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Sample records for active coeliac disease

  1. Coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Green, Peter H R; Jabri, Bana

    2003-08-01

    Coeliac disease is a genetically-determined chronic inflammatory intestinal disease induced by an environmental precipitant, gluten. Patients with the disease might have mainly non-gastrointestinal symptoms, and as a result patients present to various medical practitioners. Epidemiological studies have shown that coeliac disease is very common and affects about one in 250 people. The disease is associated with an increased rate of osteoporosis, infertility, autoimmune diseases, and malignant disease, especially lymphomas. The mechanism of the intestinal immune-mediated response is not completely clear, but involves an HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 restricted T-cell immune reaction in the lamina propria as well as an immune reaction in the intestinal epithelium. An important component of the disease is the intraepithelial lymphocyte that might become clonally expanded in refractory sprue and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma. Study of the mechanism of the immune response in coeliac disease could provide insight into the mechanism of inflammatory and autoimmune responses and lead to innovations in treatment. PMID:12907013

  2. [Coeliac disease and dentistry].

    PubMed

    van Gils, T; de Boer, N K H; Bouma, G

    2015-09-01

    Coeliac disease is a chronic autoimmune enteropathy, which is caused by exposure to dietary gluten in genetically pre-disposed individuals. -Approximately 0.5-1% of the Dutch population has coeliac disease, diag-nosed at both younger and older age. Treatment consists of a strict gluten-free diet. Symptoms can be diverse, including dental and oral manifestations. These dental and oral manifestations are often seen in patients with coeliac disease, although most of them are nonspecific. This is not the case for the symmetric enamel defects described by Aine and colleagues, which are very specific for coeliac disease. Early diagnosing of coeliac disease is important to prevent complications by (vitamin) deficiencies or rare (pre) malignant forms of coeliac disease. There seems to be a role for dentists in early diagnosing of coeliac disease. PMID:26397103

  3. Gluten intolerance (coeliac disease).

    PubMed

    Ferguson, A; Ziegler, K; Strobel, S

    1984-12-01

    Coeliac disease is a permanent condition of gluten intolerance associated with characteristic gluten-sensitive changes in the jejunal mucosa. In Edinburgh and the Lothians Region of Scotland, the prevalence of the disease is one in 1637 (61/100,000) with considerable variation in age, and sex-specific prevalence and incidence. Several lines of evidence indicate an immunologic basis for the gluten-sensitive enteropathy in coeliac disease. Animal models of intestinal T cell-mediated reactions in the gut have shown pathologic features similar to those of coeliac disease. These include changes in villus and crypt architecture with crypt hyperplasia, and increased numbers of intraepithelial lymphocytes and of intraepithelial lymphocyte mitosis. Experimental CMI reactions also influence differentiation of goblet cells and expression of Ia antigen on epithelial cells, but these factors have not yet been reported for the coeliac mucosa. In addition to this circumstantial evidence, based on animal work, other factors which suggest that CMI reactions rather than antibodies are relevant to coeliac disease include the findings of antigliadin antibodies in a proportion of normal individuals, patients without gastrointestinal disease (seen in hospital), and patients with jejunal Crohn's disease. In addition, there is a well documented patient with adult onset primary hypogammaglobulinaemia and coeliac disease. The underlying pathogenesis in coeliac disease can be envisaged as failure of the normal inhibition of immune responses to this particular food antigen in the gut. Manipulation of immunoregulatory mechanisms would provide a new approach to treatment or cure of this disease and of other food protein-sensitive enteropathies. PMID:6391293

  4. Adult coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Marmouz, F

    2007-01-01

    Coeliac disease is an auto-immune inflammatory reaction characterized by a partial or total villi's atrophy of the proximal small intestine occuring after ingestion of gluten in genetically predisposed patients. The classic form is much more frequent in children. Thereby there has been a misevaluation and improper treatment of coeliac disease in adults who suffer more from asymptomatica and atypical forms. Currently the only effective treatment is a strict gluten free diet for life. However recent researches brought a new light on the matter. Now oats as a causative factor is controvertial. The introduction of some moderate intestinal lesions (pre-atrophic with intra-epithelial hyperlymphocytosis qualified as "weak enteropathies") in the definition of coeliac disease might be possible. Moreover the way to diagnose has evolved as serological tests and markers are more used due to their efficiency. PMID:17375738

  5. Coeliac disease and pregnancy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Butler, M M; Kenny, L C; McCarthy, F P

    2011-01-01

    Coeliac disease is a gluten-sensitive enteropathy affecting up to 1% of the population. An accumulating body of evidence supports the association of coeliac disease with adverse pregnancy outcomes, including increased risk of miscarriage and intrauterine growth restriction. Reports differ regarding the extent and severity of these associations, in addition to the exact pathophysiology underlying these associations. Overall, coeliac disease is believed to be a significant condition in pregnancy and reproductive medicine with some advocating the screening of coeliac disease in all pregnant women or some specific high-risk groups.

  6. Diamine oxidase plasma activities after treatment with heparin and jejunal morphometry in untreated coeliac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Corazza, G R; Ginaldi, L; Falasca, A; Strocchi, A; Rossi, C A; Quaglino, D; Gasbarrini, G

    1989-01-01

    Diamine oxidase plasma concentrations after treatment with heparin were measured and compared with the surface to volume ratio of jejunal biopsy samples assessed by a morphometric technique in patients with untreated and treated coeliac disease and in biopsied controls. As expected, enzyme activity was significantly lower in patients with untreated coeliac disease than in patients on a gluten-free diet and in biopsied controls. No difference was found between treated patients and biopsied controls. There was a significant overall correlation between plasma enzyme activity and surface to volume ratio of jejunal mucosa, although two untreated patients without an overt malabsorption syndrome but with a very low surface to volume ratio had normal enzyme activity. This study shows that in coeliac disease plasma diamine oxidase activity after treatment with heparin does not always mirror the extent of the jejunal lesions, particularly in those patients with minimal or unrelated symptoms who would benefit most from a valid screening test to identify their condition. PMID:2511229

  7. Coeliac disease in Cuban children.

    PubMed Central

    Rabassa, E B; Sagaró, E; Fragoso, T; Castañeda, C; Gra, B

    1981-01-01

    Coeliac disease is generally considered to be a disease of Europe, North America, and Australasia. A series of well-authenticated cases from Cuba is presented. One of the factors responsible for the presence of this disease in Cuba may be the increase in wheat consumption in the last few years. It is likely that coeliac disease exists in other tropical countries. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7469463

  8. Coeliac disease, fertility, and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, R; Holmes, G K; Cooke, W T

    1982-01-01

    The effect of coeliac disease and its treatment on fertility and pregnancy in 74 patients is reported. Those on a normal diet had a shorter reproductive period, were relatively infertile, and had a higher incidence of spontaneous abortions than those on a gluten-free diet. Although maternal health did not appear to be seriously impaired by pregnancy in undiagnosed coeliacs, those on a gluten-free diet had significantly fewer symptoms and had heavier babies. PMID:7134839

  9. The prevention of coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Mearin, M Luisa

    2015-06-01

    Primary prevention of coeliac disease is currently not possible. Previously, a 'window of opportunity' was suggested for primary prevention, by introducing gluten between four and six months of age. However, results from recent prospective studies establish that the timing of gluten introduction and the duration or maintenance of breastfeeding do not influence the development of the disease. Secondary prevention is possible through early diagnosis and treatment. Since coeliac disease is severely underdiagnosed, the only way to achieve large-scale secondary prevention is by mass screening. Prospective studies indicate that important health problems, such as reduced foetal growth and birth weight, delayed growth in height and weight in children, and reduced bone mineral density in both children and adults can be prevented by mass screening. Adherence to a strict gluten-free diet may be considered as tertiary prevention. PMID:26060113

  10. Partial lipodystrophy in coeliac disease.

    PubMed Central

    O'Mahony, D; O'Mahony, S; Whelton, M J; McKiernan, J

    1990-01-01

    The association of coeliac disease and partial lipodystrophy is described. The patient also had deficiencies of serum IgA and C3 complement (the latter associated with partial lipodystrophy). In addition, there was subclinical dermatitis herpetiformis confirmed by skin biopsy. The facial wasting of fully developed partial lipodystrophy may be misinterpreted as a sign of malabsorption but the facial, upper limb, and truncal lipodystrophy contrasts with normal pelvic and lower limb appearances. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2379878

  11. Coeliac disease--associated disorders and survival.

    PubMed Central

    Collin, P; Reunala, T; Pukkala, E; Laippala, P; Keyriläinen, O; Pasternack, A

    1994-01-01

    The associated diseases in 335 coeliac patients diagnosed 1980-90 were compared with age and sex matched control patients with various gastrointestinal symptoms. Endocrine disorders were found in 11.9% of coeliac and 4.3% of control patients (p = 0.0003). Coeliac patients had insulin dependent diabetes mellitus significantly (p = 0.0094) more often (5.4%) than control patients (1.5%). connective tissue diseases were found in 7.2% of coeliac and in 2.7% of control patients (p = 0.011). Sjögren's syndrome occurred in 3.3% of coeliac patients and in 0.3% of controls (p = 0.0059). Autoimmune thyroid diseases were found in 5.4% and asthma in 3.6% of coeliac patients, but also in 2.7% and 3.6%, respectively, among control patients. The incidences of malignant diseases and the survival rate in coeliac patients were compared with those in the Finnish population. Ten coeliac patients developed a cancer during the follow up (mean 5.3 years, range 1-12) but none had a lymphoma. The risk of malignant diseases in coeliac patients did not differ from that in the Finnish population in general. Eleven coeliac patients died during the follow up. The five year survival rates of coeliac patients did not differ from those in the general population. At least 83% of the coeliac patients adhered strictly to the gluten free diet, which may explain the favourable outcome. PMID:7959226

  12. Coeliac disease: the great imitator.

    PubMed

    Duggan, John M

    2004-05-17

    Coeliac disease (CD) is caused by a complex immunological response provoked by grain protein in susceptible people. The majority of people with CD are symptom-free adults; the remainder are prone to a bewildering variety of signs and symptoms, ranging from infertility to type 1 diabetes. Many patients with undiagnosed CD spend years seeking help for complaints such as chronic tiredness or mild abdominal symptoms. In primary care, an appropriate target group to test for CD is people with anaemia (especially women), chronic tiredness, non-specific abdominal symptoms (including so-called "irritable bowel syndrome"), or a family history of CD. The response to an appropriate gluten-free diet is often life-transforming for symptomatic patients. Positive serological tests for CD require confirmation by duodenal biopsy and, if confirmed, referral to a dietitian and a coeliac society, followed by a life-long gluten-free diet. PMID:15139831

  13. A history of coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Losowsky, M S

    2008-01-01

    Coeliac disease may have an ancient history dating back to the 1st and 2nd centuries AD. The first clear description was given by Samuel Gee in 1888. He suggested that dietary treatment might be of benefit. In the early 20th century various diets were tried, with some success, but without clear recognition of the toxic components. The doctoral thesis of Wim Dicke of 1950 established that exclusion of wheat, rye and oats from the diet led to dramatic improvement. The toxicity was shown to be a protein component, referred to as gluten. Dicke's colleagues, Weijers and Van de Kamer, showed that measurement of stool fat reflected the clinical condition. Early studies were in children but stool fat measurements documented that the condition could be recognised in adults. Histological abnormalities of the lining of the small intestine were demonstrated beyond doubt by Paulley in 1954 and techniques of per-oral biopsy described by Royer in 1955 and Shiner in 1956 afforded reliable diagnosis. Concurrence in monozygotic twins suggested a genetic component, confirmed by studies of HLA antigens. Additional, non-genetic factors seem likely. Circulating antibodies suggest an immunological mechanism of damage and provide non-invasive screening tests. Lymphoma, adenocarcinoma and ulceration of the small intestine and a range of immunological disorders are associated. A relationship with dermatitis herpetiformis was suggested by Samman in 1955 and established by Shuster and Marks in 1965 and 1968. The Coeliac Society (now Coeliac UK) was founded in 1968 and similar societies now exist across the world. They provide an extremely valuable service. Present problems include definition of the tolerated levels of gluten, whether oats are toxic for some or all coeliacs and the likelihood that the condition is relatively common and frequently without classical symptoms. Hope for the future is that more convenient methods of treatment will follow better understanding. PMID:18431060

  14. Immunological indicators of coeliac disease activity are not altered by long-term oats challenge.

    PubMed

    Cooper, S E J; Kennedy, N P; Mohamed, B M; Abuzakouk, M; Dunne, J; Byrne, G; McDonald, G; Davies, A; Edwards, C; Kelly, J; Feighery, C F

    2013-03-01

    Coeliac disease is a gluten-sensitive enteropathy that develops in genetically susceptible individuals. The disease exhibits many features of an autoimmune disorder. These include the production of highly specific anti-endomysial autoantibodies directed against the enzyme tissue transglutaminase. It is well accepted that wheat-, barley- and rye-based foods should be excluded in the gluten-free diet. Although several studies report that oats ingestion is safe in this diet, the potential toxicity of oats remains controversial. In the current study, 46 coeliac patients ingested oats for 1 year and were investigated for a potential immunogenic or toxic effect. Stringent clinical monitoring of these patients was performed and none experienced adverse effects, despite ingestion of a mean of 286 g of oats each week. Routine histological analysis of intestinal biopsies showed improvement or no change in 95% of the samples examined. Furthermore, tissue transglutaminase expression in biopsy samples, determined quantitatively using the IN Cell Analyzer, was unchanged. Employing immunohistochemistry, oats ingestion was not associated with changes in intraepithelial lymphocyte numbers or with enterocyte proliferation as assessed by Ki-67 staining. Finally, despite the potential for tissue transglutaminase to interact with oats, neither endomysial nor tissue transglutaminase antibodies were generated in any of the patients throughout the study. To conclude, this study reaffirms the lack of oats immunogenicity and toxicity to coeliac patients. It also suggests that the antigenic stimulus caused by wheat exposure differs fundamentally from that caused by oats. PMID:23379438

  15. Characterisation of osteoprotegerin autoantibodies in coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Real, Ana; Gilbert, Nick; Hauser, Barbara; Kennedy, Nick; Shand, Alan; Gillett, Helen; Gillett, Peter; Goddard, Clive; Cebolla, Ángel; Sousa, Carolina; Fraser, William D; Satsangi, Jack; Ralston, Stuart H; Riches, Philip L

    2015-08-01

    Autoantibodies neutralising the effect of the bone regulatory cytokine osteoprotegerin (OPG) have been described in a patient with severe osteoporosis and coeliac disease. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and epitope specificity of autoantibodies to OPG in patients with coeliac disease, and correlate their presence with bone mineral density. A direct enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was developed and used to screen patients with coeliac disease for autoantibodies to OPG. Recombinant fragments of OPG were made to evaluate the epitope specificity and affinity of these antibodies. Phenotype information of the patients was obtained by case note review. Raised titres of antibodies to OPG were found in 7/71 (9.8 %) patients with coeliac disease, compared with 1/72 (1.4 %) non-coeliac osteoporosis clinic control patients (p < 0.05). Our results suggest that a polyclonal antibody response to OPG is raised in these patients capable of recognising different epitopes of OPG with varying affinity. The titre of OPG antibodies was associated with lower bone mineral density Z-score of the hip in coeliac patients on univariate (p < 0.05) and multivariate analysis including age, sex height and weight as covariates (p < 0.01). Polyclonal antibodies to OPG are more common in patients with coeliac disease and are independently associated with lower bone mineral density Z-scores of the hip. Further work is required to establish the clinical utility of testing for OPG antibodies. PMID:26092508

  16. Managing coeliac disease in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Leonard, M M; Cureton, P A; Fasano, A

    2015-01-01

    The association between coeliac disease and type 1 diabetes has long been established. The combination of genetic susceptibility along with a potential role for gluten in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity makes defining gluten's role in type 1 diabetes extremely important. Evidence supporting the role of a gluten-free diet to improve complications associated with type 1 diabetes is not robust. However there is evidence to support improved growth, bone density and potentially the prevention of additional autoimmune diseases in patients with coeliac disease and type 1 diabetes. The gluten free diet is expensive and challenging to adhere to in people already on a modified diet. Early identification of those who have coeliac disease and would benefit from a gluten-free diet is of utmost importance to prevent complications associated with type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease. PMID:24814173

  17. Coeliac disease and noncoeliac gluten sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Caroline R; Shamir, Raanan; Mearin, Maria L

    2015-04-01

    The spectrum of gluten-related disorders was restricted to coeliac disease and wheat allergy, but the new contemporary entity referred to as noncoeliac gluten sensitivity has gained recognition mainly in adults but also in children. Noncoeliac gluten sensitivity is defined as the presence of a variety of symptoms related to gluten ingestion in patients in whom coeliac disease and wheat allergy have been excluded. The pathophysiology and biomarkers of coeliac disease and wheat allergy are well known, but this is not the case for noncoeliac gluten sensitivity. It is also not clear whether noncoeliac gluten sensitivity is caused by consumption of gluten or by consumption of fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols. Randomized trials on noncoeliac gluten sensitivity in children are lacking and are hardly needed to evaluate its role in paediatric patients with gastroenterology to avoid the use of unnecessary restrictive diets in children and interference with proper diagnosis of coeliac disease. PMID:25564803

  18. Be vigilant for patients with coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Evans, Kate E; Leeds, John S; Sanders, David S

    2009-10-01

    Recent population studies show that coeliac disease affects around 1 in 100 people. The estimated ratio of diagnosed to undiagnosed individuals is 1:8, and the average delay in diagnosis is reported to be 11 years. The contemporary coeliac patient is diagnosed between the ages of 40 and 60, has normal or even high BMI, and subtle symptoms. Patients are often identified in screening groups which would include those with type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid disease, or a first-degree relative with coeliac disease. The presence of relevant symptoms is not essential for a diagnosis of coeliac disease. Additionally, positive serological testing alone is not sufficient to confirm the diagnosis. Endomysial antibody (EMA) and tissue transglutaminase (TTG) have a combined sensitivity and specificity of > 90% when used in combination in selected populations. However, false positives occur in conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, and autoimmune disease. Conversely antibody-negative disease accounts for around 9% of cases. IgA deficiency is a cause of false negatives and levels should be checked at the same time as EMA and TTG. Patients must consume a gluten-containing diet for six weeks before serological testing and biopsy if necessary. All those with positive serological tests, and those for whom clinical suspicion is high even if seronegative, should be referred to a gastroenterologist for a duodenal biopsy to confirm or exclude coeliac disease. Diagnosis requires the demonstration of villous atrophy in the small bowel which improves when gluten is withdrawn. PMID:19938558

  19. [Guideline 'Coeliac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis'].

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuis, Wouter P; Kneepkens, C M Frank; Houwen, Roderick H J; de Beer, Hans J A; Mulder, Chris J; Mearin, M Luisa

    2010-01-01

    The Dutch evidence-based guideline 'Coeliac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis' contains instructions for detection and treatment of coeliac disease. Coeliac disease has a high prevalence: 0.5 - 1.3%. The disease has a broad spectrum of symptoms, frequently also outside the gastrointestinal tract. Relatives of patients and persons with autoimmune diseases, microscopic colitis, IgA deficiency and syndromes of Down, Turner and Williams have an increased risk of coeliac disease. Detection is carried out by determination of IgA antibodies to tissue transglutaminase and endomysium. Testing for IgA antibodies to gliadin is only recommended in children younger than 2 years. Absence of HLA-DQ2 and DQ8 indicates that coeliac disease is most unlikely. The diagnosis should be confirmed by small bowel biopsy. Single biopsy following gluten ingestion is sufficient for diagnosis at all ages. After the diagnosis, patients should be referred to a dietician. Additionally, a yearly follow-up by a paediatrician or internal medical specialist with appropriate gastroenterology specialisation is recommended. PMID:21029498

  20. The prevalence of coeliac disease in infertility.

    PubMed

    Meloni, G F; Dessole, S; Vargiu, N; Tomasi, P A; Musumeci, S

    1999-11-01

    An increased incidence of reproductive problems, including infertility, miscarriage, low birth weight newborns, and shorter duration of breast-feeding, are known to exist in women with coeliac disease; some of these conditions are improved by a gluten-free diet. We have tried to ascertain the prevalence of coeliac disease in 99 couples who were being evaluated for infertility, compared with the known prevalence of silent disease in the population of Northern Sardinia, in which it is endemic. Of all women, four tested positive for at least two out of three markers: immunoglobulin A (IgA) antigliadin, immunoglobulin (IgG) antigliadin, and anti-endomysium antibodies, and underwent a jejunal biopsy; three had histological evidence of coeliac disease. One male partner was positive for two markers, and had a diagnostic jejunal biopsy. The prevalence of coeliac disease in infertile women seems higher (three out of 99, 3. 03%) in the study group than in the general population (17 out of 1607, 1.06%), and particularly in the subgroup with unexplained infertility (two out of 25, 8%, P < 0.03). Screening for coeliac disease should be part of the diagnostic work-up of infertile women, particularly when no apparent cause can be ascertained after standard evaluation. PMID:10548618

  1. [Coexistence of coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease in children].

    PubMed

    Krawiec, Paulina; Pawłowska-Kamieniak, Agnieszka; Pac-Kożuchowska, Elżbieta; Mroczkowska-Juchkiewcz, Agnieszka; Kominek, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease are chronic inflammatory conditions of gastrointestinal tract with complex aetiology with genetic, environmental and immunological factors contributing to its pathogenesis. It was noted that immune-mediated disorders often coexist. There is well-known association between coeliac disease and type 1 diabetes and ulcerative colitis and primary sclerosing cholangitis. However, growing body of literature suggests the association between coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease, particularly ulcerative colitis. This is an extremely rare problem in paediatric gastroenterology. To date there have been reported several cases of children with coexisting coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. Herewith we present review of current literature on coexistence of coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease in children. PMID:26891438

  2. Coeliac disease and oats: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Haboubi, N Y; Taylor, S; Jones, S

    2006-10-01

    A systematic review of the literature related to the inclusion of oats in the gluten-free diet for patients with coeliac disease to assess whether oats can be recommended. A computerised literature review of multiple databases was carried out, identifying 17 primary studies, 6 of which met the criteria for inclusion in this review. None of the six studies found any significant difference in the serology between the oats and control groups. Two studies, however, identified a significant difference (p<0.001; p = 0.039) in intraepithelial lymphocyte counts between the oats and control groups. Oats can be symptomatically tolerated by most patients with coeliac disease; however, the long-term effects of a diet containing oats remain unknown. Patients with coeliac disease wishing to consume a diet containing oats should therefore receive regular follow-up, including small bowel biopsy at a specialist clinic for life. PMID:17068278

  3. Male gonadal function in coeliac disease: 1. Sexual dysfunction, infertility, and semen quality.

    PubMed

    Farthing, M J; Edwards, C R; Rees, L H; Dawson, A M

    1982-07-01

    The prevalence of hypogonadism, sexual dysfunction and abnormalities of semen quality was determined in 28 consecutive males with coeliac disease. These observations were related to jejunal morphology and nutritional status, and were compared with findings in 19 men with Crohn's disease of similar age and nutritional status. Two of the 28 coeliacs (7%) had clinical evidence of hypogonadism but impotence and decreased sexual activity occurred more commonly, the latter apparently improving after gluten withdrawal. Of the married coeliacs, 19% had infertile marriages, a value greater than expected in the general population. Hypogonadism and sexual dysfunction were not detected in our patients with Crohn's disease. Seminal analysis in coeliacs revealed marked abnormalities of sperm morphology and motility, but only the former appeared to improve after gluten withdrawal. Similar abnormalities, however, were also detected in patients with Crohn's disease, although, unlike the coeliacs, 46% also had reduced concentrations of spermatozoa. Semen quality in coeliac disease could not be clearly related to general or specific (serum vitamin B(12) and red cell folate) nutritional deficiencies or to fertility, although sperm motility was markedly reduced in two of the three coeliacs with infertile marriages. The presence of antisperm antibodies did not appear to be an important aetiological factor in male infertility in coeliac disease. The pathogenesis of infertility and sexual dysfunction in coeliac disease remains unclear, suggesting that factors such as endocrine dysfunction or other specific nutritional deficiency may be involved. PMID:7200931

  4. [Coeliac disease and problems associated with reproduction].

    PubMed

    Hozyasz, K

    2001-03-01

    Coeliac patients taking a normal diet have a shortened reproductive period with delayed menarche and early menopause. Many studies have shown that coeliac women are susceptible to reproductive difficulties such as infertility and miscarriages. The disease is also associated with low birth weight in babies and short duration of breast feeding. Folic acid deficiency is present in the majority of patients with untreated disease and it might be a maternal risk factor for neural tube defects and orofacial clefts. Coeliac men may have reversible infertility, and as in women, if gastrointestinal symptoms are mild or absent the diagnosis may be missed. It is important to make diagnosis because the giving of gluten free diet may result in conception and favourable outcome of pregnancy. PMID:11398587

  5. Mechanisms and management of refractory coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    van Gils, Tom; Nijeboer, Petula; van Wanrooij, Roy L; Bouma, Gerd; Mulder, Chris J J

    2015-10-01

    A small subset of patients with coeliac disease become refractory to a gluten-free diet with persistent malabsorption and intestinal villous atrophy. The most common cause of this condition is inadvertent gluten exposure, but concomitant diseases leading to villous atrophy should also be considered and excluded. After exclusion of these conditions, patients are referred to as having refractory coeliac disease, of which two categories are recognized based on the absence (type I) or presence (type II) of a clonal expansion of premalignant intraepithelial lymphocyte population with a high potential for transformation into an overt enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma. Type I disease usually has a benign course that can be controlled by mild immunosuppressive treatment, but type II can be more severe with cladribine with or without autologous stem cell transplantation effective as treatment. Patients who fail to respond to cladribine therapy, however, still have a high risk of malignant transformation. Insights into the immunophenotype of these cells and the recognition that type II disease is a low-grade, no-mass lymphoma opens avenues for new treatment strategies, including chemotherapeutic and immunomodulating strategies. This Review will provide an overview of refractory coeliac disease, discussing mechanisms, diagnosis and management. PMID:26347156

  6. Non-malignant complications of coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Holmes, G K

    1996-05-01

    Patients with coeliac disease are at increased risk of developing complications which increase morbidity and mortality. Emphasis on malignant complications has often overshadowed the non-malignant risks, which have received relatively little attention, although some of these can be very troublesome and even life-threatening. This article points out that a large population of unidentified or neglected coeliac patients is at potential risk. The challenge is to identify this group by case-finding or screening programmes in selected populations, so that they can be offered a gluten-free diet and other treatments which will not only improve general health but may also prevent or reduce the development of health problems. The non-malignant risks are outlined and bone and neuropsychiatric disturbances considered in more detail because of recent developments in these areas. PMID:8783765

  7. Increased small intestinal apoptosis in coeliac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Moss, S F; Attia, L; Scholes, J V; Walters, J R; Holt, P R

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Coeliac disease (CD) mucosa is flattened despite epithelial hyperproliferation. AIMS: To establish mechanisms of cell loss in CD. PATIENTS: 14 controls, 17 active CD patients, and 16 maintained with gluten free diet. METHODS: Programmed cell death was examined in small intestinal biopsy specimens by staining fragmented DNA using terminal uridine deoxynucleotidyl nick end labelling (TUNEL), in comparison with haematoxylin and eosin stained adjacent sections. Double staining with anti-CD45 antibodies determined the origin of apoptotic cells. Apoptosis was graded from 1-3 (< 5, 5-20, > 20% respectively). Proliferating cells, immunostained by Ki-67 (MIB-1) antibody, were counted. RESULTS: Apoptotic cells were seen rarely by haematoxylin and eosin but more readily by TUNEL. In controls, 1.4 +/- 0.2% of epithelial cells were apoptotic (mean grade 1.1), mainly located in the upper villus. In active CD, frequent apoptotic cells were distributed throughout the crypt-villus unit (mean grade 2.4), decreasing after treatment to 1.1 (p < 0.001) even when still histologically abnormal. CD45 antibodies rarely stained apoptotic cells in active CD. The number of TUNEL positive cells correlated with proliferating cell number (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Enterocyte apoptosis is greatly increased in untreated CD, correlates with proliferation, and falls to normal with a gluten free diet, before histological improvement. Increased apoptosis may be responsible for villous atrophy in CD. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9038662

  8. Male gonadal function in coeliac disease: III. Pituitary regulation.

    PubMed

    Farthing, M J; Rees, L H; Dawson, A M

    1983-12-01

    Pituitary regulation of gonadal function was investigated in 39 consecutive men with treated and untreated coeliac disease and in an intestinal disease control group of 19 men with Crohn's disease of similar age and general nutritional status. Basal serum FSH concentration was increased in 10 of the coeliacs (26%) compared to only two of 19 men with Crohn's disease (11%). This abnormality was observed with equal frequency in both treated and untreated coeliacs, and was not associated with oligospermia. Serum LH concentration was increased in eight of 15 untreated coeliacs (53%) with sub-total villous atrophy, an abnormality which unlike the elevation of serum FSH, appears to return towards normal after gluten withdrawal. Serum LH was high in coeliacs despite marked elevation of the free testosterone index. Exaggerated responses of FSH and LH to LHRH were found in 89% and 45% respectively, of coeliacs with sub-total villous atrophy. However, exaggerated responses of LH alone were found more frequently in coeliacs than in men with Crohn's disease (P less than 0.02) and unlike the exaggerated FSH responses, LH responses were closely related to jejunal morphology. Exaggerated responses of FSH and LH in coeliacs were commonly found when basal gonadotrophin concentrations were normal. The occurrence of exaggerated gonadotrophin responses could not be related to plasma concentration of testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, oestradiol or the free testosterone index. Serum prolactin was modestly raised in 25% of untreated and partially treated coeliacs and in the same proportion of men with Crohn's disease. Elevated serum prolactin concentrations never exceeded 809 mU/l and were not associated with impotence or infertility. This study provides further evidence that in men with coeliac disease there is a derangement of pituitary regulation of gonadal function. This would seem to be part of a wider disturbance of central regulatory mechanisms of endocrine function in coeliac

  9. Coexistence of coeliac disease and type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    There is a selective review of the literature concerning the coexistence of coeliac disease and type 1 diabetes mellitus. This review focuses on the principles of serological tests towards coeliac disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and metabolic control measures as a result of a gluten-free diet. PMID:24868293

  10. A pilot study of fluticasone propionate in untreated coeliac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchison, H C; al Mardini, H; Gillespie, S; Laker, M; Zaitoun, A; Record, C O

    1991-01-01

    Although gluten withdrawal is likely to remain the mainstay of treatment for adult coeliac disease, many patients find the diet inconvenient and unpalatable and compliance among asymptomatic patients is often poor. Oral corticosteroids have been used for patients who seem to be resistant to gluten withdrawal but preparations with low systemic bioavailability might be preferable. We have given a new glucocorticoid (fluticasone propionate) to 12 adults with untreated coeliac disease for six weeks while they were on a normal diet. One patient defaulted and one suffered a relapse in a pre-existing neoplasm. Excluding these, there was an improvement of symptoms, a mean weight gain of 2 kg, and a rise in albumin of 5.4 g/l. There was a significant improvement in the lactulose/mannitol excretion ratio (p less than 0.05) and in all histological variables examined in paired biopsy specimens (surface and crypt intraepithelial lymphocyte/enterocyte and goblet cell/enterocyte ratios and enterocyte height, p less than 0.01 or better). In six paired specimens sucrase and alkaline phosphatase activity increased in all (p less than 0.05) and lactase in five of six. No appreciable side effects were observed, but two patients had suppressed cortisol values and synacthen responses at six weeks. A further three, with normal pretrial results, had a blunted tetracosactrin response at six weeks. Fluticasone propionate seems worthy of further assessment in the treatment of coeliac disease as an adjunct to gluten withdrawal. PMID:1901562

  11. Fecal calprotectin in coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Capone, Pietro; Rispo, Antonio; Imperatore, Nicola; Caporaso, Nicola; Tortora, Raffaella

    2014-01-01

    We would like to share with the readers the results of our experience in 50 celiac disease (CD) patients, enrolled between September 2012 and April 2013, who were referred to our third-level CD Unit. The fecal calprotectin (FC) concentration of 50 adults with newly diagnosed CD was compared to that of a control group of 50 healthy subjects. FC level was determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay with diagnostic cut-off of 75 μg/g. In addition, we tried to correlate the FC level with symptoms, histological severity of CD (Marsh grade) and level of tissue transglutaminase antibodies (aTg) in CD patients. Finally, FC level was increased in five CD patients and in four controls (10% vs 8%, P = NS); mean FC concentration of patients and controls were 57.7 (SD ± 29.1) and 45.1 (SD ± 38.4) respectively. Furthermore, no significant correlation was seen between FC levels and symptoms/Marsh grade/aTg. The five CD patients did not show inflammatory lesions (e.g., ulcers, erosions) at upper endoscopy. The four healthy controls with positive FC were followed-up for further six months; in this observational period they did not show clinical signs of any underlying disease. On these bases, we think that FC is not able to investigate the subclinical inflammatory changes of active CD and FC should be considered a useless tool in the diagnostic work-up of uncomplicated CD but it should be accompanied by aTg when ruling out organic disease in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:24574734

  12. Complications of coeliac disease: are all patients at risk?

    PubMed

    Goddard, C J R; Gillett, H R

    2006-11-01

    Coeliac disease is a common condition that is increasingly being recognised as a result of the development of sensitive and specific serology. The diagnosis of coeliac disease and its subsequent treatment with a gluten-free diet have implications for the patient, not just for symptom control but also for the possible effect on quality of life and risk of complications. Whether the mode of presentation of coeliac disease has an effect on survival or risk of complication is yet unclear. This article reviews the available evidence regarding these issues. PMID:17099088

  13. Coeliac disease and reproductive disorders: a neglected association.

    PubMed

    Rostami, K; Steegers, E A; Wong, W Y; Braat, D D; Steegers-Theunissen, R P

    2001-06-01

    Coeliac disease is a chronic disease caused by a permanent intolerance to ingested gluten resulting in immunologically mediated inflammatory damage of the small-intestinal mucosa. The wide spectrum of clinical symptoms is partly due to the malnourished state caused by the malabsorption of macro- and micronutrients. Fertility problems, sexual dysfunction and obstetrical complications are more frequently observed in patients with coeliac disease. These reproductive disorders may be a consequence of the endocrine derangements caused by selective nutrient deficiencies. Nowadays, the early diagnosis and treatment of coeliac disease is possible and not very costly. Therefore, coeliac disease must be seriously considered in the preconceptional screening and treatment of patients with reproductive disorders. PMID:11384797

  14. [Coeliac disease in children--an update].

    PubMed

    Benkebil, F; Nydegger, A

    2007-02-28

    Coeliac disease (CD), considered as an autoimmune disease with genetic predisposition can occur at any age. Several types can be observed: a) typical cases presenting early in life with signs of intestinal malabsorption; b() atypical cases showing milder, often extraintestinal symptoms; c() silent cases that are occasionally discovered because of serological screening and (d) potential/latent cases showing isolated positivity of celiac serology at first testing and eventually the typical intestinal damage later in life. To date, the method of choice to make a diagnosis is the dosage of anti-transglutaminase IgA antibodies (including total IgA to prevent false negative results), followed by intestinal biopsy. Addition of moderate amounts of oats to a gluten-free diet does not prevent clinical or small bowel mucosal healing in children. PMID:17410937

  15. Evidence for the role of a human intestinal adenovirus in the pathogenesis of coeliac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Kagnoff, M F; Paterson, Y J; Kumar, P J; Kasarda, D D; Carbone, F R; Unsworth, D J; Austin, R K

    1987-01-01

    We previously noted a region of amino acid sequence homology between A-gliadin, a major alpha-gliadin component known to activate coeliac disease, and the early region E1b protein of human adenovirus serotype 12 (Ad12), an adenovirus isolated from the human intestinal tract. In the present study sera from coeliac disease patients from the United Kingdom and the United States were assayed for neutralising antibody to Ad12 as evidence of past exposure to that virus and for antibody to synthetic peptides of A-gliadin from the region of shared sequence with the Ad12 E1b protein. Eighty nine per cent of untreated coeliac disease patients had evidence of previous Ad12 infection. There was also a significant increase in the prevalence of neutralising antibody to Ad12 among treated adults (33.3%) and children (30.8%) with coeliac disease compared with controls (0-12.8%) in the western USA and in London. There was no evidence for an increased prevalence of infection with a closely related adenovirus, adenovirus 18, or another enteric virus, Echovirus 11, among coeliac disease subjects. Additional studies documented that a region of A-gliadin that shares amino acid sequence homology with the adenovirus 12 E1b protein could be recognised as an antigenic determinant in active coeliac disease patients. Taken together, these data are compatible with the hypothesis that a viral protein may play a role in the pathogenesis of coeliac disease, perhaps by virtue of immunological cross reactivity between antigenic determinants shared by the viral protein and alpha-gliadins. PMID:2822550

  16. Depressed cell-mediated immunity in coeliac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, B B; Losowsky, M S

    1976-01-01

    Fourteen coeliac patients on a gluten free diet (GFD) and 10 on a normal diet were studied by lymphocyte transformation in response to PHA to assess the integrity of cell-mediated immunity (CMI). Transformation was depressed in the majority taking a normal diet, with improvement after a GFD. In some patients the depression may have been due to a serum factor, as transformation was more nearly normal when the lymphocytes were cultured in pooled AB serum than in their own serum. There was no correlation between transformation and nutritional deficiencies. Mantoux tests were performed in some of these and other coeliac patients and there was a very significant reduction in the incidence of positive tests compared with controls. These findings provide evidence of depressed CMI in coeliac patients taking a normal diet with improvement on a GFD and may be of relevance to the high risk of malignancy in coeliac disease, further strengthening the case for a strict GFD. PMID:1087262

  17. Coeliac disease and infertility: making the connection and achieving a successful pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hin, Harold; Ford, Fiona

    2002-01-01

    Undiagnosed coeliac disease is not uncommon in adults in the UK and can be a cause of unexplained infertility in women. Studies suggest that dietary treatment of women with coeliac disease may result in successful conception. The diet of a woman with coeliac disease during pregnancy is discussed and agencies offering support are listed. PMID:12416015

  18. Diagnosis and nursing management of coeliac disease in children.

    PubMed

    Paul, Siba Prosad; McVeigh, Lauren; Gil-Zaragozano, Elena; Basude, Dharamveer

    2016-02-01

    Coeliac disease is an autoimmune condition caused by the ingestion of gluten-containing foods and affects about 1% of children and young people in the UK. Classic symptoms include diarrhoea, bloating, weight loss and abdominal pain. However, extra-intestinal manifestations, such as iron deficiency anaemia, faltering growth, delayed puberty and mouth ulcers, are increasingly being recognised. Some children have an increased risk of developing coeliac disease, such as a strong family history, certain genetic conditions and type 1 diabetes, therefore there is a need for increased awareness and early diagnosis before symptoms occur. If coeliac disease is suspected, a child should have serological screening with anti-tissue transglutaminase titres. Diagnosis is traditionally confirmed by a small bowel biopsy while the child remains on a 'normal' diet that does not exclude gluten. More recently, for a selective group of children, modification of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition guidelines has enabled non-biopsy (serological) diagnosis of coeliac disease. Children's nurses have an important role in recognising and diagnosing coeliac disease earlier as well as offering ongoing dietary support. Enabling children to maintain a gluten-free diet is essential for general wellbeing and preventing long-term complications. PMID:26856574

  19. Making oats safer for patients with coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Dickey, William

    2008-06-01

    (Table is included in full-text article). Studies suggest that oats can be tolerated in the gluten-free diet by a majority of patients with coeliac disease. Concerns remain, however, about the possibility of contamination of commercially available oat products by wheat, barley and rye. The R5 ELISA allows the identification and quantification of wheat, barley and rye prolamins, and has demonstrated significant contamination in a range of products. If patients with coeliac disease are to take oats, it is important that those consumed are free of contamination. This assay should allow the identification of safe oat products. PMID:18467905

  20. Reappraisal of the 'lectin hypothesis' in the aetiopathogenesis of coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Colyer, J; Farthing, M J; Kumar, P J; Clark, M L; Ohannesian, A D; Waldron, N M

    1986-07-01

    The agglutinating properties of a crude gluten digest, purified gliadin fractions and established plant lectins were investigated using mammalian erythrocytes, rat enterocytes and normal and coeliac human enterocytes as the target systems. Gliadin preparations failed to cause agglutination of any of the cells tested, whereas established pure plant lectins were active cell agglutinins. These studies indicate that gliadin peptides do not interact with intestinal cells in a polyvalent, lectin-like manner and as such cannot be regarded as true lectins. Mucosal damage in coeliac disease is unlikely therefore to be related to lectin-like activity of gliadin. PMID:3709069

  1. Transient paraproteinaemia in a patient with coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Pena, A S; Nieuwkoop, J V; Schuit, H R; Hekkens, W T; Haex, A J

    1976-09-01

    A case is reported of a 43 year old man who suffered from a grass pollen allergy and a malabsorption syndrome and in whom a paraproteinaemia was found. The grass pollen hypersensitivity was abolished by desensitization. The malabsorption syndrome was found to be due to coeliac disease--that is, a "flat" mucosa of the jejunum with an almost normal ileal mucosa--followed by clinical recovery and morphological improvement on a gluten-free diet. A short period of gluten reintroduction caused deterioration of the jejunum. The monoclonal immunoglobulin (IgG-gamma) diminished and disappeared in the course of three years. Although it has not been possible to demonstrate that this paraprotein had anti-gliadin activity, it is suggested that the constant stimulation of the gut reticuloendothelial system by gluten might bear some relation to the appearance of the paraproteinaemia. PMID:976814

  2. Transient paraproteinaemia in a patient with coeliac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Pena, A S; Nieuwkoop, J V; Schuit, H R; Hekkens, W T; Haex, A J

    1976-01-01

    A case is reported of a 43 year old man who suffered from a grass pollen allergy and a malabsorption syndrome and in whom a paraproteinaemia was found. The grass pollen hypersensitivity was abolished by desensitization. The malabsorption syndrome was found to be due to coeliac disease--that is, a "flat" mucosa of the jejunum with an almost normal ileal mucosa--followed by clinical recovery and morphological improvement on a gluten-free diet. A short period of gluten reintroduction caused deterioration of the jejunum. The monoclonal immunoglobulin (IgG-gamma) diminished and disappeared in the course of three years. Although it has not been possible to demonstrate that this paraprotein had anti-gliadin activity, it is suggested that the constant stimulation of the gut reticuloendothelial system by gluten might bear some relation to the appearance of the paraproteinaemia. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:976814

  3. The coeliac disease task force " Free from Gluten," " Improved knowledge to cure coeliac disease".

    PubMed

    Greco, L; Percopo, S

    1996-05-01

    Gluten has recently been introduced into the diet of the Mediterranean and European population, but a considerable proportion has not adapted to this change and has developed intolerance to gluten. At least one million EEC citizens are gluten intolerant. In Italy each year 12 million ECU is spent in the diagnosis of uncomplicated gluten intolerance, 10 million ECU for complex diagnosis and 32 million ECU for long-term complications and malignancies. The total financial load of gluten intolerance, in its present state, is about 150 million ECU/year in Italy. Four million ECU is actually needed to develop a genetic probe, which may make the population screening feasible. A National Task Force "Free from Gluten" has been set up by the Italian Coeliac Society to stimulate fund-raising activities supporting genetic and basic research on gluten intolerance. PMID:8783751

  4. Brush border enzyme activities in the small intestine after long-term gliadin feeding in animal models of human coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Kozáková, H; Stĕpánková, R; Kolínská, J; Farré, M A; Funda, D P; Tucková, L; Tlaskalová-Hogenová, H

    1998-01-01

    Coeliac disease is a human, genetically linked, disorder which develops in gluten-sensitive persons. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of prolonged feeding of gliadin, a major fraction of gluten, on enzyme activities of enterocyte brush border membrane enzymes in rats, mice and pigs. Brush-border membranes were isolated from mucosal scrapings of the small intestine of 21-d-old rat pups hand-fed with formula milk diet, two-month-old nu/nu and +/+ BALB/c mice and two-month-old piglets fed three times a week starting at birth with high doses of gliadin. Activities of lactase, sucrase and dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV) were determined. Individual animal models differed in their response to gliadin feeding. In comparison with albumin fed controls the activities of DPP IV and lactase were decreased in rat pups, nu/nu BALB/c mice and piglets. DPP IV activity was mostly affected in the ileum of rats and piglets fed with gliadin starting at birth. On the other hand, lactase and sucrase activities of nu/nu BALB/c mice and piglets decreased to the largest extent in jejunum. PMID:9821309

  5. Matrix Expansion and Syncytial Aggregation of Syndecan-1+ Cells Underpin Villous Atrophy in Coeliac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Salvestrini, Camilla; Lucas, Mark; Lionetti, Paolo; Torrente, Franco; James, Sean; Phillips, Alan D.; Murch, Simon H.

    2014-01-01

    Background We studied the expression of sulphated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in coeliac disease (CD) mucosa, as they are critical determinants of tissue volume, which increases in active disease. We also examined mucosal expression of IL-6, which stimulates excess GAG synthesis in disorders such as Grave's ophthalmopathy. Methods We stained archival jejunal biopsies from 5 children with CD at diagnosis, on gluten-free diet and challenge for sulphated GAGs. We then examined duodenal biopsies from 9 children with CD compared to 9 histological normal controls, staining for sulphated GAGs, heparan sulphate proteoglycans (HSPG), short-chain HSPG (Δ-HSPG) and the proteoglycan syndecan-1 (CD138), which is expressed on epithelium and plasma cells. We confirmed findings with a second monoclonal in another 12 coeliac children. We determined mucosal IL-6 expression by immunohistochemistry and PCR in 9 further cases and controls, and used quantitative real time PCR for other Th17 pathway cytokines in an additional 10 cases and controls. Results In CD, HSPG expression was lost in the epithelial compartment but contrastingly maintained within an expanded lamina propria. Within the upper lamina propria, clusters of syndecan-1+ plasma cells formed extensive syncytial sheets, comprising adherent plasma cells, lysed cells with punctate cytoplasmic staining and shed syndecan ectodomains. A dense infiltrate of IL-6+ mononuclear cells was detected in active coeliac disease, also localised to the upper lamina propria, with significantly increased mRNA expression of IL-6 and IL-17A but not IL-23 p19. Conclusions Matrix expansion, through syndecan-1+ cell recruitment and lamina propria GAG increase, underpins villous atrophy in coeliac disease. The syndecan-1+ cell syncytia and excess GAG production recapitulate elements of the invertebrate encapsulation reaction, itself dependent on insect transglutaminase and glutaminated early response proteins. As in other matrix expansion disorders

  6. CTLA4 +49 A/G and CT60 polymorphisms in Dutch coeliac disease patients.

    PubMed

    van Belzen, Martine J; Mulder, Chris J J; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Pearson, Peter L; Houwen, Roderick H J; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2004-09-01

    Coeliac disease is an autoimmune disorder, characterised by villous atrophy of the small intestine, which results from a T-cell-mediated response to gluten-derived peptides. The cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) is involved in the regulation of T-cell activation and the CTLA4 +49 A/G polymorphism in exon 1 has been implicated in several autoimmune disorders, including coeliac disease. However, this polymorphism was recently excluded as being the causal variant in Graves' disease, autoimmune hypothyroidism and type I diabetes mellitus. This causal variant was mapped to the 3' region of CTLA4, with the CT60 polymorphism showing the strongest association. The aim of this study was to determine the role of the CTLA4 gene in coeliac disease in the Dutch population. The +49 A/G and CT60 polymorphisms were genotyped in a case-control cohort of 215 patients and controls. The frequency of the +49 G-allele was increased in cases, although not significantly. However, the frequency of the CT60 G-allele was increased with borderline significance in coeliac disease patients (P = 0.048), although the genotype distributions did not show a significant difference between cases and controls. These results indicate the involvement of the CTLA4 gene in coeliac disease development. The haplotype carrying the CT60 G-allele was shown to be associated with lower mRNA levels of the soluble CTLA-4 isoform, providing a possible mechanism for the T-cell-mediated destruction of the small intestine. PMID:15199380

  7. Screening sourdough samples for gliadin-degrading activity revealed Lactobacillus casei strains able to individually metabolize the coeliac-disease-related 33-mer peptide.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Sieiro, Patricia; Redruello, Begoña; Ladero, Victor; Martín, Maria Cruz; Fernández, María; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2016-05-01

    A selective culture medium containing acid-hydrolyzed gliadins as the sole nitrogen source was used in the search for sourdough-indigenous lactic acid bacteria (LAB) with gliadin-metabolizing activity. Twenty gliadin-degrading LAB strains were isolated from 10 sourdoughs made in different ways and from different geographical regions. Fifteen of the 20 isolated strains were identified as Lactobacillus casei, a species usually reported as subdominant in sourdough populations. The other 5 gliadin-degrading strains belonged to the more commonly encountered sourdough species Leuconostoc mesenteroides and Lactobacillus plantarum. All these strains were shown to be safe in terms of their resistance to antimicrobial agents. When individually incubated with the α2-gliadin-derived immunotoxic 33-mer peptide (97.5 ppm), half of the L. casei strains metabolized at least 50% of it within 24 h. One strain metabolized 82% of the 33-mer peptide within 8 h and made it fully disappear within 12 h. These results reveal for the first time the presence in sourdough of proteolytic L. casei strains with the capacity to individually metabolize the coeliac-disease-related 33-mer peptide. PMID:27021684

  8. Ulceration of the small intestine in children with coeliac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Eltumi, M; Brueton, M J; Francis, N

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ulceration of the small intestine in children has not been previously described. PATIENTS: Two children, aged 12 and 18 months, presented with a history of failure to thrive and intractable diarrhoea. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed multiple ulcers involving the first and second parts of the duodenum. Histology of biopsy specimens taken from these sites confirmed ulceration and showed other features consistent with a diagnosis of coeliac disease. They both showed pronounced clinical improvement and satisfactory linear growth on a gluten free diet. A year later the diagnosis of coeliac disease was confirmed on a biopsy controlled gluten challenge, and repeat endoscopy showed complete resolution of the intestinal ulceration. Images p614-a PMID:8944575

  9. Enteropathy associated T cell lymphoma: common in coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Colleran, Gabrielle Christina; Cronin, Kevin Christopher; Casey, Mary; Bennani, Fadel; Tobbia, Iqdam; Barry, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    A 56-year-old male admitted with haematemesis and epigastric pain and severe weight loss on a background of coeliac disease. Computed tomography (CT) abdomen revealed a thickening of the mucosal folds of a short segment of jejunum. He deteriorated and had an exploratory laparotomy and bowel resection with side-side jejojejunal stapled anastomosis and extended right hemicolectomy and ileocolic anastomosis. Histology demonstrated multifocal high-grade malignant T cell lymphoma. Coeliac disease is a very common lifelong disorder. It is associated with osteoporosis, infertility, autoimmune disorders and increased risk of malignancy including an increased risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) especially of the T cell type. Enteropathy-type T cell lymphoma is associated with a very poor prognosis. There is significant evidence that adherence to a gluten-free diet decreases the risk of developing enteropathy-type T cell lymphoma and helps to prevent development of autoimmune diseases, diabetes mellitus and osteoporosis in patients with coeliac disease. PMID:21686880

  10. Transition of care between paediatric and adult gastroenterology. Coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Ciclitira, Paul J; Moodie, Simon J

    2003-04-01

    Coeliac disease is a condition in which there is an abnormal mucosa in the small intestine. It improves with a gluten free diet, with avoidance of wheat, rye, barley and possibly oats. The history and epidemiology of this condition are discussed. Diagnosis is based on demonstrating that the characteristic histological abnormalities in the small intestine are dependent on gluten ingestion. Diagnostic pitfalls are discussed. The anti-endomysium and anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies are specific and sensitive diagnostic tools. The wide variety of clinical symptoms and presentations are discussed including the associated condition of dermatitis herpetiformis. Failure to respond to a gluten-free diet can represent simple dietary problems, an alternative diagnosis or, occasionally, the development of a serious complication of coeliac disease such as ulcerative jejunitis or enteropathy-associated T cell lymphoma. Progress towards the characterization of the toxic epitopes within gluten that exacerbate coeliac disease and our current understanding of the genetics of the disorder are presented. PMID:12676114

  11. Unusually High Incidence of Paediatric Coeliac Disease in Sweden during the Period 1973 – 2013

    PubMed Central

    Tapsas, Dimitrios; Hollén, Elisabet; Stenhammar, Lars; Fälth-Magnusson, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Objective The prevalence of coeliac disease in Sweden during the “epidemic period” (1984−1996) was one of the highest in the world. The aim of this study was to assess the coeliac disease incidence in our region over the 41-year period, and how diagnostic activity and diagnostic accuracy were affected by the introduction of antibody testing. We also looked into how patients with mild enteropathy were evaluated. Methods In the county of Östergötland in Sweden, 2790 paediatric patients were investigated for suspected coeliac disease between 1973 and 2013. Notes were scrutinised for data on sex, age, histopathological reports and final diagnosis. For comparative purposes this period was divided into three sub-periods (1973−1983, 1984−1996 and 1997−2013) named pre-epidemic, epidemic and post-epidemic. Results Coeliac disease diagnosis was received by 1,030 patients. The peak incidence rate, 301 cases/100,000 in 1994 for the age group 0−1.9 years is the highest figure ever reported. The other age groups, 2−4.9, 5−14.9, and 15−17.9 years, also had high incidence rates. After the 1984−1996 “epidemic period” the incidence decreased for the youngest group but continued to increase for the other groups. The cumulative incidence at 18 years-of-age for children born during the epidemic reached 14 cases/1000 births, the highest figure hitherto reported. Diagnostic activity differed significantly between the three sub-periods (p<0.001) increasing gradually from 1984 and reaching a peak value of 0.87 in 2012. Cases of mild enteropathy were more frequently regarded as non-coeliac disease cases, decreasing significantly in the “post-epidemic” period (p<0.001). Conclusions The incidence rate and cumulative incidence of coeliac disease were possibly the highest ever reported. Changes in diagnostic activity and accuracy could not be attributed to the introduction of new antibody tests, possibly because of other changes e.g. variations in the symptoms at

  12. Non-dietary therapeutic clinical trials in coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Crespo Pérez, Laura; Castillejo de Villasante, Gemma; Cano Ruiz, Ana; León, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Coeliac disease is a permanent immunological intolerance to gluten proteins in genetically predisposed individuals. The only management is life-long strict adherence to a gluten-free diet. Unfortunately, compliance with gluten-free diet is very difficult in practice due to the widespread presence of gluten in Western diets. For this reason, about 50% of coeliacs following a gluten-free diet continue to suffer from symptoms and present with autoantibodies and/or villous atrophy while on a gluten-free diet. It is therefore important to explore new therapies to improve the management of coeliac disease. To date, five experimental therapies have been tested in randomized and controlled clinical trials. Larazotide acetate reduces the para-cellular passage of gluten to the lamina propria by preventing the opening of intercellular tight junctions. The endopeptidases ALV003 and AN-PEP break down gluten to produce less or non-toxic peptide fragments. A therapeutic vaccine is being tested with the aim of developing gluten tolerance. Finally, infection with the nematode Necator americanus and treatment with the CCR9 antagonist Traficet-EN have also been reported. While substantial progress has been made in the last few years, it is important to remember that all these investigational therapies are in research stage and are generally being considered as "adjunctive" therapies to the gluten-free diet and not as substitutes of the gluten-free diet at this point in time. PMID:22153524

  13. Coeliac disease in endocrine diseases of autoimmune origin.

    PubMed

    Miśkiewicz, Piotr; Kępczyńska-Nyk, Anna; Bednarczuk, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Coeliac disease (CD, sometimes called gluten-sensitive enteropathy or nontropical sprue) is an inflammatory disorder of the small intestine of autoimmune origin. It occurs in genetically predisposed people and is induced by a gluten protein, which is a component of wheat. The prevalence of histologically confirmed CD is estimated in screening studies of adults in the United States and Europe to be between 0.2% and 1.0%. The results of previous studies have indicated that the prevalence of CD is increased in patients with other autoimmune disorders such as: autoimmune thyroid diseases, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and Addison's disease. A coincidence of the above diseases constitutes autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS). The high prevalence of CD in APS is probably due to the common genetic predisposition to the coexistent autoimmune diseases. The majority of adult patients have the atypical or silent type of the disease. This is the main reason why CD so often goes undiagnosed or the diagnosis is delayed. CD, if undiagnosed and untreated, is associated with many medical disorders including haematological (anaemia), metabolical (osteopenia/osteoporosis), obstetric-gynaecological (infertility, spontaneous abortions, late puberty, early menopause), neurological (migraine, ataxia, epilepsy) as well as with an increased risk of malignancy, especially: enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma, small intestine adenocarcinoma, and oesophageal and oropharyngeal carcinomas. Early introduction of a gluten-free diet and lifelong adherence to this treatment decreases the risk of these complications. PMID:22744631

  14. Degradation of coeliac disease-inducing rye secalin by germinating cereal enzymes: diminishing toxic effects in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Stenman, S M; Lindfors, K; Venäläinen, J I; Hautala, A; Männistö, P T; Garcia-Horsman, J A; Kaukovirta-Norja, A; Auriola, S; Mauriala, T; Mäki, M; Kaukinen, K

    2010-08-01

    Currently the only treatment for coeliac disease is a lifelong gluten-free diet excluding food products containing wheat, rye and barley. There is, however, only scarce evidence as to harmful effects of rye in coeliac disease. To confirm the assumption that rye should be excluded from the coeliac patient's diet, we now sought to establish whether rye secalin activates toxic reactions in vitro in intestinal epithelial cell models as extensively as wheat gliadin. Further, we investigated the efficacy of germinating cereal enzymes from oat, wheat and barley to hydrolyse secalin into short fragments and whether secalin-induced harmful effects can be reduced by such pretreatment. In the current study, secalin elicited toxic reactions in intestinal Caco-2 epithelial cells similarly to gliadin: it induced epithelial cell layer permeability, tight junctional protein occludin and ZO-1 distortion and actin reorganization. In high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectroscopy (HPLC-MS), germinating barley enzymes provided the most efficient degradation of secalin and gliadin peptides and was thus selected for further in vitro analysis. After germinating barley enzyme pretreatment, all toxic reactions induced by secalin were ameliorated. We conclude that germinating enzymes from barley are particularly efficient in the degradation of rye secalin. In future, these enzymes might be utilized as a novel medical treatment for coeliac disease or in food processing in order to develop high-quality coeliac-safe food products. PMID:20560983

  15. Coeliac disease: a potentially treatable health problem of Saharawi refugee children.

    PubMed Central

    Rätsch, I. M.; Catassi, C.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterize the clinical and nutritional impact of coeliac disease (gluten-sensitive enteropathy) among Saharawi children living as refugees in Algeria. METHODS: A total of 65 Saharawi children with coeliac disease were compared with 71 age-matched non-coeliac controls. For each participant, the clinical history was taken and a clinical examination, non-quantitative 24-hour dietary recall, anthropometric and skinfold measurements, bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA) of body composition, and venous blood sampling for haemoglobin determination were performed. RESULTS: Gluten-containing food, especially bread, was the staple diet of Saharawi children. Abdominal pain and distension were significantly commoner among children with coeliac disease than in controls (P < 0.05). The mean height-for-age was significantly lower in such children than in controls (-2.5 +/- 1.4 units vs -1.8 +/- 1.3 units, respectively, P < 0.01). No significant differences were found for either skinfold or BIA measurements. Haemoglobin values tended to be lower in children with coeliac disease than in controls. CONCLUSIONS: Coeliac disease has a negative effect on the health status of Saharawi refugee children. Because of the high prevalence of the condition in the Saharawi, a specific programme for treating all affected individuals should be established. Further studies are required to quantify the impact of coeliac disease in other areas of the developing world. PMID:11436476

  16. Recognising and Managing Refractory Coeliac Disease: A Tertiary Centre Experience

    PubMed Central

    Nasr, Ikram; Nasr, Iman; Beyers, Carl; Chang, Fuju; Donnelly, Suzanne; Ciclitira, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Refractory coeliac disease (RCD) is a rare complication of coeliac disease (CD) and involves malabsorption and villous atrophy despite adherence to a strict gluten-free diet (GFD) for at least 12 months in the absence of another cause. RCD is classified based on the T-cells in the intra-epithelial lymphocyte (IEL) morphology into type 1 with normal IEL and type 2 with aberrant IEL (clonal) by PCR (polymerase chain reaction) for T cell receptors (TCR) at the β/γ loci. RCD type 1 is managed with strict nutritional and pharmacological management. RCD type 2 can be complicated by ulcerative jejunitis or enteropathy associated lymphoma (EATL), the latter having a five-year mortality of 50%. Management options for RCD type 2 and response to treatment differs across centres and there have been debates over the best treatment option. Treatment options that have been used include azathioprine and steroids, methotrexate, cyclosporine, campath (an anti CD-52 monoclonal antibody), and cladribine or fluadribine with or without autologous stem cell transplantation. We present a tertiary centre’s experience in the treatment of RCD type 2 where treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine was used, and our results show good response with histological recovery in 56.6% of treated individuals. PMID:26633478

  17. Coeliac disease in children - an update for general dental practitioners.

    PubMed

    Paul, S P; Kirkham, E N; John, R; Staines, K; Basude, D

    2016-05-13

    Coeliac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated systemic disorder caused by ingestion of gluten found in wheat, rye and barley. It affects around 1% of children, but 90% of cases are considered to remain undiagnosed. CD classically presents with gastrointestinal manifestations including diarrhoea, bloating, weight loss and abdominal pain, but extra-intestinal features (including oral and dental manifestations) are increasingly being reported. Dental and oral manifestations such as dental enamel defects, delayed eruption of teeth, recurrent aphthous ulcers are well-recognised manifestations of CD. In patients with yet undiagnosed CD, these can sometimes be the only presenting features. Dentists have regular contact with well children, and therefore the visit to the dentist is an opportunity to suspect CD. When CD is suspected, Dental practitioners can liaise with the general medical practitioner to organise screening for coeliac disease. Positive serology will prompt onward referral to a paediatric gastroenterologist to confirm the diagnosis. The recent European Paediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) guidelines revised in 2012 have streamlined the diagnostic pathway for faster diagnosis of CD. Management involves strict adherence to a gluten free diet, which should lead to resolution of symptoms, recovery of intestinal mucosa and prevention of long-term complications associated with it. This article aims to describe CD, inform of recent changes to the diagnostic pathway and highlight the dental manifestations of the condition to equip dental practitioners to aid early diagnosis and initiation of treatment for children with CD. PMID:27173708

  18. Severe Refractory Coeliac Disease with Response Only to Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Ka Ying Bonnie; Mehta, Ravi; Mohamed, Salma; Mohamed, Zameer; Arnold, Jayantha

    2014-01-01

    Refractory coeliac disease (RCD) is characterised by recurrent or persistent malabsorptive symptoms and villous atrophy, despite strict adherence to a gluten-free diet for at least 6 months and where other causes of malabsorption including malignancy have been excluded. There is limited evidence and guidance on the effective management of these patients. We describe a case of severe RCD in our hospital, with symptoms controlled effectively only by total parenteral nutrition (TPN). This 68-year-old woman initially presented to the clinic with persistent non-bloody diarrhoea and vomiting. A diagnosis of coeliac disease was confirmed with a positive tissue transglutaminase assay and histology. A strict gluten-free diet was ineffective and she represented 6 months later with 13 kg weight loss (16.7%), ongoing abdominal pain and diarrhoea, with bowels opening 16 times a day. She was oedematous, had an albumin of 12 g/l and required hospital admission. She was treated for pancreatic insufficiency and presumptively for small bowel bacterial overgrowth with no resolution of symptoms. We ruled out infectious causes and investigated for small bowel malignancy; all results were negative. Small bowel enteroscopy showed ulcerative jejunitis. She was given 5 days of TPN, following which her symptoms improved and albumin normalised. This was sustained with symptom resolution and weight gain seen at follow-up. TPN successfully and rapidly induced remission in this case. Thus, a short period of TPN should be considered as a potential component of management in patients with severe RCD. PMID:25473387

  19. Dietary Intake In Adult Female Coeliac Disease Patients In Slovenia

    PubMed Central

    Mičetić-Turk, Dušanka

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The aim of the study was to assess dietary intake of coeliac disease (CD) patients and to determine if they are meeting the dietary reference values for a balanced diet. Subjects/Methods 40 women with CD, aged from 23 to 76 participated in our study. Total daily intake was assessed by a three-day food diary. Resting metabolic rate (RMR) was calculated using Harris-Benedict equation. Considering physical activity level (PAL) 1.4, the recommended total energy expenditure (TEE) value was determined. The data was evaluated with professional evaluation software Prodi and statistically analysed. Results 40 participants returned the food diary. The average energy intake was significantly too low to ensure the meeting of all-day energy needs (p<0.05). The meals contained a recommended proportion of protein, but a statistically significantly higher proportion of fat (p<0.05), lower proportion of carbohydrates and a significantly lower intake of dietary fibre (p<0.05). Regarding macro-, micro- elements and vitamins, there was a significant lack in the intake of calcium and iodine, folic acid, vitamin D and vitamin A (p<0.05), meanwhile iron intake was at the lower limit of the recommended intake, whereas zinc, potassium and vitamin K intake were significantly higher according to the recommended values, but were comparable with the intake of the general population in the Central European area. Conclusion Even in subjects with adequate or low daily energy intake, their meals contained too much fat, too few carbohydrates and dietary fibre as well as inorganic substances. The patients with CD should get regular nutritional monitoring and education on the quality and balance of a gluten-free diet. PMID:27284377

  20. Coeliac disease in the Rehovot-Ashdod region of Israel: incidence and ethnic distribution.

    PubMed Central

    Dahan, S; Slater, P E; Cooper, M; Brautbar, C; Ashkenazi, A

    1984-01-01

    The data from a large group of children with biopsy proved coeliac disease born in the Rehovot-Ashdod region of Israel and treated in a regional hospital provided us with the basis for the determination of the annual birth cohort incidence of coeliac disease for the period 1968-81. The findings show a minimum birth cohort incidence of 1.71/1000 live births. The highest incidence rate was in children of Asian origin and the lowest in second generation Israel born. The incidence of coeliac disease rose sharply during the study period. PMID:6608573

  1. A case of pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis in a young woman with coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Mastruzzo, Claudio; Vancheri, Carlo; Li Mura, Dario; Poletti, Venerino; Failla, Marco; Crimi, Nunzio

    2007-06-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans cells histiocytosis (pulmonary LCH) is an idiopathic unusual lung disease and its association with other systemic diseases has been rarely observed. Here, we describe a young non-smoking woman with concomitant pulmonary LCH and coeliac disease that, despite therapy, suddenly deteriorated. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report in the medical literature describing an association of coeliac disease with pulmonary LCH. Considering the concomitant occurrence of both diseases in our patient and the severe course of pulmonary LCH observed, we hypothesise that coeliac disease and pulmonary LCH might be related by a common disturbance in immunity and the onset and/or the course of pulmonary LCH could be influenced or markedly worsened by the presence of coeliac disease. PMID:17629812

  2. [Coeliac disease and reproduction: possible in vivo models].

    PubMed

    Stazi, Anna Velia

    2005-01-01

    Presently there are no in vivo models to study the different effects of coeliac disease (CD) including the increase of reproductive risks. CD is a multifactorial condition which requires both an exogenous element (gluten) and complex genetic factors; moreover, CD is associated to several endocrine, immune and reproductive diseases. There are no adequate in vivo models for the systemic complications of CD; in particular, there are no genetic knock-out models. However, models are available for gluten enteropathy such as Irish Setter and Balb/c and BDF1 mouse strains, and also for endocrine-immune diseases associated to CD such as BB rats and NOD mice. These models could be used to study reproductive aspects. This is desirable because a new model for dermatitis herpetiformis tightly associated with CD, that uses HLA-DQ8 transgenic NOD mice, has already been identified. PMID:16569922

  3. Serum autoantibodies directed against transglutaminase-2 have a low avidity compared with alloantibodies against gliadin in coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Gelderman, K A; Drop, A C A D; Trouw, L A; Bontkes, H J; Bouma, G; van Hoogstraten, I M W; von Blomberg, B M E

    2014-01-01

    Coeliac disease is characterized by intolerance to gliadin and related gluten components present in wheat, barley and rye. Coeliac disease patients harbour antibodies directed against alloantigens such as gliadin, but also against the autoantigen transglutaminase-2 (TG2). The type and quality of antibody responses provides insight into the underlying immune activation processes. Therefore, in this study we have analysed the avidity of the antibody response directed against the autoantigen TG2 and compared this with antibody responses against the alloantigens gliadin and Escherichia coli. We observed that the immunoglobulin (Ig)A autoantibody response directed against TG2 is of low avidity compared with the IgA response against the alloantigens gliadin and E. coli in the same patients; the same was true for IgG, both in IgA-deficient and in -sufficient coeliac patients. The observed avidities appear not to be related to disease stage, antibody levels, age or duration of exposure to gluten. In conclusion, in coeliac disease there is a clear difference in avidity of the antibody responses directed against the auto- and alloantigens, indicating different regulation or site of initiation of these responses. PMID:24666357

  4. Anti-actin IgA antibodies in severe coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Granito, A; Muratori, P; Cassani, F; Pappas, G; Muratori, L; Agostinelli, D; Veronesi, L; Bortolotti, R; Petrolini, N; Bianchi, F B; Volta, U

    2004-01-01

    Anti-actin IgA antibodies have been found in sera of coeliacs. Our aim was to define the prevalence and clinical significance of anti-actin IgA in coeliacs before and after gluten withdrawal. One hundred and two biopsy-proven coeliacs, 95 disease controls and 50 blood donors were studied. Anti-actin IgA were evaluated by different methods: (a) antimicrofilament positivity on HEp-2 cells and on cultured fibroblasts by immunofluorescence; (b) anti-actin positivity by enzyme-linked immuosorbent assay (ELISA); and (c) presence of the tubular/glomerular pattern of anti-smooth muscle antibodies on rat kidney sections by immunofluorescence. Antimicrofilament IgA were present in 27% of coeliacs and in none of the controls. Antimicrofilament antibodies were found in 25 of 54 (46%) coeliacs with severe villous atrophy and in three of 48 (6%) with mild damage (P < 0·0001). In the 20 patients tested, antimicrofilaments IgA disappeared after gluten withdrawal in accordance with histological recovery. Our study shows a significant correlation between antimicrofilament IgA and the severity of intestinal damage in untreated coeliacs. The disappearance of antimicrofilament IgA after gluten withdrawal predicts the normalization of intestinal mucosa and could be considered a useful tool in the follow-up of severe coeliac disease. PMID:15270857

  5. Clinical value of duodenal biopsies--beyond the diagnosis of coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Walker, Marjorie M; Talley, Nicholas J

    2011-09-15

    At upper gastrointestinal endoscopy to investigate unexplained diarrhea and iron deficiency anemia, duodenal biopsies are often taken to exclude a diagnosis of coeliac disease. While histology remains the gold standard for this diagnosis, recent developments in serological testing may overtake this as a first line test and biopsy restricted to confirming the diagnosis. Established coeliac disease on biopsy is straightforward, but early lesions may pose a challenge. Newer endoscopic procedures such as push-pull enteroscopy (balloon enteroscopy) with biopsy allow access to the small bowel beyond the second part of the duodenum. Controversy remains as to what constitutes the normal histology of the duodenum, and small bowel. Lymphocytic duodenosis (increased intraepithelial lymphocytes with normal villous architecture) in patients with negative coeliac serology can be associated with Helicobacter pylori, drugs, autoimmune and other diseases including food allergy. Full thickness small intestinal biopsies can aid in investigation of enteric neuropathies in severe dysmotility disorders. Biopsies are also taken to investigate malabsorption due to suspected infectious and metabolic disorders. Despite highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), immunosuppressed patients may be affected by duodenal pathogens. The histology of duodenal mucosa in acid related disorders reflects the damage seen at endoscopy. Although the prevalence of duodenal ulcer disease is decreasing, drugs causing ulceration remain an important disease entity. Recent observations in functional bowel disorders suggest that the duodenum may be a key site for pathology. In functional dyspepsia, patients with early satiety may have excess eosinophil infiltration, and the mast cell is probably a key player in the irritable syndrome in the small intestine. PMID:21940106

  6. Inflammatory cytokines in small intestinal mucosa of patients with potential coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    WESTERHOLM-ORMIO, M; GARIOCH, J; KETOLA, I; SAVILAHTI, E

    2002-01-01

    T helper cell type 1 (Th1) response to gluten has been implicated in the pathogenesis of coeliac disease (CD). To characterize immunological activation and mild inflammations leading to overt CD in potential coeliac patients, jejunal biopsies were obtained from family members of patients with CD or dermatitis herpetiformis (DH). Nine family members and one latent CD, eight CD patients and eight normal controls furnished jejunal biopsy specimens. Immunohistochemical staining of sections for interleukin-1α (IL-1α), IL-2, IL-4, interferon-γ (IFN-γ), tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α), CD3, γδ-T cell receptor (γδ-TCR), and αβ-TCR was carried out with monoclonal antibodies. Further, expression of IL-4 and IFN-γ messenger RNA was detected by radioactive in situhybridization in these same samples. In lamina propria, CD patients and potential CD patients had higher densities of IL-2 (P = 0·028, P = 0·043), IL-4 (P = 0·021, P = 0·034) and IFN-γ positive cells (P = 0·000, P = 0·009) than did controls. Moreover, CD patients showed a higher density of TNF-α positive cells (P = 0·012, P = 0·001) than the other two groups, and expression of IFN-γ mRNA (P = 0·035) was higher in them than in the other two study groups. Additionally, higher densities of TNF-α and IFN-γ positive cells occurred in potential CD patients with high γδ-TCR+ intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs). Our findings support the hypothesis that lamina propria T cells and macrophages, through their secretion of cytokines, play a central role in the pathogenesis of coeliac disease. The inflammatory cytokines found in potential CD specimens strongly suggest that these inflammatory markers can be identified long before visible villous changes have occurred. PMID:11982596

  7. Clinical Evaluation of Specific Oral Manifestations in Pediatric Patients with Ascertained versus Potential Coeliac Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Matacena, Giada; Costa, Stefano; Magazzù, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Patients involved on coeliac disease (CD) have atypical symptoms and often remain undiagnosed. Specific oral manifestations are effective risk indicators of CD and for this reason an early diagnosis with a consequent better prognosis can be performed by the dentist. There are not researches analysing the frequency of these oral manifestations in potential coeliac patients. The aim of this study is to investigate the oral hard and soft tissue lesions in potential and ascertained coeliac children in comparison with healthy controls. 50 ascertained children, 21 potential coeliac patients, and 54 controls were recruited and the oral examination was performed. The overall oral lesions were more frequently present in CD patients than in controls. The prevalence of oral soft tissue lesions was 62% in ascertained coeliac, 76.2% in potential coeliac patients, and 12.96% in controls (P < 0.05). Clinical dental delayed eruption was observed in 38% of the ascertained coeliac and 42.5% of the potential coeliac versus 11.11% of the controls (P < 0.05). The prevalence of specific enamel defects (SED) was 48% in ascertained coeliac and 19% in potential coeliac versus 0% in controls (P < 0.05; OR = 3.923). The SED seem to be genetically related to the histological damage and villous atrophy. PMID:25197270

  8. Speeding up coeliac disease diagnosis in cardiological settings

    PubMed Central

    Chicco, Daniela; Taddio, Andrea; Sinagra, Gianfranc; Di Lenarda, Andrea; Ferrara, Fortunato; Moretti, Michele; Martelossi, Stefano; Di Toro, Nicola; Ventura, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    Introduction High prevalence of coeliac disease (CD) has been reported among patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). We evaluated the feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of screening for CD by rapid test of anti-transglutaminase antibodies in the cardiology outpatients’ clinic. Material and methods We screened the blood samples of 104 patients with DCM, 44 of their first-degree relatives, 63 diseased controls and 101 healthy controls for the presence of anti-transglutaminase antibodies in a drop of whole blood using a rapid assay. This test was compared to the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and the anti-endomysium antibody test. Results Our rapid test was positive in three (2.9%) DCM patients, in one (2%) relative and in one (1%) healthy control. These subjects were positive at both control assays. Two DCM patients had iron-deficient anaemia. The healthy relative was asymptomatic, while the healthy control experienced extreme asthenia. The relative refused intestinal biopsy, while the others showed histological evidence of CD. During the gluten-free diet, the patient with the worst left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) underwent heart transplant, and LVEF values improved in the other two. Anaemia and tiredness resolved in all patients. Conclusion Early detection of CD in a cardiological setting allows prompt treatment with a gluten-free diet of gluten-dependent complaints with potential benefits for the course of DCM. PMID:22419932

  9. Amino acid and peptide absorption in patients with coeliac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis

    PubMed Central

    Silk, D. B. A.; Kumar, Parveen J.; Perrett, D.; Clark, M. L.; Dawson, A. M.

