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Sample records for active chronic inflammation

  1. Physical Activity Protects the Human Brain against Metabolic Stress Induced by a Postprandial and Chronic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Pruimboom, Leo; Raison, Charles L.; Muskiet, Frits A. J.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, it has become clear that chronic systemic low-grade inflammation is at the root of many, if not all, typically Western diseases associated with the metabolic syndrome. While much focus has been given to sedentary lifestyle as a cause of chronic inflammation, it is less often appreciated that chronic inflammation may also promote a sedentary lifestyle, which in turn causes chronic inflammation. Given that even minor increases in chronic inflammation reduce brain volume in otherwise healthy individuals, the bidirectional relationship between inflammation and sedentary behaviour may explain why humans have lost brain volume in the last 30,000 years and also intelligence in the last 30 years. We review evidence that lack of physical activity induces chronic low-grade inflammation and, consequently, an energy conflict between the selfish immune system and the selfish brain. Although the notion that increased physical activity would improve health in the modern world is widespread, here we provide a novel perspective on this truism by providing evidence that recovery of normal human behaviour, such as spontaneous physical activity, would calm proinflammatory activity, thereby allocating more energy to the brain and other organs, and by doing so would improve human health. PMID:26074674

  2. Studies of T-cell activation in chronic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    Chapter summary The strong association between specific alleles encoded within the MHC class II region and the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has provided the best evidence to date that CD4+ T cells play a role in the pathogenesis of this chronic inflammatory disease. However, the unusual phenotype of synovial T cells, including their profound proliferative hyporesponsiveness to TCR ligation, has challenged the notion that T-cell effector responses are driven by cognate cartilage antigens in inflamed synovial joints. The hierarchy of T-cell dysfunction from peripheral blood to inflamed joint suggests that these defects are acquired through prolonged exposure to proinflammatory cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Indeed, there are now compelling data to suggest that chronic cytokine activation may contribute substantially to the phenotype and effector function of synovial T cells. Studies reveal that chronic exposure of T cells to TNF uncouples TCR signal transduction pathways by impairing the assembly and stability of the TCR/CD3 complex at the cell surface. Despite this membrane-proximal effect, TNF selectively uncouples downstream signalling pathways, as is shown by the dramatic suppression of calcium signalling responses, while Ras/ERK activation is spared. On the basis of these data, it is proposed that T-cell survival and effector responses are driven by antigen-independent, cytokine-dependent mechanisms, and that therapeutic strategies that seek to restore T-cell homeostasis rather than further depress T-cell function should be explored in the future. PMID:12110140

  3. Nitric oxide-induced cellular stress and p53 activation in chronic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hofseth, Lorne J.; Saito, Shin'ichi; Hussain, S. Perwez; Espey, Michael G.; Miranda, Katrina M.; Araki, Yuzuru; Jhappan, Chamelli; Higashimoto, Yuichiro; He, Peijun; Linke, Steven P.; Quezado, Martha M.; Zurer, Irit; Rotter, Varda; Wink, David A.; Appella, Ettore; Harris, Curtis C.

    2003-01-01

    Free radical-induced cellular stress contributes to cancer during chronic inflammation. Here, we investigated mechanisms of p53 activation by the free radical, NO. NO from donor drugs induced both ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM)- and ataxia-telangiectasia mutated and Rad3-related-dependent p53 posttranslational modifications, leading to an increase in p53 transcriptional targets and a G2/M cell cycle checkpoint. Such modifications were also identified in cells cocultured with NO-releasing macrophages. In noncancerous colon tissues from patients with ulcerative colitis (a cancer-prone chronic inflammatory disease), inducible NO synthase protein levels were positively correlated with p53 serine 15 phosphorylation levels. Immunostaining of HDM-2 and p21WAF1 was consistent with transcriptionally active p53. Our study highlights a pivotal role of NO in the induction of cellular stress and the activation of a p53 response pathway during chronic inflammation. PMID:12518062

  4. Chronic Low Dose Chlorine Exposure Aggravates Allergic Inflammation and Airway Hyperresponsiveness and Activates Inflammasome Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sae-Hoon; Park, Da-Eun; Lee, Hyun-Seung; Kang, Hye-Ryun; Cho, Sang-Heon

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidemiologic clinical studies suggested that chronic exposure to chlorine products is associated with development of asthma and aggravation of asthmatic symptoms. However, its underlying mechanism was not clearly understood. Studies were undertaken to define the effects and mechanisms of chronic low-dose chlorine exposure in the pathogenesis of airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Methods Six week-old female BALB/c mice were sensitized and challenged with OVA in the presence and absence of chronic low dose chlorine exposure of naturally vaporized gas of 5% sodium hypochlorite solution. Airway inflammation and AHR were evaluated by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell recovery and non-invasive phlethysmography, respectively. Real-time qPCR, Western blot assay, and ELISA were used to evaluate the mRNA and protein expressions of cytokines and other inflammatory mediators. Human A549 and murine epithelial (A549 and MLE12) and macrophage (AMJ2-C11) cells were used to define the responses to low dose chlorine exposure in vitro. Results Chronic low dose chlorine exposure significantly augmented airway inflammation and AHR in OVA-sensitized and challenged mice. The expression of Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-5 and proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β and IL-33 were significantly increased in OVA/Cl group compared with OVA group. The chlorine exposure also activates the major molecules associated with inflammasome pathway in the macrophages with increased expression of epithelial alarmins IL-33 and TSLP in vitro. Conclusion Chronic low dose exposure of chlorine aggravates allergic Th2 inflammation and AHR potentially through activation of inflammasome danger signaling pathways. PMID:25202911

  5. Chronic stress enhances microglia activation and exacerbates death of nigral dopaminergic neurons under conditions of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Parkinson’s disease is an irreversible neurodegenerative disease linked to progressive movement disorders and is accompanied by an inflammatory reaction that is believed to contribute to its pathogenesis. Since sensitivity to inflammation is not the same in all brain structures, the aim of this work was to test whether physiological conditions as stress could enhance susceptibility to inflammation in the substantia nigra, where death of dopaminergic neurons takes place in Parkinson’s disease. Methods To achieve our aim, we induced an inflammatory process in nonstressed and stressed rats (subject to a chronic variate stress) by a single intranigral injection of lipopolysaccharide, a potent proinflammogen. The effect of this treatment was evaluated on inflammatory markers as well as on neuronal and glial populations. Results Data showed a synergistic effect between inflammation and stress, thus resulting in higher microglial activation and expression of proinflammatory markers. More important, the higher inflammatory response seen in stressed animals was associated with a higher rate of death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, the most characteristic feature seen in Parkinson’s disease. This effect was dependent on glucocorticoids. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that stress sensitises midbrain microglia to further inflammatory stimulus. This suggests that stress may be an important risk factor in the degenerative processes and symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:24565378

  6. Correlation of alkaline phosphatase activity to clinical parameters of inflammation in smokers suffering from chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Vishakha; Malhotra, Ranjan; Kapoor, Anoop; Bither, Rupika; Sachdeva, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Context: Current clinical periodontal diagnostic techniques emphasize the assessment of clinical and radiographic signs of periodontal diseases which can provide a measure of history of disease. Hence, new methodologies for early identification and determination of periodontal disease activity need to be explored which will eventually result in expedited treatment. Aim: To evaluate the correlation of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) to clinical parameters of periodontal inflammation in smokers with chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: Study population included 15 smoker male patients in the age group of 35–55 years suffering from moderate generalized chronic periodontitis with history of smoking present. Following parameters were evaluated at baseline, 1 month and 3 months after scaling and root planing: plaque index, bleeding index, probing pocket depth (PD), relative attachment level (RAL), and GCF ALP activity. Statistical Analysis Used: Independent variables for measurements over time were analyzed by using Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results: A statistically significant reduction in all the clinical parameters and GCF ALP activity was observed from baseline to 1 month and 3 months. A correlation was observed between change in GCF ALP activity and PD reduction as well as gain in RAL at 3 months. Conclusion: The present study emphasizes that total ALP activity could be used as a marker for periodontal disease activity in smokers. Estimation of changes in the levels of this enzyme has a potential to aid in the detection of progression of periodontal disease and monitoring the response to periodontal therapy. PMID:27563197

  7. IL-10-dependent Tr1 cells attenuate astrocyte activation and ameliorate chronic central nervous system inflammation.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Lior; Cunha, Andre Pires Da; Madi, Asaf; Beynon, Vanessa; Yang, Zhiping; Alvarez, Jorge I; Prat, Alexandre; Sobel, Raymond A; Kobzik, Lester; Lassmann, Hans; Quintana, Francisco J; Weiner, Howard L

    2016-07-01

    SEE WINGER AND ZAMVIL DOI101093/BRAIN/AWW121 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: The innate immune system plays a central role in the chronic central nervous system inflammation that drives neurological disability in progressive forms of multiple sclerosis, for which there are no effective treatments. The mucosal immune system is a unique tolerogenic organ that provides a physiological approach for the induction of regulatory T cells. Here we report that nasal administration of CD3-specific antibody ameliorates disease in a progressive animal model of multiple sclerosis. This effect is IL-10-dependent and is mediated by the induction of regulatory T cells that share a similar transcriptional profile to Tr1 regulatory cells and that suppress the astrocyte inflammatory transcriptional program. Treatment results in an attenuated inflammatory milieu in the central nervous system, decreased microglia activation, reduced recruitment of peripheral monocytes, stabilization of the blood-brain barrier and less neurodegeneration. These findings suggest a new therapeutic approach for the treatment of progressive forms of multiple sclerosis and potentially other types of chronic central nervous system inflammation. PMID:27246324

  8. IL-10-dependent Tr1 cells attenuate astrocyte activation and ameliorate chronic central nervous system inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Mayo, Lior; Cunha, Andre Pires Da; Madi, Asaf; Beynon, Vanessa; Yang, Zhiping; Alvarez, Jorge I.; Prat, Alexandre; Sobel, Raymond A.; Kobzik, Lester; Lassmann, Hans; Quintana, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    See Winger and Zamvil (doi:10.1093/brain/aww121) for a scientific commentary on this article. The innate immune system plays a central role in the chronic central nervous system inflammation that drives neurological disability in progressive forms of multiple sclerosis, for which there are no effective treatments. The mucosal immune system is a unique tolerogenic organ that provides a physiological approach for the induction of regulatory T cells. Here we report that nasal administration of CD3-specific antibody ameliorates disease in a progressive animal model of multiple sclerosis. This effect is IL-10-dependent and is mediated by the induction of regulatory T cells that share a similar transcriptional profile to Tr1 regulatory cells and that suppress the astrocyte inflammatory transcriptional program. Treatment results in an attenuated inflammatory milieu in the central nervous system, decreased microglia activation, reduced recruitment of peripheral monocytes, stabilization of the blood–brain barrier and less neurodegeneration. These findings suggest a new therapeutic approach for the treatment of progressive forms of multiple sclerosis and potentially other types of chronic central nervous system inflammation. PMID:27246324

  9. Chronic Inflammation and Neutrophil Activation as Possible Causes of Joint Diseases in Ballet Dancers

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Leandro da Silva; Santos, Vinicius Coneglian; de Moura, Nivaldo Ribeiro; Dermargos, Alexandre; Cury-Boaventura, Maria Fernanda; Gorjão, Renata; Pithon-Curi, Tania Cristina; Hatanaka, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we investigated the effects of a ballet class on the kinetic profiles of creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities, cytokines, complement component 3 (C3), and the concentrations of immunoglobulin (Ig), IgA and IgM, in ballerinas. We also verified neutrophil death and ROS release. Blood samples were taken from 13 dancers before, immediately after, and 18 hours after a ballet class. The ballet class increased the plasma activities of CK-total (2.0-fold) immediately after class, while the activities of CK-cardiac muscle (1.0-fold) and LDH (3.0-fold) were observed to increase 18 hours after the class. Levels of the TNF-α, IL-1β, IgG, and IgA were not affected under the study conditions. The exercise was found to induce neutrophil apoptosis (6.0-fold) 18 hours after the ballet class. Additionally, immediately after the ballet class, the neutrophils from the ballerinas were found to be less responsive to PMA stimulus. Conclusion. Ballet class was found to result in inflammation in dancers. The inflammation caused by the ballet class remained for 18 hours after the exercise. These findings are important in preventing the development of chronic lesions that are commonly observed in dancers, such as those with arthritis and synovitis. PMID:24701035

  10. Serious Non-AIDS Events: Therapeutic Targets of Immune Activation and Chronic Inflammation in HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Denise C; Sereti, Irini

    2016-04-01

    In the antiretroviral therapy (ART) era, serious non-AIDS events (SNAEs) have become the major causes of morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected persons. Early ART initiation has the strongest evidence for reducing SNAEs and mortality. Biomarkers of immune activation, inflammation and coagulopathy do not fully normalize despite virologic suppression and persistent immune activation is an important contributor to SNAEs. A number of strategies aimed to reduce persistent immune activation including ART intensification to reduce residual viremia; treatment of co-infections to reduce chronic antigen stimulation; the use of anti-inflammatory agents, reducing microbial translocation as well as interventions to improve immune recovery through cytokine administration and reducing lymphoid tissue fibrosis, have been investigated. To date, there is little conclusive evidence on which strategies beyond treatment of hepatitis B and C co-infections and reducing cardiovascular risk factors will result in clinical benefits in patients already on ART with viral suppression. The use of statins seems to show early promise and larger clinical trials are underway to confirm their efficacy. At this stage, clinical care of HIV-infected patients should therefore focus on early diagnosis and prompt ART initiation, treatment of active co-infections and the aggressive management of co-morbidities until further data are available. PMID:26915027

  11. Chronic inflammation and estradiol interact through MAPK activation to affect TMJ nociceptive processing by trigeminal caudalis neurons.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, A; Okamoto, K; Bereiter, D A

    2009-12-29

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) pathway plays a key role in mediating estrogen actions in the brain and neuronal sensitization during inflammation. Estrogen status is a risk factor in chronic temporomandibular muscle/joint (TMJ) disorders; however, the basis for this relationship is not known. The present study tested the hypothesis that estrogen status acts through the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway to alter TMJ nociceptive processing. Single TMJ-responsive neurons were recorded in laminae I-II at the spinomedullary (Vc/C(1-2)) junction in naïve ovariectomized (OvX) female rats treated for 2 days with high-dose (20 microg/day; HE2) or low-dose estradiol (2 microg/day; LE2) and after chronic inflammation of the TMJ region by complete Freund's adjuvant for 12-14 days. Intra-TMJ injection of ATP (1 mM) was used to activate Vc/C(1-2) neurons. The MAPK/ERK inhibitor (PD98059, 0.01-1 mM) was applied topically to the dorsal Vc/C(1-2) surface at the site of recording 10 min prior to each ATP stimulus. In naïve HE2 rats, low-dose PD98059 caused a maximal inhibition of ATP-evoked activity, whereas even high doses had only minor effects on units in LE2 rats. By contrast, after chronic TMJ inflammation, PD98059 produced a marked and similar dose-related inhibition of ATP-evoked activity in HE2 and LE2 rats. These results suggested that E2 status and chronic inflammation acted, at least in part, through a common MAPK/ERK-dependent signaling pathway to enhance TMJ nociceptive processing by laminae I-II neurons at the spinomedullary junction region. PMID:19786077

  12. Macrophage TCF-4 co-activates p65 to potentiate chronic inflammation and insulin resistance in mice.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xia; Hou, Along; Wang, Rui; Liu, Da; Xiang, Wei; Xie, Qingyun; Zhang, Bo; Gan, Lixia; Zheng, Wei; Miao, Hongming

    2016-07-01

    Transcription factor 4 (TCF-4) was recently identified as a candidate gene for the cause of type 2 diabetes, although the mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we demonstrated that the TCF-4 transgene in macrophages aggravated high-fat diet (HFD)-induced insulin resistance and chronic inflammation, characterized by the elevation of proinflammatory cytokines in the blood, liver and white adipose tissue, as well as a proinflammatory profile of immune cells in visceral fats in mice. Mechanistically, TCF-4 functioned as a co-activator of p65 to amplify the saturated free fatty acid (FFA)-stimulated promoter activity, mRNA transcription and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in primary macrophages. Blockage of p65 with a specific interfering RNA or inhibitor could prevent TCF-4-enhanced expression of proinflammatory cytokines in FFA/lipopolysaccharide-treated primary macrophages. The p65 inhibitor could abolish macrophage TCF-4 transgene-aggravated systemic inflammation, glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in HFD-treated mice. In addition, we demonstrated that the mRNA expression of TCF-4 in the peripheral blood monocytes from humans was positively correlated to the levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, tumour necrosis factor α, IL-6 and fasting plasma glucose. In summary, we identified TCF-4 as a co-activator of p65 in the potentiation of proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages and aggravation of HFD-induced chronic inflammation and insulin resistance in mice. PMID:27129186

  13. Chronic Inflammation in Skin Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is linked to the development and progression of multiple cancers, including those of the lung, stomach, liver, colon, breast and skin. Inflammation not only drives the oncogenic transformation of epithelial cells under the stress of chronic infection and autoimmune diseases, but also promotes the growth, progression and metastatic spread of cancers. Tumor-infiltrating inflammatory cells are comprised of a diverse population of myeloid and immune cell types, including monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, T and B cells, and others. Different myeloid and lymphoid cells within tumor microenvironment exert diverse, often contradicting, effects during skin cancer development and progression. The nature of tumor-immune interaction determines the rate of cancer progression and the outcome of cancer treatment. Inflammatory environment within skin tumor also inhibits naturally occurring anti-tumor immunity and limits the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy. In this article we aim to give an overview on the mechanism by which inflammation interferes with the development and therapeutic intervention of cancers, especially those of the skin.

  14. Neutrophils come of age in chronic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Caielli, Simone; Banchereau, Jacques; Pascual, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils have long been known to participate in acute inflammation, but a role in chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases is now emerging. These cells are key players in the recognition and elimination of pathogens, but they also sense self components, including nucleic acids and products of sterile tissue damage. While this normally contributes to tissue repair, it can also lead to the release of highly immunogenic products that can trigger and/or amplify autoimmune pathogenic loops. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie neutrophil activation, migration, survival and their various forms of death in health and disease might provide us with new approaches to treat chronic inflammatory conditions. PMID:23127555

  15. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Organizations (PDF, 270 KB). Alternate Language URL Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease Page Content On ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in which a person ...

  16. Parainflammation, chronic inflammation and age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mei; Xu, Heping

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is an adaptive response of the immune system to noxious insults to maintain homeostasis and restore functionality. The retina is considered an immune privileged tissue due to its unique anatomical and physiological properties. During aging, the retina suffers from a low-grade chronic oxidative insult, which sustains for decades and increases in level with advancing age. As a result, the retinal innate immune system, particularly microglia and the complement system, undergo low levels of activation (para-inflammation). In many cases, this para-inflammatory response can maintain homeostasis in the healthy aging eye. However, in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), this para-inflammatory response becomes dysregulated and contributes to macular damage. Factors contributing to the dysregulation of age-related retinal para-inflammation include genetic predisposition, environmental risk factors and old age. Dysregulated para-inflammation (chronic inflammation) in AMD damages the blood retina barrier (BRB), resulting in the breach of retinal immune privilege leading to the development of retinal lesions. This review discusses the basic principles of retinal innate immune responses to endogenous chronic insults in normal aging and in AMD, and explores the difference between beneficial para-inflammation and the detrimental chronic inflammation in the context of AMD. PMID:26292978

  17. Age-Associated Chronic Diseases Require Age-Old Medicine: Role of Chronic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Sung, Bokyung; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2012-01-01

    Most chronic diseases - such as cancer, cardiovascular disease (CVD), Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, arthritis, diabetes and obesity - are becoming leading causes of disability and death all over the world. Some of the most common causes of these age-associated chronic diseases are lack of physical activity, poor nutrition, tobacco use, and excessive alcohol consumption. All the risk factors linked to these chronic diseases have been shown to up-regulate inflammation. Therefore, downregulation of inflammation-associated risk factors could prevent or delay these age-associated diseases. Although modern science has developed several drugs for treating chronic diseases, most of these drugs are enormously expensive and are associated with serious side effects and morbidity. In this review, we present evidence on how chronic inflammation leads to age-associated chronic disease. Furthermore, we discuss diet and lifestyle as solutions for age-associated chronic disease. PMID:22178471

  18. Impact of antiretroviral therapy (ART) timing on chronic immune activation/inflammation and end-organ damage

    PubMed Central

    Rajasuriar, Reena; Wright, Edwina; Lewin, Sharon R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review The purpose of this review was to summarize recent studies on the effect of early antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV-infected patients on markers of immune activation/inflammation, viral persistence and serious non-AIDS events. Recent findings Early ART, initiated within days to months of HIV infection, was associated with marked reduction in T-cell activation often reaching levels observed in HIV-uninfected individuals. However, the impact of early ART on markers of innate immune activation, microbial translocation and inflammation/coagulation was less clear. Early ART has also been associated with a significant reduction in the frequency of latently infected cells, which was greater if ART was initiated within days to weeks rather than months following infection. However, few studies have evaluated the relationship between immune activation and viral reservoirs, specifically following early ART. Early ART may potentially reduce serious non-AIDS events and associated mortality, but most of these studies have extrapolated from changes in surrogate markers, such as CD4 : CD8 ratio. Summary Early ART was associated with beneficial effects on multiple markers of immune activation, inflammation and viral persistence. Longer term prospective studies are still needed to determine whether early ART translates to a significant reduction in serious non-AIDS events and mortality. PMID:25415420

  19. Pathogenesis of chronic rhinosinusitis: inflammation.

    PubMed

    Van Crombruggen, Koen; Zhang, Nan; Gevaert, Philippe; Tomassen, Peter; Bachert, Claus

    2011-10-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a heterogeneous group of inflammatory diseases of the nasal and paranasal cavities either accompanied by polyp formation (CRSwNP) or without polyps (CRSsNP). CRSsNP and CRSwNP are prevalent medical conditions associated with substantial impaired quality of life, reduced workplace productivity, and serious medical treatment costs. Despite recent research evidence that contributes to further unveiling the pathophysiology of these chronic airway conditions, the cause remains poorly understood and appears to be multifactorial. A diverse spectrum of alterations involving histopathology, inflammatory cell and T-cell patterns, remodeling parameters (eg, TGF-β), eicosanoid and IgE production, microorganisms, and epithelial barrier malfunctions is reported in the search to describe the pathogenesis of this heterogeneous group of upper airway diseases. Furthermore, novel evidence indicates considerable heterogeneity within the CRSwNP subgroup determining the risk of comorbid asthma. The characterization of specific disease subgroups is a challenging scientific and clinical task of utmost importance in the development of diagnostic tools and application of individualized treatments. This review focuses on recent evidence that sheds new light on our current knowledge regarding the inflammatory process of CRS to further unravel its pathogenesis. PMID:21868076

  20. Association between serum levels of high sensitive C-reactive protein and inflammation activity in chronic gastritis patients.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Asghar; Moradkhani, Atefeh; Hafezi Ahmadi, Mohammad Reza; Jafari Heirdarlo, Ali; Abangah, Ghobad; Asadollahi, Khairollah; Sayehmiri, Kourosh

    2016-05-01

    Background Gastritis is an important premalignant lesion and recent studies suggested a production of inflammatory cytokine-like C-reactive protein during gastritis. This study aimed to determine any relationship between high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and inflammation activity among patients with gastritis. Methods Demographic and clinical variables of participants were collected by a validated questionnaire. Using histology of the gastric mucosa, Helicobacter pylori status was investigated and serum concentrations of hs-CRP were measured among dyspeptic patients. Correlation between hs-CRP serum levels and inflammation activities was evaluated by logistic regression analysis. The relation between active inflammation and other variables was evaluated by logic link function model. Results Totally 239 patients (56.6% female) were analysed. The prevalence of mild, moderate and severe inflammation activities was 66.5%, 23.8% and 9.6% respectively. Mean ± SD of hs-CRP among men and women were 2.85 ± 2.84 mg/dl and 2.80 ± 4.80 mg/dl (p = 0.047) respectively. Mean ± SD of hs-CRP among patients with H. pylori infection, gland atrophy, metaplasia and dysplasia were 2.83 ± 3.80 mg/dl, 3.52 ± 5.1 mg/dl, 2.22 ± 2.3 mg/dl and 5.3 ± 5.04 mg/dl respectively. Relationship between hs-CRP and inflammation activities (p < 0.01) was significant. A significant relationship between dysplasia and hs-CRP (p < 0.04) was revealed. A significant relationship between age and hs-CRP was detected (p < 0.05). Conclusion Although serum hs-CRP is not a specific biomarker for gastritis, elevated hs-CRP levels may be considered as a predictive marker of changes in gastric mucosa and a promising therapeutic target for patients with gastritis. PMID:26758551

  1. Role of Histomorphology and Chronic Inflammation Score in Chronic Dacryocystitis

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Sudipta; Banerjee, Manas; Pal, Debashis

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Diseases of lacrimal drainage system account for nearly 3% of visits to eye clinic. Chronic dacryocystitis is a frequently encountered disorder among these patients. Histomorphology of specimens obtained after Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) is a pertinent indicator of prognostic outcome. Aim The aim of the study was to evaluate histopathology of specimens obtained after DCR and to elucidate patterns and score of chronic inflammation encountered. Materials and Methods The study was conducted for a period of one year. Total of 50 patients who were clinically diagnosed as Chronic Dacryocystitis and underwent DCR were included. Following DCR, specimens of lacrimal sac, nasal mucous membrane and nasal bone were collected. Histopathological slides were examined for chronic inflammatory cell infiltration, fibrosis and capillary proliferation and were graded according to severity, in each specimen. A Chronic Inflammation Score (CIS) was recorded for each case. Results The average age of patients was 39.04±14.22 years and their age ranged between 13 and 62 years. There were 28 (56%) females and 22 (44%) males in the study group. The nasal bone did not reveal any abnormality in any case. The nasal mucous membrane showed mild chronic inflammatory cell infiltration in 46 (92%) cases and moderate degree in 4 (8%) patients. Chronic inflammation with granulation tissue formation was noted in lacrimal sacs of all patients. The CIS revealed that 14 (28%) cases belonged to “mild” group, 26 (52%) to “moderate” group and 10 (20%) to “severe” category. Conclusion The inclusion of CIS in histomorphological evaluation of DCR specimens is recommended since it is one of the parameters that influence course of the disease.

  2. Chronic Inflammation and γδ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Fay, Nathan S; Larson, Emily C; Jameson, Julie M

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial tissues of the skin, lungs, reproductive tract, and intestines are the largest physical barriers the body has to protect against infection. Epithelial tissues are woven with a matrix of immune cells programed to mobilize the host innate and adaptive immune responses. Included among these immune cells are gamma delta T lymphocytes (γδ T cells) that are unique in their T cell receptor usage, location, and functions in the body. Stress reception by γδ T cells as a result of traumatic epithelial injury, malignancy, and/or infection induces γδ T cell activation. Once activated, γδ T cells function to repair tissue, induce inflammation, recruit leukocytes, and lyse cells. Many of these functions are mediated via the production of cytokines and growth factors upon γδ T cell activation. Pathogenesis of many chronic inflammatory diseases involves γδ T cells; some of which are exacerbated by their presence, while others are improved. γδ T cells require a delicate balance between their need for acute inflammatory mediators to function normally and the detrimental impact imparted by chronic inflammation. This review will focus on the recent progress made in understanding how epithelial γδ T cells influence the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases and how a balance between acute and chronic inflammation impacts γδ T cell function. Future studies will be important to understand how this balance is achieved. PMID:27303404

  3. Chronic Inflammation and γδ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fay, Nathan S.; Larson, Emily C.; Jameson, Julie M.

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial tissues of the skin, lungs, reproductive tract, and intestines are the largest physical barriers the body has to protect against infection. Epithelial tissues are woven with a matrix of immune cells programed to mobilize the host innate and adaptive immune responses. Included among these immune cells are gamma delta T lymphocytes (γδ T cells) that are unique in their T cell receptor usage, location, and functions in the body. Stress reception by γδ T cells as a result of traumatic epithelial injury, malignancy, and/or infection induces γδ T cell activation. Once activated, γδ T cells function to repair tissue, induce inflammation, recruit leukocytes, and lyse cells. Many of these functions are mediated via the production of cytokines and growth factors upon γδ T cell activation. Pathogenesis of many chronic inflammatory diseases involves γδ T cells; some of which are exacerbated by their presence, while others are improved. γδ T cells require a delicate balance between their need for acute inflammatory mediators to function normally and the detrimental impact imparted by chronic inflammation. This review will focus on the recent progress made in understanding how epithelial γδ T cells influence the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases and how a balance between acute and chronic inflammation impacts γδ T cell function. Future studies will be important to understand how this balance is achieved. PMID:27303404

  4. Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension Associated with Chronic Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kuse, Naoyuki; Abe, Shinji; Kuribayashi, Hidehiko; Fukuda, Asami; Kusunoki, Yuji; Narato, Ritsuko; Saito, Hitoshi; Gemma, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is one of the leading causes of severe pulmonary hypertension. According to previously reported studies in the pertinent literature, chronic inflammatory conditions may be implicated in the development of CTEPH. We herein describe the case of a 56-year-old woman who was diagnosed with CTEPH in association with chronic infection. The patient had experienced five episodes of pneumonia in the five years prior to the diagnosis of CTEPH. Blood tests from the previous five years of outpatient follow-up demonstrated that the C-reactive protein level was slightly elevated. This case suggests that a relationship exists between chronic inflammation and CTEPH, and furthermore, may contribute towards elucidating the pathophysiology of CTEPH. PMID:27250055

  5. Parainflammation, chronic inflammation, and age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei; Xu, Heping

    2015-11-01

    Inflammation is an adaptive response of the immune system to noxious insults to maintain homeostasis and restore functionality. The retina is considered an immune-privileged tissue as a result of its unique anatomic and physiologic properties. During aging, the retina suffers from a low-grade chronic oxidative insult, which sustains for decades and increases in level with advancing age. As a result, the retinal innate-immune system, particularly microglia and the complement system, undergoes low levels of activation (parainflammation). In many cases, this parainflammatory response can maintain homeostasis in the healthy aging eye. However, in patients with age-related macular degeneration, this parainflammatory response becomes dysregulated and contributes to macular damage. Factors contributing to the dysregulation of age-related retinal parainflammation include genetic predisposition, environmental risk factors, and old age. Dysregulated parainflammation (chronic inflammation) in age-related macular degeneration damages the blood retina barrier, resulting in the breach of retinal-immune privilege, leading to the development of retinal lesions. This review discusses the basic principles of retinal innate-immune responses to endogenous chronic insults in normal aging and in age-related macular degeneration and explores the difference between beneficial parainflammation and the detrimental chronic inflammation in the context of age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26292978

  6. The role of adipokines in chronic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Mancuso, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue has traditionally been defined as connective tissue that stores excess calories in the form of triacylglycerol. However, the physiologic functions attributed to adipose tissue are expanding, and it is now well established that adipose tissue is an endocrine gland. Among the endocrine factors elaborated by adipose tissue are the adipokines; hormones, similar in structure to cytokines, produced by adipose tissue in response to changes in adipocyte triacylglycerol storage and local and systemic inflammation. They inform the host regarding long-term energy storage and have a profound influence on reproductive function, blood pressure regulation, energy homeostasis, the immune response, and many other physiologic processes. The adipokines possess pro- and anti-inflammatory properties and play a critical role in integrating systemic metabolism with immune function. In calorie restriction and starvation, proinflammatory adipokines decline and anti-inflammatory adipokines increase, which informs the host of energy deficits and contributes to the suppression of immune function. In individuals with normal metabolic status, there is a balance of pro- and anti-inflammatory adipokines. This balance shifts to favor proinflammatory mediators as adipose tissue expands during the development of obesity. As a consequence, the proinflammatory status of adipose tissue contributes to a chronic low-grade state of inflammation and metabolic disorders associated with obesity. These disturbances are associated with an increased risk of metabolic disease, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and many other pathological conditions. This review focuses on the impact of energy homeostasis on the adipokines in immune function. PMID:27529061

  7. The role of adipokines in chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue has traditionally been defined as connective tissue that stores excess calories in the form of triacylglycerol. However, the physiologic functions attributed to adipose tissue are expanding, and it is now well established that adipose tissue is an endocrine gland. Among the endocrine factors elaborated by adipose tissue are the adipokines; hormones, similar in structure to cytokines, produced by adipose tissue in response to changes in adipocyte triacylglycerol storage and local and systemic inflammation. They inform the host regarding long-term energy storage and have a profound influence on reproductive function, blood pressure regulation, energy homeostasis, the immune response, and many other physiologic processes. The adipokines possess pro- and anti-inflammatory properties and play a critical role in integrating systemic metabolism with immune function. In calorie restriction and starvation, proinflammatory adipokines decline and anti-inflammatory adipokines increase, which informs the host of energy deficits and contributes to the suppression of immune function. In individuals with normal metabolic status, there is a balance of pro- and anti-inflammatory adipokines. This balance shifts to favor proinflammatory mediators as adipose tissue expands during the development of obesity. As a consequence, the proinflammatory status of adipose tissue contributes to a chronic low-grade state of inflammation and metabolic disorders associated with obesity. These disturbances are associated with an increased risk of metabolic disease, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and many other pathological conditions. This review focuses on the impact of energy homeostasis on the adipokines in immune function. PMID:27529061

  8. Microvascular remodelling in chronic airway inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Thurston, G; Maas, K; Labarbara, A; Mclean, J W; McDonald, D M

    2000-10-01

    1. Chronic inflammation is associated with blood vessel remodelling, including vessel proliferation and enlargement, and changes in vessel phenotype. We sought to characterize these changes in chronic airway inflammation and to determine whether corticosteroids that inhibit inflammation, such as dexamethasone, can also reduce microvascular remodelling. 2. Chronic airway inflammation was induced in C3H mice by infection with Mycoplasmapulmonis and the tracheal vessels treatment also decreased the immunoreactivity for P-selectin and the number of adherent leucocytes (595 +/- 203 vs 2,024 +/- 393 cells/ mm2 in treated and non-treated infected mice, respectively). 6. We conclude that microvascular enlargement and changes in vessel phenotype are features of some types of chronic inflammation and, furthermore, that dexamethasone reverses the microvascular enlargement, changes in vessel phenotype and leucocyte influx associated with chronic inflammatory airway disease. PMID:11022979

  9. The cutaneous vascular system in chronic skin inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Huggenberger, Reto; Detmar, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The blood and lymphatic vasculature play an important role in skin homeostasis. Angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis – the growth of new vessels from existing ones - have received tremendous interest because of their role in promoting cancer spread. However, there is increasing evidence that both vessel types also play a major role in acute and chronic inflammatory disorders. Vessels change their phenotype in inflammation (vascular remodeling). In inflamed skin, vascular remodeling consists of a hyperpermeable, enlarged network of vessels with increased blood flow, and influx of inflammatory cells. During chronic inflammation, the activated endothelium expresses adhesion molecules, cytokines, and other molecules that lead to leukocyte rolling, attachment and migration into the skin. Recent studies reveal that inhibition of blood vessel activation exerts potent anti-inflammatory properties. Thus, anti-angiogenic drugs might be used to treat inflammatory conditions. In particular, topical application of anti-angiogenic drugs might be ideally suited to circumvent the adverse effects of systemic therapy with angiogenesis inhibitors. Our recent results indicate that stimulation of lymphatic vessel growth and function unexpectedly represents a novel approach for treating chronic inflammatory disorders. PMID:22076324

  10. Bioactive Compounds Isolated from Microalgae in Chronic Inflammation and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Talero, Elena; García-Mauriño, Sofía; Ávila-Román, Javier; Rodríguez-Luna, Azahara; Alcaide, Antonio; Motilva, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    The risk of onset of cancer is influenced by poorly controlled chronic inflammatory processes. Inflammatory diseases related to cancer development include inflammatory bowel disease, which can lead to colon cancer, or actinic keratosis, associated with chronic exposure to ultraviolet light, which can progress to squamous cell carcinoma. Chronic inflammatory states expose these patients to a number of signals with tumorigenic effects, including nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) activation, pro-inflammatory cytokines and prostaglandins release and ROS production. In addition, the participation of inflammasomes, autophagy and sirtuins has been demonstrated in pathological processes such as inflammation and cancer. Chemoprevention consists in the use of drugs, vitamins, or nutritional supplements to reduce the risk of developing or having a recurrence of cancer. Numerous in vitro and animal studies have established the potential colon and skin cancer chemopreventive properties of substances from marine environment, including microalgae species and their products (carotenoids, fatty acids, glycolipids, polysaccharides and proteins). This review summarizes the main mechanisms of actions of these compounds in the chemoprevention of these cancers. These actions include suppression of cell proliferation, induction of apoptosis, stimulation of antimetastatic and antiangiogenic responses and increased antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:26437418

  11. The Role of Chronic Inflammation in Obesity-Associated Cancers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    There is a strong relationship between metabolism and immunity, which can become deleterious under conditions of metabolic stress. Obesity, considered a chronic inflammatory disease, is one example of this link. Chronic inflammation is increasingly being recognized as an etiology in several cancers, particularly those of epithelial origin, and therefore a potential link between obesity and cancer. In this review, the connection between the different factors that can lead to the chronic inflammatory state in the obese individual, as well as their effect in tumorigenesis, is addressed. Furthermore, the association between obesity, inflammation, and esophageal, liver, colon, postmenopausal breast, and endometrial cancers is discussed. PMID:23819063

  12. Expression of epithelial adhesion proteins and integrins in chronic inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    Haapasalmi, K.; Mäkelä, M.; Oksala, O.; Heino, J.; Yamada, K. M.; Uitto, V. J.; Larjava, H.

    1995-01-01

    Epithelial cell behavior in chronic inflammation is poorly characterized. During inflammation of tooth-supporting structures (periodontal disease), increased proliferation of epithelial cells into the inflamed connective tissue stroma is commonly seen. In some areas ulceration and degeneration take place. We studied alterations in the expression of adhesion molecules and integrins during chronic periodontal inflammation. In inflamed tissue, laminin-1 and type IV collagen were still present in the basement membrane and surrounding blood vessels, but they were also found extravascularly in inflamed connective tissue stroma. Type VII collagen and laminin-5 (also known as kalinin, epiligrin, or nicein) were poorly preserved in the basement membrane zone, but both were found in unusual streak-like distributions in the subepithelial connective tissue stroma in inflamed tissue. Both fibronectin and tenascin were substantially decreased in chronically inflamed connective tissue, showing only punctate staining at the basement membrane zone. Integrins of the beta 1 family showed two distinct staining patterns in epithelial cells during chronic inflammation; focal losses of beta 1 integrins (alpha 2 beta 1 and alpha 3 beta 1) were found in most areas, while in other areas the entire pocket epithelium was found to be strongly positive for beta 1 integrins. No members of the alpha v integrin family were found in any epithelia studied. Expression of the alpha 6 beta 4 integrin was high in basal cells of healthy tissue, but weak in epithelium associated with chronic inflammation. Chronic inflammation therefore involves alterations in both adhesion proteins and integrins expressed by epithelial cells. Basement membrane components found at abnormal sites in stroma in chronic inflammation might serve as new adhesive ligands for various cell types in inflamed stroma. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:7541610

  13. Age-Related Macular Degeneration in the Aspect of Chronic Low-Grade Inflammation (Pathophysiological ParaInflammation)

    PubMed Central

    Nita, Małgorzata; Ascaso, Francisco J.; Huerva, Valentín

    2014-01-01

    The products of oxidative stress trigger chronic low-grade inflammation (pathophysiological parainflammation) process in AMD patients. In early AMD, soft drusen contain many mediators of chronic low-grade inflammation such as C-reactive protein, adducts of the carboxyethylpyrrole protein, immunoglobulins, and acute phase molecules, as well as the complement-related proteins C3a, C5a, C5, C5b-9, CFH, CD35, and CD46. The complement system, mainly alternative pathway, mediates chronic autologous pathophysiological parainflammation in dry and exudative AMD, especially in the Y402H gene polymorphism, which causes hypofunction/lack of the protective complement factor H (CFH) and facilitates chronic inflammation mediated by C-reactive protein (CRP). Microglial activation induces photoreceptor cells injury and leads to the development of dry AMD. Many autoantibodies (antibodies against alpha beta crystallin, alpha-actinin, amyloid, C1q, chondroitin, collagen I, collagen III, collagen IV, elastin, fibronectin, heparan sulfate, histone H2A, histone H2B, hyaluronic acid, laminin, proteoglycan, vimentin, vitronectin, and aldolase C and pyruvate kinase M2) and overexpression of Fcc receptors play role in immune-mediated inflammation in AMD patients and in animal model. Macrophages infiltration of retinal/choroidal interface acts as protective factor in early AMD (M2 phenotype macrophages); however it acts as proinflammatory and proangiogenic factor in advanced AMD (M1 and M2 phenotype macrophages). PMID:25214719

  14. Airway Inflammation and Hypersensitivity Induced by Chronic Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Yu Ru; Kwong, Kevin; Lee, Lu-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Airway hypersensitivity, characterized by enhanced excitability of airway sensory nerves, is a prominent pathophysiological feature in patients with airway inflammatory diseases. Although the underlying pathogenic mechanism is not fully understood, chronic airway inflammation is believed to be primarily responsible. Cigarette smoking is known to cause chronic airway inflammation, accompanied by airway hyperresponsiveness. Experimental evidence indicates that enhanced excitability of vagal bronchopulmonary sensory nerves and increased tachykinin synthesis in these nerves resulting from chronic inflammation are important contributing factors to the airway hyperresponsiveness. Multiple inflammatory mediators released from various types of structural and inflammatory cells are involved in the smoking-induced airway inflammation, which is mainly regulated by redox-sensitive signaling pathways and transcription factors. Furthermore, recent studies have reported potent sensitizing and stimulatory effects of these inflammatory mediators such as prostanoids and reactive oxygen species on these sensory nerves. In summary, these studies using cigarette smoking as an experimental approach have identified certain potentially important cell signaling pathways and underlying mechanisms of the airway hypersensitivity induced by chronic airway inflammation. PMID:21397052

  15. Gut inflammation in chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lakhan, Shaheen E; Kirchgessner, Annette

    2010-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a debilitating disease characterized by unexplained disabling fatigue and a combination of accompanying symptoms the pathology of which is incompletely understood. Many CFS patients complain of gut dysfunction. In fact, patients with CFS are more likely to report a previous diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a common functional disorder of the gut, and experience IBS-related symptoms. Recently, evidence for interactions between the intestinal microbiota, mucosal barrier function, and the immune system have been shown to play a role in the disorder's pathogenesis.Studies examining the microecology of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract have identified specific microorganisms whose presence appears related to disease; in CFS, a role for altered intestinal microbiota in the pathogenesis of the disease has recently been suggested. Mucosal barrier dysfunction promoting bacterial translocation has also been observed. Finally, an altered mucosal immune system has been associated with the disease. In this article, we discuss the interplay between these factors in CFS and how they could play a significant role in GI dysfunction by modulating the activity of the enteric nervous system, the intrinsic innervation of the gut.If an altered intestinal microbiota, mucosal barrier dysfunction, and aberrant intestinal immunity contribute to the pathogenesis of CFS, therapeutic efforts to modify gut microbiota could be a means to modulate the development and/or progression of this disorder. For example, the administration of probiotics could alter the gut microbiota, improve mucosal barrier function, decrease pro-inflammatory cytokines, and have the potential to positively influence mood in patients where both emotional symptoms and inflammatory immune signals are elevated. Probiotics also have the potential to improve gut motility, which is dysfunctional in many CFS patients. PMID:20939923

  16. Biofilms and Inflammation in Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ge; Usui, Marcia L.; Lippman, Soyeon I.; James, Garth A.; Stewart, Philip S.; Fleckman, Philip; Olerud, John E.

    2013-01-01

    Significance The incidence, cost, morbidity, and mortality associated with non-healing of chronic skin wounds are dramatic. With the increasing numbers of people with obesity, chronic medical conditions, and an increasing life expectancy, the healthcare cost of non-healing ulcers has recently been estimated at $25 billion annually in the United States. The role played by bacterial biofilm in chronic wounds has been emphasized in recent years, particularly in the context of the prolongation of the inflammatory phase of repair. Recent Advances Rapid high-throughput genomic approaches have revolutionized the ability to identify and quantify microbial organisms from wounds. Defining bacterial genomes and using genetic approaches to knock out specific bacterial functions, then studying bacterial survival on cutaneous wounds is a promising strategy for understanding which genes are essential for pathogenicity. Critical Issues When an animal sustains a cutaneous wound, understanding mechanisms involved in adaptations by bacteria and adaptations by the host in the struggle for survival is central to development of interventions that favor the host. Future Directions Characterization of microbiomes of clinically well characterized chronic human wounds is now under way. The use of in vivo models of biofilm-infected cutaneous wounds will permit the study of the mechanisms needed for biofilm formation, persistence, and potential synergistic interactions among bacteria. A more complete understanding of bacterial survival mechanisms and how microbes influence host repair mechanisms are likely to provide targets for chronic wound therapy. PMID:24527355

  17. Fibrocytes: emerging effector cells in chronic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Reilkoff, Ronald A.; Bucala, Richard; Herzog, Erica L.

    2013-01-01

    Fibrocytes are mesenchymal cells that arise from monocyte precursors. They are present in injured organs and have both the inflammatory features of macrophages and the tissue remodelling properties of fibroblasts. Chronic inflammatory stimuli mediate the differentiation, trafficking and accumulation of these cells in fibrosing conditions associated with autoimmunity, cardiovascular disease and asthma. This Opinion article discusses the immunological mediators controlling fibrocyte differentiation and recruitment, describes the association of fibrocytes with chronic inflammatory diseases and compares the potential roles of fibrocytes in these disorders with those of macrophages and fibroblasts. It is hoped that this information prompts new opportunities for the study of these unique cells. PMID:21597472

  18. Biological activity of a small molecule indole analog, 1-[(1H-indol-3-yl)methylene]-2-phenylhydrazine (HMPH), in chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Misra, Chandra Sekhar; Gejjalagere Honnappa, Chethan; Jitta, Srinivas Reddy; Gourishetti, Karthik; Daram, Prasanthi; Singh, Mahendra Pal; Hosur Shrungeswara, Akhila; Nayak, Yogendra; Unnikrishnan, Mazhuvancherry Kesavan

    2016-01-25

    A synthetic small molecule, 1-[(1H-indol-3-yl)methylene]-2-phenylhydrazine (HMPH) was conveniently synthesised by a one-step reaction, purified and characterised by chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. HMPH scavenged free radicals and inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ROS generation and NO release in RAW-264.7 cells without signs of any detectable cytotoxicity. HMPH inhibited lipid peroxidation (LPO) with IC50 of 135 ± 9 as against 58 ± 8 μM for α-tocopherol. Further, HMPH (>50 μM) significantly reduced the LPS-induced TNF-α release in mouse peritoneal macrophages and in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). HMPH did not show any visible signs of toxicity in rats up to 400 mg/kg/intraperitoneal and 2000 mg/kg/oral. HMPH at 25 and 50 mg/kg attenuated neutrophil infiltration in air-pouch lavage and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in rat models. HMPH also reduced myeloperoxidase (MPO), nitrite and TNF-α in air-pouch lavage in addition to MPO in plasma. HMPH reduced acute paw-inflammation in carrageenan-induced paw-edema. HMPH consistently decreased both ipsilateral and contralateral paw inflammation, minimised the clinical scores of arthritis, prevented body weight (B.wt.) loss, attenuated serum C-reactive protein (C-RP) and rheumatoid factors (RF) in rat model of adjuvant-induced arthritis. Histopathology and radio-graphical reports show that HMPH reduced bone erosion in both ipsilateral and contralateral paw joints. Failure to inhibit COX suggests that effectiveness of HMPH in both acute and chronic inflammation is mediated by a multimodal mechanism involving modulation of immunity, attenuating TNF-α, protecting bone attrition and reducing oxidative stress. PMID:26549477

  19. CXCR2 inhibition suppresses acute and chronic pancreatic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Steele, Colin W; Karim, Saadia A; Foth, Mona; Rishi, Loveena; Leach, Joshua D G; Porter, Ross J; Nixon, Colin; Jeffry Evans, T R; Carter, C Ross; Nibbs, Robert J B; Sansom, Owen J; Morton, Jennifer P

    2015-09-01

    Pancreatitis is a significant clinical problem and the lack of effective therapeutic options means that treatment is often palliative rather than curative. A deeper understanding of the pathogenesis of both acute and chronic pancreatitis is necessary to develop new therapies. Pathological changes in pancreatitis are dependent on innate immune cell recruitment to the site of initial tissue damage, and on the coordination of downstream inflammatory pathways. The chemokine receptor CXCR2 drives neutrophil recruitment during inflammation, and to investigate its role in pancreatic inflammation, we induced acute and chronic pancreatitis in wild-type and Cxcr2(-/-) mice. Strikingly, Cxcr2(-/-) mice were strongly protected from tissue damage in models of acute pancreatitis, and this could be recapitulated by neutrophil depletion or by the specific deletion of Cxcr2 from myeloid cells. The pancreata of Cxcr2(-/-) mice were also substantially protected from damage during chronic pancreatitis. Neutrophil depletion was less effective in this model, suggesting that CXCR2 on non-neutrophils contributes to the development of chronic pancreatitis. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of CXCR2 in wild-type mice replicated the protection seen in Cxcr2(-/-) mice in acute and chronic models of pancreatitis. Moreover, acute pancreatic inflammation was reversible by inhibition of CXCR2. Thus, CXCR2 is critically involved in the development of acute and chronic pancreatitis in mice, and its inhibition or loss protects against pancreatic damage. CXCR2 may therefore be a viable therapeutic target in the treatment of pancreatitis. PMID:25950520

  20. TLR2-independent induction and regulation of chronic intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Boulard, Olivier; Asquith, Mark J; Powrie, Fiona; Maloy, Kevin J

    2010-02-01

    Interactions between the intestinal microflora and host innate immune receptors play a critical role in intestinal homeostasis. Several studies have shown that TLR2 can modulate inflammatory responses in the gut. TLR2 signals enhance tight junction formation and fortify the epithelial barrier, and may play a crucial role in driving acute inflammatory responses towards intestinal bacterial pathogens. In addition, TLR2 agonists can have direct effects on both Th1 cells and Treg. To define the role of TLR2 in the induction and regulation of chronic intestinal inflammation we examined the effects of TLR2 deletion on several complementary models of inflammatory bowel disease. Our results show that TLR2 signals are not required for the induction of chronic intestinal inflammation by either innate or adaptive immune responses. We further show that TLR2(-/-) mice harbor normal numbers of Foxp3(+) Treg that are able to suppress intestinal inflammation as effectively as their WT counterparts. We also did not find any intrinsic role for TLR2 for pathogenic effector T-cell responses in the gut. Thus, in contrast to their role in acute intestinal inflammation and repair, TLR2 signals may have a limited impact on the induction and regulation of chronic intestinal inflammation. PMID:19950179

  1. Pathogenesis of Myeloproliferative Neoplasms: Role and Mechanisms of Chronic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hermouet, Sylvie; Bigot-Corbel, Edith; Gardie, Betty

    2015-01-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are a heterogeneous group of clonal diseases characterized by the excessive and chronic production of mature cells from one or several of the myeloid lineages. Recent advances in the biology of MPNs have greatly facilitated their molecular diagnosis since most patients present with mutation(s) in the JAK2, MPL, or CALR genes. Yet the roles played by these mutations in the pathogenesis and main complications of the different subtypes of MPNs are not fully elucidated. Importantly, chronic inflammation has long been associated with MPN disease and some of the symptoms and complications can be linked to inflammation. Moreover, the JAK inhibitor clinical trials showed that the reduction of symptoms linked to inflammation was beneficial to patients even in the absence of significant decrease in the JAK2-V617F mutant load. These observations suggested that part of the inflammation observed in patients with JAK2-mutated MPNs may not be the consequence of JAK2 mutation. The aim of this paper is to review the different aspects of inflammation in MPNs, the molecular mechanisms involved, the role of specific genetic defects, and the evidence that increased production of certain cytokines depends or not on MPN-associated mutations, and to discuss possible nongenetic causes of inflammation. PMID:26538820

  2. Gut microbiota and inflammation in chronic kidney disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Mafra, Denise; Fouque, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a multifactorial phenotype that in chronic kidney disease is associated with adverse patient outcomes. Recently, alterations in gut microbiota composition and intestinal barrier have been associated with inflammation and oxidative stress in CKD patients. Vanholder and Glorieux recently critically reviewed [Clin Kidney J (2015) 8 (2): 168-179] the current understanding of the role of gut microbiota in the production of uraemic toxins and the therapeutic implications. Where do we stand now? The basic mechanisms of the gut-kidney crosstalk must still be clarified. In addition, the efficacy and safety of therapeutic strategies to modulate the gut microbiota in order to decrease uraemic toxin production and inflammation in chronic kidney disease should be evaluated. Finally, an impact of such strategies on hard outcomes should be demonstrated before incorporation into routine clinical practice. PMID:26034597

  3. Chronic liver inflammation modifies DNA methylation at the precancerous stage of murine hepatocarcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Stoyanov, Evgeniy; Ludwig, Guy; Mizrahi, Lina; Olam, Devorah; Schnitzer-Perlman, Temima; Tasika, Elena; Sass, Gabriele; Tiegs, Gisa; Jiang, Yong; Nie, Ting; Kohler, James; Schinazi, Raymond F.; Vertino, Paula M.; Cedar, Howard; Galun, Eithan; Goldenberg, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Chronic liver inflammation precedes the majority of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). Here, we explore the connection between chronic inflammation and DNA methylation in the liver at the late precancerous stages of HCC development in Mdr2−/− (Mdr2/Abcb4-knockout) mice, a model of inflammation-mediated HCC. Using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation followed by hybridization with “CpG islands” (CGIs) microarrays, we found specific CGIs in 76 genes which were hypermethylated in the Mdr2−/− liver compared to age-matched healthy controls. The observed hypermethylation resulted mainly from an age-dependent decrease of methylation of the specific CGIs in control livers with no decrease in mutant mice. Chronic inflammation did not change global levels of DNA methylation in Mdr2−/− liver, but caused a 2-fold decrease of the global 5-hydroxymethylcytosine level in mutants compared to controls. Liver cell fractionation revealed, that the relative hypermethylation of specific CGIs in Mdr2−/− livers affected either hepatocyte, or non-hepatocyte, or both fractions without a correlation between changes of gene methylation and expression. Our findings demonstrate that chronic liver inflammation causes hypermethylation of specific CGIs, which may affect both hepatocytes and non-hepatocyte liver cells. These changes may serve as useful markers of an increased regenerative activity and of a late precancerous stage in the chronically inflamed liver. PMID:25918251

  4. Liver Stiffness Measurement-Based Scoring System for Significant Inflammation Related to Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Mei-Zhu; Zhang, Ru-Mian; Chen, Guo-Liang; Huang, Wen-Qi; Min, Feng; Chen, Tian; Xu, Jin-Chao; Pan, Jin-Shui

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Liver biopsy is indispensable because liver stiffness measurement alone cannot provide information on intrahepatic inflammation. However, the presence of fibrosis highly correlates with inflammation. We constructed a noninvasive model to determine significant inflammation in chronic hepatitis B patients by using liver stiffness measurement and serum markers. Methods The training set included chronic hepatitis B patients (n = 327), and the validation set included 106 patients; liver biopsies were performed, liver histology was scored, and serum markers were investigated. All patients underwent liver stiffness measurement. Results An inflammation activity scoring system for significant inflammation was constructed. In the training set, the area under the curve, sensitivity, and specificity of the fibrosis-based activity score were 0.964, 91.9%, and 90.8% in the HBeAg(+) patients and 0.978, 85.0%, and 94.0% in the HBeAg(−) patients, respectively. In the validation set, the area under the curve, sensitivity, and specificity of the fibrosis-based activity score were 0.971, 90.5%, and 92.5% in the HBeAg(+) patients and 0.977, 95.2%, and 95.8% in the HBeAg(−) patients. The liver stiffness measurement-based activity score was comparable to that of the fibrosis-based activity score in both HBeAg(+) and HBeAg(−) patients for recognizing significant inflammation (G ≥3). Conclusions Significant inflammation can be accurately predicted by this novel method. The liver stiffness measurement-based scoring system can be used without the aid of computers and provides a noninvasive alternative for the prediction of chronic hepatitis B-related significant inflammation. PMID:25360742

  5. Antioxidant Effect of Spirulina (Arthrospira) maxima on Chronic Inflammation Induced by Freund's Complete Adjuvant in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Rebolledo, Gabriel Alfonso; Galar-Martínez, Marcela; García-Rodríguez, Rosa Virginia; Chamorro-Cevallos, Germán A.; Hernández-Reyes, Ana Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Abstract One of the major mechanisms in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation is the excessive production of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species, and therefore, oxidative stress. Spirulina (Arthrospira) maxima has marked antioxidant activity in vivo and in vitro, as well as anti-inflammatory activity in certain experimental models, the latter activity being mediated probably by the antioxidant activity of this cyanobacterium. In the present study, chronic inflammation was induced through injection of Freund's complete adjuvant (CFA) in rats treated daily with Spirulina (Arthrospira) maxima for 2 weeks beginning on day 14. Joint diameter, body temperature, and motor capacity were assessed each week. On days 0 and 28, total and differential leukocyte counts and serum oxidative damage were determined, the latter by assessing lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl content. At the end of the study, oxidative damage to joints was likewise evaluated. Results show that S. maxima favors increased mobility, as well as body temperature regulation, and a number of circulating leukocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes in specimens with CFA-induced chronic inflammation and also protects against oxidative damage in joint tissue as well as serum. In conclusion, the protection afforded by S. maxima against development of chronic inflammation is due to its antioxidant activity. PMID:25599112

  6. Antioxidant Effect of Spirulina (Arthrospira) maxima on Chronic Inflammation Induced by Freund's Complete Adjuvant in Rats.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Rebolledo, Gabriel Alfonso; Galar-Martínez, Marcela; García-Rodríguez, Rosa Virginia; Chamorro-Cevallos, Germán A; Hernández-Reyes, Ana Gabriela; Martínez-Galero, Elizdath

    2015-08-01

    One of the major mechanisms in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation is the excessive production of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species, and therefore, oxidative stress. Spirulina (Arthrospira) maxima has marked antioxidant activity in vivo and in vitro, as well as anti-inflammatory activity in certain experimental models, the latter activity being mediated probably by the antioxidant activity of this cyanobacterium. In the present study, chronic inflammation was induced through injection of Freund's complete adjuvant (CFA) in rats treated daily with Spirulina (Arthrospira) maxima for 2 weeks beginning on day 14. Joint diameter, body temperature, and motor capacity were assessed each week. On days 0 and 28, total and differential leukocyte counts and serum oxidative damage were determined, the latter by assessing lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl content. At the end of the study, oxidative damage to joints was likewise evaluated. Results show that S. maxima favors increased mobility, as well as body temperature regulation, and a number of circulating leukocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes in specimens with CFA-induced chronic inflammation and also protects against oxidative damage in joint tissue as well as serum. In conclusion, the protection afforded by S. maxima against development of chronic inflammation is due to its antioxidant activity. PMID:25599112

  7. Chronic brain inflammation causes a reduction in GluN2A and GluN2B subunits of NMDA receptors and an increase in the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Neuroinflammation plays a key role in the initiation and progression of neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Chronic neuroinflammation results in diminished synaptic plasticity and loss of GluN1 N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the hippocampus, leading to the cognitive deficits that are the most common symptoms of AD. Therefore, it is suggested that chronic inflammation may alter expression levels of GluN2A and GluN2B subunits of NMDA receptors and associated intracellular signalling. Chronic neuroinflammation was induced by chronic infusion of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) into the fourth ventricle in Fischer-344 rats. The status of hippocampus-dependent memory was evaluated in control rats and rats chronically infused with LPS. Microglial activation in the hippocampus was examined using immunohistochemical staining. Western blot analysis was used to measure membrane levels of GluN2A and GluN2B subunits of NMDA receptors and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in the hippocampi of these rats, and immunofluorescent double labeling was used to assess the cellular location of MAPK. Microglial activation was observed in the hippocampi of rats that showed memory impairments with chronic LPS infusion. Chronic LPS infusion reduced the levels of GluN2A and GluN2B and increased the levels of phosphorylated MAPKs in the hippocampus. MAPK-positive immunoreactivity was observed mostly in the neurons and also in non-neuronal cells. Reductions in GluN2A and GluN2B subunits of NMDA receptors coupled with altered MAPK signaling, in response to inflammatory stimuli may be related to the cognitive deficits observed in AD. PMID:24761931

  8. Phagocyte respiratory burst activates macrophage erythropoietin signalling to promote acute inflammation resolution.

    PubMed

    Luo, Bangwei; Wang, Jinsong; Liu, Zongwei; Shen, Zigang; Shi, Rongchen; Liu, Yu-Qi; Liu, Yu; Jiang, Man; Wu, Yuzhang; Zhang, Zhiren

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation resolution is an active process, the failure of which causes uncontrolled inflammation which underlies many chronic diseases. Therefore, endogenous pathways that regulate inflammation resolution are fundamental and of wide interest. Here, we demonstrate that phagocyte respiratory burst-induced hypoxia activates macrophage erythropoietin signalling to promote acute inflammation resolution. This signalling is activated following acute but not chronic inflammation. Pharmacological or genetical inhibition of the respiratory burst suppresses hypoxia and macrophage erythropoietin signalling. Macrophage-specific erythropoietin receptor-deficient mice and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) mice, which lack the capacity for respiratory burst, display impaired inflammation resolution, and exogenous erythropoietin enhances this resolution in WT and CGD mice. Mechanistically, erythropoietin increases macrophage engulfment of apoptotic neutrophils via PPARγ, promotes macrophage removal of debris and enhances macrophage migration to draining lymph nodes. Together, our results provide evidences of an endogenous pathway that regulates inflammation resolution, with important implications for treating inflammatory conditions. PMID:27397585

  9. A Mouse Model for Pathogen-induced Chronic Inflammation at Local and Systemic Sites

    PubMed Central

    Slocum, Connie S.; Weinberg, Ellen O.; Hua, Ning; Gudino, Cynthia V.; Hamilton, James A.; Genco, Caroline A.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is a major driver of pathological tissue damage and a unifying characteristic of many chronic diseases in humans including neoplastic, autoimmune, and chronic inflammatory diseases. Emerging evidence implicates pathogen-induced chronic inflammation in the development and progression of chronic diseases with a wide variety of clinical manifestations. Due to the complex and multifactorial etiology of chronic disease, designing experiments for proof of causality and the establishment of mechanistic links is nearly impossible in humans. An advantage of using animal models is that both genetic and environmental factors that may influence the course of a particular disease can be controlled. Thus, designing relevant animal models of infection represents a key step in identifying host and pathogen specific mechanisms that contribute to chronic inflammation. Here we describe a mouse model of pathogen-induced chronic inflammation at local and systemic sites following infection with the oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis, a bacterium closely associated with human periodontal disease. Oral infection of specific-pathogen free mice induces a local inflammatory response resulting in destruction of tooth supporting alveolar bone, a hallmark of periodontal disease. In an established mouse model of atherosclerosis, infection with P. gingivalis accelerates inflammatory plaque deposition within the aortic sinus and innominate artery, accompanied by activation of the vascular endothelium, an increased immune cell infiltrate, and elevated expression of inflammatory mediators within lesions. We detail methodologies for the assessment of inflammation at local and systemic sites. The use of transgenic mice and defined bacterial mutants makes this model particularly suitable for identifying both host and microbial factors involved in the initiation, progression, and outcome of disease. Additionally, the model can be used to screen for novel therapeutic strategies

  10. Chronic Inflammation Links Cancer and Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiming; Zheng, Zaozao; Ruan, Jun; Li, Zhi; Tzeng, Chi-Meng

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of genetic studies suggest that the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and cancer share common genes, pathways, and mechanisms. Despite a disruption in a wide range of similar biological processes, the end result is very different: uncontrolled proliferation and early neurodegeneration. Thus, the links between the molecular mechanisms that cause PD and cancer remain to be elucidated. We propose that chronic inflammation in neurons and tumors contributes to a microenvironment that favors the accumulation of DNA mutations and facilitates disease formation. This article appraises the key role of microglia, establishes the genetic role of COX2 and CARD15 in PD and cancer, and discusses prevention and treatment with this new perspective in mind. We examine the evidence that chronic inflammation is an important link between cancer and PD. PMID:27375474

  11. Chronic Inflammation and Cytokines in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Landskron, Glauben; De la Fuente, Marjorie; Thuwajit, Peti; Thuwajit, Chanitra; Hermoso, Marcela A.

    2014-01-01

    Acute inflammation is a response to an alteration induced by a pathogen or a physical or chemical insult, which functions to eliminate the source of the damage and restore homeostasis to the affected tissue. However, chronic inflammation triggers cellular events that can promote malignant transformation of cells and carcinogenesis. Several inflammatory mediators, such as TNF-α, IL-6, TGF-β, and IL-10, have been shown to participate in both the initiation and progression of cancer. In this review, we explore the role of these cytokines in important events of carcinogenesis, such as their capacity to generate reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, their potential mutagenic effect, and their involvement in mechanisms for epithelial mesenchymal transition, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Finally, we will provide an in-depth analysis of the participation of these cytokines in two types of cancer attributable to chronic inflammatory disease: colitis-associated colorectal cancer and cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:24901008

  12. Cigarette Smoke, Bacteria, Mold, Microbial Toxins, and Chronic Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Pauly, John L.; Paszkiewicz, Geraldine

    2011-01-01

    Chronic inflammation associated with cigarette smoke fosters malignant transformation and tumor cell proliferation and promotes certain nonneoplastic pulmonary diseases. The question arises as to whether chronic inflammation and/or colonization of the airway can be attributed, at least in part, to tobacco-associated microbes (bacteria, fungi, and spores) and/or microbial toxins (endotoxins and mycotoxins) in tobacco. To address this question, a literature search of documents in various databases was performed. The databases included PubMed, Legacy Tobacco Documents Library, and US Patents. This investigation documents that tobacco companies have identified and quantified bacteria, fungi, and microbial toxins at harvest, throughout fermentation, and during storage. Also characterized was the microbial flora of diverse smoking and smokeless tobacco articles. Evidence-based health concerns expressed in investigations of microbes and microbial toxins in cigarettes, cigarette smoke, and smokeless tobacco products are reasonable; they warrant review by regulatory authorities and, if necessary, additional investigation to address scientific gaps. PMID:21772847

  13. Inflammation and nutrition in children with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Tu, Juan; Cheung, Wai W; Mak, Robert H

    2016-05-01

    Chronic inflammation and nutritional imbalance are important comorbid conditions that correlate with poor clinical outcomes in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Nutritional disorders such as cachexia/protein energy wasting, obesity and growth retardation negatively impact the quality of life and disease progression in children with CKD. Inadequate nutrition has been associated with growth disturbances in children with CKD. On the other hand, over-nutrition and obesity are associated with poor outcomes in children with CKD. The exact mechanisms leading to these unfavorable conditions are not fully elucidated and are most likely multifactorial. In this review, we focus on the pathophysiology of nutrition disorders and inflammation and their impact on clinical outcomes in children with CKD. PMID:27152263

  14. Inflammation and nutrition in children with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Juan; Cheung, Wai W; Mak, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation and nutritional imbalance are important comorbid conditions that correlate with poor clinical outcomes in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Nutritional disorders such as cachexia/protein energy wasting, obesity and growth retardation negatively impact the quality of life and disease progression in children with CKD. Inadequate nutrition has been associated with growth disturbances in children with CKD. On the other hand, over-nutrition and obesity are associated with poor outcomes in children with CKD. The exact mechanisms leading to these unfavorable conditions are not fully elucidated and are most likely multifactorial. In this review, we focus on the pathophysiology of nutrition disorders and inflammation and their impact on clinical outcomes in children with CKD. PMID:27152263

  15. Clinical aspects of chronic ENT inflammation in children.

    PubMed

    Mansbach, A L; Brihaye, P; Casimir, G; Dhooghe, I; Gordts, F; Halewyck, S; Hanssens, L; Lemkens, N; Lemkens, P; Leupe, P; Mulier, S; Van Crombrugge, L; Van Der Veken, P; Van Hoecke, H

    2012-01-01

    In children, all ENT cavities are particularly prone to the development of chronic inflammation. This is due to many predisposing factors, of which the most common are unfavourable anatomy, absence of nasal blowing, day care attendance, allergy, immature immunity, gastro-oesophageal reflux and tobacco smoke exposure. The aim of this paper is to outline the most specific paediatric clinical aspects of chronic pharyngo-tonsillitis, rhinosinusitis, otitis media, adenoiditis and laryngotracheitis and the important influence that some of these pathologies exert on the others. PMID:23431613

  16. Perspectives for Monocyte/Macrophage-Based Diagnostics of Chronic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Gudima, Alexandru; Moganti, Kondaiah; Gratchev, Alexei; Orekhov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Summary Low-grade chronic inflammation underlies the development of the most dangerous cardiometabolic disorders including type 2 diabetes and its vascular complications. In contrast to acute inflammation induced by bacteria and viruses, chronic inflammation can be driven by abnormal reaction to endogenous factors, including Th2 cytokines, metabolic factors like advanced glycation end products (AGEs), modified lipoproteins, or hyperglycemia. The key innate immune cells that recognize these factors in blood circulation are monocytes. Inflammatory programming of monocytes which migrate into tissues can, in turn, result into generation of tissue macrophages with pathological functions. Therefore, determination of the molecular and functional phenotype of circulating monocytes is a very promising diagnostic tool for the identification of hidden inflammation, which can precede the development of the pathology. Here we propose a new test system for the identification of inflammatory programming of monocytes: surface biomarkers and ex vivo functional system. We summarize the current knowledge about surface biomarkers for monocyte subsets, including CD16, CCR2, CX3CR1, CD64, stabilin-1 and CD36, and their association with inflammatory human disorders. Furthermore, we present the design of an ex vivo monocyte-based test system with minimal set of parameters as a potential diagnostic tool for the identification of personalized inflammatory responses. PMID:27226789

  17. IRF5 controls both acute and chronic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Miriam; Byrne, Adam J.; Blazek, Katrina; Saliba, David G.; Pease, James E.; Perocheau, Dany; Feldmann, Marc; Udalova, Irina A.

    2015-01-01

    Whereas the importance of macrophages in chronic inflammatory diseases is well recognized, there is an increasing awareness that neutrophils may also play an important role. In addition to the well-documented heterogeneity of macrophage phenotypes and functions, neutrophils also show remarkable phenotypic diversity among tissues. Understanding the molecular pathways that control this heterogeneity should provide abundant scope for the generation of more specific and effective therapeutics. We have shown that the transcription factor IFN regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) polarizes macrophages toward an inflammatory phenotype. IRF5 is also expressed in other myeloid cells, including neutrophils, where it was linked to neutrophil function. In this study we explored the role of IRF5 in models of acute inflammation, including antigen-induced inflammatory arthritis and lung injury, both involving an extensive influx of neutrophils. Mice lacking IRF5 accumulate far fewer neutrophils at the site of inflammation due to the reduced levels of chemokines important for neutrophil recruitment, such as the chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1. Furthermore we found that neutrophils express little IRF5 in the joints and that their migratory properties are not affected by the IRF5 deficiency. These studies extend prior ones suggesting that inhibiting IRF5 might be useful for chronic macrophage-induced inflammation and suggest that IRF5 blockade would ameliorate more acute forms of inflammation, including lung injury. PMID:26283380

  18. Perspectives for Monocyte/Macrophage-Based Diagnostics of Chronic Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Gudima, Alexandru; Moganti, Kondaiah; Gratchev, Alexei; Orekhov, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Low-grade chronic inflammation underlies the development of the most dangerous cardiometabolic disorders including type 2 diabetes and its vascular complications. In contrast to acute inflammation induced by bacteria and viruses, chronic inflammation can be driven by abnormal reaction to endogenous factors, including Th2 cytokines, metabolic factors like advanced glycation end products (AGEs), modified lipoproteins, or hyperglycemia. The key innate immune cells that recognize these factors in blood circulation are monocytes. Inflammatory programming of monocytes which migrate into tissues can, in turn, result into generation of tissue macrophages with pathological functions. Therefore, determination of the molecular and functional phenotype of circulating monocytes is a very promising diagnostic tool for the identification of hidden inflammation, which can precede the development of the pathology. Here we propose a new test system for the identification of inflammatory programming of monocytes: surface biomarkers and ex vivo functional system. We summarize the current knowledge about surface biomarkers for monocyte subsets, including CD16, CCR2, CX3CR1, CD64, stabilin-1 and CD36, and their association with inflammatory human disorders. Furthermore, we present the design of an ex vivo monocyte-based test system with minimal set of parameters as a potential diagnostic tool for the identification of personalized inflammatory responses. PMID:27226789

  19. Chronic inflammation induces telomere dysfunction and accelerates ageing in mice

    PubMed Central

    Jurk, Diana; Wilson, Caroline; Passos, João F.; Oakley, Fiona; Correia-Melo, Clara; Greaves, Laura; Saretzki, Gabriele; Fox, Chris; Lawless, Conor; Anderson, Rhys; Hewitt, Graeme; Pender, Sylvia LF; Fullard, Nicola; Nelson, Glyn; Mann, Jelena; van de Sluis, Bart; Mann, Derek A.; von Zglinicki, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is associated with normal and pathological ageing. Here we show that chronic, progressive low-grade inflammation induced by knockout of the nfkb1 subunit of the transcription factor NF-κB induces premature ageing in mice. We also show that these mice have reduced regeneration in liver and gut. nfkb1−/− fibroblasts exhibit aggravated cell senescence because of an enhanced autocrine and paracrine feedback through NF-κB, COX-2 and ROS, which stabilizes DNA damage. Preferential accumulation of telomere-dysfunctional senescent cells in nfkb1−/− tissues is blocked by anti-inflammatory or antioxidant treatment of mice, and this rescues tissue regenerative potential. Frequencies of senescent cells in liver and intestinal crypts quantitatively predict mean and maximum lifespan in both short- and long-lived mice cohorts. These data indicate that systemic chronic inflammation can accelerate ageing via ROS-mediated exacerbation of telomere dysfunction and cell senescence in the absence of any other genetic or environmental factor. PMID:24960204

  20. Natural killer cells regulate eosinophilic inflammation in chronic rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Heui; Choi, Go Eun; Lee, Bong-Jae; Kwon, Seog Woon; Lee, Seung-Hyo; Kim, Hun Sik; Jang, Yong Ju

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophils play a major pathologic role in the pathogenesis of diverse inflammatory diseases including chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Dysregulated production of prostaglandin (PG), particularly PGD2, is considered to be an important contributing factor to eosinophilic inflammation in CRS primarily through proinflammatory and chemotactic effects on eosinophils. Here, we provide evidence that PGD2 can promote eosinophilic inflammation through a suppression of Natural killer (NK) cell effector function and NK cell-mediated eosinophil regulation. Eosinophil apoptosis mediated by NK cells was significantly decreased in CRS patients compared with healthy controls. This decrease was associated with NK cell dysfunction and eosinophilic inflammation. Tissue eosinophils were positively correlated with blood eosinophils in CRS patients. In a murine model of CRS, NK cell depletion caused an exacerbation of blood eosinophilia and eosinophilic inflammation in the sinonasal tissue. PGD2 and its metabolite, but not PGE2 and a panel of cytokines including TGF-β, were increased in CRS patients compared with controls. Effector functions of NK cells were potently suppressed by PGD2-dependent, rather than PGE2-dependent, pathway in controls and CRS patients. Thus, our results suggest decreased NK cell-mediated eosinophil regulation, possibly through an increased level of PGD2, as a previously unrecognized link between PG dysregulation and eosinophilic inflammation in CRS. PMID:27271931

  1. Therapeutics targeting persistent inflammation in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Machowska, Anna; Carrero, Juan Jesus; Lindholm, Bengt; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammation is a condition intrinsically linked to chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its other typical sequelae, such as acquired immune dysfunction, protein-energy wasting (PEW), and accelerated vascular aging that promote premature cardiovascular disease (CVD) and infections, the two leading causes of death in CKD patients. Inflammation is a major contributor to complications in CKD, and inflammatory markers, such as C-reactive protein and pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, correlate with underlying causes and consequences of the inflamed uremic phenotype, such as oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, CVD, PEW, and infections, and are sensitive and independent predictors of outcome in CKD. Therefore, inflammation appears to be a logical target for potential preventive and therapeutic interventions in patients with CKD. Putative anti-inflammatory therapy strategies aiming at preventing complications and improving outcomes in CKD span over several areas: (1) dealing with the source of inflammation (such as cardiovascular, gastrointestinal or periodontal disease and depression); (2) providing nonspecific immune modulatory effects by promoting healthy dietary habits and other lifestyle changes; (3) promoting increased use of recognized pharmacologic interventions that have pleiotropic effects; and, (4) introducing novel targeted anticytokine interventions. This review provides a brief update on inflammatory biomarkers and possible therapeutic approaches targeting inflammation and the uremic inflammatory milieu in patients with CKD. PMID:26173187

  2. Natural killer cells regulate eosinophilic inflammation in chronic rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Heui; Choi, Go Eun; Lee, Bong-Jae; Kwon, Seog Woon; Lee, Seung-Hyo; Kim, Hun Sik; Jang, Yong Ju

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophils play a major pathologic role in the pathogenesis of diverse inflammatory diseases including chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Dysregulated production of prostaglandin (PG), particularly PGD2, is considered to be an important contributing factor to eosinophilic inflammation in CRS primarily through proinflammatory and chemotactic effects on eosinophils. Here, we provide evidence that PGD2 can promote eosinophilic inflammation through a suppression of Natural killer (NK) cell effector function and NK cell-mediated eosinophil regulation. Eosinophil apoptosis mediated by NK cells was significantly decreased in CRS patients compared with healthy controls. This decrease was associated with NK cell dysfunction and eosinophilic inflammation. Tissue eosinophils were positively correlated with blood eosinophils in CRS patients. In a murine model of CRS, NK cell depletion caused an exacerbation of blood eosinophilia and eosinophilic inflammation in the sinonasal tissue. PGD2 and its metabolite, but not PGE2 and a panel of cytokines including TGF-β, were increased in CRS patients compared with controls. Effector functions of NK cells were potently suppressed by PGD2-dependent, rather than PGE2-dependent, pathway in controls and CRS patients. Thus, our results suggest decreased NK cell-mediated eosinophil regulation, possibly through an increased level of PGD2, as a previously unrecognized link between PG dysregulation and eosinophilic inflammation in CRS. PMID:27271931

  3. Microglial Activation & Chronic Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lull, Melinda E.; Block, Michelle L.

