Science.gov

Sample records for active closed conformation

  1. Retraction: Open and closed conformations reveal induced fit movements in butyrate kinase 2 activation. J. Diao, Y. D. Ma, and M. S. Hasson.

    PubMed

    2012-06-01

    The following article from Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics, "Open and closed conformations reveal induced fit movements in butyrate kinase 2 activation," by Jiasheng Diao, Yunglin D. Ma, and Miriam S. Hasson, published online on 21 October 2010 in Wiley Online Library (onlinelibrary.wiley.com), has been retracted by agreement between the journal Editor in Chief, Bertrand Garcia-Moreno, and Wiley Periodicals. The retraction has been agreed because it was established by internal investigation performed by Purdue University that the authors of this article are not the owners of the data and have no right to publication. PMID:19847916

  2. Insights into open/closed conformations of the catalytically active human guanylate kinase as investigated by small-angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rohit; Khan, Nazimuddin; Menzel, Andreas; Rajkovic, Ivan; Konrad, Manfred; Techert, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Bio-catalysis is the outcome of a subtle interplay between internal motions in enzymes and chemical kinetics. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) investigation of an enzyme's internal motions during catalysis offers an integral view of the protein's structural plasticity, dynamics, and function, which is useful for understanding allosteric effects and developing novel medicines. Guanylate kinase (GMPK) is an essential enzyme involved in the guanine nucleotide metabolism of unicellular and multicellular organisms. It is also required for the intracellular activation of numerous antiviral and anticancer purine nucleoside analog prodrugs. Catalytically active recombinant human GMPK (hGMPK) was purified for the first time and changes in the size and shape of open/closed hGMPK were tracked by SAXS. The binding of substrates (GMP + AMPPNP or Ap5G or GMP + ADP) resulted in the compaction of size and shape of hGMPK. The structural changes between open and completely closed hGMPK conformation were confirmed by observing differences in the hGMPK secondary structures with circular dichroism spectroscopy. PMID:26446352

  3. Cysteines Introduced into Extracellular Loops 1 and 4 of Human P-Glycoprotein That Are Close Only in the Open Conformation Spontaneously Form a Disulfide Bond That Inhibits Drug Efflux and ATPase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Tip W.; Clarke, David M.

    2014-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an ATP-binding cassette drug pump that protects us from toxic compounds and confers multidrug resistance. The protein is organized into two halves. The halves contain a transmembrane domain (TMD) with six transmembrane segments and a nucleotide-binding domain (NBD). The drug- and ATP-binding sites reside at the TMD1/TMD2 and NBD1/NBD2 interfaces, respectively. ATP-dependent drug efflux involves changes between the open inward-facing (NBDs apart, extracellular loops (ECLs) close together) and the closed outward-facing (NBDs close together, ECLs apart) conformations. It is controversial, however, whether the open conformation only exists transiently in intact cells because of the presence of high levels of ATP. To test for the presence of an open conformation in intact cells, reporter cysteines were placed in extracellular loops 1 (A80C, N half) and 4 (R741C, C half). The rationale was that cysteines A80C/R741C would only come close enough to form a disulfide bond in an open conformation (6.9 Å apart) because they are separated widely (30.4 Å apart) in the closed conformation. It was observed that the mutant A80C/R741C cross-linked spontaneously (>90%) when expressed in cells. In contrast to previous reports showing that trapping P-gp in a closed conformation highly activated ATPase activity, here we show that A80C/R741C cross-linking inhibited ATPase activity and drug efflux. Both activities were restored when the cross-linked mutant was treated with a thiol-reducing agent. The results show that an open conformation can be readily detected in cells and that cross-linking of cysteines placed in ECLs 1 and 4 inhibits activity. PMID:25053414

  4. Glu311 and Arg337 Stabilize a Closed Active-site Conformation and Provide a Critical Catalytic Base and Countercation for Green Bioluminescence in Beetle Luciferases.

    PubMed

    Viviani, V R; Simões, A; Bevilaqua, V R; Gabriel, G V M; Arnoldi, F G C; Hirano, T

    2016-08-30

    Beetle luciferases elicit the emission of different bioluminescence colors from green to red. Whereas firefly luciferases emit yellow-green light and are pH-sensitive, undergoing a typical red-shift at acidic pH and higher temperatures and in the presence of divalent heavy metals, click beetle and railroadworm luciferases emit a wider range of colors from green to red but are pH-independent. Despite many decades of study, the structural determinants and mechanisms of bioluminescence colors and pH sensitivity remain enigmatic. Here, through modeling studies, site-directed mutagenesis, and spectral and kinetic studies using recombinant luciferases from the three main families of bioluminescent beetles that emit different colors of light (Macrolampis sp2 firefly, Phrixotrix hirtus railroadworm, and Pyrearinus termitilluminans click beetle), we investigated the role of E311 and R337 in bioluminescence color determination. All mutations of these residues in firefly luciferase produced red mutants, indicating that the preservation of opposite charges and the lengths of the side chains of E311 and R337 are essential for keeping a salt bridge that stabilizes a closed hydrophobic conformation favorable for green light emission. Kinetic studies indicate that residue R337 is important for binding luciferin and creating a positively charged environment around excited oxyluciferin phenolate. In Pyrearinus green-emitting luciferase, the R334A mutation causes a 27 nm red-shift, whereas in Phrixotrix red-emitting luciferase, the L334R mutation causes a blue-shift that is no longer affected by guanidine. These results provide compelling evidence that the presence of arginine at position 334 is essential for blue-shifting the emission spectra of most beetle luciferases. Therefore, residues E311 and R337 play both structural and catalytic roles in bioluminescence color determination, by stabilizing a closed hydrophobic conformation favorable for green light emission, and also

  5. Functional Motions of Candida antarctica Lipase B: A Survey through Open-Close Conformations

    PubMed Central

    Ganjalikhany, Mohamad Reza; Ranjbar, Bijan; Taghavi, Amir Hossein; Tohidi Moghadam, Tahereh

    2012-01-01

    Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) belongs to psychrophilic lipases which hydrolyze carboxyl ester bonds at low temperatures. There have been some features reported about cold-activity of the enzyme through experimental methods, whereas there is no detailed information on its mechanism of action at molecular level. Herein, a comparative molecular dynamics simulation and essential dynamics analysis have been carried out at three temperatures (5, 35 and 50°C) to trace the dominant factors in the psychrophilic properties of CALB under cold condition. The results clearly describe the effect of temperature on CALB with meaningful differences in the flexibility of the lid region (α5 helix), covering residues 141–147. Open- closed conformations have been obtained from different sets of long-term simulations (60 ns) at 5°C gave two reproducible distinct forms of CALB. The starting open conformation became closed immediately at 35 and 50°C during 60 ns of simulation, while a sequential open-closed form was observed at 5°C. These structural alterations were resulted from α5 helical movements, where the closed conformation of active site cleft was formed by displacement of both helix and its side chains. Analysis of normal mode showed concerted motions that are involved in the movement of both α5 and α10 helices. It is suggested that the functional motions needed for lypolytic activity of CALB is constructed from short-range movement of α5, accompanied by long-range movement of the domains connected to the lid region. PMID:22808134

  6. Conformational changes opening and closing the CFTR chloride channel: insights from cysteine scanning mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    El Hiani, Yassine; Linsdell, Paul

    2014-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis, the most common lethal genetic disease affecting young people in North America, is caused by failure of the chloride ion channel known as CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator). CFTR belongs to the large family of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) membrane transporters. In CFTR, ATP-driven events at the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) open and close a gate that controls chloride permeation. However, the conformational changes concomitant with opening and closing of the CFTR gate are unknown. Diverse techniques including substituted cysteine accessibility method, disulfide cross-linking, and patch-clamp recording have been used to explore CFTR channel structure. Here, we consider the architecture of both the open and the closed CFTR channel. We review how CFTR channel structure changes between the closed and the open channel conformations and portray the relative function of both cytoplasmic and vestigial gates during the gating cycle. Understanding how the CFTR channel gates chloride permeation is central for understanding how CFTR defects lead to CF. Such knowledge opens the door for novel ways to maximize CFTR channel activity in a CF setting. PMID:25367045

  7. Pilot Non-Conformance to Alerting System Commands During Closely Spaced Parallel Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, Amy R.; Hansman, R. John

    1997-01-01

    Pilot non-conformance to alerting system commands has been noted in general and to a TCAS-like collision avoidance system in a previous experiment. This paper details two experiments studying collision avoidance during closely-spaced parallel approaches in instrument meteorological conditions (IMC), and specifically examining possible causal factors of, and design solutions to, pilot non-conformance.

  8. Conformational Preferences Underlying Reduced Activity of a Thermophilic Ribonuclease H

    PubMed Central

    Stafford, Kate A.; Trbovic, Nikola; Butterwick, Joel A.; Abel, Robert; Friesner, Richard A.; Palmer, Arthur G.

    2015-01-01

    The conformational basis for reduced activity of the thermophilic ribonuclease HI enzyme from Thermus thermophilus, compared to its mesophilic homolog from Escherichia coli, is elucidated using a combination of NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Explicit-solvent all-atom MD simulations of the two wild-type proteins and an E. coli mutant in which a glycine residue is inserted after position 80 to mimic the T. thermophilus protein reproduce the differences in conformational dynamics determined from 15N spin-relaxation NMR spectroscopy of three loop regions that surround the active site and contain functionally important residues: the glycine-rich region, the handle region, and the β5/αE loop. Examination of the MD trajectories indicates that the thermophilic protein samples conformations productive for substrate binding and activity less frequently than the mesophilic enzyme, although these differences may manifest as either increased or decreased relative flexibility of the different regions. Additional MD simulations indicate that mutations increasing activity of the T. thermophilus enzyme at mesophilic temperatures do so by reconfiguring the local environments of the mutated sites to more closely resemble active conformations. Taken together, the results show that both locally increased and decreased flexibility contribute to an overall reduction in activity of T. thermophilus ribonuclease H compared to its mesophilic E. coli homolog. PMID:25550198

  9. Inhibitors that stabilize a closed RAF kinase domain conformation induce dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Lavoie, Hugo; Thevakumaran, Neroshan; Gavory, Gwenaëlle; Li, John; Padeganeh, Abbas; Guiral, Sébastien; Duchaine, Jean; Mao, Daniel Y. L.; Bouvier, Michel; Sicheri, Frank; Therrien, Marc

    2016-01-01

    RAF kinases play a prominent role in cancer. Their mode of activation is complex, but critically requires dimerization of their kinase domains. Unexpectedly, several ATP-competitive RAF inhibitors were recently found to promote dimerization and transactivation of RAF kinases in a RAS-dependent manner and as a result undesirably stimulate RAS/ERK-mediated cell growth. The mechanism by which these inhibitors induce RAF kinase domain dimerization remains unclear. Here we describe BRET-based biosensors for the extended RAF family enabling the detection of RAF dimerization in living cells. Notably, we demonstrate the utility of these tools for profiling kinase inhibitors that selectively modulate RAF dimerization as well as for probing structural determinants of RAF dimerization in vivo. Our findings, which appear generalizable to other kinase families allosterically regulated by kinase domain dimerization, suggest a model whereby ATP-competitive inhibitors mediate RAF dimerization by stabilizing a rigid closed conformation of the kinase domain. PMID:23685672

  10. Close intramolecular sulfur-oxygen contacts: modified force field parameters for improved conformation generation.

    PubMed

    Lupyan, Dmitry; Abramov, Yuriy A; Sherman, Woody

    2012-11-01

    The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) offers an excellent data source to study small molecule conformations and molecular interactions. We have analyzed 130 small molecules from the CSD containing an intramolecular sulfur-oxygen distance less than the sum of their van der Waals (vdW) radii. Close S···O distances are observed in several important medicinal chemistry motifs (e.g. a carbonyl oxygen connected by a carbon or nitrogen linker to a sulfur) and are not treated well with existing parameters in the MMFFs or OPLS_2005 force fields, resulting in suboptimal geometries and energetics. In this work, we develop modified parameters for the OPLS_2005 force field to better treat this specific interaction in order to generate conformations close to those found in the CSD structures. We use a combination of refitting a force field torsional parameter, adding a specific atom pair vdW term, and attenuating the electrostatic interactions to obtain an improvement in the accuracy of geometry minimizations and conformational searches for these molecules. Specifically, in a conformational search 58 % of the cases produced a conformation less than 0.25 Å from the CSD crystal conformation with the modified OPLS force field parameters developed in this work. In contrast, 25 and 37 % produced a conformation less than 0.25 Å with the MMFFs and OPLS_2005 force fields, respectively. As an application of the new parameters, we generated conformations for the tyrosine kinase inhibitor axitinib (trade name Inlyta) that could be correctly repacked into three observed polymorphic structures, which was not possible with conformations generated using MMFFs or OPLS_2005. The improved parameters can be mapped directly onto physical characteristics of the systems that are treated inadequately with the molecular mechanics force fields used in this study and potentially other force fields as well. PMID:23053737

  11. A closed conformation of the Caenorhabditis elegans separase-securin complex.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Gudrun; Richards, Mark W; Winter, Anja; Beuron, Fabienne; Morris, Edward; Bayliss, Richard

    2016-04-01

    The protease separase plays a key role in sister chromatid disjunction and centriole disengagement. To maintain genomic stability, separase activity is strictly regulated by binding of an inhibitory protein, securin. Despite its central role in cell division, the separase and securin complex is poorly understood at the structural level. This is partly owing to the difficulty of generating a sufficient quantity of homogeneous, stable protein. Here, we report the production of Caenorhabditis elegans separase-securin complex, and its characterization using biochemical methods and by negative staining electron microscopy. Single particle analysis generated a density map at a resolution of 21-24 Å that reveals a close, globular structure of complex connectivity harbouring two lobes. One lobe matches closely a homology model of the N-terminal HEAT repeat domain of separase, whereas the second lobe readily accommodates homology models of the separase C-terminal death and caspase-like domains. The globular structure of the C. elegans separase-securin complex contrasts with the more elongated structure previously described for the Homo sapiens complex, which could represent a different functional state of the complex, suggesting a mechanism for the regulation of separase activity through conformational change. PMID:27249343

  12. A closed conformation of the Caenorhabditis elegans separase–securin complex

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Gudrun; Richards, Mark W.; Winter, Anja; Beuron, Fabienne; Morris, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The protease separase plays a key role in sister chromatid disjunction and centriole disengagement. To maintain genomic stability, separase activity is strictly regulated by binding of an inhibitory protein, securin. Despite its central role in cell division, the separase and securin complex is poorly understood at the structural level. This is partly owing to the difficulty of generating a sufficient quantity of homogeneous, stable protein. Here, we report the production of Caenorhabditis elegans separase–securin complex, and its characterization using biochemical methods and by negative staining electron microscopy. Single particle analysis generated a density map at a resolution of 21–24 Å that reveals a close, globular structure of complex connectivity harbouring two lobes. One lobe matches closely a homology model of the N-terminal HEAT repeat domain of separase, whereas the second lobe readily accommodates homology models of the separase C-terminal death and caspase-like domains. The globular structure of the C. elegans separase–securin complex contrasts with the more elongated structure previously described for the Homo sapiens complex, which could represent a different functional state of the complex, suggesting a mechanism for the regulation of separase activity through conformational change. PMID:27249343

  13. Pilot Non-Conformance to Alerting System Commands During Closely Spaced Parallel Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, Amy Ruth; Hansman, R. John; Corker, Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Cockpit alerting systems monitor potentially hazardous situations, both inside and outside the aircraft. When a hazard is projected to occur, the alerting system displays alerts and/or command decisions to the pilot. However, pilots have been observed to not conform to alerting system commands by delaying their response or by not following the automatic commands exactly. This non-conformance to the automatic alerting system can reduce its benefit. Therefore, a need exists to understand the causes and effects of pilot non-conformance in order to develop automatic alerting systems whose commands the pilots are more likely to follow. These considerations were examined through flight simulator evaluations of the collision avoidance task during closely spaced parallel approaches. This task provided a useful case-study because the effects of non-conformance can be significant, given the time-critical nature of the task. A preliminary evaluation of alerting systems identified non-conformance in over 40% of the cases and a corresponding drop in collision avoidance performance. A follow-on experiment found subjects' alerting and maneuver selection criteria were consistent with different strategies than those used by automatic systems, indicating the pilot may potentially disagree with the alerting system if the pilot attempts to verify automatic alerts and commanded avoidance maneuvers. A final experiment found supporting automatic alerts with the explicit display of its underlying criteria resulted in more consistent subject reactions. In light of these experimental results, a general discussion of pilot non-conformance is provided. Contributing factors in pilot non-conformance include a lack of confidence in the automatic system and mismatches between the alerting system's commands and the pilots' own decisions based on the information available to them. The effects of non-conformance on system performance are discussed. Possible methods of reconciling mismatches are

  14. The Crystal Structures of the Open and Catalytically Competent Closed Conformation of Escherichia coli Glycogen Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Fang; Jia, Xiaofei; Yep, Alejandra; Preiss, Jack; Geiger, James H.

    2009-07-06

    Escherichia coli glycogen synthase (EcGS, EC 2.4.1.21) is a retaining glycosyltransferase (GT) that transfers glucose from adenosine diphosphate glucose to a glucan chain acceptor with retention of configuration at the anomeric carbon. EcGS belongs to the GT-B structural superfamily. Here we report several EcGS x-ray structures that together shed considerable light on the structure and function of these enzymes. The structure of the wild-type enzyme bound to ADP and glucose revealed a 15.2 degrees overall domain-domain closure and provided for the first time the structure of the catalytically active, closed conformation of a glycogen synthase. The main chain carbonyl group of His-161, Arg-300, and Lys-305 are suggested by the structure to act as critical catalytic residues in the transglycosylation. Glu-377, previously thought to be catalytic is found on the alpha-face of the glucose and plays an electrostatic role in the active site and as a glucose ring locator. This is also consistent with the structure of the EcGS(E377A)-ADP-HEPPSO complex where the glucose moiety is either absent or disordered in the active site

  15. Two crystal structures of Escherichia coli N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase demonstrate the cycling between open and closed conformations.

    PubMed

    Gil-Ortiz, Fernando; Ramón-Maiques, Santiago; Fernández-Murga, María L; Fita, Ignacio; Rubio, Vicente

    2010-06-11

    N-Acetyl-L-glutamate kinase (NAGK), the paradigm enzyme of the amino acid kinase family, catalyzes the second step of arginine biosynthesis. Although substrate binding and catalysis were clarified by the determination of four crystal structures of the homodimeric Escherichia coli enzyme (EcNAGK), we now determine 2 A resolution crystal structures of EcNAGK free from substrates or complexed with the product N-acetyl-L-glutamyl-5-phosphate (NAGP) and with sulfate, which reveal a novel, very open NAGK conformation to which substrates would associate and from which products would dissociate. In this conformation, the C-domain, which hosts most of the nucleotide site, rotates approximately 24 degrees -28 degrees away from the N-domain, which hosts the acetylglutamate site, whereas the empty ATP site also exhibits some changes. One sulfate is found binding in the region where the beta-phosphate of ATP normally binds, suggesting that ATP is first anchored to the beta-phosphate site, before perfect binding by induced fit, triggering the shift to the closed conformation. In contrast, the acetylglutamate site is always well formed, although its beta-hairpin lid is found here to be mobile, being closed only in the subunit of the EcNAGK-NAGP complex that binds NAGP most strongly. Lid closure appears to increase the affinity for acetylglutamate/NAGP and to stabilize the closed enzyme conformation via lid-C-domain contacts. Our finding of NAGP bound to the open conformation confirms that this product dissociates from the open enzyme form and allows reconstruction of the active center in the ternary complex with both products, delineating the final steps of the reaction, which is shown here by site-directed mutagenesis to involve centrally the invariant residue Gly11. PMID:20403363

  16. Molecular Dynamics Simulation on the Conformational Transition of the Mad2 Protein from the Open to the Closed State

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chaoqun; Zhu, Yanyan; Wang, Yan; Chen, Guangju

    2014-01-01

    The Mad2 protein, with two distinct conformations of open- and closed-states, is a key player in the spindle checkpoint. The closed Mad2 state is more active than the open one. We carried out conventional and targeted molecular dynamics simulations for the two stable Mad2 states and their conformational transition to address the dynamical transition mechanism from the open to the closed state. The intermediate structure in the transition process shows exposure of the β6 strand and an increase of space around the binding sites of β6 strand due to the unfolding of the β7/8 sheet and movement of the β6/4/5 sheet close to the αC helix. Therefore, Mad2 binding to the Cdc20 protein in the spindle checkpoint is made possible. The interconversion between these two states might facilitate the functional activity of the Mad2 protein. Motion correlation analysis revealed the allosteric network between the β1 strand and β7/8 sheet via communication of the β5-αC loop and the β6/4/5 sheet in this transition process. PMID:24690997

  17. Nucleoporin Nup50 Stabilizes Closed Conformation of Armadillo repeat 10 in Importin α5*

    PubMed Central

    Pumroy, Ruth A.; Nardozzi, Jonathan D.; Hart, Darren J.; Root, Michael J.; Cingolani, Gino

    2012-01-01

    The human genome encodes six isoforms of importin α that show greater than 60% sequence similarity and remarkable substrate specificity. The isoform importin α5 can bind phosphorylated cargos such as STAT1 and Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 1, as well as the influenza virus polymerase subunit PB2. In this work, we have studied the interaction of the nucleoporin Nup50 with importin α5. We show that the first 47 residues of Nup50 bind to the C terminus of importin α5 like a “clip,” stabilizing the closed conformation of ARM 10. In vitro, Nup50 binds with high affinity either to empty importin α5 or to a preassembled complex of importin α5 bound to the C-terminal domain of the import cargo PB2, resulting in a trimeric complex. By contrast, PB2 can only bind with high affinity to importin α5 in the absence of Nup50. This suggests that Nup50 primary function may not be to actively displace the import cargo from importin α5 but rather to prevent cargo rebinding in preparation for recycling. This is the first evidence for a nucleoporin modulating the import reaction by directly altering the three-dimensional structure of an import adaptor. PMID:22130666

  18. Conformational Differences between Open and Closed States of the Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Complex

    PubMed Central

    Llácer, Jose L.; Hussain, Tanweer; Marler, Laura; Aitken, Colin Echeverría; Thakur, Anil; Lorsch, Jon R.; Hinnebusch, Alan G.; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Translation initiation in eukaryotes begins with the formation of a pre-initiation complex (PIC) containing the 40S ribosomal subunit, eIF1, eIF1A, eIF3, ternary complex (eIF2-GTP-Met-tRNAi), and eIF5. The PIC, in an open conformation, attaches to the 5′ end of the mRNA and scans to locate the start codon, whereupon it closes to arrest scanning. We present single particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) reconstructions of 48S PICs from yeast in these open and closed states, at 6.0 Å and 4.9 Å, respectively. These reconstructions show eIF2β as well as a configuration of eIF3 that appears to encircle the 40S, occupying part of the subunit interface. Comparison of the complexes reveals a large conformational change in the 40S head from an open mRNA latch conformation to a closed one that constricts the mRNA entry channel and narrows the P site to enclose tRNAi, thus elucidating key events in start codon recognition. PMID:26212456

  19. Closed conformal Killing Yano tensor and the uniqueness of generalized Kerr NUT de Sitter spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houri, Tsuyoshi; Oota, Takeshi; Yasui, Yukinori

    2009-02-01

    The higher-dimensional Kerr NUT de Sitter spacetime describes the general rotating asymptotically de Sitter black hole with NUT parameters. It is known that such a spacetime possesses a rank-2 closed conformal Killing Yano (CKY) tensor as a 'hidden' symmetry which provides the separation of variables for the geodesic equations and Klein Gordon equations. We present a classification of higher-dimensional spacetimes admitting a rank-2 closed CKY tensor. This provides a generalization of the Kerr NUT de Sitter spacetime. In particular, we show that the Kerr NUT de Sitter spacetime is the only spacetime with a non-degenerate CKY tensor.

  20. Stabilizing a flexible interdomain hinge region harboring the SMB binding site drives uPAR into its closed conformation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baoyu; Gandhi, Sonu; Yuan, Cai; Luo, Zhipu; Li, Rui; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; de Lorenzi, Valentina; Sidenius, Nicolai; Huang, Mingdong; Ploug, Michael

    2015-03-27

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a multidomain glycolipid-anchored membrane protein, which facilitates extracellular matrix remodeling by focalizing plasminogen activation to cell surfaces via its high-affinity interaction with uPA. The modular assembly of its three LU (Ly6/uPAR-like) domains is inherently flexible and binding of uPA drives uPAR into its closed conformation, which presents the higher-affinity state for vitronectin thus providing an allosteric regulatory mechanism. Using a new class of epitope-mapped anti-uPAR monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), we now demonstrate that the reciprocal stabilization is indeed also possible. By surface plasmon resonance studies, we show that these mAbs and vitronectin have overlapping binding sites on uPAR and that they share Arg91 as hotspot residue in their binding interfaces. The crystal structure solved for one of these uPAR·mAb complexes at 3.0Å clearly shows that this mAb preselects the closed uPAR conformation with an empty but correctly assembled large hydrophobic binding cavity for uPA. Accordingly, these mAbs inhibit the uPAR-dependent lamellipodia formation and migration on vitronectin-coated matrices irrespective of the conformational status of uPAR and its occupancy with uPA. This is the first study to the best of our knowledge, showing that the dynamic assembly of the three LU domains in uPARwt can be driven toward the closed form by an external ligand, which is not engaging the hydrophobic uPA binding cavity. As this binding interface is also exploited by the somatomedin B domain of vitronectin, therefore, this relationship should be taken into consideration when exploring uPAR-dependent cell adhesion and migration in vitronectin-rich environments. PMID:25659907

  1. Active-Site-Directed Inhibitors of Prolyl Oligopeptidase Abolish Its Conformational Dynamics.

    PubMed

    López, Abraham; Herranz-Trillo, Fátima; Kotev, Martin; Gairí, Margarida; Guallar, Víctor; Bernadó, Pau; Millet, Oscar; Tarragó, Teresa; Giralt, Ernest

    2016-05-17

    Deciphering conformational dynamics is crucial for understanding the biological functions of proteins and for designing compounds targeting them. In particular, providing an accurate description of microsecond-millisecond motions opens the opportunity for regulating protein-protein interactions (PPIs) by modulating the dynamics of one interacting partner. Here we analyzed the conformational dynamics of prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) and the effects of active-site-directed inhibitors on the dynamics. We used an integrated structural biology approach based on NMR spectroscopy and SAXS experiments complemented by MD simulations. We found that POP is in a slow equilibrium in solution between open and closed conformations, and that inhibitors effectively abolished this equilibrium by stabilizing the enzyme in the closed conformation. PMID:26918396

  2. Selective binding of antiinfluenza drugs and their analogues to 'open' and 'closed' conformations of H5N1 neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei; Zhang, John Z H

    2010-10-14

    It was suggested that the open conformation of the 150-loop of H5N1 avian influenza neuraminidase is intrinsically lower in energy than the closed conformation and that oseltamivir (tamiflu) favors binding to the closed conformation through a relatively slow conformational change [Russell, R. J. Nature 2006, 443, 45-49]. In the present work, a systematic computational study is performed to investigate the binding mechanism of five ligands to H5N1 neuraminidase (H5N1 NA) with the 150-loop in both open and closed conformations through molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations, and MM/PBSA free energy calculation. Our result shows that the electrostatic interactions between polar groups on the 150-loop and the charged groups of the ligands play a key role on the binding selectivity. In particular, ligands having a small positively charged group favor binding to the closed conformation of H5N1 NA, while those having a large positively charged group generally prefer binding to the open conformation. Our analysis suggests that it may be possible to design new inhibitors with large basic groups that are selective for the open conformation and thereby have stronger binding affinity to H5N1 neuraminidase. PMID:20860351

  3. Protein Conformational Landscapes and Catalysis. Influence of Active Site Conformations in the Reaction Catalyzed by L-Lactate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Świderek, Katarzyna; Tuñón, Iñaki; Martí, Sergio; Moliner, Vicent

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade L-Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) has become an extremely useful marker in both clinical diagnosis and in monitoring the course of many human diseases. It has been assumed from the 80s that the full catalytic process of LDH starts with the binding of the cofactor and the substrate followed by the enclosure of the active site by a mobile loop of the protein before the reaction to take place. In this paper we show that the chemical step of the LDH catalyzed reaction can proceed within the open loop conformation, and the different reactivity of the different protein conformations would be in agreement with the broad range of rate constants measured in single molecule spectrometry studies. Starting from a recently solved X-ray diffraction structure that presented an open loop conformation in two of the four chains of the tetramer, QM/MM free energy surfaces have been obtained at different levels of theory. Depending on the level of theory used to describe the electronic structure, the free energy barrier for the transformation of pyruvate into lactate with the open conformation of the protein varies between 12.9 and 16.3 kcal/mol, after quantizing the vibrations and adding the contributions of recrossing and tunneling effects. These values are very close to the experimentally deduced one (14.2 kcal·mol−1) and ~2 kcal·mol−1 smaller than the ones obtained with the closed loop conformer. Calculation of primary KIEs and IR spectra in both protein conformations are also consistent with our hypothesis and in agreement with experimental data. Our calculations suggest that the closure of the active site is mainly required for the inverse process; the oxidation of lactate to pyruvate. According to this hypothesis H4 type LDH enzyme molecules, where it has been propose that lactate is transformed into pyruvate, should have a better ability to close the mobile loop than the M4 type LDH molecules. PMID:25705562

  4. Outdoor Education: Opening and Closing Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mingie, Walter, Comp.

    Opening activites (to create an atmosphere of cooperation and a desire to work, explore, and learn together) and closing activities (to summarize what has happened or been learned) for outdoor education programs are described. All activities are intended to incite enthusiasm to learn and make the learning activity a desired, joyful experience.…

  5. Conformational heterogeneity in closed and open states of the KcsA potassium channel in lipid bicelles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dorothy M; Dikiy, Igor; Upadhyay, Vikrant; Posson, David J; Eliezer, David; Nimigean, Crina M

    2016-08-01

    The process of ion channel gating-opening and closing-involves local and global structural changes in the channel in response to external stimuli. Conformational changes depend on the energetic landscape that underlies the transition between closed and open states, which plays a key role in ion channel gating. For the prokaryotic, pH-gated potassium channel KcsA, closed and open states have been extensively studied using structural and functional methods, but the dynamics within each of these functional states as well as the transition between them is not as well understood. In this study, we used solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to investigate the conformational transitions within specific functional states of KcsA. We incorporated KcsA channels into lipid bicelles and stabilized them into a closed state by using either phosphatidylcholine lipids, known to favor the closed channel, or mutations designed to trap the channel shut by disulfide cross-linking. A distinct state, consistent with an open channel, was uncovered by the addition of cardiolipin lipids. Using selective amino acid labeling at locations within the channel that are known to move during gating, we observed at least two different slowly interconverting conformational states for both closed and open channels. The pH dependence of these conformations and the predictable disruptions to this dependence observed in mutant channels with altered pH sensing highlight the importance of conformational heterogeneity for KcsA gating. PMID:27432996

  6. Conformationally restrained analogs of sympathomimetic catecholamines. Synthesis, conformational analysis, and adrenergic activity of isochroman derivatives.

    PubMed

    Macchia, B; Balsamo, A; Breschi, M C; Chiellini, G; Lapucci, A; Macchia, M; Manera, C; Martinelli, A; Martini, C; Scatizzi, R

    1993-10-15

    In previous papers dealing with the study of the conformations and the biopharmacological activity of conformationally restrained analogs of sympathomimetic catecholamines (NE and ISO), proposals were advanced for the three-dimensional molecular models A, B, and C; these models provided information about the steric requirements for the direct activation of alpha 1, alpha 2,beta 1, and beta 2 adrenoceptors, respectively. The 1-(aminomethyl)-6,7-dihydroxyisochromans 11 and 12 and the 1-(aminomethyl)-5,6-dihydroxyisochromans 13 and 14 (1-AMDICs) are two different types of semirigid analogs of NE and ISO. The alpha 1, alpha 2, beta 1, and beta 2 adrenergic properties of the 1-AMDICs 11-14 were evaluated in vitro, both by radioligand binding assays and by functional tests on isolated preparations, and were compared with those of their parent compounds (NE and ISO). The results of a conformational study carried out by means of both 1H NMR spectrometry and theoretical calculations indicated that, in these 1-AMDICs, the presumed active groups (aryl moiety, amine nitrogen and benzylic ethereal oxygen) are in a spatial relationship corresponding to the one found for NE and ISO in their preferred conformations, which also proved to be the pharmacophoric conformation in the models A-C. By means of a comparison of the stereostructures of the 1-AMDICs 11-14 with their biopharmacological properties, it was possible to obtain a further definition of the model B with respect to the activation of the alpha 2 adrenoceptors; the superimposition of the 1-AMDICs 11 and 12 with the molecular model C made it possible to detect an area of the beta-adrenergic receptors which might hinder the fit of adrenergic drugs that are analogs of catecholamines with these receptors. PMID:8230093

  7. Activation of pheromone-sensitive neurons is mediated by conformational activation of pheromone-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Laughlin, John D; Ha, Tal Soo; Jones, David N M; Smith, Dean P

    2008-06-27

    Detection of volatile odorants by olfactory neurons is thought to result from direct activation of seven-transmembrane odorant receptors by odor molecules. Here, we show that detection of the Drosophila pheromone, 11-cis vaccenyl acetate (cVA), is instead mediated by pheromone-induced conformational shifts in the extracellular pheromone-binding protein, LUSH. We show that LUSH undergoes a pheromone-specific conformational change that triggers the firing of pheromone-sensitive neurons. Amino acid substitutions in LUSH that are predicted to reduce or enhance the conformational shift alter sensitivity to cVA as predicted in vivo. One substitution, LUSH(D118A), produces a dominant-active LUSH protein that stimulates T1 neurons through the neuronal receptor components Or67d and SNMP in the complete absence of pheromone. Structural analysis of LUSH(D118A) reveals that it closely resembles cVA-bound LUSH. Therefore, the pheromone-binding protein is an inactive, extracellular ligand converted by pheromone molecules into an activator of pheromone-sensitive neurons and reveals a distinct paradigm for detection of odorants. PMID:18585358

  8. Opening the conformation is a master switch for the dual localization and phosphatase activity of PTEN

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hoai-Nghia; Yang, Jr-Ming; Miyamoto, Takafumi; Itoh, Kie; Rho, Elmer; Zhang, Qiang; Inoue, Takanari; Devreotes, Peter N.; Sesaki, Hiromi; Iijima, Miho

    2015-01-01

    Tumor suppressor PTEN mainly functions at two subcellular locations, the plasma membrane and the nucleus. At the plasma membrane, PTEN dephosphorylates the tumorigenic second messenger PIP3, which drives cell proliferation and migration. In the nucleus, PTEN controls DNA repair and genome stability independently of PIP3. Whereas the concept that a conformational change regulates protein function through post-translational modifications has been well established in biology, it is unknown whether a conformational change simultaneously controls dual subcellular localizations of proteins. Here, we discovered that opening the conformation of PTEN is the crucial upstream event that determines its key dual localizations of this crucial tumor suppressor. We identify a critical conformational switch that regulates PTEN’s localization. Most PTEN molecules are held in the cytosol in a closed conformation by intramolecular interactions between the C-terminal tail and core region. Dephosphorylation of the tail opens the conformation and exposes the membrane-binding regulatory interface in the core region, recruiting PTEN to the membrane. Moreover, a lysine at residue 13 is also exposed and when ubiquitinated, transports PTEN to the nucleus. Thus, opening the conformation of PTEN is a key mechanism that enhances its dual localization and enzymatic activity, providing a potential therapeutic strategy in cancer treatments. PMID:26216063

  9. Transitions between Closed and Open Conformations of TolC: The Effects of Ions in Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Robert; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, use multidrug efflux pumps to export toxic substrates through their cell membranes. Upon formation of an efflux pump, the aperture of its outer membrane protein TolC opens and thereby enables the extrusion of substrate molecules. The specialty of TolC is its ability to dock to different transporters, making it a highly versatile export protein. Within this study, the transition between two conformations of TolC that are both available as crystal structures was investigated using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. To create a partially open conformation from a closed one, the stability of the periplasmic aperture was weakened by a double point mutation at the constricting ring, which removes some salt bridges and hydrogen bonds. These mutants, which showed partial opening in previous experiments, did not spontaneously open during a 20-ns equilibration at physiological values of the KCl solution. Detailed analysis of the constricting ring revealed that the cations of the solvent were able to constitute ionic bonds in place of the removed salt bridges, which inhibited the opening of the aperture in simulations. To remove the ions from these binding positions within the available simulation time, an extra force was applied onto the ions. To keep the effect of this additional force rather flexible, it was applied in form of an artificial external electric field perpendicular to the membrane. Depending on the field direction and the ion concentration, these simulations led to a partial opening. In experiments, this energy barrier for the ions can be overcome by thermal fluctuations on a longer timescale. PMID:19383457

  10. Simultaneous measurement of DNA motor protein conformation and activity with combined optical trap and single-molecule fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemla, Yann

    2013-03-01

    We present single-molecule measurements of Superfamily 1 UvrD helicase DNA unwinding that reveal directly how helicase stoichiometry and conformation regulate motor activity. Using a new instrument that combines high resolution optical tweezers with single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, we record DNA unwinding activity with base pair-scale resolution (via optical tweezers) simultaneously with helicase stoichiometry and conformation (via fluorescence). Quantifying the fluorescence signal from labeled UvrD, we observe that pairs of UvrD molecules are required for long distance unwinding but that individual molecules exhibit limited, non-processive unwinding activity. UvrD is also known to exhibit two different conformations, `closed' and `open', based on the orientation of its 2B regulatory domain. The function of these conformations has remained elusive. Measuring the fluorescence of FRET labeled proteins, we detect directly the conformation of the 2B domain of individual UvrD molecules during unwinding activity. We observe that UvrD is in the `closed' conformation during DNA unwinding but surprisingly switches to the `open' conformation upon reversal of helicase direction, i.e. when UvrD switches strands and translocates on the opposing strand with the DNA junction rezipping behind it. We hypothesize that the 2B domain acts as a conformational switch that controls DNA unwinding vs. re-annealing. Work supported by NSF (PHY-082261, Center for the Physics of Living Cells) and NIH (R21 RR025341A)

  11. Conformational activation of visual rhodopsin in native disc membranes.

    PubMed

    Malmerberg, Erik; M Bovee-Geurts, Petra H; Katona, Gergely; Deupi, Xavier; Arnlund, David; Wickstrand, Cecilia; Johansson, Linda C; Westenhoff, Sebastian; Nazarenko, Elena; Schertler, Gebhard F X; Menzel, Andreas; de Grip, Willem J; Neutze, Richard

    2015-03-10

    Rhodopsin is the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that serves as a dim-light receptor for vision in vertebrates. We probed light-induced conformational changes in rhodopsin in its native membrane environment at room temperature using time-resolved wide-angle x-ray scattering. We observed a rapid conformational transition that is consistent with an outward tilt of the cytoplasmic portion of transmembrane helix 6 concomitant with an inward movement of the cytoplasmic portion of transmembrane helix 5. These movements were considerably larger than those reported from the basis of crystal structures of activated rhodopsin, implying that light activation of rhodopsin involves a more extended conformational change than was previously suggested. PMID:25759477

  12. Hemi-methylated DNA opens a closed conformation of UHRF1 to facilitate its histone recognition.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jian; Cheng, Jingdong; Wang, Jiaolong; Zhang, Qiao; Liu, Mengjie; Gong, Rui; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Xiaodan; Feng, Yangyang; Lan, Wenxian; Gong, Zhou; Tang, Chun; Wong, Jiemin; Yang, Huirong; Cao, Chunyang; Xu, Yanhui

    2016-01-01

    UHRF1 is an important epigenetic regulator for maintenance DNA methylation. UHRF1 recognizes hemi-methylated DNA (hm-DNA) and trimethylation of histone H3K9 (H3K9me3), but the regulatory mechanism remains unknown. Here we show that UHRF1 adopts a closed conformation, in which a C-terminal region (Spacer) binds to the tandem Tudor domain (TTD) and inhibits H3K9me3 recognition, whereas the SET-and-RING-associated (SRA) domain binds to the plant homeodomain (PHD) and inhibits H3R2 recognition. Hm-DNA impairs the intramolecular interactions and promotes H3K9me3 recognition by TTD-PHD. The Spacer also facilitates UHRF1-DNMT1 interaction and enhances hm-DNA-binding affinity of the SRA. When TTD-PHD binds to H3K9me3, SRA-Spacer may exist in a dynamic equilibrium: either recognizes hm-DNA or recruits DNMT1 to chromatin. Our study reveals the mechanism for regulation of H3K9me3 and hm-DNA recognition by URHF1. PMID:27045799

  13. Hemi-methylated DNA opens a closed conformation of UHRF1 to facilitate its histone recognition

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jian; Cheng, Jingdong; Wang, Jiaolong; Zhang, Qiao; Liu, Mengjie; Gong, Rui; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Xiaodan; Feng, Yangyang; Lan, Wenxian; Gong, Zhou; Tang, Chun; Wong, Jiemin; Yang, Huirong; Cao, Chunyang; Xu, Yanhui

    2016-01-01

    UHRF1 is an important epigenetic regulator for maintenance DNA methylation. UHRF1 recognizes hemi-methylated DNA (hm-DNA) and trimethylation of histone H3K9 (H3K9me3), but the regulatory mechanism remains unknown. Here we show that UHRF1 adopts a closed conformation, in which a C-terminal region (Spacer) binds to the tandem Tudor domain (TTD) and inhibits H3K9me3 recognition, whereas the SET-and-RING-associated (SRA) domain binds to the plant homeodomain (PHD) and inhibits H3R2 recognition. Hm-DNA impairs the intramolecular interactions and promotes H3K9me3 recognition by TTD–PHD. The Spacer also facilitates UHRF1–DNMT1 interaction and enhances hm-DNA-binding affinity of the SRA. When TTD–PHD binds to H3K9me3, SRA-Spacer may exist in a dynamic equilibrium: either recognizes hm-DNA or recruits DNMT1 to chromatin. Our study reveals the mechanism for regulation of H3K9me3 and hm-DNA recognition by URHF1. PMID:27045799

  14. Hemi-methylated DNA opens a closed conformation of UHRF1 to facilitate its histone recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jian; Cheng, Jingdong; Wang, Jiaolong; Zhang, Qiao; Liu, Mengjie; Gong, Rui; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Xiaodan; Feng, Yangyang; Lan, Wenxian; Gong, Zhou; Tang, Chun; Wong, Jiemin; Yang, Huirong; Cao, Chunyang; Xu, Yanhui

    2016-04-01

    UHRF1 is an important epigenetic regulator for maintenance DNA methylation. UHRF1 recognizes hemi-methylated DNA (hm-DNA) and trimethylation of histone H3K9 (H3K9me3), but the regulatory mechanism remains unknown. Here we show that UHRF1 adopts a closed conformation, in which a C-terminal region (Spacer) binds to the tandem Tudor domain (TTD) and inhibits H3K9me3 recognition, whereas the SET-and-RING-associated (SRA) domain binds to the plant homeodomain (PHD) and inhibits H3R2 recognition. Hm-DNA impairs the intramolecular interactions and promotes H3K9me3 recognition by TTD-PHD. The Spacer also facilitates UHRF1-DNMT1 interaction and enhances hm-DNA-binding affinity of the SRA. When TTD-PHD binds to H3K9me3, SRA-Spacer may exist in a dynamic equilibrium: either recognizes hm-DNA or recruits DNMT1 to chromatin. Our study reveals the mechanism for regulation of H3K9me3 and hm-DNA recognition by URHF1.

  15. An Engineered Disulfide Bond Reversibly Traps the IgE-Fc3-4 in a Closed, Nonreceptor Binding Conformation

    SciTech Connect

    Wurzburg, Beth A.; Kim, Beomkyu; Tarchevskaya, Svetlana S.; Eggel, Alexander; Vogel, Monique; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2013-08-02

    IgE antibodies interact with the high affinity IgE Fc receptor, FcϵRI, and activate inflammatory pathways associated with the allergic response. The IgE-Fc region, comprising the C-terminal domains of the IgE heavy chain, binds FcϵRI and can adopt different conformations ranging from a closed form incompatible with receptor binding to an open, receptor-bound state. A number of intermediate states are also observed in different IgE-Fc crystal forms. To further explore this apparent IgE-Fc conformational flexibility and to potentially trap a closed, inactive state, we generated a series of disulfide bond mutants. Here we describe the structure and biochemical properties of an IgE-Fc mutant that is trapped in the closed, non-receptor binding state via an engineered disulfide at residue 335 (Cys-335). Reduction of the disulfide at Cys-335 restores the ability of IgE-Fc to bind to its high affinity receptor, FcϵRIα. The structure of the Cys-335 mutant shows that its conformation is within the range of previously observed, closed form IgE-Fc structures and that it retains the hydrophobic pocket found in the hinge region of the closed conformation. Locking the IgE-Fc into the closed state with the Cys-335 mutation does not affect binding of two other IgE-Fc ligands, omalizumab and DARPin E2_79, demonstrating selective blocking of the high affinity receptor binding.

  16. The insulin receptor activation process involves localized conformational changes.

    PubMed

    Baron, V; Kaliman, P; Gautier, N; Van Obberghen, E

    1992-11-15

    The molecular process by which insulin binding to the receptor alpha-subunit induces activation of the receptor beta-subunit with ensuing substrate phosphorylation remains unclear. In this study, we aimed at approaching this molecular mechanism of signal transduction and at delineating the cytoplasmic domains implied in this process. To do this, we used antipeptide antibodies to the following sequences of the receptor beta-subunit: (i) positions 962-972 in the juxtamembrane domain, (ii) positions 1247-1261 at the end of the kinase domain, and (iii) positions 1294-1317 and (iv) positions 1309-1326, both in the receptor C terminus. We have previously shown that insulin binding to its receptor induces a conformational change in the beta-subunit C terminus. Here, we demonstrate that receptor autophosphorylation induces an additional conformational change. This process appears to be distinct from the one produced by ligand binding and can be detected in at least three different beta-subunit regions: the juxtamembrane domain, the kinase domain, and the C terminus. Hence, the cytoplasmic part of the receptor beta-subunit appears to undergo an extended conformational change upon autophosphorylation. By contrast, the insulin-induced change does not affect the juxtamembrane domain 962-972 nor the kinase domain 1247-1261 and may be limited to the receptor C terminus. Further, we show that the hormone-dependent conformational change is maintained in a kinase-deficient receptor due to a mutation at lysine 1018. Therefore, during receptor activation, the ligand-induced change could precede ATP binding and receptor autophosphorylation. We propose that insulin binding leads to a transient receptor form that may allow ATP binding and, subsequently, autophosphorylation. The second conformational change could unmask substrate-binding sites and stabilize the receptor in an active conformation. PMID:1331080

  17. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase-4 Structures Reveal a Metastable Open Conformation Fostering Robust Core-free Basal Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Wynn, R. Max; Kato, Masato; Chuang, Jacinta L.; Tso, Shih-Chia; Li, Jun; Chuang, David T.

    2008-10-21

    Human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) is down-regulated by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) isoforms 1-4. PDK4 is overexpressed in skeletal muscle in type 2 diabetes, resulting in impaired glucose utilization. Here we show that human PDK4 has robust core-free basal activity, which is considerably higher than activity levels of other PDK isoforms stimulated by the PDC core. PDK4 binds the L3 lipoyl domain, but its activity is not significantly stimulated by any individual lipoyl domains or the core of PDC. The 2.0-{angstrom} crystal structures of the PDK4 dimer with bound ADP reveal an open conformation with a wider active-site cleft, compared with that in the closed conformation epitomized by the PDK2-ADP structure. The open conformation in PDK4 shows partially ordered C-terminal cross-tails, in which the conserved DW (Asp{sup 394}-Trp{sup 395}) motif from one subunit anchors to the N-terminal domain of the other subunit. The open conformation fosters a reduced binding affinity for ADP, facilitating the efficient removal of product inhibition by this nucleotide. Alteration or deletion of the DW-motif disrupts the C-terminal cross-tail anchor, resulting in the closed conformation and the nearly complete inactivation of PDK4. Fluorescence quenching and enzyme activity data suggest that compounds AZD7545 and dichloroacetate lock PDK4 in the open and the closed conformational states, respectively. We propose that PDK4 with bound ADP exists in equilibrium between the open and the closed conformations. The favored metastable open conformation is responsible for the robust basal activity of PDK4 in the absence of the PDC core.

  18. How Closely Related Are Conformations of Protein Ions Sampled by IM-MS to Native Solution Structures?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shu-Hua; Russell, David H.

    2015-09-01

    Here, we critically evaluate the effects of changes in the ion internal energy (Eint) on ion-neutral collision cross sections (CCS) of ions of two structurally diverse proteins, specifically the [M + 6H]6+ ion of ubiquitin (ubq6+), the [M + 5H]5+ ion of the intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) apo-metallothionein-2A (MT), and its partially- and fully-metalated isoform, the [CdiMT]5+ ion. The ion-neutral CCS for ions formed by "native-state" ESI show a strong dependence on Eint. Collisional activation is used to increase Eint prior to the ions entering and within the traveling wave (TW) ion mobility analyzer. Comparisons of experimental CCSs with those generated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation for solution-phase ions and solvent-free ions as a function of temperature provide new insights about conformational preferences and retention of solution conformations. The Eint-dependent CCSs, which reveal increased conformational diversity of the ion population, are discussed in terms of folding/unfolding of solvent-free ions. For example, ubiquitin ions that have low internal energies retain native-like conformations, whereas ions that are heated by collisional activation possess higher internal energies and yield a broader range of CCS owing to increased conformational diversity due to losses of secondary and tertiary structures. In contrast, the CCS profile for the IDP apoMT is consistent with kinetic trapping of an ion population composed of a wide range of conformers, and as the Eint is increased, these structurally labile conformers unfold to an elongated conformation.

  19. How Closely Related Are Conformations of Protein Ions Sampled by IM-MS to Native Solution Structures?

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-Hua; Russell, David H

    2015-09-01

    Here, we critically evaluate the effects of changes in the ion internal energy (E(int)) on ion-neutral collision cross sections (CCS) of ions of two structurally diverse proteins, specifically the [M + 6H](6+) ion of ubiquitin (ubq(6+)), the [M + 5H](5+) ion of the intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) apo-metallothionein-2A (MT), and its partially- and fully-metalated isoform, the [CdiMT](5+) ion. The ion-neutral CCS for ions formed by "native-state" ESI show a strong dependence on E(int). Collisional activation is used to increase E(int) prior to the ions entering and within the traveling wave (TW) ion mobility analyzer. Comparisons of experimental CCSs with those generated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation for solution-phase ions and solvent-free ions as a function of temperature provide new insights about conformational preferences and retention of solution conformations. The E(int)-dependent CCSs, which reveal increased conformational diversity of the ion population, are discussed in terms of folding/unfolding of solvent-free ions. For example, ubiquitin ions that have low internal energies retain native-like conformations, whereas ions that are heated by collisional activation possess higher internal energies and yield a broader range of CCS owing to increased conformational diversity due to losses of secondary and tertiary structures. In contrast, the CCS profile for the IDP apoMT is consistent with kinetic trapping of an ion population composed of a wide range of conformers, and as the E(int) is increased, these structurally labile conformers unfold to an elongated conformation. PMID:26115967

  20. Preinduction activities: a closed malpractice claims perspective.

    PubMed

    Moody, M L; Kremer, M J

    2001-12-01

    The American Association of Nurse Anesthetists Foundation conducts an ongoing study of closed malpractice claims that involve nurse anesthetists. A team of 8 CRNA researchers has to date investigated 223 closed claim files from the St Paul Fire and Marine Insurance Company. Research findings have demonstrated that failure to provide appropriate anesthesia care relative to the Scope and Standards for Nurse Anesthesia Practice was significantly associated with adverse anesthetic outcomes. Claims that involved inadequate preinduction activities (n = 22) were analyzed in the context of their compliance with published standards of care. The largest group of claims in this analysis (59%) involved damaging respiratory events, 28% entailed damaging cardiovascular events, and the principal issue in 13% of these claims involved failure to seek available information such as laboratory studies on the medical record. The most prevalent occurrence with damaging respiratory events was undocumented airway assessment in 27% of the claims. In 55% of these claims, the medical history was not completely documented. The surgical procedure categories were general surgical (32%), obstetrical (27%), otolaryngogical (23%), orthopedic (14%), and gynecologic (5%). The involved standards of care are reviewed, and recommendations are made regarding consistent completion of preinduction activities. PMID:11837148

  1. Conformational and Thermodynamic Landscape of GPCR Activation from Theory and Computation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Sijia S; Goddard, William A; Abrol, Ravinder

    2016-06-21

    We present a hybrid computational methodology to predict multiple energetically accessible conformations for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that might play a role in binding to ligands and different signaling partners. To our knowledge, this method, termed ActiveGEnSeMBLE, enables the first quantitative energy profile for GPCR activation that is consistent with the qualitative profile deduced from experiments. ActiveGEnSeMBLE starts with a systematic coarse grid sampling of helix tilts/rotations (∼13 trillion transmembrane-domain conformations) and selects the conformational landscape based on energy. This profile identifies multiple potential active-state energy wells, with the TM3-TM6 intracellular distance as an approximate activation coordinate. These energy wells are then sampled locally using a finer grid to find locally minimized conformation in each energy well. We validate this strategy using the inactive and active experimental structures of β2 adrenergic receptor (hβ2AR) and M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. Structures of membrane-embedded hβ2AR along its activation coordinate are subjected to molecular-dynamics simulations for relaxation and interaction energy analysis to generate a quantitative energy landscape for hβ2AR activation. This landscape reveals several metastable states along this coordinate, indicating that for hβ2AR, the agonist alone is not enough to stabilize the active state and that the G protein is necessary, consistent with experimental observations. The method's application to somatostatin receptor SSTR5 (no experimental structure available) shows that to predict an active conformation it is better to start from an inactive structure template based on a close homolog than to start from an active template based on a distant homolog. The energy landscape for hSSTR5 activation is consistent with hβ2AR in the role of the G protein. These results demonstrate the utility of the ActiveGEnSeMBLE method for predicting

  2. Structure of inorganic pyrophosphatase from Staphylococcus aureus reveals conformational flexibility of the active site.

    PubMed

    Gajadeera, Chathurada S; Zhang, Xinyi; Wei, Yinan; Tsodikov, Oleg V

    2015-02-01

    Cytoplasmic inorganic pyrophosphatase (PPiase) is an enzyme essential for survival of organisms, from bacteria to human. PPiases are divided into two structurally distinct families: family I PPiases are Mg(2+)-dependent and present in most archaea, eukaryotes and prokaryotes, whereas the relatively less understood family II PPiases are Mn(2+)-dependent and present only in some archaea, bacteria and primitive eukaryotes. Staphylococcus aureus (SA), a dangerous pathogen and a frequent cause of hospital infections, contains a family II PPiase (PpaC), which is an attractive potential target for development of novel antibacterial agents. We determined a crystal structure of SA PpaC in complex with catalytic Mn(2+) at 2.1Å resolution. The active site contains two catalytic Mn(2+) binding sites, each half-occupied, reconciling the previously observed 1:1 Mn(2+):enzyme stoichiometry with the presence of two divalent metal ion sites in the apo-enzyme. Unexpectedly, despite the absence of the substrate or products in the active site, the two domains of SA PpaC form a closed active site, a conformation observed in structures of other family II PPiases only in complex with substrate or product mimics. A region spanning residues 295-298, which contains a conserved substrate binding RKK motif, is flipped out of the active site, an unprecedented conformation for a PPiase. Because the mutant of Arg295 to an alanine is devoid of activity, this loop likely undergoes an induced-fit conformational change upon substrate binding and product dissociation. This closed conformation of SA PPiase may serve as an attractive target for rational design of inhibitors of this enzyme. PMID:25576794

  3. The biologically active conformations of ligand CCK B receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Pavel E.; Kuznetsova, Nina B.; Schulgin, Sergey V.; Rogacheva, Svetlana M.; Sinyakov, Valeriy V.; Kovtun, Viktor A.

    2006-07-01

    We analyzed literature data about structures of ligands of CCK B receptor. The structure of the binding site (fragments of the third extracellular loop and the seventh transmembrane helix of CCK B receptor) was determined recently by experiments. We were finding presumable biologically active conformations (BAC) of the ligands by two methods. One of them is based on the fact that the most stable conformations of the biologically active peptide on the phase interface "water-lipophilic medium" are often similar to the BAC. Another method is based on the formation of the stable ligand-receptor complex during the modeling procedure. We used Monte-Carlo method with the fixed geometry of the receptor and the optimized geometry of tetrapeptide cholecystokinin (CCK-4). It has been shown, that the first method should be used to find BAC of antagonists of CCK B receptor. The strategy of the formation of the stable ligand-receptor complex during the modeling procedure can be used for the designing of peptide agonists of CCK B receptor.

  4. Interrogating the activities of conformational deformed enzyme by single-molecule fluorescence-magnetic tweezers microscopy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qing; He, Yufan; Lu, H Peter

    2015-11-10

    Characterizing the impact of fluctuating enzyme conformation on enzymatic activity is critical in understanding the structure-function relationship and enzymatic reaction dynamics. Different from studying enzyme conformations under a denaturing condition, it is highly informative to manipulate the conformation of an enzyme under an enzymatic reaction condition while monitoring the real-time enzymatic activity changes simultaneously. By perturbing conformation of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) molecules using our home-developed single-molecule total internal reflection magnetic tweezers, we successfully manipulated the enzymatic conformation and probed the enzymatic activity changes of HRP in a catalyzed H2O2-amplex red reaction. We also observed a significant tolerance of the enzyme activity to the enzyme conformational perturbation. Our results provide a further understanding of the relation between enzyme behavior and enzymatic conformational fluctuation, enzyme-substrate interactions, enzyme-substrate active complex formation, and protein folding-binding interactions. PMID:26512103

  5. Interrogating the activities of conformational deformed enzyme by single-molecule fluorescence-magnetic tweezers microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qing; He, Yufan; Lu, H. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing the impact of fluctuating enzyme conformation on enzymatic activity is critical in understanding the structure–function relationship and enzymatic reaction dynamics. Different from studying enzyme conformations under a denaturing condition, it is highly informative to manipulate the conformation of an enzyme under an enzymatic reaction condition while monitoring the real-time enzymatic activity changes simultaneously. By perturbing conformation of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) molecules using our home-developed single-molecule total internal reflection magnetic tweezers, we successfully manipulated the enzymatic conformation and probed the enzymatic activity changes of HRP in a catalyzed H2O2–amplex red reaction. We also observed a significant tolerance of the enzyme activity to the enzyme conformational perturbation. Our results provide a further understanding of the relation between enzyme behavior and enzymatic conformational fluctuation, enzyme–substrate interactions, enzyme–substrate active complex formation, and protein folding–binding interactions. PMID:26512103

  6. Simulations of CRP:(cAMP)2 in noncrystalline environments show a subunit transition from the open to the closed conformation.

    PubMed

    García, A E; Harman, J G

    1996-01-01

    The CRP:cAMP complex functions as a transcription factor that facilitates RNA polymerase recognition of several bacterial promoters. Detailed crystal structure information is available for CRP:(cAMP)2 and for CRP:(cAMP)2 complexed with DNA. In the crystalline environment, CRP:(cAMP)2 subunits are asymmetrically related; one subunit has a closed conformation and the other has an open conformation. The CRP:(cAMP)2 complexed with DNA shows both subunits in a closed conformation. We have studied the molecular dynamics of CRP:(cAMP)2 in noncrystalline environments. CRP:(cAMP)2 was simulated for 625 ps in vacuo and for 140 ps in solution. The crystal structure of CRP:(cAMP)2 in the absence of DNA was used as the initial conformation. Molecule optimal dynamic coordinates (MODCs) (García A, 1992, Phys Rev Lett 68:2696) were used to analyze protein conformations sampled during the course of the simulations. Two MODCs define a transition of the open subunit to a closed subunit conformation during the first 125 ps of simulation in vacuo; the resulting subunit conformation is similar to that observed in CRP:(cAMP)2:DNA crystals. Simulation of CRP:(cAMP)2 in solution showed that a transition from the open to the closed state also occurs when water is explicitly included in the calculations. These calculations suggest that the asymmetric conformation of CRP:(cAMP)2 is stabilized by crystal lattice interactions. The predicted solution conformation is more symmetric, with both subunits in a closed conformation. PMID:8771197

  7. Conformational coupling, bridge helix dynamics and active site dehydration in catalysis by RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Seibold, Steve A.; Singh, Badri Nath; Zhang, Chunfen; Kireeva, Maria; Domecq, Céline; Bouchard, Annie; Nazione, Anthony M.; Feig, Michael; Cukier, Robert I.; Coulombe, Benoit; Kashlev, Mikhail; Hampsey, Michael; Burton, Zachary F.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation of Thermus thermophilus (Tt) RNA polymerase (RNAP) in a catalytic conformation demonstrates that the active site dNMP-NTP base pair must be substantially dehydrated to support full active site closing and optimum conditions for phosphodiester bond synthesis. In silico mutant β R428A RNAP, which was designed based on substitutions at the homologous position (Rpb2 R512) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc) RNAP II, was used as a reference structure to compare to Tt RNAP in simulations. Long range conformational coupling linking a dynamic segment of the bridge α-helix, the extended fork loop, the active site, and the trigger loop-trigger helix is apparent and adversely affected in β R428A RNAP. Furthermore, bridge helix bending is detected in the catalytic structure, indicating that bridge helix dynamics may regulate phosphodiester bond synthesis as well as translocation. An active site “latch” assembly that includes a key trigger helix residue Tt β’ H1242 and highly conserved active site residues β E445 and R557 appears to help regulate active site hydration/dehydration. The potential relevance of these observations in understanding RNAP and DNAP induced fit and fidelity is discussed. PMID:20478425

  8. Protein Conformational Gating of Enzymatic Activity in Xanthine Oxidoreductase

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikita, Hiroshi; Eger, Bryan T.; Okamoto, Ken; Nishino, Takeshi; Pai, Emil F.

    2012-05-24

    In mammals, xanthine oxidoreductase can exist as xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) and xanthine oxidase (XO). The two enzymes possess common redox active cofactors, which form an electron transfer (ET) pathway terminated by a flavin cofactor. In spite of identical protein primary structures, the redox potential difference between XDH and XO for the flavin semiquinone/hydroquinone pair (E{sub sq/hq}) is {approx}170 mV, a striking difference. The former greatly prefers NAD{sup +} as ultimate substrate for ET from the iron-sulfur cluster FeS-II via flavin while the latter only accepts dioxygen. In XDH (without NAD{sup +}), however, the redox potential of the electron donor FeS-II is 180 mV higher than that for the acceptor flavin, yielding an energetically uphill ET. On the basis of new 1.65, 2.3, 1.9, and 2.2 {angstrom} resolution crystal structures for XDH, XO, the NAD{sup +}- and NADH-complexed XDH, E{sub sq/hq} were calculated to better understand how the enzyme activates an ET from FeS-II to flavin. The majority of the E{sub sq/hq} difference between XDH and XO originates from a conformational change in the loop at positions 423-433 near the flavin binding site, causing the differences in stability of the semiquinone state. There was no large conformational change observed in response to NAD{sup +} binding at XDH. Instead, the positive charge of the NAD{sup +} ring, deprotonation of Asp429, and capping of the bulk surface of the flavin by the NAD{sup +} molecule all contribute to altering E{sub sq/hq} upon NAD{sup +} binding to XDH.

  9. Differential Active Site Loop Conformations Mediate Promiscuous Activities in the Lactonase SsoPox

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Mikael; Chabriere, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes are proficient catalysts that enable fast rates of Michaelis-complex formation, the chemical step and products release. These different steps may require different conformational states of the active site that have distinct binding properties. Moreover, the conformational flexibility of the active site mediates alternative, promiscuous functions. Here we focused on the lactonase SsoPox from Sulfolobus solfataricus. SsoPox is a native lactonase endowed with promiscuous phosphotriesterase activity. We identified a position in the active site loop (W263) that governs its flexibility, and thereby affects the substrate specificity of the enzyme. We isolated two different sets of substitutions at position 263 that induce two distinct conformational sampling of the active loop and characterized the structural and kinetic effects of these substitutions. These sets of mutations selectively and distinctly mediate the improvement of the promiscuous phosphotriesterase and oxo-lactonase activities of SsoPox by increasing active-site loop flexibility. These observations corroborate the idea that conformational diversity governs enzymatic promiscuity and is a key feature of protein evolvability. PMID:24086491

  10. 12 CFR 225.129 - Activities closely related to banking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Activities closely related to banking. 225.129 Section 225.129 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL... Holding Companies Interpretations § 225.129 Activities closely related to banking. Courier activities....

  11. Structural Insights into NEDD8 Activation of Cullin-RING Ligases: Conformational Control of Conjugation

    SciTech Connect

    Duda,D.; Borg, L.; Scott, D.; Hunt, H.; Hammel, M.; Schulman, B.

    2008-01-01

    Cullin-RING ligases (CRLs) comprise the largest ubiquitin E3 subclass, in which a central cullin subunit links a substrate-binding adaptor with an E2-binding RING. Covalent attachment of the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8 to a conserved C-terminal domain (ctd) lysine stimulates CRL ubiquitination activity and prevents binding of the inhibitor CAND1. Here we report striking conformational rearrangements in the crystal structure of NEDD8{approx}Cul5ctd-Rbx1 and SAXS analysis of NEDD8{approx}Cul1ctd-Rbx1 relative to their unmodified counterparts. In NEDD8ylated CRL structures, the cullin WHB and Rbx1 RING subdomains are dramatically reoriented, eliminating a CAND1-binding site and imparting multiple potential catalytic geometries to an associated E2. Biochemical analyses indicate that the structural malleability is important for both CRL NEDD8ylation and subsequent ubiquitination activities. Thus, our results point to a conformational control of CRL activity, with ligation of NEDD8 shifting equilibria to disfavor inactive CAND1-bound closed architectures, and favor dynamic, open forms that promote polyubiquitination.

  12. Propagation of conformational changes during μ-opioid receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Sounier, Rémy; Mas, Camille; Steyaert, Jan; Laeremans, Toon; Manglik, Aashish; Huang, Weijiao; Kobilka, Brian; Déméné, Héléne; Granier, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    μ-Opioid receptors (μOR) are G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are activated by a structurally diverse spectrum of natural and synthetic agonists including endogenous endorphin peptides, morphine and methadone. The recent structures of the μOR in inactive1 and agonist-induced active states (companion article) provide snapshots of the receptor at the beginning and end of a signaling event, but little is known about the dynamic sequence of events that span these two states. Here we report the use of solution-state NMR to examine the process of μOR activation. We obtained spectra of the μOR in the absence of ligand, and in the presence of the high-affinity agonist BU72 alone, or with BU72 and a G protein mimetic nanobody. Our results show that conformational changes in transmembrane segments (TM) 5 and 6, which are required for the full engagement of a G protein, are almost completely dependent on the presence of both the agonist and the G protein mimetic nanobody revealing a weak allosteric coupling between the agonist binding pocket and the G protein coupling interface (TM5 and TM6) similar to what has been observed for the β2-adrenergic receptor2. Unexpectedly, in the presence of agonist alone, we observe larger spectral changes involving intracellular loop 1 (ICL1) and helix 8 (H8), when compared to changes in TM5 and TM6. These results suggest that one or both of these domains may play a role in the initial interaction with the G protein, and that TM5 and TM6 are only engaged later in the process of complex formation. The initial interactions between the G protein and ICL1 and/or H8 may play a role in G protein coupling specificity as has been suggested for other family A GPCRs. PMID:26245377

  13. Single-molecule spectroscopy reveals how calmodulin activates NO synthase by controlling its conformational fluctuation dynamics

    PubMed Central

    He, Yufan; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Stuehr, Dennis J.; Lu, H. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms that regulate the nitric oxide synthase enzymes (NOS) are of interest in biology and medicine. Although NOS catalysis relies on domain motions, and is activated by calmodulin binding, the relationships are unclear. We used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy to elucidate the conformational states distribution and associated conformational fluctuation dynamics of the two electron transfer domains in a FRET dye-labeled neuronal NOS reductase domain, and to understand how calmodulin affects the dynamics to regulate catalysis. We found that calmodulin alters NOS conformational behaviors in several ways: It changes the distance distribution between the NOS domains, shortens the lifetimes of the individual conformational states, and instills conformational discipline by greatly narrowing the distributions of the conformational states and fluctuation rates. This information was specifically obtainable only by single-molecule spectroscopic measurements, and reveals how calmodulin promotes catalysis by shaping the physical and temporal conformational behaviors of NOS. PMID:26311846

  14. Single-molecule spectroscopy reveals how calmodulin activates NO synthase by controlling its conformational fluctuation dynamics.

    PubMed

    He, Yufan; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Stuehr, Dennis J; Lu, H Peter

    2015-09-22

    Mechanisms that regulate the nitric oxide synthase enzymes (NOS) are of interest in biology and medicine. Although NOS catalysis relies on domain motions, and is activated by calmodulin binding, the relationships are unclear. We used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy to elucidate the conformational states distribution and associated conformational fluctuation dynamics of the two electron transfer domains in a FRET dye-labeled neuronal NOS reductase domain, and to understand how calmodulin affects the dynamics to regulate catalysis. We found that calmodulin alters NOS conformational behaviors in several ways: It changes the distance distribution between the NOS domains, shortens the lifetimes of the individual conformational states, and instills conformational discipline by greatly narrowing the distributions of the conformational states and fluctuation rates. This information was specifically obtainable only by single-molecule spectroscopic measurements, and reveals how calmodulin promotes catalysis by shaping the physical and temporal conformational behaviors of NOS. PMID:26311846

  15. 12 CFR 225.123 - Activities closely related to banking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Activities closely related to banking. 225.123 Section 225.123 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL... Holding Companies Interpretations § 225.123 Activities closely related to banking. (a) Effective June...

  16. 12 CFR 225.131 - Activities closely related to banking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Activities closely related to banking. 225.131 Section 225.131 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL... Holding Companies Interpretations § 225.131 Activities closely related to banking. (a) Bank...

  17. The closed conformation of the LDL receptor is destabilized by the low Ca(++) concentration but favored by the high Mg(++) concentration in the endosome.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Oliván, Juan; Arias-Moreno, Xabier; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramón; Carrodeguas, José Alberto; Miguel-Romero, Laura; Marina, Alberto; Bruscolini, Pierpaolo; Sancho, Javier

    2015-11-30

    The LDL receptor (LDLR) internalizes LDL and VLDL particles. In the endosomes, it adopts a closed conformation important for recycling, by interaction of two modules of the ligand binding domain (LR4-5) and a β-propeller motif. Here, we investigate by SPR the interactions between those two modules and the β-propeller. Our results indicate that the two modules cooperate to bind the β-propeller. The binding is favored by low pH and by high [Ca(++)]. Our data show that Mg(++), at high concentration in the endosome, favors the formation of the closed conformation by replacing the structuring effect of Ca(++) in LR5. We propose a sequential model of LDL release where formation of the close conformation follows LDL release. PMID:26526611

  18. Ligand Docking to Intermediate and Close-To-Bound Conformers Generated by an Elastic Network Model Based Algorithm for Highly Flexible Proteins.