    1974-01-01

    A double-lumen perfusion technique has been used to study amino acid and peptide absorption in eight normal control subjects, 13 patients with untreated adult coeliac disease, and 16 patients with dermatitis herpetiformis who had varying morphological abnormalities of the small bowel. All subjects were perfused with isotonic solutions containing 10 mM glycyl-L-alanine and 10 mM glycine + 10 mM L-alanine. Patients with adult coeliac disease had impaired absorption of glycine (p < 0·01) and L-alanine (p < 0·05) from the amino acid solution compared with the control subjects. Amino acid uptake from the dipeptide solution was not significantly impaired, although four individual patients had impaired uptake of both amino acids. In contrast to these findings, very few patients with dermatitis herpetiformis had impaired amino acid absorption from either solution. Sodium absorption was impaired from both solutions when the groups of patients with adult coeliac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis with subtotal villous atrophy and partial villous atrophy were studied, and there were patients in each group who secreted sodium and water. The results suggest that malabsorption of dietary protein is unlikely to occur in dermatitis herpetiformis but may occur and contribute to protein deficiency seen in some severe cases of adult coeliac disease. The impairment of sodium and water absorption provides evidence that there may be functional impairment of the jejunal mucosa in dermatitis herpetiformis as well as in adult coeliac disease. PMID:4820629

  10. Appropriate clinical use of human leukocyte antigen typing for coeliac disease: an Australasian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Tye-Din, J A; Cameron, D J S; Daveson, A J; Day, A S; Dellsperger, P; Hogan, C; Newnham, E D; Shepherd, S J; Steele, R H; Wienholt, L; Varney, M D

    2015-01-01

    The past decade has seen human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing emerge as a remarkably popular test for the diagnostic work-up of coeliac disease with high patient acceptance. Although limited in its positive predictive value for coeliac disease, the strong disease association with specific HLA genes imparts exceptional negative predictive value to HLA typing, enabling a negative result to exclude coeliac disease confidently. In response to mounting evidence that the clinical use and interpretation of HLA typing often deviates from best practice, this article outlines an evidence-based approach to guide clinically appropriate use of HLA typing, and establishes a reporting template for pathology providers to improve communication of results. PMID:25827511

  11. Rare association of coeliac disease with aplastic anaemia: report of a case from India.

    PubMed

    Basu, Ayan; Ray, Yogiraj; Bowmik, Pratik; Rahman, Mehebubar; Dikshit, Nidhi; Goswami, Rama Prosad

    2014-09-01

    Coeliac disease is a systemic autoimmune disorder with major intestinal manifestations. It has multiple hematologic associations including anaemia (mostly due to iron, folate and/or vitamin B12 malabsorption), other cytopenias, coagulation abnormalities, hyposplenism, IgA deficiency and lymphomas. Aplastic anaemia has however, only rarely been described with celiac disease in published literature. We here present a case of atypical coeliac disease in a 40 year male Indian patient, with insignificant gastrointestinal symptoms, presenting with aplastic anaemia manifested by pancytopenia with hypocellular bone marrow. On gluten free diet, his symptoms like weakness, fatigue and malaise were relieved-blood and platelet transfusion requirement also diminished. PMID:25332580

  12. Cardiomyopathy responsive to gluten withdrawal in a patient with coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Samuel; Thomas, Angharad; Gorard, David Angelo

    2016-01-01

    A 57-year-old man with iron deficiency anaemia developed general malaise, exertional dyspnoea and features of cardiac failure out of proportion to his anaemia (haemoglobin 120 g/L). Investigations showed a severely dilated left ventricle with an ejection fraction of 15%, due to dilated cardiomyopathy. He was treated with high-dose diuretics, ACE inhibitors and β-blocker therapy. Subsequent investigation into his iron deficiency anaemia revealed a new diagnosis of coeliac disease. After starting a gluten-free diet, his cardiac function improved markedly, with ejection fraction reaching 70%, allowing his cardiac medications to be withdrawn. This case suggests a link between coeliac disease and cardiomyopathy. PMID:26976850

  13. Coeliac disease-associated polymorphisms influence thymic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Amundsen, S S; Viken, M K; Sollid, L M; Lie, B A

    2014-09-01

    Significant associations between coeliac disease (CD) and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) distributed over 40 genetic regions have been established. The majority of these SNPs are non-coding and 20 SNPs were, by expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis, found to harbour cis regulatory potential in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Almost all regions contain genes with an immunological relevant function, of which many act in the same biological pathways. One such pathway is T-cell development in the thymus, a pathway previously not explored in CD pathogenesis. The aim of our study was to explore the regulatory potential of the CD-associated SNPs (n=50) by eQTL analysis in thymic tissue from 42 subjects. In total, 43 nominal significant (P<0.05) eQTLs were found within 24 CD-associated chromosomal regions, corresponding to 27 expression-altering SNPs (eSNPs) and 40 probes (eProbes) that represents 39 unique genes (eGenes). Nine significant probe-SNP pairs (corresponding to 8 eSNPs and 7 eGenes) overlapped with previous findings in PBMC (rs12727642-PARK7, rs296547-DDX59, rs917997-IL18RAP, rs842647-AHSA2, rs13003464-AHSA2, rs6974491-ELMO1, rs2074404-NSF (two independent probes) and rs2298428-UBE2L3). When compared across more tissues, we found that 14 eQTLs could represent potentially novel thymus-specific eQTLs. This implies that CD risk polymorphisms could affect gene regulation in thymus. PMID:24871462

  14. The Evaluation of the Effects of Paternal and Maternal Silent Coeliac Disease on Birthweight and Gestational Age in Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Kahveci, H; Turan, MI; Cayir, A; Laloglu, F; Ertekin, V; Orbak, Z

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Coeliac disease is a chronic disease and is common all over the world. It has many other associated systemic side effects. This study investigated the effect of paternal and maternal silent coeliac disease on birthweight and gestational age in newborns. Methods: The study group consisted of 81 newborns who were hospitalized for prematurity or term-intrauterine growth retardation. The parents of premature and/or small for gestational age babies born with coeliac disease-specific antigens were investigated. Results: The differences were not statistically significant in fathers' tissue transglutaminase levels between premature appropriate gestational age, premature small gestational age and term small gestational age infants (p > 0.05), but statistically significant in mothers (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Silent coeliac disease may occur in parents, especially in mothers of preterm and small for gestational age infants, even in the absence of apparent clinical indications. PMID:25781285

  15. Screening of coeliac disease in undetected adults and patients diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Ajlan, Abdulrahman S

    2016-07-01

    The present study is to determine the prevalence and implication of coeliac disease (CD) among adult Saudis and compared to those with diagnosed irritable bowel syndrome. This prospective study was conducted among 980 adults. Out of that, 482 subjects (staff and students of Riyadh Health Science College) were designated as control cohorts for undetected coeliac disease. Furthermore, another contingent of 498 subjects diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) at Prince Salman Hospital and Al-Iman General Hospital also constituted a segment of the overall initial 1020 subjects. Both cases and control were tested for serological markers of coeliac disease (tissues transglutaminase (tTGAs) and endomysial autoantibody (EMAs) and were confirmed by histopathology test. All the positive for cases of coeliac disease were screened for iron deficiency anaemia, Vitamin D deficiency, and osteoporosis and weight assessment. The percentage of coeliac disease in control subjects and patients diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) were found to be 1.9% and 9.6% respectively, about 38% of the total coeliac disease patients are among females of middle age (20-39-years) and 16% of the males in the same age range. Whereas, 20% and 25% of all coeliac disease cases with ages of 40-59 were remarked as females and males respectively. The identical nature and overlap of symptoms of the two conditions could possibly result in misdiagnosis of coeliac diseases or over-diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome. The findings of the study might also give considerable implications of the disease in the nutritional level which is noticeable. PMID:27298578

  16. A Case of Variegate Porphyria in Association With Coeliac Disease and Bisphosphonate Associated Dental Osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ogundipe, Olayinka A.

    2009-01-01

    This case describes an older patient with a rare diagnosis of variegate porphyria presenting with acute abdominal pains and bloating, intermittent loose stools and jaw pains following surgical repair of an osteoporotic hip fracture. She was noted to have acute hyponatraemia. All the abdominal symptoms and the hyponatraemia were initially attributed to an acute episode of variegate porphyria with an accompanying syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion. However, following further evaluations necessitated by the incomplete resolution of the abdominal symptoms, it became apparent that some of the persisting symptoms were due to a concurrent and new presentation of serology positive coeliac disease. The jaw pains were established to be due to dental osteonecrosis in association with the use of bisphosphonate therapy for treatment of osteoporosis. The various symptoms and signs subsequently settled uneventfully following institution of appropriate management options for the various coexisting diagnoses. Keywords Abdominal pain; Abdominal bloating; Loose stools; Hyponatraemia; Variegate porphyria; Coeliac disease; Osteoporosis; Bisphosphonates; Osteonecrosis PMID:22481993

  17. Validity of histology for the diagnosis of paediatric coeliac disease: a Swedish multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Montén, Caroline; Bjelkenkrantz, Kaj; Gudjonsdottir, Audur H; Browaldh, Lars; Arnell, Henrik; Naluai, Åsa Torinsson; Agardh, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Histological evaluation of intestinal biopsies for the diagnosis of coeliac disease can be challenging and compatible with risk of misdiagnosis. The aim was to evaluate the agreement of pathological diagnosis for coeliac disease in children investigated at four major paediatric university hospitals in Sweden. MATERIALS AND METHODS Intestinal duodenal biopsies were collected from 402 children at median 9.7 years (1.4-18.3 years). A pathologist at each hospital performed the primary evaluation. A designated pathologist, blinded to the primary evaluation, performed a second Marsh classification of biopsies (M0 to M3c) taken from the bulb and duodenum separately. Kappa (κ) scores between first and second evaluation determined the agreement. Plasma samples were collected at the day of intestinal biopsy and analysed for tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (tTGA) using radioligand-binding assays. RESULTS Marsh scores were concordant in 229/356 biopsies (64%, κ = 0.52, p < 0.0001). Among discordant results, 15/127 (12%) showed M0 in distal duodenum but ≥ M2 in the bulb, whereas the opposite was true for 8/127 (6%) of the biopsies. There were fewer collected duodenal biopsies, more missing bulb biopsies and missing CD3 staining among discordant evaluations. The second evaluation revealed a Marsh score compliant with coeliac disease in 22 children of whom seven children were tTGA positive. CONCLUSIONS The variation between university hospitals on the pathological evaluation of biopsies may lead to misdiagnosis of coeliac disease in paediatric patients. Access to clinical and endoscopic information as well as tTGA levels may be useful for the pathologist to complement the evaluation in dubious cases. PMID:26635075

  18. The safety of oats in the dietary treatment of coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Richman, Emile

    2012-11-01

    Coeliac disease is a permanent inflammatory disorder of the small bowel affecting approximately 1% of the population. The only effective treatment that exists is exclusion of gluten from the diet. The present paper aims to review the literature as to whether oats are safe to eat for people with coeliac disease. Much data exist on the restrictive nature that adhering to a gluten-free diet imposes on an individual. If oats could be eaten, this would help reduce the restrictive nature of the diet. This in turn could lead to an increase in the quality of life. Oats are of high-nutritional value, providing a rich source of fibre, vitamins and minerals. The fibre source contains soluble fibre which is believed to help reduce LDL-cholesterol. A systematic review of the literature was conducted. Earlier studies conducted are difficult to compare as they used different methodologies and it is not known whether samples of oats in the studies were contaminated with gluten from other cereals. Many studies reviewed do not state the strain of oat used. Recent research has suggested that it may only be in certain strains of oats which could produce a toxic response to people with coeliac disease. In conclusion, research suggests that the risk from consuming oats may be less harmful than first thought; however, may vary according to the strain of oat. Handling that risk in clinical practice remains controversial. PMID:22931789

  19. Subclinical Cardiac Dysfunction in Children with Coeliac Disease: Is the Gluten-Free Diet Effective?

    PubMed Central

    Saylan, Berna; Cevik, Ayhan; Kirsaclioglu, Ceyda Tuna; Ekici, Filiz; Tosun, Ozgur; Ustundag, Gonca

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of coeliac disease on cardiac function in children using conventional transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and tissue Doppler echocardiography (TDE). Methods. Coeliac disease patients were evaluated in two different groups based on serum endomysial antibody (EmA) titers (EmA (+) and EmA (−)), and the data obtained by conventional and TDE studies were compared between the patient groups and healthy controls. Results. There was no significant difference between EmA (+) and EmA (−) groups in terms of the conventional TTE parameters, including ejection fraction (EF), fractional shortening (FS), and left ventricle end diastolic diameter (LVEDD), that show the left ventricular systolic function (P = 0.727, P = 0.317, P = 0.118). TDE showed a significant difference in left ventricle (LV) isovolumic relaxation time (LV IVRT) and LV myocardial performance index (LV MPI) parameters between EmA (+) and EmA (−) patient groups (P < 0.0001). Conclusion. The measurement of LV MPI and LV IVRT parameters by TDE would be beneficial in early determination of the cardiac involvement and establishing appropriate treatment and followup of patients with coeliac disease as well as in making distinction between EmA (+) and EmA (−) patients. PMID:23209919

  20. Molecular analysis of HLA-DQ A alleles in coeliac disease lack of a unique disease-associated sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Mantovani, V; Corazza, G R; Angelini, G; Delfino, L; Frisoni, M; Mirri, P; Valentini, R A; Barboni, P; Gasbarrini, G; Ferrara, G B

    1991-01-01

    Susceptibility to coeliac disease is strongly associated with some HLA class II antigens, encoded by the HLA-D region. Since the HLA-DQ locus seems to be primarily involved, we have analysed by polymerase chain reaction amplification and allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization the most polymorphic region of the HLA-DQ A1 gene. No difference was observed between the 20 coeliac patients and 20 HLA-D-matched healthy controls who took part in the study. Furthermore, in patients and controls, the restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the HLA-DQ A gene using the restriction enzyme BglII did not disclose any specific disease-associated fragment. Our results are not consistent with a unique DQ A coeliac disease-associated sequence, but rather with the hypothesis that some polymorphic residues or allelic hypervariable regions, although found also in the normal population, can predispose to coeliac disease due to their higher frequency in this condition. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:1671007

  1. Clinical utility of quantitative multi-antibody Polycheck immunoassays in the diagnosis of coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Konopka, Ewa; Grzywnowicz, Maciej; Oralewska, Beata; Cielecka-Kuszyk, Joanna; Trojanowska, Ilona; Cukrowska, Bożena

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the clinical utility of multi-antibody strategies in the diagnosis of coeliac disease (CD), the new quantitative Polycheck immunoassays were analysed. METHODS: Polycheck Celiac Panels (PCPs) are immunoenzyme screening assays for the quantitative measurement of coeliac-specific immunoglobulin class G (IgG) or class A (IgA) in serum. Lines of relevant antigens are coated together with five IgG or IgA standard lines used for the standard curve as positive control. PCP IgA consists of human recombinant human tissue transglutaminase (tTG) and deamidated gliadin peptides (DGP) as targets to detect IgA antibodies. PCP IgG consists of tTG, DGP and IF (intrinsic factor) antigens to detect antibodies in IgG class. PCPs were performed on 50 CD patients, including 6 cases with selective IgA deficiency, and 50 non-coeliac controls. CD diagnosis was performed according to the ESPGHAN recommendations: The presence of specific anti-tTG-IgA or anti-DGP-IgG (in the case of IgA deficiency) antibodies, typical histopathological changes in duodenal mucosa described in Marsh-Oberhüber classification as at least grade 2. The diagnosis of the majority of the control subjects was functional gastrointestinal disorders. The PCP results were compared with reference EliA Celikey. RESULTS: The usage of PCPs led to the correct identification of all CD patients. In our study, PCPs showed 100% agreement with the histopathological results. PCP IgA test showed a 98% concordance and correlated positively (R = 0.651, P = 0.0014) with EliA Celikey test. The highest specificity and positive predictive value (both 100%) were observed for the detection of Polycheck anti-tTG-IgA antibodies. The highest sensitivity and negative predictive value (both 100%) were achieved by Polycheck anti-DGP-IgG antibody detection. The best performance (98% sensitivity and negative predictive value, 100% specificity and positive predictive value, diagnostic accuracy - AU ROC 99%) was observed for the

  2. Coeliac disease: a diverse clinical syndrome caused by intolerance of wheat, barley and rye.

    PubMed

    McGough, Norma; Cummings, John H

    2005-11-01

    Coeliac disease is a lifelong intolerance to the gluten found in wheat, barley and rye, and some patients are also sensitive to oats. The disease is genetically determined, with 10% of the first-degree relatives affected and 75% of monozygotic twins being concordant. Of the patients with coeliac disease 95% are human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 positive. Characteristically, the jejunal mucosa becomes damaged by a T-cell-mediated autoimmune response that is thought to be initiated by a 33-mer peptide fragment in A2 gliadin, and patients with this disorder have raised levels of anti-endomysium and tissue transglutaminase antibodies in their blood. Coeliac disease is the major diagnosable food intolerance and, with the advent of a simple blood test for case finding, prevalence rates are thought to be approximately 1:100. Classically, the condition presented with malabsorption and failure to thrive in infancy, but this picture has now been overtaken by the much more common presentation in adults, usually with non-specific symptoms such as tiredness and anaemia, disturbance in bowel habit or following low-impact bone fractures. Small intestinal biopsy is necessary for diagnosis and shows a characteristically flat appearance with crypt hypoplasia and infiltration of the epithelium with lymphocytes. Diet is the key to management and a gluten-free diet effectively cures the condition. However, this commitment is lifelong and many aisles in the supermarket are effectively closed to individuals with coeliac disease. Compliance can be monitored by measuring antibodies in blood, which revert to negative after 6-9 months. Patients with minor symptoms, who are found incidentally to have coeliac disease, often ask whether it is necessary to adhere to the diet. Current advice is that dietary adherence is necessary to avoid the long-term complications, which are, principally, osteoporosis and small bowel lymphoma. However, risk of these complications diminishes very

  3. Anti-tissue transglutaminase, anti-endomysium and anti-R1-reticulin autoantibodies-the antibody trinity of coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Lock, R J; Gilmour, J E; Unsworth, D J

    1999-05-01

    Anti-tissue transglutaminase has been recently described as the predominant autoantigen in coeliac disease. We purified serum anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies from three patients with coeliac disease by column chromatography and eluted tissue section-bound R1-anti-reticulin antibodies from sections of rat tissue for two of these. Lastly, we generated seven mouse MoAbs to guinea pig tissue transglutaminase. Each preparation was examined for anti-tissue transglutaminase, anti-endomysium, anti-R1 reticulin and anti-gliadin antibodies. Column-purified patient antibodies and 2/7 mouse MoAbs gave characteristic anti-endomysium/anti-R1 reticulin reactivity on rat, monkey and human tissue. All positive sera gave indistinguishable patterns of immunofluorescence on rat liver, kidney and stomach, monkey oesophagus, and human umbilical cord. Anti-R1-reticulin eluted from sections showed anti-tissue transglutaminase reactivity in 2/2 cases, but 0/2 showed anti-gliadin reactivity. In both, tissue section-eluted anti-R1 reticulin gave endomysial staining on monkey oesophagus. None of the mouse monoclonals, or any of the purified patient's anti-tissue transglutaminase or anti-R1-reticulin antibody showed any reactivity with gliadin. These data confirm tissue transglutaminase as the predominant autoantigen in coeliac disease and suggest that both anti-endomysium and anti-R1 reticulin reactivities seen in coeliac disease arise due to an immune response to tissue transglutaminase. Rigorous immunoabsorption was sufficient to abrogate reactivity in the tissue transglutaminase ELISA, but failed to completely absorb anti-endomysium and anti-reticulin activity. The possibility remains that some of the anti-endomysium and anti-reticulin activity was directed against antigens other than tissue transglutaminase. PMID:10337016

  4. Differences in gluten metabolism among healthy volunteers, coeliac disease patients and first-degree relatives.

    PubMed

    Caminero, Alberto; Nistal, Esther; Herrán, Alexandra R; Pérez-Andrés, Jénifer; Ferrero, Miguel A; Vaquero Ayala, Luis; Vivas, Santiago; Ruiz de Morales, José M G; Albillos, Silvia M; Casqueiro, Francisco Javier

    2015-10-28

    Coeliac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy resulting from exposure to gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. Gluten proteins are partially digested by human proteases generating immunogenic peptides that cause inflammation in patients carrying HLA-DQ2 and DQ8 genes. Although intestinal dysbiosis has been associated with patients with CD, bacterial metabolism of gluten has not been studied in depth thus far. The aim of this study was to analyse the metabolic activity of intestinal bacteria associated with gluten intake in healthy individuals, CD patients and first-degree relatives of CD patients. Faecal samples belonging to twenty-two untreated CD patients, twenty treated CD patients, sixteen healthy volunteers on normal diet, eleven healthy volunteers on gluten-free diet (GFD), seventy-one relatives of CD patients on normal diet and sixty-nine relatives on GFD were tested for several proteolytic activities, cultivable bacteria involved in gluten metabolism, SCFA and the amount of gluten in faeces. We detected faecal peptidasic activity against the gluten-derived peptide 33-mer. CD patients showed differences in faecal glutenasic activity (FGA), faecal tryptic activity (FTA), SCFA and faecal gluten content with respect to healthy volunteers. Alterations in specific bacterial groups metabolising gluten such as Clostridium or Lactobacillus were reported in CD patients. Relatives showed similar parameters to CD patients (SCFA) and healthy volunteers (FTA and FGA). Our data support the fact that commensal microbial activity is an important factor in the metabolism of gluten proteins and that this activity is altered in CD patients. PMID:26428276

  5. Diagnosis and management of adult coeliac disease: guidelines from the British Society of Gastroenterology

    PubMed Central

    Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Bai, Julio C; Biagi, Federico; Card, Timothy R; Ciacci, Carolina; Ciclitira, Paul J; Green, Peter H R; Hadjivassiliou, Marios; Holdoway, Anne; van Heel, David A; Kaukinen, Katri; Leffler, Daniel A; Leonard, Jonathan N; Lundin, Knut E A; McGough, Norma; Davidson, Mike; Murray, Joseph A; Swift, Gillian L; Walker, Marjorie M; Zingone, Fabiana; Sanders, David S

    2014-01-01

    A multidisciplinary panel of 18 physicians and 3 non-physicians from eight countries (Sweden, UK, Argentina, Australia, Italy, Finland, Norway and the USA) reviewed the literature on diagnosis and management of adult coeliac disease (CD). This paper presents the recommendations of the British Society of Gastroenterology. Areas of controversies were explored through phone meetings and web surveys. Nine working groups examined the following areas of CD diagnosis and management: classification of CD; genetics and immunology; diagnostics; serology and endoscopy; follow-up; gluten-free diet; refractory CD and malignancies; quality of life; novel treatments; patient support; and screening for CD. PMID:24917550

  6. How should I approach standard endocrine evaluation in patients with coeliac disease?

    PubMed

    Napier, Catherine; Pearce, Simon H S

    2013-10-01

    Endocrine evaluation is an important consideration in the longitudinal assessment of patients with coeliac disease (CD). In addition to wide-ranging nutritional implications, this common autoimmune disorder has a significant impact on bone health. A strategy to prevent osteomalacia, in conjunction with regular assessment of bone mineral density, is essential to minimize the possibility of increased fracture risk. Clinicians should readily acknowledge that patients with CD have a higher risk of developing a coexisting autoimmune condition. A considered clinical assessment and timely biochemical evaluation, as indicated in the wider context of continued emphasis on a gluten-free diet, will ensure optimal patient management. PMID:23837873

  7. Recombinant human interleukin 10 suppresses gliadin dependent T cell activation in ex vivo cultured coeliac intestinal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Salvati, V M; Mazzarella, G; Gianfrani, C; Levings, M K; Stefanile, R; De Giulio, B; Iaquinto, G; Giardullo, N; Auricchio, S; Roncarolo, M G; Troncone, R

    2005-01-01

    Background: Enteropathy in coeliac disease (CD) is sustained by a gliadin specific Th1 response. Interleukin (IL)-10 can downregulate Th1 immune responses. Aim: We investigated the ability of recombinant human (rh) IL-10 to suppress gliadin induced Th1 response. Patients and methods: IL-10 RNA transcripts were analysed by competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in duodenal biopsies from untreated and treated CD patients, non-coeliac enteropathies (NCE), and controls. CD biopsies were cultured with a peptic-tryptic digest of gliadin with or without rhIL-10. The proportion of CD80+ and CD25+ cells in the lamina propria, epithelial expression of Fas, intraepithelial infiltration of CD3+ cells, as well as cytokine synthesis (interferon γ (IFN-γ) and IL-2) were measured. Short term T cell lines (TCLs) obtained from treated CD biopsies cultured with gliadin with or without rhIL-10 were analysed by ELISPOT for gliadin specific production of IFN-γ. Results: In untreated CD and NCE, IL-10 RNA transcripts were significantly upregulated. In ex vivo organ cultures, rhIL-10 downregulated gliadin induced cytokine synthesis, inhibited intraepithelial migration of CD3+ cells, and reduced the proportion of lamina propria CD25+ and CD80+ cells whereas it did not interfere with epithelial Fas expression. In short term TCLs, rhIL-10 abrogated the IFN-γ response to gliadin. Conclusions: rhIL-10 suppresses gliadin specific T cell activation. It may interfere with the antigen presenting capacity of lamina propria mononuclear cells as it reduces the expression of CD80. Interestingly, rhIL-10 also induces a long term hyporesponsiveness of gliadin specific mucosal T cells. These results offer new perspectives for therapeutic strategies in coeliac patients based on immune modulation by IL-10. PMID:15591503

  8. Duration of gluten exposure in adult coeliac disease does not correlate with the risk for autoimmune disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sategna, G; Solerio, E; Scaglione, N; Aimo, G; Mengozzi, G

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—Duration of gluten exposure seems to predispose adolescents with coeliac disease to autoimmune diseases. In a retrospective cohort study, we assessed the relationship between autoimmune disorders and actual gluten exposure in patients in whom coeliac disease was diagnosed in adult life (⩾16 years).
METHODS—We screened for the presence of autoimmunity in 605 controls (16-84 years) and 422 patients (16-84 years), all of whom had been on gluten withdrawal for at least one year (median follow up 9.5 years). A logistic regression analysis, setting the prevalence of autoimmunity as the dependent variable, was employed to control for independent covariates as predictors of the risk of autoimmunity.
RESULTS—The prevalence of autoimmunity was threefold higher (p<0.00001) in patients than in controls. Mean duration of gluten exposure was 31.2 and 32.6 years for patients with or without autoimmunity. Logistic regression showed that increased age at diagnosis of coeliac disease was related to the prevalence of autoimmune disease while "actual gluten exposure" which takes into account diet compliance, follow up, and age at diagnosis of autoimmune disorders were not predictive for the risk of developing autoimmune diseases (odds ratio 0.82 per year).
CONCLUSION—The prevalence of autoimmune diseases in patients with a late coeliac disease diagnosis does not correlate with duration of gluten intake. Early exposure to gluten may modify the immunological response. Gluten withdrawal does not protect patients with a late diagnosis from autoimmune diseases.


Keywords: coeliac disease; autoimmune disorders; prevalence PMID:11559646

  9. Raised number of jejunal IgG2-producing cells in untreated adult coeliac disease compared with food allergy.

    PubMed Central

    Rognum, T O; Kett, K; Fausa, O; Bengtsson, U; Kilander, A; Scott, H; Gaarder, P I; Brandtzaeg, P

    1989-01-01

    The subclass distribution of IgG-producing immunocytes was studied by two colour immunohistochemistry with monoclonal antibodies in jejunal biopsy specimens from 10 adults with untreated coeliac disease, 11 coeliac disease patients on a gluten free diet, and seven patients with established food allergy. Paired immunofluorescence staining was performed with subclass specific murine monoclonal antibodies in combination with polyclonal rabbit antibody reagent to total IgG; the proportion of cells belonging to each subclass could thereby be determined. The ratio of IgG2 immunocytes was significantly higher (p less than 0.05) in untreated coeliac disease patients (median, 35.2%; range, 26.7-65.2%) than in those on a gluten free diet (median, 7.3%; range, 0-31.9%) or those having food allergy (median, 12.5%; range, 0-36.5%). The disparity in the local IgG2 response between patients with untreated coeliac disease and those with food allergy might be due to differences in the nature of the antigenic stimuli, dissimilar genetic 'make-up' of the subjects, or both. Images Fig. 2 PMID:2599444

  10. Absorption of Amino Acids and Peptides in a Child with a Variant of Hartnup Disease and Coexistent Coeliac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tarlow, M. J.; Seakins, J. W. T.; Lloyd, June K.; Matthews, D. M.; Cheng, B.; Thomas, A. J.

    1972-01-01

    A child with a variant of Hartnup disease and co-existent coeliac disease is described. Oral tolerance tests with L-histidine, L-tyrosine, and glycyl-L-tyrosine, and in vitro uptake studies on a small intestinal biopsy with L-histidine and glycyl-L-histidine, showed impaired absorption of the free amino acids, and showed that absorption of tyrosine and mucosal uptake of histidine was better from the dipeptides than from the free amino acids. This supports the hypothesis that the intestinal mucosa can take up small peptides intact, and that the peptide uptake mechanism is not involved in the intestinal defect of Hartnup disease. PMID:5086513

  11. Anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies from coeliac patients inhibit transglutaminase activity both in vitro and in situ

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, C; Paparo, F; Caputo, I; Rossi, M; Maglio, M; Sblattero, D; Not, T; Porta, R; Auricchio, S; Marzari, R; Troncone, R

    2002-01-01

    Background and aims: Coeliac disease (CD) is a multifactorial disorder which has an autoimmune component characterised by the occurrence of disease specific autoreactive antibodies against the enzyme tissue transglutaminase (tTG). The aim of this study was to investigate whether binding of antibodies to the enzyme influences tTG activity. Methods: tTG activity was assayed in the presence of immunoglobulin A (IgA) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) purified from the serum of coeliac patients, CUB 7402 (an anti-tTG mouse monoclonal antibody), and human anti-tTG monoclonal antibodies derived from both intestinal lymphocytes from three patients with CD and from peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy subjects. For our studies we used calcium treated and untreated recombinant human tTG. Furthermore, the effects of antibodies were determined by immunohistochemical detection of tTG activity in sections of human umbilical cord. Results: IgG and IgA from CD patients inhibited tTG activity in vitro in a dose dependent manner, with a different rate of inhibition among patients. The monoclonal antibody CUB 7402 and human monoclonal antibodies displayed a dose dependent inhibitory effect towards the catalytic activity of the enzyme, both in vitro and in situ. Preincubation of tTG with CaCl2 caused loss of the inhibitory effect due to CUB 7402 but not that caused by human monoclonal antibodies. Conclusions: Purified CD IgA, IgG, as well as human anti-tTG monoclonal antibodies inhibited the enzymatic activity of human tTG both in vitro and in situ. PMID:12117875

  12. Bilateral occipital calcification, epilepsy and coeliac disease: clinical and neuroimaging features of a new syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Magaudda, A; Dalla Bernardina, B; De Marco, P; Sfaello, Z; Longo, M; Colamaria, V; Daniele, O; Tortorella, G; Tata, M A; Di Perri, R

    1993-01-01

    Twenty patients affected by bilateral occipital cortical-subcortical calcification (BOC) are described, 19 (95%) had epilepsy. In 8 of 16 cases studied, intestinal biopsy revealed coeliac disease. Fourteen patients had occipital partial epilepsy with a relatively benign outcome, while 4 patients were affected by a severe form of epilepsy, with very frequent, drug-resistant, generalised and partial seizures with mental deterioration. One patient had a single episode of convulsive status epilepticus at four months of age. The neurological examination was normal in all patients. CT showed flocculo-nodular, cortico-subcortical BOC, without enhancement and without lobar or hemispheric atrophy. MRI was normal. The clinical and neuroimaging features of these patients are different therefore from those with the Sturge-Weber Syndrome. The study confirms a high prevalence of coliac disease in patients with BOC, but the relationship between these two pathologies still needs to be clarified. Images PMID:8350105

  13. Severe exfoliative erythema of malnutrition in a child with coexisting coeliac and Hartnup's disease.

    PubMed

    Sander, C S; Hertecant, J; Abdulrazzaq, Y M; Berger, T G

    2009-03-01

    Exfoliative erythema of malnutrition is a collective term for skin lesions caused by a combination of multiple deficiencies in vitamins, microelements, essential fatty acids and amino acids. We report a 3-year-old Iraqi girl with malnutrition due to coexisting coeliac and Hartnup's disease. On admission to hospital, she presented with kwashiorkor, anaemia, hepatitis and hypoalbuminia. She had severe skin changes with erythema, desquamation, erosions and diffuse hyperpigmentation involving the whole integument, particularly the perioral area, trunk and legs. She also had angular cheilitis, glossitis, conjunctivitis and diffuse alopecia. After treatment with a high-protein gluten-free diet and supplementation with vitamins and microelements there was a rapid improvement in the skin lesions. The severity of the skin lesions in this case can be explained by the coexistence of two metabolic diseases causing complex malnutrition. PMID:19018792

  14. Coeliac Disease – New Pathophysiological Findings and Their Implications for Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Jürgen; Schuppan, Detlef

    2014-01-01

    Summary Coeliac disease (CD) is one of the most common diseases worldwide, resulting from a combination of environmental (gluten) and genetic (human leucocyte antigen (HLA) and non-HLA genes) factors. Depending on the geographical location, the prevalence of CD has been estimated to approximate 0.5-1%. The only treatment currently available for CD is a gluten-free diet (GFD) excluding gluten-containing cereals such as wheat, rye, and barley, and other foodstuffs with natural or added gluten. However, adherence rates and patient acceptance are often poor. Moreover, even in fully adherent patients, the diet may fail to induce clinical or histological improvement. Hence, it is unsurprising that studies show CD patients to be highly interested in non-dietary alternatives. The following review focuses on current pathophysiological concepts of CD, spotlighting those pathways which may serve as new possible, non-dietary therapeutic targets in the treatment of CD. PMID:26288589

  15. Autoimmune enteropathy: not all flat mucosa mean coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Volta, Umberto; Mumolo, Maria Gloria; Caio, Giacomo; Boschetti, Elisa; Latorre, Rocco; Giancola, Fiorella; Paterini, Paola; Giorgio, Roberto De

    2016-01-01

    A 62-year-old woman complaining of severe malabsorption was diagnosed with celiac disease based on the findings of flat, small intestinal mucosa and HLA-DQ2 positivity, although celiac serology was negative. This diagnosis was questioned due to the lack of clinical and histological improvement after a long period of strict gluten-free diet. The detection of enterocyte autoantibodies guided to the correct diagnosis of autoimmune enteropathy, leading to a complete recovery of the patient following an appropriate immunosuppressive treatment. Autoimmune enteropathy should be considered in the differential diagnosis of malabsorption with severe villous atrophy, including those cases with negative celiac-related serology. PMID:27099674

  16. Morphological and biochemical studies of a naturally occurring enteropathy in the Irish setter dog: a comparison with coeliac disease in man.

    PubMed

    Batt, R M; Carter, M W; McLean, L

    1984-11-01

    A naturally occurring enteropathy was identified in Irish setter dogs and wheat-sensitivity was demonstrated in a litter bred from two of the affected animals. The morphological and biochemical features of this enteropathy are described and compared to coeliac disease in man. Affected animals comprised 10 dogs that presented with poor weight gain or weight loss, with or without diarrhoea. Exocrine pancreatic function was normal and culture of duodenal juice demonstrated no marked bacterial overgrowth. Serum vitamin B12 concentrations were unaltered, but in some cases low serum and erythrocyte folate concentrations and reduced xylose absorption provided indirect evidence for proximal small intestinal disease. Examination of peroral jejunal biopsies revealed patchy morphological changes within individual animals, comprising predominantly partial, but in one case subtotal, villous atrophy. Brush border enzymes were selectively altered: the specific activities of alkaline phosphatase, leucyl-2-naphthylamidase and of zinc-resistant alpha-glucosidase were reduced by approximately 40 per cent, while activities of maltase, sucrase, lactase and gamma-glutamyl transferase were unaltered. Activity of a lysosomal enzyme was increased and there was evidence for enhanced lysosomal fragility. The activity of malate dehydrogenase, with a dual mitochondrial and cytoplasmic localisation, was decreased but there were no changes in the activities of marker enzymes for basal-lateral membranes, endoplasmic reticulum or peroxisomes. These findings, particularly the specific biochemical abnormalities, were comparable to those in partially treated coeliac disease in man; however, a specific role for wheat in the pathogenesis of the disease has yet to be defined. PMID:6522828

  17. Transition from childhood to adulthood in coeliac disease: the Prague consensus report

    PubMed Central

    Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Agreus, Lars; Ciacci, Carolina; Crowe, Sheila E; Geller, Marilyn G; Green, Peter H R; Hill, Ivor; Hungin, A Pali; Koletzko, Sibylle; Koltai, Tunde; Lundin, Knut E A; Mearin, M Luisa; Murray, Joseph A; Reilly, Norelle; Walker, Marjorie M; Sanders, David S; Shamir, Raanan; Troncone, Riccardo; Husby, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    The process of transition from childhood to adulthood is characterised by physical, mental and psychosocial development. Data on the transition and transfer of care in adolescents/young adults with coeliac disease (CD) are scarce. In this paper, 17 physicians from 10 countries (Sweden, Italy, the USA, Germany, Norway, the Netherlands, Australia, Britain, Israel and Denmark) and two representatives from patient organisations (Association of European Coeliac Societies and the US Celiac Disease Foundation) examined the literature on transition from childhood to adulthood in CD. Medline (Ovid) and EMBASE were searched between 1900 and September 2015. Evidence in retrieved reports was evaluated using the Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation method. The current consensus report aims to help healthcare personnel manage CD in the adolescent and young adult and provide optimal care and transition into adult healthcare for patients with this disease. In adolescence, patients with CD should gradually assume exclusive responsibility for their care, although parental support is still important. Dietary adherence and consequences of non-adherence should be discussed during transition. In most adolescents and young adults, routine small intestinal biopsy is not needed to reconfirm a childhood diagnosis of CD based on European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) or North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN) criteria, but a biopsy may be considered where paediatric diagnostic criteria have not been fulfilled, such as, in a patient without biopsy at diagnosis, additional serology (endomysium antibody) has not been performed to confirm 10-fold positivity of tissue transglutaminase antibodies or when a no biopsy strategy has been adopted in an asymptomatic child. PMID:27196596

  18. Transition from childhood to adulthood in coeliac disease: the Prague consensus report.

    PubMed

    Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Agreus, Lars; Ciacci, Carolina; Crowe, Sheila E; Geller, Marilyn G; Green, Peter H R; Hill, Ivor; Hungin, A Pali; Koletzko, Sibylle; Koltai, Tunde; Lundin, Knut E A; Mearin, M Luisa; Murray, Joseph A; Reilly, Norelle; Walker, Marjorie M; Sanders, David S; Shamir, Raanan; Troncone, Riccardo; Husby, Steffen

    2016-08-01

    The process of transition from childhood to adulthood is characterised by physical, mental and psychosocial development. Data on the transition and transfer of care in adolescents/young adults with coeliac disease (CD) are scarce. In this paper, 17 physicians from 10 countries (Sweden, Italy, the USA, Germany, Norway, the Netherlands, Australia, Britain, Israel and Denmark) and two representatives from patient organisations (Association of European Coeliac Societies and the US Celiac Disease Foundation) examined the literature on transition from childhood to adulthood in CD. Medline (Ovid) and EMBASE were searched between 1900 and September 2015. Evidence in retrieved reports was evaluated using the Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation method. The current consensus report aims to help healthcare personnel manage CD in the adolescent and young adult and provide optimal care and transition into adult healthcare for patients with this disease. In adolescence, patients with CD should gradually assume exclusive responsibility for their care, although parental support is still important. Dietary adherence and consequences of non-adherence should be discussed during transition. In most adolescents and young adults, routine small intestinal biopsy is not needed to reconfirm a childhood diagnosis of CD based on European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) or North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN) criteria, but a biopsy may be considered where paediatric diagnostic criteria have not been fulfilled, such as, in a patient without biopsy at diagnosis, additional serology (endomysium antibody) has not been performed to confirm 10-fold positivity of tissue transglutaminase antibodies or when a no biopsy strategy has been adopted in an asymptomatic child. PMID:27196596

  19. Screening for coeliac disease in adult patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus: myths, facts and controversy.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Sjoerd F; Tushuizen, Maarten E; von Blomberg, Boudewina M E; Bontkes, Hetty J; Mulder, Chris J; Simsek, Suat

    2016-01-01

    This review aims at summarizing the present knowledge on the clinical consequences of concomitant coeliac disease (CD) in adult patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). The cause of the increased prevalence of CD in T1DM patients is a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Current screening guidelines for CD in adult T1DM patients are not uniform. Based on the current evidence of effects of CD on bone mineral density, diabetic complications, quality of life, morbidity and mortality in patients with T1DM, we advise periodic screening for CD in adult T1DM patients to prevent delay in CD diagnosis and subsequent CD and/or T1DM related complications. PMID:27478507

  20. Severe iron deficiency anaemia as a manifestation of silent coeliac disease: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Paul, Siba P; Taylor, T M; Barnard, Penny

    2010-01-01

    Coeliac disease (CD) occurs in individuals sensitive to gluten protein contained in wheat products. It affects at least 1:100 children and may present with extra-intestinal manifestations such as iron deficiency anaemia, short stature and delay in puberty. A case of severe iron deficiency anaemia as a manifestation of CD is described here. There is a need to raise awareness among health professionals about CD and its extra-intestinal presentations. Suspicion of CD should lead to antibody screening tests and positive results should be followed by an intestinal biopsy for a definitive diagnosis. Involvement of a paediatric dietitian is vital in the management of CD and lifelong adherence to a gluten-free diet is necessary. We hope this article leaves the reader with a heightened awareness about CD and will lead to appropriate early referral to the paediatric services. PMID:20518373

  1. Severe heart failure, dilated cardiomyopathy and pulmonary haemosiderosis in coeliac disease: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Poddar, Banani; Shava, Upender; Srivastava, Anshu; Kapoor, Aditya

    2014-05-01

    Coeliac disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory, multi-system disorder with protean manifestations which has been linked to various auto-immune-mediated disorders. Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a rare extra-intestinal manifestation that is being recognised increasingly in patients with CD. Two cases of CD are described, an 18-year-old boy and a 13-year-old girl, both of whom presented with rapid onset of congestive heart failure and severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Upper limb venous thrombosis and recurrent haemoptysis secondary to pulmonary haemosiderosis in the second case were the other unusual features. The importance of CD screening of patients with DCM and pulmonary haemosiderosis is emphasised. PMID:24090525

  2. Development of a Risk Score for Extraintestinal Manifestations of Coeliac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Christine L.; Hearn, Nerissa L.; Lind, Joanne M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to identify indicators of coeliac disease (CD) in an Australian cohort, beyond the known gastrointestinal symptoms. Individuals were recruited from the general population and at the 2014 Gluten Free Expo in Sydney and in Melbourne, Australia. Data on their current health status including medical history, diagnosis for CD, and family history were collected. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors of CD. A weighted risk score system was then generated for the independent predictors, and a risk score was calculated for each individual. A total of 301 individuals were included in the study. We found an association between CD and having a family history of CD (odds ratio [OR] 7.6, 95%confidence interval [CI] 3.7–15.6), an autoimmune disorder (OR 2.1, 95%CI 1.1–4.1), anemia (OR 5.8, 95%CI 2.8–11.9), lactose intolerance (OR 4.5, 95%CI 1.2–17.7), and depression (OR 4.8, 95%CI 1.9–11.6). Risk score analysis found individuals in the medium (OR 4.8, 95%CI 2.5 to 9.3) and high-risk (OR 36.6, 95%CI 16.4 to 81.6) groups were significantly more likely to report having CD compared with those in the low-risk group. This study identifies a set of factors more commonly observed in individuals with CD, beyond the traditional gastrointestinal complaints. These include a family history of CD, the presence of another autoimmune disorder, anemia, lactose intolerance, and depression. A risk score was developed (Coeliac Risk COMPARE) which scores individuals based on the presence or absence of these additional symptoms and provides an additional screening tool when assessing whether the patient requires follow-up testing for CD. PMID:27082568

  3. Development of a Risk Score for Extraintestinal Manifestations of Coeliac Disease.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Christine L; Hearn, Nerissa L; Lind, Joanne M

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to identify indicators of coeliac disease (CD) in an Australian cohort, beyond the known gastrointestinal symptoms. Individuals were recruited from the general population and at the 2014 Gluten Free Expo in Sydney and in Melbourne, Australia. Data on their current health status including medical history, diagnosis for CD, and family history were collected. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors of CD. A weighted risk score system was then generated for the independent predictors, and a risk score was calculated for each individual. A total of 301 individuals were included in the study. We found an association between CD and having a family history of CD (odds ratio [OR] 7.6, 95%confidence interval [CI] 3.7-15.6), an autoimmune disorder (OR 2.1, 95%CI 1.1-4.1), anemia (OR 5.8, 95%CI 2.8-11.9), lactose intolerance (OR 4.5, 95%CI 1.2-17.7), and depression (OR 4.8, 95%CI 1.9-11.6). Risk score analysis found individuals in the medium (OR 4.8, 95%CI 2.5 to 9.3) and high-risk (OR 36.6, 95%CI 16.4 to 81.6) groups were significantly more likely to report having CD compared with those in the low-risk group. This study identifies a set of factors more commonly observed in individuals with CD, beyond the traditional gastrointestinal complaints. These include a family history of CD, the presence of another autoimmune disorder, anemia, lactose intolerance, and depression. A risk score was developed (Coeliac Risk COMPARE) which scores individuals based on the presence or absence of these additional symptoms and provides an additional screening tool when assessing whether the patient requires follow-up testing for CD. PMID:27082568

  4. Assessment of coeliac disease prevalence in patients with Down syndrome in Poland – a multi-centre study

    PubMed Central

    Soroczyńska-Wrzyszcz, Anetta; Barg, Ewa; Józefczuk, Jan; Korczowski, Bartosz; Grzybowska-Chlebowczyk, Urszula; Więcek, Sabina; Cukrowska, Bożena

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The results of studies assessing whether patients with Down syndrome have increased risk of coeliac disease are contradictory. The prevalence of coeliac disease in patients with Down syndrome is estimated at a wide range between 1% to as much as 18.6%. Aim To assess coeliac disease prevalence in patients with Down syndrome in Poland. Material and methods The study enrolled 301 patients with Down syndrome from six centres in Poland (Wroclaw, Sandomierz, Rzeszow, Grudziadz, Katowice, and Bydgoszcz). We measured the concentration of anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA antibodies and anti-deamidated gliadin peptide IgG antibodies in all patients. Patients with abnormal positive (> 10 U/ml) or inconclusive (7–10 U/ml) result of the serological test were offered endoscopic biopsy of the small intestine in the main centre. Results In 31 (10.3%) patients increased concentrations of the investigated antibodies were found, including 19 (6.3%) patients with increased tTg-IgA concentration, 27 (8.97%) patients with increased concentration of DGP-IgG, and 15 (4.98%) patients with increased concentration of both types of antibodies. Endoscopic biopsy of the small intestine was planned for all 31 patients with abnormal results of at least one antibody test and for 2 patients with inconclusive results. One of them suffered from previously diagnosed and histologically confirmed coeliac disease. Biopsy was not conducted in 9 patients due to contraindications, lack of their consent, or introduction of a gluten-free diet by the parents before the examination. In a group of 23 patients who underwent endoscopic biopsy of the small intestine, in 15 patients the histopathological picture of the small intestinal mucosa was typical for coeliac disease, 2 patients were diagnosed with lesions of grade 1 according to the classification by Marsh-Oberhuber, 1 patient was diagnosed with focal shortening of villi and hypertrophy of the crypts with no intraepithelial lymphocytosis

  5. Progressive cortical visual failure associated with occipital calcification and coeliac disease with relative preservation of the dorsal 'action' pathway.

    PubMed

    Plant, Gordon T; James-Galton, Merle; Wilkinson, David

    2015-10-01

    We describe the first reported case of a patient with coeliac disease and cerebral occipital calcification who shows a progressive and seemingly selective failure to recognise visual stimuli. This decline was tracked over a study period of 22 years and occurred in the absence of primary sensory or widespread intellectual impairment. Subsequent tests revealed that although the patient was unable to use shape and contour information to visually identify objects, she was nevertheless able to use this information to reach, grasp and manipulate objects under central, immediate vision. This preservation of visuo-motor control was echoed in her day-to-day ability to navigate and live at home independently. We conclude that occipital calcification following coeliac disease can lead to prominent higher visual failure that, under prescribed viewing conditions, is consistent with separable mechanisms for visual perception and action control. PMID:26218620

  6. From sample-to-answer: integrated genotyping and immunological analysis microfluidic platforms for the diagnostic and treatment of coeliac disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, M.; Höth, J.; Erwes, J.; Latta, D.; Strobach, X.; Hansen-Hagge, T.; Klemm, R.; Gärtner, C.; Demiris, T. M.; O'Sullivan, C.; Ritzi-Lehnert, M.; Drese, K. S.

    2011-02-01

    Taking advantage of microfluidics technology, a Lab-on-Chip system was developed offering the possibility of performing HLA (Human Leukocyte Antigen) typing to test genetic predisposition to coeliac disease and measure the level of immunodeficiency at the point-of-care. These analysis procedures are implemented on two different microfluidic cartridges, both having identical interfacial connections to the identical automated instrument. In order to assess the concentration of the targeted analytes in human blood, finger prick samples are processed to either extract genomic DNA carrying the coeliac disease gene or blood plasma containing the disease specific antibodies. We present here the different microfluidic modules integrated in a common platform, capable of automated sample preparation and analyte detection. In summary, this new microfluidic approach will dramatically reduce the costs of materials (polymer for the disposable chips and minute amount of bio-reagents) and minimize the time for analysis down to less than 20 minutes. In comparison to the state of the art detection of coeliac disease this work represents a tremendous improvement for the patient's quality of live and will significantly reduce the cost burden on the health care system.

  7. Possible ameliorative effect of breastfeeding and the uptake of human colostrum against coeliac disease in autistic rats

    PubMed Central

    Selim, Manar E; Al-Ayadhi, Laila Y

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To examine the possible ameliorative effect of breastfeeding and the uptake of human colostrum against coeliac disease in autistic rats. METHODS: Female rats were fed a standard diet and received a single intraperitoneal injection of 600 mg/kg sodium valproate on day 12.5 after conception. In study 1, neonatal rats were randomly subjected to blood tests to investigate autism. In study 2, the 1st group was fed by the mother after an injection of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and administration of gliadin. The pups in the 2nd group were prevented from accessing maternal milk, injected IFN-γ, administered gliadin, and hand-fed human colostrum. The normal littermates fed by the table mothers were injected with physiological saline and served as normal controls in this study. RESULTS: The protein concentration was higher in group 2 than in group 1 in the duodenum (161.6 ± 9 and 135.4 ± 7 mg/g of tissue, respectively, P < 0.01). A significant increase (P < 0.001) in body weight was detected in human colostrum-treated pups on post natal day (PND) 7 and 21 vs suckling pups in group 1. A delay in eye opening was noticed in the treated rats in group 1 on PND 13 compared with the control group and group 2. Administration of a single intraperitoneal injection of 600 mg/kg sodium valproate on day 12.5 after conception resulted in significantly reduced calcium and vitamin D levels in study 1 compared with the control groups (P < 0.001). However, human colostrum uptake inhibited increases in the level of transglutaminase antibody in autistic pups with coeliac disease. CONCLUSION: The effects of early-life nutrition and human colostrum on the functional maturation of the duodenal villi in autistic rats with coeliac disease that might limit or prevent the coeliac risk with autism. PMID:23745030

  8. Antibodies in the Diagnosis of Coeliac Disease: A Biopsy-Controlled, International, Multicentre Study of 376 Children with Coeliac Disease and 695 Controls

    PubMed Central

    Petroff, David; Richter, Thomas; Uhlig, Holm H.; Laaβ, Martin W.; Hauer, Almuthe; Stern, Martin; Bossuyt, Xavier; de Laffolie, Jan; Flemming, Gunter; Villalta, Danilo; Schlumberger, Wolfgang; Mothes, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis of coeliac disease (CD) relies on a combination of clinical, genetic, serological and duodenal morphological findings. The ESPGHAN suggested that biopsy may not be necessary in all cases. New guidelines include omission of biopsy if the concentration of CD-specific antibodies exceeds 10 times the upper limit of normal (10 ULN) and other criteria are met. We analysed the 10 ULN criterion and investigated multiple antibody-assays. Serum was collected from 1071 children with duodenal biopsy (376 CD patients, 695 disease-controls). IgA-antibodies to tissue transglutaminase (IgA-aTTG), IgG-antibodies to deamidated gliadin peptides (IgG-aDGL) and IgA-endomysium antibodies (IgA-EMA) were measured centrally. We considered 3 outcomes for antibody test procedures utilizing IgA-aTTG and/or IgG-aDGL: positive (≥10 ULN, recommend gluten-free diet), negative (<1 ULN, no gluten-free diet) or unclear (perform biopsy). Positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values were based on clear test results. We required that they and their lower confidence bounds (LCB) be simultaneously very high (LCB >90% and PPV/NPV >95%). These stringent conditions were met for appropriate antibody-procedures over a prevalence range of 9–57%. By combining IgG-aDGL with IgA-aTTG, one could do without assaying total IgA. The PPV of IgG-aDGL was estimated to be extremely high, although more studies are necessary to narrow down the LCB. The proportion of patients requiring a biopsy was <11%. The procedures were either equivalent or even better in children <2 years compared to older children. All 310 of the IgA-aTTG positive children were also IgA-EMA positive. Antibody-assays could render biopsies unnecessary in most children, if experienced paediatric gastroenterologists evaluate the case. This suggestion only applies to the kits used here and should be verified for other available assays. Confirming IgA-aTTG positivity (≥10 ULN) by EMA-testing is unnecessary if performed on the same

  9. Parenting Stress and Impact of Illness in Parents of Children with Coeliac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Epifanio, Maria Stella; Genna, Vitalba; Vitello, Maria Grazia; Roccella, Michele; La Grutta, Sabina

    2013-01-01

    Coeliac disease (CD) is a chronic disease which could stress patients and their family. Although, poor attention has been paid to the quality of life in CD children and to the functioning of families with CD children. The study aims to evaluate the parenting perception of the CD impact and the parenting distress level. A group of 74 parents of CD children compiled the Impact Childhood Illness Scale and the Parenting Stress Index which is also compiled by 74 parents of health children. The assessment does not reveal a significant impact of CD on patient’s personal life although some critical areas emerged. Results evidenced an higher level of parenting stress in parents of CD children than parents of healthy children. CD, if suitably managed, has not a critical impact on parenting perception. Although, CD certainly put parents through an higher risk of a distress related to parenting role than parents with health children. A early identification of parenting distress in a pediatric chronic illness could facilitate the adjustment to pathology. PMID:24416498

  10. The role of nurses and dietitians in managing paediatric coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Fok, Chi-Yee; Holland, Kate Sara; Gil-Zaragozano, Elena; Paul, Siba Prosad

    Coeliac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated genetic condition elicited by the ingestion of gluten, leading to proximal small bowel enteropathy. It affects around 1% of the population, although only a small proportion of cases are actually diagnosed. It is a multisystem disorder presenting with both gastrointestinal and extra-intestinal manifestations such as diarrhoea, abdominal pain, constipation, vomiting, iron deficiency anaemia, faltering growth, dental enamel defects, short stature, liver disease, arthropathy and recurrent aphthous ulcers. Nurses, working in different clinical settings, are best placed for early recognition and diagnosis of CD in children. Suspicion of CD should lead to immunoglobulin A (IgA)-based anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody screening tests and a diagnosis confirmed by an intestinal biopsy. Modification of European (ESPGHAN) guidelines now enables CD to be diagnosed without a small-bowel biopsy in a select group of symptomatic children. A gluten-free diet should preferably be started by paediatric dietitians. Strict adherence to a gluten-free diet is essential to maintain good health and to prevent long-term complications. A case study demonstrating some of the challenges that may be faced in children with CD in clinical practice is described. Specialist nurse-led CD clinics are gaining popularity and have been found to be equally effective in providing continuity of quality care. PMID:27126754

  11. Coeliac disease in children in Christchurch, New Zealand: Presentation and patterns from 2000-2010

    PubMed Central

    Kho, Adeline; Whitehead, Martin; Day, Andrew S

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the presentation patterns of a cohort of children diagnosed with coeliac disease (CD) at Christchurch Hospital, New Zealand. METHODS: Children aged 16 years or less diagnosed with CD at Christchurch Hospital, Christchurch, New Zealand, over the 11 year period between 2000 and 2010 were identified retrospectively. Diagnosis of CD was based upon standard histological criteria of endoscopically-obtained duodenal biopsies. Overlapping search methods were used to identify all relevant diagnoses within the time period. Endoscopy reports and histology findings were reviewed to confirm diagnosis. The numbers of diagnoses per year were calculated and changes in annual rates over the study period were delineated. Available records were reviewed to ascertain presenting symptoms, baseline anthropometry and the indication for referral for each child. In addition, the results of relevant investigations prior to diagnosis were accessed and reviewed. These key investigations included the results of coeliac serology testing (including tissue transglutaminase and endomysial antibodies) as well as the results of tests measuring levels of micronutrients, such as iron. In addition, the histological findings of concurrent biopsies in the oesophagus and stomach were reviewed. RESULTS: Over the 11 year study period, 263 children were diagnosed with CD at this New Zealand paediatric facility. Children were diagnosed from late infancy to 16.9 years: the largest subgroup of children (n = 111) were diagnosed between 5 and 12 years of age. The numbers of children diagnosed each year increased from 13 per year to 31 per year over the 11 years (P = 0.0095). Preschool children (aged less than 5 years) were more likely to have low weight, and to have diarrhoea and abdominal pain prior to diagnosis. Older children (over 5 years of age) most commonly presented with abdominal pain. Fifty-six (21.6%) of the 263 children were diagnosed following screening in high risk groups, with 38

  12. The gluten-free diet and its current application in coeliac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis

    PubMed Central

    Ciclitira, Paul; Hadjivassiliou, Marios; Kaukinen, Katri; Ludvigsson, Jonas F; McGough, Norma; Sanders, David S; Woodward, Jeremy; Leonard, Jonathan N; Swift, Gillian L

    2015-01-01

    Background A gluten-free diet (GFD) is currently the only available therapy for coeliac disease (CD). Objectives We aim to review the literature on the GFD, the gluten content in naturally gluten-free (GF) and commercially available GF food, standards and legislation concerning the gluten content of foods, and the vitamins and mineral content of a GFD. Methods We carried out a PubMed search for the following terms: Gluten, GFD and food, education, vitamins, minerals, calcium, Codex wheat starch and oats. Relevant papers were reviewed and for each topic a consensus among the authors was obtained. Conclusion Patients with CD should avoid gluten and maintain a balanced diet to ensure an adequate intake of nutrients, vitamins, fibre and calcium. A GFD improves symptoms in most patients with CD. The practicalities of this however, are difficult, as (i) many processed foods are contaminated with gluten, (ii) staple GF foods are not widely available, and (iii) the GF substitutes are often expensive. Furthermore, (iv) the restrictions of the diet may adversely affect social interactions and quality of life. The inclusion of oats and wheat starch in the diet remains controversial. PMID:25922672

  13. Evaluation of European coeliac disease risk variants in a north Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Senapati, Sabyasachi; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Sood, Ajit; Midha, Vandana; Szperl, Agata; Romanos, Jihane; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Franke, Lude; Alonso, Santos; Thelma, B K; Wijmenga, Cisca; Trynka, Gosia

    2015-01-01

    Studies in European populations have contributed to a better understanding of the genetics of complex diseases, for example, in coeliac disease (CeD), studies of over 23 000 European samples have reported association to the HLA locus and another 39 loci. However, these associations have not been evaluated in detail in other ethnicities. We sought to better understand how disease-associated loci that have been mapped in Europeans translate to a disease risk for a population with a different ethnic background. We therefore performed a validation of European risk loci for CeD in 497 cases and 736 controls of north Indian origin. Using a dense-genotyping platform (Immunochip), we confirmed the strong association to the HLA region (rs2854275, P=8.2 × 10−49). Three loci showed suggestive association (rs4948256, P=9.3 × 10−7, rs4758538, P=8.6 × 10−5 and rs17080877, P=2.7 × 10−5). We directly replicated five previously reported European variants (P<0.05; mapping to loci harbouring FASLG/TNFSF18, SCHIP1/IL12A, PFKFB3/PRKCQ, ZMIZ1 and ICOSLG). Using a transferability test, we further confirmed association at PFKFB3/PRKCQ (rs2387397, P=2.8 × 10−4) and PTPRK/THEMIS (rs55743914, P=3.4 × 10−4). The north Indian population has a higher degree of consanguinity than Europeans and we therefore explored the role of recessively acting variants, which replicated the HLA locus (rs9271850, P=3.7 × 10−23) and suggested a role of additional four loci. To our knowledge, this is the first replication study of CeD variants in a non-European population. PMID:25052311

  14. Reduced diversity and increased virulence-gene carriage in intestinal enterobacteria of coeliac children

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Ester; Nadal, Inmaculada; Donat, Ester; Ribes-Koninckx, Carmen; Calabuig, Miguel; Sanz, Yolanda

    2008-01-01

    Background Coeliac disease is an immune-mediated enteropathology triggered by the ingestion of cereal gluten proteins. This disorder is associated with imbalances in the composition of the gut microbiota that could be involved in its pathogenesis. The aim of the present study was to determine whether intestinal Enterobacteriaceae populations of active and non-active coeliac patients and healthy children differ in diversity and virulence-gene carriage, so as to establish a possible link between the pathogenic potential of enterobacteria and the disease. Methods Enterobacteriaceae clones were isolated on VRBD agar from faecal samples of 31 subjects (10 active coeliac patients, 10 symptom-free coeliac patients and 11 healthy controls) and identified at species level by the API 20E system. Escherichia coli clones were classified into four phylogenetic groups A, B1, B2 and D and the prevalence of eight virulence-associated genes (type-1 fimbriae [fimA], P fimbriae [papC], S fimbriae [sfaD/E], Dr haemagglutinin [draA], haemolysin [hlyA], capsule K1 [neuB], capsule K5 [KfiC] and aerobactin [iutA]) was determined by multiplex PCR. Results A total of 155 Enterobacteriaceae clones were isolated. Non-E. coli clones were more commonly isolated in healthy children than in coeliac patients. The four phylogenetic E. coli groups were equally distributed in healthy children, while in both coeliac patients most commensal isolates belonged to group A. Within the virulent groups, B2 was the most prevalent in active coeliac disease children, while D was the most prevalent in non-active coeliac patients. E coli clones of the virulent phylogenetic groups (B2+D) from active and non-active coeliac patients carried a higher number of virulence genes than those from healthy individuals. Prevalence of P fimbriae (papC), capsule K5 (sfaD/E) and haemolysin (hlyA) genes was higher in E. coli isolated from active and non-active coeliac children than in those from control subjects. Conclusion This

  15. Common polygenic variation in coeliac disease and confirmation of ZNF335 and NIFA as disease susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Ciara; Quinn, Emma M; Ryan, Anthony W; Conroy, Judith; Trimble, Valerie; Mahmud, Nasir; Kennedy, Nicholas; Corvin, Aiden P; Morris, Derek W; Donohoe, Gary; O'Morain, Colm; MacMathuna, Padraic; Byrnes, Valerie; Kiat, Clifford; Trynka, Gosia; Wijmenga, Cisca; Kelleher, Dermot; Ennis, Sean; Anney, Richard JL; McManus, Ross

    2016-01-01

    Coeliac disease (CD) is a chronic immune-mediated disease triggered by the ingestion of gluten. It has an estimated prevalence of approximately 1% in European populations. Specific HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles are established coeliac susceptibility genes and are required for the presentation of gliadin to the immune system resulting in damage to the intestinal mucosa. In the largest association analysis of CD to date, 39 non-HLA risk loci were identified, 13 of which were new, in a sample of 12 014 individuals with CD and 12 228 controls using the Immunochip genotyping platform. Including the HLA, this brings the total number of known CD loci to 40. We have replicated this study in an independent Irish CD case–control population of 425 CD and 453 controls using the Immunochip platform. Using a binomial sign test, we show that the direction of the effects of previously described risk alleles were highly correlated with those reported in the Irish population, (P=2.2 × 10−16). Using the Polygene Risk Score (PRS) approach, we estimated that up to 35% of the genetic variance could be explained by loci present on the Immunochip (P=9 × 10−75). When this is limited to non-HLA loci, we explain a maximum of 4.5% of the genetic variance (P=3.6 × 10−18). Finally, we performed a meta-analysis of our data with the previous reports, identifying two further loci harbouring the ZNF335 and NIFA genes which now exceed genome-wide significance, taking the total number of CD susceptibility loci to 42. PMID:25920553

  16. Common polygenic variation in coeliac disease and confirmation of ZNF335 and NIFA as disease susceptibility loci.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Ciara; Quinn, Emma M; Ryan, Anthony W; Conroy, Judith; Trimble, Valerie; Mahmud, Nasir; Kennedy, Nicholas; Corvin, Aiden P; Morris, Derek W; Donohoe, Gary; O'Morain, Colm; MacMathuna, Padraic; Byrnes, Valerie; Kiat, Clifford; Trynka, Gosia; Wijmenga, Cisca; Kelleher, Dermot; Ennis, Sean; Anney, Richard J L; McManus, Ross

    2016-02-01

    Coeliac disease (CD) is a chronic immune-mediated disease triggered by the ingestion of gluten. It has an estimated prevalence of approximately 1% in European populations. Specific HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles are established coeliac susceptibility genes and are required for the presentation of gliadin to the immune system resulting in damage to the intestinal mucosa. In the largest association analysis of CD to date, 39 non-HLA risk loci were identified, 13 of which were new, in a sample of 12,014 individuals with CD and 12 228 controls using the Immunochip genotyping platform. Including the HLA, this brings the total number of known CD loci to 40. We have replicated this study in an independent Irish CD case-control population of 425 CD and 453 controls using the Immunochip platform. Using a binomial sign test, we show that the direction of the effects of previously described risk alleles were highly correlated with those reported in the Irish population, (P=2.2 × 10(-16)). Using the Polygene Risk Score (PRS) approach, we estimated that up to 35% of the genetic variance could be explained by loci present on the Immunochip (P=9 × 10(-75)). When this is limited to non-HLA loci, we explain a maximum of 4.5% of the genetic variance (P=3.6 × 10(-18)). Finally, we performed a meta-analysis of our data with the previous reports, identifying two further loci harbouring the ZNF335 and NIFA genes which now exceed genome-wide significance, taking the total number of CD susceptibility loci to 42. PMID:25920553

  17. Analysis of interleukin-4 and interleukin-10 and their association with the lymphocytic infiltrate in the small intestine of patients with coeliac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Beckett, C G; Dell'Olio, D; Kontakou, M; Przemioslo, R T; Rosen-Bronson, S; Ciclitira, P J

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines are raised in the small intestine of patients with coeliac disease after ingestion of gluten but there are equivalent data on interleukin-4 (IL-4) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) producing cells. These cytokines are known to exert important regulatory effects on pro-inflammatory cytokine production from lymphocytes and macrophages. AIMS: To investigate whether there is a primary deficiency of IL-4 and IL-10 producing cells and their site of production in the small intestine of patients with coeliac disease in relation to the changes in inflammatory cell infiltrate. PATIENTS: Jejunal biopsy specimens from patients with coeliac disease (11 untreated, 10 treated) and nine disease controls were studied. METHODS: Immunohistochemical staining of sections for IL-4 and IL-10 cytokines and the cell phenotypic markers CD3 (T lymphocytes) and CD45 (total inflammatory cell infiltrate) was carried out using monoclonal antibodies. Expression of IL-4 and IL-10 messenger RNA was detected by in situ hybridisation with oligonucleotide probe cocktails for each cytokine. RESULTS: IL-4 and IL-10 mRNA and protein were detected in the lamina propria of treated and untreated coeliac patients and disease controls but not in the epithelium. A significant increase in the number of CD45 (p < 0.005) and CD3 (p < 0.05) positive cells was found in the lamina propria of patients with untreated coeliac disease compared with treated coeliac patients and disease controls but there were no differences in IL-4 or IL-10 between these groups with either method. CONCLUSIONS: There is no primary deficiency of IL-4 and IL-10 producing cells in the small intestine of patients with coeliac disease. Detectable concentrations of IL-4 and IL-10 were found in control patients which suggests that these cytokines are involved in normal mucosal immunoregulation. The increased number of T lymphocytes but not IL-4 or IL-10 producing cells in the lamina propria of

  18. The role of antitissue transglutaminase assay for the diagnosis and monitoring of coeliac disease: a French–Italian multicentre study

    PubMed Central

    Tonutti, E; Visentini, D; Bizzaro, N; Caradonna, M; Cerni, L; Villalta, D; Tozzoli, R

    2003-01-01

    Aims: Tissue transglutaminase (tTG) was recently identified as the major autoantigen in coeliac disease. The aim of this multicentre study was to evaluate the impact of a new immunoenzymatic assay for the detection of IgA anti-tGT antibodies. Methods: Seventy four Italian and French clinical laboratories participated in this study; anti-tTG IgA with an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method using guinea pig liver extract as the coating antigen, anti-endomysium IgA autoantibodies (EMA), and total serum IgA were determined in 7948 patients, 1162 of whom had coeliac disease (737 untreated cases and 425 on a gluten free diet). A proportion of the sera were then sent to a reference laboratory for anti-tTG retesting with an ELISA method using recombinant human tTG antigen. Results: Seven thousand four hundred and fifty eight (93.8%) sera were EMA/antiguinea pig tTG concordant (positive or negative); 490 (6.2%) were non-concordant. The sensitivity of EMA and antiguinea pig tTG in the 737 untreated patients with coeliac disease was 92.1% and 94.8%, respectively, and the specificity was 99.8% and 99.2%, respectively. Retesting of the discordant sera showed that of the 162 sera classified as EMA negative/antiguinea pig tTG positive, only 49 were positive for human recombinant anti-tTG, and that 39 of these were also EMA positive. Furthermore, of the 36 sera classified as EMA positive/antiguinea pig tTG negative, only two were confirmed as EMA positive. Conclusions: The antiguinea pig tTG assay is more sensitive but less specific than EMA, whereas the antihuman recombinant tTG assay is far more specific and just as sensitive as antiguinea pig tTG. Testing for EMA presents considerable interpretative problems and is difficult to standardise. PMID:12719462

  19. Improving coeliac disease risk prediction by testing non-HLA variants additional to HLA variants

    PubMed Central

    Romanos, Jihane; Rosén, Anna; Kumar, Vinod; Trynka, Gosia; Franke, Lude; Szperl, Agata; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; van Diemen, Cleo C; Kanninga, Roan; Jankipersadsing, Soesma A; Steck, Andrea; Eisenbarth, Georges; van Heel, David A; Cukrowska, Bozena; Bruno, Valentina; Mazzilli, Maria Cristina; Núñez, Concepcion; Bilbao, Jose Ramon; Mearin, M Luisa; Barisani, Donatella; Rewers, Marian; Norris, Jill M; Ivarsson, Anneli; Boezen, H Marieke; Liu, Edwin; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of coeliac disease (CD) patients are not being properly diagnosed and therefore remain untreated, leading to a greater risk of developing CD-associated complications. The major genetic risk heterodimer, HLA-DQ2 and DQ8, is already used clinically to help exclude disease. However, approximately 40% of the population carry these alleles and the majority never develop CD. Objective We explored whether CD risk prediction can be improved by adding non-HLA-susceptible variants to common HLA testing. Design We developed an average weighted genetic risk score with 10, 26 and 57 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 2675 cases and 2815 controls and assessed the improvement in risk prediction provided by the non-HLA SNP. Moreover, we assessed the transferability of the genetic risk model with 26 non-HLA variants to a nested case–control population (n=1709) and a prospective cohort (n=1245) and then tested how well this model predicted CD outcome for 985 independent individuals. Results Adding 57 non-HLA variants to HLA testing showed a statistically significant improvement compared to scores from models based on HLA only, HLA plus 10 SNP and HLA plus 26 SNP. With 57 non-HLA variants, the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve reached 0.854 compared to 0.823 for HLA only, and 11.1% of individuals were reclassified to a more accurate risk group. We show that the risk model with HLA plus 26 SNP is useful in independent populations. Conclusions Predicting risk with 57 additional non-HLA variants improved the identification of potential CD patients. This demonstrates a possible role for combined HLA and non-HLA genetic testing in diagnostic work for CD. PMID:23704318

  20. Socioeconomic variation in the incidence of childhood coeliac disease in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Zingone, Fabiana; West, Joe; Crooks, Colin J; Fleming, Kate M; Card, Timothy R; Ciacci, Carolina; Tata, Laila J

    2015-01-01

    Background Serological studies indicate that evidence of coeliac disease (CD) exists in about 1% of all children, but we lack estimates of current diagnostic patterns among children and how they vary by socioeconomic group. Methods We identified all children aged 0–18 years between 1993 and 2012 who were registered with general practices across the UK that contribute to a large population-based general practice database. The incidence of CD was evaluated in each quintile of the Townsend index of deprivation and stratified by age, sex, country and calendar year. Results Among 2 063 421 children, we identified 1247 CD diagnoses, corresponding to an overall CD incidence of 11.9 per 100 000 person-years, which was similar across the UK countries and higher in girls than in boys. We found a gradient of CD diagnosis across socioeconomic groups, with the rate of diagnosis being 80% higher in children from the least-deprived areas than in those from the most-deprived areas (incident rate ratio 1.80, 95% CI 1.45 to 2.22). This pattern held for both boys and girls and across all ages. Across all four countries of the UK, we found similar associations between CD and socioeconomic status. While CD incidence up to age 2 remained stable over the study period, diagnoses at older ages have almost tripled over the past 20 years. Conclusions Children living in less socioeconomically deprived areas in the UK are more likely to be diagnosed with CD. Increased implementation of diagnostic guidelines could result in better case identification in more-deprived areas. PMID:25613988

  1. Female fertility, obstetric and gynaecological history in coeliac disease. A case control study.

    PubMed

    Sher, K S; Mayberry, J F

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence of infertility, abortions and perinatal mortality, age at menarche and menopause in coeliac disease (CD). It was a case control study in which patients and controls matched for age and sex were sent questionnaires about their fertility profile and other obstetric and gynaecological problems. All 80 patients and 70 controls replied but only 68 groups could be matched for this study. The mean age of menarche in patients was significantly older at 13.6 years than in controls at 12.7 years. The mean age at menopause in patients and controls were 47.6 and 50.1 years respectively. The study showed the mean number of children born to patients with CD was significantly less at 1.9 (SD +/- 0.9) compared to 2.5 (SD +/- 1.2) in controls. Before diagnosis the mean number of children born to patients was 1.4 and 1.8 in controls. After diagnosis and treatment, patients had 0.5 children (SD +/- 0.9) compared to 0.7 in controls (SD +/- 1.2). It seems likely that the overall difference in fertility is due to relative infertility prior to diagnosis and its correction by a gluten-free diet. Significantly more conceptions amongst women with CD (15%) ended in miscarriage prior to diagnosis than amongst controls (6%). After diagnosis and treatment the rate of miscarriage was similar at 7 and 12% respectively. There were 120 live babies and 7 stillbirths to patients compared with 161 live babies and 1 stillbirth to controls. In conclusion, this study shows that patients with CD are subfertile and have an increased incidence of stillbirths and perinatal deaths. PMID:8063029

  2. Management of cerebral venous thrombosis in a patient with Lane-Hamilton syndrome and coeliac disease, epilepsy and cerebral calcification syndrome.