    2010-01-01

    Microglia, the resident innate immune cells in the brain, have long been implicated in the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases. Accumulating evidence points to activated microglia as a chronic source of multiple neurotoxic factors, including TNFα, NO, IL1-β, and reactive oxygen species (ROS), driving progressive neuron damage. Microglia can become chronically activated by either a single stimulus (ex. LPS or neuron damage) or multiple stimuli exposures to result in cumulative neuronal loss over time. While the mechanisms driving these phenomena are just beginning to be understood, reactive microgliosis (the microglial response to neuron damage) and ROS have been implicated as key mechanisms of chronic and neurotoxic microglial activation, particularly in the case of Parkinson’s Disease. Here, we review the mechanisms of neurotoxicity associated with chronic microglial activation and discuss the role of neuronal death and microglial ROS driving the chronic and toxic microglial phenotype. PMID:20880500

  4. Serum Autoantibodies in Chronic Prostate Inflammation in Prostate Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schlick, Bettina; Massoner, Petra; Lueking, Angelika; Charoentong, Pornpimol; Blattner, Mirjam; Schaefer, Georg; Marquart, Klaus; Theek, Carmen; Amersdorfer, Peter; Zielinski, Dirk; Kirchner, Matthias; Trajanoski, Zlatko; Rubin, Mark A.; Müllner, Stefan; Schulz-Knappe, Peter; Klocker, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammation is frequently observed on histological analysis of malignant and non-malignant prostate specimens. It is a suspected supporting factor for prostate diseases and their progression and a main cause of false positive PSA tests in cancer screening. We hypothesized that inflammation induces autoantibodies, which may be useful biomarkers. We aimed to identify and validate prostate inflammation associated serum autoantibodies in prostate cancer patients and evaluate the expression of corresponding autoantigens. Methods Radical prostatectomy specimens of prostate cancer patients (N = 70) were classified into high and low inflammation groups according to the amount of tissue infiltrating lymphocytes. The corresponding pre-surgery blood serum samples were scrutinized for autoantibodies using a low-density protein array. Selected autoantigens were identified in prostate tissue and their expression pattern analyzed by immunohistochemistry and qPCR. The identified autoantibody profile was cross-checked in an independent sample set (N = 63) using the Luminex-bead protein array technology. Results Protein array screening identified 165 autoantibodies differentially abundant in the serum of high compared to low inflammation patients. The expression pattern of three corresponding antigens were established in benign and cancer tissue by immunohistochemistry and qPCR: SPAST (Spastin), STX18 (Syntaxin 18) and SPOP (speckle-type POZ protein). Of these, SPAST was significantly increased in prostate tissue with high inflammation. All three autoantigens were differentially expressed in primary and/or castration resistant prostate tumors when analyzed in an inflammation-independent tissue microarray. Cross-validation of the inflammation autoantibody profile on an independent sample set using a Luminex-bead protein array, retrieved 51 of the significantly discriminating autoantibodies. Three autoantibodies were significantly upregulated in both screens, MUT

  5. Early-life enteric infections: relation between chronic systemic inflammation and poor cognition in children.

    PubMed

    Oriá, Reinaldo B; Murray-Kolb, Laura E; Scharf, Rebecca J; Pendergast, Laura L; Lang, Dennis R; Kolling, Glynis L; Guerrant, Richard L

    2016-06-01

    The intestinal microbiota undergoes active remodeling in the first 6 to 18 months of life, during which time the characteristics of the adult microbiota are developed. This process is strongly influenced by the early diet and enteric pathogens. Enteric infections and malnutrition early in life may favor microbiota dysbiosis and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, resulting in intestinal barrier dysfunction and translocation of intestinal bacterial products, ultimately leading to low-grade, chronic, subclinical systemic inflammation. The leaky gut-derived low-grade systemic inflammation may have profound consequences on the gut-liver-brain axis, compromising normal growth, metabolism, and cognitive development. This review examines recent data suggesting that early-life enteric infections that lead to intestinal barrier disruption may shift the intestinal microbiota toward chronic systemic inflammation and subsequent impaired cognitive development. PMID:27142301

  6. Inhalation of Environmental Stressors & Chronic Inflammation: Autoimmunity and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Mejiba, Sandra E.; Zhai, Zili; Akram, Hammad; Pye, Quentin N.; Hensley, Kenneth; Kurien, Biji T.; Scofield, R. Hal; Ramirez, Dario C.

    2009-01-01

    Human life expectancy and welfare has decreased because of the increase in environmental stressors in the air. An environmental stressor is a natural or human-made component present in our environment that upon reaching an organic system produces a coordinated response. This response usually involves a modification of the metabolism and physiology of the system. Inhaled environmental stressors damage the airways and lung parenchyma, producing irritation, recruitment of inflammatory cells, and oxidative modification of biomolecules. Oxidatively modified biomolecules, their degradation products, and adducts with other biomolecules can reach the systemic circulation, and when found in higher concentrations than normal they are considered to be biomarkers of systemic oxidative stress and inflammation. We classify them as metabolic stressors because they are not inert compounds; indeed, they amplify the inflammatory response by inducing inflammation in the lung and other organs. Thus the lung is not only the target for environmental stressors, but it is also the source of a number of metabolic stressors that can induce and worsen pre-existing chronic inflammation. Metabolic stressors produced in the lung have a number of effects in tissues other than the lung, such as the brain, and they can also abrogate the mechanisms of immunotolerance. In this review, we discuss recent published evidence that suggests that inflammation in the lung is an important connection between air pollution and chronic inflammatory diseases such as autoimmunity and neurodegeneration, and we highlight the critical role of metabolic stressors produced in the lung. The understanding of this relationship between inhaled environmental pollutants and systemic inflammation will help us to: 1) understand the molecular mechanism of environment-associated diseases, and 2) find new biomarkers that will help us prevent the exposure of susceptible individuals and/or design novel therapies. PMID:18977456

  7. Link between chronic inflammation and human papillomavirus-induced carcinogenesis (Review)

    PubMed Central

    FERNANDES, JOSÉ VERÍSSIMO; DE MEDEIROS FERNANDES, THALES ALLYRIO ARAÚJO; DE AZEVEDO, JENNER CHRYSTIAN VERÍSSIMO; COBUCCI, RICARDO NEY OLIVEIRA; DE CARVALHO, MARIA GORETTI FREIRE; ANDRADE, VANIA SOUSA; DE ARAÚJO, JOSÉLIO MARIA GALVÃO

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a defense strategy against invading agents and harmful molecules that is activated immediately following a stimulus, and involves the release of cytokines and chemokines, which activate the innate immune response. These mediators act together to increase blood flow and vascular permeability, facilitating recruitment of effector cells to the site of injury. Following resolution of the injury and removal of the stimulus, inflammation is disabled, but if the stimulus persists, inflammation becomes chronic and is strongly associated with cancer. This is likely to be due to the fact that the inflammation leads to a wound that does not heal, requiring a constant renewal of cells, which increases the risk of neoplastic transformation. Debris from phagocytosis, including the reactive species of oxygen and nitrogen that cause damage to DNA already damaged by the leukotrienes and prostaglandins, has an impact on inflammation and various carcinogenic routes. There is an association between chronic inflammation, persistent infection and cancer, where oncogenic action is mediated by autocrine and paracrine signals, causing changes in somatic cells under the influence of the microbial genome or of epigenetic factors. Among the infectious agents associated with cancer, certain genotypes of human papillomavirus (HPV) stand out. HPV is responsible for virtually all cases of cervical cancer and a lower proportion of cancers of the vagina, vulva, anus, penis and a number of extragenital cancers. In the present review, recent advances in the mechanisms involved in the inflammatory response are presented with their participation in the process of carcinogenesis, emphasizing the role of chronic inflammation in the development of HPV-induced cervical cancer. PMID:25663851

  8. Systemic inflammation after inspiratory loading in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Fuster, Antonia; Sauleda, Jaume; Sala, Ernest; Barceló, Bernardí; Pons, Jaume; Carrera, Miguel; Noguera, Aina; Togores, Bernat; Agustí, Alvar GN

    2008-01-01

    Objective Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) present systemic inflammation. Strenuous resistive breathing induces systemic inflammation in healthy subjects. We hypothesized that the increased respiratory load that characterizes COPD can contribute to systemic inflammation in these patients. Patients and methods To test this hypothesis, we compared leukocyte numbers and levels of circulating cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNFα], interleukin-1β [IL-1β], IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10), before and 1 hour after maximal incremental inspiratory loading in 13 patients with stable COPD (forced expiratory volume in one second [FEV1] 29 ± 2.5% ref) and in 8 healthy sedentary subjects (FEV1 98 ± 5% ref). Results We found that: (1) at baseline, patients with COPD showed higher leukocyte counts and IL-8 levels than controls (p < 0.01); and, (2) one hour after maximal inspiratory loading these values were unchanged, except for IL-10, which increased in controls (p < 0.05) but not in patients with COPD. Conclusions This study confirms the presence of systemic inflammation in COPD, shows that maximal inspiratory loading does not increase the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-8) in COPD patients or controls, but suggests that the former may be unable to mount an appropriate systemic anti-inflammatory response to exercise. PMID:18488438

  9. Toxic stress, inflammation and symptomatology of chronic complications in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Charles A; Faulkner, Melissa Spezia

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes affects at least 382 million people worldwide and the incidence is expected to reach 592 million by 2035. The incidence of diabetes in youth is skyrocketing as evidenced by a 21% increase in type 1 diabetes and a 30.5% increase in type 2 diabetes in the United States between 2001 and 2009. The effects of toxic stress, the culmination of biological and environmental interactions, on the development of diabetes complications is gaining attention. Stress impacts the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis and contributes to inflammation, a key biological contributor to the pathogenesis of diabetes and its associated complications. This review provides an overview of common diabetic complications such as neuropathy, cognitive decline, depression, nephropathy and cardiovascular disease. The review also provides a discussion of the role of inflammation and stress in the development and progression of chronic complications of diabetes, associated symptomatology and importance of early identification of symptoms of depression, fatigue, exercise intolerance and pain. PMID:25987953

  10. Topical steroids for chronic wounds displaying abnormal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Rangaraj, A; Richards, AJ; Riddell, A; Saravolac, VM; Harding, KG

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Chronic, non-healing wounds are often characterised by an excessive, and detrimental, inflammatory response. We review our experience of using a combined topical steroid, antibiotic and antifungal preparation in the treatment of chronic wounds displaying abnormal and excessive inflammation. Methods A retrospective review was undertaken of all patients being treated with a topical preparation containing a steroid (clobetasone butyrate 0.05%), antibiotic and antifungal at a tertiary wound healing centre over a ten-year period. Patients were selected as the primary treating physician felt the wounds were displaying excessive inflammation. Healing rates were calculated for before and during this treatment period for each patient. Changes in symptom burden (pain, odour and exudate levels) following topical application were also calculated. Results Overall, 34 ulcers were identified from 25 individual patients (mean age: 65 years, range: 37–97 years) and 331 clinic visits were analysed, spanning a total time of 14,670 days (7,721 days ‘before treatment’ time, 6,949 days ‘during treatment’ time). Following treatment, 24 ulcers demonstrated faster rates of healing, 3 ulcers showed no significant change in healing rates and 7 were healing more slowly (p=0.0006). Treatment generally reduced the burden of pain and exudate, without affecting odour. Conclusions In normal wound healing, inflammation represents a transient but essential phase of tissue repair. In selected cases, direct application of a steroid containing agent has been shown to improve healing rates, presumably by curtailing this phase. Further evaluation is required to establish the role of preparations containing topical steroids without antimicrobials in the management of chronic wounds. PMID:23676816

  11. Chronic Lymphocytic Inflammation Specifies the Organ Tropism of Prions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikenwalder, Mathias; Zeller, Nicolas; Seeger, Harald; Prinz, Marco; Klöhn, Peter-Christian; Schwarz, Petra; Ruddle, Nancy H.; Weissmann, Charles; Aguzzi, Adriano

    2005-02-01

    Prions typically accumulate in nervous and lymphoid tissues. Because proinflammatory cytokines and immune cells are required for lymphoid prion replication, we tested whether inflammatory conditions affect prion pathogenesis. We administered prions to mice with five inflammatory diseases of the kidney, pancreas, or liver. In all cases, chronic lymphocytic inflammation enabled prion accumulation in otherwise prion-free organs. Inflammatory foci consistently correlated with lymphotoxin up-regulation and ectopic induction of FDC-M1+ cells expressing the normal cellular prion protein PrPC. By contrast, inflamed organs of mice lacking lymphotoxin-α or its receptor did not accumulate the abnormal isoform PrPSc, nor did they display infectivity upon prion inoculation. By expanding the tissue distribution of prions, chronic inflammatory conditions may act as modifiers of natural and iatrogenic prion transmission.

  12. Diffuse large B cell lymphoma with chronic granulomatous inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nyunt, W W T; Wong, Y P; Wan Jamaludin, W F; Abdul Wahid, S F S

    2016-04-01

    Non-necrotic epithelioid granulomas have been reported in association with neoplasms including Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. We report a case of diffuse large B cell lymphoma with chronic granulomatous inflammation to highlight awareness of obscure tumour cells within the granuloma, to avoid delay in diagnosis and management of lymphoma. A 39-year-old Malay lady with no past medical history, presented with a 2-month history of progressive worsening of difficulty in breathing, cough, low-grade fever, loss of weight and loss of appetite. Chest X-ray showed an anterior mediastinal mass and computed tomography (CT)-guided biopsy was reported as chronic granulomatous inflammation suggestive of tuberculosis. After 2 months of anti-TB treatment, her symptoms were not relieved. The patient underwent another CT-guided biopsy of the anterior mediastinal mass in another hospital and the histopathology revealed diffuse large B cell lymphoma. The patient was referred for treatment. On histopathological review, the first sample showed noncaseating granulomas engulfing tumour cells and large abnormal lymphoid cells which were CD20 positive and with high Ki-67 proliferative index. The patient was diagnosed with diffuse large B cell lymphoma stage IV B IPSS score 3. She underwent chemotherapy (R-EPOCH) and responded well to treatment. PMID:27126666

  13. Inflammation, immune activation, and cardiovascular disease in HIV.

    PubMed

    Nou, Eric; Lo, Janet; Grinspoon, Steven K

    2016-06-19

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in people living with HIV. Several epidemiological studies have shown an increased risk of myocardial infarction and stroke compared to uninfected controls. Although traditional risk factors contribute to this increased risk of cardiovascular disease, HIV-specific mechanisms likely also play a role. Systemic inflammation has been linked to cardiovascular disease in several populations suffering from chronic inflammation, including people living with HIV. Although antiretroviral therapy reduces immune activation, levels of inflammatory markers remain elevated compared to uninfected controls. The causes of this sustained immune response are likely multifactorial and incompletely understood. In this review, we summarize the evidence describing the relationship between inflammation and cardiovascular disease and discuss potential anti-inflammatory treatment options for cardiometabolic disease in people living with HIV. PMID:27058351

  14. Use of Hes1-GFP reporter mice to assess activity of the Hes1 promoter in bone cells under chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hengwei; Sun, Wen; Li, Xing; Wang, Mengmeng; Boyce, Brendan F; Hilton, Matthew J; Xing, Lianping

    2016-09-01

    Notch signaling plays a critical role in maintaining bone homeostasis partially by controlling the formation of osteoblasts from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We reported that TNF activates Notch signaling in MSCs which inhibits osteoblast differentiation in TNF transgenic (TNF-Tg) mice, a mouse model of chronic inflammatory arthritis. In the current study, we used Hes1-GFP and Hes1-GFP/TNF-Tg mice to study the distribution and dynamic change of Notch active cells in normal and inflammatory bone loss and mechanisms mediating their enhanced proliferation. We found that Hes1-GFP+ cells are composed of cells expressing mesenchymal, hematopoietic and endothelial surface markers. CD45-/Hes1-GFP+ cells express high levels of mesenchymal markers and form CFU-F and CFU-ALP colonies. Expansion of CFU-F colonies is associated with a rapid increase in Hes1-GFP+ cell numbers and their GFP intensity. The GFP signal is lost when a CFU-F colony differentiates into an ALP+ osteoblast colony. TNF increases the numbers of CD45-/Hes1-GFP+ cells, which are stained negatively for osteoblast marker osteocalcin and localized adjacent to endosteal and trabecular bone surfaces. CD45-/Hes1-GFP+ cells in Hes1-GFP/TNF-Tg mice have increased BrdU incorporation and PDGFRβ levels. TNF increases the number of proliferating Hes1-GFP+ cells, which is prevented by a specific PDGFRβ inhibitor. Notch inhibition blocks TNF-mediated PDGFRβ expression and cell proliferation. Thus, TNF-induced MSC proliferation is mediated by PDGFRβ signal, which works at downstream of Notch. Hes1-GFP mice can be used to assess the activation status of Notch in bone cells. PMID:27269414

  15. Effect of intranasal rosiglitazone on airway inflammation and remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hwa Young; Rhee, Chin Kook; Kang, Ji Young; Park, Chan Kwon; Lee, Sook Young; Kwon, Soon Suk; Kim, Young Kyoon; Yoon, Hyoung Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Asthma is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and remodeling. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors have been reported to regulate inflammatory responses in many cells. In this study, we examined the effects of intranasal rosiglitazone on airway remodeling in a chronic asthma model. Methods: We developed a mouse model of airway remodeling, including smooth muscle thickening, in which ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized mice were repeatedly exposed to intranasal OVA administration twice per week for 3 months. Mice were treated intranasally with rosiglitazone with or without an antagonist during OVA challenge. We determined airway inflammation and the degree of airway remodeling by smooth muscle actin area and collagen deposition. Results: Mice chronically exposed to OVA developed sustained eosinophilic airway inflammation, compared with control mice. Additionally, the mice developed features of airway remodeling, including thickening of the peribronchial smooth muscle layer. Administration of rosiglitazone intranasally inhibited the eosinophilic inflammation significantly, and, importantly, airway smooth muscle remodeling in mice chronically exposed to OVA. Expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) was increased in the OVA group and decreased in the rosiglitazone group. Co-treatment with GW9660 (a rosiglitazone antagonist) and rosiglitazone increased the expression of TLR-4 and NF-κB. Conclusions: These results suggest that intranasal administration of rosiglitazone can prevent not only air way inf lammation but also air way remodeling associated with chronic allergen challenge. This beneficial effect is mediated by inhibition of TLR-4 and NF-κB pathways. PMID:26767862

  16. Effects of kramecyne on LPS induced chronic inflammation and gastric ulcers.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Castro, Angel Josabad; Pérez-Ramos, Julia; Sánchez-Mendoza, Ernesto; Pérez-González, Cuauhtemoc; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Salud

    2015-06-01

    Preclinical Research Krameria cytisoides is used for the treatment of inflammation, stomach pain, and gastric ulcers. The active ingredient from this plant is a peroxide, kramecyne (KACY) which has anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activities of KACY in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced systemic chronic inflammation in mice for 60 days, using dexamethasone (DEX) as the positive control, vehicle (the LPS group) as the negative control and the control group (mice without inflammation). KACY did not affect survival, body weight or relative organ weight in mice but it: decreased nitric oxide (NO) production by 68%; prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) by 67%; increased release of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 (2.0-fold), and reduced production of the proinflammatory cytokines, IL-6 (2.0-fold), IL-1β (2.4-fold), and TNF-α (2.0-fold). Furthermore, the gastroprotective effects of KACY in mice were evaluated in an ethanol-induced gastric ulcer model. The results showed that KACY at 50 and 100 mg/kg exerted gastroprotective effects with similar activity to 50 mg/kg ranitidine. In gastric tissues, KACY decreased the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) but increased the catalase (CAT) activity. KACY have potential for the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases due its similar activity to that of DEX. It also has gastroprotective effects. PMID:26109468

  17. Protective effect of Clerodendrum colebrookianum Walp., on acute and chronic inflammation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Deb, Lokesh; Dey, Amitabha; Sakthivel, G.; Bhattamishra, Subrat Kumar; Dutta, Amitsankar

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate antioxidant, anti-inflammatory potential of the aqueous extracts and its aqueous, n-butanol, ethyl-acetate, and chloroform fractions of Clerodendrum colebrookianum Walp. leaves. Materials and Methods: In this present study, all the test samples were evaluated on in-vivo inflammatory model such as carrageenan and histamine-induced acute-inflammation and cotton pellet induced granuloma formation in albino male rats. Test samples were also employed in in-vitro assays like DPPH* free radical scavenging activity and COX inhibition assay. Results: The test samples at the dose of 200mg/kg/p.o. were found to cause significant inhibition of carrageenan and histamine-induced inflammation and cotton pallet-induced granuloma formation on acute and chronic inflammation in rats. The test samples, except n-butanol fraction, exhibited inhibitory effect for both COX-1 and COX-2, in in-vitro assay but their percentage of inhibition values differs from each other. The test samples (aqueous extracts, aqueous, n-butanol, ethyl-acetate, and chloroform fractions) at 100 μg concentration exhibits 54.37%, 33.88%, 62.85%, 56.28%, and 57.48% DPPH* radical-scavenging effect respectively in in-vitro antioxidant study. Conclusion: These observations established the anti-inflammatory effect of C. colebrookianum leaves in acute and chronic stages of inflammation by free radical scavenging and inhibition of COX-1 and COX-2. PMID:24014914

  18. Chronic inflammation and cancer: potential chemoprevention through nuclear factor kappa B and p53 mutual antagonism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF- κB) as a mechanism of host defense against infection and stress is the central mediator of inflammatory responses. A normal (acute) inflammatory response is activated on urgent basis and is auto-regulated. Chronic inflammation that results due to failure in the regulatory mechanism, however, is largely considered as a critical determinant in the initiation and progression of various forms of cancer. Mechanistically, NF- κB favors this process by inducing various genes responsible for cell survival, proliferation, migration, invasion while at the same time antagonizing growth regulators including tumor suppressor p53. It has been shown by various independent investigations that a down regulation of NF- κB activity directly, or indirectly through the activation of the p53 pathway reduces tumor growth substantially. Therefore, there is a huge effort driven by many laboratories to understand the NF- κB signaling pathways to intervene the function of this crucial player in inflammation and tumorigenesis in order to find an effective inhibitor directly, or through the p53 tumor suppressor. We discuss here on the role of NF- κB in chronic inflammation and cancer, highlighting mutual antagonism between NF- κB and p53 pathways in the process. We also discuss prospective pharmacological modulators of these two pathways, including those that were already tested to affect this mutual antagonism. PMID:25152696

  19. Green tea polyphenols avert chronic inflammation-induced myocardial fibrosis of female rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: Green tea proposes anti-inflammatory properties which may attenuate chronic inflammation-induced fibrosis of vessels. This study evaluated whether green tea polyphenols (GTP) can avert fibrosis or vascular disruption along with mechanisms in rats with chronic inflammation. Treatments: Fo...

  20. Chrysin alleviates allergic inflammation and airway remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jing; Jiang, Mingzi; Zhang, Yunshi; Liu, Xing; Du, Qiang; Feng, Ganzhu

    2016-03-01

    Asthma is a chronic airway inflammatory disorder and progresses mainly due to airway remodeling. Chrysin, a natural flavonoid, has been reported to possess multiple biologic activities, including anti-inflammation, anti-oxidation and anti-proliferation. The present study aimed to investigate whether chrysin could relieve allergic airway inflammation and remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma and the mechanism involved. The female BALB/c mice sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) successfully developed airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), inflammation and remodeling. The experimental data showed that chrysin could alleviate OVA-induced AHR. Chrysin could also reduce OVA-induced increases in the number of inflammatory cells, especially eosinophils, interleukin (IL) -4, and IL-13 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and total IgE in serum. The decreased interferon-γ (IFN-γ) level in BALF was also upregulated by chrysin. In addition, inflammatory cell infiltration, goblet cell hyperplasia and the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) around bronchioles were suppressed by chrysin. Furthermore, the phosphorylation levels of Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) could be decreased by chrysin, which are associated with airway smooth muscle cell (ASMC) proliferation. These results indicate the promising therapeutic effect of chrysin on chronic asthma, especially the progression of airway remodeling. PMID:26780233

  1. Arginase inhibition prevents inflammation and remodeling in a guinea pig model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Pera, T; Zuidhof, A B; Smit, M; Menzen, M H; Klein, T; Flik, G; Zaagsma, J; Meurs, H; Maarsingh, H

    2014-05-01

    Airway inflammation and remodeling are major features of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), whereas pulmonary hypertension is a common comorbidity associated with a poor disease prognosis. Recent studies in animal models have indicated that increased arginase activity contributes to features of asthma, including allergen-induced airway eosinophilia and mucus hypersecretion. Although cigarette smoke and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), major risk factors for COPD, may increase arginase expression, the role of arginase in COPD is unknown. This study aimed to investigate the role of arginase in pulmonary inflammation and remodeling using an animal model of COPD. Guinea pigs were instilled intranasally with LPS or saline twice weekly for 12 weeks and pretreated by inhalation of the arginase inhibitor 2(S)-amino-6-boronohexanoic acid (ABH) or vehicle. Repeated LPS exposure increased lung arginase activity, resulting in increased l-ornithine/l-arginine and l-ornithine/l-citrulline ratios. Both ratios were reversed by ABH. ABH inhibited the LPS-induced increases in pulmonary IL-8, neutrophils, and goblet cells as well as airway fibrosis. Remarkably, LPS-induced right ventricular hypertrophy, indicative of pulmonary hypertension, was prevented by ABH. Strong correlations were found between arginase activity and inflammation, airway remodeling, and right ventricular hypertrophy. Increased arginase activity contributes to pulmonary inflammation, airway remodeling, and right ventricular hypertrophy in a guinea pig model of COPD, indicating therapeutic potential for arginase inhibitors in this disease. PMID:24563530

  2. Interleukin-17 and innate immunity in infections and chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Isailovic, Natasa; Daigo, Kenji; Mantovani, Alberto; Selmi, Carlo

    2015-06-01

    Interleukin 17 (IL-17) includes several cytokines among which IL-17A is considered as one of the major pro-inflammatory cytokine being central to the innate and adaptive immune responses. IL-17 is produced by unconventional T cells, members of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), mast cells, as well as typical innate immune cells, such as neutrophils and macrophages located in the epithelial barriers and characterised by a rapid response to infectious agents by recruiting neutrophils as first line of defence and inducing the production of antimicrobial peptides. Th17 responses appear pivotal in chronic and acute infections by bacteria, parasites, and fungi, as well as in autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and psoriatic arthritis. The data discussed in this review cumulatively indicate that innate-derived IL-17 constitutes a major element in the altered immune response against self antigens or the perpetuation of inflammation, particularly at mucosal sites. New drugs targeting the IL17 pathway include brodalumab, ixekizumab, and secukinumab and their use in psoriatic disease is expected to dramatically impact our approach to this systemic condition. PMID:25998834

  3. Obesity and Obese-related Chronic Low-grade Inflammation in Promotion of Colorectal Cancer Development.

    PubMed

    Pietrzyk, Lukasz; Torres, Anna; Maciejewski, Ryszard; Torres, Kamil

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a worldwide health problem, being the third most commonly detected cancer in males and the second in females. Rising CRC incidence trends are mainly regarded as a part of the rapid 'Westernization' of life-style and are associated with calorically excessive high-fat/low-fibre diet, consumption of refined products, lack of physical activity, and obesity. Most recent epidemiological and clinical investigations have consistently evidenced a significant relationship between obesity-driven inflammation in particular steps of colorectal cancer development, including initiation, promotion, progression, and metastasis. Inflammation in obesity occurs by several mechanisms. Roles of imbalanced metabolism (MetS), distinct immune cells, cytokines, and other immune mediators have been suggested in the inflammatory processes. Critical mechanisms are accounted to proinflammatory cytokines (e.g. IL-1, IL-6, IL-8) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). These molecules are secreted by macrophages and are considered as major agents in the transition between acute and chronic inflammation and inflammation-related CRC. The second factor promoting the CRC development in obese individuals is altered adipokine concentrations (leptin and adiponectin). The role of leptin and adiponectin in cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and metastasis is attributable to the activation of several signal transduction pathways (JAK/STAT, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K), mTOR, and 5'AMPK signaling pathways) and multiple dysregulation (COX-2 downregulation, mRNA expression). PMID:26028066

  4. Pre-neoplastic epigenetic disruption of transcriptional enhancers in chronic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kron, Ken J.; Bailey, Swneke D.; Roulois, David; Lupien, Mathieu; Line, Sérgio R. Peres; de Souza, Ana Paula; De Carvalho, Daniel D.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic periodontitis (CP) is a chronic inflammatory disease independently associated with higher incidence of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). However, the molecular mechanism responsible for this increased incidence is unknown. Here we profiled the DNA methylome of CP patients and healthy controls and compared to a large set of OSCC samples from TCGA. We observed a significant overlap between the altered DNA methylation patterns in CP and in OSCC, suggesting an emergence of a pre-neoplastic epigenome in CP. Remarkably, the hypermethylated CpGs in CP were significantly enriched for enhancer elements. This aberrant enhancer methylation is functional and able to disrupt enhancer activity by preventing the binding of chromatin looping factors. This study provides new insights on the molecular mechanisms linking chronic inflammation and tumor predisposition, highlighting the role of epigenetic disruption of transcriptional enhancers. PMID:26908456

  5. A role of NF-E2 in chronic inflammation and clonal evolution in essential thrombocythemia, polycythemia vera and myelofibrosis?

    PubMed

    Hasselbalch, Hans C

    2014-02-01

    A novel murine model for myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) generated by overexpression of the transcription factor NF-E2 has recently been described. Sustained overexpression of NF-E2 in this model induced myeloid expansion with anemia, leukocytosis and thrombocytosis. Herein, it is debated if NF-E2 overexpression also might have induced a sustained state of in vivo leukocyte and platelet activation with chronic and self-perpetuating production of inflammatory products from activated leukocytes and platelets. If so, this novel murine model also may excellently describe the deleterious impact of sustained chronic NF-E2 overexpression during uncontrolled chronic inflammation upon the hematopoietic system--the development of clonal myeloproliferation. Accordingly, this novel murine model may also have delivered the proof of concept of chronic inflammation as a trigger and driver of clonal evolution in MPNs. PMID:23932394

  6. Blood Biomarkers of Chronic Inflammation in Gulf War Illness

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Gerhard J.; Slater, Billie C. S.; Leis, Linda A.; Rector, Thomas S.; Bach, Ronald R.

    2016-01-01

    Background More than twenty years following the end of the 1990–1991 Gulf War it is estimated that approximately 300,000 veterans of this conflict suffer from an unexplained chronic, multi-system disorder known as Gulf War Illness (GWI). The etiology of GWI may be exposure to chemical toxins, but it remains only partially defined, and its case definition is based only on symptoms. Objective criteria for the diagnosis of GWI are urgently needed for diagnosis and therapeutic research. Objective This study was designed to determine if blood biomarkers could provide objective criteria to assist diagnosis of GWI. Design A surveillance study of 85 Gulf War Veteran volunteers identified from the Department of Veterans Affairs Minnesota Gulf War registry was performed. All subjects were deployed to the Gulf War. Fifty seven subjects had GWI defined by CDC criteria, and 28 did not have symptomatic criteria for a diagnosis of GWI. Statistical analyses were performed on peripheral blood counts and assays of 61 plasma proteins using the Mann-Whitney rank sum test to compare biomarker distributions and stepwise logistic regression to formulate a diagnostic model. Results Lymphocyte, monocyte, neutrophil, and platelet counts were higher in GWI subjects. Six serum proteins associated with inflammation were significantly different in GWI subjects. A diagnostic model of three biomarkers—lymphocytes, monocytes, and C reactive protein—had a predicted probability of 90% (CI 76–90%) for diagnosing GWI when the probability of having GWI was above 70%. Significance The results of the current study indicate that inflammation is a component of the pathobiology of GWI. Analysis of the data resulted in a model utilizing three readily measurable biomarkers that appears to significantly augment the symptom-based case definition of GWI. These new observations are highly relevant to the diagnosis of GWI, and to therapeutic trials. PMID:27352030

  7. Portal Chronic Inflammation in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brunt, Elizabeth M.; Kleiner, David E.; Wilson, Laura A.; Unalp, Aynur; Behling, Cynthia E.; Lavine, Joel E.; Neuschwander-Tetri, Brent A.

    2009-01-01

    Untreated adult nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by absent or mild portal chronic inflammation (CI); in the portal-based pediatric pattern of NAFLD, portal CI may be a predominant component. This study was undertaken to correlate clinical features with portal CI in the subjects enrolled in the NASH CRN. Methods Histology from central grading and clinical parameters temporally related to the biopsy were evaluated from 728 adults and 205 children. Results Sixty percent of adult biopsies had mild, 23% had more than mild, and 16% had no portal CI. In children, 76% had mild, 14% were more than mild, and 10% had no portal CI. In neither group were autoantibodies, elevated ALT, or generic use of “any” medications associated with the presence or degree of portal CI. Clinical features associated with “more than mild” in adults were older age (51 y v 44 y) (p<0.0001), female gender (p=0.001), higher BMI (p<0.0001), elevated insulin levels (median 20 v 14uU/ml) (p=0.001), higher HOMA-IR (median 5 v 3) (p<0.0001), and medications used for NAFLD (p=0.0004), diabetes (p<0.0001), and hypertension (p<0.0001). The same comparisons for “more than mild” v “none” in the pediatric biopsies showed only an association with younger age (12 y v 14 y) (p=0.01), but there was a trend favoring boys. There was no association with BMI, insulin or HOMA-IR. In both groups, lobular and portal inflammation scores had no association, but there was an association with a definite steatohepatitis diagnosis (p<0.0001 for both). Features in the adult biopsies associated with “more than mild” were steatosis amount (p=0.01and location (p<0.0001), presence of ballooning (p<0.0001), and advanced fibrosis (p<0.0001). In the pediatric biopsies, “more than mild” compared with “none” was associated with steatosis location (p=0.0008), and fibrosis score (p<0.0001), specifically, the pediatric (zone 1 accentuation) pattern (p<0.001) and portal

  8. Chronic inflammation imposes aberrant cell fate in regenerating epithelia through mechanotransduction.

    PubMed

    Nowell, Craig S; Odermatt, Pascal D; Azzolin, Luca; Hohnel, Sylke; Wagner, Erwin F; Fantner, Georg E; Lutolf, Matthias P; Barrandon, Yann; Piccolo, Stefano; Radtke, Freddy

    2016-02-01

    Chronic inflammation is associated with a variety of pathological conditions in epithelial tissues, including cancer, metaplasia and aberrant wound healing. In relation to this, a significant body of evidence suggests that aberration of epithelial stem and progenitor cell function is a contributing factor in inflammation-related disease, although the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. In this study, we have delineated the effect of chronic inflammation on epithelial stem/progenitor cells using the corneal epithelium as a model tissue. Using a combination of mouse genetics, pharmacological approaches and in vitro assays, we demonstrate that chronic inflammation elicits aberrant mechanotransduction in the regenerating corneal epithelium. As a consequence, a YAP-TAZ/β-catenin cascade is triggered, resulting in the induction of epidermal differentiation on the ocular surface. Collectively, the results of this study demonstrate that chronic inflammation and mechanotransduction are linked and act to elicit pathological responses in regenerating epithelia. PMID:26689676

  9. Current perspectives of molecular pathways involved in chronic inflammation-mediated breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Suman, Shankar; Sharma, Pradeep Kumar; Rai, Girish; Mishra, Sanjay; Arora, Deepika; Gupta, Prachi; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2016-04-01

    Inflammation has multifaceted role in cancer progression including initiation, promotion and invasion by affecting the immune surveillance and associated signaling pathways. Inflammation facilitates the over-expression of cytokines, chemokines and growth factors involved in progression of different cancers including breast cancer progression. Deregulation of biological processes such as oxidative stress, angiogenesis, and autophagy elicit favorable immune response towards chronic inflammation. Apart from the role in carcinogenesis, chronic inflammation also favors the emergence of drug resistance clones by inducing the growth of breast cancer stem-like cells. Immunomodulation mediated by cytokines, chemokines and several other growth factors present in the tumor microenvironment regulate chronic inflammatory response and alter crosstalk among various signaling pathways such as NF-κB, Nrf-2, JAK-STAT, Akt and MAPKs involved in the progression of breast cancer. In this review, we focused on cellular and molecular processes involved in chronic inflammation, crosstalk among different signaling pathways and their association in breast cancer pathogenesis. PMID:26522220

  10. Chronic unpredictable mild stress generates oxidative stress and systemic inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    López-López, Ana Laura; Jaime, Herlinda Bonilla; Escobar Villanueva, María Del Carmen; Padilla, Malinalli Brianza; Palacios, Gonzalo Vázquez; Aguilar, Francisco Javier Alarcón

    2016-07-01

    Stress is considered to be a causal agent of chronic degenerative diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, arthritis and Alzheimer's. Chronic glucocorticoid and catecholamine release into the circulation during the stress response has been suggested to activate damage mechanisms, which in the long term produce metabolic alterations associated with oxidative stress and inflammation. However, the consequences of stress in animal models for periods longer than 40days have not been explored. The goal of this work was to determine whether chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) produced alterations in the redox state and the inflammatory profile of rats after 20, 40, and 60days. CUMS consisted of random exposure of the animals to different stressors. The following activities were measured in the liver and pancreas: reduced glutathione (GSH), lipid peroxidation (LPO), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), and protein oxidation. Similarly, serum cytokine levels (IL-6, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-10) were determined. CUMS activated the stress response from day 20 until day 60. In the liver and pancreas, GHS levels were decreased from day 40, whereas protein lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation were increased. This is the first work to report that the pancreas redox state is subject to chronic stress conditions. The TAC was constant in the liver and reduced in the pancreas. An increase in the TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 inflammatory markers and a decrease in the IL-10 level due to CUMS was shown, thereby resulting in the generation of a systemic inflammation state after 60days of treatment. Together, the CUMS consequences on day 60 suggest that both processes can contribute to the development of chronic degenerative diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus. CUMS is an animal model that in addition to avoiding habituation activates damage mechanisms such as oxidative stress and low-grade chronic

  11. Noncoding RNAs and chronic inflammation: Micro-managing the fire within.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Margaret; O'Connell, Ryan M

    2015-09-01

    Inflammatory responses are essential for the clearance of pathogens and the repair of injured tissues; however, if these responses are not properly controlled chronic inflammation can occur. Chronic inflammation is now recognized as a contributing factor to many age-associated diseases including metabolic disorders, arthritis, neurodegeneration, and cardiovascular disease. Due to the connection between chronic inflammation and these diseases, it is essential to understand underlying mechanisms behind this process. In this review, factors that contribute to chronic inflammation are discussed. Further, we emphasize the emerging roles of microRNAs (miRNAs) and other noncoding RNAs (ncRNA) in regulating chronic inflammatory states, making them important future diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets. PMID:26249326

  12. A20 prevents chronic liver inflammation and cancer by protecting hepatocytes from death.

    PubMed

    Catrysse, L; Farhang Ghahremani, M; Vereecke, L; Youssef, S A; Mc Guire, C; Sze, M; Weber, A; Heikenwalder, M; de Bruin, A; Beyaert, R; van Loo, G

    2016-01-01

    An important regulator of inflammatory signalling is the ubiquitin-editing protein A20 that acts as a break on nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation, but also exerts important cytoprotective functions. A20 knockout mice are cachectic and die prematurely due to excessive multi-organ inflammation. To establish the importance of A20 in liver homeostasis and pathology, we developed a novel mouse line lacking A20 specifically in liver parenchymal cells. These mice spontaneously develop chronic liver inflammation but no fibrosis or hepatocellular carcinomas, illustrating an important role for A20 in normal liver tissue homeostasis. Hepatocyte-specific A20 knockout mice show sustained NF-κB-dependent gene expression in the liver upon tumor necrosis factor (TNF) or lipopolysaccharide injection, as well as hepatocyte apoptosis and lethality upon challenge with sublethal doses of TNF, demonstrating an essential role for A20 in the protection of mice against acute liver failure. Finally, chronic liver inflammation and enhanced hepatocyte apoptosis in hepatocyte-specific A20 knockout mice was associated with increased susceptibility to chemically or high fat-diet-induced hepatocellular carcinoma development. Together, these studies establish A20 as a crucial hepatoprotective factor. PMID:27253414

  13. Inhibitory effect of atractylenolide I on angiogenesis in chronic inflammation in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changhe; Duan, Haijie; He, Langchong

    2009-06-10

    Angiogenesis is involved in the pathology of chronic inflammatory diseases. Application of anti-angiogenic strategies is beneficial in the treatment of inflammatory disorders. Atractylenolide I is an anti-inflammation agent. To further investigate the anti-angiogenesis mechanism of atractylenolide I in cell and mice based on inflammation model, the vascular index and microvessel outgrowth were measured by using the Freunds complete adjuvant (FCA) induced mouse air pouch model as well as the mice aortic ring co-cultured with peritoneal macrophages model. The ID(50) values of atractylenolide I were 15.15 mg/kg and 3.89 microg/ml for inhibiting the vascular index in vivo and microvessel outgrowth in vitro, respectively. Atractylenolide I could dose-dependently inhibit the production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), interleukin-6 (IL-6), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and placenta growth factor (PlGF) activity in the flute of mouse air pouch and the peritoneal macrophages stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Atractylenolide I displayed a potent inhibitory effect on angiogenesis by a set of down-regulatory actions of NO, TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, VEGF and PlGF in chronic inflammation. PMID:19356732

  14. Links among inflammation, sexual activity and ovulation

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Tierney K.; Worthman, Carol M.; Vitzthum, Virginia J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives: We examined a mechanism that may coordinate trade-offs between reproduction and immune response in healthy women, namely, changes in inflammation across the ovarian cycle. Methodology: We investigated C-reactive protein (CRP), an inflammation marker, across two consecutive ovarian cycles in 61 Bolivian women. Participants provided saliva samples every other day, and dried blood spots on 5–6 days spread across weeks 2–3 of each cycle. Cycles were characterized as ovulatory/anovulatory based on profiles of reproductive hormones. Participants also reported whether they were sexually partnered with a male or sexually abstinent during the study. Results: High early-cycle, but not late-cycle, CRP was associated with anovulation. High inflammation at the end of one cycle was not associated with anovulation in the subsequent cycle. Among ovulatory cycles, women with sexual partners had significantly lower CRP at midcycle, and higher CRP at follicular and luteal phases; in contrast, sexually abstinent women had little cycle-related change in CRP. In anovulatory cycles, partnership had no effect on CRP. CRP varied significantly with socioeconomic status (higher in better-off than in poorer women). Conclusions and implications: These findings suggest that the cycle-specific effect of inflammation on ovarian function may be a flexible, adaptive mechanism for managing trade-offs between reproduction and immunity. Sociosexual behavior may moderate changes in inflammation across the ovarian cycle, suggesting that these shifts represent evolved mechanisms to manage the trade-offs between reproduction and immunity. Clinically, these findings support considering both menstrual cycle phase and sexual activity in evaluations of pre-menopausal women’s CRP concentrations. PMID:26675298

  15. Chronic Inflammation and Pain in a TNFR (p55/p75-/-) Dual Deficient Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Westlund, Karin N.; Zhang, Liping; Ma, Fei; Oz, Helieh S.

    2012-01-01

    Many aspects of tissue damage following acute or chronic inflammatory reactions can be directly attributed to the concomitant biosynthesis and release of inducible early pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα). Conversely, systemic inflammation is impacted by consequences of tissue damage. Dysregulated TNFα contributes to numerous pathophysiological conditions including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and arthritis. Inflammatory stimuli trigger proteolytic cleavage and shedding of extracellular domains of TNFα receptors giving rise to two soluble fragments (p55 sTNFR1 and p75 sTNFR2) that block further binding, activity and synthesis of TNFα. We hypothesized that absence of sTNFR inhibitory feedback control would result in accumulated high levels of TNFα and other inflammatory factors promoting the cardinal signs of chronic inflammation and pain. The present study reports a translational murine model of chronic arthritis precipitated by two consecutive inflammatory insults. The “double hit” procedures provoke a chronic inflammatory response and pain related behaviors in mice that are dually deficient in p55 (TNFR1) and p75 (TNFR2). The inflammation and pain related behaviors are transient in similarly treated wild type (WT) mice. The complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) method was used initially to induce knee joint inflammation, tactile mechanical and heat hypersensitivity, and gait disturbance. After these transient effects of the insult were resolved, a recrudescence persisting at least through 23 weeks was promoted by gastrointestinal (GI) insult with dilute intra-colonic mustard oil (MO) only in the mutant mice and was reversed by a P2X7 antagonist. Serum Proteome Profiling analysis revealed high levels of serum inflammatory factors TNFα, RANTES, CXCL9 (MIG), CXCL10 (IP-10), and CCL2 (MCP-1). In conclusion, these data suggest that impaired signaling of TNFα due to deficit of the two protective soluble p55 and p75 sTNFR inhibitory

  16. Mechanical Stress as the Common Denominator between Chronic Inflammation, Cancer, and Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Levy Nogueira, Marcel; da Veiga Moreira, Jorgelindo; Baronzio, Gian Franco; Dubois, Bruno; Steyaert, Jean-Marc; Schwartz, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of common diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and cancer, are currently poorly understood. Inflammation is a common risk factor for cancer and AD. Recent data, provided by our group and from others, demonstrate that increased pressure and inflammation are synonymous. There is a continuous increase in pressure from inflammation to fibrosis and then cancer. This is in line with the numerous papers reporting high interstitial pressure in cancer. But most authors focus on the role of pressure in the lack of delivery of chemotherapy in the center of the tumor. Pressure may also be a key factor in carcinogenesis. Increased pressure is responsible for oncogene activation and cytokine secretion. Accumulation of mechanical stress plays a key role in the development of diseases of old age, such as cardiomyopathy, atherosclerosis, and osteoarthritis. Growing evidence suggest also a possible link between mechanical stress in the pathogenesis of AD. The aim of this review is to describe environmental and endogenous mechanical factors possibly playing a pivotal role in the mechanism of chronic inflammation, AD, and cancer. PMID:26442209

  17. Do surface active parenteral formulations cause inflammation?

    PubMed

    Söderberg, Lars; Engblom, Johan; Lanbeck, Peter; Wahlgren, Marie

    2015-04-30

    Local irritation and inflammation at the site of administration are a common side effect following administration of parenteral formulations. Biological effects of surface (interfacial) activity in solutions are less well investigated than effects caused by other physico-chemical parameters such as pH and osmolality. The interfacial activity in different systems, including human plasma, typical amphiphilic substances with fundamental biological relevance such as free fatty acids, anesthetic depot formulations and six different antibiotics was measured. The relative interfacial pressure, and/or concentration of active substance, required to obtain 50% of the maximal attainable effect in terms of interfacial pressure were calculated. The aim was to test the hypothesis that these parameters would allow comparison to biological effects reported in in vivo studies on the investigated substances. The highest interfacial activity was found in a triglyceride/plasma system. Among the antibiotic tested, the highest interfacial activities were found in erythromycin and dicloxacillin, which is in accordance with previous clinical findings of a high tendency of infusion phlebitis and cell toxicity. Independently of investigated system, biological effects were minimal below a 15% relative increase of interfacial activity. Above 35-45% the effects were severe. Interfacial activity in parenteral formulations may well cause damages to tissues followed by inflammation. PMID:25708007

  18. Helicobacter pylori chronic infection and mucosal inflammation switches the human gastric glycosylation pathways

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Ana; Marcos-Pinto, Ricardo; Nairn, Alison V.; Rosa, Mitche dela; Ferreira, Rui M.; Junqueira-Neto, Susana; Freitas, Daniela; Gomes, Joana; Oliveira, Patrícia; Santos, Marta R.; Marcos, Nuno T.; Xiaogang, Wen; Figueiredo, Céu; Oliveira, Carla; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário; Carneiro, Fátima; Moremen, Kelley W.; David, Leonor; Reis, Celso A.

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori exploits host glycoconjugates to colonize the gastric niche. Infection can persist for decades promoting chronic inflammation, and in a subset of individuals lesions can silently progress to cancer. This study shows that H. pylori chronic infection and gastric tissue inflammation result in a remodeling of the gastric glycophenotype with increased expression of sialyl-Lewis a/x antigens due to transcriptional up-regulation of the B3GNT5, B3GALT5, and FUT3 genes. We observed that H. pylori infected individuals present a marked gastric local proinflammatory signature with significantly higher TNF-α levels and demonstrated that TNF-induced activation of the NF-kappaB pathway results in B3GNT5 transcriptional up-regulation. Furthermore, we show that this gastric glycosylation shift, characterized by increased sialylation patterns, favors SabA-mediated H. pylori attachment to human inflamed gastric mucosa. This study provides novel clinically relevant insights into the regulatory mechanisms underlying H. pylori modulation of host glycosylation machinery, and phenotypic alterations crucial for life-long infection. Moreover, the biosynthetic pathways here identified as responsible for gastric mucosa increased sialylation, in response to H. pylori infection, can be exploited as drug targets for hindering bacteria adhesion and counteract the infection chronicity. PMID:26144047

  19. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG reduces hepatic TNFα production and inflammation in chronic alcohol-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuhua; Liu, Yanlong; Kirpich, Irina; Ma, Zhenhua; Wang, Cuiling; Zhang, Min; Suttles, Jill; McClain, Craig; Feng, Wenke

    2013-09-01

    The therapeutic effects of probiotic treatment in alcoholic liver disease (ALD) have been studied in both patients and experimental animal models. Although the precise mechanisms of the pathogenesis of ALD are not fully understood, gut-derived endotoxin has been postulated to play a crucial role in hepatic inflammation. Previous studies have demonstrated that probiotic therapy reduces circulating endotoxin derived from intestinal gram-negative bacteria in ALD. In this study, we investigated the effects of probiotics on hepatic tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) production and inflammation in response to chronic alcohol ingestion. Mice were fed Lieber DeCarli liquid diet containing 5% alcohol for 8weeks, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) was supplemented in the last 2 weeks. Eight-week alcohol feeding caused a significant increase in hepatic inflammation as shown by histological assessment and hepatic tissue myeloperoxidase activity assay. Two weeks of LGG supplementation reduced hepatic inflammation and liver injury and markedly reduced TNFα expression. Alcohol feeding increased hepatic mRNA expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and CYP2E1 and decreased nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 expression. LGG supplementation attenuated these changes. Using human peripheral blood monocytes-derived macrophages, we also demonstrated that incubation with ethanol primes both lipopolysaccharide- and flagellin-induced TNFα production, and LGG culture supernatant reduced this induction in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, LGG treatment also significantly decreased alcohol-induced phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase. In conclusion, probiotic LGG treatment reduced alcohol-induced hepatic inflammation by attenuation of TNFα production via inhibition of TLR4- and TLR5-mediated endotoxin activation. PMID:23618528

  20. Chronic inflammation in biomaterial induced periprosthetic osteolysis: NF-κB as a therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tzu-hua; Tamaki, Yasunobu; Pajarinen, Jukka; Waters, Heather A.; Woo, Deanna K.; Yao, Zhenyu; Goodman, Stuart B.

    2013-01-01

    Biomaterial-induced tissue responses in patients with total joint replacement are associated with the generation of wear particles, which may lead to chronic inflammation and local bone destruction (periprosthetic osteolysis). Inflammatory reactions associated with wear particles are mediated by several important signaling pathways, the most important of which involves the transcription factor NF-κB. NF-κB activation is essential for macrophage recruitment and maturation, as well as the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, MCP1, etc. In addition, NF-κB activation contributes to osteoclast differentiation and maturation via RANK/RANKL signaling, which increases bone destruction and reduces bone formation. Targeting individual downstream cytokines directly (such as TNF-α or IL-1β) may not effectively prevent wear particle induced osteolysis. A more logical upstream therapeutic approach may be provided by direct modulation of the core IκB/IKKα/β/NF-κB signaling pathway in the local environment, however, the timing, dose, and strategy for administration should be considered. Suppression of chronic inflammation via inhibition of NF-κB activity in patients with malfunctioning joint replacements may be an effective strategy to mitigate wear particle induced periprosthetic osteolysis. PMID:24090989

  1. Inflammation in chronic periodontitis and significant systemic diseases.

    PubMed

    Rethman, Michael P

    2010-04-01

    Endogenous chemical mediators play seminal roles in the initiation, persistence, and resolution of inflammation. Recent studies have revealed parallels between inflammatory mediators and mechanisms common to oral and systemic diseases. These relationships imply that novel therapeutics that profoundly modulate inflammatory mediators may improve clinical outcomes. Key source for this article is a 2008 conference reported in a Journal of Periodontology supplement titled Proceedings of the 2008 Workshop on Inflammation; Inflammation and Periodontal Diseases: A Reappraisal. PMID:20509364

  2. Natural killer T cells: innate lymphocytes positioned as a bridge between acute and chronic inflammation?

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Lisa; Hegde, Subramanya

    2010-01-01

    Natural killer T cells are an innate population of T lymphocytes that recognize antigens derived from host lipids and glycolipids. In this review, we focus on how these unique T cells are positioned to influence both acute and chronic inflammatory processes through their early recruitment to sites of inflammation, interactions with myeloid antigen presenting cells, and recognition of lipids associated with inflammation. PMID:20850561

  3. Adhesive capsulitis: An age related symptom of metabolic syndrome and chronic low-grade inflammation?

    PubMed

    Pietrzak, Max

    2016-03-01

    Adhesive capsulitis (AC) is very poorly understood, particularly it's underlying etiology. Obesity and metabolic syndrome, which are strongly associated with chronic low grade inflammation, are becoming increasingly understood to underlie a raft of morbid states including upper limb pain syndromes, diabetes (DM), cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer and central nervous system dysfunction and degeneration. Notwithstanding age, two of the strongest established risk factors for AC are DM and CVD. The hypothesis argues that similar to DM and CVD, the inflammation and capsular fibrosis seen in AC is precipitated by metabolic syndrome and chronic low grade inflammation. These pathophysiological mechanisms are highly likely to be perpetuated by upregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine production, sympathetic dominance of autonomic balance, and neuro-immune activation. The hypothesis predicts and describes how these processes may etiologically underpin and induce each sub-classification of AC. An improved understanding of the etiology of AC may lead to more accurate diagnosis, improved management, treatment outcomes, and reduce or prevent pain, disability and suffering associated with the disease. The paper follows on with a discussion of similarities between the pathophysiology of AC to general systemic inflammatory control mechanisms whereby connective tissue (CT) fibrosis is induced as a storage depot for leukocytes and chronic inflammatory cells. The potential role of hyaluronic acid (HA), the primary component of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and CT, in the pathophysiology of AC is also discussed with potential treatment implications. Lastly, a biochemical link between physical and mental health through the ECM is described and the concept of a periventricular-limbic central driver of CT dysfunction is introduced. PMID:26880627

  4. Behavioral and monoamine perturbations in adult male mice with chronic inflammation induced by repeated peripheral lipopolysaccharide administration.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Saritha; Dodd, Celia A; Filipov, Nikolay M

    2016-04-01

    Considering the limited information on the ability of chronic peripheral inflammation to induce behavioral alterations, including on their persistence after inflammatory stimuli termination and on associated neurochemical perturbations, this study assessed the effects of chronic (0.25 mg/kg; i.p.; twice weekly) lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment on selected behavioral, neurochemical and molecular measures at different time points in adult male C57BL/6 mice. Behaviorally, LPS-treated mice were hypoactive after 6 weeks, whereas significant hyperactivity was observed after 12 weeks of LPS and 11 weeks after 13 week LPS treatment termination. Similar biphasic responses, i.e., early decrease followed by a delayed increase were observed in the open field test center time, suggestive of, respectively, increased and decreased anxiety. In a forced swim test, mice exhibited increased immobility (depressive behavior) at all times they were tested. Chronic LPS also produced persistent increase in splenic serotonin (5-HT) and time-dependent, brain region-specific alterations in striatal and prefrontocortical dopamine and 5-HT homeostasis. Microglia, but not astrocytes, were activated by LPS early and late, but their activation did not persist after LPS treatment termination. Above findings demonstrate that chronic peripheral inflammation initially causes hypoactivity and increased anxiety, followed by persistent hyperactivity and decreased anxiety. Notably, chronic LPS-induced depressive behavior appears early, persists long after LPS termination, and is associated with increased splenic 5-HT. Collectively, our data highlight the need for a greater focus on the peripheral/central monoamine alterations and lasting behavioral deficits induced by chronic peripheral inflammation as there are many pathological conditions where inflammation of a chronic nature is a hallmark feature. PMID:26802725

  5. The adaptive imbalance in base excision–repair enzymes generates microsatellite instability in chronic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hofseth, Lorne J.; Khan, Mohammed A.; Ambrose, Mark; Nikolayeva, Olga; Xu-Welliver, Meng; Kartalou, Maria; Hussain, S. Perwez; Roth, Richard B.; Zhou, Xiaoling; Mechanic, Leah E.; Zurer, Irit; Rotter, Varda; Samson, Leona D.; Harris, Curtis C.

    2003-01-01

    Chronic infection and associated inflammation are key contributors to human carcinogenesis. Ulcerative colitis (UC) is an oxyradical overload disease and is characterized by free radical stress and colon cancer proneness. Here we examined tissues from noncancerous colons of ulcerative colitis patients to determine (a) the activity of two base excision–repair enzymes , AAG, the major 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase, and APE1, the major apurinic site endonuclease; and (b) the prevalence of microsatellite instability (MSI). AAG and APE1 were significantly increased in UC colon epithelium undergoing elevated inflammation and MSI was positively correlated with their imbalanced enzymatic activities. These latter results were supported by mechanistic studies using yeast and human cell models in which overexpression of AAG and/or APE1 was associated with frameshift mutations and MSI. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the adaptive and imbalanced increase in AAG and APE1 is a novel mechanism contributing to MSI in patients with UC and may extend to chronic inflammatory or other diseases with MSI of unknown etiology. PMID:14679184

  6. Study on SSAO enzyme activity and anti-inflammatory effect of SSAO inhibitors in animal model of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Tábi, Tamás; Szökő, Eva; Mérey, Anita; Tóth, Veronika; Mátyus, Péter; Gyires, Klára

    2013-06-01

    SSAO/VAP-1 participates in the accumulation of leukocytes at the site of inflammation. A new SSAO inhibitor, SzV-1287 was demonstrated to inhibit both acute and chronic inflammation in rats more effectively than the known enzyme inhibitor, LJP-1207. Surprisingly, the SSAO activity was not increased, but decreased both in acute and chronic inflammation. Though experiments are in progress to clarify these findings, the enzyme might play a role in the very early phase of inflammation and be inactivated during leukocyte extravasation. PMID:23263543

  7. Polymorphism in THBS1 Gene Is Associated with Post-Refractive Surgery Chronic Ocular Surface Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Contreras-Ruiz, Laura; Ryan, Denise S.; Sia, Rose K.; Bower, Kraig S.; Dartt, Darlene A.; Masli, Sharmila

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the thrombospondin 1 (THBS1) gene with development of chronic ocular surface inflammation (keratoconjunctivitis) after refractive surgery. Design Retrospective cohort study. Participants Active duty U.S. Army soldiers (n = 143) who opted for refractive surgery. Methods Conjunctival impression cytology samples collected from participants before the surgery were used to harvest DNA for genotyping 5 THBS1 SNPs (rs1478604, rs2228262, rs2292305, rs2228262, and rs3743125) using the Sequenom iPLEX Gold platform (Sequenom, San Diego, CA). Samples collected after surgery were used to harvest RNA for gene expression analysis by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Participants were followed for 1 year after surgery to monitor the status of keratoconjunctivitis. Main Outcome Measures Genetic basis of the development of chronic keratoconjunctivitis after refractive surgery. Results Carriers of minor alleles of 3 SNPs each were found to be more susceptible to developing chronic keratoconjunctivitis (rs1478604: odds ratio [OR], 2.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.41–4.47; P = 2.5×10−3; rs2228262 and rs2292305: OR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.05–3.51; P = 4.8×10−2). Carriers of the rs1478604 minor allele expressed significantly reduced levels of thrombospondin 1 (TSP1) (P = 0.042) and increased levels of an inflammatory cytokine associated with keratoconjunctivitis, interleukin-1 β (P = 0.025), in their ocular surface epithelial cells compared with homozygous major allele controls. Conclusions Genetic variation in the THBS1 gene that results in decreased expression of the encoded glycoprotein TSP1 in ocular surface epithelial cells significantly increases the susceptibility to develop chronic ocular surface inflammation after refractive surgery. Further investigation of THBS1 SNPs in a larger sample size is warranted. PMID:24679443

  8. Chronic Inflammation-Related HPV: A Driving Force Speeds Oropharyngeal Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Ma, Xiangrui; Lei, Zhengge; Feng, Hao; Wang, Shasha; Cen, Xiao; Gao, Shiyu; Jiang, Yaping; Jiang, Jian; Chen, Qianming; Tang, Yajie; Tang, Yaling; Liang, Xinhua

    2015-01-01

    Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) has been known to be a highly aggressive disease associated with human papilloma virus (HPV) infection. To investigate the relationship between HPV and chronic inflammation in oropharyngeal carcinogenesis, we collected 140 oral mucous fresh specimens including 50 OPSCC patients, 50 cancer in situ, 30 precancerous lesions, and 10 normal oral mucous. Our data demonstrated that there was a significantly higher proportion of severe chronic inflammation in dysplastic epithelia in comparison with that in normal tissues (P<0.001). The positive rate of HPV 16 was parallel with the chronic inflammation degrees from mild to severe inflammation (P<0.05). The positive rate of HPV 16 was progressively improved with the malignant progression of oral mucous (P<0.05). In addition, CD11b+ LIN- HLA-DR-CD33+ MDSCs were a critical cell population that mediates inflammation response and immune suppression in HPV-positive OPSCC. These indicated that persistent chronic inflammation-related HPV infection might drive oropharyngeal carcinogenesis and MDSCs might pay an important role during this process. Thus, a combination of HPV infection and inflammation expression might become a helpful biomedical marker to predict oropharyngeal carcinogenesis. PMID:26193368

  9. Effects of exercise training on chronic inflammation in obesity : current evidence and potential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    You, Tongjian; Arsenis, Nicole C; Disanzo, Beth L; Lamonte, Michael J

    2013-04-01

    Chronic, systemic inflammation is an independent risk factor for several major clinical diseases. In obesity, circulating levels of inflammatory markers are elevated, possibly due to increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines from several tissues/cells, including macrophages within adipose tissue, vascular endothelial cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Recent evidence supports that adipose tissue hypoxia may be an important mechanism through which enlarged adipose tissue elicits local tissue inflammation and further contributes to systemic inflammation. Current evidence supports that exercise training, such as aerobic and resistance exercise, reduces chronic inflammation, especially in obese individuals with high levels of inflammatory biomarkers undergoing a longer-term intervention. Several studies have reported that this effect is independent of the exercise-induced weight loss. There are several mechanisms through which exercise training reduces chronic inflammation, including its effect on muscle tissue to generate muscle-derived, anti-inflammatory 'myokine', its effect on adipose tissue to improve hypoxia and reduce local adipose tissue inflammation, its effect on endothelial cells to reduce leukocyte adhesion and cytokine production systemically, and its effect on the immune system to lower the number of pro-inflammatory cells and reduce pro-inflammatory cytokine production per cell. Of these potential mechanisms, the effect of exercise training on adipose tissue oxygenation is worth further investigation, as it is very likely that exercise training stimulates adipose tissue angiogenesis and increases blood flow, thereby reducing hypoxia and the associated chronic inflammation in adipose tissue of obese individuals. PMID:23494259

  10. The role of stromal cells in the persistence of chronic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Naylor, A J; Filer, A; Buckley, C D

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation is an unstable state; it either resolves or persists. Inflammatory reactions often have a propensity for specific anatomical sites. Why inflammation persists with specific tissue tropism remains obscure. Increasing evidence suggests that stromal cells which define tissue architecture are the key cells involved, and therefore make attractive therapeutic targets. Research on stromal cells in general and fibroblasts in particular has so far been hampered by a lack of fibroblast-specific cell markers. This review highlights our increasing understanding of the role of fibroblasts in inflammation, and suggests that these cells provide the cellular basis for site specific chronic inflammation. PMID:23199320

  11. Chronic Inflammation in an Anophthalmic Socket due to a Room Temperature Vulcanized Silicone Implant

    PubMed Central

    Galindo-Ferreiro, Alicia; AlGhafri, Laila; Elkhamary, Sahar M.; Maktabi, Azza; Gálvez-Ruiz, Alberto; Galindo-Alonso, Julio; Schellini Proff, Silvana

    2016-01-01

    Two case reports are used to illustrate the signs and symptoms, complications and treatments of chronic socket inflammation due to intraorbital implants. The ophthalmic examination, surgeries and treatments are documented. Two anophthalmic cases that underwent enucleation and multiple orbital surgeries to enhance the anophthalmic socket volume developed pain, intense discharge and contracted cavities with chronic inflammation in the socket which was nonresponsive to medical therapy. Computed tomography indicated a hypodense foreign body in both cases causing an intense inflammatory reaction. The implants were removed by excisional surgery and a room temperature vulcanized silicone implant was retrieved in both cases. Socket inflammation resolved in both cases after implant removal. An intraorbital inflammatory reaction against an intraorbital implant can cause chronic socket inflammation in patients with a history of multiple surgeries. Diagnosis requires imaging and the definitive treatment is implant removal. PMID:27462246

  12. Continuous exposure to house dust mite elicits chronic airway inflammation and structural remodeling.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jill R; Wiley, Ryan E; Fattouh, Ramzi; Swirski, Filip K; Gajewska, Beata U; Coyle, Anthony J; Gutierrez-Ramos, José-Carlos; Ellis, Russ; Inman, Mark D; Jordana, Manel

    2004-02-01

    It is now fully appreciated that asthma is a disease of a chronic nature resulting from intermittent or continued aeroallergen exposure leading to airway inflammation. To investigate responses to continuous antigen exposure, mice were exposed to either house dust mite extract (HDM) or ovalbumin intranasally for five consecutive days, followed by 2 days of rest, for up to seven consecutive weeks. Continuous exposure to HDM, unlike ovalbumin, elicited severe and persistent eosinophilic airway inflammation. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated an accumulation of CD4+ lymphocytes in the lung with elevated expression of inducible costimulator a marker of T cell activation, and of T1/ST2, a marker of helper T Type 2 effector cells. We also detected increased and sustained production of helper T cell Type 2-associated cytokines by splenocytes of HDM-exposed mice on in vitro HDM recall. Histologic analysis of the lung showed evidence of airway remodeling in mice exposed to HDM, with goblet cell hyperplasia, collagen deposition, and peribronchial accumulation of contractile tissue. In addition, HDM-exposed mice demonstrated severe airway hyperreactivity to methacholine. Finally, these responses were studied for up to 9 weeks after cessation of HDM exposure. We observed that whereas airway inflammation resolved fully, the remodeling changes did not resolve and airway hyperreactivity resolved only partly. PMID:14597485

  13. Substance P at the Nexus of Mind and Body in Chronic Inflammation and Affective Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenkranz, Melissa A.

    2007-01-01

    For decades, research has demonstrated that chronic diseases characterized by dysregulation of inflammation are particularly susceptible to exacerbation by stress and emotion. Likewise, rates of depression and anxiety are overrepresented in individuals suffering from chronic inflammatory disease. In recent years, substance P has been implicated in…

  14. Apolipoprotein E promotes subretinal mononuclear phagocyte survival and chronic inflammation in age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Olivier; Calippe, Bertrand; Lavalette, Sophie; Hu, Shulong J; Raoul, William; Dominguez, Elisa; Housset, Michael; Paques, Michel; Sahel, José-Alain; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre; Combadiere, Christophe; Guillonneau, Xavier; Sennlaub, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Physiologically, the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) expresses immunosuppressive signals such as FAS ligand (FASL), which prevents the accumulation of leukocytes in the subretinal space. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is associated with a breakdown of the subretinal immunosuppressive environment and chronic accumulation of mononuclear phagocytes (MPs). We show that subretinal MPs in AMD patients accumulate on the RPE and express high levels of APOE. MPs of Cx3cr1−/− mice that develop MP accumulation on the RPE, photoreceptor degeneration, and increased choroidal neovascularization similarly express high levels of APOE. ApoE deletion in Cx3cr1−/− mice prevents pathogenic age- and stress-induced subretinal MP accumulation. We demonstrate that increased APOE levels induce IL-6 in MPs via the activation of the TLR2-CD14-dependent innate immunity receptor cluster. IL-6 in turn represses RPE FasL expression and prolongs subretinal MP survival. This mechanism may account, in part, for the MP accumulation observed in Cx3cr1−/− mice. Our results underline the inflammatory role of APOE in sterile inflammation in the immunosuppressive subretinal space. They provide rationale for the implication of IL-6 in AMD and open avenues toward therapies inhibiting pathogenic chronic inflammation in late AMD. PMID:25604058

  15. The role of airway macrophages in apoptotic cell clearance following acute and chronic lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Grabiec, Aleksander M; Hussell, Tracy

    2016-07-01

    Acute and chronic inflammatory responses in the lung are associated with the accumulation of large quantities of immune and structural cells undergoing apoptosis, which need to be engulfed by phagocytes in a process called 'efferocytosis'. Apoptotic cell recognition and removal from the lung is mediated predominantly by airway macrophages, though immature dendritic cells and non-professional phagocytes, such as epithelial cells and mesenchymal cells, can also display this function. Efficient clearance of apoptotic cells from the airways is essential for successful resolution of inflammation and the return to lung homeostasis. Disruption of this process leads to secondary necrosis of accumulating apoptotic cells, release of necrotic cell debris and subsequent uncontrolled inflammatory activation of the innate immune system by the released 'damage associated molecular patterns' (DAMPS). To control the duration of the immune response and prevent autoimmune reactions, anti-inflammatory signalling cascades are initiated in the phagocyte upon apoptotic cell uptake, mediated by a range of receptors that recognise specific phospholipids or proteins externalised on, or secreted by, the apoptotic cell. However, prolonged activation of apoptotic cell recognition receptors, such as the family of receptor tyrosine kinases Tyro3, Axl and MerTK (TAM), may delay or prevent inflammatory responses to subsequent infections. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in our understanding of the mechanism controlling apoptotic cell recognition and removal from the lung in homeostasis and during inflammation, the contribution of defective efferocytosis to chronic inflammatory lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma and cystic fibrosis, and implications of the signals triggered by apoptotic cells in the susceptibility to pulmonary microbial infections. PMID:26957481

  16. IL-17 is not essential for inflammation and chronic pelvic pain development in an experimental model of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Motrich, Ruben D; Breser, María L; Sánchez, Leonardo R; Godoy, Gloria J; Prinz, Immo; Rivero, Virginia E

    2016-03-01

    Pain and inflammation in the absence of infection are hallmarks in chronic prostatitis and chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) patients. The etiology of CP/CPPS is unclear, and autoimmunity has been proposed as a cause. Experimental autoimmune prostatitis (EAP) models have long been used for studying CP/CPPS. Herein, we studied prostate inflammation induction and chronic pelvic pain development in EAP using IL-12p40-KO, IL-4-KO, IL-17-KO, and wild-type (C57BL/6) mice. Prostate antigen (PAg) immunization in C57BL/6 mice induced specific Th1 and Th17 immune responses and severe prostate inflammation and cell infiltration, mainly composed of CD4 T cells and macrophages. Moreover, chronic pelvic pain was evidenced by increased allodynia responses. In immunized IL-17-KO mice, the presence of a prominent PAg-specific Th1 immune response caused similar prostate inflammation and chronic pelvic pain. Furthermore, markedly high PAg-specific Th1 immune responses, exacerbated prostate inflammation, and chronic pelvic pain were detected in immunized IL-4-KO mice. Conversely, immunized IL-12p40-KO mice developed PAg-specific Th2 immune responses, characterized by high IL-4 secretion and neither infiltration nor damage in the prostate. As observed in wild-type control animals, IL12p40-KO mice did not evidence tactile allodynia responses. Our results suggest that, as in patients, chronic pelvic pain is a consequence of prostate inflammation. After PAg immunization, a Th1-associated immune response develops and induces prostate inflammation and chronic pelvic pain. The absence of Th1 or Th2 cytokines, respectively, diminishes or enhances EAP susceptibility. In addition, IL-17 showed not to be essential for pathology induction and chronic pelvic pain development. PMID:26882345

  17. Effects of inhaled therapy on biomarkers of systemic inflammation in stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Antoniu, Sabina A

    2010-03-01

    In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) airways inflammation is associated in more advanced stages with systemic inflammation. COPD-associated systemic inflammation syndrome is defined currently with rather non-specific biomarkers such as C-reactive protein (CRP) but there are also other 'organ-specific' biomarkers such as surfactant protein-D which are still not well characterized but might represent more appropriate and reliable alternatives to the non-specific biomarkers. Inhaled therapies are the mainstay in stable COPD and they were demonstrated to reduce airway inflammation and more recently in the case of inhaled corticosteroids alone or combined with long-acting beta-2 agonists to reduce systemic inflammation as well. This paper focuses on current and potential biomarkers of systemic inflammation in COPD and on the systemic anti-inflammatory effects of inhaled therapies in stable COPD. PMID:19929747

  18. Acid-Sensitive Sheddable PEGylated PLGA Nanoparticles Increase the Delivery of TNF-α siRNA in Chronic Inflammation Sites.