    PubMed

    Kurkcuoglu, Zeynep; Doruker, Pemra

    2016-01-01

    Incorporating receptor flexibility in small ligand-protein docking still poses a challenge for proteins undergoing large conformational changes. In the absence of bound structures, sampling conformers that are accessible by apo state may facilitate docking and drug design studies. For this aim, we developed an unbiased conformational search algorithm, by integrating global modes from elastic network model, clustering and energy minimization with implicit solvation. Our dataset consists of five diverse proteins with apo to complex RMSDs 4.7-15 Å. Applying this iterative algorithm on apo structures, conformers close to the bound-state (RMSD 1.4-3.8 Å), as well as the intermediate states were generated. Dockings to a sequence of conformers consisting of a closed structure and its "parents" up to the apo were performed to compare binding poses on different states of the receptor. For two periplasmic binding proteins and biotin carboxylase that exhibit hinge-type closure of two dynamics domains, the best pose was obtained for the conformer closest to the bound structure (ligand RMSDs 1.5-2 Å). In contrast, the best pose for adenylate kinase corresponded to an intermediate state with partially closed LID domain and open NMP domain, in line with recent studies (ligand RMSD 2.9 Å). The docking of a helical peptide to calmodulin was the most challenging case due to the complexity of its 15 Å transition, for which a two-stage procedure was necessary. The technique was first applied on the extended calmodulin to generate intermediate conformers; then peptide docking and a second generation stage on the complex were performed, which in turn yielded a final peptide RMSD of 2.9 Å. Our algorithm is effective in producing conformational states based on the apo state. This study underlines the importance of such intermediate states for ligand docking to proteins undergoing large transitions. PMID:27348230

  19. Ligand Docking to Intermediate and Close-To-Bound Conformers Generated by an Elastic Network Model Based Algorithm for Highly Flexible Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kurkcuoglu, Zeynep; Doruker, Pemra

    2016-01-01

    Incorporating receptor flexibility in small ligand-protein docking still poses a challenge for proteins undergoing large conformational changes. In the absence of bound structures, sampling conformers that are accessible by apo state may facilitate docking and drug design studies. For this aim, we developed an unbiased conformational search algorithm, by integrating global modes from elastic network model, clustering and energy minimization with implicit solvation. Our dataset consists of five diverse proteins with apo to complex RMSDs 4.7–15 Å. Applying this iterative algorithm on apo structures, conformers close to the bound-state (RMSD 1.4–3.8 Å), as well as the intermediate states were generated. Dockings to a sequence of conformers consisting of a closed structure and its “parents” up to the apo were performed to compare binding poses on different states of the receptor. For two periplasmic binding proteins and biotin carboxylase that exhibit hinge-type closure of two dynamics domains, the best pose was obtained for the conformer closest to the bound structure (ligand RMSDs 1.5–2 Å). In contrast, the best pose for adenylate kinase corresponded to an intermediate state with partially closed LID domain and open NMP domain, in line with recent studies (ligand RMSD 2.9 Å). The docking of a helical peptide to calmodulin was the most challenging case due to the complexity of its 15 Å transition, for which a two-stage procedure was necessary. The technique was first applied on the extended calmodulin to generate intermediate conformers; then peptide docking and a second generation stage on the complex were performed, which in turn yielded a final peptide RMSD of 2.9 Å. Our algorithm is effective in producing conformational states based on the apo state. This study underlines the importance of such intermediate states for ligand docking to proteins undergoing large transitions. PMID:27348230

  20. Total Synthesis and Selective Activity of a NewClass of Conformationally Restrained Epothilones

    PubMed Central

    Alhamadsheh, Mamoun M.; Gupta, Shuchi; Hudson, Richard A.; Perera, Lalith

    2009-01-01

    Stereoselective total syntheses of two novel conformationally restrained epothilone analogues are described. Evans asymmetric alkylation, Brown allylation, and a diastereoselective aldol reaction served as the key steps in the stereoselective synthesis of one of the two key fragments of the convergent synthetic approach.Enzyme resolution was employed to obtain the second fragment as a single enantiomer. The molecules were assembled by esterification, followed by ring-closing metathesis. In preliminary cytotoxicity studies, one of the analogues showed strong and selective growth inhibitory activity against two leukemia cell lines over solid human tumor cell lines. The precise biological mechanism of action and high degree of selectivity of this analogue remain to be examined. PMID:17955508

  1. Conformation of the C1 phorbol-ester-binding domain participates in the activating conformational change of protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Ho, C; Slater, S J; Stagliano, B A; Stubbs, C D

    1999-01-01

    The fluorescent phorbol ester 12-N-methylanthraniloylphorbol 13-acetate [sapintoxin D (SAPD)] was used as both the activator and the probe for the activating conformational change of the C1 domain of recombinant protein kinase C (PKC)alpha. Fluorescence emission spectra and steady-state anisotropy measurements of SAPD in fully active membrane-associated PKC show that there is a relatively hydrophobic environment and restricted motional freedom characterizing the phorbol-ester-binding site. SAPD also interacts with the membrane lipids so that it was necessary to resort to time-resolved anisotropy measurements to resolve the signals corresponding to PKC-bound SAPD from that associated with buffer and lipid. In the presence of membrane lipids (unilamellar vesicles of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine, 4:1 molar ratio) and Ca(2+), at a concentration sufficient to activate the enzyme fully, a long correlation time characteristic of highly restricted motion was observed for PKC-associated SAPD. The fraction of SAPD molecules displaying this restricted motion, in comparison with the total SAPD including that in lipids and in buffer, increased with increasing concentrations of Ca(2+) and paralleled the appearance of enzyme activity, whereas the rotational correlation time remained constant. This could be rationalized as an increase in the number of active PKC conformers in the total population of PKC molecules. It therefore seems that there is a distinct conformation of the C1 activator-binding domain associated with the active form of PKC. The addition of SAPD and dioleoyl-sn-glycerol together produced an activity higher than that achievable by either activator alone both at concentrations that alone induced maximal activity for the respective activator; this higher activity was associated with a further restriction in SAPD motion. Increasing the cholesterol concentration, the phosphatidylethanolamine concentration, the sn-2 unsaturation in phosphatidylcholine

  2. Open and closed states of Candida antarctica lipase B: protonation and the mechanism of interfacial activation1

    PubMed Central

    Stauch, Benjamin; Fisher, Stuart J.; Cianci, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Lipases (EC 3.1.1.3) are ubiquitous hydrolases for the carboxyl ester bond of water-insoluble substrates, such as triacylglycerols, phospholipids, and other insoluble substrates, acting in aqueous as well as in low-water media, thus being of considerable physiological significance with high interest also for their industrial applications. The hydrolysis reaction follows a two-step mechanism, or “interfacial activation,” with adsorption of the enzyme to a heterogeneous interface and subsequent enhancement of the lipolytic activity. Among lipases, Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) has never shown any significant interfacial activation, and a closed conformation of CALB has never been reported, leading to the conclusion that its behavior was due to the absence of a lid regulating the access to the active site. The lid open and closed conformations and their protonation states are observed in the crystal structure of CALB at 0.91 Å resolution. Having the open and closed states at atomic resolution allows relating protonation to the conformation, indicating the role of Asp145 and Lys290 in the conformation alteration. The findings explain the lack of interfacial activation of CALB and offer new elements to elucidate this mechanism, with the consequent implications for the catalytic properties and classification of lipases. PMID:26447231

  3. Structure of the monomeric outer-membrane porin OmpG in the open and closed conformation

    PubMed Central

    Yildiz, Özkan; Vinothkumar, Kutti R; Goswami, Panchali; Kühlbrandt, Werner

    2006-01-01

    OmpG, a monomeric pore-forming protein from Escherichia coli outer membranes, was refolded from inclusion bodies and crystallized in two different conformations. The OmpG channel is a 14-stranded β-barrel, with short periplasmic turns and seven extracellular loops. Crystals grown at neutral pH show the channel in the open state at 2.3 Å resolution. In the 2.7 Å structure of crystals grown at pH 5.6, the pore is blocked by loop 6, which folds across the channel. The rearrangement of loop 6 appears to be triggered by a pair of histidine residues, which repel one another at acidic pH, resulting in the breakage of neighbouring H-bonds and a lengthening of loop 6 from 10 to 17 residues. A total of 151 ordered LDAO detergent molecules were found in the 2.3 Å structure, mostly on the hydrophobic outer surface of OmpG, mimicking the outer membrane lipid bilayer, with three LDAO molecules in the open pore. In the 2.7 Å structure, OmpG binds one OG and one glucose molecule as sugar substrates in the closed pore. PMID:16888630

  4. The Importance of Odorant Conformation to the Binding and Activation of a Representative Olfactory Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Peterlin, Zita; Li, Yadi; Sun, Guangxing; Shah, Rohan; Firestein, Stuart; Ryan, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Olfactory receptors (ORs) form a large family of G-protein coupled receptor proteins (GPCRs) responsible for sensing the ambient chemical environment. The molecular recognition strategies used by ORs to detect and distinguish odorant molecules are unclear. Here, we investigated the variable of odorant carbon chain conformation for an established odorant-OR pair: n-octanal and rat OR-I7. A series of conformationally restricted octanal mimics were tested on live olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). Our results support a model in which unactivated OR-I7 binds aliphatic aldehydes indiscriminately, and then applies conformational and length filters to distinguish agonists from antagonists. Specific conformers are proposed to activate OR-I7 by steric buttressing of an OR activation pocket. Probing endogenously expressed rat OSNs with octanal and constrained mimics furnished evidence that odorant conformation contributes to an odorant’s unique olfactory code signature. PMID:19101476

  5. Effects of protonation state of Asp181 and position of active site water molecules on the conformation of PTP1B.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Ahmet; Olmez, Elif Ozkirimli; Alakent, Burak

    2013-05-01

    In protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), the flexible WPD loop adopts a closed conformation (WPDclosed ) in the active state of PTP1B, bringing the catalytic Asp181 close to the active site pocket, while WPD loop is in an open conformation (WPDopen ) in the inactive state. Previous studies showed that Asp181 may be protonated at physiological pH, and ordered water molecules exist in the active site. In the current study, molecular dynamics simulations are employed at different Asp181 protonation states and initial positions of active site water molecules, and compared with the existing crystallographic data of PTP1B. In WPDclosed conformation, the active site is found to maintain its conformation only in the protonated state of Asp181 in both free and liganded states, while Asp181 is likely to be deprotonated in WPDopen conformation. When the active site water molecule network that is a part of the free WPDclosed crystal structure is disrupted, intermediate WPD loop conformations, similar to that in the PTPRR crystal structure, are sampled in the MD simulations. In liganded PTP1B, one active site water molecule is found to be important for facilitating the orientation of Cys215 and the phosphate ion, thus may play a role in the reaction. In conclusion, conformational stability of WPD loop, and possibly catalytic activity of PTP1B, is significantly affected by the protonation state of Asp181 and position of active site water molecules, showing that these aspects should be taken into consideration both in MD simulations and inhibitor design. PMID:23239271

  6. The Redox State Regulates the Conformation of Rv2466c to Activate the Antitubercular Prodrug TP053.

    PubMed

    Albesa-Jové, David; Comino, Natalia; Tersa, Montse; Mohorko, Elisabeth; Urresti, Saioa; Dainese, Elisa; Chiarelli, Laurent R; Pasca, Maria Rosalia; Manganelli, Riccardo; Makarov, Vadim; Riccardi, Giovanna; Svergun, Dmitri I; Glockshuber, Rudi; Guerin, Marcelo E

    2015-12-25

    Rv2466c is a key oxidoreductase that mediates the reductive activation of TP053, a thienopyrimidine derivative that kills replicating and non-replicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but whose mode of action remains enigmatic. Rv2466c is a homodimer in which each subunit displays a modular architecture comprising a canonical thioredoxin-fold with a Cys(19)-Pro(20)-Trp(21)-Cys(22) motif, and an insertion consisting of a four α-helical bundle and a short α-helical hairpin. Strong evidence is provided for dramatic conformational changes during the Rv2466c redox cycle, which are essential for TP053 activity. Strikingly, a new crystal structure of the reduced form of Rv2466c revealed the binding of a C-terminal extension in α-helical conformation to a pocket next to the active site cysteine pair at the interface between the thioredoxin domain and the helical insertion domain. The ab initio low-resolution envelopes obtained from small angle x-ray scattering showed that the fully reduced form of Rv2466c adopts a "closed" compact conformation in solution, similar to that observed in the crystal structure. In contrast, the oxidized form of Rv2466c displays an "open" conformation, where tertiary structural changes in the α-helical subdomain suffice to account for the observed conformational transitions. Altogether our structural, biochemical, and biophysical data strongly support a model in which the formation of the catalytic disulfide bond upon TP053 reduction triggers local structural changes that open the substrate binding site of Rv2466c allowing the release of the activated, reduced form of TP053. Our studies suggest that similar structural changes might have a functional role in other members of the thioredoxin-fold superfamily. PMID:26546681

  7. Substrate conformational transitions in the active site of chorismate mutase: Their role in the catalytic mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hong; Cui, Qiang; Lipscomb, William N.; Karplus, Martin

    2001-01-01

    Chorismate mutase acts at the first branch-point of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis and catalyzes the conversion of chorismate to prephenate. The results of molecular dynamics simulations of the substrate in solution and in the active site of chorismate mutase are reported. Two nonreactive conformers of chorismate are found to be more stable than the reactive pseudodiaxial chair conformer in solution. It is shown by QM/MM molecular dynamics simulations, which take into account the motions of the enzyme, that when these inactive conformers are bound to the active site, they are rapidly converted to the reactive chair conformer. This result suggests that one contribution of the enzyme is to bind the more prevalent nonreactive conformers and transform them into the active form in a step before the chemical reaction. The motion of the reactive chair conformer in the active site calculated by using the QM/MM potential generates transient structures that are closer to the transition state than is the stable CHAIR conformer. PMID:11481470

  8. Engineering a hyper-catalytic enzyme by photo-activated conformation modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Pratul K

    2012-01-01

    Enzyme engineering for improved catalysis has wide implications. We describe a novel chemical modification of Candida antarctica lipase B that allows modulation of the enzyme conformation to promote catalysis. Computational modeling was used to identify dynamical enzyme regions that impact the catalytic mechanism. Surface loop regions located distal to active site but showing dynamical coupling to the reaction were connected by a chemical bridge between Lys136 and Pro192, containing a derivative of azobenzene. The conformational modulation of the enzyme was achieved using two sources of light that alternated the azobenzene moiety in cis and trans conformations. Computational model predicted that mechanical energy from the conformational fluctuations facilitate the reaction in the active-site. The results were consistent with predictions as the activity of the engineered enzyme was found to be enhanced with photoactivation. Preliminary estimations indicate that the engineered enzyme achieved 8-52 fold better catalytic activity than the unmodulated enzyme.

  9. Structure of a mitochondrial cytochrome c conformer competent for peroxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, Levi J.; Mou, Tung-Chung; Jeakins-Cooley, Margaret E.; Sprang, Stephen R.; Bowler, Bruce E.

    2014-01-01

    At the onset of apoptosis, the peroxidation of cardiolipin at the inner mitochondrial membrane by cytochrome c requires an open coordination site on the heme. We report a 1.45-Å resolution structure of yeast iso-1-cytochrome c with the Met80 heme ligand swung out of the heme crevice and replaced by a water molecule. This conformational change requires modest adjustments to the main chain of the heme crevice loop and is facilitated by a trimethyllysine 72-to-alanine mutation. This mutation also enhances the peroxidase activity of iso-1-cytochrome c. The structure shows a buried water channel capable of facilitating peroxide access to the active site and of moving protons produced during peroxidase activity to the protein surface. Alternate positions of the side chain of Arg38 appear to mediate opening and closing of the buried water channel. In addition, two buried water molecules can adopt alternate positions that change the network of hydrogen bonds in the buried water channel. Taken together, these observations suggest that low and high proton conductivity states may mediate peroxidase function. Comparison of yeast and mammalian cytochrome c sequences, in the context of the steric factors that permit opening of the heme crevice, suggests that higher organisms have evolved to inhibit peroxidase activity, providing a more stringent barrier to the onset of apoptosis. PMID:24760830

  10. Solution conformations of nucleoside analogues exhibiting antiviral activity against human immunodeficiency virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkstra, Sandra; Benevides, James M.; Thomas, George J.

    1991-01-01

    The molecular-conformational basis for HIV-1 antiviral activity of dideoxynucleoside analogues is unknown. A recent proposal by van Roey [1] that furanose sugar puckering in the C2' -endo family (namely C3' -exo) may account for the enhanced anti-HIV-1 activity of azidothymidine (AZT), dideoxythymidine (ddT) and dideoxycytidine (ddC) has been tested by conformational analysis of these and related agents, using laser Raman spectroscopy of their solutions and crystal structures. The results show that nucleoside analogues exhibiting anti-HIV-1 activity, including AZT, ddT and ddC, exist in solution with C3' -endo as the predominating sugar pucker. The C3' -endo solution conformations differ fundamentally from the C3' -exo conformations observed in the corresponding crystal structures. Accordingly, the crystal conformation cannot be responsible for enhanced recognition of these agents, either by nucleoside kinase or reverse transcriptase, as a mechanism to explain antiviral activity. The present findings suggest that C3' -endo sugear pucker, rather than C3' -exo pucker, or other puckers of the C2' -endo family, is more probably the required conformation for antivaral activity. The present work also shows that nucleoside phosphorylation does not, in general, change the preferred solution conformation of a nucleoside. Therefore, C3' -endo sugar pucker is likely to be the preferred conformation for both nucleoside kinase and reverse transcriptase recognition. In this study, the list of thymidine nucleoside conformation markers available from Raman spectra is extended and additional group frequency assignments for C3' -azido, C3' -deoxy and related nucleoside derivatives are provided.

  11. An allolactose trapped at the lacZ β-galactosidase active site with its galactosyl moiety in a (4)H3 conformation provides insights into the formation, conformation, and stabilization of the transition state.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Robert W; Huber, Reuben E

    2015-12-01

    When lactose was incubated with G794A-β-galactosidase (a variant with a "closed" active site loop that binds transition state analogs well) an allolactose was trapped with its Gal moiety in a (4)H3 conformation, similar to the oxocarbenium ion-like conformation expected of the transition state. The numerous interactions formed between the (4)H3 structure and β-galactosidase indicate that this structure is representative of the transition state. This conformation is also very similar to that of d-galactono-1,5-lactone, a good transition state analog. Evidence indicates that substrates take up the (4)H3 conformation during migration from the shallow to the deep mode. Steric forces utilizing His418 and other residues are important for positioning the O1 leaving group into a quasi-axial position. An electrostatic interaction between the O5 of the distorted Gal and Tyr503 as well as C-H-π bonds with Trp568 are also significant. Computational studies of the energy of sugar ring distortion show that the β-galactosidase reaction itinerary is driven by energetic considerations in utilization of a (4)H3 transition state with a novel (4)C1-(4)H3-(4)C1 conformation itinerary. To our knowledge, this is the first X-ray crystallographic structural demonstration that the transition state of a natural substrate of a glycosidase has a (4)H3 conformation. PMID:26291713

  12. 12 CFR 225.131 - Activities closely related to banking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... list of closely related activities, described in general terms the nature of such activity. This... of this chapter). (d) Although a bank holding company providing management consulting advice is... shares of a client bank acquired by a bank holding company, directly or indirectly, in a...

  13. 12 CFR 225.131 - Activities closely related to banking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... advice to the list of closely related activities, described in general terms the nature of such activity... of this chapter). (d) Although a bank holding company providing management consulting advice is... shares of a client bank acquired by a bank holding company, directly or indirectly, in a...

  14. 12 CFR 225.131 - Activities closely related to banking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... advice to the list of closely related activities, described in general terms the nature of such activity... of this chapter). (d) Although a bank holding company providing management consulting advice is... shares of a client bank acquired by a bank holding company, directly or indirectly, in a...

  15. 12 CFR 225.131 - Activities closely related to banking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... list of closely related activities, described in general terms the nature of such activity. This... of this chapter). (d) Although a bank holding company providing management consulting advice is... shares of a client bank acquired by a bank holding company, directly or indirectly, in a...

  16. Photocatalytically Active Oligomeric Graphitic Carbon Nitride: Conformational Flexibility, Electronic Levels, Carrier Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Volker; Lau, Vincent; Botari, Tiago; Huhn, William; Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-03-01

    Polymers consisting of bridged heptazine units (often called ``graphitic carbon nitride'' or ``g-C3N4'') show considerable promise as photocatalysts for solar hydrogen evolution. Recent experimental evidence suggests that oligomeric rather than fully polymerized ``g-C3N4'' exhibits increased intrinsic photocatalytic activity. Using density-functional theory (DFT; van der Waals corrected PBE functional for conformers, hybrid DFT and GW for electronic levels), we show that considerable conformational flexibility exists for the heptazine trimers and tetramers. Analysis of HOMO and LUMO locations as well as trends in photocatalytic activity among heptazine oligomers and polymers reveals the NH2 groups of the oligomers as potential charge-transfer sites. We show that conformational variations of the oligomers can lead to significant, electrostatically motivated carrier localization effects. We suggest that NH2 side groups and the intrinsic conformational variations of the oligomeric species lead to the observed enhanced catalytic activity.

  17. Active site conformational changes of prostasin provide a new mechanism of protease regulation by divalent cations

    SciTech Connect

    Spraggon, Glen; Hornsby, Michael; Shipway, Aaron; Tully, David C.; Bursulaya, Badry; Danahay, Henry; Harris, Jennifer L.; Lesley, Scott A.

    2010-01-12

    Prostasin or human channel-activating protease 1 has been reported to play a critical role in the regulation of extracellular sodium ion transport via its activation of the epithelial cell sodium channel. Here, the structure of the extracellular portion of the membrane associated serine protease has been solved to high resolution in complex with a nonselective d-FFR chloromethyl ketone inhibitor, in an apo form, in a form where the apo crystal has been soaked with the covalent inhibitor camostat and in complex with the protein inhibitor aprotinin. It was also crystallized in the presence of the divalent cation Ca{sup +2}. Comparison of the structures with each other and with other members of the trypsin-like serine protease family reveals unique structural features of prostasin and a large degree of conformational variation within specificity determining loops. Of particular interest is the S1 subsite loop which opens and closes in response to basic residues or divalent ions, directly binding Ca{sup +2} cations. This induced fit active site provides a new possible mode of regulation of trypsin-like proteases adapted in particular to extracellular regions with variable ionic concentrations such as the outer membrane layer of the epithelial cell.

  18. Closed-loop and activity-guided optogenetic control.

    PubMed

    Grosenick, Logan; Marshel, James H; Deisseroth, Karl

    2015-04-01

    Advances in optical manipulation and observation of neural activity have set the stage for widespread implementation of closed-loop and activity-guided optical control of neural circuit dynamics. Closing the loop optogenetically (i.e., basing optogenetic stimulation on simultaneously observed dynamics in a principled way) is a powerful strategy for causal investigation of neural circuitry. In particular, observing and feeding back the effects of circuit interventions on physiologically relevant timescales is valuable for directly testing whether inferred models of dynamics, connectivity, and causation are accurate in vivo. Here we highlight technical and theoretical foundations as well as recent advances and opportunities in this area, and we review in detail the known caveats and limitations of optogenetic experimentation in the context of addressing these challenges with closed-loop optogenetic control in behaving animals. PMID:25856490

  19. Closed-Loop and Activity-Guided Optogenetic Control

    PubMed Central

    Grosenick, Logan; Marshel, James H.; Deisseroth, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Advances in optical manipulation and observation of neural activity have set the stage for widespread implementation of closed-loop and activity-guided optical control of neural circuit dynamics. Closing the loop optogenetically (i.e., basing optogenetic stimulation on simultaneously observed dynamics in a principled way) is a powerful strategy for causal investigation of neural circuitry. In particular, observing and feeding back the effects of circuit interventions on physiologically relevant timescales is valuable for directly testing whether inferred models of dynamics, connectivity, and causation are accurate in vivo. Here we highlight technical and theoretical foundations as well as recent advances and opportunities in this area, and we review in detail the known caveats and limitations of optogenetic experimentation in the context of addressing these challenges with closed-loop optogenetic control in behaving animals. PMID:25856490

  20. The ion-induced folding of the hammerhead ribozyme: core sequence changes that perturb folding into the active conformation.

    PubMed Central

    Bassi, G S; Murchie, A I; Lilley, D M

    1996-01-01

    The hammerhead ribozyme undergoes an ion-dependent folding process into the active conformation. We find that the folding can be blocked at specific stages by changes of sequence or functionality within the core. In the the absence of added metal ions, the global structure of the hammerhead is extended, with a large angle subtended between stems I and II. No core sequence changes appear to alter this geometry, consistent with an unstructured core under these conditions. Upon addition of low concentrations of magnesium ions, the hammerhead folds by an association of stems II and III, to include a large angle between them. This stage is inhibited or altered by mutations within the oligopurine sequence lying between stems II and III, and folding is completely prevented by an A14G mutation. Further increase in magnesium ion concentration brings about a second stage of folding in the natural sequence hammerhead, involving a reorientation of stem I, which rotates around into the same direction of stem II. Because this transition occurs over the same range of magnesium ion concentration over which the hammerhead ribozyme becomes active, it is likely that the final conformation is most closely related to the active form of the structure. Magnesium ion-dependent folding into this conformation is prevented by changes at G5, notably removal of the 2'-hydroxyl group and replacement of the base by cytidine. The ability to dissect the folding process by means of sequence changes suggests that two separate ion-dependent stages are involved in the folding of the hammerhead ribozyme into the active conformation. PMID:8752086

  1. 12 CFR 225.129 - Activities closely related to banking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... activities. The Board's amendment of § 225.4(a), which adds courier services to the list of closely related... insignificant degree any possibility of unfair competition: a. A holding company courier subsidiary established... not be subsidized by the holding company system. c. Services performed should be explicitly...

  2. 12 CFR 225.129 - Activities closely related to banking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Board's amendment of § 225.4(a), which adds courier services to the list of closely related activities... insignificant degree any possibility of unfair competition: a. A holding company courier subsidiary established... not be subsidized by the holding company system. c. Services performed should be explicitly...

  3. 12 CFR 225.129 - Activities closely related to banking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... activities. The Board's amendment of § 225.4(a), which adds courier services to the list of closely related... insignificant degree any possibility of unfair competition: a. A holding company courier subsidiary established... not be subsidized by the holding company system. c. Services performed should be explicitly...

  4. 12 CFR 225.129 - Activities closely related to banking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Board's amendment of § 225.4(a), which adds courier services to the list of closely related activities... insignificant degree any possibility of unfair competition: a. A holding company courier subsidiary established... not be subsidized by the holding company system. c. Services performed should be explicitly...

  5. Summary of Closed Circuit Television Activities in Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    London Univ. (England). Inst. of Education.

    This 1967 summary of closed circuit television (CCTV) activities in medical education presents descriptive information on 35 different medical institutions in Great Britain. Specific data on CCTV are offered by institution, equipment, and uses under each medical field: anatomy, anaesthetics, geriatrics, medicine, obstretrics and gynaecology,…

  6. 12 CFR 225.123 - Activities closely related to banking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... other financial statements of the bank holding company should not be provided unless specifically... Financial Holding Companies Interpretations § 225.123 Activities closely related to banking. (a) Effective... services for banking, financial and economic data for installation on the premises of the customer,...

  7. Autophosphorylation Activity of a Soluble Hexameric Histidine Kinase Correlates with the Shift in Protein Conformational Equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Wojnowska, Marta; Yan, Jun; Sivalingam, Ganesh N.; Cryar, Adam; Gor, Jayesh; Thalassinos, Konstantinos; Djordjevic, Snezana

    2013-01-01

    Summary In a commonly accepted model, in response to stimuli, bacterial histidine kinases undergo a conformational transition between an active and inactive form. Structural information on histidine kinases is limited. By using ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS), we demonstrate an exchange between two conformational populations of histidine kinase ExsG that are linked to different levels of kinase activity. ExsG is an atypical signaling protein that incorporates an uncommon histidine kinase catalytic core at the C terminus preceded by an N-terminal “receiver domain” that is normally associated with the response regulator proteins in two-component signal transduction systems. IM-MS analysis and enzymatic assays indicate that phosphorylation of the ExsG receiver domain stabilizes the “compact” form of the protein and inhibits kinase core activity; in contrast, nucleotide binding required for kinase activity is associated with the more open conformation of ExsG. PMID:24210218

  8. Evaluation of the effect of signalment and body conformation on activity monitoring in companion dogs

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Dorothy Cimino; Michel, Kathryn E.; Love, Molly; Dow, Caitlin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of signalment and body conformation on activity monitoring in companion dogs. Animals 104 companion dogs. Procedures While wearing an activity monitor, each dog was led through a series of standard activities: lying down, walking laps, trotting laps, and trotting up and down stairs. Linear regression analysis was used to determine which signalment and body conformation factors were associated with activity counts. Results There was no significant effect of signalment or body conformation on activity counts when dogs were lying down, walking laps, and trotting laps. However, when dogs were trotting up and down stairs, there was a significant effect of age and body weight such that, for every 1-kg increase in body weight, there was a 1.7% (95% confidence interval, 1.1% to 2.4%) decrease in activity counts and for every 1-year increase in age, there was a 4.2% (95% confidence interval, 1.4% to 6.9%) decrease in activity counts. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance When activity was well controlled, there was no significant effect of signalment or body conformation on activity counts recorded by the activity monitor. However, when activity was less controlled, older dogs and larger dogs had lower activity counts than younger and smaller dogs. The wide range in body conformation (eg, limb or body length) among dogs did not appear to significantly impact the activity counts recorded by the monitor, but age and body weight did and must be considered in analysis of data collected from the monitors. PMID:20187834

  9. Conformational flexibility and structural dynamics in GPCR-mediated G protein activation: a perspective

    PubMed Central

    Preininger, Anita M.; Meiler, Jens; Hamm, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    Structure and dynamics of G proteins and their cognate receptors, both alone and in complex, are becoming increasingly accessible to experimental techniques. Understanding the conformational changes and timelines which govern these changes can lead to new insights into the processes of ligand binding and associated G protein activation. Experimental systems may involve the use of, or otherwise stabilize, non-native environments. This can complicate our understanding of structural and dynamical features of processes such as the ionic lock, Tryptophan toggle, and G protein flexibility. While elements in the receptor’s transmembrane helices and the C-terminal α5 helix of Gα undergo well defined structural changes, regions subject to conformational flexibility may be important in fine-tuning the interactions between activated receptors and G proteins. The pairing of computational and experimental approaches will continue to provide powerful tools to probe the conformation and dynamics of receptor-mediated G protein activation. PMID:23602809

  10. Active Site Loop Conformation Regulates Promiscuous Activity in a Lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; An, Jiao; Yang, Guang-Yu; Bai, Aixi; Zheng, Baisong; Lou, Zhiyong; Wu, Geng; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng; Feng, Yan; Manco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL) from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP) exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a “hot spot” in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km) toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity. PMID:25706379

  11. Phenolic Lipids Affect the Activity and Conformation of Acetylcholinesterase from Electrophorus electricus (Electric eel)

    PubMed Central

    Stasiuk, Maria; Janiszewska, Alicja; Kozubek, Arkadiusz

    2014-01-01

    Phenolic lipids were isolated from rye grains, cashew nutshell liquid (CNSL) from Anacardium occidentale, and fruit bodies of Merrulius tremellosus, and their effects on the electric eel acetylcholinesterase activity and conformation were studied. The observed effect distinctly depended on the chemical structure of the phenolic lipids that were available for interaction with the enzyme. All of the tested compounds reduced the activity of acetylcholinesterase. The degree of inhibition varied, showing a correlation with changes in the conformation of the enzyme tested by the intrinsic fluorescence of the Trp residues of the protein. PMID:24787269

  12. Threshold occupancy and specific cation binding modes in the hammerhead ribozyme active site are required for active conformation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tai-Sung; Giambaşu, George M.; Sosa, Carlos P.; Martick, Monika; Scott, William G.; York, Darrin M.

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between formation of active in-line attack conformations and monovalent (Na+) and divalent (Mg2+) metal ion binding in the hammerhead ribozyme has been explored with molecular dynamics simulations. To stabilize repulsions between negatively charged groups, different requirements of threshold occupancy of metal ions were observed in the reactant and activated precursor states both in the presence or absence of a Mg2+ in the active site. Specific bridging coordination patterns of the ions are correlated with the formation of active in-line attack conformations and can be accommodated in both cases. Furthermore, simulation results suggest that the hammerhead ribozyme folds to form an electronegative recruiting pocket that attracts high local concentrations of positive charge. The present simulations help to reconcile experiments that probe the metal ion sensitivity of hammerhead ribozyme catalysis and support the supposition that Mg2+, in addition to stabilizing active conformations, plays a specific chemical role in catalysis. PMID:19265710

  13. Characterizing Active Site Conformational Heterogeneity along the Trajectory of an Enzymatic Phosphoryl Transfer Reaction.

    PubMed

    Zeymer, Cathleen; Werbeck, Nicolas D; Zimmermann, Sabine; Reinstein, Jochen; Hansen, D Flemming

    2016-09-12

    States along the phosphoryl transfer reaction catalyzed by the nucleoside monophosphate kinase UmpK were captured and changes in the conformational heterogeneity of conserved active site arginine side-chains were quantified by NMR spin-relaxation methods. In addition to apo and ligand-bound UmpK, a transition state analog (TSA) complex was utilized to evaluate the extent to which active site conformational entropy contributes to the transition state free energy. The catalytically essential arginine side-chain guanidino groups were found to be remarkably rigid in the TSA complex, indicating that the enzyme has evolved to restrict the conformational freedom along its reaction path over the energy landscape, which in turn allows the phosphoryl transfer to occur selectively by avoiding side reactions. PMID:27534930

  14. Activation of the A2A adenosine G-protein-coupled receptor by conformational selection.

    PubMed

    Ye, Libin; Van Eps, Ned; Zimmer, Marco; Ernst, Oliver P; Prosser, R Scott

    2016-05-12

    Conformational selection and induced fit are two prevailing mechanisms to explain the molecular basis for ligand-based activation of receptors. G-protein-coupled receptors are the largest class of cell surface receptors and are important drug targets. A molecular understanding of their activation mechanism is critical for drug discovery and design. However, direct evidence that addresses how agonist binding leads to the formation of an active receptor state is scarce. Here we use (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance to quantify the conformational landscape occupied by the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR), a prototypical class A G-protein-coupled receptor. We find an ensemble of four states in equilibrium: (1) two inactive states in millisecond exchange, consistent with a formed (state S1) and a broken (state S2) salt bridge (known as 'ionic lock') between transmembrane helices 3 and 6; and (2) two active states, S3 and S3', as identified by binding of a G-protein-derived peptide. In contrast to a recent study of the β2-adrenergic receptor, the present approach allowed identification of a second active state for A2AR. Addition of inverse agonist (ZM241385) increases the population of the inactive states, while full agonists (UK432097 or NECA) stabilize the active state, S3', in a manner consistent with conformational selection. In contrast, partial agonist (LUF5834) and an allosteric modulator (HMA) exclusively increase the population of the S3 state. Thus, partial agonism is achieved here by conformational selection of a distinct active state which we predict will have compromised coupling to the G protein. Direct observation of the conformational equilibria of ligand-dependent G-protein-coupled receptor and deduction of the underlying mechanisms of receptor activation will have wide-reaching implications for our understanding of the function of G-protein-coupled receptor in health and disease. PMID:27144352

  15. Puckering Energetics and Optical Activities of [7]Circulene Conformers.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Masashi

    2016-02-25

    The structural preference of [7]circulene is analyzed by taking into account vibronic interactions. DFT calculations reveal that pseudo-Jahn-Teller effects cause the D7h-symmetry structure to relax to C2- and Cs-symmetry structures, which are both ca. 9 kcal/mol lower in energy than the D7h structure. In energy terms, the C2-symmetry structure is 0.05 kcal/mol lower than that of the Cs-symmetry. The active vibrations are attributed to low-frequency puckering modes that are coupled with π-σ excitation states. The optical activities of the C2-symmetry structure were simulated by configuration interaction calculations, and the simulated CD/ORD spectra were reasonable and consistent with the experimental data. The optical rotatory strengths obeyed the helix rule; that is, the left-handed helix shows negative Cotton effects through the antisymmetric excited states. The calculated spectra will serve as a foundation for further investigation of optical activities of negatively curved structures. PMID:26829071

  16. The uncoupled ATPase activity of the ABC transporter BtuC2D2 leads to a hysteretic conformational change, conformational memory, and improved activity.

    PubMed

    Livnat-Levanon, Nurit; I Gilson, Amy; Ben-Tal, Nir; Lewinson, Oded

    2016-01-01

    ABC transporters comprise a large and ubiquitous family of proteins. From bacteria to man they translocate solutes at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. Unlike other enzymes that use ATP as an energy source, ABC transporters are notorious for having high levels of basal ATPase activity: they hydrolyze ATP also in the absence of their substrate. It is unknown what are the effects of such prolonged and constant activity on the stability and function of ABC transporters or any other enzyme. Here we report that prolonged ATP hydrolysis is beneficial to the ABC transporter BtuC2D2. Using ATPase assays, surface plasmon resonance interaction experiments, and transport assays we observe that the constantly active transporter remains stable and functional for much longer than the idle one. Remarkably, during extended activity the transporter undergoes a slow conformational change (hysteresis) and gradually attains a hyperactive state in which it is more active than it was to begin with. This phenomenon is different from stabilization of enzymes by ligand binding: the hyperactive state is only reached through ATP hydrolysis, and not ATP binding. BtuC2D2 displays a strong conformational memory for this excited state, and takes hours to return to its basal state after catalysis terminates. PMID:26905293

  17. The uncoupled ATPase activity of the ABC transporter BtuC2D2 leads to a hysteretic conformational change, conformational memory, and improved activity

    PubMed Central

    Livnat-Levanon, Nurit; I. Gilson, Amy; Ben-Tal, Nir; Lewinson, Oded

    2016-01-01

    ABC transporters comprise a large and ubiquitous family of proteins. From bacteria to man they translocate solutes at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. Unlike other enzymes that use ATP as an energy source, ABC transporters are notorious for having high levels of basal ATPase activity: they hydrolyze ATP also in the absence of their substrate. It is unknown what are the effects of such prolonged and constant activity on the stability and function of ABC transporters or any other enzyme. Here we report that prolonged ATP hydrolysis is beneficial to the ABC transporter BtuC2D2. Using ATPase assays, surface plasmon resonance interaction experiments, and transport assays we observe that the constantly active transporter remains stable and functional for much longer than the idle one. Remarkably, during extended activity the transporter undergoes a slow conformational change (hysteresis) and gradually attains a hyperactive state in which it is more active than it was to begin with. This phenomenon is different from stabilization of enzymes by ligand binding: the hyperactive state is only reached through ATP hydrolysis, and not ATP binding. BtuC2D2 displays a strong conformational memory for this excited state, and takes hours to return to its basal state after catalysis terminates. PMID:26905293

  18. A new autoinhibited kinase conformation reveals a salt-bridge switch in kinase activation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Qiang; Yang, Shaoyuan; Li, Dan; Zhang, Xiaoying; Zheng, Jimin; Jia, Zongchao

    2016-01-01

    In the structure of autoinhibited EphA2 tyrosine kinase reported herein, we have captured the entire activation segment, revealing a previously unknown role of the conserved Arg762 in kinase autoinhibition by interacting with the essential Mg2+-chelating Asp757. While it is well known that this Arg residue is involved in an electrostatic interaction with the phospho-residue of the activation loop to stabilize the active conformation, our structure determination revealed a new role for the Arg, acting as a switch between the autoinhibited and activated conformations. Mutation of Arg762 to Ala in EphA2 sensitized Mg2+ response, resulting in enhanced kinase catalytic activity and Mg2+ cooperativity. Furthermore, mutation of the corresponding Arg/Lys to Ala in PKA and p38MAPK also exhibited similar behavior. This new salt bridge-mediated switch may thus be an important mechanism of activation on a broader scope for kinases which utilize autophosphorylation. PMID:27324091

  19. Exploring the Role of Conformational Heterogeneity in cis-Autoproteolytic Activation of ThnT

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, there have been major achievements in understanding the relationship between enzyme catalysis and protein structural plasticity. In autoprocessing systems, however, there is a sparsity of direct evidence of the role of conformational dynamics, which are complicated by their intrinsic chemical reactivity. ThnT is an autoproteolytically activated enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of the β-lactam antibiotic thienamycin. Conservative mutation of ThnT results in multiple conformational states that can be observed via X-ray crystallography, establishing ThnT as a representative and revealing system for studing how conformational dynamics control autoactivation at a molecular level. Removal of the nucleophile by mutation to Ala disrupts the population of a reactive state and causes widespread structural changes from a conformation that promotes autoproteolysis to one associated with substrate catalysis. Finer probing of the active site polysterism was achieved by EtHg derivatization of the nucleophile, which indicates the active site and a neighboring loop have coupled dynamics. Disruption of these interactions by mutagenesis precludes the ability to observe a reactive state through X-ray crystallography, and application of this insight to other autoproteolytically activated enzymes offers an explanation for the widespread crystallization of inactive states. We suggest that the N → O(S) acyl shift in cis-autoproteolysis might occur through a si-face attack, thereby unifying the fundamental chemistry of these enzymes through a common mechanism. PMID:24933323

  20. Conformational Disorganization within the Active Site of a Recently Evolved Organophosphate Hydrolase Limits Its Catalytic Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Mabbitt, Peter D; Correy, Galen J; Meirelles, Tamara; Fraser, Nicholas J; Coote, Michelle L; Jackson, Colin J

    2016-03-01

    The evolution of new enzymatic activity is rarely observed outside of the laboratory. In the agricultural pest Lucilia cuprina, a naturally occurring mutation (Gly137Asp) in α-esterase 7 (LcαE7) results in acquisition of organophosphate hydrolase activity and confers resistance to organophosphate insecticides. Here, we present an X-ray crystal structure of LcαE7:Gly137Asp that, along with kinetic data, suggests that Asp137 acts as a general base in the new catalytic mechanism. Unexpectedly, the conformation of Asp137 observed in the crystal structure obstructs the active site and is not catalytically productive. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that alternative, catalytically competent conformers of Asp137 are sampled on the nanosecond time scale, although these states are less populated. Thus, although the mutation introduces the new reactive group responsible for organophosphate detoxification, the catalytic efficiency appears to be limited by conformational disorganization: the frequent sampling of low-energy nonproductive states. This result is consistent with a model of molecular evolution in which initial function-changing mutations can result in enzymes that display only a fraction of their catalytic potential due to conformational disorganization. PMID:26881849

  1. NMR structure of the active conformation of the Varkud satellite ribozyme cleavage site

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Bernd; Mitchell, G. Thomas; Gendron, Patrick; Major, François; Andersen, Angela A.; Collins, Richard A.; Legault, Pascale

    2003-01-01

    Substrate cleavage by the Neurospora Varkud satellite (VS) ribozyme involves a structural change in the stem-loop I substrate from an inactive to an active conformation. We have determined the NMR solution structure of a mutant stem-loop I that mimics the active conformation of the cleavage site internal loop. This structure shares many similarities, but also significant differences, with the previously determined structures of the inactive internal loop. The active internal loop displays different base-pairing interactions and forms a novel RNA fold composed exclusively of sheared G-A base pairs. From chemical-shift mapping we identified two Mg2+ binding sites in the active internal loop. One of the Mg2+ binding sites forms in the active but not the inactive conformation of the internal loop and is likely important for catalysis. Using the structure comparison program mc-search, we identified the active internal loop fold in other RNA structures. In Thermus thermophilus 16S rRNA, this RNA fold is directly involved in a long-range tertiary interaction. An analogous tertiary interaction may form between the active internal loop of the substrate and the catalytic domain of the VS ribozyme. The combination of NMR and bioinformatic approaches presented here has identified a novel RNA fold and provides insights into the structural basis of catalytic function in the Neurospora VS ribozyme. PMID:12782785

  2. Structure of the Dcp2-Dcp1 mRNA-decapping complex in the activated conformation.

    PubMed

    Valkov, Eugene; Muthukumar, Sowndarya; Chang, Chung-Te; Jonas, Stefanie; Weichenrieder, Oliver; Izaurralde, Elisa

    2016-06-01

    The removal of the mRNA 5' cap (decapping) by Dcp2 shuts down translation and commits mRNA to full degradation. Dcp2 activity is enhanced by activator proteins such as Dcp1 and Edc1. However, owing to conformational flexibility, the active conformation of Dcp2 and the mechanism of decapping activation have remained unknown. Here, we report a 1.6-Å-resolution crystal structure of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe Dcp2-Dcp1 heterodimer in an unprecedented conformation that is tied together by an intrinsically disordered peptide from Edc1. In this ternary complex, an unforeseen rotation of the Dcp2 catalytic domain allows residues from both Dcp2 and Dcp1 to cooperate in RNA binding, thus explaining decapping activation by increased substrate affinity. The architecture of the Dcp2-Dcp1-Edc1 complex provides a rationale for the conservation of a sequence motif in Edc1 that is also present in unrelated decapping activators, thus indicating that the presently described mechanism of decapping activation is evolutionarily conserved. PMID:27183195

  3. Preferential binding of allosteric modulators to active and inactive conformational states of metabotropic glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Yanamala, Naveena; Tirupula, Kalyan C; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are G protein coupled receptors that play important roles in synaptic plasticity and other neuro-physiological and pathological processes. Allosteric mGluR ligands are particularly promising drug targets because of their modulatory effects – enhancing or suppressing the response of mGluRs to glutamate. The mechanism by which this modulation occurs is not known. Here, we propose the hypothesis that positive and negative modulators will differentially stabilize the active and inactive conformations of the receptors, respectively. To test this hypothesis, we have generated computational models of the transmembrane regions of different mGluR subtypes in two different conformations. The inactive conformation was modeled using the crystal structure of the inactive, dark state of rhodopsin as template and the active conformation was created based on a recent model of the light-activated state of rhodopsin. Ligands for which the nature of their allosteric effects on mGluRs is experimentally known were docked to the modeled mGluR structures using ArgusLab and Autodock softwares. We find that the allosteric ligand binding pockets of mGluRs are overlapping with the retinal binding pocket of rhodopsin, and that ligands have strong preferences for the active and inactive states depending on their modulatory nature. In 8 out of 14 cases (57%), the negative modulators bound the inactive conformations with significant preference using both docking programs, and 6 out of 9 cases (67%), the positive modulators bound the active conformations. Considering results by the individual programs only, even higher correlations were observed: 12/14 (86%) and 8/9 (89%) for ArgusLab and 10/14 (71%) and 7/9 (78%) for AutoDock. These findings strongly support the hypothesis that mGluR allosteric modulation occurs via stabilization of different conformations analogous to those identified in rhodopsin where they are induced by photochemical isomerization

  4. Conformationally restricted elongation factor G retains GTPase activity but is inactive in translocation on the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Peske, F; Matassova, N B; Savelsbergh, A; Rodnina, M V; Wintermeyer, W

    2000-08-01

    Elongation factor G (EF-G) from Escherichia coli is a large, five-domain GTPase that promotes tRNA translocation on the ribosome. Full activity requires GTP hydrolysis, suggesting that a conformational change of the factor is important for function. To restrict the intramolecular mobility, two cysteine residues were engineered into domains 1 and 5 of EF-G that spontaneously formed a disulfide cross-link. Cross-linked EF-G retained GTPase activity on the ribosome, whereas it was inactive in translocation as well as in turnover. Both activities were restored when the cross-link was reversed by reduction. These results strongly argue against a GTPase switch-type model of EF-G function and demonstrate that conformational mobility is an absolute requirement for EF-G function on the ribosome. PMID:10983996

  5. Small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering reveal conformational changes in rhodopsin activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Utsab R.; Bhowmik, Debsindhu; Perera, Suchitrhanga M. C. D.; Chawla, Udeep; Struts, Andrey V.; Graziono, Vito; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; Heller, William T.; Qian, Shuo; Brown, Michael F.; Chu, Xiang-Qiang

    2015-03-01

    Understanding G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activation plays a crucial role in the development of novel improved molecular drugs. During photo-activation, the retinal chromophore of the visual GPCR rhodopsin isomerizes from 11-cis to all-trans conformation, yielding an equilibrium between inactive Meta-I and active Meta-II states. The principal goals of this work are to address whether the activation of rhodopsin leads to a single state or a conformational ensemble, and how protein organizational structure changes with detergent environment in solution. We use both small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques to answer the above questions. For the first time we observe the change in protein conformational ensemble upon photo-activation by SANS with contrast variation, which enables the separate study of the protein structure within the detergent assembly. In addition, SAXS study of protein structure within detergent assembly suggests that the detergent molecules form a belt of monolayer (micelle) around protein with different geometrical shapes to keep the protein in folded state.

  6. New Insights into Active Site Conformation Dynamics of E. coli PNP Revealed by Combined H/D Exchange Approach and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazazić, Saša; Bertoša, Branimir; Luić, Marija; Mikleušević, Goran; Tarnowski, Krzysztof; Dadlez, Michal; Narczyk, Marta; Bzowska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    The biologically active form of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) from Escherichia coli (EC 2.4.2.1) is a homohexamer unit, assembled as a trimer of dimers. Upon binding of phosphate, neighboring monomers adopt different active site conformations, described as open and closed. To get insight into the functions of the two distinctive active site conformations, virtually inactive Arg24Ala mutant is complexed with phosphate; all active sites are found to be in the open conformation. To understand how the sites of neighboring monomers communicate with each other, we have combined H/D exchange (H/DX) experiments with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Both methods point to the mobility of the enzyme, associated with a few flexible regions situated at the surface and within the dimer interface. Although H/DX provides an average extent of deuterium uptake for all six hexamer active sites, it was able to indicate the dynamic mechanism of cross-talk between monomers, allostery. Using this technique, it was found that phosphate binding to the wild type (WT) causes arrest of the molecular motion in backbone fragments that are flexible in a ligand-free state. This was not the case for the Arg24Ala mutant. Upon nucleoside substrate/inhibitor binding, some release of the phosphate-induced arrest is observed for the WT, whereas the opposite effects occur for the Arg24Ala mutant. MD simulations confirmed that phosphate is bound tightly in the closed active sites of the WT; conversely, in the open conformation of the active site of the WT phosphate is bound loosely moving towards the exit of the active site. In Arg24Ala mutant binary complex Pi is bound loosely, too.

  7. Interdomain conformational changes in Akt activation revealed by chemical cross-linking and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bill X; Kim, Hee-Yong

    2006-06-01

    Akt, a serine/threonine kinase, plays a critical role in cell survival. Upon growth factor receptor stimulation, cytosolic Akt is recruited to the plasma membrane by phospholipid binding and activated through phosphorylation at Thr(308) and Ser(473). Although crystal structures for the parts of Akt have been reported, neither the three-dimensional structure of the whole molecule nor sequential conformational changes during activation have been demonstrated. In this study, we demonstrated that Akt undergoes dramatic interdomain conformational changes during activation processes by probing the three-dimensional structure of full-length Akt in solution using chemical cross-linking and tandem mass spectrometry. The cross-linking results not only provided new structural information but also revealed distinctive spatial arrangements of individual domains in the Akt molecule in resting, membrane-interacted, phosphorylated, and substrate-bound states. Our data allowed a new model for stepwise interdomain conformational changes in Akt activation sequence, setting a stage for the further investigation on Akt-membrane, Akt-protein, and/or Akt-drug interactions in solution to understand molecular mechanisms involved in physiological and pathophysiological processes of cell survival. PMID:16531397

  8. Branched conformational properties of macromolecules in close relation to chemical synthesis. II. Influence of excluded volume interactions.

    PubMed

    Burchard, Walther; Schweins, Ralf; Werner, Marcel

    2015-09-21

    The description of perturbed particle conformations needs as a prerequisite the algorithm of unperturbed chains which is outlined in Paper I [J. Chem. Phys. 143, 114906 (2015)]. The mean square segment length ⟨r(2)(n)⟩=b(2)n(2ν) with ν = 0.588 for linear chains in a good solvent is used as an approximation also for branched samples. The mean square radius of gyration is easily derived, but for the hydrodynamic, the segment distribution by Domb et al. [Proc. Phys. Soc., London 85, 624 (1965)] is required. Both radii can analytically be expressed by Gamma functions. For the angular dependence of scattered light, the Fourier transform of the Domb distribution for self-avoiding random walk is needed, which cannot be obtained as an analytical function and was derived by numerical integration. The summation over all segment length in the particle was performed with an analytic fit-curve for the Fourier transform and was carried out numerically. Results were derived (i) for uniform and polydisperse linear chains, (ii) or f-functional randomly branched polymers and their monodisperse fractions, (iii) for random A3B2 co-polymers, and (iv) for AB2 hyper-branched samples. The deviation of the Gaussian approximation with the variance of ⟨r(2)(n)⟩=b(2)n(2ν) slightly overestimates the excluded volume interaction but still remains a fairly good approximation for region of qR(g) < 10. PMID:26395738

  9. Branched conformational properties of macromolecules in close relation to chemical synthesis. II. Influence of excluded volume interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchard, Walther; Schweins, Ralf; Werner, Marcel

    2015-09-01

    The description of perturbed particle conformations needs as a prerequisite the algorithm of unperturbed chains which is outlined in Paper I [J. Chem. Phys. 143, 114906 (2015)]. The mean square segment length = b 2 n 2 ν with ν = 0.588 for linear chains in a good solvent is used as an approximation also for branched samples. The mean square radius of gyration is easily derived, but for the hydrodynamic, the segment distribution by Domb et al. [Proc. Phys. Soc., London 85, 624 (1965)] is required. Both radii can analytically be expressed by Gamma functions. For the angular dependence of scattered light, the Fourier transform of the Domb distribution for self-avoiding random walk is needed, which cannot be obtained as an analytical function and was derived by numerical integration. The summation over all segment length in the particle was performed with an analytic fit-curve for the Fourier transform and was carried out numerically. Results were derived (i) for uniform and polydisperse linear chains, (ii) or f-functional randomly branched polymers and their monodisperse fractions, (iii) for random A3B2 co-polymers, and (iv) for AB2 hyper-branched samples. The deviation of the Gaussian approximation with the variance of = b 2 n 2 ν slightly overestimates the excluded volume interaction but still remains a fairly good approximation for region of qRg < 10.

  10. Molecular Crowding Affects the Conformational Fluctuations, Peroxidase Activity, and Folding Landscape of Yeast Cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Paul, Simanta Sarani; Sil, Pallabi; Chakraborty, Ritobrita; Haldar, Shubhasis; Chattopadhyay, Krishnananda

    2016-04-26

    To understand how a protein folds and behaves inside living cells, the effects of synthetic crowding media on protein folding, function, stability, and association have been studied in detail. Because the effect of excluded volume is more prominent in an extended state than in the native protein, a majority of these studies have been conducted in the unfolded state of different model proteins. Here, we have used fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and other biophysical methods to investigate the effect of crowding agents Ficoll70 and Dextran70 on the nativelike state of cytochrome c from yeast. Yeast cytochrome c (y-cytc) contains a substantial expanded state in its native folded condition, which is present in equilibrium with a compact conformer in aqueous buffer. We have found that the crowding medium affects the native state equilibrium between compact and expanded states, shifting its population toward the compact conformer. As a result, the peroxidase activity of y-cytc decreases. Urea-induced protein stability measurements show that the compaction destabilizes the protein due to charge repulsions between similar charged clusters. Interestingly, the time constant of conformational fluctuations between the compact and expanded conformers has been found to increase in the crowded milieu, suggesting a crucial role of the solution microviscosity. PMID:27050502

  11. D-Glucose-Derived 1,2,4-Trioxepanes: Synthesis, Conformational Study, and Antimalarial Activity.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, D P; Corbett, Y; Dhavale, D D; Taramelli, D; Trombini, C; Quintavalla, A; Lombardo, M

    2015-08-21

    New enantiomerically pure 1,2,4-trioxepanes 10a,b/11a,b were synthesized from D-glucose. Their conformational behavior was studied by low-temperature NMR and substantiated by DFT calculations. On evaluation of in vitro antimalarial activity, the adamantyl derivative 11b showed IC50 values in the low micromolar range, particularly against the W2 chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum strain (IC50 = 0.15 ± 0.12 μM). PMID:26237035

  12. Synthesis, biological activity, and conformational study of N-methylated allatostatin analogues inhibiting juvenile hormone biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yong; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Chuanliang; Wu, Xiaoqing; Deng, Xile; Yang, Xinling; Tobe, Stephen S

    2015-03-25

    An allatostatin (AST) neuropeptide mimic (H17) is a potential insect growth regulator, which inhibits the production of juvenile hormone (JH) by the corpora allata. To determine the effect of conformation of novel AST analogues and their ability to inhibit JH biosynthesis, eight insect AST analogues were synthesized using H17 as the lead compound by N-methylation scanning, which is a common strategy for improving the biological properties of peptides. A bioassay using JH production by corpora allata of the cockroach Diploptera punctata indicated that single N-methylation mimics (analogues 1-4) showed more activity than double N-methylation mimics (analogues 5-8). Especially, analogues 1 and 4 showed roughly equivalent activity to that of H17, with IC50 values of 5.17 × 10(-8) and 6.44 × 10(-8) M, respectively. Molecular modeling based on nuclear magnetic resonance data showed that the conformation of analogues 1 and 4 seems to be flexible, whereas analogues 2 and 3 showed a type IV β-turn. This flexible linear conformation was hypothesized to be a new important and indispensable structural element beneficial to the activity of AST mimics. PMID:25751662

  13. Role of the C-terminus in the activity, conformation, and stability of interleukin-6.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, L. D.; Hammacher, A.; Zhang, J. G.; Weinstock, J.; Yasukawa, K.; Morton, C. J.; Norton, R. S.; Simpson, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Two murine interleukin-6 (mIL-6) variants were constructed using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), one lacking the last five residues (183-187) at the C-terminus (pMC5) and another with the last five residues of mIL-6 substituted by the corresponding residues of human IL-6 (pMC5H). The growth stimulatory activity of pMC5 on the mouse hybridoma cell line 7TD1 was < 0.05% of mIL-6, whereas pMC5H and mIL-6 were equipotent. The loss of biological activity of pMC5 correlated with its negligible receptor binding affinity on 7TD1 cells, while the binding of pMC5H was comparable to that of mIL-6. Both pMC5 and pMC5H, like mIL-6, failed to interact with recombinant soluble human IL-6 receptor when assayed by surface plasmon resonance-based biosensor analysis. These studies suggest that the C-terminal seven amino acids of human IL-6, alone, do not define species specificity for receptor binding. A variety of biophysical techniques, as well as the binding of a conformational-specific monoclonal antibody, indicated that the global fold of the mIL-6 variants was similar to that of mIL-6, although small changes in the NMR spectra, particularly for pMC5, were observed. Some of these changes involved residues widely separated in the primary structure. For instance, interactions involving Tyr-22 were influenced by the C-terminal amino acids suggesting that the N- and C-termini of mIL-6 are in close proximity. Equilibrium unfolding experiments indicated that pMC5 was 0.8 kcal/mol less stable than mIL-6, whereas pMC5H was 1.4 kcal/mol more stable. These studies emphasize the structural importance of the C-terminal amino acids of IL-6 and suggest that truncation or mutation of this region could lead to small but significant alterations in other regions of the molecule. PMID:8401231

  14. Modulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 by Triton X-100--identification of two consecutive conformational transitions.

    PubMed

    Gils, A; Declerck, P J

    1998-08-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a unique member of the serpin superfamily because of its conformational and functional flexibility. In the present study, we have evaluated the influence of the non-ionic detergent Triton X-100 (TX-100) on the functional stability and conformational transitions of PAI-1. At 37 degrees C, TX-100 induced a concentration-dependent decrease of the functional half-life of PAI-1 resulting in half-lives of 177 +/- 54 min (mean +/- SD, n = 3), 19 +/- 2 min, 1.7 +/- 0.3 min and 0.53 +/- 0.03 min in the presence of 0.005, 0.010, 0.020 and 0.2% TX-100, respectively, compared to a half-life of 270 +/- 146 min in the absence of TX-100. Conformational analysis at various time points and at different temperatures (0 degrees C, 25 degrees C, 37 degrees C) revealed that this inactivation proceeds through the formation of a substrate-like intermediate followed by the formation of the latent form. Kinetic evaluation demonstrated that this conversion fits to two consecutive first-order transitions, i.e. active k1--> substrate k2--> latent. The k1 value was strongly dependent on the concentration of TX-100 (e.g. 0.002 +/- 0.0006 s(-1) and 0.029 +/- 0.003 s(-1) for 0.01% and 0.2% TX-100 at 37 degrees C) whereas the conversion of substrate to latent (k2) was virtually independent of the TX-100 concentration (i.e. 0.012 +/- 0.002 s(-1) and 0.011 +/- 0.001 s(-1) for 0.01 and 0.2% TX-100 at 37 degrees C). Experiments with a variety of other non-ionic amphiphilic compounds revealed that the amphiphilic character of the compound is, at least in part, responsible for the observed effects and strongly indicate that the currently reported mechanism of inactivation is of general importance for the conformational transitions in PAI-1. In conclusion, TX- 100 changes the initial conformation of PAI-1 resulting in altered functional properties. This observation allows us to develop a new model for the mechanism involved in the conformational flexibility of

  15. Structures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Anthranilate Phosphoribosyltransferase Variants Reveal the Conformational Changes That Facilitate Delivery of the Substrate to the Active Site.

    PubMed

    Cookson, Tammie V M; Evans, Genevieve L; Castell, Alina; Baker, Edward N; Lott, J Shaun; Parker, Emily J

    2015-10-01

    Anthranilate phosphoribosyltransferase (AnPRT) is essential for the biosynthesis of tryptophan in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). This enzyme catalyzes the second committed step in tryptophan biosynthesis, the Mg²⁺-dependent reaction between 5'-phosphoribosyl-1'-pyrophosphate (PRPP) and anthranilate. The roles of residues predicted to be involved in anthranilate binding have been tested by the analysis of six Mtb-AnPRT variant proteins. Kinetic analysis showed that five of six variants were active and identified the conserved residue R193 as being crucial for both anthranilate binding and catalytic function. Crystal structures of these Mtb-AnPRT variants reveal the ability of anthranilate to bind in three sites along an extended anthranilate tunnel and expose the role of the mobile β2-α6 loop in facilitating the enzyme's sequential reaction mechanism. The β2-α6 loop moves sequentially between a "folded" conformation, partially occluding the anthranilate tunnel, via an "open" position to a "closed" conformation, which supports PRPP binding and allows anthranilate access via the tunnel to the active site. The return of the β2-α6 loop to the "folded" conformation completes the catalytic cycle, concordantly allowing the active site to eject the product PRA and rebind anthranilate at the opening of the anthranilate tunnel for subsequent reactions. Multiple anthranilate molecules blocking the anthranilate tunnel prevent the β2-α6 loop from undergoing the conformational changes required for catalysis, thus accounting for the unusual substrate inhibition of this enzyme. PMID:26356348

  16. Ligands for pheromone-sensing neurons are not conformationally activated odorant binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Diaz, Carolina; Reina, Jaime H; Cambillau, Christian; Benton, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Pheromones form an essential chemical language of intraspecific communication in many animals. How olfactory systems recognize pheromonal signals with both sensitivity and specificity is not well understood. An important in vivo paradigm for this process is the detection mechanism of the sex pheromone (Z)-11-octadecenyl acetate (cis-vaccenyl acetate [cVA]) in Drosophila melanogaster. cVA-evoked neuronal activation requires a secreted odorant binding protein, LUSH, the CD36-related transmembrane protein SNMP, and the odorant receptor OR67d. Crystallographic analysis has revealed that cVA-bound LUSH is conformationally distinct from apo (unliganded) LUSH. Recombinantly expressed mutant versions of LUSH predicted to enhance or diminish these structural changes produce corresponding alterations in spontaneous and/or cVA-evoked activity when infused into olfactory sensilla, leading to a model in which the ligand for pheromone receptors is not free cVA, but LUSH that is "conformationally activated" upon cVA binding. Here we present evidence that contradicts this model. First, we demonstrate that the same LUSH mutants expressed transgenically affect neither basal nor pheromone-evoked activity. Second, we compare the structures of apo LUSH, cVA/LUSH, and complexes of LUSH with non-pheromonal ligands and find no conformational property of cVA/LUSH that can explain its proposed unique activated state. Finally, we show that high concentrations of cVA can induce neuronal activity in the absence of LUSH, but not SNMP or OR67d. Our findings are not consistent with the model that the cVA/LUSH complex acts as the pheromone ligand, and suggest that pheromone molecules alone directly activate neuronal receptors. PMID:23637570

  17. Structure of a Specialized Acyl Carrier Protein Essential for Lipid A Biosynthesis with Very Long-chain Fatty Acids in Open and Closed Conformations

    SciTech Connect

    Ramelot, Theresa A.; Rossi, Paolo M.; Forouhar, Farhad; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Yang, Yunhuang; Ni, Shuisong; Unser, Sarah; Lew, Scott; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Xiao, Rong; Acton, Thomas; Everett, John K.; Prestegard, James H.; Hunt, John F.; Montelione, Gaetano; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2012-09-18

    The solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structures and backbone (15)N dynamics of the specialized acyl carrier protein (ACP), RpAcpXL, from Rhodopseudomonas palustris, in both the apo form and holo form modified by covalent attachment of 4'-phosphopantetheine at S37, are virtually identical, monomeric, and correspond to the closed conformation. The structures have an extra α-helix compared to the archetypical ACP from Escherichia coli, which has four helices, resulting in a larger opening to the hydrophobic cavity. Chemical shift differences between apo- and holo-RpAcpXL indicated some differences in the hinge region between α2 and α3 and in the hydrophobic cavity environment, but corresponding changes in nuclear Overhauser effect cross-peak patterns were not detected. In contrast to the NMR structures, apo-RpAcpXL was observed in an open conformation in crystals that diffracted to 2.0 Å resolution, which resulted from movement of α3. On the basis of the crystal structure, the predicted biological assembly is a homodimer. Although the possible biological significance of dimerization is unknown, there is potential that the resulting large shared hydrophobic cavity could accommodate the very long-chain fatty acid (28-30 carbons) that this specialized ACP is known to synthesize and transfer to lipid A. These structures are the first representatives of the AcpXL family and the first to indicate that dimerization may be important for the function of these specialized ACPs.

  18. Crystal structure of the plexin A3 intracellular region reveals an autoinhibited conformation through active site sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    He, Huawei; Yang, Taehong; Terman, Jonathan R.; Zhang, Xuewu

    2010-01-20

    Plexin cell surface receptors bind to semaphorin ligands and transduce signals for regulating neuronal axon guidance. The intracellular region of plexins is essential for signaling and contains a R-Ras/M-Ras GTPase activating protein (GAP) domain that is divided into two segments by a Rho GTPase-binding domain (RBD). The regulation mechanisms for plexin remain elusive, although it is known that activation requires both binding of semaphorin to the extracellular region and a Rho-family GTPase (Rac1 or Rnd1) to the RBD. Here we report the crystal structure of the plexin A3 intracellular region. The structure shows that the N- and C-terminal portions of the GAP homologous regions together form a GAP domain with an overall fold similar to other Ras GAPs. However, the plexin GAP domain adopts a closed conformation and cannot accommodate R-Ras/M-Ras in its substrate-binding site, providing a structural basis for the autoinhibited state of plexins. A comparison with the plexin B1 RBD/Rnd1 complex structure suggests that Rnd1 binding alone does not induce a conformational change in plexin, explaining the requirement of both semaphorin and a Rho GTPase for activation. The structure also identifies an N-terminal segment that is important for regulation. Both the N-terminal segment and the RBD make extensive interactions with the GAP domain, suggesting the presence of an allosteric network connecting these three domains that integrates semaphorin and Rho GTPase signals to activate the GAP. The importance of these interactions in plexin signaling is shown by both cell-based and in vivo axon guidance assays.

  19. Surface energy modified chips for detection of conformational states and enzymatic activity in biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Asberg, Peter; Nilsson, K Peter R; Inganäs, Olle

    2006-02-28

    A novel patterning method for anchoring biomolecules and noncovalent assembled conjugated polyelectrolyte (CPE)/biomolecule complexes to a chip surface is presented. The surface energy of a hydrophilic substrate is modified using an elastomeric poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) stamp, containing a relief pattern. Modification takes place on the parts where the PDMS stamp is in conformal contact with the substrate and leaves low molecular weight PDMS residues on the surface resulting in a hydrophobic modification, and then biomolecules and CPE/biomolecule complexes are then adsorbed in a specific pattern. The method constitutes a discrimination system for different conformations in biomolecules using CPEs as reporters and the PDMS modified substrates as the discriminator. Detection of different conformations in two biomacromolecules, a synthetic peptide (JR2E) and a protein (calmodulin), reported by the CPE and resolved by fluorescence was demonstrated. Also, excellent enzyme activity in patterned CPE/horseradish peroxidase (HRP) enzyme was shown, demonstrating that this method can be used to pattern biomolecules with their activity retained. The method presented could be useful in various biochip applications, such as analyzing proteins and peptides in large-scale production, in making metabolic chips, and for making multi-microarrays. PMID:16489808

  20. Quantitative conformationally sampled pharmacophore for delta opioid ligands: reevaluation of hydrophobic moieties essential for biological activity.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Denzil; Coop, Andrew; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2007-04-19

    Recent studies have indicated several therapeutic applications for delta opioid agonists and antagonists. To exploit the therapeutic potential of delta opioids developing a structural basis for the activity of ligands at the delta opioid receptor is essential. The conformationally sampled pharmacophore (CSP) method (Bernard et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2003, 125, 3103-3107) is extended here to obtain quantitative models of delta opioid ligand efficacy and affinity. Quantification is performed via overlap integrals of the conformational space sampled by ligands with respect to a reference compound. Iterative refinement of the CSP model identified hydrophobic groups other than the traditional phenylalanine residues as important for efficacy and affinity in DSLET and ICI 174 864. The obtained models for a structurally diverse set of peptidic and nonpeptidic delta opioid ligands offer good predictions with R2 values>0.9, and the predicted efficacy for a set of test compounds was consistent with the experimental values. PMID:17367120

  1. Immobilization of enzymes using non-ionic colloidal liquid aphrons (CLAs): Activity kinetics, conformation, and energetics.

    PubMed

    Ward, Keeran; Xi, Jingshu; Stuckey, David C

    2016-05-01

    This study seeks to examine the ability of non-ionic/non-polar Colloidial Liquid Aphrons (CLAs) to preserve enzyme functionality upon immobilization and release. CLAs consisting of micron-sized oil droplets surrounded by a thin aqueous layer stabilized by a mixture of surfactants, were formulated by direct addition (pre-manufacture addition) using 1% Tween 80/mineral oil and 1% Tween 20 and the enzymes lipase, aprotinin and α-chymotrypsin. The results of activity assays for both lipase and α-chymotrypsin showed that kinetic activity increased upon immobilization by factors of 7 and 5.5, respectively, while aprotinin retained approximately 85% of its native activity. The conformation of the enzymes released through desorption showed no significant alterations compared to their native state. Changes in pH and temperature showed that optimum conditions did not change after immobilization, while analysis of activation energy for the immobilized enzyme showed an increase in activity at higher temperatures. Furthermore, the effect of bound water within the aphron structure allowed for some degree of enzyme hydration, and this hydration was needed for an active conformation with results showing a decrease in ΔH* for the immobilized system compared to its native counterpart. PMID:26497856

  2. Conformational Tinkering Drives Evolution of a Promiscuous Activity through Indirect Mutational Effects.

    PubMed

    Yang, Gloria; Hong, Nansook; Baier, Florian; Jackson, Colin J; Tokuriki, Nobuhiko

    2016-08-16

    How remote mutations can lead to changes in enzyme function at a molecular level is a central question in evolutionary biochemistry and biophysics. Here, we combine laboratory evolution with biochemical, structural, genetic, and computational analysis to dissect the molecular basis for the functional optimization of phosphotriesterase activity in a bacterial lactonase (AiiA) from the metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) superfamily. We show that a 1000-fold increase in phosphotriesterase activity is caused by a more favorable catalytic binding position of the paraoxon substrate in the evolved enzyme that resulted from conformational tinkering of the active site through peripheral mutations. A nonmutated active site residue, Phe68, was displaced by ∼3 Å through the indirect effects of two second-shell trajectory mutations, allowing molecular interactions between the residue and paraoxon. Comparative mutational scanning, i.e., examining the effects of alanine mutagenesis on different genetic backgrounds, revealed significant changes in the functional roles of Phe68 and other nonmutated active site residues caused by the indirect effects of trajectory mutations. Our work provides a quantitative measurement of the impact of second-shell mutations on the catalytic contributions of nonmutated residues and unveils the underlying intramolecular network of strong epistatic mutational relationships between active site residues and more remote residues. Defining these long-range conformational and functional epistatic relationships has allowed us to better understand the subtle, but cumulatively significant, role of second- and third-shell mutations in evolution. PMID:27444875

  3. Conformal optical elements for correcting wavefront distortions in YAG : Nd{sup 3+} active elements

    SciTech Connect

    Korolkov, V P; Nasyrov, R K; Poleshchuk, A G; Arapov, Yu D; Ivanov, A F

    2013-02-28

    Correction of the wavefront is studied for the light beam passing wide-aperture YAG : Nd3+ single-crystal rods, which are used as active elements in high-power solid-state lasers. A nonideal character of the crystal structure is responsible for the deformation of the wavefront of passing radiation. By using the halftone technology we have developed conformal aberration correctors capable of compensating rod nonuniformities and reducing the laser radiation divergence by an order of magnitude. The results obtained make it possible to employ optically nonuniform active elements in laser constructions. (laser optics 2012)

  4. A Summary of Closed Brayton Cycle Development Activities at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Lee S.

    2009-01-01

    NASA has been involved in the development of Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) power conversion technology since the 1960's. CBC systems can be coupled to reactor, isotope, or solar heat sources and offer the potential for high efficiency, long life, and scalability to high power. In the 1960's and 1970's, NASA and industry developed the 10 kW Brayton Rotating Unit (BRU) and the 2 kW mini-BRU demonstrating technical feasibility and performance, In the 1980's, a 25 kW CBC Solar Dynamic (SD) power system option was developed for Space Station Freedom and the technology was demonstrated in the 1990's as part of the 2 kW SO Ground Test Demonstration (GTD). Since the early 2000's, NASA has been pursuing CBC technology for space reactor applications. Before it was cancelled, the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (HMO) mission was considering a 100 kWclass CBC system coupled to a gas-cooled fission reactor. Currently, CBC technology is being explored for Fission Surface Power (FSP) systems to provide base power on the moon and Mars. These recent activities have resulted in several CBC-related technology development projects including a 50 kW Alternator Test Unit, a 20 kW Dual Brayton Test Loop, a 2 kW Direct Drive Gas Brayton Test Loop, and a 12 kW FSP Power Conversion Unit design.

  5. Conformational Lability in Serine Protease Active Sites: Structures of Hepatocyte Growth Factor Activator (HGFA) Alone and with the Inhibitory Domain from HGFA Inhibitor-1B

    SciTech Connect

    Shia, Steven; Stamos, Jennifer; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Fan, Bin; Wu, Judy; Corpuz, Raquel T.; Santell, Lydia; Lazarus, Robert A.; Eigenbrot, Charles

    2010-07-20

    Hepatocyte growth factor activator (HGFA) is a serine protease that converts hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) into its active form. When activated HGF binds its cognate receptor Met, cellular signals lead to cell growth, differentiation, and migration, activities which promote tissue regeneration in liver, kidney and skin. Intervention in the conversion of HGF to its active form has the potential to provide therapeutic benefit where HGF/Met activity is associated with tumorigenesis. To help identify ways to moderate HGF/Met effects, we have determined the molecular structure of the protease domain of HGFA. The structure we determined, at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution, with no pseudo-substrate or inhibitor bound is characterized by an unconventional conformation of key residues in the enzyme active site. In order to find whether this apparently non-enzymatically competent arrangement would persist in the presence of a strongly-interacting inhibitor, we also have determined, at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution, the X-ray structure of HGFA complexed with the first Kunitz domain (KD1) from the physiological inhibitor hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor 1B (HAI-1B). In this complex we observe a rearranged substrate binding cleft that closely mirrors the cleft of other serine proteases, suggesting an extreme conformational dynamism. We also characterize the inhibition of 16 serine proteases by KD1, finding that the previously reported enzyme specificity of the intact extracellular region of HAI-1B resides in KD1 alone. We find that HGFA, matriptase, hepsin, plasma kallikrein and trypsin are potently inhibited, and use the complex structure to rationalize the structural basis of these results.

