always been successful against viruses and, therefore, it is important to find new methods to disinfect water. Seventeen different coliphages were isolated from the treated municipal wastewater. These coliphages and MS2 were treated with different dosages of chlorine in drinking water, and a combined chlorine/ultraviolet irradiation treatment for the chlorine-resistant coliphages. Chlorine disinfection with 0.3-0.5 mg/L total chlorine (free Cl-dosage 0.12-0.21 mg/L) for 10 min achieved 2.5-5.7 Log10-reductions for 11 sensitive coliphages. The six most resistant coliphages showed no reduction with these chlorine concentrations. MS2 was intermediate in chlorine resistance, and thus it is not a good indicator for viruses in chlorine disinfection. In the combined treatment total chlorine of 0.05-0.25 mg/L (free Cl-dosage 0.02-0.08 mg/L) and ultraviolet irradiation (14-22 mWs/cm(2)) were more effective than chlorine alone, and 3-5 Log10-reductions were achieved for the chlorine-resistant strains. The chlorination efficiency could be increased by higher dosages and longer contact times, but this could increase the formation of disinfection by-products. Therefore, the combination treatment is a recommended disinfection method.

  5. Reactions of aqueous chlorine and chlorine dioxide with model food compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Fukayama, M.Y.; Tan, H.; Wheeler, W.B.; Wei, C.

    1986-11-01

    This presentation reviews published information concerning the reactions of chlorine gas (CL/sub 2/(g)), aqueous chlorine, and ClO/sub 2/ with model food compounds, the fate of chlorine during the chlorination of specific food products, and the potential toxicity of the reaction products. Fatty acids and their methyl esters react with chlorine with the degree of incorporation corresponding to their degree of unsaturation. Aqueous chlorine oxidizes and chlorinates lipids and amino acids much more readily than ClO/sub 2/. Several amino acids are highly susceptible to oxidation and chlorination by chlorine compounds. Reactions of chlorine and ClO/sub 2/ with several food products, including flour and shrimp, have also been characterized. Although significant quantities of chlorine can be incorporated into specific model compounds and food products, the health risks associated with exposure to chlorinated organic products are unknown. Preliminary studies using the Ames Salmonella/microsome mutagenicity assay indicate that the reaction products from mixtures of aqueous chlorine and various lipids or tryptophan are nonmutagenic. Nevertheless, additional studies are warranted, so that the toxicological significance of these reaction products can be understood more fully.

  6. Oxidation of chlorinated olefins by Escherichia coli transformed with dimethyl sulfide monooxygenase genes or cumene dioxygenase genes.

    PubMed

    Takami, Wako; Yoshida, Takako; Nojiri, Hideaki; Yamane, Hisakazu; Omori, Toshio

    1999-04-01

    In the present work, it was shown that the dimethyl sulfide (DMS) monooxygenase and the cumene dioxygenase catalyzed oxidation of various chlorinated ethenes, propenes, and butenes. The specific activities of these oxygenases were determined for C(2) to C(4) chlorinated olefins, and the oxidation rates ranged from 0.19 to 4.18 nmol.min(-1).mg(-1) of dry cells by the DMS monooxygenase and from 0.19 to 1.29 nmol.min(-1).mg(-1) of dry cells by the cumene dioxygenase. The oxidation products were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Most chlorinated olefins were monooxygenated by the DMS monooxygenase to yield chlorinated epoxides. In the case of the cumene dioxygenase, the substrates lacking any chlorine atom on double-bond carbon atoms were dioxygenated, and those with chlorine atoms attaching to double-bond carbon atoms were monooxygenated to yield allyl alcohols.

  7. Chlorine compounds and stratospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cicerone, R. J.; Walters, S.; Stolarski, R. S.

    1975-01-01

    A report by Cicerone et al. (1974) concerned with the potential size of the atmospheric perturbation produced by man-made chlorofluoromethanes is considered, giving attention to a number of errors made in the first investigation and their correction. However, the corrections do not significantly change the results reported. It had been found that chlorine oxides which arise from chlorofluoromethane usage will within 10 or 15 years provide a sink for stratospheric ozone which will dominate the natural sinks for ozone.

  8. Coal desulfurization by aqueous chlorination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalvinskas, J. J.; Vasilakos, N.; Corcoran, W. H.; Grohmann, K.; Rohatgi, N. K. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A method of desulfurizing coal is described in which chlorine gas is bubbled through an aqueous slurry of coal at low temperature below 130 degrees C., and at ambient pressure. Chlorinolysis converts both inorganic and organic sulfur components of coal into water soluble compounds which enter the aqueous suspending media. The media is separated after chlorinolysis and the coal dechlorinated at a temperature of from 300 C to 500 C to form a non-caking, low-sulfur coal product.

  9. The formation of halogen-specific TOX from chlorination and chloramination of natural organic matter isolates.

    PubMed

    Kristiana, Ina; Gallard, Hervé; Joll, Cynthia; Croué, Jean-Philippe

    2009-09-01

    The formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) is a public health concern. An important way to evaluate the presence of DBPs is in terms of the total organic halogen (TOX), which can be further specified into total organic chlorine (TOCl), bromine (TOBr), and iodine (TOI). The formation and distribution of halogen-specific TOX during chlorination and chloramination of natural organic matter (NOM) isolates in the presence of bromide and iodide ions were studied. As expected, chloramination produced significantly less TOX than chlorination. TOCl was the dominant species formed in both chlorination and chloramination. TOI was always produced in chloramination, but not in chlorination when high chlorine dose was used, due to the limited presence of HOI in chlorination as a result of the oxidation of iodide to iodate in the presence of excess chlorine. The formation of TOI during chloramination increased as the initial iodide ion concentration increased, with a maximum of approximately 60% of the initial iodide ion becoming incorporated into NOM. Iodine incorporation in NOM was consistently higher than bromine incorporation, demonstrating that the competitive reactions between bromine and iodine species in chloramination favoured the formation of HOI and thus TOI, rather than TOBr. Correlations between the aromatic character of the NOM isolates (SUVA(254) and % aromatic C) and the concentrations of overall TOX and halogen-specific TOX in chloramination were observed. This indicates that the aromatic moieties in NOM, as indicated by SUVA(254) and % aromatic C, play an important role in the formation of overall TOX and halogen-specific TOX in chloramination. THMs comprised only a fraction of TOX, up to 7% in chloramination and up to 47% in chlorination. Although chloramine produces less TOX than chlorine, it formed proportionally more non-THM DBPs than chlorine. These non-THM DBPs are mostly unknown, corresponding to unknown health risks. Considering the higher

  10. Antioxidant activity and phenolic content of leaf infusions of Myrtaceae species from Cerrado (Brazilian Savanna).

    PubMed

    Takao, L K; Imatomi, M; Gualtieri, S C J

    2015-11-01

    There is considerable interest in identifying new antioxidants from plant materials. Several studies have emphasized the antioxidant activity of species belonging to the Myrtaceae family. However, there are few reports on these species from the Cerrado (Brazilian savanna). In this study, the antioxidant activity and phenolic content of 12 native Myrtaceae species from the Cerrado were evaluated (Blepharocalyx salicifolius, Eugenia bimarginata, Eugenia dysenterica, Eugenia klotzschiana, Hexachlamys edulis, Myrcia bella, Myrcia lingua, Myrcia splendens, Myrcia tomentosa, Psidium australe, Psidium cinereum, and Psidium laruotteanum). Antioxidant potential was assessed using the antioxidant activity index (AAI) by the DPPH method and total phenolic content (TPC) by the Folin-Ciocalteu assay. There was a high correlation between TPC and AAI values. Psidium laruotteanum showed the highest TPC (576.56 mg GAE/g extract) and was the most potent antioxidant (AAI = 7.97, IC50 = 3.86 µg·mL-1), with activity close to that of pure quercetin (IC50 = 2.99 µg·mL-1). The extracts of nine species showed IC50 of 6.24-8.75 µg·mL-1. Most species showed TPC and AAI values similar to or higher than those for Camellia sinensis, a commonly consumed tea with strong antioxidant properties. The results reveal that the analyzed Myrtaceae species from the Cerrado possess high phenolic contents and antioxidant activities. Thus, they are a potential source of new natural antioxidants.

  11. Digestive enzyme activity of two stonefly species (Insecta, Plecoptera) and their feeding habits.

    PubMed

    de Figueroa, J M Tierno; Trenzado, C E; López-Rodríguez, M J; Sanz, A

    2011-11-01

    The digestive enzymes of two stoneflies species, Hemimelaena flaviventris and Isoperla morenica, were studied for the first time. These species are temporary water inhabitants and exhibit great feeding plasticity. Although they are traditionally referred to as predators, a previous study revealed that H. flaviventris incorporates some diatoms into its diet in addition to feeding usually on several prey, and I. morenica (in that study under the name of I. curtata) only feeds on animals occasionally. The enzymatic activities of digestive amylase, lipase, protease, trypsin and chymotrypsin were determined for each species at the same developmental stage. The results show that H. flaviventris has a greater digestive enzymatic pool and higher relative and absolute protease, lipase and trypsin activities than I. morenica. The latter has a relative higher amylase activity. As higher amylase activity is typical of phytophagous species and higher protease activity typical of carnivorous species; these results reveal that H. flaviventris is a more efficient zoophagous species than I. morenica. The ecological implications of these findings, including the higher secondary production of H. flaviventris in its habitat, are discussed.

  12. pH Effect on the binding of chlorin derivatives with Cremophor EL, a potential drug delivery vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Sunita; Datta, Anindya

    2005-09-01

    The binding of chlorin p6 with Cremophor EL (CrEL) at pH 5 and pH 7 has been monitored by fluorescence techniques. Upon binding with the drug delivery agent, the fluorescent species are found to be one and the same at both pH values. This is explained by a hindrance to protonation of chlorin p6 trianions by Cremophor EL. Surprisingly, it is the more hydrophilic species between the two possible chlorin p6 ions that is found to get bound preferentially with the hydrophobic delivery medium.

  13. Using trees to remediate groundwaters contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Strand, S.E.; Gordon, M.P.

    1998-06-01

    'Industrial practices in the past have resulted in contamination of groundwater with chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs) at many DOE sites, such as Hanford and Savannah River. Such contamination is a major problem because existing groundwater remediation technologies are expensive and difficult. An inexpensive method for groundwater remediation is greatly needed. Trees could be used to remediate CHC polluted groundwater at minimal cost (phytoremediation). Before phytoremediation can be extensively applied, the authors must determine the range of compounds that are attacked, the effects of metabolic products on the plants and the environment, and the effect of transpiration and concentration of CHC on uptake and metabolism. They will test the ability of hybrid poplar to take up and transform the chlorinated methanes, ethanes and ethylenes. The rate of uptake and transformation by poplar of TCE as a function of concentration in the soil, transpiration rate and illumination level will be determined. Methods will be developed to permit rapid testing of plants from contaminated sites for species able to oxidize and sequester chlorinated compounds. They will identify the nature of the bound residues of TCE metabolism in poplar. They will identify the mechanisms involved in CHC oxidation in poplar and use genetic manipulations to enhance that activity. They will introduce the genes for mammalian cytochrome P-450-IIE1, known to oxidize light CHCs such as TCE to attempt to increase the CHC metabolism capacity of poplar. The results of this research will place phytoremediation of CHCs on a firm scientific footing, allowing a rational assessment of its application to groundwater contamination. This report summarizes the results of the first 1.5 years of work on a three-year project.'

  14. The Chlorine Isotopic Composition Of Lunar UrKREEP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, J. J.; Tartese, R.; Anand, M.; McCubbin, F. M.; Neal, C. R.; Franchi, I. A.

    2016-01-01

    Since the long standing paradigm of an anhydrous Moon was challenged there has been a renewed focus on investigating volatiles in a variety of lunar samples. Numerous studies have examined the abundances and isotopic compositions of volatiles in lunar apatite, Ca5(PO4)3(F,Cl,OH). In particular, apatite has been used as a tool for assessing the sources of H2O in the lunar interior. However, current models for the Moon's formation have yet to fully account for its thermal evolution in the presence of H2O and other volatiles. For ex-ample, in the context of the lunar magma ocean (LMO) model, it is anticipated that chlorine (and other volatiles) should have been concentrated in the late-stage LMO residual melts (i.e., the dregs enriched in incompatible elements such as K, REEs (Rare Earth Elements), and P, collectively called KREEP, and in its primitive form - urKREEP, given its incompatibility in mafic minerals like olivine and pyroxene, which were the dominant phases that crystallized early in the cumulate pile of the LMO. When compared to chondritic meteorites and terrestrial rocks, lunar samples have exotic chlorine isotope compositions, which are difficult to explain in light of the abundance and isotopic composition of other volatile species, especially H, and the current estimates for chlorine and H2O in the bulk silicate Moon (BSM). In order to better understand the processes involved in giving rise to the heavy chlorine isotope compositions of lunar samples, we have performed a comprehensive in situ high precision study of chlorine isotopes in lunar apatite from a suite of Apollo samples covering a range of geochemical characteristics and petrologic types.

  15. The potential feasibility of chlorinic photosynthesis on exoplanets.

    PubMed

    Haas, Johnson R

    2010-11-01

    The modern search for life-bearing exoplanets emphasizes the potential detection of O(2) and O(3) absorption spectra in exoplanetary atmospheres as ideal signatures of biology. However, oxygenic photosynthesis may not arise ubiquitously in exoplanetary biospheres. Alternative evolutionary paths may yield planetary atmospheres tinted with the waste products of other dominant metabolisms, including potentially exotic biochemistries. This paper defines chlorinic photosynthesis (CPS) as biologically mediated photolytic oxidation of aqueous Cl(-) to form halocarbon or dihalogen products, coupled with CO(2) assimilation. This hypothetical metabolism appears to be feasible energetically, physically, and geochemically, and could potentially develop under conditions that approximate the terrestrial Archean. It is hypothesized that an exoplanetary biosphere in which chlorinic photosynthesis dominates primary production would tend to evolve a strongly oxidizing, halogen-enriched atmosphere over geologic time. It is recommended that astronomical observations of exoplanetary outgoing thermal emission spectra consider signs of halogenated chemical species as likely indicators of the presence of a chlorinic biosphere. Planets that favor the evolution of CPS would probably receive equivalent or greater surface UV flux than is produced by the Sun, which would promote stronger abiotic UV photolysis of aqueous halides than occurred during Earth's Archean era and impose stronger evolutionary selection pressures on endemic life to accommodate and utilize halogenated compounds. Ocean-bearing planets of stars with metallicities equivalent to, or greater than, the Sun should especially favor the evolution of chlorinic biospheres because of the higher relative seawater abundances of Cl, Br, and I such planets would tend to host. Directed searches for chlorinic biospheres should probably focus on G0-G2, F, and A spectral class stars that have bulk metallicities of +0.0 Dex or greater.

  16. IDENTIFICATION OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FROM OZONE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORAMINE, AND CHLORINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many drinking water treatment plants are currently using alternative disinfectants to treat drinking water, with ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine being the most popular. However, compared to chlorine, which has been much more widely studied, there is little information abo...

  17. The evolution of protected species studies to determine effects of offshore oil and gas activities

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, W.; Fairfield, C. )

    1990-01-09

    The Minerals Management Service (MMS) Environmental Studies Program (ESP) was initiated in 1973 to help ensure that the environmental information on which Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) oil and gas development decisions are based is the most definitive that can be assembled at the time. The majority of ESP studies are designed to provide information on the status of the environment, and to identify the extent of potential impact of OCS development activities. Federal OCS activities must comply with several environmental' acts, including the Marine Mammal Protection Act and the Endangered Species Act. In response to these acts, MMS has funded a significant amount of research on protected species. The basic intent of these studies is to determine if proposed OCS activities will affect protected species and whether means exist to mitigate any effects found. Over the 15 years of the ESP, protected species studies have evolved from literature syntheses and relatively simple survey efforts, to more complex studies attempting to understand complicated behavioral and physiological responses to OCS effects (e.g. noise, spilled oil), and to evaluate protected species within the context of habitat characterization. This last goal has produced a need for multidisciplinary field research. Two major field efforts have been undertaken in the Beaufort Sea and Georges Bank areas. The question of if' protected species are present has generally been answered for key OCS regions; the next step for effective environmental decision making is to understand why' protected species are present.