    PubMed

    Grover, Patrick J; Jayaram, Raja; Madder, Hilary

    2010-12-01

    We describe a case of cerebral venous thrombosis presenting in a patient with Lane-Hamilton syndrome and coeliac disease epilepsy cerebral calcification syndrome. This is a first reported occurrence of this combination. Delayed anticoagulation with early external ventricular drain insertion for life-threatening raised intracranial pressure resulted in a successful outcome. PMID:21070152

  3. Microfluorimeter with disposable polymer chip for detection of coeliac disease toxic gliadin.

    PubMed

    Mairal, Teresa; Frese, Ines; Llaudet, Enrique; Redondo, Carmen Bermudo; Katakis, Ioanis; von Germar, Frithjof; Drese, Klaus; O' Sullivan, Ciara K

    2009-12-21

    Coeliac disease is an inflammatory disease of the upper small intestine and results from gluten ingestion in genetically susceptible individuals, and is the only life-long nutrient-induced enteropathy. The only treatment is a strict gluten-free diet and the longer the individual fails to adhere to this diet, the greater the chance of developing malnutrition and other complications. The existence of reliable gluten free food is crucial to the well-being of the population. Here we report on a microfluorimeter device for the in situ detection of gliadin in foodstuffs, which could be used for a rapid control of raw materials in food processing, as well as for process control of gliadin contamination. The microfluorimeter is based on a reflector that is used inside a microfluidic chip, exploiting various strategically placed reflective or totally metallised mirrors for efficient collection of the fluorescent light emitted in a large solid angle. The chip is capable of executing five assays in parallel and has been demonstrated to possess detection sensitivity applicable to fluoroimmunoassays. Various immunoassay formats exploiting fluorescence detection, using enzyme/fluorophore labels were developed and compared in terms of sensitivity, ease of assay, assay time and compatibility with buffer used to extract gliadin from raw and cooked foodstuffs, with the best performance observed with an indirect competition assay using a fluorophore-labelled anti-mouse antibody. This assay was exploited within the microfluorimeter device, and a very low detection limit of 4.1 ng/mL was obtained. The system was observed to be highly reproducible, with an RSD of 5.9%, for a concentration of 50 ng/mL of gliadin applied to each of the five channels of the microfluorimeter. Biofunctionalised disposable strips incorporated into the microfluorimeter were subjected to accelerated Arrhenius thermal stability studies and it was demonstrated that strips pre-coated with gliadin could be stored

  4. Are immunoglobulin A anti-gliadin antibodies helpful in diagnosing coeliac disease in children younger than 2 years?

    PubMed

    Foucher, Barbara; Johanet, Catherine; Jégo-Desplat, Sophie; Sanmarco, Marielle; Dubucquoi, Sylvain; Fily-Nalewajk, Sandrine; Olsson, Nils-Olivier; Lakomy, Daniela; Escande, Andrée; Chrétien, Pascale; Fortenfant, Françoise; Chevailler, Alain; André, Chantal; Goetz, Joëlle; Humbel, René-Louis; Monier, Jean-Claude; Sibilia, Jean; Taillefer, Marie-France; Abreu, Isabelle; Fabien, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    The usefulness of immumoglobulin (Ig) A antibodies to gliadin (AGA-IgA) in addition to IgA anti-endomysium and tissue transglutaminase antibodies was evaluated in 4122 children younger than 2 years with a suspicion of coeliac disease (CD). Eight percent (312/4122) displayed IgA anti-endomysium and/or IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase, whereas 2.1% (85/4122) displayed only AGA-IgA. Clinical data were obtained for 62 of 85 children with isolated AGA-IgA, and 33 children underwent a duodenal biopsy. Histologically proven CD was established for 5 patients, whereas 57 children were diagnosed to experience other diseases. The systematic detection of AGA-IgA using native gliadin conferred no additional diagnostic benefit for the diagnosis of CD in children younger than 2 years of age, except for rare cases. PMID:21857243

  5. Efficacy of budesonide therapy in the early phase of treatment of adult coeliac disease patients with malabsorption: an in vivo/in vitro pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ciacci, C; Maiuri, L; Russo, I; Tortora, R; Bucci, C; Cappello, C; Santonicola, A; Luciani, A; Passananti, V; Iovino, P

    2009-12-01

    1. Budesonide is a glucocorticosteroid with a local anti-inflammatory effect. Coeliac disease is an immune-mediated disease caused by gluten ingestion in intolerant patients. The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of budesonide in malabsorptive coeliac patients and its effect in an in vitro gliadin challenge. 2. Twenty coeliac patients with malabsorption were enrolled in the present study and were randomly assigned to one of two 4 week treatments: (i) a gluten-free diet alone; or (ii) a gluten-free diet plus 6 mg budesonide daily. At the end of 4 weeks treatment, all patients underwent clinical evaluation, laboratory tests and self-evaluation of well-being using a visual analogue scale. Intestinal biopsies from five coeliac patients (selected randomly) and four non-coeliac disease controls who underwent upper endoscopy for intestinal bleeding were challenged with gliadin (0.5 mg/mL) and budesonide (10-30 microg/mL) for 3 and 24 h. Biopsies were tested by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence for known markers of inflammation. 3. Treatment of patients with 6 mg budesonide daily for 4 weeks resulted in increased bodyweight, a decreased number of evacuations and decreased stool weight compared with patients on a gluten-free diet alone for 4 weeks. Well-being scores were higher in patients treated with both a gluten-free diet and budesonide compared with those receiving a gluten-free diet alone. 4. In vitro studies showed that budesonide reduced epithelial tyrosine phosphorylation and expression of histocompatibility leucocyte antigen complex DR (HLA-DR) elicited by gliadin-derived peptides. In addition, the expression of cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-2 and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 in the lamina propria was reduced in patients treated with both gliadin and budesonide compared with patients treated with gliadin alone. Budesonide alone decreased HLA-DR in crypt enterocytes, as well as ICAM-1 and COX-2 expression in the lamina propria

  6. Transcriptome Analysis of CD4+ T Cells in Coeliac Disease Reveals Imprint of BACH2 and IFNγ Regulation.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Emma M; Coleman, Ciara; Molloy, Ben; Dominguez Castro, Patricia; Cormican, Paul; Trimble, Valerie; Mahmud, Nasir; McManus, Ross

    2015-01-01

    Genetic studies have to date identified 43 genome wide significant coeliac disease susceptibility (CD) loci comprising over 70 candidate genes. However, how altered regulation of such disease associated genes contributes to CD pathogenesis remains to be elucidated. Recently there has been considerable emphasis on characterising cell type specific and stimulus dependent genetic variants. Therefore in this study we used RNA sequencing to profile over 70 transcriptomes of CD4+ T cells, a cell type crucial for CD pathogenesis, in both stimulated and resting samples from individuals with CD and unaffected controls. We identified extensive transcriptional changes across all conditions, with the previously established CD gene IFNy the most strongly up-regulated gene (log2 fold change 4.6; P(adjusted) = 2.40x10(-11)) in CD4+ T cells from CD patients compared to controls. We show a significant correlation of differentially expressed genes with genetic studies of the disease to date (P(adjusted) = 0.002), and 21 CD candidate susceptibility genes are differentially expressed under one or more of the conditions used in this study. Pathway analysis revealed significant enrichment of immune related processes. Co-expression network analysis identified several modules of coordinately expressed CD genes. Two modules were particularly highly enriched for differentially expressed genes (P<2.2x10(-16)) and highlighted IFNy and the genetically associated transcription factor BACH2 which showed significantly reduced expression in coeliac samples (log2FC -1.75; P(adjusted) = 3.6x10(-3)) as key regulatory genes in CD. Genes regulated by BACH2 were very significantly over-represented among our differentially expressed genes (P<2.2x10(-16)) indicating that reduced expression of this master regulator of T cell differentiation promotes a pro-inflammatory response and strongly corroborates genetic evidence that BACH2 plays an important role in CD pathogenesis. PMID:26444573

  7. Transcriptome Analysis of CD4+ T Cells in Coeliac Disease Reveals Imprint of BACH2 and IFNγ Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Molloy, Ben; Dominguez Castro, Patricia; Cormican, Paul; Trimble, Valerie; Mahmud, Nasir; McManus, Ross

    2015-01-01

    Genetic studies have to date identified 43 genome wide significant coeliac disease susceptibility (CD) loci comprising over 70 candidate genes. However, how altered regulation of such disease associated genes contributes to CD pathogenesis remains to be elucidated. Recently there has been considerable emphasis on characterising cell type specific and stimulus dependent genetic variants. Therefore in this study we used RNA sequencing to profile over 70 transcriptomes of CD4+ T cells, a cell type crucial for CD pathogenesis, in both stimulated and resting samples from individuals with CD and unaffected controls. We identified extensive transcriptional changes across all conditions, with the previously established CD gene IFNy the most strongly up-regulated gene (log2 fold change 4.6; Padjusted = 2.40x10-11) in CD4+ T cells from CD patients compared to controls. We show a significant correlation of differentially expressed genes with genetic studies of the disease to date (Padjusted = 0.002), and 21 CD candidate susceptibility genes are differentially expressed under one or more of the conditions used in this study. Pathway analysis revealed significant enrichment of immune related processes. Co-expression network analysis identified several modules of coordinately expressed CD genes. Two modules were particularly highly enriched for differentially expressed genes (P<2.2x10-16) and highlighted IFNy and the genetically associated transcription factor BACH2 which showed significantly reduced expression in coeliac samples (log2FC -1.75; Padjusted = 3.6x10-3) as key regulatory genes in CD. Genes regulated by BACH2 were very significantly over-represented among our differentially expressed genes (P<2.2x10-16) indicating that reduced expression of this master regulator of T cell differentiation promotes a pro-inflammatory response and strongly corroborates genetic evidence that BACH2 plays an important role in CD pathogenesis. PMID:26444573

  8. Measuring beliefs about gluten free diet adherence in adult coeliac disease using the theory of planned behaviour.

    PubMed

    Sainsbury, Kirby; Mullan, Barbara

    2011-04-01

    The theory of planned behaviour (TPB) was used to elicit the salient beliefs about gluten free diet (GFD) adherence in adults with coeliac disease (CD) and to design a TPB questionnaire to predict adherence levels. This questionnaire was administered to 265 CD participants with adherence and quality of life (QOL) measures, a GFD knowledge test, and self-reported psychiatric history. Regression analyses were used to test the fit of the TPB in predicting adherence, and to determine the nature of the relationships between adherence, QOL, knowledge, and psychiatric history. The TPB combined with self-reported depression and anxiety, and QOL explained significant variance in intention (41.0%) and adherence (33.7%). Poorer dietary adherence and psychiatric history were also associated with lower QOL. Findings suggest that the TPB provides an adequate model for predicting GFD adherence in CD, and the presence of psychiatric conditions represents a potential intervention target to improve adherence and QOL. PMID:21277925

  9. Population screening for coeliac disease in primary care by district nurses using a rapid antibody test: diagnostic accuracy and feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of screening for coeliac disease by rapid detection of IgA antibodies to tissue transglutaminase performed in primary care. Design District nurses screened 6 year old children using rapid antibody testing of finger prick blood. They also collected capillary blood samples for laboratory determination of IgA and IgG antibodies to endomysium and IgA antibodies to tissue transglutaminase. Children with positive rapid test results were directly sent for biopsy of the small intestine. Setting Primary care in Jász-Nagykun-Szolnok county, Hungary. Participants 2690 children (77% of 6 year olds living in the county) and 120 nurses. Main outcome measures Positivity for antibodies to endomysium or transglutaminase in the laboratory and coeliac disease confirmed at biopsy. Results 37 children (1.4%, 95% confidence interval 0.9% to 1.8%) had biopsy confirmed coeliac disease. Only five of these children had been diagnosed clinically before screening. Rapid testing had a 78.1% sensitivity (70.0% to 89.3%) and 100% specificity (88.4% to 100%) for a final diagnosis of coeliac disease by biopsy. Sensitivity was 65.1% (50.2% to 77.6%) and specificity was 100% (99.8% to 100%) compared with combined results of IgA and IgG laboratory tests. Trained laboratory workers detected 30 of the 31 newly diagnosed IgA competent patients with the rapid test kit used blindly. Median time to biopsy after a positive rapid test result was significantly shorter (20 days, range 4-148) than after a positive laboratory result (142 days, 70-256; P<0.001). Children with coeliac disease detected at screening were smaller and had worse health status than their peers but they improved on a gluten-free diet. Conclusions A simple rapid antibody test enabled primary care nurses to detect patients with coeliac disease in the community who were not picked up in clinical care. Extra training is needed to improve sensitivity. PMID:18063612

  10. Differentiating Coeliac Disease from Irritable Bowel Syndrome by Urinary Volatile Organic Compound Analysis – A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Arasaradnam, Ramesh P.; Westenbrink, Eric; McFarlane, Michael J.; Harbord, Ruth; Chambers, Samantha; O’Connell, Nicola; Bailey, Catherine; Nwokolo, Chuka U.; Bardhan, Karna D.; Savage, Richard; Covington, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Coeliac disease (CD), a T-cell-mediated gluten sensitive enteropathy, affects ∼1% of the UK population and can present with wide ranging clinical features, often being mistaken for Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). Heightened clinical awareness and serological screening identifies those with potential coeliac disease; the diagnosis is confirmed with duodenal biopsies, and symptom improvement with a gluten-free diet. Limitations to diagnosis are false negative serology and reluctance to undergo biopsy. The gut microbiome is altered in several gastrointestinal disorders, causing altered gut fermentation patterns recognisable by volatile organic compounds (VOC) analysis in urine, breath and faeces. We aimed to determine if CD alters the urinary VOC pattern, distinguishing it from IBS. 47 patients were recruited, 27 with established CD, on gluten free diets, and 20 with diarrhoea-predominant IBS (D-IBS). Collected urine was stored frozen in 10 ml aliquots. For assay, the specimens were heated to 40±0.1°C and the headspace analysed by Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometry (FAIMS). Machine learning algorithms were used for statistical evaluation. Samples were also analysed using Gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). Sparse logistic regression showed that FAIMS distinguishes VOCs in CD vs D-IBS with ROC curve AUC of 0.91 (0.83–0.99), sensitivity and specificity of 85% respectively. GCMS showed a unique peak at 4′67 found only in CD, not D-IBS, which correlated with the compound 1,3,5,7 cyclooctatetraene. This study suggests that FAIMS offers a novel, non-invasive approach to identify those with possible CD, and distinguishes from D-IBS. It offers the potential for monitoring compliance with a gluten-free diet at home. The presence of cyclooctatetraene in CD specimens will need further validation. PMID:25330367

  11. Differentiating coeliac disease from irritable bowel syndrome by urinary volatile organic compound analysis--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Arasaradnam, Ramesh P; Westenbrink, Eric; McFarlane, Michael J; Harbord, Ruth; Chambers, Samantha; O'Connell, Nicola; Bailey, Catherine; Nwokolo, Chuka U; Bardhan, Karna D; Savage, Richard; Covington, James A

    2014-01-01

    Coeliac disease (CD), a T-cell-mediated gluten sensitive enteropathy, affects ∼ 1% of the UK population and can present with wide ranging clinical features, often being mistaken for Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). Heightened clinical awareness and serological screening identifies those with potential coeliac disease; the diagnosis is confirmed with duodenal biopsies, and symptom improvement with a gluten-free diet. Limitations to diagnosis are false negative serology and reluctance to undergo biopsy. The gut microbiome is altered in several gastrointestinal disorders, causing altered gut fermentation patterns recognisable by volatile organic compounds (VOC) analysis in urine, breath and faeces. We aimed to determine if CD alters the urinary VOC pattern, distinguishing it from IBS. 47 patients were recruited, 27 with established CD, on gluten free diets, and 20 with diarrhoea-predominant IBS (D-IBS). Collected urine was stored frozen in 10 ml aliquots. For assay, the specimens were heated to 40 ± 0.1°C and the headspace analysed by Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometry (FAIMS). Machine learning algorithms were used for statistical evaluation. Samples were also analysed using Gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). Sparse logistic regression showed that FAIMS distinguishes VOCs in CD vs D-IBS with ROC curve AUC of 0.91 (0.83-0.99), sensitivity and specificity of 85% respectively. GCMS showed a unique peak at 4'67 found only in CD, not D-IBS, which correlated with the compound 1,3,5,7 cyclooctatetraene. This study suggests that FAIMS offers a novel, non-invasive approach to identify those with possible CD, and distinguishes from D-IBS. It offers the potential for monitoring compliance with a gluten-free diet at home. The presence of cyclooctatetraene in CD specimens will need further validation. PMID:25330367

  12. Chemistry, coeliac-toxicity and detection of gluten and related prolamins in foods.

    PubMed

    Skerritt, J H; Devery, J M; Hill, A S

    1991-01-01

    Some recent advances in the understanding of the chemistry of gluten proteins and its relationship to the toxicity of different fractions in coeliac disease (gluten intolerance) is reviewed. Most recent studies on gluten toxicity have used in vitro analyses of cellular immune activation by gluten fractions and peptides. Our work indicates that gliadin is the most active of the different protein families found within the wheat grain and that a specific peptide sequence located in the amino terminus domain of alpha-gliadin and containing the sequence proline-serine-glutamine-glutamine was most active. Improvement in the dietary management of coeliac disease is possible by use of test kits for the detection of gluten in foods. Both laboratory kits and home test kits (suitable for use by individual coeliacs) are available and reliably detect gluten from wheat, rye and barley even after cooking or baking. PMID:1923557

  13. Non-coeliac gluten sensitivity and reproductive disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bold, Justine; Rostami, Kamran

    2015-01-01

    An association between coeliac disease and fertility disorders is well recognised in the current literature, but the information related to non-coeliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) and infertility is lacking. This case highlights a possible role of treating NCGS in the reversal of infertility. PMID:26468350

  14. Non-coeliac gluten sensitivity and reproductive disorders.

    PubMed

    Bold, Justine; Rostami, Kamran

    2015-01-01

    An association between coeliac disease and fertility disorders is well recognised in the current literature, but the information related to non-coeliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) and infertility is lacking. This case highlights a possible role of treating NCGS in the reversal of infertility. PMID:26468350

  15. Diversity in oat potential immunogenicity: basis for the selection of oat varieties with no toxicity in coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Comino, Isabel; Real, Ana; de Lorenzo, Laura; Cornell, Hugh; López-Casado, Miguel Ángel; Barro, Francisco; Lorite, Pedro; Torres, Ma Isabel; Cebolla, Ángel

    2011-01-01

    Background and aims Coeliac disease (CD) is triggered by an abnormal reaction to gluten. Peptides resulting from partially digested gluten of wheat, barley or rye cause inflammation of the small intestinal mucosa. Previous contradictory studies suggest that oats may trigger the abnormal immunological response in patients with CD. Monoclonal antibodies (moAbs) against the main immunotoxic 33-mer peptide (A1 and G12) react strongly against wheat, barley and rye but have less reactivity against oats. The stated aim of this study is to test whether this observed reactivity could be related to the potential toxicity of oats for patients with CD. Methods In the present study, different oat varieties, controlled for their purity and by their distinct protein pattern, were used to examine differences in moAb G12 recognition by ELISA and western blot. Immunogenicity of oat varieties was determined by 33-mer concentration, T cell proliferation and interferon γ production. Results Three groups of oat cultivars reacting differently against moAb G12 could be distinguished: a group with considerable affinity, a group showing slight reactivity and a third with no detectable reactivity. The immunogenicity of the three types of oats as well as that of a positive and negative control was determined with isolated peripheral blood mononuclear T cells from patients with CD by measurement of cell proliferation and interferon γ release. A direct correlation of the reactivity with G12 and the immunogenicity of the different prolamins was observed. Conclusions The results showed that the reactivity of the moAb G12 is proportional to the potential immunotoxicity of the cereal cultivar. These differences may explain the different clinical responses observed in patients suffering from CD and open up a means to identify immunologically safe oat cultivars, which could be used to enrich a gluten-free diet. PMID:21317420

  16. Non-coeliac gluten sensitivity: piecing the puzzle together

    PubMed Central

    Iven, Julie

    2015-01-01

    The avoidance of wheat- and gluten-containing products is a worldwide phenomenon. While coeliac disease is well-established, much remains unknown about whether gluten can be a trigger of gastrointestinal and/or extra-intestinal symptoms in patients without coeliac disease. In this article, we discuss the latest scientific evidence and our current understanding for the possible mechanisms of this largely ambiguous group, termed ‘non-coeliac gluten sensitive’ (NCGS). We can conclude that NCGS should be regarded as an independent disease outside of coeliac disease and wheat allergy, and that the number of patients affected is likely to be limited. Many questions remain unanswered and it needs to be verified whether the elimination of dietary gluten alone is sufficient for the control of symptoms, and to understand the overlap with other components of wheat. PMID:25922675

  17. Infiltration of forkhead box P3-expressing cells in small intestinal mucosa in coeliac disease but not in type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Tiittanen, M; Westerholm-Ormio, M; Verkasalo, M; Savilahti, E; Vaarala, O

    2008-01-01

    Because the role of regulatory T cells in the intestinal inflammation is unknown in coeliac disease (CD) and type 1 diabetes (T1D), the expression of forkhead box P3 (FoxP3), CD25, transforming growth factor-β, interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-8, IL-10, IL-15 and IL-18 was measured by quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction in the small intestinal biopsies from paediatric patients with active or potential CD, T1D and control patients. The numbers of FoxP3- and CD25-expressing cells were studied with immunohistochemistry. Enhanced intestinal expressions of FoxP3, IL-10 and IFN-γ mRNAs were found in active CD when compared with controls (P-values < 0·001, 0·004, <0·001). In potential CD, only the expression of IFN-γ mRNA was increased. The numbers of FoxP3-expressing cells were higher in active and potential CD (P < 0·001, P = 0·05), and the ratio of FoxP3 mRNA to the number of FoxP3-positive cells was decreased in potential CD when compared with controls (P = 0·007). The ratio of IFN-γ to FoxP3-specific mRNA was increased in active and potential CD (P = 0·001 and P = 0·002). Patients with T1D had no changes in regulatory T cell markers, but showed increased expression of IL-18 mRNA. The impaired up-regulation of FoxP3 transcripts despite the infiltration of FoxP3-positive cells in potential CD may contribute to the persistence of inflammation. The increased ratio of IFN-γ to FoxP3 mRNA in active and potential CD suggests an imbalance between regulatory and effector mechanisms. The increased intestinal expression of IL-18 mRNA in patients with T1D adds evidence in favour of the hypothesis that T1D is associated with derangements in the gut immune system. PMID:18435801

  18. The production and crystallization of the human leukocyte antigen class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 complexed with deamidated gliadin peptides implicated in coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Kate N.; Reid, Hugh H.; Borg, Natalie A.; Broughton, Sophie E.; Huyton, Trevor; Anderson, Robert P.; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2007-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 are key risk factors in coeliac disease, as they bind deamidated gluten peptides that are subsequently recognized by CD4+ T cells. Here, the production and crystallization of both HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 in complex with the deamidated gliadin peptides DQ2 α-I (PQPELPYPQ) and DQ8 α-I (EGSFQPSQE), respectively, are reported. PMID:18084083

  19. Presence of IgA and IgG antigliadin antibodies in healthy adults as measured by micro-ELISA. Effect of various cutoff levels on specificity and sensitivity when diagnosing coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Grodzinsky, E; Hed, J; Liedén, G; Sjögren, F; Ström, M

    1990-01-01

    In this study a micro-ELISA (ELISA = enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) was established and used to evaluate IgA and IgG antigliadin antibodies in 1,866 healthy adults. There was a covariation between the level of IgA antigliadin antibodies and the total serum IgA concentration, probably due to an increased IgA response in some healthy subjects. We could not find any correlation between the presence of IgG and IgA antibodies in the healthy population using the 97.5th percentile as a cutoff value. The specificity of various cutoff levels was compared with the sensitivity of the test in a population of 40 patients with coeliac disease. IgA antigliadin antibodies had a high specificity (95%) at a cutoff value giving a high sensitivity (80%). This was not possible with IgG antigliadin antibodies which had a low sensitivity (40%) when the cutoff value was selected to give a high specificity. Due to the low prevalence of coeliac disease, a decrease in the specificity of the test will have a pronounced effect on the positive predictive value. The results indicate that only IgA antigliadin antibodies are useful markers when screening subjects with few typical symptoms for biopsy when diagnosing coeliac disease, whereas IgG antibodies are of low value because of their low specificity. PMID:2242925

  20. Improving wheat to remove coeliac epitopes but retain functionality

    PubMed Central

    Shewry, Peter R.; Tatham, Arthur S.

    2016-01-01

    Coeliac disease is an intolerance triggered by the ingestion of wheat gluten proteins. It is of increasing concern to consumers and health professionals as its incidence appears to be increasing. The amino acid sequences in gluten proteins that are responsible for triggering responses in sensitive individuals have been identified showing that they vary in distribution among and between different groups of gluten proteins. Conventional breeding may therefore be used to select for gluten protein fractions with lower contents of coeliac epitopes. Molecular breeding approaches can also be used to specifically down-regulate coeliac-toxic proteins or mutate coeliac epitopes within individual proteins. A combination of these approaches may therefore be used to develop a “coeliac-safe” wheat. However, this remains a formidable challenge due to the complex multigenic control of gluten protein composition. Furthermore, any modified wheats must retain acceptable properties for making bread and other processed foods. Not surprisingly, such coeliac-safe wheats have not yet been developed despite over a decade of research. PMID:26937068

  1. Nutritional status, growth and disease management in children with single and dual diagnosis of type 1 diabetes mellitus and coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The consequences of subclinical coeliac disease (CD) in Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) remain unclear. We looked at growth, anthropometry and disease management in children with dual diagnosis (T1DM + CD) before and after CD diagnosis. Methods Anthropometry, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and IgA tissue transglutaminase (tTg) were collected prior to, and following CD diagnosis in 23 children with T1DM + CD. This group was matched for demographics, T1DM duration, age at CD diagnosis and at T1DM onset with 23 CD and 44 T1DM controls. Results No differences in growth or anthropometry were found between children with T1DM + CD and controls at any time point. Children with T1DM + CD, had higher BMI z-score two years prior to, than at CD diagnosis (p < 0.001). BMI z-score change one year prior to CD diagnosis was lower in the T1DM + CD than the T1DM group (p = 0.009). At two years, height velocity and change in BMI z-scores were similar in all groups. No differences were observed in HbA1c between the T1DM + CD and T1DM groups before or after CD diagnosis. More children with T1DM + CD had raised tTg levels one year after CD diagnosis than CD controls (CDx to CDx + 1 yr; T1DM + CD: 100% to 71%, p = 0.180 and CD: 100% to 45%, p < 0.001); by two years there was no difference. Conclusions No major nutrition or growth deficits were observed in children with T1DM + CD. CD diagnosis does not impact on T1DM glycaemic control. CD specific serology was comparable to children with single CD, but those with dual diagnosis may need more time to adjust to gluten free diet. PMID:24885742

  2. Targeting of prolamins by RNAi in bread wheat: effectiveness of seven silencing-fragment combinations for obtaining lines devoid of coeliac disease epitopes from highly immunogenic gliadins.

    PubMed

    Barro, Francisco; Iehisa, Julio C M; Giménez, María J; García-Molina, María D; Ozuna, Carmen V; Comino, Isabel; Sousa, Carolina; Gil-Humanes, Javier

    2016-03-01

    Gluten proteins are responsible for the viscoelastic properties of wheat flour but also for triggering pathologies in susceptible individuals, of which coeliac disease (CD) and noncoeliac gluten sensitivity may affect up to 8% of the population. The only effective treatment for affected persons is a strict gluten-free diet. Here, we report the effectiveness of seven plasmid combinations, encompassing RNAi fragments from α-, γ-, ω-gliadins, and LMW glutenin subunits, for silencing the expression of different prolamin fractions. Silencing patterns of transgenic lines were analysed by gel electrophoresis, RP-HPLC and mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), whereas gluten immunogenicity was assayed by an anti-gliadin 33-mer monoclonal antibody (moAb). Plasmid combinations 1 and 2 downregulated only γ- and α-gliadins, respectively. Four plasmid combinations were highly effective in the silencing of ω-gliadins and γ-gliadins, and three of these also silenced α-gliadins. HMW glutenins were upregulated in all but one plasmid combination, while LMW glutenins were downregulated in three plasmid combinations. Total protein and starch contents were unaffected regardless of the plasmid combination used. Six plasmid combinations provided strong reduction in the gluten content as measured by moAb and for two combinations, this reduction was higher than 90% in comparison with the wild type. CD epitope analysis in peptides identified in LC-MS/MS showed that lines from three plasmid combinations were totally devoid of CD epitopes from the highly immunogenic α- and ω-gliadins. Our findings raise the prospect of breeding wheat species with low levels of harmful gluten, and of achieving the important goal of developing nontoxic wheat cultivars. PMID:26300126

  3. Influence of milk-feeding type and genetic risk of developing coeliac disease on intestinal microbiota of infants: the PROFICEL study.

    PubMed

    Palma, Giada De; Capilla, Amalia; Nova, Esther; Castillejo, Gemma; Varea, Vicente; Pozo, Tamara; Garrote, José Antonio; Polanco, Isabel; López, Ana; Ribes-Koninckx, Carmen; Marcos, Ascensión; García-Novo, María Dolores; Calvo, Carmen; Ortigosa, Luis; Peña-Quintana, Luis; Palau, Francesc; Sanz, Yolanda

    2012-01-01

    Interactions between environmental factors and predisposing genes could be involved in the development of coeliac disease (CD). This study has assessed whether milk-feeding type and HLA-genotype influence the intestinal microbiota composition of infants with a family history of CD. The study included 164 healthy newborns, with at least one first-degree relative with CD, classified according to their HLA-DQ genotype by PCR-SSP DQB1 and DQA1 typing. Faecal microbiota was analysed by quantitative PCR at 7 days, and at 1 and 4 months of age. Significant interactions between milk-feeding type and HLA-DQ genotype on bacterial numbers were not detected by applying a linear mixed-model analysis for repeated measures. In the whole population, breast-feeding promoted colonization of C. leptum group, B. longum and B. breve, while formula-feeding promoted that of Bacteroides fragilis group, C. coccoides-E. rectale group, E. coli and B. lactis. Moreover, increased numbers of B. fragilis group and Staphylococcus spp., and reduced numbers of Bifidobacterium spp. and B. longum were detected in infants with increased genetic risk of developing CD. Analyses within subgroups of either breast-fed or formula-fed infants indicated that in both cases increased risk of CD was associated with lower numbers of B. longum and/or Bifidobacterium spp. In addition, in breast-fed infants the increased genetic risk of developing CD was associated with increased C. leptum group numbers, while in formula-fed infants it was associated with increased Staphylococcus and B. fragilis group numbers. Overall, milk-feeding type in conjunction with HLA-DQ genotype play a role in establishing infants' gut microbiota; moreover, breast-feeding reduced the genotype-related differences in microbiota composition, which could partly explain the protective role attributed to breast milk in this disorder. PMID:22319588

  4. Combination Testing Using a Single MSH5 Variant alongside HLA Haplotypes Improves the Sensitivity of Predicting Coeliac Disease Risk in the Polish Population

    PubMed Central

    Dabrowska, Michalina; Goryca, Krzysztof; Piatkowska, Magdalena; Kluska, Anna; Mikula, Michal; Karczmarski, Jakub; Oralewska, Beata; Rybak, Anna; Socha, Jerzy; Balabas, Aneta; Zeber-Lubecka, Natalia; Ambrozkiewicz, Filip; Konopka, Ewa; Trojanowska, Ilona; Zagroba, Malgorzata; Szperl, Malgorzata; Ostrowski, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of non-HLA variants alongside standard HLA testing was previously shown to improve the identification of potential coeliac disease (CD) patients. We intended to identify new genetic variants associated with CD in the Polish population that would improve CD risk prediction when used alongside HLA haplotype analysis. DNA samples of 336 CD and 264 unrelated healthy controls were used to create DNA pools for a genome wide association study (GWAS). GWAS findings were validated with individual HLA tag single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing of 473 patients and 714 healthy controls. Association analysis using four HLA-tagging SNPs showed that, as was found in other populations, positive predicting genotypes (HLA-DQ2.5/DQ2.5, HLA-DQ2.5/DQ2.2, and HLA-DQ2.5/DQ8) were found at higher frequencies in CD patients than in healthy control individuals in the Polish population. Both CD-associated SNPs discovered by GWAS were found in the CD susceptibility region, confirming the previously-determined association of the major histocompatibility (MHC) region with CD pathogenesis. The two most significant SNPs from the GWAS were rs9272346 (HLA-dependent; localized within 1 Kb of DQA1) and rs3130484 (HLA-independent; mapped to MSH5). Specificity of CD prediction using the four HLA-tagging SNPs achieved 92.9%, but sensitivity was only 45.5%. However, when a testing combination of the HLA-tagging SNPs and the MSH5 SNP was used, specificity decreased to 80%, and sensitivity increased to 74%. This study confirmed that improvement of CD risk prediction sensitivity could be achieved by including non-HLA SNPs alongside HLA SNPs in genetic testing. PMID:26406233

  5. The biopsy pathology of non-coeliac enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Greenson, Joel K

    2015-01-01

    Tropical sprue (TS) is a malabsorption syndrome of presumed infectious aetiology that affects residents of (or visitors to) the tropics. The histological changes of TS are similar to those of coeliac disease, with increased intraepithelial lymphocytes being central to both. Unlike in coeliac disease, however, a completely flat small bowel biopsy is uncommon in TS. TS typically involves the terminal ileum, whereas coeliac disease does not. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) has been defined as an increase in number and/or a change in the type of bacteria in the upper gut. Conditions that predispose to SIBO are largely those that decrease or interfere with small bowel motility. The mucosal histology is variable, and may include modest villous blunting accompanied by increased lamina propria and epithelial inflammation. Autoimmune enteropathy (AE) is a family of rare diseases that share common themes such as immunodeficiency states and autoantibodies. AE cases typically have marked villous atrophy similar to that in fully developed coeliac disease, but they lack the intense surface epithelial lymphocytosis. Apoptosis and lymphocyte infiltration at the base of the crypts, crypt abscesses and cryptitis are also seen. Patients with anti-goblet cell antibodies can have a lack of goblet cells, endocrine cells, and Paneth cells. PMID:25234408

  6. Anti-endomysial antibody of IgG1 isotype detection strongly increases the prevalence of coeliac disease in patients affected by type I diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Picarelli, A; Sabbatella, L; Di Tola, M; Vetrano, S; Casale, C; Anania, MC; Porowska, B; Vergari, M; Schiaffini, R; Gargiulo, P

    2005-01-01

    A strong association between type 1 insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM1) and coeliac disease (CD) is well documented, but it is known that prevalence values are underestimated. Serum anti-endomysial antibodies (EMA), considered diagnostic for CD because of their high sensitivity and specificity, belong to the IgA class, but the existence of EMA of IgG1 isotype in the presence or absence of IgA deficiency was reported. In order to re-evaluate the occurrence of CD in IDDM1 patients we performed a screening in IDDM1 patients using EMA of both isotypes. Ninety-four adults affected by IDDM1 (unaffected by CD before enrolling) were enrolled and 83 blood donors as controls. All subjects were on a gluten-containing diet. Histology and biopsy culture were performed. EMA IgA and IgG1 in sera and culture supernatants were detected. Serum EMA were positive in 13 of 94 IDDM1 patients (13·8%). Six of 13 presented IgA-EMA, seven of 13 presented IgG1-EMA. No EMA were found in the control population. Total intestinal atrophy was found in all six patients with serum IgA-EMA and in five of seven with serum IgG1-EMA. Diagnosis of CD was confirmed by histology and organ culture in all 13 patients with serum EMA. The prevalence of CD in the patients affected by IDDM1 was 6·4% for IgA-EMA-positive and 7·4% for IgG1-EMA-positive patients. We confirmed the prevalence of CD in the IDDM1 population obtained with IgA-EMA screening only (6·4%). This prevalence value increases dramatically to 13·8% when IgG1-EMA are also used in the screening. We conclude that IgG1-EMA should also be sought whenever an IDDM1 patient undergoes screening for CD. PMID:16178863

  7. The production and crystallization of the human leukocyte antigen class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 complexed with deamidated gliadin peptides implicated in coeliac disease

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Kate N.; Reid, Hugh H.; Borg, Natalie A.; Broughton, Sophie E.; Huyton, Trevor; Anderson, Robert P.; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2007-12-01

    The production and crystallization of human leukocyte antigen class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 in complex with deamidated gliadin peptides is reported. Crystals of HLA-DQ2{sup PQPELPYPQ} diffracted to 3.9 Å, while the HLA-DQ8{sup EGSFQPSQE} crystals diffracted to 2.1 Å, allowing structure determination by molecular replacement. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 are key risk factors in coeliac disease, as they bind deamidated gluten peptides that are subsequently recognized by CD4{sup +} T cells. Here, the production and crystallization of both HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 in complex with the deamidated gliadin peptides DQ2 α-I (PQPELPYPQ) and DQ8 α-I (EGSFQPSQE), respectively, are reported.

  8. Sensitivity of a hyperosmolar or "low"-osmolar test solution for sugar absorption in recognizing small intestinal mucosal damage in coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Uil, J J; van Elburg, R M; Janssens, P M; Mulder, C J; Heymans, H S

    2000-04-01

    Reliability of differential sugar absorption tests is hampered by a lack of standardization of the content and osmolarity of the test solutions. We evaluated the effect of osmolarity of the test solution of the sugar absorption test on the 5 hour urine excretion of orally administered lactulose and mannitol. A group of 28 controls and 14 coeliacs, with villous atrophy grade II to IV, ingested a hyperosmolar sugar absorption test solution and a "low"-osmolar solution, respectively. After an overnight fast, each subject ingested hyperosmolar sugar absorption test solution (2 g mannitol, 5 g lactulose and 40 g sucrose/100 ml (around 1,560 mmol/l)). After two days, this procedure was repeated with low-osmolar solution (2 g mannitol and 5 g lactulose/100 ml (around 375 mmol/l). The influence of the sequence of the tests on the results had previously been excluded. All urine from the 5 h-period following ingestion of the test solution was collected. To calculate the low-osmolar solution ratio, samples were analysed for lactulose and mannitol concentrations by gas chromatography The sensitivity of hyperosmolar SAT solution and low-osmolar solution for the detection of mucosal abnormalities in coeliacs was 64% and 43%, respectively. In conclusion, a hyperosmolar solution discriminates better between normal and damaged mucosa of the small bowel such as villous atrophy due to a relative increase in permeability for lactulose. PMID:10975768

  9. The Celiac Disease and Diabetes-Dietary Intervention and Evaluation Trial (CD-DIET) protocol: a randomised controlled study to evaluate treatment of asymptomatic coeliac disease in type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mahmud, Farid H; De Melo, Emilia N; Noordin, Karima; Assor, Esther; Sahota, Kamaljeet; Davies-Shaw, Jolie; Cutz, Ernest; Somers, Gino; Lawson, Margaret; Mack, David R; Gallego, Patricia; McDonald, Charlotte; Beaton, Melanie D; Bax, Kevin; Saibil, Fred; Gilbert, Jeremy; Kirsch, Susan; Perkins, Bruce A; Cino, Maria; Szentgyorgyi, Eva; Koltin, Dror; Parikh, Amish; Mukerji, Geetha; Advani, Andrew; Lou, Olivia; Marcon, Margaret A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Coeliac disease (CD) is an autoimmune condition characterised by gluten-induced intestinal inflammation, and observed at a 5–10 fold greater prevalence in type 1 diabetes. While universal screening for CD in patients with diabetes is frequently advocated, objective data is limited as to benefits on diabetes control, bone health or quality of life related to the adoption of a gluten-free diet (GFD) in the large proportion of patients with diabetes with asymptomatic CD. The Celiac Disease and Diabetes-Dietary Intervention and Evaluation Trial (CD-DIET) study is a multicenter, randomised controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a GFD in patients with type 1 diabetes with asymptomatic CD. Methods and analysis Children and adults (8–45 years) with type 1 diabetes will be screened for asymptomatic CD. Eligible patients with biopsy-proven CD will be randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to treatment with a GFD for 1 year, or continue with a gluten-containing diet. The primary outcome will evaluate the impact of the GFD on change in glycated haemoglobin. Secondary outcomes will evaluate changes in bone mineral density, blood glucose variability and health-related quality of life between GFD-treated and the regular diet group over a 1-year period. The study was initiated in 2012 and has subsequently expanded to multiple paediatric and adult centres in Ontario, Canada. Ethics and dissemination The findings from this study will provide high-quality evidence as to the impact of GFD treatment on glycaemic control and complications in asymptomatic children and adults with CD and type 1 diabetes. Trial registration number NCT01566110. PMID:25968008

  10. Immunohistochemical analysis of coeliac mucosa following ingestion of oats.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, U; Jones, E; Carolan, J; Feighery, C

    2006-05-01

    There is now considerable clinical evidence that oats do not activate coeliac disease. Nonetheless, a reluctance to include oats in the gluten-free diet remains. Because gluten-induced damage is accompanied by activation of the gastrointestinal immune system, the purpose of this study was to investigate if similar changes were induced by oats ingestion. Small intestinal histological sections from 10 patients who ingested 50 g of oats daily for 3 months were investigated for possible evidence of immune activation. Tissue obtained before and after oats challenge was stained with a series of antibodies directed against the following molecules: human leucocyte antigen D-related (HLA-DR), Ki-67, CD25, CD54 [intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1)] and mast cell tryptase. None of the patients developed clinical or laboratory evidence of adverse effects. The distribution of intestinal HLA-DR expression was not affected by oats ingestion and the crypt epithelium remained unstained. In the pre-oats biopsies, the percentage of Ki-67 positive enterocytes, 29.5 +/- 6.9 [95% confidence interval (CI) 13.9-45.0] did not differ significantly from that found in post-oats biopsies, 41.2 +/- 3.7 (95% CI, 32.8-49.6), P = 0.19, not significant. Furthermore, oats ingestion did not alter the number of CD25 positive and tryptase positive cells. Finally, the distribution and intensity of ICAM-1 staining was unchanged by dietary oats. In summary, detailed immunohistological studies of biopsies from patients ingesting oats for 3 months did not reveal evidence of immune activation. Together with other reported findings, this study strengthens the view that oats can be included safely in the diet of gluten sensitive patients. PMID:16634791

  11. Measurement of gluten using a monoclonal antibody to a coeliac toxic peptide of A gliadin

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, H; Rosen-Bronson, S; O'Reilly, N; Ciclitira, P

    1998-01-01

    Background—Future European Community regulations will require a sensitive and specific assay for measurement of coeliac toxic gluten proteins in foods marketed as gluten-free. To avoid spurious cross reactions with non-toxic proteins, specific antibodies and target antigens are required. A synthetic 19 amino acid peptide of A gliadin has been shown to cause deterioration in the morphology of small intestinal biopsy specimens of coeliac patients in remission. 
Aims—To develop an assay for detection of gluten in foods, based on measurement of a known toxic peptide. 
Methods—A monoclonal antibody raised against the toxic A gliadin peptide, with a polyclonal anti-unfractionated gliadin capture antibody, was used to develop a double sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the measurement of gluten in foods. 
Results—Standard curves for gliadin and for rye, barley, and oat prolamins were produced. The sensitivity of the assay was 4 ng/ml of gliadin, 500 ng/ml for rye prolamins, and 1000 ng/ml for oat and barley prolamins. The assay could detect gluten in cooked foods, although at reduced sensitivity. Prolamins from coeliac non-toxic rice, maize, millet, and sorghum did not cross react in the assay. A variety of commercially available gluten- free foods were analysed; small quantities of gluten were detected in some products. 
Conclusion—The assay may form the basis of a sensitive method for measurement of gluten in foods for consumption by patients with coeliac disease. 

 Keywords: gluten; gliadin; prolamin; coeliac disease; monoclonal antibodies PMID:10189843

  12. Disease Activity Measures in Paediatric Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Luca, Nadia J.; Feldman, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    Disease activity refers to potentially reversible aspects of a disease. Measurement of disease activity in paediatric rheumatic diseases is a critical component of patient care and clinical research. Disease activity measures are developed systematically, often involving consensus methods. To be useful, a disease activity measure must be feasible, valid, and interpretable. There are several challenges in quantifying disease activity in paediatric rheumatology; namely, the conditions are multidimensional, the level of activity must be valuated in the context of treatment being received, there is no gold standard for disease activity, and it is often difficult to incorporate the patient's perspective of their disease activity. To date, core sets of response variables are defined for juvenile idiopathic arthritis, juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus, and juvenile dermatomyositis, as well as definitions for improvement in response to therapy. Several specific absolute disease activity measures also exist for each condition. Further work is required to determine the optimal disease activity measures in paediatric rheumatology. PMID:24089617

  13. [Product development on the basis of cereal and leguminous flours to coeliac disease in children between 6-24 months; I: formulation and acceptability].

    PubMed

    Cerezal Mezquita, P; Urtuvia Gatica, V; Ramírez Quintanilla, V; Romero Palacios, N; Arcos Zavala, R

    2011-01-01

    The revaluation of the Andean cultivations, quinua (Chenopodium quinua Willd) and lupin (Lupinus albus L.), to be used in nutritional mixtures, with traditional cereals like corn (Zea mays L.) and rice (Oryza sativa L.), originate mixtures without gluten which constitute a good alternative for the nutrition of children under 24 months that suffer from celiac disease, since they improve the quality of the protein, by essential amino acids compensation, and also impacts in the product's diversification strategy. In the present work, the percentage composition of each flour in the mixture was determined by means of Linear Programming by means of the Solver form from the Excel spreadsheet. Prolamines were determined in the quinua and lupin flours by the ELISA test and the HPLC technique was used in both products obtained called "sweet mix" and "dessert mix", to define the quantity of amino acids with the purpose of providing around the 15% of the proteins required in the day. The flour mixtures selected as optimum, sweet mix, suitable for the preparation of sweet pancakes, as well as for the dessert mix, that by addition of water or milk produce a semi solid dessert, were evaluated after three months of storage, being acceptable their microbiological, bromatological and sensorial requirements, corroborating the results with the good acceptance of the products, prepared from the formulated mixtures, by the children of two Day Care centers of the City of Antofagasta-Chile. PMID:21519742

  14. [Product development on the basis of cereal and leguminous flours to coeliac disease in children aged 6-24 months; II: properties of the mixtures].

    PubMed

    Cerezal Mezquita, P; Urtuvia Gatica, V; Ramírez Quintanilla, V; Arcos Zavala, R

    2011-01-01

    The nutritional formulations of high protein content, provided by a flour mixture from two Andean cultures, quinua (Chenopodium quinua Willd) and lupino (Lupinus albus L), with two traditional cereals, maize (Zea mays L.) and rice (Oryza sativa L.), entailed to the preparation of a "sweet mixture" for the elaboration of "queques" and another "dessert mixture" flavoured with banana, that can be prepared with water or milk, constituted a good alternative as food supplement for the nutrition of children aged 6-24 months who suffer from celiac disease, since they contribute to the quality improvement of the protein, by essential amino acids compensation, they are of low cost and allow an increase in availability of products for gluten-intolerant children. Some physical, chemical, rheological, mechanical and fluidity properties, as well as the color of these mixtures for a period of conservation of 90 days were evaluated. At the end of the storage, the sweet mixture turned out to be of "little flow" and the dessert mixture changed from "little flow" to "easy flow". Viscosity for the dessert mixture, with its two types of dilutions, water and milk, presented a behavior of pseudoplastic fluid. It was possible to guess that the time of shelf life of the mixtures would be of 9 months before achieving the rancidity limit (10 mEq of oxigen/kg of fat, which would disqualify the product for consumption). The CIEL*a*b* color coordinates did not show significant differences keeping the colour in "a beige" tonality. PMID:21519743

  15. Infertility, obstetric and gynaecological problems in coeliac sprue.

    PubMed

    Sher, K S; Jayanthi, V; Probert, C S; Stewart, C R; Mayberry, J F

    1994-01-01

    There is now substantial evidence that coeliac sprue is associated with infertility both in men and women. In women it can also lead to delayed menarche, amenorrhoea, early menopause, recurrent abortions, and a reduced pregnancy rate. In men it can cause hypogonadism, immature secondary sex characteristics and reduce semen quality. The real mechanism by which coeliac sprue produces these changes is unclear, but factors such as malnutrition, iron, folate and zinc deficiencies have all been implicated. In addition in men gonadal dysfunction is believed to be due to reduced conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone caused by low levels of 5 alpha-reductase in coeliac sprue. This leads to derangement of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Hyperprolactinaemia is seen in 25% of coeliac patients, which causes impotence and loss of libido. Gluten withdrawal and correction of deficient dietary elements can lead to a return of fertility both in men and women. PMID:7988065

  16. Coeliac artery compression syndrome: can we believe our ears?

    PubMed

    McSherry, J A

    1977-11-01

    Two patients with coeliac artery compression syndrome' are described.Symptoms were vague and nonspecific, and the diagnosis was made by finding an epigastric bruit on auscultation of the abdomen and confirming the presence of a vascular lesion by angiography. Both patients were cured by surgical decompression of the coeliac trunk. Auscultation of the abdomen can be a useful part of physical examination in general practice. PMID:616859

  17. Exome Sequencing of 75 Individuals from Multiply Affected Coeliac Families and Large Scale Resequencing Follow Up

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Vanisha; Bockett, Nicholas A.; Levine, Adam P.; Mirza, Muddassar M.; Hunt, Karen A.; Ciclitira, Paul J.; Hummerich, Holger; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Simpson, Michael A.; Plagnol, Vincent; van Heel, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Coeliac disease (CeD) is a highly heritable common autoimmune disease involving chronic small intestinal inflammation in response to dietary wheat. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region, and 40 newer regions identified by genome wide association studies (GWAS) and dense fine mapping, account for ∼40% of the disease heritability. We hypothesized that in pedigrees with multiple individuals with CeD rare [minor allele frequency (MAF) <0.5%] mutations of larger effect size (odds ratios of ∼ 2–5) might exist. We sequenced the exomes of 75 coeliac individuals of European ancestry from 55 multiply affected families. We selected interesting variants and genes for further follow up using a combination of: an assessment of shared variants between related subjects, a model-free linkage test, and gene burden tests for multiple, potentially causal, variants. We next performed highly multiplexed amplicon resequencing of all RefSeq exons from 24 candidate genes selected on the basis of the exome sequencing data in 2,248 unrelated coeliac cases and 2,230 controls. 1,335 variants with a 99.9% genotyping call rate were observed in 4,478 samples, of which 939 were present in coding regions of 24 genes (Ti/Tv 2.99). 91.7% of coding variants were rare (MAF <0.5%) and 60% were novel. Gene burden tests performed on rare functional variants identified no significant associations (p<1×10−3) in the resequenced candidate genes. Our strategy of sequencing multiply affected families with deep follow up of candidate genes has not identified any new CeD risk mutations. PMID:25635822

  18. Multiple variations in the branches of the coeliac trunk

    PubMed Central

    Sumalatha, Suhani; Hosapatna, Mamatha; Bhat, K. R.; D'souza, Antony Sylvan; Kiruba, Lakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a unique case of variation in the branching pattern of the coeliac trunk. In the present case, the coeliac trunk was replaced by two separate arterial trunks. The first arterial trunk bifurcated into the left gastric and the left hepatic arteries. The second arterial trunk bifurcated into a splenic artery and a hepato-gastroduodenal trunk. The hepato-gastroduodenal trunk presented an unusual course and termination. The right hepatic artery arising from the hepato-gastroduodenal trunk also showed a variant course. Such rare variations are important for gastroenterological surgeons and interventional radiologists due to increase in number of transplantation surgeries and live donor liver transplantations. PMID:26140227

  19. Transglutaminase activation in neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jeitner, Thomas M; Muma, Nancy A; Battaile, Kevin P; Cooper, Arthur JL

    2009-01-01

    The following review examines the role of calcium in promoting the in vitro and in vivo activation of transglutaminases in neurodegenerative disorders. Diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease exhibit increased transglutaminase activity and rises in intracellular calcium concentrations, which may be related. The aberrant activation of transglutaminase by calcium is thought to give rise to a variety of pathological moieties in these diseases, and the inhibition has been shown to have therapeutic benefit in animal and cellular models of neurodegeneration. Given the potential clinical relevance of transglutaminase inhibitors, we have also reviewed the recent development of such compounds. PMID:20161049

  20. Coeliac plexus block and cephalic spread of injectate.

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, P. A.; Wells, J. C.

    1989-01-01

    Extensive cephalic spread of solution occurred in three out of seven cases studied during coeliac plexus blockade. Spread on to cardiac nerves and plexus may be a factor in hypotension following this procedure. Incremental dosage and careful screening is recommended. Images fig. 1 PMID:2923420

  1. Rupture of embolised coeliac artery pseudoaneurysm into the stomach: is coil embolisation an effective treatment for coeliac anastomotic pseudoaneurysm?

    PubMed

    Onohara, T; Okadome, K; Mii, S; Yasumori, K; Muto, Y; Sugimachi, K

    1992-05-01

    An elderly woman with an anastomotic pseudoaneurysm of the coeliac artery, after previous treatment of a thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysm, was treated by stainless steel coil embolisation. One year later, the embolised pseudoaneurysm ruptured into the stomach and total gastrectomy and aneurysmorraphy was necessary. She is leading a normal life 6 months later. PMID:1592138

  2. Multiple sclerosis-like neurological manifestations in a coeliac patient: nothing is as it seems.

    PubMed

    Mansueto, Pasquale; Di Stefano, Laura; D'Alcamo, Alberto; Carroccio, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Cobalamin (vitamin B₁₂) deficiency occurs with several disorders, involving different organs and systems, including blood, bowel, nervous system and eyes. Although the most important features are usually haematological ones, presence of neurological involvement, in the absence of blood count alterations, has just been described in the literature. Here we report the case of a 48-year-old man, suffering from coeliac disease for approximately 5 years, vegetarian, who was admitted to our department, referring dysaesthesia of the left lower limb, decreased libido and erectile dysfunction. Vitamin B₁₂ deficiency was proved, even in the absence of blood count alteration, and treated with a vitamin supplement, resulting in complete remission. PMID:22764158

  3. Ring-shaped variation of the coeliac trunk branches.

    PubMed

    Raikos, A; Pynadath, N; Anguswamy, N; Vallath, S; Kordali, P; Stirling, A

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant arterial variations in the branching pattern of the coeliac trunk are of great interest to surgeons and radiologists. We report on a rare arterial variation found in a 79-year-old cadaver during educational dissection. Specifically, the coeliac axis formed a unique incomplete trunk termed the hepato-hepatic trunk. The splenic artery arose separately from the anterior aspect of the abdominal aorta. On the right side, there was a right hepatic artery giving rise to a gastroduodenal but an absence of the left hepatic. On the left side, there was a branch coursing towards the porta hepatis; the left hepatic artery, dividing into the left gastric, an accessory left gastric, and a branch to the distal oesophagus. The hepato-hepatic trunk formed a ring-shaped vascular structure around the caudate lobe of the liver. Precise mapping and observation of the extrahepatic arteries and bile duct branches is essential in a variety of hepato-biliary laparoscopic procedures of the liver and gallbladder. Other operative procedures requiring, a comprehensive kno-wledge of the varied coeliac trunk patterns are liver transplantation and arterial embolism for hepatic tumour therapy. PMID:26620519

  4. Cross-sectional study of coeliac autoimmunity in a population of Vietnamese children

    PubMed Central

    Zanella, Sara; De Leo, Luigina; Nguyen-Ngoc-Quynh, Le; Nguyen-Duy, Bo; Not, Tarcisio; Tran-Thi-Chi, Mai; Phung-Duc, Son; Le-Thanh, Hai; Malaventura, Cristina; Vatta, Serena; Ziberna, Fabiana; Mazzocco, Martina; Volpato, Stefano; Phung-Tuyet, Lan; Le-Thi-Minh, Huong

    2016-01-01

    Objective The prevalence of coeliac disease (CD) in Vietnam is unknown. To fill this void, we assessed the prevalence of serological markers of CD autoimmunity in a population of children in Hanoi. Setting The outpatient blood drawing laboratory of the largest paediatric hospital in North Vietnam was used for the study, which was part of an international project of collaboration between Italy and Vietnam. Participants Children having blood drawn for any reason were included. Exclusion criteria were age younger than 2 years, acquired or congenital immune deficiency and inadequate sample. A total of 1961 children (96%) were enrolled (838 females, 1123 males, median age 5.3 years). Outcomes Primary outcome was the prevalence of positive autoimmunity to both IgA antitransglutaminase antibodies (anti-tTG) assessed with an ELISA test and antiendomysial antibodies (EMA). Secondary outcome was the prevalence of CD predisposing human leucocyte antigens (HLA) (HLA DQ2/8) in the positive children and in a random group of samples negative for IgA anti-tTG. Results The IgA anti-tTG test was positive in 21/1961 (1%; 95% CI 0.61% to 1.53%); however, EMA antibodies were negative in all. HLA DQ2/8 was present in 7/21 (33%; 95% CI 14.5% to 56.9%) of the anti-tTG-positive children and in 72/275 (26%; 95% CI 21% to 32%) of those who were negative. Conclusions Coeliac autoimmunity is rare in Vietnam, although prevalence of HLA DQ2/8 is similar to that of other countries. We hypothesise that the scarce exposure to gluten could be responsible for these findings. PMID:27329441

  5. Being active when you have heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease - activity ... Getting regular exercise when you have heart disease is important. Exercise can make your heart muscle stronger. It may also help you be more active without chest pain or ...

  6. Cardiovascular Disease and Cancer: Student Awareness Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, James H., Comp.

    Awareness activities pertaining to cancer and cardiovascular disease are presented as a supplement for high school science classes. The exercises can be used to enrich units of study dealing with the circulatory system, the cell, or human diseases. Eight activities deal with the following topics: (1) cardiovascular disease risk factors; (2)…

  7. On Modelling Minimal Disease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Christopher H.; Su, Li; Gladman, Dafna D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore methods for statistical modelling of minimal disease activity (MDA) based on data from intermittent clinic visits. Methods The analysis was based on a 2‐state model. Comparisons were made between analyses based on “complete case” data from visits at which MDA status was known, and the use of hidden model methodology that incorporated information from visits at which only some MDA defining criteria could be established. Analyses were based on an observational psoriatic arthritis cohort. Results With data from 856 patients and 7,024 clinic visits, analysis was based on virtually all visits, although only 62.6% provided enough information to determine MDA status. Estimated mean times for an episode of MDA varied from 4.18 years to 3.10 years, with smaller estimates derived from the hidden 2‐state model analysis. Over a 10‐year period, the estimated expected times spent in MDA episodes of longer than 1 year was 3.90 to 4.22, and the probability of having such an MDA episode was estimated to be 0.85 to 0.91, with longer times and greater probabilities seen with the hidden 2‐state model analysis. Conclusion A 2‐state model provides a useful framework for the analysis of MDA. Use of data from visits at which MDA status can not be determined provide more precision, and notable differences are seen in estimated quantities related to MDA episodes based on complete case and hidden 2‐state model analyses. The possibility of bias, as well as loss of precision, should be recognized when complete case analyses are used. PMID:26315478

  8. Immune response of the coeliac nasal mucosa to locally-instilled gliadin

    PubMed Central

    TORRE, P; FUSCO, S; QUAGLIA, F; LA ROTONDA, M L; PAPARO, F; MAGLIO, M; TRONCONE, R; GRECO, L

    2002-01-01

    We previously demonstrated a specific gluten-induced response in the rectal mucosa of coeliac patients. In the present study, we have evaluated the immune response to local gliadin challenge in the nasal mucosa of coeliac patients preliminary to exploring the feasibility of immune modulation by the nasal route. The local response to gliadin was evaluated on non-invasive scrapings of nasal mucosa. Cells harvested from the nasal scrapings of 21 coeliac patients and 12 healthy controls were counted after immunohistochemical staining. Six hours after gliadin challenge, the total number of cells was increased in coeliacs but not in controls. The increase was due principally to lymphoid cells and granulocytes. CD3+ cells doubled after gliadin challenge, but not after albumin control challenge. There was a similar rise in CD25+ cells, whereas the number of ICAM-expressing cells did not increase significantly. In control subjects, both gliadin and albumin induced a moderate but not significant increase in total cell number. In conclusion, the gliadin antigen provokes a mild inflammatory response in coeliac nasal mucosa. PMID:11966769

  9. Disease activity in osteomyelitis: role of radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Tumeh, S.S.; Aliabadi, P.; Weissman, B.N.; McNeil, B.J.

    1987-12-01

    To determine the impact of radiographic findings on the interpretation of bone and gallium scans of patients with active osteomyelitis, the authors reviewed the medical records and radiologic examinations of 104 patients. The only diagnostic finding of active disease on radiographs was the presence of a sequestrum (three patients). Other findings--such as erosion, soft-tissue swelling, and periosteal reaction--proved nonspecific and did not differentiate active from inactive disease. Furthermore, these findings did not significantly change the sensitivity or specificity of the bone and gallium scans, either in detecting or in excluding the presence of active disease.

  10. Pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm associated with coeliac artery occlusion from an aortic intramural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Sakatani, Akihiko; Doi, Yoshinori; Kitayama, Toshiaki; Matsuda, Takaaki; Sasai, Yasutaka; Nishida, Naohiro; Sakamoto, Megumi; Uenoyama, Naoto; Kinoshita, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysms are a rare type of visceral artery aneurysm, whose rupture is associated with high mortality. These aneurysms are of particular interest because local haemodynamic change caused by coeliac artery obstruction plays an important role in their development. However, the pathophysiological mechanism of coeliac artery obstruction is not completely understood. Pressure from the median arcuate ligament is most frequently reported cause. Although it is well-known that stenosis or occlusion of the visceral vessels may be caused by aortic syndrome, reports of pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm associated with coeliac artery occlusion due to aortic syndrome are extremely rare. Our case indicates a new aetiology for a pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm and demonstrates the rapid deterioration of the patient affected. PMID:27122676

  11. Identification and molecular characterization of oat peptides implicated on coeliac immune response

    PubMed Central

    Comino, Isabel; Bernardo, David; Bancel, Emmanuelle; Moreno, María de Lourdes; Sánchez, Borja; Barro, Francisco; Šuligoj, Tanja; Ciclitira, Paul J.; Cebolla, Ángel; Knight, Stella C.; Branlard, Gérard; Sousa, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Background Oats provide important nutritional and pharmacological properties, although their safety in coeliac patients remains controversial. Previous studies have confirmed that the reactivity of the anti-33-mer monoclonal antibody with different oat varieties is proportional to the immune responses in terms of T-cell proliferation. Although the impact of these varieties on the adaptive response has been studied, the role of the dendritic cells (DC) is still poorly understood. The aim of this study is to characterize different oat fractions and to study their effect on DC from coeliac patients. Methods and results Protein fractions were isolated from oat grains and analyzed by SDS–PAGE. Several proteins were characterized in the prolamin fraction using immunological and proteomic tools, and by Nano-LC-MS/MS. These proteins, analogous to α- and γ-gliadin-like, showed reactive sequences to anti-33-mer antibody suggesting their immunogenic potential. That was further confirmed as some of the newly identified oat peptides had a differential stimulatory capacity on circulating DC from coeliac patients compared with healthy controls. Conclusions This is the first time, to our knowledge, where newly identified oat peptides have been shown to elicit a differential stimulatory capacity on circulating DC obtained from coeliac patients, potentially identifying immunogenic properties of these oat peptides. PMID:26853779

  12. [Celiac disease. Risk factors for women in reproductive age].

    PubMed

    Stazi, A V; Mantovani, A

    2000-05-01

    In the past coeliac disease, or intolerance to gluten, has been considered a rare disease in infancy, whose most important signs were chronic diarrhea with malabsorption and reduced growth. However, besides this classical form, there are a number of other clinical and subclinical forms which may appear even in the adult life and without any overt intestinal sign. The alterations may affect, e.g., the liver, thyroid, skin and the female and male reproductive system. The overall prevalence of the different forms of coeliac disease in Western Europe is at least 1:300. The aim of the present paper is to describe and evaluate the effects of coeliac disease on female reproduction. Such effects include delayed menarche, amenorrhea, infertility and early menopause. Epidemiological studies show that besides reduced fertility, affected women are at higher risk of reproductive problems such as pregnancy loss, low birthweight of offspring and reduced duration of breastfeeding. There are no adequate studies to evidentiate a possible increase of birth defects; nevertheless, coeliac disease induces malabsorption, with deficiencies of nutritional factors essential to prenatal development such as iron, folic acid and vitamin K. The mechanisms underlying the reproductive alterations are still awaiting clarification; however, an interaction among specific nutritional deficiencies, endocrine imbalances and immune disturbances is suspected. As for the other effects associated to the coeliac disease, the possible prevention or treatment of the reproductive effects is only the lifelong maintenance of a gluten-free diet. PMID:11048475

  13. Physical Activity Fundamental to Preventing Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (DHHS), Washington, DC.

    Regular physical activity, fitness, and exercise are critically important for all people's health and wellbeing. It can reduce morbidity and mortality from many chronic diseases. Despite its well-known benefits, most U.S. adults, and many children, are not active enough to achieve these health benefits. Physical inactivity and related health…

  14. Biomarkers for Microglial Activation in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lautner, Ronald; Mattsson, Niklas; Schöll, Michael; Augutis, Kristin; Blennow, Kaj; Olsson, Bob; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Intensive research over the last decades has provided increasing evidence for neuroinflammation as an integral part in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Inflammatory responses in the central nervous system (CNS) are initiated by activated microglia, representing the first line of the innate immune defence of the brain. Therefore, biochemical markers of microglial activation may help us understand the underlying mechanisms of neuroinflammation in AD as well as the double-sided qualities of microglia, namely, neuroprotection and neurotoxicity. In this paper we summarize candidate biomarkers of microglial activation in AD along with a survey of recent neuroimaging techniques. PMID:22114747

  15. Release and activity of histone in diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, R; Kang, R; Fan, X-G; Tang, D

    2014-01-01

    Histones and their post-translational modifications have key roles in chromatin remodeling and gene transcription. Besides intranuclear functions, histones act as damage-associated molecular pattern molecules when they are released into the extracellular space. Administration of exogenous histones to animals leads to systemic inflammatory and toxic responses through activating Toll-like receptors and inflammasome pathways. Anti-histone treatment (e.g., neutralizing antibodies, activated protein C, recombinant thrombomodulin, and heparin) protect mice against lethal endotoxemia, sepsis, ischemia/reperfusion injury, trauma, pancreatitis, peritonitis, stroke, coagulation, and thrombosis. In addition, elevated serum histone and nucleosome levels have been implicated in multiple pathophysiological processes and progression of diseases including autoimmune diseases, inflammatory diseases, and cancer. Therefore, extracellular histones could serve as biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets in human diseases. PMID:25118930

  16. Physical activity, nutrition, and chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Blair, S N; Horton, E; Leon, A S; Lee, I M; Drinkwater, B L; Dishman, R K; Mackey, M; Kienholz, M L

    1996-03-01

    Epidemiologic, animal, clinical, and metabolic studies demonstrate the independent roles of physical activity and nutrition in the prevention and treatment of several chronic diseases. Fewer data are available to describe the synergistic effects of exercise and diet, and questions remain as to whether and how these two lifestyle factors work together to promote health and prevent disease. This paper briefly reviews many of the known effects of physical activity and nutrition on the prevention and treatment of coronary heart disease, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, obesity, and osteoporosis as well as how exercise and diet may work together. A discussion of how to increase physical activity levels and how to improve dietary intake also is included. Finally, current exercise and dietary recommendations are summarized, as are directions for future research. PMID:8776222

  17. Physical activity, obesity and cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Lakka, T A; Bouchard, C

    2005-01-01

    Sedentary lifestyle and overweight are major public health, clinical, and economical problems in modern societies. The worldwide epidemic of excess weight is due to imbalance between physical activity and dietary energy intake. Sedentary lifestyle, unhealthy diet, and consequent overweight and obesity markedly increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Regular physical activity 45-60 min per day prevents unhealthy weight gain and obesity, whereas sedentary behaviors such as watching television promote them. Regular exercise can markedly reduce body weight and fat mass without dietary caloric restriction in overweight individuals. An increase in total energy expenditure appears to be the most important determinant of successful exercise-induced weight loss. The best long-term results may be achieved when physical activity produces an energy expenditure of at least 2,500 kcal/week. Yet, the optimal approach in weight reduction programs appears to be a combination of regular physical activity and caloric restriction. A minimum of 60 min, but most likely 80-90 min of moderate-intensity physical activity per day may be needed to avoid or limit weight regain in formerly overweight or obese individuals. Regular moderate intensity physical activity, a healthy diet, and avoiding unhealthy weight gain are effective and safe ways to prevent and treat cardiovascular diseases and to reduce premature mortality in all population groups. Although the efforts to promote cardiovascular health concern the whole population, particular attention should be paid to individuals who are physically inactive, have unhealthy diets or are prone to weight gain. They have the highest risk for worsening of the cardiovascular risk factor profile and for cardiovascular disease. To combat the epidemic of overweight and to improve cardiovascular health at a population level, it is important to develop strategies to increase habitual physical activity and to prevent overweight and obesity in

  18. Physical activity, brain plasticity, and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Kirk I; Weinstein, Andrea M; Lopez, Oscar L

    2012-11-01

    In this review we summarize the epidemiological, cross-sectional, and interventional studies examining the association between physical activity and brain volume, function, and risk for Alzheimer's disease. The epidemiological literature provides compelling evidence that greater amounts of physical activity are associated with a reduced risk of dementia in late life. In addition, randomized interventions using neuroimaging tools have reported that participation in physical activity increases the size of prefrontal and hippocampal brain areas, which may lead to a reduction in memory impairments. Consistent with these findings, longitudinal studies using neuroimaging tools also find that the volume of prefrontal and hippocampal brain areas are larger in individuals who engaged in more physical activity earlier in life. We conclude from this review that there is convincing evidence that physical activity has a consistent and robust association with brain regions implicated in age-related cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease. In addition to summarizing this literature we provide recommendations for future research on physical activity and brain health. PMID:23085449

  19. [Plasma cholinesterase activity in hepatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Araoud, Manel; Mhenni, Hamida; Hellara, Ilhem; Hellara, Olfa; Neffati, Fadoua; Douki, Wahiba; Mili, Marwa; Saffar, Hammouda; Najjar, Mohamed Fadhel

    2013-01-01

    Plasma cholinesterase activity (ChE) may vary in some pathological circumstances. We studied the changes in activity of this enzyme according to the type of liver injury, to assess the interest of this parameter in the diagnosis of liver diseases. Our study was performed on 102 patients with different liver diseases and 53 healthy controls. The ChE activity was lower in patients compared to control group (p < 0.0001), and more pronounced in cirrhotic patients compared to those suffering from hepatitis. Elevated activities of AST, ALT, GGT and ALP and bilirubinemia, and decreased albuminemia were noted in patients compared to controls (p < 0.001). Hypoalbuminemia was significantly important in cirrhotic patients compared to those suffering from cholestasis or hepatitis. A correlation between ChE and bilirubin, albumin and serum protein was found in patients with cirrhosis or those with chronic hepatitis. A significantly lower activity of ChE was found in patients with hepatic insufficiency (HI). In case of suspicion of HI, the prescription of ChE activity could guide or confirm the diagnosis of the impairment. PMID:23747666

  20. Graves' disease: thyroid function and immunologic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Gossage, A.A.; Crawley, J.C.; Copping, S.; Hinge, D.; Himsworth, R.L.