  6. Crowding Modulates the Conformation, Affinity, and Activity of the Components of the Bacterial Disaggregase Machinery.

    PubMed

    Celaya, Garbiñe; Fernández-Higuero, José Angel; Martin, Ianire; Rivas, Germán; Moro, Fernando; Muga, Arturo

    2016-06-01

    Chaperone-mediated protein aggregate reactivation is a complex reaction that depends on the sequential association of molecular chaperones on their interaction with protein aggregates and on substrate refolding. This process could be modulated by the highly crowded intracellular environment, which is known to affect protein conformational change, enzymatic activity, and protein-protein interactions. Here, we report that molecular crowding shapes the chaperone activity of bacterial disaggregase composed of the DnaK system (DnaK, DnaJ, and GrpE) and the molecular motor ClpB. A combination of biophysical and biochemical methods shows that the excluded volume conditions modify the conformation of DnaK and DnaJ without affecting that of GrpE. These crowding-induced conformational rearrangements activate DnaK, enhance the affinity of DnaK for DnaJ, but not for GrpE, and increase the sensitivity of the chaperone activity to cochaperone concentration, explaining the tight control of their relative intracellular amounts. Furthermore, crowding-mediated disordering of the G/F domain of DnaJ facilitates the reversible formation of intermolecular DnaJ conglomerates. These assemblies could drive the formation of Hsp70 clusters at the aggregate surface with the consequent enhancement of the disaggregation efficiency through their coordinated action via entropic pulling. Finally, crowding helps ClpB to outcompete GrpE for DnaK binding, a key aspect of DnaK/ClpB cooperation given the low affinity of the disaggregase for DnaK. Excluded volume conditions promote the formation of the bichaperone complex that disentangles aggregates, enhancing the efficiency of the disaggregation reaction. PMID:27133933

  7. Novel analogs of alloferon: Synthesis, conformational studies, pro-apoptotic and antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Kuczer, Mariola; Czarniewska, Elżbieta; Majewska, Anna; Różanowska, Maria; Rosiński, Grzegorz; Lisowski, Marek

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we report the structure-activity relationships of novel derivatives of the insect peptide alloferon (H-His-Gly-Val-Ser-Gly-His-Gly-Gln-His-Gly-Val-His-Gly-OH). The peptide structure was modified by exchanging His at position 9 or 12 for natural or non-natural amino acids. Biological properties of these peptides were determined in antiviral in vitro test against Human Herpes Virus 1 McIntrie strain (HHV-1MC) using a Vero cell line. The peptides were also evaluated for the pro-apoptotic action in vivo on hemocytes of the Tenebrio molitor beetle. Additionally, the structural properties of alloferon analogs were examined by the circular dichroism in water and methanol. It was found that most of the evaluated peptides can reduce the HHV-1 titer in Vero cells. [Ala(9)]-alloferon exhibits the strongest antiviral activity among the analyzed compounds. However, no cytotoxic activity against Vero cell line was observed for all the studied peptides. In vivo assays with hemocytes of T. molitor showed that [Lys(9)]-, [Phg(9)]-, [Lys(12)]-, and [Phe(12)]-alloferon exhibit a twofold increase in caspases activity in comparison with the native peptide. The CD conformational studies indicate that the investigated peptides seem to prefer the unordered conformation. PMID:26986636

  8. Activation and conformational dynamics of a class B G-protein-coupled glucagon receptor.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Sun, Jixue; Li, Dongmei; Lin, Jianping

    2016-05-14

    The human glucagon receptor (GCGR) is a class B G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). The GCGR can be activated by glucagon and regulates the release of glucose. The GCGR has been proposed to be an important drug target for type 2 diabetes. Based on the structural model of a full-length glucagon-bound GCGR (glu-GCGR), we performed accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) simulations, potential of mean force (PMF) calculations, cross-correlation analysis and community network analysis to study the activation mechanism and the conformational dynamics during the activation process. The PMF map depicts three different conformational states of the GCGR: the inactive, intermediate and active states. The activation of the GCGR is characterized by the outward movement of the intracellular side of helix VI. In the active state of the GCGR, the Arg173(2.46)-Ser350(6.41) and Glu245(3.50)-Thr351(6.42) hydrogen bonds break, and the χ1 rotamer of Phe322(5.54) changes from perpendicular to parallel to helix VI. The binding of the agonist glucagon decreases the correlated motions of the extracellular loops (ELCs) and the helices around the glucagon-binding site. During the activation of the GCGR, the connections between the intracellular sides of helices become weaker, and the connections between glucagon and ECLs and the extracellular sides of helices become stronger. These facilitate G-protein coupling on the intracellular side and glucagon binding on the extracellular side, and stabilize the GCGR in the active state. We expect that this study can provide useful information on the activation mechanism of the GCGR and facilitate the future design of GCGR inhibitors. PMID:27094704

  9. Conformational dynamics of the active site loop of S-adenosylmethionine synthetase illuminated by site-directed spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Taylor, John C; Markham, George D

    2003-07-15

    S-adenosylmethionine synthetase (ATP: L-methionine S-adenosyltransferase, methionine adenosyltransferase, a.k.a. MAT) is one of numerous enzymes that have a flexible polypeptide loop that moves to gate access to the active site in a motion that is closely coupled to catalysis. Crystallographic studies of this tetrameric enzyme have shown that the loop is closed in the absence of bound substrates. However, the loop must open to allow substrate binding and a variety of data indicate that the loop is closed during the catalytic steps. Previous kinetic studies indicate that during turnover loop motion occurs on a time scale of 10(-2)s, ca. 10-fold faster than chemical transformations and turnover. Site-directed spin labeling has been used to introduce nitroxide groups at two positions in the loop to illuminate how the motion of the loop is affected by substrate binding. The two loop mutants constructed, G105C and D107C, retain wild type levels of MAT activity; attachment of a methanethiosulfonate spin label to convert the cysteine to the "R1" residue reduced the k(cat) only for the labeled D107R1 form (7-fold). The K(m) value for methionine increased 2- to 4-fold for the cysteine mutants and 2- to 7-fold for the labeled proteins, whereas the K(m) for ATP was changed by at most 2-fold. EPR spectra for both labeled proteins are nearly identical and show the presence of two major spin label environments with rotational diffusion rates differing by approximately 10-fold; the slower rate is ca. 4-fold faster than the estimated protein rotational rate. The spectra are not altered by addition of substrates or products. At both positions the less mobile conformation constitutes ca. 65% of the total species, indicating an equilibrium that only slightly favors one form, that in which the label is more immobilized. The equilibrium constant that relates the two forms is comparable to the equilibrium constant of 1.5 for a conformational change that was previously deduced from the

  10. [Synthesis, conformation, and spectroscopy of nucleoside analogues concerning their antiviral activity].

    PubMed

    Kuśmierek, Jarosław T; Stolarski, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    Chemically modified analogues of nucleosides and nucleotides, have been thoroughly investigated since the discovery of DNA double helix by Watson and Crick in 1953 (Nature 171: 737). Chemical structures, first of all tautomerism, of the nucleic acid bases, as well as the conformations of the nucleic acids constituents, determine the secondary and tertiary structures of DNA and RNA polymers. Similarly, structural and dynamic parameters of nucleoside derivatives determine their biological activity in mutagenesis, neoplastic transformation, as well as antiviral or anticancer properties. In this review, a multidisciplinary approach of Prof. David Shugar's group is presented in the studies on nucleosides and nucleotides. It consists in chemical syntheses of suitable analogues, measurements of physicochemical and spectral parameters, conformational analysis by means of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray diffraction, as well as characteristics of the nucleoside analogues as inhibitors of some selected, target enzymes, crucial in respect to antiviral activity of the analogues. These long-lasting studies follows upon the line of the main paradigm of molecular biophysics, i. e. structure-activity relationship. PMID:26677575

  11. O2 and Water Migration Pathways between the Solvent and Heme Pockets of Hemoglobin with Open and Closed Conformations of the Distal HisE7.

    PubMed

    Shadrina, Maria S; Peslherbe, Gilles H; English, Ann M

    2015-09-01

    Hemoglobin transports O2 by binding the gas at its four hemes. Hydrogen bonding between the distal histidine (HisE7) and heme-bound O2 significantly increases the affinity of human hemoglobin (HbA) for this ligand. HisE7 is also proposed to regulate the release of O2 to the solvent via a transient E7 channel. To reveal the O2 escape routes controlled by HisE7 and to evaluate its role in gating heme access, we compare simulations of O2 diffusion from the distal heme pockets of the T and R states of HbA performed with HisE7 in its open (protonated) and closed (neutral) conformations. Irrespective of HisE7's conformation, we observe the same four or five escape routes leading directly from the α- or β-distal heme pockets to the solvent. Only 21-53% of O2 escapes occur via these routes, with the remainder escaping through routes that encompass multiple internal cavities in HbA. The conformation of the distal HisE7 controls the escape of O2 from the heme by altering the distal pocket architecture in a pH-dependent manner, not by gating the E7 channel. Removal of the HisE7 side chain in the GlyE7 variant exposes the distal pockets to the solvent, and the percentage of O2 escapes to the solvent directly from the α- or β-distal pockets of the mutant increases to 70-88%. In contrast to O2, the dominant water route from the bulk solvent is gated by HisE7 because protonation and opening of this residue dramatically increase the rate of influx of water into the empty distal heme pockets. The occupancy of the distal heme site by a water molecule, which functions as an additional nonprotein barrier to binding of the ligand to the heme, is also controlled by HisE7. Overall, analysis of gas and water diffusion routes in the subunits of HbA and its GlyE7 variant sheds light on the contribution of distal HisE7 in controlling polar and nonpolar ligand movement between the solvent and the hemes. PMID:26226401

  12. A lipid-mediated conformational switch modulates the thermosensing activity of DesK.

    PubMed

    Inda, María Eugenia; Vandenbranden, Michel; Fernández, Ariel; de Mendoza, Diego; Ruysschaert, Jean-Marie; Cybulski, Larisa Estefanía

    2014-03-01

    The thermosensor DesK is a multipass transmembrane histidine-kinase that allows the bacterium Bacillus subtilis to adjust the levels of unsaturated fatty acids required to optimize membrane lipid fluidity. The cytoplasmic catalytic domain of DesK behaves like a kinase at low temperature and like a phosphatase at high temperature. Temperature sensing involves a built-in instability caused by a group of hydrophilic residues located near the N terminus of the first transmembrane (TM) segment. These residues are buried in the lipid phase at low temperature and partially "buoy" to the aqueous phase at higher temperature with the thinning of the membrane, promoting the required conformational change. Nevertheless, the core question remains poorly understood: How is the information sensed by the transmembrane region converted into a rearrangement in the cytoplasmic catalytic domain to control DesK activity? Here, we identify a "linker region" (KSRKERERLEEK) that connects the TM sensor domain with the cytoplasmic catalytic domain involved in signal transmission. The linker adopts two conformational states in response to temperature-dependent membrane thickness changes: (i) random coiled and bound to the phospholipid head groups at the water-membrane interface, promoting the phosphatase state or (ii) unbound and forming a continuous helix spanning a region from the membrane to the cytoplasm, promoting the kinase state. Our results uphold the view that the linker is endowed with a helix/random coil conformational duality that enables it to behave like a transmission switch, with helix disruption decreasing the kinase/phosphatase activity ratio, as required to modulate the DesK output response. PMID:24522108

  13. tBid Undergoes Multiple Conformational Changes at the Membrane Required for Bax Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Shamas-Din, Aisha; Bindner, Scott; Zhu, Weijia; Zaltsman, Yehudit; Campbell, Clinton; Gross, Atan; Leber, Brian; Andrews, David W.; Fradin, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    Bid is a Bcl-2 family protein that promotes apoptosis by activating Bax and eliciting mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP). Full-length Bid is cleaved in response to apoptotic stimuli into two fragments, p7 and tBid (p15), that are held together by strong hydrophobic interactions until the complex binds to membranes. The detailed mechanism(s) of fragment separation including tBid binding to membranes and release of the p7 fragment to the cytoplasm remain unclear. Using liposomes or isolated mitochondria with fluorescently labeled proteins at physiological concentrations as in vitro models, we report that the two components of the complex quickly separate upon interaction with a membrane. Once tBid binds to the membrane, it undergoes slow structural rearrangements that result in an equilibrium between two major tBid conformations on the membrane. The conformational change of tBid is a prerequisite for interaction with Bax and is, therefore, a novel step that can be modulated to promote or inhibit MOMP. Using automated high-throughput image analysis in cells, we show that down-regulation of Mtch2 causes a significant delay between tBid and Bax relocalization in cells. We propose that by promoting insertion of tBid via a conformational change at the mitochondrial outer membrane, Mtch2 accelerates tBid-mediated Bax activation and MOMP. Thus the interaction of Mtch2 and tBid is a potential target for therapeutic control of Bid initiated cell death. PMID:23744079

  14. Conformational studies on activation of the E. coli uvrB cryptic ATPase

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrand, E.L.; Grossman, L.

    1994-12-31

    Expression of a DNA-dependent ATPase activity by the uvrB protein is essential for early steps (preceding incision) in nucleotide excision repair (NER) in E. coli. Yet, in isolation, uvrB lacks any known catalytic ability. Its cryptic ATPase is elicited in NER by association with uvrA, but it can also be turned on by a specific, omp T-mediated proteolytic elimination of the C-terminal 43 amino acids. The truncated protein uvrB{sup *} may serve as a model for the activated structure induced by complex formation with uvrA. To probe the mechanism of activation, which may be expected to require a series of conformational changes, we have introduced the intrinsic fluorophore tryptophan (Trp) into the ATP binding site of uvrB via site-specific mutagenesis.

  15. Evidence from molecular dynamics simulations of conformational preorganization in the ribonuclease H active site

    PubMed Central

    Stafford, Kate A.; Palmer III, Arthur G.

    2014-01-01

    Ribonuclease H1 (RNase H) enzymes are well-conserved endonucleases that are present in all domains of life and are particularly important in the life cycle of retroviruses as domains within reverse transcriptase. Despite extensive study, especially of the E. coli homolog, the interaction of the highly negatively charged active site with catalytically required magnesium ions remains poorly understood. In this work, we describe molecular dynamics simulations of the E. coli homolog in complex with magnesium ions, as well as simulations of other homologs in their apo states. Collectively, these results suggest that the active site is highly rigid in the apo state of all homologs studied and is conformationally preorganized to favor the binding of a magnesium ion. Notably, representatives of bacterial, eukaryotic, and retroviral RNases H all exhibit similar active-site rigidity, suggesting that this dynamic feature is only subtly modulated by amino acid sequence and is primarily imposed by the distinctive RNase H protein fold. PMID:25075292

  16. Dephosphorylation of F-BAR protein Cdc15 modulates its conformation and stimulates its scaffolding activity at the cell division site

    PubMed Central

    Roberts-Galbraith, Rachel H.; Ohi, Melanie D.; Ballif, Bryan A.; Chen, Jun-Song; McLeod, Ian; McDonald, W. Hayes; Gygi, Steven P.; Yates, John R.; Gould, Kathleen L.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Cytokinesis in Schizosaccharomyces pombe requires the function of Cdc15, founding member of the pombe cdc15 homology (PCH) family of proteins. As an early, abundant contractile ring component with multiple binding partners, Cdc15 plays a key role in organizing the ring. We demonstrate that Cdc15 phosphorylation at many sites generates a closed conformation, inhibits Cdc15 assembly at the division site in interphase, and precludes interaction of Cdc15 with its binding partners. Cdc15 dephosphorylation induces an open conformation, oligomerization, and scaffolding activity during mitosis. Cdc15 mutants with reduced phosphorylation precociously appear at the division site in filament-like structures and display increased association with protein partners and the membrane. Our results indicate that Cdc15 phosphoregulation impels both assembly and disassembly of the contractile apparatus and suggest a regulatory strategy that PCH family and BAR superfamily members might broadly employ to achieve temporal specificity in their roles as linkers between membrane and cytoskeleton. PMID:20603077

  17. The VPS-20 Subunit of the Endosomal Sorting Complex ESCRT-III Exhibits an Open Conformation in the Absence of Upstream Activation

    PubMed Central

    Schuh, Amber L.; Hanna, Michael; Quinney, Kyle; Wang, Lei; Sarkeshik, Ali; Yates, John R.; Audhya, Anjon

    2015-01-01

    Members of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery function in membrane remodeling processes during multivesicular endosome biogenesis, cytokinesis, retroviral budding, and plasma membrane repair. During lumenal vesicle formation at endosomes, the ESCRT-II complex and the ESCRT-III subunit VPS-20 play a specific role in regulating assembly of ESCRT-III filaments, which promote vesicle scission. Previous work suggests that Vps20 isoforms, like other ESCRT-III subunits, exhibits an autoinhibited, closed conformation in solution, and its activation depends on an association with ESCRT-II specifically at membranes. However, we show here that C. elegans ESCRT-II and VPS-20 interact directly in solution, both in cytosolic cell extracts and using recombinant proteins in vitro. Moreover, we demonstrate that purified VPS-20 exhibits an open, extended conformation, irrespective of ESCRT-II binding, in contrast with the closed, autoinhibited architecture of another ESCRT-III subunit, VPS-24. Our data argue that individual ESCRT-III subunits adopt distinct conformations, which are tailored for their specific functions during ESCRT-mediated membrane reorganization events. PMID:25588614

  18. The conformation and activity relationship of benzofuran type of angiotensin II receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Yoo, S E; Kim, S K; Lee, S H; Kim, N J; Lee, D W

    2000-09-01

    As a continuing effort to establish the structure and activity relationship in a benzofuran type of angiotensin II antagonist, we synthesized various regioisomers and performed a series of QSAR analyses. The conformational analyses of target isomers were carried out using molecular mechanics and fine-tuned using the information from the NMR NOE experiment. The conformations of compounds with a good binding activity are quite similar to that of DuP753, a prototype of AII antagonist, suggesting that these compounds also bind to the same site of AII receptor. We then studied the compounds with a varied length of the hydroxyl group bearing side chain to find out the optimum distance between the hydroxyl group and the imidazole ring. The CoMFA with these compounds gave acceptable statistical measures (cross-validated r2 and conventional r2 to be 0.881 and 0.974, respectively) and the map was well consistent with the previously proposed pharmacophore. PMID:11026543

  19. Conformational analysis of a quinolonic ribonucleoside with anti-HSV-1 activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, Julliane D.; Velloso, Marcia Helena R.; Leal, Kátia Z.; Azeredo, Rodrigo B. de V.; Sugiura, Makiko; Albuquerque, Magaly G.; Santos, Fernanda da C.; Souza, Maria Cecília B. V. de; Cunha, Anna Claudia; Seidl, Peter R.; Alencastro, Ricardo B. de; Ferreira, Vitor F.

    2011-01-01

    The infections caused by the Herpes Simplex Virus are one of the most common sources of diseases in adults and several natural nucleoside analogues are currently used in the treatment of these infections. In vitro tests of a series of quinolonic ribonucleosides derivatives synthesized by part of our group indicated that some of them have antiviral activity against HSV-1. The conformational analysis of bioactive compounds is extremely important in order to better understand their chemical structures and biological activity. In this work, we have carried out a nuclear relaxation NMR study of 6-Me ribonucleoside derivative in order to determine if the syn or anti conformation is preferential. The NMR analysis permits the determination of inter-atomic distances by using techniques which are based on nuclear relaxation and related phenomena. Those techniques are non-selective longitudinal or spin-lattice relaxation rates and NULL pulse sequence, which allow the determination of distances between pairs of hydrogen atoms. The results of NMR studies were compared with those obtained by molecular modeling.

  20. Conformational transition in signal transduction: metastable states and transition pathways in the activation of a signaling protein.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Rahul; Yan, Honggao; Cukier, Robert I

    2015-06-01

    Signal transduction is of vital importance to the growth and adaptation of living organisms. The key to understand mechanisms of biological signal transduction is elucidation of the conformational dynamics of its signaling proteins, as the activation of a signaling protein is fundamentally a process of conformational transition from an inactive to an active state. A predominant form of signal transduction for bacterial sensing of environmental changes in the wild or inside their hosts is a variety of two-component systems, in which the conformational transition of a response regulator (RR) from an inactive to an active state initiates responses to the environmental changes. Here, RR activation has been investigated using RR468 as a model system by extensive unbiased all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in explicit solvent, starting from snapshots along a targeted MD trajectory that covers the conformational transition. Markov state modeling, transition path theory, and geometric analyses of the wealth of the MD data have provided a comprehensive description of the RR activation. It involves a network of metastable states, with one metastable state essentially the same as the inactive state and another very similar to the active state that are connected via a small set of intermediates. Five major pathways account for >75% of the fluxes of the conformational transition from the inactive to the active-like state. The thermodynamic stability of the states and the activation barriers between states are found, to identify rate-limiting steps. The conformal transition is initiated predominantly by movements of the β3α3 loop, followed by movements of the β4α4-loop and neighboring α4 helix region, and capped by additional movements of the β3α3 loop. A number of transient hydrophobic and hydrogen bond interactions are revealed, and they may be important for the conformational transition. PMID:25945797

  1. Divalent cations activate TRPV1 through promoting conformational change of the extracellular region

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Ma, Linlin; Cao, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Divalent cations Mg2+ and Ba2+ selectively and directly potentiate transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 heat activation by lowering the activation threshold into the room temperature range. We found that Mg2+ potentiates channel activation only from the extracellular side; on the intracellular side, Mg2+ inhibits channel current. By dividing the extracellularly accessible region of the channel protein into small segments and perturbing the structure of each segment with sequence replacement mutations, we observed that the S1–S2 linker, the S3–S4 linker, and the pore turret are all required for Mg2+ potentiation. Sequence replacements at these regions substantially reduced or eliminated Mg2+-induced activation at room temperature while sparing capsaicin activation. Heat activation was affected by many, but not all, of these structural alternations. These observations indicate that extracellular linkers and the turret may interact with each other. Site-directed fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements further revealed that, like heat, Mg2+ also induces structural changes in the pore turret. Interestingly, turret movement induced by Mg2+ precedes channel activation, suggesting that Mg2+-induced conformational change in the extracellular region most likely serves as the cause of channel activation instead of a coincidental or accommodating structural adjustment. PMID:24344245

  2. A Potential Substrate Binding Conformation of β-Lactams and Insight into the Broad Spectrum of NDM-1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qinghui; He, Lin

    2012-01-01

    New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase 1 (NDM-1) is a key enzyme that the pathogen Klebsiella pneumonia uses to hydrolyze almost all β-lactam antibiotics. It is currently unclear why NDM-1 has a broad spectrum of activity. Docking of the representatives of the β-lactam families into the active site of NDM-1 is reported here. All the β-lactams naturally fit the NDM-1 pocket, implying that NDM-1 can accommodate the substrates without dramatic conformation changes. The docking reveals two major binding modes of the β-lactams, which we tentatively name the S (substrate) and I (inhibitor) conformers. In the S conformers of all the β-lactams, the amide oxygen and the carboxylic group conservatively interact with two zinc ions, while the substitutions on the fused rings show dramatic differences in their conformations and positions. Since the bridging hydroxide ion/water in the S conformer is at the position for the nucleophilic attack, the S conformation may simulate the true binding of a substrate to NDM-1. The I conformer either blocks or displaces the bridging hydroxide ion/water, such as in the case of aztreonam, and is thus inhibitory. The docking also suggests that substitutions on the β-lactam ring are required for β-lactams to bind in the S conformation, and therefore, small β-lactams such as clavulanic acid would be inhibitors of NDM-1. Finally, our docking shows that moxalactam uses its tyrosyl-carboxylic group to compete with the S conformer and would thus be a poor substrate of NDM-1. PMID:22825119

  3. The conformation changes of the finger domain of tissue type plasminogen activator during the activator-inhibitor reaction.

    PubMed

    Wilczyńska, M; Cierniewski, C S

    1990-04-12

    A peptide fragment of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) corresponding to amino acid residues 4-8 (tPA4-8) was synthesized, coupled to thyroglobulin and injected into rabbits. Antibodies specific to the peptide tPA4-8 were purified immunochemically on the pentapeptide coupled to CNBr-Sepha rose 4B. Anti-tPA4-8 antibodies, reacted with iodinated peptide tPA4-8, showing a relatively high binding affinity (KD = 2.3 x 10(-8) M). There was no interaction between anti-tPA4-8 antibodies and native one- or two-chain tPA. However, reduction of disulfide bonds unmasked the epitope on the heavy chain of tPA which became accessible to anti-tPA4-8 antibodies. Similarly, complexing of tPA with alpha 1-antitrypsin inhibitor resulted in unmasking of the epitope formed by amino acid residues in the positions 4-8. Presented data suggest that complexing of tPA with inhibitors results in conformational changes occurring in the "finger" domain of tPA molecule and such conformational transition can be detected by antipeptide antibodies. Therefore, anti-tPA4-8 antibodies may be employed as sequence-specific reporter molecules to monitor local conformational changes in tPA molecule. PMID:2114044

  4. Effects of N-terminus modifications on the conformation and permeation activities of the synthetic peptide L1A.

    PubMed

    Zanin, Luciana Puia Moro; de Araujo, Alexandre Suman; Juliano, Maria Aparecida; Casella, Tiago; Nogueira, Mara Correa Lelles; Ruggiero Neto, João

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the effect of the N-terminus modification of the L1A, a synthetic octadecapeptide, on its helical content, affinity and lytic action in model membranes and on its hemolytic and antibacterial activities. L1A and its acetylated analog displayed a selective antibacterial activity to Gram-negative bacteria without being hemolytic. The covalently linked 2-aminobezoic acid to the N-terminus impaired the antibacterial efficacy and increased hemolysis. Despite their lower net charge (+2), N-terminus modifications resulted in enhanced affinity and improved lytic efficiency in anionic vesicles. The analogs also showed higher helical content and consequently higher amphipathicity in these vesicles. The conformational analysis by molecular dynamics simulations in 30 % of TFE/water showed that the hydrophobic faces of the peptides are in close contact with CF3 groups of TFE while the hydrophilic faces with water molecules. Due to the loss of the amino charge, the N-termini of the analogs are buried in TFE molecules. The analysis of the pair distribution functions, obtained for the center of mass of the charged groups, has evidenced that the state of the N-terminus has influenced the possibility of different ion-pairing. The higher complexity of the bacterial cells compared with anionic vesicles hampers to establish correlations structure-function for the analogs. PMID:26920749

  5. A sandwich ELISA for the conformation-specific quantification of the activated form of human Bax.

    PubMed

    Teijido, Oscar; Ganesan, Yogesh Tengarai; Llanos, Raul; Peton, Ashley; Urtecho, Jean-Baptiste; Soprani, Adauri; Villamayor, Aimee; Antonsson, Bruno; Manon, Stéphen; Dejean, Laurent

    2016-03-15

    Bcl-2 family proteins are critical regulators of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP), which represents the point of no return of apoptotic cell death. The exposure of the Bax N-terminus at the mitochondria reflects Bax activation; and this activated configuration of the Bax protein is associated with MOMP. N-terminal exposure can be detected using specific monoclonal and/or polyclonal antibodies, and the onset of activated Bax has extensively been used as an early marker of apoptosis. The protocols of immunoprecipitation and/or immunocytochemistry commonly used to detect activated Bax are long and tedious, and allow semiquantification of the antigen at best. The sandwich ELISA protocol we developed has a 5 ng/mL detection limit and is highly specific for the activated conformation of Bax. This ELISA allows a rapid quantification of activated human Bax in whole cells and isolated mitochondria protein extracts. These properties grant this assay the potential to further clarify the prognostic and diagnostic value of activated Bax in disorders associated with deregulated apoptotic pathways such as degenerative diseases or cancer. PMID:26748144

  6. Structural variants of yeast prions show conformer-specific requirements for chaperone activity

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Kevin C.; True, Heather L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Molecular chaperones monitor protein homeostasis and defend against the misfolding and aggregation of proteins that is associated with protein conformational disorders. In these diseases, a variety of different aggregate structures can form. These are called prion strains, or variants, in prion diseases, and cause variation in disease pathogenesis. Here, we use variants of the yeast prions [RNQ+] and [PSI+] to explore the interactions of chaperones with distinct aggregate structures. We found that prion variants show striking variation in their relationship with Hsp40s. Specifically, the yeast Hsp40 Sis1, and its human ortholog Hdj1, had differential capacities to process prion variants, suggesting that Hsp40 selectivity has likely changed through evolution. We further show that such selectivity involves different domains of Sis1, with some prion conformers having a greater dependence on particular Hsp40 domains. Moreover, [PSI+] variants were more sensitive to certain alterations in Hsp70 activity as compared to [RNQ+] variants. Collectively, our data indicate that distinct chaperone machinery is required, or has differential capacity, to process different aggregate structures. Elucidating the intricacies of chaperone-client interactions, and how these are altered by particular client structures, will be crucial to understanding how this system can go awry in disease and contribute to pathological variation. PMID:25060529

  7. Conformationally Constrained Peptidomimetic Inhibitors of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3: Evaluation and Molecular Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Pijus K.; Limbrick, Donald; Coleman, David R.; Dyer, Garrett A.; Ren, Zhiyong; Birtwistle, J. Sanderson; Xiong, Chiyi; Chen, Xiaomin; Briggs, James M.; McMurray, John S.

    2009-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) is involved in aberrant growth and survival signals in malignant tumor cells and is a validated target for anti-cancer drug design. We are targeting its SH2 domain to prevent docking to cytokine and growth factor receptors and subsequent signaling. The amino acids of our lead phosphopeptide, Ac-pTyr-Leu-Pro-Gln-Thr-Val-NH2, were replaced with conformationally constrained mimics. Structure-affinity studies led to the peptidomimetic, pCinn-Haic-Gln-NHBn (21) which had an IC50 of 162 nM (fluorescence polarization), as compared to 290 nM for the lead phosphopeptide (pCinn = 4-phosphoryloxycinnamate, Haic = (2S,5S)-5-amino-1,2,4,5,6,7-hexahydro-4-oxo-azepino[3,2,1-hi]indole-2-carboxylic acid). pCinn-Haic-Gln-OH was docked to the SH2 domain (AUTODOCK) and the two highest populated clusters were subjected to molecular dynamics simulations. Both converged to a common peptide conformation. The complex exhibits unique hydrogen bonding between Haic and Gln and Stat3 as well as hydrophobic interactions between the protein and pCinn and Haic. PMID:19334714

  8. Effect of succinylation (3-carboxypropionylation) on the conformation and immunological activity of ovalbumin.

    PubMed Central

    Kidwai, S A; Ansari, A A; Salahuddin, A

    1976-01-01

    The epsilon-amino groups of ovalbumin were modified with succinic anhydride; as many as 16 lysine residues were succinylated (3-carboxypropionylated). The five succinylated derivatives thus prepared were homogeneous with respect to the extent of chemical modification as shown by electrophoretic and immunological data. Succinylation of the amino groups altered electrophoretic mobility and isoionic pH of ovalbumin in the expected direction. U.v.-absorption and fluorescence spectra suggested changes in the microenvironment of the chromophores in the modified proteins. The difference-spectral results showed greater exposure of tyrosine and tryptophan residues in the succinylated ovalbumin. Increase in susceptibility to tryptic digestion, Stokes radius and intrinsic viscosity of native ovalbumin, which was observed on successive increase in the chemical modification, demonstrated a conformational change that was proportional to the extent of modification. The loss of immunological reactivity caused by chemical modification also indicated a conformational change in succinylated ovalbumin. The fact that the intrinsic viscosity of maximally modified ovalbumin was less than one-third of that for the completely denatured protein in 6M-guanidinium chloride suggested that the modified protein contained significant residual native structure. The latter presumably accommodates some antigenic determinants accounting for 37% residual immunological activity observed with maximally succinylated ovalbumin. Images PLATE 2 PLATE 1 PMID:820333

  9. Raman optical activity spectra and conformational elucidation of chiral drugs. The case of the antiangiogenic aeroplysinin-1.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Ortega, Belén; Casado, Juan; Blanch, Ewan W; López Navarrete, Juan T; Quesada, Ana R; Ramírez, Francisco J

    2011-04-01

    We present the determination of the conformational properties of aeroplysinin-1 in aqueous solution by means of a combined experimental and theoretical Raman optical activity (ROA) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) study. Aeroplysinin-1 is an antiangiogenic drug extracted from the sponge Aplysina cavernicola which has been proved to be a valuable candidate for the treatment of cancer and other antiangiogenic diseases. Our study shows that this molecule possesses the 1S,6R absolute configuration in aqueous solution, where only two conformers are present to a significant level. We discuss in detail the relationships between the chiro-optical ROA and VCD features, and the structural properties of various energy accessible conformers are described. The present work is one of the first studies in which both ROA and VCD have been used as complementary tools for the determination of absolute configuration and dominant solution-state conformations of an unknown therapeutically significant molecule. PMID:21401047

  10. Thermal activation of a group II intron ribozyme reveals multiple conformational states.

    PubMed

    Franzen, J S; Zhang, M; Chay, T R; Peebles, C L

    1994-09-20

    Conformational changes often accompany biological catalysis. Group II introns promote a variety of reactions in vitro that show an unusually sharp temperature dependence. This suggests that the chemical steps are accompanied by the conversion of a folded-but-inactive form to a differently folded active state. We report here the kinetic analysis of 5'-splice-junction hydrolysis (SJH) by E1:12345, a transcript containing the 5'-exon plus the first five of six intron secondary structure domains. The pseudo-first-order SJH reaction shows (1) activation by added KCl to 1.5 M; (2) cooperative activation by added MgCl2, nHill = 4.1-4.3, and [MgCl2]vmax/2 approximately 0.040 M; and (3) a rather high apparent activation energy, Ea approximately 50 kcal mol-l. In contrast, the 5'-terminal phosphodiester bond of a domain 5 transcript (GGD5) was hydrolyzed with Ea approximately 30 kcal mol-1 under SJH conditions; the 5'-GG leader dinucleotide presumably lacks secondary structure constraints. The effect of adding the chaotropic salt tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA) was also investigated. TEA reduced the melting temperatures of GGD5 and E1:12345. TEA also shifted the profile of rate versus temperature for SJH by E1:12345 toward lower temperatures without affecting the maximum rate. TEA had little effect on the rate of hydrolysis of the 5'-phosphodiester bond of GGD5. The high apparent activation enthalpy and entropy for SJH along with the effect of TEA on these parameters imply that conversion of an inactive form of E1:12345 to an active conformation accompanies enhanced occupation of the transition state as the temperature is raised to that for maximum SJH. Analytical modeling indicates that either a two-state model (open and disordered, with open being active) or a three-state model (compact, open, and disordered) could account for the temperature dependence of kSJH. However, the three-state model is clearly preferable, since it does not require that the activation parameters

  11. DNA binding induces active site conformational change in the human TREX2 3'-exonuclease.

    PubMed

    de Silva, Udesh; Perrino, Fred W; Hollis, Thomas

    2009-04-01

    The TREX enzymes process DNA as the major 3'-->5' exonuclease activity in mammalian cells. TREX2 and TREX1 are members of the DnaQ family of exonucleases and utilize a two metal ion catalytic mechanism of hydrolysis. The structure of the dimeric TREX2 enzyme in complex with single-stranded DNA has revealed binding properties that are distinct from the TREX1 protein. The TREX2 protein undergoes a conformational change in the active site upon DNA binding including ordering of active site residues and a shift of an active site helix. Surprisingly, even when a single monomer binds DNA, both monomers in the dimer undergo the structural rearrangement. From this we have proposed a model for DNA binding and 3' hydrolysis for the TREX2 dimer. The structure also shows how TREX proteins potentially interact with double-stranded DNA and suggest features that might be involved in strand denaturation to provide a single-stranded substrate for the active site. PMID:19321497

  12. c-Abl Tyrosine Kinase Adopts Multiple Active Conformational States in Solution

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases of the Abl family have diverse roles in normal cellular regulation and drive several forms of leukemia as oncogenic fusion proteins. In the crystal structure of the inactive c-Abl kinase core, the SH2 and SH3 domains dock onto the back of the kinase domain, resulting in a compact, assembled state. This inactive conformation is stabilized by the interaction of the myristoylated N-cap with a pocket in the C-lobe of the kinase domain. Mutations that perturb these intramolecular interactions result in kinase activation. Here, we present X-ray scattering solution structures of multidomain c-Abl kinase core proteins modeling diverse active states. Surprisingly, the relative positions of the regulatory N-cap, SH3, and SH2 domains in an active myristic acid binding pocket mutant (A356N) were virtually identical to those of the assembled wild-type kinase core, indicating that Abl kinase activation does not require dramatic reorganization of the downregulated core structure. In contrast, the positions of the SH2 and SH3 domains in a clinically relevant imatinib-resistant gatekeeper mutant (T315I) appear to be reconfigured relative to their positions in the wild-type protein. Our results demonstrate that c-Abl kinase activation can occur either with (T315I) or without (A356N) global allosteric changes in the core, revealing the potential for previously unrecognized signaling diversity. PMID:27166638

  13. Conformational study reveals amino acid residues essential for hemagglutinating and anti-proliferative activities of Clematis montana lectin.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bangmin; Zhang, Bin; Qi, Wei; Zhu, Yanan; Zhao, Yan; Zhou, Nan; Sun, Rong; Bao, Jinku; Wu, Chuanfang

    2014-11-01

    Clematis montana lectin (CML), a novel mannose-binding lectin purified from C. montana Buch.-Ham stem (Ranunculaceae), has been proved to have hemagglutinating activity in rabbit erythrocytes and apoptosis-inducing activity in tumor cells. However, the biochemical properties of CML have not revealed and its structural information still needs to be elucidated. In this study, it was found that CML possessed quite good thermostability and alkaline resistance, and its hemagglutinating activity was bivalent metal cation dependent. In addition, hemagglutination test and fluorescence spectroscopy proved that GuHCl, urea, and sodium dodecyl sulfate could change the conformation of CML and further caused the loss of hemagglutination activity. Moreover, the changes of fluorescence spectrum indicated that the tryptophan (Trp) microenvironment conversion might be related to the conformation and bioactivities of CML. In addition, it was also found that Trp residues, arginine (Arg) residues, and sulfhydryl were important for the hemagglutinating activity of CML, but only Trp was proved to be crucial for the CML conformation. Furthermore, the Trp, Arg, and sulfhydryl-modified CML exhibited 97.17%, 76.99%, and 49.64% loss of its anti-proliferative activity, respectively, which was consistent with the alterations of its hemagglutinating activity. Given these findings, Trp residues on the surface of CML are essential for the active center to form substrate-accessible conformation and suitable environment for carbohydrate binding. PMID:25239139

  14. RNA aptamers as conformational probes and regulatory agents for plasminogen activator inhibitor-1.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Jeppe B; Dupont, Daniel M; Andersen, Thomas B; Nielsen, Anne F; Sang, Lu; Brix, Ditte M; Jensen, Jan K; Broos, Thomas; Hendrickx, Maarten L V; Christensen, Anni; Kjems, Jørgen; Andreasen, Peter A

    2010-05-18

    The hallmark of serpins is the ability to undergo the so-called "stressed-to-relaxed" switch during which the surface-exposed reactive center loop (RCL) becomes incorporated as strand 4 in central beta-sheet A. RCL insertion drives not only the inhibitory reaction of serpins with their target serine proteases but also the conversion to the inactive latent state. RCL insertion is coupled to conformational changes in the flexible joint region flanking beta-sheet A. One interesting serpin is plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), a fast and specific inhibitor of the serine proteases tissue-type and urokinase-type plasminogen activator. Via its flexible joints' region, native PAI-1 binds vitronectin and relaxed, protease-complexed PAI-1 certain endocytosis receptors. From a library of 35-nucleotides long 2'-fluoropyrimidine-containing RNA oligonucleotides, we have isolated two aptamers binding PAI-1 by the flexible joint region with low nanomolar K(D) values. One of the aptamers exhibited measurable binding to native PAI-1 only, while the other also bound relaxed PAI-1. While none of the aptamers inhibited the antiproteolytic effect of PAI-1, both aptamers inhibited vitronectin binding and the relaxed PAI-1-binding aptamer also endocytosis receptor binding. The aptamer binding exclusively to native PAI-1 increased the half-life for the latency transition to more than 6 h, manyfold more than vitronectin. Contact with Lys124 in the flexible joint region was critical for strong inhibition of the latency transition and the lack of binding to relaxed PAI-1. We conclude that aptamers yield important information about the serpin conformational switch and, because they can compete with high-affinity protein-protein interactions, may provide leads for pharmacological intervention. PMID:20387790

  15. Effect of copper oxide nanoparticles on the conformation and activity of β-galactosidase.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Gulam; Khan, Mohd Jahir; Ahmad, Abrar; Maskat, Mohamad Yusof; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2014-11-01

    The primary objective of this study is to explore the interaction of β-galactosidase with copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs). Steady-state absorption, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic techniques have been employed to unveil the conformational changes of β-galactosidase induced by the binding of CuO NPs. Temperature dependent fluorescence quenching results indicates a static quenching mechanism in the present case. The binding thermodynamic parameters delineate the predominant role of H-bonding and van der Waals forces between β-galactosidase and CuO NPs binding process. The binding was studied by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and the result revealed that the complexation is enthalpy driven, the ΔH°<0, ΔS°<0 indicates the formation of hydrogen bonds between β-galactosidase and CuO NPs occurs. Disruption of the native conformation of the protein upon binding with CuO NPs is reflected through a reduced functionality (in terms of hydrolase activity) of the protein CuO NPs conjugate system in comparison to the native protein and CuO NPs exhibited a competitive mode of inhibition. This also supports the general belief that H-bond formation occurs with NPs is associated with a lesser extent of modification in the native structure. Morphological features and size distributions were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Additionally the considerable increase in the Rh following the addition of CuO NPs accounts for the unfolding of β-galactosidase. Chemical and thermal unfolding of β-galactosidase, when carried out in the presence of CuO NPs, also indicated a small perturbation in the protein structure. These alterations in functional activity of nanoparticle bound β-galactosidase which will have important consequences should be taken into consideration while using nanoparticles for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:25260221

  16. Cofactor bypass variants reveal a conformational control mechanism governing cell wall polymerase activity.

    PubMed

    Markovski, Monica; Bohrhunter, Jessica L; Lupoli, Tania J; Uehara, Tsuyoshi; Walker, Suzanne; Kahne, Daniel E; Bernhardt, Thomas G

    2016-04-26

    To fortify their cytoplasmic membrane and protect it from osmotic rupture, most bacteria surround themselves with a peptidoglycan (PG) exoskeleton synthesized by the penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs). As their name implies, these proteins are the targets of penicillin and related antibiotics. We and others have shown that the PG synthases PBP1b and PBP1a of Escherichia coli require the outer membrane lipoproteins LpoA and LpoB, respectively, for their in vivo function. Although it has been demonstrated that LpoB activates the PG polymerization activity of PBP1b in vitro, the mechanism of activation and its physiological relevance have remained unclear. We therefore selected for variants of PBP1b (PBP1b*) that bypass the LpoB requirement for in vivo function, reasoning that they would shed light on LpoB function and its activation mechanism. Several of these PBP1b variants were isolated and displayed elevated polymerization activity in vitro, indicating that the activation of glycan polymer growth is indeed one of the relevant functions of LpoB in vivo. Moreover, the location of amino acid substitutions causing the bypass phenotype on the PBP1b structure support a model in which polymerization activation proceeds via the induction of a conformational change in PBP1b initiated by LpoB binding to its UB2H domain, followed by its transmission to the glycosyl transferase active site. Finally, phenotypic analysis of strains carrying a PBP1b* variant revealed that the PBP1b-LpoB complex is most likely not providing an important physical link between the inner and outer membranes at the division site, as has been previously proposed. PMID:27071112

  17. The Transition from Closed to Open Conformation of Treponema pallidum Outer Membrane-associated Lipoprotein TP0453 Involves Membrane Sensing and Integration by Two Amphipathic Helices*

    PubMed Central

    Luthra, Amit; Zhu, Guangyu; Desrosiers, Daniel C.; Eggers, Christian H.; Mulay, Vishwaroop; Anand, Arvind; McArthur, Fiona A.; Romano, Fabian B.; Caimano, Melissa J.; Heuck, Alejandro P.; Malkowski, Michael G.; Radolf, Justin D.

    2011-01-01

    The molecular architecture and composition of the outer membrane (OM) of Treponema pallidum (Tp), the noncultivable agent of venereal syphilis, differ considerably from those of typical Gram-negative bacteria. Several years ago we described TP0453, the only lipoprotein associated with the inner leaflet of the Tp OM. Whereas polypeptides of other treponemal lipoproteins are hydrophilic, non-lipidated TP0453 can integrate into membranes, a property attributed to its multiple amphipathic helices (AHs). Furthermore, membrane integration of the TP0453 polypeptide was found to increase membrane permeability, suggesting the molecule functions in a porin-like manner. To better understand the mechanism of membrane integration of TP0453 and its physiological role in Tp OM biogenesis, we solved its crystal structure and used mutagenesis to identify membrane insertion elements. The crystal structure of TP0453 consists of an α/β/α-fold and includes five stably folded AHs. In high concentrations of detergent, TP0453 transitions from a closed to open conformation by lateral movement of two groups of AHs, exposing a large hydrophobic cavity. Triton X-114 phase partitioning, liposome floatation assay, and bis-1-anilino-8-naphthalenesulfonate binding revealed that two adjacent AHs are critical for membrane sensing/integration. Using terbium-dipicolinic acid complex-loaded large unilamellar vesicles, we found that TP0453 increased efflux of fluorophore only at acidic pH. Gel filtration and cross-linking experiments demonstrated that one AH critical for membrane sensing/insertion also forms a dimeric interface. Based on structural dynamics and comparison with Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipoproteins LprG and LppX, we propose that TP0453 functions as a carrier of lipids, glycolipids, and/or derivatives during OM biogenesis. PMID:21965687

  18. The structure of putative N-acetyl glutamate kinase from Thermus thermophilus reveals an intermediate active site conformation of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, Ramya; Ragunathan, Preethi; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Kumarevel, Thirumananseri; Ponnuraj, Karthe

    2012-04-13

    The de novo biosynthesis of arginine in microorganisms and plants is accomplished via several enzymatic steps. The enzyme N-acetyl glutamate kinase (NAGK) catalyzes the phosphorylation of the γ-COO(-) group of N-acetyl-L-glutamate (NAG) by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) which is the second rate limiting step in arginine biosynthesis pathway. Here we report the crystal structure of putative N-acetyl glutamate kinase (NAGK) from Thermus thermophilus HB8 (TtNAGK) determined at 1.92Å resolution. The structural analysis of TtNAGK suggests that the dimeric quaternary state of the enzyme and arginine insensitive nature are similar to mesophilic Escherichia coli NAGK. These features are significantly different from its thermophilic homolog Thermatoga maritima NAGK which is hexameric and arginine-sensitive. TtNAGK is devoid of its substrates but contains two sulfates at the active site. Very interestingly the active site of the enzyme adopts a conformation which is not completely open or closed and likely represents an intermediate stage in the catalytic cycle unlike its structural homologs, which all exist either in the open or closed conformation. Engineering arginine biosynthesis pathway enzymes for the production of l-arginine is an important industrial application. The structural comparison of TtNAGK with EcNAGK revealed the structural basis of thermostability of TtNAGK and this information could be very useful to generate mutants of NAGK with increased overall stability. PMID:22452987

  19. 12 CFR 225.123 - Activities closely related to banking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... in the same State. (e) Data processing. In providing packaged data processing and transmission..., financial or economic data on data processing or transmission equipment or facilities used in connection with permissible data processing and data transmission activities, where: (A) Equipment is...

  20. VARIABLE ACTIVE SITE LOOP CONFORMATIONS ACCOMMODATE THE BINDING OF MACROCYCLIC LARGAZOLE ANALOGUES TO HDAC8

    PubMed Central

    Decroos, Christophe; Clausen, Dane J.; Haines, Brandon E.; Wiest, Olaf; Williams, Robert M.; Christianson, David W.

    2015-01-01

    The macrocyclic depsipeptide Largazole is a potent inhibitor of metal-dependent histone deacetylases (HDACs), some of which are drug targets for cancer chemotherapy. Indeed, Largazole partially resembles Romidepsin (FK228), a macrocyclic depsipeptide already approved for clinical use. Each inhibitor contains a pendant side chain thiol that coordinates to the active site Zn2+ ion, as observed in the X-ray crystal structure of the HDAC8–Largazole complex [Cole, K. E.; Dowling, D. P.; Boone, M. A.; Phillips, A. J.; Christianson, D. W. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2011, 133, 12474]. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structures of HDAC8 complexed with three synthetic analogues of Largazole in which the depsipeptide ester is replaced with a rigid amide linkage. In two of these analogues, a 6-membered pyridine ring is also substituted (with two different orientations) for the 5-membered thiazole ring in the macrocycle skeleton. The side chain thiol group of each analogue coordinates to the active site Zn2+ ion with nearly ideal geometry, thereby preserving the hallmark structural feature of inhibition by Largazole. Surprisingly, in comparison with the binding of Largazole, these analogues trigger alternative conformational changes in the L1 and L2 loops flanking the active site. However, despite these structural differences, inhibitory potency is generally comparable to, or just moderately less than, the inhibitory potency of Largazole. Thus, this study reveals important new structure-affinity relationships for the binding of macrocyclic inhibitors to HDAC8. PMID:25793284

  1. Effects of perfluorooctane sulfonate on the conformation and activity of bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanqing; Zhang, Hongmei; Kang, Yijun; Cao, Jian

    2016-06-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is among the most prominent contaminates in human serum and has been reported to possess potential toxicity to the human body. In this study, the effects of PFOS on the conformation and activity of bovine serum albumin (BSA) were investigated in vitro. The results indicated that the binding interaction of PFOS with BSA destroyed the tertiary and secondary structures of protein with the loss of α-helix structure and the increasing of hydrophobic microenvironment of the Trp or Tyr residues. During the thermal denaturation protein, PFOS increases the protein stability of BSA. The proportion of α-helix decreased on increasing the PFOS concentration and the microenvironment of the Trp or Tyr residues becomes more hydrophobic. The results from molecular modeling indicated that BSA had not only one possible binding site to bind with PFOS by the polar interaction, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic forces. In addition, the BSA relative activities were decreased with the increase of PFOS concentration. Such loss of BSA activity in the presence of PFOS indicated that one of the binding sites in BSA is located in subdomain IIIA, which is in good agreement with the fluorescence spectroscopic experiments and molecular modeling results. This study offers a comprehensive picture of the interactions of PFOS with serum albumin and provides insights into the toxicological effect of perfluoroalkylated substances. PMID:27031195

  2. Functionally relevant diversity of closely related Nitrospira in activated sludge

    PubMed Central

    Gruber-Dorninger, Christiane; Pester, Michael; Kitzinger, Katharina; Savio, Domenico F; Loy, Alexander; Rattei, Thomas; Wagner, Michael; Daims, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Nitrospira are chemolithoautotrophic nitrite-oxidizing bacteria that catalyze the second step of nitrification in most oxic habitats and are important for excess nitrogen removal from sewage in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). To date, little is known about their diversity and ecological niche partitioning within complex communities. In this study, the fine-scale community structure and function of Nitrospira was analyzed in two full-scale WWTPs as model ecosystems. In Nitrospira-specific 16S rRNA clone libraries retrieved from each plant, closely related phylogenetic clusters (16S rRNA identities between clusters ranged from 95.8% to 99.6%) within Nitrospira lineages I and II were found. Newly designed probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) allowed the specific detection of several of these clusters, whose coexistence in the WWTPs was shown for prolonged periods of several years. In situ ecophysiological analyses based on FISH, relative abundance and spatial arrangement quantification, as well as microautoradiography revealed functional differences of these Nitrospira clusters regarding the preferred nitrite concentration, the utilization of formate as substrate and the spatial coaggregation with ammonia-oxidizing bacteria as symbiotic partners. Amplicon pyrosequencing of the nxrB gene, which encodes subunit beta of nitrite oxidoreductase of Nitrospira, revealed in one of the WWTPs as many as 121 species-level nxrB operational taxonomic units with highly uneven relative abundances in the amplicon library. These results show a previously unrecognized high diversity of Nitrospira in engineered systems, which is at least partially linked to niche differentiation and may have important implications for process stability. PMID:25148481

  3. 12 CFR 225.126 - Activities not closely related to banking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Activities not closely related to banking. 225.126 Section 225.126 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE... Financial Holding Companies Interpretations § 225.126 Activities not closely related to banking. Pursuant...

  4. 12 CFR 225.126 - Activities not closely related to banking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Activities not closely related to banking. 225.126 Section 225.126 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE... Financial Holding Companies Interpretations § 225.126 Activities not closely related to banking. Pursuant...

  5. Conformational Flexibility of a Short Loop near the Active Site of the SARS-3CLpro is Essential to Maintain Catalytic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunmei; Teng, Xin; Qi, Yifei; Tang, Bo; Shi, Hailing; Ma, Xiaomin; Lai, Luhua

    2016-02-01

    The SARS 3C-like proteinase (SARS-3CLpro), which is the main proteinase of the SARS coronavirus, is essential to the virus life cycle. This enzyme has been shown to be active as a dimer in which only one protomer is active. However, it remains unknown how the dimer structure maintains an active monomer conformation. It has been observed that the Ser139-Leu141 loop forms a short 310-helix that disrupts the catalytic machinery in the inactive monomer structure. We have tried to disrupt this helical conformation by mutating L141 to T in the stable inactive monomer G11A/R298A/Q299A. The resulting tetra-mutant G11A/L141T/R298A/Q299A is indeed enzymatically active as a monomer. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the L141T mutation disrupts the 310-helix and helps to stabilize the active conformation. The coil-310-helix conformational transition of the Ser139-Leu141 loop serves as an enzyme activity switch. Our study therefore indicates that the dimer structure can stabilize the active conformation but is not a required structure in the evolution of the active enzyme, which can also arise through simple mutations.

  6. Conformational analysis of 2-substituted piperazines.

    PubMed

    Kallel, E Adam; Vangel, Colin; Elbaum, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    The unusual activity differences of carbon linked versus oxygen linked 2-substituted piperazines as α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists led to a conformational study of several examples. The conformational preferences of which are absent from the literature. We report the first study and explanation of the conformational preference of 2-substiturted piperazines and show an example of how this preference controls binding in a pharmaceutically relevant case. In all cases the axial conformation for these 1-acyl and 1 aryl 2-substituted piperazines was found to be preferred. For the ether linked compounds, the axial conformation was found to be further stabilized by an intramolecular hydrogen bond. The axial orientation also places the basic and pyridyl nitrogens into a special orientation that closely mimics nicotine. Molecular modeling studies confirm that the R enantiomers of the compounds can bind to the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor with the basic and pyridyl nitrogens colocalized with their counterparts in Epibatidine. PMID:27212066

  7. The effect of methyl-donated hydrogen bonding on active site conformations of hyaluronate lyase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migues, Angela N.; Vergenz, Robert A.; Moore, Kevin B.

    2010-03-01

    Geometric evidence shows a val-A252 methyl-donated (MD) hydrogen bond (HB) in hyaluronate lyase (Streptococcus pneumoniae) interacts with nearby NH--O and OH--O HBs, distorting active-site helical structure. Results for model fragment A248-254 are based on experimental heavy atom positions with ab initio hydrogen atoms. The MDHB, with (H-O distance, donor-H-O angle) = (2.3å; 174^o), exhibits more favorable geometry than thr-A253 OH--O HB (1.8å; 170^o) to the same ala-249 C=O. Consequently, thr-253 N-H--O interaction is forced closer to lys-250 C=O than ala-249 C=O(2.6 versus 2.7å). A novel method has been developed to quantify the effects of atomic diplacements on motions of neighboring helices. A coordinate system was established to track the movement of specific residues and to ascertain the effect of such motions on active site conformations.

  8. Active vibration and balance system for closed cycle thermodynamic machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Songgang (Inventor); Augenblick, John E. (Inventor); Peterson, Allen A. (Inventor); White, Maurice A. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An active balance system is provided for counterbalancing vibrations of an axially reciprocating machine. The balance system includes a support member, a flexure assembly, a counterbalance mass, and a linear motor or an actuator. The support member is configured for attachment to the machine. The flexure assembly includes at least one flat spring having connections along a central portion and an outer peripheral portion. One of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion is fixedly mounted to the support member. The counterbalance mass is fixedly carried by the flexure assembly along another of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion. The linear motor has one of a stator and a mover fixedly mounted to the support member and another of the stator and the mover fixedly mounted to the counterbalance mass. The linear motor is operative to axially reciprocate the counterbalance mass. A method is also provided.

  9. Rate of hydrolysis in ATP synthase is fine-tuned by α-subunit motif controlling active site conformation.

    PubMed

    Beke-Somfai, Tamás; Lincoln, Per; Nordén, Bengt

    2013-02-01

    Computer-designed artificial enzymes will require precise understanding of how conformation of active sites may control barrier heights of key transition states, including dependence on structure and dynamics at larger molecular scale. F(o)F(1) ATP synthase is interesting as a model system: a delicate molecular machine synthesizing or hydrolyzing ATP using a rotary motor. Isolated F(1) performs hydrolysis with a rate very sensitive to ATP concentration. Experimental and theoretical results show that, at low ATP concentrations, ATP is slowly hydrolyzed in the so-called tight binding site, whereas at higher concentrations, the binding of additional ATP molecules induces rotation of the central γ-subunit, thereby forcing the site to transform through subtle conformational changes into a loose binding site in which hydrolysis occurs faster. How the 1-Å-scale rearrangements are controlled is not yet fully understood. By a combination of theoretical approaches, we address how large macromolecular rearrangements may manipulate the active site and how the reaction rate changes with active site conformation. Simulations reveal that, in response to γ-subunit position, the active site conformation is fine-tuned mainly by small α-subunit changes. Quantum mechanics-based results confirm that the sub-Ångström gradual changes between tight and loose binding site structures dramatically alter the hydrolysis rate. PMID:23345443

  10. Methods for determining enzymatic activity comprising heating and agitation of closed volumes

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, David Neil; Henriksen, Emily DeCrescenzo; Reed, David William; Jensen, Jill Renee

    2016-03-15

    Methods for determining thermophilic enzymatic activity include heating a substrate solution in a plurality of closed volumes to a predetermined reaction temperature. Without opening the closed volumes, at least one enzyme is added, substantially simultaneously, to the closed volumes. At the predetermined reaction temperature, the closed volumes are agitated and then the activity of the at least one enzyme is determined. The methods are conducive for characterizing enzymes of high-temperature reactions, with insoluble substrates, with substrates and enzymes that do not readily intermix, and with low volumes of substrate and enzyme. Systems for characterizing the enzymes are also disclosed.

  11. Conformable actively multiplexed high-density surface electrode array for brain interfacing

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, John; Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Litt, Brian; Viventi, Jonathan

    2015-01-13

    Provided are methods and devices for interfacing with brain tissue, specifically for monitoring and/or actuation of spatio-temporal electrical waveforms. The device is conformable having a high electrode density and high spatial and temporal resolution. A conformable substrate supports a conformable electronic circuit and a barrier layer. Electrodes are positioned to provide electrical contact with a brain tissue. A controller monitors or actuates the electrodes, thereby interfacing with the brain tissue. In an aspect, methods are provided to monitor or actuate spatio-temporal electrical waveform over large brain surface areas by any of the devices disclosed herein.

  12. The Catalytic Activity of Protein-Disulfide Isomerase Requires a Conformationally Flexible Molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, G.; Kober, F; Lewandrowski, U; Sickmann, A; Lennarz, W; Schindelin, H

    2008-01-01

    Protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI) catalyzes the formation of the correct pattern of disulfide bonds in secretory proteins. A low resolution crystal structure of yeast PDI described here reveals large scale conformational changes compared with the initially reported structure, indicating that PDI is a highly flexible molecule with its catalytic domains, a and a?, representing two mobile arms connected to a more rigid core composed of the b and b? domains. Limited proteolysis revealed that the linker between the a domain and the core is more susceptible to degradation than that connecting the a? domain to the core. By restricting the two arms with inter-domain disulfide bonds, the molecular flexibility of PDI, especially that of its a domain, was demonstrated to be essential for the enzymatic activity in vitro and in vivo. The crystal structure also featured a PDI dimer, and a propensity to dimerize in solution and in the ER was confirmed by cross-linking experiments and the split green fluorescent protein system. Although sedimentation studies suggested that the self-association of PDI is weak, we hypothesize that PDI exists as an interconvertible mixture of monomers and dimers in the endoplasmic reticulum due to its high abundance in this compartment.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of phosphorylated galactomannan: the effect of DS on solution conformation and antioxidant activities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junlong; Yang, Ting; Tian, Jia; Zeng, Tao; Wang, Xiaofang; Yao, Jian; Zhang, Ji; Lei, Ziqiang

    2014-11-26

    Phosphorylated derivatives of galactomannan from guar gum (GG) with the degree of substitution (DS) of 0.35-0.52 were synthesized using POCl3/pyridine. FT-IR, (13)C NMR and XPS results revealed that phosphorylation had occurred and C-6 substitution was predominant in phosphorylated guar gum (PGG). PGG showed an increase in Mw and more broad molar mass distribution in size exclusion chromatography (SEC) analysis. Higher reaction temperature (above 60 °C) resulted in a higher MW value in PGG. It might be due to the cross-linking of polysaccharide chains by POCl3 via di-ester which was also supported by monosaccharide composition result. Results of M(W) - (S(2))(z)(1/2) showed a decrease in fractal dimension (df) values. DS had greater influence on its conformation in aqueous solution. The introduction of -PO3H2 groups improved significantly the stiffness of the chains due to the electrostatic effect. Furthermore, antioxidant experiments revealed that high DS could enhance the scavenging activities of radicals of PGG in vitro. PMID:25256491

  14. Increased phospholipase A2 activity with phosphorylation of peroxiredoxin 6 requires a conformational change in the protein

    PubMed Central

    Rahaman, Hamidur; Zhou, Suiping; Dodia, Chandra; Feinstein, Sheldon I.; Huang, Shaohui; Speicher, David; Fisher, Aron B.

    2012-01-01

    We have shown previously and confirmed in the present study that the phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity of peroxiredoxin 6 (Prdx6) is markedly increased by phosphorylation. This report evaluated the conformation and thermodynamic stability of Prdx6 protein after phosphorylation to understand the physical basis for increased activity. Phosphorylation resulted in decreased negative far-UV CD, increased ANS binding, and lack of rigid tertiary structure, compatible with a change in conformation to that of a molten globule. The ΔGDo was 3.3 ± 0.3 kcal mol-1 for Prdx6 and 1.7 ± 0.7 kcal mol-1 for pPrdx6 suggesting that phosphorylation destabilizes the protein. Phosphorylation of Prdx6 changed the conformation of the N-terminal domain exposing Trp 33, as determined by tryptophan fluorescence and NaI fluorescence quenching. The kinetics of interaction of proteins with unilamellar liposomes (DPPC/egg PC/cholesterol/PG; 50:25:15:10, mol/mol) was evaluated with tryptophan fluorescence. pPrdx6 bound to liposomes with higher affinity (Kd, 5.6 ± 1.2 μM) in comparison to Prdx6 (Kd, 24.9 ± 4.5 μM). By isothermal titration calorimetry, pPrdx6 bound to liposomes with a large exothermic heat loss (ΔH = -31.49 ± 0.22 kcal mol-1). Correlating our conformation studies with the published crystal structure of oxidized Prdx6 suggests that phosphorylation results in exposure of hydrophobic residues, thereby providing accessibility to the sites for liposome binding. Because binding of the enzyme to the phospholipid substrate interface is a requirement for PLA2 activity, these results indicate that a change in the conformation of Prdx6 upon its phosphorylation is the basis for enhancement of PLA2 enzymatic activity. PMID:22663767

  15. Dark/light transition and vigilance states modulate jaw-closing muscle activity level in mice.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Keisuke; Mochizuki, Ayako; Kato, Takafumi; Ikeda, Minako; Ikawa, Yasuha; Nakamura, Shiro; Nakayama, Kiyomi; Wakabayashi, Noriyuki; Baba, Kazuyoshi; Inoue, Tomio

    2015-12-01

    Bruxism is associated with an increase in the activity of the jaw-closing muscles during sleep and wakefulness. However, the changes in jaw-closing muscle activity across states of vigilance over a 24-h period are unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of dark/light transition and sleep/wake state on EMG activity of the masseter (jaw-closing) muscle in comparison with the activity of the upper trapezius muscle (a neck muscle) over a 24-h period in mice. The activities of the masseter and neck muscles during wakefulness were much greater than during non-REM and REM sleep. In contrast, the activities of both muscles slightly, but significantly, decreased during the transition period from dark to light. Histograms of masseter activity during wakefulness and non-REM sleep showed bimodal distributions, whereas the neck muscle showed unimodal activation in all states. These results suggest that the activities of jaw-closing and neck muscles are modulated by both sleep/wake state and dark/light transition, with the latter being to a lesser degree. Furthermore, even during non-REM sleep, jaw-closing muscles display bimodal activation, which may contribute to the occurrence of exaggerated aberrant muscle activity, such as sleep bruxism. PMID:26188127

  16. Conformational Dynamics in DNA Replication Selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brieba, Luis G.

    2007-11-01

    Replicative DNA polymerases are remarkable molecular machines that carry out DNA synthesis accordingly to the Watson and Crick rules (Guanine pairs with Cytosine and Adenine with Thymidine) with high specificity or fidelity. The biochemical mechanism that dictates polymerase fidelity has its fundaments in the tight active site of replicative polymerases and the shape and size of the Watson-Crick base pairs. Pre-steady state kinetic analysis have shown that during polymerase nucleotide addition, the chemical reaction is not the rate limiting step and it was postulated that DNA polymerases suffer a conformational change from an "open" to a "closed" conformation before chemistry which is also the step responsible for their high fidelity. Crystal structures of replicative DNA polymerases demonstrated that the fingers subdomain suffers a large conformational change during catalysis and that this conformational transition aligns the polymerase active site in a proper conformation for catalysis. Recent studies using single molecule techniques and Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer analysis also shown that at least in the case of T7 DNA polymerase, the closure of the fingers subdomain is in part the rate limiting step associated with the high fidelity of DNA polymerases, although the overall fidelity of the reaction maybe involves an assemble of chemical steps and several conformational changes. Our current knowledge indicates that the mechanisms of enzyme specificity in DNA replication involve several energy landscapes that maybe correlated with conformational changes and active site assemblies.

  17. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment

    PubMed Central

    Fyfe, Cameron D.; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Wall, Daniel M.; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macro­globulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group. PMID:26143919

  18. The principle of conformational signaling.

    PubMed

    Tompa, Peter

    2016-07-25

    Signal transduction is the primary process by which cells respond to changes in their physical and chemical environments. Cellular response is initiated through a signaling protein (a receptor), which interacts with the "signal", most often a novel molecule outside or inside the cell. The mechanism of activation of the receptor is a conformational change and/or covalent modification, which then sets in motion a signaling pathway, i.e. a cascade of modification and binding events that relay and amplify the message to eventually alter the state of the cell. In reflection of this general perception, concepts such as the "second messenger" and the "phosphorylation cascade" dominate our views of signal transduction. The idea I advocate here is that the non-covalent change in protein conformation itself might serve as the initial or intermittent "signal" in the cascade, and it is often the primary event being recognized and interpreted by downstream receptor(s). This signaling principle is intertwined with many other cellular regulatory concepts, such as (pathway) allostery, conformational spread, induced folding/unfolding, conformational memory, the hierarchical assembly of complexes, and the action of regulatory chaperones and prions. By elaborating on many examples and also recent advances in experimental methodology, I show that conformational signaling, although thus far underappreciated, is a general and robust signaling principle that most of the time operates in close interplay with covalent signals in the cell. PMID:27242242

  19. Conformation, structure and activation of bovine cathepsin D. Unfolding and refolding studies.

    PubMed Central

    Lah, T; Drobnic-Kosorok, M; Turk, V; Pain, R H

    1984-01-01

    Cathepsin D is found in the cell in two forms, one a single polypeptide chain (Mr 44 000) and the other a non-covalent complex of two peptides of Mr 14 000 and 30 000. These correspond to the N-terminal and C-terminal regions of the single chain from which they originate. It has been shown that the two forms of the enzyme are closely similar in secondary-structure content, in aromatic amino acid environment and in denaturation behaviour. The two-chain enzyme has half the specific activity of the single-chain form. The denaturation and renaturation of the single-chain cathepsin D has now been studied by c.d., fluorescence and enzyme activity. Activity is lost irreversibly on unfolding, but the loss of backbone ellipticity and of folded aromatic environment is 75% reversible. The enzyme unfolds in two main stages, and the kinetics of these transitions indicate the existence of at least two intermediate forms between the native and the fully unfolded states. A further form of the enzyme exists in 0.5 M-guanidinium chloride. It is characterized by having an activity 40% greater than that of the native state. This increase is not reversed on removing the denaturant. The similarities between cathepsin D and pepsin are discussed. PMID:6712634

  20. A conformationally mobile cysteine residue (Cys-561) modulates Na+ and H+ activation of human CNT3.

    PubMed

    Slugoski, Melissa D; Smith, Kyla M; Mulinta, Ras; Ng, Amy M L; Yao, Sylvia Y M; Morrison, Ellen L; Lee, Queenie O T; Zhang, Jing; Karpinski, Edward; Cass, Carol E; Baldwin, Stephen A; Young, James D

    2008-09-01

    In humans, the SLC28 concentrative nucleoside transporter (CNT) protein family is represented by three Na+-coupled members; human CNT1 (hCNT1) and hCNT2 are pyrimidine and purine nucleoside-selective, respectively, whereas hCNT3 transports both purine and pyrimidine nucleosides and nucleoside drugs. Belonging to a phylogenetic CNT subfamily distinct from hCNT1/2, hCNT3 also mediates H+/nucleoside cotransport. Using heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes, we have characterized a cysteineless version of hCNT3 (hCNT3C-). Processed normally to the cell surface, hCNT3C- exhibited hCNT3-like transport properties, but displayed a decrease in apparent affinity specific for Na+ and not H+. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments in wild-type and hCNT3C- backgrounds identified intramembranous Cys-561 as the residue responsible for this altered Na+-binding phenotype. Alanine at this position restored Na+ binding affinity, whereas substitution with larger neutral amino acids (threonine, valine, and isoleucine) abolished hCNT3 H+-dependent nucleoside transport activity. Independent of these findings, we have established that Cys-561 is located in a mobile region of the hCNT3 translocation pore adjacent to the nucleoside binding pocket and that access of p-chloromercuribenzene sulfonate to this residue reports a specific H+-induced conformational state of the protein ( Slugoski, M. D., Ng, A. M. L., Yao, S. Y. M., Smith, K. M., Lin, C. C., Zhang, J., Karpinski, E., Cass, C. E., Baldwin, S. A., and Young, J. D. (2008) J. Biol. Chem. 283, 8496-8507 ). The present investigation validates hCNT3C- as a template for substituted cysteine accessibility method studies of CNTs and reveals a pivotal functional role for Cys-561 in Na+- as well as H+-coupled modes of hCNT3 nucleoside transport. PMID:18621735

  1. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment

    SciTech Connect

    Fyfe, Cameron D.; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Wall, Daniel M.; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel

    2015-06-30

    The X-ray structure of protease-cleaved E. coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macroglobulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group.

  2. Large loop conformation sampling using the activation relaxation technique, ART-nouveau method.

    PubMed

    St-Pierre, Jean-François; Mousseau, Normand

    2012-07-01

    We present an adaptation of the ART-nouveau energy surface sampling method to the problem of loop structure prediction. This method, previously used to study protein folding pathways and peptide aggregation, is well suited to the problem of sampling the conformation space of large loops by targeting probable folding pathways instead of sampling exhaustively that space. The number of sampled conformations needed by ART nouveau to find the global energy minimum for a loop was found to scale linearly with the sequence length of the loop for loops between 8 and about 20 amino acids. Considering the linear scaling dependence of the computation cost on the loop sequence length for sampling new conformations, we estimate the total computational cost of sampling larger loops to scale quadratically compared to the exponential scaling of exhaustive search methods. PMID:22488731

  3. ATPase Activity and ATP-dependent Conformational Change in the Co-chaperone HSP70/HSP90-organizing Protein (HOP)*

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Soh; Subedi, Ganesh Prasad; Hanashima, Shinya; Satoh, Tadashi; Otaka, Michiro; Wakui, Hideki; Sawada, Ken-ichi; Yokota, Shin-ichi; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Kubota, Hiroshi; Itoh, Hideaki

    2014-01-01

    Co-chaperones help to maintain cellular homeostasis by modulating the activities of molecular chaperones involved in protein quality control. The HSP70/HSP90-organizing protein (HOP) is a co-chaperone that cooperates with HSP70 and HSP90 in catalysis of protein folding and maturation in the cytosol. We show here that HOP has ATP-binding activity comparable to that of HSP70/HSP90, and that HOP slowly hydrolyzes ATP. Analysis of deletion mutants revealed that the ATPase domain of HOP is in the N-terminal TPR1-DP1-TPR2A segment. In addition, HOP changes its conformation in the presence of ATP. These results indicate that HOP is a unique co-chaperone that undergoes an ATP-dependent conformational change. PMID:24535459

  4. ATPase active-site electrostatic interactions control the global conformation of the 100 kDa SecA translocase

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dorothy M.; Zheng, Haiyan; Huang, Yuanpeng J.; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Hunt, John F.