  18. Mold-inhibitory activity of different yeast species during airtight storage of wheat grain.

    PubMed

    Adel Druvefors, Ulrika; Schnürer, Johan

    2005-02-01

    The yeast Pichia anomala J121 inhibits spoilage by Penicillium roqueforti in laboratory and pilot studies with high-moisture wheat in malfunctioning airtight storage. We tested the biocontrol ability of an additional 57 yeast species in a grain mini silo system. Most yeast species grew to CFU levels comparable to that of P. anomala J121 after 14 days of incubation (>10(6) CFU g(-1)). Of the 58 species, 38 (63 strains) had no mold-inhibitory effects (Pen. roqueforti levels >10(5) CFU g(-1)). Among these were 11 species (18 strains) that did not grow on the wheat grain. Several of the non-inhibiting yeast species have previously been reported as biocontrol agents in other postharvest environments. Weak inhibitory activity, reducing Pen. roqueforti levels to between 10(4) and 10(5) CFU g(-1), was observed with 11 species (12 strains). Candida silvicola and Pichia guillermondii reduced Pen. roqueforti to <10(4) CFU g(-1). Candida fennica, Candida pelliculosa, Candida silvicultrix, P. anomala (29 strains), Pichia burtonii, Pichia farinosa and Pichia membranifaciens strongly inhibited Pen. roqueforti (<10(3) CFU g(-1)) in the mini silos, but none had higher biocontrol activity than P. anomala strain J121. This report is the first of biocontrol activity of C. fennica and C. silvicultrix. The ability of 27 yeast species to grow to high CFU values without inhibiting mold growth suggests that nutrient competition may not be the main mode of action of P. anomala J121.

  19. An Examination of the Inorganic Chlorine Budget in the Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonne, G. P.; Stimpfle, R. M.; Cohen, R. C.; Voss, P. B.; Perkins, K. K.; Anderson, J. G.; Salawitch, R. J.; Elkins, J. W.; Dutton, G. S.; Jucks, K. W.

    2000-01-01

    We use the first simultaneous in situ measurements of ClONO2, ClO, and HCl acquired using the NASA ER-2 aircraft during the Photochemistry of Ozone Loss in the Arctic Region in Summer (POLARIS) mission to test whether these three compounds quantitatively account for total inorganic chlorine (Cly) in the lower stratosphere in 1997. We find (ClO + ClONO2 + HCl)/Cly = 0.92 +/- 0.10, where Cly is inferred from in situ measurements of organic chlorine source gases. These observations are consistent with our current understanding of the budget and partitioning of Cly in the lower stratosphere. We find no evidence in support of missing inorganic chlorine species that compose a significant fraction of Cly. We apply the analysis to earlier ER-2 observations dating from 1991 to investigate possible causes of previously observed discrepancies in the inorganic chlorine budget. Using space shuttle, satellite, balloon, and aircraft measurements in combination with ER-2 data, we find that the discrepancy is unlikely to have been caused by missing chlorine species or an error in the photolysis rate of chlorine nitrate. We also find that HCl/Cly is not significantly controlled by aerosol surface area density in the lower stratosphere.

  20. Behavior of sulfur and chlorine in coal during combustion and boiler corrosion. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, C.L.; Hackley, K.C.; Cao, J.; Donnals, G.L.; Ruch, R.R.; Pan, W.P.; Shao, D.

    1992-12-31

    Using the pyrolysis-QGA system, samples of coal were heated from ambient temperature to 800{degrees}C at a rate of 20{degrees}C/min in the pyrolysis chamber under a nitrogen atmosphere. The volatile products were carried with the nitrogen flow to the combustion chamber which was maintained at 850{degrees}C under a constant flow of oxygen. For Illinois coals (IBC-101, 103, and -109), HCl was the only chlorine species identified by the QGA. The HCl release profiles for the coals showed a broad peak between 250{degrees}C and 600{degrees}C with a maximum at 445{degrees}C. Neutron activation analysis of pyrolysis residues showed that 98 percent of the chlorine in raw coal was volatilized. Thus, it may be inferred that the chlorine in Illinois coals is released rapidly as HCl, not as sodium chloride (NaCl), during combustion in a utility/industrial boiler. In contrast to chlorine, the sulfur release profile for IBC-109 showed three peaks: the first sulfur peak at about 350{degrees}C was probably derived from elemental sulfur, the main peak at 475{degrees}C corresponded to the release of organic sulfur, and the third peak at 600{degrees}C resulted from the decomposition of pyrite. The low-temperature peak was absent for fresh samples. Sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) was the major sulfur species in combustion gases under an oxidizing condition; additional gaseous sulfur species (COS and H{sub 2}S) were observed when the atmosphere was changed to a reducing condition.

  1. Indoor air: Spatial variations of chlorinated pesticides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, David J.; Hites, Ronald A.

    The concentrations of two classes of chlorinated pesticides were measured in various locations within four homes. The prevalent compounds were chlorinated derivatives of cyclopentadiene which had been used as termiticides. These compounds were found in basement areas at higher concentrations than in upstairs areas of the homes. Another class of chlorinated pesticide was represented by chlorpyrifos; its spatial profile was consistent with its application in upstairs areas.

  2. Bioremediation of chlorinated organics

    SciTech Connect

    Strong-Gunderson, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    The use of lux bioreporters to measure enhanced bioavailability due to surfactants is briefly described in this paper. The bioreporters are engineered microorganisms that produce light during contaminant degradation, providing a real-time measure of microbial activity. The results of two experiments using bioreporters are summarized. The first experiment showed that the surfactant concentration that best enhanced the overall rate of toluene degradation was below the critical micelle concentration (CMC). A second experiment showed that surfactants at the CMC interfered with or inhibited the biodegradation of trichloroethylene.

  3. Reevaluation of the toxicity of chlorinated water and the usefulness of MX as an index.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Sadahiko; Nakano, Atsushi; Araki, Toshiaki

    2006-12-01

    Changes in the toxicity in chlorinated water after chlorine addition were examined. For toxicity evaluation, the chromosomal aberration test and the transformation test were conducted as indexes of initiation activity and promotion activity, respectively, in the carcinogenesis process. Activity inducing chromosomal aberrations in chlorinated Lake Biwa water gradually decreased over time after chlorination. In contrast, activity inducing transformations determined by the two-stage assay gradually increased. Thus, toxicity that decreases or increases is present in chlorinated water. Furthermore, activity inducing transformations determined by the non-two-stage assay gradually decreased over time. This direction of change is opposite to that of activity inducing transformations determined by the two-stage assay and is consistent with that of activity inducing chromosomal aberrations. The drastic decrease in initiation activity detected as activity inducing chromosomal aberrations could be the main cause for the decrease in activity inducing transformations determined by the non-two-stage assay (an index of the sum of initiation and promotion activity). MX change was quantitatively consistent with those of activity inducing chromosomal aberrations and transformations determined by the non-two-stage assay. On the other hand, directions of changes in concentrations of typical by-products such as chloroform were consistent only with that of activity inducing transformations determined by the two-stage assay. Findings of this study suggest that MX is appropriate as an index for comparing the carcinogenicity of tap water near and far from a water purification plant.

  4. Vanadium-catalyzed chlorination under molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Moriuchi, Toshiyuki; Fukui, Yasuhiro; Kato, Satoshi; Kajikawa, Tomomi; Hirao, Toshikazu

    2015-06-01

    A catalytic chlorination of ketones was performed by using a vanadium catalyst in the presence of Bu4NI and AlCl3 under atmospheric molecular oxygen. This catalytic chlorination could be applied to the chlorination of alkenes to give the corresponding vic-dichlorides. AlCl3 was found to serve as both a Lewis acid and a chloride source to induce the facile chlorination. A combination of Bu4NI and AlI3 in the presence of a vanadium catalyst under atmospheric molecular oxygen induced the iodination of ketones.

  5. Effect of chlorine-containing bleaching agents on diffuse reflection of light by cellulose pulp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, N. P.; Pokoptseva, O. K.; Sherstobitova, A. S.; Yas'kov, A. D.

    2010-07-01

    We have studied diffuse reflectance in the spectral range λ = 380-760 nm of sulfate cellulose pulp with initial hardness G = 30-70 after it was treated with a chlorine-containing bleaching agent with active chlorine concentration C = 0%-10% for different time intervals. We determined the general behavior and basic features of the concentration and time dependences of the brightness B and the diffuse reflectance spectral ratio ( R 437/ R 650)ṡ100% at λ = 457 nm and 650 nm. Based on the data obtained, we propose an optimal algorithm for using optical spectral technologies for metered addition of chlorine-containing bleaching agents.

  6. Effect of ozonation and chlorination on the mutagenic potential of drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Dolara, P.; Ricci, V.; Burrini, D.; Griffini, O.

    1981-07-01

    The mutagenic potential of water taken at various stages in a water treatment plant which used both chlorination and ozonation as methods for disinfection was investigated. Presented in this paper are some of the results obtained using the Salmonella/microsome test. The results of this investigation indicate that while mutagenic chemicals were produced by chlorination, ozonation of the chemicals in controlled laboratory experiments resulted in a decrease in the mutagenic activity. In observations at the treatment plant, mutagenic chemicals were produced to a lesser extent by ozone treatment than by chlorination. (RJC)

  7. Formation of mutagens following chlorination of humic acid. A model for mutagen formation during drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Meier, J R; Lingg, R D; Bull, R J

    1983-07-01

    Aqueous chlorination of humic acids results in the formation of compounds with direct-acting mutagenic activity in the Ames/Salmonella plate assay for tester strains TA98, TA100, TA1535, TA1537 and TA1538. The addition of a rat-liver microsomal fraction (S9) plus cofactors causes a substantial decrease of activity, the extent of which is tester strain dependent. The non-chlorinated humic acids are not mutagenic either in the presence or absence of S9. Formation of mutagenic activity and of total organic halogen (TOX) is linearly related to humic concentration in the range of 0.2-1.6 mg/ml total organic carbon (TOC), and to chlorine concentration in the range of 0.1-1.0 chlorine equivalents per mole of carbon. The mutagenic activity is due predominantly to non-volatile compounds. Mutagenic activity is also detectable, after sample concentration by lyophilization, upon chlorination at a humic acid level of 0.02 mg/ml TOC. The specific mutagenic activities (per mg TOX), and also the degree of chlorine incorporation into humic acid, at 0.02 mg/ml TOC are similar to those present after chlorination at 1 mg/ml TOC. Production of mutagens is greatly dependent on the chlorination pH, with a pattern of decreasing mutagenic activity with increasing pH. This order of activity can be at least partially explained by the alkali liability of the compounds. Chlorination of commercial humic acids is proposed as a model for examination of mutagen formation during water chlorination.

  8. Diel Patterns of Activity for Insect Pollinators of Two Oil Palm Species (Arecales : Arecaceae).

    PubMed

    Auffray, Thomas; Frérot, Brigitte; Poveda, Roberto; Louise, Claude; Beaudoin-Ollivier, Laurence

    2017-01-01

    The pollination of two oil palm species, Elaeis guineensis Jacquin and Elaeis oleifera Cortés (Arecales: Arecaceae), depends on a mutualistic relation with insects, which use male inflorescences as a brood site, and visits female inflorescences lured by the emitted odor, which is similar to that of males. Although the activity of visiting the inflorescences by these insects is critical for the adequate natural pollination of the host plant, their activity is poorly documented. In the present study, we determine the diel activity of two specialized pollinator weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) on inflorescences of their respective host-palm: Elaeidobius kamerunicus Faust specialized on E. guineensis, and Grasidius hybridus O'Brien and Beserra specialized on E. oleifera. The average timing of activity was studied by using passive interception traps. Then the pattern and the duration were refined by using aspiration trapping within the active period for each insect species at the male and female inflorescences. All the experiments were conducted in an Ecuadorian oil palm plantation, located close to Amazonian forest. El. kamerunicus and G. hybridus were found to be the pollinators of E. guineensis and E. oleifera, respectively. The two species differed in their diel pattern of activity: E. kamerunicus was active in the morning and G. hybridus during a short period at dusk. For both palm species, insect visits were synchronous on both male and female inflorescences. The synchronicity is discussed as a strategy to maintain the relation mutualistic between partners. These findings increase our understanding of the oil palm pollination system.

  9. Active Oxygen Species Generator by Low Pressure Silent Discharge and its Application to Water Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Ikeda, Akira; Tanimura, Yasuhiro; Ohta, Koji; Yoshiyasu, Hajimu

    We have proposed the new water treatment using the active oxygen species such as an atomic oxygen with the oxidation power that is stronger than ozone. Based on the results of simulations we designed the silent discharge type active oxygen generator with a water ejector, which is operated on the discharge conditions of low pressure of 6.6kPa. and high temperature of about 200°C. The experimental results are as follows. (1) The yield of the active oxygen increases with the increase of the discharge tube temperature and the decrease of the gas pressure. (2) The life time of active oxygen is tens msec. (3) The active oxygen oxidizes efficiently the formic acid compared with ozone. It is assumed from these results that the active oxygen species having a strong oxidation power is generated.

  10. Investigating Biofilm Production, Coagulase and Hemolytic Activity in Candida Species Isolated From Denture Stomatitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yigit, Nimet; Aktas, Esin; Dagistan, Saadettin; Ayyildiz, Ahmet

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Oral candidiasis, in the form of Candida-associated denture stomatitis, represents a common disease in a large percentage of denture wearers, and Candida albicans remains the most commonly isolated species. In this study, we aimed to evaluate biofilm production, coagulase and hemolytic activity of Candida species isolated from denture stomatitis patients. Materials and Methods: This study included 70 patients (31 female, 39 male). Forty-eight of the patients were found to have a positive culture. A total of 48 Candida isolates representing five species, C. albicans (n=17), C. glabrata (n=10), C. krusei (n=9), C. kefyr (n=7) and C. parapsilosis (n=5), were tested. Their coagulase activities were evaluated by a classical tube coagulase test with rabbit plasma. A blood plate assay on 3% enriched sheep blood Sabouraud-dextrose agar (SDA) was used to determine their in vitro hemolytic activities. Biofilm production was determined by a visual tube method. Results: Twenty-one Candida isolates exhibited coagulase activity, and the coagulase activities of the C. albicans (64.7%) isolates were higher than other species. C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. kefyr and C. krusei species demonstrated beta hemolysis. C. parapsilosis strains failed to demonstrate any hemolytic activities. Fifteen (88.0%) of the C. albicans strains were biofilm positive. Six (35.2%) of these strains were strongly positive, 8 (47.0%) C. albicans strains were moderately positive and 1 (5.8%) C. albicans strain was weakly positive. Sixteen (51.6%) of the non-albicans Candida strains were biofilm positive while 15 (48.3%) did not produce biofilms. Conclusion: The results of this present study indicate coagulase, hemolytic activity and biofilm production by Candida spp. isolated from patients with denture stomatitis. Investigations of these virulence factors might be helpful in gaining information about the possible virulence of oral Candida species related to denture stomatitis. PMID:25610156

  11. The Importance of Landscape Elements for Bat Activity and Species Richness in Agricultural Areas

    PubMed Central

    Heim, Olga; Treitler, Julia T.; Tschapka, Marco; Knörnschild, Mirjam; Jung, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Landscape heterogeneity is regarded as a key factor for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function in production landscapes. We investigated whether grassland sites at close vicinity to forested areas are more frequently used by bats. Considering that bats are important consumers of herbivorous insects, including agricultural pest, this is important for sustainable land management. Bat activity and species richness were assessed using repeated monitoring from May to September in 2010 with acoustic monitoring surveys on 50 grassland sites in the Biosphere Reserve Schorfheide-Chorin (North-East Germany). Using spatial analysis (GIS), we measured the closest distance of each grassland site to potentially connecting landscape elements (e.g., trees, linear vegetation, groves, running and standing water). In addition, we assessed the distance to and the percent land cover of forest remnants and urban areas in a 200 m buffer around the recording sites to address differences in the local landscape setting. Species richness and bat activity increased significantly with higher forest land cover in the 200 m buffer and at smaller distance to forested areas. Moreover, species richness increased in proximity to tree groves. Larger amount of forest land cover and smaller distance to forest also resulted in a higher activity of bats on grassland sites in the beginning of the year during May, June and July. Landscape elements near grassland sites also influenced species composition of bats and species richness of functional groups (open, edge and narrow space foragers). Our results highlight the importance of forested areas, and suggest that agricultural grasslands that are closer to forest remnants might be better buffered against outbreaks of agricultural pest insects due to higher species richness and higher bat activity. Furthermore, our data reveals that even for highly mobile species such as bats, a very dense network of connecting elements within the landscape is

  12. The Importance of Landscape Elements for Bat Activity and Species Richness in Agricultural Areas.

    PubMed

    Heim, Olga; Treitler, Julia T; Tschapka, Marco; Knörnschild, Mirjam; Jung, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Landscape heterogeneity is regarded as a key factor for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function in production landscapes. We investigated whether grassland sites at close vicinity to forested areas are more frequently used by bats. Considering that bats are important consumers of herbivorous insects, including agricultural pest, this is important for sustainable land management. Bat activity and species richness were assessed using repeated monitoring from May to September in 2010 with acoustic monitoring surveys on 50 grassland sites in the Biosphere Reserve Schorfheide-Chorin (North-East Germany). Using spatial analysis (GIS), we measured the closest distance of each grassland site to potentially connecting landscape elements (e.g., trees, linear vegetation, groves, running and standing water). In addition, we assessed the distance to and the percent land cover of forest remnants and urban areas in a 200 m buffer around the recording sites to address differences in the local landscape setting. Species richness and bat activity increased significantly with higher forest land cover in the 200 m buffer and at smaller distance to forested areas. Moreover, species richness increased in proximity to tree groves. Larger amount of forest land cover and smaller distance to forest also resulted in a higher activity of bats on grassland sites in the beginning of the year during May, June and July. Landscape elements near grassland sites also influenced species composition of bats and species richness of functional groups (open, edge and narrow space foragers). Our results highlight the importance of forested areas, and suggest that agricultural grasslands that are closer to forest remnants might be better buffered against outbreaks of agricultural pest insects due to higher species richness and higher bat activity. Furthermore, our data reveals that even for highly mobile species such as bats, a very dense network of connecting elements within the landscape is

  13. Natural chlorine and fluorine in the atmosphere, water and precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friend, James P.