    PubMed

    Aldayel, Abdulaziz M; Naguib, Youssef W; O'Mary, Hannah L; Li, Xu; Niu, Mengmeng; Ruwona, Tinashe B; Cui, Zhengrong

    2016-01-01

    There has been growing interest in utilizing small interfering RNA (siRNA) specific to pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α ( TNF-α), in chronic inflammation therapy. However, delivery systems that can increase the distribution of the siRNA in chronic inflammation sites after intravenous administration are needed. Herein we report that innovative functionalization of the surface of siRNA-incorporated poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanoparticles significantly increases the delivery of the siRNA in the chronic inflammation sites in a mouse model. The TNF-α siRNA incorporated PLGA nanoparticles were prepared by the standard double emulsion method, but using stearoyl-hydrazone-polyethylene glycol 2000, a unique acid-sensitive surface active agent, as the emulsifying agent, which renders (i) the nanoparticles PEGylated and (ii) the PEGylation sheddable in low pH environment such as that in chronic inflammation sites. In a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide-induced chronic inflammation, the acid-sensitive sheddable PEGylated PLGA nanoparticles showed significantly higher accumulation or distribution in chronic inflammation sites than PLGA nanoparticles prepared with an acid-insensitive emulsifying agent (i.e., stearoyl-amide-polyethylene glycol 2000) and significantly increased the distribution of the TNF-α siRNA incorporated into the nanoparticles in inflamed mouse foot. PMID:27434685

  19. IKKalpha limits macrophage NF-kappaB activation and contributes to the resolution of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Toby; Bebien, Magali; Liu, George Y; Nizet, Victor; Karin, Michael

    2005-04-28

    Inflammation and innate immunity involve signalling pathways leading to the production of inflammatory mediators. Usually such responses are self-limiting, but aberrant resolution of inflammation results in chronic diseases. Much attention has focused on pro-inflammatory signalling but little is known about the mechanisms that resolve inflammation. The IkappaB kinase (IKK) complex contains two catalytic subunits, IKKalpha and IKKbeta, and controls the activation of NF-kappaB transcription factors, which play a pivotal role in inflammation. Ample evidence indicates that IKKbeta mediates NF-kappaB activation in response to pro-inflammatory cytokines and microbial products. IKKalpha regulates an alternative pathway important for lymphoid organogenesis, but the role of IKKalpha in inflammation is unknown. Here we describe a new role for IKKalpha in the negative regulation of macrophage activation and inflammation. IKKalpha contributes to suppression of NF-kappaB activity by accelerating both the turnover of the NF-kappaB subunits RelA and c-Rel, and their removal from pro-inflammatory gene promoters. Inactivation of IKKalpha in mice enhances inflammation and bacterial clearance. Hence, the two IKK catalytic subunits have evolved opposing but complimentary roles needed for the intricate control of inflammation and innate immunity. PMID:15858576

  20. [Understanding and treatment strategy of the pathogenesis of periodontal disease based on chronic inflammation].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tomohiko

    2016-05-01

    Prolonged inflammation continuously promotes the infiltration of macrophages in the organization and chronically induces the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF and IL-1. In periodontal tissues, these inflammatory cytokines enhance the differentiation and activity of osteoclasts, which cause destruction of the alveolar bone. Therefore, inhibition of inflammatory cytokine production leads to the prevention or treatment of periodontal disease. IL-1 is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that strongly enhances the bone-resorbing activity of osteoclasts. Elucidation of mechanisms for the production of IL-1 is critical for understanding the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. This paper reviews recent findings of the molecular mechanisms regulating IL-1 production and focuses on inflammasome. PMID:27117624

  1. Contribution of inflammation to vascular disease in chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Suliman, Mohamed E; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2008-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by an exceptionally high mortality rate, much of which results from cardiovascular disease (CVD). Chronic low-grade inflammation, as evidenced by increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and C-reactive protein (CRP), is a common feature of CKD and may cause atherosclerotic CVD through various pathogenetic mechanisms. Evidence suggests that persistent inflammation may also be a risk factor for progression of CKD, which may result in a vicious inflammation-driven circle. The causes of inflammation in CKD are multifactorial. The influence of various comorbidities may contribute to inflammation in the setting of progressive loss of renal function. Available data suggest that pro-inflammatory cytokines also play a central role in the genesis of the metabolic syndrome. There is a lack of epidemiological data on the prevalence and consequences of inflammation in relation to protein-energy wasting (PEW) and CVD in CKD patients from developing countries. The 'westernization' of nutritional intakes and changes of life style besides the high prevalence of chronic infections in developing countries are possible additive contributors to a high prevalence of inflammation, PEW and CVD among CKD patients. Also, genetic differences may affect inflammatory responses and nutritional status and, thus, the susceptibility to CVD in different regions. PMID:18445891

  2. Smoking Is Associated with Acute and Chronic Prostatic Inflammation: Results from the REDUCE Study.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Daniel M; Nickel, J Curtis; Gerber, Leah; Muller, Roberto L; Andriole, Gerald L; Castro-Santamaria, Ramiro; Freedland, Stephen J

    2015-04-01

    Both anti- and proinflammatory effects of cigarette smoking have been described. As prostate inflammation is common, we hypothesized smoking could contribute to prostate inflammation. Thus, we evaluated the association of smoking status with acute and chronic inflammation within the prostate of men undergoing prostate biopsy. We retrospectively analyzed 8,190 men ages 50 to 75 years with PSA levels between 2.5 and 10 ng/mL enrolled in the Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events study. Smoking status was self-defined as never, former, or current. Prostate inflammation was assessed by systematic central review blinded to smoking status. The association of smoking with inflammation in the baseline, 2-year, and 4-year biopsies was evaluated with univariable and multivariable logistic regressions. At study enrollment, 1,233 (15%), 3,203 (39%), and 3,754 (46%) men were current, former, and never smokers, respectively. Current smokers were significantly younger and had smaller prostates than former and never smokers (all P < 0.05). Former smokers were significantly heavier than current and never smokers (P < 0.001). Acute and chronic prostate inflammations were identified in 1,261 (15%) and 6,352 (78%) baseline biopsies, respectively. In univariable analysis, current smokers were more likely to have acute inflammation than former (OR, 1.35; P, 0.001) and never smokers (OR, 1.36; P, 0.001). The results were unchanged at 2- and 4-year biopsies. In contrast, current smoking was linked with chronic inflammation in the baseline biopsy, but not at 2- and 4-year biopsies. In conclusion, among men undergoing prostate biopsy, current smoking was independently associated with acute and possibly chronic prostate inflammations. PMID:25644151

  3. Distinct roles of prostaglandin D2 receptors in chronic skin inflammation.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Yuki; Satoh, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Masataka; Yokozeki, Hiroo

    2011-10-01

    Prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) is a prostanoid implicated in allergic inflammation. However, the roles of PGD2 in immune and allergic responses remain controversial. PGD2 exerts its effect through the CRTH2 and DP receptors. To elucidate functional differences of PGD2 and its receptors in chronic skin inflammation, chronic contact hypersensitivity (chronic CHS) and IgE-mediated chronic allergic skin inflammation (IgE-CAI) were induced in mice deficient in the CRTH2 and/or DP genes. DP (-/-) mice and CRTH2 (-/-)/DP (-/-) mice showed exacerbated chronic CHS, and conversely, CRTH2 (-/-) mice exhibited diminished skin responses. Skin responses correlated with local levels of IL-13, CCL11, and CCL22. These phenotypic changes in chronic CHS of mutant mice were similar to those in acute CHS despite the differences in the cytokine milieus; chronic CHS and acute CHS were mediated by Th2 and Th1/Th17 immunity, respectively. However, in IgE-CAI, DP (-/-) mice showed comparable skin responses to wild-type mice. Alleviation of IgE-CAI was observed in CRTH2 (-/-) mice, and as a consequence, CRTH2 (-/-)/DP (-/-) mice exhibited diminished IgE-CAI compared with wild-type mice. IgE-CAI in mutant mice correlated with local IL-4 and CCL22 production. Consistent with these results, a CRTH2-specific antagonist exerted inhibitory effects in both chronic CHS and IgE-CAI. The present study demonstrates that functional roles of PGD2 and its receptors appear to depend on the nature of the inflammation. Nevertheless, tools targeted against PGD2-CRTH2 signals could offer therapeutic potential for both types of chronic skin inflammation. PMID:21943706

  4. Prostatic inflammation induces fibrosis in a mouse model of chronic bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Wong, Letitia; Hutson, Paul R; Bushman, Wade

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation of the prostate is strongly correlated with development of lower urinary tract symptoms and several studies have implicated prostatic fibrosis in the pathogenesis of bladder outlet obstruction. It has been postulated that inflammation induces prostatic fibrosis but this relationship has never been tested. Here, we characterized the fibrotic response to inflammation in a mouse model of chronic bacterial-induced prostatic inflammation. Transurethral instillation of the uropathogenic E. coli into C3H/HeOuJ male mice induced persistent prostatic inflammation followed by a significant increase in collagen deposition and hydroxyproline content. This fibrotic response to inflammation was accompanied with an increase in collagen synthesis determined by the incorporation of 3H-hydroxyproline and mRNA expression of several collagen remodeling-associated genes, including Col1a1, Col1a2, Col3a1, Mmp2, Mmp9, and Lox. Correlation analysis revealed a positive correlation of inflammation severity with collagen deposition and immunohistochemical staining revealed that CD45+VIM+ fibrocytes were abundant in inflamed prostates at the time point coinciding with increased collagen synthesis. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis demonstrated an increased percentage of these CD45+VIM+ fibrocytes among collagen type I expressing cells. These data show-for the first time-that chronic prostatic inflammation induces collagen deposition and implicates fibrocytes in the fibrotic process. PMID:24950301

  5. Human mesenchymal stem cells suppress chronic airway inflammation in the murine ovalbumin asthma model.

    PubMed

    Bonfield, Tracey L; Koloze, Mary; Lennon, Donald P; Zuchowski, Brandon; Yang, Sung Eun; Caplan, Arnold I

    2010-12-01

    Allogeneic human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) introduced intravenously can have profound anti-inflammatory activity resulting in suppression of graft vs. host disease as well as regenerative events in the case of stroke, infarct, spinal cord injury, meniscus regeneration, tendinitis, acute renal failure, and heart disease in human and animal models of these diseases. hMSCs produce bioactive factors that provide molecular cuing for: 1) immunosuppression of T cells; 2) antiscarring; 3) angiogenesis; 4) antiapoptosis; and 5) regeneration (i.e., mitotic for host-derived progenitor cells). Studies have shown that hMSCs have profound effects on the immune system and are well-tolerated and therapeutically active in immunocompetent rodent models of multiple sclerosis and stroke. Furthermore, intravenous administration of MSCs results in pulmonary localization. Asthma is a major debilitating pulmonary disease that impacts in excess of 150 million people in the world with uncontrolled asthma potentially leading to death. In addition, the socioeconomic impact of asthma-associated illnesses at the pediatric and adult level are in the millions of dollars in healthcare costs and lost days of work. hMSCs may provide a viable multiaction therapeutic for this inflammatory lung disease by secreting bioactive factors or directing cellular activity. Our studies show the effectiveness and specificity of the hMSCs on decreasing chronic airway inflammation associated with the murine ovalbumin model of asthma. In addition, the results from these studies verify the in vivo immunoeffectiveness of hMSCs in rodents and support the potential therapeutic use of hMSCs for the treatment of airway inflammation associated with chronic asthma. PMID:20817776

  6. Role of protein tyrosine phosphatases in regulating the immune system: implications for chronic intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Spalinger, Marianne R; McCole, Declan F; Rogler, Gerhard; Scharl, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Current hypothesis suggests that genetic, immunological, and bacterial factors contribute essentially to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. Variations within the gene loci encoding protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) have been associated with the onset of inflammatory bowel disease. PTPs modulate the activity of their substrates by dephosphorylation of tyrosine residues and are critical for the regulation of fundamental cellular signaling processes. Evidence emerges that expression levels of PTPN2, PTPN11, and PTPN22 are altered in actively inflamed intestinal tissue. PTPN2 seems to be critical for protecting intestinal epithelial barrier function, regulating innate and adaptive immune responses and finally for maintaining intestinal homeostasis. These observations have been confirmed in PTPN2 knockout mice in vivo. Those animals are clearly more susceptible to intestinal and systemic inflammation and feature alterations in innate and adaptive immune responses. PTPN22 controls inflammatory signaling in lymphocytes and mononuclear cells resulting in aberrant cytokine secretion pattern and autophagosome formation. PTPN22 deficiency in vivo results in more severe colitis demonstrating the relevance of PTPN22 for intestinal homeostasis in vivo. Of note, loss of PTPN22 promotes mitogen-activated protein kinase-induced cytokine secretion but limits secretion of nuclear factor κB-associated cytokines and autophagy in mononuclear cells. Loss of PTPN11 is also associated with increased colitis severity in vivo. In summary, dysfunction of those PTPs results in aberrant and uncontrolled immune responses that result in chronic inflammatory conditions. This way, it becomes more and more evident that dysfunction of PTPs displays an important factor in the pathogenesis of chronic intestinal inflammation, in particular inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25581833

  7. A New Mouse Model That Spontaneously Develops Chronic Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Fransén-Pettersson, Nina; Duarte, Nadia; Nilsson, Julia; Lundholm, Marie; Mayans, Sofia; Larefalk, Åsa; Hannibal, Tine D.; Hansen, Lisbeth; Schmidt-Christensen, Anja; Ivars, Fredrik; Cardell, Susanna; Palmqvist, Richard; Rozell, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Here we characterize a new animal model that spontaneously develops chronic inflammation and fibrosis in multiple organs, the non-obese diabetic inflammation and fibrosis (N-IF) mouse. In the liver, the N-IF mouse displays inflammation and fibrosis particularly evident around portal tracts and central veins and accompanied with evidence of abnormal intrahepatic bile ducts. The extensive cellular infiltration consists mainly of macrophages, granulocytes, particularly eosinophils, and mast cells. This inflammatory syndrome is mediated by a transgenic population of natural killer T cells (NKT) induced in an immunodeficient NOD genetic background. The disease is transferrable to immunodeficient recipients, while polyclonal T cells from unaffected syngeneic donors can inhibit the disease phenotype. Because of the fibrotic component, early on-set, spontaneous nature and reproducibility, this novel mouse model provides a unique tool to gain further insight into the underlying mechanisms mediating transformation of chronic inflammation into fibrosis and to evaluate intervention protocols for treating conditions of fibrotic disorders. PMID:27441847

  8. Estrogen receptors alpha mediates postischemic inflammation in chronically estrogen-deprived mice.

    PubMed

    Cordeau, Pierre; Lalancette-Hébert, Mélanie; Weng, Yuan Cheng; Kriz, Jasna

    2016-04-01

    Estrogens are known to exert neuroprotective and immuneomodulatory effects after stroke. However, at present, little is known about the role of estrogens and its receptors in postischemic inflammation after menopause. Here, we provide important in vivo evidence of a distinct shift in microglial phenotypes in the model of postmenopause brain. Using a model-system for live imaging of microglial activation in the context of chronic estrogen- and ERα-deficiency associated with aging, we observed a marked deregulation of the TLR2 signals and/or microglial activation in ovariectomized and/or ERα knockout mice. Further analysis revealed a 5.7-fold increase in IL-6, a 4.7-fold increase in phospho-Stat3 levels suggesting an overactivation of JAK/STAT3 pathway and significantly larger infarction in ERα knockouts chronically deprived of estrogen. Taken together, our results suggest that in the experimental model of menopause and/or aging, ERα mediates innate immune responses and/or microglial activation, and ischemia-induced production of IL-6. Based on our results, we propose that the loss of functional ERα may lead to deregulation of postischemic inflammatory responses and increased vulnerability to ischemic injury in aging female brains. PMID:26973103

  9. Low-grade inflammation in chronic diseases: an integrative pathophysiology anticipated by homeopathy?

    PubMed

    Adler, Ubiratan Cardinalli

    2011-05-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines and their chronic effect - low-grade inflammation - have been associated with diverse chronic conditions. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were recently proposed as a treatment strategy. Samuel Hahnemann, the founder of homeopathy, had already hypothesized a systemic and progressive disorder as the cause of many chronic diseases - the Psora theory. He also advised of the consequences of palliative use for chronic diseases, as a contrary effect of the "of the life-preserving principle" could worsen the course of those diseases. The hypotheses presented here are that the main aspects of Hahnemann's Psora theory are supported by current data on the role of pro-inflammatory cytokines and that the use of NSAIDs to treat chronic low-grade inflammation can produce a contrary, rebound effect, as anticipated by Hahnemann. By diverting from the "palliative action-rebound effect" course, not only homeopathy but integrative medicine could provide different approaches to the treatment of low-grade chronic inflammation. Studies assessing inflammatory markers in chronic integrative treatments are recommended. PMID:21277692

  10. Diet and Inflammation: Possible Effects on Immunity, Chronic Diseases, and Life Span.

    PubMed

    Ricordi, Camillo; Garcia-Contreras, Marta; Farnetti, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation negatively impacts all physiological functions, causing an array of degenerative conditions including diabetes; cancer; cardiovascular, osteo-articular, and neurodegenerative diseases; autoimmunity disorders; and aging. In particular, there is a growing knowledge of the role that gene transcription factors play in the inflammatory process. Obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes represent multifactorial conditions resulting from improper balances of hormones and gene expression. In addition, these conditions have a strong inflammatory component that can potentially be impacted by the diet. It can reduce pro-inflammatory eicosanoids that can alter hormonal signaling cascades to the modulation of the innate immune system and gene transcription factors. Working knowledge of the impact of how nutrients, especially dietary fatty acids and polyphenols, can impact these various molecular targets makes it possible to develop a general outline of an anti-inflammatory diet that offers a unique, nonpharmacological approach in treating obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. Several important bioactive dietary components can exert their effect through selected inflammatory pathways that can affect metabolic and genetic changes. In fact, dietary components that can modulate glucose and insulin levels, as well as any other mediator that can activate nuclear factor-kB, can also trigger inflammation through common pathway master switches. PMID:26400428

  11. Systemic biomarkers of inflammation and haemostasis in patients with chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate mediators of inflammation and haemostasis in patients with chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis (CNPA), a locally, destructive process of the lung due to invasion by Aspergillus species. Methods Measurements of selected biomarkers in 10 patients with CNPA and 19 healthy, matched controls were performed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and multiplex methodology. The gene expressions of relevant biomarkers were analyzed with real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Results Increased concentrations of circulating mediators of inflammation interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, RANTES, TNF-α, ICAM-1 and mediators involved in endothelial activation and thrombosis (vWF, TF and PAI-1) were observed in patients with CNPA. The concentration of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was increased both in plasma and in PBMC in the patient population. The gene expression of CD40L was decreased in PBMC from the patient group, accompanied by decreased concentrations of soluble (s) CD40L in the circulation. Conclusions The proinflammatory response against Aspergillus may be counteracted by reduced CD40L and sCD40L, as well as increased IL-10, which may compromise the immune response against Aspergillus in patients with CNPA. PMID:22731696

  12. Effects of chronic intermittent hypoxia on allergen-induced airway inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Broytman, Oleg; Braun, Rudolf K; Morgan, Barbara J; Pegelow, David F; Hsu, Pei-Ning; Mei, Linda S; Koya, Ajay K; Eldridge, Marlowe; Teodorescu, Mihaela

    2015-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea aggravates asthma, but its mechanisms are unknown. Chronic intermittent hypoxia is one hallmark feature of sleep apnea. In this study, we tested the effects of chronic intermittent hypoxia on allergen-induced inflammation in rats. Four groups (n = 9-11/group) of ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized Brown-Norway rats underwent intermittent hypoxia (10% oxygen, 30 cycles/h, 10 h/d) or normoxia for 30 days concurrent with weekly OVA or vehicle challenges. Lung physiology, differential leukocyte counts from bronchoalveolar lavage, and histology (Picro Sirius Red staining for collagen content) were compared between groups 2 days after the last challenge. Gene expression in bronchoalveolar lavage cells was quantified by quantitative PCR. Compared with normoxia, chronic intermittent hypoxia reduced the FEV0.1/FVC ratio (P = 0.005), peak expiratory flow (P = 0.002), and mean midexpiratory flow (P = 0.004), predominantly in medium and large airways; decreased the baseline eosinophil number (P = 0.01) and amplified the effect of OVA on monocyte number (P = 0.02 for the interaction); in proximal airways, increased (P = 0.008), whereas in distal airways it decreased (P = 0.004), collagen density; induced qualitative emphysematous changes in lung periphery; and increased expression of the M2 macrophage marker YM-1 and augmented OVA-induced expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Chronic intermittent hypoxia alters immune response to allergen toward a more TH-1-predominant cellular phenotype with collagen deposition and matrix degradation, leading to airflow limitation. These findings highlight the potential of sleep apnea to aggravate airway dysfunction in patients with preexistent asthma. PMID:25004109

  13. Intravenous Bone Marrow Stem Cell Grafts Preferentially Migrate to Spleen and Abrogate Chronic Inflammation in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Sandra A.; Tajiri, Naoki; Hoover, Jaclyn; Kaneko, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Adult stem cell therapy is an experimental stroke treatment. Here, we assessed homing and anti-inflammatory effects of bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) in chronic stroke. Methods— At 60 days post stroke, adult Sprague–Dawley rats received intravenous hBMSCs (4×106 labeled or nonlabeled cells) or vehicle (saline). A sham surgery group served as additional control. In vivo imaging was conducted between 1 hour and 11 days post transplantation, followed by histological examination. Results— Labeled hBMSCs migrated to spleen which emitted significantly higher fluorescent signal across all time points, especially during the first hour, and were modestly detected in the head region at the 12 hours and 11 days, compared with nonlabeled hBMSCs and vehicle-infused stroke animals, or sham (P<0.05). At 11 days post transplantation, ex vivo imaging confirmed preferential hBMSC migration to the spleen over the brain. Hematoxylin and eosin staining revealed significant 15% and 30% reductions in striatal infarct and peri-infarct area, and a trend of rescue against neuronal loss in the hippocampus. Unbiased stereology showed significant 75% and 60% decrements in major histocompatibility complex II–activated inflammatory cells in gray and white matter, and a 43% diminution in tumor necrosis factor-α cell density in the spleen of transplanted stroke animals compared with vehicle-infused stroke animals (P<0.05). Human antigen immunostaining revealed 0.03% hBMSCs survived in spleen and only 0.0007% in brain. MSC migration to spleen, but not brain, inversely correlated with reduced infarct, peri-infarct, and inflammation. Conclusions— hBMSC transplantation is therapeutic in chronic stroke possibly by abrogating the inflammation-plagued secondary cell death. PMID:26219646

  14. Monosodium glutamate neonatal intoxication associated with obesity in adult stage is characterized by chronic inflammation and increased mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors in mice.

    PubMed

    Roman-Ramos, Ruben; Almanza-Perez, Julio C; Garcia-Macedo, Rebeca; Blancas-Flores, Gerardo; Fortis-Barrera, Angeles; Jasso, Edgar I; Garcia-Lorenzana, Mario; Campos-Sepulveda, Alfonso E; Cruz, Miguel; Alarcon-Aguilar, Francisco J

    2011-06-01

    The monosodium glutamate (MSG) neonatal administration in mice provides a model of obesity with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and insulin resistance. However, the inflammatory profile of cytokines produced from fat tissue and its relationship to the metabolic dysfunction induced by MSG have not yet been revealed. The aim of this study was to establish the inflammatory profile attributed to MSG by measuring the expression of adipokines in visceral fat and serum of 19-week-old mice as well as the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors alpha and gamma (PPARα and γ). Some metabolic and biochemical parameters were also quantified. The MSG increased mRNA expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα), resistin and leptin, but adiponectin did not exhibit any changes. In addition, impaired glucose tolerance, increased levels of insulin, resistin and leptin were observed in serum. Both PPARα and PPARγ were activated in MSG-induced obese mice, which might explain its inflammatory profile. However, liver transaminases were severely depressed, indicating that MSG may also induce liver injury, contributing to inflammation. The MSG neonatal neuro-intoxication in mice may thus provide a model of obesity and inflammation characterized by the dual activation of PPARα and PPARγ, which might offer new insights into the mechanism of inflammatory diabetes in obesity leading to steatohepatitis, as well as a suitable model to study the role of new therapeutic agents to prevent or reduce insulin resistance, the inflammatory state and liver steatosis. PMID:21205225

  15. Osteoprotective Effect of Alfacalcidol in Female Rats with Systemic Chronic Inflammation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies have shown that alfacalcidol (a hydroxylated form of vitamin D) mitigates glucocorticoid-induced bone loss. This study was undertaken to explore the mechanism and bone microarchitecture of alfacalcidol in rats with systemic chronic inflammation. Thirty female rats (3-month-old) assigned to ...

  16. Green tea polyphenols attenuate deterioration of bone microarchitecture in female rats with systemic chronic inflammation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Our previous study demonstrated that green tea polyphenols (GTP) benefit bone health in female rats with chronic inflammation, because of GTP’s antioxidant capacity. The current study further evaluates whether GTP can restore bone microstructure along with related mechanism in rats wit...

  17. Plasma biomarkers of chronic inflammation are elevated in overweight Mexican-American children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Excess body weight is associated with an accumulation of chronic, low-grade inflammation that has been implicated in the pathophysiology of various diseases. The obesity epidemic is more prevalent in certain ethnic groups. Despite this health disparity, few published studies have measured biomarke...

  18. Montelukast versus Dexamethasone Treatment in a Guinea Pig Model of Chronic Pulmonary Neutrophilic Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Abdel Kawy, Hala S

    2016-08-01

    Airway inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is refractory to corticosteroids and hence COPD treatment is hindered and insufficient. This study assessed the effects of oral treatment with Montelukast (10 and 30 mg/kg) or dexamethasone (20 mg/kg) for 20 days on COPD model induced by chronic exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Six groups of male guinea pigs were studied. Group 1: naïve group, group 2: exposed to saline nebulization. Groups 3, 4, 5, and 6: exposed to 9 nebulizations of LPS (30 μg/ml) for 1 hour, 48 hours apart with or without treatment with Montelukast or dexamethasone. Airway hyperreactivity (AHR) to methacholine (MCh), histopathological study and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) as well as lung tissue analyses were performed 48 hours after the final exposure to LPS (day 20). LPS-induced pulmonary dysfunction was associated with increased neutrophil count, leukotriene (LT) B4, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in BALF. Moreover, there was an increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) level and a decrease in histone deacetylases(HDAC) activity in the lung tissue. Both Montelukast (10 or 30 mg /kg) and dexamethasone significantly reduced neutrophil count in BALF and inflammatory cells in lung parenchyma as well as TNF-α, and MDA levels. However, dexamethasone was more effective (p < 0.05). Montelukast, at a dose of 30 mg /kg, significantly reduced specific airway resistance after the 9th LPS exposure, attenuated AHR to MCh, decreased LTB4 and increased HDAC activity in comparison to dexamethasone. These results suggest that treatment with Montelukast can be useful in chronic airway inflammatory diseases including COPD poorly responsive to glucocorticoids. PMID:26751767

  19. The Role of the Transcriptional Regulation of Stromal Cells in Chronic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Valin, Alvaro; Pablos, José L.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is a common process connecting pathologies that vary in their etiology and pathogenesis such as cancer, autoimmune diseases, and infections. The response of the immune system to tissue damage involves a carefully choreographed series of cellular interactions between immune and non-immune cells. In recent years, it has become clear that stromal resident cells have an essential role perpetuating the inflammatory environment and dictating in many cases the outcome of inflammatory based pathologies. Signal transduction pathways remain the main focus of study to understand how stimuli contribute to perpetuating the inflammatory response, mainly due to their potential role as therapeutic targets. However, molecular events orchestrated in the nucleus by transcription factors add additional levels of complexity and may be equally important for understanding the phenotypic differences of activated stromal components during the chronic inflammatory process. In this review, we focus on the contribution of transcription factors to the selective regulation of inducible proinflammatory genes, with special attention given to the regulation of the stromal fibroblastic cell function and response. PMID:26501341

  20. Compartmentalized intrathecal immunoglobulin synthesis during HIV infection - a model of chronic CNS inflammation?

    PubMed

    Bonnan, Mickael; Barroso, Bruno; Demasles, Stéphanie; Krim, Elsa; Marasescu, Raluca; Miquel, Marie

    2015-08-15

    HIV infects the central nervous system (CNS) during primary infection and persists in resident macrophages. CNS infection initiates a strong local immune response that fails to control the virus but is responsible for by-stander lesions involved in neurocognitive disorders. Although highly active anti-retroviral therapy now offers an almost complete control of CNS viral proliferation, low-grade CNS inflammation persists. This review focuses on HIV-induced intrathecal immunoglobulin (Ig) synthesis. Intrathecal Ig synthesis early occurs in more than three-quarters of patients in response to viral infection of the CNS and persists throughout the course of the disease. Viral antigens are targeted but this specific response accounts for <5% of the whole intrathecal synthesis. Although the nature and mechanisms leading to non-specific synthesis are unknown, this prominent proportion is comparable to that observed in various CNS viral infections. Cerebrospinal fluid-floating antibody-secreting cells account for a minority of the whole synthesis, which mainly takes place in perivascular inflammatory infiltrates of the CNS parenchyma. B-cell traffic and lineage across the blood-brain-barrier have not yet been described. We review common technical pitfalls and update the pending questions in the field. Moreover, since HIV infection is associated with an intrathecal chronic oligoclonal (and mostly non-specific) Ig synthesis and associates with low-grade axonal lesions, this could be an interesting model of the chronic intrathecal synthesis occurring during multiple sclerosis. PMID:26198917

  1. Collagenase-3 (matrix metalloproteinase-13) expression is induced in oral mucosal epithelium during chronic inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    Uitto, V. J.; Airola, K.; Vaalamo, M.; Johansson, N.; Putnins, E. E.; Firth, J. D.; Salonen, J.; López-Otín, C.; Saarialho-Kere, U.; Kähäri, V. M.

    1998-01-01

    Increased proliferation of mucosal epithelium during inflammation is associated with degradation of subepithelial connective tissue matrix and local invasion of the epithelial cells. Here we have studied, whether collagenase-3 (MMP-13), a collagenolytic matrix metalloproteinase with an exceptionally wide substrate specificity, is expressed in the epithelium of chronically inflamed mucosa. Examination of human gingival tissue sections from subjects with chronic adult periodontitis with in situ hybridization revealed marked expression of MMP-13 in basal cells of some epithelial rete ridges expanding into connective tissue. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that these cells also expressed strongly laminin-5, suggesting that they are actively migrating cells. A strong signal for MMP-13 mRNA was occasionally also noted in the suprabasal epithelial cells facing the gingival pocket, whereas no collagenase-1 (MMP-1) mRNA was detected in any areas of the epithelium. MMP-13 expression was also detected in fibroblast-like cells associated with collagen fibers of the inflamed subepithelial connective tissue. In organ culture of human oral mucosa, MMP-13 mRNA expression was observed in epithelial cells growing into connective tissue of the specimens. Regulation of MMP-13 expression was examined in cultured normal nonkeratinizing epithelial cells isolated from porcine periodontal ligament. In these cells, MMP-13 expression at the mRNA and protein level was potently enhanced (up to sixfold) by tumor necrosis factor-alpha, transforming growth factor-beta(1), and transforming growth factor-alpha and by keratinocyte growth factor in the presence of heparin. In addition, plating periodontal ligament epithelial cells on type I collagen stimulated MMP-13 expression (sevenfold) as compared with cells grown on tissue culture plastic. The results of this study show, that expression of MMP-13 is specifically induced in undifferentiated epithelial cells during chronic inflammation

  2. The Gut as a Source of Inflammation in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Lau, Wei Ling; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Vaziri, Nosratola D

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is a non-traditional risk factor for cardiovascular mortality in the chronic kidney disease (CKD) population. In recent years, the gastrointestinal tract has emerged as a major instigator of systemic inflammation in CKD. Postmortem studies previously discovered gut wall inflammation throughout the digestive tract in chronic dialysis patients. In CKD animals, colon wall inflammation is associated with breakdown of the epithelial tight junction barrier ('leaky gut') and translocation of bacterial DNA and endotoxin into the bloodstream. Gut bacterial DNA and endotoxin have also been detected in the serum from CKD and dialysis patients, whereby endotoxin levels increase with the CKD stage and correlate with the severity of systemic inflammation in the dialysis population. The CKD diet that is low in plant fiber and symbiotic organisms (in adherence with low potassium, low phosphorus intake) can alter the normal gut microbiome, leading to overgrowth of bacteria that produce uremic toxins such as cresyl and indoxyl molecules. The translocation of these toxins from the 'leaky gut' into the bloodstream further promotes systemic inflammation, adverse cardiovascular outcomes and CKD progression. Data are lacking on optimal fiber and yogurt consumption in CKD that would favor growth of a more symbiotic microbiome while avoiding potassium and phosphorus overload. Prebiotic and probiotic formulations have shown promise in small clinical trials, in terms of lowering serum levels of uremic toxins and improving quality of life. The evidence points to a strong relationship between intestinal inflammation and adverse outcomes in CKD, and more trials investigating gut-targeted therapeutics are needed. PMID:25967288

  3. The gut as a source of inflammation in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Wei Ling; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Vaziri, Nosratola D.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is a non-traditional risk factor for cardiovascular mortality in the chronic kidney disease (CKD) population. In recent years the gastrointestinal tract has emerged as a major instigator of systemic inflammation in CKD. Post-mortem studies previously discovered gut wall inflammation present throughout the digestive tract in chronic dialysis patients. In CKD animals, colon wall inflammation is associated with breakdown of the epithelial tight junction barrier (“leaky gut”) and translocation of bacterial DNA and endotoxin into the bloodstream. Gut bacterial DNA and endotoxin have also been detected in the serum from CKD and dialysis patients, whereby endotoxin levels increase with CKD stage and correlate with severity of systemic inflammation in the dialysis population. The CKD diet that is low in plant fiber and symbiotic organisms (in adherence with low potassium, low phosphorus intake) can alter the normal gut microbiome, leading to overgrowth of bacteria that produce uremic toxins such as cresyl and indoxyl molecules. The translocation of these toxins from the “leaky gut” into the bloodstream further promotes systemic inflammation, adverse cardiovascular outcomes and CKD progression. Data is lacking on optimal fiber and yogurt consumption in CKD that would favor growth of a more symbiotic microbiome while avoiding potassium and phosphorus overload. Prebiotic and probiotic formulations have shown promise in small clinical trials, in terms of lowering serum levels of uremic toxins and improving quality of life. The evidence points to a strong relationship between intestinal inflammation and adverse outcomes in CKD, and more trials investigating gut-targeted therapeutics are needed. PMID:25967288

  4. Effect of DHU001, a Polyherbal Formula on Formalin-induced Paw Chronic Inflammation of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yoon-Hee; Chung, In-Kwon; Cheon, Woo-Hyun; Lee, Hyeung-Sik

    2011-01-01

    The effect of DHU001, a mixed herbal formula consisted of 7 types aqueous extracts for various respiratory disorders were evaluated on the formalin-induced paw chronic inflammation in mice after oral administration. Mice were subaponeurotically injected in the left hind paw with 0.02 ml of 3.75% formalin, then subjected to 500, 250 and 125 mg/kg of DHU001 oral administration, once a day for 10 days during which then the hind-paw thickness and volume were measured daily. The paw wet-weight, histological profiles, histomorphometrical analyses and paw tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α contents were conducted at termination. After two formalin treatments, a marked increase in the paw thickness and volume was detected in the formalin-injected control as compared with that in the intact control, plus at the time of sacrifice the paw wet-weights, paw TNF-α contents were also dramatically increased with severe chronic inflammation signs at histopathological observations. However, these formalin-induced chronic inflammatory changes were dramatically decreased by treatment of dexamethasone and all three different dosages of DHU001. DHU001 has favorable effects on formalin-induced chronic inflammation mediated by TNF-α suppression, and DHU001 may represent an alternative approach for the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:24278557

  5. B4GALT6 regulates astrocyte activation during CNS inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Mayo, Lior; Trauger, Sunia A.; Blain, Manon; Nadeau, Meghan; Patel, Bonny; Alvarez, Jorge I.; Mascanfroni, Ivan D.; Yeste, Ada; Kivisäkk, Pia; Kallas, Keith; Ellezam, Benjamin; Bakshi, Rohit; Prat, Alexandre; Antel, Jack P.; Weiner, Howard L.; Quintana, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes play complex roles in the response to trauma, infection or inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS). Thus, it is important to characterize the mechanisms regulating astrocyte function, as well as potential targets for the therapeutic modulation of astrocyte activity. Here we report that lactosylceramide (LacCer) levels are up-regulated in the CNS during chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an experimental model of multiple sclerosis (MS). We found that LacCer synthesized by β-1,4-galactosyltransferase 6 (B4GALT6) in astrocytes acts in an autocrine manner to trigger transcriptional programs that promote the recruitment and activation of CNS-infiltrating monocytes and microglia, and neurodegeneration. We also detected increased B4GALT6 expression and LacCer levels in CNS MS lesions. Finally, the inhibition of LacCer synthesis suppressed local CNS innate immunity and neurodegeneration in EAE, and interfered with the activation of human astrocytes in vitro. Thus, B4GALT6 is a potential therapeutic target for MS and other neuroinflammatory disorders. PMID:25216636

  6. Long-term intratracheal lipopolysaccharide exposure in mice results in chronic lung inflammation and persistent pathology.

    PubMed

    Vernooy, Juanita H J; Dentener, Mieke A; van Suylen, Robert J; Buurman, Wim A; Wouters, Emiel F M

    2002-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a major proinflammatory glycolipid component of the gram-negative bacterial cell wall, is one of the agents ubiquitously present as contaminant on airborne particles, including air pollution, organic dusts, and cigarette smoke. Chronic exposure to significant levels of LPS is reported to be associated with the development and/or progression of many types of lung diseases, including asthma, chronic bronchitis, and progressive irreversible airflow obstruction, that are all characterized by chronic inflammatory processes in the lung. In the present study, pathologic effects of long-term LPS exposure to the lung were investigated in detail. To this end, a murine model in which mice were exposed to repeated intratracheal instillation of Escherichia coli LPS was developed. We show that long-term LPS instillation in mice results in persistent chronic pulmonary inflammation, characterized by peribronchial and perivascular lymphocytic aggregates (CD4(+), CD8(+), and CD19(+)), parenchymal accumulation of macrophages and CD8(+) T cells, and altered cytokine expression. Furthermore, airway and alveolar alterations such as mucus cell metaplasia, airway wall thickening, and irreversible alveolar enlargement accompanied the chronic inflammatory response. Interestingly, the observed inflammatory and pathologic changes mimic changes observed in human subjects with chronic inflammatory lung diseases, especially chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), suggesting that this murine model could be applicable to dissect the role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of these disease conditions. PMID:11751215

  7. The role of physiological elements in the future therapies of rheumatoid arthritis. II. The relevance of energy redistribution in the process of chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Gajewski, Michał; Rzodkiewicz, Przemysław; Wojtecka-Łukasik, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    The reasons for development of chronic inflammation are complex and not fully understood. One of the factors affecting the prolongation of inflammation is changes in cell metabolism, occurring at the center of the inflammatory process. In chronic inflammation there is an imbalance between the processes of storage and consumption of energy reserves. Hypoxia that is a consequence of edema results in transition of white blood cells to anaerobic metabolism. Neutrophils, lymphocytes and macrophages produce active oxygen metabolites which on one hand facilitate the elimination of pathogens, and on the other hand, can cause damage to healthy cells located in the inflamed tissue. In this paper, we discuss the importance of disturbed redistribution of energy as one of the main reasons for transformation of the acute inflammatory process into the chronic one. PMID:27407224

  8. The role of physiological elements in the future therapies of rheumatoid arthritis. II. The relevance of energy redistribution in the process of chronic inflammation*

    PubMed Central

    Rzodkiewicz, Przemysław; Wojtecka-Łukasik, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    The reasons for development of chronic inflammation are complex and not fully understood. One of the factors affecting the prolongation of inflammation is changes in cell metabolism, occurring at the center of the inflammatory process. In chronic inflammation there is an imbalance between the processes of storage and consumption of energy reserves. Hypoxia that is a consequence of edema results in transition of white blood cells to anaerobic metabolism. Neutrophils, lymphocytes and macrophages produce active oxygen metabolites which on one hand facilitate the elimination of pathogens, and on the other hand, can cause damage to healthy cells located in the inflamed tissue. In this paper, we discuss the importance of disturbed redistribution of energy as one of the main reasons for transformation of the acute inflammatory process into the chronic one. PMID:27407224

  9. PET-Scan Shows Peripherally Increased Neurokinin 1 Receptor Availability in Chronic Tennis Elbow: Visualizing Neurogenic Inflammation?

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Magnus; Svärdsudd, Kurt; Appel, Lieuwe; Engler, Henry; Aarnio, Mikko; Gordh, Torsten; Långström, Bengt; Sörensen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    In response to pain, neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor availability is altered in the central nervous system. The NK1 receptor and its primary agonist, substance P, also play a crucial role in peripheral tissue in response to pain, as part of neurogenic inflammation. However, little is known about alterations in NK1 receptor availability in peripheral tissue in chronic pain conditions and very few studies have been performed on human beings. Ten subjects with chronic tennis elbow were therefore examined by positron emission tomography (PET) with the NK1 specific radioligand [11C]GR205171 before and after treatment with graded exercise. The radioligand signal intensity was higher in the affected arm as compared with the unaffected arm, measured as differences between the arms in volume of voxels and signal intensity of this volume above a reference threshold set as 2.5 SD above mean signal intensity of the unaffected arm before treatment. In the eight subjects examined after treatment, pain ratings decreased in all subjects but signal intensity decreased in five and increased in three. In conclusion, NK1 receptors may be activated, or up-regulated in the peripheral, painful tissue of a chronic pain condition. This up-regulation does, however, have moderate correlation to pain ratings. The increased NK1 receptor availability is interpreted as part of ongoing neurogenic inflammation and may have correlation to the pathogenesis of chronic tennis elbow. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00888225 http://clinicaltrials.gov/ PMID:24155873

  10. NKT cells prevent chronic joint inflammation after infection with Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Tupin, Emmanuel; Benhnia, Mohammed Rafii-El-Idrissi; Kinjo, Yuki; Patsey, Rebeca; Lena, Christopher J; Haller, Matthew C; Caimano, Melissa J; Imamura, Masakazu; Wong, Chi-Huey; Crotty, Shane; Radolf, Justin D; Sellati, Timothy J; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2008-12-16

    Borrelia burgdorferi is the etiologic agent of Lyme disease, a multisystem inflammatory disorder that principally targets the skin, joints, heart, and nervous system. The role of T lymphocytes in the development of chronic inflammation resulting from B. burgdorferi infection has been controversial. We previously showed that natural killer T (NKT) cells with an invariant (i) TCR alpha chain (iNKT cells) recognize glycolipids from B. burgdorferi, but did not establish an in vivo role for iNKT cells in Lyme disease pathogenesis. Here, we evaluate the importance of iNKT cells for host defense against these pathogenic spirochetes by using Valpha14i NKT cell-deficient (Jalpha18(-/-)) BALB/c mice. On tick inoculation with B. burgdorferi, Jalpha18(-/-) mice exhibited more severe and prolonged arthritis as well as a reduced ability to clear spirochetes from infected tissues. Valpha14i NKT cell deficiency also resulted in increased production of antibodies directed against both B. burgdorferi protein antigens and borrelial diacylglycerols; the latter finding demonstrates that anti-glycolipid antibody production does not require cognate help from Valpha14i NKT cells. Valpha14i NKT cells in infected wild-type mice expressed surface activation markers and produced IFNgamma in vivo after infection, suggesting a participatory role for this unique population in cellular immunity. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that the antigen-specific activation of Valpha14i NKT cells is important for the prevention of persistent joint inflammation and spirochete clearance, and they counter the long-standing notion that humoral rather than cellular immunity is sufficient to facilitate Lyme disease resolution. PMID:19060201

  11. NKT cells prevent chronic joint inflammation after infection with Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    Tupin, Emmanuel; Benhnia, Mohammed Rafii-El-Idrissi; Kinjo, Yuki; Patsey, Rebeca; Lena, Christopher J.; Haller, Matthew C.; Caimano, Melissa J.; Imamura, Masakazu; Wong, Chi-Huey; Crotty, Shane; Radolf, Justin D.; Sellati, Timothy J.; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2008-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi is the etiologic agent of Lyme disease, a multisystem inflammatory disorder that principally targets the skin, joints, heart, and nervous system. The role of T lymphocytes in the development of chronic inflammation resulting from B. burgdorferi infection has been controversial. We previously showed that natural killer T (NKT) cells with an invariant (i) TCR α chain (iNKT cells) recognize glycolipids from B. burgdorferi, but did not establish an in vivo role for iNKT cells in Lyme disease pathogenesis. Here, we evaluate the importance of iNKT cells for host defense against these pathogenic spirochetes by using Vα14i NKT cell-deficient (Jα18−/−) BALB/c mice. On tick inoculation with B. burgdorferi, Jα18−/− mice exhibited more severe and prolonged arthritis as well as a reduced ability to clear spirochetes from infected tissues. Vα14i NKT cell deficiency also resulted in increased production of antibodies directed against both B. burgdorferi protein antigens and borrelial diacylglycerols; the latter finding demonstrates that anti-glycolipid antibody production does not require cognate help from Vα14i NKT cells. Vα14i NKT cells in infected wild-type mice expressed surface activation markers and produced IFNγ in vivo after infection, suggesting a participatory role for this unique population in cellular immunity. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that the antigen-specific activation of Vα14i NKT cells is important for the prevention of persistent joint inflammation and spirochete clearance, and they counter the long-standing notion that humoral rather than cellular immunity is sufficient to facilitate Lyme disease resolution. PMID:19060201

  12. Pathway-focused genetic evaluation of immune and inflammation related genes with chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rajeevan, Mangalathu S; Dimulescu, Irina; Murray, Janna; Falkenberg, Virginia R; Unger, Elizabeth R

    2015-08-01

    Recent evidence suggests immune and inflammatory alterations are important in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). This study was done to explore the association of functionally important genetic variants in inflammation and immune pathways with CFS. Peripheral blood DNA was isolated from 50 CFS and 121 non-fatigued (NF) control participants in a population-based study. Genotyping was performed with the Affymetrix Immune and Inflammation Chip that covers 11K single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) following the manufacturer's protocol. Genotyping accuracy for specific genes was validated by pyrosequencing. Golden Helix SVS software was used for genetic analysis. SNP functional annotation was done using SPOT and GenomePipe programs. CFS was associated with 32 functionally important SNPs: 11 missense variants, 4 synonymous variants, 11 untranslated regulatory region (UTR) variants and 6 intronic variants. Some of these SNPs were in genes within pathways related to complement cascade (SERPINA5, CFB, CFH, MASP1 and C6), chemokines (CXCL16, CCR4, CCL27), cytokine signaling (IL18, IL17B, IL2RB), and toll-like receptor signaling (TIRAP, IRAK4). Of particular interest is association of CFS with two missense variants in genes of complement activation, rs4151667 (L9H) in CFB and rs1061170 (Y402H) in CFH. A 5' UTR polymorphism (rs11214105) in IL18 also associated with physical fatigue, body pain and score for CFS case defining symptoms. This study identified new associations of CFS with genetic variants in pathways including complement activation providing additional support for altered innate immune response in CFS. Additional studies are needed to validate the findings of this exploratory study. PMID:26116897

  13. Occlusion of retinal capillaries caused by glial cell proliferation in chronic ocular inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, E; Ripandelli, G; Feher, J; Plateroti, A M; Plateroti, R; Kovacs, I; Plateroti, P; Taurone, S; Artico, M

    2015-01-01

    The inner blood-retinal barrier is a gliovascular unit in which glial cells surround capillary endothelial cells and regulate retinal capillaries by paracrine interactions. During chronic ocular inflammation, microvascular complications can give rise to vascular proliferative lesions, which compromise visual acuity. This pathologic remodelling caused by proliferating Müller cells determines occlusion of retinal capillaries. The aim of the present study was to identify qualitative and quantitative alterations in the retinal capillaries in patients with post-traumatic chronic ocular inflammation or post-thrombotic vascular glaucoma. Moreover, we investigated the potential role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and pro-inflammatory cytokines in retinal inflammation. Our electron microscopy findings demonstrated that during chronic ocular inflammation, thickening of the basement membrane, loss of pericytes and endothelial cells and proliferation of Müller cells occur with irreversible occlusion of retinal capillaries. Angiogenesis takes place as part of a regenerative reaction that results in fibrosis. We believe that VEGF and pro-inflammatory cytokines may be potential therapeutic targets in the treatment of this disease although further studies are required to confirm these findings. PMID:25792393

  14. Relationship Between Chronic Inflammation and the Stage and Histopathological Size of Colorectal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rasic, Ismar; Radovic, Svjetlana; Aksamija, Goran

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The association of inflammatory reactions with almost all types of cancer supports the concept that inflammation is a critical component of tumor progression. The present study aimed to evaluate the relationship of serum markers of chronic inflammation with the stage of and histopathological size of colorectal carcinoma (CRC). Methods: This cross-sectional study included 90 patients of both sexes, mean age 66.2 (range 47-78) years, with clinically and histologically confirmed CRC, who were admitted to the Clinic for abdominal surgery UCCS for surgical treatment of CRC. The patients according to the stage of disease were divided into three groups (stage II–IV). The control group consisted of 30 subjects with no signs of malignancy and acute inflammatory diseases. Staging of CRC was done according to the TNM classification. In each patient, the preoperative blood samples were taken for determination of the parameters of inflammation: the erythrocyte sedimentation rate, white blood cells, C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen and alpha 2 globulins. Results: It was confirmed that increasing markers of inflammation followed increasing stages of colorectal cancer, depth of tumor invasion and the occurrence of metastatic disease. CRP is a biomarker that consistently and significantly increases from the second to the fourth stage of colorectal cancer (7.2 (2.3-14.6) mg/L vs. 21.85 (12.3-41) mg/L vs. 38.6 (21.5-79) mg/L; p<0.01) and significantly correlates positively with the stage of CRC (r= 0.783, p<0.001), and the tumor size (r=0.249, p<0.05). Conclusion: The study results point to an increase in the degree of chronic inflammation throughout the progression of colorectal cancer. The most consistent marker of chronic inflammation that accompanies the progression of colorectal carcinoma is CRP. PMID:27147782

  15. Sonoelastography – A Useful Adjunct for Parotid Gland Ultrasound Assessment in Patients Suffering from Chronic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Wierzbicka, Małgorzata; Kałużny, Jarosław; Ruchała, Marek; Stajgis, Marek; Kopeć, Tomasz; Szyfter, Witold

    2014-01-01

    Background Shear wave elastography (SWE) is widely used in breast, liver, prostate and thyroid evaluations. Elastography provides additional information if used to assess parotid gland pathology. We assessed parotid glands by means of SWE to compare the parenchyma properties in different types of inflammation. Material/Methods Prospective analysis included 78 consecutive patients with parotid gland pathology: sialolithiasis (33), Stensen’s duct stenosis (15), chronic inflammation (10), and primary Sjögren syndrome (pSS) (20) treated at the Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery of PUMS. The primary predictor variable was type of parotid pathology, and secondary predictor variables were patient age and the duration and intensity of complaints. Ultrasound pictures were compared with elastography values of parotid parenchyma. Results Mean elasticity values for pSS (111 Kilopascals (kPa), Stensen’s duct stenosis (63 kPa), sialolithiasis (82 kPa), and chronic inflammation (77 kPa) were significantly higher than the mean value for healthy patients (24 kPa). Elasticity increased proportionally to the intensity of complaints: mild (51 kPa), moderate (78 kPa), and strong (90 kPa). Increased elasticity did not correspond with ultrasonographic pictures. In pSS the parenchyma was almost twice as stiff as in chronic inflammation (p=0.02), although subjective complaints were mostly mild or moderate, and the ultrasonographic picture did not present features of fibrosis. Conclusions Sonoelastography, by improving routine ultrasonographic assessment, might be a useful tool for parotid evaluations during the course of chronic inflammation. An extraordinarily high degree of stiffness was revealed in pSS despite lack of fibrosis by ultrasonography and moderate subjective complaints, suggesting that sonoelastography could be a valuable diagnostic tool. PMID:25398237

  16. Animal models to study acute and chronic intestinal inflammation in mammals.

    PubMed

    Jiminez, Janelle A; Uwiera, Trina C; Douglas Inglis, G; Uwiera, Richard R E

    2015-01-01

    Acute and chronic inflammatory diseases of the intestine impart a significant and negative impact on the health and well-being of human and non-human mammalian animals. Understanding the underlying mechanisms of inflammatory disease is mandatory to develop effective treatment and prevention strategies. As inflammatory disease etiologies are multifactorial, the use of appropriate animal models and associated metrics of disease are essential. In this regard, animal models used alone or in combination to study acute and chronic inflammatory disease of the mammalian intestine paired with commonly used inflammation-inducing agents are reviewed. This includes both chemical and biological incitants of inflammation, and both non-mammalian (i.e. nematodes, insects, and fish) and mammalian (i.e. rodents, rabbits, pigs, ruminants, dogs, and non-human primates) models of intestinal inflammation including germ-free, gnotobiotic, as well as surgical, and genetically modified animals. Importantly, chemical and biological incitants induce inflammation via a multitude of mechanisms, and intestinal inflammation and injury can vary greatly according to the incitant and animal model used, allowing studies to ascertain both long-term and short-term effects of inflammation. Thus, researchers and clinicians should be aware of the relative strengths and limitations of the various animal models used to study acute and chronic inflammatory diseases of the mammalian intestine, and the scope and relevance of outcomes achievable based on this knowledge. The ability to induce inflammation to mimic common human diseases is an important factor of a successful animal model, however other mechanisms of disease such as the amount of infective agent to induce disease, invasion mechanisms, and the effect various physiologic changes can have on inducing damage are also important features. In many cases, the use of multiple animal models in combination with both chemical and biological incitants is

  17. Lung disease severity, chronic inflammation, iron deficiency, and erythropoietin response in adults with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Fischer, R; Simmerlein, R; Huber, R M; Schiffl, H; Lang, S M

    2007-12-01

    Chronic lung disorders are usually associated with a hypoxia driven increase in red cell mass. However, patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) often have normal or decreased haemoglobin levels. The present prospective observational study in cystic fibrosis patients was performed to determine which factors were involved in alterations in the hematopoetic response to corresponding arterial oxygen pressure. Sixty adult patients (age 21-51) with stable CF were included. They all had vitamin A, D, E, and K but no vitamin B12 supplementation. Twenty-five patients were on oral Fe(2+) (100 mg/day). Resting arterial blood gases, lung function, complete blood counts, parameters of iron status, CRP, sputum microbiology and serum erythropoietin were measured at recruitment and after 3 and 6 months. Patients had varying degrees of pulmonary functional impairment and 9% were hypoxemic (arterial oxygen pressure <60 mm Hg). Low-grade systemic inflammation (CRP > 0.5 mg/dl) was present in 40% of the patients, who all had bacterial colonization. None of the patient had erythrocytosis and 12 patients had anemia. There was no significant difference in iron status between patients with or without chronic iron supplementation and erythropoietin levels were normal. During the 6 months observation period no significant changes occurred. The patients exhibited an impaired erythropoietic response to hypoxemia with normal or low hematocrit in spite of chronic lung disease which might be caused by chronic inflammation associated with CF. Linear multivariate regression analysis revealed CRP levels but neither iron substitution, nor erythropoietin levels nor lung function parameters as independent determinant of haemoglobin levels. CF may be associated with anemia of variable severity as expression of the chronic inflammation present in these patients. The therapeutic consequences are to treat the underlying inflammation rather than to supplement iron. PMID:17948283

  18. Common mechanisms involved in Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes: a key role of chronic bacterial infection and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Miklossy, Judith; McGeer, Patrick L.

    2016-01-01

    Strong epidemiologic evidence and common molecular mechanisms support an association between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and type 2-diabetes. Local inflammation and amyloidosis occur in both diseases and are associated with periodontitis and various infectious agents. This article reviews the evidence for the presence of local inflammation and bacteria in type 2 diabetes and discusses host pathogen interactions in chronic inflammatory disorders. Chlamydophyla pneumoniae, Helicobacter pylori and spirochetes are demonstrated in association with dementia and brain lesions in AD and islet lesions in type 2 diabetes. The presence of pathogens in host tissues activates immune responses through Toll-like receptor signaling pathways. Evasion of pathogens from complement-mediated attack results in persistent infection, inflammation and amyloidosis. Amyloid beta and the pancreatic amyloid called amylin bind to lipid bilayers and produce Ca(2+) influx and bacteriolysis. Similarly to AD, accumulation of amylin deposits in type 2 diabetes may result from an innate immune response to chronic bacterial infections, which are known to be associated with amyloidosis. Further research based on an infectious origin of both AD and type 2 diabetes may lead to novel treatment strategies. PMID:26961231

  19. Common mechanisms involved in Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes: a key role of chronic bacterial infection and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Miklossy, Judith; McGeer, Patrick L

    2016-04-01

    Strong epidemiologic evidence and common molecular mechanisms support an association between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and type 2-diabetes. Local inflammation and amyloidosis occur in both diseases and are associated with periodontitis and various infectious agents. This article reviews the evidence for the presence of local inflammation and bacteria in type 2 diabetes and discusses host pathogen interactions in chronic inflammatory disorders. Chlamydophyla pneumoniae, Helicobacter pylori and spirochetes are demonstrated in association with dementia and brain lesions in AD and islet lesions in type 2 diabetes. The presence of pathogens in host tissues activates immune responses through Toll-like receptor signaling pathways. Evasion of pathogens from complement-mediated attack results in persistent infection, inflammation and amyloidosis. Amyloid beta and the pancreatic amyloid called amylin bind to lipid bilayers and produce Ca(2+) influx and bacteriolysis. Similarly to AD, accumulation of amylin deposits in type 2 diabetes may result from an innate immune response to chronic bacterial infections, which are known to be associated with amyloidosis. Further research based on an infectious origin of both AD and type 2 diabetes may lead to novel treatment strategies. PMID:26961231

  20. Dietary supplementation of an ellagic acid-enriched pomegranate extract attenuates chronic colonic inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Rosillo, Maria Angeles; Sánchez-Hidalgo, Marina; Cárdeno, Ana; Aparicio-Soto, Marina; Sánchez-Fidalgo, Susana; Villegas, Isabel; de la Lastra, Catalina Alarcón

    2012-09-01

    Dietary polyphenols present in Punica granatum (pomegranate), such as ellagitannins and ellagic acid (EA) have shown to exert anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of a dietary EA-enriched pomegranate extract (PE) in a murine chronic model of Cronh's disease (CD). Colonic injury was induced by intracolonic instillation of trinitrobenzensulfonic acid (TNBS). Rats were fed with different diets during 30 days before TNBS instillation and 2 weeks before killing: (i) standard, (ii) PE 250 mg/kg/day, (iii) PE 500 mg/kg/day, (iv) EA 10 mg/kg/day and (v) EA 10 mg/kg/day enriched-PE 250 mg/kg/day. Inflammation response was assessed by histology and MPO activity and TNF-α production. Besides, colonic expressions of iNOS, COX-2, p38, JNK, pERK1/2 MAPKs, IKBα and nuclear p65 NF-κB were studied by western blotting. MPO activity and the TNF-α levels were significantly reduced in dietary fed rats when compared with TNBS group. Similarly, PE and an EA-enriched PE diets drastically decreased COX-2 and iNOS overexpression, reduced MAPKs phosporylation and prevented the nuclear NF-κB translocation. Dietary supplementation of EA contributes in the beneficial effect of PE in this experimental colitis model and may be a novel therapeutic strategy to manage inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). PMID:22677088

  1. Implanted neural electrodes cause chronic, local inflammation that is correlated with local neurodegeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, George C.; Rees, Howard D.; Levey, Allan I.; Gutekunst, Claire-Anne; Gross, Robert E.; Bellamkonda, Ravi V.

    2009-10-01

    Prosthetic devices that are controlled by intracortical electrodes recording one's 'thoughts' are a reality today, and no longer merely in the realm of science fiction. However, widespread clinical use of implanted electrodes is hampered by a lack of reliability in chronic recordings, independent of the type of electrodes used. One major hypothesis has been that astroglial scar electrically impedes the electrodes. However, there is a temporal discrepancy between stabilization of scar's electrical properties and recording failure with recording failure lagging by 1 month. In this study, we test a possible explanation for this discrepancy: the hypothesis that chronic inflammation, due to the persistent presence of the electrode, causes a local neurodegenerative state in the immediate vicinity of the electrode. Through modulation of chronic inflammation via stab wound, electrode geometry and age-matched control, we found that after 16 weeks, animals with an increased level of chronic inflammation were associated with increased neuronal and dendritic, but not axonal, loss. We observed increased neuronal and dendritic loss 16 weeks after implantation compared to 8 weeks after implantation, suggesting that the local neurodegenerative state is progressive. After 16 weeks, we observed axonal pathology in the form of hyperphosphorylation of the protein tau in the immediate vicinity of the microelectrodes (as observed in Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies). The results of this study suggest that a local, late onset neurodegenerative disease-like state surrounds the chronic electrodes and is a potential cause for chronic recording failure. These results also inform strategies to enhance our capability to attain reliable long-term recordings from implantable electrodes in the CNS.

  2. Chronic inflammation (inflammaging) and its potential contribution to age-associated diseases.

    PubMed

    Franceschi, Claudio; Campisi, Judith

    2014-06-01

    Human aging is characterized by a chronic, low-grade inflammation, and this phenomenon has been termed as "inflammaging." Inflammaging is a highly significant risk factor for both morbidity and mortality in the elderly people, as most if not all age-related diseases share an inflammatory pathogenesis. Nevertheless, the precise etiology of inflammaging and its potential causal role in contributing to adverse health outcomes remain largely unknown. The identification of pathways that control age-related inflammation across multiple systems is therefore important in order to understand whether treatments that modulate inflammaging may be beneficial in old people. The session on inflammation of the Advances in Gerosciences meeting held at the National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Aging in Bethesda on October 30 and 31, 2013 was aimed at defining these important unanswered questions about inflammaging. This article reports the main outcomes of this session. PMID:24833586

  3. Regulation of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Activity by Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Schuettpelz, Laura G.; Link, Daniel C.

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are quiescent cells with self-renewal capacity and the ability to generate all mature blood cells. HSCs normally reside in specialized niches in the bone marrow that help maintain their quiescence and long-term repopulating activity. There is emerging evidence that certain cytokines induced during inflammation have significant effects on HSCs in the bone marrow. Type I and II interferons, tumor necrosis factor, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) directly stimulate HSC proliferation and differentiation, thereby increasing the short-term output of mature effector leukocytes. However, chronic inflammatory cytokine signaling can lead to HSC exhaustion and may contribute the development of hematopoietic malignancies. Pro-inflammatory cytokines such as G-CSF can also indirectly affect HSCs by altering the bone marrow microenvironment, disrupting the stem cell niche, and leading to HSC mobilization into the blood. Herein, we review our current understanding of the effects of inflammatory mediators on HSCs, and we discuss the potential clinical implications of these findings with respect to bone marrow failure and leukemogenesis. PMID:23882270

  4. Quality of life is associated with chronic inflammation in schizophrenia: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    M., Faugere; J.A., Micoulaud-Franchi; M., Alessandrini; R., Richieri; C., Faget-Agius; P., Auquier; C., Lançon; L., Boyer

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. However, the association between chronic inflammation and health outcomes in schizophrenia remains unclear, particularly for patient-reported outcomes. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between quality of life (QoL) and chronic inflammation assessed using C -Reactive Protein (CRP) in patients with schizophrenia. Two hundred and fifty six patients with schizophrenia were enrolled in this study. After adjusting for key socio-demographic and clinical confounding factors, patients with high levels of CRP (>3.0 mg/l) had a lower QoL than patients with normal CRP levels (OR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.94–0.99). An investigation of the dimensions of QoL revealed that psychological well-being, physical well-being and sentimental life were the most salient features of QoL associated with CRP. Significant associations were found between lower educational level (OR = 4.15, 95% CI = 1.55–11.07), higher body mass index (OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.06–1.28), higher Fagerström score (OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.01–1.47) and high levels of CRP. After replications with longitudinal approaches, the association between QoL and chronic inflammation may offer interesting interventional prospects to act both on inflammation and QoL in patients with schizophrenia. PMID:26041435

  5. Expression of Heat Shock Protein 27 in Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia with Chronic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuqing; Wang, Xiuli; Guo, Yuexian; Li, Wenping; Yang, Shijie; Li, Wei; Cai, Wenqing

    2015-01-01

    Background Heat shock protein 27 (HSP 27) is known as a mediator in immune response and has been recently found to be expressed in prostate cancer. This study aimed to investigate the role of HSP27 in inflammatory BPH. Material/Methods Hospitalized BPH patients who received TURP were divided into 4 groups by the presence and degrees of chronic inflammation: non-inflammatory BPH (NI BPH), mild-inflammatory BPH (MI BPH), moderate-inflammatory BPH (MOI BPH), and severe-inflammatory BPH (SI BPH). Expressions of HSP 27, TNF-α, IL-6, and CD3 in prostate tissues and serum of patients were detected by immunohistochemistry and ELISA. Results Expression of HSP27 in BPH with histological inflammation was significantly higher than in non-inflammatory BPH. In inflammatory BPH groups, HSP27 expression gradually increased along with increasing inflammation. There was a significant correlation between the expression of TNF-α, IL-6, CD3 and HSP27 among different inflammatory BPH groups. Conclusions HSP27 expression level is associated with the degree of chronic inflammation in BPH and may participate in the pathological process in inflammatory BPH. PMID:26434601

  6. Potential mechanisms underlying the role of chronic inflammation in age-related muscle wasting.

    PubMed

    Jo, Edward; Lee, Sang-Rok; Park, Bong-Sup; Kim, Jeong-Su

    2012-10-01

    Sarcopenia, an age-related condition characterized by progressive skeletal muscle degeneration, might exist as one of the primary clinical conditions underlying severe functional impairment as well as increased risk of co-morbidities in the elderly. Although the etiology of sarcopenia remains multifaceted, age-related chronic inflammation has been strongly implicated in muscle wasting and related sequelae during advanced age. Recent evidence suggests that aberrant, unresolved alterations in regular inflammatory processes during advanced age might ultimately operate as the link that drives skeletal muscle to become more degenerative and dysfunctional in nature. Such negative atrophic muscular outcomes might result from inflammation-induced disruption of central mechanisms regulating skeletal muscle morphology and remodeling. In addition, recent findings demonstrate an adverse confluence between sarcopenia and excessive adiposity (i.e. sarcopenic obesity), as the co-existence of such adverse alterations in body composition may exacerbate systemic inflammation and muscle wasting in the elderly. The following evidence-based review serves to examine sarcopenia from a mechanistic perspective with emphasis on chronic inflammation. PMID:22717404

  7. Eosinophilic airway inflammation: role in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    George, Leena; Brightling, Christopher E.

    2016-01-01

    The chronic lung diseases, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), are common affecting over 500 million people worldwide and causing substantial morbidity and mortality. Asthma is typically associated with Th2-mediated eosinophilic airway inflammation, in contrast to neutrophilic inflammation observed commonly in COPD. However, there is increasing evidence that the eosinophil might play an important role in 10–40% of patients with COPD. Consistently in both asthma and COPD a sputum eosinophilia is associated with a good response to corticosteroid therapy and tailored strategies aimed to normalize sputum eosinophils reduce exacerbation frequency and severity. Advances in our understanding of the multistep paradigm of eosinophil recruitment to the airway, and the consequence of eosinophilic inflammation, has led to the development of new therapies to target these molecular pathways. In this article we discuss the mechanisms of eosinophilic trafficking, the tools to assess eosinophilic airway inflammation in asthma and COPD during stable disease and exacerbations and review current and novel anti-eosinophilic treatments. PMID:26770668

  8. Eosinophilic airway inflammation: role in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    George, Leena; Brightling, Christopher E

    2016-01-01

    The chronic lung diseases, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), are common affecting over 500 million people worldwide and causing substantial morbidity and mortality. Asthma is typically associated with Th2-mediated eosinophilic airway inflammation, in contrast to neutrophilic inflammation observed commonly in COPD. However, there is increasing evidence that the eosinophil might play an important role in 10-40% of patients with COPD. Consistently in both asthma and COPD a sputum eosinophilia is associated with a good response to corticosteroid therapy and tailored strategies aimed to normalize sputum eosinophils reduce exacerbation frequency and severity. Advances in our understanding of the multistep paradigm of eosinophil recruitment to the airway, and the consequence of eosinophilic inflammation, has led to the development of new therapies to target these molecular pathways. In this article we discuss the mechanisms of eosinophilic trafficking, the tools to assess eosinophilic airway inflammation in asthma and COPD during stable disease and exacerbations and review current and novel anti-eosinophilic treatments. PMID:26770668

  9. Fatty acids and chronic low grade inflammation associated with obesity and the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Aoife A; Connaughton, Ruth M; Lyons, Claire L; McMorrow, Aoibheann M; Roche, Helen M

    2016-08-15

    The metabolic syndrome is a group of obesity associated metabolic conditions that result in increased risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Global increases in obesity rates have led to an increase in metabolic syndrome resulting in a demand for increased understanding of the mechanisms involved. This review examines the relationship between adipose tissue biology, lipid metabolism and chronic low grade inflammation relating to obesity and insulin resistance. PMID:27083551

  10. miR-155 promotes T follicular helper cell accumulation during chronic, low-grade inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ruozhen; Kagele, Dominique A; Huffaker, Thomas B; Runtsch, Marah C; Alexander, Margaret; Liu, Jin; Bake, Erin; Su, Wei; Williams, Matthew A; Rao, Dinesh S; Möller, Thomas; Garden, Gwenn A; Round, June L; O'Connell, Ryan M

    2014-10-16

    Chronic inflammation is a contributing factor to most life-shortening human diseases. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms that sustain chronic inflammatory responses remain poorly understood, making it difficult to treat this deleterious condition. Using a mouse model of age-dependent inflammation that results from a deficiency in miR-146a, we demonstrate that miR-155 contributed to the progressive inflammatory disease that emerged as Mir146a(-/-) mice grew older. Upon analyzing lymphocytes from inflamed versus healthy middle-aged mice, we found elevated numbers of T follicular helper (Tfh) cells, germinal center (GC) B cells, and autoantibodies, all occurring in a miR-155-dependent manner. Further, Cd4-cre Mir155(fl/fl) mice were generated and demonstrated that miR-155 functions in T cells, in addition to its established role in B cells, to promote humoral immunity in a variety of contexts. Taken together, our study discovers that miR-146a and miR-155 counterregulate Tfh cell development that drives aberrant GC reactions during chronic inflammation. PMID:25367574

  11. Contribution of Defective PS Recognition and Efferocytosis to Chronic Inflammation and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Kimani, Stanley Gititu; Geng, Ke; Kasikara, Canan; Kumar, Sushil; Sriram, Ganapathy; Wu, Yi; Birge, Raymond B.

    2014-01-01

    The rapid and efficient clearance of apoptotic cells results in the elimination of auto-antigens and provides a strong anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive signal to prevent autoimmunity. While professional and non-professional phagocytes utilize a wide array of surface receptors to recognize apoptotic cells, the recognition of phosphatidylserine (PS) on apoptotic cells by PS receptors on phagocytes is the emblematic signal for efferocytosis in metazoans. PS-dependent efferocytosis is associated with the production of anti-inflammatory factors such as IL-10 and TGF-β that function, in part, to maintain tolerance to auto-antigens. In contrast, when apoptotic cells fail to be recognized and processed for degradation, auto-antigens persist, such as self-nucleic acids, which can trigger immune activation leading to autoantibody production and autoimmunity. Despite the fact that genetic mouse models clearly demonstrate that loss of PS receptors can lead to age-dependent auto-immune diseases reminiscent of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the link between PS and defective clearance in chronic inflammation and human autoimmunity is not well delineated. In this perspective, we review emerging questions developing in the field that may be of relevance to SLE and human autoimmunity. PMID:25426118

  12. Immune dysregulation mediated by the oral microbiome: potential link to chronic inflammation and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Slocum, C; Kramer, C; Genco, C A

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is an inflammatory disorder characterized by the progressive formation of plaque in coronary arteries, termed atherosclerosis. It is a multifactorial disease that is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Although a number of risk factors have been associated with disease progression, the underlying inflammatory mechanisms contributing to atherosclerosis remain to be fully delineated. Within the last decade, the potential role for infection in inflammatory plaque progression has received considerable interest. Microbial pathogens associated with periodontal disease have been of particular interest due to the high levels of bacteremia that are observed after routine dental procedures and every day oral activities, such as tooth brushing. Here, we explore the potential mechanisms that may explain how periodontal pathogens either directly or indirectly elicit immune dysregulation and consequently progressive inflammation manifested as atherosclerosis. Periodontal pathogens have been shown to contribute directly to atherosclerosis by disrupting endothelial cell function, one of the earliest indicators of cardiovascular disease. Oral infection is thought to indirectly induce elevated production of inflammatory mediators in the systemic circulation. Recently, a number of studies have been conducted focusing on how disruption of the gut microbiome influences the systemic production of proinflammatory cytokines and consequently exacerbation of inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. It is clear that the immune mechanisms leading to atherosclerotic plaque progression, by oral infection, are complex. Understanding the immune pathways leading to disease progression is essential for the future development of anti-inflammatory therapies for this chronic disease. PMID:26791914

  13. Bronchial brush biopsies for studies of epithelial inflammation in stable asthma and nonobstructive chronic bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Riise, G C; Andersson, B; Ahlstedt, S; Enander, I; Söderberg, M; Löwhagen, O; Larsson, S

    1996-08-01

    Recently, bronchial brush biopsy (BBB) has been introduced as a complimentary method to bronchial forceps biopsy for the study of bronchial epithelial cells. We wanted to determine whether epithelial inflammatory cells in bronchial brush biopsies can reflect mucosal inflammation assessed indirectly by levels of cellular activation markers in bronchial lavage fluid. We studied 15 healthy controls, 11 asthmatics with regular steroid inhalation therapy, 13 asthmatics without steroids, and 10 smokers with nonobstructive chronic bronchitis. Differential counts of epithelial and inflammatory cells were made from the BBB material. Bronchial lavage levels of eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), myeloperoxidase (MPO), tryptase, hyaluronan and interleukin-8 (IL-8) were measured as indirect markers for inflammatory cell activation. We found an increased percentage of eosinophil granulocytes in the BBB from the steroid-untreated asthmatic patients (1.16%) in comparison to the other groups (0.11%, 0.09% and 0.02%, respectively; p<0.01). In the steroid-untreated asthmatic patients, the percentage of eosinophils correlated with ECP in bronchial lavage fluid (r=0.73; p<0.01), indicating that the BBB method can reflect the degree of eosinophilic activation. A negative correlation was found for the percentage of eosinophils in BBB with levels of provocative concentration of methacholine causing a 20% fall in forced expiratory volume in one second (PC20) for the asthmatic patients in the study (r= -0.67; p<0.003). The bronchial brush biopsy method appears to give information on the changes present in superficial bronchial epithelium in inflammatory airways disease. These changes appear to relate to the degree of inflammatory activity and disease severity in asthma. PMID:8866592

  14. Neutrophils confer T cell resistance to myeloid-derived suppressor cell-mediated suppression to promote chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Sean O; Johnson, Jenny L; Cobb, Brian A

    2013-05-15

    Low-grade chronic inflammation can persist in aging humans unnoticed for years or even decades, inflicting continuous damage that can culminate later in life as organ dysfunction, physical frailty, and some of the most prominent debilitating and deadly age-associated diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. Despite the near universal acceptance of these associations, the mechanisms underlying unresolved inflammation remain poorly understood. In this study, we describe a novel inducible method to examine systemic chronic inflammation using susceptible animal models. Induced inflammation results in unresolved innate cellular responses and persistence of the same serum proinflammatory molecules used as diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets for chronic inflammation in humans. Surprisingly, we found long-term persistence of an inflammation-associated neutrophil cell population constitutively producing the proinflammatory IFN-γ cytokine, which until now has only been detected transiently in acute inflammatory responses. Interestingly, these cells appear to confer T cell resistance to the otherwise potent anti-inflammatory function of myeloid-derived suppressor cells, revealing a novel mechanism for the maintenance of chronic inflammatory responses over time. This discovery represents an attractive target to resolve inflammation and prevent the inflammation-induced pathologies that are of critical concern for the well-being of the aging population. PMID:23576679

  15. Synergistic Effect of Green Tea Polyphenols and Vitamin D on Chronic Inflammation-Induced Bone Loss in Female Rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our recent study demonstrated a bone-protective role of green tea polyphenols (GTPs), extracted from green tea, in chronic inflammation-induced bone loss of female rats through reduction of inflammation and oxidative stress. This study further examines effects of GTPs in conjunction with vitamin D (...

  16. TRPV1 and TRPA1 antagonists prevent the transition of acute to chronic inflammation and pain in chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Erica S.; La, Jun-Ho; Scheff, Nicole N.; Davis, Brian M.; Albers, Kathryn M.; Gebhart, G.F.