    2013-01-01

    SecA is an intensively studied mechanoenzyme that uses ATP hydrolysis to drive processive extrusion of secreted proteins through a protein-conducting channel in the cytoplasmic membrane of eubacteria. The ATPase motor of SecA is strongly homologous to that in DEAD-box RNA helicases. It remains unclear how local chemical events in its ATPase active site control the overall conformation of an ~100 kDa multidomain enzyme and drive protein transport. In this paper, we use biophysical methods to establish that a single electrostatic charge in the ATPase active site controls the global conformation of SecA. The enzyme undergoes an ATP-modulated endothermic conformational transition (ECT) believed to involve similar structural mechanics to the protein transport reaction. We have characterized the effects of an isosteric glutamate-to-glutamine mutation in the catalytic base, which mimics the immediate electrostatic consequences of ATP hydrolysis in the active site. Calorimetric studies demonstrate that this mutation facilitates the ECT in E. coli SecA and triggers it completely in B. subtilis SecA. Consistent with the substantial increase in entropy observed in the course of the ECT, hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry demonstrates that it increases protein backbone dynamics in domain-domain interfaces at remote locations from the ATPase active site. The catalytic glutamate is one of ~250 charged amino acids in SecA, and yet neutralization of its sidechain charge is sufficient to trigger a global order-disorder transition in this 100 kDa enzyme. The intricate network of structural interactions mediating this effect couples local electrostatic changes during ATP hydrolysis to global conformational and dynamic changes in SecA. This network forms the foundation of the allosteric mechanochemistry that efficiently harnesses the chemical energy stored in ATP to drive complex mechanical processes. PMID:23167435

  5. Potent and selective activation of abscisic acid receptors in vivo by mutational stabilization of their agonist-bound conformation

    PubMed Central

    Mosquna, Assaf; Peterson, Francis C.; Park, Sang-Youl; Lozano-Juste, Jorge; Volkman, Brian F.; Cutler, Sean R.

    2011-01-01

    Pyrabactin resistance (PYR) 1 and its relatives belong to a family of soluble abscisic acid (ABA) receptors that inhibit type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2C) when in their agonist-stabilized conformation. Given their switch-like properties, we envisioned that mutations that stabilize their agonist-bound conformation could be used to activate signaling in vivo. To identify such mutations, we subjected PYR1 to site-saturation mutagenesis at 39 highly conserved residues that participate in ABA or PP2C contacts. All 741 possible single amino acid substitutions at these sites were tested to identify variants that increase basal PYR1-PP2C interactions, which uncovered activating mutations in 10 residues that preferentially cluster in PYR1's gate loop and C-terminal helix. The mutations cause measurable but incomplete receptor activation in vitro; however, specific triple and quadruple mutant combinations were constructed that promote an agonist-bound conformation, as measured by heteronuclear single quantum coherence NMR, and lead to full receptor activation. Moreover, these mutations retain functionality when introduced into divergent family members, and can therefore be used to dissect individual receptor function in vivo, which has been problematic because of redundancy and family size. Expression of activated PYL2 in Arabidopsis seeds activates ABA signaling by a number of measures: modulation of ABA-regulated gene expression, induction of hyperdormancy, and suppression of ABA deficiency phenotypes in the aba2-1 mutant. Our results set the stage for systematic gain-of-function studies of PYR1 and related ABA receptors and reveal that, despite the large number of receptors, activation of a single receptor is sufficient to activate signaling in planta. PMID:22139369

  6. Approaching the active conformation of 1,3-diaminopyrimidine based covalent inhibitors of Bruton's tyrosine kinase for treatment of Rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhenhua; Zhang, Qian; Yan, Lianzhong; Zhong, Guizhen; Zhang, Linqi; Tan, Xiaojuan; Wang, Yanli

    2016-04-15

    By applying conformational restrictions, we were able to discover highly potent 1,3-diaminopyrimidine based covalent inhibitors of BTK, such as 8a (IC50=3.76nM), and providing useful information of its active conformation. We are developing these novel small molecule covalent inhibitors of BTK toward oral agents for Rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26976214

  7. Conformational Dynamics of Kir3.1/Kir3.2 Channel Activation Via δ-Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Richard-Lalonde, Melissa; Nagi, Karim; Audet, Nicolas; Sleno, Rory; Amraei, Mohammad; Hogue, Mireille; Balboni, Gianfranco; Schiller, Peter W.; Bouvier, Michel; Hébert, Terence E.; Pineyro, Graciela

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed how conformational information encoded by ligand binding to δ-opioid receptors (DORs) is transmitted to Kir3.1/Kir3.2 channels. Human embryonic kidney 293 cells were transfected with bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) donor/acceptor pairs that allowed us to evaluate independently reciprocal interactions among signaling partners. These and coimmunoprecipitation studies indicated that DORs, Gβγ, and Kir3 subunits constitutively interacted with one another. GαoA associated with DORs and Gβγ, but despite being part of the complex, no evidence of its direct association with the channel was obtained. DOR activation by different ligands left DOR-Kir3 interactions unmodified but modulated BRET between DOR-GαoA, DOR-Gβγ, GαoA-Gβγ, and Gβγ-Kir3 interfaces. Ligand-induced BRET changes assessing Gβγ-Kir3.1 subunit interaction 1) followed similar kinetics to those monitoring the GαoA-Gβγ interface, 2) displayed the same order of efficacy as those observed at the DOR-Gβγ interface, 3) were sensitive to pertussis toxin, and 4) were predictive of whether a ligand could evoke channel currents. Conformational changes at the Gβγ/Kir3 interface were lost when Kir3.1 subunits were replaced by a mutant lacking essential sites for Gβγ-mediated activation. Thus, conformational information encoded by agonist binding to the receptor is relayed to the channel via structural rearrangements that involve repositioning of Gβγ with respect to DORs, GαoA, and channel subunits. Further, the fact that BRET changes at the Gβγ-Kir3 interface are predictive of a ligand’s ability to induce channel currents points to these conformational biosensors as screening tools for identifying GPCR ligands that induce Kir3 channel activation. PMID:23175530

  8. eIF4B and eIF4G jointly stimulate eIF4A ATPase and unwinding activities by modulation of the eIF4A conformational cycle.

    PubMed

    Andreou, Alexandra Zoi; Klostermeier, Dagmar

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4A (eIF4A) is a DEAD-box protein that participates in translation initiation. As an ATP-dependent RNA helicase, it is thought to resolve secondary structure elements from the 5'-untranslated region of mRNAs to enable ribosome scanning. The RNA-stimulated ATPase and ATP-dependent helicase activities of eIF4A are enhanced by auxiliary proteins, but the underlying mechanisms are still largely unknown. Here, we have dissected the effect of eIF4B and eIF4G on eIF4A RNA-dependent ATPase- and RNA helicase activities and on eIF4A conformation. We show for the first time that yeast eIF4B, like its mammalian counterpart, can stimulate RNA unwinding by eIF4A, although it does not affect the eIF4A conformation. The eIF4G middle domain enhances this stimulatory effect and promotes the formation of a closed eIF4A conformation in the presence of ATP and RNA. The closed state of eIF4A has been inferred but has not been observed experimentally before. eIF4B and eIF4G jointly stimulate ATP hydrolysis and RNA unwinding by eIF4A and favor the formation of the closed eIF4A conformer. Our results reveal distinct functions of eIF4B and eIF4G in synergistically stimulating the eIF4A helicase activity in the mRNA scanning process. PMID:24080224

  9. Active Closed-Loop Stator Vane Flow Control Demonstrated in a Low-Speed Multistage Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bright, Michelle M.; Culley, Dennis E.; Strazisar, Anthony J.

    2004-01-01

    Closed-loop flow control was successfully demonstrated on the surface of stator vanes in NASA Glenn Research Center's Low-Speed Axial Compressor (LSAC) facility. This facility provides a flow field that accurately duplicates the aerodynamics of modern highly loaded compressors. Closed-loop active flow control uses sensors and actuators embedded within engine components to dynamically alter the internal flow path during off-nominal operation in order to optimize engine performance and maintain stable operation.

  10. The open pore conformation of potassium channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Youxing; Lee, Alice; Chen, Jiayun; Cadene, Martine; Chait, Brian T.; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2002-05-01

    Living cells regulate the activity of their ion channels through a process known as gating. To open the pore, protein conformational changes must occur within a channel's membrane-spanning ion pathway. KcsA and MthK, closed and opened K+ channels, respectively, reveal how such gating transitions occur. Pore-lining `inner' helices contain a `gating hinge' that bends by approximately 30°. In a straight conformation four inner helices form a bundle, closing the pore near its intracellular surface. In a bent configuration the inner helices splay open creating a wide (12Å) entryway. Amino-acid sequence conservation suggests a common structural basis for gating in a wide range of K+ channels, both ligand- and voltage-gated. The open conformation favours high conduction by compressing the membrane field to the selectivity filter, and also permits large organic cations and inactivation peptides to enter the pore from the intracellular solution.

  11. Structural and conformational features relevant to the anti-tumor activity of calicheamicin γ 1I.

    PubMed

    Ellestad, George A

    2011-09-01

    The structural and conformational features of the potent 10-membered enediyne-containing calicheamicin γ 1I that account for its remarkable DNA site-specific binding and cleavage are reviewed. A variety of spectroscopic and biophysical techniques were used to gain insight into the binding and stereospecific DNA cleavage of this potent antitumor agent. These include gel-shift cleavage assays, atom transfer NMR experiments, drug-DNA conformational studies, circular dichroism, and capillary electrophoresis. Computational descriptions are described for the DNA binding and cleavage of calicheamicin and its activated transient intermediates based on density functional and molecular mechanics calculations. In addition, the structure and clinical utility of calicheamicin immunoconjugates for antibody-targeted chemotherapy is presented. PMID:21800378

  12. Two-step mechanism involving active-site conformational changes regulates human telomerase DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Christopher G; Moye, Aaron L; Holien, Jessica K; Parker, Michael W; Cohen, Scott B; Bryan, Tracy M

    2015-01-15

    The ribonucleoprotein enzyme telomerase maintains telomeres and is essential for cellular immortality in most cancers. Insight into the telomerase mechanism can be gained from syndromes such as dyskeratosis congenita, in which mutation of telomerase components manifests in telomere dysfunction. We carried out detailed kinetic and thermodynamic analyses of wild-type telomerase and two disease-associated mutations in the reverse transcriptase domain. Differences in dissociation rates between primers with different 3' ends were independent of DNA affinities, revealing that initial binding of telomerase to telomeric DNA occurs through a previously undescribed two-step mechanism involving enzyme conformational changes. Both mutations affected DNA binding, but through different mechanisms: P704S specifically affected protein conformational changes during DNA binding, whereas R865H showed defects in binding to the 3' region of the DNA. To gain further insight at the structural level, we generated the first homology model of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase domain; the positions of P704S and R865H corroborate their observed mechanistic defects, providing validation for the structural model. Our data reveal the importance of protein interactions with the 3' end of telomeric DNA and the role of protein conformational change in telomerase DNA binding, and highlight naturally occurring disease mutations as a rich source of mechanistic insight. PMID:25365545

  13. THE EFFECTS OF CLOSE COMPANIONS (AND ROTATION) ON THE MAGNETIC ACTIVITY OF M DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Dylan P.; West, Andrew A.; Dhital, Saurav; Fuchs, Miriam; Garces, Ane; Catalan, Silvia; Silvestri, Nicole M.

    2012-10-01

    We present a study of close white dwarf and M dwarf (WD+dM) binary systems and examine the effect that a close companion has on the magnetic field generation in M dwarfs. We use a base sample of 1602 white dwarf main-sequence binaries from Rebassa-Mansergas et al. to develop a set of color cuts in GALEX, SDSS, UKIDSS, and 2MASS color space. Then using the SDSS Data Release 8 spectroscopic database, we construct a sample of 1756 WD+dM high-quality pairs from our color cuts and previous catalogs. We separate the individual WD and dM from each spectrum using an iterative technique that compares the WD and dM components to best-fit templates. Using the absolute height above the Galactic plane as a proxy for age, and the H{alpha} emission line as an indicator for magnetic activity, we investigate the age-activity relation for our sample for spectral types {<=} M7. Our results show that early-type M dwarfs ({<=}M4) in close binary systems are more likely to be active and have longer activity lifetimes compared to their field counterparts. However, at a spectral type of M5 (just past the onset of full convection in M dwarfs), the activity fraction and lifetimes of WD+dM binary systems become more comparable to that of the field M dwarfs. One of the implications of having a close binary companion is presumed to be increased stellar rotation through disk disruption, tidal effects, or angular momentum exchange. Thus, we interpret the similarity in activity behavior between late-type dMs in WD+dM pairs and late-type field dMs to be due to a decrease in sensitivity in close binary companions (or stellar rotation), which has implications for the nature of magnetic activity in fully convective stars. Using the WD components of the pairs, we find WD cooling ages to use as an additional constraint on the age-activity relation for our sample. We find that, on average, active early-type dMs tend to be younger and that active late-type dMs span a much broader age regime making them

  14. An RNA Aptamer Specific to Hsp70-ATP Conformation Inhibits its ATPase Activity Independent of Hsp40

    PubMed Central

    Thirunavukarasu, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    The highly conserved and ubiquitous molecular chaperone heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) plays a critical role in protein homeostasis (proteostasis). Controlled by its ATPase activity, Hsp70 cycles between two conformations, Hsp70-ATP and Hsp70-ADP, to bind and release its substrate. Chemical tools with distinct modes of action, especially those capable of modulating the ATPase activity of Hsp70, are being actively sought after in the mechanistic dissection of this system. Here, we report a conformation-specific RNA aptamer that binds only to Hsp70-ATP but not to Hsp70-ADP. We have refined this aptamer and demonstrated its inhibitory effect on Hsp70's ATPase activity. We have also shown that this inhibitory effect on Hsp70 is independent of its interaction with the Hsp40 co-chaperone. As Hsp70 is increasingly being recognized as a drug target in a number of age related diseases such as neurodegenerative, protein misfolding diseases and cancer, this aptamer is potentially useful in therapeutic applications. Moreover, this work also demonstrates the feasibility of using aptamers to target ATPase activity as a general therapeutic strategy. PMID:25654640

  15. Synthesis of selenium-containing Artemisia sphaerocephala polysaccharides: Solution conformation and anti-tumor activities in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junlong; Li, Qingyao; Bao, Aijuan; Liu, Xiurong; Zeng, Junyuan; Yang, Xiaopin; Yao, Jian; Zhang, Ji; Lei, Ziqiang

    2016-11-01

    It has been reported in our previous work that selenized Artemisia sphaerocephala polysaccharides (SeASPs) with the Se content range of 168-1703μg/g were synthesized by using Na2SeO3/HNO3/BaCl2 system. In the present work, the solution property of SeASP was studied by using size exclusion chromatography combined with multi angle laser light scattering (SEC-MALLS). A decrease in df values indicated that SeASPs with different conformational features that were highly dependent on MW. SeASPs exhibited a more rigid conformation (df value of 1.29-1.52) in low molecular weight range (MW of 1.026-1.426×10(4)g/mol) and compact spherical conformation in high molecular weight range (MW of 2.268-4.363×10(4)g/mol). It could be due to the degradation of polysaccharide chains in HNO3, which was supported in monosaccharide composition analysis. Congo red (CR) spectrophotometric method and atomic force microscopy (AFM) results also confirmed the conformational transition and the evidence on the shape of the rigid chains. In vitro anti-tumor assays, SeASP2 displayed greater anti-proliferative effects against three tumor cell lines (hepatocellular carcinoma HepG-2 cells, lung adenocarcinom A549 cells and cervical squamous carcinoma Hela cells) in a dose-dependent manner. This suggested that selenylation could significantly enhance the anti-tumor activities of polysaccharide derivatives in vitro. PMID:27516251

  16. Partial proteolysis as a probe of the conformation of the gamma subunit in activated soluble and membrane-bound chloroplast coupling factor 1.

    PubMed

    Schumann, J; Richter, M L; McCarty, R E

    1985-09-25

    Treatments that enhance the latent ATPase activity of the chloroplast coupling factor (CF1) also induce hypersensitivity of the gamma subunit toward trypsin. A number of different gamma subunit cleavage products are formed (Moroney, J. V., and McCarty, R. E. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 5910-5914). We have compared the gamma cleavage products of membrane-bound and isolated CF1, activated either by reduction of the gamma disulfide bond or by removal of the epsilon subunit. The gamma subunit of isolated CF1 lacking the epsilon subunit was cleaved to a 27,000-Da species. The same cleavage site became exposed following energy-dependent conformational changes in the membrane-bound enzyme. Activation by reduction of the gamma disulfide bond also exposed this site. However, the gamma subunit of reduced CF1 was cleaved rapidly at an additional site and trypsin treatment gave rise to a 25,000-Da gamma species. The small peptide generated by the second cleavage contains one of the cysteinyl residues of the reduced disulfide bridge of gamma. This peptide dissociates from the enzyme and can be isolated by gel filtration. The close proximity of the trypsin cleavage sites to the disulfide bond of gamma is discussed with respect to the effects of tryptic cleavage on the ATPase activity of CF1. The data indicate that structural changes in a limited region of the gamma subunit strongly influence the catalytic properties of both soluble and membrane-bound CF1. PMID:2864336

  17. Stimulatory effects of opioid neuropeptides on locomotory activity and conformational changes in invertebrate and human immunocytes: evidence for a subtype of delta receptor.

    PubMed

    Stefano, G B; Cadet, P; Scharrer, B

    1989-08-01

    The presence of opioid neuropeptides was shown to stimulate conformational changes and locomotory activity in immunocytes of two representatives of invertebrates as well as in human leukocytes. Cells were examined by use of phase-contrast and Nomarski optics coupled with a Zeiss Axiophot microscope, and of the Zeiss Videoplan/Vidas Image Analysis system. Immunocompetent blood cells, activated by exogenous opioids or stressful stimuli presumed to engage endogenous opioids, showed flattening, elongation, and formation of pseudopodia. In the mollusc Mytilus edulis, ameboid movements resulted in the formation of cell clusters, an activity not observed in untreated controls, or in immunocytes simultaneously exposed to opioid and naloxone. Tests with nine immunoreactive substances revealed immunocyte stimulation by delta, mu-, kappa-, and epsilon(?)-selective ligands. One of these, [D-Ala2,D-Met5]enkephalinamide (DAMA), active at a concentration of 10 pM, proved to be considerably more effective than the rest. The high pharmacological potency of DAMA, observed in both human and invertebrate immunocytes, sets this opioid apart from the closely related [D-Ala2,D-Leu5]enkephalin, a discrepancy not occurring in the mammalian nervous system. This suggests a specific function for [Met]enkephalin in immunoregulation, mediated perhaps by a special subtype of delta receptor. PMID:2548205

  18. Membrane Phospholipid Augments Cytochrome P4501a Enzymatic Activity by Modulating Structural Conformation during Detoxification of Xenobiotics

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Manik C.; Ray, Arun K.

    2013-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 is a superfamily of membrane-bound hemoprotein that gets involved with the degradation of xenobiotics and internal metabolites. Accumulated body of evidence indicates that phospholipids play a crucial role in determining the enzymatic activity of cytochrome P450 in the microenvironment by modulating its structure during detoxification; however, the structure-function relationship of cytochrome P4501A, a family of enzymes responsible for degrading lipophilic aromatic hydrocarbons, is still not well defined. Inducibility of cytochrome P4501A in cultured catfish hepatocytes in response to carbofuran, a widely used pesticide around the world, was studied earlier in our laboratory. In this present investigation, we observed that treating catfish with carbofuran augmented total phospholipid in the liver. We examined the role of phospholipid on the of cytochrome P4501A-marker enzyme which is known as ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) in the context of structure and function. We purified the carbofuran-induced cytochrome P4501A protein from catfish liver. Subsequently, we examined the enzymatic activity of purified P4501A protein in the presence of phospholipid, and studied how the structure of purified protein was influenced in the phospholipid environment. Membrane phospholipid appeared to accelerate the enzymatic activity of EROD by changing its structural conformation and thus controlling the detoxification of xenobiotics. Our study revealed the missing link of how the cytochrome P450 restores its enzymatic activity by changing its structural conformation in the phospholipid microenvironment. PMID:23469105

  19. Cwc2 and its human homologue RBM22 promote an active conformation of the spliceosome catalytic centre

    PubMed Central

    Rasche, Nicolas; Dybkov, Olexandr; Schmitzová, Jana; Akyildiz, Berktan; Fabrizio, Patrizia; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    RNA-structural elements play key roles in pre-mRNA splicing catalysis; yet, the formation of catalytically competent RNA structures requires the assistance of spliceosomal proteins. We show that the S. cerevisiae Cwc2 protein functions prior to step 1 of splicing, and it is not required for the Prp2-mediated spliceosome remodelling that generates the catalytically active B* complex, suggesting that Cwc2 plays a more sophisticated role in the generation of a functional catalytic centre. In active spliceosomes, Cwc2 contacts catalytically important RNA elements, including the U6 internal stem-loop (ISL), and regions of U6 and the pre-mRNA intron near the 5′ splice site, placing Cwc2 at/near the spliceosome's catalytic centre. These interactions are evolutionarily conserved, as shown by studies with Cwc2's human counterpart RBM22, indicating that Cwc2/RBM22–RNA contacts are functionally important. We propose that Cwc2 induces an active conformation of the spliceosome's catalytic RNA elements. Thus, the function of RNA–RNA tertiary interactions within group II introns, namely to induce an active conformation of domain V, may be fulfilled by proteins that contact the functionally analogous U6-ISL, within the spliceosome. PMID:22246180

  20. Visualization of Activated Platelets by Targeted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Utilizing Conformation-Specific Antibodies against Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa

    PubMed Central

    von zur Muhlen, Constantin; Peter, Karlheinz; Ali, Ziad A.; Schneider, Jürgen E.; McAteer, Martina A.; Neubauer, Stefan; Channon, Keith M.; Bode, Christoph; Choudhury, Robin P.

    2009-01-01

    Ruptured atherosclerotic plaques, lined with activated platelets, constitute an attractive target for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study evaluated whether microparticles of iron oxide (MPIO) targeting ligand-induced binding sites (LIBS) on the activated conformation of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa could be used to image platelets. MPIO (size: 1 μm) were conjugated to anti-LIBS or control single-chain antibody. Following guidewire injury to mouse femoral artery, platelet adhesion was present after 24 h. Mice were perfused with anti-LIBS-MPIO (or control MPIO) via the left ventricle and 11.7-tesla MRI was performed on femoral arteries ex vivo. A 3D gradient echo sequence attained an isotropic resolution of 25 μm. MPIO binding, quantified by MRI, was 4-fold higher with anti-LIBS-MPIO in comparison to control MPIO (p < 0.01). In histological sections, low signal zones on MRI and MPIO correlated strongly (R2 = 0.72; p < 0.001), indicating accurate MR quantification. In conclusion, anti-LIBS-MPIO bind to activated platelets in mouse arteries, providing a basis for the use of function-specific single-chain antibody-MPIO conjugates for molecular MRI, and represent the first molecular imaging of a conformational change in a surface receptor. This presents an opportunity to specifically image activated platelets involved in acute atherothrombosis with MRI. PMID:18515970

  1. Active site conformational dynamics are coupled to catalysis in the mRNA decapping enzyme Dcp2

    PubMed Central

    Aglietti, Robin A.; Floor, Stephen N.; McClendon, Chris L.; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Gross, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Removal of the 5′ cap structure by Dcp2 is a major step in several 5′–3′ mRNA decay pathways. The activity of Dcp2 is enhanced by Dcp1 and bound coactivators, yet the details of how these interactions are linked to chemistry are poorly understood. Here we report three crystal structures of the catalytic Nudix hydrolase domain of Dcp2 that demonstrate binding of a catalytically essential metal ion, and enzyme kinetics are used to identify several key active site residues involved in acid/base chemistry of decapping. Using NMR and molecular dynamics, we find that a conserved metal binding loop on the catalytic domain undergoes conformational changes during the catalytic cycle. These findings describe key events during the chemical step of decapping, suggest local active site conformational changes are important for activity, and provide a framework to explain stimulation of catalysis by the regulatory domain of Dcp2 and associated coactivators. PMID:23911090

  2. 12 CFR 225.126 - Activities not closely related to banking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Activities not closely related to banking. 225... FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BANK HOLDING COMPANIES AND CHANGE IN BANK CONTROL (REGULATION Y.... Pursuant to section 4(c)(8) of the Bank Holding Company Act and § 225.4(a) of Regulation Y, the Board...

  3. An evolutionary vaccination game in the modified activity driven network by considering the closeness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Dun; Sun, Mei

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we explore an evolutionary vaccination game in the modified activity driven network by considering the closeness. We set a closeness parameter p which is used to describe the way of connection between two individuals. The simulation results show that the closeness p may have an active role in weakening both the spreading of epidemic and the vaccination. Besides, when vaccination is not allowed, the final recovered density increases with the value of the ratio of the infection rate to the recovery rate λ / μ. However, when vaccination is allowed the final density of recovered individual first increases and then decreases with the value of λ / μ. Two variables are designed to identify the relation between the individuals' activities and their states. The results draw that both recovered and vaccinated frequency increase with the increase of the individuals' activities. Meanwhile, the immune fee has less impact on the individuals' vaccination than the closeness. While the λ / μ is in a certain range, with the increase of the value of λ / μ, the recovered frequency of the whole crowds reduces. Our results, therefore, reveal the fact that the best of intentions may lead to backfire.

  4. Spacer conformation in biologically active molecules. Part 2. Structure and conformation of 4-[2-(diphenylmethylamino)ethyl]-1-(2-methoxyphenyl) piperazine and its diphenylmethoxy analog—potential 5-HT 1A receptor ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karolak-Wojciechowska, J.; Fruziński, A.; Czylkowski, R.; Paluchowska, M. H.; Mokrosz, M. J.

    2003-09-01

    As a part of studies on biologically active molecule structures with aliphatic linking chain, the structures of 4-[2-diphenylmethylamino)ethyl]-1-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazine dihydrochloride ( 1) and 4-[2-diphenylmethoxy)ethyl]-1-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazine fumarate ( 2) have been reported. In both compounds, four atomic non-all-carbons linking chains (N)C-C-X-C are present. The conformation of that linking spacer depends on the nature of the X-atom. The preferred conformation for chain with XNH has been found to be fully extended while for that with XO—the bend one. It was confirmed by conformational calculations (strain energy distribution and random search) and crystallographic data, including statistics from CCDC.

  5. Renaturation of Recombinant Treponema pallidum Rare Outer Membrane Protein 1 into a Trimeric, Hydrophobic, and Porin-Active Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongwei H.; Blanco, David R.; Exner, Maurice M.; Shang, Ellen S.; Champion, Cheryl I.; Phillips, Martin L.; Miller, James N.; Lovett, Michael A.

    1999-01-01

    We have previously observed that while native Treponema pallidum rare outer membrane protein 1 (Tromp1) is hydrophobic and has porin activity, recombinant forms of Tromp1 do not possess these properties. In this study we show that these properties are determined by conformation and can be replicated by proper renaturation of recombinant Tromp1. Native Tromp1, but not the 47-kDa lipoprotein, extracted from whole organisms by using Triton X-114, was found to lose hydrophobicity after treatment in 8 M urea, indicating that Tromp1’s hydrophobicity is conformation dependent. Native Tromp1 was purified from 0.1% Triton X-100 extracts of whole organisms by fast-performance liquid chromatography (FPLC) and shown to have porin activity in planar lipid bilayers. Cross-linking studies of purified native Tromp1 with an 11 Å cross-linking agent showed oligomeric forms consistent with dimers and trimers. For renaturation studies of recombinant Tromp1 (rTromp1), a 31,109-Da signal-less construct was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by FPLC. FPLC-purified rTromp1 was denatured in 8 M urea and then renatured in the presence of 0.5% Zwittergent 3,14 during dialysis to remove the urea. Renatured rTromp1 was passed through a Sephacryl S-300 gel exclusion column previously calibrated with known molecular weight standards. While all nonrenatured rTromp1 eluted from the column at approximately the position of the carbonic anhydrase protein standard (29 kDa), all renatured rTromp1 eluted at the position of the phosphorylase b protein standard (97 kDa), suggesting a trimeric conformation. Trimerization was confirmed by using an 11 Å cross-linking agent which showed both dimers and trimers similar to that of native Tromp1. Triton X-114 phase separations showed that all of renatured rTromp1, but none of nonrenatured rTromp1, phase separated exclusively into the hydrophobic detergent phase, similar to native Tromp1. Circular dichroism of nonrenatured and renatured rTromp1

  6. The ubiquitin-associated domain of AMPK-related kinases regulates conformation and LKB1-mediated phosphorylation and activation

    PubMed Central

    Jaleel, Mahaboobi; Villa, Fabrizio; Deak, Maria; Toth, Rachel; Prescott, Alan R.; van Aalten, Daan M. F.; Alessi, Dario R.

    2006-01-01

    Recent work indicates that the LKB1 tumour suppressor protein kinase, which is mutated in Peutz–Jeghers cancer syndrome, phosphorylates and activates a group of protein kinases that are related to AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase). Ten of the 14 AMPK-related protein kinases activated by LKB1, including SIK (salt-induced kinase), MARK (microtubule-affinity-regulating kinase) and BRSK (brain-specific kinase) isoforms, possess a ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain immediately C-terminal to the kinase catalytic domain. These are the only protein kinases in the human genome known to possess a UBA domain, but their roles in regulating AMPK-related kinases are unknown. We have investigated the roles that the UBA domain may play in regulating these enzymes. Limited proteolysis of MARK2 revealed that the kinase and UBA domains were contained within a fragment that was resistant to trypsin proteolysis. SAXS (small-angle X-ray scattering) analysis of inactive and active LKB1-phosphorylated MARK2 revealed that activation of MARK2 is accompanied by a significant conformational change that alters the orientation of the UBA domain with respect to the catalytic domain. Our results indicate that none of the UBA domains found in AMPK-related kinases interact with polyubiquitin or other ubiquitin-like molecules. Instead, the UBA domains appear to play an essential conformational role and are required for the LKB1-mediated phosphorylation and activation of AMPK-related kinases. This is based on the findings that mutation or removal of the UBA domains of several AMPK-related kinases, including isoforms of MARK, SIK and BRSK, markedly impaired the catalytic activity and LKB1-mediated phosphorylation of these enzymes. We also provide evidence that the UBA domains do not function as LKB1–STRAD (STE20-related adaptor)–MO25 (mouse protein 25) docking/interacting sites and that mutations in the UBA domain of SIK suppressed the ability of SIK to localize within punctate regions of the

  7. Mitochondrial 3β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Enzyme Activity Requires Reversible pH-dependent Conformational Change at the Intermembrane Space*

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Manoj; Thomas, James L.; Whittal, Randy M.; Bose, Himangshu S.

    2012-01-01

    The inner mitochondrial membrane protein 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (3βHSD2) synthesizes progesterone and androstenedione through its dehydrogenase and isomerase activities. This bifunctionality requires 3βHSD2 to undergo a conformational change. Given its proximity to the proton pump, we hypothesized that pH influences 3βHSD2 conformation and thus activity. Circular dichroism (CD) showed that between pH 7.4 and 4.5, 3βHSD2 retained its primarily α-helical character with a decrease in α-helical content at lower pH values, whereas the β-sheet content remained unchanged throughout. Titrating the pH back to 7.4 restored the original conformation within 25 min. Metabolic conversion assays indicated peak 3βHSD2 activity at pH 4.5 with ∼2-fold more progesterone synthesized at pH 4.5 than at pH 3.5 and 7.4. Increasing the 3βHSD2 concentration from 1 to 40 μg resulted in a 7-fold increase in progesterone at pH 4.5, but no change at pH 7.4. Incubation with guanidinum hydrochloride (GdmHCl) showed a three-step cooperative unfolding of 3βHSD2 from pH 7.4 to 4.5, possibly due to the native state unfolding to the intermediate ion core state. With further decreases in pH, increasing concentrations of GdmHCl led to rapid two-step unfolding that may represent complete loss of structure. Between pH 4 and 5, the two intermediate states appeared stable. Stopped-flow kinetics showed slower unfolding at around pH 4, where the protein is in a pseudostable state. Based on our data, we conclude that at pH 4–5, 3βHSD2 takes on a molten globule conformation that promotes the dual functionality of the enzyme. PMID:22262841

  8. The Crystal Structure of a Cardiovirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase Reveals an Unusual Conformation of the Polymerase Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Vives-Adrian, Laia; Lujan, Celia; Oliva, Baldo; van der Linden, Lonneke; Selisko, Barbara; Coutard, Bruno; Canard, Bruno; van Kuppeveld, Frank J. M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) is a member of the Cardiovirus genus within the large Picornaviridae family, which includes a number of important human and animal pathogens. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) 3Dpol is a key enzyme for viral genome replication. In this study, we report the X-ray structures of two different crystal forms of the EMCV RdRp determined at 2.8- and 2.15-Å resolution. The in vitro elongation and VPg uridylylation activities of the purified enzyme have also been demonstrated. Although the overall structure of EMCV 3Dpol is shown to be similar to that of the known RdRps of other members of the Picornaviridae family, structural comparisons show a large reorganization of the active-site cavity in one of the crystal forms. The rearrangement affects mainly motif A, where the conserved residue Asp240, involved in ribonucleoside triphosphate (rNTP) selection, and its neighbor residue, Phe239, move about 10 Å from their expected positions within the ribose binding pocket toward the entrance of the rNTP tunnel. This altered conformation of motif A is stabilized by a cation-π interaction established between the aromatic ring of Phe239 and the side chain of Lys56 within the finger domain. Other contacts, involving Phe239 and different residues of motif F, are also observed. The movement of motif A is connected with important conformational changes in the finger region flanked by residues 54 to 63, harboring Lys56, and in the polymerase N terminus. The structures determined in this work provide essential information for studies on the cardiovirus RNA replication process and may have important implications for the development of new antivirals targeting the altered conformation of motif A. IMPORTANCE The Picornaviridae family is one of the largest virus families known, including many important human and animal pathogens. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) 3Dpol is a key enzyme for picornavirus genome replication and a validated

  9. Difference and Influence of Inactive and Active States of Cannabinoid Receptor Subtype CB2: From Conformation to Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianping; Feng, Zhiwei; Ma, Shifan; Zhang, Yu; Tong, Qin; Alqarni, Mohammed Hamed; Gou, Xiaojun; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2016-06-27

    Cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2), a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), is a promising target for the treatment of neuropathic pain, osteoporosis, immune system, cancer, and drug abuse. The lack of an experimental three-dimensional CB2 structure has hindered not only the development of studies of conformational differences between the inactive and active CB2 but also the rational discovery of novel functional compounds targeting CB2. In this work, we constructed models of both inactive and active CB2 by homology modeling. Then we conducted two comparative 100 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on the two systems-the active CB2 bound with both the agonist and G protein and the inactive CB2 bound with inverse agonist-to analyze the conformational difference of CB2 proteins and the key residues involved in molecular recognition. Our results showed that the inactive CB2 and the inverse agonist remained stable during the MD simulation. However, during the MD simulations, we observed dynamical details about the breakdown of the "ionic lock" between R131(3.50) and D240(6.30) as well as the outward/inward movements of transmembrane domains of the active CB2 that bind with G proteins and agonist (TM5, TM6, and TM7). All of these results are congruent with the experimental data and recent reports. Moreover, our results indicate that W258(6.48) in TM6 and residues in TM4 (V164(4.56)-L169(4.61)) contribute greatly to the binding of the agonist on the basis of the binding energy decomposition, while residues S180-F183 in extracellular loop 2 (ECL2) may be of importance in recognition of the inverse agonist. Furthermore, pharmacophore modeling and virtual screening were carried out for the inactive and active CB2 models in parallel. Among all 10 hits, two compounds exhibited novel scaffolds and can be used as novel chemical probes for future studies of CB2. Importantly, our studies show that the hits obtained from the inactive CB2 model mainly act as inverse agonist(s) or neutral

  10. Effect of ultrasound combined with malic acid on the activity and conformation of mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) polyphenoloxidase.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lei; Liu, Wei; Xiong, Zhiqiang; Zou, Liqiang; Liu, Junping; Zhong, Junzhen; Chen, Jun

    2016-08-01

    Polyphenoloxidase (PPO) plays an important role in the browning of vegetables, fruits and edible fungi. The effects of ultrasound, malic acid, and their combination on the activity and conformation of mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) PPO were studied. The activity of PPO decreased gradually with the increasing of malic acid concentrations (5-60mM). Neither medium concentrations (10, 20, 30mM) malic acid nor individual ultrasound (25kHz, 55.48W/cm(2)) treatment could remarkably inactivate PPO. However, the inactivation during their combination was more significant than the sum of ultrasound inactivation and malic acid inactivation. The inactivation kinetics of PPO followed a first-order kinetics under the combination of ultrasound and malic acid. The conformation of combination treated PPO was changed, which was reflected in the decrease of α-helix, increase of β-sheet contents and disruption of the tertiary structure. Results of molecular microstructure showed that ultrasound broke large molecular groups of PPO into small ones. Moreover, combined treatment disrupted the microstructure of PPO and molecules were connected together. PMID:27241293

  11. Self-objectification, feminist activism and conformity to feminine norms among female vegetarians, semi-vegetarians, and non-vegetarians.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, Britney G; Khan, Aliya; Edner, Benjamin; Rosén, Lee A

    2014-01-01

    Recent research has suggested that vegetarians may be at an increased risk for developing disordered eating or body image issues when compared to non-vegetarians. However, the results of such studies are mixed, and no research has explored potential connections between vegetarianism and self-objectification. In the current study, the authors examine factors that predicted body surveillance, body shame, and appearance control beliefs; three aspects of self-objectification. Surveys were completed by 386 women from the United States who were categorized as vegetarian, semi-vegetarian, or non-vegetarian. The three groups differed regarding dietary motivations, levels of feminist activism, and body shame, but did not differ on their conformity to feminine norms. While conformity to feminine norms predicted body surveillance and body shame levels among all three groups of women, feminist activism predicted appearance control beliefs among non-vegetarians only. These findings suggest that it is important for researchers and clinicians to distinguish among these three groups when examining the relationship between vegetarianism and self-objectification. PMID:24411771

  12. Dynamic protein conformations preferentially drive energy transfer along the active chain of the photosystem II reaction centre.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Zhang, Houdao; Yue, Alexander; Yan, YiJing; Huang, Xuhui

    2014-01-01

    One longstanding puzzle concerning photosystem II, a core component of photosynthesis, is that only one of the two symmetric branches in its reaction centre is active in electron transfer. To investigate the effect of the photosystem II environment on the preferential selection of the energy transfer pathway (a prerequisite for electron transfer), we have constructed an exciton model via extensive molecular dynamics simulations and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations based on a recent X-ray structure. Our results suggest that it is essential to take into account an ensemble of protein conformations to accurately compute the site energies. We identify the cofactor CLA606 of active chain as the most probable site for the energy excitation. We further pinpoint a number of charged protein residues that collectively lower the CLA606 site energy. Our work provides insights into the understanding of molecular mechanisms of the core machinery of the green-plant photosynthesis. PMID:24954746

  13. Influence of sodium alginate pretreated by ultrasound on papain properties: Activity, structure, conformation and molecular weight and distribution.

    PubMed

    Feng, Liping; Cao, Yanping; Xu, Duoxia; You, Sasa; Han, Fu

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of sodium alginate (ALG) pretreated by ultrasound on the enzyme activity, structure, conformation and molecular weight and distribution of papain. ALG solutions were pretreated with ultrasound at varying power (0.05, 0.15, 0.25, 0.35, 0.45W/cm(2)), 135kHz, 50°C for 20min. The maximum relative activity of papain increased by 10.53% when mixed with ALG pretreated by ultrasound at 0.25W/cm(2), compared with the untreated ALG. The influence of ultrasound pretreated ALG on the conformation and secondary structure of papain were assessed by fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism spectroscopy. The fluorescence spectra revealed that ultrasound pretreated ALG increased the number of tryptophan on papain surface, especially at 0.25W/cm(2). It indicated that ultrasound pretreatment induced molecular unfolding, causing the exposure of more hydrophobic groups and regions from inside to the outside of the papain molecules. Furthermore, ultrasound pretreated ALG resulted in minor changes in the secondary structure of the papain. The content of α-helix was slightly increased after ultrasound pretreatment and no significant change was observed at different ultrasound powers. ALG pretreated by ultrasound enhanced the stability of the secondary structure of papain, especially at 0.25W/cm(2). The free sulfhydryl (SH) content of papain was slightly increased and then decreased with the increase of ultrasonic power. The maximum content of free SH was observed at 0.25W/cm(2), under which the content of the free SH increased by 6.36% compared with the untreated ALG. Dynamic light scattering showed that the effect of ultrasound treatment was mainly the homogenization of the ALG particles in the mixed dispersion. The gel permeation chromatography coupled with the multi-angle laser light scattering photometer analysis showed that the molecular weight (Mw) of papain/ALG was decreased and then increased with the ultrasonic

  14. Crystallographic Evidence of Drastic Conformational Changes in the Active Site of a Flavin-Dependent N-Hydroxylase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The soil actinomycete Kutzneria sp. 744 produces a class of highly decorated hexadepsipeptides, which represent a new chemical scaffold that has both antimicrobial and antifungal properties. These natural products, known as kutznerides, are created via nonribosomal peptide synthesis using various derivatized amino acids. The piperazic acid moiety contained in the kutzneride scaffold, which is vital for its antibiotic activity, has been shown to derive from the hydroxylated product of l-ornithine, l-N5-hydroxyornithine. The production of this hydroxylated species is catalyzed by the action of an FAD- and NAD(P)H-dependent N-hydroxylase known as KtzI. We have been able to structurally characterize KtzI in several states along its catalytic trajectory, and by pairing these snapshots with the biochemical and structural data already available for this enzyme class, we propose a structurally based reaction mechanism that includes novel conformational changes of both the protein backbone and the flavin cofactor. Further, we were able to recapitulate these conformational changes in the protein crystal, displaying their chemical competence. Our series of structures, with corroborating biochemical and spectroscopic data collected by us and others, affords mechanistic insight into this relatively new class of flavin-dependent hydroxylases and adds another layer to the complexity of flavoenzymes. PMID:25184411

  15. Crystallographic evidence of drastic conformational changes in the active site of a flavin-dependent N-hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Setser, Jeremy W; Heemstra, John R; Walsh, Christopher T; Drennan, Catherine L

    2014-09-30

    The soil actinomycete Kutzneria sp. 744 produces a class of highly decorated hexadepsipeptides, which represent a new chemical scaffold that has both antimicrobial and antifungal properties. These natural products, known as kutznerides, are created via nonribosomal peptide synthesis using various derivatized amino acids. The piperazic acid moiety contained in the kutzneride scaffold, which is vital for its antibiotic activity, has been shown to derive from the hydroxylated product of l-ornithine, l-N(5)-hydroxyornithine. The production of this hydroxylated species is catalyzed by the action of an FAD- and NAD(P)H-dependent N-hydroxylase known as KtzI. We have been able to structurally characterize KtzI in several states along its catalytic trajectory, and by pairing these snapshots with the biochemical and structural data already available for this enzyme class, we propose a structurally based reaction mechanism that includes novel conformational changes of both the protein backbone and the flavin cofactor. Further, we were able to recapitulate these conformational changes in the protein crystal, displaying their chemical competence. Our series of structures, with corroborating biochemical and spectroscopic data collected by us and others, affords mechanistic insight into this relatively new class of flavin-dependent hydroxylases and adds another layer to the complexity of flavoenzymes. PMID:25184411

  16. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Dimerization and Activation Require Ligand-Induced Conformational Changes in the Dimer Interface

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Jessica P.; Berger, Mitchell B.; Lin, Chun-Chi; Schlessinger, Joseph; Lemmon, Mark A.; Ferguson, Kathryn M.

    2005-01-01

    Structural studies have shown that ligand-induced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) dimerization involves major domain rearrangements that expose a critical dimerization arm. However, simply exposing this arm is not sufficient for receptor dimerization, suggesting that additional ligand-induced dimer contacts are required. To map these contributions to the dimer interface, we individually mutated each contact suggested by crystallographic studies and analyzed the effects on receptor dimerization, activation, and ligand binding. We find that domain II contributes >90% of the driving energy for dimerization of the extracellular region, with domain IV adding little. Within domain II, the dimerization arm forms much of the dimer interface, as expected. However, a loop from the sixth disulfide-bonded module (immediately C-terminal to the dimerization arm) also makes a critical contribution. Specific ligand-induced conformational changes in domain II are required for this loop to contribute to receptor dimerization, and we identify a set of ligand-induced intramolecular interactions that appear to be important in driving these changes, effectively “buttressing” the dimer interface. Our data also suggest that similar conformational changes may determine the specificity of ErbB receptor homo- versus heterodimerization. PMID:16107719

  17. Monoclonal antibodies that bind the renal Na/sup +//glucose symport system. 2. Stabilization of an active conformation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.S.R.; Lever, J.E.

    1987-09-08

    Conformation-dependent fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeling of the pig renal Na/sup +//glucose symporter was investigated with specific monoclonal antibodies (MAb's). When renal brush border membranes were pretreated with phenyl isothiocyanate (PITC), washed, and then treated at neutral pH with FITC in the presence of transporter substrates Na/sup +/ and glucose, most of the incorporated fluorescence was associated with a single peak after resolution by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The apparent molecular mass of the FITC-labeled species ranged from 79 to 92 kDa. Labeling of this peak was specifically reduced by 70% if Na/sup +/ and glucose were omitted. Na/sup +/ could not be replaced by K/sup +/, Rb/sup +/, or Li/sup +/. FITC labeling of this peak was also stimulated after incubation of membranes with MAb's known to influence high-affinity phlorizin binding, and stimulation was synergistically increased when MAb's were added in the presence of Na/sup +/ and glucose. Substrate-induced or MAb-induced labeling correlated with inactivation of Na/sup +/-dependent phlorizin binding. MAb's recognized an antigen of 75 kDa in the native membranes whereas substrate-induced FITC labeling was accompanied by loss of antigen recognition and protection from proteolysis. These findings are consistent with a model in which MAb's stabilize a Na/sup +/-induced active conformer of the Na/sup +//glucose symport system.

  18. Exploiting conformational dynamics in drug discovery: design of C-terminal inhibitors of Hsp90 with improved activities

    PubMed Central

    Moroni, Elisabetta; Zhao, Huiping; Blagg, Brian S.J.; Colombo, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    The interaction that occurs between molecules is a dynamic process that impacts both structural and conformational properties of the ligand and the ligand binding site. Herein, we investigate the dynamic cross-talk between a protein and the ligand as a source for new opportunities in ligand design. Analysis of the formation/disappearance of protein pockets produced in response to a first-generation inhibitor assisted in the identification of functional groups that could be introduced onto scaffolds to facilitate optimal binding, which allowed for increased binding with previously uncharacterized regions. MD simulations were used to elucidate primary changes that occur in the Hsp90 C-terminal binding pocket in the presence of first-generation ligands. This data was then used to design ligands that adapt to these receptor conformations, which provides access to an energy landscape that is not visible in a static model. The newly synthesized compounds demonstrated anti-proliferative activity at ~150 nanomolar concentration. The method identified herein may be used to design chemical probes that provide additional information on structural variations of Hsp90 C-terminal binding site. PMID:24397468

  19. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate triggers activation of focal adhesion kinase by inducing clustering and conformational changes.

    PubMed

    Goñi, Guillermina M; Epifano, Carolina; Boskovic, Jasminka; Camacho-Artacho, Marta; Zhou, Jing; Bronowska, Agnieszka; Martín, M Teresa; Eck, Michael J; Kremer, Leonor; Gräter, Frauke; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi; Perez-Moreno, Mirna; Lietha, Daniel

    2014-08-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase (NRTK) with key roles in integrating growth and cell matrix adhesion signals, and FAK is a major driver of invasion and metastasis in cancer. Cell adhesion via integrin receptors is well known to trigger FAK signaling, and many of the players involved are known; however, mechanistically, FAK activation is not understood. Here, using a multidisciplinary approach, including biochemical, biophysical, structural, computational, and cell biology approaches, we provide a detailed view of a multistep activation mechanism of FAK initiated by phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. Interestingly, the mechanism differs from canonical NRTK activation and is tailored to the dual catalytic and scaffolding function of FAK. We find PI(4,5)P2 induces clustering of FAK on the lipid bilayer by binding a basic region in the regulatory 4.1, ezrin, radixin, moesin homology (FERM) domain. In these clusters, PI(4,5)P2 induces a partially open FAK conformation where the autophosphorylation site is exposed, facilitating efficient autophosphorylation and subsequent Src recruitment. However, PI(4,5)P2 does not release autoinhibitory interactions; rather, Src phosphorylation of the activation loop in FAK results in release of the FERM/kinase tether and full catalytic activation. We propose that PI(4,5)P2 and its generation in focal adhesions by the enzyme phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase type Iγ are important in linking integrin signaling to FAK activation. PMID:25049397

  20. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate triggers activation of focal adhesion kinase by inducing clustering and conformational changes

    PubMed Central

    Goñi, Guillermina M.; Epifano, Carolina; Boskovic, Jasminka; Camacho-Artacho, Marta; Zhou, Jing; Bronowska, Agnieszka; Martín, M. Teresa; Eck, Michael J.; Kremer, Leonor; Gräter, Frauke; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi; Perez-Moreno, Mirna; Lietha, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase (NRTK) with key roles in integrating growth and cell matrix adhesion signals, and FAK is a major driver of invasion and metastasis in cancer. Cell adhesion via integrin receptors is well known to trigger FAK signaling, and many of the players involved are known; however, mechanistically, FAK activation is not understood. Here, using a multidisciplinary approach, including biochemical, biophysical, structural, computational, and cell biology approaches, we provide a detailed view of a multistep activation mechanism of FAK initiated by phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. Interestingly, the mechanism differs from canonical NRTK activation and is tailored to the dual catalytic and scaffolding function of FAK. We find PI(4,5)P2 induces clustering of FAK on the lipid bilayer by binding a basic region in the regulatory 4.1, ezrin, radixin, moesin homology (FERM) domain. In these clusters, PI(4,5)P2 induces a partially open FAK conformation where the autophosphorylation site is exposed, facilitating efficient autophosphorylation and subsequent Src recruitment. However, PI(4,5)P2 does not release autoinhibitory interactions; rather, Src phosphorylation of the activation loop in FAK results in release of the FERM/kinase tether and full catalytic activation. We propose that PI(4,5)P2 and its generation in focal adhesions by the enzyme phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase type Iγ are important in linking integrin signaling to FAK activation. PMID:25049397

  1. Active Site Detection by Spatial Conformity and Electrostatic Analysis—Unravelling a Proteolytic Function in Shrimp Alkaline Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Sandeep; Minda, Renu; Salaye, Lipika; Bhattacharjee, Swapan K.; Rao, Basuthkar J.

    2011-01-01

    Computational methods are increasingly gaining importance as an aid in identifying active sites. Mostly these methods tend to have structural information that supplement sequence conservation based analyses. Development of tools that compute electrostatic potentials has further improved our ability to better characterize the active site residues in proteins. We have described a computational methodology for detecting active sites based on structural and electrostatic conformity - CataLytic Active Site Prediction (CLASP). In our pipelined model, physical 3D signature of any particular enzymatic function as defined by its active sites is used to obtain spatially congruent matches. While previous work has revealed that catalytic residues have large pKa deviations from standard values, we show that for a given enzymatic activity, electrostatic potential difference (PD) between analogous residue pairs in an active site taken from different proteins of the same family are similar. False positives in spatially congruent matches are further pruned by PD analysis where cognate pairs with large deviations are rejected. We first present the results of active site prediction by CLASP for two enzymatic activities - β-lactamases and serine proteases, two of the most extensively investigated enzymes. The results of CLASP analysis on motifs extracted from Catalytic Site Atlas (CSA) are also presented in order to demonstrate its ability to accurately classify any protein, putative or otherwise, with known structure. The source code and database is made available at www.sanchak.com/clasp/. Subsequently, we probed alkaline phosphatases (AP), one of the well known promiscuous enzymes, for additional activities. Such a search has led us to predict a hitherto unknown function of shrimp alkaline phosphatase (SAP), where the protein acts as a protease. Finally, we present experimental evidence of the prediction by CLASP by showing that SAP indeed has protease activity in vitro. PMID

  2. A maximum entropy approach to detect close-in giant planets around active stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, P.; Donati, J.-F.; Hébrard, E.; Morin, J.; Folsom, C. P.; Böhm, T.; Boisse, I.; Borgniet, S.; Bouvier, J.; Delfosse, X.; Hussain, G.; Jeffers, S. V.; Marsden, S. C.; Barnes, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Context. The high spot coverage of young active stars is responsible for distortions of spectral lines that hamper the detection of close-in planets through radial velocity methods. Aims: We aim to progress towards more efficient exoplanet detection around active stars by optimizing the use of Doppler imaging in radial velocity measurements. Methods: We propose a simple method to simultaneously extract a brightness map and a set of orbital parameters through a tomographic inversion technique derived from classical Doppler mapping. Based on the maximum entropy principle, the underlying idea is to determine the set of orbital parameters that minimizes the information content of the resulting Doppler map. We carry out a set of numerical simulations to perform a preliminary assessment of the robustness of our method, using an actual Doppler map of the very active star HR 1099 to produce a realistic synthetic data set for various sets of orbital parameters of a single planet in a circular orbit. Results: Using a simulated time series of 50 line profiles affected by a peak-to-peak activity jitter of 2.5 km s-1, in most cases we are able to recover the radial velocity amplitude, orbital phase, and orbital period of an artificial planet down to a radial velocity semi-amplitude of the order of the radial velocity scatter due to the photon noise alone (about 50 m s-1 in our case). One noticeable exception occurs when the planetary orbit is close to co-rotation, in which case significant biases are observed in the reconstructed radial velocity amplitude, while the orbital period and phase remain robustly recovered. Conclusions: The present method constitutes a very simple way to extract orbital parameters from heavily distorted line profiles of active stars, when more classical radial velocity detection methods generally fail. It is easily adaptable to most existing Doppler imaging codes, paving the way towards a systematic search for close-in planets orbiting young, rapidly

  3. The membrane anchor of the transcriptional activator SREBP is characterized by intrinsic conformational flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Linser, Rasmus; Salvi, Nicola; Briones, Rodolfo; Rovó, Petra; de Groot, Bert L.; Wagner, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) is a conserved mechanism crucial for numerous cellular processes, including signaling, transcriptional regulation, axon guidance, cell adhesion, cellular stress responses, and transmembrane protein fragment degradation. Importantly, it is relevant in various diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, cardiovascular diseases, and cancers. Even though a number of structures of different intramembrane proteases have been solved recently, fundamental questions concerning mechanistic underpinnings of RIP and therapeutic interventions remain. In particular, this includes substrate recognition, what properties render a given substrate amenable for RIP, and how the lipid environment affects the substrate cleavage. Members of the sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) family of transcription factors are critical regulators of genes involved in cholesterol/lipid homeostasis. After site-1 protease cleavage of the inactive SREBP transmembrane precursor protein, RIP of the anchor intermediate by site-2 protease generates the mature transcription factor. In this work, we have investigated the labile anchor intermediate of SREBP-1 using NMR spectroscopy. Surprisingly, NMR chemical shifts, site-resolved solvent exposure, and relaxation studies show that the cleavage site of the lipid-signaling protein intermediate bears rigid α-helical topology. An evolutionary conserved motif, by contrast, interrupts the secondary structure ∼9–10 residues C-terminal of the scissile bond and acts as an inducer of conformational flexibility within the carboxyl-terminal transmembrane region. These results are consistent with molecular dynamics simulations. Topology, stability, and site-resolved dynamics data suggest that the cleavage of the α-helical substrate in the case of RIP may be associated with a hinge motion triggered by the molecular environment. PMID:26392539

  4. Structure-activity relationship of ibogaine analogs interacting with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in different conformational states.

    PubMed

    Arias, Hugo R; Feuerbach, Dominik; Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M; Jozwiak, Krzysztof

    2011-09-01

    The interaction of ibogaine analogs with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) in different conformational states was studied by functional and structural approaches. The results established that ibogaine analogs: (a) inhibit (±)-epibatidine-induced Ca²⁺ influx in human embryonic muscle AChRs with the following potency sequence (IC(50) in μM): (±)-18-methylaminocoronaridine (5.9±0.3)∼(±)-18-methoxycoronaridine (18-MC) (6.8±0.8)>(-)-ibogaine (17±3)∼(+)-catharanthine (20±1)>(±)-albifloranine (46±13), (b) bind to the [³H]TCP binding site with higher affinity when the Torpedo AChR is in the desensitized state compared to that in the resting state. Similar results were obtained using [³H]18-MC. These and docking results suggest a steric interaction between TCP and ibogaine analogs for the same site, (c) enhance [³H]cytisine binding to resting but not to desensitized AChRs, with desensitizing potencies (apparent EC₅₀) that correlate very well with the pK(i) values in the desensitized state, and (d) there are good bilinear correlations between the ligand molecular volumes and their affinities in the desensitized and resting states, with an optimal volume of ∼345 ų for the ibogaine site. These results indicate that the size of the binding sites for ibogaine analogs, located between the serine and nonpolar rings and shared with TCP, is an important structural feature for binding and for inducing desensitization. PMID:21642011

  5. Structural Determinants for the Selective Anti-HIV-1 Activity of the All-β Alternative Conformer of XCL1

    PubMed Central

    Guzzo, Christina; Fox, Jamie C.; Miao, Huiyi; Volkman, Brian F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 replication is regulated in vivo by a complex network of cytokines and chemokines. XCL1/lymphotactin, a unique metamorphic chemokine, was recently identified as a broad-spectrum endogenous HIV-1 inhibitor that blocks viral entry via direct interaction with the gp120 envelope glycoprotein. HIV-1 inhibition by XCL1 requires access to the alternative all-β conformation, which interacts with glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) but not with the specific XCL1 receptor, XCR1. To investigate the structural determinants of the HIV-inhibitory function of XCL1, we performed a detailed structure-function analysis of a stabilized all-β variant, XCL1 W55D. Individual alanine substitutions of two basic residues within the 40s' loop, K42 and R43, abrogated the ability of XCL1 to bind to the viral envelope and block HIV-1 infection; moreover, a loss of HIV-inhibitory function, albeit less marked, was seen upon individual mutation of three additional basic residues: R18, R35, and K46. In contrast, mutation of K42 to arginine did not cause any loss of function, suggesting that the interaction with gp120 is primarily electrostatic in nature. Strikingly, four of these five residues cluster to form a large (∼350 Å2) positively charged surface in the all-β XCL1 conformation, whereas they are dissociated in the classic chemokine fold, which is inactive against HIV-1, providing a structural basis for the selective antiviral activity of the alternatively folded XCL1. Furthermore, we observed that changes to the N-terminal domain, which is proximal to the cluster of putative HIV-1 gp120-interacting residues, also affect the antiviral activity of XCL1. Interestingly, the complement of residues involved in HIV-1 blockade is partially overlapping, but distinct from those involved in the GAG-binding function of XCL1. These data identify key structural determinants of anti-HIV activity in XCL1, providing new templates for the development of HIV-1 entry inhibitors. IMPORTANCE The host

  6. Yearning for connection? Loneliness is associated with increased ventral striatum activity to close others.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Tristen K; Muscatell, Keely A; Moieni, Mona; Dutcher, Janine M; Jevtic, Ivana; Irwin, Michael R; Eisenberger, Naomi I

    2016-07-01

    Loneliness is a distressing state indicating that one's basic need for social connection is not being met. In an effort to satisfy the need for social connection, loneliness may increase the processing of social cues and desire to connect with others. Yet the neural substrates that contribute to the drive for increased connection in response to loneliness are not known. The ventral striatum (VS), previously shown to increase in response to craving food and other rewarding stimuli, may contribute to "social craving" when one is lonely. That is, the VS may track one's 'hunger' for reconnection much as it tracks hunger for food. To examine this, participants reported on their feelings of loneliness before undergoing an fMRI scan where they viewed cues of potential social reconnection (images of a close other). Consistent with the hypothesis that loneliness stems from an unmet need for connection, loneliness was associated with reduced feelings of connection with the close other. Furthermore, greater reported loneliness was associated with increased VS activity to viewing a close other (vs stranger). Results extend the current literature by showing that lonely individuals show increased activity in reward-related regions to their closest loved ones, possibly reflecting an increased desire for social connection. PMID:26084531

  7. Sampling Long Timescale Protein Motions: OSRW Simulation of Active Site Loop Conformational Free Energies in Formyl-CoA:Oxalate CoA Transferase

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sangbae; Chen, Mengen; Yang, Wei; Richards, Nigel G. J.

    2010-01-01

    X-ray crystallographic snapshots have shown that conformational changes of a tetraglycine loop in the active site of formyl-CoA: oxalate CoA transferase (FRC) play an important role in the catalytic cycle of the enzyme. Orthogonal space random walk (OSRW) simulations have been applied to obtain quantitative computational estimates of the relative free energy of the “open” and “closed” conformations of this loop together with the energetic barrier for interconversion of these states in wild type FRC. These OSRW calculations not only show that the two conformations have similar free energies but also predict a barrier that is consistent with the observed turnover number of the enzyme. In an effort to quantitate the importance of specific residues in the tetraglycine loop, OSRW simulations have also been performed on the G258A, G259A, G260A and G261A FRC variants both to examine the energetic effects of replacing each glycine residue and to correlate the computed energies with kinetic and structural observations. In enzymes with substantially reduced catalytic efficiency (kcat/KM), the OSRW simulations reveal the adoption of additional low energy loop conformations. In the case of the G260A FRC variant, the new conformation identified by simulation is similar to that observed in the X-ray crystal structure of the protein. These results provide further evidence for the power of the OSRW method in sampling conformational space, and hence in providing quantitative free energy estimates for the conformations adopted by functionally important active site loops. In addition, these simulations model the motions of side chains that are correlated with changes in loop conformation thereby permitting access to long time-scale motions through the use of nanosecond simulations. PMID:20446682

  8. Conformational entropic maps of functional coupling domains in GPCR activation: A case study with beta2 adrenergic receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fan; Abrol, Ravinder; Goddard, William, III; Dougherty, Dennis

    2014-03-01

    Entropic effect in GPCR activation is poorly understood. Based on the recent solved structures, researchers in the GPCR structural biology field have proposed several ``local activating switches'' that consisted of a few number of conserved residues, but have long ignored the collective dynamical effect (conformational entropy) of a domain comprised of an ensemble of residues. A new paradigm has been proposed recently that a GPCR can be viewed as a composition of several functional coupling domains, each of which undergoes order-to-disorder or disorder-to-order transitions upon activation. Here we identified and studied these functional coupling domains by comparing the local entropy changes of each residue between the inactive and active states of the β2 adrenergic receptor from computational simulation. We found that agonist and G-protein binding increases the heterogeneity of the entropy distribution in the receptor. This new activation paradigm and computational entropy analysis scheme provides novel ways to design functionally modified mutant and identify new allosteric sites for GPCRs. The authors thank NIH and Sanofi for funding this project.

  9. Actively Closing the Gap? Social Class, Organized Activities, and Academic Achievement in High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Participation in Organized Activities (OA) is associated with positive behavioral and developmental outcomes in children. However, less is known about how particular aspects of participation affect the academic achievement of high school students from different social class positions. Using the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002, this study…

  10. Linear Closed-form Solution and Finite-element Analysis of an Active Tensegrity Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kmeť, Stanislav; Platko, Peter

    2012-11-01

    Results of the linear closed form solution of an active or adaptive tensegrity unit, as well as its numerical analysis using finite element method are presented in the paper. The shape of the unit is an octahedral cell with a square base and it is formed by thirteen members (four bottom and four top cables, four edge struts and one central strut). The central strut is designed as an actuator that allows for an adjustment of the shape of the unit which leads to changes of tensile forces in the cables. Due to the diagonal symmetry of the 3D tensegrity unit the closed-form analysis is based on the 2D solution of the equivalent planar biconvex cable system with one central strut under a vertical point load.

  11. Novel sensors to enable closed-loop active clearance control in gas turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisheimer, Jonathan; Holst, Tom

    2014-06-01

    Active clearance control within the turbine section of gas turbine engines presents and opportunity within aerospace and industrial applications to improve operating efficiencies and the life of downstream components. Open loop clearance control is currently employed during the development of all new large core aerospace engines; however, the ability to measure the gap between the blades and the case and close down the clearance further presents as opportunity to gain even greater efficiencies. The turbine area is one of the harshest environments for long term placement of a sensor in addition to the extreme accuracy requirements required to enable closed loop clearance control. This paper gives an overview of the challenges of clearance measurements within the turbine as well as discusses the latest developments of a microwave sensor designed for this application.

  12. Control of RecBCD enzyme activity by DNA binding- and Chi hotspot-dependent conformational changes.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Andrew F; Amundsen, Susan K; Guttman, Miklos; Lee, Kelly K; Luo, Jie; Ranish, Jeffrey; Smith, Gerald R

    2014-10-23

    Faithful repair of DNA double-strand breaks by homologous recombination is crucial to maintain functional genomes. The major Escherichia coli pathway of DNA break repair requires RecBCD enzyme, a complex protein machine with multiple activities. Upon encountering a Chi recombination hotspot (5' GCTGGTGG 3') during DNA unwinding, RecBCD's unwinding, nuclease, and RecA-loading activities change dramatically, but the physical basis for these changes is unknown. Here, we identify, during RecBCD's DNA unwinding, two Chi-stimulated conformational changes involving RecC. One produced a marked, long-lasting, Chi-dependent increase in protease sensitivity of a small patch, near the Chi recognition domain, on the solvent-exposed RecC surface. The other change was identified by crosslinking of an artificial amino acid inserted in this RecC patch to RecB. Small-angle X-ray scattering analysis confirmed a major conformational change upon binding of DNA to the enzyme and is consistent with these two changes. We propose that, upon DNA binding, the RecB nuclease domain swings from one side of RecC to the other; when RecBCD encounters Chi, the nuclease domain returns to its initial position determined by crystallography, where it nicks DNA exiting from RecC and loads RecA onto the newly generated 3'-ended single-stranded DNA during continued unwinding; a crevice between RecB and RecC increasingly narrows during these steps. This model provides a physical basis for the intramolecular "signal transduction" from Chi to RecC to RecD to RecB inferred previously from genetic and enzymatic analyses, and it accounts for the enzymatic changes that accompany Chi's stimulation of recombination. PMID:25073102

  13. Control of RecBCD Enzyme Activity by DNA Binding- and Chi Hotspot-Dependent Conformational Changes

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Andrew F.; Amundsen, Susan K.; Guttman, Miklos; Lee, Kelly K.; Luo, Jie; Ranish, Jeffrey; Smith, Gerald R.

    2014-01-01

    Faithful repair of DNA double-strand breaks by homologous recombination is crucial to maintain functional genomes. The major Escherichia coli pathway of DNA break repair requires RecBCD enzyme, a complex protein machine with multiple activities. Upon encountering a Chi recombination hotspot (5′ GCTGGTGG 3′) during DNA unwinding, RecBCD’s unwinding, nuclease, and RecA-loading activities change dramatically, but the physical basis for these changes is unknown. Here, we identify, during RecBCD’s DNA unwinding, two Chi-stimulated conformational changes involving RecC. One produced a marked, long-lasting, Chi-dependent increase in protease sensitivity of a small patch, near the Chi recognition domain, on the solvent-exposed RecC surface. The other change was identified by crosslinking of an artificial amino acid inserted in this RecC patch to RecB. Small-angle X-ray scattering analysis confirmed a major conformational change upon binding of DNA to the enzyme and is consistent with two changes. We propose that, upon DNA binding, the RecB nuclease domain swings from one side of RecC to the other; when RecBCD encounters Chi, the nuclease domain returns to its initial position determined by crystallography, where it nicks DNA exiting from RecC and loads RecA onto the newly generated 3′-ended single-stranded DNA during continued unwinding; a crevice between RecB and RecC increasingly narrows during these steps. This model provides a physical basis for the intramolecular “signal transduction” from Chi to RecC to RecD to RecB inferred previously from genetic and enzymatic analyses, and it accounts for the enzymatic changes that accompany Chi’s stimulation of recombination. PMID:25073102

  14. Structural basis of conformational transitions in the active site and 80′s loop in the FK506-binding protein FKBP12

    PubMed Central

    Mustafi, Sourajit M.; Brecher, Matthew; Zhang, Jing; Li, Hongmin; Lemaster, David M.; Hernández, Griselda

    2014-01-01

    The extensive set of NMR doublings exhibited by the immunophilin FKBP12 (FK506-binding protein 12) arose from a slow transition to the cis-peptide configuration at Gly89 near the tip of the 80′s loop, the site for numerous protein-recognition interactions for both FKBP12 and other FKBP domain proteins. The 80′s loop also exhibited linebroadening, indicative of microsecond to millisecond conformational dynamics, but only in the trans-peptide state. The G89A variant shifted the trans–cis peptide equilibrium from 88:12 to 33:67, whereas a proline residue substitution induced fully the cis-peptide configuration. The 80′s loop conformation in the G89P crystal structure at 1.50 Å resolution differed from wild-type FKBP12 primarily at residues 88, 89 and 90, and it closely resembled that reported for FKBP52. Structure-based chemical-shift predictions indicated that the microsecond to millisecond dynamics in the 80′s loop probably arose from a concerted main chain (ψ88 and ϕ89) torsion angle transition. The indole side chain of Trp59 at the base of the active-site cleft was reoriented ~90o and the adjacent backbone was shifted in the G89P crystal structure. NOE analysis of wild-type FKBP12 demonstrated that this indole populates the perpendicular orientation at 20%. The 15N relaxation analysis was consistent with the indole reorientation occurring in the nanosecond timeframe. Recollection of the G89P crystal data at 1.20 Å resolution revealed a weaker wild-type-like orientation for the indole ring. Differences in the residues that underlie the Trp59 indole ring and altered interactions linking the 50′s loop to the active site suggested that reorientation of this ring may be disfavoured in the other six members of the FKBP domain family that bear this active-site tryptophan residue. PMID:24405377

  15. Characterization and restoration of performance of {open_quotes}aged{close_quotes} radioiodine removing activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, W.P.

    1997-08-01

    The degradation of radioiodine removal performance for impregnated activated carbons because of ageing is well established. However, the causes for this degradation remain unclear. One theory is that this reduction in performance from the ageing process results from an oxidation of the surface of the carbon. Radioiodine removing activated carbons that failed radioiodine removal tests showed an oxidized surface that had become hydrophilic compared with new carbons. We attempted to restore the performance of these {open_quotes}failed{close_quotes} carbons with a combination of thermal and chemical treatment. The results of these investigations are presented and discussed with the view of extending the life of radioiodine removing activated carbons. 4 refs., 2 tabs.

  16. Thermal Dihydrogen Activation by a Closed-Shell AuCeO2(+) Cluster.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jing-Heng; He, Sheng-Gui

    2014-11-01

    Laser-ablation-generated AuCeO2(+) and CeO2(+) oxide clusters were mass-selected using a quadrupole mass filter and reacted with H2 in an ion trap reactor at ambient conditions. The reactions were characterized by mass spectrometry and density functional theory calculations. The gold-cerium bimetallic oxide cluster AuCeO2(+) is more reactive in H2 activation than the pure cerium oxide cluster CeO2(+). The gold atom is the active adsorption site and facilitates the heterolytic cleavage of H2 in collaboration with the separated O(2-) ion of the CeO2 support. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of thermal H2 activation by a closed-shell atomic cluster, which provides molecular-level insights into the single gold atom catalysis over metal oxide supports. PMID:26278765

  17. Conformations of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) orchestrate neuronal survival by a crosstalk between EGFR and NMDAR

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, T; Lesept, F; Chevilley, A; Lenoir, S; Aimable, M; Briens, A; Hommet, Y; Bardou, I; Parcq, J; Vivien, D

    2015-01-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a pleiotropic serine protease of the central nervous system (CNS) with reported neurotrophic and neurotoxic functions. Produced and released under its single chain form (sc), the sc-tPA can be cleaved by plasmin or kallikrein in a two chain form, tc-tPA. Although both sc-tPA and tc-tPA display a similar fibrinolytic activity, we postulated here that these two conformations of tPA (sc-tPA and tc-tPA) could differentially control the effects of tPA on neuronal survival. Using primary cultures of mouse cortical neurons, our present study reveals that sc-tPA is the only one capable to promote N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-induced calcium influx and subsequent excitotoxicity. In contrast, both sc-tPA and tc-tPA are capable to activate epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs), a mechanism mediating the antiapoptotic effects of tPA. Interestingly, we revealed a tPA dependent crosstalk between EGFR and NMDAR in which a tPA-dependent activation of EGFRs leads to downregulation of NMDAR signaling and to subsequent neurotrophic effects. PMID:26469972

  18. Novel human D-amino acid oxidase inhibitors stabilize an active-site lid-open conformation

    PubMed Central

    Terry-Lorenzo, Ryan T.; Chun, Lawrence E.; Brown, Scott P.; Heffernan, Michele L. R.; Fang, Q. Kevin; Orsini, Michael A.; Pollegioni, Loredano; Hardy, Larry W.; Spear, Kerry L.; Large, Thomas H.