    1982-11-01

    Patients with Graves' disease were studied for two years during and after a twelve-month course of treatment. Disease activity was determined by repeated measurements of thyroidal uptake of (/sup 99m/Tc)pertechnetate during tri-iodothyronine administration. These in-vivo measurements of thyroid stimulation were compared with the results of in-vitro assays of Graves, immunoglobulin (TSH binding inhibitory activity--TBIA). There was no correlation between the thyroid uptake and TBIA on diagnosis. Pertechnetate uptake and TBIA both declined during the twelve months of antithyroid therapy. TBIA was detectable in sera from 19 of the 27 patients at diagnosis; in 11 of these 19 patients there was a good correlation (p less than 0.05) throughout the course of their disease between the laboratory assay of the Graves, immunoglobulin and the thyroid uptake. Probability of recurrence can be assessed but sustained remission of Graves' disease after treatment cannot be predicted from either measurement alone or in combination.

  1. Graves' disease: thyroid function and immunologic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Gossage, A.A.R.; Crawley, J.C.W.; Copping, S.; Hinge, D.; Himsworth, R.L.

    1982-11-01

    Patients with Graves' disease were studied for two years during and after a twelve-month course of treatment. Disease activity was determined by repeated measurements of thyroidal uptake of (/sup 9/-9..mu..Tc)pertechnetate during tri-iodothyronine administration. These in-vivo measurements of thyroid stimulation were compared with the results of in-vitro assays of Graves, immunoglobulin (TSH binding inhibitory activity - TBIA). There was no correlation between the thyroid uptake and TBIA on diagnosis. Pertechnetate uptake and TBIA both declined during the twelve months of antithyroid therapy. TBIA was detectable in sera from 19 of the 27 patients at diagnosis; in 11 of these 19 patients there was a good correlation (p<0.05) throughout the course of their disease between the laboratory assay of the Graves, immunoglobulin and the thyroid uptake. Probability of recurrence can be assessed but sustained remission of Graves' disease after treatment cannot be predicted from either measurement alone or in combination.

  2. Macrophage activation syndrome in autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Deane, Sean; Selmi, Carlo; Teuber, Suzanne S; Gershwin, M Eric

    2010-01-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a phenomenon characterized by cytopenia, organ dysfunction, and coagulopathy associated with an inappropriate activation of macrophages. Current diagnostic criteria are imprecise, but the syndrome is now recognized as a form of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis that is characteristically associated with autoimmune diatheses. The diagnosis of incipient MAS in patients with autoimmune disease requires a high index of suspicion, as several characteristics of the disorder may be present in the underlying condition or infectious complications associated with the treatment thereof. Proposed treatment regimens include aggressive approaches that require validation in future controlled studies. This review discusses the major aspects of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of MAS with a focus on the association with autoimmune disease. PMID:20407267

  3. Active music therapy and Parkinson's disease: methods.

    PubMed

    Pacchetti, C; Aglieri, R; Mancini, F; Martignoni, E; Nappi, G

    1998-01-01

    Music therapy (MT) is an unconventional, multisensorial therapy poorly assessed in medical care but widely used to different ends in a variety of settings. MT has two branches: active and passive. In active MT the utilisation of instruments is structured to correspond to all sensory organs so as to obtain suitable motor and emotional responses. We conducted a prospective study to evaluate the effects of MT in the neurorehabilitation of patients with Parkinson's Disease (PD), a common degenerative disorder involving movement and emotional impairment. Sixteen PD patients took part in 13 weekly sessions of MT each lasting 2 hours. At the beginning and at the end of the session, every 2 weeks, the patients were evaluated by a neurologist, who assessed PD severity with UPDRS, emotional functions with Happiness Measures (HM) and quality of life using the Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire (PDQL). After every session a significant improvement in motor function, particularly in relation to hypokinesia, was observed both in the overall and in the pre-post session evaluations. HM, UPDRS-ADL and PDQL changes confirmed an improving effect of MT on emotional functions, activities of daily living and quality of life. In conclusion, active MT, operating at a multisensorial level, stimulates motor, affective and behavioural functions. Finally, we propose active MT as new method to include in PD rehabilitation programmes. This article describes the methods adopted during MT sessions with PD patients. PMID:9584875

  4. Angioarchitecture of the coeliac sympathetic ganglion complex in the common tree shrew (Tupaia glis)

    PubMed Central

    PROMWIKORN, WARAPORN; THONGPILA, SAKPORN; PRADIDARCHEEP, WISUIT; MINGSAKUL, THAWORN; CHUNHABUNDIT, PANJIT; SOMANA, REON

    1998-01-01

    The angioarchitecture of the coeliac sympathetic ganglion complex (CGC) of the common tree shrew (Tupaia glis) was studied by the vascular corrosion cast technique in conjunction with scanning electron microscopy. The CGC of the tree shrew was found to be a highly vascularised organ. It normally received arterial blood supply from branches of the inferior phrenic, superior suprarenal and inferior suprarenal arteries and of the abdominal aorta. In some animals, its blood supply was also derived from branches of the middle suprarenal arteries, coeliac artery, superior mesenteric artery and lumbar arteries. These arteries penetrated the ganglion at variable points and in slightly different patterns. They gave off peripheral branches to form a subcapsular capillary plexus while their main trunks traversed deeply into the inner part before branching into the densely packed intraganglionic capillary networks. The capillaries merged to form venules before draining into collecting veins at the peripheral region of the ganglion complex. Finally, the veins coursed to the dorsal aspect of the ganglion to drain into the renal and inferior phrenic veins and the inferior vena cava. The capillaries on the coeliac ganglion complex do not possess fenestrations. PMID:9877296

  5. Creation of the first ultra-low gluten barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) for coeliac and gluten-intolerant populations.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Gregory J; Blundell, Malcolm J; Colgrave, Michelle L; Howitt, Crispin A

    2016-04-01

    Coeliac disease is a well-defined condition that is estimated to affect approximately 1% of the population worldwide. Noncoeliac gluten sensitivity is a condition that is less well defined, but is estimated to affect up to 10% of the population, and is often self-diagnosed. At present, the only remedy for both conditions is a lifelong gluten-free diet. A gluten-free diet is often expensive, high in fat and low in fibre, which in themselves can lead to adverse health outcomes. Thus, there is an opportunity to use novel plant breeding strategies to develop alternative gluten-free grains. In this work, we describe the breeding and characterization of a novel ultra-low gluten (ULG) barley variety in which the hordein (gluten) content was reduced to below 5 ppm. This was achieved using traditional breeding strategies to combine three recessive alleles, which act independently of each other to lower the hordein content in the parental varieties. The grain of the initial variety was shrunken compared to wild-type barleys. We implemented a breeding strategy to improve the grain size to near wild-type levels and demonstrated that the grains can be malted and brewed successfully. The ULG barley has the potential to provide novel healthy foods and beverages for those who require a gluten-free diet. PMID:26427614

  6. Helping People with Alzheimer's Disease Stay Physically Active

    MedlinePlus

    ... Free Stuff Be a Partner Helping People with Alzheimer's Disease Stay Physically Active Regular physical activity has many benefits for people with Alzheimer’s disease. Exercise helps keep muscles, joints, and the ...

  7. [Inflammatory Bowel Disease Competence Network].

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Stefan; Hartmann, Heinz; Kruis, Wolfgang; Kucharzik, Torsten; Mudter, Jonas; Siegmund, Britta; Stallmach, Andreas; Witte, Christine; Fitzke, Klaus; Bokemeyer, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    The Inflammatory Bowel Disease Competence Network is a network of more than 500 physicians and scientists from university clinics, hospitals and gastroenterology practices. The focus extends from the two major forms of inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, into other chronic inflammatory conditions affecting the intestine, including coeliac disease and microscopic colitis. The network translates basic science discoveries (in particular in the molecular epidemiology research) into innovative diagnostics and therapy. Through its strong networking structures it supports a continuous process to improve quality and standardisation in patient care that is implemented in close interaction with European networks addressing this disease group.Optimisation of patient care based on scientifically proven evidence is a main focus of the network. Therefore, it supports and coordinates translational research and infrastructure projects that investigate aetiology, improvement of diagnostic methods, and development of new or improved use of established therapies. Members participate in various training projects, thus ensuring the rapid transfer of research results into clinical practice.The competence network cooperates with the main patient organisations to engage patients in all levels of activities. The network and the patient organisations have interest in promoting public awareness about the disease entities, because their importance and burden is underestimated in non-specialised medical fields and among the general public. PMID:26968556

  8. Exercise Decreases Risk of Future Active Disease in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients in Remission

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Patricia D.; Kappelman, Michael D.; Martin, Christopher F.; Chen, Wenli; Sandler, Robert S.; Long, Millie D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although exercise impacts quality of life in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), little is known about its role in disease activity. Among IBD patients in remission, we aimed to evaluate the association between exercise and subsequent active disease. Methods We performed a prospective study using the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America (CCFA) Partners Internet-based cohort of individuals with self-reported IBD. We identified participants in remission, defined as short Crohn's disease activity index (sCDAI) <150 or simple clinical colitis activity index (SCCAI) ≤2. The primary exposure was exercise status, measured using the validated Godin leisure time activity index. The primary study outcome, assessed after six months, was active disease defined using the above disease activity index thresholds. We used bivariate and multivariate analyses to describe the independent association between exercise and risk of active disease. Results We identified 1308 patients with Crohn's Disease (CD) and 549 with ulcerative or indeterminate colitis (UC/IC) in remission, of whom 227(17.4%) with CD and 135 (24.6%) with UC/IC developed active disease after 6 months. Higher exercise level was associated with decreased risk of active disease for CD (adjusted RR 0.72, 95% CI 0.55-0.94) and UC/IC (adjusted RR 0.78, 95% CI 0.54-1.13). Conclusions In patients with CD in remission, those with higher exercise levels were significantly less likely to develop active disease at six months. In patients with UC/IC in remission, patients with higher exercise levels were less likely to develop active disease at six months, however this was not statistically significant. PMID:25723616

  9. Seasonal prevalence of MS disease activity(Podcast)

    PubMed Central

    Meier, D.S.; Balashov, K.E.; Healy, B.; Weiner, H.L.; Guttmann, C.R.G.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This observational cohort study investigated the seasonal prevalence of multiple sclerosis (MS) disease activity (likelihood and intensity), as reflected by new lesions from serial T2-weighted MRI, a sensitive marker of subclinical disease activity. Methods: Disease activity was assessed from the appearance of new T2 lesions on 939 separate brain MRI examinations in 44 untreated patients with MS. Likelihood functions for MS disease activity were derived, accounting for the temporal uncertainty of new lesion occurrence, individual levels of disease activity, and uneven examination intervals. Both likelihood and intensity of disease activity were compared with the time of year (season) and regional climate data (temperature, solar radiation, precipitation) and among relapsing and progressive disease phenotypes. Contrast-enhancing lesions and attack counts were also compared for seasonal effects. Results: Unlike contrast enhancement or attacks, new T2 activity revealed a likelihood 2–3 times higher in March–August than during the rest of the year, and correlated strongly with regional climate data, in particular solar radiation. In addition to the likelihood or prevalence, disease intensity was also elevated during the summer season. The elevated risk season appears to lessen for progressive MS and occur about 2 months earlier. Conclusion: This study documents evidence of a strong seasonal pattern in subclinical MS activity based on noncontrast brain MRI. The observed seasonality in MS disease activity has implications for trial design and therapy assessment. The observed activity pattern is suggestive of a modulating role of seasonally changing environmental factors or season-dependent metabolic activity. GLOSSARY CEL = contrast-enhancing lesions; MS = multiple sclerosis. PMID:20805526

  10. Remote Physical Activity Monitoring in Neurological Disease: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Block, Valerie A. J.; Pitsch, Erica; Tahir, Peggy; Cree, Bruce A. C.; Allen, Diane D.; Gelfand, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To perform a systematic review of studies using remote physical activity monitoring in neurological diseases, highlighting advances and determining gaps. Methods Studies were systematically identified in PubMed/MEDLINE, CINAHL and SCOPUS from January 2004 to December 2014 that monitored physical activity for ≥24 hours in adults with neurological diseases. Studies that measured only involuntary motor activity (tremor, seizures), energy expenditure or sleep were excluded. Feasibility, findings, and protocols were examined. Results 137 studies met inclusion criteria in multiple sclerosis (MS) (61 studies); stroke (41); Parkinson's Disease (PD) (20); dementia (11); traumatic brain injury (2) and ataxia (1). Physical activity levels measured by remote monitoring are consistently low in people with MS, stroke and dementia, and patterns of physical activity are altered in PD. In MS, decreased ambulatory activity assessed via remote monitoring is associated with greater disability and lower quality of life. In stroke, remote measures of upper limb function and ambulation are associated with functional recovery following rehabilitation and goal-directed interventions. In PD, remote monitoring may help to predict falls. In dementia, remote physical activity measures correlate with disease severity and can detect wandering. Conclusions These studies show that remote physical activity monitoring is feasible in neurological diseases, including in people with moderate to severe neurological disability. Remote monitoring can be a psychometrically sound and responsive way to assess physical activity in neurological disease. Further research is needed to ensure these tools provide meaningful information in the context of specific neurological disorders and patterns of neurological disability. PMID:27124611

  11. NALP3 inflammasome activation in protein misfolding diseases.

    PubMed

    Shi, Fushan; Kouadir, Mohammed; Yang, Yang

    2015-08-15

    Protein-misfolding diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, type 2 diabetes, Prion diseases, and Parkinson's disease, are characterized by inflammatory reactions. In all these diseases, IL-1β (Interlukine-1β) has been shown to be an important regulator, and the misfolded proteins are proved to be triggers of the release of IL-1β. Recently, several reports demonstrated that the inflammasome activation is involved in the progress of the misfolded protein diseases, and that the inflammasome can recognize pathogenic proteins leading to the release of IL-1β. In this review, we discuss the role of inflammasome in the pathogenesis of misfolded protein diseases and the potential of inflammasome-targeting therapeutic interventions in the management of these diseases. PMID:26037399

  12. Double-Blind Randomized Clinical Trial: Gluten versus Placebo Rechallenge in Patients with Lymphocytic Enteritis and Suspected Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Anna; Ibarra, Montserrat; Temiño, Rocío; Salas, Antonio; Esteve, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background The role of gluten as a trigger of symptoms in non-coeliac gluten sensitivity has been questioned. Aim To demonstrate that gluten is the trigger of symptoms in a subgroup of patients fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for non-coeliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS), which presented with lymphocytic enteritis, positive celiac genetics and negative celiac serology. Methods Double-blind randomized clinical trial of gluten vs placebo rechallenge. Inclusion criteria: >18 years of age, HLA-DQ2/8+, negative coeliac serology and gluten-dependent lymphocytic enteritis, and GI symptoms, with clinical and histological remission at inclusion. Eighteen patients were randomised: 11 gluten (20 g/day) and 7 placebo. Clinical symptoms, quality of life (GIQLI), and presence of gamma/delta+ cells and transglutaminase deposits were evaluated. Results 91% of patients had clinical relapse during gluten challenge versus 28.5% after placebo (p = 0.01). Clinical scores and GIQLI worsened after gluten but not after placebo (p<0.01). The presence of coeliac tissue markers at baseline biopsy on a gluten-free diet allowed classifying 9 out of the 18 (50%) patients as having probable ‘coeliac lite’ disease. Conclusion This proof-of-concept study indicates that gluten is the trigger of symptoms in a subgroup of patients fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for NCGS. They were characterized by positive celiac genetics, lymphocytic enteritis, and clinical and histological remission after a gluten-free diet. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02472704 PMID:27392045

  13. Multiple plasma enzyme activities in liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, T.; Janota, I.; Smith, M. J. H.

    1961-01-01

    The measurement of the plasma activities of glutamic-oxaloacetic and glutamic-pyruvic transaminases, aldolase, cholinesterase, and isocitric, lactic, and phosphogluconic dehydrogenases in random samples of blood was found to be of no value in the differential diagnosis of hepatitis, obstructive jaundice, hepatic cirrhosis, and neoplastic conditions involving the liver. Serial determinations of the enzyme activities provided useful information about the course of certain hepatic disorders, particularly acute viral hepatitis. PMID:13711559

  14. Mast cells and their activation in lung disease.

    PubMed

    Virk, Harvinder; Arthur, Greer; Bradding, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Mast cells and their activation contribute to lung health via innate and adaptive immune responses to respiratory pathogens. They are also involved in the normal response to tissue injury. However, mast cells are involved in disease processes characterized by inflammation and remodeling of tissue structure. In these diseases mast cells are often inappropriately and chronically activated. There is evidence for activation of mast cells contributing to the pathophysiology of asthma, pulmonary fibrosis, and pulmonary hypertension. They may also play a role in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and lung cancer. The diverse mechanisms through which mast cells sense and interact with the external and internal microenvironment account for their role in these diseases. Newly discovered mechanisms of redistribution and interaction between mast cells, airway structural cells, and other inflammatory cells may offer novel therapeutic targets in these disease processes. PMID:26845625

  15. Noninvasive Molecular Imaging of Disease Activity in Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Dweck, Marc R; Aikawa, Elena; Newby, David E; Tarkin, Jason M; Rudd, James H F; Narula, Jagat; Fayad, Zahi A

    2016-07-01

    Major focus has been placed on the identification of vulnerable plaques as a means of improving the prediction of myocardial infarction. However, this strategy has recently been questioned on the basis that the majority of these individual coronary lesions do not in fact go on to cause clinical events. Attention is, therefore, shifting to alternative imaging modalities that might provide a more complete pan-coronary assessment of the atherosclerotic disease process. These include markers of disease activity with the potential to discriminate between patients with stable burnt-out disease that is no longer metabolically active and those with active atheroma, faster disease progression, and increased risk of infarction. This review will examine how novel molecular imaging approaches can provide such assessments, focusing on inflammation and microcalcification activity, the importance of these processes to coronary atherosclerosis, and the advantages and challenges posed by these techniques. PMID:27390335

  16. Effect of 2 Psychotherapies on Depression and Disease Activity in Pediatric Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Youk, Ada O.; Gonzalez-Heydrich, Joseph; Bujoreanu, Simona I.; Weisz, John; Fairclough, Diane; Ducharme, Peter; Jones, Neil; Lotrich, Francis; Keljo, David; Srinath, Arvind; Bousvaros, Athos; Kupfer, David; DeMaso, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Crohn's disease (CD) is associated with depression. It is unclear if psychosocial interventions offer benefit for depressive symptoms during active CD. In this secondary analysis of a larger study of treating depression in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease, we assessed whether cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) would differentiate from supportive nondirective therapy in treating depression and disease activity in youth with CD. We also explored whether somatic depressive symptoms showed a different pattern of response in the overall sample and the subset with active inflammatory bowel disease. Methods: Youth with depression and CD (n = 161) were randomized to 3 months of CBT (teaching coping skills) or supportive nondirective therapy (supportive listening). Depressive severity was measured using the Children's Depression Rating Scale-Revised (CDRS-R) with the somatic depressive subtype consisting of those CDRS-R items, which significantly correlated with CD activity. Disease activity was measured by the Pediatric Crohn's disease Activity Index. Given the potential confound of higher dose steroids, subanalyses excluded subjects on >20 mg/d prednisone equivalent (n = 34). Results: Total CDRS-R scores in the overall sample significantly decreased over time after both treatments (P < 0.0001). Treatment with CBT was associated with a significantly greater improvement in the Pediatric Crohn's disease Activity Index (P = 0.05) and somatic depressive subtype (P = 0.03) in those with active inflammatory bowel disease (n = 95) compared with supportive nondirective therapy. After excluding those on steroids (n = 34), there was a significant improvement in total CDRS-R (P = 0.03) and in Pediatric Crohn's disease Activity Index (P = 0.03) after CBT. Conclusions: Psychotherapy may be a useful adjunct to treat depression in the context of CD-related inflammation in youth who are not concurrently on higher dose steroids. PMID:25822010

  17. Movement-related cortical activation in familial Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Delval, A; Defebvre, L; Labyt, E; Douay, X; Bourriez, J-L; Waucquiez, N; Derambure, P; Destée, A

    2006-09-26

    We sought to determine whether or not first-degree relatives of patients with familial Parkinson disease (FDRs) present impaired movement-related cortical activity. We studied 10 familial Parkinson disease subjects, 10 FDRs, and 10 controls and analyzed event-related mu desynchronization (ERD) and beta synchronization. Forty percent FDRs presented reduced premovement mu ERD latency, suggesting that premovement cortical activation is impaired in FDRs. PMID:17000986

  18. Downregulation of Sulfotransferase Expression and Activity in Diseased Human Livers

    PubMed Central

    Yalcin, Emine B.; More, Vijay; Neira, Karissa L.; Lu, Zhenqiang James; Cherrington, Nathan J.; Slitt, Angela L.

    2013-01-01

    Sulfotransferase (SULT) function has been well studied in healthy human subjects by quantifying mRNA and protein expression and determining enzyme activity with probe substrates. However, it is not well known if sulfotransferase activity changes in metabolic and liver disease, such as diabetes, steatosis, or cirrhosis. Sulfotransferases have significant roles in the regulation of hormones and excretion of xenobiotics. In the present study of normal subjects with nonfatty livers and patients with steatosis, diabetic cirrhosis, and alcoholic cirrhosis, we sought to determine SULT1A1, SULT2A1, SULT1E1, and SULT1A3 activity and mRNA and protein expression in human liver tissue. In general, sulfotransferase activity decreased significantly with severity of liver disease from steatosis to cirrhosis. Specifically, SULT1A1 and SULT1A3 activities were lower in disease states relative to nonfatty tissues. Alcoholic cirrhotic tissues further contained lower SULT1A1 and 1A3 activities than those affected by either of the two other disease states. SULT2A1, on the other hand, was only reduced in alcoholic cirrhotic tissues. SULT1E1 was reduced both in diabetic cirrhosis and in alcoholic cirrhosis tissues, relative to nonfatty liver tissues. In conclusion, the reduced levels of sulfotransferase expression and activity in diseased versus nondiseased liver tissue may alter the metabolism and disposition of xenobiotics and affect homeostasis of endobiotic sulfotransferase substrates. PMID:23775849

  19. Liposomes for Targeted Delivery of Active Agents against Neurodegenerative Diseases (Alzheimer's Disease and Parkinson's Disease)

    PubMed Central

    Spuch, Carlos; Navarro, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease represent a huge unmet medical need. The prevalence of both diseases is increasing, but the efficacy of treatment is still very limited due to various factors including the blood brain barrier (BBB). Drug delivery to the brain remains the major challenge for the treatment of all neurodegenerative diseases because of the numerous protective barriers surrounding the central nervous system. New therapeutic drugs that cross the BBB are critically needed for treatment of many brain diseases. One of the significant factors on neurotherapeutics is the constraint of the blood brain barrier and the drug release kinetics that cause peripheral serious side effects. Contrary to common belief, neurodegenerative and neurological diseases may be multisystemic in nature, and this presents numerous difficulties for their potential treatment. Overall, the aim of this paper is to summarize the last findings and news related to liposome technology in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and demonstrate the potential of this technology for the development of novel therapeutics and the possible applications of liposomes in the two most widespread neurodegenerative diseases, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. PMID:22203906

  20. Reductions in disease activity in the AMPLE trial: clinical response by baseline disease duration

    PubMed Central

    Schiff, Michael; Weinblatt, Michael E; Valente, Robert; Citera, Gustavo; Maldonado, Michael; Massarotti, Elena; Yazici, Yusuf; Fleischmann, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate clinical response by baseline disease duration using 2-year data from the AMPLE trial. Methods Patients were randomised to subcutaneous abatacept 125 mg weekly or adalimumab 40 mg bi-weekly, with background methotrexate. As part of a post hoc analysis, the achievement of validated definitions of remission (Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI) ≤2.8, Simplified Disease Activity Index (SDAI) ≤3.3, Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data 3 (RAPID3) ≤3.0, Boolean score ≤1), low disease activity (CDAI <10, SDAI <11, RAPID3 ≤6.0), Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index response and American College of Rheumatology responses were evaluated by baseline disease duration (≤6 vs >6 months). Disease Activity Score 28 (C-reactive protein) <2.6 or ≤3.2 and radiographic non-progression in patients achieving remission were also evaluated. Results A total of 646 patients were randomised and treated (abatacept, n=318; adalimumab, n=328). In both treatment groups, comparable responses were achieved in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (≤6 months) and in those with later disease (>6 months) across multiple clinical measures. Conclusions Abatacept or adalimumab with background methotrexate were associated with similar onset and sustainability of response over 2 years. Patients treated early or later in the disease course achieved comparable clinical responses. Trial registration number NCT00929864, Post-results. PMID:27110385

  1. Immunologic findings, thrombocytopenia and disease activity in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, W. F.; Linton, A. L.; Cordy, P. E.; Keown, P. E.; Lohmann, R. C.; Lindsay, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    Twenty patients with nephritis due to systemic lupus erythematosus were followed up for a mean of 34 months after renal biopsy with serial determinations of total serum complement and C3 and C4 concentrations, binding of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), antinuclear antibody pattern and platelet count. There were 25 episodes of nonhematologic observed disease activity in 16 of the 20 patients; elevated DNA binding and thrombocytopenia correlated well with these episodes. The mean platelet count during episodes of observed disease activity was 96 +/- 42 X 10(9)/L, which was significantly different from the mean count of 248 +/- 90 X 10(9)/L during disease quiescence. The proportion of false-positive results with the immunologic tests varied from 25% to 67% and with platelet counts it was 11%. It is suggested that thrombocytopenia may be a simple and accurate index of disease activity in lupus nephritis. PMID:350367

  2. Neurochemical Plasticity of the Coeliac-Superior Mesenteric Ganglion Complex Neurons Projecting to the Prepyloric Area of the Porcine Stomach following Hyperacidity.

    PubMed

    Palus, Katarzyna; Całka, Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to determine neurochemical properties of the coeliac-superior mesenteric ganglion (CSMG) neurons supplying the prepyloric area of the porcine stomach in physiological state and following experimentally induced hyperacidity. To localize sympathetic neurons innervating the studied area of stomach, the neuronal retrograde tracer Fast Blue (FB) was applied to control animals and hydrochloric acid infusion (HCl) groups. After 23 days, animals of the HCl group were reintroduced into a state of general anesthesia and intragastrically given 5 mL/kg of body weight of 0.25 M aqueous solution of hydrochloric acid. On the 28th day, all animals were sacrificed. The CSMG complexes were then collected and processed for double-labeling immunofluorescence. In the control animals, FB-positive perikarya displayed immunoreactivity to tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine β-hydroxylase (DβH), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and galanin (GAL). Experimentally induced gastric hyperacidity changed the neurochemical phenotype of the studied neurons. An upregulated expression of GAL and NPY and the de novo synthesis of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and leu5-enkephalin (LENK) as well as downregulated expression of TH and DβH in the stomach-projecting neurons were observed. These findings enrich existing knowledge about the participation of these active substances in adaptive mechanism(s) of the sympathetic neurons during pathological processes within the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27293908

  3. Neurochemical Plasticity of the Coeliac-Superior Mesenteric Ganglion Complex Neurons Projecting to the Prepyloric Area of the Porcine Stomach following Hyperacidity

    PubMed Central

    Całka, Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to determine neurochemical properties of the coeliac-superior mesenteric ganglion (CSMG) neurons supplying the prepyloric area of the porcine stomach in physiological state and following experimentally induced hyperacidity. To localize sympathetic neurons innervating the studied area of stomach, the neuronal retrograde tracer Fast Blue (FB) was applied to control animals and hydrochloric acid infusion (HCl) groups. After 23 days, animals of the HCl group were reintroduced into a state of general anesthesia and intragastrically given 5 mL/kg of body weight of 0.25 M aqueous solution of hydrochloric acid. On the 28th day, all animals were sacrificed. The CSMG complexes were then collected and processed for double-labeling immunofluorescence. In the control animals, FB-positive perikarya displayed immunoreactivity to tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine β-hydroxylase (DβH), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and galanin (GAL). Experimentally induced gastric hyperacidity changed the neurochemical phenotype of the studied neurons. An upregulated expression of GAL and NPY and the de novo synthesis of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and leu5-enkephalin (LENK) as well as downregulated expression of TH and DβH in the stomach-projecting neurons were observed. These findings enrich existing knowledge about the participation of these active substances in adaptive mechanism(s) of the sympathetic neurons during pathological processes within the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27293908

  4. [Macrophage activation syndrome associated with adult-onset Still's disease].

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Masahiro

    2007-12-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a rare and potentially lethal disease, resulting from uncontrolled activation and proliferation of T lymphocytes and macrophages. Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is an inflammatory disease. AOSD resemble reactive MAS in its symptoms and laboratory data. Moreover, AOSD per se induces MAS. It is, therefore, quite difficult to differentiate these syndrome and disease. The immunodeficiency state induced by treatment in AOSD could reactivate latent viruses such as Epstein-Barr virus, which could potentially lead to MAS. The therapeutic agents for AOSD, such as sulfasalazine, also could provoke reactive MAS. Because multiple factors are involved in inducing MAS to a different degree, the main cause should be searched for and targeted for the therapy. PMID:18174671

  5. EULAR Sjogren's syndrome disease activity index: development of a consensus systemic disease activity index for primary Sjogren's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Seror, Raphaèle; Ravaud, Philippe; Bowman, Simon; Baron, Gabriel; Tzioufas, Athanasios; Theander, Elke; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Bootsma, Hendrika; Mariette, Xavier; Vitali, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    Objective To develop a disease activity index for patients with primary Sjögren’s syndrome (SS): the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) Sjögren’s Syndrome Disease Activity Index (ESSDAI). Methods Thirty-nine SS experts participated in an international collaboration, promoted by EULAR, to develop the ESSDAI. Experts identified 12 organ-specific “domains” contributing to disease activity. For each domain, features of disease activity were classified in 3 or 4 levels according to their severity. Data abstracted from 96 patients with systemic complications of primary SS were used to generate 702 realistic vignettes for which all possible systemic complications were represented. Using the 0–10 physician global assessment (PhGA) scale, each expert scored the disease activity of 5 patient profiles and 20 realistic vignettes. Multiple regression modelling, with PhGA used as the dependent variable, was used to estimate the weight of each domain. Results All 12 domains were significantly associated with disease activity in the multivariate model, domain weights ranged from 1 to 6. The ESSDAI scores varied from 2 to 47 and were significantly correlated with PhGA for both real patient profiles and realistic vignettes (r=0.61 and r=0.58, respectively, p<0.0001). Compared to 57 (59.4%) of the real patient profiles, 468 (66.7%) of the realistic vignettes were considered likely or very likely to be true. Conclusion The ESSDAI is a clinical index designed to measure disease activity in patients with primary SS. Once validated, such a standardized evaluation of primary SS should facilitate clinical research and should be helpful as an outcome measure in clinical trials. PMID:19561361

  6. Inflammation, immune activation, and cardiovascular disease in HIV.

    PubMed

    Nou, Eric; Lo, Janet; Grinspoon, Steven K

    2016-06-19

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in people living with HIV. Several epidemiological studies have shown an increased risk of myocardial infarction and stroke compared to uninfected controls. Although traditional risk factors contribute to this increased risk of cardiovascular disease, HIV-specific mechanisms likely also play a role. Systemic inflammation has been linked to cardiovascular disease in several populations suffering from chronic inflammation, including people living with HIV. Although antiretroviral therapy reduces immune activation, levels of inflammatory markers remain elevated compared to uninfected controls. The causes of this sustained immune response are likely multifactorial and incompletely understood. In this review, we summarize the evidence describing the relationship between inflammation and cardiovascular disease and discuss potential anti-inflammatory treatment options for cardiometabolic disease in people living with HIV. PMID:27058351

  7. Antibacterial Activity of Hawaiian Corals: Possible Protection from Disease?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gochfeld, D. J.; Aeby, G. S.; Miller, J. D.

    2006-12-01

    Reports of coral diseases in the Caribbean have appeared with increasing frequency over the past two decades; however, records of coral diseases in the Pacific have lagged far behind. Recent surveys of coral disease in the Hawaiian Islands indicate relatively low, but consistent, levels of disease throughout the inhabited Main and uninhabited Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, and demonstrate variation in levels of disease among the major genera of Hawaiian corals. Although little is known about immune defense to disease in corals, one potential mechanism of defense is the production of antimicrobial compounds that protect corals from pathogens. A preliminary survey of antibacterial chemical defenses among three dominant species of Hawaiian corals was undertaken. Crude aqueous extracts of Porites lobata, Pocillopora meandrina and Montipora capitata were tested against nine strains of bacteria in a growth inhibition assay. Inhibitory extracts were further tested to determine whether their effects were cytostatic or cytotoxic. The bacteria selected included known coral pathogens, potential marine pathogens found in human waste and strains previously identified from the surfaces of Hawaiian corals. Extracts from all three species of coral exhibited a high degree of antibacterial activity, but also a high degree of selectivity against different bacterial strains. In addition, some extracts were stimulatory to some bacteria. In addition to interspecific variability, extracts also exhibited intraspecific variability, both within and between sites. Hawaiian corals have significant antibacterial activity, which may explain the relatively low prevalence of disease in these corals; however, further characterization of pathogens specifically responsible for disease in Hawaiian corals is necessary before we can conclude that antibacterial activity protects Hawaiian corals from disease.

  8. Natural Compounds Preventing Neurodegenerative Diseases Through Autophagic Activation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhe; Adachi, Hiroaki

    2016-06-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases (NDDs) are a group of intractable diseases that significantly affect human health. To date, the pathogenesis of NDDs is still poorly understood and effective disease-modifying therapies for NDDs have not been established. NDDs share the common morphological characteristic of the deposition of abnormal proteins in the nervous system, including neurons. Autophagy is one of the major processes by which damaged organelles and abnormal proteins are removed from cells. Impairment of autophagy has been found to be involved in the pathogenesis of NDDs, and the regulation of autophagy may become a therapeutic strategy for NDDs. In recent years, some active compounds from plants have been found to regulate autophagy and exert neuroprotection against NDDs, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, spinocerebellar ataxia 3, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, via activating autophagy. In this paper, we review recent advances in the use of active ingredients from plants for the regulation of autophagy and treatment of NDDs. PMID:27302727

  9. Inflammation activation and resolution in human tendon disease

    PubMed Central

    Dakin, Stephanie G; Martinez, Fernando O; Yapp, Clarence; Wells, Graham; Oppermann, Udo; Dean, Benjamin JF; Smith, Richard DJ; Wheway, Kim; Watkins, Bridget; Roche, Lucy; Carr, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Improved understanding of the role of inflammation in tendon disease is required to facilitate therapeutic target discovery. We studied supraspinatus tendons from patients experiencing pain before and after surgical subacromial decompression treatment. Tendons were classified as having early, intermediate or advanced disease and inflammation was characterized through activation of pathways mediated by Interferon, NF-κB, glucocorticoid receptor and STAT-6. Inflammation signatures revealed expression of genes and proteins induced by Interferon and NF-κB in early stage disease and genes and proteins induced by STAT-6 and glucocorticoid receptor activation in advanced stage disease. The pro-resolving proteins FPR2/ALX and ChemR23 were increased in early stage disease compared to intermediate-advanced stage disease. Patients who were pain-free post-treatment had tendons with increased expression of CD206 and ALOX15 mRNA compared to tendons from patients who continued to experience pain post-treatment, suggesting that these genes and their pathways may moderate tendon pain. Stromal cells from diseased tendons cultured in vitro showed increased expression of NF-κB and Interferon target genes after treatment with lipopolysaccharide or IFNγ compared to stromal cells derived from healthy tendons. We identified 15-epi Lipoxin A4, a stable lipoxin metabolite derived from aspirin treatment, as potentially beneficial in the resolution of tendon inflammation. PMID:26511510

  10. How to use faecal calprotectin in management of paediatric inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Saha, Amit; Tighe, Mark P; Batra, Akshay

    2016-06-01

    Faecal calprotectin (FC) is a neutrophil-derived protein released in stool in response to mucosal inflammation. It is a simple, cheap and non-invasive test with high sensitivity and moderate specificity, which can be useful in the diagnosis and monitoring of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). FC levels correlate well with bowel inflammation (both macroscopic and histological activity) and are not influenced by disease location or type of IBD. Despite the shortcoming with regards to specificity, it is the high sensitivity of FC that makes it a valuable screening tool in the diagnosis of IBD. It is especially effective in identifying children with low probability of IBD who would not benefit from further investigations. The cut-off value selected has a significant impact on the diagnostic accuracy of the test, influencing its sensitivity and specificity, and must be interpreted judiciously. Its role in disease monitoring is as an add-on test to Paediatric Ulcerative Colitis Activity Index and Paediatric Crohn's Disease Activity Index scores and can be used to differentiate disease relapse from functional symptoms. High levels of FC are also seen in a number of other conditions, such as gastrointestinal infections and coeliac disease. It is recommended that infective causes affecting the gut must be excluded first, before FC is measured. PMID:26848103

  11. Linking estrogen receptor β expression with inflammatory bowel disease activity

    PubMed Central

    Pierdominici, Marina; Maselli, Angela; Varano, Barbara; Barbati, Cristiana; Cesaro, Paola; Spada, Cristiano; Zullo, Angelo; Lorenzetti, Roberto; Rosati, Marco; Rainaldi, Gabriella; Limiti, Maria Rosaria; Guidi, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Crohn disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) whose pathogenesis is only poorly understood. Estrogens have a complex role in inflammation and growing evidence suggests that these hormones may impact IBD pathogenesis. Here, we demonstrated a significant reduction (p < 0.05) of estrogen receptor (ER)β expression in peripheral blood T lymphocytes from CD/UC patients with active disease (n = 27) as compared to those in remission (n = 21) and healthy controls (n = 29). Accordingly, in a subgroup of CD/UC patients undergoing to anti-TNF-α therapy and responsive to treatment, ERβ expression was higher (p < 0.01) than that observed in not responsive patients and comparable to that of control subjects. Notably, ERβ expression was markedly decreased in colonic mucosa of CD/UC patients with active disease, reflecting the alterations observed in peripheral blood T cells. ERβ expression inversely correlated with interleukin (IL)-6 serum levels and exogenous exposure of both T lymphocytes and intestinal epithelial cells to this cytokine resulted in ERβ downregulation. These results demonstrate that the ER profile is altered in active IBD patients at both mucosal and systemic levels, at least in part due to IL-6 dysregulation, and highlight the potential exploitation of T cell-associated ERβ as a biomarker of endoscopic disease activity. PMID:26497217

  12. Inhibiting caspase-6 activation and catalytic activity for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Flygare, John A; Arkin, Michelle R

    2014-01-01

    Partnerships between industry and academia are becoming increasingly complex and relevant in the drive to discover innovative new medicines. We describe the structure of the collaboration between the University of California - San Francisco - Small Molecule Discovery Center (UCSF-SMDC) and Genentech to develop chemical matter that inhibits the activity of caspase-6. We focus on the scientific basis for the partnership and how the orientation- and transaction-related barriers were overcome. We describe the division of labor that allowed two groups to operate as a unified team to generate multiple chemical series with distinct mechanisms of action. The successful structure of the agreement serves as a model for future collaborations at both institutions. PMID:24283214

  13. Multiple variations of the coeliac axis, hepatic and renal vasculature as incidental findings illustrated by MDCTA.

    PubMed

    Rafailidis, Vasileios; Papadopoulos, Georgios; Kouskouras, Konstantinos; Chryssogonidis, Ioannis; Velnidou, Anastasia; Kalogera-Fountzila, Anna

    2016-08-01

    Vascular anatomical variations are not uncommon and may affect any organ's arterial or venous vasculature. The coexistence of variations in different organic systems is less commonly found, but of great clinical significance in a series of clinical conditions like organ transplantation and surgical preoperative planning. Multidetector computed tomography angiography (MDCTA) has emerged as a valuable alternative to the conventional angiography for accurate evaluation of vascular anatomy and pathology. Radiologists should be familiar with each organ's vascular variations and always report them to the clinician, even if they represent an incidental finding. This case report presents a 52-year-old female patient undergoing abdominal MDCTA for characterization of a renal lesion. This examination revealed the presence of three hilar arteries on the left kidney, a main renal vein in combination with an additional renal vein in both sides along with a replaced right hepatic artery originating from the superior mesenteric artery. Moreover, both inferior phrenic arteries were found originating from the coeliac axis. 3D volume rendering technique images were used in the evaluation of vascular anatomy as illustrated in this case report. PMID:26627693

  14. Perivascular fat, AMP-activated protein kinase and vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Almabrouk, T A M; Ewart, M A; Salt, I P; Kennedy, S

    2014-01-01

    Perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) is an active endocrine and paracrine organ that modulates vascular function, with implications for the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Adipocytes and stromal cells contained within PVAT produce mediators (adipokines, cytokines, reactive oxygen species and gaseous compounds) with a range of paracrine effects modulating vascular smooth muscle cell contraction, proliferation and migration. However, the modulatory effect of PVAT on the vascular system in diseases, such as obesity, hypertension and atherosclerosis, remains poorly characterized. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates adipocyte metabolism, adipose biology and vascular function, and hence may be a potential therapeutic target for metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and the vascular complications associated with obesity and T2DM. The role of AMPK in PVAT or the actions of PVAT have yet to be established, however. Activation of AMPK by pharmacological agents, such as metformin and thiazolidinediones, may modulate the activity of PVAT surrounding blood vessels and thereby contribute to their beneficial effect in cardiometabolic diseases. This review will provide a current perspective on how PVAT may influence vascular function via AMPK. We will also attempt to demonstrate how modulating AMPK activity using pharmacological agents could be exploited therapeutically to treat cardiometabolic diseases. PMID:24490856

  15. A Bioassay for Lafora Disease and Laforin Glucan Phosphatase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Amanda R.; Johnson, Mary Beth; Delgado-Escueta, Antonio V.; Gentry, Matthew S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Lafora disease is a rare yet invariably fatal form of progressive neurodegenerative epilepsy resulting from mutations in the phosphatase laforin. Several therapeutic options for Lafora disease patients are currently being explored, and these therapies would benefit from a biochemical means of assessing functional laforin activity following treatment. To date, only clinical outcomes such as decreases in seizure frequency and severity have been used to indicate success of epilepsy treatment. However, these qualitative measures exhibit variability and must be assessed over long periods of time. In this work, we detail a simple and sensitive bioassay that can be used for the detection of functional endogenous laforin from human and mouse tissue. Design and methods We generated antibodies capable of detecting and immunoprecipitating endogenous laforin. Following laforin immunoprecipitation, laforin activity was assessed via phosphatase assays using para-nitrophenylphosphate (pNPP) and a malachite green-based assay specific for glucan phosphatase activity. Results We found that antibody binding to laforin does not impede laforin activity. Furthermore, the malachite green-based glucan phosphatase assay used in conjunction with a rabbit polyclonal laforin antibody was capable of detecting endogenous laforin activity from human and mouse tissue. Importantly, this assay discriminated between laforin activity and other phosphatases. Conclusions The bioassay that we have developed utilizing laforin antibodies and an assay specific for glucan phosphatase activity could prove valuable in the rapid detection of functional laforin in patients to which novel Lafora disease therapies have been administered. PMID:24012855

  16. Glucocerebrosidase enzyme activity in GBA mutation Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Roberto A; Torres, Paola A; Swan, Matthew; Nichols, William; Boschung, Sarah; Raymond, Deborah; Barrett, Matthew J; Johannes, Brooke A; Severt, Lawrence; Shanker, Vicki; Hunt, Ann L; Bressman, Susan; Pastores, Gregory M; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel

    2016-06-01

    Mutations in the glucocerebrosidase (GBA1) gene, the most common genetic contributor to Parkinson's disease (PD), are associated with an increased risk of PD in heterozygous and homozygous carriers. While glucocerebrosidase enzyme (GCase) activity is consistently low in Gaucher disease, there is a range of leukocyte GCase activity in healthy heterozygous GBA1 mutation carriers. To determine whether GCase activity may be a marker for PD with heterozygous GBA1 mutations (GBA1 mutation PD, GBA PD), GBA PD patients (n=15) were compared to PD patients without heterozygous GBA1 mutations (idiopathic PD; n=8), heterozygous GBA1 carriers without PD (asymptomatic carriers; n=4), and biallelic mutation carriers with PD (Gaucher disease with PD, GD1 PD; n=3) in a pilot study. GCase activity (nmol/mg protein/hour) in GD1 PD (median [interquartile range]; minimum-maximum: 6.4 [5.7]; 5.3-11) was lower than that of GBA PD (16.0 [7.0]; 11-40) (p=0.01), while GCase activity in GBA PD was lower than idiopathic PD (28.5 [15.0]; 16-56) (p=0.01) and asymptomatic carriers (25.5 [2.5]; 23-27) (p=0.04). Therefore, GCase activity appears to be a possible marker of heterozygous GBA1 mutation PD, and larger studies are warranted. Prospective studies are also necessary to determine whether lower GCase activity precedes development of PD. PMID:26857292

  17. Cardiac parasympathetic activity in severe uncomplicated coronary artery disease.

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, J.; Flapan, A. D.; Reid, J.; Neilson, J. M.; Bloomfield, P.; Ewing, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Previous studies have suggested that coronary artery disease is independently associated with reduced cardiac parasympathetic activity, and that this is important in its pathophysiology. These studies included many patients with complications that might be responsible for the reported autonomic abnormalities. OBJECTIVE--To measure cardiac parasympathetic activity in patients with uncomplicated coronary artery disease. PATIENTS AND METHODS--44 patients of mean (SD) age 56 (8) with severe uncomplicated coronary artery disease (symptoms uncontrolled on maximal medical treatment; > 70% coronary stenosis at angiography; normal ejection fraction; no evidence of previous infarction, diabetes, or hypertension). Heart rate variability was measured from 24 hour ambulatory electrocardiograms by counting the number of times successive RR intervals exceeded the preceding RR interval by > 50 ms, a previously validated sensitive and specific index of cardiac parasympathetic activity. RESULTS--Mean (range) of counts were: waking 112 (range 6-501)/h, sleeping 198 (0-812)/h, and total 3912 (151-14 454)/24 h. These mean results were unremarkable, and < 10% of patients fell below the lower 95% confidence interval for waking, sleeping, or total 24 hour counts in normal people. There was no relation between the severity of coronary artery disease or the use of concurrent antianginal drug treatment and cardiac parasympathetic activity. CONCLUSION--In contrast with previous reports no evidence of a specific independent association between coronary artery disease and reduced cardiac parasympathetic activity was found. The results of previous studies may reflect the inclusion of patients with complications and not the direct effect of coronary artery disease itself. PMID:7913823

  18. New advances on glial activation in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kim Mai; MacLean, Andrew G

    2015-01-01

    In addition to being the support cells of the central nervous system (CNS), astrocytes are now recognized as active players in the regulation of synaptic function, neural repair, and CNS immunity. Astrocytes are among the most structurally complex cells in the brain, and activation of these cells has been shown in a wide spectrum of CNS injuries and diseases. Over the past decade, research has begun to elucidate the role of astrocyte activation and changes in astrocyte morphology in the progression of neural pathologies, which has led to glial-specific interventions for drug development. Future therapies for CNS infection, injury, and neurodegenerative disease are now aimed at targeting astrocyte responses to such insults including astrocyte activation, astrogliosis and other morphological changes, and innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:25964871

  19. Usefulness of Endoscopic Indices in Determination of Disease Activity in Patients with Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kucharski, Marcin; Karczewski, Jacek; Mańkowska-Wierzbicka, Dorota; Karmelita-Katulska, Katarzyna; Kaczmarek, Elżbieta; Iwanik, Katarzyna; Rzymski, Piotr; Grzymisławski, Marian; Linke, Krzysztof; Dobrowolska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Background. Assessment of endoscopic activity of Crohn's disease (CD) is of growing importance both in clinical practice and in clinical trials. The study aimed to assess which of the endoscopic indices used for evaluation of mucosal changes correlates with the currently used clinical indices for determination of disease activity and with the results of histopathological examination. Study. A group of 71 patients with CD and 52 individuals without a diagnosis of GI tract disease as a control group were investigated, considering clinical and histological severity of the disease and the severity of inflammatory changes in the bowel. Evaluation was conducted with the use of clinical, endoscopic, and histopathological indices. Endoscopic indices were then correlated with different clinical and histopathological indices with the aim of finding the strongest correlations. Results and Conclusions. Correlation between the clinical disease activity and the severity of endoscopic lesions in CD was shown in this study to be poor. The results also indicate that the optimal endoscopic index used in the diagnostic stage and in the assessment of treatment effects in CD is Simple Endoscopic Score for Crohn's Disease (SES-CD). PMID:26997952

  20. Nutrition and Physical Activity in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Claudia P.; de Lima Sanches, Priscila; de Abreu-Silva, Erlon Oliveira; Marcadenti, Aline

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease worldwide and it is associated with other medical conditions such as diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, and obesity. The mechanisms of the underlying disease development and progression are not completely established and there is no consensus concerning the pharmacological treatment. In the gold standard treatment for NAFLD weight loss, dietary therapy, and physical activity are included. However, little scientific evidence is available on diet and/or physical activity and NAFLD specifically. Many dietary approaches such as Mediterranean and DASH diet are used for treatment of other cardiometabolic risk factors such as insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), but on the basis of its components their role in NAFLD has been discussed. In this review, the implications of current dietary and exercise approaches, including Brazilian and other guidelines, are discussed, with a focus on determining the optimal nonpharmacological treatment to prescribe for NAFLD. PMID:26770987

  1. Nutrition and Physical Activity in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Claudia P; de Lima Sanches, Priscila; de Abreu-Silva, Erlon Oliveira; Marcadenti, Aline

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease worldwide and it is associated with other medical conditions such as diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, and obesity. The mechanisms of the underlying disease development and progression are not completely established and there is no consensus concerning the pharmacological treatment. In the gold standard treatment for NAFLD weight loss, dietary therapy, and physical activity are included. However, little scientific evidence is available on diet and/or physical activity and NAFLD specifically. Many dietary approaches such as Mediterranean and DASH diet are used for treatment of other cardiometabolic risk factors such as insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), but on the basis of its components their role in NAFLD has been discussed. In this review, the implications of current dietary and exercise approaches, including Brazilian and other guidelines, are discussed, with a focus on determining the optimal nonpharmacological treatment to prescribe for NAFLD. PMID:26770987

  2. Human ZMPSTE24 disease mutations: residual proteolytic activity correlates with disease severity

    PubMed Central

    Barrowman, Jemima; Wiley, Patricia A.; Hudon-Miller, Sarah E.; Hrycyna, Christine A.; Michaelis, Susan

    2012-01-01

    The zinc metalloprotease ZMPSTE24 plays a critical role in nuclear lamin biology by cleaving the prenylated and carboxylmethylated 15-amino acid tail from the C-terminus of prelamin A to yield mature lamin A. A defect in this proteolytic event, caused by a mutation in the lamin A gene (LMNA) that eliminates the ZMPSTE24 cleavage site, underlies the premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS). Likewise, mutations in the ZMPSTE24 gene that result in decreased enzyme function cause a spectrum of diseases that share certain features of premature aging. Twenty human ZMPSTE24 alleles have been identified that are associated with three disease categories of increasing severity: mandibuloacral dysplasia type B (MAD-B), severe progeria (atypical ‘HGPS’) and restrictive dermopathy (RD). To determine whether a correlation exists between decreasing ZMPSTE24 protease activity and increasing disease severity, we expressed mutant alleles of ZMPSTE24 in yeast and optimized in vivo yeast mating assays to directly compare the activity of alleles associated with each disease category. We also measured the activity of yeast crude membranes containing the ZMPSTE24 mutant proteins in vitro. We determined that, in general, the residual activity of ZMPSTE24 patient alleles correlates with disease severity. Complete loss-of-function alleles are associated with RD, whereas retention of partial, measureable activity results in MAD-B or severe progeria. Importantly, our assays can discriminate small differences in activity among the mutants, confirming that the methods presented here will be useful for characterizing any new ZMPSTE24 mutations that are discovered. PMID:22718200

  3. Active immunotherapy options for Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia and a major contributor to disability and dependency among older people. AD pathogenesis is associated with the accumulation of amyloid-beta protein (Aβ) and/or hyperphosphorylated tau protein in the brain. At present, current therapies provide temporary symptomatic benefit, but do not treat the underlying disease. Recent research has thus focused on investigating the molecular and cellular pathways and processes involved in AD pathogenesis to support the development of effective disease-modifying agents. In accordance with the existing Aβ-cascade hypothesis for AD pathogenesis, immunotherapy has been the most extensively studied approach in Aβ-targeted therapy. Both passive and active immunotherapies have been shown to effectively reduce Aβ accumulation and prevent downstream pathology in preclinical models. Following AN1792, second-generation active immunotherapies have shown promising results in terms of antibody response and safety. Comparatively, tau immunotherapy is not as advanced, but preclinical data support its development into clinical trials. Results from active amyloid-based immunotherapy studies in preclinical models indicate that intervention appears to be more effective in early stages of amyloid accumulation, highlighting the importance of diagnosing AD as early as possible and undertaking clinical trials at this stage. This strategy, combined with improving our understanding of the complex AD pathogenesis, is imperative to the successful development of these disease-modifying agents. This paper will review the active immunotherapies currently in development, including the benefits and challenges associated with this approach. PMID:24476230

  4. Diet and Physical Activity for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention.

    PubMed

    Lanier, Jeffrey B; Bury, David C; Richardson, Sean W

    2016-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States. One-third of these deaths may be preventable through healthy lifestyle choices including diet and physical activity. The Mediterranean diet is associated with reduced cardiovascular mortality, whereas the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) eating plan is associated with a reduced risk of coronary artery disease. Substituting dietary saturated fat with polyunsaturated fatty acids is associated with improved cardiovascular outcomes, although exogenous supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids does not improve cardiovascular outcomes. There is an association between increased sodium intake and cardiovascular risk, but reducing dietary sodium has not consistently shown a reduction in cardiovascular risk. Physical activity recommendations for adults are at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity per week, 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity per week, or an equivalent combination. Increases in physical activity by any level are associated with reduced cardiovascular risk. Introducing muscle-strengthening activities at least twice per week in previously inactive adults is associated with improved cardiovascular outcomes. Inactive adults without known CVD can gradually increase activity to a moderate-intensity level without consulting a physician. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends behavioral counseling to promote healthy diet and physical activity in adults at high risk of CVD. Evidence of benefit for counseling patients at average risk is less established. PMID:27281836

  5. Distinct features of circulating microparticles and their relationship with disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Voudoukis, Evangelos; Vetsika, Eleni-Kyriaki; Giannakopoulou, Konstantina; Karmiris, Konstantinos; Theodoropoulou, Angeliki; Sfiridaki, Aekaterini; Georgoulias, Vassilis; Paspatis, Gregorios A.; Koutroubakis, Ioannis E.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is evidence that circulating microparticles (MPs) and annexin (+) platelet-derived MPs (PDMPs) are increased in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aim of our study was to characterize the abundance, origin, and annexin V binding of MPs in patients with IBD and correlate them with the disease characteristics. Methods Case-control study of 46 IBD patients (23 Crohn’s disease, 23 ulcerative colitis) and 40 matched healthy controls (HC). MPs were divided according to annexin V binding, their origin was estimated based on specific cell membrane markers in plasma samples and their number was calculated via flow cytometry. Clinical and laboratory activity indices were also analyzed. Results Annexin (-) PDMPs (P=0.0004), total (P=0.04) and annexin (+) monocyte-derived MPs (P=0.02) were increased and annexin (-) total MPs (P=0.0007) were decreased in IBD patients compared to HC. The annexin (+)/(-) ratio of all MP types were significantly elevated in IBD patients compared to HC (P<0.003). IBD patients with active disease displayed elevated total and annexin (+) total MPs, total, annexin (+) and (-) PDMPs compared with those in remission (P<0.05). Annexin (-) PDMPs were considerably increased in IBD patients with active compared to those with inactive disease (P=0.0013). Total and annexin (-) PDMPs were significantly correlated with most of the disease activity indices (P<0.05). Conclusion The majority of circulating MPs, their counterparts and particularly annexin (-) PDMPs are increased in active IBD patients. Annexin (+)/(-) ratio proved to be the most reliable distinctive MP index between HC and IBD patients. PMID:27065731

  6. Platelet activity in the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunqiu; Li, Yongyu; Yu, Zhen; Liu, Zhanju; Shi, Yanhong; Lewandowska, Urszula; Sobczak, Marta; Fichna, Jakub; Kreis, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Platelets play a crucial role in immune responses. Impaired platelet activation may cause persistent mucosal inflammation through P-selectin, CD40-CD40L and other systems influencing granulocytes, macrophages or endothelial cells. Pharmacological regulation of platelet activation may reduce thromboembolism and limit the interaction of platelets with endothelial and inflammatory cells, in turn weakening the inflammatory responses. In this review we focus on pathophysiological activities of platelets in inflammatory bowel diseases and discuss the studies on currently available anti-platelet therapies in the treatment of gastrointestinal inflammation. Finally, we provide a prospective view to new anti-platelet agents currently under development. PMID:25585124

  7. Active immunization therapies for Parkinson's disease and multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Schneeberger, Achim; Tierney, Lanay; Mandler, Markus

    2016-02-01

    Vaccination is increasingly being investigated as a potential treatment for synucleinopathies, a group of neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy, and dementia with Lewy bodies associated with α-synuclein pathology. All lack a causal therapy. Development of novel, disease-altering treatment strategies is urgently needed. Vaccination has positioned itself as a prime strategy for addressing these diseases because it is broadly applicable, requires infrequent administration, and maintains low production costs for treating a large population or as a preventive measure. Current evidence points to a causal role of misfolded α-synuclein in the development and progression of synucleinopathies. In the past decade, significant progress in active immunization against α-synuclein has been shown both in preclinical animal models and in early clinical development. In this review, we describe the state-of-the-art in active immunization approaches to synucleinopathies, with a focus on advances in Parkinson's disease (PD) and multiple-system atrophy (MSA). We first review preclinical animal models, highlighting their progress in translation to the clinical setting. We then discuss current clinical applications, stressing different approaches taken to address α-synuclein pathology. Finally, we address challenges, trends, and future perspectives of current vaccination programs. PMID:26260853

  8. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia: a disease of activated monoclonal B cells

    PubMed Central

    Damle, Rajendra N.; Calissano, Carlo; Chiorazzi, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    B-cell type chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has long been considered a disease of resting lymphocytes. However cell surface and intracellular phenotypes suggest that most CLL cells are activated cells, although only a small subset progresses beyond the G1 stage of the cell cycle. In addition, traditional teaching says that CLL cells divide rarely, and therefore the buildup of leukemic cells is due to an inherent defect in cell death. However, in vivo labeling of CLL cells indicates a much more active rate of cell birth than originally estimated, suggesting that CLL is a dynamic disease. Here we review the observations that have led to these altered views of the activation state and proliferative capacities of CLL cells and also provide our interpretation of these observations in light of their potential impact on patients. PMID:20620969

  9. Diversity and Activity of Lysobacter Species from Disease Suppressive Soils

    PubMed Central

    Gómez Expósito, Ruth; Postma, Joeke; Raaijmakers, Jos M.; De Bruijn, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The genus Lysobacter includes several species that produce a range of extracellular enzymes and other metabolites with activity against bacteria, fungi, oomycetes, and nematodes. Lysobacter species were found to be more abundant in soil suppressive against the fungal root pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, but their actual role in disease suppression is still unclear. Here, the antifungal and plant growth-promoting activities of 18 Lysobacter strains, including 11 strains from Rhizoctonia-suppressive soils, were studied both in vitro and in vivo. Based on 16S rRNA sequencing, the Lysobacter strains from the Rhizoctonia-suppressive soil belonged to the four species Lysobacter antibioticus, Lysobacter capsici, Lysobacter enzymogenes, and Lysobacter gummosus. Most strains showed strong in vitro activity against R. solani and several other pathogens, including Pythium ultimum, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporum, and Xanthomonas campestris. When the Lysobacter strains were introduced into soil, however, no significant and consistent suppression of R. solani damping-off disease of sugar beet and cauliflower was observed. Subsequent bioassays further revealed that none of the Lysobacter strains was able to promote growth of sugar beet, cauliflower, onion, and Arabidopsis thaliana, either directly or via volatile compounds. The lack of in vivo activity is most likely attributed to poor colonization of the rhizosphere by the introduced Lysobacter strains. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that Lysobacter species have strong antagonistic activities against a range of pathogens, making them an important source for putative new enzymes and antimicrobial compounds. However, their potential role in R. solani disease suppressive soil could not be confirmed. In-depth omics'–based analyses will be needed to shed more light on the potential contribution of Lysobacter species to the collective activities of microbial consortia in disease suppressive soils. PMID:26635735

  10. Diversity and Activity of Lysobacter Species from Disease Suppressive Soils.

    PubMed

    Gómez Expósito, Ruth; Postma, Joeke; Raaijmakers, Jos M; De Bruijn, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The genus Lysobacter includes several species that produce a range of extracellular enzymes and other metabolites with activity against bacteria, fungi, oomycetes, and nematodes. Lysobacter species were found to be more abundant in soil suppressive against the fungal root pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, but their actual role in disease suppression is still unclear. Here, the antifungal and plant growth-promoting activities of 18 Lysobacter strains, including 11 strains from Rhizoctonia-suppressive soils, were studied both in vitro and in vivo. Based on 16S rRNA sequencing, the Lysobacter strains from the Rhizoctonia-suppressive soil belonged to the four species Lysobacter antibioticus, Lysobacter capsici, Lysobacter enzymogenes, and Lysobacter gummosus. Most strains showed strong in vitro activity against R. solani and several other pathogens, including Pythium ultimum, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporum, and Xanthomonas campestris. When the Lysobacter strains were introduced into soil, however, no significant and consistent suppression of R. solani damping-off disease of sugar beet and cauliflower was observed. Subsequent bioassays further revealed that none of the Lysobacter strains was able to promote growth of sugar beet, cauliflower, onion, and Arabidopsis thaliana, either directly or via volatile compounds. The lack of in vivo activity is most likely attributed to poor colonization of the rhizosphere by the introduced Lysobacter strains. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that Lysobacter species have strong antagonistic activities against a range of pathogens, making them an important source for putative new enzymes and antimicrobial compounds. However, their potential role in R. solani disease suppressive soil could not be confirmed. In-depth omics'-based analyses will be needed to shed more light on the potential contribution of Lysobacter species to the collective activities of microbial consortia in disease suppressive soils. PMID:26635735

  11. Measurement of Fractional Exhaled Nitric Oxide as a Marker of Disease Activity in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ikonomi, Erkanda; Rothstein, Robin D.; Ehrlich, Adam C.; Friedenberg, Frank K.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Definitive diagnosis of IBD requires endoscopic and pathologic confirmation. These tools are also used to classify disease activity. Our aim was to determine if the fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) could be utilized to screen for IBD and assess for disease activity. Methods We matched weighted IBD cases and controls from the 2009–2010 NHANES dataset. All subjects underwent measurement of FeNO using standardized techniques. We assessed for potential confounders for FeNO measurement including age, height, and asthma. For IBD subjects, we used the presence of diarrhea, fatigue, and weight loss as a proxy for IBD activity. Laboratory parameters examined to estimate disease activity included anemia (≤ 10 g/dl), iron deficiency (ferritin ≤ 20 ng/ml), hypoalbuminemia (≤ 3.2 g/dl), and CRP (≥ 1.1 mg/dl). Results The weighted sample represented 199,414,901 subjects. The weighted prevalence of IBD was 2,084,895 (1.0%). IBD subjects had nearly the same FeNO level as those without IBD (17.0 ± 16.2 vs. 16.7 ± 14.5 ppb). The odds of a FeNO > 25 ppb was half (OR=0.501; 95% CI 0.497–0.504) for subjects with IBD compared to those without IBD after controlling for confounders. The AUROC curve for FeNO was 0.47 (0.35–0.59). FeNO levels were not higher in patients with laboratory values suggestive of active disease. FeNO levels were higher in IBD patients with diarrhea, rectal urgency, and fatigue but were lower in those with unintentional weight loss. Conclusion Measurement of FeNO does not appear to be useful to screen for IBD or assess disease activity. PMID:27398403

  12. Elevation of Serum Acid Sphingomyelinase Activity in Acute Kawasaki Disease.

    PubMed

    Konno, Yuuki; Takahashi, Ikuko; Narita, Ayuko; Takeda, Osamu; Koizumi, Hiromi; Tamura, Masamichi; Kikuchi, Wataru; Komatsu, Akira; Tamura, Hiroaki; Tsuchida, Satoko; Noguchi, Atsuko; Takahashi, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute systemic vasculitis that affects both small and medium-sized vessels including the coronary arteries in infants and children. Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) is a lysosomal glycoprotein that hydrolyzes sphingomyelin to ceramide, a lipid, that functions as a second messenger in the regulation of cell functions. ASM activation has been implicated in numerous cellular stress responses and is associated with cellular ASM secretion, either through alternative trafficking of the ASM precursor protein or by means of an unidentified mechanism. Elevation of serum ASM activity has been described in several human diseases, suggesting that patients with diseases involving vascular endothelial cells may exhibit a preferential elevation of serum ASM activity. As acute KD is characterized by systemic vasculitis that could affect vascular endothelial cells, the elevation of serum ASM activity should be considered in these patients. In the present study, serum ASM activity in the sera of 15 patients with acute KD was determined both before and after treatment with infusion of high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), a first-line treatment for acute KD. Serum ASM activity before IVIG was significantly elevated in KD patients when compared to the control group (3.85 ± 1.46 nmol/0.1 ml/6 h vs. 1.15 ± 0.10 nmol/0.1 ml/6 h, p < 0.001), suggesting that ASM activation may be involved in the pathophysiology of this condition. Serum ASM activity before IVIG was significantly correlated with levels of C-reactive protein (p < 0.05). These results suggest the involvement of sphingolipid metabolism in the pathophysiology of KD. PMID:26447086

  13. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting of coeliac artery stenosis in the treatment of mesenteric angina: a case report and review of therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, A; Teo, N B; Pickford, I R; Moss, J G

    2000-12-01

    We report the case of a 72-year-old gentleman with mesenteric angina who was successfully treated with stenting of a coeliac artery stenosis using a Palmaz stent, and review the therapeutic options in the management of mesenteric angina. PMID:11153434

  14. Synchronizing activity of basal ganglia and pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Heimer, G; Rivlin, M; Israel, Z; Bergman, H

    2006-01-01

    Early physiological studies emphasized changes in the discharge rate of basal ganglia in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD), whereas recent studies stressed the role of the abnormal oscillatory activity and neuronal synchronization of pallidal cells. However, human observations cast doubt on the synchronization hypothesis since increased synchronization may be an epi-phenomenon of the tremor or of independent oscillators with similar frequency. Here, we show that modern actor/ critic models of the basal ganglia predict the emergence of synchronized activity in PD and that significant non-oscillatory and oscillatory correlations are found in MPTP primates. We conclude that the normal fluctuation of basal ganglia dopamine levels combined with local cortico-striatal learning rules lead to noncorrelated activity in the pallidum. Dopamine depletion, as in PD, results in correlated pallidal activity, and reduced information capacity. We therefore suggest that future deep brain stimulation (DBS) algorithms may be improved by desynchronizing pallidal activity. PMID:17017503

  15. P21-activated kinase in inflammatory and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Taglieri, Domenico M.; Ushio-Fukai, Masuko; Monasky, Michelle M.