    1990-01-01

    The geochemical cycles of chlorine and fluorine are surveyed and summarized as framework for the understanding of the global natural abundances of these species in the atmosphere, water, and precipitation. In the cycles the fluxes into and out of the atmosphere can be balanced within the limits of our knowledge of the natural sources and sinks. Sea salt from the ocean surfaces represent the predominant portion of the source of chlorine. It is also an important source of atmospheric fluorine, but volcanoes are likely to be more important fluorine sources. Dry deposition of sea salt returns about 85 percent of the salt released there. Precipitation removes the remainder. Most of the sea salt materials are considered to be cyclic, moving through sea spray over the oceans and either directly back to the oceans or deposited dry and in precipitation on land, whence it runs off into rivers and streams and returns to the oceans. Most of the natural chlorine in the atmosphere is in the form of particulate chloride ion with lesser amounts as gaseous inorganic chloride and methyl chloride vapor. Fluorine is emitted from volcanoes primarily as HF. It is possible that HF may be released directly form the ocean surface but this has not been confirmed by observation. HCl and most likely HF gases are released into the atmosphere by sea salt aerosols. The mechanism for the release is likely to be the provision of protons from the so-called excess sulfate and HNO3. Sea salt aerosol contains fluorine as F(-), MgF(+), CaF(+), and NaF. The concentrations of the various species of chlorine and fluorine that characterize primarily natural, unpolluted atmospheres are summarized in tables and are discussed in relation to their fluxes through the geochemical cycle.

  14. Characterization Activities to Evaluate Chlorinated Solvent Discharges to Tims Branch from the A/M Area of the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, D.G.

    2001-02-23

    The objective of this investigation was to identify those regions of plume outcrop along Tims Branch southeast of A/M Area and to establish fixed monitoring points along the seepline to evaluate proposed remediation needs and to support long-term monitoring activities in the vicinity of the seepline. The characterization approach employed in completing these tasks was dynamic and graded. Three stages of characterization were used to evaluate the outcrop region, with the results from each of the previous activities used to direct subsequent characterization.

  15. Salinity effects on viability, metabolic activity and proliferation of three Perkinsus species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    La, Peyre M.; Casas, S.; La, Peyre J.

    2006-01-01

    Little is known regarding the range of conditions in which many Perkinsus species may proliferate, making it difficult to predict conditions favorable for their expansion, to identify conditions inducing mortality, or to identify instances of potential cross-infectivity among sympatric host species. In this study, the effects of salinity on viability, metabolic activity and proliferation of P. marinus, P. olseni and P. chesapeaki were determined. Specifically, this research examined the effects of 5 salinities (7, 11, 15, 25, 35???), (1) without acclimation, on the viability and metabolic activity of 2 isolates of each Perkinsus species, and (2) with acclimation, on the viability, metabolic activity, size and number of 1 isolate of each species. P. chesapeaki showed the widest range of salinity tolerance of the 3 species, with high viability and cell proliferation at all salinities tested. Although P. chesapeaki originated from low salinity areas (i.e. <15???), several measures (i.e. cell number and metabolic activity) indicated that higher salinities (15, 25???) were more favorable for its growth. P. olseni, originating from high salinity areas, had better viability and proliferation at the higher salinities (15, 25, 35???). Distinct differences in acute salinity response of the 2 P. olseni isolates at lower salinities (7, 11???), however, suggest the need for a more expansive comparison of isolates to better define the lower salinity tolerance. Lastly, P. marinus was more tolerant of the lower salinities (7 and 11???) than P. olseni, but exhibited reduced viability at 7???, even after acclimation. ?? Inter-Research 2006.

  16. Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) detection of active oxygen species and organic phases in Martian soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Fun-Dow; Kim, Soon Sam; Liang, Ranty H.

    1989-01-01

    The presence of active oxygen species (O(-), O2(-), O3(-)) and other strong oxidants (Fe2O3 and Fe3O4) was invoked in interpretations of the Viking biological experiments and a model was also suggested for Martian surface chemistry. The non-biological interpretations of the biological results gain futher support as no organic compounds were detected in the Viking pyrolysis-gas chromatography mass spectrometer (GCSM) experiments at concentrations as low as 10 ppb. Electron spin resonance (ESR) measures the absorption of microwaves by a paramagnetic and/or ferromagnetic center in the presence of an external field. In many instances, ESR has the advantage of detailed submicroscopic identification of the transient species and/or unstable reaction intermediates in their environments. Since the higly active oxygen species (O(-), O2(-), O3(-), and R-O-O(-)) are all paramagnetic in nature, they can be readily detected in native form by the ESR method. Active oxygen species likely to occur in the Martian surface samples were detected by ESR in UV-irradiated samples containing MgO. A miniaturized ESR spectrometer system can be developed for the Mars Rover Sample Return Mission. The instrument can perform the following in situ Martian samples analyses: detection of active oxygen species; characterization of Martian surface chemistry and photooxidation processes; and searching for organic compounds in the form of free radicals preserved in subsoils, and detection of microfossils with Martian carbonate sediments.

  17. In vitro antifungal activity of topical and systemic antifungal drugs against Malassezia species.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Muñoz, Alfonso Javier; Rojas, Florencia; Tur-Tur, Cristina; de Los Ángeles Sosa, María; Diez, Gustavo Ortiz; Espada, Carmen Martín; Payá, María Jesús; Giusiano, Gustavo

    2013-09-01

    The strict nutritional requirements of Malassezia species make it difficult to test the antifungal susceptibility. Treatments of the chronic and recurrent infections associated with Malassezia spp. are usually ineffective. The objective of this study was to obtain in vitro susceptibility profile of 76 clinical isolates of Malassezia species against 16 antifungal drugs used for topical or systemic treatment. Isolates were identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were obtained by a modified microdilution method based on the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute reference document M27-A3. The modifications allowed a good growth of all tested species. High in vitro antifungal activity of most tested drugs was observed, especially triazole derivatives, except for fluconazole which presented the highest MICs and widest range of concentrations. Ketoconazole and itraconazole demonstrated a great activity. Higher MICs values were obtained with Malassezia furfur indicating a low susceptibility to most of the antifungal agents tested. Malassezia sympodialis and Malassezia pachydermatis were found to be more-susceptible species than M. furfur, Malassezia globosa, Malassezia slooffiae and Malassezia restricta. Topical substances were also active but provide higher MICs than the compounds for systemic use. The differences observed in the antifungals activity and interspecies variability demonstrated the importance to studying the susceptibility profile of each species to obtain reliable information for defining an effective treatment regimen.

  18. Multi-species analyses of direct activators of the constitutive androstane receptor.

    PubMed

    Omiecinski, Curtis J; Coslo, Denise M; Chen, Tao; Laurenzana, Elizabeth M; Peffer, Richard C

    2011-10-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR; NR1I3) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily and functions as an important xenochemical sensor and transcriptional modulator in mammalian cells. Upon chemical activation, CAR undergoes nuclear translocation and heterodimerization with the retinoid X receptor subsequent to its DNA target interaction. CAR is unusual among nuclear receptors in that it possesses a high level of constitutive activity in cell-based assays, obscuring the detection of ligand activators. However, a human splice variant of CAR, termed CAR3, exhibits negligible constitutive activity. In addition, CAR3 is activated by ligands with similar specificity as the reference form of the receptor. In this study, we hypothesized that similar CAR3 receptors could be constructed across various mammalian species' forms of CAR that would preserve species-specific ligand responses, thus enabling a more sensitive and differential screening assessment of CAR response among animal models. A battery of CAR3 receptors was produced in mouse, rat, and dog and comparatively evaluated with selected ligands together with human CAR1 and CAR3 in mammalian cell reporter assays. The results demonstrate that the 5-amino acid insertion that typifies human CAR3 also imparts ligand-activated receptor function in other species' CAR while maintaining signature responses in each species to select CAR ligands. These variant constructs permit in vitro evaluation of differential chemical effector responses across species and coupled with in vivo assays, the species-selective contributions of CAR in normal physiology and in disease processes such as hepatocarcinogenesis.

  19. Familiarity modulates motor activation while other species' actions are observed: a magnetic stimulation study.

    PubMed

    Amoruso, Lucia; Urgesi, Cosimo

    2016-03-01

    Observing other people's actions facilitates the observer's motor system as compared with observing the same individuals at rest. This motor activation is thought to result from mirror-like activity in fronto-parietal areas, which enhances the excitability of the primary motor cortex via cortico-cortical pathways. Although covert motor activation in response to observed actions has been widely investigated between conspecifics, how humans cope with other species' actions has received less attention. For example, it remains unclear whether the human motor system is activated by observing other species' actions, and whether prior familiarity with the non-conspecific agent modulates this activation. Here, we combined single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation and motor-evoked potential recording to explore the impact of familiarity on motor activation during the observation of non-conspecific actions. Videos displaying actions performed either by a conspecific (human) or by a non-conspecific (dog) were shown to individuals who had prior familiarity or no familiarity at all with the non-conspecific agent. We found that, whereas individuals with long-lasting familiarity showed similar levels of motor activation for human and canine actions, individuals who had no familiarity showed higher motor activation for human than for canine actions. These findings suggest that the human motor system is flexible enough to resonate with other species, and that familiarity plays a key role in tuning this ability.

  20. Determination of the antibiofilm, antiadhesive, and anti-MRSA activities of seven Salvia species

    PubMed Central

    Al-Bakri, Amal G.; Othman, Ghadeer; Afifi, Fatma U.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Several Salvia species are indigenous to Jordan and are widely used as beverages and spices and for their medicinal properties. The objective of the study was to establish the antimicrobial activities, including the antiadhesive and antibiofilm effects of seven different Salvia species. Materials and Methods: Methods used for planktonic culture included agar diffusion, broth microdilution, and minimal biocidal concentration determination while viable count was used for the determination of the antibiofilm and antiadhesion activities. Overnight cultures of reference strains of Candida albicans, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus and clinical strains of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) were used as test microorganisms. Results: An antimicrobial activity toward planktonic cultures demonstrated a significant bacteriocidal activity (≥4 log cycle reduction) for the S. triloba extract against S. aureus including MRSA. Its volatile oil exhibited an antimicrobial activity covering all tested microorganisms with the exception of P. aeruginosa. S. triloba extract and volatile oil were successful in preventing and controlling the biofilm, demonstrating antiadhesion and antibiofilm activities, respectively. Conclusion: These reported activities for S. triloba extract and volatile oil allows their listing as potential antibiofilm and anti-MRSA natural agents. This might suggest their use as an antiseptic in the prophylaxis and treatment of S. aureus-associated skin infections. The antimicrobial activity of the other tested Salvia species was negligible. PMID:21120026

  1. Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation in Plants: Mechanisms and Enhancement of Phytoremediation of Groundwater Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Strand, Stuart E.

    2002-06-01

    Several varieties of transgenic poplar containing cytochrome P-450 2E1 have been constructed and are undergoing tests. Strategies for improving public acceptance and safety of transgenic poplar for chlorinated hydrocarbon phytoremediation are being developed. We have discovered a unique rhizobium species that lives within the stems of poplar and we are investigating whether this bacterium contributes nitrogen fixed from the air to the plant and whether this endophyte could be used to introduce genes into poplar. Studies of the production of chloride ion from TCE have shown that our present P-450 constructs did not produce chloride more rapidly than wild type plants. Follow-up studies will determine if there are other rate limiting downstream steps in TCE metabolism in plants. Studies of the metabolism of carbon tetrachloride in poplar cells have provided evidence that the native plant metabolism is due to the activity of oxidative enzymes similar to the mammalian cytochrome P-450 2E1.

  2. [Effects of waterlogging on the growth and energy-metabolic enzyme activities of different tree species].

    PubMed

    Wang, Gui-Bin; Cao, Fu-Liang; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Wang-Xiang

    2010-03-01

    Aimed to understand the waterlogging tolerance and adaptation mechanisms of different tree species, a simulated field experiment was conducted to study the growth and energy-metabolic enzyme activities of one-year-old seedlings of Taxodium distichum, Carya illinoensis, and Sapium sebiferum. Three treatments were installed, i. e., CK, waterlogging, and flooding, with the treatment duration being 60 days. Under waterlogging and flooding, the relative growth of test tree species was in the order of T. distichum > C. illinoensis > S. sebiferum, indicating that T. distichum had the strongest tolerance against waterlogging and flooding, while S. sebiferum had the weakest one. Also under waterlogging and flooding, the root/crown ratio of the three tree species increased significantly, suggesting that more photosynthates were allocated in roots, and the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activities of the tree species also had a significant increase. Among the test tree species, T. distichum had the lowest increment of LDH and ADH activities under waterlogging and flooding, but the increment could maintain at a higher level in the treatment duration, while for C. illinoensis and S. sebiferum, the increment was larger during the initial and medium period, but declined rapidly during the later period of treatment. The malate dehydrogenase (MDH), phosphohexose (HPI), and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) -6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH) activities of the tree species under waterlogging and flooding had a significant decrease, and the decrement was the largest for T. distichum, being 35.6% for MDH, 21.0% for HPI, and 22.7% for G6PDH - 6PGDH under flooding. It was suggested that under waterlogging and flooding, the tree species with strong waterlogging tolerance had a higher ability to maintain energy-metabolic balance, and thus, its growth could be maintained at a certain level.

  3. Effects of ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine on Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst viability

    SciTech Connect

    Korich, D.G.; Mead, J.R.; Madore, M.S.; Sinclair, N.A.; Sterling, C.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Purified Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. Excystation and mouse infectivity were comparatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. Ozone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlorine and monochloramine did. Greater than 90% inactivation as measured by infectivity was achieved by treating oocysts with 1 ppm of ozone (1 mg/liter) for 5 min. Exposure to 1.3 ppm of chlorine dioxide yielded 90% inactivation after 1 h, while 80 ppm of chlorine and 80 ppm of monochloramine required approximately 90 min for 90% inactivation. The data indicate that C. parvum oocysts are 30 times more resistant to ozone and 14 times more resistant to chlorine dioxide than Giardia cysts exposed to these disinfectants under the same conditions. With the possible exception of ozone, the use of disinfectants alone should not be expected to inactivate C. parvum oocysts in drinking water.

  4. Effects of ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine on Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst viability.

    PubMed Central

    Korich, D G; Mead, J R; Madore, M S; Sinclair, N A; Sterling, C R

    1990-01-01

    Purified Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. Excystation and mouse infectivity were comparatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. Ozone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlorine and monochloramine did. Greater than 90% inactivation as measured by infectivity was achieved by treating oocysts with 1 ppm of ozone (1 mg/liter) for 5 min. Exposure to 1.3 ppm of chlorine dioxide yielded 90% inactivation after 1 h, while 80 ppm of chlorine and 80 ppm of monochloramine required approximately 90 min for 90% inactivation. The data indicate that C. parvum oocysts are 30 times more resistant to ozone and 14 times more resistant to chlorine dioxide than Giardia cysts exposed to these disinfectants under the same conditions. With the possible exception of ozone, the use of disinfectants alone should not be expected to inactivate C. parvum oocysts in drinking water. PMID:2339894

  5. Chemotaxis of Pseudomonas putida toward chlorinated benzoates

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood, C.S.; Parales, R.E.; Dispensa, M. )

    1990-05-01

    The chlorinated aromatic acids 3-chlorobenzoate and 4-chlorobenzoate are chemoattractants for Pseudomonas putida PRS2000. These compounds are detected by a chromosomally encoded chemotactic response to benzoate which is inducible by {beta}-ketoadipate, and intermediate of benzoate catabolism. Plasmid pAC27, encoding enzymes for 3-chlorobenzoate degradation, does not appear to carry genes for chemotaxis toward chlorinated compounds.