    2014-01-01

    The NMDAR (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor) is a central regulator of synaptic plasticity and learning and memory. hDAAO (human D-amino acid oxidase) indirectly reduces NMDAR activity by degrading the NMDAR co-agonist D-serine. Since NMDAR hypofunction is thought to be a foundational defect in schizophrenia, hDAAO inhibitors have potential as treatments for schizophrenia and other nervous system disorders. Here, we sought to identify novel chemicals that inhibit hDAAO activity. We used computational tools to design a focused, purchasable library of compounds. After screening this library for hDAAO inhibition, we identified the structurally novel compound, ‘compound 2’ [3-(7-hydroxy-2-oxo-4-phenyl-2H-chromen-6-yl)propanoic acid], which displayed low nM hDAAO inhibitory potency (Ki=7 nM). Although the library was expected to enrich for compounds that were competitive for both D-serine and FAD, compound 2 actually was FAD uncompetitive, much like canonical hDAAO inhibitors such as benzoic acid. Compound 2 and an analog were independently co-crystalized with hDAAO. These compounds stabilized a novel conformation of hDAAO in which the active-site lid was in an open position. These results confirm previous hypotheses regarding active-site lid flexibility of mammalian D-amino acid oxidases and could assist in the design of the next generation of hDAAO inhibitors. PMID:25001371

  19. The conformational state of polyphenol oxidase from field bean (Dolichos lablab) upon SDS and acid-pH activation.

    PubMed

    Kanade, Santosh R; Paul, Beena; Rao, A G Appu; Gowda, Lalitha R

    2006-05-01

    Field bean (Dolichos lablab) contains a single isoform of PPO (polyphenol oxidase)--a type III copper protein that catalyses the o-hydroxylation of monophenols and oxidation of o-diphenols using molecular oxygen--and is a homotetramer with a molecular mass of 120 kDa. The enzyme is activated manyfold either in the presence of the anionic detergent SDS below its critical micellar concentration or on exposure to acid-pH. The enhancement of kcat upon activation is accompanied by a marked shift in the pH optimum for the oxidation of t-butyl catechol from 4.5 to 6.0, an increased sensitivity to tropolone, altered susceptibility to proteolytic degradation and decreased thermostability. The Stokes radius of the native enzyme is found to increase from 49.1+/-2 to 75.9+/-0.6 A (1 A=0.1 nm). The activation by SDS and acid-pH results in a localized conformational change that is anchored around the catalytic site of PPO that alters the microenvironment of an essential glutamic residue. Chemical modification of field bean and sweet potato PPO with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodi-imide followed by kinetic analysis leads to the conclusion that both the enzymes possess a core carboxylate essential to activity. This enhanced catalytic efficiency of PPO, considered as an inducible defence oxidative enzyme, is vital to the physiological defence strategy adapted by plants to insect herbivory and pathogen attack. PMID:16393141

  20. Enhancement of Chaperone Activity of Plant-Specific Thioredoxin through γ-Ray Mediated Conformational Change

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Sik; Jung, Hyun Suk; Park, Soo-Kwon; Lee, Eun Mi; Singh, Sudhir; Lee, Yuno; Lee, Kyun Oh; Lee, Sang Yeol; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2015-01-01

    AtTDX, a thioredoxin-like plant-specific protein present in Arabidospis is a thermo-stable and multi-functional enzyme. This enzyme is known to act as a thioredoxin and as a molecular chaperone depending upon its oligomeric status. The present study examines the effects of γ-irradiation on the structural and functional changes of AtTDX. Holdase chaperone activity of AtTDX was increased and reached a maximum at 10 kGy of γ-irradiation and declined subsequently in a dose-dependent manner, together with no effect on foldase chaperone activity. However, thioredoxin activity decreased gradually with increasing irradiation. Electrophoresis and size exclusion chromatography analysis showed that AtTDX had a tendency to form high molecular weight (HMW) complexes after γ-irradiation and γ-ray-induced HMW complexes were tightly associated with a holdase chaperone activity. The hydrophobicity of AtTDX increased with an increase in irradiation dose till 20 kGy and thereafter decreased further. Analysis of the secondary structures of AtTDX using far UV-circular dichroism spectra revealed that the irradiation remarkably increased the exposure of β-sheets and random coils with a dramatic decrease in α-helices and turn elements in a dose-dependent manner. The data of the present study suggest that γ-irradiation may be a useful tool for increasing holdase chaperone activity without adversely affecting foldase chaperone activity of thioredoxin-like proteins. PMID:26580605

  1. Mapping the conformational space accessible to catechol-O-methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Ehler, Andreas; Benz, Jörg; Schlatter, Daniel; Rudolph, Markus G

    2014-08-01

    Methylation catalysed by catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is the main pathway of catechol neurotransmitter deactivation in the prefrontal cortex. Low levels of this class of neurotransmitters are held to be causative of diseases such as schizophrenia, depression and Parkinson's disease. Inhibition of COMT may increase neurotransmitter levels, thus offering a route for treatment. Structure-based drug design hitherto seems to be based on the closed enzyme conformation. Here, a set of apo, semi-holo, holo and Michaelis form crystal structures are described that define the conformational space available to COMT and that include likely intermediates along the catalytic pathway. Domain swaps and sizeable loop movements around the active site testify to the flexibility of this enzyme, rendering COMT a difficult drug target. The low affinity of the co-substrate S-adenosylmethionine and the large conformational changes involved during catalysis highlight significant energetic investment to achieve the closed conformation. Since each conformation of COMT is a bona fide target for inhibitors, other states than the closed conformation may be promising to address. Crystallographic data for an alternative avenue of COMT inhibition, i.e. locking of the apo state by an inhibitor, are presented. The set of COMT structures may prove to be useful for the development of novel classes of inhibitors. PMID:25084335

  2. Fragment-based identification of determinants of conformational and spectroscopic change at the ricin active site

    SciTech Connect

    Carra,J.; McHugh, C.; Mulligan, S.; Machiesky, L.; Soares, A.; Millard, C.

    2007-01-01

    We found that amide ligands can bind weakly but specifically to the ricin active site, producing significant shifts in positions of the critical active site residues Arg180 and Tyr80. These results indicate that fragment-based drug discovery methods are capable of identifying minimal bonding determinants of active-site side-chain rearrangements and the mechanistic origins of spectroscopic shifts. Our results suggest that tryptophan fluorescence provides a sensitive probe for the geometric relationship of arginine-tryptophan pairs, which often have significant roles in protein function. Using the unusual characteristics of the RTA system, we measured the still controversial thermodynamic changes of site-specific urea binding to a protein, results that are relevant to understanding the physical mechanisms of protein denaturation.

  3. Probing conformational changes in lipoxygenases upon membrane binding: fine-tuning by the active site inhibitor ETYA.

    PubMed

    Di Venere, Almerinda; Nicolai, Eleonora; Ivanov, Igor; Dainese, Enrico; Adel, Susan; Angelucci, B C; Kuhn, Hartmut; Maccarrone, Mauro; Mei, Giampiero

    2014-01-01

    Lipoxygenases (LOXs) are lipid-peroxidizing enzymes that are involved in the metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Their biological activity includes a membrane binding process whose molecular details are not completely understood. The mechanism of enzyme-membrane interactions is thought to involve conformational changes at the level of the protein tertiary structure, and the extent of such alterations depends on the degree of structural flexibility of the different LOX isoforms. In this study, we have tested the resilience properties of a plant and a mammalian LOX, by using high pressure fluorescence measurements at different temperatures. The binding of LOXs to the lipid bilayer has been characterized using both large and giant unilamellar vesicles and electron transfer particles (inner mitochondrial membranes) as model membranes. The data indicate that the degree of LOXs' flexibility is strictly dependent on the two distinct N- and C-terminal domains that characterize the 3D structure of these enzymes. Furthermore, they demonstrate that increasing the rigidity of protein scaffolding by the presence of an active site ligand impairs the membrane binding ability of LOXs. These findings provide evidence that the amphitropic nature of LOXs is finely tuned by the interaction of the substrate with the residues of the active site, suggesting new strategies for the design of enzyme inhibitors. PMID:24012824

  4. Conformational Change in the Active Site of Streptococcal Unsaturated Glucuronyl Hydrolase Through Site-Directed Mutagenesis at Asp-115.

    PubMed

    Nakamichi, Yusuke; Oiki, Sayoko; Mikami, Bunzo; Murata, Kousaku; Hashimoto, Wataru

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase (UGL) degrades unsaturated disaccharides generated from mammalian extracellular matrices, glycosaminoglycans, by polysaccharide lyases. Two Asp residues, Asp-115 and Asp-175 of Streptococcus agalactiae UGL (SagUGL), are completely conserved in other bacterial UGLs, one of which (Asp-175 of SagUGL) acts as a general acid and base catalyst. The other Asp (Asp-115 of SagUGL) also affects the enzyme activity, although its role in the enzyme reaction has not been well understood. Here, we show substitution of Asp-115 in SagUGL with Asn caused a conformational change in the active site. Tertiary structures of SagUGL mutants D115N and D115N/K370S with negligible enzyme activity were determined at 2.00 and 1.79 Å resolution, respectively, by X-ray crystallography. The side chain of Asn-115 is drastically shifted in both mutants owing to the interaction with several residues, including Asp-175, by formation of hydrogen bonds. This interaction between Asn-115 and Asp-175 probably prevents the mutants from triggering the enzyme reaction using Asp-175 as an acid catalyst. PMID:27402448

  5. Conformational Changes in a Hyperthermostable Glycoside Hydrolase: Enzymatic Activity Is a Consequence of the Loop Dynamics and Protonation Balance

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Leandro C.; da Silva, Viviam M.; Colussi, Francieli; Cabral, Aline D.; de Oliveira Neto, Mario; Squina, Fabio M.; Garcia, Wanius

    2015-01-01

    Endo-β-1, 4-mannanase from Thermotoga petrophila (TpMan) is a modular hyperthermostable enzyme involved in the degradation of mannan-containing polysaccharides. The degradation of these polysaccharides represents a key step for several industrial applications. Here, as part of a continuing investigation of TpMan, the region corresponding to the GH5 domain (TpManGH5) was characterized as a function of pH and temperature. The results indicated that the enzymatic activity of the TpManGH5 is pH-dependent, with its optimum activity occurring at pH 6. At pH 8, the studies demonstrated that TpManGH5 is a molecule with a nearly spherical tightly packed core displaying negligible flexibility in solution, and with size and shape very similar to crystal structure. However, TpManGH5 experiences an increase in radius of gyration in acidic conditions suggesting expansion of the molecule. Furthermore, at acidic pH values, TpManGH5 showed a less globular shape, probably due to a loop region slightly more expanded and flexible in solution (residues Y88 to A105). In addition, molecular dynamics simulations indicated that conformational changes caused by pH variation did not change the core of the TpManGH5, which means that only the above mentioned loop region presents high degree of fluctuations. The results also suggested that conformational changes of the loop region may facilitate polysaccharide and enzyme interaction. Finally, at pH 6 the results indicated that TpManGH5 is slightly more flexible at 65°C when compared to the same enzyme at 20°C. The biophysical characterization presented here is well correlated with the enzymatic activity and provide new insight into the structural basis for the temperature and pH-dependent activity of the TpManGH5. Also, the data suggest a loop region that provides a starting point for a rational design of biotechnological desired features. PMID:25723179

  6. Conformational changes in a hyperthermostable glycoside hydrolase: enzymatic activity is a consequence of the loop dynamics and protonation balance.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Leandro C; da Silva, Viviam M; Colussi, Francieli; Cabral, Aline D; de Oliveira Neto, Mario; Squina, Fabio M; Garcia, Wanius

    2015-01-01

    Endo-β-1, 4-mannanase from Thermotoga petrophila (TpMan) is a modular hyperthermostable enzyme involved in the degradation of mannan-containing polysaccharides. The degradation of these polysaccharides represents a key step for several industrial applications. Here, as part of a continuing investigation of TpMan, the region corresponding to the GH5 domain (TpManGH5) was characterized as a function of pH and temperature. The results indicated that the enzymatic activity of the TpManGH5 is pH-dependent, with its optimum activity occurring at pH 6. At pH 8, the studies demonstrated that TpManGH5 is a molecule with a nearly spherical tightly packed core displaying negligible flexibility in solution, and with size and shape very similar to crystal structure. However, TpManGH5 experiences an increase in radius of gyration in acidic conditions suggesting expansion of the molecule. Furthermore, at acidic pH values, TpManGH5 showed a less globular shape, probably due to a loop region slightly more expanded and flexible in solution (residues Y88 to A105). In addition, molecular dynamics simulations indicated that conformational changes caused by pH variation did not change the core of the TpManGH5, which means that only the above mentioned loop region presents high degree of fluctuations. The results also suggested that conformational changes of the loop region may facilitate polysaccharide and enzyme interaction. Finally, at pH 6 the results indicated that TpManGH5 is slightly more flexible at 65°C when compared to the same enzyme at 20°C. The biophysical characterization presented here is well correlated with the enzymatic activity and provide new insight into the structural basis for the temperature and pH-dependent activity of the TpManGH5. Also, the data suggest a loop region that provides a starting point for a rational design of biotechnological desired features. PMID:25723179

  7. Detailed conformation dynamics and activation process of wild type c-Abl and T315I mutant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li-Jun; Zhao, Wen-Hua; Liu, Qian

    2014-10-01

    Bcr-Abl is an important target for therapy against chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). The synergistic effect between myristyl pocket and the ATP pocket has been found. But its detailed information based on molecular level still has not been achieved. In this study, conventional molecular dynamics (CMD) and target molecular dynamics (TMD) simulations were performed to explore the effect of T315I mutation on dynamics and activation process of Abl containing the N-terminal cap (Ncap). The CMD simulation results reveal the increasing flexibility of ATP pocket in kinase domain (KD) after T315I mutation which confirms the disability of ATP-pocket inhibitors to the Abl-T315I mutant. On the contrary, the T315I mutation decreased the flexibility of remote helix αI which suggests the synergistic effect between them. The mobility of farther regions containing Ncap, SH3, SH2 and SH2-KD linker were not affected by T315I mutation. The TMD simulation results show that the activation process of wild type Abl and Abl-T315I mutant experienced global conformation change. Their differences were elucidated by the activation motion of subsegments including A-loop, P-loop and Ncap. Besides, the T315I mutation caused decreasing energy barrier and increasing intermediate number in activation process, which results easier activation process. The TMD and CMD results indicate that a drug targeting only the ATP pocket is not enough to inhibit the Abl-T315I mutant. An effective way to inhibit the abnormal activity of Abl-T315I mutant is to combine the ATP-pocket inhibitors with inhibitors binding at non-ATP pockets mainly related to Ncap, SH2-KD linker and myristyl pocket.

  8. Formal synthesis of optically active ingenol via ring-closing olefin metathesis.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kazushi; Suzuki, Yuto; Aoki, Kenta; Sakakura, Akira; Suenaga, Kiyotake; Kigoshi, Hideo

    2004-11-12

    The construction of strained carbon skeletons by ring-closing olefin metathesis (RCM) was investigated. With well-designed diene 4, RCM was found to be applicable to the formation of a highly strained inside-outside bicyclo[4.4.1]undecane skeleton of ingenol, a bioactive diterpenoid, and formal total synthesis of optically active ingenol (1) was achieved. The key features of this synthesis are construction of an A-ring by spirocyclization of the ketone with an allylic chloride unit, 26, and ring closure of a B-ring by olefin metathesis. Starting from Funk's keto ester 6, the key intermediate aldehyde 9 in Winkler's total synthesis was synthesized in eight steps in 12.5% overall yield. This strategy of direct cyclization of a strained inside-outside skeleton provided the first easy access to optically active ingenol. PMID:15527254

  9. pH-Dependent Conformational Switch Activates the Inhibitor of Transcription Elongation

    SciTech Connect

    Laptenko,O.; Kim, S.; Lee, J.; Starodubtseva, M.; Cava, F.; Berenguer, J.; Kong, X.; Borukhov, S.

    2006-01-01

    Gfh1, a transcription factor from Thermus thermophilus, inhibits all catalytic activities of RNA polymerase (RNAP). We characterized the Gfh1 structure, function and possible mechanism of action and regulation. Gfh1 inhibits RNAP by competing with NTPs for coordinating the active site Mg{sup 2+} ion. This coordination requires at least two aspartates at the tip of the Gfh1 N-terminal coiled-coil domain (NTD). The overall structure of Gfh1 is similar to that of the Escherichia coli transcript cleavage factor GreA, except for the flipped orientation of the C-terminal domain (CTD). We show that depending on pH, Gfh1-CTD exists in two alternative orientations. At pH above 7, it assumes an inactive 'flipped' orientation seen in the structure, which prevents Gfh1 from binding to RNAP. At lower pH, Gfh1-CTD switches to an active 'Gre-like' orientation, which enables Gfh1 to bind to and inhibit RNAP.

  10. Acetylcholinesterase active centre and gorge conformations analysed by combinatorial mutations and enantiomeric phosphonates.

    PubMed Central

    Kovarik, Zrinka; Radić, Zoran; Berman, Harvey A; Simeon-Rudolf, Vera; Reiner, Elsa; Taylor, Palmer

    2003-01-01

    A series of eight double and triple mutants of mouse acetylcholinesterase (AChE; EC 3.1.1.7), with substitutions corresponding to residues found largely within the butyrylcholinesterase (BChE; EC 3.1.1.8) active-centre gorge, was analysed to compare steady-state kinetic constants for substrate turnover and inhibition parameters for enantiomeric methylphosphonate esters. The mutations combined substitutions in the acyl pocket (Phe(295)-->Leu and Phe(297)-->Ile) with the choline-binding site (Tyr(337)-->Ala and Phe(338)-->Ala) and with a side chain (Glu(202)--> Gln) N-terminal to the active-site serine, Ser(203). The mutations affected catalysis by increasing K (m) and decreasing k (cat), but these constants were typically affected by an order of magnitude or less, a relatively small change compared with the catalytic potential of AChE. To analyse the constraints on stereoselective phosphonylation, the mutant enzymes were reacted with a congeneric series of S (P)- and R (P)-methylphosphonates of known absolute stereochemistry. Where possible, the overall reaction rates were deconstructed into the primary constants for formation of the reversible complex and intrinsic phosphonylation. The multiple mutations greatly reduced the reaction rates of the more reactive S (P)-methylphosphonates, whereas the rates of reaction with the R (P)-methylphosphonates were markedly enhanced. With the phosphonates of larger steric bulk, the enhancement of rates for the R (P) enantiomers, coupled with the reduction of the S (P) enantiomers, was sufficient to invert markedly the enantiomeric preference. The sequence of mutations to enlarge the size of the AChE active-centre gorge, resembling in part the more spacious gorge of BChE, did not show an ordered conversion into BChE reactivity as anticipated for a rigid template. Rather, the individual aromatic residues may mutually interact to confer a distinctive stereospecificity pattern towards organophosphates. PMID:12665427

  11. Investigation of the active site and the conformational stability of nucleoside diphosphate kinase by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Tepper, A D; Dammann, H; Bominaar, A A; Véron, M

    1994-12-23

    Nucleoside-diphosphate kinase (EC 2.7.4.6) catalyzes phosphate exchange between nucleoside triphosphates and nucleoside diphosphates. Its 17 kDa subunits are highly conserved throughout evolution in both sequence and tertiary structure. Using site-directed mutagenesis we investigated the function of 8 amino acids (Lys16, Tyr56, Arg92, Thr98, Arg109, Asn119, Ser124, and Glu133) that are totally conserved among all nucleoside diphosphate kinases known to date. The mutant proteins all show decreased specific activity and support roles for these residues in catalysis, substrate binding, or both, as was previously proposed on the basis of the x-ray structure (Moréra, S., Lascu, I., Dumas, C., LeBras, G., Briozzo, P., Véron, M., and Janin, J. (1994) Biochemistry 33, 459-467). Furthermore, residues Lys16, Arg109, and Asn 119 were identified to play important roles in conformational stability or subunit interactions. We show that Lys16 and Asn119 form a rigid structure that is important for enzymatic function and that Arg109, known to interact with the phosphate moiety of the substrate, also plays an important role in subunit association. The dual roles of Lys16, Arg109, and Asn119 in both substrate binding and subunit assembly provide further evidence for a functional coupling between catalytic activity and quaternary structure in nucleoside diphosphate kinase. PMID:7798215

  12. Conformational Restriction Leading to a Selective CB2 Cannabinoid Receptor Agonist Orally Active Against Colitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The CB2 cannabinoid receptor has been implicated in the regulation of intestinal inflammation. Following on from the promising activity of a series of 4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide, we developed constrained analogues based on a 2H-pyrazolo[4,3-c]quinolin-3(5H)-one scaffold, with improved affinity for the hCB2 receptor and had very high selectivity over the hCB1 receptor. Importantly, the lead of this series (26, hCB2: Ki = 0.39 nM, hCB1: Ki > 3000 nM) was found to protect mice against experimental colitis after oral administration. PMID:25699149

  13. Evidence That GH115 α-Glucuronidase Activity, Which Is Required to Degrade Plant Biomass, Is Dependent on Conformational Flexibility*

    PubMed Central

    Rogowski, Artur; Baslé, Arnaud; Farinas, Cristiane S.; Solovyova, Alexandra; Mortimer, Jennifer C.; Dupree, Paul; Gilbert, Harry J.; Bolam, David N.

    2014-01-01

    The microbial degradation of the plant cell wall is an important biological process that is highly relevant to environmentally significant industries such as the bioenergy and biorefining sectors. A major component of the wall is glucuronoxylan, a β1,4-linked xylose polysaccharide that is decorated with α-linked glucuronic and/or methylglucuronic acid (GlcA/MeGlcA). Recently three members of a glycoside hydrolase family, GH115, were shown to hydrolyze MeGlcA side chains from the internal regions of xylan, an activity that has not previously been described. Here we show that a dominant member of the human microbiota, Bacteroides ovatus, contains a GH115 enzyme, BoAgu115A, which displays glucuronoxylan α-(4-O-methyl)-glucuronidase activity. The enzyme is significantly more active against substrates in which the xylose decorated with GlcA/MeGlcA is flanked by one or more xylose residues. The crystal structure of BoAgu115A revealed a four-domain protein in which the active site, comprising a pocket that abuts a cleft-like structure, is housed in the second domain that adopts a TIM barrel-fold. The third domain, a five-helical bundle, and the C-terminal β-sandwich domain make inter-chain contacts leading to protein dimerization. Informed by the structure of the enzyme in complex with GlcA in its open ring form, in conjunction with mutagenesis studies, the potential substrate binding and catalytically significant amino acids were identified. Based on the catalytic importance of residues located on a highly flexible loop, the enzyme is required to undergo a substantial conformational change to form a productive Michaelis complex with glucuronoxylan. PMID:24214982

  14. The conformational state of polyphenol oxidase from field bean (Dolichos lablab) upon SDS and acid-pH activation

    PubMed Central

    Kanade, Santosh R.; Paul, Beena; Rao, A. G. Appu; Gowda, Lalitha R.

    2006-01-01

    Field bean (Dolichos lablab) contains a single isoform of PPO (polyphenol oxidase) – a type III copper protein that catalyses the o-hydroxylation of monophenols and oxidation of o-diphenols using molecular oxygen – and is a homotetramer with a molecular mass of 120 kDa. The enzyme is activated manyfold either in the presence of the anionic detergent SDS below its critical micellar concentration or on exposure to acid-pH. The enhancement of kcat upon activation is accompanied by a marked shift in the pH optimum for the oxidation of t-butyl catechol from 4.5 to 6.0, an increased sensitivity to tropolone, altered susceptibility to proteolytic degradation and decreased thermostability. The Stokes radius of the native enzyme is found to increase from 49.1±2 to 75.9±0.6 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm). The activation by SDS and acid-pH results in a localized conformational change that is anchored around the catalytic site of PPO that alters the microenvironment of an essential glutamic residue. Chemical modification of field bean and sweet potato PPO with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodi-imide followed by kinetic analysis leads to the conclusion that both the enzymes possess a core carboxylate essential to activity. This enhanced catalytic efficiency of PPO, considered as an inducible defence oxidative enzyme, is vital to the physiological defence strategy adapted by plants to insect herbivory and pathogen attack. PMID:16393141

  15. Conformational effects, molecular orbitals, and reaction activities of bis(phthalocyaninato) lanthanum double-deckers: density functional theory calculations.

    PubMed

    Qi, Dongdong; Zhang, Lijuan; Wan, Liang; Zhang, Yuexing; Bian, Yongzhong; Jiang, Jianzhuang

    2011-08-01

    The conformational effects on the frontier molecular orbital energy and stability for reduced, neutral, and oxidized bis(phthalocyaninato) lanthanum double-deckers have been revealed on the basis of density functional theory calculations. Calculation results indicate that the frontier orbital coupling degree changes along with the molecular conformation of the double-decker compound, first decreasing along with the increase of rotation angle β from 0 to 20° and then increasing along with the increase of rotation angle β from 20 to 45°. In addition, the stability for the three forms of double-decker changes in the same order, but first increasing and then decreasing along with the change of the rotation angle β in the range of 0 to 45° with a rotation energy barrier of (31.3 ± 3.1) kJ mol(-1) at 20°. This reveals that the rotation of the two phthalocyanine rings for the reduced, neutral, and oxidized bis(phthalocyaninato) lanthanum double-deckers are able to occur at room temperature. Nevertheless, the superior coordination reaction activity of the neutral bis(phthalocyaninato) lanthanum double-decker complex over their reduced form in forming sandwich-type tris(phthalocyaninato) lanthanum triple-decker compounds has also been clearly clarified on the basis of comparative calculations on the Fukui function of [La(Pc)(2)] and [La(Pc)(2)](-) using the DFT method. Fukui function analysis reveals the reaction center of the 18-electron-π-conjugated core in the bis(phthalocyaninato) lanthanum double-decker molecule against both electrophilic and radical attack. Nevertheless, the larger global chemical softness (S) for the neutral [La(Pc)(2)] than the reduced form [La(Pc)(2)](-) indicates the higher reaction activity of the former form over the latter one. This explains well the experimental findings that only the neutral instead of the reduced form of bis(tetrapyrrole) rare earth double-decker complexes, containing at least one phthalocyanine ligand, could be

  16. Conformational Change of Human Checkpoint Kinase 1 (Chk1) Induced by DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiangzi; Tang, Jinshan; Wang, Jingna; Ren, Feng; Zheng, Jinhua; Gragg, Megan; Kiser, Philip; Park, Paul S H; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Yao, Xinsheng; Zhang, Youwei

    2016-06-17

    Phosphorylation of Chk1 by ataxia telangiectasia-mutated and Rad3-related (ATR) is critical for checkpoint activation upon DNA damage. However, how phosphorylation activates Chk1 remains unclear. Many studies suggest a conformational change model of Chk1 activation in which phosphorylation shifts Chk1 from a closed inactive conformation to an open active conformation during the DNA damage response. However, no structural study has been reported to support this Chk1 activation model. Here we used FRET and bimolecular fluorescence complementary techniques to show that Chk1 indeed maintains a closed conformation in the absence of DNA damage through an intramolecular interaction between a region (residues 31-87) at the N-terminal kinase domain and the distal C terminus. A highly conserved Leu-449 at the C terminus is important for this intramolecular interaction. We further showed that abolishing the intramolecular interaction by a Leu-449 to Arg mutation or inducing ATR-dependent Chk1 phosphorylation by DNA damage disrupts the closed conformation, leading to an open and activated conformation of Chk1. These data provide significant insight into the mechanisms of Chk1 activation during the DNA damage response. PMID:27129240

  17. Structure, chain conformation, and immunomodulatory activity of the polysaccharide purified from Bacillus Calmette Guerin formulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Wang, Hong; Yu, Juping; Liu, Yameng; Lu, Weisheng; Chai, Yin; Liu, Chao; Pan, Chun; Yao, Wenbing; Gao, Xiangdong

    2016-10-01

    A polysaccharide, coded as BDP, purified from the injection powder of Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) polysaccharide and nucleic acid, was composed mainly of α-D-(1→4)-linked glucan with (1→6)-linked branches and trace amounts of fucose and mannose from the results of FT-IR, HPAEC-PAD and NMR spectrum. The Mw, Mn, Mz, and [Formula: see text] were determined to be 1.320×10(5)g/mol, 1.012×10(5)g/mol, 2.139×10(5)g/mol, and 21.8±3.2%nm by using HPSEC-MALLS, respectively. The ν value from [Formula: see text] was calculated to be 0.52±0.01, which firstly clarified that BDP existed as random coils in 0.9% NaCl aqueous solution. AFM and SEM combined with Congo-red test also revealed that the polysaccharide was irregular globular like or curly structure. Furthermore, in vitro tests on RAW264.7 murine macrophages cells revealed that BDP exhibited significant immunomodulatory activity. PMID:27312624

  18. The conserved active-site loop residues of ferrochelatase induce porphyrin conformational changes necessary for catalysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, Raid Edward; Shelnutt, John Allen; Shi, Zhen; Ferreira, Gloria C.; Franco, Ricardo T.

    2005-05-01

    Binding of porphyrin to murine ferrochelatase, the terminal enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway, is investigated by employing a set of variants harboring mutations in a putative porphyrin-binding loop. Using resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy, the structural properties of the ferrochelatase-bound porphyrins are examined, especially with respect to the porphyrin deformation occurring in the environment of the active site. This deformation is thought to be a key step in the enzymatic insertion of ferrous iron into the porphyrin ring to make heme. Our previous RR spectroscopic studies of binding of porphyrin to murine ferrochelatase led us to propose that the wild-type enzyme induces porphyrin distortion even in the absence of the metal ion substrate. Here, we broaden this view by presenting evidence that the degree of a specific nonplanar porphyrin deformation contributes to the catalytic efficiency of ferrochelatase and its variants. The results also suggest that the conserved Trp256 (murine ferrochelatase numbering) is partially responsible for the observed porphyrin deformation. Binding of porphyrin to the ferrochelatase variants causes a decrease in the intensity of RR out-of-plane vibrational mode {gamma}{sub 15}, a saddling-like mode that is strong in the wild-type enzyme. In particular, the variant with a catalytic efficiency 1 order of magnitude lower than that of the wild-type enzyme is estimated to produce less than 30% of the wild-type saddling deformation. These results suggest that specific conserved loop residues (especially Trp256) are directly involved in the saddling of the porphyrin substrate.

  19. Closed Loop Active Flow Separation Detection and Control in a Multistage Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bright, Michelle M.; Culley, Dennis E.; Braunscheidel, Edward P.; Welch, Gerard E.

    2005-01-01

    Active closed loop flow control was successfully demonstrated on a full annulus of stator vanes in a low speed axial compressor. Two independent methods of detecting separated flow conditions on the vane suction surface were developed. The first technique detects changes in static pressure along the vane suction surface, while the second method monitors variation in the potential field of the downstream rotor. Both methods may feasibly be used in future engines employing embedded flow control technology. In response to the detection of separated conditions, injection along the suction surface of each vane was used. Injected mass flow on the suction surface of stator vanes is known to reduce separation and the resulting limitation on static pressure rise due to lowered diffusion in the vane passage. A control algorithm was developed which provided a proportional response of the injected mass flow to the degree of separation, thereby minimizing the performance penalty on the compressor system.

  20. Resonant activation in a colored multiplicative thermal noise driven closed system

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Somrita; Bag, Bidhan Chandra; Mondal, Debasish

    2014-05-28

    In this paper, we have demonstrated that resonant activation (RA) is possible even in a thermodynamically closed system where the particle experiences a random force and a spatio-temporal frictional coefficient from the thermal bath. For this stochastic process, we have observed a hallmark of RA phenomena in terms of a turnover behavior of the barrier-crossing rate as a function of noise correlation time at a fixed noise variance. Variance can be fixed either by changing temperature or damping strength as a function of noise correlation time. Our another observation is that the barrier crossing rate passes through a maximum with increase in coupling strength of the multiplicative noise. If the damping strength is appreciably large, then the maximum may disappear. Finally, we compare simulation results with the analytical calculation. It shows that there is a good agreement between analytical and numerical results.

  1. Evaluating the performance of close-range 3D active vision systems for industrial design applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beraldin, J.-Angelo; Gaiani, Marco

    2004-12-01

    In recent years, active three-dimensional (3D) active vision systems or range cameras for short have come out of research laboratories to find niche markets in application fields as diverse as industrial design, automotive manufacturing, geomatics, space exploration and cultural heritage to name a few. Many publications address different issues link to 3D sensing and processing but currently these technologies pose a number of challenges to many recent users, i.e., "what are they, how good are they and how do they compare?". The need to understand, test and integrate those range cameras with other technologies, e.g. photogrammetry, CAD, etc. is driven by the quest for optimal resolution, accuracy, speed and cost. Before investing, users want to be certain that a given range camera satisfy their operational requirements. The understanding of the basic theory and best practices associated with those cameras are in fact fundamental to fulfilling the requirements listed above in an optimal way. This paper addresses the evaluation of active 3D range cameras as part of a study to better understand and select one or a number of them to fulfill the needs of industrial design applications. In particular, object material and surface features effect, calibration and performance evaluation are discussed. Results are given for six different range cameras for close range applications.

  2. Evaluating the performance of close-range 3D active vision systems for industrial design applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beraldin, J.-Angelo; Gaiani, Marco

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, active three-dimensional (3D) active vision systems or range cameras for short have come out of research laboratories to find niche markets in application fields as diverse as industrial design, automotive manufacturing, geomatics, space exploration and cultural heritage to name a few. Many publications address different issues link to 3D sensing and processing but currently these technologies pose a number of challenges to many recent users, i.e., "what are they, how good are they and how do they compare?". The need to understand, test and integrate those range cameras with other technologies, e.g. photogrammetry, CAD, etc. is driven by the quest for optimal resolution, accuracy, speed and cost. Before investing, users want to be certain that a given range camera satisfy their operational requirements. The understanding of the basic theory and best practices associated with those cameras are in fact fundamental to fulfilling the requirements listed above in an optimal way. This paper addresses the evaluation of active 3D range cameras as part of a study to better understand and select one or a number of them to fulfill the needs of industrial design applications. In particular, object material and surface features effect, calibration and performance evaluation are discussed. Results are given for six different range cameras for close range applications.

  3. Proof of principle in a de novo designed protein maquette: an allosterically regulated, charge-activated conformational switch in a tetra-alpha-helix bundle.

    PubMed

    Grosset, A M; Gibney, B R; Rabanal, F; Moser, C C; Dutton, P L

    2001-05-01

    New understanding of the engineering and allosteric regulation of natural protein conformational switches (such as those that couple chemical and ionic signals, mechanical force, and electro/chemical free energy for biochemical activation, catalysis, and motion) can be derived from simple de novo designed synthetic protein models (maquettes). We demonstrate proof of principle of both reversible switch action and allosteric regulation in a tetra-alpha-helical bundle protein composed of two identical di-helical subunits containing heme coordinated at a specific position close to the disulfide loop region. Individual bundles assume one of two switch states related by large-scale mechanical changes: a syn-topology (helices of the different subunits parallel) or anti-topology (helices antiparallel). Both the spectral properties of a coproporphyrin probe appended to the loop region and the distance-dependent redox interaction between the hemes identify the topologies. Beginning from a syn-topology, introduction of ferric heme in each subunit (either binding or redox change) shifts the topological balance by 25-50-fold (1.9-2.3 kcal/mol) to an anti-dominance. Charge repulsion between the two internal cationic ferric hemes drives the syn- to anti-switch, as demonstrated in two ways. When fixed in the syn-topology, the second ferric heme binding is 25-80-fold (1.9-2.6 kcal/mol) weaker than the first, and adjacent heme redox potentials are split by 80 mV (1.85 kcal/mol), values that energetically match the shift in topological balance. Allosteric and cooperative regulation of the switch by ionic strength exploits the shielded charge interactions between the two hemes and the exposed, cooperative interactions between the coproporphyrin carboxylates. PMID:11331012

  4. Modulation of Constitutive Activity and Signaling Bias of the Ghrelin Receptor by Conformational Constraint in the Second Extracellular Loop*

    PubMed Central

    Mokrosiński, Jacek; Frimurer, Thomas M.; Sivertsen, Bjørn; Schwartz, Thue W.; Holst, Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    Based on a rare, natural Glu for Ala-204(C+6) variant located six residues after the conserved Cys residue in extracellular loop 2b (ECL2b) associated with selective elimination of the high constitutive signaling of the ghrelin receptor, this loop was subjected to a detailed structure functional analysis. Introduction of Glu in different positions demonstrated that although the constitutive signaling was partly reduced when introduced in position 205(C+7) it was only totally eliminated in position 204(C+6). No charge-charge interaction partner could be identified for the Glu(C+6) variant despite mutational analysis of a number of potential partners in the extracellular loops and outer parts of the transmembrane segments. Systematic probing of position 204(C+6) with amino acid residues of different physicochemical properties indicated that a positively charged Lys surprisingly provided phenotypes similar to those of the negatively charged Glu residue. Computational chemistry analysis indicated that the propensity for the C-terminal segment of extracellular loop 2b to form an extended α-helix was increased from 15% in the wild type to 89 and 82% by introduction in position 204(C+6) of a Glu or a Lys residue, respectively. Moreover, the constitutive activity of the receptor was inhibited by Zn2+ binding in an engineered metal ion site, stabilizing an α-helical conformation of this loop segment. It is concluded that the high constitutive activity of the ghrelin receptor is dependent upon flexibility in the C-terminal segment of extracellular loop 2 and that mutations or ligand binding that constrains this segment and thereby conceivably the movements of transmembrane domain V relative to transmembrane domain III inhibits the high constitutive signaling. PMID:22846991

  5. New Atglistatin closely related analogues: Synthesis and structure-activity relationship towards adipose triglyceride lipase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Roy, Pierre-Philippe; D'Souza, Kenneth; Cuperlovic-Culf, Miroslava; Kienesberger, Petra C; Touaibia, Mohamed

    2016-08-01

    Adipose Triglyceride Lipase (ATGL) performs the first and rate-limiting step in lipolysis by hydrolyzing triacylglycerols stored in lipid droplets to diacylglycerols. By mediating lipolysis in adipose and non-adipose tissues, ATGL is a major regulator of overall energy metabolism and plasma lipid levels. Since chronically high levels of plasma lipids are linked to metabolic disorders including insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, ATGL is an interesting therapeutic target. In the present study, fourteen closely related analogues of Atglistatin (1), a newly discovered ATGL inhibitor, were synthesized, and their ATGL inhibitory activity was evaluated. The effect of these analogues on lipolysis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes clearly shows that inhibition of the enzyme by Atglistatin (1) is due to the presence of the carbamate and N,N-dimethyl moieties on the biaryl central core at meta and para position, respectively. Mono carbamate-substituted analogue C2, in which the carbamate group was in the meta position as in Atglistatin (1), showed slight inhibition. Low dipole moment of Atglistatin (1) compared to the synthesized analogues possibly explains the lower inhibitory activities. PMID:27155760

  6. A CORRELATION BETWEEN HOST STAR ACTIVITY AND PLANET MASS FOR CLOSE-IN EXTRASOLAR PLANETS?

    SciTech Connect

    Poppenhaeger, K.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2011-07-01

    The activity levels of stars are influenced by several stellar properties, such as stellar rotation, spectral type, and the presence of stellar companions. Analogous to binaries, planetary companions are also thought to be able to cause higher activity levels in their host stars, although at lower levels. Especially in X-rays, such influences are hard to detect because coronae of cool stars exhibit a considerable amount of intrinsic variability. Recently, a correlation between the mass of close-in exoplanets and their host star's X-ray luminosity has been detected, based on archival X-ray data from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. This finding has been interpreted as evidence for star-planet interactions. We show in our analysis that this correlation is caused by selection effects due to the flux limit of the X-ray data used and due to the intrinsic planet detectability of the radial velocity method, and thus does not trace possible planet-induced effects. We also show that the correlation is not present in a corresponding complete sample derived from combined XMM-Newton and ROSAT data.

  7. Zeta Inhibitory Peptide Disrupts Electrostatic Interactions That Maintain Atypical Protein Kinase C in Its Active Conformation on the Scaffold p62.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Li-Chun Lisa; Xie, Lei; Dore, Kim; Xie, Li; Del Rio, Jason C; King, Charles C; Martinez-Ariza, Guillermo; Hulme, Christopher; Malinow, Roberto; Bourne, Philip E; Newton, Alexandra C

    2015-09-01

    Atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) enzymes signal on protein scaffolds, yet how they are maintained in an active conformation on scaffolds is unclear. A myristoylated peptide based on the autoinhibitory pseudosubstrate fragment of the atypical PKCζ, zeta inhibitory peptide (ZIP), has been extensively used to inhibit aPKC activity; however, we have previously shown that ZIP does not inhibit the catalytic activity of aPKC isozymes in cells (Wu-Zhang, A. X., Schramm, C. L., Nabavi, S., Malinow, R., and Newton, A. C. (2012) J. Biol. Chem. 287, 12879-12885). Here we sought to identify a bona fide target of ZIP and, in so doing, unveiled a novel mechanism by which aPKCs are maintained in an active conformation on a protein scaffold. Specifically, we used protein-protein interaction network analysis, structural modeling, and protein-protein docking to predict that ZIP binds an acidic surface on the Phox and Bem1 (PB1) domain of p62, an interaction validated by peptide array analysis. Using a genetically encoded reporter for PKC activity fused to the p62 scaffold, we show that ZIP inhibits the activity of wild-type aPKC, but not a construct lacking the pseudosubstrate. These data support a model in which the pseudosubstrate of aPKCs is tethered to the acidic surface on p62, locking aPKC in an open, signaling-competent conformation. ZIP competes for binding to the acidic surface, resulting in displacement of the pseudosubstrate of aPKC and re-engagement in the substrate-binding cavity. This study not only identifies a cellular target for ZIP, but also unveils a novel mechanism by which scaffolded aPKC is maintained in an active conformation. PMID:26187466

  8. Zeta Inhibitory Peptide Disrupts Electrostatic Interactions That Maintain Atypical Protein Kinase C in Its Active Conformation on the Scaffold p62*

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Li-Chun Lisa; Xie, Lei; Dore, Kim; Xie, Li; Del Rio, Jason C.; King, Charles C.; Martinez-Ariza, Guillermo; Hulme, Christopher; Malinow, Roberto; Bourne, Philip E.; Newton, Alexandra C.

    2015-01-01

    Atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) enzymes signal on protein scaffolds, yet how they are maintained in an active conformation on scaffolds is unclear. A myristoylated peptide based on the autoinhibitory pseudosubstrate fragment of the atypical PKCζ, zeta inhibitory peptide (ZIP), has been extensively used to inhibit aPKC activity; however, we have previously shown that ZIP does not inhibit the catalytic activity of aPKC isozymes in cells (Wu-Zhang, A. X., Schramm, C. L., Nabavi, S., Malinow, R., and Newton, A. C. (2012) J. Biol. Chem. 287, 12879–12885). Here we sought to identify a bona fide target of ZIP and, in so doing, unveiled a novel mechanism by which aPKCs are maintained in an active conformation on a protein scaffold. Specifically, we used protein-protein interaction network analysis, structural modeling, and protein-protein docking to predict that ZIP binds an acidic surface on the Phox and Bem1 (PB1) domain of p62, an interaction validated by peptide array analysis. Using a genetically encoded reporter for PKC activity fused to the p62 scaffold, we show that ZIP inhibits the activity of wild-type aPKC, but not a construct lacking the pseudosubstrate. These data support a model in which the pseudosubstrate of aPKCs is tethered to the acidic surface on p62, locking aPKC in an open, signaling-competent conformation. ZIP competes for binding to the acidic surface, resulting in displacement of the pseudosubstrate of aPKC and re-engagement in the substrate-binding cavity. This study not only identifies a cellular target for ZIP, but also unveils a novel mechanism by which scaffolded aPKC is maintained in an active conformation. PMID:26187466

  9. Long-term magnetic activity in close binary systems. I. Patterns of color variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, S.

    2008-03-01

    Aims:This is the first of a series of papers in which we present the results of a long-term photometric monitoring project carried out at Catania Astrophysical Observatory aimed at studying magnetic activity in late-type components of close binary systems, its dependence on global stellar parameters, and its evolution on different time scales from days to years. In this first paper, we present the complete observation dataset and new results of an investigation into the origin of brightness and color variations observed in the well-known magnetically active close binary stars: AR Psc, VY Ari, UX Ari, V711 Tau, EI Eri, V1149 Ori, DH Leo, HU Vir, RS CVn, V775 Her, AR Lac, SZ Psc, II Peg and BY Dra Methods: About 38 000 high-precision photoelectric nightly observations in the U, B and V filters are analysed. Correlation and regression analyses of the V magnitude vs. U-B and B-V color variations are carried out and a comparison with model variations for a grid of active region temperature and filling factor values is also performed. Results: We find the existence of two different patterns of color variation. Eight stars in our sample: BY Dra, VY Ari, V775 Her, II Peg, V1149 Ori, HU Vir, EI Eri and DH Leo become redder when they become fainter, as is expected from the presence of active regions consisting of cool spots. The other six stars show the opposite behaviour, i.e. they become bluer when they become fainter. For V711 Tau this behaviour could be explained by the increased relative U- and B-flux contribution by the earlier-type component of the binary system when the cooler component becomes fainter. On the other hand, for AR Psc, UX Ari, RS CVn, SZ Psc and AR Lac the existence of hot photospheric faculae must be invoked. We also found that in single-lined and double-lined binary stars in which the fainter component is inactive or much less active the V magnitude is correlated to B-V and U-B color variations in more than 60% of observation seasons. The correlation

  10. Conformational flexibility of mephenesin.

    PubMed

    Écija, Patricia; Evangelisti, Luca; Vallejo, Montserrat; Basterretxea, Francisco J; Lesarri, Alberto; Castaño, Fernando; Caminati, Walther; Cocinero, Emilio J

    2014-05-22

    The mephenesin molecule (3-(2-methylphenoxy)propane-1,2-diol) serves as a test bank to explore several structural and dynamical issues, such as conformational flexibility, the orientation of the carbon linear chain relative to the benzene plane, or the effect of substituent position on the rotational barrier of a methyl group. The molecule has been studied by rotational spectroscopy in the 4-18 GHz frequency range by Fourier-transform methods in a supersonic expansion. The experiment has been backed by a previous conformational search plus optimization of the lowest energy structures by ab initio and density functional quantum calculations. The three lowest-lying conformers that can interconvert to each other by simple bond rotations have been detected in the jet. Rotational parameters for all structures have been obtained, and methyl torsional barriers have been determined for the two lowest-lying rotamers. The lowest-lying structure of mephenesin is highly planar, with all carbon atoms lying nearly in the benzene ring plane, and is stabilized by the formation of cooperative intramolecular hydrogen bonding. An estimation of the relative abundance of the detected conformers indicates that the energetically most stable conformer will have an abundance near 80% at temperatures relevant for biological activity. PMID:24754523

  11. Research and Technology Activities Supporting Closed-Brayton-Cycle Power Conversion System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    The elements of Brayton technology development emphasize power conversion system risk mitigation. Risk mitigation is achieved by demonstrating system integration feasibility, subsystem/component life capability (particularly in the context of material creep) and overall spacecraft mass reduction. Closed-Brayton-cycle (CBC) power conversion technology is viewed as relatively mature. At the 2-kWe power level, a CBC conversion system Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of six (6) was achieved during the Solar Dynamic Ground Test Demonstration (SD-GTD) in 1998. A TRL 5 was demonstrated for 10 kWe-class CBC components during the development of the Brayton Rotating Unit (BRU) from 1968 to 1976. Components currently in terrestrial (open cycle) Brayton machines represent TRL 4 for similar uses in 100 kWe-class CBC space systems. Because of the baseline component and subsystem technology maturity, much of the Brayton technology task is focused on issues related to systems integration. A brief description of ongoing technology activities is given.

  12. A Distant Echo of Milky Way Central Activity Closes the Galaxy’s Baryon Census

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicastro, F.; Senatore, F.; Krongold, Y.; Mathur, S.; Elvis, M.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the presence of large amounts of million-degree gas in the Milky Way’s interstellar and circum-galactic medium. This gas (1) permeates both the Galactic plane and the halo, (2) extends to distances larger than 60–200 kpc from the center, and (3) its mass is sufficient to close the Galaxy’s baryon census. Moreover, we show that a vast, ∼6 kpc radius, spherically symmetric central region of the Milky Way above and below the 0.16 kpc thick plane has either been emptied of hot gas or the density of this gas within the cavity has a peculiar profile, increasing from the center up to a radius of ∼6 kpc, and then decreasing with a typical halo density profile. This, and several other converging pieces of evidence, suggest that the current surface of the cavity, at 6 kpc from the Galaxy’s center, traces the distant echo of a period of strong nuclear activity of our supermassive black hole, occurring about 6 Myr ago.

  13. Structures of human Bruton's tyrosine kinase in active and inactive conformations suggest a mechanism of activation for TEC family kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Marcotte, Douglas J.; Liu, Yu-Ting; Arduini, Robert M.; Hession, Catherine A.; Miatkowski, Konrad; Wildes, Craig P.; Cullen, Patrick F.; Hong, Victor; Hopkins, Brian T.; Mertsching, Elisabeth; Jenkins, Tracy J.; Romanowski, Michael J.; Baker, Darren P.; Silvian, Laura F.

    2010-11-15

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), a member of the TEC family of kinases, plays a crucial role in B-cell maturation and mast cell activation. Although the structures of the unphosphorylated mouse BTK kinase domain and the unphosphorylated and phosphorylated kinase domains of human ITK are known, understanding the kinase selectivity profiles of BTK inhibitors has been hampered by the lack of availability of a high resolution, ligand-bound BTK structure. Here, we report the crystal structures of the human BTK kinase domain bound to either Dasatinib (BMS-354825) at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution or to 4-amino-5-(4-phenoxyphenyl)-7H-pyrrolospyrimidin- 7-yl-cyclopentane at 1.6 {angstrom} resolution. This data provides information relevant to the development of small molecule inhibitors targeting BTK and the TEC family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases. Analysis of the structural differences between the TEC and Src families of kinases near the Trp-Glu-Ile motif in the N-terminal region of the kinase domain suggests a mechanism of regulation of the TEC family members.

  14. Conformational Activation of Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase-1 upon DNA Binding Revealed by Small-Angle X-ray Scattering

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a nuclear protein that plays key roles in several fundamental cellular processes. PARP-1 catalyzes the polymerization of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide on itself and other acceptor proteins, forming long branched poly(ADP-ribose) polymers. The catalytic activity of PARP-1 is stimulated upon binding to damaged DNA, but how this signal is transmitted from the N-terminal DNA binding domain to the C-terminal catalytic domain in the context of the full-length enzyme is unknown. In this paper, small-angle X-ray scattering experiments and molecular dynamics simulations were used to gain insight into the conformational changes that occur during the catalytic activation of PARP-1 by an 8-mer DNA ligand. The data are consistent with a model in which binding of the DNA ligand establishes interdomain interactions between the DNA binding and catalytic domains, which induces an allosteric change in the active site that promotes catalysis. Moreover, the PARP-1–8-mer complex is seen to adopt a conformation that is poised to recruit DNA repair factors to the site of DNA damage. This study provides the first structural information about the DNA-induced conformational activation of full-length PARP-1. PMID:24588584

  15. Poly(amidoamine) salt form: effect on pH-dependent membrane activity and polymer conformation in solution.

    PubMed

    Wan, Ka-Wai; Malgesini, Beatrice; Verpilio, Ilario; Ferruti, Paolo; Griffiths, Peter C; Paul, Alison; Hann, Anthony C; Duncan, Ruth

    2004-01-01

    On exposure to an acidic pH, linear poly(amidoamine)s (PAAs) cause membrane perturbation and consequently have potential as endosomolytic polymers for the intracellular delivery of genes and toxins. Previous studies used PAAs in the hydrochloride form only. The aim of this study was to investigate systematically the effect of the PAA counterion on pH-dependent membrane activity, general cytotoxicity, and PAA solution properties to help guide optimization of PAA structure for further development of PAA-protein conjugates. PAAs (ISA 1, 4, 22, and 23; M(w) 10000-50000 g/mol) were synthesized to provide a library of PAAs having different counterions including the acetate, citrate, hydrochloride, lactate, phosphate, and sulfate salts. pH-Dependent membrane activity was assessed using a rat red blood cell haemolysis assay (conducted at a starting pH of 7.4, 6.5, or 5.5; 1 mg/mL; 1 h), and general cytotoxicity was investigated using a murine melanoma cell line (B16F10) and a human bladder endothelial-like cell line (ECV-304). Whereas poly(ethyleneimine) was haemolytic at the starting pH of 7.4 at 1 h [ approximately 50% haemoglobin (Hb) release], none of the PAA salts were haemolytic at a starting pH of 7.4 or 6.5. Although PAA acetate, citrate, and lactate were also non-haemolytic at the starting pH of 5.5, the sulfate and hydrochloride forms caused significant haemolysis (up to 80% Hb release) and ISA 22 and 23 phosphate were also markedly haemolytic ( approximately 70% Hb release). These counterion-specific differences were also clearly visible using scanning electron microscopy, which was used to visualize the red blood cell morphology. All PAAs were relatively nontoxic (IC(50) >or= 300-5000 microg/mL) compared to poly-l-lysine (IC(50) = 2-10 microg/mL), the PAA hydrochloride salts produced the greatest cytotoxicity, and the B16F10 cells were more sensitive than the ECV-304 cells. Small-angle neutron scattering suggested that ISA 23 hydrochloride had a larger

  16. WASP-121 b: a hot Jupiter close to tidal disruption transiting an active F star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delrez, L.; Santerne, A.; Almenara, J.-M.; Anderson, D. R.; Collier-Cameron, A.; Díaz, R. F.; Gillon, M.; Hellier, C.; Jehin, E.; Lendl, M.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Neveu-VanMalle, M.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Queloz, D.; Ségransan, D.; Smalley, B.; Smith, A. M. S.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Udry, S.; Van Grootel, V.; West, R. G.

    2016-06-01

    We present the discovery by the WASP-South survey of WASP-121 b, a new remarkable short-period transiting hot Jupiter. The planet has a mass of 1.183_{-0.062}^{+0.064} MJup, a radius of 1.865 ± 0.044 RJup, and transits every 1.274 9255_{-0.000 0025}^{+0.000 0020} days an active F6-type main-sequence star (V = 10.4, 1.353_{-0.079}^{+0.080} M⊙, 1.458 ± 0.030 R⊙, Teff = 6460 ± 140 K). A notable property of WASP-121 b is that its orbital semimajor axis is only ˜1.15 times larger than its Roche limit, which suggests that the planet is close to tidal disruption. Furthermore, its large size and extreme irradiation (˜7.1 109 erg s-1 cm-2) make it an excellent target for atmospheric studies via secondary eclipse observations. Using the TRAnsiting Planets and PlanetesImals Small Telescope, we indeed detect its emission in the z'-band at better than ˜4σ, the measured occultation depth being 603 ± 130 ppm. Finally, from a measurement of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect with the CORALIE spectrograph, we infer a sky-projected spin-orbit angle of 257.8°_{-5.5°}^{+5.3°}. This result may suggest a significant misalignment between the spin axis of the host star and the orbital plane of the planet. If confirmed, this high misalignment would favour a migration of the planet involving strong dynamical events with a third body.

  17. On the role of the conformational flexibility of the active-site lid on the allosteric kinetics of glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase.

    PubMed

    Bustos-Jaimes, Ismael; Sosa-Peinado, Alejandro; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Horjales, Eduardo; Calcagno, Mario L

    2002-05-24

    The active site of glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase from Escherichia coli (GlcN6P deaminase, EC 3.5.99.6) has a complex lid formed by two antiparallel beta-strands connected by a helix-loop segment (158-187). This motif contains Arg172, which is a residue involved in binding the substrate in the active-site, and three residues that are part of the allosteric site, Arg158, Lys160 and Thr161. This dual binding role of the motif forming the lid suggests that it plays a key role in the functional coupling between active and allosteric sites. Previous crystallographic work showed that the temperature coefficients of the active-site lid are very large when the enzyme is in its T allosteric state. These coefficients decrease in the R state, thus suggesting that this motif changes its conformational flexibility as a consequence of the allosteric transition. In order to explore the possible connection between the conformational flexibility of the lid and the function of the deaminase, we constructed the site-directed mutant Phe174-Ala. Phe174 is located at the C-end of the lid helix and its side-chain establishes hydrophobic interactions with the remainder of the enzyme. The crystallographic structure of the T state of Phe174-Ala deaminase, determined at 2.02 A resolution, shows no density for the segment 162-181, which is part of the active-site lid (PDB 1JT9). This mutant form of the enzyme is essentially inactive in the absence of the allosteric activator, N-acetylglucosamine-6-P although it recovers its activity up to the wild-type level in the presence of this ligand. Spectrometric and binding studies show that inactivity is due to the inability of the active-site to bind ligands when the allosteric site is empty. These data indicate that the conformational flexibility of the active-site lid critically alters the binding properties of the active site, and that the occupation of the allosteric site restores the lid conformational flexibility to a functional state. PMID

  18. Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase in complex with the feedback inhibitor CoA reveals only one active-site conformation

    SciTech Connect

    Wubben, T.; Mesecar, A.D.

    2014-10-02

    Phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase (PPAT) catalyzes the penultimate step in the coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthetic pathway, reversibly transferring an adenylyl group from ATP to 4'-phosphopantetheine to form dephosphocoenzyme A (dPCoA). To complement recent biochemical and structural studies on Mycobacterium tuberculosis PPAT (MtPPAT) and to provide further insight into the feedback regulation of MtPPAT by CoA, the X-ray crystal structure of the MtPPAT enzyme in complex with CoA was determined to 2.11 {angstrom} resolution. Unlike previous X-ray crystal structures of PPAT-CoA complexes from other bacteria, which showed two distinct CoA conformations bound to the active site, only one conformation of CoA is observed in the MtPPAT-CoA complex.

  19. Micro-resonator loss computation using conformal transformation and active-lasing FDTD approach and applications to tangential/radial output waveguide optimization I: Analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiangyu; Ou, Fang; Huang, Yingyan; Ho, Seng-Tiong

    2013-03-01

    Understanding the physics of the loss mechanism of optical microresonators is important for one to know how to use them optimally for various applications. In these three-paper series, we utilized both analytical method (Conformal Transformation Approach) and numerical method (Active-Lasing Finite-Difference Time-Domain method) to study the resonator loss and cavity quality "Q" factor and apply them to optimize the radial/tangential waveguide coupling design. Both approaches demonstrate good agreement in their common region of applicability. In Part I, we review and expand on the conformal transformation method to show how exact solution of radiation loss for the case of cylindrical micro-resonator under both TE and TM polarizations can be obtained. We show how the method can be extended to apply to microdisk case.

  20. The Role of Active Site Flexible Loops in Catalysis and of Zinc in Conformational Stability of Bacillus cereus 569/H/9 β-Lactamase.

    PubMed

    Montagner, Caroline; Nigen, Michaël; Jacquin, Olivier; Willet, Nicolas; Dumoulin, Mireille; Karsisiotis, Andreas Ioannis; Roberts, Gordon C K; Damblon, Christian; Redfield, Christina; Matagne, André

    2016-07-29

    Metallo-β-lactamases catalyze the hydrolysis of most β-lactam antibiotics and hence represent a major clinical concern. The development of inhibitors for these enzymes is complicated by the diversity and flexibility of their substrate-binding sites, motivating research into their structure and function. In this study, we examined the conformational properties of the Bacillus cereus β-lactamase II in the presence of chemical denaturants using a variety of biochemical and biophysical techniques. The apoenzyme was found to unfold cooperatively, with a Gibbs free energy of stabilization (ΔG(0)) of 32 ± 2 kJ·mol(-1) For holoBcII, a first non-cooperative transition leads to multiple interconverting native-like states, in which both zinc atoms remain bound in an apparently unaltered active site, and the protein displays a well organized compact hydrophobic core with structural changes confined to the enzyme surface, but with no catalytic activity. Two-dimensional NMR data revealed that the loss of activity occurs concomitantly with perturbations in two loops that border the enzyme active site. A second cooperative transition, corresponding to global unfolding, is observed at higher denaturant concentrations, with ΔG(0) value of 65 ± 1.4 kJ·mol(-1) These combined data highlight the importance of the two zinc ions in maintaining structure as well as a relatively well defined conformation for both active site loops to maintain enzymatic activity. PMID:27235401

  1. Thermal-induced conformational changes in the product release area drive the enzymatic activity of xylanases 10B: Crystal structure, conformational stability and functional characterization of the xylanase 10B from Thermotoga petrophila RKU-1

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, Camila Ramos; Meza, Andreia Navarro; Hoffmam, Zaira Bruna; Silva, Junio Cota; Alvarez, Thabata Maria; Ruller, Roberto; Giesel, Guilherme Menegon; Verli, Hugo; Squina, Fabio Marcio; Prade, Rolf Alexander; Murakami, Mario Tyago

    2010-12-10

    Research highlights: {yields} The hyperthermostable xylanase 10B from Thermotoga petrophila RKU-1 produces exclusively xylobiose at the optimum temperature. {yields} Circular dichroism spectroscopy suggests a coupling effect of temperature-induced structural changes with its enzymatic behavior. {yields} Crystallographic and molecular dynamics studies indicate that conformational changes in the product release area modulate the enzyme action mode. -- Abstract: Endo-xylanases play a key role in the depolymerization of xylan and recently, they have attracted much attention owing to their potential applications on biofuels and paper industries. In this work, we have investigated the molecular basis for the action mode of xylanases 10B at high temperatures using biochemical, biophysical and crystallographic methods. The crystal structure of xylanase 10B from hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga petrophila RKU-1 (TpXyl10B) has been solved in the native state and in complex with xylobiose. The complex crystal structure showed a classical binding mode shared among other xylanases, which encompasses the -1 and -2 subsites. Interestingly, TpXyl10B displayed a temperature-dependent action mode producing xylobiose and xylotriose at 20 {sup o}C, and exclusively xylobiose at 90 {sup o}C as assessed by capillary zone electrophoresis. Moreover, circular dichroism spectroscopy suggested a coupling effect of temperature-induced structural changes with this particular enzymatic behavior. Molecular dynamics simulations supported the CD analysis suggesting that an open conformational state adopted by the catalytic loop (Trp297-Lys326) provokes significant modifications in the product release area (+1,+2 and +3 subsites), which drives the enzymatic activity to the specific release of xylobiose at high temperatures.

  2. Differential furanose selection in the active sites of archaeal DNA polymerases probed by fixed-conformation nucleotide analogues.

    PubMed

    Ketkar, Amit; Zafar, Maroof K; Banerjee, Surajit; Marquez, Victor E; Egli, Martin; Eoff, Robert L

    2012-11-13

    DNA polymerases select for the incorporation of deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs) using amino acid side-chains that act as a "steric-gate" to bar improper incorporation of rNTPs. An additional factor in the selection of nucleotide substrates resides in the preferred geometry for the furanose moiety of the incoming nucleotide triphosphate. We have probed the role of sugar geometry during nucleotide selection by model DNA polymerases from Sulfolobus solfataricus using fixed conformation nucleotide analogues. North-methanocarba-dATP (N-MC-dATP) locks the central ring into a RNA-type (C2'-exo, North) conformation near a C3'-endo pucker, and South-methanocarba-dATP (S-MC-dATP) locks the central ring system into a (C3'-exo, South) conformation near a C2'-endo pucker. Dpo4 preferentially inserts N-MC-dATP and in the crystal structure of Dpo4 in complex with N-MC-dAMP, the nucleotide analogue superimposes almost perfectly with Dpo4 bound to unmodified dATP. Biochemical assays indicate that the S. solfataricus B-family DNA polymerase Dpo1 can insert and extend from both N-MC-dATP and S-MC-dATP. In this respect, Dpo1 is unexpectedly more tolerant of substrate conformation than Dpo4. The crystal structure of Dpo4 bound to S-MC-dADP shows that poor incorporation of the Southern pucker by the Y-family polymerase results from a hydrogen bond between the 3'-OH group of the nucleotide analogue and the OH group of the steric gate residue, Tyr12, shifting the S-MC-dADP molecule away from the dNTP binding pocket and distorting the base pair at the primer-template junction. These results provide insights into substrate specificity of DNA polymerases, as well as molecular mechanisms that act as a barrier against insertion of rNTPs. PMID:23050956

  3. Multiple Conformations of E. Coli Hsp90 in Solution: Insights Into the Conformational Dynamics of Hsp90

    SciTech Connect

    Krukenberg, K.A.; Forster, F.; Rice, L.M.; Sali, A.; Agard, D.A.

    2009-05-20

    Hsp90, an essential eukaryotic chaperone, depends upon its intrinsic ATPase activity for function. Crystal structures of the bacterial Hsp90 homolog, HtpG, and the yeast Hsp90 reveal large domain rearrangements between the nucleotide-free and the nucleotide-bound forms. We used small-angle X-ray scattering and recently developed molecular modeling methods to characterize the solution structure of HtpG and demonstrate how it differs from known Hsp90 conformations. In addition to this HtpG conformation, we demonstrate that under physiologically relevant conditions, multiple conformations coexist in equilibrium. In solution, nucleotide-free HtpG adopts a more extended conformation than observed in the crystal, and upon the addition of AMPPNP, HtpG is in equilibrium between this open state and a closed state that is in good agreement with the yeast AMPPNP crystal structure. These studies provide a unique view of Hsp90 conformational dynamics and provide a model for the role of nucleotide in effecting conformational change.

  4. Mapping the Free Energy Landscape of PKA Inhibition and Activation: A Double-Conformational Selection Model for the Tandem cAMP-Binding Domains of PKA RIα

    PubMed Central

    Akimoto, Madoka; McNicholl, Eric Tyler; Ramkissoon, Avinash; Moleschi, Kody; Taylor, Susan S.; Melacini, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Protein Kinase A (PKA) is the major receptor for the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) secondary messenger in eukaryotes. cAMP binds to two tandem cAMP-binding domains (CBD-A and -B) within the regulatory subunit of PKA (R), unleashing the activity of the catalytic subunit (C). While CBD-A in RIα is required for PKA inhibition and activation, CBD-B functions as a “gatekeeper” domain that modulates the control exerted by CBD-A. Preliminary evidence suggests that CBD-B dynamics are critical for its gatekeeper function. To test this hypothesis, here we investigate by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) the two-domain construct RIα (91–379) in its apo, cAMP2, and C-bound forms. Our comparative NMR analyses lead to a double conformational selection model in which each apo CBD dynamically samples both active and inactive states independently of the adjacent CBD within a nearly degenerate free energy landscape. Such degeneracy is critical to explain the sensitivity of CBD-B to weak interactions with C and its high affinity for cAMP. Binding of cAMP eliminates this degeneracy, as it selectively stabilizes the active conformation within each CBD and inter-CBD contacts, which require both cAMP and W260. The latter is contributed by CBD-B and mediates capping of the cAMP bound to CBD-A. The inter-CBD interface is dispensable for intra-CBD conformational selection, but is indispensable for full activation of PKA as it occludes C-subunit recognition sites within CBD-A. In addition, the two structurally homologous cAMP-bound CBDs exhibit marked differences in their residual dynamics profiles, supporting the notion that conservation of structure does not necessarily imply conservation of dynamics. PMID:26618408

  5. Short-time dynamics of pH-dependent conformation and substrate binding in the active site of beta-glucosidases: A computational study.

    PubMed

    Flannelly, David F; Aoki, Thalia G; Aristilde, Ludmilla

    2015-09-01

    The complete degradation of cellulose to glucose is essential to carbon turnover in terrestrial ecosystems and to engineered biofuel production. A rate-limiting step in this pathway is catalyzed by beta-glucosidase (BG) enzymes, which convert cellulobiose into two glucose molecules. The activity of these enzymes has been shown to vary with solution pH. However, it is not well understood how pH influences the enzyme conformation required for catalytic action on the substrate. A structural understanding of this pH effect is important for predicting shifts in BG activity in bioreactors and environmental matrices, in addition to informing targeted protein engineering. Here we applied molecular dynamics simulations to explore conformational and substrate binding dynamics in two well-characterized BGs of bacterial (Clostridium cellulovorans) and fungal (Trichoderma reesei) origins as a function of pH. The enzymes were simulated in an explicit solvated environment, with NaCl as electrolytes, at their prominent ionization states obtained at pH 5, 6, 7, and 7.5. Our findings indicated that pH-dependent changes in the ionization states of non-catalytic residues localized outside of the immediate active site led to pH-dependent disruption of the active site conformation. This disruption interferes with favorable H-bonding interactions with catalytic residues required to initiate catalysis on the substrate. We also identified specific non-catalytic residues that are involved in stabilizing the substrate at the optimal pH for enzyme activity. The simulations further revealed the dynamics of water-bridging interactions both outside and inside the substrate binding cleft during structural changes in the enzyme-substrate complex. These findings provide new structural insights into the pH-dependent substrate binding specificity in BGs. PMID:26160737

  6. Pegylation of Antimicrobial Peptides Maintains the Active Peptide Conformation, Model Membrane Interactions, and Antimicrobial Activity while Improving Lung Tissue Biocompatibility following Airway Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Christopher J.; Beck, Konrad; Fox, Marc A.; Ulaeto, David; Clark, Graeme C.

    2012-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have therapeutic potential, particularly for localized infections such as those of the lung. Here we show that airway administration of a pegylated AMP minimizes lung tissue toxicity while nevertheless maintaining antimicrobial activity. CaLL, a potent synthetic AMP (KWKLFKKIFKRIVQRIKDFLR) comprising fragments of LL-37 and cecropin A peptides, was N-terminally pegylated (PEG-CaLL). PEG-CaLL derivatives retained significant antimicrobial activity (50% inhibitory concentrations [IC50s] 2- to 3-fold higher than those of CaLL) against bacterial lung pathogens even in the presence of lung lining fluid. Circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy confirmed that conformational changes associated with the binding of CaLL to model microbial membranes were not disrupted by pegylation. Pegylation of CaLL reduced AMP-elicited cell toxicity as measured using in vitro lung epithelial primary cell cultures. Further, in a fully intact ex vivo isolated perfused rat lung (IPRL) model, airway-administered PEG-CaLL did not result in disruption of the pulmonary epithelial barrier, whereas CaLL caused an immediate loss of membrane integrity leading to pulmonary edema. All AMPs (CaLL, PEG-CaLL, LL-37, cecropin A) delivered to the lung by airway administration showed limited (<3%) pulmonary absorption in the IPRL with extensive AMP accumulation in lung tissue itself, a characteristic anticipated to be beneficial for the treatment of pulmonary infections. We conclude that pegylation may present a means of improving the lung biocompatibility of AMPs designed for the treatment of pulmonary infections. PMID:22430978

  7. 78 FR 44622 - Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Confidential Close Call Reporting System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ..., 2013 (78 FR 27479) and the comment period ended on July 10, 2013. The 60-day notice produced no... of Transportation Statistics (BTS), DOT. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: In compliance with the Paperwork... Close Call data is protected under the BTS confidentiality statute (49 U.S.C. Sec. 6307) and...

  8. 1,4-Disubstituted-[1,2,3]triazolyl-Containing Analogues of MT-II: Design, Synthesis, Conformational Analysis, and Biological Activity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Side chain-to-side chain cyclizations represent a strategy to select a family of bioactive conformations by reducing the entropy and enhancing the stabilization of functional ligand-induced receptor conformations. This structural manipulation contributes to increased target specificity, enhanced biological potency, improved pharmacokinetic properties, increased functional potency, and lowered metabolic susceptibility. The CuI-catalyzed azide–alkyne 1,3-dipolar Huisgen’s cycloaddition, the prototypic click reaction, presents a promising opportunity to develop a new paradigm for an orthogonal bioorganic and intramolecular side chain-to-side chain cyclization. In fact, the proteolytic stable 1,4- or 4,1-disubstituted [1,2,3]triazolyl moiety is isosteric with the peptide bond and can function as a surrogate of the classical side chain-to-side chain lactam forming bridge. Herein we report the design, synthesis, conformational analysis, and functional biological activity of a series of i-to-i+5 1,4- and 4,1-disubstituted [1,2,3]triazole-bridged cyclopeptides derived from MT-II, the homodetic Asp5 to Lys10 side chain-to-side chain bridged heptapeptide, an extensively studied agonist of melanocortin receptors. PMID:25347033

  9. Conformational Landscape of Nicotinoids: Solving the "conformational - Rity" of Anabasine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesarri, Alberto; Cocinero, Emilio J.; Evangelisti, Luca; Suenram, Richard D.; Caminati, Walther; Grabow, Jens-Uwe

    2010-06-01

    The conformational landscape of the alkaloid anabasine (neonicotine) has been investigated using rotational spectroscopy and ab initio calculations. The results allow a detailed comparison of the structural properties of the prototype piperidinic and pyrrolidinic nicotinoids (anabasine vs. nicotine). Anabasine adopts two most stable conformations in isolation conditions, for which we determined accurate rotational and nuclear quadrupole coupling parameters. The preferred conformations are characterized by an equatorial pyridine moiety and additional N-H equatorial stereochemistry at the piperidine ring (Eq-Eq). The two rings of anabasine are close to a bisecting arrangement, with the observed conformations differing in a ca. 180° rotation of the pyridine subunit, denoted either Syn or Anti. The preference of anabasine for the Eq-Eq-Syn conformation has been established by relative intensity measurements (Syn/Anti˜5(2)). The conformational preferences of free anabasine are directed by a N\\cdot\\cdot\\cdotH-C weak hydrogen bond interaction between the nitrogen lone pair at piperidine and the closest hydrogen bond in pyridine, with N\\cdot\\cdot\\cdotN distances ranging from 4.750 Å (Syn) to 4.233 Å (Anti). R. J. Lavrich, R. D. Suenram, D. F. Plusquellic and S. Davis, 58^th OSU Int. Symp. on Mol. Spectrosc., Columbus, OH, 2003, Comm. RH13.

  10. Suppressing epileptic activity in a neural mass model using a closed-loop proportional-integral controller.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junsong; Niebur, Ernst; Hu, Jinyu; Li, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Closed-loop control is a promising deep brain stimulation (DBS) strategy that could be used to suppress high-amplitude epileptic activity. However, there are currently no analytical approaches to determine the stimulation parameters for effective and safe treatment protocols. Proportional-integral (PI) control is the most extensively used closed-loop control scheme in the field of control engineering because of its simple implementation and perfect performance. In this study, we took Jansen's neural mass model (NMM) as a test bed to develop a PI-type closed-loop controller for suppressing epileptic activity. A graphical stability analysis method was employed to determine the stabilizing region of the PI controller in the control parameter space, which provided a theoretical guideline for the choice of the PI control parameters. Furthermore, we established the relationship between the parameters of the PI controller and the parameters of the NMM in the form of a stabilizing region, which provided insights into the mechanisms that may suppress epileptic activity in the NMM. The simulation results demonstrated the validity and effectiveness of the proposed closed-loop PI control scheme. PMID:27273563

  11. Suppressing epileptic activity in a neural mass model using a closed-loop proportional-integral controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junsong; Niebur, Ernst; Hu, Jinyu; Li, Xiaoli

    2016-06-01

    Closed-loop control is a promising deep brain stimulation (DBS) strategy that could be used to suppress high-amplitude epileptic activity. However, there are currently no analytical approaches to determine the stimulation parameters for effective and safe treatment protocols. Proportional-integral (PI) control is the most extensively used closed-loop control scheme in the field of control engineering because of its simple implementation and perfect performance. In this study, we took Jansen’s neural mass model (NMM) as a test bed to develop a PI-type closed-loop controller for suppressing epileptic activity. A graphical stability analysis method was employed to determine the stabilizing region of the PI controller in the control parameter space, which provided a theoretical guideline for the choice of the PI control parameters. Furthermore, we established the relationship between the parameters of the PI controller and the parameters of the NMM in the form of a stabilizing region, which provided insights into the mechanisms that may suppress epileptic activity in the NMM. The simulation results demonstrated the validity and effectiveness of the proposed closed-loop PI control scheme.