    2014-01-01

    P-21 activated kinases, or PAKs, are serine–threonine kinases that serve a role in diverse biological functions and organ system diseases. Although PAK signaling has been the focus of many investigations, still our understanding of the role of PAK in inflammation is incomplete. This review consolidates what is known about PAK1 across several cell types, highlighting the role of PAK1 and PAK2 in inflammation in relation to NADPH oxidase activation. This review explores the physiological functions of PAK during inflammation, the role of PAK in several organ diseases with an emphasis on cardiovascular disease, and the PAK signaling pathway, including activators and targets of PAK. Also, we discuss PAK1 as a pharmacological anti-inflammatory target, explore the potentials and the limitations of the current pharmacological tools to regulate PAK1 activity during inflammation, and provide indications for future research. We conclude that a vast amount of evidence supports the idea that PAK is a central molecule in inflammatory signaling, thus making PAK1 itself a promising prospective pharmacological target. PMID:24794532

  16. Glycosphingolipid synthesis inhibition limits osteoclast activation and myeloma bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Ersek, Adel; Xu, Ke; Antonopoulos, Aristotelis; Butters, Terry D.; Santo, Ana Espirito; Vattakuzhi, Youridies; Williams, Lynn M.; Goudevenou, Katerina; Danks, Lynett; Freidin, Andrew; Spanoudakis, Emmanouil; Parry, Simon; Papaioannou, Maria; Hatjiharissi, Evdoxia; Chaidos, Aristeidis; Alonzi, Dominic S.; Twigg, Gabriele; Hu, Ming; Dwek, Raymond A.; Haslam, Stuart M.; Roberts, Irene; Dell, Anne; Rahemtulla, Amin; Horwood, Nicole J.; Karadimitris, Anastasios

    2015-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are essential constituents of cell membranes and lipid rafts and can modulate signal transduction events. The contribution of GSLs in osteoclast (OC) activation and osteolytic bone diseases in malignancies such as the plasma cell dyscrasia multiple myeloma (MM) is not known. Here, we tested the hypothesis that pathological activation of OCs in MM requires de novo GSL synthesis and is further enhanced by myeloma cell–derived GSLs. Glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) inhibitors, including the clinically approved agent N-butyl-deoxynojirimycin (NB-DNJ), prevented OC development and activation by disrupting RANKL-induced localization of TRAF6 and c-SRC into lipid rafts and preventing nuclear accumulation of transcriptional activator NFATc1. GM3 was the prevailing GSL produced by patient-derived myeloma cells and MM cell lines, and exogenous addition of GM3 synergistically enhanced the ability of the pro-osteoclastogenic factors RANKL and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) to induce osteoclastogenesis in precursors. In WT mice, administration of GM3 increased OC numbers and activity, an effect that was reversed by treatment with NB-DNJ. In a murine MM model, treatment with NB-DNJ markedly improved osteolytic bone disease symptoms. Together, these data demonstrate that both tumor-derived and de novo synthesized GSLs influence osteoclastogenesis and suggest that NB-DNJ may reduce pathological OC activation and bone destruction associated with MM. PMID:25915583

  17. Urinary glucaric acid excretion in rheumatoid arthritis: influence of disease activity and disease modifying drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Addyman, R; Beyeler, C; Astbury, C; Bird, H A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine if a correlation exists between cytochrome P-450 enzyme induction and disease activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), measuring urinary excretion of D-glucaric acid (GA) as an index of phase II drug metabolism. METHODS: Patients with RA were treated with sulphasalazine, sodium aurothiomalate, or D-penicillamine in standard dose regimens, for 24 weeks. Patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) or non-inflammatory arthritis (NIA) acted as controls. The urinary GA:creatinine ratio was measured at 0, 12, and 24 weeks of treatment. RESULTS: Patients with RA had a slightly greater urinary GA:creatinine ratio than patients with AS or NIA at baseline; this increased during treatment with disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Sulphasalazine treatment had a greater effect on GA excretion than sodium aurothiomalate or D-penicillamine; this difference was statistically significant between weeks 0 and 12 (p = 0.01). Gamma glutamyltranspeptidase concentration showed a weak correlation with GA excretion between weeks 0 and 12 (p = 0.03), but all other measurements of changes in disease activity (plasma viscosity, C reactive protein, platelets, and articular index) were found not to correlate with GA excretion between weeks 0-12 or 0-24. CONCLUSION: The increased excretion of GA in patients with RA receiving DMARD treatment is probably the result of an indirect effect on hepatic metabolism bearing no relationship to disease activity. PMID:8774168

  18. Drug−disease interaction: Crohn's disease elevates verapamil plasma concentrations but reduces response to the drug proportional to disease activity

    PubMed Central

    Sanaee, Forough; Clements, John D; Waugh, Alistair W G; Fedorak, Richard N; Lewanczuk, Richard; Jamali, Fakhreddin

    2011-01-01

    AIM Inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases that includes reduced response to pharmacotherapy due to altered pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. It is not known if these effects exist in general in all inflammatory conditions. It also remains unknown whether in a given population the effect is a function of disease severity. We investigated whether pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a typical calcium channel inhibitor are influenced by Crohn's disease (CD), a disease for which the disease severity can be readily ranked. METHODS We administered 80 mg verapamil orally to (i) healthy control subjects (n = 9), (ii) patients with clinically quiescent CD (n = 22) and (iii) patients with clinically active CD (n = 14). Serial analysis of verapamil enantiomers (total and plasma unbound), blood pressure and electrocardiograms were recorded over 8 h post dose. The severity of CD was measured using the Harvey-Bradshaw Index. RESULTS CD substantially and significantly increased plasma verapamil concentration and in a stereoselective fashion (S, 9-fold; R, 2-fold). The elevated verapamil concentration, however, failed to result in an increased verapamil pharmacodynamic effect so that the patients with elevated verapamil concentration demonstrated no significant increase in response measured as PR interval and blood pressure. Instead, the greater the disease severity, the lower was the drug potency to prolong PR interval (r = 0.86, P < 0.0006), CONCLUSIONS CD patients with severe disease may not respond to cardiovascular therapy with calcium channel blockers. Reducing the severity increases response despite reduced drug concentration. This observation may have therapeutic implication beyond the disease and the drug studies herein. PMID:21592185

  19. Neural activities during affective processing in people with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tatia M C; Sun, Delin; Leung, Mei-Kei; Chu, Leung-Wing; Keysers, Christian

    2013-03-01

    This study examined brain activities in people with Alzheimer's disease when viewing happy, sad, and fearful facial expressions of others. A functional magnetic resonance imaging and a voxel-based morphometry methodology together with a passive viewing of emotional faces paradigm were employed to compare the affective processing in 12 people with mild Alzheimer's disease and 12 matched controls. The main finding was that the clinical participants showed reduced activations in regions associated with the motor simulation system (the ventral premotor cortex) and in regions associated with emotional simulation-empathy (the anterior insula and adjacent frontal operculum). This regional decline in blood oxygen level-dependent signals appeared to be lateralized in the left hemisphere and was not related to any structural degeneration in the clinical participants. Furthermore, the regions that showed changes in neural activity differed for the 3 emotional facial expressions studied. Findings of our study indicate that neural changes in regions associated with the motor and emotional simulation systems might play an important role in the development of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:22840336

  20. [Physical activity in basic and primary prevention of cardiovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Sobieszczańska, Małgorzata; Kałka, Dariusz; Pilecki, Witold; Adamus, Jerzy

    2009-06-01

    On account of the frequency of appearing and character of atherosclerosis cardiac vascular disease, one of the most crucial elements of effective fight against it is preparation of complex preventive programs including as vast number of population as possible. Consequently, Benjamin and Smitch suggested attaching the notion of basic prevention to the standard division into primary and secondary one. The basic prevention, carrying out in the general population, should concern genetic predisposition, psychosocial factors, keeping up proper body weight, healthy eating and physical activity. Especially high hopes are connected with high efficiency, simplicity and low money-consumption of preventive activities associated with physical activity modification, which has a crucial influence on reducing negative impact of atherosclerosis hazard. The results of numerous scientific research, carried out in many countries and on various, large groups, proved undoubtedly that at the healthy adult people of both sex the systematic physical activity of moderate intensification plays an essential part in preventing CVD and decreasing the death risk because of that reason as well. Moreover, systematic physical exercises show many other health-oriented actions, thanks to which they have an influence on decreasing premature and total death rate. The risk of incidence of civilization-related diseases such as diabetes type II, hypertension, obesity, osteoporosis, tumors (of large intestine, breast, prostatic gland) and depression has decreased significantly. Unequivocally positive influence has been proved at many observations dedicated to health recreational physical activity and physical activity connected with professional work based on aerobe effort. The positive effects have been also observed at children population and senior population which is more and more numerous and the most at risk. The beneficial action of physical activity is connected with direct effect on organism

  1. Physical activity, functional ability, and disease activity in children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gueddari, S; Amine, B; Rostom, S; Badri, D; Mawani, N; Ezzahri, M; Moussa, F; Shyen, S; Abouqal, R; Chkirat, B; Hajjaj-Hassouni, N

    2014-09-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a chronic condition known to cause pain-related complications in youth and affect children's physical functioning. There is no data in Arabic children with JIA about the impact of illness upon their physical activity. The objective of this study was to explore physical activity (PA) in children and adolescents with JIA compared with a healthy population and to examine associations between PA, functional ability, and disease activity. Our study included patients with JIA and group control aged between 8 and 17 years. The diagnosis was used according to the International League of Association of Rheumatology (ILAR) criteria 2001. Sociodemographic data and clinical features were collected. Physical activity level and energy expenditure were assessed with a 1-day activity diary and the metabolic equivalent (MET), respectively. Functional ability was assessed with the Moroccan version of the Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ). Disease activity was measured using the Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score (JADAS). Fifty patients and 50 controls were included (mean ± SD age 11.5 ± 3.3 and 10.5 ± 3.8 years, respectively; p = 0.49) with masculine predominance n = 30 (59.6 %) and n = 29 (58 %), respectively (p = 0.26). The median disease duration was 4.3 years (2-5). The median analog scale (VAS) pain was 20 (10-40). Fourteen patients (28 %) had an active disease. Patient population consisted in majority of oligoarticular arthritis (28 %), 14 patients. The mean of energy expenditure and physical activity were significantly higher in the JIA group. The JIA group spent more time in bed and less time on moderate to vigorous PA than the control group. There is no significant relationship between PA, functional ability, and disease activity. Our study suggests that children and adolescents with JIA have low PA levels and are at risk of losing the benefits of PA. Low PA is not related to

  2. Medicinal plant activity on Helicobacter pylori related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan-Chuen

    2014-01-01

    More than 50% of the world population is infected with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). The bacterium highly links to peptic ulcer diseases and duodenal ulcer, which was classified as a group I carcinogen in 1994 by the WHO. The pathogenesis of H. pylori is contributed by its virulence factors including urease, flagella, vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA), cytotoxin-associated gene antigen (Cag A), and others. Of those virulence factors, VacA and CagA play the key roles. Infection with H. pylori vacA-positive strains can lead to vacuolation and apoptosis, whereas infection with cagA-positive strains might result in severe gastric inflammation and gastric cancer. Numerous medicinal plants have been reported for their anti-H. pylori activity, and the relevant active compounds including polyphenols, flavonoids, quinones, coumarins, terpenoids, and alkaloids have been studied. The anti-H. pylori action mechanisms, including inhibition of enzymatic (urease, DNA gyrase, dihydrofolate reductase, N-acetyltransferase, and myeloperoxidase) and adhesive activities, high redox potential, and hydrophilic/hydrophobic natures of compounds, have also been discussed in detail. H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation may progress to superficial gastritis, atrophic gastritis, and finally gastric cancer. Many natural products have anti-H. pylori-induced inflammation activity and the relevant mechanisms include suppression of nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activation and inhibition of oxidative stress. Anti-H. pylori induced gastric inflammatory effects of plant products, including quercetin, apigenin, carotenoids-rich algae, tea product, garlic extract, apple peel polyphenol, and finger-root extract, have been documented. In conclusion, many medicinal plant products possess anti-H. pylori activity as well as an anti-H. pylori-induced gastric inflammatory effect. Those plant products have showed great potential as pharmaceutical candidates for H. pylori

  3. Memory activation reveals abnormal EEG in preclinical Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    van der Hiele, Karin; Jurgens, Caroline K; Vein, Alla A; Reijntjes, Robert H A M; Witjes-Ané, Marie-Noëlle W; Roos, Raymund A C; van Dijk, Gert; Middelkoop, Huub A M

    2007-04-15

    The EEG is potentially useful as a marker of early Huntington's disease (HD). In dementia, the EEG during a memory activation challenge showed abnormalities where the resting EEG did not. We investigated whether memory activation also reveals EEG abnormalities in preclinical HD. Sixteen mutation carriers for HD and 13 nonmutation carriers underwent neurological, neuropsychological, MRI and EEG investigations. The EEG was registered during a rest condition, i.e. eyes closed, and a working memory task. In each condition we determined absolute power in the theta (4-8 Hz) and alpha (8-13 Hz) bands and subsequently calculated relative alpha power. The EEG during eyes closed did not differ between groups. The EEG during memory activation showed less relative alpha power in mutation carriers as compared to nonmutation carriers, even though memory performance was similar [F (1,27) = 10.87; P = 0.003]. Absolute powers also showed less alpha power [F (1,27) = 7.02; P = 0.013] but similar theta power. No correlations were found between absolute and relative alpha power on the one hand and neuropsychological scores, motor scores or number of CAG repeats on the other. In conclusion, memory activation reveals functional brain changes in Huntington's disease before clinical signs become overt. PMID:17266047

  4. Functional activity of human hepatocytes under traumatic disease.

    PubMed

    Kudryavtseva, M V; Stein, G I; Shashkov, B V; Kudryavtsev, B N

    1998-03-01

    Absorption and fluorescent cytophotometry techniques were applied to studies of RNA as well as of total glycogen and its fractions as the parameters of functional activity of the hepatocytes in patients with severe mechanical trauma, both with and without autointoxication (AI). Slides were stained with gallocyanine-chromalums to determine the RNA content and were processed by the fluorescent PAS-reaction for the glycogen content. To trace the dynamics of RNA and glycogen contents in the liver punction biopsies were done in the same patients. A quick increase in the RNA content took place in both groups of patients at the first period (within the first 3 days) of traumatic disease. At the second period of disease the hepatocyte RNA content in patients without AI was found to decrease up to the initial level whereas that in patients with AI increased on the average by 36% of the initial values. The total glycogen content in hepatocytes of all the patients changed insignificantly in the course of disease but its labile fraction in patients with AI decreased to 70% of the total. The increase of hepatocyte synthetic activity and the maintenance of the high glycogen level are indicative of the large compensatory potential of the liver that enables it to carry an intensive functional load under AI conditions. PMID:9570502

  5. Subcortical evoked activity and motor enhancement in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Anzak, Anam; Tan, Huiling; Pogosyan, Alek; Khan, Sadaquate; Javed, Shazia; Gill, Steven S.; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Akram, Harith; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Green, Alexander L.; Aziz, Tipu; Brown, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Enhancements in motor performance have been demonstrated in response to intense stimuli both in healthy subjects and in the form of ‘paradoxical kinesis’ in patients with Parkinson's disease. Here we identify a mid-latency evoked potential in local field potential recordings from the region of the subthalamic nucleus, which scales in amplitude with both the intensity of the stimulus delivered and corresponding enhancements in biomechanical measures of maximal handgrips, independent of the dopaminergic state of our subjects with Parkinson's disease. Recordings of a similar evoked potential in the related pedunculopontine nucleus – a key component of the reticular activating system – provide support for this neural signature in the subthalmic nucleus being a novel correlate of ascending arousal, propagated from the reticular activating system to exert an ‘energizing’ influence on motor circuitry. Future manipulation of this system linking arousal and motor performance may provide a novel approach for the non-dopaminergic enhancement of motor performance in patients with hypokinetic disorders such as Parkinson's disease. PMID:26687971

  6. Pharmacological treatment options for mast cell activation disease.

    PubMed

    Molderings, Gerhard J; Haenisch, Britta; Brettner, Stefan; Homann, Jürgen; Menzen, Markus; Dumoulin, Franz Ludwig; Panse, Jens; Butterfield, Joseph; Afrin, Lawrence B

    2016-07-01

    Mast cell activation disease (MCAD) is a term referring to a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by aberrant release of variable subsets of mast cell (MC) mediators together with accumulation of either morphologically altered and immunohistochemically identifiable mutated MCs due to MC proliferation (systemic mastocytosis [SM] and MC leukemia [MCL]) or morphologically ordinary MCs due to decreased apoptosis (MC activation syndrome [MCAS] and well-differentiated SM). Clinical signs and symptoms in MCAD vary depending on disease subtype and result from excessive mediator release by MCs and, in aggressive forms, from organ failure related to MC infiltration. In most cases, treatment of MCAD is directed primarily at controlling the symptoms associated with MC mediator release. In advanced forms, such as aggressive SM and MCL, agents targeting MC proliferation such as kinase inhibitors may be provided. Targeted therapies aimed at blocking mutant protein variants and/or downstream signaling pathways are currently being developed. Other targets, such as specific surface antigens expressed on neoplastic MCs, might be considered for the development of future therapies. Since clinicians are often underprepared to evaluate, diagnose, and effectively treat this clinically heterogeneous disease, we seek to familiarize clinicians with MCAD and review current and future treatment approaches. PMID:27132234

  7. Subcortical evoked activity and motor enhancement in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Anzak, Anam; Tan, Huiling; Pogosyan, Alek; Khan, Sadaquate; Javed, Shazia; Gill, Steven S; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Akram, Harith; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Green, Alexander L; Aziz, Tipu; Brown, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Enhancements in motor performance have been demonstrated in response to intense stimuli both in healthy subjects and in the form of 'paradoxical kinesis' in patients with Parkinson's disease. Here we identify a mid-latency evoked potential in local field potential recordings from the region of the subthalamic nucleus, which scales in amplitude with both the intensity of the stimulus delivered and corresponding enhancements in biomechanical measures of maximal handgrips, independent of the dopaminergic state of our subjects with Parkinson's disease. Recordings of a similar evoked potential in the related pedunculopontine nucleus - a key component of the reticular activating system - provide support for this neural signature in the subthalmic nucleus being a novel correlate of ascending arousal, propagated from the reticular activating system to exert an 'energizing' influence on motor circuitry. Future manipulation of this system linking arousal and motor performance may provide a novel approach for the non-dopaminergic enhancement of motor performance in patients with hypokinetic disorders such as Parkinson's disease. PMID:26687971

  8. Metabolic correlates of pallidal neuronal activity in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Eidelberg, D; Moeller, J R; Kazumata, K; Antonini, A; Sterio, D; Dhawan, V; Spetsieris, P; Alterman, R; Kelly, P J; Dogali, M; Fazzini, E; Beric, A

    1997-08-01

    We have used [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose and PET to identify specific metabolic covariance patterns associated with Parkinson's disease and related disorders previously. Nonetheless, the physiological correlates of these abnormal patterns are unknown. In this study we used PET to measure resting state glucose metabolism in 42 awake unmedicated Parkinson's disease patients prior to unilateral stereotaxic pallidotomy for relief of symptoms. Spontaneous single unit activity of the internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPi) was recorded intraoperatively in the same patients under identical conditions. The first 24 patients (Group A) were scanned on an intermediate resolution tomograph (full width at half maximum, 8 mm); the subsequent 18 patients (Group B) were scanned on a higher resolution tomograph (full width half maximum, 4.2 mm). We found significant positive correlations between GPi firing rates and thalamic glucose metabolism in both patient groups (Group A: r = 0.41, P < 0.05; Group B: r = 0.69, P < 0.005). In Group B, pixel-based analysis disclosed a significant focus of physiological-metabolic correlation involving the ventral thalamus and the GPi (statistical parametric map: P < 0.05, corrected). Regional covariance analysis demonstrated that internal pallidal neuronal activity correlated significantly (r = 0.65, P < 0.005) with the expression of a unique network characterized by covarying pallidothalamic and brainstem metabolic activity. Our findings suggest that the variability in pallidal neuronal firing rates in Parkinson's disease patients is associated with individual differences in the metabolic activity of efferent projection systems. PMID:9278625

  9. Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels: Potential Target for Cardiovascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Dong, De-Li; Bai, Yun-Long; Cai, Ben-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (KCa) are classified into three subtypes: big conductance (BKCa), intermediate conductance (IKCa), and small conductance (SKCa) KCa channels. The three types of KCa channels have distinct physiological or pathological functions in cardiovascular system. BKCa channels are mainly expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and inner mitochondrial membrane of cardiomyocytes, activation of BKCa channels in these locations results in vasodilation and cardioprotection against cardiac ischemia. IKCa channels are expressed in VSMCs, endothelial cells, and cardiac fibroblasts and involved in vascular smooth muscle proliferation, migration, vessel dilation, and cardiac fibrosis. SKCa channels are widely expressed in nervous and cardiovascular system, and activation of SKCa channels mainly contributes membrane hyperpolarization. In this chapter, we summarize the physiological and pathological roles of the three types of KCa channels in cardiovascular system and put forward the possibility of KCa channels as potential target for cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27038376

  10. Upper Airway Genioglossal Activity in Children with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jingtao; Pinto, Swaroop J.; Allen, Julian L.; Arens, Raanan; Bowdre, Cheryl Y.; Jawad, Abbas F.; Mason, Thornton B.A.; Ohene-Frempong, Kwaku; Smith-Whitley, Kim; Marcus, Carole L.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in sickle cell disease (SCD) has been reported to be higher than that in the general pediatric population. However, not all subjects with SCD develop OSAS. We hypothesized that SCD patients with OSAS have a blunted neuromuscular response to subatmospheric pressure loads during sleep, making them more likely to develop upper airway collapse. Design: Subjects with SCD with and without OSAS underwent pressure-flow measurements during sleep using intraoral surface electrodes to measure genioglossal EMG (EMGgg). Two techniques were applied to decrease the nasal pressure (PN) to subatmospheric levels, resulting in an activated and relatively hypotonic upper airway. The area under the curve of the inspiratory EMGgg moving time average was analyzed. EMGgg activity was expressed as a percentage of baseline. Changes in EMGgg in response to decrements in nasal pressure were expressed as the slope of the EMGgg vs. nasal pressure (slope of EMGgg-PN). Setting: Sleep laboratory. Participants: 4 children with SCD and OSAS and 18 children with SCD but without OSAS. Results: The major findings of this study were: (1) using the activated but not the hypotonic technique, the slope of EMGgg-PN was more negative in SCD controls than SCD OSAS; (2) the slope of EMGgg-PN was significantly lower using the activated technique compared to the hypotonic technique in SCD controls only; (3) similarly, the critical closing pressure, Pcrit, was more negative using the activated technique than the hypotonic technique in SCD controls but not in SCD OSAS. Conclusion: This preliminary study has shown that children with SCD but without OSAS have more prominent upper airway reflexes than children with SCD and OSAS. Citation: Huang J; Pinto SJ; Allen JL; Arens R; Bowdre CY; Jawad AF; Mason TBA; Ohene-Frempong K; Smith-Whitely K; Marcus CL. Upper airway genioglossal activity in children with sickle cell disease. SLEEP 2011

  11. Active learning based segmentation of Crohns disease from abdominal MRI.

    PubMed

    Mahapatra, Dwarikanath; Vos, Franciscus M; Buhmann, Joachim M

    2016-05-01

    This paper proposes a novel active learning (AL) framework, and combines it with semi supervised learning (SSL) for segmenting Crohns disease (CD) tissues from abdominal magnetic resonance (MR) images. Robust fully supervised learning (FSL) based classifiers require lots of labeled data of different disease severities. Obtaining such data is time consuming and requires considerable expertise. SSL methods use a few labeled samples, and leverage the information from many unlabeled samples to train an accurate classifier. AL queries labels of most informative samples and maximizes gain from the labeling effort. Our primary contribution is in designing a query strategy that combines novel context information with classification uncertainty and feature similarity. Combining SSL and AL gives a robust segmentation method that: (1) optimally uses few labeled samples and many unlabeled samples; and (2) requires lower training time. Experimental results show our method achieves higher segmentation accuracy than FSL methods with fewer samples and reduced training effort. PMID:27040833

  12. Sulforaphane Protects against Cardiovascular Disease via Nrf2 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yang; Wang, Xiaolu; Zhao, Song; Ma, Chunye; Cui, Jiuwei; Zheng, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) causes an unparalleled proportion of the global burden of disease and will remain the main cause of mortality for the near future. Oxidative stress plays a major role in the pathophysiology of cardiac disorders. Several studies have highlighted the cardinal role played by the overproduction of reactive oxygen or nitrogen species in the pathogenesis of ischemic myocardial damage and consequent cardiac dysfunction. Isothiocyanates (ITC) are sulfur-containing compounds that are broadly distributed among cruciferous vegetables. Sulforaphane (SFN) is an ITC shown to possess anticancer activities by both in vivo and epidemiological studies. Recent data have indicated that the beneficial effects of SFN in CVD are due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. SFN activates NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a basic leucine zipper transcription factor that serves as a defense mechanism against oxidative stress and electrophilic toxicants by inducing more than a hundred cytoprotective proteins, including antioxidants and phase II detoxifying enzymes. This review will summarize the evidence from clinical studies and animal experiments relating to the potential mechanisms by which SFN modulates Nrf2 activation and protects against CVD. PMID:26583056

  13. Activity enhances dopaminergic long-duration response in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Auinger, Peggy; Fahn, Stanley; Oakes, David; Shoulson, Ira; Kieburtz, Karl; Rudolph, Alice; Marek, Kenneth; Seibyl, John; Lang, Anthony; Olanow, C. Warren; Tanner, Caroline; Schifitto, Giovanni; Zhao, Hongwei; Reyes, Lydia; Shinaman, Aileen; Comella, Cynthia L.; Goetz, Christopher; Blasucci, Lucia M.; Samanta, Johan; Stacy, Mark; Williamson, Kelli; Harrigan, Mary; Greene, Paul; Ford, Blair; Moskowitz, Carol; Truong, Daniel D.; Pathak, Mayank; Jankovic, Joseph; Ondo, William; Atassi, Farah; Hunter, Christine; Jacques, Carol; Friedman, Joseph H.; Lannon, Margaret; Russell, David S.; Jennings, Danna; Fussell, Barbara; Standaert, David; Schwarzschild, Michael A.; Growdon, John H.; Tennis, Marsha; Gauthier, Serge; Panisset, Michel; Hall, Jean; Gancher, Stephen; Hammerstad, John P.; Stone, Claudia; Alexander-Brown, Barbara; Factor, Stewart A.; Molho, Eric; Brown, Diane; Evans, Sharon; Clark, Jeffrey; Manyam, Bala; Simpson, Patricia; Wulbrecht, Brian; Whetteckey, Jacqueline; Martin, Wayne; Roberts, Ted; King, Pamela; Hauser, Robert; Zesiewicz, Theresa; Gauger, Lisa; Trugman, Joel; Wooten, G. Frederick; Rost-Ruffner, Elke; Perlmutter, Joel; Racette, Brad A.; Suchowersky, Oksana; Ranawaya, Ranjit; Wood, Susan; Pantella, Carol; Kurlan, Roger; Richard, Irene; Pearson, Nancy; Caviness, John N.; Adler, Charles; Lind, Marlene; Simuni, Tanya; Siderowf, Andrew; Colcher, Amy; Lloyd, Mary; Weiner, William; Shulman, Lisa; Koller, William; Lyons, Kelly; Feldman, Robert G.; Saint-Hilaire, Marie H.; Ellias, Samuel; Thomas, Cathi-Ann; Juncos, Jorge; Watts, Ray; Partlow, Anna; Tetrud, James; Togasaki, Daniel M.; Stewart, Tracy; Mark, Margery H.; Sage, Jacob I.; Caputo, Debbie; Gould, Harry; Rao, Jayaraman; McKendrick, Ann; Brin, Mitchell; Danisi, Fabio; Benabou, Reina; Hubble, Jean; Paulson, George W.; Reider, Carson; Birnbaum, Alex; Miyasaki, Janis; Johnston, Lisa; So, Julie; Pahwa, Rajesh; Dubinsky, Richard M.; Wszolek, Zbigniew; Uitti, Ryan; Turk, Margaret; Tuite, Paul; Rottenberg, David; Hansen, Joy; Ramos, Serrano; Waters, Cheryl; Lew, Mark; Welsh, Mickie; Kawai, Connie; O'Brien, Christopher; Kumar, Rajeev; Seeberger, Lauren; Judd, Deborah; Barclay, C. Lynn; Grimes, David A.; Sutherland, Laura; Dawson, Ted; Reich, Stephen; Dunlop, Rebecca; Albin, Roger; Frey, Kirk; Wernette, Kristine; Fahn, Stanley; Oakes, David; Shoulson, Ira; Kieburtz, Karl; Rudolph, Alice; Marek, Kenneth; Seibyl, John; Lang, Anthony; Olanow, C. Warren; Tanner, Caroline; Schifitto, Giovanni; Zhao, Hongwei; Reyes, Lydia; Shinaman, Aileen; Comella, Cynthia L.; Goetz, Christopher; Blasucci, Lucia M.; Samanta, Johan; Stacy, Mark; Williamson, Kelli; Harrigan, Mary; Greene, Paul; Ford, Blair; Moskowitz, Carol; Truong, Daniel D.; Pathak, Mayank; Jankovic, Joseph; Ondo, William; Atassi, Farah; Hunter, Christine; Jacques, Carol; Friedman, Joseph H.; Lannon, Margaret; Russell, David S.; Jennings, Danna; Fussell, Barbara; Standaert, David; Schwarzschild, Michael A.; Growdon, John H.; Tennis, Marsha; Gauthier, Serge; Panisset, Michel; Hall, Jean; Gancher, Stephen; Hammerstad, John P.; Stone, Claudia; Alexander-Brown, Barbara; Factor, Stewart A.; Molho, Eric; Brown, Diane; Evans, Sharon; Clark, Jeffrey; Manyam, Bala; Simpson, Patricia; Wulbrecht, Brian; Whetteckey, Jacqueline; Martin, Wayne; Roberts, Ted; King, Pamela; Hauser, Robert; Zesiewicz, Theresa; Gauger, Lisa; Trugman, Joel; Wooten, G. Frederick; Rost-Ruffner, Elke; Perlmutter, Joel; Racette, Brad A.; Suchowersky, Oksana; Ranawaya, Ranjit; Wood, Susan; Pantella, Carol; Kurlan, Roger; Richard, Irene; Pearson, Nancy; Caviness, John N.; Adler, Charles; Lind, Marlene; Simuni, Tanya; Siderowf, Andrew; Colcher, Amy; Lloyd, Mary; Weiner, William; Shulman, Lisa; Koller, William; Lyons, Kelly; Feldman, Robert G.; Saint-Hilaire, Marie H.; Ellias, Samuel; Thomas, Cathi-Ann; Juncos, Jorge; Watts, Ray; Partlow, Anna; Tetrud, James; Togasaki, Daniel M.; Stewart, Tracy; Mark, Margery H.; Sage, Jacob I.; Caputo, Debbie; Gould, Harry; Rao, Jayaraman; McKendrick, Ann; Brin, Mitchell; Danisi, Fabio; Benabou, Reina; Hubble, Jean; Paulson, George W.; Reider, Carson; Birnbaum, Alex; Miyasaki, Janis; Johnston, Lisa; So, Julie; Pahwa, Rajesh; Dubinsky, Richard M.; Wszolek, Zbigniew; Uitti, Ryan; Turk, Margaret; Tuite, Paul; Rottenberg, David; Hansen, Joy; Ramos, Serrano; Waters, Cheryl; Lew, Mark; Welsh, Mickie; Kawai, Connie; O'Brien, Christopher; Kumar, Rajeev; Seeberger, Lauren; Judd, Deborah; Barclay, C. Lynn; Grimes, David A.; Sutherland, Laura; Dawson, Ted; Reich, Stephen; Dunlop, Rebecca; Albin, Roger; Frey, Kirk; Wernette, Kristine; Mendis, Tilak

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We tested the hypothesis that dopamine-dependent motor learning mechanism underlies the long-duration response to levodopa in Parkinson disease (PD) based on our studies in a mouse model. By data-mining the motor task performance in dominant and nondominant hands of the subjects in a double-blind randomized trial of levodopa therapy, the effects of activity and dopamine therapy were examined. Methods: We data-mined the Earlier versus Later Levodopa Therapy in Parkinson's Disease (ELLDOPA) study published in 2005 and performed statistical analysis comparing the effects of levodopa and dominance of handedness over 42 weeks. Results: The mean change in finger-tapping counts from baseline before the initiation of therapy to predose at 9 weeks and 40 weeks increased more in the dominant compared to nondominant hand in levodopa-treated subjects in a dose-dependent fashion. There was no significant difference in dominant vs nondominant hands in the placebo group. The short-duration response assessed by the difference of postdose performance compared to predose performance at the same visit did not show any significant difference between dominant vs nondominant hands. Conclusions: Active use of the dominant hand and dopamine replacement therapy produces synergistic effect on long-lasting motor task performance during “off” medication state. Such effect was confined to dopamine-responsive symptoms and not seen in dopamine-resistant symptoms such as gait and balance. We propose that long-lasting motor learning facilitated by activity and dopamine is a form of disease modification that is often seen in trials of medications that have symptomatic effects. PMID:22459675

  14. Metabolic correlates of subthalamic nucleus activity in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tanya P; Carbon, Maren; Tang, Chengke; Mogilner, Alon Y; Sterio, Djordje; Beric, Aleksandar; Dhawan, Vijay; Eidelberg, David

    2008-05-01

    Overactivity of subthalamic nucleus (STN) neurons is a consistent feature of Parkinson's disease (PD) and is a target of therapy for this disorder. However, the relationship of STN firing rate to regional brain function is not known. We scanned 17 PD patients with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET to measure resting glucose metabolism before the implantation of STN deep brain stimulation electrodes. Spontaneous STN firing rates were recorded during surgery and correlated with preoperative regional glucose metabolism on a voxel-by-voxel basis. We also examined the relationship between firing rate and the activity of metabolic brain networks associated with the motor and cognitive manifestations of the disease. Mean firing rates were 47.2 +/- 6.1 and 48.7 +/- 8.5 Hz for the left and right hemispheres, respectively. These measures correlated (P < 0.007) with glucose metabolism in the putamen and globus pallidus, which receive projections from this structure. Significant correlations (P < 0.0005) were also evident in the primary motor (BA4) and dorsolateral prefrontal (BA46/10) cortical areas. The activity of both the motor (P < 0.0001) and the cognitive (P < 0.006) PD-related metabolic networks was elevated in these patients. STN firing rates correlated with the activity of the former (P < 0.007) but not the latter network (P = 0.39). The findings suggest that the functional pathways associated with motor disability in PD are linked to the STN firing rate. These pathways are likely to mediate the clinical benefit that is seen following targeted STN interventions for this disease. PMID:18400841

  15. Parkinson's disease and CYP1A2 activity

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, J T; Grünewald, R A; Rostami-Hodjegan, A; Lennard, M S; Sagar, H J; Tucker, G T

    2000-01-01

    Aims MPTP, a neurotoxin which induces parkinsonism is partially metabolized by the enzyme CYP1A2. Smoking appears to protect against Parkinson's disease (PD) and cigarette smoke induces CYP1A2 activity. Thus, we investigated the hypothesis that idiopathic PD is associated with lower CYP1A2 activity using caffeine as a probe compound. Methods CYP1A2 activity was assessed using saliva paraxanthine (PX) to caffeine (CA) ratios. Caffeine half-life was also estimated from salivary concentrations of caffeine at 2 and 5 h post dose. 117 treated and 40 untreated patients with PD and 105 healthy control subjects were studied. Results PX/CA ratios were 0.57, 0.93 and 0.77 in treated patients, untreated patients and healthy control subjects, respectively, with no significant differences between study groups (95% CI: treated patients vs controls −0.24, 0.57; untreated patients vs controls −0.75, 0.35). However, patients with PD (treated or untreated) had caffeine half-lives shorter than that in controls (treated patients: 262 min, untreated patients: 244 min, controls: 345 min; 95% CI: controls vs treated patients 23, 143 (P = 0.003); controls vs untreated patients 19, 184 (P = 0.011)). Amongst the patients with PD, caffeine half-life was also inversely related to the age of onset of disease (P = 0.012); gender and concomitant drugs did not influence this significantly. Conclusions Based on PX/CA ratio, there was no evidence of decreased CYP1A2 activity in patients compared with control subjects. The observed decrease in the elimination half-life of caffeine in PD may be caused by increased CYP2E1 activity, an enzyme that also contributes to the metabolism of caffeine. The latter warrants further investigation. PMID:11012552

  16. [Chronic Duodenitis and Celiac Disease: a path between the nonspecific and the early stages of Marsh].

    PubMed

    Passera, Andrea Helena; Passera, Mario Luis; Higa, Antonio Luis; Nuñez, Maria; Armando, Lucas; Barzón, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Given the advances in diagnosis for CD, some patients are detected with symptoms and signs of food intolerance, which have positive antibodies and autoantibodies for coeliac disease, whom present proximal bowel biopsies with chronic nonspecific duodenitis and are not associated with stages 0 and 1 Marsh. On the other hand, patients with bloating, abdominal pain, pondostatural delay, negative antibodies for CD, and chronic nonspecific duodenitis in whom removing cow's milk or gluten, the symptoms remit. There are also celiac patients with biopsies before diagnosis, with chronic nonspecific duodenitis. In this paper, we summarize three brothers with different degrees of chronic duodenitis, one with chronic nonspecific duodenitis, and two with histopathological sings of coeliac disease. It is an invitation to think that chronic nonspecific duodenitis in some patients may be an earlier manifestation of celiac disease. PMID:26544059

  17. Imaging Microglial Activation with TSPO PET: Lighting Up Neurologic Diseases?

    PubMed

    Vivash, Lucy; O'Brien, Terence J

    2016-02-01

    Neuroinflammation is implicated in the pathogenesis of a wide range of neurologic and neuropsychiatric diseases. For over 20 years, (11)C-PK11195 PET, which aims to image expression of the translocator protein (TSPO) on activated microglia in the brain, has been used in preclinical and clinical research to investigate neuroinflammation in vivo in patients with brain diseases. However, (11)C-PK11195 suffers from two major limitations: its low brain permeability and high nonspecific and plasma binding results in a low signal-to-noise ratio, and the use of (11)C restricts its use to PET research centers and hospitals with an on-site cyclotron. In recent years, there has been a great deal of work into the development of new TSPO-specific PET radiotracers. This work has focused on fluorinated radiotracers, which would enable wider use and improved signal-to-noise ratios. These radiotracers have been utilized in preclinical and clinical studies of several neurologic diseases with varying degrees of success. Unfortunately, the application of these second-generation TSPO radiotracers has revealed additional problems, including a polymorphism that affects TSPO binding. In this review, the developments in TSPO imaging are discussed, and current limitations and suggestions for future directions are explored. PMID:26697963

  18. Phospholipase A2 activating protein and idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, J W; Dickey, W D; Saini, S S; Gourley, W; Klimpel, G R; Chopra, A K

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are idiopathic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) involving synthesis of eicosanoids from arachidonic acid (AA), which is released from membrane phospholipids by phospholipase A2 (PLA2). A potentially important regulator of the production of these mediators is a protein activator of PLA2, referred to as PLA2 activating protein (PLAP). AIMS: The purpose of this investigation was to discover if PLAP values might be increased in the inflamed intestinal tissue of patients with IBD and in intestinal tissue of mice with colitis. PATIENTS: Biopsy specimens were taken from patients with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease undergoing diagnostic colonoscopy, and normal colonic mucosa was obtained from patients without IBD after surgical resection. METHODS: Immunocytochemistry with affinity purified antibodies to PLAP synthetic peptides was used to locate PLAP antigen in sections of intestinal biopsy specimens from IBD patients compared with that of normal intestinal tissue. Northern blot analysis with a murine [32P] labelled plap cDNA probe was performed on RNA extracted from the colons of mice fed dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) and cultured HT-29 cells exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). RESULTS: PLAP antigen was localised predominantly within monocytes and granulocytes in intestinal tissue sections from IBD patients, and additional deposition of extracellular PLAP antigen was associated with blood vessels and oedema fluid in the inflamed tissues. In contrast, tissue sections from normal human intestine were devoid of PLAP reactive antigen, except for some weak cytoplasmic reaction of luminal intestinal epithelial cells. Similarly, colonic tissue from DSS treated mice contained an increased amount of PLAP antigen compared with controls. The stroma of the lamina propria of the colonic mucosa from the DSS treated mice reacted intensely with antibodies to PLAP synthetic peptides, while no reaction was observed with control

  19. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Azhar, Salman

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a constellation of risk factors including insulin resistance, central obesity, dyslipidemia and hypertension that markedly increase the risk of Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor (PPAR) isotypes, PPARα, PPARδ/β and PPARγ are ligand-activated nuclear transcription factors, which modulate the expression of an array of genes that play a central role in regulating glucose, lipid and cholesterol metabolism, where imbalance can lead to obesity, T2DM and CVD. They are also drug targets, and currently, PPARα (fibrates) and PPARγ (thiazolodinediones) agonists are in clinical use for treating dyslipidemia and T2DM, respectively. These metabolic characteristics of the PPARs, coupled with their involvement in metabolic diseases, mean extensive efforts are underway worldwide to develop new and efficacious PPAR-based therapies for the treatment of additional maladies associated with the MetS. This article presents an overview of the functional characteristics of three PPAR isotypes, discusses recent advances in our understanding of the diverse biological actions of PPARs, particularly in the vascular system, and summarizes the developmental status of new single, dual, pan (multiple) and partial PPAR agonists for the clinical management of key components of MetS, T2DM and CVD. It also summarizes the clinical outcomes from various clinical trials aimed at evaluating the atheroprotective actions of currently used fibrates and thiazolodinediones. PMID:20932114

  20. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Azhar, Salman

    2010-09-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a constellation of risk factors including insulin resistance, central obesity, dyslipidemia and hypertension that markedly increase the risk of Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor (PPAR) isotypes, PPARα, PPARδ/ß and PPARγ are ligand-activated nuclear transcription factors, which modulate the expression of an array of genes that play a central role in regulating glucose, lipid and cholesterol metabolism, where imbalance can lead to obesity, T2DM and CVD. They are also drug targets, and currently, PPARα (fibrates) and PPARγ (thiazolodinediones) agonists are in clinical use for treating dyslipidemia and T2DM, respectively. These metabolic characteristics of the PPARs, coupled with their involvement in metabolic diseases, mean extensive efforts are underway worldwide to develop new and efficacious PPAR-based therapies for the treatment of additional maladies associated with the MetS. This article presents an overview of the functional characteristics of three PPAR isotypes, discusses recent advances in our understanding of the diverse biological actions of PPARs, particularly in the vascular system, and summarizes the developmental status of new single, dual, pan (multiple) and partial PPAR agonists for the clinical management of key components of MetS, T2DM and CVD. It also summarizes the clinical outcomes from various clinical trials aimed at evaluating the atheroprotective actions of currently used fibrates and thiazolodinediones. PMID:20932114

  1. Activating transcription factor 6 derepression mediates neuroprotection in Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Naranjo, José R.; Zhang, Hongyu; Villar, Diego; González, Paz; Dopazo, Xose M.; Morón-Oset, Javier; Higueras, Elena; Oliveros, Juan C.; Arrabal, María D.; Prieto, Angela; Cercós, Pilar; González, Teresa; De la Cruz, Alicia; Casado-Vela, Juan; Rábano, Alberto; Valenzuela, Carmen; Gutierrez-Rodriguez, Marta; Li, Jia-Yi; Mellström, Britt

    2016-01-01

    Deregulated protein and Ca2+ homeostasis underlie synaptic dysfunction and neurodegeneration in Huntington disease (HD); however, the factors that disrupt homeostasis are not fully understood. Here, we determined that expression of downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM), a multifunctional Ca2+-binding protein, is reduced in murine in vivo and in vitro HD models and in HD patients. DREAM downregulation was observed early after birth and was associated with endogenous neuroprotection. In the R6/2 mouse HD model, induced DREAM haplodeficiency or blockade of DREAM activity by chronic administration of the drug repaglinide delayed onset of motor dysfunction, reduced striatal atrophy, and prolonged life span. DREAM-related neuroprotection was linked to an interaction between DREAM and the unfolded protein response (UPR) sensor activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6). Repaglinide blocked this interaction and enhanced ATF6 processing and nuclear accumulation of transcriptionally active ATF6, improving prosurvival UPR function in striatal neurons. Together, our results identify a role for DREAM silencing in the activation of ATF6 signaling, which promotes early neuroprotection in HD. PMID:26752648

  2. Study on cholesteryl ester transfer activity in coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Fujinuma, Y; Tanaka, A; Maezawa, H

    1991-09-01

    The net cholesterol transfer activity from high density lipoprotein (HDL) to low density lipoprotein (LDL) was determined in the patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) to examine its effect on the pathogenesis of arteriosclerosis. Furthermore, in the CHD patients with high HDL cholesterolemia (more than 60 mg/dl), the HDL particle size was measured by high performance liquid chromatography. A significant cholesteryl ester transfer activity (P less than 0.02) was noted in the CHD patients with low HDL cholesterolemia (less than 60 mg/dl). The rate of cholesteryl ester transfer activity (cholesteryl ester transfer activity/hour) inversely correlated with the serum HDL cholesterol value (r = -0.483, P = 0.096) in the patients with CHD. These results suggest that an increase of CETA caused a low HDL cholesterol value in the CHD patients with low HDL cholesterolemia and it may have the risk of causing CHD. However, an increase of the CETA was not found in the CHD patients with high HDL cholesterolemia compared to the normal subjects, the HDL particle size being significantly greater than that in the normal subjects. In the CHD patients with high HDL cholesterolemia, the large size of HDL may have the risk of causing CHD. PMID:1934199

  3. Activating transcription factor 6 derepression mediates neuroprotection in Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, José R; Zhang, Hongyu; Villar, Diego; González, Paz; Dopazo, Xose M; Morón-Oset, Javier; Higueras, Elena; Oliveros, Juan C; Arrabal, María D; Prieto, Angela; Cercós, Pilar; González, Teresa; De la Cruz, Alicia; Casado-Vela, Juan; Rábano, Alberto; Valenzuela, Carmen; Gutierrez-Rodriguez, Marta; Li, Jia-Yi; Mellström, Britt

    2016-02-01

    Deregulated protein and Ca2+ homeostasis underlie synaptic dysfunction and neurodegeneration in Huntington disease (HD); however, the factors that disrupt homeostasis are not fully understood. Here, we determined that expression of downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM), a multifunctional Ca2+-binding protein, is reduced in murine in vivo and in vitro HD models and in HD patients. DREAM downregulation was observed early after birth and was associated with endogenous neuroprotection. In the R6/2 mouse HD model, induced DREAM haplodeficiency or blockade of DREAM activity by chronic administration of the drug repaglinide delayed onset of motor dysfunction, reduced striatal atrophy, and prolonged life span. DREAM-related neuroprotection was linked to an interaction between DREAM and the unfolded protein response (UPR) sensor activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6). Repaglinide blocked this interaction and enhanced ATF6 processing and nuclear accumulation of transcriptionally active ATF6, improving prosurvival UPR function in striatal neurons. Together, our results identify a role for DREAM silencing in the activation of ATF6 signaling, which promotes early neuroprotection in HD. PMID:26752648

  4. [The biological activity of macrophages in health and disease].

    PubMed

    Nazimek, Katarzyna; Bryniarski, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages are involved in immune response as phagocytes, antigen presenting cells and as effector cells of delayed-type hypersensitivity. Moreover, the activity of macrophages is associated with modulation of many biological processes during the whole life and depends on the actual macrophage phenotype induced under the influence of various microenvironmental stimuli. In pregnancy, placental macrophages induce the development of maternal tolerance to fetal antigens, while fetal macrophages are responsible for proper formation of tissues and organs. Residual macrophages play a very important role in tissue homeostasis, apoptotic cell clearance to prevent autoimmunization and first defense in infections. The inflammatory response of macrophages may be modulated by pathogens. Their suppressive activity is observed in immunologically privileged organs such as testes. In pathologies, macrophages are responsible for tissue damage in a case of nonspecific activation followed by overproduction of proinflammatory factors. Suppression of a specific immune response against tumors is mainly the effect of tumor associated macrophage (TAM) action. On the other hand, presentation of allergens or self-antigens by macrophages and their nonspecific activation by necrotic adipocytes leads to the induction of a chronic inflammatory response and impairment of immunity. Therefore, modulation of macrophage functions may be the key for improvement of therapy of cancer and allergic, autoimmune, metabolic, cardiovascular and Alzheimer's diseases. PMID:22922151

  5. Activation of AMP-activated kinase as a strategy for managing autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F; Barroso-Aranda, Jorge; Contreras, Francisco

    2009-12-01

    There is evidence that overactivity of both mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) contributes importantly to the progressive expansion of renal cysts in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Recent research has established that AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) can suppress the activity of each of these proteins. Clinical AMPK activators such as metformin and berberine may thus have potential in the clinical management of ADPKD. The traditional use of berberine in diarrhea associated with bacterial infections may reflect, in part, the inhibitory impact of AMPK on chloride extrusion by small intestinal enterocytes. PMID:19570618

  6. Brain Na(+), K(+)-ATPase Activity In Aging and Disease.

    PubMed

    de Lores Arnaiz, Georgina Rodríguez; Ordieres, María Graciela López

    2014-06-01

    Na(+)/K(+) pump or sodium- and potassium-activated adenosine 5'-triphosphatase (Na(+), K(+)-ATPase), its enzymatic version, is a crucial protein responsible for the electrochemical gradient across the cell membranes. It is an ion transporter, which in addition to exchange cations, is the ligand for cardenolides. This enzyme regulates the entry of K(+) with the exit of Na(+) from cells, being the responsible for Na(+)/K(+) equilibrium maintenance through neuronal membranes. This transport system couples the hydrolysis of one molecule of ATP to exchange three sodium ions for two potassium ions, thus maintaining the normal gradient of these cations in animal cells. Oxidative metabolism is very active in brain, where large amounts of chemical energy as ATP molecules are consumed, mostly required for the maintenance of the ionic gradients that underlie resting and action potentials which are involved in nerve impulse propagation, neurotransmitter release and cation homeostasis. Protein phosphorylation is a key process in biological regulation. At nervous system level, protein phosphorylation is the major molecular mechanism through which the function of neural proteins is modulted in response to extracellular signals, including the response to neurotransmitter stimuli. It is the major mechanism of neural plasticity, including memory processing. The phosphorylation of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase catalytic subunit inhibits enzyme activity whereas the inhibition of protein kinase C restores the enzyme activity. The dephosphorylation of neuronal Na(+), K(+)-ATPase is mediated by calcineurin, a serine / threonine phosphatase. The latter enzyme is involved in a wide range of cellular responses to Ca(2+) mobilizing signals, in the regulation of neuronal excitability by controlling the activity of ion channels, in the release of neurotransmitters and hormones, as well as in synaptic plasticity and gene transcription. In the present article evidence showing Na(+), K(+)-ATPase involvement

  7. Brain Na+, K+-ATPase Activity In Aging and Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Lores Arnaiz, Georgina Rodríguez; Ordieres, María Graciela López

    2014-01-01

    Na+/K+ pump or sodium- and potassium-activated adenosine 5’-triphosphatase (Na+, K+-ATPase), its enzymatic version, is a crucial protein responsible for the electrochemical gradient across the cell membranes. It is an ion transporter, which in addition to exchange cations, is the ligand for cardenolides. This enzyme regulates the entry of K+ with the exit of Na+ from cells, being the responsible for Na+/K+ equilibrium maintenance through neuronal membranes. This transport system couples the hydrolysis of one molecule of ATP to exchange three sodium ions for two potassium ions, thus maintaining the normal gradient of these cations in animal cells. Oxidative metabolism is very active in brain, where large amounts of chemical energy as ATP molecules are consumed, mostly required for the maintenance of the ionic gradients that underlie resting and action potentials which are involved in nerve impulse propagation, neurotransmitter release and cation homeostasis. Protein phosphorylation is a key process in biological regulation. At nervous system level, protein phosphorylation is the major molecular mechanism through which the function of neural proteins is modulted in response to extracellular signals, including the response to neurotransmitter stimuli. It is the major mechanism of neural plasticity, including memory processing. The phosphorylation of Na+, K+-ATPase catalytic subunit inhibits enzyme activity whereas the inhibition of protein kinase C restores the enzyme activity. The dephosphorylation of neuronal Na+, K+-ATPase is mediated by calcineurin, a serine / threonine phosphatase. The latter enzyme is involved in a wide range of cellular responses to Ca2+ mobilizing signals, in the regulation of neuronal excitability by controlling the activity of ion channels, in the release of neurotransmitters and hormones, as well as in synaptic plasticity and gene transcription. In the present article evidence showing Na+, K+-ATPase involvement in signaling pathways

  8. Arteriography of the coeliac axis and superior mesenteric artery in five cases of haemochromatosis with particular regard to the pancreatic circulation

    PubMed Central

    Scuro, L. A.; Curri, G.; Monti, G.; Zuin, R.; Romani, S.

    1968-01-01

    Arteriography of the coeliac axis and superior mesenteric artery in five patients with haemochromatosis revealed a constant deficit of pancreatic vascularization as shown by reduced visualization of the arterial circle. These consistent results appear to be significant. There was no correlation between the existence and severity of diabetes mellitus and the pancreatic vascular involvement. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:5665746

  9. Physical Activity and Hemodynamic Reactivity in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Rajiv; Light, Robert P.

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have an elevated cardiovascular risk. This study was designed to understand better the presence and strength of the relationship between physical activity and BP and to explore determinants of hemodynamic reactivity. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Twenty-four patients with CKD (mean age 69.5 yr; 3.1 antihypertensive drugs; estimated GFR 47 ml/min per 1.73 m2, albumin/creatinine ratio 403 mg/g) were studied on three occasions during a 6-wk period with 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring and simultaneous activity monitoring with wrist actigraphy. Results: Nondippers were found have a greater level of sleep activity compared with dippers, although the awake activity level was similar (7.06 versus 6.73) between groups (P = 0.042 for interaction). In 3587 BP activity pairs, hemodynamic reactivity was variable between individuals (systolic BP reactivity 1.06 [SD 10.50]; diastolic BP reactivity 0.89 [SD 7.80] heart rate reactivity 1.18 [SD 11.00]); those who were more sedentary had a greater increment in systolic BP compared with those who were less sedentary. Antihypertensive drugs blunted hemodynamic reactivity. Hemodynamic reactivity was greatest between 12 a.m. and 8 a.m., making this a vulnerable period for cardiovascular events. Conclusions: Greater hemodynamic reactivity in sedentary people with CKD offers a possible and thus far unrecognized mechanism of cardiovascular damage. Besides reducing BP, antihypertensive drugs reduce hemodynamic reactivity, which offers another plausible mechanism of cardiovascular protection with their use. PMID:18922983

  10. Ubiquitin, Proteasomes and Proteolytic Mechanisms Activated by Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Vik; Mitch, William E.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) includes 3 enzymes that conjugate ubiquitin to intracellular proteins that are then recognized and degraded in the proteasome. The process participates in the regulation of cell metabolism. In the kidney, the UPS regulates the turnover of transporters and signaling proteins and its activity is down regulated in acidosis-induced proximal tubular cell hypertrophy. In chronic kidney disease (CKD), muscle wasting occurs because complications of CKD including acidosis, insulin resistance, inflammation, and increased angiotensin II levels stimulate the UPS to degrade muscle proteins. This response also includes caspase-3 and calpains which act to cleave muscle proteins to provide substrates for the UPS. For example, caspase-3 degrades actomyosin, leaving a 14kD fragment of actin in muscle. The 14 kD actin fragment is increased in muscle of patient with kidney disease, burn injury and surgery. In addition, acidosis, insulin resistance, inflammation and angiotensin II stimulate glucocorticoid production. Glucocorticoids are also required for the muscle wasting that occurs in CKD. Thus, the UPS is involved in regulating kidney function and participates in highly organized responses that degrade muscle protein in response to loss of kidney function. PMID:18723090

  11. CENPA a Genomic Marker for Centromere Activity and Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    M. Valdivia, Manuel; Hamdouch, Khaoula; Ortiz, Manuela; Astola, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Inheritance of genetic material requires that chromosomes segregate faithfully during cell division. Failure in this process can drive to aneuploidy phenomenon. Kinetochores are unique centromere macromolecular protein structures that attach chromosomes to the spindle for a proper movement and segregation. A unique type of nucleosomes of centromeric chromatin provides the base for kinetochore formation. A specific histone H3 variant, CENPA, replaces conventional histone H3 and together with centromere-specific-DNA-binding factors directs the assembly of active kinetochores. Recent studies on CENPA nucleosomal structure, epigenetic inheritance of centromeric chromatin and transcription of pericentric heterochromatin provide new clues to our understanding of centromere structure and function. This review highlights the role and dynamics of CENPA assembly into centromeres and the potential contribution of this kinetochore protein to autoimmune and cancer diseases in humans. PMID:20119530

  12. The Correlation of Serum IL-12B Expression With Disease Activity in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye Won; Chung, Sook Hee; Moon, Chang Mo; Che, Xiumei; Kim, Seung Won; Park, Soo Jung; Hong, Sung Pil; Kim, Tae Il; Kim, Won Ho; Cheon, Jae Hee

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Genetic variants in IL12B, encoding the p40 subunit common in interleukin-12 (IL-12) and interleukin-23, were identified as the susceptibility loci for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). This study aimed to identify the correlation of serum IL-12B expression with disease activity in patients with IBD and evaluate the possibility of IL-12B as a biomarker for assessing inflammatory status in IBD. A total of 102 patients with IBD, including 38, 32, and 32 patients with Crohn's disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC), and intestinal Behçet's disease (intestinal BD), respectively, were included. The clinical and laboratory data from the patients were collected at the time of serum IL-12B measurement. Serum IL-12B levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The median IL-12B levels in patients with CD, UC, and intestinal BD were significantly higher than those in controls (1.87, 2.74, and 2.73 pg/mL, respectively, vs. 1.42 pg/mL, all P <0.05). IL-12B concentrations were associated with disease activity in patients with UC and intestinal BD but not in those with CD. IL-12B levels were increased with increasing disease activity in patients with UC (P <0.001). Likewise, patients with active intestinal BD had higher IL-12B levels than those without active disease (P = 0.008). IL-12B levels were correlated with the endoscopic disease activity of UC (P = 0.002) and intestinal BD (P = 0.001) but not that of CD. Serum IL-12B levels were significantly correlated with clinical and endoscopic disease activity in patients with UC and intestinal BD, suggesting its potential use as a biomarker for assessing disease activity in these patients. PMID:27281077

  13. Serum ST2 in inflammatory bowel disease: a potential biomarker for disease activity.

    PubMed

    Boga, Salih; Alkim, Huseyin; Koksal, Ali Riza; Ozagari, Ayse Aysim; Bayram, Mehmet; Tekin Neijmann, Sebnem; Sen, Ilker; Alkim, Canan

    2016-06-01

    ST2, a specific ligand of interleukin 33, was described as a biomarker protein of inflammatory processes and overexpression of ST2 in ulcerative colitis (UC) was shown previously. We aimed to investigate the potential relationship of serum ST2 levels with the clinical, endoscopic and histopathological activity scores in UC and Crohn's disease (CD). Serum ST2 levels were determined in 143 patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) (83 UC and 60 CD), in 50 healthy controls (HC), and in 32 patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Serum ST2 levels were elevated in IBD (56.8 (41.9-87.2) pg/mL) compared to HC and IBS (30.7 (20.2-54.3), p<0.001 and 39.9 (25.9-68.7) pg/mL, p=0.002, respectively). No significant difference was found between UC (54.2 (41.3-93.0) pg/mL) and CD (63.8 (42.7-88.4) pg/mL) and between IBS and HC. Serum ST2 levels were significantly increased in active UC compared to inactive UC (72.5 (44.1-99.5) vs 40.0 (34.7-51.6) pg/mL, p<0.001) and in active CD in comparison with inactive CD (63.8 (42.7-88.4) vs 48.4 (29.6-56.9) pg/mL, p=0.036). Patients with CD showing fistulizing behavior had significantly higher ST2 levels compared to patients with inflammatory and stricturing CD (p<0.001). Clinical activity scores of patients with UC and CD were correlated with serum ST2 levels (r=0.692, p<0.001 and r=0.242, p=0.043, respectively). Serum ST2 levels showed stepwise increases with the increasing histopathological scores of patients with UC and CD (p<0.001 for both). The present study highlights significant associations between ST2 and IBD presence and activity and demonstrates elevated serum ST2 levels in patients with active CD as a novel finding. PMID:27001944

  14. Origins of Western diseases

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, MJ

    2011-01-01

    Recent gynaecological studies show that childbirth, constipation, trauma and surgery cause injuries to autonomic nerves at different anatomical sites in the female pelvis resulting in endometriosis, adenomyosis and fibroids. Re-growth of abnormal nerves causes allodynic symptoms (‘light touch causing pain or discomfort’) some years later including vulvodynia, dyspareunia, dysmenorrhea, irritative bladder and bowel symptoms. Further consequences of autonomic denervation include tissue hypoplasia and hyperplasia, visceral dysfunction, susceptibility to infection, alcohol, tobacco and drugs, as well as pain with sensitization of the central nervous system. The ‘autonomic denervation’ view extrapolates these observations from the female pelvis to the varied anatomy of branches of the cardiac and coeliac plexi to provide primary mechanisms for many forms of Western disease. This account sets out the autonomic denervation view, identifies features of autonomic denervation in extrapelvic organs, and, contrasts it with prior accounts of chronic Western diseases including those of DP Burkitt, PRJ Burch and DP Barker. PMID:22048676

  15. Carnosinase activity of human gastrointestinal mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Sadikali, F; Darwish, R; Watson, W C

    1975-01-01

    Carnosinase, the dipeptidase which hydrolyses carnosine and other histidine-containing dipeptides, was assayed in mucosal tissues of the human and of the rat gut. Kinetic properties of the intestinal enzyme were found to be similar to carnosinase of other animal tissues. Little or no activity was detected in human gastric or colonic mucosa, and the levels were lower in duodenal than jejunal mucosa. The distribution of carnosinase is similar to that of the disaccharidases. Mean carnosinase activity was 8-8 units/g weight in 15 patients with histologically normal mucosa compared with 5-7 units in five with villous atrophy. The enzyme levels increased with histological improvement of the mucosa in patients with coeliac disease on a gluten-free diet. Tolerance curves for carnosine and its constitutent amino acids showed malabsorption of the dipeptide in a patient with carnosinase deficiency. It is concluded that the intestinal mucosa has much less hydrolase activity for carnosine than for glycylglycine and other dipeptidases, and the relatively slow hydrolysis appears to be the rate-limiting step in the total absorptive process. PMID:1237444

  16. Fecal Calprotectin and Clinical Disease Activity in Pediatric Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Kolho, Kaija-Leena; Turner, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To explore fecal calprotectin levels in pediatric ulcerative colitis (UC) in relation with the validated clinical activity index PUCAI. Methods. This study included all 37 children (median age 14 years) with UC who had calprotectin measured (PhiCal ELISA Test) by the time of PUCAI assessment at the Children's Hospital of Helsinki in a total of 62 visits. Calprotectin values <100 μg/g of stool were considered as normal. The best cut-off value of each measure to predict 3-month clinical outcome was derived by maximizing sensitivity and specificity. Results. In clinically active disease (PUCAI ≥ 10), calprotectin was elevated in 29/32 patients (91% sensitivity). When in clinical remission, 26% (8/30) of the children had normal calprotectin but 7 (23%) had an exceedingly high level (>1000 μg/g). The best cut-off value for calprotectin for predicting poor outcome was 800 μg/g (sensitivity 73%, specificity 72%; area under the ROC curve being 0.71 (95%CI 0.57–0.85)) and for the PUCAI best cut-off values >10 (sensitivity 62%, specificity 64%; area under the ROC curve 0.714 (95%CI 0.58–0.85)). Conclusion. The clinical relevance of somewhat elevated calprotectin during clinical remission in pediatric UC is not known and, until further evidence accumulates, does not indicate therapy escalation. PMID:23533791

  17. Steroid receptor RNA activator: Biologic function and role in disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chan; Wu, Hong-Tao; Zhu, Neng; Shi, Ya-Ning; Liu, Zheng; Ao, Bao-Xue; Liao, Duan-Fang; Zheng, Xi-Long; Qin, Li

    2016-08-01

    Steroid receptor RNA activator (SRA) is a type of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) which coordinates the functions of various transcription factors, enhances steroid receptor-dependent gene expression, and also serves as a distinct scaffold. The novel, profound and expanded roles of SRA are emerging in critical aspects of coactivation of nuclear receptors (NRs). As a nuclear receptor coactivator, SRA can coactivate androgen receptor (AR), estrogen receptor α (ERα), ERβ, progesterone receptor (PR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), thyroid hormone receptor and retinoic acid receptor (RAR). Although SRA is one of the least well-understood molecules, increasing studies have revealed that SRA plays a key role in both biological processes, such as myogenesis and steroidogenesis, and pathological changes, including obesity, cardiomyopathy, and tumorigenesis. Furthermore, the SRA-related signaling pathways, such as the mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), Notch and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) pathways, play critical roles in the pathogenesis of estrogen-dependent breast cancers. In addition, the most recent data demonstrates that SRA expression may serve as a new prognostic marker in patients with ER-positive breast cancer. Thus, elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying SRA-mediated functions is important to develop proper novel strategies to target SRA in the diagnosis and treatment of human diseases. PMID:27282881

  18. Diaphragm activation during exercise in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Sinderby, C; Spahija, J; Beck, J; Kaminski, D; Yan, S; Comtois, N; Sliwinski, P

    2001-06-01

    Although it has been postulated that central inhibition of respiratory drive may prevent development of diaphragm fatigue in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) during exercise, this premise has not been validated. We evaluated diaphragm electrical activation (EAdi) relative to maximum in 10 patients with moderately severe COPD at rest and during incremental exhaustive bicycle exercise. Flow was measured with a pneumotachograph and volume by integration of flow. EAdi and transdiaphragmatic pressures (Pdi) were measured using an esophageal catheter. End-expiratory lung volume (EELV) was assessed by inspiratory capacity (IC) maneuvers, and maximal voluntary EAdi was obtained during these maneuvers. Minute ventilation (V E) was 12.2 +/- 1.9 L/min (mean +/- SD) at rest, and increased progressively (p < 0.001) to 31.0 +/- 7.8 L/min at end-exercise. EELV increased during exercise (p < 0.001) causing end-inspiratory lung volume to attain 97 +/- 3% of TLC at end-exercise. Pdi at rest was 9.4 +/- 3.2 cm H(2)O and increased during the first two thirds of exercise (p < 0.001) to plateau at about 13 cm H(2)O. EAdi was 24 +/- 6% of voluntary maximal at rest and increased progressively during exercise (p < 0.001) to reach 81 +/- 7% at end-exercise. In conclusion, dynamic hyperinflation during exhaustive exercise in patients with COPD reduces diaphragm pressure-generating capacity, promoting high levels of diaphragm activation. PMID:11401887

  19. Influence of medical treatment, smoking and disease activity on pregnancy outcomes in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Julsgaard, Mette; Nørgaard, Mette; Hvas, Christian Lodberg; Grosen, Anne; Hasseriis, Sara; Christensen, Lisbet Ambrosius

    2014-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. Little is known about predictors for adverse pregnancy outcomes among women with Crohn's disease (CD). In this population-based study, we examined pregnancy outcomes in CD stratified by medical treatment and smoking status while accounting for disease activity. METHODS. In two Danish regions with a population of 1.6 million, we identified 154 CD women who had given birth within a 6-year period. We combined questionnaire data, prescription data, data from medical records and population-based medical databases. We used logistic regression to estimate prevalence odds ratios (POR) for adverse pregnancy outcomes by different predictors. RESULTS. Among 105 (80%) respondents, 55 (52%) reported taking medication during pregnancy. The majority (95%) were in disease remission. The children's mean birth weight did not differ by maternal medical treatment. As expected, smoking was a predictor of low birth weight. Mean birth weight in children of smokers in medical treatment was significantly reduced by 274 g compared with children of non-smokers who received medical treatment. In children of women without medical treatment, this difference was 126 g between smokers and non-smokers. Women in medical treatment did not have an increased risk of preterm delivery (POR 0.71; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.18-2.79), congenital malformations (POR 0.60; 0.10-3.76) or cesarean section (POR 1.40; 0.63-3.08). CONCLUSIon. In CD, smoking was negatively associated with child birth weight. This association was most pronounced among women who received medical treatment. Maternal medical treatment for CD did not seem to be a risk factor for adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:24417179

  20. Dopaminergic correlates of metabolic network activity in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Holtbernd, Florian; Ma, Yilong; Peng, Shichun; Schwartz, Frank; Timmermann, Lars; Kracht, Lutz; Fink, Gereon R; Tang, Chris C; Eidelberg, David; Eggers, Carsten

    2015-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with distinct metabolic covariance patterns that relate to the motor and cognitive manifestations of the disorder. It is not known, however, how the expression of these patterns relates to measurements of nigrostriatal dopaminergic activity from the same individuals. To explore these associations, we studied 106 PD subjects who underwent cerebral PET with both (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and (18) F-fluoro-L-dopa (FDOPA). Expression values for the PD motor- and cognition-related metabolic patterns (PDRP and PDCP, respectively) were computed for each subject; these measures were correlated with FDOPA uptake on a voxel-by-voxel basis. To explore the relationship between dopaminergic function and local metabolic activity, caudate and putamen FDOPA PET signal was correlated voxel-wise with FDG uptake over the entire brain. PDRP expression correlated with FDOPA uptake in caudate and putamen (P < 0.001), while PDCP expression correlated with uptake in the anterior striatum (P < 0.001). While statistically significant, the correlations were only of modest size, accounting for less than 20% of the overall variation in these measures. After controlling for PDCP expression, PDRP correlations were significant only in the posterior putamen. Of note, voxel-wise correlations between caudate/putamen FDOPA uptake and whole-brain FDG uptake were significant almost exclusively in PDRP regions. Overall, the data indicate that PDRP and PDCP expression correlates significantly with PET indices of presynaptic dopaminergic functioning obtained in the same individuals. Even so, the modest size of these correlations suggests that in PD patients, individual differences in network activity cannot be explained solely by nigrostriatal dopamine loss. PMID:26037537

  1. Wheat-related disorders: A broad spectrum of ‘evolving’ diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gasbarrini, GB

    2014-01-01

    Throughout the world, cereals have always been recognized as a fundamental food. Human evolution, through the development of cooking, led to the production of food rich in gluten, in order to take full advantage of the nutritional properties of this food. The result has been that gluten intolerance has arisen only in those populations that developed the art of cooking wheat. It is also recognized that wheat, one of the central elements of the Mediterranean diet, cannot be tolerated in some individuals. Among the wheat-related pathologies, coeliac disease is the best known: it is a chronic inflammatory condition affecting the gastrointestinal tract, which develops in genetically predisposed individuals. The most common manifestation is the malabsorption of nutrients. Recently, another wheat-related disease has appeared: non-coeliac gluten sensitivity, defined as the onset of a variety of manifestations related to wheat, rye and barley ingestion, in patients in whom coeliac disease and wheat allergy have been excluded. In this paper we will explore the damaging power of wheat, analysing the harmful process by which it realizes the onset of clinical manifestations associated with wheat-related disorders. PMID:25083282

  2. Biomarkers of basic activities of daily living in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hall, James R; Johnson, Leigh A; Barber, Robert C; Vo, Hoa T; Winter, A Scott; O'Bryant, Sid E

    2012-01-01

    Functional impairment is common in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related to increased caregiver burden and institutionalization. There is a dearth of research investigating the relationship between specific biomarkers and basic activities of daily living (BADLs) such as toileting, feeding, dressing, grooming, bathing, and ambulating. The present study examined the relationship between serum based biomarkers and specific ADLs in a sample of AD patients. Data were collected from 196 participants enrolled in the Texas Alzheimer's Research and Care Consortium Project and diagnosed with AD. BADLs were measured using the Lawton-Brody Physical Self-Maintenance Scale. A panel of 22 biomarkers previously found to be related to AD pathology was used for the analysis. Stepwise regression modeling was used to assess the link between the biomarkers and BADLs. Results were also examined by gender. Nine of the 22 biomarkers were significantly related to BADLs. When stratified by gender, the biomarkers accounted for 32% of the variance in the males and 27% in females. The pattern of significant biomarkers differed by gender with IL 7 and Tenascin C significantly related to BADLs for females and IL 15 significantly related to BADLs for males. The results of this study indicated that a small number of serum based biomarkers are related to BADLs, and these biomarkers differed by gender. PMID:22571981

  3. The relationship between infliximab concentrations, antibodies to infliximab and disease activity in Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Vande Casteele, Niels; Khanna, Reena; Levesque, Barrett G; Stitt, Larry; Zou, G Y; Singh, Sharat; Lockton, Steve; Hauenstein, Scott; Ohrmund, Linda; Greenberg, Gordon R; Rutgeerts, Paul J; Gils, Ann; Sandborn, William J; Vermeire, Séverine; Feagan, Brian G

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although low infliximab trough concentrations and antibodies to infliximab (ATI) are associated with poor outcomes in patients with Crohn's disease (CD), the clinical relevance of ATI in patients with adequate infliximab concentrations is uncertain. We evaluated this question using an assay sensitive for identification of ATI in the presence of infliximab. Design In an observational study, 1487 trough serum samples from 483 patients with CD who participated in four clinical studies of maintenance infliximab therapy were analysed using a fluid phase mobility shift assay. Infliximab and ATI concentrations most discriminant for remission, defined as a C-reactive protein concentration of ≤5 mg/L, were determined by receiver operating characteristic curves. A multivariable regression model evaluated these factors as independent predictors of remission. Results Based upon analysis of 1487 samples, 77.1% of patients had detectable and 22.9% had undetectable infliximab concentrations, of which 9.5% and 71.8%, respectively, were positive for ATI. An infliximab concentration of >2.79 μg/mL (area under the curve (AUC)=0.681; 95% CI 0.632 to 0.731) and ATI concentration of <3.15 U/mL (AUC=0.632; 95% CI 0.589 to 0.676) were associated with remission. Multivariable analysis showed that concentrations of both infliximab trough (OR 1.8; 95% CI 1.3 to 2.5; p<0.001) and ATI (OR 0.57; 95% CI 0.39 to 0.81; p=0.002) were independent predictors of remission. Conclusions The development of ATI increases the probability of active disease even at low concentrations and in the presence of a therapeutic concentration of drug during infliximab maintenance therapy. Evaluation of strategies to prevent ATI formation, including therapeutic drug monitoring with selective infliximab dose intensification, is needed. PMID:25336114

  4. [Celiac disease--the chameleon among the food intolerances].