  6. Toxicity of chlorine to zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Kent, Michael L; Buchner, Cari; Barton, Carrie; Tanguay, Robert L

    2014-01-16

    Surface disinfection of fertilized fish eggs is widely used in aquaculture to reduce extraovum pathogens that may be released from brood fish during spawning, and this is routinely used in zebrafish Danio rerio research laboratories. Most laboratories use approximately 25 to 50 ppm unbuffered chlorine solution for 5 to 10 min. Treatment of embryos with chlorine has significant germicidal effects for many Gram-negative bacteria, viruses, and trophozoite stages of protozoa, but is less effective against cyst or spore stages of protozoa and certain Mycobacterium spp. Therefore, we evaluated the toxicity of unbuffered and buffered chlorine solutions to embryos exposed at 6 or 24 h post-fertilization (hpf) to determine whether higher concentrations can be used for treating zebrafish embryos. Most of our experiments entailed using an outbred line (5D), with both mortality and malformations as endpoints. We found that 6 hpf embryos consistently were more resistant than 24 hpf embryos to the toxic effects of chlorine. Chlorine is more toxic and germicidal at lower pH, and chlorine causes elevated pH. Consistent with this, we found that unbuffered chlorine solutions (pH ca. 8-9) were less toxic at corresponding concentrations than solutions buffered to pH 7. Based on our findings here, we recommend treating 6 hpf embryos for 10 min and 24 hpf embryos for 5 min with unbuffered chlorine solution at 100 ppm.

  7. Inactivation of Renibacterium salmoninarum by free chlorine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pascho, Ronald J.; Landolt, Marsha L.; Ongerth, Jerry E.

    1995-01-01

    Salmonid fishes contract bacterial kidney disease by vertical or horizontal transmission of the pathogenic bacterium, Renibacterium salmoninarum. Procedures to reduce vertical transmission are under evaluation, but methods are still needed to eliminate sources of waterborne R. salmoninarum. We examined the efficacy of chlorine to inactivate R. salmoninarum. The bacterium was exposed to various levels of chlorine at pH 6, 7, or 8, and at 7.5 °C or 15 °C. At pH 7 and 15 °C, 99% inactivation occurred within 18 s, even at free chlorine concentrations as low as 0.05 mg/l. Chlorine was most effective at neutral or acidic pH, and 15 °C. The inactivation curves for 7.5 °C and pH 7, or 15 °C and pH 8, deviated from first-order kinetics by exhibiting shoulders or a tailing-off effect, suggesting that chlorine and the bacterial cells were not the sole reactants. A plot of the concentration-time (Ct) products for free chlorine at pH 7 and 15 °C produced a line with a slope less than 1, indicating that the duration of exposure was more important than the concentration of free chlorine. These data indicate that R. salmoninarum is very sensitive to chlorine, and that this disinfectant may be appropriate for use in fish hatcheries rearing salmonids affected by bacterial kidney disease.

  8. Factors Regulating Soil Organic Matter Chlorination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, T.; Gustavsson, M.; Reyier, H.; Rietz, K.; Karlsson, S.; Göransson, C.; Andersson, M.; Öberg, G.; Bastviken, D.

    2013-12-01

    Natural chlorination of organic matter is a common process in various soils. Despite the widespread abundance of soil organic chlorine, knowledge on the processes and regulation of soil organic matter chlorination are modest. The purpose of this study is to elucidate how environmental factors may influence chlorination of organic matter in soil. Four factors were chosen for this study; water content, and nitrogen, organic carbon, and chloride concentrations. The variables are all known in different ways as important for microbes and transformation of chlorine in soil. The soil was collected from 5-15 cm depth in a coniferous forest southeast of Sweden. To test how the selected factors influenced chlorination of organic matter, we used soil laboratory incubations using 36Cl-chloride as a radioisotopic marker. A multivariate factorial design with two levels of i) soil moisture, ii) chloride amendment, iii) nitrogen amendment, and iv) glucose and maltose addition was used to simultaneously test for possible combination effects for all factors. A known radioactivity of 36chloride was added to the soil samples and incubated with four different factor treatments during an incubation period of 15 and 60 days. This presentation will discuss the results of this study including what combination of factors enhanced or hampered chlorination and thereby discuss previous observed variability of organic chlorine and chloride in soil.

  9. Cytotoxicity and Antioxidant Activity of 23 Plant Species of Leguminosae Family

    PubMed Central

    Khalighi-Sigaroodi, Farahnaz; Ahvazi, Maryam; Hadjiakhoondi, Abbas; Taghizadeh, Mitra; Yazdani, Darab; Khalighi-Sigaroodi, Shahram; Bidel, Siamak

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have been focused on natural anticarcinogenic agents. Many antioxidants have been identified as anticarcinogens. Antimutagens have also been proposed as cancer chemopreventive agents. The use of natural products as anticancer has a long history that began with traditional medicine. The aim of this study was to evaluate cytotoxicity and antioxidant activity of twenty-three plant species of Leguminosae family from different regions of Iran. Twenty-three plant species of Leguminosae family were collected in May-June 2009 from different regions of Iran.Methanol extracts of these species were tested through the brine shrimp lethality assay in order to detect potential sources of novel cytotoxic compounds. The total antioxidant activity was evaluated with DPPH free radical-scavenging method. The extracts of twelve species showed moderate cytotoxicity against brine shrimp (LC50 between 30 and 50 μg/mL). The extracts of Taverniera spartea and Tephrosia persica showed significant cytotoxicity (LC50 < 30 μg/mL) with LC50 values of 0.34 and 2.43 μg/mL, respectively, whereas the positive control, thymol showed a LC50 value of 1.37 μg/mL. The chloroform fractions of the latter two species were subjected to the brine shrimp lethality assay with LC50 values of 113.79 and 1.23 μg/mL, respectively. In comparing antioxidant capacities, Gleditschia caspica and Taverniera spartea showed significant antioxidant activity (IC50 < 50 μg/mL) with LC50 values of 14.54 and 20.32 μg/mL, respectively. It could be seen among 23 tested plant species that Taverniera spartea had the most cytotoxic and antioxidant activity and was the best candidate for these effects. Further investigations are necessary for chemical characterization of the active compounds and more comprehensive biological assays. PMID:24250452

  10. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of ethanolic extracts of Lychnophora species.

    PubMed

    Guzzo, L S; Saúde-Guimarães, D A; Silva, A C A; Lombardi, J A; Guimarães, H N; Grabe-Guimarães, A

    2008-02-28

    Extracts from Lychnophora species are traditionally used in Brazil as anti-inflammatory, and to treat bruise, pain and rheumatism. The ethanolic extract of aerial parts of five species of Lychnophoras and one specie of Lychnophoriopsis were examined for the antinociceptive (hot-plate and writhing tests) and anti-inflammatory (carrageenan-induced paw oedema test) activity in mice, by oral and topical routes, respectively. In the hot-plate test, the Lychnophora pinaster (0.75 g/kg) and Lychnophora ericoides (1.50 g/kg) extracts significantly increased the time for licking of the paws. The species Lychnophora passerina, Lychnophoriopsis candelabrum and Lychnophora pinaster, using the dose of 0.75 g/kg, and Lychnophora ericoides and Lychnophora trichocarpha in both doses evaluated (0.75 and 1.50 g/kg) significantly reduced the number of writhes induced by acetic acid. The administration of Lychnophora pinaster and Lychnophora trichocarpha ointments, in both concentrations evaluated (5 and 10%, w/w), and Lychnophora passerina and Lychnophoriopsis candelabrum, in the concentration of 10%, significantly reduced the paw oedema measured 3 h after carrageenan administration, suggesting, for the first time, an anti-inflammatory activity upon topical administration of these species. The present work comparatively demonstrated the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of some Brazilian Lychnophoras.

  11. Bacterial growth with chlorinated methanes.

    PubMed Central

    Leisinger, T; Braus-Stromeyer, S A

    1995-01-01

    Chlorinated methanes are important industrial chemicals and significant environmental pollutants. While the highly chlorinated methanes, trichloromethane and tetrachloromethane, are not productively metabolized by bacteria, chloromethane and dichloromethane are used by both aerobic and anaerobic methylotrophic bacteria as carbon and energy sources. Some of the dehalogenation reactions involved in the utilization of the latter two compounds have been elucidated. In a strictly anaerobic acetogenic bacterium growing with chloromethane, an inducible enzyme forming methyltetrahydrofolate and chloride from chloromethane and tetrahydrofolate catalyzes dehalogenation of the growth substrate. A different mechanism for the nucleophilic displacement of chloride is observed in aerobic methylotrophic bacteria utilizing dichloromethane as the sole carbon and energy source. These organisms possess the enzyme dichloromethane dehalogenase which, in a glutathione-dependent reaction, converts dichloromethane to inorganic chloride and formaldehyde, a central metabolite of methylotrophic growth. Sequence comparisons have shown that bacterial dichloromethane dehalogenases belong to the glutathione S-transferase enzyme family, and within this family to class Theta. The dehalogenation reactions underlying aerobic utilization of chloromethane by a pure culture and anaerobic growth with dichloromethane by an acetogenic mixed culture are not known. It appears that they are based on mechanisms other than nucleophilic attack by tetrahydrofolate or glutathione. PMID:8565906

  12. Chlorine utilization during trihalomethane formation in the presence of ammonia and bromide

    SciTech Connect

    Amy, G.L.; Chadik, P.A.; King, P.H.; Cooper, W.J.

    1984-10-01

    The chlorination of humic substances in the presence of ammonia and bromide and the resultant formation of trihalomethanes (THM) are described. The presence of ammonia substantially reduced but did not eliminate THM production during the chlorination of waters containing humic substances. The presence of bromide ion in waters containing humic substances leads to increased THM formation, both in the presence and in the absence of ammonia. In waters containing ammonia, bromide, and humic substances, brominated haloforms can form upon chlorination. Brominated species comprise a larger portion of the total THMs at higher chlorine doses within the free chlorine region of the breakpoint curve than at lower dose in the subbreakpoint region. Although the THM formation reaction is slow and may not be complete even after 1 week of reaction time, the initial rate of formation is competitive with the relatively rapid reactions of bromide oxidation and chloramine formation. After free chlorine is converted to chloramines, THM production should theoretically cease. THMs will form in parallel with chloramine formation. This behavior has important implications for water utilities that use a raw water source containing low but significant levels of ammonia such as the Biscayne Aquifer, or are considering chloramine disinfection as a THM control strategy.

  13. Antimicrobial activity of three baccharis species used in the traditional medicine of Northern Chile.

    PubMed

    Morales, Glauco; Paredes, Adrián; Sierra, Patricia; Loyola, Luis A

    2008-04-06

    The antimicrobial activities of aqueous ethanol and chloroform extracts of three Baccharis species currently used in Northern Chile folk medicine for the treatment of several infectious and inflammatory disorders were tested against Gram-positive and negative bacteria and fungal spp. using the agar-disc diffusion assay. The results indicated that the activity was more pronounced against Gram-positive than against Gram-negative bacteria and yeast. No significant differences on the antibacterial activity were observed in the aqueous ethanol versus chloroform extracts. None of the plant extracts evaluated exhibited any activity against ten fungi tested.

  14. In-vitro activity of taurolidine on single species and a multispecies population associated with periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Zollinger, Lilly; Schnyder, Simone; Nietzsche, Sandor; Sculean, Anton; Eick, Sigrun

    2015-04-01

    The antimicrobial activity of taurolidine was compared with minocycline against microbial species associated with periodontitis (four single strains and a 12-species mixture). Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs), killing as well as activities on established and forming single-species biofilms and a 12-species biofilm were determined. The MICs of taurolidine against single species were always 0.31 mg/ml, the MBCs were 0.64 mg/ml. The used mixed microbiota was less sensitive to taurolidine, MIC and the MBC was 2.5 mg/ml. The strains and the mixture were completely killed by 2.5 mg/ml taurolidine, whereas 256 μg/ml minocycline reduced the bacterial counts of the mixture by 5 log10 colony forming units (cfu). Coating the surface with 10 mg/ml taurolidine or 256 μg/ml minocycline prevented completely biofilm formation of Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 but not of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Y4 and the mixture. On 4.5 d old biofilms, taurolidine acted concentration dependent with a reduction by 5 log10 cfu (P. gingivalis ATCC 33277) and 7 log10 cfu (A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4) when applying 10 mg/ml. Minocycline decreased the cfu counts by 1-2 log10 cfu independent of the used concentration. The reduction of the cfu counts in the 4.5 d old multi-species biofilms was about 3 log10 cfu after application of any minocycline concentration and after using 10 mg/ml taurolidine. Taurolidine is active against species associated with periodontitis, even within biofilms. Nevertheless a complete elimination of complex biofilms by taurolidine seems to be impossible and underlines the importance of a mechanical removal of biofilms prior to application of taurolidine.

  15. Mechanism of Growth Enhancement of Plants Induced by Active Species in Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Ono, Reoto; Hayashi, Nobuya

    2015-09-01

    Plant growth enhances when seeds are irradiated by plasma. However the mechanism of the growth enhancement by plasma has not been clarified. In this study, growth enhancement of plants using various active species and variation of plant cells are investigated. RF plasma is generated under conditions where pressure is 60 Pa and input electrical power is 60 W. Irradiation period varies from 0 (control) to 75 min. Air plasma shows maximum growth of plants with irradiation period of 60 min on the other hand, oxygen plasma shows the maximum growth with irradiation period of 15 min. From change of gaseous species and pressure dependence, growth enhancing factor is expected to be active oxygen species produced in plasma. According to gene expression analysis of Arabidopsis, there are two speculated mechanism of plant growth enhancement. The first is acceleration of cell cycle by gene expressions of photosynthesis and glycolytic pathway, and the second is increase of cell size via plant hormone production.

  16. Wolbachia Do Not Induce Reactive Oxygen Species-Dependent Immune Pathway Activation in Aedes albopictus

    PubMed Central

    Molloy, Jennifer C.; Sinkins, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    Aedes albopictus is a major vector of dengue (DENV) and chikungunya (CHIKV) viruses, causing millions of infections annually. It naturally carries, at high frequency, the intracellular inherited bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia strains wAlbA and wAlbB; transinfection with the higher-density Wolbachia strain wMel from Drosophila melanogaster led to transmission blocking of both arboviruses. The hypothesis that reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced immune activation plays a role in arbovirus inhibition in this species was examined. In contrast to previous observations in Ae. aegypti, elevation of ROS levels was not observed in either cell lines or mosquito lines carrying the wild-type Wolbachia or higher-density Drosophila Wolbachia strains. There was also no upregulation of genes controlling innate immune pathways or with antioxidant/ROS-producing functions. These data suggest that ROS-mediated immune activation is not an important component of the viral transmission-blocking phenotype in this species. PMID:26287231

  17. Chlorine isotope and Cl-Br fractionation in fluids of Poás volcano (Costa Rica): Insight into an active volcanic-hydrothermal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Alejandro; Eggenkamp, H. G. M.; Martínez-Cruz, María; van Bergen, Manfred J.

    2016-10-01

    Halogen-rich volcanic fluids issued at the surface carry information on properties and processes operating in shallow hydrothermal systems. This paper reports a long-term record of Cl-Br concentrations and δ37Cl signatures of lake water and fumaroles from the active crater of Poás volcano (Costa Rica), where surface expressions of magmatic-hydrothermal activity have shown substantial periodic changes over the last decades. Both the hyperacid water of its crater lake (Laguna Caliente) and subaerial fumaroles show significant temporal variability in Cl-Br concentrations, Br/Cl ratios and δ37Cl, reflecting variations in the mode and magnitude of volatile transfer. The δ37Cl signatures of the lake, covering the period 1985-2012, show fluctuations between + 0.02 ± 0.06‰ and + 1.15 ± 0.09‰. Condensate samples from adjacent fumaroles on the southern shore, collected during the interval (2010-2012) with strong changes in gas temperature (107-763°C), display a much larger range from - 0.43 ± 0.09‰ to + 14.09 ± 0.08‰. Most of the variations in Cl isotope, Br/Cl and concentration signals can be attributed to interaction between magma-derived gas and liquid water in the volcanic-hydrothermal system below the crater. The δ37Cl were lowest and closest to magmatic values in (1) fumarolic gas that experienced little or no interaction with subsurface water and followed a relatively dry pathway, and (2) water that captured the bulk of magmatic halogen output so that no phase separation could induce fractionation. In contrast, elevated δ37Cl can be explained by partial scavenging and fractionation during subsurface gas-liquid interaction. Hence, strong Cl isotope fractionation leading to very high δ37Cl in Poás' fumaroles indicates that they followed a wet pathway. Highest δ37Cl values in the lake water were found mostly in periods when it received a significant input from subaqueous fumaroles or when high temperatures and low pH caused HCl evaporation. It is

  18. Bioremediation of chlorinated solvents through public-private partnerships

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, D.E.; Heitkamp, M.A.; Klecka, G.M.