  12. Suppressing epileptic activity in a neural mass model using a closed-loop proportional-integral controller

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junsong; Niebur, Ernst; Hu, Jinyu; Li, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Closed-loop control is a promising deep brain stimulation (DBS) strategy that could be used to suppress high-amplitude epileptic activity. However, there are currently no analytical approaches to determine the stimulation parameters for effective and safe treatment protocols. Proportional-integral (PI) control is the most extensively used closed-loop control scheme in the field of control engineering because of its simple implementation and perfect performance. In this study, we took Jansen’s neural mass model (NMM) as a test bed to develop a PI-type closed-loop controller for suppressing epileptic activity. A graphical stability analysis method was employed to determine the stabilizing region of the PI controller in the control parameter space, which provided a theoretical guideline for the choice of the PI control parameters. Furthermore, we established the relationship between the parameters of the PI controller and the parameters of the NMM in the form of a stabilizing region, which provided insights into the mechanisms that may suppress epileptic activity in the NMM. The simulation results demonstrated the validity and effectiveness of the proposed closed-loop PI control scheme. PMID:27273563

  13. The conformation of P450cam in complex with putidaredoxin is dependent on oxidation state.

    PubMed

    Myers, William K; Lee, Young-Tae; Britt, R David; Goodin, David B

    2013-08-14

    Double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy was used to determine the conformational state in solution for the heme monooxygenase P450cam when bound to its natural redox partner, putidaredoxin (Pdx). When oxidized Pdx was titrated into substrate-bound ferric P450cam, the enzyme shifted from the closed to the open conformation. In sharp contrast, however, the enzyme remained in the closed conformation when ferrous-CO P450cam was titrated with reduced Pdx. This result fully supports the proposal that binding of oxidized Pdx to P450cam opposes the open-to-closed transition induced by substrate binding. However, the data strongly suggest that in solution, binding of reduced Pdx to P450cam does not favor the open conformation. This supports a model in which substrate recognition is associated with the open-to-closed transition and electron transfer from Pdx occurs in the closed conformation. The opening of the enzyme in the ferric-hydroperoxo state following electron transfer from Pdx would provide for efficient O2 bond activation, substrate oxidation, and product release. PMID:23901883

  14. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Reveals pH-Dependent Conformational Changes in Trichoderma reesei Cellobiohydrolase I: Implications for Enzymatic Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; O'Neill, Hugh Michael; McGaughey, Joseph; Urban, Volker S; Rempe, Caroline S; Petridis, Loukas; Smith, Jeremy C; Evans, Barbara R; Heller, William T

    2011-01-01

    Cellobiohydrolase I (Cel7A) of the fungus Trichoderma reesei (now classified as an anamorph of Hypocrea jecorina) hydrolyzes crystalline cellulose to soluble sugars, making it of key interest for producing fermentable sugars from biomass for biofuel production. The activity of the enzyme is pH-dependent, with its highest activity occurring at pH 4 5. To probe the response of the solution structure of Cel7A to changes in pH, we measured small angle neutron scattering of it in a series of solutions having pH values of 7.0, 6.0, 5.3, and 4.2. As the pH decreases from 7.0 to 5.3, the enzyme structure remains well defined, possessing a spatial differentiation between the cellulose binding domain and the catalytic core that only changes subtly. At pH 4.2, the solution conformation of the enzyme changes to a structure that is intermediate between a properly folded enzyme and a denatured, unfolded state, yet the secondary structure of the enzyme is essentially unaltered. The results indicate that at the pH of optimal activity, the catalytic core of the enzyme adopts a structure in which the compact packing typical of a fully folded polypeptide chain is disrupted and suggest that the increased range of structures afforded by this disordered state plays an important role in the increased activity of Cel7A through conformational selection.

  15. Attitudinal Conformity and Anonymity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyson, Herbert; Kaplowitz, Stan

    1977-01-01

    Tested college students for conformity when conditions contributing to conformity were absent. Found that social pressures (responding in public, being surveyed by fellow group members) are necessary to produce conformity. (RL)

  16. The structures of RNase A complexed with 3'-CMP and d(CpA): active site conformation and conserved water molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Zegers, I.; Maes, D.; Dao-Thi, M. H.; Poortmans, F.; Palmer, R.; Wyns, L.

    1994-01-01

    The interactions of RNase A with cytidine 3'-monophosphate (3'-CMP) and deoxycytidyl-3',5'-deoxyadenosine (d(CpA)) were analyzed by X-ray crystallography. The 3'-CMP complex and the native structure were determined from trigonal crystals, and the d(CpA) complex from monoclinic crystals. The differences between the overall structures are concentrated in loop regions and are relatively small. The protein-inhibitor contacts are interpreted in terms of the catalytic mechanism. The general base His 12 interacts with the 2' oxygen, as does the electrostatic catalyst Lys 41. The general acid His 119 has 2 conformations (A and B) in the native structure and is found in, respectively, the A and the B conformation in the d(CpA) and the 3'-CMP complex. From the present structures and from a comparison with RNase T1, we propose that His 119 is active in the A conformation. The structure of the d(CpA) complex permits a detailed analysis of the downstream binding site, which includes His 119 and Asn 71. The comparison of the present RNase A structures with an inhibitor complex of RNase T1 shows that there are important similarities in the active sites of these 2 enzymes, despite the absence of any sequence homology. The water molecules were analyzed in order to identify conserved water sites. Seventeen water sites were found to be conserved in RNase A structures from 5 different space groups. It is proposed that 7 of those water molecules play a role in the binding of the N-terminal helix to the rest of the protein and in the stabilization of the active site. PMID:7756988

  17. Conformational Change Near the Redox Center of Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase Induced by NAD(+) to Regulate the Enzyme Activity.

    PubMed

    Fukamichi, Tomoe; Nishimoto, Etsuko

    2015-05-01

    Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (LipDH) transfers two electrons from dihydrolipoamide (DHL) to NAD(+) mediated by FAD. Since this reaction is the final step of a series of catalytic reaction of pyruvate dehydrogenase multi-enzyme complex (PDC), LipDH is a key enzyme to maintain the fluent metabolic flow. We reported here the conformational change near the redox center of LipDH induced by NAD(+) promoting the access of the DHL to FAD. The increase in the affinity of DHL to redox center was evidenced by the decrease in K M responding to the increase in the concentration of NAD(+) in Lineweaver-Burk plots. The fluorescence intensity of FAD transiently reduced by the addition of DHL was not recovered but rather reduced by the binding of NAD(+) with LipDH. The fluorescence decay lifetimes of FAD and Trp were prolonged in the presence of NAD(+) to show that FAD would be free from the electron transfer from the neighboring Tyrs and the resonance energy transfer efficiency between Trp and FAD lowered. These results consistently reveal that the conformation near the FAD and the surroundings would be so rearranged by NAD(+) to allow the easier access of DHL to the redox center of LipDH. PMID:25757537

  18. Conformational flexibility of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Toniolo, Claudio; Temussi, Pierandrea

    2016-05-01

    L-Aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester, better known as aspartame, is not only one of the most used artificial sweeteners, but also a very interesting molecule with respect to the correlation between molecular structure and taste. The extreme conformational flexibility of this dipeptide posed a huge difficulty when researchers tried to use it as a lead compound to design new sweeteners. In particular, it was difficult to take advantage of its molecular model as a mold to infer the shape of the, then unknown, active site of the sweet taste receptor. Here, we follow the story of the 3D structural aspects of aspartame from early conformational studies to recent docking into homology models of the receptor. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 376-384, 2016. PMID:27038223

  19. Ligand-Dependent Conformations and Dynamics of the Serotonin 5-HT2A Receptor Determine Its Activation and Membrane-Driven Oligomerization Properties

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Jufang; Khelashvili, George; Mondal, Sayan; Mehler, Ernest L.; Weinstein, Harel

    2012-01-01

    From computational simulations of a serotonin 2A receptor (5-HT2AR) model complexed with pharmacologically and structurally diverse ligands we identify different conformational states and dynamics adopted by the receptor bound to the full agonist 5-HT, the partial agonist LSD, and the inverse agonist Ketanserin. The results from the unbiased all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations show that the three ligands affect differently the known GPCR activation elements including the toggle switch at W6.48, the changes in the ionic lock between E6.30 and R3.50 of the DRY motif in TM3, and the dynamics of the NPxxY motif in TM7. The computational results uncover a sequence of steps connecting these experimentally-identified elements of GPCR activation. The differences among the properties of the receptor molecule interacting with the ligands correlate with their distinct pharmacological properties. Combining these results with quantitative analysis of membrane deformation obtained with our new method (Mondal et al, Biophysical Journal 2011), we show that distinct conformational rearrangements produced by the three ligands also elicit different responses in the surrounding membrane. The differential reorganization of the receptor environment is reflected in (i)-the involvement of cholesterol in the activation of the 5-HT2AR, and (ii)-different extents and patterns of membrane deformations. These findings are discussed in the context of their likely functional consequences and a predicted mechanism of ligand-specific GPCR oligomerization. PMID:22532793

  20. Superiority of the S,S conformation in diverse pharmacological processes: Intestinal transport and entry inhibition activity of novel anti-HIV drug lead.

    PubMed

    Fanous, Joseph; Swed, Avi; Joubran, Salim; Hurevich, Mattan; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Kotler, Moshe; Gilon, Chaim; Hoffman, Amnon

    2015-11-30

    Chirality is an important aspect in many pharmacological processes including drug transport and metabolism. The current investigation examined the stereospecific transport and entry inhibitory activity of four diastereomers derived from a small (macrocyclic) molecule that has two chiral centers. These molecules were designed to mimic the interaction between CD4 and gp120 site of HIV-1 and thereby to function as entry inhibitor(s). Intestinal permeability was assessed by ex-vivo model using excised rat intestine mounted in side-by-side diffusion chambers. The entry inhibitory activity was monitored using indicator HeLa-CD4-LTR-beta-gal cells (MAGI assay). The (S/S) diastereomer, named CG-1, exhibited superiority in both unrelated tested biological processes: (I) high transport through the intestine and (II) entry inhibition activity (in the low μM range). The permeability screening revealed a unique transporter-mediated absorption pathway of CG-1, suggesting a significant role of the molecule's conformation on the mechanism of intestinal absorption. Here we highlight that only the S,S enantiomer (CG-1) has both (I) promising anti HIV-1 entry inhibitory properties and (II) high transporter mediated intestinal permeability. Hence we suggest preference in pharmacological processes to the S,S conformation. This report augments the knowledge regarding stereoselectivity in receptor mediated and protein-protein interaction processes. PMID:26392249

  1. Small molecule agonists of integrin CD11b/CD18 do not induce global conformational changes and are significantly better than activating antibodies in reducing vascular injury

    PubMed Central

    Faridi, Mohd Hafeez; Altintas, Mehmet M.; Gomez, Camilo; Duque, Juan Camilo; Vazquez-Padron, Roberto I.; Gupta, Vineet

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND CD11b/CD18 is a key adhesion receptor that mediates leukocyte adhesion, migration and immune functions. We recently identified novel compounds, leukadherins, that allosterically enhance CD11b/CD18-dependent cell adhesion and reduce inflammation in vivo, suggesting integrin activation to be a novel mechanism of action for the development of anti-inflammatory therapeutics. Since a number of well-characterized anti-CD11b/CD18 activating antibodies are currently available, we wondered if such biological agonists could also become therapeutic leads following this mechanism of action. METHODS We compared the two types of agonists using in vitro cell adhesion and wound-healing assays and using animal model systems. We also studied effects of the two types of agonists on outside-in signaling in treated cells. RESULTS Both types of agonists similarly enhanced integrin-mediated cell adhesion and decreased cell migration. However, unlike leukadherins, the activating antibodies produced significant CD11b/CD18 macro clustering and induced phosphorylation of key proteins involved in outside-in signaling. Studies using conformation reporter antibodies showed that leukadherins did not induce global conformational changes in CD11b/CD18 explaining the reason behind their lack of ligand-mimetic outside-in signaling. In vivo, leukadherins reduced vascular injury in a dose-dependent fashion, but, surprisingly, the anti-CD11b activating antibody ED7 was ineffective. CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that small molecule allosteric agonists of CD11b/CD18 have clear advantages over the biologic activating antibodies and provide a mechanistic basis for the difference. GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE CD11b/CD18 activation represents a novel strategy for reducing inflammatory injury. Our study establishes small molecule leukadherins as preferred agonists over activating antibodies for future development as novel anti-inflammatory therapeutics. PMID:23454649

  2. Spin-Selective Thermal Activation of Methane by Closed-Shell [TaO3 ](.).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shaodong; Li, Jilai; Schlangen, Maria; Schwarz, Helmut

    2016-06-13

    Thermal reactions of the closed-shell metal-oxide cluster [TaO3 ](+) with methane were investigated by using FTICR mass spectrometry complemented by high-level quantum chemical calculations. While the generation of methanol and formaldehyde is somewhat expected, [TaO3 ](+) remarkably also has the ability to abstract two hydrogen atoms from methane with the elimination of CH2 . Mechanistically, the generation of CH2 O and CH3 OH occurs on the singlet-ground-state surface, while for the liberation of (3) CH2 , a two-state reactivity scenario prevails. PMID:27159562

  3. 29 CFR 1620.4 - “Closely related” and “directly essential” activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...; employees in the personnel, labor relations, employee benefits, safety and health, advertising, promotion, and public relations activities of the producing enterprise; work instructors for the...

  4. Closed-loop control of epileptiform activities in a neural population model using a proportional-derivative controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun-Song; Wang, Mei-Li; Li, Xiao-Li; Ernst, Niebur

    2015-03-01

    Epilepsy is believed to be caused by a lack of balance between excitation and inhibitation in the brain. A promising strategy for the control of the disease is closed-loop brain stimulation. How to determine the stimulation control parameters for effective and safe treatment protocols remains, however, an unsolved question. To constrain the complex dynamics of the biological brain, we use a neural population model (NPM). We propose that a proportional-derivative (PD) type closed-loop control can successfully suppress epileptiform activities. First, we determine the stability of root loci, which reveals that the dynamical mechanism underlying epilepsy in the NPM is the loss of homeostatic control caused by the lack of balance between excitation and inhibition. Then, we design a PD type closed-loop controller to stabilize the unstable NPM such that the homeostatic equilibriums are maintained; we show that epileptiform activities are successfully suppressed. A graphical approach is employed to determine the stabilizing region of the PD controller in the parameter space, providing a theoretical guideline for the selection of the PD control parameters. Furthermore, we establish the relationship between the control parameters and the model parameters in the form of stabilizing regions to help understand the mechanism of suppressing epileptiform activities in the NPM. Simulations show that the PD-type closed-loop control strategy can effectively suppress epileptiform activities in the NPM. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61473208, 61025019, and 91132722), ONR MURI N000141010278, and NIH grant R01EY016281.

  5. A prospective cohort study of latent tuberculosis in adult close contacts of active pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sun Hyo; Lee, Seung Jun; Cho, Yu Ji; Jeong, Yi Yeong; Kim, Ho Cheol; Lee, Jong Deog; Kim, Hee Jin; Menzies, Dick

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: The objective of this prospective study was to evaluate the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in adult close contacts of active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) patients in Korea. Methods: Adult close contacts of active pulmonary TB patients were recruited at a regional tertiary hospital in Korea. The participants were tested for LTBI using the tuberculin skin test (TST) and/or QuantiFERON-TB Gold (QFT-G) test. LTBI patients, who consented to treatment, were randomly assigned to receive isoniazid for 9 months (9INH) or rifampin for 4 months (4RIF). Results: We examined 189 adult close contacts (> 18 years) of 107 active pulmonary TB patients. The TST and QFT-G were positive (≥ 10 mm) in 75/183 (39.7%) and 45/118 (38.1%) tested participants, respectively. Among 88 TST or QFT-G positive LTBI participants, 45 participants were randomly assigned to receive 4RIF (n = 21) or 9INH (n = 24), respectively. The average treatment duration for the 4RIF and 9INH groups was 3.3 ± 1.3 and 6.1 ± 2.7 months, respectively. Treatment was completed in 25 participants (4RIF, n = 16; 9INH, n = 9). LTBI participants who accepted treatment were more likely to be women and have more cavitary lesions on the chest radiographs of index cases and positive TST and QFT-G results compared to those who refused treatment. Conclusions: About 40% of adult close contacts of active pulmonary TB patients had LTBI; about 50% of these LTBI participants agreed to treatment. PMID:27052266

  6. Prediction of sea water intrusion for mining activity in close precincts of sea shore.

    PubMed

    Singh, Awanindra Pratap; Gupta, Prem Kumar; Khandelwal, Manoj

    2013-01-01

    The mining lease area of Surka [District Bhavnagar, Gujarat (India)] is located within 6-12 km horizontal distance of sea shore of Gulf of Cambay. Whenever, there will be onset of lignite extraction, there will be always a threat of sea water intrusion into the mining lease area due to its close proximity to seashore. This article describes the prediction of sea water intrusion into the lease area of whole mining block using Ghyben-Herzberg relation between fresh and saline water, Remote Sensing, Ground Truth verification, Electrical Resistivity Survey and groundwater table monitored during the year 2004. As per the Ghyben-Herzberg relation, results show that there will not be sea water intrusion. If there is excess pumping of water then also the basement rock below the lignite seam will put hindrance to any possible upconing of saline water interface. PMID:24083098

  7. Physical Activity Capture Technology With Potential for Incorporation Into Closed-Loop Control for Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Dadlani, Vikash; Levine, James A; McCrady-Spitzer, Shelly K; Dassau, Eyal; Kudva, Yogish C

    2015-11-01

    Physical activity is an important determinant of glucose variability in type 1 diabetes (T1D). It has been incorporated as a nonglucose input into closed-loop control (CLC) protocols for T1D during the last 4 years mainly by 3 research groups in single center based controlled clinical trials involving a maximum of 18 subjects in any 1 study. Although physical activity data capture may have clinical benefit in patients with T1D by impacting cardiovascular fitness and optimal body weight achievement and maintenance, limited number of such studies have been conducted to date. Clinical trial registries provide information about a single small sample size 2 center prospective study incorporating physical activity data input to modulate closed-loop control in T1D that are seeking to build on prior studies. We expect an increase in such studies especially since the NIH has expanded support of this type of research with additional grants starting in the second half of 2015. Studies (1) involving patients with other disorders that have lasted 12 weeks or longer and tracked physical activity and (2) including both aerobic and resistance activity may offer insights about the user experience and device optimization even as single input CLC heads into real-world clinical trials over the next few years and nonglucose input is introduced as the next advance. PMID:26481641

  8. Low-order design and high-order simulation of active closed-loop control for aerospace structures under construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balas, Mark J.

    1989-01-01

    Partially constructed/assembled structures in space are complicated enough but their dynamics will also be operating in closed-loop with feedback controllers. The dynamics of such structures are modeled by large-scale finite element models. The model dimension L is extremely large (approximately 10,000) while the numbers of actuators (M) and sensors (P) are small. The model parameters M(sub m) mass matrix, D(sub o) damping matrix, and K(sub o) stiffness matrix, are all symmetric and sparse (banded). Thus simulation of open-loop structure models of very large dimension can be accomplished by special integration techniques for sparse matrices. The problem of simulation of closed-loop control of such structures is complicated by the addition of controllers. Simulation of closed-loop controlled structures is an essential part of the controller design and evaluation process. Current research in the following areas is presented: high-order simulation of actively controlled aerospace structures; low-order controller design and SCI compensation for unmodeled dynamics; prediction of closed-loop stability using asymptotic eigenvalue series; and flexible robot manipulator control experiment.

  9. A selective, slow binding inhibitor of factor VIIa binds to a nonstandard active site conformation and attenuates thrombus formation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Olivero, Alan G; Eigenbrot, Charles; Goldsmith, Richard; Robarge, Kirk; Artis, Dean R; Flygare, John; Rawson, Thomas; Sutherlin, Daniel P; Kadkhodayan, Saloumeh; Beresini, Maureen; Elliott, Linda O; DeGuzman, Geralyn G; Banner, David W; Ultsch, Mark; Marzec, Ulla; Hanson, Stephen R; Refino, Canio; Bunting, Stuart; Kirchhofer, Daniel

    2005-03-11

    The serine protease factor VIIa (FVIIa) in complex with its cellular cofactor tissue factor (TF) initiates the blood coagulation reactions. TF.FVIIa is also implicated in thrombosis-related disorders and constitutes an appealing therapeutic target for treatment of cardiovascular diseases. To this end, we generated the FVIIa active site inhibitor G17905, which displayed great potency toward TF.FVIIa (Ki = 0.35 +/- 0.11 nM). G17905 did not appreciably inhibit 12 of the 14 examined trypsin-like serine proteases, consistent with its TF.FVIIa-specific activity in clotting assays. The crystal structure of the FVIIa.G17905 complex provides insight into the molecular basis of the high selectivity. It shows that, compared with other serine proteases, FVIIa is uniquely equipped to accommodate conformational disturbances in the Gln217-Gly219 region caused by the ortho-hydroxy group of the inhibitor's aminobenzamidine moiety located in the S1 recognition pocket. Moreover, the structure revealed a novel, nonstandard conformation of FVIIa active site in the region of the oxyanion hole, a "flipped" Lys192-Gly193 peptide bond. Macromolecular substrate activation assays demonstrated that G17905 is a noncompetitive, slow-binding inhibitor. Nevertheless, G17905 effectively inhibited thrombus formation in a baboon arterio-venous shunt model, reducing platelet and fibrin deposition by approximately 70% at 0.4 mg/kg + 0.1 mg/kg/min infusion. Therefore, the in vitro potency of G17905, characterized by slow binding kinetics, correlated with efficacious antithrombotic activity in vivo. PMID:15632123

  10. Impact of Ser17 Phosphorylation on the Conformational Dynamics of the Oncoprotein MDM2.

    PubMed

    Bueren-Calabuig, Juan A; Michel, Julien

    2016-05-01

    MDM2 is an important oncoprotein that downregulates the activity of the tumor suppressor protein p53 via binding of its N-terminal domain to the p53 transactivation domain. The first 24 residues of the MDM2 N-terminal domain form an intrinsically disordered "lid" region that interconverts on a millisecond time scale between "open" and "closed" states in unliganded MDM2. While the former conformational state is expected to facilitate p53 binding, the latter competes in a pseudo-substrate manner with p53 for its binding site. Phosphorylation of serine 17 in the MDM2 lid region is thought to modulate the equilibrium between "open" and "closed" lid states, but contradictory findings on the favored lid conformational state upon phosphorylation have been reported. Here, the nature of the conformational states of MDM2 pSer17 and Ser17Asp variants was addressed by means of enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations. Detailed analyses of the computed lid conformational ensembles indicate that both lid variants stabilize a "closed" state, with respect to wild type. Nevertheless, the nature of the closed-state conformational ensembles differs significantly between the pSer17 and Ser17Asp variants. Thus, care should be applied in the interpretation of biochemical experiments that use phosphomimetic variants to model the effects of phosphorylation on the structure and dynamics of this disordered protein region. PMID:27050388

  11. Protein Allostery and Conformational Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingjing; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2016-06-01

    The functions of many proteins are regulated through allostery, whereby effector binding at a distal site changes the functional activity (e.g., substrate binding affinity or catalytic efficiency) at the active site. Most allosteric studies have focused on thermodynamic properties, in particular, substrate binding affinity. Changes in substrate binding affinity by allosteric effectors have generally been thought to be mediated by conformational transitions of the proteins or, alternatively, by changes in the broadness of the free energy basin of the protein conformational state without shifting the basin minimum position. When effector binding changes the free energy landscape of a protein in conformational space, the change affects not only thermodynamic properties but also dynamic properties, including the amplitudes of motions on different time scales and rates of conformational transitions. Here we assess the roles of conformational dynamics in allosteric regulation. Two cases are highlighted where NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation have been used as complementary approaches to identify residues possibly involved in allosteric communication. Perspectives on contentious issues, for example, the relationship between picosecond-nanosecond local and microsecond-millisecond conformational exchange dynamics, are presented. PMID:26876046

  12. Structure and cytotoxic activity of sesquiterpene glycoside esters from Calendula officinalis L.: Studies on the conformation of viridiflorol.

    PubMed

    D'Ambrosio, Michele; Ciocarlan, Alexandru; Colombo, Elisa; Guerriero, Antonio; Pizza, Cosimo; Sangiovanni, Enrico; Dell'Agli, Mario

    2015-09-01

    Topic applications of Calendula officinalis L. lipophilic extracts are used in phytotherapy to relieve skin inflammatory conditions whereas infusions are used as a remedy for gastric complaints. Such a different usage might be explained by some cytotoxicity of lipophilic extracts at gastric level but little is known about this. Therefore, we screened the CH2Cl2 extract from the flowers of C. officinalis by MTT and LDH assays in human epithelial gastric cells AGS. This bioassay-oriented approach led to the isolation of several sesquiterpene glycosides which were structurally characterized by spectroscopic measurements, chemical reactions and MM calculations. The conformational preferences of viridiflorol fucoside were established and a previously assigned stereochemistry was revised. The compounds 1a, 2a and 3f showed comparably high cytotoxicity in the MTT assays, whereas the effect on LDH release was lower. Our study provides new insights on the composition of C. officinalis extracts of medium polarity and identifies the main compounds that could be responsible for cytotoxic effects at gastric level. PMID:26057223

  13. Applications of hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX) for the characterization of conformational dynamics in light-activated photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Robert; Heintz, Udo; Winkler, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Rational design of optogenetic tools is inherently linked to the understanding of photoreceptor function. Structural analysis of elements involved in signal integration in individual sensor domains provides an initial idea of their mode of operation, but understanding how local structural rearrangements eventually affect signal transmission to output domains requires inclusion of the effector regions in the characterization. However, the dynamic nature of these assemblies renders their structural analysis challenging and therefore a combination of high- and low-resolution techniques is required to appreciate functional aspects of photoreceptors. This review focuses on the potential of hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) for complementing the structural characterization of photoreceptors. In this respect, the ability of HDX-MS to provide information on conformational dynamics and the possibility to address multiple functionally relevant states in solution render this methodology ideally suitable. We highlight recent examples demonstrating the potential of HDX-MS and discuss how these results can help to improve existing optogenetic systems or guide the design of novel optogenetic tools. PMID:26157802

  14. Mycobacterium tuberculosis RsdA provides a conformational rationale for selective regulation of σ-factor activity by proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Ravi K.; Prabha, Tangirala Surya; Manjeera, Gowravaram; Gopal, Balasubramanian

    2013-01-01

    The relative levels of different σ factors dictate the expression profile of a bacterium. Extracytoplasmic function σ factors synchronize the transcriptional profile with environmental conditions. The cellular concentration of free extracytoplasmic function σ factors is regulated by the localization of this protein in a σ/anti-σ complex. Anti-σ factors are multi-domain proteins with a receptor to sense environmental stimuli and a conserved anti-σ domain (ASD) that binds a σ factor. Here we describe the structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis anti-σD (RsdA) in complex with the -35 promoter binding domain of σD (σD4). We note distinct conformational features that enable the release of σD by the selective proteolysis of the ASD in RsdA. The structural and biochemical features of the σD/RsdA complex provide a basis to reconcile diverse regulatory mechanisms that govern σ/anti-σ interactions despite high overall structural similarity. Multiple regulatory mechanisms embedded in an ASD scaffold thus provide an elegant route to rapidly re-engineer the expression profile of a bacterium in response to an environmental stimulus. PMID:23314154

  15. Analysis of Cytochrome P450 CYP119 Ligand-dependent Conformational Dynamics by Two-dimensional NMR and X-ray Crystallography*

    PubMed Central

    Basudhar, Debashree; Madrona, Yarrow; Kandel, Sylvie; Lampe, Jed N.; Nishida, Clinton R.; de Montellano, Paul R. Ortiz

    2015-01-01

    Defining the conformational states of cytochrome P450 active sites is critical for the design of agents that minimize drug-drug interactions, the development of isoform-specific P450 inhibitors, and the engineering of novel oxidative catalysts. We used two-dimensional 1H,15N HSQC chemical shift perturbation mapping of 15N-labeled Phe residues and x-ray crystallography to examine the ligand-dependent conformational dynamics of CYP119. Active site Phe residues were most affected by the binding of azole inhibitors and fatty acid substrates, in agreement with active site localization of the conformational changes. This was supported by crystallography, which revealed movement of the F-G loop with various azoles. Nevertheless, the NMR chemical shift perturbations caused by azoles and substrates were distinguishable. The absence of significant chemical shift perturbations with several azoles revealed binding of ligands to an open conformation similar to that of the ligand-free state. In contrast, 4-phenylimidazole caused pronounced NMR changes involving Phe-87, Phe-144, and Phe-153 that support the closed conformation found in the crystal structure. The same closed conformation is observed by NMR and crystallography with a para-fluoro substituent on the 4-phenylimidazole, but a para-chloro or bromo substituent engendered a second closed conformation. An open conformation is thus favored in solution with many azole ligands, but para-substituted phenylimidazoles give rise to two closed conformations that depend on the size of the para-substituent. The results suggest that ligands selectively stabilize discrete cytochrome P450 conformational states. PMID:25670859

  16. Dynamic equilibrium between closed and partially closed states of the bacterial Enzyme I unveiled by solution NMR and X-ray scattering

    PubMed Central

    Venditti, Vincenzo; Schwieters, Charles D.; Grishaev, Alexander; Clore, G. Marius

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme I (EI) is the first component in the bacterial phosphotransferase system, a signal transduction pathway in which phosphoryl transfer through a series of bimolecular protein–protein interactions is coupled to sugar transport across the membrane. EI is a multidomain, 128-kDa homodimer that has been shown to exist in two conformational states related to one another by two large (50–90°) rigid body domain reorientations. The open conformation of apo EI allows phosphoryl transfer from His189 located in the N-terminal domain α/β (EINα/β) subdomain to the downstream protein partner bound to the EINα subdomain. The closed conformation, observed in a trapped phosphoryl transfer intermediate, brings the EINα/β subdomain into close proximity to the C-terminal dimerization domain (EIC), thereby permitting in-line phosphoryl transfer from phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) bound to EIC to His189. Here, we investigate the solution conformation of a complex of an active site mutant of EI (H189A) with PEP. Simulated annealing refinement driven simultaneously by solution small angle X-ray scattering and NMR residual dipolar coupling data demonstrates unambiguously that the EI(H189A)–PEP complex exists in a dynamic equilibrium between two approximately equally populated conformational states, one corresponding to the closed structure and the other to a partially closed species. The latter likely represents an intermediate in the open-to-closed transition. PMID:26305976

  17. Effects of High Pressure Homogenization on the Activity, Stability, Kinetics and Three-Dimensional Conformation of a Glucose Oxidase Produced by Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    Tribst, Alline Artigiani Lima; Cota, Júnio; Murakami, Mario Tyago; Cristianini, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    High pressure homogenization (HPH) is a non-thermal method, which has been employed to change the activity and stability of biotechnologically relevant enzymes. This work investigated how HPH affects the structural and functional characteristics of a glucose oxidase (GO) from Aspergillus niger. The enzyme was homogenized at 75 and 150 MPa and the effects were evaluated with respect to the enzyme activity, stability, kinetic parameters and molecular structure. The enzyme showed a pH-dependent response to the HPH treatment, with reduction or maintenance of activity at pH 4.5–6.0 and a remarkable activity increase (30–300%) at pH 6.5 in all tested temperatures (15, 50 and 75°C). The enzyme thermal tolerance was reduced due to HPH treatment and the storage for 24 h at high temperatures (50 and 75°C) also caused a reduction of activity. Interestingly, at lower temperatures (15°C) the activity levels were slightly higher than that observed for native enzyme or at least maintained. These effects of HPH treatment on function and stability of GO were further investigated by spectroscopic methods. Both fluorescence and circular dichroism revealed conformational changes in the molecular structure of the enzyme that might be associated with the distinct functional and stability behavior of GO. PMID:25061935

  18. A slow anion channel in guard cells, activating at large hyperpolarization, may be principal for stomatal closing.

    PubMed

    Linder, B; Raschke, K

    1992-11-16

    Slowly activating anion channel currents were discovered at micromolar 'cytoplasmic' Ca2+ during patch-clamp measurements on guard-cell protoplasts of Vicia faba and Xanthium strumarium. They activated at potentials as low as -200 mV, with time constants between 5 and 60 s, and no inactivation. The broad voltage dependence exhibited a current maximum near -40 mV. The single-channel open time was in the order of seconds, and the unitary conductance was 33 ps, similar to that of the already described 'quick' anion channel of guard cells. Because of its activity at low potentials, the slow anion channel may be essential for the depolarization of the plasmalemma that is required for salt efflux during stomatal closing. PMID:1385219

  19. Stalk segment 5 of the yeast plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase. Labeling with a fluorescent maleimide reveals a conformational change during glucose activation.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Manuel; Pardo, Juan Pablo; Allen, Kenneth E; Slayman, Carolyn W

    2002-10-25

    Glucose is well known to cause a rapid, reversible activation of the yeast plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, very likely mediated by phosphorylation of two or more Ser/Thr residues near the C terminus. Recent mutagenesis studies have shown that glucose-dependent activation can be mimicked constitutively by amino acid substitutions in stalk segment 5 (S5), an alpha-helical stretch connecting the catalytic part of the ATPase with transmembrane segment 5 (Miranda, M., Allen, K. E., Pardo, J. P., and Slayman, C. W. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 22485-22490). In the present work, the fluorescent maleimide Alexa-488 has served as a probe for glucose-dependent changes in the conformation of S5. Experiments were carried out in a "3C" version of the ATPase, from which six of nine native cysteines had been removed by site-directed mutagenesis to eliminate background labeling by Alexa-488. In this construct, three of twelve cysteines introduced at various positions along S5 (A668C, S672C, and D676C) reacted with the Alexa dye in a glucose-independent manner, as shown by fluorescent labeling of the 100 kDa Pma1 polypeptide and by isolation and identification of the corresponding tryptic peptides. Especially significant was the fact that three additional cysteines reacted with Alexa-488 more rapidly (Y689C) or only (V665C and L678C) in plasma membranes from glucose-metabolizing cells. The results support a model in which the S5 alpha-helix undergoes a significant change in conformation to expose positions 665, 678, and 689 during glucose-dependent activation of the ATPase. PMID:12169695

  20. Exposure of MC4R to agonist in the endoplasmic reticulum stabilizes an active conformation of the receptor that does not desensitize

    PubMed Central

    Granell, Susana; Molden, Brent M.; Baldini, Giulia

    2013-01-01

    Melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) is a G protein-coupled receptor expressed in neurons of the hypothalamus where it regulates food intake. MC4R responds to an agonist, α-melanocyte–stimulating hormone (α-MSH) and to an antagonist/inverse agonist, agouti-related peptide (AgRP), which are released by upstream neurons. Binding to α-MSH leads to stimulation of receptor activity and suppression of food intake, whereas AgRP has opposite effects. MC4R cycles constantly between the plasma membrane and endosomes and undergoes agonist-mediated desensitization by being routed to lysosomes. MC4R desensitization and increased AgRP expression are thought to decrease the effectiveness of MC4R agonists as an antiobesity treatment. In this study, α-MSH, instead of being delivered extracellularly, is targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of neuronal cells and cultured hypothalamic neurons. We find that the ER-targeted agonist associates with MC4R at this location, is transported to the cell surface, induces constant cAMP and AMP kinase signaling at maximal amplitude, abolishes desensitization of the receptor, and promotes both cell-surface expression and constant signaling by an obesity-linked MC4R variant, I316S, that otherwise is retained in the ER. Formation of the MC4R/agonist complex in the ER stabilizes the receptor in an active conformation that at the cell surface is insensitive to antagonism by AgRP and at the endosomes is refractory to routing to the lysosomes. The data indicate that targeting agonists to the ER can stabilize an active conformation of a G protein-coupled receptor that does not become desensitized, suggesting a target for therapy. PMID:24248383

  1. Solvent-Induced Reversal of Activities between Two Closely Related Heterogeneous Catalysts in the Aldol Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Kandel, Kapil; Althaus, Stacey M; Peeraphatdit, Chorthip; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Trewyn, Brian G; Pruski, Marek; Slowing, Igor I

    2013-01-11

    The relative rates of the aldol reaction catalyzed by supported primary and secondary amines can be inverted by 2 orders of magnitude, depending on the use of hexane or water as a solvent. Our analyses suggest that this dramatic shift in the catalytic behavior of the supported amines does not involve differences in reaction mechanism, but is caused by activation of imine to enamine equilibria and stabilization of iminium species. The effects of solvent polarity and acidity were found to be important to the performance of the catalytic reaction. This study highlights the critical role of solvent in multicomponent heterogeneous catalytic processes.

  2. Swift/XRT detection of another active X-ray transient close to Sgr A*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degenaar, N.; Reynolds, M. T.; Wijnands, R.; Miller, J. M.; Kennea, J. A.; Ponti, G.; Haggard, D.; Gehrels, N.

    2016-06-01

    Daily monitoring observations of the Galactic center performed with the Swift/XRT (Degenaar et al. 2015) have revealed activity of a new X-ray transient located ~10" South of Sgr A*. This object is clearly detected during three consecutive ~0.9 ks PC mode observations performed on 2016 May 28 and 30, and June 1. The 0.3-10 keV count rate has risen from ~2E-2 to ~0.1 counts/s between those observations.

  3. Close, but no garlic: Perceptuomotor and event knowledge activation during language comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Amsel, Ben D.; DeLong, Katherine A.; Kutas, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has shown that language comprehension is guided by knowledge about the organization of objects and events in long-term memory. We use event-related brain potentials (ERPs) to determine the extent to which perceptuomotor object knowledge and event knowledge are immediately activated during incremental language processing. Event-related but anomalous sentence continuations preceded by single-sentence event descriptions elicited reduced N400s, despite their poor fit within local sentence contexts. Anomalous words sharing particular sensory or motor attributes with contextually expected words also elicited reduced N400s, despite being inconsistent with global context (i.e., event information). We rule out plausibility as an explanation for both relatedness effects. We show that perceptuomotor-related facilitation is not due to lexical priming between words in the local context and the target or to associative or categorical relationships between expected and unexpected targets. Overall our results are consistent with the immediate and incremental activation of perceptual and motor object knowledge and generalized event knowledge during sentence processing. PMID:25897182

  4. Complex domain interactions regulate stability and activity of closely related proneural transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    McDowell, Gary S.; Hardwick, Laura J.A.; Philpott, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Characterising post-translational regulation of key transcriptional activators is crucial for understanding how cell division and differentiation are coordinated in developing organisms and cycling cells. One important mode of protein post-translational control is by regulation of half-life via ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. Two key basic Helix-Loop-Helix transcription factors, Neurogenin 2 (Ngn2) and NeuroD, play central roles in development of the central nervous system but despite their homology, Ngn2 is a highly unstable protein whilst NeuroD is, by comparison, very stable. The basis for and the consequences of the difference in stability of these two structurally and functionally related proteins has not been explored. Here we see that ubiquitylation alone does not determine Ngn2 or NeuroD stability. By making chimeric proteins, we see that the N-terminus of NeuroD in particular has a stabilising effect, whilst despite their high levels of homology, the most conserved bHLH domains of these proneural proteins alone can confer significant changes in protein stability. Despite widely differing stabilities of Ngn2, NeuroD and the chimeric proteins composed of domains of both, there is little correlation between protein half-life and ability to drive neuronal differentiation. Therefore, we conclude that despite significant homology between Ngn2 and NeuroD, the regulation of their stability differs markedly and moreover, stability/instability of the proteins is not a direct correlate of their activity. PMID:24998442

  5. Evaluation of surface contamination with cyclophosphamide following simulated hazardous drug preparation activities using two closed-system products

    PubMed Central

    Zock, Matthew D; Soefje, Scott; Rickabaugh, Keith

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. A preliminary investigation was conducted to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of two closed-system products in preventing contamination of typical pharmacy workplace surfaces with cyclophosphamide during simulated hazardous drug preparation activities in a controlled laboratory setting. Methods. Two separate trials simulating hazardous drug compounding using cyclophosphamide were performed with two different closed-system products. Prior to each trial, work area surfaces of the biological safety cabinet (BSC) workbench, the BSC airfoil and front grill, and the floor below the BSC were cleaned, and wipe samples were collected and analyzed to determine, if present, levels of cyclophosphamide. Following each trial, wipe samples were collected from the work area surfaces to determine the hazardous drug containment effectiveness of each closed-system product. Results. Cyclophosphamide was not detected on work area surfaces prior to each trial. Low levels were detected on the BSC workbench surface following both trials. Discussion. Based on the limited number of samples obtained during this preliminary study and the determination of the presence of the chemical of interest on the drug vials, no statistical evaluation was performed to compare the relative effectiveness of the two systems tested. Work practices and procedures regarding product operation may affect hazardous drug containment and worker safety. Further study and statistical analyses are needed. PMID:20584743

  6. Fake conformal symmetry in conformal cosmological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackiw, R.; Pi, So-Young

    2015-03-01

    We examine the local conformal invariance (Weyl invariance) in tensor-scalar theories used in recently proposed conformal cosmological models. We show that the Noether currents associated with Weyl invariance in these theories vanish. We assert that the corresponding Weyl symmetry does not have any dynamical role.

  7. Near Infrared Activity Close to the Crab Pulsar Correlated with Giant Gamma-ray Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudy, Alexander R.; Max, Claire E.; Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2014-01-01

    We describe activity observed in the near-infrared correlated with a giant gamma-ray flare in the Crab Pulsar. The Crab Pulsar has been observed by the Fermi and AGILE satellites to flare for a period of 3 to 7 days, once every 1-1.5 years, increasing in brightness by a factor of 3-10 between 100MeV and 1GeV. We used Keck NIRC2 laser guide star adaptive optics imaging to observe the Crab Pulsar and environs before and during the March 2013 flare. We discuss the evidence for the knot as the location of the flares, and the theoretical implications of these observations. Ongoing target-of-opportunity programs hope to confirm this correlation for future flares.

  8. Rational design and validation of an anti-protein kinase C active-state specific antibody based on conformational changes

    PubMed Central

    Pena, Darlene Aparecida; Andrade, Victor Piana de; Silva, Gabriela Ávila Fernandes; Neves, José Ivanildo; Oliveira, Paulo Sergio Lopes de; Alves, Maria Julia Manso; Devi, Lakshmi A.; Schechtman, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) plays a regulatory role in key pathways in cancer. However, since phosphorylation is a step for classical PKC (cPKC) maturation and does not correlate with activation, there is a lack of tools to detect active PKC in tissue samples. Here, a structure-based rational approach was used to select a peptide to generate an antibody that distinguishes active from inactive cPKC. A peptide conserved in all cPKCs, C2Cat, was chosen since modeling studies based on a crystal structure of PKCβ showed that it is localized at the interface between the C2 and catalytic domains of cPKCs in an inactive kinase. Anti-C2Cat recognizes active cPKCs at least two-fold better than inactive kinase in ELISA and immunoprecipitation assays, and detects the temporal dynamics of cPKC activation upon receptor or phorbol stimulation. Furthermore, the antibody is able to detect active PKC in human tissue. Higher levels of active cPKC were observed in the more aggressive triple negative breast cancer tumors as compared to the less aggressive estrogen receptor positive tumors. Thus, this antibody represents a reliable, hitherto unavailable and a valuable tool to study PKC activation in cells and tissues. Similar structure-based rational design strategies can be broadly applied to obtain active-state specific antibodies for other signal transduction molecules. PMID:26911897

  9. Rational design and validation of an anti-protein kinase C active-state specific antibody based on conformational changes.

    PubMed

    Pena, Darlene Aparecida; Andrade, Victor Piana de; Silva, Gabriela Ávila Fernandes; Neves, José Ivanildo; Oliveira, Paulo Sergio Lopes de; Alves, Maria Julia Manso; Devi, Lakshmi A; Schechtman, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) plays a regulatory role in key pathways in cancer. However, since phosphorylation is a step for classical PKC (cPKC) maturation and does not correlate with activation, there is a lack of tools to detect active PKC in tissue samples. Here, a structure-based rational approach was used to select a peptide to generate an antibody that distinguishes active from inactive cPKC. A peptide conserved in all cPKCs, C2Cat, was chosen since modeling studies based on a crystal structure of PKCβ showed that it is localized at the interface between the C2 and catalytic domains of cPKCs in an inactive kinase. Anti-C2Cat recognizes active cPKCs at least two-fold better than inactive kinase in ELISA and immunoprecipitation assays, and detects the temporal dynamics of cPKC activation upon receptor or phorbol stimulation. Furthermore, the antibody is able to detect active PKC in human tissue. Higher levels of active cPKC were observed in the more aggressive triple negative breast cancer tumors as compared to the less aggressive estrogen receptor positive tumors. Thus, this antibody represents a reliable, hitherto unavailable and a valuable tool to study PKC activation in cells and tissues. Similar structure-based rational design strategies can be broadly applied to obtain active-state specific antibodies for other signal transduction molecules. PMID:26911897

  10. Comparative Study of Two Box H/ACA Ribonucleoprotein Pseudouridine-Synthases: Relation between Conformational Dynamics of the Guide RNA, Enzyme Assembly and Activity

    PubMed Central

    Leclerc, Fabrice; Branlant, Christiane; Charpentier, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Multiple RNA-guided pseudouridine synthases, H/ACA ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs) which contain a guide RNA and four proteins, catalyze site-specific post-transcriptional isomerization of uridines into pseudouridines in substrate RNAs. In archaeal particles, the guide small RNA (sRNA) is anchored by the pseudouridine synthase aCBF5 and the ribosomal protein L7Ae. Protein aNOP10 interacts with both aCBF5 and L7Ae. The fourth protein, aGAR1, interacts with aCBF5 and enhances catalytic efficiency. Here, we compared the features of two H/ACA sRNAs, Pab21 and Pab91, from Pyrococcus abyssi. We found that aCBF5 binds much more weakly to Pab91 than to Pab21. Surprisingly, the Pab91 sRNP exhibits a higher catalytic efficiency than the Pab21 sRNP. We thus investigated the molecular basis of the differential efficiencies observed for the assembly and catalytic activity of the two enzymes. For this, we compared profiles of the extent of lead-induced cleavages in these sRNAs during a stepwise reconstitution of the sRNPs, and analyzed the impact of the absence of the aNOP10–L7Ae interaction. Such probing experiments indicated that the sRNAs undergo a series of conformational changes upon RNP assembly. These changes were also evaluated directly by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, a tool highly adapted to analyzing RNA conformational dynamics. In addition, our results reveal that the conformation of helix P1 formed at the base of the H/ACA sRNAs is optimized in Pab21 for efficient aCBF5 binding and RNP assembly. Moreover, P1 swapping improved the assembly of the Pab91 sRNP. Nonetheless, efficient aCBF5 binding probably also relies on the pseudouridylation pocket which is not optimized for high activity in the case of Pab21. PMID:23922977

  11. Adsorption of enzymes to stimuli-responsive polymer brushes: Influence of brush conformation on adsorbed amount and biocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Meike; Bittrich, Eva; König, Ulla; Rajeev, Bhadra Lakshmi; Müller, Martin; Eichhorn, Klaus-Jochen; Thomas, Sabu; Stamm, Manfred; Uhlmann, Petra

    2016-10-01

    Polyelectrolyte brushes can be utilized to immobilize enzymes on macroscopic surfaces. This report investigates the influence of the pH value of the surrounding medium on the amount and the activity of enzymes adsorbed to poly(2-vinylpyridine) and poly(acrylic acid) brushes, as well as the creation of thermoresponsive biocatalytically active coatings via the adsorption of enzymes onto a mixed brush consisting of a polyelectrolyte and temperature-sensitive poly(N-isopropylacryl amide). Spectroscopic ellipsometry and attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy are used to monitor the adsorption process. Additionally, infrared spectra are evaluated in terms of the secondary structure of the enzymes. Glucose oxidase is used as a model enzyme, where the enzymatic activity is measured after different adsorption conditions. Poly(acrylic acid) brushes generally adsorb larger amounts of enzyme, while less glucose oxidase is found on poly(2-vinylpyridine), which however exhibits higher specific activity. This difference in activity could be attributed to a difference in secondary structure of the adsorbed enzyme. For glucose oxidase adsorbed to mixed brushes, switching of enzymatic activity between an active state at 20°C and a less active state at 40°C as compared to the free enzyme in solution is observed. However, this switching is strongly depending on pH in mixed brushes of poly(acrylic acid) and poly(N-isopropylacryl amide) due to interactions between the polymers. PMID:27447452

  12. The Evolutionary Conformation from Traditional Lecture to Active Learning in an Undergraduate Biology Course and Its Effects on Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diederich, Kirsten Bakke

    2010-01-01

    In response to the declining number of students in the United States entering into the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) disciplines, there has been an attempt to retain student interest in the sciences through the implementation of more active learning in the classroom. Active learning is defined as any instructional method that…

  13. alpha-lytic protease can exist in two separately stable conformations with different His57 mobilities and catalytic activities.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Kristin Coffman; Sudmeier, James L; Bachovchin, Daniel A; Bachovchin, William W

    2005-01-25

    alpha-Lytic protease is a bacterial serine protease widely studied as a model system of enzyme catalysis. Here we report that lyophilization induces a structural change in the enzyme that is not reversed by redissolution in water. The structural change reduces the mobility of the active-site histidine residue and the catalytic activity of the enzyme. The application of mild pressure to solutions of the altered enzyme reverses the lyophilization-induced structural change and restores the mobility of the histidine residue and the enzyme's catalytic activity. This effect of lyophilization permits a unique opportunity for investigating the relationship between histidine ring dynamics and catalytic activity. The results demonstrate that His57 in resting enzymes is more mobile than previously thought, especially when protonated. The histidine motion and its correlation to enzyme activity lend support to the reaction-driven ring flip hypothesis. PMID:15657134

  14. α-Lytic protease can exist in two separately stable conformations with different His57 mobilities and catalytic activities

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Kristin Coffman; Sudmeier, James L.; Bachovchin, Daniel A.; Bachovchin, William W.

    2005-01-01

    α-Lytic protease is a bacterial serine protease widely studied as a model system of enzyme catalysis. Here we report that lyophilization induces a structural change in the enzyme that is not reversed by redissolution in water. The structural change reduces the mobility of the active-site histidine residue and the catalytic activity of the enzyme. The application of mild pressure to solutions of the altered enzyme reverses the lyophilization-induced structural change and restores the mobility of the histidine residue and the enzyme's catalytic activity. This effect of lyophilization permits a unique opportunity for investigating the relationship between histidine ring dynamics and catalytic activity. The results demonstrate that His57 in resting enzymes is more mobile than previously thought, especially when protonated. The histidine motion and its correlation to enzyme activity lend support to the reaction-driven ring flip hypothesis. PMID:15657134

  15. Probing the interaction induced conformation transitions in acid phosphatase with cobalt ferrite nanoparticles: Relation to inhibition and bio-activity of Chlorella vulgaris acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Farooq; Zhou, Xing; Yao, Hongzhou; Zhou, Ying; Xu, Chao

    2016-09-01

    The present study explored the interaction and kinetics of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (NPs) with acid phosphatase (ACP) by utilizing diverse range of spectroscopic techniques. The results corroborate, the CoFe2O4 NPs cause fluorescence quenching in ACP by static quenching mechanism. The negative values of van't Hoff thermodynamic expressions (ΔH=-0.3293Jmol(-1)K(-1) and ΔG=-3.960kJmol(-1)K(-1)) corroborate the spontaneity and exothermic nature of static quenching. The positive value of ΔS (13.2893Jmol(-1)K(-1)) corroborate that major contributors of higher and stronger binding affinity among CoFe2O4 NPs with ACP were electrostatic. In addition, FTIR, UV-CD, UV-vis spectroscopy and three dimensional fluorescence (3D) techniques confirmed that CoFe2O4 NPs binding induces microenvironment perturbations leading to secondary and tertiary conformation changes in ACP to a great extent. Furthermore, synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) affirmed the comparatively significant changes in microenvironment around tryptophan (Trp) residue by CoFe2O4 NPs. The effect of CoFe2O4 NPs on the activation kinetics of ACP was further examined in Chlorella vulgaris. Apparent Michaelis constant (Km) values of 0.57 and 26.5mM with activation energy values of 0.538 and 3.428kJmol(-1) were determined without and with 200μM CoFe2O4 NPs. Apparent Vmax value of -7Umml(-1) corroborate that enzyme active sites were completely captured by the NPs leaving no space for the substrate. The results confirmed that CoFe2O4 NPs ceased the activity by unfolding of ACP enzyme. This suggests CoFe2O4 NPs perturbed the enzyme activity by transitions in conformation and hence the metabolic activity of ACP. This study provides the pavement for novel and simple approach of using sensitive biomarkers for sensing NPs in environment. PMID:27209386

  16. How Can Active Region Plasma Escape into the Solar Wind from Below a Closed Helmet Streamer?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandrini, C. H.; Nuevo, F. A.; Vásquez, A. M.; Démoulin, P.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Baker, D.; Culhane, J. L.; Cristiani, G. D.; Pick, M.

    2014-11-01

    Recent studies show that active-region (AR) upflowing plasma, observed by the EUV-Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) onboard Hinode, can gain access to open-field lines and be released into the solar wind (SW) via magnetic-interchange reconnection at magnetic null-points in pseudo-streamer configurations. When only one bipolar AR is present on the Sun and is fully covered by the separatrix of a streamer, such as AR 10978 in December 2007, it seems unlikely that the upflowing AR plasma can find its way into the slow SW. However, signatures of plasma with AR composition have been found at 1 AU by Culhane et al. ( Solar Phys. 289, 3799, 2014) that apparently originated west of AR 10978. We present a detailed topology analysis of AR 10978 and the surrounding large-scale corona based on a potential-field source-surface (PFSS) model. Our study shows that it is possible for the AR plasma to move around the streamer separatrix and be released into the SW via magnetic reconnection, which occurs in at least two main steps. We analyse data from the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH) in a search for evidence of the chain of magnetic reconnections that we propose. We find a noise storm above the AR and several varying sources at 150.9 MHz. Their locations suggest that they might be associated with particles accelerated during the first-step reconnection process at a null point well outside of the AR. We find no evidence of the second reconnection step in the radio data, however. Our results demonstrate that even when it appears highly improbable for the AR plasma to reach the SW, indirect channels involving a sequence of reconnections can make it possible.

  17. Non-dimensionalised closed-form parametric analysis of semi-active vehicle suspensions using a quarter-car model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadian, Mehdi; Blanchard, Emmanuel

    2011-02-01

    This article provides a non-dimensionalised closed-form analysis of semi-active vehicle suspensions, using a quarter-car model. The derivation of the closed-form solutions for three indices that can be used for ride comfort, vehicle handling, and stability are presented based on non-dimensionalised suspension parameters. The behaviour of semi-active vehicle suspensions is evaluated using skyhook, groundhook, and hybrid control policies, and compared with passive suspensions. The relationship between vibration isolation, suspension deflection, and road holding is studied, using three performance indices based on the mean square of the sprung mass acceleration, rattle space, and tyre deflection, respectively. The results of the study indicate that the hybrid control policy yields significantly better comfort than a passive suspension, without reducing the road-holding quality or increasing the suspension displacement for typical passenger cars. The results also indicate that for typical passenger cars, the hybrid control policy results in a better compromise between comfort, road holding and suspension travel requirements than both the skyhook and groundhook control methods.

  18. Probing Protein Multidimensional Conformational Fluctuations by Single-Molecule Multiparameter Photon Stamping Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conformational motions of proteins are highly dynamic and intrinsically complex. To capture the temporal and spatial complexity of conformational motions and further to understand their roles in protein functions, an attempt is made to probe multidimensional conformational dynamics of proteins besides the typical one-dimensional FRET coordinate or the projected conformational motions on the one-dimensional FRET coordinate. T4 lysozyme hinge-bending motions between two domains along α-helix have been probed by single-molecule FRET. Nevertheless, the domain motions of T4 lysozyme are rather complex involving multiple coupled nuclear coordinates and most likely contain motions besides hinge-bending. It is highly likely that the multiple dimensional protein conformational motions beyond the typical enzymatic hinged-bending motions have profound impact on overall enzymatic functions. In this report, we have developed a single-molecule multiparameter photon stamping spectroscopy integrating fluorescence anisotropy, FRET, and fluorescence lifetime. This spectroscopic approach enables simultaneous observations of both FRET-related site-to-site conformational dynamics and molecular rotational (or orientational) motions of individual Cy3-Cy5 labeled T4 lysozyme molecules. We have further observed wide-distributed rotational flexibility along orientation coordinates by recording fluorescence anisotropy and simultaneously identified multiple intermediate conformational states along FRET coordinate by monitoring time-dependent donor lifetime, presenting a whole picture of multidimensional conformational dynamics in the process of T4 lysozyme open-close hinge-bending enzymatic turnover motions under enzymatic reaction conditions. By analyzing the autocorrelation functions of both lifetime and anisotropy trajectories, we have also observed the dynamic and static inhomogeneity of T4 lysozyme multidimensional conformational fluctuation dynamics, providing a fundamental

  19. Glucose-induced conformational change in yeast hexokinase.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, W S; Steitz, T A

    1978-01-01

    The A isozyme of yeast hexokinase (ATP:D-hexose 6-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.1) crystallized as a complex with glucose has a conformation that is dramatically different from the conformation of the B isozyme crystallized in the absence of glucose. Comparison of the high-resolution structures shows that one lobe of the molecule is rotated by 12 degrees relative to the other lobe, resulting in movements of as much as 8 A in the polypeptide backbone and closing the cleft between the lobes into which glucose is bound. The conformational change is produced by the binding of glucose (R.C. McDonald, T.A. Steitz, and D.M. Engelman, unpublished data) and is essential for catalysis [Anderson, C.M., Stenkamp, R.E., McDonald, R.C. & Steitz, T.A. (1978) J. Mol. Biol. 123, 207-219] and thus provides an example of induced fit. The surface area of the hexokinase A-glucose complex exposed to solvent is smaller than that of native hexokinase B. By using the change in exposed surface area to estimate the hydrophobic contribution to the free energy changes upon glucose binding, we find that the hydrophobic effect alone favors the active conformation of hexokinase in the presence and absence of sugar. The observed stability of the inactive conformation of the enzyme in the absence of substrates may result from a deficiency of complementary interactions within the cavity that forms when the two lobes close together. PMID:283394

  20. A spectroscopic investigation on the interaction of a magnetic ferrofluid with a model plasma protein: effect on the conformation and activity of the protein.

    PubMed

    Paul, Bijan Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Kaustav; Bose, Subhrangsu; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2012-11-28

    The understanding of the interaction of nanomaterials with relevant biological targets e.g., proteins is of paramount importance in biological and pharmaceutical fields of research. In a biological fluid, proteins can associate with nanomaterials which can subsequently exert a significant impact on the conformation and functionality of the protein. Here we report the binding interaction of a model plasma protein Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) with a magnetic nanoparticle of mixed spinel origin (Ni(0.5)Zn(0.5)Fe(2)O(4), abbreviated as NZFO from now and onwards). The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔS and ΔG) for the protein-nanoparticle binding interaction have been evaluated from the van't Hoff equation to unveil that the binding interaction is enthalpically as well as entropically driven (ΔH < 0 and ΔS > 0), with an overall favorable Gibbs free energy change (ΔG < 0). Also the thermodynamic parameters delineate the predominant role of electrostatic interaction in the BSA-NZFO binding process. The results of temperature dependent fluorescence quenching and time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements indicate a static quenching mechanism in the present case. Steady-state absorption, synchronous fluorescence, three-dimensional (3D) fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic techniques have been employed to unveil the conformational changes in BSA induced by the binding of NZFO. Disruption of the native conformation of the protein upon binding with NZFO is reflected through a reduced functionality (in terms of esterase activity) of the protein-NZFO conjugate system in comparison to the native protein. Based on the experimental findings the probable binding location of NZFO is argued to be the hydrophilic domain IB. This seems physically realizable since domain I of BSA is characterized by a net negative charge and hence can serve as a favorable binding site for NZFO carrying a positive surface charge. The key role of electrostatic forces in the BSA

  1. Ubiquitin vinyl methyl ester binding orients the misaligned active site of the ubiquitin hydrolase UCHL1 into productive conformation

    SciTech Connect

    Boudreaux, David A.; Maiti, Tushar K.; Davies, Christopher W.; Das, Chittaranjan

    2010-07-06

    Ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCHL1) is a Parkinson disease-associated, putative cysteine protease found abundantly and selectively expressed in neurons. The crystal structure of apo UCHL1 showed that the active-site residues are not aligned in a canonical form, with the nucleophilic cysteine being 7.7 {angstrom} from the general base histidine, an arrangement consistent with an inactive form of the enzyme. Here we report the crystal structures of the wild type and two Parkinson disease-associated variants of the enzyme, S18Y and I93M, bound to a ubiquitin-based suicide substrate, ubiquitin vinyl methyl ester. These structures reveal that ubiquitin vinyl methyl ester binds primarily at two sites on the enzyme, with its carboxy terminus at the active site and with its amino-terminal {beta}-hairpin at the distal site - a surface-exposed hydrophobic crevice 17 {angstrom} away from the active site. Binding at the distal site initiates a cascade of side-chain movements in the enzyme that starts at a highly conserved, surface-exposed phenylalanine and is relayed to the active site resulting in the reorientation and proximal placement of the general base within 4 {angstrom} of the catalytic cysteine, an arrangement found in productive cysteine proteases. Mutation of the distal-site, surface-exposed phenylalanine to alanine reduces ubiquitin binding and severely impairs the catalytic activity of the enzyme. These results suggest that the activity of UCHL1 may be regulated by its own substrate.

  2. The evolutionary conformation from traditional lecture to active learning in an undergraduate biology course and its effects on student achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diederich, Kirsten Bakke

    In response to the declining number of students in the United States entering into the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) disciplines, there has been an attempt to retain student interest in the sciences through the implementation of more active learning in the classroom. Active learning is defined as any instructional method that requires students do something in the classroom rather than simply listen to a lecture (Herreid, 2006). These student centered approaches provide the students with the opportunity to work cooperatively while developing the skills required for critical inquiry. They also help the students make the connections between what is being taught and how it can be applied in a real world setting. Science education researchers have attempted to analyze the efficacy of active learning. Although they find it difficult to compare the data, they state unequivocally that "Active learning is a better strategy for learning than the traditional didactic lecture format" (Prince, 2004). However, even though research supports the efficacy of active learning, instructors find it difficult to adopt this pedagogy into their classrooms due to concerns such as loss of content knowledge and student resistance. This three year qualitative and quantitative study addressed the level of student learning and satisfaction in an introductory vertebrate biology class at a small liberal arts college. The courses were taught by the same instructor using three pedagogical methods; traditional lecture (TL), problem-based learning (PBL), and case-based learning (CBL). Student grades and levels of assessment were compared between the TL and PBL, while student attrition rates, course satisfaction and views of active and group learning were analyzed across all three sections. The evolutionary confirmations from TL to PBL and ultimately the adoption of CBL as the method of choice are discussed from the view of both the faculty member and the students.

  3. Study of chaperone-like activity of human haptoglobin: conformational changes under heat shock conditions and localization of interaction sites.

    PubMed

    Ettrich, Rüdiger; Brandt, Wolfgang; Kopecký, Vladimír; Baumruk, Vladimír; Hofbauerová, Katerina; Pavlícek, Zdenek

    2002-10-01

    With respect to the mechanism of chaperone-like activity, we examined the behavior of haptoglobin under heat shock conditions. Secondary structure changes during heat treatment were followed by circular dichroism, Raman and infrared spectroscopy. A model of the haptoglobin tetramer, based on its sequence homology with serine proteases and the CCP modules, has been proposed. Sequence regions responsible for the chaperone-like activity were not fully identical with the region that takes part in formation of the hemoglobin-haptoglobin complex. We can postulate the presence of at least two different chaperone-binding sites on each haptoglobin heavy chain. PMID:12452443

  4. High-dose-rate Three-dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy Combined with Active Breathing Control for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Early-stage Non-small-cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruozheng; Yin, Yong; Qin, Yonghui; Yu, Jinming

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and benefits of using high-dose-rate three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) combined with active breathing control (ABC) for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Eight patients with early-stage NSCLC underwent CT scans under standard free-breathing (FB) and moderately deep inspiration breath-hold (mDIBH) with ABC. Two high-dose-rate 3D-CRT plans (1000 Mu/min) were designed based on the CT scans with FB and mDIBH. The maximal dose (D1%), minimal dose (D99%), conformity index (CI), and homogeneity index (HI) of the planning target volume (PTV), and dose-volume indices of the organs at risk between each plan were compared. The mean PTV volume decreased from 158.04 cm(3) with FB to 76.90 cm(3) with mDIBH (p < 0.05). When mDIBH was used, increases in the affected lung volume (by 47%), contralateral lung volume (by 55%), and total lung volume (by 50%) were observed compared to FB (p < 0.05). The V5-V40 of the affected lung (Vx represented the percentage volume of organs receiving at least the x Gy), V5-V40 and the mean dose for the total lung, V5-V40 and mean dose of the chest wall, and the maximum dose of the spinal cord were less for mDIBH than FB (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in CI, HI, D1%, or D99% for the PTV between the plans. In conclusion, high-dose-rate 3D-CRT combined with ABC reduced the radiation dose to the lungs and chest wall without affecting the dose distribution in SBRT of early-stage NSCLC patients. PMID:24988055

  5. Interaction of Rio1 Kinase with Toyocamycin Reveals a Conformational Switch That Controls Oligomeric State and Catalytic Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kiburu, Irene N.; LaRonde-LeBlanc, Nicole

    2012-10-10

    Rio1 kinase is an essential ribosome-processing factor required for proper maturation of 40 S ribosomal subunit. Although its structure is known, several questions regarding its functional remain to be addressed. We report that both Archaeoglobus fulgidus and human Rio1 bind more tightly to an adenosine analog, toyocamycin, than to ATP. Toyocamycin has antibiotic, antiviral and cytotoxic properties, and is known to inhibit ribosome biogenesis, specifically the maturation of 40 S. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of toyocamycin bound to Rio1 at 2.0 {angstrom} and demonstrated that toyocamycin binds in the ATP binding pocket of the protein. Despite this, measured steady state kinetics were inconsistent with strict competitive inhibition by toyocamycin. In analyzing this interaction, we discovered that Rio1 is capable of accessing multiple distinct oligomeric states and that toyocamycin may inhibit Rio1 by stabilizing a less catalytically active oligomer. We also present evidence of substrate inhibition by high concentrations of ATP for both archaeal and human Rio1. Oligomeric state studies show both proteins access a higher order oligomeric state in the presence of ATP. The study revealed that autophosphorylation by Rio1 reduces oligomer formation and promotes monomerization, resulting in the most active species. Taken together, these results suggest the activity of Rio1 may be modulated by regulating its oligomerization properties in a conserved mechanism, identifies the first ribosome processing target of toyocamycin and presents the first small molecule inhibitor of Rio1 kinase activity.

  6. Conformational coupling between the active site and residues within the KC-channel of the Vibrio cholerae cbb3-type (C-family) oxygen reductase

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Young O.; Mahinthichaichan, Paween; Lee, Hyun Ju; Ouyang, Hanlin; Kaluka, Daniel; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Arjona, Davinia; Rousseau, Denis L.; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Ädelroth, Pia; Gennis, Robert B.

    2014-01-01

    The respiratory chains of nearly all aerobic organisms are terminated by proton-pumping heme-copper oxygen reductases (HCOs). Previous studies have established that C-family HCOs contain a single channel for uptake from the bacterial cytoplasm of all chemical and pumped protons, and that the entrance of the KC-channel is a conserved glutamate in subunit III. However, the majority of the KC-channel is within subunit I, and the pathway from this conserved glutamate to subunit I is not evident. In the present study, molecular dynamics simulations were used to characterize a chain of water molecules leading from the cytoplasmic solution, passing the conserved glutamate in subunit III and extending into subunit I. Formation of the water chain, which controls the delivery of protons to the KC-channel, was found to depend on the conformation of Y241Vc, located in subunit I at the interface with subunit III. Mutations of Y241Vc (to A/F/H/S) in the Vibrio cholerae cbb3 eliminate catalytic activity, but also cause perturbations that propagate over a 28-Å distance to the active site heme b3. The data suggest a linkage between residues lining the KC-channel and the active site of the enzyme, possibly mediated by transmembrane helix α7, which contains both Y241Vc and the active site cross-linked Y255Vc, as well as two CuB histidine ligands. Other mutations of residues within or near helix α7 also perturb the active site, indicating that this helix is involved in modulation of the active site of the enzyme. PMID:25288772

  7. Oil removal and effects of spilled oil on active microbial communities in close to salt-saturation brines.

    PubMed

    Corsellis, Yannick Y; Krasovec, Marc M; Sylvi, Léa L; Cuny, Philippe P; Militon, Cécile C

    2016-05-01

    Abiotic and biotic processes associated with the degradation of a light petroleum in brines close to the salt-saturation (~31 %) and the effect of labile organic matter (LOM) supply (casaminoacids/citrate; 0.2 and 0.1 % w/v, respectively) were followed during an incubation of 30 days. After 4-week incubation at 40 °C under light/dark cycles, a 24 % of abiotic degradation was observed in untreated brines. The stimulation of native brines community with LOM addition allowed an additional 12.8 % oil attenuation due to biodegradation processes. Successional changes in the active microbial community structure due to the oil contamination (16S rRNA DGGE approach) showed the selection of one phylotype affiliated to Salinibacter and the disappearance of Haloquadratum walsbyi in untreated brines. In LOM-amended microcosms, phylotypes related to Salinibacter, Haloarcula, Haloterrigena and Halorhabdus were selected. An effect of hydrocarbon contamination was only observed in the bacterial community with the inhibition of two dominant proteobacterial phylotypes. This study further confirms that short-term and moderate oil biodegradation is possible in LOM-stimulated brines. Biodegradation should be much more reduced under in situ conditions. Self-cleaning capacities of close to saturation hypersaline lakes appears, therefore very limited compared to non-extreme haline environments. PMID:26955981

  8. A Comparative Analysis between Active and Passive Techniques for Underwater 3D Reconstruction of Close-Range Objects

    PubMed Central

    Bianco, Gianfranco; Gallo, Alessandro; Bruno, Fabio; Muzzupappa, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    In some application fields, such as underwater archaeology or marine biology, there is the need to collect three-dimensional, close-range data from objects that cannot be removed from their site. In particular, 3D imaging techniques are widely employed for close-range acquisitions in underwater environment. In this work we have compared in water two 3D imaging techniques based on active and passive approaches, respectively, and whole-field acquisition. The comparison is performed under poor visibility conditions, produced in the laboratory by suspending different quantities of clay in a water tank. For a fair comparison, a stereo configuration has been adopted for both the techniques, using the same setup, working distance, calibration, and objects. At the moment, the proposed setup is not suitable for real world applications, but it allowed us to conduct a preliminary analysis on the performances of the two techniques and to understand their capability to acquire 3D points in presence of turbidity. The performances have been evaluated in terms of accuracy and density of the acquired 3D points. Our results can be used as a reference for further comparisons in the analysis of other 3D techniques and algorithms. PMID:23966193

  9. A comparative analysis between active and passive techniques for underwater 3D reconstruction of close-range objects.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Gianfranco; Gallo, Alessandro; Bruno, Fabio; Muzzupappa, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    In some application fields, such as underwater archaeology or marine biology, there is the need to collect three-dimensional, close-range data from objects that cannot be removed from their site. In particular, 3D imaging techniques are widely employed for close-range acquisitions in underwater environment. In this work we have compared in water two 3D imaging techniques based on active and passive approaches, respectively, and whole-field acquisition. The comparison is performed under poor visibility conditions, produced in the laboratory by suspending different quantities of clay in a water tank. For a fair comparison, a stereo configuration has been adopted for both the techniques, using the same setup, working distance, calibration, and objects. At the moment, the proposed setup is not suitable for real world applications, but it allowed us to conduct a preliminary analysis on the performances of the two techniques and to understand their capability to acquire 3D points in presence of turbidity. The performances have been evaluated in terms of accuracy and density of the acquired 3D points. Our results can be used as a reference for further comparisons in the analysis of other 3D techniques and algorithms. PMID:23966193

  10. Conformational dynamics through an intermediate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garai, Ashok; Zhang, Yaojun; Dudko, Olga K.

    2014-04-01

    The self-assembly of biological and synthetic nanostructures commonly proceeds via intermediate states. In living systems in particular, the intermediates have the capacity to tilt the balance between functional and potentially fatal behavior. This work develops a statistical mechanical treatment of conformational dynamics through an intermediate under a variable force. An analytical solution is derived for the key experimentally measurable quantity—the distribution of forces at which a conformational transition occurs. The solution reveals rich kinetics over a broad range of parameters and enables one to locate the intermediate and extract the activation barriers and rate constants.