    2013-01-01

    Visceral afferents expressing transient receptor potential channels TRPV1 and TRPA1 are thought to be required for neurogenic inflammation and development of inflammatory hyperalgesia. In a mouse model of chronic pancreatitis (CP) produced by repeated episodes (twice/wk) of caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis (AP), we studied involvement of these TRP channels in pancreatic inflammation and pain-related behaviors. Antagonists of the two TRP channels were administered at different times to block the neurogenic component of AP. Six bouts of AP (over 3 wks) increased pancreatic inflammation and pain-related behaviors, produced fibrosis, sprouting of pancreatic nerve fibers and increased TRPA1 and TRPV1 gene transcripts and a nociceptive marker, pERK, in pancreas afferent somata. Treatment with TRP antagonists, when initiated prior to week 3, decreased pancreatic inflammation and pain-related behaviors and also blocked development of histopathological changes in the pancreas and upregulation of TRPV1, TRPA1 and pERK in pancreatic afferents. Continued treatment with TRP antagonists blocked development of CP and pain behaviors even when mice were challenged with seven more weeks of twice/wk caerulein. When started after week 3, however, treatment with TRP antagonists was ineffective in blocking the transition from AP to CP and the emergence of pain behaviors. These results suggest 1) an important role for neurogenic inflammation in pancreatitis and pain-related behaviors, 2) there is transition from AP to CP, after which TRP channel antagonism is ineffective, and thus 3) that early intervention with TRP channel antagonists may effectively attenuate the transition to and development of CP. PMID:23536075

  17. Chronic Kidney Disease Influences Multiple Systems: Describing the Relationship between Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, Kidney Damage, and Concomitant Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Patrick S.; Scanlan, Aaron T.; Dalbo, Vincent J.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by increased levels of oxidative stress and inflammation. Oxidative stress and inflammation promote renal injury via damage to molecular components of the kidney. Unfortunately, relationships between inflammation and oxidative stress are cyclical in that the inflammatory processes that exist to repair radical-mediated damage may be a source of additional free radicals, resulting in further damage to renal tissue. Oxidative stress and inflammation also have the ability to become systemic, serving to injure tissues distal to the site of original insult. This review describes select mediators in the exacerbatory relationship between oxidative stress, inflammation, and CKD. This review also discusses oxidative stress, inflammation, and CKD as they pertain to the development and progression of common CKD-associated comorbidities. Lastly, the utility of several widely accessible and cost-effective lifestyle interventions and their ability to reduce oxidative stress and inflammation are discussed and recommendations for future research are provided. PMID:25861414

  18. Chronic alcohol exposure exacerbates inflammation and triggers pancreatic acinar-to-ductal metaplasia through PI3K/Akt/IKK

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, XIN; LI, XUQI; MA, QINGYONG; XU, QINHONG; DUAN, WANXING; LEI, JIANJUN; ZHANG, LUN; WU, ZHENG

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM) has been identified as an initiating event that can progress to pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) or pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Acini transdifferentiation can be induced by persistent inflammation. Notably, compelling evidence has emerged that chronic alcohol exposure may trigger an inflammatory response of macrophages/monocytes stimulated by endotoxins. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the role of inflammation induced by chronic alcohol and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure in the progression of pancreatic ADM, as well as to elucidate the possible mechanisms involved. For this purpose, cultured macrophages were exposed to varying doses of alcohol for 1 week prior to stimulation with LPS. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and regulated upon activation, normal T cell expression and secreted (RANTES) expression were upregulated in the intoxicated macrophages with activated nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Following treatment with the supernatant of intoxicated macrophages, ADM of primary acinar cells was induced. Furthermore, the expression of TNF-α and RANTES, as well as the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B(Akt)/inhibitory κB kinase (IKK) signaling pathway have been proven to be involved in the ADM of acinar cells. Moreover, Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were employed to further explore the induction of pancreatic ADM by chronic alcohol and LPS exposure in vivo. At the end of the treatment period, a number of physiological parameters, such as body weight, liver weight and pancreatic weight were reduced in the exposed rats. Plasma alcohol concentrations and oxidative stress levels in the serum, as well as TNF-α and RANTES expression in monocytes were also induced following chronic alcohol and LPS exposure. In addition, pancreatic ADM was induced through the PI3K/Akt/IKK signaling pathway by the augmented TNF-α and RANTES expression levels in the exposed rats. Overall, we

  19. IFN-γ differentially regulates subsets of Gr-1(+)CD11b(+) myeloid cells in chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xiaoxia; Fang, Yimin; Hu, Shengfeng; Wu, Yongjian; Yang, Kun; Liao, Chunxin; Zhang, Yuanqing; Huang, Xi; Wu, Minhao

    2015-08-01

    During chronic inflammation, prolonged over-reactive immune response may lead to tissue destruction, while immune suppression hinders tissue repair and pathogen elimination. Therefore, precise regulation of the immune response is needed to avoid immuno-pathology. Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) is widely used in clinical treatment of inflammatory diseases. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here, we evaluated the role of IFN-γ on CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) myeloid cell differentiation and function, using a heat-killed Mycobacterium bovis BCG-induced chronic inflammation model. After challenge with heat-killed BCG, two subpopulations of CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) myeloid cells were generated in the mouse spleen. Phenotypical, morphological and functional analysis indicated that the CD11b(+)Gr-1(high) Ly6G(high) Ly6C(low) subset was neutrophil-like myeloid-derived inducer cells (N-MDICs), which promoted T cell activation, while the other subset was CD11b(+)Gr-1(low) Ly6G(neg) Ly6C(high) monocyte-like myeloid-derived suppressor cells (M-MDSCs) that displayed extensive suppressor function. IFN-γ treatment dampened N-MDICs-mediated T cell activation through up-regulating T cell suppressive mediators, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and arginase I. While for M-MDSCs, IFN-γ reduced their suppressing activity by decreasing the arginase activity. Our study provides evidence that IFN-γ balances the over-reactive vs compromised immune response through different regulation of distinct myeloid subsets, and therefore displays significant therapeutic potential for effective immuno-therapy of chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:26021804

  20. Gut hormones: emerging role in immune activation and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Khan, W I; Ghia, J E

    2010-07-01

    Gut inflammation is characterized by mucosal recruitment of activated cells from both the innate and adaptive immune systems. In addition to immune cells, inflammation in the gut is associated with an alteration in enteric endocrine cells and various biologically active compounds produced by these cells. Although the change in enteric endocrine cells or their products is considered to be important in regulating gut physiology (motility and secretion), it is not clear whether the change plays any role in immune activation and in the regulation of gut inflammation. Due to the strategic location of enteric endocrine cells in gut mucosa, these gut hormones may play an important role in immune activation and promotion of inflammation in the gut. This review addresses the research on the interface between immune and endocrine systems in gastrointestinal (GI) pathophysiology, specifically in the context of two major products of enteric endocrine systems, namely serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine: 5-HT) and chromogranins (Cgs), in relation to immune activation and generation of inflammation. The studies reviewed in this paper demonstrate that 5-HT activates the immune cells to produce proinflammatory mediators and by manipulating the 5-HT system it is possible to modulate gut inflammation. In the case of Cgs the scenario is more complex, as this hormone has been shown to play both proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory functions. It is also possible that interaction between 5-HT and Cgs may play a role in the modulation of immune and inflammatory responses. In addition to enhancing our understanding of immunoendocrine interaction in the gut, the data generated from the these studies may have implications in understanding the role of gut hormone in the pathogenesis of both GI and non-GI inflammatory diseases which may lead ultimately to improved therapeutic strategies in inflammatory disorders. PMID:20408856

  1. Bacillus-produced surfactin attenuates chronic inflammation in atherosclerotic lesions of ApoE(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Gan, Ping; Jin, Dong; Zhao, Xiuyun; Gao, Zhenqiu; Wang, Shengying; Du, Peng; Qi, Gaofu

    2016-06-01

    Bacillus-produced surfactin can inhibit acute inflammation in vitro and in vivo. However, there is no report whether surfactin could inhibit chronic inflammation in the atherosclerotic lesions. Apoliprotein E deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice (fed on atherogenic diet) were intragastrically administered with surfactin for 9 doses, then the athero-protective effect of surfactin was determined in vivo. The results showed surfactin could induce anti-inflammatory factors such as IgA, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and interleukin (IL)-10 in the intestine. Further investigation discovered that surfactin also systemically induced CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) Tregs in spleen, which could inhibit T cells to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-γ. The IgG subclass pattern with high titer of IgG1 (Th2-type) but low titer of IgG2a (Th1-type) was also found in the surfactin-treated mice. As a result, the attenuation of chronic inflammation was observed in the surfactin-treated groups accompanying with less TNF-α but more IL-10 in the atherosclerotic lesions. Moreover, surfactin could reduce serum total cholesterol and cholesterol in low-density lipoprotein, and increase serum cholesterol in high-density lipoprotein in mice. Collectively, surfactin could significantly attenuate atherosclerotic lesions on the aorta by restoration of the delicate balance of Th1/Th2 response in mice. PMID:27082998

  2. Inflammation meets sensitization--an explanation for spontaneous nociceptor activity?

    PubMed

    Rukwied, Roman; Weinkauf, Benjamin; Main, Maurice; Obreja, Otilia; Schmelz, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Anti-nerve growth factor (anti-NGF) treatment is analgesic in chronic inflammatory pain conditions without reducing inflammation. Hypothesizing that ongoing pain induced by inflammatory mediators is increased by long term sensitization of nociceptors, we combined the non-inflammatory NGF-sensitization model with an inflammatory ultraviolet-B (UV-B) model in human volunteers. UV-B irradiation of the skin presensitized with NGF 3 weeks before intensified the pre-existing NGF hyperalgesia during the inflammatory phase of UV-B and caused spontaneous pain in about 70% of the subjects. Pain levels paralleled the intensity of UVB inflammation. Hyperalgesia recorded on a VAS (0-100) was additive after combined NGF/UV-B treatment versus single NGF or UV-B treatment for mechanical impact and tonic heat stimuli, again paralleling the intensity of the UV-B inflammation. In contrast, ratings to tonic mechanical pressure (100 kPa for 10 seconds, peak VAS 58 ± 7 vs VAS 21 ± 5 [NGF] and VAS 12 ± 3 [UV-B]) and pinprick (150 mN for 5 seconds, peak VAS 33 ± 7 vs VAS 10 ± 2 [NGF] and VAS 8 ± 3 [UV-B]) increased in a supra-additive manner. This supra-additive effect faded 24 hours after irradiation, although heat sensitization remained increased. Hyperalgesia and spontaneous pain coexisted in NGF/UV-B treated skin but did not significantly correlate (r < -0.1 at day 1 and r < 0.2 at day 3). We conclude that NGF can sensitize nociceptive endings such that inflammatory mediators may cause sufficient excitation to provoke spontaneous pain. Our results suggest that neuronal sensitization and level of inflammation represent independent therapeutic targets in chronic inflammatory pain conditions. PMID:23933233

  3. Helicobacter pylori-induced chronic inflammation causes telomere shortening of gastric mucosa by promoting PARP-1-mediated non-homologous end joining of DNA.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wei-Ping; Hou, Ming-Chih; Lan, Keng-Hsin; Li, Chung-Pin; Chao, Yee; Lin, Han-Chieh; Lee, Shou-Dong

    2016-09-15

    Helicobacter pylori infection leads to chronic gastritis and increased risk of gastric cancer. The mechanism involves chronic inflammation. We aimed to determine the mechanism by which H. pylori infection causes telomere shortening in inflammatory gastric mucosa. Gastric biopsy specimens were obtained from 20 patients with chronic gastritis or peptic ulcer caused by H. pylori infection. The specimens showed increased NF-κB and superoxide dismutase activities and elevated expressions of PARP-1 and γ-H2AX, all of which returned to normal levels after anti-H. pylori treatment, suggesting that oxidative DNA damage and PARP-1 overexpression might cause telomere shortening. In this report, we adopted DNA end joining assay and showed that H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa had increased alternative NHEJ (non-homologous end joining), implicating that telomere shortening was caused by inflammation-mediated overproduction of reactive oxygen species and PARP-1, leading to telomere shortening. PMID:27450718

  4. Breast implant (PIP), chronic inflammation and cancer: is there a connection? Case report.

    PubMed

    Gubitosi, Adelmo; Docimo, Giovanni; Ruggiero, Roberto; Esposito, Alessandro; Esposito, Emanuela; Foroni, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    The "PIP problem", in the field of the breast augmentation, represents today a surgical epidemiological emergency. The massive media coverage produced a kind of mass fear and many women are asking for explantations. A 47 y.o. female, breasts implanted with PIP devices for breast augmentation in 1998, came to our clinic asking for explantation and excisional biopsy of a 2.5 cm nodule adjacent to the upper side of the breast implant capsule. The outcome of the pathologic examination of the excised nodule was: ductal infiltrating carcinoma of the breast, medium degree of differentiation. After 7 days from the first operation the patient underwent a skin-sparing mastectomy with axillary limphadenectomy and immediate reconstruction by a submuscular placement of implant. The surgical specimen sent for pathologic examination revealed: "granulomatous inflammation by giant cells around extraneous material, lymph nodes, negative for cancer, showed extensive accumulation of foamy macrofages containing extraneous material". The findings of foreign material in granulomas and macrophages that are the primary inflammation body defense, suggest that the chronic inflammation, coming from mammary implants subject to leakage or/and osmotic shift, increase the risk of breast cancer. We therefore suggest improving the explantation/replacement of old implants. KEY WORDS: Breast cancer, Extraneous material, Immediate breast reconstruction, Inflammation, Pip Implant. PMID:23075481

  5. Chronic skin inflammation leads to bone loss by IL-17-mediated inhibition of Wnt signaling in osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Uluçkan, Özge; Jimenez, Maria; Karbach, Susanne; Jeschke, Anke; Graña, Osvaldo; Keller, Johannes; Busse, Björn; Croxford, Andrew L; Finzel, Stephanie; Koenders, Marije; van den Berg, Wim; Schinke, Thorsten; Amling, Michael; Waisman, Ari; Schett, Georg; Wagner, Erwin F

    2016-03-16

    Inflammation has important roles in tissue regeneration, autoimmunity, and cancer. Different inflammatory stimuli can lead to bone loss by mechanisms that are not well understood. We show that skin inflammation induces bone loss in mice and humans. In psoriasis, one of the prototypic IL-17A-mediated inflammatory human skin diseases, low bone formation and bone loss correlated with increased serum IL-17A levels. Similarly, in two mouse models with chronic IL-17A-mediated skin inflammation,K14-IL17A(ind)andJunB(Δep), strong inhibition of bone formation was observed, different from classical inflammatory bone loss where osteoclast activation leads to bone degradation. We show that under inflammatory conditions, skin-resident cells such as keratinocytes, γδ T cells, and innate lymphoid cells were able to express IL-17A, which acted systemically to inhibit osteoblast and osteocyte function by a mechanism involving Wnt signaling. IL-17A led to decreased Wnt signaling in vitro, and importantly, pharmacological blockade of IL-17A rescued Wnt target gene expression and bone formation in vivo. These data provide a mechanism where IL-17A affects bone formation by regulating Wnt signaling in osteoblasts and osteocytes. This study suggests that using IL-17A blocking agents in psoriasis could be beneficial against bone loss in these patients. PMID:27089206

  6. CD11c(+) monocyte/macrophages promote chronic Helicobacter hepaticus-induced intestinal inflammation through the production of IL-23.

    PubMed

    Arnold, I C; Mathisen, S; Schulthess, J; Danne, C; Hegazy, A N; Powrie, F

    2016-03-01

    In inflammatory bowel diseases, a breakdown in host microbial interactions accompanies sustained activation of immune cells in the gut. Functional studies suggest a key role for interleukin-23 (IL-23) in orchestrating intestinal inflammation. IL-23 can be produced by various mononuclear phagocytes (MNPs) following acute microbial stimulation, but little is known about the key cellular sources of IL-23 that drive chronic intestinal inflammation. Here we have addressed this question using a physiological model of bacteria-driven colitis. By combining conditional gene ablation and gene expression profiling, we found that IL-23 production by CD11c(+) MNPs was essential to trigger intestinal immunopathology and identified MHCII(+) monocytes and macrophages as the major source of IL-23. Expression of IL-23 by monocytes was acquired during their differentiation in the intestine and correlated with the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) and CD64. In contrast, Batf3-dependent CD103(+) CD11b(-) dendritic cells were dispensable for bacteria-induced colitis in this model. These studies reinforce the pathogenic role of monocytes in dysregulated responses to intestinal bacteria and identify production of IL-23 as a key component of this response. Further understanding of the functional sources of IL-23 in diverse forms of intestinal inflammation may lead to novel therapeutic strategies aimed at interrupting IL-23-driven immune pathology. PMID:26242598

  7. Frontline Science: Splenic progenitors aid in maintaining high neutrophil numbers at sites of sterile chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Jhunjhunwala, Siddharth; Alvarez, David; Aresta-DaSilva, Stephanie; Tang, Katherine; Tang, Benjamin C; Greiner, Dale L; Newburger, Peter E; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G

    2016-08-01

    Neutrophils are constantly generated from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in the bone marrow to maintain high numbers in circulation. A considerable number of neutrophils and their progenitors have been shown to be present in the spleen too; however, their exact role in this organ remains unclear. Herein, we sought to study the function of splenic neutrophils and their progenitors using a mouse model for sterile, peritoneal inflammation. In this microcapsule device implantation model, we show chronic neutrophil presence at implant sites, with recruitment from circulation as the primary mechanism for their prevalence in the peritoneal exudate. Furthermore, we demonstrate that progenitor populations in the spleen play a key role in maintaining elevated neutrophil numbers. Our results provide new insight into the role for splenic neutrophils and their progenitors and establish a model to study neutrophil function during sterile inflammation. PMID:26965635

  8. Roles of Chronic Low-Grade Inflammation in the Development of Ectopic Fat Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Mei; Yang, Shumin; Li, Qifu

    2014-01-01

    Pattern of fat distribution is a major determinant for metabolic homeostasis. As a depot of energy, the storage of triglycerides in adipose tissue contributes to the normal fat distribution. Decreased capacity of fat storage in adipose tissue may result in ectopic fat deposition in nonadipose tissues such as liver, pancreas, and kidney. As a critical biomarker of metabolic complications, chronic low-grade inflammation may have the ability to affect the process of lipid accumulation and further lead to the disorder of fat distribution. In this review, we have collected the evidence linking inflammation with ectopic fat deposition to get a better understanding of the underlying mechanism, which may provide us with novel therapeutic strategies for metabolic disorders. PMID:25143667

  9. Role of altered intestinal microbiota in systemic inflammation and cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mafra, Denise; Lobo, Julie C; Barros, Amanda F; Koppe, Laetitia; Vaziri, Nosratola D; Fouque, Denis

    2014-01-01

    The normal intestinal microbiota plays a major role in the maintenance of health and disease prevention. In fact, the alteration of the intestinal microbiota has been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of several pathological conditions, including obesity and insulin resistance, among others. Recent studies have revealed profound alterations of the gut microbial flora in patients and animals with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Alterations in the composition of the microbiome in CKD may contribute to the systemic inflammation and accumulation of gut-derived uremic toxins, which play a central role in the pathogenesis of accelerated cardiovascular disease and numerous other CKD-associated complications. This review is intended to provide a concise description of the potential role of the CKD-associated changes in the gut microbiome and its potential role the pathogenesis of inflammation and uremic toxicity. In addition, the potential efficacy of pre- and pro-biotics in the restoration of the microbiome is briefly described. PMID:24762311

  10. Chronic inflammation contributes to the development of hepatocellular carcinoma by decreasing miR-122 levels

    PubMed Central

    Li, Changfei; Deng, Mengmeng; Hu, Jun; Li, Xin; Chen, Lizhao; Ju, Ying; Hao, Junli; Meng, Songdong

    2016-01-01

    Persistent inflammation in chronic hepatitis plays a major role in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this study, the major inflammatory cytokines expressed in chronic hepatitis, IL-6 and TNF-α, induced a marked decrease in microRNA-122 (miR-122) levels, and miR-122 expression was downregulated in the livers of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients. The decrease of miR-122 caused upregulation of the proinflammatory chemokine CCL2. IL-6 and TNF-α suppressed miR-122 both by directly downregulating the transcription factor C/EBPα and indirectly upregulating c-myc, which blocks C/EBPα-mediated miR-122 transcription. In addition, IL-6 and TNF-α levels were elevated and miR-122 levels were decreased in mouse and rat models of diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-induced HCC. Restoration of miR-122 levels through delivery of agomir-122 suppressed DEN-induced hepatocarcinogenesis in mice. Our results show that inflammation-induced miR-122 downregulation in hepatitis contributes to carcinogenesis and suggest that increasing miR-122 may be an effective strategy for preventing HCC development in CHB patients. PMID:26933995

  11. Intrinsic mutagenic properties of 5-chlorocytosine: A mechanistic connection between chronic inflammation and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fedeles, Bogdan I.; Freudenthal, Bret D.; Yau, Emily; Singh, Vipender; Chang, Shiou-chi; Li, Deyu; Delaney, James C.; Wilson, Samuel H.; Essigmann, John M.

    2015-01-01

    During chronic inflammation, neutrophil-secreted hypochlorous acid can damage nearby cells inducing the genomic accumulation of 5-chlorocytosine (5ClC), a known inflammation biomarker. Although 5ClC has been shown to promote epigenetic changes, it has been unknown heretofore if 5ClC directly perpetrates a mutagenic outcome within the cell. The present work shows that 5ClC is intrinsically mutagenic, both in vitro and, at a level of a single molecule per cell, in vivo. Using biochemical and genetic approaches, we have quantified the mutagenic and toxic properties of 5ClC, showing that this lesion caused C→T transitions at frequencies ranging from 3–9% depending on the polymerase traversing the lesion. X-ray crystallographic studies provided a molecular basis for the mutagenicity of 5ClC; a snapshot of human polymerase β replicating across a primed 5ClC-containing template uncovered 5ClC engaged in a nascent base pair with an incoming dATP analog. Accommodation of the chlorine substituent in the template major groove enabled a unique interaction between 5ClC and the incoming dATP, which would facilitate mutagenic lesion bypass. The type of mutation induced by 5ClC, the C→T transition, has been previously shown to occur in substantial amounts both in tissues under inflammatory stress and in the genomes of many inflammation-associated cancers. In fact, many sequence-specific mutational signatures uncovered in sequenced cancer genomes feature C→T mutations. Therefore, the mutagenic ability of 5ClC documented in the present study may constitute a direct functional link between chronic inflammation and the genetic changes that enable and promote malignant transformation. PMID:26243878

  12. Effect of mesenchymal stem cells on inhibiting airway remodeling and airway inflammation in chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiahui; Bai, Chong; Yang, Jianming; Lou, Guoliang; Li, Qiang; Chen, Ruohua

    2013-07-01

    Previous studies proved that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) could improve a variety of immune-mediated disease by its immunomodulatory properties. In this study, we investigated the effect on airway remodeling and airway inflammation by administrating BMSCs in chronic asthmatic mice. Forty-eight female BALB/c mice were randomly distributed into PBS group, BMSCs treatment group, BMSCs control group, and asthmatic group. The levels of cytokine and immunoglobulin in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The number of CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells and morphometric analysis was determined by flow cytometry, hematoxylin-eosin, immunofluorescence staining, periodic-acid Schiff, and masson staining, respectively. We found that airway remodeling and airway inflammation were evident in asthmatic mice. Moreover, low level of IL-12 and high levels of IL-13, IL-4, OVA-specific IgG1, IgE, and IgG2a and the fewer number of CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells were present in asthmatic group. However, transplantation of BMSCs significantly decreased airway inflammation and airway remodeling and level of IL-4, OVA-specific IgE, and OVA-specific IgG1, but elevated level of IL-12 and the number of CD4 + CD25 + regulatory T cells in asthma (P < 0.05). However, BMSCs did not contribute to lung regeneration and had no significant effect on levels of IL-10, IFN-Y, and IL-13. In our study, BMSCs engraftment prohibited airway inflammation and airway remodeling in chronic asthmatic group. The beneficial effect of BMSCs might involved the modulation imbalance cytokine toward a new balance Th1-Th2 profiles and up-regulation of protective CD4 + CD25 + regulatory T cells in asthma, but not contribution to lung regeneration. PMID:23334934

  13. Intrinsic mutagenic properties of 5-chlorocytosine: A mechanistic connection between chronic inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Fedeles, Bogdan I; Freudenthal, Bret D; Yau, Emily; Singh, Vipender; Chang, Shiou-chi; Li, Deyu; Delaney, James C; Wilson, Samuel H; Essigmann, John M

    2015-08-18

    During chronic inflammation, neutrophil-secreted hypochlorous acid can damage nearby cells inducing the genomic accumulation of 5-chlorocytosine (5ClC), a known inflammation biomarker. Although 5ClC has been shown to promote epigenetic changes, it has been unknown heretofore if 5ClC directly perpetrates a mutagenic outcome within the cell. The present work shows that 5ClC is intrinsically mutagenic, both in vitro and, at a level of a single molecule per cell, in vivo. Using biochemical and genetic approaches, we have quantified the mutagenic and toxic properties of 5ClC, showing that this lesion caused C→T transitions at frequencies ranging from 3-9% depending on the polymerase traversing the lesion. X-ray crystallographic studies provided a molecular basis for the mutagenicity of 5ClC; a snapshot of human polymerase β replicating across a primed 5ClC-containing template uncovered 5ClC engaged in a nascent base pair with an incoming dATP analog. Accommodation of the chlorine substituent in the template major groove enabled a unique interaction between 5ClC and the incoming dATP, which would facilitate mutagenic lesion bypass. The type of mutation induced by 5ClC, the C→T transition, has been previously shown to occur in substantial amounts both in tissues under inflammatory stress and in the genomes of many inflammation-associated cancers. In fact, many sequence-specific mutational signatures uncovered in sequenced cancer genomes feature C→T mutations. Therefore, the mutagenic ability of 5ClC documented in the present study may constitute a direct functional link between chronic inflammation and the genetic changes that enable and promote malignant transformation. PMID:26243878

  14. Inflammation and Mechanical Stretch Promote Aortic Stiffening in Hypertension Through Activation of p38 MAP Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing; Thabet, Salim R.; Kirabo, Annet; Trott, Daniel W.; Saleh, Mohamed A.; Xiao, Liang; Madhur, Meena S.; Chen, Wei; Harrison, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Aortic stiffening commonly occurs in hypertension and further elevates systolic pressure. Hypertension is also associated with vascular inflammation and increased mechanical stretch. The interplay between inflammation, mechanical stretch and aortic stiffening in hypertension remains undefined. Objective To determine the role of inflammation and mechanical stretch in aortic stiffening. Methods and Results Chronic angiotensin II infusion caused marked aortic adventitial collagen deposition, as quantified by Masson’s Trichrome Blue staining and biochemically by hydroxyproline content, in wild-type (WT) but not in Recombination Activation Gene-1 deficient (RAG-1−/−) mice. Aortic compliance, defined by ex-vivo measurements of stress-strain curves, was reduced by chronic angiotensin II infusion in WT mice (p<0.01) but not in RAG-1−/− mice (p<0.05). Adoptive transfer of T cells to RAG-1−/− mice restored aortic collagen deposition and stiffness to values observed in WT mice. Mice lacking the T cell derived cytokine IL-17a were also protected against aortic stiffening. In additional studies, we found that blood pressure normalization by treatment with hydralazine and hydrochlorothiazide prevented angiotensin II-induced vascular T cell infiltration, aortic stiffening and collagen deposition. Finally, we found that mechanical stretch induces expression of collagen 1α1, 3α1 and 5a1 in cultured aortic fibroblasts in a p38 MAP kinase-dependent fashion, and that inhibition of p38 prevented angiotensin II-induced aortic stiffening in vivo. IL-17a also induced collagen 3a1 expression via activation of p38 MAP kinase. Conclusions Our data define a pathway in which inflammation and mechanical stretch lead to vascular inflammation that promotes collagen deposition. The resultant increase in aortic stiffness likely further worsens systolic hypertension and its attendant end-organ damage. PMID:24347665

  15. Local and systemic neutrophilic inflammation in patients with lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent investigations suggest that neutrophils play an important role in the immune response to lung cancer as well as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the amount of neutrophils and markers of their activity in lung cancer and COPD and in coexistence of these two diseases. Methods In total, 267 persons were included in the study: 139 patients with lung cancer, 55 patients with lung cancer and COPD, 40 patients with COPD, and 33 healthy subjects. Peripheral blood and BAL fluid samples were obtained for cell count analysis and determination of NE, MPO levels and ROS production. NE and MPO levels in the serum and BAL fluid were determined by ELISA. ROS production was analyzed by flow cytometer. Results The percentage, cell count of neutrophils and neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio in the peripheral blood were significantly higher in lung cancer patients with or without COPD compared to COPD patients or healthy individuals (P < 0.05). The percentage and cell count of neutrophils in BAL fluid were significantly lower in patients with lung cancer with or without COPD than in patients with COPD (P < 0.05). However, BAL fluid and serum levels of both NE and MPO were significantly higher in patients with lung cancer than COPD patients or healthy individuals (P < 0.05). Neutrophils produced higher amounts of ROS in patients with lung cancer with or without COPD compared with COPD patients or healthy individuals (P < 0.05). Conclusions The results from this study demonstrate higher degree of local and systemic neutrophilic inflammation in patients with lung cancer (with or without COPD) than in patients with COPD. PMID:23919722

  16. Mammalian Antimicrobial Peptides: Promising Therapeutic Targets Against Infection and Chronic Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Pujarini; Das, Santasabuj

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are integral components of the host innate immune system and functional throughout the plant and animal kingdoms. AMPs are short cationic molecules and lethal against a wide range of bacteria, viruses, fungi, yeast and protozoa due to their membranolytic effects on the negatively-charged microbial membranes. In addition, they exert multiple immunomodulatory roles like chemotaxis, modulation of cytokine and chemokine expression, leukocyte activation etc. Since AMPs suffer loss of microbicidal properties under serum and tissue environments, their capacity to modulate the immune system may predominates under the physiological conditions. Discovery of new antibiotics is lagging far behind the rapidly spreading drug resistance among the microorganisms. Both natural and synthetic AMPs have shown promise as 'next generation antibiotics' due to their unique mode of action, which minimises the chance of development of microbial resistance. In addition, they have therapeutic potential against non-infectious diseases like chronic inflammation and cancer. Many of the synthetic AMPs are currently undergoing clinical trials for the treatment of debilitating diseases, such as catheter-related infections, diabetic foot ulcers, chemotherapy-associated infections etc. Some of them have already entered the market as topical preparations. In this review, we synopsise the current literature of natural and synthetic AMPs in different infectious and inflammatory diseases of human microfloral habitats, especially the gastrointestinal, respiratory and genitourinary tracts and the skin. We also discuss the classification of AMPs, their mode action and antimicrobial spectrum, including the pathogen evasion mechanisms. In short, we tried to present the locus standi of AMPs in relation to human diseases and highlight the most promising synthetic peptides emerging from the clinical trials. Finally, we focused on the limitations and hurdles in terms of cost of

  17. An extended chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Chris; Phadke, Rahul; Howard, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids (CLIPPERS) is a recently described central nervous system inflammatory condition. In this case report we describe a patient initially with features consistent with this syndrome, who represented with seizures (not previously reported in this syndrome) and corresponding prominent cortical involvement on imaging (also not previously noted). Owing to diagnostic uncertainty, cerebral biopsy was performed revealing histology consistent with CLIPPERS, excluding other differentials. Following a further brainstem relapse, this patient was treated with high-dose steroids, subsequently switched to a tapering oral regime and now, azathioprine, a steroid-sparing agent. She remains well on this. PMID:24966263

  18. Leukocyte Telomere Length in Major Depression: Correlations with Chronicity, Inflammation and Oxidative Stress - Preliminary Findings

    PubMed Central

    Wolkowitz, Owen M.; Mellon, Synthia H.; Epel, Elissa S.; Lin, Jue; Dhabhar, Firdaus S.; Su, Yali; Reus, Victor I.; Rosser, Rebecca; Burke, Heather M.; Kupferman, Eve; Compagnone, Mariana; Nelson, J. Craig; Blackburn, Elizabeth H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Depression is associated with an unusually high rate of aging-related illnesses and early mortality. One aspect of “accelerated aging” in depression may be shortened leukocyte telomeres. When telomeres critically shorten, as often occurs with repeated mitoses or in response to oxidation and inflammation, cells may die. Indeed, leukocyte telomere shortening predicts early mortality and medical illnesses in non-depressed populations. We sought to determine if leukocyte telomeres are shortened in Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), whether this is a function of lifetime depression exposure and whether this is related to putative mediators, oxidation and inflammation. Methodology Leukocyte telomere length was compared between 18 unmedicated MDD subjects and 17 controls and was correlated with lifetime depression chronicity and peripheral markers of oxidation (F2-isoprostane/Vitamin C ratio) and inflammation (IL-6). Analyses were controlled for age and sex. Principal Findings The depressed group, as a whole, did not differ from the controls in telomere length. However, telomere length was significantly inversely correlated with lifetime depression exposure, even after controlling for age (p<0.05). Average telomere length in the depressed subjects who were above the median of lifetime depression exposure (≥9.2 years' cumulative duration) was 281 base pairs shorter than that in controls (p<0.05), corresponding to approximately seven years of “accelerated cell aging.” Telomere length was inversely correlated with oxidative stress in the depressed subjects (p<0.01) and in the controls (p<0.05) and with inflammation in the depressed subjects (p<0.05). Conclusions These preliminary data indicate that accelerated aging at the level of leukocyte telomeres is proportional to lifetime exposure to MDD. This might be related to cumulative exposure to oxidative stress and inflammation in MDD. This suggest that telomere shortening does not antedate depression and is

  19. Current concepts in chronic inflammatory diseases: Interactions between microbes, cellular metabolism, and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Garn, Holger; Bahn, Sabine; Baune, Bernhard T; Binder, Elisabeth B; Bisgaard, Hans; Chatila, Talal A; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Culmsee, Carsten; Dannlowski, Udo; Gay, Steffen; Gern, James; Haahtela, Tari; Kircher, Tilo; Müller-Ladner, Ulf; Neurath, Markus F; Preissner, Klaus T; Reinhardt, Christoph; Rook, Graham; Russell, Shannon; Schmeck, Bernd; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus; Steinhoff, Ulrich; van Os, Jim; Weiss, Scott; Zemlin, Michael; Renz, Harald

    2016-07-01

    Recent research indicates that chronic inflammatory diseases, including allergies and autoimmune and neuropsychiatric diseases, share common pathways of cellular and molecular dysregulation. It was the aim of the International von-Behring-Röntgen Symposium (October 16-18, 2014, in Marburg, Germany) to discuss recent developments in this field. These include a concept of biodiversity; the contribution of urbanization, lifestyle factors, and nutrition (eg, vitamin D); and new mechanisms of metabolic and immune dysregulation, such as extracellular and intracellular RNAs and cellular and mitochondrial stress. Epigenetic mechanisms contribute further to altered gene expression and therefore to the development of chronic inflammation. These novel findings provide the foundation for further development of preventive and therapeutic strategies. PMID:27373325

  20. Topical administration of hyaluronic acid in children with recurrent or chronic middle ear inflammations.

    PubMed

    Torretta, Sara; Marchisio, Paola; Rinaldi, Vittorio; Gaffuri, Michele; Pascariello, Carla; Drago, Lorenzo; Baggi, Elena; Pignataro, Lorenzo

    2016-09-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) treatment has been successfully performed in patients with recurrent upper airway infections or rhinitis. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of the topical nasal administration of an HA-based compound by investigating its effects in children with recurrent or chronic middle ear inflammations and chronic adenoiditis. A prospective, single-blind, 1:1 randomised controlled study was performed to compare otoscopy, tympanometry and pure-tone audiometry in children which received the daily topical administration of normal 0.9% sodium chloride saline solution (control group) or 9 mg of sodium hyaluronate in 3 mL of a 0.9% sodium saline solution. The final analysis was based on 116 children (49.1% boys; mean age, 62.9 ± 17.9 months): 58 in the control group and 58 in the study group. At the end of follow-up, the prevalence of patients with impaired otoscopy was significantly lower in the study group (P value = 0.024) compared to baseline but not in the control group. In comparison with baseline, the prevalence of patients with impaired tympanometry at the end of the follow-up period was significantly lower in the study group (P value = 0.047) but not in the control group. The reduction in the prevalence of patients with conductive hearing loss (CHL) (P value = 0.008) and those with moderate CHL (P value = 0.048) was significant in the study group, but not in the control group. The mean auditory threshold had also significantly improved by the end of treatment in the study group (P value = 0.004) but not in the control group. Our findings confirm the safety of intermittent treatment with a topical nasal sodium hyaluronate solution and are the first to document its beneficial effect on clinical and audiological outcomes in children with recurrent or chronic middle ear inflammations associated with chronic adenoiditis. PMID:27481884

  1. Dietary soy and tea mitigate chronic inflammation and prostate cancer via NFκB pathway in the Noble rat model

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Anna; Bruno, Richard S.; Löhr, Christiane V.; Taylor, Alan W.; Dashwood, Rodrick H.; Bray, Tammy M.; Ho, Emily

    2010-01-01

    Chronic inflammation and nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) have been implicated in prostate cancer development; thus, dietary factors that inhibit NFκB may serve as effective chemo-preventative agents. Prostate cancer risk is significantly lower in Asian countries compared to the US, which has prompted interest in the potential chemopreventative action of Asian dietary components such as soy and green tea. This study examined the effects of dietary soy and tea on NFκB activation and inflammation in vivo using a hormone-induced rat model for prostate cancer. Male Noble rats implanted with estradiol and testosterone were divided into 4 dietary groups: control, soy, tea, or soy+ tea. NFκB activation and inflammatory cytokines were measured post implantation. The combination of soy and tea suppressed NFκB p50 binding activity and protein levels via induction of IκBα. Soy and tea also decreased prostate inflammatory infiltration, increased Bax/BcL2 ratio, and decreased protein expression of TNFα, IL-6 and IL1-β compared to control. Soy and tea attenuated prostate malignancy by decreasing prostate hyperplasia. These effects were not apparent in groups treated with soy or tea alone. The ongoing in vivo studies thus far suggest that combination of foods, such as soy and tea, may inhibit hormone-induced pro-inflammatory NFκB signals that contribute to prostate cancer development. PMID:20801632

  2. Functional up-regulation of Nav1.8 sodium channel in Aβ afferent fibers subjected to chronic peripheral inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Functional alterations in the properties of Aβ afferent fibers may account for the increased pain sensitivity observed under peripheral chronic inflammation. Among the voltage-gated sodium channels involved in the pathophysiology of pain, Nav1.8 has been shown to participate in the peripheral sensitization of nociceptors. However, to date, there is no evidence for a role of Nav1.8 in controlling Aβ-fiber excitability following persistent inflammation. Methods Distribution and expression of Nav1.8 in dorsal root ganglia and sciatic nerves were qualitatively or quantitatively assessed by immunohistochemical staining and by real time-polymerase chain reaction at different time points following complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) administration. Using a whole-cell patch-clamp configuration, we further determined both total INa and TTX-R Nav1.8 currents in large-soma dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons isolated from sham or CFA-treated rats. Finally, we analyzed the effects of ambroxol, a Nav1.8-preferring blocker on the electrophysiological properties of Nav1.8 currents and on the mechanical sensitivity and inflammation of the hind paw in CFA-treated rats. Results Our findings revealed that Nav1.8 is up-regulated in NF200-positive large sensory neurons and is subsequently anterogradely transported from the DRG cell bodies along the axons toward the periphery after CFA-induced inflammation. We also demonstrated that both total INa and Nav1.8 peak current densities are enhanced in inflamed large myelinated Aβ-fiber neurons. Persistent inflammation leading to nociception also induced time-dependent changes in Aβ-fiber neuron excitability by shifting the voltage-dependent activation of Nav1.8 in the hyperpolarizing direction, thus decreasing the current threshold for triggering action potentials. Finally, we found that ambroxol significantly reduces the potentiation of Nav1.8 currents in Aβ-fiber neurons observed following intraplantar CFA injection and

  3. [Characteristics of bronchial inflammation in children with chronic non-productive cough].

    PubMed

    Bunu, Carmen; Vancea, Dorin; Păunescu, Virgil

    2003-01-01

    The aim of study was to correlate the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell subpopulations in light microscopy and clinical-functional parameters in 20 children with chronic nonproductive cough (potentially evolving to asthma) in comparison with 20 children with mild and moderate stable asthma. The results revealed a different BAL cell profile of chronic coughing children, characterized by a lower percent of total cells (0.279 +/- 0.055 x 10(6)/ml), eosinophils (0.97 +/- 0.80%), lymphocytes (6.02 +/- 0.85%) and epithelial cells (28.52 +/- 5.15%) and higher percent of macrophages (46.05 +/- 7.94%) and neutrophils (18.27 +/- 4.93%). Eosinophilic inflammation in BAL and bronchial hyper-responsiveness (PC20 methacholine = 1.73 +/- 0.15 mg/ml) were revealed in three cases with chronic cough. Based on these reasons, they were included in "cough variant asthma". In conclusion, children with nonproductive chronic cough represent a heterogenous group, with different underlying causes. Only a minority of these patients has "cough variant asthma", with a favorable response to inhaled corticotherapy. PMID:14702696

  4. Association of Mucosal Organisms with Patterns of Inflammation in Chronic Rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Chalermwatanachai, Thanit; Zhang, Nan; Holtappels, Gabriele; Bachert, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic rhinosinusitis is a multifactorial process disease in which bacterial infection or colonization may play an important role in the initiation or persistence of inflammatory response. The association between mucosal bacteria presence and inflammatory patterns has only been partially explored. Objective To demonstrate specific mucosal microorganisms possible association with inflammatory patterns. Methods We collected nasal polyps or sinus tissues from a clinical selection of six patient groups with defined sinus disease using tissue biomarkers. In the tissues, we detected bacteria using peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH). Results After reviewing a total of 115 samples (15–20 samples per group), the mucosal presence of Staphylococcus aureus was correlated with IL-5 and SE-IgE positive chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps and nasal polyps from cystic fibrosis patients. Chronic rhinosinusitis without nasal polyps with TNFα >20 pg/ml was associated with the mucosal presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Conclusion This study identifies the relationship between intramucosal microbes and inflammatory patterns, suggesting that bacteria may affect the type of inflammation in chronic rhinosinusitis. Additional investigation is needed to further identify the nature of the relationship. PMID:26275068

  5. Inflammation activation and resolution in human tendon disease

    PubMed Central

    Dakin, Stephanie G; Martinez, Fernando O; Yapp, Clarence; Wells, Graham; Oppermann, Udo; Dean, Benjamin JF; Smith, Richard DJ; Wheway, Kim; Watkins, Bridget; Roche, Lucy; Carr, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Improved understanding of the role of inflammation in tendon disease is required to facilitate therapeutic target discovery. We studied supraspinatus tendons from patients experiencing pain before and after surgical subacromial decompression treatment. Tendons were classified as having early, intermediate or advanced disease and inflammation was characterized through activation of pathways mediated by Interferon, NF-κB, glucocorticoid receptor and STAT-6. Inflammation signatures revealed expression of genes and proteins induced by Interferon and NF-κB in early stage disease and genes and proteins induced by STAT-6 and glucocorticoid receptor activation in advanced stage disease. The pro-resolving proteins FPR2/ALX and ChemR23 were increased in early stage disease compared to intermediate-advanced stage disease. Patients who were pain-free post-treatment had tendons with increased expression of CD206 and ALOX15 mRNA compared to tendons from patients who continued to experience pain post-treatment, suggesting that these genes and their pathways may moderate tendon pain. Stromal cells from diseased tendons cultured in vitro showed increased expression of NF-κB and Interferon target genes after treatment with lipopolysaccharide or IFNγ compared to stromal cells derived from healthy tendons. We identified 15-epi Lipoxin A4, a stable lipoxin metabolite derived from aspirin treatment, as potentially beneficial in the resolution of tendon inflammation. PMID:26511510

  6. Diet and Inflammation in Alzheimer's Disease and Related Chronic Diseases: A Review.

    PubMed

    Gardener, Samantha L; Rainey-Smith, Stephanie R; Martins, Ralph N

    2015-12-01

    Inflammation is one of the pathological features of the neurodegenerative disease, Alzheimer's disease (AD). A number of additional disorders are likewise associated with a state of chronic inflammation, including obesity, cardiovascular disease, and type-2 diabetes, which are themselves risk factors for AD. Dietary components have been shown to modify the inflammatory process at several steps of the inflammatory pathway. This review aims to evaluate the published literature on the effect of consumption of pro- or anti-inflammatory dietary constituents on the severity of both AD pathology and related chronic diseases, concentrating on the dietary constituents of flavonoids, spices, and fats. Diet-based anti-inflammatory components could lead to the development of potent novel anti-inflammatory compounds for a range of diseases. However, further work is required to fully characterize the therapeutic potential of such compounds, including gaining an understanding of dose-dependent relationships and limiting factors to effectiveness. Nutritional interventions utilizing anti-inflammatory foods may prove to be a valuable asset in not only delaying or preventing the development of age-related neurodegenerative diseases such as AD, but also treating pre-existing conditions including type-2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and obesity. PMID:26682690

  7. Low-grade chronic inflammation perpetuated by modern diet as a promoter of obesity and osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Ilich, Jasminka Z; Kelly, Owen J; Kim, Youjin; Spicer, Maria T

    2014-06-01

    Some of the universal characteristics of pre-agricultural hominin diets are strikingly different from the modern human diet. Hominin dietary choices were limited to wild plant and wild animal foods, while the modern diet includes more than 70 % of energy consumed from refined sugars, refined vegetable oils, and highly processed cereals and dairy products. The modern diet, with higher intake of fat has also resulted in a higher ratio of omega-6 (n-6) to omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), contributing to low-grade chronic inflammation (LGCI) and thus promoting the development of many chronic diseases, including obesity and osteoporosis. In this review, we describe the changes in modern diet, focusing on the kind and amount of consumed fat; explain the shortcomings of the modern diet with regard to inflammatory processes; and delineate the reciprocity between adiposity and inflammatory processes, with inflammation being a common link between obesity and osteoporosis. We present the evidence that overconsumption of n-6 PUFA coupled with under-consumption of n-3 PUFA results in LGCI and, along with the increased presence of reactive oxygen species, leads to a shift in mesenchymal stem cells (precursors for both osteoblasts and adipocytes) lineage commitment toward increased adipogenesis and suppressed osteoblastogenesis. In turn, high n-6 to n-3 PUFA ratios in the modern diet, coupled with increased synthesis of pro-inflammatory cytokines due to adiposity, propagate obesity and osteoporosis by increasing or maintaining LGCI. PMID:24945416

  8. Impact of daily cooling treatment on skin inflammation in patients with chronic venous disease

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Martina; King, Dana E.; Madisetti, Mohan; Prentice, Margie

    2015-01-01

    People with chronic venous disease are at high risk for developing venous leg ulcers. Inflammation is posited as a pathological factor for this chronic condition as evidenced by persistently elevated skin temperature. As part of a larger trial to test the effects of a cooling regimen on leg ulcer prevention, the objective of this preliminary study was to evaluate the first 30 days of intense daily cooling. Compared to a placebo control cuff, a gel cuff applied to the most severely affected lower leg skin for 30 minutes daily showed no statistically significant differences between temperatures taken in the home at baseline compared to those measured at the 1 month follow up visit. There were also no differences in temperatures noted between the two groups, although the temperatures in the treatment group were lower 30 minutes after treatment, an indication of adherence. There was no discernable decrease or increase in temperature at a given time point during the 30 day treatment period compared to the control group. It may be better to have patients monitor skin temperature on a daily basis and then apply the cuff as necessary, rather than requiring daily cooling based on baseline measurement. This “prn” approach may provide a sufficient cooling milieu to prevent escalation of inflammation and thwart ulcer occurrence or recurrence. Clinical trials registration #NCT01509599 PMID:25703058

  9. IL-32: A Novel Pluripotent Inflammatory Interleukin, towards Gastric Inflammation, Gastric Cancer, and Chronic Rhino Sinusitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A vast variety of nonstructural proteins have been studied for their key roles and involvement in a number of biological phenomenona. Interleukin-32 is a novel cytokine whose presence has been confirmed in most of the mammals except rodents. The IL-32 gene was identified on human chromosome 16 p13.3. The gene has eight exons and nine splice variants, namely, IL-32α, IL-32β, IL-32γ, IL-32δ, IL-32ε, IL-32ζ, IL-32η, IL-32θ, and IL-32s. It was found to induce the expression of various inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β as well as macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) and has been reported previously to be involved in the pathogenesis and progression of a number of inflammatory disorders, namely, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), gastric inflammation and cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In the current review, we have highlighted the involvement of IL-32 in gastric cancer, gastric inflammation, and chronic rhinosinusitis. We have also tried to explore various mechanisms suspected to induce the expression of this extraordinary cytokine as well as various mechanisms of action employed by IL-32 during the mediation and progression of the above said problems. PMID:27143819

  10. Diethylcarbamazine Reduces Chronic Inflammation and Fibrosis in Carbon Tetrachloride- (CCl4-) Induced Liver Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Sura Wanessa Santos; de França, Maria Eduarda Rocha; Rodrigues, Gabriel Barros; Barbosa, Karla Patrícia Sousa; Nunes, Ana Karolina Santana; Pastor, André Filipe; Oliveira, Anne Gabrielle Vasconcelos; Oliveira, Wilma Helena; Luna, Rayana Leal Almeida; Peixoto, Christina Alves

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of DEC on the CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity in C57BL/6 mice. Chronic inflammation was induced by i.p. administration of CCl4 0.5 μL/g of body weight through two injections a week for 6 weeks. DEC (50 mg/kg) was administered by gavage for 12 days before finishing the CCl4 induction. Histological analyses of the DEC-treated group exhibited reduced inflammatory process and prevented liver necrosis and fibrosis. Immunohistochemical and immunofluorescence analyses of the DEC-treated group showed reduced COX-2, IL1β, MDA, TGF-β, and αSMA immunopositivity, besides exhibiting decreased IL1β, COX-2, NFκB, IFNγ, and TGFβ expressions in the western blot analysis. The DEC group enhanced significantly the IL-10 expression. The reduction of hepatic injury in the DEC-treated group was confirmed by the COX-2 and iNOS mRNA expression levels. Based on the results of the present study, DEC can be used as a potential anti-inflammatory drug for chronic hepatic inflammation. PMID:25374445

  11. Investigation of the effect of traditional Chinese medicine on pain and inflammation in chronic nonbacterial prostatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y-J; Song, G-H; Liu, G T

    2016-08-01

    According to traditional Chinese medicine, the symptoms of chronic nonbacterial prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CNP/CPPS) may be treated using a cocktail of herbs that stimulate blood circulation ('activating blood circulation formula'). We investigated the effect of three doses of this formula on a rat model of CNP/CPPS. Male Wistar rats were injected with a saline extract of male sex accessory glands on days 0 and 30 to induce prostatitis and then treated daily by gavage between days 32 and 60. Treatment with low, medium and high doses of activating blood circulation formula resulted in an almost total rescue of paw withdrawal threshold at day 60, and treatment with the highest dose also significantly decreased prostate inflammation (assessed histopathologically). We further observed elevated serum prostaglandin E2 levels in the CNP/CPPS model which decreased upon high-dose treatment, and increased Cox-2 expression in the prostate and spinal cord dorsal horn which was rescued in both tissues in the high-dose group and in the prostate in the medium-dose group. These results shed light on a possible mechanism by which activating blood circulation therapy may alleviate pain in a rat model of CNP/CPPS by downregulating Cox-2 expression in the spinal cord, thereby raising the pain threshold. Further research will be needed to fully characterise the mechanism by which activating blood circulation therapy produces this therapeutic effect. PMID:26840892

  12. Inflammation as a Risk of Developing Chronic Kidney Disease in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kochi, Masako; Kohagura, Kentaro; Shiohira, Yoshiki; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Ohya, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Objective The relationship between chronic inflammation and the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) remained not-clear in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study aims to examine the relationship between persistently high C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, and the incidence of CKD in RA. Methods We retrospectively examined the relationship between the levels of CRP and incidence of CKD in 345 RA patients. The outcome of interest was incidence of CKD, defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 and/or positive dipstick testing for proteinuria for ≥3 months. We defined high CRP, as >3.0 mg/L. On the basis of three measurements of CRP for 6-months period, patients were divided into three groups: group 1, including patients with no high CRP values; group 2, patients with transient high CRP values (once or twice) and group 3, patients with persistently high CRP values. Results During a median follow-up period of 89 months, 14% of all patients developed CKD. The cumulative incidence of CKD was 7% in group 1, 14% in group 2 and 22% in group 3 (P = 0.008, log-rank test). In a multivariate analysis, including classical risk factors for CKD, persistently high CRP was an independent predictor of the incidence of CKD (hazard ratio, 3.00; 95% confidence interval, 1.23–8.53; P = 0.01). Conclusions Persistently high CRP was a significant risk factor for the incidence of CKD. Results suggest that persistent inflammation is a marker for the high risk of CKD in RA. PMID:27537204

  13. Absence of seizures in Rasmussen encephalitis with active inflammation.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Debopam; Gokden, Murat; Albert, Gregory W

    2016-06-01

    Severe focal motor epilepsy is considered a clinical hallmark of Rasmussen encephalitis (RE). The authors report a 6-year-old girl with progressive right sided hemiparesis, loss of language skills, left sided hemispheric atrophy, and brain pathologic features characteristic for RE. The patient did not experience seizures over a 2year period after symptom onset and for several months during follow-up. This report expands the clinical spectrum of RE and suggests that seizures are not a universal symptom of RE. Our patient's quite remarkable neurologic deficits along with active inflammation in the absence of epilepsy supports that, at least in some individuals, unilateral hemispheric progressive inflammation can occur without active seizure activity. PMID:26775150

  14. Role of the Toll Like receptor (TLR) radical cycle in chronic inflammation: possible treatments targeting the TLR4 pathway.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Kurt; Maes, Michael

    2013-08-01

    Activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) complex, a receptor of the innate immune system, may underpin the pathophysiology of many human diseases, including asthma, cardiovascular disorder, diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndrome, autoimmune disorders, neuroinflammatory disorders, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, autism, clinical depression, chronic fatigue syndrome, alcohol abuse, and toluene inhalation. TLRs are pattern recognition receptors that recognize damage-associated molecular patterns and pathogen-associated molecular patterns, including lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from gram-negative bacteria. Here we focus on the environmental factors, which are known to trigger TLR4, e.g., ozone, atmosphere particulate matter, long-lived reactive oxygen intermediate, pentachlorophenol, ionizing radiation, and toluene. Activation of the TLR4 pathways may cause chronic inflammation and increased production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) and oxidative and nitrosative stress and therefore TLR-related diseases. This implies that drugs or substances that modify these pathways may prevent or improve the abovementioned diseases. Here we review some of the most promising drugs and agents that have the potential to attenuate TLR-mediated inflammation, e.g., anti-LPS strategies that aim to neutralize LPS (synthetic anti-LPS peptides and recombinant factor C) and TLR4/MyD88 antagonists, including eritoran, CyP, EM-163, epigallocatechin-3-gallate, 6-shogaol, cinnamon extract, N-acetylcysteine, melatonin, and molecular hydrogen. The authors posit that activation of the TLR radical (ROS/RNS) cycle is a common pathway underpinning many "civilization" disorders and that targeting the TLR radical cycle may be an effective method to treat many inflammatory disorders. PMID:23436141

  15. The Changes of Energy Interactions between Nucleus Function and Mitochondria Functions Causing Transmutation of Chronic Inflammation into Cancer Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ponizovskiy, Michail R

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between nucleus and mitochondria functions induce the mechanism of maintenance stability of cellular internal energy according to the first law of thermodynamics in able-bodied cells and changes the mechanisms of maintenance stability of cellular internal energy creating a transition stationary state of ablebodied cells into quasi-stationary pathologic states of acute inflammation transiting then into chronic inflammation and then transmuting into cancer metabolism. The mechanisms' influences of intruding etiologic pathologic agents (microbe, virus, etc.) lead to these changes of energy interactions between nucleus and mitochondria functions causing general acute inflammation, then passing into local chronic inflammation, and reversing into cancer metabolism transmutation. Interactions between biochemical processes and biophysical processes of cellular capacitors' operations create a supplementary mechanism of maintenance stability of cellular internal energy in the norm and in pathology. Discussion of some scientific works eliminates doubts of the authors of these works. PMID:27480780

  16. T cells are necessary for ILC2 activation in house dust mite-induced allergic airway inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Bobby W S; de Bruijn, Marjolein J W; Tindemans, Irma; Lukkes, Melanie; KleinJan, Alex; Hoogsteden, Henk C; Hendriks, Rudi W

    2016-06-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammation of the airways mediated by an adaptive type 2 immune response. Upon allergen exposure, group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) can be rapidly activated and represent an early innate source of IL-5 and IL-13. Here, we used a house dust mite (HDM)-driven asthma mouse model to study the induction of ILC2s in allergic airway inflammation. In BALF, lungs, and lymph nodes, ILC2 activation is critically dependent on prior sensitization with HDM. Importantly, T cells are required for ILC2 induction, whereby T-cell activation precedes ILC2 induction. During HDM-driven allergic airway inflammation the accumulation of ILC2s in BALF is IL-33 independent, although infiltrating ILC2s produce less cytokines in Il33(-/-) mice. Transfer of in vitro polarized OVA-specific OT-II Th2 cells alone or in combination with Th17 cells followed by OVA and HDM challenge is not sufficient to induce ILC2, despite significant eosinophilic inflammation and T-cell activation. In this asthma model, ILC2s are therefore not an early source of Th2 cytokines, but rather contribute to type 2 inflammation in which Th2 cells play a key role. Taken together, ILC2 induction in HDM-mediated allergic airway inflammation in mice critically depends on activation of T cells. PMID:27062360

  17. Impaired Resolution of Inflammation in the Endoglin Heterozygous Mouse Model of Chronic Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Madonna R.; Sotov, Valentin; Douda, David N.; Ardelean, Daniela S.; Khan, Meraj A.; Robertson, Susan J.; Philpott, Dana J.

    2014-01-01

    Endoglin is a coreceptor of the TGF-β superfamily predominantly expressed on the vascular endothelium and selective subsets of immune cells. We previously demonstrated that Endoglin heterozygous (Eng+/−) mice subjected to dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) developed persistent gut inflammation and pathological angiogenesis. We now report that colitic Eng+/− mice have low colonic levels of active TGF-β1, which was associated with reduced expression of thrombospondin-1, an angiostatic factor known to activate TGF-β1. We also demonstrate dysregulated expression of BMPER and follistatin, which are extracellular regulators of the TGF-β superfamily that modulate angiogenesis and inflammation. Heightened colonic levels of the neutrophil chemoattractant and proangiogenic factor, CXCL1, were also observed in DSS-treated Eng+/− mice. Interestingly, despite increased macrophage and neutrophil infiltration, a gut-specific reduction in expression of the key phagocytic respiratory burst enzymes, NADPH oxidase 2 (Nox-2) and myeloperoxidase, was seen in Eng+/− mice undergoing persistent inflammation. Taken together, these findings suggest that endoglin is required for TGF-β superfamily mediated resolution of inflammation and fully functional myeloid cells. PMID:25114380

  18. Prophylactic liraglutide treatment prevents amyloid plaque deposition, chronic inflammation and memory impairment in APP/PS1 mice.

    PubMed

    McClean, Paula L; Jalewa, Jaishree; Hölscher, Christian

    2015-10-15

    Type 2 diabetes is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previously, we have shown that the diabetes drug liraglutide is protective in middle aged and in old APP/PS1 mice. Here, we show that liraglutide has prophylactic properties. When injecting liraglutide once-daily ip. in two months old mice for 8 months, the main hallmarks of AD were much reduced. Memory formation in object recognition and Morris water maze were normalised and synapse loss and the loss of synaptic plasticity was prevented. In addition, amyloid plaque load, including dense core congophilic plaques, was much reduced. Chronic inflammation (activated microglia) was also reduced in the cortex, and neurogenesis was enhanced in the dentate gyrus. The results demonstrate that liraglutide may protect from progressive neurodegeneration that develops in AD. The drug is currently in clinical trials in patients with AD. PMID:26205827

  19. High dietary fiber intake is associated with decreased inflammation and all-cause mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Raj Krishnamurthy, Vidya M.; Wei, Guo; Baird, Bradley C.; Murtaugh, Maureen; Chonchol, Michel B.; Raphael, Kalani L.; Greene, Tom; Beddhu, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is considered an inflammatory state and a high fiber intake is associated with decreased inflammation in the general population. Here, we determined whether fiber intake is associated with decreased inflammation and mortality in chronic kidney disease, and whether kidney disease modifies the associations of fiber intake with inflammation and mortality. To do this, we analyzed data from 14,543 participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III. The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 60 ml/min per 1.73 m2) was 5.8%. For each 10-g/day increase in total fiber intake, the odds of elevated serum C-reactive protein levels were decreased by 11% and 38% in those without and with kidney disease, respectively. Dietary total fiber intake was not significantly associated with mortality in those without but was inversely related to mortality in those with kidney disease. The relationship of total fiber with inflammation and mortality differed significantly in those with and without kidney disease. Thus, high dietary total fiber intake is associated with lower risk of inflammation and mortality in kidney disease and these associations are stronger in magnitude in those with kidney disease. Interventional trials are needed to establish the effects of fiber intake on inflammation and mortality in kidney disease. PMID:22012132

  20. Calcineurin inhibitors cyclosporine A and tacrolimus induce vascular inflammation and endothelial activation through TLR4 signaling.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues-Diez, Raquel; González-Guerrero, Cristian; Ocaña-Salceda, Carlos; Rodrigues-Diez, Raúl R; Egido, Jesús; Ortiz, Alberto; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Ramos, Adrián M

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of the calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) cyclosporine and tacrolimus greatly reduced the rate of allograft rejection, although their chronic use is marred by a range of side effects, among them vascular toxicity. In transplant patients, it is proved that innate immunity promotes vascular injury triggered by ischemia-reperfusion damage, atherosclerosis and hypertension. We hypothesized that activation of the innate immunity and inflammation may contribute to CNI toxicity, therefore we investigated whether TLR4 mediates toxic responses of CNIs in the vasculature. Cyclosporine and tacrolimus increased the production of proinflammatory cytokines and endothelial activation markers in cultured murine endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells as well as in ex vivo cultures of murine aortas. CNI-induced proinflammatory events were prevented by pharmacological inhibition of TLR4. Moreover, CNIs were unable to induce inflammation and endothelial activation in aortas from TLR4(-/-) mice. CNI-induced cytokine and adhesion molecules synthesis in endothelial cells occurred even in the absence of calcineurin, although its expression was required for maximal effect through upregulation of TLR4 signaling. CNI-induced TLR4 activity increased O2(-)/ROS production and NF-κB-regulated synthesis of proinflammatory factors in cultured as well as aortic endothelial and VSMCs. These data provide new insight into the mechanisms associated with CNI vascular inflammation. PMID:27295076

  1. Calcineurin inhibitors cyclosporine A and tacrolimus induce vascular inflammation and endothelial activation through TLR4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues-Diez, Raquel; González-Guerrero, Cristian; Ocaña-Salceda, Carlos; Rodrigues-Diez, Raúl R.; Egido, Jesús; Ortiz, Alberto; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Ramos, Adrián M.

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of the calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) cyclosporine and tacrolimus greatly reduced the rate of allograft rejection, although their chronic use is marred by a range of side effects, among them vascular toxicity. In transplant patients, it is proved that innate immunity promotes vascular injury triggered by ischemia-reperfusion damage, atherosclerosis and hypertension. We hypothesized that activation of the innate immunity and inflammation may contribute to CNI toxicity, therefore we investigated whether TLR4 mediates toxic responses of CNIs in the vasculature. Cyclosporine and tacrolimus increased the production of proinflammatory cytokines and endothelial activation markers in cultured murine endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells as well as in ex vivo cultures of murine aortas. CNI-induced proinflammatory events were prevented by pharmacological inhibition of TLR4. Moreover, CNIs were unable to induce inflammation and endothelial activation in aortas from TLR4−/− mice. CNI-induced cytokine and adhesion molecules synthesis in endothelial cells occurred even in the absence of calcineurin, although its expression was required for maximal effect through upregulation of TLR4 signaling. CNI-induced TLR4 activity increased O2−/ROS production and NF-κB-regulated synthesis of proinflammatory factors in cultured as well as aortic endothelial and VSMCs. These data provide new insight into the mechanisms associated with CNI vascular inflammation. PMID:27295076

  2. Predomination of IL-17-producing tryptase-positive/chymase-positive mast cells in azoospermic chronic testicular inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chen, S-J; Duan, Y-G; Haidl, G; Allam, J-P

    2016-08-01

    Chronic testicular inflammation and infection have been regarded as important factors in the pathogenesis of azoospermia. As key effector cells in innate and adaptive immune system, mast cells (MCs) were observed in inflammation and autoimmune disease. Furthermore, increased expression of tryptase-positive MCs has been reported in testicular disorders associated with male infertility/subfertility. However, little is known about the potential relationship between MCs and chronic testicular inflammation in azoospermic patients. Moreover, the preferential expression of MCs' subtypes in testis of these patients is still far from being understood. Thus, this study aimed to investigate characteristics of testicular MCs as well as their subtypes in azoospermic men with chronic testicular inflammation (AZI, n = 5) by immunohistochemical techniques. Our results showed significant increase of MCs in AZI, and more importantly, considerable numbers of tryptase-positive/chymase-positive MCs could also be demonstrated in AZI, when compared to control groups representing azoospermia without chronic testicular inflammation (AZW, n = 5) and normal spermatogenesis (NT, n = 5) respectively. Most interestingly, immunofluorescence staining revealed autoimmune-associated interleukin (IL)-17-producing MCs in AZI, whereas co-expression of MC markers with tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-10 and IL-1β could not be detected. In conclusion, AZI is associated with significant increase of tryptase-positive/chymase-positive MCs expressing IL-17, and these MCs might contribute to the pathogenesis of AZI. PMID:26420243

  3. Influence of Hepatic Inflammation on FibroScan Findings in Diagnosing Fibrosis in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xianghua; Xu, Cheng; He, Dengming; Zhang, Huiyan; Xia, Jie; Shi, Dairong; Kong, Lingjun; He, Xiaoqin; Wang, Yuming

    2015-06-01

    Hepatic inflammation may affect the performance of FibroScan. This prospective study investigated the influence of hepatic inflammation on liver stiffness measurement (LSM) values by assessing FibroScan and liver biopsy findings in 325 patients with chronic hepatitis B. Liver fibrosis and inflammation were classified into five stages (S0-S4) and grades (G0-G4) according to the Scheuer scoring system. LSM values were correlated with fibrosis stage and inflammation grade (r = 0.479, p < 0.001, and r = 0.522, p < 0.001, respectively). Although LSM values increased in parallel with inflammation grade, no significant differences were found between patients with significant fibrosis (S2-S4) (p > 0.05). For inflammation grades G0, G1, G2 and G3, areas under receiver operating characteristic curves of FibroScan for significant fibrosis were 0.8267 (p < 0.001), 0.6956 (p < 0.001), 0.709 (p = 0.0012) and 0.6947 (p = 0.137), respectively. Inflammation has a significant influence on LSM values in patients with chronic hepatitis B with mild fibrosis, but not in those with significant fibrosis. PMID:25724309

  4. HIV Impairs Lung Epithelial Integrity and Enters the Epithelium to Promote Chronic Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Fernanda; Mandke, Pooja; Chau, Eric; Aggarwal, Neil R.; D’Alessio, Franco R.; Lambert, Allison A.; Kirk, Gregory; Blankson, Joel; Drummond, M. Bradley; Tsibris, Athe M.

    2016-01-01

    Several clinical studies show that individuals with HIV are at an increased risk for worsened lung function and for the development of COPD, although the mechanism underlying this increased susceptibility is poorly understood. The airway epithelium, situated at the interface between the external environment and the lung parenchyma, acts as a physical and immunological barrier that secretes mucins and cytokines in response to noxious stimuli which can contribute to the pathobiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We sought to determine the effects of HIV on the lung epithelium. We grew primary normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells and primary lung epithelial cells isolated from bronchial brushings of patients to confluence and allowed them to differentiate at an air- liquid interface (ALI) to assess the effects of HIV on the lung epithelium. We assessed changes in monolayer permeability as well as the expression of E-cadherin and inflammatory modulators to determine the effect of HIV on the lung epithelium. We measured E-cadherin protein abundance in patients with HIV compared to normal controls. Cell associated HIV RNA and DNA were quantified and the p24 viral antigen was measured in culture supernatant. Surprisingly, X4, not R5, tropic virus decreased expression of E-cadherin and increased monolayer permeability. While there was some transcriptional regulation of E-cadherin, there was significant increase in lysosome-mediated protein degradation in cells exposed to X4 tropic HIV. Interaction with CXCR4 and viral fusion with the epithelial cell were required to induce the epithelial changes. X4 tropic virus was able to enter the airway epithelial cells but not replicate in these cells, while R5 tropic viruses did not enter the epithelial cells. Significantly, X4 tropic HIV induced the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). We demonstrate that HIV can enter airway

  5. HIV Impairs Lung Epithelial Integrity and Enters the Epithelium to Promote Chronic Lung Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Brune, Kieran A; Ferreira, Fernanda; Mandke, Pooja; Chau, Eric; Aggarwal, Neil R; D'Alessio, Franco R; Lambert, Allison A; Kirk, Gregory; Blankson, Joel; Drummond, M Bradley; Tsibris, Athe M; Sidhaye, Venkataramana K

    2016-01-01

    Several clinical studies show that individuals with HIV are at an increased risk for worsened lung function and for the development of COPD, although the mechanism underlying this increased susceptibility is poorly understood. The airway epithelium, situated at the interface between the external environment and the lung parenchyma, acts as a physical and immunological barrier that secretes mucins and cytokines in response to noxious stimuli which can contribute to the pathobiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We sought to determine the effects of HIV on the lung epithelium. We grew primary normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells and primary lung epithelial cells isolated from bronchial brushings of patients to confluence and allowed them to differentiate at an air- liquid interface (ALI) to assess the effects of HIV on the lung epithelium. We assessed changes in monolayer permeability as well as the expression of E-cadherin and inflammatory modulators to determine the effect of HIV on the lung epithelium. We measured E-cadherin protein abundance in patients with HIV compared to normal controls. Cell associated HIV RNA and DNA were quantified and the p24 viral antigen was measured in culture supernatant. Surprisingly, X4, not R5, tropic virus decreased expression of E-cadherin and increased monolayer permeability. While there was some transcriptional regulation of E-cadherin, there was significant increase in lysosome-mediated protein degradation in cells exposed to X4 tropic HIV. Interaction with CXCR4 and viral fusion with the epithelial cell were required to induce the epithelial changes. X4 tropic virus was able to enter the airway epithelial cells but not replicate in these cells, while R5 tropic viruses did not enter the epithelial cells. Significantly, X4 tropic HIV induced the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). We demonstrate that HIV can enter airway

  6. Multiple cerebral infarcts with a few vasculitic lesions in the chronic stage of cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kenji; Hayashi, Shintaro; Sanpei, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Masahito; Takahashi, Hitoshi

    2012-10-01

    We report a 75-year-old man with a 3.5-year history of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA)-related inflammation. His initial symptom was headache and sensory aphasia appeared 1 month later. Brain MRI revealed features compatible with meningoencephalitis involving the right frontal, parietal and temporooccipital lobes. A brain biopsy sample from the right parietal lobe showed thickening of the leptomeninges, and granulomatous vasculitis with multinucleated giant cells and vascular Aβ deposits. No vascular lesions were evident by cerebral angiography. Serological examination revealed an elevated level of proteinase 3 anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (PR3-ANCA). The patient was treated with corticosteroids, but this was only partially and temporarily effective. Autopsy revealed marked leptomeningeal thickening with inflammatory cell infiltrates and hemosiderin deposits, many superficial predominantly small infarcts at various stages in the cerebral cortex and only a few cerebral active vasculitic lesions. Immunohistochemically, CAA showing widespread Aβ-positive blood vessels with double-barrel formations was demonstrated. In conclusion, we consider that, although the association of PR3-ANCA with the pathogenesis of Aβ-associated vasculitis remained unclear, the present case represents a rare example of CAA-related inflammation at the chronic stage. PMID:22188118

  7. Current concepts on oxidative/carbonyl stress, inflammation and epigenetics in pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Yao Hongwei; Rahman, Irfan

    2011-07-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a global health problem. The current therapies for COPD are poorly effective and the mainstays of pharmacotherapy are bronchodilators. A better understanding of the pathobiology of COPD is critical for the development of novel therapies. In the present review, we have discussed the roles of oxidative/aldehyde stress, inflammation/immunity, and chromatin remodeling in the pathogenesis of COPD. An imbalance of oxidants/antioxidants caused by cigarette smoke and other pollutants/biomass fuels plays an important role in the pathogenesis of COPD by regulating redox-sensitive transcription factors (e.g., NF-{kappa}B), autophagy and unfolded protein response leading to chronic lung inflammatory response. Cigarette smoke also activates canonical/alternative NF-{kappa}B pathways and their upstream kinases leading to sustained inflammatory response in lungs. Recently, epigenetic regulation has been shown to be critical for the development of COPD because the expression/activity of enzymes that regulate these epigenetic modifications have been reported to be abnormal in airways of COPD patients. Hence, the significant advances made in understanding the pathophysiology of COPD as described herein will identify novel therapeutic targets for intervention in COPD.

  8. Assessment of Inflammation in an Acute on Chronic Model of Inflammatory Bowel Disease with Ultrasound Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Machtaler, Steven; Knieling, Ferdinand; Luong, Richard; Tian, Lu; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ultrasound (US) molecular imaging has shown promise in assessing inflammation in preclinical, murine models of inflammatory bowel disease. These models, however, initiated acute inflammation on previously normal colons, in contrast to patients where acute exacerbations are often in chronically inflamed regions. In this study, we explored the potential of dual P- and E-selectin targeted US imaging for assessing acute inflammation on a murine quiescent chronic inflammatory background. Methods: Chronic colitis was induced using three cycles of 4% DSS in male FVB mice. Acute inflammation was initiated 2 weeks after the final DSS cycle through rectal administration of 1% TNBS. Mice at different stages of inflammation were imaged using a small animal ultrasound system following i.v. injection of microbubbles targeted to P- and E-selectin. In vivo imaging results were correlated with ex vivo immunofluorescence and histology. Results: Induction of acute inflammation resulted in an increase in the targeted US signal from 5.5 ± 5.1 arbitrary units (a.u.) at day 0 to 61.0 ± 45.2 a.u. (P < 0.0001) at day 1, 36.3 ± 33.1 a.u. at day 3, returning to levels similar to control at day 5. Immunofluorescence showed significant increase in the percentage of P- and E-selectin positive vessels at day 1 (P-selectin: 21.0 ± 7.1% of vessels; P < 0.05; E-selectin: 16.4 ±3.7%; P < 0.05) compared to day 0 (P-selectin: 10.3 ± 5.7%; E-selectin: 7.3 ± 7.0%). Conclusions: Acute inflammation can be accurately measured in a clinically relevant murine model of chronic IBD using ultrasound molecular imaging with a dual P- and E- selectin-targeted contrast agent. PMID:26379784

  9. The monocytic population in chronic lymphocytic leukemia shows altered composition and deregulation of genes involved in phagocytosis and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Maffei, Rossana; Bulgarelli, Jenny; Fiorcari, Stefania; Bertoncelli, Linda; Martinelli, Silvia; Guarnotta, Carla; Castelli, Ilaria; Deaglio, Silvia; Debbia, Giulia; De Biasi, Sara; Bonacorsi, Goretta; Zucchini, Patrizia; Narni, Franco; Tripodo, Claudio; Luppi, Mario; Cossarizza, Andrea; Marasca, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages reside in tissues infiltrated by chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells and the extent of infiltration is associated with adverse prognostic factors. We studied blood monocyte population by flow cytometry and whole-genome microarrays. A mixed lymphocyte reaction was performed to evaluate proliferation of T cells in contact with monocytes from patients and normal donors. Migration and gene modulation in normal monocytes cultured with CLL cells were also evaluated. The absolute number of monocytes increased in chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients compared to the number in normal controls (792±86 cells/μL versus 485±46 cells/μL, P=0.003). Higher numbers of non-classical CD14+CD16++ and Tie-2-expressing monocytes were also detected in patients. Furthermore, we performed a gene expression analysis of monocytes in chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients, showing up-regulation of RAP1GAP and down-regulation of tubulins and CDC42EP3, which would be expected to result in impairment of phagocytosis. We also detected gene alterations such as down-regulation of PTGR2, a reductase able to inactivate prostaglandin E2, indicating immunosuppressive activity. Accordingly, the proliferation of T cells in contact with monocytes from patients was inhibited compared to that of cells in contact with monocytes from normal controls. Finally, normal monocytes in vitro increased migration and up-regulated CD16, RAP1GAP, IL-10, IL-8, MMP9 and down-regulated PTGR2 in response to leukemic cells or conditioned media. In conclusion, altered composition and deregulation of genes involved in phagocytosis and inflammation were found in blood monocytes obtained from chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients, suggesting that leukemia-mediated “education” of immune elements may also include the establishment of a skewed phenotype in the monocyte/macrophage population. PMID:23349302

  10. The Regulatory Role of Activating Transcription Factor 2 in Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tao; Li, Yong Jun; Bian, Ai Hong; Zuo, Hui Bin; Zhu, Ti Wen; Ji, Sheng Xiang; Kong, Fanming; Yin, De Qing; Wang, Chuan Bao; Wang, Zi Fu; Wang, Hong Qun; Yang, Yanyan; Yoo, Byong Chul

    2014-01-01

    Activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) is a member of the leucine zipper family of DNA-binding proteins and is widely distributed in tissues including the liver, lung, spleen, and kidney. Like c-Jun and c-Fos, ATF2 responds to stress-related stimuli and may thereby influence cell proliferation, inflammation, apoptosis, oncogenesis, neurological development and function, and skeletal remodeling. Recent studies clarify the regulatory role of ATF2 in inflammation and describe potential inhibitors of this protein. In this paper, we summarize the properties and functions of ATF2 and explore potential applications of ATF2 inhibitors as tools for research and for the development of immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:25049453

  11. Toll-like receptors and chronic inflammation in rheumatic diseases: new developments.

    PubMed

    Joosten, Leo A B; Abdollahi-Roodsaz, Shahla; Dinarello, Charles A; O'Neill, Luke; Netea, Mihai G

    2016-06-01

    In the past few years, new developments have been reported on the role of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in chronic inflammation in rheumatic diseases. The inhibitory function of TLR10 has been demonstrated. Receptors that enhance the function of TLRs, and several TLR inhibitors, have been identified. In addition, the role of the microbiome and TLRs in the onset of rheumatic diseases has been reported. We review novel insights on the role of TLRs in several inflammatory joint diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, gout and Lyme arthritis, with a focus on the signalling mechanisms mediated by the Toll-IL-1 receptor (TIR) domain, the exogenous and endogenous ligands of TLRs, and the current and future therapeutic strategies to target TLR signalling in rheumatic diseases. PMID:27170508

  12. Lung inflammation biomarkers and lung function in children chronically exposed to arsenic

    SciTech Connect

    Olivas-Calderón, Edgar; Recio-Vega, Rogelio; Gandolfi, A. Jay; Lantz, R. Clark; González-Cortes, Tania; Gonzalez-De Alba, Cesar; Froines, John R.; Espinosa-Fematt, Jorge A.