    1995-12-31

    This paper provides an overview of the program activities of the Remediation Technology Development Forum (RTDF). The consortium is comprised of six private companies and three federal agencies. The program will demonstrate three in-situ processes for biodegradation of chlorinated solvents: cometabolic bioventing, intrinsic bioremediation, and accelerated anaerobic biodegradation. The program objectives are to demonstrate that these processes are effective, reliable, and cost efficient, and to achieve public and regulatory acceptance of these technologies.

  19. Abiotic stresses activate a MAPkinase in the model grass species Lolium temulentum L.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forage and turf grasses are utilized in diverse environments which exposes them to a variety of abiotic stresses, however very little is known concerning the perception or molecular responses to these various stresses. In the model grass species Lolium temulentum (Lt), a 46 kDa mitogen-activated pro...

  20. Rare & Endangered Species: Understanding Our Disappearing Plants and Animals. Activities Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Gas Association, Arlington, VA. Educational Services.

    About 464 plants and animals found in the United States and its territories are listed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as threatened or endangered. Another 3900 are candidates for protection. The activities in this guide are designed to help teachers and students understand the issue of endangered species. It includes ideas for several…

  1. Population and hierarchy of active species in gold iron oxide catalysts for carbon monoxide oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    He, Qian; Freakley, Simon J.; Edwards, Jennifer K.; Carley, Albert F.; Borisevich, Albina Y.; Mineo, Yuki; Haruta, Masatake; Hutchings, Graham J.; Kiely, Christopher J.

    2016-09-27

    The identity of active species in supported gold catalysts for low temperature carbon monoxide oxidation remains an unsettled debate. With large amounts of experimental evidence supporting theories of either gold nanoparticles or sub-nm gold species being active, it was recently proposed that a size-dependent activity hierarchy should exist. Here we study the diverging catalytic behaviors after heat treatment of Au/FeOx materials prepared via co-precipitation and deposition precipitation methods. After ruling out any support effects, the gold particle size distributions in different catalysts are quantitatively studied using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). A counting protocol is developed to reveal the true particle size distribution from HAADF-STEM images, which reliably includes all the gold species present. As a result, correlation of the populations of the various gold species present with catalysis results demonstrate that a size-dependent activity hierarchy must exist in the Au/FeOx catalyst.

  2. Population and hierarchy of active species in gold iron oxide catalysts for carbon monoxide oxidation

    DOE PAGES

    He, Qian; Freakley, Simon J.; Edwards, Jennifer K.; ...

    2016-09-27

    The identity of active species in supported gold catalysts for low temperature carbon monoxide oxidation remains an unsettled debate. With large amounts of experimental evidence supporting theories of either gold nanoparticles or sub-nm gold species being active, it was recently proposed that a size-dependent activity hierarchy should exist. Here we study the diverging catalytic behaviors after heat treatment of Au/FeOx materials prepared via co-precipitation and deposition precipitation methods. After ruling out any support effects, the gold particle size distributions in different catalysts are quantitatively studied using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). A counting protocol is developed to revealmore » the true particle size distribution from HAADF-STEM images, which reliably includes all the gold species present. As a result, correlation of the populations of the various gold species present with catalysis results demonstrate that a size-dependent activity hierarchy must exist in the Au/FeOx catalyst.« less

  3. Isotopic evidence for quick freshening of magmatic chlorine in the Lesser Antilles arc volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Jendrzejewski, N.; Aubaud, C. P.; Bonifacie, M.; Crispi, O.; Dessert, C.; Agrinier, P.

    2012-12-01

    Despite numerous geophysical and geochemical monitoring techniques developed over the last 50 years to detect magma activities in volcanoes, it is still challenging to evaluate the state of magmatic activity during its decreasing phase (transitory quiet stage and/or final stage of the magma intrusion which may last for decades) for those infrequent, slow developing, and dangerous explosive eruptive arc volcanoes, attributed to the interaction between the magma and hydrothermal cells at shallow depths to produce complex phreato-magmatic events. Recent studies have implied that chloride in intrusion-induced thermal springs could be a potential sensitive indicator of shallow magma degassing. However, possible contamination from surface chlorine reservoirs, such as seawater, may overprint the magmatic signature and complicate the interpretation of field observation. Here, based on chlorine isotope examination of various water samples from two recently erupted volcanoes in the Lesser Antilles arc (Soufrière in Guadeloupe: phreatic eruption in1976-1977; Montagne Pelée in Martinique: pelean eruption in 1929-1932), we show that magmatic chlorine is isotopically distinct from surface chlorine (seawater, meteoric water, and ground water). A chlorine isotopic survey on thermal springs in Guadeloupe and Martinique indicate that the magmatic chlorine signature is still present in some of the thermal springs in Guadeloupe but completely disappeared in Martinique. This suggests that magmatic chlorine be rapidly flushed from hydrothermal system within < 30 to 80 years after the magmatic eruption. This enables chlorine isotopes to be a sensitive proxy to monitor shallow magmatic activities, particularly practicable at centennial scale.

  4. Antibacterial activity of extracts of three Croton species collected in Mpumalanga region in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Selowa, S C; Shai, L J; Masoko, P; Mokgotho, M P; Magano, S R

    2009-12-30

    The antibacterial activities of three Croton species were compared using bioautography and the serial microdilution methods. The methanolic extracts of all the species had low activity against Escherichia coli. The highest activity was observed with Croton megalobotrys against Enterococcus faecalis with a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of 0.02 mg/ml. Croton steenkapianus extracts were the least active of the species investigated, only managing an MIC value of 0.625 mg/ml against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Croton megalobotrys leaf powder was serially extracted using solvents of various polarities. The lowest MIC value (0.06 mg/ml) of the serially extracted fractions was observed with acetone against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The liquid-liquid fractions of the methanol extract of Croton megalobotrys were also tested. The lowest MIC value of 0.02 mg/ml was observed with n-hexane fraction against Enterococcus faecalis. The carbon tetrachloride fraction was further fractionated using column chromatography with silica as the immobile phase. The resulting seven fractions were tested for activity following the bioassay-guided practice, and it emerged that the first three fractions had active compounds against Staphylococcus aureus when the bioautography method was used.

  5. Detection, formation and occurrence of 13 new polar phenolic chlorinated and brominated disinfection byproducts in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yang; Wang, Ying; Li, Aimin; Xu, Bin; Xian, Qiming; Shuang, Chendong; Shi, Peng; Zhou, Qing

    2017-04-01

    Recently, 13 new polar phenolic chlorinated and brominated disinfection byproducts (Cl- and Br-DBPs) were identified and quantified in simulated chlorinated drinking water by adopting product ion scan, precursor ion scan, and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) analyses using ultra performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-tqMS). The 13 new DBPs have been drawing increasing concern not only because they possess significantly higher growth inhibition, developmental toxicity, and chronic cytotoxicity than commonly known aliphatic DBPs, but also because they act as intermediate DBPs that can decompose to form the U.S. EPA regulated DBPs. In this study, through MS parameter optimization of the UPLC/ESI-tqMS MRM analysis, the instrument detection and quantitation limits of the 13 new DBPs were substantially lowered to 0.42-6.44 and 1.35-16.51 μg/L, respectively. The total levels of the 13 new DBPs formed in chlorination were much higher than those formed in chloramination within a contact time of 3 d. In chlorination, the 13 new DBPs formed quickly and decomposed rapidly, and their total concentration kept on decreasing with contact time. In chloramination, the levels of the dominant species (i.e., trihalo-phenols) firstly increased and then decreased with contact time, whereas the levels of the other new DBPs were relatively low and kept on increasing with contact time. An increasing of pH from 6.0 to 9.0 decreased the formation of the 13 new DBPs by 57.8% and 62.3% in chlorination and chloramination, respectively. Gallic acid was found to be present in various simulated and real source water samples and was demonstrated to be a precursor of the 13 new DBPs with elucidated formation pathways. Furthermore, 12 of the 13 new DBPs were detected in 16 tap water samples obtained from major cities in East China, at total levels from 9.5 to 329.8 ng/L. The concentrations of the new DBPs were higher in samples

  6. Chlorine sensing properties of zinc oxide resistive gas sensor doped with platinum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedot, M.; Suchorska-Woźniak, P.; Rac, O.; Nawrot, W.; Teterycz, H.

    2016-11-01

    In presented studies resistive chlorine gas sensor with gas sensitive layer in the form of zinc oxide microrods doped with platinum was developed. The growth of active layer was carried out in water solution containing zinc nitrate (V), hexamethylenetetramine and chloroplatinic acid using the chemical bath deposition method. The structure and morphology of obtained sensors was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). To determine the chlorine gas sensing properties Temperature-Stimulated Conductance method (TSC) was used. During the measurements sensor was tested in a reference atmosphere and an atmosphere with 2, 5 or 8 ppm of chlorine. Obtained results have shown that zinc oxide microrods doped with platinum were obtained. TSC measurements showed that developed sensor allows to detect chlorine with very good sensitivity.

  7. An analysis of dioxin production as a function of chlorine feed

    SciTech Connect

    Liberson, G.L.; Belanger, W.D.

    1996-12-31

    The effectiveness of decreasing dioxin emissions by reducing incinerator chlorine feeds is the subject of a continuing debate. This paper presents an analysis of the relationship between PCDD/PCDF emissions and chlorine feed at a single hazardous waste incinerator. The data used in this analysis were taken from multiple test series, conducted over a 13 month period, at a hazardous waste incinerator that employs an activated carbon injection system for supplemental control of PCDD/PCDFs. The chlorine feed rates range between 0 and 3,304 pounds per hour, and the PCDD/PCDF emission rates range between 0.7 and 39.0 ng/DSCM {at} 7% O{sub 2}. This analysis reveals that, for a modern hazardous waste incinerator using carbon injection, there is no correlation between dioxin emissions and chlorine feed.

  8. The Free Energies of Reactions of Chlorinated Methanes with Aqueous Monovalent Anions: Applications of ab initio Electronic Structure Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bylaska, Eric J.; Dixon, David A.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2000-01-01

    The presence of different anionic species in natural waters can significantly alter the degradation rates of chlorinated methanes and other organic compounds. Favorable reaction energetics is a necessary feature of these nucleophilic substitution reactions that can result in the degradation of the chlorinated methanes. In this study, ab initio electronic structure theory is used to evaluate the free energies of reaction of a series of monovalent anionic species (OH-, SH-, NO3 -, HCO3 -, HSO3 -, HSO4 -, H2PO4 -, and F-) that can occur in natural waters with the chlorinated methanes, CCl4, CCl3H, CCl2H2, and CClH3. The results of this investigation show that nucleophilic substitution reactions of OH-, SH-, HCO3 -, and F- are significantly exothermic for chlorine displacement, NO3 - reactions are slightly exothermic to thermoneutral, HSO3

  9. In vitro antiplasmodial activity of benzophenones and xanthones from edible fruits of Garcinia species.

    PubMed

    Lyles, James T; Negrin, Adam; Khan, Shabana I; He, Kan; Kennelly, Edward J

    2014-06-01

    Species of Garcinia have been used to combat malaria in traditional African and Asian medicines, including Ayurveda. In the current study, we have identified antiplasmodial benzophenone and xanthone compounds from edible Garcinia species by testing for in vitro inhibitory activity against Plasmodium falciparum. Whole fruits of Garcinia xanthochymus, G. mangostana, G. spicata, and G. livingstonei were extracted and tested for antiplasmodial activity. Garcinia xanthochymus was subjected to bioactivity-guided fractionation to identify active partitions. Purified benzophenones (1-9) and xanthones (10-18) were then screened in the plasmodial lactate dehydrogenase assay and tested for cytotoxicity against mammalian (Vero) cells. The benzophenones guttiferone E (4), isoxanthochymol (5), and guttiferone H (6), isolated from G. xanthochymus, and the xanthones α-mangostin (15), β-mangostin (16), and 3-isomangostin (17), known from G. mangostana, showed antiplasmodial activity with IC50 values in the range of 4.71-11.40 µM. Artemisinin and chloroquine were used as positive controls and exhibited IC50 values in the range of 0.01-0.24 µM. The identification of antiplasmodial benzophenone and xanthone compounds from G. xanthochymus and G. mangostana provides evidence for the antiplasmodial activity of Garcinia species and warrants further investigation of these fruits as dietary sources of chemopreventive compounds.

  10. Evaluation of Antibacterial Activity and Reactive Species Generation of N-Benzenesulfonyl Derivatives of Heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Sol Romina; Miana, Gisele Emilse; Albesa, Inés; Mazzieri, María Rosa; Becerra, María Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Two N-benzenesulfonyl (BS) derivatives of 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinoline (THQ) were designed, prepared, and screened for antibacterial activity. This approach was based on combining the two privileged structures, BS and THQ, which are known to be active. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of BS-THQ and its analogue 4-NH2BS-THQ, and to investigate the roles of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species in their lethality. Both showed bactericidal activity against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213 and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) ATCC 43300, with transmission electron microscopy revealing a disturbed membrane architecture. Furthermore, an increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in strains treated with BS-THQ with respect to the control was detected when fluorescent microscopy and spectrophotometric techniques were used. The analogue 4-NH2BS-THQ demonstrated a broader spectrum of activity than BS-THQ, with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 100 µg/mL against reference strains of S. aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The assayed compounds represent promising structures for the development of new synthetic classes of antimicrobials.

  11. Profile and antioxidant activity of phenolic extracts from 10 crabapples (Malus wild species).

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Shi, Junling; Wang, Kun

    2014-01-22

    Phenolic products are highly demanded by the food and cosmetics industries and consumers due to their high antioxidant activities. To evaluate the potential of crabapples (Malus wild species) in preparing phenolic extracts, fruits of 10 crabapples grown in China were separately extracted with 80% (v/v) ethanol and ethyl acetate and the phenolic profiles, polyphenol (PC) and flavonoid contents (FC), and antioxidant activities of the extracts were analyzed. Chlorogenic acid, (-)-epicatechin, rutin, hyperin, and phlorizin appeared as the major phenolic compounds in all phenolic extracts. Ethanol extracts had PC of 302.83-1265.94 mg GAE/100g and FC of 352.45-2351.74 mg RE/100g, being 4.17 and 4.49 times those obtained in ethyl acetate extracts and much higher than those previously reported in apples. Malus wild species appeared as rich sources of phenolic compounds with high antioxidant activity, especially when high chlorogenic acid and rutin contents are emphasized.

  12. Antioxidant activities and polyphenolic contents of three selected Micromeria species from Croatia.

    PubMed

    Vladimir-Knežević, Sanda; Blažeković, Biljana; Štefan, Maja Bival; Alegro, Antun; Koszegi, Tamás; Petrik, József

    2011-02-10

    Antioxidant activities of three selected Micromeria species growing in Croatia (M. croatica, M. juliana and M. thymifolia) were evaluated using five different antioxidant assays, in comparison with plant polyphenolic constituents and reference antioxidants. All studied ethanolic extracts exhibited considerable activity to scavenge DPPH and hydroxyl free radicals, reducing power, iron chelating ability and total antioxidant capacity in the order: M. croatica > M. juliana > M. thymifolia. Total polyphenol (9.69-13.66%), phenolic acid (5.26-6.84%), flavonoid (0.01-0.09%) and tannin (3.07-6.48%) contents in dried plant samples were determined spectrophotometrically. A strong positive correlation between antioxidant activities and contents of phenolic acids and tannins was found, indicating their responsibility for effectiveness of tested plants. Our findings established Micromeria species as a rich source of antioxidant polyphenols, especially the endemic M. croatica.

  13. Multivariate data analysis to evaluate the fingerprint peaks responsible for the cytotoxic activity of Mallotus species.

    PubMed

    Tistaert, C; Chataigné, G; Dejaegher, B; Rivière, C; Nguyen Hoai, N; Chau Van, M; Quetin-Leclercq, J; Vander Heyden, Y

    2012-12-01

    The Mallotus genus comprises numerous species used as traditional medicines in oriental countries and provides scientists a broad basis in the search for pharmacologically active constituents. In this paper, the cytotoxicity of 39 Mallotus extracts, different in species, part of the plant used, origin, and harvest season, is evaluated combining cytotoxicity assays with fingerprint technology and data handling tools. At first, the antiproliferative activity of the plant extracts is analyzed both on a non-cancerous cell line (WI-38--human lung fibroblast) and on a cancerous cell line (HeLa human cervix carcinoma). The results are linked to a data set of high-performance liquid chromatographic fingerprint profiles of the samples using multivariate calibration techniques. The regression coefficients of the multivariate model are then evaluated to indicate those peaks potentially responsible for the cytotoxic activity of the Mallotus extracts. In a final step, the cytotoxic extracts are analyzed by HPLC-MS and the indicated peaks identified.