    PubMed

    Ströhle, Alexander; Wolters, Maike; Hahn, Andreas

    2013-10-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder resulting from gluten intolerance and is based on a genetically predisposition. Symptoms occur upon exposure to prolamin from wheat, rye, barley and related grain. The pathogenesis of celiac disease has not yet been sufficiently elucidated but is being considered as an autoimmune process. At its core are the deamidation of prolamin fragments, the building of specific antibodies and the activation of cytotoxic T-cells. The immunological inflammatory process is accompanied by structural damages of the enterocytes (villous atrophy, colonization and crypt hyperplasia). The symptoms and their extent depend on the type of the celiac disease; classic and non-classic forms are being distinguished (atypical, oligosymptomatic, latent and silent celiac disease). Characteristics of the classic presentation are malabsorption syndrome and intestinal symptoms such as mushy diarrhea and abdominal distension. The diagnosis of celiac disease is based on four pillars: Anamnesis and clinical presentation, serological evidence of coeliac specific antibodies (IgA-t-TG; IgA-EmA), small intestine biopsy and improvement of symptoms after institution of a gluten-free diet. The basis of the therapy is a lifelong gluten-free diet, i. e. wheat, rye, barley, spelt, green-core, faro-wheat, kamuth and conventional oats as well as food items obtained therefrom. Small amounts of up to 50 mg gluten per day are usually tolerated by most patients; amounts of > or = 100 mg/day lead mostly to symptoms. Gluten-free foods contain < or = 20 ppm or 20 mg/kg (Sign: symbol of the 'crossed ear' or label 'gluten-free'). At the beginning of the therapy the fat and lactose intake may need to be reduced; also the supplementation of single micronutrients (fat-soluble vitamins, folic acid, B12, iron, and calcium) may be required. Alternative therapies are being developed but have not yet been clinically tested. PMID:24266248

  5. Women, men, and rheumatoid arthritis: analyses of disease activity, disease characteristics, and treatments in the QUEST-RA Study

    PubMed Central

    Sokka, Tuulikki; Toloza, Sergio; Cutolo, Maurizio; Kautiainen, Hannu; Makinen, Heidi; Gogus, Feride; Skakic, Vlado; Badsha, Humeira; Peets, Tõnu; Baranauskaite, Asta; Géher, Pál; Újfalussy, Ilona; Skopouli, Fotini N; Mavrommati, Maria; Alten, Rieke; Pohl, Christof; Sibilia, Jean; Stancati, Andrea; Salaffi, Fausto; Romanowski, Wojciech; Zarowny-Wierzbinska, Danuta; Henrohn, Dan; Bresnihan, Barry; Minnock, Patricia; Knudsen, Lene Surland; Jacobs, Johannes WG; Calvo-Alen, Jaime; Lazovskis, Juris; Pinheiro, Geraldo da Rocha Castelar; Karateev, Dmitry; Andersone, Daina; Rexhepi, Sylejman; Yazici, Yusuf; Pincus, Theodore

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Gender as a predictor of outcomes of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has evoked considerable interest over the decades. Historically, there is no consensus whether RA is worse in females or males. Recent reports suggest that females are less likely than males to achieve remission. Therefore, we aimed to study possible associations of gender and disease activity, disease characteristics, and treatments of RA in a large multinational cross-sectional cohort of patients with RA called Quantitative Standard Monitoring of Patients with RA (QUEST-RA). Methods The cohort includes clinical and questionnaire data from patients who were seen in usual care, including 6,004 patients at 70 sites in 25 countries as of April 2008. Gender differences were analyzed for American College of Rheumatology Core Data Set measures of disease activity, DAS28 (disease activity score using 28 joint counts), fatigue, the presence of rheumatoid factor, nodules and erosions, and the current use of prednisone, methotrexate, and biologic agents. Results Women had poorer scores than men in all Core Data Set measures. The mean values for females and males were swollen joint count-28 (SJC28) of 4.5 versus 3.8, tender joint count-28 of 6.9 versus 5.4, erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 30 versus 26, Health Assessment Questionnaire of 1.1 versus 0.8, visual analog scales for physician global estimate of 3.0 versus 2.5, pain of 4.3 versus 3.6, patient global status of 4.2 versus 3.7, DAS28 of 4.3 versus 3.8, and fatigue of 4.6 versus 3.7 (P < 0.001). However, effect sizes were small-medium and smallest (0.13) for SJC28. Among patients who had no or minimal disease activity (0 to 1) on SJC28, women had statistically significantly higher mean values compared with men in all other disease activity measures (P < 0.001) and met DAS28 remission less often than men. Rheumatoid factor was equally prevalent among genders. Men had nodules more often than women. Women had erosions more often than men, but

  6. Rapid fecal calprotectin testing to assess for endoscopic disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease: A diagnostic cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Kwapisz, Lukasz; Mosli, Mahmoud; Chande, Nilesh; Yan, Brian; Beaton, Melanie; Micsko, Jessica; Mennill, Pauline W.; Barnett, William; Bax, Kevin; Ponich, Terry; Howard, John; Tirolese, Anthony; Lannigan, Robert; Gregor, James

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim: With increasing numbers of patients diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), it is important to identify noninvasive methods of detecting disease activity. The aim of this study is to examine the diagnostic accuracy of fecal rapid calprotectin (FC) testing in the detection of endoscopically active IBD. Patients and Methods: All consecutive patients presenting to outpatient clinics with lower gastrointestinal symptoms were prospectively recruited. Patients provided FC samples. Sensitivity (Sn), specificity (Sp), positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) for FC were calculated. Receiver–operator characteristics (ROC) curve was used to identify the ideal FC cutoff that predicts endoscopic disease activity. Correlation between FC and endoscopic disease activity, disease location, and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were measured. Results: One hundred and twenty-six patients, of whom 52% were females, were included in the final analysis with a mean age of 44.4 ± 16.7 years. Comparing FC to endoscopic findings, the following results were calculated: A cutoff point of 100 μg/g showed Sn = 83%, Sp = 67%, PPV = 65%, and NPV = 85%; and 200 μg/g showed Sn = 66%, Sp = 82%, PPV = 73%, and NPV = 77%. Based on ROC curve, the best FC cutoff point to predict endoscopic disease activity was 140 μg/g. Using this reference, FC levels strongly correlated with colorectal, ileocolonic, and ileal disease and predicted endoscopic activity. Conclusions: FC is an accurate test when used as an initial screening tool for patients suspected of having active IBD. Given its noninvasive nature, it may prove to reduce the need for colonoscopy and be an added tool in the management of IBD. PMID:26655130

  7. Oats and bowel disease: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Thies, Frank; Masson, Lindsey F; Boffetta, Paolo; Kris-Etherton, Penny

    2014-10-01

    Whole-grain foods such as oats may protect against colorectal cancer and have benefits on inflammatory bowel disease and coeliac disease. The present study aimed to systematically review the literature describing intervention studies that investigated the effects of oats or oat bran on risk factors for bowel disease. A literature search was conducted using Embase, Medline and the Cochrane library, which identified 654 potential articles. Thirty-eight articles describing twenty-nine studies met the inclusion criteria. Two studies carried out in participants with a history of colorectal adenomas found no effects of increased oat-bran intake on indirect risk makers for colorectal cancer. One of two interventions with oat bran in patients with ulcerative colitis showed small improvements in the patients' conditions. Most of the eleven studies carried out in adults with coeliac disease showed no negative effects of uncontaminated oat consumption. The fourteen studies carried out in volunteers with no history of bowel disease suggest that oats or oat bran can significantly increase stool weight and decrease constipation, but there is a lack of evidence to support a specific effect of oats on bowel function compared with other cereals. A long-term dietary intake of oats or oat bran could benefit inflammatory bowel disorders, but this remains to be proven. A protective effect on colorectal adenoma and cancer incidence has not yet been convincingly shown. The majority of patients with coeliac disease could consume up to 100 g/d of uncontaminated oats, which would increase the acceptability of, and adherence to, a gluten-free diet. PMID:25267242

  8. Evaluation of telomerase activity in non-genital Bowen's disease.

    PubMed

    Mitsuishi, T; Nakatake, M; Kaneko, T; Ohara, K; Kato, T; Iida, K; Iwabu, Y; Tokunaga, K; Sata, T; Kawana, S; Yamada, O

    2009-06-01

    We investigated the level of telomerase activity (TA) in 17 specimens of non-genital Bowen's disease (BD) and in 14 specimens of skin without sun exposure (non-exposed skin) using a non-isotopic PCR-based telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay. Expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT; the catalytic subunit of telomerase) was also evaluated by immunochemistry in the non-genital BD tissues. Moderate to high levels of TA were detected in 41.2% of 17 non-genital BD specimens (P = 0.001). In contrast, TA was not evident in non-exposed skin. Recently, nucleolin was reported to be associated with hTERT, so we used this antibody instead of hTERT antibody. Immunohistochemistry showed that nucleolin expression was associated with high TA levels in non-genital BD. Our results also revealed differences of TA levels among non-genital BD specimens. High levels of TA in those specimens were not age related. Five out of 7 specimens (71.4%) with moderate to high TA levels were from sun-exposed sites, while the remaining 10 specimens with low levels of TA were from non-exposed sites. These results suggested that cellular DNA damage caused by ultraviolet irradiation might be associated with an increase of TA in non-genital BD. Among non-genital BD specimens, 4 out of 17 (23.5%) showed high levels of TA (median relative TA value: 79.8%; P = 0.003), which might be associated with immortalization or transformation to invasive squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:19250332

  9. Health-related quality of life in youth with Crohn's disease: The role of disease activity and parenting stress

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Wendy N.; Boyle, Shana L.; Graef, Danielle M.; Janicke, David M.; Jolley, Christopher D.; Denson, Lee A.; Baldassano, Robert N.; Hommel, Kevin A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is an important, but understudied construct in pediatric IBD. Family-level predictors of HRQOL have been understudied as are the mechanisms through which disease activity impacts HRQOL. The current study examines the relationship between a family-level factor (parenting stress) and HRQOL in youth with Crohn's disease. Parenting stress is examined as a mechanism through with disease activity impacts HRQOL. Methods 99 adolescents with Crohn's disease and their parents were recruited across three sites. Adolescents completed the IMPACT-III (IBD-specific HRQOL). Parents completed the Pediatric Inventory for Parents, a measure of medically-related parenting stress that assesses: 1) stress due to the occurrence of medical stressors and 2) stress due to the perceived difficulty of stressors. Disease activity was obtained from medical records. Results Parenting stress due to the occurrence of medical stressors partially mediated the disease severity-HRQOL relationship, reducing the relationship between these variables from 49.67% to 31.58% (B = -.56, p <.0001). Boot strapping analysis confirmed that the indirect effect of disease severity on HQROL via parenting stress significantly differed from zero. Parenting stress due to the perceived difficulty of medical stressors partially mediated the disease severity-HRQOL relationship, reducing the relationship from 49.67% to 30.29% (B = -.55, p < .0001). The indirect effect was confirmed via bootstrapping procedures. Conclusions As disease severity increased, parenting stress also increased, and adolescent HRQOL decreased. Parenting stress should be considered and assessed for along with medical factors as part of a comprehensive approach to improving HRQOL in adolescents with Crohn's disease. PMID:25564807

  10. Health-related quality of life in adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease depends on disease activity and psychiatric comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Engelmann, G; Erhard, D; Petersen, M; Parzer, P; Schlarb, A A; Resch, F; Brunner, R; Hoffmann, G F; Lenhartz, H; Richterich, A

    2015-04-01

    Adolescent patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) show an increased risk for behavioral and emotional dysfunction. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is influenced by medical illnesses, as well as by psychiatric disorders, but for adolescents with IBD, the extent to which HRQoL is influenced by these two factors is unclear. For 47 adolescent IBD patients, we analyzed disease activity, HRQoL and whether or not a psychiatric disorder was present. Disease activity was estimated using pediatric Ulcerative Colitis Activity Index and pediatric Crohn's Disease Activity Index. The IMPACT-III and the EQ-5D were used to measure HRQoL and QoL, respectively. In addition, patient and parent diagnostic interviews were performed. 55.3 % patients fulfilled DSM-IV criteria for one or more psychiatric disorders. In all patients, psychiatric comorbidity together with disease activity contributed to a reduction in quality of life. Adolescents with IBD are at a high risk for clinically relevant emotional or behavioral problems resulting in significantly lower HRQoL. We conclude that accessible, optimally structured psychotherapeutic and/or psychiatric help is needed in adolescent patients with IBD. PMID:24838299

  11. Constitutive Activation of G Protein-Coupled Receptors and Diseases: Insights into Mechanisms of Activation and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Ya-Xiong

    2008-01-01

    The existence of constitutive activity for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) was first described in 1980s. In 1991, the first naturally occurring constitutively active mutations in GPCRs that cause diseases were reported in rhodopsin. Since then, numerous constitutively active mutations that cause human diseases were reported in several additional receptors. More recently, loss of constitutive activity was postulated to also cause diseases. Animal models expressing some of these mutants confirmed the roles of these mutations in the pathogenesis of the diseases. Detailed functional studies of these naturally occurring mutations, combined with homology modeling using rhodopsin crystal structure as the template, lead to important insights into the mechanism of activation in the absence of crystal structure of GPCRs in active state. Search for inverse agonists on these receptors will be critical for correcting the diseases cause by activating mutations in GPCRs. Theoretically, these inverse agonists are better therapeutics than neutral antagonists in treating genetic diseases caused by constitutively activating mutations in GPCRs. PMID:18768149

  12. Ghrelin and adipokines as circulating markers of disease activity in patients with Takayasu arteritis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The current markers of disease activity in Takayasu arteritis (TA) are insufficient for proper assessment. We investigated circulating levels of unacylated and acylated ghrelin, leptin and adiponectin and their relationships with disease activity in patients with TA. Methods This study included 31 patients with TA and 32 sex-, age- and body mass index-matched healthy controls. Disease activity was assessed in TA patients using various tools, including Kerr's criteria, disease extent index-Takayasu, physician's global assessment, radiological parameters, and laboratory markers. Plasma unacylated and acylated ghrelin, and serum leptin and adiponectin levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results Unacylated and acylated ghrelin levels were found to be significantly lower in TA patients than that in healthy controls. Patients with active disease had lower unacylated ghrelin levels than those with inactive disease and had lower acylated ghrelin levels than healthy controls. Ghrelin levels were negatively correlated with various parameters of disease activity. The leptin/ghrelin ratio was significantly higher in TA patients than controls. It was positively correlated with disease activity. There was a positive correlation between unacylated and acylated ghrelin and a negative correlation between leptin and ghrelin. There was no statistical difference in adiponectin levels between TA patients and controls. The radiological activity markers were positively correlated with other parameters of disease activity. Conclusions This study suggests that plasma unacylated and acylated ghrelin levels may be useful in monitoring disease activity and planning treatment strategies for patients with TA. The serum leptin level and leptin/ghrelin ratio may also be used to help assess the disease activity. PMID:23259466

  13. Development and assessment of a modified Pediatric Crohn Disease Activity Index.

    PubMed

    Leach, Steven T; Nahidi, Lily; Tilakaratne, Samantha; Day, Andrew S; Lemberg, Daniel A

    2010-08-01

    The Pediatric Crohn Disease Activity Index (PCDAI) is an established and validated measure of disease activity in children with Crohn disease. However, its use in the research setting can be limited because of ambiguity of the subjective and anthropometric components of the index. Here we propose and evaluate a modified PCDAI (Mod PCDAI) consisting of the laboratory measures of the PCDAI plus C-reactive protein. This Mod PCDAI can provide an indication of disease activity because it correlates with the PCDAI, physicians' global assessment, and fecal calprotectin, and therefore may provide a suitable alternative to the PCDAI when required. PMID:20479686

  14. Leisure Time Physical Activity and Mortality in Chronic Kidney Disease: Preliminary findings from the MDRD study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. In the general population, physical activity is associated with reduced mortality. We examined physical activity status in CKD patients and its relation to all-cause mortality. The Modified...

  15. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta agonist ameliorated inflammasome activation in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Jung; Yeon, Jong Eun; Ko, Eun Jung; Yoon, Eileen L; Suh, Sang Jun; Kang, Keunhee; Kim, Hae Rim; Kang, Seoung Hee; Yoo, Yang Jae; Je, Jihye; Lee, Beom Jae; Kim, Ji Hoon; Seo, Yeon Seok; Yim, Hyung Joon; Byun, Kwan Soo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the inflammasome activation and the effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR)-δ agonist treatment in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) models. METHODS: Male C57BL/6J mice were classified according to control or high fat diet (HFD) with or without PPAR-δ agonist (GW) over period of 12 wk [control, HFD, HFD + lipopolysaccharide (LPS), HFD + LPS + GW group]. HepG2 cells were exposed to palmitic acid (PA) and/or LPS in the absence or presence of GW. RESULTS: HFD caused glucose intolerance and hepatic steatosis. In mice fed an HFD with LPS, caspase-1 and interleukin (IL)-1β in the liver were significantly increased. Treatment with GW ameliorated the steatosis and inhibited overexpression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In HepG2 cells, PA and LPS treatment markedly increased mRNA of several nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain-like receptor family members (NLRP3, NLRP6, and NLRP10), caspase-1 and IL-1β. PA and LPS also exaggerated reactive oxygen species production. All of the above effects of PA and LPS were reduced by GW. GW also enhanced the phosphorylation of AMPK-α. CONCLUSION: PPAR-δ agonist reduces fatty acid-induced inflammation and steatosis by suppressing inflammasome activation. Targeting the inflammasome by the PPAR-δ agonist may have therapeutic implication for NAFLD. PMID:26668503

  16. Markers of endothelial cell activation and immune activation are increased in patients with severe leptospirosis and associated with disease severity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives: Previous studies concluded that haemorrhage is one of the most accurate prognostic factors of mortality in leptospirosis. Therefore, endothelial cell activation was investigated in relation to disease severity in severe leptospirosis. Methods: Prospective cohort study of severe leptospi...

  17. Can directed activity improve mobility in Huntington's disease?

    PubMed

    Busse, M E; Rosser, A E

    2007-04-30

    Huntington's disease is an inherited disorder of the CNS that results in progressive deterioration of mobility and cognition and also affects behaviour. There are no disease-modifying interventions available to date, although there has been considerable progress in research directed at understanding the pathological basis of the disease with a view to identifying potential treatments. It is however important not to overlook currently available treatment strategies, including rehabilitation approaches. There has been little work to date to explore the potential of such approaches and here we highlight the need for more systematic studies in this area as well as the need for good objective assessment tools and the potential role that rehabilitation and training may have in the application of novel treatment options. PMID:17352942

  18. Faecal alpha-1-antitrypsin and excretion of 111indium granulocytes in assessment of disease activity in chronic inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Fischbach, W; Becker, W; Mössner, J; Koch, W; Reiners, C

    1987-01-01

    Intestinal protein loss in chronic inflammatory bowel diseases may be easily determined by measurement of alpha-1-antitrypsin (alpha 1-AT) stool concentration and alpha 1-AT clearance. Both parameters were significantly raised in 36 and 34 patients respectively with chronic inflammatory bowel diseases, compared with eight patients with non-inflammatory bowel diseases, or 19 healthy volunteers. There was wide range of overlap between active and inactive inflammatory disease. Contrary to serum alpha 1-AT, faecal excretion and clearance of alpha 1-AT did not correlate with ESR, serum-albumin, orosomucoid, and two indices of disease activity. A comparison of alpha 1-AT faecal excretion and clearance with the faecal excretion of 111In labelled granulocytes in 27 patients with chronic inflammatory bowel diseases, showed no correlation between the intestinal protein loss and this highly specific marker of intestinal inflammation. Enteric protein loss expressed by faecal excretion and clearance of alpha 1-AT does not depend on mucosal inflammation only, but may be influenced by other factors. PMID:3495470

  19. Rheumatoid arthritis and pregnancy: evolution of disease activity and pathophysiological considerations for drug use

    PubMed Central

    Hazes, Johanna M.W.; Coulie, Pierre G.; Geenen, Vincent; Vermeire, Séverine; Carbonnel, Franck; Louis, Edouard; Masson, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    It has long been known that pregnancy and childbirth have a profound effect on the disease activity of rheumatic diseases. For clinicians, the management of patients with RA wishing to become pregnant involves the challenge of keeping disease activity under control and adequately adapting drug therapy during pregnancy and post-partum. This article aims to summarize the current evidence on the evolution of RA disease activity during and after pregnancy and the use of anti-rheumatic drugs around this period. Of recent interest is the potential use of anti-TNF compounds in the preconception period and during pregnancy. Accumulating experience with anti-TNF therapy in other immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, such as Crohn’s disease, provides useful insights for the use of TNF blockade in pregnant women with RA, or RA patients wishing to become pregnant. PMID:21890617

  20. Withanolides: Biologically Active Constituents in the Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shahid A; Khan, Sher B; Shah, Zarbad; Asiri, Abdullah M

    2016-01-01

    The use of natural products in drug discovery and development have an important history. Several therapeutic agents have been investigated during the biological screenings of natural compounds. It is well documented that plants are possibly the core of novel substances that led to the discovery of new, novel, and effective therapeutic agents. Therefore, in the last few decades, scientists were thoroughly attempting for the search of benevolent drugs to protect mankind from various diseases and discomforts. The diverse chemical structures of natural products are the key element of their success in modern drug discovery. Cholinesterase enzyme inhibitors (ChEI) are chemicals which inhibit the splitting of cholinesterase enzymes (acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase). Acetyl cholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) are two types of cholinesterase enzymes that have been identified in vertebrates that are responsible for Alzheimer's disease and related dementia. Withanolides are affective plant secondary metabolites which inhibit acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase enzyme and thus possibly will be the future drug for Alzheimer's disease. By viewing the importance of natural products in drug discovery and development, we present here, the importance of withanolides in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. In this article, we also describe the classification and structural characterization of withanolides. This review comprises of 114 compounds. PMID:26527154

  1. Implementation of the Simple Endoscopic Activity Score in Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Koutroumpakis, Efstratios; Katsanos, Konstantinos H.

    2016-01-01

    Simple Endoscopic Score for Crohn's Disease (SES-CD) was developed as an attempt to simplify Crohn's Disease Endoscopic Index of Severity (CDEIS). Since it was constructed from CDEIS, SES-CD performs comparably but also carries similar limitations. Several studies have utilized SES-CD scoring to describe disease severity or response to therapy. Some of them used SES-CD score as a continuous variable while others utilized certain cutoff values to define severity grades. All SES-CD cutoff values reported in published clinical trials were empirically selected by experts. Although in most of the studies that used SEC-CD scoring to define disease severity, a score <3 reflected inactive disease, no study is using score 0 to predefine inactivity. Studies applying SES-CD to define response to treatment used score 0. There is no optimal SES-CD cut-off for endoscopic remission. The quantification of mucosal healing using SES-CD scoring has not been standardized yet. As the definition of mucosal healing by SES-CD is unset, the concept of deep remission is also still evolving. Serum and fecal biomarkers as well as new radiologic imaging techniques are complementary to SES-CD. Current practice as well as important changes in endoscopy should be taken into consideration when defining SES-CD cutoffs. The optimal timing of SES-CD scoring to assess mucosal healing is not defined yet. To conclude, SES-CD represents a valuable tool. However, a consensus agreement on its optimal use is required. PMID:27184635

  2. Dysbiosis of the gut microbiota in disease

    PubMed Central

    Carding, Simon; Verbeke, Kristin; Vipond, Daniel T.; Corfe, Bernard M.; Owen, Lauren J.

    2015-01-01

    There is growing evidence that dysbiosis of the gut microbiota is associated with the pathogenesis of both intestinal and extra-intestinal disorders. Intestinal disorders include inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and coeliac disease, while extra-intestinal disorders include allergy, asthma, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, and obesity. In many of these conditions, the mechanisms leading to disease development involves the pivotal mutualistic relationship between the colonic microbiota, their metabolic products, and the host immune system. The establishment of a ‘healthy’ relationship early in life appears to be critical to maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Whilst we do not yet have a clear understanding of what constitutes a ‘healthy’ colonic microbiota, a picture is emerging from many recent studies identifying particular bacterial species associated with a healthy microbiota. In particular, the bacterial species residing within the mucus layer of the colon, either through direct contact with host cells, or through indirect communication via bacterial metabolites, may influence whether host cellular homeostasis is maintained or whether inflammatory mechanisms are triggered. In addition to inflammation, there is some evidence that perturbations in the gut microbiota is involved with the development of colorectal cancer. In this case, dysbiosis may not be the most important factor, rather the products of interaction between diet and the microbiome. High-protein diets are thought to result in the production of carcinogenic metabolites from the colonic microbiota that may result in the induction of neoplasia in the colonic epithelium. Ever more sensitive metabolomics methodologies reveal a suite of small molecules produced in the microbiome which mimic or act as neurosignallers or neurotransmitters. Coupled with evidence that probiotic interventions may alter psychological endpoints in both humans and in rodent models

  3. [Anorectal manometry in Hirschsprung disease].

    PubMed

    Gil Vernet, J M; Casasa, J M; Lloret, J; Marhuenda, C; Broto, J; Boix Ochoa, J

    1992-07-01

    To show the absence of inhibitory reflex of the anus (R.I.A.) by ano-rectal manometry is an important sign in the diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease. Between 1989 and 1991, a series of 199 patients was studied. The patients were divided into two groups: 0-1 month and 1 month to 50 years. Both groups were subdivided into cases with or without clinical and radiological suspicion of aganglionism. In this series, R.I.A. was absent in 88 patients and present in 111. Histologic study and follow-up confirmed the existence of aganglionism in 86 patients, hyperganglionism in 1, anal stenosis in 8, cystic fibrosis in 4 and 1 coeliac disease; the rest were megarecta to a greater or lesser degree. There was 1 false negative, signifying a percentage of error of 0.5%. PMID:1389969

  4. High IL-23 level is a marker of disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Abu Al Fadl, Esam M; Fattouh, Mona; Allam, Ahmed A

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune systemic disorder characterized by inflammatory responses mainly affecting the synovial joints. Interleukin-23 (IL-23) is a heterodimeric pro-inflammatory cytokine secreted by activated dendritic cells and activated macrophages. IL-23 is the key cytokine controlling inflammation in peripheral tissues leading to the development of autoimmune diseases. The objective of our study was to determine the relationship between the IL-23 level and disease activity in RA patients. Sixty RA patients were included in the study with mean age of 40 years; they included 44 (73.3 %) females and 16 males (26.7 %). The clinical parameters of disease activity were determined, including the 28-joint disease activity score (DAS28), serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), Anti-citrullinated peptide antibody (ACPA), rheumatoid factor (RF), and TNF-alpha and the degree of bony erosions based on X-rays. Patients were subdivided into active disease group (n = 30) with DAS28 score higher than 5.1 (Group I); and remission group (n = 30) with DAS28 score less than 2.6 (Group II). Thirty healthy individuals in the same age group of RA patients including 22 (73.3%) females and 8 males (26.7%) were randomly selected as the control group (Group III). The levels of IL-23 were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the correlations between the serum levels of IL-23 and disease activity parameters of patients with RA were determined. Serum levels of IL-23 were significantly higher in RA patients during active stage of the disease in comparison to the patients in remission and the control group. There was a significant positive correlation between serum IL-23 levels in RA patients and individual disease activity parameters. It is concluded that elevated serum IL-23 level may be a useful marker to detect active RA and disease progression in patients with RA. PMID:24617049

  5. Development and Retrospective Validation of the Juvenile Spondyloarthritis Disease Activity (JSpADA) Index

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Pamela F.; Colbert, Robert A.; Xiao, Rui; Feudtner, Chris; Beukelman, Timothy; DeWitt, Esi Morgan; Pagnini, Ilaria; Wright, Tracey B.; Wallace, Carol A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To develop and validate a Juvenile Spondyloarthritis (JSpA) Disease Activity (JSpADA) index for use in clinical practice and research. Methods Using modified Delphi consensus techniques, ten items were selected by participants in the international pediatric rheumatology list-serve, the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance, and the list-serve for the Pediatric Section of the American College of Rheumatology. Validation was performed in a retrospective multicenter cohort of 243 children. Results 106 physicians representing 14 countries completed the initial questionnaire. Completion rates for the subsequent questionnaires were 84%, 75%, and 77% of the original respondents. Ten items reached 80% consensus: arthritis, enthesitis, patient pain assessment, inflammatory markers, morning stiffness, clinical sacroiliitis, uveitis, back mobility, and patient and physician assessments of disease activity. Two items were eliminated after item analysis (patient and physician assessments of disease activity). Factor analysis identified 3 primary domains that explain 58% of variance: peripheral disease, axial disease, and uveitis. Cronbach α coefficient was 0.66. The JSpADA had high or moderate correlations with the Juvenile Arthritis disease activity score (r=0.80), patient and physician assessments of disease activity (r=0.70 and 0.66), and the Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (r=0.56). The JSpADA discriminated well between subjects with active versus inactive disease (p<0.001) and was responsive to improvement or worsening in disease activity over time (p<0.001). Conclusion Using international input and consensus formation techniques, we developed and validated the first disease activity assessment for JSpA. Future studies should validate the JSpADA index in a prospective multi-center cohort. PMID:25047959

  6. Active ingredients of ginger as potential candidates in the prevention and treatment of diseases via modulation of biological activities

    PubMed Central

    Rahmani, Arshad H; shabrmi, Fahad M Al; Aly, Salah M

    2014-01-01

    The current mode of treatment based on synthetic drugs is expensive and also causes genetic and metabolic alterations. However, safe and sound mode of treatment is needed to control the diseases development and progression. In this regards, medicinal plant and its constituents play an important role in diseases management via modulation of biological activities. Ginger, the rhizome of the Zingiber officinale, has shown therapeutic role in the health management since ancient time and considered as potential chemopreventive agent. Numerous studies based on clinical trials and animal model has shown that ginger and its constituents shows significant role in the prevention of diseases via modulation of genetic and metabolic activities. In this review, we focused on the therapeutics effects of ginger and its constituents in the diseases management, and its impact on genetic and metabolic activities. PMID:25057339

  7. Indium 111-granulocyte scanning in the assessment of disease extent and disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease. A comparison with colonoscopy, histology, and fecal indium 111-granulocyte excretion

    SciTech Connect

    Saverymuttu, S.H.; Camilleri, M.; Rees, H.; Lavender, J.P.; Hodgson, H.J.; Chadwick, V.S.

    1986-05-01

    Indium 111-leukocyte scanning has recently been introduced as a new method for imaging inflammatory bowel disease. The technique has recently been made more specific for acute inflammation by labeling a pure granulocyte fraction rather than the conventional mixed leukocyte preparation. We now report a prospective study comparing 111In-granulocyte scanning with endoscopy, histology, and fecal 111In-granulocyte excretion for the assessment of disease extent and severity in colonic inflammatory bowel disease. In 52 patients with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis, disease extent and severity were assessed macroscopically, histologically, or by scanning using a numerical grading system. Excellent correlations were found between both endoscopy and histology and 111In scans (r = 0.90 (endoscopy) and r = 0.90 (histology) for extent; r = 0.86 and r = 0.91 for disease activity). Severity graded by scanning also showed a close correlation with fecal 111In-granulocyte excretion (r = 0.90). Indium 111-granulocyte scans are a rapid, accurate, noninvasive means of assessing both disease extent and severity of colonic involvement in inflammatory bowel disease.

  8. Temporal Effect of Depressive Symptoms on the Longitudinal Evolution of Rheumatoid Arthritis Disease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Rathbun, Alan M.; Harrold, Leslie R.; Reed, George W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Depression is common in the rheumatoid arthritis (RA) population, yet little is known of its effect on the course of disease activity. The aim of our study was to determine if prevalent and incident depressive symptoms influenced longitudinal changes in RA disease activity. Methods RA patients with and without depressive symptoms were identified using single-item questions from an existing registry sample. Mixed-effects models were used to examine changes in disease activity over 2 years in those with and without prevalent and incident depressive symptoms. Outcome variables included composite disease activity, joint counts, global assessments, pain, function, and acute-phase reactants. Model-based outcome estimations at the index dates and corresponding 1- and 2-year changes were calculated. Results Rates of disease activity change were significantly different in patients with a lifetime prevalence of symptomology, but not incident depressive symptoms, when compared to controls. Prior symptoms were associated with slower rates of disease activity decline, evidenced by the estimated 1-year Clinical Disease Activity Index changes: −3.0 (−3.3, −2.6) and −4.0 (−4.3, −3.6) in patients with and without lifetime prevalence, respectively. Analogous results were obtained for most of the other disease activity outcomes; although, there was no temporal effect of prevalent symptoms of depression on swollen joints and acute-phase reactants. Conclusion Depressive symptoms temporally influence the evolution of RA disease activity, and the magnitude is dependent on the time of symptomatic onset. However, the effect is limited to patient-reported pain, global assessment, and function, as well as physician-reported global assessment and tender joints. PMID:25384985

  9. Carotid body chemoreceptors, sympathetic neural activation, and cardiometabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Iturriaga, Rodrigo; Del Rio, Rodrigo; Idiaquez, Juan; Somers, Virend K

    2016-01-01

    The carotid body (CB) is the main peripheral chemoreceptor that senses the arterial PO2, PCO2 and pH. In response to hypoxemia, hypercapnia and acidosis, carotid chemosensory discharge elicits reflex respiratory, autonomic and cardiovascular adjustments. The classical construct considers the CB as the main peripheral oxygen sensor, triggering reflex physiological responses to acute hypoxemia and facilitating the ventilatory acclimation to chronic hypoxemia at high altitude. However, a growing body of experimental evidence supports the novel concept that an abnormally enhanced CB chemosensory input to the brainstem contributes to overactivation of the sympathetic nervous system, and consequent pathology. Indeed, the CB has been implicated in several diseases associated with increases in central sympathetic outflow. These include hypertension, heart failure, sleep apnea, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and metabolic syndrome. Indeed, ablation of the CB has been proposed for the treatment of severe and resistant hypertension in humans. In this review, we will analyze and discuss new evidence supporting an important role for the CB chemoreceptor in the progression of autonomic and cardiorespiratory alterations induced by heart failure, obstructive sleep apnea, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and metabolic syndrome. PMID:26920146

  10. Cytomegalovirus Infection in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Is Not Associated with Worsening of Intestinal Inflammatory Activity

    PubMed Central

    do Carmo, Alexandre Medeiros; Santos, Fabiana Maria; Ortiz-Agostinho, Carmen Lucia; Nishitokukado, Iêda; Frota, Cintia S.; Gomes, Flavia Ubeda; de Arruda Leite, André Zonetti; Pannuti, Claudio Sérgio; Boas, Lucy Santos Vilas; Teixeira, Magaly Gemio; Sipahi, Aytan Miranda

    2014-01-01

    Background Cytomegalovirus is highly prevalent virus and usually occurs in immunocompromised patients. The pathophysiology and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease often induce a state of immunosuppression. Because this, there are still doubts and controversies about the relationship between inflammatory bowel disease and cytomegalovirus. Aim Evaluate the frequency of cytomegalovirus in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and identify correlations. Methods Patients with inflammatory bowel disease underwent an interview, review of records and collection of blood and fecal samples. The search for cytomegalovirus was performed by IgG and IgM blood serology, by real-time PCR in the blood and by qualitative PCR in feces. Results were correlated with red blood cell levels, C-reactive protein levels, erythrocyte sedimentation rates and fecal calprotectin levels for each patient. Results Among the 400 eligible patients, 249 had Crohn's disease, and 151 had ulcerative colitis. In the group of Crohn's disease, 67 of the patients had moderate or severe disease, but 126 patients presented with active disease, based on the evaluation of the fecal calprotectin. In patients with ulcerative colitis, only 21 patients had moderate disease, but 76 patients presented with active disease, based on the evaluation of the fecal calprotectin. A large majority of patients had positive CMV IgG. Overall, 10 patients had positive CMV IgM, and 9 patients had a positive qualitative detection of CMV DNA by PCR in the feces. All 400 patients returned negative results after the quantitative detection of CMV DNA in blood by real-time PCR. Analyzing the 19 patients with active infections, we only found that such an association occurred with the use of combined therapy (anti-TNF-alpha + azathioprine) Conclusion The findings show that latent cytomegalovirus infections are frequent and active cytomegalovirus infection is rare. We did not find any association between an active infection of CMV

  11. Expression of PARK7 is increased in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Vörös, Péter; Sziksz, Erna; Himer, Leonóra; Onody, Anna; Pap, Domonkos; Frivolt, Klára; Szebeni, Beáta; Lippai, Rita; Győrffy, Hajnalka; Fekete, Andrea; Brandt, Ferenc; Molnár, Kriszta; Veres, Gábor; Arató, András; Tulassay, Tivadar; Vannay, Adám

    2013-09-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that the gene called Parkinson's disease 7 (PARK7) might be an upstream activator of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, which plays a major role in sustaining intestinal barrier integrity. Furthermore, PARK7 has been proposed to participate in the Toll-like receptor (TLR)-dependent regulation of the innate immune system. Our aim was to investigate the involvement of PARK7 in the pathogenesis of coeliac disease (CD). Duodenal biopsy specimens were collected from 19 children with untreated CD, five children with treated CD (maintained on gluten-free diet), and ten children with histologically normal duodenal biopsies. PARK7 mRNA expression and protein level were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blot, respectively. Localization of PARK7 was visualized by immunofluorescence staining. Protein level of PARK7 increased in the duodenal mucosa of children with untreated CD compared to children with treated CD or to control biopsies (p <0.03). We detected intensive PARK7 staining in the epithelial cells and lamina propria of the duodenal mucosa of children with untreated CD compared with that in control biopsies. Our finding that mucosal expression of PARK7 is increased suggests that PARK7 is involved in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal diseases, notably CD. Our results suggest that PARK7 may alter processes mediated by HIF-1α and TLR4, which supports a role for PARK7 in the maintenance of epithelial barrier integrity, immune homeostasis, or apoptosis. PMID:23832581

  12. [Measurement of physical activity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Magnussen, Helgo; Waschki, Benjamin; Watz, Henrik

    2009-04-15

    Physical activity is an important parameter related to morbidity and mortality in cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome/diabetes, mental disorders, cancer, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In COPD, lower levels of physical activity as reported by the patients are associated with a faster annual lung function decline, increased number of hospitalizations, and higher risk of mortality. Self-reported physical activity, however, correlates only poorly with objectively quantified physical activity in patients with COPD. Recent data show that physical activity can reliably be measured in a substantial number of patients with COPD. Extrapulmonary effects of COPD are associated with reduced physical activity. Clinical characteristics commonly used to assess disease severity like the forced expiratory volume in 1 s or the 6-min walk distance only incompletely reflect the physical activity of patients with COPD. PMID:19399389

  13. Why and how should we measure disease activity and damage in lupus?

    PubMed

    Feld, Joy; Isenberg, David

    2014-06-01

    The assessment of disease activity and flare and differentiating them from permanent damage in patients with SLE is challenging. The SLEDAI, SLEDAI-2K and SELENA-SLEDAI measure global disease activity. The BILAG measures organ-specific activity. The BILAG better captures the change in the different organs at the expense of complexity. The SRI is a composite index incorporating both BILAG and SLEDAI indices and a physician's global assessment. It has been used in the most recent clinical trials. Damage correlates with prognosis; it is assessed by the SLICC/SDI index. This index scores damage whatever the cause, disease or treatment related, or the consequence of concomitant disease. The disease activity and damage indices do not correlate well with the patient's health related quality of life (HRQoL), the degree of disability or the impact of disease. The impact of the patients' joint disease on their HRQoL is assessed via the HAQ questionnaire and the global health status via the SF-36 index, or one of the more recently described lupus specific quality of life indices [Lupus QoL]. The global assessment instruments and the BILAG index can also be used in children and adolescents with SLE. However, a modified paediatric version of the SLICC/SDI damage index is advised. Many advances have been achieved in disease activity and damage measurement in the past 20 years but the problem of how best to capture flare accurately remains. PMID:24791651

  14. Can red cell distribution width be a marker of disease activity in ulcerative colitis?

    PubMed Central

    Ipek, Serkan; Cekic, Cem; Alper, Emrah; Coban, Eyup; Eliacik, Eylem; Arabul, Mahmut; Aslan, Fatih; Vatansever, Sezgin; Yalcin, Hulya; Unsal, Belkis

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The current study aimed to investigate the association between disease activity and red cell distribution width (RDW) levels in ulcerative colitis and to determine whether RDW can be used as a marker of disease activity in non-anemic ulcerative colitis. Methods: The RDW levels of 310 ulcerative colitis patients who underwent colonoscopy were analyzed retrospectively. The patients were divided into two groups (active disease and remission) according to the endoscopic activity index. In addition, the accuracy of RDW in determining disease activity in non-anemic patients was assessed. The efficacy of RDW in determining disease activity was compared to that of white blood cell count, platelet count, C-reactive protein, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Results: Two hundred and six (66.5%) patients had active disease, and 104 (33.5%) were in remission. The mean RDW levels in patients with active ulcerative colitis and in those in remission were 16.8±2.9 and 15.5±1.4, respectively (P<0.001). Ninety-six (46.6%) patients in the active disease group and 89 (85.6%) in the remission group were non-anemic, and their respective RDW levels were 15.4±1.2 and 15.3±1.1 (P=0.267). The sensitivity and specificity of RDW in determining inflammation were 41% and 91%, respectively (AUC 0.65, P<0.001). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that RDW can be used as a marker for disease activity in ulcerative colitis, but it did not have the same efficacy in the non-anemic group. PMID:26550336

  15. Invasive pneumococcal disease leads to activation and hyperreactivity of platelets.

    PubMed

    Tunjungputri, Rahajeng N; de Jonge, Marien I; de Greeff, Astrid; van Selm, Saskia; Buys, Herma; Harders-Westerveen, Jose F; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, Norbert; Urbanus, Rolf T; de Groot, Phillip G; Smith, Hilde E; van der Ven, Andre J; de Mast, Quirijn

    2016-08-01

    Using a novel porcine model of intravenous Streptococcus pneumoniae infection, we showed that invasive pneumococcal infections induce marked platelet activation and hyperreactivity. This may contribute to the vascular complications seen in pneumococcal infection. PMID:27322088

  16. Effect of dietary restrictions on disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Beri, D; Malaviya, A N; Shandilya, R; Singh, R R

    1988-01-01

    Additions in five steps were made, as a possible therapeutic measure, to the diet of 27 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) after a period of two weeks of a basal isocaloric diet free from pulses, cereals, milk, and non-vegetarian protein foods. Fourteen patients finally took part in the trial, 10 (71%) of whom showed significant clinical improvement. Only three patients (11%) adhered to the diet for a period of 10 months. The others discontinued the diet and were then treated with conventional disease modifying drugs. The study indicates that dietary factors may influence inflammatory response in RA. PMID:3278696

  17. Influence of liver disease and environmental factors on hepatic monooxygenase activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Brodie, M J; Boobis, A R; Bulpitt, C J; Davies, D S

    1981-01-01

    The effects of liver disease and environmental factors on hepatic microsomal cytochrome P-450 content, NADPH-cytochrome c reductase (reductase) activity and aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) activity have been simultaneously investigated in 70 patients undergoing diagnostic liver biopsy. The activity of reductase was not significantly affected by the presence of liver disease or any of the environmental factors studied. Cytochrome P-450 content decreased with increasing severity of liver disease whereas AHH activity was only significantly reduced in biopsies showing hepatocellular destruction. None of the parameters of monooxygenase activity varied significantly with the age or sex of the patients. Alcohol excess was associated with decreased cytochrome P-450 content and AHH activity and this effect was independent of the histological status of the biopsy. Both high caffeine intake and cigarette smoking increased AHH activity in the absence of any change in cytochrome P-450 content. There was a positive correlation between the number of meat meals eaten per week and cytochrome P-450 content. Chronic treatment with enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants appeared to increase both cytochrome P-450 content and AHH activity. Despite differential effects of liver disease and environmental influences on cytochrome P-450 content and AHH activity there was a highly significant correlation between the two parameters. The results of the present study correlate well with the known effects of disease and environment on drug metabolism in vivo. PMID:7308271

  18. Sarcoid-like lymphocytosis of the lower respiratory tract in patients with active Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Smiéjan, J M; Cosnes, J; Chollet-Martin, S; Soler, P; Basset, F M; Le Quintrec, Y; Hance, A J

    1986-01-01

    To re-evaluate the relationship between Crohn's disease and sarcoidosis, we compared the numbers and types of cells recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage from normal volunteers and patients with Crohn's disease, with other forms of inflammatory bowel disease, and with sarcoidosis. Patients with Crohn's disease, but not patients with other inflammatory bowel disorders, had an increase in the number of T lymphocytes on the surface of the lower respiratory tract similar to that seen in patients with sarcoidosis. As in sarcoidosis, this lymphocytosis results from an expansion of the T4+ T-lymphocyte subset, is characteristic of patients with active disease only, and is not associated with similar abnormalities in the peripheral blood. Thus, patients with apparently localized Crohn's disease have sarcoid-like lymphocytosis of the lower respiratory tract, a finding that emphasizes the systemic nature of Crohn's disease and the disorder's close relationship to sarcoidosis. PMID:3940500

  19. Predictors of Alzheimer's Disease Caregiver Depression and Burden: What Noncaregiving Adults Can Learn from Active Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayslip, Bert, Jr.; Han, GiBaeg; Anderson, Cristina L.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined similarities and differences between active caregivers (adult children and spouses whose family member had Alzheimer's disease) and not-as-yet caregiving adults (adult children and spouses whose family members are older, but do not as yet suffer from Alzheimer's disease). The objective was to determine what factors predict…

  20. Daily energy expenditure, physical activity, and weight loss in Parkinson's disease patients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) commonly exhibit weight loss (WL) which investigators attribute to various factors, including elevated energy expenditure. We tested the hypothesis that daily energy expenditure (DEE) and its components, resting energy expenditure (REE) and physical activity (P...

  1. Post-traumatic stress in Crohn's disease and its association with disease activity

    PubMed Central

    Cámara, Rafael J A; Gander, Marie-Louise; Begré, Stefan; von Känel, Roland

    2011-01-01

    Objective Violence, accidents and natural disasters are known to cause post-traumatic stress, which is typically accompanied by fear, suffering and impaired quality of life. Similar to chronic diseases, such events preoccupy the patient over longer periods. We hypothesised that post-traumatic stress could also be caused by Crohn's disease (CD), and that CD specific post-traumatic stress could be associated with an increased risk of disease exacerbation. Methods A cohort of CD patients was observed over 18 months in various types of locations providing gastroenterological treatment in Switzerland. The cohort included 597 consecutively recruited adults. At inclusion, CD specific post-traumatic stress was assessed using the Post-traumatic Diagnostic Scale (range 0–51 points). During follow-up, clinical aggravation was assessed by combining important outcome measures. Patients with post-traumatic stress levels suggestive of a post-traumatic stress disorder (≥ 15 points) were compared with patients with lower post-traumatic stress levels as well as with patients without post-traumatic stress. Also, the continuous relation between post-traumatic stress severity and risk of disease exacerbation was assessed. Results The 88 (19.1%) patients scoring ≥15 points had 4.3 times higher odds of exacerbation (95% CI 2.6 to 7.2) than the 372 (80.9%) patients scoring <15 points, and 13.0 times higher odds (95% CI 3.6 to 46.2) than the 45 (9.8%) patients scoring 0 points. The odds of exacerbation increased by 2.2 (95% CI 1.6 to 2.8) per standard deviation of post-traumatic stress. Conclusions CD specific post-traumatic stress is frequent and seems to be associated with exacerbation of CD. Thus gastroenterologists may want to ask about symptoms of post-traumatic stress and, where relevant, offer appropriate management according to current knowledge. PMID:24349679

  2. Gut microbiome composition and function in experimental colitis during active disease and treatment-induced remission

    PubMed Central

    Rooks, Michelle G; Veiga, Patrick; Wardwell-Scott, Leslie H; Tickle, Timothy; Segata, Nicola; Michaud, Monia; Gallini, Carey Ann; Beal, Chloé; van Hylckama-Vlieg, Johan ET; Ballal, Sonia A; Morgan, Xochitl C; Glickman, Jonathan N; Gevers, Dirk; Huttenhower, Curtis; Garrett, Wendy S

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulated immune responses to gut microbes are central to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and gut microbial activity can fuel chronic inflammation. Examining how IBD-directed therapies influence gut microbiomes may identify microbial community features integral to mitigating disease and maintaining health. However, IBD patients often receive multiple treatments during disease flares, confounding such analyses. Preclinical models of IBD with well-defined disease courses and opportunities for controlled treatment exposures provide a valuable solution. Here, we surveyed the gut microbiome of the T-bet−/− Rag2−/− mouse model of colitis during active disease and treatment-induced remission. Microbial features modified among these conditions included altered potential for carbohydrate and energy metabolism and bacterial pathogenesis, specifically cell motility and signal transduction pathways. We also observed an increased capacity for xenobiotics metabolism, including benzoate degradation, a pathway linking host adrenergic stress with enhanced bacterial virulence, and found decreased levels of fecal dopamine in active colitis. When transferred to gnotobiotic mice, gut microbiomes from mice with active disease versus treatment-induced remission elicited varying degrees of colitis. Thus, our study provides insight into specific microbial clades and pathways associated with health, active disease and treatment interventions in a mouse model of colitis. PMID:24500617

  3. Difference Between Latent TB Infection and Active TB Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... ray, or positive sputum smear or culture • • Has active TB bacteria in his/her body • • Usually feels sick and may have symptoms such as coughing, fever, and weight loss • • May spread TB bacteria to others • • Needs treatment to treat ...

  4. Flare, Persistently Active Disease, and Serologically Active Clinically Quiescent Disease in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A 2-Year Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Fabrizio; Ceccarelli, Fulvia; Perricone, Carlo; Miranda, Francesca; Truglia, Simona; Massaro, Laura; Pacucci, Viviana Antonella; Conti, Virginia; Bartosiewicz, Izabella; Spinelli, Francesca Romana; Alessandri, Cristiano; Valesini, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Objective Several indices have been proposed to assess disease activity in patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). Recent studies have showed a prevalence of flare between 28–35.3%, persistently active disease (PAD) between 46%–52% and serologically active clinically quiescent (SACQ) disease ranging from 6 to 15%. Our goal was to evaluate the flare, PAD and SACQ rate incidence in a cohort of SLE patients over a 2-year follow-up. Methods We evaluated 394 SLE patients. Flare was defined as an increase in SLEDAI-2K score of ≥4 from the previous visit; PAD was defined as a SLEDAI-2K score of ≥4, on >2 consecutive visits; SACQ was defined as at least a 2-year period without clinical activity and with persistent serologic activity. Results Among the 95 patients eligible for the analysis in 2009, 7 (7.3%) had ≥1 flare episode, whereas 9 (9.4%) had PAD. Similarly, among the 118 patients selected for the analysis in 2010, 6 (5%) had ≥1 flare episode, whereas 16 (13.5%) had PAD. Only 1/45 patient (2.2%) showed SACQ during the follow-up. Conclusion We showed a low incidence of flare, PAD and SACQ in Italian SLE patients compared with previous studies which could be partly explained by ethnic differences. PMID:23029327

  5. Alveolar hydatid disease. Review of the surgical experience in 42 cases of active disease among Alaskan Eskimos.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, J F; Rausch, R L; Wilson, F R

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors reviewed the pathophysiology and clinical management of endemic alveolar hydatid disease in Alaskan Eskimos, incorporating recent developments in diagnosis and treatment. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Alveolar hydatid disease is a highly lethal zoonotic infection caused by the larval stage of Echinococcus multilocularis. This cestode is restricted geographically to northern climates, where foxes and small rodents represent the natural hosts. Domestic dogs also may serve as definitive hosts, and thus, transmit the parasite to humans. Human infection is characterized by the development of a cancer-like hepatic mass, which may extend to adjacent structures or metastasize to distant sites. If the infection goes untreated, mortality reaches 80%. METHODS: The medical records of all patients with alveolar hydatid disease diagnosed or treated at the Alaska Native Medical Center between 1951 and 1993 were reviewed. Forty-two cases of active disease are presented. RESULTS: Nine patients underwent resection of hepatic lesions with intent to cure, and each had a favorable result. Average post-diagnosis survival of those patients was 22 years; six still are living and free of disease. Partial resections or drainage procedures were performed in ten patients. Chemotherapy was used to augment the surgical treatment of eight patients, and four received chemotherapy alone, resulting in improved outcomes compared with historic controls. Late complications included hepatic abscess, biliary obstruction, and portal venous hypertension. CONCLUSIONS: Whereas alveolar hydatid disease rarely is encountered in other areas of North America, the biologic potential for spread of the disease may be increasing because of illegal importation of infected foxes to the Eastern seaboard. Therefore, the surgical community should maintain an awareness of the diagnosis and management of this potentially devastating parasitic infection. Images Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:7717785

  6. Odorant receptor-mediated sperm activation in disease vector mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Pitts, R. Jason; Liu, Chao; Zhou, Xiaofan; Malpartida, Juan C.; Zwiebel, Laurence J.

    2014-01-01

    Insects, such as the malaria vector mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, depend upon chemoreceptors to respond to volatiles emitted from a range of environmental sources, most notably blood meal hosts and oviposition sites. A subset of peripheral signaling pathways involved in these insect chemosensory-dependent behaviors requires the activity of heteromeric odorant receptor (OR) ion channel complexes and ligands for numerous A. gambiae ORs (AgOrs) have been identified. Although AgOrs are expressed in nonhead appendages, studies characterizing potential AgOr function in nonolfactory tissues have not been conducted. In the present study, we explore the possibility that AgOrs mediate responses of spermatozoa to endogenous signaling molecules in A. gambiae. In addition to finding AgOr transcript expression in testes, we show that the OR coreceptor, AgOrco, is localized to the flagella of A. gambiae spermatozoa where Orco-specific agonists, antagonists, and other odorant ligands robustly activate flagella beating in an Orco-dependent process. We also demonstrate Orco expression and Orco-mediated activation of spermatozoa in the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti. Moreover, we find Orco localization in testes across distinct insect taxa and posit that OR-mediated responses in spermatozoa may represent a general characteristic of insect reproduction and an example of convergent evolution. PMID:24550284

  7. Immunoresponsiveness in Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn's Disease—Effect of Colectomy and Suppression of Disease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lyanga, John; Davis, Paul; Thomson, Alan B. R.

    1988-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of medically induced symptomatic disease improvement on in vitro tests of cell-mediated immune responses in 33 patients with Crohn's disease. When results obtained in 17 patients with ulcerative colitis were compared with those of 10 patients with ulcerative colitis who had undergone a colectomy, no significant correlation was detected between individual clinical and laboratory variables or the Crohn's disease activity index and in vitro tests of cell-mediated immunity. A different pattern emerged from the longitudinal tests of cell-mediated immunity: when these test results were initially abnormal in patients with Crohn's disease, clinical improvement as assessed by the Crohn's disease activity index was associated with normalizing cell-mediated immunity. In contrast, when the test results were initially normal, clinical improvement was not associated with any change in the immune response. Following colectomy in patients with ulcerative colitis, some abnormalities of suppressed immune responses remained, although patients were cured of their disease. Factors other than clinical disease activity may be responsible for the suppressed immunoresponsiveness in some patients with inflammatory bowel disease, and variable changes in cell-mediated immunity occur after both surgical and medical treatment. PMID:3388844

  8. Adjuvant oestrogen therapy does not improve disease activity in postmenopausal patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    van den Brink, H R; van Everdingen, A A; van Wijk, M J; Jacobs, J W; Bijlsma, J W

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate whether oestrogens can be used as treatment to diminish disease activity in women with rheumatoid arthritis. METHODS--Forty postmenopausal female patients with active rheumatoid arthritis participated in a placebo-controlled, double-blind study on the possible beneficial effect of adjuvant treatment of oestradiol on disease activity. RESULTS--Thirty three patients completed 52 weeks of treatment with 2 mg oestradiol-valerate or placebo. No statistically significant difference was found in and between both treatment groups with regard to articular indices, pain score by visual analogue scale, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and health questionnaire on daily activities before, during and at the end of the study. CONCLUSION--This first randomised prospective placebo-controlled study shows no beneficial effect of oestrogens on disease activity in postmenopausal female patients with rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:8311536

  9. Beyond endoscopic assessment in inflammatory bowel disease: real-time histology of disease activity by non-linear multimodal imaging.

    PubMed

    Chernavskaia, Olga; Heuke, Sandro; Vieth, Michael; Friedrich, Oliver; Schürmann, Sebastian; Atreya, Raja; Stallmach, Andreas; Neurath, Markus F; Waldner, Maximilian; Petersen, Iver; Schmitt, Michael; Bocklitz, Thomas; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Assessing disease activity is a prerequisite for an adequate treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. In addition to endoscopic mucosal healing, histologic remission poses a promising end-point of IBD therapy. However, evaluating histological remission harbors the risk for complications due to the acquisition of biopsies and results in a delay of diagnosis because of tissue processing procedures. In this regard, non-linear multimodal imaging techniques might serve as an unparalleled technique that allows the real-time evaluation of microscopic IBD activity in the endoscopy unit. In this study, tissue sections were investigated using the non-linear multimodal microscopy combination of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), two-photon excited auto fluorescence (TPEF) and second-harmonic generation (SHG). After the measurement a gold-standard assessment of histological indexes was carried out based on a conventional H&E stain. Subsequently, various geometry and intensity related features were extracted from the multimodal images. An optimized feature set was utilized to predict histological index levels based on a linear classifier. Based on the automated prediction, the diagnosis time interval is decreased. Therefore, non-linear multimodal imaging may provide a real-time diagnosis of IBD activity suited to assist clinical decision making within the endoscopy unit. PMID:27406831

  10. Beyond endoscopic assessment in inflammatory bowel disease: real-time histology of disease activity by non-linear multimodal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernavskaia, Olga; Heuke, Sandro; Vieth, Michael; Friedrich, Oliver; Schürmann, Sebastian; Atreya, Raja; Stallmach, Andreas; Neurath, Markus F.; Waldner, Maximilian; Petersen, Iver; Schmitt, Michael; Bocklitz, Thomas; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-07-01

    Assessing disease activity is a prerequisite for an adequate treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. In addition to endoscopic mucosal healing, histologic remission poses a promising end-point of IBD therapy. However, evaluating histological remission harbors the risk for complications due to the acquisition of biopsies and results in a delay of diagnosis because of tissue processing procedures. In this regard, non-linear multimodal imaging techniques might serve as an unparalleled technique that allows the real-time evaluation of microscopic IBD activity in the endoscopy unit. In this study, tissue sections were investigated using the non-linear multimodal microscopy combination of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), two-photon excited auto fluorescence (TPEF) and second-harmonic generation (SHG). After the measurement a gold-standard assessment of histological indexes was carried out based on a conventional H&E stain. Subsequently, various geometry and intensity related features were extracted from the multimodal images. An optimized feature set was utilized to predict histological index levels based on a linear classifier. Based on the automated prediction, the diagnosis time interval is decreased. Therefore, non-linear multimodal imaging may provide a real-time diagnosis of IBD activity suited to assist clinical decision making within the endoscopy unit.

  11. Beyond endoscopic assessment in inflammatory bowel disease: real-time histology of disease activity by non-linear multimodal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chernavskaia, Olga; Heuke, Sandro; Vieth, Michael; Friedrich, Oliver; Schürmann, Sebastian; Atreya, Raja; Stallmach, Andreas; Neurath, Markus F.; Waldner, Maximilian; Petersen, Iver; Schmitt, Michael; Bocklitz, Thomas; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Assessing disease activity is a prerequisite for an adequate treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. In addition to endoscopic mucosal healing, histologic remission poses a promising end-point of IBD therapy. However, evaluating histological remission harbors the risk for complications due to the acquisition of biopsies and results in a delay of diagnosis because of tissue processing procedures. In this regard, non-linear multimodal imaging techniques might serve as an unparalleled technique that allows the real-time evaluation of microscopic IBD activity in the endoscopy unit. In this study, tissue sections were investigated using the non-linear multimodal microscopy combination of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), two-photon excited auto fluorescence (TPEF) and second-harmonic generation (SHG). After the measurement a gold-standard assessment of histological indexes was carried out based on a conventional H&E stain. Subsequently, various geometry and intensity related features were extracted from the multimodal images. An optimized feature set was utilized to predict histological index levels based on a linear classifier. Based on the automated prediction, the diagnosis time interval is decreased. Therefore, non-linear multimodal imaging may provide a real-time diagnosis of IBD activity suited to assist clinical decision making within the endoscopy unit. PMID:27406831

  12. Serum Amyloid A Circulating Levels and Disease Activity in Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Giani, Teresa; Fioravanti, Antonella; Iacoponi, Francesca; Simonini, Gabriele; Pagnini, Ilaria; Spreafico, Adriano; Chellini, Federico; Galeazzi, Mauro; Cimaz, Rolando

    2012-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the association between circulating levels of serum amyloid A protein (SAA) and disease activity in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Our study group included 41 JIA patients (9 male, 32 female), classified according to the International League of Associations for Rheumatology (ILAR) criteria (5); 16 had polyarticular onset disease and 25 had oligoarticular onset disease. Among 25 patients with oligoarticular disease, three had extended oligoarthritis. Serum amyloid A (SAA), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured in both patients and 26 healthy controls. SAA levels were higher in JIA patients versus healthy controls (p<0.001). Significant positive correlations were found between SAA and the presence of active joints (rho=0.363, p<0.05), the number of active joints (rho=0.418, p<0.05), ESR (R=0.702, p<0.05) and CRP (R=0.827, p<0.05). No significant correlations between ESR and the presence of active joints (rho=0.221, p=0.225) or between ESR and the number of active joints (rho=0.118, p=0.520) were demonstrated in JIA patients. No significant correlations were obtained between CRP and the presence of active joints (rho=0.034, p=0.855) or between CRP and the number of active joints (rho=0.033, p=0.859). We discovered a significant increase in SAA levels in JIA patients, compared to controls, and a strong positive correlation between SAA level and JIA disease activity. We also discerned SAA to be a more sensitive laboratory marker than ESR and CRP for evaluating the presence and number of active joints. We suggest that SAA can be used as an additional indicator of disease activity in JIA. PMID:22869491

  13. Performance characteristics of the simplified version of ankylosing spondylitis disease activity score (SASDAS).

    PubMed

    Solmaz, Dilek; Yildirim, Tulay; Avci, Okan; Tomas, Nazmiye; Akar, Servet

    2016-07-01

    Various types of disease activity measures are available for axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA), and there is no gold standard for all individual patients. The ankylosing spondylitis disease activity score (ASDAS) is highly discriminatory, sensitive to change, and associated with structural progression. A simplified version of the ASDAS (SASDAS) was proposed and found to be a simple and practical tool to assess disease activity. Our aim was to test the performance characteristics of the SASDAS and compare it with validated tools. In total, 97 consecutive ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients were included in the study. Disease activity was assessed by the ASDAS-erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), ASDAS-C-reactive protein (CRP), bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index (BASDAI), and SASDAS. The relationship among these activity indices and the level of agreement of various activity categories were tested. There was a strong correlation between the SASDAS and other activity indices, including the BASDAI (r = 0.916, p < 0.001), ASDAS-CRP (r = 0.847, p < 0.001), and ASDAS-ESR (r = 0.942, p < 0.001). Although the agreement between the ASDAS-ESR and SASDAS was good (weighted kappa of 0.744 and total agreement of 77 %), there was moderate agreement between the ASDAS-CRP and SASDAS (weighted kappa of 0.579 and total agreement of 66 %). The disagreement was particularly striking in "moderate" and "high disease activity" states. Approximately 40 % of patients classified as moderate activity according to the ASDAS-ESR and 45 % according to the ASDAS-CRP were differentially categorized by the SASDAS. The results of the present analysis suggest that the simplified version of the ASDAS-ESR should be further validated in various settings and populations due to a questionable level of agreement between the ASDAS-CRP and SASDAS. PMID:26670454

  14. Chronic osteomyelitis: bone and gallium scan patterns associated with active disease

    SciTech Connect

    Tumeh, S.S.; Aliabadi, P.; Weissman, B.N.; McNeil, B.J.

    1986-03-01

    Bone and gallium scans are used to assess osteomyelitis patients with prior bone disease. To refine the criteria for interpreting these scans, the data from 136 consecutive patients with clinically suspected osteomyelitis were reviewed. Active osteomyelitis was diagnosed with surgery or biopsy and culture in 49 patients, excluded with the same criteria in 16, and excluded by clinical follow-up for at least 6 months in 71. Five different scintigraphic patterns were found. The true-positive and false-positive ratios, the likelihood ratios, and posterior probabilities for active osteomyelitis in each pattern were calculated. Only one pattern (gallium uptake exceeding bone-seeking radiopharmaceutical uptake) was indicative of active disease. Other patterns slightly raised or decreased the probability of disease. The extent of these changes varies directly with the prior probability of disease, determined from patient-specific factors (e.g., clinical data, laboratory data, findings on plain films) known best by the referring clinician.

  15. Vitamin D Status Is Associated with Disease Activity among Rheumatology Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Sabbagh, Zohreh; Markland, Janet; Vatanparast, Hassanali

    2013-01-01

    The co-existence of high prevalence of vitamin D inadequacy among Canadians and high prevalence of systematic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARDs) raise the question on relationship between the two situations. Objective: To determine vitamin D status in known cases of common SARDs and compare to those with non-autoimmune diseases; further, to evaluate the impact of vitamin D on disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) cases. Methods: In a retrospective case-control study design, we evaluated 116 patients in a community clinic classified in two groups, Control group: patients with non-rheumatic disease (n = 56), and Case group: those with rheumatic diseases (n = 60). We compared plasma vitamin D status (25(OH)D), indicators of disease activity and other potential confounders. Further, we determined factors associated with disease activity in RA cases. Results: The plasma 25(OH)D was significantly lower in Case group (64.8 ± 29.8) compared to Control group (86.8 ± 37.7). High number of SARDs outpatients 56%) had considerably low plasma 25(OH)D concentration. RA cases with low plasma 25(OH)D had over five times higher risk of disease activity (OR = 5.15 95% CI 1.16, 22.9; p = 0.031). Conclusion: Inadequate vitamin D status in SARDs cases, along with considerably strong association with disease activity in RA cases, indicate the need for proper evaluation of vitamin D status in this clinical population. Moreover, appropriate training should be given to the patients to ensure the intake of the recommended amount of vitamin D per day through diet or supplement. PMID:23803739

  16. Low Serum Lysosomal Acid Lipase Activity Correlates with Advanced Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shteyer, Eyal; Villenchik, Rivka; Mahamid, Mahmud; Nator, Nidaa; Safadi, Rifaat

    2016-01-01

    Fatty liver has become the most common liver disorder and is recognized as a major health burden in the Western world. The causes for disease progression are not fully elucidated but lysosomal impairment is suggested. Here we evaluate a possible role for lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) activity in liver disease. To study LAL levels in patients with microvesicular, idiopathic cirrhosis and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Medical records of patients with microvesicular steatosis, cryptogenic cirrhosis and NAFLD, diagnosed on the basis of liver biopsies, were included in the study. Measured serum LAL activity was correlated to clinical, laboratory, imaging and pathological data. No patient exhibited LAL activity compatible with genetic LAL deficiency. However, serum LAL activity inversely predicted liver disease severity. A LAL level of 0.5 was the most sensitive for detecting both histologic and noninvasive markers for disease severity, including lower white blood cell count and calcium, and elevated γ-glutamyltransferase, creatinine, glucose, glycated hemoglobin, uric acid and coagulation function. Serum LAL activity <0.5 indicates severe liver injury in patients with fatty liver and cirrhosis. Further studies should define the direct role of LAL in liver disease severity and consider the possibility of replacement therapy. PMID:26927097

  17. Low Serum Lysosomal Acid Lipase Activity Correlates with Advanced Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Shteyer, Eyal; Villenchik, Rivka; Mahamid, Mahmud; Nator, Nidaa; Safadi, Rifaat

    2016-01-01

    Fatty liver has become the most common liver disorder and is recognized as a major health burden in the Western world. The causes for disease progression are not fully elucidated but lysosomal impairment is suggested. Here we evaluate a possible role for lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) activity in liver disease. To study LAL levels in patients with microvesicular, idiopathic cirrhosis and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Medical records of patients with microvesicular steatosis, cryptogenic cirrhosis and NAFLD, diagnosed on the basis of liver biopsies, were included in the study. Measured serum LAL activity was correlated to clinical, laboratory, imaging and pathological data. No patient exhibited LAL activity compatible with genetic LAL deficiency. However, serum LAL activity inversely predicted liver disease severity. A LAL level of 0.5 was the most sensitive for detecting both histologic and noninvasive markers for disease severity, including lower white blood cell count and calcium, and elevated γ-glutamyltransferase, creatinine, glucose, glycated hemoglobin, uric acid and coagulation function. Serum LAL activity <0.5 indicates severe liver injury in patients with fatty liver and cirrhosis. Further studies should define the direct role of LAL in liver disease severity and consider the possibility of replacement therapy. PMID:26927097

  18. EULAR Sjögren's syndrome disease activity index (ESSDAI): a user guide

    PubMed Central

    Seror, Raphaèle; Bowman, Simon J; Brito-Zeron, Pilar; Theander, Elke; Bootsma, Hendrika; Tzioufas, Athanasios; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Ramos-Casals, Manel; Dörner, Thomas; Ravaud, Philippe; Vitali, Claudio; Mariette, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The EULAR Sjögren's syndrome (SS) disease activity index (ESSDAI) is a systemic disease activity index that was designed to measure disease activity in patients with primary SS. With the growing use of the ESSDAI, some domains appear to be more challenging to rate than others. The ESSDAI is now in use as a gold standard to measure disease activity in clinical studies, and as an outcome measure, even a primary outcome measure, in current randomised clinical trials. Therefore, ensuring an accurate and reproducible rating of each domain, by providing a more detailed definition of each domain, has emerged as an urgent need. The purpose of the present article is to provide a user guide for the ESSDAI. This guide provides definitions and precisions on the rating of each domain. It also includes some minor improvement of the score to integrate advance in knowledge of disease manifestations. This user guide may help clinicians to use the ESSDAI, and increase the reliability of rating and consequently of the ability to detect true changes over time. This better appraisal of ESSDAI items, along with the recent definition of disease activity levels and minimal clinically important change, will improve the assessment of patients with primary SS and facilitate the demonstration of effectiveness of treatment for patients with primary SS. PMID:26509054

  19. Clinicians’ guide to the use of fecal calprotectin to identify and monitor disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Bressler, Brian; Panaccione, Remo; Fedorak, Richard N; Seidman, Ernest G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Objective monitoring of the severity of inflammation in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an essential part of disease management. However, repeat endoscopy to define extent and severity of inflammation is not practical. Fecal calprotectin (FC) is a biomarker that can be used as a surrogate test to distinguish inflammatory from noninflammatory gastrointestinal disease. METHODS: A targeted search of the literature regarding FC, focusing primarily on the past three years, was conducted to develop practical clinical guidance on the current utility of FC in the routine management of IBD patients. RESULTS: It is recommended that samples for FC testing be obtained from the first bowel excretion of the day. FC testing should be used as standard of care to accurately confirm inflammation and ‘real-time’ disease activity when a clinician suspects an IBD flare. Although FC is a reliable marker of inflammation, its role in routine monitoring in improving long-term outcomes has not yet been fully assessed. Based on available evidence, the authors suggest the following cut-off values and management strategies: when FC levels are <50 μg/g to 100 μg/g, quiescent disease is likely and therapy should be continued; when FC levels are >100 μg/g to 250 μg/g, inflammation is possible and further testing (eg, colonoscopy) is required to confirm inflammation; and when FC levels are >250 μg/g, active inflammation is likely and strategies to control inflammation should be initiated (eg, optimizing current therapies or switching to an alternative therapy). DISCUSSION: FC is a useful biomarker to accurately assess the degree of inflammation and should be incorporated into the management of patients with IBD. PMID:26125109

  20. Immunometabolic biomarkers of inflammation in Behçet's disease: relationship with epidemiological profile, disease activity and therapeutic regimens.