    2015-09-01

    Evidence suggests that exposure to arsenic in drinking water during early childhood or in utero has been associated with an increase in respiratory symptoms or diseases in the adulthood, however only a few studies have been carried out during those sensitive windows of exposure. Recently our group demonstrated that the exposure to arsenic during early childhood or in utero in children was associated with impairment in the lung function and suggested that this adverse effect could be due to a chronic inflammation response to the metalloid. Therefore, we designed this cross-sectional study in a cohort of children associating lung inflammatory biomarkers and lung function with urinary As levels. A total of 275 healthy children were partitioned into four study groups according with their arsenic urinary levels. Inflammation biomarkers were measured in sputum by ELISA and the lung function was evaluated by spirometry. Fifty eight percent of the studied children were found to have a restrictive spirometric pattern. In the two highest exposed groups, the soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products' (sRAGE) sputum level was significantly lower and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) concentration was higher. When the biomarkers were correlated to the urinary arsenic species, negative associations were found between dimethylarsinic (DMA), monomethylarsonic percentage (%MMA) and dimethylarsinic percentage (%DMA) with sRAGE and positive associations between %DMA with MMP-9 and with the MMP-9/tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1) ratio. In conclusion, chronic arsenic exposure of children negatively correlates with sRAGE, and positively correlated with MMP-9 and MMP-9/TIMP-1 levels, and increases the frequency of an abnormal spirometric pattern. Arsenic-induced alterations in inflammatory biomarkers may contribute to the development of restrictive lung diseases. - Highlights: • First study in children evaluating lung inflammatory biomarkers and As levels

  13. Obesity-induced DNA released from adipocytes stimulates chronic adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Nishimoto, Sachiko; Fukuda, Daiju; Higashikuni, Yasutomi; Tanaka, Kimie; Hirata, Yoichiro; Murata, Chie; Kim-Kaneyama, Joo-ri; Sato, Fukiko; Bando, Masahiro; Yagi, Shusuke; Soeki, Takeshi; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Imoto, Issei; Sakaue, Hiroshi; Shimabukuro, Michio; Sata, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Obesity stimulates chronic inflammation in adipose tissue, which is associated with insulin resistance, although the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. Here we showed that obesity-related adipocyte degeneration causes release of cell-free DNA (cfDNA), which promotes macrophage accumulation in adipose tissue via Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9), originally known as a sensor of exogenous DNA fragments. Fat-fed obese wild-type mice showed increased release of cfDNA, as determined by the concentrations of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) in plasma. cfDNA released from degenerated adipocytes promoted monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) expression in wild-type macrophages, but not in TLR9-deficient (Tlr9−/−) macrophages. Fat-fed Tlr9−/− mice demonstrated reduced macrophage accumulation and inflammation in adipose tissue and better insulin sensitivity compared with wild-type mice, whereas bone marrow reconstitution with wild-type bone marrow restored the attenuation of insulin resistance observed in fat-fed Tlr9−/− mice. Administration of a TLR9 inhibitory oligonucleotide to fat-fed wild-type mice reduced the accumulation of macrophages in adipose tissue and improved insulin resistance. Furthermore, in humans, plasma ssDNA level was significantly higher in patients with computed tomography–determined visceral obesity and was associated with homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), which is the index of insulin resistance. Our study may provide a novel mechanism for the development of sterile inflammation in adipose tissue and a potential therapeutic target for insulin resistance. PMID:27051864

  14. Chronic PM2.5 Exposure and Inflammation: Determining Sensitive Subgroups in Mid-life Women

    PubMed Central

    Ostro, Bart; Malig, Brian; Broadwin, Rachel; Basu, Rupa; Gold, Ellen B.; Bromberger, Joyce T.; Derby, Carol; Feinstein, Steven; Greendale, Gail A.; Jackson, Elizabeth A.; Kravitz, Howard M.; Matthews, Karen A.; Sternfeld, Barbara; Tomey, Kristin; Green, Robin R.; Green, Rochelle

    2015-01-01

    Background Several cohort studies report associations between chronic exposure to ambient fine particles (PM2.5) and cardiovascular mortality. Uncertainty exists about biological mechanisms responsible for this observation, but systemic inflammation has been postulated. In addition, the subgroups susceptible to inflammation have not been fully elucidated. Methods We investigated whether certain subgroups are susceptible to the effects of long-term exposure to PM2.5 on C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation directly linked to subsequent cardiovascular disease. We used data from the SWAN cohort of 1,923 mid-life women with up to five annual repeated measures of CRP. Linear mixed and GEE models accounting for repeated measurements within an individual were used to estimate the effects of prior-year PM2.5 exposure on CRP. We examined CRP as a continuous and as binary outcome for CRP greater than 3 mg/l, a level of clinical significance. Results We found strong associations between PM2.5 and CRP among several subgroups. For example a 10 µg/m3 increase in annual PM2.5 more than doubled the risk of CRP greater than 3 mg/l in older diabetics, smokers and the unmarried. Larger effects were also observed among those with low income, high blood pressure, or who were using hormone therapy, with indications of a protective effects for those using statins or consuming moderate amounts of alcohol. Conclusions In this study, we observed significant associations between long-term exposure to PM2.5 and CRP in several susceptible subgroups. This suggests a plausible pathway by which exposure to particulate matter may be associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. PMID:24792413

  15. Effect of paricalcitol on endothelial function and inflammation in type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Thethi, Tina K.; Bajwa, Muhammad A.; Ghanim, Husam; Jo, Chanhee; Weir, Monica; Goldfine, Allison B.; Umpierrez, Guillermo; Desouza, Cyrus; Dandona, Paresh; Fang-Hollingsworth, Ying; Raghavan, Vasudevan; Fonseca, Vivian A.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) have impaired endothelial function. Vitamin D and its analogs may play a role in regulation of endothelial function and inflammation. We studied effects of paricalcitol compared to placebo on endothelial function and markers of inflammation and oxidative stress in patients with T2DM and CKD. Methods A double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in 60 patients with T2DM and stage 3 or 4 CKD. Paricalcitol 1 mcg or placebo was administered orally once daily for three months. Brachial artery flow mediated dilatation (FMD), nitroglycerine mediated dilation (NMD), and plasma concentrations of inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor –α and interleukin-6, highly-sensitive C-reactive protein; endothelial surface proteins, intercellular adhesion molecule –1 and monocyte chemo attractant protein-1, and plasma glucose, insulin, free fatty acids, and urinary isoprostane were measured at baseline and end of three months. Results 27 patients in the paricalcitol group and 28 patients in the control group completed the study, though analysis of FMD at both time points was possible in 23 patients in each group. There was no significant difference in the change in FMD, NMD or the biomarkers examined after paricalcitol or placebo treatment. Conclusions Treatment with paricalcitol at this dose and duration did not affect brachial artery FMD or biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress. The lack of significance may be due to the fact that the study patients had advanced CKD and that effects of paricalcitol are not additive to the effects of glycemic, lipid and anti-hypertensive therapies. PMID:25633573

  16. Characterisation of cochlear inflammation in mice following acute and chronic noise exposure.

    PubMed

    Tan, Winston J T; Thorne, Peter R; Vlajkovic, Srdjan M

    2016-08-01

    Oxidative stress has been established as the key mechanism of the cochlear damage underlying noise-induced hearing loss, however, emerging evidence suggests that cochlear inflammation may also be a major contributor. This study aimed to improve our understanding of the cochlear inflammatory response associated with acute and chronic noise exposure. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to acute traumatic noise (100 dBSPL, 8-16 kHz for 24 h) and their cochleae collected at various intervals thereafter, up to 7 days. Using quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, changes in expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β), chemokines (CCL2) and cell adhesion molecules (ICAM-1) were studied. All gene transcripts displayed similar dynamics of expression, with an early upregulation at 6 h post-exposure, followed by a second peak at 7 days. ICAM-1 immunoexpression increased significantly in the inferior region of the spiral ligament, peaking 24 h post-exposure. The early expression of proinflammatory mediators likely mediates the recruitment and extravasation of inflammatory cells into the noise-exposed cochlea. The occurrence of the latter expression peak is not clear, but it may be associated with reparative processes initiated in response to cochlear damage. Chronic exposure to moderate noise (90 dBSPL, 8-16 kHz, 2 h/day, up to 4 weeks) also elicited an inflammatory response, reaching a maximum after 2 weeks, suggesting that cochlear damage and hearing loss associated with chronic environmental noise exposure may be linked to inflammatory processes in the cochlea. This study thus provides further insight into the dynamics of the cochlear inflammatory response induced by exposure to acute and chronic noise. PMID:27109494

  17. A gut microbiota-targeted dietary intervention for amelioration of chronic inflammation underlying metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Shuiming; Fei, Na; Pang, Xiaoyan; Shen, Jian; Wang, Linghua; Zhang, Baorang; Zhang, Menghui; Zhang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Chenhong; Li, Min; Sun, Lifeng; Xue, Zhengsheng; Wang, Jingjing; Feng, Jie; Yan, Feiyan; Zhao, Naisi; Liu, Jiaqi; Long, Wenmin; Zhao, Liping

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation induced by endotoxin from a dysbiotic gut microbiota contributes to the development of obesity-related metabolic disorders. Modification of gut microbiota by a diet to balance its composition becomes a promising strategy to help manage obesity. A dietary scheme based on whole grains, traditional Chinese medicinal foods, and prebiotics (WTP diet) was designed to meet human nutritional needs as well as balance the gut microbiota. Ninety-three of 123 central obese volunteers (BMI ≥ 28 kg m−2) completed a self-controlled clinical trial consisting of 9-week intervention on WTP diet followed by a 14-week maintenance period. The average weight loss reached 5.79 ± 4.64 kg (6.62 ± 4.94%), in addition to improvement in insulin sensitivity, lipid profiles, and blood pressure. Pyrosequencing of fecal samples showed that phylotypes related to endotoxin-producing opportunistic pathogens of Enterobacteriaceae and Desulfovibrionaceae were reduced significantly, while those related to gut barrier-protecting bacteria of Bifidobacteriaceae increased. Gut permeability, measured as lactulose/mannitol ratio, was decreased compared with the baseline. Plasma endotoxin load as lipopolysaccharide-binding protein was also significantly reduced, with concomitant decrease in tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and an increase in adiponectin. These results suggest that modulation of the gut microbiota via dietary intervention may enhance the intestinal barrier integrity, reduce circulating antigen load, and ultimately ameliorate the inflammation and metabolic phenotypes. PMID:24117923

  18. Antileukotriene Reverts the Early Effects of Inflammatory Response of Distal Parenchyma in Experimental Chronic Allergic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Gobbato, Nathália Brandão; de Souza, Flávia Castro Ribas; Fumagalli, Stella Bruna Napolitano; Lopes, Fernanda Degobbi Tenório Quirino dos Santos; Prado, Carla Máximo; Martins, Milton Arruda; Tibério, Iolanda de Fátima Lopes Calvo; Leick, Edna Aparecida

    2013-01-01

    Aims. Compare the effects of montelukast or dexamethasone in distal lung parenchyma and airway walls of guinea pigs (GP) with chronic allergic inflammation. Methods. GP have inhaled ovalbumin (OVA group-2x/week/4weeks). After the 4th inhalation, GP were treated with montelukast or dexamethasone. After 72 hours of the 7th inhalation, GP were anesthetised, and lungs were removed and submitted to histopathological evaluation. Results. Montelukast and dexamethasone treatments reduced the number of eosinophils in airway wall and distal lung parenchyma compared to OVA group (P < 0.05). On distal parenchyma, both treatments were effective in reducing RANTES, NF-κB, and fibronectin positive cells compared to OVA group (P < 0.001). Montelukast was more effective in reducing eotaxin positive cells on distal parenchyma compared to dexamethasone treatment (P < 0.001), while there was a more expressive reduction of IGF-I positive cells in OVA-D group (P < 0.001). On airway walls, montelukast and dexamethasone were effective in reducing IGF-I, RANTES, and fibronectin positive cells compared to OVA group (P < 0.05). Dexamethasone was more effective in reducing the number of eotaxin and NF-κB positive cells than Montelukast (P < 0.05). Conclusions. In this animal model, both treatments were effective in modulating allergic inflammation and remodeling distal lung parenchyma and airway wall, contributing to a better control of the inflammatory response. PMID:24151607

  19. Elevated [11C]-D-Deprenyl Uptake in Chronic Whiplash Associated Disorder Suggests Persistent Musculoskeletal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Linnman, Clas; Appel, Lieuwe; Fredrikson, Mats; Gordh, Torsten; Söderlund, Anne; Långström, Bengt; Engler, Henry

    2011-01-01

    There are few diagnostic tools for chronic musculoskeletal pain as structural imaging methods seldom reveal pathological alterations. This is especially true for Whiplash Associated Disorder, for which physical signs of persistent injuries to the neck have yet to be established. Here, we sought to visualize inflammatory processes in the neck region by means Positron Emission Tomography using the tracer 11C-D-deprenyl, a potential marker for inflammation. Twenty-two patients with enduring pain after a rear impact car accident (Whiplash Associated Disorder grade II) and 14 healthy controls were investigated. Patients displayed significantly elevated tracer uptake in the neck, particularly in regions around the spineous process of the second cervical vertebra. This suggests that whiplash patients have signs of local persistent peripheral tissue inflammation, which may potentially serve as a diagnostic biomarker. The present investigation demonstrates that painful processes in the periphery can be objectively visualized and quantified with PET and that 11C-D-deprenyl is a promising tracer for these purposes. PMID:21541010

  20. Elevated [11C]-D-deprenyl uptake in chronic Whiplash Associated Disorder suggests persistent musculoskeletal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Linnman, Clas; Appel, Lieuwe; Fredrikson, Mats; Gordh, Torsten; Söderlund, Anne; Långström, Bengt; Engler, Henry

    2011-01-01

    There are few diagnostic tools for chronic musculoskeletal pain as structural imaging methods seldom reveal pathological alterations. This is especially true for Whiplash Associated Disorder, for which physical signs of persistent injuries to the neck have yet to be established. Here, we sought to visualize inflammatory processes in the neck region by means Positron Emission Tomography using the tracer (11)C-D-deprenyl, a potential marker for inflammation. Twenty-two patients with enduring pain after a rear impact car accident (Whiplash Associated Disorder grade II) and 14 healthy controls were investigated. Patients displayed significantly elevated tracer uptake in the neck, particularly in regions around the spineous process of the second cervical vertebra. This suggests that whiplash patients have signs of local persistent peripheral tissue inflammation, which may potentially serve as a diagnostic biomarker. The present investigation demonstrates that painful processes in the periphery can be objectively visualized and quantified with PET and that (11)C-D-deprenyl is a promising tracer for these purposes. PMID:21541010

  1. Chronic Pelvic Inflammation Diminished Ovarian Reserve as Indicated by Serum Anti Mülerrian Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Linlin; Sheng, Yan; Sun, Mei; Hu, Jingmei; Qin, Yingying; Chen, Zi-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the potential damaging effect of chronic pelvic inflammation on ovarian reserve. Design Case-control study. Patients A total of 122 women with bilateral tubal occlusion, diagnosed by hysterosalipingography (HSG) and 217 women with normal fallopians were recruited. Measurements Serum anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH), basic follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteining hormone (LH), estradiol (E2), and testosterone (T) were measured; and antral follicle counts (AFCs) were recorded. Results Significantly lower level of AMH was observed in women with bilateral tubal occlusion compared to control group [2.62 (2.95) ng/ml vs. 3.37 (3.11) ng/ml, P = 0.03], and the difference remained after adjustment of BMI (Padjust = 0.04). However, no statistical difference was found in the levels of FSH [7.00 (2.16) IU/L vs. 6.74 (2.30) IU/L], LH [4.18 (1.52) IU/L vs. 4.63 (2.52) IU/L], E2 [35.95 (20.40) pg/ml vs. 34.90 (17.85) pg/ml], T [25.07±11.46 ng/dl vs. 24.84±12.75 ng/dl], and AFC [6.00 (4.00) vs. 7.00 (4.00)] between two groups (p>0.05). Conclusions Women with bilateral tubal occlusion showed decreased AMH level, suggesting that chronic pelvic inflammation may diminish ovarian reserve. More caution should be paid when evaluating the detriment of PID on female fertility. PMID:27272680

  2. Complement activation promotes muscle inflammation during modified muscle use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenette, J.; Cai, B.; Tidball, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    Modified muscle use can result in muscle inflammation that is triggered by unidentified events. In the present investigation, we tested whether the activation of the complement system is a component of muscle inflammation that results from changes in muscle loading. Modified rat hindlimb muscle loading was achieved by removing weight-bearing from the hindlimbs for 10 days followed by reloading through normal ambulation. Experimental animals were injected with the recombinant, soluble complement receptor sCR1 to inhibit complement activation. Assays for complement C4 or factor B in sera showed that sCR1 produced large reductions in the capacity for activation of the complement system through both the classical and alternative pathways. Analysis of complement C4 concentration in serum in untreated animals showed that the classical pathway was activated during the first 2 hours of reloading. Analysis of factor B concentration in untreated animals showed activation of the alternative pathway at 6 hours of reloading. Administration of sCR1 significantly attenuated the invasion of neutrophils (-49%) and ED1(+) macrophages (-52%) that occurred in nontreated animals after 6 hours of reloading. The presence of sCR1 also reduced significantly the degree of edema by 22% as compared to untreated animals. Together, these data show that increased muscle loading activated the complement system which then briefly contributes to the early recruitment of inflammatory cells during modified muscle loading.

  3. Microbiome, Inflammation and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Francescone, Ralph; Hou, Vivianty; Grivennikov, Sergei I.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation has long been suspected to play a major role in the pathogenesis of cancer. Only recently however, have some mechanisms of its tumor promoting effects come to light. Microbes, both commensal and pathogenic, are critical regulators of the host immune system, and ultimately, of inflammation. Consequently, microbes have the potential power to influence tumor progression as well, through a wide variety of routes, including chronic activation of inflammation, alteration of tumor microenvironment, induction of genotoxic responses, and metabolism. In this review, we will provide a general overview of commensal microbiota, inflammation and cancer, and how microbes fit into this emerging field. PMID:24855005

  4. Green tea polyphenols mitigate bone loss of female rats in a chronic inflammation-induced bone loss model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to explore bioavailability, efficacy, and molecular mechanisms of green tea polyphenols (GTP) related to preventing bone loss in rats with chronic inflammation. A 2 (placebo vs. lipopolysaccharide, LPS) × 2 (no GTP vs. 0.5% GTP in drinking water) factorial design using ...

  5. Protective actions of green tea polyphenols and alfacalcidol on bone microstructure in female rats with chronic inflammation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the effects of green tea polyphenols (GTP) and alfacalcidol on bone microstructure and strength along with possible mechanisms in rats with chronic inflammation. A 12-week study using a 2 (no GTP vs. 0.5%, w/v GTP in drinking water) × 2 (no alfacalcidol vs. 0.05 ug/kg alfacal...

  6. Colchicine to decrease NLRP3-activated inflammation and improve obesity-related metabolic dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Demidowich, Andrew P; Davis, Angela I; Dedhia, Nicket; Yanovski, Jack A

    2016-07-01

    Obesity is a major risk-factor for the development of insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Circulating molecules associated with obesity, such as saturated fatty acids and cholesterol crystals, stimulate the innate immune system to incite a chronic inflammatory state. Studies in mouse models suggest that suppressing the obesity-induced chronic inflammatory state may prevent or reverse obesity-associated metabolic dysregulation. Human studies, however, have been far less positive, possibly because targeted interventions were too far downstream of the inciting inflammatory events. Recently, it has been shown that, within adipose tissue macrophages, assembly of a multi-protein member of the innate immune system, the NOD-like receptor family pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome, is essential for the induction of this inflammatory state. Microtubules enable the necessary spatial arrangement of the components of the NLRP3 inflammasome in the cell, leading to its activation and propagation of the inflammatory cascade. Colchicine, a medication classically used for gout, mediates its anti-inflammatory effect by inhibiting tubulin polymerization, and has been shown to attenuate macrophage NLRP3 inflammasome arrangement and activation in vitro and in vivo. Given these findings, we hypothesize that, in at-risk individuals (those with obesity-induced inflammation and metabolic dysregulation), long-term colchicine use will lead to suppression of inflammation and thus cause improvements in insulin sensitivity and other obesity-related metabolic impairments. PMID:27241260

  7. HIV-associated chronic immune activation

    PubMed Central

    Paiardini, Mirko; Müller-Trutwin, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    Summary Systemic chronic immune activation is considered today as the driving force of CD4+ T-cell depletion and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). A residual chronic immune activation persists even in HIV-infected patients in which viral replication is successfully inhibited by antiretroviral therapy, with the extent of this residual immune activation being associated with CD4+ T-cell loss. Unfortunately, the causal link between chronic immune activation and CD4+ T-cell loss has not been formally established. This article provides first a brief historical overview on how the perception of the causative role of immune activation has changed over the years and lists the different kinds of immune activation that have been observed to be characteristic for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The mechanisms proposed to explain the chronic immune activation are multiple and are enumerated here, as well as the mechanisms proposed on how chronic immune activation could lead to AIDS. In addition, we summarize the lessons learned from natural hosts that know how to ‘show AIDS the door’, and discuss how these studies informed the design of novel immune modulatory interventions that are currently being tested. Finally, we review the current approaches aimed at targeting chronic immune activation and evoke future perspectives. PMID:23772616

  8. Chronic Inflammation and Angiogenic Signaling Axis Impairs Differentiation of Dental-Pulp Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Michael; Chun, Crystal; Strojny, Chelsee; Narayanan, Raghuvaran; Bartholomew, Amelia; Sundivakkam, Premanand; Alapati, Satish

    2014-01-01

    Dental-pulp tissue is often exposed to inflammatory injury. Sequested growth factors or angiogenic signaling proteins that are released following inflammatory injury play a pivotal role in the formation of reparative dentin. While limited or moderate angiogenesis may be helpful for dental pulp maintenance, the induction of significant level of angiogenesis is probably highly detrimental. Hitherto, several studies have addressed the effects of proinflammatory stimuli on the survival and differentiation of dental-pulp stem cells (DPSC), in vitro. However, the mechanisms communal to the inflammatory and angiogenic signaling involved in DPSC survival and differentiation remain unknown. Our studies observed that short-term exposure to TNF-α (6 and 12 hours [hrs]) induced apoptosis with an upregulation of VEGF expression and NF-κB signaling. However, long-term (chronic) exposure (14 days) to TNF-α resulted in an increased proliferation with a concomitant shortening of the telomere length. Interestingly, DPSC pretreated with Nemo binding domain (NBD) peptide (a cell permeable NF-κB inhibitor) significantly ameliorated TNF-α- and/or VEGF-induced proliferation and the shortening of telomere length. NBD peptide pretreatment significantly improved TNF-α-induced downregulation of proteins essential for differentiation, such as bone morphogenic proteins (BMP)-1 & 2, BMP receptor isoforms-1&2, trasnforming growth factor (TGF), osteoactivin and osteocalcin. Additionally, inhibition of NF-κB signaling markedly increased the mineralization potential, a process abrogated by chronic exposure to TNF-α. Thus, our studies demonstrated that chronic inflammation mediates telomere shortening via NF-κB signaling in human DPSC. Resultant chromosomal instability leads to an emergence of increased proliferation of DPSC, while negatively regulating the differentiation of DPSC, in vitro. PMID:25427002

  9. ‘Emergency exit' of bone-marrow-resident CD34+DNAM-1brightCXCR4+-committed lymphoid precursors during chronic infection and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Bozzano, Federica; Marras, Francesco; Ascierto, Maria Libera; Cantoni, Claudia; Cenderello, Giovanni; Dentone, Chiara; Di Biagio, Antonio; Orofino, Giancarlo; Mantia, Eugenio; Boni, Silvia; De Leo, Pasqualina; Picciotto, Antonino; Braido, Fulvio; Antonini, Francesca; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco; Moretta, Lorenzo; De Maria, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    During chronic inflammatory disorders, a persistent natural killer (NK) cell derangement is observed. While increased cell turnover is expected, little is known about whether and how NK-cell homeostatic balance is maintained. Here, flow cytometric analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in chronic inflammatory disorders, both infectious and non-infectious, reveals the presence of a CD34+CD226(DNAM-1)brightCXCR4+ cell population displaying transcriptional signatures typical of common lymphocyte precursors and giving rise to NK-cell progenies with high expression of activating receptors and mature function and even to α/β T lymphocytes. CD34+CD226brightCXCR4+ cells reside in bone marrow, hardly circulate in healthy donors and are absent in cord blood. Their proportion correlates with the degree of inflammation, reflecting lymphoid cell turnover/reconstitution during chronic inflammation. These findings provide insight on intermediate stages of NK-cell development, a view of emergency recruitment of cell precursors, and upgrade our understanding and monitoring of chronic inflammatory conditions. PMID:26436997

  10. 'Emergency exit' of bone-marrow-resident CD34(+)DNAM-1(bright)CXCR4(+)-committed lymphoid precursors during chronic infection and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bozzano, Federica; Marras, Francesco; Ascierto, Maria Libera; Cantoni, Claudia; Cenderello, Giovanni; Dentone, Chiara; Di Biagio, Antonio; Orofino, Giancarlo; Mantia, Eugenio; Boni, Silvia; De Leo, Pasqualina; Picciotto, Antonino; Braido, Fulvio; Antonini, Francesca; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco; Moretta, Lorenzo; De Maria, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    During chronic inflammatory disorders, a persistent natural killer (NK) cell derangement is observed. While increased cell turnover is expected, little is known about whether and how NK-cell homeostatic balance is maintained. Here, flow cytometric analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in chronic inflammatory disorders, both infectious and non-infectious, reveals the presence of a CD34(+)CD226(DNAM-1)(bright)CXCR4(+) cell population displaying transcriptional signatures typical of common lymphocyte precursors and giving rise to NK-cell progenies with high expression of activating receptors and mature function and even to α/β T lymphocytes. CD34(+)CD226(bright)CXCR4(+) cells reside in bone marrow, hardly circulate in healthy donors and are absent in cord blood. Their proportion correlates with the degree of inflammation, reflecting lymphoid cell turnover/reconstitution during chronic inflammation. These findings provide insight on intermediate stages of NK-cell development, a view of emergency recruitment of cell precursors, and upgrade our understanding and monitoring of chronic inflammatory conditions. PMID:26436997

  11. Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription-3, Inflammation, and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Bharat B.; Kunnumakkara, Ajaikumar B.; Harikumar, Kuzhuvelil B.; Gupta, Shan R.; Tharakan, Sheeja T.; Koca, Cemile; Dey, Sanjit; Sung, Bokyung

    2011-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3) is one of six members of a family of transcription factors. It was discovered almost 15 years ago as an acute-phase response factor. This factor has now been associated with inflammation, cellular transformation, survival, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis of cancer. Various types of carcinogens, radiation, viruses, growth factors, oncogenes, and inflammatory cytokines have been found to activate STAT-3. STAT-3 is constitutively active in most tumor cells but not in normal cells. Phosphorylation of STAT-3 at tyrosine 705 leads to its dimerization, nuclear translocation, DNA binding, and gene transcription. The phosphorylation of STAT-3 at serine 727 may regulate its activity negatively or positively. STAT-3 regulates the expression of genes that mediate survival (survivin, bcl-xl, mcl-1, cellular FLICE-like inhibitory protein), proliferation (c-fos, c-myc, cyclin D1), invasion (matrix metalloproteinase-2), and angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor). STAT-3 activation has also been associated with both chemoresistance and radioresistance. STAT-3 mediates these effects through its collaboration with various other transcription factors, including nuclear factor-κB, hypoxia-inducible factor-1, and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ. Because of its critical role in tumorigenesis, inhibitors of this factor’s activation are being sought for both prevention and therapy of cancer. This has led to identification of small peptides, oligonucleotides, and small molecules as potential STAT-3 inhibitors. Several of these small molecules are chemo-preventive agents derived from plants. This review discusses the intimate relationship between STAT-3, inflammation, and cancer in more detail. PMID:19723038

  12. Chronic lung inflammation in victims of toxic gas leak at Bhopal.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, V K; Sankaran, K; Sharma, S K; Misra, N P

    1995-02-01

    Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) studies in 20 patients at Bhopal, 1.3 +/- 0.4 yr and 2.7 +/- 0.6 yr after toxic gas exposure had revealed that the lower respiratory tract inflammation had progressed from initial macrophage alveolitis to macrophage-neutrophilic alveolitis. The interval between the two lavages was 1.4 +/- 0.6 yr. BAL studies in a new group of 24 patients 5.1 +/- 1.0 yr after exposure had confirmed chronic inflammation of the lower respiratory tract as evidenced by macrophage-neutrophilic alveolitis in these subjects as well. Clinical, radiographic and pulmonary function abnormalities were persistent in a proportion of subjects in both groups. Fibronectin (FN) levels were estimated in BAL fluid in 41 patients. Elevated FN levels were seen in 12 (29.3%) subjects and nine of these 12 had radiographic abnormalities. Severely exposed subjects (n = 30) had significantly higher BAL fibronectin levels compared to normal subjects and mild/moderately exposed subjects. Repeat FN estimations in BAL samples from 10 patients had revealed that five had abnormally high FN including three who had high FN on both occasions. The number of patients showing abnormal decline in pulmonary function was higher in patients with elevated FN than in patients with normal FN. Thus, persisting clinical, roentgenographic and ventilatory abnormalities, as well as macrophage-neutrophilic alveolitis along with abnormally elevated FN levels in a proportion of subjects, suggest the possibility that lung fibrosis can occur in subjects exposed to toxic gas at Bhopal. PMID:7708994

  13. IL-9 signaling as key driver of chronic inflammation in mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    Neurath, Markus F; Finotto, Susetta

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have highlighted a crucial regulatory role of the cytokine IL-9 in driving immune responses in chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases at mucosal surfaces. IL-9 activates various types of immune and non-immune cells carrying the membrane bound IL-9R. IL-9 signaling plays a pivotal role in controlling the differentiation and activation of these cells by inducing the Jak/STAT pathway. In particular, IL-9 induces activation of T helper cells and affects the function of various tissue resident cells such as mast cells and epithelial cells in the mucosa. Importantly, recent findings suggest that blockade of IL-9 signaling is effective in treating experimental models of autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel diseases, allergic disorders such as food allergy and asthma. Thus, blockade of IL-9 and IL-9R signaling emerges as potentially novel approach for therapy of inflammatory diseases in the mucosal immune system. PMID:26976761

  14. Physical Activity and Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ran; Chomistek, Andrea K.; Dimitrakoff, Jordan D.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Willett, Walter C.; Rosner, Bernard A.; Wu, Kana

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) is a prevalent urologic disorder among men, but its etiology is still poorly understood. Our objective was to examine the relationship between physical activity and incidence of CP/CPPS in a large cohort of male health professionals. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study among men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study followed from 1986 to 2008. The study population included 20,918 men who completed all CP/CPPS questions on the 2008 questionnaire. Leisure-time physical activity, including type and intensity of activity, was measured by questionnaire in 1986. A National Institute of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index pain score was calculated based on the responses on the 2008 questionnaire. Participants with pain scores ≥ 8 were considered CP/CPPS cases (n=689). Results Higher leisure-time physical activity was associated with lower risk of CP/CPPS. The multivariable-adjusted odds ratio (OR) comparing >35.0 to ≤3.5 MET-h/wk of physical activity was 0.72 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.56, 0.92, p for trend <0.001). Observed inverse associations between physical activity and CP/CPPS were similar for both moderate- and vigorous-intensity activities. Sedentary behavior, measured as time spent watching television, was not associated with risk of CP/CPPS (p for trend 0.64). Conclusions Findings from this study, the first large scale and most comprehensive study to date on this association, suggest that higher levels of leisure-time physical activity may lower risk of CP/CPPS in middle-aged and older men. PMID:25116086

  15. Airways inflammation in subjects with chronic bronchitis who have never smoked.

    PubMed Central

    Lusuardi, M.; Capelli, A.; Cerutti, C. G.; Spada, E. L.; Donner, C. F.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Smoking is the single most common cause of chronic bronchitis but the disease can also occur in non-smokers. Alterations in the lung responsible for the disease, such as oxidant/antioxidant and protease/antiprotease imbalance, have been investigated in smokers. The aim of our study was to evaluate local cellular and soluble factors (albumin, immunoglobulins, proteases, alpha 1-antitrypsin, and transferrin) that may be involved in the development of chronic bronchitis in subjects who have never smoked. METHODS--Sixteen clinically stable patients with chronic bronchitis who had never been smokers were studied and 17 healthy non-smokers served as controls. All subjects underwent bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Total and differential cell counts and concentrations of the main proteins (albumin, immunoglobulins, complement fractions, alpha 1-antitrypsin, and transferrin) were measured. Elastase-like activity was assessed in cells and supernatants. To estimate the oxidant burden the release of superoxide anion (O2-) from native cell populations was evaluated. RESULTS--Recovery of BAL fluid was reduced in older individuals in both the chronic bronchitis and control groups. There was no difference in total cell count, but neutrophil percentage count was higher in those with chronic bronchitis (median (range) 3.5 (1.6-14.2)) than in controls (1.3 (0.5-3.7)). These differences were most pronounced in the first recovery, representative of the bronchial lavage. There was no difference in bronchial epithelial cells. Total proteins and albumin levels were comparable and IgG, IgA, IgM, C3, C4, transferrin and alpha 1-antitrypsin values standardised to albumin did not show any significant differences. No differences in elastase-like levels in supernatants were detected. In cell lysates elastase-like activity x 10(7) cells (macrophages+neutrophils) was increased in patients with chronic bronchitis (0.25 (0.06-4.3) compared with controls 0.08 (0.03-0.9) micrograms PPEeq

  16. Possible role of Escherichia coli in propagation and perpetuation of chronic inflammation in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study investigated a possible role of Escherichia coli in propagation and perpetuation of the chronic inflammation in ulcerative colitis (UC). The lesions of UC are located superficially on the rectal and/or colonic mucosa. It is suggested that the commensal bacteria of the digestive tract may play a role in the pathogenesis of UC. Several studies have demonstrated proliferation of E. coli in the gut of UC patients. An increase in the number of E. coli in the inflamed tissue is most probably related to the abundance of iron ions produced by the bacteria. Methods Colon mucosal biopsies were collected from 30 patients with acute-phase UC, both from tissues with inflammatory changes (n = 30) and unchanged tissue with no inflammatory changes (n = 30) from the same patient. Biopsies were also taken from 16 patients with irritable bowel syndrome diarrhea who comprised the control group. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of the biopsy specimens was performed using culture methods and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Genotyping of the E. coli isolates was done using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Multiplex PCR was used to compare the E. coli strains for the presence of genes responsible for synthesis of iron acquisition proteins: iroN, iutA, iha, ireA, chuA, and hlyA. Results We demonstrated that there was a significant increase in the number of E. coli at the sites of inflammation in patients with UC compared to the control group (P = 0.031). Comparative analysis of the restriction patterns of E. coli isolated from inflammatory and unchanged tissues showed that the local inflammatory changes did not promote specific E. coli strains. There was a significant difference in the frequency of the iroN gene in E. coli isolated from patients with UC as compared to the control group. Conclusions The increase in the numbers of E. coli in the inflammatory tissues is related to the presence of chuA and iutA genes, which facilitate iron acquisition

  17. Low level laser therapy reduces inflammation in activated Achilles tendinitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjordal, Jan M.; Iversen, Vegard; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Alvaro B.

    2006-02-01

    Objective: Low level laser therapy (LLLT) has been forwarded as therapy for osteoarthritis and tendinopathy. Results in animal and cell studies suggest that LLLT may act through a biological mechanism of inflammatory modulation. The current study was designed to investigate if LLLT has an anti-inflammatory effect on activated tendinitis of the Achilles tendon. Methods: Seven patients with bilateral Achilles tendonitis (14 tendons) who had aggravated symptoms by pain-inducing activity immediately prior to the study. LLLT (1.8 Joules for each of three points along the Achilles tendon with 904nm infrared laser) and placebo LLLT were administered to either Achilles tendons in a random order to which patients and therapist were blinded. Inflammation was examined by 1) mini-invasive microdialysis for measuring the concentration of inflammatory marker PGE II in the peritendinous tissue, 2) ultrasound with Doppler measurement of peri- and intratendinous blood flow, 3) pressure pain algometry and 4) single hop test. Results: PGE 2- levels were significantly reduced at 75, 90 and 105 minutes after active LLLT compared both to pre-treatment levels (p=0.026) and to placebo LLLT (p=0.009). Changes in pressure pain threshold (PPT) were significantly different (P=0.012) between groups. PPT increased by a mean value of 0.19 kg/cm2 [95%CI:0.04 to 0.34] after treatment in the active LLLT group, while pressure pain threshold was reduced by -0.20 kg/cm2 [95%CI:-0.45 to 0.05] after placebo LLLT. Conclusion: LLLT can be used to reduce inflammatory musculskeletal pain as it reduces inflammation and increases pressure pain threshold levels in activity-induced pain episodes of Achilles tendinopathy.

  18. Lung inflammation biomarkers and lung function in children chronically exposed to arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Olivas-Calderón, Edgar; Recio-Vega, Rogelio; Gandolfi, A. Jay; Lantz, R. Clark; González-Cortes, Tania; Alba, Cesar Gonzalez-De; Froines, John R.; Espinosa-Fematt, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests that exposure to arsenic in drinking water during early childhood or in utero is associated with an increase in respiratory symptoms and diseases in adulthood, however only a few studies have been carried out during those sensitive windows of exposure. Recently our group demonstrated that exposure to arsenic during early childhood or in utero was associated with impairment in the lung function in children and suggested that this adverse effect could be due to a chronic inflammatory response to the metalloid. Therefore, a cross-sectional study was designed in a cohort of children associating lung inflammatory biomarkers and lung function with urinary As levels. A total of 275 healthy children were partitioned into four study groups according with their As levels. Inflammation biomarkers were measured in sputum by ELISA and the lung function was evaluated by spirometry. Fifty eight percent of the studied children were found to have a restrictive spirometric pattern. In the two highest exposed groups, the Soluble Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts (sRAGE) sputum level was significantly lower and Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) concentration was higher. When the biomarkers were correlated to the urinary arsenic species, negative associations were found between dimethylarsinic (DMA), monomethylarsenic percentage (%MMA) and dimethylarsinic percentage (%DMA) with sRAGE and positive associations between %DMA with MMP-9 and with the MMP-9/Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase (TIMP-1) ratio. In conclusion, chronic arsenic exposure of children negatively correlates with sRAGE, and positively correlated with MMP-9 and MMP-9/TIMP-1 levels, and increases the frequency of an abnormal spirometric pattern. PMID:26048584

  19. Microglial NLRP3 inflammasome activation mediates IL-1β-related inflammation in prefrontal cortex of depressive rats.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ying; Chen, Xu-Yang; Zhang, Qing-Yu; Kong, Ling-Dong

    2014-10-01

    Depression is an inflammatory disorder. Pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) may play a pivotal role in the central nervous system (CNS) inflammation of depression. Here, we investigated IL-1β alteration in serum, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) of chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS)-exposed rats, a well-documented model of depression, and further explored the molecular mechanism by which CUMS procedure induced IL-1β-related CNS inflammation. We showed that 12-week CUMS procedure remarkably increased PFC IL-1β mRNA and protein levels in depressive-like behavior of rats, without significant alteration of serum and CSF IL-1β levels. We found that CUMS procedure significantly caused PFC nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) inflammatory pathway activation in rats. The intriguing finding in this study was the induced activation of nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain-like receptor family pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome with the increased IL-1β maturation in PFC of CUMS rats, suggesting a new grade of regulatory mechanism for IL-1β-related CNS inflammation. Moreover, microglial activation and astrocytic function impairment were observed in PFC of CUMS rats. The increased co-location of NLRP3 and ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1) protein expression supported that microglia in glial cells was the primary contributor for CUMS-induced PFC NLRP3 inflammasome activation in rats. These alterations in CUMS rats were restored by chronic treatment of the antidepressant fluoxetine, indicating that fluoxetine-mediated rat PFC IL-1β reduction involves both transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. These findings provide in vivo evidence that microglial NLRP3 inflammasome activation is a mediator of IL-1β-related CNS inflammation during chronic stress, and suggest a new therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of depression. PMID:24859041

  20. Acute colitis induced by dextran sulfate sodium progresses to chronicity in C57BL/6 but not in BALB/c mice: correlation between symptoms and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Melgar, Silvia; Karlsson, Agneta; Michaëlsson, Erik

    2005-06-01

    Exposure to dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) induces acute colitis, which is normally resolved after DSS removal. To study chronicity, mice are typically subjected to three to five cycles of weekly DSS exposures, each followed by a 1- to 2-wk rest period. Here, we describe a novel and convenient way of inducing chronic, progressive colitis by a single exposure to DSS. C57BL/6 mice exposed to DSS for 5 days developed acute colitis that progressed to severe chronic inflammation. The plasma haptoglobin levels remained high during the chronic phase, showing that the inflammation was active. Surprisingly, the mice regained their original weight along with the progression of colitis, and the only apparent symptom was loose feces. Histopathological changes 4 wk after DSS removal were dense infiltrates of mononuclear cells, irregular epithelial structure, and persistent deposits of collagen. A progressive production of the cytokines IL-1beta, IL-12 p70, and IL-17 correlated with the extensive cellular infiltration, whereas high IFN-gamma production was mainly found late in the chronic phase. Similar to C57BL/6 mice, BALB/c mice exposed to 5 days of DSS developed acute colitis as previously described. The acute colitis was accompanied by elevated plasma levels of haptoglobin and increased colonic levels of IL-1alpha/beta, IL-6, IL-18, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. However, soon after DSS removal, BALB/c mice recovered and were symptom free within 2 wk and completely recovered 4 wk after DSS removal in terms of histopathology, haptoglobin levels, and local cytokine production. In summary, these data stress the effect of genetic background on the outcome of DSS provocation. We believe that the present protocol to induce chronic colitis in C57BL/6 mice offers a robust model for validating future therapies for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:15637179

  1. Development and Validation of an Animal Model of Prostate Inflammation-Induced Chronic Pelvic Pain: Evaluating from Inflammation of the Prostate to Pain Behavioral Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Feng; Chen, Hequn; Yang, Jinrui; Wang, Long; Cui, Yu; Guan, Xiao; Wang, Zhao; Niu, Jiping; Zu, Xiongbing; Qi, Lin; Zhang, Xiangyang; Tang, Zhengyan; Liu, Longfei

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic prostatitis/Chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) is the most common type of prostatitis. Due to the lack of a suitable animal model partly, the pathogenesis for this condition is obscure. In the current study we developed and validated an animal model for nonbacterial prostatitis and prostate inflammation-induced chronic pelvic pain in rats with the use of intraprostatic injection of λ-carrageenan. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 250–350 g were used for the experiments. After intraprostatic injection of 3% λ-carrageenan, at different time points(after 24 h, 7d, 14d and 30d of injection), radiant heat and von Frey filaments were applied to the scrotum of rats to measure the heat and mechanical thresholds respectively. Then the prostate was removed for histology, and cyclooxygenase (COX) 2 protein expression was determined by Western-blot. Evans blue(50 mg/kg) was also injected intravenously to assess for plasma protein extravasation at different time points after injection of λ-carrageenan. Results Compared to control group, inflamed animals showed a significant reduction in mechanical threshold (mechanical allodynia) at 24 h and 7d(p = 0.022,0.046, respectively), and a significant reduction in heat threshold (thermal hyperalgesia) at 24 h, 7d and 14d(p = 0.014, 0.018, 0.002, respectively) in the scrotal skin. Significant increase of inflammatory cell accumulation,COX2 expression and Evans blue extravasation were observed at 24 h, 7d and 14d after injection. Conclusions Intraprostatic λ-carrageenan injection induced neurogenic prostatitis and prostate inflammation pain, which lasted at least 2 weeks. The current model is expected to be a valuable preclinical tool to study the neurobiological mechanisms of male chronic pelvic pain. PMID:24823660

  2. Effects of central administration of oxytocin-saporin cytotoxin on chronic inflammation and feeding/drinking behaviors in adjuvant arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Takanori; Kawasaki, Makoto; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Yoshimura, Mitsuhiro; Motojima, Yasuhito; Saito, Reiko; Ueno, Hiromichi; Maruyama, Takashi; Sabanai, Ken; Mori, Toshiharu; Ohnishi, Hideo; Sakai, Akinori; Ueta, Yoichi

    2016-05-16

    An increase in the arthritis index as a marker of chronic inflammation and suppression of food intake are observed in adjuvant arthritic (AA) rats. Our previous study demonstrated that central oxytocin (OXT)-ergic pathways were activated potently in AA rats. In the present study, OXT-saporin (SAP) cytotoxin, which chemically disrupts OXT signaling was administered centrally to determine whether central OXT may be involved in the developments of chronic inflammation and alteration of feeding/drinking behavior in AA rats. The arthritis index was significantly enhanced in AA rats pretreated with OXT-SAP administered intrathecally (i.t.) but not intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.). Suppression of food intake was significantly attenuated transiently in AA rats pretreated with OXT-SAP administered i.c.v. but not i.t. Suppression of drinking behavior was not affected by i.t. or i.c.v. administration of OXT-SAP in AA rats. In addition, intraperitoneal administration of an OXT receptor antagonist did not change the arthritis index or feeding/drinking behavior in AA rats. These results suggest that central OXT-ergic pathways may be involved in anti-inflammation at the spinal level and suppression of feeding behavior at the forebrain-brainstem level in AA rats. PMID:27060190

  3. Evidence for chronic inflammation as a component of the interstitial lung disease associated with progressive systemic sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, G.A.; Bitterman, P.B.; Rennard, S.I.; Ferrans, V.J.; Crystal, R.G.

    1985-04-01

    Progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS) is a generalized disorder characterized by fibrosis of many organs including the lung parenchyma. Unlike most other interstitial disorders, traditional concepts of the interstitial lung disease associated with PSS have held it to be a ''pure'' fibrotic disorder without a significant inflammatory component. To directly evaluate whether an active alveolitis is associated with this disorder, patients with chronic interstitial lung disease and PSS were studied by open lung biopsy, gallium-67 scanning, and bronchoalveolar lavage. Histologic evaluation of the biopsies demonstrated that the interstitial fibrosis of PSS is clearly associated with the presence of macrophages, lymphocytes, and polymorphonuclear leukocytes, both in the interstitium and on the alveolar epithelial surface. Gallium-67 scans were positive in 77% of the patients, showing diffuse, primarily lower zone uptake, suggestive of active inflammation. Consistent with the histologic findings, bronchoalveolar lavage studies demonstrated a mild increase in the proportions of neutrophils and eosinophils with occasional increased numbers of lymphocytes. Importantly, alveolar macrophages from patients with PSS showed increased release of fibronectin and alveolar-macrophage-derived growth factor, mediators that together stimulate lung fibroblasts to proliferate, thus suggesting at least one mechanism modulating the lung fibrosis of these patients.

  4. Chronic inflammation of the placenta: definition, classification, pathogenesis, and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chong Jai; Romero, Roberto; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Kim, Jung-Sun

    2015-10-01

    Chronic inflammatory lesions of the placenta are characterized by the infiltration of the organ by lymphocytes, plasma cells, and/or macrophages and may result from infections (viral, bacterial, parasitic) or be of immune origin (maternal anti-fetal rejection). The 3 major lesions are villitis (when the inflammatory process affects the villous tree), chronic chorioamnionitis (which affects the chorioamniotic membranes), and chronic deciduitis (which involves the decidua basalis). Maternal cellular infiltration is a common feature of the lesions. Villitis of unknown etiology (VUE) is a destructive villous inflammatory lesion that is characterized by the infiltration of maternal T cells (CD8+ cytotoxic T cells) into chorionic villi. Migration of maternal T cells into the villi is driven by the production of T-cell chemokines in the affected villi. Activation of macrophages in the villi has been implicated in the destruction of the villous architecture. VUE has been reported in association with preterm and term fetal growth restriction, preeclampsia, fetal death, and preterm labor. Infants whose placentas have VUE are at risk for death and abnormal neurodevelopmental outcome at the age of 2 years. Chronic chorioamnionitis is the most common lesion in late spontaneous preterm birth and is characterized by the infiltration of maternal CD8+ T cells into the chorioamniotic membranes. These cytotoxic T cells can induce trophoblast apoptosis and damage the fetal membranes. The lesion frequently is accompanied by VUE. Chronic deciduitis consists of the presence of lymphocytes or plasma cells in the basal plate of the placenta. This lesion is more common in pregnancies that result from egg donation and has been reported in a subset of patients with premature labor. Chronic placental inflammatory lesions can be due to maternal anti-fetal rejection, a process associated with the development of a novel form of fetal systemic inflammatory response. The syndrome is characterized

  5. Ascorbic acid: its role in immune system and chronic inflammation diseases.

    PubMed

    Sorice, Angela; Guerriero, Eliana; Capone, Francesca; Colonna, Giovanni; Castello, Giuseppe; Costantini, Susan

    2014-05-01

    Ascorbic acid (AA), also known as vitamin C, was initially identified as the factor preventing the scurvy disease, and became very popular for its antioxidant properties. It is an important co-substrate of a large class of enzymes, and regulates gene expression by interacting with important transcription factors. AA is important in all stressful conditions that are linked to inflammatory processes and involve immunity. It has been known for decades that the persistence of an inflammatory stimulus is responsible for the onset of many diseases. AA is essential to stimulate the immune system by increasing the strength and protection of the organism. Therefore, its immunostimulant, antinflammatory, antiviral and antibacterial roles are well known, we have summarized its main functions in different types of diseases related to the immune system and chronic inflammation. We can conclude that AA, due to its effects and diversity of regulated pathways, is suitable for use in various fields of medicine including immunology, toxicology, radiobiology and others. AA is not preferable to be used as an isolated mode of treatment, but it can be co-applied as an adjuvant to regulate immunity, gene expression and other important physiological processes. However, we propose that future studies will take into consideration the research of new combinations of antioxidant natural substances and drugs. PMID:24766384

  6. Microbiota alterations in acute and chronic gastrointestinal inflammation of cats and dogs

    PubMed Central

    Honneffer, Julia B; Minamoto, Yasushi; Suchodolski, Jan S

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota is the collection of the living microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and viruses) inhabiting the gastrointestinal tract. Novel bacterial identification approaches have revealed that the gastrointestinal microbiota of dogs and cats is, similarly to humans, a highly complex ecosystem. Studies in dogs and cats have demonstrated that acute and chronic gastrointestinal diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), are associated with alterations in the small intestinal and fecal microbial communities. Of interest is that these alterations are generally similar to the dysbiosis observed in humans with IBD or animal models of intestinal inflammation, suggesting that microbial responses to inflammatory conditions of the gut are conserved across mammalian host types. Studies have also revealed possible underlying susceptibilities in the innate immune system of dogs and cats with IBD, which further demonstrate the intricate relationship between gut microbiota and host health. Commonly identified microbiome changes in IBD are decreases in bacterial groups within the phyla Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, and increases within Proteobacteia. Furthermore, a reduction in the diversity of Clostridium clusters XIVa and IV (i.e., Lachnospiraceae and Clostridium coccoides subgroups) are associated with IBD, suggesting that these bacterial groups may play an important role in maintenance of gastrointestinal health. Future studies are warranted to evaluate the functional changes associated with intestinal dysbiosis in dogs and cats. PMID:25469017

  7. New Insights on COX-2 in Chronic Inflammation Driving Breast Cancer Growth and Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Hugo, Honor J; Saunders, C; Ramsay, R G; Thompson, E W

    2015-12-01

    The medicinal use of aspirin stretches back to ancient times, before it was manufactured in its pure form in the late 19th century. Its accepted mechanistic target, cyclooxygenase (COX), was discovered in the 1970s and since this landmark discovery, the therapeutic application of aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has increased dramatically. The most significant benefits of NSAIDs are in conditions involving chronic inflammation (CI). Given the recognized role of CI in cancer development, the use of long-term NSAID treatment in the prevention of cancer is an enticing possibility. COX-2 is a key driver of CI, and here we review COX-2 expression as a predictor of survival in various cancer types, including breast. Obesity and post-partum involution are natural inflammatory states that are associated with increased breast cancer risk. We outline the COX-2 mediated mechanisms contributing to the growth of cancers. We dissect the cellular mechanism of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and how COX-2 may induce this to facilitate tumor progression. Finally we examine the potential regulation of COX-2 by c-Myb, and the possible interplay between c-Myb/COX-2 in proliferation, and hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF1α)/COX-2 in invasive pathways in breast cancer. PMID:26193871

  8. Microbiota alterations in acute and chronic gastrointestinal inflammation of cats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Honneffer, Julia B; Minamoto, Yasushi; Suchodolski, Jan S

    2014-11-28

    The intestinal microbiota is the collection of the living microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and viruses) inhabiting the gastrointestinal tract. Novel bacterial identification approaches have revealed that the gastrointestinal microbiota of dogs and cats is, similarly to humans, a highly complex ecosystem. Studies in dogs and cats have demonstrated that acute and chronic gastrointestinal diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), are associated with alterations in the small intestinal and fecal microbial communities. Of interest is that these alterations are generally similar to the dysbiosis observed in humans with IBD or animal models of intestinal inflammation, suggesting that microbial responses to inflammatory conditions of the gut are conserved across mammalian host types. Studies have also revealed possible underlying susceptibilities in the innate immune system of dogs and cats with IBD, which further demonstrate the intricate relationship between gut microbiota and host health. Commonly identified microbiome changes in IBD are decreases in bacterial groups within the phyla Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, and increases within Proteobacteia. Furthermore, a reduction in the diversity of Clostridium clusters XIVa and IV (i.e., Lachnospiraceae and Clostridium coccoides subgroups) are associated with IBD, suggesting that these bacterial groups may play an important role in maintenance of gastrointestinal health. Future studies are warranted to evaluate the functional changes associated with intestinal dysbiosis in dogs and cats. PMID:25469017

  9. Chronic Stress, Inflammation, and Glucose Regulation in U.S. Hispanics from the HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study

    PubMed Central

    McCurley, Jessica L.; Mills, Paul J.; Roesch, Scott C.; Carnethon, Mercedes; Giacinto, Rebeca E.; Isasi, Carmen R.; Teng, Yanping; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Llabre, Maria M.; Penedo, Frank J.; Schneiderman, Neil; Gallo, Linda C.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes prevalence is rising rapidly, and diabetes disproportionately affects Hispanics and other underserved groups. Chronic stress may contribute to diabetes risk, but few studies have examined this relationship in U.S. Hispanics. We examined associations of chronic stress with fasting glucose, glucose tolerance, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in Hispanics without diabetes, and also assessed indirect effects of stress through inflammation (CRP). Participants were 3923 men and women, aged 18-74, without diabetes, from the four U.S. field centers (Bronx, NY; Chicago, IL; Miami, FL; San Diego, CA) of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL)-Sociocultural Ancillary study. Participants completed a measure of chronic life stress and a physical exam with oral glucose tolerance test. In a multivariate regression analysis with adjustment for demographic and health covariates, higher chronic stress was related to higher fasting glucose (standardized regression coefficient: β=.09, p<0.01), post load glucose (β=.07, p<0.05), and HbA1c levels (β=.08, p<0.01). However, there was no indirect effect of stress through inflammation. Findings suggest that higher chronic stress is associated with poorer glucose regulation in Hispanics, prior to the onset of a clinical diabetes diagnosis. PMID:25898909

  10. Chronic stress, inflammation, and glucose regulation in U.S. Hispanics from the HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study.

    PubMed

    McCurley, Jessica L; Mills, Paul J; Roesch, Scott C; Carnethon, Mercedes; Giacinto, Rebeca E; Isasi, Carmen R; Teng, Yanping; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Llabre, Maria M; Penedo, Frank J; Schneiderman, Neil; Gallo, Linda C

    2015-08-01

    Diabetes prevalence is rising rapidly, and diabetes disproportionately affects Hispanics and other underserved groups. Chronic stress may contribute to diabetes risk, but few studies have examined this relationship in U.S. Hispanics. We examined associations of chronic stress with fasting glucose, glucose tolerance, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in Hispanics without diabetes, and also assessed indirect effects of stress through inflammation (CRP). Participants were 3,923 men and women, aged 18-74, without diabetes, from the four U.S. field centers (Bronx, NY; Chicago, IL; Miami, FL; San Diego, CA) of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) Sociocultural Ancillary study. Participants completed a measure of chronic life stress and a physical exam with oral glucose tolerance test. In a multivariate regression analysis with adjustment for demographic and health covariates, higher chronic stress was related to higher fasting glucose (standardized regression coefficient: β = .09, p < .01), postload glucose (β = .07, p < .05), and HbA1c levels (β = .08, p < .01). However, there was no indirect effect of stress through inflammation. Findings suggest that higher chronic stress is associated with poorer glucose regulation in Hispanics, prior to the onset of a clinical diabetes diagnosis. PMID:25898909

  11. Inflammasome Activity in Non-Microbial Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ather, Jennifer L.; Martin, Rebecca A.; Ckless, Karina; Poynter, Matthew E.

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of interleukin-1 (IL-1) family cytokines in inflammatory disease has rapidly developed, due in part to the discovery and characterization of inflammasomes, which are multi-subunit intracellular protein scaffolds principally enabling recognition of a myriad of cellular stimuli, leading to the activation of caspase-1 and the processing of IL-1β and IL-18. Studies continue to elucidate the role of inflammasomes in immune responses induced by both microbes and environmental factors. This review focuses on the current understanding of inflammasome activity in the lung, with particular focus on the non-microbial instigators of inflammasome activation, including inhaled antigens, oxidants, cigarette smoke, diesel exhaust particles, mineral fibers, and engineered nanomaterials, as well as exposure to trauma and pre-existing inflammatory conditions such as metabolic syndrome. Inflammasome activity in these sterile inflammatory states contribute to diseases including asthma, chronic obstructive disease, acute lung injury, ventilator-induced lung injury, pulmonary fibrosis, and lung cancer. PMID:25642415

  12. Angiotensin-(1-7) attenuates airway remodelling and hyperresponsiveness in a model of chronic allergic lung inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, G S; Rodrigues-Machado, M G; Motta-Santos, D; Silva, A R; Caliari, M V; Prata, L O; Abreu, S C; Rocco, P R M; Barcelos, L S; Santos, R A S; Campagnole-Santos, M J

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose A long-term imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators leads to airway remodelling, which is strongly correlated to most of the symptoms, severity and progression of chronic lung inflammation. The Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)]/Mas receptor axis of the renin-angiotensin system is associated with attenuation of acute and chronic inflammatory processes. In this study, we investigated the effects of Ang-(1-7) treatment in a model of chronic allergic lung inflammation. Experimental Approach Mice were sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA; 4 injections over 42 days, 14 days apart) and were challenged three times per week (days 21–46). These mice received Ang-(1-7) (1 μg·h−1, s.c.) by osmotic mini-pumps, for the last 28 days. Histology and morphometric analysis were performed in left lung and right ventricle. Airway responsiveness to methacholine, analysis of Ang-(1-7) levels (RIA), collagen I and III (qRT-PCR), ERK1/2 and JNK (Western blotting), IgE (elisa), cytokines and chemokines (elisa multiplex), and immunohistochemistry for Mas receptors were performed. Key Results Infusion of Ang-(1-7) in OVA-sensitized and challenged mice decreased inflammatory cell infiltration and collagen deposition in the airways and lung parenchyma, and prevented bronchial hyperresponsiveness. These effects were accompanied by decreased IgE and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and decreased pro-inflammatory cytokines. Mas receptors were detected in the epithelium and bronchial smooth muscle, suggesting a site in the lung for the beneficial actions of Ang-(1-7). Conclusions and Implications Ang-(1-7) exerted beneficial attenuation of three major features of chronic asthma: lung inflammation, airway remodelling and hyperresponsiveness. Our results support an important protective role of Ang-(1-7) in lung inflammation. PMID:25559763

  13. Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps is characterized by B-cell inflammation and EBV-induced protein 2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Hulse, Kathryn E.; Norton, James E.; Suh, Lydia; Zhong, Qiu; Mahdavinia, Mahboobeh; Simon, Patrick; Kern, Robert C.; Conley, David B.; Chandra, Rakesh K.; Tan, Bruce K.; Peters, Anju T.; Grammer, Leslie C.; Harris, Kathleen E.; Carter, Roderick G.; Kato, Atsushi; Schleimer, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the high prevalence and morbidity of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), little is known about the mechanisms that underlie its pathogenesis. Recent studies have suggested that B cells might play an important role in CRS. Objective We sought to thoroughly characterize B lineage cells within sinus tissues of patients with CRS and healthy control subjects and to determine whether levels of EBV-induced protein 2, which is known to play an important role in the development of B-cell responses, were increased in patients with CRS. Methods Cells isolated from sinus tissues of patients with CRS and healthy control subjects were characterized by means of flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Local production of antibodies was measured in tissue extracts, nasal lavage fluid, and sera by using multiplex bead arrays and ELISA. Quantitative RT-PCR, ELISA, and Western blotting were used to assess gene and protein expression from tissue extracts. Results Nasal polyps (NPs) from patients with CRS had increased levels of both B cells and plasma cells compared with uncinate tissue from healthy control subjects (P < .05). NPs also contained significantly increased levels of several antibody isotypes compared with normal uncinate tissue (P < .05), but no differences in circulating antibody levels were found. Interestingly, levels of EBV-induced protein 2 were also increased in NPs (P < .05) and were positively correlated with expression of plasma cell markers (CD138 and B lymphocyte–induced maturation protein) in sinus tissue. Conclusion B cells and plasma cells are enriched in NPs, actively produce antibodies locally, and might contribute to chronic inflammation in patients with CRS. Elucidating the mechanisms that underlie this excessive local B-cell response might provide novel insights for the development of improved therapeutic strategies. PMID:23473835

  14. Development of asthmatic inflammation in mice following early-life exposure to ambient environmental particulates and chronic allergen challenge

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Cristan; Siegle, Jessica S.; Shadie, Alexander M.; Nikolaysen, Stina; Garthwaite, Linda; Hansbro, Nicole G.; Foster, Paul S.; Kumar, Rakesh K.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Childhood exposure to environmental particulates increases the risk of development of asthma. The underlying mechanisms might include oxidant injury to airway epithelial cells (AEC). We investigated the ability of ambient environmental particulates to contribute to sensitization via the airways, and thus to the pathogenesis of childhood asthma. To do so, we devised a novel model in which weanling BALB/c mice were exposed to both ambient particulate pollutants and ovalbumin for sensitization via the respiratory tract, followed by chronic inhalational challenge with a low mass concentration of the antigen. We also examined whether these particulates caused oxidant injury and activation of AEC in vitro. Furthermore, we assessed the potential benefit of minimizing oxidative stress to AEC through the period of sensitization and challenge by dietary intervention. We found that characteristic features of asthmatic inflammation developed only in animals that received particulates at the same time as respiratory sensitization, and were then chronically challenged with allergen. However, these animals did not develop airway hyper-responsiveness. Ambient particulates induced epithelial injury in vitro, with evidence of oxidative stress and production of both pro-inflammatory cytokines and Th2-promoting cytokines such as IL-33. Treatment of AEC with an antioxidant in vitro inhibited the pro-inflammatory cytokine response to these particulates. Ambient particulates also induced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression following administration to weanling mice. However, early-life dietary supplementation with antioxidants did not prevent the development of an asthmatic inflammatory response in animals that were exposed to particulates, sensitized and challenged. We conclude that injury to airway epithelium by ambient environmental particulates in early life is capable of promoting the development of an asthmatic inflammatory response in sensitized and antigen-challenged mice

  15. Asbestos-Induced Cellular and Molecular Alteration of Immunocompetent Cells and Their Relationship with Chronic Inflammation and Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Hidenori; Maeda, Megumi; Lee, Suni; Nishimura, Yasumitsu; Kumagai-Takei, Naoko; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Shoko; Hatayama, Tamayo; Kojima, Yoko; Tabata, Rika; Kishimoto, Takumi; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Otsuki, Takemi

    2012-01-01

    Asbestos causes lung fibrosis known as asbestosis as well as cancers such as malignant mesothelioma and lung cancer. Asbestos is a mineral silicate containing iron, magnesium, and calcium with a core of SiO2. The immunological effect of silica, SiO2, involves the dysregulation of autoimmunity because of the complications of autoimmune diseases found in silicosis. Asbestos can therefore cause alteration of immunocompetent cells to result in a decline of tumor immunity. Additionally, due to its physical characteristics, asbestos fibers remain in the lung, regional lymph nodes, and the pleural cavity, particularly at the opening sites of lymphatic vessels. Asbestos can induce chronic inflammation in these areas due to the production of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species. As a consequence, immunocompetent cells can have their cellular and molecular features altered by chronic and recurrent encounters with asbestos fibers, and there may be modification by the surrounding inflammation, all of which eventually lead to decreased tumor immunity. In this paper, the brief results of our investigation regarding reduction of tumor immunity of immunocompetent cells exposed to asbestos in vitro are discussed, as are our findings concerned with an investigation of chronic inflammation and analyses of peripheral blood samples derived from patients with pleural plaque and mesothelioma that have been exposed to asbestos. PMID:22500091

  16. Bacteria activate sensory neurons that modulate pain and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Isaac M.; Heesters, Balthasar A.; Ghasemlou, Nader; Von Hehn, Christian A.; Zhao, Fan; Tran, Johnathan; Wainger, Brian; Strominger, Amanda; Muralidharan, Sriya; Horswill, Alexander R.; Wardenburg, Juliane Bubeck; Hwang, Sun Wook; Carroll, Michael C.; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Nociceptor sensory neurons are specialized to detect potentially damaging stimuli, protecting the organism by initiating the sensation of pain and eliciting defensive behaviors. Bacterial infections produce pain by unknown molecular mechanisms, although they are presumed secondary to immune activation. Here we demonstrate that bacteria directly activate nociceptors, and that the immune response mediated through TLR2, MyD88, T cells, B cells, and neutrophils/monocytes is not necessary for Staphylococcus aureus induced pain in mice. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia parallels live bacterial load rather than tissue swelling or immune activation. Bacteria induce calcium flux and action potentials in nociceptor neurons, in part via bacterial N-formylated peptides and the pore-forming toxin alpha-hemolysin through distinct mechanisms. Specific ablation of Nav1.8-lineage neurons, which include nociceptors, abrogated pain during bacterial infection, but concurrently increased local immune infiltration and lymphadenopathy of the draining lymph node. Thus, bacterial pathogens produce pain by directly activating sensory neurons that modulate inflammation, an unsuspected role for the nervous system in host-pathogen interactions. PMID:23965627

  17. Anti-Inflammatory and Antinociceptive Effects of Salbutamol on Acute and Chronic Models of Inflammation in Rats: Involvement of an Antioxidant Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Uzkeser, Hulya; Cadirci, Elif; Halici, Zekai; Odabasoglu, Fehmi; Polat, Beyzagul; Yuksel, Tugba Nurcan; Ozaltin, Seda; Atalay, Fadime

    2012-01-01

    The possible role of β-2 adrenergic receptors in modulation of inflammatory and nociceptive conditions suggests that the β-2 adrenergic receptor agonist, salbutamol, may have beneficial anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects. Therefore, in this study, we induced inflammatory and nociceptive responses with carrageenan-induced paw edema or cotton-pellet-induced granuloma models, both of which result in oxidative stress. We hypothesized that salbutamol would prevent inflammatory and nociceptive responses by stimulating β-2 adrenergic receptors and the prevention of generation of ROS during the acute inflammation process in rats. Both doses of salbutamol used in the study (1 and 2 mg/kg) effectively blocked the acute inflammation and inflammatory nociception induced by carrageenan. In the cotton-pellet-induced granuloma test, both doses of salbutamol also significantly decreased the weight of granuloma tissue on the cotton pellets when compared to the control. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of salbutamol were found to be comparable with those of indomethacin. Salbutamol decreased myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and lipid peroxidation (LPO) level and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and level of glutathione (GSH) during the acute phase of inflammation. In conclusion, salbutamol can decrease acute and chronic inflammation, possibly through the stimulation of β-2 adrenergic receptors. This anti-inflammatory effect may be of significance in asthma treatment, where inflammation also takes part in the etiopathology. This study reveals that salbutamol has significant antioxidative effects, which at least partially explain its anti-inflammatory capabilities. These findings presented here may also shed light on the roles of β-2 adrenergic receptors in inflammatory and hyperalgesic conditions. PMID:22665951

  18. Impaired function of CTLA-4 in the lungs of patients with chronic beryllium disease contributes to persistent inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chain, Jennifer L; Martin, Allison K; Mack, Douglas G; Maier, Lisa A; Palmer, Brent E; Fontenot, Andrew P

    2013-08-15

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is an occupational lung disorder characterized by granulomatous inflammation and the accumulation of beryllium-responsive CD4(+) T cells in the lung. These differentiated effector memory T cells secrete IL-2, IFN-γ, and TNF-α upon in vitro activation. Beryllium-responsive CD4(+) T cells in the lung are CD28 independent and have increased expression of the coinhibitory receptor, programmed death 1, resulting in Ag-specific T cells that proliferate poorly yet retain the ability to express Th1-type cytokines. To further investigate the role of coinhibitory receptors in the beryllium-induced immune response, we examined the expression of CTLA-4 in blood and bronchoalveolar lavage cells from subjects with CBD. CTLA-4 expression was elevated on CD4(+) T cells from the lungs of study subjects compared with blood. Furthermore, CTLA-4 expression was greatest in the beryllium-responsive subset of CD4(+) T cells that retained the ability to proliferate and express IL-2. Functional assays show that the induction of CTLA-4 signaling in blood cells inhibited beryllium-induced T cell proliferation while having no effect on the proliferative capacity of beryllium-responsive CD4(+) T cells in the lung. Collectively, our findings suggest a dysfunctional CTLA-4 pathway in the lung and its potential contribution to the persistent inflammatory response that characterizes CBD. PMID:23851684

  19. Coronary heart disease, chronic inflammation, and pathogenic social hierarchy: a biological limit to possible reductions in morbidity and mortality.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Rodrick; Wallace, Deborah; Wallace, Robert G

    2004-05-01

    We suggest that a particular form of social hierarchy, which we characterize as "pathogenic", can, from the earliest stages of life, exert a formal analog to evolutionary selection pressure, literally writing a permanent developmental image of itself upon immune function as chronic vascular inflammation and its consequences. The staged nature of resulting disease emerges "naturally" as a rough analog to punctuated equilibrium in evolutionary theory, although selection pressure is a passive filter rather than an active agent, like structured psychosocial stress. Exposure differs according to the social constructs of race, class, and ethnicity, accounting in large measure for observed population-level differences in rates of coronary heart disease across industrialized societies. American Apartheid, which enmeshes both majority and minority communities in a social construct of pathogenic hierarchy, appears to present a severe biological limit to continuing declines in coronary heart disease for powerful as well as subordinate subgroups: "Culture"--to use the words of the evolutionary anthropologist Robert Boyd--"is as much a part of human biology as the enamel on our teeth". PMID:15160975

  20. Coronary heart disease, chronic inflammation, and pathogenic social hierarchy: a biological limit to possible reductions in morbidity and mortality.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Rodrick; Wallace, Deborah; Wallace, Robert G.

    2004-01-01

    We suggest that a particular form of social hierarchy, which we characterize as "pathogenic", can, from the earliest stages of life, exert a formal analog to evolutionary selection pressure, literally writing a permanent developmental image of itself upon immune function as chronic vascular inflammation and its consequences. The staged nature of resulting disease emerges "naturally" as a rough analog to punctuated equilibrium in evolutionary theory, although selection pressure is a passive filter rather than an active agent, like structured psychosocial stress. Exposure differs according to the social constructs of race, class, and ethnicity, accounting in large measure for observed population-level differences in rates of coronary heart disease across industrialized societies. American Apartheid, which enmeshes both majority and minority communities in a social construct of pathogenic hierarchy, appears to present a severe biological limit to continuing declines in coronary heart disease for powerful as well as subordinate subgroups: "Culture"--to use the words of the evolutionary anthropologist Robert Boyd--"is as much a part of human biology as the enamel on our teeth". PMID:15160975

  1. Low Vitamin D Status Is Associated with Systemic and Gastrointestinal Inflammation in Dogs with a Chronic Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Titmarsh, Helen F.; Gow, Adam G.; Kilpatrick, Scott; Cartwright, Jennifer A.; Milne, Elspeth M.; Philbey, Adrian W.; Berry, Jacqueline; Handel, Ian; Mellanby, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Vitamin D deficiency, as assessed by serum concentrations of 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), has been linked to the development of over-zealous and inappropriate inflammation in humans. However, the relationship between vitamin D status and inflammation in dogs is ill-defined. Chronic enteropathies (CE) are frequently diagnosed in client owned dogs, have a wide range of serum 25(OH)D concentrations, and represent a spontaneous model in which to probe the relationship between vitamin D and inflammation. The hypothesis of this study was that vitamin D status would be negatively associated with systemic and gastrointestinal inflammation in dogs with a CE. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between serum 25(OH)D concentrations and markers of systemic and gastrointestinal inflammation in a cohort of dogs with CE. Methods and Materials Serum 25(OH)D concentrations, together with neutrophil, monocyte, eosinophil and lymphocyte counts, duodenal histopathology scores, serum IL-2, IL-6, IL-8 and TNFα concentrations and were measured in 39 dogs with histologically confirmed CE. A linear regression model examined the relationship between serum 25(OH)D status and measures of inflammation. Results Serum 25(OH)D concentrations were negatively associated with neutrophil and monocyte counts, duodenal histopathology scores and serum IL-2 and IL-8 concentrations. Dogs with low serum 25(OH)D concentrations typically had an inflammatory signature characterised by high monocyte and neutrophil numbers together with low lymphocyte numbers. There is a need to establish whether low vitamin D status is a cause or consequence of inflammation. PMID:26333093

  2. Oxidative stress–induced mitochondrial dysfunction drives inflammation and airway smooth muscle remodeling in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Wiegman, Coen H.; Michaeloudes, Charalambos; Haji, Gulammehdi; Narang, Priyanka; Clarke, Colin J.; Russell, Kirsty E.; Bao, Wuping; Pavlidis, Stelios; Barnes, Peter J.; Kanerva, Justin; Bittner, Anton; Rao, Navin; Murphy, Michael P.; Kirkham, Paul A.; Chung, Kian Fan; Adcock, Ian M.; Brightling, Christopher E.; Davies, Donna E.; Finch, Donna K.; Fisher, Andrew J.; Gaw, Alasdair; Knox, Alan J.; Mayer, Ruth J.; Polkey, Michael; Salmon, Michael; Singh, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Inflammation and oxidative stress play critical roles in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Mitochondrial oxidative stress might be involved in driving the oxidative stress–induced pathology. Objective We sought to determine the effects of oxidative stress on mitochondrial function in the pathophysiology of airway inflammation in ozone-exposed mice and human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. Methods Mice were exposed to ozone, and lung inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and mitochondrial function were determined. Human ASM cells were isolated from bronchial biopsy specimens from healthy subjects, smokers, and patients with COPD. Inflammation and mitochondrial function in mice and human ASM cells were measured with and without the presence of the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ. Results Mice exposed to ozone, a source of oxidative stress, had lung inflammation and AHR associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and reflected by decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), increased mitochondrial oxidative stress, and reduced mitochondrial complex I, III, and V expression. Reversal of mitochondrial dysfunction by the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ reduced inflammation and AHR. ASM cells from patients with COPD have reduced ΔΨm, adenosine triphosphate content, complex expression, basal and maximum respiration levels, and respiratory reserve capacity compared with those from healthy control subjects, whereas mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were increased. Healthy smokers were intermediate between healthy nonsmokers and patients with COPD. Hydrogen peroxide induced mitochondrial dysfunction in ASM cells from healthy subjects. MitoQ and Tiron inhibited TGF-β–induced ASM cell proliferation and CXCL8 release. Conclusions Mitochondrial dysfunction in patients with COPD is associated with excessive mitochondrial ROS levels, which contribute to enhanced inflammation and cell

  3. Association of chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps and asthma: clinical and radiological features, allergy and inflammation markers.