  14. Chemical composition and larvicidal activity of several essential oils from Hypericum species from Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Rouis, Zyed; Laamari, Ali; Abid, Nabil; Elaissi, Ameur; Cioni, Pier Luigi; Flamini, Guido; Aouni, Mahjoub

    2013-02-01

    The chemical composition of the essential oils extracted from some Tunisian Hypericum species and their larvicidal activity against Culex pipiens larvae were evaluated. The chemical compositions of the essential oils from the aerial plant parts were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. One hundred and thirty-four compounds were identified, ranging between 85.1 and 95.4 % of the oil's composition. The components were monoterpene hydrocarbons, oxygenated monoterpenes, sesquiterpene hydrocarbons, oxygenated sesquiterpenes, non-terpenic hydrocarbons, and others. The larvicidal activity of the essential oils was evaluated using a method recommended by WHO. Larvicidal tests revealed that essential oils from the Hypericum species have a significant larvicidal activity against C. pipiens, with LC(50) ranging between 102.82 and 194.70 ppm. The most powerful essential oils against these larvae were Hypericum tomentosum and Hypericum humifusum samples, followed by the essential oil of Hypericum perforatum.

  15. Sulfatase-activated fluorophores for rapid discrimination of mycobacterial species and strains

    PubMed Central

    Beatty, Kimberly E.; Williams, Monique; Carlson, Brian L.; Swarts, Benjamin M.; Warren, Robin M.; van Helden, Paul D.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2013-01-01

    Most current diagnostic tests for tuberculosis do not reveal the species or strain of pathogen causing pulmonary infection, which can lead to inappropriate treatment regimens and the spread of disease. Here, we report an assay for mycobacterial strain assignment based on genetically conserved mycobacterial sulfatases. We developed a sulfatase-activated probe, 7-hydroxy-9H-(1,3-dichloro-9,9-dimethylacridin-2-one)–sulfate, that detects enzyme activity in native protein gels, allowing the rapid detection of sulfatases in mycobacterial lysates. This assay revealed that mycobacterial strains have distinct sulfatase fingerprints that can be used to judge both the species and lineage. Our results demonstrate the potential of enzyme-activated probes for rapid pathogen discrimination for infectious diseases. PMID:23878250

  16. Kinetics of chlorine atom reactions with molecules of atmospheric interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goliff, Wendy Suzanne

    1997-07-01

    The major factor in determining whether chlorine atom (Cl) reactions are important sinks in the stratosphere for hydrogen-containing species is the relative rate constants for attack by Cl versus attack by hydroxyl (HO). Although the rates of HO with methyl bromide (CH3Br), HFC-32 (CH2F2), HFC-125 (CHF2CF3), HFC-152a (CH3CHF2), HCFC-123 (CHCl2CF3) and HCFC-124 (CHClFCF3) are well-known, few data are available for their rate constants with Cl. The thermal reaction rate constants of hydrogen abstraction by Cl with CH3Br, CH2F2,/ CHF2CF3,/ CH3CHF2,/ CHCl2CF3/ and/ CHClFCF3 in the gas phase have been measured at 298K and 4,000 torr. 38Cl was reacted with each species against the common competitor, bromotrifluoroethylene (CF2=CFBr). The decomposition product of the competitor reaction, 38-chlorotrifluoroethylene (CF2[=]CF38Cl), was measured by radiogas chromatography. The relative rate constants were converted to an absolute scale by comparison to the well- known rate constant of Cl with methane (CH4). The gas phase substitution reactions of thermal atomic chlorine with methyl iodide and methyl bromide to form methyl chloride have been Cl+CH3X/to CH3Cl+X/ (X=Br,I)investigated at two pressures (4,000 torr & 760 torr) and three temperatures (273K, 295K, 343K), using radioactive 38Cl from the thermal neutron induced 37Cl(n,/gamma)38Cl nuclear reaction. The initially energetic 38Cl atoms are thermalized by inelastic collisions with inert CClF3 prior to reaction with the methyl halide. The yields of CH338Cl were analyzed by radiogas chromatography. The yields of CH338Cl from thermal chlorine atom reactions at 295K are 8.6% from methyl iodide, and 0.5% from methyl bromide. The corresponding reaction rate constant for thermal chlorine attack to form CH3Cl at 295K is (1.7/pm0.2)×10-15/ cm3 molecule- 1/sec-1 with CH3Br. The substitution reaction with methyl iodide is pressure-independent over the 1-5 atmosphere range. The yields of CH338Cl increase with decreasing temperature

  17. The relationship between total cholinesterase activity and mortality in four butterfly species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bargar, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between total cholinesterase activity (TChE) and mortality in four butterfly species (great southern white [Ascia monuste], common buckeye [Junonia coenia], painted lady [Vanessa cardui], and julia butterflies [Dryas julia]) was investigated. Acute contact toxicity studies were conducted to evaluate the response (median lethal dose [LD50] and TChE) of the four species following exposure to the organophosphate insecticide naled. The LD50 for these butterflies ranged from 2.3 to 7.6 μg/g. The average level of TChE inhibition associated with significant mortality ranged from 26 to 67%, depending on the species. The lower bounds of normal TChE activity (2 standard deviations less than the average TChE for reference butterflies) ranged from 8.4 to 12.3 μM/min/g. As a percentage of the average reference TChE activity for the respective species, the lower bounds were similar to the inhibition levels associated with significant mortality, indicating there was little difference between the dose resulting in significant TChE inhibition and that resulting in mortality.

  18. Chemical Constituents Analysis and Antidiabetic Activity Validation of Four Fern Species from Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen-Yu; Chiu, Fu-Yu; Lin, Yenshou; Huang, Wei-Jan; Hsieh, Po-Shiuan; Hsu, Feng-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Pterosins are abundant in ferns, and pterosin A was considered a novel activator of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, which is crucial for regulating blood glucose homeostasis. However, the distribution of pterosins in different species of ferns from various places in Taiwan is currently unclear. To address this question, the distribution of pterosins, glucose-uptake efficiency, and protective effects of pterosin A on β-cells were examined. Our results showed that three novel compounds, 13-chloro-spelosin 3-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (1), (3R)-Pterosin D 3-O-β-d-(3'-p-coumaroyl)-glucopyranoside (2), and (2R,3R)-Pterosin L 3-O-β-d-(3'-p-coumaroyl)-glucopyranoside (3), were isolated for the first time from four fern species (Ceratopteris thalictroides, Hypolepis punctata, Nephrolepis multiflora, and Pteridium revolutum) along with 27 known compounds. We also examined the distribution of these pterosin compounds in the mentioned fern species (except N. multiflora). Although all pterosin analogs exhibited the same effects in glucose uptake assays, pterosin A prevented cell death and reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. This paper is the first report to provide new insights into the distribution of pterosins in ferns from Taiwan. The potential anti-diabetic activity of these novel phytocompounds warrants further functional studies. PMID:25622260

  19. Chemical constituents analysis and antidiabetic activity validation of four fern species from Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen-Yu; Chiu, Fu-Yu; Lin, Yenshou; Huang, Wei-Jan; Hsieh, Po-Shiuan; Hsu, Feng-Lin

    2015-01-22

    Pterosins are abundant in ferns, and pterosin A was considered a novel activator of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, which is crucial for regulating blood glucose homeostasis. However, the distribution of pterosins in different species of ferns from various places in Taiwan is currently unclear. To address this question, the distribution of pterosins, glucose-uptake efficiency, and protective effects of pterosin A on β-cells were examined. Our results showed that three novel compounds, 13-chloro-spelosin 3-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (1), (3R)-Pterosin D 3-O-β-d-(3'-p-coumaroyl)-glucopyranoside (2), and (2R,3R)-Pterosin L 3-O-β-d-(3'-p-coumaroyl)-glucopyranoside (3), were isolated for the first time from four fern species (Ceratopteris thalictroides, Hypolepis punctata, Nephrolepis multiflora, and Pteridium revolutum) along with 27 known compounds. We also examined the distribution of these pterosin compounds in the mentioned fern species (except N. multiflora). Although all pterosin analogs exhibited the same effects in glucose uptake assays, pterosin A prevented cell death and reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. This paper is the first report to provide new insights into the distribution of pterosins in ferns from Taiwan. The potential anti-diabetic activity of these novel phytocompounds warrants further functional studies.

  20. Electro-active sensor, method for constructing the same; apparatus and circuitry for detection of electro-active species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An electro-active sensor includes a nonconductive platform with a first electrode set attached with a first side of a nonconductive platform. The first electrode set serves as an electrochemical cell that may be utilized to detect electro-active species in solution. A plurality of electrode sets and a variety of additional electrochemical cells and sensors may be attached with the nonconductive platform. The present invention also includes a method for constructing the aforementioned electro-active sensor. Additionally, an apparatus for detection and observation is disclosed, where the apparatus includes a sealable chamber for insertion of a portion of an electro-active sensor. The apparatus allows for monitoring and detection activities. Allowing for control of attached cells and sensors, a dual-mode circuitry is also disclosed. The dual-mode circuitry includes a switch, allowing the circuitry to be switched from a potentiostat to a galvanostat mode.

  1. Diversity of Secondary Metabolites from Marine Bacillus Species: Chemistry and Biological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mondol, Muhammad Abdul Mojid; Shin, Hee Jae; Islam, Mohammad Tofazzal

    2013-01-01

    Marine Bacillus species produce versatile secondary metabolites including lipopeptides, polypeptides, macrolactones, fatty acids, polyketides, and isocoumarins. These structurally diverse compounds exhibit a wide range of biological activities, such as antimicrobial, anticancer, and antialgal activities. Some marine Bacillus strains can detoxify heavy metals through reduction processes and have the ability to produce carotenoids. The present article reviews the chemistry and biological activities of secondary metabolites from marine isolates. Side by side, the potential for application of these novel natural products from marine Bacillus strains as drugs, pesticides, carotenoids, and tools for the bioremediation of heavy metal toxicity are also discussed. PMID:23941823

  2. Chlorination of Wastewater, Manual of Practice No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Water Pollution Control Federation, Washington, DC.

    This manual reviews chlorination practices in the treatment and disposal of wastes from the earliest known applications. The application of chlorination for various purposes is described but no attempt has been made to compare chlorination with other methods. Included are chapters on the development and practice of wastewater chlorination,…

  3. Chlorination. Training Module 2.300.2.77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with chlorine, the reasons for chlorination and safe operation and maintenance of gas chlorine, dry calcium hypochlorite and liquid sodium hypochlorite chlorination systems for water supply and wastewater treatment facilities. Included are…

  4. Influence of Chlorine Emissions on Ozone Levels in the Troposphere

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorine emissions from cooling towers are emitted mainly as hypochlous acid, not as molecular chlorine. Chlorine emissions from cooling towers in electric utilities in the U.S. are estimated to be 4,400 tons per year. Molecular chlorine increases more tropospheric ozone than hyp...

  5. Mechanistic aspects of ingested chlorine dioxide on thyroid function: impact of oxidants on iodide metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Bercz, J P; Jones, L L; Harrington, R M; Bawa, R; Condie, L

    1986-01-01

    Toxicological studies dealing with recent findings of health effects of drinking water disinfectants are reviewed. Experiments with monkeys and rodents indicate that the biological activity of ingested disinfectants is expressed via their chemical interaction with the mucosal epithelia, secretory products, and nutritional contents of the alimentary tract. Evidence exists that a principal partner of this redox interaction is the iodide of nutritional origin that is ubiquitous in the gastrointestinal tract. Thus the observation that subchronic exposure to chlorine dioxide (ClO2) in drinking water decreases serum thyroxine levels in mammalian species can be best explained with changes produced in the chemical form of the bioavailable iodide. Ongoing and previously reported mechanistic studies indicate that oxidizing agents such as chlorine-based disinfectants oxidize the basal iodide content of the gastrointestinal tract. The resulting reactive iodine species readily attaches to organic matter by covalent bonding. Evidence suggests that the extent to which such iodinated organics are formed is proportional to the magnitude of the electromotive force and stoichiometry of the redox couple between iodide and the disinfectant. Because the extent of thyroid uptake of the bioavailable iodide does not decrease during ClO2 ingestion, it seems that ClO2 does not cause iodide deficiency of sufficient magnitude to account for the decrease in hormonogenesis. Absorption of one or more of iodinated molecules, e.g., nutrients, hormones, or cellular constituents of the alimentary tract having thyromimetic or thyroid inhibitory properties, is a better hypothesis for the effects seen. Images FIGURE 1. a FIGURE 1. b FIGURE 1. c PMID:3816729

  6. Platinum nanoparticle during electrochemical hydrogen evolution: Adsorbate distribution, active reaction species, and size effect

    DOE PAGES

    Tan, Teck L.; Wang, Lin -Lin; Zhang, Jia; ...

    2015-03-02

    For small Pt nanoparticles (NPs), catalytic activity is, as observed, adversely affected by size in the 1–3 nm range. We elucidate, via first-principles-based thermodynamics, the operation H* distribution and cyclic voltammetry (CV) during the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) across the electrochemical potential, including the underpotential region (U ≤ 0) that is difficult to assess in experiment. We consider multiple adsorption sites on a 1 nm Pt NP model and show that the characteristic CV peaks from different H* species correspond well to experiment. We next quantify the activity contribution from each H* species to explain the adverse effect of size.more » From the resolved CV peaks at the standard hydrogen electrode potential (U = 0), we first deduce that the active species for the HER are the partially covered (100)-facet bridge sites and the (111)-facet hollow sites. Upon evaluation of the reaction barriers at operation H* distribution and microkinetic modeling of the exchange current, we find that the nearest-neighbor (100)-facet bridge site pairs have the lowest activation energy and contribute to ~75% of the NP activity. Edge bridge sites (fully covered by H*) per se are not active; however, they react with neighboring (100)-facet H* to account for ~18% of the activity, whereas (111)-facet hollow sites contribute little. As a result, extrapolating the relative contributions to larger NPs in which the ratio of facet-to-edge sites increases, we show that the adverse size effect of Pt NP HER activity kicks in for sizes below 2 nm.« less

  7. Platinum nanoparticle during electrochemical hydrogen evolution: Adsorbate distribution, active reaction species, and size effect

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Teck L.; Wang, Lin -Lin; Zhang, Jia; Johnson, Duane D.; Bai, Kewu

    2015-03-02

    For small Pt nanoparticles (NPs), catalytic activity is, as observed, adversely affected by size in the 1–3 nm range. We elucidate, via first-principles-based thermodynamics, the operation H* distribution and cyclic voltammetry (CV) during the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) across the electrochemical potential, including the underpotential region (U ≤ 0) that is difficult to assess in experiment. We consider multiple adsorption sites on a 1 nm Pt NP model and show that the characteristic CV peaks from different H* species correspond well to experiment. We next quantify the activity contribution from each H* species to explain the adverse effect of size. From the resolved CV peaks at the standard hydrogen electrode potential (U = 0), we first deduce that the active species for the HER are the partially covered (100)-facet bridge sites and the (111)-facet hollow sites. Upon evaluation of the reaction barriers at operation H* distribution and microkinetic modeling of the exchange current, we find that the nearest-neighbor (100)-facet bridge site pairs have the lowest activation energy and contribute to ~75% of the NP activity. Edge bridge sites (fully covered by H*) per se are not active; however, they react with neighboring (100)-facet H* to account for ~18% of the activity, whereas (111)-facet hollow sites contribute little. As a result, extrapolating the relative contributions to larger NPs in which the ratio of facet-to-edge sites increases, we show that the adverse size effect of Pt NP HER activity kicks in for sizes below 2 nm.

  8. Chlorine dioxide remediation of a virus-contaminated manufacturing facility.

    PubMed

    Lutgen, Mark

    2011-01-01

    CONFERENCE PROCEEDING Proceedings of the PDA/FDA Adventitious Viruses in Biologics: Detection and Mitigation Strategies Workshop in Bethesda, MD, USA; December 1-3, 2010 Guest Editors: Arifa Khan (Bethesda, MD), Patricia Hughes (Bethesda, MD) and Michael Wiebe (San Francisco, CA) Chlorine dioxide fumigation was successfully used to decontaminate a virally contaminated biotech manufacturing facility. Addressing safety, product quality, and corrosion risks were important factors in planning the building fumigation. Studies were performed to define the conditions in which minute mouse virus (MMV) is inactivated by chlorine dioxide and to understand equipment and facility risks. Written plans and procedures documented activities necessary to safely fumigate the building and requalify it to manufacture commercial product.