    PubMed

    Cantarini, L; Pucino, V; Vitale, A; Talarico, R; M Lucherini, O; Magnotti, F; De Rosa, V; Galgani, M; Alviggi, C; Marone, G; Galeazzi, M; Matarese, G

    2016-05-01

    Behcet's disease (BD) is a systemic inflammatory disease with a still unclear pathogenesis. Although several inflammatory molecules have been studied, current biomarkers are largely insensitive in BD and unable to predict disease progression and response to treatment. Our primary aim was to explore serum levels of soluble CD40 L (sCD40L), soluble intracellular adhesion molecule (sICAM-1), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), myeloperoxidase (MPO), leptin, resistin, osteoprotegerin (OPG), soluble type 1 tumour necrosis factor receptor (sTNFR), interleukin (IL)-6 and serum amyloid A (SAA) serum concentration in a cohort of 27 BD patients. The secondary aim was to evaluate potential correlations between the putative circulating biomarkers, demographic profile of patients, the status of disease activity, the specific organ involvement at the time of sample collection and different therapeutic regimens. Serum concentrations of sTNFR (P = 0·008), leptin (P = 0·0011), sCD40L (P < 0·0001) and IL-6 (P = 0·0154) were significantly higher in BD patients than in HC, while no difference was found in MCP-1, MPO and resistin serum levels. Moreover, we observed significantly higher sTNFR serum concentrations in BD patients presenting inactive disease than HC (P = 0·0108). A correlation between sTNFR and age was also found, with higher levels in patients over 40 years than HC (P = 0·0329). Although further research is warranted to elucidate the role of circulating biomarkers, some of that may contribute to the understanding of the physiopathology processes underlying BD activity and damage as well as to provide useful tools for prognostic purposes and a personalized treatment approach. PMID:26756979

  1. Cumulative disease activity predicts incidental hearing impairment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

    PubMed

    Pascual-Ramos, Virginia; Contreras-Yáñez, Irazú; Rivera-Hoyos, Paula; Enríquez, Lorena; Ramírez-Anguiano, Jaqueline

    2014-03-01

    We previously reported that 24% of 113 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients had hearing impairment (HI). We investigated if disease activity was a predictor of incidental HI. One hundred and four patients completed three consecutive 6 months-apart rheumatic evaluations and concomitant audiometric evaluations which included at least an interview, an otoscopic evaluation, and a pure tone audiometry. HI was defined if the average thresholds for at least one of low-, mid-, or high-frequency ranges were ≥25 decibels (dB) hearing level in one or both ears. Appropriated statistics was used. Internal review board approval was obtained. Patients were most frequently middle-aged (43.4 ± 13.3 years), female (89.4%), and had median disease duration of 5 years and low disease activity. All were receiving RA treatment. At inclusion, 24 patients had HI which was sensorineural in 91.7% of them. Among the 80 patients without HI at baseline, 10 (12.5%) developed incidental HI, and they had more disease activity either at baseline ([median, range] disease activity score-28 joints evaluated-C-reactive protein [DAS28-CRP], 3.9 [1.6-7.3] vs. 2.1 [1-8.7], p = 0.006) or cumulative previous incidental HI (3.4 [1.8-4.8] vs. 2 [1-6.2], p = 0.007) and were more frequently on combined methotrexate and sulfasalazine (20 vs. 1.4%, p = 0.05) than their counterparts. In the adjusted Cox proportional model, cumulative DAS28-CRP was the only variable to predict incidental HI (odds ratio, 1.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-2.7; p = 0.01). Almost 13% of RA patients with short disease duration and low disease activity developed incidental HI during 1 year. Cumulative disease activity predicted incidental HI. PMID:24435352

  2. Correlation Between Low Bone Density and Disease Activity in Patients with Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Amiriani, Taghi; Besharat, Sima; Pourramezan, Zahra; Mirkarimi, Honey Sadat; Aghaei, Mehrdad; Joshaghani, Hamidreza; Roshandel, Gholamreza; Faghani, Maryam; Besharat, Mahsa

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Different clinical and epidemiological studies using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry have shown an increased prevalence of low bone mineral density in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between bone density and the disease activity in patients with ulcerative colitis. METHODS In this cross-sectional study, 52 patients with ulcerative colitis (duration of the disease less than 5 years) were invited to our research center, Golestan province, northeast of Iran, during February 2012 up to August 2012. A demographic checklist and Simple Clinical Colitis Activity Index was completed for each patients and 5 cc of blood sample was taken after obtaining the informed consent. We used colorimetry method for measuring serum calcium, UV method for serum phosphorus and ELISA for serum vitamin D. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was done to evaluate the bone density. Data analysis was done using SPSS software version 16. Normality of data was assessed using Kolmogorov– Smirnov test. T and ANOVA tests were used if data had normal distribution. Mann-Whitney U or Kruskal-Wallis tests were used for the remaining data. Correlation between qualitative variables was evaluated by Chi-square test. RESULTS The mean (±SD) age and disease activity of the patients were 37.72 (±12.18) years and 4.78 (±1.98), respectively. There were no correlation between disease activity and mean age. Low bone density was seen in 30.8%, 11.5%, and 15.4% in spine, femur neck, and hip, respectively. There was no relationship between Z-score of total hip, spine, and femur neck with disease activity, age, and duration of disease (p>0.05). CONCLUSION Our results showed an acceptable rate of low bone density in patients with ulcerative colitis without any correlation with the disease activity index. PMID:25628850

  3. Correlation between low bone density and disease activity in patients with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Amiriani, Taghi; Besharat, Sima; Pourramezan, Zahra; Mirkarimi, Honey Sadat; Aghaei, Mehrdad; Joshaghani, Hamidreza; Roshandel, Gholamreza; Faghani, Maryam; Besharat, Mahsa

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Different clinical and epidemiological studies using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry have shown an increased prevalence of low bone mineral density in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between bone density and the disease activity in patients with ulcerative colitis. METHODS In this cross-sectional study, 52 patients with ulcerative colitis (duration of the disease less than 5 years) were invited to our research center, Golestan province, northeast of Iran, during February 2012 up to August 2012. A demographic checklist and Simple Clinical Colitis Activity Index was completed for each patients and 5 cc of blood sample was taken after obtaining the informed consent. We used colorimetry method for measuring serum calcium, UV method for serum phosphorus and ELISA for serum vitamin D. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was done to evaluate the bone density. Data analysis was done using SPSS software version 16. Normality of data was assessed using Kolmogorov- Smirnov test. T and ANOVA tests were used if data had normal distribution. Mann-Whitney U or Kruskal-Wallis tests were used for the remaining data. Correlation between qualitative variables was evaluated by Chi-square test. RESULTS The mean (±SD) age and disease activity of the patients were 37.72 (±12.18) years and 4.78 (±1.98), respectively. There were no correlation between disease activity and mean age. Low bone density was seen in 30.8%, 11.5%, and 15.4% in spine, femur neck, and hip, respectively. There was no relationship between Z-score of total hip, spine, and femur neck with disease activity, age, and duration of disease (p>0.05). CONCLUSION Our results showed an acceptable rate of low bone density in patients with ulcerative colitis without any correlation with the disease activity index. PMID:25628850

  4. Enteroscopy in small intestinal inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Gay, G J; Delmotte, J S

    1999-01-01

    The development of new semilong enteroscopes, videopush enteroscope (VPE), has modified the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to inflammatory intestinal diseases owing to the biopsy and therapeutic capacities. In Crohn's Disease, VPE is useful in nonusual clinical presentations: occult intestinal bleeding and in the treatment by dilatation of jejunal and ileal strictures. In atrophic coeliac disease (ACD) VPE is mandatory each time oesogastroduodenoscopy biopsies are noninformative in order to obtain pathologic jejunal biopsis. In addition, in refractory ACD and in the case of jejunal blood loss ACD, VPE is mandatory in the search for ulcerative jejunitis and lymphoma. The management of chronic diarrhea of the adult, classic endoscopy remains the gold standard procedure and is carried out first but in patients with negative results, VPE can proceed immediately. Good results can only be obtained if VPE is performed by endoscopist who is highly interested in this field of investigation. PMID:9834320

  5. The role of microglial activation in disease progression.

    PubMed

    Correale, Jorge

    2014-09-01

    Microglia, a unique type of myeloid cell, play a key role in the inflammation-mediated neurodegeneration occurring during both acute and chronic stages of multiple sclerosis (MS). These highly specialized cells trigger neurotoxic pathways, producing pro-inflammatory cytokines, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and proteolytic enzymes, causing progressive neurodegeneration. Microglia have also been associated with development of cortical lesions in progressive MS, as well as with alterations of synaptic transmission in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). However, they also play an important role in the promotion of neuroprotection, downregulation of inflammation, and stimulation of tissue repair. Notably, microglia undergo changes in morphology and function with normal aging, resulting in a decline of their ability to repair central nervous system damage, making axons and neurons more vulnerable with age. Modulation of microglial activation for therapeutic purposes must consider suppressing deleterious effects of these cells, while simultaneously preserving their protective functions. PMID:24812046

  6. Validity of a Questionnaire to Assess the Physical Activity Level in Coronary Artery Disease Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guiraud, Thibaut; Granger, Richard; Bousquet, Marc; Gremeaux, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study is to compare, in coronary artery disease patients, physical activity (PA) assessed with the Dijon Physical Activity Questionnaire (DPAQ) and the true PA objectively measured using an accelerometer. Seventy patients wore an accelerometer (MyWellness Key actimeter) throughout 1 week after a cardiac rehabilitation program that…

  7. Altered Activation of the Tibialis Anterior in Individuals with Pompe Disease: Implications for Motor Unit Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Corti, Manuela; Smith, Barbara K; Falk, Darin J; Lawson, Lee Ann; Fuller, David D; Subramony, S.H.; Byrne, Barry J; Christou, Evangelos A

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pompe disease is a progressive disease that affects skeletal muscles and leads to loss of ambulation. We investigated the activation of the tibialis anterior (TA) in late onset Pompe disease (LOPD) individuals during maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and evoked involuntary responses. Methods Four LOPD patients and matched control subjects performed MVC of the TA using dorsiflexion and TA evoked responses. Activation of the TA was recorded with surface EMG. Results The Pompe patients exhibited greater power at frequencies below 60 Hz and reduced power above 100 Hz. They exhibited reduced increase in M-wave and prolonged M-wave latency and duration in response to stimulation. Discussion These results provide evidence that LOPD individuals have an altered activation pattern of the TA during maximal contractions. The observed activation pattern may reflect impairments in voluntary command, neuromuscular junction pathology, or compensatory drive due to a reduced number of functional motoneurons. PMID:25186912

  8. Fecal calprotectin is associated with disease activity in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Duran, Arzu; Kobak, Senol; Sen, Nazime; Aktakka, Seniha; Atabay, Tennur; Orman, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Calprotectin is one of the major antimicrobial S100 leucocyte proteins. Serum calprotectin levels are associated with certain inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and inflammatory bowel disease. The aim of this study was to investigate serum and fecal calprotectin levels in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and show their potential relations to the clinical findings of the disease. Fifty-one patients fulfilling the New York criteria of AS and 43 healthy age- and gender-matched volunteers were included in the study. Physical and locomotor system examinations were performed and history data were obtained for all patients. Disease activity parameters were assessed together with anthropometric parameters. Routine laboratory examinations and genetic testing (HLA-B27) were performed. Serum calprotectin levels and fecal calprotectin levels were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The mean age of the patients was 41.5 years, the mean duration of the disease was 8.6 years, and the delay in diagnosis was 4.2 years. Serum calprotectin levels were similar in both AS patients and in the control group (p=0.233). Serum calprotectin level was correlated with Bath AS disease activity index (BASDAI) and Bath AS functional index (BASFI) (p=0.001, p=0.002, respectively). A higher level of fecal calprotectin was detected in AS patients when compared with the control group. A statistically significant correlation between fecal calprotectin level and BASDAI, BASFI, C-reactive protein and Erythrocyte sedimentation rate were detected (p=0.002, p=0.005, p=0.001, p=0.002, respectively). The results indicated that fecal calprotectin levels were associated with AS disease findings and activity parameters. Calprotectin is a vital disease activity biomarker for AS and may have an important role in the pathogenesis of the disease. Multi-centered prospective studies are needed in order to provide further insight. PMID:26773186

  9. Fecal calprotectin is associated with disease activity in patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Duran, Arzu; Kobak, Senol; Sen, Nazime; Aktakka, Seniha; Atabay, Tennur; Orman, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Calprotectin is one of the major antimicrobial S100 leucocyte proteins. Serum calprotectin levels are associated with certain inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and inflammatory bowel disease. The aim of this study was to investigate serum and fecal calprotectin levels in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and show their potential relations to the clinical findings of the disease. Fifty-one patients fulfilling the New York criteria of AS and 43 healthy age- and gender-matched volunteers were included in the study. Physical and locomotor system examinations were performed and history data were obtained for all patients. Disease activity parameters were assessed together with anthropometric parameters. Routine laboratory examinations and genetic testing (HLA-B27) were performed. Serum calprotectin levels and fecal calprotectin levels were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The mean age of the patients was 41.5 years, the mean duration of the disease was 8.6 years, and the delay in diagnosis was 4.2 years. Serum calprotectin levels were similar in both AS patients and in the control group (p=0.233). Serum calprotectin level was correlated with Bath AS disease activity index (BASDAI) and Bath AS functional index (BASFI) (p=0.001, p=0.002, respectively). A higher level of fecal calprotectin was detected in AS patients when compared with the control group. A statistically significant correlation between fecal calprotectin level and BASDAI, BASFI, C-reactive protein and Erythrocyte sedimentation rate were detected (p=0.002, p=0.005, p=0.001, p=0.002, respectively). The results indicated that fecal calprotectin levels were associated with AS disease findings and activity parameters. Calprotectin is a vital disease activity biomarker for AS and may have an important role in the pathogenesis of the disease. Multi-centered prospective studies are needed in order to provide further insight. PMID:26773186

  10. Persons with moderate Alzheimer's disease use simple technology aids to manage daily activities and leisure occupation.

    PubMed

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'Reilly, Mark F; Sigafoos, Jeff; Renna, Caterina; Pinto, Katia; De Vanna, Floriana; Caffò, Alessandro O; Stasolla, Fabrizio

    2014-09-01

    Two studies assessed technology-aided programs to support performance of daily activities and selection/activation of music items with patients with moderate Alzheimer's disease. In Study I, four patients were presented with activity-related pictorial instructions via a computer fitted with inexpensive, commercial software. In Study II, four patients were (a) presented with different music options and (b) allowed to select and activate the preferred option via a microswitch response. Study I showed that each patient learned to perform the two activities available with percentages of correct responses exceeding 85 by the end of the intervention. Study II showed that all patients learned to choose and activate music options. Psychology students, employed in a social validation check, scored the patients' behavior within the program better than their behavior in a control situation. The relevance and usability of simplified pictorial-instruction programs and music choice programs for patients with moderate Alzheimer's disease were discussed. PMID:24881006

  11. Vitamin D concentrations and disease activity in Moroccan children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In addition to its important metabolic activities, vitamin D also contributes to the regulation of the immune system. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between hypovitaminosis D and disease activity in Moroccan children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods In this cross-sectional study, forty children with JIA were included, all having been diagnosed according to the classification criteria of International League of Associations for Rheumatology (ILAR). The children underwent anthropometric assessment and clinical evaluation. Disease activity was measured using the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28) for polyarticular and oligoarticular JIA and the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) for enthesitis-related arthritis. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin [25(OH)D] D2 and D3 were measured using radioimmunoassay (RIA). Hypovitaminosis D was defined as serum 25(OH)D <30 ng/ml. Results The average age of participants was 11 years ± 4.23. Hypovitaminosis D was observed in 75% of patients. In univariate analyses, 25(OH)D levels were negatively associated with DAS28 for polyarticular and oligoarticular JIA. No significant relationship was found between 25(OH)D levels and BASDAI for juvenile spondylarthropathy. In multivariate linear regression analysis, no association persisted between 25(OH)D levels and DAS28. Conclusions Our study suggested that serum levels of vitamin D were low in Moroccan children with JIA disease. Future studies with a larger population are needed to confirm our results. PMID:24690195

  12. Toward Development of a Fibromyalgia Responder Index and Disease Activity Score: OMERACT Module Update

    PubMed Central

    Mease, PJ; Clauw, DJ; Christensen, R; Crofford, L; Gendreau, M; Martin, SA; Simon, L; Strand, V; Williams, DA; Arnold, LM

    2012-01-01

    Following development of the core domain set for fibromyalgia (FM) in OMERACT 7–9, the FM working group has progressed toward the development of an FM responder index and a disease activity score based on these domains, utilizing outcome indices of these domains from archived randomized clinical trials (RCTs) in FM. Possible clinical domains that could be included in a responder index and disease activity score include: pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance, cognitive dysfunction, mood disturbance, tenderness, stiffness, and functional impairment. Outcome measures for these domains demonstrate good to adequate psychometric properties, although measures of cognitive dysfunction need to be further developed. The approach used in the development of responder indices and disease activity scores for rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis represent heuristic models for our work, but FM is challenging in that there is no clear algorithm of treatment that defines disease activity based on treatment decisions, nor are there objective markers that define thresholds of severity or response to treatment. The process of developing candidate dichotomous responder definitions and continuous quantitative disease activity measures is described, as is participant discussion that transpired at OMERACT 10. Final results of this work will be published in a separate manuscript pending completion of analyses. PMID:21724721

  13. The Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor‐γ Pioglitazone Improves Vascular Function and Decreases Disease Activity in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Marder, Wendy; Khalatbari, Shokoufeh; Myles, James D.; Hench, Rita; Lustig, Susan; Yalavarthi, Srilakshmi; Parameswaran, Aishwarya; Brook, Robert D.; Kaplan, Mariana J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with heightened mortality due to atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD). Inflammatory pathways in RA negatively affect vascular physiology and promote metabolic disturbances that contribute to CVD. We hypothesized that the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor‐γ (PPAR‐γ) pioglitazone could promote potent vasculoprotective and anti‐inflammatory effects in RA. Methods and Results One hundred forty‐three non‐diabetic adult RA patients (76.2% female, age 55.2±12.1 [mean±SD]) on stable RA standard of care treatment were enrolled in a randomized, double‐blind placebo controlled crossover trial of 45 mg daily pioglitazone versus placebo, with a 3‐month duration/arm and a 2‐month washout period. Pulse wave velocity of the aorta (PWV), brachial artery flow mediated dilatation (FMD), nitroglycerin mediated dilatation (NMD), microvascular endothelial function (reactive hyperemia index [RHI]), and circulating biomarkers of inflammation, insulin resistance, and atherosclerosis risk all were quantified. RA disease activity was assessed with the 28‐Joint Count Disease Activity Score (DAS‐28) C‐reactive protein (CRP) and the Short Form (36) Health Survey quality of life questionnaire. When added to standard of care RA treatment, pioglitazone significantly decreased pulse wave velocity (ie, aortic stiffness) (P=0.01), while FMD and RHI remained unchanged when compared to treatment with placebo. Further, pioglitazone significantly reduced RA disease activity (P=0.02) and CRP levels (P=0.001), while improving lipid profiles. The drug was well tolerated. Conclusions Addition of pioglitazone to RA standard of care significantly improves aortic elasticity and decreases inflammation and disease activity with minimal safety issues. The clinical implications of these findings remain to be established. Clinical Trial Registration URL: ClinicalTrials.gov Unique Identifier: NCT00554853. PMID:24252844

  14. Pharmacogenetics of paraoxonase activity: elucidating the role of high-density lipoprotein in disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Daniel Seung; Marsillach, Judit; Furlong, Clement E; Jarvik, Gail P

    2014-01-01

    PON1 is a key component of high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) and is at least partially responsible for HDL's antioxidant/atheroprotective properties. PON1 is also associated with numerous human diseases, including cardiovascular disease, Parkinson's disease and cancer. In addition, PON1 metabolizes a broad variety of substrates, including toxic organophosphorous compounds, statin adducts, glucocorticoids, the likely atherogenic l-homocysteine thiolactone and the quorum-sensing factor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Numerous cardiovascular and antidiabetic pharmacologic agents, dietary macronutrients, lifestyle factors and antioxidant supplements affect PON1 expression and enzyme activity levels. Owing to the importance of PON1 to HDL function and its individual association with diverse human diseases, pharmacogenomic interactions between PON1 and the various factors that alter its expression and activity may represent an important therapeutic target for future investigation. PMID:24024900

  15. Heat Shock Protein-70 Expression in Vitiligo and its Relation to the Disease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Doss, Reham William; El-Rifaie, Abdel-Aziz A; Abdel-Wahab, Amr M; Gohary, Yasser M; Rashed, Laila A

    2016-01-01

    Background: Vitiligo is a progressive depigmenting disorder characterized by the loss of functional melanocytes from the epidermis. The etiopathogenesis of vitiligo is still unclear. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are prime candidates to connect stress to the skin. HSPs were found to be implicated in autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and other skin disorders as psoriasis. Aim and Objectives: The aim of this study was to map the level of HSP-70 in vitiligo lesions to declare its role in the pathogenesis and activity of vitiligo. Materials and Methods: The study included thirty patients with vitiligo and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Vitiligo patients were divided as regards to the disease activity into highly active, moderately active, and inactive vitiligo groups. Skin biopsies were taken from the lesional and nonlesional skin of patients and from the normal skin of the controls. HSP-70 messenger RNA (mRNA) expression was estimated using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results: Our analysis revealed a significantly higher expression of HSP-70 mRNA in lesional skin biopsies from vitiligo patients compared to nonlesional skin biopsies from vitiligo patients (P < 0.001) and compared to skin biopsies from healthy controls (P < 0.001). The level of HSP-70 was not found to be correlated with age, sex, or disease duration. The expression of HSP-70 was correlated with the disease activity and patients with active vitiligo showed higher mean HSP-70 level compared to those with inactive disease. Conclusions: HSP-70 plays a role in the pathogenesis of vitiligo and may enhance the immune response in active disease. PMID:27512186

  16. Is the serum cholesterol-coronary heart disease relationship modified by activity level in older persons?

    PubMed

    Harris, T B; Makuc, D M; Kleinman, J C; Gillum, R F; Curb, J D; Schatzkin, A; Feldman, J J

    1991-08-01

    Although coronary heart disease remains a leading cause of death and disability in old age, the relationship of serum cholesterol level to risk of coronary heart disease in old age is controversial. Data for 2,388 white persons aged 65-74 who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) I Epidemiologic Follow-up Study (NHEFS) were examined to determine the relationship of serum cholesterol level to coronary heart disease incidence and whether activity level would modify this relationship. While there was no overall relationship between serum cholesterol level and coronary heart disease risk in either men or women, the relationship between serum cholesterol level and coronary heart disease differed within activity groups. For persons who were more active, serum cholesterol level was associated with a graded increase in risk of coronary heart disease, from 1.3 (95% CI 0.7, 2.3) in those with serum cholesterol level of 4.7-5.1 to 1.7 in those with serum cholesterol level of 6.2 mmol/L or more (95% CI 1.0, 2.7), when compared with those with serum cholesterol level below 4.7. For the least active persons, all levels of cholesterol were associated with a significant inverse relative risk, including cholesterol of 6.2 mmol/L or more (Relative risk = 0.4 (95% CI 0.2, 0.7]. These data suggest that factors such as activity level may modify the serum cholesterol-coronary heart disease association in old age. The serum cholesterol-coronary heart disease association in more active older persons resembles that seen in younger populations, whereas the association in less active persons is that of serum cholesterol level and risk of cancer or death. The modification of the serum cholesterol-coronary heart disease association by activity level may have implications for appropriate clinical management as well as appropriate design of research studies of this association. PMID:2071804

  17. Metabolic activity of sodium, measured by neutron activation, in the hands of patients suffering from bone diseases: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Spinks, T.J.; Bewley, D.K.; Paolillo, M.; Vlotides, J.; Joplin, G.F.; Ranicar, A.S.O.

    1980-01-01

    Turnover of sodium in the human hand was studied by neutron activation. Patients suffering from various metabolic abnormalities affecting the skeleton, who were undergoing routine neutron activation for the measurement of calcium, were investigated along with a group of healthy volunteers. Neutron activation labels the sodium atoms simultaneously and with equal probability regardless of the turnover time of individual body compartments. The loss of sodium can be described either by a sum of two exponentials or by a single power function. Distinctions between patients and normal subjects were not apparent from the exponential model but were brought out by the power function. The exponent of time in the latter is a measure of clearance rate. The mean values of this parameter in (a) a group of patients suffering from acromegaly; (b) a group including Paget's disease, osteoporosis, Cushing's disease, and hyperparathyroidism; and (c) a group of healthy subjects, were found to be significantly different from each other.

  18. Role of Inflammasome Activation in the Pathophysiology of Vascular Diseases of the Neurovascular Unit

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Islam N.; Ishrat, Tauheed; Fagan, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Inflammation is the standard double-edged defense mechanism that aims at protecting the human physiological homeostasis from devastating threats. Both acute and chronic inflammation have been implicated in the occurrence and progression of vascular diseases. Interference with components of the immune system to improve patient outcome after ischemic injury has been uniformly unsuccessful. There is a need for a deeper understanding of the innate immune response to injury in order to modulate, rather than to block inflammation and improve the outcome for vascular diseases. Recent Advances: Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors or NOD-like receptor proteins (NLRPs) can be activated by sterile and microbial inflammation. NLR family plays a major role in activating the inflammasome. Critical Issues: The aim of this work is to review recent findings that provided insights into key inflammatory mechanisms and define the place of the inflammasome, a multi-protein complex involved in instigating inflammation in neurovascular diseases, including retinopathy, neurodegenerative diseases, and stroke. Future Directions: The significant contribution of NLRP-inflammasome activation to vascular disease of the neurovascular unit in the brain and retina suggests that therapeutic strategies focused on specific targeting of inflammasome components could significantly improve the outcomes of these diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1188–1206. PMID:25275222

  19. Wearable Systems for Monitoring Mobility-Related Activities in Chronic Disease: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Allet, Lara; Knols, Ruud H.; Shirato, Kei; de Bruin, Eling D.

    2010-01-01

    The use of wearable motion sensing technology offers important advantages over conventional methods for obtaining measures of physical activity and/or physical functioning in individuals with chronic diseases. This review aims to identify the actual state of applying wearable systems for monitoring mobility-related activity in individuals with chronic disease conditions. In this review we focus on technologies and applications, feasibility and adherence aspects, and clinical relevance of wearable motion sensing technology. PubMed (Medline since 1990), PEdro, and reference lists of all relevant articles were searched. Two authors independently reviewed randomised trials systematically. The quality of selected articles was scored and study results were summarised and discussed. 163 abstracts were considered. After application of inclusion criteria and full text reading, 25 articles were taken into account in a full text review. Twelve of these papers evaluated walking with pedometers, seven used uniaxial accelerometers to assess physical activity, six used multiaxial accelerometers, and two papers used a combination approach of a pedometer and a multiaxial accelerometer for obtaining overall activity and energy expenditure measures. Seven studies mentioned feasibility and/or adherence aspects. The number of studies that use movement sensors for monitoring of activity patterns in chronic disease (postural transitions, time spent in certain positions or activities) is nonexistent on the RCT level of study design. Although feasible methods for monitoring human mobility are available, evidence-based clinical applications of these methods in individuals with chronic diseases are in need of further development. PMID:22163393

  20. Identification of miRNAs that modulate glucocerebrosidase activity in Gaucher disease cells.

    PubMed

    Siebert, Marina; Westbroek, Wendy; Chen, Yu-Chi; Moaven, Nima; Li, Yan; Velayati, Arash; Saraiva-Pereira, Maria Luiza; Martin, Scott E; Sidransky, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of the enzyme glucocerebrosidase. Although it is a monogenic disease, there is vast phenotypic heterogeneity, even among patients with the same genotype. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs involved in many biological processes and diseases. To determine whether miRNAs can affect glucocerebrosidase activity, we performed a screen of 875 different miRNA mimics. The screen was performed using Gaucher fibroblasts, and glucocerebrosidase activity was used as the initial outcome parameter. We found several miRNAs that either up- or down-regulated glucocerebrosidase activity. In follow-up assays, we confirmed that one specific miRNA (miR-127-5p) down-regulated both glucocerebrosidase activity and protein levels by down-regulation of LIMP-2, the receptor involved in proper trafficking of glucocerebrosidase from the endoplasmic reticulum to the lysosome. A conditioned media assay demonstrated that cells treated with this miRNA secreted glucocerebrosidase into the extracellular environment, supporting impaired LIMP-2 function. Two other miRNAs, miR-16-5p and miR-195-5p, were found to up-regulate glucocerebrosidase activity by greater than 40% and to enhance expression and protein levels of the enzyme. In conclusion, we show that miRNAs can alter glucocerebrosidase activity in patient cells, indicating that miRNAs can potentially act as modifiers in Gaucher disease. PMID:25584808

  1. Identification of miRNAs that modulate glucocerebrosidase activity in Gaucher disease cells

    PubMed Central

    Siebert, Marina; Westbroek, Wendy; Chen, Yu-Chi; Moaven, Nima; Li, Yan; Velayati, Arash; Saraiva-Pereira, Maria Luiza; Martin, Scott E; Sidransky, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of the enzyme glucocerebrosidase. Although it is a monogenic disease, there is vast phenotypic heterogeneity, even among patients with the same genotype. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs involved in many biological processes and diseases. To determine whether miRNAs can affect glucocerebrosidase activity, we performed a screen of 875 different miRNA mimics. The screen was performed using Gaucher fibroblasts, and glucocerebrosidase activity was used as the initial outcome parameter. We found several miRNAs that either up- or down-regulated glucocerebrosidase activity. In follow-up assays, we confirmed that one specific miRNA (miR-127–5p) down-regulated both glucocerebrosidase activity and protein levels by down-regulation of LIMP-2, the receptor involved in proper trafficking of glucocerebrosidase from the endoplasmic reticulum to the lysosome. A conditioned media assay demonstrated that cells treated with this miRNA secreted glucocerebrosidase into the extracellular environment, supporting impaired LIMP-2 function. Two other miRNAs, miR-16–5p and miR-195–5p, were found to up-regulate glucocerebrosidase activity by greater than 40% and to enhance expression and protein levels of the enzyme. In conclusion, we show that miRNAs can alter glucocerebrosidase activity in patient cells, indicating that miRNAs can potentially act as modifiers in Gaucher disease. PMID:25584808

  2. Remission in rheumatoid arthritis: benefit over low disease activity in patient-reported outcomes and costs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease that causes a considerable burden for the patient and society. It is not clear yet whether aiming for remission (REM) is worthwhile, especially when compared with low disease activity (LDA). Methods In 356 consecutive RA patients, we obtained data on physical function (health assessment questionnaire (HAQ)), health-related quality of life (HRQoL: Short Form 36 (SF36), Short Form 6 dimensions (SF-6D), Euro QoL 5D (EQ-5D)), work productivity (work productivity and activity impairment questionnaire (WPAI)), as well as estimation of direct and indirect costs. Cross-sectionally, data were compared in patients within different levels of disease activity according to the simplified disease activity index (SDAI; remission (REM ≤3.3); n = 87; low disease activity (LDA: 3.3 < SDAI ≤11); n = 103; moderate to high disease activity (MDA/HDA) >11 n = 119) by using analyses of variance (ANOVA). Longitudinal investigations assessed patients who changed from LDA to REM and vice versa. Results We found differences in patients achieving REM compared with LDA for HAQ (0.39 ± 0.58 versus 0.72 ± 68), WPAI (percentage impairment while working 11.8% ± 18.7% versus 26.8% ± 23.9%; percentage of overall activity impairment, 10.8% ± 14.1% versus 29.0% ± 23.6%)), EQ-5D (0.89 ± 0.12 versus 0.78 ± 0.6) and SF-36 (physical component score (PCS): 46.0 ± 8.6 versus 38.3 ± 10.5; mental component score (MCS): 49.9 ± 11.1 versus 47.9 ± 12.3) (P < 0.01 for all, except for SF36 MCS). Regarding costs, we found significant differences of direct and indirect costs (P < 0.05) within different levels of disease activity, with higher costs in patients with higher states of disease activity. Longitudinal evaluations confirmed the main analyses. Conclusion Patients with REM show better function, HRQoL, and productivity, even when compared with another

  3. UPS Activation in the Battle Against Aging and Aggregation-Related Diseases: An Extended Review.

    PubMed

    Papaevgeniou, Nikoletta; Chondrogianni, Niki

    2016-01-01

    Aging is a biological process accompanied by gradual increase of damage in all cellular macromolecules, i.e., nucleic acids, lipids, and proteins. When the proteostasis network (chaperones and proteolytic systems) cannot reverse the damage load due to its excess as compared to cellular repair/regeneration capacity, failure of homeostasis is established. This failure is a major hallmark of aging and/or aggregation-related diseases. Dysfunction of the major cellular proteolytic machineries, namely the proteasome and the lysosome, has been reported during the progression of aging and aggregation-prone diseases. Therefore, activation of these pathways is considered as a possible preventive or therapeutic approach against the progression of these processes. This chapter focuses on UPS activation studies in cellular and organismal models and the effects of such activation on aging, longevity and disease prevention or reversal. PMID:27613027

  4. Controlled trial of polymeric versus elemental diet in treatment of active Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Giaffer, M H; North, G; Holdsworth, C D

    1990-04-01

    30 patients with active Crohn's disease, mean Crohn's Disease Activity Index 301 (SE 32), who would otherwise have been treated with steroids, were randomised to receive for 4 weeks either an elemental diet ('Vivonex') (n = 16) or a polymeric diet ('Fortison') (n = 14). Assessment on days 10 and 28 showed that clinical remission occurred in 5 (36%) of the 14 patients on fortison compared with 12 (75%) of the 16 patients assigned to vivonex. The difference in remission rate was significant (p less than 0.03). Dietary treatment resulted in little change in the nutritional state and various laboratory indices of activity over a 4 week period despite clinical improvement. Polymeric diets do not seem to offer an effective therapeutic alternative to elemental diets in patients with acute exacerbations of Crohn's disease. PMID:1969560

  5. The Case for Increased Physical Activity in Chronic Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Brief Review.

    PubMed

    Shephard, R J

    2016-06-01

    Regular physical activity reduces the risk of colon cancer, but there is little information on the merits of such activity in the prevention and management of chronic inflammatory bowel disease (CIBD). The present systematic review thus documents current levels of habitual physical activity and aerobic and muscular function in CIBD, and examines the safety, practicality and efficacy of exercise programmes in countering the disease process, correcting functional deficits and enhancing quality of life. A systematic search of the Ovid/Medline database from January 1996 to May 2015 linked the terms physical activity/motor activity/physical fitness/physical training/physical education/training/exercise/exercise therapy with Crohn's disease/colitis/ulcerative colitis/inflammatory bowel disease, supplementing this information by a scanning of reference lists and personal files.12 of 16 published studies show a low level of habitual physical activity in CIBD, with sub-normal values for aerobic power, lean tissue mass and muscular strength. 3 of 4 studies suggest physical activity may reduce the risk of developing IBD, and 11 interventions all note that exercise programmes are well tolerated with some decreases of disease activity, and functional gains leading to an increased health-related quality of life. Moreover, programme compliance rates compare favourably with those seen in the treatment of other chronic conditions. More information on mechanisms is needed, but regular moderate aerobic and/or resistance exercise improves the health status of patients with CIBD both by modulating immune function and by improving physical function. A regular exercise programme should thus become an important component in the management of CIBD. PMID:27116344

  6. Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors: regulators of Rho GTPase activity in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Danielle R.; Rossman, Kent L.; Der, Channing J.

    2016-01-01

    The aberrant activity of Ras homologous (Rho) family small GTPases (20 human members) has been implicated in cancer and other human diseases. However, in contrast to the direct mutational activation of Ras found in cancer and developmental disorders, Rho GTPases are activated most commonly by indirect mechanisms in disease. One prevalent mechanism involves aberrant Rho activation via the deregulated expression and/or activity of Rho family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RhoGEFs). RhoGEFs promote formation of the active GTP-bound state of Rho GTPases. The largest family of RhoGEFs is comprised of the Dbl family RhoGEFs with 70 human members. The multitude of RhoGEFs that activate a single Rho GTPase reflect the very specific role of each RhoGEF in controlling distinct signaling mechanisms involved in Rho activation. In this review, we summarize the role of Dbl RhoGEFs in development and disease, with a focus on Ect2, Tiam1, Vav and P-Rex1/2. PMID:24037532

  7. Activated eosinophils and interleukin 5 expression in early recurrence of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Dubucquoi, S; Janin, A; Klein, O; Desreumaux, P; Quandalle, P; Cortot, A; Capron, M; Colombel, J F

    1995-01-01

    Endoscopic recurrences after radical surgery for Crohn's disease are useful for studying the pathogenesis of initial lesions of Crohn's disease. Factors predisposing to recurrence are poorly understood, but it has been shown that eosinophilic infiltration of the neoileum may occur within a few weeks of resection. The aim of this study was to compare, in nine patients having an ileocolectomy, the infiltration of eosinophils and their activation state in normal and diseased areas of the neoileum, three months after surgery. Tissue eosinophils were studied by histochemical methods and electron microscopy. Mucosal expression of interleukin 5 (IL 5), an important eosinophil activating factor was studied using in situ hybridisation. Sixty per cent of patients had endoscopic recurrence at three months. Eosinophil infiltration was more pronounced in diseased than in endoscopically normal areas and was associated with a high expression of IL 5 mRNA. Ultrastructural analysis showed features of eosinophil activation, but no cytotoxic lesions of surrounding inflammatory or epithelial cells. This study suggests that local synthesis of IL 5 associated with eosinophil activation in the tissues could participate in early mucosal damage in Crohn's disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7557575

  8. Depressive Symptoms in Crohn's Disease: Relationship with Immune Activation and Tryptophan Availability

    PubMed Central

    Guloksuz, Sinan; Wichers, Marieke; Kenis, Gunter; Russel, Maurice G. V. M.; Wauters, Annick; Verkerk, Robert; Arts, Baer; van Os, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is associated with immune activation and depressive symptoms. This study determines the impact of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α treatment in CD patients on depressive symptoms and the degree to which tryptophan (TRP) availability and immune markers mediate this effect. Fifteen patients with CD, eligible for anti-TNF-α treatment were recruited. Disease activity (Harvey-Bradshaw Index (HBI), Crohn's Disease Activity Index (CDAI)), fatigue (Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI)), quality of life (Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire (IBDQ)), symptoms of depression and anxiety (Symptom Checklist (SCL-90), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS)), immune activation (acute phase proteins (APP)), zinc and TRP availability were assessed before treatment and after 2, 4 and 8 weeks. Anti-TNF-α increased IBDQ scores and reduced all depression scores; however only SCL-90 depression scores remained decreased after correction for HBI. Positive APPs decreased, while negative APPs increased after treatment. After correction for HBI, both level and percentage of γ fraction were associated with SCL-90 depression scores over time. After correction for HBI, patients with current/past depressive disorder displayed higher levels of positive APPs and lower levels of negative APPs and zinc. TRP availability remained invariant over time and there was no association between SCL-90 depression scores and TRP availability. Inflammatory reactions in CD are more evident in patients with comorbid depression, regardless of disease activity. Anti-TNF-α treatment in CD reduces depressive symptoms, in part independently of disease activity; there was no evidence that this effect was mediated by immune-induced changes in TRP availability. PMID:23544139

  9. Activation of benign autoimmunity as both tumor and autoimmune disease immunotherapy: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Irun R

    2014-11-01

    Here, I consider how benign autoimmunity, the immunological homunculus, can be used to reinstate the healthy regulation of inflammation in both autoimmune diseases and in tumor immunotherapy. Different autoimmune diseases manifest clinically distinct phenotypes, but, in general, they all result from the transition of benign, healthy recognition of key body molecules into a damaging effector reaction. Tumors, in contrast to autoimmune diseases, grow by subverting the immune system into supporting and protecting the growing tumor from immune surveillance. Therefore our therapeutic aim in autoimmune disease is to induce the immune system to down-regulate the specific autoimmune effector reaction that causes the disease; in tumor immunotherapy, on the contrary, we aim to deprive the growing tumor of its illicit activation of immune suppression and to unleash an autoimmune disease targeted to the tumor. The recent success of anti-PD1 and anti-CTLR4 treatments exemplify the reinstatement of tumor autoimmunity subsequent to inhibition of immune suppression. With regard to the therapy of autoimmune diseases, I cite examples of immune system down-regulation of autoimmune diseases by T cell vaccination or HSP60 peptide treatment. Inducing the immune system to regulate itself is safer than global immune suppression and may be more effective in the long run. PMID:24924121

  10. Histone deacetylase inhibitors increase glucocerebrosidase activity in Gaucher disease by modulation of molecular chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chunzhang; Rahimpour, Shervin; Lu, Jie; Pacak, Karel; Ikejiri, Barbara; Brady, Roscoe O.; Zhuang, Zhengping

    2013-01-01

    Gaucher disease is caused by mutations of the GBA gene that encodes the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GCase). GBA mutations often result in protein misfolding and premature degradation, but usually exert less effect on catalytic activity. In this study, we identified the molecular mechanism by which histone deacetylase inhibitors increase the quantity and activity of GCase. Specifically, these inhibitors limit the deacetylation of heat shock protein 90, resulting in less recognition of the mutant peptide and GCase degradation. These findings provide insight into a possible therapeutic strategy for Gaucher disease and other genetic disorders by modifying molecular chaperone and protein degradation pathways. PMID:23277556

  11. Infectious Diseases (ID) Learning Unit: How Rapidly to Evaluate for Active Tuberculosis Disease in Low-Prevalence Settings.

    PubMed

    Chida, Natasha; Shah, Maunank

    2016-03-01

    With declining tuberculosis (TB) incidence in low-prevalence settings, many clinicians are likely unaware that the approach to diagnosing active TB is evolving with newer technologies. Rapid molecular assays are commercially available, and more are likely to enter the market in the coming years. These tests, such as the Xpert MTB/RIF, which can detect TB and drug-resistance in 2 hours, are increasingly used in settings with higher TB prevalence; however, uptake has been slower in low-prevalence settings. Newer algorithms incorporating rapid TB diagnostics have the ability to alter current clinical and infection control practice patterns. In this learning unit, we review current and newly available tests for the detection of active TB disease and their usage in low-prevalence settings. PMID:27186583

  12. Infectious Diseases (ID) Learning Unit: How Rapidly to Evaluate for Active Tuberculosis Disease in Low-Prevalence Settings

    PubMed Central

    Chida, Natasha; Shah, Maunank

    2016-01-01

    With declining tuberculosis (TB) incidence in low-prevalence settings, many clinicians are likely unaware that the approach to diagnosing active TB is evolving with newer technologies. Rapid molecular assays are commercially available, and more are likely to enter the market in the coming years. These tests, such as the Xpert MTB/RIF, which can detect TB and drug-resistance in 2 hours, are increasingly used in settings with higher TB prevalence; however, uptake has been slower in low-prevalence settings. Newer algorithms incorporating rapid TB diagnostics have the ability to alter current clinical and infection control practice patterns. In this learning unit, we review current and newly available tests for the detection of active TB disease and their usage in low-prevalence settings. PMID:27186583

  13. Gender, body mass index and rheumatoid arthritis disease activity: results from the QUEST-RA study

    PubMed Central

    Jawaheer, Damini; Olsen, Jørn; Lahiff, Maureen; Forsberg, Sinikka; Lähteenmäki, Jukka; Silveira, Ines Guimaraes da; Rocha, Francisco Airton; Laurindo, Ieda Maria Magalhães; Mota, Licia Maria Henrique da; Drosos, Alexandros A.; Murphy, Eithne; Sheehy, Claire; Quirke, Edel; Cutolo, Maurizio; Rexhepi, Sylejman; Dadoniene, Jolanta; Verstappen, Suzan M.M.; Sokka, Tuulikki

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether body mass index (BMI), as a proxy for body fat, influences rheumatoid arthritis (RA) disease activity in a gender-specific manner. Methods Consecutive patients with RA were enrolled from 25 countries into the QUEST-RA program between 2005 and 2008. Clinical and demographic data were collected by treating rheumatologists and by patient self-report. Distributions of Disease Activity Scores (DAS28), BMI, age, and disease duration were assessed for each country and for the entire dataset; mean values between genders were compared using Student’s t-tests. An association between BMI and DAS28 was investigated using linear regression, adjusting for age, disease duration and country. Results A total of 5,161 RA patients (4,082 women and 1,079 men) were included in the analyses. Overall, women were younger, had longer disease duration, and higher DAS28 scores than men, but BMI was similar between genders. The mean DAS28 scores increased with increasing BMI from normal to overweight and obese, among women, whereas the opposite trend was observed among men. Regression results showed BMI (continuous or categorical) to be associated with DAS28. Compared to the normal BMI range, being obese was associated with a larger difference in mean DAS28 (0.23, 95% CI: 0.11, 0.34) than being overweight (0.12, 95% CI: 0.03, 0.21); being underweight was not associated with disease activity. These associations were more pronounced among women, and were not explained by any single component of the DAS28. Conclusion BMI appears to be associated with RA disease activity in women, but not in men. PMID:20810033

  14. Can fecal calprotectin better stratify Crohn’s disease activity index?

    PubMed Central

    Scaioli, Eleonora; Cardamone, Carla; Scagliarini, Michele; Zagari, Rocco Maurizio; Bazzoli, Franco; Belluzzi, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Background Crohn’s disease (CD) activity index (CDAI) is still widely used for monitoring clinical activity in CD patients, but is of little value as indicator of persistent inflammation in symptomless patients. Fecal calprotectin levels ≥150 µg/g are strongly indicative of endoscopically and/or histologically active disease. Our aim was to study, in a large cohort of CD patients, the relationship between CDAI and fecal calprotectin levels. Methods CDAI and fecal calprotectin levels were evaluated in consecutive patients from a CD outpatient clinic. Results We enrolled 193 CD patients, of whom 38% with CDAI <150 had a calprotectin value ≥150 µg/g, suggestive of active disease. A logistic regression model showed that for CDAI levels between 100 and 150, the estimated logistic probability of calprotectin ≥150 µg/g increased progressively to 76%, reaching 94% where disease activity was localized in the colon. With a CDAI cut-off >120, we found a high diagnostic accuracy of 72%, with 88% specificity and 50% sensitivity (positive predictive value: 76%, negative predictive value: 71%) to identify a calprotectin value ≥150 µg/g. Conclusion CDAI scores between 100 and 150 display an acceptable ability to quantify the risk of persistent inflammation as expressed by the high calprotectin level. PMID:25831217

  15. Synapses, NMDA receptor activity and neuronal Aβ production in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bordji, Karim; Becerril-Ortega, Javier; Buisson, Alain

    2011-01-01

    A direct relationship has been established between synaptic activity and amyloid-β secretion. Dysregulation of neuronal calcium homeostasis was shown to increase production of amyloid-β, contributing to the initiation of Alzheimer's disease. Among the different routes of Ca(2+) entry, N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, a subtype of ionotropic glutamate receptors, are especially involved in this process because of their ability to gate high levels of Ca(2+) influx. These receptors have been extensively studied for their crucial roles in synaptic plasticity that underlies learning and memory but also in neurotoxicity occurring during acute brain injuries and neurodegenerative diseases. For one decade, several studies provided evidence that NMDA receptor activation could have distinct consequences on neuronal fate, depending on their location. Synaptic NMDA receptor activation is neuroprotective, whereas extrasynaptic NMDA receptors trigger neuronal death and/or neurodegenerative processes. Recent data suggest that chronic activation of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors leads to a sustained neuronal amyloid-β release and could be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Thus, as for other neurological diseases, therapeutic targeting of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors could be a promising strategy. Following this concept, memantine, unlike other NMDA receptor antagonists was shown, to preferentially target the extrasynaptic NMDA receptor signaling pathways, while relatively sparing normal synaptic activity. This molecular mechanism could therefore explain why memantine is, to date, the only clinically approved NMDA receptor antagonist for the treatment of dementia. PMID:21568789

  16. Impact of Network Activity on the Spread of Infectious Diseases through the German Pig Trade Network

    PubMed Central

    Lebl, Karin; Lentz, Hartmut H. K.; Pinior, Beate; Selhorst, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The trade of livestock is an important and growing economic sector, but it is also a major factor in the spread of diseases. The spreading of diseases in a trade network is likely to be influenced by how often existing trade connections are active. The activity α is defined as the mean frequency of occurrences of existing trade links, thus 0 < α ≤ 1. The observed German pig trade network had an activity of α = 0.11, thus each existing trade connection between two farms was, on average, active at about 10% of the time during the observation period 2008–2009. The aim of this study is to analyze how changes in the activity level of the German pig trade network influence the probability of disease outbreaks, size, and duration of epidemics for different disease transmission probabilities. Thus, we want to investigate the question, whether it makes a difference for a hypothetical spread of an animal disease to transport many animals at the same time or few animals at many times. A SIR model was used to simulate the spread of a disease within the German pig trade network. Our results show that for transmission probabilities <1, the outbreak probability increases in the case of a decreased frequency of animal transports, peaking range of α from 0.05 to 0.1. However, for the final outbreak size, we find that a threshold exists such that finite outbreaks occur only above a critical value of α, which is ~0.1, and therefore in proximity of the observed activity level. Thus, although the outbreak probability increased when decreasing α, these outbreaks affect only a small number of farms. The duration of the epidemic peaks at an activity level in the range of α = 0.2–0.3. Additionally, the results of our simulations show that even small changes in the activity level of the German pig trade network would have dramatic effects on outbreak probability, outbreak size, and epidemic duration. Thus, we can conclude and recommend that the network activity

  17. Activation of farnesoid X receptor attenuates hepatic injury in a murine model of alcoholic liver disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Weibin; Zhu, Bo; Peng, Xiaomin; Zhou, Meiling; Jia, Dongwei; Gu, Jianxin

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •FXR activity was impaired by chronic ethanol ingestion in a murine model of ALD. •Activation of FXR attenuated alcohol-induced liver injury and steatosis. •Activation of FXR attenuated cholestasis and oxidative stress in mouse liver. -- Abstract: Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a common cause of advanced liver disease, and considered as a major risk factor of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Hepatic cholestasis is a pathophysiological feature observed in all stages of ALD. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, and plays an essential role in the regulation of bile acid, lipid and glucose homeostasis. However, the role of FXR in the pathogenesis and progression of ALD remains largely unknown. Mice were fed Lieber-DeCarli ethanol diet or an isocaloric control diet. We used a specific agonist of FXR WAY-362450 to study the effect of pharmacological activation of FXR in alcoholic liver disease. In this study, we demonstrated that FXR activity was impaired by chronic ethanol ingestion in a murine model of ALD. Activation of FXR by specific agonist WAY-362450 protected mice from the development of ALD. We also found that WAY-362450 treatment rescued FXR activity, suppressed ethanol-induced Cyp2e1 up-regulation and attenuated oxidative stress in liver. Our results highlight a key role of FXR in the modulation of ALD development, and propose specific FXR agonists for the treatment of ALD patients.

  18. Physical activity and sedentary behaviour: applying lessons to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Hill, K; Gardiner, P A; Cavalheri, V; Jenkins, S C; Healy, G N

    2015-05-01

    In health and disease, the benefits of regular participation in moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity are well documented. However, individuals with chronic conditions, such as those with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), typically do very little activity at a moderate or vigorous intensity. Much of their day is instead spent in sedentary behaviour, such as sitting or reclining, which requires very little energy expenditure. This high level of time spent in sedentary behaviour can have serious health consequences, including increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease and premature mortality. There is emerging evidence to suggest that participation in light intensity physical activities (e.g. standing or slow walking) may have benefits for cardio-metabolic health. Given the low aerobic capacity of individuals with moderate to severe COPD, increasing light intensity activity (through reducing sedentary time) may be a feasible additional strategy to improve health in this population, alongside traditional recommendations to increase the time spent in moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity. This review provides an overview of physical activity and sedentary behaviour, with a particular emphasis on these behaviours for people with COPD. It provides suggestions for the measurement of these behaviours within the clinical setting, as well as for interventions that may be effective at increasing physical activity and reducing sedentary behaviour in this population. PMID:25164319

  19. Prediction of disease relapses by multibiomarker disease activity and autoantibody status in patients with rheumatoid arthritis on tapering DMARD treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rech, Juergen; Hueber, Axel J; Finzel, Stephanie; Englbrecht, Matthias; Haschka, Judith; Manger, Bernhard; Kleyer, Arnd; Reiser, Michaela; Cobra, Jayme Fogagnolo; Figueiredo, Camille; Tony, Hans-Peter; Kleinert, Stefan; Wendler, Joerg; Schuch, Florian; Ronneberger, Monika; Feuchtenberger, Martin; Fleck, Martin; Manger, Karin; Ochs, Wolfgang; Schmitt-Haendle, Matthias; Lorenz, Hanns-Martin; Nuesslein, Hubert; Alten, Rieke; Henes, Joerg; Krueger, Klaus; Schett, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyse the role of multibiomarker disease activity (MBDA) score in predicting disease relapses in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in sustained remission who tapered disease modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) therapy in RETRO, a prospective randomised controlled trial. Methods MBDA scores (scale 1–100) were determined based on 12 inflammation markers in baseline serum samples from 94 patients of the RETRO study. MBDA scores were compared between patients relapsing or remaining in remission when tapering DMARDs. Demographic and disease-specific parameters were included in multivariate logistic regression analysis for defining predictors of relapse. Results Moderate-to-high MBDA scores were found in 33% of patients with RA overall. Twice as many patients who relapsed (58%) had moderate/high MBDA compared with patients who remained in remission (21%). Baseline MBDA scores were significantly higher in patients with RA who were relapsing than those remaining in stable remission (N=94; p=0.0001) and those tapering/stopping (N=59; p=0.0001). Multivariate regression analysis identified MBDA scores as independent predictor for relapses in addition to anticitrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) status. Relapse rates were low (13%) in patients who were MBDA−/ACPA−, moderate in patients who were MBDA+/ACPA− (33.3%) and MBDA−ACPA+ (31.8%) and high in patients who were MBDA+/ACPA+ (76.4%). Conclusions MBDA improved the prediction of relapses in patients with RA in stable remission undergoing DMARD tapering. If combined with ACPA testing, MBDA allowed prediction of relapse in more than 80% of the patients. Trial registration number EudraCT 2009-015740-42. PMID:26483255

  20. Physical Activity and Exercise for Secondary Prevention among Patients with Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Darden, Douglas; Richardson, Caroline; Jackson, Elizabeth A

    2013-12-01

    Most adults do not achieve the recommended levels of physical activity, including patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Furthermore, healthcare providers often do not understand the benefits of physical activity in CVD patients, rather over emphasizing the potential risks related to activity. Recent studies suggest reductions in cardiovascular events including mortality with concomitant improvements in quality of life for many vascular conditions. However gaps in our current knowledge base remain. Recent research on physical activity including use of novel internet based interventions are developing areas of interest have moved to reduce such knowledge gaps. PMID:24396552

  1. New Insights into Glomerular Parietal Epithelial Cell Activation and Its Signaling Pathways in Glomerular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hua; Chen, Shan; He, Fang-Fang; Wang, Yu-Mei; Bondzie, Philip; Zhang, Chun

    2015-01-01

    The glomerular parietal epithelial cells (PECs) have aroused an increasing attention recently. The proliferation of PECs is the main feature of crescentic glomerulonephritis; besides that, in the past decade, PEC activation has been identified in several types of noninflammatory glomerulonephropathies, such as focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, diabetic glomerulopathy, and membranous nephropathy. The pathogenesis of PEC activation is poorly understood; however, a few studies delicately elucidate the potential mechanisms and signaling pathways implicated in these processes. In this review we will focus on the latest observations and concepts about PEC activation in glomerular diseases and the newest identified signaling pathways in PEC activation. PMID:25866774

  2. Survival effects of physical activity on mortality among persons with liver disease.

    PubMed

    Loprinzi, Paul D; VanWagner, Lisa B

    2016-06-01

    Physical activity is protective of premature mortality and those with liver disease are at an increased risk of early mortality. It is thus plausible to suggest that physical activity may have survival benefits among those with liver disease, but this has yet to be investigated. In a national sample, we examine the prospective association of objectively-measured physical activity on all-cause mortality among those with liver disease. Data from the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (with follow-up through 2011) were evaluated (analyzed in 2015). Physical activity was assessed via accelerometry over 7 days. Liver disease was assessed via self-report of physician diagnosis. Covariates included age, gender, race-ethnicity, serum cotinine, income-to-poverty ratio, C-reactive protein, cholesterol medication use, blood pressure medication use, alcohol behavior, self-reported liver disease status, serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), serum gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) and comorbid illness. The sample included 162 adults who self-reported a physician-diagnosis of liver disease. The unweighted median follow-up period was 80.0 months (IQR = 68-91; SD = 18.0). In the sample, 12,815 person-months occurred with a mortality incidence rate of 1.09 deaths per 1000 person-months. After adjustments, for every 10 min/day increase in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), participants had an 89% reduced risk of all-cause mortality (HRadjusted = 0.11; 95% CI: 0.02-0.47; P = 0.004). There was no evidence of moderation by alcohol behavior, ALT, GGT or Hepatitis C virus status. These findings demonstrate that modest increases in MVPA may have survival benefits among those with a self-reported liver condition. PMID:26844199

  3. Evaluation of disease activity in rheumatic patients by leucocyte adhesiveness/aggregation.

    PubMed Central

    Berliner, S; Fried, M; Caspi, D; Weinberger, A; Yaron, M; Pinkhas, J; Aronson, M

    1988-01-01

    Previous work has shown that leucocyte adhesiveness/aggregation (LAA), as measured by the leukergy test, correlates well with disease severity in rheumatic patients. As LAA is probably a manifestation of the acute phase reaction various components of the acute phase reaction were measured in order to identify the best marker of disease activity. In addition to LAA, the following variables were measured in 79 patients with various rheumatic diseases and in 10 controls: white blood cell and platelet counts, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, haptoglobin, fibrinogen, C reactive protein, albumin, globulin, caeruloplasmin, alpha 1, alpha 2, beta, and gamma globulin, and haemoglobin concentrations. Patients were graded according to the state of their disease as mild, moderate, or severe. The extent of leucocyte adhesiveness/aggregation in peripheral blood proved to be the best laboratory variable for the grading of disease activity. Correct grading was obtained in 63% of the patients by means of the LAA, compared with 48% with C reactive protein, 41% with caeruloplasmin, 40% with haptoglobin, and 32% with haemoglobin. It is suggested that LAA of the peripheral blood during inflammation may be used as a reliable marker of disease severity. PMID:3260093

  4. Persons with mild or moderate Alzheimer's disease managing daily activities via verbal instruction technology.

    PubMed

    Lancioni, Giulio E; La Martire, Maria L; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'Reilly, Mark F; Sigafoos, Jeff; Pinto, Katia; Minervini, Mauro G

    Four studies assessed the effectiveness of verbal instructions presented via technology in helping persons with mild or moderate Alzheimer's disease perform daily activities. The first 2 studies were replication efforts concerning morning bathroom routine and table setting and included 4 and 2 participants, respectively. The third study targeted coffee preparation with 3 participants. The fourth study assessed maintenance and generalization of morning bathroom routine and dressing with 1 participant. Nonconcurrent multiple baseline designs served for the first 3 studies and a 5-month postintervention data collection for the fourth study. Verbal instructions for the activity steps presented via technology were effective in helping the participants of the first 3 studies reacquire basic daily activities and the participant of the fourth study retain the reacquired activities across time and settings. These results suggest that the approach reported may be a useful strategy for helping persons with Alzheimer's disease. PMID:19106276

  5. Matriptase initiates epidermal prokallikrein activation and disease onset in a mouse model of Netherton syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sales, Katiuchia Uzzun; Masedunskas, Andrius; Bey, Alexandra L.; Rasmussen, Amber; Weigert, Roberto; List, Karin; Szabo, Roman; Overbeek, Paul A.; Bugge, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    Deficiency in the serine protease inhibitor LEKTI is the etiological origin of Netherton syndrome. The principal morbidities of the disease are stratum corneum detachment and chronic inflammation. We show that the membrane protease, matriptase, initiates Netherton syndrome in a LEKTI-deficient mouse model by premature activation of a pro-kallikrein-related cascade. Auto-activation of pro-inflammatory and stratum corneum detachment-associated pro-kallikrein-related peptidases was either low or undetectable, but they were efficiently activated by matriptase. Ablation of matriptase from LEKTI-deficient mice dampened inflammation, eliminated aberrant protease activity, prevented stratum corneum detachment, and improved epidermal barrier function. The study uncovers a pathogenic matriptase-pro-kallikrein pathway that could be operative in several human skin and inflammatory diseases. PMID:20657595

  6. Vitamin D Receptor Activators and Clinical Outcomes in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gravellone, Luciana; Rizzo, Maria Antonietta; Martina, Valentina; Mezzina, Nicoletta; Regalia, Anna; Gallieni, Maurizio

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency appears to be an underestimated risk factor for cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease. Evidence from both basic science and clinical studies supports the possible protective role of vitamin D beyond its effect on mineral metabolism. Toxicity of pharmacologic doses of active vitamin D metabolites, in particular calcitriol, is mainly due to the possibility of positive calcium and phosphorus balance. Therefore, vitamin D analogs have been developed, which suppress PTH secretion and synthesis with reduced calcemic and phosphatemic effects. Observational studies suggest that in hemodialysis patients the use of a vitamin D receptor (VDR) activator, such as calcitriol, doxercalciferol, paricalcitol, or alfacalcidol, is associated with a reduced mortality when compared with nonusers of any VDR activator. In this article the existing literature on the topic is reviewed, although a more robust answer to the question of whether or not VDR activators have beneficial effects in hemodialysis patients will hopefully come from a randomized controlled trial. PMID:21647319

  7. Tau-based therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease: active and passive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Panza, Francesco; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; Seripa, Davide; Imbimbo, Bruno P; Lozupone, Madia; Santamato, Andrea; Tortelli, Rosanna; Galizia, Ilaria; Prete, Camilla; Daniele, Antonio; Pilotto, Alberto; Greco, Antonio; Logroscino, Giancarlo

    2016-09-01

    Pharmacological manipulation of tau protein in Alzheimer's disease included microtubule-stabilizing agents, tau protein kinase inhibitors, tau aggregation inhibitors, active and passive immunotherapies and, more recently, inhibitors of tau acetylation. Animal studies have shown that both active and passive approaches can remove tau pathology and, in some cases, improve cognitive function. Two active vaccines targeting either nonphosphorylated (AAD-vac1) and phosphorylated tau (ACI-35) have entered Phase I testing. Notwithstanding, the recent discontinuation of the monoclonal antibody RG7345 for Alzheimer's disease, two other antitau antibodies, BMS-986168 and C2N-8E12, are also currently in Phase I testing for progressive supranuclear palsy. After the recent impressive results in animal studies obtained by salsalate, the dimer of salicylic acid, inhibitors of tau acetylation are being actively pursued. PMID:27485083

  8. Interleukin 35 Synovial Fluid Levels Are Associated with Disease Activity of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Šenolt, Ladislav; Šumová, Barbora; Jandová, Romana; Hulejová, Hana; Mann, Heřman; Pavelka, Karel; Vencovský, Jiří; Filková, Mária

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To study the association of systemic and local interleukin-35 (IL-35) levels in rheumatoid arthritis. Methods 37 patients with treatment naïve early RA, 49 with established RA and 29 control patients with osteoarthritis (OA) were studied. Serum and paired synovial fluid samples were analysed for IL-35. Disease activity of RA patients was assessed according to the 28-Joint Count Disease Activity Score (DAS28). Results The levels of serum IL-35 were significantly higher in patients with treatment naïve early RA compared to those with established disease and control OA subjects. In addition, serum levels of IL-35 significantly decreased 12 weeks after initiation of glucocorticoids and conventional synthetic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs in patients with treatment naïve early RA. Synovial fluid IL-35 levels were significantly higher in RA compared to OA patients, were significantly elevated compared to serum counterparts and correlated with synovial fluid leukocyte count (r=0.412; p<0.01), serum CRP levels (r=0.362; p<0.05) and DAS28 (r=0.430, p<0.01). Conclusion This is the first study showing elevated circulating levels of IL-35 in treatment naïve early RA, its significant decrease after treatment initiation and positive association between increased synovial fluid IL-35 and disease activity in patients with long-lasting RA. PMID:26204444

  9. Aortic ascorbic acid, trace elements, and superoxide dismutase activity in human aneurysmal and occlusive disease

    SciTech Connect

    Dubick, M.A.; Hunter, G.C.; Casey, S.M.; Keen, C.L.

    1987-02-01

    Altered trace elements and ascorbic acid metabolism have been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. However, their role in the disease process, or the effect of atherosclerosis on their tissue levels within plaque, is poorly understood. The presence study analyzes the concentrations of Fe, Cu, Zn, and Mn, and ascorbic acid and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in tissue samples from 29 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) and 14 patients with atherosclerotic occlusive disease (AOD). It was observed that the Fe and Mn concentrations in AAA and AOD tissue were higher than the levels in nondiseased control aorta, whereas Cu and Zn levels in AAA and AOD tissue were similar to the levels in controls. The Zn:Cu ratio was significantly lower in the AAA tissue in comparison to both AOD and control tissue. In addition, AAA and AOD tissue had low ascorbic acid levels and low Cu, Zn-SOD activity with Cu,Zn-SOD:Mn-SOD ratios of 0.27 and 0.19, respectively, compared to a ratio of 3.20 in control aorta. These data indicate that aorta affected by aneurysms and occlusive disease have altered trace element and ascorbic acid concentrations, as well as low Cu,Zn-SOD activity. Although these observations do not directly support the hypothesis that AAA is associated with aortic Cu deficiency they do suggest a role for oxygen radicals or increased lipid peroxidation in occlusive and aneurysmal disease of the aorta.

  10. Circulating activated T cell subsets in autoimmune thyroid diseases: differences between untreated and treated patients.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, H; Okugawa, T; Itoh, M

    1991-11-01

    To investigate the relationships between lymphocyte subsets and thyroid function, peripheral blood lymphocytes were analysed with cell surface antigens of activated (HLA-DR+) T, helper T (CD4+ 2H4-, CD4+ 4B4+) and suppressor-inducer T (CD4+ 2H4+, CD4+ 4B4-) cells subsets in 56 patients with Graves' disease, 16 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, 7 patients with typical subacute thyroiditis and 2 patients with the thyrotoxic phase of autoimmune thyroiditis. Both patients with Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis had increased percentages of HLA-DR+ T (Ia+ CD3+) cells as well as HLA-DR+ helper-inducer T (Ia+ CD4+) cells, which seemed to be independent of treatments. The percentage of HLA-DR+ suppressor-cytotoxic T (Ia+ CD8+) cells was increased in euthyroid or hypothyroid patients with Graves' disease following treatment, but was normal in hyperthyroid patients. The percentages of Ia+ CD4+ cells and Ia+ CD8+ were also increased in patients with thyroiditis, whereas these abnormal values normalized in the remission phase. These findings suggest that an increase in Ia+ CD4+ cells characteristically occurs during immune system activation in patients with hyperthyroid Graves' disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis and the thyrotoxic phase of subacute thyroiditis, whereas the activated CD8+ cells in Graves' disease are induced by antithyroidal therapy. PMID:1684685

  11. Neurovascular dysfunction, inflammation and endothelial activation: Implications for the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related disorder characterized by progressive cognitive decline and dementia. Alzheimer's disease is an increasingly prevalent disease with 5.3 million people in the United States currently affected. This number is a 10 percent increase from previous estimates and is projected to sharply increase to 8 million by 2030; it is the sixth-leading cause of death. In the United States the direct and indirect costs of Alzheimer's and other dementias to Medicare, Medicaid and businesses amount to more than $172 billion each year. Despite intense research efforts, effective disease-modifying therapies for this devastating disease remain elusive. At present, the few agents that are FDA-approved for the treatment of AD have demonstrated only modest effects in modifying clinical symptoms for relatively short periods and none has shown a clear effect on disease progression. New therapeutic approaches are desperately needed. Although the idea that vascular defects are present in AD and may be important in disease pathogenesis was suggested over 25 years ago, little work has focused on an active role for cerebrovascular mechanisms in the pathogenesis of AD. Nevertheless, increasing literature supports a vascular-neuronal axis in AD as shared risk factors for both AD and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease implicate vascular mechanisms in the development and/or progression of AD. Also, chronic inflammation is closely associated with cardiovascular disease, as well as a broad spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases of aging including AD. In this review we summarize data regarding, cardiovascular risk factors and vascular abnormalities, neuro- and vascular-inflammation, and brain endothelial dysfunction in AD. We conclude that the endothelial interface, a highly synthetic bioreactor that produces a large number of soluble factors, is functionally altered in AD and contributes to a noxious CNS milieu by releasing inflammatory and neurotoxic species

  12. Relationship of lipoprotein(a) levels to physical activity and family history of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Martín, S; Elosua, R; Covas, M I; Pavesi, M; Vila, J; Marrugat, J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the association of physical activity with serum lipoprotein(a) [La(a)] levels in individuals according to whether they had a family history of coronary heart disease (CHD). METHODS: Lp(a) levels in 332 healthy Spanish men aged 20 to 60 years were measured. Physical activity and family history of CHD were assessed. RESULTS: For men with a family history of CHD, the odds ratio for Lp(a) levels above the median value was 0.13 (95% confidence interval = 0.03, 0.50) in very active men (energy expended in physical activity > 300 kcal/day) compared with active men (energy expended in physical activity < 300 kcal/day). CONCLUSIONS: Regular daily physical activity in individuals with a family history of CHD could be useful for controlling Lp(a) levels. PMID:10076490

  13. Assessment of inflammatory bowel disease activity by technetium 99m phagocyte scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Pullman, W.E.; Sullivan, P.J.; Barratt, P.J.; Lising, J.; Booth, J.A.; Doe, W.F.

    1988-10-01

    Autologous technetium 99m-labeled phagocyte scanning has been used to assess disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease in 51 consecutive patients. Strong correlations were found between the 24-h fecal excretion of isotope and the histologic score of mucosal biopsy specimens (rS = 0.84, p less than 0.001, where rS is Spearman's rank correlation coefficient), and between the 24-h fecal excretion of isotope and a clinical inflammatory bowel disease activity index based on the Crohn's disease activity index (rS = 0.87, p less than 0.001). To develop a clinically useful and objective measure of inflammatory bowel disease activity that did not require a 24-h stool collection, the intensity of bowel uptake on scanning was graded visually from 0 to 4, a ratio of count rates for the region of interest to the iliac crest reference region was calculated, and the rapidity of labeled phagocyte uptake into inflamed bowel was measured as the peak uptake time. Visual grading of disease activity on the scans was validated by comparing it with the ratio of count rates from inflamed bowel regions of interest and those from the iliac crest reference region. The ratio of count rates showed a significant correlation with the clinical disease activity index (r = 0.75, p less than 0.001). The visual scan grade also correlated well with the clinical activity index (r = 0.87, p less than 0.001). Count rates from hourly scans were also used to calculate the time of peak uptake of counts for a given region of interest. There was a strong negative correlation between this peak uptake time and the fecal excretion of isotope (rS = -0.81, p less than 0.001), a clinical activity index (r = -0.60, p less than 0.001), and the histologic score of the mucosal biopsy specimens (r = -0.84, p less than 0.001).