  11. Effects of high hydrostatic pressure treatments on haemagglutination activity and structural conformations of phytohemagglutinin from red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Liu, Cencen; Zhao, Mouming; Sun, Weizheng; Ren, Jiaoyan

    2013-02-15

    Red kidney beans were subjected to high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment (50, 150, 250, 350, 450 MPa) and phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) was then extracted by affinity chromatography. It appeared that HHP treatment could increase crude extract yield and decrease its haemagglutination activity. For purified samples, PHA yield was not affected at pressures <450 MPa while the haemagglutination activity was noticeably reduced at 450 MPa. The structural changes were investigated using electrophoresis, size exclusion chromatography (SEC), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and differencial scanning calorimetry (DSC). Electrophoresis and SEC profiles revealed a new high molecular weight polymer after 450 MPa treatment. At pressures <450 MPa, FTIR showed an increase in β-sheet structure and a decrease in α-helix. At 450 MPa, the bands at 1688 cm(-1), representing aggregate strands and random coils, increased. The conclusions are that pressures <450 MPa can cause PHA unfolding and induce PHA aggregation at 450 MPa. PMID:23194535

  12. The effect of tensile stress on the conformational free energy landscape of disulfide bonds.

    PubMed

    Anjukandi, Padmesh; Dopieralski, Przemyslaw; Ribas-Arino, Jordi; Marx, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    Disulfide bridges are no longer considered to merely stabilize protein structure, but are increasingly recognized to play a functional role in many regulatory biomolecular processes. Recent studies have uncovered that the redox activity of native disulfides depends on their C-C-S-S dihedrals, χ2 and χ'2. Moreover, the interplay of chemical reactivity and mechanical stress of disulfide switches has been recently elucidated using force-clamp spectroscopy and computer simulation. The χ2 and χ'2 angles have been found to change from conformations that are open to nucleophilic attack to sterically hindered, so-called closed states upon exerting tensile stress. In view of the growing evidence of the importance of C-C-S-S dihedrals in tuning the reactivity of disulfides, here we present a systematic study of the conformational diversity of disulfides as a function of tensile stress. With the help of force-clamp metadynamics simulations, we show that tensile stress brings about a large stabilization of the closed conformers, thereby giving rise to drastic changes in the conformational free energy landscape of disulfides. Statistical analysis shows that native TDi, DO and interchain Ig protein disulfides prefer open conformations, whereas the intrachain disulfide bridges in Ig proteins favor closed conformations. Correlating mechanical stress with the distance between the two a-carbons of the disulfide moiety reveals that the strain of intrachain Ig protein disulfides corresponds to a mechanical activation of about 100 pN. Such mechanical activation leads to a severalfold increase of the rate of the elementary redox S(N)2 reaction step. All these findings constitute a step forward towards achieving a full understanding of functional disulfides. PMID:25286308

  13. The Effect of Tensile Stress on the Conformational Free Energy Landscape of Disulfide Bonds

    PubMed Central

    Anjukandi, Padmesh; Dopieralski, Przemyslaw; Ribas–Arino, Jordi; Marx, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    Disulfide bridges are no longer considered to merely stabilize protein structure, but are increasingly recognized to play a functional role in many regulatory biomolecular processes. Recent studies have uncovered that the redox activity of native disulfides depends on their C–C–S–S dihedrals, and . Moreover, the interplay of chemical reactivity and mechanical stress of disulfide switches has been recently elucidated using force–clamp spectroscopy and computer simulation. The and angles have been found to change from conformations that are open to nucleophilic attack to sterically hindered, so–called closed states upon exerting tensile stress. In view of the growing evidence of the importance of C–C–S–S dihedrals in tuning the reactivity of disulfides, here we present a systematic study of the conformational diversity of disulfides as a function of tensile stress. With the help of force-clamp metadynamics simulations, we show that tensile stress brings about a large stabilization of the closed conformers, thereby giving rise to drastic changes in the conformational free energy landscape of disulfides. Statistical analysis shows that native TDi, DO and interchain Ig protein disulfides prefer open conformations, whereas the intrachain disulfide bridges in Ig proteins favor closed conformations. Correlating mechanical stress with the distance between the two –carbons of the disulfide moiety reveals that the strain of intrachain Ig protein disulfides corresponds to a mechanical activation of about 100 pN. Such mechanical activation leads to a severalfold increase of the rate of the elementary redox reaction step. All these findings constitute a step forward towards achieving a full understanding of functional disulfides. PMID:25286308

  14. EBV latency types adopt alternative chromatin conformations.

    PubMed

    Tempera, Italo; Klichinsky, Michael; Lieberman, Paul M

    2011-07-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) can establish latent infections with distinct gene expression patterns referred to as latency types. These different latency types are epigenetically stable and correspond to different promoter utilization. Here we explore the three-dimensional conformations of the EBV genome in different latency types. We employed Chromosome Conformation Capture (3C) assay to investigate chromatin loop formation between the OriP enhancer and the promoters that determine type I (Qp) or type III (Cp) gene expression. We show that OriP is in close physical proximity to Qp in type I latency, and to Cp in type III latency. The cellular chromatin insulator and boundary factor CTCF was implicated in EBV chromatin loop formation. Combining 3C and ChIP assays we found that CTCF is physically associated with OriP-Qp loop formation in type I and OriP-Cp loop formation in type III latency. Mutations in the CTCF binding site located at Qp disrupt loop formation between Qp and OriP, and lead to the activation of Cp transcription. Mutation of the CTCF binding site at Cp, as well as siRNA depletion of CTCF eliminates both OriP-associated loops, indicating that CTCF plays an integral role in loop formation. These data indicate that epigenetically stable EBV latency types adopt distinct chromatin architectures that depend on CTCF and mediate alternative promoter targeting by the OriP enhancer. PMID:21829357

  15. Effect of control surface mass unbalance on the stability of a closed-loop active control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.

    1989-01-01

    The effects on stability of inertial forces arising from closed-loop activation of mass-unbalanced control surfaces are studied analytically using inertial energy approach, similar to the aerodynamic energy approach used for flutter suppression. The limitations of a single control surface like a leading-edge (LE) control or a trailing-edge (TE) control are demonstrated and compared to the superior combined LE-TE mass unbalanced system. It is shown that a spanwise section for sensor location can be determined which ensures minimum sensitivity to the mode shapes of the aircraft. It is shown that an LE control exhibits compatibility between inertial stabilization and aerodynamic stabilization, and that a TE control lacks such compatibility. The results of the present work should prove valuable, both for the purpose of flutter suppression using mass unbalanced control surfaces, or for the stabilization of structural modes of large space structures by means of inertial forces.

  16. Citicoline protects brain against closed head injury in rats through suppressing oxidative stress and calpain over-activation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Ke; Gu, Yi; Zhao, Yumei; Li, Zhenzong; Sun, Ming

    2014-07-01

    Citicoline, a natural compound that functions as an intermediate in the biosynthesis of cell membrane phospholipids, is essential for membrane integrity and repair. It has been reported to protect brain against trauma. This study was designed to investigate the protective effects of citicoline on closed head injury (CHI) in rats. Citicoline (250 mg/kg i.v. 30 min and 4 h after CHI) lessened body weight loss, and improved neurological functions significantly at 7 days after CHI. It markedly lowered brain edema and blood-brain barrier permeability, enhanced the activities of superoxide dismutase and the levels of glutathione, reduced the levels of malondialdehyde and lactic acid. Moreover, citicoline suppressed the activities of calpain, and enhanced the levels of calpastatin, myelin basic protein and αII-spectrin in traumatic tissue 24 h after CHI. Also, it attenuated the axonal and myelin sheath damage in corpus callosum and the neuronal cell death in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 subfields 7 days after CHI. These data demonstrate the protection of citicoline against white matter and grey matter damage due to CHI through suppressing oxidative stress and calpain over-activation, providing additional support to the application of citicoline for the treatment of traumatic brain injury. PMID:24691765

  17. Activation and Transformation of Ethane by Au2 VO3(+) Clusters with Closed-Shell Electronic Structures.

    PubMed

    Li, Ya-Ke; Li, Zi-Yu; Zhao, Yan-Xia; Liu, Qing-Yu; Meng, Jing-Heng; He, Sheng-Gui

    2016-01-26

    The study of chemical reactions between gold-containing heteronuclear oxide clusters and small molecules can provide molecular level mechanisms to understand the excellent activity of gold supported by metal oxides. While the promotion role of gold in alkane transformation was identified in the clusters with atomic oxygen radicals (O(-.)), the role of gold in the systems without O(-.) is not clear. By employing mass spectrometry and quantum chemistry calculations, the reactivity of Au2 VO3(+) clusters with closed-shell electronic structures toward ethane was explored. Both the dehydrogenation and ethene elimination channels were identified. It is gold rather than oxygen species initiating the C-H activation. The Au-Au dimer formed during the reactions plays important roles in ethane transformation. The reactivity comparison between Au2 VO3(+) and bare Au2(+) demonstrates that Au2 VO3(+) not only retains the property of bare Au2(+) that transforming ethane to dihydrogen, but also exhibits new functions in converting ethane to ethene, which reveals the importance of the composite system. This study provides a further understanding of the reactivity of metal oxide supported gold in alkane activation and transformation. PMID:26679978

  18. Global attractors of complete conformal foliations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukova, Nina I

    2012-03-31

    We prove that every complete conformal foliation (M,F) of codimension q{>=}3 is either Riemannian or a (Conf(S{sup q}), S{sup q})-foliation. We further prove that if (M,F) is not Riemannian, it has a global attractor which is either a nontrivial minimal set or a closed leaf or a union of two closed leaves. In this theorem we do not assume that the manifold M is compact. In particular, every proper conformal non-Riemannian foliation (M,F) has a global attractor which is either a closed leaf or a union of two closed leaves, and the space of all nonclosed leaves is a connected q-dimensional orbifold. We show that every countable group of conformal transformations of the sphere S{sup q} can be realized as the global holonomy group of a complete conformal foliation. Examples of complete conformal foliations with exceptional and exotic minimal sets as global attractors are constructed. Bibliography: 20 titles.

  19. Closed bore XMR (CBXMR) systems for aortic valve replacement: active magnetic shielding of x-ray tubes.

    PubMed

    Bracken, John A; DeCrescenzo, Giovanni; Komljenovic, Philip; Lillaney, Prasheel V; Fahrig, Rebecca; Rowlands, J A

    2009-05-01

    Hybrid closed bore x-ray/MRI systems are being developed to improve the safety and efficacy of percutaneous aortic valve replacement procedures by harnessing the complementary strengths of the x-ray and MRI modalities in a single interventional suite without requiring patient transfer between two rooms. These systems are composed of an x-ray C-arm in close proximity (approximately 1 m) to an MRI scanner. The MRI magnetic fringe field can cause the electron beam in the x-ray tube to deflect. The deflection causes the x-ray field of view to shift position on the detector receptacle. This could result in unnecessary radiation exposure to the patient and the staff in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Therefore, the electron beam deflection must be corrected. The authors developed an active magnetic shielding system that can correct for electron beam deflection to within an accuracy of 5% without truncating the field of view or increasing exposure to the patient. This system was able to automatically adjust to different field strengths as the external magnetic field acting on the x-ray tube was changed. Although a small torque was observed on the shielding coils of the active shielding system when they were placed in a magnetic field, this torque will not impact their performance if they are securely mounted on the x-ray tube and the C-arm. The heating of the coils of the shielding system for use in the clinic caused by electric current was found to be slow enough not to require a dedicated cooling system for one percutaneous aortic valve replacement procedure. However, a cooling system will be required if multiple procedures are performed in one session. PMID:19544789

  20. Closed bore XMR (CBXMR) systems for aortic valve replacement: Active magnetic shielding of x-ray tubes

    PubMed Central

    Bracken, John A.; DeCrescenzo, Giovanni; Komljenovic, Philip; Lillaney, Prasheel V.; Fahrig, Rebecca; Rowlands, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    Hybrid closed bore x-ray∕MRI systems are being developed to improve the safety and efficacy of percutaneous aortic valve replacement procedures by harnessing the complementary strengths of the x-ray and MRI modalities in a single interventional suite without requiring patient transfer between two rooms. These systems are composed of an x-ray C-arm in close proximity (≈1 m) to an MRI scanner. The MRI magnetic fringe field can cause the electron beam in the x-ray tube to deflect. The deflection causes the x-ray field of view to shift position on the detector receptacle. This could result in unnecessary radiation exposure to the patient and the staff in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Therefore, the electron beam deflection must be corrected. The authors developed an active magnetic shielding system that can correct for electron beam deflection to within an accuracy of 5% without truncating the field of view or increasing exposure to the patient. This system was able to automatically adjust to different field strengths as the external magnetic field acting on the x-ray tube was changed. Although a small torque was observed on the shielding coils of the active shielding system when they were placed in a magnetic field, this torque will not impact their performance if they are securely mounted on the x-ray tube and the C-arm. The heating of the coils of the shielding system for use in the clinic caused by electric current was found to be slow enough not to require a dedicated cooling system for one percutaneous aortic valve replacement procedure. However, a cooling system will be required if multiple procedures are performed in one session. PMID:19544789

  1. Interactome Analysis Reveals Ezrin Can Adopt Multiple Conformational States*

    PubMed Central

    Viswanatha, Raghuvir; Wayt, Jessica; Ohouo, Patrice Y.; Smolka, Marcus B.; Bretscher, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Ezrin, a member of the ezrin-radixin-moesin family (ERM), is an essential regulator of the structure of microvilli on the apical aspect of epithelial cells. Ezrin provides a linkage between membrane-associated proteins and F-actin, oscillating between active/open and inactive/closed states, and is regulated in part by phosphorylation of a C-terminal threonine. In the open state, ezrin can bind a number of ligands, but in the closed state the ligand-binding sites are inaccessible. In vitro analysis has proposed that there may be a third hyperactivated form of ezrin. To gain a better understanding of ezrin, we conducted an unbiased proteomic analysis of ezrin-binding proteins in an epithelial cell line, Jeg-3. We refined our list of interactors by comparing the interactomes using quantitative mass spectrometry between wild-type ezrin, closed ezrin, open ezrin, and hyperactivated ezrin. The analysis reveals several novel interactors confirmed by their localization to microvilli, as well as a significant class of proteins that bind closed ezrin. Taken together, the data indicate that ezrin can exist in three different conformational states, and different ligands “perceive” ezrin conformational states differently. PMID:24151071

  2. Molecular conformation of the full-length tumor suppressor NF2/Merlin—a small angle neutron scattering study

    PubMed Central

    Khajeh, Jahan Ali; Ju, Jeong Ho; Atchiba, Moussoubaou; Allaire, Marc; Stanley, Christopher; Heller, William T.; Callaway, David J.E.; Bu, Zimei

    2014-01-01

    Summary The tumor suppressor protein Merlin inhibits cell proliferation upon establishing cell-cell contacts. Because Merlin has high sequence similarity to the Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin (ERM) family of proteins, the structural model of ERM protein autoinhibition and cycling between closed/resting and open/active conformational states is often employed to explain Merlin function. However, recent biochemical studies suggest alternative molecular models of Merlin function. Here, we have determined the low resolution molecular structure and binding activity of Merlin and a Merlin(S518D) mutant that mimics the inactivating phosphorylation at S518 using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and binding experiments. SANS shows that in solution both Merlin and Merlin(S518D) adopt a closed conformation, but binding experiments indicate that a significant fraction of either Merlin or Merlin(S518D) is capable of binding to the target protein NHERF1. Upon binding to the phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate lipid, the wild-type Merlin adopts a more open conformation than in solution, but Merlin(S518D) remains in a closed conformation. This study supports a rheostat model of Merlin in NHERF1 binding, and contributes to resolve a controversy about the molecular conformation and binding activity of Merlin. PMID:24882693

  3. Estrogen receptor alpha somatic mutations Y537S and D538G confer breast cancer endocrine resistance by stabilizing the activating function-2 binding conformation

    PubMed Central

    Fanning, Sean W; Mayne, Christopher G; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Carlson, Kathryn E; Martin, Teresa A; Novick, Scott J; Toy, Weiyi; Green, Bradley; Panchamukhi, Srinivas; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Griffin, Patrick R; Shen, Yang; Chandarlapaty, Sarat; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Greene, Geoffrey L

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) gene (ESR1), especially Y537S and D538G, have been linked to acquired resistance to endocrine therapies. Cell-based studies demonstrated that these mutants confer ERα constitutive activity and antiestrogen resistance and suggest that ligand-binding domain dysfunction leads to endocrine therapy resistance. Here, we integrate biophysical and structural biology data to reveal how these mutations lead to a constitutively active and antiestrogen-resistant ERα. We show that these mutant ERs recruit coactivator in the absence of hormone while their affinities for estrogen agonist (estradiol) and antagonist (4-hydroxytamoxifen) are reduced. Further, they confer antiestrogen resistance by altering the conformational dynamics of the loop connecting Helix 11 and Helix 12 in the ligand-binding domain of ERα, which leads to a stabilized agonist state and an altered antagonist state that resists inhibition. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12792.001 PMID:26836308

  4. Metal-induced conformational changes in ZneB suggest an active role of membrane fusion proteins in efflux resistance systems.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, Fabien; Lee, John K; O'Connell, Joseph D; Miercke, Larry J W; Verschueren, Koen H; Srinivasan, Vasundara; Bauvois, Cédric; Govaerts, Cédric; Robbins, Rebecca A; Ruysschaert, Jean-Marie; Stroud, Robert M; Vandenbussche, Guy

    2010-06-15

    Resistance nodulation cell division (RND)-based efflux complexes mediate multidrug and heavy-metal resistance in many Gram-negative bacteria. Efflux of toxic compounds is driven by membrane proton/substrate antiporters (RND protein) in the plasma membrane, linked by a membrane fusion protein (MFP) to an outer-membrane protein. The three-component complex forms an efflux system that spans the entire cell envelope. The MFP is required for the assembly of this complex and is proposed to play an important active role in substrate efflux. To better understand the role of MFPs in RND-driven efflux systems, we chose ZneB, the MFP component of the ZneCAB heavy-metal efflux system from Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34. ZneB is shown to be highly specific for Zn(2+) alone. The crystal structure of ZneB to 2.8 A resolution defines the basis for metal ion binding in the coordination site at a flexible interface between the beta-barrel and membrane proximal domains. The conformational differences observed between the crystal structures of metal-bound and apo forms are monitored in solution by spectroscopy and chromatography. The structural rearrangements between the two states suggest an active role in substrate efflux through metal binding and release. PMID:20534468

  5. Conformational, spectroscopic and nonlinear optical properties of biologically active N,N-dimethyltryptamine molecule: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Öner, Nazmiye; Tamer, Ömer; Avcı, Davut; Atalay, Yusuf

    2014-12-10

    The effective psychoactive properties of N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) known as the near-death molecule have encouraged the imagination of many research disciplines for several decades. Although there is no theoretical study, a number of paper composed by experimental techniques have been reported for DMT molecule. In this study, the molecular modeling of DMT was carried out using B3LYP and HSEh1PBE levels of density functional theory (DFT). Our calculations showed that the energy gap between HOMO and LUMO is low, demonstrating that DMT is a biologically active molecule. Large hyperconjugation interaction energies imply that molecular charge transfer occurs in DMT. Moreover, NLO analysis indicates that DMT can be used an effective NLO material. PMID:24983923

  6. Conformational, spectroscopic and nonlinear optical properties of biologically active N,N-dimethyltryptamine molecule: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öner, Nazmiye; Tamer, Ömer; Avcı, Davut; Atalay, Yusuf

    2014-12-01

    The effective psychoactive properties of N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) known as the near-death molecule have encouraged the imagination of many research disciplines for several decades. Although there is no theoretical study, a number of paper composed by experimental techniques have been reported for DMT molecule. In this study, the molecular modeling of DMT was carried out using B3LYP and HSEh1PBE levels of density functional theory (DFT). Our calculations showed that the energy gap between HOMO and LUMO is low, demonstrating that DMT is a biologically active molecule. Large hyperconjugation interaction energies imply that molecular charge transfer occurs in DMT. Moreover, NLO analysis indicates that DMT can be used an effective NLO material.

  7. Conformational Analysis of the Host-Defense Peptides Pseudhymenochirin-1Pb and -2Pa and Design of Analogues with Insulin-Releasing Activities and Reduced Toxicities.

    PubMed

    Manzo, Giorgia; Scorciapino, Mariano Andrea; Srinivasan, Dinesh; Attoub, Samir; Mangoni, Maria Luisa; Rinaldi, Andrea C; Casu, Mariano; Flatt, Peter R; Conlon, J Michael

    2015-12-24

    Pseudhymenochirin-1Pb (Ps-1Pb; IKIPSFFRNILKKVGKEAVSLIAGALKQS) and pseudhymenochirin-2Pa (Ps-2Pa; GIFPIFAKLLGKVIKVASSLISKGRTE) are amphibian peptides with broad spectrum antimicrobial activities and cytotoxicity against mammalian cells. In the membrane-mimetic solvent 50% (v/v) trifluoroethanol-H2O, both peptides adopt a well-defined α-helical conformation that extends over almost all the sequence and incorporates a flexible bend. Both peptides significantly (p < 0.05) stimulate the rate of release of insulin from BRIN-BD11 clonal β-cells at concentrations ≥ 0.1 nM but produce loss of integrity of the plasma membrane at concentrations ≥ 1 μM. Increasing cationicity by the substitution Glu(17) → l-Lys in Ps-1Pb and Glu(27) → l-Lys in Ps-2Pa generates analogues with increased cytotoxicity and reduced insulin-releasing potency. In contrast, the analogues [R8r]Ps-1Pb and [K8k,K19k]Ps-2Pa, incorporating d-amino acid residues to destabilize the α-helical domains, retain potent insulin-releasing activity but are nontoxic to BRIN-BD11 cells at concentrations of 3 μM. [R8r]Ps-1Pb produces a significant increase in insulin release rate at 0.3 nM and [K8k,K19k]Ps-2Pa at 0.01 nM. Both analogues show low hemolytic activity (IC50 > 100 μM) but retain broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and remain cytotoxic to a range of human tumor cell lines, albeit with lower potency than the naturally occurring peptides. These analogues show potential for development into agents for type 2 diabetes therapy. PMID:26606380

  8. Interconversion of active and inactive 30 S ribosomal subunits is accompanied by a conformational change in the decoding region of 16 S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Moazed, D; Van Stolk, B J; Douthwaite, S; Noller, H F

    1986-10-01

    Zamir, Elson and their co-workers have shown that 30 S ribosomal subunits are reversibly inactivated by depletion of monovalent or divalent cations. We have re-investigated the conformation of 16 S rRNA in the active and inactive forms of the 30 S subunit, using a strategy that is designed to eliminate reversible ion-dependent conformational effects that are unrelated to the heat-dependent Zamir-Elson transition. A combination of structure-specific chemical probes enables us to monitor the accessibility of pyrimidines at N-3 and purines at N-1 and N-7. Chemically modified bases are identified by end-labeling followed by analine-induced strand scission (in some cases preceded by hybrid selection), or by primer extension using synthetic DNA oligomers. These studies show the following: The transition from the active to the inactive state cannot be described as a simple loosening or unfolding of native structure, such as that which is observed under conditions of more severe ion depletion. Instead, it has the appearance of a reciprocal interconversion between two differently structured states; some bases become more reactive toward the probes, whilst others become less reactive as a result of inactivation. Changes in reactivity are almost exclusively confined to the "decoding site" centered at positions 1400 and 1500, but significant differences are also detected at U723 and G791 in the central domain. This may reflect possible structural and functional interactions between the central and 3' regions of 16 S rRNA. The inactive form also shows significantly decreased reactivity at positions 1533 to 1538 (the Shine-Dalgarno region), in agreement with earlier findings. The principal changes in reactivity involve the universally conserved nucleotides G926, C1395, A1398 and G1401. The three purines show reciprocal behavior at their N-1 versus N-7 positions. G926 loses its reactivity at N-1, but becomes highly reactive at N-7 as a result of the transition of the inactive

  9. The Clusters-in-a-Liquid Approach for Solvation: New Insights from the Conformer Specific Gas Phase Spectroscopy and Vibrational Optical Activity Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Angelo S.; Thomas, Javix; Poopari, Mohammad R.; Xu, Yunjie

    2016-01-01

    Vibrational optical activity spectroscopies, namely vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and Raman optical activity (ROA), have been emerged in the past decade as powerful spectroscopic tools for stereochemical information of a wide range of chiral compounds in solution directly. More recently, their applications in unveiling solvent effects, especially those associated with water solvent, have been explored. In this review article, we first select a few examples to demonstrate the unique sensitivity of VCD spectral signatures to both bulk solvent effects and explicit hydrogen-bonding interactions in solution. Second, we discuss the induced solvent chirality, or chiral transfer, VCD spectral features observed in the water bending band region in detail. From these chirality transfer spectral data, the related conformer specific gas phase spectroscopic studies of small chiral hydration clusters, and the associated matrix isolation VCD experiments of hydrogen-bonded complexes in cold rare gas matrices, a general picture of solvation in aqueous solution emerges. In such an aqueous solution, some small chiral hydration clusters, rather than the chiral solutes themselves, are the dominant species and are the ones that contribute mainly to the experimentally observed VCD features. We then review a series of VCD studies of amino acids and their derivatives in aqueous solution under different pHs to emphasize the importance of the inclusion of the bulk solvent effects. These experimental data and the associated theoretical analyses are the foundation for the proposed “clusters-in-a-liquid” approach to account for solvent effects effectively. We present several approaches to identify and build such representative chiral hydration clusters. Recent studies which applied molecular dynamics simulations and the subsequent snapshot averaging approach to generate the ROA, VCD, electronic CD, and optical rotatory dispersion spectra are also reviewed. Challenges associated with

  10. The clusters-in-a-liquid approach for solvation: New insights from the conformer specific gas phase spectroscopy and vibrational optical activity spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yunjie; Perera, Angelo; Thomas, Javix; Poopari, Mohammad

    2016-02-01

    Vibrational optical activity spectroscopies, namely vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and Raman optical activity (ROA), have been emerged in the past decade as a powerful spectroscopic tool for stereochemical information of a wide range of chiral compounds in solution directly. More recently, their applications in unveiling solvent effects, especially those associated with water solvent, have been explored. In this review article, we first select a few examples to demonstrate the unique sensitivity of VCD spectral signatures to both bulk solvent effects and explicit hydrogen-bonding interactions in solution. Second, we discuss the induced solvent chirality, or chiral transfer, VCD spectral features observed at the water bending band region in detail. From these chirality transfer spectral data, the related conformer specific gas phase spectroscopic studies of small chiral hydration clusters, and the associated matrix isolation VCD experiments of hydrogen-bonded complexes in cold rare gas matrices, a general picture of solvation in aqueous solution emerges. In such an aqueous solution, some small chiral hydration clusters, rather than the chiral solutes themselves, are the dominant species and are the ones who contribute mainly to the experimentally observed VCD features. We then review a series of VCD studies of amino acids and their derivatives in aqueous solution under different pHs to emphasize the importance of the inclusion of the bulk solvent effects. These experimental data and the associated theoretical analyses are the foundation for the proposed “clusters-in-a-liquid” approach to account for solvent effects effectively. We present several approaches to identify and build such representative chiral hydration clusters. Recent studies which applied molecular dynamics simulations and the subsequent snapshot averaging approach to generate the ROA, electronic CD, and optical rotatory dispersion spectra are also reviewed. Challenges associated with the

  11. The Clusters-in-a-Liquid Approach for Solvation: New Insights from the Conformer Specific Gas Phase Spectroscopy and Vibrational Optical Activity Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Perera, Angelo S; Thomas, Javix; Poopari, Mohammad R; Xu, Yunjie

    2016-01-01

    Vibrational optical activity spectroscopies, namely vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and Raman optical activity (ROA), have been emerged in the past decade as powerful spectroscopic tools for stereochemical information of a wide range of chiral compounds in solution directly. More recently, their applications in unveiling solvent effects, especially those associated with water solvent, have been explored. In this review article, we first select a few examples to demonstrate the unique sensitivity of VCD spectral signatures to both bulk solvent effects and explicit hydrogen-bonding interactions in solution. Second, we discuss the induced solvent chirality, or chiral transfer, VCD spectral features observed in the water bending band region in detail. From these chirality transfer spectral data, the related conformer specific gas phase spectroscopic studies of small chiral hydration clusters, and the associated matrix isolation VCD experiments of hydrogen-bonded complexes in cold rare gas matrices, a general picture of solvation in aqueous solution emerges. In such an aqueous solution, some small chiral hydration clusters, rather than the chiral solutes themselves, are the dominant species and are the ones that contribute mainly to the experimentally observed VCD features. We then review a series of VCD studies of amino acids and their derivatives in aqueous solution under different pHs to emphasize the importance of the inclusion of the bulk solvent effects. These experimental data and the associated theoretical analyses are the foundation for the proposed "clusters-in-a-liquid" approach to account for solvent effects effectively. We present several approaches to identify and build such representative chiral hydration clusters. Recent studies which applied molecular dynamics simulations and the subsequent snapshot averaging approach to generate the ROA, VCD, electronic CD, and optical rotatory dispersion spectra are also reviewed. Challenges associated with the

  12. A Case Study of After-School Activities in One School That Is Making Progress in Closing the Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shugerman, Susan Robin

    2013-01-01

    Closing the achievement gap has been a national conversation for several decades and a priority for educators and researchers. By looking closely at one school which is showing exceptional success with closing the achievement gap for low income students and English language learners, this study seeks to understand how school personnel and parents…

  13. Active ocular vergence improves postural control in elderly as close viewing distance with or without a single cognitive task.

    PubMed

    Matheron, Eric; Yang, Qing; Delpit-Baraut, Vincent; Dailly, Olivier; Kapoula, Zoï

    2016-01-01

    Performance of the vestibular, visual, and somatosensory systems decreases with age, reducing the capacity of postural control, and increasing the risk of falling. The purpose of this study is to measure the effects of vision, active vergence eye movements, viewing distance/vergence angle and a simple cognitive task on postural control during an upright stance, in completely autonomous elderly individuals. Participated in the study, 23 elderly subjects (73.4 ± 6.8 years) who were enrolled in a center dedicated to the prevention of falling. Their body oscillations were measured with the DynaPort(®) device, with three accelerometers, placed at the lumbosacral level, near the center of mass. The conditions were the following: eyes open fixating on LED at 20 cm or 150 cm (vergence angle 17.0° and 2.3° respectively) with or without additional cognitive tasks (counting down from one hundred), performing active vergence by alternating the fixation between the far and the near LED (convergence and divergence), eyes closed after having fixated the far LED. The results showed that the postural stability significantly decreased when fixating on the LED at a far distance (weak convergence angle) with or without cognitive tasks; active convergence-divergence between the LEDs improved the postural stability while eye closure decreased it. The privilege of proximity (with increased convergence at near), previously established with foot posturography, is shown here to be valid for accelerometry with the center of mass in elderly. Another major result is the beneficial contribution of active vergence eye movements to better postural stability. The results bring new perspectives for the role of eye movement training to preserve postural control and autonomy in elderly. PMID:26522373

  14. Activation of SIRT3 attenuates triptolide-induced toxicity through closing mitochondrial permeability transition pore in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanqin; Wang, Wenwen; Xiong, Zhewen; Kong, Jiamin; Qiu, Yuwen; Shen, Feihai; Huang, Zhiying

    2016-08-01

    Triptolide (TP), an active component of the traditional Chinese herb Tripterygium wilfordii Hook f. (TWHF), has multiple pharmacological effects. However, the severe toxicity of TP greatly restricts its clinical applications. Although TP exposure causes serious heart injury, the mechanism underlying TP-induced cardiotoxicity has rarely been investigated. In previous studies, we found that TP-induced oxidative stress was involved in the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis of cardiomyocytes. Opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) is the key to the mitochondrial dysfunction in cardiac toxicity. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential cardioprotective effects of sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) on the mPTP. In the present study, the cytotoxicity of TP was accompanied by the up-regulation of the SIRT3 protein level and its rapid aggregation in nuclei and mitochondria. The SIRT3-FOXO3 signaling pathway was activated simultaneously, resulting in increased transcription of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and catalase (CAT) for the elimination of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In addition, augmentation of the SIRT3 level via the overexpression plasmid SIRT3-Flag provided resistance to TP-induced cellular damage, whereas knocking down the SIRT3 level via siRNA accelerated the damage. Because it is an activator of SIRT3, the protective effect of resveratrol was also evaluated in H9c2 cells. In conclusion, the current results suggest that activation of SIRT3 substantially ameliorates the detrimental effects of TP by closing the mPTP. PMID:27064125

  15. Structural basis for the antipolymer activity of Hb ζ2βs2 trapped in a tense conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safo, Martin K.; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Schreiter, Eric R.; Eric Russell, J.

    2015-11-01

    The phenotypical severity of sickle cell disease (SCD) can be mitigated by modifying mutant hemoglobin S (Hb s, Hb α2β 2s) to contain embryonic ζ globin in place of adult α-globin subunits (Hb ζ2β2s). Crystallographical analyses of liganded Hb ζζ2β2s, though, demonstrate a tense (T-state) quaternary structure that paradoxically predicts its participation in--rather than its exclusion from--pathological deoxyHb S polymers. We resolved this structure-function conundrum by examining the effects of α → ζ exchange on the characteristics of specific amino acids that mediate sickle polymer assembly. Superposition analyses of the βs subunits of T-state deoxyHb α2β2s and T-state CO-liganded Hb ζ2β2s reveal significant displacements of both mutant βsVal6 and conserved β-chain contact residues, predicting weakening of corresponding polymer-stabilizing interactions. Similar comparisons of the α- and ζ-globin subunits implicate four amino acids that are either repositioned or undergo non-conservative substitution, abrogating critical polymer contacts. CO-Hb ζ2βs2 additionally exhibits a unique trimer-of-heterotetramers crystal packing that is sustained by novel intermolecular interactions involving the pathological βsVal6, contrasting sharply with the classical double-stranded packing of deoxyHb S. Finally, the unusually large buried solvent-accessible surface area for CO-Hb ζ2β2s suggests that it does not co-assemble with deoxyHb S in vivo. In sum, the antipolymer activities of Hb ζ203b2;2s appear to arise from both repositioning and replacement of specific α- and βs-chain residues, favoring an alternate T-state solution structure that is excluded from pathological deoxyHb S polymers. These data account for the antipolymer activity of Hb ζ2β2s, and recommend the utility of SCD therapeutics that capitalize on α-globin exchange strategies.

  16. Submaximal conformal symmetry superalgebras for Lorentzian manifolds of low dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Medeiros, Paul

    2016-02-01

    We consider a class of smooth oriented Lorentzian manifolds in dimensions three and four which admit a nowhere vanishing conformal Killing vector and a closed two-form that is invariant under the Lie algebra of conformal Killing vectors. The invariant two-form is constrained in a particular way by the conformal geometry of the manifold. In three dimensions, the conformal Killing vector must be everywhere causal (or null if the invariant two-form vanishes identically). In four dimensions, the conformal Killing vector must be everywhere null and the invariant two-form vanishes identically if the geometry is everywhere of Petrov type N or O. To the conformal class of any such geometry, it is possible to assign a particular Lie superalgebra structure, called a conformal symmetry superalgebra. The even part of this superalgebra contains conformal Killing vectors and constant R-symmetries while the odd part contains (charged) twistor spinors. The largest possible dimension of a conformal symmetry superalgebra is realised only for geometries that are locally conformally flat. We determine precisely which non-trivial conformal classes of metrics admit a conformal symmetry superalgebra with the next largest possible dimension, and compute all the associated submaximal conformal symmetry superalgebras. In four dimensions, we also compute symmetry superalgebras for a class of Ricci-flat Lorentzian geometries not of Petrov type N or O which admit a null Killing vector.

  17. Chi hotspots trigger a conformational change in the helicase-like domain of AddAB to activate homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Gilhooly, Neville S.; Carrasco, Carolina; Gollnick, Benjamin; Wilkinson, Martin; Wigley, Dale B.; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Dillingham, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    In bacteria, the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks is modulated by Chi sequences. These are recognised by helicase-nuclease complexes that process DNA ends for homologous recombination. Chi activates recombination by changing the biochemical properties of the helicase-nuclease, transforming it from a destructive exonuclease into a recombination-promoting repair enzyme. This transition is thought to be controlled by the Chi-dependent opening of a molecular latch, which enables part of the DNA substrate to evade degradation beyond Chi. Here, we show that disruption of the latch improves Chi recognition efficiency and stabilizes the interaction of AddAB with Chi, even in mutants that are impaired for Chi binding. Chi recognition elicits a structural change in AddAB that maps to a region of AddB which resembles a helicase domain, and which harbours both the Chi recognition locus and the latch. Mutation of the latch potentiates the change and moderately reduces the duration of a translocation pause at Chi. However, this mutant displays properties of Chi-modified AddAB even in the complete absence of bona fide hotspot sequences. The results are used to develop a model for AddAB regulation in which allosteric communication between Chi binding and latch opening ensures quality control during recombination hotspot recognition. PMID:26762979

  18. Assessment of conformational, spectral, antimicrobial activity, chemical reactivity and NLO application of Pyrrole-2,5-dicarboxaldehyde bis(oxaloyldihydrazone).

    PubMed

    Rawat, Poonam; Singh, R N

    2015-04-01

    An orange colored pyrrole dihydrazone: Pyrrole-2,5-dicarboxaldehyde bis(oxaloyldihydrazone) (PDBO) has been synthesized by reaction of oxalic acid dihydrazide with 2,5 diformyl-1H-pyrrole and has been characterized by spectroscopic analysis (1H, 13C NMR, UV-visible, FT-IR and DART Mass). The properties of the compound has been evaluated using B3LYP functional and 6-31G(d,p)/6-311+G(d,p) basis set. The symmetric (3319, 3320 cm(-1)) and asymmetric (3389, 3382 cm(-1)) stretching wave number confirm free NH2 groups in PDBO. NBO analysis shows, inter/intra molecular interactions within the molecule. Topological parameters have been analyzed by QTAIM theory and provide the existence of intramolecular hydrogen bonding (N-H⋯O). The local reactivity descriptors analyses determine the reactive sites within molecule. The calculated first hyperpolarizability value (β0=23.83×10(-30) esu) of pyrrole dihydrazone shows its suitability for non-linear optical (NLO) response. The preliminary bioassay suggested that the PDBO exhibits relatively good antibacterial and fungicidal activity against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Candida albicans, Aspergillus niger. The local reactivity descriptors--Fukui functions (fk+, fk-), local softnesses (sk+, sk-) and electrophilicity indices (ωk+, ωk-) analyses have been used to determine the reactive sites within molecule. PMID:25615679

  19. Assessment of conformational, spectral, antimicrobial activity, chemical reactivity and NLO application of Pyrrole-2,5-dicarboxaldehyde bis(oxaloyldihydrazone)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, Poonam; Singh, R. N.

    2015-04-01

    An orange colored pyrrole dihydrazone: Pyrrole-2,5-dicarboxaldehyde bis(oxaloyldihydrazone) (PDBO) has been synthesized by reaction of oxalic acid dihydrazide with 2,5 diformyl-1H-pyrrole and has been characterized by spectroscopic analysis (1H, 13C NMR, UV-visible, FT-IR and DART Mass). The properties of the compound has been evaluated using B3LYP functional and 6-31G(d,p)/6-311+G(d,p) basis set. The symmetric (3319, 3320 cm-1) and asymmetric (3389, 3382 cm-1) stretching wave number confirm free NH2 groups in PDBO. NBO analysis shows, inter/intra molecular interactions within the molecule. Topological parameters have been analyzed by QTAIM theory and provide the existence of intramolecular hydrogen bonding (N-H⋯O). The local reactivity descriptors analyses determine the reactive sites within molecule. The calculated first hyperpolarizability value (β0 = 23.83 × 10-30 esu) of pyrrole dihydrazone shows its suitability for non-linear optical (NLO) response. The preliminary bioassay suggested that the PDBO exhibits relatively good antibacterial and fungicidal activity against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Candida albicans, Aspergillus niger. The local reactivity descriptors - Fukui functions (fk+, fk-), local softnesses (sk+, sk-) and electrophilicity indices (ωk+, ωk-) analyses have been used to determine the reactive sites within molecule.

  20. Dolastatin 11 conformations, analogues and pharmacophore.

    PubMed

    Ali, Md Ahad; Bates, Robert B; Crane, Zackary D; Dicus, Christopher W; Gramme, Michelle R; Hamel, Ernest; Marcischak, Jacob; Martinez, David S; McClure, Kelly J; Nakkiew, Pichaya; Pettit, George R; Stessman, Chad C; Sufi, Bilal A; Yarick, Gayle V

    2005-07-01

    Twenty analogues of the natural antitumor agent dolastatin 11, including majusculamide C, were synthesized and tested for cytotoxicity against human cancer cells and stimulation of actin polymerization. Only analogues containing the 30-membered ring were active. Molecular modeling and NMR evidence showed the low-energy conformations. The amide bonds are all trans except for the one between the Tyr and Val units, which is cis. Since an analogue restricted to negative 2-3-4-5 angles stimulated actin polymerization but was inactive in cells, the binding conformation (most likely the lowest-energy conformation in water) has a negative 2-3-4-5 angle, whereas a conformation with a positive 2-3-4-5 angle (most likely the lowest energy conformation in chloroform) goes through cell walls. The highly active R alcohol from borohydride reduction of dolastatin 11 is a candidate for conversion to prodrugs. PMID:15878670

  1. Effect of PEG surface conformation on anticancer activity and blood circulation of nanoemulsions loaded with tocotrienol-rich fraction of palm oil.

    PubMed

    Alayoubi, Alaadin; Alqahtani, Saeed; Kaddoumi, Amal; Nazzal, Sami

    2013-10-01

    Tocotrienol-rich fraction of palm oil, which contains the isomers of vitamin E, was shown to possess potent anticancer activity against mammary adenocarcinoma cell lines. Its clinical use, however, is limited by poor oral bioavailability and short half-life. Previously, we developed tocotrienol-rich lipid nanoemulsions for intravenous administration. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of surface grafted polyethylene glycol (PEG) on the properties of the nanoemulsions. PEGylation was achieved by the addition of equimolar PEG groups using poloxamer or 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[amino(polyethylene glycol)2000] (PEG2000-DSPE). The effect of PEG surface topography on the antiproliferative activity of nanoemulsions against mammary adenocarcinoma cells, their susceptibility to protein adsorption, and its effect on blood hemolysis and circulation time was investigated. Nanoemulsions PEGylated with poloxamer or PEG2000-DSPE were stable under physical stress. Poloxamer nanoemulsion, however, displayed higher uptake and potency against MCF-7 tumor cells in 2D and 3D culture and increased hemolytic effect and susceptibility to IgG adsorption, which was reflected in its rapid clearance and short circulation half-life (1.7 h). Conversely, PEGylation with PEG2000-DSPE led to a 7-fold increase in mean residence time (12.3 h) after IV injection in rats. Reduced activity in vitro and improved circulation time suggested strong shielding of plasma proteins from the droplets. Differences between the nanoemulsions were attributed to polymer imbibitions and the differences in PEG conformation and density on the surface of the droplets. PMID:23990503

  2. Structural studies of conformational changes of proteins upon phosphorylation: Structures of activated CheY, CheY-N16-FliM complex, and AAA {sup +} ATPase domain of NtrC1 in both inactive and active states

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seok-Yong

    2003-04-10

    Protein phosphorylation is a general mechanism for signal transduction as well as regulation of cellular function. Unlike phosphorylation in eukaryotic systems that uses Ser/Thr for the sites of modification, two-component signal transduction systems, which are prevalent in bacteria, archea, and lower eukaryotes, use an aspartate as the site of phosphorylation. Two-component systems comprise a histidine kinase and a receiver domain. The conformational change of the receiver domain upon phosphorylation leads to signal transfer to the downstream target, a process that had not been understood well at the molecular level. The transient nature of the phospho-Asp bond had made structural studies difficult. The discovery of an excellent analogue for acylphosphate, BeF{sub 3}{sup -}, enabled structural study of activated receiver domains. The structure of activated Chemotaxis protein Y (CheY) was determined both by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. These structures revealed the molecular basis of the conformational change that is coupled to phosphorylation. Phosphorylation of the conserved Asp residue in the active site allows hydrogen bonding of the T87 O{gamma} to phospho-aspartate, which in turn leads to the rotation of Y106 into the ''in'' position (termed Y-T coupling). The structure of activated CheY complexed with the 16 N-terminal residues of FliM (N16-FliM), its target, was also determined by X-ray crystallography and confirmed the proposed mechanism of activation (Y-T coupling). First, N16-FliM binds to the region on CheY that undergoes a significant conformational change. Second, the ''in'' position of Y106 presents a better binding surface for FliM because the sidechain of Y106 in the inactive form of CheY (''out'' position) sterically interferes with binding of N16-FliM. In addition to confirmation of Y-T coupling, the structure of the activated CheY-N16-FliM complex suggested that the N16-FliM might be sandwiched between CheY and the remainder of

  3. Galilean conformal electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Arjun; Basu, Rudranil; Mehra, Aditya

    2014-11-01

    Maxwell's Electrodynamics admits two distinct Galilean limits called the Electric and Magnetic limits. We show that the equations of motion in both these limits are invariant under the Galilean Conformal Algebra in D = 4, thereby exhibiting non-relativistic conformal symmetries. Remarkably, the symmetries are infinite dimensional and thus Galilean Electrodynamics give us the first example of an infinitely extended Galilean Conformal Field Theory in D > 2. We examine details of the theory by looking at purely non-relativistic conformal methods and also use input from the limit of the relativistic theory.

  4. Design, synthesis and biological activity of new neurohypophyseal hormones analogues conformationally restricted in the N-terminal part of the molecule. Highly potent OT receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowska, Anna; Ptach, Monika; Borovičková, Lenka; Slaninová, Jiřina; Lammek, Bernard; Prahl, Adam

    2012-08-01

    In this study we present the synthesis and some pharmacological properties of fourteen new analogues of neurohypophyseal hormones conformationally restricted in the N-terminal part of the molecule. All new peptides were substituted at position 2 with cis-1-amino-4-phenylcyclohexane-1-carboxylic acid (cis-Apc). Moreover, one of the new analogues: [cis-Apc(2), Val(4)]AVP was also prepared in N-acylated forms with various bulky acyl groups. All the peptides were tested for pressor, antidiuretic, and in vitro uterotonic activities. We also determined the binding affinity of the selected compounds to human OT receptor. Our results showed that introduction of cis -Apc(2) in position 2 of either AVP or OT resulted in analogues with high antioxytocin potency. Two of the new compounds, [Mpa(1),cis-Apc(2)]AVP and [Mpa(1),cis-Apc(2),Val(4)]AVP, were exceptionally potent antiuterotonic agents (pA(2) = 8.46 and 8.40, respectively) and exhibited higher affinities for the human OT receptor than Atosiban (K (i) values 5.4 and 9.1 nM). Moreover, we have demonstrated for the first time that N -terminal acylation of AVP analogue can improve its selectivity. Using this approach, we obtained compound Aba[cis-Apc(2),Val(4)]AVP (XI) which turned out to be a moderately potent and exceptionally selective OT antagonist (pA(2) = 7.26). PMID:22038179

  5. SLITHER: a web server for generating contiguous conformations of substrate molecules entering into deep active sites of proteins or migrating through channels in membrane transporters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Po-Hsien; Kuo, Kuei-Ling; Chu, Pei-Ying; Liu, Eric M; Lin, Jung-Hsin

    2009-07-01

    Many proteins use a long channel to guide the substrate or ligand molecules into the well-defined active sites for catalytic reactions or for switching molecular states. In addition, substrates of membrane transporters can migrate to another side of cellular compartment by means of certain selective mechanisms. SLITHER (http://bioinfo.mc.ntu.edu.tw/slither/or http://slither.rcas.sinica.edu.tw/) is a web server that can generate contiguous conformations of a molecule along a curved tunnel inside a protein, and the binding free energy profile along the predicted channel pathway. SLITHER adopts an iterative docking scheme, which combines with a puddle-skimming procedure, i.e. repeatedly elevating the potential energies of the identified global minima, thereby determines the contiguous binding modes of substrates inside the protein. In contrast to some programs that are widely used to determine the geometric dimensions in the ion channels, SLITHER can be applied to predict whether a substrate molecule can crawl through an inner channel or a half-channel of proteins across surmountable energy barriers. Besides, SLITHER also provides the list of the pore-facing residues, which can be directly compared with many genetic diseases. Finally, the adjacent binding poses determined by SLITHER can also be used for fragment-based drug design. PMID:19433508

  6. SLITHER: a web server for generating contiguous conformations of substrate molecules entering into deep active sites of proteins or migrating through channels in membrane transporters

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Po-Hsien; Kuo, Kuei-Ling; Chu, Pei-Ying; Liu, Eric M.; Lin, Jung-Hsin

    2009-01-01

    Many proteins use a long channel to guide the substrate or ligand molecules into the well-defined active sites for catalytic reactions or for switching molecular states. In addition, substrates of membrane transporters can migrate to another side of cellular compartment by means of certain selective mechanisms. SLITHER (http://bioinfo.mc.ntu.edu.tw/slither/or http://slither.rcas.sinica.edu.tw/) is a web server that can generate contiguous conformations of a molecule along a curved tunnel inside a protein, and the binding free energy profile along the predicted channel pathway. SLITHER adopts an iterative docking scheme, which combines with a puddle-skimming procedure, i.e. repeatedly elevating the potential energies of the identified global minima, thereby determines the contiguous binding modes of substrates inside the protein. In contrast to some programs that are widely used to determine the geometric dimensions in the ion channels, SLITHER can be applied to predict whether a substrate molecule can crawl through an inner channel or a half-channel of proteins across surmountable energy barriers. Besides, SLITHER also provides the list of the pore-facing residues, which can be directly compared with many genetic diseases. Finally, the adjacent binding poses determined by SLITHER can also be used for fragment-based drug design. PMID:19433508

  7. Conformational Electroresistance and Hysteresis in Nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiangguo; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Cheng, Hai-Ping

    2014-07-02

    Among many mechanisms proposed for electroresistance, ones involving structural changes are the least understood because of challenges of controllability and repeatability. Yet structural changes can cause dramatic changes in electronic properties, leading to multiple ways in which conduction paths can be opened and closed, not limited to filament movement or variation in molecular conductance. Here we show at least another way: conformational dependence of the Coulomb charging energy of a nanocluster, where charging induced conformational distortion changes the blockade voltage, which in turn leads to a giant electroresistance. This intricate interplay between charging and conformation change is demonstrated in a nanocluster Zn3O4 by combining a first-principles calculation with a temperature dependent transport model. The predicted hysteretic Coulomb blockade staircase in the current-voltage curve adds another dimension to the rich phenomenon of tunneling electroresistance. The new mechanism also provides a better controlled and repeatable platform to study conformational electroresistance.

  8. Conformational Electroresistance and Hysteresis in Nanoclusters

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Xiangguo; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Cheng, Hai-Ping

    2014-07-02

    Among many mechanisms proposed for electroresistance, ones involving structural changes are the least understood because of challenges of controllability and repeatability. Yet structural changes can cause dramatic changes in electronic properties, leading to multiple ways in which conduction paths can be opened and closed, not limited to filament movement or variation in molecular conductance. Here we show at least another way: conformational dependence of the Coulomb charging energy of a nanocluster, where charging induced conformational distortion changes the blockade voltage, which in turn leads to a giant electroresistance. This intricate interplay between charging and conformation change is demonstrated in amore » nanocluster Zn3O4 by combining a first-principles calculation with a temperature dependent transport model. The predicted hysteretic Coulomb blockade staircase in the current-voltage curve adds another dimension to the rich phenomenon of tunneling electroresistance. The new mechanism also provides a better controlled and repeatable platform to study conformational electroresistance.« less

  9. Conformal bootstrap in embedding space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortin, Jean-François; Skiba, Witold

    2016-05-01

    It is shown how to obtain conformal blocks from embedding space with the help of the operator product expansion. The minimal conformal block originates from scalar exchange in a four-point correlation function of four scalars. All remaining conformal blocks are simple derivatives of the minimal conformal block. With the help of the orthogonality properties of the conformal blocks, the analytic conformal bootstrap can be implemented directly in embedding space, leading to a Jacobi-like definition of conformal field theories.

  10. Genetic dissection of independent and cooperative transcriptional activation by the LysR-type activator ThnR at close divergent promoters.

    PubMed

    Rivas-Marín, Elena; Floriano, Belén; Santero, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of tetralin biodegradation operons is one of the examples of unconventional LysR-type mediated transcriptional regulation. ThnR activates transcription from two divergent and closely located promoters PB and PC. Although ThnR activates each promoter independently, transcription from each one increases when both promoters are together. Mutational analysis of the intergenic region shows that cooperative transcription is achieved through formation of a ThnR complex when bound to its respective sites at each promoter, via formation of a DNA loop. Mutations also defined ThnR contact sites that are important for independent transcriptional activation at each promoter. A mutation at the PB promoter region, which abolishes its independent transcription, does not affect at all PB transcription in the presence of the divergent promoter PC, thus indicating that the complex formed via DNA loop can compensate for the deficiencies in the correct protein-DNA interaction at one of the promoters. Combination of mutations in both promoters identifies a region at PC that is not important for its independent transcription but it is essential for cooperative transcription from both promoters. This work provides new insights into the diversity and complexity of activation mechanisms used by the most abundant type of bacterial transcriptional regulators. PMID:27087658

  11. Genetic dissection of independent and cooperative transcriptional activation by the LysR-type activator ThnR at close divergent promoters

    PubMed Central

    Rivas-Marín, Elena; Floriano, Belén; Santero, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of tetralin biodegradation operons is one of the examples of unconventional LysR-type mediated transcriptional regulation. ThnR activates transcription from two divergent and closely located promoters PB and PC. Although ThnR activates each promoter independently, transcription from each one increases when both promoters are together. Mutational analysis of the intergenic region shows that cooperative transcription is achieved through formation of a ThnR complex when bound to its respective sites at each promoter, via formation of a DNA loop. Mutations also defined ThnR contact sites that are important for independent transcriptional activation at each promoter. A mutation at the PB promoter region, which abolishes its independent transcription, does not affect at all PB transcription in the presence of the divergent promoter PC, thus indicating that the complex formed via DNA loop can compensate for the deficiencies in the correct protein-DNA interaction at one of the promoters. Combination of mutations in both promoters identifies a region at PC that is not important for its independent transcription but it is essential for cooperative transcription from both promoters. This work provides new insights into the diversity and complexity of activation mechanisms used by the most abundant type of bacterial transcriptional regulators. PMID:27087658

  12. Role of positively charged residues of the second transmembrane domain in the ion transport activity and conformation of human uncoupling protein-2.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Tuan; Matovic, Tijana; Parker, James; Smith, Matthew D; Jelokhani-Niaraki, Masoud

    2015-04-14

    Residing at the inner mitochondrial membrane, uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2) mediates proton transport from the intermembrane space (IMS) to the mitochondrial matrix and consequently reduces the rate of ATP synthesis in the mitochondria. The ubiquitous expression of UCP2 in humans can be attributed to the protein's multiple physiological roles in tissues, including its involvement in protective mechanisms against oxidative stress, as well as glucose and lipid metabolisms. Currently, the structural properties and ion transport mechanism of UCP2 and other UCP homologues remain poorly understood. UCP2-mediated proton transport is activated by fatty acids and inhibited by di- and triphosphate purine nucleotides. UCP2 also transports chloride and some other small anions. Identification of key amino acid residues of UCP2 in its ion transport pathway can shed light on the protein's ion transport function. On the basis of our previous studies, the second transmembrane helix segment (TM2) of UCP2 exhibited chloride channel activity. In addition, it was suggested that the positively charged residues on TM2 domains of UCPs 1 and 2 were important for their chloride transport activity. On this basis, to further understand the role of these positively charged residues on the ion transport activity of UCP2, we recombinantly expressed four TM2 mutants: R76Q, R88Q, R96Q, and K104Q. The wild type UCP2 and its mutants were purified and reconstituted into liposomes, and their conformation and ion (proton and chloride) transport activity were studied. TM2 Arg residues at the matrix interface of UCP2 proved to be crucial for the protein's anion transport function, and their absence resulted in highly diminished Cl(-) transport rates. On the other hand, the two other positively charged residues of TM2, located at the UCP2-IMS interface, could participate in the salt-bridge formation in the protein and promote the interhelical tight packing in the UCP2. Absence of these residues did not

  13. Conformations of Substituted Ethanes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingsbury, Charles A.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews state-of-the-art of conformational analysis and factors which affect it. Emphasizes sp-3 hybridized acrylic molecules. Provides examples on the importance of certain factors in determining conformation. Purpose, is to provide examples for examination questions. (Author/SA)

  14. Changes to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor extracellular loops differentially affect GnRH analog binding and activation: evidence for distinct ligand-stabilized receptor conformations.

    PubMed

    Pfleger, Kevin D G; Pawson, Adam J; Millar, Robert P

    2008-06-01

    GnRH and its structural variants bind to GnRH receptors from different species with different affinities and specificities. By investigating chimeric receptors that combine regions of mammalian and nonmammalian GnRH receptors, a greater understanding of how different domains influence ligand binding and receptor activation can be achieved. Using human-catfish and human-chicken chimeric receptors, we demonstrate the importance of extracellular loop conformation for ligand binding and agonist potency, providing further evidence for GnRH and GnRH II stabilization of distinct active receptor conformations. We demonstrate examples of GnRH receptor gain-of-function mutations that apparently improve agonist potency independently of affinity, implicating a role for extracellular loops in stabilizing the inactive receptor conformation. We also show that entire extracellular loop substitution can overcome the detrimental effects of localized mutations, thereby demonstrating the importance of considering the conformation of entire domains when drawing conclusions from point-mutation studies. Finally, we present evidence implicating the configuration of extracellular loops 2 and 3 in combination differentiating GnRH analog binding modes. Because there are two endogenous forms of GnRH ligand but only one functional form of full-length GnRH receptor in humans, understanding how GnRH and GnRH II can elicit distinct functional effects through the same receptor is likely to provide important insights into how these ligands can have differential effects in both physiological and pathological situations. PMID:18356273

  15. Conformational Changes in Inositol 1,3,4,5,6-Pentakisphosphate 2-Kinase upon Substrate Binding

    PubMed Central

    Baños-Sanz, José Ignacio; Sanz-Aparicio, Julia; Whitfield, Hayley; Hamilton, Chris; Brearley, Charles A.; González, Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    Inositol 1,3,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate 2-kinase (IP5 2-K) catalyzes the synthesis of inositol 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakisphosphate from ATP and IP5. Inositol 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakisphosphate is implicated in crucial processes such as mRNA export, DNA editing, and phosphorus storage in plants. We previously solved the first structure of an IP5 2-K, which shed light on aspects of substrate recognition. However, failure of IP5 2-K to crystallize in the absence of inositide prompted us to study putative conformational changes upon substrate binding. We have made mutations to residues on a region of the protein that produces a clasp over the active site. A W129A mutant allowed us to capture IP5 2-K in its different conformations by crystallography. Thus, the IP5 2-K apo-form structure displays an open conformation, whereas the nucleotide-bound form shows a half-closed conformation, in contrast to the inositide-bound form obtained previously in a closed conformation. Both nucleotide and inositide binding produce large conformational changes that can be understood as two rigid domain movements, although local changes were also observed. Changes in intrinsic fluorescence upon nucleotide and inositide binding are in agreement with the crystallographic findings. Our work suggests that the clasp might be involved in enzyme kinetics, with the N-terminal lobe being essential for inositide binding and subsequent conformational changes. We also show how IP5 2-K discriminates between inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate and 3,4,5,6-tetrakisphosphate enantiomers and that substrate preference can be manipulated by Arg130 mutation. Altogether, these results provide a framework for rational design of specific inhibitors with potential applications as biological tools for in vivo studies, which could assist in the identification of novel roles for IP5 2-K in mammals. PMID:22745128

  16. The Closing Mechanism of DNA Polymerase I at Atomic Resolution.

    PubMed

    Miller, Bill R; Beese, Lorena S; Parish, Carol A; Wu, Eugene Y

    2015-09-01

    DNA polymerases must quickly and accurately distinguish between similar nucleic acids to form Watson-Crick base pairs and avoid DNA replication errors. Deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) binding to the DNA polymerase active site induces a large conformational change that is difficult to characterize experimentally on an atomic level. Here, we report an X-ray crystal structure of DNA polymerase I bound to DNA in the open conformation with a dNTP present in the active site. We use this structure to computationally simulate the open to closed transition of DNA polymerase in the presence of a Watson-Crick base pair. Our microsecond simulations allowed us to characterize the key steps involved in active site assembly, and propose the sequence of events involved in the prechemistry steps of DNA polymerase catalysis. They also reveal new features of the polymerase mechanism, such as a conserved histidine as a potential proton acceptor from the primer 3'-hydroxyl. PMID:26211612

  17. Conformational analyses of periplanone analogs by molecular mechanics calculations.

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, K; Mori, M; Okada, K; Chuman, T; Goto, H; Osawa, E; Sakakibara, K; Hirota, M

    1991-04-01

    Conformational parameters of pheromonally active analogs (1 and 2) of periplanones, the sex pheromones of the American cockroach, were investigated by molecular mechanics calculations. They existed in several conformers with small energy differences. These results were supported by NMR analysis. The structural features of the conformers of the analogs were compared with X-ray structures of periplanones. PMID:24258922

  18. Design and synthesis of side-chain conformationally restricted phenylalanines and their use for structure-activity studies on tachykinin NK-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Josien, H; Lavielle, S; Brunissen, A; Saffroy, M; Torrens, Y; Beaujouan, J C; Glowinski, J; Chassaing, G

    1994-05-27

    Constrained analogues of phenylalanine have been conceptually designed for analyzing the binding pockets of Phe7 (S7) and Phe8 (S8), two aromatic residues important for the pharmacological properties of SP, i.e., L-tetrahydroisoquinoleic acid, L-diphenylalanine, L-9-fluorenylglycine (Flg), 2-indanylglycine, the diastereomers of L-1-indanylglycine (Ing) and L-1-benz[f]indanylglycine (Bfi), and the Z and E isomers of dehydrophenylalanine (delta ZPhe, delta EPhe). Binding studies were performed with appropriate ligands and tissue preparations allowing the discrimination of the three tachykinin binding sites, NK-1, NK-2, and NK-3. The potencies of these agonists were evaluated in the guinea pig ileum bioassay. According to the binding data, we can conclude that the S7 subsite is small, only the gauche (-) probe [(2S,3S)-Ing7]SP presents a high affinity for specific NK-1 binding sites. Surprisingly, the [delta EPhe7]SP analogue, which projects the aromatic ring toward the trans orientation, is over 40-fold more potent than the Z isomer, [delta ZPhe7]SP. A plausible explanation of these conflictual results is that either the binding protein quenches the minor trans rotamer of [(2S,3S)-Ing7]SP in solution or this constrained amino acid side chain rotates when inserted in the protein. In position 8, the high binding affinities of [Flg8]SP and [(2S,3S)-Bfi8]SP suggest that the S8 subsite is large enough to accept two aromatic rings in the gauche (-) and one aromatic ring in the trans direction. Peptides bearing two conformational probes in positions 7, 8, or 9 led to postulate that S7, S8, and S9 subsites are independent from each other. The volumes available for side chains 7 and 8 can be estimated to be close to 110 and 240 A3, respectively. The large volume of the S8 subsite raises question on the localization of the SP-binding site in the NK-1 receptor. If SP were to bind in the transmembrane domains, the cleft defined by the seven transmembrane segments must rearrange

  19. THE CHROMOSPHERIC ACTIVITY OF [HH97] FS Aur-79: A CLOSE BINARY WITH LATE-TYPE ACTIVE (dK7e+dM3e) COMPONENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, S. J.; Robertson, J. W.; De Souza, T. R.; Tycner, C.; Honeycutt, R. K. E-mail: jrobertson@atu.edu E-mail: c.tycner@cmich.edu

    2011-04-15

    Using Doppler tomography we show that FS Aur-79, a near-contact close binary system with late-type active dK7e+dM3e components, has chromospheric prominences in two distinct emission regions associated with the primary star and a larger amount of chromospheric activity associated with the cooler secondary star. The line profiles, equivalent widths, and equivalent width ratios of the H{alpha} and H{beta} emission lines as a function of orbital phase further support that the majority of the chromospheric emission originates above the secondary star and near the neck region. Analysis of high-resolution spectra using the technique of broadening functions has enabled us to determine the radial velocity of the secondary star near quadratures to be approximately 224 km s{sup -1}. A Wilson-Devinney model of the system fitting the UBV light curves and radial velocities shows that there are star spots near the chromospherically active regions. Finally, the absence of Li I {lambda}6708 in the spectra lets us put a lower limit on the age of this system to at least 500 Myr.

  20. Structure of Human Pancreatic Lipase-Related Protein 2 with the Lid in an Open Conformation

    SciTech Connect

    Eydoux, Cecilia; Spinelli, Silvia; Davis, Tara L.; Walker, John R.; Seitova, Alma; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; De Caro, Alain; Cambillau, Christian; Carriere, Frederic

    2008-10-02

    Access to the active site of pancreatic lipase (PL) is controlled by a surface loop, the lid, which normally undergoes conformational changes only upon addition of lipids or amphiphiles. Structures of PL with their lids in the open and functional conformation have required cocrystallization with amphiphiles. Here we report two crystal structures of wild-type and unglycosylated human pancreatic lipase-related protein 2 (HPLRP2) with the lid in an open conformation in the absence of amphiphiles. These structures solved independently are strikingly similar, with some residues of the lid being poorly defined in the electron-density map. The open conformation of the lid is however different from that previously observed in classical liganded PL, suggesting different kinetic properties for HPLRP2. Here we show that the HPLRP2 is directly inhibited by E600, does not present interfacial activation, and acts preferentially on substrates forming monomers or small aggregates (micelles) dispersed in solution like monoglycerides, phospholipids and galactolipids, whereas classical PL displays reverse properties and a high specificity for unsoluble substrates like triglycerides and diglycerides forming oil-in-water interfaces. These biochemical properties imply that the lid of HPLRP2 is likely to spontaneously adopt in solution the open conformation observed in the crystal structure. This open conformation generates a large cavity capable of accommodating the digalactose polar head of galactolipids, similar to that previously observed in the active site of the guinea pig PLRP2, but absent from the classical PL. Most of the structural and kinetic properties of HPLRP2 were found to be different from those of rat PLRP2, the structure of which was previously obtained with the lid in a closed conformation. Our findings illustrate the essential role of the lid in determining the substrate specificity and the mechanism of action of lipases.

  1. Monitoring Conformational Changes in the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase EGFR.

    PubMed

    Becker, Christian; Öcal, Sinan; Nguyen, Hoang D; Phan, Trang; Keul, Marina; Simard, Jeffrey R; Rauh, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase EGFR is regulated by complex conformational changes, and this conformational control is disturbed in certain types of cancer. Many ligands are known to bind EGFR in its active conformation, thereby preventing ATP from binding. Only a few ligands are known to stabilize EGFR in its inactive conformation, thus providing novel strategies for perturbing EGFR activity. We report a direct binding assay that enables the identification of novel ligands that bind to and stabilize the inactive conformation of EGFR. PMID:26991964

  2. Calnexin and calreticulin bind to enzymically active tissue-type plasminogen activator during biosynthesis and are not required for folding to the native conformation.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, S; Bulleid, N J

    1997-01-01

    The roles of the endoplasmic-reticulum lectins calnexin and calreticulin in the folding of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) have been investigated using an in vitro translation system that reconstitutes these processes as they would occur in the intact cell. Using co-immunoprecipitation of newly synthesized tPA with antibodies to calnexin and calreticulin, it was demonstrated that the interaction of tPA with both lectins was dependent upon tPA glycosylation and glucosidase trimming. When tPA was synthesized in the presence of semi-permeabilized cells under conditions preventing complex formation with calnexin and calreticulin, the translation product had a specific plasminogenolytic activity identical with that when synthesized under conditions permitting interactions with both lectins. Furthermore, complexes of tPA bound to calnexin and calreticulin were shown to be enzymically active. These results demonstrate that calnexin and calreticulin can form a stable interaction with correctly folded tPA; however, such interactions are not required for the synthesis of enzymically active tPA. PMID:9359841

  3. Anticholinergic substances: A single consistent conformation

    PubMed Central

    Pauling, Peter; Datta, Narayandas

    1980-01-01

    An interactive computer-graphics analysis of 24 antagonists of acetylcholine at peripheral autonomic post-ganglionic (muscarinic) nervous junctions and at similar junctions in the central nervous system, the crystal structures of which are known, has led to the determination of a single, consistent, energetically favorable conformation for all 24 substances, although their observed crystal structure conformations vary widely. The absolute configuration and the single, consistent (ideal) conformation of the chemical groups required for maximum anticholinergic activity are described quantitatively. Images PMID:16592775

  4. [Conformers of carnosine].

    PubMed

    Kliuev, S A

    2006-01-01

    The geometric and energetic parameters of most stable conformations of carnosine were calculated by the semiempirical guantum-chemical method PM3. The carnosine-water-zinc (II) clusters were simulated. PMID:16909845

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis acyl carrier protein synthase adopts two different pH-dependent structural conformations

    SciTech Connect

    Gokulan, Kuppan; Aggarwal, Anup; Shipman, Lance; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Sacchettini, James C.

    2011-07-01

    Bacterial acyl carrier protein synthase plays an essential role in the synthesis of fatty acids, nonribosomal peptides and polyketides. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis, AcpS or group I phosphopentatheine transferase exhibits two different structural conformations depending upon the pH. The crystal structures of acyl carrier protein synthase (AcpS) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and Corynebacterium ammoniagenes determined at pH 5.3 and pH 6.5, respectively, are reported. Comparison of the Mtb apo-AcpS structure with the recently reported structure of the Mtb AcpS–ADP complex revealed that AcpS adopts two different conformations: the orthorhombic and trigonal space-group structures show structural differences in the α2 helix and in the conformation of the α3–α4 connecting loop, which is in a closed conformation. The apo-AcpS structure shows electron density for the entire model and was obtained at lower pH values (4.4–6.0). In contrast, at a higher pH value (6.5) AcpS undergoes significant conformational changes, resulting in disordered regions that show no electron density in the AcpS model. The solved structures also reveal that C. ammoniagenes AcpS undergoes structural rearrangement in two regions, similar to the recently reported Mtb AcpS–ADP complex structure. In vitro reconstitution experiments show that AcpS has a higher post-translational modification activity between pH 4.4 and 6.0 than at pH values above 6.5, where the activity drops owing to the change in conformation. The results show that apo-AcpS and AcpS–ADP adopt different conformations depending upon the pH conditions of the crystallization solution.

  6. Assemblies of Conformal Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Assemblies of tanks having shapes that conform to each other and/or conform to other proximate objects have been investigated for use in storing fuels and oxidizers in small available spaces in upper stages of spacecraft. Such assemblies might also prove useful in aircraft, automobiles, boats, and other terrestrial vehicles in which space available for tanks is limited. The basic concept of using conformal tanks to maximize the utilization of limited space is not new in itself: for example, conformal tanks are used in some automobiles to store windshield -washer liquid and coolant that overflows from radiators. The novelty of the present development lies in the concept of an assembly of smaller conformal tanks, as distinguished from a single larger conformal tank. In an assembly of smaller tanks, it would be possible to store different liquids in different tanks. Even if the same liquid were stored in all the tanks, the assembly would offer an advantage by reducing the mechanical disturbance caused by sloshing of fuel in a single larger tank: indeed, the requirement to reduce sloshing is critical in some applications. The figure shows a prototype assembly of conformal tanks. Each tank was fabricated by (1) copper plating a wax tank mandrel to form a liner and (2) wrapping and curing layers of graphite/epoxy composite to form a shell supporting the liner. In this case, the conformal tank surfaces are flat ones where they come in contact with the adjacent tanks. A band of fibers around the outside binds the tanks together tightly in the assembly, which has a quasi-toroidal shape. For proper functioning, it would be necessary to maintain equal pressure in all the tanks.

  7. Quantum massive conformal gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faria, F. F.

    2016-04-01

    We first find the linear approximation of the second plus fourth order derivative massive conformal gravity action. Then we reduce the linearized action to separated second order derivative terms, which allows us to quantize the theory by using the standard first order canonical quantization method. It is shown that quantum massive conformal gravity is renormalizable but has ghost states. A possible decoupling of these ghost states at high energies is discussed.

  8. Conformational flexibility related to enzyme activity: evidence for a dynamic active-site gatekeeper function of Tyr(215) in Aerococcus viridans lactate oxidase.