  9. In vitro activity, postantibiotic effect and human monocyte activity of grepafloxacin against Legionella species.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Jacques; St-Pierre, Claude

    1999-04-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the in vitro antimicrobial activity, postantibiotic effect (PAE) and human monocyte activity of grepafloxacin compared with sparfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, erythromycin and rifampicin against 181 strains of Legionella pneumophila, nine strains of L. micdadei, 10 strains of L. dumoffii, seven strains of L. longbeachae and seven other Legionella strains. METHODS: MICs were determined by standard agar dilution using buffered yeast extract (BYE) agar. PAE and human monocyte activity were determined by standard culture techniques. RESULTS: Grepafloxacin, sparfloxacin and rifampicin were the most active agents against L. pneumophila (MIC90 active than erythromycin against L. dumoffii and L. longbeachae and more active than both erythromycin and clarithromycin against L. micdadei and isolates of other Legionella spp. The PAE of grepafloxacin against erythromycin-susceptible L. pneumophila (2.62 h) was higher than that of sparfloxacin (0.88 h), erythromycin (0.93 hours) and clarithromycin (0.72 h). Against erythromycin-resistant L. pneumophila, the PAE of grepafloxacin (4.18 h) was higher than those of all the other antibiotics tested. Grepafloxacin, sparfloxacin, ciprofloxacin and clarithromycin inhibited the growth of all L. pneumophila strains and other erythromycin-resistant Legionella spp. in human monocytes. However, only grepafloxacin and ciprofloxacin prevented regrowth or killed L. pneumophila after removal of extracellular antibiotic. CONCLUSIONS: Grepafloxacin showed effective antibacterial activity against the Legionella spp. tested, and has a PAE and activity within human monocytes that suggest it may be useful in the treatment of lower respiratory tract infections caused by Legionella spp.

  10. Soil peroxidase-mediated chlorination of fulvic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asplund, Gunilla; Borén, Hans; Carlsson, Uno; Grimvall, Anders

    Humic matter has recently been shown to contain considerable quantities of naturally produced organohalogens. The present study investigated the possibility of a non-specific, enzymatically mediated halogenation of organic matter in soil. The results showed that, in the presence of chloride and hydrogen peroxide, the enzyme chloroperoxidase (CPO) from the fungus Caldariomyces fumago catalyzes chlorination of fulvic acid. At pH 2.5 - 6.0, the chlorine to fulvic acid ratio in the tested sample was elevated from 12 mg/g to approximately 40-50 mg/g. It was also shown that this reaction can take place at chloride and hydrogen peroxide concentrations found in the environment. An extract from spruce forest soil was shown to have a measurable chlorinating capacity. The activity of an extract of 0.5 kg soil corresponded to approximately 0.3 enzyme units, measured as CPO activity. Enzymatically mediated halogenation of humic substances may be one of the mechanisms explaining the widespread occurrence of adsorbable organic halogens (AOX) in soil and water.

  11. Efficacy and Safety Evaluation of a Chlorine Dioxide Solution.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jui-Wen; Huang, Bin-Syuan; Hsu, Chu-Wei; Peng, Chun-Wei; Cheng, Ming-Long; Kao, Jung-Yie; Way, Tzong-Der; Yin, Hao-Chang; Wang, Shan-Shue

    2017-03-22

    In this study, a chlorine dioxide solution (UC-1) composed of chlorine dioxide was produced using an electrolytic method and subsequently purified using a membrane. UC-1 was determined to contain 2000 ppm of gaseous chlorine dioxide in water. The efficacy and safety of UC-1 were evaluated. The antimicrobial activity was more than 98.2% reduction when UC-1 concentrations were 5 and 20 ppm for bacteria and fungi, respectively. The half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of H1N1, influenza virus B/TW/71718/04, and EV71 were 84.65 ± 0.64, 95.91 ± 11.61, and 46.39 ± 1.97 ppm, respectively. A 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test revealed that the cell viability of mouse lung fibroblast L929 cells was 93.7% at a 200 ppm UC-1 concentration that is over that anticipated in routine use. Moreover, 50 ppm UC-1 showed no significant symptoms in a rabbit ocular irritation test. In an inhalation toxicity test, treatment with 20 ppm UC-1 for 24 h showed no abnormality and no mortality in clinical symptoms and normal functioning of the lung and other organs. A ClO₂ concentration of up to 40 ppm in drinking water did not show any toxicity in a subchronic oral toxicity test. Herein, UC-1 showed favorable disinfection activity and a higher safety profile tendency than in previous reports.

  12. Development of industrial catalysts for sustainable chlorine production.

    PubMed

    Mondelli, Cecilia; Amrute, Amol P; Moser, Maximilian; Schmidt, Timm; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2012-01-01

    The heterogeneously catalyzed gas-phase oxidation of HCl to Cl(2) offers an energy-efficient and eco- friendly route to recover chlorine from HCl-containing byproduct streams in the chemical industry. This process has attracted renewed interest in the last decade due to an increased chlorine demand and the growing excess of byproduct HCl from chlorination processes. Since its introduction (by Deacon in 1868) and till recent times, the industrialization of this reaction has been hindered by the lack of sufficiently active and durable materials. Recently, RuO(2)-based catalysts with outstanding activity and stability have been designed and they are being implemented for large-scale Cl(2) recycling. Herein, we review the main limiting features of traditional Cu-based catalysts and survey the key steps in the development of the new generation of industrial RuO(2)-based materials. As the expansion of this technology would benefit from cheaper, but comparably robust, alternatives to RuO(2)-based catalysts, a nov el CeO(2)-based catalyst which offers promising perspectives for application in this field has been introduced.

  13. Cytochromes P450 and species differences in xenobiotic metabolism and activation of carcinogen.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, D F; Ioannides, C; Parke, D V

    1998-01-01

    The importance of cytochrome P450 isoforms to species differences in the metabolism of foreign compounds and activation of procarcinogens has been identified. The possible range of P450 isozymes in significant variations in toxicity exhibited by experimental rodent species may have a relevance to chemical risk assessment, especially as human P450s are likely to show changes in the way they metabolize xenobiotics. Consequently, in the safety evaluation of chemicals, we should be cautious in extrapolating results from experimental animal models to humans. This paper focuses on examples in which species differences in P450s lead to significant alterations in carcinogenic response, and includes a discussion of the current procedures for toxicity screening, with an emphasis on short-term tests. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9755138

  14. Threatened and endangered wildlife species of the Hanford Site related to CERCLA characterization activities

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzner, R.E.; Weiss, S.G.; Stegen, J.A.

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site has been placed on the National Priorities List, which requires that it be remediated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) or Superfund. Potentially contaminated areas of the Hanford Site were grouped into operable units, and detailed characterization and investigation plans were formulated. The DOE Richland Operations Office requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to conduct a biological assessment of the potential impact of these characterization activities on the threatened, endangered, and sensitive wildlife species of the Hanford Site. Additional direction for WHC compliances with wildlife protection can be found in the Environmental Compliance Manual. This document is intended to meet these requirements, in part, for the CERCLA characterization activities, as well as for other work comparable in scope. This report documents the biological assessment and describes the pertinent components of the Hanford Site as well as the planned characterization activities. Also provided are accounts of endangered, threatened, and federal candidate wildlife species on the Hanford Site and information as to how human disturbances can affect these species. Potential effects of the characterization activities are described with recommendations for mitigation measures.

  15. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase activity by standardized hydroalcoholic extracts of four Asteraceae species from the Argentine Puna.

    PubMed

    Alberto, M R; Zampini, I C; Isla, M I

    2009-09-01

    We determined the anti-inflammatory activity of standardized extracts of four medicinal plant species (Baccharis incarum, B. boliviensis, Chuquiraga atacamensis, Parastrephia lucida) that grow in the Argentine Puna (3800 m above sea level) and that are used to reduce oxidative stress and alleviate gout and arthritic pain. The extracts of plant aerial parts were standardized in terms of total phenolic compounds and flavone/flavanone content and free radical scavenging activity. All extracts showed high phenolic compound concentration (0.5-1.6 mg/mL), mainly flavones and flavonols (0.1-0.8 mg/mL). The extracts showed hydrogen donating ability (DPPH and ABTS) and reactive oxygen species scavenging activity (O2-, OH-, H2O2). The ability of the extracts to inhibit cyclooxygenase enzymes (COX-1 and COX-2) was determined by calculating percent inhibition of PGE2 production measured by enzyme immunoassay. All extracts inhibited both enzymes with IC50 values of 2.0 to 16.7 microg/mL. The anti-inflammatory activity of B. incarum and C. atacamensis extracts was higher than that of B. boliviensis and P. lucida. The IC50 values obtained for indomethacin were 0.11 and 0.78 microM for COX-1 and COX-2, respectively. The present results are consistent with the anecdotal use of these species in phytotherapic preparations.

  16. Larvicidal activity of selected aloe species against Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culiciade).

    PubMed

    Chore, Judith K; Obonyo, Meshack; Wachira, Francis N; Mireji, Paul O

    2014-01-01

    Management of mosquito vectors by current classes of mosquitocides is relatively ineffective and necessitates prospecting for novel insecticides with different modes of action. Larvicidal activities of 15 crude extracts from three geographically isolated Aloe ngongensis (Christian), Aloe turkanensis (Christian), and Aloe fibrosa (Lavranos & L.E.Newton) (Xanthorrhoeaceae) species (five each) were evaluated against Aedes aegypti (Linnaeus in Hasselquist) (Diptera: Culiciade L.) yellow fever mosquito. Freshly collected leaves were separately shade-dried to constant weight at room temperature (25 ± 2°C) and powdered. Each powder was macerated in solvents of increasing polarity (hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, acetone, and methanol) for 72 h and subsequently filtered. Third-instar larvae (n = 25) of the mosquito were exposed to the extracts at different concentrations for 24 h to establish dose response relationships. All the fractions of A. ngongensis were active below 1 mg/ml except A. fibrosa and A. turkanensis. The highest activity (LC50) mg/ml was obtained with extracts of A. fibrosa hexane (0.05 [0.04-0.06]), followed by A. ngongensis hexane (0.11 [0.08-0.15]) and A. turkanensis ethyl acetate (0.11 [0.09-0.12]). The activities are apparently Aloe species specific and extraction solvent dependent. These findings suggest that extracts from selected Aloe species have mosquitocidal principles that can be exploited in development of new insecticides.

  17. Screening and bioguided fractionation of Amaryllidaceae species with anti-Trichomonas vaginalis activity.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Patrícia de Brum; Giordani, Raquel Brandt; De Carli, Geraldo Attilio; Zuanazzi, José Angelo Silveira; Tasca, Tiana

    2011-07-01

    The Amaryllidaceae family is known by its ornamental and medicinal value and has attracted considerable attention due to the content of alkaloids of its species, which showed interesting biological properties. The present study evaluated the anti-Trichomonas vaginalis activity of eighteen extracts (12.5 to 0.19 mg/mL) and six isolated alkaloids (125 to 1.9 µg/mL) from Amaryllidaceae species. The alkaloids diminished the trophozoites viability (from 15 to 40 %). The extracts from Hippeastrum breviflorum demonstrated the highest anti-T. vaginalis activity (viability was 60 % reduced), and a bioguided study was conducted. Six fractions with antiprotozoal activity had lycorine and lycosinine as major components suggesting a synergistic effect, taking into account the higher anti-T. vaginalis activity of extracts when compared to isolated alkaloids. Our results point out the antiprotozoal potential of the Amaryllidaceae species against T. vaginalis. This parasite causes trichomonosis, the most prevalent nonviral sexually transmitted diseases (STD) worldwide and a public health problem that requires new therapeutic alternatives as well bioactive natural products.

  18. ModuleBlast: identifying activated sub-networks within and across species.

    PubMed

    Zinman, Guy E; Naiman, Shoshana; O'Dee, Dawn M; Kumar, Nishant; Nau, Gerard J; Cohen, Haim Y; Bar-Joseph, Ziv

    2015-02-18

    Identifying conserved and divergent response patterns in gene networks is becoming increasingly important. A common approach is integrating expression information with gene association networks in order to find groups of connected genes that are activated or repressed. In many cases, researchers are also interested in comparisons across species (or conditions). Finding an active sub-network is a hard problem and applying it across species requires further considerations (e.g. orthology information, expression data and networks from different sources). To address these challenges we devised ModuleBlast, which uses both expression and network topology to search for highly relevant sub-networks. We have applied ModuleBlast to expression and interaction data from mouse, macaque and human to study immune response and aging. The immune response analysis identified several relevant modules, consistent with recent findings on apoptosis and NFκB activation following infection. Temporal analysis of these data revealed cascades of modules that are dynamically activated within and across species. We have experimentally validated some of the novel hypotheses resulting from the analysis of the ModuleBlast results leading to new insights into the mechanisms used by a key mammalian aging protein.

  19. D-Xylose fermentation, xylitol production and xylanase activities by seven new species of Sugiyamaella.

    PubMed

    Sena, Letícia M F; Morais, Camila G; Lopes, Mariana R; Santos, Renata O; Uetanabaro, Ana P T; Morais, Paula B; Vital, Marcos J S; de Morais, Marcos A; Lachance, Marc-André; Rosa, Carlos A

    2017-01-01

    Sixteen yeast isolates identified as belonging to the genus Sugiyamaella were studied in relation to D-xylose fermentation, xylitol production, and xylanase activities. The yeasts were recovered from rotting wood and sugarcane bagasse samples in different Brazilian regions. Sequence analyses of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and the D1/D2 domains of large subunit rRNA gene showed that these isolates belong to seven new species. The species are described here as Sugiyamaella ayubii f.a., sp. nov. (UFMG-CM-Y607(T) = CBS 14108(T)), Sugiyamaella bahiana f.a., sp. nov. (UFMG-CM-Y304(T) = CBS 13474(T)), Sugiyamaella bonitensis f.a., sp. nov. (UFMG-CM-Y608(T) = CBS 14270(T)), Sugiyamaella carassensis f.a., sp. nov. (UFMG-CM-Y606(T) = CBS 14107(T)), Sugiyamaella ligni f.a., sp. nov. (UFMG-CM-Y295(T) = CBS 13482(T)), Sugiyamaella valenteae f.a., sp. nov. (UFMG-CM-Y609(T) = CBS 14109(T)) and Sugiyamaella xylolytica f.a., sp. nov. (UFMG-CM-Y348(T) = CBS 13493(T)). Strains of the described species S. boreocaroliniensis, S. lignohabitans, S. novakii and S. xylanicola, isolated from rotting wood of Brazilian ecosystems, were also compared for traits relevant to xylose metabolism. S. valenteae sp. nov., S. xylolytica sp. nov., S. bahiana sp. nov., S. bonitensis sp. nov., S. boreocarolinensis, S. lignohabitans and S. xylanicola were able to ferment D-xylose to ethanol. Xylitol production was observed for all Sugiyamaella species studied, except for S. ayubii sp. nov. All species studied showed xylanolytic activity, with S. xylanicola, S. lignohabitans and S. valenteae sp. nov. having the highest values. Our results suggest these Sugiyamaella species have good potential for biotechnological applications.

  20. Promoting Active Species Generation by Electrochemical Activation in Alkaline Media for Efficient Electrocatalytic Oxygen Evolution in Neutral Media.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kun; Cheng, Han; Liu, Linqi; Lv, Haifeng; Wu, Xiaojun; Wu, Changzheng; Xie, Yi

    2017-01-11

    In this study, by using dicobalt phosphide nanoparticles as precatalysts, we demonstrated that electrochemical activation of metallic precatalysts in alkaline media (comparing with directly electrochemical activation in neutral media) could significantly promote the OER catalysis in neutral media, specifically realizing a 2-fold enhanced activity and meanwhile showing a greatly decreased overpotential of about 100 mV at 10 mA cm(-2). Compared directly with electrochemical activation in neutral media, the electrochemical activation in harsh alkaline media could easily break the strong Co-Co bond and promote active species generation on the surface of metallic Co2P, thus accounting for the enhancement of neutral OER activity, which is also evidenced by HRTEM and the electrochemical double-layer capacitance measurement. The activation of electrochemical oxidation of metallic precatalysts in alkaline media enhanced neutral OER catalysis could also be observed on CoP nanoparticles and Ni2P nanoparticles, suggesting this is a generic strategy. Our work highlights that the activation of electrochemical oxidation of metallic precatalysts in alkaline media would pave new avenues for the design of advanced neutral OER electrocatalysts.

  1. Nonvolatile mutagens in drinking water: production by chlorination and destruction by sulfite

    SciTech Connect

    Cheh, A.M.; Skochdopole, J.; Koski, P.; Cole, L.

    1980-01-04

    In a laboratory simulation of a drinking water treatment process, the levels of nonvolatile mutagens in drinking water were quantified. By means of the Ames Salmonella test, unchlorinated water was found to be devoid of mutagens. Chloramine-treated water however, contained mutagenic activity; water chlorinated with free chlorine showed even greater mutagenic activity. Dechlorination of drinking water with sulfite sharply reduced the mutagenic activity. Treatment with sulfur dioxide is proposed as an effective, inexpensive method of reducing the direct-acting mutagenic activity of drinking water and of aqueous industrial effluents. (1 graph, 20 references, 1 table)

  2. Differential water mite parasitism, phenoloxidase activity, and resistance to mites are unrelated across pairs of related damselfly species.