  14. Longitudinal influence of microglial activation and amyloid on neuronal function in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhen; Okello, Aren A; Brooks, David J; Edison, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Amyloid deposition, tangle formation, neuroinflammation and neuronal dysfunction are pathological processes involved in Alzheimer's disease. However, the relative role of these processes in driving disease progression is still unclear. The aim of this positron emission tomography study was to: (i) investigate longitudinal changes of microglial activation, amyloid and glucose metabolism; and (ii) assess the temporospatial relationship between these three processes in Alzheimer's disease. A group of eight patients with a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (66 ± 4.8 years) and 14 healthy controls (65 ± 5.5 years) underwent T1 and T2 magnetic resonance imaging, along with (11)C-(R)-PK11195, (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scans for microglial activation, amyloid deposition and glucose metabolism. All patients were followed-up with repeated magnetic resonance imaging and three positron emission tomography scans after 16 months. Parametric maps were interrogated using region of interest analysis, Statistical Parametric Mapping, and between-group correlation analysis at voxel-level using Biological Parametric Mapping. At baseline, patients with Alzheimer's disease showed significantly increased microglial activation compared to the control subjects. During follow-up, for the first time, we found that while there is a progressive reduction of glucose metabolism, there was a longitudinal increase of microglial activation in the majority of the patients with Alzheimer's disease. Voxel-wise correlation analysis revealed that microglial activation in patients with Alzheimer's disease was positively correlated with amyloid deposition and inversely correlated with regional cerebral metabolic rate at voxel level over time. Even though one of the limitations of this study is the lack of longitudinal follow-up of healthy control subjects, this study demonstrates that there is persistent neuroinflammation throughout the Alzheimer

  15. Glycoprotein YKL-40: a novel biomarker of chronic graft-vs-host disease activity and severity?

    PubMed Central

    Duraković, Nadira; Krečak, Ivan; Perić, Zinaida; Milošević, Milan; Desnica, Lana; Pulanić, Dražen; Pusic, Iskra; Kušec, Vesna; Vrhovac, Radovan; Pavletic, Steven Z.; Nemet, Damir

    2016-01-01

    Aim To investigate whether increased YKL-40 levels positively correlate with graft-vs-host disease (cGVHD) activity and severity and if YKL-40 could serve as a disease biomarker. Methods This case-control study was conducted at the University Hospital Centre Zagreb from July 2013 to October 2015. 56 patients treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) were included: 35 patients with cGVHD and 21 without cGVHD. There was no difference between groups in age, sex, median time from transplant to study enrollment, intensity of conditioning, type of donor, or source of stem cells. Blood samples were collected at study enrollment and YKL-40 levels were measured with ELISA. Disease activity was estimated using Clinician’s Impression of Activity and Intensity of Immunosuppression scales and disease severity using Global National Institutes of Health (NIH) score. Results YKL-40 levels were significantly higher in cGVHD patients than in controls (P = 0.003). The difference remained significant when patients with myelofibrosis were excluded from the analysis (P = 0.017). YKL-40 level significantly positively correlated with disease severity (P < 0.001; correlation coefficient 0.455), and activity estimated using Clinician’s Impression of Activity (P = 0.016; correlation coefficient 0.412) but not using Intensity of Immunosuppression (P = 0.085; correlation coefficient 0.296). Conclusion YKL-40 could be considered a biomarker of cGVHD severity and activity. However, validation in a larger group of patients is warranted, as well as longitudinal testing of YKL-40 levels in patients at risk of developing cGVHD. PMID:27374825

  16. Decreased ADAMTS 13 Activity is Associated With Disease Severity and Outcome in Pediatric Severe Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jainn-Jim; Chan, Oi-Wa; Hsiao, Hsiang-Ju; Wang, Yu; Hsia, Shao-Hsuan; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Decreased ADAMTS 13 activity has been reported in severe sepsis and in sepsis-induced disseminated intravascular coagulation. This study aimed to investigate the role of ADAMTS 13 in different pediatric sepsis syndromes and evaluate its relationship with disease severity and outcome. We prospectively collected cases of sepsis treated in a pediatric intensive care unit, between July 2012 and June 2014 in Chang Gung Children's Hospital in Taoyuan, Taiwan. Clinical characteristics and ADAMTS-13 activity were analyzed. All sepsis syndromes had decreased ADAMTS 13 activity on days 1 and 3 of admission compared to healthy controls. Patients with septic shock had significantly decreased ADAMTS 13 activity on days 1 and 3 compared to those with sepsis and severe sepsis. There was a significant negative correlation between ADAMTS 13 activity on day 1 and day 1 PRISM-II, PELOD, P-MOD, and DIC scores. Patients with mortality had significantly decreased ADAMTS 13 activity on day 1 than survivors, but not on day 3. Different pediatric sepsis syndromes have varying degrees of decreased ADAMTS 13 activity. ADAMTS 13 activity is strongly negatively correlated with disease severity of pediatric sepsis syndrome, whereas decreased ADAMTS 13 activity on day 1 is associated with increased risk of mortality. PMID:27100422

  17. Chronic active destructive herpes simplex encephalitis with recovery of viral DNA 12 years after disease onset.

    PubMed

    Asenbauer, B; McEntagart, M; King, M D; Gallagher, P; Burke, M; Farrell, M A

    1998-06-01

    Acute herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) carries significant morbidity and mortality even after early treatment with antiviral agents (7). As well as causing acute neurological disease, Herpes viruses are associated with relapsing--remitting (Varicella--Zoster, Epstein-Barr) and chronic (Rasmussen encephalitis) disease processes (1). A two-year-old girl developed acute HSE which was followed by a 10-year neurologic illness characterised by asymmetric spastic tetraparesis, pseudobulbar palsy, the opercular syndrome of Foix-Chavany-Marie (4) and seizures. The neurological signs remained static until the child died suddenly 12 years after disease onset. Neuropathologic examination demonstrated active chronic encephalitis. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) DNA was recovered from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded brain tissue. This case provides additional evidence for the development of chronic neurological disease attributable to persistence of herpes simplex virus type 1. PMID:9706620

  18. Rosai-Dorfman Disease Harboring an Activating KRAS K117N Missense Mutation.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Vignesh; Margolskee, Elizabeth; Kluk, Michael; Giorgadze, Tamara; Orazi, Attilio

    2016-09-01

    Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD) or sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy is a rare histiocytic proliferation that is generally considered to be reactive with a benign clinical course. The etiology of RDD is very poorly understood. Recent studies have shown frequent BRAF, NRAS, KRAS, and PIK3CA activating mutations in several histiocytic neoplasms highlighting the emerging importance of the RAF/MEK/ERK pathway in the pathogenesis of these diseases. Here we report a case of Rosai-Dorfman disease involving the submandibular salivary gland with a KRAS K117N missense mutation discovered by next-generation sequencing. These results suggest that at least a subset of RDD cases may be clonal processes. Further mutational studies on this rare histiocytic disease should be undertaken to better characterize its pathogenesis as well as open up potential avenues for therapy. PMID:26922062

  19. A molecular link between the active component of marijuana and Alzheimer's disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Eubanks, Lisa M; Rogers, Claude J; Beuscher, Albert E; Koob, George F; Olson, Arthur J; Dickerson, Tobin J; Janda, Kim D

    2006-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the leading cause of dementia among the elderly, and with the ever-increasing size of this population, cases of Alzheimer's disease are expected to triple over the next 50 years. Consequently, the development of treatments that slow or halt the disease progression have become imperative to both improve the quality of life for patients and reduce the health care costs attributable to Alzheimer's disease. Here, we demonstrate that the active component of marijuana, Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), competitively inhibits the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE) as well as prevents AChE-induced amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) aggregation, the key pathological marker of Alzheimer's disease. Computational modeling of the THC-AChE interaction revealed that THC binds in the peripheral anionic site of AChE, the critical region involved in amyloidgenesis. Compared to currently approved drugs prescribed for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, THC is a considerably superior inhibitor of Abeta aggregation, and this study provides a previously unrecognized molecular mechanism through which cannabinoid molecules may directly impact the progression of this debilitating disease. PMID:17140265

  20. The impact of microglial activation on blood-brain barrier in brain diseases

    PubMed Central

    da Fonseca, Anna Carolina Carvalho; Matias, Diana; Garcia, Celina; Amaral, Rackele; Geraldo, Luiz Henrique; Freitas, Catarina; Lima, Flavia Regina Souza

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB), constituted by an extensive network of endothelial cells (ECs) together with neurons and glial cells, including microglia, forms the neurovascular unit (NVU). The crosstalk between these cells guarantees a proper environment for brain function. In this context, changes in the endothelium-microglia interactions are associated with a variety of inflammation-related diseases in brain, where BBB permeability is compromised. Increasing evidences indicate that activated microglia modulate expression of tight junctions, which are essential for BBB integrity and function. On the other hand, the endothelium can regulate the state of microglial activation. Here, we review recent advances that provide insights into interactions between the microglia and the vascular system in brain diseases such as infectious/inflammatory diseases, epilepsy, ischemic stroke and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:25404894

  1. Role of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ in Ocular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Su; Gu, Hongwei; Hu, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR γ), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, is a ligand-activated transcription factor that plays an important role in the control of a variety of physiological processes. The last decade has witnessed an increasing interest for the role played by the agonists of PPAR γ in antiangiogenesis, antifibrosis, anti-inflammation effects and in controlling oxidative stress response in various organs. As the pathologic mechanisms of major blinding diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic retinopathy (DR), keratitis, and optic neuropathy, often involve neoangiogenesis and inflammation- and oxidative stress-mediated cell death, evidences are accumulating on the potential benefits of PPAR γ to improve or prevent these vision threatening eye diseases. In this paper we describe what is known about the role of PPAR γ in the ocular pathophysiological processes and PPAR γ agonists as novel adjuvants in the treatment of eye diseases. PMID:26146566

  2. Pulmonary Rehabilitation and Physical Activity in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Spruit, Martijn A; Pitta, Fabio; McAuley, Edward; ZuWallack, Richard L; Nici, Linda

    2015-10-15

    Physical inactivity is common in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) compared with age-matched healthy individuals or patients with other chronic diseases. Physical inactivity independently predicts poor outcomes across several aspects of this disease, but it is (at least in principle) treatable in patients with COPD. Pulmonary rehabilitation has arguably the greatest positive effect of any current therapy on exercise capacity in COPD; as such, gains in this area should facilitate increases in physical activity. Furthermore, because pulmonary rehabilitation also emphasizes behavior change through collaborative self-management, it may aid in the translation of increased exercise capacity to greater participation in activities involving physical activity. Both increased exercise capacity and adaptive behavior change are necessary to achieve significant and lasting increases in physical activity in patients with COPD. Unfortunately, it is readily assumed that this translation occurs naturally. This concise clinical review will focus on the effects of a comprehensive pulmonary rehabilitation program on physical activity in patients with COPD. Changing physical activity behavior in patients with COPD needs an interdisciplinary approach, bringing together respiratory medicine, rehabilitation sciences, social sciences, and behavioral sciences. PMID:26161676

  3. Increasing Patient Activation Could Improve Outcomes for Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shawn L; Siegel, Corey A

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a complex disease process that often requires the integration of skills from various health care providers to adequately meet the needs of patients with IBD. The medical and surgical treatment options for IBD have become more complicated and are frequently a source of angst for both the patient and provider. However, it has become more important than ever to engage patients in navigating the treatment algorithm. Although novel in the IBD world, the concept of patients' becoming more active and effective managers of their care has been well studied in other disease processes such as diabetes mellitus and mental illness. This idea of patient activation refers to a patient understanding his or her role in the care process and having the skill sets and self-reliance necessary to manage his or her own health care. Over the past decade, evidence supporting the role of patient activation in chronic illness has grown, revealing improved health outcomes, enhanced patient experiences, and lower overall costs. Patient activation can be measured, and interventions have been shown to improve levels of activation over time and influence outcomes. A focus on patient activation is very appropriate for patients with IBD because this may potentially serve as a tool for IBD providers to not only improve patient outcomes and experience but also reduce health care costs. PMID:26422517

  4. Pivotal Role of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase-Activated Protein Kinase 2 in Inflammatory Pulmonary Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Feng; Deng, Jing; Wang, Gang; Ye, Richard D.; Christman, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-activated protein kinase (MK2) is exclusively regulated by p38 MAPK in vivo. Upon activation of p38 MAPK, MK2 binds with p38 MAPK, leading to phosphorylation of TTP, Hsp27, Akt and Cdc25 that are involved in regulation of various essential cellular functions. In this review, we discuss current knowledge about molecular mechanisms of MK2 in regulation of TNF-α production, NADPH oxidase activation, neutrophil migration, and DNA-damage-induced cell cycle arrest which are involved in the molecular pathogenesis of acute lung injury, pulmonary fibrosis, and non-small-cell lung cancer. Collectively current and emerging new information indicate that developing MK2 inhibitors and blocking MK2-mediated signal pathways is a potential therapeutic strategy for treatment of inflammatory and fibrotic lung diseases and lung cancer. PMID:26119506

  5. Targeting Syk-activated B cells in murine and human chronic graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Ryan; Allen, Jessica L.; Luznik, Leo; MacDonald, Kelli P.; Paz, Katelyn; Alexander, Kylie A.; Vulic, Ante; Du, Jing; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Taylor, Patricia A.; Poe, Jonathan C.; Serody, Jonathan S.; Murphy, William J.; Hill, Geoffrey R.; Maillard, Ivan; Koreth, John; Cutler, Corey S.; Soiffer, Robert J.; Antin, Joseph H.; Ritz, Jerome; Chao, Nelson J.; Clynes, Raphael A.; Sarantopoulos, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Novel therapies for chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) are needed. Aberrant B-cell activation has been demonstrated in mice and humans with cGVHD. Having previously found that human cGVHD B cells are activated and primed for survival, we sought to further evaluate the role of the spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) in cGVHD in multiple murine models and human peripheral blood cells. In a murine model of multiorgan system, nonsclerodermatous disease with bronchiolitis obliterans where cGVHD is dependent on antibody and germinal center (GC) B cells, we found that activation of Syk was necessary in donor B cells, but not T cells, for disease progression. Bone marrow–specific Syk deletion in vivo was effective in treating established cGVHD, as was a small-molecule inhibitor of Syk, fostamatinib, which normalized GC formation and decreased activated CD80/86+ dendritic cells. In multiple distinct models of sclerodermatous cGVHD, clinical and pathological disease manifestations were not eliminated when mice were therapeutically treated with fostamatinib, though both clinical and immunologic effects could be observed in one of these scleroderma models. We further demonstrated that Syk inhibition was effective at inducing apoptosis of human cGVHD B cells. Together, these data demonstrate a therapeutic potential of targeting B-cell Syk signaling in cGVHD. PMID:25852057

  6. Disease Activity, Proteinuria, and Vitamin D Status in Children with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Juvenile Dermatomyositis

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Angela Byun; Thierry-Palmer, Myrtle; Gibson, Keisha L.; Rabinovich, C. Egla

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate relationships between vitamin D, proteinuria, and disease activity in pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). Study design Multiple linear regression was used to associate subject-reported race, sunscreen use, and vitamin D intake with physician-assessed disease activity and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] in subjects with pediatric SLE (n = 37) or JDM (n = 21). Serum 25(OH)D was correlated with urinary vitamin D binding protein/creatinine ratio (DBP/C) and other indicators of proteinuria. Results Serum 25(OH)D levels in subjects with SLE were inversely associated with the natural log of urinary DBP/C (r = −0.63, p < 0.001) and urine protein to creatinine ratio (r = −0.60, p<0.001), with an adjusted mean 10.9 (95% CI 5.1, 16.8) ng/mL decrease in 25(OH)D for those with proteinuria. Excluding subjects with proteinuria, serum 25(OH)D levels were inversely associated with disease activity in JDM, but not in SLE. Overall, 66% of all subjects were taking concurrent corticosteroids, but this was not associated with 25(OH)D levels. Conclusions Low serum 25(OH)D in patients with SLE is associated with proteinuria and urinary DBP. Vitamin D deficiency is associated with disease activity in patients with JDM and SLE; this relationship in SLE may be confounded by proteinuria. PMID:21924736

  7. Physical Activity and Sport Participation in Youth with Congenital Heart Disease: Perceptions of Children and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moola, Fiona; Faulkner, Guy E. J.; Kirsh, Joel A.; Kilburn, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    This study explored perceptions toward physical activity and sport in the lives of youth with congenital heart disease. Thirteen cardiac participants were interviewed in the presence of their parents, and a process of inductive analysis was conducted. Sport was not considered a valued pursuit despite the belief that it is essential for the…

  8. 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and juvenile idiopathic arthritis: is there an association with disease activity?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To examine the association between serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and disease activity in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), to determine the prevalence of vitamin D (VD) deficiency [25(OH)D=19 ng/ml] and insufficiency [25(OH)D 20-29 ng/ml], and to determine factors associated with ...

  9. Search for Antiprotozoal Activity in Herbal Medicinal Preparations; New Natural Leads against Neglected Tropical Diseases.

    PubMed

    Llurba Montesino, Núria; Kaiser, Marcel; Brun, Reto; Schmidt, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Sleeping sickness, Chagas disease, Leishmaniasis, and Malaria are infectious diseases caused by unicellular eukaryotic parasites ("protozoans"). The three first mentioned are classified as Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) by the World Health Organization and together threaten more than one billion lives worldwide. Due to the lack of research interest and the high increase of resistance against the existing treatments, the search for effective and safe new therapies is urgently required. In view of the large tradition of natural products as sources against infectious diseases [1,2], the aim of the present study is to investigate the potential of legally approved and marketed herbal medicinal products (HMPs) as antiprotozoal agents. Fifty-eight extracts from 53 HMPs on the German market were tested by a Multiple-Target-Screening (MTS) against parasites of the genera Leishmania, Trypanosoma, and Plasmodium. Sixteen HMPs showed in vitro activity against at least one of the pathogens (IC50 < 10 µg/mL). Six extracts from preparations of Salvia, Valeriana, Hypericum, Silybum, Arnica, and Curcuma exhibited high activity (IC50 < 2.5 µg/mL). They were analytically characterized by UHPLC/ESI-QqTOF-MSMS and the activity-guided fractionation of the extracts with the aim to isolate and identify the active compounds is in progress. PMID:26248069

  10. Often seen, rarely recognized: mast cell activation disease--a guide to diagnosis and therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Afrin, Lawrence B; Butterfield, Joseph H; Raithel, Martin; Molderings, Gerhard J

    2016-01-01

    Mast cell (MC) disease has long been thought to be just the rare disease of mastocytosis (in various forms, principally cutaneous and systemic), with aberrant MC mediator release at symptomatic levels due to neoplastic MC proliferation. Recent discoveries now show a new view is in order, with mastocytosis capping a metaphorical iceberg now called "MC activation disease" (MCAD, i.e. disease principally manifesting inappropriate MC activation), with the bulk of the iceberg being the recently recognized "MC activation syndrome" (MCAS), featuring inappropriate MC activation to symptomatic levels with little to no inappropriate MC proliferation. Given increasing appreciation of a great menagerie of mutations in MC regulatory elements in mastocytosis and MCAS, the great heterogeneity of MCAD's clinical presentation is unsurprising. Most MCAD patients present with decades of chronic multisystem polymorbidity generally of an inflammatory ± allergic theme. Preliminary epidemiologic investigation suggests MCAD, while often misrecognized, may be substantially prevalent, making it increasingly important that practitioners of all stripes learn how to recognize its more common forms such as MCAS. We review the diagnostically challenging presentation of MCAD (with an emphasis on MCAS) and current thoughts regarding its biology, epidemiology, natural history, diagnostic evaluation, and treatment. PMID:27012973

  11. Controlled trial of oligopeptide versus amino acid diet in treatment of active Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, J C; Giaffer, M H; Holdsworth, C D

    1995-01-01

    Elemental diets are effective in inducing remission in active Crohn's disease, but how they exert this therapeutic effect is unclear. In a previous study a whole protein containing diet proved less effective than one in which food antigens were excluded, suggesting that exclusion of food antigens from the gut was a possible mechanism. This study was designed to test whether an oligopeptide diet of hydrolysed proteins was as effective as an amino acid based diet. These diets were equally antigen free but with different nitrogen sources. Forty four patients with active Crohn's disease were randomised in a controlled trial of amino acid versus oligopeptide diet. The feeds were given by nasogastric tube in equicaloric quantities and were the sole form of nutrition. Treatment was continued for four weeks although failure to improve by day 10 resulted in withdrawal. Quantitative leucocyte scintigraphy was used to investigate the effect of diet treatment on gut inflammation. Clinical and nutritional responses to treatment were also measured. Sixteen patients entered remission (including withdrawal of corticosteroids), six patients could not tolerate the nasogastric tube, and 22 patients failed to respond. The two diets were equally effective. Patients who responded had a rapid drop in clinical index of disease activity and a major reduction in the bowel uptake of leucocytes on scintigraphy. The oligopeptide and amino acid based enteral feeds were equally effective at inducing remission in active Crohn's disease. With both diets clinical improvement was accompanied by a reduction in intestinal inflammation. Images Figure 3 PMID:7890238

  12. Targeting Syk-activated B cells in murine and human chronic graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Ryan; Allen, Jessica L; Luznik, Leo; MacDonald, Kelli P; Paz, Katelyn; Alexander, Kylie A; Vulic, Ante; Du, Jing; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Taylor, Patricia A; Poe, Jonathan C; Serody, Jonathan S; Murphy, William J; Hill, Geoffrey R; Maillard, Ivan; Koreth, John; Cutler, Corey S; Soiffer, Robert J; Antin, Joseph H; Ritz, Jerome; Chao, Nelson J; Clynes, Raphael A; Sarantopoulos, Stefanie; Blazar, Bruce R

    2015-06-25

    Novel therapies for chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) are needed. Aberrant B-cell activation has been demonstrated in mice and humans with cGVHD. Having previously found that human cGVHD B cells are activated and primed for survival, we sought to further evaluate the role of the spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) in cGVHD in multiple murine models and human peripheral blood cells. In a murine model of multiorgan system, nonsclerodermatous disease with bronchiolitis obliterans where cGVHD is dependent on antibody and germinal center (GC) B cells, we found that activation of Syk was necessary in donor B cells, but not T cells, for disease progression. Bone marrow-specific Syk deletion in vivo was effective in treating established cGVHD, as was a small-molecule inhibitor of Syk, fostamatinib, which normalized GC formation and decreased activated CD80/86(+) dendritic cells. In multiple distinct models of sclerodermatous cGVHD, clinical and pathological disease manifestations were not eliminated when mice were therapeutically treated with fostamatinib, though both clinical and immunologic effects could be observed in one of these scleroderma models. We further demonstrated that Syk inhibition was effective at inducing apoptosis of human cGVHD B cells. Together, these data demonstrate a therapeutic potential of targeting B-cell Syk signaling in cGVHD. PMID:25852057

  13. Deficient Rab11 activity underlies glucose hypometabolism in primary neurons of Huntington's disease mice

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xueyi; Valencia, Antonio; McClory, Hollis; Sapp, Ellen; Kegel, Kimberly B.; DiFiglia, Marian

    2012-05-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Primary Huntington's disease neurons are impaired in taking up glucose. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rab11 modulates glucose uptake in neurons. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increasing Rab11 activity attenuates the glucose uptake defect in disease neurons. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We provide a novel mechanism for glucose hypometabolism in Huntington's disease. -- Abstract: Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. Positron emission tomography studies have revealed a decline in glucose metabolism in the brain of patients with HD by a mechanism that has not been established. We examined glucose utilization in embryonic primary cortical neurons of wild-type (WT) and HD knock-in mice, which have 140 CAG repeats inserted in the endogenous mouse huntingtin gene (HD{sup 140Q/140Q}). Primary HD{sup 140Q/140Q} cortical neurons took up significantly less glucose than did WT neurons. Expression of permanently inactive and permanently active forms of Rab11 correspondingly altered glucose uptake in WT neurons, suggesting that normal activity of Rab11 is needed for neuronal uptake of glucose. It is known that Rab11 activity is diminished in HD{sup 140Q/140Q} neurons. Expression of dominant active Rab11 to enhance the activity of Rab11 normalized glucose uptake in HD{sup 140Q/140Q} neurons. These results suggest that deficient activity of Rab11 is a novel mechanism for glucose hypometabolism in HD.

  14. Surveillance for Neisseria meningitidis Disease Activity and Transmission Using Information Technology

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, S. Sohail; Oviedo-Orta, Ernesto; Mekaru, Sumiko R.; Freifeld, Clark C.; Tougas, Gervais; Brownstein, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Background While formal reporting, surveillance, and response structures remain essential to protecting public health, a new generation of freely accessible, online, and real-time informatics tools for disease tracking are expanding the ability to raise earlier public awareness of emerging disease threats. The rationale for this study is to test the hypothesis that the HealthMap informatics tools can complement epidemiological data captured by traditional surveillance monitoring systems for meningitis due to Neisseria meningitides (N. meningitides) by highlighting severe transmissible disease activity and outbreaks in the United States. Methods Annual analyses of N. meningitides disease alerts captured by HealthMap were compared to epidemiological data captured by the Centers for Disease Control’s Active Bacterial Core surveillance (ABCs) for N. meningitides. Morbidity and mortality case reports were measured annually from 2010 to 2013 (HealthMap) and 2005 to 2012 (ABCs). Findings HealthMap N. meningitides monitoring captured 80-90% of alerts as diagnosed N. meningitides, 5-20% of alerts as suspected cases, and 5-10% of alerts as related news articles. HealthMap disease alert activity for emerging disease threats related to N. meningitides were in agreement with patterns identified historically using traditional surveillance systems. HealthMap’s strength lies in its ability to provide a cumulative “snapshot” of weak signals that allows for rapid dissemination of knowledge and earlier public awareness of potential outbreak status while formal testing and confirmation for specific serotypes is ongoing by public health authorities. Conclusions The underreporting of disease cases in internet-based data streaming makes inadequate any comparison to epidemiological trends illustrated by the more comprehensive ABCs network published by the Centers for Disease Control. However, the expected delays in compiling confirmatory reports by traditional surveillance systems

  15. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 is implicated in disease activity in adult and juvenile onset systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Meshaal, Safa; El Refai, Rasha; El Saie, Ahmed; El Hawary, Rabab

    2016-06-01

    The Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway is one of a handful of pleiotropic cascades used to transduce a multitude of signals for development and homeostasis in humans. It is the principal signaling mechanism for a wide array of cytokines and growth factors. Dysregulated cytokine action on immune cells plays an important role in the initiation and progress of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In this study, we tried to assess the role of STAT5 in systemic lupus erythematosus and correlate its phosphorylation level with the disease activity. The activation of the STAT5 was assessed by measuring the level of expression of phosphorylated STAT5 (pSTAT5) using flow cytometry on the peripheral blood T and B cells in 58 SLE patients (40 adult and 18 juvenile onset) and on 23 healthy age- and sex-matched controls for both groups. Serum prolactin level was also assessed in the patients and control by ELISA. The study revealed that the level of pSTAT5 was higher in adult SLE patients than in healthy control (p = 0.001) and in juvenile-onset SLE patients versus age-matched control (p = 0.031). A positive correlation existed between the pSTAT5 levels and Systemic Lupus Activity Measure (SLAM) score and also with multiple clinical manifestations indicating a potential role of STAT5 signaling in pathogenesis SLE. The pSTAT5 signaling is implicated in the disease activity of SLE and may be a useful target of therapy by correcting the dysregulation of cytokines involved in the disease pathogenesis. PMID:27041383

  16. Correlation between clinical and MRI disease activity scores in axial spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    MacKay, James W; Aboelmagd, Sharief; Gaffney, J Karl

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-based disease activity scores (DAS) in axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) are rarely employed in the normal clinical setting, whereas clinical DAS are used routinely to monitor disease activity and set thresholds for biologic treatment. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the correlation between MR and clinical DAS in a general axSpA outpatient population and to assess the difference in MR DAS in individuals with high and low clinical DAS. This was a prospective, cross-sectional observational study. Forty participants with axSpA who presented for MR of the whole spine and sacroiliac joints as part of ongoing management were included. Completion of Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) and Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS) was performed at the time of MR examination. MR images were scored by two independent observers using the Spondyloarthritis Research Consortium of Canada (SPARCC) MR DAS. There were weak, non-significant correlations between total SPARCC score and BASDAI (r = 0.18, p = 0.26), ASDAS using erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ASDAS-ESR) (r = 0.31, p = 0.07) and ASDAS using C-reactive protein level (ASDAS-CRP) (r = 0.31, p = 0.05). There was no significant difference in the SPARCC score of participants with high and low clinical DAS. MR DAS may provide information about disease activity not provided by the current standard of clinical DAS and may be considered as a useful adjunct in clinical practice. PMID:25894437

  17. Activity performance problems of patients with cardiac diseases and their impact on quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Duruturk, Neslihan; Tonga, Eda; Karatas, Metin; Doganozu, Ersin

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To describe the functional consequences of patients with cardiac diseases and analyze associations between activity limitations and quality of life. [Subjects and Methods] Seventy subjects (mean age: 60.1±12.0 years) were being treated by Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and Cardiology Departments were included in the study. Activity limitations and participation restrictions as perceived by the individual were measured by the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM). The Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living (NEADL) Scale was used to describe limitations in daily living activities. To detect the impact of activity limitations on quality of life the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) was used. [Results] The subjects described 46 different types of problematic activities. The five most identified problems were walking (45.7%), climbing up the stairs (41.4%), bathing (30%), dressing (28.6%) and outings (27.1%). The associations between COPM performance score with all subgroups of NEADL and NHP; total, energy, physical abilities subgroups, were statistically significant. [Conclusion] Our results showed that patients with cardiac diseases reported problems with a wide range of activities, and that also quality of life may be affected by activities of daily living. COPM can be provided as a patient-focused outcome measure, and it may be a useful tool for identifying those problems. PMID:26311919

  18. Activity performance problems of patients with cardiac diseases and their impact on quality of life.

    PubMed

    Duruturk, Neslihan; Tonga, Eda; Karatas, Metin; Doganozu, Ersin

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] To describe the functional consequences of patients with cardiac diseases and analyze associations between activity limitations and quality of life. [Subjects and Methods] Seventy subjects (mean age: 60.1±12.0 years) were being treated by Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and Cardiology Departments were included in the study. Activity limitations and participation restrictions as perceived by the individual were measured by the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM). The Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living (NEADL) Scale was used to describe limitations in daily living activities. To detect the impact of activity limitations on quality of life the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) was used. [Results] The subjects described 46 different types of problematic activities. The five most identified problems were walking (45.7%), climbing up the stairs (41.4%), bathing (30%), dressing (28.6%) and outings (27.1%). The associations between COPM performance score with all subgroups of NEADL and NHP; total, energy, physical abilities subgroups, were statistically significant. [Conclusion] Our results showed that patients with cardiac diseases reported problems with a wide range of activities, and that also quality of life may be affected by activities of daily living. COPM can be provided as a patient-focused outcome measure, and it may be a useful tool for identifying those problems. PMID:26311919

  19. Aretaeus of Cappadocia and his treatises on diseases.

    PubMed

    Tekiner, Halil

    2015-01-01

    Aretaeus of Cappadocia is considered as one of the greatest medical scholars of Greco-Roman antiquity after Hippocrates. He presumably was a native or at least a citizen of Cappadocia, a Roman province in Asia Minor (Turkey), and most likely lived around the middle of the second century (A.D.) His eight volume treatise, written in Ionic Greek, entitled On the Causes, Symptoms and Cure of Acute and Chronic Diseases remained unknown until the middle of the 16th century when, in 1552, the first Latin edition was published. In this work, Aretaeus offered clinical descriptions of a number of diseases among which he gave classic accounts of asthma, epilepsy, pneumonia, tetanus, uterus cancer and different kinds of insanity. He differentiated nervous diseases and mental disorders and described hysteria, headaches, mania and melancholia. He also rendered the earliest clear accounts on coeliac disease, diphtheria and heart murmur, and gave diabetes its name. PMID:26037198

  20. Measuring Physical Activity in Older Adults with and without Early Stage Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Amber S.; Vidoni, Eric D.; Loskutova, Natalia; Johnson, David K.; Burns, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    We compared subjective reports of physical activity with objective measures of physical fitness including cardiorespiratory capacity, body composition, and physical performance in 146 older adults with and without early stage Alzheimer’s disease (ESAD). Respondents reported primarily unstructured and low-intensity activities, including walking and housework. Individuals with ESAD participated in fewer and lower intensity physical activities than those without ESAD. In those without ESAD, housework was related to lower body mass index, leisure walking was related to faster speed on a timed walking test, and participation in sports was related to higher peak oxygen intake. In individuals with ESAD, reported physical activities did not predict any of the physical fitness, body composition, or physical performance measures. We conclude that measures of physical activity require expansion of unstructured and low intensity activities to improve sensitivity in sedentary populations, especially in older adults with ESAD. PMID:24062599

  1. Multifunctional activity of polyphenolic compounds associated with a potential for Alzheimer's disease therapy from Ecklonia cava.

    PubMed

    Choi, Byoung Wook; Lee, Hye Sook; Shin, Hyeon-Cheol; Lee, Bong Ho

    2015-04-01

    Five polyphenols were isolated and purified from a brown alga Ecklonia cava. These compounds showed diverse biological activities such as antioxidative, antiinflammatory, and enzyme inhibitory activities. This led us to investigate the potential of these compounds as Alzheimer's disease drugs. All of the compounds showed moderate acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity in a micromolar range (IC50 from 16.0 to 96.3 μM). For butyrylcholinesterase, a new target for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, phlorofucofuroeckol-A (PFF-A), showed a particularly potent inhibitory activity (IC50 0.95 μM), which is over 100-fold greater than for acetylcholinesterase. These compounds inhibited glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta, which is related to the formation of hyperphosphorylated tau and generation Aβ. Bieckol and PFF-A inhibited amyloid precursor protein biosynthesis. PFF-A also showed very strong β-secretase inhibitory activity with IC50 of submicromole. These results render these compounds as interesting potential drug candidates for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25640212

  2. Complement activity is associated with disease severity in multifocal motor neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Vlam, Lotte; Cats, Elisabeth A.; Harschnitz, Oliver; Jansen, Marc D.; Piepers, Sanne; Veldink, Jan Herman; Franssen, Hessel; Stork, Abraham C.J.; Heezius, Erik; Rooijakkers, Suzan H.M.; Herpers, Bjorn L.; van Strijp, Jos A.; van den Berg, Leonard H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether high innate activity of the classical and lectin pathways of complement is associated with multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and whether levels of innate complement activity or the potential of anti-GM1 antibodies to activate the complement system correlate with disease severity. Methods: We performed a case-control study including 79 patients with MMN and 79 matched healthy controls. Muscle weakness was documented with Medical Research Council scale sum score and axonal loss with nerve conduction studies. Activity of the classical and lectin pathways of complement was assessed by ELISA. We also determined serum mannose-binding lectin (MBL) concentrations and polymorphisms in the MBL gene (MBL2) and quantified complement-activating properties of anti-GM1 IgM antibodies by ELISA. Results: Activity of the classical and lectin pathways, MBL2 genotypes, and serum MBL concentrations did not differ between patients and controls. Complement activation by anti-GM1 IgM antibodies was exclusively mediated through the classical pathway and correlated with antibody titers (p < 0.001). Logistic regression analysis showed that both high innate activity of the classical pathway of complement and high complement-activating capacity of anti-GM1 IgM antibodies were significantly associated with more severe muscle weakness and axonal loss. Conclusion: High innate activity of the classical pathway of complement and efficient complement-activating properties of anti-GM1 IgM antibodies are determinants of disease severity in patients with MMN. These findings underline the importance of anti-GM1 antibody–mediated complement activation in the pathogenesis and clinical course of MMN. PMID:26161430

  3. cis-Active elements of Friend spleen focus-forming virus: from disease induction to disease prevention.

    PubMed

    Baum, C; Hunt, N; Hildinger, M; Eckert, H G; Zaehres, H; Richters, A; John, J; Löhler, J; Ostertag, W

    1998-01-01

    The polycythemic strain of the Friend spleen focus-forming virus (SFFVp) is a replication-defective, acutely transforming retrovirus inducing a bistage erythroleukemia in susceptible mice. The first stage of the disease is an acute polyclonal erythroblastosis induced by the proliferation-promoting effect of gp55. gp55 is expressed from a spliced subgenomic message of SFFVp and stimulates the cellular receptor for erythropoietin. Using a selectable SFFVp that otherwise mimics the specificity of the disease, we demonstrate that the kinetics of the polyclonal expansion depends on the transcriptional strength of the retroviral cis-active elements. By exchanging gp55 for apathogenic genes, we show that SFFVp enhancer and splice signals can be successfully utilized for the development of retroviral vectors mediating very efficient transgene expression in hematopoietic cells. Apathogenic selectable SFFVp-based vectors carrying distinct enhancer alterations are a valuable tool to analyze transcriptional control of leukemia viruses in the absence of oncogenic proteins. Moreover they might have therapeutic potential. PMID:9587397

  4. Thermal Inactivation of Newcastle Disease Virus I. Coupled Inactivation Rates of Hemagglutinating and Neuraminidase Activities

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, John S.; Haywood, A. M.

    1973-01-01

    The thermal stability of Newcastle disease virus has been characterized in terms of the rate constants for inactivation of hemagglutinating activity (HA), neuraminidase activity (NA), and infectivity. Inactivation of HA results in the concomitant loss of NA. Infectivity, however, is much more thermolabile. Disintegration of the virus particle is not responsible for the identical rate constants for inactivation of HA and NA, nor is their parallel inactivation uncoupled in envelope fragments produced by pretreating the virus with phospholipase-C. The data indicate that a common envelope factor(s) can influence the thermal stability of both activities. PMID:4734647

  5. Disease Mutations in Rab7 Result in Unregulated Nucleotide Exchange and Inappropriate Activation

    SciTech Connect

    B McCray; E Skordalakes; J Taylor

    2011-12-31

    Rab GTPases are molecular switches that orchestrate vesicular trafficking, maturation and fusion by cycling between an active, GTP-bound form, and an inactive, GDP-bound form. The activity cycle is coupled to GTP hydrolysis and is tightly controlled by regulatory proteins. Missense mutations of the GTPase Rab7 cause a dominantly inherited axonal degeneration known as Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2B through an unknown mechanism. We present the 2.8 A crystal structure of GTP-bound L129F mutant Rab7 which reveals normal conformations of the effector binding regions and catalytic site, but an alteration to the nucleotide binding pocket that is predicted to alter GTP binding. Through extensive biochemical analysis, we demonstrate that disease-associated mutations in Rab7 do not lead to an intrinsic GTPase defect, but permit unregulated nucleotide exchange leading to both excessive activation and hydrolysis-independent inactivation. Consistent with augmented activity, mutant Rab7 shows significantly enhanced interaction with a subset of effector proteins. In addition, dynamic imaging demonstrates that mutant Rab7 is abnormally retained on target membranes. However, we show that the increased activation of mutant Rab7 is counterbalanced by unregulated, GTP hydrolysis-independent membrane cycling. Notably, disease mutations are able to rescue the membrane cycling of a GTPase-deficient mutant. Thus, we demonstrate that disease mutations uncouple Rab7 from the spatial and temporal control normally imposed by regulatory proteins and cause disease not by a gain of novel toxic function, but by misregulation of native Rab7 activity.

  6. Clinical value of fecal calprotectin in determining disease activity of ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jun-Ying; Ouyang, Qin; Li, Guo-Dong; Xiao, Nan-Ping

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate possibility and clinical application of fecal calprotectin in determining disease activity of ulcerative colitis (UC). METHODS: The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to measure the concentrations of calprotectin in feces obtained from 66 patients with UC and 20 controls. C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), acid glycoprotein (AGP) were also measured and were compared with calprotectin in determining disease activity of UC. The disease activity of UC was also determined by the Sutherland criteria. RESULTS: The fecal calprotectin concentration in the patients with active UC was significantly higher than that in the inactive UC and in the controls (402.16 ± 48.0 μg/g vs 35.93 ± 3.39 μg/g, 11.5 ± 3.42 μg/g, P < 0.01). The fecal calprotectin concentration in the inactive UC group was significantly higher than that in the control group (P < 0.05). A significant difference was also found in the patients with active UC of mild, moderate and severe degrees. The area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristics (AUCROC) was 0.975, 0.740, 0.692 and 0.737 for fecal calprotectin, CRP, ESR and AGP, respectively. There was a strong correlation between the fecal calprotectin concentration and the endoscopic gradings for UC (r = 0.866, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Calprotectin in the patient’s feces can reflect the disease activity of UC and can be used as a rational fecal marker for intestinal inflammation in clinical practice. This kind of marker is relatively precise, simple and noninvasive when compared with other commonly-used markers such as CRP, ESR and AGP. PMID:18176961

  7. Sec63 and Xbp1 regulate IRE1α activity and polycystic disease severity

    PubMed Central

    Fedeles, Sorin V.; So, Jae-Seon; Shrikhande, Amol; Lee, Seung Hun; Gallagher, Anna-Rachel; Barkauskas, Christina E.; Somlo, Stefan; Lee, Ann-Hwee

    2015-01-01

    The HSP40 cochaperone SEC63 is associated with the SEC61 translocon complex in the ER. Mutations in the gene encoding SEC63 cause polycystic liver disease in humans; however, it is not clear how altered SEC63 influences disease manifestations. In mice, loss of SEC63 induces cyst formation both in liver and kidney as the result of reduced polycystin-1 (PC1). Here we report that inactivation of SEC63 induces an unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway that is protective against cyst formation. Specifically, using murine genetic models, we determined that SEC63 deficiency selectively activates the IRE1α-XBP1 branch of UPR and that SEC63 exists in a complex with PC1. Concomitant inactivation of both SEC63 and XBP1 exacerbated the polycystic kidney phenotype in mice by markedly suppressing cleavage at the G protein–coupled receptor proteolysis site (GPS) in PC1. Enforced expression of spliced XBP1 (XBP1s) enhanced GPS cleavage of PC1 in SEC63-deficient cells, and XBP1 overexpression in vivo ameliorated cystic disease in a murine model with reduced PC1 function that is unrelated to SEC63 inactivation. Collectively, the findings show that SEC63 function regulates IRE1α/XBP1 activation, SEC63 and XBP1 are required for GPS cleavage and maturation of PC1, and activation of XBP1 can protect against polycystic disease in the setting of impaired biogenesis of PC1. PMID:25844898

  8. Activity and school attendance monitoring system for adolescents with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Venugopalan, Janani; Brown, Clark; Cheng, Chihwen; Stokes, Todd H; Wang, May D

    2012-01-01

    Sickle cell disease, the most common hemoglobin disorder, affects major organ systems with symptoms of pain, anemia and a multitude of chronic conditions. For adolescents, the disease adversely affects school attendance, academic progress and social activity. To effectively study the relationship among school attendance and other factors like demographics and academic performance, studies have relied on self-reporting and school records, all of which have some bias. In this study we design and prototype a system, called SickleSAM (Sickle cell School attendance and Activity Monitoring system), for automatically monitoring school attendance and daily activity of adolescents with sickle cell disease. SickleSAM intends to remove human bias and inaccuracies. The system uses built-in GPS to collect data which will be recorded into a cloud database using Short Messaging Service technology. SickleSAM is developed by Georgia Institute of Technology in conjunction with Children's Healthcare of Atlanta (CHOA). System effectiveness is being evaluated using a trial of 10 adolescents with the disease. PMID:23366422

  9. Unraveling the actions of AMP-activated protein kinase in metabolic diseases: Systemic to molecular insights.

    PubMed

    Weikel, Karen A; Ruderman, Neil B; Cacicedo, José M

    2016-05-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a critical role both in sensing and regulating cellular energy state. In experimental animals, its activation has been shown to reduce the risk of obesity and diabetes-related co-morbidities such as insulin resistance, the metabolic syndrome and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. However, in humans, AMPK activation alone often does not completely resolve these conditions. Thus, an improved understanding of AMPK action and regulation in metabolic and other diseases is needed. Herein, we provide a brief description of the enzymatic regulation of AMPK and review its role in maintaining energy homeostasis. We then discuss tissue-specific actions of AMPK that become distorted during such conditions as obesity, type 2 diabetes and certain cancers. Finally, we explore recent findings regarding the interactions of AMPK with mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 and the lysosome and discuss how changes in these relationships during overnutrition may lead to AMPK dysfunction. A more thorough understanding of AMPK's molecular interactions during diseases of overnutrition may provide key insights for the development of AMPK-based combinatorial treatments for metabolic disease. PMID:27085772

  10. Mitotic activation: a convergent mechanism for a cohort of neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Husseman, J W; Nochlin, D; Vincent, I

    2000-01-01

    Previous evidence from our lab and others has implicated the mitotic cdc2/cyclin B1 kinase in the neurofibrillary degeneration of Alzheimer's disease. To examine the specificity of this relationship, and define conditions leading to atypical activation of mitotic kinase in postmitotic neurons, we have applied antibodies specific for the cdc2 kinase, its activator, cyclin B1, and three cdc2 produced phosphoepitopes: the TG-3 phosphoepitope in tau and nucleolin, the MPM-2 phosphoepitope in a variety of substrates, and the H5 phosphoepitope in RNA polymerase II, to affected brain regions from a spectrum of neurodegenerative disorders. Our results demonstrate that neurons containing characteristic lesions in a subset of diseases including Down Syndrome (DS), Frontotemporal Dementia linked to chromosome 17 (FTD-17), Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP), Corticobasal Degeneration (CBD), Parkinson-Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis of Guam (GP-ALS), Niemann Pick disease type C (NPDC), and Pick's disease, display mitotic indices, implicating diverse etiologies in mitotic activation. The convergence of various degenerative schemes into a unified mitotic kinase-driven pathway provides a common target for therapeutic treatment of these different disorders. PMID:11124425

  11. Transcriptional dysregulation of inflammatory/immune pathways after active vaccination against Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Ramsingh, Arlene I; Manley, Kevin; Rong, Yinghui; Reilly, Andrew; Messer, Anne

    2015-11-01

    Immunotherapy, both active and passive, is increasingly recognized as a powerful approach to a wide range of diseases, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Huntington's disease (HD), an autosomal dominant disorder triggered by misfolding of huntingtin (HTT) protein with an expanded polyglutamine tract, could also benefit from this approach. Individuals can be identified genetically at the earliest stages of disease, and there may be particular benefits to a therapy that can target peripheral tissues in addition to brain. In this active vaccination study, we first examined safety and immunogenicity for a broad series of peptide, protein and DNA plasmid immunization protocols, using fragment (R6/1), and knock-in (zQ175) models. No safety issues were found. The strongest and most uniform immune response was to a combination of three non-overlapping HTT Exon1 coded peptides, conjugated to KLH, delivered with alum adjuvant. An N586-82Q plasmid, delivered via gene gun, also showed ELISA responses, mainly in the zQ175 strain, but with more variability, and less robust responses in HD compared with wild-type controls. Transcriptome profiling of spleens from the triple peptide-immunized cohort showed substantial HD-specific differences including differential activation of genes associated with innate immune responses, absence of negative feedback control of gene expression by regulators, a temporal dysregulation of innate immune responses and transcriptional repression of genes associated with memory T cell responses. These studies highlight critical issues for immunotherapy and HD disease management in general. PMID:26307082

  12. Raised serum level of APRIL in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: correlations with disease activity indices.

    PubMed

    Hegazy, M; Darwish, H; Darweesh, H; El-Shehaby, A; Emad, Y

    2010-04-01

    The aim of the present study is to assess serum APRIL levels in SLE patients versus rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and normal control and to correlate serum APRIL levels in SLE patients with disease activity indices. Serum APRIL levels was measured in 40 SLE patients, 20 patients with RA and 20 healthy volunteers who served as control group. Disease activity in SLE patients was assessed by the British Isles Lupus Assessment Group (BILAG) index and SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI), and results were correlated with serum APRIL levels. Significantly higher serum APRIL levels was observed in SLE patients compared to RA patients and normal controls (p=0.003 and p < or = 0.001, respectively). Positive correlations were found between serum APRIL levels and total BILAG index (r=0.486 and p=0.001), BILAG musculoskeletal score (r=0.848 and p < or = 0.001) and BILAG cardiorespiratory score (r=0.326 and 0.04). Serum APRIL was higher in SLE patients compared to RA patients and normal control subjects and positively correlates with BILAG index and higher levels may be associated with musculoskeletal manifestations of the disease. APRIL antagonism could be a potential therapeutic target in SLE. PMID:20116334

  13. Activity and School Attendance Monitoring System for Adolescents with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Venugopalan, Janani; Brown, Clark; Cheng, Chihwen; Stokes, Todd H.; Wang, May D.

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease, the most common hemoglobin disorder, affects major organ systems with symptoms of pain, anemia and a multitude of chronic conditions. For adolescents, the disease adversely affects school attendance, academic progress and social activity. To effectively study the relationship among school attendance and other factors like demographics and academic performance, studies have relied on self-reporting and school records, all of which have some bias. In this study we design and prototype a system, called SickleSAM (Sickle cell School attendance and Activity Monitoring system), for automatically monitoring school attendance and daily activity of adolescents with sickle cell disease. SickleSAM intends to remove human bias and inaccuracies. The system uses built-in GPS to collect data which will be recorded into a cloud database using Short Messaging Service technology. SickleSAM is developed by Georgia Institute of Technology in conjunction with Children's Healthcare of Atlanta (CHOA). System effectiveness is being evaluated using a trial of 10 adolescents with the disease. PMID:23366422

  14. Studies of generalized elemental imbalances in neurological disease patients using INAA (instrumental neutron activation analysis)

    SciTech Connect

    Ehmann, W.D.; Vance, D.E.; Khare, S.S.; Kasarskis, E.J.; Markesbery, W.R.

    1988-01-01

    Evidence has been presented in the literature to implicate trace elements in the etiology of several age-related neurological diseases. Most of these studies are based on brain analyses. Using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), we have observed trace element imbalances in brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and Picks's disease. The most prevalent elemental imbalances found in the brain were for bromine, mercury, and the alkali metals. In this study the authors report INAA studies of trace elements in nonneural tissues from Alzheimer's disease and ALS patients. Samples from household relatives were collected for use as controls wherever possible. Hair samples were washed according to the International Atomic Energy Agency recommended procedure. Fingernail samples were scraped with a quartz knife prior to washing by the same procedure. For ALS patients, blood samples were also collected. These data indicate that elemental imbalances in Alzheimer's disease and ALS are not restricted to the brain. Many elements perturbed in the brain are also altered in the several nonneural tissues examined to date. The imbalances in different tissues, however, are not always in the same direction. The changes observed may represent causes, effects, or simply epiphenomena. Longitudinal studies of nonneural tissues and blood, as well as tissue microprobe analyses at the cellular and subcellular level, will be required in order to better assess the role of trace elements in the etiology of these diseases.

  15. Salivary Acetylcholinesterase Activity Is Increased in Parkinson's Disease: A Potential Marker of Parasympathetic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Fedorova, Tatyana; Knudsen, Cindy Soendersoe; Mouridsen, Kim; Nexo, Ebba; Borghammer, Per

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Decreased salivary flow and xerostomia are frequent findings in Parkinson's disease (PD), possibly caused by alterations in the parasympathetic tonus. Here we explore salivary acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity as a potential biomarker in PD. Methods. We measured salivary flow, AChE activity, and total protein concentration in 30 PD patients and 49 healthy controls. We also performed exploratory correlation analyses with disease duration, motor symptom severity, autonomic complaints, and other nonmotor symptoms. Results. PD patients displayed significantly decreased salivary flow rate, significantly increased salivary AChE activity, and total protein concentration. Importantly, the AChE activity/total protein ratio was significantly increased in PD patients, suggesting that increased AChE activity cannot be explained solely by upconcentration of saliva. The Unified PD Rating Scale (UPDRS) score displayed significant correlation with total salivary protein (P = 0.002) and near-significant correlation with salivary flow (P = 0.07). Color vision test scores were also significantly correlated with AChE activity (P = 0.04) and total protein levels (P = 0.002). Conclusion. Salivary AChE activity is increased in PD patients compared to healthy controls. Future studies are needed to elucidate whether this parameter reflects the extent of neuronal damage and parasympathetic denervation in the salivary glands of PD patients. PMID:25767737

  16. Behavioral and Locomotor Measurements Using an Open Field Activity Monitoring System for Skeletal Muscle Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tatem, Kathleen S.; Quinn, James L.; Phadke, Aditi; Yu, Qing; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2014-01-01

    The open field activity monitoring system comprehensively assesses locomotor and behavioral activity levels of mice. It is a useful tool for assessing locomotive impairment in animal models of neuromuscular disease and efficacy of therapeutic drugs that may improve locomotion and/or muscle function. The open field activity measurement provides a different measure than muscle strength, which is commonly assessed by grip strength measurements. It can also show how drugs may affect other body systems as well when used with additional outcome measures. In addition, measures such as total distance traveled mirror the 6 min walk test, a clinical trial outcome measure. However, open field activity monitoring is also associated with significant challenges: Open field activity measurements vary according to animal strain, age, sex, and circadian rhythm. In addition, room temperature, humidity, lighting, noise, and even odor can affect assessment outcomes. Overall, this manuscript provides a well-tested and standardized open field activity SOP for preclinical trials in animal models of neuromuscular diseases. We provide a discussion of important considerations, typical results, data analysis, and detail the strengths and weaknesses of open field testing. In addition, we provide recommendations for optimal study design when using open field activity in a preclinical trial. PMID:25286313

  17. Behavioral and locomotor measurements using an open field activity monitoring system for skeletal muscle diseases.

    PubMed

    Tatem, Kathleen S; Quinn, James L; Phadke, Aditi; Yu, Qing; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2014-01-01

    The open field activity monitoring system comprehensively assesses locomotor and behavioral activity levels of mice. It is a useful tool for assessing locomotive impairment in animal models of neuromuscular disease and efficacy of therapeutic drugs that may improve locomotion and/or muscle function. The open field activity measurement provides a different measure than muscle strength, which is commonly assessed by grip strength measurements. It can also show how drugs may affect other body systems as well when used with additional outcome measures. In addition, measures such as total distance traveled mirror the 6 min walk test, a clinical trial outcome measure. However, open field activity monitoring is also associated with significant challenges: Open field activity measurements vary according to animal strain, age, sex, and circadian rhythm. In addition, room temperature, humidity, lighting, noise, and even odor can affect assessment outcomes. Overall, this manuscript provides a well-tested and standardized open field activity SOP for preclinical trials in animal models of neuromuscular diseases. We provide a discussion of important considerations, typical results, data analysis, and detail the strengths and weaknesses of open field testing. In addition, we provide recommendations for optimal study design when using open field activity in a preclinical trial. PMID:25286313

  18. Serotonin content of platelets in inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Correlation with clinical activity.

    PubMed

    Zeller, J; Weissbarth, E; Baruth, B; Mielke, H; Deicher, H

    1983-04-01

    Significantly decreased platelet serotonin contents were measured in rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), progressive systemic sclerosis, and mixed connective tissue disease. An inverse relationship between platelet serotonin levels and clinical disease activity was observed in both rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. SLE patients with multiple organ involvement showed the lowest platelet serotonin values. No correlation was observed between platelet serotonin contents and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug treatment, presence of circulating platelet reactive IgG, or the amount of circulating immune complexes. The results are interpreted as indicating platelet release occurring in vivo during inflammatory episodes of the rheumatic disorders investigated. PMID:6838676

  19. Understanding the impact of deep brain stimulation on ambulatory activity in advanced Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rochester, Lynn; Chastin, Sebastien Francois Martin; Lord, Sue; Baker, Katherine; Burn, David John

    2012-06-01

    Whilst deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (DBS-STN) improves the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), its effect on daily activity is unknown. We aimed to quantify changes in ambulatory activity following DBS-STN in advanced PD using novel accelerometry based measures that describe changes to the volume and pattern of walking. Seventeen participants with advanced PD were measured over a 7-day period using an activPAL (™) activity monitor. Data were collected 6 weeks before and 6 months after surgery and included measures that describe the volume and pattern of ambulatory activity (number of steps per day, accumulation, diversity and variability of walking time), alongside standard measures for disease severity, freezing of gait, gait speed, and extended activities of daily living. Activity outcomes were compared pre- and 6 months post-surgery using linear mixed models and correlated with standard outcomes. The results of this study are despite significant improvements in motor symptoms after surgery, the volume of ambulatory activity (total number of steps per day) did not change (P = 0.468). However, significant increases in length and variability of walking bouts emerged, suggesting improvements in diversity and flexibility of walking patterns. Motor severity and extended activities of daily living scores were significantly correlated with walking bout variability but not with volume of walking. Thus, the conclusions are reduction in motor symptom severity after DBS-STN translated into selective improvements in daily activity. Novel measures derived from accelerometry provide a discrete measure of performance and allow closer interpretation of the impact of DBS-STN on real-world activity. PMID:22086738

  20. Evaluation of antiviral activity of plant extracts against foot and mouth disease virus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Younus, Ishrat; Siddiq, Afshan; Ishaq, Humera; Anwer, Laila; Badar, Sehrish; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate antiviral activity of chloroformic leaves extracts of three plants: Azadirachta indica, Moringa oleifera and Morus alba against Foot and Mouth disease virus using MTT assay (3-(4, 5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide). Antiviral and cytotoxic activity of each extract was evaluated as cell survival percentage and results were expressed as Means ± S.D. The concentrations which resulted in cell survival percentages of greater than 50% are considered to be effective antiviral concentrations. From the tested plant extracts, Moringa oleifera showed potent antiviral activity (p<0.05) while Azadirachta indica showed significant antiviral activity in the range of 1-50μ/ml & 12-100μ/ml respectively. In contrast no antiviral activity was observed by Morus alba as all the tested concentration resulted in significant reduction (p<0.05) in cell survival percentage. PMID:27393440

  1. Identification of a protein kinase activity in purified foot- and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed Central

    Grubman, M J; Baxt, B; La Torre, J L; Bachrach, H L

    1981-01-01

    Purified preparations of foot-and-mouth disease virus types A, O, and C contain a protein kinase activity which can transfer the gamma phosphate of [32P]ATP to virion structural proteins VP2 and VP3 and exogenous acceptor proteins. Utilizing protamine sulfate as an acceptor, the kinase activity can be demonstrated in disrupted virus but not in intact virus. The enzyme is heat labile with optimal activity at pH 7 or greater. Serine residues of protamine sulfate were identified as the amino acid phosphorylated by the protein kinase. Treatment of purified virus with trypsin, which cleaves VP3, did not affect the protein kinase activity. The results indicate that the protein kinase activity found in FMDV is present in an internally located protein of viral or host origin. Images PMID:6268834

  2. Development of the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease activity rating scale: reliability, validity and factorial structure.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Michiko; Takai, Kenichi; Nakajima, Kazuo; Kagawa, Koujiro

    2003-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop the Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Activity Rating Scale (CARS) to measure life-related activity in patients with COPD, and to confirm its reliability and constructive validity in a factorial structure model. The subjects consisted of 114 patients with COPD. An 88-item life-related activity list, generated previously from a literature review, was administered. The secondary structural model consisted of four factors with 12 items. The results of the confirmatory factor analysis by structural equation modeling showed the fit criteria to be statistically significant. The internal consistency of the 12 items was highly reliable (Cronbach's alpha = 0.924). The CARS score was correlated with pulmonary function tests, breathlessness, and the health-related quality of life (QOL) scales in Pearson correlation coefficient. The results suggest that the COPD Activity Rating Scale is a valid scale for the assessment of life-related activity in patients with COPD. PMID:12603718

  3. Platelet Mitochondrial Activity and Pesticide Exposure in Early Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bronstein, Jeff M.; Paul, Kimberly; Yang, Laurice; Haas, Richard H.; Shults, Clifford W.; Le, Thuy; Ritz, Beate

    2015-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD) but the cause of this dysfunction is unclear. Methods Platelet mitochondrial complex I and I/III (NADH cytochrome c reductase, NCCR) activities were measured in early PD patients and matched controls enrolled in a population based case-control study. Ambient agricultural pesticide exposures were assessed with a geographic information system and California Pesticide Use Registry. Results In contrast to some previous reports, we found no differences in complex I and I/III activities in subjects with PD and controls. We did find that NCCR activity correlated with subjects’ exposure to pesticides known to inhibit mitochondrial activity regardless of their diagnosis. Conclusions ETC activity is not altered in PD in this well-characterized cohort when compared to community-matched controls but appears to be affected by environmental toxins, such as mitochondria-inhibiting pesticides. PMID:25757798

  4. Electromyographic Activity in the EEG in Alzheimer's Disease: Noise or Signal?

    PubMed Central

    van der Hiele, Karin; Reijntjes, Robert H. A. M.; Vein, Alla A.; Westendorp, Rudi G. J.; van Buchem, Mark A.; Bollen, Eduard L. E. M.; Middelkoop, Huub A. M.; van Dijk, J. Gert

    2011-01-01

    Many efforts have been directed at negating the influence of electromyographic (EMG) activity on the EEG, especially in elderly demented patients. We wondered whether these “artifacts” might reflect cognitive and behavioural aspects of dementia. In this pilot study, 11 patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD), 13 with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 13 controls underwent EEG registration. As EMG measures, we used frontal and temporal 50–70 Hz activity. We found that the EEGs of AD patients displayed more theta activity, less alpha reactivity, and more frontal EMG than controls. Interestingly, increased EMG activity indicated more cognitive impairment and more depressive complaints. EEG variables on the whole distinguished better between groups than EMG variables, but an EMG variable was best for the distinction between MCI and controls. Our results suggest that EMG activity in the EEG could be more than noise; it differs systematically between groups and may reflect different cerebral functions than the EEG. PMID:21559240

  5. Electromyographic activity in the EEG in Alzheimer's disease: noise or signal?

    PubMed

    van der Hiele, Karin; Reijntjes, Robert H A M; Vein, Alla A; Westendorp, Rudi G J; van Buchem, Mark A; Bollen, Eduard L E M; Middelkoop, Huub A M; van Dijk, J Gert

    2011-01-01

    Many efforts have been directed at negating the influence of electromyographic (EMG) activity on the EEG, especially in elderly demented patients. We wondered whether these "artifacts" might reflect cognitive and behavioural aspects of dementia. In this pilot study, 11 patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD), 13 with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 13 controls underwent EEG registration. As EMG measures, we used frontal and temporal 50-70 Hz activity. We found that the EEGs of AD patients displayed more theta activity, less alpha reactivity, and more frontal EMG than controls. Interestingly, increased EMG activity indicated more cognitive impairment and more depressive complaints. EEG variables on the whole distinguished better between groups than EMG variables, but an EMG variable was best for the distinction between MCI and controls. Our results suggest that EMG activity in the EEG could be more than noise; it differs systematically between groups and may reflect different cerebral functions than the EEG. PMID:21559240

  6. Activation of farnesoid X receptor attenuates hepatic injury in a murine model of alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weibin; Zhu, Bo; Peng, Xiaomin; Zhou, Meiling; Jia, Dongwei; Gu, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a common cause of advanced liver disease, and considered as a major risk factor of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Hepatic cholestasis is a pathophysiological feature observed in all stages of ALD. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, and plays an essential role in the regulation of bile acid, lipid and glucose homeostasis. However, the role of FXR in the pathogenesis and progression of ALD remains largely unknown. Mice were fed Lieber-DeCarli ethanol diet or an isocaloric control diet. We used a specific agonist of FXR WAY-362450 to study the effect of pharmacological activation of FXR in alcoholic liver disease. In this study, we demonstrated that FXR activity was impaired by chronic ethanol ingestion in a murine model of ALD. Activation of FXR by specific agonist WAY-362450 protected mice from the development of ALD. We also found that WAY-362450 treatment rescued FXR activity, suppressed ethanol-induced Cyp2e1 up-regulation and attenuated oxidative stress in liver. Our results highlight a key role of FXR in the modulation of ALD development, and propose specific FXR agonists for the treatment of ALD patients. PMID:24269813

  7. Inhibition of histone deacetylase 6 activity reduces cyst growth in polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Cebotaru, Liudmila; Liu, Qiangni; Yanda, Murali K; Boinot, Clement; Outeda, Patricia; Huso, David L; Watnick, Terry; Guggino, William B; Cebotaru, Valeriu

    2016-07-01

    Abnormal proliferation of cyst-lining epithelium and increased intracystic fluid secretion via the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) are thought to contribute to cyst growth in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) expression and activity are increased in certain cancers, neurodegenerative diseases, and in Pkd1-mutant renal epithelial cells. Inhibition of HDAC6 activity with specific inhibitors slows cancer growth. Here we studied the effect of tubacin, a specific HDAC6 inhibitor, on cyst growth in polycystic kidney disease. Treatment with tubacin prevented cyst formation in MDCK cells, an in vitro model of cystogenesis. Cyclic AMP stimulates cell proliferation and activates intracystic CFTR-mediated chloride secretion in ADPKD. Treatment with tubacin downregulated cyclic AMP levels, inhibited cell proliferation, and inhibited cyclic AMP-activated CFTR chloride currents in MDCK cells. We also found that tubacin reduced cyst growth by inhibiting proliferation of cyst-lining epithelial cells, downregulated cyclic AMP levels, and improved renal function in a Pkd1-conditional mouse model of ADPKD. Thus, HDAC6 could play a role in cyst formation and could serve as a potential therapeutic target in ADPKD. PMID:27165822

  8. Evidence for the absence of cerebral glucose-6-phosphatase activity in glycogen storage disease type I (Von Gierke's disease)

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, M.E.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Hawkins, R.A.; Philippart, M.

    1981-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type I (GSD-I) is characterized by a functional deficit in glucose-6-phosphatase that normally hydrolyzes glucose-6-PO/sub 4/ to glucose. This enzyme is primarily found in liver, kidney, and muscle but it is also present in brain, where it appears to participate in the regulation of cerebral tissue glucose. Since most neurological symptoms in GSD-I patients involve systemic hypoglycemia, previous reports have not examined possible deficiencies in phosphatase activity in the brain. Positron computed tomography, F-18-labeled 2-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and a tracer kinetic model for FDG were used to measure the cortical plasma/tissue forward and reverse transport, phosphorylation and dephosphorylation rate constants, tissue/plasma concentration gradient, tissue concentration turnover rate for this competitive analog of glucose, and the cortical metabolic rates for glucose. Studies were carried out in age-matched normals (N = 13) and a single GSD-I patient. The dephosphorylation rate constant in the GSD-I patient was about one tenth the normal value indicating a low level of cerebral phosphatase activity. The other measured parameters were within normal limits except for the rate of glucose phosphorylation which reflected a cortical glucose metabolic rate one half the normal value. Since glucose transport and tissue glucose concentration was normal, the reduced cortical glucose metabolism probably results from the use of alternative substrates (..beta..-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate) which are consistently elevated in the plasma of GSD-I patients.

  9. Interdicting Gq Activation in Airway Disease by Receptor-Dependent and Receptor-Independent Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Carr, Richard; Koziol-White, Cynthia; Zhang, Jie; Lam, Hong; An, Steven S; Tall, Gregory G; Panettieri, Reynold A; Benovic, Jeffrey L

    2016-01-01

    Gαqβγ heterotrimer (Gq), an important mediator in the pathology of airway disease, plays a central role in bronchoconstriction and airway remodeling, including airway smooth muscle growth and inflammation. Current therapeutic strategies to treat airway disease include the use of muscarinic and leukotriene receptor antagonists; however, these pharmaceuticals demonstrate a limited clinical efficacy as multiple Gq-coupled receptor subtypes contribute to these pathologies. Thus, broadly inhibiting the activation of Gq may be an advantageous therapeutic approach. Here, we investigated the effects of broadly inhibiting Gq activation in vitro and ex vivo using receptor-dependent and receptor-independent strategies. P4pal-10 is a protease activated receptor 4-derived pepducin that exhibits efficacy toward multiple Gq-coupled receptors. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that P4pal-10 selectively inhibits all G protein coupling to several Gq-coupled receptors, including protease activated receptor 1, muscarinic acetylcholine M3, and histamine H1 receptors, while demonstrating no direct effect on Gq. We also evaluated the ability of FR900359, also known as UBO-QIC, to directly inhibit Gq activation. FR900359 inhibited spontaneous Gαq nucleotide exchange, while having little effect on Gαsβγ, Gαiβγ, or Gα12/13βγ heterotrimer activity. Both P4pal-10 and FR900359 inhibited Gq-mediated intracellular signaling and primary human airway smooth muscle growth, whereas only FR900359 effectively interdicted agonist-promoted airway contraction in human precision cut lung slices. These studies serve as a proof of concept that the broad-based inhibition of Gq activation may be a useful therapeutic approach to treat multiple common pathologies of airway disease. PMID:26464325

  10. Identification of novel urinary biomarkers for assessing disease activity and prognosis of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yune-Jung; Yoo, Seung-Ah; Hwang, Daehee; Cho, Chul-Soo; Kim, Wan-Uk

    2016-01-01

    To optimize treatment for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), it is ideal to monitor the disease activity on a daily basis because RA activity fluctuates over time. Urine can be collected routinely at home by patients. Recently, we identified four urinary biomarker candidates—gelsolin (GSN), orosomucoid (ORM)1, ORM2 and soluble CD14 (sCD14)—in RA patients through transcriptomic and proteomic studies. Here, we investigated the clinical significance of the aforementioned urinary biomarker candidates in a prospective manner. For the first time, we found that urinary ORM1, ORM2 and sCD14 levels, but not GSN, were elevated in RA patients and had a positive correlation with the status of the disease activity. In particular, urine tests for ORM 1, ORM 2 and sCD14 efficiently represented the presence of high RA activity without the need for measuring blood markers. In a parallel study, a more rapid radiographic progression over 3 years was observed in patients with higher ORM2 levels. Combined measurements of urinary ORM2 and serum C-reactive protein synergistically increased the predictability of the radiographic progression of RA (odds ratio: 46.5). Collectively, our data provide evidence that blood-free, urinary biomarkers are promising surrogates for assessing disease activity and prognosis of RA. We anticipate that our urinary biomarkers will provide novel candidates for patient-driven measurements of RA activity at home and can shift the paradigm from blood to urine testing in the assessment of RA activity and prognosis in hospitals. PMID:26915672

  11. Identification of novel urinary biomarkers for assessing disease activity and prognosis of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Park, Yune-Jung; Yoo, Seung-Ah; Hwang, Daehee; Cho, Chul-Soo; Kim, Wan-Uk

    2016-01-01

    To optimize treatment for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), it is ideal to monitor the disease activity on a daily basis because RA activity fluctuates over time. Urine can be collected routinely at home by patients. Recently, we identified four urinary biomarker candidates-gelsolin (GSN), orosomucoid (ORM)1, ORM2 and soluble CD14 (sCD14)-in RA patients through transcriptomic and proteomic studies. Here, we investigated the clinical significance of the aforementioned urinary biomarker candidates in a prospective manner. For the first time, we found that urinary ORM1, ORM2 and sCD14 levels, but not GSN, were elevated in RA patients and had a positive correlation with the status of the disease activity. In particular, urine tests for ORM 1, ORM 2 and sCD14 efficiently represented the presence of high RA activity without the need for measuring blood markers. In a parallel study, a more rapid radiographic progression over 3 years was observed in patients with higher ORM2 levels. Combined measurements of urinary ORM2 and serum C-reactive protein synergistically increased the predictability of the radiographic progression of RA (odds ratio: 46.5). Collectively, our data provide evidence that blood-free, urinary biomarkers are promising surrogates for assessing disease activity and prognosis of RA. We anticipate that our urinary biomarkers will provide novel candidates for patient-driven measurements of RA activity at home and can shift the paradigm from blood to urine testing in the assessment of RA activity and prognosis in hospitals. PMID:26915672

  12. Hedgehog Pathway Activation Parallels Histologic Severity of Injury and Fibrosis in Human Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Cynthia D.; Suzuki, Ayako; Zdanowicz, Marzena; Abdelmalek, Manal F.; Burchette, James; Unalp, Aynur; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2012-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway mediates several processes that are deregulated in patients with the metabolic syndrome (e.g., fat mass regulation, vascular/endothelial remodeling, liver injury and repair, and carcinogenesis). The severity of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and the metabolic syndrome generally correlate. Therefore, we hypothesized that the level of Hh pathway activation would increase in parallel with the severity of liver damage in NAFLD. To assess potential correlations between known histologic and clinical predictors of advanced liver disease and Hh pathway activation, immunohistochemistry was performed on liver biopsies from a large well-characterized cohort of NAFLD patients (n=90) enrolled in the Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Clinical Research Network (NASH CRN) Database 1 study. Increased Hh activity (evidenced by accumulation of Hh-ligand producing cells and Hh-responsive target cells) strongly correlated with portal inflammation, ballooning, and fibrosis stage (each p<0.0001), supporting a relationship between Hh pathway activation and liver damage. Pathway activity also correlated significantly with markers of liver repair, including numbers of hepatic progenitors and myofibroblastic cells (both p<0.03). In addition, various clinical parameters that have been linked to histologically-advanced NAFLD, including increased patient age (p<0.005), BMI (p<0.002), waist circumference (p<0.0007), homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (p<0.0001) and hypertension (p<0.02), correlated with hepatic Hh activity. Conclusion: In NAFLD patients, the level of hepatic Hh pathway activity is highly correlated with the severity of liver damage and with metabolic syndrome parameters that are known to be predictive of advanced liver disease. Hence, deregulation of the Hh signaling network may contribute to the pathogenesis and sequelae of liver damage that develops with the metabolic syndrome. PMID:22213086

  13. Engineering neprilysin activity and specificity to create a novel therapeutic for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Webster, Carl I; Burrell, Matthew; Olsson, Lise-Lotte; Fowler, Susan B; Digby, Sarah; Sandercock, Alan; Snijder, Arjan; Tebbe, Jan; Haupts, Ulrich; Grudzinska, Joanna; Jermutus, Lutz; Andersson, Christin

    2014-01-01

    Neprilysin is a transmembrane zinc metallopeptidase that degrades a wide range of peptide substrates. It has received attention as a potential therapy for Alzheimer's disease due to its ability to degrade the peptide amyloid beta. However, its broad range of peptide substrates has the potential to limit its therapeutic use due to degradation of additional peptides substrates that tightly regulate many physiological processes. We sought to generate a soluble version of the ectodomain of neprilysin with improved activity and specificity towards amyloid beta as a potential therapeutic for Alzheimer's disease. Extensive amino acid substitutions were performed at positions surrounding the active site and inner surface of the enzyme and variants screened for activity on amyloid beta 1-40, 1-42 and a variety of other physiologically relevant peptides. We identified several mutations that modulated and improved both enzyme selectivity and intrinsic activity. Neprilysin variant G399V/G714K displayed an approximately 20-fold improved activity on amyloid beta 1-40 and up to a 3,200-fold reduction in activity on other peptides. Along with the altered peptide substrate specificity, the mutant enzyme produced a markedly altered series of amyloid beta cleavage products compared to the wild-type enzyme. Crystallisation of the mutant enzyme revealed that the amino acid substitutions result in alteration of the shape and size of the pocket containing the active site compared to the wild-type enzyme. The mutant enzyme offers the potential for the more efficient degradation of amyloid beta in vivo as a therapeutic for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25089527

  14. B-vitamins and bone in health and disease: the current evidence.

    PubMed

    Clarke, M; Ward, M; Strain, J J; Hoey, L; Dickey, W; McNulty, H

    2014-05-01

    Osteoporosis, a metabolic skeletal disease characterised by decreased bone mass and increased fracture risk, is a growing public health problem. Among the various risk factors for osteoporosis, calcium and vitamin D have well-established protective roles, but it is likely that other nutritional factors are also implicated. This review will explore the emerging evidence supporting a role for certain B-vitamins, homocysteine and the 677 C → T polymorphism in the gene encoding the folate-metabolising enzyme methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, in bone health and disease. The evidence, however, is not entirely consistent and as yet no clear mechanism has been defined to explain the potential link between B-vitamins and bone health. Coeliac disease, a common condition of malabsorption, induced by gluten ingestion in genetically susceptible individuals, is associated with an increased risk both of osteoporosis and inadequate B-vitamin status. Given the growing body of evidence linking low bone mineral density and/or increased fracture risk with low B-vitamin status and elevated homocysteine, optimal B-vitamin status may play an important protective role against osteoporosis in coeliac disease; to date, no trial has addressed this possible link. PMID:24572592

  15. [Diseases of the kidneys and urinary tract and possibilities of their active detection in miners].

    PubMed

    Kozyr', V I; Plotkin, V Ia

    1992-01-01

    The examination of 630 miners aged 18-64 working in the mines of the Lugansk region revealed urinary and renal diseases in 15.7% of them. They were affected with chronic prostatitis (34.3%), urolithiasis (27.2%), chronic pyelonephritis (14.2%), 162 miners (33%) out of 490 had urinary shifts (hematuria in 91, proteinuria in 52, both hematuria and proteinuria in 19 examinees) when examined upon ascending from the mine. 61 miners had urinary syndrome only after working shifts. It was unrelated to relevant diseases. The authors point out the necessity of active screening of renal and urinary diseases during routine medical check-ups in miners. PMID:1387182

  16. Transgenerational transmission of systemic mast cell activation disease-genetic and epigenetic features.

    PubMed

    Molderings, Gerhard J

    2016-08-01

    Systemic mast cell activation disease (MCAD) comprises disorders characterized by an enhanced release of mast cell mediators accompanied by a varying accumulation of dysfunctional mast cells. Within the last years, evidence has been presented that MCAD is a multifactorial polygenic determined disease with the KIT(D816V) mutation and its induced functional consequences considered as special case. The respective genes encode proteins for various signaling pathways, epigenetic regulators, the RNA splicing machinery, and transcription factors. Transgenerational transmission of MCAD appears to be quite common. The basics of the molecular mechanisms underlying predisposition of the disease, that is, somatic and germline mutations and the contribution of epigenetic processes have become identifiable. The aim of the present review is to present and discuss available genetic, epigenetic and epidemiological findings, and to present a model of MCAD pathogenesis. PMID:26880691

  17. A new recombinant hybrid polypeptide and its immunologic adjuvant activity for inactivated infectious bursal disease vaccine.

    PubMed

    Cai, Mei-hong; Zhu, Feng; Wu, Hao-chen; Shen, Ping-ping

    2014-07-01

    Both bursin (Lys-His-Gly-NH2) and Gagnon's peptides (Lys-Asn-Pro-Tyr) can induce B-cell differentiation. However, it is unclear whether a recombinant hybrid polypeptide consisting of a tandem array of 14 copies of bursin and two copies of Gagnon's peptide can induce the proliferative activity of lymphocytes. Here, this recombinant hybrid polypeptide was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by SDS-PAGE. Various assays showed that it not only promoted B-lymphocyte proliferation in vitro but also increased the titers of antibodies directed against infectious bursal disease virus fourfold in the sera of chickens vaccinated with the inactivated infectious bursal disease virus vaccine. The recombinant hybrid polypeptide also reduced the pathological lesions in the bursa of Fabricius caused by infectious bursal disease virus BC6/85. Our results show that this recombinant hybrid polypeptide may be a promising immune adjuvant. PMID:24652544

  18. [Myeloperoxidase activity in blood plasma as a criterion of therapy for patients with cardiovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Grigorieva, D V; Gorudko, I V; Kostevich, V A; Sokolov, A V; Buko, I V; Vasilyev, V B; Polonetsky, L Z; Panasenko, O M; Cherenkevich, S N

    2016-03-01

    A significant increase in the myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity has been found in plasma of patients with stable angina and with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in comparison with the control group. MPO concentration was significantly increased in plasma of ACS patients. Reduced MPO activity in the treated ACS patients correlated with a favorable outcome of the disease. Generally, changes in plasma MPO concentration coincided with changes in lactoferrin concentration thus confirming the role of neutrophil degranulation in the increase of plasma concentrations of these proteins. The increase in MPO activity was obviously determined by modification of the MPO protein caused by reactive oxygen species and halogen in the molar ratio of 1 : 25 and 1 : 50. The decrease in plasma MPO activity may be associated with increased plasma concentrations of the physiological inhibitor of its activity, ceruloplasmin, and also with modification of the MPO protein with reactive oxygen species and halogen at their molar ratio of 1 : 100 and higher. Thus, MPO activity may be used for evaluation of effectiveness of the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27420626

  19. Circulating ADAM17 Level Reflects Disease Activity in Proteinase-3 ANCA-Associated Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Anna; Lovric, Svjetlana; Engel, Alissa; Beese, Michaela; Wyss, Kristin; Hertel, Barbara; Park, Joon-Keun; Becker, Jan U; Kegel, Johanna; Haller, Hermann; Haubitz, Marion; Kirsch, Torsten

    2015-11-01

    ANCA-associated vasculitides are characterized by inflammatory destruction of small vessels accompanied by enhanced cleavage of membrane-bound proteins. One of the main proteases responsible for ectodomain shedding is disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 17 (ADAM17). Given its potential role in aggravating vascular dysfunction, we examined the role of ADAM17 in active proteinase-3 (PR3)-positive ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). ADAM17 concentration was significantly increased in plasma samples from patients with active PR3-AAV compared with samples from patients in remission or from other controls with renal nonvascular diseases. Comparably, plasma levels of the ADAM17 substrate syndecan-1 were significantly enhanced in active AAV. We also observed that plasma-derived ADAM17 retained its specific proteolytic activity and was partly located on extracellular microparticles. Transcript levels of ADAM17 were increased in blood samples of patients with active AAV, but those of ADAM10 or tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 3, which inhibits ADAMs, were not. We also performed a microRNA (miR) screen and identified miR-634 as significantly upregulated in blood samples from patients with active AAV. In vitro, miR-634 mimics induced a proinflammatory phenotype in monocyte-derived macrophages, with enhanced expression and release of ADAM17 and IL-6. These data suggest that ADAM17 has a prominent role in AAV and might account for the vascular complications associated with this disease. PMID:25788529

  20. Novel Risk Factors of Cardiovascular Disease and Their Associations Between Obesity, Physical Activity And Physical Fitness

    PubMed Central

    Buchan, Duncan S.; Thomas, Non E.; Baker, Julien S.

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is increasing around the globe and is the leading cause of death around the world. Though once thought of as an adult problem, it is now recognised that the early manifestations of disease may occur during chil