    PubMed

    Staikūniene, Jūrate; Vaitkus, Saulius; Japertiene, Lidija Marija; Ryskiene, Silvija

    2008-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) with and without nasal polyps represent different stages of one chronic inflammatory disease of the mucosa of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Coexistence of chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps and asthma and rather similar characteristics of inflammation support assumption that chronic rhinosinusitis and nasal polyps and asthma may be, at least in part, the same disease process. We therefore aimed to evaluate the differences of sinus radiologic findings, systemic inflammation and allergy markers, pulmonary function of chronic rhinosinusitis associated with nasal polyps and asthma. A total of 121 patients with chronic rhinosinusitis referred to tertiary center were evaluated; 23 healthy persons served as controls. Sinus CT scans and nasal endoscopy were performed. Allergic rhinitis was diagnosed according to history and positive skin prick tests to common inhalant allergens. Asthma was diagnosed according to GINA by history and pulmonary function tests. Aspirin intolerance was assessed by history. Total IgE, Aspergillus fumigatus-specific IgE levels, leukocyte and eosinophil count in the peripheral blood were measured. Nasal polyps were detected in 84 patients (69.4%), asthma diagnosed in 48 patients (39.6%), associated with nasal polyps (91.7%) and allergic rhinitis in 45.5% of patients. Forty-four patients with chronic rhinosinusitis and having nasal polyps and asthma were characterized by older age (P<0.01), greater duration of nasal symptoms (P<0.001), higher number previous surgeries (P<0.01), more severe sinus disease on CT scan (P<0.001), greater blood leukocyte and eosinophil count, total IgE level (P<0.01), bronchial obstruction (P<0.05), incidence of allergic rhinitis (P<0.01), and sensitivity to house dust mite D. pteronyssinus (47.7%, P<0.01) and mold allergens (29.5%, P<0.01) comparing to the patients with isolated chronic rhinosinusitis. The extent of sinus CT changes was greater in asthmatics and correlated

  4. Active "itch fibers" in chronic pruritus.

    PubMed

    Schmelz, M; Hilliges, M; Schmidt, R; Ørstavik, K; Vahlquist, C; Weidner, C; Handwerker, H O; Torebjörk, H E

    2003-08-26

    An itch-specific neuronal pathway was recently discovered in healthy humans and animals. Here the authors report that activity in this specific pathway coincides with itch under pathophysiologic conditions in a patient with chronic pruritus. Microneurographic recordings from the symptomatic area revealed spontaneous activity in six single C-fiber afferents that had the characteristic features of "itch fibers." Itch may be caused by activity in a specific subpopulation of C-fiber afferents. PMID:12939442

  5. Inflammation Enhances the Risks of Stroke and Death in Chronic Chagas Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Guedes, Paulo Marcos Matta; de Andrade, Cléber Mesquita; Nunes, Daniela Ferreira; de Sena Pereira, Nathalie; Queiroga, Tamyres Bernadete Dantas; Machado-Coelho, George Luiz Lins; Nascimento, Manuela Sales Lima; Do-Valle-Matta, Maria Adelaide; da Câmara, Antônia Cláudia Jácome; Chiari, Egler; Galvão, Lúcia Maria da Cunha

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic strokes have been implicated as a cause of death in Chagas disease patients. Inflammation has been recognized as a key component in all ischemic processes, including the intravascular events triggered by vessel interruption, brain damage and repair. In this study, we evaluated the association between inflammatory markers and the death risk (DR) and stroke risk (SR) of patients with different clinical forms of chronic Chagas disease. The mRNA expression levels of cytokines, transcription factors expressed in the adaptive immune response (Th1, Th2, Th9, Th17, Th22 and regulatory T cell), and iNOS were analyzed by real-time PCR in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of chagasic patients who exhibited the indeterminate, cardiac, digestive and cardiodigestive clinical forms of the disease, and the levels of these transcripts were correlated with the DR and SR. Cardiac patients exhibited lower mRNA expression levels of GATA-3, FoxP3, AHR, IL-4, IL-9, IL-10 and IL-22 but exhibited higher expression of IFN-γ and TNF-α compared with indeterminate patients. Digestive patients showed similar levels of GATA-3, IL-4 and IL-10 than indeterminate patients. Cardiodigestive patients exhibited higher levels of TNF-α compared with indeterminate and digestive patients. Furthermore, we demonstrated that patients with high DR and SR exhibited lower GATA-3, FoxP3, and IL-10 expression and higher IFN-γ, TNF-α and iNOS mRNA expression than patients with low DR and SR. A negative correlation was observed between Foxp3 and IL-10 mRNA expression and the DR and SR. Moreover, TNF-α and iNOS expression was positively correlated with DR and SR. Our data suggest that an inflammatory imbalance in chronic Chagas disease patients is associated with a high DR and SR. This study provides a better understanding of the stroke pathobiology in the general population and might aid the development of therapeutic strategies for controlling the morbidity and mortality of Chagas disease. PMID

  6. Inflammation Enhances the Risks of Stroke and Death in Chronic Chagas Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Paulo Marcos Matta; de Andrade, Cléber Mesquita; Nunes, Daniela Ferreira; de Sena Pereira, Nathalie; Queiroga, Tamyres Bernadete Dantas; Machado-Coelho, George Luiz Lins; Nascimento, Manuela Sales Lima; Do-Valle-Matta, Maria Adelaide; da Câmara, Antônia Cláudia Jácome; Chiari, Egler; Galvão, Lúcia Maria da Cunha

    2016-04-01

    Ischemic strokes have been implicated as a cause of death in Chagas disease patients. Inflammation has been recognized as a key component in all ischemic processes, including the intravascular events triggered by vessel interruption, brain damage and repair. In this study, we evaluated the association between inflammatory markers and the death risk (DR) and stroke risk (SR) of patients with different clinical forms of chronic Chagas disease. The mRNA expression levels of cytokines, transcription factors expressed in the adaptive immune response (Th1, Th2, Th9, Th17, Th22 and regulatory T cell), and iNOS were analyzed by real-time PCR in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of chagasic patients who exhibited the indeterminate, cardiac, digestive and cardiodigestive clinical forms of the disease, and the levels of these transcripts were correlated with the DR and SR. Cardiac patients exhibited lower mRNA expression levels of GATA-3, FoxP3, AHR, IL-4, IL-9, IL-10 and IL-22 but exhibited higher expression of IFN-γ and TNF-α compared with indeterminate patients. Digestive patients showed similar levels of GATA-3, IL-4 and IL-10 than indeterminate patients. Cardiodigestive patients exhibited higher levels of TNF-α compared with indeterminate and digestive patients. Furthermore, we demonstrated that patients with high DR and SR exhibited lower GATA-3, FoxP3, and IL-10 expression and higher IFN-γ, TNF-α and iNOS mRNA expression than patients with low DR and SR. A negative correlation was observed between Foxp3 and IL-10 mRNA expression and the DR and SR. Moreover, TNF-α and iNOS expression was positively correlated with DR and SR. Our data suggest that an inflammatory imbalance in chronic Chagas disease patients is associated with a high DR and SR. This study provides a better understanding of the stroke pathobiology in the general population and might aid the development of therapeutic strategies for controlling the morbidity and mortality of Chagas disease. PMID

  7. Subconjunctival Sirolimus for the Treatment of Chronic Active Anterior Uveitis: Results of a Pilot Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sen, H. Nida; Larson, Theresa A.; Meleth, Annal D.; Smith, Wendy M.; Nussenblatt, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the safety and possible efficacy of subconjunctival sirolimus for the treatment of chronic active anterior uveitis Design Prospective, non-randomized, open-label clinical trial. Methods This single-center pilot trial enrolled 5 patients with chronic active anterior uveitis. The study drug was administered as single subconjunctival injection of 30μL (1,320μg) sirolimus in the study eye at the baseline visit. Study visits were performed at baseline, 2 weeks, 4 weeks and monthly until 4 months, and included a complete ophthalmic exam, review of systems, adverse event assessment at each visit, physical exam and ancillary ophthalmic testing at some visits. The primary outcome measure was a 2-step reduction in the anterior chamber inflammation within 4 weeks of injection of the study drug. Results There were 3 females and 2 males; 4 patients had idiopathic anterior uveitis and one had psoriatic arthritis-associated anterior uveitis. Three of the five patients met the primary outcome criteria by showing at least a 2-step decrease in inflammation within 4 weeks, 2 patients showed a 1-step decrease in inflammation within the same time frame. No recurrence was encountered during a 4 month follow-up. There were no serious adverse events. Conclusions Subconjunctival sirolimus appears to be well tolerated in this pilot trial and shows promise as a treatment for active inflammation in patients with chronic anterior uveitis. Larger studies are needed to assess its usefulness in uveitis. PMID:22465364

  8. Implant of polymer containing pentacyclic triterpenes from Eugenia punicifolia inhibits inflammation and activates skeletal muscle remodeling.

    PubMed

    Leite, Paulo Emílio C; Lima-Araújo, Katia G; França, Guilherme R; Lagrota-Candido, Jussara; Santos, Wilson C; Quirico-Santos, Thereza

    2014-12-01

    Sustained chronic inflammation induces activation of genes involved in cellular proliferation and apoptosis, thereby causing skeletal muscle degeneration. To investigate in vitro effects of isolated pentacyclic triterpenes from Eugenia punicifolia (Ep-CM) upon signaling pathways involved in the regulation of skeletal muscle cell line proliferation, and in vivo muscular tissue remodeling. C2C12 cells were seeded on eight-well plates and [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation, TUNEL assays, mitochondria viability, zymography for matrix metalloproteases (MMPs), Western blot analysis for MAPKinase signaling pathway, NFκB activation and HMGB1 production subsequently determined under basal conditions and after Ep-CM treatment. A polymer containing Ep-CM was implanted on the volar surface of gastrocnemius muscles subjected to acute injury induced by bupivacaine for local slow and gradual release of bioactive compounds, and mice killed 4 days after surgery. Ep-CM inhibited proliferation of C2C12 myoblast cell line in a dose-dependent manner, confirmed by reduction of [(3)H]-thymidine uptake without affecting cell viability or inducing apoptosis. The cytostatic effect of Ep-CM occurred mainly via inhibition of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) activation and DNA synthesis, possibly inhibiting the G1 phase of the cell cycle, since Ep-CM increased pAkt and p27(kip1) but reduced Cyclin D1. Ep-CM in vitro treatment increased MMP-9 and MMP-2 activities of C2C12 myoblast cells, but reduced in vivo MMP-9 activity and acute muscular inflammation. Besides cytostatic and anti-inflammatory effects, Ep-CM pentacyclic triterpenes also contributed to degradation of basement membrane components by activating mechanisms of skeletal muscle remodeling in response to local injury. PMID:24830560

  9. Spinal Inflammation in the Absence of Sacroiliac Joint Inflammation on Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients With Active Nonradiographic Axial Spondyloarthritis

    PubMed Central

    van der Heijde, Désirée; Sieper, Joachim; Maksymowych, Walter P; Brown, Matthew A; Lambert, Robert G W; Rathmann, Suchitrita S; Pangan, Aileen L

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the presence of spinal inflammation with and without sacroiliac (SI) joint inflammation on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with active nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis (SpA), and to compare the disease characteristics of these subgroups. Methods ABILITY-1 is a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial of adalimumab versus placebo in patients with nonradiographic axial SpA classified using the Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society axial SpA criteria. Baseline MRIs were centrally scored independently by 2 readers using the Spondyloarthritis Research Consortium of Canada (SPARCC) method for the SI joints and the SPARCC 6–discovertebral unit method for the spine. Positive evidence of inflammation on MRI was defined as a SPARCC score of ≥2 for either the SI joints or the spine. Results Among patients with baseline SPARCC scores, 40% had an SI joint score of ≥2 and 52% had a spine score of ≥2. Forty-nine percent of patients with baseline SI joint scores of <2, and 58% of those with baseline SI joint scores of ≥2, had a spine score of ≥2. Comparison of baseline disease characteristics by baseline SI joint and spine scores showed that a greater proportion of patients in the subgroup with a baseline SPARCC score of ≥2 for both SI joints and spine were male, and patients with spine and SI joint scores of <2 were younger and had shorter symptom duration. SPARCC spine scores correlated with baseline symptom duration, and SI joint scores correlated negatively with the baseline Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, but neither correlated with the baseline Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score, total back pain, the patient's global assessment of disease activity, the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index, morning stiffness, nocturnal pain, or C-reactive protein level. Conclusion Assessment by experienced readers showed that spinal inflammation on MRI might be observed in half of

  10. Early Interfaced Neural Activity from Chronic Amputated Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Garde, Kshitija; Keefer, Edward; Botterman, Barry; Galvan, Pedro; Romero, Mario I.

    2009-01-01

    Direct interfacing of transected peripheral nerves with advanced robotic prosthetic devices has been proposed as a strategy for achieving natural motor control and sensory perception of such bionic substitutes, thus fully functionally replacing missing limbs in amputees. Multi-electrode arrays placed in the brain and peripheral nerves have been used successfully to convey neural control of prosthetic devices to the user. However, reactive gliosis, micro hemorrhages, axonopathy and excessive inflammation currently limit their long-term use. Here we demonstrate that enticement of peripheral nerve regeneration through a non-obstructive multi-electrode array, after either acute or chronic nerve amputation, offers a viable alternative to obtain early neural recordings and to enhance long-term interfacing of nerve activity. Non-restrictive electrode arrays placed in the path of regenerating nerve fibers allowed the recording of action potentials as early as 8 days post-implantation with high signal-to-noise ratio, as long as 3 months in some animals, and with minimal inflammation at the nerve tissue-metal electrode interface. Our findings suggest that regenerative multi-electrode arrays of open design allow early and stable interfacing of neural activity from amputated peripheral nerves and might contribute towards conveying full neural control and sensory feedback to users of robotic prosthetic devices. PMID:19506704

  11. IL-1 receptor blockade restores autophagy and reduces inflammation in chronic granulomatous disease in mice and in humans.

    PubMed

    de Luca, Antonella; Smeekens, Sanne P; Casagrande, Andrea; Iannitti, Rossana; Conway, Kara L; Gresnigt, Mark S; Begun, Jakob; Plantinga, Theo S; Joosten, Leo A B; van der Meer, Jos W M; Chamilos, Georgios; Netea, Mihai G; Xavier, Ramnik J; Dinarello, Charles A; Romani, Luigina; van de Veerdonk, Frank L

    2014-03-01

    Patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) have a mutated NADPH complex resulting in defective production of reactive oxygen species; these patients can develop severe colitis and are highly susceptible to invasive fungal infection. In NADPH oxidase-deficient mice, autophagy is defective but inflammasome activation is present despite lack of reactive oxygen species production. However, whether these processes are mutually regulated in CGD and whether defective autophagy is clinically relevant in patients with CGD is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that macrophages from CGD mice and blood monocytes from CGD patients display minimal recruitment of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) to phagosomes. This defect in autophagy results in increased IL-1β release. Blocking IL-1 with the receptor antagonist (anakinra) decreases neutrophil recruitment and T helper 17 responses and protects CGD mice from colitis and also from invasive aspergillosis. In addition to decreased inflammasome activation, anakinra restored autophagy in CGD mice in vivo, with increased Aspergillus-induced LC3 recruitment and increased expression of autophagy genes. Anakinra also increased Aspergillus-induced LC3 recruitment from 23% to 51% (P < 0.01) in vitro in monocytes from CGD patients. The clinical relevance of these findings was assessed by treating CGD patients who had severe colitis with IL-1 receptor blockade using anakinra. Anakinra treatment resulted in a rapid and sustained improvement in colitis. Thus, inflammation in CGD is due to IL-1-dependent mechanisms, such as decreased autophagy and increased inflammasome activation, which are linked pathological conditions in CGD that can be restored by IL-1 receptor blockade. PMID:24550444

  12. NEMO Prevents RIP Kinase 1-Mediated Epithelial Cell Death and Chronic Intestinal Inflammation by NF-κB-Dependent and -Independent Functions

    PubMed Central

    Vlantis, Katerina; Wullaert, Andy; Polykratis, Apostolos; Kondylis, Vangelis; Dannappel, Marius; Schwarzer, Robin; Welz, Patrick; Corona, Teresa; Walczak, Henning; Weih, Falk; Klein, Ulf; Kelliher, Michelle; Pasparakis, Manolis

    2016-01-01

    Summary Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) regulate gut immune homeostasis, and impaired epithelial responses are implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). IEC-specific ablation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) essential modulator (NEMO) caused Paneth cell apoptosis and impaired antimicrobial factor expression in the ileum, as well as colonocyte apoptosis and microbiota-driven chronic inflammation in the colon. Combined RelA, c-Rel, and RelB deficiency in IECs caused Paneth cell apoptosis but not colitis, suggesting that NEMO prevents colon inflammation by NF-κB-independent functions. Inhibition of receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIPK1) kinase activity or combined deficiency of Fas-associated via death domain protein (FADD) and RIPK3 prevented epithelial cell death, Paneth cell loss, and colitis development in mice with epithelial NEMO deficiency. Therefore, NEMO prevents intestinal inflammation by inhibiting RIPK1 kinase activity-mediated IEC death, suggesting that RIPK1 inhibitors could be effective in the treatment of colitis in patients with NEMO mutations and possibly in IBD. PMID:26982364

  13. Sleep Loss Activates Cellular Markers of Inflammation: Sex Differences

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Michael R.; Carrillo, Carmen; Olmstead, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is associated with inflammation and related disorders including cardiovascular disease, arthritis, and diabetes mellitus. Given sex differences in the prevalence of inflammatory disorders with stronger associations in females, this study was undertaken to test the effects of sleep loss on cellular mechanisms that contribute to proinflammatory cytokine activity. In 26 healthy adults (11 females; 15 males), monocyte intracellular proinflammatory cytokine production was repeatedly assessed at 08:00, 12:00, 16:00, 20:00, and 23:00 h during a baseline period and after partial sleep deprivation (awake from 11 PM to 3 AM). In the morning after a night of sleep loss, monocyte production of interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor- α differentially changed between the two sexes. Whereas both females and males showed a marked increase in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) - stimulated production of IL-6 and TNF-α in the morning immediately after PSD, production of these cytokines during the early- and late evening was increased in the females as compared to decreases in the males. Sleep loss induces a functional alteration of monocyte proinflammatory cytokine responses with females showing greater cellular immune activation as compared to changes in males. These results have implications for understanding the role of sleep disturbance in the differential risk profile for inflammatory disorders between the sexes. PMID:19520155

  14. Decreased fibrinolytic activity in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Mussoni, L; Pintucci, G; Romano, G; De Benedetti, F; Massa, M; Martini, A

    1990-01-01

    The basal fibrinolytic activity in 17 children with active juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) was investigated. It was found that patients with JCA, and particularly those with the systemic form, show decreased plasma fibrinolytic activity and a marked increase in plasminogen activator inhibitor. Additionally, it was found that patients with systemic JCA, but not those with the polyarticular or pauciarticular form, have increased circulating levels of tissue-type plasminogen activator, and endothelial cell protein, suggesting possible endothelial cell participation in systemic JCA. PMID:2125408

  15. Klotho Reduction in Alveolar Macrophages Contributes to Cigarette Smoke Extract-induced Inflammation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Lingling; Wang, Yujie; Gao, Wei; Yuan, Cheng; Zhang, Sini; Zhou, Hong; Huang, Mao; Yao, Xin

    2015-11-13

    Abnormal inflammation and accelerated decline in lung function occur in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Klotho, an anti-aging protein, has an anti-inflammatory function. However, the role of Klotho has never been investigated in COPD. The aim of this study is to investigate the possible role of Klotho by alveolar macrophages in airway inflammation in COPD. Klotho levels were assessed in the lung samples and peripheral blood mononuclear cells of non-smokers, smokers, and patients with COPD. The regulation of Klotho expression by cigarette smoke extract (CSE) was studied in vitro, and small interfering RNA (siRNA) and recombinant Klotho were employed to investigate the role of Klotho on CSE-induced inflammation. Klotho expression was reduced in alveolar macrophages in the lungs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells of COPD patients. CSE decreased Klotho expression and release from MH-S cells. Knockdown of endogenous Klotho augmented the expression of the inflammatory mediators, such as MMP-9, IL-6, and TNF-α, by MH-S cells. Exogenous Klotho inhibited the expression of CSE-induced inflammatory mediators. Furthermore, we showed that Klotho interacts with IκBα of the NF-κB pathway. Dexamethasone treatment increased the expression and release level of Klotho in MH-S cells. Our findings suggest that Klotho plays a role in sustained inflammation of the lungs, which in turn may have therapeutic implications in COPD. PMID:26385922

  16. Reciprocal inhibition between miR-26a and NF-κB regulates obesity-related chronic inflammation in chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Qingyun; Wei, Meng; Kang, Xia; Liu, Da; Quan, Yi; Pan, Xianming; Liu, Xiling; Liao, Dongfa; Liu, Jinbiao; Zhang, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is causally linked to osteoarthritis (OA), with the mechanism being not fully elucidated. miRNAs (miRs) are pivotal regulators of various diseases in multiple tissues, including inflammation in the chondrocytes. In the present study, we for the first time identified the expression of miR-26a in mouse chondrocytes. Decreased level of miR-26a was correlated to increased chronic inflammation in the chondrocytes and circulation in obese mouse model. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that miR-26a attenuated saturated free fatty acid-induced activation of NF-κB (p65) and production of proinflammatory cytokines in chondrocytes. Meanwhile, NF-κB (p65) also suppressed miR-26a production by directly binding to a predicted NF-κB binding element in the promoter region of miR-26a. Finally, we observed a negative correlation between NF-κB and miR-26a in human patients with osteoarthritis. Thus, we identified a reciprocal inhibition between miR-26a and NF-κB downstream of non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) signalling in obesity-related chondrocytes. Our findings provide a potential mechanism linking obesity to cartilage inflammation. PMID:26182366

  17. Suhuang antitussive capsule at lower doses attenuates airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Lan-Hong; Wu, Yin-Fang; Lai, Tian-Wen; Wang, Hai-Sheng; Xiao, Hui; Che, Luan-Qing; Ying, Song-Min; Li, Wen; Chen, Zhi-Hua; Shen, Hua-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Suhuang antitussive capsule (Suhuang), a traditional Chinese medication, is found effective in treating chronic cough and cough variant asthma (CVA). This study aimed to determine the possible effects and underlying mechanisms of Suhuang on chronic ovalbumin (OVA)-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), inflammation, and remodeling in mice. Mice were randomly assigned to six experimental groups: control, OVA model with or without Suhuang (low dose: 3.5 g/kg, middle dose: 7.0 g/kg, high dose: 14.0 g/kg), or dexamethasone (2.5 mg/kg). AHR, inflammatory cells, cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), lung pathology, mucus production, and airway remodeling were examined. We found Suhuang treated at lower doses effectively inhibited OVA-induced AHR, airway inflammation, mucus production and collagen deposition around the airway. High dose of Suhuang reduced most of the inflammatory hallmarks while exerted inconsiderable effects on the number of macrophages in BALF and AHR. At all doses, Suhuang significantly reduced the levels of interlukin (IL) -13 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, but had little effects on IL-4, IL-5, IL-17A and interferon (IFN)-γ. Thus, Suhuang administration alleviates the pathological changes of chronic asthma likely through inhibition of IL-13 and TGF-β1. Suhuang might be a promising therapy for patients with allergic asthma in the future. PMID:26861679

  18. Suhuang antitussive capsule at lower doses attenuates airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Lan-Hong; Wu, Yin-Fang; Lai, Tian-Wen; Wang, Hai-Sheng; Xiao, Hui; Che, Luan-Qing; Ying, Song-Min; Li, Wen; Chen, Zhi-Hua; Shen, Hua-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Suhuang antitussive capsule (Suhuang), a traditional Chinese medication, is found effective in treating chronic cough and cough variant asthma (CVA). This study aimed to determine the possible effects and underlying mechanisms of Suhuang on chronic ovalbumin (OVA)-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), inflammation, and remodeling in mice. Mice were randomly assigned to six experimental groups: control, OVA model with or without Suhuang (low dose: 3.5 g/kg, middle dose: 7.0 g/kg, high dose: 14.0 g/kg), or dexamethasone (2.5 mg/kg). AHR, inflammatory cells, cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), lung pathology, mucus production, and airway remodeling were examined. We found Suhuang treated at lower doses effectively inhibited OVA-induced AHR, airway inflammation, mucus production and collagen deposition around the airway. High dose of Suhuang reduced most of the inflammatory hallmarks while exerted inconsiderable effects on the number of macrophages in BALF and AHR. At all doses, Suhuang significantly reduced the levels of interlukin (IL) -13 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, but had little effects on IL-4, IL-5, IL-17A and interferon (IFN)-γ. Thus, Suhuang administration alleviates the pathological changes of chronic asthma likely through inhibition of IL-13 and TGF-β1. Suhuang might be a promising therapy for patients with allergic asthma in the future. PMID:26861679

  19. Etiologic and clinical analysis of chronic complex anal and rectal inflammation in children less than 3 years old

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yanlei; Zheng, Shan; Xiao, Xianmin

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the etiology and clinical diagnostic method for chronic complex anal and rectal inflammation in children less than 3 years old. Method: Seven children (5 males and 2 females; 1 year 8 months to 3 years of age at the time of physician evaluation) with chronic complex anal and rectal inflammation were enrolled between May 2008 and May 2013 at our hospital. Clinical history, results of auxiliary examinations, and empirical treatment of the children were analyzed retrospectively combined with the etiologic diagnosis. Results: Four patients were confirmed to have Crohn’s disease and one patient was confirmed to have intestinal tuberculosis; two patients were suspected to have Crohn’s disease. Anemia and low pre-albumin level were common (seven patients); serologic testing revealed four patients with elevated IgG levels and seven patients with elevated IgA levels; there were no patients with positive tuberculosis antibody titers and two patients were weakly positive for C-ANCA (one patient with Crohn’s disease and one patient intestinal tuberculosis). Colonoscopies revealed that the entire colon was affected in one patient, the left hemicolon was affected in four patients, and the sigmoid colon and rectum were affected in two patients. Two patients with Crohn’s disease and one patient with intestinal tuberculosis were diagnosed by colonoscopies in combination with histopathologic examinations. Two patients with Crohn’s disease were confirmed after empirical drug treatment, and two other patients were not definitely diagnosed. Conclusion: The possibility of Crohn’s disease or intestinal tuberculosis should be considered in the clinical diagnosis of complex chronic anal and rectal inflammation in younger children. Local surgery is sometimes unnecessary. Empirical drug treatment should be used if necessary. PMID:25550910

  20. Chromosome abnormalities in chronic active hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Stefanescu, D. T.; Moanga, M.; Teodorescu, M.; Brucher, J.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation on human peripheral blood lymphocyte chromosomes in chronic active hepatitis was carried out. A higher percentage of chromatid and chromosome lesions was recorded in all patients studied as compared with control groups—normal individuals, healthy subjects who had suffered from acute viral hepatitis, patients with alcoholic liver disease, and patients with mechanical jaundice due to cancer. The possible origin of these abnormalities is discussed. PMID:5076805

  1. Nav1.9 channel contributes to mechanical and heat pain hypersensitivity induced by subacute and chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Lolignier, Stéphane; Amsalem, Muriel; Maingret, François; Padilla, Françoise; Gabriac, Mélanie; Chapuy, Eric; Eschalier, Alain; Delmas, Patrick; Busserolles, Jérôme

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation is known to be responsible for the sensitization of peripheral sensory neurons, leading to spontaneous pain and invalidating pain hypersensitivity. Given its role in regulating neuronal excitability, the voltage-gated Nav1.9 channel is a potential target for the treatment of pathological pain, but its implication in inflammatory pain is yet not fully described. In the present study, we examined the role of the Nav1.9 channel in acute, subacute and chronic inflammatory pain using Nav1.9-null mice and Nav1.9 knock-down rats. In mice we found that, although the Nav1.9 channel does not contribute to basal pain thresholds, it plays an important role in heat pain hypersensitivity induced by subacute paw inflammation (intraplantar carrageenan) and chronic ankle inflammation (complete Freund's adjuvant-induced monoarthritis). We showed for the first time that Nav1.9 also contributes to mechanical hypersensitivity in both models, as assessed using von Frey and dynamic weight bearing tests. Consistently, antisense-based Nav1.9 gene silencing in rats reduced carrageenan-induced heat and mechanical pain hypersensitivity. While no changes in Nav1.9 mRNA levels were detected in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) during subacute and chronic inflammation, a significant increase in Nav1.9 immunoreactivity was observed in ipsilateral DRGs 24 hours following carrageenan injection. This was correlated with an increase in Nav1.9 immunolabeling in nerve fibers surrounding the inflamed area. No change in Nav1.9 current density could be detected in the soma of retrolabeled DRG neurons innervating inflamed tissues, suggesting that newly produced channels may be non-functional at this level and rather contribute to the observed increase in axonal transport. Our results provide evidence that Nav1.9 plays a crucial role in the generation of heat and mechanical pain hypersensitivity, both in subacute and chronic inflammatory pain models, and bring new elements for the understanding of its

  2. High-Potency Topical Steroids: An Effective Therapy for Chronic Scalp Inflammation in Rapp-Hodgkin Ectodermal Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Theiler, Martin; Frieden, Ilona J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic erosive pustular dermatitis with a predilection for the scalp is a hallmark of ectodermal dysplasias (EDs) caused by mutations in TP63, including Rapp-Hodgkin and Hay-Wells EDs. It is among the most troublesome and symptomatic complications and is typically refractory to classic wound care approaches. We report two cases of Rapp-Hodgkin ED with refractory scalp erosions that markedly improved with the use of potent topical steroids. We also note marked similarities between this scalp inflammation and "erosive pustular dermatosis of the scalp," a condition more typically found in elderly individuals with severe scalp sun damage, and speculate about possible shared pathogenetic mechanisms. PMID:26861896

  3. Rheumatoid cachexia: cytokine-driven hypermetabolism accompanying reduced body cell mass in chronic inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    Roubenoff, R; Roubenoff, R A; Cannon, J G; Kehayias, J J; Zhuang, H; Dawson-Hughes, B; Dinarello, C A; Rosenberg, I H

    1994-01-01

    The cytokines IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha cause cachexia and hypermetabolism in animal models, but their role in human inflammation remains controversial. The relationship between in vitro cytokine production and metabolism was examined in 23 adults with RA and 23 healthy control subjects matched on age, sex, race, and weight. Body composition was measured by multicompartmental analysis of body cell mass, water, fat, and bone mass. Resting energy expenditure (REE) was measured by indirect calorimetry. Cytokine production by PBMC was measured by radioimmunoassay. Usual energy intake, physical activity, disability scores, medication use, and other confounders were also measured. Body cell mass was 13% lower (P < 0.00001), REE was 12% higher (P < 0.008), and physical activity was much lower (P < 0.001) in subjects with RA. Production of TNF-alpha was higher in RA than controls, both before and after stimulation with endotoxin (P < 0.05), while production of IL-1 beta was higher with endotoxin stimulation (P < 0.01). In multivariate analysis, cytokine production was directly associated with REE (P < 0.001) in patients but not in controls. While energy and protein intake were similar in the two groups and exceeded the Recommended Dietary Allowances, energy intake in subjects with RA was inversely associated with IL-1 beta production (P < 0.005). In this study we conclude that: loss of body cell mass is common in RA; cytokine production in RA is associated with altered energy metabolism and intake, despite a theoretically adequate diet; and TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta modulate energy metabolism and body composition in RA. PMID:8200971

  4. The Role of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase-Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKAPKs) in Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Moens, Ugo; Kostenko, Sergiy; Sveinbjørnsson, Baldur

    2013-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways are implicated in several cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, cell survival, cell motility, metabolism, stress response and inflammation. MAPK pathways transmit and convert a plethora of extracellular signals by three consecutive phosphorylation events involving a MAPK kinase kinase, a MAPK kinase, and a MAPK. In turn MAPKs phosphorylate substrates, including other protein kinases referred to as MAPK-activated protein kinases (MAPKAPKs). Eleven mammalian MAPKAPKs have been identified: ribosomal-S6-kinases (RSK1-4), mitogen- and stress-activated kinases (MSK1-2), MAPK-interacting kinases (MNK1-2), MAPKAPK-2 (MK2), MAPKAPK-3 (MK3), and MAPKAPK-5 (MK5). The role of these MAPKAPKs in inflammation will be reviewed. PMID:24705157

  5. Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection: The Relation between Hepatitis B Antigen Expression, Telomere Length, Senescence, Inflammation and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tachtatzis, Phaedra M.; Marshall, Aileen; Aravinthan, Aloysius; Verma, Suman; Penrhyn-Lowe, Sue; Mela, Marianna; Scarpini, Cinzia; Davies, Susan E.; Coleman, Nicholas; Alexander, Graeme J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection can lead to the development of chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. We hypothesized that HBV might accelerate hepatocyte ageing and investigated the effect of HBV on hepatocyte cell cycle state and biological age. We also investigated the relation between inflammation, fibrosis and cell cycle phase. Methods Liver samples from patients with chronic HBV (n = 91), normal liver (n = 55) and regenerating liver (n = 15) were studied. Immunohistochemistry for cell cycle phase markers and HBV antigens was used to determine host cell cycle phase. Hepatocyte-specific telomere length was evaluated by quantitative fluorescent in-situ hybridization (Q-FISH) in conjunction with hepatocyte nuclear area and HBV antigen expression. The effects of induced cell cycle arrest and induced cellular senescence on HBV production were assessed in vitro. Results 13.7% hepatocytes in chronic HBV had entered cell cycle, but expression of markers for S, G2 and M phase was low compared with regenerating liver. Hepatocyte p21 expression was increased (10.9%) in chronic HBV and correlated with liver fibrosis. Mean telomere length was reduced in chronic HBV compared to normal. However, within HBV-affected livers, hepatocytes expressing HBV antigens had longer telomeres. Telomere length declined and hepatocyte nuclear size increased as HBV core antigen (HBcAg) expression shifted from the nucleus to cytoplasm. Nuclear co-expression of HBcAg and p21 was not observed. Cell cycle arrest induced in vitro was associated with increased HBV production, in contrast to 
in vitro induction of cellular senescence, which had no effect. Conclusion Chronic HBV infection was associated with hepatocyte G1 cell cycle arrest and accelerated hepatocyte ageing, implying that HBV induced cellular senescence. However, HBV replication was confined to biologically younger hepatocytes. Changes in the cellular location of HBcAg may be related to the

  6. Chronic Superantigen Exposure Induces Systemic Inflammation, Elevated Bloodstream Endotoxin, and Abnormal Glucose Tolerance in Rabbits: Possible Role in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Bao G.; Stach, Christopher S.; Kulhankova, Katarina; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Excessive weight and obesity are associated with the development of diabetes mellitus type 2 (DMII) in humans. They also pose high risks of Staphylococcus aureus colonization and overt infections. S. aureus causes a wide range of severe illnesses in both healthy and immunocompromised individuals. Among S. aureus virulence factors, superantigens are essential for pathogenicity. In this study, we show that rabbits that are chronically exposed to S. aureus superantigen toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1) experience impaired glucose tolerance, systemic inflammation, and elevated endotoxin levels in the bloodstream, all of which are common findings in DMII. Additionally, such DMII-associated findings are also seen through effects of TSST-1 on isolated adipocytes. Collectively, our findings suggest that chronic exposure to S. aureus superantigens facilitates the development of DMII, which may lead to therapeutic targeting of S. aureus and its superantigens. PMID:25714716

  7. Nonresolving Inflammation in gp91phox-/- Mice, a Model of Human Chronic Granulomatous Disease, Has Lower Adenosine and Cyclic Adenosine 5′-Monophoshate

    PubMed Central

    Rajakariar, Ravindra; Newson, Justine; Jackson, Edwin K.; Sawmynaden, Precilla; Smith, Andrew; Rahman, Farooq; Yaqoob, Muhammad M; Gilroy, Derek W

    2009-01-01

    In chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) there is failure to generate reactive oxygen metabolites resulting in recurrent infections and persistent inflammatory events. As responses to sterile stimuli in murine models of CGD also result in non-resolving inflammation, we investigated whether defects in endogenous counter-regulatory mechanisms and/or pro-resolution pathways contribute to the aetiology of CGD. To this end we carried out a series of experiments finding, in the first instance that adenosine and cAMP, which dampen innate immune-mediated responses, show a biphasic profile in resolving peritonitis; peaking at onset, waning as inflammation progresses and rising again at resolution. We also found elevations in adenosine and cAMP in resolving human peritonitis. In gp91phox-/- mice, an experimental model of CGD, levels of adenosine and cAMP were significantly lower at onset and again at resolution. Corroborating the finding of others, we show that adenosine, signalling through its A2A receptor and therefore elevating cAMP is not only anti-inflammatory but, importantly, it does not impair pro-resolution pathways, properties typical of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Conversely, antagonising the A2A receptor worsens acute inflammation and prolongs resolution. Taking this further, activating the A2A receptor in gp91phox-/- mice was dramatically anti-inflammatory regardless of the phase of the inflammatory response A2A agonists were administered i.e. onset or resolution demonstrating wide and robust pharmacological flexibility that is unlikely to subvert pro-resolution pathways. Therefore, we describe the biphasic profile of adenosine and cAMP throughout the time course of acute inflammation that is dysregulated in CGD. PMID:19234224

  8. Natural killer T cells are dispensable in the development of allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation and remodelling in a mouse model of chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Koh, Y-I; Shim, J-U; Lee, J-H; Chung, I-J; Min, J-J; Rhee, J H; Lee, H C; Chung, D H; Wi, J-O

    2010-07-01

    Natural killer T (NK T) cells have been shown to play an essential role in the development of allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and/or airway inflammation in mouse models of acute asthma. Recently, NK T cells have been reported to be required for the development of AHR in a virus induced chronic asthma model. We investigated whether NK T cells were required for the development of allergen-induced AHR, airway inflammation and airway remodelling in a mouse model of chronic asthma. CD1d-/- mice that lack NK T cells were used for the experiments. In the chronic model, AHR, eosinophilic inflammation, remodelling characteristics including mucus metaplasia, subepithelial fibrosis and increased mass of the airway smooth muscle, T helper type 2 (Th2) immune response and immunoglobulin (Ig)E production were equally increased in both CD1d-/- mice and wild-type mice. However, in the acute model, AHR, eosinophilic inflammation, Th2 immune response and IgE production were significantly decreased in the CD1d-/- mice compared to wild-type. CD1d-dependent NK T cells may not be required for the development of allergen-induced AHR, eosinophilic airway inflammation and airway remodelling in chronic asthma model, although they play a role in the development of AHR and eosinophilic inflammation in acute asthma model. PMID:20456411

  9. Atrial fibrillation is associated with hematopoietic tissue activation and arterial inflammation.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Philip; Ishai, Amorina; MacNabb, Megan; Abdelbaky, Amr; Lavender, Zachary R; Ruskin, Jeremy; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Tawakol, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is associated with the development of atrial fibrillation (AF). Activity in hematopoietic tissues, which produce inflammatory leukocytes, is closely related to systemic inflammation, arterial inflammation and cardiovascular events, but its relationship to AF is unknown. Using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, we examined the relationships between AF, splenic metabolic activity and vascular inflammation. We conducted a cross sectional study of 70 participants: 35 with AF, who were matched (by age, sex and history of active cancer) to 35 controls without AF. Splenic metabolic activity and vascular aortic inflammation were measured by the mean FDG maximum standard uptake values (SUV Max) by PET. We examined (1) the association between AF and splenic activity, and (2) AF and aortic inflammation. The mean age of the population was 68.13 (standard deviation (SD) 8.98) years and 46 (65 %) participants were male. Splenic activity was higher in AF participants [2.31 (SD 0.45) vs. 2.07 (SD 0.37), p = 0.024], and remained significant after adjusting for demographic and clinical covariates. Aortic inflammation was also higher in AF participants [2.22 (SD 0.44) vs. 1.91 (SD 0.44), p = 0.004], and remained significant on multivariable analysis. Aortic inflammation and splenic activity were highly correlated (Pearson R = 0.61, p < 0.001). Atrial fibrillation is associated with higher hematopoietic tissue activation and arterial inflammation. Further studies are needed to clarify the mechanisms by which this cardio-splenic axis is implicated in AF. PMID:26411879

  10. Chronic variable stress activates hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Courties, Gabriel; Dutta, Partha; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Zaltsman, Alex; von zur Muhlen, Constantin; Bode, Christoph; Fricchione, Gregory L.; Denninger, John; Lin, Charles P.; Vinegoni, Claudio; Libby, Peter; Swirski, Filip K.; Weissleder, Ralph; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to psychosocial stress is a risk factor for many diseases, including atherosclerosis1,2. While incompletely understood, interaction between the psyche and the immune system provides one potential mechanism linking stress and disease inception and progression. Known crosstalk between the brain and immune system includes the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, which centrally drives glucocorticoid production in the adrenal cortex, and the sympathetic–adrenal–medullary axis, which controls stress–induced catecholamine release in support of the fight–or–flight reflex3,4. It remains unknown however if chronic stress changes hematopoietic stem cell activity. Here we show that stress increases proliferation of these most primitive progenitors, giving rise to higher levels of disease–promoting inflammatory leukocytes. We found that chronic stress induced monocytosis and neutrophilia in humans. While investigating the source of leukocytosis in mice, we discovered that stress activates upstream hematopoietic stem cells. Sympathetic nerve fibers release surplus noradrenaline, which uses the β3 adrenergic receptor to signal bone marrow niche cells to decrease CXCL12 levels. Consequently, elevated hematopoietic stem cell proliferation increases output of neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes. When atherosclerosis–prone ApoE−/− mice encounter chronic stress, accelerated hematopoiesis promotes plaque features associated with vulnerable lesions that cause myocardial infarction and stroke in humans. PMID:24952646

  11. CD14 Signaling Restrains Chronic Inflammation through Induction of p38-MAPK/SOCS-Dependent Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Sahay, Bikash; Patsey, Rebeca L.; Eggers, Christian H.; Salazar, Juan C.; Radolf, Justin D.; Sellati, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    Current thinking emphasizes the primacy of CD14 in facilitating recognition of microbes by certain TLRs to initiate pro-inflammatory signaling events and the importance of p38-MAPK in augmenting such responses. Herein, this paradigm is challenged by demonstrating that recognition of live Borrelia burgdorferi not only triggers an inflammatory response in the absence of CD14, but one that is, in part, a consequence of altered PI3K/AKT/p38-MAPK signaling and impaired negative regulation of TLR2. CD14 deficiency results in increased localization of PI3K to lipid rafts, hyperphosphorylation of AKT, and reduced activation of p38. Such aberrant signaling leads to decreased negative regulation by SOCS1, SOCS3, and CIS, thereby compromising the induction of tolerance in macrophages and engendering more severe and persistent inflammatory responses to B. burgdorferi. Importantly, these altered signaling events and the higher cytokine production observed can be mimicked through shRNA and pharmacological inhibition of p38 activity in CD14-expressing macrophages. Perturbation of this CD14/p38-MAPK-dependent immune regulation may underlie development of infectious chronic inflammatory syndromes. PMID:20011115

  12. The novel compound Sul-121 inhibits airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in experimental models of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Han, Bing; Poppinga, Wilfred J.; Zuo, Haoxiao; Zuidhof, Annet B.; Bos, I. Sophie T.; Smit, Marieke; Vogelaar, Pieter; Krenning, Guido; Henning, Robert H.; Maarsingh, Harm; Halayko, Andrew J.; van Vliet, Bernard; Stienstra, Stef; Graaf, Adrianus Cornelis van der; Meurs, Herman; Schmidt, Martina

    2016-01-01

    COPD is characterized by persistent airflow limitation, neutrophilia and oxidative stress from endogenous and exogenous insults. Current COPD therapy involving anticholinergics, β2-adrenoceptor agonists and/or corticosteroids, do not specifically target oxidative stress, nor do they reduce chronic pulmonary inflammation and disease progression in all patients. Here, we explore the effects of Sul-121, a novel compound with anti-oxidative capacity, on hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and inflammation in experimental models of COPD. Using a guinea pig model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced neutrophilia, we demonstrated that Sul-121 inhalation dose-dependently prevented LPS-induced airway neutrophilia (up to ~60%) and AHR (up to ~90%). Non-cartilaginous airways neutrophilia was inversely correlated with blood H2S, and LPS-induced attenuation of blood H2S (~60%) was prevented by Sul-121. Concomitantly, Sul-121 prevented LPS-induced production of the oxidative stress marker, malondialdehyde by ~80%. In immortalized human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, Sul-121 dose-dependently prevented cigarette smoke extract-induced IL-8 release parallel with inhibition of nuclear translocation of the NF-κB subunit, p65 (each ~90%). Sul-121 also diminished cellular reactive oxygen species production in ASM cells, and inhibited nuclear translocation of the anti-oxidative response regulator, Nrf2. Our data show that Sul-121 effectively inhibits airway inflammation and AHR in experimental COPD models, prospectively through inhibition of oxidative stress. PMID:27229886

  13. The novel compound Sul-121 inhibits airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in experimental models of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Han, Bing; Poppinga, Wilfred J; Zuo, Haoxiao; Zuidhof, Annet B; Bos, I Sophie T; Smit, Marieke; Vogelaar, Pieter; Krenning, Guido; Henning, Robert H; Maarsingh, Harm; Halayko, Andrew J; van Vliet, Bernard; Stienstra, Stef; Graaf, Adrianus Cornelis van der; Meurs, Herman; Schmidt, Martina

    2016-01-01

    COPD is characterized by persistent airflow limitation, neutrophilia and oxidative stress from endogenous and exogenous insults. Current COPD therapy involving anticholinergics, β2-adrenoceptor agonists and/or corticosteroids, do not specifically target oxidative stress, nor do they reduce chronic pulmonary inflammation and disease progression in all patients. Here, we explore the effects of Sul-121, a novel compound with anti-oxidative capacity, on hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and inflammation in experimental models of COPD. Using a guinea pig model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced neutrophilia, we demonstrated that Sul-121 inhalation dose-dependently prevented LPS-induced airway neutrophilia (up to ~60%) and AHR (up to ~90%). Non-cartilaginous airways neutrophilia was inversely correlated with blood H2S, and LPS-induced attenuation of blood H2S (~60%) was prevented by Sul-121. Concomitantly, Sul-121 prevented LPS-induced production of the oxidative stress marker, malondialdehyde by ~80%. In immortalized human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, Sul-121 dose-dependently prevented cigarette smoke extract-induced IL-8 release parallel with inhibition of nuclear translocation of the NF-κB subunit, p65 (each ~90%). Sul-121 also diminished cellular reactive oxygen species production in ASM cells, and inhibited nuclear translocation of the anti-oxidative response regulator, Nrf2. Our data show that Sul-121 effectively inhibits airway inflammation and AHR in experimental COPD models, prospectively through inhibition of oxidative stress. PMID:27229886

  14. B7 interactions with CD28 and CTLA-4 control tolerance or induction of mucosal inflammation in chronic experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Geboes, K; Hellings, P; Maerten, P; Heremans, H; Vandenberghe, P; Boon, L; van Kooten, P; Rutgeerts, P; Ceuppens, J L

    2001-08-01

    CD28-B7 interaction plays a critical costimulatory role in inducing T cell activation, while CTLA-4-B7 interaction provides a negative signal that is essential in immune homeostasis. Transfer of CD45RB(high)CD4(+) T cells from syngeneic mice induces transmural colon inflammation in SCID recipients. This adoptive transfer model was used to investigate the contribution of B7-CD28/CTLA-4 interactions to the control of intestinal inflammation. CD45RB(high)CD4(+) cells from CD28(-/-) mice failed to induce mucosal inflammation in SCID recipients. Administration of anti-B7.1 (but not anti-B7.2) after transfer of wild-type CD45RB(high)CD4(+) cells also prevented wasting disease with colitis, abrogated leukocyte infiltration, and reduced production of proinflammatory cytokines IL-2 and IFN-gamma by lamina propria CD4(+) cells. In contrast, anti-CTLA-4 treatment led to deterioration of disease, to more severe inflammation, and to enhanced production of proinflammatory cytokines. Of note, CD25(+)CD4(+) cells from CD28(-/-) mice similar to those from the wild-type mice were efficient to prevent intestinal mucosal inflammation induced by the wild-type CD45RB(high) cells. The inhibitory functions of these regulatory T cells were effectively blocked by anti-CTLA-4. These data show that the B7-CD28 costimulatory pathway is required for induction of effector T cells and for intestinal mucosal inflammation, while the regulatory T cells function in a CD28-independent way. CTLA-4 signaling plays a key role in maintaining mucosal lymphocyte tolerance, most likely by activating the regulatory T cells. PMID:11466409

  15. Cholesterol Crystals Activate the NLRP3 Inflammasome in Human Macrophages: A Novel Link between Cholesterol Metabolism and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Rajamäki, Kristiina; Lappalainen, Jani; Öörni, Katariina; Välimäki, Elina; Matikainen, Sampsa; Kovanen, Petri T.; Eklund, Kari K.

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammation of the arterial wall is a key element in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, yet the factors that trigger and sustain the inflammation remain elusive. Inflammasomes are cytoplasmic caspase-1-activating protein complexes that promote maturation and secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin(IL)-1β and IL-18. The most intensively studied inflammasome, NLRP3 inflammasome, is activated by diverse substances, including crystalline and particulate materials. As cholesterol crystals are abundant in atherosclerotic lesions, and IL-1β has been linked to atherogenesis, we explored the possibility that cholesterol crystals promote inflammation by activating the inflammasome pathway. Principal Findings Here we show that human macrophages avidly phagocytose cholesterol crystals and store the ingested cholesterol as cholesteryl esters. Importantly, cholesterol crystals induced dose-dependent secretion of mature IL-1β from human monocytes and macrophages. The cholesterol crystal-induced secretion of IL-1β was caspase-1-dependent, suggesting the involvement of an inflammasome-mediated pathway. Silencing of the NLRP3 receptor, the crucial component in NLRP3 inflammasome, completely abolished crystal-induced IL-1β secretion, thus identifying NLRP3 inflammasome as the cholesterol crystal-responsive element in macrophages. The crystals were shown to induce leakage of the lysosomal protease cathepsin B into the cytoplasm and inhibition of this enzyme reduced cholesterol crystal-induced IL-1β secretion, suggesting that NLRP3 inflammasome activation occurred via lysosomal destabilization. Conclusions The cholesterol crystal-induced inflammasome activation in macrophages may represent an important link between cholesterol metabolism and inflammation in atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:20668705

  16. Inflammation and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    de Luca, Carl; Olefsky, Jerrold M.

    2008-01-01

    Obesity-induced chronic inflammation is a key component in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and the Metabolic syndrome. In this review, we focus on the interconnection between obesity, inflammation and insulin resistance. Pro-inflammatory cytokines can cause insulin resistance in adipose tissue, skeletal muscle and liver by inhibiting insulin signal transduction. The sources of cytokines in insulin resistant states are the insulin target tissue themselves, primarily fat and liver, but to a larger extent the activated tissue resident macrophages. While the initiating factors of this inflammatory response remain to be fully determined, chronic inflammation in these tissues could cause localized insulin resistance via autocrine/paracrine cytokine signaling and systemic insulin resistance via endocrine cytokine signaling all of which contribute to the abnormal metabolic state. PMID:18053812

  17. Chronic inflammation and the role for cofactors (hepatitis C, drug abuse, antiretroviral drug toxicity, aging) in HAND persistence.

    PubMed

    Gill, Alexander J; Kolson, Dennis L

    2014-09-01

    HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) is a group of syndromes of varying degrees of cognitive impairment affecting up to 50 % of HIV-infected individuals. The neuropathogenesis of HAND is thought to be driven by HIV invasion and productive replication within brain perivascular macrophages and endogenous microglia, and to some degree by restricted infection of astrocytes. The persistence of HAND in individuals experiencing suppression of systemic HIV viral load with antiretroviral therapy (ART) is incompletely explained, and suggested factors include chronic inflammation, persistent HIV replication in brain macrophages, effects of aging on brain vulnerability, and co-morbid conditions including hepatitis C (HCV) co-infection, substance abuse, and CNS toxicity of ART, among other factors. This review discusses several of these conditions: chronic inflammation, co-infection with HCV, drugs of abuse, aging, and antiretroviral drug effects. Effectively managing these co-morbid conditions in individuals with and without HAND is critical for improving neurocognitive outcomes and decreasing HIV-associated morbidity. PMID:24929842

  18. Chronic inflammation aggravates metabolic disorders of hepatic fatty acids in high-fat diet-induced obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lei; Zhong, Shan; Qu, Haiyang; Xie, Yunxia; Cao, Zhennan; Li, Qing; Yang, Ping; Varghese, Zac; Moorhead, John F.; Chen, Yaxi; Ruan, Xiong Z.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) increases with increasing body mass index (BMI). However, approximately 40–50% of obese adults do not develop hepatic steatosis. The level of inflammatory biomarkers is higher in obese subjects with NAFLD compared to BMI-matched subjects without hepatic steatosis. We used a casein injection in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed C57BL/6J mice to induce inflammatory stress. Although mice on a HFD exhibited apparent phenotypes of obesity and hyperlipidemia regardless of exposure to casein injection, only the HFD+Casein mice showed increased hepatic vacuolar degeneration accompanied with elevated inflammatory cytokines in the liver and serum, compared to mice on a normal chow diet. The expression of genes related to hepatic fatty acid synthesis and oxidation were upregulated in the HFD-only mice. The casein injection further increased baseline levels of lipogenic genes and decreased the levels of oxidative genes in HFD-only mice. Inflammatory stress induced both oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress in HFD-fed mice livers. We conclude that chronic inflammation precedes hepatic steatosis by disrupting the balance between fatty acid synthesis and oxidation in the livers of HFD-fed obese mice. This mechanism may operate in obese individuals with chronic inflammation, thus making them more prone to NAFLD. PMID:25974206

  19. Lipid peroxidation-mediated inflammation promotes cell apoptosis through activation of NF-κB pathway in rheumatoid arthritis synovial cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Geng; Wang, Ying; Cen, Xiao-Min; Yang, Min; Liang, Yan; Xie, Qi-Bing

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation of multiple joints. The central pathogenesis of RA is the proliferation of synovial fibroblasts in response to inflammatory cytokines. However, some of the targeted therapies for inflammation reactions do not display significant clinical improvement after initiation of therapy. Thus, the relationship between inflammatory responses and RA therapy is still incompletely understood. In the present study, we proposed to determine whether enhanced inflammations may lead to cell apoptosis in rheumatoid arthritis synoviocytes. Our results indicated that products of lipid peroxidations, 4-HNE, may induce synovial intrinsic inflammations by activating NF-κB pathways and it may lead to cell apoptosis. Pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB activation may reduce the 4-HNE mediated inflammation responses and subsequent cell apoptosis. Our results may help to clarify the role of inflammations on RA development and imply that blocking NF-κB activation may be partly beneficial for human RA therapy. These findings might provide a mechanism-based rationale for developing new strategy to RA clinical therapy. PMID:25741130

  20. Implications of compromised zinc status on bone loss associated with chronic inflammation in C57BL/6 mice

    PubMed Central

    Chongwatpol, Pitipa; Rendina-Ruedy, Elizabeth; Stoecker, Barbara J; Clarke, Stephen L; Lucas, Edralin A; Smith, Brenda J

    2015-01-01

    Compromised zinc status and chronic inflammation are independent factors that can contribute to bone loss. However, zinc’s role in regulating lymphoid and myeloid cell populations, combined with the interplay between the immune and skeletal systems raises the question as to the extent to which a low-grade inflammatory challenge in the context of marginal zinc deficiency would exacerbate bone loss. To address this question, young adult C57BL/6 male mice (n=32) were used in a 2×2 factorial design with dietary zinc (adequate or 35 ppm vs inadequate or −Zn =5 ppm) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 0 or 0.1 mg/kg body weight). Mice were fed their respective diets for 10 weeks. On the 6th week, mice had a slow release pellet implanted to induce a low-grade inflammation for the final 4 weeks of the study. −Zn induced a decrease in total white cell counts and peripheral lymphocytes, whereas LPS increased blood monocytes. LPS significantly reduced spine bone mineral density and trabecular bone volume and number of the vertebral body compared with both zinc adequate and inadequate without LPS groups. Likewise, the most pronounced effects on bone strength occurred with LPS, however, −Zn also had negative effects on the bone von Mises stresses. LPS induced an increase in TNF-α and this response was further increased with −Zn. Although the marginal zinc deficiency altered immune function, bone loss was not exacerbated with low-grade chronic inflammation in marginally zinc-deficient young adult mice. These findings demonstrate that in young adult animals an immune challenge modestly increases the inflammatory response and worsens bone biomechanics in the context of a marginal zinc deficiency, but not to the extent that more severe adverse outcomes are observed on bone structural parameters. PMID:26203271

  1. Chronic inflammation and risk of colorectal and other obesity-related cancers: The health, aging and body composition study.

    PubMed

    Izano, Monika; Wei, Esther K; Tai, Caroline; Swede, Helen; Gregorich, Steven; Harris, Tamara B; Klepin, Heidi; Satterfield, Suzanne; Murphy, Rachel; Newman, Anne B; Rubin, Susan M; Braithwaite, Dejana

    2016-03-01

    Evidence of the association between chronic inflammation and the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) and other obesity-related cancers (OBRC) remains inconsistent, possibly due to a paucity of studies examining repeated measures of inflammation. In the Health ABC prospective study of 2,490 adults aged 70-79 years at baseline, we assessed whether circulating levels of three markers of systemic inflammation, IL-6, CRP and TNF-α, were associated with the risk of CRC and OBRC, a cluster including cancers of pancreas, prostate, breast and endometrium. Inflammatory markers were measured in stored fasting blood samples. While only baseline measures of TNF-α were available, IL-6 and CRP were additionally measured at Years 2, 4, 6 and 8. Multivariable Cox models were fit to determine whether tertiles and log-transformed baseline, updated and averaged measures of CRP and IL-6 and baseline measures of TNF-α were associated with the risk of incident cancer(s). During a median follow-up of 11.9 years, we observed 55 and 172 cases of CRC and OBRC, respectively. The hazard of CRC in the highest tertile of updated CRP was more than double that in the lowest tertile (HR = 2.29; 95% CI: 1.08-4.86). No significant associations were seen between colorectal cancer and IL-6 or TNF-α. Additionally, no significant associations were found between obesity-related cancers and the three inflammatory markers overall, but we observed a suggestion of effect modification by BMI and NSAID use. In summary, in this population, higher CRP levels were associated with increased risk of CRC, but not of OBRC. The findings provide new evidence that chronically elevated levels of CRP, as reflected by repeated measures of this marker, may play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis in older adults. PMID:26413860

  2. Coincident Helminth Infection Modulates Systemic Inflammation and Immune Activation in Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    George, Parakkal Jovvian; Kumar, Nathella Pavan; Sridhar, Rathinam; Hanna, Luke E.; Nair, Dina; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V.; Nutman, Thomas B.; Babu, Subash

    2014-01-01

    Background Helminth infections are known to modulate innate and adaptive immune responses in active and latent tuberculosis (TB). However, the role of helminth infections in modulating responses associated with inflammation and immune activation (reflecting disease activity and/or severity) in TB is not known. Methodology We measured markers of inflammation and immune activation in active pulmonary TB individuals (ATB) with co-incidental Strongyloides stercoralis (Ss) infection. These included systemic levels of acute phase proteins, matrix metalloproteinases and their endogenous inhibitors and immune activation markers. As a control, we measured the systemic levels of the same molecules in TB-uninfected individuals (NTB) with or without Ss infection. Principal Findings Our data confirm that ATB is associated with elevated levels of the various measured molecules when compared to those seen in NTB. Our data also reveal that co-incident Ss infection in ATB individuals is associated with significantly decreased circulating levels of acute phase proteins, matrix metalloproteinases, tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases as well as the systemic immune activation markers, sCD14 and sCD163. These changes are specific to ATB since they are absent in NTB individuals with Ss infection. Conclusions Our data therefore reveal a profound effect of Ss infection on the markers associated with TB disease activity and severity and indicate that co-incidental helminth infections might dampen the severity of TB disease. PMID:25375117

  3. Neurovascular dysfunction, inflammation and endothelial activation: Implications for the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related disorder characterized by progressive cognitive decline and dementia. Alzheimer's disease is an increasingly prevalent disease with 5.3 million people in the United States currently affected. This number is a 10 percent increase from previous estimates and is projected to sharply increase to 8 million by 2030; it is the sixth-leading cause of death. In the United States the direct and indirect costs of Alzheimer's and other dementias to Medicare, Medicaid and businesses amount to more than $172 billion each year. Despite intense research efforts, effective disease-modifying therapies for this devastating disease remain elusive. At present, the few agents that are FDA-approved for the treatment of AD have demonstrated only modest effects in modifying clinical symptoms for relatively short periods and none has shown a clear effect on disease progression. New therapeutic approaches are desperately needed. Although the idea that vascular defects are present in AD and may be important in disease pathogenesis was suggested over 25 years ago, little work has focused on an active role for cerebrovascular mechanisms in the pathogenesis of AD. Nevertheless, increasing literature supports a vascular-neuronal axis in AD as shared risk factors for both AD and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease implicate vascular mechanisms in the development and/or progression of AD. Also, chronic inflammation is closely associated with cardiovascular disease, as well as a broad spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases of aging including AD. In this review we summarize data regarding, cardiovascular risk factors and vascular abnormalities, neuro- and vascular-inflammation, and brain endothelial dysfunction in AD. We conclude that the endothelial interface, a highly synthetic bioreactor that produces a large number of soluble factors, is functionally altered in AD and contributes to a noxious CNS milieu by releasing inflammatory and neurotoxic species

  4. High amylose resistant starch diet ameliorates oxidative stress, inflammation, and progression of chronic kidney disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inflammation is a major mediator of CKD progression and is partly driven by altered gut microbiome and intestinal barrier disruption, events which are caused by: urea influx in the intestine resulting in dominance of urease-possessing bacteria; disruption of epithelial barrier by urea-derived ammoni...

  5. A resistant starch fiber diet ameliorates oxidative stress, inflammation, and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inflammation is a constant feature and a major mediator of CKD progression. It is, in part, driven by altered gut microbiome and disruption of intestinal epithelial barrier, events which are primarily caused by: 1- urea influx in the intestine resulting in dominance of urease-possessing bacteria; 2-...

  6. Inflammation Biomarkers of Advanced Disease in Nongingival Tissues of Chronic Periodontitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Thiago Alvares; Silva, Marcelo José Barbosa; Alves, Polyanna Miranda; Chica, Javier Emílio Lazo; Barcelos, Emilio Zorzo; Giani, Max Antonio Alves; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier; da Silva, João Santana; Rodrigues Júnior, Virmondes; Rodrigues, Denise Bertulucci Rocha; Cardoso, Cristina Ribeiro de Barros

    2015-01-01

    Chronic periodontitis is a multifactorial inflammatory disease that affects supporting structures of the teeth. Although the gingival response is largely described, little is known about the immune changes in the alveolar bone and neighboring tissues that could indicate periodontal disease (PD) activity. Then, in this study we identified the ongoing inflammatory changes and novel biomarkers for periodontitis in the tissues directly affected by the destructive disease in PD patients. Samples were collected by osteotomy in 17 control subjects during extraction of third molars and 18 patients with advanced PD, in which alveoloplasty was necessary after extraction of teeth with previous extensive periodontal damage. Patients presented mononuclear cells infiltration in the connective tissue next to the bone and higher fibrosis area, along with increased accumulation of IL-17+ and TRAP+ cells. The levels of TNF-α and MMP-2 mRNA were also elevated compared to controls and a positive and significant correlation was observed between TNF-α and MMP-2 mRNA expression, considering all samples evaluated. In conclusion, nongingival tissues neighboring large periodontal pockets present inflammatory markers that could predict ongoing bone resorption and disease spreading. Therefore, we suggested that the detailed evaluation of these regions could be of great importance to the assessment of disease progression. PMID:26063981

  7. Selective P2X7 receptor antagonists for chronic inflammation and pain

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly-Roberts, Diana; Jarvis, Michael F.

    2008-01-01

    ATP, acting on P2X7 receptors, stimulates changes in intracellular calcium concentrations, maturation, and release of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and following prolonged agonist exposure, cell death. The functional effects of P2X7 receptor activation facilitate several proinflammatory processes associated with arthritis. Within the nervous system, these proinflammatory processes may also contribute to the development and maintenance of chronic pain. Emerging data from genetic knockout studies have indicated specific roles for P2X7 receptors in inflammatory and neuropathic pain states. The discovery of multiple distinct chemical series of potent and highly selective P2X7 receptor antagonists have enhanced our understanding of P2X7 receptor pharmacology and the diverse array of P2X7 receptor signaling mechanisms. These antagonists have provided mechanistic insight into the role(s) P2X7 receptors play under pathophysiological conditions. In this review, we integrate the recent discoveries of novel P2X7 receptor-selective antagonists with a brief update on P2X7 receptor pharmacology and its therapeutic potential. PMID:18568426

  8. Acetylcholinesterase activity in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Prall, Y G; Gambhir, K K; Cruz, I A; Blassingale, J; Ampy, F R

    2000-01-21

    Twenty healthy subjects and 39 Chronic Renal Failure patients (CRF-patients) maintained on chronic hemodialysis were used in this investigation to study the changes in acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity of red blood cells (RBCs). The CRF-patients were all undergoing hemodialysis treatment. AChE activity from the CRF-patients was determined before and after dialysis. An additional objective was to study the effect of chronic renal failure on human red blood cell aging. Blood samples were drawn from controls and CRF-patients in tubes containing EDTA or sodium heparin as an anticoagulant. Red blood cells were purified to avoid interference with monocytes, reticulocytes and leukocytes. The purified RBCs were subfractionated into young (y) (1.08-1.09), mid (m) (1.09-1.11) and old (o) (1.11-1.12) percoll density (g/mL) fractions using a discontinous percoll gradient. The mean +/- SD AChE per gram hemoglobin (U/g Hgb) activities in whole blood (WB), purified human red blood cells (PRBCs), young human red blood cells (y-RBCs), mid age human red blood cells (m-RBCs) and old human red blood cells (o-RBCs) in CRF-patients were 31.2+/-3.43, 29.3+/-3.26, 30.4+/-3.91, 25.1+/-5.25, 17.1+/-6.02 in females and 29.8+/-5.39, 28.8+/-5.29, 28.7+/-5.29, 23.7+/-5.39 and 16.0+/-5.60 in males. AChE activity from CRF-patients were higher than that found in the control subjects. The aging of human RBCs in both the controls and CRF-patients showed a progressive reduction in AChE activity. AChE activity of RBCs from female CRF-patients were significantly higher (p < 0.05) than that of the female control subjects. The RBCs isolated from male CRF-patients showed a higher AChE activity than control males, but a significant difference was only observed with the mid-age-cells. These studies further indicate that AChE activity remained insignificantly different in the various density based age subfractions of RBCs of both CRF-patients and controls. PMID:10698358

  9. Transient infection of the zebrafish notochord with E. coli induces chronic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen-Chi, Mai; Phan, Quang Tien; Gonzalez, Catherine; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Levraud, Jean-Pierre; Lutfalla, Georges

    2014-01-01

    Zebrafish embryos and larvae are now well-established models in which to study infectious diseases. Infections with non-pathogenic Gram-negative Escherichia coli induce a strong and reproducible inflammatory response. Here, we study the cellular response of zebrafish larvae when E. coli bacteria are injected into the notochord and describe the effects. First, we provide direct evidence that the notochord is a unique organ that is inaccessible to leukocytes (macrophages and neutrophils) during the early stages of inflammation. Second, we show that notochord infection induces a host response that is characterised by rapid clearance of the bacteria, strong leukocyte recruitment around the notochord and prolonged inflammation that lasts several days after bacteria clearance. During this inflammatory response, il1b is first expressed in macrophages and subsequently at high levels in neutrophils. Moreover, knock down of il1b alters the recruitment of neutrophils to the notochord, demonstrating the important role of this cytokine in the maintenance of inflammation in the notochord. Eventually, infection of the notochord induces severe defects of the notochord that correlate with neutrophil degranulation occurring around this tissue. This is the first in vivo evidence that neutrophils can degranulate in the absence of a direct encounter with a pathogen. Persistent inflammation, neutrophil infiltration and restructuring of the extracellular matrix are defects that resemble those seen in bone infection and in some chondropathies. As the notochord is a transient embryonic structure that is closely related to cartilage and bone and that contributes to vertebral column formation, we propose infection of the notochord in zebrafish larvae as a new model to study the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying cartilage and bone inflammation. PMID:24973754

  10. Combined administration of secretin and oxytocin inhibits chronic colitis and associated activation of forebrain neurons

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Martha G.; Anwar, Muhammad; Chang, Christine Y.; Gross, Kara J.; Ruggiero, David A.; Gershon, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease is unknown; however, the disorder is aggravated by psychological stress and is itself psychologically stressful. Chronic intestinal inflammation, moreover, has been reported to activate forebrain neurons. We tested the hypotheses that the chronically inflamed bowel signals to the brain through the vagi and that administration of a combination of secretin (S) and oxytocin (OT) inhibits this signaling. Methods Three daily enemas containing 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS), which were given to rats produced chronic colitis and ongoing activation of Fos in brain neurons. Key Results Fos was induced in neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, basolateral amygdala, central amygdala, and piriform cortex. Subdiaphragmatic vagotomy failed to inhibit this activation of Fos, suggesting that colitis activates forebrain neurons independently of the vagi. When administered intravenously, but not when given intracerebroventricularly, in doses that were individually ineffective, combined S/OT prevented colitis-associated activation of central neurons. Strikingly, S/OT decreased inflammatory infiltrates into the colon and colonic expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ. Conclusions & Inferences These observations suggest that chronic colonic inflammation is ameliorated by the systemic administration of S/OT, which probably explains the parallel ability of systemic S/OT to inhibit the colitis-associated activation of forebrain neurons. It is possible that S and OT, which are endogenous to the colon, might normally combine to restrict the severity of colonic inflammatory responses and that advantage might be taken of this system to develop novel means of treating inflammation-associated intestinal disorders. PMID:20210978

  11. Activation of nuclear factor-kappaB in dogs with chronic enteropathies.

    PubMed

    Luckschander, Nicole; Hall, Jean A; Gaschen, Frédéric; Forster, Ursula; Wenzlow, Nanny; Hermann, Pascal; Allenspach, Karin; Dobbelaere, Dirk; Burgener, Iwan A; Welle, Monika

    2010-02-15

    Homeostasis in the intestinal microenvironment between the immune system and luminal antigens appears disturbed in chronic enteropathies. Pro-inflammatory cytokines likely play a role in the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation. Several inflammatory and immunoregulatory genes have associated nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) binding sites, which allow NF-kappaB to regulate gene transcription. The purpose of this study was to investigate (1) the occurrence of NF-kappaB activation during mucosal inflammation in situ, (2) the mucosal distribution pattern of cells expressing activated NF-kappaB within treatment groups, and (3) the effect of specific therapy on NF-kappaB activation. Dogs with chronic enteropathy were studied (n=26) and compared with 13 healthy dogs. Ten dogs had food responsive disease (FRD) and 16 had inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). NF-kappaB activation was detected in duodenal mucosal biopsies using a mouse monoclonal antibody (MAB 3026) that selectively binds the nuclear localization sequence of activated NF-kappaB. To identify macrophages, biopsies were stained using the MAC 387 antibody. Macrophages in the lamina propria double-stained for MAC 387 and NF-kappaB were quantitated; epithelial cell expression of activated NF-kappaB was determined semi-quantitatively. Results showed that more macrophages positive for activated NF-kappaB were present in lamina propria of dogs with chronic enteropathy compared to control dogs (p<0.01). More NF-kappaB positive epithelial cells were observed in FRD dogs compared to IBD dogs (p<0.05). After therapy, the number of macrophages and epithelial cells staining positive for activated NF-kappaB decreased (p<0.01) in chronic enteropathy dogs. In conclusion, activation of NF-kappaB is closely associated with the pathophysiology of canine chronic enteropathy. Down-regulation follows successful therapy. PMID:19740552

  12. Lysophosphatidylcholine perpetuates macrophage polarization toward classically activated phenotype in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaofei; Qiu, Chunguang; Zhao, Luosha

    2014-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory macrophages are involved in vascular inflammation and serve as the major effector cells in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is a major phospholipid moiety affixed to oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and thought to play important roles in the development of atherosclerosis. In this study we described that a bioactive lipid derivative, lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC), generated from hydrolysis of the PC moiety of oxidized LDL, promoted and stabilized a strong M1 phenotype in macrophage polarization. Another derivative, 9-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (9-HODE), did not show the similar biological function. Blockade of G protein coupled receptor, G2A, which mediates the signal transduction of lysoPC, diminished the effects of lysoPC on the macrophage polarization toward M1 phenotype. The results provide insights into the new mechanism on how oxidized LDL participates in tissue inflammation in atherosclerosis. PMID:24841857

  13. Physical activity, nutrition, and chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Blair, S N; Horton, E; Leon, A S; Lee, I M; Drinkwater, B L; Dishman, R K; Mackey, M; Kienholz, M L

    1996-03-01

    Epidemiologic, animal, clinical, and metabolic studies demonstrate the independent roles of physical activity and nutrition in the prevention and treatment of several chronic diseases. Fewer data are available to describe the synergistic effects of exercise and diet, and questions remain as to whether and how these two lifestyle factors work together to promote health and prevent disease. This paper briefly reviews many of the known effects of physical activity and nutrition on the prevention and treatment of coronary heart disease, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, obesity, and osteoporosis as well as how exercise and diet may work together. A discussion of how to increase physical activity levels and how to improve dietary intake also is included. Finally, current exercise and dietary recommendations are summarized, as are directions for future research. PMID:8776222

  14. Blockage of caspase-1 activation ameliorates bone marrow inflammation in mice after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jianlin; Wu, Jinyan; Li, Yuanyuan; Xia, Yuan; Chu, Peipei; Qi, Kunming; Yan, Zhiling; Yao, Haina; Liu, Yun; Xu, Kailin; Zeng, Lingyu

    2016-01-01

    Conditioning regimens before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), cause damage to bone marrow and inflammation. Whether inflammasomes are involved in bone marrow inflammation remains unclear. The study aims to evaluate the role of inflammasomes in bone marrow inflammation after HSCT. On days 7, 14, 21 and 28 after HSCT, mice were sacrificed for analysis of bone marrow inflammation, pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion, inflammasomes expression and caspase-1 activation. Bone marrow inflammation with neutrophils and macrophages infiltration was observed after HSCT. Secretion of IL-1β, IL-18, TNF-α and IL-6 were elevated, with increased caspase-1 activation and inflammasomes expression. Caspase-1 inhibitor administration after HSCT significantly reduced infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages into bone marrow and increased the numbers of megakaryocytes and platelets. In conclusion, inflammasomes activation is involved in bone marrow inflammation after HSCT and caspase-1 inhibition attenuates bone marrow inflammation and promoted hematopoietic reconstitution, suggesting targeting caspase-1 might be beneficial for improving HSCT outcomes. PMID:26639193

  15. Current and emerging strategies for the treatment and management of systemic lupus erythematosus based on molecular signatures of acute and chronic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Das, Undurti N

    2010-01-01

    Lupus is a chronic, systemic inflammatory condition in which eicosanoids, cytokines, nitric oxide (NO), a deranged immune system, and genetics play a significant role. Our studies revealed that an imbalance in the pro- and antioxidants and NO and an alteration in the metabolism of essential fatty acids exist in lupus. The current strategy of management includes administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as hydroxychloroquine and immunosuppressive drugs such as corticosteroids. Investigational drugs include the following: 1) belimumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes and inhibits the biological activity of B-lymphocyte stimulator, also known as B-cell-activation factor of the TNF family; 2) stem cell transplantation; 3) rituximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody against CD20, which is primarily found on the surface of B-cells and can therefore destroy B-cells; and 4) IL-27, which has potent anti-inflammatory actions. Our studies showed that a regimen of corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide, and methods designed to enhance endothelial NO synthesis and augment antioxidant defenses, led to induction of long-lasting remission of the disease. These results suggest that methods designed to modulate molecular signatures of the disease process and suppress inflammation could be of significant benefit in lupus. Some of these strategies could be vagal nerve stimulation, glucose–insulin infusion, and administration of lipoxins, resolvins, protectins, and nitrolipids by themselves or their stable synthetic analogs that are known to suppress inflammation and help in the resolution and healing of the inflammation-induced damage. These strategies are likely to be useful not only in lupus but also in other conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, ischemia-reperfusion injury to the myocardium, ischemic heart disease, and sepsis. PMID:22096364

  16. Persistent cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition downregulates NF-{kappa}B, resulting in chronic intestinal inflammation in the min/+ mouse model of colon tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Carothers, Adelaide M; Davids, Jennifer S; Damas, Beatrice C; Bertagnolli, Monica M

    2010-06-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition prevents adenoma formation in humans and mouse models of colon cancer. The selective COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib reduces COX-2 and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) expression and adenomas in the intestine of Min/+ mice after treatment for several weeks, but prolonged treatment increases PGE(2) production, resulting in drug-resistant tumor formation and transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta)-dependent intestinal fibrosis. In this study, we examined pathways that regulate COX-2 expression and suppress chronic intestinal inflammation. We show that NF-kappaB signaling was inhibited in the ileum of Min/+ mice receiving long-term treatment with celecoxib. This effect was associated with inhibition of TGFbeta-associated kinase-1 and IkappaB kinase alpha/beta activities and reduced expression of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4 that enhance colonic barrier function. Additionally, we observed reduced activities of protein kinases c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase 1 and protein kinase A and transcription factor cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein, regulators of COX-2 expression, which cross-talk with NF-kappaB. In ileum subjected to long-term celecoxib treatment, we noted relatively higher expression of COX-2, vascular endothelial growth factor, and interleukin-1beta in Paneth cells, whereas NF-kappaB and COX-2 were more strongly expressed by an expanded population of stromal myofibroblasts. Our findings argue that celecoxib resistance is an acquired adaptation to changes in the crypt microenvironment that is associated with chronic intestinal inflammation and impaired acute wound-healing responsiveness. PMID:20484034

  17. Effect of Azithromycin plus Rifampin versus Amoxicillin Alone on Eradication and Inflammation in the Chronic Course of Chlamydia pneumoniae Pneumonitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bin, Xie Xiao; Wolf, Katerina; Schaffner, Thomas; Malinverni, Raffaele

    2000-01-01

    The effects of treatment with azithromycin plus rifampin (A+R), amoxicillin (A), or placebo (P) on the chronic course of experimental Chlamydia pneumoniae pneumonitis in mice were assessed by culture, PCR, and immunocytochemistry as well as by degree of inflammation in lung tissue. Eradication of the pathogen was significantly more frequent and inflammation in tissue was significantly reduced after treatment with A+R compared to after treatment with A or P. Combination therapy with azithromycin plus rifampin showed favorable effects in the chronic course of C. pneumoniae pneumonitis. PMID:10817751

  18. Proteases in agricultural dust induce lung inflammation through PAR-1 and PAR-2 activation.

    PubMed

    Romberger, Debra J; Heires, Art J; Nordgren, Tara M; Souder, Chelsea P; West, William; Liu, Xiang-de; Poole, Jill A; Toews, Myron L; Wyatt, Todd A

    2015-08-15

    Workers exposed to aerosolized dust present in concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) are susceptible to inflammatory lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Extracts of dust collected from hog CAFOs [hog dust extract (HDE)] are potent stimulators of lung inflammatory responses in several model systems. The observation that HDE contains active proteases prompted the present study, which evaluated the role of CAFO dust proteases in lung inflammatory processes and tested whether protease-activated receptors (PARs) are involved in the signaling pathway for these events. We hypothesized that the damaging proinflammatory effect of HDE is due, in part, to the proteolytic activation of PARs, and inhibiting the proteases in HDE or disrupting PAR activation would attenuate HDE-mediated inflammatory indexes in bronchial epithelial cells (BECs), in mouse lung slices in vitro, and in a murine in vivo exposure model. Human BECs and mouse lung slice cultures stimulated with 5% HDE released significantly more of each of the cytokines measured (IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, keratinocyte-derived chemokine/CXC chemokine ligand 1, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2/CXC chemokine ligand 2) than controls, and these effects were markedly diminished by protease inhibition. Inhibition of PARs also blunted the HDE-induced cytokine release from BECs. In addition, protease depletion inhibited HDE-induced BEC intracellular PKCα and PKCε activation. C57BL/6J mice administered 12.5% HDE intranasally, either once or daily for 3 wk, exhibited increased total cellular and neutrophil influx, bronchial alveolar fluid inflammatory cytokines, lung histopathology, and inflammatory scores compared with mice receiving protease-depleted HDE. These data suggest that proteases in dust from CAFOs are important mediators of lung inflammation, and these proteases and their receptors may provide novel targets for therapeutic intervention in CAFO dust-induced airways disease. PMID

  19. Melanocortin antagonism ameliorates muscle wasting and inflammation in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Wai W.