    PubMed

    Mlynarek, Julia J; Iserbyt, Arne; Nagel, Laura; Forbes, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    Related host species often demonstrate differences in prevalence and/or intensity of infection by particular parasite species, as well as different levels of resistance to those parasites. The mechanisms underlying this interspecific variation in parasitism and resistance expression are not well understood. Surprisingly, few researchers have assessed relations between actual levels of parasitism and resistance to parasites seen in nature across multiple host species. The main goal of this study was to determine whether interspecific variation in resistance against ectoparasitic larval water mites either was predictive of interspecific variation in parasitism for ten closely related species of damselflies (grouped into five "species pairs"), or was predicted by interspecific variation in a commonly used measure of innate immunity (total Phenoloxidase or potential PO activity). Two of five species pairs had interspecific differences in proportions of individuals resisting larval Arrenurus water mites, only one of five species pairs had species differences in prevalence of larval Arrenurus water mites, and another two of five species pairs showed species differences in mean PO activity. Within the two species pairs where species differed in proportion of individuals resisting mites the species with the higher proportion did not have correspondingly higher PO activity levels. Furthermore, the proportion of individuals resisting mites mirrored prevalence of parasitism in only one species pair. There was no interspecific variation in median intensity of mite infestation within any species pair. We conclude that a species' relative ability to resist particular parasites does not explain interspecific variation in parasitism within species pairs and that neither resistance nor parasitism is reflected by interspecific variation in total PO or potential PO activity.

  3. Effects of Al(III) and nano-Al13 species on malate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaodi; Cai, Ling; Peng, Yu; Li, Huihui; Chen, Rong Fu; Shen, Ren Fang

    2011-01-01

    The effects of different aluminum species on malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity were investigated by monitoring amperometric i-t curves for the oxidation of NADH at low overpotential using a functionalized multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) modified glass carbon electrode (GCE). The results showed that Al(III) and Al(13) can activate the enzymatic activity of MDH, and the activation reaches maximum levels as the Al(III) and Al(13) concentration increase. Our study also found that the effects of Al(III) and Al(13) on the activity of MDH depended on the pH value and aluminum speciation. Electrochemical and circular dichroism spectra methods were applied to study the effects of nano-sized aluminum compounds on biomolecules.

  4. Effects of Al(III) and Nano-Al13 Species on Malate Dehydrogenase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaodi; Cai, Ling; Peng, Yu; Li, Huihui; Chen, Rong Fu; Shen, Ren Fang

    2011-01-01

    The effects of different aluminum species on malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity were investigated by monitoring amperometric i-t curves for the oxidation of NADH at low overpotential using a functionalized multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) modified glass carbon electrode (GCE). The results showed that Al(III) and Al13 can activate the enzymatic activity of MDH, and the activation reaches maximum levels as the Al(III) and Al13 concentration increase. Our study also found that the effects of Al(III) and Al13 on the activity of MDH depended on the pH value and aluminum speciation. Electrochemical and circular dichroism spectra methods were applied to study the effects of nano-sized aluminum compounds on biomolecules. PMID:22163924

  5. Eriosema (Fabaceae) Species Represent a Rich Source of Flavonoids with Interesting Pharmacological Activities.

    PubMed

    Awouafack, Maurice Ducret; Tane, Pierre; Spiteller, Michael; Eloff, Jacobus Nicolaas

    2015-07-01

    Many flavonoids have so far been isolated as main secondary metabolites in plant species of the genus Eriosema (Fabaceae), which contains approximately 160 species. A total of 52 flavonoids including isoflavones, dihydroflavonols, flavonols, flavanones, dihydrochalcones, isoflavanone and their pyrano or glucoside derivatives were isolated and characterized from the five species of this genus investigated to date. Total synthesis and semi-synthesis (acetylation, methylation, hydrogenation, and cyclization) of some isolated flavonoids were reported. Due to several significant pharmacological properties (antimicrobial, cytotoxicity, anti-mycobacterial, antioxidant, antiviral, erectile-dysfunction, vasodilatory and hypoglycemic) of the isolated flavonoids and derivatives, more scientists should be interested in investigating Eriosema species. The present review is the first to document all flavonoids that have been reported from the genus Eriosema to date together with their synthetic and semi-synthetic derivatives, and their pharmacological properties. Dihydrochalcones, which are precursors of other classes of flavonoids, are very rare in natural sources and their isolation from Eriosema species may explain the large number of flavonoids found in this genus. It appears that isoflavone could be a marker for species in this genus. The 83 flavonoids (1-83) documented include 52 isolates, 31 semi-synthetic and 3 totally synthetic derivatives. Data were obtained from Google scholar, Pubmed, Scifinder, Sciencedirect, and Scopus. With 52 different flavonoids isolated from only 5 of the approximately 160 species it shows the remarkable chemical diversity of this genus. This compilation of the biological activities and chemical composition may renew the interest of pharmacologists and phytochemists in this genus.

  6. Demonstration of neuraminidase activity in Mycoplasma neurolyticum and of neuraminidase proteins in three canine Mycoplasma species.

    PubMed

    Berčič, Rebeka Lucijana; Cizelj, Ivanka; Benčina, Mateja; Narat, Mojca; Bradbury, Janet M; Dovč, Peter; Benčina, Dušan

    2012-03-23

    Neuraminidases are virulence factors in many pathogenic microorganisms. They are present also in some Mycoplasma species that cause disease in birds, dogs and alligators. Thirty-seven Mycoplasma species have been examined previously for neuraminidase (sialidase) activity, whereas many of the species causing disease in man, ruminants, pigs, rodents and other animals have not. In this study neuraminidase enzymatic activity (NEAC) was examined in 45 previously untested Mycoplasma species, including those causing diseases in man, farm animals and laboratory animals. The only species in which NEAC was found was Mycoplasma neurolyticum, specifically, its type strain (Type A(T)) which is capable of inducing neurologic signs in inoculated young mice and rats. The NEAC of washed cells was relatively weak, but it differed even more than 10-fold among cells of cultures derived from individual colonies of M. neurolyticum. A weak NEAC was also detected in the supernatant of the M. neurolyticum broth culture. Canine Mycoplasma spp. with high sialidase activity reported previously, Mycoplasma canis, Mycoplasma cynos and Mycoplasma molare had 100-fold more NEAC than M. neurolyticum, but apparent differences in NEAC levels existed among strains of M. canis and of M. cynos. Zymograms using neuraminidase-specific chromogenic substrate were used to show proteins having NEAC. In M. canis (a field isolate Larissa and the type strain PG14(T)), M. cynos (isolate 896) and M. molare (type strain H542(T)) proteins with NEAC had molecular masses of ∼130kDa, 105kDa and 110kDa, respectively. Identification of these neuraminidases could provide the basis for their molecular characterization.

  7. Active hydrogen species on TiO2 for photocatalytic H2 production.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zongfang; Zhang, Wenhua; Xiong, Feng; Yuan, Qing; Jin, Yuekang; Yang, Jinlong; Huang, Weixin

    2014-04-21

    Photocatalytic H2 production over TiO2 has attracted tremendous attention and achieved great progress, but the active hydrogen species is still unknown. Employing a rutile TiO2(110) surface as a model catalyst we report here for the first time the direct observation of photocatalytic H2 production under ultrahigh vacuum conditions during UV-light irradiation at 115 K and the identification of negatively-charged hydride-type H-Ti species as the corresponding photoactive surface species by means of thermal desorption spectroscopy, photon-stimulated desorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and DFT calculations. The formation and stability of H-Ti species are closely related to available surplus electrons on the rutile TiO2(110) surface that can be created by the formation of surface BBO vacancies or by the formation of surface hydroxyls via the adsorption of atomic H or molecular H2 on O sites. The photocatalytic H2 production from H-Ti species is hole-mediated and co-existing water exerts a negative effect on this process.

  8. Biological Activities of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species: Oxidative Stress versus Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Weidinger, Adelheid; Kozlov, Andrey V.

    2015-01-01

    In the past, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) were shown to cause oxidative damage to biomolecules, contributing to the development of a variety of diseases. However, recent evidence has suggested that intracellular RONS are an important component of intracellular signaling cascades. The aim of this review was to consolidate old and new ideas on the chemical, physiological and pathological role of RONS for a better understanding of their properties and specific activities. Critical consideration of the literature reveals that deleterious effects do not appear if only one primary species (superoxide radical, nitric oxide) is present in a biological system, even at high concentrations. The prerequisite of deleterious effects is the formation of highly reactive secondary species (hydroxyl radical, peroxynitrite), emerging exclusively upon reaction with another primary species or a transition metal. The secondary species are toxic, not well controlled, causing irreversible damage to all classes of biomolecules. In contrast, primary RONS are well controlled (superoxide dismutase, catalase), and their reactions with biomolecules are reversible, making them ideal for physiological/pathophysiological intracellular signaling. We assume that whether RONS have a signal transducing or damaging effect is primarily defined by their quality, being primary or secondary RONS, and only secondly by their quantity. PMID:25884116

  9. Antioxidant and anti-atherogenic activities of three Piper species on atherogenic diet fed hamsters.

    PubMed

    Agbor, Gabriel A; Vinson, Joe A; Sortino, Julianne; Johnson, Robert

    2012-05-01

    Atherogenic diet is known to induce high plasma lipid concentration, oxidative stress and early atherosclerosis. Antioxidants have potentials to counter the effect of atherogenic diet. The present research aims at evaluating the antioxidant and anti-atherosclerotic activities of three Piper species (Piper guineense, Piper nigrum and Piper umbellatum) on atherogenic diet fed hamsters. Hamsters divided into 8 groups: normal control, atherosclerotic control and six test groups. The normal animals fed normal rodent chow, the atherosclerotic control animals fed the same rodent chow supplemented with 0.2% cholesterol and 10% coconut oil (high cholesterol diet). The 6 test groups' animals fed same diet as the atherosclerotic control group but with additional supplementation of 2 graded doses (1 and 0.25 mg/kg body weight, o.p.) of plant extracts for 12 weeks. The atherogenic diet induced a collapse of the erythrocyte antioxidant defense system (significant decrease in superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities). Atherogenic diet also induced an increase in plasma total cholesterol, triglyceride, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), oxidation of low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) and accumulation of foam cells in the aorta a hall mark for atherosclerosis. Administration of the Piper species prevented the collapse of the antioxidant system and the increase of plasma parameters maintaining them towards normality. The Piper species also prevented LDL oxidation by increasing the time (lag time) for its oxidation. The results suggest that these Piper species have significant antioxidant and anti-atherogenic effect against atherogenic diet intoxication.

  10. The effect of five Taraxacum species on in vitro and in vivo antioxidant and antiproliferative activity.

    PubMed

    Mingarro, D Muñoz; Plaza, A; Galán, A; Vicente, J A; Martínez, M P; Acero, N

    2015-08-01

    Plants belonging to the genus Taraxacum are considered a nutritious food, being consumed raw or cooked. Additionally, these plants have long been used in folk medicine due to their choleretic, diuretic, antitumor, antioxidant, antiinflammatory, and hepatoprotective properties. This genus, with its complex taxonomy, includes several species that are difficult to distinguish. Its traditional use must be related not only to T. officinale F.H. Wigg., the most studied species, but also to others. The aim of this work is to compare five different common South European species of Taraxacum (T. obovatum (Willd.) DC., T. marginellum H. Lindb., T. hispanicum H. Lindb., T. lambinonii Soest and T. lacistrum Sahlin), in order to find differences between antioxidant and cytotoxic activities among them. Dissimilarities between species in LC/MS patterns, in in vitro and intracellular antioxidant activity and also in the cytotoxicity assay were found. T. marginellum was the most efficient extract reducing intracellular ROS levels although in in vitro assays, T. obovatum was the best free radical scavenger. A relevant cytotoxic effect was found in T. lacistrum extract over HeLa and HepG2 cell lines.

  11. Valuing the Endangered Species Antirrhinum lopesianum: Neuroprotective Activities and Strategies for in vitro Plant Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Andreia; Fortalezas, Sofia; Pimpão, Rui; Figueira, Inês; Maroco, João; Aguiar, Carlos; Ferreira, Ricardo B.; Miguel, Célia; Santos, Cláudia N.

    2013-01-01

    Plant phytochemicals are described as possessing considerable neuroprotective properties, due to radical scavenging capacity and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity, important bioactivities in neurodegeneration. Antirrhinum lopesianum is a rare endemism from the Iberian Peninsula, occurring at the northeastern border between Portugal and Spain. It is classified as Endangered, due to its highly fragmented geographical occupation, facing a high risk of extinction in the Portuguese territory, within 20 years. Here, we describe for the first time the chemical characterization of extracts of the species concerning total phenol content, flavonoid content and antioxidant properties. The profile of high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detector (HPLC-DAD) of the polyphenol-enriched fraction of plant extracts was also performed, showing the great potential of the species as a source of bioactive phytochemical compounds. A. lopesianum’s potential for neuroprotection was revealed by a significant acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity and also by a neuroprotective effect on a human cell model of neurodegeneration. Moreover, this is the first report describing a successful procedure for the in vitro propagation of this endangered species. The comparison of phenolic content and the HPLC-DAD profile of wild and in vitro propagated plants revealed that in vitro plants maintain the ability to produce secondary metabolites, but the profiles are differentially affected by the growth regulators. The results presented here greatly contribute to the value for this species regarding its potential as a source of phytochemicals with prospective neuroprotective health benefits. PMID:26784465

  12. Thermal diffusion of chlorine in uranium dioxide studied by secondary ion mass spectrometry and X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipon, Y.; Toulhoat, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Raimbault, L.; Scheidegger, A. M.; Farges, F.; Carlot, G.

    2007-05-01

    In a nuclear reactor, 35Cl present as an impurity in the nuclear fuel is activated by thermal neutron capture. During interim storage or geological disposal of the nuclear fuel, 36Cl may be released from the fuel to the geo/biosphere and contribute significantly to the 'instant release fraction'. In order to elucidate the diffusion mechanisms, both irradiation and thermal effects must be assessed. This paper deals with the thermal diffusion of chlorine in depleted UO2. For this purpose, sintered UO2 pellets were implanted with 37Cl at an ion fluence of 1013 cm-2 and successively annealed in the 1175-1475 K temperature range. The implanted chlorine is used to simulate the behaviour of the displaced one due to recoil and to interactions with the fission fragments during reactor operation. The behaviour of the pristine and the implanted chlorine was investigated during thermal annealing. SIMS and μ-XAS (at the Cl-K edge) analyses show that: the thermal migration of implanted chlorine becomes significant at 1275 K; this temperature and the calculated activation energy of 4.3 eV points out the great ability of chlorine to migrate in UO2 at relatively low temperatures, the behaviour of the implanted chlorine which aggregates into 'hot spots' during annealing before its effusion is clearly different from that of the pristine one which remains homogenously distributed after annealing, the 'hot spot' and the pristine chlorine seem to be in different structural environments. Both types of chlorine are assumed to have a valence state of -I, the comparison between an U2O2Cl5 reference compound and the pristine chlorine environment shows a contribution of the U2O2Cl5 to the pristine chlorine.

  13. Total Phenolic Content and Antioxidant Activity of Some Malvaceae Family Species

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Adriana Maria Fernandes; Pinheiro, Lilian Sousa; Pereira, Charlane Kelly Souto; Matias, Wemerson Neves; Gomes, Roosevelt Albuquerque; Chaves, Otemberg Souza; de Souza, Maria de Fátima Vanderlei; de Almeida, Reinaldo Nóbrega; de Assis, Temilce Simões

    2012-01-01

    The antioxidant activity of four species of the Malvaceae family (Sidastrum micranthum (A. St.-Hil.) Fryxell, Wissadula periplocifolia (L.) C. Presl, Sida rhombifolia (L.) E. H. L and Herissantia crispa L. (Brizicky)) were studied using the total phenolic content, DPPH radical scavenging activity and Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) assays. The antioxidant activity of the crude extract, phases and two isolated flavonoids, kaempferol 3,7-di-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside (lespedin) and kaempferol 3-O-β-D-(6''-E-p-coumaroil) glucopyranoside (tiliroside) was determined. The results showed that there is a strong correlation between total polyphenol contents and antioxidant activity of the crude extract of Sidastrum micranthum and Wissadula periplocifolia; however, this was not observed between Sida rhombifolia and Herissantia crispa. The ethyl acetate (EaF) phase showed the best antioxidant effect in the total phenolics, DPPH and TEAC assays, followed by the chloro