    PubMed

    Stoisser, Thomas; Brunsteiner, Michael; Wilson, David K; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    L-Lactate oxidase (LOX) belongs to a large family of flavoenzymes that catalyze oxidation of α-hydroxy acids. How in these enzymes the protein structure controls reactivity presents an important but elusive problem. LOX contains a prominent tyrosine in the substrate binding pocket (Tyr(215) in Aerococcus viridans LOX) that is partially responsible for securing a flexible loop which sequesters the active site. To characterize the role of Tyr(215), effects of substitutions of the tyrosine (Y215F, Y215H) were analyzed kinetically, crystallographically and by molecular dynamics simulations. Enzyme variants showed slowed flavin reduction and oxidation by up to 33-fold. Pyruvate release was also decelerated and in Y215F, it was the slowest step overall. A 2.6-Å crystal structure of Y215F in complex with pyruvate shows the hydrogen bond between the phenolic hydroxyl and the keto oxygen in pyruvate is replaced with a potentially stronger hydrophobic interaction between the phenylalanine and the methyl group of pyruvate. Residues 200 through 215 or 216 appear to be disordered in two of the eight monomers in the asymmetric unit suggesting that they function as a lid controlling substrate entry and product exit from the active site. Substitutions of Tyr(215) can thus lead to a kinetic bottleneck in product release. PMID:27302031

  9. Conformational flexibility related to enzyme activity: evidence for a dynamic active-site gatekeeper function of Tyr215 in Aerococcus viridans lactate oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Stoisser, Thomas; Brunsteiner, Michael; Wilson, David K.; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    L-Lactate oxidase (LOX) belongs to a large family of flavoenzymes that catalyze oxidation of α-hydroxy acids. How in these enzymes the protein structure controls reactivity presents an important but elusive problem. LOX contains a prominent tyrosine in the substrate binding pocket (Tyr215 in Aerococcus viridans LOX) that is partially responsible for securing a flexible loop which sequesters the active site. To characterize the role of Tyr215, effects of substitutions of the tyrosine (Y215F, Y215H) were analyzed kinetically, crystallographically and by molecular dynamics simulations. Enzyme variants showed slowed flavin reduction and oxidation by up to 33-fold. Pyruvate release was also decelerated and in Y215F, it was the slowest step overall. A 2.6-Å crystal structure of Y215F in complex with pyruvate shows the hydrogen bond between the phenolic hydroxyl and the keto oxygen in pyruvate is replaced with a potentially stronger hydrophobic interaction between the phenylalanine and the methyl group of pyruvate. Residues 200 through 215 or 216 appear to be disordered in two of the eight monomers in the asymmetric unit suggesting that they function as a lid controlling substrate entry and product exit from the active site. Substitutions of Tyr215 can thus lead to a kinetic bottleneck in product release. PMID:27302031

  10. Conformational sampling techniques.

    PubMed

    Hatfield, Marcus P D; Lovas, Sándor

    2014-01-01

    The potential energy hyper-surface of a protein relates the potential energy of the protein to its conformational space. This surface is useful in determining the native conformation of a protein or in examining a statistical-mechanical ensemble of structures (canonical ensemble). In determining the potential energy hyper-surface of a protein three aspects must be considered; reducing the degrees of freedom, a method to determine the energy of each conformation and a method to sample the conformational space. For reducing the degrees of freedom the choice of solvent, coarse graining, constraining degrees of freedom and periodic boundary conditions are discussed. The use of quantum mechanics versus molecular mechanics and the choice of force fields are also discussed, as well as the sampling of the conformational space through deterministic and heuristic approaches. Deterministic methods include knowledge-based statistical methods, rotamer libraries, homology modeling, the build-up method, self-consistent electrostatic field, deformation methods, tree-based elimination and eigenvector following routines. The heuristic methods include Monte Carlo chain growing, energy minimizations, metropolis monte carlo and molecular dynamics. In addition, various methods to enhance the conformational search including the deformation or smoothing of the surface, scaling of system parameters, and multi copy searching are also discussed. PMID:23947647

  11. The Structure of a High Fidelity DNA Polymerase Bound to a Mismatched Nucleotide Reveals an ;Ajar; Intermediate Conformation in the Nucleotide Selection Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Eugene Y.; Beese, Lorena S.

    2011-10-10

    To achieve accurate DNA synthesis, DNA polymerases must rapidly sample and discriminate against incorrect nucleotides. Here we report the crystal structure of a high fidelity DNA polymerase I bound to DNA primer-template caught in the act of binding a mismatched (dG:dTTP) nucleoside triphosphate. The polymerase adopts a conformation in between the previously established 'open' and 'closed' states. In this 'ajar' conformation, the template base has moved into the insertion site but misaligns an incorrect nucleotide relative to the primer terminus. The displacement of a conserved active site tyrosine in the insertion site by the template base is accommodated by a distinctive kink in the polymerase O helix, resulting in a partially open ternary complex. We suggest that the ajar conformation allows the template to probe incoming nucleotides for complementarity before closure of the enzyme around the substrate. Based on solution fluorescence, kinetics, and crystallographic analyses of wild-type and mutant polymerases reported here, we present a three-state reaction pathway in which nucleotides either pass through this intermediate conformation to the closed conformation and catalysis or are misaligned within the intermediate, leading to destabilization of the closed conformation.

  12. 29 CFR 779.105 - Employees engaged in activitiesclosely related” and “directly essential” to the production of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... âdirectly essentialâ to the production of goods for commerce. 779.105 Section 779.105 Labor Regulations... Engaged in Commerce Or in the Production of Goods for Commerce § 779.105 Employees engaged in activitiesclosely related” and “directly essential” to the production of goods for commerce. Some employees...

  13. 29 CFR 779.105 - Employees engaged in activitiesclosely related” and “directly essential” to the production of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... âdirectly essentialâ to the production of goods for commerce. 779.105 Section 779.105 Labor Regulations... Engaged in Commerce Or in the Production of Goods for Commerce § 779.105 Employees engaged in activitiesclosely related” and “directly essential” to the production of goods for commerce. Some employees...

  14. 29 CFR 779.105 - Employees engaged in activitiesclosely related” and “directly essential” to the production of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... âdirectly essentialâ to the production of goods for commerce. 779.105 Section 779.105 Labor Regulations... Engaged in Commerce Or in the Production of Goods for Commerce § 779.105 Employees engaged in activitiesclosely related” and “directly essential” to the production of goods for commerce. Some employees...

  15. 29 CFR 779.105 - Employees engaged in activitiesclosely related” and “directly essential” to the production of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... âdirectly essentialâ to the production of goods for commerce. 779.105 Section 779.105 Labor Regulations... Engaged in Commerce Or in the Production of Goods for Commerce § 779.105 Employees engaged in activitiesclosely related” and “directly essential” to the production of goods for commerce. Some employees...

  16. Conformational Isomerism Can Limit Antibody Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Debler, E.W.; Muller, R.; Hilvert, D.; Wilson, I.A.

    2009-05-14

    Ligand binding to enzymes and antibodies is often accompanied by protein conformational changes. Although such structural adjustments may be conducive to enzyme catalysis, much less is known about their effect on reactions promoted by engineered catalytic antibodies. Crystallographic and pre-steady state kinetic analyses of antibody 34E4, which efficiently promotes the conversion of benzisoxazoles to salicylonitriles, show that the resting catalyst adopts two interconverting active-site conformations, only one of which is competent to bind substrate. In the predominant isomer, the indole side chain of Trp{sup L91} occupies the binding site and blocks ligand access. Slow conformational isomerization of this residue, on the same time scale as catalytic turnover, creates a deep and narrow binding site that can accommodate substrate and promote proton transfer using Glu{sup H50} as a carboxylate base. Although 34E4 is among the best catalysts for the deprotonation of benzisoxazoles, its efficiency appears to be significantly limited by this conformational plasticity of its active site. Future efforts to improve this antibody might profitably focus on stabilizing the active conformation of the catalyst. Analogous strategies may also be relevant to other engineered proteins that are limited by an unfavorable conformational pre-equilibrium.

  17. Closed Large Cell Clouds

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    article title:  Closed Large Cell Clouds in the South Pacific     ... unperturbed by cyclonic or frontal activity. When the cell centers are cloudy and the main sinking motion is concentrated at cell ...

  18. Observing lysozyme's closing and opening motions by high-resolution single-molecule enzymology.

    PubMed

    Akhterov, Maxim V; Choi, Yongki; Olsen, Tivoli J; Sims, Patrick C; Iftikhar, Mariam; Gul, O Tolga; Corso, Brad L; Weiss, Gregory A; Collins, Philip G

    2015-06-19

    Single-molecule techniques can monitor the kinetics of transitions between enzyme open and closed conformations, but such methods usually lack the resolution to observe the underlying transition pathway or intermediate conformational dynamics. We have used a 1 MHz bandwidth carbon nanotube transistor to electronically monitor single molecules of the enzyme T4 lysozyme as it processes substrate. An experimental resolution of 2 μs allowed the direct recording of lysozyme's opening and closing transitions. Unexpectedly, both motions required 37 μs, on average. The distribution of transition durations was also independent of the enzyme's state: either catalytic or nonproductive. The observation of smooth, continuous transitions suggests a concerted mechanism for glycoside hydrolysis with lysozyme's two domains closing upon the polysaccharide substrate in its active site. We distinguish these smooth motions from a nonconcerted mechanism, observed in approximately 10% of lysozyme openings and closings, in which the enzyme pauses for an additional 40-140 μs in an intermediate, partially closed conformation. During intermediate forming events, the number of rate-limiting steps observed increases to four, consistent with four steps required in the stepwise, arrow-pushing mechanism. The formation of such intermediate conformations was again independent of the enzyme's state. Taken together, the results suggest lysozyme operates as a Brownian motor. In this model, the enzyme traces a single pathway for closing and the reverse pathway for enzyme opening, regardless of its instantaneous catalytic productivity. The observed symmetry in enzyme opening and closing thus suggests that substrate translocation occurs while the enzyme is closed. PMID:25763461

  19. Conformational dynamics of a G-protein α subunit is tightly regulated by nucleotide binding.

    PubMed

    Goricanec, David; Stehle, Ralf; Egloff, Pascal; Grigoriu, Simina; Plückthun, Andreas; Wagner, Gerhard; Hagn, Franz

    2016-06-28

    Heterotrimeric G proteins play a pivotal role in the signal-transduction pathways initiated by G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activation. Agonist-receptor binding causes GDP-to-GTP exchange and dissociation of the Gα subunit from the heterotrimeric G protein, leading to downstream signaling. Here, we studied the internal mobility of a G-protein α subunit in its apo and nucleotide-bound forms and characterized their dynamical features at multiple time scales using solution NMR, small-angle X-ray scattering, and molecular dynamics simulations. We find that binding of GTP analogs leads to a rigid and closed arrangement of the Gα subdomain, whereas the apo and GDP-bound forms are considerably more open and dynamic. Furthermore, we were able to detect two conformational states of the Gα Ras domain in slow exchange whose populations are regulated by binding to nucleotides and a GPCR. One of these conformational states, the open state, binds to the GPCR; the second conformation, the closed state, shows no interaction with the receptor. Binding to the GPCR stabilizes the open state. This study provides an in-depth analysis of the conformational landscape and the switching function of a G-protein α subunit and the influence of a GPCR in that landscape. PMID:27298341

  20. Conformal Collineations in String Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baysal, Hüsnü; Camci, U.ğur; Tarhan, İsmail; Yilmaz, İhsan; Yavuz, İlhami; Dolgov, A.

    In this paper, we study the consequences of the existence of conformal collineations (CC) for string cloud in the context of general relativity. Especially, we interest in special conformal collineation (SCC), generated by a special affine conformal collineation (SACC) in the string cloud. Some results on the restrictions imposed by a conformal collineation symmetry in the string cloud are obtained.

  1. Conformational kinetics reveals affinities of protein conformational states

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Kyle G.; Suo, Yang; Oas, Terrence G.

    2015-01-01

    Most biological reactions rely on interplay between binding and changes in both macromolecular structure and dynamics. Practical understanding of this interplay requires detection of critical intermediates and determination of their binding and conformational characteristics. However, many of these species are only transiently present and they have often been overlooked in mechanistic studies of reactions that couple binding to conformational change. We monitored the kinetics of ligand-induced conformational changes in a small protein using six different ligands. We analyzed the kinetic data to simultaneously determine both binding affinities for the conformational states and the rate constants of conformational change. The approach we used is sufficiently robust to determine the affinities of three conformational states and detect even modest differences in the protein’s affinities for relatively similar ligands. Ligand binding favors higher-affinity conformational states by increasing forward conformational rate constants and/or decreasing reverse conformational rate constants. The amounts by which forward rate constants increase and reverse rate constants decrease are proportional to the ratio of affinities of the conformational states. We also show that both the affinity ratio and another parameter, which quantifies the changes in conformational rate constants upon ligand binding, are strong determinants of the mechanism (conformational selection and/or induced fit) of molecular recognition. Our results highlight the utility of analyzing the kinetics of conformational changes to determine affinities that cannot be determined from equilibrium experiments. Most importantly, they demonstrate an inextricable link between conformational dynamics and the binding affinities of conformational states. PMID:26162682

  2. Conformers of Gaseous Serine.

    PubMed

    He, Kedan; Allen, Wesley D

    2016-08-01

    The myriad conformers of the neutral form of natural amino acid serine (Ser) have been investigated by systematic computations with reliable electronic wave function methods. A total of 85 unique conformers were located using the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory. The 12 lowest-energy conformers of serine fall within a 8 kJ mol(-1) window, and for these species, geometric structures, precise relative energies, equilibrium and vibrationally averaged rotational constants, anharmonic vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities, quartic and sextic centrifugal distortion constants, dipole moments, and (14)N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants were computed. The relative energies were refined through composite focal-point analyses employing basis sets as large as aug-cc-pV5Z and correlation treatments through CCSD(T). The rotational constants for seven conformers measured by Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy are in good agreement with the vibrationally averaged rotational constants computed in this study. Our anharmonic vibrational frequencies are compared to the large number of experimental vibrational absorptions attributable to at least six conformers. PMID:27294314

  3. Conformal inflation coupled to matter

    SciTech Connect

    Brax, Philippe

    2014-05-01

    We formulate new conformal models of inflation and dark energy which generalise the Higgs-Dilaton scenario. We embed these models in unimodular gravity whose effect is to break scale invariance in the late time Universe. In the early Universe, inflation occurs close to a maximum of both the scalar potential and the scalar coupling to the Ricci scalar in the Jordan frame. At late times, the dilaton, which decouples from the dynamics during inflation, receives a potential term from unimodular gravity and leads to the acceleration of the Universe. We address two central issues in this scenario. First we show that the Damour-Polyalov mechanism, when non-relativistic matter is present prior to the start of inflation, sets the initial conditions for inflation at the maximum of the scalar potential. We then show that conformal invariance implies that matter particles are not coupled to the dilaton in the late Universe at the classical level. When fermions acquire masses at low energy, scale invariance is broken and quantum corrections induce a coupling between the dilaton and matter which is still small enough to evade the gravitational constraints in the solar system.

  4. Quantifying macromolecular conformational transition pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyler, Sean; Kumar, Avishek; Thorpe, Michael; Beckstein, Oliver

    2015-03-01

    Diverse classes of proteins function through large-scale conformational changes that are challenging for computer simulations. A range of fast path-sampling techniques have been used to generate transitions, but it has been difficult to compare paths from (and assess the relative strengths of) different methods. We introduce a comprehensive method (pathway similarity analysis, PSA) for quantitatively characterizing and comparing macromolecular pathways. The Hausdorff and Fréchet metrics (known from computational geometry) are used to quantify the degree of similarity between polygonal curves in configuration space. A strength of PSA is its use of the full information available from the 3 N-dimensional configuration space trajectory without requiring additional specific knowledge about the system. We compare a sample of eleven different methods for the closed-to-open transitions of the apo enzyme adenylate kinase (AdK) and also apply PSA to an ensemble of 400 AdK trajectories produced by dynamic importance sampling MD and the Geometrical Pathways algorithm. We discuss the method's potential to enhance our understanding of transition path sampling methods, validate them, and help guide future research toward deeper physical insights into conformational transitions.

  5. Closed-loop feedback control and bifurcation analysis of epileptiform activity via optogenetic stimulation in a mathematical model of human cortex.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Prashanth; Sleigh, Jamie W; Kirsch, Heidi E; Szeri, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics provides a method of neuron stimulation that has high spatial, temporal, and cell-type specificity. Here we present a model of optogenetic feedback control that targets the inhibitory population, which expresses light-sensitive channelrhodopsin-2 channels, in a mean-field model of undifferentiated cortex that is driven to seizures. The inhibitory population is illuminated with an intensity that is a function of electrode measurements obtained via the cortical model. We test the efficacy of this control method on seizurelike activity observed in two parameter spaces of the cortical model that most closely correspond to seizures observed in patients. We also compare the effect of closed-loop and open-loop control on seizurelike activity using a less-complicated ordinary differential equation model of the undifferentiated cortex in parameter space. Seizurelike activity is successfully suppressed in both parameter planes using optimal illumination intensities less likely to have adverse effects on cortical tissue. PMID:26871110

  6. Comparative conformational analysis of peptide T analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akverdieva, Gulnare; Godjayev, Niftali; Akyuz, Sevim

    2009-01-01

    A series of peptide T analogs were investigated within the molecular mechanics framework. In order to determine the role of the aminoacid residues in spatial formation of peptide T the conformational peculiarities of the glycine-substituted analogs were investigated. The conformational profiles of some biologically tested analogs of this peptide were determined independently. The received data permit to assess the active form of this peptide. It is characterized by β-turn at the C-terminal physiologically active pentapeptide fragment of peptide molecule. The received results are important for the investigation of the structure-activity relationship and may be used at design of a rigid-molecule drug against HIV.

  7. Importance of the backbone conformation of (-)-ternatin in its fat-accumulation inhibitory activity against 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, Kenichiro; Miwa, Ryoka; Yamada, Kaoru; Uemura, Daisuke

    2009-02-21

    Key relationships between the intramolecular H-bond-derived backbone conformation and the bioactivity of the novel fat-accumulation inhibitor (-)-ternatin are examined by analyses of the NMR spectroscopic data and CD spectra of designed analogues. The results reveal that the beta-turn structure of (-)-ternatin is responsible for its potent fat-accumulation inhibitory effect against 3T3-L1 murine adipocytes. PMID:19194593

  8. Fluorescence quenching induced by conformational fluctuations in unsolvated polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiangguo; Duft, Denis; Parks, Joel H

    2008-10-01

    Time-resolved measurements were conducted to relate the fluorescence lifetimes of dye-derivatized polypeptides to local conformational dynamics in trapped, unsolvated peptide ions. This research was performed to better understand the intramolecular interactions leading to the observed increase of fluorescence quenching with temperature and, in particular, how this quenching is related to conformational fluctuations. Dye-derivatized polyproline ions, Dye-[Pro] n -Arg (+)-Trp, are formed by electrospray ionization and trapped in a variable-temperature quadrupole ion trap where they are exposed to a pulsed laser which excites fluorescence. Lifetime data exhibit fluorescence quenching as a result of an interaction between the dye and tryptophan (Trp) side chain. This result is consistent with solution measurements performed for comparison. The lifetime temperature dependence is closely fit over the range 150-463 K by an Arrhenius model of the ensemble averaged quenching rate, k q. Model fits of the measured lifetimes yield a frequency prefactor of approximately 10 (11) s (-1) for k q characteristic of collective motions of the side chains identified in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The data fits also yield activation barriers of approximately 0.3 eV, which are comparable to intramolecular electrostatic interactions calculated between the unshielded charge on the Arg residue and the dye. As a result, the quenching rate appears to be determined by the rate of conformational fluctuations and not by the rate of a specific quenching mechanism. The peptide sequence of Dye-Trp-[Pro] n -Arg (+) was also studied and identified a dependence of the quenching rate on the electrostatic field in the vicinity of the dye, Trp pair. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed over the range of experimental measurements to study trajectories relevant to the quenching interaction. The MD simulations indicate that as the temperature is increased, conformational fluctuations in

  9. Conformational Changes Relevant to Channel Activity and Folding within the first Nucleotide Binding Domain of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator*

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Rhea P.; Chong, P. Andrew; Protasevich, Irina I.; Vernon, Robert; Noy, Efrat; Bihler, Hermann; An, Jian Li; Kalid, Ori; Sela-Culang, Inbal; Mense, Martin; Senderowitz, Hanoch; Brouillette, Christie G.; Forman-Kay, Julie D.

    2012-01-01

    Deletion of Phe-508 (F508del) in the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) leads to defects in folding and channel gating. NMR data on human F508del NBD1 indicate that an H620Q mutant, shown to increase channel open probability, and the dual corrector/potentiator CFFT-001 similarly disrupt interactions between β-strands S3, S9, and S10 and the C-terminal helices H8 and H9, shifting a preexisting conformational equilibrium from helix to coil. CFFT-001 appears to interact with β-strands S3/S9/S10, consistent with docking simulations. Decreases in Tm from differential scanning calorimetry with H620Q or CFFT-001 suggest direct compound binding to a less thermostable state of NBD1. We hypothesize that, in full-length CFTR, shifting the conformational equilibrium to reduce H8/H9 interactions with the uniquely conserved strands S9/S10 facilitates release of the regulatory region from the NBD dimerization interface to promote dimerization and thereby increase channel open probability. These studies enabled by our NMR assignments for F508del NBD1 provide a window into the conformational fluctuations within CFTR that may regulate function and contribute to folding energetics. PMID:22722932

  10. Conformational changes relevant to channel activity and folding within the first nucleotide binding domain of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Rhea P; Chong, P Andrew; Protasevich, Irina I; Vernon, Robert; Noy, Efrat; Bihler, Hermann; An, Jian Li; Kalid, Ori; Sela-Culang, Inbal; Mense, Martin; Senderowitz, Hanoch; Brouillette, Christie G; Forman-Kay, Julie D

    2012-08-17

    Deletion of Phe-508 (F508del) in the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) leads to defects in folding and channel gating. NMR data on human F508del NBD1 indicate that an H620Q mutant, shown to increase channel open probability, and the dual corrector/potentiator CFFT-001 similarly disrupt interactions between β-strands S3, S9, and S10 and the C-terminal helices H8 and H9, shifting a preexisting conformational equilibrium from helix to coil. CFFT-001 appears to interact with β-strands S3/S9/S10, consistent with docking simulations. Decreases in T(m) from differential scanning calorimetry with H620Q or CFFT-001 suggest direct compound binding to a less thermostable state of NBD1. We hypothesize that, in full-length CFTR, shifting the conformational equilibrium to reduce H8/H9 interactions with the uniquely conserved strands S9/S10 facilitates release of the regulatory region from the NBD dimerization interface to promote dimerization and thereby increase channel open probability. These studies enabled by our NMR assignments for F508del NBD1 provide a window into the conformational fluctuations within CFTR that may regulate function and contribute to folding energetics. PMID:22722932

  11. Towards a closed-loop cochlear implant system: application of embedded monitoring of peripheral and central neural activity.

    PubMed

    Mc Laughlin, Myles; Lu, Thomas; Dimitrijevic, Andrew; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2012-07-01

    Although the cochlear implant (CI) is widely considered the most successful neural prosthesis, it is essentially an open-loop system that requires extensive initial fitting and frequent tuning to maintain a high, but not necessarily optimal, level of performance. Two developments in neuroscience and neuroengineering now make it feasible to design a closed-loop CI. One development is the recording and interpretation of evoked potentials (EPs) from the peripheral to the central nervous system. The other is the embedded hardware and software of a modern CI that allows recording of EPs. We review EPs that are pertinent to behavioral functions from simple signal detection and loudness growth to speech discrimination and recognition. We also describe signal processing algorithms used for electric artifact reduction and cancellation, critical to the recording of electric EPs. We then present a conceptual design for a closed-loop CI that utilizes in an innovative way the embedded implant receiver and stimulators to record short latency compound action potentials ( ~1 ms), auditory brainstem responses (1-10 ms) and mid-to-late cortical potentials (20-300 ms). We compare EPs recorded using the CI to EPs obtained using standard scalp electrodes recording techniques. Future applications and capabilities are discussed in terms of the development of a new generation of closed-loop CIs and other neural prostheses. PMID:22328183

  12. Conformation and hydrogen ion titration of proteins: a continuum electrostatic model with conformational flexibility.

    PubMed

    You, T J; Bashford, D

    1995-11-01

    A new method for including local conformational flexibility in calculations of the hydrogen ion titration of proteins using macroscopic electrostatic models is presented. Intrinsic pKa values and electrostatic interactions between titrating sites are calculated from an ensemble of conformers in which the positions of titrating side chains are systematically varied. The method is applied to the Asp, Glu, and Tyr residues of hen lysozyme. The effects of different minimization and/or sampling protocols for both single-conformer and multi-conformer calculations are studied. For single-conformer calculations it is found that the results are sensitive to the choice of all-hydrogen versus polar-hydrogen-only atomic models and to the minimization protocol chosen. The best overall agreement of single-conformer calculations with experiment is obtained with an all-hydrogen model and either a two-step minimization process or minimization using a high dielectric constant. Multi-conformational calculations give significantly improved agreement with experiment, slightly smaller shifts between model compound pKa values and calculated intrinsic pKa values, and reduced sensitivity of the intrinsic pKa calculations to the initial details of the structure compared to single-conformer calculations. The extent of these improvements depends on the type of minimization used during the generation of conformers, with more extensive minimization giving greater improvements. The ordering of the titrations of the active-site residues, Glu-35 and Asp-52, is particularly sensitive to the minimization and sampling protocols used. The balance of strong site-site interactions in the active site suggests a need for including site-site conformational correlations. PMID:8580316

  13. Seed conformal blocks in 4D CFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echeverri, Alejandro Castedo; Elkhidir, Emtinan; Karateev, Denis; Serone, Marco

    2016-02-01

    We compute in closed analytical form the minimal set of "seed" conformal blocks associated to the exchange of generic mixed symmetry spinor/tensor operators in an arbitrary representation ( ℓ, overline{ℓ} ) of the Lorentz group in four dimensional conformal field theories. These blocks arise from 4-point functions involving two scalars, one (0, | ℓ - overline{7ell;} |) and one (| ℓ - overline{ℓ} |, 0) spinors or tensors. We directly solve the set of Casimir equations, that can elegantly be written in a compact form for any ( ℓ, overline{ℓ} ), by using an educated ansatz and reducing the problem to an algebraic linear system. Various details on the form of the ansatz have been deduced by using the so called shadow formalism. The complexity of the conformal blocks depends on the value of p = | ℓ - overline{ℓ} | and grows with p, in analogy to what happens to scalar conformal blocks in d even space-time dimensions as d increases. These results open the way to bootstrap 4-point functions involving arbitrary spinor/tensor operators in four dimensional conformal field theories.

  14. Extended conformal algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouwknegt, Peter

    1988-06-01

    We investigate extensions of the Virasoro algebra by a single primary field of integer or halfinteger conformal dimension Δ. We argue that for vanishing structure constant CΔΔΔ, the extended conformal algebra can only be associative for a generic c-value if Δ=1/2, 1, 3/2, 2 or 3. For the other Δ<=5 we compute the finite set of allowed c-values and identify the rational solutions. The case CΔΔΔ≠0 is also briefly discussed. I would like to thank Kareljan Schoutens for discussions and Sander Bais for a careful reading of the manuscript.

  15. Charged conformal Killing spinors

    SciTech Connect

    Lischewski, Andree

    2015-01-15

    We study the twistor equation on pseudo-Riemannian Spin{sup c}-manifolds whose solutions we call charged conformal Killing spinors (CCKSs). We derive several integrability conditions for the existence of CCKS and study their relations to spinor bilinears. A construction principle for Lorentzian manifolds admitting CCKS with nontrivial charge starting from CR-geometry is presented. We obtain a partial classification result in the Lorentzian case under the additional assumption that the associated Dirac current is normal conformal and complete the classification of manifolds admitting CCKS in all dimensions and signatures ≤5 which has recently been initiated in the study of supersymmetric field theories on curved space.

  16. Logarithmic conformal field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainutdinov, Azat; Ridout, David; Runkel, Ingo

    2013-12-01

    Conformal field theory (CFT) has proven to be one of the richest and deepest subjects of modern theoretical and mathematical physics research, especially as regards statistical mechanics and string theory. It has also stimulated an enormous amount of activity in mathematics, shaping and building bridges between seemingly disparate fields through the study of vertex operator algebras, a (partial) axiomatisation of a chiral CFT. One can add to this that the successes of CFT, particularly when applied to statistical lattice models, have also served as an inspiration for mathematicians to develop entirely new fields: the Schramm-Loewner evolution and Smirnov's discrete complex analysis being notable examples. When the energy operator fails to be diagonalisable on the quantum state space, the CFT is said to be logarithmic. Consequently, a logarithmic CFT is one whose quantum space of states is constructed from a collection of representations which includes reducible but indecomposable ones. This qualifier arises because of the consequence that certain correlation functions will possess logarithmic singularities, something that contrasts with the familiar case of power law singularities. While such logarithmic singularities and reducible representations were noted by Rozansky and Saleur in their study of the U (1|1) Wess-Zumino-Witten model in 1992, the link between the non-diagonalisability of the energy operator and logarithmic singularities in correlators is usually ascribed to Gurarie's 1993 article (his paper also contains the first usage of the term 'logarithmic conformal field theory'). The class of CFTs that were under control at this time was quite small. In particular, an enormous amount of work from the statistical mechanics and string theory communities had produced a fairly detailed understanding of the (so-called) rational CFTs. However, physicists from both camps were well aware that applications from many diverse fields required significantly more

  17. ATP-competitive LRRK2 inhibitors interfere with monoclonal antibody binding to the kinase domain of LRRK2 under native conditions. A method to directly monitor the active conformation of LRRK2?

    PubMed

    Gillardon, Frank; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Froehlich, Thomas; Ueffing, Marius; Hengerer, Bastian; Gloeckner, Christian J

    2013-03-30

    Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are the most common genetic cause of Parkinson's disease. LRRK2 kinase activity is required for toxicity in neuronal cell cultures suggesting that selective kinase inhibitors may prevent neurodegeneration in patients. Directly monitoring LRRK2 activity in cells would be advantageous for the development of small molecule LRRK2 inhibitors. Here, we demonstrate that a monoclonal anti-LRRK2 antibody directed against the activation segment binds less efficiently to native LRRK2 protein in the presence of ATP-competitive LRRK2 inhibitors. Since kinase inhibitors prevent autophosphorylation and refolding of the activation segment, we hypothesize that the antibody preferentially binds to the active conformation of LRRK2 under native conditions. PMID:23318290

  18. The conforming brain and deontological resolve.

    PubMed

    Pincus, Melanie; LaViers, Lisa; Prietula, Michael J; Berns, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Our personal values are subject to forces of social influence. Deontological resolve captures how strongly one relies on absolute rules of right and wrong in the representation of one's personal values and may predict willingness to modify one's values in the presence of social influence. Using fMRI, we found that a neurobiological metric for deontological resolve based on relative activity in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) during the passive processing of sacred values predicted individual differences in conformity. Individuals with stronger deontological resolve, as measured by greater VLPFC activity, displayed lower levels of conformity. We also tested whether responsiveness to social reward, as measured by ventral striatal activity during social feedback, predicted variability in conformist behavior across individuals but found no significant relationship. From these results we conclude that unwillingness to conform to others' values is associated with a strong neurobiological representation of social rules. PMID:25170989

  19. The Conforming Brain and Deontological Resolve

    PubMed Central

    Pincus, Melanie; LaViers, Lisa; Prietula, Michael J.; Berns, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Our personal values are subject to forces of social influence. Deontological resolve captures how strongly one relies on absolute rules of right and wrong in the representation of one's personal values and may predict willingness to modify one's values in the presence of social influence. Using fMRI, we found that a neurobiological metric for deontological resolve based on relative activity in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) during the passive processing of sacred values predicted individual differences in conformity. Individuals with stronger deontological resolve, as measured by greater VLPFC activity, displayed lower levels of conformity. We also tested whether responsiveness to social reward, as measured by ventral striatal activity during social feedback, predicted variability in conformist behavior across individuals but found no significant relationship. From these results we conclude that unwillingness to conform to others' values is associated with a strong neurobiological representation of social rules. PMID:25170989

  20. Conformal cloak for waves

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Huanyang; Leonhardt, Ulf; Tyc, Tomas

    2011-05-15

    Conformal invisibility devices are only supposed to work within the valid range of geometrical optics. Here, we show by numerical simulations and analytical arguments that for certain quantized frequencies, they are nearly perfect even in a regime that clearly violates geometrical optics. The quantization condition follows from the analogy between the Helmholtz equation and the stationary Schroedinger equation.

  1. Extended conformal field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taormina, Anne

    1990-08-01

    Some extended conformal field theories are briefly reviewed. They illustrate how non minimal models of the Virasoro algebra (c≥1) can become minimal with respect to a larger algebra. The accent is put on N-extended superconformal algebras, which are relevant in superstring compactification.

  2. PERSONALITY AND CONFORMITY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BAROCAS, RALPH; GORLOW, LEON

    AN INVESTIGATION WAS MADE OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PERSONALITY FACTORS AND CONFORMITY. THE SUBJECTS WERE 243 RANDOMLY SELECTED STUDENTS ENROLLED IN COLLEGE PSYCHOLOGY COURSES WHO WERE DIVIDED INTO GROUPS OF 97, 96, AND 50 SUBJECTS. A PERSONALITY FACTOR INVENTORY WAS OBTAINED FROM RESPONSES TO A LARGE LIST OF TRUE-FALSE PERSONALITY ITEM…

  3. Animal culture: chimpanzee conformity?

    PubMed

    van Schaik, Carel P

    2012-05-22

    Culture-like phenomena in wild animals have received much attention, but how good is the evidence and how similar are they to human culture? New data on chimpanzees suggest their culture may even have an element of conformity. PMID:22625856

  4. Conformational changes in biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Vassili

    2005-12-01

    Biopolymer conformational changes are involved in many biological processes. This thesis summarizes some theoretical and experimental approaches which I have taken at UCLA to explore conformational changes in biopolymers. The reversible thermal denaturation of the DNA double helix is, perhaps, the simplest example of biopolymer conformational change. I have developed a statistical mechanics model of DNA melting with reduced degrees of freedom, which allows base stacking interaction to be taken into account and treat base pairing and stacking separately. Unlike previous models, this model describes both the unpairing and unstacking parts of the experimental melting curves and explains the observed temperature dependence of the effective thermodynamic parameters used in models of the nearest neighbor type. I developed a basic kinetic model for irreversible thermal denaturation of F-actin, which incorporates depolymerization of F-actin from the ends and breaking of F-actin fiber in the middle. The model explains the cooperativity of F-actin thermal denaturation observed by D. Pavlov et al. in differential calorimetry measurements. CG-rich DNA sequences form left-handed Z-DNA at high ionic strength or upon binding of polyvalent ions and some proteins. I studied experimentally the B-to-Z transition of the (CG)6 dodecamer. Improvement of the locally linearized model used to interpret the data gives evidence for an intermediate state in the B-to-Z transition of DNA, contrary to previous research on this subject. In the past 15 years it has become possible to study the conformational changes of biomolecules using single-molecule techniques. In collaboration with other lab members I performed a single-molecule experiment, where we monitored the displacement of a micrometer-size bead tethered to a surface by a DNA probe undergoing the conformational change. This technique allows probing of conformational changes with subnanometer accuracy. We applied the method to detect

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis acyl carrier protein synthase adopts two different pH-dependent structural conformations

    SciTech Connect

    Gokulan, Kuppan; Aggarwal, Anup; Shipman, Lance; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Sacchettini, James C.

    2011-09-20

    The crystal structures of acyl carrier protein synthase (AcpS) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and Corynebacterium ammoniagenes determined at pH 5.3 and pH 6.5, respectively, are reported. Comparison of the Mtb apo-AcpS structure with the recently reported structure of the Mtb AcpS-ADP complex revealed that AcpS adopts two different conformations: the orthorhombic and trigonal space-group structures show structural differences in the {alpha}2 helix and in the conformation of the {alpha}3-{alpha}4 connecting loop, which is in a closed conformation. The apo-AcpS structure shows electron density for the entire model and was obtained at lower pH values (4.4-6.0). In contrast, at a higher pH value (6.5) AcpS undergoes significant conformational changes, resulting in disordered regions that show no electron density in the AcpS model. The solved structures also reveal that C. ammoniagenes AcpS undergoes structural rearrangement in two regions, similar to the recently reported Mtb AcpS-ADP complex structure. In vitro reconstitution experiments show that AcpS has a higher post-translational modification activity between pH 4.4 and 6.0 than at pH values above 6.5, where the activity drops owing to the change in conformation. The results show that apo-AcpS and AcpS-ADP adopt different conformations depending upon the pH conditions of the crystallization solution.

  6. CONFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT USING GELS

    SciTech Connect

    Randall S. Seright

    2003-09-01

    This report describes work performed during the second year of the project, ''Conformance Improvement Using Gels.'' The project has two objectives. The first objective is to identify gel compositions and conditions that substantially reduce flow through fractures that allow direct channeling between wells, while leaving secondary fractures open so that high fluid injection and production rates can be maintained. The second objective is to optimize treatments in fractured production wells, where the gel must reduce permeability to water much more than that to oil. Pore-level images from X-ray computed microtomography were re-examined for Berea sandstone and porous polyethylene. This analysis suggests that oil penetration through gel-filled pores occurs by a gel-dehydration mechanism, rather than a gel-ripping mechanism. This finding helps to explain why aqueous gels can reduce permeability to water more than to oil. We analyzed a Cr(III)-acetate-HPAM gel treatment in a production well in the Arbuckle formation. The availability of accurate pressure data before, during, and after the treatment was critical for the analysis. After the gel treatment, water productivity was fairly constant at about 20% of the pre-treatment value. However, oil productivity was stimulated by a factor of 18 immediately after the treatment. During the six months after the treatment, oil productivity gradually decreased to approach the pre-treatment value. To explain this behavior, we proposed that the fracture area open to oil flow was increased substantially by the gel treatment, followed by a gradual closing of the fractures during subsequent production. For a conventional Cr(III)-acetate-HPAM gel, the delay between gelant preparation and injection into a fracture impacts the placement, leakoff, and permeability reduction behavior. Formulations placed as partially formed gels showed relatively low pressure gradients during placement, and yet substantially reduced the flow capacity of

  7. Molecular Dynamics Studies on the Conformational Transitions of Adenylate Kinase: A Computational Evidence for the Conformational Selection Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Jie; Hao, Pei; Li, Yi-Xue; Wang, Jing-Fang

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli adenylate kinase (ADK) is a monomeric phosphotransferase enzyme that catalyzes reversible transfer of phosphoryl group from ATP to AMP with a large-scale domain motion. The detailed mechanism for this conformational transition remains unknown. In the current study, we performed long time-scale molecular dynamics simulations on both open and closed states of ADK. Based on the structural analyses of the simulation trajectories, we detected over 20 times conformational transitions between the open and closed states of ADK and identified two novel conformations as intermediate states in the catalytic processes. With these findings, we proposed a possible mechanism for the large-scale domain motion of Escherichia coli ADK and its catalytic process: (1) the substrate free ADK adopted an open conformation; (2) ATP bound with LID domain closure; (3) AMP bound with NMP domain closure; (4) phosphoryl transfer occurred with ATP, and AMP converted into two ADPs, and no conformational transition was detected in the enzyme; (5) LID domain opened with one ADP released; (6) another ADP released with NMP domain open. As both open and closed states sampled a wide range of conformation transitions, our simulation strongly supported the conformational selection mechanism for Escherichia coli ADK. PMID:23936827

  8. The research of conformal optical design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin; Li, Yan; Huang, Yi-fan; Du, Bao-lin

    2009-07-01

    in conformal optical design, the SPGD optimization algorithm is operated at each zoom position to calculate the optimized surface shape of the MEMS DM. The communication between MATLAB and Code V established via ActiveX technique is applied in simulation analysis.

  9. Conformation of inhibitor-free HIV-1 protease derived from NMR spectroscopy in a weakly oriented solution

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Julien; Louis, John M.; Bax, Ad

    2014-01-01

    Flexibility of the glycine-rich flaps is known to be essential for catalytic activity of the HIV-1 protease, but their exact conformations at the different stages of the enzymatic pathway remain subject to much debate. While hundreds of crystal structures of protease-inhibitor complexes have been solved, only about a dozen inhibitor-free protease structures have been reported. These apo-structures reveal a large diversity of flap conformations, ranging from closed, to semi-open and wide-open. To evaluate the average structure in solution, we measured residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) and compared these to values calculated for crystal structures representative of the closed, semi-open and wide-open states. The RDC data clearly indicate that the inhibitor-free protease, on average, adopts a closed conformation in solution that is very similar to the inhibitor-bound state. By contrast, a highly drug-resistant protease mutant, PR20, adopts the wide-open flap conformation. PMID:25470009

  10. Clinical-Grade Generation of Active NK Cells from Cord Blood Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells for Immunotherapy Using a Closed-System Culture Process

    PubMed Central

    Spanholtz, Jan; Preijers, Frank; Tordoir, Marleen; Trilsbeek, Carel; Paardekooper, Jos; de Witte, Theo; Schaap, Nicolaas; Dolstra, Harry

    2011-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell-based adoptive immunotherapy is a promising treatment approach for many cancers. However, development of protocols that provide large numbers of functional NK cells produced under GMP conditions are required to facilitate clinical studies. In this study, we translated our cytokine-based culture protocol for ex vivo expansion of NK cells from umbilical cord blood (UCB) hematopoietic stem cells into a fully closed, large-scale, cell culture bioprocess. We optimized enrichment of CD34+ cells from cryopreserved UCB units using the CliniMACS system followed by efficient expansion for 14 days in gas-permeable cell culture bags. Thereafter, expanded CD34+ UCB cells could be reproducibly amplified and differentiated into CD56+CD3− NK cell products using bioreactors with a mean expansion of more than 2,000 fold and a purity of >90%. Moreover, expansion in the bioreactor yielded a clinically relevant dose of NK cells (mean: 2×109 NK cells), which display high expression of activating NK receptors and cytolytic activity against K562. Finally, we established a versatile closed washing procedure resulting in optimal reduction of medium, serum and cytokines used in the cell culture process without changes in phenotype and cytotoxic activity. These results demonstrate that large numbers of UCB stem cell-derived NK cell products for adoptive immunotherapy can be produced in closed, large-scale bioreactors for the use in clinical trials. PMID:21698239

  11. Galilean conformal and superconformal symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Lukierski, J.

    2012-10-15

    Firstly we discuss briefly three different algebras named as nonrelativistic (NR) conformal: Schroedinger, Galilean conformal, and infinite algebra of local NR conformal isometries. Further we shall consider in some detail Galilean conformal algebra (GCA) obtained in the limit c{yields}{infinity} from relativistic conformal algebraO(d+1, 2) (d-number of space dimensions). Two different contraction limits providing GCA and some recently considered realizations will be briefly discussed. Finally by considering NR contraction of D = 4 superconformal algebra the Galilei conformal superalgebra (GCSA) is obtained, in the formulation using complexWeyl supercharges.

  12. Ring closing metathesis reactions of α-methylene-β-lactams: application to the synthesis of a simplified phyllostictine analogue with herbicidal activity.

    PubMed

    Coe, Samuel; Pereira, Nicole; Geden, Joanna V; Clarkson, Guy J; Fox, David J; Napier, Richard M; Neve, Paul; Shipman, Michael

    2015-07-28

    Ring closing metathesis (RCM) reactions of α-methylene-β-lactams are used to construct strained 11- and 12-membered macrocycles that mimic key structural elements of phyllostictine A. The highest yield and stereoselectivity was achieved making 12-membered macrocycle Z-19 with use of a p-methoxyphenyl group on the lactam nitrogen. Interestingly, substrate concentration had an important influence on the stereochemical course of the reaction. A simplified analogue produced using this approach displays phytotoxic activity against Chlamydomonas reinhardtii suggesting that the α-methylene-β-lactam subunit is responsible, at least in part, for the herbicidal activity of phyllostictine A. PMID:26081012

  13. Conformational Transformations in Aromatic Nitroso Oxides.

    PubMed

    Yusupova, Alfia R; Safiullin, Rustam L; Khursan, Sergey L

    2016-07-21

    A systematic theoretical study on conformational transformations of monosubstituted (ortho- and para-) aromatic nitroso oxides R-C6H4NOO was performed. The existence of two rotation axes enables two types of conformational transitions in substituted arylnitroso oxides: trans/cis (rotation around the N-O bond) and syn/anti (rotation around the C-N bond, which is important in ortho isomers). The complete set of conformers was localized for R-C6H4NOO using four selected density functional (M06-L, mPWPW91, OLYP, and HCTH) and augmented polarization basis set of triple splitting. It was found that the activation enthalpy of the trans-cis conformational transition is nearly insensitive to the nature of R and ranges within 58-60 kJ/mol for para isomers. The ortho substituent has an insignificant effect on ΔH(≠)trans→cis: it increases this value by ∼5 kJ/mol in syn isomers and decreases it by ∼3 kJ/mol in anti isomers. On the contrary, the syn-anti conformational barrier is considerably affected by the substituent R; an increase in the electron-withdrawing properties of R decreases ΔH(≠)syn→anti. The activation enthalpies grow with increasing polarity of the solvent, as it was found using IEFPCM calculation. The values of relaxation time for all conformational equilibria were calculated and compared with known lifetimes of aromatic nitroso oxides. Our results suggest that syn/anti transitions occur fast enough in the scale of the experimental lifetime. However, trans/cis transformations proceed more slowly. And under certain conditions discussed in the paper, the rate of this conformational transition limits that of irreversible decay of nitroso oxide. PMID:27356269

  14. Conformational rearrangements in the transmembrane domain of CNGA1 channels revealed by single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Maity, Sourav; Mazzolini, Monica; Arcangeletti, Manuel; Valbuena, Alejandro; Fabris, Paolo; Lazzarino, Marco; Torre, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels are activated by binding of cyclic nucleotides. Although structural studies have identified the channel pore and selectivity filter, conformation changes associated with gating remain poorly understood. Here we combine single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) with mutagenesis, bioinformatics and electrophysiology to study conformational changes associated with gating. By expressing functional channels with SMFS fingerprints in Xenopus laevis oocytes, we were able to investigate gating of CNGA1 in a physiological-like membrane. Force spectra determined that the S4 transmembrane domain is mechanically coupled to S5 in the closed state, but S3 in the open state. We also show there are multiple pathways for the unfolding of the transmembrane domains, probably caused by a different degree of α-helix folding. This approach demonstrates that CNG transmembrane domains have dynamic structure and establishes SMFS as a tool for probing conformational change in ion channels. PMID:25963832

  15. Conformational rearrangements in the transmembrane domain of CNGA1 channels revealed by single-molecule force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Sourav; Mazzolini, Monica; Arcangeletti, Manuel; Valbuena, Alejandro; Fabris, Paolo; Lazzarino, Marco; Torre, Vincent

    2015-05-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels are activated by binding of cyclic nucleotides. Although structural studies have identified the channel pore and selectivity filter, conformation changes associated with gating remain poorly understood. Here we combine single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) with mutagenesis, bioinformatics and electrophysiology to study conformational changes associated with gating. By expressing functional channels with SMFS fingerprints in Xenopus laevis oocytes, we were able to investigate gating of CNGA1 in a physiological-like membrane. Force spectra determined that the S4 transmembrane domain is mechanically coupled to S5 in the closed state, but S3 in the open state. We also show there are multiple pathways for the unfolding of the transmembrane domains, probably caused by a different degree of α-helix folding. This approach demonstrates that CNG transmembrane domains have dynamic structure and establishes SMFS as a tool for probing conformational change in ion channels.

  16. Self-Specific Stimuli Interact Differently than Non-Self-Specific Stimuli with Eyes-Open Versus Eyes-Closed Spontaneous Activity in Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Pengmin; Grimm, Simone; Duncan, Niall W.; Holland, Giles; Guo, Jia shen; Fan, Yan; Weigand, Anne; Baudewig, Juergen; Bajbouj, Malek; Northoff, Georg

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that there may be a distinct relationship between spontaneous neural activity and subsequent or concurrent self-specific stimulus-induced activity. This study aims to test the impact of spontaneous activity as recorded in an eyes-open (EO) resting state as opposed to eyes-closed (EC) on self-specific versus non-self-specific auditory stimulus-induced activity in fMRI. In our first experiment we used self-specific stimuli comprised of the subject’s own name and non-self-specific stimuli comprised of a friend’s name and an unknown name, presented during EO versus EC baselines in a 3 name condition × 2 baseline design. In Experiment 2 we directly measured spontaneous activity in the absence of stimuli during EO versus EC to confirm a modulatory effect of the two baseline conditions in the regions found to show an interaction effect in Experiment 1. Spontaneous activity during EO was significantly higher than during EC in bilateral auditory cortex and non-self-specific names yielded stronger signal changes relative to EO baseline than to EC. In contrast, there was no difference in response to self-specific names relative to EO baseline than to EC despite the difference between spontaneous activity levels. These results support an impact of spontaneous activity on stimulus-induced activity, moreover an impact that depends on the high-level stimulus characteristic of self-specificity. PMID:23908625

  17. Comprehensive objective maps of macromolecular conformations by quantitative SAXS analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hura, Greg L.; Budworth, Helen; Dyer, Kevin N.; Rambo, Robert P.; Hammel, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensive perspectives of macromolecular conformations are required to connect structure to biology. Here we present a small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) Structural Similarity Map (SSM) and Volatility of Ratio (VR) metric providing comprehensive, quantitative and objective (superposition-independent) perspectives on solution state conformations. We validate VR and SSM utility on human MutSβ, a key ABC ATPase and chemotherapeutic target, by revealing MutSβ DNA sculpting and identifying multiple conformational states for biological activity. PMID:23624664

  18. Logarithmic conformal field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainutdinov, Azat; Ridout, David; Runkel, Ingo

    2013-12-01

    Conformal field theory (CFT) has proven to be one of the richest and deepest subjects of modern theoretical and mathematical physics research, especially as regards statistical mechanics and string theory. It has also stimulated an enormous amount of activity in mathematics, shaping and building bridges between seemingly disparate fields through the study of vertex operator algebras, a (partial) axiomatisation of a chiral CFT. One can add to this that the successes of CFT, particularly when applied to statistical lattice models, have also served as an inspiration for mathematicians to develop entirely new fields: the Schramm-Loewner evolution and Smirnov's discrete complex analysis being notable examples. When the energy operator fails to be diagonalisable on the quantum state space, the CFT is said to be logarithmic. Consequently, a logarithmic CFT is one whose quantum space of states is constructed from a collection of representations which includes reducible but indecomposable ones. This qualifier arises because of the consequence that certain correlation functions will possess logarithmic singularities, something that contrasts with the familiar case of power law singularities. While such logarithmic singularities and reducible representations were noted by Rozansky and Saleur in their study of the U (1|1) Wess-Zumino-Witten model in 1992, the link between the non-diagonalisability of the energy operator and logarithmic singularities in correlators is usually ascribed to Gurarie's 1993 article (his paper also contains the first usage of the term 'logarithmic conformal field theory'). The class of CFTs that were under control at this time was quite small. In particular, an enormous amount of work from the statistical mechanics and string theory communities had produced a fairly detailed understanding of the (so-called) rational CFTs. However, physicists from both camps were well aware that applications from many diverse fields required significantly more

  19. Multiscale conformal pattern transfer

    PubMed Central

    Lodewijks, Kristof; Miljkovic, Vladimir; Massiot, Inès; Mekonnen, Addis; Verre, Ruggero; Olsson, Eva; Dmitriev, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a method for seamless transfer from a parent flat substrate of basically any lithographic top-down or bottom-up pattern onto essentially any kind of surface. The nano- or microscale patterns, spanning macroscopic surface areas, can be transferred with high conformity onto a large variety of surfaces when such patterns are produced on a thin carbon film, grown on top of a sacrificial layer. The latter allows lifting the patterns from the flat parent substrate onto a water-air interface to be picked up by the host surface of choice. We illustrate the power of this technique by functionalizing broad range of materials including glass, plastics, metals, rough semiconductors and polymers, highlighting the potential applications in in situ colorimetry of the chemistry of materials, anti-counterfeit technologies, biomolecular and biomedical studies, light-matter interactions at the nanoscale, conformal photovoltaics and flexible electronics. PMID:27329824

  20. Multiscale conformal pattern transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodewijks, Kristof; Miljkovic, Vladimir; Massiot, Inès; Mekonnen, Addis; Verre, Ruggero; Olsson, Eva; Dmitriev, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a method for seamless transfer from a parent flat substrate of basically any lithographic top-down or bottom-up pattern onto essentially any kind of surface. The nano- or microscale patterns, spanning macroscopic surface areas, can be transferred with high conformity onto a large variety of surfaces when such patterns are produced on a thin carbon film, grown on top of a sacrificial layer. The latter allows lifting the patterns from the flat parent substrate onto a water-air interface to be picked up by the host surface of choice. We illustrate the power of this technique by functionalizing broad range of materials including glass, plastics, metals, rough semiconductors and polymers, highlighting the potential applications in in situ colorimetry of the chemistry of materials, anti-counterfeit technologies, biomolecular and biomedical studies, light-matter interactions at the nanoscale, conformal photovoltaics and flexible electronics.

  1. Multiscale conformal pattern transfer.

    PubMed

    Lodewijks, Kristof; Miljkovic, Vladimir; Massiot, Inès; Mekonnen, Addis; Verre, Ruggero; Olsson, Eva; Dmitriev, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a method for seamless transfer from a parent flat substrate of basically any lithographic top-down or bottom-up pattern onto essentially any kind of surface. The nano- or microscale patterns, spanning macroscopic surface areas, can be transferred with high conformity onto a large variety of surfaces when such patterns are produced on a thin carbon film, grown on top of a sacrificial layer. The latter allows lifting the patterns from the flat parent substrate onto a water-air interface to be picked up by the host surface of choice. We illustrate the power of this technique by functionalizing broad range of materials including glass, plastics, metals, rough semiconductors and polymers, highlighting the potential applications in in situ colorimetry of the chemistry of materials, anti-counterfeit technologies, biomolecular and biomedical studies, light-matter interactions at the nanoscale, conformal photovoltaics and flexible electronics. PMID:27329824

  2. Conformal gripping device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to a conformal gripping device. In an embodiment of the present invention a conformal gripper device may be disclosed comprising a frame that includes an array of movable pins. The device may also include a roller locking and unlocking system within the frame. The system may comprise a pair of locking rollers for each row of gripper pins to facilitate locking and unlocking the array of gripper pins on a column-by-column basis. The system may also include a striker element that may force the locking rollers to roll along an angled roll surface to facilitate unlocking of the array of pins on a column-by-column basis. The system may further include an electromagnetic actuator or solenoid and permanent magnets to facilitate movement of the striker element and the locking rollers.

  3. The conformal bootstrap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poland, David; Simmons-Duffin, David

    2016-06-01

    The conformal bootstrap was proposed in the 1970s as a strategy for calculating the properties of second-order phase transitions. After spectacular success elucidating two-dimensional systems, little progress was made on systems in higher dimensions until a recent renaissance beginning in 2008. We report on some of the main results and ideas from this renaissance, focusing on new determinations of critical exponents and correlation functions in the three-dimensional Ising and O(N) models.

  4. Conformal scalar field wormholes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halliwell, Jonathan J.; Laflamme, Raymond

    1989-01-01

    The Euclidian Einstein equations with a cosmological constant and a conformally coupled scalar field are solved, taking the metric to be of the Robertson-Walker type. In the case Lambda = 0, solutions are found which represent a wormhole connecting two asymptotically flat Euclidian regions. In the case Lambda greater than 0, the solutions represent tunneling from a small Tolman-like universe to a large Robertson-Walker universe.

  5. Conformations of organophosphine oxides

    DOE PAGESBeta

    De Silva, Nuwan; Zahariev, Federico; Hay, Benjamin P.; Gordon, Mark S.; Windus, Theresa L.

    2015-07-17

    The conformations of a series of organophosphine oxides, OP(CH3)2R, where R = methyl, ethyl, isopropyl, tert-butyl, vinyl, and phenyl, are predicted using the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory. Comparison of potential energy surfaces for rotation about P–C bonds with crystal structure data reveals a strong correlation between predicted location and energetics of minima and histograms of dihedral angle distributions observed in the solid state. In addition, the most stable conformers are those that minimize the extent of steric repulsion between adjacent rotor substituents, and the torsional barriers tend to increase with the steric bulk of the rotating alkyl group. MM3 forcemore » field parameters were adjusted to fit the MP2 results, providing a fast and accurate model for predicting organophosphine oxides shapes—an essential part of understanding the chemistry of these compounds. As a result, the predictive power of the modified MM3 model was tested against MP2/cc-pVTZ conformations for triethylphosphine oxide, OP(CH2CH3)3, and triphenylphosphine oxide, OP(Ph)3.« less

  6. Conformations of organophosphine oxides

    SciTech Connect

    De Silva, Nuwan; Zahariev, Federico; Hay, Benjamin P.; Gordon, Mark S.; Windus, Theresa L.

    2015-07-17

    The conformations of a series of organophosphine oxides, OP(CH3)2R, where R = methyl, ethyl, isopropyl, tert-butyl, vinyl, and phenyl, are predicted using the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory. Comparison of potential energy surfaces for rotation about P–C bonds with crystal structure data reveals a strong correlation between predicted location and energetics of minima and histograms of dihedral angle distributions observed in the solid state. In addition, the most stable conformers are those that minimize the extent of steric repulsion between adjacent rotor substituents, and the torsional barriers tend to increase with the steric bulk of the rotating alkyl group. MM3 force field parameters were adjusted to fit the MP2 results, providing a fast and accurate model for predicting organophosphine oxides shapes—an essential part of understanding the chemistry of these compounds. As a result, the predictive power of the modified MM3 model was tested against MP2/cc-pVTZ conformations for triethylphosphine oxide, OP(CH2CH3)3, and triphenylphosphine oxide, OP(Ph)3.

  7. Hot conformal gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojaza, Matin; Pica, Claudio; Sannino, Francesco

    2010-12-01

    We compute the nonzero temperature free energy up to the order g6ln⁡(1/g) in the coupling constant for vectorlike SU(N) gauge theories featuring matter transforming according to different representations of the underlying gauge group. The number of matter fields, i.e. flavors, is arranged in such a way that the theory develops a perturbative stable infrared fixed point at zero temperature. Because of large distance conformality we trade the coupling constant with its fixed point value and define a reduced free energy which depends only on the number of flavors, colors, and matter representation. We show that the reduced free energy changes sign, at the second, fifth, and sixth order in the coupling, when decreasing the number of flavors from the upper end of the conformal window. If the change in sign is interpreted as a signal of an instability of the system then we infer a critical number of flavors. Surprisingly this number, if computed to the order g2, agrees with previous predictions for the lower boundary of the conformal window for nonsupersymmetric gauge theories. The higher order results tend to predict a higher number of critical flavors. These are universal properties, i.e. they are independent of the specific matter representation.

  8. Bacterial Species-Specific Activity of a Fluoroquinolone against Two Closely Related Pasteurellaceae with Similar MICs: Differential In Vitro Inoculum Effects and In Vivo Efficacies

    PubMed Central

    Lhermie, Guillaume; El Garch, Farid; Toutain, Pierre-Louis; Ferran, Aude A.; Bousquet-Mélou, Alain

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the antimicrobial activity of a fluoroquinolone against two genetically close bacterial species belonging to the Pasteurellaceae family. Time-kill experiments were used to measure the in vitro activity of marbofloxacin against two strains of Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida with similar MICs. We observed that marbofloxacin was equally potent against 105 CFU/mL inocula M. haemolytica and P. multocida. However, an inoculum effect was observed with P. multocida, meaning that marbofloxacin activity was decreased against a 108 CFU/mL inoculum, whereas no inoculum effect was observed with M. haemolytica. Marbofloxacin activity was also tested in a lung infection model with immunocompromised mice intratracheally infected with 109 CFU of each bacteria. At the same dose, the clinical and bacteriological outcomes were much better for mice infected with M. haemolytica than for those infected with P. multocida. Moreover, bacteriological eradication was obtained with a lower marbofloxacin dose for mice infected with M. haemolytica. Our results suggest that the differential in vivo marbofloxacin efficacy observed with the two bacterial species of similar MIC could be explained by a differential inoculum effect. Consequently, MICs determined on 105 CFU inocula were not predictive of the differences in antibiotic efficacies against high bacterial inocula of closely related bacterial strains. These results could stimulate further investigations on bacterial species-specific antibiotic doses in a clinical setting. PMID:26506096

  9. Bacterial Species-Specific Activity of a Fluoroquinolone against Two Closely Related Pasteurellaceae with Similar MICs: Differential In Vitro Inoculum Effects and In Vivo Efficacies.

    PubMed

    Lhermie, Guillaume; El Garch, Farid; Toutain, Pierre-Louis; Ferran, Aude A; Bousquet-Mélou, Alain

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the antimicrobial activity of a fluoroquinolone against two genetically close bacterial species belonging to the Pasteurellaceae family. Time-kill experiments were used to measure the in vitro activity of marbofloxacin against two strains of Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida with similar MICs. We observed that marbofloxacin was equally potent against 105 CFU/mL inocula M. haemolytica and P. multocida. However, an inoculum effect was observed with P. multocida, meaning that marbofloxacin activity was decreased against a 108 CFU/mL inoculum, whereas no inoculum effect was observed with M. haemolytica. Marbofloxacin activity was also tested in a lung infection model with immunocompromised mice intratracheally infected with 109 CFU of each bacteria. At the same dose, the clinical and bacteriological outcomes were much better for mice infected with M. haemolytica than for those infected with P. multocida. Moreover, bacteriological eradication was obtained with a lower marbofloxacin dose for mice infected with M. haemolytica. Our results suggest that the differential in vivo marbofloxacin efficacy observed with the two bacterial species of similar MIC could be explained by a differential inoculum effect. Consequently, MICs determined on 105 CFU inocula were not predictive of the differences in antibiotic efficacies against high bacterial inocula of closely related bacterial strains. These results could stimulate further investigations on bacterial species-specific antibiotic doses in a clinical setting. PMID:26506096

  10. Cosmic ray variations with the period close to 27 days and their connection with solar activity longitudinal distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Tyasto, M. I.; Vernova, E. S.

    1985-01-01

    The amplitude and phase changes of the 27 day cosmic ray variation from 1958 to 1975 are studied. The comparison between cosmic ray intensity characteristics and longitudinal distribution of solar activity ones for different stages of the solar cycle are made.

  11. Visualization of codon-dependent conformational rearrangements during translation termination

    PubMed Central

    He, Shan L.; Green, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    While the recognition of stop codons by class 1 release factors (RFs) on the ribosome takes place with extremely high fidelity, the molecular mechanisms behind this remarkable process are poorly understood. Here we performed structural probing experiments with Fe(II)-derivatized RFs to compare the conformation of cognate and near-cognate ribosome termination complexes. The structural differences that we document provide an unprecedented view of signal transduction on the ribosome that depends on authentic stop codon recognition. These events initiate with very close interactions between RF and the small subunit decoding center (DC), lead to increased interactions between the switch loop of the RF and specific regions of the subunit interface and end in the precise orientation of the RF for maximal catalytic activity in the large subunit peptidyl transferase center (PTC). PMID:20208546

  12. Increasing Ubiquitin Ion Resistance to Unfolding in the Gas Phase Using Chloride Adduction: Preserving More "Native-Like" Conformations Despite Collisional Activation.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Nicole D; Kim, Doyong; Russell, David H

    2016-06-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) of ubiquitin from acidified (0.1%) aqueous solution produces abundant ubiquitin-chloride adduct ions, [M + nH + xCl]((n - x)+), that upon mild heating react via elimination of neutral HCl. Ion mobility collision cross section (CCS) measurements show that ubiquitin ions retaining chloride adducts exhibit CCS values similar to those of the "native-state" of the protein. Coupled with results from recent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for the evolution of a salt-containing electrospray droplet, this study provides a more complete picture for how the presence of salts affects the evolution of protein conformers in the final stages of dehydration of the ESI process and within the instrument. PMID:27137645

  13. The Role of Flexibility and Conformational Selection in the Binding Promiscuity of PDZ Domains

    PubMed Central

    Münz, Márton; Hein, Jotun; Biggin, Philip C.

    2012-01-01

    In molecular recognition, it is often the case that ligand binding is coupled to conformational change in one or both of the binding partners. Two hypotheses describe the limiting cases involved; the first is the induced fit and the second is the conformational selection model. The conformational selection model requires that the protein adopts conformations that are similar to the ligand-bound conformation in the absence of ligand, whilst the induced-fit model predicts that the ligand-bound conformation of the protein is only accessible when the ligand is actually bound. The flexibility of the apo protein clearly plays a major role in these interpretations. For many proteins involved in signaling pathways there is the added complication that they are often promiscuous in that they are capable of binding to different ligand partners. The relationship between protein flexibility and promiscuity is an area of active research and is perhaps best exemplified by the PDZ domain family of proteins. In this study we use molecular dynamics simulations to examine the relationship between flexibility and promiscuity in five PDZ domains: the human Dvl2 (Dishevelled-2) PDZ domain, the human Erbin PDZ domain, the PDZ1 domain of InaD (inactivation no after-potential D protein) from fruit fly, the PDZ7 domain of GRIP1 (glutamate receptor interacting protein 1) from rat and the PDZ2 domain of PTP-BL (protein tyrosine phosphatase) from mouse. We show that despite their high structural similarity, the PDZ binding sites have significantly different dynamics. Importantly, the degree of binding pocket flexibility was found to be closely related to the various characteristics of peptide binding specificity and promiscuity of the five PDZ domains. Our findings suggest that the intrinsic motions of the apo structures play a key role in distinguishing functional properties of different PDZ domains and allow us to make predictions that can be experimentally tested. PMID:23133356

  14. Substrate-Specific Reorganization of the Conformational Ensemble of CSK Implicates Novel Modes of Kinase Function

    PubMed Central

    Jamros, Michael A.; Oliveira, Leandro C.; Whitford, Paul C.; Onuchic, José N.; Adams, Joseph A.; Jennings, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    Protein kinases use ATP as a phosphoryl donor for the posttranslational modification of signaling targets. It is generally thought that the binding of this nucleotide induces conformational changes leading to closed, more compact forms of the kinase domain that ideally orient active-site residues for efficient catalysis. The kinase domain is oftentimes flanked by additional ligand binding domains that up- or down-regulate catalytic function. C-terminal Src kinase (Csk) is a multidomain tyrosine kinase that is up-regulated by N-terminal SH2 and SH3 domains. Although the X-ray structure of Csk suggests the enzyme is compact, X-ray scattering studies indicate that the enzyme possesses both compact and open conformational forms in solution. Here, we investigated whether interactions with the ATP analog AMP-PNP and ADP can shift the conformational ensemble of Csk in solution using a combination of small angle x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. We find that binding of AMP-PNP shifts the ensemble towards more extended rather than more compact conformations. Binding of ADP further shifts the ensemble towards extended conformations, including highly extended conformations not adopted by the apo protein, nor by the AMP-PNP bound protein. These ensembles indicate that any compaction of the kinase domain induced by nucleotide binding does not extend to the overall multi-domain architecture. Instead, assembly of an ATP-bound kinase domain generates further extended forms of Csk that may have relevance for kinase scaffolding and Src regulation in the cell. PMID:23028292

  15. Nucleotide-induced conformational dynamics in ABC transporters from structure-based coarse grained modelling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flechsig, Holger

    2016-02-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are integral membrane proteins which mediate the exchange of diverse substrates across membranes powered by ATP molecules. Our understanding of their activity is still hampered since the conformational dynamics underlying the operation of such proteins cannot yet be resolved in detailed molecular dynamics studies. Here a coarse grained model which allows to mimic binding of nucleotides and follow subsequent conformational motions of full-length transporter structures in computer simulations is proposed and implemented. To justify its explanatory quality, the model is first applied to the maltose transporter system for which multiple conformations are known and we find that the model predictions agree remarkably well with the experimental data. For the MalK subunit the switching from open to the closed dimer configuration upon ATP binding is reproduced and, moreover, for the full-length maltose transporter, progression from inward-facing to the outward-facing state is correctly obtained. For the heme transporter HmuUV, for which only the free structure could yet be determined, the model was then applied to predict nucleotide-induced conformational motions. Upon binding of ATP-mimicking ligands the structure changed from a conformation in which the nucleotide-binding domains formed an open shape, to a conformation in which they were found in tight contact, while, at the same time, a pronounced rotation of the transmembrane domains was observed. This finding is supported by normal mode analysis, and, comparison with structural data of the homologous vitamin B12 transporter BtuCD suggests that the observed rotation mechanism may contribute a common functional aspect for this class of ABC transporters. Although in HmuuV noticeable rearrangement of essential transmembrane helices was detected, there are no indications from our simulations that ATP binding alone may facilitate propagation of substrate molecules in this transporter

  16. Combined Use of Residual Dipolar Couplings and Solution X-ray Scattering To Rapidly Probe Rigid-Body Conformational Transitions in a Non-phosphorylatable Active-Site Mutant of the 128 kDa Enzyme I Dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Takayama, Yuki; Schwieters, Charles D.; Grishaev, Alexander; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Clore, G. Marius

    2012-10-23

    The first component of the bacterial phosphotransferase system, enzyme I (EI), is a multidomain 128 kDa dimer that undergoes large rigid-body conformational transitions during the course of its catalytic cycle. Here we investigate the solution structure of a non-phosphorylatable active-site mutant in which the active-site histidine is substituted by glutamine. We show that perturbations in the relative orientations and positions of the domains and subdomains can be rapidly and reliably determined by conjoined rigid-body/torsion angle/Cartesian simulated annealing calculations driven by orientational restraints from residual dipolar couplings and shape and translation information afforded by small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering. Although histidine and glutamine are isosteric, the conformational space available to a Gln side chain is larger than that for the imidazole ring of His. An additional hydrogen bond between the side chain of Gln189 located on the EIN{sup {alpha}/{beta}} subdomain and an aspartate (Asp129) on the EIN{sup {alpha}} subdomain results in a small ({approx}9{sup o}) reorientation of the EIN{sup {alpha}} and EIN{sup {alpha}/{beta}} subdomains that is in turn propagated to a larger reorientation ({approx}26{sup o}) of the EIN domain relative to the EIC dimerization domain, illustrating the positional sensitivity of the EIN domain and its constituent subdomains to small structural perturbations.

  17. Closing the gap between ethics knowledge and practice through active engagement: an applied model of physical therapy ethics.

    PubMed

    Delany, Clare M; Edwards, Ian; Jensen, Gail M; Skinner, Elizabeth

    2010-07-01

    Physical therapist practice has a distinct focus that is holistic (ie, patient centered) and at the same time connected to a range of other providers within health care systems. Although there is a growing body of literature in physical therapy ethics knowledge, including clinical obligations and underlying philosophical principles, less is known about the unique ethical issues that physical therapists encounter, and how and why they make ethical decisions. As moral agents, physical therapists are required to make autonomous clinical and ethical decisions based on connections and relationships with their patients, other health care team members, and health institutions and policies. This article identifies specific ethical dimensions of physical therapist practice and highlights the development and focus of ethics knowledge in physical therapy over the last several decades. An applied ethics model, called the "active engagement model," is proposed to integrate clinical and ethical dimensions of practice with the theoretical knowledge and literature about ethics. The active engagement model has 3 practical steps: to listen actively, to think reflexively, and to reason critically. The model focuses on the underlying skills, attitudes, and actions that are required to build a sense of moral agency and purpose within physical therapist practice and to decrease gaps between the ethical dimensions of physical therapist practice and physical therapy ethics knowledge and scholarship. A clinical case study is provided to illustrate how the ethics engagement model might be used to analyze and provide insight into the ethical dimensions of physical therapist practice. PMID:20448105

  18. Quantity, Quality, and Variety of Pupil Responses during an Open-Communication Structured Group Directed Reading-Thinking Activity and a Closed Communication Structured Group Directed Reading Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petre, Richard M.

    The quality, quantity, and variety of pupil responses while using two different group directed reading activities, the Directed Reading Activity (DRA), and the Directed Reading-Thinking Activity (DRTA) were investigated in this study. The subjects, all fourth graders in two nearby communities, were grouped into above-grade-level, at-grade-level,…

  19. Conformational Transition Pathways in Signaling and Enzyme Catalysis Explored by Computational Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachov, Dimitar V.

    that can explain the experimentally measured activation volume differences. The transition state of the conformational change was proposed to lie close to the closed state. Additionally, a number of descriptors were used to characterize the free energy landscape of the mesophile. It was found that the features of landscape are highly sensitive to the binding of different ligands, their protonation states and the presence of magnesium.

  20. Development of conformal respirator monitoring technology

    SciTech Connect

    Shonka, J.J.; Weismann, J.J.; Logan, R.J.

    1997-04-01

    This report summarizes the results of a Small Business Innovative Research Phase II project to develop a modular, surface conforming respirator monitor to improve upon the manual survey techniques presently used by the nuclear industry. Research was performed with plastic scintillator and gas proportional modules in an effort to find the most conducive geometry for a surface conformal, position sensitive monitor. The respirator monitor prototype developed is a computer controlled, position-sensitive detection system employing 56 modular proportional counters mounted in molds conforming to the inner and outer surfaces of a commonly used respirator (Scott Model 801450-40). The molds are housed in separate enclosures and hinged to create a {open_quotes}waffle-iron{close_quotes} effect so that the closed monitor will simultaneously survey both surfaces of the respirator. The proportional counter prototype was also designed to incorporate Shonka Research Associates previously developed charge-division electronics. This research provided valuable experience into pixellated position sensitive detection systems. The technology developed can be adapted to other monitoring applications where there is a need for deployment of many traditional radiation detectors.

  1. Effects of intra-aortic balloon pump timing on baroreflex activities in a closed-loop cardiovascular hybrid model.

    PubMed

    Fresiello, Libera; Khir, Ashraf William; Di Molfetta, Arianna; Kozarski, Maciej; Ferrari, Gianfranco

    2013-03-01

    Despite 50 years of research to assess the intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) effects on patients' hemodynamics, some issues related to the effects of this therapy are still not fully understood. One of these issues is the effect of IABP, its inflation timing and duration on peripheral circulation autonomic controls. This work provides a systematic analysis of IABP effects on baroreflex using a cardiovascular hybrid model, which consists of computational and hydraulic submodels. The work also included a baroreflex computational model that was connected to a hydraulic model with a 40-cm(3) balloon. The IABP was operated at different inflation trigger timings (-0.14 to 0.31 s) and inflation durations (0.05-0.45 s), with time of the dicrotic notch being taken as t = 0. Baroreflex-dependent parameters-afferent and efferent pathway activity, heart rate, peripheral resistance, and venous tone-were evaluated at each of the inflation trigger times and durations considered. Balloon early inflation (0.09 s before the dicrotic notch) with inflation duration of 0.25 s generated a maximum net increment of afferent pathway activity of 10%, thus leading to a decrement of efferent sympathetic activity by 15.3% compared with baseline values. These times also resulted in a reduction in peripheral resistance and heart rate by 4 and 4.3% compared with baseline value. We conclude that optimum IABP triggering time results in positive effects on peripheral circulation autonomic controls. Conversely, if the balloon is not properly timed, peripheral resistance and heart rate may even increase, which could lead to detrimental outcomes. PMID:23121229