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant melanocortin signaling has been implicated in the pathogenesis of wasting in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Previously, we demonstrated that agouti-related peptide (AgRP), a melenocortin-4 receptor antagonist, reduced CKD-associated cachexia in CKD mice. Our previous studies with AgRP utilized dual energy X-ray (DXA) densitometry to assess the body composition in mice (Cheung W, Kuo HJ, Markison S, Chen C, Foster AC, Marks DL, Mak RH. J Am Soc Nephrol 18: 2517–2524, 2007; Cheung W, Yu PX, Little BM, Cone RD, Marks DL, Mak RH. J Clin Invest 115: 1659–1665, 2005). DXA is unable to differentiate water content in mice, and fluid retention in CKD may lead to an overestimate of lean mass. In this study, we employed quantitative magnetic resonance technique to evaluate body composition change following central administration of AgRP in a CKD mouse model. AgRP treatment improved energy expenditure, total body mass, fat mass, and lean body mass in CKD mouse. We also investigated the effect of CKD-associated cachexia on the signaling pathways leading to wasting in skeletal muscle, as well as whether these changes can be ameliorated by central administration of AgRP. AgRP treatment caused an overall decrease in proinflammatory cytokines, which may be one important mechanism of its effects. Muscle wasting in CKD may be due to the activation of proteolytic pathways as well as inhibition of myogenesis and muscle regeneration processes. Our results suggest that these aberrant pathological pathways leading to muscle wasting in CKD mice were ameliorated by central administration of AgRP. PMID:22914778

  20. Antagonism of CRTH2 ameliorates chronic epicutaneous sensitization-induced inflammation by multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Boehme, Stefen A; Chen, Edward P; Franz-Bacon, Karin; Sásik, Roman; Sprague, L James; Ly, Tai Wei; Hardiman, Gary; Bacon, Kevin B

    2009-01-01

    Prostaglandin D(2) (PGD(2)) and its receptor chemoattractant receptor homologous molecule expressed on T(h)2 cells (CRTH2) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of numerous allergic diseases. We investigated the role of PGD(2) and CRTH2 in allergic cutaneous inflammation by using a highly potent and specific antagonist of CRTH2. Administration of this antagonist ameliorated cutaneous inflammation caused by either repeated epicutaneous ovalbumin or FITC sensitization. Gene expression and ELISA analysis revealed that there was reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA or protein produced. Importantly, the CRTH2 antagonist reduced total IgE, as well as antigen-specific IgE, IgG1 and IgG2a antibody levels. This reduction in antibody production correlated to reduced cytokines produced by splenocytes following in vitro antigen challenge. An examination of skin CD11c(+) dendritic cells (DC) showed that in mice treated with the CRTH2 antagonist, there was a decrease in the number of these cells that migrated to the draining lymph nodes in response to FITC application to the skin. Additionally, naive CD4(+) T lymphocytes co-cultured with skin-derived DC from CRTH2 antagonist-treated mice showed a reduced ability to produce a number of cytokines compared with DC from vehicle-treated mice. Collectively, these findings suggest that CRTH2 has a pivotal role in mediating the inflammation and the underlying immune response following epicutaneous sensitization. PMID:19066315

  1. Chronic exposure to perfluorinated compounds: Impact on airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Min H.; Jha, Aruni; Ojo, Oluwaseun O.; Mahood, Thomas H.; Basu, Sujata; Detillieux, Karen A.; Nikoobakht, Neda; Wong, Charles S.; Loewen, Mark; Becker, Allan B.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging epidemiological evidence reveals a link between lung disease and exposure to indoor pollutants such as perfluorinated compounds (PFCs). PFC exposure during critical developmental stages may increase asthma susceptibility. Thus, in a murine model, we tested the hypothesis that early life and continued exposure to two ubiquitous household PFCs, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perflurooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS), can induce lung dysfunction that exacerbates allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and inflammation. Balb/c mice were exposed to PFOA or PFOS (4 mg/kg chow) from gestation day 2 to 12 wk of age by feeding pregnant and nursing dams, and weaned pups. Some pups were also sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA). We assessed lung function and inflammatory cell and cytokine expression in the lung and examined bronchial goblet cell number. PFOA, but not PFOS, without the OVA sensitization/challenge induced AHR concomitant with a 25-fold increase of lung macrophages. PFOA exposure did not affect OVA-induced lung inflammatory cell number. In contrast, PFOS exposure inhibited OVA-induced lung inflammation, decreasing total cell number in lung lavage by 68.7%. Interferon-γ mRNA in the lung was elevated in all PFC-exposed groups. Despite these effects, neither PFOA nor PFOS affected OVA-induced AHR. Our data do not reveal PFOA or PFOS exposure as a risk factor for more severe allergic asthma-like symptoms, but PFOA alone can induce airway inflammation and alter airway function. PMID:25217661

  2. FADS2 genotype regulates delta-6 desaturase activity and inflammation in human adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Vaittinen, Maija; Walle, Paula; Kuosmanen, Emmi; Männistö, Ville; Käkelä, Pirjo; Ågren, Jyrki; Schwab, Ursula; Pihlajamäki, Jussi

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is associated with disturbed lipid metabolism and low-grade inflammation in tissues. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between FA metabolism and adipose tissue (AT) inflammation in the Kuopio Obesity Surgery study. We investigated the association of surgery-induced weight loss and FA desaturase (FADS)1/2 genotypes with serum and AT FA profile and with AT inflammation, measured as interleukin (IL)-1β and NFκB pathway gene expression, in order to find potential gene-environment interactions. We demonstrated an association between serum levels of saturated and polyunsaturated n-6 FAs, and estimated enzyme activities of FADS1/2 genes with IL-1β expression in AT both at baseline and at follow-up. Variation in the FADS1/2 genes associated with IL-1β and NFκB pathway gene expression in SAT after weight reduction, but not at baseline. In addition, the FA composition in subcutaneous and visceral fat correlated with serum FAs, and the associations between serum PUFAs and estimated D6D enzyme activity with AT inflammation were also replicated with corresponding AT FAs and AT inflammation. We conclude that the polymorphism in FADS1/2 genes associates with FA metabolism and AT inflammation, leading to an interaction between weight loss and FADS1/2 genes in the regulation of AT inflammation. PMID:26609056

  3. Loss of Cdh1 and Trp53 in the uterus induces chronic inflammation with modification of tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Stodden, Genna R.; Lindberg, Mallory E.; King, Mandy L.; Paquet, Marilène; MacLean, James A.; Mann, Jordan L.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Lydon, John P.; Hayashi, Kanako

    2015-01-01

    Type II endometrial carcinomas are estrogen independent, poorly differentiated tumors that behave in an aggressive manner. Since TP53 mutation and CDH1 inactivation occur in 80% of human endometrial type II carcinomas, we hypothesized that mouse uteri lacking both Trp53 and Cdh1 would exhibit a phenotype indicative of neoplastic transformation. Mice with conditional ablation of Cdh1 and Trp53 (Cdh1d/dTrp53d/d) clearly demonstrate architectural features characteristic of type II endometrial carcinomas, including focal areas of papillary differentiation, protruding cytoplasm into the lumen (hobnailing) and severe nuclear atypia at 6-mo of age. Further, Cdh1d/dTrp53d/d tumors in 12-mo old mice were highly aggressive, and metastasized to nearby and distant organs within the peritoneal cavity, such as abdominal lymph nodes, mesentery and peri-intestinal adipose tissues, demonstrating that tumorigenesis in this model proceeds through the universally recognized morphologic intermediates associated with type II endometrial neoplasia. We also observed abundant cell proliferation and complex angiogenesis in the uteri of Cdh1d/dTrp53d/d mice. Our microarray analysis found that most of the genes differentially regulated in the uteri of Cdh1d/dTrp53d/d mice were involved in inflammatory responses. CD163 and Arg1, markers for tumor-associated macrophages, were also detected and increased in the uteri of Cdh1d/dTrp53d/d mice, suggesting that an inflammatory tumor microenvironment with immune cell recruitment is augmenting tumor development in Cdh1d/dTrp53d/d uteri. Further, inflammatory mediators secreted from CDH1 negative, TP53 mutant endometrial cancer cells induced normal macrophages to express inflammatory related genes through activation of NFκB signaling. These results indicate that absence of CDH1 and TP53 in endometrial cells initiates chronic inflammation, promotes tumor microenvironment development following the recruitment of macrophages, and promotes aggressive

  4. Loss of Cdh1 and Trp53 in the uterus induces chronic inflammation with modification of tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Stodden, G R; Lindberg, M E; King, M L; Paquet, M; MacLean, J A; Mann, J L; DeMayo, F J; Lydon, J P; Hayashi, K

    2015-05-01

    Type II endometrial carcinomas (ECs) are estrogen independent, poorly differentiated tumors that behave in an aggressive manner. As TP53 mutation and CDH1 inactivation occur in 80% of human endometrial type II carcinomas, we hypothesized that mouse uteri lacking both Trp53 and Cdh1 would exhibit a phenotype indicative of neoplastic transformation. Mice with conditional ablation of Cdh1 and Trp53 (Cdh1(d/d)Trp53(d/d)) clearly demonstrate architectural features characteristic of type II ECs, including focal areas of papillary differentiation, protruding cytoplasm into the lumen (hobnailing) and severe nuclear atypia at 6 months of age. Further, Cdh1(d/d)Trp53(d/d) tumors in 12-month-old mice were highly aggressive, and metastasized to nearby and distant organs within the peritoneal cavity, such as abdominal lymph nodes, mesentery and peri-intestinal adipose tissues, demonstrating that tumorigenesis in this model proceeds through the universally recognized morphological intermediates associated with type II endometrial neoplasia. We also observed abundant cell proliferation and complex angiogenesis in the uteri of Cdh1(d/d)Trp53(d/d) mice. Our microarray analysis found that most of the genes differentially regulated in the uteri of Cdh1(d/d)Trp53(d/d) mice were involved in inflammatory responses. CD163 and Arg1, markers for tumor-associated macrophages, were also detected and increased in the uteri of Cdh1(d/d)Trp53(d/d) mice, suggesting that an inflammatory tumor microenvironment with immune cell recruitment is augmenting tumor development in Cdh1(d/d)Trp53(d/d) uteri. Further, inflammatory mediators secreted from CDH1-negative, TP53 mutant endometrial cancer cells induced normal macrophages to express inflammatory-related genes through activation of nuclear factor-κB signaling. These results indicate that absence of CDH1 and TP53 in endometrial cells initiates chronic inflammation, promotes tumor microenvironment development following the recruitment of macrophages

  5. Activated protein C prevents inflammation yet stimulates angiogenesis to promote cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Christopher J; Xue, Meilang; Thompson, Patrick; Davey, Ross A; Whitmont, Kaley; Smith, Susan; Buisson-Legendre, Nathalie; Sztynda, Tamara; Furphy, Louise J; Cooper, Alan; Sambrook, Philip; March, Lyn

    2005-01-01

    Activated protein C (APC) is a serine protease that plays a central role in physiological anticoagulation, and has more recently been shown to be a potent anti-inflammatory mediator. Using cultured human cells, we show here that APC up-regulates the angiogenic promoters matrix metalloproteinase-2 in skin fibroblasts and umbilical vein endothelial cells, vascular endothelial growth factor in keratinocytes and fibroblasts, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in fibroblasts. In the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane assay, APC promoted the granulation/remodeling phases of wound healing by markedly stimulating angiogenesis as well as promoting reepithelialization. In a full-thickness rat skin-healing model, a single topical application of APC enhanced wound healing compared to saline control. APC-treated wounds had markedly more blood vessels on day 7 and a significantly lower infiltration of neutrophils at days 4 and 7. The broad spectrum matrix metallo-proteinase, GM6001, prevented the ability of APC to promote wound healing. In summary, our results show that APC promotes cutaneous wound healing via a complex mechanism involving stimulation of angiogenesis and inhibition of inflammation. These unique properties of APC make it an attractive therapeutic agent to promote the healing of chronic wounds. PMID:15953048

  6. Markers of inflammation, activation of blood platelets and coagulation disorders in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Matowicka-Karna, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) includes ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. It is a group of chronic disorders characterized by inflammation of the gastrointestinal track with unknown etiology. Currently applied biomarkers include CRP, ESR, pANCA, ASCA, and fecal calprotectin. The etiopathogenesis of IBD is multifactorial. In patients with IBD in inflamed alimentary tract mucosa the number of recruited monocytes and activated macrophages which are source of cytokines. In IBD, the exacerbation is accompanied by thrombocytosis. Platelets play a crucial role in the hemostasis and inflammatory response. Selectins, which regulates the hemostasis and inflammatory response, stimulates the secretion of many inflammatory mediators such as β-thromboglobuline, CD40L, fibrinogen, IL-1β, platelet factor-4. In the course of IBD the following changes are observed: an increase in the number of platelets (reactive thrombocytosis), PDW and PCT, reduction in MPV, increased production and excretion of granular content products (P-selectin, GP53, β-TG, PF-4, vWF, fibrinolytic inhibitors). PMID:27117106

  7. The amino acid sensor GCN2 controls gut inflammation by inhibiting inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Rajesh; Loebbermann, Jens; Nakaya, Helder I; Khan, Nooruddin; Ma, Hualing; Gama, Leonardo; Machiah, Deepa K; Lawson, Benton; Hakimpour, Paul; Wang, Yi-chong; Li, Shuzhao; Sharma, Prachi; Kaufman, Randal J; Martinez, Jennifer; Pulendran, Bali

    2016-03-24

    The integrated stress response (ISR) is a homeostatic mechanism by which eukaryotic cells sense and respond to stress-inducing signals, such as amino acid starvation. General controlled non-repressed (GCN2) kinase is a key orchestrator of the ISR, and modulates protein synthesis in response to amino acid starvation. Here we demonstrate in mice that GCN2 controls intestinal inflammation by suppressing inflammasome activation. Enhanced activation of ISR was observed in intestinal antigen presenting cells (APCs) and epithelial cells during amino acid starvation, or intestinal inflammation. Genetic deletion of Gcn2 (also known as Eif2ka4) in CD11c(+) APCs or intestinal epithelial cells resulted in enhanced intestinal inflammation and T helper 17 cell (TH17) responses, owing to enhanced inflammasome activation and interleukin (IL)-1β production. This was caused by reduced autophagy in Gcn2(-/-) intestinal APCs and epithelial cells, leading to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), a potent activator of inflammasomes. Thus, conditional ablation of Atg5 or Atg7 in intestinal APCs resulted in enhanced ROS and TH17 responses. Furthermore, in vivo blockade of ROS and IL-1β resulted in inhibition of TH17 responses and reduced inflammation in Gcn2(-/-) mice. Importantly, acute amino acid starvation suppressed intestinal inflammation via a mechanism dependent on GCN2. These results reveal a mechanism that couples amino acid sensing with control of intestinal inflammation via GCN2. PMID:26982722

  8. Flax Fiber Hydrophobic Extract Inhibits Human Skin Cells Inflammation and Causes Remodeling of Extracellular Matrix and Wound Closure Activation

    PubMed Central

    Styrczewska, Monika; Kostyn, Anna; Kulma, Anna; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Augustyniak, Daria; Prescha, Anna; Czuj, Tadeusz; Szopa, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is the basis of many diseases, with chronic wounds amongst them, limiting cell proliferation and tissue regeneration. Our previous preclinical study of flax fiber applied as a wound dressing and analysis of its components impact on the fibroblast transcriptome suggested flax fiber hydrophobic extract use as an anti-inflammatory and wound healing preparation. The extract contains cannabidiol (CBD), phytosterols, and unsaturated fatty acids, showing great promise in wound healing. In in vitro proliferation and wound closure tests the extract activated cell migration and proliferation. The activity of matrix metalloproteinases in skin cells was increased, suggesting activation of extracellular components remodeling. The expression of cytokines was diminished by the extract in a cannabidiol-dependent manner, but β-sitosterol can act synergistically with CBD in inflammation inhibition. Extracellular matrix related genes were also analyzed, considering their importance in further stages of wound healing. The extract activated skin cell matrix remodeling, but the changes were only partially cannabidiol- and β-sitosterol-dependent. The possible role of fatty acids also present in the extract is suggested. The study shows the hydrophobic flax fiber components as wound healing activators, with anti-inflammatory cannabidiol acting in synergy with sterols, and migration and proliferation promoting agents, some of which still require experimental identification. PMID:26347154

  9. Flax Fiber Hydrophobic Extract Inhibits Human Skin Cells Inflammation and Causes Remodeling of Extracellular Matrix and Wound Closure Activation.

    PubMed

    Styrczewska, Monika; Kostyn, Anna; Kulma, Anna; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Augustyniak, Daria; Prescha, Anna; Czuj, Tadeusz; Szopa, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is the basis of many diseases, with chronic wounds amongst them, limiting cell proliferation and tissue regeneration. Our previous preclinical study of flax fiber applied as a wound dressing and analysis of its components impact on the fibroblast transcriptome suggested flax fiber hydrophobic extract use as an anti-inflammatory and wound healing preparation. The extract contains cannabidiol (CBD), phytosterols, and unsaturated fatty acids, showing great promise in wound healing. In in vitro proliferation and wound closure tests the extract activated cell migration and proliferation. The activity of matrix metalloproteinases in skin cells was increased, suggesting activation of extracellular components remodeling. The expression of cytokines was diminished by the extract in a cannabidiol-dependent manner, but β-sitosterol can act synergistically with CBD in inflammation inhibition. Extracellular matrix related genes were also analyzed, considering their importance in further stages of wound healing. The extract activated skin cell matrix remodeling, but the changes were only partially cannabidiol- and β-sitosterol-dependent. The possible role of fatty acids also present in the extract is suggested. The study shows the hydrophobic flax fiber components as wound healing activators, with anti-inflammatory cannabidiol acting in synergy with sterols, and migration and proliferation promoting agents, some of which still require experimental identification. PMID:26347154

  10. Association of Markers of Inflammation with Sleep and Physical Activity Among People Living with HIV or AIDS.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Michael D; Jaggers, Jason R; Dudgeon, Wesley D; Hébert, James R; Youngstedt, Shawn D; Blair, Steven N; Hand, Gregory A

    2015-06-01

    This study examined associations of sleep and minutes spent in moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) with C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin (IL)-6 among persons living with HIV. Cross-sectional analyses (n = 45) focused on associations of inflammatory outcomes (i.e., CRP and IL-6) with actigraph-derived sleep duration, latency, and efficiency; sleep onset; wake time; and wake-after-sleep-onset; as well as MVPA. Least square means for CRP and IL-6 by levels of sleep and MVPA were computed from general linear models. Individuals below the median of sleep duration, above the median for sleep onset, and below the median of MVPA minutes had higher CRP or IL-6 levels. Generally, individuals with both low MVPA and poor sleep characteristics had higher inflammation levels than those with more MVPA and worse sleep. Understanding the combined impact of multiple lifestyle/behavioral factors on inflammation could inform intervention strategies to reduce inflammation and therefore, chronic disease risk. PMID:25399034

  11. Association of Markers of Inflammation with Sleep and Physical Activity among People Living with HIV or AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Michael D.; Jaggers, Jason R.; Dudgeon, Wesley D.; Hébert, James R.; Youngstedt, Shawn D.; Blair, Steven N.; Hand, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined associations of sleep and minutes spent in moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) with C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin (IL)-6 among persons living with HIV (PLWH). Cross-sectional analyses (n=45) focused on associations of inflammatory outcomes (i.e., CRP and IL-6) with actigraph-derived sleep duration, latency, and efficiency; bedtime; wake time; and wake-after-sleep-onset; as well as MVPA. Least square means for CRP and IL-6 by levels of sleep and MVPA were computed from general linear models. Individuals below the median of sleep duration, above the median for bedtime, and below the median of MVPA minutes had higher CRP or IL-6 levels. Generally, individuals with both low MVPA and poor sleep characteristics had higher inflammation levels than those with more MVPA and better sleep. Understanding the combined impact of multiple lifestyle/behavioral factors on inflammation could inform intervention strategies to reduce inflammation and therefore, chronic disease risk. PMID:25399034

  12. The Effects of Tumstatin on Vascularity, Airway Inflammation and Lung Function in an Experimental Sheep Model of Chronic Asthma.

    PubMed

    Van der Velden, Joanne; Harkness, Louise M; Barker, Donna M; Barcham, Garry J; Ugalde, Cathryn L; Koumoundouros, Emmanuel; Bao, Heidi; Organ, Louise A; Tokanovic, Ana; Burgess, Janette K; Snibson, Kenneth J

    2016-01-01

    Tumstatin, a protein fragment of the alpha-3 chain of Collagen IV, is known to be significantly reduced in the airways of asthmatics. Further, there is evidence that suggests a link between the relatively low level of tumstatin and the induction of angiogenesis and inflammation in allergic airway disease. Here, we show that the intra-segmental administration of tumstatin can impede the development of vascular remodelling and allergic inflammatory responses that are induced in a segmental challenge model of experimental asthma in sheep. In particular, the administration of tumstatin to lung segments chronically exposed to house dust mite (HDM) resulted in a significant reduction of airway small blood vessels in the diameter range 10(+)-20 μm compared to controls. In tumstatin treated lung segments after HDM challenge, the number of eosinophils was significantly reduced in parenchymal and airway wall tissues, as well as in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The expression of VEGF in airway smooth muscle was also significantly reduced in tumstatin-treated segments compared to control saline-treated segments. Allergic lung function responses were not attenuated by tumstatin administration in this model. The data are consistent with the concept that tumstatin can act to suppress vascular remodelling and inflammation in allergic airway disease. PMID:27199164

  13. The Effects of Tumstatin on Vascularity, Airway Inflammation and Lung Function in an Experimental Sheep Model of Chronic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Van der Velden, Joanne; Harkness, Louise M.; Barker, Donna M.; Barcham, Garry J.; Ugalde, Cathryn L.; Koumoundouros, Emmanuel; Bao, Heidi; Organ, Louise A.; Tokanovic, Ana; Burgess, Janette K.; Snibson, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Tumstatin, a protein fragment of the alpha-3 chain of Collagen IV, is known to be significantly reduced in the airways of asthmatics. Further, there is evidence that suggests a link between the relatively low level of tumstatin and the induction of angiogenesis and inflammation in allergic airway disease. Here, we show that the intra-segmental administration of tumstatin can impede the development of vascular remodelling and allergic inflammatory responses that are induced in a segmental challenge model of experimental asthma in sheep. In particular, the administration of tumstatin to lung segments chronically exposed to house dust mite (HDM) resulted in a significant reduction of airway small blood vessels in the diameter range 10+–20 μm compared to controls. In tumstatin treated lung segments after HDM challenge, the number of eosinophils was significantly reduced in parenchymal and airway wall tissues, as well as in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The expression of VEGF in airway smooth muscle was also significantly reduced in tumstatin-treated segments compared to control saline-treated segments. Allergic lung function responses were not attenuated by tumstatin administration in this model. The data are consistent with the concept that tumstatin can act to suppress vascular remodelling and inflammation in allergic airway disease. PMID:27199164

  14. Value of the 8-oxodG/dG ratio in chronic liver inflammation of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengcheng; Ramm, Grant A; Macdonald, Graeme A

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the role of oxidative DNA damage in chronic liver inflammation in the evolution of hepatocellular carcinoma. The accumulated data demonstrated that oxidative DNA damage and chronic liver inflammation are involved in the transformation of normal hepatocytes and their evolution towards hepatocellular carcinoma. However, the levels of 8-oxy-2'-deoxy-guanosine (8-oxodG), a biomarker of oxidative DNA damage, were overestimated and underestimated in previous reports due to various technical limitations. The current techniques are not suitable to analyze the 8-oxodG levels in the non-malignant liver tissues and tumors of hepatocellular carcinoma patients unless they are modified. Therefore, in this study, the protocols for extraction and hydrolysis of DNA were optimized using 54 samples from hepatocellular carcinoma patients with various risk factors, and the 8-oxodG and 2'-deoxyguanosine (dG) levels were measured. The patients enrolled in the study include 23 from The Princess Alexandra Hospital and The Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospitals, Brisbane, Australia, and 31 from South Africa. This study revealed that the 8-oxodG/dG ratios tended to be higher in most non-malignant liver tissues compared to hepatocellular carcinoma tissue (p=0.2887). It also appeared that the ratio was higher in non-malignant liver tissue from Southern African patients (p=0.0479), but there was no difference in the 8-oxodG/dG ratios between non-malignant liver tissues and tumors of Australian hepatocellular carcinoma patients (p=0.7722). Additionally, this study also revealed a trend for a higher 8-oxodG/dG ratio in non-malignant liver tissues compared to tumoural tissues of patients with HBV. Significant differences were not observed in the 8-oxodG/dG ratios between non-cirrhotic and cirrhotic non-malignant liver tissues. PMID:26890046

  15. Protective actions of green tea polyphenols and alfacalcidol on bone microstructure in female rats with chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chwan-Li; Yeh, James K; Samathanam, Christina; Cao, Jay J; Stoecker, Barbara J; Dagda, Raul Y; Chyu, Ming-Chien; Wang, Jia-Sheng

    2011-07-01

    This study investigated the effects of green tea polyphenols (GTP) and alfacalcidol on bone microstructure and strength along with possible mechanisms in rats with chronic inflammation. A 12-week study using a 2 (no GTP vs. 0.5%, w/v GTP in drinking water)×2 (no alfacalcidol vs. 0.05 μg/kg alfacalcidol orally, 5×/week) factorial design was employed in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-administered female rats. A group receiving placebo administration was used to compare with a group receiving LPS administration only to evaluate the effect of LPS. Changes in tibial and femoral microarchitecture and strength of femur were evaluated. Difference in expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in proximal tibia using immunohistochemistry was examined. Compared to the placebo group, the LPS-administered-only group had significantly lower femoral mass, trabecular volume, thickness and number in proximal tibia and femur, and lower periosteal bone formation rate in tibial shafts but had significantly higher trabecular separation and osteoclast number in proximal tibia and eroded surface in endocortical tibial shafts. Both GTP and alfacalcidol reversed these LPS-induced detrimental changes in femur, proximal tibia and endocortical tibial shaft. Both GTP and alfacalcidol also significantly improved femoral strength, while significantly suppressed TNF-α expression in proximal tibia. There were significant interactions in femoral mass and strength, trabecular separation, osteoclast number and TNF-α expression in proximal tibia. A combination of both showed to sustain bone microarchitecture and strength. We conclude that a protective impact of GTP and alfacalcidol in bone microarchitecture during chronic inflammation may be due to a suppression of TNF-α. PMID:21036589

  16. Value of the 8-oxodG/dG ratio in chronic liver inflammation of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pengcheng; Ramm, Grant A; Macdonald, Graeme A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the role of oxidative DNA damage in chronic liver inflammation in the evolution of hepatocellular carcinoma. The accumulated data demonstrated that oxidative DNA damage and chronic liver inflammation are involved in the transformation of normal hepatocytes and their evolution towards hepatocellular carcinoma. However, the levels of 8-oxy-2′-deoxy-guanosine (8-oxodG), a biomarker of oxidative DNA damage, were overestimated and underestimated in previous reports due to various technical limitations. The current techniques are not suitable to analyze the 8-oxodG levels in the non-malignant liver tissues and tumors of hepatocellular carcinoma patients unless they are modified. Therefore, in this study, the protocols for extraction and hydrolysis of DNA were optimized using 54 samples from hepatocellular carcinoma patients with various risk factors, and the 8-oxodG and 2′-deoxyguanosine (dG) levels were measured. The patients enrolled in the study include 23 from The Princess Alexandra Hospital and The Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospitals, Brisbane, Australia, and 31 from South Africa. This study revealed that the 8-oxodG/dG ratios tended to be higher in most non-malignant liver tissues compared to hepatocellular carcinoma tissue (p=0.2887). It also appeared that the ratio was higher in non-malignant liver tissue from Southern African patients (p=0.0479), but there was no difference in the 8-oxodG/dG ratios between non-malignant liver tissues and tumors of Australian hepatocellular carcinoma patients (p=0.7722). Additionally, this study also revealed a trend for a higher 8-oxodG/dG ratio in non-malignant liver tissues compared to tumoural tissues of patients with HBV. Significant differences were not observed in the 8-oxodG/dG ratios between non-cirrhotic and cirrhotic non-malignant liver tissues. PMID:26890046

  17. Administration of low dose estrogen attenuates persistent inflammation, promotes angiogenesis, and improves locomotor function following chronic spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Samantaray, Supriti; Das, Arabinda; Matzelle, Denise C; Yu, Shan P; Wei, Ling; Varma, Abhay; Ray, Swapan K; Banik, Naren L

    2016-05-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes loss of neurological function and, depending upon the severity of injury, may lead to paralysis. Currently, no FDA-approved pharmacotherapy is available for SCI. High-dose methylprednisolone is widely used, but this treatment is controversial. We have previously shown that low doses of estrogen reduces inflammation, attenuates cell death, and protects axon and myelin in SCI rats, but its effectiveness in recovery of function is not known. Therefore, the goal of this study was to investigate whether low doses of estrogen in post-SCI would reduce inflammation, protect cells and axons, and improve locomotor function during the chronic phase of injury. Injury (40 g.cm force) was induced at thoracic 10 in young adult male rats. Rats were treated with 10 or 100 μg 17β-estradiol (estrogen) for 7 days following SCI and compared with vehicle-treated injury and laminectomy (sham) controls. Histology (H&E staining), immunohistofluorescence, Doppler laser technique, and Western blotting were used to monitor tissue integrity, gliosis, blood flow, angiogenesis, the expression of angiogenic factors, axonal degeneration, and locomotor function (Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan rating) following injury. To assess the progression of recovery, rats were sacrificed at 7, 14, or 42 days post injury. A reduction in glial reactivity, attenuation of axonal and myelin damage, protection of cells, increased expression of angiogenic factors and microvessel growth, and improved locomotor function were found following estrogen treatment compared with vehicle-treated SCI rats. These results suggest that treatment with a very low dose of estrogen has significant therapeutic implications for the improvement of locomotor function in chronic SCI. Experimental studies with low dose estrogen therapy in chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) demonstrated the potential for multi-active beneficial outcomes that could ameliorate the degenerative pathways in chronic SCI as

  18. Sedentary Lifestyle and High-Carbohydrate Intake are Associated with Low-Grade Chronic Inflammation in Post-Menopause: A Cross-sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Alves, Bruna Cherubini; Silva, Thaís Rasia da; Spritzer, Poli Mara

    2016-07-01

    Introduction Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in post menopausal women, and inflammation is involved in the atherosclerosis process. Purpose to assess whether dietary pattern, metabolic profile, body composition and physical activity are associated with low-grade chronic inflammation according to high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels in postmenopausal women. Methods ninety-five postmenopausal participants, with no evidence of clinical disease, underwent anthropometric, metabolic and hormonal assessments. Usual dietary intake was assessed with a validated food frequency questionnaire, habitual physical activity was measured with a digital pedometer, and body composition was estimated by bioelectrical impedance analysis. Patients with hs-CRP ≥10 mg/L or using hormone therapy in the last three months before the study were excluded from the analysis. Participants were stratified according to hs-CRP lower or ≥3 mg/L. Sedentary lifestyle was defined as walking fewer than 6 thousand steps a day. Two-tailed Student's t-test, Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney U or Chi-square (χ(2)) test were used to compare differences between groups. A logistic regression model was used to estimate the odds ratio of variables for high hs-CRP. Results participants with hs-CRP ≥3 mg/L had higher body mass index (BMI), body fat percentage, waist circumference (WC), triglycerides, glucose, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (p = 0.01 for all variables) than women with hs-CRP <3 mg/L. Also, women with hs-CRP ≥3 mg/L had a higher glycemic load diet and lower protein intake. Prevalence of sedentary lifestyle (p < 0.01) and metabolic syndrome (p < 0.01) was higher in women with hs-CRP ≥3 mg/L. After adjustment for age and time since menopause, the odds ratio for hs-CRP ≥3 mg/L was higher for sedentary lifestyle (4.7, 95% confidence interval [95%CI] 1.4-15.5) and carbohydrate intake (2.9, 95%CI

  19. Plasma catecholamine activity in chronic lead poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    deCastro, F.J.

    1990-04-01

    Plasma catecholamines where measured in 15 children with chronic lead poisoning and 15 matched controls by radioimmunassay. The data suggest that plasma catecholamines (norepinephrine and epinphrine) were significantly elevated in chronic lead poisoning. Plasma catecholamine elevation may well be important in the clinical finding of hyperactivity and hypertension associated with chronic lead poisoning.

  20. Treatment with Adenosine Receptor Agonist Ameliorates Pain Induced by Acute and Chronic Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Montes, Guilherme Carneiro; Hammes, Nathalia; da Rocha, Miguel Divino; Montagnoli, Tadeu Lima; Fraga, Carlos Alberto Manssour; Barreiro, Eliezer J; Sudo, Roberto Takashi; Zapata-Sudo, Gisele

    2016-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory autoimmune condition, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) plays an important role in its pathophysiology. In vitro, (E)-N'-(3,4-dimethoxybenzylidene)-N-methylbenzohydrazide (LASSBio-1359) has exhibited anti-TNF-α properties, and in vivo these effects are mediated via activation of adenosine receptor. This work investigates the antinociceptive action of LASSBio-1359 in murine models of acute and chronic inflammatory pain. Male mice received an intraperitoneal injection of LASSBio-1359 and then were evaluated in formalin- and carrageenan-induced paw edema assays. Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) was used to induce a mouse model of monoarthritis. These mice were treated with LASSBio-1359 by oral gavage to evaluate thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia. TNF-α and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression as well as histologic features were analyzed. The time of reactivity to formalin in the neurogenic phase was reduced from 56.3 ± 6.0 seconds to 32.7 ± 2.2 seconds and 23.8 ± 2.6 seconds after treatment with LASSBio-1359 at doses of 10 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg, respectively. A reversal of the antinociceptive action of LASSBio-1359 was observed in the inflammatory phase after treatment with ZM 241385 [4-(2-[7-amino-2-(2-furly)[1,2,4]triazolo[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-ylamino]ethyl)phenol], an adenosine A2A antagonist. Carrageenan-induced thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia were reduced after treatment with LASSBio-1359. Similarly, CFA-induced thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia were reduced after treatment with LASSBio-1359 (25 and 50 mg/kg). Levels of TNF-α and iNOS expression increased in the monoarthritis model and were normalized in animals treated with LASSBio-1359, which was also associated with beneficial effects in the histologic analysis. These results suggest that LASSBio-1359 represents an alternative treatment of monoarthritis. PMID:27194479

  1. Systemic inflammation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who are colonized with Pneumocystis jiroveci.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Enrique J; Rivero, Laura; Respaldiza, Nieves; Morilla, Rubén; Montes-Cano, Marco A; Friaza, Vicente; Muñoz-Lobato, Fernando; Varela, José M; Medrano, Francisco J; Horra, Carmen de la

    2007-07-15

    In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, high levels of airway and systemic inflammatory markers are associated with a faster decrease in lung function. Our study shows that patients colonized by Pneumocystis jiroveci have higher proinflammatory cytokine levels than do noncolonized patients. This suggests that Pneumocystis may play a role in disease progression. PMID:17578770

  2. Prolidase activity in chronic plaque psoriasis patients

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Nurten; Ozgöztas, Orhan; Sezen, Hatice; Yesilova, Yavuz; Turan, Enver

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory, T-cell-mediated and hyperproliferative skin disease characterized by erythematous, squamous, sharply circumscribed and infiltrated plaques. The metabolisms of the collagen proteins undergo considerable changes due to the acceleration of their turnovers as a result of increased prolidase activity in psoriasis patients. Aim To determine the level of prolidase activity in psoriasis patients and evaluate its relationship with the oxidative system. Material and methods The serum prolidase enzyme activity, total antioxidant levels and total oxidant levels of 40 psoriasis patients and a control group including 47 healthy individuals were analyzed by using their serum samples, and their oxidative stress indices were calculated. Results The prolidase levels (p < 0.01), total oxidant levels (p < 0.01) and oxidative stress index levels (p < 0.001) of the patient group were higher than the corresponding parameters in the control group. The total antioxidant level was low (p < 0.01). Although a positive correlation was found between the prolidase and total antioxidant levels and the total oxidant level, no correlation was found between prolidase and the oxidative stress index. Conclusions It has been determined that the activity of the prolidase enzyme increases due to the increased collage turnover in psoriasis patients. Increased serum oxidant levels and oxidative stress indices values may play a role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. PMID:26015776

  3. Role of Chronic Inflammation in Myopia Progression: Clinical Evidence and Experimental Validation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui-Ju; Wei, Chang-Ching; Chang, Ching-Yao; Chen, Ter-Hsin; Hsu, Yu-An; Hsieh, Yi-Ching; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Wan, Lei

    2016-08-01

    Prevention and treatment of myopia is an important public problem worldwide. We found a higher incidence of myopia among patients with inflammatory diseases such as type 1 diabetes mellitus (7.9%), uveitis (3.7%), or systemic lupus erythematosus (3.5%) compared to those without inflammatory diseases (p<0.001) using data from children (<18years old) in the National Health Insurance Research database. We then examined the inhibition of myopia by atropine in Syrian hamsters with monocular form deprivation (MFD), an experimental myopia model. We found atropine downregulated inflammation in MFD eyes. The expression levels of c-Fos, nuclear factor κB (NFκB), interleukin (IL)-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were upregulated in myopic eyes and downregulated upon treatment with atropine. The relationship between the inflammatory response and myopia was investigated by treating MFD hamsters with the immunosuppressive agent cyclosporine A (CSA) or the inflammatory stimulators lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or peptidoglycan (PGN). Myopia progression was slowed by CSA application but was enhanced by LPS and PGN administration. The levels of c-Fos, NF-κB, IL-6, and TNF-α were upregulated in LPS- and PGN-treated eyes and downregulated by CSA treatment. These findings provide clinical and experimental evidence that inflammation plays a crucial role in the development of myopia. PMID:27470424

  4. Chronic diarrhea among adults in Kigali, Rwanda: association with bacterial enteropathogens, rectocolonic inflammation, and human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Clerinx, J; Bogaerts, J; Taelman, H; Habyarimana, J B; Nyirabareja, A; Ngendahayo, P; Van de Perre, P

    1995-11-01

    One hundred patients with chronic diarrhea were seen in the Department of Internal Medicine at the Centre Hospitalier de Kigali, Rwanda; stool and/or rectal swab culture was performed for these patients, and they underwent rectoscopy and serological testing for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Enteropathogenic bacteria were isolated from 39 (39%) of the patients: Shigella species (22 of 100 patients tested), non-typhi Salmonella (11/100), Aeromonas species (5/60), and Campylobacter species (4/60). Rectocolitis was seen in 70 (70%) of the patients. HIV-1 antibodies were detected in 82 (94%) of 87 patients tested. Cytomegalovirus was not found in rectal biopsy specimens from 29 patients. Entamoeba histolytica was detected in two of 31 rectal smears. Idiopathic ulcerative colitis was diagnosed for two HIV-1-seropositive patients. One or more AIDS-defining diseases were found in 32 (32%) of the patients, and 72 (72%) fulfilled the World Health Organization's clinical case definition criteria for AIDS. Chronic diarrhea, as seen in a hospital setting in a region highly endemic for HIV-1 infection, is strongly associated with HIV-1 infection, with rectocolonic inflammation, and with infection due to enteropathogenic bacteria. PMID:8589155

  5. Interleukin 10 suppresses experimental chronic, granulomatous inflammation induced by bacterial cell wall polymers.

    PubMed Central

    Herfarth, H H; Mohanty, S P; Rath, H C; Tonkonogy, S; Sartor, R B

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Interleukin 10 (IL10) inhibits monocyte/macrophage and T lymphocyte effector functions. This study examined the effect of systemically administered IL10 on acute and chronic granulomatous enterocolitis, hepatitis, and arthritis in a rat model. METHODS: Lewis rats were injected intramurally with streptococcal peptidoglycan-polysaccharide (PG-APS) polymers. Beginning 12 hours before PG-APS injection, rats were treated daily with subcutaneous murine recombinant IL10 or vehicle for three or 17 days. RESULTS: IL10 attenuated acute enterocolitis in a dose dependent fashion (p < 0.01). Protective effects were more profound in the chronic granulomatous phase with decreased enterocolitis and markedly inhibited leucocytosis, hepatic granulomas, and chronic erosive arthritis (p < 0.001). IL10 downregulated tissue IL1, IL6, tumour necrosis factor alpha, and interferon gamma gene expression, consistent with the in vitro effects of IL10 on PG-APS-stimulated splenocytes. Caecal IL1 protein concentrations and IL2 and interferon gamma secretion by in vitro stimulated mesenteric lymph nodes were downregulated in IL10 treated animals. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that exogenous IL10 can inhibit experimental granulomatous inflammatory responses and suggest that IL10 treatment could be an effective new therapeutic approach in human disorders such as Crohn's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and sarcoidosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9038666

  6. Serum markers of inflammation and oxidative stress in chronic opium (Taryak) smokers.

    PubMed

    Ghazavi, Ali; Mosayebi, Ghasem; Solhi, Hassan; Rafiei, Mohammad; Moazzeni, Seyed Mohammad

    2013-06-01

    A relationship between the expression of inflammation markers, oxidative stress and opium use has not been clearly established. This study was done to determine serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), quantity of C3 and C4 complement factors, immunoglobulins, nitric oxide (NO) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in opium smokers and non-drug-using control participants. The present study was done on 44 male opium smokers and 44 controls of the same sex and age (20-40 years). The control group was healthy individuals with no lifetime history of drug abuse or dependence. All of the opium abusers were selected from those who had a history of opium use, for at least one year, with a daily opium dosage not less than 2g. Addicts known to abuse alcohol or other drugs were excluded. Serum hs-CRP concentration was measured using ELISA method and serum C3, C4 and immunoglobulins concentration were determined by Single Radial Immunodiffusion (SRID) method. NO production was estimated through Griess reaction and TAC was assessed by Ferric Reducing/Antioxidant Power (FRAP) test. Serum hs-CRP, complement factors (C3 and C4) and FRAP levels were significantly higher in the opium smokers (8.93 ± 1.93; 138.47 ± 13.39; 68.79 ± 7.02 and 972.75 ± 11.55, respectively) relative to the control group (0.72 ± 0.09; 93.36 ± 8.73; 33.08 ± 7.39 and 761.95 ± 18.61, respectively). These results permit us to conclude that opium smokers indeed present with a low to moderate grade inflammation, which is defined by an increase in acute phase proteins. PMID:23850638

  7. Amelioration of inflammation and tissue damage in sickle cell model mice by Nrf2 activation.

    PubMed

    Keleku-Lukwete, Nadine; Suzuki, Mikiko; Otsuki, Akihito; Tsuchida, Kouhei; Katayama, Saori; Hayashi, Makiko; Naganuma, Eriko; Moriguchi, Takashi; Tanabe, Osamu; Engel, James Douglas; Imaizumi, Masue; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2015-09-29

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited disorder caused by a point mutation in the β-globin gene, leading to the production of abnormally shaped red blood cells. Sickle cells are prone to hemolysis and thereby release free heme into plasma, causing oxidative stress and inflammation that in turn result in damage to multiple organs. The transcription factor Nrf2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2) is a master regulator of the antioxidant cell-defense system. Here we show that constitutive Nrf2 activation by ablation of its negative regulator Keap1 (kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1) significantly improves symptoms in SCD model mice. SCD mice exhibit severe liver damage and lung inflammation associated with high expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules compared with normal mice. Importantly, these symptoms subsided after Nrf2 activation. Although hemolysis and stress erythropoiesis did not change substantially in the Nrf2-activated SCD mice, Nrf2 promoted the elimination of plasma heme released by sickle cells' hemolysis and thereby reduced oxidative stress and inflammation, demonstrating that Nrf2 activation reduces organ damage and segregates inflammation from prevention of hemolysis in SCD mice. Furthermore, administration of the Nrf2 inducer CDDO-Im (2-cyano-3, 12 dioxooleana-1, 9 diene-28-imidazolide) also relieved inflammation and organ failure in SCD mice. These results support the contention that Nrf2 induction may be an important means to protect organs from the pathophysiology of sickle cell-induced damage. PMID:26371321

  8. Effect of Hyssopus officinalis L. on inhibiting airway inflammation and immune regulation in a chronic asthmatic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    MA, XIAOJUAN; MA, XIUMIN; MA, ZHIXING; WANG, JING; SUN, ZHAN; YU, WENYAN; LI, FENGSEN; DING, JIANBING

    2014-01-01

    The Uygur herb, Hyssopus officinalis L., has been demonstrated to affect the levels of a number of cytokines in asthmatic mice, including interleukin-4, -6 and -17 and interferon-γ. In the present study, the effect of Hyssopus officinalis L. on airway immune regulation and airway inflammation was investigated in a mouse model of chronic asthma. A total of 32 BALB/c mice were randomly divided into four groups, which included the normal, chronic asthmatic, dexamethasone treatment and Hyssopus officinalis L.treatment groups. Mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin to establish an asthma model and the ratio of eosinophils (EOS) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was determined. In addition, the levels of immunoglobulin (Ig)E and IgG were detected using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The degree of airway mucus secretion was observed using the periodic acid-Schiff stain method. The results demonstrated that the ratio of EOS in the BALF and the level of serum IgE in the chronic asthmatic and dexamethasone treatment groups increased, while the level of serum IgG decreased, when compared with the normal group. In addition, excessive secretion of airway mucus was observed in these two groups. However, the EOS ratio in the BALF and the levels of serum IgE and IgG in the Hyssopus officinalis L. treatment group were similar to the results observed in the normal group. In conclusion, Hyssopus officinalis L. not only plays an anti-inflammatory role by inhibiting the invasion of EOS and decreasing the levels of IgE, but also affects immune regulation. PMID:25289025

  9. Effect of Hyssopus officinalis L. on inhibiting airway inflammation and immune regulation in a chronic asthmatic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaojuan; Ma, Xiumin; Ma, Zhixing; Wang, Jing; Sun, Zhan; Yu, Wenyan; Li, Fengsen; Ding, Jianbing

    2014-11-01

    The Uygur herb, Hyssopus officinalis L., has been demonstrated to affect the levels of a number of cytokines in asthmatic mice, including interleukin-4, -6 and -17 and interferon-γ. In the present study, the effect of Hyssopus officinalis L. on airway immune regulation and airway inflammation was investigated in a mouse model of chronic asthma. A total of 32 BALB/c mice were randomly divided into four groups, which included the normal, chronic asthmatic, dexamethasone treatment and Hyssopus officinalis L.treatment groups. Mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin to establish an asthma model and the ratio of eosinophils (EOS) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was determined. In addition, the levels of immunoglobulin (Ig)E and IgG were detected using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The degree of airway mucus secretion was observed using the periodic acid-Schiff stain method. The results demonstrated that the ratio of EOS in the BALF and the level of serum IgE in the chronic asthmatic and dexamethasone treatment groups increased, while the level of serum IgG decreased, when compared with the normal group. In addition, excessive secretion of airway mucus was observed in these two groups. However, the EOS ratio in the BALF and the levels of serum IgE and IgG in the Hyssopus officinalis L. treatment group were similar to the results observed in the normal group. In conclusion, Hyssopus officinalis L. not only plays an anti-inflammatory role by inhibiting the invasion of EOS and decreasing the levels of IgE, but also affects immune regulation. PMID:25289025

  10. Female cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) develop chronic anemia with renal inflammation and cystic changes.

    PubMed

    Ichii, Osamu; Nakamura, Teppei; Irie, Takao; Kouguchi, Hirokazu; Nakamura, Daisuke; Nakamura, Saori; Sato, Shinobu; Yokoyama, Keisuke; Horino, Taro; Sunden, Yuji; Elewa, Yaser Hosny Ali; Kon, Yasuhiro

    2016-09-01

    The cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) is a laboratory rodent that has been used for studies on human infectious diseases. In the present study, we observed that female cotton rats, not the male cotton rats, developed chronic anemia characterized by reduced red blood cell, hemoglobin, and hematocrit levels from 5 to 9 months of age without any changes in the mean corpuscular hemoglobin and volume levels. In peripheral blood, the reticulocyte count did not increase in response to anemia in female cotton rats, and no extramedullary hematopoiesis was observed in the liver or spleen. Further, the serum levels of urea nitrogen and creatinine increased from 5 to 9 months of age in female cotton rats compared to male cotton rats, and these increases became more prominent from 10 months of age onward, indicating chronic kidney disease. Histopathologically, female cotton rats manifested tubulointerstitial lesions characterized by the infiltration of mononuclear cells, including plasma cells and CD3(+) T-cells, as well as the dilation of calbindin-D28k(+) distal tubules from 5 to 9 months of age. The severity of these lesions progressed from 10 months of age onward, and renal fibrotic features and numerous tubular cysts appeared without any obvious glomerular lesions. A significant decrease in the erythropoietin protein levels was observed in the kidney of aged female cotton rats, and significant correlations were detected between anemia and tubulointerstitial damage. These results suggest that aged female cotton rats chronically develop renal anemia, and this rodent may serve as a novel model to elucidate its pathogenesis. PMID:27099161

  11. Both Acute and Chronic Placental Inflammation Are Overrepresented in Term Stillbirths: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Hulthén Varli, Ingela; Petersson, Karin; Kublickas, Marius; Papadogiannakis, Nikos

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To elucidate differences in the frequency and severity of acute chorioamnionitis (CAM) and chronic villitis in placentas from stillborns compared with liveborns at term and to evaluate other risk factors and placental findings. Design. Case-control study. Setting. All delivery wards in major Stockholm area. Population or Sample. Placentas from stillborn/case (n = 126) and liveborn/control (n = 273) neonates were prospectively collected between 2002 and 2005. Methods. CAM was assessed on a three-grade scale based on the presence and distribution of polymorphonuclear leucocytes in the chorion/amnion. The presence of vasculitis and funisitis was recorded separately. Chronic villitis was diagnosed by the presence of mononuclear cells in the villous stroma. Relevant clinical data were collected from a specially constructed, web-based database. The statistic analyses were performed using multivariable logistic regression. Results. CAM (especially severe, AOR: 7.39 CI: 3.05–17.95), villous immaturity (AOR: 7.17 CI: 2.66–19.33), villitis (<1 % AOR: 4.31 CI: 1.16–15.98; ≥1 %, AOR: 3.87 CI: 1.38–10.83), SGA (AOR: 7.52 CI: 3.06–18.48), and BMI >24.9 (AOR: 2.06 CI: 1.21–3.51) were all connected to an elevated risk of term stillbirth. Conclusions. We found that CAM, chronic villitis, villous immaturity, SGA, and maternal overweight, but not vasculitis or funisitis are independently associated with risk for stillbirth at term. PMID:22966214

  12. Decreased Cell Wall Galactosaminogalactan in Aspergillus nidulans Mediates Dysregulated Inflammation in the Chronic Granulomatous Disease Host.

    PubMed

    Henriet, Stefanie S V; van de Sande, Wendy W J; Lee, Mark J; Simonetti, Elles; Momany, Michelle; Verweij, Paul E; Rijs, Antonius J M M; Ferwerda, Gerben; Sheppard, Donald C; de Jonge, Marien I; Warris, Adilia

    2016-08-01

    Invasive aspergillosis is a major threat to patients suffering from impaired neutrophil function, with Aspergillus fumigatus being the most common species causing this life-threatening condition. Patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) not only develop infections with A. fumigatus, but also exhibit a unique susceptibility to infection with the normally nonpathogenic species Aspergillus nidulans. In this study, we compared the inflammatory cytokine response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy and CGD patients to these two fungal species. CGD patients displayed evidence for a chronic hyperinflammatory state as indicated by elevated plasma IL-1β and TNF-α levels. PBMCs isolated from CGD patients secreted higher levels of IL-1β and TNF-α in response to A. nidulans as compared with A. fumigatus. The presence or absence of melanin in the cell wall of A. nidulans did not alter the cytokine release by healthy or CGD PBMCs. In contrast, A. fumigatus mutants lacking melanin stimulated higher levels of proinflammatory cytokine release from healthy, but not CGD PBMCs. Purified cell wall polysaccharides of A. nidulans induced a much higher level of IL-1β secretion by CGD PBMCs than did cell wall polysaccharides isolated from A. fumigatus. Using modified A. nidulans strains overexpressing galactosaminogalactan, we were able to show that the increased secretion of inflammatory cytokines by CGD PBMCs in response to A. nidulans are a consequence of low levels of cell wall-associated galactosaminogalactan in this species. PMID:27142572

  13. Gene Regulatory Networks Activated during Chronic Tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic tuberculosis represents a burden for most of world’s population. Several genes were found to be up-regulated at the late stage of chronic tuberculosis when DNA microarray protocol was used to analyze murine tuberculosis. Rv0348 is a potential transcriptional regulator that is highly expresse...

  14. A Novel Selective Prostaglandin E2 Synthesis Inhibitor Relieves Pyrexia and Chronic Inflammation in Rats.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Ryusuke; Kuwabara, Harumi; Sugimoto, Kotaro; Kubota, Kazufumi; Imamura, Yuichiro; Kiho, Toshihiro; Tengeiji, Atsushi; Kawakami, Katsuhiro; Shimada, Kohei

    2016-04-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a terminal prostaglandin in the cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway. Inhibition of PGE2 production may relieve inflammatory symptoms such as fever, arthritis, and inflammatory pain. We report here the profile of a novel selective PGE2 synthesis inhibitor, compound A [N-[(1S,3S)-3-carbamoylcyclohexyl]-1-(6-methyl-3-phenylquinolin-2-yl)piperidine-4-carboxamide], in animal models of pyrexia and inflammation. The compound selectively suppressed the synthesis of PGE2 in human alveolar adenocarcinoma cell line A549 cells and rat macrophages. In the lipopolysaccharide-induced pyrexia model, this compound selectively reduced PGE2 production in cerebrospinal fluid and showed an anti-pyretic effect. In the adjuvant-induced arthritis model, compound A therapeutically decreased foot swelling in the established arthritis. Our data demonstrates that selective suppression of PGE2 synthesis shows anti-pyretic and anti-inflammatory effects, suggesting that selective PGE2 synthesis inhibitors can be applied as an alternative treatment to nonsteroidal, anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or COX-2-selective inhibitors. PMID:26923147

  15. Oral inflammation and bacteremia: implications for chronic and acute systemic diseases involving major organs.

    PubMed

    Hirschfeld, Josefine; Kawai, Toshihisa

    2015-01-01

    Gingivitis and periodontitis are both highly prevalent gum diseases characterized by an accumulation of a polymicrobial biofilm (dental plaque) around teeth and inflammation in adjacent soft tissues. During dental procedures, even tooth brushing, these bacteria and their components, such as endotoxin, can easily disseminate into the systemic circulation through minor or major gingival injuries. Particularly in immuno-compromised subjects or patients with preexisting pathologic conditions, bacteremia may lead to bacterial infection of distant organs, which may cause immunological reactions. Oral bacteria and endotoxins have been found in sepsis, infective endocarditis, lung infection, liver disease and many other potentially lethal disorders. This article presents a review of the possible pathologic consequences of bacteremia originating in the oral cavity and points out the most commonly affected organs as well as preventive and treatment measures. At the present time, plaque control by subjects and/or dental professionals is one of the most effective means to prevent the onset and progression of oral bacteremia-induced systemic diseases. PMID:25567334

  16. Transcription factor network downstream of protease activated receptors (PARs) modulating mouse bladder inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Saban, Ricardo; Simpson, Cindy; Davis, Carole A; Dozmorov, Igor; Maier, Julie; Fowler, Ben; Ihnat, Michael A; Hurst, Robert E; Wershil, Barry K; Saban, Marcia R

    2007-01-01

    Background All four PARs are present in the urinary bladder, and their expression is altered during inflammation. In order to search for therapeutic targets other than the receptors themselves, we set forth to determine TFs downstream of PAR activation in the C57BL/6 urinary bladders. Methods For this purpose, we used a protein/DNA combo array containing 345 different TF consensus sequences. Next, the TF selected was validated by EMSA and IHC. As mast cells seem to play a fundamental role in bladder inflammation, we determined whether c-kit receptor deficient (Kitw/Kitw-v) mice have an abrogated response to PAR stimulation. Finally, TFEB antibody was used for CHIP/Q-PCR assay and revealed up-regulation of genes known to be downstream of TFEB. Results TFEB, a member of the MiTF family of basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper, was the only TF commonly up-regulated by all PAR-APs. IHC results confirm a correlation between inflammation and TFEB expression in C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, Kitw/Kitw-v mice did not exhibit inflammation in response to PAR activation. EMSA results confirmed the increased TFEB binding activity in C57BL/6 but not in Kitw/Kitw-v mice. Conclusion This is the first report describing the increased expression of TFEB in bladder inflammation in response to PAR activation. As TFEB belongs to a family of TFs essential for mast cell survival, our findings suggest that this molecule may influence the participation of mast cells in PAR-mediated inflammation and that targeting TFEB/MiTF activity may be a novel approach for the treatment of bladder inflammatory disorders. PMID:17705868

  17. Angiotensin-(1-7) inhibits inflammation and oxidative stress to relieve lung injury induced by chronic intermittent hypoxia in rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, W; Kang, J; Hu, K; Tang, S; Zhou, X; Yu, S; Li, Y; Xu, L

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with inflammation and oxidative stress in lung tissues and can lead to metabolic abnormalities. We investigated the effects of angiotensin1-7 [Ang-(1-7)] on lung injury in rats induced by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH). We randomly assigned 32 male Sprague-Dawley rats (180-200 g) to normoxia control (NC), CIH-untreated (uCIH), Ang-(1-7)-treated normoxia control (N-A), and Ang-(1-7)-treated CIH (CIH-A) groups. Oxidative stress biomarkers were measured in lung tissues, and expression of NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) and Nox subunits (p22phox, and p47phox) was determined by Western blot and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Pulmonary pathological changes were more evident in the uCIH group than in the other groups. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and immunohistochemical staining showed that inflammatory factor concentrations in serum and lung tissues in the uCIH group were significantly higher than those in the NC and N-A groups. Expression of inflammatory factors was significantly higher in the CIH-A group than in the NC and N-A groups, but was lower than in the uCIH group (P<0.01). Oxidative stress was markedly higher in the uCIH group than in the NC and N-A groups. Expression of Nox4 and its subunits was also increased in the uCIH group. These changes were attenuated upon Ang-(1-7) treatment. In summary, treatment with Ang-(1-7) reversed signs of CIH-induced lung injury via inhibition of inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:27599201

  18. Role of ammonia, inflammation, and cerebral oxygenation in brain dysfunction of acute-on-chronic liver failure patients.

    PubMed

    Sawhney, Rohit; Holland-Fischer, Peter; Rosselli, Matteo; Mookerjee, Rajeshwar P; Agarwal, Banwari; Jalan, Rajiv

    2016-06-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a common feature of acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). Although ammonia, inflammation, and cerebral oxygenation are associated with HE in acute liver failure, their roles in ACLF are unknown. The aim of this prospective, longitudinal study was to determine the role of these pathophysiological variables in ACLF patients with and without HE. We studied 101 patients with ACLF admitted to the intensive care unit. Severity of ACLF and HE, arterial ammonia, jugular venous oxygen saturation (JVO2 ), white blood cell count (WCC), and C-reactive protein were measured at days 0, 1, 3, and 7. Patients were followed until death or hospital discharge. Mortality was high (51 patients, 50.5%), especially in patients with HE of whom 35 of 53 (66.0%) died regardless of ACLF severity. At baseline, increased WCC and abnormal JVO2 (high or low) were independent predictors of death. Further deterioration in inflammation, JVO2 , and ammonia were also predictive of mortality. JVO2 deviation and hyperammonemia were associated with the presence and severity of HE; improvement in these parameters was associated with a reduction in HE grade. No direct interaction was observed between these variables in regards to mortality or HE. In conclusion, this study describes potential mechanisms of HE in ACLF indicating that ammonia and abnormal cerebral oxygenation are important. The results suggest that ammonia, JVO2 , and WCC are important prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets. The relative roles of these pathophysiological factors in the pathogenesis of HE in ACLF or guiding therapy to improve survival requires future study. Liver Transplantation 22 732-742 2016 AASLD. PMID:27028317

  19. Decreased Serum Level of miR-146a as Sign of Chronic Inflammation in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Baldeón R., Lucy; Weigelt, Karin; de Wit, Harm; Ozcan, Behiye; van Oudenaren, Adri; Sempértegui, Fernando; Sijbrands, Eric; Grosse, Laura; Freire, Wilma; Drexhage, Hemmo A.; Leenen, Pieter J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence that chronic inflammation is an important determinant in insulin resistance and in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2D). MicroRNAs constitute a newly discovered system of cell regulation and in particular two microRNAs (miR-146a and miR-155) have been described as regulators and biomarkers of inflammation. Aim To determine a putative association between the levels of miR-146a and miR-155 in serum of T2D patients, clinical parameters and serological indicators of inflammation. Methods We performed quantitative Real Time PCR (qPCR) of microRNAs from serum (56 Ecuadorian T2D ambulatory patients and 40 non-diabetic controls). In addition, we evaluated T2D-related serum cytokines.chemokines and growth factors using a commercially available multi-analyte cytometric bead array system. We correlated outcomes to clinical parameters, including BMI, HbA1c and lipid state. Results The Ecuadorian non-diabetic controls appeared as overweight (BMI>25: patients 85%, controls 82.5%) and as dyslipidemic (hypercholesterolemia: patients 60.7%, controls 67.5%) as the patients. The serum levels of miR-146a were significantly reduced in T2D patients as compared to these non-diabetic, but obese/dyslipidemic control group (mean patients 0.61, mean controls set at 1; p = 0.042), those of miR-155 were normal. The serum levels of both microRNAs correlated to each other (r = 0.478; p<0.001) and to leptin levels. The microRNAs did not correlate to BMI, glycemia and dyslipidemia. From the tested cytokines, chemokines and growth factors, we found IL-8 and HGF significantly raised in T2D patients versus non-diabetic controls (p = 0.011 and 0.023 respectively). Conclusions This study shows decreased serum anti-inflammatory miR-146a, increased pro-inflammatory IL-8 and increased HGF (a vascular/insular repair factor) as discriminating markers of failure of glucose control occurring on the background of obesity and dyslipidemia. PMID:25500583

  20. Interactions between Myc and Mediators of Inflammation in Chronic Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ting; Zhou, Yu; Ko, Kwang Suk; Yang, Heping

    2015-01-01

    Most chronic liver diseases (CLDs) are characterized by inflammatory processes with aberrant expressions of various pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators in the liver. These mediators are the driving force of many inflammatory liver disorders, which often result in fibrosis, cirrhosis, and liver tumorigenesis. c-Myc is involved in many cellular events such as cell growth, proliferation, and differentiation. c-Myc upregulates IL-8, IL-10, TNF-α, and TGF-β, while IL-1, IL-2, IL-4, TNF-α, and TGF-β promote c-Myc expression. Their interactions play a central role in fibrosis, cirrhosis, and liver cancer. Molecular interference of their interactions offers possible therapeutic potential for CLDs. In this review, current knowledge of the molecular interactions between c-Myc and various well known inflammatory mediators is discussed. PMID:26508814

  1. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Chronic Inflammation-Associated Organ Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ueha, Satoshi; Shand, Francis H. W.; Matsushima, Kouji

    2012-01-01

    Organ fibrosis is a pathological condition associated with chronic inflammatory diseases. In fibrosis, excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) severely impairs tissue architecture and function, eventually resulting in organ failure. This process is mediated primarily by the induction of myofibroblasts, which produce large amounts of collagen I, the main component of the ECM. Accordingly, the origin, developmental pathways, and mechanisms of myofibroblast regulation are attracting increasing attention as potential therapeutic targets. The fibrotic cascade, from initial epithelial damage to eventual myofibroblast induction, is mediated by complex biological processes such as macrophage infiltration, a shift from Th1 to Th2 phenotype, and by inflammatory mediators such as transforming growth factor-β. Here, we review the current understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying organ fibrosis. PMID:22566952

  2. Anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of cyanocobalamin (vitamin B12) against acute and chronic pain and inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh, H; Moallem, S A; Moshiri, M; Sarnavazi, M S; Etemad, L

    2012-07-01

    In this study, the anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of cyanocobalamin (Vit B12) against acute and chronic pain and inflammation were evaluated in mice. Vit B12 (0.87, 1 and 1.77 mg/kg) were injected intraperitoneally. The anti-nociceptive effects against acute pain were examined using hot-plate and writhing tests. The chronic pain was examined 14 days after sciatic nerve ligation using the hot-plate test. Morphine (10 mg/kg) was used as a positive control. Anti-inflammatory effects of Vit B12 against acute and chronic inflammation were assessed using xylene-induced edema in ears and granuloma caused by compressed cotton implantation, respectively. In these tests, sodium diclofenac (15 mg/kg) was used as a positive control. Vit B12 showed a dose related effect in acute anti-nociceptive test and increased the anti-nociceptive effect of morphine in chronic treatment. Vit B12 demonstrated an anti-nociceptive effect in chronic studies as single or continues daily treatment and increased significantly the anti-nociceptive effect of morphine. All doses of Vit B12 significantly decreased xylene-induced ear edema. Maximum anti-inflammatory effect (37.5%) was obtained at dose of 1 mg/kg. In chronic inflammation, Vit B12 significantly decreased granuloma formation in mice. In conclusion our work presents some experimental evidence supporting the administration of cyanocobalamin in controlling acute and chronic neuropathic pain. Cyanocobalamin may have anti-inflammatory effect. It may reduce tolerance to anti-nociceptive effect of morphine as well. PMID:22588629

  3. Research Advances in the Intervention of Inflammation and Cancer by Active Ingredients of Traditional Chinese Medicine.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yinghong; Cai, Tiange; Xia, Xi; Cai, Y; Wu, Xiao Yu

    2016-01-01

    A large body of evidence has shown that inflammation and cancer are strongly related. Thus anti-inflammatory agents have been investigated for cancer prevention and treatment in preclinical and clinical studies, including the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). In TCM, there exist a wide range of biologically active substances, such as saponins, flavonoids, alkaloids, polysaccharides, polyphenols, phenylpropanoids, and quinones. Many of these active ingredients have been reported to inhibit inflammation, activate inflammatory immune response, and/or inhibit cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. Given the potential role of inflammation in cancer initiation and progression, the inflammatory tumor microenvironment, the cross-talks between inflammatory and cancer cells, and multitargeting activities of some TCM compounds, we summarize the current knowledge on the anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties of ingredients of TCM together with their underlying mechanisms in an integrated way. We hope to provide a reliable basis and useful information for the development of new treatment strategies of inflammation and cancer comprehensively using TCM and their active ingredients. This article is open to POST-PUBLICATION REVIEW. Registered readers (see "For Readers") may comment by clicking on ABSTRACT on the issue's contents page. PMID:27096696

  4. Obesity-induced chronic inflammation in high fat diet challenged C57BL/6J mice is associated with acceleration of age-dependent renal amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    van der Heijden, Roel A.; Bijzet, Johan; Meijers, Wouter C.; Yakala, Gopala K.; Kleemann, Robert; Nguyen, Tri Q.; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Schalkwijk, Casper G.; Hazenberg, Bouke P. C.; Tietge, Uwe J. F.; Heeringa, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Obesity-induced inflammation presumably accelerates the development of chronic kidney diseases. However, little is known about the sequence of these inflammatory events and their contribution to renal pathology. We investigated the effects of obesity on the evolution of age-dependent renal complications in mice in conjunction with the development of renal and systemic low-grade inflammation (LGI). C57BL/6J mice susceptible to develop age-dependent sclerotic pathologies with amyloid features in the kidney, were fed low (10% lard) or high-fat diets (45% lard) for 24, 40 and 52 weeks. HFD-feeding induced overt adiposity, altered lipid and insulin homeostasis, increased systemic LGI and adipokine release. HFD-feeding also caused renal upregulation of pro-inflammatory genes, infiltrating macrophages, collagen I protein, increased urinary albumin and NGAL levels. HFD-feeding severely aggravated age-dependent structural changes in the kidney. Remarkably, enhanced amyloid deposition rather than sclerosis was observed. The degree of amyloidosis correlated significantly with body weight. Amyloid deposits stained positive for serum amyloid A (SAA) whose plasma levels were chronically elevated in HFD mice. Our data indicate obesity-induced chronic inflammation as a risk factor for the acceleration of age-dependent renal amyloidosis and functional impairment in mice, and suggest that obesity-enhanced chronic secretion of SAA may be the driving factor behind this process. PMID:26563579

  5. Neutrophil proteolytic activation cascades: a possible mechanistic link between chronic periodontitis and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Alfakry, Hatem; Malle, Ernst; Koyani, Chintan N; Pussinen, Pirkko J; Sorsa, Timo

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are chronic inflammatory diseases that affect a large segment of society. Coronary heart disease (CHD), the most common cardiovascular disease, progresses over several years and affects millions of people worldwide. Chronic infections may contribute to the systemic inflammation and enhance the risk for CHD. Periodontitis is one of the most common chronic infections that affects up to 50% of the adult population. Under inflammatory conditions the activation of endogenous degradation pathways mediated by immune responses leads to the release of destructive cellular molecules from both resident and immigrant cells. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their regulators can activate each other and play an important role in immune response via degrading extracellular matrix components and modulating cytokines and chemokines. The action of MMPs is required for immigrant cell recruitment at the site of inflammation. Stimulated neutrophils represent the major pathogen-fighting immune cells that upregulate expression of several proteinases and oxidative enzymes, which can degrade extracellular matrix components (e.g. MMP-8, MMP-9 and neutrophil elastase). The activity of MMPs is regulated by endogenous inhibitors and/or candidate MMPs (e.g. MMP-7). The balance between MMPs and their inhibitors is thought to mirror the proteolytic burden. Thus, neutrophil-derived biomarkers, including myeloperoxidase, may activate proteolytic destructive cascades that are involved in subsequent immune-pathological events associated with both periodontitis and CHD. Here, we review the existing studies on the contribution of MMPs and their regulators to the infection-related pathology. Also, we discuss the possible proteolytic involvement and role of neutrophil-derived enzymes as an etiological link between chronic periodontitis and CHD. PMID:26608308

  6. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) Ameliorates Chronic Alcohol Ingestion-Induced Hepatic Steatosis and Inflammation: Role of Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rui; Xu, Xihui; Babcock, Sara A.; Zhang, Yingmei; Ren, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) plays a critical role in the detoxification of the ethanol metabolite acetaldehyde. This study was designed to examine the impact of global ALDH2 overexpression on alcohol-induced hepatic steatosis. Methods Wild-type friendly virus B (FVB) and ALDH2 transgenic mice were placed on a 4% alcohol or control diet for 12 weeks. Serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), bilirubin and cholesterol, hepatic triglyceride, steatosis, fat metabolism-related proteins, pro-inflammatory cytokines, glutathione (GSH), oxidized glutathione (GSSG), autophagy and autophagy signaling were examined. The role of autophagy was evaluated in ADH1-transfected human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cells (VA-13) treated with or without autophagy inducer rapamycin and lysosomal inhibitors. Results Chronic alcohol intake led to elevated AST, ALT, bilirubin, AST/ALT ratio, cholesterol, hepatic triglycerides, hepatic fat deposition as evidenced by H&E and oil Red O staining, associated with disturbed fat metabolism-related proteins (fatty acid synthase, SCD1), upregulated interleukin-6, TNF-α, cyclooxygenase, oxidative stress, and loss of autophagy, the effects of which were attenuated or ablated by ALDH2 transgene. Moreover, ethanol (100 mM) and acetaldehyde (100, 500 μM) increased levels of IL-6 and IFN-γ, and suppressed autophagy in VA-13 cells, the effects of which were markedly alleviated by rapamycin. In addition, lysosomal inhibitors mimicked ethanol-induced p62 accumulation with little additive effect with ethanol. Ethanol significantly suppressed LC3 conversion in the presence of lysosomal inhibitors. Conclusions In summary, our results revealed that ALDH2 plays a beneficial role in ameliorating chronic alcohol intake-induced hepatic steatosis and inflammation through regulation of autophagy. PMID:25457208

  7. Association between Inflammation and Cardiac Geometry in Chronic Kidney Disease: Findings from the CRIC Study

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Jeffrey C.; Ojo, Akinlolu O.; Barrows, Ian R.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Townsend, Raymond R.; Joffe, Marshall M.; Rosas, Sylvia E.; Wolman, Melanie; Patel, Samir S.; Keane, Martin G.; Feldman, Harold I.; Kusek, John W.; Raj, Dominic S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and myocardial contractile dysfunction are independent predictors of mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The association between inflammatory biomarkers and cardiac geometry has not yet been studied in a large cohort of CKD patients with a wide range of kidney function. Methods Plasma levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, high-sensitivity C-Reactive protein (hs-CRP), fibrinogen and serum albumin were measured in 3,939 Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort study participants. Echocardiography was performed according to the recommendations of the American Society of Echocardiography and interpreted at a centralized core laboratory. Results LVH, systolic dysfunction and diastolic dysfunction were present in 52.3%, 11.8% and 76.3% of the study subjects, respectively. In logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, diabetic status, current smoking status, systolic blood pressure, urinary albumin- creatinine ratio and estimated glomerular filtration rate, hs-CRP (OR 1.26 [95% CI 1.16, 1.37], p<0.001), IL-1RA (1.23 [1.13, 1.34], p<0.0001), IL-6 (1.25 [1.14, 1.36], p<0.001) and TNF-α (1.14 [1.04, 1.25], p = 0.004) were associated with LVH. The odds for systolic dysfunction were greater for subjects with elevated levels of hs-CRP (1.32 [1.18, 1.48], p<0.001) and IL-6 (1.34 [1.21, 1.49], p<0.001). Only hs-CRP was associated with diastolic dysfunction (1.14 [1.04, 1.26], p = 0.005). Conclusion In patients with CKD, elevated plasma levels of hs-CRP and IL-6 are associated with LVH and systolic dysfunction. PMID:25909952

  8. Sirtuins Link Inflammation and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Vachharajani, Vidula T.; Liu, Tiefu; Wang, Xianfeng; Hoth, Jason J.; Yoza, Barbara K.; McCall, Charles E.

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuins (SIRT), first discovered in yeast as NAD+ dependent epigenetic and metabolic regulators, have comparable activities in human physiology and disease. Mounting evidence supports that the seven-member mammalian sirtuin family (SIRT1–7) guard homeostasis by sensing bioenergy needs and responding by making alterations in the cell nutrients. Sirtuins play a critical role in restoring homeostasis during stress responses. Inflammation is designed to “defend and mend” against the invading organisms. Emerging evidence supports that metabolism and bioenergy reprogramming direct the sequential course of inflammation; failure of homeostasis retrieval results in many chronic and acute inflammatory diseases. Anabolic glycolysis quickly induced (compared to oxidative phosphorylation) for ROS and ATP generation is needed for immune activation to “defend” against invading microorganisms. Lipolysis/fatty acid oxidation, essential for cellular protection/hibernation and cell survival in order to “mend,” leads to immune repression. Acute/chronic inflammations are linked to altered glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation, at least in part, by NAD+ dependent function of sirtuins. Therapeutically targeting sirtuins may provide a new class of inflammation and immune regulators. This review discusses how sirtuins integrate metabolism, bioenergetics, and immunity during inflammation and how sirtuin-directed treatment improves outcome in chronic inflammatory diseases and in the extreme stress response of sepsis. PMID:26904696

  9. Sirtuins Link Inflammation and Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Vachharajani, Vidula T; Liu, Tiefu; Wang, Xianfeng; Hoth, Jason J; Yoza, Barbara K; McCall, Charles E

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuins (SIRT), first discovered in yeast as NAD+ dependent epigenetic and metabolic regulators, have comparable activities in human physiology and disease. Mounting evidence supports that the seven-member mammalian sirtuin family (SIRT1-7) guard homeostasis by sensing bioenergy needs and responding by making alterations in the cell nutrients. Sirtuins play a critical role in restoring homeostasis during stress responses. Inflammation is designed to "defend and mend" against the invading organisms. Emerging evidence supports that metabolism and bioenergy reprogramming direct the sequential course of inflammation; failure of homeostasis retrieval results in many chronic and acute inflammatory diseases. Anabolic glycolysis quickly induced (compared to oxidative phosphorylation) for ROS and ATP generation is needed for immune activation to "defend" against invading microorganisms. Lipolysis/fatty acid oxidation, essential for cellular protection/hibernation and cell survival in order to "mend," leads to immune repression. Acute/chronic inflammations are linked to altered glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation, at least in part, by NAD+ dependent function of sirtuins. Therapeutically targeting sirtuins may provide a new class of inflammation and immune regulators. This review discusses how sirtuins integrate metabolism, bioenergetics, and immunity during inflammation and how sirtuin-directed treatment improves outcome in chronic inflammatory diseases and in the extreme stress response of sepsis. PMID:26904696

  10. Cholinesterase activity in rat liver and serum during experimentally induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Simon, G; Budavári, I

    1977-01-01

    Cholinesterase activity of albino rats with acute local oedematous inflammation induced by turpentine, croton oil or Freund's adjuvant was elevated in the liver homogenate but decreased in the serum. Aprotinin administration prevented the decrease of serum activity. In the oedema fluid of rats treated with croton oil an enzyme with cholinester splitting activity was detected and it was shown to be identical with serum cholinesterase (EC 3. 1. 1. 8.). PMID:311577

  11. Intranasal curcumin ameliorates airway inflammation and obstruction by regulating MAPKinase activation (p38, Erk and JNK) and prostaglandin D2 release in murine model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Subhashini; Chauhan, Preeti S; Dash, D; Paul, B N; Singh, Rashmi

    2016-02-01

    Asthma, a multifactorial, chronic inflammatory disease encompasses multiple complex pathways releasing number of mediators by activated mast cells, eosinophils and T lymphocytes, leading to its severity. Presently available medications are associated with certain limitations, and hence, it is imperative to search for anti-inflammatory drug preferably targeting signaling cascades involved in inflammation thereby suppressing inflammatory mediators without any side effect. Curcumin, an anti-inflammatory molecule with potent anti-asthmatic potential has been found to suppress asthmatic features by inhibiting airway inflammation and bronchoconstriction if administered through nasal route. The present study provides new insight towards anti-asthmatic potential of intranasal curcumin at lower doses (2.5 and 5.0mg/kg) in Balb/c mice sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) which is effective in inhibiting airway inflammation. These investigations suggest that intranasal curcumin (2.5 and 5.0mg/kg) regulates airway inflammation and airway obstruction mainly by modulating cytokine levels (IL-4, 5, IFN-ƴ and TNF-α) and sPLA2 activity thereby inhibiting PGD2 release and COX-2 expression. Further, the suppression of p38 MAPK, ERK 42/44 and JNK54/56 activation elucidate the mechanism behind the inhibitory role of intranasal curcumin in asthma progression. Thus, curcumin could be better alternative for the development of nasal formulations and inhalers in near future. PMID:26761722

  12. A novel dual GLP-1 and GIP incretin receptor agonist is neuroprotective in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease by reducing chronic inflammation in the brain.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lijun; Li, Dongfang; Feng, Peng; Li, Lin; Xue, Guo-Fang; Li, Guanglai; Hölscher, Christian

    2016-04-13

    The incretins glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) are growth factors. GLP-1 mimetics are on the market as treatments for type 2 diabetes. Both GLP-1 and GIP mimetics have shown neuroprotective properties in previous studies. In addition, the GLP-1 mimetic exendin-4 has shown protective effects in a clinical trial in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Novel GLP-1/GIP dual-agonist peptides have been developed to treat diabetes. Here, we report the neuroprotective effects of a novel dual agonist (DA-JC1) in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of PD. MPTP was injected once daily (20 mg/kg intraperitoneally) for 7 days and the dual agonist was coinjected once daily (50 nmol/kg intraperitoneally). We found that the drug reduced most of the MPTP-induced motor impairments in the rotarod, open-field locomotion, and muscle strength test. The number of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neurons in the substantia nigra and striatum was reduced by MPTP and increased by DA-JC1. Synapse numbers (synaptophysin expression) were reduced in the substantia nigra and the striatum by MPTP and DA-JC1 reversed this effect. The activation of a chronic inflammation response by MPTP was considerably reduced by the dual agonist (DA) (astroglia and microglia activation). Therefore, dual agonists show promise as a novel treatment of PD. PMID:26918675

  13. Serum metabolomic signatures discriminate early liver inflammation and fibrosis stages in patients with chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haijun; Sun, Zeyu; Pan, Hongying; Chen, Meijuan; Tong, Yongxi; Zhang, Jiajie; Chen, Deying; Su, Xiaoling; Li, Lanjuan

    2016-01-01

    Chronic HBV (CHB) infected patients with intermediate necroinflammation and fibrosis are recommended to receive antiviral treatment. However, other than liver biopsy, there is a lack of sensitive and specific objective method to determine the necroinflammation and fibrosis stages in CHB patients. This study aims to identify unique serum metabolomic profile associated with histological progression in CHB patients and to develop novel metabolite biomarker panels for early CHB detection and stratification. A comprehensive metabolomic profiling method was established to compare serum samples collected from health donor (n = 67), patients with mild (G < 2 and S < 2, CHB1, n = 52) or intermediate (G ≥ 2 or S ≥ 2, CHB2, n = 36) necroinflammation and fibrosis. Multivariate models were developed to differentiate CHB1 and CHB2 from controls. A set of CHB-associated biomarkers was identified, including lysophosphatidylcholines, phosphatidylcholines, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, and bile acid metabolism products. Stratification of CHB1 and CHB2 patients by a simple logistic index, the PIPSindex, based on phosphatidylinositol (PI) and phosphatidylserine (PS), was achieved with an AUC of 0.961, which outperformed all currently available markers. A panel of serum metabolites that differentiate health control, CHB1 and CHB2 patients has been identified. The proposed metabolomic biosignature has the potential to be used as indicator for antiviral treatment for CHB management. PMID:27498553

  14. Serum metabolomic signatures discriminate early liver inflammation and fibrosis stages in patients with chronic hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Haijun; Sun, Zeyu; Pan, Hongying; Chen, Meijuan; Tong, Yongxi; Zhang, Jiajie; Chen, Deying; Su, Xiaoling; Li, Lanjuan

    2016-01-01

    Chronic HBV (CHB) infected patients with intermediate necroinflammation and fibrosis are recommended to receive antiviral treatment. However, other than liver biopsy, there is a lack of sensitive and specific objective method to determine the necroinflammation and fibrosis stages in CHB patients. This study aims to identify unique serum metabolomic profile associated with histological progression in CHB patients and to develop novel metabolite biomarker panels for early CHB detection and stratification. A comprehensive metabolomic profiling method was established to compare serum samples collected from health donor (n = 67), patients with mild (G < 2 and S < 2, CHB1, n = 52) or intermediate (G ≥ 2 or S ≥ 2, CHB2, n = 36) necroinflammation and fibrosis. Multivariate models were developed to differentiate CHB1 and CHB2 from controls. A set of CHB-associated biomarkers was identified, including lysophosphatidylcholines, phosphatidylcholines, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, and bile acid metabolism products. Stratification of CHB1 and CHB2 patients by a simple logistic index, the PIPSindex, based on phosphatidylinositol (PI) and phosphatidylserine (PS), was achieved with an AUC of 0.961, which outperformed all currently available markers. A panel of serum metabolites that differentiate health control, CHB1 and CHB2 patients has been identified. The proposed metabolomic biosignature has the potential to be used as indicator for antiviral treatment for CHB management. PMID:27498553

  15. Thymoquinone ameliorates testicular tissue inflammation induced by chronic administration of oral sodium nitrite.

    PubMed

    Alyoussef, A; Al-Gayyar, M M H

    2016-06-01

    Although sodium nitrite has been widely used as food preservative, building bases of scientific evidence about nitrite continues to oppose the general safety in human health. Moreover, thymoquinone (TQ) has therapeutic potential as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial and anticancer. Therefore, we investigated the effects of both sodium nitrite and TQ on testicular tissues of rats. Forty adult male Sprague Dawley rats were used. They received either 80 mg kg(-1) sodium nitrite or 50 mg kg(-1) TQ daily for twelve weeks. Serum testosterone was measured. Testis were weighed and the testicular tissue homogenates were used for measurements of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL10, caspase-3, caspase-8 and caspase-9. Sodium nitrite resulted in significant reduction in serum testosterone concentration and elevation in testis weight and Gonado-Somatic Index. We found significant reduction in testicular tissues levels of IL-4 and IL-10 associated with elevated levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, caspase-3, caspase-8 and caspase-9. In conclusion, chronic oral sodium nitrite induced changes in the weight of rat testis accompanied by elevation in the testicular tissue level of oxidative stress markers and inflammatory cytokines. TQ attenuated sodium nitrite-induced testicular tissue damage through blocking oxidative stress, restoration of normal inflammatory cytokines balance and blocking of apoptosis. PMID:26260072

  16. Oral inflammation and infection, and chronic medical diseases: implications for the elderly.

    PubMed

    Scannapieco, Frank A; Cantos, Albert

    2016-10-01

    Oral diseases, such as caries and periodontitis, not only have local effects on the dentition and on tooth-supporting tissues but also may impact a number of systemic conditions. Emerging evidence suggests that poor oral health influences the initiation and/or progression of diseases such as atherosclerosis (with sequelae including myocardial infarction and stoke), diabetes mellitus and neurodegenerative diseases (such as Alzheimer's disease, rheumatoid arthritis and others). Aspiration of oropharyngeal (including periodontal) bacteria causes pneumonia, especially in hospitalized patients and the elderly, and may influence the course of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This article addresses several pertinent aspects related to the medical implications of periodontal disease in the elderly. There is moderate evidence that improved oral hygiene may help prevent aspiration pneumonia in high-risk patients. For other medical conditions, because of the absence of well-designed randomized clinical trials in elderly patients, no specific guidance can be provided regarding oral hygiene or periodontal interventions that enhance the medical management of older adults. PMID:27501498

  17. Eosinophils Reduce Chronic Inflammation in Adipose Tissue by Secreting Th2 Cytokines and Promoting M2 Macrophages Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Yang, Peng; Cui, Ran; Zhang, Manna; Li, Hong; Qian, Chunhua; Sheng, Chunjun; Qu, Shen; Bu, Le

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is now recognized as a low-grade, chronic inflammatory disease that is linked to a myriad of disorders including cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, and liver diseases. Recently it is found that eosinophils accelerate alternative activation macrophage (AAM) polarization by secreting Th2 type cytokines such as interleukin-4 and interleukin-13, thereby reducing metainflammation in adipose tissue. In this review, we focused on the role of eosinophils in regulating metabolic homeostasis and obesity. PMID:26688684

  18. Chronic Lymphocytic Inflammation with Pontine Perivascular Enhancement Responsive to Steroids with a Significant Elevation of β-2 Microglobulin Levels

    PubMed Central

    Fujisawa, Naoaki; Mori, Harushi; Matsui, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids (CLIPPERS) is a relapsing-remitting disorder for which steroid administration is a key to control the progression. CLIPPERS can exhibit radiological features similar to malignant lymphoma, whose diagnosis is confounded by prior steroid administration. We report a case of CLIPPERS accompanied by abnormal elevation of β-2 microglobulin in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). A 62-year-old man started to experience numbness in all fingers of his left hand one year ago, which gradually extended to his body trunk and legs on both sides. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated numerous small enhancing spots scattered in his brain and spinal cord. CSF levels of β-2 microglobulin were elevated; although this often indicates central nervous system involvement in leukemia and lymphoma, the lesions were diagnosed as CLIPPERS based on the pathological findings from a biopsy specimen. We emphasize the importance of biopsy to differentiate between CLIPPERS and malignant lymphoma because the temporary radiological response to steroid might be the same in both diseases but the treatment strategies regarding the use of steroid are quite different. PMID:26713153

  19. ASC has extracellular and prionoid activities that propagate inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Bernardo S.; Bossaller, Lukas; De Nardo, Dominic; Ratter, Jacqueline M.; Stutz, Andrea; Engels, Gudrun; Brenker, Christoph; Nordhoff, Mark; Mirandola, Sandra R.; Al-Amoudi, Ashraf; Mangan, Matthew; Zimmer, Sebastian; Monks, Brian; Fricke, Martin; Schmidt, Reinhold E.; Espevik, Terje; Jones, Bernadette; Jarnicki, Andrew G.; Hansbro, Philip M.; Busto, Patricia; Marshak-Rothstein, Ann; Hornemann, Simone; Aguzzi, Adriano; Kastenmüller, Wolfgang; Latz, Eicke

    2014-01-01

    Microbes or danger signals trigger inflammasome sensors, which induce polymerization of the adapter ASC and assembly of an ASC speck. ASC specks recruit and activate caspase-1, which induces IL-1β cytokine maturation and pyroptotic cell death. Here we show that after pyroptosis ASC specks accumulate in the extracellular space, where they promote further IL-1β maturation. In addition, phagocytosis of ASC specks induces lysosomal damage, nucleation of soluble ASC as well as caspase-1 and IL-1β activation in the recipient cell. ASC specks appear in bodily fluids from inflamed tissues and autoantibodies against ASC specks develop in patients and animals with autoimmune pathologies. Together, these findings reveal extracellular functions of ASC specks and a novel form of cell-to-cell communication. PMID:24952505

  20. Reduction in Pain and Inflammation Associated With Chronic Low Back Pain With the Use of the Medical Food Theramine.

    PubMed

    Shell, William E; Pavlik, Stephanie; Roth, Brandon; Silver, Michael; Breitstein, Mira L; May, Lawrence; Silver, David

    2014-09-18

    improvement in amino acid concentration and treatment response. Treatment with amino acid precursors was associated with substantial improvement in chronic back pain, reduction in inflammation, and improvement in back pain correlated with increased amino acid precursors to neurotransmitters in blood.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 3.0 License, where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially. PMID:25237981

  1. A dual pH/Redox responsive copper-ligand nanoliposome bioactive complex for the treatment of chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Mavuso, Simphiwe; Choonara, Yahya E; Marimuthu, Thashree; Kumar, Pradeep; du Toit, Lisa C; Kondiah, Pierre P D; Pillay, Viness

    2016-07-25

    A novel dual pH/redox-responsive polymeric nanoliposome system (NLs) loaded with a copper-liganded bioactive complex was prepared and designed as a controlled delivery system for the management of inflammation. The NLs were synthesised after preparation of the copper-glyglycine-prednisolone succinate] ([(Cu(glygly)(PS)]) complex, and the dual pH/redox responsive biopolymer respectively. The methodology undertaken for the development of the drug delivery system involved coordination of the bioactive to Copper (II), preparation of dual pH/redox responsive biopolymer, and the synthesis of dual pH/redox nanoliposomes. Characterisations of the prepared copper-liganded bioactive [Copper-glyglycine-prednisolone succinate] ([(Cu(glygly)(PS)]) complex, dual pH/redox responsive biopolymer (Eudragit E100-cystamine) and [(Cu(glygly)(PS)]-loaded NLs were carried out using spectroscopic and physicochemical techniques. Results indicated a high inflammatory/oxidant inhibitory activity of [Cu(glygly)(PS)] in comparison to the free PS drug. The [Cu(glygly)(PS)] complex exhibited a significant free radical-scavenging activity (60.1±1.2%) and lipoxygenase (LOX-5) inhibitory activity (36.6±1.3%) in comparison to PS which resulted in activity of 4.4±1.4% and inhibition of 6.1±2.6% respectively. The [Cu(glygly)(PS)] loaded NLs demonstrated low release profiles of 22.9±5.4% in 6h at pH 7.4, in comparison to a significant accelerated release at pH 5 in a reducing environment of 75.9±3.7% over 6h duration. Results suggest that the novel copper-liganded bioactive delivery system with controlled drug release mechanism could serve as a potential drug delivery system candidate in the management of inflammation. PMID:27269194

  2. Exposure to nickel oxide nanoparticles induces pulmonary inflammation through NLRP3 inflammasome activation in rats.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhengwang; Fang, Yiliang; Lu, Yonghui; Qian, Fenghua; Ma, Qinglong; He, Mingdi; Pi, Huifeng; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    With recent advances in the manufacture and application of nickel oxide nanoparticles (NiONPs), concerns about their adverse effects on the respiratory system are increasing. However, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms of NiONP-induced pulmonary toxicity remain unclear. In this study, we focused on the impacts of NiONPs on pulmonary inflammation and investigated whether the NLRP3 inflammasome is involved in NiONP-induced pulmonary inflammation and injury. NiONP suspensions were administered by single intratracheal instillation to rats, and inflammatory responses were evaluated at 3 days, 7 days, or 28 days after treatment. NiONP exposure resulted in sustained pulmonary inflammation accompanied by inflammatory cell infiltration, alveolar proteinosis, and cytokine secretion. Expression of Nlrp3 was markedly upregulated by the NiONPs, which was accompanied by overexpression of the active form of caspase-1 (p20) and interleukin (IL)-1β secretion in vivo. NiONP-induced IL-1β secretion was partially prevented by co-treatment with a caspase-1 inhibitor in macrophages. Moreover, siRNA-mediated Nlrp3 knockdown completely attenuated NiONP-induced cytokine release and caspase-1 activity in macrophages in vitro. In addition, NiONP-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation requires particle uptake and reactive oxygen species production. Collectively, our findings suggest that the NLRP3 inflammasome participates in NiONP-induced pulmonary inflammation and offer new strategies to combat the pulmonary toxicity induced by NiONPs. PMID:27524893

  3. Exposure to nickel oxide nanoparticles induces pulmonary inflammation through NLRP3 inflammasome activation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhengwang; Fang, Yiliang; Lu, Yonghui; Qian, Fenghua; Ma, Qinglong; He, Mingdi; Pi, Huifeng; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    With recent advances in the manufacture and application of nickel oxide nanoparticles (NiONPs), concerns about their adverse effects on the respiratory system are increasing. However, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms of NiONP-induced pulmonary toxicity remain unclear. In this study, we focused on the impacts of NiONPs on pulmonary inflammation and investigated whether the NLRP3 inflammasome is involved in NiONP-induced pulmonary inflammation and injury. NiONP suspensions were administered by single intratracheal instillation to rats, and inflammatory responses were evaluated at 3 days, 7 days, or 28 days after treatment. NiONP exposure resulted in sustained pulmonary inflammation accompanied by inflammatory cell infiltration, alveolar proteinosis, and cytokine secretion. Expression of Nlrp3 was markedly upregulated by the NiONPs, which was accompanied by overexpression of the active form of caspase-1 (p20) and interleukin (IL)-1β secretion in vivo. NiONP-induced IL-1β secretion was partially prevented by co-treatment with a caspase-1 inhibitor in macrophages. Moreover, siRNA-mediated Nlrp3 knockdown completely attenuated NiONP-induced cytokine release and caspase-1 activity in macrophages in vitro. In addition, NiONP-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation requires particle uptake and reactive oxygen species production. Collectively, our findings suggest that the NLRP3 inflammasome participates in NiONP-induced pulmonary inflammation and offer new strategies to combat the pulmonary toxicity induced by NiONPs. PMID:27524893

  4. Regulation of Th17/Treg function contributes to the attenuation of chronic airway inflammation by icariin in ovalbumin-induced murine asthma model.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ying; Liu, Baojun; Sun, Jing; Lv, Yubao; Luo, Qingli; Liu, Feng; Dong, Jingcheng

    2015-06-01

    Icariin which is a flavonoid glucoside isolated from Epimedium brevicornu Maxim, has been reported to have anti-osteoporotic, anti-inflammatory and anti-depressant-like activities. In this study, we observed the effect of icariin on airway inflammation of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced murine asthma model and the associated regulatory mode on T-helper (Th)17 and regulatory T (Treg) cell function. Our data revealed that chronic OVA inhalation induced a dramatic increase in airway resistance (RL) and decrease in the lung dynamic compliance (Cdyn), and icariin and DEX treatment caused significant attenuation of such airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). BALF cell counts demonstrated that icariin and DEX led to a prominent reduction in total leukocyte as well as lymphocyte, eosinophil, neutrophil, basophil and monocyte counts. Histological analysis results indicated that icariin and DEX alleviated the inflammatory cells infiltrating into the peribronchial tissues and goblet cells hyperplasia and mucus hyper-production. Flow cytometry test demonstrated that icariin or DEX administration resulted in a significant percentage reduction in CD4+RORγt+ T cells and elevation of CD4+Foxp3+ T cells in BALF. Furthermore, icariin or DEX caused a significant reduction in IL-6, IL-17 and TGF-β level in BALF. Unfortunately, icariin had no effect on IL-10 level in BALF. Western blot assay found that icariin or DEX suppressed RORγt and promoted Foxp3 expression in the lung tissue. qPCR analysis revealed that icariin and DEX resulted in a notable decrease in RORγt and increase in Foxp3 mRNA expression in isolated spleen CD4+ T cell. In conclusion, our results suggested that icariin was effective in the attenuation of AHR and chronic airway inflammatory changes in OVA-induced murine asthma model, and this effect was associated with regulation of Th17/Treg responses, which indicated that icariin may be used as a potential therapeutic method to treat asthma with Th17/Treg imbalance phenotype

  5. Inflammation-induced S100A8 activates Id3 and promotes colorectal tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuemei; Ai, Feiyan; Li, Xiayu; She, Xiaoling; Li, Nan; Tang, Anliu; Qin, Zailong; Ye, Qiurong; Tian, Li; Li, Guiyuan; Shen, Shourong; Ma, Jian

    2015-12-15

    The aberrant expression of S100A8 and S100A9 is linked to nonresolving inflammation and ultimately to carcinogenesis, whereas the underlying mechanism that allows inflammation to progress to specific cancer types remains unknown. Here, we report that S100A8 was induced by inflammation and then promoted colorectal tumorigenesis downstream by activating Id3 (inhibitor of differentiation 3). Using gene expression profiling and immunohistochemistry, we found that both S100A8 and S100A9 were upregulated in the chemically-induced colitis-associated cancer mouse model and in human colorectal cancer specimens. Furthermore, we showed that S100A8 and S100A9 acted as chemoattractant proteins by recruiting macrophages, promoting the proliferation and invasion of colon cancer cell, as well as spurring the cycle that culminates in the acceleration of cancer metastasis in a nude mouse model. S100A8 regulated colon cancer cell cycle and proliferation by inducing Id3 expression while inhibiting p21. Id3 expression was regulated by Smad5, which was directly phosphorylated by Akt1. Our study revealed a novel mechanism in which inflammation-induced S100A8 promoted colorectal tumorigenesis by acting upstream to activate the Akt1-Smad5-Id3 axis. PMID:26135667

  6. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Activation by TCDD Reduces Inflammation Associated with Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Jenna M.; Shepherd, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Crohn's disease results from a combination of genetic and environmental factors that trigger an inappropriate immune response to commensal gut bacteria. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is well known for its involvement in the toxicity of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), an environmental contaminant that affects people primarily through the diet. Recently, TCDD was shown to suppress immune responses by generating regulatory T cells (Tregs). We hypothesized that AhR activation dampens inflammation associated with Crohn's disease. To test this hypothesis, we utilized the 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) murine model of colitis. Mice were gavaged with TCDD prior to colitis induction with TNBS. Several parameters were examined including colonic inflammation via histological and flow cytometric analyses. TCDD-treated mice recovered body weight faster and experienced significantly less colonic damage. Reduced levels of interleukin (IL) 6, IL-12, interferon-gamma, and tumor necrosis factor-α demonstrated suppression of inflammation in the gut following TCDD exposure. Forkhead box P3 (Foxp3)egfp mice revealed that TCDD increased the Foxp3+ Treg population in gut immune tissue following TNBS exposure. Collectively, these results suggest that activation of the AhR by TCDD decreases colonic inflammation in a murine model of colitis in part by generating regulatory immune cells. Ultimately, this work may lead to the development of more effective therapeutics for the treatment of Crohn's disease. PMID:21131560

  7. Key mechanisms governing resolution of lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Robb, C T; Regan, K H; Dorward, D A; Rossi, A G

    2016-07-01

    Innate immunity normally provides excellent defence against invading microorganisms. Acute inflammation is a form of innate immune defence and represents one of the primary responses to injury, infection and irritation, largely mediated by granulocyte effector cells such as neutrophils and eosinophils. Failure to remove an inflammatory stimulus (often resulting in failed resolution of inflammation) can lead to chronic inflammation resulting in tissue injury caused by high numbers of infiltrating activated granulocytes. Successful resolution of inflammation is dependent upon the removal of these cells. Under normal physiological conditions, apoptosis (programmed cell death) precedes phagocytic recognition and clearance of these cells by, for example, macrophages, dendritic and epithelial cells (a process known as efferocytosis). Inflammation contributes to immune defence within the respiratory mucosa (responsible for gas exchange) because lung epithelia are continuously exposed to a multiplicity of airborne pathogens, allergens and foreign particles. Failure to resolve inflammation within the respiratory mucosa is a major contributor of numerous lung diseases. This review will summarise the major mechanisms regulating lung inflammation, including key cellular interplays such as apoptotic cell clearance by alveolar macrophages and macrophage/neutrophil/epithelial cell interactions. The different acute and chronic inflammatory disease states caused by dysregulated/impaired resolution of lung inflammation will be discussed. Furthermore, the resolution of lung inflammation during neutrophil/eosinophil-dominant lung injury or enhanced resolution driven via pharmacological manipulation will also be considered. PMID:27116944

  8. Stromelysin-2 (MMP10) Moderates Inflammation by Controlling Macrophage Activation.

    PubMed

    McMahan, Ryan S; Birkland, Timothy P; Smigiel, Kate S; Vandivort, Tyler C; Rohani, Maryam G; Manicone, Anne M; McGuire, John K; Gharib, Sina A; Parks, William C

    2016-08-01

    Several members of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family control a range of immune processes, such as leukocyte influx and chemokine activity. Stromelysin-2 (MMP10) is expressed by macrophages in numerous tissues after injury; however, little is known of its function. In this study, we report that MMP10 is expressed by macrophages in human lungs from patients with cystic fibrosis and induced in mouse macrophages in response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection both in vivo and by isolated resident alveolar and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM). Our data indicates that macrophage MMP10 serves a beneficial function in response to acute infection. Whereas wild-type mice survived infection with minimal morbidity, 50% of Mmp10(-/-) mice died and all showed sustained weight loss (morbidity). Although bacterial clearance and neutrophil influx did not differ between genotypes, macrophage numbers were ∼3-fold greater in infected Mmp10(-/-) lungs than in wild-types. Adoptive transfer of wild-type BMDM normalized infection-induced morbidity in Mmp10(-/-) recipients to wild-type levels, demonstrating that the protective effect of MMP10 was due to its production by macrophages. Both in vivo and in cultured alveolar macrophages and BMDM, expression of several M1 macrophage markers was elevated, whereas M2 markers were reduced in Mmp10(-/-) tissue and cells. Global gene expression analysis revealed that infection-mediated transcriptional changes persisted in Mmp10(-/-) BMDM long after they were downregulated in wild-type cells. These results indicate that MMP10 serves a beneficial role in response to acute infection by moderating the proinflammatory response of resident and infiltrating macrophages. PMID:27316687

  9. P-selectin increases angiotensin II-induced cardiac inflammation and fibrosis via platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    LIU, GAIZHEN; LIANG, BIN; SONG, XIAOSU; BAI, RUI; QIN, WEIWEI; SUN, XU; LU, YAN; BIAN, YUNFEI; XIAO, CHUANSHI

    2016-01-01

    Platelet activation is important in hypertension-induced cardiac inflammation and fibrosis. P-selectin expression significantly (P<0.05) increases when platelets are activated during hypertension. Although P-selectin recruits leukocytes to sites of inflammation, the role of P-selectin in cardiac inflammation and fibrosis remains to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate whether platelet-derived P-selectin promotes hypertensive cardiac inflammation and fibrosis. P-selectin knockout (P-sel KO) mice and wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 littermates were infused with angiotensin II (Ang II) at 1,500 ng/kg/min for 7 days and then cross-transplanted with platelets originating from either WT or P-sel KO mice. P-selectin expression was increased in the myocardium and plasma of hypertensive mice, and the P-sel KO mice exhibited significantly (P<0.05) reduced cardiac fibrosis. The fibrotic areas were markedly smaller in the hearts of P-sel KO mice compared with WT mice, as assessed by Masson's trichrome staining. In addition, α-smooth muscle actin and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) expression levels were decreased in the P-sel KO mice, as assessed by immunohistochemistry. Following platelet transplantation into P-sel KO mice, the number of Mac-2 (galectin-3)- and TGF-β1-positive cells was increased in mice that received WT platelets compared with those that received P-sel KO platelets, and the mRNA expression levels of collagen I and TGF-β1 were also increased. The results from the present study suggest that activated platelets secrete P-selectin to promote cardiac inflammation and fibrosis in Ang II-induced hypertension. PMID:27121797

  10. P‑selectin increases angiotensin II‑induced cardiac inflammation and fibrosis via platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gaizhen; Liang, Bin; Song, Xiaosu; Bai, Rui; Qin, Weiwei; Sun, Xu; Lu, Yan; Bian, Yunfei; Xiao, Chuanshi

    2016-06-01

    Platelet activation is important in hypertension‑induced cardiac inflammation and fibrosis. P-selectin expression significantly (P<0.05) increases when platelets are activated during hypertension. Although P‑selectin recruits leukocytes to sites of inflammation, the role of P‑selectin in cardiac inflammation and fibrosis remains to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate whether platelet‑derived P‑selectin promotes hypertensive cardiac inflammation and fibrosis. P‑selectin knockout (P‑sel KO) mice and wild‑type (WT) C57BL/6 littermates were infused with angiotensin II (Ang II) at 1,500 ng/kg/min for 7 days and then cross‑transplanted with platelets originating from either WT or P‑sel KO mice. P‑selectin expression was increased in the myocardium and plasma of hypertensive mice, and the P‑sel KO mice exhibited significantly (P<0.05) reduced cardiac fibrosis. The fibrotic areas were markedly smaller in the hearts of P‑sel KO mice compared with WT mice, as assessed by Masson's trichrome staining. In addition, α‑smooth muscle actin and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF‑β1) expression levels were decreased in the P‑sel KO mice, as assessed by immunohistochemistry. Following platelet transplantation into P‑sel KO mice, the number of Mac‑2 (galectin‑3)‑ and TGF‑β1‑positive cells was increased in mice that received WT platelets compared with those that received P‑sel KO platelets, and the mRNA expression levels of collagen I and TGF‑β1 were also increased. The results from the present study suggest that activated platelets secrete P‑selectin to promote cardiac inflammation and fibrosis in Ang II‑induced hypertension. PMID:27121797

  11. Inflammation Activation Contributes to Adipokine Imbalance in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shui-ping; Huang, Xian-sheng

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation can be activated as a defensive response by the attack of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) for ischemic tissue injury. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of ACS-activated inflammation on adipokine imbalance and the effects of statins on the crosstalk between inflammation and adipokine imbalance during ACS. In this study, 586 subjects were categorized into: (1) control group; (2) SA (stable angina) group; and (3) ACS group. Circulating levels of hs-CRP, adiponectin and resistin were measured by ELISA. Furthermore, forty C57BL/6 mice were randomized into: sham, AMI, low-statin (atorvastatin, 2 mg/kg/day) and high-statin (atorvastatin, 20 mg/kg/day) group. After 3 weeks, AMI models were established by surgical coronary artery ligation. Circulating levels and adipose expressions of adiponectin and resistin were assessed in animals. Besides, we investigate the effects of atorvastatin on ox-LDL-induced adipokine imbalance in vitro. As a result, we found that ACS patients had higher hs-CRP and resistin levels and lower adiponectin levels. Our correlation analysis demonstrated hs-CRP concentrations were positively correlated with resistin but negatively with adiponectin levels in humans. Our animal findings indicated higher circulating hs-CRP and resistin levels and lower adiponectin levels in AMI mice. Atorvastatin pre-treatment dose-dependently decreased hs-CRP and resistin levels but increased adiponectin levels in mice. The consistent findings were observed about the adipose expressions of resistin and adiponectin in mice. In study in vitro, ox-LDL increased cellular resistin expressions and otherwise for adiponectin expressions, which dose-dependently reversed by the addition of atorvastatin. Therefore, our study indicates that the ACS attack activates inflammation leading to adipokine imbalance that can be ameliorated by anti-inflammation of atorvastatin. PMID:26986475

  12. Association of Elevated Serum Lipoprotein(a), Inflammation, Oxidative Stress and Chronic Kidney Disease with Hypertension in Non-diabetes Hypertensive Patients.

    PubMed

    Tangvarasittichai, Surapon; Pingmuanglaew, Patcharin; Tangvarasittichai, Orathai

    2016-10-01

    Hypertension is the most common cardiovascular risk factor. Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)], inflammation, oxidative stress and chronic kidney disease (CKD) exacerbate the response to tissue injury and acts as markers of the vascular disease, especially in glomerulosclerosis. We compared the clinical characteristics of 138 non-diabetes hypertensive women (ndHT) patients with 417 non-diabetes normotensive subjects and tested the association of hypertension with Lp(a), inflammation, CKD and oxidative stress by using multiple logistic regression. BP, BMI, waist circumference, creatinine, Lp(a), inflammation and malondialdehyde levels were significantly higher and CKD state in the ndHT patients (p < 0.05). Multiple logistic regression showed hypertension associated with increased Lp(a), inflammation, ORs and 95 % CIs were 2.52 (1.33, 4.80), 2.75 (1.44, 5.27) after adjusting for their covariates. Elevated serum Lp(a) and inflammation levels concomitants with increased oxidative stress and CKD were the major risk factors associated with hypertension and implications for the increased risk of HT and vascular disease. PMID:27605742

  13. DNMT1-PPARγ pathway in macrophages regulates chronic inflammation and atherosclerosis development in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jie; Qiu, Youzhu; Yang, Jie; Bian, Shizhu; Chen, Guozhu; Deng, Mengyang; Kang, Huali; Huang, Lan

    2016-01-01

    The DNA methyltransferase-mediated proinflammatory activation of macrophages is causally linked to the development of atherosclerosis (AS). However, the role of DNMT1, a DNA methylation maintenance enzyme, in macrophage polarization and AS development remains obscure. Here, we established transgenic mice with macrophage-specific overexpression of DNMT1 (Tg(DNMT1)) or PPAR-γ (Tg(PPAR-γ)) to investigate their effects on AS progression in ApoE-knockout mice fed an atherogenic diet. Primary macrophages were extracted to study the role of the DNMT1/PPAR-γ pathway in regulating inflammatory cytokine production. We demonstrated that Tg(DNMT1) significantly increased proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages and plasma, and it accelerated the progression of AS in the atherogenic diet-treated ApoE-knockout mice. Further, we found that the DNA methylation status of the proximal PPAR-γ promoter was regulated by DNMT1 in macrophages. Notably, additional Tg(PPAR-γ) or pharmacological activation of PPAR-γ effectively prevented Tg(DNMT1)-induced proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages and AS development in the mouse model. Finally, we demonstrated that elevated DNMT1 was correlated with decreased PPAR-γ, and increased proinflammatory cytokine production in the peripheral blood monocytes isolated from the patients with AS, compared to those of healthy donors. Our findings shed light on a novel strategy for the prevention and therapy of AS. PMID:27530451

  14. DNMT1-PPARγ pathway in macrophages regulates chronic inflammation and atherosclerosis development in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jie; Qiu, Youzhu; Yang, Jie; Bian, Shizhu; Chen, Guozhu; Deng, Mengyang; Kang, Huali; Huang, Lan

    2016-01-01

    The DNA methyltransferase-mediated proinflammatory activation of macrophages is causally linked to the development of atherosclerosis (AS). However, the role of DNMT1, a DNA methylation maintenance enzyme, in macrophage polarization and AS development remains obscure. Here, we established transgenic mice with macrophage-specific overexpression of DNMT1 (TgDNMT1) or PPAR-γ (TgPPAR-γ) to investigate their effects on AS progression in ApoE-knockout mice fed an atherogenic diet. Primary macrophages were extracted to study the role of the DNMT1/PPAR-γ pathway in regulating inflammatory cytokine production. We demonstrated that TgDNMT1 significantly increased proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages and plasma, and it accelerated the progression of AS in the atherogenic diet-treated ApoE-knockout mice. Further, we found that the DNA methylation status of the proximal PPAR-γ promoter was regulated by DNMT1 in macrophages. Notably, additional TgPPAR-γ or pharmacological activation of PPAR-γ effectively prevented TgDNMT1-induced proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages and AS development in the mouse model. Finally, we demonstrated that elevated DNMT1 was correlated with decreased PPAR-γ, and increased proinflammatory cytokine production in the peripheral blood monocytes isolated from the patients with AS, compared to those of healthy donors. Our findings shed light on a novel strategy for the prevention and therapy of AS. PMID:27530451

  15. Analysis of local chronic inflammatory cell infiltrate combined with systemic inflammation improves prognostication in stage II colon cancer independent of standard clinicopathologic criteria.

    PubMed

    Turner, Natalie; Wong, Hui-Li; Templeton, Arnoud; Tripathy, Sagarika; Whiti Rogers, Te; Croxford, Matthew; Jones, Ian; Sinnathamby, Mathuranthakan; Desai, Jayesh; Tie, Jeanne; Bae, Susie; Christie, Michael; Gibbs, Peter; Tran, Ben

    2016-02-01

    In Stage II colon cancer, multiple independent studies have shown that a dense intratumoural immune infiltrate (local inflammation) is associated with improved outcomes, while systemic inflammation, measured by various markers, has been associated with poorer outcomes. However, previous studies have not considered the interaction between local and systemic inflammation, nor have they assessed the type of inflammatory response compared with standard clinicopathologic criteria. In order to evaluate the potential clinical utility of inflammatory markers in Stage II colon cancer, we examined local and systemic inflammation in a consecutive series of patients with resected Stage II colon cancer between 2000 and 2010 who were identified from a prospective clinical database. Increased intratumoural chronic inflammatory cell (CIC) density, as assessed by pathologist review of hematoxylin and eosin stained slides, was used to represent local inflammation. Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) >5, as calculated from pre-operative full blood counts, was used to represent systemic inflammation. In 396 eligible patients identified, there was a non-significant inverse relationship between local and systemic inflammation. Increased CIC density was significantly associated with improved overall (HR 0.45, p = 0.001) and recurrence-free survival (HR 0.37, p = 0.003). High NLR was significantly associated with poorer overall survival (HR 2.56, p < 0.001). The combination of these markers further stratified prognosis independent of standard high-risk criteria, with a dominant systemic inflammatory response (low CIC/high NLR) associated with the worst outcome (5-year overall survival 55.8%). With further validation this simple, inexpensive combined inflammatory biomarker might assist in patient selection for adjuvant chemotherapy in Stage II colon cancer. PMID:26270488

  16. NLRP3 inflammasome activation by mitochondrial ROS in bronchial epithelial cells is required for allergic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S R; Kim, D I; Kim, S H; Lee, H; Lee, K S; Cho, S H; Lee, Y C

    2014-01-01

    Abnormality in mitochondria has been suggested to be associated with development of allergic airway disorders. In this study, to evaluate the relationship between mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) and NLRP3 inflammasome activation in allergic asthma, we used a newly developed mitochondrial ROS inhibitor, NecroX-5. NecroX-5 reduced the increase of mitochondrial ROS generation in airway inflammatory cells, as well as bronchial epithelial cells, NLRP3 inflammasome activation, the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB, increased expression of various inflammatory mediators and pathophysiological features of allergic asthma in mice. Finally, blockade of IL-1β substantially reduced airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in the asthmatic mice. These findings suggest that mitochondrial ROS have a critical role in the pathogenesis of allergic airway inflammation through the modulation of NLRP3 inflammasome activation, providing a novel role of airway epithelial cells expressing NLRP3 inflammasome as an immune responder. PMID:25356867

  17. Administration of Pigment Epithelium-Derived Factor Inhibits Airway Inflammation and Remodeling in Chronic OVA-Induced Mice via VEGF Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Wangjian; Su, Mei; Huang, Mao; Cai, Jiankang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is a recently discovered antiangiogenesis protein. PEDF possesses powerful anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, antiangiogenic, and antifibrosis properties. It has been reported that PEDF can regulate vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression. This study aimed to evaluate whether recombinant PEDF protein could attenuate allergic airway inflammation and airway remodeling via the negative regulation of VEGF using a murine model of chronic ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma and BEAS-2B human bronchial epithelial cells. Methods In an in vivo experiment, mice sensitized with OVA were chronically airway challenged with aerosolized 1% OVA solution for 8 weeks. Treated mice were given injections of recombinant PEDF protein (50 or 100 µg/kg body weight) via the tail vein. In an in vitro experiment, we investigated the effects of recombinant PEDF protein on VEGF release levels in BEAS-2B cells stimulated with IL-1β. Results Recombinant PEDF protein significantly inhibited eosinophilic airway inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness, and airway remodeling, including goblet cell hyperplasia, subepithelial collagen deposition, and airway smooth muscle hypertrophy. In addition, recombinant PEDF protein suppressed the enhanced expression of VEGF protein in lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in OVA-challenged chronically allergic mice. In the in vitro experiment, VEGF expression was increased after IL-1β stimulation. Pretreatment with 50 and 100 ng/mL of recombinant PEDF protein significantly attenuated the increase in VEGF release levels in a concentration-dependent manner in BEAS-2B cells stimulated by IL-1β. Conclusions These results suggest that recombinant PEDF protein may abolish the development of characteristic features of chronic allergic asthma via VEGF suppression, providing a potential treatment option for chronic airway inflammation diseases such as asthma. PMID:26739410

  18. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor, acting at the spinal cord level, participates in bladder hyperactivity and referred pain during chronic bladder inflammation.

    PubMed

    Frias, B; Allen, S; Dawbarn, D; Charrua, A; Cruz, F; Cruz, C D

    2013-03-27

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin (NT) known to participate in chronic somatic pain. A recent study has indicated that BDNF may participate in chronic cystitis at the peripheral level. However, the principal site of action for this NT is the central nervous system, most notably the spinal cord. The effects of centrally-acting BDNF on bladder function in normal animals and its central role during chronic cystitis are presently unknown. The present study was undertaken to clarify this issue. For that purpose, control non-inflamed animals were intrathecally injected with BDNF, after which bladder function was evaluated. This treatment caused short-lasting bladder hyperactivity; whereas chronic intrathecal administration of BDNF did not elicit this effect. Cutaneous sensitivity was assessed by mechanical allodynia as an internal control of BDNF action. To ascertain the role of BDNF in bladder inflammation, animals with cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis received intrathecal injections of either a general Trk receptor antagonist or a BDNF scavenger. Blockade of Trk receptors or BDNF sequestration notably improved bladder function. In addition, these treatments also reduced referred pain, typically observed in rats with chronic cystitis. Reduction of referred pain was accompanied by a decrease in the spinal levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation, a marker of increased sensory barrage in the lumbosacral spinal cord, and spinal BDNF expression. Results obtained here indicate that BDNF, acting at the spinal cord level, contributes to bladder hyperactivity and referred pain, important hallmarks of chronic cystitis. In addition, these data also support the development of BDNF modulators as putative therapeutic options for the treatment of chronic bladder inflammation. PMID:23313710

  19. The Genus Aloe: Phytochemistry and Therapeutic Uses Including Treatments for Gastrointestinal Conditions and Chronic Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Cock, I E

    2015-01-01

    Plants of the genus Aloe have perhaps the longest recorded history of medicinal usage and are amongst the most widely used plants for traditional medicinal purposes worldwide. Aloe vera, Aloe ferox, Aloe arborescens and Aloe perryi are the best known and most widely used, but many other species are also used for their therapeutic properties. The Aloes have been used since ancient times, particularly for the treatment of microbial infections, gastrointestinal disorders and inflammatory conditions. In addition to their myriad uses in traditional therapeutics, the Aloes have also been used as components of cosmetic formulations, and in the food and beverage industries. Despite their wide acceptance, studies from different laboratories often report wide variations in the therapeutic bioactivities from within the same Aloe species, even when the same extraction procedures are used. Furthermore, leaves from individual Aloe plants within the same species may have widely varying levels of the bioactive phytochemicals. Phytochemical analyses have shown that many Aloe species contain various carbohydrate polymers (notably glucomannans) and a range of other low molecular weight phenolic compounds including alkaloids, anthraquinones, anthrones, benzene and furan derivatives, chromones, coumarins, flavonoids, phytosterols, pyrans and pyrones. There has been a wealth of information published about the phytochemistry and therapeutic potential of the Aloes (especially Aloe vera). Much of this has been contradictory. Intra- and interspecies differences in the redox state of the individual Aloe components and in the ratios of these components may occur between individual plants. These factors may all affect the physiological properties of Aloe extracts. Due to the structure and chemical nature of many of the Aloe phytochemicals, it is likely that many of the reported medicinal properties are due to antioxidant or prooxidant effects. The antioxidant/prooxidant activities of many Aloe

  20. The role of chronic inflammation in cardiovascular disease and its regulation by nutrients.

    PubMed

    Osiecki, Henry

    2004-03-01

    Multiple risk markers for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease act in a synergistic way through inflammatory pathways. This article discusses some of the key inflammatory biochemical risk markers for cardiovascular disease; in particular, the role of three basic cell types affected by these risk markers (endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and immune cells), the crucial role of inflammatory mediators, nitric oxide balance in cardiovascular pathology, and the use of nutrients to circumvent several of these inflammatory pathways. Most risk markers for cardiovascular disease have a pro-inflammatory component, which stimulates the release of a number of active molecules such as inflammatory mediators, reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, and peroxynitrite from endothelial, vascular smooth muscle, and immune cells in response to injury. Nitric oxide plays a pivotal role in preventing the progression of atherosclerosis through its ability to induce vasodilation, suppress vascular smooth muscle proliferation, and reduce vascular lesion formation. Nutrients such as arginine, antioxidants (vitamins C and E, lipoic acid, glutathione), and enzyme cofactors (vitamins B2 and B3, folate, and tetrahydrobiopterin) help to elevate nitric oxide levels and may play an important role in the management of cardiovascular disease. Other dietary components such as DHA/EPA from fish oil, tocotrienols, vitamins B6 and B12, and quercetin contribute further to mitigating the inflammatory process. PMID:15005643

  1. Perinatal chronic hypoxia induces cortical inflammation, hypomyelination, and peripheral myelin-specific T cell autoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Sterling B; Kong, Xiagmei; Venkataraman, Ramgopal; Savedra, Allen Michael; Kernie, Steven G; Stowe, Ann M; Raman, Lakshmi

    2016-01-01

    pCH is an important risk factor for brain injury and long-term morbidity in children, occurring during the developmental stages of neurogenesis, neuronal migration, and myelination. We show that a rodent model of pCH results in an early decrease in mature myelin. Although pCH does increase progenitor oligodendrocytes in the developing brain, BrdU labeling revealed a loss in dividing progenitor oligodendrocytes, indicating a defect in mature cell replacement and myelinogenesis. Mice continued to exhibited hypomyelination, concomitant with long-term impairment of motor function, weeks after cessation of pCH. The implication of a novel neuroimmunologic interplay, pCH also induced a significant egress of infiltrating CD4 T cells into the developing brain. This pCH-mediated neuroinflammation included oligodendrocyte-directed autoimmunity, with an increase in peripheral myelin-specific CD4 T cells. Thus, both the loss of available, mature, myelin-producing glial cells and an active increase in autoreactive, myelin-specific CD4 T cell infiltration into pCH brains may contribute to early pCH-induced hypomyelination in the developing CNS. The elucidation of potential mechanisms of hypoxia-driven autoimmunity will expand our understanding of the neuroimmune axis during perinatal CNS disease states that may contribute to long-term functional disability. PMID:26038434

  2. Helicobacter pylori neutrophil activating protein as target for new drugs against H. pylori inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Choli-Papadopoulou, Theodora; Kottakis, Filippos; Papadopoulos, Georgios; Pendas, Stefanos

    2011-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is among the most common human infections and the major risk factor for peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Within this work we present the implication of C-terminal region of H. pylori neutrophil activating protein in the stimulation of neutrophil activation as well as the evidence that the C-terminal region of H. pylori activating protein is indispensable for neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells, a step necessary to H. pylori inflammation. In addition we show that arabino galactan proteins derived from chios mastic gum, the natural resin of the plant Pistacia lentiscus var. Chia inhibit neutrophil activation in vitro. PMID:21677824

  3. Plasma thymic hormone activity in patients with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, C. H.; Greenberg, Lynn E.; Chapman, S. W.; Goldstein, G.; Lewis, Verna M.; Twomey, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    To further characterize the immunological abnormalities in patients with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, the thymic hormone activity in their plasma was measured. Of the sixteen patients in the study, seven had chronic diffuse candidiasis, five had candidiasis with endocrinopathies and four had candidiasis with thymoma. Only one patient, an anergic child with chronic diffuse candidiasis had severe deficiency of plasma thymic hormone activity. Two patients, a woman with candidiasis and multiple endocrinopathies and an elderly man with metastatic epithelial thymoma had supranormal values. These studies indicate that the immunological deficit in most patients with these forms of chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis is not due to deficiency of a thymic inductive activity and suggest that an intrinsic defect exists in the maturation of antigen-responsive lymphoid cells. PMID:743805

  4. Transrepression function of the glucocorticoid receptor regulates eyelid development and keratinocyte proliferation but is not sufficient to prevent skin chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Donet, Eva; Bosch, Pilar; Sanchis, Ana; Bayo, Pilar; Ramírez, Angel; Cascallana, José L; Bravo, Ana; Pérez, Paloma

    2008-04-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) play a key role in skin homeostasis and stress responses acting through the GC receptor (GR), which modulates gene expression by DNA binding-dependent (transactivation) and -independent (transrepression) mechanisms. To delineate which mechanisms underlie the beneficial and adverse effects mediated by GR in epidermis and other epithelia, we have generated transgenic mice that express a mutant GR (P493R, A494S), which is defective for transactivation but retains transrepression activity, under control of the keratin 5 promoter (K5-GR-TR mice). K5-GR-TR embryos exhibited eyelid opening at birth and corneal defects that resulted in corneal opacity in the adulthood. Transgenic embryos developed normal skin, although epidermal atrophy and focal alopecia was detected in adult mice. GR-mediated transrepression was sufficient to inhibit keratinocyte proliferation induced by acute and chronic phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate exposure, as demonstrated by morphometric analyses, bromodeoxyuridine incorporation, and repression of keratin 6, a marker of hyperproliferative epidermis. These antiproliferative effects were mediated through negative interference of GR with MAPK/activator protein-1 and nuclear factor-kappaB activities, although these interactions occurred with different kinetics. However, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced inflammation was only partially inhibited by GR-TR, which efficiently repressed IL-1beta and MMP-3 genes while weakly repressing IL-6 and TNF-alpha. Our data highlight the relevance of deciphering the mechanisms underlying GR actions on epithelial morphogenesis as well as for its therapeutic use to identify more restricted targets of GC administration. PMID:18174358

  5. S-adenosylmethionine reduces airway inflammation and fibrosis in a murine model of chronic severe asthma via suppression of oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sun-Young; Hong, Gyong Hwa; Kwon, Hyouk-Soo; Park, Sunjoo; Park, So Young; Shin, Bomi; Kim, Tae-Bum; Moon, Hee-Bom; Cho, You Sook

    2016-01-01

    Increased oxidative stress has an important role in asthmatic airway inflammation and remodeling. A potent methyl donor, S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), is known to protect against tissue injury and fibrosis through modulation of oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of SAMe on airway inflammation and remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma. A mouse model was generated by repeated intranasal challenge with ovalbumin and Aspergillus fungal protease twice a week for 8 weeks. SAMe was orally administered every 24 h for 8 weeks. We performed bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid analysis and histopathological examination. The levels of various cytokines and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) were measured in the lung tissue. Cultured macrophages and fibroblasts were employed to evaluate the underlying anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic mechanisms of SAMe. The magnitude of airway inflammation and fibrosis, as well as the total BAL cell counts, were significantly suppressed in the SAMe-treated groups. A reduction in T helper type 2 pro-inflammatory cytokines and HNE levels was observed in mouse lung tissue after SAMe administration. Macrophages cultured with SAMe also showed reduced cellular oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Moreover, SAMe treatment attenuated transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-induced fibronectin expression in cultured fibroblasts. SAMe had a suppressive effect on airway inflammation and fibrosis in a mouse model of chronic asthma, at least partially through the attenuation of oxidative stress and TGF-β-induced fibronectin expression. The results of this study suggest a potential role for SAMe as a novel therapeutic agent in chronic asthma. PMID:27256110

  6. S-adenosylmethionine reduces airway inflammation and fibrosis in a murine model of chronic severe asthma via suppression of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sun-Young; Hong, Gyong Hwa; Kwon, Hyouk-Soo; Park, Sunjoo; Park, So Young; Shin, Bomi; Kim, Tae-Bum; Moon, Hee-Bom; Cho, You Sook

    2016-01-01

    Increased oxidative stress has an important role in asthmatic airway inflammation and remodeling. A potent methyl donor, S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), is known to protect against tissue injury and fibrosis through modulation of oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of SAMe on airway inflammation and remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma. A mouse model was generated by repeated intranasal challenge with ovalbumin and Aspergillus fungal protease twice a week for 8 weeks. SAMe was orally administered every 24 h for 8 weeks. We performed bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid analysis and histopathological examination. The levels of various cytokines and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) were measured in the lung tissue. Cultured macrophages and fibroblasts were employed to evaluate the underlying anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic mechanisms of SAMe. The magnitude of airway inflammation and fibrosis, as well as the total BAL cell counts, were significantly suppressed in the SAMe-treated groups. A reduction in T helper type 2 pro-inflammatory cytokines and HNE levels was observed in mouse lung tissue after SAMe administration. Macrophages cultured with SAMe also showed reduced cellular oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Moreover, SAMe treatment attenuated transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-induced fibronectin expression in cultured fibroblasts. SAMe had a suppressive effect on airway inflammation and fibrosis in a mouse model of chronic asthma, at least partially through the attenuation of oxidative stress and TGF-β-induced fibronectin expression. The results of this study suggest a potential role for SAMe as a novel therapeutic agent in chronic asthma. PMID:27256110

  7. Evaluation on Potential Contributions of Protease Activated Receptors Related Mediators in Allergic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huiyun; Zeng, Xiaoning; He, Shaoheng

    2014-01-01

    Protease activated receptors (PARs) have been recognized as a distinctive four-member family of seven transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that can be cleaved by certain serine proteases. In recent years, there has been considerable interest in the role of PARs in allergic inflammation, the fundamental pathologic changes of allergy, but the potential roles of PARs in allergy remain obscure. Since many of these proteases are produced and actively involved in the pathologic process of inflammation including exudation of plasma components, inflammatory cell infiltration, and tissue damage and repair, PARs appear to make important contribution to allergy. The aim of the present review is to summarize the expression of PARs in inflammatory and structural cells, the influence of agonists or antagonists of PARs on cell behavior, and the involvement of PARs in allergic disorders, which will help us to better understand the roles of serine proteases and PARs in allergy. PMID:24876677

  8. Activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor downregulates inflammasome activity and liver inflammation via a β-arrestin-2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Ahmad; Hoque, Rafaz; Ouyang, Xinshou; Farooq, Ahsan; Ghani, Ayaz; Ahsan, Kaimul; Guerra, Mateus; Mehal, Wajahat Zafar

    2014-10-01

    Activation of the cytosolic inflammasome machinery is responsible for acute and chronic liver inflammation, but little is known about its regulation. The N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor families are heterotetrameric ligand-gated ion channels that are activated by a range of metabolites, including aspartate, glutamate, and polyunsaturated fatty acids. In the brain NMDA receptors are present on neuronal and nonneuronal cells and regulate a diverse range of functions. We tested the role of the NMDA receptor and aspartate in inflammasome regulation in vitro and in models of acute hepatitis and pancreatitis. We demonstrate that the NMDA receptor is present on Kupffer cells, and their activation on primary mouse and human cells limits inflammasome activation by downregulating NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 and procaspase-1. The NMDA receptor pathway is active in vivo, limits injury in acute hepatitis, and can be therapeutically further activated by aspartate providing protection in acute inflammatory liver injury. Downregulation of inflammasome activation by NMDA occurs via a β-arrestin-2 NF-kβ and JNK pathway and not via Ca(2+) mobilization. We have identified the NMDA receptor as a regulator of inflammasome activity in vitro and in vivo. This has identified a new area of immune regulation associated by metabolites that may be relevant in a diverse range of conditions, including nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and total parenteral nutrition-induced immune suppression. PMID:25104498

  9. Chronic intermittent hypoxia activates nuclear factor-{kappa}B in cardiovascular tissues in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, Harly; Ye Xiaobing; Wilson, David; Htoo, Aung K.; Hendersen, Todd; Liu Shufang . E-mail: sliu@lij.edu

    2006-05-05

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an important risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The mechanisms through which OSA promotes the development of cardiovascular disease are poorly understood. In this study, we tested the hypotheses that chronic exposure to intermittent hypoxia and reoxygenation (CIH) is a major pathologic factor causing cardiovascular inflammation, and that CIH-induces cardiovascular inflammation and pathology by activating the NF-{kappa}B pathway. We demonstrated that exposure of mice to CIH activated NF-{kappa}B in cardiovascular tissues, and that OSA patients had markedly elevated monocyte NF-{kappa}B activity, which was significantly decreased when obstructive apneas and their resultant CIH were eliminated by nocturnal CPAP therapy. The elevated NF-{kappa}B activity induced by CIH is accompanied by and temporally correlated to the increased expression of iNOS protein, a putative and important NF-{kappa}B-dependent gene product. Thus, CIH-mediated NF-{kappa}B activation may be a molecular mechanism linking OSA and cardiovascular pathologies seen in OSA patients.

  10. Cocoa Procyanidins with Different Degrees of Polymerization Possess Distinct Activities in Models of Colonic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Bitzer, Zachary T.; Glisan, Shannon L.; Dorenkott, Melanie R.; Goodrich, Katheryn M.; Ye, Liyun; O’Keefe, Sean F.; Lambert, Joshua D.; Neilson, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Procyanidins are available in the diet from sources such as cocoa and grapes. Procyanidins are unique in that they are comprised of repeating monomeric units and can exist in various degrees of polymerization. The degree of polymerization plays a role in determining the biological activities of procyanidins. However, generalizations cannot be made regarding the correlation between procyanidin structure and bioactivity, because the size-activity relationship appears to be system-dependent. Our aim was to screen fractions of procyanidins with differing degrees of polymerization in vitro for anti-inflammatory activities in models of colonic inflammation. Monomeric, oligomeric, and polymeric cocoa procyanidin fractions were screened using cell models of disrupted membrane integrity and inflammation in human colon cells. High molecular weight polymeric procyanidins were the most effective at preserving membrane integrity and reducing secretion of interleukin-8 in response to inflammatory stimuli. Conversely, oligomeric procyanidins appeared to be the least effective. These results suggest that polymeric cocoa procyanidins may be the most effective for preventing loss of gut barrier function and epithelial inflammation, which are critical steps in the pathogenesis of metabolic endotoxemia, inflammatory bowel disease, and colon cancer. Therefore, further investigations of the potential health-protective benefits of cocoa procyanidins with distinct degrees of polymerization, particularly high molecular weight procyanidins, are warranted. PMID:25869594

  11. The active contribution of Toll-like receptors to allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Keqiang; Xiang, Yi; Yao, Xiaohong; Liu, Ying; Gong, Wanghua; Yoshimura, Teizo; Wang, Ji Ming

    2011-10-01

    Epithelia lining the respiratory tract represent a major portal of entry for microorganisms and allergens and are equipped with innate and adaptive immune signaling receptors for host protection. These include Toll-like receptors (TLRs) that recognize microbial components and evoke diverse responses in cells of the respiratory system. TLR stimulation by microorganism-derived molecules activates antigen presenting cells, control T helper (Th) 1, Th2, and Th17 immune cell differentiation, cytokine production by mast cells, and activation of eosinophils. It is clear that TLR are involved in the pathophysiology of allergic airway diseases such as asthma. Dendritic cells (DCs), a kind of antigen presenting cells, which play a key role in the induction of allergic airway inflammation, are privileged targets for pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). During the allergic responses, engagement of TLRs on DCs determines the Th2 polarization of the T cells. TLR signaling in mast cells increases the release of IL-5, and TLR activation of airway epithelial cells forces the generation of proallergic Th2 type of cytokines. Although these responses aim to protect the host, they may also result in inflammatory tissue damage in the airway. Under certain conditions, stimulation of TLRs, in particular, TLR9, may reduce Th2-dependent allergic inflammation by induction of Th1 responses. Therefore, understanding the complex regulatory roles of TLRs in the pathogenesis of allergic airway inflammation should facilitate the development of preventive and therapeutic measures for asthmatic patients. PMID:21624504

  12. Maternal inflammation during late pregnancy is lower in physically active compared to inactive obese women

    PubMed Central

    Tinius, Rachel A.; Cahill, Alison G.; Strand, Eric A.; Todd Cade, W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The primary purpose of this study was to compare maternal plasma inflammation between physically active and inactive obese women during late pregnancy. The secondary purpose was to examine the relationships between maternal plasma inflammation and lipid metabolism and maternal and neonatal metabolic health in these women. Methods A cross-sectional, observational study design was performed in 16 obese-inactive ((OBI) age: 25.0 ± 4.8 years, pre-pregnancy BMI: 36.3 ± 4.3kg/m2, body fat percentage in late gestation: 37.7 ± 3.5%) and 16 obese-active ((OBA) age: 28.9 ± 4.8 years, pre-pregnancy BMI: 34.0±3.7kg/m2, body fat in late gestation: 36.6 ± 3.8%) women during the third trimester of pregnancy. Maternal plasma inflammation (C -reactive protein (CRP)) and insulin resistance (Homeostatic Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR)) were measured at rest. Plasma lipid concentration and metabolism (lipid oxidation and lipolysis) were measured at rest, during a 30-minute bout of low-intensity (40% VO2peak) exercise, and during a resting recovery period using indirect calorimetry. Umbilical cord blood was collected for measurement of neonatal plasma insulin resistance, inflammation, and lipid concentration. Neonatal body composition was measured via air displacement plethysmography. Results Maternal plasma CRP concentration was significantly higher in OBI compared to OBA women (9.1 ± 4.0 mg/L versus 6.3 ±2.5mg/L, p=0.02). Maternal plasma CRP concentration was significantly associated with maternal lipolysis (r=0.43, p=0.02), baseline lipid oxidation rate (r=0.39, p=0.03), and baseline plasma free fatty acid concentration (r=0.36, p=0.04). Conclusions Maternal physical activity may reduce inflammation during pregnancy in obese women. Maternal lipid metabolism is related to systemic inflammation. PMID:26799789

  13. Maternal inflammation during late pregnancy is lower in physically active compared with inactive obese women.

    PubMed

    Tinius, Rachel A; Cahill, Alison G; Strand, Eric A; Cade, W Todd

    2016-02-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to compare maternal plasma inflammation between physically active and inactive obese women during late pregnancy. The secondary purpose was to examine the relationships between maternal plasma inflammation and lipid metabolism and maternal and neonatal metabolic health in these women. A cross-sectional, observational study design was performed in 16 obese-inactive (OBI; means ± SD; age, 25.0 ± 4.8 years; prepregnancy body mass index (BMI), 36.3 ± 4.3 kg/m(2); body fat percentage in late gestation, 37.7% ± 3.5%) and 16 obese-active (OBA; age, 28.9 ± 4.8 years; prepregnancy BMI, 34.0 ± 3.7 kg/m(2); body fat in late gestation, 36.6% ± 3.8%) women during the third trimester of pregnancy. Maternal plasma inflammation (C -reactive protein (CRP)) and insulin resistance (Homeostatic Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance) were measured at rest. Plasma lipid concentration and metabolism (lipid oxidation and lipolysis) were measured at rest, during a 30-min bout of low-intensity (40% peak oxygen uptake) exercise, and during a resting recovery period using indirect calorimetry. Umbilical cord blood was collected for measurement of neonatal plasma insulin resistance, inflammation, and lipid concentration. Neonatal body composition was measured via air displacement plethysmography. Maternal plasma CRP concentration was significantly higher in OBI compared with OBA women (9.1 ± 4.0 mg/L vs. 6.3 ± 2.5 mg/L, p = 0.02). Maternal plasma CRP concentration was significantly associated with maternal lipolysis (r = 0.43, p = 0.02), baseline lipid oxidation rate (r = 0.39, p = 0.03), and baseline plasma free fatty acid concentration (r = 0.36, p = 0.04). In conclusion, maternal physical activity may reduce inflammation during pregnancy in obese women. Maternal lipid metabolism is related to systemic inflammation. PMID:26799789

  14. Inflammation Level after Decompression Surgery for a Rat Model of Chronic Severe Spinal Cord Compression and Effects on Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    YANG, Tao; WU, Liang; WANG, Huiliang; FANG, Jingyi; YAO, Ning; XU, Yulun

    Delayed neurological deterioration in the absence of direct spinal cord insult following surgical decompression is a severe postoperative complication in patients with chronic severe spinal cord compression (SCC). The spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) has been verified as a potential etiology of the complication. However, the exact pathophysiologic mechanisms of the decompression-related IRI remain to be defined. In this study, we developed a practical rat model of chronic severe SCC. To explore the underlying role of inflammation in decompression-related IRI, immunoreactivity of pro-inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) before and after decompression were measured. In addition, expression level of TNF-α and IL-1β was examined with Western blot. Immunohistochemical staining showed negative result in gray matters in the sham group and sham-decompression group. In the severe compression group, strong positive staining of TNF-α and IL-1β were found, suggesting a dramatic infiltration of inflammatory cells in gray matters. Furthermore, the severe compression group showed a significant increase in expression level of TNF-α and IL-1β as compared with the sham group (p < 0.05). In the severe compression-decompression group, both immunostaining and Western blot showed significant increase of TNF-α and IL-1β levels in the spinal cord compared with the severe compression group (p < 0.05). The results demonstrated that surgical decompression plays a stimulative role in inflammation through increasing the expression of inflammatory cytokines in the rat model of chronic severe SCC injury. Inflammation may be one of the important pathological mechanisms of decompression-related IRI of chronic ischemia. PMID:26119897

  15. Brain injury caused by chronic fetal hypoxemia is mediated by inflammatory cascade activation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Rong; Hou, Weijian; Dong, Yafeng; Yu, Zhiyong; Stites, Josh; Weiner, Carl P

    2010-06-01

    The prevalence of cerebral palsy (CP) shows little temporal or geographic variation and is associated with preterm birth, maternal/fetal infection/inflammation, and fetal growth restriction (IUGR), a potential surrogate for chronic fetal hypoxemia (CHX). We previously demonstrated CHX causes a fetal inflammatory response syndrome (FIRS). Herein, we test the hypothesis that CHX may cause fetal brain injury by upregulating inflammatory cytokine cascades, culminating in apoptosis pathway activation. Time-mated guinea pigs were housed in 12% or 10.5% O(2) for the last 21% of gestation. Chronic fetal hypoxemia increased the lactate/pyruvate and decreased the glutathione (GSH)/oxidized glutathione (GSSH) ratios, confirming a shift to a prooxidant state. The end result was a >30% decrease in hippocampal neuron density. Based on a microarray spotted with 113 cytokines and receptors, 22 genes were upregulated by CHX in proportion to the degree of hypoxia; the findings were confirmed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Thus, CHX triggers fetal brain inflammation inversely proportional to its severity characterized by increased apoptosis and neuronal loss. We suggest CHX fetal brain injury is not directly caused by oxygen deprivation but rather is an adaptive response that becomes maladaptive. PMID:20360591

  16. Voluntary exercise prevents colonic inflammation in high-fat diet-induced obese mice by up-regulating PPAR-γ activity

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei-Xin; Wang, Ting; Zhou, Feng; Wang, Ying; Xing, Jun-Wei; Zhang, Shen; Gu, Shou-Zhi; Sang, Li-Xuan; Dai, Cong; Wang, Hai-Lan

    2015-04-10

    Obesity is associated with increased colonic inflammation, which elevates the risk of colon cancer. Although exercise exerts anti-inflammatory actions in multiple chronic diseases associated with inflammation, it is unknown whether this strategy prevents colonic inflammation in obesity. We hypothesized that voluntary exercise would suppress colonic inflammation in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity by modulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ. Male C57Bl/6J mice fed either a control diet (6.5% fat, CON) or a high-fat diet (24% fat, HFD) were divided into sedentary, voluntary exercise or voluntary exercise with PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662 (10 mg/kg/day). All interventions took place for 12 weeks. Compared with CON-sedentary group, HFD-sedentary mice gained significantly more body weight and exhibited metabolic disorders. Molecular studies revealed that HFD-sedentary mice had increased expression of inflammatory mediators and activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB in the colons, which were associated with decreased expression and activity of PPAR-γ. Voluntary exercise markedly attenuated body weight gain, improved metabolic disorders, and normalized the expression of inflammatory mediators and activation of NF-κB in the colons in HFD-mice while having no effects in CON-animals. Moreover, voluntary exercise significantly increased expression and activity of PPAR-γ in the colons in both HFD- and CON-animals. However, all of these beneficial effects induced by voluntary exercise were abolished by GW9662, which inhibited expression and activity of PPAR-γ. The results suggest that decreased PPAR-γ activity in the colon of HFD-induced obesity may facilitate the inflammatory response and colon carcinogenesis. Voluntary exercise prevents colonic inflammation in HFD-induced obesity by up-regulating PPAR-γ activity. - Highlights: • Obesity down-regulates PPAR-γ in the colon. • Down-regulated colonic PPAR-γ may facilitate inflammatory

  17. Interleukin-1β biosynthesis inhibition reduces acute seizures and drug resistant chronic epileptic activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Maroso, Mattia; Balosso, Silvia; Ravizza, Teresa; Iori, Valentina; Wright, Christopher Ian; French, Jacqueline; Vezzani, Annamaria

    2011-04-01

    Experimental evidence and clinical observations indicate that brain inflammation is an important factor in epilepsy. In particular, induction of interleukin-converting enzyme (ICE)/caspase-1 and activation of interleukin (IL)-1β/IL-1 receptor type 1 axis both occur in human epilepsy, and contribute to experimentally induced acute seizures. In this study, the anticonvulsant activity of VX-765 (a selective ICE/caspase-1 inhibitor) was examined in a mouse model of chronic epilepsy with spontaneous recurrent epileptic activity refractory to some common anticonvulsant drugs. Moreover, the effects of this drug were studied in one acute model of seizures in mice, previously shown to involve activation of ICE/caspase-1. Quantitative analysis of electroencephalogram activity was done in mice exposed to acute seizures or those developing chronic epileptic activity after status epilepticus to assess the anticonvulsant effects of systemic administration of VX-765. Histological and immunohistochemical analysis of brain tissue was carried out at the end of pharmacological experiments in epileptic mice to evaluate neuropathology, glia activation and IL-1β expression, and the effect of treatment. Repeated systemic administration of VX-765 significantly reduced chronic epileptic activity in mice in a dose-dependent fashion (12.5-200 mg/kg). This effect was observed at doses ≥ 50 mg/kg, and was reversible with discontinuation of the drug. Maximal drug effect was associated with inhibition of IL-1β synthesis in activated astrocytes. The same dose regimen of VX-765 also reduced acute seizures in mice and delayed their onset time. These results support a new target system for anticonvulsant pharmacological intervention to control epileptic activity that does not respond to some common anticonvulsant drugs. PMID:21431948

  18. Location-specific activation of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus by localized inflammation.

    PubMed

    Belevych, Natalya; Buchanan, Krystal; Chen, Qun; Bailey, Michael; Quan, Ning

    2010-10-01

    The existence of an immunological homunculus has been proposed, but evidence for location-specific response of the central nervous system to immunological stimulation is lacking. In this study, we show that inflammation induced by injection of casein into one of the causes c-fos expression in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) in an asymmetrical manner: much stronger activation is always induced in the contralateral PVN. Unilateral sciatic nerve transection abolished the casein-induced PVN activation if casein was injected into the hindlimb with the nerve transection, but had no effect if casein was injected into the hindlimb with intact nerve innervation. Injection of casein into one the forelimbs also caused contralateral PNV activation. Further, stronger PVN activation was found in the anterior PVN after the forelimb injection, but in the posterior PVN after the hindlimb injection. Casein-induced PVN activation is absent in IL-1R1 KO, IL-6 KO, TNFα KO, and in C3H/HeJ (TLR4 mutant) animals. In comparison, injection of LPS, a systemic inflammagen, into one hindlimb induced bilateral PVN activation but injection of live Escherichia coli into one hindlimb induced contralateral PVN activation. These results support the notion that local inflammation may activate the PVN by neural routes in a location-specific manner. PMID:20570615

  19. Chronic NF-κB activation links COPD and lung cancer through generation of an immunosuppressive microenvironment in the lungs.

    PubM